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GENEALOOV OO^LEeT,o^, 



HISTORY 



OF 



OREGON 



Illustrated 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO— PORTLAND 

THE PIONEER HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 



1205983 




HARVEY W. SCOTT 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HARVEY WHITEFIELD SCOTT. 

For forty years Harvey Whitefield Scott was editor of The Oregonian and in his 
death the journalistic profession of America lost one of its most brilliant minds, one 
of its most accomplished scholars, and one of its most vigorous and courageous writers. 
He was a pioneer and a builder. For nearly a half century he labored for the develop- 
ment of the Pacific coast, and Portland and the surrounding country owe their splendid 
progress in large measure to the work of this terse conductor of a great newspaper. 
He possessed those qualities which in the aggregate make what men call character, and 
this character, shining out through the columns of The Oi'egonian, has exalted the char- 
acter of the state and the minds of her sons. 

His birth occurred in Tazewell county, Illinois, February 1, 1838. He came of Scotch 
ancestry, his paternal forefathers landing at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1755. His 
grandparents became residents of Pennsylvania and North Carolina, and his parents, 
John Tucker and Ann (Roelofson) Scott, established their home in Tazewell county, 
Illinois, where Harvey W. Scott continued to reside until his fourteenth year, becoming 
inured to a life of severe toil, assisting with the work of the fields during the summer 
months, while in the winter seasons he attended the district school. In 1852 the family 
started across the plains to Oregon with ox teams — a journey that was fraught with 
many dangers and privations. On reaching Oregon they first located in Yamhill county, 
two of the party, the mother and a brother, having succumbed to the hardships of the 
journey. The rest of the family resided in that locality for about a year and removed 
to the Puget Sound country, settling in the vicinity of Olympia, in what is now Mason 
county, Washington. In the difficult work of clearing the land and preparing the soil 
for the cultivation of crops Mr. Scott bore his full share and was thus occupied until 
1855, when he enlisted as a private in the Washington Territory Volunteers, under 
Captain Calvin W. Swindall, and for about nine months was engaged in Indian war- 
fare. Subsequently he worked in logging camps, also following surveying and farming 
until 1857, when he resolved to secure a better education and set out for Oregon City, 
walking the entire distance from Olympia. For a short time he resided with relatives 
in Clackamas county, Oregon, attending school in Oregon City, while later he continued 
his studies at Pacific University at Forest Grove, providing the necessary funds for his 
education by working as a farm hand in the neighborhood. In 1859 his father returned 
to Oregon, settling upon a farm three miles west of Forest Grove, and the son then 
entered Pacific University, where in 1863 he was the first to complete the four years' 
classical course, thus becoming the first alumnus of the institution. Near his father's 
place was a sawmill, in which Mr. Scott worked when not employed elsewhere. He 
was an expert .axman, and did a good deal of work in clearing the forest about Forest 
Grove. He was fond of the classics and read in the original all the Latin and Greek 
authors he could find. He possessed a retentive memory and throughout his life pre- 
served a general familiarity with classical literature, being able to quote therefrom with 
remarkable readiness. Undoubtedly his great literary ability was due in large measure 
to his study of the classics, and when asked what books in English he regarded as 
most helpful in creating his literary style, he replied: "The speeches of Edmund Burke 
and the prophecies of Jeremiah and Isaiah in the Old Testament." 

Following his graduation Mr. Scott went to Idaho, where for a year he was engaged 
in mining and whipsawing, and in 1S64 he came to Portland. For a few months he 
was employed as librarian of the Portland Library, which at that time utilized two 
small rooms on the second floor of a brick building on the northeast corner of First 
and Stark streets. While thus engaged he wrote a few articles for The Oregoninn and 
subsequently obtained a position with the paper through the elTorts of Matthew P. 
Deady, then president of the Portland Library Association. He was at that time study- 
ing law in his leisure hours under the direction of Erasmus D. Shattuck, but the field 
of journalism proved a more congenial one and he directed his energies along that 



6 HISTORY OP OREGON 

line. Showing a decided talent for newspaper work he soon became editor of The 
Oregonian. in which position he found a wide scope for his tastes and abilities. With- 
out previous experience in the complex duties of what is usually first a trade and after- 
wards a profession, he rose to all the exacting requirements of his work, and so signal 
was his success and so thoroughly was his individuality associated with his paper that 
his name became a household word over the entire northwest. One of his first notable 
articles was an editorial written on the death of President Lincoln, which attracted 
widespread attention. He gave The Oregonian his continuous editorial service until 
October. 1S72, when he was appointed collector of customs for the port of Portland, 
which position he retained for four years, and in 1877 returned to The Oregonian as 
editor and part owner, where he remained until his death in 1910. 

With a strong love of the locality and state and a clear perception of the immense 
natural advantages of Oregon and Washington, Mr. Scott gave the most minute atten- 
tion to the discovery of the stores of wealth in the forests, mines, soil and climate. 
To a certain extent he had so learned the feelings, demands and habits of the people 
that his utterances were the daily voice of the Oregonians. Bold and forceful in his 
writings, never seeking to conciliate, he met with opposition but usually prevailed. 
Earnest and sincere in all that he did, he had no patience with pretense and had a 
wholesome contempt for shams. Avoiding rhetorical art or indirection of language, he 
went with incisive directness to his subject and commanded attention by the clearness 
and vigor of his statement, the fairness of his arguments and the thorough and careful 
investigation of his subject. In the midst of his journalistic and business affairs he 
found time to pursue literary, philosophical, theological and classical study and to his 
constant and systematic personal investigation in these directions were due his schol- 
arly attainments. At the time of the reorganization of the Associated Press in 1898 
he took a prominent part therein and served as a member of its board of directors until 
his death in 1910. 

In October, 1865, Mr. Scott was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Nicklin and 
they became the parents of two sons; John H. and Kenneth, but the latter died in 
childhood. The mother passed away January 11, 1875, and in the following year Mr. 
Scott wedded Miss Margaret McChesney of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, and to their union 
were born two sons and a daughter: Leslie M., Ambrose and Judith. 

In his political views Mr. Scott was a republican, yet he never hesitated to con- 
demn any course or measure of the party which he deemed detrimental to good govern- 
ment and the welfare of the nation. He was a strong supporter of the gold standard, 
which he championed through the columns of The Oregonian. when the republican as 
well as the democratic party of the state advocated the Bryan policy of free silver at 
a ratio of sixteen to one, and through his influence Oregon gave its vote in 1896 to the 
republican gold standard candidate for president, William McKinley. In 1876 he was a 
delegate to the republican national convention, held at Cincinnati, which nominated 
Rutherford B. Hayes for president of the United States. In 1886 he was temporary 
secretary of the state convention of the union party and at numerous times was an 
active participant as a delegate in conventions of the republican party in Oregon. He 
was offered the positions of ambassador to Mexico and minister to Belgium, which 
offices he declined. He was a dominant factor in Oregon politics, although never an 
office holder, but his clear, logical and trenchant editorials had an immeasurable in- 
fluence over public thought and action. He made The Oregnninn a power and influence 
not only in the Pacific northwest but throughout the country. He always gave personal 
editorial support to every project which he deemed of vital significance to the city and 
was a member of the charter board which drafted the present charter of Portland. He 
was also a member of the Portland water board and was active in the movement which 
resulted in the erection of a monument in the Plaza to the dead of the Second Oregon 
Volunteers who fought in the Spanish-American war. For a number of years he was 
a member of the board of trustees of Pacific University and at the time of his death 
was its president. In 190.3 he was elected president of the Lewis and Clark Fair Asso- 
ciation and through the columns of The Oregonian did much to promote its success. 
The other Portland journals followed in his lead and made the Lewis and Clark Expo- 
sition the best advertised fair that has ever been held in America. 

Mr. Scott was a member of the Arlington and Commercial clubs of Portland, Ore- 
gon. He attained high rank in Masonry, with which he became identified in 1905 as 
a member of Portland Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & A. M. He afterward became a member 
of Washington Chapter, No. 18, R. A. M.; and Oregon Commandery, No. 1. K. T. In 
1906 he attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite Consistory in Washing- 



HISTORY OF OREGON 7 

ton, D. C, and became a member of Ai Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine on the 15th 
of June, 1907. 

In disposition Mr. Scott was most friendly and inclined to be charitable in con- 
sidering the errors and faults of men. He was kind-hearted and sympathetic, quick to 
vindicate the right and denounce the wrong, whether of public or individual concern. 
His crowning virtue, however, was the love he bore for his state and his pride in its 
material advancement. He labored unceasingly for high ideals and the betterment of 
the common lot. Success and honor were his, each worthily won, and there is in his 
history an element of inspiration for others and an example of high principles and 
notable achievement. 

Death came to Mr. Scott on the 7th of August, 1910, following a surgical operation 
in Baltimore, Maryland, when he was seventy-two years of age. The funeral services 
were conducted at Portland, Oregon, under the auspices of the Scottish Rite Consistory, 
the ceremony being a most solemn and impressive one. His death took from Oregon 
her most illustrious figure. Among the many tributes paid to his memory by the press 
throughout the country we quote the following: 

H. H. Kohlsaat, editor of the Chicago Record-Herald, wrote of Mr. Scott: "He 
was one of the last survivors of the newspaper era that produced a number of great 
editors and leaders of public opinion. He made The Oregonian; he was The Oregonian. 
He knew and understood the people and the territory he had cast his lot with as a 
lad; he interpreted their sentiments, defended their interests and successfully urged his 
own convictions upon them. Few men in the Pacific northwest wielded as great an 
influence for good." 

The following comment was made by S. A. Perkins, publisher of the Tacoma 
Ledger and Nexcs: "Harvey W. Scott was the dean of the newspaper men of the Pacific 
coast. There were no greater, east or west, and those of his class can be counted upon 
the fingers of one hand. He ranked with such journalists as Dana, Watterson and 
Greeley. He was a product of the Pacific northwest and for years exerted a greater 
influence on its current history than any other man. When Harvey Scott spoke the 
public listened. His opinions commanded the respect of even those who did not follow 
them. For years the name of Harvey Scott was a household word in the 'old Oregon 
country' and his face was familiar to thousands of pioneers. He knew the lite of the 
pioneers, for lie was one of them, and his intellectual attainments and broad human 
sympathy enabled him to write of pioneer life with remarkable thoroughness and 
fidelity. An authority on the Pacific northwest, a profound student of history and 
the classics, a master politician in the best sense of the term, an editor whose utter- 
ances were always courageous and convincing, Harvey Scott was the most dominant 
intellectual force west of the Rocky Mountains." 

Harrison Gray Otis, publisher of the Los Angeles Times, said of him: "When 
Harvey W. Scott passed away at Baltimore yesterday one of the greatest lights of 
journalism went out. He was a great editor in every sense of the word; great in mental 
force, great in executive ability, great as a writer. He made the Portland Oregonian 
famed throughout the country for its breadth of vision, its originality of thought and 
the power and effectiveness of its editorial expression. He fought many a good fight 
against adverse odds and when he died was engaged in a vigorous battle for principle 
against the fury of passing clamor. He saw a hamlet grow into a metropolis, saw 
cities and towns multiply in the field which he dominated. 

"His masterful, rugged character will be missed for long and felt keenly in the 
walks where it was familiar, in the workshop which he loved, in the profession which 
he honored and which honored him, and, indeed, in the ranks of the strong and thought- 
ful up and down the land. Oregon still has need of him and although his voice is 
hushed, we may be sure that the brave, arrow-piercing words he has spoken and written 
will live for years to come and go on battling in the service of eternal truth." 



GEORGE P. LA FONTAINE. 

George F. La Fontaine, who is engaged in the transfer and storage business in 
Portland, was born in St. Paul, Oregon, February 22, 1891. He was educated in the 
public schools of St. Paul, while spending his youthful days in the home of his parents. 
His father, Narisace La Fontaine was born in the Province of Quebec, Canada, and 
came to Portland in 1851 when fifteen years of age. He afterward located at St. Paul, 



8 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Oregon, where he homesteaded on the Nehalem mountains near Sherwood, residing 
there for nine years, at which time he disposed of the property and again took up his 
abode in St. Paul, once more following farming. In 1893 he sold his property and 
removed to Washington. While carrying on agricultural pursuits at St. Paul he was 
badly burned in a forest fire, in fact his arms and back were so frightfully burned 
while he was fighting the flames that it caused him to give up all farming and all 
active work. In 1896 he returned to Portland and continued to reside here until 
two years prior to his death, which occurred in the home of his son, B. F. La Fontaine, 
near Salem, on December 26, 1913. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Margaret 
Duperre, is a native of Oregon and a daughter of a native French Canadian, who 
first came to Oregon in 1826. She is living with her son near Salem at the age 
of sixty-seven years. 

George F. La Fontaine of this review has always resided in the west and has long 
been imbued by the spirit of western enterprise and progress. After attending the 
public school of his native town he continued his education in St. George's school at 
Tacoma, Washington, from which he was graduated in 1903. He then engaged in the bag- 
gage and express business in Portland and in 1917 established business on his own account 
at 66 Sixth street, under the name of the Baggage Transfer & Express Company. He 
now employs four trucks in his transfer department and also has a large patronage 
in the storage department of his business. 

On the 19th of March, 1915, Mr. La Fontaine was married to Miss Delphia May 
Shephard, a native of western Oregon and a daughter of Leonard and Josephine 
(Brassfield) Shephard, who were pioneers of this state, crossing the plains with ox 
teams at a very early day. Both are now deceased. The Shephards crossed the plains 
from Iowa in 1849. They settled where Baker City now stands. 

Mr. La Fontaine has long taken an active interest in politics as a republican. 
He is a young man of great enterprise and energy and has already made a creditable 
position in business circles. 



JOHN B. YEON. 



Many lines of activity connect the name of John B. Yeon with the history of Port- 
land. He has not only been the builder of one of its finest business blocks but was 
also road master of Multnomah county when the Columbia highway was built. He 
likewise rendered valuable service in connection with war activities and many other 
tangible evidences of his public spirit might be cited. Of Canadian birth, he was born 
at Plantagenet, Ontario, April 24, 1865, his parents being John B. and Delamose 
(Besonet) Y'eon. When seventeen years of age he left home, having up to this time 
devoted his attention largely to the acquirement of a public school education, with 
later instruction in the high school at Plantagenet. He then came into the United 
States and made his way to Defiance, Ohio, in 1SS2. There he secured employment 
in connection with the logging business at a wage of one dollar per day, working from 
four o'clock in the morning until late at night, driving a team. While the work was 
of a most arduous character, his determination and energy thus displayed laid the 
foundation of his later success. The heavily timbered district around Defiance offered 
an excellent field for the lumber industry and Mr. Y'eon there gained a knowledge 
that he put to practical use for some years after his removal to the coast in 1885. It 
was at that date that he became a resident of Oregon, where for some time he engaged 
in business in connection with the lumber industry. Step by step he advanced, im- 
proving every opportunity that came to him at length winning a place among the 
prosperous and substantial business men of Portland. The tangible evidence of his 
life of well directed energy and thrift is the fine Yeon building situated at the corner 
of Fifth and Alder streets. The work was begun on the 11th of August, 1910, by the 
hauling of the big beams and girders and on the 15th of August the actual task of 
construction was undertaken, the building being ready for occupancy on the 1st of 
February, 1911. It remains today one of the fine business structures of the city and 
has been a source of gratifying income to the owner, who. having arrived in Oregon 
with a cash capital of but fifty dollars, is today one of the prosperous residents of the 
Rose City. This has been the logical outcome of his fit utilization of time and talents. 
He early realized what a modern philosopher has said: "Success does not depend upon 
a map but upon a time-table." Every locality offers its chances for advancement and 




JOHN B. YEON 



HISTORY OF OREGON 11 

it Is the one who fully uses every moment who soon passes on the highway of life 
others who perhaps started out ahead of him. 

Mr. Yeon was married July 17, 1907, to Mrs. Elizabeth Welsh, a daughter of John 
Mock, and they now have four children: Mary Pauline, John B., Allen Eugene and 
Norman Leroy. Mr. Yeon and his wife belong to the Catholic church and he is identi- 
fied with, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He also belongs to the Arlington 
Club and to the Commercial Club and politically is a republican. He was appointed 
in November, 1920, by Governor Olcott, a member of the Highway Commission of 
Oregon. He is never neglectful of any duty of citizenship and his cooperation at all 
times can be counted upon to further plans and projects for the general good, yet 
business has claimed the greater part of his time and attention and round by round 
he has climbed the ladder of success. For four years he served on the board of directors 
of the Chamber of Commerce and took a most helpful interest in promoting many 
activities which have constituted forces in the city's improvement. In 1913 he became 
road master of Multnomah county, filling the position for four years and during that 
period the beautiful Columbia highway was built — one of the finest scenic roads of 
the entire country. For this he received one dollar a year salary and paid all his 
own expenses. In 1917 and 1918 he served as supervisor of the Spruce Division for 
Oregon and in this and many other ways he gave active aid to his country during 
the war period, seeking ever to uphold the interests of the government and advance 
the welfare of soldiers in camp and field. 



CLAUDE E. INGALLS. 



Claude E. Ingalls is the editor of the Corvallis Gazette-Times, a live, up-to-date 
newspaper. He was born in Plainfield, Iowa, August 27, 1877, a son of Orlo and Emily 
(Lockwood) Ingalls. The father is a native of West Bend, Wisconsin, and his 
ancestral record can be traced back in the United States to 1628. He followed the 
occupation of farming in Wisconsin and in 1880 made his way to the Pacific coast 
country, locating at Vancouver, Washington. He engaged in the operation of saw- 
mills in Washington and Oregon and also in the conduct of farming interests in 
those states and in Dakota. In 1S93 he returned to Wisconsin and later went to Topeka, 
Kansas, where he now resides. The mother is deceased. She was born in Hyde Park, 
London, England, and passed away at Vancouver, Washington, in 1895. 

Claude E. Ingalls was reared and educated in Wisconsin and Kansas, being gradu- 
ated from the high school at Washington, Kansas, with the class of 1897. Subsequently 
he engaged in teaching school in the Sunflower state for seven years, during which 
period he also studied law. He was admitted to the bar in Kansas in June, 1902, 
and practiced his profession in that state for about fifteen years. He then entered 
the newspaper field and purchased the Washington (Kansas) Republican in August, 
1904, while in the following year he became owner of the Register, consolidating 
the two papers. In 1915 he came to Oregon and purchased the Gazette-Times at 
Corvallis, of which he has since been editor. In 1916 he sold a half interest In the 
Gazette-Times to Charles L. Springer, who became business manager. In 1917 N. R. 
Moore was taken into partnership as news editor and they have made a very 
readable and attractive journal, devoted to the interests of the community in which 
they live and to the dissemination of general news. They have introduced the most 
progressive methods in management and publication and the Gazette-Times now enjoys 
the largest circulation of any paper in the county. Mr. Ingalls has twice been elected 
president of the Oregon State Editorial Association. In 1920 he was elected council- 
man at large for the city of Corvallis. 

On the 2d of May, 1906, Mr. Ingalls was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
E. Caldwell, and they have become the parents of two children, namely: Alice, 
who was born in June, 1911: and Robert, whose birth occurred in February, 1916. 

In his political views Mr. Ingalls is a republican and during the administration 
of President Taft he was appointed postmaster of Washington, Kansas, in which 
office he rendered such efl5cient service that he was retained by President Wilson, 
filling the position for a . period of four years. That he is a patriotic and public- 
spirited citizen was shown during the World war when he served as chairman of the 
County Council of Defense and also as chairman or secretary of all Liberty loan 
drives. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian and in Masonry he has attained high 



12 HISTORY OF OREGON 

rank, being a thirty-second degree Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is likewise connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias 
and the sons of the American Revolution, while his interest in the welfare and 
advancement of his city is indicated in his membership in the Corvallis Commercial 
Club, of which he is the president. He is ever loyal to any cause which he espouses 
and to the standards of life which he has set up for himself, and he is numbered as 
one of the progressive men and reliable citizens of Corvallis, enjoying the friend- 
ship, confidence and regard of all with whom he has been associated. 



LARRY I. SULLIVAN. 



One of the profitable business enterprises of Portland is the Fashion Garage, of 
which Larry L Sullivan is the proprietor. He is one of the progressive young busi- 
ness men of the city, whose intelligently directed efforts are meeting with a substan- 
tial measure of success. Mr. Sullivan is a native of Kansas. He was born in Wichita 
in 1888 and is a son of E. and Sarah (Kirkpatrick) Sullivan, the former a native of 
Kentucky and the latter of North Carolina. They became pioneers of Kansas, going 
to Wichita during the period of its boom, and the father is now living retired on a 
farm adjacent to the city. 

Larry I. Sullivan acquired his education in the common schools and when a young 
man of twenty-four years made his way to Portland. He established his present 
business in June, 1916, starting with two Maxwell cars, and during the intervening 
period of five years he has built up a trade of extensive and gratifying proportions, 
being now the owner of fifteen new cars of superior style and quality and employing 
eight men in his garage. Mr. Sullivan is an enterprising and energetic young man, 
possessing initiative and business ability of a high order, and he was the originator in 
the Pacific coast of the plan of renting out automobiles without drivers. He leases 
the repair department of his garage to W. E. Winslow, who does repair work of all 
kinds and also rents storage space for machines. The Fashion Garage is located at 
the corner of Tenth and Taylor streets in Portland and is one of the most modern and 
up-to-date establishments of the kind in the city, enjoying a large and constantly 
increasing patronage as a result of the excellence of its service and the reliable and 
progressive methods employed by its owner. 

On the Sth of August, 1918, Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Ems, of Wichita, and they have become the parents of a daughter. Bertha May. He 
is the owner of a good modern residence in Laurelhurst and is a firm believer in the 
future of this section of the country, it being his desire to induce his relatives to 
establish their home in the "Rose City." He is much interested in the welfare and 
progress of Portland and as a citizen does all in his power to expand its trade 
relations and promote civic development. He is yet a young man but has already 
accomplished much and all who know him esteem him for his energy, his aggressive- 
ness and his sterling integrity. 



JUDGE CLAIBORNE H. STEWART. 

Judge Claiborne H. Stewart, who is now serving for the second term as post- 
master of Albany, having been reappointed to that position by President Wilson in 
1919, is discharging the duties of that office in a prompt and capable manner. He 
was born in Knoxville, Marion county, Iowa, December 29, 1852, and is a son of Dr. 
William Q. and Ann R. (Humphrey) Stewart, natives of Ohio. The family is of 
Scotch-Irish descent, representatives of the name emigrating to America and becoming 
residents of Pennsylvania. As a child the mother went with her parents to Illinois 
and then to Iowa at a very early period in the development of that state. This was 
prior to the Black Hawk war, at which time Burlington was but a trading post, 
the country being sparsely settled. The father was a merchant and physician and 
practiced his profession at Knoxville and Albia until 1865, when he crossed the plains 
to Oregon, spending his first winter in this state near Mount Tabor, in the vicinity 
of Portland. In 1866 he removed to Albany, Linn county, and purchased property 



HISTORY OF OKECiOX l:j 

which is now owned by Claiborne H. Stewart of this review and on which he has 
reared his family. Owing to impaired health the father did not engage in the prac- 
tice of medicine in Oregon but subsequently became connected with the drug busi- 
ness, in which he was interested for several years. He continued a resident of Albany 
until his demise, which occurred on the 17th of March, 1882, when he was sixty- 
seven years of age, for he was born on the 5th of May, 1815. The mother, surviving 
him for many years, passed away in 1917 at the advanced age of ninety-six years, 
and both were highly esteemed and respected in the community where they resided. 

Claiborne H. Stewart acquired his early education in the schools of Albia, Iowa, 
and completed his studies at Albany, Oregon. On the 5th of June, 1867, he entered 
the office of the Democrat as printer's devil and there thoroughly mastered the printer's 
trade, at which he worked for several years, and then purchased that publication, 
which he conducted until the spring of 1882, when he disposed of his holdings therein, 
having a short time before sold an interest in the paper to United States Senator 
George Chamberlain. In 1882 he was called to public office, being elected county 
clerk of Linn county, in which position he served for two years. In 1884 he entered 
mercantile circles, establishing a hardware business as a partner of E. F. Sox, under 
the firm style of the Stewart & Sox Hardware Company. They engaged in the sale 
of farm implements and sawmill machinery and through their progressive business 
methods and honorable dealing succeeded in building up a business of extensive pro- 
portions, their trade covering all of Benton and Linn counties and a portion of Lane, 
Marion and Polk counties. They continued in business for twenty-four years, during 
which period they gi-adually extended the scope of their trade until theirs became a most 
substantial and profitable enterprise. In 1904 Mr. Stewart had been honored with 
election to the office of county judge, in which position he proved most capable, ren- 
dering decisions which were strictly fair and impartial. Upon leaving the bench he 
became associated with his son-in-law in the conduct of a store dealing in electrical 
appliances and was thus engaged until 1915, when he was appointed by President 
Wilson to the position of postmaster of Albany. He rendered such satisfactory 
service in that connection that he was reappointed in August, 1919, so that he is 
still filling that office, discharging his duties in a most capable and efficient manner. 
Always courteous and obliging and prompt and faithful in the care of the mail, Mr. 
Stewart has proved a most popular official. 

On the 4th of January, 1877, Judge Stewart was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
J. Irvine, a daughter of the Rev. S. G. and Mary (Rainey) Irvine, the former a 
native of Wooster, Ohio, while the latter was born near Belfast, in the north of 
Ireland. Her parents emigrated to the United Stales when she was but two years 
of age and settled at Cambridge, Ohio. Rev. Mr. Irvine came to Oregon from Wooster, 
Ohio, as a missionary and owing to the wild state of the country at that time was 
obliged to travel on horseback from place to place in the performance of his duties. 
He was a minister of the United Presbyterian church and continued to preach the 
gospel at Albany and Oakville, Oregon, the remainder of his life, his work proving 
a potent force for good in the communities which he served. 

To Judge and Mrs. Stewart were born ten children, three of whom died in 
infancy. Those who survive are: Stanley I., secretary and manager of the Lebanon 
Electric Light & Water Power Company; William Edgar, a practicing physician of 
Portland, maintaining offices in the Selling building. He enlisted for service in the 
World war, in which he did most important work for his country, being engaged 
in the task of organizing hospitals in France. He served throughout the period of 
the war, being discharged as major at the close of the conflict; Charles H. was 
assistant deputy governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco until January 
1st, 1921, at which time he was appointed one of the vice presidents of the North- 
western Bank of Portland. He organized the Salt Lake City branch of the bank, 
of which he was manager until January 1, 1920, when he was called to San Fran- 
cisco to assume the duties of his present position. He is very prominent in financial 
circles of the west, having formerly acted as bank examiner of Oregon; Mary R. is the 
wife of Joseph H. Ralston, who is engaged in the electrical business at Albany, 
Oregon; Ralph is also a veteran of the World war. He served with the artillery 
forces and was so fortunate as to escape injury, although he participated in many 
a hard-fought battle. He is now engaged in the work of estimating lands for taxa- 
tion purposes in Roosevelt county, Montana; Kate, who is an employe of the First 
National Bank of Albany, is residing at home; Robert L. also participated as a 
soldier in the World war, serving throughout the period of hostilities as a member 



14 HISTORY OF OREGON 

of an artillery company. He is now connected with the Mountain States Electric & 
Power Company. 

Judge Stewart gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and he 
has taken a prominent part in public affairs, serving for four terms as a member 
of the city council, while tor about twelve years he was chief of the fire department, 
thus rendering valuable service to the city. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the United Presbyterian church and for over twenty years he served 
as its secretary, and he has also been secretary of the Albany Commercial Club. He 
is a man of strict integrity, ever holding to high ideals of manhood and citizenship, 
and no public trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed. His life has been so 
varied in its activities, so honorable in its purpose and so far-reaching and beneficial 
in its effects that it has become an integral part of the history of his section of the 
state and his sterling worth is attested by all with whom he has come into contact. 



HENRY LEWIS PITTOCK. 



With the history of progress in Oregon the name of Henry Lewis Pittock is closely 
associated and in his passing on the 28th of January, 1919, Portland lost one of her 
honored pioneers who for sixty-six years had been a resident of the city. The story 
of his life is one of successful achievement in the face of obstacles and difficulties 
which would have completely overwhelmed a man of less resolute spirit and deter- 
mination and his record should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what 
may be accomplished when one has the will to dare and to do. He was a dynamic 
force in public affairs and left the impress of his individuality for good upon many 
lines of the state's development and upbuilding. He had few enemies, his rigid 
adherence to the principles of truth and honor gaining him the respect and esteem 
of all with whom he came in contact. 

Mr. Pittock was a native of England. He was born in London, March 1, 1836. a 
son of Frederick and Susanna (Bonner) Pittock, both natives of Kent county. His 
father first came to America in 1825 with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pittock, who 
emigrated from Dover, Kent county, and established their home in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. Frederick Pittock later went to London, where he learned the printer's trade 
and was married, but returned to Pittsburgh in 1S39 and spent the remainder of his 
life in that city, devoting his attention principally to the printing business. Henry L. 
Pittock was the third in a family of eight children. A brother, Robert Pittock, formerly 
of Portland, died in San Diego, California, about 190S, and another brother, John W. 
Pittock, was the founder of the Pittsburgh (Penn.) Leader. 

In the public schools of Pittsburgh, Mr. Pittock received his early education and 
subsequently attended the preparatory school of the University of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. He acquired a good knowledge of the printing business while working in his 
father's office in Pittsburgh and in 1853, when seventeen years of age, in company with 
his eldest brother. Robert, he joined an emigrant party whose destination was the 
Pacific coast. At the Malheur river the brothers separated, Robert Pittock going to 
Eugene, while the subject of this review came to Portland, arriving in this city bare- 
footed and penniless. He attempted to secure work in the different newspaper offices 
of Portland without success and was finally offered a position as assistant bartender at 
the Columbia Hotel but refused the offer. In the latter part of October he was tendered 
a situation by Thomas J. Dryer, proprietor of the Weekly Oregonian, who agreed to 
give him his board and clothing for six months' services. In accepting this offer Mr. 
Pittock displayed the elemental strength of his character — a strength that constituted 
the foundation of his later success in all of his undertakings. Long before the expira- 
tion of his six month's term he had proven his worth and ability and was engaged for 
a year at a salary of nine hundred dollars, after which he was paid journeyman's wages. 
From this time forward his advancement was continuous. Frequently during the first 
years of his connection with the Oregonian the responsibility of getting out the paper 
devolved entirely upon him, as Mr. Dryer was too busy with other affairs, and thus 
Mr. Pittock soon assumed the business management of the enterprise. During the cam- 
paign of 1860 he took charge of the paper under contract with Mr. Dryer, who was 
engaged in making a canvass of the state as a republican candidate for presidential 
elector, and immediately following the election Mr. Pittock purchased the Oregonian. 
He at once instituted a progressive spirit in its management, and going to San Fran- 




HENRY L. PITTOCK 



HISTORY OF OKEGOX IT 

Cisco, he purchased a cylinder press and other necessary equipment, for it was his 
intention to convert the paper into a daily. On the 4th of February, 1861, he published 
the first issue of the Morning Oregonian, which now ranks as the leading paper of 
the state and one of the foremost publications of the entire country. 

Throughout his long and busy life Mr. Pittock was actively connected with the 
Oregonian, and being a man of resourceful business ability, he also turned his attention 
to other fields, becoming identified with some of the most important industrial, financial 
and manufacturing enterprises of the state. He was a pioneer in railroad, river trans- 
portation, banking and manufacturing industries and was especially interested in the 
manufacture of paper from pulp. To the energetic nature and strong mentality of such 
men as Mr. Pittock are due the development and ever increasing prosperity of Port- 
land, and many of the finest business blocks in the city stand as lasting memorials 
to his initiative spirit and indomitable perseverance. 

On the 20th of June, 1860, Mr. Pittock was united in marriage to Miss Georgiana 
Martin Burton, whose parents were E. M. and Rhoda Ann Burton. Mrs. Pittock's girl- 
hood was spent in Clark county, Missouri, and Keokuk, Iowa. Her parents crossed 
the plains to Oregon in 1S52, settling near Milwaukie. There the father became promi- 
nent as a manufacturer, operating one of the first flouring mills in the state, and he 
was widely known and highly respected as one of the early pioneers of Oregon. His 
daughter, Mrs. Pittock, passed away on the 12th of June, 1918, and in less than a year 
afterward Mr. Pittock departed this life. He is survived by two brothers and two sis- 
ters: Thomas R. Pittock, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; George W. Pittock, now residing 
in Oakland, California; Mrs. Stratton, whose home is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
and Mrs. McFall, a resident of Portland, Oregon. The surviving children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Pittock are five in number: Mrs. E. F. Emery, of Millsboro, Pennsylvania; and 
F. F. Pittock, Mrs. F. W. Leadbetter, Mrs. Lockwood Hebard and Mrs. J. E. Gantenbein, 
all of Portland. 

Many enterprises of Portland stand today as monuments to the life work of Henry 
L. Pittock, but a more fitting and even more lasting tribute is the cherished memory 
which his friends entertain for him. His life embodied the principles of upright man- 
hood and citizenship, and his labors were ever of a character that contributed not only 
to individual success but also to the general welfare and prosperity. His name Is writ- 
ten high on the roll of the honored dead who were among the builders and promoters 
of the great northwest. 



THOMAS J. HAYTER. 



Thomas J. Hayter passed away at the family home at Dallas, October 30, 
1918. at the age of eighty-eight years, eight months and twenty-two days, and in his 
demise Oregon lost one of her honored pioneers, who for nearly seventy years had 
been prominently identified with the history of Polk county and of the state. He 
was a veteran of the Indian wars and there was no phase of frontier life with 
which he was not familiar. He was an interested witness of the marvelous develop- 
ment of the northwest and through his industry and enterprise contributed in sub- 
stantial measure to the work of reclamation and improvement, his influence being 
ever on the side of advancement and improvement. 

Mr. Hayter was born February 8, 1830, in the old town of Franklin, Howard 
county, Missouri, a representative of an old and honored southern family of English 
and Irish ancestry. His father, James H. Hayter, was a native of Virginia who emi- 
grated to Missouri about 1816, settling in the village of New Franklin, then a small 
hamlet in the very outskirts of civilization. Here he established a sawmill and a 
flouring mill and also engaged in other manufacturing and agricultural pursuits, 
becoming one of the leading business men of his community. He married Sarah 
Fulkerson, a native of Lee county, Virginia, and a descendant of one of the old 
families of the south, and they continued to reside in New Franklin until 1856, when 
they became victims of the cholera epidemic which swept over Missouri and the 
states along the Mississippi. 

Of their family of ten children, Thomas Jefferson Hayter was the last survivor. 
As a youth he attended the village school of New Franklin and later assisted his 
father in his milling and farming operations. At the age of nineteen years, when 
news of the gold strike in California was sweeping the country, he joined an expe- 

Vol. II— 2 



18 HISTORY OF OREGOX 

dition bound for the Golden state. The party left New Franklin on the 15th of April, 
1849, traveling with ox teams across the plains by way of Port Hall, Humboldt and 
Truckee and following closely the route chosen by the surveyors of the Central 
Pacific Railroad twenty years later. On arriving at Sacramento Mr. Hayter secured 
employment as teamster for a large concern, transporting merchandise from Sacra- 
mento to the various mining camps. In August, 1849, he began mining on his own 
account and was thus engaged until the fall of 1850, when he sailed as a passenger 
on the steamer Creole, bound for Oregon, and after a voyage of twenty-three days 
landed in Portland, then a small settlement with but a few scattered houses. Here 
he cut wood for a few months during that winter. He then made his way to Polk 
county, where he took up a donation claim, but in 1852 disposed of this and returned 
to Missouri by way of Panama with the intention of bringing his aged parents to 
Oregon. They were too frail to attempt the long journey by wagon, however, and he 
remained with them until 1854, when he started across the plains for the state of 
his adoption. On the second journey he followed the old route as far as the Raft 
river and then took up the Oregon trail. He arrived at the first settlement in Oregon 
in September, 1854, and soon afterward engaged in ranching on a farm three miles 
west of Dallas, specializing in the raising of fine stock. 

In the fall of 1855 he volunteered for service in the campaign against the 
Indians and as a member of Company G, First Oregon Regiment of Cavalry, under 
command of Colonel James W. Nesmith, he saw several weeks of active service In 
the Yakima Indian war. During this period he contracted bronchitis and was re- 
moved to a hospital at The Dalles, Oregon, later receiving his honorable discharge. 
He then returned to his stock ranch in Polk county, which he sold in the following 
year, locating on a two hundred and sixty acre tract of land three miles east of 
Dallas. This he carefully tilled and developed, adding many improvements to his 
land and bringing it under a high state of cultivation, so that he at length became 
the owner of one of the best farms in the county. He resided thereon almost con- 
tinuously for more than a quarter of a century and then moved with his family to 
Dallas, where he lived retired throughout the remainder of his life, having through 
his industry and enterprise in former years accumulated a comfortable competence 
which enabled him to rest from further labor. 

In May, 1856, Mr. Hayter was united in marriage to Miss Mary I. Embree, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carey D. Embree, who emigrated to Oregon from their 
home in Howard county, Missouri, in 1844. at which time their daughter, Mary, 
was but six years old. Taking up a donation claim in Polk county two miles east 
of Dallas, the father there engaged in farming for many years, at length removing 
to Dallas, where he lived retired throughout the balance of his life. He became 
one of the prominent citizens of his community, serving as sheriff of Polk county 
during territorial days and resigning that ofl5ce in 1848. There was not a death in 
his family until one child reached the age of sixty years and Mr. Embree's demise 
occurred when he had attained the venerable age of ninety-five years. Mrs. Embree 
met an accidental death in 1881, being thrown from a wagon. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hayter were born six children, namely: Eugene, who is serving as vice president 
of the Dallas National Bank; Mark, a prominent dentist of Dallas; J. C, a successful 
merchant of this city; Oscar, a leading attorney of Dallas, who is mentioned elsewhere 
in this work; Alice E., who died when five years of age; and Frank, who died at the 
age of six months. 

Mr. Hayter became prominent in public affairs and in 1876 was elected on the 
democratic ticket to represent his district in the Oregon legislature, receiving a 
flattering majority of votes. As a member of the house of representatives he was 
recognized by his colleagues as an earnest and effective worker and his record was 
one of which the county was proud. While his own educational opportunities had 
been limited, he had become well informed through wide reading and observation and 
few men had a more comprehensive knowledge of human events and affairs. His chief 
interest outside of his home was centered in the establishment of an efficient school 
system in Oregon. He gave liberally of his means to the upbuilding of La Creole 
Academy, a pioneer institution of learning, and for many years served as a director 
of his local school district. He was interested in all those things which are of cul- 
tural value and which tend to uplift the individual, thus bringing a higher moral 
plane to the community. In every relation he was true to high and honorable 
principles, never faltering in the choice between right and wrong but always endeav- 
oring to follow the course sanctioned by conscience and good judgment. His integrity 



HISTORY OF OREGON 19 

in business affairs, his loyalty and patriotism in matters of citizenship, his fidelity 
in friendship and his devotion to home and family were characteristics which won 
for him the high and enduring regard of all with whom he was associated. 

His eldest son, Eugene Hayter, is an enterprising business man and influential 
citizen of his community and is now serving as vice president of the Dallas National 
Bank. 

On the 21st of November, 1888, Eugene Hayter was united in marriage to Miss 
Evelyn Schultz, a daughter of Asbury and Eliza (Seders) Schultz, natives of Ohio 
and Indiana, respectively. In 1861 her parents emigrated from Illinois to Oregon, 
becoming residents of Dallas, where her father engaged in contracting and building. 
He constructed a number of buildings in the city, where he continued to reside 
throughout the remainder of his life. Mr. and Mrs. Hayter have become the parents 
of two children: A daughter, Frank L., who was born April 18, 1890, and is now 
the wife of H. R. Patterson, Jr., a professor in the Oregon Agricultural College at 
Corvallis; and Charles Carey, who was born October 8, 1900, and is now a student 
in the department of mechanical engineering at the State Agricultural College. 



W. H. GRABENHORST. 



William H. Grabenhorst was born in Baltimore, Maryland, December 14, 1859, and is 
the son of Henry C. and Margaret A. (Layer) Grabenhorst. The father of Mr. Graben- 
horst was born in the province of Bl-unswick, Germany, and emigrated to the United 
States in 1847. He is still living at the advanced age of ninety-two years, but the 
mother died on the 26th of May, 1921, at the age of eighty-two years. She was born in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Grabenhorst was educated in the public schools of Baltimore, Maryland, and 
was also a student three years at the Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg. His introduc- 
tion into business was as a member of the United States coast and geodetic survey at 
Washington, D. C. 

On the 22d day of September, 1881, he was married to Miss Eva Haight, of 
Dutchess county. New York. In 1883, accompanied by his wife, he settled in Webster 
county, Iowa, where he engaged in farming. Eight children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Grabenhorst: Anna A., Lillian M., George H., William H., Charles W., Eugene 
B., Nelle C. and Evelyn I., all of whom are now living except Anna A. 

In 1902 Mr. Grabenhorst and family moved to Marion county, Oregon, and pur- 
chased what was known as the Frank C. Baker farm, four miles south of Salem, con- 
sisting of three hundred and twenty-seven acres. He farmed this tract of land for a 
number of years and was very successful in this line of work. Thinking it was for 
the best interests of himself and family, he subdivided this tract of land and sold the 
same in small tracts of five acres. The amount he received from these sales justified 
his judgment in the matter. 

In 1911 Mr. Grabenhorst moved from his farm to Salem, where he engaged in 
the real estate and loan business. He is an enterprising business man. He has sub- 
divided over two thousand acres of land, which has greatly promoted the development 
of the city of Salem and the country adjacent thereto. His success in lite has been 
due to his energy and attention to the business in which he has been engaged. His 
pride in the development of the capital city of Oregon has been one of the principal 
causes of adding so much to the growth and prosperity of Salem. 



W. J. BISHOP. 



W. J. Bishop is at the head of the firm of Bishop Brothers of Willamette Valley 
Transfer Company of Portland, in which he is associated with his brothers, George 
V. and A. C. Bishop. They were the pioneers in trucks for transportation purposes 
in Portland and they have ever been regarded as most progressive and enterprising 
business men. 

W. J. Bishop was born on the 24th of July, 1881, in New York, while his brother, 
George V. Bishop, was there born on the 31st of March, 1884. Their parents were 
J. W. and Margaret (La Vie) Bishop; the former, also a native of the Empire state. 



20 HISTORY OF OREGOX 

has passed away, but the mother, whose birth occurred in Georgia, is living and makes 
her home in Portland. 

The educational opportunities of W. J. Bishop were those which usually fall to 
the lot of the average boy. No special advantages were his at the outset of his 
career, but by determination and energy he has steadily worked his way upward. He 
became a resident of Portland in 1902 and he and his brothers took the initial step 
in truck transportation between Salem and Portland. They operate sixteen trucks 
that have a capacity of one hundred tons per day and they employ sixty-two people. 
They have warehouses in both Woodburn and Salem and their business is one of 
extensive and gratifying proportions. They are also numbered among the largest 
hop growers of the state and as dealers in hops their business is exceeded by none. 
They have three hundred and twenty acres planted to hops and during the summer 
employ one hnndrei pnA seventy-five pe-^ple, while in the picking season their 
employes number one thousand, so that they are most prominent figures in con- 
nection with a growing industry in the northwest. 

George V. Bishop spent seventeen years in the employ of the Bank of California 
of Portland and when he left that institution he was filling the responsible position 
of credit man. A. C. Bishop, who is also a member of the Willamette Valley Transfer 
Company, is in charge of the hop industry owned and controlled by the brothers. 
The company is incorporated for one hundred thousand dollars, of which only twenty- 
two thousand three hundred dollars is outstanding. The brothers have been connected 
with the hop industry for many years and they have long been recognized as most 
progressive men of Oregon, accomplishing what they undertake and laboring along 
lines which contribute to the welfare and benefit of the state as well as to the advance- 
ment of their individual fortunes. 

In 1906 W. J. Bishop was united in marriage to Miss Minnette Canklin of Port- 
land, and they have become the parents of two children: Robert Morton and Albert 
Lyle. aged respectively eleven and five years. George V. Bishop was married to 
Miss Molly Kunz of Portland and they have two children: George, aged twelve, and 
Richard, aged six. A. C. Bishop is likewise married, having wedded Mary Graham 
of Bedford, Indiana. 

The Bishop Brothers, with offices at 408 Flanders street in Portland, are indeed 
well known and their worth as business men and citizens is widely acknowledged. 
The Willamette Valley Transfer Company has become one of the important business 
Interests of the city and added to their previously developed hop industry has made 
them most active factors in the business life of the northwest. 



B. L. STEEVES, A. M„ M, D. 



Dr. B. L. Steeves, who since 1909 has specialized in the treatment of diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat at Salem, where his professional skill and ability have 
won for him a liberal practice, is also prominent in financial circles as president of 
the Salem Bank of Commerce and his standing in both professional and business 
circles of the city is an enviable one. He has also figured prominently in other con- 
nections, having at one time been lieutenant governor of Idaho. Dr. Steeves is a 
native of Canada. He was born in the province of New Brunswick, July 7, 1868, and 
is a son of Aaron and Lydia (Steeves) Steeves, who were also natives of that province. 
They became residents of the United States when in 1886 they made their way west- 
ward to Oregon, settling in Salem, whither two of their sons, D. B. and C. W. Steeves, 
had preceded them. During the period of their residence here they gained many 
warm friends and the father died in the capital city in 1893, his wife surviving him 
for ten years. 

B. L. Steeves pursued his education in the public schools of his home locality 
and afterward attended the Prince of Wales College on Prince Edward Island. When 
eighteen years of age he took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in the 
east until 1888, when he came to Oregon and continued his studies in the Willamette 
University of Salem, from which he was graduated with the class of 1891, winning 
the Master of Arts degree. Desirous of entering upon the practice of medicine he 
entered the medical department of the Willamette University at Portland in the fall 
of 1891 and was there graduated with the class of 1894. Thus well equipped for the 
practice of his profession he opened an office at Silverton, Oregon, where he remained 




DR. B. L. STEEVES 



HISTORY OF OREGON 23 

for three years. In 1897 he removed to Weiser, Idaho, where he engaged in general 
practice for twelve years, building up a large practice during that period. He also 
became a prominent factor in political circles and in 1905 was elected lieutenant gov- 
ernor on the ticliet with Governor Frank R. Gooding. He filled the position for one 
term with credit and honor to himself and his constituents, his political service con- 
stituting a most commendable chapter in his life history. In the meantime he had 
not abandoned his practice but in 1909 he disposed of his professional interests in 
Idaho and returned to Salem, where he took up a special line of work, confining his 
attention to the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in which he 
liad become especially interested. He pursued postgraduate work in New York and 
in Philadelphia and thus greatly promoted his proficiency and skill in his profession. 
He owns one of the principal business and office buildings of Salem, located at the 
southeast corner of State and Liberty streets. Here he maintains a well appointed 
suite of rooms, supplied with all the modern appliances and equipment to be found 
in the offices of the most progressive physicians. He has ever kept in touch with 
the trend of modern professional thought, research and investigation through wids 
reading and study and his pronounced ability is attested by his professional colleagues 
and contemporaries and also by the large patronage accorded him. He has ever held 
to high professional standards and is thoroughly conversant with the most advanced 
methods of ophthalmology, rhinology and laryngology. Dr. Sleeves has also attained 
prominence in financial affairs as president of the Salem Bank of Commerce and his 
business interests are most capably and successfully conducted. His home is situated 
at the corner of Church and Chemeketa streets and his residence is one of the finest 
in the city. 

In 1S93 occurred the marriage of Dr. Sleeves and Miss Sarah Hunt, a daughter of 
George W. and Elizabeth (Smith) Hunt. Her father and mother came to Marion 
county, Oregon, in 1847, being among the honored pioneer residents of this part of 
the state. They secured a donation land claim which has never been divided and 
which is now the property of their son, Jeptha. Dr. and Mrs. Steeves have become 
the parents of two children: Laban and Muriel; the former completed a medical 
course at fhe State University, while the latter was graduated in 1921 from Willamette 
University. 

In his political views Dr. Steeves is a republican and he keeps well informed re- 
garding the questions and issues of the day. He served as mayor of Salem in 1915 
and gave to the city a most businesslike and progressive administration. He and 
his family hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and he has served 
on its official board. He was a delegate to the General Conference at Saratoga Springs 
in 1916. To the work of the church he makes liberal contribution and does all in 
his power to further its interests. He is president of the board of trustees of Willam- 
ette University and served as president of the Oregon State Medical Association until 
the 1st of July. 1920. having been elected to that office in Seattle in 1918. In his 
chosen life work he has made continuous progress and his skill and ability today 
place him in the foremost ranks of the medical profession, not only of Salem but of 
the entire state. His life is actuated by high and honorable principles, commanding 
for him the respect and esteem of his fellowmen, including his colleagues and con- 
temporaries in the profession, and he is prompted in all that he does by laudable 
ambition and broad humanitarian principles. 



HON. JAY H. UPTON. 



The name of Upton has long been a distinguished one in connection with the 
judicial history of Oregon, members of the family having risen to positions of emi- 
nence at the bar of the state, and Hon. Jay H. Upton, a leading attorney of Prine- 
ville, is ably sustaining the traditions of the family in this regard. He is likewise 
a prominent figure in public affairs, representing the seventeenth district in the 
state senate, this being the largest senatorial district in Oregon. In public office 
he has ever stood for development and for constructive measures and he is leaving 
the impress of his individuality upon the legislative history of the state. He is 
also engaged in farming on an extensive scale and his labors in behalf of irrigation 
interests have been most effective and beneficial. 

Senator Upton is a native of the northwest and comes of honorable and dis- 



24 HISTORY OF OREGON 

tinguished ancestry, the family having been established in America as early as 
1640. and representatives of the name have since figured prominently in the public 
life of the nation. He was born in Colfax. Washington, April 28, 1879, and when but 
six weeks old was taken by his parents to Portland, which was the family home at 
that period, so that practically his entire life has been passed within the borders 
of this state. He is a direct descendant of John Upton, who emigrated from England 
to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1640, and another representative of the family served 
on the staff of Washington at Valley Forge. The paternal grandfather, W. W. 
Upton, occupied a prominent position in public affairs, becoming one of the first 
Justices of the supreme court of Oregon. In 1876 he was appointed comptroller of 
the United States treasury and served through the administrations of President 
Hayes. Cleveland and Harrison. He also stood high in Masonic circles, receiving 
the honorary thirty-third degree and his life was guided by the beneficent teachings 
of the order. He had five sons: James B.. Charles B.. William H.. George W. and 
Ralph R., all of whom became prominent members of the bar, Charles B. practicing 
his profession in Oregon during its territorial days and after its admission to state- 
hood. He is now deceased. William H. Upton, who has also passed away, became 
an eminent jurist of Washington, serving as superior judge at Walla Walla. He was 
also a well known Mason, serving as assistant grand secretary for the state of 
Washington. George W. Upton, now a resident of Warren, Ohio, married Harriet 
Taylor, who for twenty-five years has been active in the cause of woman's suffrage, 
serving as national treasurer of the organization. At the last election she acted as 
vice chairman of the national executive committee of the republican party and she 
is a woman of superior mental attainments. James B. Upton, the father of Senator 
Upton, was admitted to the bar in California and in 1866 came to Oregon, becoming 
one of the pioneer lawyers of the state. He opened an office in Portland and there 
continued in practice until his retirement in 1884. In 1888 he removed to Tillamook 
county, taking up a homestead on Nestucca bay, and was one of the first to locate 
in that section after the Nestucca Indian reservation was opened up for settlement. 
He was one of the players on the old Pioneers, a famous baseball team of the early 
days, of which Frank Warren, William Wadhams, V. Cook. Joe Buchtel and others 
were also members. At Oregon City. Oregon, in 1869, he married Amanda Shaw, 
a native of Missouri, who crossed the plains to Oregon in 1852, settling in the 
Tualatin valley. She was a daughter of Jefferson Shaw and her demise occurred at 
Portland in 1910, while Mr. Upton there passed away in 1919. They were widely 
known and highly respected pioneer residents of the state. The five surviving mem- 
bers of their family are: Jay H. and Charles S. Upton, who are residents of Prine- 
ville; Mrs. Anna Maude Scott, of Moro, Oregon; Mrs. Marietta Ostrander and George E. 
Upton, whose homes are in Portland. 

In the grammar and high schools of Portland Jay H. Upton acquired his edu- 
cation, subsequently entering the law department of the University of Oregon, from 
which he was graduated in 1902. In 1898. while attending high school, he enlisted 
for service in the Spanish-American war, becoming a private of Company H. of the 
Second Oregon Volunteer Infantry, with which he was sent to the Philippines. He 
served throughout the period of hostilities and also during the insurrection on the 
islands, making a most creditable military record. Following his graduation he 
opened an oflSce in Portland, where he continued to reside until 1913, building up a 
good clientage. Subsequently he removed to Prineville, where he has since remained, 
being accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage connecting him with 
much important litigation tried in the courts of the district. He has much natural 
ability but is withal a hard student and is never content until he has mastered every 
detail of his cases. He believes in the maxim "There is no excellence without labor," 
and follows it closely. His legal learning, his analytical mind, the readiness with 
which he grasps the points in an argument, all combine to make him one of the 
most able lawyers of his section of the state and his upright policy has gained for 
him the confidence and admiration of his professional colleagues. Mr. Upton has 
not confined his attention to the practice of his profession but has also done notable 
work along irrigation lines. He has been instrumental in securing the passage of 
much beneficial legislation in this connection, laboring untiringly for the promotion 
of irrigation projects, and for two years he was president of the Oregon Irrigation 
Congress, in which capacity he rendered most valuable service, resulting in the 
splendid agricultural development of the state today. It was through his efforts that 
the Ochoco irrigation district was organized and developed, whereby twenty-two thou- 



HISTOKY OF OREGON 25 

sand acres of arid and unproductive land at Prineville has been irrigated and re- 
claimed. He is also extensively interested in agricultural pursuits, successfully oper- 
ating an irrigated farm in central Oregon. 

In his political views Mr. Upton is a republican and in 1913 he was elected 
representative from Multnomah county to the state legislature, where he made a 
most creditable record. In 1921 he was again called to public office, being elected 
state senator from the seventeenth district, which includes Crook, Deschutes, Jefler- 
son, Klamath and Lake counties and is the largest senatorial district of Oregon, com- 
prising nearly one-quarter of the area of the state. He has done valuable work 
as a legislator and has been instrumental In framing legislation which has been 
of great value to the state. He gives to each question which comes up for settle- 
ment his earnest consideration and his endorsement of any measure is an indication 
of his honest belief in its efficacy as a factor in good government or as an element 
in the promotion of the best interests of the state. He possesses exceptional aptitude 
for legislative activity and is a forceful speaker who occasionally ascends gracefully 
to high flights of oratory. He is a hard working member of the senate and has never 
used his natural talents unworthily nor supported a dishonorable ciuse. 

In Portland, Oregon, on the 28th of April, 1909, Senator Upton was united in 
marriage to Maude Joyce Cannon, a native of Roseburg, this state. He is a member 
of the Protestant Episcopal church and is prominent in fraternal circles, belonging 
to Lodge No. 142, of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, of which he is a past 
exalted ruler; to Eyrie No. 4, of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, of which he is 
past president; and to the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past chancellor com-' 
mander. He is also identified with the United Spanish War Veterans, of which he is a 
past department commander for Oregon. He has made a splendid political record, 
characterized by marked devotion to duty and the fearless defense of what he 
believes to be right. His entire life has been spent in Oregon and he has taken a 
most active and helpful part in promoting the work of progress and improvement, 
leaving the impress of his individuality for good upon many lines of the state's 
development. He is a man of high ideals and exalted standards of citizenship whose 
irreproachable character and incorruptible integrity have won for him the high 
and enduring regard of all who know him. 



W. G. ALLEN. 



W. G. A'len. who has long been connected with the development of the fruit 
industry in Oregon, is now acting as manager for the Hunt Brothers Packing Com- 
pany at Salem, in which connection he is supervising important and extensive inter- 
ests, his services proving very valuable to the concern. He is energetic, farsighted 
and capable in the conduct of the interests intrusted to his care and under his 
management the business of the company has steadily grown. He also manifests a 
large measure of executive ability and financial insight and in business matters his 
judgment has ever been found sound and reliable and his enterprise unfaltering. 

Mr. Allen is a native of Kansas. He was born July 31, 1876, and came to Newberg, 
Oregon, with his parents, William K. and Mary E. (Hill) \llen, the former of whom 
passed away in 1905 at Newberg, Oregon, while the latter is now a resident of Wenatchee. 
Washington. The father was identified with the early prune-drying industry of the 
Willamette valley and Vancouver, Washington, and he became the originator of the 
tunnel system of drying all kinds of fruits and vegetables, gaining a position of promi- 
nence in connection with canning interests of the northwest. In association with his 
father, W. G. Allen purchased the Wallace cannery in Salem and also a cannery in 
Eugene, the Salem plant being remodeled, after which it was sold in 1902. In 1900 
the son went to Eugene, acting as manager of the cannery there for ten years and 
also continuing to serve in that capacity after the plant became the property of the 
Eugene Fruit Growers Association. In the spring of 1911 he returned to Salem and 
took charge of the plant of the California Fruit Canners Association, now known as 
the California Packing Corporation, remaining with that company until 1913. In 
1914 Hunt Brothers erected a large plant on Front and Division streets, covering 
an area one hundred by five hundred feet, and of this Mr. Allen became manager 
in 1914. The company does an extensive business, canning everything in the way 
of fruit. They export and sell to jobbers throughout the United States and in the 



2(> HISTORY OP OREGON 

busy season employ about five hundred people, their pay roll being about two thousand 
dollars a day. Their products have become well known both in this country and 
abroad and they expect to keep pace with the growth of the fruit industry in this 
section of the state. Mr. Allen is proving entirely equal to the responsibilities which 
devolve upon him as manager, and owing to his intimate knowledge of the business 
is most capably directing the labors of those under him. He gives careful oversight 
to every phase of the enterprise and is constantly seeking to increase the efficiency 
of the plant, to improve in every way possible the quality of the products and to extend 
the trade to new territory. He is a keen, intelligent business man with a rapid grasp 
of details and his initiative spirit enables him to formulate plans which have re- 
sulted in the enlargement and substantial gi-owth of the undertaking. He is the 
owner of a fine prune orchard of two hundred and fifty acres, all in bearing, at 
Dundee, in Yamhill county, and he also has a loganberry farm of twenty-five acres, 
located east of Brooks, in Marion county, while he likewise is the owner of a straw- 
berry farm of fifty acres all in bearing, on his five hundred acre farm located in the 
Mission bottom of Marion county. His horticultural interests are capably conducted 
and bring to him a substantial addition to his income. 

On the 1st of January, 1900, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Florence 
Cook, a native of Iowa, and they have become the parents of three children: Wayne, 
Kenneth and Harold, the youngest being two years of age. Mr. Allen's success is 
due in large measure to the fact that he has continued in the field which he 
entered as a young man and as the years have passed he has gained wide experi- 
ence, which makes him an authority in his line of work. His plans are carefully 
formed and promptly executed and he has ever based his activity in business affairs 
upon strict integrity and close application. He is always loyal to any cause which 
he espouses and faithful to every duty and his record as a man and citizen is a 
most commendable one. 



HON. CHARLES WILLIAM FULTON. 

When one determines the capabilities of a man, he must regard the depths from 
which he has climbed as well as the heights to which he has attained. In a word, 
he must measure the obstacles and difficulties which have confronted him and which 
have been overcome. Judged by this standard, the record of Charles William Fulton 
is a remarkable one, for he had many handicaps in youth, worked hard to secure an 
education and received his legal training only at the cost of earnest, self-denying effort. 
Teaching school through the day, he allowed himself few social pleasures and devoted 
his evening hours to the study of law, thus making thorough preparation for the bar. 
In this is indicated the nature of the man. who became one of the leading attorneys 
and most hierhly respected citizens of Portland and a distinguished statesman of Oregon. 

Mr. Fulton was born in Lima, Ohio, August 24, 1853, a son of Jacob and Eliza A. 
Fulton. The father was a carpenter by trade and a soldier of the Civil war, serving 
as second lieutenant of a company in the Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry during 
the period of hostilities between the north and south. He had removed with his family 
from Ohio to Harrison county, Iowa, in 1855, and it was here that Charles W. Fulton 
began liis education in the common schools, while later he continued his studies in the 
high school of Maenolia. the county seat of Harrison county. In 1S70, when seven- 
teen years of age, he accompanied his parents on their removal to Pawnee City, Nebraska, 
and there attended the Pawnee City Academy for two years. This constituted the extent 
of his educational advantages, but even these were not enjoyed as a gift from the hands 
of fate. He was but nine years of age when his father went to war and it was neces- 
sary for him to do much service in support of the family and his opportunities to pur- 
sue his studies were greatly curtailed thereby. Notwithstanding difficulties and 
obstacles, he persevered and when he ceased to be a student he became a teacher. 
While thus connected with the district schools he devoted the hours which are usually 
termed leisure to the study of law. his thorough preliminary reading securing him 
admission to the bar in April, 1S75. Two or three days later— on the 6th of April — 
he left his Nebraska home for Oregon, arriving in Portland on the 20th of the same 
month. His only suit of clothing was the one he wore and he had but ten dollars and 
a quarter when he reached his destination. He did not know a single person in Port- 
land nor on the entire Pacific coast. He believed, however, that success awaited him 




CHARLES W. FULTON 



HISTORY OF OREGON 29 

in return for earnest, honest effort. It was his intention to secure a clerkship in a 
law ofRce, but after making application to every attorney in the city and later apply- 
ing to every livery stable in the city tor work he became discouraged at the prospect 
here and went to Albany, where he met a young man, James K. Weatherford, who a 
short time before had been elected to the office of school superintendent. He told Mr. 
Fulton of a school which he believed he might secure at Waterloo, Linn county, eighteen 
miles from Albany. That afternoon he walked to the school and secured the posi- 
tion. The next morning he walked back to Albany, where he sold his watch for three 
dollars and a half in order to obtain money with which to pay for his teacher's certifi- 
cate, and then successfully passing the examination, he started the following morn- 
ing with twenty-five cents in his pocket for Waterloo. He capably conducted the 
school through the ensuing term and in the following July went to Astoria, where 
he entered upon the practice of law. He came to Portland in March, 1909, and estab- 
lished himself as one of the leading lawyers of this city as well as one of the promi- 
nent lawmakers of the state. 

On the 5th of September, 1878, Mr. Fulton was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
M. Hobson, who was born on Clatsop Plains, in Clatsop county, Oregon, and is there- 
fore a "native daughter." Her father, John Hobson, was one of the prominent pioneers 
of the state and served as collector of customs at Astoria under President Cleveland. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fulton became the parents of a son, Fred C, whose birth occurred Febru- 
ary 7, 1887. 

In June prior to his marriage Mr. Fulton had been elected to the state senate and 
the wedding trip of the young couple was from Astoria to Salem, where Mr. Fulton 
attended the succeeding session of the legislature, which at that time convened in 
September. From that time until his death he was prominently connected with the 
political history of the state and nation. In 1881 he was appointed city attorney by 
the city council of Astoria, which position he held for three years at a salary of fifty 
dollars per month. In 1890 he was again elected a member of the upper house of the 
Oregon assembly. In 1893 he was chosen president of the senate, where he presided 
with dignity and uniform justice, his rulings being based upon a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of parliamentary law and procedure. In 1898 he was again elected to the state 
senate and was once more chosen as the presiding officer of the upper house in 1901. 
The following year he was reelected state senator and thus through four terms was 
an active associate of Oregon's leading lawmakers, leaving the impress of his indi- 
viduality upon the legislative proceedings which in large measure have shaped the 
policy and guided the destiny of the commonwealth. His work in the senate is a mat- 
ter of history. Mr. Fulton ever stood fearlessly in defense of what he believed to be 
right, and while he believed in concerted party action and thorough organization, he 
did not believe in sacrificing the public welfare to partisanship nor placing individual 
aggrandizement before the good of his constituents. In 1888 he was chosen presiden- 
tial elector and carried Oregon's vote to Washington in February, 1889. During the 
session of the Oregon legislature in February, 1903, he was elected to the United States 
senate and served for a full term of six years. 

Mr. Fulton passed away on the 27th of January, 1918, at the age of sixty-five 
years, and his demise was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had 
made for himself a prominent place in the community, and his progressive citizen- 
ship and his sterling personal worth gained for him the warm regard of all who 
knew him. At his death the family received hundreds of letters of sympathy and 
condolence from the most eminent men of the state and the nation. In a resolution 
passed by the bench and bar of Oregon appears the following: "It is with a profound 
sense of personal loss that the members of the bench and bar of Oregon assemble for 
the purpose of establishing a lasting memorial of his character and of his attainments 
in the profession of the law and to commemorate his distinguished services to his 

state and to his country His life was as an open book, for he soon created a 

place for himself as one of the foremost citizens of the state, known and respected 
far and wide as a man of sterling worth and of unusual ability. His probity, his sin- 
cerity and his genial and kindly manner drew to himself a host of friends and admirers 
to whom his untimely death in the midst of the busy and active practice of his pro- 
fession came with a shock of bereavement. 

"As a lawyer he enjoyed an extensive and varied practice which his diligence and 
his talents and his solid attainments well merited. Always an effective and forceful 
speaker, his arguments to juries were powerful and convincing. His cases were always 
well prepared, so that he went into court with a clear conception of what he desired 



30 HISTORY OF OREGON 

to show. In the presentation of his case to the court, in his analysis of the legal 
principles involved, and in making practical application of the:;e principles to the 
evidence, he was earnest, strong and logical. His integrity, his conscientiousness, 
his recognition of the proper relations of an attorney to court and to client, gained 
for him the respect of the .iudges before whom he practiced, and he always treated 
his opponents with courtesy, dignity and good nature, without abating in any degree 
his loyal and enthusiastic zeal for his client's rights. As a citizen and as a neighbor 
he was patriotic, public-spirited, tolerant and just. He was an unostentatious man, 
free from pretense and affectation. To those who knew him well the memory of his 
warm friendship, his vibrant voice, his hearty laugh, his vigorous hand grasp, his 
ready retort, his apt illustration by appropriate anecdote, his cheerful, cordial and 
spontaneous good fellowship, is all a precious legacy. The world is better for his 
having lived in it, and the influence of his example will not soon be lost." 

