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Full text of "A history of northern Michigan and its people"

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1219032 



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3 1833 01074 7183 



A HISTORY 

OF 



Northern Michigan 

AND ITS PEOPLE 



PERRY F. POWERS 

Assisted by H. G. CUTLER 
Editor of the Lewis Publishing Company 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



1912 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



1219032 




-V.t^V^\^^^v ^\ 



History of 

Northern Michigan 



Julius T. Hannah. — "A truly great life," says Webster, "when 
Heaven vouchsafes so rare a gift, is not a temporary flame, burning bright 
for a while and then expiring, giving place to returning darkness. It 
is rather a spark of fervent heat as well as radiant light, with power to 
enkindle the common mass of human mind ; so that when it glimmers 
in its own decay, and finally goes out in death, no night follows, but 
it leaves the world all light, all on fire, from the potent contact of its 
own spirit." A splendid type of American manhood was Julius T. 
Hannah, who passed from this life on the 29th of November, 1905, 
deeply mourned by a large circle of friends in his home at Traverse City, 
Michigan. 

Julius Truemaii Hannah was born on tlie 29th of March, 1858, in 
what is now Traverse City, and he is a son of Perry and Anna A. (Plynn) 
Hannah, the former of whom was a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
where his birth occurred on the 24th of September, 1824, and the latter of 
whom was born in New York on the 25th of December, 1832. The father 
was interested in the lumber business in northern ilichigan for a half 
century. He came to Traverse City in 1851, invested in large tracts of 
timber land in Grand Traverse county and during the long intervening 
years was a tremenduous power in financial and indu.strial affairs in the 
old Wolverine state. On other pages of this work will be found a sketch 
of his interesting career so that further data are not required at this 
juncture. While a mere child Mrs. Hannah became orphaned and in her 
girlhood she moved to the city of Chicago, where she met and married 
Perry Hannah. To this union w-ere born three children, namely : Hattie, 
who is the wife of J. F. Keeney, of Chicago ; Julius T.. the immediate sub- 
ject of this review ; and Clara Belle, who married George W. Gardner, 
of St. Paul, ^Minnesota. 

In his native city Julius T. Hannah grew to maturity and after com- 
pleting the curriculum of the public schools thereof he was matriculated 
in the college at Racine, Wisconsin, in which well ordered institution he 
pursued the regular course and in whidi lie was graduated as a member 
of the class of 187(). Being the only son. his father designed him as his 

559 



560 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

successor in business and accordingly Julius T. entered upon a routine 
to learn the details of the business which had already assumed such gi- 
gantic proportions. He first enteied one of the departments of the mer- 
cantile establishment of Hannah, Lay & Company, where he worked for 
one year, at the expiration of which he entered another department, 
remaining there for another year, and so on imtil he had mastered the 
details of the mercantile branch of his father's business. He was next 
given a position in the office and later was assigned to the duties of out- 
side foreman, continuing incumbent of the latter position for three years. 
Subsequently he was in the saw mills and other maniifacturing plants, 
in the yards, where millions of feet of lumber were piled up in the woods, 
where the trees were cut down and the logs prepared for the mill and 
in addition to other things he familiarized himself with every detail re- 
lating to the line of steamboats owned and operated by the company. 
He was next transferred to the banking department, beginning as he 
had in all the others, at the foot of the ladder and steadily advancing 
until he reached the position of president of the Traveree City State 
Bank, of which he was incumbent at the time of his death, in 1905. His 
advancement was entirelj' due to his own well directed efforts and not 
at all to the fact that he was a son of Perry Hannah. The Traverse City 
State Bank was incorporated under the laws of the state in 1892, with 
a paid-up capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars, with a surplus 
fimd of twenty-five thousand dollars and undivided net profits of fifty- 
six thousand, five lunidred and twenty dollars. The officers of the bank 
before the death of Perry Hannah were as follows: Perry Hannah, 
president ; A. Tracy Lay. first vice-president ; James Morgan, second 
vice-president ; J. T. Hannah, cashier ; and S. G. Garland, assistant cash- 
ier. At the time of his death Mr. Hannah of this review was likewise 
a member of the board of directors. 

While Mr. Hannah never had the time nor the desire to participate 
activel.v in public affairs his interest in political questions was deep and 
sincere and he gave an earnest support to the principles of the Republi- 
can party, believing that the platform of the party contained the best 
elements of good government. In their i*eligious faith INIr. and Mrs. 
Hannah were not adherents of any special faith biit usually attended 
the services of the Grace Episcopal church, to which Mrs. Hannah still 
gives an ardent support. ]\Ir. Hannah was ever a generous contributor 
to all measures and enterprises advanrod for the public good and it has 
been said concerning him lliat liis chaiity knew only the bounds of his 
opportunities. In the time-honored Masonic order he had passed through 
the circle of the Scottish Rite branch, having attained to the thirty- 
second degree ; in the Knights of Pythias he was a member of l)ofh the 
subordinate and uniform rank; and he also affiliated with the Benevolent 
& Protective Order of Elks and with the Knights of the Maccabees. 

On the 30th of June, 189(5. was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ilannnli 
to Mi.ss Elsie K. Raft', a daughter of George W. Raff, who was long post- 
master of Traverse City and who was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 2nd of November, 1909. Elsewhere in this volume will be found 
a sketch of the career of l\Ir. RaiT. Mrs. Hannah was born at Napoleon, 
Ohiii, to 11i(> i)ublic school.s of wliich phici' she is indelited for her early 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 561 

educational training. She is a woman of innate refinement and culture 
and her gracious and pleasing personality have won her a high place in 
the loving regard of her many friends. 

Up to the time of his death Julius T. Hannah assumed most of the 
responsibilities of his father's business. Alive to all modern business 
methods, Mr. Hannah during his lifetime aided and encouraged the loca- 
tion of more business enterprises than the city had ever known before. 
As a result Traverse City is now enjoying an era of prosperity far be- 
yond that enjoyed by any other town or city in northern ilichigan. Mr. 
Hannah's death was mourned by a large number of friends and business 
associates and in losing him Traverse City lost an ardent friend of 
progress and prosperity. Mr. Hannah was a man of tremenduous vitality, 
extraordinary executive ability and fine moral fiber. His entire record, 
both public and private, will bear the closest inspection and he leaves 
as an heritage to his wife and friends a good name and an untarnished 



George W. Raff. — For a long number of years George W. Raff was 
the efficient and popular incumbent of the office of postmaster of Traverse 
City, and when he was summoned to the life eternal, on the 2nd of No- 
vember, 1909, northern Michigan lost one of its most loyal and public- 
spirited citizens. Looking into the clear perspective of his career there 
may be seen definite courage, persistent determination and self-confidence, 
which, as coupled with integrity of purpose, are the factors that con- 
serve success and make it consistent. 

George W. Raff was a native son of Pennsylvania, his birth having 
occurred in Franklin county, that state, on the 27th of December, 1833. 
His parents were Peter and Catherine (Snyder) Raff, both of whom 
were likewise born in the old Keystone state of the Union. The father 
was siunmoned to the life eternal when George W. was a child of but 
three years of age, he having met death in an accident. The mother 
passed away at the home of one of her children in Ohio, at the patriarchal 
age of ninety-three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Raft" were born nine 
children, of whom George W. was the youngest. All have now passed 
to the great beyond except two — Peter, who is a farmer and resides at 
Ames, Iowa; and John, of Cannon, Ohio. The early life of him to whom 
this sketch is dedicated was passed in Pennsylvania, where he received 
his preliminary educational training. When fourteen years of age he 
accompanied his mother to Ohio, location being made at Wilmot. Stark 
county, where they resided about nine years and whence they removed 
to Iowa, remaining in that state until the inception of the Civil war. 
After coming to Ohio Mr. Raff attended school for one year and then 
entered upon an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, in which he soon 
became an expert workman. He continued to be identified with that 
line of enterprise throughout much of his active business career, only 
retiring in order to devote more time to his duties as postmaster, to 
which office he was first appointed by President Grant. He retired 
permanently from tailoring about 1898. 

When the dark cloud of Civil war obscured the national horizon ^Mr. 
Raff gave evidence of his intrinsic patriotism by enlisting as a soldier 



562 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

in Company K, Twenty-third Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in which he 
was commissioned second lieutenant. For about a year after his enlist- 
ment the held of operations of the Twenty -third Iowa Regiment was Mis- 
souri, where it was largely engaged in skirmishing and garrison duty. 
After being in sei-vice about one year Lieutenant Raff received an injury 
which disqualified him for active duty, and he was forced to resign 
on account of disability. He immediately returned to his family in 
Stark county, Ohio, and for the ensuing seventeen years he and his wife 
maintained their home at Napoleon, that state. Soon after General 
Grant's inauguration as president George W. Raff was appointed post- 
master of Napoleon and he served in that capacitj' for a period of eight 
years. In 1880 the family removed from Ohio to Michigan, settling in 
Traverse City, where Mr. Raft* resided until his death. He engaged in the 
tailoring business, conducting a fine establishment for a number of years. 
"When Benjamin Harrison became president of the United States, in 
1889, Ml-. Raff, was by him, appointed postmaster of Traverse City and he 
discharged the duties of that office most creditably until President Cleve- 
land appointed a Democrat to fill the office. Upon the return of the 
Republican party to power, Mr. Raff was again appointed postmaster 
of Traverse City and by successive re-appointments he continued the 
able incumbent of that responsible position until the time of his death, 
in 1909. 

On the 13th of April, 1853, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Raff 
to Miss Sarah Agler. who was born at Wilmot, Ohio, in 1834, and who 
is a daughter of George and Eva (Wyandt) Agler, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. After their marriage Mr. and JMrs. Raff resided in Stark 
county, Ohio, until 1857, when removal was made to Marshalltown, Mar- 
shall county, Iowa, where they lived until the outbreak of the Rebellion, 
as previously noted. To Mr. and Mrs. Raff were born four children, 
one of whom died in infancy. Concerning the others, Laura R., who 
was long her father's assistant in the postoffice. is now the wife of 
Charles Beers, city clerk of Traverse City. Elsie married Julius T. 
Hannah, president of the Traverse City State Bank at the time of his 
death, as well as all the other institutes of the firm in Michigan, and his 
death oecun-ed on the 29th of November, 1905. On other pages of this 
work appears a .sketch dedicated to his career. Geoi-ge "W. Jr., is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Raff & IMorgan, electricians of Traverse City. All of 
the above children were afforded liberal educations and they all reside 
in Traverse City. Mrs. Raff has now attained to the venerable age of 
seventy-five years, but she still i-etains in much of their pristine vigor 
the fine mental and physical qualities of her youth. She is a woman of 
most pleasing personality and is deeply beloved by all who have come 
within the sphere of her gentle influence. 

In his political adheroncy Mr. Raff was a stalwart Republican, as 
already intimated. His first vote was cast for Salmon P. Chase for gov- 
ernor of Ohio and his first presidential vote was cast for John C. Fremont, 
in 1856. While not identified formally with any religious institutions, 
]\Tr. Raff was a Christian man in the truest sense of the word. All his 
deeds and thoujrhts were periiieated with that broad human .s>Tnpathy 
which is inherent in the characters of great men, and it has justly been 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 563 

said of him that the circle of his friends was coincident with that of his 
acquaintances. In a fraternal way he was affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Masonic order and with the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He was the owner of considerable valuable real-estate and a beautiful 
residence in Traverse City. 

Henry C. Ransom. — There are manifold reasons for according in this 
publication definite recognition of the life and labors of Judge Ransom, 
who has served for virtually a quarter of a century as probate judge of 
Mason county, where he has maintained his home for more than thirty- 
five years, so that he may consistently be designated one of the pioneer 
citizens of this section of the state. He has been called upon to serve 
in various other offices of public trust and no one holds more secure 
vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem in Mason county 
than does he. Integrity, loyalty and fidelity have characterized his 
course in all the relations of life, and in this work tribute is rendered 
him as one of the essentFally representative citizens of the city of 
Ludington and of Mason county, to the development and upbuilding 
of both of which he has made generous and noteworthy contribution. 

In one of his characteristic speeches Hon. Chauncey M. Depew made 
iise of the following effective paraphrase of a familiar quotation : 
"Some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are born 
in the state of Ohio." Judge Ransom finds a due measure of satisfac- 
tion in being able to qualify under the last premise of the foregoing 
statement, as he claims the fine old Buckeye commonwealth as the 
place of his nativity and is a scion of honored pioneer families of that 
state. He was born on the homestead farm of his father in Florence 
township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 27th of January, 1849, the only 
son of Henry G. and Maryette (French) Ransom, to whom were also 
born two daughters. Martha A., the elder sister, married J. H. Lau- 
rence, who is deceased. Frances M., deceased, married Clark E. Boener. 
The father was born in Berlin township, Huron county, Ohio, and there 
he was reared and educated binder the conditions and influences of the 
pioneer day. After his marriage he removed to Florence township, in 
the same county, where he continued to be actively engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, at the age of thirty-eight years. He 
was a son of Russell Ransom, who was born in Connecticut, and who 
was a scion of a family founded in New England in the Colonial era 
of our national history, the lineage being traced back to Danish-English 
origin and North England people. Russell Ransom was one of the 
pioneers of the historic old Western Reserve, where he established his 
home about 1820, and there he passed the residue of his life in what is 
now Erie county. The mother of Judge Ransom was born in Wakeman 
township, Huron county, Ohio, and was a daiighter of Burton French, 
who likewise was one of the early settlers of that countj', where he 
took up his abode upon immigrating to the west from his native state 
of Connecticut, in 1819. Mrs. Maryette (French) Ransom was sum- 
moned to the life eternal when about seventy-two years of age, and 
both she and her husband were earnest members of the jMethodist 
church. They were intelligent, industrious and God-fearing folks, and 



564 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

their lives counted for good, though they never deviated from simple 
and unostentatious habits and customs. They had appreciation of the 
true values of life and were worthy of the uniform esteem that was 
accorded them by all who knew them. 

Judge Ransom has never found reason to regret the fact that he was 
reared to the .sturdy and invigorating discipline involved in the de- 
veloping and improving of a pioneer farm, and his early educational 
privileges were those afforded in the common schools of the locality 
and period with two terms in Oberlin college. He was too young to 
enter military service at the inception of the Civil war, but his youth- 
ful patriotism was such that when he had attained to the age of sixteen 
years he tendered his services in defense of the Ihiion. He enlisted in 
the winter of 1865 as a private in Company F, One Hundred and 
Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with this gallant command 
he continued in active service until the close of the war, when he was 
mustered out and received his honorable discharge. After having thus 
proved his loyalty to the republic, Judge Ransom returned to his 
home in Ohio, and thereafter he was enabled to supplement his educa- 
tion by attending Oberlin College, that state, for two years. As a 
young man he learned the cooper's trade, and to this he devoted his 
attention for a few years, as a journeyman. In this connection it may 
be noted that he was thus employed in Findlay, Ohio, for one year, and 
for an equal period at Elmore, Ottawa county, that state. 

In 1875 Judge Ransom came to nortliern .Midiigan and secured a 
homestead claim in Custer township, ]\Ias(in county, where he forth- 
with instituted the reclamation and development of a farm. His energy 
and former experience enabled him to make excellent progress, and he 
in due time developed one of the productive farms of this county. He 
resided on this homestead for a decade, and it is worthy of note that he 
has never entirely severed his allegiance to or abated his interest in the 
great basic industry of agriculture, as is evidenced by the fact that at 
the present time he is the owner of two well improved farms in Mason 
county. While residing on his original homestead Judge Ransom be- 
came a leader in public affairs of a local order and was called upon to 
serve in the offices of township clerk and township supervisor. The 
acceptability of his work in these connections marked him for higher 
official preferment in the gift of the people of the community, and in 
1884 he was elected county treasurer, a position of which he continued 
incumbent for four years and in which he gave a mo.st careful and dis- 
criminating administration of the fiscal affairs of the county. In 1888 
he was elected .judge of probate, and this office he has since held with- 
out interruption, — his successive re-elections showing the estimate 
placed upon him and his services by the citizens of the county. He is 
now serving his sixth term of four years each, and it is safe to say that 
so long as he will consent to retain the office other candidates for the 
same may consider their chances insistently negative. 

In politics Judge Ransom has given unswerving allegiance to the 
Republican party from the time of reaching his legal majority and he 
has given effective service in behalf of its cause. His wife holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist church. That he has maintained a distinct 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 565 

interest in his old comrades of the Civil war is shown by his art'iliation 
with Pap Williams Post No. 15, Grand Army of the Hcpulilif. in his 
home city of Ludington. He has served as quarterniast rr dl' iliis or- 
ganization and has been active in its affairs. In the iMasonic fiatii-nity 
Judge Ransom is identified with the lodge, chapter, and counnaudery 
in Ludington, and with the Saladin Temple, Ancient Arabic. Order of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in the city of Grand Rapids. He also 
holds membership in the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Pythias. 

In the year 1871 was solemnized the marriage of Judge Ransom to 
Miss Mary A. Rippon, who was born in Lincolnshire, England, and 
who was eight years of age at the time of the family emigration to 
America. She is a daughter of Henry and Mary A. (Ainsworth) Rip- 
pon, both natives of Lincolnshire, England, and upon coming to the 
United States the family located in Camden, Lucas county, Ohio, where 
Mrs. Ransom was reared to maturity. Her parents passed the closing 
years of their lives in Ohio. Judge and Mrs. Ransom have no children, 
but their pleasant home is pervaded by a spirit of hospitality and goodly 
cheer, so that it is a favorite resort for their wide circle of friends in 
the community that has so long been their home. 

Hon. Roswell P. Bishop, of Ludington, former representative from 
Michigan in the United States congress, is one of the distinguished mem- 
bers of the bar of the state, has been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession at Ludington for more than thirty-five years, is one of the 
gallant and loyal soldiers who aided in the preservation of the Union in 
the climacteric period of the ('i\il war, and is a citizen to whom is ac- 
corded the most unequivocal eonlidence and esteem in the state that has 
so long represented his home. He has been closely identified Avith the 
material and civic progress of Ludington and ilason county, is an in- 
fluential factor in the councils of the Republican party in Michigan, 
and as a member of congress has shown high ability as a statesman, the 
while he has done miich to further the best interests of the state that 
has thus honored and been honored by him. 

In both the agnatic and maternal lines Mr. Bishop is a scion of fam- 
ilies whose names have been identified with the annals of American his- 
tory since the early colonial days in New England, that cradle of so 
much of our national history. 

Mr. Bishop was born at Sidney, Delaware county, New York, on the 
6th of January, 1843, and is the only son of Edward and Anna (An- 
drews) Bishop, both of whom were likewise natives of Delaware county, 
New York, where the respective families established homes in the 
pioneer days in the old Empire state of the Union. Edward Bishop 
passed the closing years of his life in ]\Iason county, iMichigan, where 
he took up his abode in 1880 and where he died at the venerable age of 
seventy-seven years. He was a son of Joseph Bishop, who was born in 
Westchester county, New York, and who devoted practically his entire 
mature life to agricultural pursuits, in connection with which he de- 
veloped a productive farm in Delaware county. New York, where he 
continued to reside until 1850. when he removed to Iowa. He thus be- 



566 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

came one of the sterling pioneers of the Hawkeye state, where he con- 
tinued to reside nntil his death, at a venerable age. The genealogy of 
the Bishop family is traced back to staxnich English stock and the ori- 
ginal settlement of its representatives in America was made in Con- 
necticut, in the colonial era. 

Edward Bishop was reared and educated in his native state and dur- 
ing the major part of his long and active career he was an etfeetive 
exponent of the great basic industry of agriculture. He was twice mar- 
ried and he whose name initiates this review was the only son of the 
first marriage. Of the three daughters of this union two are living, — 
Elizabeth, who is the widow of Thomas Hallock and who resides at 
Unadilla Center, Otsego county, New York, and Mary, who is the wife 
of Harry Jagger, a representative farmer and honored citizen of Mason 
county, Michigan, where he owns a valuable landed estate near the city 
of Ludington. Mrs. Anna (Andrews) Bishop, mother of the subject of 
this review, was a daughter of Barrows Andrews, who was born in Con- 
necticut and who was a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of that state : his wife was a descendant of Robert Treat Paine, who was 
one of the signers of that immortal document, the Declaration of In- 
dependence. 

Roswell P. Bishop was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm 
and secured his early educational training in the common schools of his 
native county, where he was reared to maturity and where he continued 
to be actively identified with agricultural pursuits until his patriotism 
and loyalty were roused to responsive action by the thundering of rebel 
guns against the ramparts of old Fort Sumter. He was among the first 
to respond to President Lincoln's first call for volunteers, as he enlisted 
on the 3d of August, 1861. as a private in Company C, Forty-third New 
York Volunteer Infantry. He was eighteen years of age at the time 
and soon proceeded to the front with his regiment, which was assigned 
to the Army of the Potomac. He participated with his command in a 
number of spirited conflicts with the enemy and endured the full tension 
of arduous military service until April 28, 1862, when he received a 
severe wound in an engagement at Lee's IMills, Virginia. His injury 
finally necessitated the amputation of his right arm and he was confined 
for months in the hospital. Being thus incapacitated for further active 
service, he received his honorable discharge while on the field, near 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, in December, 1862. He thus made an endur- 
ing physical sacrifice in the cause of his country and his military record 
is one that should grant to him lasting honor. 

After the close of his service as a valiant soldier of the Union Mr. 
Bishop returned to New York and, realizing, in view of his physical 
infirmity, the expediency of gaining an education Ihat would fit him for 
effective effort along lines aside from manual labor, he prosecuted his 
studies in turn in Unadilla Academy. Cooperstown Seminary and Wal- 
ton Academy, excellent institutions in his native state. Thereafter he 
devoted his attention to teaching in the public schools for several years 
and in the meanwhile he formulated definite plans for his future career, 
having decided to prepare himself for the legal profession. With this 
end in view he entered the T^niversity of IMichigan. in September, 1868. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 567 

and he carried forward his studies in both the literary and law depart- 
ments of this great institution, in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1872, with the well earned degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He was admitted to the bar of the state in 1875, having in the mean- 
while continued his labors as a teacher. Soon afterward he established 
his home in Ludington, which was then a mere lumbering town of ob- 
scure order, although it had been made the judicial center of Mason 
county. Here he has maintained his home during the long intervening 
years, within which he has gained precedence as one of the representa- 
tive members of the ]Michigan bar and been identified with much im- 
portant litigation in both the state and federal courts. The young law- 
yer was energetic, careful and conscientious in his professional work 
and soon laid the foundation for the large and representative practice 
that he has so long controlled, the while there came distinctive evidence 
of the confidence aceoi'dcd him in the county in which he had elected to 
establish his permanent home. In 1876 he was elected prosecuting at- 
torney of Mason countj-, and the efficiency of his service was indicated 
by his re-election in 1878, as his own successor. His work in this office 
materially heightened his reputation as an able and resourceful trial 
lawyer and in 1884 he was again elected to the same office, in which he 
served one term, of two years. In 1882 he was chosen representative 
of his county in the state legislature, and a full decade later, in 1892, 
he was again elected to this office. In the meanwhile he had been one of 
the leaders in the councils of the Republican party in this section of 
the state, and his ability and fidelity to trust marked him as eligible for 
more disinguished official preferment. He was elected to represent a 
district of Michigan in the United States eongvess, in which he made an 
admirable record, proving a valuable working member of the house and 
participating earnestly in the deliberations of the floor and the com- 
mittee room. He served, by successive re-elections, from the Fifty- 
fourth to the Fifty-eighth congress, both inclusive, and at the time of his 
last election, he received 14,502 votes, while the opposing candidates 
were accorded recognition at the polls in the following and respective 
number of votes : David W. Goodenough, Democrat, 6,166 ; Edward T. 
Palmer, Prohibitionist, 969; and David ]\I. Stevens, Socialist, 330. In 
19U() JMr. Bishop was elected a delegate to the state constitutional con- 
vention of Michigan, and in November of the following year President 
Roosevelt appointed him a member of the Spanish treaty claims com- 
mission, in which connection he gave evidence of his marked diplomatic 
ability and mature judgment. His entire career in public office has been 
one of distinctive loyalty and faithfulness to trust and he has honored 
his adopted state by his worthy life and worthy services. 

Maintaining a livel.v interest in his old comrades in arms, Mr. Bish- 
op signified the same bv membership in a Grand Army of the Republic 
Post, and he is also affiliated with the Ludington organizations of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent & Protective Order 
of Elks, and the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the directorate 
of the State Bank of Ludington and a stockholder in the First National 
Bank of this cit.v. 

In February. 1872. ;\Ir. Bishoji was united in marriage to ;Miss Louisa 



568 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Gaunt, of Ann Arbor, this state, ilr. and 'Sirs. Bishop have one sou, 
Roswell F., who now holds a position in one of the government offices 
in the city of Washington. 

Andrew L. Deuel. — The present incumbent of the office of probate 
judge of Emmet county is a scion of a family whose name has been 
identified with the annals of Michigan during the entire period of its 
history as one of the sovereign states of the Union, and he has not 
only been for thirty years a representative member of the bar of 
Emmet county but he has also served in various local offices of public 
trust aside from that of which he is now in tenure. He was for a 
number of years postmaster of Harbor Springs, in which beautiful 
little city, the judicial center of the county, he has long maintained 
his home, and no citizen of the county has a more impregnable place 
in popular confidence and esteem. Judge Deuel has been at all times 
progressive and loyal as a citizen and he has contributed his quota 
to the civic and material advancement and upbuilding of his home 
county. 

Judge Andrew L. Deuel was born on a farm in "Walled Lake town- 
ship, Oakland county, Michigan, on the 23d of August, 1850, and is 
a son of Thorn and Mary (Lord) Deuel, both natives of the state of 
New York, where the former was born in 1817 and the latter in 1818. 
Thorn Deuel came to Michigan in 1837, the year that marked the 
admission of the state to the Union, and he became one of the pioneers 
of Oakland county, where, as a young man of vigor, ambition and 
indefatigable industry, he reclaimed a farm in the midst of the virgin 
forest, the while both he and his .young wife lived up to the fiill tension 
of the strenuous pioneer epoch in the histor.y of this connnonwealth. 
He later engaged in the general merchandise business at Ortonville, 
Oakland county, and, as a man of ability and sterling character, he 
was called upon to serve in various offices of public trust, including 
that of justice of the peace. When the nation was rent by civil war 
he took an active part in raising troops for the defense of the LTnion. 
His son Arthur enlisted in the Sixth Michigan Volunte<>r Infantry, 
and died at Baton Rouge in 1863. His son Herbert rendered valiant 
service and participated in man.v of the important engagements mark- 
ing the progress of the great conflict between the north and the south, 
including the ever memorable battle of Getty.sburg, being also in the 
Seventeenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, which gained wide i'ei)uta- 
tion as the "Stonewall Regiment." This son is now a resident of the 
city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he is engaged in mercantile 
business. Thorn Deuel finally removed to Washtenaw county, where 
he continued to be activel.y engaged in a^icultural pursuits for a num- 
ber of years, but after his retirement he went to Olivet, in which village 
his death occurred in the .year 1877. His cherished and devoted wife 
survived him by many .years and was summoned to the life eternal in 
1900, at the venerable age of eight.y-two .years. Botii were zealous mem- 
bers of the Baptist church and their lives counted for good in all rela- 
tions, the while their names merit a place on the roll of the sterling 
pioneers of the Wolverine state, with who.se develoi)ment and progress 




e;^^ %^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 569 

tlu-y were closely identified. In polities Thorn Deuel was originally 
a Whig and later a Republican and he ever took a lively and intelligent 
interest in the questions and issues of the hour. Of the children four 
sons and two daughters attained to years of maturity and of the 
number three sons are now living. 

Like many another son of Jlichigan, Jutlge Andrew L. Deuel found 
his early experiences compassed by the sturdy discipline of the farm, 
and under these conditions he waxed strong in mind and bod.y, the 
while he duly availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public 
schools. His ambition for higher education was quickened to decisive 
action, as is evident from the fact that he completed a course of 
study in the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti, the first 
normal school in the state and long one of the most celebrated in the 
entire Union. He put his sihul.istir nc-(iuirements to good use b.y 
turning his attention to practicnl |iril.ii;ogy, in which connection he 
was, as a young man, a successful and popular teacher in the public 
schools for a period of five years. His last work in this line was in 
the schools of Mount Pleasant, the judicial center of Isabella county. 
Having in the meanwhile matured definite plans for his future career. 
Judge Deuel was matriculated in the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1880, and from which he received his degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. He was forthwith admitted to the bar of his native state and 
he selected Harbor Springs, the judicial center of Emmet county, as 
the field of his professional endeavors. Here he established his home 
on the 1st of iMay, 1880, and here he has continued to reside during 
the long intervening years, which have been marked by definite and 
worthy accomplishment on his part — both as a lawyer and as a citizen 
of utmost loyalty and progressiveness. He soon proved himself ad- 
mirably equipped for the work of his chosen profession and thus 
became identified with important litigated interests in this section of 
the state, the while he built up a substantial and representative prac- 
tice, which eventually extended into the higher courts of the state, 
as well as the federal tribunals. In the autvimn of 1880, less than a 
.vear after engaging in practice at Harbor Springs. Judge Deuel was 
elected prosecuting attorney of the county, an office of which he con- 
tinued incumbent for one term and one in which he made an excellent 
record as a public prosecutor. He has ever continued to take a 
lively interest in educational affairs and his services along this line 
have been given to Emmet county with efficienc.v and zeal. He served 
for several years as a member of the county board of school examiners 
and later he was county school commissioner for nearly a decade, dur- 
ing which period he did splendid work in bringing the public schools 
of the county up to a high standard of efficiency, by unifying and 
systematizing their work and securing the retention of capable teach- 
ers. He is at the present time president of the board of education of 
Harbor Springs. 

Under the administration of President Harrison, Judge Deuel was 
appointed postmaster of Harbor Springs, and he assumed the duties 
of this position in 1888. He held the office four years under the 



570 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Harrison administratiou aud for a similar period under that of Presi- 
dent McKinley. He was reappointed by President Roosevelt and con- 
tinued in service, with distinctive discrimination and acceptability, 
until February, 1909, when he resigned, to assume the duties of the 
office of probate judge of Emmet county, to which position' he had 
been elected in November of the preceding year. His broad and exact 
knowledge of the law, his familiarity with real-estate values in the 
county and his mature judgment and excellent executive powers have 
made him an ideal administrator of the important affairs of the pro- 
bate court. He knows every man, woman and child in the county, and 
is universally loved and respected. 

Judge Deuel has given his co-operation in the furtherance of those 
measures and enterprises that have tended to advance the general 
welfare of the community and he has shown abiding interest in the 
civic and material upbuilding of the county in which he has so long 
maintained his home. In addition to his own attractive residence 
property in Harbor Springs he is also the OM-ner of a well equipped 
summer-resort hotel and four fine cottages at Forest Beach, one mile 
from Harbor Springs, on the most beautiful part of Little Traverse 
Bay, whose attractions as a place of summer sojourn are known 
throughout the entire country. He is the owner of about four hun- 
dred acres of land in the vicinity of his home city, including some of 
the most valuable land along the shore of the bay, and none has been 
more active and progressive in the development of realty in this 
section. As may naturally be inferred, the judge is unwavering in 
his allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, of whose interests 
he has been a zealous promoter in this section of the state, as an active 
and effective worker in its ranks. He and his wife and daughter are 
communicants of the Harbor Springs Presbyterian church. In the 
Masonic fraternity he has attained to the thirty-second degree of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and his local affiliation in the York 
Rite bodies is the Harbor Springs Lodge, No. 378, Free and Accepted 
Masons and Royal Arch Masons. In the city of Grand Rapids, where 
he maintains his Scottish Rite affiliations, he is identified with DeWitt 
Clinton Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. He also 
holds membership in Petoskey Lodge, No. 629, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He and his family are valued and popular 
factors in the best social activities of their home city and their beau- 
tiful residence is a center of gracious hospitality. 

On the 27th of December, 1881, was solemnized the marriage of 
Judge Deuel to Miss Emma Lance, of Mount Pleasant, Isabella county. 
She was born in Ionia county, this state, and is a daughter of George 
and Mary (Parmalee) Lance who are survived by four children, of 
whom Mrs. Deuel was the second in order of birth. The father was 
a contractor and builder by vocation, was a Republican in politics and 
both he and his wife held membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They passed the closing years of their lives in this state. The 
father passed away at Mt. Pleasant and the mother at Harbor Springs. 
Judge and Mrs. Deuel have one daughter, Helen, who is now a student 
in Aekley Hall, in the city of (irand Rapids, an excellent siliool con- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 571 

ducted under the auspices of the Episcopalian diocese of western 
Michigan. 

J. W. Parkhurst. — Standing prominent among the able and influen- 
tial business men of Osceola county is J. W. Parkhui-st, a well-known 
and prosperous banker of Reed City, who is actively identified with the 
advancement of the material interests of this section of the state. Com- 
ing from sturdy New England stock, he was born August 9, 1867. in 
Elkland, Tioga county, Pennsylvania. His father, John Parkhurst, 
was born and brought up in Richmond, Cheshire county, New Hamp- 
shire. Well trained in business affairs, he became quite successful as 
a financier, and about 1850 established himself as a banker in Elkland, 
Pennsylvania, where he continued a resident until his death, at the age 
of sixty-seven years. He married Rebecca Kennedy, a native of Ark- 
port, Steuben county, New York, and of the children born of their union 
three grew to years of maturity, as follows : Luin K., deceased ; Carrie, 
wife of W. B. Williams, of Traverse City, Michigan; and J. W., the 
special subject of this brief sketch. 

Brought up in Elkland, Pennsylvania, J. W. Parkhurst obtained his 
elementary education in the graded schools of his native place, com- 
pleting his early studies at Alford Academy. Subsequently entering 
his father's bank, he gradually worked his way upward from the lowest 
position, clo.sely studying the details of eveiy department of the insti- 
tution and becoming familiar with its management. In October, 1889, 
Mr. Parkhurst and his brother, the late L. K. Parkhurst, came to Reed 
City, and here established a private bank under the firm name of L. K. 
Parkhurst & Company, the senior member of the firm being the presi- 
dent and Mr. Parkhurst cashier. On August 26, 1890, this institution 
was merged into the First National Bank of Reed City, with the same 
officers at its head. On May 30, 1905, after the death of his brother, Mr. 
Parkhurst was made pl-esident of the bank, and ]Mr. F. G. Hammond be- 
came its cashier. This bank, with its capital of $50,000.00, is one of the 
strongest financial institutions of the county, its reputation for stability 
and strength being largely due to the energetic efforts and unerring 
judgment of Mr. Parkhui-st. 

Mr. Parkhui-st married, October 18, 1888, Helen Moon, a daughter 
of Rev. Dr. S. H. Moon, a noted Presbyterian divine of Elkland, Pennsyl- 
vania, and into their pleasant home two children have been born, 
namely: Gertrude and Luin. Politically ]Mr. Parkhurst supports the 
principles of the Republican party by voice and vote, and fraternally 
he is a Thirty-second degree Mason. 

Rev. F.vther Anthony Schum.vcher, of Reed City, Jlichigan. — For 
many years St. Philip's Church— Catholic — had been attended as a Jlis- 
sion. by the varioas priests from Big Rapids and Cadillac, until, attended 
by Rev. A. Schumacher, it was made a congregation, a resident priest 
being appointed to reside there for future work. In his residence here 
of eight years he has done nuich for the upbuilding of the congregation 
and is held in deep respect and affection by his flock. Father Schu- 
macher is a native of the state, his birth having occurred in the city of 



572 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Detroit, on the 23d day of October, 1872. His parents were John Joseph 
Schumacher and Miss Mary Theisen, the former a teacher by occupation, 
and the subject is of German descent. He attended the parochial school 
of his native city and also received additional schooling in Bay City. He 
ultimately entered St. Francis Seminary at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 
September, 1891, to prepare for the priesthood, and his ordination took 
place at Grand Rapids, Michigan, June 29, 1901, being ordained by the 
Rt. Rev. Henry Joseph Richter, Bishop of St. Andrew's Cathedral. 

Father Schumacher's first charge was at Big Rapids, where he was 
assi.stant to Rev. Fr. Thomas J. Delanty, of St. Mary's church, until 
transferred to Reed City. His identification with the Catholic church 
of Reed City dates from October, 1903, when he assumed charge of St. 
Philip's congregation, which numbers about thirty families. 

In addition to his duties here he also has several missions, these being 
at Paris, Mecosta county; at Evart, Osceola countj'; and stations at Lu- 
ther, Lake county ; at Dighton, Osceola county ; at Nirvana, Lake county ; 
while he occasionally visits also Baldwin of Lake county. In all of these 
places he is held in high regard and affection and his advice and help 
in ecclesiastical matters are eagerly sought. His career in the church 
has covered only a decade, but judging by past achievements he is and 
will be one of Michigan's busy Catholic clergymen. 

Father Schumacher's mother, Mary Theisen, is a native of Germany, 
her father's family having cros.sed the sea when she was of tender years. 
She is to be numbered among the j\Iichigan pioneers, and now, a worthy 
woman of over seventy-five years, resides at Reed City, Osceola county, 
Michigan, whilst his father "died in 1884, at the age of about forty-nine 
years and was buried at Bay City, Michigan. 

Judge Ibvin Chase. — It is given to some men to inspire confidence 
in all those with whom they come in contact, and their gifts and abilities 
are so evident as to cause a community to look upon them instinctively as 
the fitting incumbents of public office. Of this type is Judge Irvin 
Chase of Evart, present pi-obate judge and the holder of a long array of 
public offices, having been justice of the peace for twenty years and at 
different times building clerk, township assessor, township clerk, super- 
visor for about five years, member of the town council and assistant post- 
master under the Harrison administration. Essentially public-spirited, 
straightforward and energetic, he is a valuable factor in any campaign 
for bettered conditions and may be numbered among the most valued 
and honored of the citizens of Evart. 

By birth and its primary tie, Judge Chase belongs to the Empire 
.state, where in Orange county, on June 27, 1851, his eyes first opened to 
the light of day. His years of usefulness, however, have been given to 
Michigan, and the name of Chase was given prestige before him by that 
greatly esteemed gentleman, Asahel Chase, his father. Asahel Chase, 
also a native of New York, came to Michigan in 1868, when his son was 
a yoiith of about seventeen years. The family located at Saginaw for 
a time, the father holding the position of city clerk for the space of about 
seven .years. lie subseqiientl.v came to Evart, his identification with this 
place dating from 1876. and this city was to prove tlic .scene of his entire 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 573 

remaining space of years, his demise oeeurring here in 1886. He ais- 
sumed the editorship of the Evarf Review upon coming here and his 
career as a progressive representative of the fourth estate of Michigan 
continued from 1876 until 1881. He was a man who had some experience 
in public affairs and he served both as justice of the peace and as city 
elerk during his residence here. His wife was previous to her marriage 
Miss ^lary W. VanAniburgh, a native of New York, who died in Evart 
in 1879, some six years previous to his own demise in 1886. Their three 
children all are living at the present time. Etta is the wife of W. L. 
Stoddard, of Plainwell, Allegan county, Michigan, and Frank Chase is a 
farmer and miller of Osceola county. Mr. Chase was the second in order 
of birth. 

The boyhood and youth of Irvin Chase was spent in New York and 
to the schools of Tioga county and also of Saginaw is he indebted for his 
early education. During a part of his yoiuig manhood he learned the 
printing business, when he was about twenty-two years of age, and dur- 
ing his father's incumbency of the office of city clerk he came to Evart 
and launched the Evart Review, his father being associated with him 
in 1876 as editor, and he published that well-known .sheet until the year 
1881, when he sold it to its present owner, Mr. George W. Minchin and 
hi.s brother, — Jesse IMinchin. Mr. Chase busied himself with outside 
work for about one year and then entered upon a career as a servant of 
the people. He was first elected justice of the peace and village clerk, 
holding the latter office for the space of eighteen years and the former 
for twenty. He has been both township assessor and township clerk and 
was supervisor for about five years. When the Republican party elected 
Benjamin Harrison to the presidency Mr. Chase became assistant post- 
master and he has been a member of the village council. In 1908 dis- 
tinctive mark of the stronghold he has gained upon popular esteem in 
the community was given in his elevation to the office of probate judge, 
which office he holds at the present day. 

In politics he gives allegiance to the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party. In short there is nothing of public import in Evart and 
the surrounding country in which Judge Chase is not helpfully inter- 
ested. His position has enabled him to be more observant than the or- 
dinarj' citizen of social and economic conditions. In all that affects the 
city and its people he has a keen interest and there is no local move- 
ment which in his judgment promises to benefit any considerable number 
of his fellow citizens that does not have his cordial advocacy and gener- 
ous support. 

The marriage of Judge Chase was solemnized February 29. 1876, 
Miss Libbie Fishpool, daughter of Thomas and Eliza (Tucker) Fishpool, 
becoming his vAie and the mistress of his household. ]Mrs. Chase was 
born at New Baltimore, Michigan, in 1855. The issue of their union is 
one son, Homer A., who is an electrician, a resident in Evart. His wife 
was Miss ilarie Kennedy previous to her marriage, and they have a 
young son, Montell. Homer Chase also has a daughter, Marvel, by a 
former marriage. 

Judge Chase now has to his credit thirty-seven years of residence in 
Evart and he has won the distinction of being one of its best and most 



574 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

favorably known citizens. He finds pleasure and profit in his lodge 
relations, holding membership in the time-honored Masonic order, in 
which he has the Chapter degree and also being affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees. 

Merritt Chandler. — Of good old Quaker ancestry, which runs back 
in this country to a settler in the colony of William Penn in 1687, on 
his father's side, and to one of the early arrivals in Massachusetts, on 
his mother's, Merritt Chandler of Onaway, has many sources of in- 
spiration to lofty citizenship and heroic action in his' family history, 
and in his own record he has been true to them, and shown iiimself 
well worthy of the name he bears. He has undertaken gigantic enterprises 
and carried them through to triumphant success. He has conducted 
his business on an extensive scale, and made it subservient to the 
welfare of the regions in which he has operated. He founded and gave 
a name to the city of his home, and has watched over its growth and 
development with all the solicitous care and affection of a fond father. 

Mr. Chandler was born on a farm near the present city of Adrian 
in Lenawee county, this state, on November 29, 1843. He' is a son of 
Thomas and Jane (Merritt) Chandler, the former bom near Philadel- 
phia in 1806 and the latter in the state of New York. The father died 
in 1881 and the mother in 1898 at the age of eighty-four years. They 
were married in ^Michigan, and became the parents of three children, 
two of whom are living, the subject of this brief review and his brother 
William G. William Chandler is one of the most prominent men of 
northern Michigan and a leading citizen of Sault Ste. JMarie. 

The father lost his mother when he was but three years old and his 
father only nine years later. He was the second of their three children, 
the others being his sister Elizabeth and his brother William G. Eliza- 
beth Margaret Chandler was a very active Abolitionist and a volumin- 
ous writer for the early Abolition papers in both prose and poetry. 

Thomas Chandler came to Michigan in 1829 and located in the wild- 
erness on unbroken land near the site of the present thriving and at- 
tractive city of Adrian in Lenawee county. According to the custom 
and necessities of the time and locality, he put up a little log house and 
redeemed from the waste a tract of land which in time, under his 
assiduous and skillful labor, became a fine farm. On this he passed the 
remainder of his days, prospering in a worldly way. giving due atten- 
tion to the development of the country around him and the direction 
of its public affairs, and rising to a high place in the estimation of the 
people. He was first an Abolitionist and later a Republican in politics. 

His son Merritt was educated in the common schools and at Raisin 
Valley seminary, a well-known Quaker institution of learning in south- 
ern Michigan, and at the age of twenty-six started out in the world 
solely on his own resources. He lumbered in ('ass county until the 
winter of 1874-5. then transferred his base of operations to Cheboygan, 
where he lived until he moved his family to Onaway in 1886, having 
built a dwelling for himself here two years before. He was the first 
storekeeper in Onaway, having his store in his residence for a time and 
later in a l>uil(ling erected for the purpose, whicli was destroyed by 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 575 

tire. AiU'v this disaster he built the structure now occupied by his 
extensive and progressive business in the mercantile line. 

In 1879 Mr. Chandler secured a contract to build state roads, his 
first undertaking in this direction being the highway from Petoskey to 
Presque, Isle, a distance of seventy-eight miles. Afterward he built 
the Allis road, seventeen miles long, from Black lake to the southeast 
corner of Allis township. These roads were built according to the 
standard of excellence Mr. Chandler sets for himself in all depart- 
ments of his work, and as compensation for his services the state 
ceded him about forty thousand acres of timber land, distributed 
throughout the iiortliern counties but i-liictly in the neighborhood of 
Onaway. 

He has sold about ten thousand ac'res of this laiul, and is graduall.v 
disposing of more. It is covered with fine hardwood timber, and as 
fast as this is cleared off he offers the land for sale for farming pur- 
poses, giving new settlers every possible inducement to locate on it. 
He has held his lumber at almost prohibitive prices for outside pur- 
chasers and sold it at reasonable rates to local manufacturers, or those 
who could thereby be induced to locate in this vicinity. In this way he 
has helped more than any one other man to build up Onaway and give 
it the progressive impulse which distinguishes it. In fact, he is the 
father of Onaway, and, as has lieen noted, gave the town its name. He 
selected the word "Onaway" from Longfellow's "Hiawatha" because 
it means "awake," and signifies the kind of cit.v he hoped to build and 
foster into practical realization of the meaning its name expresses. 
From the start he has watched over the child of his creation, spending 
his time and money freely to aid in its growth and improvement and 
make it what he wished it to be. His labors were potential in bringing 
the railroad to the city, he was the jDrime mover in the erection of 
the opera house and he built the Chandler House, and he and ^Irs. 
Chandler were the leading ones in founding and erecting the Friends' 
Meeting House, and in many other ways he has been the chief impulse 
to progress in the communit.y and the surrounding country. 

For many years Mr. Chandler was too busy to give attention to 
farming, but he is now actively engaged in that interesting and stinui- 
lating pursuit on a large scale. He cultivates about one thousand acics 
of cleared land according to the mo.st approved modern methods, and 
carries on extensive operations in producing high bred live stock. Here- 
ford cattle. Percheron horses and standard breeds of sheep. He has 
on his fai-m one hundred head of these fine cattle, aliout forty superior 
horses and colts of his admired .strain and some three hundred and 
fifty sheep of high grade and lofty blood. In breeding this high class 
stock he has been engaged during the last ten years, and his products 
have won the most elevated standing in the markets everywhere 
throughout the country M'ithiu the range of his shipments. 

Mr. Chandler was one of the organizers of the Onaway Dairy 
Products Company and is its vice president. He was also one of the 
originators of the Guernsey Breeders' Association, and founded the 
town of Onaway in 1892. It was chiefly through his efforts that the 
Detroit & :\Iack"inac railroad was built througli the town in 19(11. Al- 



576 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ways progressive in his fariniug operations, he was the first man to 
raise alfalfa in Presque Isle county, beginning it about five years ago. 
Since then many advanced farmers have followed his example in this 
respect greatly to their own advantage and the benefit of the county. 
With a deep and abiding interest in the welfare of his community, and 
at all times willing to make his interest practical and effective for the 
good of the people, he gave ten thousand dollars toward the erection 
of a city hall and court house in the same building, and in this now 
three terms of court are held every year. 

In politics llr. Chandler is a Republican and renders his party 
efficient service. He is not ambitious to hold office, but waived his 
aversion to the cares of official station and served as a member of 
the state constitutional convention, and in that body distinguished him- 
self by his general intelligence, his readiness in expressing his views, 
his force in defending them and his devotion to the interests of the 
people. 

In 1866 Mr. Chandler was united in marriage with Miss Rachel 
Shaw, who was born in Ohio, from whence the family later migrated 
lo Michigan. She is a daughter of Nathan and JMiriam (James) Shaw, 
natives of Ohio and both now deceased. 

Jlr. and Mrs. Chandler have had but one child, their son Lewis, who 
died in infancy. But they have three adopted children: Annie, the wife 
of John Bevens, who is living in California ; George, who is in business 
with his adopted father in Onaway, and William, who is a resident of 
the state of Oregon. They are all creditable to their foster parents 
and esteemed as among the best citizens of the communities in which 
they have their homes. 

Albert Tracy Lay, now venerable in years, is one of the few sur- 
viving members of the famous "old guard" to whose well directed ener- 
gies in the early days, was due the development of the magnificent tim- 
ber resources of northern Michigan, and his operations in connection 
with the lumbering industry have continued during a period of fully 
sixty yeai's, — operations of the broadest scope and importance. He 
was one of the pioneers who realized the great value of the untrainmeled 
pine forests of this section of the state and here he began operations 
when the entire "upper country" was but little more than a wilder- 
ness. He was the virtual founder of the present attractive and thriving 
metropolis and .judicial center of Grand Traverse county; Traverse 
City, and his splendid powers were brought into most eiifeetive play in 
furthering the civic and material development and upbuilding of north- 
ciii Micliigan. To him and others of the pioneer lumbermen of north- 
ern ;\Iicliigan, the state must ever accord a debt of honor and apprecia- 
tion, and no work purporting to touch the history of the now opulent 
and progressive upper portion of this commonwealth can be consistent 
with itself if there is failure to give special recognition to the honored 
gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph. For many years Mr. 
Lay has maintained his business headquarters in the city of Chicago, 
and his beautiful home is located in Highland I'ark. one of the most 
attractive suburbs of tlie great western ineti-opolis. 




Ci . Jr^(^^a^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 577 

Albert Tracy Lay claims the fine old Empire state of the Union as 
the place of his nativity and the family of which he is a scion was there 
founded in the pioneer epoch, the while the name has been identified 
with the annals of Ainerican history since the colonial days, the orig- 
inal representative of the same having come from England and estab- 
lished homes in New England. Mr. Lay was born at Batavia, the cap- 
ital of Genesee county. New York, on the 18th of June, 1825, and thus 
he is eighty-six years of age at the time of the publication of this his- 
torical work. He is a son of George W. and Olive (Foote) Lay, the 
former of whom was born in Catskill, New York, and the latter in 
Tolland, Connecticut. The father was summoned to the life eternal at 
the age of sixty years and the mother was sixty-one years of age at the 
time of her death. They became the parents of three children, all sons, 
and of the number the subject of this review is the only one now living. 
George W. Lay was a man of exceptional intellectual and professional 
ability and was a factor of prominence and influence in public affairs 
of national scope. He was numbered among the representative mem- 
bers of the bar of his native state and continued to be engaged in the 
work of liis profession at Batavia, Genesee county, until his death. He 
represented his district in the national congress from 1833 to IS;]?, and 
from 1839 to 1842 he was a member of the state legislature of New 
York. In the latter year he was appointed Charge d' Afifaires to Swe- 
•,Ien, of which diplomatic post he continued incumbent until 1845. In 
politics he accorded an unwavering allegiance to the Whig party, under 
the "old-line" regime, and both he and his wife were earnest comnumi- 
eants of the Episcopal church. 

A. Tracy Lay is indebted to the schools of Batavia and G'^neseo, 
New York, for his early educational discipline, and when but sixteen 
years of age, he began his business career as clerk in a country store in 
his native town in April, 1841, and he served in that capacity for three 
years when he was made manager of the store, and was thus engaged 
until October, 1849, when he came to the west and established his home 
in Chicago, which then gave slight indication of becoming the great 
metropolis which it is to-day. In the spring of the following year he 
engaged in the lumber business at the corner of Canal and Jackson 
streets, Chicago, and at this time was formed his partnership with the 
late Perry Hannah, with whom he continued to be associated in great 
business enterprises for many years — the alliance being terminated 
only by the death of his honored confrere and friend. Operations in 
Chicago were instituted under the firm name of Hannah, Lay & Com- 
pany, and in April, 1851, the firm purchased a saw mill and a tract of 
pine land in Omena county, Michigan, which then included the greatei- 
part of the present counties of Grand Traverse and Leelanau. The 
mill and a considerable portion of the land thus purchased wpre within 
the present corporate limits of Traverse City Payment for the prop- 
erty was made in gold, to Harris Boardman, of Napierville. Illinois, and 
there is much of significance in the statement that the compensation 
thus given for the mill and three hundred acres of pine land was oidy 
seven^ hundred dollars. On April 20. 1851, Mr. Hannah embarked at 
Chicago, on the scliooner Venus, with the gold in his possession to pay 



578 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

for this newij- purchased propertj-, and set sail for what is now Traverse 
City. Mr. Lay went to Traverse City a few mouths later — namely Au- 
gust 28, 1851, sailing on the schooner, L. P. Hilliard. After supervising 
the erection of a new saw-mill, Mr. Lay started forth on foot, in October 
of the same year, for Old Mission, twenty miles distant, and from that 
point he proceeded in a row boat a distance of ten miles up the shore of 
Lake Michigan to Northport. He passed one night on the lake shore, 
sleeping in his blanket, then rowed a boat to Cathead, and from there 
to North Manitou Island where he secured transportation on the steamer 
Acme, by which he had passage to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, whence he 
proceeded by steamer Traveler of the Goodrich line to Chicago in which 
city he arrived late in October. In the following month he left Chicago 
on the schooner Newbold, with supplies for the firm's new store to be 
conducted in connection with the lumber camp and saw mill in what is 
now Traverse City. The vessel had a tempestuous voyage, and was 
reported lost, but it finally reached its destination, after having run 
into South Manitou for shelter. Mr. Lay recalls in appreciative remi- 
niscence that his thanksgiving dinner was eaten on the little schooner 
and that the none too Epicurean repast consisted of white fish and 
beans. He did not return to Chicago until the middle of December. 

From 1853 to 1857 inclusive, Mr. Lay passed the months from April 
to October in northern Michigan, where he had supervision of the 
firm's various ])usiness activities. In 1853 he -went to the city of Wash- 
ington and, by proper immunities, succeeded in securing the establish- 
ment of a postoffice at Traverse City, which was then a mere lumbering 
town, consisting of a few primitive log buildings and board "sliaeks," 
and having a population of not more than one hundred persons. He 
himself had given to the place the name of Traverse, and by this title 
the postoffice was designated. The present name was adopted a num- 
ber of years later, upon the incorporation of the town and the institu- 
tion of a uumicipal government. To the efforts of Mr. Lay was due 
the establisliing of the mail route from Traverse City to Manistee. He 
secured the contract for carrying the mail between Traverse City and 
Manistee, at tlie rate of four hundred dollars a year for the four years 
covered by said contract. He then employed an Indian, known as Joe, 
to fiarry the mail on his back between the two towns, and this Indian 
made the journeys on foot over a trail "blazed" through the forests, 
by means of cutting bark from the trees to indicate the route. "Joe" 
niade the trip each week, covering a total distance of about seventy 
miles, and his only acknowledgment of fatigue was the laconic expres- 
sion, occasionally uttered, "Indian sick in the legs." Mr. Lay assumed 
this contract in 1853 and Dr. Goodale was appointed the first postmas- 
ter of Traverse City in the same year, the office being located in the old 
log store of Hannah, Lay & Company, this primitive business place 
eon.stituting the chief sountc of supplies for the community. In 1853, 
assisted by a civil engineer named Wlielpley, Mr. Lay laid out the town 
of Traverse City, and thus became, as before stated, the virtual founder 
of this prosperous municipality. In the same year was effected the 
segregation and formal organization of Grand Traverse county, and 
the first court was held flic same ye:ir in tlie village of Traverse, whi'-h 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 579 

was designated as the county-seat. Over this primitive tribunal pre- 
sided Judge Martin of Grand Rapids, and in order to obtain a jury at 
the trial of a man for murder, the mill had to be shut down. 

Mr. Lay has given his influence and liberal co-operation to all meas- 
ures and enterprises that have compassed the development and upbuild- 
ing of Grand Traverse county and its attractive metropolis, and his 
capitalistic interests in this section of the state are still of wide scope 
iind importance. He and his long-time associate, Mr. Hannah, were 
numbered among the most prominent and extensive representatives of 
the great lumber industry of northern ]\Iichigan during practically the 
entire period through which the same was the principal line of enter- 
prise in this region, and he and his associate at the present time still 
have valuable interests in this field of enterprise. Since 1857 Mr. Lay 
has maintained his home in Chicago, or its delightful suburb. Highland 
Park, and in the western metropolis he makes daily visits to his office 
in the Chamber of Commerce building, at 133 "West Washington street, 
— a fact that shows that, though venerable in age, he retains his mental 
and physical powers practically unimpaired. He has achieved a large 
and worthy success, and his name has ever stood as the exponent of 
integrity and honor, so that no blemish rests on the record of his long 
and productive career as a man of affairs. His capitalistic interests are 
wide and varied and he is one of the many sterling business men whose 
substantial prosperity had its basis in the great lumber industry of 
Michigan. He is president of the Chamber of Commerce Safety Vault 
Company, and is also president of the following companies: the Han- 
nah-Lay Company, the Hannah & Lay Company, and the Hannah-Lay 
Mercantile Company, all of which are represented by large interests in 
northern Michigan and especially in Traverse City and Grand Traverse 
county. In 1880 Mr. Lay became one of the organizers and incorpora- 
tors of the State Bank of Traverse City, and he is president of this sub- 
stantial and popular financial institution at the present time. 

In politics Mr. Lay originally gave his support to the Whig party, 
and he recalls with gratification that in the interests of this party he 
organized, at Batavia, New York, when a young man a Zachary Taylor 
Club, and that later he had the privilege of attending the inauguration 
of Mr. Taylor as president of the United States, on the 5th of March, 
1849. Upon the organization of the Republican party Mr Lay trans- 
ferred his allegiance to the same, and he has since continued a stalwart 
advocate of its principles and policies. Mr. Lay is a zealous communi- 
cant of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which he holds membership 
in the parish of Grace church, at Chieag;o, his home city. He is a mem- 
l)er of the Chicago Historical Society in the same city, is also identified 
with the Union League Club and the Church Club of that diocese of 
the Protestant Episcopal cliurch, while in his own suburban city he is 
a member of the Highland Park Club. He has led a busy and useful 
life, but has never permitted its boundaries to be circumscribed by mere 
self-aggrandizement, as he has had appreciation of the higher ideals of 
human existence and has shown a due sense of his stewardship. His 
contribiitions to worthy charities and benevolences have been lil)eral 
and invariably unostentatious, and he is one of whom it may justly be 



580 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

said that he would "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame." He 
stands as a true type of American manhood, and now that the shadows 
of his life lengthen far from the sunset gates of the west, he may well 
feel that he has played well his part as one of the world's workers. 

At Batavia, New York, on the 20th of February, 1855, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Lay to Miss Catherine Smith, who was there 
born and reared and who was a daughter of Rev. Lucius Smith, rector 
of St. James Episcopal church of Batavia, New York, and a representa- 
tive citizen of Genesee county. Mrs. Lay, a woman of most gracious 
personality, and a devoted wife and mother, was summoned to the life 
eternal on the 27th of February, 1907, and her memory is revered by 
all who came within the sphere of her gentle and kindly influence. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lay became the parents of four daixghters, of whom two are 
living, — Olive, who is the wife of Colonel Charles A. H. McCauley, of 
the United States army, and Catherine, who is the wife of R. Floyd 
Clinch, a representative business man of Chicago. 

Orville Dennis. — Life is a voyage, in the progress of which we are 
perpetually changing our scenes. Orville Dennis has arrived at a port 
where he can stop a while and look back at that part of the voyage he 
has already passed. He has .seen the good and the evil that are in the 
world, the ups and downs, and he has learned to be uncensorious, hu- 
mane. He has learned to attribute the best motives to every action and 
to be chary of imputing a sweeping and cruel blame. He has no finger 
of scorn to point at anything under the sun. Along with this pleasant 
blandness and charity there is a certain grave, serious humor. From 
this same port he can see an expanse of waters covered with a mist. 
If there are rocks ahead he cannot see them. If there are whirlpools he 
hopes to be able to avoid them by steering his boat with the same steady 
hand which has been his salvation in the past. 

Putting metaphor on one side, Orville Dennis was born in Milton 
township, Cass county, Michigan, March 28, 1873. His father, Cassius 
M. Dennis, was an eastern man, where he received his education. He 
married Miss Alphonzy Hopkins, whose family originally came from 
Delaware. Mr. Dennis was a farmer for many years in Milton and 
later moved to Edwardsburg, Cass county, and engaged in the hardware 
business. 

Orville went with his parents to Edwardsburg, Michigan, where he 
attended the village schools, having only been to school a very short time 
in the district school of Milton. Next he attended the district school in 
Richmond township, Osceola county, where he liad moved with his 
mother. She was very desirous of his obtaining a good education, realiz- 
ing that it was a capital which would stand him in good .stead wlierever 
he might find himself placed. 

He attended the high school at Reed City, Michigan, from which he 
graduated in 1890, at the age of seventeen. This was doing remarkably 
well, as he had not attended high school the full year while he lived 
on the farm in Richmond township and then, too. he taught for one 
term l)efor<' he graduated. During his senior vear he had made up his 
iiiiiul flint lie should like to lie a Ijiwvcr. To thnt end. al'tcr his gradua- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 581 

tioii, he entered the law office of S. Wesselius of Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan. He did not, however, remain but one year, as he was offered the 
school at Dighton, Michigan, and he needed the money. He taught at 
Dighton for a year, after which he taught for another year at Prosper. 
He had shown himself such an excellent organizer and such a wise 
disciplinarian that he was offered the position of principal of Tustin. 
He held this position for one year, at the end of which time he felt a 
desire to enter the journalistic field. He entered into partnership with 
W. R. Frantz and together they purchased the McBain Chronicle from 
Mr. L. VanMeter. Soon after the purchase of the paper Mr. Frantz 
died, whereupon Mr. Dennis bought out, his partner's interest from the 
estate. He conducted the paper alone until 1897 and showed marked 
ability as a journalist. In 1897 he sold the paper to Mr. Charles R. 
Burleson and purchased from Mr. L. VanMeter the Missaukee Republi- 
can, a paper published at Lake City. He still owns and edits this paper. 

While still at McBain, the principal of the high school died, and the 
school board, knowing of Mr. Dennis' pedagogical success, induced him 
to finish out the year as principal. Judge Dennis has never lost his in- 
terest in educational work, realizing that it is the training of the child 
that makes or mars a nation. 

On June 8, 1898, Mr. Dennis married Miss Mabel Marks, of McBain. 
She was born in Ohio, her parents being also natives of that state. Her 
father, Willis F. Marks, served in an Ohio regiment during the Civil 
war. He married Celestia Henning. After the close of the war i\Ii . 
and Mrs. Marks came to Micliigan and located on a faVm, but later they 
moved into the town of McBain, where Miss Marks taught for .several 
years before her marriage. Judge and Mrs. Dennis have one child. 
Harold, born October 19, 1905. 

The Judge's political career has been varied. It is needless to say 
he is a Republican. While he was at IMcBain he was township clerk 
and also treasurer of the village of McBain. For two terms he was p 
member of the board of county school examiners of Missaukee county. 
In November, 1900, he was elected a member of the Michigan Icgislatuie 
for the district composed of Wexford, Clare and Missaukee counties. 
During this term this district was changed so as to comprise Missaukee 
and Kalkaska counties. In 1902 he was again elected to the legislature 
in the reconstructed district, being nominated without opposition. In 
both elections he received the largest vote in the county of ^Iissauk« of 
any candidate that had no opposition. During his first term as a mem- 
ber of the legislature he was a member of the committee on Marquette 
prison, the committee on state printing and also served on other leading 
committees. During liis second term he was again placed on the com- 
mittee on the Marquette prison and had done such efficient work during 
his previous service that he was appointed chairman, and received other 
very important committee appointments. In November. 1904, he was 
elected judge of the Probate Court for j\Iissaukee county. His service 
in this office being so exceptionally good, in 1908 he was again elected 
to the same position, being tiie first man in the history of the county to 
receive a second nomination aiul election to the office of judge of pro- 
liatc for the I'ountv. ;\Ir. Dennis has served for three consecutive terms 



582 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

as member of the Republican State Central Committee. He is one of 
the founders and directors of the Lake City State Bank. He owns a 
tine farm on the shores of Lake Missaukee, which he is constantlj^ im- 
proving and developing. Mr. Dennis is one of the progressive citizens 
of the county. It is his earnest desire that the county of Missaukee 
shall take a first place among the counties of northern Michigan. He is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Macca- 
liees. His family attend the Methodist Episcopal church in Lake City. 
Judge Dennis may congratulate himself that he has had such large op- 
portunities to be of service to his state. The state and his county have 
reason to congratulate themselves that in ]\Ir. Dennis it has found a man 
who is both capable and willing to be of use. In his private life, Judge 
Dennis is without l)lemish and his political life has been such that no 
reproach can be cast upon it. 

Judge Charles H. Rose. — On August 28, 1909, Judge Charles H. 
Rose, one of the mast eminent and well-beloved citizens of Evart and 
Osceola county, whose renown as a lawyer and .jurist spread far beyond 
local boundaries. 

"Gave his honors to the world again. 

His blessed part to Heaven and slept in peace." 

It would be difficult to name anyone whose loss would have been of 
a more general character and more deeply and sincerely regretted than 
his, for he has been summed up, by one who knew him well, as "an 
honored citizen, a good man and a Christian." 

Charles H. Rose was a native son of the state in which he was td 
live his life and win his honors, his eyes having first opened to the light 
of day in Washtenaw county August 26, 1853, so that at the time of his 
death he had just passed his fifty-sixth birthday. A glance at the his- 
tory of the Rose family shows its origin upon American soil to have 
been made in an early day. The parents of the subject were William 
H. and Clarissa Rose, the former being a farmer, and it was upon a farm 
that the younger. days of Judge Rose were passed. He experienced the 
usual pleasures and activities incident to the life of the farmer's son. 
engaging in the manifold duties to be encountered upon the homestead, 
and in the winter taking his place behind a desk in the district school. 
His public school training was completed by a course in the high school 
at Vassar. When he was about nine years of age he removed with his 
parents to Tuscola county. He early showed some of the usual earmarks 
of talent, being an inveterate reader and a good student. When a very 
young man he engaged for a time in a pedagogical capacity, with the 
hope, with the income thereof, of sometime being able to acquire a more 
liberal education. There were in the family six children, and one of 
these was Arthur Ro.se. a promising young attorney living at Caro, who 
encouraged him in this aml)ition. It was upon the advice of this brotlici 
that he entered the University of Michigan and entirely upon his own 
exertion paid his way. After pursuing the regular eoui-se he entered 
the law department and was graduated with the class of 1879. When 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 583 

ready to hang out his professional shingle, young Rose chose Evart for 
a location and was so well satisfied with his choice that he remained 
here for the rest of his life. He entered into a law partnership with 
C. A. Withey, under the caption of Rose & Withey, but the association 
of the two young attorneys was not of long duration, since Mr. Withey 
removed to Reed City. 

The splendid gifts of Judge Rose were soon recognized, and in a 
short time he came to be looked upon as one of the coming men of Os- 
ceola county and ^Michigan. In less than the usual time which elapses, 
so to speak, before a young lawyer finds his feet, he had built up a 
large and remunerative practice in this and adjoining counties and be- 
fore the Supreme Court. As signal mark of the approval in whieli he 
was held in the community he received many public trusts and was ever 
happy to prove the confidence reposed in him well founded, ever meet- 
ing grave questions with incomparable ability. He served as circuit 
court commissioner and prosecuting attorney of Osceola county; was 
village attorney at Evart for sixteen years ; and was for many years a 
member of the board of trustees of the village and of the board of edu- 
cation. The stalwart champion of good education, it was indeed appro- 
priate that he should so long be identified with the school board, — eight- 
een years as its trustee, and the most of that time holding the ofBce of 
president of the board. 

His judiciary career began w^ith his appointment as judge of the 
Nineteenth judicial circuit by Governor Warner, to succeed Judge ilc- 
Alvay, who had been elected to the Supreme bench in the spring of 
1905 ; and in April of the same year he was elected to the term of six 
years, but in 1909, because of continued ill health, he tendered his resig- 
nation and on Augast 25, three days prior to his death, his life-long 
friend and old time business partner, the Hon. Charles A. Withey, was 
appointed to succeed him. 

The story of his nomination for judge of the Nineteenth judicial 
circuit of Michigan is indeed interesting and cannot be otherwise than 
appropriate for incorporation in this brief sketch. A portion of an 
account of the affair taken from the current edition of an Evart journal 
is herewith given with but .slight paraphrase: 

"Charles H. Rose of this place was nominated for the long and 
short term for judge of the Nineteenth judicial circuit on the 445th bal- 
lot at the adjourned judicial convention at 3 o'clock Saturday morning, 
he receiving thirteen of the twenty-five votes cast for the long term, 
and afterward the vote of the convention for the short tei-m, and he has 
since been oppointed by Governor Warner to fill vacancy until election 
and qualification for short term. 

"To Osceola county this is an especially pleasing outcome of a re- 
markable contest. The convention was originally called to meet at 
Ludington January 10. Undoubtedly due to oversight, several features 
of the call of that convention were not right, one of them being to give 
to Manistee eleven delegates, whereas it was entitled to but nine. The 
convention organized w-ith Judge Nicholson of Lake county as chair- 
man and T. R. Welch of Osceola as secretaiy. The committee on cre- 
dentials reported full lists of delegates present, namely, two from Lake. 



584 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

eleven from Manistee, nine from Mason and seven from Osceola, but 
recommended that nine delegates be seated from Manistee. Upon adop- 
tion of the report, Manistee took oifense and withdrew from further 
participation in convention. Those remaining proceeded with business. 
A. A. Keiser of Ludington and C. II. Rose of Evart were nominated, 
and when balloting began Mr. Keiser received seven votes of ilason 
and two of Lake and JMr. Rose seven of Osceola. Balloting proceeded 
practically in the same order until earlj' next morning when 156 ballots 
had been taken. Adjournment was made until morning, but the re- 
newal of the session did not differ in result, the ballots reaching the 
203d, and adjournment was made to meet at the same place February 24. 

"Upon reassembling of convention all delegations were present, 
Manistee with eleven. A delegate moved that the eleven delegates from 
Manistee be seated and be allowed to cast nine votes, which was adopted 
and the convention proceeded in order, Mani-stee giving her nine votes 
to her favorite candidate, John H. Grant, Mason giving her nine to 
Keiser, Osceola her seven to Rose, with Lake county's two alternating 
between Grant and Keiser. This proceeded with clockwork regularity 
until the 445th ballot, when six of the Mason county delegates swung to 
Rose's support and he received thirteen votes and the nomination. 

"And," adds the journal from which this piece of political adven- 
ture is taken, "there is no fjuestion but that Mr. Rose's nomination is a 
popular one. He is a lawyer of broad learning, of much experience, 
and one in whose fairness all have confidence. Mr. Rose and the Osceola 
county delegation were greeted by many at Reed City, Hersey and Evart 
upon their return and congratulated upon their success." 

In the matter of political faith Judge Rose was a Republican, hav- 
ing an honest conviction of the superiority of the policies and princi- 
ples advocated by the party, but he was too big a man to be uncompro- 
misingly partisan or to esteem mere partisanship above securing the 
best man for an office and the attainment of the greatest good for the 
greatest number. With him patriotism was more than a mere rhetorical 
expression and it would be difficult to conceive ideals of citizenship of a 
higher character than were his. 

Judge Rose had interests additional to his profession, having been 
one of the promoters of the First State Savings Bank of Evart and for 
a time its president. He likewise did much to\vard bringing into being 
the Evart Citizens' Telephone Company, whose lines form an important 
link in the state independent telephone service, and he served as presi- 
dent of the company for a time. He also had important property hold- 
ings in the nature of several fine farms situated in the vicinity. He 
had. indeed, never lost his wholesome love of country life and farming, 
with which he had been so familiar in his youth, had never lost its 
charm for him. 

Judge Ro.se laid the foundations of an ideally happy liome life on 
June 2, 1880, his chosen lady being IMiss Emma Lancashire, daughter 
of Mathew II. and Hannah (Winterton) Lanca.shire. ]\Irs. Rose is a 
native of Wilmington, Delaware, and their union was celebrated at her 
home in Evart, Rev. J. C. Floyd, pastor of the Methodist Epi.scoi)al 
church, officiating. Of the five' chihlrcn wlio were lioi'u to bless this 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 585 

union three sons are living. — namely: Arthur 11., a mining engineer; 
Charles Lovell, .iust completing an agricultural college course, and Rol- 
land L., in high school. The Rose home is one of the refined and cul- 
tured aljodes of the town and the center of a gracious hospitality. Both 
ilrs. Rose and her honored husband were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Evart, Judge Rose having united by letter upon 
first coming here, and, zealous in assisting in its campaign for good, he 
willingly undertook the additional responsibility of ser\'ing for many 
years in an official capacity, being chairman of the board of trustees at 
"the time of his death. As has been said of him in one of the many ap- 
preciations written at the time of his demise, "During these years he 
was identified closely with the interests of his home town and county 
and watched with no little pride their progress from a political, social, 
educational and religious standpoint, not failing himself in being a large 
contributor in matters that make for civic righteousness." 

A close and hard student, iintiringly devoted to the profession to 
which he was so great an ornament, he overtaxed his physical powers, 
bringing on an affection of the heart, arterial sclerosis, from which he 
could not rally, thiLS being removed from his sphere of activity in the 
prime of mentality. 

It cannot be otherwise than appropriate to quote from the memorial 
appreciation written by Messrs. James H. Thompson, B. Newton Sa- 
vidge and William A. Lewis, of the Osceola County Bar Association, and 
adopted by that body in open court, at Hersey, on ^londay, September 
27, 1909. After reviewing the life of the deceased .judge. 

' ' Thus briefly is told the story of a life unusually full of activity and 
achievement and we are startled into the consciousness of the vanity and 
futility of earthly pursuits. Power, wealth, worldly honor, the ac- 
complishment of things undertaken, occupy our every thought, but 
when our dissolution comes, all fallacies are. detected, all distinctions 
vanish, all ranks are levelled, and we mu.st stand mute before the Su- 
preme Judge of heaven and earth to answer for deeds done in the body. 
It is on occasions such as this that we come to know our inmost selves, 
the 'I' whose conscience must be satisfied or life will be a dismal fail- 
ure. And so to-day, while the lips of our long time friend are forever 
stilled, yet he speaks to us more emphatically even than in life, warn- 
ing us and advising us of the brevity of human life and the necessity 
of making the most and best of present opportunities. Life is not meas- 
ured by length of years and it is not for us to say whether earthly 
careers are long or short. A noted divine has said, 'The best part of 
one's life is the performance of his daily duties. All higher motives, 
ideals, conceptions and sentiments in a man are of no account if they 
do not come forward to strengthen him for the better discharge of the 
duties which devolve upon him in the ordinary affaii-s of life.' 

"The geat combinations of trade and finance, the marvellous d^' 
velopment of the world's resources, call for vast aggregation of capital 
and armies of men to carry out the gigantic plans of present day pro- 
gress. The individual is so far lost sight of that human life seemingly 
becomes of less and less importance as we go farther from the days of 
more primitive conditions-, yet men in their enthusiasm for accomplish- 



586 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ment sacrifice life for the betterment of mankind and the benefit of 
future generations. It has been aptly said that life is what we cherish 
most in pureuing our various avocations. The consuming ambition of 
Charles H. Rose was to excel in his chosen profession. No case was 
too difficult for him to master, no technicalities of the law too intricate 
for him to attack. With vmconquerable tenacity he worked out the 
case that came under his care, and gloried in the ability to win against 
apparently hopeless odds. It was this desire to master the details of 
his work that caused him to be regardless of his physical needs, and his 
death is a sacrifice to preent day conditions and his ambition to meet 
them as a winner. He crowded his nervous, mental and physical capac- 
ity to the limit of endurance, despite the warnings of friends and physi- 
cians, in order that his clients might have the best he had to give. This, 
then, is the measure of human greatness and usefulness : 

" 'We live in deeds, not years, — in thoughts, not breaths — 
In feelings, not in figures on a dial. 
We count time by heart throbs. He most lives 
Who thinks most, feels the nobl&st, acts the best.' " 

Judge Rose was a member of the ancient and august Masonic order, 
belonging to the Blue Lodge No. 320 of Evart, and his impressive obse- 
quies were under Masonic charge. 

Frederick R. Walker, who is well known because of his effective, 
earnest laboi-s in behalf of the Republican party and who is now serving 
with utmost efficiency as judge of the probate court, is a resident of 
Traverse City and he has maintained his home in Grand Travei-se county, 
^Michigan, since 1884. He is a man of remarkable executive ability, and 
through perseverance and close application to the work at hand he has 
gained precedence as one of the mo.st prominent business men in this 
section of the state. Judge Walker was bom on a fann in Indiana 
county, Penn.sylvania, on the 4th of April. 1859, and he is a son of John 
C. and Catherine (Snyder) Walker, both of whom were born in the great 
German Empire. The mother came to America in 1837 and the father 
in 1845. Their marriage was solemnized in Indiana county. Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1848, and they became the parents of nine children, of wlioni 
Frederick R. was the seventh in order of birth. All the children were 
born in Pennsylvania and of the number six are now living. In 1868 
the Walker family removed to the state of Tennessee and in 1883 the 
parents came to Michigan, locating on a farm in Grand Traverse cotinty. 
The father died on the 2nd of February, 1898. while on a visit to his 
son, David W., of Putnam county, Kansas, and the mother is .still living 
at the age of eighty-seven. 

Judge Walker was a child of but nine years of age at the time of his 
parents' removal to Tennessee, where he completed his educational train- 
ing and where he continued to reside until he had attained to the a^c of 
nineteen years, at which time he went to Kansas, passing the ensuing 
four years in the counties of Reno and Osage, where he was identified 
with agricultural pursuits. In the spring of 1884 he came to Grand 



1219032 




^^2^^^^ e^ ^. 



"-^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 587 

Traverse county, Michigan, purchasing one luuidred and eighty acres of 
most arable land — one hundred and ten acres in Mayfield township and 
seventy aei-es in Grant township. He immediately turned his attention 
to diversified farming and has continued to be identified with that line 
of enterprise during the long intervening years to the present time, in 
1911. He now owns a splendid estate of two hundred and thirty acres, 
to the management of which he gives a general supervision, the while 
most of his time is taken up with his duties as probate judge. He is 
the owner of considerable real-estate in Traverse City and in addition 
to his other interests he is a heavy stockholder in the Walker-Buckley 
Bank, at Buckley, Wexford county, Michigan, in which his brother is 
likewise interested. 

In his political convictions Judge Walker is a loyal advocate of the 
principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor, 
as previously intimated, and during his residence in Grand Traverse 
county he has been incumbent of many important positions of public 
trust and responsibility. His first public office was that of justice of the 
peace, to which he was elected in the spring of 1885. For eight years 
he was school inspector and in 1891 he was elected a member of the boai-d 
of supervisors of Grand Travei-se county, of which he was chairman for 
three years. He was a prominent factor in the building of the county 
court iioiLse at Traverse City and in 1904 was further honored by his fel- 
low men in that he was then elected probate judge of Grand Traverse 
county. He was re-elected to this responsible position in 1908, and is 
incumbent of this office at the present time, in 1911. He has ever mani- 
fested a deep and sincere interest in all mattei-s projected for the good of 
the general welfare and he holds a high place in the regard of his fel- 
low citizens. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with Sherman Lodge, 
Free & Accepted Masons; and with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, 
Knights of the Tented Maccabees. He and his wife reside at Traver.se 
City, where they are popular factors in connection with the best social 
activities. 

At Mayfield, this county, on the 26th of April, 1898, was recorded 
the marriage of Judge Walker to Miss Myrtle Dixon, whose birth occur- 
red in Grand Traverse county on the 11th of February, 1874. She 
is a woman of the most pleasing personality and is deeply beloved by all 
who have come within the sphere of her gracious influence. To this 
imion have been born four children, namely, — Russell R.. Frederick R., 
Jr., Reginald and David C. Judge Walker is possessed of a noble char- 
acter, one that subordinates personal ambition to public good and seeks 
rather the benefit of others than the aggrandizement of self. Endowed 
by nature vrith high intellectual qualities. Judge Walker is a man of 
broad information and experience and he well merits the honor con- 
ferred upon him in his election to his present office. 

Asa C. Gray.— a man of versatile talents, possessing good business 
ability and judgment, Asa C. Gray, of Harrison, has had a varied ex- 
perience in life, and through his own efforts has steadily climbed the 
ladder of attainments. A son of Elijah Gray, he was born, October 15, 
1852, at Speaker, Michigan. 



588 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

His Grandfather Gray was born, reared, and married in New York 
state. In the earlier part of the nineteenth century he started with his 
family from LeRoy, New York, for Ohio, whit-h was then considered 
the "Far West," "taking with him $6,000 in gold, intending to invest 
in Ohio land. At Buffalo he embarked on a lake boat, but the vessel 
was wrecked near Long Point, and he lost all of his possessions, includ- 
ing his gold. Unable to continue the journey, he settled in Canada, and 
there he and his wife spent their remaining days. 

Elijah Gray remained in Canada until after attaining manhood, 
but after his marriage located in Speaker, Michigan, where he was for 
a few years employed in agricultural pursuits. He was three times 
married. He married first, in Canada, Phoebe Ostrander, who died in 
Michigan, when her son, Asa C. Gray, was but five years of age. 

Left motherless in childhood, Asa C. Gray went to Eden, Elgin 
county, Canada, to live with his father's sister. Two years later his 
aunt came with her family to Michigan, locating near what is now Mays- 
ville, where Asa continued his schooling. His father, who had previous- 
ly settled in Fayette county, Iowa, there married again, and he came to 
Michigan and took Asa home with him. His wife was a school teacher 
prior to her marriage, and under her tuition Asa made good progress 
in his studies. She died two years later, and the boy returned to 
Michigan, his old home, and 'worked for his aunt's husband, his uncle 
liy marriage. This uncle exchanged his Michigan property for a farm 
in Canada, but before he had moved his family there the uncle's brother, 
and brother-in-law were drafted into the Union army, and they 
skipped to Canada, leaving Asa, his aunt and her- children to harvest 
their crops. When the family were ready to move to Canada, in order 
to have a team there, one load of household goods was sent over the 
road, Asa and his uncle driving the team the entire distance of three 
hundred miles. At the end of three years the family returned to Michi- 
gan. 

The ensuing eleven years Mr. Gray was engaged in lumbering in 
Michigan and Canada, and had accumulated some money. Coming to 
Clare county in 1882, he bought land near Harrison, and was profitably 
engaged in lumbering and farming until 1904, when he was elected 
judge of probate of Clare county. Serving most ably and faithfully in 
tiie position, he was honored with a re-election in 1908, and is now serv- 
ing his second term with the same satisfactory results. 

Judge Gray has ever taken a deep interest in promoting the welfare 
of town and county, and while living on his farm served several tenns 
each as supervisor and town clerk ; was town treasurer four years ; and 
for a long time was director, and moderator, of the local school board. 
Fraternally tiie Judge is a member of the Ancient Free & Accepted 
Order of Masons; of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and of the 
Court of Honor. In his religious views he is liberal, believing in the 
Fatherhood of God and the Brotheriiood of Man. 

Judge Gray married, in 1880, Mrs. Louisa Currell, nee Russell, of 
Vassar, Michigan. She was born in Genesee county, Michigan, where 
her parents located on coming to this state froni New York. Judge 
and Mrs. (Jray's marriage has been blessed by the birth of two children, 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 589 

namely : Harry Garfield, who lived but one brief year ; and Jessie May, 
born in 1889. 

Hon. Homer H. Quay. — For the important and responsible official 
position which he is now filling with so mneh credit to himself and ben- 
efit to the people, Hon. Homer H. Quay, probate judge of Cheboygan 
county, has had excellent preparation in and out of professional lines. 
Operations in useful industry in a number of different localities and 
amid people of widely varying circumstances, pursuits and habits, gave 
him an extensive and accurate knowledge of human nature, while his 
scholastic attainments, acquired in good schools, and his professional 
training, gained in diligent study and instructive practice, fitted him 
well for the intellectual requirements of his official duties, and for the 
performance of them he also had the aid given by experience in other 
offices directly related to the one he occupies now. 

Judge Quay was born at Forester, Sanilac county, ilichigan, on Octo- 
ber 30, 1875, and is a son of David and Eliza (Quirt) Quay, the former 
bom in the state of New York in 1830 and the latter in Canada in 1833. 
He was the last born of their seven children, five of whom are living. 
The father came to Michigan in his young manhood and soon aftei-ward 
went to California during the early excitement over the discovery of 
gold in that state. He passed a number of yeai-s on the Pacific slope, 
mining, prospecting and doing whatever else opportunity offered or his 
necessities required. 

The young adventurer was not, however, very successful as a miner 
and grew weary of the wild life the occupation involved. He therefore 
returned to ^Michigan and again took up his residence in Sanilac county. 
In 1876 he came to Cheboygan, and here he was engaged in milling and 
the lumber business to the time of his death, which took place in 1898. 
His widow survived him eleven years, passing away in 1909. He attained 
prominence in his locality and for a time served as county treasurer. In 
political faith he was a pronounced Republican, and in religious con- 
nection was united with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Judge Quay began his academic education in the public schools and 
completed it at the Cheboygan high school. He secured his professional 
preparation at the Detroit College of Law, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1900. Within the same year he began his practice in Cheboygan, 
forming a partnership with M. W. Benjamin for the purpose, the firm 
name being Benjamin & Quay. The partnership continued from Sep- 
tember, 1900. to January 1. 1909. when it w-as dissolved on account of 
Mr. Quay's assuming the duties of probate judge. In 1901 and 1902 
he served as circuit court commissioner, and in 1903 was elected county 
prosecuting attorney and held said office until his election as probate 
judge in the fall of" 1908, which office he still holds. For over a decade 
Judge Quay has practiced law in Cheboygan and he has rendei-ed excel- 
lent service to the county and its people, and, what is as much to their 
credit as to his, the service is highly appreciated. He is clean, fearl&ss and 
exact in the performance of his official duties, knowing the law and ad- 
ministering it without hesitation on the one side or favor to any person 
or class on the other. But he is liberal and just in his interpretation of 



590 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

it, and will not allow its teclmicalities to work injury to any person with 
business in his court. 

The fraternal life of the community has long engaged his interest and 
had his active assistance. He is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Order of Elks, holding his membership in both in the Cheboygan lodges 
of these fraternities. His political faith is pledged and his political 
services are given to the Republican party, and in its councils he holds 
an en^aable place and has a potential influence. He has for years been 
a leading man in county politics, having sei-ved from 1906 to 1910 as 
chairman of the county central committee, and both through this posi- 
tion and his excellent party work in the field amply demonstrated his 
organizing ability and his power to rouse the confidence and enthusiasm 
of his party followers. By the party leaders in the state and by the rank 
and file of the organization in his county his services have been highly 
valued, as his citizenship is from evei-y point of view. He is regarded 
as one of the most upright, capable and useful men in the county, and 
one of its most representative citizens in evei-y relation of life. 

Delos F. Diggins. — In his beautiful sketch of "The Great Stone 
Pace," Hawthorne tells of the direction and development of Ernest's 
life in boyhood and manhood and until its very closing days through the 
influence of his observation of the impressive mountain view. There 
was an appeal to Ernest in the noble lines of the great configuration that 
actuated and modified his life and gave to it a purpose and a value it 
otherwise might not have known! 

And that which was true of Hawthorne's mountain dwellers ex- 
plains in part the influences that relate to all our lives. The man whose 
life illustrates and interprets for those about him the qualities most ad- 
mirable performs the highest possible service. Not knowingly, or with 
intention was such service rendered, and yet it is true of Delos P. Dig- 
gins that quietly, modestly, consistently, he gave to those who observed 
him and who knew him an interpretation of integrity and loyalty and 
kindness that will abide as an appeal and an influence so long as the 
communities exist to whom and for whom so much of his life was given. 

Delos F. Diggins was born at Harvard, Illinois, May 16, 1852, and 
his death occurred September 7, 1907. He was the son of Franklin and 
Ellen C. (Blodgett) Diggins. His father died in 1891 and the death of 
the mother followed that of the son about one year later, in September, 
1908. Two brothers, Albert B. Diggins of Harvard, Illinois, and Fred 
A. Diggins of Cadillac, sons of Franklin and Ellen Diggins, yet survive 
their parents and brother. Mr. Diggins was married at Hersey, ]\Iich- 
igan, December 19, 1877, to Miss Esther C. Gerrish, a daughter of 
Nathanial S. Gerrish and Caroline (Getehell) Gerrish, and the home of 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Diggins continued in Hersey until 1883 when they re- 
moved to Cadillac. Mr. Diggins' business life in the latter city was en- 
tered upon as cashier of the D. A. Blodgett & Company bank, his re- 
moval to Cadillac, indeed, being part of the business plan of his uncle, 
D. A. Blodgett, in order that Mr. Diggins might assume direction and 
control of the bank. In 1890 Mr. Diggins retired from the active man- 
agement of the bank that he might become a member of the firm and 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 591 

resident manager of the lumber business of Blodgett, Cummer & Dig- 
gins. His successful service in this direction continued until his death 
in September, 1907. 

Beautifully carved in a stone of heroic size that rests by the grave of 
Delos F. Diggins are figures representative of the Spirit of Kindness. 
Their ministrations are typified in part through sympathetic thought and 
overbending watchfulness that extends to a little child. Fitting and 
tender testimony is this impressive tribute of love and of art to the sym- 
pathies that most marked the life of him whose remains in that hillside 
rest. But the Spirit of Kindness graven in the stone are not so enduring 
or so impressive as the memory and influence for thought and kindness 
to others that exist and will continue in the lives and hearts of those that 
best knew D. F. Diggins. 

Through the fruits of his labor the blessings of life and health have 
been made possible for many who otherwise might have been denied. 
Through the closing months and days of his life, some of them knowing 
much of weakness and pain to himself, Mr. Diggins participated with 
his wife in formulating ways and means by which they should provide 
their home city of Cadillac with an adequate and beautiful hospital 
building and equipment. The building was well entered upon while yet 
he could direct it and was furnished in accordance with the mutual pur- 
poses and plans of j\Ir. and Mrs. Diggins. In accordance with further 
hopes and expectations Mr. and ]Mrs. Diggins had together held and re- 
viewed there has been provided for the children of Cadillac a ilanual 
Training building modern and possessed of provision anticipatory of 
many years. The Spirit of Kindness that was related to the life of Delos 
F. Diggins will minister in a helpful, worthy way to children whose lives 
will be better and whose possibilities will be greater because of his 
thought and his plans for them. 

Because of the contemplation of his ideal in the face formed of the 
mountain picture the life of Ernest, we are told, was larger and better 
in its touch and help to those with whom he lived. Because of his life 
among them, because of what he sought to do and to be, and by reason 
of the spirit that actuated him, the memory of Delos F. Diggins and the 
influence of his life on those with whom he lived has larger grown as the 
years have gone, and will remain. 

William W. Mitchell. — The preparation and publication of a his- 
tory of Northern ^Michigan as a territory or section sufficiently unique 
within itself to deserve separate and distinct attention was principally 
based on the citizenship of that region, on the men it has produced and 
on tlie part they have plaj'ed in the development of their respective 
communities and in the creation of a spirit which marks as peculiar the 
counties and communities of their homes. 

We are assured by observing and thoughtful students of men and 
their movements from the earliest periods and traditions of time that 
geography more than philosophy has had to do with the qualities and 
characteristics of our race ; that the mountains and rugged hillsides and 
valleys of Switzerland and Scotland and Norway have liad a larger part 
in marking and making the differences that exist between the inhab- 



592 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

itants of these countries and the people of perpetual warmth and bloom 
in tropic lands than have any other influences that relate to their efforts 
or to their existence. 

The typical men of Northern jMichigan have represented the develop- 
ment that contact and familiarity with its peculiar problems have pro- 
duced. Its great forests and its products of timber related in the earlier 
years to the deep snows of winter, to the long river drives, and to the 
business perils of loss or gain through the shifting and unreliable exigen- 
cies of men and mills and markets, were incidents of experience that 
became factoi-s in the mental and physical shaping of the men who 
shared them. 

William AY. Mitchell, of Cadillac, favorably and well represents 
what the people of that section refer to with pride as the Northern Mich- 
igan temperament and spirit. Northern ]\Iichigan has been Mr. Mitch- 
ell's home for more than thirty-five years, Cadillac being his place of 
residence throughout that entire period. Hillsdale was the childhood and 
boyhood home of j\lr. Jlitchell and in that city he was born on the 3d 
day of June, 1854. His parents were Charles T. and Harriet (Wing) 
Mitchell, the former of whom was born in New York and the latter in 
Wayne county, Michigan. Charles T. IMitchell, the father, was a man 
whose life work formed a most valuable contribution to the city and 
county of his home and to his adopted state in which throughout all his 
life in Michigan he was an influential and honored citizen. William 
W. Mitchell was the third of six children born to his parents at Hills- 
dale, but one of whom besides himself is now living, a sister, Harriet 
W., wife of Dr. Walter II. Sawyer, of Hillsdale. 

In the very earliest days of its infancy, in 1873, was the village of 
Clam Lake, the predecessor of the city of Cadillac, when William W. 
Jlitchell entered upon his life and labors there. His uncle, George A. 
Mitchell, whose name will always be connected with recitals of the or- 
igin and history of Clam Lake and of Cadillac as their literal founder 
and earliest pioneer, was then the principal lumber manufacturer there, 
and the young man entered his iincle's employ as a saw mill tallyman. 
Through successive and somewhat rapid stages Mr. Mitchell passed 
through the experience of teamster in the woods, foreman of the lum- 
l)er .yard and participant in a logging contract, and became junior mem- 
1)er "of the firm, the name of which is known now widely almost as is the 
name of our state, "Cobbs & Mitchell." It was in 1877 that he entered 
into ])artner.ship with Jonathan W. Cobbs, who had come to Northern 
^Michigan from Indiana in 1874. The business relation thus formed con- 
tinued until the death of Mr. Cobbs in the autumn of 1899, after which 
it was reorganized and incorporated under the name through which it 
has flourished and grown throughout the twenty -one years of its previous 
existence. Mr. Mitchell was also junior partner in the lumber manu- 
facturing firm of Mitchell Brothers, which came into existence in 1882, 
and which was also reorganized and incorporated in 1899. His brother, 
Austin W. Mitchell, whose death occurred in 1902, was the senior mem- 
lier of the firm of IMitchell Brothers, through which the name of Mitchell 
has become one well known and honored in lumber circles throughout 
our state and country. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERiN MICHIGAN 593 

Mr. Mitchell M^as married in 1876, at Hillsdale, to Miss Ella Yost, a 
daughter of George Yost, who had removed from Waterloo, New York, 
to Michigan, in the days of Mrs. Mitchell's early childhood. A son and 
a daughter, Charles T. and Marie Elizabeth, complete their immediate 
family. 

It has been said of Cadillac, that it is possessed of a spirit of self- 
helpfulness; quite noteworthy and unusual; that there exists among its 
citizens a willingness to unite for common purposes and for their mutual 
interests that has been the most important factor in its continued ad- 
vancement and growth. This spirit and this willingness in the city of his 
long-time home represent the influence and the purpose of William W. 
Mitchell. ' ' Can 't we get together so as to work this out in a kindly way 
for the good of all?" has been his many-times repeated question and 
plea to his neighbors and home friends throughout the years. And that 
plea has not failed of accomplishment. Will Mitchell, as he is best known 
to those with whom he has longest lived, has been more then generous 
with Cadillac and its people. Comfort and beauty and stability in 
surroundings, and his thought of young men and effort to care for 
them, are testified to in enduring structures. But William W. Mitchell's 
largest and best contribution to Cadillac has been the value of his own 
life. His thought for others has become a community influence, his 
interest and desire for kindly cooperation has been made a permanent 
element of tlie life about him. The provisions of beauty and convenience 
and comfort with which ]Mr. Mitchell had to do ma.y change and decay, 
the structures of stone and iron may 1)e dissolved by time, but his 
helpful influence upon the lives of those who have best known him will 
remain as a contribution permanent and abiding. 

Perry Hann.\h. — To Hon. Perry Hannah came the attainment of a 
distinguished position in conection with the great material industries 
of northern ]\Iichigan. His life achievements worthily illustrate what may 
be achieved by persistent and painstaking effort and his tremendous suc- 
cess in financial and commercial affairs of large import in this section 
of the state was the result of his own well directed endeavors. He was 
a man of progressive ideas; although versatile, he was not superficial; 
exactness and thoroughness characterized all his attainments. While Mr. 
Hannah reached the venerable age of eighty years, he attained much of 
his former strength and vigor and the splendid mental and physical 
powers of his youth until life's work was done. 

Mr. Hannah was .justly known as the "father of Traverse City." He 
resided in this place for nearly three score years and during all that 
time his contribution to progress and development was of the most in- 
sistent order. In the early '50s he invested with his associates, A. T. 
Lay and William ^Morgan, the mone.y which opened up his region and 
gave employment to nearly every pioneer who came here in those early 
days. The opening of the lumber business here by the firm was the 
foundation upon which the city was laid, and how firm a foundation it 
was is shown by the thriving city with its ad.iacent territory dotted with 
fine farms, villages and hamlets. At the time of Mr. Hannah's arrival 
in this region there was not a sign of civilization and the entire country 



594 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

was in a state of that virgin wilderness which had been untouched hy 
the hand of man. In Mr. Hannah's own words he will here describe the 
harbor as it was when it first struck his vision. 

"The voyage was tempestuous. After riding out a gale of three 
days' duration on Lake Michigan, we finally entered the bay and made 
Old Mission harbor in pleasant weather. The scene before us, as the 
vessel rounded into the harbor, appeared to us tempest-tossed voyagers 
the loveliest ever beheld by mortal eyes. The sun was just sinking be- 
hind the western hills, the white-washed houses of the Indian village 
gleaming brightly in his parting rays, while the tops of the forest trees 
seemed bathed in a floating mist of gold. On the bank sat a picturesque 
group of Indians, enjoying the fragrant fumes of their pipes. 

"The women were seen engaged in feminine avocations pertaining 
to their simple mode of life. The shouting of a company of children 
in gleeful play, mingled with the sound of tinkling bells from a herd 
of ponies feeding on the hillsides beyond, made music in harmony with 
the quiet beauty of the scene. 

"After remaining two hours at Old Mission, the 'Venus' set sail for 
her destination, the head of the west arm of the bay. The night was 
beautiful, with the glorious moon shining brightly in the heavens. The 
only opening in the forest visible to the party as it landed was the nar- 
row clearing opening the road to Captain Boardman's water-power saw 
mill." 

Although deeply impressed with the wild beauties of nature, it was 
not for artistic purposes that Mr. Hannah had left civilization, and ere 
long his keen foresight and excellent business acumen ca'me into play as 
he sized up the possibilities of a fortune in the millions of feet of pine 
which were only awaiting the invasion of the woodman's axe and the 
hum of the mill to convert the raw material into valuable lumber. With 
an energy and steadfastness of purpose which has ever marked the 
transactions of the firm of Hannah, Lay and Company, operations were 
begun and carried on with the result which is familiar to all — every 
member of the firm became a millionaire and Mr. Hannah was the 
wealthiest man in the region. 

On a farm known as Beech "Woods, twelve miles from Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 22d of September, 1824, occurred the birth of Perry Han- 
nah. He traced his ancestry back to stanch Scotch extraction, his father 
having been a major in the army of his native land. I\Ir. Hannah was 
a child of but three years of age at the time of his mother's death. 
Thereafter, until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, he re- 
sided in the home of his paternal grandmother, where he was reared in 
the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. He attended the district 
schools during the winter terms and during the summer months helped 
in the work and management of the home farm. In 1828, one year after 
the death of his wife, the father migrated to Michigan, where he re- 
mained for a period of twelve years, at the expiration of which time he 
returned to Erie for his family, which consisted of two sons and two 
daughters. Perry Hannah was then living with William B. Weed, a 
cousin of William B. Ogden, the great railroad magnate of Chicago. 
The father gave the young Perry his choice of remaining with Mr. Weed 



HISTORY DP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 595 

or of coming with liim to the wilds of Michigan. Mr. Weed had become 
very much attached to Perry and tried to persuade him to remain as 
an inmate of his home, offering as an inducement that when he should 
have attained his legal majority he would give him a new suit of clothes, 
a yoke of oxen and a new logging chain. At that time Mr. Weed 's offer 
was a very liberal one but Perry, tilled with the spirit of adventure, 
chose to accompany his father. Mr. Hannah's sister, the late Mrs. 
Sarah Maynard, was also a member of the party. After an arduous 
drive to Erie, the family took passage on the old steamer Madison for 
Detroit, traveling second class. Arriving in Deti'oit the following morn- 
ing, passage was then taken to Port Huron, where the father was en- 
gaged for some time in the rafting of logs. 

After looking about him, Mr. Hannah, of this review, secured a po- 
sition with John Wells, a merchant of Port Huron, in whose employ he 
remained for the ensuing three years. Subsequently he made the ac- 
quaintance of a lumberman and arranged to ship his stock to Chicago 
for him while the owner went in advance to open an office and yard in 
that city. After shipping the lumber, Mr. Hannah followed to Chicago 
and accepted a position in his employer's office. Later he hired out to 
Jacob Beidler, one of the richest lumbermen in the western metropolis, 
at the munificent salary of four hundred dollars a year. The salary 
seemed enormous to him at the time and his duty consisted chiefly in 
sizing up and purchasing lumber at Port Huron. He made good in the 
duties assigned to him and in due time prepared to launch out into 
business for himself. Accordingly, in 1850, he entered into partner- 
ship alliance with A. Tracy Lay and James and William Morgan, under 
the firm name of Hannah, Lay & ]\Iorgan, and with a borrowed capital 
of six thousand dollars an office was opened in Chicago. Hearing of the 
fine land in northern Michigan, Mr. Hannah was delegated to come to 
this section of the fine old Wolverine state for the purpose of inspection. 
The year following the formation of the partnership valuable lands were 
acquired in this vicinity and a saw mill erected. For two or three years 
Mr. Hannah and IMr. Lay alternated iu the management of affairs here, 
and in 1854 Mr. Hannah decided to make this section his permanent 
home. 

The firm of Hannah, Lay & Company, established in 1850, has con- 
tinued to the present time, the only change made in the personnel being 
the addition of William Morgan, younger brother of James Morgan, one 
of the original partners. Some years ago they retired from the lumber 
business, each having made a fortune, but they still conduct the other 
interests of the company, which consist of a three-story brick block used 
for a general department store, at Traverse City, and the Traverse City 
State Bank, which is located on the corner of Union and Front streets, 
in a fine building erected at a cost of two hundred thousand dollars. 
Hannah, Lay & Company are the owners of considerable valuable real 
estate in Chicago, one of their buildings being the Chamber of Commerce, 
the site of which cost six hundred thousand dollars and the building 
one million dollars. All of these concerns were under the direct man- 
agement of Mr. Hannah and Mr. Lay during their lifetime. William 



596 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ilorgan, the fourth member of the firm, lives in Califoriva. James 
^Morgan passed to eternal rest in 1900. 

On the first of January, 1852, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hannah to Miss Anna A. Flint, of New York, who died February 24, 
1898. To Mr. and IMrs. Hannah were born three children — Julius T., 
who died on the 29th of November, 1905, and concerning whose career 
a sketch appears elsewhere in this work ; jMrs. J. F. Keeney, of Chicago, 
Illinois; and Mrs. George W. Gardner, of St. Paul, ^Minnesota. 

Although he attained to the advanced age of eighty-one years, Mr. 
Hannah was an active business man lantil his death, Aiigust 16, 1904, 
his shrewd judgment and fine business ability being equal to that of 
many a younger man of affairs. It is most gratifying to record here 
that Mr. Hannah's great wealth had been gained through square and 
honorable methods and tliat he himself built the ladder by which he 
had risen to affluence. In connection with his own advancement he had 
been an important factor in the development and growth of Traverse 
City and the surrounding territory. In polities he accorded a stalwart 
allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and in 1856-7 he gave 
most efficient service as a member of the state legislature, serving on 
many important committees and taking an influential part in the de- 
liberations of the house. For twenty -eight years he served as moderator 
of the school board, was supervisor for several years, president of the vil- 
lage of Traverse City from the time of its incorporation and later he was 
its first mayor. He never affiliated M'ith any church organization biit 
was a liberal contributor on various occasions, having given the sites 
for nearly all the church edifices in the city. His life history is cer- 
tainly worthy of commendation and emulation, for along honorable and 
straightforward lines he won the success which crowned his efforts and 
which made him one of the most substantial residents of Traverse City, 
and, in fact, the State of IMichigan, and in his death all classes from 
laborer to millionaire bowed their heads in honor of a benefactor of 
mankind. 

Emery D. Weimer, who has been in business and a progressive 
figure in the civic affairs of the Upper Peninsula for some forty years, 
is a widely known lumberman and a dealer in real estate, especially 
timber hmds, at Ludington. He was born in Kent county, IMichigan, on 
the 4th of February, 1856, and his father, G. Weimer, who was a pioneer 
of that section, is also a resident of Ludington. The son spent his boy- 
hood at Ionia and when twelve years of age he came to Ludington, where 
he was educated in the common schools, afterwards going to Grand Rap- 
ids and pursuing a business course in a college there. 

Mr. Weimer 's first practical experience in the business and the lum- 
ber world was an employee of D. L. Filer, manufacturers of lumber 
at Ludington, and he soon became so well posted that he found work with 
various companies as a lumber inspector. He was actively and con- 
tinuously engaged in tliat field from 1881 to 1900, when he permanently 
located at Ludington. He is not only lai-gely interested in timber lands 
and lumber enterprises in upper Michigan, but has important interests 
on the Pacific coast, being secretary of a timber company whose lands 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 597 

are in California, and is one of the directors of the Detroit- Vancouver 
Timber Company, whose holdings lie along the Columbia river. 

Mr. Weimer has been active in polities and public affairs for many 
years, and is one of the best known Democrats in the Upper Peninsula. 
He has served as treasurer of the city of Ludington for four successive 
terms; has been alderman of the Second ward and county superivsor; 
has been active as a member of the school board and on the Democratic 
committees of the city, county and congressional district, having been 
honored with the chairmanship of the county organization. As to his 
standing in Masonry, it is sufficient to mention that he has reached the 
thirty-second degree of that order. 

Married in 1883 to j\Iiss ]\Iamie W. McAllister, daughter of Ephraim 
and Mahala McAllister, ilr. Weimer has become the father of two daugh- 
ters and a son, viz : Bessie May ; Gertrude, now the wife of F. W. Kehlet, 
of Los Angeles, California; and Emery D., Jr., who is at home. 