His record is a splendid illustration of the fact that character and ability will 
come to the front anywhere, and that it is under the stimulus of opposition and neces- 
sity that the best and strongest in men are brought out and developed. His course 
commanded and merited the confidence and support of his fellowmen, and as lawyer 
and statesman he ranked among those whose records have conferred honor and dignity 
upon the state which has honored them. 



R. E. POMEROY, M. D. 



One of the younger representatives of the medical fraternity at Salem is Dr. R. 
E. Pomeroy, a leading physician and surgeon of this city, who is specializing In the 
treatment of urology and who since January 1, 1920, has served as city health oflacer, 
most capably discharging the duties of that ofBce. He is thoroughly familiar with 
the scientific principles which underlie the profession and by wide reading and 
study keeps abreast with the advancement that is continually being made in methods 
of medical and surgical practice. 

Dr. Pomeroy is a native son of Oregon and a representative of one of its oldest 
pioneer families. He was born in Woodburn, March 2, 1894, his parents being C. T. 
and Margaret E. (Cornelius) Pomeroy, the former a prominent merchant of Salem. 
The mother was well known as a successful physician, enjoying a large and lucra- 
tive practice. She was married at Dayton, Oregon, and is now deceased but the father 
survives and is still active in business circles of Salem. He is also a native of 
this state, his birth having occurred in Yamhill county. He is a son of C. T. 
and Henrietta (Blish) Pomeroy, who crossed the plains to Oregon in the early '40s, 
taking up their residence near Hillsboro, where the grandfather of Dr. Pomeroy of 
this review devoted his energies to farming pursuits. 

After completing his high school studies at Salem, Dr. Pomeroy entered the 
medical department of Oregon University, from which he was graduated in June, 
1916, and at once opened an office in Salem, where his practice steadily grew in 
volume and importance as his professional skill and ability became recognized. On 
the 13th of April, 1917, he enlisted in the navy and was commissioned senior lieu- 
tenant. He was sent overseas and had charge of a French and American unit in 
venereal diseases. He remained overseas for about sixteen months and upon receiving 
his discharge from the service he at once returned to Salem and took up the task 
of rebuilding his practice. He maintains a finely appointed suite of offices in the 
Oregon building on State street in Salem, equipped with all of the most modern 
medical appliances, and is specializing in the treatment of urology. He has studied 
broadly, thinks deeply and his efforts have been of the greatest value to his patients. 
On the 1st of January, 1920, Dr. Pomeroy was appointed city health officer and as a 
public official his record is a most creditable one, for he is most efficiently and 
conscientiously discharging the duties which devolve upon him in this connection. 
He is a lover of his profession, deeply interested in its scientific and humanitarian 
phases, and he puts forth every effort to make his labors effective in checking the 
ravages of disease. 

In December, 1916, Dr. Pomeroy was united in marriage to Miss Leone Griffin 
and they have a large circle of friends in the city. Fraternally Dr. Pomeroy is 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masons. He is a 
young man of energy, ability and determination who is fast forging to the front 



HISTORY OF OREGON ;J1 

in his profession. His life is actuated by high and honorable principles and his 
course has ever been directed along lines which command the respect and confidence 
of his fellowmen and his professional colleagues and contemporaries. 



JOHN MARION LEWIS 



John M. Lewis, who since 1902 has served as county treasurer of Multnomah county, 
is systematic, prompt and reliable in the discharge of iis duties and is proving a faithful 
custodian of the public funds. He has devoted much of his life to public service and at 
all times has been found faithful to the trust reposed in him. Mr. Lewis is a native son 
of Oregon and his entire life has been spent in the northwest. A representative of one 
of the honored pioneer families of the state he was born in Linn county, September 
20, 1855. He traces his ancestral record back to old families of Virginia, North Carolina 
and Tennessee. His paternal great-grandfather. Fielding Lewis, was born in 1767 in 
the Old Dominion and at an early age became a resident of North Carolina, subsequently 
removing to eastern Tennessee. His son, Fielding Lewis, Jr., was born in 1811 and 
prior to 1830 became a resident of Wabash county, Illinois. Later he removed to 
Missouri and in the spring of 1852, attracted by the advantages offered in the develop- 
ment of the rich agricultural lands of the northwest, he started across the plains with 
his family. The journey was a long and tedious one and it was six months ere they 
reached their destination — a point near Brownsville, in Linn county, Oregon. Crossing 
the Snake river opposite the site of Huntington they followed the general course of the 
river down to its junction with the Columbia, thence proceeding down the Columbia 
valley to the mouth of the Willamette and up the latter stream to Linn county. The 
journey was beset by many hardships and perils and mountain fever and cholera broke 
out in the party, claiming as a victim Lucinda Moore Lewis, the wife of Fielding Lewis, 
her grave being made on the banks of the Snake river near Birch creek. When they 
reached Burnt river Charles Wesley Lewis, a son, also passed away, and at the upper 
Cascades a grave was made for Marion Lewis, while Mary Ellen Lewis died on the 
Oregon side of the river opposite Vancouver barracks. 

James Preston Lewis, one of the family who traveled with them on the long journey 
to the northwest, entered land in the forest following his arrival in Oregon and this he 
cleared and developed, subsequently removing to Althouse, Josephine county, where he 
purchased a tract of land on which he resided until his death on the 18th of February, 
1906. He became prominent in the public lite of his community and served for three 
terms as county assessor. On the 29th of November, 1853, he was united in marriage 
to Tennessee Teresa Tycer, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. H. H. Spalding, 
who came to Oregon with Marcus Whitman in 1836. Mrs. Lewis was born in Linn 
county, Missouri, a daughter of Lewis Tycer, a native of Nashville, Tennessee, and an 
early resident of Linn county, Missouri. His father came from France to aid the 
American colonists in their struggle for independence and tradition says participated in 
the battle of Guilford Courthouse and in other engagements of note. The year 1853 
witnessed the arrival of Lewis Tycer and his family in Oregon. His first home was 
a pioneer cabin, but he later purchased a farm and a comfortable residence in which he 
continued to make his home to the time of his death at the age of seventy-seven years 
and which is still owned by a member of his family. James P. and Tennessee Lewis 
became the parents of three sons and three daughters who are living: George W., who is 
sheriff of Josephine county, now serving his sixth term and was formerly in business 
at Grants Pass, Oregon, during a period when he was out of the sheriff's office; James E.; 
Mrs. 0. J. Wetherbee; Mrs. Joseph G. Hiatt, residing at Santa Rosa, California; and 
Mrs. James E. Holland. James E., Mrs. Wetherbee and Mrs. Holland all reside on 
farms in Josephine county. 

John M. Lewis was reared and educated in his native county to the age of seventeen 
years and then accompanied his parents on their removal to Josephine county. He 
assisted his father in the work of the fields and later engaged in mining to some extent. 
In 1881 he arrived in Portland and here resumed his studies, being desirous of securing 
a better education. He pursued a commercial course in the Portland Business College 
and in 1882 became a government employe, having charge of the mailing division 
of the Portland post office under Postmaster George A. Steel for about three years. 
He continued to occupy the position for eighteen months under C. W. Roby, the democratic 
postmaster, and was then compelled to resign owing to impaired health caused by close 



'A-2 HISTORY OF OEEGOX 

confinement to the work. He spent the next three years as lumber inspector in the 
employ of the H. R. Duniway Lumber Company in East Portland and while there 
residing was again called to public office, representing his ward in the city council of 
East Portland from 1888 until 1890. In the latter year he was appointed postmaster 
under the administration of President Harrison and filled the position until the consolida- 
tion of the cities of Portland and East Portland, when the office was discontinued. 
Later he was appointed superintendent of Station A, which superseded the old office 
in East Portland, and continued in that position under Postmaster Steel until the close 
of the latter's second term. In 1894 Mr. Lewis became deputy treasurer under A. W. 
Lambert, and two years later was reappointed to the same office by Ralph W. Hoyt, 
continuing in that position for four years more. He was then elected county treasurer 
and through subsequent reelections has since remained the incumbent in that office. 
No better testimonial of his capability and fidelity could be given nor of the confidence 
reposed in htm by his fellowmen. His identification with political life in Multnomah 
county forms one of the vital interests of his lite and he has always done able and 
faithful work. 

On the 1st of May, 1883, in Portland, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Lewis 
and Miss Ella M. McPherson, a native of Linn county, Oregon, and a daughter of W. A. 
McPherson, who came to this state about 18.50. He was connected with public service as 
state printer from 1866 until 1870 and his death occurred in 1891. Four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, one of whom. Herbert Wayne, died at the age of two years; 
Edith is a successful teacher connected with the public schools of Portland; lone mar- 
ried Dallas M. Mark of this city, a veteran of the World war who spent fourteen months 
in France as a noncommissioned officer with the One Hundred and Sixteenth Engineers 
corps. Wade Vernon, the youngest member of the family, also served in the war with 
Germany, spending twenty-one months in France as a member of the Eighteenth 
Engineers Corps, and is now a student in the Oregon Agricultural College where he is 
pursuing a course in mining engineering. He married Miss Jessie Thayer, of Rainier, 
Oregon, who during the war period was engaged in reconstruction work in Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

The family attend the Central Presbyterian church, in the work of which Mr. 
Lewis has long taken an active and helpful part, having served for some time as 
ruling elder. In his fraternal relations he is an Odd Fellow and is also connected 
with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Woodmen of the World, while in 1910 
he became affiliated with Washington Lodge, No. 46, A. F. & A. M., of which lodge he has 
been chaplain for the past ten years: Washington Chapter Xo. 18 Royal Arch Masons; 
Washington Council No. 3, R. & S. JM. and Martha Washington Chapter. Order of the 
Eastern Star No. 14. He is a charter member of Abernethy's Cabin, No. 1, Native Sons of 
Oregon, and is a member of the Oregon Historical Society. His political allegiance has 
always been given to the republican party, for his study of the political conditions and 
questions of the day has led him to the belief that its platform contains the best elements 
of good government. His residence is at No. 604 East Ankeny street, where he has 
resided for thirty-four years. His has been a well spent life, characterized by a progressive 
public spirit that has found tangible manifestation on many occasions. In public 
office his course has ever been above suspicion. The good of the community he places 
before partisanship and the welfare of his constituents before personal aggrandize- 
ment. Wherever he is known he is highly esteemed, but in the city of his residence 
where he is best known he inspires personal friendships of unusual strength and all 
who know him have high admiration tor his good qualities of heart and mind. 



J. W. JONES. 



B. W. Jones, of Portland, is a member of the firm of Goodell-Akin-Jones, Incor- 
porated, financial and insurance agents, doing business both in Portland and in 
Seattle. Mr. Jones was born at Farmington, Michigan, March 20. 1887. and is a son 
of H. H. and Alice S. (Perry) Jones, both of whom were natives of the state of 
New York. The father was engaged in merchandising in Michigan for many years 
but eventually retired in 1909 and passed away at Novi, that state, in 1915. The 
mother survives and is yet living at Novi. 

B. W. Jones pursued his education in the high school of Northville. Michigan, 



HISTORY OF OREGON 33 

and afterward attended the State University at Ann Arbor, from wliich lie was 
graduated in 1907 with the LL. B. degree, having completed a law course. The 
opportunities of the northwest attracted him, however, and instead of entering upon the 
practice of law he made his way to Lincoln county, Oregon, where he took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres. In the spring of 1910 he became actively en- 
gaged in the timber business in association with F. R. Hyland, under the firm name of 
Hyland & Jones. In 1912 this company was dissolved and Mr. Jones went to 
Sheridan, Oregon, where he engaged in the insurance business. While there residing 
he also served as mayor of the town in 1913, and during his incumbency in that 
office most of the civic improvements of the town were made. In 1914 he accepted 
the state agency for the Phoenix Fire Insurance Company of London, England, and 
also had jurisdiction for the company over southern Idaho and northern California. 
In March, 1920, however, he resigned that position to become a partner in the firm 
of Goodell-Akin-Jones, Incorporated, handling insurance and commercial paper, with 
offices in the Wilcox building in Portland. The firm of Metzger & Jones, insurance 
brokers of Seattle, Washington, is a branch of the Portland house and is one of the 
largest concerns of the kind on the coast. In their Portland and Seattle offices they 
employ seventeen men and their business is steadily growing. In addition to his 
activities in that connection Mr. Jones is still the owner of his homestead, embracing 
a valuable tract of timber land. 

In 1910 was celebrated the marriage of B. W. Jones and Harriet Bewley, a native 
daughter of Oregon. Her father, A. J. Bewley, came to Oregon from Tennessee 
about forty years ago, and her mother, Mrs. Minnie (Mendenhall) Bewley, was also 
a pioneer of this state and a native of Tennessee. Both survive and their home is 
now in Sheridan, Oregon. To Mr. and Mrs. Jones have been born two sons: Bud- 
dington and Howard, aged respectively seven and three years. 

After America's advent into the World war Mr. Jones offered his services, was 
accepted and had completed preparations for going overseas, but the armistice was 
signed before he sailed. He has long been active in politics as a supporter of the 
republican party and is a firm believer in its principles. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His varied business activities have 
brought him a wide acquaintance in the northwest and he is today a most promi- 
nent figure in insurance and financial circles, possessing comprehensive knowledge 
of both branches of his business and most carefully directing his efforts, so that 
success in substantial measure is his reward. 



HON. IRA C. POWELL. 



Hon. Ira C. Powell, president of the First National Bank of Monmouth, is regarded 
as one of the leading citizens of the community in which he resides and his progress- 
iveness has been a potent element in its continued development and upbuilding. He 
is a representative of one of the old and honored pioneer families of Oregon, his father, 
Franklin S. Powell, having emigrated to this state from Illinois, in the year 1851. In 
Linn county he took up as a donation claim a half section of land near the present site of 
Albany, which he operated until about 1872, then leased his property, removed to Polk 
county and there became the owner of another halt section. This he cultivated for 
many years and then removed to Monmouth, where he lived retired throughout the 
remainder of his life. He was an extensive stock raiser and was one of the first to 
introduce pure bred Merino sheep into Linn county. While residing in Polk county 
he engaged in the raising of pure bred Cotswold sheep and Angora goats and was very 
successful in his operations along that line. He became prominently known throughout 
the state and in 1889 was elected to represent his district in the state legislature. He 
also served as chairman of the board of trustees of Christian College and during his 
legislative service was instrumental in having the college taken over by the state as a 
normal school. He passed away at Monmouth, December 4, 1916, at the advanced age 
of eighty-seven years, but his wife, Louisa (Peeler) Powell, survives and is residing in 
Monmouth, having attained the venerable age of ninety-one years. She is one of the hon- 
ored pioneer women of the state and her reminiscences of the early days are most 
interesting. 

The son, Ira C. Powell, was born in Linn county, Oregon, November 26, 1865, and 
there attended the public schools, later pursuing a course of study in Christian College at 

Vol. II— 3 



34 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Monmouth. He then engaged in teaching school and also followed farming for two 
years. In 1889 he first became interested in financial affairs in connection with a private 
bank and the following year in association with others he organized the Polk County 
Bank, of which he became cashier. In 1911 it was converted into the First National 
Bank and four years later, or in 1915, Mr. Powell was made president of the institution, 
in which capacity he has since served also filling the position of manager. The other 
officers are J. B. V. Butler, vice president, and F. E. Chambers, cashier, and all are 
substantial and progressive business men of this section of the state. The bank is 
capitalized for thirty thousand dollars, has a surplus and undivided profits of twenty- 
five thousand dollars, while its resources have reached the sum of five hundred 
thousand dollars. The present bank building was erected in 1896 and the 
First National Bank of Monmouth is regarded as one of the sound and reliable moneyed 
institutions of this part of the state. With keen insight into business affairs and with 
thorough understanding of every phase of banking, Mr. Powell has been largely instru- 
mental in promoting the growth and success of the institution, and while he is progressive 
and aggressive, he employs that conservatism necessary to safeguard depositors as well 
as stockholders. He is also a stockholder and was one of the organizers of the Central 
Clay Products Company of Monmouth and is much interested in horticulture, being the 
owner of two orchards, in which he engages in the growing of prunes, cherries and 
walnuts. He has won a substantial measure of success in the conduct of his business 
affairs and is a man of resolute spirit whose plans are carefully made and promptly 
executed. 

In December, 1894, Mr. Powell was united in marriage to Miss Lena Butler, who 
passed away in 1908, leaving three children: Clares, aged twenty-four years, who is a 
graduate of the State University, class of 1921, and also associated with his father in 
the conduct of the bank; Herbert, who is eighteen years of age and is a student at the 
university at Eugene; and Ira D., Jr., aged twelve, who is attending the public schools. 
In 1916 Mr. Powell was again married, his second union being with Miss Ethel Jackson. 

In his political views Mr. Powell is a republican and has filled several public offices 
of trust and responsibility. In 1911 he was called upon to represent his district in the 
state legislature, where he was the stalwart champion of many measures for the 
public good. He served for four terms as mayor of Monmouth, giving to the city a most 
progressive and businesslike administration, and for ten years has been a member of 
the school board, doing all in his power to advance the standards of education in his 
part of the state. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian 
church, in wliich he is serving as a trustee, and fraternally he is identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has so conducted his interests that he has not 
only won individual success but has also contributed in marked measure to the upbuild- 
ing, development and prosperity of the community in which he resides and Monmouth 
numbers him among her most valued citizens. 



HENRY WALDO COE, M. D. 



Dr. Henry Waldo Coe was born in Waupun, Wisconsin, November 4, 1857, his 
father being Samuel Buel Coe, M. D., and his mother Mary (Chronkhite) Coe. He is 
a direct descendant, tenth in line, of Robert Coe, Puritan, who landed in New England 
from England in 1634, and on his mother's side is of old Knickerbocker stock. The 
Spelman genealogy gives Dr. S. B. Coe as a cousin of the late elder Mrs. John D. 
Rockefeller. 

Dr. Henry Waldo Coe spent his boyhood days at Morristown, Minnesota, where 
his parents moved from Wisconsin in 1863. The father was a surgeon in the First 
Minnesota Heavy Artillery in the Civil war. Two ancestors were captains in Colonial 
wars— John Coe and his son John— while a later progenitor, James Coe, was a corporal 
in the Revolutionary war, on account of whose service Dr. Coe and his sons are Sons of 
the American Revolution. Dr. Henry Waldo Coe volunteered and had provision- 
ally been accepted by Colonel Roosevelt for his proposed overseas volunteer army as 
a base hospital surgeon, but when Colonel Roosevelt's project failed of government 
acceptance Dr. Coe was unable to secure admission into the great war, though at home 
he took an active part in all war activities in bond sales, Y. M. C. A.. Red Cross and 
other auxiliary work. His three sons, George Clifford, Wayne Walter and Earl Alphonso, 
all college boys, volunteered as privates for such service, the two older and first men- 



1205983 




DR. HENRY WALDO COE 



HISTORY OP OREGON 37 

tioned having risen in service from the ranks to lieutenants. Their records appear 
later on herein. 

Dr. Coe, after a high school education, took his college course at the University 
of Minnesota and studied medicine at the University of Michigan and Long Island 
College Hospital, graduating at the latter in 1880. He did much postgraduate work 
in this country and abroad. 

He located at Mandan, North Dakota, in 1880, where he was surgeon for the 
Northern Pacific Railroad, superintendent of the state board of health and president 
of the State Medical Society. Here also he was mayor of his, little city and was the 
first member of the legislature from the state, then territory, of North Dakota, from 
west of the Missouri river, representing thirteen counties. He was president of the 
Oregon branch of the Roosevelt Memorial Association, and is one of the trustees of 
the National Roosevelt Memorial Association. 

In 1891, seeking a larger field, with his wife and a young child, George Clifford 
Coe, he moved to Portland, Oregon, where he has since resided, taking an active part 
in medical affairs and a leading position in the development of this state, where 
within a few years his two other sons were born. 

Among the medical positions he has held in Portland are those of professor of 
anatomy and of nervous and mental diseases in the Willamette University and neu- 
rologist of the old Portland Hospital; secretary of the Portland Clinical Society; 
president of the State Medical Society; president of the Portland City and County 
Medical Society; member of the house of delegates of the American Medical Associa- 
tion. He is a member in these medical societies today and also of the American 
Medico-Psychological Society, and an ex-president of the American Medical Editors As- 
sociation, and for thirty years a life member of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. He is a member of the Scottish Rite and Shrine orders of 
Masonry. 

He is affiliated with the Congregational church, the church of his New England 
ancestors. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, the City Realty Board, the Pro- 
gressive Business Men's Club, the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club, the Rosarians 
and the Arlington Club. He is a life member of the Portland Rowing Club and the 
Portland Yacht Club. 

While president of the American Medical Editors Association, he made a special 
trip to investigate hygienic conditions at Panama and to furnish a private report 
of his findings, which were altogether favorable, to President Roosevelt. 

While in the east securing the American Medical Association for Portland for 
1905, he was in 1904, in a few days' campaign, elected by Portland to the state senate, 
a vacancy having unexpectedly occurred in the republican ticket a few days before the 
election. He was at the time the choice of both republican factions and elected by 
one of the largest majorities ever given a state senator from Portland. 

He was until the death of Theodore Roosevelt a warm personal friend, and en- 
joyed, until the death of the ex-president, to a marked degree the confidence of the 
elder Theodore, a friendship then extending back for thirty-five years to the early 
days of Dakota, where both were for the time being pioneers in territorial days. For 
seven years, while Theodore Roosevelt was in the White House, Dr. Henry Waldo 
Coe was the confidential associate as to Oregon matters, being often called to Wash- 
ington for conference touching the then somewhat distracted political situation in the 
republican party in this state, and on several occasions, though not always, he was 
able to pacify disturbing conditions. 

Dr. Coe, as a republican, was either a delegate or alternate to five consecutive 
national conventions of that party. He avoided local and state political activity in 
Oregon, and it was only when Theodore Roosevelt suggested that he should do his 
mite in national politics that he somewhat reluctantly attempted to do so. In 1908 
he helped in the convention to nominate Taft and took charge of the financial portion 
of the campaign, raising all the funds for the Oregon campaign and sending for the 
first time from Oregon ten thousand dollars to the national republican committee. 

He was again a delegate in 1912, following his great leader into the progressive 
party movement, and was for the new party national committeeman for Oregon. He 
was one of the original signers of the Declaration of Rights calling the progressive 
national convention to meet in Chicago in 1912. In 1916 he joined with thirty-five 
other progressive national committeemen in the endorsement of the republican nominee. 

In 1893 Dr. Coe established in Portland The Medical Sentinel, which ever since 
he has successfully carried forward. He was well fitted for publication work, as his 



38 HISTORY OF OREGON 

first financial venture was a newspaper at Morristown, Minnesota, and later he estab- 
lished the Northern Pacific Times at Valley City. North Dakota, while he was still 
under age and not yet a physician. At one time he was secretary of the Oregon Press 
Association. 

In 1894 he established his sanitarium tor nervous and mental diseases for the 
care of patients, in the specialty to which in medicine he thereafter confined his pro- 
fessional work, organizing what is now known as Morningside Hospital. Later he 
withdrew from private practice and since 1910 has devoted himself to his sanitarium 
work, which has since that date cared for only United States government cases, the 
largest private institution for nervous and mental diseases on the Pacific coast, and 
which is entirely owned by Dr. Coe. At present there are two hundred and forty 
patients therein domiciled. 

Dr. Coe has been largely interested in good sized business enterprises in the 
northwest, including farming, dairying, mining, fruit raising and banking. It was 
he who colonized the Furnish-Coe Irrigation Project in Umatilla county, Oregon, and he 
laid out the town of Stanfield in the same region, and is a large owner of productive 
lands on the project and much improved property in the little city he established. 

He organized and was the first president of the First National Bank of Kelso, 
Washington, the First National Bank at St. Johns, Oregon, and the Bank of Stanfield, 
and is still actively interested in the little bank. He also helped organize the Scan- 
dinavian Bank of Portland, now the State Bank of Portland, and was a vice president 
therein, as well as a director in the Scandinavian Savings Bank of Astoria. He has 
built many substantial edifices in Portland and elsewhere, including the magnificent 
home at Twenty-fifth and Lovejoy, which he presented to his first wife. 

Dr. Coe again married, March 25, 1915. His bride was Miss Elsie Ara Waggoner. 
With her and his sons he lives in Laurelhurst, on Royal Court avenue, a quiet, con- 
tented and happy life, at peace with all the world. 

He is a great traveler and has been in almost every corner of the world. He 
spends several weeks in Washington, D. C, each winter, and has enjoyed special honors 
at the White House. Twice during the term of President Taft he was the dinner 
guest of President and Mrs. Taft at the White House, while often before Dr. Coe was 
the guest at the White House at the table of President Roosevelt. He is erecting a 
bronze heroic equestrian statue to President Roosevelt in Portland to be completed 
in 1921, by his sculptor A. Phimister Proctor. He is deeply interested in bronzes 
the world over. He provided to the women of America, erecting the Sacajawea monu- 
ment in the Portland City Park, the bronze therein— some two tons of metal. 

Dr. and Mrs. Coe spent the summer of 1920 in travel in Europe, where Dr. Coe 
went in study of mental and nervous diseases in soldiers one, two, three and four 
years later after war service than could be done in America. Mrs. Coe went tor 
travel and a study of the old masters in sculpture, bronze and painting. 

George Clifford Coe was born in Mandan, North Dakota, in 1SS5, graduated from 
Portland Academy, Belmont School and Stanford University and the Graduate School 
of Harvard University; enlisted as a private in the medical section of the United 
States Signal Corps, Camp Fremont, California, in May, 191S. Later was transferred 
to the Fourth Officers Training Camp at Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and re- 
ceived his commission as second lieutenant in field artillery and was assigned to the 
Ammunition Train of the Thirteenth Division, where he trained troops at Camp Travis, 
San Antonio, Texas. He is now manager of a blooded stock farm in Lovell. Maine. 

Wayne Walter Coe was born at Portland, Oregon, In 1894. Graduated at Port- 
land Academy and Oregon Agricultural College and attended the Graduate School of 
Cornell University for one year. Enlisted as a private July 30, 1917, in Base Hospital 
Unit, No. 46, at Portland, Oregon. Was transferred to Third Oflficers Training Camp, 
Camp Lewis, Washington, January 5, 1918, successfully completing the course in field 
artillery; promoted to sergeant and recommended for a commission. Sailed for Europe, 
May 23, 1918, in a casual detachment. Detailed to Saumur Artillery School, France, 
where he was commissioned as second lieutenant of field artillery. Transferred to the 
Air Service and trained as aerial observer. Second Aviation Instruction Center, Tours, 
France. Assigned to the Eighty-fifth Aerial Squadron, Toul Air Dome. November 5, 

1918, and remained on active flying duty with his squadron until discharged in August, 

1919. Later served in the army of occupation on the Rhine. He is now acting as 
assistant to his father. 

Earl Alphonso Coe was born at Portland, Oregon, in 1896. Graduated at Portland 
Academy and after return from overseas at Oregon Agricultural College, enlisted in 



HISTORY OF OREGON 39 

the regular army September, 1917, as a private and was at once assigned to tlie Seven- 
teenth Field Artillery, Battery B, then training at Camp Robinson, Wisconsin. He 
sailed for France, December, 1917, and remained with this outfit of the Second Division 
throughout their six campaigns, ending in the triumphant march to the Rhine, where 
in the army of occupation he remained until mustered out in April, 1919. In 1920 
he spent six months in, and graduated from a business college at Washington, D. C. He 
is now, under civil service, an attache of the Market Division of the Agricultural 
Department, Washington, D. C. 



M. D. MORGAN. 



M. D. Morgan, editor and lessee of the Harrisburg Bulletin, published at Har- 
risburg, Linn county, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, May 16, 1876, a son of John and 
Bertha (Moan) Morgan, the former a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, while the 
latter was born in Norway. The father accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Platteville, Wisconsin, and there followed the wheelwright's trade. He was an 
honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting as a member of Company I, Tenth 
Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served for two years, when he was discharged 
on account of illness. On regaining his health he reenlisted, becoming a member 
of Company I, Twenty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry, and served with that command 
until the close of the war. He received a number of wounds and several times was 
taken prisoner but succeeded in making his escape. At the close of hostilities he 
returned to his Wisconsin home, but after a short time went to Dubuque, Iowa, where 
his marriage occurred. In 1877 he went to Dows, Iowa, and opened a wagon shop, 
continuing its conduct until ill health compelled him to retire. Coming to the 
west in search of a brother, he reached the state of Oregon, and finding the mild 
climate here to his liking, he took up his abode in Salem in 1904, there residing 
until 1909, when he removed to Harrisburg, in which city he spent his remaining 
days. He passed away April 30, 1915, and the motter survived him but a year, her 
death occurring May 31, 1916. 

M. D. Morgan was reared and educated in Dows, Iowa, and there learned the 
printer's trade, which he followed in different parts of the country. Subsequently 
he took up the study of telegraphy and for two years worked at that occupation, but 
not finding it to his liking, he resumed his former trade of printer and on the 1st 
of January, 1899, purchased the Renwick (la.) Times, which he operated for two 
years and then sold. Purchasing the Butler County Tribune, published at Allison, 
Iowa, he continued to conduct that paper for a period of six years and, then 
decided to seek other fields of operation and came to Oregon, becoming connected 
with the Statesman, issued at Salem, where he remained until July, 1908. His next 
venture was in connection with the Harrisburg (Ore.) Bulletin, which he operated 
until December 1, 1917, and then sold, purchasing a farm near Harrisburg, in Linn 
county, but this investment did not prove a profitable one. He carried on his 
farming operations entirely by tractor, but owing to continued drought his crops 
proved a failure and he was obliged to abandon the project. He then went to Van- 
couver, Washington, where he once more took up his former trade, becoming con- 
nected with The Columbian, having charge of the job department and doing editorial 
work. In June, 1919, he returned to Harrisburg and leased his old paper, the Bulle- 
tin, which he has since conducted. He is thoroughly at home in this line of work, 
owing to his long connection with newspaper interests, and he is making the Bulletin 
a very readable and attractive journal, devoted to the interests of the community 
which it serves and to the dissemination of home news. He has introduced the most 
progressive methods in management and publication and has added to the substantial 
reputation which the Bulletin has always enjoyed. Mr. Morgan is still the owner 
of his farm near Harrisburg. It comprises one hundred and fourteen acres and 
from its rental he derives a substantial addition to his income. 

On the 20th of February, 1901, occurred the marriage of M. D. Morgan and 
Miss Lola Irene Michael, and they have become the parents of eight children: Leland, 
who assists his father in the publication of the Bulletin; Wayne, who is also con- 
nected with the work of the paper; Genevieve, who is the second in order of birth; 
and Joseph, Carroll, Donald, Irene and Edith. 

Mr. Morgan gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has taken 



40 HISTORY OF OREGON 

an active interest in public affairs of his community, serving as a member of the 
various town councils in the communities in which he has resided. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Masonic order. He stands at all times for improvement in 
everything relating to the development and upbuilding of the county along intellectual, 
political, material and moral lines, and in his editorial capacity he is producing a 
newspaper of much interest and value to the community in which he lives. 



HENRY FAILING. 



It was upon the 9th of June, 1S51, that Henry Failing arrived in Portland as a 
passenger on the Steamer Columbia, then one of the fleet of the Pacific Steamship Com- 
pany. Years later when Portland celebrated its carnival of roses when millions of the 
beautiful queen of flowers had justly won for Portland the name of the Rose City, Henry 
Failing could look back to that other June day, when with his father, Josiah Failing, 
and his younger brother, John W. Failing, he made his way up the Columbia river 
and on to the little town of three or four hundred population which at that time con- 
sisted of only one or two streets bordering the Willamette, but which was destined to 
become one of the great metropolitan and trade centers of the northwest. A fellow 
passenger on the same ship was C. H. Lewis and for many years the two celebrated 
the anniversary of their arrival in the city together. Great, indeed, was the contrast 
in his condition when he became a resident of Portland to that which he had left in 
the east, for he was not only a resident but a native of New York city. His birth 
occurred January 17, 1S34, his parents being Josiah and Henrietta (Ellison) Failing, 
of whom mention is made elsewhere in this work. 

He received thorough educational training in his early youth but continued to 
attend) school only until April, 1846. when at the age of twelve years he started out 
in the business world as ofl^ce boy in the counting house of L. F. de Figanere & Com- 
pany on Piatt street, in New York. The senior partner of the firm was a brother of 
the Portuguese minister to the^ United States, while another member of the firm was 
Mr. Rosat. a French merchant from Bordeaux. The house was patronized by many 
French dealers of New York and while connected with the establishment Mr. Failing 
was required to speak and to write the French] language with which he was already 
familiar. He readily mastered business principles and became an expert accountant. 
His next position was that of bookkeeper in the large dry goods jobbing house of Eno. 
Mahoney & Company, the senior partner in this firm being Amos R. Eno. a New York 
millionaire, who afterward told an intimate friend that it was one of the mistakes of 
his business life that he did not make it more of an inducement for Henry Failing to 
remain with him. However, the business association between the two men ripened 
into a warm friendship that was terminated only by death. Mr. Failing applied him- 
self with the utmost thoroughness to the mastery of every task assigned him and 
to the work of acquainting himself with every modern business principle and thus 
he had gained wide knowledge and valuable experience when he joined his father and 
brother on the trip to the west, leaving New York on the 15th of April. 1S51. The 
journey was made from New York to Chagres. Panama, whence they proceeded by boat 
up the Chagres river and thence to Panama by mule train. On reaching the western 
coast of the isthmus they took passage on the Steamer Tennessee, which eventually 
brought them to San Francisco and as previously stated the 9th of June witnessed 
their arrival in Portland. It was the intention of Henry Failing and his father to 
engage in merchandising and they at once began the erection of a store building on 
Front and Oak streets, where in due course of time tliey installed their stock sent to 
them from the east. The father also became a prominent factor in the public life of 
the little community and in the year following their arrival was elected a member of 
the first city council of Portland and in 1853 became mayor. Following his father's 
retirement from the business in 1864 Henry Failing continued the management of the 
store alone, extending the scope of his activities to meet the changing conditions brought 
about by the rapid growth of the city and consequent demands along mercantile lines. 
He gained substantial success as a merchant and in 1869 became a factor in the banking 
circles of Portland where he joined with his father, Josiah Failing, and the Hon. H. 
W. Corbett in purchasing a controlling interest in the First National Bank from A. M. 
and L. M. Starr, who had been prominent in the establishment of the bank in 1866. 
Mr. Failing was continuously president of the bank from 1869 until his death and a 




HENRY FAILING 



HISTORY OF OREGOX 43 

controlling spirit in the institution, which became one of the strongest moneyed con- 
cerns of the northwest. He had no sooner assumed charge than the capital stock was 
increased from one hundred to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, which sum was 
doubled in 1S80, at which time the legal surplus and undivided profits amounted to more 
than the capital stock of five hundred thousand dollars. Year after year extensive divi- 
dends were paid to the stockholders and the bank became recognized as one of the 
most prominent financial enterprises on the coast. In January, 1871, Mr. Failing and 
Mr. Corbett also consolidated their mercantile enterprises, organizing the firm of Cor- 
bett. Failing & Company, which maintained an existence for more than twenty-two 
years. 

A contemporary biographer has said of him: "Something of the cosmopolitan inter- 
ests of Mr. Failing is indicated in the fact that not only was he one of the most dis- 
tinguished and capable merchants and bankers of Portland, but was also equally active 
in his efforts in behalf of political, intellectual and moral porgress. He believed it the 
duty as well as the privilege of every American citizen to support through political 
activity and by his ballot the measures that he deemed most beneficial to the community 
and to the country at large. His position was never a matter of doubt. He stood loy- 
ally for what he believed to be right and advocated a policy which he believed to be 
both practical and progressive. He was made chairman of the state central committee 
of the Union party, a combination of republicans and war democrats, who in 1862 car'- 
ried Oregon for the Union. Two years later, when thirty years of age, he was chosen 
mayor of Portland and his administration constituted an era of development, improve- 
ment and reform in connection with Portland's affairs. During his first administration 
a new city charter was obtained, a system of street improvements adopted and much 
good work was done. So uniform was the endorsement of his first term that at his 
reelection there were only five dissenting votes. In 1873 he was chosen for a third term 
and as chief executive of the city he advocated and supported much municipal legisla- 
tion, which is still felt in its beneficial effects in Portland. In 1885 he became a member 
of the water committee and when that committee was organized was unanimously chosen 
chairman, thus serving until his death. He was never bitterly aggressive in politics nor 
indulged in personalities. He believed in the principles which he advocated and, there- 
fore, supported them, but he allowed to each the right of individual opinion. His mar- 
velous judgment and powers of exact calculation are well illustrated by his service as 
chairman of the water committee. For many years he, substantially unaided, annually 
made the estimates required by law of the receipts and expenditures of the committee 
for the year next ensuing. These estimates are, under the varied circumstances neces- 
sarily considered in making them, characteristic of him and some of them are marvels 
of exactness. His estimate of the cost of operation, maintenance, repairs and interest 
for the year 1893 was one hundred thousand dollars and the actual outlay was one 
hundred thousand, two hundred and eleven dollars and ninety-one cents. His estimate 
of receipts for the year 1892 was two hundred and forty thousand dollars and the 
receipts actually collected were two hundred and thirty-seven thousand, three hundred 
dollars and eighty-five cents. His estimate of the receipts for the year 1897 was two 
hundred and thirty-two thousand dollars. The amount actually collected was two hun- 
dred and thirty-one thousand, eight hundred and sixty dollars and ninety-five cents. 
The magnitude of the task of making these estimates is emphasized when the fact is 
considered that not only the fluctuations in the population of a large city must be con- 
sidered, but climatic conditions anticipated and the amount of water consumed in 
Irrigation based thereon; the amount of building and the volume of trade considered 
and an estimate made of the water consumed in building and in the use of elevators. 
These various sources of revenue were all carefully considered and estimates made 
which were in excess of the actual income in but trifling amounts. 

"Not only in the field of politics did Mr. Failing put forth effort that had direct bear- 
ing upon the welfare of Portland but in many other ways his labors were of equal value. 
No good work done in the name of charity or religion sought his cooperation in vain. 
He gave freely and generously of his means and of his time to support beneficial public 
projects. Chosen a regent of the University of Oregon he was made president of the 
board and so continued until his death, which occurred November 8, 189S. He was also 
a trustee and treasurer of the Pacific University, the oldest educational institution of 
the state. He was a generous contributor to and active worker in the First Baptist 
church of Portland and the Baptist Society, of which he long served as president. He 
was the treasurer of the Children's Home and his heart and hand reached out in ready 
sympathy and aid to all who needed assistance. He was associated with William H. 



44 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Ladd and H. W. Corbett in purchasing and laying out the grounds of Riverside ceme- 
tery and the beautiful city of the dead is, as it were, a monument to his efforts in that 
direction. He labored earnestly and effectively for the Portland Library Association, 
of which he was president, and his benevolence and enterprise largely made possible 
the erection of the library building. Coming to Portland in pioneer times, he lived for 
forty-seven years to witness its growth and upbuilding. No duty devolving upon him 
was neglected and no opportunity to aid his city was passed by heedlessly. He was still 
serving as a member of the water commission at the time of his death and that com- 
mittee prepared a lengthy memorial in his honor. In, every home of the city where 
he was known — and his acquaintance was wide — the news of his demise was received 
with sorrow and regret. He had attached himself closely to his fellow-townsmen, not 
only by reason of his public activities but by those personal qualities which win warm 
regard and enduring friendship. He was a man of fine personal appearance — an index 
of the larger life and broader spirit within." 

A few of the distinctive features of the character of Henry Failing have been 
touched upon in passing. It is not for lack of individuality that the portraiture of his 
life is difficult, but by reason of the very simplicity of his character. His development 
was like that of the country, continuous and straightforward, and his every act con- 
tributed to the growth of the city and state in which he lived. Like the flower that 
unfolds in the sunlight opportunity brought forth the perfect blossom of his activity 
and just as naturally. He impressed one as a man certain of his position. While a 
most successful banker he was ever sympathetic and generous and of him it was said: 
"It was not always easy for him to say no, but when he did speak his negative was 
absolute." He was a cool observer and very deliberate in his judgment, but his deci- 
sion was sharp and final. He was ever courteous though reserved and those who came 
within the close circle of his friends found him cordial and most genial and kindly. 
His speech was a counterpart of his demeanor, conservative and exact, and rather aimed 
below than above the fullness of the facts. Although his early educational opportunities 
were somewhat limited he ever remained a student and by general reading accumulated 
a fund of information on various subjects far in excess of that possessed by the majority 
of college bred men. His reading so kept pace with his study of men and affairs that 
the combination made him a man of such wide knowledge and culture that few would 
imagine that his schooldays ended when he was but twelve years of age. He was re- 
markable for his familiarity with questions of national policy, particularly those of 
finance and he was a prominent figure in banking circles in various parts of this coun- 
try, nor was his name unknown in the financial circles of Europe. Wherever known 
he was looked upon as a man most worthy of trust. It is true that his benefactions 
were many and most generous, but of these he seldom spoke, for to him gifts lost their 
flavor if heralded. What the history of Portland would have been without Henry 
Failing it is impossible to imagine. The city in considerable measure stands as a 
monument to his ability and none the less to that spirit which prompted him to recog- 
nize the brotherhood of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. 



LEON V. JENKINS. 



Leon V. Jenkins, the efficient chief of police of Portland, comes of honorable and 
distinguished ancestry and actuated by the undaunted courage and spirit of determi- 
nation which dominated his forbears he is adding new lustre to the family name. 
Mr. Jenkins was born in 1879, a son of Webster and Sarah (O'Malia) Jenkins, the 
former a native of New York state and the latter of Indiana. The maternal grand- 
mother, Ann (Bates) Jenkins, was a granddaughter of Rufus Bates who defended 
American interests as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, serving for seven years in 
that conflict. He was one of the famous "Green Mountain boys" and in company with 
eighty others volunteered to escort Ethan Allen on his secret expedition to capture 
Fort Ticonderoga, being one of the six men who clubbed their muskets and battered 
down the door which admitted Allen to the sleeping quarters of Commander La Place, 
thus resulting in the capture of the fort. He was also in General Starke's command 
and as a veteran of the Revolutionary war his name is recorded on the government 
pension rolls. He was a Baptist minister and for sixty-two years engaged in preach- 
ing the gospel, his labors being productive of much good. He attained the venerable 
age of ninety-six years and was highly esteemed and respected by all who knew him. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 45 

Other progenitors of the family also rendered valuable services to their country as 
Revolutionary war soldiers. Mr. Jenkins' great-great-grandfather in the maternal 
line, George Bates, was born at Shaftsbury, Vermont, April 21, 1775, and reared a 
family of twelve children, also becoming a man of prominence in his community. 
At the age of six years Webster Jenkins, the father, removed with his parents to 
Michigan during the period of its great activity as a lumbering centre and he became 
identified with that industry. In young manhood he left Michigan and removed to 
Estherville, Iowa, then at the age of eighteen enlisted and served during the Civil 
war in the Seventh Iowa Cavalry for three years and four months as General Sully's 
personal orderly, and subsequently made his way to the coast, going first to San 
Francisco, California, and later to Portland, Oregon. He afterwards went to "Wash- 
ington, taking up a preemption claim in the vicinity of Kalama and it was upon this 
property that his son, Leon V., was born. While residing in that state he also became 
the owner of sawmills and for years served as justice of the peace at Kalama, being 
known as "Squire" Jenkins. In his later life he returned to Portland, where he 
engaged in carpentering, being an expert workman. He passed away August 24, 1911, 
having for seven years survived the mother, whose demise occurred August 31, 
1904. Of their family four sons survive: Leon V., Elba S., Orlin C. and Roy. 

Their son, Leon V. Jenkins, attended the common schools of Kalama, Wash- 
ington, and Portland, Oregon, spending much of his boyhood in his father's saw- 
mill and later pursued a commercial course in a business college of Portland. His 
first position in the business world was that of office boy in a laundry and being 
interested in that line of work he decided to learn the business. His faithfulness 
and capability soon won him promotion and he advanced through various positions 
until he at length became superintendent, serving in that capacity for various Port- 
land laundries. His connection with the police force of the city dates from October 
5, 1908, when he was appointed patrolman. He was most conscientious and faithful 
in the discharge of his duties and soon won merited advancement, being made ser- 
geant on the 1st of May, 1912, lieutenant on the 1st of December, 1916, captain on the 
4th of May, 1917, and chief of police on the 4th of November, 1919, in which capacity 
he is now serving. He is making an excellent record in office and has succeeded in 
building up one of the best organized police departments in any city in the north- 
west. He is a man of strict integrity, fearless in the discharge of his duties and 
all law-abiding citizens feel that they are well protected while he is in office, for he is 
determined to rid the city of crime and lawlessness and make Portland one of the 
best governed cities in the northwest. 

On the 20th of December, 1899, Mr. Jenkins was united in marriage to Miss 
Kathryn Lucille Gushing, a native of Arapahoe, Nebraska, and they have become the 
parents of a son, Raymond, now fifteen years of age, who is attending Hill's Military 
Academy. In his political views Mr. Jenkins is a stanch republican, active in support 
of the principles and candidates of the party. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and 
is master of Mount Tabor Lodge, No. 42, also holding membership in the Shrine. His 
record as a public official is a most creditable one and in every relation of life he 
measures up to the highest standard of manhood and citizenship, standing today as 
a splendid representative of the spirit of the American northwest. 



THOMAS NELSON. 



To many people in smaller communities and country districts the local newspaper 
is not only a cheerful companion and interesting entertainer, but often friend and 
adviser. A paper which possesses all of these qualifications is -the Junction City 
Times, which under the able direction of Thomas Nelson has developed into one of the 
best and most influential newspapers in this section of the state, its editorial policy 
being consisl;ent and to the point. 

Mr. Nelson was born in Young America, Illinois, April 16, 1870, a son of James 
H. and Caroline (Snodgrass) Nelson, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter 
of Illinois. In Illinois the father worked at his trade of plasterer, but attracted to 
the west, he went to Colorado at an early period in the settlement of that state and 
there followed his trade for many years. He was greatly interested in mining and 
prospecting and devoted a large portion of his life to that pursuit. He was an 
honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting as a member of the Tenth Illinois Infan- 



46 HISTORY OF OREGON 

try, with which command he served for a year and a half, when he was discharged 
on account ot illness. The last years ol his life were spent with his son Thomas 
and he passed away at Cambridge, Idaho, May 8, 1915. The mother, however, sur- 
vives and is now residing in California. 

Thomas Nelson pursued his education in the schools of Boulder, Colorado, later 
attending the State University and also a business college. "While a student at the 
university he learned the printer's trade and after completing his course he went to 
California, where he worked at his trade for about a year. In 1888 he came to Oregon, 
accepting the position of foreman on the Daily Reveille, published at Baker City, 
with which he was connected for four years. On the expiration of that period he 
went to Portland, Oregon, and for about eight months he was employed on the 
Oregonian and then went to John Day, in the eastern part of the state, where he 
established a paper of his own. After two years he sold out. going to Heppner, 
Oregon, for a time working at his trade, but subsequently leased a plant, which he 
operated for a year. From there he went to Pendleton, Oregon, and there conducted 
a job office until 1896, when he purchased a paper at Cambridge, Idaho, continuing 
its operation until 1919. His next removal took him to Eugene, where he ran a 
job office until October, 1919, at which time he came to Junction City and pur- 
chased the Junction City Times, which he is now managing. He has greatly improved 
the plant, which at the time of his purchase was located in a small building. Moving 
into a large modern building, he thoroughly revolutionized the plant, installing all 
the latest presses and linotype machines and in fact every appliance to be found in the 
most modern plants in the country. He has greatly increased the size of his paper, 
changing it from a four to an eight-page publication, which is not only representative 
of first-class typography but also excels on account of its terse style in setting forth 
the news events of the section in which it circulates. Its local columns are full of 
interest and the general news ot the world is clearly and completely given. The prin- 
cipal policy of the Times has been to serve the public promptly and well and that 
Mr. Nelson has succeeded Is evident from the large circulation which his publication 
enjoys. All those who advertise in its columns tind it worth their while and con- 
sider the investment for an advertisement in this paper a comparatively small outlay 
which is many times redeemed by the assured returns. 

On the 28th of May, 1916, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
Watrous and they have become the parents of two children; Thomas Vardell, whose 
birth occurred in February, 1917; and Eugene, Henry, born in May, 1919. 

In his political views Mr. Nelson is a republican and his religious faith is indi- 
cated by his attendance at and support of the Methodist Episcopal church. His fra- 
ternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the United Artisans 
and the Woodmen of the World and along the line of his profession he is identified with 
the Typographical Union. Mr. Nelson's long connection with journalistic interests 
has made him thoroughly familiar with every phase of newspaper publication and in 
the management of the Times he is proving very successful. He is also the owner of 
one of the best homes in the city and is classed with the substantial and representa- 
tive citizens of his community. Mr. Nelson secured his education entirely through his 
own efforts and is deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished in life. 
He is interested in all that has to do with public progress in the community or the 
uplift of the individual and his aid and influence are always on the side of advance- 
ment and improvement. He is a man of substantial worth, a splendid representative 
of American manhood and citizenship. 



CYRUS ABDA DOLPH. 



Cyrus Abda Dolph, who lor many years was a distinguished member of the Port- 
land bar and whose name to the time of his death was always found on the list of those 
whose records reflected credit and honor upon the legal history of the state, was born 
near Havana. Schuyler county. New York, September 27, 1840, his parents being Chester 
V. and Elizabeth Vanderbilt (Steele) Dolph. The family name was originally De Wolf 
but as the years passed underwent various changes until it flnally assumed the present 
form during the French and Indian war. The first paternal American ancestor of 
Cyrus A. Dolph was Balthazer De Wolf, who came to the new world about the middle 
of the seventeenth century and settled in Connecticut, residing first in Wethersfield and 




CYRUS A. DOLPH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 49 

later at Lyme. To him and his wife, Alice, was born a son, Edward, and through him 
and his wife, Rebecca, the line of descent comes down through Charles and Prudence, 
Joseph and Tabitha (Johnson), Abda and Mary (Coleman), Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Norton), their son, Chester V. and Elizabeth Vanderbilt (Steele). In many ways the 
family has been closely associated with America's history. Abda Dolph served in the 
Revolutionary war with Colonel Whiting's New York troops. Another famous ancestor 
of Cyrus A. Dolph was Governor Mayhew of colonial tame, who succeeded in settling 
the difficulties with the Indians during King Philip's war. He was lord of Tisbury 
Manor and became governor of, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, in 1674. Cyrus A. 
Dolph was also a great-grandson of Jacob Vanderbilt, brother of the first Cornelius 
Vanderbilt. 

He obtained his education at Havana, New York, where he remained until 1862, 
and in that year made his way to the Pacific coast in connection with his brother. 
United States Senator Joseph N. Dolph. They settled in Portland, then a small town 
of less than five hundred population. Mr. Dolph here took up the study of law and 
in 1866 was admitted to the bar. His success in the practice of his profession was 
marked from the beginning. He was early accorded a large clientage that constantly 
Increased in volume and importance as the years passed. In 1869, without solicitation 
on his part, he was nominated on the republican ticket for the office of city attorney. 
While he accepted the office at that time he declined subsequent nominations for the 
state general assembly and for the state senate and he even refused the high office of 
circuit Judge of the ninth Judicial circuit, which was tendered him by President Benja- 
min Harrison in 1891. His inflexible honesty brought him a most valuable clientage 
from among those who appreciated the value of able and conscientious counsel. While 
he was recognized as a strong and effective advocate in the work of the courts he was 
best known as a counselor and was especially valued by men of large affairs whose 
extensive and diversified interests called for the most expert legal guidance. Chief 
among these men was Henry Villard, who appointed Mr. Dolph his personal attorney 
In Oregon and the northwest and made him general attorney for all the corporations 
which Mr. Villard controlled. Mr. Dolph served on the directorates of the various 
important railway and subsidiary companies with which Mr. Villard was connected 
and was intrusted with the duty of seeing that the great financier's policies were car- 
ried out. The many important and intricate questions that arose during the early his- 
tory of railroad construction and subsequent operation in Oregon and Washington were 
handled by him with rare judgment and to the satisfaction of all parties concerned. 
He was a director and the general attorney of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Com- 
pany and the Oregon & California Railroad Company; was also consulting attorney in 
Oregon for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company; was a director and for twelve years 
president of the Northern Pacific Terminal Company of Oregon and thus became an 
active factor in connection with the development and improvement of the railway sys- 
tems of the northwest. 

The law firm of which Mr. Dolph was a member was organized by him in 1873, 
his associates being his brother, Joseph N. Dolph, Judge E. C. Bronaugh and Joseph 
Simon. Upon the election of his brother to the United States senate and the retire- 
ment of Judge Bronaugh in 1883, Cyrus A. Dolph became senior partner of the new firm, 
in which he was connected with Judge C. B. Bellinger, Rufus Mallory and Joseph Simon. 
Subsequently Judge Bellinger was elected to the federal bench and was succeeded in 
the firm by John M. Gearin. This firm sent four members to the United States senate^ 
Joseph N. Dolph, John H. Mitchell, John M. Gearin and Joseph Simon — one to congress 
and one to the federal bench. In personnel, in prestige and achievement it was per- 
haps the most distinguished law firm on the Pacific coast. Mr. Dolph was generally 
recognized as an exceptionally sound business man. His own business achievements 
were by no means slight. He was instrumental in the organization of the Security 
Savings & Trust Company, of which he served as a director, and of various other bank- 
ing institutions. He was likewise attorney for a number of banks, though he sedulously 
avoided public office. Nevertheless he was prominently active in every movement for 
the welfare of the city and state and it was said of him by one who knew him well that 
there was no great public enterprise inaugurated in Oregon during the forty years pre- 
ceding his death with which he was not in one way or another connected. He was 
president of the board of trustees of the Portland Library Association; was regent of 
the University of Oregon; was a member of the Portland water committee, under whose 
Jurisdiction were constructed the great waterworks for the city of Portland, and vice 
president of the board of trustees of Reed College. Incidentally it may be mentioned 



oO HISTORY OF OREGON 

that he was the personal attorney of Mrs. Reed, drafted the will which gave the bulk 
of her estate to Reed College and worked out with her the plans for that institution. 

Mr. Dolph was also interested in a large number of philanthropic enterprises and 
was president of the board of trustees of the Old Peoples Home, to which he devoted 
a great deal of time and to which he rendered much substantial service. He was also 
president of the board of trustees of the First Baptist church and was active and promi- 
nent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in the Masonic fraternity. There 
is a striking unanimity in the estimate of Mr. Dolph's personality, character and attain- 
ments as expressed by the men who were in a position to know him well. Judge Bellinger 
once said of him: "He has in an unusual degree those qualities which distinguish the 
safe lawyer from tlie showy one. Steadfast in his friendship, conservative in his jiidg- 
ment when the conduct of others exposes them to censure, considerate of the feelings 
of his fellows, scrupulously careful of the rights of those with whom he is brought into 
business relations and conscientious in all that he does, he is deservedly held in high 
esteem by all who know him." An identical view is presented in the memorial resolu- 
tion of the Bench and Bar of Oregon: "No lawyer at the bar has received or merited 
in greater degree the confidence of the people and his associates. In his domestic life 
Mr. Dolph exemplified the same gentle qualities that endeared him to all who knew 
him. His death has left vacant a large place at this bar. Cyrus A. Dolph was a good 
man. a sound lawyer, a wise counselor and a faithful friend. As a man his ideals were 
grounded upon the basic teachings of religion and his life conformed to those ideals 
without being spectacular, ascetic, severe or dogmatic. As a lawyer he was quiet, 
serious, careful, exact and safe — well trained in the great fundamental principles which, 
guided by practical knowledge, made him an able adviser and wise counselor. He was 
steady and abiding in his friendships and no one who ever enjoyed that relation with 
him could, if worthy, fail of his support at all times or under any circtimstances. His 
friendships were firm, genuine and lasting." 

Mr. Dolph was married in Portland. Oregon. June 24, 1875, to Elise, daughter of 
Charles Cardinell, of Portland, and they became the parents of four children: Joseph 
Norton, Hazel Mills, William Vanderbilt and John Mather. The death of Mr. Dolph 
occurred in Portland, June 22. 1914, when he w^as in the seventy-fourth year of his 
age. Thus passed one whose worth was uniformly acknowledged by all who knew 
him, one who had used his talents wisely and well, who had met every duty and every 
obligation of life with the consciousness that comes from a right conception of things 
and an habitual regard for what is best in the exercise of human activity. 



ASAHEL BUSH. 



Those forces which have contributed most to tlie development, improvement and 
benefit of the state of Oregon received impetus from the labors of Asahel Bush, who 
passed away at Salem on the 23d of December, 1913. He was distinctively a man of 
affairs and one who wielded a wide influence. In every sphere of life in which he 
acted he left an indelible impress through the attainment of his purpose and in all 
that he undertook he was actuated by high ideals that sought the benefit of his home 
locality or the state at large. He was no ordinary type of man. His strong personality, 
quick and clear perception, energy and persistency of purpose, together with his sound 
judgment, would have placed him in a position of leadership in any walk of life which 
he chose to follow. 

Mr. Bush was a native of the east. He was born in Westfield, Massachusetts. 
June 4, 1824, a son of Asahel and Sally (Nobe) Bush, representatives of old and 
prominent families of that section, who had settled there in the early part of the 
seventeenth century. The father became a man of prominence in his community, 
being frequently called to public offices, and he was widely known and highly respected. 
. The homestead on which the son was born has been in possession of the family, in 
direct line, for a century and a half and is now owned and occupied by one of the name. 

In the pursuit of an education Asahel Bush attended the common school of the 
neighborhood, later entering the village academy, where he remained a student until 
his father's death, which occurred when he was but fifteen years of age. Soon after- 
ward he abandoned his studies and went to Saratoga Springs, New York, where he 
spent about three years in learning and working at the art of printing. He then went 
to Albany, where for a few months he was connected \vith the state printing, also 



HISTORY OF OREGON 51 

receiving considerable insight into political affairs, and from there he proceeded to 
Cleveland, Ohio, remaining in that city for about a year. As a striking contrast to 
the present means of locomotion it may be mentioned that he made the trip from 
Schenectady to Buffalo in a "line boat" of the Erie canal, occupying about a week on 
the voyage. Cleveland was then but a village, and farther up the lakes were Racine 
and Sheboygan, hopeful rivals of Chicago, then an aspiring young town, more noted for 
its adhesive mud than anything else. Prom Cleveland Mr. Bush returned to his native 
village, where he read law and also was engaged in editing the Westfield Standard from 
January 24, 1849, until July 3, 1850, likewise filling the ofRce of town clerk, which he 
resigned on leaving for Oregon in July of that year, going by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama and arriving in Oregon City on the 30th of September. 

Here he became prominent in political affairs, 'being chosen chief clerk of the house 
of representatives, and soon won recognition as a leader among democratic members 
of the legislature. During the session an act was passed creating the office of territorial 
printer, to which he was easily elected by the legislature, and this office he continued 
to hold by successive annual elections until the state was admitted to the Union. At 
the general election in June, 1858, he was elected state printer on the democratic ticket 
and held the office until the general election in 1864, when he was succeeded by Henry 
L. Pittock. 

On the 28th of March, 1851, he commenced the publication of the first distinctively 
democratic paper in Oregon, the Statesman, being associated in the enterprise with the 
democratic congressman from Oregon, Samuel R. Thurston, who aided in financing 
the project and whose interests Mr. Bush subsequently purchased. For the next ten 
years he conducted the paper with marked professional and pecuniary success, during 
which time the government of Oregon was carried on by the Statesman and its friends, 
sometimes called the "Salem Clique." This autocracy was not always as kind and con- 
siderate of the dissatisfied and refractory among its subjects as might have been and 
sometimes administered justice to them untempered with mercy. But it had one supreme 
virtue; it generally kept shams and knaves out of office and never permitted or winked at 
any peculation of public funds. 

During his editorial career Mr. Bush performed a great deal of labor. He started 
with empty pockets, but with willing hands and an active brain. Often he might have 
been seen at the case setting up his saucy, trenchant, sinewy editorials and spicy, 
pungent paragraphs, without copy. Industrious, temperate and economical beyond the 
average of men, he gained on the world from the first issue of the Statesman. But, 
though provident and thrifty in a marked degree, no taint of dishonesty or meanness 
in business ever touched his name. He also maintained a constant correspondence with 
the captains over tens and fifties and more, all over the territory, and by this means, 
in conjunction with the columns of the Statesman, maintaned an almost autocratic 
control over public affairs. 

In the division of the democratic party in the presidential election of 1860, he 
adhered to the Douglas wing and actively supported Stephen A. Douglas for president. 
At the outbreak of the war he supported the Union cause and in 1862 was a member of 
the convention of that year which put a Union state ticket in, the field. In that body 
he successfully opposed the appointment of a state central committee, as looking to a 
permanent organization, which he did not favor. At the succeeding presidential election 
in 1864 he supported McClellan. Though a party man, he was liberal in his views and 
would never cast his ballot in favor of a democratic candidate whom he did not consider 
qualified for office. In 1861 he was a member of the board of visitors at the military 
academy at West Point, his associates on the board being David Davis, afterwards a 
justice of the supreme court and a United States senator, and also James G. Blaine, 
then editor of the Kennebec Journal but not otherwise known to fame. 

In the early '60s Mr. Bush was tor four years a silent partner in the mercantile firm 
of Lucien Heath & Company at Salem and in 1868 he here engaged in banking in 
association with William S. Ladd, subsequently acquiring Mr. Ladd's interest in the 
business, which he continued under the old firm name of Ladd & Bush. He also became 
well known in manufacturing lines, having milling interests at Salem, Oregon City 
and Albina, Oregon. 

In 1878 Mr. Bush accepted the appointment of superintendent of the penitentiary, 
under the belief that the institution was costing the state more than it should, and for 
four years continued to hold that office, accepting no salary for the first two years of 
his service. He managed the institution as conscientiously as though it were his own 
business, without reference to the "good of the party," and the result was that the 



52 IIISTORV OF OREGON 

expenses were reduced from one-fourth to one-half of what they had been in former 
years. At the democratic convention in 1888 he was chosen chairman of the state 
central committee and in this position he antagonized some of the "crumb-picking" 
newspaper people by not subsidizing them tor the campaign. One of these said to him 
seriously, as if the issue of the campaign depended upon it: "Mr. Bush, unless my paper 
is supplied with money I am afraid it will die;" to which he replied: "I think then it 
had better die," and the result was that it did. 

In 1854 Mr. Bush was united in marriage to Miss Eugenia Zieber, a daughter of 
John S. Zieber, a native of Pennsylvania, who came to Oregon In 1851 and was subse- 
quently appointed surveyor general of the territory. Mrs. Bush possessed a very attrac- 
tive and winning personality and was ever a faithful wife and devoted mother. She 
died early in life, in the year 1863, leaving a family of four children, three daughters 
and a son, to whose training and welfare the father was most devoted. His initiative 
spirit and powers of organization brought him into prominent relations and his 
success was due not only to his business talent but also to an unsullied reputation, which 
he regarded as of more worth than all the power which wealth could buy. In every 
relation he was true to high and honorable principles and never faltered in the choice 
between right and wrong, always endeavoring to follow the course sanctioned by con- 
science and good judgment. His work was at all times a source of benefit to the state 
and in his passing Oregon lost one of its honored pioneers and foremost citizens — a 
man who left the impress of his labors upon the northwest and its upbuilding. 

His son, A. N. Bush, is a prominent banker of Salem, conducting the business 
established by his father under the firm style of Ladd & Bush. He married Miss Lulu 
M. Hughes, a daughter of John and Emma Pherne (Pringle) Hughes, honored pioneers 
of this state. Mrs. Hughes was born in St. Charles, Missouri, October 13, 1838, her 
parents being Virgil Kellogg and Pherne Tabitha (Brown) Pringle, the former a native 
of Connecticut and the latter of Vermont. For generations the Pringle family were 
residents of New England and the name was a most prominent and honored one in the 
east. In 1846 Mr. and Mrs. Pringle came to Oregon over the old trail by way of Fort 
Hall and the Applegate cut-off, being the first party to come on the cut-off, casting in 
their lot with the pioneer settlers of Salem. Here Virgil K. Pringle lived until he 
settled on a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres four miles southeast of the 
town, but afterward again took up his residence in Salem, where for many years he was 
prominently identified with business and public life. His wife was a woman of artistic 
tastes, doing notable work in landscape and portrait painting when far advanced in years. 
For forty-five years she was a highly respected resident of the South Salem hills and 
her demise occurred in 1892. 

Her daughter, Mrs. Hughes, came to Salem when eight years of age, residing with 
her parents on the home farm, and during her schooldays she boarded with Father 
Leslie. She would ride into town on horseback, remaining until the end of the week, 
when she would return to the farm. Her education was acquired in the Oregon Institute 
and on the 29th of July, 1857, she was married to John Hughes, who was for many years 
a successful merchant of Salem. They became the parents of seven children, of whom 
four survive. Mrs. Hughes possessed a kindly, sympathetic nature and was widely 
known as the orphans' friend. She reared four orphans, two boys and two girls, and 
practically reared three others. She was devotedly attached to her family and home 
and hers was one of the most attractive and hospitable dwellings in Salem. A devout 
Christian, she was for many years a leader in the First Methodist church of Salem, 
usually entertaining the presiding bishop at her home during the church conference, when 
it met in Salem. She had a most extensive acquaintance throughout Oregon and knew per- 
sonally every governor of the state, including the present governor, Hon. Ben W. Olcott, 
and she was also acquainted with Father McLaughlin. From Salem she removed to 
Portland, where she resided for several years, and with the history of development and 
improvement in the Willamette valley the name of the family has long been associated. 
Mrs. Hughes passed away January 4, 1921, at the advanced age of eighty-two years, 
and was laid to rest beside her husband in the cemetery at Salem, a large gathering 
of friends and old settlers being present to pay tribute to her memory. 

Her grandmother, Mrs. Tabitha (Foftatt) Brown, was one of the noblest women who 
ever came to Oregon. She was a native of Massachusetts and following the death of 
her husband she engaged in teaching school in Maryland and Virginia, subsequently 
removing to Missouri with her family, which consisted of two sons and a daughter. 
In the spring of 1846, when sixty-six years of age, she provided herself with a good ox 
team and what seemed to her a sufficient amount of supplies for the trip and in com- 



HISTORY OP OREGON 53 

pany with her daughter and one son and also her brother-in-law, Captain John Brown, 
started for Oregon. She made a great portion of the trip on horseback. This was a 
most remarkable undertaking for a woman of her years, indicating her intrepid spirit 
and dauntless bravery, and Mrs. Brown gives the following graphic description of her 
journey across the plains: 

"At Fort Hall three or four trains were decoyed off by a rascally fellow who came 
out from the settlement in Oregon, assuring us that he had found a new cut-off and 
that if we would follow him we would be in the settlement long before those who had 
gone down the Columbia. This was in August. We yielded to his advice. Our suffering 
from that time on no tongue can tell. We were carried hundreds of miles south of 
Oregon into Utah and California, fell in with Klamath and Rogue Indians, lost nearly 
all our cattle, and passed the Umpqua canyon, nearly twelve miles through. I rode 
through in three days at the risk of my life, on horseback, having lost my wagon and 
all that I had but the horse that I was on. Our families were the first to start through 
the canyon, so that we got through the mud and rocks so much better than those who 
followed." The canyon referred to by Mrs. Brown was the present famous Cow Creek 
canyon, which within the past few years has been such a source of terror to the section 
hands and train crews of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The canyon was strewn with 
dead cattle, broken wagons, beds, clothing and everything but provisions, of which 
commodity they were nearly all destitute. Winter had set in. To resume Mrs. Brown's 
narrative: "Mr. Pringle and Pherne insisted upon my going ahead with Uncle John to 
try to save our lives. They were obliged to stay behind a few days to recruit their cattle. 
We divided the last bacon, of which I had three slices. I had also a cup full of tea, but 
no bread. We saddled our horses and set off, not knowing whether we should see 
each other again." Mrs. Brown was thus thrown entirely upon her own resources. 
Captain Brown being too old to be of any assistance to her, and by evening they had 
caught up with the wagons that had left camp that morning. The party had had nothing 
to eat and their cattle had given out. The following morning Mrs. Brown divided her 
food with them and started out to overtake the three wagons ahead. They saw but two 
Indians in the distance. Captain Brown became dizzy and later delirious and fell from 
his horse, and with great difficulty they proceeded until night overtook them and the 
rain. Dismounting from her horse, which had never been ridden by a woman before and 
which she experienced considerable difficulty in managing, Mrs. Brown made a lean-to 
from her old wagon sheet, which she had used under her saddle, and assisted Captain 
Brown to reach this improvised camp, covering him as best she could and fearing that he 
would pass away before dawn. As soon as daylight appeared she saddled the horses, 
assisting the old captain to his feet, and Just when they were about to renew their 
journey a man from the wagons ahead came up, saying that he had been in search of 
venison and that the wagons were but a half mile beyond. This small party traveled 
on and at the foot of the Calapooya mountains the children and grandchildren of Mrs. 
Brown joined them. They were many days in crossing the snow-covered mountains, 
not being able to advance more than a mile or two each day. By this time their supply 
of venison had become practically exhausted and Mr. Pringle set out on horseback for 
the nearest settlement. Mrs. Brown relates: "Through all my suffering on the plains, 
I not once sought relief by the shedding of tears, nor thought we would not live to 
reach the settlements." 

On Christmas Day, at two o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Brown entered the house of 
the Methodist minister in Salem, "the first house," she relates, "I had set my feet in 
in nine months. For two or three weeks of my journey down the Willamette I had 
felt something in my glove finger which I supposed to be a button." This she found 
was a six-cent piece and a quarter, her entire cash capital, with which she purchased 
two needles, and traded off some old clothing to the squaws for buckskin, which she 
worked into gloves for the ladies and gentlemen of Oregon, realizing about thirty dollars 
from the sale of her handiwork. At a later period she accepted an invitation from Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark to spend the winter with them on the Tualatin plains, which is now the 
site of the city of Forest Grove. On arrivng there she saw the necessity of some sort of 
school and at once proposed to use the log "meeting house" for such purposes, offering 
her services as teacher without special compensation other than her expenses, which 
were met by the patrons of the school, those who were financially able to do so paying 
one dollar per week, which included board, tuition, washing, etc. Mrs. Brown agreed 
to teach this school for a year free of charge, securing as her assistant a well educated 
lady who was the wife of a missionary. The neighbors had collected broken knives and 
forks, tin pans and dishes which they could spare to equip this pioneer boarding school 



.VI lllSTOKV (»K OUI'dON 

nml in Mnrch, 1848, the school wns opened. In the following summer the number o( 
pupils hiid Increased to thirty, ranging In age from tour to twenty-one years, and a 
lionrding house whs erected for the pupils, who did all the work but the washing. Mrs. 
Urown thus became the founder of what was later developed into one of the leading 
schools of Oregon, the racillc University of F'orest Grove, and her work along educational 
lines was of Inestimable value to the state. She passed away in the late "SOs at the age 
of eighty years, one of the most widely known and well beloved women the state has 
ever known. Hers was a noble, self-saeriflcing life, devoted to the service of others, 
and her name is deeply engraved upon the pages of Oregon's history as one whose 
labors were of untold value in promoting the educational and moral upbuilding of the 
state. She was truly cast In heroic mold— a worthy type of that noble band of pioneer 
men and women of Oregon to whom the present generation owes a debt of gratitude 
which can never be fully repaid. It will thus be seen that Mrs. Bush is a representative 
of one of the oldest and most honored pioneer families of the state and she has every 
reason to feel proud of her ancestry, displaying in her own life the many admirable 
(luallties of her forbears. She is actively and helpfully interested in all that pertains 
to public progress and development and is held In the highest esteem by a wide circle 
of friends. Mrs. Hush has in her possession the marriage banns of her great-great-grand- 
mother, which were published at Brimfleld, Massachusetts. November SO. 1799, an 
heirloom to which she attaches great value. 



THKOnOUK HfKNEY WllA'OX. 

The history of Theodore Uurney Wilcox, now deceased, is the story of earnest 
endeavor, guided by sound judgment and crowned by successful achievement. It is 
a trite saying that there is always room at the top, but to comparatively few does 
this condition seem to act as a stimulus tor business effort. In the case of Mr. Wilcox, 
however, he realized that progress and sncoeps lay before him if he was willing to 
pay the price of earnest. self-<ienylng effort. Throughout his entire career he fully 
utUiKed his opportunities and each day in his active life marked off a fuU-faithed 
attempt to know more and to grow more, so that in the course of years he reached 
a point of leadership as the principal stockholder of the Portland Flouring Mills 
Company, the owners of the largest flour milling enterprise on the Pacific coast. 

Mr. Wilcox was born at Agiiwam. Massachusetts, a little New England village, 
on the Sth of July. 1S56. and was a direct descendant of David Wilcox, who was the 
village physician of Hebron. Connecticut, and who had come from Wales in 1635, his 
brother having been one of the original settlers of Hartford. Connecticut. The an- 
cestral line was traced down to Henry S. Wilcox, who was also born in Massachusetts, 
and who there married Surah Burney. a daughter of Thomas Buriiey. who came to the 
I'nited States from the north of England about 1S20 and settled in Webster. Massa- 
chusetts. The death of Henry S. Wilcox occurred in the Old Bay state in 190S. when 
he was eighty-seven yeai-s of age. while his wife departed this lite in 1901 at the 
age of seventy-five. They were the parents of a son and two daughters and through 
the periixl of his boyhood and youth this son, Theodore B. Wilcox, remained under 
the p!»rental rcnit. attending the public schools to the age of sixteen years. 

Starling out in the business world he was first employed in the Hampden National 
Bank at Westfield. Massachusetts, and that he proved both capable and loyal is indi- 
cated in the tact that in 1S77. when Asahel Bush of the Bank of Liidd & Bush of 
Salem. Oregon, and also a native of Massjichusetts. found him in the Hampden Bank 
at Westfield he offered him a position in the Ladd & Tilton Bank of Portland. The 
offer was accepted and thus the young man became identified with the Rose City. He 
wntinued to act as teller in the Ladd & Tilton Bank until 1SS4. when he became con- 
fidential man to W. S. Ladd. ix-cupying that position until 1S93 and remaining as 
confidential adviser to Mr. Uidd's sons until the end of 1S94. He then terminated 
his connection with the bank that he might give his undivided attention to the develop- 
ment of his flour manufacturing interests. Ten years before, or in 1SS4, he had 
organiieil the Portland Flouring Mills Company, taking over several properties then 
largely in bankruptcy. These different enterprises he combined and reorganized, 
putting them upon a paying basis. The stock of the company was held by Mr. Wilcox 
and the lj>dd estate, the former becoming general manager, with W. S. Ladd as 
president of the company. Ipon the death of the latter in January. 1S9S. Mr. Wilcox 




THEODORE B. WILCOX 



HISTORY OF OREGOX 57 

was elected to the presidency and for many years thereafter concentrated his efforts 
and attention upon the further development and enlargement of the business until he 
made it the foremost enterprise of its kind in the northwest. Ere his death a biog- 
rapher wrote of him concerning his business career: "Coming of a family that for 
generations has been connected with manufacturing interests, he has always been a 
believer in the efficacy of manufacturing enterprises as a potent factor in the develop- 
ment of a community and with this principle in mind two aims have been predominant 
in his work: to make the Portland Flouring Mills one of the largest and best institu- 
tions of the kind in the world; to promote the upbuilding of the northwest through 
the benefits that must accrue by the development and conduct of a large and success- 
ful enterprise. From insigniflcent proportions the business has steadily grown until 
it is today the most extensive of the kind on the. Pacific coast, with a daily output 
of over ten thousand barrels. Oregon flour bearing the name of Portland has been 
carried to all parts of the world, from the Amur river to the Cape of Good Hope, 
and from Alaska to Cape Horn, to all the Pacific islands and to various European 
ports. Through this development of the flour trade and the introduction of the output 
into all parts of the world and through the opening of new markets into which other 
millers have also sent their products, the interests of the farmers of the northwest 
have been greatly enhanced, their products commanding better prices, whereby the 
general prosperity has been greatly promoted. At a banquet given in Portland In 
honor of J. J. Hill, some time before his death, Mr. Hill, the railway magnate, said: 
'Mr. Wilcox has done more than any other man in Portland through the fame of the 
institution of which he is the head to develop the commerce of the Columbia river 
and gain recognition for the northwest throughout the world." Having spent his early 
life in the banking business Mr. Wilcox has always continued in more or less close 
connection with financial affairs and is interested in several of the leading banking 
institutions of the northwest, together with various other enterprises of Portland 
and the state. His success finds its root In his power as an organizer and his ability 
to unite varied and ofttimes seemingly diverse interests into a unified and harmon- 
ious whole. His initiative spirit has prompted him to continue beyond the paths 
that others have marked out into new fields where his intelligently directed efforts 
and appreciation of opportunity have resulted in successful achievement." 

Not alone did Mr. Wilcox confine his attention to the manufacture of flour. He 
became extensively interested in Portland realty and was the owner of a number of 
the splendid business houses of the city. He was also a stockholder and director of 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, a stockholder in the United States National 
Bank and a stockholder and director of the Ladd & Tilton Bank. His sound Judgment 
and his cooperation were eagerly sought by business men who recognized their worth 
and always profited by his opinion. Whatever he undertook constituted an element 
in public progress as well as individual success. He was keenly interested in the 
development of the Columbia river for commercial purposes and realizing the im- 
portance of making Portland an ocean port Mr. Wilcox urged and solicited a govern- 
ment appropriation for removing the bar at the mouth of the Columbia river, thus 
allowing the largest ocean going vessels to reach the Portland docks and for several 
years he was the president of the Port of Portland Commission. For many years he 
did most earnest and effective work as a member of the Portland Commercial Club 
in advancing the interests of the city, extending its trade relations and maintaining 
high civic standards. For six years he served as chairman of the executive committee 
of the organization. He also was prominent in organizing the Oregon Development 
League, acting as president for several years, the aim of which was the encourage- 
ment of the different communities throughout the state to advertise their own sections. 
This movement resulted in the formation of more than a hundred different organiza- 
tions, all working along the same lines. 

Mr. Wilcox was twice married. A son of hfs first marriage survives — Raymond B., 
whose mother passed away many years ago. On the 18th of June, 1890, Mr. Wilcox 
was married to Miss Nellie Josephine Stevens, a daughter of William and Laura (Pease) 
Stevens, of Massachusetts. Mrs. Wilcox was a teacher in her early days and is a 
lady of refined and beautiful character. By her marriage she became the mother of 
two children: Theodore Burney, a graduate of Yale, who is now in the Ladd & Tilton 
Bank; and Claire, who is the wife of Cameron Squires, also connected with the same 
bank. 

While Mr. Wilcox became a recognized leader in business circles in the northwest 
and in support of many plans and projects for the public welfare he never sought nor 



58 HISTORY OF OREGON 

desired political office, yet he was frequently solicited to become a candidate for gov- 
ernor and United States senator. While he declined to accept public office his aid 
and cooperation could at all times be counted upon to further any legitimate public 
interest having to do with the welfare and advancement of community, commonwealth 
or country. In 1909, when a thoroughly reliable and influential man was needed In 
the Portland water board — a man upon whom would largely devolve the responsibility 
of investing the three million dollar funds appropriated for doubling the water supply, 
he was urged to accept that trust and did so. He was one of the executive committee 
of the Lewis & Clark Exposition and his keen business discernment constituted an 
important factor in its success. The nature and magnitude of his work in public and 
private connections constituted a factor of Portland's promotion, power and prominence 
and he was justly classed with the foremost citizens of the northwest. He passed 
away on the 31st of March, 1918, at the age of sixty-two years, but ere the close of his 
career he had rendered signal service to his country in connection with the conditions 
arising out of the World war. He was chosen milling commissioner immediately after 
the passage of the food bill by congress in the fall of 1917 and the organization of 
the federal grain corporation. One who knew him well in writing of him said with 
reference to this appointment: "The appointment was in direct recognition of his 
unquestioned ability and sound knowledge of grain and milling conditions through- 
out the northwest. With a genius tor organization, his milling industry became a 
smoothly coordinated business of vast proportions, sending its output to the ports 
of all the world. Oregon flour became known wherever bread is baked and the natural 
stimulus to grain growing in this state and others of the Pacific coast region created 
a new and undreamed of prosperity. Mr. Wilcox was always active in the affairs of 
the Portland Chamber of Commerce, serving a term as president and retaining a 
place on the board of directors until his death. He was a life member of the Multnomah 
Amateur Athletic Club and also belonged to the Arlington Club and the Waverly Club. 
He had no fraternal affiliations. In spiritual affairs he was a communicant of the 
First Presbyterian church. Theodore Burney Wilcox was a master builder — a man of 
magnificent vision — never a dreamer. He was a practical man but one who keenly 
understood the power of the ideal. He had a rare grasp of the perspective and in 
the furthering of an accepted plan, which was always thoroughly thought out, he 
was like the driving wheel of an engine in his execution. He had the courage of his 
convictions and though in his keen business sense he was as strong as steel, there 
was an essential softness in his soul that but few were privileged to know. He was 
an inspiration and counselor to many young men starting out in life and was always 
ready with his energy and other means to assist in any worthy cause. At a time of 
life when he wished to conserve his energies and enjoy the fruits of his many years 
of labor and success in partial retirement on a newly developed farm, the call to duty 
in the great war threw him more closely than ever into the harness of affairs and 
as chairman of the federal milling division of the Pacific northwest he closed his 
career. In the pursuit of this work it was necessary to make frequent trips across the 
continent and on the 6th of March, though ill at the time, in response to a sense of 
duty, he insisted upon taking what proved to be his final trip, as he was stricken on 
the train. During his last days at home the beauties of his soul were laid bare to 
those near him to an extent that they had never recognized before." The story of 
his life is cherished by all who knew him and his memory enshrined in the hearts of 
those who came within the close circle of his friendship. 



LEWIS W. KINZER. 



Lewis W. Kinzer was for over four decades one of the progressive and enterprising 
agriculturists of Linn county but since 1916 has lived retired, leaving the active operation 
of the farm to the capable management of his son, John W. Kinzer. Although he has 
passed the seventy-first milestone on life's journey, he is remarkably well preserved and 
appears to be a man of fifty. Mr. Kinzer was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, in 
June. 1849. his parents being Lewis and Louisa M. (Wolf) Kinzer. the former a native 
of Ohio, while the latter was also born in Des Moines county. Iowa. The father removed 
to Iowa at an early period in the development of that state and for a short time resided in 
Des Moines county. He had previously been a resident of California, whither he had gone 
in quest of gold, but not meeting with success in his venture he returned to the interior 



HISTORY OF OKEGOX 59 

of the country and for a time made his home in Iowa. Once more he started for the 
west and with ox teams crossed the plains to Oregon, settling in Linn county, where 
he purchased land near the present site of the town of Crabtree, becoming the owner 
of three hundred and twenty acres. This he improved and developed and was active 
in its management throughout the remainder of his life. He died about 1S70 at the 
comparatively early age of forty-nine years, while the mother, surviving him for a 
quarter of a century passed away about 1895, when sixty-seven years of age. 

Lewis W. Kinzer has passed practically his entire life within the borders of this 
state, for he was but a year and a half old when brought by his parents to Oregon. 
He pursued his education in the district schools and remained at home until he at- 
tained his majority, when he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of the old home 
farm, devoting his energies to its further development and improvement for many 
years. His well directed labors and progressive methods were rewarded by a sub- 
stantial measure of success and he became the owner of a most valuable property, 
continuing active in its conduct until 1916, when he suffered a paralytic stroke, since 
which time his son, John W. Kinzer, has capably directed the work of the farm. 

On the 6th of June, 1875, Mr. Kinzer was united in marriage to Miss M. Ellen 
Arnold, who was born near Brownsville, Oregon, April 2, 1857, and is a daughter of 
Isaac and Priscilla (Hannah) Arnold, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 
of Iowa. The father followed farming in the Hawkeye state until 1852, when he 
started for Oregon, becoming one of its early pioneers. Settling in Linn county, he took 
up land two miles from the present site of the town of Brownsville and this he 
cleared and developed for five years, when he sold that ranch and purchased land 
four miles east of Scio. This he continued to cultivate throughout the remainder of 
his life, passing away May 3, 1883, when seventy-three years of age. The mother 
survived him tor seven years, her death occurring May 12, 1890, when she had at- 
tained the age of sixty-seven years. To Mr. and Mrs. Kinzer were born three chil- 
dren: John Wesley, the eldest, is now operating the home farm, upon which he 
resides. He married Rose Belyeu and they have two children, Lyle K. and Reta D.; 
Letha E. married Benjamin Franklin Carman and they reside at Eugene, Oregon; 
Lizzie E. became the wife of W. 0. Wimmer and passed away in November, 1918, 
a victim of the influenza epidemic. 

In his political views Mr. Kinzer Is a republican and his wife is a member of the 
Baptist church. He is not affiliated with any fraternal organizations but through his 
membership in the Grange he has ever kept in touch with the most advanced and 
scientific methods of farming. His present success is the result of his former years 
of indefatigable effort, enterprise and thrift and in the section where his lite has been 
passed he is widely known and universally honored. 



PRINCE LUCIAN CAMPBELL. 

Prince Lucian Campbell, president of the University of Oregon since 1902, was 
born in Newmarket, Missouri, October 6, 1861, his parents being Thomas Franklin 
and Jane Eliza Campbell. The father, too, was a well known educator who was 
president of the Christian College at Monmouth, Oregon, from 1869 until 1882. 

Dr. Campbell of this review won his Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation 
from Christian College in 1879. He afterward became a Harvard student and the 
university at Cambridge conferred upon him the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1886. 
From Pacific University he received the LL.D. degree, as he did also from the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. He entered the teaching profession in 1879 in connection with 
Christian College, where he remained for three years or until 1882. In 1890 he was 
called to the presidency of the Oregon State Normal School and there remained for 
twelve years or until 1902, when he was elected to the presidency of the University 
of Oregon and has continued at the head of the institution, covering a period of nine- 
teen years. It would be tautological in this connection to enter into any series of 
statements showing him to be a man of broad scholarly attainment and one of the 
eminent educators of the northwest, for this has been shadowed forth between the 
lines of this review. Those who know aught of his professional career recognize the 
high standards that he has always maintained and the advanced ideals which he has 
ever followed. 

Aside from his professional activities Dr. Campbell was president of the Polk 



60 HISTORY OF OREGON 

County Bank from 1892 until 1905, since which time he has concentrated his attention 
upon the profession which he chose as a life work. He is a representative of the 
National Association of State Universities on the American Council on Education. 
His religious faith is that of the Christian church. 



WILLIAM WICK COTTON. 



The great part which William Wick Cotton took in the industrial and commercial 
development of the northwest is reflected to a considerable extent and is available in 
permanent and tangible form in the record and in the history of the great transporta- 
tion company — the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company of which he was so import- 
ant a factor for nearly thirty years. Throughout this period he was the secretary and 
attorney for the company, the success of which is attributable in large measure to his 
sound judgment and progressive methods. Withall he was a man of kindly deeds who 
recognized and met the duties and obligations of life not merely from a sense of duty, 
however, but because of his deep interest in his fellowmen, based upon broad humani- 
tarian principles. 

While Mr. Cotton was born in the great empire of the west this side of the 
Mississippi, much of his early life was spent on the Atlantic seaboard. He first opened 
his eyes to the light of day at Lyons, Iowa, December 13, 1859, his parents being Aylett 
R. and Laura (Wick) Cotton, the former a descendant of John Cotton who came from 
Barnston, England, to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1633. Aylett R. Cotton was a lawyer 
and judge in Iowa. William Wick Cotton's early educational training was received 
from his mother and he was then sent to the east, where he entered the Pennsylvania 
State Norma! School at Millersville, from which he was in due time graduated and 
then taught for a time in the same institution. He afterward became a law student of 
Columbia University of New York and there completed his course in 1882, during which 
he read law in the offices of John F. Dillon, chief counsel of the Union Pacific Railroad. 
He was admitted to the bar of New York state and there began his practice. He 
displayed special aptitude in his studies and after several years of practical applica- 
tion of the lessons which he had learned under some of the greatest instructors of the 
country, he became in 1SS7 assistant to the general solicitor of the Union Pacific Rail- 
way Company at Omaha, Nebraska. 

The year 1SS9 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Cotton in Portland, at which time he 
was made general attorney for the Pacific division of the Union Pacific Railway Com- 
pany and when the line passed into the control of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation 
Company he became connected with the latter organization. He was widely recognized 
on the Pacific coast as a brilliant lawyer and in 1901 was appointed as an associate of 
Judge C. B. Bellinger of the United States district court, to prepare a new edition of 
the laws and codes of Oregon and with marked ability discharged the duties of that 
appointment. His chief life work, however, was in connection with the Oregon Rail- 
road & Navigation Company of which he was made attorney and secretary. In 1915 he 
was named to direct valuation of the Union Pacific and its affiliated lines. In these 
connections he bent his powers to constructive effort and administrative direction, 
while his comprehensive knowledge of the law enabled him to pass upon every in- 
volved and intricate legal point. In 1905 he was appointed by President Roosevelt 
United States district judge for the district of Oregon which he accepted but later 
resigned. 

On the 29th of August, 1888, Mr. Cotton was married to Miss Fannie R. Colling- 
wood, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and for nearly thirty years they traveled life's 
journey most happily together, being separated by the hand of death on the 13th of 
March, 191S. 

Mr. Cotton was a well known clubman of Portland, belonging to the Arlington, 
Commercial, University and Waverly Golf Clubs. His political endorsement was given 
to the republican party, yet he was never active in politics as an office seeker. He pre- 
ferred that Ills service to mankind should be of a different character and it is said 
of him that lie was instrumental in aiding many young men now prominent members 
of the Oregon bar in making their first step across the legal threshold. His assistance 
was most quietly and unostentatiously given but proved him the friend indeed. His own 
boyhood had largely been a period of strife against obstacles and difficulties and he 
realized just what timely assistance would mean to others. Through his own inherent 




WILLIAM W. COTTON 



HISTORY OF OREGON 63 

force of character and developing powers he had risen to a place preeminent among 
the attorneys of the northwest and was one of the most widely quoted and consulted 
legal figures of the railway world. 

Mr. Cotton largely turned to agricultural interests for recreation and relaxation. 
He became the owner and operator of three farms in the vicinity of Portland, one of 
these being at Gresham, where he maintained his country home, one at Newberg and 
one on Bachelder's island, in the Columbia river. He was especially interested in 
dairying and took a leading part in organizing the Oregon Dairymen's League, acting 
as directing adviser. He indeed made valuable contribution to the advancement and 
progress of the northwest and the record which he left is both tangible and prominent. 
His life was fraught with good deeds, with considerate actions toward others and by 
charity quietly bestowed. During the European war he was made the head' of the 
railway valuation committee in Portland and he stood for all those forces which con- 
tributed to the successful prosecution of the war. Wherever William Wick Cotton was 
known he is spoken of in terms of the highest regard. His life in every respect measured 
up to advanced standards and the world is better for his having lived. At the time 
of his demise he was the president of the Boy Scouts of Portland. 



GEORGE E. MARTIN. 



George E. Martin, manager of the Telephone Register, a weekly paper issued at 
McMinnville, was born in New Boston, Wayne county, Michigan, December 19, 1877, 
a son of Amos and Jane (Rosencrans) Martin, natives of Massachusetts. In an early 
day the father went to Michigan and there followed farming until 1891, when he 
came to the west, settling in Clackamas county, Oregon, where he purchased a small 
tract of land, and this he continued to cultivate until his death, which occurred in 
October, 1911, while the mother passed away in June, 1914. 

George E. Martin was reared in Wayne county, Michigan, where he attended the 
public schools, and his high school course was pursued at Oswego, Oregon. After 
completing his education he learned the printer's trade, which he followed in Hillsboro, 
Oregon, for three years. He arrived in McMinnville in 1900 and here found employ- 
ment with the Telephone Register, of which he became proprietor at the end of two 
years, continuing to operate the plant for a period of seven years, when he sold 
the enterprise. He still continued with the paper, however, in the capacity of manager 
and in February, 1921, repurchased the plant, which he has since operated. He has 
added many improvements in the way of machinery and presses and now has one 
of the most modern and best equipped newspaper plants in the state. The Telephone 
Register is a weekly of high standing, filled with good reading matter and enjoying 
a large circulation. Mr. Martin is conducting his publication as an independent re- 
publican paper and has made it the champion of every measure and movement 
calculated to upbuild the town and promote the growth of the surrounding district. 

On the 31st of December, 1900, Mr. Martin was united in marriage to Miss Nena 
Nicklin, and they have become the parents of two children, G. Alphadine anJ E. Dale, 
both of whom are attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Martin is an independent republican, and fraternally 
he is identified with the Knights of Pythias. He takes an intelligent interest in 
public affairs, and his work as a progressive newspaper man contributes to the 
development of the district in which he is located. He is one of the enterprising and 
public-spirited citizens of Yamhill county, widely known and highly respected. 



ALLEN E. FROST. 



Allen E. Frost, owner and publisher of the Benton County Courier, issued at 
Corvallis, was born in Athens county, Ohio, October 27, 1872. a son of David G. and 
Ruth A. (Stout) Frost, also natives of Ohio. The father followed farming and car- 
pentering in the Buckeye state. In 1891 he came west to Oregon, taking up his abode 
in Oregon City, where he continued to follow his trade throughout his remaining 
years. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting as a member of Com- 
pany B, One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, with which he served for three 



04 HISTORY OF OREGON 

years, participating in many hard-fought battles and enduring hardships and priva- 
tions in order that the Union might be preserved. He passed away in 1902 at the 
age of seventy-two years, and the mother's demise occurred in 1905, when she had 
also attained the age of seventy-two. 

Allen E. Frost attended school in Ohio and Kansas, his parents having resided 
for two years in the Sunflower state. On completing his studies he began learning 
the printer's trade, finishing his apprenticeship at Oregon City, Oregon, whither 
he had removed with his parents in 1891. He followed his trade in the employ of 
others until 1911, when he started in business on his own account, purchasing an 
interest in a paper at Oregon City, with which he was connected until the 15th of 
March, 1915, when he disposed of his interest in that publication and removed to Cor- 
vallis, purchasing the Benton County Republican. This he is now conducting under 
the name of the Benton County Courier and has greatly improved the plant, installing 
two linotype machines and all the latest presses, his equipment being modern in every 
particular. He has made the Courier a readable and attractive journal, devoted to the 
welfare of the district. Its news is always accurate and reliable and it has there- 
fore become popular with the general public, having an extensive circulation. 

On the 5th of June, 1901, Mr. Frost was united in marriage to Miss Alice G. 
Andrews, and they have become the parents of two children, namely: Melville Eugene, 
who was born February 24, 1903; and Dorothy Loretta, born September 9, 1908. 

In his political views Mr. Frost is a democrat, and fraternally he is identified 
with the Woodmen of the World, while Mrs. Frost belongs to the Women of Woodcraft. 
In religious faith he is a Presbyterian and he is much interested in the work of the 
church, serving as one of its elders. He is publishing the Courier in accordance 
with the most progressive ideas of modern journalism, and in his editorial capacity 
he is contributing in substantial measure to the development of the district in which 
he is located, standing at all times for improvement in everything relating to the 
upbuilding and advancement of the county along intellectual, political, material and 
moral lines. He is accounted one of the progressive men of his community and is 
highly esteemed by all who know him. 



WILLARD L. MARKS. 



Willard L. Marks, attorney at law and member of the well known law firm of 
Hill & Marks, with offices in the Cusick Bank building at Albany, was born near 
Lebanon, in Linn county, Oregon, June 25, 1883, a son of James M. and Mary P. 
(Blain) Marks, natives of Indiana. The father crossed the plains to Oregon in com- 
pany with his parents in 1852 and took up a donation land claim near Lebanon. 
The mother came to this state with her parents in 1848, being at that time but four 
years of age. Her father was a minister of the Presbyterian church and later 
became one of the founders of the United Presbyterian church. Upon coming to this 
state he first located in Oregon City, where he became editor of the Oregon Spectator, 
which was the first newspaper published west of the Rocky Mountains. Not long 
afterward he removed to Linn county and established a church and school at Union 
Point, in the vicinity of Brownsville. He died at Albany many years ago. James 
M. Marks, the father of Mr. Marks of this review, traded the donation land claim 
near Lebanon, which he had acquired on first coming to this state, for other land in 
that vicinity and this farm he operated for many years. He was one of the leaders 
in religious and educational affairs in his community and became one of the founders 
of the First Presbyterian church at Lebanon. He at length removed to Albany, where 
he resided for some time, and subsequently went to California, where he passed away 
in 1914, when nearly eighty years of age. The mother, however, survives and is now 
residing in Napa, California. 

Willard L. Marks was reared and educated in Linn county. Oregon. He attended 
the public schools at Lebanon and at Albany and later entered Albany College, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1904. While a student there he not only 
won scholastic honors and was a member of the college debating team but was 
prominent as an athlete and was a member of the track team which won the state 
championship in 1903. He also served as president of the old Collegiate Athletic 
League of Oregon. He met most of the expenses of his academic education by doing 
newspaper work and in addition to doing his school work served as city editor of the 



HISTORY OF OREGON 65 

Albany Daily Herald during most of his senior year in college. After completing 
his college course he engaged in newspaper work and was for a year a reporter on the 
Portland Telegram. In 1906 he became chief deputy county clerk of Linn county and 
four years later was elected county clerk, being the first candidate for public office 
in Linn county ever nominated on both the republican and democratic tickets. He 
rendered such good service in that office that he was reelected without opposition in 
1912. 

Shortly after his graduation from college Mr. Marks began the study of law in 
connection with his other work and while serving as county clerk was admitted to the 
bar. On the 1st day of January, 1915, he retired from the clerk's office to take up 
the practice of law, and on that date formed a partnership with Gale S. Hill and 
since then has been associated with the law firm of Hill & Marks at Albany. Upon tak- 
ing up the practice of law he was appointed deputy district attorney for Linn county 
and filled that position for six years. 

On the 16th of April, 1907, occurred the marriage of Willard L. Marks and Miss 
Beryl Turner, a daughter of John and Fluella M. (Fisher) Turner, the former a native 
of Illinois and the latter of Missouri. The father was a railroad agent in this 
state for several years and followed that line of work throughout his entire life. 
He passed away in 1903 but the mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Marks have two 
children, a son, Robert Leighton Marks, who was born August 4, 1914, and a daughter, 
Marian Elizabeth Marks, born February 17, 1921. 

In politics Mr. Marks is a republican and he has been an active worker for the 
party. He served some time as secretary of the republican central committee of Linn 
county and has represented the county as a member of the state central committee sev- 
eral years. He was a member of the executive committee of the party in Oregon dur- 
ing the presidential campaigns of 1916 and 1920. He has had different opportunities 
to fill public office but prefers to devote his attention to the conduct of his extensive 
law business. Mr. Marks is prominent in fraternal circles. He has filled various 
offices in the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias and served as grand chancellor 
of Oregon in 1915 and 1916. He is also a member of different bodies of the Masonic 
order and other organizations. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Marks is deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished in life, for 
he worked his way through college and through the exercise of determination, energy 
and n'^tive ability has advanced steadily in his profession until he now ranks with the 
leading attorneys of his section of the state. 



C. B. O'NEILL. 

C. B. O'Neill, a leading optician of Salem whose establishment is located in the 
Bush Bank building, is well qualified for his professional work through comprehen- 
sive training and broad experience and he has built up a large patronage. A native of 
North Dakota, he was born in Minnewaukan, March 30, 1891, and is a son of William 
and Carrie L. (Burdick) O'Neill, the former was born in New Jersey and the latter 
in "Winona, Minnesota. The father became a pioneer of Canada and of North Dakota 
and he and his wife are now residing in California. 

For two years C. B. O'Neill was a high school student in North Dakota, complet- 
ing his course in Portland, Oregon. Subsequently he attended McCormick College 
of Chicago, where he pursued a course in ophthalmology and was graduated in 1911. 
He then secured a position as traveling salesman with the firm of Woodard, Clarke 
& Company, wholesale druggists of Portland, whom he represented on the road for one 
and a half years. On the expiration of that period he came to Salem, where he became 
identified with the Barr Jewelry Company, with whom he remained tor one and a 
half years, when he established himself in business independently, opening a store 
at Nos. 5 and 6 in the Bush Bank building in Salem. Here he has since been located 
handling a complete line of optical goods and other merchandise, attractively dis- 
played, and his enterprising methods, reasonable prices and courteous treatment of 
customers have won for him a large and gratifying patronage. He is thoroughly 
familiar with the scientific principles which underlie his profession and through 
wide reading and study he keeps abreast with the progress that is being made 
along ophthalmological lines, being recognized as an expert optician. Although he 



66 HISTOKY OF OREGON 

entered business with a small capital he was confident that his professional ability 
would soon become recognized by the residents of the Willamette valley and his faith 
has been amply justified, for his business has enjoyed a continuous growth. 

On the 30th of June, 1915, Mr. O'Neill was united in marriage to Miss Edna May 
Faulkner, a native of Washington, and they reside in a fine home in Salem, of which 
Mr. O'Neill is the owner. During the progress of the war with Germany he enlisted 
in the medical department of the navy, going first to the navy yards at Bremerton, 
Washington, whence he was sent to Charleston, South Carolina. He was then trans- 
ferred to the marines and sent to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, remaining in 
the service for ten months. Actuated by determination, enterprise and laudable 
ambition, his career has been one of continuous progress and he ranks with the 
leading opticians of this section of the state. He is interested in everything that 
pertains to public progress and improvement and is accounted one of the valued citizens 
of Salem, his substantial traits of character winning for him the esteem and regard of 
a large circle of friends. 



CICERO M. IDLEMAN. 



Cicero M. Idleman, attorney at law of Portland, was born August 18, 1854, in Marion, 
Ohio, the city which has so recently been in the limelight as the place of residence 
of the newly elected president of the United States. Marion was also the home of Silas 
Idleman, the father of Cicero M. Idleman, who was the first child born in that county, 
his natal day being February 10, 1822. He was married in Marion in 1844 to Catharine 
Pontius, also a native of Marion. The father departed this life in July, 1903, having 
for about five years survived his wife, who died in 1898. 

Cicero M. Idleman was reared in Marion and there acquired a primary education, 
while later he spent two years as a student in the Smithville (Ohio) Academy. He 
next entered the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, but left that institution 
in his junior year to take a position under the government in the railway mail serv- 
ice. He thus acted for two years and utilized his leisure time in reading law, so that 
he qualified for the bar and in 1883 was admitted to practice in the courts of Ohio. 
His removal to the west occurred in the year 1884 and in June of that year he became 
a junior partner in the law firm of Johnson, McCown & Idleman, a relation that was 
maintained until 1894, when Mr. Idleman became a member of the firm of Carey, Idle- 
man, Mays & Webster. That relation continued until Mr. Idleman was elected attorney 
general of Oregon in 1896, assuming the duties of the office in the month of January. 
He filled the position through the four-year term, making a most creditable record, 
endorsed by his professional brethren and by public opinion as well. At the close of 
his term he resumed law practice and has since given his attention to his profession 
without entering upon partnership relations. He is a man of pronounced ability in his 
chosen calling, having comprehensive understanding of the principles of jurisprudence, 
displaying great thoroughness and decision in the preparation of his cases and great 
clearness, earnestness and force in the presentation of his cause before the courts. His 
assertions in court are seldom seriously questioned and the many verdicts which he 
has won, favorable to the interests of his clients, attest his power as a lawyer. 

On the 3d of April, 1907, Mr. Idleman was married to Miss Margaret E. Denning, 
a daughter of the late Job Denning, who was a native of Indiana. Their marriage was 
celebrated in Portland, where Mr. and Mrs. Idleman have gained many friends. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the 
Knights of Pythias. He belongs also to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
the Royal Arcanum. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the State Chamber 
of Commerce, the Press Club, and the Progressive Business Men's Club— associations 
which indicate much of the nature of his interests and his principles. He served on 
the legal advisory board during the World war and also on the questionnaire board 
and in fact did every possible service for the government. In politics he has always 
been a republican, but has never sought nor desired office, save that he served through 
the one term as attorney general of the state, as previously indicated. He was one of 
three who in 1891 organized the Portland Chamber of Commerce and was one of the 
committee of fifteen who erected the Chamber of Commerce building. He has labored 
untiringly for local progress and benefit through these connections and has worked 
unremittingly through political channels for the upbuilding of the commonwealth and 




CICERO M. IDLEMAN 



HISTORY OF OREGON 69 

country. He was chairman of the Republican County Central Committee of Multnomah 
county in 1908 and for twenty years was president of the Multipor Republican Club of 
Portland. He was and is a friend of Warren G. Harding and took an active part in 
promoting the cause of his one-time fellow townsman through the republican campaign 
of 1920. His entire career has been marked by a progressiveness and a steadfastness of 
purpose that never stops short of the attainment of his objective. 



JOHN W. ORR. 



Law enforcement rests in safe hands with John W. Orr, who is strict, fearless 
and prompt in the discharge of his duties as sheriff of Polk county, to which office 
he was first elected in 1914. Mr. Orr is widely and favorably known in the section 
where he resides, for he was born in Polk county on the 9th of August, 1878, and is 
a son of Samuel S. and Charlotte Orr, the former a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, 
while the latter was born near Edinburgh, Scotland. In 1873 the father emigrated 
to America and crossing the country to Oregon purchased land near Rickreall, in Polk 
county, which he engaged in cultivating until 1905, when he removed to Portland and 
there lived retired until his demise on the 19th of March, 1919, at the age of seventy- 
four years. The mother survives and is still residing in Portland. 

Their son, John W. Orr, attended the district schools of Polk county and the 
public and high schools of Rickreall, later pursuing a course in Armstrong's Busi- 
ness College at Portland. His first position was that of bookkeeper for the Capital 
Lumber Company of Salem, Oregon, and subsequently turned to agricultural pur- 
suits purchasing land in the vicinity of Rickreall which he continued to operate until 
1914, when he was called to public office, being elected sheriff of Polk county. So 
creditable a record did he make in that connection that he has since been con- 
tinued in the office, his excellent service justifying the trust reposed in him by his 
fellow townsmen. He leaves nothing undone to enforce the law according to his con- 
science and is fearless in the discharge of his duties. He is still the owner of his farm 
near Rickreall but is not active in its cultivation, his time being entirely devoted to his 
public duties. 

On the 10th of August, 1904, Mr. Orr was united in marriage to Miss Wilma E. 
Dalton and they have become the parents of a daughter, Charlotte I., who was born 
October 18, 1906. In his political views Mr. Orr is a republican, loyal to the principles 
of the party, and fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the United 
Artisans, the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan, the lodge, chapter and the 
Eastern Star of the Masonic order, and Mrs. Orr is identified with the Eastern Star 
and Pythian Sisters. He is also a member of the Grange and in religious faith is a 
Congregationalist. He is ever ready to give his support to measures for the promo- 
tion of the public welfare and as sheriff of Polk county is discharging his duties in 
such a way as to earn the high encomiums of the general public. He has a wide 
acquaintance in this section of the state, where his entire life has been passed, and 
he is everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, his many sterling traits of character 
winning for him the high regard of all who know him. 



HOMER SPEER. 



For thirty years Homer Speer has been a resident of Oregon, having come to this 
state when but twelve years old. Eight years of this time he has lived in Tangent, where 
he is successfully conducting a merchandise business, and he is now serving Tangent 
as postmaster, in which position his genial personality and business aptitude have won 
for him many friends. 

Homer Speer was born in Bushnell, Illinois, in June, 1878, his parents being 
Marcus H. and Emma (Painter) Speer, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. 
The father engaged in farming and later removed to Illinois, where he rented a fine 
piece of land which he operated until 1890. In that year he came to Oregon, settled 
in Marion county and resumed farming, purchasing some land which he imme- 
diately set about to improve and on which he resided the remainder of his life. 



70 HISTORY OF OREGON 

He passed away, February 25, 1918, and had survived his wife four years, her death 
having occurred in October, 1914. 

The subject of this review, Homer Speer, was reared and educated in the dis- 
trict schools of McDonough county, Illinois, until he was twelve years of age, when 
he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oregon. The family settled in Marion 
county and here Mr. Speer resumed his education to the age of nineteen years, when 
he removed to California with the idea of completing his education. He commenced 
the study of law, applying such close industry and mental concentration upon this 
work that his health began to fail and he was forced to give up his studies. He 
remained two years longer in California, however, and having regained his health, 
returned to Oregon and to his home county, starting a general store at Mehama, 
Marion county, which venture proved a success and in which he continued for four 
years. At the expiration of this period he removed to Mill City and there was em- 
ployed at various occupations for a while, later establishing another store, which he 
operated for three and one-half years. For one year he had a grocery store, but pre- 
ferring to handle merchandise he removed to Tangent, Linn county, and purchased 
a large general store, which he has since operated. In the conduct of his store he 
has employed only the highest standards and has endeavored in every possible way 
to please his patrons, believing that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement. 

Mr. Speer was married March 2, 1902, to Miss Alice Pratt and to them have been 
born four children: Opal F., whose birth occurred in November, 1902; Marion A., born 
April 5, 1908: and Merwin H., born August IS, 1914. The wife and mother died 
February 25, 1919. after an illness of two years, her death being deeply regretted 
by many friends who had learned to esteem her highly. 

Mr. Speer is well known in Masonic circles and also in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Politically he is a republican, giving support to the principles of the 
party, yet never seeking nor desiring office. His religious faith is manifested in his 
membership in the Christian church and the sterling worth of his character has won 
for him the high esteem of all with whom he has come into contact. 



JOHN E. MATTHEWS. 



John E. Matthews, member of the firm of Matthews & Matthews, who are 
ers of the Yaquina Bay News of Newport, is a progressive newspaper man and has 
made his paper the champion of every movement calculated to upbuild the town 
and promote the growth of the surrounding district. The News is one of the old 
and reliable journals of this section of the state, having been founded in 1883 by the 
father of Mr. Matthews, and throughout the intervening period it has enjoyed a steady 
growth, now having a large list of subscribers. 

Mr. Matthews was born on the island of Malta, in the Mediterranean, October 
13, 1853, a son of John E. and Hester (Ruthvin) Matthews. The father was a native 
of Glamorganshire, Wales, and his education was secured at the celebrated military 
college at Sandhurst, on the river Thames, near London, England. He was commis- 
sioned captain and for many years served in the British army. Following his retire- 
ment he crossed the ocean with his children in 1864, first becoming a resident of 
Canada. He later crossed the border into the United States, taking up his abode in 
Iowa. In 1878 he came to Oregon and five years later, or in 1883, established the 
Yaquina Bay News at Newport, continuing active in its conduct throughout the 
remainder of his life. He passed away in 1915 at the age of eighty-three, but the 
mother of the subject of this review died in Ireland during his boyhood. 

John E. Matthews was reared and educated in Ireland and at the age of eighteen 
years emigrated to Canada, where for a number of years he was employed at the 
shipbuilder's trade. Crossing the border into the United States, he went with his 
father to Kansas, where for ten years they engaged in the cattle business. In 1878 
he accompanied his father to Oregon and when the latter subsequently established 
the Yaquina Bay News at Newport, he assisted in the conduct of the paper until his 
father's demise, since which time he has successfully operated the publication in 
association with his brother William, who, however, is now in the officers' training 
school at Fort Monroe, Virginia, while another brother, Crosby, is connected with 
the life-saving service at Newport. The business is conducted under the firm style 
of Matthews & Matthews and they have a modern newspaper plant, equipped with 



HISTORY OF OREGON 71 

linotype machines and all the latest presses, and they also do a large job business, 
turning out first-class work. The News is a publication of high standing, filled with 
good reading matter and enjoying a large circulation. Mr. Matthews is thoroughly 
familiar with every phase of the business and is conducting the paper along the 
most modern and progressive lines, productive of substantial results. 

In his political views he is a stanch republican and through the medium of his 
paper has rendered valiant service for his party. He is a vigorous writer, ever fear- 
less in advocating the best things for his community, county and state. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and for twenty-seven years 
has been a member of the encampment. He also belongs to the Rebekahs and his 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Episcopal church. His aid and 
cooperation have at all times been found on the side of progress and improvement 
and he has ever stood for those forces which work for the uplift of the individual 
and the benefit of the community at large. He is everywhere spoken of as a citizen 
of worth and possesses many sterling qualities which have won for him the high 
regard of all who know him. 



C. M. OLSEN. 



C. M. Olsen, deceased, was the founder and promoter of the C. M. Olsen Transfer 
& Storage Company of Portland and for many years enjoyed an enviable reputation 
as a representative and successful business man of the city. He was born in Gotten- 
burg, Sweden, November 18, 1844, and came of a family long prominent in that 
country. His people, too, were devoted members of the Lutheran church. His father, 
Ole Mattson, was a farmer throughout his active lite. He wedded Anna Helgesdotter, 
who was born June 9, 1822, and they became the parents of eleven children, eight 
of whom attained adult age, while four of the number are living. C. M. Olsen of this 
review and a sister were the only members of the family who became residents of 
America. 

C. M. Olsen was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming familiar 
with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. As opportunity 
offered he attended school and thus acquired his education when his time was not in 
demand for farm work. At length he decided to try his fortune in the new world 
and in 1868 crossed the Atlantic, landing in New York city. He afterward became 
a sailor and for many years was upon the sea. He had made the voyage to the 
United States on the sailing vessel Amoy from Seville, Spain, and reached New 
York harbor on the 1st of April, 1868. He there embarked on the Flordimare for the 
Mediterranean and remained for some time on the coasting trade. As a seaman on 
the Formosa he sailed by way of Good Hope to Melbourne, Australia, and from there 
to Hongkong, China, while later he visited Manila and Batavia, India. In 1873 Mr. 
Olsen again visited his native land and the following year returned to New York 
city as a sailor on the Oceanic. On the same steamer he made a trip to Liverpool 
and was then transferred to an American sailing ship, aboard which he returned to 
America. For some time afterward he was engaged in the coasting trade between 
New York city and New Orleans and later served as quartermaster on a ship running 
between New York and Savannah. For two years he was quartermaster on the 
Anterior, running between New York, the West Indies and Brazil, and then became 
quartermaster on the steamer City of Sidney and through the straits of Magellan made 
his way to San Francisco, where he left the ship, remaining in California for about 
three years. 

It was in 1877 that Mr. Olsen arrived in Portland on the old Oregon and his first 
year's residence here brought him a disastrous experience, as his employers kept his 
wages. For two years thereafter he worked on a farm and by the end of that time had 
no difficulty in obtaining employment, as he had given proof of his industry and 
capability. It was about 1881 that he turned his attention to the transfer business and 
from a small beginning developed a large and profitable enterprise, having a large 
storage house at No. 128 First street. He made a specialty of moving pianos and sates 
and as the years passed developed a business of extensive proportions, in which his sons 
afterward became interested. 

It was in Portland that Mr. Olsen was united in marriage to Miss Ottilia W. Schmale, 
a native of Germany, and to them were born two sons, Charles and George. Mrs. Olsen 



72 HISTORY OF OREGON 

is still living and is now a silent partner in the business which was established by her 
husband but keeps closely in touch with every phase of the business, which is being 
carried on by her sons. Mr. Olsen was identified with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and gave his political allegiance to the republican party but never sought 
nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his efforts and his energies upon his business 
affairs. He sailed to many points of the world and his experiences were indeed broad 
and varied, enriching his mind with many reminiscences of foreign travel. In the 
hard school of experience, too, he learned valuable lessons, all of which developed In 
him a resourcefulness and strength of manhood that made him an active factor in the 
world's w^ork and gained for him the respect and confidence of his fellowmen. 

The business which Mr. Olsen established has been carried on under the name of 
the C. M. Olsen Transfer & Storage Company since his death, which occurred on the 
25th of May, 1919. His sons, Charles W. and George M., then succeeded to the business. 
A change from horses to motor trucks had been gradually made over a period of five 
years. At one time the company utilized twelve teams and today uses five heavy 
service trucks, employing sixteen people. They cater only to the transfer and storage 
of household goods and the annual volume of their business amounts to sixty thousand 
dollars. Their warehouse includes twenty-five thousand square feet of floor space and 
they have every facility for handling their patronage. They conduct a large suburban 
business, which includes The Dalles, Astoria, Eugene, Albany, Salem and Corvallis. 
They pack and crate furniture and also consolidate carloads of furniture and care for 
the shipments. Their warehouse is fireproof and their business is among the foremost 
enterprises of the kind in Portland. 

The son, Charles W. Olsen, is a law graduate of the University of Michigan and 
has been admitted to the bar in Oregon. He belongs to Washington Lodge, No. 46, 
A. F. & A. M., and also to Sunnyside Chapter, R. A. M. On the 29th of July, 1915, he 
married Bernice E. Knudsen, of South Haven, Michigan, and they are the parents of 
twins. Jean Corinne and Cara Manette. 

George M. Olsen was educated at the Hill Military Academy and in the public 
schools of Portland, being graduated from the academy on Friday, the 13th of June, 
1913, as a member of a class of thirteen. He is sure this number does not carry with 
it the proverbial unluckiness. He also attended the University of Michigan, which he 
left at the age of twenty-two years. He is a talented musician and has traveled with 
his own orchestra for five years throughout the east and south. On one occasion he 
had a remarkable battle with a hold-up man in Racine, Wisconsin, who attacked him 
with a knife, inflicting a cut in his hand and arm, the results of which crippled his 
hand. Mr. Olsen, however, succeeded in wresting the knife from his assailant and 
held him at bay until aid was secured. The desperado is now doing eleven years' time 
in the penitentiary. 

In 1919 Mr. Olsen returned to Portland and is associated with his brother in the 
transfer and storage business. He was married in the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, 
to Miss Florence Eva Davis, a native of Mackinac Island, Michigan. During his college 
days he became a member of the Phi Kappa Sigma and is also well known in Masonic 
circles, belonging to the blue lodge of Sunnyside, and has taken the degrees of Royal 
Arch Masonry, of the Knight Templar commandery and of Al Kader Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
in politics is an active republican. The sons are proving worthy successors of their 
father in the conduct of business interests in Portland, where the name of Olsen has 
long been a synonym for honest business enterprise and progressiveness. 



COLEMAN H. WHEELER. 



Co.cman H. Wheeler was a man to whom opportunity was ever a call to action— 
a call to which he made immediate and effective response. For many years he was num- 
bered among the prominent lumbermen of the northwest and brought to heir in the 
conduct of his business in this section of the country the experience which he had 
obtained in the lumber woods of Michigan. His lite was an illustration of the fact 
that power grows through the exercise of effort. He snw the chances for advancement 
in this section of the country, with its almost limitless forests, and year by year he 
broadened the scope of his activities until he stood as one of the foremost representa- 
tives of the lumber industry of Oregon. He was born at Bellroek, Ontario, Canada, in 




COLEMAN H. WHEELER 



HISTORY OF OREGON 75 

1865, a son of Isaac Benjamin and Marie (St. Pierre) Wheeler, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania, while the latter was born in Paris, France. The father removed to 
Canada in early life and there engaged in the lumber business throughout the greater 
part of his days, or until he retired. 

Coleman H. Wheeler was reared to the age of sixteen years in Canada and acquired 
his early education in the schools of that country, while later he pursued a commercial 
course in Portland, recognizing the need and value of further educational opportunities. 
On leaving his home in Canada he went first to Michigan and there engaged in driving 
logs on the rivers of that state. The reports concerning the vast timber resources of 
the northwest caused him to make his way to this section of the country. He was first 
at Tacoma, Washington, and later became interested in the unsurveyed timber lands 
south of the lower Columbia in Oregon and established his home in Portland. From 
that time forward he was closely associated with the lumber industry of this state. 
For many years he was engaged in surveying timber lands and in locating homesteaders 
on the upper Nehalem river. Among the tracts that he located and purchased for east- 
ern capital was the Dubois timber tract, now owned by the Eccles interests of Utah. 
He was the original owner and promoter of the Wheeler Lumber Company of Wheeler, 
Oregon, a town which was named in his honor, and the estate is still a stockholder 
of the company. He was conducting large-scale logging operations at the time of his 
death. He had a sawmill and logging camps at Cochran and a timber tract of eight 
thousand acres which was being logged for him by contract to the firms of Whitten & 
Bryant and Francis Weist & Company. He not only located many tracts of fine timber 
for his company, but also secured valuable holdings for himself and thus at the time 
of his death he was able to leave his family in most comfortable financial circum- 
stances. 

In 1896 Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Miss Cora B. Bryant, a daughter 
of Z. and Lavina (Creighbaum) Bryant, who were natives of New York and of Virginia, 
respectively. They came to Oregon in 1852, crossing the plains with ox team and 
settling in Baker City. The father engaged in the live stock business. There he met 
and married his wife and their daughter, Mrs. Wheeler, was born there. Her grand- 
father. Elijah Granger Bryant, came to Oregon in 1852 and took up a donation claim 
of six hundred and forty acres, situated at Clatskanie, where he engaged in the lumber 
business. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler: Coleman H., Joe Bryant 
and Marguerite S. 

Mr. Wheeler belonged to no fraternal orders or clubs, but devoted his leisure hours 
to his home and the enjoyment of the companionship of the members of his household. 
There is much that is stimulating in his life record. When he was twenty-two years 
of age he obtained a book on surveying and studied it closely. At that time no govern- 
ment survey had been made of the land south of the Columbia in Oregon and he sur- 
veyed all of that section of the country, his work being afterward accepted by the govern- 
ment. He was indeed a self-made man and one who deserved great credit for what 
he accomplished. He possessed unfaltering energy, laudable ambition and indefatigable 
enterprise. His business vision was broad and his faith in Oregon and her future unlim- 
ited. He early had the prescience to discern something of what the future held in 
store for this great and growing western country and acting in accordance with the 
dictates of his faith and judement he lived to garner in the fullness of time the fruits 
of his energy and ability. He was, however, but fifty-five years of age wheni he was 
called to his final rest and it seemed that a much longer period of usefulness should 
have been his; but death called him and he passed on, leaving a memory that is dear 
to all who were his associates of the business world as well as those whom he met in 
the relations of friendship. 



CHARLES B. WILSON. 

Charles B. Wilson, the popular and efficient county clerk of Yamhill county, was 
born in Fairmount, Indiana, April 23, 1875, a son of Joseph and Marian (Binford) 
Wilson, also natives of the Hoosier state. The father there engaged in merchandising 
and during the period of the Civil war he served as postmaster of Fairmount. In 1887 
he removed to the west, becoming a resident of California, where he remained for two 
years, and then came to Oregon, settling at Newberg, Yamhill county, where for many 
years he engaged in the grocery business. He is now living retired in that city in 



7(i HISTORY OF OREGON 

the enjoyment of a well earned rest, and his wife also survives. For fifty-five years they 
have traveled life's journey together and Mr. Wilson is now eighty-one years of age, 
while his wife has reached the age of seventy-six. They have many friends in the 
community where they have so long resided and are held in the highest respect and 
esteem by all who know them. 

Their son, Charles B. Wilson, attended the schools of Indiana, California, and New- 
berg, Oregon, graduating from the Pacific College at that place with the class of 1897. 
On completing his education he became associated with his father in the conduct of 
a grocery store and following the latter's retirement he assumed the entire manage- 
ment of the business, which he successfully conducted for a period of eight years. In 
1909 he was appointed postmaster of Newberg by President William H. Taft and served 
in that office until 1913, when he engaged in the insurance business, in which he con- 
tinued active until the fall of 1914, when he was elected county clerk of Yamhill county, 
his excellent service in that position winning him reelection in November, 1920. He is a 
courteous and obliging official, thoroughly fitted for the work of the office, into which 
he has introduced a number of new methods which greatly facilitate the discharge of 
his duties and make his services very valuable to the public. In partnership with W. S. 
Link, Mr. Wilson owns a farm of four hundred and eighteen acres near Sheridan which 
they are leasing, and he is also a stockholder in the United States National Bank of 
Newberg. 

On the 30th of June, 1897, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle E. 
Gardner and they have become the parents of three children, namely: Lois M., who 
is the wife of A. J. Allan, residing six miles east of the city of Vancouver, Washington; 
Wendell C, who is attending the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis; and Joseph 
T., a student in the McMinnville schools. 

Mr. Wilson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for four years 
served as a member of the city council of Newberg. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World, and in religious 
faith he is a Friend. He is a man of high principles and standards, progressive and 
reliable in business, loyal in citizenship and at all times displaying devotion to the 
duties that devolve upon him. For thirty-two years he has resided in Oregon, and his 
integrity and reliability have won for him a large and ever increasing circle of friends. 



WILL H. BENNETT. 



Will H. Bennett, who entered financial circles in 1903 in the humble capacity of 
bookkeeper, has made wise use of his time, talents and opportunities and is now occupy- 
ing the position of vice president and cashier of the Inland Empire Bank of Pendleton. 
Long experience and study have given him a comprehensive knowledge of the banking 
business in principle and detail and he is able to speak with authority upon many 
questions connected with financial interests. 

Mr. Bennett is a native of this state. He was born in Portland at the corner of 
West Park and Morrison streets, July 10, 1879, a son of Alexander W. and Jane (Mur- 
doch) Bennett, natives of Scotland. The father came to Portland in September, 1870, 
and is now living retired in that city. To Mr. and Mrs. Bennett were born five children: 
Frank S., who was an attorney on the municipal bench in Portland and who passed 
away in 1910, at which time he was a candidate for the office of county judge; Sim A., 
who is teller in the First National Bank of Portland; Helen, a teacher in Portland; 
Grace Jane, the wife of George C. Carter of Portland; and Will H., of this review. 
All of the children are graduates of the old Portland high school of Portland. 

Following his graduation from high school Will H. Bennett attended night school, 
after which he entered the employ of J. P. Sharkey & Company, engaged in the whole- 
sale saddlery business, and for a year was connected with that firm. He then became 
an employe of W. P. Fuller & Company, with whom he remained for four years, and 
on the 20th of June, 1903, he entered banking circles, accepting the position of book- 
keeper with the First National Bank at Heppner, Oregon. At the end of four years he 
resigned that position to become paying and receiving teller for the Citizens National 
Bank at Baker City, with which he was connected until the 1st of August, 1908. He 
then resigned and returned to Portland, entering the First National Bank as book- 
keeper. On the 14th of October. 1909, he was appointed deputy in the office of the state 
bank examiner and when the laws were changed in 1911 he received the appointment 



HISTORY OF OREGON 77 

of bank examiner, from which position he resigned on Novembr 1, 1913, to become 
vice president of the First State and Savings Bank at Klamath Falls, Oregon. He 
retained that position until the 10th of January, 1916, when he resigned to accept the 
cashiership of the Citizens Bank at Portland. This position he filled until the 11th of 
February, 1918, when he was appointed superintendent of banks for the state of Oregon, 
taking office on the 18th of February of that year. He resigned this position on the 
31st of December, 1920, to associate himself with the Inland Empire Bank of Pendle- 
ton, Oregon, as vice president and cashier, which offices he is now filling, J. W. Maloney 
being the president. 

Mr. Bennett is well known as an able financier and banker of more than ordinary 
ability, who has promoted the success of the enterprise with which he is connected 
by systematic and progressive work. He is shrewd, systematic and unquestionably 
honest and these qualities have gained him the respect and confidence of the men who 
have had business with him and have consequently influenced the prosperity of the 
enterprise with which he is connected. The policy which he as ever followed in this 
connection is such as carefully safeguards the interests of depositors and at the same 
time promotes the success of the institution. 

On the 11th of April, 1918, Mr. Bennett was united in marriage to Miss Beatrice 
Burchill of Portland, and they have become the parents of a son, Pearson Murdoch, 
now in his second year. Mr. Bennett is deeply interested in all that pertains to public 
progress and development, and, while a resident of Klamath Palls, served as vice-president 
of the Chamber of Commerce. He is a life member of the Multnomah Amateur Athletic 
Club of Portland, a member of the Golf Club of Pendleton and fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masons, also belonging to 
the Shrine in the last named organization. With industry and determination as his 
dominant qualities Mr. Bennett has made steady progress in the business world, advanc- 
ing from a humble financial position until he ranks witli the leading bankers of the 
state. Moreover, his business record is such as any man might be proud to possess, 
it being a source of inspiration and admiration to his colleagues and contemporaries. 
He is a man of high principles and worthy motives, who would be a decided acquisition 
to any community. 



IRA P. POWERS. 



One of the substantial business enterprises of Portland is the Ira P. Powers Furni- 
ture Company. Ira F. Powers, Sr., the founder of the business, was tor a long period 
not only one of the leading manufacturers and merchants of this city but one whose 
high sense of honor, personal integrity and broad humanitarianism gained for him the 
high regard and unqualified confidence of his fellowmen. The American branch of the 
family was established at Littleton, Massachusetts, at an early period in the coloniza- 
tion of the new world and the lineage is traced back in England as far as the twelfth 
century. The name of Powers, or Power, is from the old Norman name le Poer and 
is as old in England as the time of William the Conqueror, one of whose officers at 
the battle of Hastings bore that name, which appears on the roll of survivors in Battle 
Abbey. The name was changed to the present form in 1683 and through succeeding 
generations representatives of the name continued to reside in New England. Walter 
Power, the founder of the American branch of the family, was born in 1639 and died 
February 22, 1708. He was married March 11, 1661, to Trial, a daughter of Deacon 
Ralph and Thankes Shepard, who was born February 10, 1641. A genealogical record 
says: "Little is known of Walter Power, but probably he had not received advantages 
of much early education but depended upon strong sinews and sterling good sense to 
establish a home for himself and family. Trial, his wife, seems to have been a woman 
of some education. At the time of their marriage they settled in or near Concord, now 
the town of Littleton. In 1694 Walter Power bought of Thomas Waban and other 
Indians one-fourth part of the township of Nashobe. His remains were doubtless laid 
in the old Powers burying ground, as were also those of his wife, who survived him 
many years." 

Their third child, Isaac Power, was born in 1665 and was married April 14, 1701, 
to Mrs. Mary Winship, the widow of Samuel Winship and the daughter of John Poulter. 
Isaac Power seems to have been prominent among the sons of his father and to have 
taken the lead in affairs. He was captain of the military; a petitioner for town incor- 



78 HISTORY OF OREGON 

poration; moderator of the first town meeting and continued to hold office for many 
years. He was twice elected to the ^eat and general court and was colonial agent for 
conveying lands. One of the children of Captain Isaac and Mary Power was Gideon 
Power, the third of their family, who probably lived in Lexington, Massachusetts, as 
his name appears on the town rolls as a soldier in an old French war. He married 
Lydia Russell and they had four children, the third being Jonas Powers, who was born 
December 6, 1738, and married Betsey Tower. They became residents of Vermont and 
had a family of nine children. Of these Asa Powers, the second in order of birth, mar- 
ried Rebecca Shippinwell, of Chester, Vermont. Of this marriage there were born 
eight children, the eldest being Levi Powers, whose birth occurred July 9, 1791. Leaving 
his old home in Vermont he established a branch of the family at Ballston Spa, New 
York. There he wedded Mary Frost, who died March 2, 1872, while his death occurred 
April 17, 1882. 