Samuel Emmett Neihardt, M. D. — Holding high place among his 
professional brethren in northern Michigan is Dr. Samuel Emmett 
Neihardt, a physician of much ability and usefulness in the community 
in which his interests are centered. Into his composition enters that 
sterling element, — the German — and his family has been founded for a 
considerable length of time in America. Dr. Neihardt was born in West 
Unity, Ohio, February 14, 1863. One of the earliest Neihardts was Con- 
rad, who was born in jMaryland, of German parents, and resided later 
in life in Pennsylvania. lie was an unlearned farmer and a Protestant 
and he reared a large family of children. He was a minute man in the 
Indian wars, which were numerous during his lifetime. His public serv- 
ices of civic and religious character are not known to the present gen- 
eration. His wife was Elizabeth Kruger, an American of German an- 
cestry, born in Pennsylvania on the day of the Cherry Valley massacre. 
Their son, Jacob Neihardt, was born in Penns.ylvania and came to Ohio 
in his youth. He located in Williams count}', that state, as early as 1837 
and there died at an old age. He was an unlearned farmer, as were 
most of his contemporaries, but none the less a good citizen ; he held no 
office; he was a Lutheran and was active in building up the church at 
Melbern, Ohio. He reared a large family. George W. Neihardt, son of 
the foregoing and father of the subject, was born in Holmes county, 
October 23, 1835. He was a school teacher and farmer and received a 
good education. He was graduated from the literary department of the 
University of ^Michigan with the class of 1861. In religious convic- 
tion he was of the Protestant Lutheran faith, and in politics he was in- 
dependent, having voted with all parties, for he believed in supporting 
the better man and the better measure, irrespective of partisanship. He 
was for many years principal of the academy at Orland, Indiana. The 
sub.iect's mother's grandfather, Adam McGowan. was a pauper child 
sent from Scotland to this country and sold into service to pay for his 
passage. Her father, Samuel McGowan, was born in Ohio and was one 
of a large family. The mother, whose maiden name was Mary M. IMe- 
Gowan, was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, December 26, 1840, and is 



598 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the youngest of a family of ten. Her mother and maternal grandmother 
were of German ancestry. 

Dr. Neihardt was educated in the country schools of Lagrange county, 
Indiana, whence the family removed when he was a boy. He was in due 
time graduated from the Orland high school and his first adventures 
as a wage earner were in a pedagogical capacity, for he taught school 
in both Indiana and Michigan. This extended over two years or until 
he was nineteen. He then began the study of medicine at Orland with 
the late Dr. James Wallace, and in 1884-5 he matriculated in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and received his degree of M. D. from the medical 
department of the University of Wooster, Ohio, near the city of Cleve- 
land, in 1886. He first began the practice of his profession at South 
Boardman on August 25, 1886, and it is a favorable commentary on 
the confidence he has won and the general opinion of his wisdom and 
usefulness that he has ever since remained here, becoming the friend and 
physician of hundreds of families. 

Dr. Neihardt is eminently public spirited and takes a helpful in- 
terest in all affairs concerning the public welfare. In political convic- 
tion he is a Democrat and he has held nearly all the village, township 
and school offices, while for fourteen years he has been pension exam- 
ining surgeon. In all public work his services have been a credit to 
himself and an honor to his constituents. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic blue lodge, Kalkaska lodge. No. 332; Traverse City Chapter and 
Traverse City Council. He is likewise affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Independent Order 
of Foresters. 

Dr. Neihardt was first married to Lily Thrift, in Toledo, Ohio. She 
was a graduate of the Toledo high school and a teacher in the schools of 
the city. Her parents are E. Washington and Rachel Thrift, the former 
a newspaper man a member of Lee's Black Horse Cavalry, serving 
four years in the Confederate army. The Thrifts are an old Virginia 
family. Mrs. Neihardt died in March, 1889, leaving no children. The 
subject was married. August 30, 1891, to Addie J. Gardner at South 
Boardman. She was a daughter of Charles A. and Catherine Gardner 
the former a farmer and justice of the peace ; she was a graduate of the 
Kaskaska schools. She passed away in September, 1901, leaving five 
children, three girls and two boys. Dr. Neihardt was united in mar- 
riage on December 30, 1901, to ]\iaude Mary Dick, daughter of William 
and Susan Dick, the father a farmer and prominent man who has held 
many offices. A number of children have been born to the last union. 

The children of Dr. Neihardt are as follows : Marv, born August 28, 
1892; Catherine Dora, October 21, 1894; Samuel Emmett, April 12, 
1897; Charles Elton, April 12, 1897; Lola Ethel, September 7, 1899; 
Olga May, December 30, 1902; Gretchen, March 5, 1904; Mildred Eliz- 
abeth, June 25, 1905 ; and Helen, September 26, 1909. 

Dr. Neihardt is of a type eminently well fitted physically for a doc- 
tor, being strong and healthy, and fond of out-door sports. He has a 
disposition to indulge in active out-of-door work and has built up a 
large practice in a rough new country. For a long time he had the 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 599 

difficult work of caring for a large practice of a very scattered sort, 
but his ministrations are now more concentrated. 

Amil F. Nerlinger. — Though this representative member of the bar 
of Grand Traverse county claims the old Keystone state as the place of 
his nativity he has been a resident of northern Michigan since his early 
childhood. His honored father was one of the pioneer exponents of the 
agricultural industry in Grand Traverse county, where he reclaimed a 
farm from the wilderness and where he still maintains his home. 

Amil F. Nerlinger was born in the city of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
on the 2d of May, 1875, and is a son of John and Frederica (Yost) 
Nerlinger, the former of whom was born in the kingdom of Bavaria, 
Germany, on the 21st of August, 1848, and the latter of whom was born, 
August 2d, 1849, in Alsace-Lorraine, France, a province that was wrested 
from France in the Franco-Prussian war, since which time it has been 
a part of the German empire. The marriage of the parents was solem- 
nized in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 24th of July, 1874, 
and of the four children the eldest is he whose name initiates this re- 
view; Carrie E. died in infancy; Charles is a resident of the State of 
Washington, where he is engaged in farming and lumbering ; and John, 
Jr., is engaged as a plumber at Traverse City, Michigan. John Nerl- 
inger, Sr., was reared to maturity in his fatherland, where he was af- 
forded the advantages of the common schools and where also he learned 
the trade of a cooper. In the spring of 1868, when about twenty years 
of age, he severed the ties that bound him to home and native land and 
set forth to seek his fortunes in America, whither he came without finan- 
cial resources of more than nominal order, but fortified with resolute 
purpose, industrious habits and definite ambition. He landed in New 
York city, where he was employed at his trade for three months, at the 
expiration of which he removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
remained a short time. He established his home in Allegheny City, that 
state, after his marriage and there he remained until 1878, when he came 
with his family to Michigan and made Grand Traverse county his des- 
tination. He arrived in Traverse City in March of that year and pur- 
chased a tract of wild land in East Bay township, where he developed a 
productive farm, upon which he and his devoted wife have since con- 
tinued to reside. He has made excellent improvements on the homestead, 
which comprises eighty acres of arable land, and twenty acres are devoted 
to a fine fruit orchard, which gives excellent returns for the labor ex- 
pended in its planting and cultivation. John Nerlinger, Sr., is known 
as one of the substantial citizens of the county and his sterling character 
has gained to him the high regard of all who know him. He has given 
his support to the measures and enterprises that have tended to ad- 
vance the social and material welfare of the community and he served 
several terms as a member of the school board of his district. In politics 
he is a stalwart Democrat. 

Amil F. Nerlinger was three years of age at the time of the family 
removal to Grand Traverse county, and here he was reared to adult 
age under the discipline of the home farm, in the meanwhile availing 
himself of the advantages of the district schools and finally of the Trav- 



600 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

erse City high school. At the time of the inception of the Spanish- 
American war Mr. Nerlinger was a senior in the Traverse City high 
school and was president of his class. He showed his patriotism by 
promptly tendering his services as a volunteer soldier. On the 16th of 
May, 1898, he enlisted as a private in Company j\I, Thirty-fourth Mich- 
igan Volunteer Infantry. This regiment was mustered into the United 
States service on the 25th of the same month, and Colonel John P. Peter- 
mann assumed command of the same. The regiment left for Camp 
Alger, Virginia, on the 6th of June, and thereafter the command re- 
ported for duty on Cuban soil. It lauded at Siboney on the 1st of July 
and after marching all night reached the scene of hostilities early on 
the morning of the second day of the battle of San Juan hill. The 
regiment was assigned to duty on the liue in support of the batteries 
and later it did outpost duty. It thus participated in the Santiago ex- 
pedition under General Shatter and bore its full share of hardships 
and dangers. The members of the regiment were mustered out of the 
government service at Travei-se City, Michigan, where the boys of Com- 
pany M received their houorable discharge on the 9th of December, 
1898. Mr. Nerlinger has cemented the ties and vitalized the associations 
of his military service by his membership in the United Spanish-Amer- 
ican War Veterans' Association. 

After the close of the war ]\Ir. Nerlinger determined to prepare him- 
self for the legal profession and in September, 1898, he was matriculated 
in the law department of the University of Michigan and graduated with 
the class of 1901. He duly received his well-earned degree of Bachelor 
of Laws and was by the supreme court of Michigan admitted to the bar 
of the state June 19, 1901. He began the practice of his profession at 
Elk Rapids, Antrim county, where he served his novitiate and tried his 
mettle. He there remained about one year and during this time was as- 
sociated in practice with Steven D. Lardie, who had been his class- 
mate in the University. In September, 1902, ]\Ir. Nerlinger, for the 
purpose of finding a broader field for the exercise of his energies and 
powers, opened an office in Traverse City, where he has since been en- 
gaged in the general practice of his profession, in which he has shown 
him.self a resourceful trial lawyer and well fortified counselor. He is 
careful in the preparation of his cases and as an advocate before court 
or jury is concise, clear and cogent in his presentation of his cause. He 
has appeared in connection with a number of important litigations and 
has been counsel for representative persons and corporations. He has 
served as justice of the peace since 1903 and in April, 1907, he was 
elected .judge of the recorder's court of Traverse City. 

In politics Mr. Nerlinger accords an unwavering allegiance to the 
cause of the Republican party, and in this connection he is ever ready 
to give a reason for the faith which he holds. In the Masonic fraternity 
his affiliations are with Traverse City Lodge. No. 222, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; and 
Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars. He is also 
identified with the local organizations of the Knights of Pythias, of 
Traverse City Lodge, No. 73; the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks Traverse City Lodge, No. 323 : the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN GOl 

lows, Equality Lodge, No. 503; the Modern Maccabees Tent, No. 136; 
Hannah Camp, No. 23, U. S. W. V., and other fraternal and social or- 
ganizations. 

On the 8th of June, lOOi, Mr. Nerlinger was united in marriage to 
i\liss Rozella Vogelsang, who was born at Postoria, Ohio, and whose 
parents, William P. and Eva (Walter) Vogelsang, now reside in the 
city of Grand Rapids, Michigan. On April 2, 1911, a daughter, Mar- 
garet Frank Nerlinger, was born to Mr. and ilrs. Nerlinger. 

Byeon Burmeister. — One of the prominent business men of northern 
Michigan is Byron Burmeister. He was born at ilishicott, Manitowoc 
county, Wisconsin, on April 20, 1852. His parents were natives of Ger- 
many. His father, William Burmeister, was one of the pioneers of the 
county, settling at Mishieott in 1843. At an early age Byron Burmeister 
with his parents moved to Manitowoc, where he was reared until he 
was ten years of age. He accompanied his father back to Germany, 
where he attended school for one year. They made the trip to Germany 
in a sailing vessel, being on the way five weeks, and while abroad visited 
London, Hamburg and many other noted cities and places. Upon his 
return to Wisconsin Byron continued to attend school, after which he 
followed the carpenter's trade for a few years. In 1865 he took to sailing 
and continued in that line of enterprise for just twenty yeara, first as 
a common sailor but at the age of twent.y-three as a captain. At one 
time he was owner of several vessels. On the 20th of November, 1885, 
he established his home in Onekama, where he built a store and engaged 
in the general merchandise business. The fire of October 1, 1891, de- 
stroyed all his property, but as he held a partial insurance, he imme- 
diately commenced to construct another building, the one his store now 
occupies, which was completed on December 10th. At this time he re- 
commenced a general mercantile business, in which he is still engaged. 
Soon after his arrival at Onekama he began to handle tan bark and cord 
wood, using his own vessels to transport these commodities to various 
ports of the Great Lakes. As agriculture in his coiinty developed, he 
took up the shipping of farm products, iintil he became the heaviest 
shipper of these products in this part of the state. 

By nature Mr. Burmeister is honest and honorable, genial and kindly. 
His integrity is never questionel by either buyer or seller. In politics 
he is a Democrat. He has held various offices of a local nature for many 
years, in none of which he ever accepted compensation. He is ever on 
ithe alert to do all in his power to advance the general welfare of the 
community he has elected to make his home. At present he is president 
of the village of Onekama, and has been a member of the village council 
since the incorporation of Onekama in 1891. 

On September 9. 1885, Mr. Burmeister married Miss Mary Falge, of 
Manitowoc. Wisconsin. She was born in Austria Hungary, on October 
22, 1866. At the age of three she came to America with her mother. At 
the time of her marriage she was a prominent school teaelier of the city 
of Manitowoc. IMr. and Mrs. Burmeister have three children, namely : 
Alberta, born in 1886; William, in 1893: and Norma, in 1895. Alberta 
was graduated in the Onekama high school, after which she attended the 



602 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Ferris Institute for one year, then entered the University of Michigan, 
from which institution she graduated in the class of 1908. At present 
she is assisting in the management of her father's business. William 
is a student in the local high school and Norma is just about to enter 
therein. 

Thomas Tomlinson Bates, of Traverse City, Michigan, was born 
December 13, 1841, at Keeseville, Essex county. New York. His father 
was Rev. Merritt Bates and his mother Eliza A. Tomlinson, both being 
of English ancestry. The father was a Methodist Episcopal clergy- 
man, and an active and uncompromising anti-slavery man through all 
the thirty-five years preceding the Civil war. A man of strong convic- 
tions and great ability, he occupied a prominent place in his church, and 
lived to see the triumph of the cause to which he had giv^eu the' best 
years of his life. His mother was of the old New York family of Tom- 
linsons, prominent in New York city in Revolutionary times and the 
years immediately following. 

Thomas T. Bates was educated in the public schools. At sixteen he 
began life for himself, clerking at one dollar a week and boarding him- 
self. A year later he was general helper in a bank at Glens Falls, New 
York. At eighteen he occupied an important position in a banking 
house in Memphis, Tennesee, but came north at the outbreak of the 
war. He removed to Traverse City in 1863, was cashier for Hannah, 
Lay & Company two years, and resigned to open a real estate office 
with Hon. D. C. Leach, whose interest in the business he bought in 1871. 
In 1858 his uncle, Hon. Morgan Bates, established the Grand Traverse 
Herald, and sold the paper in 1867 to Hon. D. C. Leach. Thomas T. 
Bates, who had had the management since 1865, bought the Herald of 
Mr. Leach in 1876, and has since that time been its editor. His wife, Mrs. 
M. E. C. Bates, was for many years associate editor, his daughter Miss 
Mabel, now Mrs. Mabel Bates Williams, of Denver, Colorado, local and 
society editor and associate manager, and since the death of Mi-s. Bates, 
editor of the Home Department of the Herald and Evening Record, 
while since her mother's death. Miss Clara Bates has been president of 
the Herald Young Folks Sunshine club, and editor of that department 
in the Herald. 

Mr. Bates has always been active in politics. He was prominent in 
eastern New York in 1856, when only fifteen years old, in the youths' 
organization of "The Rocky Mountain Boys" in the Fremont cam- 
paign. His first presidential vote was for Lincoln in 1864, and he has 
never missed voting a straight Republican ticket since. He has never 
been a political office-holder, with the exception of that of postmaster 
at Traverse City, 1881-3, resigning the position on account of the in- 
creasing business of the Herald, which demanded his time. He was for 
several years chairman of the township and count.v committees. In 1880, 
he was chosen a member of the state central committee of his party and 
served ten consecutive years, the longest conseculive service ever given 
by any member of the party. He represented his district as delegate 
in the Republican national convention in 1892, and was made secretary 
of the delegation. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 603 

In 1885 Mr. Bates was appointed a member of the Board of Trustees 
of the Northern Michigan Asylum, now the Traverse City State Hos- 
pital, located at Traverse City, and which was opened to patients that 
year. He was re-appointed in 1889, again in 1895, again in 1901 and 
again in 1907 and is still acting on the board. This is the longest ser- 
vice ever given by any member of any board of managers of any state 
institution in Michigan. He was President of the Board from 1886 to 
1892, and again from 1907 to 1910. In the fall of 1885 he was also ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of Building Commissioners for the same 
institution, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Hon. Perry 
Hannah, and was at once chosen chairman of the Board, serving in this 
capacity until the completion of the work of the commission in the fall 
of 1886. He was elected secretary of the Travei-se City Railroad com- 
pany upon its organization in 1871 and served in that capacity until 
the road was leased to the (Jrand Rapids and Indiana Railroad Com- 
pany; was then placed upon the Board of Directors of the Traverse City 
Railroad Company and still holds the position, and for several years 
was president of the company. For several years he was a member of 
and President of the Board of Library Trustees of Traverse City. For 
a number of years he was President of the Traverse City Business Men 's 
Association, which was instrumental in locating at that point many of 
the important manufacturing establishments of Traverse City. In 1897 
he established with J. W. Hannen, TIte Evening Record, and the enter- 
prise has been very successful. In 1904 the business was incorporated 
as the Herald and Record Company and ilr. Bates has been President 
of the company since its organization. In 1910 the Eagle Press, daily, 
semi-weekly and job department, was consolidated with the Herald and 
Record Company, as were also the Fife Lake Monitor and Kingslci/ 
Echo, both weekly papers published in the county. 

In 1904 Mr. Bates was a member of the Executive Committee having 
in charge the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of the 
Republican party "Under the Oaks" at Jackson, and which took place 
July 6th of that year. 

In 1909 he was appointed by the governor one of the Michigan 
members of the Lincoln National Memorial Association to arrange for 
the observance of the one-hundreth anniversary of the birth of Abra- 
ham Lincoln at the birthplace of the martyred President, and to pro- 
vide for a national monument on the spot to commemorate the event. 

Mr. Bates was married in 1867 to Miss ]\Iartha E. Cram, daughter 
of Jesse Cram, who for many eai's was identified with the early history 
of Wayne and Genesee counties, and who was also one of the pioneers 
of Grand Traverse county. ^Irs. Bates died in 1905. The family con- 
sists of two daughters, Mrs. Mabel Bates Williams and Miss Clara, and 
a son, George G., who was for many years in the publishing business in 
Chicago, and who is now a resident of Traverse City and is Vice-Presi- 
dent and actively interested in the Herald and Record company. 

Samuel Gilpin. — A widely known business man and citizen of pub- 
lie affairs Samuel Gilpin, of Cheboygan, is now specially identified with 
the lumber business of northern i\tichigan. Like many others in his 



604 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

section of the state who have contributed in large measure to the pros- 
perity and civic progress of that section, he is a Canadian of English 
ancestry. Mr. Gilpin was born in Northumberland county, Canada, on 
the 7th of February, 1854, and is a son of Johu and ]\Iinerva (Pickle) 
Gilpin, the father a native of Cornwall, England, who died in 1854, and 
the mother of Essex county, Canada, who passed away in 1898. The chil- 
dren born of their marriage were Margaret, who became the wife of 
Thomas Blackmore, both residents of Omaha, Nebraska, and Samuel, of 
this biography. 

The father cauie to Canada with his parents in 1838, he being the 
only son in a family of four children, and the daughters were Mary. Ann 
and Elizabeth. The sou continued his old-world occiipation of farming 
in Northumberland county, conditions at that time being primitive in 
the extreme; in fact, the Gilpin family was rated among the pioneer 
agricultural element of that section of the dominion. 

Saiuuel Gilpin received his education at Campbellford, Northumber- 
land countj', Canada, and spent his boyhood days on the homestead farm, 
varying its labors with work at the forge and in the lumber camps. 
\^^ien he came to Cheboygan in 1881 he was, therefore, in good training 
to make a success of the t.vpical industries of that section of the States. 
Coining hither as agent for Raber & Watson in the lumber business, he 
at once established himself as a permanent factor in the growth of the 
place, and was soon engaged in his chosen field as an independent unit, 
as a member of the well known firm of Watson & Gilpin, extensive 
handlers of lumber, railroad ties and cedar poles and posts. 

Mr. Gilpin's good sense, independence and stanch Republicanism 
also brought him into favorable public notice, with the result that he 
was elected as the first alderman from the Second ward of Cheboygan, 
in wliich office he served most acceptedly for three terms of two years 
(>ach, and that he also held membership on the County Drainage Board 
for four years. Mr. Gilpin has broad and active standing as a f raternal- 
ist. In 1872 he joined the Masonic order at Campbellport, Canada; 
has been a member of the Maccabees for the past twenty years; be- 
longed to the Orangemen while a citizen of the Dominion ; and is identi- 
fied with the Chelmgan Lodge, No. 504, B. P. O. E. 

In 1876 Samuel Gilpin married Miss Charlotte Ming, a native of 
Germany and daughter of Henry and Mary (Roenigk) Ming, both also 
born the Fatherland. Her father died in 1877, at the age of fifty-nine 
years, her mother surviving until 1902, when she dropped her earthly 
burdens at seventy-six. Of their ten children, three were born in Ger- 
many and five are still living. In 1859 the Ming family boarded a sail- 
ing vessel for the United States and. after a voyage of six weeks, entered 
New York harlior and were soon located at Oswego. Later they moved to 
Canada, where Mr. Ming followed his profession as a veterinary surgeon, 
in which he had previously been engaged in connection with the Prus- 
sian cavalry service. He finally located at Norham, Ontario, where he 
continued in that line and became a leading citizen. Mr. Ming was 
prominently identified with the good work of the Methodist church in 
Norham. and served as a member of the school board for a period of 
thirty years. In politics be was a Republican. 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 605 

The following- ehildreu have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilpin: Dr. 
John H., a graduate from the medical department of the Michigan Uni- 
versity, class of 1904, and now a practicing physician of Fort Wayne, 
Indiana ; Mary Minerva, wife of M. D. Pralich, a merchant of Cheboy- 
gan ; Charles H., associated with his father in the lumber business ; Lot- 
tie Maud, a student at the Michigan University; Thomas Franklin and 
Margaret, students in the Cheboygan high school. 

George A. Lisk. — One of the most active, progressive, and intelligent 
newspaper men of Northern Michigan, George A. Lisk, of Bast Jordan, 
is well known in .iournalistic circles as editor and proprietor of the 
Charlevoix County Herald, which he purchased in 1905 It was es- 
tablished in 1896, and had many ups and downs during its existence 
until taken in charge by Mr. Lisk, who is building it up to a good posi- 
tion among the leading publications of the county. A son of George 
and Mary J. (Cooley) Lisk, he was born at Arcadia, Lapeer county, 
Michigan, February 19, 1874, coming from good old New England an- 
cestry. His father, George Lisk, was born and reared in that quaint old 
seaport, Gloucester. 

Born and brought up in Gloucester, Massachusetts, George Lisk nat- 
urally engaged in seafaring pursuits, and until twenty-one years of age 
sailed before the mast. In 1862 he enlisted in the Thirty-fifth Mass- 
achusetts Infantry, and subsequentl.y took part in many of the hard- 
fought battles of the Civil war, being under fire at Fredericksburg, South 
IMountain and Antietam. Wounded in the latter battle, he was sub- 
sequently transferred to the Relief Corps. At the close of the conflict, 
he enlisted in the First United States Infantry, and after his discharge 
from the service, at Fort Wa.vne, settled in Michigan. Engaging in con- 
struction work, he assisted in the building of the Pontiac, Oxford & 
Northern Railroad, at its completion locating on a farm in Arcadia, 
Lapeer county. 

Receiving his preliminary education in Lapeer county, Michigan, in 
Arcadia and Lapeer, George A. Lisk subsequently continued his studies 
for several years in the schools of Lansing, Michigan, and Gloucester, 
Massachusetts. Returning to Michigan, he served an apprenticeship at 
the printer's ti-ade in the office of the Lapeer Clarion, a weekly paper 
published in Lapeer, with which he was connected for thirteen years. 
Soon after leaving Lapeer, Jlr. Lisk came to East Jordan, and having 
purchased the Charlevoix County Herald, and the good \y\\\ of the paper 
and its patrons, has since edited and published it successfully, each sea- 
son adding to its attractions and value, and largely increasing its cir- 
culation. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican 
party, but is not active in politics. 

^Ir. Lisk married, June 25, 1902, Jennie M. Bonney, of Imlay City, 
Michigan. She was born in Sanilac county, Michigan, a daughter of 
Moses and Jeannette (Howard) Boune.y. natives of New York state. 
Fraternally Mr. Lisk is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and of the Knights of the Maccabees, his wife belonging to the Ladies 
of the ilaceahees. Although neither Mr. or Jlrs. Lisk are connected 
li\- ini'inhcrship witli any religions organization, tlioy are generous and 



606 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

charitable, giving freely to any and all worthy objects, and are ever 
ready to aid the establishment of any enterprise calculated to benefit the 
place or the people. 

John Monagiian. — Among the sterling citizens who have contributed 
to the material and civic development and progress of the city of Alpena 
is John Monaghan, who has been a resident of Michigan for more than 
half a century and who has maintained his residence in Alpena for 
nearly thirty years, within which he has been identified with various 
lines of business enterprise. He has been the architect of his own 
fortunes, as he came from his native land to America when a youth and 
dependent entirely upon his own resources. His career has been marked 
by integrity and honor and he has thus merited the confidence and 
esteem so uniformly reposed in him. 

Mr. Monaghan was born in County Wexford, Ireland, on the 1st of 
November, 1835, and is a son of Patrick and Ann (McGuire) Monaghan, 
both of whom were likewise natives of that county. The father passed 
the last eight years of his life in Detroit, Michigan, where he died at the 
age of seventy-eight years, and the mother passed the closing years of 
her life in the home of her son John, subject of this review. She at- 
tained to the venerable age of eighty-one years and had been a resi- 
dent of Alpena for several years prior to her death. Of the seven chil- 
dren only two are now living, John being the elder and George being 
likewise a resident of Alpena, where he is district agent for the Stand- 
ard Oil Company. Patrick Monaghan was a farmer in his native county 
and continued to reside in the Emerald Isle until he was about seventy 
years of age, when he came with his devoted wife to America, to join liis 
sons, who accorded him and his wife the utmost filial care and solicitude 
during the residue of their lives. Both were devout communicants of 
the Catholic church. 

John Monaghan passed his boyhood days on his father's modest 
farm in Ireland, and in the meanwhile he attended the parochial schools 
in a somewhat irregular ^^'ay. When but twelve years of age he went 
to the city of Diiblin, where he secured employment as clerk in the 
mercantile establishment of Patrick McGuire, and he continued his res- 
idence in Dublin until he had attained to his legal majority, when, in 
1856, he embarked on the small sailing vessel "New Ross," two hundred 
and fifty tons displacement, and set forth on the long and weary voyage 
to America. After five ^^eeks on the ocean he landed in the city of 
Quebec, Canada, whence he proceeded down the St. Lawrence river 
and by Lake Erie to Kingston, Ontario, from which point he made 
the trip by railroad to Detroit, Michigan. He was without financial 
resources but was ready to turn his attention to any occupation that 
would yield him an honest livelihood. In Detroit he secured employ- 
ment as waiter in the old National hotel, which was located on the site 
of the present magnificent Pontchartrain hotel, the finest in the state. 
Later he secured a position as clerk in the wholesale grocery establish- 
ment of Thomas A. Parker, and that he proved a valued factor in con- 
nection with the enterprise is indicated by the fact that he was event- 
ually admitted to partnership in the same. After he had thus become 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN W)7 

an interested principal in the business a department of ship chandlery 
was added. After having been identified with this concern for a period 
of years Mr. Monaghan engaged in the same lines of enterprise in an 
individual way, and he continued to be engaged in business in Detroit 
until 1882, when he disposed of his interests there and removed to 
Alpena, where he entered into partnership with John P. Healey and 
engaged in the retail grocery trade, under the firm name of J. P. 
Healey & Company. Later he engaged in the contracting business, in 
the installing of cedar-block street pavements, and in this connection 
he built up an extensive and prosperous enterprise. In 1898 IMr. Mon- 
aghan and William II. Johnson became associated in the organization 
and incorporation of the Alpena Coal Company, of which he has since 
been secretary, treasurer and general manager. In 1899 he also be- 
came one of the organizers and incorporators of the Alpena Portland 
Cement Company, and he has since had the general management of 
the land interests of this company. He has been essentially progres- 
.sive in his civic attitude, and it should be noted that it was primarily 
due to the efforts of himself and Charles H. Reynolds that the first 
macadam street paving was done in Alpena, — eight blocks on Chisholm 
street. He was also one of the organizers of the Alpena Mutual Ben- 
efit Telephone Company, of which he is a director, and in various other 
relations he has been a factor in advancing local interests. In politics 
^Ir. ]Monaghan has given an unfaltering allegiance to the Democratic 
party, and while a resident of the city of Detroit he not only served 
as representative of the Eighth ward on the board of aldermen but 
also as a member of the board of edl^cation. He is a zealous com- 
municant of the Catholic church and member of the parish of St. 
Bernard's church. He is affiliated with Alpena Council, No. 529, 
Knights of Columbus, and with the local branch of the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association. The life of Mr. Monaghan in the early years of 
his residence in America was one of struggle and vicissitude, but his 
courage and ambition enabled him to surmount obstacles and to win 
eventually a worthy success. Though not a man of large wealth he 
has achieved definite success and is one of the substantial citizens of 
Alpena, where his circle of friends is limited only by that of his ac- 
quaintances. 

In the year 1860 was solemnized the marriage of I\Ir. Monaghan to 
Miss Susan Leddy, and their gracious companionship on the .iourney of 
life was continued for more than forty years. It was severed liy the 
death of the devoted wife and mother in 1904, and thus was entailed the 
maximum loss and bereavement in the life of him to whom this sketch 
is dedicated, ilrs. ^lonaghan was born in Detroit, Michigan, and was 
a daughter of Thomas and Rose Leddy, both of whom were born in 
Ireland, of Scottish ancestry. They passed the closing years of their 
lives in the city of Detroit and all of their children, four in number, 
are now deceased. Thomas Leddy came to America when a young 
man and his marriage was solemnized in the state of New Jersey, 
whence he later removed to Michigan and established his home in De- 
troit. Mr. and Mrs. ilonaghan became the parents of thirteen chil- 
dren, and of the number si'ven are living. ^Ir. ^lonaghan has reason 



608 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

to be proud of what has been accomplished by his children, all of whom 
have honored the name of the family, and concerning the seven surviv- 
ors the following brief data are given: Thomas, who is now engaged 
in the grocery business in Alpena, was born and reared in Detroit, 
where he received the advantages of the celebrated Detroit College, con- 
ducted by the Jesuit Fathers. He married Miss Beatrice Redmond. 
William, who likewise availed himself of the privileges of Detroit Col- 
lege, is now sales manager for an extensive Portland cement company 
at Belleville, Michigan ; he married Miss Celeste Saguyn. James P. 
attended Detroit College and later was graduated in St. Louis Uni- 
versity, in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. He was ordained to the 
priesthood of the Catholic church and after passing one year at Bar- 
celona, Spain, he returned to St. Louis, being later sent to the Philip- 
pine islands, where he served as assistant rector for three years, be- 
sides holding commission from the United States government as assist- 
ant to Father Algie. who was in charge of the local observatorj' of the 
government weather bureau. Ill health finally compelled his return 
to the United States, and after passing some time in Alpena, where he 
recuperated his energies, he was called to his alma mater, the Univer- 
sity of St. Louis, where he has since held the chair of sciences. He is 
a priest of the Jesuit order and a man of especially fine intellectual 
attainments. Martin, who is engaged in the practice of law in the city 
of Minneapolis, I\linnesota, gained his literary or academic education 
in Detroit College and St. Louis University, after which he entered 
the law department of Georgetown University, in the District of Col- 
umbia, the oldest Catholic university in the Union, and in this institu- 
tion he was graduated, since which time he has achieved status as one of 
the representative members of the bar of Minnesota. He married 
Miss Agnes Gavagan. Frank, who was graduated in the Alpena high 
school, continued his studies in the University of Michigan, in which 
he completed thorough courses in chemistry and mechanical engineer- 
ing, and he is now engaged in the work of the profession for which he 
thus fitted himself, being incumbent of a responsible position with the 
Buick Automobile Company, of Flint, Michigan. He married Miss 
Lucy DeRoche and they have one son. Annie, who is a member of 
the Catholic order of Sisters of Charity, is connected with St. Leo's 
convent, in the city of Detroit, where she is a teacher of music; and 
Susan M. has presided over the domestic economies of her father's 
home since the death of the loved wife and mother. 

DoN.vLD "W. McKay is the accommodating and efficient cashier of 
tlie firm of Early, McKay & Company, bankers, v\'hose place of business 
is situated in Tawas City, Iosco county. Michigan. This highly com- 
mendable monetary institution was founded in 1905. Mr. i\IcKay was 
born in Caro, Tuscola county, Michigan, in 1883. He is a son of Will- 
iam and Mary (MacKie) McKay, the former of whom was born in 
Scotland, on the 9th of September. 1840. The father immigrated to the 
United States in the year 1856, at which time he was a lad of sixteen 
years of age. lie located at Almont, Lapeer county, Michigan, where 
lie continued to rosido until 187fi. in which year he removed to Tuscola 




EDITOR CLARION, REED CITY, MICHIGAN 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 609 

county, where he was identified with agricultural pursuits. He was a 
man of prominence and influence iu his home community and he served 
his fellow citizens iu many public offices of trust and responsibility. 
For twelve years he held the office of township supervisor and in 1882 
he was elected sheriff of Tviscola county, remaining incumbent of that 
office for four years. In 1889 he was given further mark of the high 
regard of his fellow men in that he was then elected to represent his 
district in the state legislature. He served in the house in the sessions 
of 1889-1900 and 1900-1901 and he was again chosen representative 
in 1905. He was a man of unusual foresight and extraordinary execu- 
tive ability. In politics he endorsed the cause of the Republican party 
and he was ever on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all 
measures projected for the good of the general welfare. To Mr. and 
Mrs. William McKay wei-e born nine children, concerning whom the 
following brief data are here incorporated : H. W., Minnie and Hester 
are deceased ; James is cashier of the Prescott Bank, at Prescott, ilich- 
igan; Mary N. is state librarian at Lansing, Michigan; Robert C. of 
the Ogemaw County Bank; Estelle is a resident of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Lloyd is cashier of the East Tawas Bank; and Donald W. is the im- 
mediate subject of this review. William ilcKay was summoned to 
eternal rest on the 12th of February, 1907, and his cherished and de- 
voted wife, who preceded him to the life eternal, died on the 11th of 
May, 1891. 

Donald W. McKay was reared and educated at Caro, Michigan, to 
whose public schools he is indebted for his early educational disciphne, 
the same including a course in the local high school, in which he was 
graduated. After leaving school he was for sevei'al .years connected 
with the Western Land & Sugar Company, at Grand Junction. Color- 
ado, whither he had gone. Later he was proffered and accepted the 
position of cashier of the bank of Early, McKay & Company, and since 
that time he has been a loyal and public-spirited citizen of Tawas City, 
Michigan. Politically he gives his support to the principles and policies 
for which the Republican party stands sponsor and while he has never 
as yet held any public office he is recognized as a man of liberal ten- 
dencies and as one much interested in the general welfare of the city 
and state at large. He is popular and prominent in local social or- 
ganizations. 

Lorenzo A. Barker. — Honored and respected in every class of 
society, "Ren" Barker, as he is familiarly known, has for many years 
been a leader in thought and action in the public life of northern Mich- 
igan, and his name is inscribed high on the roll of its foremost citizens, 
his honorable career adding lustre to the history of the state. Faith- 
fulness to duty and strict adherence to a fixed purjiose in life will do 
more to advance a man's interest than wealth or adventitious circum- 
stances. The successful men of the day are the.v who have planned their 
own advancement and have accomplished it in spite of many obstacles 
and with a certainty that could have been attained only through their 
own efforts. This class has a woi-thy representative iu "Ren" Barker, 
who is a Civil war veteran and who has recently written a book which 



610 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

is the history of his company — "D", Sixty-sixth Illinois, also known as 
Birge's Western Sharpshooters. 

The following history of Mv. Barker and his book consists largely of 
extracts taken from articles which appeared in the Detroit News- 
Tribune of Detroit, Gramd Rapids Daily Herald, Detroit Saturday 
Night, Traverse City Daily Record, Saginaiv Cotirier, Herald, and other 
state papers. 

"Mr. Barker has now attained to the venerable age of seventy-two 
years but he is wonderfully well preser\'ed and does not look a day 
over fifty. He was born in Naples, Ontario county, New York, on the 
16th day of August, 1839, and is a son of George W. and Welthy (Tyler) 
Barker, the father having been born in Litchfield, Mass., and both 
father and mother were reared in New York. Both are now deceased 
The young 'Ren' received his preliminary educational training in the 
public schools of Italy, Yates county, New Y^'ork. He entered upon an 
apprenticeship at the printer's trade in the Battle Creek Journal office 
when still a youth and in that place he also became an ardent Whig in 
his political convictions. He came to Battle Creek, Michigan in 1852. 
He has ever been an ardent politician; he was 'IJnder the Oaks' at 
Jackson, at the organization of the Republican party, in 1854 ; hurrahed 
for John C. Fremont in the presidential campaign of 1856, though then 
not old enough to vote, and he has hurrahed for every Republican can- 
didate since, and expects to live to hurrah for several more. His war 
service as a sharpshooter covered three years, ten months and nine 
days, but more of that anon. 

"In 1867 he helped establish the Flint Globe; later was foreman and 
reporter of the Sioux City, Iowa, Times in 1878; founder of the Sibley, 
Iowa, Gazette in 1872; manager of the Chelsea, Iowa, Bugle in 1875; 
foreman and manager of the Hastings, JMichigan, Banner in 1876; 
starter of the Lake City Journal in 1877 ; and since 1884 he has owned 
and operated the Reed City Clarion, at Reed City, Osceola county, 
Michigan." The ensuing resume of Mr. Barker's book will sei-ve to il- 
lustrate his experiences in the Civil war, and it may be said here that 
the book is well worth reading as history and recreation. 

Company D, Sixty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, was re- 
cruited principally in Battle Creek, Hartford, Keeler, Watervleit, Ben- 
ton Harbor and St. Joseph, in September, 1861, by Captain John Piper 
of Battle Creek, who was killed at Spottsylvania. It was sent to bar- 
racks at St. Louis. Missouri, and mustered in as the Fourteenth Mis- 
souri, afterward called the Sixty-sixth Illinois. It was under fire for 
the first time at jMt. Zion. ]\Iissouri, December 28, 1861. Early in 1862 
it formed a part of Grant's army that captured Forts Henry and Donel- 
son and many thousand prisoners. It was in the thickest of the fighting 
at Corinth aiid Shiloh in the spring of 1862. Its first colonel, Birge, was 
superseded in June, 1862, by Pat Burke, a regular army artillery cap- 
tain. Burke was a daredevil in battle and was mortally wounded in the 
Atlanta campaign. 

"Ren" and in fact most of the soldiers in Grant's army, supposed the 
fall of Forts Donelson and Henry ended the war, so they proceeded to 
collect all sorts of relics to take home. Included in the relics Mr. Barker 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 611 

stowed in his knapsack was a six-poimd cannon ball, which he carried 
on a march of eighteen miles. Then he discarded it and the rest of the 
relies. Three years of fighting was ahead of them before they could 
take relics home. 

In the Slimmer of 1862 Company D was on duty at General Grant's 
headquarters at Corinth. In April, 1863, it made a march of sixty-four 
miles in tiventy-four hours while on a scouting expedition, which is said 
to be the longest march ever made by a company in that time. In De- 
cember, 1863, the men of Company D discarded their old rifles and pur- 
chased at their own expense the newly invented 17-shooter Henrys, 
paying fifty dollars each for the guns. The men continued to own their 
rifles to the end, the government furnishing the ammunition. Mr. 
Barker still has his Henry which he carried from 1862 to 1865, and he 
has the names of all the battles in which he used it engraved on the 
brass mountings of the stock. It is the only Henry still owned by a 
veteran of Company D. 

Company D and the rest of the Sixty-sixth were assigned to Sher- 
man's army for the Atlanta campaign. It had the distinction on May 
9, 1864, of opening the fighting of the army of the Tennessee, in this 
campaign. In the campaign the company was under fire one hundred 
and twenty days, the regiment losing two hundred and twenty-five men 
in killed and wounded. Company D lost all of its officers. After 
the fighting of July 22, the regimental flag showed sixty-six bullet holes 
in it. Mr. Barker himself was shot in the foot. Company D continued 
with Sherman's army on the march through Georgia and in the cam- 
paign through the Carolinas, culminating in the surrender of Johnston's 
army. It participated in the Grand Review at Washington, in May, 
1865, and July 7th was mustered out of the service. This little band of 
Wolverine sharpshooters, for they were all Michigan young men, in its 
three years and eleven months' service, marched five thousand miles, 
fought twenty pitched battles, beside skirmishes innumerable, and lost 
almost as many men in killed and wounded as it contained at the close 
of the war. For twenty-seven years Company D has held its annual 
reunions at Water\rleit, Berrien county. 

Company D was on duty at the hanging of a somewhat noted Con- 
federate spy, Sam Davis, at Pulaski, Tennessee, November 1863, to 
whom the Daughters of the Confederacy only last year erected a monu- 
ment. Davis was caught with documents which he could only have 
secured from some disloyal Union officer. He was offered his life if 
he would reveal the officer's name, but he refused. Mr. Barker, who 
was coi-poral at that time gives a graphic description of that occurrence 
in his book. It is most interesting but rather grewsome and will not 
be included here on account of limited space. 

Jlr. Barker reprints in his book a letter he wrote to his father in 
the summer of 1863, just after the Division Commander, General Ogels- 
by, had resigned his commission. It reads: 

"Dear Father: — The address I enclose is from our brave General 
Ogplsby on taking leave of us. We regret to part with him as he is a 
perfect soldiers' man. I received the papers you sent and am very much 
obliged for them. At the present time of writing, I feel first-rate. In 



Q12 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

my last letter I wrote about the capture of nine rebels by us. One of 
them was recognized as having deserted the rebels and joined our 
forces then after he had gotten a full equipment, a horse, saddle, ear- 
bine, revolver, saber and uniform he deserted our forces at Corinth. 
He was recognized, tried and shot last Thursday. It wiU be apt to 
teach others a lesson. 

■'Who would not belong to the Second Brigade? Thank God that 
I do, and that I was in the fight of the 3d of October, 1862, that General 
Ogelsby speaks of. * * * Your son, 'Ren' Barker." 

Jlr. Barker, despite the hard and continuous fighting of Company 
D, in the Atlanta campaign, like Silas Wegg, occasionally dropped 
into poetry. He wrote some that was sung by Company D on its 
marches. One set was labeled for their corps commander. General 
Logan, and sung to the tune of "The Kingdom's a'Comin'. " It had 
this chorus: 

"The Johnnies ran, aha! 
They'll fight us soon no moi*e, 
They must have heard that Logan's a'comin' 
With the Fifteenth army corps. ' ' 

Mr. Barker, in these piping times of peace, calls himself a "rabid 
Republican," a "stalwart of the stalwarts." He was a Blaine and Lo- 
gan presidential elector in 1884, and a Harrison presidential elector in 
1889, also a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, that nominated McKinley and Roosevelt; Past 
Chancellor Commander of the Reed City Knights of Pythias, has been 
secretary of Company D, Sixty-sixth Illiuois Reunion Association 
for twenty-seven years; adjutant for Steetman Post, Reed City, G. A. R., 
ten years; adjutant for General I. C. Smith Post, Reed City, G. A. R., 
for eleven years; member of the Republican State Press Association 
and the Michigan State Press Association for years; was a member of 
the Michigan State Central Committee, under McMillan for eight years; 
is also a member of the Elks Lodge at Big Rapids ; also honorary mem- 
ber of the Moose Lodge of Reed City, and is a valued and appreciative 
member of various other representative social and fraternal organiza- 
tions of prominent order. He is permanent historian of Company D. 
He has been delegate to the National Grand Army Encampments: 
Boston twice, Washingtou, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Buffalo, Detroit, 
St. Louis, St. Paul, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Denver, and to everv 
state encampment since 1884. He was Postmaster of Reed Citj' under 
President Harrison; has just been made Michigan's Honorary Vice 
President of the National Bureau for the Advancement of Patriotism. 
He is a loyal and public spirited citizen and lias contributed gener- 
ously toward measures tending to advance the general welfare of the 
community. As a man he is affable and courteous in manner and in 
all the relations in life his record will bear the search-light of fullest 
investigation. 

Jacob H. Myers.^ — One of those splendid estates which are at once 
the pride and strength of Northern Michigan is that of Jacob H. Myers, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 613 

whose farm of one hundred and sixty acres, with its excellent buildings, 
broad fields and fruitful orchards, is situated near Levering. Mr. 
Myers is a native of Bellefoute, Center county, Pennsylvania, his birth 
having occurred September 29, 1861. He is the son of James and Mary 
Jane (Harris) Myers, both of whom were born in Pottsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1838 and both of whom are living in honored and useful 
citizenship in the Keystone state. They were married in Pottsville and 
became the parents of a family of typical pioneer proportions, eleven 
sons and daughters being born into their home. Of these but the fol- 
lowing are living at the present time: the subject; Ida, wife of James 
J. Smith ; and Minnie, wife of Charles H. Harphey. The father was a 
lumberman in his native state and came to Michigan in 1872, locating 
in Monroe township, Cheboygan county, where he became one of the 
pioneer farmers. He redeemed a farm from the wilderness and thus 
paved the way for latter day civilization and prosperity. He is at the 
present time and has been for many years justice of the peace. He is 
a stalwart supporter of Democratic principles and has ever given evi- 
dence of a very live brand of public spirit. 

Jacob H. Myers was educated in the public schools of Pennsylvania 
and was a lad of about eleven years of age at the time of the exodus to 
Northern Michigan. It was his portion to live to the fullest the many 
interesting experiences of pioneer life and he took a strenuous part in 
the improvement of the land which his father had secured from the 
government. He learned the many secrets of seed time and harvest 
under the excellent tutelage of his father and at the age of seventeen 
years began working in the woods as a lumberman. His winters were 
passed in the lumber camps and his summers on the river drives, and, 
developed by the hard, but wholesome life, he grew in brain and brawn. 

In 1894 Mr. Myers entered upon a new era in his life, and deter- 
mined that after all the life in which he had engaged while beneath 
the paternal roof was tlie one for him. He purchased eighty acres of 
land and started in to clear him a home out of the forest primeval and 
he has prospered exceedingly, being one of the successful agricultural 
men of his community. His holdings, to which he has added from 
time to time, now amount to one hundred and sixty acres, eighty acres 
of which are cleared. In addition to his standing as an able exponent of 
the great basic industry, Jlr. ]\Iyers has been township treasurer for 
six years and he is a leader in Republican politics, to which he has 
given heart and hand since earliest voting days. His fraternal affilia- 
tions extend to the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On August 29, 1883, Mr. Myers assumed the responsibilities of mar- 
ried life, Miss Addie Armentrout becoming his wife. She is a native 
of Ohio and is the daughter of Jerry and Mary Ann Armentrout, both 
of the Buckeye state, the father having been summoned to his eternal 
rest and the mother sur%'iving, a venerable and much respected lady. 
They were the parents of seven children, the wife of the subject being 
tlie sixth in order of birth. Jerry Armentrout, who removed with his 
family from Ohio to Indiana, was a wagon maker and farmer by trade. 
In 1876 he made another change of residence and took up his abode in 
Michigan, locating in Hebron township, Cheboygan county, where he 



614 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

engaged in agriculture throughout the remainder of his active and 
useful life. 

Mr. and Mrs. I\Iyers have given five fine j^oung citizens to the state, 
their sons and daughters being as follows: Grover C. ; Maud, wife of 
Charles Strabich ; Raymond ; Graeie ; and Clyde. 

J. J. Kahn is one of the prosperous and substantial merchants at 
Mikado, Alcona county, Michigan, where he has been engaged in ex- 
tensive business operations since 1901. He carries a full line of gen- 
eral merchandise of the best assortment and caters to a large and rep- 
resentative patronage. Mr. Kahn was born in Russia, in 1870, and he 
is a son of Abraham and Sarah Kahn, both of whom were likewise born 
in Russia, whence they came to America in 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Abra- 
ham Kahn became the parents of eleven children, ten of whom are liv- 
ing, in 1911, namely: J. J., S. B., Izadore, Philip, George, Dora, Rose, 
Grace, Bessie and Annie. The father was summoned to eternal rest 
on the 5th of September, 1910. 

In 1890, when a young man of twenty years of age, J. J. Kahn 
immigrated to the United States, locating at Bay City, Michigan, where 
he made his headquarters while traveling for a mercantile concern in 
various parts of Sliehigan. He came to Mikado iu 1900 and since 1901 
has been engaged in the general merchandise business, as already noted. 
Mr. Kahn was reared in the Jewish faith and he received his early edu- 
cational training in his native land. Although he has devoted most 
of his time and attention to the details of his business, he was elected 
to the office of village councilman in 1907, continuing the able and 
popular incumbent of that position to the present time, iu 1911. He is 
affiliated with various fraternal and social organizations of a repi-esenta- 
tive character and he is held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. 

In the year 1896 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Kahn to Miss 
Annie Loewenberg. Mr. and ]Mrs. Kahn have seven children, whose 
names are here entered in respective order of birth: Sydney K., Iver 
S., Ellen K., Garrison M., Abraham, Esther and Ruth, all of whom are 
inmates of the parental home. 

Henry A. Blake. — Entering the Federal army almost at the dawn 
of his manhood for the preservation of the Union and suffering great 
hardships in Southern military prisons in consequence of having been 
captured by the enemy three months after his enlistment; inaugurat- 
ing new industries in this part of the country soon after the close of the 
war in which he engaged; and at all times vigorous, determined and 
resourceful in work for the benefit of the nation in general and the 
locality of his home in particular, Henry A. Blake of Cheboygan, has 
given Northern Michigan a fine example of elevated American man- 
hood devoted to good purposes during his residence of forty-three years 
among its people, as he has done through life, wherever he has been. 

Mr. Blake is a native of Bethel, Vermont, where he was born on 
IMareh 8, 1842, and a son of William and Nancy Blake, the former 
born in Vermont in 1800 and the latter in England. They were the 
parents of twelve cliildren, four of wliom are living. Lemon, Levi, El- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 615 

leu and Henry A. The father passed the whole of his life in his native 
state industriously engaged in farming. He was first a Whig and after- 
ward a Republican in politics, and attained local prominence in the 
councils of his party. His wife died in 1846 and his own life ended in 
1874. 

Henry A. Blake was orphaned by the death of his mother when he 
was but four years of age, and necessarily grew to manhood without 
the fostering care and judicious guidance a mother's considerate at- 
tention would have given him. He attended the public schools until he 
was old enough to learn a trade and then learned that of a machinist. 
By the time he completed his apprenticeship the Civil war was at its 
heiglit and he shared the zeal and ardor of his section of the country 
in behalf of the Union. He soon made his patriotism practical by en- 
listing in Company I, Second New York Cavalry, on August 26, 1864, 
being enrolled in Albany. His regiment was soon in the midst of 
hostilities and its services were almost constantly required on either the 
skirmish line or a more ambitious field of conflict. Mr. Blake took part 
in all its engagements until he was made a prisoner of war at Newton, 
in the Shenandoah valley, Virginia, on November 22, 1864. 

He was first confined in Libby prison of odioiis memory, and then 
transferred to another human shamble located at Salisbury, North 
Carolina. In these prisons he suffered horrors beyond description, but 
happily his confinement lasted only about four months, as he was pa- 
roled in March, 1865. He received his discharge from the army at An- 
napolis, Maryland, on June 26, 1865, and returned to his former home 
in New England, where he remained but two years. The great West 
held out a beckoning hand to him, and in 1867 he came to Michigan, lo- 
cating in Cheboygan a year later. 

His advent in this section was timely, as there was need here of a 
man of his caliber and attainments. He soon became busy in connec- 
tion with his trade, and in 1869 melted the first iron that ever was 
liquefied for use in the arts in this part of the state. Lumbering then 
formed the principal industry in these parts, and as he did not find the 
time yet ripe for the fashioning of iron into instruments of service, Mr. 
Blake turned his attention to operating a saw mill, which he continued 
until 1871. In that year he built the first machine shop in Cheboygan, 
and he has been conducting this enterprise ever since with steadily ex- 
panding trade, increasing operations and growing results in output and 
profits. 

Mr. Blake has always contributed a good citizen's share to the prog- 
ress and development of the city and county of his home, and done 
a good citizen's part toward promoting the peace, comfort and general 
welfare of their people. He was a member of the first village board of 
Cheboygan and helped materially to lay the foundations of its municipal 
government, and in all its subsequent history he has been a potent 
force for good in connection with its public affairs and its intellectual 
and social life. 

The fraternal activities of the community have interested him, too, 
and he has taken a leading part in them as a member of the Masonic 
order in lodge, chapter and templar Masonry, and also in connection 



616 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

witli the Cheboygan Lodge of Elks, to which he has belonged many 
years. In addition, he pays his tribute to the memories of his military 
service by active and appreciative membership in Ruddock Post, No. 
224, Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he is a Republican, firm 
in his devotion to his party and loyal in his support of its candidates 
and principles, but he has never sought or desired any of its honors or 
emoluments for himself. 

Mr. Blake was married on November 22, 1867, to Miss Annie Allen, 
a native of Scotland. They have three children : Their daughter Jessie ; 
their son William H., who is manager of the Cheboygan Telephone 
company ; and their other son, John A., who is a member of the firm of 
Henry A. Blake & Son, of which his father is the head. The firm manu- 
factures marine and stationary engines, iron and brass castings and 
steamboat and mill supplies, and carries on a general business in foundry 
and machine work. Its large and completely equipped plant works up 
enormous quantities of raw material and gives employment to a large 
number of workmen. The industry is one of the principal ones in 
this part of the state, and its products are held in the highest repute all 
over the country and in many foreign lands. Their superiority in ma- 
terial, workmanship and adaptability to the uses for which they are 
intended is mainly due to the skill and ability of Mr. Blake as a ma- 
chinist. 

William H. Johnson. — Since the decline of the great lumbering 
industry, which for many years constituted the chief source of pro- 
ductive enterprise in northern Michigan, its representative citizens 
have turned their energies into other channels of business and have 
showed both courage and appreciation in the development of other re- 
sources and in building up a substantial industrial and commercial com- 
munity. Among those who have thus materially assisted in the com- 
passing of this grateful result stands this well known citizen of Alpena, 
and as one of the pioneers and honored and influential citizens of north- 
ern Michigan he is specially entitled to recognition in this publication. 
Mr. Johnson was long and prominently identified with lumbering opera- 
tions, but he has shown the same broad spirit of enterprise in connec- 
tion with other lines of business, through which he has fostered an en- 
during material and civic prosperity in the city and county that have 
been his home for many years. Further interest attaches to his career 
by reason of the fact that he was one of the loyal sons of the republic 
who rendered gallant service in behalf of the Union during the climac- 
teric period of the Civil war. 

William H. Johnson was a scion of one of the pioneer families of 
Wisconsin, where his parents, Phineas M. and Orra A. (Collins) John- 
son took up their abode in the late '30s, before the admission of the 
state to the Union. The father was a native of Connecticut and the 
mother of New York and they passed the closing years of their lives 
in Chicago. The father of Mr. Johnson devoted the major portion of 
his active career to lumbering and was a man of ability and .sterling 
character. He died in Florida and his wife passed away in Chicago. 

William H. Johnson was bom in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, on the 10th of 




\io ^VVv Cvvo^ V^ C 



s 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN G17 

Febraaiy, 1840, and after due preliminary discipline in the common 
schools he took a partial course in Oberlin College, at Oberlin, Ohio, 
where he i-emaiued a student for two years. At the inception of the war 
of the Rebellion he was a resident of Chicago, and as soon as circum- 
stances made it possible he tendered his service in defense of the Union. 
In August, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Battery A, First Illinois 
Light Artillery, with which he saw long and arduous service and with 
which he participated in many of the important engagements and man- 
oeuvers marking the progress of the great conflict between the north 
and the south. He was with Sherman on the ever memorable march 
from Atlanta to the sea. and he took part in the battles of Atlanta and 
Corinth, the siege of Vieksburg, and the innumerable other engage- 
ments in which the gallant command was involved. In the national 
capital he not only took part in the Grand Review of the victorious but 
weary and jaded troops but was also mustered out in that city. He 
received his honorable discharge at Washington on the 25th of May, 
1865, and his record as a soldier of the Union will ever reflect honor 
upon his name. 

After the close of the war Mr. Johnson maintained his residence at 
Chicago until the spring of 1867, when he came to Alpena, Michigan, 
and engaged in the lumber business, with which he continued to be ac- 
tively identified for fully forty years and in which his operations were 
of broad scope and importance during much of this time. From the 
time of establishing his home in Alpena iSlr. Johnson showed a most 
commendable civic loyalty and progressiveness, and his aid and influ- 
ence have been freely given in the supporting of enterprises and meas- 
ures that have furthered the general prosperity of the community. His 
success in connection with business affairs has been worthily won and 
represents the direct result of his own efforts. In 1882 he became one 
of the organizers of the Alpena National Bank, and on the 9th of Jan- 
uary, 1883, one month after its incorporation, he became a member of 
its directorate. Later he became vice-president of the in.stitution, and 
in 1899 he was elected president, an office of which he has since been 
incumbent. He has proved a most discriminating chief executive and 
it is largely due to his wise administrative policy that this has become 
one of the leading financial institutions of northern jMiehigan. The 
bank's original chai'ter expired in 1902 and it then secured a new ehai'- 
ter under the same title. It bases its operations upon a capital stock 
of fifty thousand dollars, and it is recognized as one of the solid and 
ably managed banking houses of the state. Mr. Johnson was one of 
the organizers of the Alpena Mutual Benefit Telephone Company, an 
independent corporation giving admirable service, and of the same he 
is treasurer. His liberality has also been shown in connection with the 
promotion of other important enterprises and his capitalistic invest- 
ments in his home city and county are large and important. He is a 
stockholder in a number of manufacturing concerns in Alpena, where 
he also owns a large amount of valuable realty, both improved and un- 
improved, besides which he is the holder of a large amoiint of excellent 
land in various parts of the county. His varied investments thus make 
him one' of the largest taxpayers of the county, and he is giving his 



618 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

personal siipervisiou to the development and improvement of his 
landed estate, thus contributing in large and generous degree to the 
development of the agricultural resources of a section that was form- 
erly valued only for its timber. He has ever been an aggressive and 
far-sighted business man and his mature judgment has made him a 
valued factor in connection with the manifold enterprises with which 
he has concerned himself, the while his counsel has been duly appre- 
ciated by his business associates as well as in connection with matters 
of public import. He talies deep interest and pride in his home city 
and is one of its most honored and valued citizens, his sterling char- 
acter having gained and retained to him the confidence and esteem of 
all classes. 

Mr. Johnson is well fortified in his convictions and opinions as to 
matters of governmental policy. He has never been ambitious for public 
office but during the earlier years of his residence in Alpena he Avas 
elected by the Democratic party to the office of county clerk, and served 
two terms. His continued interest in his old comrades of the Civil war 
is indicated by his membership in Horace S. Roberts Post, No. 139, 
Grand Army of the Republic, with which he lias been identified from 
the time of its organization. In the Masonic fraternity his affiliations 
are here briefly noted: Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Jla- 
sons ; Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons ; Sahgonahkato 
Council, No. 58, Royal & Select Masters; Alpena Commandery, No. 34, 
Knights Templars; and JMoslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the ]\Iy,stic Shrine, in the city of Detroit. 

In the year 1873 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Johnson to 
Miss ]Mary G. Nason, who was born in Boston, September 14, 1851, and 
who is a daughter of William Nason, a resident of Alpena at the time 
of his death. ^Mr. and Mrs. William Nason were born in Augusta, Maine, 
from whence they moved to Boston and later to Chicago, where Mrs. 
Johnson spent most of her school days. They moved to Alpena in 1871. 

]\lr. and Mrs. Johnson have two daughters and one son, — Orra N., 
Nason C. and Wilma. Orra N. is attending the T^niversity of Wiscon- 
sin and Nason C. is a student in the TTniversity of Michigan. 

Sylvester Vaughan, who passed to the great beyond on the 12th of 
April, 1911, was long and successfully identified with the lumber in- 
dustry in northern Michigan. Mr. Vaughan was born in Saginaw City, 
Michigan, in 1837, a son of Roderick W. and Clarissa Vaughan, both 
of whom were natives of the state of New York, whence they came to the 
old Wolverine state in the early pioneer days. Settlement was first 
made at Detroit and thence thej^ removed to Saginaw City, where the 
father was engaged in business. Mr. and Mrs. Roderick W. Vaughan 
became the parents of twelve children and of the number Sylvester, of 
this review was the last survivor. Four of his brothers were gallant 
soldiers in various of the struggles which have disturbed the peace of 
this country. Erastus was in the Michigan and Toledo disturbance 
over the boundary line between Michigan and Ohio; George was a 
soldier in the Mexican war; and Levi and Conolas were participants 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 619 

in the struggles which marked the progress of the Civil war, Levi hav- 
ing sacrificed his life in the Union cause at the battle of Shiloh. 

To the public schools of Saginaw City Sylvester Vaughan is in- 
debted for his early educational discipline and at the age of sixteen 
years he was elected marshal of that place. He continued to maintain 
his home in Saginaw City until 1862, in which year he came north in 
the interest of the Land Lumbering Company, for which concern he 
was prospecting timber in and about the vicinity of Iosco count.y. Sub- 
sequently he was engaged in fishing in the region of Saginaw City and 
in 1864 he was again in the employ of the Land Lumbering Company. 
His main work was that of estimating timber and exploring new timber 
lands. After three years passed in the service of the above company 
he began to work in a similar capacity for the Stone & Conkwright 
Company, with the interests of which concei-n he was identified for the 
ensuing ten years. In 1875 he became timber estimator for the firm 
of S. P. Bliss & Company, and six years later he began the timber bus- 
iness upon his own responsibility, having as a partner in his new ven- 
ture, John E. Potts. In conjunction with his lumber interests he also 
rafted logs and he has the reputation for being the first man to run 
logs out of the timber country in a boom, the logs being rafted to the 
lake where they were sent to the various points on the lakes east and 
south. His first consignment was in 1868 and he continued to engage 
in the rafting of logs up to the time that the Boom Company was or- 
ganized. In 1870 he purchased a tract of ninety-six acres of land, to 
which he later added a tract of twenty acres and upon this fine estate, 
a fine farm of one hundred and sixteen acres of most arable land in 
Iosco county, he erected substantial and elaborate buildings, and there 
he maintained his home. At various times he bought and sold lands 
and dealt in real estate to a considerable extent. He was eminently 
successful in all his business ventures and it is interesting to note here 
that he himself built the ladder by which he rose to afiHuence. 

Among the various public offices of which he was incumbent may 
be mentioned those of supervisor, highway commissioner and deputy 
sheriff. He was a member of the board of supervisors for twelve years, 
was highwaj' commisioner for eight years and for two years was deputy 
sheriff under Sheriff Quackenbush. In all the relations of life Mr. 
Vaughan so conducted himself as to command the confidence and esteem 
of his fellow citizens. His straightforward, honorable career is worthy 
of commendation and his examplary life should serve as lesson and 
incentive to the younger generation. 

On the 5th of July, 1862, was solemnized the marriage of ilr. 
Vaughan to Miss Laura A. Ilubbell. To this union were born five 
children, two of whom are living, in 1911. Warren P. married Miss 
Mary A. Cartwright, in 1897, and they had four children, namely, — 
Winnie M., Charles H., JMargaret E. (deceased) and Wilhelmina. Ed- 
ward M. was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. IMcCluskey, and 
they have two sons, — Mahlon S. and Kenneth B. 

Emil E. Kihnke. — An essentially representative citizen and business 
man who has contributed in no small measure to the progress and de- 



620 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

velopment of this section of the fine old Wolverine state is Emil E. 
Kihnke, who was born at Jlauistee, Michigan, in the hotel which was 
opened by his father and which is now operated by him, the date of his 
nativity being January 18, 1880. He is a son of Andrew and Charlotte 
(Bethke) Kihnke, both of whom were born in Germany, whence they 
came to America in the '60s, locating at i\Ianistee. The father first se- 
cured employment in the iliehigan woods and in 1869 he opened an hotel 
on Lake street, Manistee, naming it the German Home. In 1871 the big 
fire of Manistee destroyed everything and in the following year Mr. 
Kihnke erected at the corner of Division and Clay streets a fine com- 
modious building and opened another hotel, naming this one the Central 
Hotel. It has a reputation for being one of the best hostleries in north- 
ern ilichigan and ]\Ir. Kihnke continued to oversee its management un- 
til his death, which occurred on the 4th of January, 1910. His wife 
survives him and is now residing at No. 41 Clay street. 

Emil E. Kihnke was reared to maturity in the parental home and he 
attended the German and public schools of ilanistee until he had passed 
thiough tlie eighth grade. Thereafter he attended a commercial school 
at Manistee for one term, at the expiration of which he began to assist 
his father in the management of the hotel, assuming the full responsi- 
bility thereof at the time of his parents' death. Aside from the hotel 
business he is deeply interested in various other enterprises of import- 
ant order. In February, 1905, he became one of the organizer.s of the 
^Iani.stee Candy Company, this concern becoming incorporated under 
the laws of the' state in June. 1905. Of this company Mr. Kihnke was 
elected secretary and treasurer, continuing incumbent of that office un- 
til 1908, in which year he bought out the other stockholders and changed 
the name of the factory to the Crescent Candy Company, under which 
title it has continued to do business to the present time. In 1906 he es- 
tablished the American Printing Company, which cai-ries on mainly a 
jobbing and commercial line of work, making a specialty of the three- 
color process and high-class catalogue and book work. Mr. Kihnke is 
n man of most enterprising business methods and his fair and honorable 
dealings have won him the highest regard of his fellow men. 

Though never a seeker after political honors of any description Mr. 
Kihnke has ever .shown a deep interest in all matters tending to pro- 
inote the general good and in politics he maintains an independent at- 
titude, preferring to give his support to men and measures meeting with 
the approval of his judgment. Fraternally he is a valued and apprecia- 
tive member of the ]\Iasonic order and he is also affiliated with the 
Benevolent & Prot(>ctive Order of Elks, the :\Iodern Romans, the United 
Commercial Travelers and the Royal Arcanum. His religious faith is 
in harmony with the tenets of the German Lutheran church, in which 
lu' was reared. 

^Ir. Kihnke married :\liss Lydia Coodreau of ^Manistee. an<l they 
liave two daughters and a son. 

Howard I). Bradford. — Enterprise and determination are strong ele- 
ments in prosi)erity and they are found among the salient characteristics 
of HowMnl 1). liradford, of Manistee, one of the city's most progressive 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 621 

and capable bu.siiR-ss men. His advaiieenu'iit in the industrial world has 
been the direct result of his own individual efforts and to-day he is en- 
joying a richly merited success. Mr. Bradford was born in Fredonia, 
Wisconsin, on the 27th of July, 185-1, his parents being Joshua and ^lar- 
garet (McGlouthlin) Bradford, both of whom are now deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradford were natives of the province of New Bruns- 
wick, Canada, whence they removed to Wisconsin in the early pioneer 
days. The father was engaged in farming in Wisconsin and in 18(i5 he 
removed with his family to Michigan, locating on a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres near Arcadia. For a number of years he was 
identified with the lumber industry on the INlanistee river and he helped 
cut the first road from Bear Lake to Lake ;\lichigan. He was sum- 
moned to eternal rest in the year 1904 and his cherished and devoted 
wife passed away in 1903. They were the parents of ten children, nine 
of whom are now living. 

Howard D. Bradford received his preliminary educational training 
in the public schools of Fredonia, Wisconsin, and he was eleven years 
of age at the time of the family removal to Michigan, where he began 
to assist his father in his lumber operations. After his marriage, in 
1877, ^Ir. Bradford became interested in the lumber business on his own 
account, also looking up land for various companies. In 1892 he eann' 
to Manistee, where he was identified with the lumbering business until 
1901, when he purchased the undertaking and furniture business in 
which he is now engaged. He has large land interests in Louisiana and 
Florida and he is a man whose various business ventures have been of a 
distinctively successful order. He is Republican in his political pro- 
clivities and is ever alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all 
measures and enterprises advanced for the general welfare of the com- 
numity. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Modern Romans and the Knights of the Maccabees, and he and his 
family are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the 
various departments of whose work they have been most active factors. 

In the year 1877 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bradford to 
^liss Aurilla Chapin, of Arcadia. Her parents were Hiram and Cynthia 
(Arnold) Chapin, both of whom were born and reared in the state of 
New York, whence they came to Michigan in 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Brad- 
ford had three children, — Ray C, Leota and Lucile, the second of whom 
was summoned to the life eternal at the age of three years. Lucile re- 
mains at home and is just about to enter high school. She has taken up 
the study of music with the intention of thoroughly perfecting herself 
in that art. Ray is associated in business with his father. He was mar- 
ried, in 1900, to Miss Rose Keel, of ;\Iani.stee, and they have one child, 
Douglass Howard, who was born on the 2nd of August, 1902. Ray C. 
Hr;ulford is a iiicinher of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the .Modein Romans and he is one of the most progressive citizens of 
the younger generation in Manistee. 

James W. Milliken. — Richly endowed with those attributes that 
make for true nobility of character, James W. ^lilliken. of Traverse 
City, lived a life that was cumulative in its influence for arood in all its 



622 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

relations, and the angle of this benignant influence continues to widen 
now that he has passed to the "land of the leal." Buoyant optimism 
and mature judgment were combined in his makeup; sincerity and un- 
wavering loyalty were his; and his nature was one that set aside the 
grosser materialism to keep aflame the lamp of luminous spirituality. 
He gained large and definite success in connection with the temporal 
affairs of life, and yet his labors along practical lines did not deflect 
him from the course along which the higher ideals find representation. 
Tolerance and abiding human sympathy were his constant guests and 
he did all in his power to aid and comfort those who were in affliction 
or distress. Of him it may well be said that he ' ' kept himself unspotted 
of the world," and that "his works do follow him." He played a large 
and generous part in connection with the civic and business life of 
Traverse City, was an influential factor in public affairs, served as a 
member of the state senate, and was essentially one of the representa- 
tive business men of northern Michigan, of which section he could justly 
be termed a pioneer, as he maintained his home in Traverse City for 
more than thirty years. In offering in this publication a brief tribute 
to his memory it is deemed but consonant to incorporate, with but 
slight paraphrase and elimination, the memoir published in the Churcli 
Helper of Traverse City in July, 1908, the month after his death, which 
occurred while lie was on a New York Central train, near the national 
metropolis, on the morning of June 19, 1908, he and his wife being at 
the time en route to attend the commencement exercises at Yale Uni- 
versity, in which their only son was graduating. 

Hon. James W. ]Milliken was born in Denmark, Oxford county, 
Maine, on the 20th of May, 1848, and was a son of Joseph and Mary 
Ann (Buck) Jlilliken, both of whom were likewise born and reared in 
the old Pine Tree state, where the respective families were founded in 
the pioneer days. The father, who was prominently identified with the 
lumbering industry in his native state, died on the 27th of October, 
1885, and the devoted wife and mother was summoned to the life eternal 
in August, 1893, both having been devout members of the Congrega- 
tional church. He was one of their four children, and the others are : 
Samuel K., engaged in the carriage business at Worcester, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts; Henrietta, the wife of Homer B. Jennison, of the same city; 
and Charles O., who died at his home in Biddeford, York county, Maine, 
in the year 1896. 

Mr. Milliken M-as a man who never let pass without improving it any 
opportunity for bettering himself, and ambition and sturdy self-reliance 
were early manifested in his career. His boyhood and youth were passed 
at Saco, York county, Maine, and very little chance was given him to 
secure an education. For three years he was employed as clerk in a 
dry-goods store at Saco. These three years, in which he received a fund 
of valuable information concerning the mercantile business, influenced 
his entire career, filling him with a desire eventually to own a business 
of his own. When eighteen years of age he determined to set out to see 
some of the world, and, in company with a boyhood companion and 
schoolmate, Frank Hamilton, he started west, the two having previously 
made arrangements for einploj'ment in Traverse City, Michigan, where 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 623 

they arrived in June, 1868, and where they forthwith assumed clerical 
positions in the general store of the Hannah & Lay Mercantile Com- 
pany, with which concern they continued to be identified for nearly six 
years. Further data concerning the early expei-iences of the two young 
men and also coucei-ning their long and grateful association in business 
appear in the sketch of the career of Mr. Hamilton, on other pages of 
this volume. 

In 1874, feeling that they had acquired sufficient knowledge and ex- 
perience to justify an independent business enterprise. Messrs. Hamilton 
and Milliken formed a partnership and engaged in the drj^-goods and 
clothing business in the old Hulburd store on East Front street, and 
the firm name of Hamilton, ]\Iilliken & Company was adopted at this 
time. Mr. Milliken had entire charge of the dry-goods department, 
while the clothing department was under the supervision of Mr. 
Hamilton. 

After building up a large and appreciative trade, and finding that 
they were fast outgrowing their original quarters, in which they had 
passed sixteen years, in 1889 they built tlie brick block in Avhich the 
stores have since been located, at 204-6 East Front street. Here the 
two friends and coadjutors worked together, the firm name at this time 
being changed to Hamilton & ililliken, after the purchase of the inter- 
ests previously held by others. The west half of the building was de- 
voted exclusively to dry goods, under ilr. Milliken 's care, and in the 
east half Mr. Hamilton conducted the clothing department. Through 
all the years of their business association Messrs. Milliken and Hamil- 
ton continued the comradeship initiated in their boyhood days, but 
eventually their business became so heavy that it was deemed expedient 
for them to dissolve the partnership and for each to conduct an indi- 
vidual enterprise, by retaining each the department which he had built 
up during the years of their partnership. Accordingly, in February, 
1893, the partnership was thus dissolved, but the relations that had ex- 
isted for so many years were continued. The interior arrangement of 
the stores remained unchanged ; the communication between the stores 
to-day is the same that it M'as on the day of opening, and even as Mr. 
Milliken was beloved by his own clerks, so also was he held in the high- 
est esteem by those employed in the adjoining store. 

Early in life Mr. Milliken espoused the cause of the Republican 
party, and he ever afterward continued a staunch advocate of its prin- 
cipals and policies. During the exciting campaign of 1888 he was chair- 
man of the Republican county committee of Grand Traverse county, 
and he so admirably directed the aifairs of his party that the Republi- 
can majority in the county was considerably increased. He had pre- 
viously served as chairman of the county committee, and he retained 
the incumbency for several years after the campaign noted. 

In 1897 Mr. ^Milliken was elected to fill a vacancy in the office of 
state senator from the Seventh district, and in the following year he 
received the regular nomination for this office, on the Republican ticket, 
the district comprising the counties of Antrim, Charlevoix, Grand 
Traverse, Kalkaska, Benzie. Leelanau and Wexford. His opponent was 
Herman B. Sturtevant, who was suppoi'ted by the Democratic, Populist 



624 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

•aud Free-silvL-r parties. Prentice W. Whitman also was a t-andidate. 
The official count disclosed the vote to be : Whitman, 816 ; Sturtevant. 
3,256; and Milliken, 7,906. Mr. Milliken completed a very successful 
term as state senator, and although amply qualified and splendidly 
equipped for a political career nothing could induce him to accept an- 
other political office. He was thoroughly wedded to the calling of his 
choice, and the halls of legislation could not long allure him from his 



Although Mr. Milliken 's chief business was that of his mercantile 
establishment, he was also an interested principal in the Traverse City 
Potato Implement Company and was a large real-estate and resort- 
property owner. He was one of the organizers of the Ne-ah-ta-wanta 
Resort Association. In any enterprise that stood for the betterment of 
Traverse City he was always counted upon for support. When the 
Grand Traverse Fair Association was organized ;\Ir. Milliken was 
chosen chairman of several important committees, and in everything 
projected in a public way he was ever instant with co-operation and 
generous support. 

JMr. Milliken was a thorough business man. There were no "loose 
ends" in his affairs and his store was a model in every way. But not 
only that, — he was interested in the welfare of his employes. In the 
store he provided a circulating library, a rest room and other conven- 
iences for making the work of the day easier to perform. Out at East 
Bay there is a cottage made possible through his generosity, and the 
same is given over to the use of the employes of the store. Considera- 
tion and kindliness marked the relation of :\Ir. Milliken to all in his 
employ and there were few resignations in his store, where positions 
were much sought. All of this is a more eloquent tribute than words 
to the life and character of James W. Milliken. 

At the time of his death ^h\ ]\Iilliken was serving his third consecu- 
tive term as president of the Michigan State Sunday School Association, 
and he was also superintendent of the Sunday-school of the Congrega- 
tional church in his home city when he was summoned from the scene 
of life's mortal endeavors. His religious faith was an integral part of 
his character and was of the type that makes for faithfulness in all 
things. He remembered those Mdio were forgotten and those who sat 
in darkness. His sympathy was all-pervading and his helpfulness kindly 
and practical. He -was active in all departments of church work and 
was one of the veritable pillars of the Congregational church in Traverse 
City, his cherished and devoted wife being his earaest co-ad.iutor in 
church work. He was one of the influential members of the Traverse 
City Board of Trade and did much to fostoi- and further the high civic 
ideals for which that body stands sponsor. He was a member of its 
directorate and chairman of its committe on public improvements. 

James W. Milliken was a successful man, not only in accumulating 
money but also in attaining the respect of his fellow men and being 
honored by the city of his choice. His character was above reproach, 
his intellect of the keenest, and his foresight most remarkable, yet, 
withal, he was willing to help whenever and wherever he could. How 
many he aided in his hoitie eit^•. how many of the poor will miss him. 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 625 

will never be ,known, but the number is large. He was signally demo- 
cratic in bearing, ready with a kind word and cheerful greeting for all, 
and his generons nature gained to him friends among all classes and 
conditions of men. He kept the needle of his life true to the pole-star 
of faith and hope and loyalty, and his career offers both lesson and 
incentive. 

Mv. ^Milliken Avas a lover of his home, and within its precints all 
his interests centered, the while his noble characteristics there shone 
most brightl.y, so that to his wife and son there remains a measure of 
consolation and compensation in having thus closely touched a life of 
so great purity and nobility. ^Ir. ;\Iilliken was a member of the board 
of trustees of Olivet College at the time of his death and deeply inter- 
ested in the work of this institution, maintained under the auspices of 
Congregational church. Fi'om an editorial appearing in the Cliurch 
Helper at the time of his death are taken the following significant state- 
ments: "Mr. Milliken was the highest type of the Christian business 
man. No man ever doubted his sincerity, no man ever questioned his 
business integrity; all men respected him; those who knew him loved 
him. His influence was always for good. He was a cheerful liver, a 
cheerful doer, a cheerful giver. His greatest happiness was found in the 
happiness of others. His whole living was a splendid example of Chris- 
tian activity and \isefulness." 

On the 8th of June, 1881, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Milli- 
ken to ]\Iiss Callie Thaeker, who was born at Defiance, Defiance county, 
Ohio, on the 20th of January, 1858, and who survives him. She was 
seven years of age at the time of the family removal to Traverse City, 
where she was reared and educated and where she was graduated in 
the high school as a member of the class of 1878. She is a daughter of 
William and Mary (Mickey) Thaeker, who passed the closing years of 
their lives in Traverse City. Mrs. Milliken has been a popular and 
valued factor in the best social and religious activities of the city which 
has represented her home from her childhood, and which is endeared 
to her by the gracious associations of the past. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken 
had but one child, James Thaeker ]\Iilliken. who was born on the 20th 
of August, 1882. and who now has the active supervision of the exten- 
sive mercantile business so long conducted by his honored father. He 
is one of the able and popular young business men of his native city and 
is well up-holding the prestige of the honored name which he l)ears. 
After completing the curriculum of the public schools of Traverse City 
he continued his studies for four years in Olivet College, at Olivet, this 
state, and was then matriculated in historic old Yale University, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1908, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. The deatli of his father caused him to aban- 
don his plans for completing the prescribed course in the law depart- 
ment of the same institution. He is a stanch supporter of the cause of 
the Republican party, is a member of the Congregational church, and 
is identified with representative fraternal and social organizations in 
his home city, as well as with the Traverse City Board of Trade. 



626 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Delos L. Filer. — Of the late Delos L. Filer it may weU be said that 
he coveted success but scorned to attain it except through industry 
and honest means. He acquired wealth without fraud or deceit and the 
results of his life are prolific in incentive and inspiration. He was a 
dominating factor in connection with the material and civic develop- 
ment of northern Michigan and his broad views and great business 
capacity made his influence especially potent in connection with the 
upbuilding of the cities of Manistee and Ludington, of the former of 
which he was the virtual founder. No shadow rests i;pon any portion 
of his career, now that he has been called from the scenes and labors 
of this mortal life, and it is incumbent that every publication purport- 
ing to take cognizance of those whose eiforts have conserved the de- 
velopment of northern ilichigan should give special tribute and con- 
sideration to the honored pioneer whose name initiates this memoir. His 
success was great, and was largely gained through his intimate as- 
sociation with the gxeat lumbering industry, and he was essentially 
the architect of his own fortunes. He was one of the strong and re- 
sourceful men who came to northern Michigan in the pioneer days and 
his identification with lumbering enterprises in this favored section of 
the state was one of broad scope and importance. It is safe to sa.y that 
no one has done more to further the progress of this part of Michigan 
than did he and that the memory of none is here clothed with higher 
popular honor. 

Delos L. Filer was of Scotch parentage and had the sterling traits 
of the sturdy i-ace from which he sprung. He was born in the state of 
New York, on the 17th of September, 1817, and his death occurred at 
his liome in the city of Ludington. ^lichigan, on the 26th of July, 1879. 
He was reared to adult age in his native state and his early experiences 
were those gained in connection with the work of the home farm, the 
while he duly availed himself of the advantages of the common schools 
of the locality and period. That he made good use of such scholastic 
opportunities is evidenced by the fact that when a young man he proved 
himself eligible for pedagogic honors and that he was a successful and 
popular teacher in the district schools of New York, at intervals, for 
several years. He there became identified also with lumbering and mer- 
cantile enterprises, and thus early he showed forth energ.v and resource- 
fulness, sturdy rectitude and that capacity for productive application 
which ever designates the true Scotch type. Prom his boyhood he knew 
fellowship with toil, and diiring the entire course of his long and use- 
ful life he never lacked in appreciation of its dignity and value, as he 
realized that skilled hands and industry constitute the master key of 
success and progress. 

Mr. Filer continued his residence in the old Empire state until 1849, 
when he came with his family to the west and located at Racine, Wis- 
consin. For the ensuing four years he gave his attention to the selling 
of tobacco, through Wisconsin and Illinois, and he then, in the autumn 
of 1853, came to Michigan and established his liome in ]\lanistee, where 
he became bookkeeper for the pioneer lumber firm of E. & J. Canfield. 
at a salary of four hundred dollars a year. In order to better provide 
for the needs of his faTiiily he supplemented his income through service 




J^w^fe^. 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 627 

in a far different direction. He had no inconsiderable knowledge of 
naedicine and the simpler forms of surgery, and as he was the only man 
thus equipped within the confines of several counties in his locality his 
services as a physician were much in requisition, frequently entailing 
his being called to points far distant from his home to minister to those 
who were ill or injured. A natural leader in thought and action, Mr. 
Filer soon became one of the influential citizens of the pioneer com- 
nuiuity, which has since developed into the attractive city of Manistee. 
He was early elected to the office of clerk in :\Ianistee county, and with 
discrimination and judgment he invested his surplus earnings in the pur- 
chase of government laud in this section within five years of his associa- 
tion with the Canfields. In 1858 he purchased a half interest in what was 
known as the Batchelder mill property, which included a saw mill, a 
jiortion of the land on which is now situated the city of Manistee, and 
some outlying pine lands. He thus initiated his independent operations 
in connection with the lumber industry and success attended his ef- 
forts from the start. He afterward purchased the interest of his part- 
ner, L. G. Smith, and thus became sole owner of the property men- 
tioned. To this he later added two hundred and forty acres, known as 
the ]\IcVickar property, now constituting the heart of the city of ^Man- 
istee. This purchase was made in the early '60s. This and his pre- 
viously acquired lands cover nearly two-thirds of the territory now 
included within the corporate limits of the city. ilr. Filer's well di- 
rected enterprise in the development of the lumber resources at his com- 
mand, combined with the rapid appreciation in the value of his real- 
estate holdings, made his success one of substantial order, — a success 
that was not a spectacular order but one that rested en the firm fo\;nda- 
tion of energy, integrity and work. His mill, which v,-as located on Uie 
dock and near the site of the present Dunham hotel, was destroyed by 
fire in July, 1864, together with a large quantity of lumber. This fire 
entailed to him a loss of about one hundred thousand dollars, with 
$11,000 insurance indemity. He then erected a new mill, at the upper 
end of the city and on the shore of Manistee lake, and he platted a large 
portion of the land near the site of the former mill into village lots. At 
this time he admitted to partnership in his business. M. S. Tyson, of 
^lilwaukee, and the main luml)er manufactui'ing enterprise %vas con- 
ducted under the firm name of Filer & Tyson. At the time of platting 
his land, as just noted, J\Ir. Filer donated to the city, the gi-ounds on 
which stand the court house and the Union school building, and he also 
virtually gave the site of the present Temperance Hall. It should be 
noted thaf during the years of his residence both in Manistee and Lud- 
ington, Mr. Filer manifested the utmost civic liberality and loyalty, as 
he contributed generously to the furtherance of all public enterprises 
and improvements, as well as to the building and support of churches 
and other institutions for the general good of the eonniumity. 

In 1866 Jlr. Filer sold nearly all of his large property in Manistee 
to the firm of il. S. Tyson & Company, and formed a partnership with 
his sons, E. Golden and Delos AV. The firm purchased about two thou- 
sand acres of land at a point about three miles soiith of Manistee and 
extending from the mouth of the Little Manistee river along the shores 



628 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

of Lake ^Jliehigaii. His sous, E. Goldeji and Delos W. Filer were ad- 
mitted to partuership aud tlius was formed the lirm of D. L. Filer & 
Sons. Ou the shore of Manistee lake, at a point a short distance north 
of the mouth of the Little Manistee river, the tirm ereeted a saw mill. 
This was equipped with two circular saws and had a capacity for the 
output of fifty thousand feet of lumber in each daj' of twelve hours, — 
then the recognized day of labor. This enterprise was the virtual initia- 
tion of the great lumbering business with which the name of Filer has 
been so prominently associated and which is still continued by the two 
sons mentioned. Mr. Filer brought to bear his mature judgment aud 
great executive ability in the development of the splendid industries 
with which he was so long identified and through which he gained large 
and worthy success. 

In 1868 JMr. Filer removed to Ludington, the .iudicial center of 
Mason county, where he became one of the interested principals in the 
Pere Jlarquette Lumber Company, which purchased the large property 
of James Ludington, — virtually all the real estate in that vicinity and 
representing a valuation of fully five hundred thousand dollars. The 
associates of Mr. Filer in this important venture were Colonel John 
Mason Loomis, of Chicago, and James Ludington, later of Milwaukee, 
Imt the direction and supervision of the business was entrusted entirely 
to him. Contrary to the policy of the original owner of the various prop- 
erties, which had been to discourage other industries. ^Ir. Filer, with 
characteristic liberality and civic progressiveness, gave out every pos- 
sible inducement to secure to Ludington every kind of business enter- 
prise, with the result that the village rapidly expanded in population 
and general prosperity. Before leaving Manistee he had induced set- 
tlers to take up tillable lands in that section of the state, and he was 
essentially the founder of the Norwalk colony and farming community, 
located about eight miles north of Manistee. His plan was to supply 
the gold required by the government in connection with the purchase 
of siich land and then to take a mortgage on the property and tlius 
assist the settlers in gaining homes and independence through their own 
efforts. This is a wise philanthropy, and many owe a debt of gratitude 
to Mr. Filer for his interposition in this way. He ever showed the 
utmost consideration in this connection and his object was far removed 
from mere personal aggrandizement. He also introduced fruit culture 
in this section of the state by a practical test that involved great pe- 
cuniary i-isk to himself; and in many other instances he proved his 
deep interest in the welfare of his fellow men. He made many extensive 
land deals within his business career and most of the same were confined 
to Michigan, to which state his loyalty was of the most intense order, as 
he fully appreciated that this commonwealth had given him the medium 
tlirough which he so signally advanced his jyersonal fortune. He was 
the founder of the Cream City Inm Works, one of the extensive indus- 
trial concerns of the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and in this enter- 
prise he was originally associated with John M. Stowell, under the firm 
name of Filer & Stowell. 

Delos L. Filer was a .strong and practical business man. but lie was 
also large of mind and heart, so that his life was not compassed by the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 629 

narrow boundaries of materialism. On the couti-ary, his nature was one 
of fineness and much of spirituality as shown in his abiding appreciation 
of those things that represent the higher ideals of life. He was a true 
friend, was kindly and tolerant in his judgment of his fellow men, and 
in his home the noble (lualities of the man found their maximum ex- 
emplifieation. His name is held in lasting honor and regard in tlie 
eities of JIanistee and Ludington and, indeed, throughout northern 
^liehigan, to whose development and upbuilding he contributed in most 
generous measure. He left the gracious heritage of worthy thoughts and 
worthy deeds and was one of the world's noble army of productive 
workers. 

In polities Mr. Filer accorded a staunch allegiance to the Republican 
party, and he was well fortified in his opinions as to matters of public 
import. He was ever ready to extend his aid in behalf of worthy char- 
ities and benevolences, though he never courted publicity. He was rather 
one who would "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame." The 
following statements made concerning him are worthy of perpetuation 
in this memoir: "]\Ir. Filer was essentially a broad-gauged man. and in 
business, politics and religion he had the courage of his convictions. lie 
was versatile in his acquireinents, possessing some knowledge of almost 
all subjects. While he was too cautious to overreach his possibilities in 
business ventiires, he was ever ready to explore new fields of enterprise, 
providing his own unaided judgment so directed, and his success showed 
the unerring qualities of his opinions. He was generous to those who 
needed assistance, gave freel.v to all public enterprises that tended to 
better the community in which he lived, and by those who knew him best 
his death was regarded as a public loss of irreparable order. ' ' 

In 1838 Mr. Filer was united in marriage, in the state of New York, 
to ]Miss Sarah A. Paine, who died in June of the following year, leaving 
an infant daughter, Amanda, who became the wife of John M. Yahue 
and who died in the state of Florida in 1873. In March, 1840, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of ilr. Filer to Miss Juliet Golden, who was born 
and reared in the state of New Y''ork, and who was summoned to the life 
eternal in 1864. Of this union were born three sons and one daughter : 
E. Golden. Delos W., IMary J. and Frank, the only daughter being now 
the wife of Alouzo G. Sexton, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. E. Golden Filer 
is individually mentioned on other pages of this work ; Delos W., who 
died in October, 1899, was associated in the lumber business with his 
two brothers ; and Frank, who still retains an interest in the same enter- 
prise, maintains his home in the city of Detroit, ]\Iiehigan, where he is 
president of the Standard Tie Company, an extensive concern whose 
business extends throughoiit the Union. On the 23rd of January. 1866. 
Mr. Filer contracted a third marriage, being then united to Miss Mary 
M. Pierce, of Manistee, who survives him, as does also their only child. 
Grace. They maintain their home in Detroit. 

The health of Mr. Filer finally became much impaired, and in hope 
of recuperating his energies he traveled extensively through the south 
and west. In the winter of 1878-9 he started for California, but at 
Denver his condition became so serious that he returned to his home in 
Ludington. where he died on the 26th of the following July. His re- 



030 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

mains were laid to rest in beautiful Forest Home cemetery, in the citj- 
of j\Iil\vaukee, and an elaborate granite monument of chaste design 
marks the resting place of this noble man and honored citizen who did 
so much for northern Michigan, wliere his name will long be held in 
reverent memory. 

E. Golden Filer. — As a lumberman and capitalist as well as a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen this well known and representative 
business man has well upheld the prestige of a name honored in the 
annals of northern Michigan, and he is a son of the late Delos L. Filer, 
to wliom a special memoir is dedicated on other pages of this volume, 
so that it is not necessary to again i-eview the data in the sketch at hand. 
Like his father, Mr. Filer has been a prominent and influential factor 
in connection with the lumbering industry in this section of the state, 
and his operations, carried forward with vigor and discrimination have 
penetrated other parts of the Union. His local himbering interests now 
center largely at Filer City, a suburb of Mani,stee, a thriving town 
named in honor of the family of which he is a representative and where 
lie maintains his home. Mr. Filer gave to the nation the loyal service of 
a loyal soldier of the Union in the Civil war, and in the "piping times 
of peace" his loyalty has been of the same insistent type, — a voucher 
for good citizenship and productive energy. He has ever been ready to 
do his part in the forwarding of enterprises and measures tending to 
promote the material and social prosperity of the community, and his 
sterling attributes of character have won aud retained to him the 
inviolable confidence aud esteem of his fellow men. 

The eldest of the four children of Delos L. and Juliet (Golden ) Filer, 
he whose name initiates this review, was born in Jefferson county, New 
York, on the 4th of December, 1840. He there received his rudimentary 
education in the common schools and he was nine years of age when the 
family came to the west and established a home in Racine, Wisconsin, in 
1849. There he attended the public schools until he had attained to 
the age of thirteen years, and his parents then removed to Manistee. 
^Michigan, in 1853. This was then a center of the great lumber indus- 
try and the conditions were those of a pioneer comnuinity. Mr. Filer 
continued to attend school at intervals, but the major part of his educa- 
tio has been gained through self-discipline and through long and active 
Jtssociation M-ith men and affairs. He was afforded collegiate advantages, 
but he places a true estimate on the lessons gained under the wisest of 
all iieadmasters, experience. After the family removal to Manistee, Mr. 
Filer found employment for two or three years in connection with the 
saw mill and store conducted by E. & J. ("antield, for whom liis father 
was at the time acting as bookkeeper, and in addition to this, he j>assed 
considerable time in the woods, thus gaining further knowledge of the 
details of the industry with which he was destined to become most prom- 
inently identified in later years. His salary at this time was sixteen dol- 
lars a month, so that the future capitalist did not gain his early experi- 
ence under sybartie conditions. In 1858 Mr. Filer returned to Racine, 
Wisconsin, where he attended Racine College for the ensuing two years. 
After his return to Manistee he devoted one vear to the studv of law, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN (3:51 

under the able preeeptorship of Hon. Thomas J. Ramsdell, who was at 
that time a leading member of the bar of this section of the state. When 
Mr. Ramsdell was elected to the state legislature young Filer accom- 
panied him to Lansing and soon afterward received appointment to a 
clerical position in the office of the auditor general of the state. He had 
not yet reached his legal majority and politicians at the state capital pro- 
tested against his retention of this position, but he continued incumbent 
of the same for two years, at the expiration of which he voluntarily re- 
signed, in order to respond to the call of higher duty and go forth in 
defense of the Union, whose integrity was jeopardized by armed rebel- 
lion. 

On the organization of Companj' A, Twentieth Michigan Volunteer 
Infantry, at Lansing, in August, 1862, Mr. Filer enlisted as a private in 
the same, and he accompanied his regiment to the front, the command 
joining the Army of the Potomac immediately after the battle of An- 
tietam. He was soon afterward detailed to special duty in the sub- 
sistence department at the headquarters of his brigade, and later he 
was assigned to post duty in the same department, with which he con- 
tinued to be connected until his final discharge. On the 28th of June. 
1863, he and four hundred other Federal soldiers were captured by 
General Imboden's command of cavalry at Edwards Ferry, Maryland, 
and the prisoners were marched, under cavalry escort, steadily from 
Sunday morning until three o'clock Monday afternoon without rest or 
food. The heat and dust were so intense that many fell from exhaustion, 
and at the end of the march the men were paroled, this ceremonial tak- 
ing place in an open field, twenty-two miles distant from the city of 
Baltimore. Mr. Filer made his way to Baltimore, which city was then 
under martial law. and after continuing on a parole about a month he 
I'eported to the commissary department at Washington for duty. He 
was ordered to Bealton Station, Virginia, where he remained about 
thirty days, at the expiration of whicli he was transferred to Fort Foote. 
^laryland. Three months later he was again ordered to the national 
capital, where he was on duty in the commissary department for the 
ensuing year, during the greater part of which he had charge of the 
payment of commutation of rations on furloiighs. In the autumn of 
18(3Jr, Mr. Filer received news of the death of his loved and devoted 
mother, and, through the aid of influential friends, he secured his 
honorable discharge, an incidental stipulation being the furnishing of a 
substitute. 

After the close of his military career Mr. Filer returned to Manistee, 
where he became identified with the large lumbering business which his 
father had here established. In the autumn of 1866 he became associ- 
ated with his father and his next younger brother. Delos W.. in the erec- 
tion of a mill at the head of Manistee lake, and this had a capacity for 
tlie output of fifty thousand feet of lumber a day. The father and two 
sons thus effected the organization of the firm of D. L. Filer & Sons, 
and in 1868 the father left the business in charge of E. Golden Filer 
and removed to Ludington. where his later operations are duly noted 
in the sketch of his career given on other pages of this publication. E. 
Golden Filer assumed entire charge of the extensive business of the firm 



632 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

at Manistee and he has continued at the head of the same during the 
long intervening years. The enterprise, still broad in its ramifications, 
is still conducted under the original title, and Mr. Filer's associate in 
the same is his brother Frank, the other brother, Delos W., having con- 
tinued to be identified with the business until his death, in October, 1899. 
Mr. Filer is also president of the Manistee County Savings Bank; vice 
president of the Preferred Life Insurance Company, Grand Rapids, 
Michigan; and is a director in the Michigan Trust Company, Grand 
Rapids, Michigan ; the Commonwealth Power Railway and Light Com- 
pany, New York, the United Light and Railway Company; the Fort 
Dodge Light Company; Crows Nest Pass Lumber Company and in va- 
rious other companies. 

Mv. Filer has also been associated with Jolm Canfield in the purchase 
of large ti-acts of timberland in Wisconsin and with Charles F. Ruggles 
in similar purchases in Minnesota, in both of which states he still re- 
tains large interests, the while there has been a due development of the. 
lumber preserve thus secured. Mr. Filer was the active administrator 
of the immense estate left by his father and he retains from the same 
large and valuable interests in Ludington and other parts of Mason 
county. The little town surrounding the Filer mill, in Manistee county, 
bears the name of Filer City, and is virtually owned by the represen- 
tatives of the name. The township in which the village is situated like- 
wise bears the title of Filer. 

E. Golden Filer has been a man of broad and important activities 
and has by no means been dependent entirely upon paternal prestige 
for the success he has gained. He is one of the strong and valued citi- 
zens of northern Michigan and stands representative of high civic ideals, 
the while his course has been so guided and governed as to amply justify 
the unqualified confidence and esteem popularly reposed in him. In 
polities, though never a seeker of public office, he is found arrayed as a 
stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party. His beautiful 
home is a center of gracious hospitality and Mrs. Filer is a popular 
figure in the leading social activities of the community. 

It is but consonant that in this connection should he reproduced an 
appreciative estimate given by one who has known ilr. Filer from his 
boyhood: "Modest and retiring in demeanor, unflinchingly firm in his 
friendships, noble and generous in character, methodical and conserva- 
tive in business, cool and deliberate in arriving at conclusions but quite 
willing and able to defcnil his convictions, pure in social relations. — in 
a word, a gentleman whose acquaintance it is a misfortune not to have 
made, — such is E. Golden Filer." 

On fh(> 2r)th of December, 1865, at Racine, Wisconsin, was solemnized 
tlie marriage of Jlr. Filer to IMiss Julia A. Filer, who was born at Ra- 
cine. Wisconsin, and who is a daugliter of Alanson and Maria (Pilking- 
ton) Filer. 

Charles Nelson. — Since 1892 has Charles Nelson been a resident in 
the city of Ludington, ^lason county, Jlichigan. and since 1898 he has 
been actively engaged in buying, selling and shipping produce, adding 
to that (■nfcr|)risc. in 1908, the coal connnission business. Tie was liorn 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 633 

in Denmark, on the "JOth of Septembt-r, 1S64, and he was reared and 
edueated in his native land, whence ho came to the United States at the 
age of twenty-one years. After his arrival in this country he pro- 
ceeded directly to Ludington and immediately purchased a little farm 
in Pere Marquette township, Mason county, one and a half miles out- 
side the city limits. He was identified with agricultural pursuits for a 
period of seven years, at the expiration of which, in 1892, he established 
his home in Ludington, as already noted. For a number of years he was 
in the employ of Mr. Stearnes, working in his saw mills and other places 
until 1898, at which time he engaged in the produce business, buying, 
selling and shipping all kinds of marketable goods. In this connection 
ho built up a large and prosperous business. In 1906 he had constructed 
his tine office and warehouse and in 1908 he began to handle a coal 
commission business in addition to his other interests, catering to a 
wholesale and retail trade and employing four men and two teams with 
which to carry on the business. Mr. Nelson is a most capable business 
man and he is a most loyal and public-spirited citizen, doing all in his 
power to advance the growth and general progress of his adopted 
country. 

In Denmark, in 1890, was solemnized the marriage of ^Ir. Nelson 
to iliss Catherine Nelson, who was born and reared in that country. 
They have six children, namely, — Sarah, Christine, Olga, Dagmer, Anna 
and Harvey. 

jMr. Nelson is a Democrat in his political proclivities and he is well 
known as one of the leading business men in Ludington, where he has 
taken an active part in public affaii's. He is affiliated with various fra- 
ternal and social organizations of prominent order and he and his fam- 
ily are devout members of the Baptist church, in the various depart- 
ments of whose work they have been most active factors. 

S. Albert F. Richmond, M. D. — Among the prominent physicians 
and surgeons of Onekama, Manistee county, Michigan, is Dr. S. Albert 
F. Richmond, who has been engaged in the active practice of his pro- 
fession in this place for fully a score of years. He was born at Earlville, 
Lasalle county, Illinois, on the 3d of June, 1857. and is a son of Elisha 
and Lucina (Stevens) Richmond, both of whom were natives of New 
York, whence they removed to Illinois with their respective parents at 
an early day. Dr. Richmond was the eighth in order of birth in a fam- 
ily of nine children and he early became associated with his father in 
the work and management of the home farm, attending school for a 
few months during the winter each year. By hard study he was en- 
abled to secure a teacher's certificate after which he spent one term 
in teaching. In the spring of 1864 the father and family started out 
for Michigan, Manistee being the destination in view. Later Mr. 
Richmond went to Bear Lake, where he took up a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres. The family started to move with teams and 
covered wagons in the fall of 1864 "but cold weather and rains drove 
them back and they continued to reside in Illinois for another three 
years. In 1867, with their teams, wagons and portable goods, they again 
started upon the long and arduous trip to northern ilichigan and after 



634 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

seveo weeks of travel they arrived at Bear Lake, in June. Their laud 
was located in section 29 and they immediately began the work of re- 
clamation, clearing their land and raising good crops. Both parents 
were summoned to the life eternal about the year 1901, they having at- 
tained to upwards of eighty-four years. 

In 1877 S. Albert F., of this review, went to Bear Lake, where he be- 
gan to study medicine under the able preceptorship of his brother Tyler 
W., who was a practicing physician in that village. In 1878 he Avas 
matriculated in the medical department of the University of Jlichigan, 
at Ann Arbor, in which excellent institution he was graduated as a 
member of the cla.ss of 1881, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. Immediately after his graduation he entered upon the prac- 
tice of his profession at ^lanistee, where he remained for a few months, 
after which he passed ten months at Tallman, Mason county. In Jan- 
uary, 1883, he went to Bear Lake, where he remained for a period of two 
years, at the expiration of M-hich he again settled at ^lanistee, remaining 
at that place until his health began to fail, when he was forced to give 
up practice, for a time. In 1887 he came to Onekama, where he soon 
built up a large and representative patronage and where his efforts 
along the line of his profession have met with the most unequivocal 
success. In 1893 he purchased the drug business of C. D. Staulej', con- 
duc ing that establishment in connection with his private practice. In 
politics he accords a loyal support to the cause of the Republican party 
and he is ever alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures 
projected for the general welfare of the community. He has held va- 
rious public offices of local trust, among them being town treasurer, 
justice of the peace and village clerk ; he was president of the village 
for three years and for twenty years has been a notary public. He and 
his wife are devout members of the Congregational church, in the va- 
rious departments of whose work they have ever manifested a deep and 
thorough interest. 

In the year 1879 Dr. Richmond was united in marriage to Miss Min- 
nie M. Conklin, who was born at Dayton, Ohio, whence she came to 
.Michigan with her parents, who located at Bear Lake about 1867. Dr. 
and ilrs. Richmond have three children, namely, — Earle K., born at 
Bear Lake in 1883 ; Frank A., born at Manistee in 1885 ; and Ruth S., 
born at Onekama in 1891. Earle K. is auditor for the Chicago & Rock 
Island Railroad Coinpniiy. with iK'adiinnrters at Chicago; Frank A. is 
chief telegraph o]i(i:ifnr i'm thr ( hiinuo lV; Xorthwestei'n Railroad Com- 
pany and is locati'd in Nrhi nska : and Kuth S. is a .student at I\Iount 
Pleasant, where she is pursuing a course in domestic science. 

Wn^LiAM Miller. — ]\Ianistee may well count herself fortunate in hav- 
ing so large a number of able business men whose progressive methods 
and strong initiative powers have done so much to make this city one 
of the foremo.st industrial centers in the Wolverine state. A repre- 
sentative merchant and hard-ware dealer in Manistee is William Miller, 
who was born in Germany in 1844. His parents were Carl and Wilhe- 
mina Miller, botli of whom are now deceased. In 1862, when William 
was a lad of about eighteen years of age, the Miller family emigrated 



HISTORY OF NORTHERjN MICHIGAN 6C5 

to America, location being made in JManistee county, Michigan, where 
a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres was entered. The father 
was identified with agricultural pursuits during the major portion of 
his life. 

William Miller received his educational training in the old Father- 
land and after arriving in i\ranistee he worked in the lumber mills 
during the summer, helping his father in the clearing and cultivating 
of the farm during the winter and spring months. In 1869, however, 
he turned his attention to the dry-goods and clothing business at ^lan- 
istee, continuing in this line of enterprise lentil 1871, when his entire 
stock and store were destroyed by fire. Undaunted, he started again 
in the same business, which he continued with eminent success until 
1877, in which year he sold out and began working in a hardware 
store, in which connection he laid the foundation for his present thriv- 
ing and prosperous business. He worked by the month until 1887, 
when the firm of Miller & Company was organized at its present loca- 
tion. In 1891 he bought out his partners and his stock now consists of 
general hardware, including builders' supplies and farming imple- 
ments of all kinds. He is a man of impregnable integrity and extra- 
ordinary executive ability and one who has done much to advance the 
general welfare of the community. In politics he accords a stalwart 
allegiance to the principles and policies of the Republican party and 
in a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the 
I\Jnights of the Maccabees. He and his Avife are devout members of the 
German Lutheran church, in the various departments of whose work 
they have been most zealous factors. He has the honor of being the 
oldest member of the church and has a general supervision of its affairs. 

In the year 1869 'Sir. ]Miller was united in marriage to IMiss Adelia 
Radke, of Manistee. She was born in Germany and came to America 
when a young girl in company with her parents. Her father was a 
shoemaker by trade and was long engaged in the boot and shoe busi- 
ness in j\Ianistee. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have six children, namely, — 
Robert, Amanda, Herman, Alvina, Richard and Bertie. Robert mar- 
ried Miss Nellie Williams, of Manistee; Amanda married Sir. Henry 
Viederman, of ililwaukee, Wisconsin ; Herman married Miss Tina KroU, 
of Buffalo, New York ; Alvina became the wife of Harry Kroll, of Buf- 
falo, New York; Richard married Miss Annie Winkler, of ilanistee; 
and Bertie is the wife of Nels Johnson, of ilanistee. Robert and Her- 
man are engaged with their father in the hardware business and Rich- 
ard is bookkeeper for the American Hide & Leather Tannery, of 
Manistee. 

William G. Hudson. — No citizen of Ludington, the beautiful capital 
city of ilason county, commands more secure place in popular confi- 
dence and esteem than does William G. Hudson, who has here main- 
tained his home for nearly two score yeai's. who has been prominently 
identified with the upbuilding of the city, and who has here held var- 
ious offices of distinctive public trust, including that of postmaster. He 
was for many years engaged in business as one of the leading mer- 
chants of Ludington, and his aid and influence liave been potent in eon- 



6a6 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

uei'liou with the civic and material development and progress of this 
favored section of the Wolverine state. He is one of the loyal sons of 
the republic who gave valiant service as soldiers of the Union during 
the climacteric period of the Civil wai', and he manifested the fervor of 
his jiatriotism by enlisting when a mere youth. Ancestors of Mr. Hud- 
son in both the paternal and maternal lines were numbered among the 
patriot soldiers of the Continental forces in the war of the Revolution, 
and through his own services he added new laurels to the military pres- 
tige thus gained by his forebears. A man of broad intellectual ken and 
of inviolable integrity in all the relations of life, Mr. Hudson well merits 
the unqualified esteem in which he is held in the community that has 
so long represented his home, and thus it is but consonant that in this 
publication be entered a brief record of his career. 

William G. Hudson was born at Gouverneur, St. Lawrence county. 
New York, on the 1-ith of October, 1843, and is a son of Henry and 
ilary (Chappell) Hudson. Henry Hudson was born near Pittsfield, 
Berkshire county, Massachusetts, and was of English descent, the fam- 
ily having been founded in New England in the colonial epoch of our 
national history. His father was likewise a native of the old Bay state, 
and the latter 's father, Darius Hudson, was a valiant soldier with the 
,Ma.ssachusetts troops in the Revolutionary war. Henry Hudson was 
reared to maturity in his native state and there learned the cooper's 
trade. As a young man he removed to the state of New Y''ork, where, in 
1834, was solemnized his marriage to iliss ilary Chappell, who was 
born and reared in that state and whose paternal grandfather was a 
soldier of the Revolution. Soon after his marriage, which occurred in 
the southern part of the state, Henry Hudson removed to St. Lawrence 
county, New York, where he engaged in the work of his trade and where 
he also bought a tract of land. He developed his farm and there con- 
tinued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until 1845, when he 
located in the town of Gouverneur, in the same county, where he eon- 
ducted a hotel for a period of about fifteen years. After his retirement 
from this line of enterprise he turned his attention to the i-eal-estate 
business, in which he there continued to be engaged until his death, at 
the age of fifty-two years ; his wife long survived him and was eighty- 
two years of age when she was summoned to the life eternal. This 
worthy couple became the parents of five sons and two daughters, and 
all of the sons served as soldiers in the Civil war. The parents were 
members of the Universalist church and in polities the father was or- 
ginall.v an old-line Whig, from which party he transferred his allegiance 
to the Republican party at the time of its organization. 

William <;. Hudson was reared to adult age in the town of (louvor- 
iicur. Ni'W York, where his early educational advantages were those 
ali'orded in the common schools and in well conchicted private schools. 
When the dark cloud of Civil war east its pall over the national firma- 
mi'iit the youthful patriotism of ^Mr. Hudson was roused to definite re- 
sponse, and he was among those who went forth at the time when Presi- 
dent Lincoln issued his first call for s'olunteers. Early in 1861. several 
months i)rior to his eighteenth birthday anniversary. 'Sir. Hudson en- 
listed as a private in the Sixteenth New York \'olunt('Of Infantry, hut 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 637 

illness prevented his being mustered in at this time. Early in August 
of the same year he enlisted as a private in Battery H, First New York 
Light Artillery, with which command he was mustered into the United 
States service and with which he departed for the national capital in 
the following October. In the spring of 1862 his battery joined the 
Army of the Potomac, in the command of General MeClellan, for the 
Peninsular campaign, and from that time forward his record as a 
soldier of the Union has been briefly summed up as follows : The first 
engagement was near Newport News, with the Confederate gunboat 
"Teaser," on the James river; he was at the seige of Yorktown and all 
through the Peninsular campaign, including Fair Oaks and the seven 
days' retreat of JlcClellan from White Oak swamp to Harrison's Land- 
ing. During the winter of 1862-3 he was with the army at Yorktown. 
Virginia, and Gloucester Point. In the spring he joined General Kil- 
Patrick in his raid to Mathews Court House and Mobjack Bay. His 
command then joined the Fourth Army Corps, under General Dix, in 
June, 1863, and thus took part in the second expedition against Rich- 
mond, along the same route taken by ilcClellan in 1862, and there were 
engagements with the enemy at Baltimore Cross Roads and other 
points, — principally skirmishes. The forces then returned to York- 
town and thence to Washington. From the national capital the com- 
mand proceeded to Frederick City, Maryland, and it arrived just one 
day too late to take part in the ever memorable battle of Gettysburg. 
Again joining the Army of the Potomac, at Warrington Junction, Vir- 
ginia, Mr. Hudson took part in the Mine Run campaign, late in 1863. 
In May, 1864, he started for Culpeper Court House, with General Grant 
on his great campaign, and he participated in the battle of the Wilder- 
ness as well as in the engagements at Spottsylvania Court House, Jer- 
icho Ford, Bethesda Church and before Petersburg, in July; and in 
nearly all the engagements from that time until September 5, 1864, — 
thus having served more than three years before attaining to his legal 
majority. He received his honorable discharge, at the Yellow Tavei-n. 
in front of Petersburg. Virginia, on the 5th of September. 1864, and his 
record as a gallant and loyal soldier of the republic is one that will ever 
redound to his credit ancl honor. 

In the autumn of 1864 Mr. Hudson came to Michigan and located at 
Olivet, Eaton county, where he engaged in the work of his trade, that 
of painter, and where his marriage was solemnized in December of the 
following year. He finally established a paint and oil store at Olivet, 
where he continued in business until January, 1872, when he removed 
to Ludington, which was then a mere lumber town. Here he opened a 
paint store, and from a modest inception he built up a prosperous en- 
terprise^ in connection with which he became one of the representative 
business men of the village. He continued in this line of business un- 
til 1888 and in the spring of the following year he was appointed post- 
master of Ludington, after General Harrison had succeeded Grover 
Cleveland in the presidency of the United States. He retained this 
office four years, when a retiirn of Democratic administration compassed 
his retirement. In 1892 ;\Ir. Hudson was elected city assessor and he 
held this office two years. In 1898. after the election of McKinli'v to 
Toi. n— 6 



638 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the j)resicleney, ilr. Hudson was again commissioned postmaster, and 
at the expiration of his first term of four years he was reappointed, 
thus serving under both Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt. He re- 
tired from office in 1905. and his administration of the affairs of the 
local postoifice has passed on record as one of signal ability and dis- 
crimination, as well as one that gained imiform popular approval in 
the community. Since leaving the postofiSce Mr. Hudson has lived 
virtually retired. He has ever been uncompromising in his allegiance 
to the Republican party and has been an active worker in behalf of its 
cause, as well as a leader in its local councils. He has held various 
city and eoimty offices, including that of chairman of the board of 
supervisors of Mason county, and his loyalty, integrity and public spirit 
have brought to him unequivocal confidence and esteem in the com- 
munity that has so long represented his home. 

Mr. Hudson is an appreciative and valued member or comrade of 
Pap Williams Post, No. 15, Grand Army of the Republic, and he has 
been long and prominently identified with the time-honored Masonic 
fraternity. He was raised to the degree of Master ]\Iason in Belle vue 
Lodge, No. S3, Free & Accepted Masons, at Bellevue. ]\Iichigan, in 1868, 
and in the same year he there received also the degrees in Bellevue 
Chapter, No. 53, Royal Arch Masons. In 1870 he received the maximum 
chivalrie order in Marshall Commandery, No. 17, Knights Templars, at 
Marshall, Michigan. He was a charter member of Olivet Lodge, No. 
267, Free & Accepted Masons, and was its worshipful master in 1871. 
He was also one of the organizers of Ludington Chapter, No. 92, Royal 
Arch ]\Iasous, in 1873, and was for four years High Priest of the same. 
Mr. Hudson received the Council degrees in Oceana Council, No. 27, 
Royal & Select Masters, at Pentwater, Michigan, and is a charter mem- 
ber of Ludington Council, No. 48. He has had the distinction of serv- 
ing as Grand I\Iaster of the Grand Council of ^Michigan, an office of 
which he was incumbent in 1883. He was thrice Illustrious Master of 
Ludington Council for four years, and in his home eit.v he also is ac- 
tively affiliated with Pere Marquette Lodge, No. 299, Free & Accepted 
Masons, to which he was dimitted upon his removal to this city. In 
1890 he served as Grand High Priest of the grand chapter of Michigan 
and he was one of the foremost in effecting the organization of Apollo 
Commandery No. 31, Knights Templars, in Ludington, in 1882. He is a 
charter member of this Commandery and was its first Eminent Com- 
mander, an office which he retained four consecutive years. In the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Masonry Mr. Hudson received Ihe 
thirty-second degree on the 16th of February, 1881, in DeWitt Clinton 
Consistory, in the city of Grand Rajiids, and on the 15th of Septem- 
ber, 1891, in the city of Boston, was conferred upon him the maximum 
and honorai'v degree, tlie thirty-third. He is affiliated with the various 
bodies of DcWitt Clinton Consistory and in the same city he also is 
identified willi Saladin Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the ^lystie Shrine. Even these brief data offer assurance 
that IMr. Hudson is one of the prominent exemplars of ]\Iasonry in 
:\nchigan and he is well known in the circles of-the great fraternity. 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN G39 

of whose noble teachings and history he is deeply appreciative. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

At Olivet, Michigan, on the 28th of December, 1865, was solemnized 
the marriage of ]Mr. Hudson to I\Iiss ^Melissa J .Whitney, who was born 
in Illinois but who was reared to maturity in Eaton county, Michigan, 
where her father, the late Marcus Whitney was an honored pioneer. 
Prior to her marriage Mvs. Hudson had been a successful and popular 
teacher in the public schools of Eaton county, and in Ludington .she 
has long been a popular factor in religious and social activities. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hudson became the parents of two children, — Mortimer L., 
who was bom on the 3d of January, 1868, and Bertha May, who Avas 
born May 6, 1871, and died April 18, 1881. Mortimer L. Hudson, who 
is associated with the Edward Hines Lumber Company, of Chicago, was 
graduated in the law department of the University of ^Michigan and was 
engaged in the practice of his profession in Ludington imtil 1898, when 
he removed to Chicago and formed his present connection. He served 
as city attorney of Ludington and also as proseeiitiug attorney of Mason 
coiinty, and he was recognized as one of the essentially representative 
members of the bar of this section of the state. 

Frank Hamilton. — To the early enlisting of the co-operation of men 
of enterprise, ability and integrity in the furtherance of its industrial 
and other business activities has been mainly due the splendid advance- 
ment made by northern iMichigan in the lines of development and civic 
progress. Among the sterling citizens who have contributed to such 
gratifying results is numbered Frank Hamilton, who is one of the rep- 
resentative business men and most honored citizens of Traverse City 
and whose identification with local interests had its inception in the 
pioneer days, as is evident when it is stated that he has here maintained 
his home for more than forty years. He came to Traverse City as a 
young man and has kept pace with its growth and upbuilding, simul- 
taneously with w'hich he has advanced surely and worthily forward to 
the goal of independence and definite prosperity. He is consistently 
to be designated as one of the pioneer merchants of this section of the 
state and is now president of the Hamilton Clothing Company, one of 
the leading retail concerns of Grand Traverse county, besides which 
he has other important local interests. He has stood exponent of the 
most loyal citizenship and has contributed his quota to the support of 
the measures and enterprises that have brought about the upbuilding 
of a thriving little city, the while his course has been such as to retain 
to him the unqualified confidence and esteem of the community in Avhich 
he has so long maintained his home. 

A scion of a family whose name has been identified with the annals 
of New England, that cradle of so much of our national history, since 
the early colonial epoch, j\Ir. Hamilton himself is a native of the old 
Pine Tree state, and his ancestry is of that staunch order that should 
ever prove a source of pride ancl satisfaction. He was born in Water- 
boro, York county. ^Maine, on the 20th of November. 1848, and is a son 
of Porter and Sally (Hill) Hamilton, both of whom were likewise na- 
tives of York county, where the respective families were founded in 



640 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the pioneer days. The father was boru ^lareh 1, 1814, and died October 
16, 1884, while the mother was boru December 25, 1819, and died Sep- 
tember 18, 1901 ; both passed their entire lives in their native county. 
They became the parents of three children, — Howard, who was born 
November 13, 1845, and who is a representative citizen and business 
man of Biddiford, York county, Maine ; Frank, whose name initiates this 
review ; and Charles, who died on the 3d of I\Iay, 1886. Porter Hamil- 
ton was a man whose character exemplified the fine traditions of the 
New England stock and his life was one of signal honor and usefulness. 
He was a wheelwright by trade, and followed this vocation in connec- 
tion with agricultural pursuits, but during a portion of his active career 
he was engaged in the general merchandise business in the village of 
Waterboro. He was called upon to serve in various local oflSces of pub- 
lic trust, including that of representative of York county in the state 
legislature, of which he was a member for two years. He also sei-ved 
as deputy sheriff, and this entailed his residence in Alfred, the county 
seat, during his incumbency of the same; the latter years of his life 
were spent in Saco where he was engaged in the manufacture of car- 
riages. In politics he was a staunch supporter of the principles, of the 
Democratic pai'tj' as exemplified by Jefferson and Jackson, and both 
he and his wife were attendants of the Unitarian church. 

Under the benignant influences of a good home Frank Hamilton 
was reared to years of maturity, and he early began to assist his father 
in the store and on the farm, the while he duly availed himself of the 
privileges of the common schools of the locality and period. He thus 
attended school both at Waterboro and Alfred, and at the age of sixteen 
years he assumed the position of clerk in the dry goods store conducted 
"by his uncle, B. F. Hamilton, at Saco. ilaine. He later went to Biddi- 
ford, Maine, where the same uncle was an interested principal in the 
dry-goods business conducted under the firm name of Emery & Com- 
pany, and there he held the position of salesman for three years. 
Through these associations j\Ir. Hamilton gained excellent experience 
in connection with the practical details of the mercantile business, and 
thus fortified himself for further responsibilities and eventually inde- 
l)endent operations along the same line of enterprise. It is interesting 
to i-ecord that his honored uncle under whom he thus secured his 
initial training is still living, at Saco. Elaine, at the patriarchal age of 
ninety-one years (1911). Another uncle, Samuel K. Hamilton, is one 
of the representative members of the bar of the city of Boston and 
has been engaged in the active practice of his ])rofession for nearly 
half a century. 

In 1868. in company with his friend J. W. Millikcii, iiiiothcr young 
man who had received similar discipline in the mercantile business. 
Mr. Hamilton visited the city of Boston, in search of emplo.vment in 
a larger field; there he was so well received by one of the old-time 
wholesale dry-goods houses, — Wellington Brothers, that three months 
later he was called to Boston by this firm to meet — Jlr. Smith Barnes, 
who wished to secure the services of two young men. who should ac- 
company him on his return to Traverse City. ^Michigan, where he was 
manager of the large genci'al store conducted by IlMnnah. Lay & Com- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Ml 

pany. Mr. Hamilton met tlie overtures with favor aod he and his young^ 
friend Milliken made arrangements to accept the positions tendered. 
They made the journey by way of Chicago, from which city they 
secured transportation to their destination on the steamer "Allegheny," 
from which they disembarked at Traverse City on the 31st of IMay, 
1868. They became salesmen in the dry-goods and clothing department 
of the establishment mentioned, and after two years of such service 
Mr. Hamilton was promoted to a position in the general ofSces of the 
firm of Hannah, Lay & Company. Three years later the two ambitious 
young men were enabled to initiate independent operations, through 
the favor and co-operation of their former employers. They organized 
the firm of Hamilton, jMilliken & Company, in which the Hannah & Lay 
firm and also Mr. Barnes became interested as "silent" partners. The 
new firm was thus organized in the year 1873, and the mercantile 
business was continued under the conditions noted until 1880. when 
IMessrs. Hamilton and Milliken purchased the interests of the other 
principals and assumed full control of the business, which they devel- 
oped into one of large scope. Their relations were of the most hai'- 
monious order, and the two boyhood friends continx;ed to be thus 
actively associated until 1892, in February of which year the partner- 
ship was dissolved by mutual consent, — .Mr. ]Milliken retaining the 
dry-goods, carpets and cloak lines, and Mr. Hamilton the clothing, 
hats, caps and men's furnishing goods. The enterprise had grown 
unwieldy and the two members of the fii'm considered it a matter of 
expediency to thus divide the business, as the demands of the trade 
in the departments as thus divided were sufficient to justify such 
segregation. The former partners are still associated in the owner- 
ship and occupancy of the fine two-story brick building which they 
erected in 1889, at the corner of Front and Cass streets, and the same 
affords adequate accommodations for the two finely equipped and 
thoroughly modern .stores. Mr. Hamilton finally found it expedient 
to incorporate his business, and this was done in 1894, when the present 
Hamilton Clothing Company was organized. The enterprise of ;\Ir. 
i\Iilliken is conducted under the title of J. W. Milliken, Incorporated. 
It is interesting to record that the store first occupied by the firm of 
Hamilton, IMilliken & Company was a wooden building known as the 
Hulburd building, located on Front street, and this continued the 
headquarters of the business until the erection of the firm's new build- 
ing, as already noted. 

Early convinced of the excellent future in store for Traverse City, 
^Ir. Hamilton made judicious investments in local real estate, of which 
his holdings at the jiresent time are still large. He sold his interest in 
the lot on which the First National Bank erected its fine building, and 
he is at the present time vice-president of this substantial and popular 
financial institution, with which he has been identified from the time 
of its organization. He was one of the organizers of the Traverse City 
Business IMen's Association and had the distinction of being its first 
president. When the ^Michigan Business ]\Ien's Association was organ- 
ized, with a representation, which, during his two years of activity as 
president, pumbered seventy local associations in the state, ^Ir. Ilnmil- 



642 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ton was I'lcftcd iis the first president of this noteworthy t'ederaticm. in 
the activities of whieh he has been an influential factor. Every inuler- 
taking that has been projected for the general good of the community 
has received his support and encouragement, and he has been exponent 
of the most liberal and progressive civic ideals. He was niaj'or of his 
city, of whose municipal affairs he gave a most careful and acceptable 
administration; he retained this executive office for one term. He was 
then appointed to fill a vacancy in the city council and later was elected 
as his own successor. He has been specially zealous in the work of secur- 
ing good roads in Grand Traverse county and was the first road com- 
missioner appointed for the county after tlie legislative enactment that 
provided state co-operation in this work. The impetus given to the 
<'onstruction of proper highways under his administration and tlirough 
his continued ett'orts had been potent in promoting the best interests of 
the county and. its people. In politics Mr. Hamilton accords a staunch 
allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and both he and his wife 
hold membership in the Congregational church, in the work of whieh 
they have long been active and zealous. These are populuar factors in 
the social life of their home city and their attractive home is a center 
of gracious hospitality. 

On the Sth of .lanuary. 1877, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hamilton In Miss l-;\a liosiuan. who was born at Westfield, Chautauqua 
county, New York, on the 21st of June, 1845. She is a daughter of 
Captain Alfred W. Rosman, to whom a memoir is dedicated on other 
pages of this work, so that further data concerning the familj- history 
are not demanded in the present connection. ^Ir. and ^Irs. Hamilton 
have no children. 

Captain Alfred W. Rosmax was one of the strong and valiant fig- 
ures in connection with navigation interests on the Gi'eat Lakes, and 
was one of the veritable pioneers in connection with this line of enter- 
prise. He knew ^Michigan from the pioneer epoch of its history, and 
this publication is favored in being able to present a brief review of 
his career, the data for the article having been considerately supplied 
by his daughter, Mrs. Frank Hamilton, of Traverse City. Captain 
Rosman M-as a man of sturdy integrity of character, loyal to duty and 
kindly and sympathetic under an exterior that indicated the strict 
disciplinarian. He was a scion of staunch old New England stock and 
till' family, of English lineage, was founded in America in the colonial 
era of our national history. Captain Alfred W. Rosman was born at 
Burlington, Vermont, on the 30th of September, 1818. and died at his 
home in Chicago, on the 26th of November, 1892, after having refused 
to give up the command of his vessel until the preceding month, when, 
during his last voyage, he had to be supported by two of his men 
while standing on the bridge to give his final orders. This one action 
indicated the nuin as he was, foi' none was ever truer to duty or to 
the responsibilities imposed. 

Captain Hosnian became idnitilird witli navigalinn on the Great 
Lakes when a boy, and he was ('oiiiinMiKler of sailing and steam vessels 
for over liall' a "ccntui'v. enjovini: an almost inrrrdiblc cxporieuce in 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN B4;J 

watching the tremendous strides of advancement made within the 
active career of his lifetime. He saw Chicago in 1835, an almost un- 
known point. There was no harbor and he went ashore in a small 
boat. The future metropolis showed a few small houses clustering 
near the present site of the Rush street bridge, and the most conspic- 
uous buildings were old Fort Dearborn and the residence of that well 
knoMU pioneer, John Kinzie. The embryonic city had no bridges, in 
lieu of which were supplied two floats, — one on the main river and 
the other on the south branch. Streets were of the most primitive 
order and practically impassable in seasons of rain. At that time St. 
Joseph, Michigan, was a much larger town, and Grand Haven had the 
only harbor on Lake ^Michigan. At that point were a warehouse and 
several smaller buildings, and the sites of the present cities of Mus- 
kegon, ilanistee and Ludington were given over to the untrammeled 
forest ■\vilds. Detroit was a mere village with no paved streets, and 
practically all provisions were secured from the Canadian side of the 
river. Such provisions were customarily transported by fishermen, 
whose arrival in the morning hours was signalized by their songs. 
The first ferry-boat across the Detroit river was the "Argo," and the 
bottom of this primitive craft was constriieted of squared logs. St. 
Clair flats were entirely unimproved when Captain Rosman gained his 
first view of the same. The channel was hardly nine feet in depth, and 
no attempts were made to take vessels through the same at night. At 
^lackinac Island the fort was at that time occupied by American sol- 
diers; fur trading was at its zenith and the warehouses were filled 
with valuable pelts. At Fort Mackinac the Indians received their pay 
from the government, and many thousands of the red men made their 
way thither for this purpose. They came from all quarters, even from 
the ilissouri, and were given blankets and money, the latter being silver 
half-dollars packed in boxes. Traders flocked from all points to barter 
with the Indians, and the result was that the latter usually departed as 
poor as they came, save for the accumulation of a few trinkets. In 
the autumn of 18.35 the "Austerlitz" went ashore at Sleeping Bear 
Point, and the crew attempted to walk along the beach to the nearest 
setth'ment, — at Grand Haven. Several of the number died en route 
and were buried beneath the snow. The survivors finally reached 
Grand Haven and thence proceeded by stage to Detroit. One who 
was familiar with this disaster was vdunu Rosman and his reminiscences 
in later years were most graphic, as tdiirhiuM this and manifold other 
experiences encountered. In the spring <<\' ls:;(;. as a member of the 
crew of the "^Marshal Ney,"' he visited the wreck of the "Austerlitz," 
and from the same was recovered a barrel of flour that had been un- 
der the water all winter, five pounds of which had been damaged. 

As master of the schooner "Jacob A. Barker." in 1838-9, Captain 
Rosman went to Thunder Bay river, where the city of Alpena now 
stands, and this was the first vessel that ever entered Thunder Bay, 
the trip having been made for the purpose of securing a load of fish. 
In the spring of 184-1: Captain Rosman assumed charge of the brig 
■"Illinois," which was considered a large vessel in those days but 
wliicli would appear a mere pigmy beside the great lake craft of the 



644 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

present time. The brig carried studding sails alow, and aloft, with 
top-gallant studding sails. The personnel of the crew included, be- 
sides the captain, two mates, six sailors, a royal boy, cook and cabin 
boy, and the vessel transported seven thousand bushels of wheat. 
Early in 1851 Captain Rosman assumed command of the propellor 
"Lady of the Lake," at Ogdensburg, New York, and he sent the clerk, 
Z. M. Hall, to Boston to advertise the new line and to solicit freight. 
By this means some business was secured from New England, and all 
of the freight was transported by the one vessel mentioned, in the 
ownership of which Captain Rosman was associated with Dean Rich- 
mond and John P. Chapin. Later the owner sold the boat and business 
to Philo Chamberlin and J. H. Crawford, who eventually added to the 
line a score of propellers, as increasing business demanded, and thus 
was formed the Northern Transportation Company, the boats of which 
plied between Ogdensburg and Chicago for more than twenty years. 

In 1874 Captain Rosman became agent for this company at Glen 
Haven, Michigan, the Vermont Central Railroad Company having pur- 
chased the line, which had in commission twenty-one propellers on the 
route between Ogdensburg and Chicago. The captain retained his 
office as agent for the company for a period of five years. In 1881, 
already a veteran in the service, he took command of the steamei 
"Corona." of the Goodrich Transportation Company, of Chicago. He 
sailed this vessel between Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and Menominee, 
Michigan, and from 1882 to 1891 he was in command of the propeller 
"Menominee," between Chicago, Grand Haven and Muskegon. In 
the winter of 1891 he superintended the building of the steamship 
"Atlanta," at Cleveland, for the Goodrich Transportation Company, 
and with the same he made the first trial trip to Chicago, in June of 
that year. The boat was a model in every waj% and Captain Rosman 
took great pride in his fine craft, which he continued to command 
vintil October 22, 1892, when he became very ill. He insisted, however, 
in running his boat into Grand Haven, though, as stated in the open- 
ing paragraph of this sketch, he required the support of two of his 
men while standing on the bridge to give the orders which closed his 
long, useful and hono»able career as an officer of vessels on the Great 
Lakes. His death occurred in the following month. He "stood four- 
square to every wind that blows," and his life ofi'ers lesson and incen- 
tive in its fidelity, its loyalty and its impregnable integrity. 

On the 23d of January, 1843, in the city of Buffalo, New York, 
Captain Rosman was united in marriage to IMiss Eliza J. Dascomb, who 
was born at Westfield, Chautauqua county. New York, on the 11th of 
October, 1820, and who died, at Traverse City, Michigan, on the 29th 
of October, 1896. For twelve years prior to his death Captain Ros- 
man had maintained his home in Chicago. Of the two children of this 
iniion it may be recorded that the elder, Eva. was born at Westfield, 
Chautauqua county. New York, on the 21st of June, 1845, and that 
she is the wife of Frank Hamilton, of Traverse City, concerning whom 
individual mention is made elsewhere in this work; Charles A., the 
younger of the two children, was born at Westfield, New York, on the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN (Uo 

•21st of February, 1847, iiiul died at El Paso, Texas, on the 11th of 
April, 1888. 

Arthur R. Babcock, editor of the Herald-Times, West Branch, Mich- 
igan, was born in Marshall, Calhoun county, this state, in 1868, one 
of the five children of Robert and Mary (Smith) Babcock, both of Mich- 
igan. Of this family three are now living, Mr. Babcock and his two 
sisters, Mrs. Kittie Bennett, formerly a teacher, now a resident of 
West Branch, and jMiss Clara, an artist of some note and a teacher 
in the Bay City Art School. 

Mr. Babcock was reared and received his early education in his 
native county. He spent two years as a student at Albion College, 
after which for several years he taught school. In 1888 he came to 
West Branch. Here, after a brief time spent as a teacher in the district 
schools he left the school room to enter the newspaper business and 
began work on the Times, where he fitted himself to become its future 
editor and proprietor. 

The Herald-Times had its beginning thirty-three yeai-s ago. It was 
established in 1882, under the name of the Herald, by J. Allen, who 
continued it as such until 1890. In that year it was consolidated with 
the Times and took the title Herald-Times. Mr. Allen continuing as its 
editor and owner. The Times was eight years old, it having been 
ushered into existence in 1882 by Weeks & French. After the con- 
solidation ;\Ir. Babcock remained with the paper, and in 1902 pur- 
chased it of Mr. Allen. He has since placed it on a solid basis and 
secured for it the largest circulation of any paper in the county, 
and in addition to conducting the paper he does a large job business, 
thus keeping his office and press room busy. 

Politically a Republican, Mr. Babcock has from time to time been 
honored by his party, and has served in various local offices, including 
those of township and city clerk and secretary and chairman of the 
Republican County Committee, having been chairman a number of 
times. He was appointed Postmaster of West Branch on January 
16, 1911. 

Fraternally ilr. Babcock is prominent and active in both the 
JIasonic Order and the Knights of Pythias Lodge, in the former being 
a past master and in the latter, past chancellor. Also he is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America. Religiously he and his family 
are identified Mnth the ^Methodist Episcopal church. 

In 1892 he was united in marriage with Miss Rilla Woods, daiighter 
of Charles and Ruth Woods, of ;\Iichigan, and their union has been 
blessed in the birth of five children, four of whom are living, namely : 
Lloyd, Josephine, Marion and Benjamin. 

James S. Madison. — There is no broader field for public good than 
that afi'orded in the newspaper business. An editor, if he be of the 
liberal-minded type, can become a powerful influence for public im- 
provement and James S. Madison, as editor of the Daily and 
Weekly Advocate, has contributed in generous measure to the ma- 
terial and civic develoimieiit and progress of the city of Manistee. Mr. 



646 HISTORY OF NORTHP^RN MICHIGAN 

.Madison was born in the state of Virginia on the 25th of December, 
1857. and lie is a sou of John and Fanny Carroll jMadison, both of 
whom died when James S. was a mere infant. He was adopted by 
Thomas Simpson, who came to ]\Iichigan in 1867, locating at Pokagou. 
Cass county, where he was identified with farming business for one 
year, at the expiration of which he removed to Bear Lake. James S. 
Madison received but limited educational advantages in his youth, as 
he was obliged to work in the mills for his support. When eighteen 
years of age he began to learn the printing business in the office of 
S. W. Fowder, who was publishing a weekly paper at ^lanistee. ;\Iich- 
igan. He continued in the employ of ^Ir. Fowler for one year, when 
he began to realize the need of further ediieational training if he 
were to follow the printing business. Accordingly he left the office 
and began a three years' course of study in the local high school and 
after graduating in that institution he entered the office of the Manistee 
Times, where he remained until 1882, in which year the business was 
sold to Mr. H. S. Hilton, James passing along with the business. He 
remained there until 1885, when he purchased the outfit and named 
the paper the Sentinel, which he continued to publish until 1886, when 
he and Mr. Hilton, who owned another paper, named the Times, agreed 
upon a copartneriship, consolidating the two publications and naming 
the new paper the Timcs-SentineL This continued until 1892, when 
Mr. Madison purchased a half interest in the Manistee Advocate from 
John P. O'Malley, making that paper Republican in its policies. In 
1893 he purchased Mr. O'Malley 's interest and in 1895 he decided to 
try publishing a daily issue in connection with the weekly. 

In the newspaper world IMr. IMadison is an influential factor and 
through his able and pointed editorials he has done much to advance 
Ihe general welfare of the community and to point out and procure for 
llie city many needed improvements. His respective papers are pub- 
lished under the names of the Weekly Advocate and the Daily Advocate 
and both have a large and healthy circulation. In politics Mr. Madison 
accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and 
he is affiliated with various fraternal and social organizations of repre- 
sentative character. His religious views coincide with the teachings of 
the Congregational church and as a citizen he is essentially loyal and 
public spirited, holding a secure place in tlie high regard of his fellow 



Ellas Hall. — Now living virtually retired from active business, this 
venerable and honored citizen of Ludingtou finds that his "Hues are 
cast in pleasant places," as here he has an attractive home and is sur- 
rounded by a host of loyal and valued friends. He has been one of 
thi- world's workers and his success has been the result of his own well 
(lii-ected effoi'ts. He is not only one of the representative citizens of 
;\Iason county but is also a native son of Michigan and a scion of one 
(if its honored pioneer families, witii whose annals the name has been 
identified during practically the entire period of its statehood. He 
was one of the loyal sons of Michigan who went forth to render valiant 
s.Tvicc ill di'Teiise' of tile I'liioii wlicii its integrity was meiui.'cd by armed 




^k£<:o:...lA^'^i-i26- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 647 

i-ebelliou, and in all the relations of life he has shown the same high 
sense of duty that he manifested as a soldiei-. His life has been one of 
earnestness and honor, and it is but in justice due that in this publica- 
tion be entered a brief review of bis career. 

Elias Hall was born in Allegan county, Michigan, on the 26th of 
Januarj", 1838, and he is a son of Silas and Susan (Stormsj Hall, both 
of whom were born in New Hampshire, and both of whom were repre- 
sentatives of families founded in New England in the colonial epoch of 
our national historj-. Silas Hall was born at Croydeu, Sullivan county. 
New Hampshire, in which state he was reared and educated, and he came 
to j\liehigan in 1836, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of Allegan 
countj', where he remained until 1842, when he removed to Grand 
Rapids, which was then a mere lumbering village, and he was closely 
identified with the early history of what is now the second city of the 
state. He was a contractor and builder by vocation and as a man of 
strong individuality, sterling character and alert mentality he wielded 
much influence in the community with which he thus identified himsell'. 
He was a resident of Grand Rapids at the time of his death, at the age 
of sixty-five years, and his name merits an enduring place on the roll 
of the honored pioneers of the Wolverine commonwealth. In jjolitics 
he was originally a Whig, but he identified himself with the Republican 
party at the time of its organization and ever afterward continued a 
strong advocate of its principles. He was twice married. — first to Miss 
Susan Storms, who died at the age of fift.y-five years. They became the 
parents of five children, of whom four attained to years of maturity, and 
of the number three are now living, the subject of this review being the 
eldest: Mary, who resides in the city of Grand Rapids, is the widow of 
E. Chase Phillips; and Jeanette is the wife of Charles T. Patterson, of 
Washington. For his second wife the father mai'ried Maria Dean. 

Elias Hall was a child of four years at the time of the family re- 
moval from Allegan county to Grand Rapids, and there he was reared 
to yeai's of maturity. He has witnessed the various stages of growth 
in the upbuilding of this fine commercial and industrial city, and hi.s 
memory well recalls the time when it was little more than a straggling 
village. He was afforded the advantages of the common schools of the 
locality and period, and as a youth he began to assist his father in his 
various business operations. He apparently inherited his skill as a uie- 
chanie and was one of the early cabinet makers employed in the furni- 
ture manufactory of Nelson, Matter & Company, which eventually be- 
came one of the great concerns giving world wide prestige to Grand 
Rapids as a furniture-manufacturing center. 

When the dark cloud of Civil war cast its pall over the national 
horizon "Sir. Hall did not long subordinate Ihe call of patriotism, as in 
1862 he enlisted as a private in Company B. Fifth Michigan Cavalry, 
which became a part of the gallant brigade connuauded by General Cus- 
ter, who later sacrificed his life in the great Indian massacre throiigh 
which his name is perpetuated in the history of the nation. This brigade 
was attached to the Army of the Potomac and with the same ;\lr. Hall 
continued in active service until the close of the war. He was promoted 
to tlie office of quartermaster's sergeant and later to that of orderl\- ser- 



648 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

geant, with whieh rank he was mustered out after the long and sangui- 
nary struggle had reached its close. He participated in many of the 
important battles marking the progress of the great conflict and proved 
himself a valiant and faithful soldier of the republic. He participated 
in the Grand Review of the victorious troops in the city of Washington, 
and he was on the skirmish line facing Lee's army at the time of the 
final surrender of that gallant Confederate officer. He received his hon- 
orable discharge at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 20th of July, 
1865. 

After the close of the war Mr. Hall returned to Grand Rapids, where 
he continued to be employed at the cabinet-maker's trade for several 
years, having devoted a total of about twenty years to this line of work, 
in which he became a specially skillful artisan. In 1881 he removed to 
Ludington, where he engaged in the retail furniture business, in which 
he continued until 1887, when he i-emoved to Reed City, Osceola county, 
where he was identified with the same line of enterprise for the ensuing 
three years, and also insurance, at the expiration of which he returned 
lo Grand Rapids, whence he removed to the city of Battle Creek in 1901. 
For a period of about sixteen years he was a traveling salesman for 
furniture manufactories, and insurance agent, and he continued to re- 
side in Battle Creek until 1907, when he returned to Ludington, where 
he has since lived retired. From 1871 to 1875 he was a resident of St. 
Joseph, Missouri, where he was engaged in business, and during his 
entire active career he maintained a high reputation for close applica- 
tion and executive ability. 

From tlie time of attaining his legal majority to the present, Mr. 
Hall has been an uncompromising supporter of the cause of the Re- 
publican party, and he east his first presidential vote for Abraham Lin- 
coln, while serving as a soldier in the Civil war in the field. He has 
voted for every presidential candidate of the party since that time and 
is well fortified in his opinions as to matters of public polity. Mr. 
Hall is a valued and appreciative member of Custer Post, No. 5, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in the city of Grand Rapids, and there also he 
has been affiliated with Valley City Lodge, No. 86, Free & Accepted Ma- 
sons, from which he holds a certificate indicating that he has been a 
member of the same for forty years. He also holds membership in the 
Independent Order of Foresters, and both he and his wife are zealous 
members of the First Baptist Church of Ludington, in which he is a 
deacon. 

Mr. Hall has been twice married. In 1860 was solemnized his union 
to Miss Martha E. Haire, who was born in Canada and with her people 
moved to Michigan and was married here. She died in Colorado, in 1878. 
Two children were born of this union — William Silas who now resides in 
Guadalajara, Mexico, where he is employed by the Mexican government, 
and Eva J., who died at the age of seven years. On the 6th of October, 
1879, Mr. Hall wedded Miss Jennie Shackelton, who was born at Alpine, 
Kent county. Michigan, and who is a daughter of the late Jeremiah and 
Rachel (Williams) Shackelton, honored pioneers of that county. Two 
children were born of the second marriage— George Morgan, a traveling 



HISTORY OF NOKTHEKN MICHIGAN 649 

salesman in the city of Grand Rapids, and John DeWitt, who is engaged 
in the real estate business in Ludiugton. 

Arthur Steinmetz. — He whose nanie initiates this review is the 
jH-oprietor of the Standish Stock farm, a valuable property consisting 
of some three hundred and thirty of the most desirable acres of Arenac 
county. This farm has been in his possession and management since 
February 1, 1904, and his operations thereupon have met with the most 
aliuiidant success — by no means accidental, but the logical result of 
business acumen, good judgment, honest dealing and fine executive 
ability. Two hundred acres of Mr. Steinmetz's land are under cultiva- 
tion and a great part of the remainder is devoted to pasture. He has 
a dairy of twenty-five cows, many of which are pure blooded Jersey 
and the rest of fine quality. He also raises horses and hogs on an 
extensive scale, the latter being of the Chester White breed, of which 
he makes a specialty. His farm is admirably improved and equipped 
and his barn is of the most modern construction, measuring fifty-six 
by one hundred and twenty-eight feet. For four years Mr. Steinmetz's 
dairy has provided the town of Standish with milk of the highest 
quality. 

Arthur Steinmetz is well and favorably known throughout Arenac 
county, and he is a native of the state in which his entire life has been 
passed, Calhoun county having been the district of his nativity and its 
date the 7th of September. 1871. He is the sou of James and Sai-ah 
(Heinbaugh) Steinmetz, both of whom were born in the Keystone 
state. On both sides of the house the ancestors are of German birth, 
but immigrated at an early date to America, where they found the 
opportunity and prosperity for which they had hoped. As was the 
case with so many of their countrymen, they ultimately located in 
Pennsylvania and became valuable factors in the life of any community 
which they made their own. 

]Mr. Steinmetz was educated in the connuon schools of his native 
county and at an early age concluded to adopt the great basic industry 
for his own. He had secured a good practical training in its various 
departments under the excellent tutelage of his father and he lost no 
valuable time in futile experiment. He is now to be counted among 
the most scientific and practical of agriculturists, and uses the most 
modern and highly improved farming machinery. His stock enjoy fine 
reputation in this part of the state. 

On January 24, 1893, Mr. Steinmetz was united in marriage to 
]\Iiss Lena Gidley, of Jackson, Michigan. She is a daughter of John 
Gidley. This happy union has been further cemented by the birth of 
six children, namely: Ellen, Melba, Harold, James, Clara and Florence. 
The subject is Democratic in politics and is a prominent and popular 
member of the Modern Brotherhood of America. 

John G. Diebold. treasurer of Ogemaw county. IMichigan, is one of 
the prominent and influential men of his locality and may be classed 
with the successful num of northern Michigan. 

'Sir. Diebold was born in 1867, in Bruce county, province of Ontario. 



650 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Canada, sou of George and Catherine Diebold, the former a native of 
Germany and the latter of Canada. In 1883 the family moved to 
Michigan, and the parents are still living in this state, being residents 
of West Branch. Of their eight children John G. is the eldest, the 
others in order of birth being as follows: "Valentine, Mrs. Catherine 
Mahoney. 'Sirs. jMargaret F. Hadrick, Mrs. Anna Mahoney, Mrs. Pena 
King, Mrs. ;\Iaiid Chilton and George, Jr. 

John G. Diebold was reared to farm life and has always been in- 
terested in agricultural pursuits. He now owns eight hundred and 
sixty acres of land, three hundred acres of which are in his home farm 
and under a high state of cultivation. An interesting feature of his 
farm is his apiary. For a number of years he has been interested in bee 
culture, giving to it his close and careful attention and now having 
three hundred colonies. 

Besides looking after his large farming interests, I\Ir. Diebold has 
found time for public service, and has efficiently filled a number of local 
offices. He served two terms as township treasurer and fourteen terms 
as supervisor. Also for some time he was superintendent of the county 
poor. In November, 1910, he was elected to his present office, that of 
county treasi\rer, and assumed the duties of this position on January 
1, 1911. 

]Mr. Diebold and Miss Emma Wirges were united in marriage in 
1895, and to them have been born ten children, of whom seven are 
living, namely : Peter F., born in June, 1896 ; Margaret, in 1899 ; Wil- 
liam D., in 1902; Joseph J., in 1903; Emma M., in 1905; John G., in 
1907, and Catherine H., in 1909. Mrs. Diebold is a daughter of Jacob 
and Margaret (Wolf) Wirges, and was the first white child born in 
Ogemaw county, the date of her birth being 1875. ilr. Diebold is a 
member of both the Ancient Order of Gleaners and the Grange, and in 
the latter takes an active part. 

George R. Giesman. — One of the tine old residents of the city of 
ilanistee, Michigan, who has been actively identified with its interests 
and general welfare for nearly half a century is George R. Giesman, 
who has long been a dealer in real-estate, loans and insurance, in con- 
nection with which enterprise he also conducts a steam-ship agency. 
He was born at Huron, Erie county, Ohio, on the 5th of March, 1842, 
and his father, whose name was George Giesman, was born at Gross- 
herzog Zum Hcssen Darmstadt, province of Starkeuburg Lindenfels, 
Germany, the date of his nativity having been 1810. George Giesman 
left Germany in 1825 and emigrated to America, locating first in the 
state of New York, whence he removed to Ohio and later to Wisconsin. 
In 1835 he married Miss ilargaret Wendel, at Buffalo, she having been 
born and reared at Germany. In the summer of 1842 he located in 
IMilwankee, Wisconsin, in which city he was one of the first mason con- 
tractors, building the first lighthouse on Lake :Michigan. at Mackinaw. 
He did most of the stone and brick work for the La Crosse Railroad, 
at North ]\[ilwaukee, and did all of the stone Avork at the dam and 
built the first brick brewery for Best in IMilwankeo. lie also con- 
structed the origimi] St. Charles lidtol on .Market Square, Adler's resi- 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN " 651 

deuce ou the east side, Baunial's Block, Stamm's Block and Conrad's 
Block on Reede street, as well as many other prominent buildings that 
were erected during the years of 1840-1850. He was summoned to the 
life eternal on the 15th of October, 1867, and his cherished and devoted 
wife passed aM'a.y in March, 1904. They became the parents of nine 
children, three of whom are living, George R., of this sketch being the 
third in order of birth. 

George R. Giesmau received his educational training in the public 
schools of Milwaukee. He was employed at farm work during the 
summer seasons and at the early age of twelve years he began clerking 
in a store, eventually being given charge of a marine supply store at 
Milwaukee. In 1867 he established his home at Manistee, where he 
accepted a position as bookkeeper and yard salesman for the Manistee 
Planing ]\Iill Company. In the fall of 1871 he became bookkeeper and 
storcman for the Green & Millmore Lumber Company, retaining that 
jjosition for two years, and in the spring of 1874 was elected city clerk. 
In 1875 he engaged in the real-estate, loan and insurance business, in 
which line of enterprise he has gained most distinctive success. He also 
conducts a large steam-ship agency for traffic on the Great Lakes and 
he has other varied interests of broad scope and importance in this 
section of the state. 

Mr. Giesman has ever been aligned as a stalwart supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party and he has been a most active participant 
in local politics. In 1870 he was elected supervisor in ward four and in 
1874-5 he gave most efficient service as city clerk of Manistee. In 1875 
he was acting mayor of the city and in 1883 he was further honored 
by his fellow citizens in that he was then elected to the office of justice 
of the peace. In the last mentioned office he received a large majority 
of votes and was the only Republican elected to a city office at that 
time. In 1885 Mr. Giesman was a candidate for and was elected to 
the office of city treasurer and it may be said concerning him that in 
all his public offices he has acquitted himself with honor and dis- 
tinction. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the time-honored 
Masonic order, in which he has been incumbent of the office of recorder 
of Manistee Commandery, Knights Templars, for sis years. He is also 
a valued and appreciative member of the Knights of Pythias and 
both he and his wife are devout members of the Congregational cluu-ch, 
in the different departments of whose work they have been most active 
factors. Mr. Giesman is a God-fearing, law-abiding, progressive citizen 
and he holds a secure vantage ground in the high regard of the com- 
munity in which he has so long maintained his home. He has estab- 
lished a reputation for fair and honorable methods and impregnable 
integrity and he has ever exerted himself in behalf of progress and 
good government. 

On the 1st of September, 1863, ^Ir. Giesman was united in mar- 
riage to JMiss Caroline Gablemann, who was born and reared in the 
state of New Jersey and who went to ^Milwaukee, Wisconsin, when a 
young girl. Her father died when she was a mere child and her mother, 
who lived to the patriarchal age of ninety-two years, was summoned to 
eternal rest in 1893. Mr. and "Sirs. Giesman became the parents of five 



602 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MTCHTGAN 

cliildi-i'ii. nnincly.— Georgie C, Cora. Lillia. Byron and Finicic. two of 
wlioni arc now dect^ased — Cora and Byron. 

Christian A. Oppenborn. — Among the distinctively prominent and 
brilliant lawyers of the state of Michigan none is more versatile, talented 
or well equipped for the work of his profession than Christian A. Oppen- 
born. who maintains his home and business headquarters at Alpena. 
Throni;hont hi.s career as an able attorney aiul well fortified counselor 
he has, by reason of unimpeachable conduct and close observance of the 
unwritten code of professional ethics, gained the admiration and respect 
of his fellow members of the bar, in addition to which he commands a 
high place in the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. During 
the greater part of his life thus far Christian A. Oppenborn has resided 
in Alpena, where he is now engaged in the active practice of law and 
where he has taken a decidedly prominent part in public aifairs. For 
two terms he was incumbent of the office of county treasurer and in 1910 
lie was elected to represent Alpena county in the state legislature of 
llichigan. 

Christian A. Oppenborn was born at Alpena, Michigan, .on the 31st 
of January, 1873, and he is a son of Henry L. and Minnie (Wiesigat) 
Oppenborn, the former of whom was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1848, 
and the latter of whom was born in Konigsburg, in Prussia, the date of 
lici- nativity having been 1856. Mi-, and Jlrs. Henry L. Oppenborn were 
united in marriage at Alpena and they became the parents of eight chil- 
dren, seven of whom are living at the present time, in 1911, and of 
whom the subject of this review was the firstborn. The father immi- 
grated to the United States in 1869 and came dircrtly to Michigan, set- 
tling first at Detroit and later at Alpena, where he engaged in general 
farming and horticulture. In 1890 he established the family home in 
the city of Alpena, where he resided until 1902, at which time he re- 
moved to Alabama on account of the impaired condition of his health. 
He is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party in his 
political proclivities and in his religious faith is a devout member of 
the German Lutheran church. 

To the public schools of Alpena Christian A. Oppenborn is indebted 
for his pi-climinary educational training and after leaving school he was 
variously enuaucii until 1900. when he was elected county treasurer of 
Alpena county, being re-elected to that office in 1902. In lOO'i-OG-OT he 
was a student in the Detroit College of Law, in which excellent institu- 
tion he was graduated as a member of the class of 1907, duly receiving 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws. Immediately after graduation he 
opened up offices at Alpena, where he has succeeded in building up a 
large and lucrative clientage and where lie has gained prestige as one 
of the nio.st capable lawyers in this section of the state. In 1909 he was 
a])poiiited circuit court commissioner, an office of which he is incumbent 
at the present time. On the 8tli of November, 1910, he was elected to 
represent Alpena county in the state legislature and in discharging the 
duties connected therewith acquitted himself with all of honor and dis- 
tinction. During the session of 1910-11 he served on a number of im- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 653 

portant committees and he was successful in securing a great deal of 
important legislation for his district. 

On the 25th of December, 1900, Mr. Oppeuborn was united in mar- 
ried to Miss Annie L. Gardner, whose birth occurred in Sanilac county, 
Michigan, and who is a daughter of Stephen and Emma (Switzer) 
Gardner. Mr. Gardner was born in the state of New York and his wife 
is a native of Michigan. Both are now living at Croswell, Michigan. 
They became the parents of three children of whom Mrs. Oppenborn was 
the second in order of birth. Mr. Gardner is a farmer by occupation and 
in his political allegiance he is a stanch supporter of the Republican 
party. Mr. and Mrs. Oppenborn have one daughter, Dorothea Lovice, 
whose natal day is the 16th of January, 1906. 

On the 14th of May, 1898, Mr. Oppenborn enlisted as a soldier in 
Company B, Thirty-third Michigan Volunteers, for service in the Span- 
ish-American war. He participated in the battle of San Juan Hill and 
received his honorable discharge and was mustered out of service on the 
28th of December, 1898. He retains a deep and sincere interest in his 
conu'ades in arms and signifies the same by membership in Arthur 
Heney Camp of the Spanish-American Veterans. In fraternal channels 
Mr. Oppenborn is affiliated with Myrtle Lodge, No. 432, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is past grand of the Grand Lodge of 
the state. He is also connected with Alpena Lodge. No. 505, Benevolent 
& Protective Order of Elks and with the Arbeiter Unterstuetzungs, a 
German aid society. In politics he is an uncompromising Republican 
and in religious circles he is connected with the German Lutheran 
church, in the different departments of whose work they are most active 
and zefdous factors. Mr. Oppenborn is a man of broad human sympathy 
and great benevolence. Charity in its widest and best sense is practiced 
by him. and his kindness has made smooth the rough way of many a 
weary traveler on life's journey. In his private life he is distinguished 
l\y ail that marks the true gentleman. Endowed by nature with high 
intellectual qualities, to which are added the discipline and embellish 
nients of culture, his is a most attractive personality. Well versed in 
the learning of his profession, and with a deep knowledge of human con- 
duct, with great sagacity and extraordinary tact, he stands in the fore- 
most ranks of the legal fraternity of Michigan and he is everywhere ac- 
corded unqualified confidence and esteem by reason of his e.xemplarj' 
life. 

George E. Upton. — A man of fine initiative, one who not only has 
ideas but who also knows how to carry oiat a project, how to make be- 
ginnings, is George E. Upton, who through his own well directed en- 
deavors has built up a large enterprise in his particular line and who 
now ranks as one of the most influential merchants in Onekama. He 
was born in Nottingham, England, on the 9th of January, 1857, and 
is a son of Edmund C. and Alice (Winterton) Upton, the former of 
whom came to America in 1863 and the latter of whom, with the six 
children, came to this comitry in 1864. For about three years the 
family home was maintained at Cleveland, Ohio, from which place they 



654 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

removed to Michigan, where Mr. Upton entered a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Empire township, Leelanau county. 

George E. Upton was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm, in the work and management of which he early began to assist 
his father. His educational training was of the most meager order, 
being obtained in the institutions of a sparsely settled countrj^ where 
school was conducted but a few months during the year. When fifteen 
years of age he went to Traverse City, this state, where he entered upon 
a three-year apprenticeship at the harness-maker's trade, after the 
completion of which he continued in the employ of his instructor, 
George Hicks, as a journeyman for the ensuing six years. After spending 
some months in carriage trimming in Cleveland, Ohio, he then worked 
six years more for J. T. Beadle in the harness business. Then, in 
February, 1885, he started in business for himself, at which time lie 
came to Onekama, where he opened a harness shop, being obliged to 
take an upstairs room as the place of his business operations, as no 
other place could be secured. At the expiration of nine months he 
moved into a building which been erected for him, remaining there 
until 1896, when he moved to a larger place in the east end of the 
town. He continued to operate an exclusive harness shop until 1905 
when, the harness business not demanding all his time, he added a 
stock of shoes, hats and hosiery. He has built up a thriving business 
and is now contemplating the erection of a still larger place of busi- 
ness. In politics j\Ir. Upton is a Republican and he has been incumbent 
of various public offices of local trust, including that of town clerk, to 
which he was elected in 1886 and of which he was in tenure for a period 
of thirteen years, only resigning it on account of the urgency of busi- 
ness affairs. He has been president of the village for several terms and 
he has contributed in generous measure to all matters projected for the 
good of the community. He is a nunuber of the Knights of the Tented 
ilaccabees and his religious faith is in harmony with the teachings of 
the Congregational church. He is a God-fearing, law-abiding, progres- 
sive citizen who unwaveringly does the right as he interprets it and no 
one holds a higher place in the confidence and regard of his fellowmen 
than does he. 

On the 16th of "Sl&y, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Upton to Miss Elizabeth White, of Onekama. She was born in Wales, 
whence she came to America with her parents when she was a young 
girl. Mr. and Mrs. Upton became the parents of one child, Russell J., 
who was born on the 27th of April, 1897. Mrs. Upton was summoned 
to the life eternal in 1897, after which the infant Russell was taken 
into the home of his grandparents, where he was carefully nurtured 
until three years of age, when he returned to his father, at Onekama. 
Russell is at school and is developing a marked talent for music, being 
a member of the school orchestra and taking part in various local 
entertainments. 

Thomas E. Andresen. — Constancy and perseverance are the qualities 
that inevitably lead to success and these are the attributes which have 
contributed in such generous meastire to the fine achievement of Thomas 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 655 

E. Audrest'U, wlio conducts the "Three iu One'" store at ^Manistee. 
Michigan. He was born in Denmark in 1858 and in his native land, 
in the early part of 1881, he wedded Hansino liensen, likewise a native 
of that eounti-y. Immediately after that important event they set out 
for America, coming directly to Manistee, landing in this place with but 
fifty cents. Mr. Andresen secured work in one of the mills in this 
vicinity on the day following his arrival and he occupied various posi- 
tions in the lumber mills for the ensuing five or six years. He then 
began operations as a bill-poster, following this line of enterprise for 
two years, at the expiration of which he opened up a butcher shop in 
Manistee. In 1900 he established his business in a fine new building 
which he had erected on Sixth street, this building having been so 
constructed that he could add to it should be wish so to do. In 1903 
he built an adjoining apartment, in which he opened up a grocery 
store, laying in a complete stock of staple and fancy groceries. Three 
years later he built a thix'd addition, of the same size as the two former 
ones, each being twenty-five feet by eighty feet in lateral dimensions, 
putting into the third store a full line of notions and variety stock. He 
named the block so constructed the "Three in One" and under this 
unique title he is now conducting a most thriving business, he being a 
man of fine executive ability and unquestioned integrity. His annual 
business now represents from forty-five to fifty thousand dollars and it 
is most gratifying to contemplate in view of the fact that his success is 
entirely the outcome of his own well directed endeavors, he himself 
having built the ladder by which he has climbed to affluence. 

Mr. Andresen is a staunch Democrat in his political convictions 
and though he has never manifested aught of ambition for the honors 
or emoluments of public office, he has represented his ward as alderman 
for two terms of two years each. Hs is deeply interested in all matters 
tending to raise the standard of civic and industrial afi'airs in ^Manistee 
and he holds a secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. 
He and his family attend the Lutheran church, to whose work and 
charities he has contributed most generously. ^Ir. and Jlrs. Andresen 
have five children, namely, — Thorvall, Harry, William, Edward and 
Ella, the three elder of whom are associated with their father in the 
work and management of the store. 

Thomas Horne. one of the most extensive shippers of farm produce 
and live stock, West Branch, jMichigan, was born in England in 1862, 
the son of English parents, Thomas and Mary Horne. His mother died 
in England some years ago and his father still resides there. At the 
age of nineteen, in 1881, Thomas Horne left his native land and came 
alone to America, where without financial aid or backing of any kind 
he has worked his way to the front and established himself in a flourish- 
ing business. This has been accomplished by living up to the Golden 
Rule and paying close attention to tnie business principles. For seven- 
teen years Mr. Horne was a resident of Lansing, Jliehigan, and it was 
there in 1888, twenty-two years ago, that he began his present line of 
He owns valuable property at West Branch, consisting of 



656 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

thirty-one acres, eleven and a half of which are within the corporation 
limits. 

On February 11, 1887, Thomas Home and Miss Dora Van Dyke, 
daughter of Samuel Van Dyke, were iinited in marriage, and to the 
encouragement and help of his wife Mr. Home attributes much of the 
success he has attained, yirs. Home is a native of Canada, who in 
early life accompanied her parents to ^Michigan, their settlement being 
in Livingston county, where she was reared and educated. She is a 
woman of sound jvidgment and rare tact. While they have no children 
of their own Jlr. and 'Sirs. Home have an adopted daughter, May. 

John Borucki, one of the general merehandise men of Manistee, 
Michigan, who is essentially loyal and public-spirited in his civic atti- 
tude and who has done much to maintain the high standard of the in- 
dustrial world of this city is John Borucki, who was born in German 
Poland, the date of his nativity being March 22, 1866. He came to 
America in 1883, at which time he Avas a youth of seventeen years of 
age. He established his home in Oak Hill, where he began working in 
the mills. Prior to his emigration to America he had learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, and being quite expert in that particular enterprise he 
began to spend the evenings repairing shoes for the men at the mill. He 
was thus engaged for eight years and in 1891 he opened up a shoe store 
in Oak Hill, later erecting a building in which he carried fine stocks of 
shoes and groceries. In 1907 he further enlarged his scope of opera- 
tions by adding a meat-market to his already well established concern. 
On the'l-lth of April, 1908, his place of business was destroyed by fire, 
thus wiping out what represented many years of earnest toil and en- 
deavor. With characteristic pluck and a determination to conquer all 
obstacles, however, he immediately began building and in August, 1908, 
he opened his present large and commodious store, adding notions and 
clothing to the other departments. A fine business amounting to from 
twenty-five to thirty thousand dollars a year is now controlled by Mr. 
Borucki and his two elder sons, all of whom hold a high place in the 
regard of their fellow men. 

In politics Mr. Borucki and his sons are staunch Republicans and 
they have done much to advance the civic and material welfare of the 
connnunity. On the 9th of November, 1908, 'Sir. Borucki was appointed 
postmaster of Oak Hill, in which connection he is giving most efficient 
service. He and his family are devout communicants of the ("atholic 
church, holding membership in St. Joseph's Polish church, and they are 
liberal contributors to its work and charities. Mr. Bomeki is a mem- 
ber of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, which maintains headquarters 
in the citv of Chicago, Illinois. 

On the 22nd of Novembei'. 1886, Mr. Borucki married Miss Mary 
Krolikowski, who was born in German Poland on the 14th of ^March. 
1866, she having made the trip to America alone, landing in the Ignited 
States, September 14, 1884, and locating at Manistee, where she secured 
work as a cook in a boarding house, :\Tr. and :\Trs. Borucki hnv(> seven 
children.— Stanley J.. Blanche. Leon, William. Victoria. Jennie and 
Florence. StanleV J. is connected with his father in the work and man- 




^, M ^^-^^^^^^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 657 

agement of the store and he is deputy postmaster of Oak Hill. In the 
spring of 1909 he was elected town clerk of Filer township and in 1910 
he was chosen as his own successor in that office. He is a member of 
the Polish Roman Catholic Union, besides which he is also affiliated 
with the Knights of Columbus. Blanche is the housekeeper and a dress- 
maker by trade. Leon, who was bom on the 1st of April, 1892, has 
charge of the meat department of his father's business, and William, 
Victoria, Jennie and Florence are attending school. 

Charles H. Reynolds. — When cognizance is taken of the lives and 
achievements of those who have been dominating forces in connection 
with the development and upbuilding of the thriving city of Alpena and 
its tributary territory, there is all of consistency in according special 
recognition to the honored and intluential citizen and sterling business 
man to whom this brief memoir is dedicated. For fuUy thirty years 
prior to his death Mr. Reynolds was engaged in the jewelry business in 
Alpena, but his progressiveness and generous civic ideals also led him 
into other fields of enterprise through wlych the best interests of the 
community were significantly advanced. He was broad-minded and 
liberal, sincere, earnest and upright in all the relations of life, and he 
ever held the uniform confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He 
played a large part in the social and business life of Alpena and there 
his name shall be held in perpetual honor as one of the city's resource- 
ful upbuilders and strong and generous characters. Further interest 
attaches to his career by reason of the fact that he was a native son of 
Michigan and a member of one of its sterling pioneer families. 

Charles H. Rej-nolds was born at St. Joseph, Berrien county, Michi- 
gan, on the 14th of May, 1855, and was summoned to eternal rest on 
March 2, 1910. His parents were early settlers of Berrieu county, 
Michigan. He whose name initiates this review received his earl.y educa- 
tion in the common schools of St. Joseph and when a mere boy he became 
familiar with the active duties of life. He was employed in a lath mill 
when but fourteen years of age and thereafter served a thoroiigh ap- 
prenticeship to the trade of jeweler. Finally he removed from his native 
town to Genesee county, where he was engaged in the work of his trade 
for several years, during the latter part of which period he was em- 
ployed by George Childs, the leading jeweler of the city of Flint, that 
county. In 1878 Mr. Reynolds came to Alpena, and within a short time 
thereafter he assumed charge of the jewelry store of Frederick S. Good- 
rich. In 1880 he purchased the business from Mr. Goodrich and he con- 
tinued the enterprise thereafter until the time of his death, thirty years 
later, as he assumed control of the business on January 8, 1880. Mr. 
Re.vnolds kept pace with the march of progress and his store was ever 
maintained with the best of facilities and with a select and comprehen- 
sive stock, adequate to meeting all demands. On the site of his store, 
which is still conducted by his sons, there stood at one time the residence 
of E. K. Potter, the eldest of the well-known Potter brothers of Alpena, 
and this house was destroyed in the disastrous fire that swept the city 
in 1873. The store built on the site by Mr. Goodrich has been almost 
made over again and is now thoroughly up-to-date. 



658 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Energetic, self-reliaut and sagacious, Mr. Reynolds was ever ready to 
lend his co-operation in enterprises tending to promote the industrial 
and civic progress of his home city and county. He became interested in 
timber lands in both Michigan and Wisconsin and in Douglass county 
of the latter state, he was associated with George B. Holmes in lumber- 
ing operations, including the ownership of a saw mill. He was a stock- 
holder and director in the Alpena National Bank; was one of the organ- 
izers of the Alpena Mutual Benefit Telephone Company, of which he was 
elected president and remained such for the last ten years of his life.. 
He was also one of the organizers of the Alpena Portland Cement Com- 
pany, which was incorporated in 1899, and of which he served as vice- 
president and secretary until his demise, having been specially en- 
thusiastic in the promotion of the important industrial enterprise of 
this corporation. He was the first citizen in Alpena to construct a 
cement walk in front of his business propert.y and his residence premises 
were also the first in the city to show this altogether admirable im- 
provement. The first cement walk thus laid in Alpena was that in front 
of his jewelry store on Second avenue, and other enterprising citizens 
soon began to emulate his example. It was also primarily due to the 
progressive ideas and earnest efforts of Mr. Reynolds that the first con- 
crete street paving was done in Alpena and he was associated with John 
Monaghan in assuming the contract for the completion of this original 
work, — on Chisholm street. In 1905 Mr. Reynolds organized the Lake- 
side Cranberry Company for the development of the cranberry marshes 
secured in Alpena county, and he was pi-esident of this company. He 
also did much to add to the attractiveness of the business section of his 
home city. In 1909 he built the Reynolds garage of reinforced cement 
construction, and the same is now occupied by Charles F. Steele. To- 
gether with Mr. George B. Holmes they erected during the summer of 
1909 a modern two story brick and steel building on their property on 
Second avenue. This building is used for mercantile business and office 
purposes on the second floor. 

In politics, though well-fortified in his opinion and essentially public- 
spirited, Mr. Reynolds never manifested predilection for official prefer- 
ment, though he served several terms as supervisor of the First ward 
and was also a valued member of the Board of Education for two or 
more terms. He was a stanch advocate of the principles of the Repub- 
lican party and his religious faith was that of the Congregational church, 
of which Ins wife also has long been a devoted member. While Mr. Rey- 
nolds won large and worthy success through his own efforts, he was not 
self-centered, but was generous, kindly and tolerant, ever genial and 
alwavs ready to assist those in affliction or di.stress. He was actively 
identified with various fraternal and social organizations and his popu- 
larity in each was on a parity with that which he enjoyed in all other 
relat'ions of life. He was one of the organizers and served as the presi- 
dent of the Union Life Guards, and in the time-honored jMasonic fra- 
ternity his local affiliations were as here noted : Alpena Lodge. No. 199, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Thunder Bay Chapter. No. 74. Royal Arch 
Masons; and Alpena Commandery. No. 34, Knights Templar. He also 
held membership in Moslem Temple. Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 659 

of the Mystic Shrine. Ho was likewise identified with Alpena Lodge, 
No. 70, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Alpena Lodge, No. 505, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. The various fraternal orders 
with which he was identified passed earnest resolutions and testimonials 
of sorrow at the time of his death, and from the Commandery of Knights 
Templars came the following appreciative resolutions : 

"It is with profound sorrow and a feeling of deep personal afflic- 
tion that the eminent commander and Sir Knights of Alpena Com- 
niander.y. No. 34, again place on record the loss of one of its members. 
Sir Knight Charles H. Reynolds was called by the Master of all Good 
Workmen on the second day of ]\Iarch (1910) to rest from his labors. 
From boyhood he was a resident of Alpena. He was a good citizen, 
active in every sphere and trusted and respected by all who knew him. 
He was M'ise in counsel, cautious in judgment and prompt in action. In 
disposition he was genial; in bearing, courteous; in dealing, .iust. 
Through his short illness he remained calm, brave and gentle. From 
first to last no word of complaint nor any sign of impatience escaped 
him. He died as he lived. 

"Of Sir Knight Reynolds' life amid the sacred privacies of home — 
filled, as it was, with all that makes home dear — it is not our privilege 
to speak; but to his bereaved family we respectfully tender the assur- 
ance that while our full sympathy goes oiit to them in their sorrow, we 
share also in their thankfulness that the sorrow is softened by so many 
considerations of memory and touched with the light of a glorious hope. 
We extend to his family our deepest sympathy in their bereavement 
and sorrow and desire that a copy of this minute be sent to them and 
that the same be spread upon our records." 

At Otisville, Genesee county, jMichigan, in the year 1878, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Charles H. Reynolds to Jliss ^largaret Craw- 
ford, who was there born and reared and who remains in the beautiful 
home in Alpena, — a home endeared and hallowed to her by the many 
gracious memories and associations of the past. ^Ir. Reynolds is sur- 
vived by two sons, William H. and Charles A. 

Hon. John S. Elwell. — Conspicuous on the roll of the prominent 
men of Standish is the name of the Hon. John S. Elwell, who has played 
an important and wholly praiseworthy part in the progress and devel- 
opment of the place. For twenty-eight years he has been identified 
with its civic, social and commercial life, in the latter department of 
affairs he represented Hobson & Company's Granite & IMarble Works 
of Saginaw. During the period mentioned he has held many important 
offices. In 1885 he was elected .iustice of the peace of the township of 
Lincoln, and he was subsequently elected .iustice of the peace of the 
borough when Standish became such. Wlien Standi.sh was incorporated 
as a city he was again the choice of the people for that office, of which 
he is the encumbent at the present time. He likewise served one term 
as judge of probate: three terms as circuit court commissioner: and in 
1895 was admitted to the iliehigan bar. The Hon. Mr. Elwell has had 
a varied though jirosperous and honorable career since coming to this 
i-itv. in whidi it h;is l)rr!i liis haiii)iness ti) win so nnich of confidence 



660 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

and recognition. He has tried several lines of business, — the sewing 
machine, the insurance and the undertaking, and in all of them has 
found the success which ever rewards unbending integrity, unabating 
energy and initiative and an energy which never flags. 

Mr. Elwell is a native of the Wolverine state, his birth having oc- 
curred in Oakland coimty on the 8th day of December, 1843. He re- 
ceived such educational discipline as was necessary to fit him for a life 
of future usefulness in the common schools. His youth was spent amid 
rural surroundings, his father being a farmer, and under the excellent 
tutelage of the elder gentleman he received a training in agriculture in 
its several departments which would have fitted him for that calling 
had he desired to assume it. His first adventures in the world of affairs 
were in the capacity of a harness-maker, but he did not continue long 
employed in this manner. He removed to Standish in 1884 and at o^ce 
took an active part in the many-sided life of the community in which 
his interests are now centered. 

In 1870 ]\Ir. Elwell was united in marriage to Jliss Jane M.. daugh- 
ter of Amos and Melissa (Park) Brown, the foundation of a happy and 
congenial life companionship being thus laid. Their children are five in 
number, namely : Jennie, Frank, Ruth, Arthur D., and William D., the 
latter deceased. 

Mr. Elwell is the son of Darius and Ann (Townsend) Elwell, of the 
state of New York, who at an early day in its history emigrated to 
Michigan, where they became prosperous agriculturists. The greater 
part of the life of this worthy couple was passed in Romeo. Oakland 
county. 

Mr. Elwell is independent in polities, but is very public-spirited, 
giving active support to all causes likely to result in the greatest good 
to the greatest number. Fraternally he belongs to the Order of Mac- 
cabees and in his religious conviction he is Baptist, being a trustee in 
the church of that denomination. 

Charles Utter. — The able and popular incumbent of the office of 
superintendent of the plant of the American Printing Company at Man 
istee, Michigan, is Mr. Charles Utter, who was born at Conneaut, Ashta 
bula county, Ohio, on the 28th of April. 1874. His father was Rev 
Francis Utter, a Methodist clergyman, who was born in Ohio. Rev 
Utter married .Mi.ss Charlotte Stuck, a native of Pennsylvania. Dur 
ing the period of the Civil war, Rev. Utter was enlisted in the Ohio regi 
ment as cliaplain and he served in this capacity throughout the war. 
About 1876 Rev. and ^Mrs. Utter removed to St. Johns, Michigan, 
whither he had been sent in connection with his ministerial duties. As 
time passed he had charge of parishes in different places but eventually 
he was recalled to St. Johns, where he passed the residue of his life, his 
death having occurred in the year 1882. The mother passed away at a 
later date. They were the parents of fo\ir children, of which number 
Charles was the youngest born. 

Charles Utter resided with his parents unlil lie had attauied to the 
age of nine years, at which time he went to live with n Mr. Sullivan nt 
Ulinrji. Miehiuiin. his fnther hHvint:' died when he \v;is but eiuht yeyrs 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 661 

old. Ilu received his education in the public schools of Gratiot county, 
often working mornings and evenings in the office and eking out what 
learning he could in the meantime. In 1885 he went to live with his 
brother Darain at DeWitt, Michigan, who was a teacher by occupation. 
Charles remained with him, attending school and working at odd jobs 
until he was eighteen, at which time he went to Kalamazoo, where he 
entered the employment of the Commercial Printing Company, remain- 
ing there until 1895. He then took to roving, going to Oxford, Flint 
and Lapeer, working in various printing offices and remaining but a 
short time at each one, as none of the places seemed to suit him. Finally 
he arrived at JIanton, where he engaged with the Trihune and where he 
continued to maintain his home until 1904, in which year he established 
his home in ;Mauistee, entering the employ of J. H. Shults. In July, 
1905, he was proffered and accepted the foremanship of the News Pub- 
lishing Company, retaining this incumbency until April, 1906, in which 
year Mr. Kihnke established the American Printing Company and en- 
gaged Mr. Utter as superintendent of the plant. He has retained this 
position to the present time, in 1911, and his varied experiences in dif- 
ferent printing offices have made him a most valuable asset to this 
concern. 

]Mr. Utter is a staunch Republican in his political convictions and 
he is essentially progressive and public-spirited in his civic attitude. In 
a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and his I'e- 
ligious faith is that of the ^lethodist Episcopal church. ^Ir. I'tter is a 
most capable business man and he holds a high place in the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow citizens. 

George Hyde, proprietor of Hyde "s Restaurant on Main street, "West 
Branch, Micliigan, is one of the wide-awake business men of this city, 
where he has been identified with his present enterprise the past four 
years. ^Ir. Hyde was born in Ireland in 1859. a .son of Crawford and 
Ann Hyde and one of their four children, three of whom are living, he 
being the only one residing in Michigan. In 1868 the family left the 
"Emerald Isle" and came to America, making settlement in Lenawee 
county, Jliehigan. In this state George was reared and has ever since 
made his home, notwithstanding in the meantime he has been doing 
business in various parts of the United States. In early life he learned 
the mason 's trade, at which he spent most of his years. He was an ex- 
tensive contractor and builder, paying much attention to concrete con- 
struction in the erection of railroad bridges, viaducts, etc., in all of 
which he was very successful. He was engaged in this particular line 
of work from 1885 until recently, and has been in the employ of various 
railroad companies not only in different parts of the United States but 
also in Old Jlexico. He has been identified with the building of arches, 
abutments and bridges for the following railroad companies: B. C. & 
St. L., R. & P., West Shore, Niekle Plate, Omaha, North-Western, N. W. 
& :M., 1. C, :M. T. & T. In Old ^Mexico he did construction work for 
the V. C. & P. and Mexican Central Railroad Companies, in all this work 
filling the position of either foreman, inspector or superintendent. 
Having in his eiinloy workmen of different nationalities, it was neees- 



662 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

sary for him to familiarize himself with their language, and to-day he 
speaks the Spanish language quite as fluently as he does his mother 
tongue. 

In 1891 and 1892 Mr. Hyde was a partner in operating Oak Point, 
a summer resort in Ohio, where he was successful, and in 1910 he set- 
tled down to the restaurant business in West Branch, where he owns 
some valuable property, including his residence and several lots. In 
this business he is ably assisted by his wife, formerly Miss Jolianna 
Peters, and whom he married in 1908. 

An incident in which Mr. Hyde figured and which was written up 
in the local papers at the time is deserving of mention here, as showing 
the sort of material of which he is made. While stationed at Minnea- 
polis, in the employ of the Cook Construction Company, 'Sir. Hyde 
risked his life to save that of some boys. It was on Sunday. The scows 
used in the construction work were tied up to the docks, but through 
negligence were not locked. Along came three boys who untied one of 
the scows, got into it and allowed it to run out as far as the lines would 
permit, without realizing their danger until they found they could not 
pull the boat back to her former place at the dock. Then there was 
great excitement on the shore as the people gathered there watched the 
boys in the little boat. The current of the ^lississippi was swift and 
sure and the dam was high. At this critical moment Mr. Hyde con- 
ceived the idea of reaching the imperilled boys by propelling himself, 
hand over hand over the cable, which was alsout fifteen hundred feet 
long and ten feet from the water. It was a herculean feat even for an 
acrobat, but he accomplished it and saved the boys from death. 

WALDEM.iR E. Brown. — Since 1900 has Waldemar E. Brown, 
of Manistee, Michigan, been incumbent of the office of superintend- 
ent of the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company lumber yards, having 
charge of the manufacturing, grading and shipping of this substantial 
concern. He was born in the city of Sarpsborg, Norway, on the 18th of 
August, 1863, and is a son of Bernt J. and Helena (Borganson) Brown, 
the former of whom died in the old country and the latter accompanied 
her two children — a boy and a girl — to America in the year 1886, at 
which time Waldemar E. was twenty-three years of, age. The first lo- 
cation was made at White Cloud. Michigan, whence they moved to 
Minneapolis, ]\Iinnesota, later coming to Manistee, which represents 
their home at the present time. The mother i.s still living and she has 
now attained to the venerable age of sixty-eight years. 

Waldemar E. Brown attended the state school of Norway until he 
had passed through the eighth grade, at which time he was sent to a 
private institution in which to receive a commei'cial education. After 
completing a course in the latter school he entered an office as assistant 
l)ookkeepei', later securing a position as clerk in the post office. The 
year 1880 was devoted to a salt water trip which included various im- 
portant ports and in 1881 he came to America, his first stopping place 
being Grand Haven, this state, whence he proceeded to Spring Lake, 
where he was employed in a mill and lumber yard during the summer. 
Tlie following winter he sjient in a lumbei- camp, returning to Spring 




/^an^ , 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 663 

Lake in the spring. For two or three years thereafter he did hard man- 
ual labor in the mills, yards and camps, and in the fall of 1883 he went 
to Hungerford, where he worked in a lumber yard, planing mill and 
saw mill, after which he became assistant superintendent of the board- 
ing house of Stewart. Ives & Company. Later he was transferred to 
the yards of this concern, where he learned to inspect lumber. In 1888 
he removed to Diamond Lake, where for the ilichigan Lumber Com- 
pany he acted as edgeman, trimmer and lumber inspector. After seven 
years identification with this concern he went to Lilly Junction, where 
he inspected lumber of the Sissons-Lilly Lumber Company and to- 
wards the close of his identification with them had charge of the yards. 
He remained there until the spring of 1897, at which time he went to 
Cloquet, JMinnesota, as inspector for the Northern Lumber Company. 
In July, 1897, he established his home in Manistee, engaging with the 
Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company as inspector. Some time later he 
became foreman of the Lake Shore yards and in 1900, as previously 
noted, he was appointed superintendent of the yards, having charge of 
manufacturing, grading and .shipping. 

On the 13th of July, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brown 
to Miss Phyllis Gardner, of Big Rapids. She was born in Canada, a 
daughter of George and ]\Iargaret (Moulee) Gardner, the former a na- 
tive of Canada and the latter of Ohio, their arrival in Michigan occur- 
ring when Phyllis was a mere child. The father was long engaged as 
ship carpenter, and his death occurred in Michigan about the year 1903, 
the mother still surviving. Mr. and Mrs. Brown became the parents of 
six children, concerning whom the following brief data are here re- 
corded — Walter was born on the 19th of Maj' 1886 ; Marv Catherine, 
on the 3rd of July, 1887 ; Elmer, born April 14th, 1889, died on the 27th 
of April of the same year; Isabella was born on the 26th of ]\Iarch, 
1890 ; Joseph, born on the 17th of March, 1893, died on the 28th of May 
the same year; and Charles was borii on the 17th of December, 1892. 

Jlr. Brown is a Republican in his political proclivities and he is a 
man whose civic attitude is of the most progressive order. While a 
resident of Lilly he served as .justice of the peace and as a school di- 
rector. In 1905 he was elected fire and police commissioner of Man- 
istee, serving in that office until 1908. In the spring of 1910 he was 
given further evidence of pojiular confidence and esrecm ni that li" was 
then elected mayor of ^Manistee, in which office he gave a most efficient 
administration of the municipal affairs of the city, and was re-elected 
mayor in the spring of 1911. 

His fraternal connections are with the following organizations: 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Knights of the Jlaceabees: 
JModern Brotherhood of America; Knights of the White Cross; Modern 
Romans; the Scandinavian Working Men's A.ssociation : and the Eagles. 
He and his wife are devout communicants of the Catholic Church, hold- 
ing membership in the Guardian Angel church, in the various depart- 
ments of whose work they have been most zealous factors. 

Fr.^ntv C. Adamski. — An enterprising citizen of the younger gen- 
eration in ^Manistee. ^Michigan, is Frank C. Adamski. who was born at 



664 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

this place on tlu' 15th of September, 1881. He is a son of Joseph and 
Mary (Jarka) Adamski, both of whom were born in Germany, whence 
they emigrated to America about the year 1872, locating at Manistee, 
where the father began working in the mills. He was employed by 
Louis Sands and he contiuuel to be identified with lumbering operations 
for a period of seventeen years, at the expiration of which he purchased 
a tract of forty acres of land two and a half miles distant from ]Man- 
istee, reclaiming a tine farm from the wilderness. In 1889 he purchased 
a small grocery business at Oak Hill, which he enlarged in 1900 by 
building an addition to the store, fitting the place up with all the most 
modern equipment. He also constructed a house adjoining the .store 
and there he and his wife now maintain their home. 

Prank C. Adamski is the fourth in order of birth in a family of 
eight children, all of whom are living. He received his preliminary 
education in the parochial and public schools of Manistee county, 
spending two years in the local high school. In 1897 he Avent to Mil- 
waukee, where he entered the employ of the Lincoln Avenue Drug 
Company as an apprentice, remaining there one year, after which he 
became a student in the Milwaukee I\Iedical College, in which well 
ordered institution he was graduated in the class of 1900, duly receiv- 
ing his degree of Bachelor of Pharmacy. After his graduation he re- 
turned to Michigan, where he successfully passed an examination be- 
fore the Michigan Board of Pharmacy, after which he accepted a posi- 
tion with W. R. Hall of Manistee, as pharmacist, continuing in his em- 
ploy for seven consecutive years. In 1907, however, his health became 
impaired and he was forced to resign his position. After attending col- 
lege for one year he returned to iManistee, where he established the 
Red Cross Pharmacy on the 1st of July, 1909. He equipped the store 
with the latest fittings, dispensing M-ith the old-style counters and in- 
stalling up-to-date show cases instead, placing each upon a marble base. 
This splendid establishment is one of the show places of the town and 
it controls a large and lucrative trade. Mr. Adamski is a stalwart sup- 
porter of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party 
stands sponsor and he manifests a deep and abiding interest in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the general welfare of the community. In a fraternal 
way he is connected with the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. He is a devout communicant of the 
Catholic church and holds membership in the St. Joseph's parish. 

On the 15th of June, 1910, Mr. Adamski was united in marriage to 
Miss Margaret Schmelling, a daughter of William and jMargaret 
Sehmelling, both of whom are prominent citizens of JManistee, M'here the 
father is a contractor and builder by vocation. Mr. and I\rrs. Adamski 
are popular factors in connection with the best social activities of 
Manistee and their home is a recooiiized center o1' most rcliiicd nnd 
gracious hospitality. 

Professor Elmer N. Durpee. — It is not to be gainsaid that there 
is no office carrying with it so much of responsibility as that of the in- 
structor who moulds the plastic mind of youth, who instills into the 
formative brain those principles which, when matured, will he the chief 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 665 

heritage of the active man who iu due time will sway the multitudes, 
lead armies, govern nations or frame the laws by which civilized na- 
tions are governed. To say that all learned men are capable of filling 
this high and important office is by no means the truth. One is inclined 
fretjueutlj' to believe that the true instructor is born and not made; he 
nuist have a vast knowledge of human nature; he must know not only 
what is in books but what is in man also, — that is, he must understand 
his pupil and deal with his mind according to his individuality. 

Among the popular instructors of Michigan is Professor Durfee. 
His education and long experience, together with his knowledge of 
youthful human nature, have fitted him in a high degree to fill his 
present position as superintendent of the Standish public schools. He 
has held his present positon since 1905, and in the ensuing years has 
given abundant satisfaction to pupils and parents. The Standish public 
school is upon a high plane of excellence. It has twelve grades and a 
corps of nine competent teachers, and fits its students for the best of the 
colleges. In the course of study are two languages. There are three 
hundred and sixty pupils enrolled on its books and it graduates on an 
average of ten students per year. 

Professor Durfee is a native of the Wolverine state and the year of 
his birth was 1866. He is the son of Edgar and Elizabeth (Bennett) 
Durfee, both of whom are likewise natives of the state. They are of 
English parentage, the subject's grandparents having come here in the 
early history of the state, and, attracted by its manifold advantages, 
made it their permanent home. Professor Durfee was reared and re- 
ceived his education of a preliminarj^ character in the schools of Shia- 
wassee and Clare counties, and a great part of his higher education 
was obtained after the attainment of his majority. Later in life, and 
after he had had many years experience in teaching, he concluded his 
\vork in the State Normal College of IMichigan, passing in 1908 those 
final examinations which cjualified him for all state work for life. He 
has to his credit twenty years as an instructor and he enjoys high 
prestige among instructors throughout the state. 

In 1891 Professor Durfee established a happy home and congenial 
life companionship by his marriage to Miss Katia Kellogg. Their union 
has been blessed by the birth of five children, — Ruth, Walter, Joy, Max 
and Harold. 

In the matter of political conviction Professor Durfee subscribes to 
the articles of faith of the Republican party and in evidence of the con- 
fidence which he has inspired in the comnninity is the fact that he has 
been several times elected to public office, having held the positions of 
justice of the peace, supervisor and alderman. He is public spirited 
and his right hand is ever given to such good causes as he believes will 
result in benefit to the whole body politic. Fraternally he is a member 
of the time-honored IMasonic order. 

Herbert L. Dow is a native son of the state of Maine, where his birth 
occurred on the 28th of June, 1866. and is a scion of fine old New Eng- 
land families, his parents being Oscar R. and Helen A. (DoUoff) Dow. 
who moved west to ^Michigan in 1867. at which time Herbert L. was an 



666 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

infant of hut one year. Like all the early pioneers Oscar R. Dow 
worked in the lumber woods for a number of years after his arrival iu 
this state. In 1S75 he purchased a tract of two hundred acres of land, 
to w-hicli he soon added another tract of fortj- acres, in Gladwin county, 
where he was located for twenty-nine years, and then he sold that es- 
tate and bought two hundred and forty acres in Sage township, where 
he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits during the long interven- 
ing years to the present time and where he and his wife still maintain 
their home. He has served his township and county in various public 
ofBces of responsibility and trust, having been county treasurer and 
township treasurer, besides which he was also highway commissioner. 
He and his wife became the parents of four children, namely, — Herbert 
L., the immediate subject of this review; Prank. Fred and Lelia, of 
whom the latter three were born in Michigan. 

Herbert L. Dow was reared to the invigorating influence of the home 
farm, in whose work he early became associated with his father, and 
he received his preliminary educational training in the common schools 
of Gladwin county. At an early age he manifested an aptitude for me- 
chanics, and accordingly he studied and eventually mastered station- 
ary steam engineering, for which work he procured a license. For sev- 
eral years he resided at Wagerville, Gladwin county, Michigan, where he 
kept a store and operated a cheese factory, and in 1907 he established 
his home at Gladwin, where he owns and operates a saw mill, a planing 
mill and a machine shop. He has been interested in the lumber busi- 
ness since 1894 and in connection with his machine shop he makes a 
specialty of automobile repairing. He is a representative citizen and 
has gained a wide reputation for" unquestioned integrity and fair and 
honorable methods in connection with all his business dealings. He has 
ever been progressive and enterprising and it is an historical fact that 
with his father he owned and ran the first threshing machine in this 
county, operating the same for a period of nine years. In politics he 
has ever been aligned as a loyal supporter of the principles of the 
Democratic party and in connection with political affairs was supei-visor 
of Grout township for seven years. He is now, in 1911, clerk of the 
city of Gladwin, in connection with the duties of which office he is ac- 
quitting himself most creditably. Socially he is a member of the Jla- 
sonic order, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Grange, and the re- 
ligious faith of the family is in harmony with the Jlcthodist Episcopal 
church. His father and mother were of the Presbyterian faith. 

In the year 1890 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Dow to Miss 
Effie G. Woods, who was born and reared in Sanilac county. To this 
union have been born five children, — Edson, Ethel, Vera, Russell and 
Irma. Mr. Dow is a citizen whose loyalty and public spirit have been of 
the most insistent order and it is but consonant to state here that no 
one in Gladwin holds a higher place in popular confidence and regard 
than does he. 

Geobge W. Doane. — Although a civil engineer by profession George 
W. Doane has been engaged in the abstract business at Gladwin, Mich- 
gaii. since 19(10 and he lias taken ;iii active jiart in the political affairs of 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN m7 

the community, ably filling some of the most important offices that the 
city has had to ott'er. He was born in Gratiot county, Michigan, on the 
23d of August, 1864, and is a son of Harrison P. and Frances (Crandall) 
Doane, the former of whom was a native of the state of New York, 
whence he came to the old Wolverine state with his parents when but 
three years of age. The mother was likewise born in the Empire state 
of the Union and she is now living, at the age of seventy-five years, in 
Huntington Park, California. The Doane family on their arrival in 
this state located in Oakland county, where they entered a tract of gov- 
ernment land and continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits 
until the respective deaths of the father and son. Harrison P. and 
Frances Doane became the parents of three children, two of whom are 
now living, — George W., the immediate subject of this review, and Mrs. 
J. M. Thayer, of Huntington Park, California. 

George W. Doane was reared and educated in Genesee county, sup- 
plementing his earlier training by a course in the high school at Holly, 
Oakland county. He studied civil engineering under the preceptorship 
of a private tutor and in time became exceedingly proficient in his 
chosen field. He was a resident of Genesee county until 1888, in which 
year he established his home in Gladwin, where he has maintained his 
residence during the intervening years to the present time, in 1911. Up 
to 1900 Mr. Doane was engaged in the work of his profession and in 
that year he turned his attention to the abstract business, in which his 
success has been on a parity with his well directed endeavors. He fiir- 
nishes complete abstracts of all titles and transfers of property sold in 
Gladwin county. Long experience and keen interest in the work have 
made him an expert in this line of enterprise. In politics he is aligned 
as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Republican party and he has 
served most creditably in various important offices of public trust. He 
has held the office of clerk of Grant township and has been county sur- 
veyor of Gladwin coiant.v, in addition to which he has also been city 
engineer of Gladwin. For six years he was alderman and he is now 
(1911) serving his fourth term as justice of the peace, having been 
incumbent of the latter office for a period of sixteen years. He is ex- 
tremely conversant with the laws of the state and no movement pro- 
jected for the improvement of Gladwin has met with any but the heart- 
iest approval on his part. He is affiliated with several representative 
social organizations. 

In the year 1898 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Doane to Miss 
Emma E. Scott, who was born and reared at Newburgh, Ontario, and 
who is a daughter of Thomas Scott, also of Newburgh. No children have 
been born to this union. ]Mr. Doane is a man of broad general informa- 
tion and is endowed by nature with high intellectual qualities. While 
he has won marked success in business he has at the same time kept in 
touch with the thinking men of the age and is thoroughly informed upon 
many of the subjects which concern the general interest of society and 
the welfare of the nation. 

James J. Potter. — Any publication purporting to enter record 
concerning the representative citizens of Alpena would be devoid of 



668 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

eonsisteuey were there failure to accord recognition to this pioneer 
business man, who has here maintained his home for nearly half a cen- 
tury and who has been prominently identified with the social and ma- 
terial development of the fine little city which has been the scene of his 
worthy and productive activities along normal lines of enterprise. Here 
lie has been engaged in the hardware business for more than forty years, 
and in the communitj' his name has ever been synonymous with integrity 
and honor, the while his civic loyalty and public spirit have been of 
the most pronounced order, as shown in his support of all measures that 
have tended to conserve the best interests of the community. A man 
of sincerity and sterling character, an aggressive and successful factor 
in business life, and a citizen who merits tlie high esteem in which he is 
uniformly held, Mr. Potter is one whose career is pleasing to contem- 
plate, and his also is the distinction of having served as a valorous sol- 
dier of the Union during the greater part of the Civil war. 

James J. Potter was born in Carleton count}', province of Ontario, 
Canada, on a farm about 28 miles distant from the city of Ottawa, and 
the date of his nativity was November 1, 1843. He is a son of Thomas 
and Margaret (Duncan) Potter, both of whom were born in the north 
of Ireland and both of whom were of Scotch and Irish lineage. The 
father was born in the year 1790 and died at Port Huron, Michigan, in 
1865, the major portion of liis active career having been devoted to the 
cooper trade, which he learned in liis native land. He emigrated from 
the Emerald Isle to America in the early '30s and thereafter maintained 
his home in the province of Ontario, Canada, until IS-IS, when he came 
to Michigan and located iu Port Huron, which was then a mere village. 
There he engaged in day laboring and there he maintained his home for 
many years. He was a man of alert mentality and so lived as to deserve 
and command the unqualified confidence and esteem of his fellow men. 
His wife, to whom he was married while a resident of Ireland, was born 
in the year 1808 and she was summoned to the life eternal in 1876. The 
father was a communicant of the Episcopal church and the 
mother of the Methodist church. They became the parents of eight sons, 
of whom six attained to years of maturity, and of the number James J., 
of this sketch, is the elder of the two now living. His only surviving 
brother. John D., is associated with him in business, under the title of 
tlie Potter Hardware Company, and is individually mentioned on other 
l>ages of this work. 

James J. Potter was a lad of about five years at the time of the family 
removal to Port Huron, Michigan, where he was reared to adult age and 
where he was afforded the advantages of the common schools of the 
period. When the Civil war was precipitated on a divided nation he 
showed his intrinsic loyalty by tendering his services in defense of the 
Union. On the 29th of July, 1862, about four months prior to his nine- 
teenth birthday anniversary, he enlisted "for three years or during tlie 
war." as a private in Company C, Twenty-second Michigan Volunteer 
Infantry, with which gallant command he served until the close of the 
war. He received his honorable discharge at Nashville, Tennessee, on 
the 26th of June, 1865, and was mustered out as second lieutenant of 
Company E, in the city of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Potter accompanied 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 669 

his regiment into Kentucky at the time when General Kirby Smith, the 
well known Confederate officer, was preparing to make a raid on the city 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, but the regiment at this time was ill equipped for 
conflict with the enemy. Though its members had been supplied with 
Austrian rifles they had no supply of cartridges, a deficiency that was 
made good by whittling bullets of larger calibre to fit their guns. The 
command marched from Covington, Kentucky, on the opposite side of 
the Ohio river from Cincinnati, to Lexington, Kentucky, where it re- 
mained during the winter of 1862-3. In the spring it marched to Le- 
banon, Kentucky, having been in pursuit of General Morgan through 
Kentucky, and finally it reached Nashville, Tenn., where it remained on 
provost duty until September, 1863. The regiment then moved on to 
Chattanooga and arrived in time to take active part in the battle of 
Chickamauga, where it supported a battery during the engagement on 
the 19th of September. On the 20th the Twenty-second Michigan, which 
was temporarily attached to Granger's reserve corps, was ordered to 
the right. It charged over Snodgrass hill into the stronghold of the 
enemy losing very heavily in killed and wounded, repulsed a counter 
charge and held the ground from noon until evening when the amuni- 
tion was exhausted, order was given to fall back, but before its execu- 
tion, came an order to return to the hill, and this action was taken by the 
gallant command with no ammunition, the result being all that were left 
were captured by the Confederate forces who surrounded them after 
dark. Mr. Potter was among the number thus taken prisoner and with 
his comrades he was taken to Ringgold, Georgia, and marched to Daltou 
where they were placed on freight ears and taken to Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. He was incarcerated in Pemberton prison, across the street from 
the notorious Libby prison, and after being held there for six weeks was 
removed to Danville, Virginia. In the spring of 1864, he and other 
prisoners were transferred to Andersonville prison. After the fall of 
Atlanta they were started for Charleston. South Carolina. Sixty prison- 
ers were assigned to each box car and as there was no room for the 
guards in the ears they took their positions on the roof of the ears, six on 
each car. Mr. Potter was placed in charge of the men in his car and 
upon arrival at night at Fort Valley, Georgia, he managed to escape from 
the train. He endured untold hardships and privations in making his 
way to the Union lines, one hundred and fifty miles distant. He passed 
fifteen days and sixteen nights on the road and walked the entire dis- 
tance to Decatur, Georgia, where he joined the Union forces. Upon his 
arrival he found that he had been promoted second lieutenant, with an 
order from General Thomas for him to be mustered into this office. He 
thus served as an officer of his regiment until the close of the war. and, 
as already stated, was mustered out with the rank of second lieutenant. 
His record as a soldier of the republic is without blemish, being marked 
by utmost fidelity and gallantry, and it redounds to his lasting honor. 
After the close of the war Mr. Potter entered the Bryant & Stratton 
Business College in the city of Detroit, and after the completion of a 
course in this institution he came to Northern Michigan and established 
his residence in Alpena, where he arrived on the 1st of December. 1865. 
Here he secured the position of bookkeeper for tlie lumlieriiig firm of L. 



670 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

M. Mason & Company, with which he continued until 1868, when he 
formed a partnership with his elder brother, Edward K., and engaged in 
the retail hardware businss, under the firm name of Potter Brothers. 
The enterprise had a most modest inception, but from this nucleus has 
been evolved the large and important business now controlled by the 
Potter Hardware Company, one of the most notable concerns of the 
kind in the entire northern part of the state and one that now represents 
both wholesale and retail trade. In 1869, John D. Potter purchased the 
interest of his brother Edward K. and the business was thereafter con- 
tinued under the name of Potter Brothers until November, 1909, when 
the two principals, James J. and John D. effected the organization of the 
Potter Hardware Company, which was duly incorporated under the 
laws of the state and which bases its operations upon a capital stock of 
sixty thousand dollars. The two brothers retain virtually the entire 
stock of the concern and James J. is president of the company, while 
John D. holds the office of treasurer. Through tlie enterprise noted the 
Potter brothers have contributed in large measure to the business so- 
lidity and prestige of Alpena and here their high reputation for fair- 
ness and honesty in all transactions constitutes their strongest asset, as 
they have gained and retained the unequivocal confidence of the com- 
munity with whose interests they have been so long and prominently 
identified as representative business men and loyal and progressive 
citizens. 

In politics James J. Potter has ever been found arrayed as a stalwart 
supporter of the cause of the Republican party and he has served in 
various offices of public trust. He was supervisor of Alpena township 
for one term and for twelve years held the office of deputy collector of 
United States customs for the eastern district of Michigan. He has ever 
maintained a sincere interest in his old comrades of the Civil war and 
is one of the appreciative and valued members of Horace S. Roberts 
Post, No. 139, Grand Array of the Republic, of which he was one of the 
organizers and of which he served as commander for several terms. He 
is also affiliated with Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted ]\Iasons, 
and Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arcli Masons. Both he and his 
wife are most zealous members of the Baptist church in Alpena, and lie 
served for nearly forty years as superintendent of its Sunday school, an 
office from which he retired in 1908. 

On the 29th of January, 1868. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Potter to Miss Frances 6. Barlow, who was born at Branchville, Sussex 
county, New Jersey, and who is a daughter of Rev. Frederick N. and 
Harriet (Gillette) Barlow, both of whom were born in Connecticut, 
both being representatives of families founded in New England in the 
colonial epoch of our national history. Rev. Frederick N. Barlow was 
an able and honored clergyman of the Baptist church, in whose ministry 
he labored witli all of consecrated zeal for more than half a century. 
He celebrated his eighty-ninth birthday anniversary on the 13th of 
March, 1911, and is now living retired in Alpena, where he is held in 
reverent affection by all who know him. lie had the distinction of being 
the organizer of the First Baptist church of Alpena, in 1867, and served 
as its pastor for fully ten years. He was first lieutenant of ('om]iaiiy H, 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 671 

One Hundred and Fifteenth New York Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil 
war and was surrendered as a prisoner of war at Harper's Ferry; he 
received a parole after being held in durance for several months and 
finally rejoined his regiment. He is one of the honored members of 
Horace S. Roberts Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and has served as 
chaplain of the same. Mrs. Barlow died April 4, 1881. Mr. and 
Mrs. Potter became the parents of seven children, of whom five are liv- 
ing. The other two, a daughter and a son, died in infancy. Rev. Arthur 
B. is a clergyman of the Baptist church and holds a pastorate at Balston, 
New York ; Harriet is the wife of Charles E. Cheney, of Detroit, Michi- 
gan; Frederic N., postmaster of Alpena, is specifically mentioned else- 
where in this volume; Frank E. remains at the parental home and is 
associated with the business of the Potter Hardware Company; and J. 
Carroll is engaged with Russell & Erwin Manufacturing Compau.y in 
New York City. 

Frederic N. Potter. — As the efficient and popular postmaster of 
his native city of Alpena, where he is also engaged in the fire and acci- 
dent insurance business, Mr. Potter merits recognition in this publica- 
tion, and he is known as one of the representative citizens of the county 
that has ever been his home and in which he is a member of a family 
whose name has been long and prominently identified with the history 
of this favored section of the Wolverine state. Adequate data concern- 
ing the family appears in the sketch of the career of his father, James 
J. Potter, on other pages of this work, and a repetition of the same is 
not demanded in the present article. 

Frederic Nelson Potter was born in Alpena on the 16th of Septem- 
ber. 1872, and is a son of James J. and Frances G. (Barlow) Potter, 
the father still residing in this city. After completing the curriculum 
of the public schools Mr. Potter assumed the position of clerk in the 
hardware establishment of the firm of Potter Brothers, in which his 
father was senior member, and he continued to be identified with this 
enterprise until 1890, when he associated himself with his uncle, Will- 
iam H. Potter, in the work and management of a well improved farm in 
Alpena county. This study and invigorating industry engrossed his 
attention until 1894, when he again became a salesman in the hardware 
establishment of Potter Brother, long one of the leading mercantile con- 
cerns of Alpena. He continued to be thus engaged until 1900, when he 
here established himself in the fire and accident insurance business, in 
which he has since successfully continued. He is representative of lead- 
ing insurance companies and as an underwriter has a position of leader- 
ship among similar agencies in his home city. In 1906 Mr. Potter re- 
ceived from President Roosevelt appointment and commission to the 
office of postmaster of Alpena, and upon the expiration of his term he 
Avas reappointed, by President Taft, in June, 1910. He has given a most 
careful and efl'eetive administration of the affairs of this office and has 
done much to improve the service and facilities thereof, with the result 
that there has been a gratifying measure of popular approval and en- 
dorsement. He enjoys unqualified esteem in the community in which 
he was born and reared, and such popular approbation constitutes an 



672 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

eftVctive metewand of character. In polities, as may naturally be in- 
ferred, Mr. Potter is found aligned as an uncompromising advocate 
of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands 
sponsor, and he has given yeoman service in its local ranks. He is af- 
filiated with Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons ; Thunder 
Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; ilyrtle Lodge, No. 432. In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows; and Alpena Lodge, No. 505, Bene- 
volent & Protective Order of Elks, besides which he holds membership 
in other civic organizations of representative character. 

On the 22d of May, 1895, ilr. Potter was united in marriage to Miss 
Kathryn JleLeod, who was born in Bay City, Michigan, and who was 
the second in order of birth of the three daughters of John J. and Han- 
nah L. McLeod, the latter of whom died when Mrs. Potter was a child 
and the former of whom now resides in Alpena. -Mr. McLeod was born 
in Ben Becula, Scotland, and, as the name indicates, is of staunch Scot- 
tish lineage. He was long and prominently identified with railroad in- 
terests in Michigan, having early become an employe of the Detroit, Bay 
City & Alpena Railroad, whose original line is now a part of the Detroit' 
& Mackinac Railroad. As a conductor on the Detroit, Bay City & 
Alpena Railroad he had the distinction of bringing the first passenger 
train into Alpena, and the occasion was one notable in this history of 
this city, where he has lived virtuall.v retired since 1900. He is a 
staunch Republican and is affiliated with the local lodge, chapter and 
eommandery of the Masonic fraternity, being one of the well known 
and highly esteemed citizens of northern Jlichigan, of the development 
of which section of the state he has been an appreciative witness. ^Mr. 
and ;\rrs. Potter have one son, William Henry, who was born on the 1st 
of September, 1896. 

Mrs. Teresa Rosa Burr. — The time is not far past when women were 
considered unfit to transact business. They had been so frequently in- 
formed that they were the "weaker vessel" they believed it themselves 
and in the smallest business matters they sought humble counsel of their 
male relatives. One of the distinguishing features of the late nineteenth 
and early twentieth century is a marked change in this attitude and the 
woman of the twentieth century, particularly the American woman, is 
sharply competing with her brother for position in the various profes- 
sions and trades. Not only have the clerical and lesser positions been 
well filled by women, but they have besieged the highest walks of life 
and are found in the professors' chair, on the platform, in the pulpit 
and at the bar. Thus it is but a sign of the times when there is en- 
countered one of the foremo.st business concerns of the cit.v which is in 
the hands of a woman. This is the Standish Creamery, and its manager 
and proprietor is Mrs. T. R. Burr. 

The Standi.sh Creamery is one of those substantial and well-conducted 
institutions which eontrifjute in due mea.sure to the progress and pros- 
perity of the conununity in which they are located. This certain in- 
dustry was established a good many years ago by a Mr. Judd. and was 
conducted as a cheese factorv by that gentleman for about twent.v-three 
years, [t was purchased by Prank A. Burr, the husband of the subject 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 673 

of tlie sketch, in 1904 and upon the deoeasf of .Air. Burr in 1905 the 
management was assumed by his wife. The creamery has experienced 
constant growth and prosperity and at the present time the product 
amounts to one hundred and sixty-six thousand pounds of butter per 
annum. This is used in supplying Standish and many other points, in- 
cluding Bay City and surrounding to^vns. Mrs. Biirr is gifted with 
business acumen, sound judgment and great executive ability, and her 
success has by no means been an accident, but a logical result. 