While Levi and Mary (Frost) Powers were living at Au Sable, Clinton county. 
New York, a son was born to them May 5, 1831. To the boy the parents gave the 
name of Ira. He was carefully trained under the parental roof but from the age of 
twelve years had to depend upon his own resources for a livelihood and the inferior 
educational advantages of the community in which he lived enabled him to make com- 
paratively little progress along the line of mental development save that a naturally 
quick and receptive mind and a retentive memory enabled him to learn many valuable 
lessons in the school of experience. In the course of time hfs continually broadening 
knowledge promoted him to a place where his intellectual power far exceeded that of 
the majority of his fellowmen with whom he came into contact, enabling him correctly 
to solve intricate business problems, carefully to formulate plans and to execute them 
with dispatch. His opportunity came with the discovery of gold in California, which 
drew him to the Pacific coast. The long journey around Cape Horn being completed 
he made his way to the mines, where he engaged in a search for the precious metal 
for thirteen years, meeting with considerable success, prospecting during that period in 
various parts of California and Idaho. 

In the spring of 1865, however, Mr. Powers turned his attention to commercial 
pursuits, establishing a second-hand furniture business in Portland in partnership 
with A. Burchard. The new enterprise proved profitable and was conducted until they 
suffered heavy loss by fire in 1875. In the meantime Mr. Powers had extended his 
efforts to include the manufacture of furniture, which he began in 1S72 under the firm 
style of Donly, Beard & Powers, their plant being located at Willsburg. In 1875 he 
established a factory on Front street, at the northwest corner of Jefferson street, where 
he was located tor six years. Subsequently the business was at the foot of Montgomery, 
while later the plant was removed to South Portland. In 1882 the furniture store on 
First street was destroyed by fire with a loss of forty thousand dollars. In 1884 there 
occurred a fire in the factory with losses amounting to sixty-three thousand dollars, 
covered only by eleven thousand dollars insurance. It was after this that the plant was 
built on a three acre tract of land in South Portland, but here the factory was carried 
away by the Willamette freshet in 1891, causing a loss of one hundred thousand dollars. 
All of these losses occurred within a period of ten years. On the 1st of March, 1911, 
the company removed to its present building at the corner of Third and Yamhill streets, 
where a general house furnishing business is conducted. In 1893 the business was incor- 
porated under the firm style of the Ira F. Powers Manufacturing Company and 
Mr. Powers remained as president until his death. This has become one of the impor- 
tant productive industries of the city, its trade increasing as the result of the thorough 
workmanship and attractive style which is characteristic of the output. 

Notwithstanding that the business was a constantly growing one Mr. Powers did 
not devote his entire attention to this line, his resourceful ability enabling him to 
accomplish substantial results in other connections. His name became a prominent one 
in banking circles and he was, moreover, actively associated with interests which bore 
upon the general development and prosperity of the city but had no direct effect upon 
his own finances. He was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Manufac- 
turers Association and he was active as one of the builders of the Morrison street 
bridge, while of the Madison street bridge he was a stockholder. 

Throughout his life Mr. Powers was actuated by a spirit of helpfulness that was 
again and again manifest in his relations with individuals and also in association with 
organized charities and benevolences. The homeless boy appealed strongly to his heart 
and it is said at times he had as many as five such boys in his home, doing all he could 
to train them for positions of usefulness and honor in the business world. It was 



HISTORY OF OREGON 79 

largely through his instrumentality that the Boys and Girls Society was organized in 
Portland. The homeless and friendless never sought his assistance in vain, his chari- 
table spirit reaching out to all, while his material assistance was the tangible expression 
of his warm heart. He was in thorough sympathy with the basic principles of those 
organizations which recognize the brotherhood of mankind and thus it was that after 
coming to Portland he cooperated in the work of the Masonic fraternity here. He 
became a member of Gold Run Lodge, F. & A. M., while in California, and transferred 
his membership to Harmony Lodge, No. 12 of Portland, of which he served as treasurer 
for twelve years. He also joined Portland Chapter, No. 3, R. A. M.; Oregon Com- 
mandery, No. 1, K. T.; and Al Kader Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He belonged to Pilot 
Peak Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., at one time and to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
while his political allegiance was ever given to the republican party. 

Ira F. Powers, Sr., was twice married. In 1860 he wedded Miss Minnie "Wilson, who 
died four years later, leaving an only son, Frederick, now of Maine. In 1870 Mr. Powers 
wedded Mary Sullivan, a native of New York city, who in an early day was taken to 
the west by her parents, D. and Jessie Sullivan, and afterward accompanied her mother 
from California to Oregon. By the second marriage there was but one son, Ira F., of 
this review. 

The death of the mother, Mrs. Mary Powers, occurred in 1875. Mr. Powers survived 
until the 8th of September, 1902, when he was called to his final rest at the age of 
seventy-one years, leaving not only the fruits of former toil as represented in impor- 
tant manufacturing interests, but also an untarnished name that had long stood in 
Portland as the synonym for commercial enterprise and probity. 

The son, Ira F. Powers, Jr., was born in 1872 in Portland, one block from the present 
site of the business and in the pursuit of his education attended the public and high 
schools of his native city, subsequently becoming a pupil in the Bishop Scott Academy. 
Between the ages of seventeen and twenty years he was in his father's store, after which 
he spent a year in the furniture business at La Grande, Oregon. Subsequently he became 
a traveling salesman but in August, 1902, resigned his position to become secretary of the 
Ira F. Powers Manufacturing Company and following his father's demise he succeeded 
to the presidency of the concern which is now known as the Ira F. Powers Furniture 
Company. He is ably carrying forward the business founded by his father and is rec- 
ognized as one of the reliable and progressive merchants of the city. The trade has 
steadily grown from year to year until It has assumed extensive proportions, the ware- 
house occupying a floor space of one hundred and thirty thousand feet, while eighty- 
five people are employed in the conduct of the business which includes everything in 
the line of house furnishings. 

In 1906 Mr. Powers was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Nichols, a resident 
of this city, and they have become the parents of two children, John Thompson and 
Elizabeth. The family home is a beautiful modern residence in the attractive suburban 
district of Rivera. Mr. Powers gives his political support to the republican party and 
his interest in the development and upbuilding of his city is indicated in his member- 
ship in the Chamber of Commerce, the City Plan Commission and the city industrial 
committee. He has membership in all of the leading clubs of Portland and is a Mason 
of high standing, having attained the thirty-second degree in the consistory. He is 
also a member of the Shrine and is likewise identified with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. 



C. J. SHEDD. 



A notably successful career is that of C. J. Shedd, manager of the Davis-Shedd 
Company, dealers in general merchandise, and president of the Bank of Shedd, in which 
connection he is controlling important and extensive interests at Shedd, Linn county. 
Mr. Shedd is a native son of Illinois, his birth having occurred in June, 1857, and his 
parents were Frank and Emily (Olin) Shedd, the former born in New Hampshire and 
the latter in Ohio. In 1839 the father removed to Illinois, where he engaged in farming 
until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a member of the One Hundred 
and Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, becoming Captain of Company C. At the end 
of a year he was discharged on account of illness and in 1864 he started across the 
plains to Oregon as captain of a wagon train traveling with ox teams. Settling in 
Linn county, he purchased land now adjoining the town of Shedd, of which he became 



■so HISTORY OF OREGON 

the founder and which was named in his honor. He improved and developed his farm, 
converting it into a valuable property and continuing its cultivation throughout his 
remaining years. He was most highly respected and esteemed in his community and 
for one term was a member of the state legislature. He passed away in 1893, having 
for nine years survived the mother, whose demise occurred in 1884. 

C. J. Shedd was but seven years of age at the time of the removal to Oregon and 
in the district schools of this state he pursued his education. After completing his 
studies he engaged in cultivating the home farm until 1895, when he was appointed 
postmaster of Shedd and served in that capacity for a period of four years. In 1900 
he turned his attention to general merchandising in association with J. R. Davis and 
in 1912 the business was incorporated as the Davis-Shedd Company, of which Mr. Shedd 
has since been the manager. They carry a very large stock of merchandise and under 
the able direction of Mr. Shedd the business has assumed extensive and substantial 
proportions, the progressive methods and reliability of the firm winning for them a 
large patronage. Being a man of resourceful business ability, Mr. Shedd has extended 
his efforts into various lines and in March, 1913, in association with others he organized 
the Bank of Shedd, of which he has since served as president, the other officers being 
J. B. Bell of Eugene, vice president, and J. C. Clay, cashier. The bank has a capital 
stock of fifteen thousand dollars, its surplus amounts to five thousand dollars and its 
deposits have reached the sum of one hundred and seventy thousand dollars. Mr. Shedd 
has made a close study of the banking business and has ever made it his purpose to 
safeguard thoroughly the interests of depositors, so that the institution of which he is 
the head has ever enjoyed the full confidence of the public and has become recognized 
as a sound and substantial moneyed institution. He likewise is the owner of farm 
land which he leases and is thus continually broadening the scope of his activities, 
carrying forward to successful completion everything that he undertakes. 

In December, 1893, Mr. Shedd was united in marriage to Miss Anna Botsford and 
to them have been born three children: Bertha Lucille, Frank Raymond and Harold 
L., all at home. In his political views Mr. Shedd is a democrat and for one term he 
represented his district in the state legislature, where he rendered Important and 
valuable service, giving thoughtful and earnest consideration to all the vital problems 
which came up for settlement. For over twenty-flve years he has served as justice of 
the peace, rendering decisions which have ever been characterized by fairness and 
impartiality. Mrs. Shedd attends the Methodist church and fraternally Mr. Shedd Is 
identified with the Masons and the Woodmen of the World. A man of keen business 
discernment and sound judgment, Mr. Shedd has made for himself a creditable place 
in financial and mercantile circles of Linn county and his activities have always been 
of a character that have contributed to public progress and prosperity as well as to 
individual success. His life has ever been actuated by high and honorable principles 
and he is loyal to all those Interests which make for true manhood and progressive 
citizenship. 



BARGE EDWARD LEONARD. 

Barge Edward Leonard, who for twelve years has been a representative of the 
Portland bar, was born in Rochelle, Illinois, November 17, 1SS6, a son of Edward and 
Eliza (Young) Leonard, their marriage being celebrated in Rochelle, where the father 
was born in 1848. He followed farming for many years but had put aside the cares of 
active business life at the time of his demise, which occurred on the 8th of January, 
1921. His widow is still a resident of Rochelle. 

In the schools of his native city Barge E. Leonard pursued his education, followed 
by a year's art course in the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, and the 
study of law at the University of Michigan. He was graduated from the latter institu- 
tion in 1909, with the degree of LL. B., and then came to Portland, where he at once 
entered upon active practice, in which he has continued. His ability in this field is 
pronounced and his success is attributable in no small measure to the thoroughness with 
which he prepares his cases. He is married and has one daughter. 

Mr. Leonard is a member of the Scottish Rite Masons and of the Mystic Shrine, 
also of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Progressive Business Club, the 
City Club, the University Club, the Press Club, and of the Multnomah Bar Association, 
of which he was president in 1919. He is likewise identified with the Phi Kappa Psi, 




BARGE E. LEONARD 



HISTORY OF OREGON 83 

•a Greek letter fraternity, with tlie Friars Club and the Theta Nu Epsilon, is a Rosarian 
and was chosen a director of the Rose Festival for 1921. He was nominated on the 
republican ticket for the Oregon legislature in the spring of 1920 and elected at the 
general election, serving in the thirty-first legislative assembly. 

Mr. Leonard belongs to the American Legion and to La Societe De Forty Hommes 
et Eight Chevaux. His military record is most Interesting. He entered the Second 
Officers Training Camp at the Presidio of San Francisco, August 25. 1917, giving up 
his practice of law in Portland and volunteering for service in the "World war. He was 
commissioned first lieutenant of infantry in the National Army, November 27, 1917, was 
assigned to duty with the Sixty-third Infantry on the same date and on the 26th of 
February, 1918, was selected from among officers at the Presidio, because of special 
knowledge, aptitude and fitness, for intelligence duty and ordered to duty with the 
postal censorship board in San Francisco; organized postal censorship office at the 
Ferry post office, San Francisco, which acted as a clearing house for all foreign mail 
leaving the Pacific coast during the World war; by reason of demonstrated capacity 
and extraordinary efficiency in the administration and organization of the postal censor- 
ship, upon completion of the work, was assigned to duty in the office of the department 
intelligence officer as executive officer. Military Intelligence Division, Western Depart- 
ment, San Francisco, and continued as executive officer until his discharge November 
27, 1918. He was detached from the Sixty-third Infantry, July 13, 1918, and assigned 
to general staff in connection with work above mentioned. He was in charge of all 
Investigations relative to enemy aliens in San Francisco and Bay cities, directing a 
force of twenty-four investigators in this work. In October, 1918, he was recommended 
for promotion to captain, recommendation, however, not acted upon because of the 
signing of the armistice. He was the first officer in the Western Department requesting 
bis discharge upon closing of hostilities and after discharge was recommended for a 
major's commission in the Reserve Corps. Mr. Leonard's services to the army were of 
exceptional character and only because of the confidential nature of the work, specific 
details cannot be given. The same spirit of loyalty characterizes his relation to his 
clients and has brought him prominence among the younger representatives of the Port- 
land bar. 



W. S. FITTS. 



One of the substantial and progressive business men of Salem is W. S. Fitts, who 
Is associated with his son, Ira J., in the conduct of a large fish and poultry market, 
and he is also interested in the Newport Ice & Fish Company and is a stockholder in 
Hotel Marion of Salem. In the conduct of his business affairs he displays sound Judg- 
ment, energy and enterprise, and success in substantial measure has rewarded his 
efforts. Mr. Fitts is a native of the south. He was born in Bibb county, Alabama, 
November 3, 1868, a son of T. J. Fitts, who was also a native of that locality and 
devoted his attention to the raising of corn and cotton. He married Rhoda Conwill, 
also a native of Alabama, who passed away at the age of eighty years, and the father 
is also deceased. 

In 1891 W. S. Fitts came to the west, first becoming a resident of Walla Walla, 
Washington. Subsequently he made his way to Oregon and for a time engaged in 
farming in the vicinity of Salem, after which he located in the city, where he entered 
business circles in 1901, establishing a fish market at No. 444 Court street. His pro- 
gressive and enterprising business methods, reasonable prices and courteous treatment 
of patrons soon gained for him a large patronage and he now has most of the private 
trade of Salem. His son, Ira J. Fitts, is associated with him in the conduct of the 
enterprise and he is a most progressive and alert young business man. They deal 
in fish and poultry, purchasing their fish from all over the coast and handling approx- 
imately fifty tons annually. Their establishment is the leading fish and poultry market 
in the city catering to the retail trade and they intend within a short time to install 
a cold storage plant, which will greatly facilitate the conduct of their business. 
Mr. Fitts is also interested in the Newport Ice & Fish Company in association with 
J. F. Meehan, Mrs. C. M. McKillop and others, and he is likewise a stockholder in Hotel 
Marion of Salem. His interests are thus extensive and important, showing him to he 
a most capable business man, energetic, farsighted and sagacious. 

In Bibb county, Alabama, in 1894, Mr. Fitts was married to Miss Lula Elliott, and 



84 HISTORY OP 0RP:G0N 

three children have been born to this union: Ira J., who married Wilda Solomon of 
Salem, February 6, 1921; Inez G., who is employed by Hartman Brothers, Jewelers; 
and Clifford W., who met an accidental death, being killed by a truck on the 12th of 
February, 1920. 

Beginning business with a capital of but forty dollars, Mr. Fitts worked untiringly 
to gain a start and as the years have passed he has steadily progressed, overcoming all 
obstacles and diflSculties in his path, and he now occupies a position of prominence in 
commercial circles of his city. The secret of his success lies in the fact that he has 
never been afraid of earnest labor and that his diligence and determination have been 
supplemented by unquestioned integrity and reliability. He is regarded as one of the 
leading citizens of Salem and his progressiveness has been a potent element in its con- 
tinued development. 



OTTO FRIEDLI. 



Otto Friedli, president and manager of the Portland Cheese Company at Portland, 
is a native of Switzerland, his birth having occurred in the land of the Alps, November 
30, 1875, his parents being John and Mary (Leuenberger) Friedli, who were also 
natives of that country. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming and 
passed away in Switzerland, September 13, 1903, while the mother's death occurred in 
May, 1916. 

Otto Friedli attended the common schools of his native country and when a young 
man of nineteen years crossed the Atlantic to America, settling first in Green county, 
Wisconsin, where he was employed in a cheese factory. He later became a shipping 
clerk and buyer for two of the largest wholesale cheese houses in southern Wisconsin 
and continued in the business for eight years. It was in 1906 that he arrived in the 
northwest, making his way to Seattle, Washington, where he engaged in the cheese 
business on his own account for a year and then sold out. In 1907 he came to Portland 
and here organized the Portland Cheese Company, of which he became president and 
manager. The company are importers, manufacturers and wholesale dealers in cheese, 
olive oil, macaroni, fish, etc., but they give the major part of their attention to the 
cheese trade and are owners of the following brands: Badger State brand cheese, 
Beaver brand cheese and Vertex brand olive oil. They are distributors for Martin 
Brothers & Company's Bluhill cheese and Martin's New York Cheddar. Their specialty, 
however. Is the Beaver brand cheese, of which they make the fancy French size for table 
use. They also manufacture a Swiss cheese and employ ten people. They sell mostly 
to the creameries in wholesale lots. Mr. Priedli's associate officers in the company are: 
Charles Zuercher, Jr., vice president; and A. R. Morris, secretary and treasurer. The 
volume of their business now amounts annually to $400,000. 

Mr. Friedli was united in marriage to Miss Frieda Fuhrer, who was born in Lon- 
don, England, but is of Swiss parentage. They have two children: Helen Edna and 
Carl Edwin. The secretary of the company, Mr. Morris, wedded Hazel Clark of Port- 
land, in 1914 and they are the parents of two children: Jeane Roberta and Hazel 
Dorothy. 

Mr. Friedli is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he is a 
member of both the Swiss Club and the Swiss Aid Society. He has never had occasion 
to regret his determination to come to the new world, for in this land he has found 
the opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has made steady progress 
until he has reached the goal of prosperity, being now one of the successful business 
men of his adopted city. 



CLARE W. IRVINE. 



A man of keen business discernment and sound judgment, Clare W. Irvine has 
made for himself a most creditable place in financial circles of the state as president 
of the Farmers State Bank of Independence, of which he was one of the organizers. 
The success of the bank is due in large measure to the enterprise and thoroughly 
reliable methods of Mr. Irvine, who carefully studies every phase of banking and whose 
close application is an important element in the continued success of the institution. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 85 

He is a worthy representative of one of Oregon's honored pioneer families and was born 
in Polk county, January 26, 1872, a son of Josephus and Sarah (Fisher) Irvine, the 
former a native of Missouri and the latter of Iowa. In 1852 the father accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Oregon, being at that time a lad of ten years. The 
family settled in Marion county, where the grandfather took up a donation claim. It 
was in 1852 that the maternal grandfather crossed the plains to Oregon and also took 
up a claim in Marion county. Josephus Irvine resided in Marion county until after 
his marriage, when he removed to Polk county, and for several years engaged in cul- 
tivating rented land. He then engaged in draying at Independence, conducting business 
along that line for about eight years, when he entered mercantile circles, establishing 
a grocery store, and this he continued to operate throughout the remainder of his life. 
He passed away in September, 1902, at the age of sixty, but the mother is yet living. 

Their son, Clare W. Irvine, was reared in Polk county, where he attended the 
district schools and also the public schools of Independence, after which he pursued a 
course in a business college at Salem, Oregon. When eighteen years of age he entered 
business life as an employe of the Independence National Bank and has since been 
identified with financial interests. His first position was that of bookkeeper and after 
serving for six years in that capacity his faithful and conscientious service and excel- 
lent business ability won him promotion to the position of cashier, which he filled for 
sixteen years. In 1912, in association with J. J. Fenton, he organized the Farmers 
State Bank at Independence, becoming cashier. Subsequently he purchased the interest 
of Mr. Fenton and has since filled the office of president, with J. B. Parker as vice pres- 
ident and C. G. Irvine, cashier. The bank is housed in a modern building which was 
erected in 1918. It is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, has a surplus of 
seven thousand five hundred dollars and its deposits have reached the sum of four 
hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Irvine's comprehensive study and practical experience 
have acquainted him with the various phases of the banking business and thoroughly 
qualified him for the successful conduct of the interests under his control. The policy 
he has ever followed in this connection is such as carefully safeguards the interests of 
depositors and at the same time promotes the success of the institution, which is 
enjoying a steady and substantial growth. 

In June, 1904, Mr. Irvine was united in marriage to Miss Edna Burnett, a daughter 
of the Rev. Peter and Mary E. (Todd) Burnett, the latter a native of Oregon. The 
father came to this state at an early period in its development and has devoted his 
entire life to preaching the gospel as a minister of the Christian church, his religious 
instruction proving a tangible force for good in the various communities in which he 
has made his home. He is now living retired in Eugene but the mother passed away 
in 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Irvine have become the parents of two children, namely: 
Robert C, who was born March 10, 1907; and Clare W., Jr., born May 20, 1911. 
Mrs. Irvine is a member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Irvine is a loyal adherent of the republican party and fraternally is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, being the 
possessor of the jeweled emblem bestowed by the latter order upon those who have for 
twenty-five years been connected with the lodge. He is also a Mason, holding member- 
ship in the Shrine, and his life has ever been guided by the beneficent teachings of' 
these orders. He is one of the foremost figures in the business world of Independence 
and through his activities has not only achieved individual success but has also con- 
tributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding and progress of his section of the 
state. He is everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, possessing many substantial 
qualities which have won for him the high regard of all who know him. 



E. T. BUSSELLE. 



One of the best known consulting engineers of the northwest is E. T. Busselle, who 
maintains offices at Salem, Oregon, and at San Francisco, California, having a large 
practice in the Pacific coast states. He is thoroughly familiar with the scientific prin- 
ciples underlying his profession and he has done much important work in connection 
with public utilities. 

A native of Indiana, Mr. Busselle was born at Shelbyville, May 9, 1877, where he 
live'd until the age of six, when the family took up residence at Indianapolis, Indiana. 
After completing the work of the high school, he entered Purdue University of Indiana, 



86 HISTORY OP OREGON 

where he pursued a course in electrical engineering. Upon leaving the university, he 
entered upon a course of practical Instruction in the field of electrical science and later 
on conducted a night school of instruction in electrical engineering in the city of 
Indianapolis and also, several years later, in the city of Portland, Oregon. Coming 
west in 1909, his first venture was in Idaho, with headquarters at Boise, where he 
remained about one year. He then located in Portland and later took up residence in 
Salem, Oregon, the latter change being made necessary by his association with the 
organization of the public service commission of Oregon. After serving four years with 
the public service commission of Oregon, he resigned the position of chief engineer, 
department of utilities, to enter private practice. He then engaged in business as an 
attorney-consulting engineer, his principal activities being the preparation of inventories, 
appraisals and evaluation reports upon public utility properties and the compilation 
of such statistical data and financial statements as are necessary to the proper presen- 
tation of rate cases before regulating bodies. Starting in 1916 with a five-room suite 
of offices on the second floor of the Masonic Temple building in Salem, he later estab- 
lished an office in San Francisco, California, and he enjoys a large practice throughout 
the Pacific coast region. Thorough preparatory study has well qualified him for the 
work in which he is engaged and he is regarded as an attorney-engineer of marked 
ability, his services being In such demand that he is obliged to spend a great portion 
of his time in travel. His work as consulting engineer and attorney has been largely 
along the line of public utility activities and he possesses an exceptional comprehensive 
knowledge of the needs and requirements of utilities, as well as a knowledge of the 
laws pertaining thereto. 

Mr. Busselle was united in marriage to Miss Goldie Grace Shafer of Indianapolis, 
Indiana, and they have become the parents of two children: Earl T., who is a student 
in the University of Oregon at Eugene; and Elbert R., who is a student in the Salem 
high school. 

Mr. Busselle is a man of enterprising spirit and of commendable ambition, whose 
professional labors have been an effective force in promoting the work of development, 
progress and upbuilding in the various sections in which he has operated. Gaining 
that superior ability which comes from close study and broad experience, he stands 
in an eminent and enviable position among the consulting engineers of the northwest. 



I. H. AMOS. 



Any list of twenty men who have most impressed themselves on conditions in 
Oregon would easily include the name of I. H. Amos. Such characters do not come by 
chance; they may be invariably traced to generations of high thinking and auspicious 
environment. Mr. Amos was born in Mt. Savage, Maryland, June 8th, 1844, of sterling 
Staffordshire ancestry, son of William and Rachel (Whitehouse) Amos. Through a 
fruitful life until his death, December 24th, 1915, he fulfilled the promise of such sub- 
stantial heritage. 

Mr. Amos was not a college man; but beginning with a good school education he 
attained through a study of men and affairs, through extensive travel and the reading of 
good books, such a culture as colleges seldom give. No human need was too small for 
his earnest study; no national problem too big for the grasp of his splendid mentality. 

A nailer by trade, he spent his early years in labor with his hands, like the Master 
whom it was his delight to serve, learning that sympathy with the wage-worker which 
made him so essentially a man of the people. Granted the truth of the Swedish hand- 
craftsman theory that no great mental development is won without hand skill, this 
humble occupation doubtless played its part in developing a most unusually practical 
thinker. 

Not least among the causes contributing to his great power may be counted his 
family life. His marriage to Lilian Jane Sadler, daughter of John Sadler, a pioneer of 
Cleveland, Ohio, enriched his life with a companion who was in thorough sympathy with 
his highest aspir.itions. Into this home were born three such children as come from a 
rich union of heart and brain: William Frederick, a physician of rare skill; Lilian 
Edna, a teacher in one of Portland's high schools; and Grace Mildred, who is continuing 
her father's business, all deeply interested in the work their father's hands have dropped. 
Tlie home life was unusually beautiful, for a spirit of comradeship prevailed. As a host 
Mr. Amos was unexcelled. To share the hospitality of the Amos home was an experience 




I. H. AMOS 



HISTORY OP OREGON 89 

that left a delightful memory. Here foregathered kindred spirits and under this roof 
were initiated many of the great movements that have brought blessing to the state. 

Mr. Amos was an able and successful business man. From 1865 to 1887 he was with 
a large hardware firm in Cleveland — in the latter years as partner. In 1887 he accepted 
a position with the hardware firm of Foster & Robertson of Portland. From 1893 until 
his death he represented some of the largest metal lines in the United States. 

Although a keen and alert man of business, Mr. Amos was best known for his 
humanitarian service, especially in the cause of prohibition. Associated as early as 
1869 with the Ohio leaders and pioneers for national pronibition, he was, in 1872, a 
candidate for the General Assembly and took an active part in the constitutional cam- 
paign. As a prohibition party man he was ever a leader. It is noteworthy that Mr. 
Amos was the inspiration of the first measure passed under the Oregon Initiative. This 
Incident we give in the words of his friend and colleague, B. Lee Paget: 

"Soon after the supreme court declaration upon the constitutionality of the initiative, 
F. McKercher, Harry W. Stone, and myself met with Mr. Amos for lunch in Watson's 
restaurant. Mr. Amos suggested that local option on the liquor question be the first 
measure submitted under the initiative. It was agreed that we share pro rata the 
expense. This plan was carried out with the final result that Oregon was given her 
first local option law." 

Mr. Amos brought to the northwest, where he became such a power for good, the 
thorough training of his early experience. Coming to Oregon In 1887 he reorganized 
the prohibition forces and became an active worker in the constitutional campaign of 
that year. From 1888 until his death he was a member of the Oregon State Prohibition 
Committee, and from 1896 to 1908, chairman of the committee. During this period 
he was his party's candidate for various offices: State senator, mayor of Portland, 
and governor of the state, in each case receiving a very large vote. As candidate 
for commissioner-at-large for Multnomah county, in 1914, he received a phenomenal 
vote (for a minority candidate) of over 12,000. No man was more loved and trust- 
ed in the national councils of his party than Mr. Amos. He was prominent as a 
candidate for vice presidential nomination in the Indianapolis convention of 1904. He 
labored untiringly in the Oregon prohibition campaigns of 1910 and 1914, and rejoiced 
in the victory of the latter campaign. The full consummation of this triumph he was 
never to see, for, a few days before the law went into effect, in January 1916, he was 
called by death. A Portland daily paper commented upon his death: "Father of Oregon 
Dry Party Passes." There is an especial appropriateness in these words. One might 
go further and say that his labors and leadership in all prohibition work of the state 
make him pre-eminently the "Father of Oregon Prohibition." 

But I. H. Amos was not only a prohibitionist; he was a man of affairs. Indeed, much 
of his success in his chosen work was due to his ability to bring about the cooperation 
of various civic and church organizations in non-partisan campaigns. He was for many 
years superintendent of All Saints Episcopal Sunday school of Cleveland and later of 
Trinity Sunday school of Portland, serving as vestryman in both of these churches. As 
state secretary of the Sunday School Association of Oregon he inaugurated many for- 
ward movements, whose beneficent effects are still felt. Notable among his achievements 
was the World's Temperance Congress in connection with the World's Fair, Portland, 
1905. Mr. Amos was an enthusiastic member of the Auld Lang Syne Society of Oregon, 
for he loved the Oregon country as the land of his heart's desire. He was for some 
time a member of the Board of Directors of the Y. M. C. A., also a member of the Oregon 
Civic League and chairman of one of its most important committees. If no account 
were taken of his labors in the prohibition field Mr. Amos would still be acknowledged 
a most important factor in Oregon's progress. 

We give a few brief excerpts from testimonials by close friends. 

J. P. Newell, Mr. Amos's successor as chairman of the state committee, says: 
"Nearly eighteen years of close association with I. H. Amos ever deepened my respect 
and affection for him. I have never known him to do an unworthy act or to utter an 
unworthy thought. There was no bitterness in his heart toward any person; his indigna- 
tion was ever for the deed, never for the doer. Strong and fearless in his convictions, 
he was sweet of temper and modest in his estimate of himself. If the energy which he 
put into the temperance work had been devoted to selfish use:-j, he would have died rich in 
money instead of good works. He had better things to do than make money. Making 
the world a better place to live in was more to him than wealth. I have no regret for 
the sake of him who has gone, but I am sad when I think of the years to come when 
I shall miss the warm handclasp and the wise counsel of my leader and friend." 



90 HISTORY OF OREGON 

F. McKercher: — "Mr. Amos was a devoted husband and father, a loyal and sym- 
pathetic friend, a conscientious business man and a patriotic and self-sacrificing citizen. 
He was remarkably gifted in the art of meeting and persuading men. Had his energies 
been expended in the usual channels he might easily have had a high standing among 
leaders of political thought and action; but his finer sensibilities prevailed, and his 
vigorous personality expressed itself in the work of reform for the moral, social, and 
political uplift of his country." 

T. S. McDaniel: — "Mr. Amos accepted the responsibilities of life seriously. Every- 
thing that needed doing meant that he must relate himself to it and give to it the full 
measure of his strength. Rarely have I known one who so literally disregarded his 
own material interest in determining his course of action. He was to me and many 
others in the prohibition ranks, a leader like unto Moses, laboring his full forty years 
in the wilderness of indifference, where the people were dull of understanding, unable 
to realize that God was ready to take them over Jordan as soon as they were ready to 
cooperate with Him. When God brought the people to the border of the promised 
land He released I. H. Amos and took him, like the ancient prophet, from a mountain 
top of glorious experience to be with Himself." 

Like Moses, Mr. Amos chose rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than 
to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season. 

Editorial, "The Vindicator": — "Isaiah H. Amos was a good soldier of the Better 
Tomorrow. It was impossible to get away from the force of his warm brotherly spirit 
or to fail to admire his rock-fast devotion to the truth. It is good to have known him 
and to have served with him. The memory he leaves is fragrant and beautiful. It 
will be richly worth while, some day, somewhere, where the great and good and wise 
and brave form their ranks in the everlasting triumphant march of eternal truth, to 
feel again his shoulder touch and hear again his cheer." 



GEORGE L. BAKER. 



The career of George L. Baker, mayor of Portland, presents a notable example of 
a self-made man. From a street Arab of San Francisco to the highest oflBce within the 
gift of the people of Portland is a far cry, but the indomitable energy, resolute purpose 
and courageous spirit of the man were assets of far greater value than inherited 
wealth and utilizing every legitimate opportunity for advancement he has pressed 
steadily forward to the goal of success. His life has been filled with adventure and in 
the postgraduate school of experience he has learned many valuable lessons. 

A native of Oregon Mayor Baker was born at The Dalles in 1S6S, a son of John 
and Mary (Edgett) Baker. When a small child he was taken by his parents to Walla 
Walla, Washington, where the family resided for a short time and then started over- 
land to the Willamette valley of Oregon, traveling by means of a saddle horse and a 
pack horse. From there they removed to Seattle, whence they boarded a steamer trans- 
porting lumber, working their passage to San Francisco where the father opened a shoe 
shop. The family were in very straitened circumstances and George L. Baker was 
obliged to leave school at the age of nine years in order to aid in providing funds for 
their sustenance. He worked at any honest labor he could obtain, blacking shoes and 
selling newspapers, often picking up stray bits of coal from the streets in order to 
provide warmth for the family. Later he secured employment at carriage painting, 
after which he obtained work in a theatre, an occupation that proved very congenial 
to him and rising from the bottom of the ladder he worked his way to the top as far 
as theatricals on the Pacific coast were concerned. His first venture into the theatrical 
world was not successful and it was not long afterward that he was compelled to seek 
employment as a sewer laborer in Seattle in order to replenish the family exchequer. 
While the family were residing in Seattle the son made his way to Portland where 
he again entered theatrical circles, becoming caretaker for the animals in the Cordray 
Museum, while later he was made assistant flyman in the old Marquam Theatre. There 
he remained for several years, his energy, conscientious service and capability winning 
him successive promotions until he at length rose to the position of manager. His 



HISTORY OF OREGON 91 

next independent theatrical venture was at Baker, Oregon, where he erected an opera 
house at a cost of thirty-three hundred dollars, but the net result of a year of effort 
there was failure and loss of all but twenty dollars of the investment. Returning to 
Portland he looked about for a new field of operation and finally took a lease on the 
old Metropolitan Theatre, which he conducted for a year at a net profit of about thirty- 
four thousand dollars. The following year the Portland theatrical field was invaded 
by an eastern theatrical interest and in the ensuing controversy for supremacy in 
the field Mr. Baker was forced into bankruptcy after an expenditure of about sixty- 
one thousand dollars. His strict honesty and integrity are indicated in the fact that 
after years of hard work he was at length able to liquidate his indebtedness of 
twenty-seven thousand dollars and thus start even with the world, his only assets 
being some theatrical fixtures, which, however, were later lost in the fire which 
destroyed the old Exposition building, thus leaving him again penniless. Still un- 
dismayed by a culmination of misfortunes which would have utterly disheartened a 
man of less determination and courage, Mr. Baker once more ventured into the the- 
atrical world, leasing the old Tabernacle which he remodelled, launching his new 
enterprise under the name of the Bungalow Theatre. This last undertaking proved a 
success and he next became interested in the Eleventh Street Theatre, subsequently 
taking over the Marquam which now bears his name. 

In addition to his business activity Mr. Baker has been very prominent in civic 
affairs. For eleven years he served as a member of the city council of Portland, 
retiring from that body when the commission form of government was adopted. Two 
years thereafter he was elected city commissioner and after serving for two years 
in that position he was chosen mayor in 1916 and reelection has since continued him 
in that office. He is one of the most popular chief executives the city has ever had. 
He is giving to Portland a most public-spirited and progressive administration, char- 
acterized by various needed reforms and improvements and the worth of his work 
is widely acknowledged. He regards a public office as a position of trust and never 
uses his natural talents unworthily nor supports dishonorable causes. His official 
record is a most creditable one and he is striving in every way possible to make Port- 
land one of the best governed cities in the Pacific northwest. 

Mayor Baker is prominent in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second 
degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory and also belonging to Al Kader Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also identified with the Woodmen of the World, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is 
also a member of a number of civic organizations, including the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Mayor Baker is a citizen of whom Portland may well feel proud. He is a 
big man in every sense of the word, by nature kind-hearted, sympathetic and gener- 
ous and possessing those sterling qualities of manhood which in every land and 
clime compel respect and admiration. 



FRANCIS MARION WILKINS. 



Francis Marion Wilkins, former mayor of Eugene, is one of the most highly 
residents of the city. Moreover, he is one of the oldest sons of Oregon, 
his birth having occurred in Clackamas county on the 10th of August, 1848. 
Throughout the intervening years which have brought Oregon from its territorial 
position to a place among the leading states of the Union, he has been greatly inter- 
ested in its progress and in all possible ways has aided in its improvement and de- 
velopment. His father, the Hon. Mitchell Wilkins, was born in Orange county, 
North Carolina, in 1818. In early life he engaged in boating and boat building on 
the Mississippi river and subsequently resided near St. Joseph, Missouri, performing 
the first carpenter work of any note in that embryo town. In 1847 Mr. Wilkins and 
his wife crossed the plains to Oregon and after many trials and tribulations they 
reached Clackamas county on the 25th of October. They spent the winter near what 
is now Marquam and in the spring of 1848 resumed their journey toward the south, 
at length reaching what is now Lane county, where Mr. Wilkins took up a donation 
claim of six hundred and forty acres located ten miles northeast of the present site 
of the city of Eugene. He at once set about the work of clearing and developing his 
claim and had barely become established in his pioneer home when, lured by the 
discovery of gold in California, he started for the Eldorado on horseback in the fall 



92 HISTORY OP OREGON 

of 1849. This venture proved unsuccessful, however, and soon afterward he returned 
to his Oregon ranch, where he resided the remainder of his life, devoting his energies 
to stock raising, in which he met with a substantial measure of success. He became 
a prominent figure in public affairs and in 1876 he was commissioner from Oregon to 
the Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia, acting in the same capacity at the New 
Orleans Exposition in 1884 and the Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893. He 
likewise became one of the organizers of the State Agricultural Society and for many 
years served a.s its president. In 1844, in Platte county, Missouri, he married Per- 
melia Ann Allan, who was born in Bates county, Missouri, April 7, 1827, a daughter of 
Robert and Elizabeth (Morrow) Allan, and they became the parents of seven children, 
three of whom are living: Francis Marion, Angeline and Amos. Those deceased are 
Jasper, Eliza Jane, Henrietta and May Rose. Mr. Wilkins passed away January 31, 
1904, while his wife's death occurred on the 10th of June, 1909. Coming to the state 
in pioneer times they bore their full share in the work of development and upbuild- 
ing and in the section where they resided they were widely known and universally 
honored. 

In the acquirement of an education their son, Francis M. Wilkins, attended the 
district schools and afterwards learned the drug business. In 1869 he was gradu- 
ated from the Portland Business College and in 1877 he embarked in business on 
his own account in connection with Dr. Shelton, under the firm name of Shelton & 
Wilkins. After a brief period, however, Mr. Wilkins purchased his partner's interest 
and conducted the business alone until his retirement in 1895, his reliable and pro- 
gressive business methods and his reasonable prices having won for him a good 
patronage. He has since been active in public affairs and for eight years served on 
the promotion board of the Commercial Club, in which capacity he rendered valuable 
service to his city in promoting its business interests. In other public connections 
he has given equal demonstration of his loyalty to the best interests of the community, 
serving for two years as councilman of his city, to which office he was elected in 1905. 
He has also been called to the office of mayor of Eugene and gave to the city a 
businesslike and progressive administration, characterized by many needed reforms 
and improvements. It was during his tenure of office that the first street paving was 
done in the city and the first land purchased for park purposes. He also secured for 
the city many needed public utilities, including gas and street car service, and the first 
combination wagon for fighting fire was secured during his administration. He served 
for a number of years as president of the Lane County Agricultural Society, which 
has for its purpose the holding of fairs in Lane county and for the past six years 
he has been a member of the board of public commissioners. Thus along many lines 
of activity he has contributed to the progress and upbuilding of his city. 

In 1872 Mr. Wilkins was united in marriage to Miss Emma Goltra, a native of 
Lebanon, Linn county, the wedding ceremony being performed at her home in Lane 
county. They have become the parents of five children: Maude, the wife of Herbert 
T. Condon of Seattle, Washington; F. L., also a resident of Seattle; Nina, the wife 
of Major C. C. McCormack, a surgeon in the United States army; Lucia, who mar- 
ried Major H. C. Moore, who spent a year and a half in France and is now stationed at 
Ft. Lawton, Washington; and Gladys. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and fra- 
ternally he is connected with Spencer Butte Lodge, No. 9, I. O. 0. F., and is also a 
past chief patriarch of Wimawhala Encampment, No. 6. He became a member of the 
first lodge of the Knights of Pythias organized at Eugene and is identified with Eugene 
Camp, No. 15, Woodmen of the World, of which he became a charter member. 



A. E. PETERSEN. 



A. E. Petersen, a successful real estate dealer of Salem, is also well known as a 
horticulturist, being the owner of one hundred and four acres of valuable land in this 
vicinity, devoted principally to the raising of fruit, and along both lines of activity he 
has contributed to the work of development and improvement in his section of the state. 
He was born at Red Wing, Minnesota, October 12, 1877, and is a son of J. H. Petersen, 
a native of Norway, who came to the United States when seven years of age, becoming 
a resident of Red Wing. Subsequently he went to St. Paul and in 1889 he came to Port- 
land, Oregon, establishing himself in the cutlery business. He has been very success- 



HISTORY OF OREGON 93 

ful in the conduct of his mercantile interests and although sixty-four years of age is still 
an active factor in commercial circles, his place of business being at No. Ill Third 
street, in Portland. In 1876, in Red Wing, Minnesota, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Suhrs, who was born in that city in 1856. Mr. Petersen was one of the early 
settlers of Minnesota, having located in that state before the building of a railroad 
through that section of the country. He maintains his residence in Salem, although his 
business interests are in Portland, and his sterling traits of character have gained for 
him a wide circle of friends. 

In the schools of St. Paul, Minnesota, and Portland, Oregon, A. E. Petersen pursued 
his education and on starting out in life independently he became identified with the 
real estate business, handling Northern Pacific Railroad lands. He had also pursued a 
course in law and was associated in practice with Charles H. Abercrombie, city attorney 
of Astoria, and they likewise engaged in handling realty, their activities in that field 
constituting an important element in promoting the substantial growth and upbuilding 
of the city of Astoria. Subsequently Mr. Petersen operated the Seaburg Fish Cannery 
on the Rogue river for two years, after which he returnd to Salem, where he became 
identified with the real estate business and also followed the occupation of farming, 
along which lines he is still active, his office being located in the Oregon building. He 
has negotiated many important realty transfers and has an intimate knowledge of the 
worth of real estate in his locality, being considered an expert in placing valuations 
upon property. He is also successfully conducting his farming interests, being the 
owner of a twenty-four acre ranch adjoining the city limits, which is devoted to the 
cultivation of prunes, cherries, apples and loganberries. He also owns a farm of eighty 
acres eight miles south of Salem and on this property he raises prunes, loganberries and 
grain. He employs the most scientific methods in the cultivation of his land, his efforts 
being productive of excellent results. He maintains his residence in Salem and is the 
owner of an attractive home at No. 823 North Commercial street. 

On the 8th of June, 1911, Mr. Petersen was united in marriage to Miss Grace Mosier, 
a daughter of Tobias and Mary (Beeman) Mosier, honored pioneer settlers of Oregon 
and members of two of its most prominent and influential families. The father came 
to the Willamette valley in 1847 and the mother arrived four years later. Both crossed 
the plains with ox teams, experiencing the horrors of Indian attacks and passing near 
the scene of the Whitman massacre. Mr. Petersen is fond of good literature and is an 
extremely well-read man, having devoted much time to the study of history. He is 
regarded as an authority on the history of Oregon and has in his possession many val- 
uable books pertaining thereto. His labors have always been constructive and intelli- 
gently carried forward, resulting in the attainment of a substantial measure of success, 
while at the same time his efforts have proved a valuable element in promoting the 
growth and prosperity of his community. He is recognized as an enterprising and alert 
business man and as a public-spirited citizen and his personal qualities are such that he 
has gained the warm friendship of many. 



EDWARD GRENFELL. 



As fire marshal of Portland Edward Grenfell is rendering most Important and 
valuable service to the city, discharging the duties of the office with notable capa- 
bility and fidelity. He is one of Oregon's native sons, his birth having occurred at 
McMlnnville in 1882. His parents, Edward and Annie (Shank) Grenfell, were na- 
tives of Cornwall, England, and of New Zealand, respectively, the father coming to 
Oregon in the '80s by way of Cape Horn. In this state he engaged in farming and to 
him and his wife were born ten children, namely: Nettie, Thomas, Edward, Stewart, 
Stephen, William, Ralph, Lester, Ernest and Izora. 

Edward Grenfell, the third in the family, was reared on his father's farm and 
remained at home until he reached the age of twenty years. On starting out in life 
independently he became connected with the Bremerton navy yards, where Be remained 
for two years and then made his way to Portland, securing employment as a member 
of the fire department. His faithful and efficient service soon won recognition and 
in December, 1907, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and in March of the 
following year was made captain. In January, 1918, he received the appointment of 
fire marshal and also became battalion chief of district No. 1, being now at the 
head of fire prevention work in Portland. His thorough preliminary training and 



94 HISTORY OF OREGON 

broad experience well qualify him for this responsible position and he is conducting 
the department along the most modern and progi-essive lines, at all times keeping 
abreast with the advancement that is being made in methods of fire prevention. 
He is a thoroughly dependable man, of courageous spirit and firm determination and 
is deserving of the highest commendation for the capable manner in which he is dis- 
charging his duties. 

In 1915 Mr. Grenfell was united in marriage to Miss Iva O. Olenstead who was 
born and reared in the state of New York. In his political views he is a republican, 
stalwart in his support of the principles and candidates of the party and fraternally 
he is identified with the Woodmen of the World. He is also a Mason of high rank, 
having attained the thirty-second degree in the consistory and also belonging to the 
Shrine, and in his life he exemplifies the beneficent teachings of the order. His entire 
career has been characterized by marked devotion to duty and in safeguarding the 
lives and property of the citizens of Portland he is performing a service of inestimable 
worth. 



ALPHA EUGENE ROCKEY, M. D. 

The name of Dr. Alpha Eugene Rockey of Portland figures prominently in the 
annals of surgery in the northwest. Since 1891 Dr. Rockey has practiced in the Rose 
City and his wide study and increasing experience have placed him in the front rank 
among those of expert skill in this section of the country. A native of Illinois, he was 
born in 1857, and following the completion of a course in medicine he practiced for 
ten years in Iowa City. While there residing he was united in marriage to Miss Phila 
Jane Watson and they became the parents of two sons. Anxious to obtain the highest 
degree of efficiency possible in his chosen profession and actuated at all times by a 
sense of conscientious duty in his chosen work, he went abroad for postgraduate study 
in pathology and surgery, spending several years in the universities of London, Berlin, 
Vienna, Paris and Cairo. 

Coming to Portland in 1891, Dr. Rockey concentrated his efforts largely upon general 
surgical practice and also for nineteen years was surgeon to the street railways, first 
to the Oregon Water Power & Railway Company, and from the time of its organization 
chief surgeon to the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, until after his return 
from military service. He then resigned this position to engage in the exclusive prac- 
tice of surgery in association with his sons, Drs. Paul and Eugene Watson Rockey. 

Dr. Rockey of this review is a member of the county, state and national medical 
associations and of the North Pacific Surgical Association, o£ the American College of 
Surgeons and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has 
served as president of the city, the county and the state medical societies and has made 
numerous and valuable contributions to surgical literature, becoming widely known in 
this connection. 

In 1911 Dr. Rockey was commissioned lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps 
by President William Howard Taft. When America entered the World war he and 
his sons applied for active service and were assigned to duty at the base hospital at 
Camp Lewis. There the father was given the rank of major and made chief of the 
surgical service. His sons went overseas with the American Expeditionary Forces, 
did active duty in evacuation hospitals in France and after the armistice were with the 
Third Army in the occupied territory. Dr. Rockey was retired from active duty in 
May, 1919, with the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Medical Reserve Corps of the 
army. 



HOLDER M. PIHL. 



Holger M. Pihl, of the Pihl Transfer & Storage Company of Portland, conducting a 
baggage, packing and shipping business, is a native of Denmark, his birth having 
occurred at Bornholm, in that country. His father, Chris Pihl, was also a native of 
that place and is still farming there at the age of sixty-eight years. The mother, who 
bore the maiden name of Marie Dedrickson, is also living. 

Holger M. Pihl was educated in the common schools of his native country and when 




LIEUTENANT COLONEL A. E. ROCKEY 



HISTORY OF OREGON 97 

eighteen years of age bade adieu to friends and family and sailed for the new world. 
He made his way at once to Oregon and engaged in farming in Washington county, 
being employed by John F. Forbis for seven years. Then in connection with his 
brother, Carl C. Pihl, he purchased a farm at Banks, Oregon, comprising one hundred 
and sixty-four acres of land and continued the cultivation of the place for two years. 
The brothers still own the property, from which they expect to remove all the timber, 
and stock it with Jersey cows in the near future. It was in 1915 that Holger M. Pihl 
and his brother, M. P., entered the transfer and storage business and today their annual 
patronage brings them in more than thirty-six thousand dollars. They operate one 
light and five heavy service trucks and their business is steadily increasing. It is 
conducted as a partnership arrangement, Holger M. Pihl being associated with his 
brother, M. P. Pihl, who came to the United States in 190S and established the business. 
Another brother, C. C. Pihl, came to Oregon in 1904 and is also a resident of Portland, 
but is not connected with the company. The Pihl Transfer & Storage Company employs 
six men and the two brothers, who own the business, are stockholders also of the 
Cremona Phonograph Company of Albany, Oregon. 

In 1919 Holger M. Pihl was married to Miss Lena Stevens, a native of this state 
and a daughter of J. Stevens, who has been in the employ of the City Water Works 
for twenty-two years. They have one child, a daughter, Margery Ellen, who is an 
Infant. Both of Mrs. Pihl's parents are pioneers of Oregon and are still living in this 
state. 

Mr. Pihl deserves great credit for what he has accomplished. He borrowed one 
hundred dollars with which to pay his passage to the United States and thus empty 
handed he started out in the business wo: Id. Step by step he has advanced and his 
success has led him to an enviable position among the industrious and progressive 
young business men of his adopted city. 



J. B. LABER. 



J. B. Laber, whose real estate activities in Portland have been of an important 
character, was born in Kentucky in 1S65 and came to Oregon in 1880, when a youth of 
fifteen years. For two years after his arrival in the northwest he taught school in 
Vancouver, Washington. Since that time his attention has been given to real estate 
activities and he has contributed much to the development of Portland and this section 
of the state. He was active in promoting the Interstate Bridge, the Union Stock 
Yards and the Greater Port Development, and his land holdings in the peninsular 
district of Portland are considerable. While he has been one of the city's most active 
and public-spirited men he shrinks from anything that savors of personal publicity. 
The Peninsular Development project, which is one of the largest in the northwest, 
is located at the junction of the Willamette and Columbia rivers, which he terms the 
Manhattan of the Pacific, for the end of the peninsula is laid out in the form of the 
battery of New York city and is so called in this gigantic plan of city building. Mr. 
Laber is content to place the judgment of his activities with the people and he finds 
his pleasure at his own fireside with his family. 



M. J. DRISCOLL. 



M. J. Driscoll, president of the Driscoll & Collier Transfer Company of Portland, 
was born in Connecticut, May 12, 1866. His father, Timothy Driscoll, was a native of 
Ireland and came to America fifty-seven years ago, after which he engaged in the 
cotton manufacturing business, continuing his residence in New England throughout 
his remaining days. He passed away at Providence, Rhode Island, about fifteen years 
ago. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Hanova O'Shea, was also a native of 
Ireland, and they were married in that country. 

M. J. Driscoll obtained his education in the public schools of his native state and 
thirty years ago came to Oregon, settling in Portland. For nine years he was connected 
with the fire department of the city and then turned his attention to the livery business, 
which he conducted at Fifth and Pine streets until the building was sold, when he 
removed to Washington and Nineteenth streets. Four years later he disposed of his 

Vol. II— 7 



98 HISTORY OF OKEGON 

livery barn and turned his attention to the draying business with office at 27 Second 
street. After being located there for twelve years he removed to his present location 
at 284 Everett street. He carries on a general draying business and employs about 
twenty people, utilizing fourteen wagons and two auto trucks in the conduct of his 
business, which is carried on under the name of the Driscoll & Collier Transfer Company, 
of which he is president, while his wife is vice president. 

Mr. Driscoll was first united in marriage to Miss Mary Callahan, a native of 
Norwich, Connecticut, and to them was born one child, Alice, who is now a teacher in 
the Glen Haven school. A few years after his first wife passed away he was united in 
marriage to Miss Margaret Frainey, a native of Portland. 

In politics Mr. Driscoll is a republican and tor four years served as a member 
of the city council, exercising his official prerogatives in support of the many plans and 
measures for the general good. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Foresters, the Hibernians and the Woodmen of the World. He 
has become well known as an active and representative business man in Portland and 
concentrates the greater part of his time and attention upon his business affairs, yet is 
interested in all matters pertaining to the general welfare, and his support and coopera- 
tion can be counted upon to further various measures for the public good. 



HON. ARCHIE J. JOHNSON. 

Hon. Archie J. Johnson, president of the Benton County State Bank of Corvallis, is 
a man of resourceful business ability who has not only won distinction in the field of 
finance but is equally prominent as an agriculturist, stock-raiser, lumberman and 
statesman. A representative of one of the oldest families of the state, he was born in 
Marion county, Oregon, September 18, 1867, on the old donation land claim of his 
grandfather, Hiram Alvah Johnson. His parents, John Charles and Violetta 
(Gunsaules) Johnson, were natives of Illinois, the former born in Pike county in 1842 
and the latter in Knox county, April 19, 1846. In 1847 Hiram Alvah Johnson started 
with his family across the plains, traveling with ox teams and wagons, his son, John 
C. Johnson, being at that time but five years of age. On reaching Oregon, Hiram A. 
Johnson took up a donation claim in Marion county, three miles north of the present 
site of the town of Jefferson, and it was upon this property that Archie J. Johnson was 
born. The grandfather at once began the arduous task of clearing and developing his 
claim, on which he continued to reside for several years, and subsequently he was for 
some time engaged in general merchandising at Jefferson. At length he removed to 
Salem, Oregon, where he became prominent in public affairs, serving as justice of the 
peace for a period of eighteen years. He passed away at Salem at the age of seventy- 
seven years, and his wife, surviving him for two years, died at the age of seventy-six. 
She also crossed the plains with her parents in 1852, making the journey with ox teams 
and settling near Jefferson, Oregon. 

John C. Johnson, the eldest son of the family, was reared and educated in Marion 
county, Oregon, and after completing his studies he engaged in teaching school for two 
years. He then turned his attention to farming and stock raising, purchasing land 
near Scio in Linn county, which he improved and developed, and he was active in its 
operation until 1874. He then removed to Scio, where he engaged in general merchandis- 
ing for a number of years and subsequently became interested in the money-loaning 
business in that city and was thus active for some time. At a still later period, in 
association with his son, Archie J., he purchased the mercantile business which he had 
formerly owned and managed at Scio. conducting it under the firm name of J. C. Johnson 
& Son at that point for about four years, when he removed to Salem and there lived 
retired until 1913, when he took up his abode in Corvallis, where he resided up to the 
date of his death, December 3, 1920. The mother survives. As pioneers of this state 
their experiences were broad and varied, bringing them knowledge of every phase of 
frontier life. Great indeed have been the changes which have been wrought in the 
intervening period, and in the work of development and improvement they bore their 
full share. 

Archie J. Johnson was reared and educated in Linn county, attending the public 
schools of Scio, and subsequently was a student in the Portland Business College, from 
which he was graduated at the age of eighteen. On starting out in the business world 



HISTORY OF OREGON 99 

he became a clerk in a general mercantile establishment, with which he was connected 
tor a period of six years. In 18S8 he went to Seattle, Washington, where he became 
associated with the firm of White & Company, dealers in real estate, with whom he 
continued for one and a half years, platting six additions to that city and selling four 
while there and two after leaving Seattle. In 1SS9 he returned to Scio and in association 
with his father purchased the store which the latter had formerly conducted there and 
this they continued to operate for about three years. In 1890, while a resident of Scio, 
Archie J. Johnson became one of the organizers of the Bank of Scio and thus received 
his initial experience in financial affairs. Two years later, or in 1892, in association 
with T. J. Munkers, Mr. Johnson purchased the bank, becoming its cashier. In 1895 he 
turned his attention to manufacturing interests, purchasing an interest in the Scio 
Milling Company, of which he became manager, and serving in that capacity until 1902, 
when he disposed of all of his business investments in the town. In 1900 he had been 
appointed national bank examiner, which position he filled for six and a half years, 
covering the states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming and ably 
discharging his duties in that connection. In 1903 he purchased a stock farm of forty- 
one hundred acres in the northern part of Benton county. This was the largest stock 
ranch in the county in a single body of land, and Mr. Johnson's brother-in-law and his 
brother C. V. assisted him in its operation. In 1903 he and his family removed to 
Corvallis. In 1906 he resigned his position as bank examiner and organized the Benton 
County National Bank of Corvallis, erecting the building in which the institution is 
now housed. On the 25th of July, 1907, the bank opened its doors for business and 
in 1916 it was made a state bank, through taking out a state charter. From the time 
of its organization Mr. Johnson has been president of the bank, which has become known 
as one of the strongest financial institutions of the county, the successful conduct of 
the enterprise being largely due to his initiative and ability. The policy of the bank 
has been strongly influenced by his business principles, and while he is ever progressive 
and aggressive, he employs that conservatism necessary to safeguard the interests of 
depositors as well as stockholders. Mr. Johnson also acts as manager of the bank, with 
J. L. Gault as vice president and cashier; his son, Elmo E. and Floyd B. Bogue, his 
son-in-law as assistant cashiers. The institution is capitalized for sixty thousand 
dollars, has a surplus of twenty thousand dollars, resources amounting to one million 
and a quarter dollars, while its deposits have reached the sum of approximately one 
million, two hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Johnson is also president of the Willamette 
Valley Stock & Land Company, live stock, lumber and bond brokers. He is likewise 
interested in farming and stock raising, having a valuable farm near Corvallis, on which 
he has until recently kept his fine herd of registered Jersey cattle. He also specializes 
in the breeding of Hampshire-Down sheep with his associates on their fine farm of 
five hundred and forty acres in South Benton. His agricultural interests are extensive 
and important and in addition to his holdings in this state he is the owner of large 
ranches in Montana and Washington. During the World war he purchased some fine 
spruce timber land on the Siletz river in Lincoln county and erected a mill at the 
mouth of that stream, taking large government contracts for cutting spruce lumber for 
airplanes and continuing its operation until the close of the war. He is a man 
of exceptional business qualifications, who is continually broadening the scope of his 
activities with good results, carrying forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes, for in his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. 

On the 31st of January, 18SS, Mr, Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Linnie 
Young, a daughter of Nathan and Mary Young, natives of Ohio. In an early day her 
father moved westward, becoming a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he 
engaged in the milling business. In 1880 he came to Oregon and after residing at 
various places in the state he at length removed to Scio, where he continued to make 
his home from 1884 until his demise in May, 1919, at the venerable age of ninety years. 
The mother passed away in 1914 and they were highly respected residents of their 
community. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were born seven children, as follows: CLeo 
married J. F. Porter, formerly cashier of the Benton County State Bank, but now 
secretary of the Willamette Valley Stock & Land Company. They reside in Corvallis 
and have one child, Lyle. Zeta became the wife of Floyd E. Bogue, assistant cashier of 
the Benton County State Bank, and passed away in January, 1919, as a victim of the 
Influenza. Elmo E., who also acts as assistant cashier of the Benton County State 
Bank, married Linnie D. Durrell and they have two children, Donald and Charles. 
Darrell D., manager of the Willamette Valley Stock & Land Company, married Bertha 
McHenry and they have become the parents of a son, Dick. Orlo O. is a student in 



100 HISTORY OP OREGON 

the Oregon Agricultural College. Wanda L. is a high school pupil. Archie J., Jr., who is 
eight years of age, is attending the graded schools. 

In his political views Mr. Johnson is a republican and he has taken a prominent 
part in the public affairs of his county and state. In 1S94 he was elected state senator 
from Linn county, in which office he served for four years, giving earnest support to 
all the bills which he believed would prove beneficial to the commonwealth. He care- 
fully studied the problems which came up for settlement and his legislative career is 
one over which there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. While a resident 
of Scio he was for two terms a member of the town council and also served as mayor 
of the city for one term. Since becoming a resident of Corvallis he has served as a 
member of the council for one term and for two years as mayor, in which connection 
he gave to the city a most businesslike and progressive administration. In 1906, while 
still serving in the office of mayor, he was elected state senator from Benton county, 
which office he filled for four years, again rendering important and valuable service 
to his county and state, his influence being ever on the side of advancement and im- 
provement. At the expiration of his term in 1910 he refused to be a candidate to succeed 
himself. He is much interested in the welfare and development of his city and for 
two years was president of the Corvallis Commercial Club, in which connection he 
contributed largely to the extension of its trade relations. Fraternally Mr. Johnson is 
identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and in the latter organization he has passed through all of the chairs. In 
religious faith he is a Presbyterian and an active worker in the church, having since 
1905 served as chairman of its board of trustees. The activities of Mr. Johnson have 
ever been of a constructive character and he deserves classification with the builders of 
the great northwest, for he has taken an active part in the development of the material 
resources of the country and the promotion of commercial and financial interests. His 
initiative spirit and notable ability have carried him into important relations and the 
breadth and scope of his interests have been such that his labors have constituted an 
important feature in the history of the state. He stands always on the side of progress 
and improvement, of right and reform, and he is a representative of the highest type 
of American manhood and citizenship. 

During the World war, Mr. Johnson accepted the chairmanship of Benton County's 
War Council and was made chairman of all war drives, devoting practically all of his 
time to such work, ever putting his county over the top. His son Darrell D., was one 
of the first to volunteer his services in the army, going to the first training camp at 
the Presidio, where he was given a second lieutenant's commission. He went to France 
with the Ninety-first Division; was in the great Argonne Forest fight, where he was 
wounded on the night of September 26, 191S, and was compelled to lie in the hospital 
at Bordeaux for two and a half months before he could return to his home in America. 
He is now fully recovered however. Orlo 0. volunteered as a marine but spent his time 
along the Atlantic coast mainly, not being priviledged to go across the waters. 



SYLVESTER FARRELL. 



When Sylvester Farrell passed away in 1909 death removed one who had long 
been a most honored and prominent factor in the business life and development of 
Portland. Looking at his record through the perspective of the years, one realizes 
how valuable was his contribution to the city. He was a man of well balanced 
capacities and powers who long occupied a central place on the stage of action and his 
labors found culmination in the development of a number of most important industries. 
While a most active factor in business, he never allowed personal interests or ambition 
to dwarf his public spirit or activities. His was the record of a strenuous life — the 
record of a strong individuality, sure of itself, stable in purpose, quick in perception, 
swift in decision, energetic and persistent in action. 

Mr. Farrell was of Canadian nativity, his birth having occurred at St. Thomas, 
Ontario, August 2, 1833. He was the eldest of a family of three sons and a daughter 
and was only ten years of age when left an orphan, an uncle acting as guardian. He 
and his younger brothers lived upon a farm and their opportunities of acquiring an 
education were extremely meager. Sylvester Farrell received less than a year's instruc- 
tion in the schoolroom but learned many valuable lessons in the school of experience 
and was continually promoting his knowledge by reading and observation, so that he 




SYLVESTER FARRELL 



HISTORY OF OREGON 103 

became a man of notably sound judgment and manifested keen insight and sagacity 
concerning business affairs and other experiences of life. The urge of necessity 
prompted him to seek employment when he was still quite young, his first position 
being that of a clerk in a grocery store in St. Thomas, Ontario. Attracted by the 
opportunities of the great and growing west, he made his way to San Francisco, where 
he learned the miller's trade, being employed along that line for three years. 

Mr. Farrell became a resident of Portland in 1867 and after working along various 
lines he entered into partnership with Richard Everding and purchased the business of 
the firm of Everding & Beebe, the senior partner of which was a brother of Richard 
Everding. With the change in ownership the firm style of Everding & Farrell was 
adopted and the business was later incorporated under that name. Mr. Farrell was 
continuously connected with the lirm from 1867 until the time of his demise and the 
business is still carried on at the old location — 140 Front street. They conducted a 
wholesale produce and commission business and their patronage steadily increased 
until their interests had assumed extensive proportions. After some years the firm 
also became identified with logging and with the salmon packing industry, owning can- 
neries at Pillar Rock, Washington, where their output amounted to thirty thousand cases 
yearly. Their logging interests are at Deep River, Washington, and the timber is sold 
directly to the mills. It was in connection with George T. Myers that Mr. Farrell built 
the first salmon cannery on Puget Sound in 1879 but afterward disposed ot his interest 
in that enterprise to his partner. It was subsequent to this time that he developed 
his interests at Pillar Rock on the Columbia river and became president of the Pillar 
Rock Packing Company. As commission merchants in the grain trade the company 
built up a most extensive business, theirs being one of the first commission houses in 
the city, and it came to be a current phrase that "Mr. Farrell opened Front street every 
morning," for he was usually at his post between six and seven o'clock. Work was his 
pleasure and for forty years, from early morning until late in the evening, he was 
seldom off duty at the store of Everding & Farrell. With his firm he also became 
extensively interested in timber lands, in logging companies and in farm lands. What- 
ever he undertook seemed to prosper and yet this was not the result of any fortunate 
combination of circumstances but the direct outcome of business ability that was devel- 
oped through years of experience and close application. 

Death came to Mr. Farrell suddenly. On the morning of the 11th of January, 1909, 
he went as usual to his office and a few moments after entering the room was seen to 
stagger and fall. His nephew, standing near, caught him but almost Instantly he 
breathed his last. 

In early manhood Mr. Farrell was united in marriage to Miss Honor Miller and 
they became the parents of five children. Thomas George was associated with his 
father in business. Robert S., who was also admitted to partnership by his father, is 
a member ot the state senate and one of the most prominent legislators ot Oregon, who 
served for two terms in the house and for tour terms has been a member of the senate. 
Fraternally, too, he has extensive connections. Annie, the eldest daughter, is the wife 
of Frederick W. Cookman. Ida is the wife ot W. W. Youngson. The youngest daughter, 
Jessie, is at home with her mother. 