JMrs. Burr, whose maiden name was Teresa Haubeur, is a native of 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Marshall and Teresa 
(Hapinger) Haubeur, natives of the same county and state. The father 
was engaged in farming and Mrs. Burr's youthful years were passed 
on the farm, her education being secured in the schools of Clarion, 
Pennsylvania. It was while living in Pennsylvania that Mrs. Burr met 
and married Mr. Burr, their union being celebrated on December 13, 
1887. To them were born two children, — Genevieve and Marvin, both 
with their mother. There is also a son, Ralph Burr, born to the first 
marriage of Mr. Burr. 

Frank A. Burr, deceased, was born in Girard county. Michigan, in 
1856, a son of Charles Burr. He wa.s educated in the public schools of 
his native county and when a young man took up the creamei'y busi- 
ness, which he followed until his demise, — a period of twenty-three 
years. In 1885 he removed to the Keystone state, where for a time he 
engaged in the creamery business in Clarion county and there he con- 
tracted that union which was to prove happy and congenial and which 
was only terminated by death. He was of English descent. He and his 
wife became identified with Standish in the year 1903, soon thereafter 
becoming proprietors of the Standish Creamery, and in 1905 the head 
of the house was summoned from a life of usefulness to the Great Be- 
yond. His wife immediately took up the reins of management and has 
made the success above recorded. 

Peank p. Dunwell, the present elBcient postmaster of the thriving 
little lake-port city of Ludington, judicial center of Mason county, is 
one of the .sterling citizens given to northern ^Michigan by the old Buck- 
eye state, and in Ludington he stands exponent of civic loyalty and pro- 
gressiveness. the while he has been an influential factor in public affairs 
in this section of the state. 

Prank Pearce Dunwell was bom in Solon township, Cuyahoga county, 
Ohio, on the 8th of June, 1852, and is a son of George W.' and Electa P. 
(Tinker) Dunwell. the former of whom was bom in the state of New 
York and the latter in Ohio, where her father, Hiram J. Tinker was an 
early settler. The Dunwell family became identified with the annals of 
the fine old Western Reserve in Ohio in the pioneer days, as is evident 
when it is stated that George W. Dunwell. father of him whose name pre- 
faces this conspectus, was a boy at the time of the family removal from 
New York to Cuyahoga county. Ohio. His father, Samuel A. Dunwell. 
was bom on Long Island, and the family, of English lineage, was founded 
in America in the colonial days. George W. Dunwell was reared to man- 
hood in the Buckeye state, where he continued to be identified with 



674 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

agricultural pursuits, in Cuyahoga county, until 1861, wheu he came to 
Michigan and purchased a tract of land in Hopkins township, Allegan 
county, where he reclaimed a productive farm and where he continued to 
maintain his home until the time of his death, at the age of sixty-nine 
years. His cherished and devoted wife was but thirty-eight years of age 
at the time of her death. They became the parents of two sons and two 
daughters, all of whom attained to years of maturity and of whom the 
subject of this review is the eldest. 

Frank P. Dunwell is indebted to the district schools of his native 
county for his rudimentary educational discipline, and he was twelve 
years of age at the time of the family removal to AUegan county, ]\Iich- 
igan, where he was reared to adult age and where he duly availed him- 
self of the advantages of the public schools of the period. This training 
was supplemented by attendance in Hiram College, at Hiram, Ohio, an 
institution of which General James A. Garfield was at one time president. 

As a young man Mr. Dimwell identified himself with the interests of 
northern Michigan, whose principal industry at that time was lumbering. 
He passed three yeai-s at Pentwater, Oceana county, and on New Year's 
day of the year 1874 he took up his residence in the little village of 
Ludington, where he became a clerk in the general store of Donohue & 
Melendy Company. On the 1st of the following ilarch he became a clerk 
in this establishment where he continued for some time as a clerk, after 
which he was associated in the work of the bank established by Mr. 
Stray. He was thus identified with the banking business in Ludington 
for a period of about thirteen years, and as he has been identified with 
local business and civic interests for more than thirty-five yeai-s he may 
propei'ly be designated as one of the pioneer citizens of Ludington, in 
whose advancement to its present position as one of the prosperous and 
attractive cities of the state he has contributed loyally of his infiuence 
and tangible co-operation. While interested in the banking business Mr. 
Dunwell became associated with Eugene C. Rolm in the insurance busi- 
ness, and later he formed a partnership with his former employer, Mr. 
Sti-ay, in the same line of enterprise, with which he is still actively and 
successfully identified, under the firm name of Dunwell & Stray. 

JIany years ago Mr. Dunwell identified himself in an active way with 
public affairs of local order, and he has ever given his aid and influence 
in the support of measures and enterprises that have tended to advance 
the best interests of the community. He has been unwavering in his 
allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and has been influential 
in its eoimcils and in the manoeuvering of its forces in this part of the 
state. In 1896 he was elected treasurer of Mason coimty, and prior to 
this he had served six years as city clerk and for an equal period as 
supervisor of the second ward of Ludington. He gave a most careful 
administration of the fiscal affairs of the county and continued incum- 
bent of the office of treasurer for four years. He was soon afterward 
appointed state salt inspector, and he served in this capacity for two 
years. In 1906, after most gratifying endorsement on the part of the 
people of Ludington, he was appointed pastmaster of this city, his com- 
mission having been dated April 12th of that year. He has since given 
the ma.ior portion of his time and attention to the duties of this impor- 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 675 

tant office and has done much to systematize and otherwise improve the 
service. The local postoffiee is a model in appointments and facilities 
and is the center from which are supplied five rural free-delivery routes. 

Mr. Dunwell has been a resident of Ludington for nearly two score 
years, and no citizen has shown more loyal interest and enthusiasm in 
promoting its social and material progress, as well as that of the county. 
He served eight years as chairman of the Republican county committee, 
and in 1896 he was a delegate from Michigan to the Republican national 
convention, at St. Louis, that nominated the lamented President MeKin- 
ley for the first term. He also represented ^Michigan in the national 
convention of his party, at Chicago, in 1900, when McKinley was re- 
nominated as its standard-bearer. For nine years Mr. Dunwell served 
as a member of the Ludington board of education, and during virtually 
this entire period he was secretary of the board. He was the prime 
factor in the movement that resulted in the erection of the present mag- 
nificent court house of IMason county, and was secretary of the commis- 
sion that secured the site for and had charge of the erection of the build- 
ing. The Foster school building was erected while he was a member of 
the board of education, and he was a zealous worker also for this note- 
worthy improvement. He was one of the promoters of the county road 
system, by which the improvement and maintenance of the roads are 
under the direct supervision of the county board of supervisors. In 
all other enterprises that have been advanced for the general good of the 
city and county his co-operation and personal service have been given 
with all of zeal and earnestness, and he may well be acclaimed one of 
the builders of the beautiful little city that has so long been his home 
and in which his interests are centered. 

In the ilasonic fraternity Mr. Dunwell has compassed the circle of 
Ijoth the York and Scottish Rites, in which latter he has attained to the 
thirty-second degree. He has passed various official chairs in the time- 
lionured fraternity and is deeply appreciative of its history and noble 
teachings. He also holds membership in the local lodges of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. No citizen 
of ilasou county is better known and it may consistently be said that 
none is held in more uniform confidence and esteem. 

In February, 1877, Mr. Dunwell was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace S. Lewis, whose death occurred ]\Iareh 21 of the same year. The 
only child of this union, Grace S.. is now the wife of George Asby. On 
the 21st of October, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Dunwell 
to ]\Iiss ]\IabeI L. DeHart. and she was .summoned to the life eternal in 
May, 1902, leaving no children. 

WiLLi.\M E. CoATES, M. D. — Other men's services to the people and 
the state can be measured by definite deeds, by dangers averted, by 
legislation secured, by institutions built, by commerce promoted. The 
work of a doctor is entirely estranged from these lines of enterprise 
yet without his capable, health-giving assistance all other accomplish- 
ments would count for naught. Plan's greatest prize on earth is physi- 
cal health and vigor; nothing deteriorates mental activity so quickly as 
prolonged sickness, — hence the broad field for human lioljifulness af- 



676 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

forded in the medieal profession. The successful doctor requires some- 
thing more than mere technical training, — he must be a man of broad 
human sympathy and genial kindliness, capable of inspiring hope and 
faith in the heart of his patient. Such a man is he whose name ini- 
tiates this article. 

Dr. William Edward Coates, Jr., was born at Jlilwaukee, Wisconsin, 
on the 25th of December, 1870, and is a son of William E. and Matilda 
(Wambold) Coates, the former of whom was born in Wisconsin, on the 
10th of Januai-y, 1840, and the latter of whom claimed Pennsylvania as 
the state of her nativity. When the dark cloud of Civil war obscured 
the national horizon, Jlr. William E. Coates, Sr., tendered his services 
in defense of the union, enlisting as a private in Company A, Twenty- 
eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served from 1862 until the 
close of the war, at which time he was breveted captain. He was with 
the western forces at Vicksburg and later was detached and sent with 
his company to Arkansas. He participated in many important engage- 
ments marking the progress of the war and at one time received a 
wound in the throat. His regiment was often sent to the front in bat- 
tle. He was a member of the staff sent into Mexico at the close of the 
war to protect the frontier and throughout his entire military career 
he was recognized as a daring and gallant soldier. He was mustered 
out of service in Brownsville, Texas, in 1865, and thereafter returned 
to Wisconsin, where he engaged in business at Menominee Falls for a 
number of years. Later he removed to ^Milwaukee, where he was 
identified with the grocery business until 1883, in which year he was 
appointed collector of internal revenue for Wisconsin. Upon leaving 
the government service, in 1886, he entered the employ of a wholesale 
grocery establishment in the capacity of traveling salesman, remaining 
with this concern until his death, which occurred in March, 1904. He 
married Miss Matilda Wambold and they became the parents of several 
children, of whom William E. Coates was one. 

Dr. Coates passed his boyhood days in J\Iilwaul?ee, to whose public 
schools he is indebted for his early educational training, having attended 
high school in that city for one year. In 1887 the family removed to 
Manistee, Michigan, where he continued to attend school for about one 
year. At the age of eighteen he passed the teacher's examination, after 
which he taught school at Arcadia for a term of four months. In the fol- 
lowing winter he was a student in the high school and later he taught 
one term at District No. 7. Bniwnstown. Then District No. 1 desired his 
services and he was engaged as principal of the Stromach high school, 
remaining there for a year. After attending high school again for a 
few months he was matriculated in the University of Michigan, at the 
age of twenty-one years, in February, 1892, in the medical department 
of which excellent institution he was a student for about a year and a 
half. In September, 1893, he went to Chicago, -where he entered the 
.iunior class of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, later attending 
the medical department of the University of Illinois, in which he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1896, duly receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. Having spent considerable time in the study 
of bacteriology and microscopic analysis, he was appointed professor. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN H77 

of those branches in the Chicago Post-Gi'aduate Medical School. Whila 
studying, he was engaged at odd times as a lecturer, filling in from 
time to time for other professors. He finally' left the Post Graduate 
school and accepted the position of instructor in bacteriology in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was pathological instructor 
in clinic microscopic study and was later made adjunct professor of 
pathology, having full charge of that department for a number of years. 
He devoted a great deal of time to the affairs of a west side hospital 
while in Chicago, and in addition to his other duties he was an instruc- 
tor in various night medical schools in the great western metropolis. 

In August, 1903, he was obliged to leave Chicago on account of the 
impaired condition of his health, due to overwork and strain, and it 
was at this time that he made his advent in ^lanistee, where he entered 
upon the general practice of his profession. In 1906 he established his 
home in Onekama, where he took up general practice and out-door 
sanitary work. While in Manistee he was appointed inspector of milks 
and dairies, organizing the first inspection department at that city, 
this being one of the first in Michigan. He organized a system of in- 
spection that has been copied by many of the cities and towns of ]Michi- 
gan. His principal object in locating at Onekama was to establish a 
tuberculosis sanitarium, the organization of which was effected JIarch 
16, 1906, the institution being called the Onekama Heights Sanitarium 
Association, of which Dr. W. E. Coates was made medical director. 
The purpose of the founding of this institution was for the treatment 
of incipient cases of tuberculosis, the main object being to educate the 
people to a better care of the sick. Dr. Coates was instrumental in 
bringing the exhibit of the National Association for the stud.y and pre- 
vention of tuberculosis to Manistee, in Jul.y, 1906. The foregoing state- 
ments are sufificient evidence of the marvelous activity of the Doctor 
for the general advancement of sanitary conditions in Onekama, and 
they are deemed ample voucher of his deep and abiding interest in 
humanity. In the fall of 1910 an organization was formed at Onekama 
for the bettering and advancement of business, the Doctor being elected 
president of the same. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to 
the cause of the Republican party and he has contributed generously of 
his aid and influence in support of all measures tending to enhance the 
good of the community. He has served as village president and as a 
health officer and is at the present time ju.stice of the peace. He is 
affiliated with the Knights of the Maccabees and with the Modern 
Brotherhood of America. He and his wife are devout members of the 
Congregational church, in the various departments of whose work they 
have been zealous factors. 

On the 24th of June, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Coates to ]\Iiss Bertha ]\Iay Hesse, of Chicago, in which city she was 
born and reared. She is of German parentage and her maternal grand- 
father was a quartermaster under Napoleon I., his house having been 
the headquarters of the great general during one of his eapaigns. The 
grandfather came to America in the early '30s in a sailing vessel. He 
was a wheelwright by trade and it is recorded that he built and put 
together the first wagon constructed west of Lake ^liehigan. Dr. and 



678 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Mrs. Coates have three children, namely, — William Edward III, born 
on the 22d of April, 1897 ; Archie L., born on the 1st of November, 
1898 ; and Dorothy Helen, born on the 28th of November, 1901. 

William E. Douglas. — As the years relentlessly mark the milestones 
on the pathway of time, the older generation slowly gives waj' to the 
new and gradually there passes from our midst the men who made our 
country what it is and who built up this glorious empire for the men 
of now. In every generation and in every community some few men 
leave an indelible imprint upon the history of that community and upon 
the memories of those who have known them by their ability to fight 
and win even against great odds, and by that kind of character which 
wins lasting friends because of that innate quality which people know 
as loyalty. William E. Douglas, who passed into the life eternal on 
the 5th of June, 1910, was one of those. He was a resident of the city 
of ilanistee during the greater part of his active career and his life 
story is one which is inseparably connected with the history of Northern 
Michigan, where his multifarious business interests assumed gigantic 
l)roportious. He was a noble illustration of what indepeudence, self- 
faith, self-reliance and lofty ideals can accomplish in America. He was 
absolutely self-made. 

A native of the Dominion of Canada, William E. Douglas was born 
at Chatham, province of Quebec, Canada, the date of his nativity being 
the 28th of April, 1848. and he was a son of William and Eliza Jane 
(Dwer) Douglas, both of whom were likewise natives of Canada. To 
the public schools of his native place William E. Douglas was indebted 
for his preliminary educational training and in early life he became as- 
sociated with his father in the latter 's lumber business. Mr. and "Sirs. 
Douglas became the parents of eight children — two boys and six girls, 
whose names are here entered in respective order of birth, — William E.. 
Myra (deceased), Margaret, Mary Ann, Carrie, Elizabeth (deceased). 
Isabel and John, the last-mentioned of whom died at the age of ten 
years. The Douglas family removed to Jlichigan in the year 1879, lo- 
cating at ^Manistee, where the parents passed the residue of their lives, 
the father having died in 1898, at the age of seventy-two years, and 
the mother in 1900, at the age of seventy-one years. As already inti- 
mated, the father was a lumberman by vocation and he achieved emin- 
ent success in that particular line of enterprise. 

William E. Douglas received but meager schooling in his youth and 
at the age of fourteen years he entered the employ of the Canadian 
government, working in the Canadian locks for the ensuing six years, 
at the expiration of which he became interested in his father's lumber 
business. In 1869 he severed the ties which bound him to honu' and 
native land and came to Michigan, settling in the city of Manistee, 
where he assumed the practical responsibilities of life as a teamster in 
tlie logging camps for McGiness & Smith. Shortly after his advent in 
tliis place he and Sam ]\IeClintie started out on an extended tour of tlie 
west, traveling through California, Oregon and Washington, in search 
for a good business location. Not finding exactly what they wanted 
thev eventually returned to ^lanistee. where he soon began logging and 




//ff/fff iff ^'/f/fr^/fr-j' 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 679 

eouti-aotiug and whei-e he rapidly gained recognition as a lumber man 
of no small caliber. In the year 1880 he entered into a partnership al- 
liance with Edward Buckley, under the firm name of Buckley & Doug- 
las, and this mutually agreeable association continued until Mr. Douglas' 
death, in 1910. 

The first line of endeavor to which the firm of Buckley & Douglas 
devoted its attention was the logging business, cixtting down timber 
and manufacturing the same. In connection with the manufacturing 
department .some five mills were utilized and as much as seventy million 
feet of liunber was turned out in a single year. This output repre- 
sented the timber cut on the firm's own reserves and also that purchased. 
In 1886 Buckley & Douglas bought the extensive pine-land holdings of 
the firm of Ruddock & Xuttall, together with the saw mills formerly 
conducted by that concern on Manistee Lake. Immediately after this 
purchase the mills were rebuilt and a complete line of new machinery 
installed, the entire expenditure amounting to eleven thousand five 
hundred dollars. For the ensuing eight years the firm made a specialty 
of export trade, large shipments of lumber being made to England and 
the entire export product averaging from two to four million feet an- 
nually. The mills were kept in operation day and night throughout 
the entire year, the output demanding the sawing of about fifty million 
feet of logs per annum. With the passage of time the business of the 
firm of Buckley & Douglas grew to such gigantic propoi'tions that a 
reorganization of the concern was rendered expedient. Accordingly, 
the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company was incorporated under the 
laws of the state of Michigan, Mr. Buckley becoming president, teasurer 
and general manager, and Mr. Douglas serving as vice-president, gen- 
eral superintendent and secretarv of the companv until his death, in 
1910. 

After the year 1887 Mr. Douglas devoted the greater part of 
his time and attention to the building and later to the operating of 
the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad, a standard gauge line ex- 
tending between Manistee and Traverse City, a distance of seventy 
miles. When the various branches of the road are included the 
total length of line is one hundred and twenty miles, over which mil- 
lions of logs have been transported to the company's mills. This 
road is still utilized for logging purposes and in addition thereto is 
devoted to passenger and freight transportation. Up to the time of 
his demise Mr. Douglas was vice-president of the Manistee & North- 
eastern Railroad Company, of which Mr. Buckley is president and 
general manager. In 1896-7 the company completed the erection 
of the most extensive salt works in the entire state of Michigan. 
The plant is located at the foot of Third street and has a capacity for 
the production of twenty-five hundred barrels of salt daily, the brine 
being secured from wells sunk to a depth of two thousand feet, in the 
salt strata of rock. The firm of Buckley & Dougla.s early manifested 
keen executive ability and judicious foresight by purchasing the greater 
part of the lumber manufactured in their mills, thus holding in reserve 
their own extensive forests. While achieving marvelous success in the 
lumber industry the company has fostered and encouraged the growth 



680 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

of other business enterprises in Michigan so that the decline of the 
former business will not impair or retard development along other lines 
in the state. From the forgoing a fair idea may be obtained of the re- 
markable executive talents and tremenduous vitality of Mr. Douglas, 
whose interests were of such a broad and varied nature. 

In politics Mr. Douglas was aligned as an uncompromising sup- 
porter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party 
stands sponsor and while he never had time nor desire for political 
preferment of any description, he Avas loyal and public-spirited in his 
civic attitude, contributing in generous measure to all projects ad- 
vanced for the good of the general welfare. In the grand old Masonic 
order he was a York Rite Mason, being a valued and appreciative mem- 
ber of ]Manistee Lodge, No. 228, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons ; Manistee 
Chapter, No. 65, Royal Arch Masons: and Manistee Commandery, No. 
32, Knights Templars. He preferred the quiet and comfort of his home 
fireside and the intimate companionship of his family and personal 
friends to club life and the mad whirl of political strife. He was a 
devoted husband and a true friend and counselor and at all times he 
was generous and kindly in his attitude to those in distress or less for- 
tunately situated in the way of worldly goods than himself. His death 
occurred at the Palmer House in Chicago, on the 5th of June, 1910, 
and his remains were interred at Oak Grove cemetery, Manistee. His 
loss was uniformly mourned throughout northern Michigan where the 
list of his personal friends was coincident with that of his acquaintances. 

At Manistee, on the 9th of October, 1879, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of ]\Ir. Douglas to Jliss Anna M. Halter, the third child in the 
family of ten children born to Anton and Anna M. (Stamper) Halter. 
Mrs. Douglas' father was born in France and her mother was a native 
of Germany, whence they emigrated to the United States as little 
children with their parents, Louis Halter, and John B. Stemper. Loca- 
tion was first made by the Halter and Stemper families in the city of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, whence Antoji Halter and family in 1847 re- 
moved to ^lanistee. Jlr. Halter was a mill-wright and carpenter by 
occupation and he was summoned to eternal rest in 1894 at the age of 
sixty-two years, his cherished and devoted wife, who preceded him to 
the higher life, having passed away in 1876, at the comparatively early 
age of thirty-nine years. Concerning the ten children born to ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Halter, the following brief data are here incorporated — Christina 
C. who first married Paul Camine, of Manistee, is now the wife of Alex 
Smith, of Manistee; John B. is a railroad engineer and resides in 
Manistee; Mrs. Douglas is the next in order of birth; George A. is like- 
wise an engineer at ;\lanistee; Louis resides at Denison, Texas; Charles 
nuiintains his home at Red Lodge, Montana; Jlichael died at the age 
of twenty-one years; Joseph A. died when two years old; Albert 
C. lives at Kankakee, Illinois; and Frank resides at Centralia, Wash- 
ington. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas had no children. She is a devout mem- 
ber of the (luanlinn Angol Catholic church, while I\Ir. Douglas Avas a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and also attended the Congrega- 
tional church, bi'ing broad-minded in his religious views, and to all good 
works be was a iiiost lilieriil cdntrilintor. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 681 

Eugene Foster. — A representative citizen of Gladwin, Michigan, and 
one who has taken an active part in Republican politics and done much 
to conserve the general welfare of the community in which he resides, 
is Hon. Eugene Foster, editor and publisher of the Gladwin County 
Record, which publication he has issued with marked success since 
1879. The Record was founded by James S. Holden, in 1878, and from 
a very small beginning it has increased its number of subscribers to 
fifteen hundred, in 1911. 'Sir. Foster assisted on the first issue of the 
Record, was in charge of the paper for Mr. Holden the first year, then 
published the paper under lease and by purchase alone until 1884. He 
assisted Jlr. Holden to issue the first edition, and was given charge of 
the paper from the start. The first few years of its publication he filled 
the positions of editor, printer and devil of the small craft, experienc- 
ing all the phases of pioneer .iournalism in a then lumbering county, 
now a prosperous agricultural locality, and was known as the young- 
est editor in the state. In 1884 he took into partnership his brother, 
Isaac Foster, now an attorney and postmaster of Gladwin, and it is 
now run under the firm name of Foster Brothers. The best and most 
improved machinery is installed, including a folder and a typesetting 
machine, and one department is devoted to job printing, in which line 
a large business is conducted. 

Eugene Fo.ster was born in Caroga, Fvalton county. New York, on the 
8th day of August, 1860, and is the son of Rev. Edwin and Elizabeth L. 
(Fulmer) Foster, both of whom were born and reared in the state of 
New York, where their marriage was solemnized. Rev. Edwin Foster, 
with his family, removed to Michigan early in the '70s, and they first 
located at ilidland, and he afterwards united with the Detroit ]\Ietho- 
dist Episcopal conference, and filled a number of appointments in 
Jlichigan. being an eloquent and forcible minister of the gospel. He 
had four children. — Eugene, Isaac, Jessie L. and Emma Jane, the last 
of whom died in childhood, the three first named now living in Glad- 
win. He was summoned to the life eternal in 1880. Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Foster survives her honored husband and is now (1911) residing at 
(ibid win. 

Eugene Foster received his educational training in Fulton and 
Hamilton counties. New York, and at Cass City and Tuscola, ^lichigan. 
In 1875 he went to Midland, this stHte. where he entered upon an ap- 
prenticeship at the printer's trade, remaining in that place for a period 
of three years, at the expiration of which he came to Gladwin, where he 
has since resided. In 1881 he was elected school assessor of this city 
and served in that capacity for nine years, Gladwin being then under 
the district school system. In 1893-95 he served on the board of edu- 
cation and as president thereof, 1894-95. In 1882 he was chosen clerk 
of Grout township, remaining incumbent of that office for three years. 
When Gladwin was incorporated as a village, in 1885, Mr. Foster was 
elected clerk of the village and was successively re-elected to that office 
for five terms, and he served in the capacity of postmaster, under ap- 
pointment by President Ben.iamin Harrison, for four years. When 
Gladwin became a city, in 1893, Jlr. Foster became its first mayor and 
he was again chosen for that office in 1894, 1895, 1902 and 1903. He 



.682 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

was a member of the constitutional convention in 1907, and in 1908 he 
was elected state senator from the Twenty-eighth district, and was re- 
turned to that office again in 1910. His political adhereney is with the 
Republican party and he has been a member of the Republican county 
committee since 1882 and chairman thereof since 1892. 

In a social way jMr. Foster is a member of the Masonic order, in 
which he is affiliated with Gladwin Lodge No. 397, Free and Accepted 
Masons; and Gladwin Chapter No. 157, Royal Arch Masons; besides 
which he holds memberships in the Order of Eastern Star, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of Foresters, the Tribe of Ben Hur, 
the Loyal Guards and the Patrons of Husbandry. Mr. Foster has ever 
manifested a deep and abiding interest in all matters pertaining to the 
general good of the community and he has made for himself an enviable 
record for reliability in business, loyalty in citizenship and fidelity in 
friendship, besides which he has added to these admirable qualities 
unswerving faithfulness in office. 

H. E. Rea, D. V. S., West Branch, Michigan, was born in the province 
of Ontario, Canada, in 1878, son of Robert and Hannah Rea, both 
natives of that place, where the father died in 1910. There the sub- 
ject of this sketch was reared and educated. He is a graduate of the 
Toronto Veterinary College, with the class of 1902, and since his gradu- 
ation has been engaged in the practice of his profession at West 
Branch, which, having no other registered veterinary surgeon, he has 
found a good field for his labor. A lover of domestic animals, and espe- 
cially of horses, and equipped with superior technical training, Di-. 
Rea has from the very beginning of his practice met with marked suc- 
cess. In addition to practicing his profession and conducting a hos- 
pital at West Branch, he deals extensively in horses, buying and selling 
at all seasons of the year and is regarded as one of the best .judges of 
horses in Ogemaw county. He is a member of the Michigan Veterinary 
Association, and enjoys the distinction of being a director of that body. 
Socially the Doctor is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Royal Guards. 

He is the only member of his family in the ITnited States, the others 
having remained at the old home in Canada. In 1906 he married :Miss 
Nellie Longwell, daughter of Chkrles Longwell, and they have one 
daughter, Ethel. 

Stephen H. Cornell, M. D.— During the years which mark the 
period of Dr. Cornell's professional career he has met with gratifying 
success and during the period of his residence in Copemish he has won 
the good will and patronage of many of the best citizens here. He is a 
thorough student and endeavors to keep abreast of the times in every- 
thing relating to the discoveries in medical science. Progressive in 
his ideas and favoring modern methods as a whole, he does not dis- 
pense with the time-tried systems whose value has stood the test of 
years. He now stands very "high in the medical profession of the state 
and is in the most significant sense a self-made man. 

Dr. Stephen H. Cornell was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, 



HISTORY OP' NORTHERN MICHIGAN ms 

ou the 2nd of March, 1869, and he is a sou of David and Melissa 
(Smith) Cornell, both of whom were likewise born in Canada, whence 
they removed with their family to Michigan, in 1879. Location was 
first made at Reed City, Osceola county, where tlie father engaged in 
the timber and real-estate business. In 1890 the family home was es- 
tablished at Copemish, Manistee county, where David Cornell devoted 
his attention to the drug business. The parents are now residents of 
Copemish. Stephen H. was the first in order of birth in a family of five 
children, one of whom, Alexander S. Cornell, is also engaged in thi- 
practice of medicine in this city. On other pages of this work are given 
fuller data concerning the latter 's career. Stephen H. Cornell was af- 
forded the advantages of the public schools of Reed City and iu 1887 
he entered the Detroit ^Medical College, pursuing the full course and 
graduating as a member of the class of 1890, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. During vacations, while at college, the Doctor earned 
money with which to pay a portion of his expenses by teaching school. 
After his graduation he was interne at St. Mary's Hospital, in the city 
of Detroit, for one year. Thereafter he pursued a post-graduate 
course in the Bellevue Hospital College, in New York City, and he also 
took an electro-physical course, under the able preceptorship of Dr. 
Junettner. of Cincinnati, Ohio. He then went into Upper ^Michigan as 
physician and surgeon at the Calumet and Hecla mines and in 1891 
he came to Copemish, where he established his home, and here he opened 
offices and entered upon the active practice of his profession. He has 
gained eminent precedence as an able and skilled physician and surgeon 
and in connection with his work has given most efficient service as an 
officer of the board of health of Copemish. 

Dr. Cornell has been twice married. In 1893 he wedded Miss Alice 
Cunningham, of this city. She was born in the state of N'cw York and 
came to Michigan with her parents about 1877. The family resided for 
a time at Freesoil, from whence she went to Flint, Michigan, and re- 
ceived most of her education. Mr. Cunningham was long engaged in 
the timber business. Mrs. Cornell came to Copemish as assistant post- 
mistress. Slie was summoned to the life eternal in 1898 and in 1905 the 
Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Genevieve Dean, of Sherman, 
this state. She is a daughter of William and Demarious (Baldwin) 
Dean, both of whom were born in Michigan and resided at Sherman 
until their death. Dr. and Mrs. Cornell have one child, Demarious Ade- 
line, who was born on the 17th of August, 1910. 

Dr. Cornell is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Knights of the JIaccabees, besides which he is also enrolled as 
a member of various professional organizations of representative charac- 
ter. His interest in political questions is deep and sincere and he gives 
an earnest support to Democratic principles, believing that the plat- 
form of the party contains the best elements of good government. 
Concentration of purpose and persistently applied energy rarely fail 
of success in the accomplishment of any task, however great, and in 
tracing the career of Dr. Cornell it is plainly seen that these have been 
the secret of his success. 



684 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Peter E. Shien. — The lumber interests of Michigan, which are of 
vast extent and significance, have been developed and promoted by 
men of great enterprise, foresight and sagacity, prominent among the 
number being Peter E. Shien, a well known and highly respected resi- 
dent of Tawas City, Iosco county. A son of IMiehael Shien, he was born 
February 14, 1848, in Elmira, Chemung county, New York. Michael 
Shien migrated with his family to ilichigan in 1852, becoming a pio- 
neer settler of Holly, Oakland county. He was a contractor by occupa- 
tion, in that line of industry doing his full share toward bringing the 
state to its present advanced condition as regards its material prop- 
perity. He married ]\Iary Brickley, and of their eleven children four 
survive, but Peter E., the ninth child in succession of birth, and a sis- 
ter are the only ones of the family living in Michigan. 

Reared on a farm, Peter E. Shien attended the district schools until 
sixteen years of age, and being an exceptionally good scholar, there 
laid a substantial foundation for a future prosperous career. Enlisting 
in 1864 in Company K, Fifth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, he served 
until the close of the Civil war, first as a musician and afterward as 
mounted orderly on the staffs of both General Hancock and General 
Grant, his proficiency in horsemanship and his faithfulness in duty 
well qualifying him for the position. He was honorably discharged 
from the service on August 16, 1865,, at Parkersburg, Indiana, having 
(lurint; his term of enlistment received no wounds, although he was se- 
verely in.iured during the engagement at Petersburg, Virginia, by being 
thrown from his horse. 

Returning home, ]Mr. Shien again attended school for a while, mate- 
rially advancing his education. In 1867 he went to Au Sable, Iosco 
county, where he was for a while employed in the fishery business. 
Subsequently making au entire change of occupation, Mr. Shien em- 
barked in the lumber business, with which he was actively associated 
for thirty-eight consecutive years, holding numerous responsible posi- 
tions in the lumber districts of Michigan. He became an expert esti- 
mator of timber, sometimes estimating for the buyer, sometimes for the 
seller, and frequently for both, his calculations in every case varying 
but very little from the figures taken by actual measurement. He has 
likewise had the management of the shipment of much lumber to New 
York and other eastern shipping points, ably handling its transporta- 
tion. Although so long connected with the lumber trade, he has been 
in the employ of but three firms, his long retention by each being greatly 
to his credit. 

Taking a warm interest in public atVairs, Mr. Shien has filled many 
offices of impoi'tanee since becoming a resident of Michigan. For eight 
years he was land trespass agent for the state government; in 1896 he 
was elected sheriff of Iosco county; and for a number of years was 
treasurer and supervisor of Oscodo township. Fraternally he is a 
Seottish Rite Mason, having taken the thirty-second degree in IMa- 
sonry. and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the 
Independent Order of Foresters and of the National Union. 

.Air. Shien married, in 1871, Jennie Van Wormer, and their only child 
lived ))ut a brief time. Mr. and Mrs. Shien have an attractive home in 




T'^^^^ (^ ^.^--^^-^^^'^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 685 

Tawas City, and its hospitable doors are ever open to their large circle 
of warm friends and acquaintances. 

Homer G. Benedict. — Prominent among the more active and valued 
citizens of Grayling is Homer G. Benedict, who has through his ability 
and ti-ustworthiness won the full confidence of his fellow-men, and as 
sherifit' of Crawford county is performing his official duties with charac- 
teristic fidelity and intelligence. A native of Wisconsin, he was born, in 
1852, in Dodge county. His father, Ira Benedict, was born in Ohio and 
was united in marriage with Vanelia M. Meeker, of Ohio, and after a 
time moved to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. After his death his wife moved with six children to Hills- 
dale county, where she spent her remaining days. Of the seven children 
born to Ira Benedict and his wife, three survive, namely : Luther C, 
Homer G. and Thomas G. 

But six years old when his mother settled in Michigan, Homer G. 
Benedict acquired his early education in the rural schools of Hillsdale 
county, living there until 1888. Making his first appearance in Craw- 
ford county in that year, he embarked in farming and butchering, in 
the latter industry being prosperously employed for twenty-two years. 
He was also successful as an agriculturist, and has title to a partly im- 
proved farm of eighty acres, pleasantly located in Beaver Creek town- 
ship, Crawford county. Mr. Benedict has an honorable record of citi- 
zenship, and in the various official positions to which he has been elected 
by the people has served to the utmost satisfaction of all concerned. He 
was township treasurer for two years; justice of the peace eight years; 
postmaster at Wellington, Crawford county, an equal length of time; 
was supervisor by appointment one year; and has filled various offices 
of minor importance. On January 1, 1911, he assumed his office as 
sheriff of the county, and to its duties is devoting his time and energies, 
pleasing and satisfying his fellow-citizens on either side of the political 
fence. 

Mr. Benedict married, in 1873, Pauline M. Lee, who was born in 
Hillsdale county, Michigan, in 1854. Her parents, John and Mercy Lee, 
natives respectively, of Connecticut and New York state, settled in Hills- 
dale county, Michigan, in 1845 and with true pioneer courage redeemed 
a farm from the wilderness. Into their humble home nine children were 
born, two of whom are living, namely: Levi C. Lee and Mrs. Benedict. 
Mr. and Mrs. Benedict are parents of six children, as follows : Mercy B., 
born June 29, 1874, married Herman Gohn ; Luna I., born April 28, 
1876, married George Annis; Gertrude M., born October 17, 1878, mar- 
ried August Wright ; Elizabeth V., born December 25, 1884, married 
Christopher King; Eva B., born March 3, 1892, at home; and Frank L., 
born March 26, 1897, also at home. 

Irvin-g Cady French. — Of the younger generation of business men 
of Kalkaska county, there is none, it is quite safe to say, more truly en- 
titled to the respect and confidence of the community in which his inter- 
ests are centered than Irving Cady French, junior member of the retail 
lumber f nii of X. A. Fi-ench 6c Co. He is one of the most progressive 



686 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

of the men connected with that important Michigan industry, lumber, 
and his identification will now number more than a decade of years. 
He is the scion of a family long founded on American shores, Lieuten- 
ant William French having come to the new land, destined to become 
the abode of the "free and the home of the brave" only a few years 
subsequent to the Mayflower, while a long line of bearers of the name 
has exemplified those high ideals of citizenship which characterize 'Slv. 
French. 

By the circumstance of birth Irving Cady French is a native of the 
Empire state, the scene of his nativity having been Spruigville, Erie 
county. New York, and his birthdate March 26, 1876. When Maeaulay 
was shown the clustering vines in Hampton Court, with trunk like unto 
a tree, he expressed a wish to behold the mother root in Spain from 
which the scion was cut, and similarly it is but natural to desire to 
trace the ancestral forces that are unitel in every son and daughter of 
ability and high ideals. The family of the subject of this review is a 
very old and honored one, claiming its origin from Rollo, Duke of 
Normandy, a Norman Viking who settled in France in 910, several gen- 
erations before William the Conqueror appeared upon the horizon and 
effectually changed the progress of events for all time. The line is 
traced unbroken from the above-mentioned Lieutenant William French. 
He was born ilarch 15, 1603, in Halstead, Essex county, England, came 
to America in 1635, and settled in Cambridge, Massaehiisetts, becom- 
ing one of the original proprietors and earliest settlers of Billerica, 
Middlesex county, Massachusetts, which settlement was founded in 
1652. The records in the possession of Mr. French are silent as to the 
occupation of that gentleman, but it is very evident that he was a man 
of influence and importance in a day when native worth was tolerably 
sure of recognition and the record of his life is one of which his de- 
scendants cannot be otherwise than proud. A lieutenant of militia, he 
was afterwards promoted to the rank of captain ; from 1660 to 1669 he 
served as selectman; he was the first deputy, or representative of 
Billerica in the General Court at Boston and was very active in the 
cause of Indian instruction. He died November 20, 1681, crowned with 
years and honors, a type of the stanch and public-.spirited American 
which has enabled the nation to become what it is. The subseciuent line 
is as follows: Corporal John, born in 1635; his son, William, was born 
in 1687; Nathaniel, son of the foregoing, was born in 1721; his son, Joel, 
was born in 1768; his son, Nathaniel, was born March 5, 1812, at Uum- 
merston, Vermont, and died November 21, 1876, at Susquehanna, Penn- 
sylvania. The latter was a farmer throughout the course of his life, 
and for many years was a deacon in the Baptist church. His son, 
Newell A., father of the subject, was born October 28. 1838, in Jackson 
township, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, secured a common school 
education, removed to New York and was there living at the time of 
the birth of Mr. French. 

The place and time of the nativity of that highly esteemed gentle- 
man, the late Newell Andrew French, has been given. His death oc- 
curred July 28, 1910, his years at the time of his demise being seventy- 
one, and his memory is likely to remain green in the hearts of the many 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 687 

friends lie has left hehiiid on his journey to that "bourne whenee no 
traveler returns."" He was a man who gave an intelligent and altruis- 
tic consideration to such questions as affected the welfare and progress 
of the community in general; he was a stanch Republican in politics. 
He was engaged in the lumber business and was a contracting builder. 
He was entrusted with various ofSces in municipal and civic bodies, 
was for thirteen years county superintendent of the poor of Kalkaska 
county and at all times gave ample proof that his circle of interest was 
by no means co-incident with that of his own affairs. He married 
Sarah Jane Cady, the daughter of Ebenezer S. and Mary (Oyer) Cady. 
She was of German and English extraction, the paternal ancestor, 
Nicholas Cady, having come to America from England in 1644, while 
the Oyers were Germans. IMrs. French was born in Schuyler, Her- 
kimer county. New York, Januar.y 13, 1844, and died in Kalkaska, 
August 29, 1900, after a life of great worthiness. There were in the 
family two children, Jlr. French being the first in order of birth. 

His father having removed to Kalkaska in 1876, the early years of 
Mr. French were passed here and it was here that he obtained an ex- 
cellent public school education, being graduated from the higher de- 
partment in June, 1893. He subsequently took a business course in 
Benzonia College at Benzonia, JMichigan. Previous to this, however, 
in 1885, he had attained to the position of "printer's devil," in the 
office of the Kalkaska Leader, and in this manner vacations and 
hours after school until his school days were concluded were utilized 
in the varied and strenuous fashion common to the vocation named 
above. The office is one which is popularly declared to constitute an 
education of a liberal character in itself and Mr. French made the most 
of the opportunities presented in this line. At one time he worked for 
a banker-editor who evinced great interest as to what he did with his 
earnings and finally induced him to save each week a stated portion 
of them, — the money to be deposited in his bank. We have Mr. French's 
own word for it that the bank and the advice both proved good and 
the savings of those days formed the basis of what was later invested 
in the present business. j\lr. N. A. French had embarked in the lumber 
business in 1899, and the subject became the junior member of the re- 
tail lumber firm of N. A .French & Son, in which business the latter 
still continues, his father's recent demise having left him in sole man- 
agement. The business has grown with the years and is one of Kal- 
kaska's important in.stitutions. Mr. French deals in rough and manu- 
factured lumber, lath, shingles, doors and windows, and in mouldings, 
porch trimmings, building paper and ready roofing. 

On May 14, 1902, ]\Ir. French laid the foundations of a happy home 
and a congenial life companionship by his marriage to Miss Cora D. 
Terpening, daughter of George A. and Ella E. Terpening, of Reading. 
Michigan, the father being a fruit grower by occupation. The mar- 
riage of Mr. and J\Irs. French was solemnized in Reading and has re- 
sulted in the birth of three children, all born in Kalkaska, JMichigau. 
They are as follows: Charles B., November 15, 1904; Frances E.. De- 
cember 14, 1906 ; and JMarian J., June 4, 1910. 

Mr. French is a Republican in politics, but has taken in this de- 



688 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

partment of affairs only the interest of the intelligent voter, and has 
never held public office. Although giving his heart and hand to all 
good movenieuts, he docs not belong to any church. He is a prominent 
and popular Mason, and is and has been for nine jears, secretary of 
Kalkaska lodge No. 332, Free and Accepted Masons. He pays homage 
to "the heavenly maid." having no small amount of musical taste and 
talent; is saxaphonist in the local band and has held various offices in 
the organization. 

James M. Magmeb. — It has been given this native son of the world's 
gi'eatest metropolis to gain precedence as one of the prominent and 
valued factors in connection with the industrial activities of northern 
Michigan, and he is numbered among the representative business men 
of Ludington, the judicial center of ;\tason county, where he stands 
exponent of progressive spirit and civic loyalty. 

;\Ir. ]\lagmer, who is one of the interested principals in the Cartier 
^Manufacturing Company, of Ludington, where he is also engaged in 
the undertaking business, was born in the city of London, England, on 
the 18th of Jlarch, 1863, and is a son of Julius and ]Mary (Clancy) 
Magmer, the former of whom was born in Germany and the latter of 
whom was born in London, of staunch Irish lineage. The mother died 
in London, and the venerable father has for many years maintained his 
home in the city of Milwaukee. Wisconsin, where he took ^^p his resi- 
dence about the year 1876, soon after his emigration to the United 
States. His sterling attributes of character have gained and retained 
to him the high regard of those with whom he has come in contact dur- 
ing his long and useful life. 

He whose name forms the caption of this article was a lad of about 
thirteen years of age at the time of the family removal from London to 
America. In his native city he had secured his rudimentary education, 
which was supplemented by attendance in the public schools of Mil- 
waidtee. When about eighteen years of age he secured employment 
with the Pere ^larquette Steamship Company, for which he worked on 
the first steamboat put into commission l)y this company, — the F. & 
P. M. steamer "No. 1." He was thereafter assigned to duty on one 
vessel after another until the initiation of the car-ferry system of the 
company, when he became chief steward of the system, with headquar- 
ters in Ihe city of Ludington, where he thus took up his residence in 
1895. He continued in the employ of this company for the long period 
of twenty-two years, and as chief steward he had charge of supplies 
for the great car-ferry boats and other steamers of the line. 

Upon severing his connection with this corporation, Mr. Magmer be- 
came associated with Messrs. Antoine and Charles E. Cartier in the 
mercantile business conducted by the Cartier Manufacturing Company, 
and in this conn/iction, as a stockholder of the company, he assumed 
charge of its extensive double brick stoi-e in the Fourth ward of the city 
of Ludington. He is still interested in this enterprise but since 1907 
he has given the major portion of his time and attention to his indi- 
vidual business as an undertaker and funeral director. He has a finely 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 689 

ctHiipjit'd establishment, with the most modern of facilities and aeees- 
sories. 

In politics Mr. IMagmer accords a staunch allegiance to the Republi- 
can party, though he has never been an aspirant for public office. Both 
he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church and for the 
past decade he has been president of the Ludington organization of the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association. He is also affiliated with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, the Sons 
of King Jacqua, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the 
(iaelic Knights. He is specially zealous in connection witli the worlc of 
the Catholic church, and both he and his wife are prominent members 
of the parish of St. Simon's in their home city. 

On the 21st of May, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Mag- 
mer to Miss Mary A. Duffy, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in which state 
she was born and reared. They became the parents of two sons and 
two daughters, namely: John J., Loretta, Harry and ^Margaret. All 
of the children are living except Loretta, who died at the age of eigh- 
teen years. 

Martin Abrahamson is one of the energetic business men of the 
younger generation in Ludington, whither he came with his parents 
when a child of but four years of age. He was born at Brevik, Nor- 
way, on the 21st of September, 1881, and is a son of Lars and Johanna 
(Christofiferson) Abrahamson, both of whom were likewise born in 
Norway, where they were reared and educated and where their mar- 
riage was solemnized. They emigrated to America in 1885 and imme- 
diately thereafter established their home in Ludington, where they still 
reside and where the father is engaged in shipping and selling gravel. 
He was long a sailor on the Great Lakes and was also interested at one 
time in ship-building. Mr. and ^Mrs. Abrahamson became the parents 
of six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living, 
Martin being the second in order of birth. 

Martin Abrahamson was i-eared and educated at Ludington and he 
was engaged in various kinds of work during his youth, paying his own 
school expenses. In 1907 he and his brother John became interested in 
the coal, wood and cement business, under the firm name of Abraham- 
son & Brothers. On the first of January, 1910, 'Mr. Abrahamson pur- 
chased his brother's share in the business and the same is now being 
run under the title of Martin Abrahamson, with location at the foot of 
Emily street, south of the railroad tracks. Mr. Abrahamson has been 
eminently successful in his various business enterprises and he is rapidly 
gaining prestige as one of the influential citizens of Ludington. In 
politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican 
party and though he has never manifested aught of ambition or desire 
for public office of any description he ever gives freely of his aid and 
influence to all movements pro.jected for the general welfare of the 
community. His religious faith is in harmony with the tenets of the 
Norwegian Methodist Episcopal church, in which lie is serving as 
steward. He is a bachelor. 



690 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

John J. Reycr.U'^t, M. D. — Numbered amoug the essentially repre- 
sentative physicians and sui-geons of northern Michigan and associated 
in practice with his brother, Dr. George E., in the city of Petoskey, where 
they founded and conduct the Petoskey hospital, one of the noble insti- 
tutions of the city, Dr. John J. Reycraft is known as a man of splendid 
professional attainments and as one who has achieved specially high 
reputation in the surgical department of his chosen and exacting profes- 
sion. He is one of the progressive and public-spirited citizens of Pe- 
toskey and has served as its mayor, a fact that indicates the high esteem 
in which he is held in the community in which he is laboring with all 
of zeal and ability in the alleviation of human suffering and distress. He 
is thoroughly en rapport with his profession and in the same his abiding 
human sympathy transcends mere sentiment to become an actuating mo- 
tive for helpfuhiess. 

Dr. John J. Reycraft was born at Highgate, Kent county, province 
of Ontario, Canada, on the 4th of October, 1869, and is a son of William 
and Lucy (Risk) Reycraft, the former of whom was born in county 
Cork, Ireland, and the latter of whom was born in the western part of 
the province of Ontario, Canada, of Scotch and German lineage. Of the 
four children of this union Dr. John J. was the second in order of birth, 
his brother, George E., is associated with him in practice, as has already 
been stated; William H. is a farmer of some note in Canada, making a 
specialty of wheat raising; and the only sister, Ella, who married Ed- 
ward Beattie of Highgate, Ontario, remains at the parental home, in 
the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, where the father and three sons 
are associated in the ownership of an e.\tensive wheat ranch. William 
Reycraft was a lad of ten years at the time of his parents' immigration 
from the Emerald Isle to the province of Ontario, Canada, where he was 
reared and educated and where he eventually became a prosperous agri- 
culturist and grain buyer, at Highgate, Kent county. There he con- 
tinued to maintain his home until 1908, when he removed to the pro- 
vince of Saskatchewan, where he and his three sons purchased three sec- 
tions of land, to the supervision of which fine ranch of nineteen hundred 
and twenty acres he has since given his attention. The property has 
been admirably developed under his direction and is now one of the 
valuable wheat ranches of that favored section of the Dominion of 
Canada. He is one of the influential citizens of his community and hi 
that district of large opportunities and large undertakings he and iiis 
wife have an attractive home. 

Dr. John J. Reycraft gained his preliminary education in the public 
schools of his native province, and after completing the curriculum of 
the high school at Ridgetown, Ontario, he continued his studies in the 
Chatham Collegiate Institute, at Chatham, that province. This was 
supplemented by a course in the normal department of Toronto Uni- 
versity, in 1886, and after leaving that institution he gave effective ser- 
vice as a teacher in the public schools of Ontario for two years. In prep- 
aration for the work of his chosen profession he entered the Detroit 
College of Medicine, in the metropolis of Michigan, where he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as a member of the class of 
1891, with the well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. After his 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 691 

graduation he served as first house surgeon in the Detroit Hospital until 
the autumn of 1891, when he established his home at Mackinaw City, 
this state, where he was engaged in general practice until 1894, when he 
located in the city of Petoskey, where he soon built up a substantial and 
representative practice, to which he continued to give his undivided 
attention until the spring of 1900, when, in order to fortify himself 
still further for the work of his profession, he went abroad, where he 
availed himself of the privileges of the clinic of the leading hospitals in 
the cities of Paris, London, Berlin, Glasgow and Belfast. He returned 
to Petoskey in the summer of 1900, and here he has since specialized in 
the department of surgery, in which he is known as a most skillful 
operator and in which his work has been attended by most gratifying 
success, with attendant reputation of more than local order. In 1907, 
realizing the need for such an institution. Dr. Reycraft became the 
founder of the Petoskey hospital, in the ownership and management of 
which he is associated with his brother, as has already been stated in 
this context, and of which he is chief surgeon. The hospital is equipped 
with the most modern appliances and accessories, has the best of sani- 
tarj' provisions throughout, and proves a most valuable acquisition to 
the city, as its privileges are utilized by numerous patrons in the imme- 
diate community as well as from distant points. Dr. Reycraft is a 
member of the Emmet County Medical Society, the Michigan State 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He has 
served as a member of the United States board of pension examining 
surgeons for Emmet county and his careful observance of the ethical 
code of his profession, as combined with his genial and companionable 
personality, has gained and retained to him the high regard of his pro- 
fessional confreres, as well as the unqualified confidence and esteem 
of the people of his home city and county. The doctor is a firm be- 
liever in the generic brotherhood of man and in this respect he has faith 
in the sympathy, kindliness and helpfulness of his fellow men, without 
reference to religion, politics or other associations. Holding such views, 
he has never had any desire to identify himself with any fraternal or- 
ganization, as he deems the same an infringement of the higher fellow- 
ship that should animate all sorts and conditions of men, the while he 
believes that such organizations are incompatible with the spirit of 
American institutions. In politics he accords staunch allegiance to the 
Democratic party and his interest in public affairs of a local order is of 
the most insistent and loyal type. In 1909 was accorded distinctive 
mark of his personal popularity and recognition of his eligibility, for 
he was then elected mayor of Petoskey. He gave so careful and pro- 
gressive an administration of municipal affairs that he was elected as 
his own successor, in 1910, and thus served two consecutive terms, with 
credit to himself and with marked benefit to the city and its people. 

The 20th of March, 1902, bore record of the marriage of Dr. Rey- 
craft to Miss Metta Cornell, who was born in the city of South Bend, 
Indiana, and who died on the 1st of the following May, having thus 
survived her marriage by less than two months. 



692 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Hon. George A. Prescott. — The class of men who have been active iu 
developing and advancing the lumber interests of northern Michigan 
and who have given character and impetus to the development of the 
wonderful resources of this part of the Peninsular state are men of keen- 
perceptive faculties and strong personality, whose strenuous grasp has 
laid the foundations of a mighty industry. To this class, and in its 
front rank, stands the Hon. George A. Prescott. of Tawas City, Iosco 
county, who for many years was general manager of the immense busi- 
ness of the widely known firm of Charles H. Prescott & Sons, lumber 
manufacturers and dealers. 

This firm was founded more than thirty years ago by Charles H. 
Prescott, the father of Hon. George A. Prescott. He came from Penn- 
sylvania to Michigan in 1876, bought heavily timbered land in Iosco 
county, and at once embarked in business as a lumberman, founding 
the firm of which he was for so many years at the head. In 1878 he 
removed to Bay City, where he successfully continued his operations, 
from year to year extending and increasing the operations of his firm. 
In 1904 the mill belonging to the firm was burned and its manufacture 
of lumber ceased, the plant having never been rebuilt. During its 
earlier years of existence the firm manufactured white pine and Nor- 
way pine lumber, but in later years confined its manufacti;res to hard- 
wood lumber. This firm employed from fifty to two hundred men, 
while the output of its mills had an annual average of from ten million 
to twelve million feet of lumber each year until 1910, when its last 
lumber deal Avas closed. In 1880 the firm added a mercantile depart- 
ment to its other business, establishing a store at Ta^vas City, and two 
j^ears later, in 1882, George A. Prescott became resident manager of 
the firm of which he was for so many j'ears at the head. In 1878 he 
sand acres of good farming land, on which is located the town of Pres- 
cott. Nine thousand acres of this land is fenced and under cultivation, 
and on this ranch in 1910 Mr. Prescott, the general manager of the 
entire business, handled twelve hundred head of cattle and seventy- 
eight hundred head of sheep, making a good record iu tliat line of 
agricultural labor. 

Born on March 1. 1862. in Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania. George x\.. 
Prescott lived there until sixteen years old, obtaining his early educa- 
tion in the common schools. In 1878 he joined his father in Bay City, 
]\Iichigan, and attended the Bay City High School two years. He sub- 
sequently spent three months at the Detroit Business College, and in 
1880 took a course of study at the Collegiate Institute in Hamilton, 
New York. Returning to Michigan, I\lr. Prescott took up his residence 
at Tawas City in 1881. and in 1882 assumed the general management 
of the business of the firm of Charles H. Prescott & Sons, of which he 
was a member, as above stated. lender his guiding hand the manufac- 
turing and mercantile interests of the firm were increased and ex- 
tended, and a large agricultural industry was developed and ijrinnotcd, 
all assuming in course of time immense proportions. 

Since coming to Tawas City, Mr. Prescott has ever evinced great in- 
terest in local affairs and has served his fellow-citizens wisely and well 
in various capacities, having been village trustee, a member of the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 693 

Board of Education, and in ofiSces of a more important character. lu 
1895 he was elected state senator from the Twenty-eighth senatorial 
district, and served from 1895 until 1898, inclusive. At the Republican 
District Convention held Juno 30, 1904, Mr. Prescott was unanimously 
chosen as candidate of his party for secretary of state, and on Novem- 
ber 8, 1904, was elected by a vote of the people to that office, polling 
a vote of 339,030 ballots, while his opponents, James B. Balch, received 
159,314; Charles R. Evans, 12,702; Henry P. Keaver, 7,537; and Henry 
Ullericht, 913. i\Ir. Prescott 's sterling character and worth are uni- 
versally recognized, and he is extremely popular not only in his district 
but in his home town. 

George "W. Hopkins. — There are few men whose lives are crowned 
with the honor and respect which is universally accorded to George W. 
Hopkins, but through nearly half a century's connection with the indus- 
trial world of northern Michigan his has been an unblemished character. 
With him success in life has been reached by sterling qualities of mind 
and a heart true to every manly principle. He has never deviated from 
what his judgment indicated to be right and honorable between his 
fellowmcn and himself. He has never swerved from the path of duty 
and he has every reason to enjoy the consciousness of having gained 
for himself by his honorable, straightforward career the confidence and 
respect of the entire community in which he lives. The piiblic career 
of few other men of Bear Lake has extended over a longer period, and 
none has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless 
in reputation. 

George W. Hopkins was born in Preston county. West Virginia, on 
the 8th of November, 1844, and is a son of Samuel and Susanna (Loar) 
Hopkins, the former of whom was born at Western Union, West Vir- 
ginia, in 1818, and the latter of whom claimed Oakland. Maryland, as 
the place of her nativity, the date of her birth having been 1819. 
George W. Hopkins' attendance in public school was of meager order 
but as his father and mother were both teachers by vocation he re- 
ceived good instruction from them. His grandfather Hopkins was a 
merchant in Boston in an early day. In 1855 iMr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Hopkins, with their children, moved to Michigan, locating >n Lenawee 
county, where the father was engaged in contracting and building. 
George W. remained at home until 1862. in which year he bought his 
time from his father, agreeing to pay two hundred and fifty dollars 
for his time until he had attained to the age of twenty-one years. He 
engaged in making maps of counties, doing the work of surveying, 
sketching, drafting and selling them. When twenty-one years of age 
he had accumulated some five thousand dollars. Thereafter he was en- 
gaged for a time in selling fruit trees in ilanistee countj' and later he 
entered into the brick-making industry. He then took up the purchas- 
ing of pine lands and in this connection he put as much as forty mil- 
lion feet of logs into the Jlanistee river. In 1873 he came to Bear Lake 
and erected a saw mill, which he continued to operate until 1903, since 
which time he has maintained a general supervision over his extensive 
property holdings, improving the same with good roads and bridges. 



694 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

His son, Arthur L., is associated with him in business and has charge of 
the farm of one thousand acres, eighty of which are set to orchards. 
They cultivate an average of one hundred and twenty acres of corn, 
cut two hundred and fifty acres of hay, and three hundred acres of rye, 
in addition to which they feed from seventj'-five to one hundred head 
of cattle during the winter months. 

In the year 1868 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hopkins to Miss 
Ella Stuart, of Bellaire, Ohio. She was born in the city of Boston, 
Massachusetts, of parents who were natives of England, whence they 
immigrated to America, in 1815, locating first in Boston and then in 
Philadelphia. The father was long engaged in railroad work, helping 
to build the Baltimore & Ohio road across the Allegheny mountains, 
and for a number of years he was agent for the Adams Express Com- 
pany at Bellaire, Ohio, where his death occun-ed in 1881. ;\Ir. and Mrs. 
Hopkins became the parents of four children, namely, — Arthur L., 
Agnes, Clare and Bess. As already noted Arthur L. assists his father 
in the management of their immense farm and another of his activities 
is shown when it is stated that he devotes considerable time to lectur- 
ing before many of the farmers' institutes of ^Michigan. In 1890 he 
was united in marriage to Miss Aggie Crook, a daughter of a Baptist 
minister who for years was a missionary among the Indians in this 
section. They have two daughters, — Grace, who was born on the 5th 
of December, 1892; and Neva, who was born on the r2th of November, 
1894. Arthur L. Hopkins is affiliated with the time-honored jMasonic 
fraternity and he is also an appreciative member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of the Maccabees, while his 
wife holds membership in the Order of the Eastern Star. Both are 
devout members of the Baptist church, in the various departments of 
whose work they have been most active factors. Agnes Hopkins mar- 
ried William II. Kempfler, who is professor of Forestry in the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, at Madison. Clare Hopkins is the wife of C. C. 
Burgess, of Baltimore, Maryland: and Bess wedded Prof. A. A. Wor- 
cester, an attorney at law of Big Rapids, Michigan. 

Recently Mr. George W. Hopkins purchased niiiety-si.\ thousand 
acres of land in Florida and he has other financial interests of broad 
scope and importance. His interest in political questions is deep and 
sincere and he gives an earnest support to independent principles, be- 
lieving that neither of the old parties contains the best elements of 
good government. He and his wife are not formally connected with 
any church organization but they attend liberal church organizations 
and are ever ready to give their support to any worthy cause advanced 
for the good of the community. Mr. Hopkins is a typical western man, 
possessing the ambition and spirit of progress which have been the 
dominant factors in the upbuilding of this section of the country. 
Among his friends he is hijihly esteenifd for his social nature, his genial 
disposition and he has ratified strong fricndsliijjs by his deference for 
the opinions of others and his kindly consideration. 

Arthur F. Keseberg. — Among the well known and progressive busi- 
ness men of Lndington, ;\Ias<)n county, Michigan, is Arthur F. Kese- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 695 

berg, whose contribution to the development and good government of 
this section of the fine old Wolverine state has been of no mean order. 
He is engaged in the coal, wood, cement and iee business, in which con- 
nection he has built up a large and substantial trade. He was born at 
Sheboygan, Wisconsin, on the 26th of January, 1862, and is a son of 
Joseph and Dorothea (Kastner) Keseberg, the former of whom was a 
native of Westphalia, Germany, and the latter of whom was born in 
Saxony, Germany. j\Irs. Keseberg eame to this country with her par- 
ents and Mr. Keseberg made the trip alone, he being the only member 
of the family to emigrate to America. Their marriage was solemnized 
in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Both parents are now deceased, as are also 
two of their seven children, Arthur E., of this sketch, being the oidy 
son now living. 

Arthur F. Keseberg was reared and educated in his native city and 
at the age of fourteen years he entered upon an apprenticeship at the 
tanner's trade, serving three years, at the expiration of which he fol- 
lowed that trade for a period of four years. Subsequently, when he 
had attained to his legal majority, he engaged in business in partner- 
ship with his father, in Sheboygan, continuing to be thus identified for 
four years. Thereafter he was in the employ of the United States and 
American Express Companies for abovit two and a half years and for 
five years after that he was agent for the Gutsch Brewing Company, his 
business headquarters being at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1898 he es- 
tablished his home in Ludington, where he became bookkeeper for the 
Ludington Wooden Ware Company, the Standard Wooden Ware Com- 
pany and the Specialty Wooden Ware Company, keeping three sets of 
books at one time. One the 1st of February, 1906, he engaged in the 
coal, ice and building material business, building up a large wholesale 
and retail trade. From small beginnings he has enlarged his scope of 
operations until he now employs li\ r Icmis and wagons. His first year's 
business amounted to about twniiy llimisand dollars, while the business 
for 1910 increased to over fifty-tliousand dollars. 

In politics Mr. Keseberg accords a loyal allegiance to the cause of 
the Republican party and he is recognized as one of the most patriotic 
and public-spirited citizens in Mason countj'. He takes an active part 
in local politics and at one time was alderman of the Second ward. 
In a fraternal way he is an appreciative member of the time-honored 
Masonic order, in which he is past eminent commander of Apollo Com- 
mandery. No. 31, Knights Templars, and he is also affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
in the latter of which he is a charter member of Ludington Lodge. No. 
736. He is also a member of the German Aid Society and he and his 
wife hold member.ship in the Episcopal chur(?h, in the various depart- 
ments of whose work they have been most active factors. 

On the 25th of September, 1883. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Keseberg to Miss Minnie A. Warner, a daughter of Alvin Warner, of 
Sheboygan. ^Ir. and Mrs. Keseberg have an adopted daughter. — 
Katherine. 



696 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Albert W. Black. — An able and influential member of the legal 
fraternity, Albert W. Black of East Tawas, now serving as prosecuting 
attorney for Iosco county, is a man of talent and culture and is widely 
known as a public-spirited and progressive citizen, ever ready and willing 
to do his part in advancing and promoting the best interests of his com- 
munity. A son of Albert W. and Ellen (Lucas) Black, he was born in 
Bay City, Michigan, November 21, 1880, and there acquired his com- 
mon school and high school education. 

A young man of distinctive energy and ambition, he earlj^ determined 
to fit himself for a professional career, and with that end in view entered 
the State Law School at Lansing, Michigan, and was there graduated 
with the class of 1904. Almo-st immediately after receiving his diploma 
Mr. Black was admitted to the bar, and in July, 190-4, located at East 
Tawas, where his legal knowledge and skill soon attracted the attention 
of the community, and his clientage grew with great rapidity, becoming 
extensive and remunerative. 

As a representative of the highest type of manhood and of the best 
American citizenship, Mr. Black takes a lively interest in aU that goes 
to conserve the welfare of his home city and county, and never shirks 
the responsibilities that accompany public office. In 1907, 1908 and 1909 
he served East Tawas as city attorney. For five years, from 1906 until 
1910, inclusive, he was Circuit Court commissioner for Iosco county. 
Elected prosecuting attorney for the same county in November. 1910, 
Mr. Black assumed the duties of the position in January, 1911, and has 
since filled the office with marked ability, his wide research, broad 
powers of reasoning and his natural aptitude for legal work making him 
a most valuable and desirable man for the place. "When the Iosco County 
Board of Trade was organized Mr. Black was one of its most enthusiastic 
promoters, and is now, in 1911, serving as its president. He is also a 
director of the Iosco Agricultural Society, and in its management takes 
much interest. 

Prominent iu the Masonic fraternity, Mr. Black has taken the thirty- 
second degree. Scottish Rite, and is a member of Baldwin Lodge, No. 
274. F. & A. JI. ; of the Consistory at Bay City ; of Elf Khurafch Temple, 
A. A. 0. N. M. S., at Saginaw ; and of the Order of the Eastern Star. 
He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Knights of Pythias. He married, in 1907, Nina M., daughter of William 
J. Fox. 

"Wesley Di'NN & Son.— This firm includes two ol' the repi-csciitalive 
men of the village of Kingsley, Michigan, "Wesley and Howard Dunn— 
who form an important factor in the lumber manufacturing industry 
of this prosperous northern town. A review of their lives is of interest 
in this connection. 

"Wesley Dunn is a native of the Empire state. He was born at Wa- 
tertowii. New York, in 1837, and when very young was brought liy his 
parents to Michigan, their location being on a farm at Fawn River. 
Here his boyhood and youth were passed, his educational advantages 
being limited to the local schools near his home. At the age of twenty- 
one lie left the parental roof 07id started out in the world to mnke his 




--Xy^ (^-ou a^^>^^<^. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 697 

own way. At Bronson, Michigan, he found employment, and there he 
made his first business venture, when he opened up a general store. He 
first came to Kingsley, from Bi-onson, more than twenty-five years ago — 
in the fall of 1885, to be exact — but at that time he remained here only 
a brief period, going thence to Westminster, where he started a general 
store. In 1893 he returned to Kingsley and purchased the sawmill of 
Burkett brothers, and since that date has been engaged in the manufac- 
ture of lumber, lath and shingles. In 1904 the mill was destroyed by 
fire, but that same year was rebuilt, enlarged and equipped witii mod- 
ern machinery, and in 1910 it was remodeled and still further improved, 
and now under the direct management of the younger member of the 
firm, backed by the experience of the elder, the business is in a pros- 
perous condition. 

In 1863 Wesley Dunn and Miss Mary Bennett were iinited in mar- 
riage, and of the four children born to them only one, Howard W., is 
now living. The first two, Annie Bell and Edward, died in infancy 
Arthur Bennett, born September 10, 1881, died in 1900. Howard W., 
born December 7, 1883, is the junior member of the firm whose name 
introduces this sketch. Mrs. Wesley Dunn is a native of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, and at the time of her marriage was a resident of Bronson, 
Michigan, she having accompanied her parents to Michigan when quite 
young. The Bennett family made the journey across New York state 
via canal, and on their arrival in this state settled on a farm near 
Bronson. 

At the time Wesley Dunn and family took up their residence at 
Kingsley, Howard was a lad of ten years. He attended school at this 
place until 1901, when he entered Kalamazoo College, where he pursued 
a full literary course. He graduated at this institution in the spring of 
1908, in the meantime having spent one year in study at the Chicago 
University, and in the fall of 1908 he returned to Chicago and received 
from the University the degree of Bachelor of Science. Thus equipped, 
he returned to Kingsley and settled down in business with his father, 
under the name given above, Wesley Dunn & Son. On July 1, 1911, 
the Bank of Kingsley (a private institution) was incorporated as a state 
hank, with Howard Dunn as one of the principal stockholders. Al- 
though the youngest stockholder, he was one of the directors and tlic 
second vice-president. 

On May 28, 1910, Howard W. Dunn and Miss Margaret Fi-ances 
Albright, of Traverse City, Michigan, were united in marriage. Mrs. 
Dunn is a native of Kokomo, Indiana, and a daiighter of Newton and 
Jessie (Butler) Albright. 

Both the senior and junior Dunns are identified with the Baptist 
church, to which they contribute liberal support, and, politically, both 
father and son are Repulilicaus. active and influential in local affairs. 
At this writing Howard Dunn is a member of the village council. At 
different times his father has served as school director, member of the 
village council and village treasurer. At the present time he is treas- 
urer of the school board of Kingsley, and also is a trustee of Kalamazoo 
College. 



698 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Andrew J. ]\Iebschel. — As proprietor of an extensive hardware, 
plumbing and general repair business at East Tawas, Andrew J. Mer- 
sehel is conspicuously concerned with the commercial prosperity of his 
home city, and also of Iosco county. Having begun his active career 
at the lower rung of the ladder of attainments, and having by means of 
sturdy industry, enterprising energy, and judicious management made 
steady and rapid progress along the highway of success, he is a fine rep- 
resentative of the self-made men of our times, and eminently desers'ing 
of the high regard and esteem so universally accorded him by his fellow- 
men. A native of Michigan, he was born, in 1871, in St. Clair county, 
coming from thrifty German stock. 

His parents, Andrew and Margaret IMersehel, were born and reared in 
Germany. Immigrating to the United States, they located iu Detroit, 
Jlichigan, in 1852, but subsequently removed to St. Clair county, where 
they brought up their children, which were ten in number, and of whom 
seven are now living, Andrew J. being the seventh child of the household 
in order of birth. 

Receiving his elementary education in the common schools, Andrew 
J. Merschel began working at the plumber's trade in his native county, 
from there going to ]\Iarine City and finally completing his apprentice- 
ship at Port Huron where, through his extensive and varied experience, 
he became thorough master of its every detail. Peeling then the need of 
a better education, he pursued his studies for awhile at Albion College. 
Subsequently resuming his trade, he has continued at it ever since, being 
now an expert in its numerous branches, as a practical plumber having 
built up a large business. Embarking in mercantile pui-suits. Mr. ]\Ier- 
schel opened his present hardware establishment at East Tawas, which 
he is managing successfully in connection with his plumbing and general 
repair business, his numerous patrons having implicit faith in his ability 
and honest work, his aim being to give full value for money received. 

Although his business demands the greater part of his time and atten- 
tion Mr. Merschel has served as alderman and supervisor, and while a 
member of the City Council was president .pro teni of the city. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which 
he is past noble grand ; and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Merschel married, June 14, 1908, Miss Elsie Runke, and of their 
union two children have been born, namely : i\Iargiierite and Noi'iuan. 

George 0. Switzer, M. D. — In no profession have the mark of prog- 
ress and the discoveries of science effected greater changes of method 
and practical application than in that of medicine, and he who would 
be fully in accord with the spirit of the age must be a close student, 
possessed of a keen and discriminating mind, capable of determining 
what is best in the new theories and truths constantly advanced and of 
then applying them to the needs of the profession whose noble object is 
the alleviation of human suffering. In this regard Dr. Switzer is by 
no means lacking, and his knowledge, skill and abilit.v have gained him 
high prestige among the citizens and practitioners of Ludington and 
Mason count.v. He was born in Eric count,v. Pennsylvania. Alareh 8, 
1854, and is tlie son of George H. and Mary Jane (AValdorflf) Switzer, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 699 

both natives of Allegany county, New York. The father, who was a 
millwright and lumberman, came to Barry county, Michigan, in 1860, 
when the subject was a young lad. In 1871 he located in Lake county, 
Michigan, where he built a large sawmill for the P''ormau Brothers, and 
there was passed the rest of his active life, his demise occurring in the 
year 1879. He was then in the prime of life and was engaged in lum- 
bering for the Danaher & Melendy Lumber Company when summoned 
to the other world. The mother survives, her years being seventy-seven 
and she makes her home in Pentwater, Oceana county. To this worthy 
couple five children were born, three of whom grew to maturity. Dr. 
Switzer was the third child in order of birth and is the only one living 
at the present time. 

Dr. Switzer 's residence in Michigan dates from the age of six yeai-s, 
for he was of such tender years when his father came to Barry county. 
It was within the borders of that county that he was reared and at- 
tended the public schools, his high school course being pursued at Hast- 
ings. It was Dr. Switzer 's lot to know the various trials and recom- 
penses of the school master, for he served in that capacity for some 
years, and as a conscientious and enlightened young pedagogue gave 
general satisfaction in the communities which benefited by his teach- 
ing. He taught his first school at Hope, in Barry county, and his last 
one at Baldwin in Lake county, the latter including the term of 1875 
and '76. Meantime he had arrived at a decision to become a physician 
and to this end he began the study of medicine, receiving a well-earned 
degree at the Bennett Medical College in Chicago, in the year 1881. 
His practice was inaugurated at Ludington, where for one year he min- 
istered to the woes of suffering and afflicted humanity in that section. 
He then transferred the scene of his activities to Pentwater and in that 
place was in practice for a period of eighteen years or until 1900. In 
the meantime he had not been content with letting well enough alone 
and he had taken a thorough post-graduate course in the medical de- 
partment of the Chicago College of Physicians and Surgeons, graduat- 
ing therefrom in 1897. In 1902 he returned to Ludington, the scene of 
his maiden endeavors as a practitioner, and has been in successful prac- 
tice hei-e ever since that time. He believes in the expediency of pre- 
serving the unity of the profession and holds membership in the State 
and American Medical Associations. 

Dr. Switzer joined the ranks of the Benedicts on the 25th day of 
August, 1876, by his marriage with Adaline Marthland, a daughter of 
Rev. M. Marthland. One daughter is the issue of this marriage, Alice ' 
M., a nurse in the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. He was married 
a second time, on the 18th of April, 1900. ]Miss Anna B. Jansen of Chi- 
cago, a daughter of Lars Jansen, becoming his wife. He has two chil- 
dren by this marriage, namely : Lars Waldorf!" and Lois Olga. 

Dr. Switzer is a life-long Republican and has efficiently held se\'eral 
offices, such as coroner and pension examiner. Were it not that he was 
esteemed one of the leading physicians of Northern Jlichigan he would 
still be well-known for his lodge relations alone, his membership ex- 
tending to the ancient and august Masonic order, in which he has the 



700 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Knights Templar degree, and also to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

L. D. Shietlipf. — One of the representative citizens of Bear Lake, 
Manistee county, Michigan, is Mr. L. D. Shirtliff, who has done much to 
further the industrial progress and development of this section of the 
fine old Wolverine state. He was boru at Novi, Oakland county, Michi- 
gan, on the 17th of April, 1841, and is a son of Sylvanus and Mary 
(Durfee) Shirtliff, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, 
whence they came to Michigan at an early day, the father engaging in 
carpentry and building. Mr. and Mrs. Shirtliff became the parents of 
five children, and they both died when L. D. was a mere infant. 
He was taken into the home of his maternal uncles, Addison and Seth 
Durfee, and there reared to maturity. He is indebted to the district 
schools of Novi for his preliminary educational training, which he later 
supplemented by a two-years' course in the Michigan State Normal 
School at Ypsilanti. In 1860 he began teaching, his first school being 
at Highland, Michigan, where he remained for one term, after which he 
taught for two years at New Hudson. After his marriage, in 1864, he 
and his wife resided at Novi and Lyons for a time, Mr. Shirtliff being 
engaged in farming. Later they went to Owosso where they remained 
for one year and in 1866 they removed to Pleasanton, in which vicinity 
he had located a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of wild 
timber land. He reclaimed one hundred acres of this tract to cultiva- 
tion and there built a home and continued to reside for a period of 
eighteen years, at the expiration of which, in 1880, they removed to 
Bear Lake, where they engaged in the hotel business. Mr. Shirtliff was 
identified with this line of enterprise for a few years and after dispos- 
ing of the same he became interested in the real-estate, loan and collec- 
tion business, in which he is engaged at the present time, in 1910. He 
IS a man of fine executive ability and broad experience and has done a 
great deal toward developing the natural resources of this section. 

In politics Mr. Shirtliff accords a stalwart allegiance to the prin- 
ciples and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor and 
his contribution to good government and progress has been of the most 
insistent order. For sixteen years he gave most efficient service as jus- 
tice of the peace in Pleasanton and for the past twenty years he has 
been a justice at Bear Lake. In his rulings it is said that but few re- 
verses have been given by the higher courts. He has served two terms 
"as county coroner and for seven years has been town treasurer of Bear 
Lake. In all of his public offices he has acquitted himself with the 
greatest of honor and distinction. In a fraternal way he is affiliated 
with the time-honored Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Knights of the Tented Maccabees and the Grange. Al- 
though he does not hold membership in any church he and his wife at- 
tend and give their support to the Baptist church, in the various de- 
partments of whose work they have been most zealous. 

In the year 1864 Mr. Shirtliff was united in marriage to Miss Char- 
lotte Snyder, of New Hudson, Michigan, her parents having been resi- 
dents ofGroveland, this state, during most of their lives. They became 




(^^ /). ^^^^- 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 701 

the parents of oni' child. Leo R., who was born on the 8th of February, 
1879, and who died when but three years of age. Mrs. Shirtliff is a 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star, the Daughters of Rebekah 
and the Ladies of the Tented Maccabees, of Bear Lake, to all of which 
orders she has given a most loyal support, holding various offices and 
doing much to make them substantial. Mr. and Mrs. Shirtliff hold a 
secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem and it may be 
said of them that the list of their personal friends is coincident with 
that of their acquaintances. 

John C. Viall. — As one of the valued contributors to the subject- 
matter of this historical work John C. Viall is con.sistently given special 
recognition in the work, and, further than this, the publishers find in 
his career many points of definite interest as indicating his value as one 
of the representative citizens of northern Michigan. He is a member 
of a family whose name has been worthily linked with the history of 
Michigan for more than sixty years, and within its gracious borders he 
has maintained his home from his boyhood days, besides which it was 
his to render valiant service as a member of a Michigan regiment in the 
Civil war. He may consistently be designated as one of the pioneers of 
the city of Alpena, where he has resided for forty years and where he 
was long and actively identified with newspaper work, as editor and 
publisher of the Alpena Argus. Through the medium of his paper as 
well as through his personal influence along other channels he has con- 
tributed much to the furtherance of the best interests of the community 
and has ever been the exponent of progressive policies and abiding pub- 
lic spirit. No citizen holds more secure vantage ground in popular con- 
fidence and esteem in Alpena county, and none is more familiar with the 
elements and agencies that have compassed the upbuilding of the thriv- 
ing and beautiful little city in which he has so long maintained his home. 

John C. Viall was born in Pittsfield, Otsego county. New York, on 
the 9th of March, 1842, and is a son of John C. and Sarah A. (Ballou) 
Viall, both likewise natives of the old Empire state, where the former 
was born January 2, 1815, and the latter on the 20th of December, 
1822. In 1850 the family inoved to Michigan and settled in the village 
of Pontiac. Both he and his wife continued their residence in Michgan 
until their death, the father having passed away in 1883 and the mother 
having been summoned to the life eternal on the 8th of March, 1897. 
John C. Viall, Sr., likewise was a loyal and gallant soldier of the ITnion 
during the climateric period of the war between the North and South, 
in which he was a member of the Eighth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. 
He passed the closing years of his life in Michigan, and his wife was a 
resident of Alpena, this state, at the time of her death. Mrs. Viall was 
a woman of most gracious personality and of marked literar.y talent, in 
which connection she was the author of a number of poems that are 
chaste in diction and beautiful in sentiment. Among these productions 
may be mentioned those bearing the following titles: "Let Me Sleep," 
"My Brother," "The Other Shore," "Lines to Madge Moore," "My 
Childhood," "Carrier's Address," "The American Soldier," and lines 
written on the presentation of a ring to her son John C. Of the six 



702 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

children born to John C. and Sarah A. (Ballou) Viall, all three sons 
and three daughters attained to years of maturity, and of the number 
two sons and one daughter are now living. 

John C. Viall, whose name initiates this review, gained his rudi- 
mentary education in the schools of his native state and supplemented 
this by attendance in the schools of Pontiac, Michigan. However, he 
was but thirteen years of age at the time when he entered upon an 
apprenticeship to the printer's trade, at the office of tlie Pontiac Jacl- 
sonian, and he became well versed in the intricacies and mysteries of 
the "art preservative of all arts," the discipline of which has been well 
designated as equivalent to a liberal education. When the dark cloud 
of Civil war cast its gruesome pall over the national horizon the intrinsic 
patriotism of Mr. Viall prompted him to tender forthwith his services 
in the defense of the Union. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in the 
Eighth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, but he was rejected, being un- 
able to pass the requisite examination. His patriotic ardor was not to 
be thus quenched, however, as is shown by the fact that he tried to 
enlist in turn in each the Second Michigan Cavalry, the Third Michigan 
Cavalry and the Seventeenth United States Infantry, but on the same 
score as before he was rejected on each occasion. In February, 1865, 
he finally realized his ambition, in that both he and his brother Frank 
M. enlisted as privates. in Company D, Twenty-second Micliigan Volun- 
teer Infantry, which they joined at Chattanooga, Tennessee. Both 
were later transferred to Company D, Twenty-ninth Michigan Volun- 
teer Infantry, and in this command they continued to serve iintil the 
close of the war, having been mustered out at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 
on the 6th of September, 1865, and having didy received honorable 
discharge after their return to Michigan. His continued interest in 
the "boys in blue" who followed the old flag to victory is shown by his 
membership in Horace S. Roberts Post, No. 139, Grand Army of the 
Republic, in Alpena, of which he is a past commander. 

After the close of the war Mr. Viall returned to Pontiac, Michigan, 
and he continued to be employed as a journeyman at his trade until 
1869, when he entered into partnership with William P. Nisbett and 
became one of the editors and publishers of the Pontiac Bill Poster, a 
weekly newspaper. In 1871 he sold his interest jn the bu.siness and 
removed to Alpena, which was then a small village with interests cen- 
tering principally in the lumber industry. Here he became the founder 
of the Alpena Ar()ns. the first issue of which appeared on the 29th of 
June, 1871. In the disastrous fire that swept Alpena on July 12th of 
the following year his office and its entire contents were destroyed, en- 
tailing a total loss. He courageously and confidently faced the emer- 
gency and within six weeks, with an entire new equipment, had brought 
about the raising of the Argus from its ashes. He made the paper 
not only a most worthy exponent and advocate of local interests Init 
also an effective force in connection with political affairs, its policy 
being that of uncompromising support of the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party, under whose banner he has been aligned from the time of 
attaining to his legal majority. He retained tlie ownership of the Argvsi 
for neariv thirtv-fivc vear.s. and in 1905 sold the plniit and business to 



PIISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 703 

James Collins, oue of the present publishers. Mr. Viall gained reputa- 
tion as one of the able and successful representatives of country joiir- 
nalism in Michigan, and his paper wielded much influence in promot- 
ing good governmental policies of local order and in forwarding all 
enterprises and measures tending to advance the general well-being of 
his home city and county. He is a forceful and vigorous writer and 
his editorial utterances have invariably bore the evidences of sincerity, 
civic loyalty and mature judgment. While never ambitious for public 
office, Mr. Viall served one year as a member of the board of aldermen 
of Alpena, representing in this body the old second ward, and for 
eleven years he was a member of the city board of education, in which 
connection he was the constant advocate of advanced policies and the 
best possible facilities. 

Mr. Viall has been consistently termed the "father of Odd Fellow- 
ship in Alpena," and he has been an earnest and appreciative member 
of this fraternity, to the advancement of whose local interests he has 
contributed most generously. On the 3d of October, 1871, he effected 
the organization of Alpena Lodge, No. 170, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and he was the first to be chosen its Noble Grand. The city 
now has two flourishing lodges, two lodges of the allied body, the 
Daughters of Rebekah, and also an encampment organization of the 
Patriarchs Militant. It was principally through Mr. Viall's zeal and 
determined effort that the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Alpena 
purchased their present fine three-story building, all of which is util- 
ized by the organization, whose local membership is now more than one 
thousand persons. He is also afSliated with Alpena Lodge, No. 199, 
Free and Accepted Masons; and Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal 
Arch Masons. In religion Mr. and Mrs. Viall are of the Episcopalian 
faith. 

In the city of Pontiac, Michigan, on the 7th of April, 1864, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Viall to Martha M. Brown, who was liorn 
in the state of Ohio, as were also her parents. Sanford L. and Amelia 
C. (Moulton) Brown. The father served as a musician in the Twenty- 
second Michigan Volunteer Infantry in the Civil war, and remained 
with this command until victory had crowned the Union arms. Both 
he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in Ohio. Mr. 
and Mrs. ^"iall became the parents of three children, namely: George 
W., Florence M., and Carrie M. George "W. died in Alpena, February 
9, 1876, aged eleven years. Florence was married to George M. Hanna 
in 1887, and of her four children, George V. and William E. Hanna 
are now living, while the mother passed away in 1904, aged thirty-six 
years. Carrie M., born March 2, 1876, married in 1894 Charles C. 
Cushman. and to them, three children were born, Carryl C, Natalie C. 
and GwjTine, all residing in Alpena. 

Thomas Curry. — Northern Michigan has been the home and the 
scene of the labors of many men who have not only led lives that should 
serve as an example to those who come after them but who have also been 
of important service to this section of the fine old Wolverine state in 
various avenues of public usefvdness. A representative pioneer in Iosco 



704 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

county is Thomas Curry, of East Tawas, whose contribution to progress 
and development has ever been of the most insistent order and who was 
long a member of the well known firm of Curry Brothers, a prominent 
lumber and hotel concern in the early days. Thomas Curry was bom in 
County Argenteuil, in the province of Quebec, Canada, on the 29th of 
October, 1842, and is a son of Isaiah and Abigail (Riley) Curry, both 
of whom are now deceased. The father was an agriculturist in Canada 
during the major portion of his active business career and he reared to 
maturity five children, namely, — Jqhn, Chailes, Isaiah, Mary A. and 
Thomas, all of whom are deceased except Thomas, the immediate subject 
of this review. 

Isaiah Curry, an elder brother of him to whom this sketch is dedi- 
cated, immigrated to Michigan in the year 1865, and Thomas joined him 
in the following year. They were extensive land owners, holding about 
eight hundred acres of splendid timber land. In 1867 they purchased a 
large tract of land in Tawas township, a portion of which is still owned 
by the subject of this sketch. Thomas Curry has already given to his 
children nearly five hundred acres of farm land in this section and he is 
still the owner of much valuable propert.y in and adjoining East Tawas. 
In 1867 the Curry Brothers constructed a large hotel in Tawas City, 
the same being christened the "American House." In this popular hotel 
the traveling public found the best entertainment and the most hospitable 
of hosts. The American House was destroyed by fire in 1868 and in the 
same year they erected a hotel at Tawas City, which was much superior 
to the first one in every respect. Later they built the Tawas City Hotel, 
and this too was destroyed by the ravages of fire. During the years be- 
tween 1867 and 1882 the Curiy Brothers lost four hotels and one dwell- 
ing through fire. This would be enough to dishearten any ordinary man 
but Isaiah and Thomas Curry plodded on and eventually success crowned 
their various ventures so that to-day Mr. Curiy has attained a compe- 
tency and is now living in virtual retirement at East Tawas. In 1894 
Mr. Thomas Currj% ^\'ith his family, removed to one of his farms in 
Iosco county, where he continued to reside until 1905, in which year he 
established the family home in East Tawas. That Mr. Currj- is eminently 
popular among his fellow citizens and business associates may well be 
seen when it is stated that for the past thirty-three years he has been 
incumbent of the office of director in the Michigan Agricultural Society. 
In politics he endorses the cause of the Republican party and while he 
has never had time or ambition for the honors and emoluments of public 
office his eveiy effort has been exerted in behalf of good government and 
general prosperity. The Curry family has even been aligned as devout 
communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church, the established church 
of England, in whose faith Thomas Curry was reared and to which he 
continues to give a most zealous allegiance. 

On the 5th of February, 1874, Mr. Curry was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine J. Schneeberger, who was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
and who is a daughter of John Schneeberger, long a representative and 
influential citizen of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Curry have six children, 
all of whom were born in Tosco county, Michigan, whose names are here 
entered in respective order of birth. — Charles W., Vinn M., Lillie M., 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 705 

Waldo I., Thomas V., and Johanna C. Lillie M. is now the wife of 
Mertal Barns, and they maintain their liome at East Tawas. 

The entire life of Thomas Curry has been one of industry and pro- 
priety. He has reared and educated a fine family and now, in his de- 
clining years, suiTOunded with plenty to supply every want and by a 
family of which he is justly proud, he may pass the residue of his life 
in comfort and contentment — a deserved reward for a most deserving 
man. 

John Martin Wugg.\zee is one of the progressive business men of 
Tawas City, Iosco county, Michigan, where since 1903 he has maintained 
his residence, and by his straightforward line of conduct ingratiated him- 
self into the good favor of his fellow citizens. Mr. Wuggazer was bom 
at Big Rapids, Michigan, on the 12th of January, 1S75, and he is a son 
of Rev. C. L. Wuggazer, present pastor in the Lutheran church at Au- 
burn, Michigan. Rev. Wuggazer is a native son of Germany and he 
pui-sued his theological studies at St. Louis, Missouri, being ordained 
to the ministry in about the year 1870. His eloquence and sound Chris- 
tian teaching, as combined with inherent manliness and sterling integ- 
rity of character, have endeared him to the hearts of his congregation. 
He is possessed of a vigorous mentality and is liberal in thought and 
action, his every act being indicative of that broad human sympathy 
which is always fused in a noble personality. In 1870 was solemnized 
the marriage of Rev. Wuggazer, and he became the father of four sons 
and four daughtei-s, of whom the following are living : Arthur, John and 
Martin and Lydia, who married Prof. Wendt. 

After completing the curriculum of the public schools of his native 
place, including the high school, John M. Wuggazer was matriculated in 
"the Grand Rapids School of Pharmacy, in which he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1892, with the degree of Bachelor of Pharmacy. 
He has been interested in the drug business ever since jouth and his 
present fine establishment at Tawas City is well equipped with all the 
best and purest drugs. In polities he accords an unswerving allegiance 
to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands 
sponsor and in a public way ]Mr. Wuggazer has been of great service to 
hLs fellow citizens. For two years he w^as incumbent of the office of 
alderman of Tawas City and in 1904-5 he gave efficient service as mayor 
of the city. In 1911 he was given further proof of the high regard of 
his fellow men in that he was then again elected to the office of mayor. 
He is proving a most admirable administrator of the municipal affairs 
of the city and it is always his aim to secure such legislation as will ad- 
vance the progress and development of the city. He is a man whose de- 
portment of character and loyalty to duty fit him for anj^ municipal, 
social or civil position in life. He and his wife are devout members of 
the Lutheran church. 

In the year 1903 Mr. Wuggazer was united in marriage to Miss Olive 
Culler, whose birth occurred in Illinois, where she was reared and edu- 
cated and she is a daughter of Henry Culler. Jlr. and Mrs. Wuggazer 
have no children. 



706 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Desire E. Cartier. — A membei* of one of the honored pioneer fam- 
ilies of northern Michigan and a son of the late Antoine E. Cartier, who 
was long one of the most influential citizens and leading business men of 
the city Ludington, Desire E. Cartier has from his youth been closely 
identified with the manifold and important interests that were projected 
and conserved by his father, and he is himself a man of large business 
affairs. A review of the life of his father appeal's elsewhere in this 
work, within whose pages are also sketches of other representative mem- 
bers of the family, so that it is not necessary to repeat the data in the 
article at hand. The city of Ludington gives well merited distinction to 
Ml". Cartier as one of its most influential and public-spirited citizens and 
as a business man of fine executive and administrative powers. 

Desire E. Cartier was born in the city of ilauistee, Jlichigan, on the 
31st of January, 1871. and when he was six years of age his parents es- 
tablished their permanent home in Ludington. His rudimentary educa- 
tion was secured in the Catholic parochial schools of JManistee and Lud- 
ington. in wliieh latter city he also availed himself of the advantages of 
the public schools. In 1884 he entered the great Notre Dame University 
at South Bend, Indiana, in which institution he was graduated as a meu^- 
ber of the class of 1892 and from which he received the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science. Upon his return to Ludington he became associated with 
his father's extensive business activities, with which he has since con- 
tinued to be identified and in connection with which he now exercises 
most noteworthy executive functions. He has been president of the 
Cartier Lumber Company since the death of his father, in March, 1910, 
and he is also president of the Cartier Manufacturing Company, an- 
other of the important industrial concerns of Ludington. The fii-st men- 
tioned corporation gives employment to an average of two hundred and 
fifty men, and the latter company retains on its pay rolls an average of' 
ninety employes, ilr. Cartier is chairman of the board of directors of 
the Cartier-Magmer Company and is a dii'ector of the Ludington State 
Bank and of the Chicago, Racine & Milwaukee Line, which operates a 
fine line of steamers on Lake Michigan. He is also vice-president of the 
Northern Michigan Transportation Company and has other important 
capitalistic interests. 

Mr. Cartier. like his father and brothers, stands exemplar of the most 
distinctive public spirit, and representatives of this sterling family have 
(lone mucli to foster the civic and material vipbuilding of the cit.v of Lud- 
ington. He is found aligned under the banner of the Republican party 
and both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church. He 
is one of the prominent and influential members of the Ludington organi- 
zation of the Knights of Columbus and he is secretary and treasurer of 
the local St. Thomas Society. In the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks he is identified with Ludington Lodge, No 736, and was demitted 
to the same from Ashland Lodge, No. 558, of Ashland, Wisconsin, of 
which latter he was a charter member. He has also represented his 
lodge in the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the order. 

On the 24th of April, 1890, Mr. Cartier was united in marriage to 
Miss Alice Coady, a daughter of Patrick Coady, who was a resident of 
Pana, Christian county, Illinois. The seven cliildren nf this union are: 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 707 

George E, Louise A.. Ali.'.- and Alfred (twins). Rosemary, Elizabeth 
and Robert. 

Silas C. Overpack.— Among the influential and prominent citizens 
of the city of Jlaaistee, Jlichigan, is Mr. Silas C. Overpack who was 
boru m Chemung county, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of March, 1842 a 
son of George and IMercy Overpack. The father was identified with 
carpentering and farming during the major part of his active business 
career and he removed with his family to iMichigan about the year 1850 
They settled in Oakland county, where the parents passed the residue 
ot their lives and where they were summoned to the life eternal 

Silas C. Overpack, who was the sixth in order of birth in a family 
ot ten children, received his educational training in the public schools 
of his native place and after his arrival in ilichigan he entered upon an 
apprenticeship at the wagon-making trade. In 1868 he came to Man- 
istee, where he began the manufacturing of wagons and sleighs for 
lumbering purposes. Three years later he added to his original business 
the^ manufacturing of ten-foot logging wheels and salt and mill carts 
and eventually he introduced in his establishment a department for the 
sale of harnesses, whips, robes and blankets. He has constantly em- 
ployed a force of from twelve to fifteen men and is recognized as an 
eminently successful business man. In politics :Mr. Overpack takes a 
deep and sincere interest in the aiifairs of the Republican party and in 
connection with the general progress and development of the com- 
munity he has ever given most freely of his aid and influence He has 
given most efficient service as a member of the board of supervisors of 
Manistee and has also served on the city council. In the time-honored 
Masonic order he has passed through the circle of York Rite Masonry 
holding membership in commandery No. 32, Knights Templars, besides 
which he is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. In their re- 
ligious faith the Overpack family are members of the Unitarian church 
but there being no church of that denomination in ^lanistee they attend 
the Congregational services. They are active factors in connection with 
all charitable movements in the city and contribute in generous meas- 
ure to all worthy measures advanced for the public good. 

At Manistee, in 1871, was celebrated the marriage'' of Mr. Overpack 
to Miss :Millie Jlagoon, who was born and reared in IManistee To this 
union have been bom three children,— Roy, Nellie and Stella. Roy was 
graduated in the local high school and thereafter entered the I'niversity 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in the literary department of which he was 
graduated in 1903 and in the law department of which he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1905, duly receiving his degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. Immediately after graduating he became associated with his 
father in business. He is secretary of the Board of Trade of ilanistee 
and IS a stalwart Republican in his political convictions. In the Ma- 
sonic Order he is a Knight Templar and in the Knights of Pythias he is 
past chancellor. Miss Nellie is a musician. Studying first at Ann Ar- 
bor and later at Detroit under the instruction of :\rarshal Pease she 
eventually went to the city of Chicago, where she continued her studies 
under Mrs. Willard Bracken, head of the Cosmopolitan School of JIusic 



708 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

She is now engaged in teaching vocal music in the western metropolis 
and she has charge of the organization of vocal classes outside of Chi- 
cago. Stella remains at home, where she is attending school. 

Charles B. Tweedale, M. D. — The son of an eminent physician and 
surgeon of the province of Ontario, the associate in his course in medi- 
cine of men who have since become renowned, and himself a diligent 
student and observant practitioner in several departments of his pro- 
fession, Ur. Charles B. Tweedale of Cheboygan has had some unusual 
advantages in his training lor his life work in the circumstances amid 
which he prepared for it. His subsequent diligence in keeping the pace 
set for him by those circumstances, and the success he has won bj' this 
course, prove emphatically that he was worthy of their best lessons and 
that none has been lost on him. 

The doctor is a native of Ontario himself, and was born at Vienna, 
Elgin county, in that province, on August 2, 1S66. His parents. Dr. 
John B. and Frances (Beesley) Tweedale, were born in England and 
are both now deceased. Of the nine children born to theiu but two are 
living, the doctor and his older sister Florence, who is tlie wife of Frank 
Taylor, and is living in the state of Washington. 

The father came to the New World in his young manhood partially 
prepared for a professional career, having begun the study of medicine 
and surgery in his native land. In continuation of his course he entered 
the Medical University of Buffalo, New York, and was graduated from 
that institution in 1857. He afterward pursued a special course of 
instruction in the Victoria University of Medicine in Toronto, and 
another in the medical department of Magill University in Montreal, 
and received a diploma from each of these great professional seats of 
learning. 

He began, continued and ended his professional work in Elgin 
county and its eastern neiglibor, Norfolk county, Ontario, passing the 
last eighteen or twenty years of his life and iisefulness in the city of 
St. Thomas in Elgin county, continuing active in the practice until the 
end, which came in 1S89, when he was sixty-eight years of age. He 
was highly endowed by nature and well trained by study and experi- 
ence for his professional duties, and rose to a leading place among the 
medical men of Ontario. 

Dr. Charles B. Tweedale obtained his professional training in the 
University of Medicine in Buffalo, New York, being graduated • from 
the institution just thirty-one years after his father. After his grad- 
uation he took a post-graduate course in the university in company with 
nine other young men. One of tliese was Frank B. Hamilton, now 
famous as a surgeon. Another was Matthew D. Mann, also renowned 
in medical circles, and still another was Roswcll Park, the cmiiiciit sur- 
geon who attended the late President McKinley when tlie deadly aim of 
his assassin laid him on his deathbed. 

Dr. Tweedale passed one year practicing in company with Ins father 
in St. Thomas, and then Four trying years in eastern Michigan, In 
1895 he located in Cheboygan, and here he has become one of the lead- 
ing physicians and surgeons of this part of the state. He specializes in 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 709 

blood, kidney and nervous diseases, and keeps himself up to the hour 
in knowledge of the latest developments in those lines of practice by a 
diligent study of the best literature published concerning them, and by 
frequent conferences with his medical brethren of other special lines 
and those in general practice. During the last fifteen years he has been 
secretary of the Cheboygan Medical Society, and for almost an eqiial 
period an active member of the State ]\Iedical Association, of whose 
meetings he is a regular and interested attendant. 

The people of Cheboygan have not been ignorant of or indifferent 
to his ability and skill iti his department of usefulness. He served as 
county coroner two terms, as county physician one term, and as city 
health officer in 1909, 1910 and 1911 at their behest, and gave all the 
interests involved excellent service. He was also surgeon for the De- 
troit & Mackinac Railroad. His fellow citizens have long held him in 
high regard as a physician of fine ability and great resourcefulness in 
emergencies, giving him their patronage in a considerable volume and 
depending on his services with absolute confidence and reliance. As a 
citizen he has been in the front rank for every line of civic duty and 
in popular esteem from his advent in the community and the beginning 
of his work among its people. 

The big insurance companies, which alwaj's employ the best talent 
available to them for their needs, have also found him worthy of their 
confidence and secured his services. He is at present (1911) medical 
examiner for the Mutual Life, the Indiana State Life, the Prudential, 
the Fidelity Mutual, the Manufacturers Life, the Security Mutual, the 
Michigan State Life, Detroit Life, and the Security Trust and Life 
insurance companies. He is also examining physician for numerous 
fraternal orders and benefieial societies. The doctor has taken a warm 
interest in fraternal life on account of its beneficent and social features, 
and given to several of the fraternities prevalent among men the ben- 
efit of his active and helpful membership. He belongs to and is a Past 
Exalted Ruler of Cheboygan Lodge of Elks, and is also on the roster 
of Temple Lodge of Odd Fellows, Nekahnis Lodge of Knights of Pyth- 
ias, and Cheboygan Aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In polit- 
ical faith and adherence he is a steadfast and zealous Republican. 
Every interest of value in the city and county receives his studious and 
serviceable attention, and every worthy agency at work for the benefit 
of their people has his earnest, energetic and intelligent support. 

Edward J. McCartney.- — Among the representative citizens of Tawas 
City, Michigan. Edward J. McCartney is well deserving of recognition 
in this publication, both on account of his business ability and also on 
account of his intrinsic patriotism to all measures pro.iected for the good 
of the general welfare. He has here been engaged in the butter busi- 
ness, as junior member of the Tawas City Butter Company, since 1906. 
Mr. McCartney was born in Genesee county, ^Michigan, on the 2nd of 
February, 1871, a son of Henry and Ann (Purcell) McCartney, both 
of whom were born and reared in Ireland, M'henee they came to America 
and to Genesee county, IMichiean, in the early pioneer days. The father 
was engaged in the great basic industry of agriculture during the major 



710 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

portion of his active business career and he and his wife became the 
parents of six children, four of whom are now living. He was sum- 
moned from the scene of his mortal endeavors in the year 1873, at the 
early age of thirty-three years, and the mother passed away in 1898, 
at the age of sixty-two years. 

Edward J. McCartney was the youngest in order of birth in a family 
of six children and he was reared to adult age on the old homestead 
farm in Genesee county, Michigan, in the work and management of 
which he early became associated with his brothers. He was an infant 
of but two years of age at the time of his father's death and he was 
early in life thrown upon his own resources. However, he succeeded 
in getting a good common school education and in 1898, just after the 
death of his mother, he purchased a farm of eighty acres in Maple 
Grove township, Saginaw county, forty of which are in a high state of 
cultivation. He was engaged in diversified farming imtil 190(3, in which 
year he became an interested principal in the Tawas Butter Company. 
The firm consists of Mr. JlcCartney and H. A. Ammerou, the latter of 
whom has seven other creameries beside the one at Tawas City. Mr. 
Ammeron has been in the creamery business for a number of years and 
both he and Mr. JlcCartney are experienced butter makers. The Tawas 
Butter Company manufactures about thirty-five thousand pounds of 
creamei'y butter a year and it is recognized as an industry which adds 
considerably to the prosperity of the community and city at large. This 
concern has been located at Tawas City since 1908. The present finely 
equipped creamery consists of two rooms, one twenty-four by forty-six 
feet in lateral dimensions, and a boiler room twenty-four by thirtj' feet. 
In politics Mr. McCartney accords a stalwart allegiance to the prin- 
ples of the Republican party and in a fraternal way he is affiliated with 
vario^is representative organizations of a local character. He and his 
wife are devoted members of the Catholic church at Tawas City and 
they are active fa.ctors in connection with church affairs. Mr. Mc- 
Cartney began life with nothing to back him but pluck and persever- 
ance and through close application to the affairs at hand he has made 
of success not an accident but a direct result. 

On the 17th of October, 1898, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
McCartney to iliss Margaret E. Burns, a daughter of Patrick and 
Katherine (Hogan) Burns, both of whom are now deceased. The Burns 
family located in Saginaw county, Michigan, about the year 1872 and 
there the father became an eminently prosperous farmer, owning and 
operating a splendid estate of one himdred and sixty acres of most 
arable land. Mr. and Jlrs. Burns had seven children and of the num- 
ber four are now living, namely, — Margaret E., Thomas, Annie and 
Frank. To Mr. and Mrs. ]\IcCartney have been born three children,— 
Henry, Francis and Kitty. 

WiLUAM H. Kimball. — A well known and highly esteemed citizen 
of Ludington, where he is incumbent of the office of city trea.surer, Mr. 
Kimball is well entitled to recognition as one of the representative men 
of ]\Iason county, and he has passed the major portion of his life thus 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 711 

far in ilichigan, where his parents took up their residenee in the middle- 
pioneer epoch. 

William H. Kimball was born in Schuyler county, New York, on the 
1st of December, 1842, and is a son of John Kimball, who was bom and 
reared in that state, where he continued to reside until 1859, when he 
removed with his family to Jlichigan and settled in Jackson county, 
where he purchased a tract of land and developed a productive farm. 
He was one of the sterling citizens of that section of the state and ever 
conuuanded the unqualified esteem of his fellow men. He lived to attain 
the patriarchal age of ninety-one years and virtually his entire active 
career was one of close identification with agricultural pursuits. He was 
a son of William Kimball, who was born in Maryland, and whose father 
was a native of Holland, a country from whence he emigrated to Amer- 
ica in the Colonial days. Mrs. Elizabeth (Horton) Kimball, mother of 
him whose name initiates this article, was likewise bom and reared in 
the old Empire state of the Union, as was also her father, Thomas Hor- 
ton, a scion of stanch English stock. The lineage of the Horton family 
is authentically traced back to the sixteenth century. ]\lrs. Elizabeth 
(Horton) Kimball passed the closing years of her life in Jackson coimty, 
Michigan, and was eighty-three years of age when she was summoned to 
eternal rest. Of the seven children five attained to maturity and four 
are living at the present time. 