A contemporary biographer has written of Mr. Farrell as follows: "While Mr. 
Farrell held membership with the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the United Workmen and 
a number ot other fraternal organizations, he seldom attended lodge, invariably spend- 
ing his evenings at home with his family, to whom he was most devoted. His kindly 
spirit was always manifest in his treatment of dumb animals and a pet dog, horse or 
cat was almost invariably his companion. In his office for seven years he had a large 
maltese cat and each Sunday and on holidays he would go to the store with milk and 
food for his pets. A nature that thus responds to the needs of the dumb animals is 
sure to have a heart warm with kindness for all humanity and the spirit of helpful- 
ness was manifest in all Mr. Farrell's relations with his fellowmen. He was one of the 
founders and for many years a trustee of the Boys and Girls Aid Society of the state 
of Oregon. He was never neglectful of the duties of citizenship and gave hearty and 
generous response when his aid was needed to further any public project that promised 
to be of value to city, state or nation. He figured prominently in state and county 
politics, for several terms represented his district in the general assembly and for 
six years was a member of the city council. He served upon nearly all of the city 
commissions and up to the time of his death was a member of the state board of pilot 
commissioners. 

"The Oregonian of January 13, 1909, published the following tribute from the pen 



104 HISTORY OP OREGON 

of one who had known him long and well: 'The lives well spent, the good names well 
earned, are not so numerous as to be overlooked. The passing over of Sylvester Farrell 
deserves public recognition. Commencing his business life in this city forty years 
ago in a little, old, ramshackle shed of a warehouse on the river's brink, near the foot 
of Madison street, with nothing but willing hands and honest hearts, he and his still 
remaining partner built up a profitable and enduring business which defied the storms 
of adversity, brought them an ample fortune and placed their names at the top of the 
list of honest, successful and absolutely trustworthy merchants. No man ever trusted 
the word of Sylvester Farrell and was disappointed. His word was as good as his 
bond and passed current for ready cash. Not only in private life, but equally so in all 
his business transactions, he was a Just man and loved mercy. Many is the man whose 
account has been carried by his firm through the stress of hard times and until the 
clouds had rolled by, bringing relief. Whether he was a member of any church, I know 
not, but in his intercourse with his fellowmen he manifested the vital principle of 
Christianity and never forgot the Golden Rule. As a citizen Mr. Farrell was a model 
man. Willing to serve wherever he could render useful service, he most efliclently 
served his city and state in many positions and without self-seeking in any form. Pub- 
lic-spirited to the extent of his ability, he rendered valuable aid in developing the re- 
sources of the state and building up this city. He was one of the directors of the 
company that proposed and constructed the Dayton, Sheridan & Dallas Railroad, which 
was the foundation of the second railroad system of the Willamette valley, and ren- 
dered great and effective support to that enterprise. He also gave great aid to the 
railroad development of the timber resources of the Columbia river region. And tak- 
ing the man in all his relations to his fellow citizens, his city and his state, he is 
among all the hundred thousand citizen voters of the state most worthily to be ranked 
the one in a thousand. Good friend, true man, hail and farewell!' The machinery of 
an iron constitution suddenly stopped. The light of his lamp has gone out, and Sylves- 
ter Farrell, the Junior member of the oldest living firm in the city of Portland, has 
crossed the great river, there to await those who will follow." 



WILLIAM H. WHEELER. 



As editor and proprietor of the Brownsville Times, William H. Wheeler is pro- 
ducing a newspaper of much interest and value to the community in which he lives. 
He was born in Vermont, November 10, 1S50, a son of William Henry Harrison and 
Ann (Standish) Wheeler, the former a native of the Green Mountain state, while the 
latter was born in Canada. In the east the father followed the trades of a carpenter 
and tanner and also engaged in farming for many years, but in 1S53 he crossed the 
border into Canada and remained a resident of that country throughout- the remainder 
of his life. He passed away in ISSl at the age of sixty-six years, while the mother's 
death occurred in 1S97, when she was seventy-seven years of age. 

Their son, William H. Wheeler, was reared and educated in Canada, within fifty 
feet of the United States boundary line, and there learned the printer's trade. Returning 
to his native state, he became editor of the Vermont Farmer, serving in that capacity 
in 187.3 and 1874. Two years later he went west to California and in 1877 he purchased 
a paper at Watsonville, California, which he conducted for three years and then went 
to San Francisco, where he became a member of the editorial staff of the Chronicle. At 
the end of four years he severed his connection with that publication and turned his 
attention to farming. Coming to Oregon, he took up a homestead in Lane county and 
this he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for a period of seventeen 
years. He then sold the property and turned his attention to other lines, conducting a 
hotel at Seaside, Oregon, for two years. Reentering the field of Journalism, he went 
to Eugene and while a resident of that city was connected with the Register for seven 
years. In June, 1919, he arrived In Brownsville and leased the Brownsville Times, 
which he has since operated, but previous to that time had acted as correspondent tor 
city papers. The Times is one of the best and most influential newspapers in this 
section of the state. Its local columns are always full of interest and the news of the 
world is clearly and concisely set forth. Its information is accurate and reliable and 
it has become popular' with the reading public, enjoying a large circulation, and is 
therefore a good advertising medium. Mr. Wheeler is familiar with every phase of 
newspaper publication and in the management of the Times is meeting with excellent 



HISTORY OF OREGON 105 

While operating his farm in Lane county he specialized in the raising of 
Jersey cattle and he is still the owner of a residence in Eugene. 

In September, 1919, Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna A. Harvey, 
and by a former marriage he has a son, Marion P. Wlieeler, who is postmaster at 
Greenleaf, Oregon, and a daughter, Mabel, who is the wife of Alfred Steinhauer and 
also resides at Greenleaf. Mr. Wheeler owes much of his success to his wife, who 
ably assists him in his editorial work. In politics he is independent and Mrs. Wheeler 
is a member of the Christian church. He stands at all times for improvement in 
everything relating to the upbuilding and development of the county along intellectual, 
political, material and moral lines and his many sterling traits of character have won 
for him the high regard of all who know him. 



F. T. WILCOX. 



F. T. Wilcox, president of the Fernwood Dairy of Portland, has for fourteen years 
been a resident of this city. He was born in Big Rapids, Michigan, October 29, 1869, 
and is a son of S. S. and Adelaide L. (Barber) Wilcox. The father was a native of 
New York, born in 1S41. He pursued his education in the public schools of that state 
and at a college at Albany, New York, and in 1865 removed westward to Michigan. He 
entered the hardware business at Big Rapids, that state, and was also a director of the 
First National Bank of that place for twenty years, long occupying a prominent position 
in the commercial and financial circles there. In 1887 he retired and moved to West 
Superior, Wisconsin, where he passed away in 1892. His wife was born in Pontiac, 
Michigan, and was a daughter of T. W. Barber, a carriage and wagon manufacturer of 
Pontiac. Mrs. Wilcox passed away in Portland in 1908 while visiting her son. 

To the public school system of his native state F. T. Wilcox is indebted for the 
educational privileges which he enjoyed and which prepared him for life's practical 
and responsible duties. He also pursued a special business course and was thus well 
qualified for the activities which later claimed his time and attention. For a con- 
siderable period he was engaged in the hardware business in Superior, Wisconsin, and 
also became interested in the dairy business there, so that he gained knowledge of and 
experience in the business while still residing in the Mississippi Valley. In 1906 he 
removed to the northwest, settling first in Seattle, Washington, but after a short time he 
came to Portland and here soon entered the dairy business, establishing the Fernwood 
Dairy, which has since become one of the profitable enterprises of this character in 
Oregon. The business has been incorporated with Mr. F. T. Wilcox as president, S. S. 
Wilcox as vice president, and L. G. McConnell as secretary and treasurer. Their estab- 
lishment is located at Nos. 13 and 15 Union avenue, and they conduct a general creamery 
business and manufacture butter and are also wholesale distributors of milk, cream, 
butter, eggs and cheese. Their establishment furnishes employment to about thirty- 
seven people. 

In 1891 Mr. Wilcox was united in marriage to Miss Cora D. Apthorp, a native of 
Medina, Ohio, and a daughter of James Apthorp, a cabinet-maker, now deceased. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilcox were born two children: Fred T., now attending Jefferson high 
school at the age of sixteen years; and Stephen S., twenty-five years of age, who married 
Helen Woodcock, a daughter of C. C. Woodcock, a Portland lumberman. Mr. Wilcox 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias and his son, Stephen S. Wilcox, is a Mason, 
while the latter's wife is connected with the Eastern Star. The family is well known 
in Portland, where through the pursuit of a legitimate business Mr. Wilcox has won 
substantial success and also gained an honored name. 



F. G. MYERS. 



F. G. Myers, who for over three decades has been a resident of Salem, is well 
known as the owner and proprietor of The Spa, one of the leading restaurants and 
refreshment parlors in the state. He is a most enterprising and progressive business 
man and his success is the direct result of his close application, perseverance and 
unremitting energy. He was born in Oil City, Pennsylvania, May 27, 1879, and when 
eleven years of age came to Oregon with his parents, David S. and Clara (Weaver) 



10(i HISTORY OF OREGON 

Myers, who took up their residence on a farm east of Lebanon. The father engaged in 
the work of tilling the soil until 1904, when he met an accidental death, being killed by 
a falling tree. The mother survives and resides with her son, O. J. Myers, in Salem. 

In the public schools of Salem, F. G. Myers acquired his education, later pursuing 
a course in a business college. In 1898 he became an employe of W. T. Stolz, a candy 
manufacturer, who was at that time the owner of The apa. He devoted his energies 
to acquiring a thorough knowledge of the business, faithfully performing every task 
assigned him, and at the end of four years was made manager. Carefully saving his 
earnings, he was at length able to purchase a fifth interest in the business and at the 
end of two years increased his holdings to a half interest, while in 1917 he bought 
out the entire business, which he has since most successfully conducted, now having 
one of the most attractive restaurants and refreshment parlors in the state. He is most 
progressive and enterprising in his business methods and has recently let a contract 
for six thousand dollars to cover the cost of enlarging and decorating his establishment, 
which when completed will have a seating capacity of one hundred and ninety-eight 
persons. He has installed a refrigeration plant in connection with his business and his 
soda fountain is twenty-nine feet in length. He thoroughly understands the restaurant 
and confectionery business and is regarded as an expert candy-maker, manufacturing 
over one hundred varieties, having perhaps the most diversified line on the coast. He 
makes everything that he sells, including ice cream, sherbets and lemon custards, the 
last named being a specialty on which he has the monopoly for this section of the 
country. He maintains a strictly high class restaurant, the service and food being of 
superior quality, and he is now conducting an extensive business, giving employment to 
twenty-six people, his pay roll amounting to twenty-nine thousand dollars per year. 
The Spa is one of the oldest and best known restaurants and refreshment parlors in 
this section of the country, having been in operation for thirty-two years, and Mr. 
Myers has had its name copyrighted for the state of Oregon. Its furnishings are in 
excellent taste and it draws its patronage from the best class of people in the city. 

In 1907 Mr. Myers was united in marriage to Miss May E. Priester, a native of 
Mapleton, Iowa, and they have become the parents of two children: Deryl Franklin and 
Maxine May. Mr. Myers is a self-made man, whose prosperity is attributable entirely 
to his own efforts. He is regarded as one of the prominent citizens of Salem because 
of his sterling worth, because of his business enterprise and because of his fidelity to 
every interest calculated to promote the welfare and upbuilding of this section of 
the state. 



JOHN LELAND HENDERSON. 

John Leland Henderson, attorney at law at Tillamook city, is descended from dis- 
tinguished American ancestry in both paternal and maternal lines, the names of his 
ancestors appearing in the history of this country from the earliest colonial days. His 
birth occurred in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1851, and he is a son of John and Catherine 
(Leland) Henderson, the former a native of Indiana. The grandfather, also named 
John, was one of the most distinguished lawyers of the south and was a contemporary 
of Clay, Calhoun and Webster. For many years he served his state in the United States 
senate and Daniel Webster is said to have remarked of him that Senator Henderson 
was without doubt the best land lawyer in America. His son John, the father of John 
Leland Henderson, was associated with him in connection with the legal profession. 
Like his father he was a man of strong convictions and had numerous friends and 
enemies. During one of the political riots at the time of reconstruction in the south, 
he was shot while in the streets of New Orleans in February, 1866, and passed away 
soon afterward. The American founder of the Leland family was Henry Leland, an 
English gentleman, who came to this country in 1652, and our subject is a direct de- 
scendant through his ■J'^n Ebenezer of Sherburne and his son Phineas Eleazer of Graf- 
ton. A grand aunt of Mr. Henderson's was Abigail Leland, who married Millard Fill- 
more, later president of the United States. A great aunt, Elvira Leland, married 
Charles Coolidge and became the great-grandmother of Calvin Coolidge, now serving 
as vice president of the United States. The mother of Mr. Henderson was a daughter 
of Judge Sherman Leland, who was for many years probate judge of Norfolk county, 
Massachusetts, and a member of both house and senate of the state. He was widely 
recognized as a representative member of the legal profession and as a citizen was 




JOHN LELAND HENDERSON 



HISTORY OF OREGON 109 

always interested in any movement for the development and improvement of the gen- 
eral welfare. Mrs. Henderson was a woman of superior education and for many years, 
both before and after her marriage, was a teaeher of several languages, being able to 
speak and write them fluently. 

Until 1865 John Leland Henderson received his education by use of a fine library, 
together with instruction from his mother, who was his sole tutor till he entered the 
Jesuit College of New Orleans, Louisiana. Later he was a student in a military school 
at Brattleboro, Vermont, and was also for some time enrolled in Cornell University, but 
upon the completion of his freshman year there took up the profession of teaching on 
the Pacific coast. In 1870 he came to Oregon, locating in Portland, where he engaged 
in surveying. In 1871 he taught his first school in Eugene and afterward taught in 
other places in the Willamette valley. In 1879 he moved to Olympia, Washington, 
teaching in the Collegiate Institution. In 1891 he went to Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, 
where his ancestors had lived and there he studied law, being admitted to the bar in 
1893. He engaged in the practice of his profession there and also conducted an abstract 
business until 1S98, when he returned to Oregon and was admitted to practice before 
the bar of this state. He located in Hood River, where he resumed his practice, remain- 
ing there for eleven years, when he returned to Portland. In 1911 he located in Tilla- 
mook, where he has since resided and has gained recognition as a representative mem- 
ber of the legal profession throughout the state. The zeal with which he has devoted 
his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced tor the interests of his clients 
and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases have brought 
him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. In addition to his 
professional interests he is secretary and treasurer of the Tillamook Title & Abstract 
Company, one of the most complete plants of its kind in the state. 

In 1873 occurred the marriage of Mr. Henderson and Miss Harriet E. Humphrey, 
a member of one of Oregon's representative pioneer families, and they became the 
parents of the following living children: Leland J., a successful engineer of Columbus, 
Georgia, and the father of the famous Dixie Highway, of which he is president; Louis 
A., who is a graduate of the University of Oregon and served for fourteen months as 
captain of engineers in Prance during the World war; Edwin A., a journalist of Seattle, 
Washington; Sidney E., a mining engineer, whose home is in Oklahoma and who mar- 
ried Lucia, the only daughter of President P. L. Campbell of the University of Oregon; 
and Faith, the wife of E. H. Rueppell of Portland. In 1897 Mr. Henderson married 
Marian I. Grimes of Rapids Parish, Louisiana, and two children have been born to 
this union: Robert Lynn and William E. The elder son served with the marines 
during the World war and William joined the navy, making a fine record in the naval 
school. He is now associated with his father in the operation of a one hundred and 
sixty acre ranch, located at Sugar Loaf Peak in Tillamook county. Mr. Henderson 
takes particular pride in his six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren and expects 
to live to see his great-great-grandchildren. 

Fraternally Mr. Henderson is an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias, and he has 
filled all the chairs in both organizations. He is likewise a Mason, having attained the 
degrees in the chapter and council, and he is an exemplary member of that order. He 
has always been a great athlete and although he is now nearing the seventy mark, every 
Sunday he walks to his ranch, a distance of seven miles, where he works all day 
returning home on foot in the evening. He holds many records as a swimmer and 
while living in Hood River in 1908 swam the Columbia river from Hood River to 
Cascade locks, a distance of twenty-two miles. Mr. Henderson's life has been one of 
continuous activity and he has attained success in every undertaking whether along 
the line of his profession or in business circles. During the ten years of his residence 
in Tillamook he has made many friends who appreciate his sterling characteristics and 
genuine personal worth, and he is readily conceded to be a representative citizen of 
Oregon. 



WALTER G. HENDERSON. 



Law enforcement rested in safe hands with Walter G. Henderson, who was strict, 
fearless and prompt in the discharge of his duties as sheriff of Yamhill county. He 
was born in Zanesville, Ohio, October 5, 1846, and is a son of A. G. and Sarah (Allen) 
Henderson, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. The father was a 



nn HISTORY OP OREGON 

brick and stone m-ason by trade and in an early day he went to Ohio, purchasing land 
in the vicinity of Zanesville which he continued to cultivate until 1853, when he removed 
westward to Iowa. He took up a homestead claim in Marion county and also preempted 
land, and this he brought to a high state of development, remaining active in its 
operation during the balance of his life. He passed away in August, 1SS4, at the age of 
seventy-four years, and the mother's demise occurred in 1886, when she had also attained 
the age of seventy-four years. 

Their son, Walter G. Henderson, was reared and educated in Marion county, Iowa, 
and in 186lj. when a young man of twenty years, he started for Oregon, working his 
way across the plains by driving a four-mule team. It was a long and tedious journey, 
occupying the entire summer, and on arriving in Oregon Mr. Henderson located in Yam- 
hill county, where he iirst secured work as a farm hand, following that and other 
occupations for several years. Later he engaged in farming independently, continuing 
active along that line for five years. In 1877 he arrived in McMinnville, where he 
purchased a livery business, of which he was the proprietor until 1907, when he sold, 
having also conducted a hardware establishment during that period. In 1894 he had 
been elected sheriff of Yamhill county, serving until 1896, and in 1908 he was again 
chosen for that office, in which he remained the incumbent until January 1, 1921, his 
frequent reelections attesting the value of his services in that connection. He left 
nothing undone to enforce the law according to his conscience, and all law-abiding 
citizens felt that they were well protected while he was in office, for he succeeded in 
driving the lawless element from the boundaries of his county, so that the safety of the 
public was greatly increased. 

On the 16th of November, 1867, Mr. Henderson was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Adams, who passed away March 21, 1919. after a three years' illness. She became the 
mother of five children, namely: Nettie, the wife of W. W. Estabrook. a resident of 
Yakima. Washington; Irene, who died in 1880; Ernest R.. who is engaged in farming 
near La Grande, Oregon; Glenn A., who is connected with the internal revenue office at 
Portland; and Raymond R., at home. 

In his political views Mr. Henderson is a republican and he has served as a member 
of the city council. His fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Artisans, and the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, and his religious faith is indicated by his attendance at the 
Christian church. His record in public ofl5ce is one of which he has every reason to 
be proud and at all times he has been actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the 
general good. His sterling qualities make for popularity, and in the county where he 
has so long resided he has many friends, to whom he is familiarly known as "Walt." 



ALBERT E. DOYLE. 



Many of Portland's most beautiful and substantial business structures stand as 
monuments to the notable skill and ability of Albert E. Doyle, a prominent architect 
of this city whose efforts have constituted potent factors in making this a city beautiful, 
noted throughout the Pacific northwest for its splendid business edifices and fine homes. 
Liberally qualified for his professional work by thorough and comprehensive study both 
in this country and abroad he has steadily advanced in his chosen vocation until his 
superior work has won for him classification with the most eminent architects in the 
northwest. 

Mr. Doyle comes of distinguished ancestry, representatives of the family having 
offered their lives in defense of American interests during the Revolutionary war and 
in his professional work he is adding new lustre to an honored family name. He was 
born in Santa Cruz, California. July 27; 1877, a son of James Edward and Mary A. 
(Oakey) Doyle, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of England. In 1869 
the father removed westward to California and during the '70s became a resident of 
Portland. Here he engaged in building and contracting, erecting many of the most sub- 
stantial structures during the early period in the development of this city. He con- 
ducted his interests in partnership with Mr. Porter, one of the pioneer builders of 
the city, and they became known as leading contractors of Portland, the excellence of 
their work securing tor them many important contracts. Mr. Doyle pas.sed away in 
1904, while his widow survived him for several years, her demise occurring in 1915. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 111 

They reared a family of four children, namely: Albert E.; Arthur M.; Ed. E.; and 
Mrs. J. T. Edgerton. 

Albert E. Doyle, the eldest of the family, secured a common school education and 
during his boyhood spent much of his time in his father's shop, there acquiring much 
useful knowledge regarding building work. For twelve years he was in the employ 
of the firm of Whidden & Lewis, well known architects ot Portland, after which he 
pursued special courses in design at Columbia University of New York city and in 
ateliers while working in the office of Henry Bacon. Desirous of still further per- 
fecting his professional knowledge he spent several months as a student in the American 
School of Archaeology at Athens, Greece and a year in foreign travel. Returning to 
the United States he established an office in Portland, becoming associated with W. B. 
Patterson under the firm style of Doyle & Patterson. The excellent work done by the 
firm soon won recognition, resulting in a large and gratifying patronage. This relation- 
ship was maintained until 1914 when Mr. Doyle embarked in business independently 
and has since continued alone, standing at the top of his profession. His labors have 
been an essential element in enhancing the beauty and promoting the development ot the 
"Rose City," and among the structures which he has designed may be mentioned the 
following: the United States National Bank, the Public Library, the Reed College Build- 
ings, Benson Hotel, Meier & Pranks Department Store, the Lipman & Wolfe Depart- 
ment Store, the Selling building, the Morgan building, the Northwestern National Bank 
building and numerous other public edifices and fine residences. A further indication 
of Mr. Doyle's professional standing is indicated in the tact that in 1919 the Oregon 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architecture chose among the ten most notable 
examples of architectural beauty in Portland the following structures, all of which were 
designed by the subject ot this review; The Reed College buildings, the Central Public 
Library, the United States National Bank building and the residence of P. J. Cobbs. 
Mr. Doyle is thoroughly familiar with all of the scientific principles that underlie the 
profession of architecture and in his work skilfully combines beauty with utility. 

In 1906 was celebrated the marriage of Albert E. Doyle and Miss Lucie Godley, 
a daughter of Henry Godley, a representative merchant of Albany, Oregon, and they 
have become the parents of four children: Kathleen, Helen, Jean and Billy. The family 
residence is at No. 437 East Twenty-third street. North. 

Mr. Doyle's interest in the welfare and progress of his city is indicated by his 
membership in the City Planning Commission and the Chamber of Commerce. He is 
also identified with the Arlington Club and is a director of the Portland Art Museum and 
member ot the Board of Regents, Reed College. He is a man with a thorough appre- 
ciation of the finer things in life and his life work is of worth to the world. As the 
architect of his own fortunes he has builded wisely and well, evolving a structure of life 
which in its simplicity and greatness is worthy of the hands of a master builder. 



W. G. VASSALL. 



W. G. Vassall, vice president of the Dallas City Bank and also identified with 
various other business enterprises of this section of Oregon, is also prominent in public 
affairs as city treasurer, making a most creditable record in office. He was born in 
Leeds, England, August 5, 1S64, and is a son of Rev. William and Martha Ann (Skelton) 
Vassall, the former a native of Prance and the latter of England. The father was a 
minister of the Episcopal church and devoted his life to preaching the gospel in England, 
his labors in that connection being productive of much good. He passed away in 1S83 
and the mother survived him for several years, her demise occurring in 1914. 

Their son, W. G. Vassal!, w^as reared and educated in England and in 1882, at the 
age of eighteen years, emigrated to the United States, and making his way across the 
country to Oregon, he settled in Polk county, purchasing land at Dallas. This he 
developed and improved, continuing active in its cultivation until 1S99, when he turned 
his attention to financial interests, entering the Dallas City Bank in the capacity of book- 
keeper. His faithful, conscientious and efficient service soon won him promotion and 
he became successively assistant cashier, cashier and vice president, in wliich office he is 
now serving. He is thoroughly familiar with every phase of the banking business and 
has been largely instrumental in promoting the growth and success of the institution, 
which has become recognized as one of the sound financial enterprises of this section 
of the state. The bank was organized in 1888 with the following oflicers: M. M. Ellis, 



112 HISTORY OF OREGON 

president; C. G. Coad, cashier; and R. E. Williams, assistant cashier. The last named 
gentleman is now serving as president of the institution, with Mr. Vassall as vice 
president, F. J. Craven as cashier, and A. F. Toner, assistant cashier, while its directors, 
in addition to the officers, are I. F. Yoakum, J. W. Crider, R. L. Chapman and Dr. M. 
Hayter, all of whom are thoroughly reliable and progressive business men of this part 
of the state. The bank is capitalized for fifty thousand dollars and now has surplus 
and undivided profits amounting to twenty thousand, three hundred and seventy-six 
dollars, while its deposits have reached the sum of four hundred and sixty-two thousand, 
three hundred and forty-eight dollars. It also controlled the bank at Falls City, Oregon, 
but has since sold its interests in that connection. Mr. Vassall is also a stockholder 
and director of the Dallas National Bank, a stockholder in the Dallas Machine & Locomo- 
tive Works, and is also identified with various other business enterprises, his interests 
being extensive and important. He is a man of marked business ability, foresight and 
enterprise and in the control of his various interests he has won a substantial measure 
of success. 

In January, 1S92, Mr. Vassall was united in marriage to Miss Emma Murphy, 
whose demise occurred in 1912. In his political views he is a republican and has taken 
a prominent part in public affairs of his community, now filling the office of city 
treasurer. He discharges his duties systematically, promptly and capably and is 
proving a faithful custodian of the public funds. He has also been a member of the 
city council and his influence is ever on the side of advancement and improvement. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World and the Masons, belonging 
to Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland, and in religious faith he is an 
Episcopalian. His activities have been of a varied character and as a cooperant factor 
in many projects for the public good he has contributed in no small degree to the up- 
building and improvement of this district. He is a reliable and progressive business 
man and citizen and his many commendable traits of character have established him in 
an enviable position among his fellow townsmen. 



THOMAS L. DUGGER. 



Thomas L. Dugger, editor and proprietor of the Scio Tribune, published at Scio, 
Linn county, has for a half century resided within the borders of this state and is there- 
fore entitled to classification with its honored pioneers. He was born in Macoupin 
county, Illinois, December 17, 1S46, a son of Leonard W. and Sarah (Penn) Dugger, the 
former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Illinois. Brought by his parents to 
Illinois when but three years of age, the father was reared and educated in Madison 
county, that state. After completing his studies he took up farming and purchased land 
in Macoupin county, which he improved and developed, continuing its operation for a 
number of years. He then disposed of his farm and started for the west, coming to 
Oregon in 1876, but after remaining in the state for a year he returned to Illinois and 
purchased his old farm in Macoupin county, which he continued to operate during the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1882. His wife survived him for three 
years, passing away in 1885. 

Thomas L. Dugger was reared and educated in Macoupin county, Illinois, and subse- 
quently entered Blackburn University at Carlinville, Illinois. Previous to pursuing 
his college course, however, he had fought as a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting in 
1862 as a member of Company M, Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, with which command 
he served for three years, participating in many hard fought battles and enduring many 
hardships and privations during that memorable conflict. Upon leaving college, or in 
1870, he came west to Oregon and for one year engaged in teaching school in Portland, 
after which he removed to Linn county, where he followed that profession tor a period 
of eleven years. He was very successful as a teacher, imparting clearly and readily to 
others the knowledge he had acquired, and he became known as one of the prominent 
educators of the state, having charge of Santiam Academy at Lebanon, which has since 
been discontinued. He then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits on a farm six 
miles west of Lebanon, which he cultivated and improved for three years, when he was 
obliged to abandon his farming operations on account of his wife's health. He was next 
engaged in canvassing the county for subscribers to the Albany Herald, of which he 
later became associate editor, gradually acquiring a knowledge of the printer's trade in 
his own shop. In 1890 he became a resident of Scio, purchasing the Scio Press, which 



HISTOKY OF OREGON 113 

he conducted for a period of seven years and then sold, retaining, however, his subscription 
list. His next removal was to Albany, where he became connected with the publication 
of the Peoples Press, but at the end of six months he returned to his farm near Lebanon 
and was active in its operation from 1900 until 1905. In the latter year he returned to 
Scio and again purchased the Santiam News, continuing its publication until 1912, when 
he sold out and purchased a new plant, founding The Tribune In Lebanon, where he 
conducted the paper for a year and then removed his plant to Sweet Home, Oregon. At 
length the business men of Scio induced him to establish his plant in Scio, where it has 
been in operation since 1914. Two years later, or in 1916, he purchased once more 
his old paper, the Santiam News, and consolidated the two publications under the 
name of the Scio Tribune, which he now owns and edits. He has a thoroughly modern 
newspaper plant, equipped with the latest presses and machinery, and he has made 
The Scio Tribune a most valuable and interesting journal, devoted to the welfare and 
Interests of the community which it serves. Its local columns are always full of interest 
and the general news of the world is clearly and completely given, the aims of the 
nation are well set forth and political questions are treated Justly and without prejudice. 
The principal policy of the paper has been to serve the public promptly and well and 
that Mr. Dugger has succeeded is evident from the large circulation which his publica- 
tion enjoys. He is the only Civil war veteran in the state who is actively engaged in 
publishing a newspaper. 

On the 13th of September, 1872, Mr. Dugger was united in marriage to Mrs. G. A. 
Henderson, who passed away February 3, 1921. They became the parents of two chil- 
dren: Samuel W., the elder, was born in 1873. He became a member of the regular 
army, serving for about ten years as a musician, and he passed away at El Paso, Texas, 
in February, 1918, at the age of forty-five years, while still in the service of the govern- 
ment; Sarah E. was born in 1878 and her death occurred in 1893. 

In his political views Mr. Dugger is an independent democrat and he is now serv- 
ing as justice of the peace at Scio and as notary public. In religious faith he is a 
Spiritualist and fraternally he is identified with the Leonidas Lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias at Scio, of which he is a charter member. He renews associations with his 
comrades who wore the blue by his connection with McPherson Post., G. A. R., of Albany, 
of which he is also a charter member. Identified with this section of the state from 
pioneer times, Mr. Dugger is most widely known and his sterling traits of character 
have gained for him an enviable position in public regard. He is actuated by a most 
progressive spirit in all that he undertakes and he has made the Scio Tribune the 
champion of every measure and movement calculated to upbuild the town and promote 
the growth of the surrounding district. 



GEORGE MONTGOMERY ARMSTRONG. 

George Montgomery Armstrong, who for many years was identified with Wells 
Fargo & Company at Portland, was born at St. Johns, New Brunswick, February 16, 
1873. His father, George Armstrong, was also a native of that place and devoted his 
life to the occupation of farming. He came to Oregon in 1887, settling in Albany. His 
brother was one of the very early pioneer settlers of Oregon and when he died left an estate 
comprising more than a thousand acres of land. This, George Armstrong came to Oregon 
to claim. The uncle had taught school in Canada and later in Oregon, by which means 
he made his first money, which he invested in land and from time to time as his finan- 
cial resources increased he added to his acreage until his holdings were very extensive. 
George Armstrong, having removed to the northwest, became identified with the agri- 
cultural development of the section near Albany and continued his farming operations 
until his death in 1893. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Adeline Kyle, was a 
daughter of John and Mary Kyle, both of whom were natives of New Brunswick, who 
came to Oregon in 1887, here following the removal of Mr. Armstrong to the northwest. 
In the family of Mr. and Mrs. George Armstrong were eight children, of whom three have 
passed away, while those living are: Mrs. Flora Schmitke and Arthur Armstrong, resi- 
dents of Calgary, Canada; Mrs. Adeline Smith, living at Scio, Oregon; Mrs. Maude Turner, 
a resident of Portland; and Mrs. Alice Vienna, a widow, also living in Portland. 

George Montgomery Armstrong was a youth of fourteen years when with his parents 
he came to the northwest. He lived on a farm in Albany for two years and when he 
was but twenty-one years of age purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land in 

Vol. II— 8 



114 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Polk county, which he improved. Later he bought one hundred and seven and a half 
acres at Souver, Oregon, which he also developed and improved, purchasing this land 
from his father and paying for it on the installment plan. It was in 1890 that he came 
to Portland and at once entered the employ of Wells Fargo & Company at Third & 
Pine streets, being at that time but seventeen years of age. He served the company in 
various capacities, as office boy, driver, messenger on the road, superintendent of stables 
and eventually as superintendent of drivers and street equipment. He continued with the 
company throughout the period of his residence in Portland, or until his death. 

On the 17th of September, 1896, Mr. Armstrong was married to Miss Myrtle Foster, 
a native of Fargo, North Dakota, and a daughter of Charles arid Lilly May (Barber) 
Foster. Her parents came to Portland in 1881 and the father became an engineer for 
the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company. Both he and his wife are deceased, the 
former having passed away in 1894, while the mother died in 1896. In their family were 
four children; May L., the wife of A. J. Johnston, auditor for the Portland Railway 
Light & Power Company, and the mother of one daughter, Janet May, who is attending 
Jefferson high school; Charles F., who married Grace Dowling, member of a pioneer 
family of Portland, and to them have been born a son and a daughter, Dalton and Cather- 
ine; Agnes S., who became the wife of R. G. Ladd, who passed away in 1915, since 
which time Mrs. Ladd has lived with her sister Mrs. Armstrong, who is the other mem- 
ber of the family. To Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong was born but one child, George Edwin, 
who is now eleven years of age. The family circle was broken by the hand of death 
on the 7th of August, 1918, when Mr. Armstrong was called to the home beyond. He 
was killed in an automobile accident and words of condolence reached his widow from 
many people and from all points where he was known, for he was much beloved 
by his business associates and the friends whom he had met in social life. He 
was able to leave Mrs. Armstrong in comfortable financial circumstances, owing to 
the investments which he had previously made in farm property. He belonged 
to the Masonic fraternity and also to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Transportation Club. He was but forty-five years of age when he was called to his final 
rest and it seems that he should have been spared for years to come but fate ruled 
otherwise. He left to his family not only a comfortable competence but also the record 
of a well spent life and an untarnished name. He was the possessor of many of those 
qualities which men most admire — loyalty in citizenship, progressiveness and reliability 
in business and faithfulness in friendship. 



JOSEPH TOUSANT GAGNON. 

As one of the potential factors in the growth of southern Oregon and especially 
of Medford and Jackson county, Joseph Tousant Gagnon deserves more than passing 
notice. Twenty-one years ago he came to this state and he is an example of what can 
be accomplished through individual effort intelligently directed, for he today owns and 
has under construction the Medford & Coast Railroad, which when completed will 
operate a train service from the city of Medford to Crescent City and passing through 
the county seat of Jacksonville. He is also the owner of two large sawmills and a 
box factory and has extensive investments in timber lands and other important busi- 
ness interests. 

Mr. Gagnon was born at St. Agnes, in the province of Quebec, Canada, in 1S62, his 
parents being Frank and Pauline (Dellier) Gagnon. The grandparents in both the 
paternal and maternal lines were natives of France. J. T. Gagnon remained upon 
his father's farm until he reached the age of eighteen years, when he started out to 
try his fortune in the business world. He made his initial step by securing work with 
a construction gang on the Canada-Atlantic Railroad and in a short time he took over 
a subcontract on his own account. He continued as a railroad building contractor until 
1896, when he came to Oregon and purchased a large tract of timber land. Two years 
later he established his home in Medford and soon afterward built a sawmill on Jack- 
son creek, which was destroyed by fire but was quickly rebuilt owing to the charac- 
teristic energy and determination of Mr. Gagnon. In 1901 he located permanently in 
Medford and erected another sawmill and a box factory in this city. He now has two 
large sawmills in operation in addition to his box factory and the latter turns out two 
million fruit and other boxes annually. The important business interests of Mr. Gag- 
non in Jackson county now furnish employment to several hundred men. He is the 




JOSEPH T. GAGNON 



HISTORY OF OREGON 117 

owner of large and fine timber interests and has still other business of importance. 
The Medford & Coast Railroad, which he and other parties are building will be of 
untold value and worth to the community. . The road will be equipped for both freight 
and passenger trafiBc. Construction was started just prior to the World war but hos- 
tilities which so materially upset business conditions prevented the road from operating 
its passenger trains. For three years, however, freight traffic was carried on over the 
line and in the summer of 1921 the passenger cars will be put on and an hour schedule 
will be maintained on the run between Medford and Jacksonville. 

In 1S85 Mr. Gagnon was married to Miss Mary Louise Dallier, who passed away in 
1S87. In 1SS8 he wedded Emma Clement, who, like his former wife, is a native of 
Canada, and both were of French descent. Mr. Gngnon has no living children of his 
own but has adopted and reared several. Two of these were nephews, who were reared 
and educated by him and are now prosperous business men in Canada. An orphan girl 
was also taken into his home and is now the wife of Baptiste Coulon, of Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Gagnon is a zealous member of the Catholic church, In which he is serving as 
a trustee. He is a past president of the Union of St. John, a member of the Knights of 
Columbus and of the Catholic Foresters of America. He is also a member of the Med- 
ford Chamber of Commerce and of the Oregon Manufacturers Association. Since com- 
ing to the United States he has given most of his time to his business interests, but 
he takes an active and helpful part in civic matters. While living in Canada he was 
an earnest supporter of the liberal party and represented Starmonte, province of 
Ontario, in the dominion parliament. He is content that his public service shall he 
done as a private citizen, however, since taking up his abode in Oregon and he ranks 
high as a business man — one whose efforts are a contributing element to the upbuilding 
of town and county as well as a source of individual profit. 



THEODORE ROTH. 



Theodore Roth, a successful and enterprising business man of Salem, is president 
of the Roth Company and the Gile Mercantile Company, dealing in groceries, and also 
of the Oregon Flax Fibre Company, one of the important industrial enterprises of the 
northwest. He has done notable work in connection with the promotion of the flax 
industry in Oregon, which through his efforts has been greatly stimulated. Starting 
out in life with no capital except the determination to succeed, he has attained success 
and stands today as a splendid example of a self-made man. 

Mr. Roth is a native of Switzerland. He was born in Canton Neufchatel, April 20, 
1876, and in 1885, when nine years of age, was brought by his parents, John and Anna 
(Ramseyer) Roth, to the United States. They made their way to Kansas, where the 
father followed the occupation of farming until 1890, when he came with his family 
to Oregon, taking up his residence in the vicinity of Salem, where he again engaged in 
farming. Both parents are deceased. 

When fifteen years of age Theodore Roth began work in a dry goods store of Salem, 
where he remained for eight years, after which he was employed for a year in a furni- 
ture house. Ambitious to engage in business independently, when twenty-five years of age, 
in association with P. E. Graber, he purchased a grocery store and founded the firm of 
Roth & Graber, which existed as such for ten years, when the business was incorporated 
under the name of the Roth Company. The business has grown steadily from year to 
year, owing to their reliable and progressive business methods, reasonable prices and 
courteous treatment of customers and their trade has assumed extensive and gratifying 
proportions. Their interests are conducted in their own building and they are operating 
one of the most up-to-date groceries on the coast, carrying the best the market affords 
in the line of shelf goods and pastries. Mr. Roth is also president of the Gile Mer- 
cantile Company, which he took over in 1920 and reorganized into a stock company. They 
are wholesale dealers in groceries and fruits and the business is now established on a 
paying basis, for Mr. Roth is a sagacious business man, whose plans are well defined and 
promptly executed, and his connection with any undertaking Insures a prosperous out- 
come of the same. 

Mr. Roth has also done notable work in connection with the reviving of the flax 
industry in Oregon. In 1915, while he was acting as chairman of the industrial bureau 
of the Chamber of Commerce, a Mr. Crawford made a trip from Ireland to the United 



118 HISTORY OF OREGON 

States for the purpose of studying conditions in regard to the flax industry in this 
country. He found Oregon a most promising Held and upon his recommendation Mr. 
Roth brought the matter to the attention oS Governor Withycombe and T. B. Kay with 
regard to its feasibility as a prison industry. They were in favor of the project and a 
bill was prepared and passed the legislature for an appropriation of forty thousand dollars 
to establish the industry. During Governor West's incumbency he had discontinued 
operations with the stove works, then conducted by the prisoners, as they could not 
meet their obligations, so this left the State Penitentiary without an industry. The flax 
industry as operated by the penitentiary has greatly prospered and they have contracted 
for over seven hundred acres of flax. The success of the industry in this connection 
so impressed Mr. Roth and his associates that in 1916 they organized the Oregon Flax 
Fibre Company, with the subject of this review as the president, Edward Schunke as 
secretary and E. J. Hausett as superintendent, the headquarters being at Salem, while 
the mill is located at Turner, Oregon. The superintendent and manager, E. J. Hausett, 
is a native of Belgium and a son-in-law of Eugene E. Basse, a pioneer flax man, who came 
to Oregon about twenty years ago and started the flax industry, but owing to two dis- 
astrous fires he sustained serious losses and was obliged to discontinue the business, 
after which the flax industry in Oregon was dormant for a number of years, being revived 
only through the efforts of Mr. Roth. The Oregon Flax Fibre Company purchased its 
machinery from an unused flax mill at Chehalis. Washington, securing some of the latest 
types of Irish machinery for making long line fibre, spinning tow and upholstering tow. 
It is thus prepared and shipped to the spinners in the various markets of the United 
States. The industry as conducted by the company at present is on a par with the 
methods used in Belgium and Ireland but does not conform with American ideas of 
manufacturing. The quality of long line fibre produced in Oregon is rapidly approach- 
ing the best produced in Ireland and Belgium. Foreign industries are watching its 
growth with intense interest and it undoubtedly will become one of the great indus- 
tries of the Pacific coast in the near future. 

In 1909 Mr. Roth was united in marriage to Miss Elsie May Pearmine of Salem, and 
they have become the parents of three children; Marvin A., George P. and Frances 
Evelyn. He has displayed sound judgment, energy and determination in the conduct 
of his business affairs and in everything that he does he is actuated by a spirit of 
progress and enterprise that prompts his continued effort until he has reached the 
desired goal. His career proves that prosperity and an honored name may be won 
simultaneously. As the architect of his own fortunes he has builded wisely and well 
and at the same time his labors have been a valuable asset in the development of the 
resources of the state through his promotion of the flax industry. In every relation of 
life he measures up to the highest standards of manhood and citizenship and Salem is 
proud to claim him as one of her citizens. 



JAY L. LEWIS. 



Jay L. Lewis, city attorney and actively engaged in the practice of law at Corvallis 
as a member of the firm of Yates & Lewis, is recognized as one of the able attorneys 
of Benton county. He was born in Skagit county, Washington, October 9, 1888, a son 
of James P. and Minnie (Lindstedt) Lewis, the former a native of Vancouver, Wash- 
ington, and the latter of California. The father was but an infant when his parents 
removed to Oregon and on entering the business world he became a bookkeeper and 
accountant, being thus employed in eastern Oregon, while later he removed to the 
Puget Sound country, where he continued to reside throughout the remainder of his life. 
He passed away in February, 1896, and the mother's demise occurred in February, 1905. 

Their son, Jay L. Lewis, pursued his education in the schools of Tacoma, Washing- 
ton, and was graduated from the high school with the class of 1907. He then entered 
the law school of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1911 with the LL. B. degree. Returning to the west, he opened an oflSce in 
Portland, Oregon, where for a year he continued in practice and then removed to Eugene. 
He there formed a partnership with Judge Skipworth. with whom he continued to 
practice for two and a half years, and in April, 1915, he arrived in Corvallis, where he 
became associated in practice with J. F. Yates, a relationship that has since been main- 
tained. They have built up a large and representative clientage and the firm name figures, 
on the court records in connection with the most important cases tried in the district. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 119 

Mr. Lewis is an earnest and discriminating student of his profession, thoroughly familiar 
with the principles of jurisprudence, and in their application is seldom, if ever, at 
fault. He has ever conformed his practice to the highest ethics of the profession and is 
widely recognized as an able minister in the temple of justice. 

In 1916 Mr. Lewis was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle McDonald and they 
have many friends in the city where they reside. In his political views Mr. Lewis is a 
republican, and he is now serving as city attorney of Corvallis. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons and the Loyal Order of Moose. Although one of the younger 
representatives of the legal fraternity, Mr. Lewis is rapidly advancing in his profes- 
sion and has already won an enviable position at the Benton county bar, being held 
in the highest esteem by his associates in the practice of law, while as a citizen he is 
progressive and public-spirited, his influence being ever on the side of advancement and 
improvement. 



J. W. PETTIT. 

J. W. Pettit, founder and promoter of an extensive business carried on under the 
name of the Pettit Feather & Bedding Company in Portland, was born in Hamilton 
county, Tennessee. October 29, 1873. His father, William Pettit, died in Tennessee, and 
in 1887 the mother, Mrs. Annie Pettit, started for California accompanied by her son, 
J. W. They took up their abode in Oakland and as soon as J. W. Pettit was old enough 
he became the support of the family. He worked for many years as a mechanic and 
then entered the mercantile business on his own account at Selby, Contra Costa county, 
California, where he continued business for four years. He then sold out and went to 
San Francisco, where he became connected with the Crescent Feather Company as a mem- 
ber of the firm. After six years he disposed of his interests there and cdme to Portland 
in 1908. Here he organized the Pettit Feather & Bedding Company with a plant at 
Twenty-sixth and Upshur streets and from there he removed to Twelfth and Lovejoy 
streets but in 1916 his plant was destroyed by fire. He then reestablished his plant at 
Fourteenth and Johnson streets, where he remained for two and a half years, within 
which time he erected his present plant — a modern two-story factory building, one hun- 
dred by one hundred and fifty feet, situated at the corner of Guild and York streets. 
He has twenty-five employes and his trade extends to Washington, Southern Oregon and 
Idaho. The feathers which he uses are mostly secured from the Orient and the other 
raw materials are obtained in the east and south. He has built up the business from 
nothing until his annual sales now amount to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 
He makes a standard line of high class bedding and is the sole owner of the business. 

Mr. Pettit was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Guisler, a native of Oregon and 
a daughter of Paul Guisler, one of the prominent retail furniture dealers of Portland. 
They have one child, Margaret, named for her mother, and the family occupies an at- 
tractive home in Laurelhurst, one of the finest residence districts in Portland. Mr. 
Pettit belonas to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and to the Commercial Club 
and is much interested in all that pertains to the welfare and progress of the com- 
munity, commonwealth and country. Moreover, he is a splendid type of the high-minded, 
progi-essive business man of America. He has won his success entirely through his own 
efforts, building up a business by reason of close application, indefatigable energy and 
capable management. He is today the only manufacturer of comforters and pillows in 
the state of Oregon and has the most convenient and best factory equipment in the state. 
The Business is a monument to his enterprise and ability and it is today one of the 
important manufacturing industries of Portland. 



OTIS A. WOLVERTON. 

Otis A. Wolverton, who is now living at Monmouth, where he is filling the office of 
mayor, is widely and favorably known in Polk county, for he has here spent his entire 
life. He was born on a farm eight miles south of Monmouth, May 10, 1861, and is a 
son of John and Mary (Nealey) Wolverton, the former a native of New York and the 
latter of Ohio. In 1853 the father and mother left their home in Burlington, Iowa, and 
with ox team and wagon set out for Oregon. On reaching this state they located on land 



120 HISTORY OF OREGON 

eight miles south of the present site of Monmouth, where he became the owner of six 
hundred and forty acres. This he brought to a high state of development, continuing 
its cultivation and improvement until 1880, when he took up his residence in the town 
and there lived retired during the balance of his life. He was very successful in the 
conduct of his farming interests and became prominent in community affairs, serving 
as treasurer of Christian College, now the State Normal school, and also as a member 
of the city council of Monmouth. He passed away on the 30th of December, 1902, at the 
age of eighty years, and the mother's demise occurred September 20, 1909, when she had 
reached the advanced age of eighty-four years. They were numbered among the earliest 
settlers of the state and were widely known and highly esteemed. They became the par- 
ents of seven children, of whom five are living, a brother of the subject of this review 
being Judge Charles E. Wolverton, a prominent jurist of Portland. 

Otis A. Wolverton was reared in Polk county, where he attended the district schools 
and also the public schools of Monmouth, subsequently pursuing a course of study in 
Christian College. On starting out in life independently he rented the old home place 
and later purchased three hundred and fifty acres of the homestead, continuing active 
in its operation from 1880 until 1902, or for a period of twenty-two years. He became 
well known as a stock raiser, introducing the first herd of Jersey cattle into Polk county, 
and was very successful in the conduct of his interests. In 1902 he took up his resi- 
dence in Monmouth and four years later was appointed postmaster, serving in that 
capacity until 1914, since which time he has lived practically retired, although he gives 
considerable attention to the raising of bees, now having sixty stands, and is finding 
that line of work both profitable and interesting, for he could not be content to lead a 
life of utter idleness. 

On the 22d of November, 1885, Mr. Wolverton was united in marriage to Miss Rosa 
Loughary, and they became the parents of three children: Reuel, who was engaged in 
the electric business in Portland and passed away February 13, 1915, at the age of 
twenty-eight years; Edith, the wife of J. D. Bolter, who is operating the home farm; 
and Leto, who is a graduate of the State Normal school and is now engaged in teaching 
in the schools of Portland. The wife and mother passed away August 13, 1905, and on 
the 18th of October, 1910, Mr. Wolverton wedded Mrs. Irene Dalton. 

In his political views Mr. Wolverton is a republican and is much interested in the 
welfare and progress of his community, serving for two years as a member of the city 
council, while for twelve years he has been a member of the school board, doing all in 
his power to advance educational standards in his section of the state. In 1918 he was 
chosen mayor of Monmouth and so excellent was his record in that oflSce that he was 
reelected in November, 1920. He has always been loyal to the trust reposed in him and 
is giving to the city a most progressive and business-like administration, the worth of 
his work being generally acknowledged. For ten years he has been president of the 
Monmouth Improvement Company, in which connection he has done much to promote the 
business interests of his city and extend its trade relations. He is also a member of the 
local Grange, and fraternally is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs, while his religious faith is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Christian church. Mr. Wolverton has devoted much of his life to public 
service and at all times has been actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general 
good. He has led a busy, active and useful life and his many sterling traits of charac- 
ter have won for him an enviable position in the regard of his fellow townsmen. 



IRA WALLACE CARL. 



Ira Wallace Carl, who enjoys a well earned reputation as a careful and conscientious 
lawyer, ever true to the interests of his clients, has since 1911 practiced at the Port- 
land bar. He was born upon a farm in Coos county, Oregon, in 1886, and is a son of 
August and Amanda E. (Newcomer) Carl. The father was born in Germany in 1835, 
came to America at the age of twenty-three and during the Civil war enlisted in the 
Union army as a member of Company F, Ninth Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry, 
serving until honorably discharged on account of illness. He was married in Iowa 
to Amanda E, Newcomer, a native of Illinois, and in 18S1 they removed to Oregon, 
settling in Coos county, where for many years the family home was maintained. The 
father passed away in 1903 and is survived by his widow, who is now living in Port- 
land. 




IRA W. CARL 



HISTORY OF OREGON 1'2:] 

Ira W. Carl was reared on the home farm to the age of seventeen years and during 
that period attended the country schools. He afterwards became a student in the Ore- 
gon Agricultural College and was graduated in 1911 from the law department of the 
University of Oregon, for he had determined to engage in the practice of law as a 
life work. The same year he was admitted to the bar and opened an office in Portland, 
where he has remained. He is still working his way upward and advancing steadily 
towards the top. Care and close attention to the case in hand has been one of his salient 
characteristics and he is regarded as a sate counselor and also able in the trial of the 
case before the court. He is a clear, concise, and forecful speaker and his utterances 
carry conviction to the minds of his hearers. 

On the 10th of August, 191S, in Portland, Mr. Carl was married to Miss Beulah 
Frances Miller, a daughter of Claude R. Miller, a native of Iowa who was married in 
Michigan to Miss Catherine Elnora Price, also born in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Carl are 
well known socially, having many friends in Portland and this section of the state. 
During the war period Mr. Carl became a permanent member of the legal advisory 
board. He also signed up and passed for the navy but the armistice was signed before 
he entered active service. His political endorsement has always been given to the 
republican party but without the desire of office as a reward for party fealty. He is 
well known in fraternal circles and is an exemplary representative ot the Masonic 
order, in which he has obtained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite while with 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. He is like- 
wise connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Knights of 
Pythias. He has a membership in the Portland Press Club. Progressive Business Men's 
Club and in the Portland Chamber of Commerce. He is keenly interested in all those 
forces that make for the development of the city and for civic righteousness and keeps 
thoroughly informed concerning the vital questions and issues of the day. He has 
always been a great reader and an apt scholar and his clear thinking enables him to 
arrive at the right conclusion on almost any subject which engages his attention. He 
is most generous of his means, where assistance is needed. His hours of recreation 
are devoted to hiking and mountain climbing, and he is a lover of the great out-of- 
doors. 



SAMUEL STEEN DUNCAN. 



Educational work in Yamhill county is well carried forward by Samuel S. Duncan, 
who as county superintendent of schools has not only made numerous valuable improve- 
ments in the administration of educational affairs but has also successfully exerted his 
efforts in order to bring about harmonious collaboration between the teachers of the 
county, thus insuring the pupils of the schools a higher degree of efficiency in their 
lessons. 

Mr. Duncan was born in Bellefontaine, Ohio, September 11, 1861, and is a son of 
Andrew and Nancy (Steen) Duncan, natives of Pennsylvania. In an early day the father 
went to Ohio and there resided until the fall of 1865, when he removed westward to 
Illinois and later to Iowa, where he followed farming pursuits until 1884. In that year 
he went to Kansas, taking up his residence near Osborne, where he lived retired until 
May, 1896, when he came to Oregon, taking up his abode with his son, Samuel S., with 
whom he continued to make his home during the remainder of his life. He passed away 
in December, 1896, at the age of eighty-one and a half years, and the mother's demise 
occurred December 17, 1893, when she was seventy-one years of age. 

Samuel S. Duncan was reared in Illinois and there attended the public 
schools, after which he entered an academy at Monmouth, Illinois, from which he 
was graduated with the class ot 1876. He then pursued a four years' course at 
Amity College at College Springs, Iowa, after which he engaged in the profession 
of teaching, following that line of work in Kansas from 1885 to 1886 and from 1888 to 
1889. In the spring of the latter year he came to Oregon, locating in Yamhill county, 
where for a time he taught in the country schools and then went to Carlton, where for 
three years he was connected with the public schools. He next went to Yamhill and thero 
was engaged in teaching for three years, after which he followed his profession in Dayton 
for six years, serving as principal at each of the above named towns. His next removal 
took him to McMinnville, where for one year he was principal of the Cook school, and 
he then became principal ot a school at Amity, Oregon, there remaining for live years. 



124 HISTORY OF OREGON 

On the expiration of that period he went to La Fayette, where for three years and three 
months he filled the position of principal, completing the scholastic year as principal of a 
school at S ICO. Montana. His successful work as an educator soon won wide recognition 
and while in Montana he was offered and accepted a position in Yamhill. After teaching 
there for two weeks he was appointed county superintendent of schools in 1911, his 
excellent service in that capacity winning for him reelection, so that he is still occupying 
that position, having heen again chosen in November, 1920. His excellent training for the 
profession and his long experience in school work have made him not only a successful 
teacher but have given him Inside information in regard to school affairs which well fits 
him for the position which he occupies. Studious by nature, he keeps in touch with 
the most modern ideas in regard to the education of children and has done much to 
improve the curriculum and the methods of instruction followed in the county. 

On the 12th of September, 1883, Mr. Duncan was united in marriage to Miss Jennie 
McNerney, and they became the parents of eight children, namely: Grace, who married 
N. T. McCoy, the proprietor of a garage at Newberg, Oregon; James A., a well known 
druggist of Salem; Doris, the wife of Charles Bentley, who is connected with the 
United States shipping board as port representative at Helsingfors, Finland; Wilma, a 
successful teacher of Newberg, and the wife of C. A. Evans, who is there engaged in the 
plumbing business; Theo Steen, who is in the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company at Portland; Charles K., who is operating his ranch at Mosby, Montana, and 
also one owned by his father; Milton Verne, who is employed by J. K. Gill & Company, 
engaged in the stationery business at Portland; and Leland Stewart, who is managing his 
father's fruit ranch near Springbrook, Oregon. 

Mr. Duncan is a stalwart republican in his political views, and fraternally he is 
identified with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He also holds membership in the local Grange, and his religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Christian church. He is much interested in church activities, 
serving as deacon and is also president of the Yamhill County Sunday School Associa- 
tion. He regards the public schools as the bulwark of the nation, and, actuated at all 
times by a spirit of progress that takes cognizance of all improved educational methods, 
he has placed the schools of Yamhill county upon a high plane. His professional career 
has been one of continuous advancement, and he is regarded as one of the eminent 
educators of the state. 



COLONEL HENRY ERNST DOSCH. 

Not seeking honor but simply endeavoring to do his duty, honors have yet heen 
multiplied to Colonel Henry Ernst Dosch and prosperity has followed all his under- 
takings. There is perhaps no man in Portland who has done so much to make known 
the advantages and resources of Oregon as Mr. Dosch, who has been the representative 
of his state in various national and International expositions. 

A n-'tive of Germany he was born at Kastel-Mainz, on the Rhine, June 17, 1841, a 
son of John Baptist and Anna (Busch) Dosch. The name Dosch is Arabic, which would 
indicate the origin of the family. The ancestry of the family can be traceed back to 
the early settlement of southern Germany and through generation after generation the 
fpmi'y WTS prominently represented In military circles by those who held high rank as 
officers in the German army. Colonel John B. Dosch and his father. Colonel Ernst 
Dosch, were officers in the army and the former had two brothers who also held high 
rank in the service of their country. At the close of an honorable record in the army 
he entered the diplomatic service and with a creditable record therein retired to his 
large estate ad.ioining Kastel-Mainz. He had married Anna, a daughter of Ulrich Busch, 
who was extensively engaged in the lumber business at Kastel-Mainz. Her brother, 
Adolphus Busch, has since become one of the most prominent residents of St. Louis, 
Missouri. In the family were seven children. 

Colonel Henry E. Dosch, the only surviving son, pursued his education in Mainz, 
Germany, in the Gewerbe scbule fuer Handel und Industrie, from which he was 
graduated in April, 1857. This school bears the same relation to the present manual 
training school that the high school bears to the grammar school. Subsequently he was 
apprenticed to a large importing house in Mainz, his term of indenture continuing to 
January, 1860, and on the 17th of that month he sailed tor the United States. Making 
his way to St. Louis he secured a position as bookkeeper and was so employed until 



HISTORY OF OREGON 125 

after the outbreak of the Civil war. In May, 1S61, he volunteered in General John C. 
Fremont's body-guard (cavalry), thus serving until November 25, 1861, when the entire 
guard was mustered out of service after the famous fight October 25, 1S61, at Spring- 
field, Missouri, General Fremont being removed from command. At Springfield these 
valiant guardsmen met and routed three thousand Confederates in a desperate conflict 
which lasted from three in the afternoon until dark and during the engagement Mr. 
Dosch was wounded in the right leg. He reenlisted in Company C, of the Fifth 
Missouri Cavalry and rose to the rank of sergeant major and acting adjutant. After 
the battle of Pea Ridge the Fifth was merged with the Fourth Missouri Cavalry and 
Colonel Dosch as acting Colonel was mustered out in April, 1863. 

In May of that year he first became acquainted with the west, crossing the plains 
with an ox team and walking from Omaha to Sacramento, California. He stopped for 
a brief period at Virginia City, where he rode the Wells Fargo Express pony on the 
Overland from that place to Lake Bigler, now Tahoe, known as Friday's station. After- 
ward he walked across the Sierra Nevadas and reached San Francisco, where he secured 
a position as bookkeeper and came to Oregon, arriving in Portland on the 9th of April, 
1864, and then went to The Dalles, where he assumed his position as bookkeeper and 
cashier for a firm dealing in miners' supplies. The next year he engaged in merchandis- 
ing at Canyon City, Oregon, and continued until the loss of his stock and store by fire 
led him to come to this city in 1871. For a long period he was connected with com- 
mercial interests in Portland as a wholesale boot and shoe merchant, having his estab- 
lishment on Front street. Failing health caused him at length to retire from business 
in 1890. Indolence and idleness, however, are utterly foreign to his nature and he turned 
his attention to horticulture, which has always possessed the keenest fascination for 
him. In 1889 Oregon's governor appointed him a member of the board of horticultural 
commissioners and succeeding governors reappointed him to the office until his service 
covered eleven years. In the biennial reports which have been issued under his 
direction those published in 1S99 and 1901 have been adopted as textbooks at Cornell 
University, the University of Michigan, the University of Wisconsin, Stuttgart Uni- 
versity in Germany and various colleges in England. Since his retirement from active 
business thirty-one years ago Colonel Dosch has given mo.st of his time to the interest 
of Oregon, particularly along horticultural lines. He introduced the French walnut, so 
prolific now, after experimenting for years as to the best variety adapted to the climatic 
and soil conditions here. He has certainly made liberal contribution to the progress and 
upbuilding of Oregon in his efforts to bring before the world a knowledge of its re- 
sources, especially in the attractive exhibits of the products of the state as shown in the 
different expositions of this and other countries. He was executive commissioner from 
Oregon at the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893; at the Trans- 
Mississippi Exposition at Omaha in 1898; at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo 
in 1901; at the West-India Exposition in Charleston in 1901-2; and at the International 
Exposition at Osaka, Japan, in 1903. He was also commissioner general of the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904; was director of exhibits and privileges at the 
Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland in 1905; and occupied the same 
position at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition at Seattle in 1909. He was decorated 
by the emperor of Japan for valuable services rendered them, first receiving the emblem 
of the Sacred Treasure, while recently the insignia of the Rising Sun, the highest honor 
that could be conferred, was given him. Colonel Dosch has been a frequent contributor 
to horticultural journals and his writings have commanded wide and interested attention. 
His labors in this direction have been of material benefit to the state in the improve- 
ment of methods, in the introduction of new species and in disseminating an accurate 
knowledge of Oregon soil, the possibilities of the state as an horticultural center and 
the special fruits suited to various localities. 

On the 10th of July, 1866, in Canyon City, Oregon, Colonel Dosch was married 
to Miss Marie Louise Fleurot, a daughter of Pierre and Judith (Pigeon) Fleurot. Mrs. 
Dosch was born in France and came to Oregon with her parents in 1857, making the 
trip by way of the isthmus and up the Pacific to Portland. The children born of this 
marriage are: Ernst, who married Winifred Wurzbacher; Arno, who married Elsie 
Sperry; Roswell; Lilly Anna; Camellia; and Marguerite, who married Mr. David 
Campbell. 

In his political views Colonel Dosch has always been a democrat. In 1866 he be- 
came a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, filled various offices in the 
local lodge and was grand master of Oregon In 1888. He likewise belongs to Lincoln- 
Garfield Post, No. 3, G. A. R., and was its commander in 1893. A contemporary of 



126 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Colonel Dosch has said: "During the long period of his residence in the west he has 
kept in touch wHth the progress in the world of thought and action and while especially 
devoted to the great northwest, yet has no narrow spirit of prejudice but is loyal to 
the welfare of our country and interested in world-wide progress. Frequent trips to 
the east, as well as several voyages across the ocean to the old home land, have brought 
to him an intimate knowledge of the development of our nation and the influence of 
modern thought in the old world; but while loyal to the land of his birth, he believes 
the history of the future ages is to be written by the United States and especially by 
that portion thereof lying along the Pacific coast." 

Though eighty years of age he is still in the harness with the State Board of 
Horticulture, preferring to wear out rather than to rust out. 



JOSHUA W. FRENCH. 



A detailed account of the life and experiences of Joshua W. French, now 
would present a most accurate description of pioneer life of the northwest. For many 
years he resided in this section of the country, becoming one of the early merchants 
of the state and also one of the pioneer bankers. He was born in Holland, Vermont, 
September 13, 1830, a son of Joshua and Polly ( Meade 1 French. The son acquired his 
education in the common schools and remained on the old homestead farm in New 
England until he had attained his majority. He afterward spent a year in Haverhill, 
Massachusetts, and on the 10th of January, 1852, in company with his cousin, 
Meade, sailed from New York for San Francisco by way of the Isthmus of 
During fourteen days of their long and arduous trip they subsisted solely on hard tack 
and stale corned beef. On the 11th of February 1852, they arrived in San Francisco, 
at which time Mr. French was the possessor of a lone picayune. After making several 
unsuccessful attempts to secure employment of various kinds he approached a gang of 
men with teams and persuaded the boss to let him work enough to earn something 
to eat. He was a powerful man physically and a willing worker and he performed 
his task so capably and eflSciently that the superintendent kept him and soon put him 
on as foreman. He made enough' money on that job to pay his expenses to the gold 
mines and for a time met with success in his operations in the gold fields. Subse- 
quently he went to Calaveras county, California, and operated a ferry on the Stanislaus 
river in connection with his brother Daniel. In 1861 Joshua and Daniel French re- 
turned to San Francisco, where they engaged in taking contracts for mastic roofing, 
Joshua French superintending the placing of the first roof on the Russ House and the 
Occidental Hotel and also on many other prominent buildings of that time. When the 
Civil war broke out materials advanced so greatly in price that the firm could no longer 
realize a profit on their business and sold out. 

In January, 1862, through the influence of his cousin W. S. Ladd of Portland, Mr. 
French with his two brothers Daniel and Joseph and also with Granville Oilman, 
formed a partnership and engaged in merchandising at The Dalles, Oregon, conducting 
the business under the firm name of Oilman, French & Company. At that time there 
were no freight teams leaving The Dalles, owing to the scarcity of horses in the 
northwest. All freight was hauled to Canyon City and interior towns on pack mules, 
the goods being placed in casks and a cask lashed on each side of a mule, while the 
animal at times carried thi-ee casks. It was an interesting but not an unusual sight to 
see a train of eighty mules leaving the store packed with casks. The goods were paid 
for in gold dust and the scales which were used in weighing the gold dust for the firm 
are now in possession of the French & Company Bank at The Dalles. The partners, 
after acquiring a sufficient amount of gold dust, would then ship it to the mint in 
San Francisco to be coined. At one time Mr. French and his brother Daniel had a 
line of steamers plying between Portland and The Dalles and a contract to carry the 
United States mail as well as freight and passengers. 

In the year in which the partnership was formed Mr. French went to Umatilla 
where he superintended the work of erecting a stone building in which the company 
established a branch store, supplying it with goods from The Dalles establishment, 
his brother Daniel then taking charge of and conducting the store. In 1867 Mr. 
French and his brother Daniel bought out the business and in connection with their 
mercantile interests established a bank, which was the first one in eastern Oregon. 
They conducted their affairs under the firm style of French & Company and met with 




JOSHUA W. FRENCH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 129 

success in both their commercial and financial undertakings. In 1875 they disposed 
of the mercantile business to the firm of Brooks & McFarland but continued in the 
banking business. In 1876 they removed to their building on the north side of Second 
street and three years later completed a building at the corner of Second and Wash- 
ington streets, which has been occupied and known as the French & Company Bank 
from that time until the present, the business being still carried on under the firm 
name. On the death of Daniel M. French in 1902 Joshua W. French became the head 
and general manager of the bank of French & Company. He was also the president 
of the Condon National Bank and president of the Arlington National Bank and the 
Eastern Oregon Banking Company at Shaniko. He was interested in and was a 
director of the Wasco Warehouse Milling Company at The Dalles, also the Butler Bank- 
ing Company at Hood River and was one of the principal owners in the Gilman-French 
Land & Live Stock Company in eastern Oregon. 

In 1861 at Sau Francisco, Mr. French was united in marriage to Miss Laura Ellen 
Burke, a daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Ellis) Burke. She was born at Charleston, 
Maine, and it was in the year 1861 that she made her way to the Pacific coast with a 
brother and an elder sister to live with them in San Francisco. She was in her younger 
years a teacher in the public schools of her native state. By her marriage she became 
the mother of five children, three of whom are living: Mrs. Nellie J. French Bolton, 
Edward H. and Vivian H. 

Mr. French loved his home, being a devoted husband and father, counting no 
personal effort nor sacrifice on his part too great if it would promote the happiness 
of his family. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity of which he was an active mem- 
ber and in his life exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft. He was prominently 
Identified with all things pertaining to the upbuilding and betterment of his town, 
county and state. He passed away December 23, 1907, after long years of connection 
with the coast country, during which he had witnessed much of its growth and progress. 
His cooperation was never sought in vain when matters of public welfare were under 
consideration. He gave his endorsement and support to all plans for the general good 
and in many ways his labors were of decided advantage to the state, particularly in 
the development of business leading to the present-day progress and prosperity of 
Oregon. 



CHALMER LEE GEORGE, D. D. S. 

One of the leading dentists of Salem is Chalmer Lee George, who is numbered among 
the younger representatives of the fraternity, and his professional skill and ability 
have already secured for him a gratifying patronage. He is a native son of the state, 
for his birth occurred in Oregon City, November 20, 1894. His father, William P. George, 
is a native of Iowa who came to this state in 1894, locating at Oregon City, where 
he engaged in the hotel business. In 1896 he became a resident of Salem, becoming 
identified with the restaurant business and also following the occupation of farming, 
specializing in the raising of prunes and loganberries, in which he has been quite 
successful. At Medical Lake, Washington, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura A. 
Williams, a native of Wales, and they became the parents of six children: Jesse R. and 
William P., Jr., who are associated with their father in the restaurant business; Hazel 
L., J. D. and Isabel F., all of whom are attending school; and Chalmer Lee, of this 
review. 

Dr. George attended the public and high schools of Salem and in 1914 he entered 
the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, and was graduated from that institu- 
tion in 1917 on the completion of a course in dentistry. Entering an office in the 
Equitable building in New York city, he there engaged in practice and in April, 1918, 
he entered the service of the United States navy as a dentist, being assigned to the 
training station at Goat Island, California, thus gaining valuable practical experience. 
After receiving his discharge from the service he returned to Salem on the 13th of 
June, 1919, and upon successfully passing the state board examination he located for 
practice in the Masonic Temple building of Salem, where he maintains one of the best 
equipped dental offices on the Pacific coast, supplied with every modern appliance of 
value in the practice of dental surgery. He possesses unusual mechanical skill and is 
efficient, thorough and painstaking in all of his work, employing the most modern 
methods of dental surgery, and he has already gained a large and gratifying patronage. 

Vol. 11—9 



].!() HISTORY OP OREGON 

On the 3(1 of April, 1920, Dr. George was married to Miss Grace M. Howell, whose 
parents, John and Amy (Nelson) Howell, were honored pioneers of this state. Her 
father passed away in 1907 but her mother survives, residing at No. 740 University 
street, in Salem. Dr. George belongs to Delta Sigma Delta, a college fraternity, and 
fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, the .Masons and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. By broad reading and study he keeps in touch 
with the progress that is constantly being made along the line of dental surgery and 
his pronounced ability is attested by his professional colleagues and contemporaries. 
His life work is one of broad usefulness and Salem numbers him among her most 
valued citizens. 



RALPH S. VAN CLEVE. 



Ralph S. Van Cleve occupies a prominent position in business circles of Lincoln 
county not only by reason of the success which he has achieved, but also owing to the 
straightforward business policy which he has ever followed. Mr. Van Cleve is a 
native of this state. He was born in Albany, Linn county, June 29, 1S79, and is a son 
of Coll and Frances L. (Shepherd) Van Cleve, the former born in Illinois in 1833 and 
the latter in Iowa in 1846. The father was a printer by trade and also conducted a 
newspaper in Illinois. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war. enlisting in 1864. 
He became captain of Company F, Ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was honorably 
discharged on the completion of his three months' term of enlistment. In the 
same year, or in 1864, he crossed the plains to Oregon, believing that the mild climate 
of this state would restore his health, which the rigors of military life had greatly 
impaired, and at the end of a few months his weight was increased from ninety to one 
hundred and sixty-five pounds. For a short period he resided at The Dalles and then 
removed to Portland, where for about five years he was employed as a compositor on 
the Oregonian. On the expiration of that period he made his way to Albany, Linn 
county, where he established the Daily Register and successfully conducted the paper 
until 1882, when his plant was destroyed by fire. He was then appointed collector of 
customs at Yaquina bay, in Lincoln county, his commission being signed by President 
Arthur, and he retained that position until the election of President Cleveland, serving 
for a term of four years, and for one term he filled the office of mayor of Albany. His 
next removal took him to Scio, where he established a newspaper, which he subsequently 
sold to its present owner, T. L. Dugger. Going to Yaquina. Oregon, he there engaged in 
newspaper publication, subsequently removing his plant to Toledo. Lincoln county, 
where he successfully continued its operation until his demise in September. 1913. In 
the early days he had also engaged in prospecting in Idaho and Montana and was 
familiar with many phases of pioneer lite in the northwest. The mother's demise 
occurred in 1892. She was a daughter of J. M. Shepherd, who left his Iowa home in 
the early '60s and crossed the plains to Oregon, casting in his lot with its early pioneers. 
He operated a pony express from Baker, Oregon, to points in eastern Idaho and was 
also a printer by trade, establishing the first newspaper at Baker. Oregon. For many 
years he continued its publication and then sold the paper, opening a job oflSce, which 
he continued to conduct throughout the remainder of his life. 

Ralph S. Van Cleve was reared in Linn county and in the public schools of Albany 
he pursued his education. After completing his studies he learned the printer's trade 
under the direction of his father but has never engaged in that line of work. After his 
mother's death, which occurred when he was thirteen years of age, he entered the 
business world and for fifteen years was employed as clerk in different establishments, 
thus gaining a thorough knowledge of business methods. On the 9th of November, 1906, 
he purchased a general mercantile business at Toledo, which he has since conducted. 
He now carries the largest stock of general merchandise in Toledo and is the owner of 
the building in which his store is located — a modern, two-story structure, fifty by 
seventy-five feet in dimensions. His establishment is most attractive by reason of its 
tasteful arrangement and the large line of fine goods which he handles, while the busi- 
ness methods of the house commend it to the support of the general public. He has 
closely studied the needs and wishes of the public and has been able to meet the various 
demands of the trade, which has now assumed large and gratifying proportions. He 
does not fear to venture where favoring opportunity leads the way and opportunity is 
ever to him a call to action. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 131 

On the 26th of April, 1906, Mr. Van Cleve was united in marriage to Miss Edith 
Elder and they have become the parents of two children: Frances Oneatta, who was 
born May 19, 1907; and Edith Rowena, born May 23, 1909. 

In his political views Mr. Van Cleve is a republican and he has been called to public 
positions of honor and trust, serving for two terms as a member of the city council. In 
1915 he was elected president of the port of Toledo for a term of four years, but resigned 
at the end of three years in order to devote his entire attention to his extensive business 
interests. He stands high in Masonry, having attained the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite, his membership being in Oregon Consistory, No. 1. He is also identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the United Artisans and the Eastern Star 
and his wife is a member of the Rebekahs, the United Artisans and the Eastern Star. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Episcopal church. In the 
conduct of his business affairs Mr. Van Cleve has displayed sound judgment and his 
energy and enterprise have gained him recognition as one of the substantial and repre- 
sentative merchants of his part of the state. He has always followed the most honorable 
methods and has therefore gained the confidence of all who have had business dealings 
with him. He is a most progressive and public-spirited citizen and his many commend- 
able traits of character have won for him an enviable position in the regard of his 
fellow townsmen. 



G. E. SANDERSON. 



G. E. Sanderson, well known in business circles of the city as "Sandy, Portland's 
Kodak and Pen Man," is an alert, enterprising young man whose spirit of initiative and 
determination is carrying him forward to the goal of success. He has always continued 
in the line of activity in which he embarked as a youth of .seventeen and is thoroughly 
familiar with every phase of the trade, his specialized knowledge being of great value 
to him in the attainment of prosperity. Mr. Sanderson is a native of Wisconsin. He 
was born in Galesville in 1S93, a son of George E. and Cora (Button) Sanderson and a 
representative of an old Massachusetts family whose ancestors gallantly fought for 
American interests in the Revolutionary war. The father was one of the leading live 
stock breeders of the east, specializing in the raising of Red Polled cattle. For many 
years he kept a herd of from forty to sixty cattle which he exhibited at all of the leading 
stock shows in that section of the country, winning many first prizes and becoming 
known as an authority on live stock. Of his children five are living: Lela, the 
wife of C. E. Emberson, of Seattle, Washington; Lloyd, residing in Wisconsin; Howard; 
G. E.; and Ruth, who is assisting the subject of this review in the conduct of his business. 
Reared on a farm G. E. Sanderson pursued his education in the schools of the 
neighborhood and remained at home until he reached the age of seventeen years, when 
he went to Seattle, Washington, where he became connected with photographic work. 
In 1914 he arrived in Portland and here took charge of the photography department of 
the Owl Drug Store, remaining thus employed for three years, or until 1917, when he 
determined to engage in business on his own account, opening an establishment at No. 
328 Washington street. He specializes in the handling of kodaks and pens, conducting 
what is probably the only store of the kind in the country. He also carries candy novel- 
ties and his main establishment is located at No. 328 Washington street in the Merchants 
Trust building, where he has a suite of eighteen rooms. He thoroughly understands 
every phase of the business and actuated at all times by a spirit of energy and 
determination he has gradually extended his interests until he is now conducting a 
business amounting to fifteen thousand dollars a month. His business methods have 
ever been characterized by strict integrity and his plans are carefully formulated and 
promptly executed. His employes number forty people and he is regarded as one of 
Portland's most progressive young business men. 

In 1912 Mr. Sanderson was united in marriage to Miss Helen Koch, of Seattle, Wash- 
ington, and they have become the parents of two children. Jack and Credwyn. The 
family residence is at No. 596 East Fifty-first street. Mr. Sanderson possesses a genial 
nature and is a member of the leading clubs of the city, where he is popularly known 
as "Sandy." He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
the Masons and in the last named order has attained the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite, also holding membership in the Shrine in which he is an active worker. 
He is a member of the Methodist church and in his daily life exemplifies its teachings. 



132 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Mr. Sanderson is a young man but has already accomplished much. He has fought life's 
battles unaided and has come off victorious in the strife. His fellow townsmen attest 
his sterling qualities and personal worth as well as his business ability and he has 
gained a wide circle of friends during the period of his residence in the northwest. 



LOUIS SALOMON. 



For many years Louis Salomon was well known in connection with the real estate 
development of Portland, where he entered that field of labor in 1888, continuing therein 
until his death in 1916. He had reached the seventieth milestone on life's journey when 
he was called to his final rest, his birth having occurred in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, 
March 11, 1846. He came to the United States in 1859, when a youth of thirteen years, 
crossing the Atlantic on a sailing vessel which was manned by negroes, these being 
the first black people that Mr. Salomon had ever seen. He landed at Philadelphia, but 
after a few years spent in the east made his way to the Pacific coast, arriving in 
California in 1863 and two years later came to Portland, Oregon, and still later settled 
at Long Tom in Lane county, where he opened a store. He afterward removed to Lan- 
caster and when the town of Junction City was laid out by Ben HoUiday, who built the 
Oregon and Central Railroads, Mr. Salomon was offered his choice of a building site for 
a store, without cost, if he would move to the town, which he did. There was no saw- 
mill in the neighborhood, but Mr. HoUiday told him if he would get his lumber in 
Portland it should be hauled for him to Junction City free of charge. Thus he became 
identified with the upbuilding and development of the community, where he continued 
until 1888, when he removed to Portland and entered the real estate business and con- 
tinued therein until his death. His original location was at First and Washington 
streets, after which he removed to 231 Stark street and eventually to 300 Oak street. 
In 1905, his son, Adolph H., entered the business with him and has since become the 
head of the real estate and mortgage loans business, which is conducted under the firm 
name of Salomon & Company and maintains offices in the Railway Exchange building. 

It was after his arrival in the new world that Louis Salomon was united in marriage 
to Miss Hattie Simon, a native of Weisenheim, Germany, who came to Portland with 
her parents about 1870. Her father, Samuel Simon, settled on a tract of land, now 
known as the Simon Addition at East Twenty-sixth and Division streets. The marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. Salomon was celebrated on December 9, 1877, and Mrs. Salomon passed 
away May 5, 1919. In their family were four children: Adolph, forty-two years of 
age; Claudia, the wife of C. S. Samuel, manager of the Oregon Life Insurance Company, 
their family now numbering two sons, Millard A. and Leo; Sylvia A., the wife of Sigmund 
Sonnenberg, who is engaged in merchandising in San Francisco; and Sidney H., who 
was born in May, 1886, and is engaged in the insurance business in Portland. The 
family has long been prominently known in Portland and the firm of Salomon & Com- 
pany is one of the oldest operating in the real estate fields here. During his connection 
therewith the father contributed in no small measure to the development and improve- 
ment of the city. He made a close study of real estate conditions, was familiar with all 
property on the market and was thus able to negotiate many important real estate trans- 
fers. He was actuated in all he undertook by a spirit of enterprise and by a laudable 
ambition and as the years passed he won a substantial measure of success. 



J. C. SIEGMUND. 



J. C. Siegmund, who for nearly a half century has been a resident of Oregon and is 
therefore entitled to classification with its pioneer settlers, is now numbered among the 
prominent and substantial business men of Salem, where he is at the head of an ex- 
tensive undertaking, conducted under the name of the Union Abstract Company, this 
being the largest enterprise of the kind in the city. He was born in Sheboygan, Wis- 
consin, December 25, 18G1, and in 1874, when thirteen years of age, came to Oregon with 
his parents, Jacob and Margarette (Klumb) Siegmund. The family located in Portland, 
where they remained for a year while the father looked about for a suitable farm. He 
purchased a ranch of three hundred and twenty acres southeast of Salem and later bought 
an additional tract of five hundred and thirty-eight acres adjoining his original invest- 



HISTORY OF OREGON 133 

ment and is still tlie owner of that property, which he has greatly improved, converting it 
into one of the finest farms in the northwest. He grows grain and also engages in the 
raising of good stock and although eighty-nine years of age, retains much of his early 
mental and physical vigor, being still an active factor in the world's work. The mother 
passed away on Memorial day of 1920, at which time she had reached the age of eighty- 
three years. 

Their son, J. C. Siegmund, attended the public schools of his native state, complet- 
ing his education in Willamette University at Salem, Oregon. He followed the occu- 
pation of farming until his twenty-fifth year and subsequently engaged in teaching 
school. His fellow citizens, recognizing his worth and ability, called him to public 
oflSce and from July, 1902, until July, 1907, he served as county recorder of Marion 
county, discharging his duties with a sense of conscientious obligation that made his 
record a most commendable one. On the expiration of his ofiicial service he engaged 
in the abstract business in Salem, of which he had gained a thorough and compre- 
hensive knowledge while acting as county recorder, and is now conducting his inter- 
ests under the name of the Union Abstract Company. His business judgment has ever 
been found to be sound and reliable and his enterprise unfaltering and his interests are 
operated along the most systematic and progressive lines, productive of excellent results. 
About nine thousand real estate transfers are recorded annually in Salem and Mr. 
Siegmund receives more than two-thirds of the abstract business resulting from these 
transfers, having the leading enterprise of that kind in the city. His place of business is 
at No. 345 State street and his employes average nine people. 

In 1898 Mr. Siegmund was united in marriage to Miss Inez I. Hale, a daughter of 
William and Rachel (Alphin) Hale, honored pioneers of Oregon, the former coming to 
this state in 1852 and the latter in 1847. Mr. and Mrs. Siegmund have become the par- 
ents of a son, Floyd L., who is now attending college at Corvallis, Oregon. The various 
experiences of pioneer life are familiar to Mr. Siegmund and through his industry and 
enterprise he has contributed to the substantial development and progress of the section 
in which he lives. He can remember when many of the well cultivated farms of today 
were covered with a dense growth of forest trees and when great stretches of land that 
are now thickly populated presented no indication of civilization. He has made good 
use of his time, his talents and his opportunities and in the evening of life can look back 
Over the past without regret and forward to the future without fear. He has a wide 
acquaintance in this section of the state and Salem numbers him among her substantial 
and highly respected citizens. 



JOSEPH E. SHELTON. 



Joseph E. Shelton is one of the owners and publishers of the Eugene Daily Guard 
and as a progressive newspaper man he is contributing in large measure to the develop- 
ment of the district in which he is located. He was born in Indian Mound, Stewart 
county, Tennessee, February 3, 1873, his parents being Eldridge M. and Elizabeth 
(Hunt) Shelton, natives of Tennessee. The father followed farming in that state and 
also served in the Confederate army during the Civil war. In ISSO he went to Kentucky, 
becoming a resident of Mayfleld, where he has since made his home. The mother passed 
away in October, 1918. 

Joseph E. Shelton acquired his education in the schools of Mayfield, Kentucky, and 
afterward learned the printer's trade in the office of the Mayfield Monitor. At the age 
of eighteen years he left home and started out in the world on his own account, going 
to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where he purchased a half interest in the Daily Era, with 
which he was connected until 1893. He then went to Springfield, Missouri, and was 
secretary-treasurer of the Leader Publishing Company of that city until 1896, at which 
time he became telegraph editor of the Daily Commercial of Louisville, Kentucky, with 
which he remained until the Despatch was established, when he became news editor 
of that paper. Subsequently he went to Paducah, Kentucky, and founded the Daily 
Democrat, of which he was managing editor until 1901, when failing health compelled 
him to seek a change of climate and he went to Arizona, becoming editor of the Phoenix 
Gazette. His connection with that journal continued until 1905, when, his health being 
restored, he returned to Missouri and operated a weekly paper at Union until 1911. 
In that year he came to Oregon and went to work as advertising manager for the Daily 
Guard at Eugene, and after a year's service he became managing editor. Later he pur- 



l:!4 HISTORY OP OREGOX 

chased an interest in the Eugene Morning Register, with which he was connected for 
two years. On the 11th of April, 1916, in association with Charles H. Fisher, he pur- 
chased the Eugene Daily Guard, which they have since successfully conducted. Mr. 
Shelton acted as editor and manager of the Guard until Mr. Fisher disposed of his 
paper at Salem, Oregon, at which time the latter assumed the editorial duties, while 
Mr. Shelton is business manager. Theirs is one of the oldest papers in the state, its 
first issue appearing in 1866, when it was published as a weekly. In June, 1891, it became 
a daily and has grown from a one-man shop to one of the most modern printing plants in 
the northwest, equipped with all of the latest presses and three linotype machines. From 
a typographical standpoint it is up-to-date and as its news is always accurate and reliable 
it has won the confidence of the public in large measure and enjoys an extensive 
circulation, thus making it a valuable advertising medium. Its editorial policy is vig- 
orous and the Guard has ever been a leader in public affairs, always standing strongly 
for the development of the natural resources of the Willamette valley. 

On the 20th of December, 1899, Mr. Shelton was united in marriage to Miss Ger- 
trude Elizabeth Vitt, a daughter of Hon. A. A. and Mollie (Ferguson) Vitt, natives of 
Missouri. The father was prominent in manufacturing and financial circles of his 
locality as a miller and banker and also won distinction in public affairs, having served 
as representative from Franklin county to the Missouri state legislature. He passed 
away October 3, 1920. The mother died about 1880. 

Mr. Shelton is well known in fraternal and club circles of Eugene, holding member- 
ship in the Masonic order, the Eastern Star, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Kiwanis Club, while his interest in the welfare and advancement of his city and state 
is indicated in his membership in the Oregon Chamber of Commerce and the Eugene 
Chamber of Commerce. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and 
in religious faith he is a Presbyteriah. Mr. Shelton's broad experience in the news- 
paper field has made him one of the best known men in journalistic circles of the 
country and through the medium of his paper he has aided largely in promoting 
public progress along material, intellectual, social, political and moral lines. 



LAWRENCE S. KAISER. 



Lawrence S. Kaiser, a native son of Portland and a member of one of the honored 
pioneer families of the state, is doing excellent work as a public official, having served 
as superintendent of the bureau of waterworks since 1914, and he has also gained 
prominence as a successful real estate dealer. As a business man and as a public official 
he has made an excellent record, and his efforts have been an element in the general 
development and upbuilding of the city in which his entire life has been passed. 

Mr. Kaiser was born in Portland, September 9, 1870, a son of Andrew and Rosa B. 
(Scharr) Kaiser, the former born in Switzerland in 1830 and the latter in Wittenburg, 
Germany, in 1838. The maternal grandfather was also a native of Germany and a man 
of prominence in his community, serving for eight years as burgomaster, but subse- 
quently left that country and came to America, landing at New Orleans, Louisiana, in 
1850. The parents of Lawrence S. Kaiser crossed the plains to San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, in 1859, making the trip by mule team and being three months en route. From 
San Francisco they came to Portland as passengers on a sailing vessel and the father 
here established himself in business, opening a confectionery store on Front street, 
near Yamhill, in the early '60s and becoming one of the pioneer merchants of the city. 
At a subsequent period he removed to Linnton, Oregon, and there took up his abode 
upon a ranch. 

In the pursuit of an education Lawrence S. Kaiser attended the public schools of 
his native city, becoming a student in the Couch and old North Central schools, where 
he continued his studies until 1888. when he entered the Portland Business College, 
from which he was graduated in June, 1890, on the completion of a course in book- 
keeping and banking, while subsequently he devoted two years to the study of law. 
Upon starting out in the business world he became bookkeeper and collector for Wake- 
field, Fries & Company, remaining with that firm from 1890 until 1894, and he then 
filled the position of cashier tor the water committee of Portland, acting in that capacity 
from 1894 until 1902. In the latter year he became chief clerk for the water board of 
Portland, thus serving until 1914, and on the 7th of May of that year was elected by 




LAWRENCE S. KAISER 



HISTORY OF OREGON 137 

the city council to the office of superintendent ot the bureau of waterworks, in which 
capacity he is now serving. His long connection with this department has made him 
thoroughly familiar with its workings and he is therefore well qualified to discharge 
the duties that devolve upon him, doing conscientious, systematic and efficient work, 
which has made his services of great value to the city. He has also been active in the 
field of real estate, purchasing a tract of land known as the Canyon Gardens, located at 
Chapman and Jefferson streets, which he platted as Kaiser's subdivision of King's first 
addition, selling the property to good advantage. He has made extensive investments 
in real estate, having firm faith in Portland's future as a business center, and he is the 
owner of property in Couch's addition. King's addition, Irving's addition, the HoUiday 
Park addition, Westmoreland and the Davenport tract. In 1906 he sold one hundred 
and forty-four acres adjoining Linnton to A. L. Mills, president of the First National 
Bank, and he is regarded as an expert valuator and a shrewd, farsighted business man 
who is never afraid to venture where favoring opportunity points out the way. His 
plans are carefully formulated, and his business transactions have ever balanced up 
with principles of honor and integrity. 

At Springbrook, in Yamhill county, Oregon, on the 12th of September, 1893, Mr. 
Kaiser was united in marriage to Miss Miriam M. Skinner, a daughter of Edward Hayes 
and Penelope J. (Leddick) Skinner, of Rockford, Illinois. Mrs. Kaiser was born in 
Rockford, February 18, 1871, and was a cousin of President Rutherford B. Hayes. She 
came to Portland in 1890 and died October 28, 1918, leaving three children: Marguerite 
Jewel, born March 9, 1895, who is a graduate of St. Mary's and Philomath Colleges 
and has devoted her attention to educational work, having taught school in Oregon and 
Idaho; Lawrence Edward, who was born May 23, 1903, and is now attending the Benson 
Polytechnic School; and Miriam Edna, a student at the Ladd school. 

In his political views Mr. Kaiser is a republican, and his religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the First Congregational church, with which he has been affiliated 
since 1896. He is a member of the Oregon Historical Society, the Portland Press Club, 
the Portland Social Turnverein and the Auld Lang Syne Society, while fraternally he is 
identified with Camp No. 77 of the Woodmen of the World and with Columbia Lodge, 
No. 114, A. F. & A. M. He is making a splendid political record, characterized by faith- 
ful and efficient service and marked devotion to duty, and his life has been a busy and 
useful one, filled with honorable purpose and accomplishment. He has been an inter- 
ested witness of much of the growth and development of Portland and has been an 
active factor in its progress. Wherever known he is held in high regard, and most 
of all where he is best known. 



OTTO HARTWIG. 



Otto Hartwig, president of the Oregon State Federation of Labor, in which office 
he has served since 1916, is exceptionally well qualified to discharge the responsible 
duties which devolve upon him in this connection, ably representing the labor interests 
of the state. A native of Michigan, Mr. Hartwig was born in Manistee in 1887, a son of 

C. S. and Laura (Cabella) Hartwig, the former a native of Denmark and the latter 
of Hamburg, Germany. Emigrating to America, they became residents of Michigan, 
whence they removed successively to Wisconsin, Montana, Idaho and Oregon, arriving 
In Portland in 1906. 

After completing his school course Otto Hartwig learned automobile and carriage 
painting in Wisconsin and later the trade of a painter and paper hanger, which he 
followed successfully until 1916, during which period he took an active part in the 
work of the unions. In that year he was chosen president of the State Federation of 
Labor — an office which was entirely unsolicited by Mr. Hartwig, but the choice was a 
wise one, for he is eminently fitted for leadership and under his wise guidance the 
interests of the state labor organization have been well cared for. The State Federation 
is composed of one hundred and thirty labor organizations and has a membership of 
nearly fifty thousand. Mr. Hartwig is also secretary of the state board of conciliation 
and a member of the board of vocational training and was identified with the United 
States employment service during the World war. In 1919 he was sent to Washington, 

D. C, on a commission regarding the cancellation of shipping contracts and in the same 
year represented Oregon at the international convention of the Federation of Labor. 
At various times Mr. Hartwig has desired to resign his office as president of the State 



138 HISTORY OF OREGOX 

Federation but the organization has refused to accept his resignation, believing that 
they can find no one so well qualified to fill this most exacting position. By virtue of 
his office he was a member of draft board No. 1 during the World war and took a 
prominent part in all the loan drives and also was a member of the Boy Scouts com- 
mittee. 

In 1918 Mr. Hartwig was united In marriage to Miss Rachel B. Hickman of Port- 
land, and they have become the parents of a son. Otto R., Jr., now in his first year. Mr. 
Hartwig resides on Powell valley road in a suburban home surrounded by seven and a 
half acres of land. He is a member of the Painters Union and president of the Labor 
Temple Association. Although a young man he has already become one of the foremost 
figures in labor organizations of the country and his natural endowments well qualify 
him for the important position which he so capably fills. His record measures up to 
the full standard of honorable manhood and those who know him recognize in him a 
citizen whose loyalty to the public welfare has never been questioned, while his in- 
tegrity and honor in private affairs are matters familiar to all with whom he has been 
associated. 



GALE S. HILL. 



Gale S. Hill, former district attorney of Linn county, is an able member of the Ore- 
gon bar, holding to the highest standards of the profession. He is likewise a member of 
the law firm of Hill & Marks, leading attorneys of Albany, whose clientele is extensive 
and of a representative character. Mr. Hill is a native son of Oregon, his birth having 
occurred in the city where he still makes his home on the 11th of November, 1S87. His 
parental grandfather. Dr. R. C. Hill, was a Baptist minister who crossed the plains to 
Oregon in 1852 and for a time resided in Benton county. Subsequently he became a 
resident of Albany and here founded the Baptist church, of which he continued as pastor 
throughout the remainder of his active life, his work in that connection proving of 
far-reaching and beneficial effect. His son. Dr. J. L. Hill, was but four years of age 
when his parents made the journey to Oregon from Tennessee. For a time he worked 
on farms in the state and then learned the printer's trade, after which he entered 
Willamette University, and working his way through that institution of learning and 
was graduated therefrom in 1871, at which time the M. D. degree was bestowed upon 
him. He engaged in the practice of medicine at Buena Vista, Polk county, tor a year 
and then opened an office in Albany, where he continued in practice to the time of 
his death. In addition to his private practice, which was extensive and important, 
he was surgeon general of the Oregon National Guards under Governor Moody and 
his professional standing was of the highest. He was careful in diagnosis, and wide 
reading and study kept him abreast with the advancement continually being made in 
the methods of medical and surgical practice. He also wrote extensively for news- 
papers and was a man of broad learning, who possessed one of the best libraries in 
the state and was likewise said to have the finest museum on the Pacific coast. He 
traveled extensively and at the opening of the World war he was making a tour of. 
the world, being a passenger on a German boat en route from Australia to Aden. The 
steamer was pursued by war ships and at length was obliged to put into a neutral port 
in East Africa, from which point Dr. Hill made his way home as best he could, being 
compelled to follow the African coast, but finally reached his native land in safety. He 
had wedded Mary Pennington, a native of Linn county, Oregon. Her father, Stewart 
M. Pennington, came to this state in 1847 and took up a donation claim in Linn county, 
which he improved and developed, and subsequently went to Pendleton, Oregon, where 
for some time he engaged in merchandising, in which he won success, acquiring a 
substantial competence which enabled him to live retired in his later years in the 
enjoyment of a well earned rest. He represented Umatilla county in the state senate 
for two terms and gave earnest and thoughtful consideration to all vital ques- 
tions which came up for settlement. He passed away at Albany in 1913. Dr. Hill 
was prominent in the Knights of Pythias, being grand chancellor of his lodge for the 
state of Oregon. He was a man of high intellectual attainments, who, working his 
way through college, attained high rank in his profession and was classed with the 
most skilled physicians of his section of the state. He passed away in July, 1919. at 
the age of seventy-four years, while the mother's death occurred in December, 1896. 
Their son. Gale S. Hill, attended the public schools of Albany and later enrolled 



HISTORY OF OREGON 139 

It in Albany College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. 
He then read law in the office of J. K. Weathertord and spent one year in the office of 
his uncle, W. Lair Hill, at Oakland, California, being admitted to the bar in 1900. 
He opened an office in Albany and has continued in practice here. His knowledge of 
the law is comprehensive and exact and he is seldom, it ever, at fault in the applica- 
tion of a legal principle. On the 1st of January, 1915, Mr. Hill formed a partnership 
with W. L. Marks, and this association has continued, the firm now being accorded 
a large and representative clientage. Mr. Hill's ability in his profession has won 
recognition by election to public office and for eight and a half years he served as 
deputy district attorney under John H. McNary of Salem. In 1912 he was elected 
district attorney for the old third judicial district, comprising Linn, Marion. Polk. 
Yamhill and Tillamook counties, and held that office until the district was divided, 
when he served for Linn and Marion counties. When each county was made a district 
he was elected district attorney for Linn county in 1916 and served in that office until 
January 1. 1921. 

Mr. Hill gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his fraternal 
connections are with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while along the line of his 
profession he is identified with the American, Oregon State and Linn County Bar 
Associations, and of the last named has served as president. He is the owner of a 
fine law library and is a man of high professional attainments, whose standing at the 
bar is an enviable one. He is deeply interested in all that pertains to public progress 
and improvement, giving his aid and cooperation to all plans and movements for the 
general good, and his enterprise and public spirit have made him a valued citizen of 
his community. 



M. H. ABBEY. 



M. H. Abbey is the senior member of the firm of M. H. & E. J. Abbey, proprietors 
of the Abbey Hotel at Newport, a hostelry which is known throughout the Pacific north- 
west, and he also has valuable holdings in lead and silver mines in British Columbia. 
He is a most enterprising and successful business man and in the conduct of his various 
interests displays sound judgment and excellent executive ability. Mr. Abbey is a 
representative of one of the old and honored pioneer families of the state. He was 
born in the city where he now resides on the 11th of April, 1869, and is a son of Peter 
M. and Sarina S. (Earl) Abbey, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Canada. 
The father was employed as a clerk in mercantile establishments in his native state 
and later went to Canada, where he resided for a year. He then returned to the States 
and in 1866 came to Oregon, taking up his residence in Elk City, Lincoln county, where. 
in partnership with his brothers, he engaged in general merchandising until 1869, when 
he removed to Newport. Here he opened a general mercantile establishment and also 
establislied the Abbey Hotel, continuing active in those lines throughout the remainder 
of his life. He was most successful in the conduct of his mercantile interests and 
the excellent service afforded by his hotel soon gained for it widespread popularity 
and it became known throughout the Pacific northwest. He passed away on the 6th 
of February, 1916, at the age of seventy-nine years and the mother's demise occurred 
in April of that year, when she was sixty-eight years of age. They were widely known 
and highly esteemed as honored pioneer settlers of the state. 

Their son, M. H. Abbey, was reared in Newport and here attended the public 
schools, later pursuing a course in Philomath College, while his brother, E. J. Abbey, 
was for three years a student in the public schools of Corvallis, Oregon. On entering 
business life the brothers became associated with their father in the conduct of the 
hotel and following his demise they became sole proprietors of the business, conducting 
their interests under the firm name of M. H. & E. J. Abbey. In 1910 they erected a 
fine modern hotel, three stories in height, containing eighty-five rooms and supplied 
with all the latest equipment and conveniences to be found in a first-class hostelry. The 
hotel is noted for its excellent cuisine and it has found favor with the traveling public, 
being known from Alaska to San Diego. It is conducted along the most modern and 
progressive lines and the service rendered patrons is high grade in every particular. 
M. H. Abbey is also a stockholder in the Western State Bank of Newport and is like- 
wise extensively interested in lead and s-ilver mines in British Columbia. His invest- 



140 HISTORY OF OREGON 

ments have been judiciously made and capably managed and by reason of his enterprise 
and diligence he has won a substantial measure of success. 

In November, 1901, Mr. Abbey was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Kist of Ash- 
land, Oregon, and they became the parents of a daughter, Irene, who is now the wife 
of E. A. Scram of Los Angeles. On the 1st of January, 1917, Mr. Abbey wedded Miss 
Sadie Patterson and they have a large circle of friends in the city where they reside. 

In his political views Mr. Abbey is a republican and is much interested in public 
affairs of his community, having served for two terms as port commissioner of New- 
port, which position he capably filled until January 1. 1921. His fraternal connections 
are with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
His entire life has been passed in Oregon and he is actuated by the spirit of western 
enterprise and progress that has been a dominant factor in bringing about the rapid 
upbuilding and substantial growth of the state. He is a man of high principles and 
honorable purposes and wherever known he commands the respect and confidence of 
all with whom he is associated. 



ANTHONY NEPPACH. 



For almost forty-five years Anthony Neppach has been identified with the 
now carried on under the name of the Nicolai-Neppach Company in Portland. He is 
a representative of one of the oldest and best known of the pioneer families of the 
city and there are few so thoroughly acquainted with the history of Portland and its 
development as he. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in Fond du Lac, March 1, 
1856, and was a youth of seventeeen years when he came to the northwest. His parents 
were Mr. and Mrs. William Charles Neppach and their children were John C, Joseph 
H., Stephen A., Susan, Peter F., Frances, William Charles and Anthony. Only two 
of the number are now living: Mrs. Susan Kratz, who resides in Oakland, California; 
and Anthony, of this review. It was William Charles Neppach, the father, who built 
the brick structure at the northwest corner of Third and Burnside streets in 1887. 
Other members of the family were prominently identified with the early business 
development of Portland, for Stephen A., Peter F. and Joseph H. Neppach, brothers 
of Anthony Neppach, opened a drug store on the northwest corner of First and Oak 
streets in 1874 and afterward removed to the building owned by the Neppach family 
at Third and Burnside streets. Another brother. John, was for years engaged in the 
feed business and later conducted a feed business on the east side and afterward a 
butchering business. Thus the name of Neppach began to figure more and more promi- 
nently in connection with the trade circles of the city and has been prominently known 
to the present time. 

Anthony Neppach was a youth of seventeen years when the family home was estab- 
lished in Portla.nd. He journeyed westward by way of San Francisco and arrived in 
the Rose City on the 3d of September, 1873, after a seven days' voyage on the "Ora 
Flame." Three shots were fired from the mouth of a cannon at Sauvies Island, an- 
nouncing the arrival of the steamship, which was always an event to this city with its 
five thousand population that always turned out en masse to welcome the incoming 
steamers, which at that time docked at the foot of Glisan street. The Portland of 
that day bore little resemblance to the metropolitan city of the present, although 
changes were being gradually brought about that laid the foundation for the present Port- 
land. In the year 1871 there was a large fire in the neighborhood of the foot of Jefferson 
street and business was then transferred to the lower end of the town, the Clarendon 
hotel being built at First and Glisan streets, while the old 0. & C. terry at the foot 
of that street handled the freight across the river. The Stark street ferry, owned by 
Levi and Jack Knott, handled the passenger trade between the east and west sides 
by means of a cable rope. The first planing mill in Portland was built by Nicolai 
Brothers and this constituted the predecessor of the plant of the Nicolai-Neppach Com- 
pany of the present day. The original planing mill was erected in 1866. The supply 
of timber was received from scows which entered what was then known as Balch creek 
at the foot of Fifteenth street, below the plant of the Willamette Lumbering & Manu- 
facturing Company, thence proceeded up through Couch's lake where the Union depot 
now stands and landed the lumber at Second and Everett streets. Many times Mr. 
Neppach put on his skates at First and Everett streets and skated down to Couch's and 




ANTHONY NEPPACH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 143 

Guild's lakes, beyond where now stands the North Pacific sawmill. In the year 1876 
Anthony Neppach became interested in the planing mill and has since been identified 
with the business now conducted under the name of the Nicolai-Neppach Company. 
He was a young man of twenty-one when he entered the plant in which he has since 
worked, either in the mill or in connection with executive management. Throughout 
the intervening period he has contributed in large measure to the growth and success 
of the undertaking, as he became acquainted with every phase of the business and 
developed his powers more and more wisely to direct its activities. The Nieolai-Nip- 
pach Company were the first people that experimented with the timber of Oregon. 
They went into the forests, chopped down the trees, such as cedar and larch, and packed 
out on their backs a sufficient amount of wood to experiment as to its usefulness as 
a finishing lumber. 

In the year 1888 Mr. Neppach was united in marriage to Miss Kate M. Sohns, a 
daughter of Louis Sohns, the incorporator and president of the First Bank of Van- 
couver, Washington, and five times mayor of that city. He was elected nine times 
to the legislature and helped frame the laws of the state of Washington when it was 
changed from a territory into a state. Mr. and Mrs. Neppach now reside at No. 255 North 
Twenty-fifth street, at the corner of Northrup. Great, indeed, have been the changes 
which have occurred since Mr. Neppach took up his abode in Portland in company 
with the members of his father's household. The site of the city then covered a com- 
paratively small district near the river, but with the passing years the growth has 
extended to the adjoining hillside, with East Portland as a great city across the 
Willamette. The Neppach family has borne its full share in the work of general 
development and progress and Anthony Neppach still maintains a prominent position 
in the business circles, honored and respected by all who know him, not alone for the 
success which he has achieved but also by reason of the progressive and straightfor- 
ward business methods he has ever followed. 



HIRAM TERWILLIGER. 



The student of history cannot carry his investigation far into the records of 
Oregon without learning of the close connection of the Terwilliger family with the 
development and upbuilding of the state. Hiram Terwilliger was long associated with 
mining and ranching interests here and from pioneer times representatives of the 
name have taken active part in the work of public improvement along many lines. They 
were Illinois people who cast in their lot with the early settlers, becoming associated 
with the first white men who took up their abode in the Willamette valley. Prior to 
living in Illinois, the family had come from Ohio and it was at Vernon, Knox county, 
Ohio, that Hiram Terwilliger was born on the sixth of March, 1S40, his parents being 
James and Sophronia (Hurd) Terwilliger. Both of his parents were of Dutch descent 
and the Terwilliger family, as indicated by early colonial records, were among the 
first settlers of New York. The great grandmother of Hiram Terwilliger in the paternal 
line was owner of a large tract of land on the site where New York City now stands. 
James Terwilliger, the father, became a blacksmith of Knox county, Ohio, where he 
resided until 1841, and then removed westward to Illinois, settling in Hancock county 
on the Mississippi river. This attractive district had already won the favorable atten- 
tion of the Mormon leader, Joseph Smith, who there established a colony of the Latter- 
day Saints, who at Nauvoo erected a temple and planted homes. This aroused great 
antagonism among the residents of that section of the slate, but for several years 
the Mormons continued to arrive and settle there from the east end of Europe. At 
length James Terwilliger sold his farm and Joined the Latter-day Saints on their 
emigration to the northwest. This was before the time of the gold excitement, and 
farming, fur trading and merchandising constituted the only business pursuits known in 
the great region between the Mississippi river and the Pacific coast. Mr. Terwilliger 
started upon the long journey with a team of four oxen and an emigrant wagon, in 
which were his wife and four children. He left his old home in April and it was 
not until October that he reached his destination, and his wife had succumbed to the 
hardships of the trip, dying while en route. On reaching the Willamette valley James 
Terwilliger erected a log cabin, on what is now the corner of First and Morrison 
streets in Portland, and also built a blacksmith shop, being the first to open a smithy 
in this city, which at that time was a tiny hamlet giving little promise of its future 



144 HISTORY OF OREGON 

development and growth. In 1847 Mr. Terwilliger was married to Mrs. Palinda Green, 
and in 1850 the family home was established in South Portland on a tract of six hun- 
dred and forty acres of land that is now within the corporation limits of this city. He 
afterward obtained the property as a donation claim and eighty-one acres of the 
original tract was in possession of Hiram Terwilliger to the time of his death and 
was the site of his home. The growth of the city greatly increased the value of the 
property and portions of the original claim were sold from time to time for residence 
purposes. 

Mr. Terwilliger was keenly interested in public affairs in the early days and did 
not a little to shape public thought, action and progress. He served as a colonel of the 
State Militia and enjoyed the highest respect of all of his associates, who were among 
the substantial citizens of Portland. He died in 1890 at the advanced age of eighty- 
four years, and thus passed on one who had been a connecting link between the pioneer 
past and the progressive present. The tract of land now known as Terwilliger Park 
was originally donated to the city for cemetery purposes but later was dedicated to 
its present use and is a permanent monument to a man who was the first to discern 
the possibilities of Portland as an attractive site for a growing city. 

Hiram Terwilliger was but five years of age when he accompanied his parents on 
the long arduous journey across the plains and over the mountains to the beautiful 
Willamette valley. During his lifetime he witnessed a marvelous transformation in 
what was first a wilderness, and lived to see a flourishing and beautiful city rise on 
the site of the old homestead farm which he occupied in his boyhood days. He pur- 
sued his early education in the public schools of Portland and at Forest Grove, and 
continued to remain in Oregon until 1862, when he went to the mines of Idaho and later 
spent tour years in a logging camp in Oregon. He likewise devoted three years to a 
seafaring life, sailing along the coast, and for a year and a half, beginning in 1869, 
he conducted a feed and grocery store in Portland. In 1870 he became interested in 
the dairy business in Tillamook county, where he continued for four years but finally 
took up his abode in Portland on a beautiful tract of an acre and a half, which he 
owned until his death. He was likewise the owner of seventy-five acres of valuable 
Portland property and had an interest on the corner of First and Morrison streets, 
where his father had originally opened his blacksmith shop. He was one of the men 
of affluence in this city and at all times carefully and successfully managed his business 
affairs. 

On the 12th of July, 1869, in Tillamook, Oregon, Mr. Terwilliger was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Edwards, a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Edwards, who 
crossed the plains in 1862 and settled in Tillamook. Mrs. Terwilliger was born in 
Keokuk, Iowa, and has now passed away. They became the parents of four children: 
James and Joseph, both of Portland; Charlotte, the wife of Frank Butz, and the 
mother of two daughters, Latha and Ethel; and Virtue, the wife of Edward Rogers of 
Portland, her family now numbering three children, Ruth, George and Mildred. The 
death of Mr. Terwilliger occurred April 18, 1918, while his wife survived a little more 
than a year, passing away October 26, 1919. 

When Mr. Terwilliger had been a resident of Portland for seventy years the 
Oregonian wrote an interesting article concerning him as follows: "To practically 
every inhabitant of Portland the name of Terwilliger is known, largely through its 
association with the modern drive, Terwilliger boulevard, that winds in and out in the 
hills of South Portland; but to a scant hundred persons the name of Hiram Terwilliger 
is inseparable from the history of Portland since its foundation. For just seventy years 
ago he came to Portland, or rather passed through the dense wilderness where Port- 
land now stands, and at the age of five years began a career probably unequaled by any 
other living man. As a child he had only Indians tor playmates and he learned to 
'speak jargon better than English.' Mr. Terwilliger does not see Portland as it is today 
— he remembers only the time when 'Uncle Johnny' Stephens lived across the river; when 
Clinton Kelley lived farther east; when Phineas Carruthers lived north of his father's 
homestead and when G. H. Quiraby, Mr. Pettygrove and all the others were Portland's 
first citizens. He is a republican but never sought political office. He ran for the 
legislature one session, was defeated by one vote, so decided that was enough for him. 
He decries modern social and political conditions and wishes that the whole scene 
could be changed and he could 'live again the days when every one was a neighbor to 
every one else; when each man had an equal amount of property and privilege and no 
one was trying to wrest what you had from you through legal technicality!' " Through 
his entire life Mr. Terwilliger enjoyed the confidence and goodwill of those with whom 



HISTORY OP OREGON 145 

he had long been associated. That his life, was an upright and honorable one is indi- 
cated in the fact that his stanchest friends were those who had known him from his 
boyhood days, and it was with deep regret that Portland chronicled the passing of this 
honored pioneer settler. 



R. J. PETERSON. 



R. J. Peterson, conducting one of the fine photographic studios of Portland, came 
to the city in March, 1907, and through the intervening period of fourteen years has 
been a well known representative of photographic art in this city. Mr. Peterson is a 
native of Jamestown, New York, and in his youthful days attended school in Gary, 
New York, and also the Jamestown high school, from which he was graduated on the 
completion of his course. He later entered upon an apprenticeship to the American 
Aristotype Company in his home town in order to learn the method of making photo- 
graphic paper. He there continued for a few years, thoroughly acquainting himself 
with every phase of the business and at length took up the professional part of using 
the manufactured product of the Aristo Company, becoming connected with the Monroe 
Studio at Jamestown, New York. Still later he conducted a studio of his own at 
Austin, Pennsylvania, and afterward in his native city. At different periods he was 
connected with many prominent studios in the east, including the home studio of Mr. 
Hall on Virginia street, Buffalo, New York. 

It was in 1905 that Mr. Peterson made his way to the Pacific coast, thinking to 
enjoy better opportunities, perhaps, in this section of the country. He arrived in San 
Francisco, where he made his home for two years and then in March, 1907, removed 
to Portland, where he has continued to reside. He has made for himself a most cred- 
itable position in the business circles of the city. He purchased the Dufresne Studio 
in the Buchanan block in 1910 and was not long in building up a good business, for 
he soon gave tangible proof of his capability and high standards as a representative of 
photographic art. In June, 1916, he opened his present studio in the Pittock block 
and has since been here located. He is thoroughly familiar with the latest processes 
of photography, has keen appreciation of the values of light and shade and has a 
happy faculty of catching a natural pose or expression, so that he produces excellent 
likenesses of his patrons. 

On the 22d of September, 1897, Mr. Peterson was married to Miss Carrie Radley 
of Olean, New York, and during the period of their residence in Portland they have 
gained many warm friends and made for themselves an enviable position in social 
circles. Mr. Peterson has a great love for the western country, with its beauty and 
its progressiveness and is now numbered among the substantial business men of the 
Rose City. 



D. A. WHITE. 



Since 1890 D. A. White has been engaged in the commission business in Salem 
and he enjoys the distinction of being the pioneer merchant in that line of activity in 
the city. His trade has assumed extensive proportions and he is most capably con 
ducting his interests, his efforts being rewarded with a gratifying measure of success, 
He was born near Peoria, Illinois, December 5, 1854, and came to the west in October, 
1880, settling In Kansas, where he remained for a period of seven years and then re 
moved to Anatone, Washington. After residing for three years in Washington he came 
to Oregon and in 1890 located in Salem, establishing a commission business on Cour 
street. Subsequently he moved his business to Commercial street and afterward pur 
chased the ground of his present location, on which he erected a two-story building 
and also a brick warehouse two stories in height and one hundred and fifty by forty 
two feet in dimensions, these being on Front street. He also built two warehouses 
on Water street, which have a capacity of six hundred tons of baled hay. Mr. White 
is associated in business with his two sons and their interests are conducted under the 
style of D. A. White & Sons. They deal in hay, grain and teed and their enterprising 
methods and reliable dealing have secured for them a large patronage, theirs being one 
of the largest and oldest commission houses in the city. Mr. White is also the owner 

Vol. 11—10 



14() HISTORY OF OREGON 

of a farm of sixty-six acres near Salem, which is given over to the cultivation of logan- 
berries, and this he rents, deriving therefrom a substantial addition to his income. 
He is an energetic, farsighted and progressive business man and success in substantial 
measure has crowned his efforts. 

On the 3d of January, 1SS7, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Edith D. 
Brewster, a descendant of Elder (William) Brewster, who was one of the passengers 
on the Mayflower. Mr. and Mrs. White were married at El Paso, Illinois, and they 
have become the parents of three children: H. O., who married Miss Nellie D. Cox 
of Silverton, Oregon, and has two sons, Lowell and Otho, both of whom are attending 
school; Floyd M.; and Blanche I., who is at home with her parents. The sons are 
energetic and progressive young business men and are members of the firm of D. A. 
White & Sons. The family is widely and favorably known in Salem, having resided 
here for a period of thirty-one years, and through his mercantile activities Mr. White 
has substantially contributed to the business development of the city. His entire career 
has been actuated by a spirit of progress that has been productive of substantial results 
and his worth to the community is widely acknowledged. 



ELMER HURLEY SMITH, D. 0., M. D. 

Associated with the professional interests of Hillsboro, Washington county, is Dr. 
Elmer Hurley Smith, who serves his community as doctor of medicine and of osteopathy. 
During the time Dr. Smith has practiced in Hillsboro he has won the confidence and 
goodwill of his fellow citizens, with the result that he has a large and lucrative practice. 

A native of Missouri is Dr. Smith, having been born in that state July 24, 1883. 
His father. Dr. Lundy B. Smith, was also a native of Missouri but came west with his 
family in the early 90's and settled in Oregon. Locating in Portland Dr. Smith prac- 
ticed his profession for a quarter of a century and was widely recognized as one of 
the leading physicians of that place. The mother of the subject of this review was 
Miss Mary E. Bronson and was also a native of Missouri. Both the Smith and Bronson 
families were from a line of old pioneer Ohio stock. In 1918 the mother died and the 
father is now retired from active practice. He resides with his son and at times assists 
him in his work. 

Dr. E. H. Smith, the subject of this review, is indebted to the schools of Portland 
for his early education. He later took up the study of medicine at the American School 
of Osteopathy and was graduated from this institution in 1910, with the degree of D. 0. 
He continued his studies in the Pacific Medical College at Los Angeles, where after 
completing the desired course he received the degree of M. D. Having thus been thor- 
oughly trained in two branches of his chosen profession. Dr. Smith established himself 
at Hillsboro and has since practiced there. Following the advanced idea of his calling 
he has used in his practice the curative knowledge of both schools, with the result that 
he has obtained a substantial measure of success. Dr. Smith owns and conducts Hills- 
boro's only hospital and while his practice is general he leans strongly to surgery, and 
were he located in a larger city it is that branch in which he would specialize. He is 
ever of an ambitious nature and hopes that the future may find him specializing as 
a surgeon in one of our large cities. 

In the desire for more knowledge and to keep abreast of the immense strides for- 
ever taking place in his profession. Dr. Smith is a constant student and it is this close 
application to his life work that has brought to him the success he now enjoys. His 
ability as a physician may be well illustrated by the fact that for five years he held 
the responsible oifice of city health ofTicer. In civic as well as professional affairs 
Dr. Smith is progressive and there is no man more esteemed throughout Washington 
county than he. 



GEORGE J. WILHELM. 



George J. Wilhelm is prominently operating in the field of banking at Harrisburg 
as vice president and cashier of the First National Bank and is also identified with 
other important business enterprises which have won him a place with the substantial 
and prosperous men of his community. Mr. Wilhelm was born in St. Cloud, Wisconsin, 




DR. ELMER H. SMITH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 149 

October 24, 1880, a son of George and Agnes (Andreas) Wilhelm, natives of Germany. 
When but a year old the father was brought by his parents to America, the family 
locating near Kiel, Wisconsin. There the grandfather of George J. Wilhelm took up 
land, which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for a number of 
years, when he sold it and in 1860 started on the long journey across the plains to 
Oregon, making the trip with ox teams. Locating at Monroe, in Benton county, he 
there purchased land, which he operated for some time and also assisted his son in 
the conduct of a general merchandise business. He passed away in 1890, when eighty 
years of age, and his wife's death occurred in 1889. The son, George Wilhelm, did not 
accompany his parents on their removal to Oregon but remained in Wisconsin, where 
for a time he followed farming, but ill health compelled him to abandon the arduous 
task of developing his land and he turned his attention to the hotel business, in which 
he engaged at St. Cloud and later at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, thus continuing until his 
demise. He was a man of prominence in his community and at various times his 
fellow townsmen sought to secure his services as a public official, but he declined all 
nominations, preferring to give his undivided attention to his business affairs. He 
passed away in April, 1900, and the mother's death occurred in August, 1898. 

George J. Wilhelm attended the parochial schools of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, from 
which he was graduated in 1S94. On starting out in the business world he secured 
a position as clerk in a large hardware store at Sheboygan when but fourteen years 
of age and remained with that firm for a period of six years, during which time his 
capability and faithful and conscientious service won him various promotions until he 
became assistant manager, being at that time a young man of twenty years. He next 
became connected with the Aladdin Soap Company in the capacity of secretary-treasurer 
and manager and under his direction the business was established upon a paying basis. 
In 1902 he severed his connection with that firm and became traveling representative 
for the B. J. Johnson Soap Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, remaining wuth that 
house for a year. He then came west at the request of the firm of A. Wilhelm & Sons, 
whose headquarters were at Monroe, Oregon, and assumed charge of its entire grain 
and milling business. This firm operated three flour mills and was the owner of four 
warehouses and conducted an extensive business, turning out three carloads of flour 
and feed per day. He remained with this firm until 1907, when he turned his atten- 
tion to the banking business, conducting the Bank of Harrisburg, a private financial 
institution, for a period of ten months, or until June, 1908, when the bank was national- 
ized, becoming the First National Bank of Harrisburg. This he operated alone for a 
year. The capital stock of Mr. Wilhelm's private bank was ten thousand dollars, which 
was increased to twenty-five thousand dollars after its nationalization. During the 
first year of its existence as a national institution it paid a seven per cent dividend, a 
nine per cent dividend the second year, a dividend of ten per cent for the next three 
years, twelve per cent for the succeeding four years, while in 1919 a sixteen per cent 
dividend was paid, in addition to which it built up a twenty-five thousand dollar sur- 
plus, its deposits reaching the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. It now 
has a surplus of twenty-eight thousand one hundred and fourteen dollars and deposits 
amounting to two hundred and seventy-one thousand, two hundred and sixteen dollars. 
The present oflicers of the bank are. R. K. Burton, president; W. A. Lane, vice presi- 
dent; George J. Wilhelm, vice president and cashier; and H. F. Halverson, assistant 
cashier, all being thoroughly reliable and progressive business men of their section 
of the state. Mr. Wilhelm personally attends to practically all of the business connected 
therewith and is proving most capable in the conduct of its affairs, although he had 
had no previous banking experience when he became connected with the institution. 
He is a man of sound business principles and in the management of the First National 
Bank has made it his first consideration to see to it that the depositors and stock- 
holders are well protected. However, he has been progressive enough to extend credits 
when they were sought by responsible parties and has in that way promoted business 
and agricultural enterprises. Being a man of resourceful business ability he has 
extended his efforts into various lines and is president of Hill & Company, which firm 
carries a seventy thousand dollar stock of hardware, harness, implements, furniture, 
carpets, rugs and general house furnishings, and also has the agency for automobiles, 
recently erecting a fine garage at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. At the time of its 
organization the business of the firm amounted to eight thousand dollars per year 
and the extent of Its growth is indicated in the fact that in 1919 its business amounted 
to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, while its transactions for 1920 exceeded 
that amount. Mr. Wilhelm was also the founder of the Harrisburg Warehouse & 



150 HISTORY OF OREGOX 

Lumber Company, which he established in 1912, and is now serving as its president. 
The company is engaged in the conduct of a wholesale grain and hay business of 
extensive proportions. He is likewise the founder of the Harrisburg Lumber & Manu- 
facturing Company, which was organized in April, 1920, and is now serving as secre- 
tary and treasurer of the company, which owns some of the finest and largest tracts 
of hardwood timber in the state, including maple, ash, oak, fir and balm lumber. The 
firm has established a new market for balm lumber with manufacturers, who hereto- 
fore had not made use of this product, and their shipments are made principally to 
Wisconsin. Mr. Wilhelm also has extensive farming interests in the vicinity, being 
the owner of six farms which he engaged in operating until the past year, but now 
rents his holdings. He was formerly extensively engaged in stock raising. Mr. Wil- 
helm is a man of large affairs who is continually broadening the scope of his activities 
with good results and carries forward to successful completion everything that he 
undertakes, for in his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. In all business affairs 
he readily discriminates between the essential and the non-essential and, discarding 
the latter, utilizes the former to the best possible advantage. 

On the 17th of April, 1907, Mr. Wilhelm was united in marriage to Miss Cecil 
Rampy, a daughter of Robert A. and Sarah (Johnson) Rampy, who were pioneers of 
this state, emigrating to Oregon from Missouri in 1860. They became residents of 
Harrisburg, where for many years Mr. Rampy successfully conducted a drug store, 
while later he operated a bank, gaining a prominent position among the substantial 
business men of this section of the state. He continued to make his home in Harris- 
burg until his demise, which occurred in 1908, while the mother passed away in 1907. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm have become the parents of five children: George R., Agnes E., 
Marjorie C, Millard F. and Gretta C. 

In his political views Mr. Wilhelm is independent and has taken an active interest 
in public affairs of his community, serving for several terms as city treasurer. His 
interest in the welfare and upbuilding of his city is indicated by his membership 
in the Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce, and during the influenza epidemic of 1918 
he was instrumental in curbing the disease by caring for the patients in the public 
schools, which were used as hospitals, many cases being treated in this manner. In 
religious faith he is a Catholic and his fraternal connections are with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Knights of Columbus and the United Artisans. He is a most patriotic 
and public-spirited citizen and during the World war rendered valuable aid to the 
government as chairman of Liberty Loan and Red Cross drives and also as chairman 
of the Harrisburg Council of Defense. Mr. Wilhelm is a man of keen discrimination 
and clear vision, possessing executive ability of an unusually high order, and his 
achievements in a business way entitle him to classification with America's captains 
of industry. He is wide-awake and alert and in his life exemplifies the spirit of progress 
which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the country. 



JUDGE HARRY H. BELT. 



Judge Harry H. Belt, circuit judge of the twelfth judicial district, comprising 
Yamhill and Polk counties, has the distinction of being the youngest judge elected to 
the circuit court bench in the state. He is one of Oregon's native sons, for his birth 
occurred at Salem, November 24, 18S3, his parents being John D. and Nellie (Hackle- 
man) Belt, the former born in Missouri and the latter in Oregon. In 1S53 the father 
accompanied his parents on their journey across the plains with ox teams. The 
family located at Salem, where the grandfather took up land and cleared and developed 
it, placing many improvements on his property. He was also a physician and in addi- 
tion to cultivating his farm practiced his profession at Salem, continuing active alorig 
those lines during the balance of his life. His son, John D. Belt, on starting out in 
the business world engaged in the drug business, becoming proprietor of a store at 
Salem and later conducting an establishment of that character in Dallas. In the man- 
agement of his business interests he won a substantial measure of success and is now 
living retired at Forest Grove, Oregon. The mother also survives and they are highly 
esteemed residents of their community. He is a democrat in his political views and 
strictly adheres to the principles of that party, steadfastly supporting its measures 
and candidates. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 151 

Harry H. Belt attended the public schools of Dallas and later became a student 
at the State Normal school at Monmouth, Oregon, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1903. Subsequently he taught school for three years in Yamhill county, 
and so excellent was his record as an educator that he was called to the ofiice of super- 
intendent of schools of Yamhill county, which office he capably filled for three years, 
when he resigned in order to devote his entire attention to the study of law. While 
teaching he had devoted his leisure hours to mastering the principles of jurisprudence, 
his uncle, Judge George H. Burnett, now serving as judge of the supreme court of 
Oregon, being his instructor. In 1906 he was admitted to the bar and then entered 
the office of Oscar Hayter, a prominent attorney of Dallas. While well grounded in 
the principles of common law when admitted to the bar, he has continued through 
the whole of his professional lite a diligent student of those elementary principles which 
constitute the basis of all legal science and this knowledge has served him well in many 
a legal battle before the court. Judge Belt's ability as a lawyer soon won recognition 
and he was called to the office of circuit judge of the twelfth judicial district, being 
at the time of his election the youngest judge chosen to that office in the state, the 
territory over which he originally had jurisdiction comprising Yamhill, Polk and 
Tillamook counties. The last named county, however, is not now included within the 
boundaries of the twelfth judicial circuit, which comprises Polk and Yamhill counties. 
At the close of his six years' term Judge Belt was reelected without opposition and 
is now the incumbent in the office. He has made a record over which there falls no 
shadow of wrong nor suspicion of evil and his native sense of justice as well as his 
knowledge of the law have made him an able presiding officer over the tribunal of 
which he has charge. His decisions indicate strong mentality and careful analysis, 
his ability being based upon a finely balanced mind and splendid intellectual attain- 
ments. 

On the 3d of July, 1907, Judge Belt was united in marriage to Miss Martha Pald- 
anius and they have become the parents of two children, George L. and Myra, who are 
attending school. Mrs. Belt is a member of the Church of Christ, Scientist. In his 
political views the Judge is a republican and a stalwart supporter of party principles. 
Fraternally he Is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, exemplifying 
in his life the beneficent spirit underlying these orders. He possesses a high sense 
of duty and honor and never swerves from the course which his conscience dictates 
as right. He has a wide acquaintance in this section of the state and the sterling 
traits of his character have established him high in public regard. 



H. HIRSCHBERG. 



H. Hirschberg, president of the Independence National Bank, at Independence, 
Oregon, is bending his energies to administrative direction and executive control, and 
actuated at all times by a spirit of unfaltering enterprise, has contributed in large 
measure to the success of the institution, which is one of the old and substantial banks 
of the county. He never sacrifices high standards to commercialism and his record is 
proof of the fact that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. Mr. 
Hirschberg was born in Germany, November 26, 1853, and is a son of Hyman and Sarah 
Hirschberg, who were also natives of that country and there spent their entire lives. 
The father engaged in merchandising and both parents passed away in 1873, dying 
within six months of each other. 