William H. Kimball, the sixth in order of birth of the seven children 
of John and Elizabeth (Horton) Kimball, is indebted to the common 
schools of his native state for his early educational discipline and was 
sixteen years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal 
to jMichigan, in 1859. He assisted in the work of the home farm in 
Jackson county until he was prompted by patriotism and loyalty to re- 
spond to the call of higher duty, when the integrity of the nation was 
thrown into jeopardy through armed rebellion. He was among the first 
to tender his services in defense of the Union. In September, 1861, he 
enlisted as a member of Company H, First Michigan Engineers, in \vhich 
command he served for three years, during the major portion of which 
time he held the office of corporal. He took part in many of the impor- 
tant engagements marking the progress of the great conflict between the 
North and South, and it should be noted that he participated in the 
battle of Perryville, Kentucky, the siege of Corinth and the battle of 
Stone River. He was never absent from his regiment during the entire 
period of his service as a valiant and faithful soldier of the republic, 
and he received his honorable discharge at Atlanta in October. 1864, at 
the expiration of his term of enlistment. 

Upon the termination of his militaiy career Mr. Kimball returned to 
Jackson county, where he continued to be actively associated with the 
great basic industry of agriculture imtil 1873, when he came to northern 
Michigan and established his home in the village of Ludington. where 
he has thus resided for nearly two score of years, within which he has 
witnessed the development of this section into one of the most prosperous 
and attractive in the state. For many years he gave his attention to 
lumber inspecting, and in this line he had much to do with the exploit- 
ing of the magnificent timber resources which so long gave Michigan 



712 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

prestige and industrial prosperity. Mr. Kimball has been loyal and pro- 
gressive as a citizen and his sterling characteristics and unmistakable 
ability have marked him as specially eligible for offices of public trust 
and responsibility. In 1894 he was elected sheriff of i\Iason countj', and 
after giving a most admirable administration during his fii-st term of 
two years he was elected his own successor, in 1896, thus sen'ing four 
consecutive years in this exacting office. He was supervisor for the Sec- 
ond ward of Ludington three years and is now serving his third consecu- 
tive term in the office of city treasurer of Ludington. Strongly fortified 
in his political convictions and opinions, i\Ir. Kimball is uncompromising 
in his allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, and dui-ing the 
long years of his residence in Alason county he has shown a specially 
vital interest in public affairs and has given his influence and co-opera- 
tion in the forwarding of enterprises and measures that have tended to 
advance the general welfare of the commimity. Mr. Kimball is an appre- 
ciative and valued member of Pap Williams Post, No. 15, Grand Army 
of the Republic, is affiliated with Pere ilarquette Lodge, No. 299, Free 
& Accepted ilasons, and is a member of the Congregational church. 

In the year 1873 was celebrated the marriage of IMr. Kimball to iliss 
Laura Inez Fellows, a school teacher, and who was born and reared in 
Jackson county, this state, a representative of one of the honored pioneer 
families of Michigan. J\Ir. and Mis. Kimball have two sons. Dr. Horton 
Fellows and Dr. John A. E., both of whom are skilled members of the 
dental profession and both of w-hom are engaged in successful practice 
in the state of Idaho. 

Hyman Joseph. — Especially fitted by natural talent, training and 
experience for a commanding position in the business world, Hyman 
Joseph is conspicuously identified with the promotion of the mercantile 
interests of Grayling as a member and the manager of the Grayling iler- 
cantile Company, which was established in 1902 and is composed of the 
following named gentlemen : R. Hanson, Hyman Joseph, John K. Han- 
son and Marius Hanson. This is the largest and most important mercan- 
tile organization in Grayling as regards either capital, stock or building, 
bearing comparison with the large department stores of many of our 
thriving cities. The building in which this enterprising company is 
housed is two stories in height, and both floors are amply stocked with 
goods of a .superior quality, a complete line of men's, women's and chil- 
dren's furnishings of the best qualities and most modern styles being 
kept constantly on hand. Under the supervision of its able and genial 
manager prompt and satisfactory service is given to its numerous pa- 
trons, and the business is extending and increasing in volume each year. 

The youngest of the four children of Joseph and ^Martha Joseph, Hy- 
man Joseph was born in 1850, in Plock, Russian Poland, and was there 
reared and educated, living in his native country until twenty-five years 
of age. Emiffratinp then to the United States, he landed in New S'ork 
city on April 15, 1875. In March, 1876, he made his way to Michigan, 
for three years thereafter making his headquarters in JBay City, but 
traveling throughout the northern part of the state as a dr>' goods sales- 
man. The business proved so profitable that in 1879 ^Ir. Joseph settled 




^6/l.J^ (Co (p^^^^y^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 713 

at Otsego Lake, where he was prosperously engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits imtil 1902, when he assisted in the organization of the Grayling 
Mercantile Company, of which he has since been the manager. 

Mr. Joseph has been twice married. He married first, in 1876, jMary 
^Morris, of Germany, and to them four children were born, Rachel, Sam- 
uel. Ida and Abraham. He married in 1891 Rose Wolf, and they are the 
parents of four children, Martha, Henry, Louis and Margaret. Frater- 
nally Mr. Joseph is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Knights of 
Pythias and of the Knights of the Maccabees. 

Will E. Edgerton. — The present efficient and popular sheriff of 
J^niiuet county has been closely identified with the industrial and civic 
activities of this county, where he has maintained his home since 1886 
and where he has gained definite independence and prosperity through 
his own well directed endeavors, the while he has so ordered his course 
as to retain the high esteem of the communitj'. He has served in vari- 
ous local offices of public trust and he assumed the duties of his present 
important office on the 1st of January, 1911, prior to which time he had 
given effective service as deputy sheriff. He is a scion of one of the 
sterling pioneer families of Michigan and his parents, each of whom 
has passed the psalmist's span of three score years and ten, now reside 
in the village of Brutus, Emmet county, where his father has the dis- 
tinction of being the oldest blacksmith in the state actively engaged in 
the work of his trade. 

Will E. Edgerton, whose duties as sheriff of the county, involve his 
residence in its judicial center, the attractive little city of Peto.skey, 
is a native of Steubenville, Jefferson county, Ohio, where he was born 
on the 17th of December, 1858, and he is a son of Harris and Delia 
(Edgerton) Edgerton, both of ■whom were born in Vermont and both 
of whom are representatives of families founded in historic New Eng- 
land in the colonial era. Of the three children Sheriff Edgerton is the 
elder of the two now living, and his sister, Etta, is the wife of George 
Aurand, of Flint, this state. Harris Edgerton was a child at the time 
of his parents' immigratiou from New England to the wilds of jMich- 
igan, and his father, Curtis Edgerton, became one of the early settlers 
of St. Clair county, this state, where he reclaimed a farm from the 
virgin forest and where both he and his wife passed the residue of their 
lives. There Harris Edgerton was reared to adult age under the sturdy 
discipline of the pioneer farm, and his educational advantages in his 
youth were limited to the somewhat primitive schools of the locality 
and period. As a .vouth he went to Almont. Lapeer county, where 
he served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith trade, and later he re- 
moved to the state of New York, where his marriage was solemnized. 
Sliortly afterward he established his residence in Steubenville, Ohio, 
where he was engaged in the work of his trade until the early "lifls, 
when he returned to New York state, where he soon afterward subor- 
dinated all other interests to go forth as a lo.val soldier of the Union 
In the city of Rochester he enlisted as a private in the Twenty-second 
New^ York Volunteer Calvary, with which he proceeded to the front 
and with which he took part in a number of the important engage- 



714 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ments marking the progress of the gi-eat conflict. His enlistment was 
for a term of three years "or during the war," and he continued at 
the post of duty until his health became so impaired as to incapacitate 
him for further service, under which conditions he received his honor- 
able discharge, in the citj' of Baltimore, Maryland. Hi; then returned 
to Steiibenville, Ohio, and after his recovery he returned to Almont, 
Michigan, where he was engaged in the work of his trade for a period 
of about three years. His field of endeavor for the next three years 
was at Midland City, Midland county, and he then returned to Lapeer 
county and engaged in business at his trade in the village of Columbia- 
ville, where he continued to maintain his home about eighteen years, 
at the expiration of which he located in the village of Brutus, Emmet 
county, where he has since been actively engaged in the work of his 
trade and where he is a citizen who commands the unqualified confi- 
dence and esteem of the community. His life has been one of consecu- 
tive industry and he is a man of strong character and sterling qualities. 
He has served two terms as clerk of Brutus township, is a stalwart in 
the camp of the Republican party, and is affiliated with the Grand 
Army of the Republic and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

The present sheriff of Emmet county gained his rudimentary dis- 
cipline in the village schools of Almont, Lapeer county, and supple- 
mented this by an effective course of study in the public schools of 
Goodrichville, now known as Goodrich, in Genesee county. His first 
independent occupation was that of laborer on the farm of John 
Schuman, in the vicinity of Goodrichville, and in compensation for his 
services he received eight dollars a month and his board. Later he 
was similarly employed on the farm of John Coats of Oakland counly, 
and here he commanded an augmented stipend, as he received thirteen 
dollars a month. He was still a boy when he entered the employ of the 
firm of Carpenter Brothers, who were engaged in lumbering operations 
in Lapeer county, and from the position of general-utility boy in the 
lumber woods he was gradually advanced by this firm until he had the 
entire supervision of a crew of eighty workmen. He continued with 
this concern for nine years, and soon after his marriage, which was 
solemnized in 1878, he established his permanent home in Emmet 
county, where he secured a homestead claim of eighty acres of wild 
land, one and one-half miles east of the little hamlet of Brutus, and in- 
stituted the reclamation of a farm. He applied himself with diligence 
and by good management he developed the place into a valuable prop- 
erty. In the nu^anwhile Mr. Edgerton had shown a lively interest in 
all that touched the welfare of the connnunity and he had been ap- 
pointed deputy sheriff of the county, an office of which he continued 
incumbent during thirteen years, nine of which he also held the posi- 
tion of .superintendent of the county farm and poor house. His total 
service as deputy sheriff covered a period of thirteen years, and thus 
he was a most logical candidate for the still more responsible office of 
sheriff, to which he was elected in November, 1910, and in which his 
administration has been marked by the utmost efficiency and vigor. 
He also served five years as highway commissioner of Maple River town- 
.ship and was f(ir three vears incnml)ent of the office of school director 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 715 

of the Brutus district. Tlie sheriii is unswerving in his allegiance to 
the Republican party and has been a zealous worker in behalf of its 
cause. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of the 
Maccabees and he is well known throughout the county in which he has 
so long maintained his home and in which his popularity is of the 
most unequivocal type. 

On the 3d of July, 1878, was recorded the marriage of j\Ir. Edger- 
ton to Miss Sarah A. Lauthers, who was born in the province of On- 
tario, Canada, and who is a daughter of John and Sarah Lauthers, 
both natives of Ireland, where their marriage was solemnized and 
whence they soon afterward came to America and established their 
home in Ontario, Canada, where all of their children were born. 
Finally Mr. Lauthers came with his family to Michigan and engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Lapeer county, where he remained until 
1881, when he established his home in Petoskey, where he is now liv- 
ing virtually retired and where his wife died several years ago. Of 
the six children Mrs. Edgerton was the second in order of birth. i\[r. 
and Mrs. Edgerton became the parents of nine children, of whom 
five are living, namely : Custer R., Mary, Winifred, Hugh, and Bina F. 

Dr. Frank C. Witter is among the younger representatives of the 
medical fraternity of Petoskey, Michigan, but his years seem no bar to 
his progress and prominent position in connection with his chosen call- 
ing. During the two years which mark the period of his residence in 
this place he has gained high favor among a large and lucrative patron- 
age. He is a practitioner of equipment equal to that of the best and he 
has been a devoted student of his profession since youth. His broad 
knowledge of his science and sympathetic manner have given him rank 
among the most skillful and popular physicians and surgeons in the 
city. 

A native of the fine old Wolverine state of the Union, Dr. Witter 
was born at Lawrence. Van Buren county, Michigan, the date of his 
nativity being the 26th of January, 1879. He is a son of Frank and 
Mary (Pendill) Witter, the former of whom was born in the stat<' (if 
New York and the latter of whom claims Michigan as the place of her 
birth. The father was born in Michigan in 1847 and for a number of 
years he was most successfully engaged in the dry-goods business at 
Lawrence, where his death occurred on the 3rd of March. 1879. The 
mother of the Doctor is still living and she maintains her home at 
Lawrence, having reached the venerable age of fifty-eight years. 

Dr. Witter lost his father when he was a child of but six weeks of 
age and thus he was reared principally by his mother. In the public 
schools of Lawrence he received his preliminary educational training, 
having been graduated in the high school of that place. Subsequently 
he was matriculated as a student in the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, in the medical department of which excellent institution he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1906. For two years thereafter 
he was engaged in teaching pathology in his alma mater and for a time 
he was also demonstrator of obstetrics and first assistant in the clinic 
in obstetrics and o'vuccologv. He located at Pctoskev. ^fichitian, on 



716 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the 10th of September, 1909, and here he initiated the active practice of 
his profession. With the passage of time he has gained recognition as 
one of the best physicians and surgeons in Emmet county and he now 
controls a splendid practice at Petoskey and in the territory normally 
tributary thereto. In connection with the work of his chosen vocation 
he is affiliated with the Petoskey Medical Society, the Michigan State 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is also a 
valued and appreciative member of the Phi Rho Sigma College frater- 
nitj' and in the time-honored Masonic order he is connected with the 
local lodge of the York Rite branch of the time-honored Masonic order. 
In the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks he is a member of Pe- 
toskey Lodge, No. 269. In polities he gives a stalwart allegiance to the 
principles and policies propounded by the Republican party and while 
he has never had aught of ambition or desire for political office of any 
description he is ever on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy 
with all projects advanced for the good of the general welfare. 

At Lapeer, Michigan, on the 14th of February, 1907, Dr. Witter was 
united in marriage to Miss Lena L. Armstrong, whose birth occurred 
at Lapeer, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Joseph Armstrong, a 
representative citizen and business man at Lapeer. Dr. and Mrs. Wit- 
ter have one son, Joseph Armstrong Witter, whose natal day is the 19th 
of June, 1909. Dr. Witter and his wife are popular in the best social 
activities of Petoskej', Avhere their attractive and comfortable home is 
recognized as a center of most refined hospitality. 

Harry J. Kerley. — IManistee county has been signally favored in the 
personnel of its executive officers, and Mr. Kerley is a former county 
treasurer and merits further recognition in this publication bj' reason 
of the fact that he is a native son of the county and a scion of one of its 
honored pioneer families. 

Harry J. Kerley was born in Manistee, on the 19th of January, 1870, 
and is a son of Dennis and Pauline (Crawford) Kerley, the former of 
whom died when the son Harry was about ten years of age. The mother 
was born in the city of Detroit, Michigan, and she was a child at the 
time when her father. Captain John Crawford, established his home in 
Manistee, where she was reared to maturity and where she continued 
to reside until her death, which occurred in the year 1905. By her first 
marriage she became the mother of four children, namely : May, who 
is the wife of James M. Ramsdell, of Manistee ; Harry J., whose name 
initiates this review; Albert C, who is a resident of Richmond, Cali- 
fornia, where he is engaged in the real-estate business; and Kathryn, 
who is the wife of Lyman C. Austin, of Manistee. Several years after 
the death of her first husband Mrs. Kerley became the wife of Adelbert 
Downing, and the only child of the second union is Miss Adelle Down- 
ing, still a resident of Manistee. The Crawford family was prominently 
identified with the pioneer history of the state of New York, whence 
came the original representative in Michigan, and Captain John 
Crawford was long identified with navigation interests on the Great 
Lakes, he having passed the closing years of his life in the city of Man- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 717 

istee and having been a captain of various lake vessels during the course 
of his long and active career on the inland seas. 

Harry J. Kerley is indebted to the public schools of Manistee for 
liis preliminary educational discipline, Avhich was effectively supple- 
mented by a course of study in the Ferris Industrial School at Big 
Rapids. When but twelve years of age he gained his initial experience 
in connection with the active duties and responsibilities of life, as he 
then secured employment in a brick yard in his native city. Later he 
was here employed for several years as clerk in mercantile establish- 
ments, after which he served about a decade as a member of the city 
corps of mail carriers in Manistee, besides which he was for a .short 
time clerk in the registration department of the local postofflce. He 
resigned his position as mail carrier in 1905 and thereafter was a trav- 
eling representative of a wholesale candy house in Manistee for a per- 
iod of one year, during which he stiU continued to maintain his home 
in Manistee. 

In politics ilr. Kerley has ever accorded an unwavering allegiance 
to the Republican party and he has taken a lively interest in the work 
of its local contingent, though he never appeared as a candidate for 
public office until 1906, in November of which year he was elected 
county treasurer to which he Avas later re-elected. In his long tenure 
of this position he broke all precedents in his native county, and his 
retention of the important fiscal office not only bears indubitable evi- 
dence of his able administration but also of his personal popularity in 
the county that has been his home from the time of his nativity to the 
present. His advancement has been gained through his own worth and 
ability, and he is one of the well known and essentially representative 
citizens of Manistee, where his circle of friends is coincident with that 
of his acquaintances. He is prominently concerned Avith the local or- 
ganizations of the time-honored JMasonic fraternity, and is affiliated 
with the f olloAving bodies : Manistee Lodge, No. 228, Free & Accepted 
Masons, of Avhich he is past master; Manistee Chapter, No. 65, Royal 
Arch Masons, of which he is past high priest, and Manistee Command- 
dery, No. 43, Knights Templars, of Avhich he is at present an officer. He 
is also affiliated Avith the local organizations of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Knights of the Modern JIaccabees, and the Modern Romans, besides 
which he is identified Avith the Deutsch Orden Harugari, a representa- 
tive German societj-. He is a Congregationalist in his church affilation. 

On the 20th of September, 1894, Mr. Kerley was united in marriage 
to iliss Minnie E. Robertson, Avho was born and reared in Manistee 
county and Avho is a daughter of George T. and Ellen (Davis) Robert- 
son, noAv of Bay City, ^lichigan. Mr. and ]\Irs. Kerley have one daugh- 
ter, Lucille A.. Avho Avas born on the 13th of December. 1895. 

Cecil G. Bradford. — In revicAving the careers of representative bus- 
iness men of Alpena county special interest attaches to that of Mr. Brad- 
ford, by reason of the fact that he is not only a scion of one of the hon- 
ored pioneer families of the city of Alpena but also a natiA-e son of the 
same. He is one of the alert and progressive business men of the 
younger generation in his native city. Avhere his interests are of impor- 



718 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

tant order, and as a loyal and public-spirited citizen of sterling character 
he commands the high regard of the community which has ever repre- 
sented his home and been the scene of his well directed endeavors along 
normal lines of enterprise. 

Cecil G. Bradford was born in the city of Alpena on the 18th of 
October, 1875, and is a son of George D. and Helen (Masters) Bradford, 
the former of whom was born on the picturesque island of Jersey, in the 
English channel, in 1833, and the latter of whom was born in London, 
England, in 1836. Their marriage was solemnized in England and both 
families are of sterling English lineage, traced back through many gen- 
erations in the ' ' right little, tight little isle. ' ' The father continued his 
residence in Alpena until his death, in 1898, and here his widow still 
maintains her home. Of their three children the youngest is he whose 
name initiates this review; Claude M. is a resident of New Haven, Con- 
necticut, where he is the manager of the Nelson Morris Packing House ; 
and Ada is the wife of John A. Corbia, of Alpena. George D. Brad- 
ford and his wife emigrated from England to the United States in 
1867, and soon after their arrival they came to jMichigan, first locating 
in Port Huron, where they remained a few years. They then came to 
Alpena, which was then a small lumber town, and here Mr. Bradford 
opened a meat market, which he conducted for a number of years, be- 
sides which he became a dealer in cigars and tobacco. He was one of 
the well known and highly honored citizens of Alpena, was one of its 
pioneer business men, and he lent his aid in the development and up- 
building of the city. He served for a number of years as a member of 
the board of education and was othervvise influential in local affairs. He 
was a charter member of Hopper Lodge, No. 386, Free & Accepted Ma- 
sons, and served as treasurer of the same for several terms. In the same 
time-honored fraternity he was also affiliated with Thunder Bay Chap- 
ter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons ; Alpena Commandery, No. 34, Knights 
Templars; Michigan Sovereign Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, in the city of Detroit, in which he attained to the thirty-second de- 
gree ; and in the metropolis of the state he was also identified wih the ad- 
junct organization, Moslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. Prior to coming to America he and his wife were 
communicants of the Church of England, and in the United States thej' 
naturally became identified with the same denomination, as represented 
in the Protestant Episcopal church. In politics ilr. Bradford aligned 
himself as a supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he ever 
took an intelligent and lively interest in matters of national and state 
importance. A man of superior mentality and one whose life was guided 
and governed by the highest principles of integrity and honor, he well 
merited the secure place accorded him in popular confidence and esteem. 

Cecil G. Bradford is indebted to the piiblic schools of his native city 
for his early educational discipline, which included the curriculum of 
the high school, and after leaving school he was a bookkeeper until 1901, 
when he engaged in the hotel business, becoming one of the proprietors 
of the Cobden hotel, in Alpena, and continuing as a popular bonifacc 
until 1906, when he engaged in the operation of flour and planing mills, 
with which lines of enterprise he is now actively identified. He is one of 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 719 

the ineiubers of the Thunder Bay ililliiig Compauy, whose mill is modern 
in equipment and facilities, and was one of the organizers of the Brad- 
ford Lumber & Planing Mill Compauy, which was incorporated in 1907, 
and of which important industrial concern he is president. Like his 
honored father he has accorded unfaltering allegiance to the Republican 
party, and while he has never sought the honors or emoluments of politi- 
cal office he shows a loyal interest in all that touches the welfare of his 
native city. His aid and indueuce are given in support of measures and 
enterprises tending to advance the material and civic progress of the 
city, and here his personal popularity is of the most unequivocal order. 
He was one of the oi*ganizers of the Alpena Country Club and was its 
secretary and treasurer during the fii-st two years of its existence. He 
takes a lively interest in its atfairs and is appreciative of the advantages 
and attractions of this representative organization. Both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church and are active 
in the general work of the parish. He is affiliated "svith Hopper Lodge, 
No. 386, Free & Accepted jMasons: and with Alpena Lodge, No. 505, 
Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 7th of June, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brad- 
ford to iliss Caroline Johnston, who, like himself, was born and reared 
in Alpena. She is a daughter of Jame.s ]M. and Elizabeth (Pollard) 
Johnston, the former of whom died in 1905 and the latter of whom still 
resides in Alpena. Of the two children Mrs. Bradford is the younger 
and Frank B. is engaged in farming in ^Montmorency county. James M. 
Johnston was long numbered among the prominent and influential busi- 
ness men of Alpena, where he took up his residence in the pioneer days 
and where he was identified with the flour-mill and planing-mill business 
at the time of his death. He was a stanch Republican and served a 
number of years as a member of the coimty board of supervisors. He 
contributed materially to the upbuilding of the city of Alpena, was a 
valued member of its Chamber of Commerce, and was a man to whom 
was ever accorded the most unqualified popular esteem. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bradford have two children, — William Johnston and Helen. 

Rev. Ch.\rles C. Coors. — How difficult it is for a young man to 
choose the line of work he intends to follow throughout his life ! What 
a little thing will often cause him to decide and how often he is apt to 
change his mind after he has started on his career. A single stone may 
turn the rivulet of water to the right or to the left. We sometimes say 
that Providence shapes our careers. Undoubtedly something outside of 
ourselves has something to do with the general direction of a man's life, 
but the getting on is purely a pei-sonal affair. Each individual is fated 
to work out his own career. The Rev. Charles C. Coors, editor and 
publisher of the Farwell Sun has had a varied career, having several 
times changed its course, but throughout he has been the same man, with 
the same natural capabilities, each one of which he has developed to its 
fullest extent. He is one of the prominent men of Clare county, as pop- 
ular as he is respected. His career has been a most interesting one. 

His birth place was White River, Michigan, September 4, 1862. He 
was the son of John F. and Anna Marie Dorothy Coors, who were na- 



720 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

tives of Germany. They came to the United States soon alter their mar- 
riage and went direct to Chicago. John F. Coors had been a salt water 
sailor but he decided not to follow the sea any more, nor did he care to 
.sail on the lakes. After staying in Chicago a very short time, merely 
long enough to look over the prospects, they went to Black River, Alle- 
gan county, in Michigan, where they took up a homestead of eighty acres. 
They later moved to White River, Michigan, where most of their chil- 
dren were born. The familj- was large and they had a hard pull to g«t 
along and ediicate the children. Mr. Coors died in 1889 and his wife 
in 1901. 

Charles C. remembers very distinctly the little farm house at White 
River where he was born, and where as soon as he was old enough he had 
his own duties to perform, — things for which he was responsible and he 
was made to realize that if he did not perform these duties they would 
be left undone, thereby learning a valuable lesson of industry and re- 
.sponsibility which has helped him in his later life. He remembers the 
log school house where he went in the winter time and learneil the rudi- 
ments of knowledge. He was an apt scholar and read a great deal at 
home, thus picking up more learning than he could have acquired dui-- 
ing the short period he was able to attend school. When he was only 
twelve years old he had the choice of remaining on the farm or going out 
to earn his living at some other business. He had never cared for the 
work of a farmer and he too wanted to see more of the outside world, 
so he left his home and entered a printing office at Montague. He 
worked in this printing office for three years, not realizing that later 
he would have a much more prominent connection with the press. At 
the expiration of three years he began to work in the mills and factories, 
where he could get more pay, having very special use for all the money 
he could get. He was brought up in the German Jlethodist Episcopal 
church and he had decided that he wanted to become a minister. Hav- 
ing always been of a serious, earnest nature, he felt that for liim the 
ministry offered the best that there was to be had, that is, greater chances 
for usefulness. As soon as he had saved enough money, he and one of 
his brothers went to Berea, Ohio, and there entered the German Theo- 
logical College, but before he had completed the course, he became sick 
and had to return home. He soon regained his health on the farm and 
continued a part of his studies with a Presbyterian clergyman, thereby 
gaining a liberality of view which he probably would never have had 
if he had studied only on the line of his own church. In September of 
1889, he was admitted to the ministry in the Jlethodist Episcopal church 
and immediately commenced to preach. His first charge was at Crystal 
Valley in Oceana county, where he stayed two years, preaching and 
ministering to the i)eople. Next he went to Farwell, remaining there 
three years ; thence to Pentwater and Freesoil. During these years he 
worl^ed so hard that his health, never very rugged, again compelled him 
to take a rest. Inasmuch as chnnijo of ^ork constitutes rest in many 
cases, he bought out a printing nt'ti.c iiml \\ cut into the pulilishing busi- 
ness, his paper being the Monianiu Ohsi n-( r. After successfully run- 
ning this papci- for two years ami ;i li:iir. lie sold out and liought a farm, 
but as the farm lite did'iiot suit liis wile, he gavr it up and returned to 



n [STORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 721 

the ministry, his clinrch being at North Muskegon for two years. He 
now has a farm near Farwell and is interested in the Tri-County Land 
Agency. 

He married Miss Sophie M. Munson and she bore him two children, 
Merrill P., born in September, 1890, at Crystal Valley, and Arthur W., 
born in March, 1892. ]Mrs. Coors died in 1902 while they were living at 
North Muskegon, her health having been poor for several years. Later 
Mr. Coors married iliss Julie H. White, of Dexter, Michigan. 

The Reverend Charles C. Coors may justly feel that he knows Mich- 
igan thoroughly, having lived in all parts of it at different periods of his 
life. It is natural that he should be greatly interested in the welfare of 
the state from several standpoints. He is anxious for its moral improve- 
ment, from the viewpoint of a minister. He is desirous of its intellectual 
uplift from the attitude of a newspaper man, and he is concerned about 
its agricultural condition from his position as a farmer, but above all is 
he eager for tho welfare of its citizens from the standpoint of a man. 
In all the capabilities in which he has served, Mr. Coors' aim has always 
been to offer his best in the interests of his fellow man, whether as 
minister of the Gospel, as journalist or as a farmer. He is a power for 
good in the community. 

Lewis E. Bahle, who is ably filling the office of postmaster at Sut- 
tons Bay, also owns and conducts a general merchandise business of 
extensive proportions at that place. He was born in Norway on the 
8th of July, 1849. and in that country received his preliminary educa- 
tional training. His parents, Maret and Larson (Esten) Bahle were 
likewise born and reared in Norway, where they continued to reside 
until they came to this country, where they lived for thirty years be- 
fore they were called on to the undiscovered country. In 1868, when 
a youth of nineteen years of age, Mr. Bahle decided to seek his for- 
tunes amongst a ncAver civilization and accordingly set forth for the 
United States. Immediately after arriving in this country he located 
at Northport, Leelanau comity, Michigan, where he worked for other 
people, being employed for some time in a ship-yard in Wisconsin. In 
1871 he removed to what is now known as the village of Suttons Bay. 
He hired an Indian to haul what goods he possessed one mile into thf 
country, where he located upon a tract of eighty acres of wild land, 
which he cleared and raised to a fair state of cultivation. He gradually 
drifted into the lumbering business and later turned his attention to 
mercantile affairs. In 1885 he owned a general store in Suttons Bay 
and a number of years later the same was changed into a clothing 
and dry-goods store, which has grown in size and patronage until 
to-day it is one of the finest establishments of its kind in the county. 

In politics iMr. Bahle is aligned as a loyal supjiorter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party and he has ever been on the qui vive to 
do all in his power to advance the general progress and development 
of this section of the grand old Wolverine state. In 1888 he was ap- 
pointed postmaster, by President Harrison, and he gave out the first 
money-order issued in Suttons Bay. During President Cleveland's 
second administration Mr. Bahle was replaced by a Democrat in the 



722 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

postofBce but when the Republicans again came into power he was 
reappointed to the postmastersbip, in which connection he has served 
most faithfullj' and well to the present time, in 1911. Indeed, Mr. 
Bahle is running the office in such a shape that he is quite willing for 
an inspector to call at any time. Although not American born his 
citizenship in the land of his adoption has ever been of the most lo.yal 
and public-spirited order and he holds a secure vantage ground in 
popiilar confidence and esteem! He is connected with various social 
and fraternal organizations of representative character and he and his 
family are members of the Lutheran church, in the different depart- 
ments of whose work they have been most active factors. 

In the year 1876 ^Ir. Bahle was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Oleue 
Engebregtson, of Norway, and to them were born ten children, 
namely: Slaret, Gena, Esten, Emma, Lena, Marton, John, Otto, Nellie 
and Thomas. Maret is the wife of Peter Peclerson, who is now man- 
ager of Mr. Bahle 's store at Suttons Bay; Gena is the wife of Ed 
Grasser, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits in the vicinity of 
Suttons Bay; Lena married Carl Garthe, a fai'mer of near Northport; 
Esten is first ofiScer of the Pere Marquette Car Ferry, No. 17 ; formerly 
he was second officer of car ferry. No. 15 and saw the first distress 
signal waved from the fated No. 18, which sank in Lake Michigan in 
1900. Esten was in the boat which was sent to succor those in danger, 
the same being swamped on the high seas, and his life being saved by 
reason of the three life preservers which he had fastened to his body. 
Emma is a teacher in the Bay City schools ; Martin is a wheelsman on 
the Great Lakes on the Manistee boat ; John remains at home ; Otto is 
a machinist in some a\;to works in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; 
and Nellie and Thomas remain at home, being students in the local 
grade schools. JMrs. Bahle was summoned to the life eternal in 1898 
and in 1899 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bahle to Miss Emma 
C. "Weir, of Muncie, Indiana. Prior to her marriage Mrs. Bahle was a 
popular and successful teacher in the public schools at ]\Iuncie. To this 
union one child has been born — Louis, whose bii'th occurred on the 
29th of December, 1900. 

JOHX K. H.\NSON. — Reared to habits of industry, lionesty and thrift, 
John K. Hanson has led a busy and useful life, and is now li\'ing re- 
tired from active business cares in Grayling, which has been his home 
the past thirty-two years, and is enjoying a well-earned competency. 
Bom in Denmark in 1838, he spent his earlier life in his native land, 
living there until after attaining his majority. 

Having made up his mind to cross the ocean in search of an advan- 
tageous place in which to earn a good living, Mr. Hanson landed in the 
United States on March 23, 1863. and came directly to Michigan. Lo- 
cating in Manistee, he became head sawyer in the lumber regions, a posi- 
tion that he retained several seasons. Having accumulated some money, 
he started in business for himself as a furniture manufacturer and 
dealer, and was succeeding well in his venture when a fire consumed 
his entire stock, and he was again forced to start life even with the 
world. Changing his residence, he came, in 1879, to Grayling, and re- 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 723 

sumed his old oceupatiou of head sawyer in a lumber mill for twenty- 
five years thereafter being in the employ of R. Hanson. Having in the 
meantime accumulated considerable money, Mr. Hanson bought an in- 
terest, which he still retains, in the mill with which he was so long con- 
nected as sawyer, and also purchased an interest in the Grayling Mer- 
cantile Company, a concern doing a prosperous business in Grayling. 
In 1905 he retired from active business cares, and is now enjoying a well- 
deserved leisure. 

Mr. Hanson married, in 1866, Maran Lasmusson, and to them four 
children have been bom, namely: Marius, Holger, Sigwald, and Emma 
M. Mr. Hanson has ever evinced a warm interest in local affairs, and in 
addition to having served as a member of the city council has been vil- 
lage treasurer three years. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree 
ilason, and religiously he is a trustworthy member of the Danish Liith- 
eran church. 

Wareen D. Carpenter. — A business man of prominence and influ- 
ence at Harbor Springs, Michigan, is Warren D. Carpenter, who is here 
most successfully engaged in the boot and shoe business. Mr. Carpen- 
ter was born in McKean county, Pennsylvania, on the 25th of January, 
1868, and he is a son of Daniel F. and Clara C. (Rice) Carpenter, both 
of whom were born in the state of New York, the former in 1834 and 
the latter in 1831. The father was summoned to the life eternal in 1909, 
at the venerable age of seventy-five years ,and the mother passed away 
the same year at the age of seventy-one years. Of the eight children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel F. Carpenter, Warren D. was the fifth in 
order of birth and seven are living, in 1911. Daniel F. Carpenter re- 
moved from his native place in the old Empire state of the Union to 
]McKean county, Pennsylvania, as a .young man and there he engaged in 
the grocery business. In 1874 he decided to try his fortunes further 
west and in that year came to Michigan, locating first on a farm some 
sixteen miles north of Grand Rapids. At that early day the country 
about Grand Rapids was virgin wilderness but with the passage of time 
Mv. Carpenter succeeded in literally hewing a farm for himself out of 
the wilds. In 1878 he became one of the pioneers at what was then 
called Little Traverse but which is now known as Harbor Springs. He 
immediately engaged in farming in Emmet county and he passed his 
declining years at Harbor Springs. At the time of his demise, in 1909, 
he was the owner of farming property amounting to fortj^ acres. In 
liolitics he was originally a Whig but at the time of the organization of 
the Republican party, in 1858, under the Oaks, in Jackson county, this 
state, he transferred his allegiance thereto. He was never active in 
politics but he was ever ready to do all in his power to advance pro- 
gress and improvement in this section of the state. He and his wife 
were devout members of the Methodist church, in whose faith they 
reared their children and to whose good works they were liberal cou- 
tribiitors of their time and means. They were citizens of sterling in- 
tegrity and worth and as a result of their hospitality and innate kind- 
liness of spirit they commanded the confidence and esteem of all with 
whom they came in contact. 



724 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Warren D. Carpenter was a child of but six years of age at the time 
of his parents' removal from Pennsylvania to Michigan and he was ten 
years of age at the time of the establishment of the family home at Har- 
bor Springs. In the public schools of this place he received his early 
educational discipline, the same consisting of such study as he had time 
for during the winter sessions. During the busy seasons he was assoc- 
iated with his father and brothers in the Avork and management of the 
old homestead farm, in connection with which he waxed strong of mind 
and body. He later pursued a commercial course in Parsons' Business 
College, at Kalamazoo, Michigan. He launched out in the business 
world in 1898, first engaging in the dairy business at Harbor Springs. 
In 1905 he disposed of his dairy and took a trip to Colorado on aceoiuit 
of failing health, traveling for a period of two years. For a time after 
his return to Harbor Springs he was engaged in clerking in a store biit 
in the latter part of 1907 he again decided to go into business on his 
own account. In that year, then, he opened up a splendidly equipped 
establishment, in which he makes a specialty of boots and shoes. His 
concern has grown in proportions since 1907 and it is now recognized as 
one of the most up-to-date booteries in northern ^Michigan, his patron- 
age including some of the most fastidious trade at Harbor Springs and 
the surrounding country. He is a business man of unusual ability and 
most tremenduous vitality and solely through his own eifoi'ts he has 
succeeded in building up a fine place for himself in the business world 
of this section of the state. 

In politics Mr. Carpenter is an uncompromising advocate of the lu'in- 
ciples and policies promulgated by the Republican party. He has nev(>r 
given a great deal of attention to local politics, not being an office 
seeker, but he has served with the utmost efficiency' as village treasurer, 
in discharging the duties of which important office he acquitted himself 
with all of honor and distinction. In the time-honored JIasonic oi'der, 
he is affiliated with Harbor Springs Lodge, No. 378. Free and Accepted 
IMasons. He is also a valued and appreciative member of Harbor Springs 
Lodge, No. 198, Knights of Pythias, in which he has been keeper of re- 
cords and seals for the past two years. In religious faith Mrs. Car- 
penter is connected with the Presbyterian cluu'ch at Harbor Springs. 

At Harbor Springs. Michigan, on the 26th of October, 1900, Mr. Car- 
penter was united in marriage to j\Iiss Amelia Therry, who was born at 
Lowell, JMichigan, in the year 1871, and who is a daughter of Nicholas 
and Lousia (Smith) Therry. Mr. Therry was born in Luxemburg, Ger- 
many, whence he emigrated to the United States about the year 1853, 
proceeding directly to Michigan. As a youth he learned the shoe- 
maker's trade and during the early years of his active career was iden- 
tified with that line of enterprise. Later he turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits and he is now engaged in farming operations in 
Charlevoix county, this state. Of the four children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Therry Mrs. Carpenter was the second in order of birth. She was 
reared and educated in Michigan and she is a woman of most gracious 
personality, being deeply beloved by all who have come within the sphere 
of her gentle influence. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter became the parents 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 725 

of two (^•hildren, — Edith, who is now a pupil in the public school at 
Harbor Springs; and Eloisc, wlio died in infancy. 

John A. Higgins. — Although a native of the Empire state, thirty- 
eight years of residence in ^Manistee have made John A. Higgins, former 
sheritif and for many years connected with the Manistee & Northeastern 
Railroad, one of tliose who are very loyal to the interests of this part 
of the state. Pew citizens of Manistee are better known and he is held 
in general high esteem for he has ever cheerfully given his support to 
those enterprises that tend to public development and, with hardly an 
exception he has been connected with every interest that has promoted 
public welfare. He is a stalwart Republican, having long been at the 
forefront in local party affairs. 

Jlr. Higgins was born in Saratoga county. New York, June 9, 1857, 
and in his veins unite the English and Irish elements, his father and 
mother having been natives of England and Ireland, respectively. 
When a young man of twenty-one, the former became attracted with 
the idea of Amerieai independence and opportunity and crossed the 
Atlantic to claim his share of the same, and it came about that he lo- 
cated in the state of New York, where he remained until his death at 
the age of fifty-six years. William Higgins, for such was the name of 
the father, was a farmer by occupation. The mother, whose maiden 
name was Ann Ross, was reared in her native Erin. When ]\Ir. Higgins 
was but five years of age he had the misfortune to lose his mother, there 
being five children in the family, and two of them younger than himself. 

Jlr. Higgins is one of the army of self-made men, for he started out 
for himself at the age of thirteen years. The family resources were 
low and as everyone knows, there is no arguing with necessity. When 
he was fifteen his wanderings brought him to ^lanistee, which, although 
he may have believed it to be merely an episoilc at the time, was in 
reality a most important thing, for it was to il.t. rininc his location for 
the next forty yeai-s. His arrival was not at an auspiiious moment, for 
it was in the summer succeeding the great fire, and where the court 
house now stands there was only a grim waste of blackened hemlock 
stubs. He spent the fall and winter in the woods, almost immediately 
shouldering a pack and accompanying Edward ^McLaughlin, a land 
looker, into the lumber woods, these trips often lasting for three months. 
The energetic young fellow then secured a clerkship with Se.vmour 
Brothers, and following that he became clerk for George ]\I. Kanouse 
in the old City Hotel and when the Dunham House was opened by .Mr. 
Kanouse, Mr. Higgins, who had earned the confidence of his employer, 
was given the position of first clerk. From the fall of 1888 dates ]\Ir. 
Higgins' first identification with the railroad business, when the iMau- 
istee & Northeastern Railroad was built, it being he who ran its finst 
passenger train over the road, the line at that time terminating at Bear 
Creek. He was with the railroad company for eighteen years and made 
a splendid record. He served in the capacity of conductor and ever 
manifested that loyalty to duty which is to be discerned in all his rela- 
tions. He resigned December 15, 1906, after having been elected sheriff 
of Manistee county, and at the time he was tendered a banquet by the 



726 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

officials of the road and his fellow employees, being presented -with a 
very handsome token of the esteem in which he was held by them. 

As previous!}' mentioned !Mr. Higgins is one of the most enthusiastic 
and active of Republicans, devoted to the policies and principles for 
which the Grand Old Party stands sponsor and ever ready to go any- 
where, to do anything for the good of the party. In the capacity of 
sheriff he gave service of a high character. In 1910 he was delegate to 
the State Convention held in the city of Detroit. 

In 1880, ilr. Higgins laid the foimdation of a happy home life, the 
lady to become his wife being ]Miss Nellie Barry, daughter of David 
and Teresa Barry of Cheboygan, Wisconsin. Their union has been 
cemented by the birth of six children, namely: Raymond, William, 
Ray, Emeline, Prank and Barry . 

;\Ir. Higgins is popular in lodge circles. His affiliations extend to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, to the Knights of Pythias, 
Brotherhood of Railwav Conductors and to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, 

Few railroad conductors in Northern Michigan are better and more 
favorably known, his eighteen years' continuous service having been 
of the most satisfactory character. His courtesy, geniality', and other 
fine qualities, will not allow him soon to be forgotten by the patrons of 
the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad. 

Rev. Alonzo Barnard. — A great and noble soul was that which had 
iutl welling in the mortal tenement of "Father" Barnard, as he Avas 
affectionately known, and his life was one of love and service for his 
fellow men. With all of devotion and self-abnegation he carried the 
gospel of the divine Jlaster to the humble and lowly, and no man has 
ever manifested a higher sense of stewardship. He labored long and 
zealously as a missionary among the Indians of the nothAvest and dur- 
ing later years saw similar service in northern iMichigan. As a young 
man he gave equally faithful service in behalf of the negroes of the 
south prior to and diu'ing the Civil war, and he was ever the guide, 
counselor and friend of the poor, the afflicted and the oppressed. This 
honored and faithful servant passed the closing years of his long and 
useful life at Pomona, Manistee county, Michigan, and it is altogether 
consonant that in this Avork be entered a brief tribute to his memory, 
though it Avill be impossible to enter into details concerning his signally 
interesting and varied career. 

Alonzo Barnard Avas born in the town of Peru, Bennington county, 
Vei-mont, on the 2d of June, 1817, and his death occurred at Pomona, 
]\richigan, on the 7th of April, 1905. His character Avas moulded Avith 
flu> strength of the granite hills of his native state and his youthful 
surroundings Avcre those that compassed the average Ncav England 
fai'iner boy of the period. He ever Avas instant in appreciation of 
tlic influence of his noble mother in this foi"mative period of his char- 
acter, and her gracious Christian influence and kindly solicitude un- 
diuibtedly had important bearing upon making him the strong man 
tliat he became. His early educational advantages Avere limited in 
scope. OAving to the exigencies of time and phice, but lie had tlu' determi- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 727 

nation and ambition adequate to overcome greater handicaps than this. 
The texture of moral nature was fine in an intrinsic sense, and while a 
youth he was led to enlist himself vigorously as a member of the army 
of the church militant, the church of Christ on earth. Abiding faith 
and constant good works characterized his entire active career, and it 
may well be said that his was the faith that made faithful in all things. 
"Father Barnard" was about twenty years of age at the time of 
the family removal to Ohio, and through his well directed efforts he 
was there enabled to supplement effectively his somewhat meager 
education. He pursued his stiidies in a local academy and also in 
Oberlin College, which well known institution was then in its incep- 
tion, and in 1837-8 he was in Louisiana and Mississippi, where he met 
with many interesting experiences and endured arduous toil. There 
his sympathies for the negroes were greatly aroused, and he took part 
in their religious meetings as a leader and instructor, though such in- 
terposition was contrary to the regulations established by the slave 
holders. Later he aided many slaves to freedom when they fled from 
their masters to refuge in Canada, and for a considerable time he was 
a teacher of the negro families that had found hospice in that dominion. 
Concerning his experiences in the south Father Barnard himself wrote 
the following words many years later: "There I saw slavery in some 
of its worst forms, and I longed to do or say something to comfort the 
poor slaves, but learning that the laws of Mississippi forbade all com- 
munication of northern whites with the slaves, under a severe penalty 
I was obliged to keep quiet and only show them by signs and oc- 
casionally a few words that I was their friend." That he eventually 
yielded to his righteous inclinations, regardless of the legal restrictions 
imposed, is evident from his statements, in the same connection, that 
he finally led in one or more of their prayer meetings and also read 
from the Bible and made short addresses of comfort and consolation. 
Impaired health compelled his return to the north, and, dependent 
upon his own energies for maintenance, he finally availed himself of 
the privileges of Oberlin College. On his eighty-fifth birthday anni- 
versary, June 2, 1902, this venerable clergj^man wrote as follows con- 
cerning his efforts at this time: "IMy college life was similar to that 
of all other college students of the day. It was marked by hard study 
and, in my case, by hard work out of school hours to pay my way, 
Avhilst my classmates were playing ball or otherwise amusing them- 
selves. I taught school during two Avinters in the vicinity of Oberlin. 
In my junior year I decided to spend the winter in my room, reviewing 
and perfecting my knowledge of the languages. Having obtained em- 
ployment in the boarding house sufficient to pay for my board, I settled 
down to my work, but before winter set in circumstances changed my 
plans. Those were the days of the operation of the fugitive-slave law 
and many slaves were fleeing to Canada through the 'underground 
railroad,' in the business of which I had a hand. Having seen with my 
own eyes the horrors of slavery in the south. I naturally sympathized 
with the fugitives and gave them aid in their toilsome way to freedom. 
One of my classmates had gone to Canada to teach the fugitives who 
had sought freedom there. He wrote to me urging me to come and 



728 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

teach the colored soldiers who were then stationed at Chatham." This 
letter led to Father Barnard's removal to Canada and he endured 
many vicissitudes before and after reaching his destination. The 
work accomplished by Mr. Barnard in this connection was marked by 
the same earnest devotion and consecrated zeal that attended his labors 
as a missionary among the Indians of the northwest in the early '50s, 
his ordination as a clergyman of the Congregational church having oc- 
curred while he was a student at Oberlin College. 

Concerning the career of Father Barnard as an Indian missionary 
the following statements have been given by another venerable clergy- 
man, Rev. J. P. Schell, who later labored in the same region, and the 
reproduction is made with but slight paraphrase and elimination: 

■'Rev. Alonzo Bai-nard was born in Vermont and removed with 
his father's family to Elyria, Ohio, at the age of seventeen. He 
studied at Oberlin College, and upon his graduation, in 1843, was mar- 
ried to Miss Sarah P. Babcock, a classmate in the same institution. 
Immediately following their marriage they set out, in company with 
others, to engage in missionary labors among the Chippewa Indians 
in northern Minnesota. They and their associates labored at Red and 
Cass lakes, as well as at other points in that wild region, during a 
period of ten years, at the expiration of Avhich, in the spring of 1853. 
they removed, with Rev. David B. Spencer and his family, to St. 
Joseph, now Walhalla, ou the northern boundary of North Dakota, 
and sought to open a mission school for the instruction of the native 
children at that important frontier trading post. Here Mrs. Barnard 
soon ended her earthly labors, followed the ensuing summer by the 
tragic death of a devoted associate, Mrs. Spencer, at the hands of the 
savages. The mission being broken up the following year, 1854, by the 
increasing hostility of the Sioux Indians, Mr. Barnard took refuge 
in the Red river settlement of Kildonan, near the present city of Win- 
nipeg. After spending some years in that region — a po^'tion of the 
time in missionary labors among the Cree Indians in the vicinity of 
Lake Wiunipeg — he removed to Benzonia, ^Michigan, where he and 
other members of his family made their home during many years 
thereafter, until shortly before his decease. On the 7th of April, 1905, 
at the home of his son and daughter, this venerable and useful servant 
of God was called to enter upon his heavenly res1, Mt llie rijie agi' of 
nearly eighty-eight years. 

"Aside from the missionary labors of Father Barnard it should he 
a matter of interest to the people of North Dakota and other sections 
of the northwest to recall the following facts, which I believe can be 
satisfactorily established, namely : He was the fii-st white protestant 
missionary that ever visited the villages of Pembina and St. Joseph 
(Walhalla), having visited the region, in company with Mr. Tanner, 
the Baptist missionary, in the summer of 1851. lie, in company with 
Rev. Ayer. was the first ordained Congregational missionary to visit 
and conduct religious services in the old Kildonan settlement (now 
Winnipeg), in the winter of 1843. Mr. Barnard brought to Walhalla. 
and afterward to Winnipeg, the first itriiitiiig jiress ever set up and 
operated in these regions, or. indeed, in llic norllnvi-st. He also broiiiilit 




XJL^^n^n^-\^y ^A/i /?k^7.n-«^^ ^^^^Mj 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 729 

to Walhalla, and later to Kildonan, the first melodeon ever brought into 
this region. He brought this instrument and the printing press up the 
Mississippi river in a bireh-bark canoe in the spring of 1849, on his 
return from a trip to the east. The old tombstone obtained for his 
wife, buried at Walhalla, was perhaps the first regular tombstone ever 
set over any Christian grave on North Dakota soil. His wife was the 
first white protestant t'ciiiale missionary to lay down her life for the 
cause of Christ on North Dakota soil. Mr. Barnard also had a camera 
and took the earliest daguerreotypes ever taken in this region and per- 
haps in the northwest." 

For ten years after coming to Michigan Rev. Barnai'd was engaged 
in missionary work amont;- the Indians on Traverse bay. He was well 
known throughout nortlicrn ^Michigan and was held in veneration by 
all who came Avithin the sphere of his noble and kindly influence. His 
was a life of signal consecration and now that he rests from his labors 
it may well be said that his works do follow him. 

Rev. Barnard was first married at Rochester, Ohio, on the 12th of 
April, 1843, to IMiss Sarah P. Babcock, who was born at Blanford, 
Massachusetts, October 6, 1819, and who died in Manitoba. Canada. 
October 25, 1853. Four children were born of this union — Ellen 
Elizabeth, who was born at Red Lake, Minnesota, December 3, 1845, 
and who died in ilanitoba, Canada, June 21, 1863 ; Emma Eliza, who 
was born at Rochester, Ohio, September 25, 1848, and died at Benzonia, 
^liehigan, June 9, 1883 ; Alonzo Bardwell, who Avas born at Cass Lake, 
^Minnesota, August 15, 1850, and who died at Benzonia. Michigan. 
August 5, 1864; and George Whipple, who was born at Cass Lake. 
Minnesota, September 11, 1852, and who is now a resident of Galveston, 
Texas. At Pittsfield, Ohio, on the 10th of August, 1854, was solemnized 
the marriage of Father Barnard to JIi.ss Mary :MacDonald, who was 
born in Manitoba, Canada, April 10, 1832, and* who died at Benzonia. 
.Michigan. August 29, 1900. Concerning the children of the second 
marriage the following brief data are given: Sarah Philena, who was 
born in Manitoba. Canada. May 25, 1855, is unmarried and living with 
her brother in Jayfield, ^Michigan ; John Josiah, who was born at Belle 
Prairie, Jlinnesota, September 6, 1856, is now a resident of Jayfield, 
Michigan; William Herbert, who was born at Belle Prairie, January 26, 
1858. died at Benzonia, Michigan, February 5, 1864; Mary Etta, who 
was born in jManitoba, Canada, December 29, 1859, died in Benzonia. 
Michigan, February 5, 1880; and James Herbert, born in Benzonia, 
Jliehigan, March 21, 1864, is a representative physician of Tustin, 
Osceola county, this state and is individually mentioned on other pages 
of this work. 

James H. Barnabd, M. D., is a native of northern Michigan and here 
lias attained to marked .success and prestige as one of the representa- 
tive physicians and .surgeons of this favored section of the Wolverine 
state. He is engaged in the practice of his profession at Tustin, Osceola 
county, and such is his standing as a citizen and physician that he is 
entitled to special recognition in this publication. The Doctor is a 
son of Rev. Alonzo Barnard, to whom a memoir is dedicated on other 



730 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

pages of this work, so that a repetition of the data is not demanded in 
the present connection. It may be noted, however, that the honored 
father was one of the most prominent and distinguished missionaries 
among the Indians of the northwest and that his life was one of signal 
consecration and zeal in his noble calling. The youngest of the five chil- 
dren of Rev. Alonzo and ]Mary (MacDonald) Barnard, Dr. James H. 
Barnard was born at Benzonia, the count.y seat of Benzie county, Mich- 
igan, and the date of his nativity was March 21, 1864. The Doctor 
is indebted to the public schools of his native county for his early 
educational discipline, which was supplemented by a course in Grand 
Traverse College, at Benzonia. After leaving school he identified him- 
self with agricultural pursuits in Benzie county, where he became a 
successful farmer and stock-grower and where he developed a valuable 
farm property. With these great basic lines of industry he continued 
to be actively concerned for many years and he then determined to 
seek a broader field of endeavor by preparing himself for the medical 
profession. With this end in view he entered the Grand Rapids Medical 
College, in the city of Grand Rapids. He completed the prescribed 
course in this excellent institution, in which he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1900 and from which he received the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. Coming forth well fortified for the work of 
his chosen profession, Dr. Barnard engaged in active general practice 
at Pomona, IManistee county, where his success amply justified his 
change of vocation. There he remained until 1907, when he removed 
to the thriving little town of Tustin. Osceola county, where he has since 
maintained his home and where lie h;is built up a substantial and rep- 
resentative practice, the scope and iiiiinii'tiiiu-e of which well indicate 
his technical ability and offer indisimtiilili^ voucher for his personal 
popularity. Ever mindful of the unwritten ethical code of his profes- 
sion, the Doctor commands the confidence and esteem of his fellow prac- 
titioners and he is an active member of the Osceola-Lake County Med- 
ical Society, besides which he also holds membership in the Michigan 
State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Taking up 
the practice of medicine when of mature years. Dr. Barnard has 
brought to bear a specially well disciplined mind and a full apprecia- 
tion of the dignity and responsibility of his profession, to the work of 
which he has devoted himself Avith all of earnestness and self-abnega- 
tion and with resultant success of the most unequivocal type. He is 
a close and appreciative student and has recourse to the best standard 
and periodical literature of his profes.sion. He is identified with vari- 
ous fraternal organizations of representative order and both he and 
his wife are zealous members of the Baptist church. In polities the 
Doctor is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Re- 
publican party, but he has had no desire to enter the turbulence of 
so-called practical politics. 

Near the city of Toronto, Canada, on the 3d of September, 1903, 
was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Barnard to IMiss Ethel M. Alex- 
ander, who was born in the city of London, England, and who was about 
five years of age at the time of the family removal to America. She 
was reared to maturity in the province of Ontario, Canada, and prior 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 731 

to her marriage she had been a successful and popular teacher in the 
public schools, besides which she had qualified herself as a trained 
nurse, so that she has proved an effective co-adjutor to her husband 
when circumstances have demanded her interposition. Dr. and Mrs. 
Barnard have two fine little sons — George Alonzo and James Alex- 
ander. 

John P. Deadman, D. V. S. — There has been naught of temporizing 
or indirection in the career of this able and honored citizen of northern 
Michigan, who gained prestige as one of the leading representatives of 
the veterinary profession in the state, a vocation which has been fol- 
lowed successfully by his father and grandfather, as well as by six of 
his brothers, so that he has had no sinecure in maintaining the profes- 
.sioual prestige of the name which he bears. lie was born in London, 
province of Ontario, Canada, on the 26th of November, 1S6S, and is a 
sou of William and Cliristina (McKay) Deadman, the former of whom 
was born in England and the latter in Scotland. Their marriage was 
solemnized in Ontario and the father passed the clo.sing years of his 
life in Alpena, Michigan. In that city his widow still maintains her 
home. Of their ten children eight are still living, — Jacob I., who re- 
sides at Cobalt, Ontario; AVilliam P., who resides in Boyne City, Michi- 
gan ; Angus, who is a resident of Marquette, Michigan ; John P., who is 
the immediate subject of this sketch ; and Emily, his twon sister, who 
is the wife of Eugene Johnson, deceased; Byron B., of Alpena, Michi- 
gan, to whom a sketch is dedicated on other pages of this work ; Richard 
H., who is county clerk of Alpena county and who is mentioned else- 
where in this work; and Charles A., who resides at Madison, Wisconsin. 
All of the brothei-s are veterinary surgeons except Richard H., and all 
are actively engaged in the practice of their profession. The grand- 
father, Dr. Jacob Deadman, was born in England and there passed his 
entire life, having been engaged in the practice of veterinary surgerv 
from 1828 to 1864. Dr. William Deadman, father of John P. Deadman, 
learned the veterinary science in his native land under the able direc- 
tion of his father, and when a young man he came to America and lo- 
cated in the province of Ontario, Canada, where he was engaged in the 
work of his profession until 1879. He then removed to Alpena, Jlichi- 
gan, where he continued to reside until his death. He was actively en- 
gaged in professional work for nearly fifty years. The sons organized 
and incorporated the Deadman Brothers Medical Company of Alpena 
and were associated therein in the manufacture of various veterinarj' 
remedies for a number of yeare. 

Dr. John P. Deadman was reared to the age of twelve years in his 
native county in Ontario and there gained his early education in the 
public schools. He then accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Alpena, Michigan, where he continued to attend the public schools, and 
finally, after preliminary discipline under the direction of his father, 
he entered the veterinary department of the Detroit College of j\Iedi- 
cine, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895, and 
from which he received the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Surgery. 

Prior to this time he had been associated with his father in practice. 



732 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 

He continued to reside at Alpena until the spring of 1895, when he 
took up his residence at Sault Ste. IVIarie, where he continued in the 
work of his profession until the autumn of 1909, when, on accoiuit of 
the ill health of his wife, he removed to Portland, Oregon, in the hope 
that his loved companion might be restored to health. She was, however, 
smnmoned to the life eternal in ilay, 1910, and Dr. Deadman then i-e- 
turned to Sault Ste. Marie, where he has since continued in the work 
of his profession, in which he has long held precedence as one of the 
able and successful residents thereof. In politics he is aligned as a stal- 
wart supporter of the cause of the Democratic party. He is a member 
of the ^Michigan State Veterinary Association and had the distinction 
of being a member of the first veterinary examining board in the state 
of Michigan, besides which he served for some time as United States In- 
spector of the port of Sault Ste. Marie. He served four years as treas- 
urer of the city of Sault Ste. Marie and no citizen enjoys a liigher de- 
gree of popular confidence and esteem. He is afifiliated with Red Cross 
Lodge, No. 51, Knights of Pythias ; Sault Ste. JIarie Chapter, No. 552 ; 
Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks; Sault Ste. Marie Lodge, No. 
12:i. Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and also holds membership in 
the Knights of the Macabees and Algona Society. 

In September. 1893, Dr. Deadman was united in marriage to Miss 
Sophronia Eagle, who was born in the province of Ontario. Canada, 
and whose death occurred in the city of Portland, Oregon, in May, 1910. 
as already stated. Concerning the five children of this union the fol- 
lowing brief record is given: Emily died in infancy, as did also Russell 
N. and Jennings "W.. these children being triplets. Webster "W. remains 
at the paternal liome; as does also Helen Sophronia, who is five years of 
age at the time of this writing. 

At the time of the Doctor's removal to Portland, Oregon, in 1909, 
as stated in a preceding paragraph, one of the Saidt Ste. ]Marie papers 
entered an appreciative and facetious article concerning him and from 
this it is deemed but consonant to make the following quotations with 
but slight paraphrase, as the statements are well worthy of perpetuation 
in.stead of being buried in musty newspaper files : 

"Now that the Doctor is about to leave for the edge of the great 
American continent, it might be opportune to take advantage of the 
chance to say a few things about him before his face. There are i)rob- 
ably but few men anywhere wlio constitute as good a theme for the 
talker or writer. There are probably but few men who liave had such 
perilous and eventful careers. There is much of striking interest to be 
said about this unique personality. 

"In the first place he is one of the prominent veterinary surgeons 
in the .state and comes from what is presumably one of the oldest families 
of veterinaries in this country. His father and grandfather and six 
of his brothers are veterinary surgeons and there is only one black 
sheep in the family who failed to keep tlie pace set by the ancestoi's. A 
.striking fact in regard to this remarkable man is that he fights the battle 
of life with but one leg and with but one sure-enough eye. Years ago 
the Doctor was a splendid specimen of physical manliood and ready for 
muscular stunts in eomiietition with the strong boys, but one accident 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 733 

resulted in the loss of a leg and aDother took one eye and threatened to 
take two. However, one leg was not a handicap when the Doctor en- 
tered the political race, and in spite of the overwhelming normal Repub- 
lican majority he was able to win easily for two terms. As a one-legged 
political sprinter the Doctor was certainly entitled to classification with 
fast company. 

"Still more .striking facts in regard to the Doctor are that he is a 
twin himself, was the father of triplets and his hunting mare some years 
ago gave birth to twin colts. It has also been said that the doctor was 
the owner of a two-headed calf and that his hens laid double-yolked 
eggs, but this is somewhat of an exaggeration. The Doctor has a two- 
headed calf in his office but it was not the child of one of his cows. The 
Doctor is also prominent as a hunter and fisherman. After he lost his 
leg and was not qualified for the tramp role, he gained distinction for 
successfully hunting for deer from the back of his faithful mare. He is 
familiar with the angling game and an ardent devotee of the sport." 

Byron B. Deadman, D. V. S. — It is a rare thing to find in a single 
family so much talent along one line of endeavor as is displayed in the 
Deadman family. Three genei-ations, — paternal grandfather, father and 
six sons, have all achieved most distinctive success as veterinary sur- 
ueons. Concerning this distinguished family a more complete history 
appears elsewhere in this volume, in the sketch of the career of John F. 
Deadman, a brother of him whose name introduces this article. 

Dr. Byron Bruce Deadman was born at Clandeyboy, ]\Iiddlesex 
county, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 7th of March, 1871. He 
is a son of Dr. William H. and Christina (McKay) Deadman, who re- 
moved to Michigan in 1881, establishing the family home in Alpena. 
Dr. Byron B. Deadman was a child of ten years of age at the time of 
his advent in the "Wolverine state and after a good common-school educa- 
tion he began the stvidy of veterinary surgerj^ under the able preceptor- 
ship of his father. So rapid was his progress in this profession that he 
became a reliable assistant to his father when but sixteen years old. 
He has continued to be identified with this line of enterprise during the 
long intervening years and he is now recognized as an authority on all 
animal diseases. He is a valued and appreciative member of the Wol- 
verine Veterinary Association and in a fraternal way he is affiliated mth 
Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons; and Alpena Lodge, 
No. 505, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, basides which he also 
holds membership in the Knights of the JIaccabees. In politics he is 
■iligned as a stanch supporter of the principles and policies for which 
the Republican party stands sponsor and though he has never mani- 
fested aught of ambition for public office of any description he contrib- 
utes in generous measure to all enterprises pro.ieeted for the good of the 
community. In 1906 Dr. Deadman and his two brothers. Dr. John F. 
Deadman, of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, and Richard H. Deadman. of 
Alpena, organized the Deadman Brothers Medical Company, at Alpena, 
the same being incorporated mider the laws of the state with a capital 
stock of sixty thousand dollars. Its officers are as follows, — Dr. Dead- 
man, of this sketch, president; Riehai'd H. Deadman, .secretary; and Dr. 



734 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

John F. Deadman, treasurer. The company has built up an extensive 
business and its admirable success is due in large measure to the fair 
and honorable methods employed by the Deadman brothers. They are 
men of extraordinary executive ability and are well deserving of their 
reputation for sterling integrity and unquestioned honesty. 

On the 5th of May, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Dead- 
man to ^liss Violet Hopkins, who was born in Tuscola county, Michigan, 
and who is a daughter of Lorenzo and EveljTi (AVintou) Hopkins, both 
of whom were born and reared in Michigan. Mr. Hopkins is engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Oscoda and Alcona counties and he is recog- 
nized as an essentially loyal and public spirited citizen. His political 
faith is that of the Republican party. ;\Irs. Deadman is the third in 
order of birth in a family of four children and she was reared and edu- 
cated in her native county. Dr. and jMrs. Deadman became the parents 
of ten children, four of whom are living, namely, — Violet, Lorenzo, and 
John and Lois, twins. 

Alp^red Ray Cinpield. — It is not to be gainsaid that one of the 
most able, widely known and honorable citizens of Clare, iliehigan, is 
Alfred Ray Canfield, who since 1895 has been editor and publisher of 
that live and enlightened chronicler of events and moulder of public 
opinion, — The Clare Cottrier. The Courier is one of the best conducted 
weeklies in this section of the Wolverine state and is politically inde- 
pendent. Jlr. Canfield however has given heart and hand to the Demo- 
cratic faith since his earliest voting days, holding high place in his party 
councils. On ftlay 1, 1911, Jlr. Canfield received appointment to the 
office of tally clerk in the House of Representatives at the National cap- 
ital, and during his absence in Washington, D. C, the Courier is abh' 
conducted by the subject's sou, Don W. Canfield. 

Mr. Canfield is a native son of the state of ]\Iichigan, his birth hav- 
ing occurred at Portland, on August 26, 1867. There were passed his 
youth and school days, his residence being maintained there until 188:1. 
when he removed to Harrison, Michigan. During the winter of 1883-4, 
the young man came to the conclusion to become a representative of 
the Fourth Estate, and as a stepping stone to this he established a .iob 
office, beginning in a very modest way and purchasing a limited amount 
of material. Although this may sound simple and easy in recountal it 
was in reality a very bold step that was made, for young Canfield knew 
absolutely nothing of the business. He was, however, of a mechanical 
bent and with this advantage he concluded to 

"put it to the touch, and win or lose it all." 
Most of his infonnation ho gained from books, not even having the 
usual training under the guidance of an "old timer." He succeeded, his 
combination of industry, pluck and determination jiroving a strong one. 

^Ir. Canfield 's father was a lawyer by profession and a man inter- 
ested in the many-sided life of the community. In July, 1884, that 
gentleman in association with W. W. Green, formed a firm called Green 
& Canfield for the purpose of starting an independent newspaper and 
gave the same the name of the Standard. The subject was made its 
manager and lalwred strenuously in l)oth its nieclianical and editorial 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 735 

departments. In February, 1885, he found himself in a position to buy 
the paper and he consolidated it with the Cleaver, a contemporary 
sheet under the management of D. Lee Sanborn, the new paper to be 
known as the Cleaver and Standard. In January, 1886, he bought out 
Mr. Sanborzi and dropped the name Standard, continuing its publica- 
tion under the name of the Clare County Cleaver. He subsequently sold 
tlie Cleaver and in June, 1895, established the Clare Courier, which 
under his clever and efficient captaincy has grown to be a thriving and 
popular weekly. ~Sh: Canfield has ever been in harmony with the prin- 
ciples advanced by the Democratic party and cast his first vote for 
Grrover Cleveland in 1888, having reached his majority just in time. In 
that year he changed the policy of the paper from independent to 
Democratic. He has held public olSce from time to time, having been 
deputy county clerk of Clare county and having been a member of the 
board of education at Harrison and also at Clare. He is secretary of 
the Clare board of trade and for nine years was chief of the Clare fire 
department. He is a member of the executive committee of North- 
eastern Michigan Development Bureau and was elected secretary of the 
Democratic State Central Committee in 1903. In every trust he has 
proved faithful and efficient and there is nothing of public import in 
county and town in which he is not helpfully interested. He keeps in 
touch with all such matters as affect the Fourth Estate and in evidence 
of the prominence he enjoys in newspaperdom is the fact that he holds 
the position of President of the North-eastern Michigan Press Associ- 
ation. He finds no small amount of pleasure in his affiliation with the 
Knights of Pythias. 

On August 15. 1888, ~Sh-. Canfield established a happy household by 
his marriage to ^Miss ^Minnie Bogue, of Harrison, Michigan. His chosen 
lady was born ^larch 12, 1868. in Pennsylvania and came here with an 
uncle who located in ^Michigan to make his home. Mr. and Mrs. Canfield 
share their pleasant home with the following children : Don W., born 
April 21, 1891. in charge of the paper during his father's absence in 
Washington; ]Mary Helen, born September 28, 1904; and John Henry, 
born January 18, 1906. Don W. was sent in 1911 as a delegate to the 
State Firemen 's Association. 

Melvin a. Bates. — Enterprising, active and progres.sive, ilelviu A. 
Bates, postmaster at Grayling, holds a position of prominence in social, 
business and political circles and is highly esteemed as a man of honest 
worth and sterling integrity. A son of James K. Bates, he was born 
December 8, 1865. in Onondaga county, New York, but has spent the 
larger part of his life in ^Michigan. James K. Bates was born, bred and 
educated in the Empire state. He married Catherine Staley, who died 
in 1874, in Onondaga county. New York, leaving six children, four of 
whom now reside in ^Michigan, Coming with his six motherless children 
to Michigan in 1878. he located in Crawford county, and continued his 
occupation as a farmer during his active career in Grayling. He is still 
living here. 

Reeei^ang his rudimentary education in his native state, Melvin A. 
Bates attended the rural schools of Crawford county, here completing 



736 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

his early studies. Beginning life for himself as a clerk, he became in- 
terested in mercantile pursuits, for two years being in business on his 
own account, and now he holds an interest in the well-known firm of 
Cormine & Company. In 1897 Mr. Bates was appointed postmaster at 
Grayling, and has held the position, by reappointment, ever since, his 
i-eeord of continuous sei-vice bearing evidence of his fidelity, ability and 
popularity in the commiinity. He is likewise the owner and manager 
of the Local Telephone Company, which has already two hundred pat- 
rons and is still extending its lines. For three terms he served as town- 
ship clerk. 

Mr. Bates was imited in marriage, in 1887, with Elizabeth Williams, 
and into their pleasant household four children have been born, namely : 
Catherine, Lillian, Russell E. and ^Mildred. Fraternally Mr. Bates 
stands high in Masonic circles, beiag a past master, a past high priest 
and a member of the Council. 

John Pedden, M. D., a prominent physician of Petoskey, and med- 
ical examiner for the United States Marine Corps, has been engaged in 
a large general practice here since 1900. Dr. Pedden has won his suc- 
cesses in life by hard work and a p^rsistencj- which he probably in- 
herited from his Scotch ancestry. 

He was born on a farm in Adelaide township, Middlesex county, 
Ontario, November 10, 1872, began his schooling in a log schoolhoiise 
at Mud Creek Corners in that toM'nship, walking three miles along a 
trail through the woods every morning and evening. At the age of 
twelve he had completed the course of the local public schools, and 
after two years' work on the farm entered the Collegiate Institute at 
Strathroy, where he graduated with the class of 1892. During the four 
succeeding years, teaching supplied him with the funds for a profes- 
sional education, and he entered the Detroit College of Medicine, where 
he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1900. Since then he 
has practiced at Petoskey. He is a member of the county, state and 
American medical societies. 

Dr. Pedden belongs to one of the pioneer families of Ontario. His 
grandfather, Andrew Pedden, came from Scotland in 1832. landing at 
Quebec and pushing his Avay through the wilderness to Jliddlesex 
county, where he cleared a farm and made a good home for his fam- 
ily. His son John, the Doctor's father, was born in Scotland in 1830, 
and was reared in ^Middlesex county, where he helped his father in 
liis pioneer labor, and later cleared out a farm of his own. where he is 
still living, an old and honored citizen. His farm was always noted for 
its high-class horses and other stock, and he was progressive in every 
way. He married Jliss Nancy McLachlan. who was born in East 
Williams township. i\Iiddlesex county, where she was reared, married 
and is still living. She became the mother of nine children, .six of Avhom 
are living, the Doctor being the second child and oldest son. 

Dr. Pedden is a thirty-second degree Mason, being aiifiliated with 
Durand Lodge No. 344, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and Avith 
DeWitt Clinton Consistory and the Saladin Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Grand Rapids. In politics he is a Republican. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 737 

October 7, 1904, he married Miss Eva Rockwell. She was born at 
Bear Lake, Manistee county, ^Michigan, being the youngest child of 
Charles and Lucretia Rockwell. Her father is a farmer of Manistee 
county and has been prominent in Democratic politics, having held all 
the township and county offices. Dr. and Mrs. Pedden have two chil- 
dren : Helen and John Rockwell. 

William G. McCune. — Honored and respected by all, there is no 
man in Emmet county, Michigan, who occupies a higher place in the 
confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens than does William G. ile- 
Cune, who is most successfully engaged in the real-estate, loan and in- 
surance business at Petoskey. He possesses untiring energy, is quick of 
perception, forms his plan readily and is determined in their execution; 
and his close application to business and excellent management have 
brought to him the high degree of prosperity which to-day is his. 

A native of the old Wolverine state. AVilliam George McCune was 
bom in the city of Detroit, Michigan, the date of his birth being the 
19th of September, 1875. He is a son of William J. and Angeline 
(Snow) McCune, the former a native of New York City. The father, 
who was engaged in the insurance business during the greater portion 
of his active career, is now living, in retirement, at Petoskey. Mrs. Will- 
iam J. McCune was summoned to eternal rest in the year 1891. Of the 
two children born to Mr. and ill's. McCune both are living at the pres- 
ent time, the subject of this review having been the fii-st born. The 
younger son, Newell McCune, is now identified with the ilethodist Epis- 
copal church at Benton Harbor as pastor. The father came to Petoskey 
in 1884, at which time William G. McCune was a child of but nine years 
of age. 

William G. McCune received his early educational discipline from 
his mother and after the family home was established at Petoskey he 
attended the public schools of this city. Subsequently he was matricu- 
lated as a student in Albion College, at Albion, Michigan, and in 1896 
he entered the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in the law de- 
partment of which excellent institution he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1899, duly receiving his degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Immediately after graduation. Mr. McCune went to the city of Chicago, 
where he initiated the active practice of his profession, being there in 
the office with Joseph H. Pitch. In 1900. however, he gave up law work 
and came to Petoskey, where he is now engaged in the real-estate, loan 
and insurance business. In this particular field of endeavor he is 
achieving most gratifying success and in connection with his work he 
has done a great deal toward the improvement of the city in which he 
has so long maintained his home. In politics he is a stalwart Republican 
and while he is no office seekei-, he is deeply and sincerely interested in 
community affairs and is ever ready to clo his humble part toward the 
advancement of the general welfare. While in college he was initiated 
into the Delta Tau Delta Greek letter fraternity and in his religious faith 
he is a consistent member of the Methodist Epi.scopal church, in the dif- 
ferent departments of whose work he is an active and zealous faetoB. 

At Grand Rapids, Michigan, on the 15th of October, 1904, was sol- 



738 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

eiimized the marriage of Mr. McCune to Miss Helen Allen, who was born 
and reared in Grand Rapids and who is a daughter of S. N. Allen, long 
a representative business man in that city. Mr. and ::\Irs. McCune are 
the parents of two children, — Allan, born on the 14th of Alarch, 1907 ; 
and William S., whose natal day is the rtth of June, 1909. 

H. B. Laesen. — For nearly forty years the name of Larsen has stood 
for everything which was good and dependable in the line of general 
merchandise at Manistee or in northern Michigan; the name carried 
this high guarantee because an honest and an able man was behind the 
name. With the exception of the live years from 1SS9 to 1S93 spent in 
Chicago, H. B. Larsen has been building up this substantial reputation, 
as business man and citizen, in association with his brothers and as 
sole proprietor of his mercantile establishment, since his coming to 
Manistee in the last year of the war. 

Mr. Larseu is a native of Denmark, born June 17, 1842. and was 
reared in his birth-land until he was thirteen years of age. when he 
emigrated to the United States, settling first in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
When he moved to ^lanistee in 1865 he was a sturdy young man of 
twenty-three, ambitious but imtried in business. The succeeding nine 
years were devoted to a preliminaiy education hi most practical mat- 
ters, this period being chiefly occupied in following his trade of mill- 
wright, and in the year 1874 lie associated himself with his brothers, 
Albert (now deceased) and Fred C, in the establishment of a second- 
hand store. This .semi-independent venture developed so well that the 
business gradually branched out into that of general merchandise, and 
in 1879 he withdrew from the partnership of Larsen Brothers and 
founded his own house on the site of the mammoth establishment which 
he now conducts. 

In 1882 Mr. Larsen built the store which is now a portion of the sub- 
stantial block which bears his name. In 1889 he leased it and engaged 
in business in Chicago during the succeeding four years, but returned 
to Manistee duriug the hard times of 1893, realizing that this citj- was a 
good place in which to thrive and to rear and educate one's children. 
Resuming business "at the old stand," his honorable methods and per- 
sonal popularity raised his enterprise to one of the most prominent in 
northern Michigan and one of the most complete .department stores in 
the state. With the e.xpansion of the business his accommodations out- 
grew the original quartei-s, and the lai-ge. two-story structure known as 
the H. B. Larsen Block is the result. This has a front of one hundred 
and twenty-five feet and a depth of about eighty-five feet. 

Mr. Larsen 's domestic life is typical of the faithfulness and affection 
of his countrymen, who in this countrj' are able to give fuller expression 
to their family love in the shape of comforts and even luxuries of the 
home. With his wife, Anna Hansen, he resides in a substantial resi- 
dence on a pleasant street, sustained and cheered by the affectionate 
ministrations of his life-partner and his five children — Clarion, Harry, 
Ethel, Avis and Lawrence. Outside of his household and warm friends 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 739 

he finds an outlet to his fraternal disposition in his connection with the 
Masons, of which he is a thirty-second degree member. 

Arthur Wilkinson, I\I. D. — Nearly two score years ago Dr. Wilkin- 
son established himself in the practice of his profession in the little 
lumber town of Alpena, anil thus it may be readily understood that he 
is numbered among the pioneer physicians and surgeons of this favored 
section of the state. Pie still maintains his home in Alpena, in the de- 
velopment of which he has aided in no insignificant way, and he is an 
able representative of the noble and exacting profession to which he 
has devoted his attention for so many years and in which his success has 
been on a parity with his recognized talents. In his home community 
he is valued as a true friend, a dispenser of good cheer, a safe and wise 
counselor in all matters affecting the happiness and welfare of the 
families and the community in general. He has made of his calling 
more than a cold-blooded science, without soul, heart or sympathy, and 
he has seduously observed the ethics and ideals of his profession, and 
his personal honor, one of his chief endowments, has been manifested 
in all his intercourse M-ith his fellow men. His dominating purpose has 
been to alleviate suffering and distress, and his reward has been based 
upon honest and conscientious service as a true friend of humanity. 
Thus it may well be understood that this sterling physician is loved 
and honored in the many families to whom he has ministered during 
the long years of successful practice in the city of Alpena and its 
vicinity. 

Dr. Wilkinson was born at West Essa, Simcoe county, Ontario, 
Canada, a village located about sixty miles distant from the city of 
Toronto, and the date of his nativity was May 25, 1842. His father, 
John Wilkinson, was born in the north of Ireland, where he was reared 
and educated and whence he emigrated to America in 1832. He located 
in the province of Ontario, Canada, and soon afterward joined the royal 
troops and aided in the suppression of the memorable McKenzie re- 
bellion. At the close of this conflict he secured a tract of land in Simcoe 
county, where he developed a valuable farm and where he continued 
to reside during the residue of his long and useful life, which came to 
its close on the 7th of February, 1877. In 1838 was solemnized his 
marriage to Miss Jane Spears, who likewise was a native of the north 
of Ireland and who came to Canada when a girl. She is still living on 
the old homestead farm and has attained to the extremely venerable 
age of ninety-two years (1911). John and Jane (Spears) Wilkinson 
became the parents of six sons and three daughters, all of whom are 
living, and of the number Dr. Wilkinson, of this review, was the second 
in order of birth. The aged mother, who is held in deepest filial solici- 
tude in the gracious evening of her life, has long been a devoted mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church, and of the same her husband was likewise 
an earnest adherent. 

On the homestead farm to which reference has just been made Dr. 
Wilkinson was reared to the age of eighteen years, in the meanwhile 
lending his aid in the various departments of its work, the while he at- 
tended the common schools of the locality during the winter months. 



740 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

At the age noted he entered the Bradford grammar school, in which he 
continued his studies for one year, and later he was a student in the 
Barrie grammar school, the principal of which was Rev. Mr. Checkley, 
a clergyman of the Church of England and a teacher of wide reputation 
in Ontario. After leaving school Dr. Wilkinson proved himself eligible 
for pedagogic honor, and for several years he was a successful and 
popular teacher in the schools of his native province. In the meanwhile 
he had formulated definite plans for a life work, and in harmony there- 
with he was finally matriculated in the medical department of the 
University of Toronto, in which he completed the prescribed four years' 
course and in which he was graduated, with the well earned degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, as a member of the class of 1872. In the mean- 
while he had also attended the government military school in the same 
city, and immediately after his graduation he came to Michigan in 
search of an eligible location. He arrived in Alpena on the 23d of 
April, 1872, and here established his permanent home. During the long 
intervening years he has continued as one of the able and popular rep- 
resentatives of his profession in this part of the state, and he has not 
failed to keep in touch with the advances made in both departments of 
the same. He has the genial and urbane manners of the dignified old- 
school regime, and through his character and effective labors he has 
honored the profession of his choice. No citizen of Alpena is better 
known or held in more unqualified esteem, and he has found time to do 
well his part in the promotion of measures and entei-prises through 
which the upbuilding and development of his home city have been 
conserved. He has made judicious investments in local realty, and a 
farm that he purchased many years ago is to a large extent now in- 
cluded within the corporate limits of the city of Alpena. He has taken 
marked pride and satisfaction in the development of this property and 
he continued to reside on the farm until 1905, since which year he has 
maintained his residence in the Masonic Temple building, in the central 
part of the city of Alpena, and of which he is the owner. 

Ever broad-minded and public-spirited in his civic attitude, Dr. 
Wilkinson has frequently been importuned to accept the nomination for 
mayor of Alpena, but he has persistently refused such overtures, as he 
has had no predilection for public office, preferring to devote his time 
and attention to the work of his chosen profession. In politics he ac- 
cords a staunch allegiance to the cause of the Democratic party, and 
both he and his wife are zealous communicants of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church, in which they are active members of the local parish of 
Charity church. 

At the time of the organization of the Third Regiment, Michigan. 
National Guard, Dr. Wilkinson was appointed assistant surgeon of 
the same, and in the state militia he was finally promoted to the office of 
surgeon of the brigade, of which his regiment was a part. He has not 
been active in the affairs of the National Guard during the past several 
years. The Doctor is affiliated with Hopper Lodge, No. 386, Free & 
Accepted Masons; and Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch 
Masons; besides which both he and his wife are identified with the 




Qcv«Mi^wLcJciW 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 741 

auxiliary organization, Alpena Chapter, No. 143, Order of the Easter 
Star. 

On the 18th of November, 1874, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Wilkinson to Miss Frances E. Shepardsou, who was born at Dresden, 
"Washington county. New York, at the foot of beautiful Lake Cham- 
plain, and who is a daughter of Captain Seymour and Elizabeth 
(Jones) Shepardson, both of whom were likewise natives of Wash- 
ington county. Captain Shepardson was born at Putnam, that county, 
on the 2d of February, 1820, and died in June, 1883, and his wife was 
born at Dresden on the 30th of August, 1820, and her death occurred 
in 1892. Of the four children all are now deceased except Mrs. Wilkin- 
son. Dr. and Mrs. Wilkinson have one son and one daughter: Arthur 
J., who is now engaged in the practice of medicine at Arrow Head, 
Hot Springs, California, married Miss Dasia S. Armstrong, and they 
have two children, — John and Philip; and Elizabeth Nason Wilkinson 
is the wife of Robert H. Rayburn, of Alpena, concerning whom specific 
mention is made elsewhere in this work. Dr. and Mrs. Wilkinson have 
been leaders for many years in the best social activities of Alpena and 
here their circle of friends is coincident with that of their acquaintances. 

Robert H. Rayburn was born in St. Clair county, Michigan, on the 
31st of October, 1866, and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Steele) 
Rayburn. When he was not two years of age the family removed 
from St. Clair county to Alpena, in which city he was reared to man- 
hood. After completing a course in the high school he identified him- 
self with the lumber industry, in connection with which he was em- 
ployed principally as a scaler of logs and with this line of enterprise 
he continued to be concerned for a number of years. In 1892 he was 
elected county treasurer of Alpena county and served two terms in that 
capacity. In 1897 he was elected count}'- clerk and after serving one 
term in this office he became associated with William H. Campbell in 
the organization of the Michigan Veneer Company, in 1899. Mr. Ray- 
burn has been president of the company from the time of its incorpora- 
tion and he is also president and manager of the Island Mill Lumber 
Company, which was incorporated in 1906. He is one of the best 
known and active business men of the city that has been his home since 
childhood days. He is found arrayed as a stanch advocate of the 
eavise of the Democratic party. He is an ardent sportsman and a lover 
of nature. 

In 1903 Mr. Rayburn was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
N. Wilkinson, daughter of Dr. Arthur Wilkinson, one of the pioneer 
physicians and surgeons of Alpena. Mrs. Rayburn was born and reared 
in Alpena. The subject and his wife have two children, — Robert and 
Frances Elizabeth. 

James Buckley, whose sudden death occurred June 15, 1911, was 
for forty years one of the most conspicuous figures in the business and 
public life of northern Michigan. At the time of his death he was 
postmaster of Petoskey, having held that office nearly twenty years 
and being one of the best known federal officials of the state. The 



742 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

city of Petoskey claimed him as one of its most prominent pioneer 
citizens. He located there at almost the beginning of its history as a 
settlement, and was the first mayor of its tovm government. The 
acti\'ities of the late James Buckley covered a wide field, in business, 
politics and social life, and his sudden passing took away a personality 
and power which his associates and fellow citizens could not well 
spare. 

He was born in Detroit, Michigan, December 19, 1840. His parents, 
Daniel and Ann Buckley, both now deceased, were natives of Ireland 
and after their marriage emigrated to this coimtrj- in 1840. From 
Detroit, the father in 1841 moved out to western ilichigan, becoming 
one of the pioneers at Paw Paw in Van Buren county, and the farm 
which he hewed out of the wilderness was his homestead until his 
death. In polities he was a Democrat. 

Of the seven children in the family, James was the second. He was 
reared on a farm and educated in the schools of that period. On 
August 2, 1862, when twenty-two years old, he enlisted in Company 
C of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, and was mustered into service at 
Detroit, August 28, 1862. His regiment joining the Army of the 
Cumberland at Louisville, and he was with it in all its battles and 
skirmishes except while in the hospital, participating in forty-one 
skirmishes and engagements. Important eugagements of his military 
record were: New Liberty, April 20, 1863; Chickamauga Creek, Sep- 
tember 16, 1863; Waldron Ridge, October 1, 1863; Chickamauga Gap, 
January 24, 1864; Floyd Springs, January 29, 1864; Pumpkin Vine, 
May 25, 1864; near Kenesaw Mountain, June 26, 1864; near Jonesboro. 
August 19, 1864. In Kilpatrick's raid about Atlanta, on August 20, 
1864, a minnie ball wounded him in the left shoulder, and he was con- 
fined in the hospital at Nashville until November 25. 1864, when he 
rejoined his regiment at Macon, Georgia, and continued in service 
to the close of the war. He received his honorable discharge at Nash- 
ville, July 1, 1865. 

After his return to Van Buren county, he attended Eastman's 
Business College in Chicago and was graduated in 1867. Having 
learned the carpenter trade he followed that during the summers and 
taught school in the winter up to 1870, when he moved to northern 
^fichigan and became a pioneer in that then rapidly developing coun- 
try. For four years he was engaged in the lumber business at Big 
Rapids. 

In 1874 Mr. Buckley came to Petoskey and began the career which 
continued until his death thirty-seven years later. This period meas- 
ures tlie history of Petoskey from a small settlement to one of the 
important cities of the state, and his life work entered largely into 
this development. For the first three years he followed his trade as 
carpenter. Then, with Mr. George Mosher, he established the Petoskey 
Record, but other duties caused him to sell his interest after one year. 
He was elected county register of deeds in 1878, being the first Re- 
publican elected to this office in Emmet county, and was re-elected in 
1880, serving four years. In 1879 he engaged in the hardware business, 
which he sold eight years later and began the manufacture of lum- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 748 

ber and wooden-ware. Five years later he resumed the hardware 
business and continued one of the successful merchants of Petoskey 
until 1906. 

Mr. Buckley was first appointed to the office of postmaster in 1890, 
by President Harrison, serving four years. In 1898 President McKinley 
again appointed him to the office, and by re-appointments in 1902, 
1906, 1910, bj' the presidents in office at the times, he continued this 
public service mitil his death. Besides being first mayor of the city 
of Petoskey, "Slv. Buckley was for two terms a member of the city 
council, for many years was supervisor of the toM-nship and honored 
with other local offices. 

Mr. Buckley was a member of every branch of the Masonic order, 
and was a charter member of every Masonic auxiliary that has a lodge 
in Petoskey, incliiding the Eastern Star and the White Shrine of 
Jerusalem, while he was a member of the Mj^stie Shrine and Scottish 
Rite at Grand Rapids. He served continuously for twenty-eight years 
as treasurer of both the chapter and council of this order. He became 
a Mason on December 16, 1868. He was past master of Durand Lodge 
No. 344, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, was a member of Emmet 
Chapter No. 104, Royal Arch Masons, Petoskey Coimeil No. 52, Royal 
and Select Masters ; past eminent commander of Ivanhoe Commanderj- 
No. 36, Knights Templar; member of DeWitt Clinton Consistory at 
Grand Rapids since 1880; Avorthy patron of Beulah Chapter No. 63, 
Order of Eastern Star; official in Queen Esther Shrine No. 15, Order 
of White Shrine of Jerusalem. He had taken thirty-two degrees in 
^Masonry. He was also past exalted ruler of Petoskej^ Lodge No. 629, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

]\Ir. Buckley was married, December 14, 1880, to Miss ilay Rowan. 
Their son, Paul Buckley, is a graduate of the law department of the 
University of Michigan and is living at Petoskey at this time. 

John R. Nix. — There is no lawyer in the state of Michigan who has 
a higher standing than John R. Nix , attorney at law, Lake City, ]\Iich- 
igan. He has had an interesting career, but throughout it has been 
beyond reproach. No one has been able to cast any aspersions on his 
character either in a private or a public capacity. Since his fii-st 
entry into the field of law he has set himself to run the course with 
singleness of purpose. His goal was not a crown of glory for himself, 
but that he might perform each day the duties which were nearest. 
This course he has kept without deviating to the right nor to the left. 
To such, honors will come without being sought, as indeed they have to 
^Ir. Nix, but in his mind the contentment which comes with the knowl- 
edge of a life well spent means much more than the positions of honor 
which he has filled. 

He was born in Henry county, Alabama, in May, 1860. His father, 
William J. Nix, was a physician of some repute in the county, but in 
1863, during the Civil war, he died. He had married Elizabeth i\h;rra}' 
and after the death of her husband ]\Irs. Nix moved with her family to 
.Montgomery county, Alabama ; she knew that on her devolved the care 
of providing for her children's needs both physical and mental and in 



744 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Montgomei-y county there were greater educational advantages than 
in her old home. She lived for and in her children and died in 1898. 
John R. has only a very dim recollection of his father, who died when 
he was three years old, but his mother he feels should receive all the 
credit of his success. He had the good fortune to be born right, as he 
inherited a sound body from both father and mother, but his mother's 
was the only influence which he realized. Honesty, decency, obedience, 
cleanliness in thought and speech, were the things she insisted upon. 
Then she made sure that her children learned as much as they could 
during their school years. She saw to it that they went to school each 
day and that they made every day count. She realized that what they 
knew the M'orld could not take from them. She stirred them with 
ambition to do things, to make their presence felt in the world, not for 
their own sake, but for the sake of the world. All of this was accom- 
plished in a quiet way, an almost imperceptible influence that has only 
been fully realized in later years. John commenced his school education 
in Montgomery county, Alabama, whither the family had moved after 
the dea^h of his father. He attended the grade schools and then the 
high school at Montgomery, Alabama. In 1882 he entered the Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College of the state, taking up the study of law. 
He graduated two years later, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Law. 
He went before the court of examiners and was examined by attorney 
W. H. Watts, the attorney general for the confederacy of the south, 
John Nix passed the examination and was admitted to practice in all 
the courts of Alabama. After his admission to the bar he went to 
Louisville, Kentucky and opened an office there. He tried to obtain 
a practice, but his father had sided with the notherners in the Civil 
war and when that fact became known, the people of Kentucky would 
have none of him. After remaining in Louisville for about a year and a 
half, he went to Fort Smith, Arkansas. Here he was very successful 
and he remained until 1892, when he went to Muskogee, Indian Terri- 
tory. He there took up practice in the federal courts, but not finding 
the climate desirable, he decided to go to Ohio. Just at that time there 
was a good deal of talk of the mining riches that were to be had at 
Paulding, Ohio, and with the enthusiasm of j'outh he went there, hoping 
to make some money as a prospector. He soon found that the outlook 
was not favorable and his stay was short. He next Avent to Catterville, 
Arkansas, but the water was very bad there and he realized that there 
was danger to life if he stayed. He decided to come to Michigan and 
in 1908 he took up his residence in Lake City and immediatelj' began 
to practice here. During the three years which have ensued since then 
he has succeeded in making his presence felt in the community, in a 
personal as well as a legal way. The governor has appointed him to 
the office of Circuit Court Commissioner of Missaukee county. Mr. Nix 
holds cards authorizing him to practice in all the courts of the United 
States. 

In 1891 he was married to Miss Luetta Myers of Paulding county, 
Ohio. While they were living in Indian Territory, soon after their 
marriage, her health was very poor, which indeed was the reason for 
their going to Ohio, in the hope that the nir of her nntive home might 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 745 

prove of benefit to her. The results justified the move. After they 
moved to Arkansas she, as well as her husband, suffered from the effects 
of the poor drinking water, but after they moved away they both 
regained their health. Mr. and Mrs. Nix have one child, Temperance 
Elizabeth, born August 4, 1904, in Arkansas. Since Mr. and ]\Irs. Nix 
came to Lake City, Mi's. Nix's parents have been obliged to leave 
Arkansas on account of their health and they have settled in Gladwin 
county, Michigan, where they can see their daughter and her family 
frequently. Mr. and Mrs. Nix are both very popular in the social world 
of Lake City and it is hoped that they will stay here for the rest of 
their lives. Mr. Nix has already evinced a lively interest in the welfare 
of the state and he is desirous of doing everything in his power to pro- 
mote the good of his county. 

Olaf Sorenson and Sons. — Among the well-kno\\Ti, well-patronized, 
and prosperous business firms of Grayling, that of Olaf Sorenson & Sons 
occupied a noteworthy position, being one of the leading companies to 
deal exclusively iu confectionery a-ud tobacco. Their establishment, 
which would, indeed, be a credit and an ornament to cities of much 
larger size and of more importance, is one of cleanest, neatest, and 
most appropriately furnished, of any store of its kind in Crawford 
county. 

Olaf Sorenson, the head of the firm, was born in Denmark, a son of 
Severin and Lena (Peterson) Sorenson, who came from Denmark, the 
land of their birth, to the United States in 1888, locating in northern 
Michigan, where seven of their eleven children, eight of whom emi- 
grated to this country, are now in business. 

Coming to America, the poor man's paradise, Olaf Sorenson located 
in Grayling, Michigan, where he has since been extensively engaged 
in the lumber business, now, in 1911, being one of the trusted overseers 
of the affairs of Sailing, Hanson & Co., lumber manufacturers and deal- 
ers. In searching for a business which would give him more leisure, at 
the same time being more lucrative, and furnish employment for his chil- 
dren, Mr. Sorenson, in 1909 bought out James W. Sorenson, a dealer 
in tobacco, and in the years that have since elapsed has built up his 
present large and profitable trade in tobacco and confectionery. 
Catering to the wants of their numerous customers, the firm of Olaf 
Sorenson & Sons carries the very best brand of domestic and imported 
cigars and tobacco, and deals in pure and wholesome candy only, the 
confectionery so temptingly displayed on the well arranged shelves of 
the establishment being of standard makes, and especially enticing to 
the passer-by. 

In the management of his mercantile business Mr. Sorenson has the 
assistance of his three sons, who are members of the firm, as follows: 
Alfred Sorenson, born in 1886 ; Carl, bom in 1889 ; and Herluf, born in 
1891. Religiously ^Ir. Sorenson and his family are valued members of 
the Danish Lutheran Church. 

Reuben G. Porter, D. D. S. — The standing of every profession is 
marked by the character of the men who represent it, and the reputa- 



746 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

tion of Dr. Reuben G. Porter stands second to none in Petoskey as a 
successful and popular dentist. Excellent technical training as coupled 
with some twenty years' active practice in dental work makes Dr. Porter 
an adept in his chosen field of work. He is a native of Petoskey, where 
his birth occurred on the 23d of May, 1858, and he is a son of Andrew 
and Mai-y (Glenn) Porter, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania, 
the former in Venango coimty and the latter in Butler county. The 
father died in February, 1899, at the venerable age of eighty-two years, 
and the mother passed to the life eternal in June, 1903, at the age of 
eighty-two years. Mr. and ill's. Porter were married in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of four children, all of whom 
are deceased except the immediate subject of this review, who was the 
third in order of birth. Andrew Porter was a cabinet-maker by trade 
and for a number of years he was a contractor and builder in Pennsyl- 
vania, where he erected a number of churches. He came to Michigan in 
1852 and located on the Mission farm in Eramet county, the same hav- 
ing been located about one mile south of the village of Petoskey. He 
was a Presbyterian missionary and for a time was in the employ of the 
government as a teacher. During his residence in Michigan he also acted 
as interpreter for the Indians and acted in that capacity on the occa- 
sion when Rev. John Ridpath first preached to the Indians in the old 
IMission school house. Mr. Porter was identified with mission work for 
a period of twenty-two j-ears and during that time was the popular and 
efScient incumbent of a number of township and county offices. In 
politics he was a stanch supporter of the Republican party after its 
organization, in 1858, and he was an active factor in the local councils 
of that party. 

Dr. Porter received his rudimentary educational training in the 
commission schools of Petoskey and he also studied for a time in West 
Sunliury Acadi'iiiy, Pennsylvania, and took a normal course at Washing- 
ton. Pennsylvania and at the Pennsylvania Dental College at Philadel- 
phia, he spent a few months. In the year 1889 he was matriculated as a 
student in Washington University, at St. Louis. Mis.souri, in the dental 
department of which excellent institution he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1891, duly receiving his well earned degree of Doctor of 
Dental Surgery, taking the first prize as best operator in the class. Im- 
mediately after graduation he located at Petoskey, where he rapidly 
gained prestige as one of the most skilled dentists in this section of the 
state. He controls a large and lucrative patronage in this city, where 
he is universally esteemed for his splendid citizenship and his fine 
professional ability. In connection with his life work he is a member 
of the Michigan State Dental Society and in ]ioiitics he is a .stanch 
advocate of the principles and policies of the Prohibition party. 

On the 20th of September. 1882. Dr. Porter was united in marriage 
to Miss Sarah Jarman, whose demise occurred in the year 1895. This 
union was prolific of five children, whose names are here entei-ed in 
respective order of bii-th, — Editli. Tsebelle, Esther. Howard and Lowrie. 
On the 23d of December. 1896. Dr. Porfei- married :\Iiss Retta Wilford, 
who was born and reared at Elyria. Ohio, and who is a daughter of 
Saiiniol Wilford. Dr. and ]Mi-s. Portei' have (ine son. Wilford. In their 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 747 

religions faith Dr. Porter and liis wife are devout members of the Bap- 
tist eluireh, to whose philanthropical work they are most liberal contri- 
butors. The Doctor is a man of wide experience and broad informa- 
tion and it has been said concerning him that liis charity knows only 
the bounds of his opportunities. 

AViLLiAii GREENFIELD; — As a farmer, a lumberman cutting timber in 
the woods, a logger driving his cut and that of others down the river 
toward its place of manufacture, and a banker uniting with others in 
founding and conducting one bank and afterward organizing and ope- 
j-ating one of his own, and now dealing in cedar lumber as a merchant, 
William Greenfield of Onaway has tried his hand at several different 
occupations, and has shown skill and capacity in all. Mr. Greenfield is 
not a native of the United States but has been a resident of Michigan 
during the last thirty-four j'ears. He is therefore thoroughly Amer- 
icanized and feels as much devotion for the land of his adoption as he 
ever could have felt for that of liis birth. His life began in the city of 
Goole, Yorkshire, England, on October 13. 1858, and in 1869, when he 
was eleven years of age, he accompanied his parents to Canada, finding 
a new home in the province of Ontario, county of Elgin. 

He is a son of Joseph and Ann (Ellis) Greenfield, also natives of 
Goole, where the father and mother were both born. Both liave passed 
to their final account after long years of labor, the father liaving died 
at the age of sixty-four and the mother at that of fifty-seven. They 
were the parents of six children, three sons and three daughters. Three 
of their oflispi-ing are living : Annie, the wife of William Parkes, who is 
living in Manchester, England; Mary, the wife of William Gaiusbeck, 
a resident of Los Angeles, California; and William, the subject of this 
brief review. The father followed farming in Canada for a number of 
.years, as he had done from his boyhood in his native land. Some time 
before his death he retired from active pursuits and located in London, 
Ontario, where he died in 1894. 

His son William began liis education in the state or public schools 
of England and completed it in those of Ontario. He worked on his 
father's farm in both countries, taking a full hand in the labor even 
in early youth, and remained at hosue until he reached the age of nine- 
teen. In 1877 he came to Michigan, arriving in the fall of the year, and 
took up his residence near the city of Port Huron. There he wrought 
in the woods as a lumberman during the winter and as a hired man 
on fai-ms during the summer for a time. 

From the vicinity of Port Huron he moved to Alpena, but he still 
continued lumbering in the winter and driving logs dovni the river on 
their way to the mills in the summer until 1885. Then he married and 
bought eighty acres of land in Montmorency county. Of this tract he 
cleared seventy acres, after building himself a dwelling and other nec- 
essary structures, and followed farming until 1901. He found the life 
of a fai'mer agreeable in many particulars, although under the circum- 
stances in his case the work was very hard, and the profits of his indus- 
try were satisfactory in a large measure. But he still felt a longing to 



748 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

be connected with the lumber trade in some way and determined to 
gratify the strong desire. 

In 1901 he moved to Onaway and went to work for the Lobdell & 
Bailey Manufacturing Company, exercising a careful supervision over 
the company's timber lands. He continued to serve the company in 
this capacity for four years, then passed the next three as superintend- 
ent of its logging business. During this period he also gave attention 
to another line of profitable endeavor. In 1902 he helped to found the 
Onaway State Savings Bank and for a time served as one of its dii'ect- 
ors. He still owns stock in the bank but is not now a director, having 
given up this position in 1909 in order to engage in the banking business 
on his own account at Tower, Cheboygan comity, where he founded the 
Tower Exchange Bank and became its president. He also, about the 
same time, began the extensive business as a dealer iu cedar lumber 
which he is still conducting in Tower, putting on the market the yield 
from his own large acreage of timber land as well as that of other tracts 
available to him which are rich in the kind of lumber he handles. 

Mr. Greenfield still has liis home in Onaway, however, and takes an 
earnest interest and leading part in the public aft'airs of the citj' and 
the county in which it is located. He has been a member of the school 
board in Onawa for five years, and while he lived in Montmorency 
county served as supervisor of Hillman township there for two years. 
He is zealous always for the best and most wholesome development of 
the community in which he lives, and cheerfully bears his full share of 
the burden incident to pushing needed improvements to completion, 
and furnishes his full share of the inspiration and enterprise required 
to start them. 

In political faith Mr. Greenfield is an ardent Republican and, acting 
on firmly held convictions, he is an energetic and effective worlcer for 
the success and proper guidance of his pai-ty. Fraternally he holds 
membership in Onaway Lodge No. 425 of the Masonic order, and in 
several other benevolent and fraternal associations. On October 27, 
1885, he was iniited in marriage with Miss Marj' McDonald, a native of 
Lexington, Michigan, and a daughter of Alexander and Sarah (Rey- 
nolds') McDonald. Three children have been born of the union, two 
(laughters and one son : Ada, who is attending the University of Chi- 
cago and is now in her second year of the course ; Alene, M'ho is at home 
with her parents ; and Arthur, who is also still a member of the parental 
family circle. All the members of the family have shown themselves to 
be upright and useful citizens, and all are highly esteemed in accord- 
ance with their demonstrated merit. 

Hon. William H. McFadzen, one of Manistee county's representative 
citizens and business men, comes on both sides of his family of that 
nation which, never conquered though often beaten, gave kings to Eng- 
land, field-marshals to France, Prussia and Russia, cardinals to Rome, 
the second greatest man to the Reformation and to America a body of 
citizens whose priceless value can not be reckoned and who have made 
such an imprint upon our history that any of our citizens are proud to 
cliiim Scotch blood. Mr. i\IcFadzcn ha.s boon identified witli the com- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 749 

mercial interests of the county since the year 1889 and now is accounted 
one of its principal merchants. Few men are better known than he 
throughout its length and breadth, and the fact that he is an excellent 
linguist, speaking Polish and German as well as his own language, has 
given him popularity among the foreign element which is by no means 
small in this section. He is one of the leaders in Republican party 
ranks and has held public office to the satisfaction of all concerned and 
he has mining and other capitalistic interests of great importance in sev- 
eral sections of this country of ours. 

Like a good many of the citizens of this part of Michigan Mr. Mc- 
Fadzen is a native of Canada, his birth having occuri-ed February 14, 
1862. His father, John McFadzen, was a native of Highland, Scotland, 
but came to the much vaunted land of opportunity, — America — when a 
l)oy. He chose timbering and land-looking as an occupation and he 
married Bell Douglas, who was a Canadian by birth but of Scotch 
descent. The father and mother spent their later yeai's at Filer City, 
ilichigan, the former dying at the age of eighty-two years and the latter 
at seventy-nine. They were the parents of six children, three of whom 
grew to maturity. 