Their son. H. Hirschberg, was reared and educated in his native land and there 
learned the tinner's trade, which he followed in Germany until 1870, when he sought 
the opportunities offered in America to an enterprising and energetic young man and 
crossed the Atlantic, landing in New York city, where he worked at his trade and 
also followed other occupations until 1872. In that year he came to the west, arriving 
in Portland, Oregon, in April and remaining in that city until the 12th of August, when 
he removed to Independence, establishing the first tin shop in the town. This he con- 
ducted for two years and then engaged in general merchandising in connection with his 
brother, an association that was maintained until 1886, when they disposed of their 
interests and H. Hirschberg entered banking circles, establishing a private bank, which 
he conducted until January 7, 1889. He then organized the Independence National 
Bank, of which he has since served as president, with C. A. McLaughlin as the vice 



ir.2 HISTORY OF OREGON 

president and Ira D. Mix as cashier. The bank Is capitalized for fifty thousand dollars, 
has a surplus of fifteen thousand dollars and deposits amounting to four hundred thou- 
sand dollars. In 1890 Mr. Hirschberg erected a modern bank and office building which 
the bank has since occupied. The equipment is thoroughly modern and everything 
is done to safeguard and protect the interests of depositors. Moreover, the business 
of the bank is conducted along lines which constitute an even balance between conserva- 
tive measures and progressiveness and at the same time the policy of the bank extends 
to its patrons every possible assistance commensurate with the safety of the institu- 
tion. Mr. Hirschberg is a man of splendid executive ability and his administrative 
direction and enterprising spirit have been important elements in the successful conduct 
of the institution. On first coming to this county he invested in farm land and has 
since added to his original possessions, now owning fifteen hundred acres in one body, 
in addition to other farm property in the county. He is extensively interested in the 
growing of hops and in 1920 raised from three hundred and fifty acres, a crop valued at 
one hundred and eighty-three thousand, seven hundred and twenty-eight dollars. He 
has seventeen hop houses on his land and all modern equipment necessary for the 
proper production of hops and in this enterprise he is associated with Mr. McLaughlin, 
the work being done on shares. He has also become the owner of business and resi- 
dence property in Independence and Portland, as well as in other parts of the state, 
and is extensively interested in timber lands in Benton county, owning sixteen hundred 
and eighty acres, which contain eighty million feet of yellow fir. He is likewise the 
owner of forty-eight thousand acres of land in the state of Sonora, Mexico, and he is 
one of the most extensive land holders in Oregon. He is a keen and intelligent busi- 
ness man with a rapid grasp of details and a shrewd discrimination in investment and 
whatever he undertakes he carries forward to a successful termination. 

In his political views Mr. Hirschberg is independent, voting for the man whom he 
regards as best qualified for office, regardless of party affiliation. He is not affiliated 
with any church but contributes liberally to the support of all denominations. For 
the past twenty years he has been state treasurer of the State Grange, and fraternally 
is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World, the Rebekahs, 
the Eastern Star and the Masons, belonging to the Scottish Rite Consistory and to the 
Shrine in the last named organization. In the control of his business interests he dis- 
plays marked ability and energy, regarding no detail as too unimportant to receive 
his attention, and at the same time controlling the larger factors in his interests with 
notable assurance and power. His initiative spirit and notable ability have carried 
him into important relations and his activities have constituted an important element 
in the general development and upbuilding of this section of the state. For fifty years 
he has been a resident of Polk county and is widely and favorably known in the locality 
in which he makes his home, being recognized as a progressive business man and a 
public-spirited citizen, loyal to the best interests of the community. 



W. H. BEHARRELL. 



W. H. Beharrell, manager of Heywood Brothers and Wakefield Company, has been 
identified with Portland's industries for many years, and has been twenty-six years 
with the firm he now represents. He was born in New Albany, Indiana, March 2, 1854, 
and is the son of Henry and Sarah J. (Daniel) Beharrell. The former was a native 
of England, while his mother was born in Indiana and is now living in Portland at 
the age of ninety-three. His father died in Portland at the age of seventy-seven. He 
was in the implement business while in Indiana but following his removal to Portland 
in 1878 lived a retired life, free from business cares. 

W. H. Beharrell preceded his parents to the Pacific Coast, first making his home 
in San Jose, California, where he then entered the employ of James A. Clayton, a real 
estate dealer of that thriving city. In April, 1874, he came to Portland which was then 
but a village. After a year spent in various pursuits, among them working as a 
longshoreman, he went into the storage and wharfage business. After a limited time 
he accepted a position with the Oregon Furniture Manufacturing Company, one of the 
pioneer industries in that line, later rising to the position of president of that com- 
pany, from which he retired to accept the position he now holds. 

The Heywood Brothers and Wakefield Company are the largest chair manufacturers 



HISTORY OF ORECiOX 153 

in the world, having headquarters at Boston, Massachusetts. They have recently pur- 
chased the plant of the Oregon Chair Company. They are large employers of labor, 
having at Portland in their combined establishments a large force of skilled mechanics. 
From this plant they supply the states of California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, Alaska and British Columbia. 

On January 15, 1S76, Mr. Beharrell was married to Miss Eliza Richards, a native 
of Penzance, England, who came to America with her parents in 1872. To this union 
have been born six children, four of whom are living. 

His connection with one of Portland's largest institutions entitles him to recogni- 
tion, when considering the growth of Portland, her industries, or any historical chron- 
icle of the early citizens of the Oregon country. 



JOS. F. WESELY. 



A man of keen business discernment and sound judgment, Jos. P. Wesely has 
made for himself a creditable place in business circles of Scio as the proprietor of a 
well appointed mercantile establishment, and for the past five years he has also acted 
as local express agent. He was born in New York City, New York, June 20, 1873, a 
son of John and Frances (Young) Wesely, natives of Bohemia. The father was a 
marble cutter by trade and in 1870 he emigrated to the United States, thinking to find 
better business opportunities in this country. For three years he resided in the eastern 
metropolis and then removed to the middle west, establishing his home in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. At the end of three years he left that state and in 1877 went to Kansas, 
where he took up a timber claim of one hundred and sixty acres. He cleared and 
developed his land, continuing its operation for many years, and it was there that he 
passed away in 1904 at the age of fifty-three years. The mother, however, survives 
and now resides in Scio. She reared a family of fifteen children, of whom five sons 
and five daughters are living. 

Jos. F. Wesely pursued his early education in the district schools of Kansas, his 
first lessons being received in a sod house, while subsequently he was graduated from 
the Ellsworth schools. In order to secure the money for his academic course he clerked 
for two years in a grocery store and then entered the normal school at Salina, Kansas, 
where he pursued a preparatory course in business and a course in teaching. He 
also entered upon the work of the scientific course, which, however, he was obliged 
to discontinue, owing to ill health. Subsequently he engaged in teaching in the district 
where he had attended school, remaining a teacher in that locality for a period of 
seven years. Mr. Wesely is a well educated man of marked linguistic ability, convers- 
ing fluently in tlie Bohemian, German and English languages, and as an educator 
he was very successful, imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he 
had acquired. In the year 1898, in company with his uncles, he came to Oregon and 
for a year was in their employ. He then became connected with the flax industry 
at Scio, remaining for a year, after which he went to Salem, where he also followed 
that line of work for a year. Returning to Scio, he engaged in general merchandising 
in partnership with his brother, John Wesely, an association that was maintained for 
four years, when the business was divided, Mr. Wesely's brother becoming the owner 
of the stock of dry goods, while Mr. Wesely took over the grocery establishment, which 
he has since conducted. He is very careful in the selection of his goods and his known 
reliability, enterprising methods, reasonable prices and courteous treatment of patrons 
have secured for him a large patronage. For the past five years he has also acted as 
local express agent and he likewise has farming interests, owning and operating a 
tract of fourteen acres just outside the city limits. The land is rich and productive 
and from its cultivation he is deriving a substantial addition to his income. He is 
an energetic and farsighted business man and in the conduct of his varied interests 
he is meeting with most gratifying success. 

On the 30th of June, 190S, Mr. Wesely was united in marriage to Miss Rose L. 
Sticha and they have become the parents of four children, namely: Maximilian, aged 
eleven years: Frances R., who is nine years of age; Angeline, aged two; and Stanley, 
who died in April, 1913, at the age of seven months. 

In his political views Mr. Wesely is independent, voting for the candidate whom 
he deems best fitted for oflice without regard to party affiliation. He has taken a 
prominent part in the public affairs of his community and for five years has served 



VA HISTORY OF OREGON 

as city treasurer, while for tliirteen years he acted as school clerk, the cause of public 
education ever receiving his stalwart support. His fraternal connections are with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Mr. Wesely has led a busy, active and useful life, employing every oppor- 
tunity to advance, and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, for he 
started out in life empty-handed and his present prosperity is the direct outcome of 
persistency of purpose and undaunted energy. He is a public-spirited and progressive 
citizen, whose sterling worth has won for him the high regard of all who know him. 



HON. JAMES KNOX WEATHERFORD. 

Hon. James Knox Weatherford, a distinguished member of the Oregon bar prac- 
ticing at Albany, was born in Putnam county, Missouri, in March, 1S50, his parents 
being Alfred H. and Sophia (Smith) Weatherford, the former a native of Virginia and 
the latter of Ohio. In an early day the father removed to Illinois, in which state 
his marriage occurred, and shortly afterward he went with his bride to Missouri, pur- 
chasing land in Putnam county. This he improved and developed and he was later 
called to public office when Putnam county was organized as a separate county. He 
was appointed by the governor as the first county judge and at the next general election 
was elected clerk of the county, which position he held until his death in 1856. He 
was a man highly respected in this community. The mother's death occurred in 1862. 

James K. Weatherford was reared and educated in his native county to the age 
of thirteen years and in 1864 started for Oregon in company with a Mr. Morgan, a 
friend of his father. For a time Mr. Weatherford engaged in driving ox teams in 
eastern Oregon and then secured employment in a woolen mill at Brownsville, in Linn 
county, where he remained until the mill was destroyed by fire in 1865. He then 
returned to the eastern part of the state and resumed his former occupation of driving 
oxen, being thus engaged until the fall of 1865, when he again became an employe 
in the woolen mills, working under Tom Kay. He continued to work in the mills 
for three years and in 1868 went to Corvallis, Oregon, where he enrolled as a student 
in the Oregon Agricultural College, from which he won his A. B. degree upon gradua- 
tion with the class of 1872. While attending college he resided in a small dwelling 
which he had erected at a cost of seventy-five dollars and in order to defray the ex- 
penses of his tuition he worked in the harvest fields during vacation periods, but 
was still eight hundred dollars in debt at the time of his graduation. For six months 
he engaged in teaching school and in 1874 he was elected county school superintendent, 
occupying that position for two years, during which time he bestowed certificates 
upon many who later were numbered with Oregon's most prominent men. among whom 
were United States Senators George E. Chamberlain and C. W. Fulton. In the mean- 
time Mr. Weatherford had engaged in the study of law and in September, 1876, he 
was admitted to the bar. He opened an oflSce in Albany and during the intervening 
period of forty-five years has here continued in practice, having associated with him 
as partners at various times such distinguished members of the profession as Judge 
W. C. Piper, D. R. Blackburn, ex-attorntey general of Oregon; United States Senator 
George E. Chamberlain, Ex-Senator O. P. Coshow of Roseburg, J. Fred Abates, county 
judge of Benton county, Oregon; Gale S. Hill, ex-district attorney of Linn county; 
R. C. Cooley of Enterprise and A. K. McMahan of Albany, and J. R. Wyatt, who is 
his present partner and Mark V. Weatherford, also a member of the firm. Mr. Weather- 
ford of this review has specialized in the practice of criminal law, in which he has 
been very successful, having won a state-wide reputation. He is an adept trial lawyer 
and has probably defended more men held for murder than any other attorney in the 
state. He is the possessor of the largest private law library in the Willamette valley, 
if not in the state, which is of invaluable assistance to him in his legal work. Mr. 
Weatherford is also the owner of extensive realty holdings. He owns the store and 
office building in which his office is located, also his fine residence at No. 505 Mont- 
gomery street, and several of the large business blocks of the city, including the Rolfe 
Theater building. He likewise has large farming interests in Linn county and timber 
holdings in Lincoln county and for a number of years has been associated with the 
woolen mills at Salem, his activities thus covering a broad scope. 

Mr. Weatherford gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and in 
1876 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, where he served 




HON. JAMES K. WEATHERFORD 



HISTORY OF OREGON 157 

for two years and was then made speaker of the house. He likewise served for 
three terms as state senator, was the nominee for secretary of state and twice ran for 
congress but was defeated. In 18S5 Mr. Weatherford was appointed a member of the 
board of regents of the Oregon Agricultural College and for the past twenty years 
has been its president. At the time of his graduation the college consisted of but 
one small wooden building, but as a member of the building committee he has been 
influential in securing the erection of a number of fine buildings. He has ever been 
much interested in the cause of public education and for over forty years has served 
on the Albany school board, doing everything in his power to advance the standards 
of the schools. For one term he also was mayor of Albany, giving to the city a 
businesslike and progressive administration. He is prominent in fraternal circles, 
being a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past grand master. He is likewise identified 
with the Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and 
shrine, and he also is connected with the Eastern Star. During the war with Ger- 
many he gave indisputable proof of his patriotism and devotion to his country. 

In February, 1877, Mr. Weatherford was united in marriage to Annette Cottle, 
at that time a resident of San Jose, California, but a native of Linn county, Oregon. 
They have two children: Realto L., who resides at Corvallis and is operating his 
father's farm at Harrisburg; and Alfred B., who is connected with the internal revenue 
office at Portland. 



JOHN W. OGILBEE. 



A notably successful career is that of John W. Ogilbee, who since 1883 has been 
engaged in the real estate business in Portland, while for a period of twenty-seven years 
he has occupied his present offices in the Hegele building. He has an intimate know- 
ledge of the worth of all real estate in his locality and is considered an expert in 
placing valuations upon property. A native of Ohio, Mr. Ogilbee was born in Belmont 
county in 1846, a son of Robert and Mary Ann (Stonebreaker) Ogilbee, the former born 
in the north of Ireland of Scotch-Irish parentage, while the later was of Pennsylvania 
Dutch descent. In 1849 the family removed to Iowa, where the father followed farm- 
ing and John W. Ogilbee was reared on a farm, acquiring a common school education. 
On entering the business world he became clerk in a store and was thus employed 
until 1871, when he removed to Oregon, taking up his residence in Portland. He first 
secured a situation in a grocery store at the corner of First and Madison streets, con- 
ducted by S. A. Stansbury, one of the pioneer merchants of the city. Through the 
exercise of industry and economy he at length accumulated suflScient capital to engage 
in business independently and in 1878 established an enterprise which he conducted 
for a few years and then sold, removing to The Dalles, where for three years he operated 
a grocery store. In 1883 he returned to Portland and entered real estate circles, and 
has continued in that line of activity, having occupied his present quarters in the Hegele 
building for twenty-seven years. He is regarded as one of the most enterprising and 
reliable real estate operators in the city, being now accorded a large patronage. He 
has negotiated many important realty transfers, operating largely in the Sellwood dis- 
trict, and through his activity in this field has contributed in marked measure to the 
development and upbuilding of the city. He is a man of strict integrity and in busi- 
ness matters his judgment has ever been found to be sound and reliable. 

In 1868, while a resident of Iowa, Mr. Ogilbee was united in marriage to Miss 
Agnes E. Laubach, whose father. Rev. Abram Laubach, devoted his life to the ministry 
as a representative of the Methodist denomination. In 1871 he was sent as a missionary 
to Port Townsend, Washington and in his later years engaged in publishing the Christian 
Advocate in partnership with Isaac Dillon, the plant being located in Portland. He 
was untiring in his labors in behalf of the church and his efforts met with well 
deserved success. Mrs. Ogilbee was born in Virginia and reared in Ohio and by her 
marriage she has become the mother of three sons; W. Earl, J. Ray and Paul A. 

As one of the few surviving veterans of the Civil war Mr. Ogilbee is deserving of 
the highest honor and respect. At the outbreak of hostilities between the north and 
south he was residing in southern Iowa and there engaged in guerrilla warfare before 
enlisting with the Forty-fifth Iowa Infantry, with which command he served under 
General Grant and Sherman until the close of the war, when he received his honorable 



]:,S HISTORY OF OREGON 

discharge. In 1883 he became one of the organizers of Sumner Post, No. 12, G. A. R., 
and is one of the four surviving charter members of the organization. During the second 
year of its existence he served as senior vice commander and since has occupied the post 
of quartermaster, while he is now serving as adjutant, having filled the latter office 
for the past twenty years. He has never missed a meeting of his post except during 
his absence from the city and has been selected as a delegate to the national encamp- 
ment of the Grand Army of the Republic to be held in Indianapolis in 1921. For his 
military service Mr. Ogilbee is receiving a pension from the government and he has 
devoted much of his time to assisting other Civil war veterans in obtaining a govern- 
ment allowance. Since April, 1868, he has been a member of the Masonic order, whose 
teachings he exemplifies in his daily life, and for the past thirty-five years he has 
served as a notary public. He resides at No. 595 Tolman avenue, in the Sellwood 
district, occupying a large modern residence, and is well and favorably known in the 
community where he has so long resided. His has been a life of diligence and determi- 
nation, and success in substantial measure has come to reward his labors. He is a 
reliable and progressive business man, a loyal and patriotic citizen, and his many com- 
mendable traits of character have established him in an enviable position among his 
fellow townsmen. 



ALBERT THEODORE PETERSON. 

Albert Theodore Peterson is a progressive and enterprising merchant of Toledo, 
whose initiative spirit and notable ability have carried him into important relations. 
His business activity has ever balanced up with the principles of truth and honor and 
in all of his work he has never sacrificed the high standards which he has set up for 
himself. There is no feature of public life having to do with the welfare and progress 
of the community in which he is not deeply interested and his progressiveness has been 
a potent element in its continued development and upbuilding. 

Mr. Peterson was born in Henry county, Illinois, October 23, 1859, and is a son 
of S. G. and Louisa (Johnson) Peterson, natives of Sweden, who emigrated to the United 
States in 1840, taking up their residence in Chicago when that city had a population of 
but eight hundred. The father subsequently went to Henry county, Illinois, where he 
purchased land, to the cultivation of which he devoted the remainder of his life. He 
passed away at the age of sixty-one years and the mother's demise also occurred in 
Henry county. They became the parents of eight children, of whom seven survive, one 
son passing away in Iowa in 1918. 

Albert T. Peterson was reared in Henry county, Illinois, and in the district schools 
pursued his education. He remained at home until he attained his majority and then 
engaged in farming independently in that state until 1887, when he made his way to 
Oregon, settling in Albany, Linn county, where for about two years he followed the car- 
penter's trade. Thinking that sea air would prove beneficial to himself and wife, he 
removed to Toledo in 1889 and was so favorably impressed with conditions in this section 
of the state that he decided to make it his permanent home. He first engaged in busi- 
ness here as proprietor of a meat market, which he conducted for a year, and was 
then variously employed until 1893, when he commenced dealing in cascara bark, which 
he shipped to foreign and domestic ports through the agency of J. F. Ulrich of San 
Francisco. He conducted his operations along that line on an extensive scale, handling 
in one year alone two hundred tons, and he is still engaged in its sale, being the only 
merchant in Toledo who deals in that commodity. In 1901 he went to Chitwood, where 
he purchased a general store, which he later sold and in 1902 opened a hardware and 
plumbing establishment in Toledo, which he has since conducted with good success. 
His is the only hardware business in the town and his large and carefully selected 
stock, his progressive and reliable business methods and his courteous treatment of 
patrons have secured for him a large trade. He also handles sash, doors and blinds as 
well as all kinds of agricultural implements and tools. In 1916 he became local agent 
for the Ford cars and two years later erected a large garage and hotel building which 
is modern in every respect. He is also the owner of a large store building and in the 
spring of 1921 he erected a three-story structure of brick adjoining his garage, which 
is used for hotel purposes and also for his hardware business. He is the owner of 
considerable property in Toledo and Lincoln county, including one hundred and twenty 
building lots in the town, and he has also engaged in the cattle business to some 



HISTORY OF OREGON 159 

extent. He is likewise well known in financial circles of his section as the president, 
and one the organizers and a stockholder and director of the First National Bank of 
Toledo, located in its modern two-story bank building, the upper floor being devoted 
to offices, while the lower floor is utilized for banking purposes. The bank is capitalized 
for twenty-five thousand dollars. His activities are thus broad and varied, showing him 
to be a man of excellent administrative ability and keen business discernment, and 
whatever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion, for in his vocabulary 
there is no such word as fail. 

On the 10th of March, 1885, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Eva I. 
Hall, a native of Galva, Illinois, and a daughter of George R. and Margaret A. (Hadsall) 
Hall. Her parents came to Oregon in 1889, settling in Benton county, where the father 
purchased a farm, which he engaged in cultivating for many years, but is now living 
retired at Alpine, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have two sons, W. E. and John A., 
who for some years were employed as telegraph operators, the latter being connected 
with the Western Union at Portland. They are now assisting their father in the conduct 
of his hardware business and are alert, wide-awake and enterprising young business 
men. Both are married. 

In his political views Mr. Peterson is a republican and is now filling the office of 
commissioner of the port of Toledo, while for about five terms he has served as a 
member of the city council, in which capacities his work has been of great value to 
the municipality. He stands for all that means progress and improvement to the 
individual and to the community and has aided in promoting many plans and projects 
for the public good, being recognized as a most unselfish and public-spirited citizen. 
He was instrumental in securing tor Toledo the new station of the Corvallis & Eastern 
Railroad and was one of the active promoters of the Lincoln County Court House, 
bringing that project through to a successful termination after it had been practically 
abandoned. He worked most energetically in its behalf and at the end of three months 
had succeeded in securing suflicient funds to cover the erection of the building. The 
depot, which is a substantial brick structure, was erected by the citizens of Toledo, Mr. 
Peterson's subscription to the fund being exceptionally large. He was also instrumental 
in securing for the city the government spruce mill, the municipality donating the 
factory site and also a twenty-five year water right. He also succeeded in inducing 
the Fisher-Story Company to locate here, selling them the site on which their mill is 
now being erected, and his services have been of great value in promoting the up- 
building and development of his city. In religious faith he is an Episcopalian and 
his fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Woodmen of the World. He is a patriotic and loyal American and during the World 
war rendered valuable service to the government, actively promoting all local drives 
and campaigns. The activity of Mr. Peterson in relation to the public welfare has been 
of wide scope and ho man has done more to further the interests and upbuilding of 
the town. What he has accomplished represents the fit utilization of his time, talents 
and opportunities and the most envious cannot grudge him his success, so worthily 
has it been won, so well used. His life in every relation has measured up to the 
highest standards and he stands as a splendid example of American manhood and 
chivalry. 



E. A. BENNET. 



One of the leading business enterprises of Salem is the Capital City Nu,rsery Com- 
pany, of which E. A Bennet is president and manager. He has been identified with 
this business for the past sixteen years and is proving energetic, farsighted and efl5cient 
in the conduct of the extensive interests of which he is the head. Under his manage- 
ment the business of the company has steadily grown, its trade now covering a wide 
territory. Mr. Bennet is a native of Illinois. He was born in Tremont, Tazewell 
county, June 22, 1864, a son of Jesse E. and Lydia (Johnson) Bennet. The father 
followed the occupation of farming in Illinois and in March, 1SS2, he removed with 
his family to Oregon, becoming identified with the Oregon State Agricultural Society, 
but for a few years preceding his death in 1906 he lived practically retired. His wife 
passed away in 1909. They had a family of two children: E. A., of this review: and 
Lulie May, who is the wife of R. V. Jones, president of a large shipbuilding company 
at Vancouver, Washington. 



160 HISTORY OF OREGON 

In the pursuit of his education E. A. Bennet devoted considerable attention to 
the study of the classics and he also pursued a commercial course at Willamette Uni- 
versity. In 1887 he left the university and began teaching, his first school being at 
Mount Angel, after which he followed the profession successively at Newport, Sublimity 
and Stayton, Oregon, and at La Center, Washington. He then entered the mercantile 
field in which he continued active for thirteen year.s before forming his present asso- 
ciation with the Capital City Nursery Company of Salem. He has been identified with 
this concern for the past sixteen years and as president and manager of the company 
he is at the head of important and extensive business interests, their trade now reach- 
ing to Idaho, Montana and Nebraska. They carry a full line of fruit and ornamental 
trees and shrubbery and employ from fifty to seventy-five salesmen. Mr. Bennet main- 
tains his office in his attractive home at No. 1030 Chemeketa street and is proving most 
capable in directing the interests of the firm. He gives careful oversight to all phases 
of the business and is constantly endeavoring to extend the trade of the company to 
new territory, so that his services have become very valuable to the concern. 

In 1S82 occurred the marriage of E. A. Bennet and Miss Esther Reed of Washing- 
ton, and they have become the parents of three children: Lidia Theodosia is a teacher 
in the Jefferson high school at Portland. She married Charles B. Martin, an architect 
of that city, and they live in their pleasant modern home at Evergreen Station, Clack- 
amas county, Oregon; Dr. N. Paul Bennet is a prominent dentist of Seattle, Washington. 
He is associated in practice with Dr. Olseu and they maintain offices on Ballard street 
in that city; the youngest member of the family Is Gordon, who is now twelve years 
of age. 

Mr. Bennet's religious faith is Indicated by his membership in the Christian church 
of Salem, in the work of which he takes an active and helpful interest, serving as an 
elder therein. He is a reliable and progressive business man and citizen and his 
many commendable traits of character have established him in an enviable position 
among his fellow townsmen. 



HORACE SEELY BUTTERFIELD. 

Horace Seely Butterfield was an honored pioneer of the northwest who won promi- 
nence as an inventor and merchant, his activities along the latter line contributing in 
substantial measure to the growth of Portland, while as an inventor he made valuable 
contributions to the world's work. He was born in Hokah, Minnesota, August 16, 1860, 
a son of Hiram and Levisa Ann (Self ridge) Butterfield, the former a native of Albany, 
New York, while the latter was of English parentage. 

Horace S. Butterfield was a youth of fifteen years when in 1875 he came to Oregon 
in company with his father, his mother having previously passed away in Minnesota. 
He had acquired his education in the schools of his native state and with his father 
came to the northwest, the family home being established at Eugene. The father there 
engaged in farming but passed away about a year after reaching Oregon. Horace S. 
Butterfield became an apprentice to H. N. Crane, a jeweler of Eugene, and in 1878 
removed to Portland, where he entered the employ of John A. Beck, a prominent jeweler. 
He thoroughly acquainted himself with every phase of the business and in 1880 the firm 
of Butterfield Brothers was organized by Horace S. and A. E. Butterfield, who opened 
the first exclusive wholesale jewelry and optical goods store established on the Pacific 
coast. For twenty-five years the firm conducted business at First and Morrison streets 
and afterwg,rd removed to Third and Morrison, occupying space in the Mohawk building. 
Not only did Mr. Butterfield attain skill in jewelry manufacturing and repairing and 
win substantial success as a jewelry merchant, but he also made valuable contribution 
to the science of navigation through his inventions. In 1912 he brought forth an inven- 
tion known as the Butterfield azimuth chronometer, the value of which met with instant 
recognition. It was designed to show automatically the momentary azimuths, or bear- 
ings of the sun and other celestial objects under observation, continually through the 
day, night and year, eliminating the use of azimuth tables and all mathematical cal- 
culations incident to navigation, geodetic and magnetic problems. Under date of July 
19, 1913, the Scientific American Supplement said: "Readers of the Scientific American 
Supplement this week have the privilege of examining the first published description 
of an invention which is remarkable for being fundamentally new, both in regard to 
the results secured by its use and to the mechanism Involved, as it is the only thing 




^^?^-^23 , ^^2^^-<fcttr.-,,Z-<^-^^ 



HISTORY OF OREGON 163 

of its kind and is capable of securing, automatically and immediately, results which 
have hitherto been obtained only through long and difficult mental labor. This inven- 
tion, or discovery, conceived by Horace S. Butterfield, of Portland, Oregon, has been 
embodied, with the assistance of Olof Ohlson, in a scientific instrument which is called 
the Butterfield azimuth chronometer. The value of the instrument will be at once 
apparent to navigators particularly and also to surveyors and others who have occasion 
to determine terrestrial positions and directions from astronomical observations, when 
it is realized that by its use the following determinations may be made instantly and 
automatically, without calculation or reference to tables and with great accuracy. The 
position of a ship at sea may be found or the latitude and longitude of any spot on 
the surface of the earth determined. The true directions may be determined independ- 
ent of the compass and compass errors detected and corrected. Local time may be 
accurately determined. These determinations may be made at any hour of the day 
or night when the sun or a known star is visible, even though the period of visibility 
is very short. Anyone who has even the most elementary knowledge of navigation, or 
who has ever tried to work out the position of a ship from the usual observations, 
or who has known the anxiety caused by the uncertainties of the magnetic compass, will 
understand the inestimable benefit which such an instrument, which saves the time 
and mental labor, and above all, eliminates the liability of error involved in these deter- 
minations, must be. 

"The need of an instrument of some sort for simplifying the processes of applying 
astronomical observations correctly to the uses of navigation became apparent to Mr. 
Butterfield through information obtained on shipboard, when he became deeply im- 
pressed by the facts, well known to all navigators, that an immense amount of time 
and labor is required to take observations of the sun and stars and work out the 
position of the ship from these observations, and that errors are liable to occur at all 
stages of the calculations; that long periods of time frequently elapse in cloudy weather 
when observations at noon and at the other usual fixed times cannot be taken, and that 
brief intervals of clearing at other times, when the sun is visible for a few moments, 
cannot conveniently be made use of for taking observations, and above all, that mag- 
netic compasses are far from reliable, and that the adjustment of their errors is a 
tedious proceeding and one of constantly recurring necessity. 

"The same need has also been given official recognition by the United States navy 
department. In a circular letter of February 26, 1912, from the acting secretary to 
all the officers of the navy, attention was called to the fact that the science of nautical 
astronomy has not advanced as rapidly as other sciences in recent years and that the 
department was desirous of developing new nautical instruments and new ways of 
using instruments and principles already available so as to increase the accuracy and 
ease of determining positions at sea from observations of heavenly bodies; and the 
officers were urged and encouraged to bring all available new ideas and information 
relating to new instruments and methods to the attention of the department. 

"The methods heretofore necessary and now generally practiced for determining com- 
pass errors and adjusting compasses and for determining the position of the observer 
on the earth's surface by astronomical observations, involve a cumbersome series of 
observations by the aid of different instruments and complicated calculations, including 
the solution of a spherical triangle, with reference to numerous tables of constant and 
variable values. Even certain recently devised methods of simplified navigation, by 
which more or less close approximations of the true position at sea are obtained, in- 
volve a considerable amount of calculation and reference to tables. The use of the But- 
terfield instrument greatly simplifies the use of the observations to be taken for these 
purposes and wholly eliminates all calculations, securing results fully as accurate as 
can be obtained by the most careful observations with the best instruments correctly 
worked up, and much more accurate than are usually obtained by navigators. 

"The salient features of the instrument are, sighting vanes mounted to rotate 
horizontally on ball bearings in the center of a pelorous plate (which is itself adjustable 
about the same axis), a timepiece furnished with the usual hands, and a transmission 
mechanism through which motion is imparted from the timepiece to the sighting vanes 
at a variable rate, corresponding at each instant to the momentary rate of change in 
the ben ring of the sun or other heavenly body. 

"The Butterfield instrument may also be incorporated with the gyroscopic com- 
pass, as a synchronized repeater, to give the longitude instantly by direct reading, 
and may be used individually with the gyro, for quick orientation at the starting of 
the compass. As the gyro can be depended on always to show the true meridian, longi- 



164 HISTORY OF OREGON 

tude is determined when the azimuth chronometer is used as a gyro repeater, by direct- 
ing the sight vanes toward the sun by manipulation of the timepiece, when the time- 
piece will indicate local apparent time, which may be readily turned into longitude. 
It may also be used in the same way as an ordinary pelorous or azimuth instrument 
for taking observations on chartered objects. The same reasons which make the instru- 
ment useful to the navigator, make it equally useful to the surveyor and the engineer 
in establishing the meridian line and running a course. 

"All that has been said above with regard to taking sights on the sun applies to 
observations on the stars, to obtain the same results at night, provided the star selected 
for observation has a declination not greater than the maximum declination of the sun 
and the timepiece is regulated tor sidereal time. All declinations within that of the 
sun are taken care of by adjustments of the declination gear. 

"The instrument is adapted to be used also as a precision sundial, but for this 
purpose the clock movement is not necessary. The hand-setting mechanism is retained 
and is used to bring the sighting vanes into bearing with the sun, thus automatically 
setting the clock hands to show local time. A cam designed to correct for the equa- 
tion of time will be used with the precision sundial to cause the clock hands to show 
local mean time at any instant." 

In 1S87 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Butterfleld and Miss Genevieve New- 
man, a daughter of Thomas and Anna (Roddy) Newman, and to Uiem was born a 
daughter, Genevieve. Thomas Newman was a native of England, while his wife was 
a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and came of Quaker ancestry. They were 
married in San Francisco in 1854 and in the same year removed to Salem, Oregon. 
Mr. Newman was a prominent figure in this state in the early days of its development 
and progress. He crossed the plains with the Joe Meeks party in 1852. During 
the plight of the Brother Jonathan, which was wrecked off the California coast, Mr. 
Newman was one of the few passengers to help save the vessel after it was given up 
by the officers. He was a prominent figure in the Indian wars of 1861 and 1882, aid- 
ing in fighting the Nez Perce Indians and other tribes that went upon the warpath. 
In the early '80s he and his family removed to Vancouver, Washington, where he 
remained until 1886, when he came to Portland. In 1887 his wife passed away and in 
later years Mr. Newman resided in California, his death occurring at Santa Cruz, that 
state, April 15, 1914, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-five years. For 
six decades he had been a valued and exemplary representative of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, his membership being in Good Samaritan Lodge of Portland. 
He made valuable contribution to the state during its pioneer era and was a man 
respected and honored wherever known. 

Mr. Butterfleld never aspired to office, yet was many times requested to become a 
candidate for official position. He was quiet and unassuming in manner, loved out- 
door life and sports and was a well known angler and hunter. He was also the owner 
of a fine apple orchard in the Hood River valley and there he spent his vacations, 
finding the development of his apple orchard next in interest to his creative labors 
in the field of science. Mr. Butterfleld was a charter member of Company K, Oregon 
National Guard, which was organized in 1886 and was composed of Oregon's most 
prominent men, many of whom became captains of the state's most important indus- 
tries. He was also a Scottish Rite Mason, belonging to Oregon Consistory of Portland. 
He passed away April 4, 1917. Through his social and business activities he made 
many friends who speak highly of his sterling worth, his upright character and his 
many splendid qualifications. All who knew him bear tribute to his life, and his mem- 
ory is enshrined in the hearts of those with whom he came in contact. He was a man 
of great kindliness and sympathy as well as of marked ability as a merchant and 
inventor and he stood prominently among those who pushed forward the wheels of 
progress in the northwest. 



HOWARD B. FREELAND. 



Howard B. Freeland, one of the proprietors of the Springfield News, published at 
Springfield, Lane county, was born in Norfolk, Nebraska, May 17, 1894. He is a son 
of Henry P. and Helen M. (Buffington) Freeland, the former a native of Greene county, 
Indiana, while the latter was born in Le Mars, Iowa. The father went west to Nebraska 
and in that state worked at his trade of harness-making until 1905, when he went 



HISTORY OF OREGON 165 

to Colorado and there resided until the spring of 1907, at which time he came to 
Oregon, locating at Salem, where he still resides. The mother also survives. 

Howard B. Freeland was eleven years of age when he accompanied his parents 
on their removal westward to Greeley, Colorado, and his education was acquired in 
the schools of that city, in Nebraska and in Salem, Oregon. After his textbooks were 
laid aside he learned the printer's trade in the office of the Statesman and he continued 
to follow that trade in various parts of the state until September S, 1919, when he 
purchased an interest in the Springfield News. In November of that year he admitted 
Samuel H. Taylor as a partner in the enterprise and they have since conducted the 
News. They have built up a fine newspaper, and they are owners of a thoroughly 
modern printing plant, equipped with all the latest presses and machinery, including 
a linotype machine. They do a large job business, including considerable work 
for the county, and in the conduct of their business have ever followed the most pro- 
gressive and enterprising methods. 

On the 15th of June, 1919, Mr. Freeland was united in marriage to Miss Leda Mae 
Henderson, a daughter of James and Myrtle (Barnes) Henderson, residents of Salem, 
Oregon. Mr. Freeland enlisted for service in the World war on the 28th of April, 1917, 
and was stationed at Vancouver Barracks with the Fourth Engineers, but owing to 
sickness was discharged on the 28th of November of the same year. He is a member 
of the American Legion and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. 
He was reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is patriotic and 
public-spirited and is greatly interested in the development of his community, to which 
he has largely contributed through the medium of his paper, and his worth as a man 
and citizen is widely acknowledged. 



VICTOR K. STRODE. 



Victor K. Strode, who, according to the consensus of opinion on the part of his 
fellowmen, was ever animated by a kind, noble, affectionate spirit, passed away in 
Portland on the 16th of January, 1920. For almost four decades he had been a 
member of the bar of this city and was recognized as one of the eminent lawyers and 
brilliant orators of the northwest. He also displayed marked ability in the manage- 
ment of business affairs of importance, but that which causes his memory to be 
cherished and revered was a beautiful spirit that sought out the good in others and 
appraised each individual at his true worth. 

Victor K. Strode was born in Kane county, Illinois, on the 25th of August, 1851. 
His youth was largely passed in Missouri and he was graduated from the State Normal 
School at Kirksville, Missouri. Moreover, he rounded out a thorough educational train- 
ing by broad reading and even in young manhood was thoroughly well acquainted with 
the old English authors and throughout his life kept in close touch with the vital in- 
terests, questions and problems of the day and, according to one of his lifelong friends, 
"hardly any topic could arise in a general conversation that Mr. Strode would not in 
some way Illuminate from the vast amount of information which he had stored away 
in a finely constructed memory and which was always at command to serve his pur- 
pose." It was in 1860 that Mr. Strode went to Los Angeles, California, and later 
removed to Visalia, in the same state, where he taught school for about two years. On 
the expiration of that period he went to San Francisco, where he entered the law 
oflSce of General William H. L. Barnes, an eminent representative of the bar on the 
Pacific coast. Mr. Strode read law under the direction of Mr. Barnes until his admis- 
sion to the bar and for a brief period he continued in the practice of law in San 
Francisco but about 1879 removed to Portland and entered into partnership relations 
with Jarvis Varnel Beach, a connection that was maintained for many years under 
the firm style of Strode & Beach. In 1895 their partnership relation, but not their 
friendship, was severed and later Mr. Strode admitted Charles N. Wait, a son of 
Aaron E. Wait, to a partnership. One who knew him well wrote of him at the time 
of his death: "Mr. Strode's legal work was marked by great thoroughness. No one 
ever found him surprised; he was always prepared on his law and his facts. His 
conduct of a trial of a cause was accompanied by a sweetness of disposition such as 
Is seldom given to any of the children of men. Attention to his own affairs has taken 
him away somewhat from the practice of his chosen profession of late years, and 
there are many of the younger members of the bar who did not personally know Mr. 



166 HISTORY OF OREGON 

strode, but the writer of this sketch has known nearly all of the lawyers of the terri- 
torial and of the early state days; he feels that he can affirm that he never knew one 
who had the love, confidence and respect of his associates to a greater degree than did 
Mr. Strode." 

In 18S7 Mr. Strode was united in marriage to Miss Kate Wiegand, the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wiegand, well known and well beloved pioneers of Portland, 
where Mr. Wiegand acquired a large amount of property before his death at the com- 
paratively early age of thirty-two years. His daughter, Mrs. Strode, was born in a 
house then located where the Panama building now stands at the corner of Third and 
Alder streets, which building is now the property of his heirs. When the excavation 
was made for this building the roots of a magnolia tree, under the shade of which 
she had played in her youth, were dug out. Mr. and Mrs. Strode became the parents 
of three children. Charles J., the eldest, married Ethel D. Williams, a native of Port- 
land, and they have one son, Wayne. Victor W., the second son, was chief wireless 
operator in the transport service during the World war and made five trips across 
the ocean after having pursued a government radio course at Harvard University. 
He married Helen Doris Clark, a native of Portland and a representative of one of 
the pioneer families of the city. The eldest son, Charles J., is auditor for the Braden 
Packing Company of Pasadena, California, and was with the Emergency Fleet Corpora- 
tion during the World war. The other son of the family, Walter, has passed away. 
The death of the husband and father occurred on the 16th of January, 1920, leaving 
to his family the priceless heritage of an honored name and a memory which they will 
ever cherish because he was largely the ideal husband and father. 

In his political views Mr. Strode was a stalwart democrat and for many years 
was a recognized leader of the party in this state. In 1S92 he represented Oregon as 
a delegate in the national convention which nominated Grover Cleveland. He fre- 
quently discussed on the platform vital questions and issues of the day and one of the 
local papers said of him: "Judge Strode was an orator of remarkable ability and con- 
sidered one of the best jury advocates in Oregon. His ability to see the best that 
there was in his fellowmen was so conspicuous and his power to express his thoughts 
so wonderful that the Bar Association on most occasions delegated to him the privilege 
of delivering the eulogies said for departed members of the organization." Mr. Strode 
was deeply interested in the questions concerning the purposes of lite and the destiny 
of man and his belief was unfaltering concerning future existence. He often remarked 
that the promise meant all that was said: "Now faith is the substance of things hoped 
for, the evidence of things not seen." His own life was an expression of the highest 
ideals of American manhood and citizenship. He used his time and talents wisely 
and well. He gained fame and honor as a lawyer, respect as a citizen and, moreover, 
his life proved the truth of the Emersonian philosophy that "the way to win a friend 
is to be one." A lifetime associate wrote of him: "It shall be to the writer of this 
article a matter of fond recollection that in his pilgrimage through this world to 
that world that is to come, it was permitted him to know in the intimacy of a friend- 
ship of more than forty years, the kind, the noble, the affectionate spirit that animated 
him, known in the flesh as Victor K. Strode. 

Green be the turf above thee, 
Friend of my better days; 
None knew thee but to love thee. 
None named thee but to praise." 



CHARLES H. FISHER. 



Charles H. Fisher has devoted his entire life to the newspaper business and in 
this field of endeavor has won success. He is now one of the proprietors of the Eugene 
Daily Guard, which ranks among the oldest newspapers of the state, having been 
founded as a weekly in 1866. Mr. Fisher was born in Clay county, South Dakota, 
August 28, 1865, a son of Jesse L. and Mary L. (Turner) Fisher. The father was an 
honored veteran of the Civil war. He enlisted in a Michigan regiment and after 
serving for some time was discharged on account of disability. He afterward went 
to North Dakota and in 1877 came to Oregon, taking up his abode in Roseburg, where 
he was engaged in various enterprises during the balance of his life, following farm- 



HISTORY OF 0REC40X 167 

ing, merchandising and milling. He resided in Roseburg until his death, which oc- 
cured in 1905. The mother survived him tor five years, passing away in 1910. 

Charles H. Fisher was twelve years of age at the time of the removal of his 
parents to this state and he attended the public schools of Roseburg, completing his 
education in the State University of Oregon. It was while attending that institution 
that he entered upon his journalisic career, being elected editor of the old Laurean 
Literary Society. After leaving the university Mr. Fisher taught school for a brief 
time and then with his meager savings purchased control of a little paper at Oakland, 
which he called the Umpqua Herald. After conducting this paper for a year or two 
he sought other fields of operation and went to Roseburg, Oregon, where he formed a 
partnership with Fred Flood for the publication of the Herald, which is said to have 
been the first semi-weekly published in the state. This was about 1SS7. Some time 
later the Herald was consolidated with the Review, at which time Mr. Fisher disposed 
of his interest therein, but later repurchased the journal. It was in the early days 
of the consolidated Review, when they were building it up first into a semi-weekly 
and then into a daily, that Mr. Fisher says he did his best journalistic work, and it 
was here that he gained confidence in his own ability to go into any town and publish 
a paper that the people would have to read. It is to this quality that he attributes 
his constant success. In 1896 the Review became a daily and soon afterward Mr. Fisher, 
retaining his interest, went to Boise, Idaho, for his health. There he organized a 
stock company and started the Evening Capital News, of which he became editor. 
Like all the other Fisher papers, this soon took hold and is today one of the leading 
dailies of Idaho. Upon regaining his health Mr. Fisher disposed of his Roseburg and 
Boise interests and purchased the Eugene Guard, which he conducted for a few years 
and then sold. He subsequently purchased the Salem Capital Journal, which he con- 
ducted very successfully, greatly increasing its circulation and installing modern equip- 
ment. While still at Salem Mr. Fisher, in association with J. E. Shelton, purchased 
the Eugene Guard, of which Mr. Shelton took charge, Mr. Fisher remaining in Salem 
until he disposed of the Journal, since which time he has devoted his attention to the 
conduct of the Guard in association with his partner, Mr. Fisher acting as editor of 
the paper, while Mr. Shelton has charge of the business details. The partners are 
men of broad experience in the newspaper field and the Guard is conceded to be one 
of the best papers in this section of the state. Its plant is thoroughly modern, equipped 
with all the latest presses and machinery, including three linotype machines, and it 
Is a most interesting and valuable journal to the community in which it is published. 
Its news is always accurate and reliable and it has therefore gained a large circulation, 
which makes it a valuable advertising medium. 

Mr. Fisher married Miss Effie Owens and they have many friends in Eugene and 
vicinity. He is one of the regents of the State University of Oregon and his fraternal 
connections are with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and the Woodmen of the World. His political allegiance is given to the demo- 
cratic party and in religious faith he is a Baptist. He has won success in the jour- 
nalistic field through the wise utilization of time and opportunity and he has ever 
held to the highest standards of newspaper publication, his aid and influence being 
always on the side of advancement and improvement. 



HALF. M. BOND. 



Balf. M. Bond, cashier of the Halsey State Bank of Halsey, Linn county, is making 
a creditable record in the ofllce by the prompt and faithful manner in which he is 
discharging his duties, looking after the welfare of depositors and safeguarding the 
interests of the institution. He has here passed his entire life, for he was born in 
Halsey on the 15th of February, 1S91, a son of Owen and Mary C. (Keeney) Bond, 
also natives of this state. The father, who was born in Linn county, engaged in farm- 
ing and stock raising on a ranch six miles west of Halsey where he continued to 
reside until his demise on the 1st of February, 1913. The mother, however, survives. 

In the public schools of Halsey, Bait. M. Bond pursued his education and on enter- 
ing the business world became an employe of S. E. Young & Son of Albany, with whom 
he was connected for some time. In 1912 he entered the Halsey State Bank as assistant 
cashier and in the following year purchased stock in the institution, becoming cashier, 
in which position he has since served most conscientiously and efficiently, the growth 



168 HISTORY OF OREGON 

of the bank being due in large measure to his initiative and ability. The institution 
was organized in 1910, at which time a modern bank building was erected. Its present 
officers are: C. H. Koontz, president; D. Taylor, vice president; and B. M. Bond, 
cashier, all of whom are reliable and progressive business men of this section of the 
state. The bank is capitalized for twenty thousand dollars and has a surplus of twelve 
thousand dollars. Its deposits will average one hundred and eighty thousand dollars 
and its total resources are two hundred and fifty-two thousand dollars. Mr. Bond is 
also connected with farming interests, being the owner of the home farm of three 
hundred and ten acres, which he purchased from the other heirs. This prdlperty he 
rents and thereby derives an additional source of revenue. 

On the 20th of August, 1919, Mr. Bond was united in marriage to Miss Esther 
Marie Frisbee and they have many friends in their community. Mr. Bond is a 
republican in his political views and has taken a prominent and active part In public 
affairs of his city, serving as city treasurer for three years, while for six years he 
has been clerk of the school board. He attends the Methodist Episcopal church and 
in its work he is actively and helpfully interested, having served as a teacher in 
the Sunday school for the past four years. His fraternal connections are with the 
Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs, the Masons and the Eastern Star. Mr. Bond is a young 
man of excellent business qualifications who has already advanced well toward the 
goal of success and the sterling worth of his character is indicated In the fact that 
in the community where he has spent his entire lite he is held in the highest esteem. 



FREDERICK EGGERT. 



The influences which shape the career of an individual are often remote and 
difficult to trace, but not so in the case of Frederick Eggert, a man of marked democracy 
of spirit, of kindly and generous disposition, of inflexible integrity and of high pur- 
poses. The foundations of his upright character were laid in the teachings of a sturdy, 
religious parentage. His father, John Heinrich Eggert, was born in Lippe-Detmold, 
Germany, April 18, ISll, while his mother, who bore the maiden name of Sophie Wil- 
helmene Freitag, was born in Hanover, Germany, January 12, 1811. They came to 
America in early life and their marriage was celebrated in Detroit, Michigan, February 
12, 1837. Their family numbered four sons, of whom Frederick Eggert II was born 
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 30. 1843, his lite record spanning the intervening years 
until he passed away on the 26th of April. 1918, in Portland, Oregon. His three 
brothers survive him, but other children of the family died in infancy. 

Frederick Eggert was quite young when his parents removed from Milwaukee to 
Illinois, settling near Freeport, and there at the age of three years he suffered a long 
and severe attack of spinal meningitis, which left him with the handicap of a frail 
body, a weak heart and very limited physical strength. In the spring of 1856 the 
family home was established on a farm near Lawrence, the first "free-state" town in 
Kansas, and there his strength was strained to the uttermost in farm work, while he 
had less than the average meager opportunity of the youth of that day to obtain an 
education. When seventeen years of age his active brain, bright mind and determined 
will led him to decide upon a different career than that of the farmer and he obtained 
employment in a general merchandise establishment at Lawrence, where by diligence, 
unfailing courtesy and geniality he won friends whose friendship and loyalty to him 
have been one of his cherished possessions throughout the intervening years. His 
business experience constituted the basis of his later success. He was employed in a 
store when on August 21, 1863, while he was sleeping in a room over the store, Quantrell 
with his fierce Confederate raiders fell upon the town, sacked and burned it and left 
one hundred and sixty-five citizens lying dead in the streets, one of his employers 
being among the victims. Mr. Eggert, then a frail boy, was about to be shot when 
one of the raiders tor some unknown reason interposed and saved his life and did not 
desert him until he had gotten him away from danger. 

On the 2d of November, 1865, Mr. Eggert determined to engage in business on 
his own account and made his first trip on a railroad when he went to Chicago to 
buy a stock of goods. That he won success is not a matter of marvel, for he practiced 
close application, stern self-denial and rigid economy and lived an upright, honorable 
life that commanded for him the confidence and respect of all who knew him. In the 




FREDERICK EGGERT 



HISTORY OF OREGON 171 

midst of an active business career he never neglected liis religious duties but was 
a faithful member and generous supporter of the First Methodist church and occupied 
many official positions in connection therewith. 

On the 1st of September, 1873, Mr. Eggert was married to Miss Elizabeth Avery, 
M. D., a homeopathic physician, who was then located in Lawrence but who had for- 
merly been a resident of Connecticut. For forty-five years they traveled life's journey 
most happily together and Mrs. Eggert was then left to mourn the loss of one who 
had been an ideal husband in his home relations. 

With the desire to secure broader business opportunities than were afforded in 
Lawrence, Kansas, Mr. Eggert came to the wgst and after testing the effect of the 
rainy season upon his health he closed out his business in Kansas on the 22d of Feb- 
ruary, 1876, in order to become a resident of Oregon. He bore with him a letter of 
introduction from L. Z. Leiter of the wholesale house of Field, Leiter & Company of 
Chicago, to Murphy, Grant & Company, the largest wholesale dry goods dealers in 
San Francisco, and over his own signature Mr. Leiter wrote: "Mr. Bggert's credit 
is good for all the goods you can persuade him to buy." Establishing a home in 
Albany and finding trade conditions somewhat different from those of the east, Mr. 
Eggert found employment with Samuel E. Young, the leading merchant of Linn county, 
taking charge of the dry goods department. During tlie six and a half years which 
he spent in that position his business qualifications made a lasting impression upon 
the pioneer residents of that place. On the 11th of November, 1882, Mr. Eggert entered 
into partnership relations with Mr. Young and Walter E. Turrell, under the firm name 
of Eggert, Young & Company, and engaged in the boot and shoe business as the suc- 
cessors of The Pacific Boot and Shoe Company, thus acquiring the oldest store in that 
line in the Pacific northwest, their location being at No. 109 First street, Portland. 
Although conditions were very disheartening at the beginning his indomitable courage 
and business methods enabled him to overcome all obstacles with success. After three 
years Mr. Eggert purchased the interests of his partners in the business but retained 
the firm name by mutual consent and ever enjoyed the lifelong friendship of his 
former associates in the enterprise. Later he was for a time in partnership with 
Walter E. Turrell and his brother, George J. Turrell, in the retail shoe business in 
Tacoma and Seattle and subsequently became associated with J. F. Kelly, A. Staiger 
and E. Rice, with whom he shared his prosperity until each in turn was able to engage 
in business for himself. He was at various periods connected with other important 
business enterprises in Portland. In 1889 he formed a partnership with Messrs. Treen 
and Raymond, of Seattle, Messrs. Turrell, of Tacoma and Seattle, and his youngest 
Drother, Charles F. Eggert, who for several years had been on a farm in the Waldo 
hills of Marion county, and thus under the firm name of Treen", Raymond, Turrell & 
Company they opened a wholesale shoe business in Seattle. Their trade was increasing 
in substantial manner when the great Seattle fire destroyed their entire store and 
stock. Mr. Eggert lost heavily, not only directly but also through his interest in a 
local insurance company, which this and subsequent fires in EUensburg and Spokane 
swept out of existence. 

Immediately after the fire Mr. Eggert established his brother in the retail shoe 
business in the unburned district and thus founded the Eggert Shoe Company of 
Seattle. To his brother's four sons, who from boyhood were connected with the busi- 
ness, Mr. Eggert gradually sold his interest as fast as his nephews were fitted to 
assume responsibilities. 

In 1897, for the benefit of his health, Mr. Eggert went to the Hood River valley 
and then purchased of Hon. E. L. Smith a portion of Beulah Land, to which he added 
by subsequent purchases one hundred and forty acres and built thereon a summer home 
on what is conceded to be the most picturesque spot in the valley, calling his place 
Eggermont. He planted one of the first commercial orchards, if not the first, in the 
Hood River valley and was a pioneer in Hood River apple culture. Because of the 
growth of his business which made greater demands upon his time and energies tnan 
he cared to give, he sold the place in February, 1911, to the Eggermont Orchard Com- 
pany. 

On the 1st of November, 1892, the Eggert, Young Company removed to the Hamil- 
ton building on Third street, in Portland, for the firm's increasing business and clientele 
required more spacious and modern quarters. In due time three employes, Jordan 
Purvine, W. B. Brazelton and Miss N. B. Townsend, became stockholders and since 
Mr. Eggert's death have succeeded to the management, conducting the business as far 
as possible along the lines which he instituted, for during the nearly thirty-six years 



172 HISTORY OF OREGON 

of his business life in Portland he had made for himself and the firm an enviable 
place as an influential factor in winning for Portland its position as a mercantile 
center of the Pacific coast. An excellent characterization of Mr. Eggert was given 
by one who had been associated with him in his office for seventeen years and he said: 
"Those who knew Mr. Eggert best were impressed with his democracy. Every man 
coming into contact with him in a business way was given a hearing and If his proposi- 
tion was economically sound he was received in a friendly spirit. 

"A man seeking employment found in hini a sympathetic listener whether or not 
there was a vacancy in the corps of helpers. And to any boy — struggling with poverty 
and trying to make for himself a place — it gave Mr. Eggert the keenest pleasure to 
give a helping hand. His plan for doing that was to teach him the value of money 
and the need for industry — two branches of knowledge seemingly neglected in this 
day. Once interested in a boy his movements were closely watched and great was 
Mr. Eggert's disappointment if his teachings were disregarded. He frequently quoted 
Lincoln's saying that God must have loved the common people because he made so 
many of them. 

"Another characteristic was his cheerful and sunny disposition. Blues did not 
find an encouraging glance from him and they speedily took flight from any company 
of which he was a part. His friends came to him with a fund of funny stories and 
they usually took away with them an equal number in exchange; good, wholesome, 
laugh-provoking stories — this always in spite of failing health and ofttimes in the 
face of serious weakness. 

"Mr. Eggert stood for inflexible uprightness, requiring the same of himself that 
he expected in others. Nothing less than right characterized his dealings with men. 
Having struggled with poverty himself and retained his integrity, he knew whereof 
he spoke when he counseled men that honesty was not only the best policy but the 
only policy. His frequently expressed wish was that the race could realize the truth 
of the old Book's saying 'The wages of sin is death.' 

"His very presence created a clean atmosphere in business, for he would not tol- 
erate nor excuse deviation from the principles he believed in and knew to be right. 
Possessed of good judgment and keen business insight his advice was frequently sought 
and always freely given. Many a widow and orphan have felt his loss as a counselor 
and friend; without realizing it himself, he was instinctively the friend of the friend- 
less. And to those he called friend he was unswervingly true. Sometimes he was im- 
posed upon because he never believed ill of those to whom his allegiance was given 
until he was forced to believe it. For those who betrayed a trust he had only con- 
tempt and the wrongdoer saw himself in a new and unflattering light after an interview 
with Mr. Eggert. 

"Those most closely associated with him in business miss his guiding hand. His 
decisions were quickly made, his judgment unerring and his spirit kind. He was a 
type of what might be called the 'old school' of business men — those who forged 
ahead in spite of handicaps — and who conducted affairs of today on the solid founda- 
tions learned in the early days. 'Continue thou in the things which thou hast learned,' 
was a text he found helpful both in material and spiritual things and he built a life 
and a business upon that which would stand." Another said of him: "His success 
from every standpoint was founded on character. He was a man of clean life and 
sterling integrity; his yea was yea and his nay, nay. In spite of frail health he was 
optimistic of soul and cheerful in spirit. His cheery smile and kindly greeting were 
always helpful and encouraging and after a little talk with him the world always 
seemed a brighter place and life a little more worth while. He loved Portland and its 
people; he loved Oregon, its snow-capped mountains, 'God's alabaster towers,' its beau- 
tiful scenery and equable climate. He loved his country and dearly prized the honor 
of its flag. Less than two hours before he passed onward he held his pen in hand 
for the last time to subscribe for a very considerable amount of Liberty bonds of 
which he had previously taken an amount very large in proportion to his resources. 

"He loved his church. On coming to Oregon circumstances led him and his wife 
to unite with the Congregational church and no exigency of its needs ever failed to 
receive from him a response to the limit of his means. He was deeply religious by 
birth, training and temperament and many ministers of the Gospel were among his 
dearest life-long friends. 

"He loved life, made the mo.st of its sunshine, dispelled its shadows by his optim- 
ism, bore its burdens with fortitude, 'scattering seeds of kindness' all along the way. 
During his last days he had expressed gratitude for having been granted 'five years 



HISTORY OF OREGON 173 

of borrowed time' beyond the allotted human span of 'threescore years and ten.' 
Even in declining health Mr. Eggert had with rare exception spent a portion of each 
day at his office. Three days before the end his physical strength failed him and grad- 
ually waned until he entered into rest and at the age of seventy-ftve years closed an 
unusually successful career, leaving an unblemished record and a name honored at 
home and abroad." 



A. A. HOOVER. 



A. A. Hoover, well known in financial circles in Portland, is conducting a brokerage 
business and is also proprietor of a bakery. Step by step he has advanced since starting 
out in the business world and obstacles and difficulties in his path have seemed to serve 
but as an impetus for renewed effort on his part. He was born in Macy, Indiana, March 
20, 1872, but has been a resident of Portland since 1893, arriving here in the year in 
which he attained his majority. His grandfather, Daniel Hoover, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and died in December, 1890, at Akron, Indiana, where he devoted his 
life to farming. His son, Joseph Hoover, was a native of Macy, Indiana, born in the 
same house as his son, A. A. Hoover of this review. He married Elvira Tracy, a 
daughter of James and Catherine Tracy, and she yet makes her home in Akron, Indiana. 
Mr. Hoover comes of ancestral lines long connected with America. The grandmother 
of his father's mother attended the funeral of George Washington and always retained 
a vivid recollection of that momentous event. 

Reared in the Mississippi valley, A. A. Hoover came to Portland in 1893, thinking 
to enjoy better opportunities and advantages in the new and growing west. He entered 
the employ of the East Side Railway Company, there remaining for a year, after which 
he spent a year as bookkeeper in the employ of G. Covach & Company, wholesale fish 
dealers at 290 First street. Later he went to Seattle and subsequently to San Francisco, 
where he entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, continuing 
with the corporation from 1895 until 1898, when he returned to Portland. 

It was at this period that Mr. Hoover entered the commercial circles of the city 
by purchasing a half interest in a grocery store in connection with Ethan Allen at 
435 Sixth street. The business prospered and in time Mr. Hoover purchased the interest 
of his partner and conducted the store under his own name until July 4, 1900, when 
the store was destroyed by fire and after paying all of his bills he found himself the 
possessor of but eight dollars in cash and a horse and wagon. He then sold the wagon 
for fifty dollars and traded the horse for two lots at Peninsular Station. Entering the 
employ of F. Dresser & Company, prominent retail grocers at Seventh and Washington 
streets, he remained with that house until May 1, 1903, and while with them worked 
out the plan that later won for him the title of "Doughnut King." The firm of Dresser 
& Company conducted a delicatessen, of which department Mr. Hoover had charge. 
They bought all of their cooked goods and Mr. Hoover suggested to the proprietor 
that he be permitted to prepare and cook the articles of food at the store, thus saving 
the profit which went to outsiders who prepared the food. Moreover, some of the 
articles of prepared food were not satisfactory, among which were the doughnuts han- 
dled by the firm. The proprietor accepted the proposition made by Mr. Hoover and the 
latter's doughnuts were so superior that a great trade was built up and Mr. Hoover 
later made arrangements with his employer to make all the doughnuts at his own 
home and sell them to him in order that he personally might be benefited. On the 1st of 
May, therefore, he opened business on his own account in the rear of his home and 
began delivery with one wagon, personally making the deliveries and putting in a full 
working day of twenty hours. He still has in his possession the first cutter and his 
old mixing bowl. As time passed on his trade grew with such rapidity that he hired 
men to make the deliveries while he gave all of his attention to the shop. In 1908 he 
began to employ men in the shop and from that point the business has steadily grown 
to its present large proportions. He retains all of his original employes in both oflSce 
and cake and doughnut departments. The business has been most carefully managed 
and directed and is so thoroughly systematized that Mr. Hoover finds little necessity 
to supervise it, having turned over the management to Mrs. C. D. Waters. In another 
line Mr. Hoover is putting forth effective and successful efforts, for he conducts a 
general brokerage business under the firm name of Hoover-Peterson, Incorporated, 
selling agents, importers, exporters and brokers, with offices in the Board of Trade 



174 HISTORY OF OREGON 

building. Of this firm Mr. Hoover is the president, with F. H. Peterson as secretary 
and treasurer. 

In 1894 Mr. Hoover veas united in marriage to Miss Dora Belle Lesher, a native of 
St. Paul and a daughter of W. F. and Lucy (Price) Lesher, the former deceased, while 
the latter is living in Portland. To Mr. and Mrs. Hoover has been born one child, Lucy 
Elvira. Mr. Hoover finds his recreation in trap shooting and boating. He belongs 
to the Trap Shooters Club, the Multnomah Angler Club, the Portland Motor Boat Club 
and the Sportsman's League. He also has membership with the United Artisans, the 
Modern Woodmen, Progressive Business Men's Club, Portland Chamber of Commerce, 
and the Masonic fraternity, and in the last named has attained high rank and is now 
a member of the Mystic Shrine. His is the record of a truly self-made man. From 
early life he has worked his way upward and though all days in his career have not 
been equally bright he has managed to turn sudden failures into successes and to avoid 
the storm clouds which seem to indicate disaster. Step by step he has progressed and 
his life illustrates what can be accomplished when there is a will to dare and to do. 

Mr. Hoover's home, located on the bank of the Willamette river at Grand Avenue 
and Brooklyn street, with its unobstructed view of the city, snow capped mountains and 
miles of river front, is one of the finest in the city and is fittingly known as "The King's 
Palace." 



REV. JOHN CUMMISKY, 0. S. B. 

Rev. John Cummisky, O. S. B., pastor of St. Agatha's Catholic church in Portland, 
was born November 23, 1885, at Lead, South Dakota, and is a son of John B. and Belle 
Cummisky. He acquired his early education at the Sisters' Academy at Sturgis, South 
Dakota, and his college training was acquired with the Benedictine Fathers of Con- 
ception, Missouri, and in 1905 he joined the Benedictine Order. He studied theology 
and philosophy at Mount Angel, where he was ordained in 1910. He was then assigned 
to mission work in Clackamas county, Oregon, where he remained until given his 
present appointment as pastor of St. Agatha's church in April, 1911. 

This church was opened on the 25th of April, 1911, by Father John Cummisky, 
who built the combination church and school, the church services being held on the 
second floor while the first floor was used for school purposes. When Father Cummisky 
took charge the parish numbered less than two hundred people, with an attendance of 
about sixty pupils in the school. Today, through the splendid work and organization 
powers of the pastor, the parish has become one of the strong Catholic centers of 
Portland, with an average of five hundred communicants, and one hundred and fifty 
pupils in the school. On the 16th of August, 1919, the ground was broken for a new 
church and on New Year's day of 1920 the corner stone was laid for a beautiful new 
edifice, which has been constructed of Oregon stone. The dimensions of the nave are 
one hundred and fourteen by fifty feet and the transept has a depth of seventy feet. 
The church was completed' and dedicated Sunday, October 3, 1920, and is one of the 
finest Catholic churches in Portland. The purposes and plans of Father Cummisky are 
well defined and carefully executed and he is securing the hearty cooperation of his 
parishioners in the work which he has laid out to accomplish for his parish. 



E. E. WILSON. 

E. E. Wilson, prominent in financial circles of Corvallls as vice president of the 
First National Bank, has passed his entire life within the borders of this state. He 
was born in the city where he now resides on the 23d of October, 1869, and is a son of 
Lewis P. and Rose J. (Russell) Wilson, the former a native of Illinois and the latter 
of Missouri. The father crossed the plains to Oregon with his parents in 1853, at 
which time he was seventeen years of age, while the mother came to this state in the 
year 1851, in company with her parents, her father being a millwright by trade. The 
father purchased land in this state and became the owner of land in Benton county, 
■which he cultivated successfully for many years, but is now living retired at Corvallis. 
The mother also survives and they are well known and highly respected pioneers of 
Benton county. 