^Ir. ]\IcFadzen was a child of four years when his parents removed 
to ]Manistee county, Jlichigan, with their family. In the district schools 
of the county he secured his education but it was of a somewhat limited 
character, since at the early age of fifteen years he found it expedient 
to enroll himself among the wage-earners. He found employment in 
the shingle mills of Manistee and continued in this capacity until 1888. 
As previously mentioned, in 1889 he inaugurated his mercantile career 
and with the capital which his savings represented he set up in business 
at his present location, the date being April, 1889. In the succeeding 
twenty-one years he has encountered the greatest success and now en- 
joys a large and evev-growing patronage. Besides groceries and dry 
goods he handles among other things hay, flour and feed and many 
other lines of produce and commodity. 

^Ir. ]McFadzen has long been interested in public matter.s and has 
played an influential role in local party affairs. He has also won the 
confidence of the commimity, and one evidence of this was liis election to 
the office of supervisor of files, and to this trust he gave efficient and 
faithful service for the space of five years. He was elected chairman 
of the board of supervisors in 1907 ancl 1908 and was re-elected in 1910. 
He is very loyal to the interests of the locality in which he has spent 
nearly his entire life. He has even had the experiences of the North- 
ern woodsman, having followed his profession for a time as a youth. 

ilr. ]\IcFadzen was married in November, 1885, in Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, ^liss Maggie C. Jeneau, becoming his wife. She is a descendant 
of Solomon Jeneau, one of the pioneers of the vicinity of Milwaukee, 
and she was born and reared in the Wisconsin city. They have four 
children living, namely: Bell C, teaching her third year in the Oak 
Hill schools ; Arthur R., a cooper with the Sands Salt & Lumber Com- 
pany: Donald W., a student in the high school of the city of Jlanistee: 
and Ellis J., attending the district school of Oak Hill. Eva IM. died at 
the age of three years. 



750 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

jMr. McFaclzen finds no small amount of pleasure in his lodge rela- 
tions, which extend to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 
250, 'of Manistee, and to the Modern Maccabees, No. 316, in both of 
which he enjoys great popularity. In addition to his previously men- 
tioned business interests he has stock in the Bull Frog iliuing Com- 
pany of Springdale, Nevada, and with the 0. K. Land Company of 
^Madison, Wisconsin. 

William Burston. — An energetic young man, earnest and steadfast 
in purpose and action, WiUiam Burston, a prosperous druggist of Far- 
well, has gained an assured position among the foremost men of the com- 
munity, and has rendered valued service in many public positions of 
trust and responsibility. A native of Michigan, he was born, September 
i, 1851, in Ypsilanti, of English ancestry. 

His father, F. Richard Burston, was born, bred, and married in 
England. Emigrating with his bride to the United States, he lived in 
various towns and cities in Michigan, following his trade of a merchant 
tailor, having been located first in Ypsilanti, then in Detroit, from there 
moving to Manistee, thence to Cadillac, and later to Saginaw. He 
finally returned to Cadillac, where he spent his last days. He married 
Bessie Rosvere, who was born in England, and is now living with her 
son William, in Farwell. 

WiUiam Burston attended the public schools of Manistee, Saginaw, 
and ia Cadillac completed the tenth grade. Entering then the drug es- 
tablishment of Davis ife Maurer, at Cadillac, he remained with the firm 
nine years, during which time he took the druggist's examination before 
the Michigan State Board of Pharmacy, and was granted a certificate as 
a registered pharmacist, locating in Farwell on January 10, 1906. Jlr. 
Burston bought out ]\Ir. H. M. Roj's, and has since carried on a suc- 
cessful drug business, having an extensive and lucrative patronage. 

Identified in politics with the Republican party, Mr. Burston was 
elected village clerk of Farwell in 1907, and the same spring was chosen 
clerk of Surry township. He served so satisfactorily in both positions 
that he was re-elected at the expiration of his term of service. He was 
for two years village trustee, and in the spring of 1911 was honoi-ed 
with an election as president of the village. Mr. Burston is a member 
of the Retail Drug Association of Michigan. He is a regular attendant 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and gives as liberally as his means 
will allow to all worthy objects. He married July 26th, 1911, Miss 
Florence Clark, of Farwell. 

Wabren J. Rachow. — The history of a nation is nothing more than 
a history of the individuals comprising it, and as they are characterized 
by loftier or lower ideals, actuated by the spirit of ambition or indiffer- 
ence, so it is with a state, county or town. Success along any line of 
endeavor would never be properly appreciated if it came with a single 
effort and unaccompanied by some hard.ships for it is the knocks and 
bruises in life that make success taste so sweet. The career of Warren 
J. Rachow, who is the present able and popular incumbent of the office 
of cashier of the Charleviox State Savings Bank, but accentuates the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 751 

fact that success is bound to come to those who join brains with ambi- 
tion and are willing to work. It is entirely through his own well di- 
rected endeavors that Mr. Rachow has reached so high a place on the 
ladder of success and in view of that fact his achievements are the more 
gratifying to contemplate. 

Warren J. Rachow was born on a farm in Oakland county, Mich- 
igan, the date of his nativity being the 16th of May, 1879, and he is a 
son of Christopher and j\Iary (Young) Rachow, both natives of the 
great Empire of Germany. The father was born in 1846 and the mother 
in 1859 and their marriage was solemnized at Orion, Michigan, in 
1875. Of the three children born to them two are living at the present 
time, namely, — Emma, who is the wife of Oscar Brewster, a representa- 
tive business man at Pontiac, .Michigan ; and Warren J., to whom this 
sketch is dedicated. Christopher Rachow was educated in Germany and 
as a young man he was enlisted for service in the German army. He 
served with the utmost efficiency in the French and German war dur- 
ing the years 1870 to 1872 inclusive, having been a member of the 
German cavalry, and at the close of that sanguinary conflict he was 
presented with a medal by Emperor Wilhelm for his succes.sful delivery 
of niunerous important messages. In 1847 he decided to try his for- 
tunes in the New World and accordingly severed the ties which bound 
him to home and native land and emigrated to the United States. 
After landing in the harbor of New York City he proceeded directly to 
Michigan, locating on a farm in Oakland county, where he became the 
owner of some forty acres of wild land in the vicinity of Orion. He 
literally lu'wed himself a farm out of the wilderness and with the pas- 
sage of time he added continually to his original estate until he is now 
the owner of a finely improved farm of two hundred and twenty acres 
of some of the finest land in the entire state. He is engaged in diver- 
sified agriculture and the raising of high-grade stock, being a great 
lover of horses, sheep and cattle. In his political convictions he is a 
stalwart supporter of the principles and policies for which the Demo- 
cratic party stands spon.sor and at the present time, in 1911, he is 
serving with the greatest satisfaction to his constituents as justice of the 
peace of his homo township. He has ever manifested a deep and sincere 
interest in educational affairs and for twelve years was a member of 
the school board. He is a man of broad mental caliber and fine 
moral fiber ; is genial in his associations and in every sphere is accorded 
the unalloyed confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens, who admire 
him for his sterling integrity and worth. 

In the common schools of Oakland county Warren J. Rachow re- 
ceived his preliminary educational discipline, the same having been ef- 
fectively supplemented by a course of study in the Orion high school, 
in which he was graduated. Subsequently he attended the Commercial 
College at Valparaiso, Indiana, and at the age of twenty-two years he 
entered the employ of the Oakland County Savings Bank, at Pontiac. 
Michigan, remaining in that institution in a clerical capacity for the 
ensuing eighteen months. At the expiration of that period he helped D. 
H. Power to establish a chain of banks in the following localities. — 
Sheridan, Mount Morris. Kingsley, Sutton Bay, Northport. Cedar and 



752 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

McBain. In January, 1905, he decided to launch out into the banking 
business ou his own account and at that time established a bank for 
himself at Copeuiish, .Alichigau, the same being conducted for three 
years by the firm of Hodge & Rachow. Eventually disposing of his in- 
terest in the latter concern Mr. Rachow purchased the controlling stock 
in the Charlevoix State Savings Bank, one of the most substantial finan- 
cial institutions in Charlevoix county. This bank was incorporated 
under the laws of the state of jMichigan in the year 1905, with a capital 
stock of twenty-five thousand dollars and its official corps is as follows, — 
R. P. Foley, president; H. S. Harsha, vice-president; and Warren J. 
Rachow, cashier. Mr. Rachow is a business man of unusual executive 
ability and tremendous vitality and it is largely through his own per- 
sistency and determination to forge ahead that he has been so success- 
ful in his various undertakings. In politics he is a Republican and in 
fraternal orders he is affiliated with Rochester M. Lodge, Knights of 
the Tented Maccabees; and with Pontiac Lodge, No. 810, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 23d of February, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Rachow to Miss Mary L. Langley, a native of Toronto, province of On- 
tario, Canada, and a daughter of Simeon C. and Isabella (Dennis) 
Langley, the former of English and the latter of Irish descent. Mr. 
and Mrs. Langley have four children, of whom jMrs. Rachow was the 
first born. She was reared and educated in Toronto and came to Michi- 
gan in the year 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Rachow are active in church work 
and they are pojuilar in the Itest social circk's of their home commiuiity, 
jMrs. Rachow being particularly interested in all things of a musical 
nature. 

Dr. C. W. Bahel. — Although retired from active work in his pro- 
fession this leading citizen of Onaway, wlio is foremost in all good under- 
takings for the improvement and elevation of his home city and county, 
zealous, industrious and effective in all his enterprises, and very popu- 
lai- socially, is still properly accorded his professional title, and because 
of his genial and companionable nature is familiarly known to all the 
people around him as "Doc Bahel." The record of his life and career, 
which is necessarily given very briefly here, is full of incitement and 
stinuilus for joujig men who are struggling upward on the rugged road 
to success and prominence, and is cheering to those who have reached 
tlie eminence. 

The doctor was born at Chatham, Chester county, in that great hive 
of industrj', Pennsylvania, within whose borders almost every form of 
liunian endeavor is to be found, his life beginning there on April 10. 
1852. He is a son of William and Catherine (Burke) Bahel, the former 
horn in New Jersey and the latter in the city of Cork, Ireland, and 
both now deceased. They were the parents of four children, of whom 
the doctor was the first in the order of birth. 

The father moved from his native state to Pennsylvania in his 
young manhood, and soon afterward enlisted in the Union army to aid 
in defending the Union against dismemberment by force. He joined 
Company H of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, the famous 




_<"ii.:»-*i^ 



^:?^"^5^^^a.-^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 753 

"Bucktail Reserves" regiment, which carved its name high and deep 
on the tablets of our momentous and sanguinary Civil war. He was 
enrolled in Oil City, Pennsylvania, and served four full years with 
his regiment. 

In the spring of 1867 he moved his family to Michigan and located 
in Lapeer county near the town of the same name. His hopes of ad- 
vancement in this state, which then held oiit high promise to all comers 
with industry, frugality and patience in their make-up and habits, were 
doomed to disappointment. Soon after their arrival in the state both 
he and his wife died and left their offspring to the cold charity of the 
world and the care of strangers or their own resources. The doctor at 
that time was about sixteen years of age. 

He had obtained a limited education in the district schools of his 
native state, and being of a resolute and self-reliant nature, entered 
with alacrity and a determination to succeed on the work of providing 
for himself. Willing to do anything that would furnish him subsistence, 
he worked at day labor in the construction of the Detroit & Bay City 
Railroad, and later learned the barber trade. While working at this 
he began the task of preparing himself for a more exalted position and 
career. Studying industriously along several lines of knowledge, chem- 
istry and drugs engaged his attention particularly, and he decided to 
devote himself to acquiring a thorough knowledge of them as far as his 
circumstances would allow. 

After a due course of study and preparation he passed a successful 
examination before the state board of pharmacists, and in 1884 opened 
a drug store at Otsego Lake. He remained there until 1893, wlien he 
moved to Gaylord in the same county. In that city he opened a liiuch 
more pretentious drug store, with a stock of goods worth ten thousand 
dollars, and built himself a comfortable dwelling. Soon afterward, 
however, he was accidentally shot in the hip by the discharge of a rifle 
in the hands of a careless person. This accident confined him to liis lied 
for a year and a half, and during that period almost all his worldly 
possessions melted away. 

After partially regaining his health and recovering two thousand 
dollars from the man who had injured him and crippled him for life, 
he went to Vienna, Montmorency county, and began the practice of 
medicine, having previously been granted a diploma by the Physiolog- 
ical College of Medicine of Chicago. Sometime later he sold his resi- 
dence in Gaylord and located at Fargo, St. Clair county, where he con- 
ducted a drug store and practiced medicine with promise of pronoimced 
success until he decided to change his base of operations to Onaway, 
which he did on July 5, 1898. 

When he left Fargo for Onaway he had a horse and buggy and three 
dollars in money. When he arrived in Onaway he had only money 
enough left to pay for one night's lodging and one meal. As the result 
of his diligence, thrift and frugality he now owns considerable prop- 
erty of yalue, including his attractive home on State street and the 
building in which his drug store is located, and has been since he started 
the business in December, 1901. In addition he owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of stumpage land in Cass township which he purchased in 



754 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

1906. The land is near Onaway and is improved with a good house 
and a fine barn with other necessary outbuildings. He has forty acres 
of this land cleared and maintains on it two span of work horses, one 
driving team, sixteen head of cattle, fifteen of sheep and eight of hogs. 
In 1910 lie raised over six hundred dollars worth of produce oft" of this 
forty acres, and as his farming is progressive, he has reason to expect 
better results and larger returns each succeeding year. 

Dr. Bahel has taken a decidedly active part in the public life of 
Onaway ever since he became a resident of the city. He was a member 
of the city council for a number of years and served on the school board 
during the last four. He was mayor one term, and during his tenure 
of the office the city hall was built, the cornerstone being laid by him. 
He also helped to lay out the streets of the city, and aided in giving its 
progress impetus and trend in many other ways. 

He has long been active in the fraternal life of the community as 
a Freemason, a Knight of the Maccabees and a member of the Order of 
Elks. He was made a Master Mason in Gaylord Lodge, but dimitted 
from it in order to become a charter member of Onaway Lodge No. -125. 
In the Order of Elks he belongs to Cheboygan Lodge No. 504. Al- 
though he is not now actively engaged in the practice of medicine, he 
has kept up with the advances in the profession and gratified his desire 
for special knowledge in connection with it by continued study. He 
also pursued a course of special study in the American Optical College 
in Detroit, from which he was graduated on March 9. 1905. He became 
a member of the State Optical Association on July -1, 1908, and has ever 
since been a leading factor in its meetings, its work and its social 
functions. 

On October 17, 1875, the doctor was united in marriage with Miss 
Catherine J. Fusee, a native of Canada. Three children, all daughters, 
have blessed their union and brightened their family circle: Mabel 
Blanch, now the widow of the late Judson Dean; Grace Ethel, and 
Veva Ruth Adelia. It is seen from the above narrative that Dr. Bahel 
has had his full share of vicissitudes in life and been severely tried by 
succeeding di-sasters. But he has triumphed over every obstacle, over- 
come every difficulty and borne with patience every trial. He has also 
at all times kept his nerve and maintained his constancy of purpose. 
These facts, together with his sunny nature, high character and ser- 
viceable citizenshp have won him the universal esteem of the people 
of Onaway and Presque Isle county. 

Marius Han^^on.— a man of good executive and financial ability, 
Marius Hanson is widely known as proprietor of the Bank of Grayling, 
which he established in 1900, and has since suci-essfully managed, mak- 
ing it one of the leading institutions of its kind. He later acquired the 
Crawford County Exchange, which was established in 1897, of which his 
brother. Helger Hanson, is assistant cashier. He was born in 18(59, in 
Manistee, Michigan, of substantial Danish ancestry. 

His parents, John K. and TMary Hanson, emigrated from Denmark, 
their native country, to the United States, locating first in Manistee, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 755 

.Miehigau, but settling in 1879, in Crawford county, where the father 
had extensive lumber interests. 

Marius Hanson was bred and educated in Crawford county, which 
has been his home since his boyhood days. During his earlier career, 
he was identified with the lumber industry of Michigan, but for ten 
years or more has devoted his time to the management of the Bank of 
Grayling, and to his other financial interests. As a loyal and patriotic 
citizen, Mr. Hanson has never shirked the duties of public office, but 
has served the village in vai-ious capacities. A prominent and influen- 
tial member of the Republican party, he has served as chairman of the 
Republican County Committee, and held other offices of distinction. 
He married Mary Maud Parson of Grayling, Michigan, a daughter of 
Auer Parson, and they have one daughter, Lueile, who attends school. 

Church op the Guardian Angels. — In view of the fact that civil- 
ization was ushered into so much of northern Michigan by the noble and 
self-abnegating missionaries of the Catholic church, whose emissaries 
thus penetrated the wilds of a veritable terra incognita and brought to 
the benighted Indians the message of the divine Master, it is gratifying 
to note with the passing of years the great mother church has main- 
tained a strong hold in this section of the state and that its benignant 
activities have been in charge of those instant in consecrated zeal and de- 
votion. One of the most noteworthy parishes of the church in the entire 
upper section of the Wolverine state is that of the Church of the 
Guardian Angels, in the city of Manistee, and its sublime title has been 
duly justified by the character of the woi-k accomplished. A review of 
the history of this church by Father Grimme appeared after his death 
in pamphlet form and the appreciative estimate is worthy of repro- 
duction in this volume, on which score the entii-e article is here given 
place \nth but slight paraphrase and with certain supplementary data. 

"The original settlement of the white man in this part of the 
country took place some forty years ago. People of various nationalities 
and creeds came here in quest of work and wealth, gradually forming 
a community and ushering in business enterprise. Catholics, as usual, 
were among the pioneers, and as such shared the weal and woe of pioneer 
life. 

"This region at that period was not veiy inviting for comfort and 
pleasure ; still where wants are few, contentment is easily obtained. All 
luxuries and many conveniences had to be foregone; nevertheless the 
early settler, in his simple tastes and frugal habits, was not without real 
genuine enjoyments to smooth the rough edges of his hardy life, into 
which he entered with a zest and pleasure unknown to the youth of 
the present day. 

"As in other respects, so also in a religious point of view everyone 
had to do the best he could under the circumstances. 

"There were no churches, no regular public divine churches. 

"Occasionally 'religious meetings' would be held in Mr. Fay's hotel, 
in ]\Irs. Hogan's hotel and in ^Ir. 'Neil's house. Priests were then 
few and far between. At intervals a priest woiild come from across 
Lake ^Michigan, as Father Tucker and some Jesuit Fathers ; sometimes 



756 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

also the Indian Missionaries, Fathers Ignatius Mrack (afterwards 
Bishop) and P. S. Zorn (now c-liaplain at Mercy Hospital, Big Rapids, 
Michigan) came down from Traverse, along the shore in oanoes or 
worked their way through the woods, frequently on foot, occasionally on 
horse-back. A few times, later on, the place was visited by priests from 
Grand Rapids and Muskegon, amongst them the Rev. James Puleher, 
now pastor of St. James' church. Grand Rapids. He was the first priest 
who said mass in the little frame church on the north side. 

"Finally in August of the year 1868, the Rt. Rev. Bishop Borgess 
sent Father H. I\Ieutt'els as resident pastor of Manistee and missions. 
A small frame church had been built in the first ward before Father 
Meuffels located here. The site for this church, a plot of five acres. 
had been donated for the purpose bv Mr. William T. Thorpe in July, 
1862. 

"The Catholics who were living on the south side of the river in order 
to get to church were obliged to cross the water in canoes, there being 
no bridge at that time. Later on a so-called ferry boat took them 
across for a 'fare.' and thus the boatman and the priest di^^ded be- 
tween themselves the 'cliange' of the church-going people. 

"After a few years the Catholics procured a beautiful site on the 
southeast corner of Maple and Third streets and arrangements were 
immediately made to erect a church building thereon. Stones for the 
foundation were bought and hauled to the grounds, and every indica- 
tion pointed to the speedy erection of a new church. Just then a ter- 
rible conflagration swept the rising, prosperous city of Manistee, the 
same memorable night that Chicago was visited with a like affliction. 
Dwelling houses, stores and mills were doomed, and many families left 
homeless and penniless to meet the rigors of approaching winter. 

"To help others (more needy perhaps) Father Meuffels gave or sold 
the stones intended for a church to a mill-owner to help him rebuild 
his mill. Thus for the time being ended the project of erecting the in- 
tended church. 

"Father Meuifels was succeeded by Father M. Willigan, who came 
here in June, 1873. He had nothing wherewith to begin his labors ex- 
cept the aforementioned lots. He was however not long in gathering 
the means to build a church. He worl?ed hard and the people nobly 
seconded his efforts. He canvassed the houses, the mills, the woods 
and thus succeeded in building the neat and substantial brick building, 
on the corner of Third and Sycamore streets, which serves both for 
church and school, and is kno^vn as St. Mary's church. 

"Owing to Father Willigan 's energy and perseverance a house for 
the Sisters, whom he called to teach the parochial school, was also 
erected, likewise the parochial residence, and the little house now oc- 
cupied by William J. Kennealy and wife, which was intended for the 
pastor's office. He also bought forty acres of land just south of the 
city limits, ten acres of which he stumped and laid out for a cemetery, 
known as the Mount Carmel Cemetery. 

"Father Willigan was succeeded by the Rev. D. Callaert, in Septem- 
ber, 1881, Father Callaert was also a zealous worker. His principal work 
consisted in remodeling the buildings erected by his predece.ssoi- and in 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 757 

improviDg and beautifying the grounds. He also sold the five-aere plat 
donated by Mr. Thorpe for church purposes, realizing the sum of eight 
hundred dollars therefrom. 

"One notable feature of his work was the starting of a temperance 
society, which prospered for a time and did, no doubt, a considerable 
good. 

"The Catholic congregation had now grown to such proportions 
that St. Mary's church could not nearly accommodate all who came to 
worship. As the Polish people at this time constituted the majority of 
the congregation, and were especially anxious to be by themselves, the 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Richter permitted them to build a church for their 
exclusive use. How earnestly and successfully they worked for the 
cause of religion is evidenced by the "magnificent church and school 
property which they how pos.sess and the prosperous condition and 
unity of their large congregation. 

"Again, after a few years, St. Mary's congregation had outgrown 
the capacity of the chui'ch, and after repeated urgent requests made by 
Father D. Callaert. the Rt. Rev. Bishop finally granted another separa- 
tion. The meeting of the two sets of delegates, appointed according to 
previous notices given by Rev. D. Callaert, was held at the pastoral 
residence on Tuesday, Januai-y 2'4, 1888, for the purpose of taking into 
consideration the division of the whole property of St. Mary's church, 
in order to form two separate congregations, as directed by the Rt. Rev. 
Bishop of Grand Rapids. The papers formally dividing the congrega- 
tion were made out and signed by the committees appointed for the 
purpose and submitted to the Rt. Rev. Bishop for his approval. 

"By the terms of the articles of separation, the French portion 
of the congregation, were to retain all of the church property, to Ijc 
known as St. ^lai-y's church property, and to pay to their departing 
brethren, in lieu of their claim on said property, the .sum of seven 
thousand dollars ($7,000). The English and German speaking Cath- 
olics were to have the right to use the old church, etc.. until the new 
church should be finished. 

"Father Callaert. in view of failing health, thercui)on resigned and 
left for his native land, Belgium, where he is now recrxiiting his health 
and resting from his arduous labors in ^Manistee and elsewhere. 

"The Sisters of St. PVaneis, of ]\Ianitowoc, "Wisconsin, who had been 
teaching St. Mary's .school from the time of its organization, also re- 
signed and left a month later, the end of :\lay. In their place the Sisters 
of ^lercy. of Big Rapids. ^liehigan. took charge of the school the fol- 
lowing fall. 

"The marked progress of the children, notwithstanding unfavorable 
circumstances, gives evident proof of their efficiency and success as 
teachers. 

"Father T. J. Hudon, of Alpena, Michigan, had been appointed pas- 
tor of the French congregation in the beginning of the year 1888. He 
went to work with a will to collect and otherwise raise the $7,000 which 
the congregation owed. That he worked is proven by the fact that the 
last remnant of the amount was paid over December 22. 1890. the day 
after the new church was dedicated. Rev. W. W. Grimiiie. of Bijr 



758 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Rapids, Michigan, was sent to take charge of the out-going portion of 
St. Mary's Congregation. 

"A good site of more than one acre, for church buildings, was soon 
secured at a cost of three thousand dollars, ($3,000) on Fifth street, end 
of Sycamore. 

"Father Grimme entered his new field of labor May 1st, 1888. He 
had a prospective $7,000 and the good will of his people with which 
to begin his work. As the time for log and frame churches had had its 
day, and thinking that if the people could possibl.y afford it the House 
of God should be the grandest house in a community, with the advice of 
his zealous and noble-hearted people, he resolved to build a solid brick 
church: One worthy, in a manner, of God and the cause the church 
espouses. 

"The corner stone of this building was laid September 2, 1890. and 
the church was blessed under the name and protection of the Guardian 
Angels, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop H. J. Richter, of Grand Rapids, on 
December 21, 1890. Immediately after the blessing, the ehui-ch was 
formally opened by a solemn high mass celebrated by the pastor, Rev. 
H. W. Grimme, assisted by Rev. Edward Kozlowski. of St. Joseph's 
church, as Deacon, and Rev. Joseph T. Hudon, of St. Mary's church, as 
Sub-deacon. The Rt. Rev. Bishop preached a very beautiful and in- 
structive sermon on the occasion. In the afternoon, during solemn ves- 
pers, the peal of three new bells donated by Mrs. B. Hogan, of Fond du 
lac, Wisconsin, formerly of Jlanistee, was blessed by the Rt. Rev. Bishop. 
They pealed forth their harmonious tones for the first time on Christ- 
mas morning, at four-thirty o'clock. The inscription on the largest of 
the bells reads: 'Donated by Mrs. B. Hogan in memory of her son, 
Francis J. Finan, who died August 23, 1876, aged twenty-four years.' 
By request of Mrs. Hogan. who could not be present, her daughter, 
Mrs. T. Wing, of Manistee, Mr. Thomas Kenny and Father Grimme, 
acted as sponsors at the blessing of the bells. The bells were named 
'Francis,' ' JIargaret, ' and 'Mary,' respectively. 

' ' Thus after noble efforts and heroic sacrifices the church is now com- 
pleted and paid for. It is a lasting monument to the piety, zeal and 
generosity of the members of the church of the Guardian Angels. ' All 
to the greater honor and glory of God, and to the salvation of souls." 

Before the above splendidly written and interesting history of the 
Guardian Angels church could be published the great and noble soul of 
Father Grimme was summoned to eternal rest, his spirit having passed 
to the great beyond on the eve of Thanksgiving, November 25, 1891. 
His death was uniformly mourned throughout IManistee and this entire 
section of northern Michigan, where his efforts had been prolific of such 
far-reaching results. After the demise of Father Grimme, Rev. J. T. 
Hudon attended the church of the Guardian Angels until the appoint- 
ment of the present pastor. Rev. J. M. Steffes, September 1. 1892. 
Father Steffes is the present able incumbent of the pastorate of the 
Guardian Angels church and he is particularly well fitted liy innate 
abilitj' and training to succeed Father Grimme. 

Since the coming of Father Steffes important additions and im- 
provements have been made upon the church pi-oporty. Two now altars 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 759 

and the beautiful statuary that adorns the interior of the edifice have 
been purchased and the present commodious school-building erected. 
The value of the property belonging to the church of the Guardian An- 
gels is estimated at one hundred thousand dollars. The present mem- 
bership of the church consists of two hundred families, or about eight 
hundred souls. The Catholic Mutual Benefit Association is one of the 
leading societies of the congregation and it was organized by Father 
Grimme in 1889. The Ancient Order of Hibernians, organized March 
13, 1898, has an extensive membership, as do also the Catholic Knights 
and Ladies of America and the Ladies Auxiliary. Another addition to 
the church is the beautiful five thousand dollar organ installed, in 1911, 
by James Dempsey and family, in memory of the cherished wife and 
devoted mother, Mi'S. ]\Iary F. Dempsey. On the 20th of September. 
1909, Carrie Filer donated to this church a beautiful chime of twelve 
bells, which were installed in April, 1910. The following names are 
surmounted by a neat cro.ss on each of the bells, — Caroline, Thomas. 
Pius, Henry Joseph, Mary, Gertrude, Philomena, Alphonsus, Caecilia, 
Aloysius, James and Anna. 

Mr. Patrick Nond donated the clock in church spire and the mag- 
nificent onyx candlesticks on the altar in memory of his son "Walter. 

Father SteflFes. although a young man, has shown evidence of rare 
ability and tact in the administration of the affairs of his large congre- 
gation, and by his kindly and sympathetic devotion to his pastoral 
duties has endeared himself to the people of his parish. In the com- 
munity at large Father Steffes is recognized as a man of rare scholarship 
and libei-al views, and also as a friend to all movements that make for 
the common good. 

Edvfard E. McKnigiit. M. D., who is engaged in the practice of his 
profession in the city of Alpena and who is one of the representative 
physicians and surgeons of this section of the .state, is a native of the 
Wolverine state and a scion one of its sterling pioneer families. He was 
born on a farm in Cascade township, Kent county, Jlichigan, on the 
1st of September. 1869, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Fitz- 
patrick) McKnight, the former of whom was born at Adair, in the 
county of Limerick, Ireland, in 1835, and the latter of whom was born 
in Queens county, Ireland. Thomas ]\IcKnight was a lad of seven 
years at the time of the family emigration to America, in 1844, and 
the long and weary voyage was made on a sailing vessel of the type 
connnon to that period. His father, James JMcKnight, came with his 
family to iliehigan soon after the arrival in the new world, and after 
remaining for a short time in Detroit he removed to Kent count.v, 
where he secured a tract of heavily timbered land and reclaimed a 
farm from the wilderness. He was one of the pioneers of that count.v. 
in which is situated (irand Rapids, the second city in the state in point 
of population and industrial importance, and he did well his part in 
the movement of material and social development and progress. Grand 
Rapids having been a mere village at the time when he establi-shed his 
home in Kent county, where both he and his wife passed the residue 



760 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

of their lives. Their names merit au enduring place on the roll of the 
honored pioneers of that county. 

Thomas ]McKnight was reared to maturity amidst the scenes, in- 
cidents and labors of the pioneer days in Kent county, and he lived 
up to the full tension of that epoch, his days from boyhood up having 
been filled with "ceaseless toil and endeavor." Like his honored father, 
he developed a farm from the forest and in due time he became one of 
the prosperous representatives of the agricultural interests of Kent 
county. He gained a competency through his well directed etforts and 
is now living retired in the village of Berlin, Ottawa county, this state. 
He is a Democrat in his political proclivities and is a zealous comnnxni- 
cant of the Catholic church, as was also his wife, who died in 1875, when 
her son Edward E., of this sketch, was but six years of age. Of the 
seven children six are still living and concerning, them the following 
brief data are given: John J. is a representative farmer of Kent 
county; Thomas, Jr., is likewise a prosperous agriculturist of the same 
county; William F. is a lawyer by profession and is engaged in practice 
in the city of Grand Rapids ; L. Frank is likewise a member of the bar 
of the city of Grand Rapids, where he is also engaged in the real- 
estate business; Dr. Edward E., of this review, was the next in order 
of birth ; and Charles A., who was graduated in the law department of 
the University of Michigan, is now a commercial traveling salesman, 
with residence at Chicago. 

Dr. Edward E. McKnight was reared to the sturdy discipline of the 
home farm and gained his preliminary educational discipline in the 
district schools, after which he continued his .studies in turn in the 
Grand Rapids high school and the normal school at Valparaiso, Indiana, 
now known as the Northern Indiana University. In this institution he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1887 and for the following 
two years he was a successful and popular teacher in the public schools 
of Michigan, his services in this profession having been given in Kent 
county. He was then matriculated in the medical department of the 
University of ^Michigan, in which he completed the prescribed four 
years' course and was graduated as a member of the class of 1894, 
in June of which year he received his well earned degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. He came forth well fortified for the work of his chosen and 
most exacting profession, and his novitiate in the same was served in 
the city of Grand Rapids, where he continued in active general prac- 
tice until 1897, when he removed to Alpena, which attractive little 
city has since been the scene of his earnest and successful labors as a 
physician and surgeon. He has built up a large and representative 
practice of general order and has kept in close touch with the advances 
made in both departments of his profession, to the best standard and 
periodical literature of which he has constant recourse. He served two 
terms as city health officer, and he is actively identified with the 
American Medical Association, the Michigan State Medical Society, 
and the Alpena County Medical Society. 

As a citizen Dr. McKiiight is essentially progressive and public- 
spirited, and there has been no dearth of evidence of his personal popu- 
larity ill his lidiiic city. In l!H)(i he was elected mayor of Ali)ena. and 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 761 

the best voucher for the efficiency and acceptability of his administra- 
tion was that given in his re-election as his own successor in 1908, so 
that he continued incumbent of the office of chief executive of the 
municipal government for four consecutive years. His regime was 
notable for its progressiveness and he kept himself thoroughly informed 
concerning the affairs of all departments of the municipal government, 
in which he instituted wise economic measures aud policies. Both he 
and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, in which they 
are zealous and valued members of the parish of St. Bernard's church, 
and in politics he has ever accorded an unequivocal allegiance to the 
Democratic party. 

On the 26th of June, 1900, was solemnized the mai-riage of Dr. 
McKnight to ^liss Elizabeth Potvin, who was born and reared in the 
city of Alpena and who is a daughter of Jules and Elizabeth (O'Neil) 
Potvin, both of whom are now deceased and of whose two children 
^Irs. WcKnight is the younger; her brother, Edward, is a resident of 
Memphis, Tennessee, where he is engaged in the hotel business. Jules 
Potvin was of French lineage and was born in the province of Quebec, 
Canada. He was one of the pioneers of Alpena, Michigan, and here 
erected the old Alpena House, a hotel which he successfully conducted 
for many years. He was a well known and highly esteemed citizen 
of this section of the state, was a Democrat in his political proclivities 
and both he and his wife were communicants of the Catholic church. 
Dr. and 'Sirs. McKnight have one son, Paul F., who was born on the 
18th of ilay, 1901. The attractive family home is a center of refined 
and cordial hospitality and both Dr. and ilrs. McKnight are popular 
factors in the best social activities of the community. 

John J. Saxton. — A strong and representative citizen of Farwell, 
John J. Saxton holds a place of prominence in business circles, being 
postmaster and undertaker, and is active in public affairs, and in 
fraterual organizations. A native of Lenawee county, Jlichigan, he 
was born in Tecumseh village in 1859, a son of John and Dorinda 
(, Daniels) Saxton, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania, while 
the latter claimed New York for her native state. 

Left fatherless at the age of five years, John J. Saxton was given 
.such educational advantages, only, as the village school aft'orded, and 
at the age of fourteen years began life as a wage-earner in the paper 
mills, where he continued working for about eight years. Desirous then 
of finding more remunerative emplo.yment, he prospected in different 
localities, finally becoming a clerk at a lunch counter at Toledo, Ohio. 
Soon resigning that business, Mv. Saxton became brakeman on the 
Lake Shore and ^Michigan Southern Railroad, but four months of that 
work proved sufficient for him, and he made a change of occupation, 
going to Ishpemiug, ^lichigan, as clerk in a hotel. Coming from there 
to Farwell, Clare county, in 1882, he accepted a position as clerk in a 
store, and when his employers transferred their stock and business to 
a place then called Jleredith, Slv. Saxton accompanied them, and 
remained with them two years. He then opened a barber shop at that 
place and followed that trade. After travelin£r a while Mr. Saxton 



762 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

returned to Farwell where he continued in that business for some time. 
In 1897 being appointed postmaster. In 1907 he entered the under- 
taking business and is now postmaster and undertaker. 

A zealous supporter of the principles of the Republican party, he 
has never shirked the responsibilities devolving upon him as a public- 
spirited, faithful citizen, but has served in various offices, having been 
village clerk, village trustee, and for many terms a school trustee. He 
is an active member of the Farwell Improvement Society, and belongs 
to the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, and to the Knights 
of the ^Maccabees. In his religious beliefs he is liberal, and attends 
the Congregational church. 

Mr. Saxton has been twice married. He married first, in 1888, Alice 
Foster, who was born in England, and came to this country alone, join- 
ing an aunt Avho was living in Farwell. She passed to the higher life 
in 1900, having borne him five children, three of whom died in infancy, 
while two are living, namely : Ethel Gertrude, a student at the Mount 
Pleasant Normal School; and Percy Webster, attending the Mount 
Pleasant High School. "When at home both of these children assist 
their father in the postofSce, serving as deputy postmasters. J\Ir. Saxton 
married second, in 1901, ]\Irs. Adella Hammond, nee Barrett. 

Philip E. Bailey. — Mason county is signally favored in the person- 
nel of her corps of officials, and one of the most efficient and popular 
members of the same is Mr. Bailey, who is incumbent of the position of 
county clerk and who is one of the best known citizens of Ludington. 
He has been a resident of Michigan from the time of his birth aud is a 
scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of this state, while his 
course has been such as to uphold the prestige of the name which he 
beai-s and to make him a valued factor in the world's great army of 
workers. 

Philip E. Bailey was born in Walker township, Kent county, Mich- 
igan, on the 7th of December, 1853, and is a son of Alexander C. and 
Acenath (Matthews) Bailey, the former of whom was born in Weathers- 
field, Connecticut, a scion of a family founded in New England in the 
colonial days, and the latter was a native of the province of Ontario, 
Canada. Alexander C. Bailey was reared to maturity in his native 
state and as a youth of nineteen years he came to ]\Iichigan aud num- 
bered himself eventually among the pioneers of Kent county, where 
he developed a farm and also followed the work of his trade, that of 
blacksmith. He there continued to reside until his death, which oc- 
curred when he was forty-six years of age, aud his devoted wife was 
forty-five years of age at the time she was summoned to the life eternal. 
They became the parents of two sons and two daughters, all of whom 
attained to years of maturity, and of the number Philip E. is the young- 
est. The other son, George L., is one of the representative farmers of 
Walker township, Kent county. 

The future clerk of Mason county was reared under the invigorating 
influences of the homestead farm and thus early learned the lessons and 
value of practical industry. When but twelve years of age, however, 
ho began a more or less independent career, securing employment at 



^■i\^ 




C^-^^^z^ 




HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 763 

such work as was available and within the compass of his ability and 
strength, and in the meanwhile availing himself of the advantages, of 
the common schools, which he attended at somewhat irregular intervals. 
He found employment in the great lumber mills in the city of Grand 
Rapids, the metropolis and judicial center of his native county, and 
tinally became foreman in a shingle mill, in Montcalm county. There- 
after he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits in Kent county 
for a period of about five years. 

In April, 1886, Mr. Bailey removed from Kent county to ilasou 
county and secured a tract of unimproved land in Eden township. He 
gave himself vigorously to the development of this farm and eventually 
brought the same under effective cultivation, besides which he made 
other excellent improvements of a permanent order. He continued to 
give his attention to the management of his farm until elected to his 
present office. On January 2, 1901, he established his residence in the 
city of Ludington, where he has since maintained his home. 

In politics Mr. Bailey has ever been found arrayed as a staunch sup- 
porter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party 
stands sponsor, and he has given yeoman service as a worker in its 
local ranks. In the autumn of 1900 he was elected county clerk of 
Mason county, and the best voucher for the efficiency and acceptability 
of his administration of this important office is that given by the fact 
that he has since continued incumbent of this position, in which he is 
now serving his sixth consecutive term, which will expire January 1, 
1913, the while he is assured of re-election so long as he consents to 
appear as candidate on the ticket of his party. He is affiliated with the 
Ludington lodges of the Knights of Pythias and Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, as well as with St. Marys Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 

On Febru.ar.v 6, 1878, Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss 
Josephine Major, whose father, Charles B. Major, was one of the pio- 
neers and representative citizens of Eden township, Mason comity, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bailey have six children, namely: Claude B., Burt A., Harrv 
M., George A., William H. and Philip F. 

G. Arthur Holliday, il. D. — The section of Michigan to which this 
publication is devoted has its full quota of able and successful repre- 
sentatives of the medical profession, and prominent among the number 
is Dr. Holliday, who is engaged in practice in Traverse City, where he 
has built up a large and prosperous professional business. 

On the homestead farm of his father, in Ontario coiinty, Canada, 
Dr. Holliday was ushered into the world on the 26th of June, 1867. 
He is a son of Jack.son and Jane (Hall) Holliday, the former of whom 
was born in England, in 1818, and the latter of whom was born in the 
state of Vermont, in 1830, a representative of an old and honored New 
England family. The father passed away in 1874 and the mother in 
1876, and of the ten children six are living. Dr. Holliday having been 
the ninth in order of birth. Jackson Holliday was reared and educated 
in his native land and at the age of nineteen years he came to America 
and located in Ontario county, province of Ontario, Canada, where he 
seciired a tract of hcavilv timbered land and reclaimed a farm from 



764 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the wilderness. He became specially successful and prominent as a 
breeder of higligrade horses and cattle and was one of the influential 
and highly esteemed citizens of Ontario county, where both he and his 
wife continued to reside imtil their death. Both were earnest and 
zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. HoUiday is indebted to the public schools of his native province 
for his earl}' educational discipline, which was supplemented by a course 
in tile University of Michigan. In preparation for the work of his 
chosen jjrofession he entered Detroit College of ^Medicine, in which he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1904 and from which he 
received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. In 1886 he established his 
liome in Traverse City, which has always been his home except the five 
years spent in college. He has gained much through his active identi- 
fication with various professional organizations, including the Grand 
Traverse County ^ledical Society, and the Michigan State Medical 
Society. In 1907 he was appointed health officer of Traverse City, and 
he retained this incumbency for three successive years, during which 
he gave a most discriminating and effective service. The doctor is 
affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free and Accepted ;\Iasons; 
and Traverse City Lodge. No. 73, Ivnights of Pythias. While essentially 
i)i-o.uressiv(' and public-spirited in his attitude he is independent in 
politics and gives his support to the men and measures meeting the 
approval of his judgment. Both he and his wife are active and devoted 
members of the Fir.st Methodist Episcopal church of Traverse City and 
he is a member of its l)oard of stewards. He has so ordered his course 
as to retain the inviolable confidence and good will of his professional 
confreres and the high regard of the community in which he has main- 
tained his home for a quarter of a century. 

On the 3d of December, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Ilolliday to Miss Jenifer F. Cook, who was born and reared in Traverse 
City and who is a daughter of John and Esther (Rewe) Cook, both of 
whom were born in England. They are now both deceased. Mr. Cook 
was numbered among the sterling pioneers of Traverse City, where he 
was long identified with the extensive lumbering operation of the firm 
of Hannah, Lay & Company. Of the seven children Mrs. Holliday was 
the fourth in order of birth, and of the others one son and one daughter 
are living. Dr. and Mrs. Holliday have three children. — Harry A., 
Margaret and Dorothy. 

Edwin I. Ferguson, proprietor of the New Emmet Hotel and Annex 
and a prominent factor in business and political circles at Harbor 
Springs, Michigan, is a representative citizen and a man who not only 
has achieved his individual success b\it has also public-spiritedly de- 
voted himself to the general welfare of his fellow men, and has been 
foremost in advancing enterprises and improvements which will prove 
of lasting benefit to the city, county and state. He is, furthermore, a 
self-made man, having earned his own livelihood from early youth. 
From the first he was possessed of ambition and determination and his 
energy, courage and business .judgment have brought him to a position 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 765 

of esteem and influence among the citizens of this state, where he is a 
man of mark in all the relations of life. 

A native of ^lichigan, Edwin I. Ferguson was born at Paw Paw, in 
Van Buren county, the date of his birth being the 7th of June, 1855. 
He is a son of Philo N. and JIary (Irving) Ferguson, the former of 
whom was born at Oswego, New Yorli, and the latter of whom was a 
native of the Dominion of Canada. The father was summoned to the 
life eternal in 1893, at the age of sixty-two yeai-s, and the mother 
attained to the age of seventy-four years, her demise having occurred 
in 1904. Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Philo N. Ferguson 
but three are living at the present time, namely, — Henry S., who is now 
residing at Elmhurst, California ; Edwin I., the immediate subject of 
this review; and Ella, who is the wife of David Tilliston, of Charlevoix. 
Michigan. Philo N. Ferguson was a millwright by trade and he came 
to ^Michigan from New York, in the year 1854, locating at Paw Paw, 
in the vicinity of which place he erected a number of mills. Subse- 
quently he engaged in farming near Lawton and eventually he located 
in Ionia county, Michigan, removing thence to Pleasantview township, 
Emmet county, Michigan, in 1875. In the latter place he established 
the family home on a farm at Forrest Beach near Harbor Springs and 
there he was identified with the great basic industry of agriculture 
during the residue of his life. He was very prominent in Odd Fellow 
circles, having installed the first lodges of that organization at Cadillac, 
Mackinaw City and other places. In politics he was aligned as a stanch 
supporter of the principles and policies promulgated by the Republican 
party. 

Edwin I. Ferguson was reared to the invigorating influences of the 
old homestead farm and he received his preliminary educational train- 
ing in the public schools of Ionia county, Jlichigan. He Avas associated 
with his father in the work and management of the old homestead 
until he had reached his twentieth year. In 1875 he came to what 
was then known as Little Traverse but which is now called Harbor 
Springs. Here he entered the employ of the general merchandise firm 
of Hai-twell & Felter, continuing to Avork in the store of that concern 
for a period of two and a half years, at the expiration of which he 
located on a homestead in Pleasantview township, Emmet county, 
Michigan. For the ensuing five years he was actively engaged in 
clearing his farm and in the spring of 1881 he came to Little Traverse, 
where he turned his attention to the dray and express business. With 
the latter line of enterprise he continued to be identified up to 1898, 
at which time he engaged in the hotel business, continuing to devote 
his entire time and attention to that work during the intervening years 
to the present time, in 1911. 

The New Emmet Hotel and Annex, the splendid hostlery of which 
Mr. Ferguson is proprietor, holds distinctive prestige as one of the 
finest hotels in northern ^Michigan. The following statements, taken 
from an illustrated booklet gotten out about the hotel is a good sum- 
mary of its attractions. "Closely nestled, the green hills of Emmet to 
the north, and the cool, sparkling waters of Little Travei-se Bay to the 
south, lies Harbor Springs, in the heart of the northern Jlichigan resort 



766 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

country. A beautiful little city of two thousand five hundred popula- 
tion, it is the center of supplies for all north shore resorts, and the 
rendezvous for thousands of visitors during the summer months. It 
has many conveniences and advantages of larger cities, and its harbor 
is the best and safest on the Great Lakes. It is one of the oldest places 
in ^lichigan, and, aside from its picturesque location and famous 
springs, is full of historic interest. It was here that the famous mis- 
sionary, Pere ilarquette, erected the first mission church in this region 
and labored among the Indians." The hotel is complete in all its 
appointments, the rooms being large, light and airy. It is heated by 
steam and lighted by electricity and the pumbing throughout the house 
is constructed on the most sanitary principles. A special feature of 
this well equipped hotel is its dining-room, in which all the tables 
command an extensive view of the water. The table is excellent and 
everything possible is done to increase the comfort of the guests. By 
way of amusement there is dancing, sailing, rowing, bathing and 
golfing. ]\lany trips of exceptional interest are open to the guests, 
the same including a visit to the Indian village at Ya-way-ga-mug, 
where may be seen members of the Ojibwaj^, Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians in a vivid production of Longfellow's "Hiawatha." The 
climate is ideally cool and balmy; there is no hay-fever in this region 
and the nights are ju.st right for restful sleep. 

In jiolitics Mr. Ferguson accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause 
of the Repulilican party, in the local councils of which he has figured 
most prominently. He was the first marshal of the village of Little 
Traverse and in the early days also served as the first street commis- 
sioner. For some thirty years he has resided in this city and it may 
be said without fear of contradiction that no man in Harbor Springs 
commands a higher place in the confidence and esteem of his fellow 
citizens than does he. As "mine host" he is kindly and genial, his 
reminiscent mind being filled with anecdotes from the eai'ly pioneer 
days, when this section was mostly virgin wilderness and occupied 
largely by Indians. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with a number 
of representative organizations and in religious matters he and his 
family are devout members of the Presbyterian church. 

On the 22d of June, 1878, Mr. Ferguson was united in marriage to 
]\Iiss Hannah L. Barber, whose birth occurred in Livingston county, 
^Michigan, and who is a daughter of Samuel L. and Elizabeth (Field) 
Barber, Itoth natives of the state of New York. Mr. Barber came to 
^ricbigan overland at an early date, having driven hither from New 
York in an ox-cart. He located in Livingston county and there literally 
hewed a farm out of the wilderness. The nearest milling point in those 
days was Detroit. In 1876 the Barber family removed to Emmet 
county, settling on a farm near Harbor Springs. In his political con- 
victions Mr. Barber was originally a Whig but after the organization 
of the Republican party he transferred his allegiance to its principles 
and policies. Mr. and Mrs. Barber were the parents of four children, 
of whom Mrs. L. Ferguson was the second in order of birth. ]\Ir. and 
]\lrs. Ferguson have two children, — Orval S., who married Alta Boston, 
and now resides at Harbor Springs, where he has been freight agent for 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 767 

the railroad for the past fourteen years ; and Mae, who is the wife of 
DeWitt D. Porter, of Harbor Springs. ]\Ir. Porter is connected with 
Mr. Ferguson in the new Emmet Hotel. 

John F. Kelly, ^I. D., of Manistee, Michigan, is a rising j'oung 
physician and surgeon whose talents and disposition insure him suc- 
cess and an enviable reputation. Engaged in the noblest of callings, 
in which more personal sacrifice is involved than in any other vocation 
in the world, he has launched out for a life of hard work, for both 
body and mind, and he faces the issue with entire willingness and 
energy. 

This progressive and up-to-date representative of the calling to 
which he has already proved an ornament, is a native of ^Michigan, his 
birth having occurred at Maple Valley, this state, January 16, 1876. 
As his name indicates he is of Irish and Scotch descent. His father, 
whose name was Thomas Kelly, is a native of Canada, having been born 
near Prescott, Ontario, one of his parents being Scotch, and the mother 
of Dr. Kelly, whose maiden name was Martha McCord, was also born 
near Prescott, Ontario. The father, whose occupation was that of a saw 
filer, removed to Big Rapids, Mecosta county, in 1882. 

It was in the town mentioned that the early years of Mr. Kelly 
were passed and for his preliminary education he is indebted to the 
public schools of the place, his graduation from the higher department 
occurring in 1897. He also completed the course presented by the 
Ferris Institute of his native town and, in the meantime having come 
to the conclusion to adopt as his own the medical profession, he matricu- 
lated at the Detroit College of Medicine, finishing there in due time, 
previously spending two years at the Mercy Hospital at Big Rapids. 
Thus excellently prepared for the profession he was to follow he first 
hung out his shingle at Applegate, Sanilac county, in the year 1907. 
In March, 1909, he removed to Sutton's Bay, but his residence there 
was of a transient character and his identification with the many-sided 
life of JManistee dates from 1910. He opened an office and in the short 
time that he has made this the scene of his enlightened activities he 
has built up a large practice and has gained prestige in professional 
circles. He is a member of the County, State and American JMedical 
Associations and of Kappa chapter of Phi Beta Pi. In his political 
convictions he has Republican leanings, but he is too broad-minded 
to esteem mere partisanship above the best man and the best measure, 
irrespective of party lines. 

On September 24, 1910, Dr. Kelly forsook the ranks of the bachelors 
and was united in marriage to Miss Mayme Noud, daughter of Patrick 
Noud, their union being celebrated at Manistee, Michigan, in the 
Guardian Angels church. 

Daniel W. Goodenough. — One of the representative business men 
of the city of Ludington is Daniel Webster Goodenough, who has here 
maintained his home for nearly forty years and who has contributed 
his quota to the civic and industrial development of his home city and 
county. He ma.y well be designated as one of the pioneers of Mason 



768 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

county, even as he is a scion o£ a family whose name has been identified 
with tlie annals of Michigan history for more than sixty years. The 
lineage of the Goodenough family is traced back to English origin and 
tlu- first representatives in America settled in New England in the Co- 
lonial epoch. 

Daniel W. Goodenough reverts to the old Empire state of the Union 
as the place of his nativity, though he has been a resident of Michigan 
since his chiklliood days. He was born in Cattaraugus county, New 
York, on the 16th of March. 1842, and is a son of David Washington 
Goodenough, who likewise was a native of the state of New York, where 
he was reared and educated and where he continued to ))e identified 
with agricultural pursuits until 1849, when he removed with his family 
to Michigan and settled in Lawrence township. Van Buren county, but 
he died on the 1st of May of the following .year. He was a man of ster- 
ling character and strong individuality, and in his younger days he 
had been a successful teacher in the common schools of his native state. 
His father, David Goodenough, was born in Vermont and passed the 
closing years of his life in Cattaraugus county. New York, where he 
settled in an early day. Mrs. Laura (Try on) Goodenough, mother of 
the subject of this review, was born in the province of New Brunswick, 
Canada, and she passed the closing years of her life at Lawrence, Mich- 
igan, where she died in 1890, at the venerable age of seventy-eight years. 
Of the four children Daniel W. was the third in order of birth and the 
only son : of the three daughters only one is now living, Darliska, who 
is the wife of Hanable M. Marshall, of Ludington. 

He whose name initiates this review was a lad of seven years at the 
time of the family removal from New York to Van Buren county, Mich- 
igan, where he was reared to adult age under the sturdy discipline of 
the farm and where his educational advantages were those afforded in 
the common schools of the localitv and period. He early initiated his 
business career, as it became incumbent upon him to aid his widowed 
motlier as well as to provide for his own needs. Thus he secured em- 
ployment in a general store at Lawrence, Van Buren county, wlien he 
was Imt thirteen years of age, and he continued to be employed as a 
clerk in mercantile establishments of this order for a period of about 
ten years, at the expiration of which, when twenty -three years of age, 
he brought his experience and limited financial resources into play by 
engaging in the same line of enterprise on his own responsibility in the 
village of Hartford, Van Buren county, where he conducted a general 
store about seven years. He was energetic, careful and enterprising, 
and this fact, as couplied with his fair and honorable methods, gained 
to him definite success in his business operations. At the expiration of 
tbe period noted, in 1872, he disposed of his interests at Hartford and 
came to Mason county, where he ha.s maintained his home during the 
long intervening years, within which he has witnessed and aided in the 
development of this section from virtually the primitive wilds to one 
of tlie attractive and opulent organic divisions of the fine old Wolverine 
state. He engaged forthwith in the general merchandise business in 
Ludington. which was then a mere village, and after continuing this 
enterprise about four .\cars liis establishment was destroyed by fire. He 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 769 

then turned his attention to the lumbering industry, with whit-h he 
continued to be actively and suceessl'ully identified for many years and 
with which he is still connected to a limited extent. His operations in 
this line reached large proportions and were continued actively until 
about 1890. He is the owner of valuable farm property in Mason 
county, as well as of the old Olney homestead farm in Van Buren 
county, and he gives a general supervision to these properties, the while 
he has been manager and one of the principle .stockholders of the Lud- 
ington Milling Company since 1890. This corporation owns a large 
and well equipped flour mill, the mechanical facilities and other acces- 
sories of which are of the best modern type. Mr. Goodenough has 
directed his business operations with much circumspection and judg- 
ment, and through his association with normal lines of industrial and 
business enterprise he has gained a substantial fortune. In addition to 
his other interests he has for some time given attention to the extending 
of financial loans on approved real-estate security. 

Every measure and undertaking that have been projected for the 
general good of his home city and county have been accorded the earn- 
est support of Mr. Goodenough, and his attitude as' a citizen is essen- 
tially progressive and public-spirited. In politics he is aligned as a 
supportei- of the cause of the Democratic party, and while he has never 
had any predilection for official preferment, he represented the second 
ward of Ludington on the board of aldermen in the early period fol- 
lowing the incorporation of the municipality under city government. 
He is well known throughout his home county, and his genial person- 
ality and sterling attributes of character have retained to him the higli 
regard of those with whom he has come in contact in the various rela- 
tions of life. 

In the year 1866 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Goodenough to 
Miss Lodema Olney, who was born and reared in Van Buren county, 
this state, and who is a daughter of Burrill A. and Elvira Olney. Her 
father was one of the first settlers of Hartford township, that county, 
and was prominently identified with the development and iipbuilding 
of that section. Mr. and Mrs. Goodenough had two daughters and one 
son. Eleanor is the wife of H. S. Gray, a representative member of 
the bar of Benton Harbor, Michigan, and they have two children — 
Emily and Luman. Olive Emily died at the age of twelve j'ears. Lu- 
man W. Goodenough, the only son, was afforded the best of educational 
advantages, including a course in the law department of the University 
of Michigan, and he is now engaged in the successful practice of his 
profession in the city of Detroit. He married Miss Elizabeth Noble. 
and they have two children — Elizabeth and Eleanor. 

William B. Robersom. — A man of broad intellectuality, wide-awake 
and brainy, William B. Roberson holds high rank among the more 
enterprising and public-spirited citizens of Alpena, and is prominently 
identified with many of its foremost interests, his influence being 
felt alike in agricultural, commercial, financial and social circles. His 
tireless energy and his practical ideas and comprehensive grasp of 
details, combined with n wonderful power of organization, have marked 



770 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

him as a man oi' excellent executive ability and made him one of the 
leaders in all movements of a progressive character. He was born 
February 21, 1881, in Utica, Macomb county, Michigan, a son of Dr. 
George G. Robersou. 

George G. Robersou, il. D., was boru in 1856, in Mt. Clemens, 
Macomb county, Michigan, and was educated primarily in the public 
schools. He subsequently attended the University of Michigan, after 
which, having decided to enter upon a professional career, he was 
graduated from the Detroit College of Medicine and from the National 
.Medical University of Berlin, Germany. For upwards of thirty years 
Dr. Robersou has been actively and successfully engaged in the practice 
of medicine at Utica, Michigan, being among the foremost physicians 
and surgeons of his communit}-. Dr. Robersou married Clara Eames, 
who was born in Utica, ilichigan, in 1860, and is a direct descendant 
of one Thomas Eames, who came from England to the United States 
in 1632, settling in Massachusetts. The Doctor and Mrs. Roberson 
have two children, namely : William B., the special subject of this brief 
biographical sketch; and Edgar J., born in 1883, and now a resident 
of ilontana, being engaged in numerous enterprises in and about 
Chouteau. 

Acquiring his elementary education in the public schools, William 
B. Roberson was graduated from the Utica High School in 1898 as 
president of his class. In 1900 he was graduated from the Detroit 
Central High School, and while studying in that institution he had the 
honor of representing the Detroit High School in a state oratorical 
contest, in which he secured first place. He subsequently entered the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and was there graduated in 
1904. with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Beginning his active career in Detroit, Michigan, Mr. Robersou be- 
came affiliated with various enterprises, including advertising, publish- 
ing, .iobbing, and others of like nature. Disposing of all of his Detroit 
interests in May, 1906, he married during the following month, and. 
with his bride, came to Alpena to assume charge of the W. B. Conistock 
estate, which he has handled ably and satisfactorily. Possessing ex- 
cellent business ability and judgment, Mr. Roberson has been active in 
the promotion of beneficial projects since becoming a resident of 
Alpena, and has organized, or helped to organize, many enterprises of 
financial and commercial value to the community. He assisted in the 
organization of the State Savings Bank of Alpena, and was One of its 
directors until its consolidation with the Alpena County Savings Bank; 
he organized the Alpena Farm Produce Company, of which he is a 
director and the secretary and treasurer; the Alpena News Publish- 
ing Company, of which he is the president and treasurer and one of 
the directorate; and the Alpena Motor Car Company, of which, in 
addition to being a director, he is secretary and treasurer. Mr. Rober- 
son was for two years, when the interests which he represented were 
sold, a director of the Alpena Power Company, limited, and of the 
Alpena Electric Light Company. An important factor in the organiza- 
tion of the Alpena Chamber of Commerce, ^Ir. Roberson has been an 
active assistant in pushing foi'ward the industrial tlevclopment of the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 771 

fity and promoting its material interests. In addition to the above 
mentioned enterprises with which he is identified he has numerous 
other interests of a business nature in Alpena and in other communities, 
his great prosperity in his career being the merited reward of his 
persistent efforts, perseverance and industry. 

ilr. Roberson is a stanch Republican, supporting the principles of 
his party by voice and vote, but is a strong believer in non-partisan 
municipal politics. Fraternally he is a member of Utica Lodge, No. 71, 
F. & A. M. ; of Alpena Lodge, No. 505, B. P. 0. E. ; of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; and of the Knights of the ilaecabees. He belongs 
to the Zeta Psi College fraternity ; to the Michigan Society ; Sons of the 
American Revolution; to the Alpena Country Club; the Detroit Country 
Club ; and to the Detroit Club. 

On June 2, 1906, in Detroit, Michigan, Mr. Roberson was united in 
marriage with Hazel Morris, who was born in that city June 3, 1881, 
being a daughter of Edmund A. Morris, secretary, treasurer and general 
manager of the Detroit Lead Pipe and Sheet Lead Works. Mr. and Mrs. 
Roberson have one child, Jolin Eames Roberson, who was horn in 
Alpena May 9, 1907. 

W. Henry Wilson. — Keen-sighted and enterprising, possessing sound 
judgment and rare business ability, W. Henry Wilson holds a con- 
spicuous position among the leading business men of northern ilich- 
igan, and has been an important factor in advancing the material in- 
terests of Harrison, his home city. Coming on both sides of the house 
of substantial New England ancestry, he was born in November, 1846, 
on a farm in Barre, Vermont, where, in early life his father followecl 
the trade of a stone cutter. 

Having acquired a good education in the public schools, W. Henry 
Wilson left the east in 1866, starting westward in his search for fame 
and fortune, and for two years was engaged as clei'k in a furnishing 
goods house in Chicago. Locating in IMichigan in 1868, he became a 
member of the firm of W. H. and F. A. Wilson, which made a specialty 
of purchasing timber lands and lumbering, and for three years carried 
on a good business in Genesee county. In 1871 ilessrs. Wilson trans- 
ferred their operations to Isabella county, and in 1879 they bought from 
the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Company the land on which the 
city of Harrison now stands, and began lumbering. The firm soon after 
opened a general store in Harrison, and here, in 1880, they erected a 
saw mill. As the land was cleared, it was placed on the market, and 
sold for farming purposes. The firm did an extensive and lucrative 
business in this vicinity, and were also largely interested in southern 
lands. After his marriage, and prior to coming to Harrison to live, 
in 1882, I\Ir. Wilson lived in Vernon township, and he and his partner 
were engaged in lumbering in Isabella counties. He is now associated 
in business with his son, being head of the well-known firm of W. H. 
& W. L. Wilson, which owns ten thousand acres of land in Clare and 
ilissaukee counties, and deals in both improved farms and unimproved 
lands. 

Mr. Wilson is identified with one of the leading financial institutions 



772 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

of the county, being first vice-president of the State Savings Bank of 
Harrison. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Knights 
of Pythias. His son William is a member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Order of ilasons, and is identified with the Republican party. 
Going back to his old home in Barre, Vermont, in 1869, Mr. Wilson 
was there united in marriage with Gertri;de Carr, and to them four 
children have been born, namely : Sarah E. ; Cora E., wife of Rev. A. 
W. Johnson, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Cadillac; 
John E., who with an uncle is engaged in the stationery and blank book 
business at Seattle, Washington ; and William L., junior member of the 
firm of W. H. & W. L. Wilson. 

Rev. John J. Rtess. — Devout in spirit, sincere in his convictions, ex- 
tremely earnest in purpose, the labors of Rev. John J. Riess, pastor of 
St. Mary's Church, at Grayling, Crawford county, have been blessed, and 
he is known as one of the most popular and best beloved clergymen of 
this part of the state, having endeared himself to Protestants and Cath- 
olics, alike. He is a deep thinker, and an eloquent speaker, fluent in 
his delivery, and convincing in his logic, and an untiring worker in the 
Master's vineyard. A native of Germany, he was born. November 1, 
1879, in Bavaria, being the oldest child in a family of six children. His 
parents, John N. and Margaret (Helgrath) Riess, emigrated from the 
Fatherland to this country in 1880, and now, in 1911, are living in 
Ludington, Michigan. 

Designed for the priesthood from his youth, John J. Riess was edu- 
cated at St. Francis' Seminary, in ^Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and after 
his ordination, June 24, 1903, was appointed assistant pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, at West Branch, Ogemaw county, Michigan, receiving 
the appointment in July, of that year, at the same time being made as- 
sistant pastor of St. Mary's Church, in Grayling. In September. 1908, 
St. Mar.y's parish was formed, and Rev. Father Riess was installed as 
pastor. In addition to his pastorate of St. Mary's, he supplies St. 
Michael's Church, at Roscommon, and the stations at Frederic, Lewis- 
ton, Lovells, and Waters. 

St. Mary's Church was established in 1884 by Father Schulack, S. J., 
a good and Godly man, well known in the early history of Northern 
Michigan as an active and devoted missionary. St. Michael's Church, 
in Rosconniion was also established in 1884, and to both of these churches 
the devout Father Schulack fed the Bread of Life for three vears. Prom 
1887 until 1888 Rev. A. We])eler, of Clieboygan, Jlichigan," supplied at 
St. Mary's, and being then moved to West Branch, he had charge of 
both St. Joseph 's and St. Mary 's until 1900. From that time until July, 
1903, Rev. G. Gutbausen, who succeeded Rev. A. Webeler at West 
Branch, cared for the flocks at St. Mary's and St. Jliehael's. Since that 
date Father Riess has had full charge of the churches mentioned above, 
and his work has been blessed far beyond the most sanguine expecta- 
tions. 

In 1905 St. Mary's Church, at Grayling was enlarged, renovated, and 
beautified, and in 1911 Father Riess purchased gi'ound in Frederic, the 
station which was under his charge, and had a beautiful structure erected 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 77;i 

in which his people might worship the Lord. In the entire field over 
which Rev. Fr. Riess has spiritual control, there are one hundred and 
fifty families, St. Mary's parish alone consisting of sixty-five families. 
The church at Grayling has a seating capacity of two hundred, and in 
1908 a new and commodious parsonage was built, the entire church 
property being now valued at $20,000. 

In addition to all of this there has been erected at a great cost 
and sacrifice the Grayling IMercy Hospital, the mam building of which 
is forty feet by seventy feet, with a wing twenty-five feet by thirty-two 
feet. This institution was a donation from Mr. R. Hanson and other 
lumbermen, and was officially turned over to and placed under the 
charge of the Sisters of Mercy. The building, which has accommoda- 
tions for forty patients, is equipped with all the modern improvements 
found in up-to-date institutions of the kind. Father Riess has served 
as building manager of the hospital and is now a meiiiber of its advis- 
ing committee. 

Peter Fri8KE. — The great empire of Germany has contributed a 
most valuable element to the cosmopolitan social fabric of our American 
republic, which has had much to gain and nothing to lose from this 
source. Among the sterling citizens of German birth and ancestry re- 
siding in the city of ilanistee is Peter Friske, who has here maintained 
his home for more than thirty years and who has here gained definite 
success through his own well directed energies. He may consistently 
be designated at the present time as one of the pioneer business men of 
the city, and here his hold upon popular esteem has been fortified 
through stanch integritj- and genial personality. 

Mr. Friske was bom in Germany on the 14th of February, 1856. and 
is a son of Stephen and Rosa (Keen) Friske, both of whom passed their 
entire lives in Gennany, where the father was a farmer by vocation. 
Peter Fri.ske was reared to adult age on the home farm and is indebted 
to the excellent schools of his fatherland for his early educational train- 
ing. In 1877, shortly after attaining to his legal majority, he severed 
the liome ties and set forth to seek his fortunes in America. He landed 
in New York city and soon afterward made his way to Detroit. ]\Iich- 
igan, where he was employed for a short time. He then went to Wiscon- 
sin, where he remained about one year, at the expiration of which, in 
1878, he returned to Michigan and made Manistee his destination. He 
secured employment in connection with the great lumbering activities 
of this section of the state, and he continued to work in saw mills and 
lumber camps until 1884. in the meanwhile being industrious and frugal 
and carefully conserving his earnings. In the year mentioned he pur- 
chased the lot at 174 Eighth street in the city of ilanistee on which is 
located his present place of business. On this lot he erected a store 
and a residence, and here he has maintained his home during the long 
intervening years, the while he has built up a prosperous general mer- 
chandise business. He has also made judicial investments, including 
the purchase of pine lands in the earlier years of his business career, 
and through the development of his properties he added materially to 
his financial resources, thus attaining to the goal of independence and 



774 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

substantial prosperity. He is one of the representative business men 
of JIanistee, has shown a loyal interest in all that has concerned its wel- 
fare and has at all times given his support to such projects as have 
tended to conserve its social and material advancement. 

No citizen commands a higher degree of popular confidence in Man- 
istee than does ilr. Friske, and this has been shown in otificial preferment 
conferred upon him. He is a stalwart supporter of the cause of tbe 
Democratic party and in 1890 he represented the Seventh ward in the 
eitj- board of aldermen. In 1892 he was further honored in being elected 
to the important office of county treasurer, of which he continued incum- 
bent for two years and in which he gave a most careful and acceptable 
administration of the fiscal affairs of the county. He is a member of the 
German Working ilen 's Society and the Knights of Columbus, and both 
he and his wife are zealous commvuiieauts of the Catholic church. 

In the year 1884 Mr. Friske was united in marriage to Miss Belle 
Levenduski, of Manistee, and she was summoned to the life eternal in 
1888. Of the three children of this imion it may be recorded that Anna 
died at the age of five years ; Paul is a resident of Detroit, and Edward 
maintains his home in ililwaukee. In 1891 Mr. Friske contracted a sec- 
ond marriage, having then been united to Miss Helen Biggie, who was 
born and reared in Manistee, and of the children of this union the fol- 
lowing are living, namely : Marian, Belle, Joseph, Rose, Stephen, Leo, 
Helen, Maria and Winifred. 

Fkank Fochtman, restauranteur, is known all over northern Mich- 
igan as proprietor of the finest grill cafe in this part of the state. His 
establishment at Petoskey is by no means one of the least of the at- 
tractions which have given that city a reputation. In this age of travel 
when a large proportion of the population spend part of their time away 
from the home kitchen, the man who furnishes wholesome food to the 
public contributes as great a service to society as any other individual. 
Mr. Fochtman has been in business at 438 East Lake street since 1897. 
The palm garden which is a part of his establishment is one of its most 
popular features. 

Mr. Fochtman was born in Pennsylvania, April 24, 1871, and comes 
of good old German stock. His parents were Henry and Elizabeth 
Tegler Fochtman, both natives of Penns.ylvania. Of their twelve cliil- 
(Iren, nine are living and Frank is the fourth in order of birth. His 
father, who for a number of years followed blacksmithing and carriage 
making at St. Mary's, Pennsylvania, in 1881 moved to Emmet county. 
IMichigan, where he went to farming. A few years later locating in 
Petoskey, he conducted a saloon until his son Frank bought him out, 
and since then he has been more or less actively engaged in real estate 
though he is now practically retired. While farming he was honored 
with township offices, and has been a progressive citizen. He is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic church, and in politics a Oemocrat. 

Frank Fochtman received his education in the public and parochial 
schools of Petoskey, and his first work was as an expressman. He was 
in the saloon business with his father until he bought out the business in 




^Ct>^M^Cv^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 775 

1897. Since then he has developed the cafe to its present attractive 
reputation, and now caters to the best class of trade. 

His fraternal affiliations are with the Petoskey Lodge No. 629, B. P. 
O. E., and iu politics he is a Democrat. In 1896 he was married to 
Miss Mary Sexton and they have no children. 

Amos B. Cbow. — An essentially loyal and public-spirited citizen of 
Alpena, Michigan, is Amos B. Crow, who is president of the Alpena 
Marble & Granite Company, of which he was one of the organizers. Mr. 
Crow was born at Chatham, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 2nd 
of August, 1868, and is a son of Andrew and Harriet (Purser) Crow, 
the former of wliom was born in the county of Kent, Ontario, and the 
latter at Seven Oake, Kent county, England, whence she emigrated to 
Canada about 1850. Andrew Crow was engaged in the grocery business 
at Chatham during the major portion of his active business career and 
he was summoned to the life eternal in 1883, at forty-five years of age. 
He was affiliated with the time-honored Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Crow 
after the death of her honored husband became the wife of John Sim- 
mons and she is now residing in the state of Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. 
Crow became the parents of six children, four of whom are now living, — 
Reta, who resides iu Alabama ; Amos B. is the immediate subject of this 
sketch; Ada maintains her home in Alabama; and Templeton resides at 
Marine City, Michigan. 

Amos B. Crow was fourth la order of birth in the family of six 
children and after completing the curriculum of the public schools of 
Chatham he assisted in the grocery business of his father. He was 
about fifteen years of age at the time of his father's death and he 
came to ]\lichigan in 1886, establishing his home at Alpena, where he 
became interested in the marble business with George Haggerty. The 
firm adopted the name of Crow & Haggerty and continued to do busi- 
ness for about two years, at the expiration of which Mr. Crow pur- 
chased his partner's share and continued the industry individually until 
the 26th of July, 1907, when the Alpena ilarble & Granite Company was 
organized. This company was incorporated under the laws of the 
state with a capital stock of $10,000 and Mr. Crow was elected president 
of the company, with George Lough as secretary and treasurer. The 
headquarters of this thriving concern are maintained in the tine build- 
ing, recently consti-ucted, on the corner of Washington avenue and 
Third street. This business house is of brick and stone, with re-enforced 
concrete floor and roof. It is two stories in height and contains a finely 
equipped office with modern and up-to-date furnishings. An extensive 
business is controlled by the company and the concern is recognized as 
a valuable addition to the industrial world of Alpena. 

On the 30th of January. 1891, Mr. Crow joined the Michigan Na- 
tional Guard, becoming a member of Company B, Third Regiment. The 
Third Regiment became a part of the IMichigan volunteers at the time of 
the inception of the Spanish-American war and was on dutv from the 
26th of April, 1898, to the 28th of December of that year. ' Mr. Crow 
was mustered out of service as sergeant of his company. In a fraternal 
way he is affiliated with Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted ;\Ia- 



776 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

sons; Myrtle Lodge, No. 432, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
Arthur Heney Post No. 87, Spanish-American War Veterans. His po- 
litical views coincide with the principles and policies of the Republican 
party and both he and his wife are devout members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

On the 11th of December, 1895, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Crow to Miss Emma Lough, who was born in Cumberland, Guernsey 
county, Ohio, and who is a daughter of Alexander and Mary (Wall) 
Lough. The father was bom in Buckingham, Ontario, and the mother 
was born and reared in Ireland. Their marriage was solemnized in 
Canada and they became the parents of twelve children, all of whom are 
living. Mr. Lough came with his family to Alpena, Michigan, in 1S81, 
and he was a millwright by trade. He helped constiaict a number of 
mills in Michigan and for a time was in the government employ, in 
which connection he constructed and repaired lighthouses. He re- 
tired from active business about one year prior to his death, which oc- 
curred in 1908, at the venerable age of seventy-six years. Mrs. Lough 
survives her honored husband and she now maintains her home in Al- 
pena. Mr. Lough was a member of the Presbyterian church, as is his 
widow. His political support was given to the Republican party. 'Slv. 
and Mrs. Crow have four children, all sons — Arthur, Harold, Ralpli E. 
and Ervin. 

Lewis W. Sund.^y. — Thoroughly enterprising and progressive, Lewis 
W. Sunday, of Harrison, is widely known throughout northern Mich- 
igan, not only as sheriif of Clare county, but as one of its most prosper- 
ous farmers and stock dealers. He was born, in 1869, on a farm in 
Salem township, Steuben county, Indiana, where his parents, Daniel 
and Susanna (Lyge) Sunday, settled on moving from Pennsylvania. 
During his boyhood he attended the district schools, and when at home 
assisted his father in the labors attendant upon a rural life, becoming 
familiar with all branches of agriculture. 

Coming with his family to Michigan in 1894, IMr. Sunday purchased 
a tract of land in Arthur township, Clare county, and began the im- 
provement of the farm which he now owns. Laboring with a will, he has 
placed the land under a high state of cultivation, furaLshed it with a 
thoroughbred stock, and erected buildings of the most modern construc- 
tion, the estate being a credit to his taste and wise management. Soon 
after locating in Arthur township. Mr. Sunday became a stock buyer 
for the Saginaw Beef Company, and later began raising and buying 
beef on his own account. Later, in connection with his own business, 
he was engaged by the Saginaw Lumber and Salt Company, which 
owned a tract of land containing five thousand acres, to look after their 
interests. Through Mr. Sunday's efforts, the entire tract was sold to 
newcomers, and he had the full satisfaction of seeing it developed into 
valuable and productive farms. 

Mr. Sunday continued farming and stock buying and selling until 
1908. when he was elected sheriff of Clare coimty. an office to which 
he was re-elected in 1910. this being his .second term in this position. He 
is an eai-nest supportor of th(> principles of the Republican party, and 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 777 

has never shirked the duties of public office. While a resident of 
Arthur township, he was school director three years; served the same 
length of time as school treasurer; and for eight years was supervisor. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and of the An- 
cient Order of Gleaners. 

At Hudson, Indiana, on September 11, 1890, Mr. Sunday was 
united in marriage with Josephine Sams, who was born in Salem, In- 
diana, a daughter of Abdelphan and Mary (Simonson) Sams, natives 
of Indiana, and they have two children, namely: Walter J., born Jan- 
uary 11, 1892 ; and Harold D., born August 15, 1894. 

In 1900 the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Clare, 
Lake, and Osceola counties, was organized, and in 1908 Mr. Sunday was 
elected its president, and has held the office since, being re-elected in 
1909. and in 1910. 

Orlin L. Raicestr.vw, — In partnership with his father Orlin L. Rake- 
straw is engaged in the general merchandise business at Lupton, Og- 
emaw county, ilichigan, and together father and son own some nine 
hundred acres of improved and unimproved real-estate in this section 
of the state. Jlr. Rakestraw, of this review, was born at Beloit, Ohio, 
on the 24th of July, 1866. and is a son of Joshua and Ellen (Stanley) 
Rakestraw, who removed from Beloit, Ohio, to Michigan, in 1884, locat- 
ing at what was then Lane and which is now Lupton, in Rose township, 
Ogemaw county. The father purchased a tract of forty acres of land, 
which he gradually improved, and subsequently, in partnership with his 
son, Orlin L., he engaged in the mercantile business. From a small be- 
ginning this establishment has graduallj^ increased its scope of opera- 
tions and at the present time it is one of the most modem and well 
equipped stores in the county. The son was po.stmaster of Lupton in 
which incumbency he continued for three years, at the expiration of 
which the father assumed the duties of that office as Orlin L. was obliged 
to be absent from Lupton for a time. Joshua Rakestraw has been hon- 
ored by his fellow citizens with the offices of highway commissioner 
and township clerk. Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Rakestraw became the parents 
of three children. — Orlin L., Olive and Hannah, and the entire family 
are devout members of the Friends chiirch, at Lupton. 

In his political convictions Mr. Rakestraw accords a stalwart alle- 
giance to the cause of the Republican party and at the present time 
he is assistant postmaster under his father and he is also notary public. 
In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the time-honored ^lasonic order 
and with the Knights of the Maccabees, He has ever been on the qui 
vive to advance the general welfare of tlie town and county and he and 
his wife are popular factors in connection with the best social activities 
in the community. 

In the year 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Rakestraw to 
Miss Geneva Dobson, who was born and reared at Alliance, Ohio. To 
this union has been born one son. — Ernest J., whose natal dav is the 
16th of January, 1892. 



778 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

William Rath. — Among the sterling citizens of Mason county who 
have contributed in generous degree to the industrial and civic progress 
and upbuilding of this favored section of the Wolverine commonwealth 
is William Rath, who is the present able and honored incumbent of tlie 
office of mayor of the city of Ludington, where he is also serving as 
deputy coUeetor of customs for this important port on the Great Lakes 
system. 

Mr. Rath is a scion of staunch German lineage and while he is essen- 
tially loyal to American institutions and an effective exponent of the 
American spirit, he finds a just measure of satisfaction in reverting to 
the great German empire as his fatherland. He was born in the city of 
Hamburg, one of the three celebrated "Hause Towns" of Germany, on 
the 28th of January, 1849, and is a son of Hans and Mary Rath. " The 
father died in Germany and the mother died at the home of her son 
after spending twenty years in America. Mr. Rath is indebted to the 
excellent schools of his native city for his early educational training and 
there he was reared to maturity under beneficent environments. In 
1870, soon after attaining to his legal majority, he severed the ties that 
bound him to home and fatherland and set forth to seek his fortunes in 
America, to whose complex social fabric the German empire has con- 
tributed a significantly large and valuable element. He landed in New 
York city and soon n.iade his way westward to Michigan. He arrived 
in Ludington on the 21st of June, 1870, and during the long intervening 
.vears this place has represented his home, the while he has witnessed 
its development from a mere straggling hamlet in the lumber woods to 
a position of importance as a thriving little industrial city and summer 
resort, as well as a prominent entrepot on the Great Lakes. The business 
career of Mr. Rath in Mason county began in a most modest way, as his 
.Irst employment was as a workman in local saw mills. Through fidel- 
ity and effective service he won promotion to the position of log scaler 
and lumber inspector, and he familiarized himself with all details of 
the great lumber industry, which then represented the principal and by 
far the most important line of business enterprise in the entire nortiiern 
part of the state. About the year 1880 Mr. Rath engaged in lumbering 
inspecting in an independent way as a member of the firm of Weimer 
& Rath. Eventually he became senior member of the firm of Rath & 
('artier, and this alliance is still in existence. Operations in the manu- 
facturing of lumber in Mason county were continued by the firm until 
1907, and since that time its field of enterprise has been principally in 
the handling of southern timber lands. 

Energy, industry and mature judgment have characterized the entire 
business career of the present ma.vor of Ludington, and his advancement 
to a position of independence and distinctive prosperity has been gained 
through his own well directed efforts, the while his integrity of purpose 
and devotion to principle have retained to him the unqualified confi- 
dence and esteem of those with whom he has come in contact in the va- 
rious relations of life. In the year 1901 Mr. Rath became associated 
with Judge Charles G. Wing in organizing and establishing the Luding- 
ton State Bank, and he has since been one of its principal stockholders 
as well as a member of its directorate. Under the same auspii-es was 



I 



"».% v'W%'^ *• ^•''"iiaisvm''--* > 



i 




HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 779 

founded the Fountain Bank, at Fountain, Mason county, and lioth of 
these are staunch and popular financial institutions of the northern 
part of Michigan. Mr. Rath continues as one of the interested princi- 
pals in the bank last mentioned, and his progressive spirit and business 
acumen have also been shown through his earnest co-operation in tiic 
promoting and upbuilding of a number of successful manufacturing 
enterprises in his home city and other places in this section of Michigan. 
He is sole owner of the Briny Inn, a splendid commercial and resort 
hotel in the city of Manistee, Michigan, and in addition to his extensive 
real-estate holdings in Ludington and other parts of Mason county he 
is the owner of much valuable real estate in the city of Chicago. He 
has shown great circumspection and judgment in his real-estate invest- 
ments and through the medium of the same has added materially to his 
ample fortune. He came to Ludington more than forty years ago, a 
mere youth, a veritable stranger in a strange land, and without financial 
resources or influential friends. Thus the success he has achieved 
through earnest and honest endeavor stands the more to his credit and 
places him among those worthy of the proud American title of a self- 
made man. 

Mr. Rath has been significantly loyal as a citizen and has shown a 
deep interest in all that has tended to advance the material and social 
welfare of his home city. In politics he is found aligned as a .staunch 
supporter of the cause of the Republican party and he has been an 
influential figure in local affairs of a public nature, the while lie has been 
called upon to serve in various positions of distinctive trust. For ten 
years he was a member of the board of aldermen of Ludington, and in 
the spring of 1910 there came a further and well merited mark of pop- 
ular esteem when he was elected mayor of the city, for a term of one 
year. His administration of municipal affairs has been marked by the 
same fidelity and progressiveness that have characterized his business 
career and he is proving the ^\^sdom of the popular suft'rage which 
brought to him this official preferment. He had previously represented 
Ludington county as a member of the county board of supervisors, and 
in every possible way he has supported measures and enterprises that 
have tended to conserve the advancement and general prospei-ity of his 
home city and county. He has given time, effort and money in the pro- 
motion of industrial enterprises, in the effecting of public improve- 
ments and in fostering those undertakings that represent the higher 
civic ideals. He has been identified with the Ludington Board of Trade 
during virtually the entire period of its existence and was its president 
for two years. For seven years he was a member of the board of trus- 
tees of the Ludington cemetery, and for more than a decade and a half 
he has given effective service to the government as deputy collector of 
customs. Both he and his wife are zealous members of the German 
Lutheran church, in whose faith he was reared. 

On the 17th of July, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Rath 
to Miss Lucy Rickhoff, who likewise was born in Germany, whence she 
came with her parents to America when a girl. Mr. and Mrs. Rath 
became the parents of one child, Jennie. They have raised two adopted 
daughters, Ella and Jessie. 



780 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Oliver J. Gowans, postmaster of Mackinaw City, is an enterprising 
young business man who has been connected with positions of respon- 
sibility and honor in his home city since he was twenty years of age. 

He was born at Gladwin, Gladwin county, Michigan, August 18, 
1883, and received his education in the Gladwin high school and the 
Mt. Pleasant normal school. While stiU a boy he became cleik in one of 
the offices of the Michigan Central railroad, and in 1902 was promoted 
chief clerk of the office at :\lackinaw City. This office he held up to 
November, 1910, which was the date of his appointment to the post- 
mastership. He is an active Republican and one of the best representa- 
tives of the progressive citizenship of northern Michigan. 

Mr. Gowans is a son of John and Rosa (Davis) Gowans, the former 
a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and the latter of Stratford, Ontario. 
They were married in Ontario and both are still living. Of their live 
children three are living: — Oliver J., Olive and Howard. The father 
was brought to this countrj' when a child, and the family tirst located in 
Utah, from which state he moved to Stratford, Ontario, later to Gladwin 
county, Michigan, and since 1909 has been a resident of Mackinaw City. 
His business was mason contracting, and while in Gladwin county he 
served as township supervisor. In politics he is a Republican. Oliver 
J. Gowans is affiliated with Wawatam Lodge No. 448 Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and St. Ignace Chapter, No. 36-4, Royal Arch Masons, 
and he and his wife are members of the Eastern Star. June 28, 1905, 
he married ]\Iiss Sylvia Jlay Callam. Mackinaw City is her birthplace, 
and her parents, Charles A. and Amanda A. (Smith) Galium, were both 
born in this state. Her father, who died in 1898, was a lumberman of 
Saginaw, and her mother passed away May 5, 1911. Their children 
were: ;\Irs. Gowans, Otie A. and Catherine J. 

S.uiuEL W. Baker. — An able and valued factor in connection with 
educational affairs in northern i\Iichigan, Professor Baker is incumbent 
of the office of superintendent of the public schools of the city of ]\Ian- 
istee and is known as not only a successful educator but also as a dis- 
criminating and efficient administrative officer, in evidence of which his 
success in his present field of endeavor offers adequate voucher. 

Professor Baker was bom at Port Perrj', Ontario county, province of 
Ontario. Canada, on the 2d of September, 1849, and is a son of Dr. M. 
S. and Rachel 51. (Brown) Baker, the former of whom was born in 
England and the latter in the province of Ontario, Canada, where 
their marriage was solemnized. Professor Baker was about eight years 
of a^p at the time of the family removal to Michigan and he was reared 
to adult age in Shiawasse county, where he was afforded the advantages 
of the schools of Corunna, the county seat. He supplemented this pre- 
liminary academic training by a through course in the Jfichigan State 
Normal School at Ypsilanti, in which admirable institution he was 
graduated. He has been active in the work of the pedagogic profession 
for full.v thirty-five years, and his success in the same has been on a 
parity with his recognized abilit.v, which has been reinforced by the 
long experience in the field of popular education. He holds a life certi- 
ficate from the state as a teacher, and he has further amplified his scope 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 781 

uf knowledge by proving himself eligible also for the legal profession. 
While actively engaged in teaching about thirty odd years ago he pur- 
sued a course of study in the law, under effective private preceptorship, 
and he was admitted to the bar of Michigan, after which he was engaged 
in the practice of law in Clinton county for two years. His predilection 
for and great interest in pedagogy, however, soon called him back to 
work as a teacher, and it may be taken as a matter of objective grati- 
fication that he was not long deflected from this field of endeavor, as his 
labors have been prolific in results of the most benignant order. Pro- 
fessor Baker became superintendent of the public schools of Ovid, this 
state, and he resigned this position to take up the study of law. Two 
years later, however, the school board of the same place urged him to 
resume his former position, and he accepted the overtures. He contin- 
ued incumbent of this charge until he was elected superintendent of the 
schools of Big Rapids, where he continued his earnest and fruitful 
labors in this capacity for the ensuing eight years. He then, in 1893, 
removed to ilanistee, where he opened a business college, which he con- 
ducted for the ensuing two years, at the expiration of which he was 
elected director of the Normal training school. Two years later further 
recognition of his ability and sterling character was given in his elec- 
tion to the office of superintendent of the public schools of the city. His 
administration extended over a period of a full decade, and he resigned 
the office in November, 1908, to accept the position of district manager 
of a prominent life-insurance company, with headquarters in Manistee. 
In April, 1910, he .yielded to earnest importunities and accepted his 
former office of superintendent of the city schools, and his influence 
has since been most potent in maintaining the schools of Manistee at the 
high standard to which he had brought them during his previoiLs and 
extended regime. It will thus be seen that there has been distinctive 
appreciation of his long and faithful service as chief executive of the 
public-school s.vstem of Manistee, and here he commands secure vantage 
ground in the confidence and esteem of all who know him. He is not 
only most successful as an instructor, but has the power of infusing 
enthusiasm among both teachers and students, thus insuring the best 
results from the privileges provided. 

In politics Professor Baker is aligned as a stalwart advocate of the 
principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor, 
and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and is a charter 
member of the local organization of the Modern Romans. 

At Corunna, Michigan, was solemnized the marriage of Professor 
Baker to Miss Ellen L. Gillett, who was born and reared in this state 
and who is a member of one of its sterling pioneer families. Her father, 
the late Jason C. Gillett, was a master mechanic and was a valiant 
soldier in a Michigan regiment in the Civil war. Both he and his wife 
passed their closing years in Michigan. Mrs. Baker had been a suc- 
cessful and popular teacher in the public schools of her native state 
prior to her marriage, and she is a woman of culture and most gracious 
personality, — one who is a popular factor in connection with the best 
social activities of her home city. Professor and Mi-s. Baker have four 



782 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

sons and two daughters, all of whom have, as may well be supposed, been 
afforded the best of educational advantages. They are Ethel; Ray C. 
and Lee, both members of the theatrical profession, in which they have 
shown much talent and been identified with representative companies; 
Ward is a professional violinist of admirable ability ; and Eva and Don- 
ald remain at the parental home. 

Ronald Barton. — To be numbered among the active factors in the 
commercial life of Farwell and thus well worthy of representation in 
this work devoted to the lives of the valuable citizens of northern Mich- 
igan is Ronald Barton, who is here engaged in the meat market busi- 
ness. He is still to be numbered in the younger generation of business 
men, his birth having occurred in 1877. He is a son of John W. and 
Sarah (Burke) Barton, and through his father he is connected with 
Erin, which country has given to the United States a large and im- 
portant element of her population. 

When John W. Barton was a lad his parents joined the great emi- 
grating company seeking wider opportunity in America. They first 
located in Canada, where the father engaged in farming, being em- 
ployed as superintendent of a large agricultural estate owned by an 
English corporation. In 1883 the family removed to the United States, 
taking up their residence in Farwell, Michigan, where John W. Barton 
accepted a position as a superintendent in the lumber camps. Later 
he purchased a home in Farwell and resides here at the present time, 
secure in the enjoyment of the regard of his fellow citizens. 

Ronald Barton holds Farwell in happiest association for it was here 
that the roseate days of boyhood and youth were passed, and in the 
excellent public schools of the town he received his education. In 1898, 
when about twenty-one years of age he went far afield, locating in Bliss, 
Mississippi, where he engaged as superintendent and cook in a lumber 
camp and mill. After remaining there for a while Mr. Barton returned 
to Farwell and established himself independently in business by open- 
ing a meat market. He continued at this for a comparatively brief time 
and then went to Weidman, Michigan, where he accepted a position. 
Very soon he returned to Farwell and purchased the market and 
business of Mr. Sheekles and in the conduct of this he has met with 
success and has built up a large and ever-increasing patronage. He 
also engages in the buying of hogs and poultry for shipping. He is a 
member ever welcome in the gatherings of the lodges with which he is 
affiliated — the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of 
the World. 

Mr. Barton became a Benedict over a decade ago, his marriage being 
solemnized in December, 1900. Mrs. Barton is a native of Canada and 
a daughter of William and Mary (Clendeming) Ritchie, the former 
being a mill hand and the family removing to Michigan several years 
ago. Two children have been born into their home, — Belle in 1902, 
and Leo, in 1906. 

Godfrey St. Peter. — A representative business man of the .younger 
generation who holds a secure place in the confidence and esteem of 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 783 

his fellow men at Mikado, Alcona county, Michigan, is Godfrey St. 
Peter, who is here engaged in the feed and grain business. Mr. St. 
Peter was born at Oscoda, Iosco county, Michigan, the date of his 
birth being 24th of December, 1881. He is a son of Louis and Rose 
(Paquette) St. Peter, both of whom were born and reared in the 
Dominion of Canada. The father came to the United States in 1863, 
locating at Bay City, Michigan, removing thence to Au Sable, where 
was solemnized his marriage to Miss Rose Paquette. To this union 
were born three children, — Godfrey, the immediate subject of this 
review; Joseph, who is in Mikado; and Rose, who remains at the 
parental home. Louis St. Peter removed to Mikado, Alcona county, 
in 1893, and he now resides upon a fine farm of eighty acres, where he 
is engaged in diversified agriculture and the growing of high-grade 
stock. 

Godfrey St. Peter received his early educational training in the 
public schools at Oscoda and he was a youth of twelve years of age at 
the time of his parents' removal to Mikado, where he became associated 
with his father in the work and management of the home farm. He 
continued to be identified with farming until 1907, in which year he 
established his home in Mikado, where he is now engaged in the care of 
an extensive shipping business. He is a dealer in flour, feed, grain, 
beans and seeds, and his fine elevator, which was erected in 1906 and 
which is forty by sixty feet in lateral dimensions, is situated on the 
Detroit & Mackinac Railroad. jMr. St. Peter controls a large and con- 
stantly increasing trade and by reason of his fair and straightforward 
business methods and unfailing courtesy to his customers he is rapidly 
gaining prestige as one of the able and popular business men in this 
place. In polities he endorses the cause of the Republican party and 
he has served his township with all of efficiency as clerk for a period 
of two years. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of 
the Maccabees and with the Modern Brotherhood of America. In his 
religious faith he is a stanch advocate of the doctrines preached in the 
Catholic church, in whose faith he was reared. 

In the year 1907 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. St. Peter to 
Miss Josephine LaFare, who was bom at Oscoda and who is a daughter 
of Peter and Mary (Roberts) LaFare, both of whom are now living in 
Mikado. To Mr. and Mrs. St. Peter have been born two children, — 
Louisa and Leonard. 

John Pehrson, county register of deeds of Mason county, Michigan, 
is a native of Sweden, that country which has given to America one 
of her mo.st important and valuable sources of emigration. The Swed- 
ish element has shown itself to be possessed of all the essential ele- 
ments of good citizenship and these in fullest measure characterize 
him whose name initiates this review. Jlr. Pehrson was born near 
the town of Karlstad, December 14, 1859, and it was there that he 
was reared and educated. The names of his parents were Pehr Olson 
and Christina Olson, the farmer being a farmer by occupation, and 
Mr. Pehrson was the last in a family of ten children. 

In 1880. shortly before the attainment of his majority, :\Ir. Pehr- 



784 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

son hearkened to the voice of opportunity from the shores of the 
New World, and severing home ties set sail for America. In course 
of time he found his way to Ludington, Mason county, and there re- 
mained for about two years, engaged in general work. He then 
found himself in a position to marry, and after that happy event he 
purchased land in Amber township and removed to it. It was new 
land, much of it wooded, but he set about taming the virgin acres 
and clearing them and soon had a most valuable farming property, 
which he still owns. This contains one hundred and fifty-five acres, and 
is most advantageously situated about four miles east of Ludington. 
Pie engages for the nuist part iu the cultivation of hay and general 
farming. 

The subject is everywhere known as a public-spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen, and one to whom it is eminently safe to entrust the 
public interests. He is one of the captains iu the ranks of local Re- 
publicanism and his unselfish devotion to the party was recognized 
in 1904 by his election to the important office of register of deeds. 
As signal mark of the satisfactory character of his services and the 
esteem in which he is held he was re-elected in 1906, again in 1908, 
and again in 1910. In the latter year he received a majority of eight 
hundred and twenty-four votes, which shows his popularity. He is 
assisted by his daughter, Agnes L., as deputy county register. This 
is not his first experience as a factor in public afl:'airs, for he was 
supervisor of Amber township for eight .years, has served on the town- 
ship school board, and has been the encumbent of several other local 
offices. For thirty years he has been a resident of ilason county, in 
that time witnessing great change and progress, while contributing 
in no small measure to the same. Mr. Pehrson in 1907 returned to 
his native country where he spent six weeks visiting his boyhood home 
and associates. 

On the 7th day of October, 1882, Mr. Pehrson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Hilma Anderson, a native of Sweden and a daughter of 
Andwew Johnson. Their union has been blessed by the birth of four 
children, namely: Louis G., Victor C, Charles W., and Agnes L., all 
educated in jMichigan. 

Mr. Pehrson is not one to allow all social and fraternal proclivities 
to be sacrificed to the demands of business, and he is one of the promi- 
nent lodge men of the county, his membership extending to the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Swedish Aid Society. 

John J. Walker, the present jjostmaster of Levering, has been iden- 
tified with the business growth of that town since 1890, and his own 
interests have extended with the progress of this place from the pioneer 
conditions which existed in that year. 

Mr. Walker was born in Bruce county, Ontario, May 30, 1864, a 
son of Benjamin and Ann (Dobson) Walker, both natives of Ireland. 
His father died at the age of eighty-nine, and his mother at the age of 
sixty-five. John J. is the fourth of their eight children, six of whom 
are living. The father emigrated to Canada and was (>ngaged in farm- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 785 

ing tluTc until ISTl, was a resident of North Carolina until 1877, and 
ill that year niovi'd to Harbor Springs, Michigan, and later to the 
vicinity of Carp Lake, in Emmet county, where he spent the rest of his 
life on a farm. He was a Democrat in polities. 

John J. Walker received his schooling in the state of North Carolina, 
and in 1879 came to Levering with his parents, he first engaged in the 
merchandise and sawmill business with his brother Benjamin in 1890, 
the firm of Walker Bros, being for many years one of the most success- 
ful in this part of the state. In 1909 John J. Walker succeeded to 
control of the business, and ho carried on a large trade in dry goods, 
clothing, groceries, etc. In 1908 he organized the Levering Telephone 
Company, and is its secretary-treasurer, manager, and owner of ninet.y- 
five percent of the stock. 

For a number of years Mr. Walker has assumed various public re- 
sponsibilities in his community. In 1903 he was appointed postmaster, 
and by reappointment in 1907 still holds the office. For eight year.s he 
was supervisor of Carp Lake township, and of McKinley township three 
years. He has been a school director fourteen or fifteen years, and has 
also served on the board of review, as .justice of the peace and highway 
commissioner. He is one of the influential Republicans of northern 
^Michigan. His fraternal affiliation is with Durand Lodge No. 344, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and with Lodge No. 190, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd. Fellows. 

December 7, 1893, John J. Walker married Miss Susie Luesing, and 
they have two children, Ralph D. and Charles B. Mrs. Walker was 
born in Ontario, a daughter of Andrew and Sophia (Paraperiue) 
Luesing, both natives of Germany. Her mother is still living. There 
were five children in their family. Mr. Luesing, who was a carriage 
maker by trade, was one of the early settlers of Emmet county, having 
located near Levering in 1878. lie held township ol'liccs. and in 
l)olitics was a Republican. 

Jesse Allen. — One of the large-minded and enterprising men who 
have found journalism an appropriate field for their energy and breadth. 
Jesse Allen is employed in a profession which is peculiarly exacting, 
and as editor and publisher of the Clare County Cleaver, a weekly 
newspaper published in Harrison, is meeting with well deserved success. 
He was born. February 8, 1879, at Bridgeport, Michigan, a son of 
Henry Allen, who served as a soldier in the Civil war, belonging to the 
Twenty-second Volunteer Infantry. 

When Jesse Allen was a child his niollii-r came with him to Harrison 
to take charge of a family of children Id't motherless by the death of 
her sister. Here he received his rudinicntaiy education, attending the 
public schools until fourteen years of age. Having a natural taste and 
aptitude for journalism, he then went to Lansing, Michigan, where he 
was apprenticed to the printer's trade, remaining there several years. 
In 1900, owing to failing health, Jlr. Allen sought out-door work, and 
for a time was engaged in farming in Wexford county, afterward find- 
ing employment in a saw-mill. Returning to Harrison in 1905. ^Ir. 
Allen entered the employ of Mr. Asa 11. Aldrich. then editor and |)uli- 



786 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

lisher of the Cleaver, and in 1909 purchased the interest of his em- 
ployer in the paper, which he has since edited and published. De- 
voting his thought and energy to his chosen work, he has maintained 
the reputation of the journal as a bright, clean, and newsy sheet, and 
is constantly adding to its attractions, and largely increasing its cir- 
culation. Mr. Allen is successful in business, and has accumulated a 
good property, in addition to owning his newspaper being proprietor 
of a farm of eight}' acres, located near Harrison. 

■ Mr. Allen married, in March, 1907, Martha Payne, a daughter of 
George E. and Stella (White) Payne. She was born in Greenwood, 
Michigan, where her father was a merchant. Two children have blessed 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Allen, namely : George E., born February 14, 
1908 ; and Mary Estella, born April 1," 1910. 

A stanch Republican in his political afifiliations, Mr. Allen has been 
a delegate to the Count.y Republican Convention for the past four years, 
and is now serving his fourth year as city clerk. He is liberal in church 
matters, and a generous contributor to all worthy enterprises, being 
noted for his public spirit and benevolence. 

Antonie E. Bonneville, M. D. — Other men's services to the people 
and the state can be measured b.y definite deeds, by dangers averted, 
by legislation secured, by institutions built, by commerce promoted. 
The work of a doctor is entirely estranged from these lines of enter- 
prise, yet without his capable, health-giving assistance all other accom- 
plishment would count for naught. Man's greatest prize on earth is 
physical health and vigor; nothing deteriorates mental activity so 
([uickly as prolonged sickness, — hence the broad field for human help- 
fulness afforded in the medical profession. The successful doctor re- 
(juires something more than mere technical training, — he must be a 
man of broad human sympath.y and genial kindliness, capable of in- 
spiring hope and faith in the heart of his patient. Such a man is he 
who.se name initiates this article. 

Dr. Antonie E. Bonneville was born at Bresier Falls, New York, on 
the 15th of June, 1855, and he is a son of Antonie and Genevieve (Le- 
blanc) Bonneville, both of whom were born and reared in Paris, France. 
The father was summoned to the life eternal in 1888, at the age of 
seventy-five years, and the mother lived to the patriarchal age of one 
hundred years and two months, her death having occurred in 1905. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bonneville were married at St. Aniscet, Huntingdon 
county, province of Quebec, Canada, and they became the parents of 
twelve children, three sons and nine daughters, and of the number nine 
are now living, the sub.iect of this review being the eighth in order 
of birth. John Bonneville, grandfather of the Doctor, was banished 
with his family from France to Arcadia on account of his liberal views 
in regard to government. At this time Antonie Bonneville, Sr., was a 
lad of but twelve years of age. His parents were of the nobility in 
France and his wife's ancestors were famous generals under Napoleon. 
Antonie Bonneville, Sr., received his preliminary educational training 
in France; in 1835 he came to Bresier Falls, New York, where he 
prcpniT.l himsi'lf for tlir legal profession. .After being admitted to the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 787 

bar he tried only one case and deciding that the business was not to 
his taste, he located in Glengarry county, province of Ontario, Canada, 
where he engaged in farming and where he became editor of the paper 
known as the Canadian Farmer. He was a great lover of fine stock 
and was the owner of thoroughbred cattle and fine horses imported from 
Europe. He was a friend of Sir John McDonald, one of his neighbors 
being Ronald S. ^McDonald, a brother of Sir John. As a member of the 
1860 Agricultural Society, he did much to heighten interest in good 
farming and he and his wife were devout communicants of the Catholic 
church, in which he served as a trustee. 

Dr. Bonneville was educated in the public schools of Lancaster. 
Ontario, and he completed a course of study in the normal school at 
Montreal. In 1865 he was matriculated in the University of Paris, at 
Paris, France, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1868, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. After his graduation he 
.studied medicine in this excellent institution for a period of two years, 
at the expiration of which he returned to Ontario. In the fall of 
1871 he removed to New York and worked in a drug store at Fort 
Covington, where he was also a,ssistant-surgeon to Dr. A. L. Gillis. 
In 1882 he established his home in the city of Chicago, Illinois, where 
he was interne in a private hospital for two years, after which he 
studied medicine in the Physicians and Surgeons College in that city. 
Thereafter he took charge of the Wisconsin and Michigan Hospital, at 
Ashland, Wisconsin, continuing to be identified with that institution 
until 1888, when he removed to New York city, where he became a 
student in the University of New York, in which he was graduated 
June 12, 1890, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then re- 
turned to Ashland, Wisconsin, where he had charge of the Ashland 
City Hospital until 1896, in which year he came to Alpena. Here he 
conducted the Alpena Hospital until 1908, since which time he has 
devoted his attention to the general practice of his profession. He has 
a natural predilection for surgery and has been eminently successful 
in various delicate operations which have required the greatest of 
skill. He controls a large and representative practice and is recognized 
as one of the leading physicians and surgeons in this section of the 
state. In connection with his profession the Doctor is interested in 
horticulture, having a tract of sixt.y acres of most arable land and 
a general truck farm on which he raises peppermint and all kinds of 
medical plants and herbs. 

Dr. Bonneville is a member of various professional organizations of 
representative character and he is also affiliated with the Knights of 
Columbus, the St. John the Baptist Society, the French Canadian So- 
ciety and the Knights of the Maccabees. His religious faith is in 
harmony with the teachings of the Catholic church, in which he is a 
devout communicant. When he was a mere child he memorized the 
small and large Catholic catechisms and he was confirmed when but 
eight years of age. At the age of sixteen years he made stump speeches 
against Laurie and Eventurelle in Ontario. In politics he accords a 
loyal support to the cause of the Republican party and though he has 
never manifested aught of desire for the honors or emoluments of 



788 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

political ofBce he takes a deep and intelligent interest in all matters 
tending to advance the general welfare of the community in which 
he has elected to maintain his home. The Doctor has traveled very 
extensively, having visited the diiierent countries in Europe and Asia, 
including Japan and China, besides which he has made an extended tour 
of Australia. He also visited Arcadia, the place to which his grand- 
parents were banished, and he has paid his respects to the institution 
at Acadia which bears the name of Bonneville and which was dedicated 
by his ancestors. 

In the year 1899 was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Bonneville 
to Miss Elizabeth D. O'Brien, who was born on the 25th of September, 
1872. at Wausau. Marathon county, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter 
of James and Elizabeth (Hasse) O'Brien, the former of whom is a 
native of England and the latter of whom claims Germany as the place 
of her nativity. Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien became the parents of three 
daughters and four sons, all of whom are living, Mrs. Bonneville being 
the first born. Mr. O'Brien is a railroad man, having been in the 
employ of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad Company for 
fully twenty years. He is a Democrat in his political proclivities and 
is a communicant of the Catholic church, as is also his wife. His son, 
James T. O'Brien, was general superintendent of the Pere Marquette 
Railroad and boat-line for a number of years. He has now retired from 
active business and is traveling. Another son, John, is a noted actor 
and Edward G. O'Brien is an interne in a hospital in Detroit, Michigan. 
Dr. and Mrs. Bonneville have one son, Antonie E., Jr., who was born 
on the 21st of May, 1902. 

Alex. C. Hornkohl. — It is most gratifying at this juncture to accord 
recognition to Alex C. Hornkohl, a representative business man of 
Manistee, Michigan, and a citizen who has always stood for honesty 
and efficiency in public office and whose influence has ever been exerted 
in the direction of general progress and development. 

Alex C. Hornkohl was born in the city of Manistee on the 16th of 
September, 1877, and is a son of Daniel and Sophia (Kamschulte) 
Hornkohl, the former of whom was born at Hamburg and the latter at 
Berlin. The father was identified with the bakery business during the 
greater part of his active business career, and he has been deceased 
since April 17, 1908. The mother preceded him by a number of years, 
her death occurring March 9, 1895. Alex was the seventh in order of 
birth in a family of eight children, and those now living are: ]Mrs. 
Marie A. Casey, of Burlington, Vermont: Miss Clementine Hornkohl, 
of Mani.stee ; and Gustave A., Adolph G. and Alex C, also of Manistee. 
After completing the curriculum of the public schools of Manistee Alex 
C. Hornkohl pursued a commercial course in the IManistee Business 
College. In 1901 he rented the bakery business from his father and 
continued to operate the same for a period of one year. He then sold 
the business to his father and ran the same until 1907, in which year he 
bought the business himself and since that time he has leased it out. 
The bakery is located on First and Grant streets and its greatly ex- 
tended l)usiness iiinkes tliis concern one of the most important bakeries 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 7»9 

in this section of ilicliigan. Mr. Ilorukohl is also interested in the 
flour, grain and hay business, which is conducted under the title of 
Alex C. Hornkohl, and which carries on a large trade in carload lots, 
besides which he is also incumbent of the position of president of the 
Manistee Glove Company. 

Like his father before him, Alex C. Hornkohl has ever manifested 
a deep interest in public affairs. His father was for eight years a 
member of the Manistee board of aldermen and for eleven years he was ' 
chief of the fire department. In politics Mr. Hornkohl, of this sketch, 
is aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party 
and he has held many important offices of public trust and responsi- 
bility. Concerning him the following statements were made at the 
time when he was candidate for the office of county treasurer, in 1910. 
"In love for his home city Mr. Hornkohl has been excelled by none. 
He has always taken the lead in movements looking to the betterment 
of Manistee. This fact was recognized by his election to the office of 
vice-president of the board of trade when it was organized last spring. 
Mr. Hornkohl has done a great deal toward the growth of this organiza- 
tion during the past few months and has been prominent in the various 
lines of work carried on by the board of trade to secure more factories 
for Manistee." Mr. Hornkohl has served the city in the capacity of 
city treasurer and his broad experience in financial and business affairs, 
together with his careful attention to the duties of the office, made him 
a model official. In 1910 he was candidate for the office of county 
treasurer and in the ensuing election was elected. 

On the 29th of September, 1897, at Manistee, Michigan, Air. Horn- 
kohl was united in marriage to Miss Lulu Mary Cole, a native of 
Oswego, New York, and a daughter of William Cole, who has been a 
resident of Manistee for some twenty-six years. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hornkohl have been born five sons and one daughter, namely, — Alex C, 
Jr., William, Faye, George, Carl and Alargret, all of whom were born 
in Manistee. In a fraternal way Mr. ITuriikdhl is prominent in Mich- 
igan Masonry, haviiiL: passcil tliriuii;li tlic i-irdi' nf York Rite Masonry 
and holding memlH'i-sliip in the AhniistiM' ('oiiiinaiidery. No. 43, Knights 
Templars. He is also an appreciative member of the Knights of 
Pythias, of the Elks, the Eagles, the Independent Order of Foresters 
and the Modern Romans. 

Daniel D. Bruce, who is the owTier of extensive real-estate property 
in Mikado and who has one hundred and sixty acres of farming lands 
in Alcona county, is the genial proprietor of the Bruce House at Mikado. 
This modern and well equipped hostlery was built by Air. Bruce in 1886, 
and it is a commodious well furnished hotel, capable of accommodating 
as many as twenty guests. Mr. Bruce is a popular host and as a citizen 
is recognized for his impregnable integrity of character and deep and 
sincere interest in all matters of public import. He was born in the 
province of Ontario, Canada, on the 8th of April, 1857, and is a son 
of Duncan and Christina (Johnson) Bruce, both of whom were reared 
and educated in Scotland, whence they emigrated to the Dominion of 
Canada about the year 1844. In 1863 removal was made to Huron 



790 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

county, Michigan, and in 1869 the family home was established in north- 
em Michigan. In 1873 location was made in Alcona county, where the 
father entered a tract of eighty acres of government land, which he 
improved and on which he farmed until his demise, which occurred in 
1898. His widow survived him for several years and she was sum- 
moned to the life eternal in 1906. To Mr. and ilrs. Duncan Bruce 
were born si.\ children: Elizabeth, now Mrs. P. J. McDonald; Mary, 
who is the wife of John McPerson and who resides at Jlikado ; Daniel 
D., who is the immediate subject of this review ; Christina, who became 
the wife of A. W. Kenneddy and resides in Ionia county ; Jessie wedded 
Albert North, of Mikado; and Annie, is now Mrs. James Carham, of 
Oregon. 

Daniel D. Bruce grew to years of maturity and was educated in the 
public schools of Huron and Alcona counties. After leaving school he 
passed a considerable portion of his time in the lumber camps, continu- 
ing to be variously identified with the lumber industry until 1886. In 
1881 he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land in and ad.ia- 
eent to Mikado and when the village was laid out in 1887 it covered a 
portion of his holdings. He ploughed the ground for the main street 
and he now owns forty-two lots in the village, besides which he has two 
tracts, of eighty acres each, adjoining the village. He has ever mani- 
fested the keen interest of a benefactor in the town of Mikado and shortly 
after its corporation he donated half an acre of land to Philip O. Part- 
ridge, upon which to build the first store house in the place. Mr. Bruce 
has been a continuous resident of Mikado since 1887. In his political 
adherency he accords a stanch allegiance to the principles and policies of 
the Republican party, in which he has been chairman of the county com- 
mittee. As public official he has given efficient service as highway com- 
missioner of the township. In 1886 Mr. Bruce constructed his present 
fine hotel and the same has added materially to the progress and develop- 
ment of the place, attracting many travelers by reason of its excellent 
equipment. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bruce to Miss Mary A. 
MeGillis and to this union have been born seven children, whose names 
are here entered in respective order of birth, — William W., Sarah A., 
Duncan D.. Mary E.. Lula C, Catherine L. and Daniel L., all of whom 
remain at the parental home. In their religious faith the Bruce family 
are devout members of the Presbyterian church at Mikado. 

John i\I. Harris, of Boyne City, probate judge of Charlevoix county, 
and one of the leading lawyers of northern Michigan, was born in On- 
tario, September 10, 1861. The success of his career has been achieved 
throughout by his own industry. As a boy he worked on the farm dur- 
ing the summer and attended school in the winter. At the age of sev- 
enteen he left Canada and in Charlevoix county, Michigan, worked as 
a carpenter and mason, and during the winter season taught school. He 
was principal of the schools at Ironton, and in 1888 became principal 
of the Boyne City school. During the five years he served in the schools 
here he read law" with R. L. Corbett and in April. 1893, was admitted to 
Ihi' bar. He began practice in July. 189:5, and when Mr. Corbett was 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 791 

elected to the ciiriiit heiicli Mr. Harris succeeded him, iu 1893, as gen- 
eral attorney for W. II. White Co., whose legal affairs are still en- 
trusted to Mr. Harris. In 1890 Mr. Harris was a member of the school 
board as examiner. In 1896 he was elected prosecuting attorney, seiving 
two terms, and in 1900 was elected judge of probate, and has succeeded 
himself in this office to the present time. As probate judge he is active 
in the State Association of Probate Judges and served as president of 
the association one term. He is an active Republican. 

Mr. Harris is a son of Chester and Mary Jane (Gray) Harris. His 
father was bom in Pennsylvania in 1835 and died at Charlevoix in 1903, 
and the mother was born in Ontario in 1840 and died in 1904. They 
had two children, John M. and Mary, the wife of James M. Iseman. 
The father, who was taken to Ontario by his parents when he was young, 
spent his active life in lumbering and farming. 

February 22, 1888, John M. Harris married Miss Nellie Noyes. She 
was born in Banks township, Antrim county, Michigan, a daughter of 
Amos and Hannah (Hardey) Noyes, both now deceased. Her father 
and mother were born near Rochester, New York, and her father was one 
of the early settlers at North Adams, Hillsdale county, Michigan, and in 
1863 moved to northern Michigan, locating in Antrim county and taking 
up land in 1864. He later lived for a time in Charlevoix county, and 
in 1887 moved to Ironton, where he spent the rest of his life. In pol- 
itics he was a Democrat. He and his wife had three children. Seven 
children were born to Mv. and Mrs. Harris, five of whom are living: 
Bessie, wife of Fred Wenzel ; Lyle, Kate, Helen and June. ilr. Harris 
affiliates with Bo.yne City Lodge No. 391, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, with Boyne City Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Earl Fairbanks, M. D. — One of the longest established and most 
highly respected physicians and surgeons of Luther, Lake county, is 
Earl Fairbanks, M. D., who is also entitled to the term, "Honorable," 
having served in the Michigan legislature with credit to himself and 
his constituents for two terms in the house of representatives, and two 
terms in the senate. A native of Michigan, he was bom in Allegan 
county, July 19, 1860. of sturdy New England stock. 

Stephen Fairbanks, the Doctor's father, w-as born, bred and educated 
in Massachusetts, growing to manhood on the ancestral farm. In search 
of "pastures new," he came as a young man to Michigan, locating in 
Kalamazoo county, where he resided until after his marriage. Re- 
moving from there to Allegan county, he entered one hundred and sixty 
acres of Government land, and immediately began the pioneer task of 
clearing a farm from the wilderness. He was busily engaged in his 
work when the Civil war was declared. Inspired by patriotic zeal, he 
enlisted, in 1861, in the Eighth Michigan Cavalry, in which he served 
bravely until after Stoneman's noted raid. Taken severely ill from ex- 
posure on the field, he returned to his home in Allegan county, and 
died soon after, his death occurring January 21, 1865, when but thirty- 
five years of age. He married Sarah Earl, who was bom in New York 



792 HISTORY OP iNORTHERN MICHIGAN 

State, and thei'e brought up and educated. Pour children were born 
into their home, namely: Emeline, Isabel, Prank, and Earl. 

The youngest child of the parental household. Earl Fairbanks began 
as a boy to assist his widowed mother in the care of the home farm, 
doing such chores as he was able. When old enough he became self-sup- 
porting, his first wages being earned when but sixteen years old as a 
school teacher. After teaching one term in the district school, he decided 
to try an entirely different line of occupation, and entered the employ 
of the Pere Marquette Railroad Company, then known as the Western 
Michigan Railroad Company, as a common laborer and a brakeman. 
He subsequently worked in the woods a few seasons, and in 1882 settled 
in Luther, Lake eoimty, and was here employed the next three years in 
piling, inspecting, and loading lumber in a large lumber yard. His 
natural tastes and inclinations making him desirous of obtaining a 
knowledge of medicine. Mr. Fairbanks went to Ann Arbor in 1885, and 
in 1888 was there gi'aduated from the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. Returning to Luther, Dr. Fairbanks has been in 
active practice here since, his talents, skill and wisdom classing him 
among the more successful physicians of the place. 

Active and influential in political circles, the Doctor has held various 
township and county offices, an(J for twelve years served as postmaster 
at Luther. Elected to the legislature in 1892, he served in the house 
two terms, and has since been twice chosen to represent the Twenty- 
sixth Senatorial district in the state senate In 1900 he was a delegate 
to the Republican National Convention, held in Philadelphia, and in 
1896 was alternate delegate to the convention held at Saint Louis. He 
is much interested in ancestral history, and is vice president of the 
association known as the Fairbanks Family of America. 

Fraternally the Doctor is a thirty-second degree IMason, belonging to 
the Knights Templar Commandery, and to the Ancient Arabic Order of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows ; belonging to the lodge, the encampment, 
and the canton ; of the Modern Woodmen of America ; of the Knights of 
the Maccabees ; and of the Roj'al Neighbors. 

On September 25, 1886, in Ann Arbor. ]\Iichigan, Dr. Fairbanks 
married Fannie Downer, who was boi-n and reared in that city, and be- 
fore her marriage taught school in Luther. Six children have blessed 
their union, namely: Earl; Guy; Fannie, Stephen; Hai-ry, deceased; 
and Joie, deceased. The Doctor is now serving as president of the vil- 
lage of Luther, and as a member of the Luther board of education. He 
is a member of the county board of supervisors, and has served as chair- 
man of the Republican County Conniiittee of Lake County for years, 
which position he still holds. 

Wesley M. Cross, general merchant and i)Ostniastcr at Temple. .Midi- 
igan, is a self made man and the meinbei-s of the comnumity say he has 
done a remarkably good .iob. For a man to make a success of his life 
under any circumstances, in this age of competition, is a subject for con- 
gratulation, but when he has all the difficulties to encounter that Mr. 
Cross has surmounted, lie mav jusUv be iiniud ni' liiinsc'lf. As ;i matter 




C^^^^t-iz:^^^^-^-<^c< o, ^> /;>-^i^...ey? 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 793 

of fact, however, Mr. Cross is a very modest man in I'egard to his own 
attainments and capabilities. 

He was born in October, 1871, in St. Louis connty, ilissouri. At 
that time his father was living on a farm near St. Louis, then only a 
village, but as he knew more about carpentering than he did about 
farming and did not make a sii((rs.s of the latter, the family moved into 
the village of St. L(mis. Here Wesley alteiided ilie villat;e M-hool, having 
only just commenced to go tti the distiiet scIkmiI lielui'e iliey lel't the farm. 
When he was ten years old his school days ended abruptly, as he left 
home and has never seen his father since that time. Young as he was, 
he secured work in a shingle factor}'. He worked in various mills for 
several years, then became a stationary engineer, following this occupa- 
tion for some time. Not desiring to be a mechanic all his life, he next 
secured work in a .store at Riverdale. then at Tawas City and later at 
Whittemore. From tliese e.xperieiiees he gained his conunercial educa- 
tion, a slower methdd lliaii by alteiidini;' a business college, but more 
practical. In 1893 he eame in Clarence, opened a general store, carry- 
ing a very full and complete line of goods. He also filled the po- 
sition of postmaster. Ten years later he purchased a farm which he 
managed himself. Since he was a very small boy he had not had any 
experience of farm life, but he nevertheless made a success of that, as 
of everything to which he turned his hand. In 1905 he came to Temple 
and again opened a general store, which has grown very considerably 
within the last six years. He is also the postmaster of Temple. 

In the year 1902 he married Miss Minnie Smith of Temple, Jlichigan. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cross' only child is Lee, born in September, 1906. 

The Republicans have a staunch adherent in ]\Ir. Cross and they ap- 
preciate his many good qualities, showiug same by the honors they have 
bestowed on him. He is supervisor of Redding township, having been 
for three years a member of the county board of supervisors. He is the 
chairman of the committee on equalization. He is also a director in 
the Northeastern Michigan Development Bureau Association. He be- 
longs to the fraternal order of the Gleaners, standing high in the or- 
ganization. Although he lives in Temple, he still owns his three hun- 
dred and sixty acre farm and manages it himself. There are very few 
men in Michigan who have had such a remarkable career as 'Sir. Cross, 
a man as popular as he is well known. 

Charles E, Cartier. — The present representative of the Twenty- 
sixth di.strict of Jlichigan in the state senate is an exponent of that 
progressive spirit that has caused the northern counties of Michigan 
to forge so staunchly forward along industrial and commercial lines 
within the past two decades, and he is numbered among the veritable 
captains of industi\v in the city of Ludington, where he has lived since 
his childhood days and where he is vice-president of each the Cartier 
Manufacturing Company and the Cartier Lumber Company, two of 
the important industrial concerns of Mason county. Adequate as- 
surance as to his hold upon popular confidence and esteem in this sec- 
tion of the state is given by the distinguished official preferment ac- 
corded him, and such are his lovaltv and abilitv that he can n(4 but 



794 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

prove a valuable member of the upper house of the state legislature, 
to which he was elected in November, 1910. 

Hon. Charles E. Cartier was born in the city of JManistee, ;\Iic'higan, 
on the 24th of March, 1875, and is the eighth in order of birth of nine 
children of A. E. and Eliza A. (Ayres) Cartier. The father was long 
numbered among the representative business men and influential citi- 
zens of northern Michigan, and on other pages of this publication is 
entered a memoir to this honored resident of Ludington, where iie 
died on the first of March, 1910. He whose name initiates this review 
was but three years of age at the time of the family removal from 
]\Ianistee to Ludington, in which latter city he gained his early educa- 
tion in the public schools. After completing the curriculum of the 
high school he entered the University of Michigan, in which he con- 
tinued his studies for two years. He then became associated with his 
father's extensive business enterprises, with which he has since been 
actively identified, proving an able executive and showing deep in- 
terest in the furtherance of these and other industrial undertakings 
that have given so noteworthy prestige to the thriving and beautiful 
little city of Ludington. 

Senator Cartier has shown a broad and liberal public spirit and 
has been an active factor in the councils of the Republican party in 
this section of his native state. He served as mayor of Ludington in 
1908-9 and gave a most progressive and business like administration 
of the municipal affairs. In the Republican primaries in the fall of 
1910, he was nominated, without opposition, for representative of the 
Twenty-sixth district in the state senate, and in the ensuing election 
he was, after a spirited and effective campaign throughout the dis- 
trict, elected by a most gratifying majority. He took his seat in the 
senate on the 4th of January, 1911, and has already shown his mettle 
as a conscientious and loyal member of the state legislature. He is 
affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Mutual Benefit 
Association, the Modern Woodmen of America, and Ludington Lodge. 
No. 736, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, in which popular 
fraternal organization he served one term as district deputy for west- 
ern Michigan. He is a member of the directorate of the First National 
Bank of Ludington and has other capitalistic interests of importance, 
being a worthy representative of one of the well known and highly 
honored families of northern Michigan. Both he and his wife are 
communicants of the Catholic church, in whose faith he was reared. 

On the 6th of September, 1899, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Cartier to Miss Ellen M. Coady, daughter of Patrick Coady. a 
representative citizen of Pana, Illinois, and the two children of this 
union are Charles E., Jr., and Helen M. 

Paul Weine, who is now giving most efficient service in the office 
of county register of deeds of Alpena county, has filled a number of 
important offices of public trust and he is recognized as a loyal and 
progressive citizen. He was born in the province of Brandenburg, 
Prussia, Germany, on the 2nd of March. 1862, and is a son of John and 
Augusta (Poland) Weine, both of whom were likewise born in Branden- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 795 

burg, the former in 1832 and the latter in 1820. Mr. and Mrs. Weine 
were married in Germany and they became the parents of one son, 
the immediate subject of this sketch. Mr. Weine embarked for America 
in 1869 and after a long and weary trip on a sailing-vessel he landed in 
the city of New York, whence he proceeded to Buffalo and thence to 
Saginaw, Michigan. He was a wagon-maker by trade, having served 
an apprenticeship at this trade in his native land. On his arrival in 
Michigan he hired out as a farm hand and in 1870 he removed to 
Alpena county, where he obtained employment in a saw mill. In 1871 
he sent for his wife and son and they made the voyage by steamer, 
arriving at Alpena January 9, 1872, having made the trip from Standish 
to Alpena by stage. In 1876 Mr. Weine. with his family, located in 
Alpena township, Alpena county, on a tract of eighty acres of land. 
He literally hewed a farm out of the wilderness and he continued to be 
identified with agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, 
his death having occurred in May, 1908. His devoted companion passed 
away in 1892, at the age of seventy-two years. In politics John Weine 
maintained an independent attitude, voting for men and measures 
meeting with the approval of his judgment. He and his wife were 
devout members of the German Lutheran church, in whose faith they 
had been reared in the fatherland. 

Paul Weine was a lad of about ten years of age at the time of his 
arrival in America. He attended school for three years in Germany and 
for two years in Alpena. When fourteen years of age he began to 
work in a shingle mill and continued to be so employed during the 
summers until twenty-six years of age. The winters he devoted to cut- 
ting timber on his father's farm. In 1889 he purchased forty acres 
of land in Alpena township, Alpena county, and soon after his marriage, 
in 1891, he established his home on this land, gradually reclaiming it to 
cultivation and making many improvements. He engaged in diversi- 
fied agriculture and his farm is now one of the finest in the county. 
]Mr. Weine 's first public office was as a member of the school board 
and he held this position from 1888 until his election to the office of 
county register of deeds, in November, 1908. He was elected as his 
own successor in this latter office in the fall election in 1910. For 
five terms he was incumbent of the office of township treasurer and 
he was township supervisor for four terms. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Knights of the Maccabees and the Harugari Society. In politics 
he accords a stanch allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and 
he has ever given most freely of his aid and influence in support of all 
measures and enterprises advanced for the general welfare of the com- 
munity. He is a man of progressive ideas and no citizen is held in 
higher confidence and esteem in Alpena. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the German Lutheran church. 

On the 12th of September, 1891, Mr. Weine was united in mar- 
riage to ]\Iiss Amelia Genshaw, who was born in Alpena county and 
who is a daughter of William and Amelia (Simmons) Genshaw. both 
of whom were born in Germany. Mr. Genshaw emigrated to America 
when a young man and began life as a farm hand. He gradually 
accumulated the means wherewith to purchase a farm and he was 



796 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

identified with agriculture until his death. 'Sim. Genshaw now resides 
in Alpena township and of her five children four are living, — William, 
Amelia, Charles and Annie. Amelia Genshaw Weine was reared and 
educated in her native county and she and her husband became the 
of seven children, two of whom are deceased. Those living 
-Richard. William, Albert, Dora and Clarence. 

Cantjte a. Johnson, postmaster and one of the substantial business 
men of Mikado, where he has been engaged in the general merchandise 
business for the past twenty years, is the owner of a splendid farm of 
two hundred and twenty acres, the same being one of the finest in this 
township. In addition to his other real estate holdings Mr. Johnson 
has a tract of one hundred and twenty acres of unimproved land in 
Mikado town.ship, Alcona county, Michigan. 

Although Mr. Johnson is not a native American he has resided in 
the United States since he was an infant three years of age. He was 
bom in Norway, on the 12th of February, 1854, and is a son of John 
Johnson, also of Norway, wljo with his family of six children emigrated 
to the United States in 1857, locating in Orleans county. New York. 
The father was a laborer during much of his active business career and 
he was summoned to the life eternal in 1906, his wife having passed away 
in 1897. Of the family of six children, two are now liNang, Enger M., 
who is now 'Sirs. Skinner and who resides at Carlton, New York and 
Canute A., the immediate subject of this review. Slv. Johnson received 
his preliminary educational training in the common schools of Orleans 
county. New York, and in 1874, at which time he was a youth of twenty 
years, he removed to Shiawassee county, Michigan, where he turned his 
attention to farming. In 1891 he established his home in ]\Iikado, where 
he purchased a tract of eighty acres of farm land, to which he has kept 
adding year after year until at the present time his holdings amount to 
three hundred and forty acres. After his arrival in IMikado he estab- 
lished his present mercantile concern, this being the second store of its 
kind in the town.. 

Politically Mr. Johnson endorses the cause of the Republican party 
and for the past sixteen years he has been postmaster of Mikado, being 
the second man to hold that office. He has also been incumbent of the 
offices of township treasurer and township clerk and now, in 1911, he 
is justice of the peace, having remained in tenure of that position for 
the past twelve years. In all his business relations Mr. Johnson is known 
as a man of unquestioned honesty and sterling integrity. Through 
thrift and pertinacity of purpose he has made all his ventures count for 
good and to-day he is recognized as one of the most prominent and in- 
fluential men in the county. Fraternally he is affiliated with Ilarris- 
ville Lodge, No. 292, Free & Accepted Masons, the Knights of the Mac- 
cabees and the Grange. 

In 1895 ]\Ir. Johnson married Miss Mary McFarland, who was born 
and reared at Buffalo, New York, and who is a daughter of Malcomb 
and Jennett McFarland. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have been born two 
children, Newton E. and Jennie M. The religious faith of the family 
is in harmony with the tenets of the Presbyterian church at Mikado. 




(y^:^/yy^-ccc.cAy^tc,<^ct^^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 797 

George W.- Bailey is a pioneer settler of 1873 in Charlevoix county, 
and has been identified with the progress of this part of the state for 
nearly forty years. He was born in Erie county, New York, April 9, 
1837,' and was reared and educated there. On May 28, 1861, he re- 
sponded to one of the first calls of the war and enlisted in company E, 
Seventy-second New York Voliuiteers, this regiment forming part of 
Sickle's Brigade. He participated at the siege of Yorktown, at Will- 
iamsburg, was thirty days on the firing line in the Fair Oaks campaign 
and on the seven days' retreat, was at Malvern Hill, Harrison Landing, 
Catlett's Station, the second Bull Run, and Chantilla. He was then on 
detached duty under Gen. D. Ulman at Port Hudson, Louisiana, and 
was there at the surrender, July 9, 1864. After having participated in 
all the battles and skirmishes of his regiment he was honorably dis- 
charged at New Orleans, October 8, 1864. 

He returned to New York to engage in farming until 1873, when he 
moved to Wilson township, Charlevoix county, and entered one hundred 
and sixty acres of land out of the wilderness that then prevailed almost 
unbroken in this part of the state. He cleared sixty-five acres, built him- 
self a home, and lived there until 1887, when he became a resident of 
Boyne village, now Boyne City. For about six years he worked as scaler 
of logs. While living in Wilson township he served twelve years as town- 
ship supervisor, as superintendent of schools in the township for five 
years, after which he moved to the village of Boyne City, was elected 
supervisor of Evangeline township — which office he held for twelve 
years consecutively. When Boyne Citj^ was incorporated in 1905 he was 
elected city assessor, which office he has since held ; was deputy county 
clerk two terms, deputy sheriff two terms. In politics he is a Republi- 
can, belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, and is a member of 
Boyne City Lodge No. 391, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Bailey comes of a New England family, who emigrated to 
America from England in the year 1681. His parents were Joseph and 
Fannie (Lake) Bailey. The former was born in Shaftsbury, Vermont, 
in 1810, and died in 1871, and the latter was a native of New York state 
and lived to the age of eighty-nine years. Three of their seven children 
are now living: Daniel W., of Buffalo, New York; George W. ; Albion 
J., of Fredonia, New York. The father passed his active life as a farm- 
er in Erie county. New York. 

August 24, 1858, Mr. George W. Bailey married Miss Caroline Park- 
inson, who was a native of Erie county. New York, and died in 1S80, 
leaving four children : Wellington R., a farmer in South Dakota ; Wir- 
field, also a farmer in that state ; Frank L., a farmer; William W., in t' j 
drug business at Boyne City. Mr. Bailey's second marriage occurred 
Ausust 24, 1882, when Emma F. Hull became his wife. She is a native 
of Michigan. Four children were born of this union: Floyd and ilon- 
ro(>, who live at Battle Creek; Paul and Marion Pauline, at home. 

Thomas Smurthwaite. — One of the valued contributors lo the 
generic historical subject-matter of this publication is this well known 
and highly esteemed citizen of Manistee, and it is the wish of the pub- 
lishers to accord in tins volume a permanent mark of appreciation of 



798 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the co-operation given by him and also to enter a brief review of his 
career as one of the world's earnest and productive workers. He is 
recognized as one of the rep^-esentative members of the bar of northern 
Michigan and has been called upon to serve in various offices of dis- 
tinctive public trust, including that of prosecuting attorney of Manis- 
tee county. 

Mr. Smurthwaite was born in the city of Toronto, Canada, on the 
18th of January, 1850, and is a son of Thomas and Lavinia (McLellan) 
Smurthwaite, the former of whom was born near Richmond, Yorkshire, 
England, and the latter near the city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Thomas 
Smurthwaite, Sr., was eight j'ears of age at the time when his parents 
emigrated from England and established their home in the province of 
Ontario, Canada, where he was reared and educated and where he 
continued to reside until 1865, when he came with his family to Michi- 
gan, within whose borders he has since maintained his home. Now 
venerable in years, he resides with his daughter, Mrs. William H. 
Tucker, of Flint, Michigan, his cherished and devoted wife having been 
summoned to the life eternal on the 10th of February, 1895. The 
major portion of his active career was devoted to the manufacturing 
of brick. The lineage of the Smurthwaite family in England is traced 
back to the time of the Norman conquest, and the name has long been 
identified with the annals of sturdy old Yorkshire. 

Thomas Smurthwaite. Jr., whose name initiates this article, was 
reared to the age of fifteen years in the province of Ontario, Canada, 
where he worked in his father's brick yard and on the home farm, and 
where he gained his rudimentary education in tlie common schools. 
"When he had attained to the age noted he came with his parents to 
Michigan, and he was reared to maturity in Sanilac county, where he 
gained his full quota of experience in arduous toil and endeavor. He 
has continued his residence in Michigan without intermission during 
the long intervening period, except for one year passed in Tacoma, 
Washington. His education has been principally gained through self- 
discipline, and he is a graduate of neither high school nor college, 
though he was for a time enabled to attend the excellent schools of the 
city of Toronto, prior to the removal of the family to Michigan. After 
leaving school he assisted in the work of his father's brick yard, in 
Sanilac county, during the summer seasons, and in the winter terms 
he taught in the country schools, thus showing that he had made good 
use of such advantages as had been accorded him. Later he was em- 
ploved as foreman in brick yards at St. Clair and Dearborn, this state. 
In 1875-6 ]\Ir. Smurthwaite was a teacher in the village schools of Bald- 
win, Lake county, and in the meanwhile he had taken up and carefully 
prosecuted the study of law, under effective preceptorship. He was 
admitted to the bar at Baldwin on the 14th of July, 1876, and in the 
spring of the following year he entered the law office of Judge Ldward 
E. Edwards, of Fremont, Newago county, where he was associated with 
the Judge in professional work for one year. He then returned to 
Baldwin, in the spring of 1878, and there engaged in the practice of 
his profession in an individual way. In the autumn of the same year 
he was elected prosecuting attorney of Lake county, and the best evi- 



HISTORY OF NOKTIIEKiN JllCIilGAN 799 

denee of the efficiency and acceptability of his service was that accorded 
in his election as his own successor in 1880. In 1884 Mr. Smurthwaite 
removed to the city of Tacoma, Washington, where he remained one 
year, and upon liis return to Michigan he located in Detroit, wliere he 
engaged in the active practice of his profession under auspicious con- 
ditions. Impaired health, however, compelled him to abandon liis woi-k 
in the metropolis of the state, and in the autumn of 1886 he removed 
to Manistee, where he continued in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession and where he has gained secure vantage ground as one of the 
versatile and resoiirc?ful members of the bar of this section of tlie 
state. In 1890 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Manistee county,^ 
and at the expiration of his first term he was re-elected, in 1892, thus 
continuing incumbent of the office for four consecutive years. lie 
made an admirable record as public prosecutor and has long held liigli 
reputation as a skillful trial lawyer. 

Prior to 1896 Mr. Smurthwaite had given his allegiance to liie Re- 
publican party, but in that year the policies advanced by Hon. William 
J. liryan ancl adopted by the Democratic party made such appeal to 
his judgment that he espoused the cause of the latter political organiza- 
tion, in whose campaign of that year he gave eil'ective service in sup- 
port of the presidential nominee, Mr. Bryan. His well defined convic- 
tions liave since that time kept him in the ranks of the Democratic 
party and lie is an effective advocate of its principles and policies. In 
1897 further evidence of popular confidence and esteem was accorded 
-Mr. Smurthwaite through his election to the office of mayor of Manis- 
tee, in which he served two terms of one year each. His administration, 
duly conservative, was marked by thorough business policies and ]>ro- 
gressiveness, and within his regime many excellent public improve- 
ments of permanent order were made, while efficiency and economy were 
secured in the various departments of the numicipal government. Prior 
to this, in 1890, Mr. Smurthwaite had served as city attorncx'. uiidi'r 
Mayor Magnan, and in 1899 he held the same preferment luidcr the 
administration of Mayor King. 

In 1901 Mr. Smurthwaite removed to Traverse City, where !ie ei.n- 
tinued in the practice of his profession until the summer of PtlO, wIk ii 
he returned to Manistee, where he is again established in practice of a 
representative order. He has been identified with much of the impor- 
tant litigation in the courts of this part of the state and is known as a 
hard worker in his profession and as one who has honored the same by 
his interpositiori and effective labors. He lias ever maintained high 
civic ideals and has ca.st his influence in the cause of good government, 
local and national. He was a most influential factor in .sectiring to 
j\Iani.«tee its fine water system, and tlie principal cause of his election to 
the office of mayor was to secure this acquisition by the city, lie was 
indefatigable iii pushing the work forward, but the final result was 
attained under the mayoralty of Dr. King, the while he himself served 
at the time as city attorney. Mr. Smurthwaite has been identified with 
the Masonic fraternity since 1873, and his only affiliation in the same 
is with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Jlasons. He 
is also identified witli fraternal insurance orders. A man of ]iositive 



800 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

views in all things and one who has a reason for his opinions and con- 
victions, Mr. Smurthwaite finds in the faith of the Protestant Episcopal 
church the tenets and ideals which meet his approval. He is an earnest 
communicant, as is also Mrs. Smurthwaite, and both are prominent 
and valued factors in the work of the local parish of Holy Trinity 
church. He is staunchly in favor of the embellished ritual of the ' ' high- 
church" wing and this attitude is the result of careful study of church 
history and the primitive usages of the Church of England, with which 
the family has been identified since the time of the Reformation, so 
that probably his predilections have an inherent quality. 

Mr. Smurthwaite has been in a significant sense the architect of his 
own fortunes, and he has accomplished much, though the materialistic 
views of life have never appealed to him, with the result that, though a 
worker, he has shown deep appreciation for the higher ideals. Sincere, 
tolerant and kindly, he wins and retains friends in all classes, and is 
satisfied to have gained such temporal success as his labors have justi- 
fied, the while he has been instant in sympathy and aid for those in 
"any way afflicted or distressed in mind, body or estate," thus showing 
a high sense of his .stewardship as a man among men. Concerning him 
the following pertinent .statements have been written and they are 
worthy of perpetuation: "Mr. Smurthwaite is a little too sympathetic, 
or, as some would say, too radical, for eminent financial success. He 
is not a worshiper of Mammon or of its representatives, and he is op- 
posed to all matters political or social that tend to enrich the few at the 
expense of the many. He has found plenty of hard work to do, and 
the will and ability to do it." 

The domestic relations of Mr. Smurthwaite have been of most grate- 
ful order, and in his home and wife and children his interests are cen- 
tered. At Port Huron, Michigan, on the 20th of October, 1874, was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Matilda Lueinda Indermille, who was 
born at Detroit, Michigan, and who was the fourth in order of birth of 
three sons and seven daughters born to Frederick and Hannah E. Inder- 
mille, both of whom passed the closing years of their lives in Detroit, 
the greater part of the active career of the father having been devoted 
to commercial life. Of the children no sons but seven daughters are 
now living. Concerning the ehildi-en of Mr. and Mrs. Snuirthwaite the 
following brief data are given: Milton Gray, who was born July 27, 
1875, is now a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; William Thomas, who 
was born February 5, 1877, died at Baldwin, Michigan, August 16, 
1886; the next child was stillborn, in June. 1878; Gillespie Pritchard, 
who was born January 23, 1880, died at Traverse City March 25, 1902; 
Charles Frederick, who was born November 28, 1881, now resides at 
Phoenix, Arizona; Julian Hawthorne, who was born December 27, 
1883, died at Baldwin. August 16, 1886 ; Paul, who was born February 
5, 1885, died at Baldwin on the 5th of May, 1886; Ethel, who was born 
May 1, 1888, is now a student in the University School of Music at Ann 
Arbor (1911) ; Bessie Lucille, who was born August 8. 1891, is a fresh- 
man in the Univer-sity of Michigan, in the class of 1914 in tlie literary 
department; and Mary Louise, who was born April 18. 1893, remains 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 801 

at the parental home and is a student in the Manistee high st'hool, as a 
member of the class of 1912. 

WiLBER B. Pool. — A man of broad ideas and wide vision, Wilber B. 
Pool, editor of the Luther Observer, at Luther, Michigan, has met with 
a large measure of success as a journalist, the paper which he founded 
and of which he has since had control being now one of the leading 
newspapers of Lake county. A son of the late J. M. Pool, he was Ixjrn 
at Upper Sanduskj', Ohio, September 7, 1854, of Scotch-English lineage. 

Born in Richland county, Ohio, J. JM. Pool was brought up as a 
farmer's son, and received his education in the rural schools of his dis- 
trict. He subsequently served an apprenticeship at the trade of a car- 
penter and joiner. After his marriage he bought land in Wyandot 
county, Ohio, and began the improvement of a homestead. During the 
Civil war he enlisted as a one-hundred day man, and during the raid of 
Mosby's troops was taken prisoner, but subsequently escaped. At the 
expiration of his period of enlistment he returned to his Ohio home, 
and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, at the 
venerable age of eighty years. He was a life-long Republican and a 
valued citizen. He married Mary Hartupee, who was born in Richland 
county, Ohio, of German and French ancestry. The following sons and 
daughters were born of their union : A daughter that died in infancy; 
Wiliiam F. ; Emma E. ; Wilber B. ; Ora B. ; Elmer E. ; James C. ; Frank 
L. ; and Harley A. 

Obtaining his preliminary education in the district schools of Wyan- 
dot county, Wilber B. Pool afterwards attended the Normal School at 
Ada, Ohio, taking the scientific course and subsequently taking the law 
and literary courses at Valparaiso, Indiana. Returning to his native 
state, he was engaged in the practice of his profession at Upper San- 
dusky for a brief time. In 1881, however, he came to Michigan to as- 
sist his brother and an uncle who were running a hardware store in 
Jackson. Becoming familiar with the details of the business. ]Mr. Pool 
in 1882 established a hardware store in Liither and managed it success- 
fully for twelve years. In 1894 he opened a printing office in Luther 
and founded the "Observer," which he has since managed with undis- 
puted success. 

'Sir. Pool has likewise devoted a part of his time and energies to the 
practice of his profession, being a member of the Michigan bar, and 
for fifteen years has served as Circuit court commissioner. He is prom- 
inent in public affairs, having held many of the village and towmship 
offices, for many years serving as a member of the Luther Board of 
Education and as its president. He is an active member of the Metho- 
ri.st Episcopal church and its local preacher. 

William A. Wyman, one of the leading business men of the city of 
McBain and one of the most popular and influential citizens of Mis.sau- 
kee county, was born on a farm in the township of Sandstone, Jackson 
county, Michigan, August 27, 1874. He was the eldest son of Cliarles G. 
and Mary A. Wyman. His father, Charles G. Wyman, was the first en- 
gineer in the employ of Buckley & Douglas on their logging railroad in 



802 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Manistee county. He died November 29, 1890, from injuries received 
while in the discharge of his duties as engineer on the Manistee & 
Northeastern railroad. Four years later, his widow INIary A. Wyman, 
married W. T. Brain, a merchant at Manistee, ]\Iichigan, where they 
now reside. 

William's earliest recollections cluster around the farm home in 
Jackson county, where he was born and where he spent the early years 
of his life. His education was secured io a district school and in a 
graded school in the little village of Parma and the city of Jackson. 
Having obtained a fair common school education, he entered Devlin's 
Business College at Jackson, Michigan, about October 1, 1890. His in- 
tentions were to complete the business course, but the death of his 
father occurring a few weeks later, caused him to change his plans. 
"With all the enthusiasm of youth he launched out into the business 
world to find employment where he could gain a practical business edu- 
cation as well as assist him financially. His first position was in the 
office of Charles Ruggles at Manistee, jMichigan. He later secured a 
position as clerk in a grocery and drug store for George R. Scoville, in 
the same city. He next accepted a position with Rademaker & Hender- 
son as manager of their transfer lines, this position he held for three 
years. It was during this time that he met Miss ^Minnie E. Stanley, 
whom he married March 31, 1896. She is the daughter of Charles D. 
and Mary R. Stanley, the former of whom was a merchant at Manistee 
and held the office of register of deeds and clerk of IManistee county, 
and later was general manager of the E. R. Dailey Company at Sutton 's 
Rmv. ;\lichit;aii, and is now a banker at Jlount Morris, Michigan. 

After ]\Ir. Wyman 's marriage his first position was circulating repre- 
sentative for the Manistee Daily Advocate and Grand Rapids Herald 
at Manistee. This position he held one year until he moved to Sutton's 
Bay, Jlichigan, where he entered the employ of E. R. Dailey as book- 
keeper. Two years later the business of E. R. Dailey was incorporated 
into a slock company, under the name of The PI R. Dailey Company, and 
Mr. Wyman being one of the stockholders, was elected a director and 
secretary and treasurer of the company. Four years later Mr. Dailey 
sold his interest in the company to the other stockholders and the cor- 
poration name was changed to The Wyinan «& Strong Company, Mr. 
Wyman holding the offices of general manager, secretary and treasurer. 
D^iring his residence at Sutton 's Bay. Mr. Wyman held in succession 
the offices of township treasurer, village treasurer and village trustee, 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. 

In 1904 he severed his connection with the Wyman & Strong company 
and came to McBain, Michigan, where he established the first banking 
institution that McBain ever had and the second bank in ;\Iissaukee 
coimty. So universally popular, under his able and pleasing manage- 
ment, did this bank become, that in six months' time it was necessary 
to seek a larger building for the banking offices in order to handle the 
busine-ss. Mr. Wyman is now president of the bank having admitted Mr. 
Orrin O. Dunham as a partner in 1906. 

During the year 1907, he with Mr. 0. 0. Dunham, built, furnished 
and equipped the neat l)Muk building at Dighton. IMichigiin. and on Jan- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 803 

uary 2, 1908, opened its doors for business as "The Farmers & Mer- 
chants Banli. " Mr. Wyman was vice president of this bank until July, 
1910, when he sold his interest in the institution. He was one of the 
organizers of the Dighton Land Company, a corporation, whose main 
business is dealing in real estate, and is one of the directors and the 
treasurer of this company. 

Mr. Wyman has never been an office seeker, but the Republican 
party has thrust offices upon him, but this fact has not in the least de- 
terred him from doing his duty with firmness and impartialit.y which 
only adds to his popularity. He was one of the leading citizens to assist 
in securing the charter, specially granted, which made McBain a city. 
He held the office of ilcBain village treasurer and, upon the r&signation 
of C. R. Burleson as mayor, was appointed by the council to fill the va- 
cancy and so well did he fill the office that he was elected to succeed 
himself, which position he still holds. 

With his wife and two daughters, Rhea M., born November 12, 1901, 
and Mary Evelyn, born August 22, 1904, Mr. Wyman occupies a beau- 
tiful home in the finest residence part of the city. He belongs to three 
fraternal orders, viz : the Masons, Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and Modern Woodmen of America. He is one of the most ready men to 
assist in a worthy cause and always has his eyes open for anything that 
will advance the interest of his home city and commonwealth, and he is 
considered a most useful man to the county, the state and the country at 
large. 

Henry Yockey is most successfully engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits on his fine farm of two hundred acres adjoining the village of 
I\Iikado, in Alcona count.y, Michigan. He is also interested in land 
speculations and at one time was the faithful and efifieient incumbent of 
the office of justice of the peace. Mr. Yockey was born in the cit}^ of 
Buffalo, New York, the date of his nativity being the 6th of Augu.st, 
1842. He is a son of Philip and Sallie (Houri) Yockey, who was born 
in Alsace, which province was then a kingdom of France but which was 
ceded to Germany in 1871, as the result of the Franco-Prussian war. 
The parents emigrated to the United States in 1835, location being made 
at Buffalo, New York, where the father turned his attention to the 
lumber industry ; he also owned and operated a canal boat in the early 
days and he was a prominent business man in Buffalo during a long 
period of years. To Philip and Sallie Yockey were born seven children, 
five of whom are living at the present time, in 1911. The parents are 
both deceased. 

To the public schools of Buffalo Mr. Yockey, of this review, is in- 
debted for his preliminary educational training and in 1862, when 
twenty j'ears of age, he removed to Saginaw, Michigan, continuing to 
maintain his home at that place for the ensuing ten years, at the ex- 
piration of which he removed to Au Sable, where he constructed that 
well known hostelry, the Yockey House, the same being completed in 
1873. Mr. Yockey owned and operated that hotel up to 1876 and in 
that year he became interested in the meat business, doing an extensive 
business on the lakes by means of trading boats. He was identified 



804 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

with the latter enterprise up to 1897, at which time he came to Mikado, 
where he has since been engaged in the great basic industry of agricul- 
ture. He owns a splendid estate of two hundred acres of land adjoin- 
ing Mikado and he is also the owner of a number of good lots in the 
village. For some time past he has been much interested in the real- 
estate business, doing considerable in the way of land speculations. He 
is a man of unusual foresight and good judgment and orie whose coun- 
cil is sought by his fellow citizens. He is loyal and public-spirited in 
all matters pertaining to the general welfare of the community in which 
he has long resided and no measure projected for progress and develop- 
ment fails to meet with his heartiest approval and support. Politically 
he is an uncompromising Republican and the only office of which he 
has ever been incumbent is that of justice of the peace, to which he was 
elected in 1897 and which he held for four years. Fraternally he is 
connected with various organizations of representative character and 
in his religious faith he is a devout member of the Lutheran church, of 
which is wife is likewise a member. 

In the year 1872 Mr. Tockey was united in marriage to Miss Annie 
Miller, a daughter of Adam Miller, long a representative business man 
at Saginaw, Michigan, where Mrs. Yockey was reared and educated. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Yockey have been born four children, whose names 
are here entered in respective order of birth, — Samuel, Edward, Henry 
and Sarah. 

Lou. S. Darling. — One of the substantial business men and highly 
esteemed citizens of Petoskey, Mr. Darling is senior member of the firm 
of Darling & Beahan, which controls a large and important enterprise 
in the handling of product, seeds, agricultural implements, carriages 
and other vehicles and whose extensive and well equipped establish- 
ment is eligibly located at 416 Howard street. Such is Mr. Darling's 
standing as a representative citizen and business man of Emmet county 
that there is all of consistency in according him specific recognition in 
this publication. 

Mr. Darling claims the old Empire state of the Union as the place 
of his nativity and within its gracious borders were also born his par- 
ents, a fact that indicates that the respective families were there 
founded in an early day. L. Steele Darling was born in Tioga county, 
New York, on the 12th of February, 1862, and is a son of Selim and 
Theodocia (Gale) Darling. The father, who was born in the year 1824, 
was a resident of Petoskey, Michigan, at the time of his death, in 1904, 
and here his widow has since continued to maintain her home, the sub- 
ject of this review being the only survivor of their four children. Selim 
Darling learned the trade of carpenter when a young man and event- 
ually became a successful contractor and builder. In 1873 he removed 
to Flint, Michigan, where he continued to be identified with this irn- 
portant line of business enterprise until 1878, when he established his 
permanent home in Petoskey, Michigan, where he gained prestige as 
one of the leading contractors and builders of this county and where 
he ever held secure place in popular confidence and esteem. He aided 
materially in the development and upbuilding of Petoskey and was one 




.^^ ,^25*-zrzf~ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 805 

of its loyal and public-spirited citizens. His political support was given 
to the Republican party, he was affiliated with the local lodge of Knights 
of Pythias, and was a zealous member of the Presbyterian church, as 
is also his widow, whose gentle and gracious attributes of character 
have endeared her to all who have come within the immediate sphere of 
her influence. 

Lou. Steele Darling, whose name initiates this review, gained his 
early educational discipline in the public schools of his native county 
and supplemented this by attendance in the schools of the city of Flint, 
^lichigan. As a youth he served a thorough apprenticeship at the car- 
penter's trade, under the direction of his honorecl father, and he further 
fortified himself by a course in architectural designing, in a correspond- 
ence school. From 1878 until 1894 he was associated with his father in 
the contracting and building business, and he then turned his attention 
to his present line of enterprise, in which his success has been on a parity 
with his indefatigable energy, progressive methods and good manage- 
ment. In the prosecution of the business he is associated with a valued 
coad.iutcu-. Charles C. Beahan, under the firm title of Darling & Beahan. 
and their fair and honorable dealings have gained to them a large and 
appreciative patronage, with the result that they have built up a busi- 
ness that is unexcelled in its line by any other in Emmet county. 

As a citizen I\Ir. Darling is essentially broadminded. progressive and 
liberal, and he has given ready support to enterprises and undertakings 
projected for the general good of his home community. He served one 
term as a member of the city board of aldermen, as representative of 
the first M'ard. Mr. Darling accords unwavering allegiance to the Re- 
publican party, and is affiliated with Petoskey Lodge, No. 282, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and Petoskey Tent, No. 223, Knights of 
the ]Modern jMaccabees. Both Mr. and Mrs. Darling are adherents of 
the Presbyterian church. 

On the 23d of September, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Darling to Jliss Cora Bacon, the only child of Levi and Diana (Bennett) 
Bacon, the former of whom was a resident of Petoskey at the time of 
his death and the latter of whom now maintains her home in Petoskey. 
Mr. and Mrs. Darling have three children. Theodocia Anna. Selim 
Bacon, and Ada Louise. 

John H. Grant. — Measured by its benignant influence and worthy 
accomplishment, as well as by popular approbation, the life of Judge 
Grant, of ilanistee, has counted for much, and he is deserving of con- 
sideration in this publication as one of the representative members of 
the JMichigan bar and one of the influential and honored citizens of 
the city of Manistee, where he has maintained his home for nearly 
thirty years and where he has served on the bench of the Probate Court 
of Manistee county continuously for the past decade and a half. A 
man of ideas and ideals, his character is the positive expression of 
a strong, loyal and sincere nature, and he has employed his powers to 
goodly ends as one of the world's noble army of workers. 

Judge Grant was born on a farm near the village of Burlington, 
Carroll cduiity, Indiana, on the 22ntl of September, 1857, and is a 



806 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

son of John M. and Catherine (Spangler) Grant, the former of whom 
was born in Butler county, Ohio, where the family was founded in the 
pioneer days, and the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania, 
whence she accompanied her parents on their removal to Butler county, 
Ohio, when a young woman. In that county was solemnized her mar- 
riage to John M. Grant in 1847, and about 1850 they removed to Car- 
roll county, Indiana. The father of Judge Grant became one of the 
prosperous farmers of Carroll county, where he continued to reside 
until his death, at the venerable age of eighty-six years, and his ster- 
ling integrity of character won and retained to him the inviolable con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellow men. His wife is still living in Car- 
roll county and is eighty-four years of age at the time of this writ- 
ing, in 1911. Of the nine children seven grew to maturity and are 
still living, and until the death of the honored father there had been no 
other break of death in the family circle for more than half a century. 
Judge Grant was the sixth in order of birth, and the family name has 
been identified with the annals of American history since the Colonial 
epoch. The lineage is traced back to staunch Scotch origin. 

Judge Grant was reared under the invigorating influences of the 
farm, and in this connection he gained his initial experience in the 
practical duties and responsibilities of a workaday world. The gracious 
environment of his home and his naturally alert mentality begot 
in him definite ambition, and he determined to secure a liberal 
education after he had completed the curriculmn of the country schools. 
It was this determination that primarily brought him to IMichigan, and 
in 1875 he became a student in the high school at Ann xVrbor, the seat 
of the Great University of Michigan. There he continued his studies 
for two years, after which he attended the Pontiac high school for one 
year, at the expiration of which he was matriculated in the literary 
department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1882 and from which he received his well 
earned degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the following year he was 
graduated in the law department of the same institution, which then 
conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was forth- 
with admitted to the bar of the state, and tho.se wlio know liim agree 
that it is fortunate for ^Michigan that he did not return to his native 
commonwealth. 

In April, 1883, Judge Grant established his home in Manislee. where 
he has resided continuously during the long intervening years. Here 
he entered the law offices of the firm of Ramsdell & Benedict, with \yhom 
he was associated until 1887, when he formed a partnership alliance 
with Judge Aaron V. McAlvay, which mutually pleasing and effective 
professional association was continued for fourteen years, to be sev- 
ered only when Judge McAlvay was elected circuit judge and later 
was chosen a member of the Supreme Court of Michigan, upon the 
bench of whieli he has presided since 1904. In August, 1905. Judge 
Grant formed a partner.sliip in the law with Max E. Neal. under tlie 
title of Grant & Neal, and this association continued until February. 
1911. Judge Grant, prior to assuming his present office on the bencii 
of the Probate (^urt, had gained more than local reputation as a re- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 807 

sourceful and versatile advocate at the bar and as a specially safe and 
conservative counselor, his dicta invariably being based upon wide and 
accurate knowledge of tliv srifucc of jurisprudence and upon judgment 
of noteworthy niatiuity ami ilisniiiiiuation. 

In politics Judge (irant has ever been an unwavering advo(;ate of 
the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands spon- 
sor, and, without entering aggressively into tlie tumult of so-called 
practical politics, he has given yeoman service in behalf of the party 
cause. In 1903 he was elected city attorney of Manistee, and of this 
office he was incuml)ent for three terms. He has sought no office aside 
from those of direct association with the work of his chosen profession, 
which he has considered well worthy of his undivided loyalty. In 
August, 1894, Governor Rieli appointed him judge of the Probate Court 
of Manistee county, to till the vacancy caused by the death of Judge 
Nelson W. Nelson, and at the regular election in the autumn of the same 
year he was duly elected to fill out the unexpired term. Through suc- 
cessive re-elections he has .since continued in tenure of this important 
office, and his administration of its affairs has been marked ]}y the 
most scrupulous care in all details, thus constituting a veritable model 
of efficiency. Judge Grant has shown a most loyal interest in all that 
has touched the welfare of his home city, and he served for fifteen 
years as a member of its board of education. His labors in this capac- 
ity were not of perfunctory order, but he insistently advocated pro- 
gressive measures, in which connection it should be stated that during 
his service on this board the commercial, kindergarten, music, drawing, 
manual-training and domestic-science departments were established in 
connection with the work of the public schools of Manistee. He was 
one of the principal organizers of the Manistee County Savings Bank, 
of which he is still a director, and since the bank was organized he has 
been chairman of its discount committee. Upon the death of Hon. 
Arthur Hill, regent of the University of Michigan, Governor Warner 
conferred a well merited honor upon Judge Grant by appointing him to 
fill this vacancy on the Board of Regents of his noble old alma mater. 
The appointment was made on the 22d of December, 1909, and the term 
will expire on the -Slst of Deeendier, 1913. 

Judge Grant is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Romans, in whish last-named or- 
ganization he is an officer of the supreme body. He is also a director 
of the Northern Assurance Company of Michigan, which has its head- 
quarters in the city of Detroit. 

As a churchman and a worker for the uplift of his fellow men the 
services of Judge Grant have been earnest and zealous. He has long 
been one of the vertible pillars of the First Methodist Episcopal church 
of Manistee and has been superinteiuient of its Sunday-school for more 
than a score of years. His labors, however, have transcended local lim- 
itations, as is evident when it is stated that he has been president of the 
Michigan Conference Brotherhood of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
two years, and that for three years he has served as president of the 
Michigan State Sunday School Association, besides which he is pres- 



808 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

ident of the Epworth League Assembly at Ludington. Both he and his 
wife are most devoted workers in the various departments of their 
church and in their private lives are instant in good works and kindly 
deeds, so that a natural sequel has been the affectionate regard shown 
them by those who have come within the spliere of their influence. 

At Burlington, Indiana, on the 5th of April, 1883, was solemnized 
tlie marriage of Judge Grant to Miss Henrietta Mason, who was born in 
the state of Indiana, and who is a daughter of Rev. and Mrs. (Elihu) 
Mason. Her parents passed the closing years of their lives in Kansas. 
Judge and Mrs. Grant became the parents of five children, two of whom 
died in infancy. Paul the oldest son, educated in the local schools and 
in the University, is now in business in Chicago. Edith, the daughter, 
is now studying in the Conservatory of Music at Oberlin, Ohio, and 
Arthur, now fourteen, is in the public schools of Manisiee. 

Norman "W. Dunan. — It is a subject for congratulation that the 
young men in the state of Michigan are coming to the front in such a 
prominent way. It augurs well for the future of the state. Norman W. 
Dunan, attorney at law at Lake City, at an age when most young men 
have yet to show the mettle there is in them, has already had honors be- 
stowed upon him. Judging, from the successes he has already had, he 
has a great career before him. He was bom at St. Mary's, Ohio, Octo- 
ber 8, 1886. His parents, Otis and Leah Dunan, are natives of Ohio 
and Michigan respectively. Mrs. Dunan 's maiden name was Van Riper 
and they lived at St. ]\Iary 's at the time they were married, where Mr. 
Dunan was interested in a. bank, and where he is still living engaged 
as a banker. 

Norman's boyhood was passed at his native town, where he received 
his early education. He attended the grammar school and then the 
high school, graduating from high school in 1904. In the fall of th.it 
year he entered Oberlin college, taking a special course. He only stayed 
there until the end of the school year and in the fall of 1905 he entered 
the law department of the University of Michigan, located at Ann 
Arbor, from which he graduated in 1908, receiving the degree of Bache- 
lor of Law. In July, 1908, immediately after his graduation, he en- 
tered into a copartnership with Mr. Arthur W. Penny at Cadillac. 
They named the firm Penny & Dunan and immediately began to do busi- 
ness. The next month they opened another office under the same name 
at Lake City. The following month, September, he whs nominated on 
the Republican ticket for the office of prosecuting attorney for the county 
and although he had not yet appeared in court on any case, he wa.s 
elected at the November polls. This is a unique experience ; there is no 
record of any other lawyer having been elected to office before he had 
shown what he could do by winning at least some eases. He made good, 
however, and held the office for two years, during which time he handled 
some of the most critical cases known in the history of the court and in 
each case he secured conviction. He took two appeals to the Supreme 
Court of the state and won both of thern. During the last three years 
he ha.s been admitted to practice in all the courts of the state and Feb- 
ruary 2, 1911, he was appointed by the governor of j\Iichigan to the 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 809 

oiBee of Circuit Court Commissioner of Missaukee county. Taken in 
all, Mr. Dunan's success has been phenomenal. He is intensely in ear- 
nest in regard to his work ; each case in turn is to him the most important 
that could exist. To him, when he undertakes a ease there is nothing 
trivial about it. He offers his best every time, regardless of what the 
result may be, and the success of such a nature is assured. 

Mr. Dunan is not married. In polities he is a Republican. He is 
not at present identified with any church, but he gives liberally to any 
worthy object. 

Richard H. Deadm.vn. — The ])resent able incumbent of the office of 
L-ounty clerk of Alpena county is Richard H. Deadman, who is a native 
of Canada but who has resided in Michigan since he was eight years of 
age. He was born at Clandeboye, Middlesex county. Province of On- 
tario, Canada, on the 20th of September, 1873, and is a son of Dr. Will- 
iam H. and Christina (McKay) Deadman, concerning whom mention 
is made on other pages of this work in the sketch dedicated to John P. 
Deadman, brother of him whose name initiates this review. As ready 
reference may be made to the article mentioned a detailed account of the 
family history is not deemed necessary at this point. Mr. Deadman 's 
maternal grandfather. Hector McKay, was a soldier in the war of 1812, 
in the English service. He participated in the battle of New Orleans 
and he and two of his comrades were the only ones in his company who 
escaped death in that terrible conflict. 

Richard II. Deadman commenced his education in his native county 
in Canada and he was but eight years of age at the time of his parents' 
removal to Alpena. Michigan. After graduating in the Alpena high 
school he pursued a course in bookkeeping and stenography and was en- 
gaged in that line of work for a period of eight years. At the time of 
the inception of the Spanish- American war, in 1898. he enlisted in Com- 
pany B, Thirty-third Regiment, ilichigan Volunteer Infantry, and he 
was in the United States army from Jiuie until December 28, 1898. 
While stationed at Camp Alger, Virginia, Mr. Deadman was detailed 
for special duty at the war department at Washington and later he had 
charge of the " mustering-out " rolls of his detachment. After his re- 
turn to Michigan and during the session of the state legislature in 1901 
he served as clerk of the judiciary committee in the house of represen- 
tatives in Lansing. In the spring of 1901 he entered the employ of the 
Richardson Lumber Company as bookkeeper and stenographer and he 
remained with this firm until 1907. In 1906, together with his brothers, 
John F.. of Sault Ste. Marie, and Byron B., of Alpena, he became one 
of the organizei-s and incorporators of the Deadman Brothers' Medical 
Company at Alpena, Michigan. In 1908 Mr. Deadman was given dis- 
tinctive mark of popular confidence and esteem in that he was then 
elected county clerk of Alpena county and he was further honored by 
a re-election in November, 1910. At the polls in the latter election he 
received a hand.some majority. 

In politics Mr. Deadman has ever accorded a staunch allegiance to 
the cause of the Republican party and in a fraternal way he is affiliated 
with Alpena Lodge. Xo. 70. Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Al- 



810 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

pena Lodge, No. 148, Kbights of Pythias; Alpena Lodge, No. 505, Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; and Arthur Henry Camp, Span- 
ish-American AVar Veterans, in which he is vice-commander. It is in- 
teresting to note that in a family of seven boys Richard H. is the only 
one to eschew the profession of veterinary surgeon. His grandfather, 
father and six brothers have all attained distinction in this line of en- 
deavor. 

On the 29th of April, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Deadman to IMiss Lillian M. Rea, who was born in Portland, Canada, a 
daughter of Robert and Mary (Austin) Rea, both of whom were like- 
wise born in Canada. Mr. Rea removed with his family to ;\Iichigan in 
1886 and established his home at Hilhnan, where he was engaged in the 
lumber business for a period of twenty years. He is now actively in- 
terested in banking, the creamery business and farming and is recog- 
nized as one of the influential citizens in Hillman. He is a Republican 
in his political convictions and is serving as supervisor on the school 
board. Mr. and Mrs. Rea have seven children, Mrs. Deadman being the 
.second child in order of birth. She was reared and educated in Hill- 
man and is a woman of most gracious personality. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Dead- 
man have four children, — Elizabeth, Dorothea, Robert Rea and Chris- 
tina. 

Charles C. Beahan. — One of the substantial and ably conducted 
business enterprises that has contributed to the industrial and commer- 
cial prestige of the city of Petoskey is that conducted by the firm of 
Darling & Beahan, dealers in seeds, general produce and agricultural 
implements, and as one of the interested principals in this well known 
and reliable firm Mr. Beahan holds secure vantage ground as one of the 
representative business men and honored citizens of Petoskey. He came 
with his parents to ^Michigan when a boy and is a representative of one 
of the sterling pioneer families of this state, within whose borders the 
major portion of his life has been passed and in which he has so ordered 
his course as to merit and retain the vnic(|uivocaI confidence and re- 
gard of his fellow men. 

\o commonwealth of the Union has. from tlie pioneer days to the 
present time, contributed more generously to the citizenship of Michi- 
gan than has the fine old Empire state, and Charles C. Beahan is to be 
placed on record as a native of the state of New York. He was born at 
Hector, Tompkins county, that state, in what is now Schuyler county, 
and the date of his nativity was April 21, 1839. He is a son of Matthew 
and Mary (Fossett) Beahan, the former of whom was born in coiuity 
Kildare, Ireland, and the latter in Tompkins county. New York. The 
father was seventy-two years of age at the time of his death and the 
mother was summoned to the life eternal at tlic age of seventy-three 
years. Of the ten children Charles C who is now the only one living, 
was the nintli in order of birth. Mrs. :Mary (Fossett) Beahan vyas a 
granddaughter of General Morrison, who was a member of the military 
staff of General Washington in the war of the Revolution, and her 
father, George Fossett, was one of the first settlers in Seneca county. 
New York, whrre he tonk up his abode among the Indinns. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Mil 

Matthew Beahan was reared and educated in the fair old Emerald 
Isle and among his schoolmates was Alexander T. Stewart, who gained 
distinction as the first of the great "merchant princes" of the United 
States. The two young men were companions in their immigration to 
America, to which country they made the voyage on a sailing vessel of 
the type common to that day, and they landed in New York city, where 
]\Ir. Stewart was destined to become a man of great wealth and in- 
fluence and one of national reputation in the business world. In his na- 
tive land Mr. Beahan had learned the trade of millwright and soon af- 
ter his arrival in America he located in the town of Hector, in what is 
now Schuyler county. New Y^ork, where he operated a flotir mill and 
was also identified with agricultural pursuits until 1846, when he re- 
moved with his family to ^lichigan and located on the site of the pres- 
ent city of Flint, Genesee county, where he secured a tract of wild land 
and instituted the development of a farm, besides which he built Hud 
operated a grist mill. He was one of the pioneers of that county and 
was influential in public affairs in that section of the state. In addition 
to being called to various local offices of trust he served one term in the 
state senate. He was a staunch Democrat in his political proclivities 
but was equally unswerving in his antipathy to the institution of hu- 
man slavery, so that he was a zealous abolitionist in the crucial epoch 
which culminated in the Civil war. Both he and his wife continued to 
reside in Flint until their death and their names merit enduring place 
on the roll of the honored pioneers of that section of the state. 

Charles C. Beahan gained his rudimentary educational discipline 
in his native state and was a lad of about seven years at the time of the 
family's removal to Michigan, which was then considered on the fron- 
tier of civilization. He availed himself of the advantages of the pioneer 
schools of Genesee county and soon began to render effective aid in 
connection with the work of his father's farm. He finally engaged in 
farming on his own responsibility, in Genesee county, and later was 
identified with the same line of enterprise in the southwestern part of 
Missouri, where hr rciiKiiiicd a few years. He then removed to Sioux 
City, Iowa, whwv he hiMaine one of the organizers of the Sioux City 
Nursery & Seed ( '(>iii|iiiiiy, in the development of whose business he was 
one of the principiil I'.ictnrs. He remained at Sioux City about eight 
years, at the expiiiiliiin of which, in 1893, he returned to Michigan and 
located in Petoskey. wlieie he has since been engaged in the handling 
of seeds, general produce, agricultural implements and carriages, in 
which enterprise he is associated with Lou S. Darling, under the firm 
name of Darling & Beahan. A review of the career of. Mr. Darling is 
entered on other pages of this work, and it may be noted that the firm 
controls a large and substantial business of wide ramifications, special 
attention being given to northern-grown seed peas, beans and potatoes, 
a storage and transfer business being conducted in connection with 
other operations. 

While a resident of Flint, this state, 'Sir. Beahan served not only as 
city treasurer but also as county treasurer and county register of deeds, 
and he is at the present time a member of the board of park commis- 
sioners of Petoskey. whore he is known as a loyal and public-spirited 



812 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

citizen. In polities he has ever given his allegiance to the Democratic 
party and he is well fortified in his opinions as to matters of public 
polity. On the 23d of April, 1867, Mr. Beahan became an entered ap- 
prentice in the local lodge of Free & Accepted Masons at Flint, Michi- 
gan, and in this organization, Flint Lodge, No. 23, he was raised to the 
sublime degree of master Mason on the 5th of the following August. 
By dimit from his original lodge he became actively atfiliated with 
Durand Lodge, No. 344, in Petoskey, on the 5th of January, 1892. On 
the 19th of December, 1868, he became a member of Washington Chap- 
ter, No. 15, Royal Arch Masons, at Flint, from which he was dimitted 
to Emmet Chapter, No. 104, in Petoskey, on the 7th of March, 1892. 
On the 13th of the followdng January he became a member of Petoskey 
Council, No. 52, Royal & Select Masters. May 11, 1869, marked his 
reception of chivalric orders, Genesee Commandery, No. 15, Knights 
Templars, at Flint, from which he was dimitted to assume his present 
affiliation with Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 36, at Petoskey. He has been 
a close and appreciative student of the history and teachings of the 
time-honored Masonic fraternity and takes an active interest in the af- 
fairs of the various bodies with which he is affiliated. 

In the year 1874 Mr. Beahan was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
Darling, of Flint, this state, and she died at Sioux City, Iowa, in 1890. 
The three children of this union — one son and two daughters — are all 
deceased. Mr. Beahan later wedded Miss Eliza E. Eldridge, a resident 
of Flint, but no children have been bom of this union. 

WiLLLVM J. Barnhart. — A broad-minded and influential citizen and 
business man of Manistee, Michigan, Mr. William J. Barnhart has re- 
sided in this city for fully a score of years and his identification with 
the industrial and political affairs of this section of the state has been 
of prominent order. In 1910 he was appointed postmaster of the city 
liy President Taft and in this office he is acquitting himself most credit- 
ably. 

Mr. Barnhart was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, on the 
6th of March, 1851, a son of Urban and Mary A. (McDowell) Barnhart, 
both of whom were likewise born in Canada and the latter of whom is 
now deceased. The father was a carpenter and joiner by occupation 
and he settled in Leelanau county, Michigan, in the year 1864, at which 
time William J. was a youth of thirteen years. In 1880 Urban Barn- 
hart removed to Leland, Leelanau county, but he is now living in 
Traverse City, Michigan, at the age of eighty-five years. His father, 
James Barnhart, was born in the state of New York and became an 
early settler in Canada, where his death occurred. The Barnharts 
came to America at an early date. Mary A. (McDowell) Barnhart was 
a native of Canada, her parents having come to America from Ireland, 
in which country they were born, of Scotch parents, and whence they 
emigrated to Canada about the year 1824. Mrs. Barnhart was sum 
moned to the life eternal in 1908, at the age of eighty-two years. Of 
the family of six children, William J. is the only son and was the second 
in order of birth. All the children grew to maturity and of the number 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 813 

three are now living, the two daughters being Miss C. A. Barnhart, of 
Traverse City, and Mrs. M. J. Blumosar. 

To the common schools ot his native lancj and to those of Leland, 
Michigan, Mr. Barnhart is indebted for his educational training. Up 
to the age of twenty-one years he was identified with his father in the 
work of his trade, and he came to Manistee in 1872. For one year 
thereafter he worked in the old ship-yard on Manistee Lake, finally re- 
moving to a farm in Browntown, Manistee county, in the spring of 
1875. In addition to farming he did considerable carpenter work for 
the ensuing five years, at the expiration of which he moved to Bear 
Lake, where he engaged in the contracting and building enterprise and 
where he erected a planing mill, which he operated for some seven years. 
in the latter business he had associated with him a Mr. Wareham, who 
later disposed of his interest to D. D. Smith. In 1882 Mr. Barnhart 
bought Mr. Smith out and continued the enterprise alone until the 
fall of 1S87, when he sold out and the following March removed to the 
city of Manistee, where he has since resided. He entered the employ of 
Buckley & Douglas, now the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company, as 
millwright and superintendent of transmission and has remained in 
their employ ever since. In 1905 he was promoted to the office of gen- 
eral superintendent of the immense lumber business of this company, 
operating, at the time of this writing, in 1911, two mills and two salt 
blocks. He is an eminently able business man and in a political way 
has had many honors heaped upon him. 

;Mr. Barnhart is aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
the Republican party and he has been an active factor in furthering the 
welfare of the county and city. He was a member of the city i-ouncil 
from the Seventh ward for a period of four years, was a member of tlie 
board of water commissioners for nine yeai's and was elected mayor of 
Manistee in the spring of 1909, giving a most satisfactory administra- 
tion of the municipal afifairs of the city during his incumbency of the 
latter office. In 1910 he was appointed by President William A. Taft 
postmaster of the city. These preferments indicate sufficiently the con- 
fidence and esteem awarded to Mr. Barnhart by his fellow citizens, so 
that further comment would be superfluous at this point. That he has 
always been interested in the progress and growth of the community in 
which he has been a resident is illustrated in the following account : 
"It was while a resident on his farm that Mr. Barnhart was chiefly 
instrumental in having built the first school-house to be erected in 
the district where he resided, walking from his home, some twenty-two 
miles distant, to Manistee, where after considerable difficulty he suc- 
ceeded in disposing of the two hundred and fifty dollars worth of bonds 
which had been issued by the district to defray the cost of building the 
school. Then tramping back home he and his neighbors turned out 
and with their own hands built the building and were rewarded by hav- 
ing a school opened there upon its completion." 

In the year 1873 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Barnhart to 
Miss Mary Shiria, a daughter of Adam and Nancy Shiria. Mrs. Barn- 
hart was born and reared at Pennsylvania and she is a woman of most 
pleasing personalitv. Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart became the parents of five 
Vol. n— 17 



814 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

children, two of whoui are deceased, namel\-, — Rose and Florence. 
Those living are: William G., born on the 16th of August, 1879; Lulu, 
born on the 23d of November, 1886; and Mabel, born on the 12tli of 
May, 1888. William G. married Miss Josephine Petoskay; Lulu mar- 
ried J. J. Love, a dentist, of Manistee, Michigan ; and Mabel married 
S. B. Chapman, of Manistee. 

In a fraternal way Mr. Barnhart has passed through the circle of 
Scottish Rite Masonry, having attained to the thirty-second degree and 
he is also affiliated with the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks and 
the Knights of Pythias. In his religious faith he and his family are 
affiliated with the Congregational church and it may be said of iiim 
that his charity knows only the bounds of his opportunities. For thirty- 
eight years he has been a resident of Manistee county and during all 
that time he has so lived and conducted himself that his life-record will 
bear the search.light of fullest investigation. 

William F. Levtis, il. D. — Although he has been a resident of 
Luther, Lake county, but a comparatively short time, William F. Lewis, 
JI. D., has, by his uniform courtesy of manner and promptness in plac- 
ing his services, medical or otherwise, at the disposal of all, gained for 
himself the general respect and good will of the community, and won a 
fair share of the medical practice of the place. He was born, August 8, 
1873. in Charlevoix, Jlichigan, the son of a pioneer physician of north- 
ern ^Michigan, Dr. L. Lewis, of whom a brief sketch may be found on 
another page of this volume. 

Acquiring his rudimentary education in the public schools of Charle- 
voix, William F. Lewis was subsequently graduated from the Charlevoix 
High School. Later he continued his studies for five years in the Cin- 
cinnati ]\Iedical School, from which he Avas graduated with the class of 
1895. The following two years he was house surgeon at the Willie Hipp 
Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, where he gained an experience of great 
value to him in his after career. In 1898 and 1899 Dr. Lewis was in ac- 
tive practice of his profession at Charlevoix, Michigan, from there going 
to Elk Rapids, where he remained six years, being busily employed at 
his profession. Retiring then from active practice for a time, he was 
for two and one-half years associated with the Wooster Lumber Com- 
pany at Saginaw-, ^Michigan. 

Coming to Luther in IMarch. 1910, the Doctor opened an oflfice, and 
has since devoted his energies to the practice of medicine, and has won 
a fair share of patronage, much of his business being in the rural dis- 
tricts. He was United States pension surgeon five years. The Doctor 
has two children, namely: Franklin L. and Audrey Louise. He is a 
steadfast Republican in his political views, and is now serving as health 
officer of Luther. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 
and to the Knights of the Maccabees. 

Fred P. Smith.— One of our greatest American writers. Oliver Wen- 
dell Holmes, wrote of a brilliant classmate, 

"There was a young fellow of excellent pith. 
Fate tried to obscure him by naming him Smith." 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 815 

If Pate had auy such ilesigu in the ease of the subject, she has again 
been thwarted, for Fred P. Smith is one of the brilliant and able young 
lawyers of Alpena and his activities in public life have been of the 
highest character. 

Mr. Smith was born in Alpena, ^lichigan, June 6, 1877, and he is 
the son of Samuel P. and ilargaret ^I. (Allen) Smith. The father was 
by birth a Canadian, his eyes having first opened to the light of day at 
Dunway, Quebec. May 1, 1847, and hi.s demise occurred in 1899. The 
mother was born at St. Clair, St. Clair county, Michigan, and survived 
her honored husband many years, dying January 1, 1911. One son, the 
subject, was the only issue of the union. Samuel P. Smith came to Mich- 
igan in 186-4. located at Alpena. ^lichigan, and engaged as a lumberman 
and mill sawyer, subsequently removing to a farm in Alpena county 
where he cleared him a homestead out of the wilderness. He was a 
Republican in polities and a member of Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free 
& Accepted ilasons, having first become a member of the time-honored 
order, June 2, 1875. 

Mr. Smith has spent nearly his entire life in this place and has had 
the advantage of an excellent and varied education. After finishing 
such education as was afforded by the public schools of Alpena, ]\Ir. 
Smith entered the State Normal College at Ypsilanti and subsequently 
the University of Alichigan, from whose law department he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1905. He elected to begin his practice in the city 
of his birth, and the scene of his happiest experiences, and the success 
he has encountered here has been indeed gratifying. In addition to 
his professional duties, he has found time for valuable public service and 
has been a member of the school board in 1900 and of the board of county 
school examiners in 1900-1-2-3. He also filled a vacancy in the former 
body in the year 1905. In 1908 Jlr. Smith received tmmistakable mark 
of the confidence and regard he enjoys in the community by his election 
to the office of prosecuting attorney and so excellent were his services 
in this capacity that he was reelected in November, 1910. 

The subject is one of those who find no small amovuit of pleasure in 
their fraternal relations. He is a Mason, belonging to Alpena Lodge. 
No. 199, Free and Accepted Masons, and in his ideals are incorporated 
the principles of moral and social justice and brotherly love, which since 
fable-environed ages have been the fundamentals of the organization. 
He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Ijeing Past 
Grand of ^Myrtle Lodge. No. 432, and being identified with Thunder Bay 
encampment. No. 87. He gives heart and hand to the men and meas- 
ures of the Grand Old Party. IMr. Smith married July 12, 1911, Cora 
B. Langworthy. of Alpena. 

John Q. Zuck, commissioner of schools in Missaukee county, is 
proud to consider himself a farmer. He has not spent all his previous 
years in the cultivation of the ground, although he has been zealous in 
sewing seed of another character and in different soil and in both cases 
his efforts have been productive. It is such men as Mr. Zuck who ele- 
vate the farming profession. He is not one of the men who believe that 
any one can farm. He knows that it takes brains and education to get 



816 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

out of the soil all of which it is capable. The reason why so many men 
make failures of their farms is not because they do not labor enough, 
but because they do not use their heads enough. This is not the fault of 
Mr. Zuck; he has made an unmitigated success of farming. He is how- 
ever, much more than a farmer; he is a man who has done nuich good 
for the coimty and for the world at large. He is a man whose private 
life has been exemplary, who has taught by example and by precept, who 
has woi-n himself out in his efforts to give to others the best that was in 
him. 

.lohu y. Zuck was born at Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 8, 1876. His father was John Zuck, of German descent. He 
was a farmer and married Lydia Borrah, the daughter of a farmer. 
Soon after their marriage the family moved to Cedar county, Iowa, 
where they still live. 

When John Q. was a very small boy he went with his family to Cedar 
county, Iowa, and there attended the district school and subsequently 
the high school. Later he attended the Mt. Morris College three years 
and the Northern Illinois College two years, graduating from the normal 
department of the latter school in 1898 and taking the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science the following year. From the time he left high school 
he had decided that he wanted to teach. During his childhood days he 
had learned to work on the farm and had imbibed a great deal of knowl- 
edge of farm life, but he did not feel that he wanted to be a farmer. 
Having spent so many years in accjuiring knowledge, he now wanted to 
become a distributor. Knowledge is like charity, it blesses him that 
gives and him that takes, it is something that one can give away and 
still possess in even greater abundance. Having decided to teach, he 
did not have to work up as mo.st teachers do, but as soon as he was grad- 
uated from the Northern Illinois College he was offered the position of 
principal of the schools at Dixon, Iowa. He remained here for six years 
and then went to Chappell, Nebraska, and was principal of the schools 
there for two years. Next he was superintendent of schools at Battle 
Creek, Nebraska. While he was in Nebraska he was employed by the 
states of Colorado and Nebraska to lecture before various institutions 
and normal colleges of the state. He is a very ready speaker, his lan- 
guage l)eing both fluent and forceful. He has something of interest and 
use to say and he says it in the clearest, most interesting manner possi- 
ble. After spending two years at Battle Creek, Nebraska, his health 
failed and he was compelled to tender his resignation. Some time pre- 
vious to this he had invested in a farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
at Falmouth, Jlichigan, Missaukee county. When he found himself 
compelled to desist from his arduous labors, he came to the farm where 
he has since resided. He has purchased one hundred and twenty addi- 
tional acres of land, so that now he has a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, u[)on which he expends the same amount of work and energy that 
he i)ut into his pedagogical labors. In April. 1910. there was a vacancy 
in the office of the superintendent of schools of the county and he was 
induced to till the vacancy. With the outdoor life his health had greatly 
improved and he accepted the position. His work was so excellent 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN B17 

tliat iu the fall of 1910, when he was again nominated for the same 
office, he was elected without any opposition. 

In 1898 he was married to :\liss Ruth Willey, the daughter of Charles 
and Lydia Willey, farmers in Bennett, Iowa. .Mr. Zuck made her ac- 
quaintance while he was attending school in Iowa and the friendship 
then begun broadened into matrimony. Mr. and Mrs. Zuck have three 
children, IMarlin D., born in 1899, Leo H.. born in 1903 and Gerald C, 
born iu 1909. 

In politics Mr. Zuck is a Republican. He belongs to two fraternal 
orders, the Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is not 
a member of any church, but he gives liberally to any object which he 
deems worthy of support. Although Mr. Zuck has been engaged in 
scholastic work for so many years, he is nothing of a pedant, on the 
other hand he is simple in his speech and manners. He is most genial 
and hospitable and it gives him great pleasure to entertain his numerous 
friends at his farm and to show them the workings of its details. It is 
to be hoped that he has a long life of usefulness still before him. 

Geoege S. Danseb is general manager of the Petoskey Grocery Com- 
pany, one of the largest wholesale houses of northern Michigan. The 
management of the business has been in his hands since March, 1900, 
and its reputation and success are chiefly due to his ability and experi- 
ence as a business man. 

Mr. Danser was born at Weston, West Virginia, January 23, 1870. 
His father, George C. Danser, Avho was born on a farm in Pennsylvania 
in 1829 and died at the age of sixty-four in 1893, moved to West Vir- 
ginia when a young man and with his father, William Danser, engaged 
in the foundry business at Weston, where he remained one of the sub- 
stantial business men up to his death. He also took a prominent part 
in public affairs. He served as mayor of Weston two terms, was alder- 
man, and a member of the school board. His politics was Repi;blican, 
and he was a member of the Presbyterian church and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah 
Daugherty, was born iu Jlorgantown, West Virginia, in 1831, and died 
in 1903, aged seventy-two. Of their nine children, three sons and three 
daughters are living, George S. being the sixth in order of birth. 

After a good general education in the public schools of Weston and 
a course in a commercial college, George S. Danser got his first busi- 
ness experience as clerk in a retail grocery store, the proprietor being 
Mr. Patterson. This beginning was made while he was still a boy, and 
in 1891 he was advanced to the wholesale grocery house of Ruhl, Koble- 
gard & Company of Weston. His promotion to larger duties was steady, 
and in March, 1900, he was selected as general manager of the Petoskey 
Grocery Company, Ruhl & Koblegard being the principal owners of 
this concern. 

^Ir. Danser was married in 1904 to IMiss Fannie Hastings. She was 
born in Petoskey, a daughter of David Hastings, a blacksmith of this 
city. ;\Irs. Danser was the youngest of six children, five of whom are 
living. ;Mr. and Mrs. Danser have two children : George William and 
Ruth Janet. In political belief he is a Republican. 



818 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Richard G. Peters is one of the leading representatives of the busi- 
ness inteiesLs of the northwest and there is in the city of Manistee prob- 
ably no man who has done more for the industrial development and 
substantial upbuilding of this part of the state than has Mr. Peters. 
He deserves great credit for what he has accomplished, as he started 
out in life empty-handed, possessing no capital in money but having 
a rich .store of determination, of strong purpose and integrity. Upon 
these qualities as a foundation he has constriicted his success and as 
the ai'chitect of his own fortunes has builded wisely and well. His 
career is certainly one worthy of emulation and he belongs to that class 
of repi'esentative Americans who while promoting their individual 
interests have also advanced the general welfare and public prosperity. 

Mr. Peters was born in Delaware bounty, New York, on the 2nd of 
July, 1832, and is a son of James H. and Susan (Squires) Peters, both 
of whom are now deceased. The father was identified with agricultural 
pursuits in the Empire .state at the time of the birth of Richard 6. and 
a few years thereafter the family home was established in the city of 
S.yracuse, New York, whence removal was eventually made to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where Mr. James H. Peters was engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness. In 1849 Mrs. Peters was summoned to the life eternal and 
Richard H., being a lad of about fifteen years of age, went to live with 
his grandparents at Tully, New York. For two years he divided his 
time between work on the farm in the busy seasons and attendance in 
the district schools during the winter months. In 1851 he was for one 
year in the employment of his uncle as gate keeper upon a toll road at 
Syracuse. When eighteen years of age he rejoined his father in Cin- 
cinnati and a short time later he fell in with a cousin who resided at 
Monroe, Michigan, returning with him in 1850 and working for him 
upon his farm until late in the autumn of that year. Thereafter he en- 
tered the employ of the ^Michigan Southern Railroad Company and for a 
time had charge of a division of that road in the capacity of assistant 
civil engineer, retaining that position for the ensuing four or five years. 
In 1855 he entered the employ of the late Charles Means, assuming 
charge of that gentleman's lumber and mill interests at Big Point, Au 
Sable, Michigan. He was thus engaged for the next few years, at the 
expiration of which lie went to Ludington, where he purchased a small 
tract of government land, devoting a year to getting out the timber on 
it. He later accepted an offer from James Ludington, then an extensive 
lumber operator at the mouth of the Pere Marquette river, this site 
later becoming the village of Ludington, to take charge of his mill and 
lumber operations at that point. Two years later, in 1866, he became 
associated with M. S. Tyson and G. "W. Robinson, both of Milwaukee, in 
the purchase of the large property holdings of Fiton & Tyson, at Manis- 
tee, the same consisting of a large body of pine lands on the Manistee 
river, two saw mills at the mouth of the river and a large portion of the 
site of the city of Manistee. For this valuable property the sum of two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars was paid. The partnership then 
formed lasted but two years and from that time to the present Mr. 
Peters has been practically alone in the gigantic lumber industry in that 
section of the state, being widely known under the .sol)ri(|U('t of "King 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 819 

Among Lumbermeu. " In due time he became the owner of perhaps the 
largest tract of pine stumps ever held by any individual person in the 
state of Michigan. In 1869 he purchased the large mill property of 
Wheeler & Hopkins, on Manistee Lake, and continued to operate that 
plant for the following thirteen years, at the expiration of which it was 
destroyed by fire. The annual output of that mill was twelve million 
feet of lumber. After the destruction of the mill Mr. Peters purchased 
forty acres of laud with the mill hitherto operated by Louis Sands, the 
same being located on what is now known as the village of East Lake, 
on the east side of Manistee Lake. This mill has since been rebuilt and 
enlarged and a second mill added in order to accommodate the large 
amount of business demanded of it. 

Soon after the discovery, in 1885, that Manistee was underlaid by a 
fifty-foot strata of rock salt wells were bored to a depth of two thousand 
feet and salt blocks, with a capacity for turning out eighteen hundred 
barrels of salt daily, were erected. In this line of enterprise Mr. Peters 
became deeply interested in a financial way and about that time his pay- 
roll included about eight hundred names. In connection with his lum- 
ber operations a railroad into the timber region was constructed and at 
the time of this writing, in 1911, it comprises some seventy miles of 
track and is well equipped both for logging purposes and for transpor- 
tation. About the time of the purchase of the East Lake property Mr. 
Peters, in company with Horace Butter, bought two large bodies of the 
laud grant of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Company and on 
the same laid out the town of Tallman, some twenty-eight miles south 
of Manistee, on the Flint & Pere Marquette road. The two tracts of 
land were estimated to contain about one hundred and thirty million 
feet of pine, and on the same a mill was constructed by Butter & Peters, 
which was in operation for four j-ears and which was then destroyed by 
fire. It was never rebuilt. This firm had previously purchased a large 
mill at Ludington and at the time of tlie destruction of the above mill 
by fire it was enlarged and a salt block added to its former scope of 
operations, a force of about four hundred men being constantly em- 
ployed. Included in that property was some thirty miles of railroad. 

Mr. Peters was also interested at Chase, Michigan, in the firm of 
Dunham, Peters & Company, extensive lumber manufacturers. He also 
had an interest in the Sti'onach Lumber Company, of Manistee, and as 
a member of the firm of Peters & Morrison controlled fifteen thousand 
acres 'of pine land on the Menominee river in the Upper Peninsula, 
this same concern being also interested in the large mill of the Interior 
Lumber Company at Interior, Michigan. In his own name Mr. Peters 
at one time hekl fully one hundred and fifty thousand acres of pine 
timber lands in Michigan and Wisconsin, and he was also part owner 
of one hundred thousand acres of yellow pine lands in Alabama and 
the Carolinas. Aside from the lumber industry Mr. Peters has other 
financial interests of broad scope and importance. He is president of 
and an extensive stockholder in the Manistee National Bank and is a 
director in the Fifth National Bank at Grand Rapids. In politics he 
accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and 
he is most liberal in his views and charitable in his dealings with all 



820 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

people. His religious faith is in harmony with the tenets of the Con- 
gregational church and as a citizen his loyalty and integrity have never 
been questioned. 

In 1858 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Peters to Miss Evelyn 
N. Tibbitts, who was a daughter of a prominent farmer in Lenawee 
county, Michigan. She was summoned to her reward on the 10th of 
February, 1897. 

E. GoHEEN. who is ably filling the office of postmaster of Lincoln, 
Alcona county, Michigan, of which position he has been incumbent since 
1898, is successfully engaged in the general merchandise business in this 
place, where he is honored and esteemed as a citizen of intrinsic loyalty 
and- public spirit. Mr. Goheen was born in the province of Ontario, 
Canada, in July, 1861, a son of Joseph and Statira Goheen, the former 
of Dutch and the latter of Irish origin. Mr. and Mrs. Goheen became 
the parents of nine children, two of whom maintain their homes in the 
United States. 

]\Ir. Gohen, of this review, was the fifth in order of birth in a family 
of nine children and he received a good education in the common schools 
of his native place prior to his immigration to the United States, in 
1883. That he put his scholastic attainments to good use is evident 
when it is stated that he wa.s engaged in the pedagogic profession for 
a period of sixteen and a half year.s— two years in Canada and the re- 
mainder of the time in the United States, whither he came in January, 
1883. He engaged in the general merchandise business, in 1897, at 
Lincoln, Alcona county, Michigan, and he now owns and conducts one 
of the most modern and well equipped establishments in this section of 
the state. In politics he is a loyal Rciniblican and during his residence 
in Lincoln he has been honored with the following offices: he was justice 
of the peace for four years: was treasurer of Lincoln township for two 
years: was a member of the board of township supervisors for four 
years; and since 1898 he has been postmaster of Lincoln, having been 
first appointed to that office by President McKinley. Mr. Goheen mani- 
fests a deep and sincere interest in all matters pertaining to education 
and has long been a member of the board of school examiners. He has 
resided in Ijincoln township .since 1883 and in Lincoln since 1891 and 
during all that time he has been constantly on the alert to do all in his 
power to advance the general welfare of the county and state at large. 
In addition to his mercantile interests he has two fine farms of forty 
acres each, to the operation of which he gives a general supervision. 
In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the L. A. R. and with the Knights 
of the IMaceabees. 

In the year 1886 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Goheen to Miss 
Belle Springstead, who was born and reared in the province of Ontario, 
Canada. To this union have been born five children, namely, — Ray- 
mond C, Nettie B., Ward J., Hermon M. and Vivian M., all of whom 
remain at the parental home. 

Judge Isaac Grant. — Deeply interested in the growth and advance- 
ment of his home community. Judge Isaac Grant holds a place of note 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 821 

in Reed City, where he has served with ability and fidelity in the vari- 
ous offices of trust and responsibility to which he has been elected by 
his fellow-townsmen. A son of Charles Grant, he was born in Saint 
Johns, Clinton county, Michigan, June 25, 1846. His paternal grand- 
father. Dr. Isaac Grant, was born and bred in ]\Iassachusetts, and was 
there educated for the medical profession. He subsequently locati'd in 
Michigan as a practicing physician, and spent his last days in Albion. 
He was of pure Scotch ancestry, the descendant of the same emigrant 
ancestor as the late General U. S. Grant, said ancestor having been one 
of three brothers that emigrated to New England from Seotlanil in 
Colonial days. Mr. Grant's grandfather was a sergeant in the Revolu- 
tionary war, going out from Massachusetts and serving all through the 
war. He was taken prisoner at New York and put on the old prison 
ship, and was one of only four of the original number of one hundred 
and twenty-five that came out alive after being on the boat. His name 
was also Isaac Grant. 

Charles Grant was born in Massachusetts, and there educated. In 
1836, while Michigan was still under territorial government, he came 
here in search of a favorable location, and after spending a while in 
Detroit and in lona, took up a tract of wild land in Saint Johns, Clinton 
county. Felling the giant progeny of the forest, he cleared and im- 
proved a homestead from the wilderness, and was there employed as a 
carpenter, builder and farmer until his death, at the venerable age of 
ninety-two years. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812, being cap- 
tain of a company raised in New York state. He married Emeline Gil- 
bert, who was born in New York state, a daughter of Isaac Gilbert, who 
was, likewise, of Scotch descent. She lived to a ripe old age, her death, 
when ninety-one years old, being caused by an accident. She was his 
second wife, and of their seven children Isaac, the subject of this sketch, 
was the fourth child in succession of birth. By his first marriage 
Charles Grant reared four children. 

Receiving a practical education in the public schools of Saint Johns, 
Isaac Grant remained beneath the parental roof-tree until 1863, when, 
on October 2, he enlisted in Company I, Tenth Michigan Volunteer Cav- 
alry, as a private, and served until the close of the war. being honor- 
ably discharged November 11, 1865, as sergeant of his company. Dur- 
ing his service, he took an active part in fifty-tWo different engagements, 
some of them mere skirmishes and some hotly-contested battles, but 
he was never wounded, receiving not even a scratch. Returning to 
Saint Johns, Mr. Grant was there engaged, with the exception of one 
winter spent in the pine woods, as a farmer until 1868. Marrying in 
that year, Daney Clark, he located in Saint Louis, Gratiot county, IMich- 
igan, where he was in the flour and feed business two years. Going to 
i\lount Pleasant. Jlichigan, in 1870, he was there a general merchant 
for two years, when, in 1872, he moved with his family to Baldwin. Lake 
county, and, in addition to his mercantile business he engaged in lum- 
bering and contracting. 

Whil6 there, in 1874. Jlr. Grant was elected sheriff of Lake county, 
a position which he filled two years. In 1880 he was again elected 
sherift". and served anoth( r \^ rm nf two yeais in that capacity. He was 



822 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

subsequently in the livery business there for about nine months, but in 
September, 1883, he transferred his business and residence to Reed 
City, and continued as a liveryman for a year. Embarking then in the 
lumber, fiour and milling business, he met with deserved success in his 
operations, continuing until 1908. Elected judge of probate in 1904, he 
served acceptably for fouj- years. In 1909, when his judgeship expired. 
Judge Grant, who had disposed of his milling interests the previous 
year, was elected assessor of Reed City. He still holds that position, 
and is also justice of the peace and notary public. He deals extensively 
in real estate, and is the owner of considerable property of value. 

Judge Grant married, October 25, 1868, Daney Clark, and into their 
household six children have been born, namely : Rena M. ; Alda M. ; 
Clark D., deceased; Howard; Anna; and Harold. Politically the Judge 
has been a life-long Republican and a faithful supporter of the prin- 
ciples of his party. He is a member of General I. C. Smith Post. No. 
451. G. A. R.. Department of Michigan, and belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and to the Modern Woodmen of America. 

John D. Potter. — One of the sterling pioneers and prominent and 
influential business men of the city of Alpena is John D. Potter, who is 
one of the interested principals in the Potter Hardware Company, one 
of the representative and important commercial concerns of this sec- 
tion of the state. 

Like many others of the leading citizens of northern Jlichigan ilr. 
Potter claims the province of Ontario, Canada, as the place of his na- 
tivity, and he is a son of Thomas and Margaret (Duncan) Potter, the 
former of English and the latter of Scottish ancestry. Concerning the 
family history adequate data appear in the sketch of James J. Potter, 
brother and business associate of the subject of this review, and as the 
article in question is incorporated on other pages of this volume it is 
not necessary to repeat the information in the present connection. 
John D. Potter was born in the city of London, Middlesex county. On- 
tario, on the 22d of September, 1846, and accompanying the family on 
their removal to Port Huron, IMichigan, he received his early education 
in its common schools of the pioneer days. After leaving school he was 
variously employed, principally in connection with the lumber industry, 
until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he subordinated all other in- 
terests to tender his services in defense of the Union. He enlisted, on 
the 19th of August, 1864, as a private in Comi)any H, Third ^Michigan 
Volunteer Infantry, and he was mustered in at Pontiac. His regiment 
was assigned to the Southwestern Army, and later was reorganized, at 
Decatur. Alabama, where it became a part of the Fourth Army Corps 
and was commanded by General Stanley. Mr. Potter had taken up his 
residence in Alpena in July, 1862, and hei-e his enlistment was made at 
a recruiting headquarters. He continued in active service in the south- 
west for some time after the surrender of Generals Lee and Johnston, 
and received his honorable discharge in the city of Detroit. Michigan, 
in June. 1866. He lived uj) to the full tension of the great conflict be- 
tween the north and south and participated in all the battles and skir- 
mishes in whicli his i-(>gimcnt was involved, including the battles of 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 823 

Murfreesboro and Nashville. In November, 1865, he was promoted sec- 
ond lieutenant of his company, and in January of the following year 
further recognition of his gallant and faithful service was accorded by 
his being promoted first lieutenant, while in Texas. 

Aftei- the close of his military career Mr. Potter returned to Alpena 
and again identified himself with the extensive lumbering operations 
that were then being carried on in this section of the state. He served 
for some time as log scaler and later became superintendent of a saw 
mill, which position he held until 1869, when he became as.sociated with 
his brother James J. in the hardware business in Alpena, where he pur- 
chased the interest of his brother E. K., who had been one of the foun- 
ders of the enterprise. Keeping in touch with the march of progress, the 
firm of Potter Brothers built up a large and prosperous basiness, and 
prior to the decline of the lumber industry a large trade was controlled 
in furnishing supplies demanded in connection with that line of enter- 
prise. The business has been both wholesale and retail in its functions 
and the house is now one of the oldest, most substantial and most popu- 
lar of its kind in the entire northern part of the state, while the two 
pioneer citizens who have so long been at its head have gained and 
retained the unqualified confidence and respect of all with whom they 
have had dealings or have come into contact in other relations. The 
business was continued under the firm name of Potter Brothers until 
November, 1909, when it was found expedient to incorporate the same, 
under the present title of the Potter Hardware Company. 

John D. Potter has not only been a business man of most careful and 
progressive methods, but he has also been known as a man of utmost 
civic loyalty and liberality, — ever ready to lend his influence and aid in 
support of measures pro.ieeted for the general good of the city and 
county in which he has so long maintained his home. In politics, though 
never an aspirant for public office, he accords a staunch allegiance to 
the Republican party, and both he and his wife are earnest and valued 
members of the Congregational church in Alpena. Here also he perpetu- 
ates the more gracious memories of his career as a soldier of the Union 
by retaining membership in Horace S. Roberts Post. No. 139. Grand 
Army of the Republic. He is an appreciative member of the time- 
honored Masonic fraternity, in which his local affiliations are with Al- 
pena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons; Thunder Bay Chapter, 
No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; and Alpena Commandery. No. 34, Knights 
Templars. In the ad.iunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, he has "crossed the burning sands of 
the desert" and proved himself eligible for membership in ]Moslem 
Temple, in the city of Detroit. 

On the 23d of September. 1868, Mr. Potter was united in marriage to 
Miss Frances E. Palmer, who was at the time a resident of Alpena. 
Michigan. She was born at Cooperstown. New York, and is the. second 
in order of birth of the four children of Robert and Elizabeth (P"'rench) 
Palmer, both of whom were born in the state of New York. The father 
was a pioneer lumberman of northern New York state, and while thus 
engaged he met an accidental death, about the year 1864. His widow is 



824 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

still living, at the venerable age of eighty-six years (1911) and main- 
tains her home in Wellsville, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Potter have three 
daughters, — Ida, who is the wife of Alexander ]\I. Marshall, of Duluth, 
Minnesota; and Emma E. and Mabel G., who remain at the parental 
home. 

Edgak J. KiNGSCOTT, engaged in the mercantile business at Bear 
Lake, Michigan, is one of the most favorably known and highly es- 
teemed of the citizens in this part of the state. A man active in politics 
and one who has held public office in an acceptable and enliglitened 
manner, he is also a leading figure in the commercial world, as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Walker & Kingscott, clothiers and furnishers, who 
conduct an up-to-date enterprise which adds materially to the progress 
and high standing of the city. He has inherited many high traditions, 
being the son of one of the most dauntless of Michigan pioneers and 
bravest of Civil war veterans. 

Mr. Kingscott was born in Bear Lake township, October 8, 1869, 
his parents being William G. and Hannah (Hoyt) Kingscott. The 
father was a native of the state of New York, his birth having occurred 
in Genessee county, in the year 1837. His parents came to the state 
of Michigan at an early day, locating in Macomb county, and in this 
section the youth of the subject's father was passed. In the year 1866 
he entered one hundred and sixty acres of timber land in Manistee 
county which he cleared and brought to a state of cultivation and there 
he made his home until his death. He was a life-long Republican and 
very zealous in the cause and a signal mark of the approval in which he 
was held in the community in which he was best known was his elevation 
to the office of supervisor of the township, a position which he retained 
for years. In the year 1866, he was married in Macomb county, Michi- 
gan, to Miss Hannah Hoyt, a native of Connecticut who came to Michi- 
gan in the early '50s. Their union was blessed by the birth of three 
sons and three daughters, Manistee county being the birthplace of all 
of them. The other surviving members of the family are May E., Ralph 
H., and Walter J. 

At the time of the great conflict between the states William G. 
Kingscott hearkened to the call of "Father Abraham" and his own 
native patriotism and in 1861 enlisted at Grand Rapids in the Second 
Michigan Cavalry, serving more than four years in all, from the be- 
ginning to the end of the war. This honored veteran died in 1893, his 
years numbering l)ut fifty-five at the time of his demise. The mother 
died January 3, 1911, at Bear Lake, Michigan. 

To the district schools of Bear Lake township is Mr. Kingscott in- 
debted for his early educational advantages, his attendance being later 
supplemented by a season at the grammar school of the town of Bear 
Lake. He had' some thought, even before reaching his ma.iority, of 
taking up a commercial career, and he entered the commercial depart- 
ment of Ferris College, at Big Rapids, Michigan, and was graduated 
from that institution in the year 1903. His youth was passed amid 
rural surroundings and he became well versed in the many depart- 
ments of agricultural science under the able tutelage of his father. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 825 

He proved of great assistanee in the agrieiiltiiral duties and re- 
mained upon the liomestead until his fatiier's deatli and for the eight 
.sucL-eeding years. Naturally inclined to public life ; interested in pol- 
itics and a most loyal supporter of the policies and principles of the 
Republican party ; public-spirited, even at the expense of personal ad- 
vantage; it was indeed appropriate that Mr. Kingseott should enter 
politics and his career has been most satisfactoi-y from every viewpoint. 
In 1898 he was elected supervisor of Bear Lake township and remained 
in that capacity for four years. In 1902 he was elected to the offii-e of 
register of deeds, holding the office for eight years, and his faithful and 
efficient service greatly redounded to his credit. In business he has 
met with like success, his association with Mr. C. E. Walker in the 
clothing and furnishing business dating from the year 1905, when he 
bought a partnership in the company, which is the descendant of one 
of the oldest enterprises of the place, the store of Walker & O'Rourke. 

Mr. Kingseott is an enthusiastic lodge man and indeed one of the 
most prominent in this part of Michigan. He is, first and foremost, a 
member of the ancient and august Masonic order, belonging to the lilue 
lodge and chapter and upon occasion wearing the white-plumed helmet 
of the Knight Templar. He fraternizes with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; the Modern Romans; and is Past Chancellor Commander 
of the Knights of Pythias. In all of these he enjoys great popularity 
for many good gifts of mind and heart. 

Mr. Kingseott was married January 11. 1911, to Miss Susannah H. 
Richardson, of Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Henry Miltner. — Education is the capital which everj' man or 
woman must have in order to succeed. This was the opinion of Henry 
Miltner, now prosecuting attorney of Missaukee county. Everything 
he possesses today, both in the way of material wealth and personal 
acquirements, is the result of his own individual effort. He had very 
little schooling, at the age when a boy usually goes to school, but he 
improved those years by laying up a store of knowledge for himself. 
A nuHi educates himself by work as well as by reading and Mr. Miltner 
has had the advantage of both kinds of education. He has made the 
best possible use of his opportunities, but he has not always waited for 
opportunity to come and knock. Rather he has advanced to meet it 
and if necessary to make it. There are men who are ignorant and do 
not know it; they have a contempt for education. Such people are 
hopeless and it is of no use trying to do anything with them. There 
are others who know little and are ashamed of it, but have not enough 
go in them to change affairs. There are still others, like Mr. Miltner, 
who are determined to acquire knowledge and of such men are our 
leaders made. It is such men as these who accomplish things. 

Henry Miltner was born upon a farm in Iosco township, Livingston 
county, Jlichigan, November 18, 1882. His parents were George and 
^lary (Lergl ^liltner. The mother died before he had reached the age 
of five and the father before he was ten. He then lived with his grand- 
father on his farm ip Livingston county. As soon as he was old enough 
he began to work on his grandfather's farm and he then laid the founda- 



826 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

tion of the necessity to work which has carried him through many 
difficulties. Until he was twelve years old he had no schooling to speak 
of, but he learned how to read in some way and after that he picked up 
every scrap of information he could glean making the most of the few 
times he was able to attend school. When he was twelve years old he 
went to school four months out of the year — the winter term, working 
hard on the farm during the eight months, but even during the sum- 
mer he found some time to study, after his twelve hours work in the 
fields. By the time he was sixteen he had completed the work that is 
covered bj- the grammar school and was ready to enter high school. 
He came to Lake City where he obtained employment in return for his 
board. After he graduated from high school he taught for two winters, 
boarding himself and sleeping in the school house one winter, in order 
to save money. He expended his earnings by taking a course in short- 
hand at the Ferris Institute and managed to cover the required ground 
in three months.' He returned to Lake City and secured employment 
with Attorney F. O. Gatt'ney. He remained with him for three years, 
during which time he became deeply interested in law and he began to 
study it in his spare time. At the end of the three years he went to the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and took a summer course of eight 
weeks. When school opened in the fall, he had made such prodigious 
strides that lie was able to enter as a senior and at the close of the 
school year he obtained a diploma covering three years' course and the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws from the University of Michigan, as the 
result of one year's work and the eight weeks' summer term. The 
ground he covered in that time is a three years' course. After he left 
the University Mr. Miltner was admitted to the bar before the Supreme 
Court of ^lichigan at Lansing and returned to Lake City where most 
of his education had been acquired. He was now ready to begin his 
career as a lawyer. He former a partnership with Mr. Gaffney and they 
started business under the firm name of Gaffney & jMiltner, with offices 
at Cadillac and Lake City. ^Ir. Gaffney went to Cadillac and -\Ir. Milt- 
ner took charge of the Lake City office. In 1906, when he was only 
twenty-four years of age he was appointed prosecuting attorney of the 
county to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Mr. Charles L. 
Goll. In 1910 he was put up as a candidate for the office of prosecuting 
attorney of the county and he was elected. 

February 25, 1909, Mr. Miltner married Miss Gertrude May Howey, 
a very popular young lady in Lake City. She is the daughter of Stephen 
and Kate Howey. Mr. Howey was very M'ell known in Lake City, hav- 
ing been a hardware merchant here for twent.y years. He died in 1903. 
^fr. and ilrs. Miltner have one child. Charles S., born January 20. 1910. 

^Ir. ]\liltner is a member of the Catholic Church and holds member- 
ship with the Knights of Columbus and the Elks. He is still a very 
young man and only at the beginning of his career, although a less 
ambitious man might feel that he might well be satisfied with present 
conditions. Mr. Jliltncr is not ambitious to cover himself with glory, 
but he is and alwa.vs has been, desirous of giving to the world the best 
that is in him. His achievements in the face of ^reat odds slinw that 
he has naturally great capabilities. He does not feel that this is any 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN y27 

mattLT for being proud ot hinuself, but rather that by reasou of his 
capabilities he is so much the more responsible. Air. Miltner has al- 
ways ottered his best, so that the fact that he has a wife and child to 
work for can otter no further incentive, where none was needed. He 
will continue to give of himself for the good of his fello-\nnen, for the 
upholding of right and justice, for the benefit of his family. 

Theodore A. Ferris, who has long been identified with industrial 
aft'airs in Alichigan, is now interested in the manufacture of lumber 
and shingles, in conjunction with which he conducts a planing mill, 
the scene of his labors being at Lincoln, Alcona county, Michigan. .Mr. 
Ferris owns a fine farm in Alcona county and as a citizen he has ever 
been exceptionally public-spirited, having been honored by his fellow 
men with many important offices of trust and responsibility, in all of 
which he has acquitted himself most creditably. 

Mr. Ferris was born in Seneca county, New York, on the 2nd of 
November, 1848, and he is a son of John and Salome (Dailey) Ferris, 
the former a native of England and the latter a native of the state of 
New York. In 1858 jMr. and Mrs. Ferris removed to Sanilac county, 
Michigan, where the father purchased a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, which they improved and upon which they continued to reside 
until 1887, in which year they removed to Tacoma, Washington, where 
they passed the residue of their lives, their deaths having occurred in 
1889 and 1891 respectively. In the family of fourteen children four 
are deceased, — James, Theodore A. (of this review), Lucena, deceased, 
Edwin. William, Frank, Libby, Ella (deceased), Lydia, Ada, Lilly, 
Rosie (deceased), Leonard and Warren (deceased). 

To the public schools of Sanilac coiuity JMr. Ferris is indebted for 
his early educational training, the same consisting of such advantages as 
were afforded in the schools of the locality and period. He was tein 
years of age at the time of his parents' removal to Michigan and as he 
attained to years of maturity he became interested in the lumber busi- 
ness, continuing to be identified with that industry during the long in- 
tervening years to the present time. He has resided at Lincoln. Alcona 
county, for the past twenty-four years, during the first twelve of which 
he was in the employ of the lumber firm of Alger Smith & Company. 
Since 1898 he has been interested in the lumber business on his own 
account, manufacturing lumber and shingles and operating a large plan- 
ing mill at Lincoln. He is the owner of considerable town property and 
he also owns a fine farm of eighty acres in an adjoining township. He 
is a business man of unusual energy and ability and it is gratifying to 
note that his success is the result of his own well applied endeavors. In 
politics Mr. Ferris endorses the cause of the Republican party and dui-- 
ing his residence at Lincoln he has been incumbent of the following 
offices : justice of the peace, .school director, and member of the to\\Tiship 
board of supervisors. In 1908 Mr. Ferris constructed_a beautiful home 
at Lincoln, the same replacing one destroyed by fire, in 1893. In a fra- 
ternal way he is connected with the Knights of the Maccabees and with 
the Grange. 

On the 25th of December. 1876, was celebrated the marriage nf :\Ir. 



828 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Ferris to ^liss Emma Wixson, a daughter of Jesse and Rebecca Wixson, 
who were long residents of Sanilac county, Michigan, and who were na- 
tives respectively of Canada and New York. Mr. and Mrs. Wixson had 
twelve children, whose names are here recorded, — Henry, Sophronia, 
Alonzo, Mary, Willard, Joseph, Jesse, Lauretta, George, Stillman, Elsie 
and Emma, of whom six are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Ferris became the 
parents of six children, — Nellie, who is now Mrs. N. G. Oliver, of Oscoda ; 
Gaige, Lee, Percy, Frank and Bertram, the latter of whom is deceased. 
The Ferris family are devout members of the Baptist church in their 
religious faith and they have ever been liberal contributors to all phi- 
lanthropical movements set forward in Lincoln. 

WiLLi.\M O'Neal, proprietor of the Park House at Petoskey, is one 
of the pioneer lumbermen of northern Michigan, and the record of his 
career is an important chapter in the history of development in this 
part of the state. He was one of the pioneers who accomplished great 
tasks during the times when the lumber interests were clearing away 
the wilderness of iMichigan, and the honor and prosperity of his later 
years are well deserved rewards of the determined energy and execu- 
tive ability displayed in earlier life. 

Born at Ottawa, Canada, May 9, 1852, he was a son of "William and 
Rose (Lyons) O'Neal. His father, who died at the age of sixty-eight, 
was born in County Clare, Ireland, and at an early age made the twelve 
weeks' voyage on a sailing vessel to Quebec, and from there to Bristol 
township, Ontario. There he hewed a farm from the wilderness, and a 
few years later moved to Stephen township in Huron county, twent.y- 
six miles north of London. Here he lived ten years, and in 1864 moved to 
Sagirtaw, ^Michigan, where he was gardener vip to the time of his death. 
He was a lover of tine cattle and always kept some on his farm. Of 
his life in Ireland, he was always proud to relate his part in hauling 
the carriage of Daniel O'Connell through the streets of Kilrush, County 
Clare, after the latter's election to a seat in Parliament. In American 
politics he was a Democrat and was a member of the Catholic church. 
His wife. Rose Lyons, whom he married in Bristol, Ontario, was a na- 
tive of County Leitrim, Ireland, and passed away at the age of sixty- 
six. They were parents of four sons and two daughters, of whom three 
sons and one daughter are living. 

WilliMiii O'Neal, who was the third child, attended school in his 
home coinmunity tmtil thirteen years old, when he became an employe 
in Arthur Hill's .sawmill. At the age of sixteen he went into the woods, 
walking sixty miles from Saginaw to the then timber-covered site of 
Mount Pleasant on Pine river, wliere he worked for two years, the first 
in peeling logs. The third winter he was placed in charge of a camp 
of forty men for Isaac Parsons of Saginaw. During the three winters 
of this employment, all the supplies for the camp had to be brought by 
canoe or scow from Redkey to the mouth of the IMolossea river, thence 
up the Tittabawassee river to their headquarters. . 

His next work was as log sealer on the Au Sable river, the first year 
for Sanbourn & Beach of Port Huron, and two winters for T. F. Thomp- 
son. On his return to Saginaw he was appointed superintendent of a 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 829 

lunib(.'r ramp for Williani Callaiii, and later became foreman for A. T. 
Hliss, the former governor of Miehigan. It was diirinfi' this hitter em- 
ployment that Mr. O'Neal gained his first important distinction among 
Alichiuan hunhermen, and which brought down on him the disph-asure 
of the ax-men. He was the first man in the state to introduce the use 
of the cross-cut saw in felling trees, instead of the old method of chop- 
ping. The walking boss reported this innovation to ]Mr. Bliss. The 
latter carried the matter before the board of trade of lumbermen at 
Saginaw. The result of the contention was that Tim Dorr and Pat 
Glenn, both prominent lumbermen from the state of ilaine, also intro- 
duced the cross-cut saw in preference to the ax, and the method was 
quickly adopted by most of the lumbermen of the state. It is said that 
the price of cross-cut saws suddenly rose one dollar each. 

May 1, 1879, Mr. O'Neal transferred the scene of his operations to 
Emmet county, and for ten years had charge of the William Callam 
lumber business in this region. He was the pioneer on Cecil Bay and 
among the first in all this region. At the same time his wife had charge 
of the camp boarding house. His work comprised the removal of ten 
thousand acres of timber, and the old sawmill is still standing on Carp 
river near Cecil Bay. From there he moved to Levering and for two 
years had charge of a lumber business at Pellston. In the meantime he 
had bought a tract of land in Bliss township of Emmet county, where 
his family made their home and where he had a man in charge of the 
clearing. For two years he had charge of one hundred and thirty-five 
men for Hall & Buel at Seeny, A. C. Hubbel being superintendent, and 
he was then engaged by Col. L. T. Dickerson of Chicago to* superintend 
the milling and lumber business at Cecil Bay. Four or five years later 
the ten thousand acres together with the mill at Cecil Bay were turned 
over to him to sell, and after buying fifteen hundred acres for himself 
he sold the rest to Davis & Caldwell of Battle Creek. For several years 
he continued in the lumber business on his own account, selling his 
logs to the Cecil Bay Lumber Company. 

The farm in Bliss township which he had cleared out of the wilder- 
ness has become a prosperous community largely through his efforts 
and example. When he first located there, schools were few and far 
between, and he had to drive thirtj'-three miles to have his children 
baptized. Later, when roads were opened, a priest came once in three 
months to the O'Neal home to say mass for the people in that vicinity. 
Later ;Mr. O'Neal set aside five acres of his farm as the site for the first 
church built in this locality, and he practically built the church him- 
self. He has also given forty more acres for this little church. Four 
of his children each live on eighty acres which he gave them, all being 
within a short distance of the church. The original farm which he still 
owns is a finely improved place, and had a good orchard of eight acres 
in apples. In October, 1909, he bought the Park Hotel in Petoskey and 
has since engaged in the hotel business. 

As a citizen Mr. O'Neal has taken a prominent part in the local 
affairs of his township and county. He has held all the township of- 
fices, being supervisor at the time of his removal to Petoskey. He was 
moderator of the school hoard several years, was justice of the peace 



830 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

and township treasurer. In politics he is a Democrat. For two years 
he was chairman of the executive committee of the Emmet Count.y Fair 
Association and for three years was president of the Fair Association. 

Fraternally he is a member of 'Neal Tent No. 763, K.. 0. T. M., at 
Bliss, this tent having been named for him, and he was its commander 
fourteen years, for seven times was delegate to the grand session of 
the jMaccabees and was county delegate to Toledo. He is a grand 
knight of Petoskey Lodge No. 923, Knights of Columbus. 

November 19, 1877, Mr. O'Neal married Miss Sarah ;\Ie('ourt. She 
is a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, and has shared in the experiences 
and success of her husband and reared a large family of children. Of 
the eight children born to them, six are now living : — Edward J. ; 
Emma Cecil, who has the distinction of being the first white child born 
at Cecil Bay, and the locality was named in her honor ; Arthur P. ; 
^laud May: George T. ; and Leo 'SI., the two last named still residing 
at home. 

James H. Booth. — Prominent among the well-known and highly es- 
teemed citizens of Reed City is James H. Booth, a retired capitalist who 
has accomplished a most satisfactory work in the business world, acquir- 
ing a handsome competency through his own vigorous and energetic 
efforts. Descended from a long line of thrifty Scotch ancestiy, he was 
born May 1, 1846. in Gait, Ontario, Canada, a son of James Booth. 

Bom, bred and educated in Scotland, James Booth emigrated to 
Canada at the age of twenty-one years, locating in Gait. He subse- 
quently mart-ied, and in 1863 came with his family to Michigan. He 
was a machinist by trade, and after following it for a time in Grand 
Rapids moved to Muskegon, where he continued a resident until his 
death, at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. Wliile in Canada he 
worked at his trade and was also engaged in the lumber and milling busi- 
ness. He married in Canada Isabel Skene, who was born in Scotland 
and emigrated from there to Canada when a child of eight yeai-s, cros.sing 
the ocean with her parents. She died at the age of four score and four 
years, .just a few weeks prior to the sixty-third anniversary of her mar- 
riage to James Booth. Of her eleven children, seven are living at the 
present writing, in December. 1910. 

The eldest child of the parental household, James H. Booth, was fif- 
teen years old when he came with the family to Michigan. Working with 
his father, he learned the machinist's trade, which he followed for a 
while. The country roundabout him was then scarce settled, there being 
few railroads in that part of the state and nuich of the land being still 
in its primitive wildness. Subsequently embarking in the lumber busi- 
ness with his father. Mr. Booth first operated six miles south of Reed 
City, fini.shing up on the Luther branch. Going then to Little Bay, he 
embarked in business as .iunior member of the lumber firm of Warner 
& Booth. He eventually became head of the firm of J. H. Booth & Com- 
pany, and continued operations in that locality for five years longer, 
when he transferred his business to Sidnaw. where for twelve years he 
was one of the foremost lumber manufacturers and dealers, under the 
firm name of J. H, I^ooth & Company. :\Ir. Booth was afterward en- 




'l\.i^2.^:£^ou2r^. A-- 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 831 

gaged in the lumber business for two years in North Carolina in the 
same county, his home, however, being, as previously, in Reed City, 
Michigan. Having aeciunulated a fortune, he is now enjoying a well- 
earned leisure, living retired from active bvxsiness cares in Reed City. 

Mr. Booth married, June 28, 1875, Catherine Kelley, of iluskegon, 
Michigan, and to them two children have been born, namely: Isabelle, 
wife of Dr. D. S. Fleisehhaur, of Wabasha, Minnesota; and Elmer J., 
who married Mildred Withey, of Reed City, a daughter of Judge With- 
ey. Politically Mr. Booth is identified with the Republican party, but 
takes no active part in public affairs, having never been an aspirant for 
official honors. 

E. Nelson Heysett, M. D. — One of the leading physiciaus and sur- 
geons of Lake county, E. Nelson Heysett, M. D., of Baldwin, is a prac- 
titioner of much experience and skill, and as a close student of the 
science which he has chosen as a profession is meeting with recognized 
success. A son of William Heysett, he was born May 27, 1868, in In- 
gersoll, Ontario, coming on the paternal side of English ancestry. 

William Heysett was born, bred and educated in Devonshire, Eng- 
land, his birth occurring April 4, 1841. Preparing for the ministry 
in early life, he preached the gospel in his native land for a number of 
years. Emigrating to this country in 1868, he spent a comparatively 
brief time in Ontario, Canada, from there moving in 1869 to Pent- 
water, Michigan. An old-time circuit rider, he preached in different 
places, for awhile being located at Bear Lake, ^Michigan. From there 
he went to Ludington, Michigan, where he opened a drug store, which 
he has since managed successfully, having been in continuous busi- 
ness there for four decades. He is a strong Democrat in politics, active 
in local affairs, and has twice been nominated to represent his district 
in the state legislature. He married in Canada Elizabeth Dundass, 
who was born in Ontario, of Irish ancestors, and to them two children 
have been born, namely : E. Nelson, the special subject of this personal 
review ; and Frederick William, M. D., a practicing physician in Lud- 
ington, Michigan. 

Improving to the utmost his advantages for securing an education, 
E. Nelson Heysett completed the courses of study in the graded schools 
and high school of Ludington, Michigan, and on March 25, 1890, was 
graduated with the degree of il. D. from Rush Medical College in Chi- 
cago, Illinois. Taking up the practice of his profession in Tennessee, 
Dr. Heysett remained there two years. Returning then to Michigan, 
he was for eight years in active and successful practice in Ludington. 
In 1900, desirous of enlarging his field of action, the Doctor selected 
Baldwin, Lake County, as a most favorable place of location, and the 
excellent practice which he has since enjoyed is proof that he made 
no mistake in his choice. His great success in the management of cases 
that have come under his charge and the many difficult operations 
which he has successfully performed have placed him in an eminent 
position among the authorities on medicine and surgery in this part 
of the state. He is surgeon on the Saginaw and Petoskey Division of 



832 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

the Perc IMarquette Railroad, and is a valued member of the Lake 
County, the State, and the American Medical Associations. 

Fraternally the Doctor is prominent in Masonic circles, being a 
Knight Templar and a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Politically he is a firm supporter of the 
principles of the Republican party, and has never shirked the respon- 
sibilities of public office. For two terms he was president of the vil- 
lage; was a village trustee two terms; and is now serving his second 
term as president of the Baldwin School Board. 

Dr. Heysett married, November 16, 1892, Jeannette Bouton, who 
was born in New York state, but was brought up and educated in Mich- 
igan, her father, Norman L. Bouton, having been a prominent merchant 
of Pentwater. She is a woman of culture and refinement, and prior 
to her marriage taught school in Ludington five years, and for two 
years was one of the corps of instructors in the Pentwater High School. 
The Doctor and Mrs. Heysett have two children, namely : Dorothy and 
Norman. 

Addison A. Keiser. — Among the able representatives of the legal 
profes.sion in IMason county is this well known citizen of Ludington, 
where he has built up a substantial practice, the extent and character 
of which bears evidence not only of his personal popularity but also of 
his ability as an advocate and counselor. Further interest attaches to 
his career as a member of the IMichigan bar from the fact that he is a 
native son of the state and a member of a family whose name has been 
identified with the history of this favored commonwealth for more than 
two score of years. 

Mr. Keiser was born on the homestead farm of his father in Green- 
bush township. Clinton county. Michigan, on the 4th of October, 1871, 
and is a son of John J. and Sarah (Biddle) Keiser, the former of whom 
was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, and the latter in Elkhart county, 
Indiana. John J. Keiser is a son of Rev. Joseph Keiser, who was a 
native of Pennsylvania and who was numbered among the pioneer set- 
tlers of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he developed a productive farm 
and where he served long and faithfully as a minister of the Evangelical 
church. He continued to reside in Ohio until the close of his life, ever 
earnest in good work and kindly deeds. His father, who likewise bore 
the name of Joseph, was a native of Germany and upon emigrating to 
America, in an early day, took up his residence in Peiuisylvania. where 
he passed the residue of his life. John J. Keiser continued to maintain 
his home in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, until 1869, when he removed with 
his family to Michigan and puroha.sed a tract of land in Clinton county, 
where he has since resided. He still lives on the old homestead, which 
he developed into one of the fine farms of that county, and as a sterling 
citizen and a man of indefatigable industry he holds a secure place in 
the confidence and regard of the community in which he ha.s so long 
made his home and to the development of which he has contributed his 
quota. He is sixty-nine years of age at the time of this writing, and his 
cherished and devoted wife is sixty-one years old (1911). Roth are zeal- 
ous members of the Evangelical church, and in politics he has ever given 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 833 

a stalwart support to the cause of the Republieau party. Mrs. Sarah 
(Biddle) Keiser was, as already noted, born in Elkhart county, Indiana, 
and she was a child at the time of her father's death. She was taken 
into the home of her uncle, Levi Biddle, and was reared to maturity in 
Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where her marriage was solemnized. Of the 
five children Addison A., of this review, was the third in order of birth, 
and concerning the others the following brief data are given : Clara is 
the wife of Charles Houk, of Summit township. Mason county, ilichigan ; 
Edward is a representative farmer of Clinton county; Almeda is the 
wife of Allen Houk, who is a prosperous agriculturist of Summit town- 
ship. Mason county; and iMiss Elda remains at the parental home. 

Addison A. Keiser wa,s reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm which was the place of his nativity, and thus he early learned the 
lessons of practical industry and gained appreciation of the dignity of 
honest toil and endeavor. He duly availed himself of the advantages 
of the district schools and supplemented this discipline by attending 
the excellent public schools of St. Johns, the judicial center of Clinton 
county. There also he initiated the work of preparing himself for his 
chosen profession, as he began reading law in the office of the firm of 
Norton & Bronson, whose members were leading representatives of the 
Clinton county bar. In February, 1892, he was matriculated in the law 
department of the University of Michigan, and, such had been his ad- 
vancement under the effective private preceptorship just noted, he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1893. He duly received his de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws and was admitted to the bar of the state, at 
Ann Arbor, in June, 1893, at the time of his graduation. On the 10th 
of the following month he came to northern Michigan and established 
his permanent home in Ludington, where he entered the law office of 
Michael B. Danaher, with whom he was in practice for the ensuing six 
years. In 1895 Jlr. Keiser was elected circuit-court commissioner for 
Mason county, and this office he retained for two years. In 1898 further 
mark of popular esteem and of appreciation of his professional ability 
was given by his election to the office of prosecuting attorney. His first 
term of service amply demonstrated his powers, fidelity and "loyalty as a 
public prosecutor, and he was chosen as his own successor iii 1900, as 
was he again in 1902, so that he retained the office for six consecutive 
years. Jlason county has never had a prosecuting attorney whose rec- 
ord has been more admirable in the conservation of justice and the pro- 
tecting of the interests of the people. 

Since 1905 Mr. Keiser has been engaged in the general practice of 
his profession, and he retains a large and representative clientage, in 
connection with which he has appeared in much important litigation in 
both the state and federal courts. In 1909 he was appointed United 
States commissioner for the Western district of Michigan, and he still 
remains incumbent of this office. iTe is liberal and progressive in his 
civic attitude and soon after coming to Ludington he was elected to 
represent the Second ward in the common council. From the time of 
attaining to his legal majority he has been found arraved as a staunch 
and effective exponent of the principles and policies for which the Re- 



834 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

publican party stands sponsor, and he is a leader in its councils in Mason 
county. He is a member of the Alichigan State Bar Association, and is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Knights of the ^Modern Maccabees and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Mr. Keiser has identitied himself with the vari- 
ous business interests of local order, aside from the work of his profes- 
sion, and has given special attention to the handling of real estate, in 
which line of enterprise he has contributed not a little to the material 
and social progress of his home city and county. 

On the 23d of June, 1894, Mr. Keiser was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Clark, who was bom and reared in Clinton county, j\lichigan, and 
who is a daughter of Robert and Anna (Brubaker) Clark, now deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keiser have two children, — Marion, who was born on the 
23d of April, 1898; and Donald, who was born on the 23d of August. 
1905. 

William P. Cable, who is one of the most capable undertakers in 
Alcona county, conducts a fine embalming establishment at Harrisville, 
where he is recognized as a man of worth and prominence. The art of 
embalming is to some extent lost as the Egyptians understood and 
practiced it, but if properly done it requires as miich of an expert as 
does the preservation of the beauty of the living. Mr. Carle has a 
thorough understanding of his business, being specially well equipped 
for this work. He was born in Saint Clair county, Michigan, on the 
18th of August, 1859, and is a son of Frederick and Elizabeth Carle, of 
Port Huron, Michigan. The father was a carpenter by trade and he 
removed with his family to Alcona county in 1866. His death occurred 
in 1894 and his widow was summoned to eternal rest in 1905. From 
1880 to 1905 the mother conducted the Alcona House, at Harrisville, 
anil after her death her son, the subject of this review, conducted it un- 
til 1910. 

To the public schools of Alcona Mr. Carle is indebted for his prelim- 
inary educational training and as a young man he secured a position on 
the Pere Marquette Railroad, continuing to be identified with that line of 
enterprise for a period of twelve years, at the expiration of which he 
went to Alpena, wlii-re he conducted a grocery store for the ensuing 
ti'u years. In 1905 he retiu-ned to Harrisville and in that year took up 
hi.s iiresent business. He is the only funeral director in the city and as 
such does a large business. He is a Republican in his political convic- 
tions and fraternally he is affiliated with the Free & Accepted Masons, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the jModern Woodmen of 
America. He and his wife are worthy and helpful members of the 
;\[etliodist Episcopal church and they hold a secure vantage ground in 
the confidence and esteem of their fellow citizens. 

In the year 1893 Mr. Carle was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
MacGillis, a daughter of James MacGillis, long a representative busi- 
ness man of Alcona county. Mrs. Carle was born in Canada and is a 
woman of most pleasing personality. No children have been born to 
this union. 




l^/a./j.<a^ -uiJ\/j.^^, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 835 

George A. Cuyleb. — The present able incumbent of the office of reg- 
ister of deeds of Alcona county, Michigan, is George A. Cuyler, who is 
now serving his third term in office, this fact being conclusive evidence 
of his worth to his constituents and the high esteem in which he is held 
by them. ^Ir. Cuyler was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, 
the date of his nativity being the 6th of October, 1863. He is a son of 
George and Margaret (Gauley) Cuyler, both of whom were born and 
reared in Canada, where the former was summoned to the life eternal 
in 1866 and where the latter is now residing. To Mr. and Mrs. George 
Cuyler were born six children, of whom four sons emigrated to the 
United States. 

(ieorge A. Cuyler was the fifth in order of birth in the family of six 
ihildren and he grew up and was educated in his home town in Canada. 
In 1885, at which time he was twenty-two years of age, he emigrated 
to the United States, locating at Black River, Michigan, where he re- 
mained until 1906, in which year he removed to Harrisville, where he 
has since maintained his home. After his arrival in the States he was 
interested in the lumber industry for a number of years and subse- 
quently he was appointed a member of the life-saving station at Stur- 
geon Point, continuing incumbent of that position for a period of four- 
teen years, at the expiration of which, in 1906, he was elected to the 
office of register of deeds in Alcona county. In politics Mr. Cuyler ac- 
cords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies for which the 
Republican party stands sponsor and as a public-spirited and loyal citi- 
zen he has done much to advance progress and development in this sec- 
tion of northern Michigan. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights 
of the Tented Maccabees and with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. In his religious faith he is a devout member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in the various departments of whose work he and his 
wife have long been active and zealous factors. 

In tlie year 1891 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Cuyler to Miss 
Anna Shirley, who was born in Canada, where she was liberally edu- 
cated and whence she came to the United States in 1885. To this union 
has t)('en born two children. — Edna 'S\.. who married Pith .Medar, of 
Harris\ille, and Hazen S., who is attending school at Harrisville. 

Charles C. Dunham, probate judge, Cadillac, Michigan, was born 
in Hinkley, Medina county, Ohio, November 17. 1845, a son of AVilliam 
and Hannah A. (Conaut) Dunham, both deceased. 

William Dunham, a native of Grand Isle, Vermont, was born in 
1824, a son of John and Julia (Hilliard) Dunham. When he was eight 
years old he moved with his parents to Medina county, Ohio, where his 
next ten years were passed on a farm and where he attended the com- 
mon schools up to the time he was eighteen. Then he learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed in Ohio for a period of ten years, 
until 1853, when he came to Michigan and made settlement at Grand 
Rapids. Here he was variously occupied up to the time the Civil war 
was inaugurated. At the very beginning of the war, in 1861, he raised 
a company at Fentonville, Michigan, of which he was made captain 
and which was mustered into the service as Company I, Third ]\Iichi- 



836 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

gan Cavalry. A year later he resigned on account of disability, and 
from that time until 1867 made his home at Fenton. That year he went 
to Manistee, where soon afterward he was elected county clerk and 
register of deeds, which office he filled two j^ears, at the expiration of 
which time he embarked in the banking business with Charles Secor & 
Company. After eight years' association with the company he took the 
business and operated it alone for two years, having organized a state 
bank, of which he was president. In the spring of 1879 he purchased a 
half interest in the wholesale grocery house of Arthur Meigs, of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, which was for years one of the largest wholesale 
grocery establishments in that cit.v. It was not, however, until April, 
1881, that Mr. Dunham moved his family to Grand Rapids, and from 
that time forward he was prominently identified with the business 
activities of the city. He was one of the organizers of the Fifth Na- 
tional Bank of Grand Rapids and was president of the institution, and 
he was one of the stockholders of the Dean Printing Company of Grand 
Rapids. Politically he was a Republican, and had the honor of serving 
as one of the presidential electors at the time Rutherford B. Hayes was 
elected. In the Masonic circles of Michigan he stood high. In 1877 
he was grand master of the state, and he had the distinction of having 
conferred upon him the Thirty-third degree, the highest honor be- 
stowed upon any ;Mason. William Dunham was twice married. By his 
first wife, Hannah A. (Conaut) Dunham, he had five children, namely: 
William H., deceased; Charles C, whose name introduces this sketch; 
Jennie A., wife of Albert J. Hatch, of Grand Rapids; Phebe A., wife 
of N. Brewer, of Grand Rapids; and Julia, deceased. The mother of 
these children was born in Medina county, Ohio, in 1824, a daughter 
of Chester Conaut, and she and Mr. Dunham were united in marriage in 
1813. Eleven years later, September 6, 1854, her death occurred at 
Gaines, Michigan. On February 26. 1856, he married for his second 
wife Miss Emeline Godwin, a native of Bangor, Maine, born April 17, 
1832, a daughter of William R. and Caroline (Harlow) Godwin, who 
survives him. His death occurred in 1907. 

Charles C. Dunham, as above stated, was born in Medina county, 
Ohio. At the time of the removal of his father's family to Michigan he 
was a mere lad, and in the schools of what was then called Fentonville, 
now Fenton, he received his early education. Also he attended school 
at Wayland, Michigan, and later studied law at that place in the office 
of Hon. G. Charles Godwin. In 1885, at Cadillac, Michigan, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. In the meantime, when only seventeen years of age. 
he tendered his services to the Union cause, enlisting at Fentonville as 
a member of Company L, Tenth Michigan Cavalry. That was in July. 
1863. He saw two and a half years of active service, during which time 
he participated in fifty-eight skirmishes and battles. He was mustered 
out of the service at Knoxville. Tennessee, and at once returned to 
Michigan, where, at Manistee, he engaged in the sawmill and lumber 
business. He came to Cadillac in 1874 and opened a grocery store, and 
was engaged in the grocery business for a number of years. Mean- 
while he was elected sheriff of Wexford county, and was re-elected 
from time to time until he had served six terms covering in all twelve 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ba7 

years. Finally he sokl his yroi'ery business and engaged in the luulcr- 
taking and furniture business, and, having disposed of the stock of 
furniture in 1906, he has since that date given his entire attention to 
undertaking. 

Politically 'Sir. Dnnham has always been a Republican. In ad- 
dition to his long service as sheriff he was justice of the peace four years, 
supervisor from the Third ward four years, and mayor of the city two 
terms. At the recent election he was choice for probate judge and 
April 3, 1911, was again elected mayor of Cadillac. 

Judge Dunham has numerous fraternal associations. He is a mem- 
ber of Clam Lake Lodge, No. 331, F. and A. M. ; Cadillac Chapter, No. 
103, R. A. M., of which he was high priest; Cadillac Council, No. 70, 
R. & S. M. ; Cadillac Lodge, No. 46, K. of P. ; the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; and Washington Post. No. 444, G. A. R. 

i\Ir. Dunham is married and has an only child, Eva D., wife of E. M. 
Wheaton. 

Samuel B. KL^hn. — Through close application and well applied in- 
dustry many men have risen to important positions in the business 
world. To be born amid unfavoring circumstances does not imply that 
one's life shall be passed amid such surroundings, and especially in 
America, the "melting pot of all nations" is opportunity oifered for 
advancement. It is this that has drawn so many people of foreign birth 
to the new world, where they have profited by existing conditions and 
have so shaped their lives that they have gained a fair measure of pros- 
perity, which is the goal of all business endeavor. 

Mr. Samuel B. Kahn has been most successfully engaged in the gen- 
eral merchandise business at Harrisville, Alcona county, Michigan, since 
1895, and here he is recognized as a loyal citizen, whose every public 
act has been a contributor to progress and development, ilr. Kahn 
was born at Kurland, Russia, on the 15th of September. 1873, and he 
is a son of Abraham and Sarah (Tange) Kahn. The father died in 
September, 1910, and the mother is living in Bay City. l\Ir. Kahn was 
reared and educated in his native land, under the strict rules of the 
Hebrew church is as far as was permissible under the Russian gov- 
ernment. As a youth he developed decided ability in the line of mer- 
cantile pursuits and in 1892, when nineteen years of age, he emigrated 
to the United States and .settled in Michigan. In 1895 he located at 
Harrisville, where he opened a general store. His energy and vim soon 
began to count for good and from small beginnings his business gradu- 
ally grew in scope and importance until to-day his splendid establish- 
ment is one of the best in Alcona county. In 1906 he purchased the old 
Van Buskirk stand, fronting on the lake and the same is two and a half 
stories in height aud is well stocked with the choicest of fresh and staple 
merchandise direct from the importer and factory. With his stajile 
and fancy line of goods he caters to even the most factious city cus- 
tomer and in the business world of this place he is noted for his straight- 
forward and honorable dealings. 

Politically Mr. Kahn endorses the cause of the Republican party 
and during his residence in Harrisville he has been honored with the 



838 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

t'oUowiiiii offices of trust and responsibility : He was treasurer of the 
school board for niue years, was a member of the city coiineil for six 
years and for three years was mayor of Harrisville. He is now (1911) 
secretary of the Republican County Committee. In a fraternal way 
he is affiliated with the Masonic order, in the Scottish Rite branch of 
which he has attained to the thirty-second degree and in the York Rite 
of which he is a member of Harrisville Lodge, No. 292, Free & Accepted 
Masons, in which he is a past master. He is also a valued and apprecia- 
tive member of the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of 
the Nobles of the JNIystic Shrine. In every walk of life Mr. Kahn's 
conduct has been characterized by strict adherence to honesty and prin- 
ciple and his exemplary life may well serve as lesson and incentive to 
others. He is a man of resolute purpose and one whose laudable ambi- 
tion has stimulated him to put forth his best efforts both in his own 
private business affairs and in the administration of the duties of the 
public offices to which he has been elected at diffei-ent times. 

In 1897 ^Ir. Kahn was united in marriage to ^liss Nellie Sandorf, of 
Bay City, Michigan. To this union have been born four children, 
namely, — Ivar J., Beruice D., Louisa and Velma R. Mr. and Mrs. Kahn 
are popular in connection with the best social activities in Harrisville 
and their home is celebrated for its gracious and cordial hospitality and 
the good cheer which there abounds. 

Charles H. Schram. — An essentially representative business man of 
Lincoln, Alcona county, Michigan, and one whose energy and enterprise 
have won him a high place in the confidence and esteem of his fellow men 
is Charles H. Schram, who has resided in this town .since 1881, and who 
as a boy and man has retained an untarnished reputation amongst people 
who have known him from earliest youth. Mr. Schram was born in the 
province of Ontario, Canada, on the 27th of September, 1875, and is a 
son of David and Celesty (Underbill) Schram, both of whom were like- 
wise born and reared in Canada, where was solemnized their marriage 
and whence they came to the United States in the year 1881. Location 
was made in Lincoln and subsequently the father purchased a farm of 
seventy-five acres of land, which is now in a high state of cultivation. 
Of their eleven children seven are now living, namely, — Charles H., the 
immediate subject of this review; Anna, who is now Mrs. L. Dewey; 
George A. ; Frederick B. ; Earl 0. ; Emma, who is Mrs. C. Clayton ; and 
Etta. 

After completing the curriculum of the public schools of Lincoln 
Charles H. Schram entered upon an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's 
trade, with the work of which he continued to be identified for a num- 
ber of years. In 1899 he conducted a grocery store and in 1907 he be- 
came manager of the Lincoln Mercantile Company. In his political 
faith Mr. Schram is a staunch advocate of the principles and policies 
for which the Republican party stands sponsor and while lie ha.s never 
manifested aught of ambition for the honors or emoluments of public 
office he is ever on the alert to do all in his power to advance tlie general 
welfare of the community in which he has elected to maintain his home. 
He is a b^^siness man of irreproachable conduct and straightforward 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 839 

methods and as such uoiiimandjs the high esteem of all with whom he 
has come in contact. He is a strictly temperance man and in a fraternal 
way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of the Tented Maccabees and the Modern Brotherhood of Amer- 
ica. For two years he was the efficient incumbent of the office of village 
clerk. 

In 1902 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Sehram to Miss Sarah 
J. Brounlee who is a daughter of William and Jane Brounlee, and who 
was reared and educated in Canada, ilr. and Mrs. Sehram have no chil- 
dren. They are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church in 
their religious adherency and are popular factors in connection with the 
best social activities of the community, their home being widely recog- 
nized as a center of most gracious hospitality. 

Blair F. Scott, who is ably filling the office of county clerk of Mis- 
saukee county, Michigan, maintains his home at Lake City, the judicial 
center of this county. For nine years he was the popular inciunbent of 
the office of postmaster of Lake City and prior to 1901 he was engaged 
in the drug business at this place. A native of the fine old Keystone 
state of the Union, Mr. Blair F. Scott was born at Beaver, Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, on the 24th of November, 1866. He is a son of 
Noah and Margaret (Ferguson) Scott, both of whom were likewise na- 
tives of the state of Ohio. The father was a railroad contractor by occu- 
pation and for a number of years was in the employ of the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad Company. In 1872 the Scott family removed from 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, to Somerset county, that state, where the young 
Blair F. began his educational training. Subsequently he was matricu- 
lated as a student in the State Normal School at California, Pennsyl- 
vania, remaining in that institution for a period of one year. In 1891 
he went to Ada. Ohio, where he attended a school of pharmacy, in which 
he was graduated with the degi-ee of Bachelor of Pharmacy. For a 
time he was engaged in the work of his profession at Ada, Ohio, and 
later he came to Michigan, locating in the city of Detroit, whence he 
removed to Kalamazoo. From the latter place he came to Lake City, in 
1893. beginning to work for Dr. John 0. Decker in the latter 's drug 
store, which he eventually purchased and which he continued to con- 
duet with marked success until 1901. In that year he was appointed 
postmaster of Lake City, by President McKinley, and he remained in 
tenure of that office until 1910. when he was honored by his fellow citi- 
zens with election to the office of county clerk of Missaukee county. 

In the year 1897 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Scott to ":XIiss 
Kate Beauthien, of Lake City. Mrs. Scott was born at Big Rapids. 
Michigan, a daughter of Carl and Aneniae Beauthien, both of whom 
were natives of Germany. Mr. Beauthien was a soldier in the German 
army prior to his emigration to America, and during his active career 
in this country was a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have three children,— 
Margaret, Doris and Pauline, all of whom are attending school in Lake 
City. 

In politics Mr. Scott endorses the cause of the Republican party, in 
the local councils of which he has ever been an active and zealous factor. 



840 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

For three years he was town clerk of Lake City, for two years was vil- 
lage clerk and for ioxir years was incumbent of the office of county coro- 
ner. He is now secretary of the Republican county committee. In a 
fraternal way he is affiliated with the time-honored Masonic order and 
with the Knights of Pythias. A citizen of imusual loyalty and public 
spirit, he is a co-operant factor in all matters projected for the good of 
the general welfare and by reason of his square and straightforward 
dealings is accorded the whole-souled regard of his fellow men. 

William W. Rice. — The late William Wirt Rice, who died at his 
home in Petoskey, ou the 12th of September, 1891, was here the founder 
of the extensive and important industrial enterprise conducted under 
the title of the W. W. Rice Leather Company, and he was actively 
identified with this line of business during his entire active career, 
which was marked by large and worthy accomplishment. Mr. Rice es- 
tablished his residence in Petoskey more than a quarter of a century 
ago and identified himself closely with its civic and business interests. 
He did much to further its development and upbuilding, gave his aid 
and influence in support of all legitimate measures and enterprises pro- 
jected for the general good of the connnunity, and, above all, he was a 
man whose nobility of character and fine business ability made him a 
power for good in the little city in which his interests became centered 
after his i-etirement from business in the state of New York. He was 
signally true and loyal in all the relations of life, was generous, kindly 
and tolerant, was of optimistic temperament, and his gracious person- 
ality gained and retained to him the staunchest of friends in all classes. 
His was a large mind and a large soul, and both were manifest in all 
stages of his career, which was one of distinctive attainment along nor- 
mal lines of productive industry. Though he maintained his home in 
Michigan for less than a decade his name and fame remain a very part 
of the history of Petoskey and Emmet county, and none is more worthy 
of representation in this publication. 

The genealogy of the family of which William Wirt Rice was a 
sterling scion is traced hack to Robert Rice, who was born in England, 
about the year 1590, and records extant show that the family name in 
England was variously spelled as Royce, Roise and Royse, the while 
there is no definite indication as to the exact time when the iiresent 
simplified orthography of the name was adopted. Robert Rice emi- 
grated to America in 1631 and first settled at Boston, Massachusetts, 
whence he removed to New London, Connecticut, prior to 1657, and be- 
came one of the earlier settlers of that place. He became a citizen of 
prominence and influence in this community, in which he served as 
constable in 1660 and which he represented in the colonial legislature 
in the following year. Records show him to have been a man of probity 
and good repute and he became the owner of a property of considerable 
value. He died at New London, in 1676. and his wife, Elizabeth, sur- 
vived him, as data show that she was still living on the family estate in 
1688. They liecame the parents of six sons and three daughters. 

Sanuiel. the third son of Robert and Elizabeth Rice, married Han- 
nah Churchill, of Wethcrsfield. Connecticut, and he resides at New 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN H41 

London, where he was a freeman in lf)69, but he removed thenee to 
Walliogford, Xew Haven colony, prior to 1677. He was the father of 
two sons and three daughters, and his eldest son, who likewise bore 
the name of Samuel, resided at Wallingford, where, on the 5th of June, 
1690, he married Sarah Baldwin. Samuel and Sarah (Baldwin) Rice 
became the pai-ents of four children, and Samuel died on the 11th of 
June, 1729. Jacob, the youngest son, was boru April 11, 1697, and on 
the 28th of September, 1724, he wedded Thankful Beach, who was born 
September 20, 1702, and who was a daughter of Thomas and Phebe 
Beach. Jacob Rice died November 13, 1727, at the age of thirty years, 
and was survived by two children, Amos and Experience. 

Amos Rice, who was born on the 1st of November 1725, was married 
to Sarah Morse about the year 1753, and they resided at Wallingford, 
Connecticut. They became the parents of seven sons and four daugh- 
ters, and their fifth son was Benajah, who was born March 16, 1767, 
and whose marriage to Sarah Hough was solemnized in January, 1793. 
Amos, the only son of Benajah and Sarah (Hough) Rice, was born in 
Windham, Greene county. New York, on the 22d of August, 1800, and 
thus it is shown that the parents were pioneers of that section of the 
Empire state. Amos Rice was reared to manhood in his native county 
and there he married Loretta Susan Andrews. In 1857 they removed 
to Lewis county. New York, where they passed the residue of their 
lives, secure in the high regard of all who knew them. Of their chil- 
dren William W., subject of this memoir, and two of his brothers, be- 
came prominently concerned with the tanning industry in the state of 
New York. 

William Wirt Rice was born at Lexington, Greene county. New 
York, on the 13th of August, 1833, and when he was two years of age 
his parents removed to Homer, Cortland county, where he was reared 
to adult age and where he was afforded the advantages of Cortland 
Academy, which was long one of the representative educational insti- 
tutions of this section of the state. He continued to be associated with 
the work and management of the home farm until he had attained to 
the age of twenty years, and in 1853 he left the home roof and removed 
to the town of Greig, Lewis county. New York, where he served a 
thorough apprenticeship at the tanner's trade, in the well ordered tan- 
nery of C. W. Pratt. He was thus employed for three years, at a com- 
pensation of twelve dollars a month, and in the meanwhile he mastered 
all details of the tanning of sole leather. In 1856, in company with his 
eldest brother, Benajah B. Rice, he erected a tannery at Dunning 's Sta- 
tion, on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, nine miles 
distant from Scranton. Pennsylvania, but he sold his interest in this 
tannery liefore it was placed in operation. In December, 1856, he es- 
tablished his home in Crogham, Lewis county. New York, and in the 
following year he there erected a tannery, which he successfully oper- 
■ ated until 1865. when the plant was destroyed by fire. A new tannery 
was forthwith erected and equipped. Benajah B. Rice was associated 
with his brother in the enterprise until 1863. when he sold his interest 
to his father, who, in the following year, transferred the same to his 
son Yale, who thereafter continued to he associated with his vounger 



842 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

brdther, William W.. of this review, in the operation of the wel' 
equipped plant until this and other properties held by the firm of W. 
& Y. Riee were sold to the firm of Bullard & Company, of New York 
City. 

Concerning the operations with which William W. Riee was thus long 
and successfully identified in Lewis county, New York, further data 
may consistently be entered. The capacity of the firm 's tannei-y at the 
time when the property was sold was thirty thousand sides of sole 
leather per .year, and in the manufacturing of the same thirty thousand 
cords of tanbark were utilized. In the spring of 1870 the firm pur- 
chased ten thousand acres of land in Lewis county, principally for the 
purpose of thus securing a reserve of hemlock timber for use in con- 
nection with their tannery. They also erected a tannery at Jordan 
Falls, on the Oswegatchie river, and this plant had an output capacity 
of sixty thousand sides of sole leather per annum. At this point they 
also erected twenty-five or more dwellings for the use of employes, to- 
gether with a large boarding house, a general store and a school house. 
In 1873 they piirehased about eighteen thousand additional acres of 
land, principally for its hemlock timber, and they built up one of the 
most extensive tanning enterprises in that section of the Empire State. 
On the 27th of Febi-uary. 1883, the tanneries and about ten thousand 
acres of the hemlock land were sold by the Rice brothers to Bullard & 
Company, of New York City, and about two years later, in 1885, Will- 
iam W. Rice came to Emmet county, ^Michigan, and established at 
Petoskey a tannery from which has Ijeen evolved the large and pros- 
perous business now conducted under the corporate title of the W. W. 
Rice Leather Company, in Avhich his sons, as the interested principals, 
have perpetuated his name. The original tannery at Petoskey had a 
capacity for output of fifty sides of dry-hide hemlock sole leather a 
day, and concerning the growth and expansion of the enterprise further 
and adequate details are given in the sketches of the careers of the two 
sons, George S. and Francis Y., on other pages of this work. 

Petoskey was a small and obscure village at the time when William 
W. Rice here established his home, and his piiblic spirit reached wider 
manifestation than the upbuilding of the important industrial enterprise 
which he here founded. He was alert in the promoting of measures and 
pro.iects for the advancement of all interests tending to foster social 
and material progress and became a leader in local business circles as 
well as in the direction of public affairs. He Avas president of the vil- 
lage board of trustees at the time of his death and no citizen com- 
manded a fuller measure of popular confidence and esteem. lie was 
considerate in the treatment of all in his employ and showed a kindly 
interest in their welfare, the while he was essentially democratic in his 
attitude and placed true valuations upon both men and things. A 
kind word was ever his to give to those employed by him and by others, 
and he had an abiding appreciation of the dignity and value of honest 
toil and endeavor, in whatever capacity. Sympathy and toleration 
were his permanent guests and his entire life was ordered upon the high- 
est plane of integrity and honor. As a man and as (Uie who contributed 
liis (piota to llic advancement and upbuilding of Petoskey and Emmet 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 843 

poiuity his name and work should be made the subject of definite tribute 
in this history of northern Michigan, where he lived and labored to 
goodly ends. 

In politics Mr. Rice gave a staunch allegiance to the cause of the 
Democratic party, and his wife was a zealous member of the Presbyte- 
rian church. 

On the 11th of October, 1864, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Rice to iliss iMartha A. Gowdy, wlio was born at Lowville, the county 
seat of Lewis county. New York, in 1839, and whose death occurred 
at Petoskey in 1885. She was a daughter of Norman Gowdy, one of 
the representative citizens and business men of Lewis county. Con- 
cerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Rice the following brief record is 
given in conclusion of this memoir : Alice G., who was born on the :24th 
of October, 1865, died on the 28th of September. 1870; George Stanley, 
who was born August 20. 1867, is individually mentioned elsewhere in 
this work; Julia B., who was born October 23, 1869, is now ilrs. Arthur 
M. Coburn, of Detroit: Francis Yale, who was born November 12, 1871, 
is likewise the sub.ject of a specific sketch on other pages of this work; 
Norman G., who was born January 12, 1874, is now a resident of Ubly, 
-Michigan; and Martha A., who was born September 12. 1876. is ^Irs. 
Morgan Curtis of Petoskey. 

George Stanley Rice, of Petoskey, president of the W. W. Rice 
Leather Company, is well upholding the prestige of a name that has been 
one of prominence and distinction in connection with the civic and in- 
dustrial progress of this favored section of the Wolverine common- 
wealth, and he is numbered among the essentially representative busi- 
ness men of Petoskej% which has been his home since the days of his 
youth and in which he has so ordered his cause as to retain secure van- 
tage ground in popular confidence and regard. Elsewhere in this vol- 
ume is entered a memoir to his honored father, the late William Wirt 
Rice, and thus it is not necessary to repeat the data of the latter's ca- 
reer and of the family history in the present connection. 

George Stanley Rice was born at Crogham. Lewis county, New York, 
on the 20th of August. 1867. and he is indebted to the schools of his 
native state for his early educational advantages, which compassed 
higher academic studies. He early became associated with his father's 
tanning business, and literally grew up in the same, so that he is familiar 
with all scientific and practical details of the important line of enter- 
prise with which he has been identified from his boyhood to the present 
time. Pull details concerning his father's business career are given in 
the memoir dedicated to the latter, and reference should be made to the 
article in question for supplemental information. George S. Rice was 
about eighteen years of age at the time of the family removal, in 1885. 
from Lewis county, New York, to Petoskey, and here he became actively 
associated with his father in the establishing and operating of the tan- 
nery, the original capacity of which was for the output of fifty sides of 
dry-hide hemlock .sole leather each day. He and his young brother 
were their father's valued and able coad.jutors in the enterprise from 
its inception, and as straiglitforward. reliable business men and equijiped 



844 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

with thorough knowledge of all details of this line of industry, they 
have continued the business with marked success since their father 
passed away, on the 12th of September, 1891. On the 31st of the fol- 
lowing December they effected the incorporation of the business under 
the laws of the state and adopted the present title of the W. W. Rice 
Leather Company, retaining their father's name as a tribute to his mem- 
orj' and in recognition of his having been the founder of the enterprise. 
The plant is one of the largest and best equipped in the State the same 
being devoted exclusively to the manufacturing of sole leather of the 
best grade. The enterprise is carried forward along the careful and con- 
servative lines defined in the policies of its founder and has proved a 
most valuable contribution to the commercial prestige of Petoskey and 
this entire section of Michigan. When operated at full capacity the 
tannery gives an output of three hundred thousand sides of sole leather 
a year, and the fine products find a ready demand in the market. 

Like his father, George S. Rice ha.s shown a commendable interest in 
civic and public afifairs in his home city and county, and he is emphati- 
cally progressive and public-spirited. He served one term as supervisor 
of Bear Creek township, but in polities he maintains an independent 
attitude and has had no desire to enter the turbulent stream of so-called 
practical politics. He gives his support to the men and measures meet- 
ing the approval of his judgment. In addition to his association with 
the manufacturing enterprise noted he is also vice-president of the 
First State Bank of Petoskey, one of the substantial and popular finan- 
cial in,stitutions of northern Michigan. Mr. and J\Irs. Rice are valued 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

On the 4th of December, 1888, Mr. Rice wedded Miss Fannie M. 
Beckham, who was born at Napoleon, Ohio, and who was the fifth in 
order of birth of the six children of Judge William and Amanda (Lem- 
ert) Beckham, both of whom were born and reared in Ohio, where the 
respective families were founded in the pioneer days, and where Judge 
Beckham not only served as ,iudge of the probate court of Henry county 
but where lie was also a successful contractor and agriculturist, He re- 
moved with his family to Petoskey, Michigan, when this thriving little 
city was a mere village, and here both he and his wife continued to 
reside until their death. Mr. and ]\Irs. Rice became the parents of seven 
children, of whom three died in infancy, and the four surviving are: 
William Wirt, Yale, George Stanley, Jr., and John Richard. The 
family is one of prominence in connection with the best social activities 
of the community and the attractive home, located on Mitchell street, is 
known as a center of gracious hospitality. 

Fr.vncis Y. Rice. — Among those whci are actively concerned witli tlie 
industrial and business interests of northern Michigan and who have 
here stood exemplar of the most progressive policies and appreciative 
civic loyaltj' is Francis Yale Rice, secretary of the W. W. Rice Leather 
Company up to 1906, one of the important industrial enterprises of the 
beautiful little city of Petoskey, Emmet county, whose prestige as a 
manufactui'ing and conmiercial center should not be subordinated to 
its widely known attractions as one of the most popular summer resorts 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 845 

of northena Michigan. Inasmuch as the upbuilding of the splendid en- 
terprise of the W. W. Rice Leather Company is adequately outlined in 
the memoir to William "Wirt Rice, its founder, and in that of George 
S. Rice, its president, it is deemed unnecessary to repeat the same in the 
present sketch. William Wirt Rice, father of him whose name initiates 
this paragraph, left an indelible impress upon the industrial and social 
history of Petoskey, where he founded the business which is now carried 
forward with all of energy and success by his sons, of whom the younger 
is he to whose career attention is now briefly directed. 

Francis Yale Rice, the fourth in order of birth of the six children of 
William W. and Martha A. (Gowdy) Rice, was bom at Louisville, Lewis 
county, New York, on the 12th of November, 1872, and thus he was a 
lad of about thirteen years at the time of the family removal to Petoskey 
in 1885. His rudimentary education was secured in the public schools 
of his native place and was supplemented by attendance in the schools 
of Petoskey, after which he prosecuted high academic studies in Alma 
College, at Alma, Gratiot county, and completed a commercial course 
in the Ferris Institute, in the city of Big Rapids, this state. After 
leaving school he became actively associated with the tanning business 
established by his father, and after the honored father passed away, in 
1891, the two sons incorporated the business, which has since been con- 
ducted i;nder the title of the W. W. Rice Leather Company, and George 
S. Rice, the elder of the brothers, is president of the company, while 
Francis Y. has given most effective sei-vice in the office of secretary. In 
1906 Mr. Rice also engaged in the livery business, and he has since con- 
ducted one of the leading establishments of this kind in Emmet county, 
with the best of equipment and service. He is one of the progressive 
business men of the city that has been his home from his boyhood days 
and here his standing in business circles is on a parity with his popu- 
larity in the community, in which his sterling character and genial per- 
sonality have gained to him a host of friends. In politics Mr. Rice is 
found aligned as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, 
but he has had no predilection for the honors or emoluments of public 
office. He is affiliated with Petoskey Lodge, No. 629, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, Inawandiwin Lodge. No. 56, Knights of Pyth- 
ias, ; and Petoskey Lodge, No. 282, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

On the 12th of December, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Rice to Miss Ennna Raymond, who was born and reared in the city of 
Grand Rapids, this state, and who is the only daughter and the eldest 
of the four children of Morris and Laura E. (Wauperton) Raymond 
both of whom were born in Maryland. Morris Raymond was for 
twenty-seven years state agent in Michigan for the Connecticut Fire 
Insurance Company, and later he became general agent for the Royal 
Exchange Insurance Company, of England. He was a Republican in 
politics and was affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. A man of winning pei"sonality and the highest principles, he ever 
commanded the unequivocal esteem of his fellow men. and he died, at 
Grand Rapids, in 1910. at the age of sixty years; his widow now main- 
tains her home at Grand Rapids. Mr. and Mrs. Rice have two fine little 
sons,— Francis Yale, Jr.. and Edward Raymond. 



846 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

James B. Martin, M. D. — The course of Dr. Martin has been such as 
to exemplify the highest ethics of his chosen profession and, engaged 
in successful general practice in Traverse City, he is worthy of recog- 
nition as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of northern 
Michigan, the section to which this publication is devoted. 

Dr. Martin claims the fine old Keystone state of the Union as the 
place of his nativity. He was born in the city of Scranton, Lack- 
awanna county, Pennsylvania, on the 12th of March, 1855, and is a son 
of Daniel and Margaret (Barry) Martin, both of whom were born and 
reared in Ireland, but they were married in America. After their emi- 
gration to this country they established their home in Pennsylvania, 
where they remained until about 1860, when they came to Michigan and 
took up their residence in St. Joseph county, where the father reclaimed 
a productive farm and where he continued to be engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits during the remainder of his active career. He passed 
the closing years of his life in the village of Menton, that county, where 
he died at the venerable age of eighty-three years, and his name is 
given a place of honor on the roster of the sterling piouoors of that 
section of the state. Both he and his wife were communicants of the 
Catholic church, and she died at the age of sixty-six years. Their seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, are living, and of the number 
Dr. Martin of this review was the third in order of birth. 

Dr. Martin was about five years of age at the time of the family 
removal to Michigan and he was reared to adult age under the sturdy 
and invigorating discipline of the old homestead farm in St. Joseph 
county, where he was also afforded the advantages of the public 
schools. His predilections and ambitions led him to seek a broader 
sphere of endeavor than that offered in the monotonous and arduous 
routine of the farm, and he early formulated definite plans for his 
future career. Appreciative of the responsibilities and exactions of th.' 
medical profession and also of its humane functions, he decided to pre- 
pare himself for the same. With this end in view he was finally 
matriculated in the medical department of the University of Michigan, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1881, and from 
which he received his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. In 
October of the same year he came to northern Michigan and located 
in the village of Manton, Wexford county, where he initiated the prac- 
tice of his profession, in the work of which he there continued until 
1889, when he removed to Traverse City, the metropolis and judicial 
center of Grand Traverse county, where he has since successfully fol- 
lowed the work of his profession and where he has long controlled a 
large and representative practice. He has subordinated all other 
interests to the demands of his profession and has been a close and 
appreciative student of its standard and periodical literature, so that 
he has recourse to the most approved modern remedial agencies and 
technical methods and facilities. He is an active and valued member 
of the Grand Traverse County Medical Society and the Michigan State 
]\redical Society, and is also identified with the American IMedical 
Association. Dr. Martin has served three terms as health officer 
of Traverse City, and in this position his services have not been of 




%ft[lUa4^^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 847 

merely nomenal order, for he has put forth every possibk' effort to 
promote sanitary conditions and to safeguard the health of the com- 
munity in general. While a resident of Manton, Wexford county, he 
served as village clerk and was for three years president of the village 
council, besides which he was township clerk for two years. In poli- 
tics Dr. Martin is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of 
the Democratic party, and he is well fortified in his opinions as to mat- 
ters of public polity, both national and local. He is alfiliat'^d with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
On the 1st of November, 1882, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Martin to Miss JIary J. Shepard, who was born and reared at Middle- 
ville, Barry county, Michigan, and she was summoned to the life 
eternal on the 30th of March, 1901. She is survived by one daughter, 
Rhea, who remains at the paternal home. Dr. Martin married Miss 
]\Iabel Bullock of St. Joseph, Missouri, on December 20, 1910. 

Robert A. Richards. — Honored and respected by all, there is no 
man in Iosco county, Michigan, who occupies a more enviable position 
in commercial circles than does Robert A. Richards, not alone on ac- 
count of the brilliant success he has achieved, but also on account of the 
honorable, straightforward business policy he has ever followed. He 
possesses untiring energy, is quick of perception, forms his plans readily 
and is determined in their execution, his close application to business 
and his excellent management having brought to him the high degree of 
prosperity which is his to-day. He stands as one of the foremost repre- 
sentatives of the hardware business in this section of the fine old Wol- 
verine state, and while laboring for his own success he has also promoted 
the general prosperity by pushing forward the wheels of progress and 
advancing the commercial prestige in Au Sable and that portion of the 
county in which he makes his home. 

Robert A. Richards, dealer in exclusive hardware, paints and oils, 
was born in England, on the 25th of December, 1848, and he is a son of 
Benjamin and Phoebe (Powell) Richards. The father was born in 
Bridgeport, Dorsetshire, England, on the 21st of March, 1825. and as a 
youth he learned the tinsmith's trade, with which he was identified dur- 
ing much of his subsequent career. In 1845 was solemnized his marriage 
to Miss Phoebe Powell, who was likewise born and reared in England, 
and they became the parents of ten children, seven of whom are still 
living, namely, — Robert A., James. William, Frederick, JMary, Sai-ah 
and Blanche. Benjamin Richards emigrated to the United States in 
the year 1854 and in due time he made a home for his family, who fol- 
lowed him to this country about the year 1856. Immediately after land- 
ing m America the father located at Lansingburg, New York, and thence 
he went to London, Canada, where he remained but a short time, and re- 
turned to Lansingburg, New York. In 1866 he removed to Alpena, 
^Michigan, where he worked at his trade in connection with the Barlow 
Hardware Store. In 1872 he started a hardware store of his own at Al- 
pena and in 1874 the family home was estalilished at Ea.st Tawas, 
Michigan, where Mr. Richards eventually became the owner of the busi- 
ness block now occupied by tite Richards Brothers Hardware Store. 



848 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

lu 1883 he turned the harihvaie business over to his sons and then, 
company with J. H. Sehineels, opened a bank, which he later 
of to his partner. Returning to Alpena he was there engaged in the 
dry -goods business for the ensuing eight years, at the expiration of 
which he again took up his abode at East Tawas, where he took an active 
interest in the hardware business. He was a man of most phenomenal 
energy and marked business capacity and his accomplishment in the 
commercial world was of gigantic proportions. Fraternally he was 
affiliated with the time-honored ^lasonic order, in which he was a valued 
and appreciative member of Baldwin lodge of East Tawas and Alpena 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. He was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 22d of March, 1901, at the venerable age of seventy-six years, and 
his cherished and devoted wife still lives at East Tawas. They belonged 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Robert A. Richards was a child of four years of age at the time 
of his arrival in the United States and he completed his preliminary 
educational training in the public schools of Alpena, Michigan. He was 
a resident of the state of New York for eight years, returning to Alpena 
in 1874, at which time he there engaged in the hai-dware business. In 
1882 he removed to Au Sable, Iosco county, where he established a hard- 
ware store in partnership with C. E. Wilcox. This firm was burned out 
in 1891 and the partnership was then dissolved. Mr. Richards in the 
same year formed a partnership with his brother, James and they were 
together for two years since which time the business has been conducted 
by R. A. Richards. On the 15th of July, 1901, his business place was 
destroyed by fire, the loss amounting to some seventeen thousand dol- 
lars. His present place of business is a fine modern building, forty by 
eighty feet in lateral dimensions and the stock contained therein is of 
the best and most modem type, the same including all kinds of hard- 
ware, paints and oils. 

On the 3d of April, 1865, Robert A. Richards enlisted as a soldier 
in the Civil war, becoming a member of Company C, One Hundred and 
Ninety-second New York Volunteer Infantry. He served with all of 
valor and faithfulness until the close of the war and received his hon- 
orable discharge on the 28th of August. 1865. In politics he accords a 
.staunch allesiiancc to the cause of the Republican party and he has taken 
an active part in public affairs of a local order. He served several years 
as clerk of Au Sable and for two years he was incumbent of the office 
of treasurer of this city. In 1897 he was elected to the office of treas- 
urer of Iosco county, in which he gave most efficient service for two 
terms. In a fraternal wa.v he is connected with Au Sable Lodge, No. 
243, Free & Accepted Masons, in which he has been secretary since 1882 
and Iosco Chapter, No. 83, Royal Arch Masons in which he has been 
treasurer since 1894. ]\Ir. Richards is a man of distinct and forceful in- 
dividuality, of marked sagacity, of undaunted enterprise, and in manner 
is genial, courteous and easily approachable. His career has ever been 
such as to warrant the trust and confidence of tlie business world and 
his activity in industrial, commercial and financial circles forms no un- 
important chapter in the history of Iosco county. 

Mr. Richards has been twice married, his first luiiou being to Miss 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 849 

Rebecca Sicker, a native of New York, in which state the marriage was 
solemnized in 1869. JMrs. Richards was summoned to eternal rest in 
1881. and in 1882 ^Ir. Richards wedded Miss Julia A. Baker, a daughter 
of William Baker, of Alpena, ^Michigan. To the latter union have been 
born two children, — Norma E. and Benjamin II., both of whom ri'inaiu 
at the parental home. 

Peter T. Peterson. — A prominent and intlueutial citizen of Fife 
Lake, Michigan, and one whose contribution to progress and develop- 
ment has ever been of the most insistent order is Peter T. Peterson, who 
though nearing his three score years and ten is still handling his business 
and working hard each day. He has ever manifested a deep and sincere 
interest in community affairs and has been the popular and efficient in- 
cumbent of a number of important public offices of trust and respon- 
sibility. The splendid success he has gained in a business way is en- 
tirely the outcome of his own well directed endeavors and for that reason 
his high position to-day is the more gratifying to contemplate. 

Peter T. Peterson was born at Laaland, Denmark, on the 7th of June, 
1845, and he is a son of Hans and Marie Peterson, both of whom are de- 
ceased. The father was a farmer by occupation and under the invig- 
orating discipline of the old home farm Peter T. was reared to maturity. 
His father was summoned to eternal rest when he was a young boy and 
thus he was early throw^n upon his own resources. He received but 
meager educational advantages in his youth and was set to learning the 
blacksmith's trade. He worked for his master for a period of five years, 
during which time he received no pay other than his board. In 1868 he 
and a brother decided to emigrate to America and accordingly severed 
the ties which bound them to home and native land and set sail for 
the United States. They proceeded immediately to Michigan, locating 
at Muskegon, where he secured work in one of the lumber camps. For 
several years he worked iip and down the river in connection with the 
great lumber industry and in 1878 settled at Fife Lake, which was then 
nothing but a wilderness. Seventeen months thereafter he rented a 
shop and shortly afterward he bought out Charles Lancaster, who was 
engaged in blaeksmithing and wagon making. In 1906 he purchased a 
building which he later enlarged but which was destroyed by fire the 
same year. He then bought another building, a store, which he also en- 
larged, and in which he had a wood-working shop in connection with 
his blacksmith business. Through hard work and frugality he has 
succeeded in gaining a competency though he is still leading an active 
business life maintaining a general supervision of his blacksmith es- 
tablishment. 

In the year 1879 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Peterson to 
Miss Georgia Ann Harding, who was born and reared in this state and 
who is a daughter of John and Dorothea Harding, of Stanwood, ;\Iich- 
igan. Jlr. Harding was engaged in farming operations during the 
greater part of his active career. ^Ir. and ]\Irs. Peterson have three 
children concerning whom the following brief data is here incorporated : 
Elsie iM. is the wife of Clinton W. Combs, who is in the employ of the 
United States Forestry department, in the state of Oregon ; Claudia is 



850 - HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

in the emploj' of the prosecuting attorney of Sanilac county, Michigan, 
and Raymond S. is a barber at Grand Haven. Michigan. 

For the long period of twenty-four years Mr. Peter.son, of this notice, 
was a member of the school board of Fife Lake. He was one of the 
organizers of the high school district and has been moderator, treasurer 
and secretary of the school board on different occasions. For nine years 
he was incumbent of the office of town treasurer, was town clerk for one 
year and is village treasurer at the present time, this being his eighth 
year in that office. He was president of the village for five years, was a 
member of the \dllage council for six years and is a member of the 
county Republican committee. It will be seen from the foregoing that 
Mr. Peterson has been decidedly an active factor in community affairs 
since his advent in Fife Lake more than thirty years ago. In a fra- 
ternal way he has passed through all the official chairs of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and he is now past grand. While he is not 
formally connected with any religious organization he gives freely of 
his aid and influence in support of all measures pro.jected for the well 
being of this section of the state. He is a man of large heart and gen- 
erous impulses and as such is accorded the unalloyed confidence and 
esteem of his fellow citizens. He has lived a most exemplary life, is a 
devoted husband and father, and as a citizen his loyalty and public 
spirit have ever been of the most insistent order. 

Nicholas Neil. — The dominating spirit of self-help is what has eon- 
served the distinctive business success and prestige of Mr. Nicholas 
Neil, who now conducts a flourishing general merchandise concern at 
Lincoln, Alcona coiinty, Michigan, where from modest inception he has 
built up an extensive trade and where he holds a high reputation for 
personal integrity and honorable methods. 

]\Ir. Neil was born in Canada, on the 27th of December, 1861, and 
is a son of Nicholas and Annie (Campbell) Neil, both of whom traced 
their ancestrv back to staunch Scotch extraction. The parents were born 
in Canada and there the mother was summoned to eternal rest in 1864, 
the father coming to the United States in 1881. To Mr. and Jlrs. Nich- 
olas Neil was born twelve children, seven of whom are now living and of 
the number the subject of this review was the second in order of birth. 
Nicholas Neil, Jr., received his preliminary' educational training in the 
public schools of his native place and he emigrated to the United States 
on the 12th of April, 1879, at which time he was a youth of about sev- 
enteen years of age. He first located at Ilari-isville, Michigan, where he 
was long identified with lumbering operations and he came to Lincoln 
in 1906. In 1907 he opened his present fine mercantile establishment, 
in which he handles a fine stock of general merchandise, boots and shoes. 
Through close application to business he has succeeded in building up a 
large and profitable trade in this vicinity, where he is known as a man 
of excellent business ability, enersretic and far-sighted, and where he has 
achieved prosperity through well directed efi^oit, the wliilc he has ever 
commanded the unqualified regard of those with wlunii he lias come in 
contact in either a business or a social way. 

In the vear 1897 was recorded tlie marriage (if .Mr. Xcil to Mi.s,s 




(^:4>c;t-irt_,-e^*/V: a7[«=u^:^7^^.<?.^?xy^ 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 851 

Carrie McClaurin, who was bora and reared in Canada, and who is a 
daughter of Robert JMcClaurin. To this union have been born four chil- 
dren, namely, — Wallace, Alice, Clayton and Percy. Mr. and i\Irs. Neil 
are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church and they are 
liberal contributors to all worthy projects. The family home is a center 
sf hospitality, and entertainment is continually being extended to the 
large circle of friends. 

Rev. Francis A. Kaczmarek. — Our Lady of Mount Carmel church 
at Gaylord, Otsego county, Michigan, was organized in 1880 by Rev. 
Francis F. Szulak, who assumed charge of it in connection with his 
work at other parishes in the old missionary days. He visited the parish 
from time to time, and, though his opportunities were meagre, suc- 
ceeded in building a church. He was succeeded by Rev. Francis Bruno 
Torka, a Franciscan. The first resident pastor was Rev. Father Leopold 
Opyrehalski, who came here in 1888. He was influential in establish- 
ing the church on a more substantial basis and built the present parish 
house. He was in turn succeeded by Rev. Father M. Groehowski, wlio 
remained here but one year. In 1889 Rev. A. Lipinski was installed as 
pastor, and he was followed by Rev. Casimir Skory. In 1893 Father 
Skory built the present school, which cost about two thousand dollars. 
He also had a cemetery platted and blessed and a small chapel erected. 
On the 27th of August, 1904, Rev. S. Pongannis became pastor, and he 
remained until October 1, 1907, at which time the Rev. Francis A. 
Kaczmarek was installed as pastor. The property of the parish con- 
sists of a stately and magnificent brick church, a brick dwelling and a 
frame parochial school building, the valuation of which amounts to 
about thirty-five thousand dollars. The parish is composed of one 
hundred and fifteen families and the school, which was formerly under 
lay authority, is now conducted by the Dominican Sisters. 

Rev. Father Francis A. Kaczmarek, the present incumbent of the 
pastorate of Our Lady of Mount Carmel church, is one of the beloved 
and popular clergymen of the village of Gaylord, where he has been 
at the head of the Catholic element since 1907, as previously noted. 
Father Kaczmarek was born in Poland, on the 2nd of April, 1878, and 
he is a son of Andrew and Mary (Wendrowicz) Kaczmarek the latter 
now living in Bay City, where Father Kaemarek was reared. He re- 
ceived his preliminary education in the St. Stanislas school at Bay City 
and later he supplemented that discipline by a course of study in St. 
Mary's Polish Seminary at Detroit. Subsequently he was matriculated 
in St. Francis Theological Seminary, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in which 
excellent institution he was graduated with honors as a member of the 
class of 1901. He was ordained priest by the Rt. Rev. Henry J. Richter, 
D. D., in Grand Rapids, Michigan, June 29, 1901, and his first assign- 
ment was as assistant pastor at Manistee, Michigan, where he remained 
for a period of four years. In 1905 he was transferred to Grand Rapids, 
where he became assistant to Father Skory for one year. In 1906 he 
was given charge of the Polish Catholic Church at Metz, where he re- 
mained for one .year, at the expiration of which he was advanced to the 
pastorate of Our Lady of Mount Carmel churcli at Gaylord. His pro- 



852 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

motions have been rapid and well merited, and it may be said that 
while the pastor has a large and appreciative congregation, the people 
have a most worthy and well beloved pastor. During the incumbency of 
Rev. Kaezmarek general conditions in the Catholic parish at Gaylord 
have been greatly improved, both spiritually and temporally. The 
property has been improved and its value enhanced more than ten 
thousand dollars. The religious life of the people of whom he has 
charge has been intensified and every holy and righteous enterprise has 
been pressed to its completion. Father Kaezmarek has not endeared 
himself to the Catholic element only, but has also won a high place in 
the confidence and esteem of the resident Protestants. His earnestness, 
enthusiasm and aggressiveness have won to him the merit he so well 
deserves from all Christian people. 

In his political convictions leather Kaezmarek is a stalwart sup- 
porter of the cause of the Republican party, and Avhile his religious 
duties prevent his being an active factor in political circles, he is ever 
on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and 
enterprises advanced for the good of the community. He is affiliated 
with various fraternal and social organizations of a Catholic nature 
and he has done much to promote and develop philanthropical tend- 
encies among his parishoners. Other men's services to the people and 
state can be measured by definite deeds, by dangers averted, by legis- 
lation secured, by institutions built, by commerce promoted, but what 
he accomplishes is through the influence of speech and written words 
and personal character — an influence whose value is not to be reckoned 
with mathematical exactness but which may be worth more by far than 
material benefits to the one affected by it. 

J. A. Gerhardt. — Distinguished not onl.y as a worthy representative 
of the native-born citizens of Reed City. Osceola county, but as one of 
the foremost business men of the place, J. A. Gerhardt is eminently de- 
serving of special mention in a work of this character. He comes of sub- 
stantial German and pioneer ancestry, and was bom October 19, 1881, 
in Reed City, a son of John Gerhardt. 

Born in Cassel, a walled city of Germany, John Gerhardt lived there 
until eighteen years old, when, lured to America by the stories told 
throughout the Fatherland of its rich soil and many opportunitias of- 
fered a poor man for obtaining wealth, he crossed the ocean, locating 
shortly after his arrival in ^Michigan. Locating at Reed City, Osceola 
county, when but twenty-three years old, he has resided here since, 
and now, at the age of seventy-two years, has the distinction of having 
lived in the county more years than any other resident. Energetic and 
thrifty, he has accumulated considerable property and is now living re- 
tired from active busines.s, enjoying the fruits of his earlier days of toil. 
The farm on which he settled when coming to this part of the .state was 
located three miles south of Reed City, and through his wise and 
.judicious labors became one of the best improved and most productive 
estates of his community. He married Catherine Bittner, who was born 
sixty-eighty years ago. and of their ten children eight are now, in De- 
cember, 1910. living. 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN »53 

J. A. Gerhardt, the seventh child and sixth son of his parents, was 
reared on the home farm and gleaned his first book knowledge in the 
rural schools of his native district. Not content to settle in life as an 
agriculturist, he entered a general store as a clerk, and during an ap- 
prenticeship of two years in that capacity acquired a practical knowl- 
edge of mercantile pursuits. Forming a partnership with his cousin, he 
carried on business for a time under the name of Gerhardt Brothers, a 
firm which was subsequently merged into that of the C. E. Gerhardt 
Company. Mr. Gerhardt has since bought out all of the stock belonging 
to Mr. C. E. Gerhardt, and is not only president of the company but its 
sole owner, although its name has not yet been changed. His estab- 
lishment is one of the leading ones of its kind in this part of Osceola 
county, and in the management of its different departments he keeps 
twelve people busily employed, his trade being extensive, as well as 
lucrative. 

Mr. Gerhardt married December 15, 1908, Alice Gingrich, a daughter 
of Joseph and Barbara (Mosser) Gingrich, well-known and highly es- 
teemed residents of Osceola county. 

Thom.\s Quinlan and John F. Quinlan. — Thomas Quinlan, of Pe- 
toskey, is chairman of the Thomas Quinlan & Sons Company. Ltd.. and 
is a member of the family which have been prominently identified with 
the commercial and financial life of Petoskey since the beginning of this 
city's importance among the centers of northern Michigan. In recent 
years the principal activities of the family have been concentrated under 
the title of Thomas Quinlan & Sons Company, Ltd.. which was organized 
February 3. 1908. and whose board of managers is as follows: Thonms 
Quinlan, chairman; C. C. Quinlan and M. ^i. Burnham, vice chairmen; 
William T. Quinlan. treasurer; and John F. Quinlan, secretary. The 
company handle mortgage securities, and its capital stock is one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, seventy thousand dollars of which is paid in. 

The parents of Thomas Quinlan were John and Elizabeth (Flood) 
Quinlan. The former was born in county Tipperary. Ireland, and lived 
to the age of eighty-two. When a young man he came to this country 
on a sailing vessel, and from New York went into Vermont, where he 
began farming and for thirty-eight years was engaged in buying and 
shipping live stock to the old Brighton and Cambridge markets. He 
was also elected to the Vermont legislature, being an active Democrat 
in politics. His first wife was a native of Vermont, and their five chil- 
dren are: Michael, who served with the First Vermont Cavalry through 
the Civil war; William, now deceased, was a merchant of Albany. New 
York; John, who ser\'ed during the war as a member of the First Ver- 
mont Sharpshooters; JMartin; and Thomas, of Petoskey. His second 
wife was Margaret Harney, a native of Ireland, and she was the mother 
of three sons and three daughters, of whom the following survive : Jo- 
seph, now living on the old Vermont homestead and a buyer and shipper 
of stock ; Nellie ; Mary ; Frank ; and Kate. 

Thomas Quinlan, son of John Quinlan, was born at Charlotte. Chit- 
tenden county. Vermont. December 22. 1848. was reared on the Ver- 
mont homestead and received lii.s education in a sehoolhouse located on 



854 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

his father's farm. His first experience in business was as a clerk when 
he was seventeen year old, after which he returned to the farm. In 
October, 1871, at the age of twenty-three, he came west to Norwood, 
Michigan, and after working as a clerk for several years located at 
Petoskey in November, 1874, an early year in the history of this city. 

He came here as manager of the Fox, Rose & Butters general mer- 
chandise business and continued in that capacitj' for several yeai-s. In 
the spring of 1878, with Philip B. Wachtel, he established the first 
banking house of Petoske.y, known as Wachtel & Quinlan, bankers. His 
interest was later sold to W. L. Curtis of Kalamazoo, and he was tlien 
engaged in the real estate and insurance business up to 1908, when the 
Thomas Quinlan & Sons Company, Ltd., was organized and took over 
his interests, he being now chairman of the board of managers. 

In politics Thomas Quinlan is a Democrat and his first important 
public office was register of deeds, to which he was elected in 1880 and 
re-elected in 1882. He also served as township treasurer and village 
treasurer of Petoskey. 

September 23, 1879, he married Miss M. Barbara Wachtel, a native 
of Pennsylvania. They had four children: John F. ; William T., treas- 
urer of the company, and secretary-treasurer of the Detroit Life In- 
surance Company ; Carlos C, vice president, and who organized the 
Detroit Life Insurance Company and is now organizing the National 
Fire Insurance Company of Detroit ; and Edith M. All the sons have 
won conspicuous places in the financial and business world. 

John F. Quinlan. the oldest of the three brothers, was born at 
Petoskey, November 1, 1880, and received his education in the public 
schools here and the Ferris Institute at Big Rapids. For four .years he 
was employed in the postoffice under his uncle P. B. Wachtel, for a 
year was bookkeeper for the Belding-Hall Manufacturing Company, 
and then for four years had charge of the office of the Bogardus Land 
& Lumber Company at Pellston. He then continued at Pellston in the 
real estate and insurance business on his own account until 1908, when 
he became one of the organizers of Thomas Quinlan & Sons Company, 
Ltd. 

A Republican in politics, he was elected city treasurer for 1909-10. 
He is a member of Petoskey Lodge No. 629, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks., and Inawandiwin Lodge No. 56, Knights of Pythias. 
November 28, 1904, he married Miss Grace Witherspoon. She was born 
in Harrison, Michigan. They have one daughter, Grace Edith. 

Thomas Y. Kimball, M. D. — During the years which mark the 
period of Dr. Kimball's profes.sional career he has met with gratifying 
success and during the period of his residence at Fife Lake. Michigan, he 
has won the good will and patronage of many of the best citizens here. 
He is a thorough student and endeavors to keep abreast of the times in 
everything relating to the discoveries in medical science. Progressive 
in his ideas and favoring modern methods as a whole, he does not dis- 
pense with the time-tried s.ystems whose value has stood the test of years. 
There is in his record much that is worthy of the liighest commendation, 
for limited privileges and financial resources made it necessary that he 



HISTORY OF NOKTHERN MICHIGAN 855 

personally meet the expenses of a college course. In doing this he dis- 
played tiie elemental strength of his character, which has been the 
foundation of his success. He now stands very high in the medical pro- 
fession of the state and is in the fullest sense of the term a self-made 
man. 

A native of the fine old Keytone state of the Union, Dr. Kimball 
was born at Wellshoro, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of June, 187-1, and he 
is a son of Charles T. and Isabelle (Sligh) Kimball, both of whom were 
born and reared in Pennsylvania. The father was a lumberman by oc- 
cupation and he removed to Fife Lake, Michigan, with his family, in 
the year 1886. Here Charles T. Kimball was engaged in the mercantile 
business and in lumbering for a number of years and he was ever a 
prominent and influential factor in all matters affecting the good of the 
general welfare. He was sunrmoned to eternal rest in the year 1004. at 
the age of sixty-four years. His cherished and devoted wife, who is 
still living, makes her home with her son, the Doctor. 

Dr. Thomas Y. Kimball was educated to the age of twelve years at 
Wellshoro, Pennsylvania, and after the family removal to Fife Lake, 
i\Iichigan, he completed his school work in this place. For some four 
years after reaching his majority he was engaged in teaching school in 
the northern section of jMichigan and at the expiration of that time he 
decided upon the medical profession as his life work. With that object 
in view he entered the Milwaukee Medical College, in 1895, continuing 
as a student in that institution for one year. He was then matriculated 
as a student in the Grand Rapids Medical College, in which he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1899. duly receiving his well 
earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. Since that time he has broadened 
his medical knowledge by attendance in post-graduate schools at De- 
troit, Chicago and at Rochester, Minnesota, in the last-mentioned place 
having been under the instruction of the far-famed Mayo brothers. Im- 
mediately after his graduation, in 1899, he located at Jennings, iMieh- 
igan, where he was engaged in the active practice of his profession for 
one year. He then returned to Fife Lake, remaining here for some six 
years, at the expiration of which, in 1907, he went to the upper penin- 
sula of Michigan as physician and surgeon for the Worden Luml)er 
Company. Eighteen nnrnths later he returned to Kalkaska, where he 
entered iirto a partnership alliance with Dr. S. A. Johnson, of Kalkaska. 
Jliehigan. At the time of Dr. Johnson's death, in 1908, Dr. Kimball 
was offered a position as head surgeon and medical advisor of a hospital 
at Spirit Lake, Idaho, whither he journeyed in the fall of 1909. This 
hospital was supported by the Idaho and Washington Northern Rail 
road Company and Dr. Kimball continued as its head for a period of 
fourteen months, when, on account of his mother's failing health, he was 
forced to return to ^Michigan. He then located at Fife Lake, where he 
is now established with a large and lucrative patronage and where he 
is accorded recognition as one of the ablest physicians and surgeons in 
Grand Traverse county. 

On the 23d of Septenrber. 190(3. Dr. Kimball was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Florence Lucier, of Sault Ste ilarie. Michigan. She is 
a daughter of Peter and ^laggic ( Ruttrell) Lucier. of that city. Mr. 



856 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Luuier is a millwright by trade and lias long been engaged in the work 
of that line of enterprise. Dr. and ilrs. Kimball have no children. 
They are popular factors in connection with the best social activities of 
Fife Lake where their attractive home is recognized as a center of refine- 
ment and most gracious hospitality. 

In his political adhereney Dr. Kimball is aligned as a stanch sup- 
porter of the principles and policies promulgated by the Republican 
party and while he has never shown aught of desire for political prefer- 
ment of any description he has been the able incumbent of the office of 
village clerk of Fife Lake for a period of four years. In connection with 
the work of his profession he is a valued and appreciative member of the 
Grand Travei-se County Medical Society and of the ]\Iichigan State 
Medical Society. In a fraternal way his affiliations are with the local 
lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith 
is in harmony with the tenets of the Presbyterian church, in the differ- 
ent departments of which he is an active factor. Dr. Kimball is a man 
of broad information and deep human sympathy and by reason of his 
fine medical skill, his genial disposition and true gentlemanliness he 
is a man of mark in the community in which he maintains his home. 

Clinton D. Woodruff, M. D. — A well-known and successful physi- 
cian and surgeon of Reed City, Michigan, Clinton D. Woodruff, il. D., 
has gained marked prestige in his profession and is held in high esteem 
by his fellow-citizens. A native of New England, he was bom June 26, 
1832, in Avon, Hartford county. Connecticut, coming on the paternal 
side of Welsh ancestry. 

Arden Woodruff, the Doctor's father, was born and reared in Con- 
necticut, spending his earlier years on a farm. After serving an ap- 
prenticeship of seven years at the trade of a tanner arid currier, he fol- 
lowed it for a time in New England and later in Allegany county. New 
York. Going thence to Wyoming county, New York, he was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits at Warsaw for a while, and then settled in Stry- 
kersville, the same county. A man of much ability and intelligence, he 
became active in public affairs, while there serving for two years as 
representative to the state legislature. Disposing finally of his property 
in that section, he moved to West Bloomfield. Ontario county. New York, 
where he spent his last years, passing away at the venerable age of 
eighty-one years. He married Sophia Tillotson, a native of Connecticut. 
She survived him, living to be almost ninety years of age. She was an 
unusually bright and active woman, able to take care of her room until 
almost her very last days. Of her children, two sons grew to manhood, 
namely : Edward P.. a bookkeeper, died in Chicago ; and Clinton D., the 
sub,iect of this brief personal record. 

Spending his boyhood days in Wyoming county. New York, Clinton 
D. Woodruff obtained the rudiments of his education in the district 
schools of Warsaw, after which he attended a select school at Strykers- 
ville for a year, subsequently continuing his studies in Albany. Begin- 
ning his career in Warsaw, he was there clerk in a dry goods establish- 
ment for ten months, after which he spent a year farming. Removing 
to Kilbourn (yity. AVisconsin. in 1856, he remained there a few months 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 8[.7 

looking about, and in the spring of 1857 accepted a position as clerk 
and manager of a drug store. Succeeding well and liking the work, he 
then bought out the establishment at the end of two years and con- 
tinued the business until 1866. In 1860 he begun the study of medicine, 
and in 1862 attended a course of lectures in the medical department 
of the University of the City of New York. Returning to Kilbourn 
City, he continued the practice of his profession there, and in 1865 was 
appointed by the governor as assistant surgeon of the Thirteenth Wis- 
consin Volunteer Infantry. In this capacity Dr. WoodruflE went with 
the Texas expedition from Orleans to San Antonio, Texas, where he 
remained with his regiment until mustered out of service in December, 
1865, at JMadison, Wisconsin. 

Resuming his practice and the management of his drug business, 
the Doctor continued his residence in Wisconsin until 1875, when he 
sold out and returned to New York state to care for his father, who was 
in feeble health at that time and who lived but a brief while after. Lo- 
cating in Lima, New York, after the death of his father, Dr. Woodruff 
bought out the practice and good will of Dr. Tisdal and was there in 
active practice six years. He subsequently spent a short time in Buffalo, 
New York, from there moving to Allegan county, Michigan, where he 
practiced medicine ten years. The ensuing six years he was in practice 
at Grand Rapids, Michigan, where his wife died. He spent the following 
year with his son, and then returned to Allegan county, Michigan, where 
he continued his professional labors for two years. From there the 
Doctor was called to the Reed City Sanitarium, where he was house 
physician and surgeon until the burning of the institution, two and one- 
half years later. Then, after spending three months as physician at 
tile Kalamazoo Sanitarium, Dr. Woodruff' removed to Mesick, Michigan, 
where he practiced for a year. Returning then to Reed City, he has 
since been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, his skill and wide experience gaining for him an excellent 
patronage. 

The Doctor is a member of the Osceola County Medical Society and 
its president in 1909; and belongs to the Michigan State Medical So- 
ciety. Religiously he is a valued member of the Congregational church 
and superintendent of its Suntlay-school. A life-long Republican in 
politics, he has helped elect every Republican president since the forma- 
tion of his party. 

Dr. Woodruff has been twice married. He married first, in 1854, in 
Warsaw, New York, Emma Tillotson, who died in Grand Rapids, Mich- 
igan. Three years later, in Allegan county, Michigan, he married Helen 
M. Peck. Of the Doctor's four children, one son and one daughter have 
passed to the life beyond, and two sons are living, namely: Herbert A., 
assistant cashier in the old National Bank at Grand Rapids ; and Ernest 
0., vice president of the W. G. Hutchinson Company of Los Angeles, 
California. The daughter, Lillian B. Woodruff, was .educated in music 
at Lima, New York, and afterward taught music in Allegan, Plainwell 
and at Grand Rapids, being vei-y successful. She lived to be thirty-four 
years old, her death at that age being deeply regretted by a host of 
warm friends. 



858 HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

William W. Smith. — While the disposition to do honor to those who 
have served well their race or their nation is prevalent among all en- 
lightened people and is of great value everywhere and under all forms 
of government, it is particularly appropriate to those fostered in this 
country, where no man is born to public office or public honor, coming 
to neither by inheritance, but where all men are equal before the law, 
where the race for distinction is over the road for public usefulness and 
is open to everyone who chooses to enter, however humble and obscure 
he may be, and where the advantageous circumstances of family and 
wealth count, in the vast majority of cases, for but little or nothing. 
In an enumeration of the men of the present generations who have won 
honor for themselves and at the same time have honored the state to 
which they belong it is imperative that distinct recognition be accorded 
to William W. Smith, for he is one of the distinguished citizens of 
northern Michigan, where he has figured prominently in public affairs. 

William W. Smith is a native son of New York, his birth having oc- 
cured at Constantia, Oswego county, on the 22nd of August, 1849. He 
is a son of William W. and Ada A. (West) Smitli, both of whom were 
likewise born in the old Empire state of the Union, the former in the 
year 1817, and the latter in 1822. In 1846 was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. Smith and they became the parents of four children, 
two of whom survive at the present time, in 1911, — William W., the 
immediate subject of this review; and Frank, who is now senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Smith & Hull, of Grand Traverse county. The father 
was a lumberman by occupation and he passed his entire life in the 
state of New York, where his demise occurred in 1857, at the compara- 
tively young age of forty years. The mother is now deceased. 

The boyhood days of William W. Smith were passed in Oswego 
county, New York, to the public schools of which vicinity he is indebted 
for his early educational training. He came to Traverse City, Grand 
Traverse county, Michigan, in 1860, at which time he was a child of 
about eleven years of age. He continued to attend school until he bad 
attained the age of thirteen years, at which time he entered the emplo.y 
of the firm of Hannah, Lay & Company, as an assistant in a saw mill. 
Subsequently he grasped the opportunity of becoming a cabin-boy on 
one of the company's steamers, retaining that position from 1864 until 
1866. From 1866 to 1874 he was engaged in general work for the firm 
and for the ensuing ten years he was a clerk in one of their grocery 
stores. Thereafter he performed whatever work was assigned to him. 
in the sawmill in the summer, in the woods in the winter, as steward 
and clerk on the steamer "City of Traverse," and later as clerk on the 
steamer "Faxton," plying between Traverse City and Charlevoix, Pe- 
toskey and Harbor Springs. After serving one year in the lumber of- 
fice he was placed in charge of the company's large flouring mill, situ- 
ated on the south bank of the Boardman river, near Sixth and Union 
streets. For fully a quarter of a century he has been the efficient and 
popular incumbent of this position, which he holds to the present time. 

In his political convictions Mr. Smith is a staunch advocate of the 
principles promulgated by the Republican party and during his resi- 
dence in Traverse City he has been honored by his fellow citizens with 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 859 

many important offices of public trust and responsibility, in all of which 
he has acquitted himself with honor and distinction. For ten years he 
was alderman from one of the wards of the city; for two years he was 
mayor of the city, in connection with the duties of which office he gave 
a most admirable administration of the municipal affairs; and in ]!IO:j 
he was water commissioner. In addition to his work as manager of the 
flour mill of Hannah, Lay & Company, he has various financial inter- 
ests of broad scope and importance. He is a director and stockholder in 
the State Bank and has considerable valuable property holdings in 
this city. He stands high in fraternal and social orders in northern 
Michigan, holding membership in Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free 
& Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars; Saladin 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at 
Grand Rapids; and DeWitt Clinton Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite, being a thirty-second degree Mason. He is also tiffilialeil with 
Grand Traverse Lodge, No. 200, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in which he is past noble grand ; Traverse City Lodge, No. 323, Benevo- 
lent & Protective Order of Elks ; the Knights of the Maccabees, and the 
Independent Order of Foresters. 

On the 8th of June, 1874, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Smith to Miss Susan E. Reynolds, a native of New York, where she 
was born on the 3d of December, 1853. She is a daughter of Edward 
Reynolds, a native of Greenfield, Vermont, and a lumberman by occu- 
pation in the ante-bellum days. He enlisted as a soldier in the Union 
army and made a splendid record for himself as a brave and dashing 
soldier but was killed at the battle of Monocacy Junction, Maryland, on 
the 30th of July, 1864. He married Miss Mary Berryman who died at 
the age of eighty-three years, she having been a resident of Traverse 
City. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds became the parents of five children, con- 
cerning whom the following brief record is here entered, — James is en 
gaged in agricultural pursuits in Garfield township, this county ; Susan 
E. is the wife of Mr. Smith, as already noted; Richard is employed at 
the mill of which Mr. Smith is manager; Anise is the wife of E. L. 
Parmenter, an agriculturist in Leelanau county; and Josephine is the 
wife of C. D. Monroe, a machinist in Traverse City. Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith have the following children : Ada, who is the wife of Sprague 
Pratt, of Los Angeles; William E. is identified with the Hannah & 
Lacy Company of Traverse City ; Jennie M. married W. J. Rennie and 
resides at Traverse City ; and Jay P. and Helen E. remain at the 
parental home. 

Although not connected formally with any religious organization, 
^Ir. Smith attends and gives his support to the Congregational church, 
of which his family are devout members. It is most gratifying to note, 
in view of the very meager educational training afforded him in his 
youth, that through persistent effort and extensive reading he has be- 
come a wonderfully well informed man. He was forced to leave school 
at the early age of thirteen years and thereafter he completed his dis- 
cipline in the school of experience. He has been in the employ of one 
firm for the past forty-seven years, nearly half a century, and during 



860 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

all that time he has advanced from one position of responsibility to 
another until he is now manager of the big flour mill at Traverse City. 
In all the relations of life his record has been characterized by fair and 
honorable methods and as a result no man in this section holds a higher 
place in popular confidence and esteem than does he. 

RoLA E. Peescott. — As owner and publisher of the decidedly enter- 
prising paper known as the Alcana County Herald, Mr. Rola E. Prescott 
is rapidly gaining precedence as one of the foremost newspaper men 
in this part of the state. This publication was established at Lincoln, 
Michigan, on the 1st of January, 1908, it being then a seven column 
folio with a circulation of about two hundred with two pages home 
print. It was purchased by Mr. Prescott, in March, 1910. The paper 
was then reduced to six folio, with four pages home print and will be 
made all home print at an early date. The circulation has increased 
four hundred per cent under its present management, now number- 
ing eight hundred. It is the only country weekly in the United States 
having its own cartoonist and giving its readers a live cartoon on county 
subjects in every issue. "It's Different" is the Herald watchword; 
and it is. Mr. Prescott is a believer in originality and personality. 
Besides the cartoon service it has many features belonging more to the 
city daily than the country weekly class. Advertising cannot be se- 
cured on the front page, nor will it be found mixed with news. The 
paper is not sensational but gives all the news without fear or favor, and 
has a live editorial column in which the paper's views are given — and all 
the views are confined to this column, the paper's position not being 
allowed to influence the news columns. Several special writers con- 
tribute to its cohuuns on various subjects. In addition to the publica- 
tion of the paper a jobbing department is conducted, where job print- 
ins, designing and engraving are carried on. 

In Huron county, Michigan, on the 4th of July, 1881, occurred the 
birth of Rola E. Prescott. He is of Irish descent and is a son of Edward 
and AUie (Smith) Prescott, the father having been born in Erin and 
the mother in Canada. The father was a sailor, but is now retired and 
living at Harbor Beach. Rola E. is one of three sons born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Prescott. His mother died when he was ten years 
of age, and he was thrown upon his own resources at the age of thirteen 
starting as a delivery boy in a grocery, and later following his father's 
calling — that of a sailor. Improving spare moments in study, he wa.s 
able to secure a teacher's certificate when sixteen. He later took a 
business college course in the Cleary College at Ypsilanti. He was 
assistant postmaster at Harbor Beach, Huron county, Michigan, from 
1900 to 1904 and in tlic latter year he removed to Kalamazoo, where he 
was iialf owner and iiiiniaiivr of the Art Printing Company, lie was 
city salesman and assistant manager for the American Type Founders 
Company, of Detroit, in 1905-6 and from 1906 to 1910 he was secretary 
and treasurer of the Harbor Beach (Michigan) Tiwcs. In IMarch of 
the latter year he purchased the Alcona County Herald and since that 
time he has been a prominent and influential resident of Lincoln. 

On the 7th of September. 1904. was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 



HISTORY OP NORTHERN MICHIGAN 861 

Presfolt to Jliss Ethel iMann. a daughter of Alexander and Rachel 
Mann, of Berkshire, Michigan. To this union has been born one daugh- 
ter, Erva Claire, whose natal day is the 28th of May, 1905. 

In politics Mr. Preseott is an independent, believing that the man 
or the principle ever count more than party. He is president of his 
home village and has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all 
matters projected for the general welfare of the county and country. 
He is a man of energy and integrity. In a fraternal way he is affiliated 
with Huron Lodge, No. 361, Free & Accepted Masons, and is also con- 
nected with the adjunct IMasonic organization, the Order of the Eastern 
Star, of which his wife is likewise a member. He is a member of the 
Loyal Guards and of the Grange. In their religious faith ilr. and l\Irs. 
Preseott give their support to the doctrines upheld by the Presbyterian 
church and they hold a high place in popular confidence and esteem. 

Michael O'Beien. — One of the representative men of the northern 
part of the Lower Peninsula of the state of Michigan is well known 
and highly honored citizen of Alpena, where he has maintained his home 
for forty-two years and where he is engaged in the practice of law, be- 
sides being identified with various important lines of business enter- 
prise. He has assisted as one of the builders of Alpena, of which city 
he has served as mayor, and at all times has contributed his share to 
the material and civic progress of this thriving city. Mr. O'Brien has 
triumphed over adverse conditions and pressed forward to the goal of 
worthy success. He is a self-made man. and integrity and honor have 
characti'rized him in all the relations of life, so that he well merits 
the esteem so freely accorded him in the community in which he has so 
long made his home and in which he is a prominent and influential 
citizen. 

Michael O'Brien well exemplifies the sterling traits of the race 
from which he is sprung, and his alert mentality, matiire judgment and 
keen business sagacity are on a parity with his genial and whole-souled 
personality. He was born on a farm near Belleville, province of On- 
tario, Canada, on the 18th of September, 1852, and is the eldest son in 
a family of three sons and three daughters born to Patrick and Catherine 
(Fitzgerald) O'Brien, both of whom were natives of county Limerick, 
Ireland, where the former was born in the year 1821 and the latter in 
1833. The parents were young at the time of coming to America ; the 
father came in 1846 and the mother in 18-1:8, and their marriage was 
solemnized at Belleville. Ontario, on the 20th of August, 1849. The 
father died on the 14th of March, 1869, and the mother long sui-vived 
him, having been summoned to eternal rest on the 21st of May, 1910. in 
the city of Alpena. Both were devout members of the Catholic church, 
and of their children two sons and three daughters are now living. 
Patrick O'Brien was reared and educated in his native land and in 1846 
he came to America. lie bought a piece of land in the county of Has- 
tings and soon became identified with agriculture and, being a cabinet 
maker, also worked at his trade near Belleville, Ontario, until about the 
year 1855, when he removed with his family to the city of Detroit, 
Michigan ; later he entered the employ of the Great Western Railroad 

vol. 11—20 



862 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

Company, which necessitated his removal to Windsor, and in the service 
of that company he continued for some time. Later on he became 
connected with the post ofSce department and he continued to reside 
in Windsor until his death. 

Michael O'Brien, whose name initiates this review, gained his early 
educational discipline in the Catholic parochial schools of Windsor, 
Ontario, and supplemented this by a course in the old Bryant & Strat- 
ton Business College in the city of Detroit. At Windsor he learned the 
trade of shoe-making, in which he became a skilled workman and in 
1868, at the age of sixteen years, he began working as a journej'man at 
his trade, in which connection he was employed tirst at Trenton and 
later at Lexington, Michigan. He was not j'et seventeen years of age 
at the time of his father's death, and his widowed mother was left with 
the care of five children besides Michael, the elde.st son. The latter 
thus became the virtual head of the family, and beyond the bare neces- 
sities of life for himself he devoted his earnings to the support of his 
mother and children. 

On the 28th of July, 1869, Mr. O'Brien came to Alpena, which was 
then a small lumbering town, and here he secured work at liis trade by 
entering the employ of Murdoch JMcLeod, and when that gentleman 
went out of business he went to work for the late John W. Creighton. 
That he had made good use of his earlier educational advantages M-as 
shown soon after he established his home at Alpena. He attended night 
school three years, after which he passed the required examination and 
proved himself eligible for pedagogic honors. In 1872 he brought his 
mother and the other children to Alpena and he continued to support 
the family until tlie younger children were able to do for themselves. 
No son ever accorded more earnest and devoted filial solicitude than did 
he, and his noble old mother never failed to mark her appreciation of 
his fidelity during these earlier years of vicissitude. 

In 1875 Mr. O'Brien engaged in the manufacturing ;uul retail boot 
and shoe business on his own account and he was on the road to suc- 
cess when disaster overtook liim, February 21, 1876, in that his store 
and stock were destroyed by fire with other stores, with the result that 
he was compelled to resume the work of his trade and again start at 
the foot of the ladder. In the meantime he had secured firm vantage 
ground in the confidence and good will of the community and his per- 
sonal popularity was significantly shown by his election as alderman in 
April, 1880, and in November of the same year he was also elected to 
the office of county clerk of Alpena county, and through successive re- 
elections he served four consecutive terms in this important office, a 
total of eight years, and the administration of the office was careful, 
systematic and thorough. Wliile incumbent of this position Mr. O'Brien 
began tlie study of law and was admitted to the bar on the 31st of De- 
cember, 1887. 

In 1889 Mr. O'Brien purchased the law and abstract business of the 
late Joseph B. Newton and entered into a professional and business 
partnership with William T. Sleator, who was then in the abstract busi- 
ness, and with whom he continued to be associated for ten years. Since 
July 1, 1899, his law and busine-ss partner has been Hon. James Frnncis, 



HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 863 

a former representative of Alpena county in the state legislature. They 
control a large and representative law practice and also conduct a gen- 
eral real-estate and loan business. In 1890 Mr. O'Brien was elected 
mayor of Alpena and he gave a progressive administration of the affairs 
of the municipal government. Within his regime, which compiised tliree 
terms of two years each, many important public improvements were 
effected in the city, including the erection of the present splendid high- 
school building. As mayor of the city he wa.s the prime factor in secur- 
ing the construction of the tirst big brick sewer within the municipal 
limits. This is two miles in length, flushes itself automatically and af- 
fords effective drainage for the whole south side of the city, besides 
which it is the only sewer of the kind in the entire state. 

Everytliing that has tended to conserve the best material and civic 
interests of his home city has received the earnest support of Mr. 
O'Brien, and he has been identified actively with all important move- 
ments and enterprises along this line. He was the first president of the 
Alpena Business lien's Association, and is a director of the Alpena 
Chamber of Commerce, of which he was elected the first presideut, an 
office which he held for two years. He is also a stockholder and director 
of the Alpena County Savings Bank. He is the secretary and a director 
of the Alpena Land Improvement Company, and is president of the 
Alpena Roller Flour Mills, incorporated in 1899. His vaiious in- 
terests, professional, business and civic, place insistent demands upon 
his time and attention, but he has found ample opportunity for effective 
service in behalf of the cause of the Democratic partj', of whose policies 
and principles he is an ardent advocate. In 1