REV. JOHN CUMMISKY, O. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 177 

E. E. Wilson was reared in Benton county and in the public schools of Corvallis 
he pursued his education, while later he became a student in the Oregon Agricultural 
College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1889. He then entered the 
law school of the University of Oregon, from which he was graduated in 1893 with the 
LL. B. degree. He had also pursued his law studies in the office of R. & E. B. Wil- 
liams and Carey and also that of Governor W. W. Thayer. Mr. Carey is the editor of 
this work. Following his graduation from the university Mr. Wilson opened an office 
in Corvallis, where he has since continued in practice, his ability in his profession 
winning for him a large clientele. His high professional standing is indicated in the 
fact that he has been called to the office of city attorney at various times, his entire 
period of service covering a decade. He is the incumbent in that office and was 
appointed district attorney under Governor West, but resigned. Mr. Wilson has also 
become prominent in financial circles of his city and is now the vice president of the 
First National Bank of Corvallis, one of the sound financial institutions of this part 
of the state. He also has become interested in farm properties which are proving a 
profitable investment and he is continually broadening the scope of his activities with 
good results, carrying forward to successful completion everything that he undertakes. 

In his political views Mr. Wilson is a democrat and a stanch supporter of the 
principles and candidates of that party. He is not affiliated with any clubs or fraternal 
organizations, but is much interested in the educational progress of the state and for 
seven years served as a member of the board of regents of the Oregon Agricultural 
College. There are few who have longer made their home in Corvallis than Mr. Wilson 
and as one of the native sons his record is a source of pride to his fellow townsmen, 
who have ever found him arrayed on the side of law and order, of progress and improve- 
ment. He is a man of high professional standing, of marked business integrity and 
ability and the sterling worth of his character is recognized by all with whom he has 
been associated. 



A. V. R. SNYDER. 



A. V. R. Snyder, the efficient treasurer of Polk county, is also engaged in the fire 
insurance business at Dallas and is managing the financial affairs of the county with 
the same care displayed in the control of his individual interests. He has filled other 
positions of public trust and over the record of his public career there falls no shadow 
of wrong nor suspicion of evil. He was born in Milford, Illinois, April 16, 1852, and 
is a son of James P. and Sarah E. (Bray ton) Snyder, the former a native of New York 
and the latter of Ohio. In an early day the father became a resident of Illinois and in 
1856 started across the plains to California, but was never heard from afterward and 
it is supposed that he met death in the Mountain Meadow massacre in Utah. The 
mother continued a resident of Illinois until her demise in 1909. 

A. V. R. Snyder was reared in Illinois, attending the public schools of Oregon, that 
state, and later becoming a student at the Mount Morris Seminary. After completing 
his studies he learned the printer's trade at Oregon, beginning his apprenticeship in 
1867, and for several years continued to follow the trade in various places. On the 
24th of July, 1872, he arrived at McMinnville, Oregon, where, in association with his 
brother, he founded the Yamhill County Reporter, which they conducted until 1885, 
and then sold the plant and went to Astoria, where they purchased the Gateway Herald, 
continuing its publication until 1889, again selling out and removing to Dallas, Polk 
county, where Mr. Snyder of this review obtained employment in the office of the 
Observer, with which he was connected for a time, subsequently establishing the Valley 
Transcript. For four years he conducted his interests at Dallas, at the end of which 
time he moved the plant to McMinnville and issued the publication at that city until 
1901, when he was appointed collector of customs at Wrangle, Alaska, serving in that 
position until 1902. He resigned to accept the appointment of United States commis- 
sioner, occupying that office for eight years, or until 1910, when he returned to Dallas 
and engaged in the fire insurance business, in which he still continues. He has closely 
studied every detail of the business and is most successfully managing his interests, 
writing a large amount of insurance annually. In 1916 he was elected county treasurer 
of Polk county and his excellent record in that office led to his reelection without an 
opposing candidate at the close of his term in 1919. He is discharging his duties with 
promptness and fidelity and is proving a faithful custodian of the public funds. 



178 HISTORY OF OREGON 

In November, 1874, Mr. Snyder was united In marriage to Miss Laura B. Rowell 
and they have become the parents of seven children, namely: George C. L., a resident 
o£ Portland; Sarah E., the wife o£ W. C. Cook of McMinnville; Jennie A., who married 
T. J. Warren, also a resident of McMinnville; Frank E., who is living in Seattle, Wash- 
ington; A. Claire, residing in McMinnville, Oregon; Pauline, the wife of H. C. Lowe 
o£ Seattle; and William C who makes his home in Tulare, California. 

In his political views Mr. Snyder is a republican and has been called upon to fill 
various public offices of honor and trust. While residing at McMinnville he served for 
two years as city recorder and lor six years filled that position at Dallas. For four 
consecutive sessions he was assistant chief clerk of the state legislature, his work being 
performed most systematically and accurately. His fraternal connections are with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan, his mem- 
bership being in Abd Uhl Atef Temple of Portland. He also belongs to Friendship 
Lodge, No. 6, I. 0. 0. P., to La Creole Encampment at Dallas, and is likewise a member 
of Elmira Lodge, No. 26, of the Rebekahs, and a member of McMinnville, Oregon, Lodge, 
No. 1283, B. P. 0. E. The family attend the Episcopal church and their lives are guided 
by its teachings. He has displayed rare qualities as a public official and is held in 
equally high regard in the various connections in which he is found, his labors at all 
times being attended by results that are farreaching and beneficial. 



MAJOR EDWARD C. MEARS. 

Major Edward C. Mears, a veteran of the World war, is now engaged in the general 
insurance business in partnership with Herbert Gordon and for many years has figured 
prominently in commercial circles of Portland, most capably managing his interests. 
The family name has long been a distinguished one in military affairs, the father and 
sons having rendered notable service to the country in time of peril. A native of the 
Pacific coast, the major is actuated by the spirit of western enterprise and progress 
that have been the dominant factors in bringing about the rapid upbuilding and sub- 
stantial growth of this part of the country. 

Major Mears was born in San Francisco, California, September 21, 1870. His 
father, Colonel Frederick Mears, attained distinction in the Civil war, as a lieutenant- 
colonel. In 1S60 he was stationed at Vancouver barracks and following the close of 
the war he continued active in the regular army, passing away at Fort Spokane in 
1891 with the rank of colonel, his period of service extending over thirty years. The 
three surviving children of the family are: Edward C, of this review; Winifred, a 
resident of San Francisco, California; and Colonel Frederick Mears, U. S. A., who is 
at present supervising the construction of a railroad for the government in Alaska. 
He is well known in engineering circles throughout the country, having been next in 
authority to General Goethals in the work of constructing the Panama canal. He also 
rendered valuable service to his country during the war with Germany, directing as 
general manager the transportation of all United States troops in France at that period. 

As a boy Edward C. Mears was naturally much interested in military affairs, 
owing to his father's long connection therewith and he became a student in the Shattuck 
Military School at Faribault. Minnesota, from which he was graduated in the class 
of 1S86. He afterward continued his education in the College of the City of New York, 
of which he is an 1S93 alumnus. He has been a resident of Portland since 1S93 and 
for fifteen years was identified with banking in this city, serving as the first cashier 
of the Lumbermen's National Bank. He was also the receiver of the Title Guarantee 
& Trust Company, selling the assets of the concern and netting the creditors one hundred 
cents on the dollar, and he has likewise acted as receiver for other companies. For 
some time he engaged in the brokerage business, winning a large clientele which he 
represented in investment in Pacific coast timber and bonds. In July, 1920, he engaged 
in the general insurance business in partnership with Herbert Gordon and they are 
building up a good clientage as the result of their enterprising business methods and 
straightforward and reliable dealing. 

On the 9th of February, 1895, Major Mears was united in marriage to Miss An- 
toinette Prescott. a daughter of C. H. Prescott who was at one time general manager 
of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, associated with Henry Villard and 
T. Oakes. He was likewise vice president of the Northern Pacific Railroad Cc«npany 
and was one of the most prominent factors in railway and transportation circles up 



HISTORY OP OREGON 179 

to the tirhe of his death, which occurred on the 7th of August, 1905. Major and 
Mrs. Mears have become the parents of two daughters: Antoinette, who is the wife 
of Willis B. Ashley, a member of the firm of Ashley & Runuelin, bankers; and Georgi- 
anna B. 

Major Mears has been prominent in military affairs. For eight years he served 
as adjutant of the Third Infantry Regiment of the Oregon National Guard and is also 
a veteran of the "World war, called to service in May, 1917, as captain. He was assigned 
to the Eighty-eighth Division, with which he served for eleven months in France, 
winning promotion to the rank of major. He is a member of the American Legion, 
which he was active in organizing and he is also identified with the Military Order 
of the Loyal Legion, having served as commander of the local chapter and is a member 
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He is a member of the Alpha Delta Phi, a college 
fraternity and also of the Arlington Club, and his political allegiance is given to the 
republican party. His activities have been of a varied nature and as a business man 
his standing is of the highest. His life has been well spent, characterized by the 
conservation of his forces, by the utilization of opportunity and by a correct under- 
standing of life's values and purposes. The strength that he has manifested in business 
circles has its root in upright, honorable manhood, winning for him the unqualified 
regard of all with whom he has been associated. 



H. S. GILE. 

For thirty years H. S. Gile has been a resident of Oregon and he h 
recognized leader in horticultural circles of the state, aiding largely in the develop- 
ment of the prune industry. It was principally through his efforts that the Oregon 
prune was established in the markets of the east. In 1900 he organized the Willamette 
Valley Prune Association and until 1913 was its manager. This was the pioneer pack- 
ing organization in the northwest and was largely responsible for saving the prune 
industry to Oregon. In 1915 he was the chief factor in organizing the Pheasant Fruit 
Juice Company, which was directly responsible for saving the loganberry industry 
from what seemed inevitable destruction and later consolidated with the Phez Com- 
pany, which now has an international sale for its products. 

Mr. Gile is a native of Canada. He was born at Smith Falls, in the province of 
Ontario. Crossing the border into the United States before he was of age, he later 
became a resident of Nebraska, whence he came to Oregon about thirty years ago, taking 
up his abode in Salem. In 1900 Mr. Gile became active in forming the first organ- 
ization for packing and marketing prunes, which is now known as the Willamette 
Valley Prune Association and which markets the Pheasant and Hunter brands of 
prunes. Mr. Gile is still a large stockholder in this association. Oregon owes him 
a great debt tor his work in behalf of her prune industry, for it was largely due to 
his efforts, at a time when this fruit needed a champion, that the superiority of the 
Oregon prune became known outside of the state. Analysis shows that prunes grown 
in this state contain valuable therapeutic properties not found to the same extent in 
the sweeter varieties of prunes, and also that they carry a much larger percentage of 
albuminoids than prunes grown elsewhere, thus giving them the highest food value. 
It would be impossible to find a more healthful and nutritious article of diet. Oregon 
prunes are evaporated Fallenburg plums and the orchards in the Willamette valley are 
as carefully cared for as the easterner's favorite rose bed. When the fruit has ripened, 
it is gathered, cleaned and cured in great hot-air evaporators, after which it is taken 
to the packing plants and by means of great power machinery is sorted into several 
sizes, the largest fruits running about thirty-five prunes to the pound. Before being 
packed the fruit is passed through a large, rapidly revolving cylinder filled with live 
steam at high pressure, and is finally washed and while very hot packed in paper- 
lined boxes. Mr. Gile was among the first to go east for the purpose of introducing 
the Oregon prune to our great domestic markets. His efforts in this connection were 
later given much unsolicited publicity by the Saturday Evening Post, which devoted 
considerable space to the matter, the subject of this review being described as invading 
the east with his pockets bulging with prunes. The easterners at first declared that 
they were well satisfied with the prunes which they were buying from California and 
complained of the sourness and toughness of the Oregon product, but through improved 
methods of preparation plus perseverance and determination the Oregon prune was 



180 HISTORY OF OREGON 

finally placed on the eastern market and It is there to stay. Mr. Gile and his associates 
are interested in five ranches, four of which total five hundred acres, and of this three 
hundred and five acres are given over to the production of fruit. The fifth ranch 
contains eight hundred and sixty-two acres, three hundred acres being devoted to 
fruit raising. They also own and operate prune packing plants at Newberg and Rose- 
burg under the firm name of H. S. Gile & Company and their interests are now most 
extensive, it being their constant endeavor to extend their markets. 

In 1915 Mr. Gile was chiefly responsible for the organization of the Pheasant Fruit 
Juice Company, which in 191S was consolidated with the Northwest Fruit Products 
Company, becoming known as the Phez Company, under which style it is now con- 
ducted. Mr. Gile was the president of these corporations until January, 1921, during 
which formative period the business has enjoyed a phenomenal growth, its transactions 
for the year 1918 amounting to about two million dollars. Since the enforcement of 
prohibition the consumption of sweet soft drinks has increased tremendously and the 
business is now one which affords unlimited possibilities. The Phez Company has 
confined itself to the manufacture and merchandising of pure fruit juice products, 
Phez being made from the juice of the loganberry, which grows here in abundance. 
They also manufacture Applju and pure sweet cider, using for this purpose from five 
to ten thousand tons of apples annually, and their products command an extensive 
sale throughout the United States. Five well equipped plants are owned by the Phez 
Company, the one at Salem being located in the center of the city and given over to 
the manufacture of loganberry juice. The buildings are of concrete and brick con- 
struction and include ice and cold storage facilities of large proportions. The cold 
storage is not only used by the company but is also open for public use at profitable 
rates. The receiving and fruit-pressing equipment in this building includes a system of 
huge hydraulic presses connected up with thorough pasteurizing, filtering and condensing 
appliances. The Olympia plant is the most extensive and is located on the extreme 
south end of Puget Sound, being connected with all of the railroads which enter the 
city. This is devoted to the manufacture of Applju and is a model of sanitation. 
Great quantities of apples known as packing house seconds are used, which means 
sprayed, clean fruit, all bruised and discolored portions being removed before the 
crushing process in order to avoid the least discoloration in the juice. The jam. Jelly 
and preserve plant is housed in a building ninety by five hundred feet, the property 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, located on its main line tracks in Salem, 
close to its passenger station. This building is supplied with the most modern and 
sanitary equipment and the capacity of the plant is about one carload a day when 
running at full capacity. The junior plant at Wenatchee Is used chiefly as a receiving 
and shipping station for a large part of the apples which are used at the Olympia 
plant. The products manufactured by the company are unexcelled for purity and 
excellence of flavor and have gained well merited popularity throughout the United 
States. 

Mr. Gile is an affable, courteous gentleman whose initiative spirit and powers of 
organization have led him into important relations, whereby the state has greatly 
benefited. An analyzation of his life record indicates that close application, determina- 
tion and industry have been the salient factors in his present-day success. He possesses 
a natural inclination to stick to a proposition until the desired result is achieved, 
and while attaining individual prosperity his labors have been an effective force in 
promoting the development of the state along horticultural lines, his efforts proving 
far-reaching and resultant. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM GADSBY. 

In the death of Captain William Gadsby, which occurred on the 20th of September, 
1918, Portland lost a representative citizen and business man who had long been 
identified with its commercial interests as proprietor of a large furniture and carpet 
house at the corner of First and Washington streets. He was ever actuated by a 
laudable ambition and his energy and determination enabled him to overcome all 
obstacles and difliculties in his path. In fact, in his vocabulary there was no such 
word as fail and the trials which always beset a business career seemed to serve 
but as an impetus for renewed effort on his part. 

Mr. Gadsby was of English birth and lineage. He was born January 18, 1859, 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM GADSBY 



HISTORY OF OREGON 183 

in Birmingham, England, where the family name has long been associated with mer- 
cantile enterprises. His father, William Gadsby, was but fprty years of age when 
death cut short a career of great promise. He had married Prances Anne Moore, a 
daughter of Richard Moore, the owner of Prestop Park, in Leicestershire, England. 
She, too, spent her entire life in that country. In the family were five children. 

Owing to the death of his father and business reverses which came to the family 
William Gadsby was forced to start out in life on his own account when but twelve 
years of age. He was employed in various ways for a period of four years and then 
joined the British army, being assigned to the Seventeenth Foot, then stationed in 
Ireland. In 1877 he was sent to India and while in that country acquired a thorough 
knowledge of Hindustani, one of the languages of Hindustan. This qualified him for 
appointment to a staff position in the Bombay commissariat department and while thus 
serving he assisted in the embarkation of the army corps sent from India to Malta 
and to Cyprus during the Russo-Turkish war. On the outbreak of the Afghan war 
he was detailed to take charge of the stores of the Third Brigade, Kandahar Field 
Force, and accompanied the division under General Roberts to relieve Kandahar. 
After serving with the movable column under General Ross in the Hurnai valley he 
returned to India. 

It was while at Bombay, on the 4th of February, 1880, that Captain Gadsby was 
united in marriage to Miss Nellie Slater, a daughter of Oliver Slater, of Newhall, 
Staffordshire, England. After he had been on military duty in India for about six 
years his health failed and he was compelled to resign his position in the army and 
return to his native country, hoping that the change of climate would prove beneficial. 
On the contrary, however, he found the climate of England very trying and thus was 
induced to come to the United States. He made his way to Colorado and the dry 
air of that state proved extremely beneficial to him. Accordingly he decided to locate 
there and took out naturalization papers, after which he established a furniture store 
in Denver, meeting with very substantial success in the conduct of the business until 
1889, when the condition of his wife's health caused him again to seek a change of 
climate. Portland became his destination and after establishing his family here he 
again turned his attention to the furniture trade and from the beginning met with 
notable prosperity. For a long period he conducted a large store at First and Wash- 
ington streets, in the very heart of the commercial center of Portland. He carried 
an extensive and attractive line of furniture and carpets and his sales reached a 
notable figure. He ever realized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best advertise- 
ment and, moreover, he ever felt the truth of the old axiom that honesty is the best 
policy. His business methods were entirely straightforward, winning him a high 
standing in mercantile circles. Energetic and progressive, he kept in touch with 
the trend of the trade at all times and the finest that the markets in his line afforded 
could be at all times found in his store. 

With Captain Gadsby's removal to the United States he became a loyal citizen 
of his adopted country and when the United States entered into war with Spain he 
joined the army. He had previously served in the Oregon National Guard for several 
years, rising from the ranks to the captaincy of Company G. Therefore at the out- 
break of hostilities in the Spanish-American war he was commissioned by Governor 
Lord, becoming captain of Company G of the Second Oregon Volunteer Infantry. In 
that capacity he accompanied the regiment to the Philippines and was present at the 
capture of Manila, remaining on the islands until invalided home. He resigned his 
commission in December, 1898, and thereafter spent three months in recuperating in 
southern California. 

To Captain and Mrs. Gadsby were born two sons, William B. and Walter M., both 
of whom were born in India and are now engaged in the furniture business. They 
also adopted a daughter, Alice. The eldest son, Benjamin Gadsby, was born in Bom- 
bay, India, in 1S81, while the birth of the second son, Walter Moore, occurred at 
Neemuch, in central India, in 1882. Both were educated in the Portland Business 
College and in the Bishop Scott Academy. They became the associates of their father 
in business and upon his death succeeded to the ownership of the furniture and carpet 
house, displaying the same sterling qualities of business which won success tor the 
founder of the store. 

The death of Captain Gadsby occurred September 20, 1918, when he was fifty-nine 
years of age. Politically he had become a republican following his naturalization 
and he remained a stalwart supporter of the party. He was also a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce of Portland, of the Commercial Club and of the Board of 



184 HISTORY OF OREGON 

4 
Trade and fraternally was connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
belonged to the Episcopal church and his life was ever guided by high and honorable 
principles that brought him prominently to the front as a business man, that made 
him a citizen whose loyalty was above question and that constituted him a firm friend 
and a devoted husband and father. 



WALTER L. HEMBREE. 



Walter L. Hembree, serving for a second term as postmaster of McMinnville, is 
widely and favorably known in Yamhill county, for he has here spent his entire life. 
He was born in the city in which he now resides October 6, 1S71, and is a son of Waman 
C. and Nancy Ann (Garrison) Hembree, the former a native of McMinnville, Tennessee, 
and the latter of Iowa. When a small boy the father went to Missouri and in April, 
1843, he crossed the plains to Oregon as a member of a large train of immigrants, 
arriving in this state in October of that year and driving an ox team the entire dis- 
tance. He was at that time fourteen years of agg and had made the trip in company 
with his parents, who settled on a donation claim in Yamhill county, six miles north- 
east of McMinnville. He had attended school in Missouri, and in Oregon he completed 
his education, remaining with his parents until he attained his majority. He traded 
his squatter's right to a half section of land for forty bushels of grain and a cow, con- 
ducting the transaction with the father of Judge Burnett, a leading jurist of Salem, 
but the family ate the grain and the cow died. Subsequently Mr. Hembree took up 
land three-quarters of a mile northwest of Carlton, in Yamhill county, which he cleared 
and developed, continuing active in its cultivation and improvement for several years. 
On the 14th of October, 1855, he enlisted for service in the Yakima Indian war as 
a member of a company of volunteers commanded by Captain A. J. Hembree, an 
uncle, who was killed the following April. The father remained in the service until 
1856, when he was mustered out, and, returning to Yamhill county, he engaged in 
general merchandising in McMinnville in association with his father conducting that 
business for several years. Subsequently he purchased a tract of land two miles south 
of the town and this he continued to operate until 1891, when he took up his residence 
in Monmouth, Oregon, in order to educate his children but later returned to McMinn- 
ville and there made his home throughout the remainder of his life, passing away 
on the 22d of March, 1920, when he had reached the venerable age of ninety-one years 
and two weeks, while the mother's demise had occurred on the 7th of September, 1891. 
He was prominent in the local councils of the democratic party and was a member of 
the Grange. His life was ever an upright and honorable one and for about seventy 
years he was a devoted and faithful member of the Christian church. A short time 
prior to his death he took an airship ride over the surrounding country, greatly 
enjoying the trip. He was one of the honored pioneers of Oregon and through his 
activities contributed in substantial manner to the upbuilding and development of 
his section of the state. He was twice married, his first union being with Nancy Ann 
Garrison, who became the mother of the subject of this review. She started across 
the plains to Oregon with her parents in 1845 and in Nevada her father was killed by 
the Indians. In 1892 Mr. Hembree was united in marriage to Nancy Beagle Crisp, 
who passed away in April, 1914. In 1843 she made the long journey across the plains 
with her parents, who settled in Washington county, Oregon, near the present site of 
Forest Grove, and there they continued to reside until called by death. 

Walter L. Hembree was reared in Y^amhill county and there attended the district 
schools, subsequently pursuing his studies in the public schools of McMinnville and 
later completed a course in the State Normal School at Monmouth. On entering busi- 
ness life he became an employe in a bank at Monmouth, with which he was connected 
for a time, and then was for three years active in the further cultivation and im- 
provement of the old home farm, which is still owned by the family. In 1S96 he pur- 
chased a book store at McMinnville, which he continued to conduct successfully until 
1920, or for a period of twenty-four years, his large and well selected stock, reasonable 
prices and courteous treatment of customers winning for him a good patronage. On 
the 26th of January, 1916, he was appointed postmaster and his excellent service in 
that connection led to his reappointment in January, 1920, for an additional term of 
four years. He is prompt, efficient and reliable in the discharge of his duties and is 
making an excellent record in office. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 185 

In September, 1904, Mr. Hembree was united in marriage to Miss Clara Irvine, 
and they have become the parents of a daughter, Helen, who was born September 
29, 1907. He is a stanch democrat in his political views and in 1920 attended the 
democratic national convention held at San Francisco, California. For two terms he 
served as city recorder, proving systematic and accurate in the discharge of the duties 
of that office. Fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and the Woodmen of the World, and his religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
bership in the Christian church. As a business man and as a public oiBcial Mr. 
Hembree has made an excellent record, and his efforts have been an element in the 
general development and upbuilding of this section of the state. He has passed his 
entire life in Yamhill county, where he is widely known and highly respected as a 
citizen of sterling worth. 



WILLIAM K. SMITH. 



William K. Smith of Portland reached an honored old age and had passed the 
eighty-eighth milestone on life's journey ere "the weary wheels of life at length were 
stilled." For forty-five years he lived in Portland, contributing in notable measure 
to its development along many lines. His own business career was characteristic of 
the expansion and growth of the northwest and he aided in laying broad and deep 
the wide foundation upon which has been built the preseni progress and prosperity of 
this section of the country. He came to the Pacific coast from Pennsylvania, his birth 
having occurred in Fayette county of the latter state on the 3rd of August, 1826, his 
parents being Peter and Barbara (Showalter) Smith, who were of English and Holland 
Dutch descent, respectively. The father was a farmer and carpenter, who on leaving 
Pennsylvania established his home in Ohio, taking up his abode on a tract of wild land 
in Clermont county, and there devoting his life to farming until his removal to 
Indiana. He subsequently resided at different periods in Illinois and Texas, his death 
occurring in the latter state, while his wife passed away in Ohio. 

William K. Smith was but six years of age when the family went to the Buckeye 
state. The various removals of his parents made him a pupil in the schools of 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Alabama, and later he went with the family to Texas, 
where he engaged in farming until eighteen years of age. He then started out inde- 
pendently and went to Alabama, where he again attended school. He was also 
employed as a clerk in the mercantile establishment fo his uncle, who was also a 
physician, and while Mr. Smith was earning his living as a salesman he likewise 
read medicine. For five years he remained in Alabama and then located in La Grange, 
Texas, where he occupied a position as clerk in a mercantile establishment and before 
he left the Lone Star state had earned a cow and calf by splitting rails. With his return 
to Texas he took up the live stock business, in which he engaged for some time, but 
eventually sold his herd of cattle and removed to St. Louis for the purpose of im- 
proving his education. Experience had brought him to a realization of the value 
of education as a factor in the attainment of success and for a time he was a student 
in a commercial college of St. Louis and later attended the Shurtleff College at Alton, 
Illinois. He was also studying life, its opportunities and its possibilities, and while 
at Shurtleff formed a company to cross the plains, believing that he might have better 
opportunities on the Pacific coast, where his brother, Joseph S. Smith, was already 
living. He left St. Louis with about eight head of fine cattle and horses and a few 
men to assist him In the care of the stock but ere he reached his journey's end his 
horses were stolen and the party had experienced considerable trouble with the 
Indians while crossing the plains. Soon after reaching California Mr. Smith sold 
his cattle and took up the business of mining but was unsuccessful in this venture 
and opened a small store on the McCallum river. After he had been in California for 
a year he visited his brother, Joseph S. Smith, who in the meantime had removed with 
his family to Whidby's island in Puget Sound, Washington. It was on this trip that 
he passed through Portland in 1854, at which time the city was a small town of little 
commercial and industrial importance. From Portland he traveled on horseback to his 
destination and after a short visit with his brother returned to Oregon, becoming a 
resident of Salem, where he purchased a stock of books, paints, oils and general 
merchandise from Dr. Wilson whose donation land claim was the original town site 
of Salem. Mr. Smith carried on business successfully for fifteen years and it was 



186 HISTORY OP OREGON 

during that time that he also developed the water system of the city, bringing in an 
unlimited supply of pure water from the Santa Ana river. He also extended his busi- 
ness activity in various other directions, becoming the largest stockholder in the Salem 
Woolen Mills, in which enterprise he became associated with J. P. Miller, H. W. Corbett, 
W. S. Ladd, L. F. Grover, J. S. Smith and Daniel Waldo all of whom were numbered 
among Oregon's most prominent pioneer settlers and business men. From the Salem 
Woolen Mills was made the first shipment of wool sent to the east from the Pacific 
coast. Associated with practically the same partners Mr. Smith built the first large 
flouring mills and an immense wheat warehouse, his mills being the largest on the 
coast and operated by water power from the Santa Ana river. From point to point 
Mr. Smith enlarged his activities by acquiring the McMinnville Flouring Mills and 
he traded to Robert Kinney his stock in the woolen mills for a ranch of a thousand 
acres stocked with fine horses, and the McMinnville mills. His laudable ambition was 
still unsatisfied, for opportunity was ever to him a call to action and recognizing the 
fact that Portland had splendid natural advantages, which would contribute toward 
making it a city of great commercial prominence, he severed his business connections 
at Salem and in 1869 became a permanent resident of Portland. Here he established a 
sawmill and began the manufacture of lumber, becoming eventually the owner of three 
sawmills, which he operated on an extensive scale, becoming one of the leading lumber- 
men of this section of the country. He was also associated with C. H. Lewis, Henry 
Failing and H. W. Corbett in financing the Bull Run system of water supply for 
Portland and was a member of the original water commission, thus doing a service 
for the city for which future generations will need to revere his memory for years 
to come. He also became a conspicuous figure in the financial circles of Portland as a 
representative of the Portland Savings Bank, which was organized in ISSO, and of 
which he was made a director and the vice president. He also represented the 
directorate of the Commercial Bank and was the vice president and one of the 
directors of the Ainsworth Bank. Portland further benefited by his labors as the 
builder of a dock and warehouse on the levee north of Salmon street in 1876 and he 
turned his attention to the question of urban transportation, becoming one of the 
promoters of the street railway system by aiding in the organization of the old Cable 
Car Company. He was also among the first to discuss and support the question of 
establishing an electric line and was interested with Ben HoUaday in building the 
first railway in Oregon. Mr. Smith was likewise connected with shipping interests 
and became the owner of a four-masted bark, Hattie C. Bessie, which he chartered to 
Chinese merchants for twenty thousand dollars for a single trip to China. A con- 
temporary biographer has said of him, "His business connections were so varied and 
important in Portland that it would have seemed that outside affairs could have no 
claim upon his time and attention, yet he had an important agricultural interest, 
owning at one time a ranch of a thousand acres in Yamhill county, stocked with fine 
horses and cattle. This property he traded for the Hattie C. Bessie. While in Salem 
he purchased the first bushel of apples ever sold in that city and afterward disposed 
of many of the apples at a dollar each, and sold one for five dollars to D. M. Durell, 
a banker and sawmill man, who said he would take the apple to the Smithsonian 
Institution in Washington, for it was almost the size of a large cocoanut. Later Mr. 
Smith engaged in the real estate business and sold more land for railroad terminals 
than any man in Portland. He sold to J. J. Hill, the railroad magnate, realty that was 
worth more than a quarter of a million dollars and he furnished the site for two parks 
to the city of Portland. In 1894 he purchased Council Crest, paying fifty thousand 
dollars for sixty acres." It seems that there was scarcely a phase of Portland's 
business development with which Mr. Smith was not more or less closely associated 
and his sound judgment, keen business enterprise and unfaltering diligence were im- 
portant elements in the growth and progress of the city, as well as in the advance- 
ment of his own fortunes. 

In 1S64, in San Francisco, Mr. Smith wedded Miss Debbie H. Harker, a sister of 
General Charles Harker, whose title was proof of his service in the Civil war. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith became parents of six children: Eugenia the wife of T. Harris Bartlett 
of Idaho; William K. ; Victor H., who was a graduate of the Willamette Medical 
College, the Virginia Medical College and the Medical College of New York, and who 
died in 1915; Joseph H., who married Gertrude Eger; Charles H., who died when four 
years of age; and Sumner, who was drowned in the Willamette river, while saving 
the life of a young lady whose rescue he effected at the cost of his own life. 

Mr. Smith was a man of most generous nature and gave freely to the support of 



HISTORY OF OREGON 187 

various churches and also to the Willamette University at Salem. He furnished the 
ground upon which the Willamette Medical School in Portland is built and was ever 
a stalwart friend of education. He loved literature and was familiar with many of 
the best writers and was particularly fond of Pope and of Thomas Moore. He became 
a life member and a director of the Portland Library Association and continued his 
interest in the work after the library was taken over by the city of Portland. Death 
called him January 15, 1914, when he was in the eighty-eighth year of his age. He had 
accomplished his task, had played his part well and there had come to him those 
things which men covet — honor, riches and a good name. 



LESTER MARTIN. 



Lester Martin is an enterprising and progressive business man of Newport, where 
since 1913 he has been engaged in the real estate, insurance and loan business, in 
which he has been very successful, being now accorded a large patronage. He was 
born in Fall River, Massachusetts, February 14, 1S79, and is a son of James A. and 
Elander (Fowler) Martin the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Massachu- 
setts. The father became a resident of Massachusetts about 1861 and there engaged 
in milling until 1882, when he returned to his native state, where he continued active 
in the milling business throughout his remaining years, conducting his manufacturing 
interests at Richmond and at Roanoke, Virginia. He passed away in 1909 but the 
mother survives. 

The son, Lester Martin, was reared in Virginia and there attended school, also 
becoming a pupil in a night school at Detroit, Michigan. At the age of sixteen years 
he learned the barber's trade and in 1908 sought the opportunities of the west, going 
to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where for three years he was engaged in the real estate and 
coal business. He then went to Vancouver, Washington, where he resided for nine, 
months, and in 1913 came to Oregon establishing a real estate, loan and insurance 
business at Newport, in Lincoln county, and also opening a barber shop. He has 
since continued active along those lines and his enterprise, reliability and sound 
business judgment are proving potent elements in his success. He is thoroughly 
familiar with property values and has negotiated many important realty transfers. 
His barber shop is well patronized, owing to the fact that his establishment is always 
scrupulously clean and sanitary, equipped with the latest and most improved appli- 
ances along that line, and the service rendered customers is flrst-class in every par- 
ticular. 

On the 19th of September, 1917, Mr. Martin was united in mariage to Miss Lila 
L. Lewis and they have become the parents of two children, Clydia Camille and Joseph 
Lester. In his political views Mr. Martin is a republican, prominent in the councils 
of the party. For the past four years he has served as chairman of the republican 
central committee and has also been state committeeman from Lincoln county. His 
fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen 
of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. 
He has won substantial success in the conduct of his business affairs and his honorable 
methods have gained for him the confidence of all who have had business dealings with 
him. He is widely and favorably known in the locality where he makes his home, 
being recognized as a representative business man and a public-spirited citizen, loyal 
to the best interests of the community. 



C. F. WRIGHT. 



C. F. Wright, vice president and secretary of the firm of Ballou & Wright, extensive 
DistrilDutors of Automobile Equipment, is also vice president of the Lumbermen's Trust 
Company and is recognized as one of the resourceful, enterprising and progressive 
business men of Portland whose plans are carefully formulated and promptly executed. 
He has always followed the most honorable and straightforward methods and has 
therefore gained the confidence of all who have had business dealings with him. Mr. 
Wright is a native of Kansas and a son of Richard and Elizabeth (Parker) Wright 



188 HISTORY OF OREGON 

who were born in the state of New York. When but two years of age he was taken 
by his parents to Gallatin valley in Montana, where in the early days his father 
became identitied with the stock industry, while later he engaged in ranching. 

C. F. Wright acquired a high school education and later pursued a business course 
in the State College of Montana, after which he was for a time identified with insurance 
interests. In 1S96, in association with Oscar B. Ballou, his present partner, he engaged 
in business in Great Falls, Montana, and after disposing of their interests at that 
place they came to Oregon and in 1901 established a bicycle business at Portland. 
Gradually extending their activities, they added a line of automobile accessories and 
were the pioneers in that business in Portland. They have ever followed the most 
progressive and reliable business methods and their trade has steadily grown from 
year to year until they are now owners of one of the largest enterprises of that 
character on the Pacific coast, maintaining branch establishments at Seattle and 
Spokane, Washington. Their employes number one hundred people, of whom fifty are 
at work in the Portland establishment — a four-story building on Broadway. The 
firm has purchased a desirable site at Tenth and Flanders streets and intends to erect 
within a year a modern five-story building for the conduct of their business. They 
are operating on a most extensive scale, their annual business amounting to two million 
dollars, ninety-five per cent of which is wholesale trade and the firm name is a synonym 
for reliability and progressiveness. Mr. Wright is also interested in other enterprises, 
being vice president of the Lumbermen's Trust Company and a director of the American 
Security Bank at Vancouver, Washington. He is continually broadening the scope of 
his activities with good results, carrying forward to successful completion everything 
that he undertakes. 

In 1903 Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Miss Georgia Gwynne, a former 
resident of Salem and of Welsh descent, and they have become the parents of a son, 
Arthur Frederick, who is now attending school. Mr. Wright is a charter member of 
the State Automobile Association of which he was president in 1919 and for ten years 
he has been a member of its board of directors. His interest in the welfare and up- 
building of his city is indicated by his membership in the Chamber of Commerce and 
he is also identified with the Portland Golf Club and the Irvington Club. He is like- 
wise a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite 
and also belonging to Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland. He has had 
broad experience in a business way and has been active in pushing forward the wheels 
of progress in Portland and Multnomah county. His course has been characterized by 
integrity and honor in every relation and commands for him the respect and esteem 
of all with whom he has been associated. 



ARTHUR VAN DUSEN, M. D. 

Dr. Arthur Van Dusen, a leading physician of Astoria, was born in the place of his 
present residence on the 7th of December, 1S86. He is a descendant of a fine old Dutch 
family, his grandfather having been Adam Van Dusen, who settled in New York state 
in the days of Heinrich Hudson and who crossed the plains by ox team in 1849 on 
his way to Astoria to join friends who had settled in the fur trading post established 
by another member of the New York Dutch colony at Astoria. Adam Van Dusen 
engaged as a merchant at the Astor trading post long before the city of Astoria became 
a reality. A son of Adam Van Dusen was Brenham Van Dusen, who was born in 
Astoria and still resides there, one of the city's most highly respected citizens. He 
married Fannie L. Dickinson, a member of a family of Virginia planters, her imme- 
diate ancestors coming to Oregon in the early days. Among the children born of this 
union was Arthur Van Dusen, whose name initiates this review. 

Dr. Arthur Van Dusen received his preliminary education in the grade and high 
schools of Astoria and in due time entered the University of Oregon, from which he 
was graduated in 1910. Upon deciding on a medical career he attended the North- 
western Medical College at Chicago, receiving his diploma in 1914. His first profes- 
sional experience was obtained in the Mercy Hospital of Chicago, where he remained 
for eighteen months under the late Dr. John B. Murphy, one of America's eminent 
surgeons. In 1916 Dr. Van Dusen returned to his home in Astoria and opening an 
office was soon enjoying an excellent practice, which was interrupted by the outbreak 
of the World war. Dr. Van Dusen volunteered as surgeon in the United States navy 




DR. ARTHUR VAN DUSEN 



HISTORY OF OREGON 191 

and served with the commission of senior lieutenant. For twenty months he was 
chief surgeon at the Bremerton (Wash.) Navy Yard and this, with a cruise as surgeon 
of the United States Battleship Idaho, served as a postgraduate course. At the end 
of the war he returned to Astoria and resumed his practice, which has grown to 
extensive proportions. Although the practice of Dr. Van Dusen is general, the greater 
percentage of his work is surgery. Dr. Van Dusen has never married. 

Fraternally Dr. Van Dusen is a Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree 
Of the Scottish Rite and is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and belongs to the Elks. 
In the Greek letter fraternities he is a member of Sigma Nu, a literary fraternity, and 
Of Nu Sigma Nu, a medical fraternity. In civic affairs he takes a prominent part, 
being a member of the Chamber of Commerce and being appreciative of the social 
amenities of life he is identified with many of the important clubs and social organiza- 
tions of the city. In the line of his profession. Dr. Van Dusen is a member of the 
Clatsop County Medical Society, the Oregon Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. Dr. Van Dusen is popular both in and out of the profession and is a man 
any community would be proud to claim' as a citizen. 



MATTHEW HALE DOUGLASS. 

Matthew Hale Douglass, librarian of the University of Oregon at Eugene, is a native 
of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Osage, Mitchell county, on the 16th of September, 
1874. He is a son of the Rev. T. 0. and Maria (Greene) Douglass, the former a Congre- 
gational minister. Mr. Douglass received the Bachelor of Arts degree from Grinnell 
College in 1895, while in 1898 that institution conferred upon him the degree of 
Master of Arts. His educational training well qualified him for the duties of librarian 
of Grinnell College, which position he filled from 1899 until 1908. In the latter year he 
was appointed librarian of the University of Oregon, and in this responsible position 
he is still serving. He is thoroughly efficient and capable in the discharge of the duties 
which devolve upon him in this connection and is a man of high intellectual attain- 
ments. 

At Lexington, Nebraska, on the 25th of June, 1905, Mr. Douglass was united in 
marriage to Miss Minnie Griswold, a daughter of Ira P. and Lucy M. Griswold and a 
graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Mrs. Douglass is a member of the 
faculty of the Oregon School of Music, having charge of the children's work in Piano. 
Mr. Douglass is independent in his political views and his religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Congregational church. 



JOHN P. COOLEY. 

John P. Cooley, postmaster of Brownsville, to which office he was appointed in 
1914, is one of the native sons of Oregon, for he was born near Woodburn, in Marion 
county, December 29, 1S52, his parents being Jackson and Harriet L. (Dimmick) Cooley 
the former born in Missouri and the latter in Illinois. In 1845 the father crossed the 
plains from Clay county, Missouri, to Oregon, the journey being made with ox teams. 
He was accompanied by two brothers and a sister and upon reaching this state he 
settled in Marion county, taking up a government claim, and upon this land a portion 
of the town of Woodburn is now located. He cleared and developed his claim and con- 
tinued its operation until 1S70, when he sold out and removed to Salem, where he lived 
retired throughout the remainder of his life. He passed away August 16, 1884, at the 
age of sixty-seven years and the mother's demise occurred in March, 1892, when she 
was fifty-seven years of age. They were honored pioneers of the state and were greatly 
esteemed and respected in their community. 

Their son, John P. Cooley, pursued his education in the district schools of Marion 
county and in the high school of Belle Passi. After completing his school work he was 
employed in the woolen mills at Salem, Oregon City and Brownsville, Oregon, from 
the time he was eighteen years of age until about 1913, and during that period he also 
engaged in farming to some extent. On the 12th of September, 1879, he removed to 
Brownsville and has since resided in this vicinity. In 1914 he was appointed postmaster 
of Brownsville and is now serving in that capacity, discharging the duties of that office 



192 HISTOKY OF OREGON 

with promptness and efficiency. He still has farming interests, owning twenty-seven 
and a half acres of land within the city limits of Brownsville, and this he leases to 
good advantage. He is alert, energetic and capable in the management of his business 
affairs and is known as a man of thorough reliability and integrity. 

On the 28th of November, 1875, Mr. Cooley was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
E. Cole, and they became the parents of three children, namely: Oleti P., who for the 
past ten years has been engaged in teaching school in Portland, Oregon; Albert 
Sidney, a prominent attorney of Enterprise, Oregon; and Florence M., who became 
the wife of R. H. Jonas and resides at Forest Grove, Oregon. The wife and mother 
passed away August 1, 1910, after an illness of eighteen years and her loss was deeply- 
felt by the members of her household. 

In his political views Mr. Cooley is a democrat and he has taken an active and 
prominent part in public affairs of his community, serving as mayor, councilman and 
school director, in which connections he rendered important and valuable service to his 
city. Fraternally he is identified with the United Artisans and the Masons and in 
religious faith he is a Baptist. He has always been loyal to any public trust reposed In 
him and puts forth every effort for the benefit and upbuilding of the city in which he 
makes his home. From pioneer times he has resided within the borders of Oregon and 
his career has ever been such as has reflected credit and honor upon the state. 



HOMER T. SHAVER. 



Homer T. Shaver, assistant manager of the Shaver Transportation Company, was 
born in Portland, August 27, 1891, and is a son of George M. Shaver, who is mentioned 
at length on another page of this work. Homer T. Shaver is of the third generation of 
the family resident in Portland. He was educated in the common schools and after- 
ward attended the Allen preparatory school at Portland, while from Pacific University 
at Forest Grove, Oregon, he won his Bachelor of Arts degree in June, 1913. He next 
entered the George Washington University at "Washington, D. C, and won his LL. B. 
degree in June, 1916, after which he returned to Portland and practiced law for two 
years with the firm of McDougal, McDougal & Shaver. Following the declaration of war 
he made every effort to get across but on account of the condition of his eyes was not 
accepted. However, he entered the shipyards at Vancouver, Washington, as employ- 
ment manager and was largely responsible for the upbuilding of the organization, as he 
hired all of the men for all of the yards and had four thousand men working in the 
two wood and one steel shipbuilding yards when he resigned his position in February, 
1918, to become outfitting foreman for the yards. In this position he outfitted fifteen 
ships with all necessary materials. He was in the employ of the G. M. Standifer Construc- 
tion Corporation when occupying the position of employment manager and It was 
through this association that he became interested in a newly patented steering gear 
for steam or motor vessels invented by Peter A. Johnson, foreman of maintenance work, 
and A. C. Fries, foreman of the machine shop, both of the Standifer Corporation. It is 
a Hew departure in mechanical steering gear, consisting of a device for controlling the 
rudder by air pressure instead of by steam, as is tlie general practice at the present 
time. The device has been installed on the Shaver Transportation Company's steamer 
Henderson, where it is being tried out and perfected. An official test run was recently 
made with a party of experts aboard, who were unanimous in their approval of the 
device. The attractive feature of this is its extreme simplicity. The vital parts of 
the mechanism consist only of an air compressor, pipe lines and a pair of steel cylin- 
ders which contain pistons connected directly with a transverse arm immovably fixed 
to the rudder stock. By the movement of a small hand lever in the pilotehouse, air 
under pressure is admitted to the cylinders, pressing on the forward end of one piston 
and the after end of the other at the same time, so that the rudder is quickly brought 
to any desired position. The vibration of the rudder in the stream from the propeller 
or wash of heavy seas is all absorbed by the cushions of compressed air in the cylin- 
ders. To market this device the Johnson-Fries Marine Construction Company haa 
been formed, of which Mr. Johnson is the president, Mr. Fries the vice president, 
J. C. Neill the secretary-treasurer and Homer T. Shaver the business manager. Other 
directors of the company are G. M. Shaver, A. E. Crittenden and J. C. Neill. 

In June, 1920, Homer T. Shaver was called to his present position as assistant 
manager of the Shaver Transportation Company and has thus become an official In 



HISTORY OP OREGON 193 

an organization that has been a most potent force in connection with marine transporta- 
tion in the northwest through many decades. 

On the 17th of October, 1918, Mr. Shaver was married to Miss Florence Jacobson of 
Portland, and to them has been born a daughter, Catherine Susan, who is now in her 
second year. Mr. Shaver is a Mason in his fraternal relations and belongs to the 
Multnomah Club and to several college fraternities, including the Sigma Chi and the 
Phi Delta Phi, the latter an honorary legal fraternity. During his college days he was 
captain of the college eleven and won twelve monograms in three years — something 
never achieved before. Basket-ball was the game in which he was most interested and 
most proficient. His time and energies are now largely concentrated upon his business 
affairs and he is regarded as an unusually alert, enterprising and capable young man 
— one whose future career will undoubtedly be well worth watching. 



STEPHEN P. BACH. 



Stephen P. Bach, president of the First National Bank of Lebanon and also con- 
nected with mercantile interests as president of the firm of Bach-Buhl & Company, 
engaged in general merchandising in Lebanon, is a native of Germany, his birth 
having occurred at Hoch Hansen, June 27, 1860. His parents Joseph and Rosalia 
(Bartlemay) Bach, were likewise natives of Germany, where the father engaged in 
merchandising during the greater part of his life. He passed away in March, 1892, 
and the mother survived him for but a month her death occurring in April of that year. 

Stephen P. Bach was reared and educated in Germany and after his testbooks 
were put aside he was employed for two years as clerk in a lumber-yard. In 1880, 
when twenty years of age, he crossed the ocean to the United States, becoming a 
resident of Cleveland, Ohio, where he remained for one and a half years. He then 
came to Oregon and for two years worked on a farm near Salem after which he was 
for four years employed in a grocery store conducted by John Hughes. In 1890 he 
came to Lebanon and engaged in general merchandising, in which he has continued, 
admitting George H. Buhl as a partner in 1904. Mr. Bach later became connected 
with and was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Lebanon in 1907, at 
which time he was made vice president of the institution. In 1912 the bank was 
reorganized and Mr. Bach became its president, in which capacity he has since served, 
most capably directing its affairs. He is a man of sound judgment and keen dis- 
crimination and under his management the business of the bank has steadily grown 
along substantial lines until it is today recognized as one of the sound financial 
institutions of this part of the state. It is capitalized for fifty thousand, its sur- 
plus and undivided profits amount to sixteen thousand five hundred and four dollars 
and its deposits have reached the sum of seven hundred and thirty-nine thousand, 
four hundred and seventy-two dollars. The officers of the bank are: S. P. Bach, 
president, J. C. Mayer, vice president, and Alex Power, cashier, and all are thor- 
oughly reliable business men of this section of the state. Mr. Bach is also a stock- 
holder in the Lebanon Light & Water Company and the Pacific States Fire In- 
surance Company and in addition he owns considerable city property and from these 
various lines of activity is deriving a most gratifying Income. In all that he does he 
manifests a progressive spirit. He does not fear to venture where favoring opportunity 
leads the way and opportunity is ever to him a call to action. 

In January 1891, Mr. Bach was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Sheridan, a 
daughter of John and Kate (Michaelburg) Sheridan, the former a native of Canada 
and the latter of Wisconsin. Her father became one of the pioneers of Oregon, having 
come to this state fifty years ago, and here he spent the remainder of his life, engaging 
in the occupation of farming in Linn county. He passed away in 1916 but the mother 
survives. Mr. and Mrs. Bach have become the parents of a daughter, Bessie Louise, 
who was born in November, 1893, and is yet at home. 

Mr. Bach is a democrat in his political views and has taken a prominent part 
in public affairs of his locality, serving as mayor of Lebanon, as a member of the 
city council and also on the school board and in each of these connections has rendered 
important and valuable services to the city. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and in religious faith he is a Catholic. In the 
conduct of his business affairs he has displayed sound judgment and his energy and 
enterprise have gained him recognition as one of the substantial and valued citizens 

Vol. 11—13 



194 HISTORY OP OREGON 

of his part of the state. Untiring in his activity for the public good and ever actuated 
by high and honorable purposes in all relations of life, his labors have been far-reach- 
ing and resultant. 



BENJAMIN GARDNER WHITEHOUSE. 

Character and ability are the qualities which make a man honored and which 
command for him the respect and confidence of others. The attainment of wealth has 
never, save in a few rare instances, caused a man's name to be inscribed on the pages 
of history. By reason of his fidelity to the highest standards of manhood and citizen- 
ship Ben.iamin Gardner Whitehouse won the good will and high regard of those with 
whom he came in contact and Portland long numbered him among her valued citizens. 
Mr. Whitehouse was a native of Boston, Massachusetts, born December 5, 1834. When 
he was but four years of age the family home was established at Vassalboro, Maine, 
where six years later the mother passed away and five years afterward the father 
died, leaving him an orphan at the age of fifteen years. He went to live with his 
uncle. Captain Reuben Weeks, whose kind care, insofar as possible, made up to him 
the loss of his parents. He attended the district school in the winter months and 
in the summer seasons assisted the uncle in the work of the farm until he reached 
the age of eighteen years and then went to Boston in 1852, finding employment in 
an accounting house. Ambitious to improve his education he attended a private com- 
mercial college in the evening. A year after his arrival in Boston he was advanced 
to the position of bookkeeper by the firm of Door, Proctor & Company and in the 
fall of 1856 the firm sent him to the lumber districts of Wisconsin to take charge of 
the manufacture and shipment of lumber from Green Bay to Milwaukee and Chicago. 
There were many things in frontier life that did not appeal to Mr. Whitehouse and 
after two years he returned to Boston but soon made another change, owing to the 
influence of friends who had gone to California and wrote him glowing accounts of 
the opportunities on the coast. 

In February, 1859, he started for San Francisco, journeying by steamer to Panama, 
thence by land to the western coast and arriving in San Francisco, March 22, 1S59. 
He did not find conditions there as he had anticipated and made his way northward 
to Portland where he arrived May 22, 1859. 

Through the intervening years to the time of his demise Mr. Whitehouse con- 
tinued to be a resident of the Rose City and for many years has been prominently 
known in its business circles. He was first employed as hotel clerk by S. N. Arrigoni, 
with whom he continued as long as Mr. Arrigoni remained in the hotel business. 
With the completion of the overland stage route between Portland and Sacramento 
he was appointed agent for the company and cashier for Oregon. With the building 
of the first railroad into Portland and the discontinuance of the stage line he sought 
other employment and in September, 1S66, became connected with the Portland Gas 
Light Company and the Portland Water Company, continuing with both during their 
existence. He was one of the incorporators of the former and remained a director and 
cashier of the company until it sold out. The Portland Water Works sold its plant 
to the city in 1886 and in the later years of his life Mr. Whitehouse was connected 
with the Portland Gas & Coke Company. Another biographer writing of Mr. White- 
house before his death said: "It would be difficult in the space necessarily allotted 
in a publication of this character to do justice to a life such as is briefly outlined 
above. Mr. Whitehouse is a pioneer not of ordinary type and yet possessing many 
of the characteristics that led to the settlement of the west and the erection of a 
civilization that is the wonder of the world. In him were born and bred the gentler 
virtues — the virtues that have softened the asperities of harsher natures, whose mis- 
sion it has been to make the rough places smooth, while the mission of men like Mr. 
Whitehouse has been to present living examples of the higher traits that embellish 
civilization and make home a synonym for tenderness and love. Both sorts of men 
are necessary and both have nobly performed their work. Their monument is written 
in enduring characters in the hearts of tens of thousands now living in happy homes 
and who recognize that to the pioneers they owe the blessings they enjoy today." 

Mr. Whitehouse was married December 15, 1858, to Clara Bradley Homans, the 
eldest daughter of Harrison and Sarah B. (Bradley) Homans of Vassalboro, Maine, 
the former born in the Pine Tree state and the latter in Massachusetts. 




BENJAMIN G. WHITEHOUSE 



HISTORY OF OREGON 197 

Not long after his marriage Mr. Whitehouse started for the coast, leaving his wife 
in Boston until he could arrange to have a home for her to join him. In 1862 she 
came to Portland. They became the parents of five children: Harry A., who died in 
1864, when but a year old; May Elizabeth, the wife of Henry S. Hostetter, a major 
in the United States army; Gertrude, the wife of Edward Cookingham, president 
of the Ladd & Tilton Bank, and they are the parents of Prescott W. and Holt W. Cook- 
ingham; Clara Homans, the wife of Edward L. Brown, comptroller and treasurer of 
the Northern Pacific Terminal Company of Portland and they are the parents of two 
children, Kathleen and Gardner; and Morris H., a prominent architect of Portland, 
who married Grace R. Reed of Boston, Massachusetts. Major and Mrs. Hostetter have 
two children, Patience and Marian S., who are with their parents, the major now 
being stationed at Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Whitehouse passed away May 9, 1912. He was always devoted to his family 
and found his greatest happiness at his own fireside. He was very prominently known 
in Masonic circles and upon him was conferred the honorary thirty-third degree. He 
was the first secretary and first candidate entered, passed and raised in Portland 
Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & A. M., after its organization, which lodge is now the largest 
in the state. He served as secretary of the lodge twelve years, secretary of Portland 
Royal Arch Chapter for four years, secretary of Oregon Commandery, K. T., for eighteen 
years and of the Scottish Rite bodies for twelve years. He was grand treasurer of 
the Grand Commandery of the Knights Templar for eighteen years, past almoner and 
treasurer of the Oregon Consistory for sixteen years and had served as first and only 
recorder of Al Kader Temple for twenty-two years. He was elected a life member 
of Oregon Commandery, K. T., in 1908 and for faithful services as grand treasurer of 
the Grand Commandery the honorary title of past commander was conferred upon him 
in 1908. He was coronated thirty-third degree Mason by the Supreme Council in 
Washington, D. C, January 18, 1893. Judged by every standard Mr. Whitehouse was 
a man whom to know was to esteem and honor and the sterling worth of his character 
constituted an example that might well be followed and that has caused his memory 
to be enshrined in the hearts of all who knew him. 



WILiilAM H. RICKARD. 



William H. Rickard of Benton county, is a native son of Oregon, his birth having 
occurred in the county where he now resides on the 1st of September, 1872. He is a 
son of Samuel and Susan J. (Banton) Rickard, the former born in Indiana and the latter 
in Missouri. In 1852 the father crossed the plains with his parents to Oregon, the family 
settling in Benton county, where the grandfather of William H. Rickard took up a 
homestead claim, which he cleared and developed, continuing its operation for many 
years. At length he removed to Junction City, Oregon, where he lived retired until his 
demise at the advanced age of ninety years. His wife passed away in 1915 at the 
venerable age of ninety-one years. Their son, Samuel Rickard, was educated in the 
schools of Benton county and on starting out in life for himself he took up the occu- 
pation of farming, engaging in the cultivation of one of his father's places and also 
operating rented land, continuing active along that line until his death, which occurred 
in 1891, when he was forty-one years of age. He had survived his wife for three years, 
her demise having occurred in 1888, at which time she had reached the age of thirty- 
eight years. 

William H. Rickard was reared in Benton county and there attended school, gradu- 
ating from the Bellfontain high school. For one year he was a student at the Oregon 
Agricultural College and subsequently operated rented land for a few years until he 
was able to purchase a stock ranch in Benton county. In June, 1908, he was elected 
county assessor of Benton county and as the work of the oflSce did not require all of 
his attention he also devoted part of his time to the operation of his ranch. He was a 
courteous and obliging oSicial, thoroughly fitted for the work of the office, into which 
he introduced a number of new methods which greatly facilitated the discharge of his 
duties. He displayed rare qualities as a public oflicial and that his services found favor 
with the public is indicated in the fact that reelection had made him the incumbent 
in the position for twelve years. He is careful, systematic and progressive in the 
management of his farm and his stock-raising interests are important and profitable. 

On the 12th of August, 1894, Mr. Rickard was united in marriage to Miss Ida 



198 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Purdy, a daughter of William and Julia (Johnson) Purdy, the former a native of 
New York and the latter of Lane county. Oregon. Her father emigrated to the west 
and engaged in the cultivation of a large hop yard in the vicinity of Coburg, Oregon, 
being very successful in his operations along that line. He has passed away, but the 
mother survives and is now a resident of Lebanon, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Rickard have 
become the parents of three children, namely; Clive H., Harvey L. and Elvin E. They 
are also rearing a child, William R. Purdy, who is now fifteen years of age, upon 
whom they are bestowing parental kindness and affection. 

In his political views Mr. Rickard is a democrat and his fraternal connections are 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order 
of Moose and the Woodmen of the World, while his wife is a member of the Women 
of Woodcraft. He is likewise identified with the Grange and thus keeps in touch with 
the advancement that is being made in methods of agriculture and stock raising. Mr. 
Rickard is a typical western man, wide-awake, alert and enterprising, and his career 
has been marked by steady advancement, due to his close application, his unremitting 
energy and his reliability. His lite has ever been guided by high and honorable prin- 
ciples and he is loyal to all those interests which make for honorable manhood and pro- 
gressive citizenship. 



W. N. DANIELS. 

W. N. Daniels, a dealer in produce in Portland, where he has built up a business 
of substantial and gratifying proportions, was born in western New York, December 18, 
1861, and is a son of John Quincy Adams Daniels, who removed from New England to 
New York and in the Empire state followed the occupation of farming until his death, 
which occurred when his son, W. N. Daniels of this review, was but three years of age. 
The mother bore the maiden name of Mary Ann Barker and was born on the Hudson 
river in New York but passed away before the removal of Mr. Daniels of this review 
to the west, in the spring of 1891. 

Having spent his tirst three decades in New York W. N. Daniels then sought the 
opportunities of the new and growing west, making his way to Kettle Falls, about one 
hundred miles north of Spokane, Washington. He remained there for only two nights, 
for he found the weather twenty degrees below zero and could not stand the severe cold. 
Accordingly he removed to Tacoma and thence to Olympia, where he met several old 
friends who years before had been his schoolmates, among these being Judge Milo Root 
and Carey Lattin. 

It was on the 4th of July, 1891, that Mr. Daniels arrived in Portland and here 
turned his attention to the apple packing business in the Willamette valley, while later 
he established the La Grande Creamery in Portland on the 1st of December, 1891, 
with headquarters at 12 Front street, purchasing supplies of butter, eggs and cheese for 
sale in the retail market. In 1893, in company with T. W. Russell, he established busi- 
ness on Yamhill street and after a time took over the interest of his partner. In 1914 
the building which he had been occupying was torn down and he removed to his present 
location at the corner of First and Yamhill streets. Here he handles butter, eggs. 
cheese and smoked meats. In 1901 he was Joined by his brother, John Quincy Adams 
Daniels, who came from the east, where he had formerly engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits and in the bond business, but for the past nineteen years he has been associated 
with his brother in the produce business in Portland. He is a man of fine stature, over 
six feet In height. On the 10th of June, 1890, he married Louise Dawson, a native of 
Louisville, Kentucky, but at that time a resident of Buffalo. New York. They are the 
parents of one son, John Quincy Adams Daniels, Jr., now twenty-four years of age, 
who for two years was overseas as a member of the Ninety-first Division, Three Hun- 
dred and Sixty-third Field Ambulance Corps. He participated in the terrible battle 
of the Argonne forest and had his medical kit shot off his hip. He was with the 
Ninety-first Division when the troops went over the top on the 26th of September, 1918. 
He joined Uncle Sam's forces as a medical student and came out as a corporal. At 
the time he enlisted he was studying to be a physician at the University of California 
and since his return has resumed his Interrupted studies and will graduate In the 
spring of 1921. His parents are most keenly interested in everything that is of Interest 
to their son, the family relation being almost more that of people of kindred age than 
of parent and child. 



HISTORY OF OREtiOX 199 

Both W. N. and J. Q. A. Daniels are now well known In the business circles of 
Portland, where they have long occupied a prominent and enviable position, their suc- 
cess being attributable entirely to their close application, their progressive methods, 
their alertness and their enterprise. For three decades W. N. Daniels has been identified 
with the northwest, so that he has witnessed much of its development, and as the 
years have passed his aid has always been given to the work of general progress and 
improvement as well as to the upbuilding of his own fortunes. 



JOHN H. CARSON. 



John H. Carson, who since 1920 has served as district attorney of Marion county, 
is ably discharging his duties in this connection, for his knowledge of the law is com- 
prehensive and exact and he is most capably looking after the interests of the public. 
He is one of Oregon's native sons, his birth having occurred in Salem, November 2, 
1894. His father, John A. Carson, was born in Lurgan, Ireland, and emigrated to 
Canada, whence he made his way to Salem, Oregon, in 188S. While residing in Canada 
he was admitted to the bar and on coming to Oregon he was admitted to the bar on 
motion. He became one of the leading members of the bar of the state and one of his 
most notable cases was that In which he defended E. C. Hasey in the famous Guggen- 
heim railroad case in Alaska, around which Rex Beach built his story entitled "The 
Iron Trail. " Mr. Carson also became prominent in public affairs, serving as a member 
of the state senate from 1911 until 1913. In Toronto, Canada, he married H^en Fraser 
:.nd they became the parents of five children: Mrs. Hugh C. McCammon, Catherine C. 
John H., Allen G. and Wallace P. Mr. Carson passed away at Salem on the 7th of 
December, 1916. His widow survives and is yet a resident of this city. 

Their son, John H. Carson, attended the public schools of Salem and Mount Angel 
College, later becoming a student at Willamette University, where he won his LL. B. 
degree upon the completion of a law course. He also studied law in his father's office, 
which he now occupies, being a member of the firm of Carson and Brown, the Junior 
partner having also been associated with Mr. Carson's father in practice. They have 
been very successful in the trial of cases and have been accorded a good clientage. Mr. 
Carson is a strong and able lawyer, clear and concise in his presentation of a case, 
logical in his deductions and sound in his reasoning, while in the application of legal 
principles he is seldom, if ever, at fault. His fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth 
and ability, called him to public office and in 1920 he was elected district attorney of 
Mirion county, in which capacity he Is now serving, his official record being a most 
creditable one, characterized by conscientious and efficient work In behalf of the public. 

In October, 1920, Mr. Carson was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle Jane Albright, 
a representative of one of the old and prominent families of Clackamas county. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. Although one of the younger members of the legal fraternity, 
he is making continuous and rapid progress in his profession and is proving a worthy 
successor of his father, being endowed with much of the talent and legal acumen pos- 
sessed by the latter. When but twenty-one years of age he was admitted to the bar 
of Salem and some time before this had successfully passed the required examination, 
thus indicating his unusual mental attainments. He holds to high standards in pro- 
fessional service, has great respect for the dignity of his calling and zealously devotes 
his energies to hs profession. He is nccounted one of Salem's most valued citizens 
and enjoys the esteem and regard of a large circle of friends. 



GEORGE A. WILHELM. 

George A. Wilhelm, member of the firm of A. Wilhelm & Sons, automobile dealers 
of Junction City and also engaged in the operation of flour mills, is a native son of 
Oregon, his birth having occurred at Monroe, in Benton county. May 14, 1884. He is 
a son of Adam and Elizabeth (Miller) Wilhelm, the former a native of Germany, while 
the latter was born in Metz, France. When a child the father was brought to America 
by his parents, who located in Wisconsin, where the grandfather of George A. Wilhelm 
engaged in the hotel business. In the early '708 he came to Oregon, settling at Monroe, 



200 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Benton county, and here he continued to make his home until his demise. His son, 
Adam Wilhelm, was reared and educated in Wisconsin and in the late '60s came to 
Oregon, first hecoming a resident ot Corvallis, remaining there for two years and then 
removing to Monroe. There he engaged in general merchandising and also conducted 
a grain business and is still active along those lines, now operating under the firm 
style of A. Wilhelm & Sons. They also have flour mills and are extensively engaged in 
the automobile business, being proprietors of a large garage at Junction City, and are 
likewise maintaining establishments of that character at Corvallis and Monroe, Oregon. 
Mr. Wilhelm has thus become a prominent and successful business man of his part of the 
state and is highly respected in the community where he resides. The mother is de- 
ceased, her demise having occurred in California in 1915. 

Their son, George A. Wilhelm, was reared and educated at Monroe, Oregon, complet- 
ing his studies at Columbia University of Portland, after which he was for two years 
connected with the Title & Trust Company of that city. In 1908 he became manager of 
the Junction City Milling Company, operated by the firm of A. Wilhelm & Sons, and is 
now acting in that capacity. In the above mentioned year they also established an 
automobile business at Junction City, of which Mr. Wilhelm acts as manager, and 
under his able direction the business has enjoyed a continuous growth, branch estab- 
lishments being maintained at Corvallis and Monroe, Oregon. They are agents for the 
Overland and Dodge cars and in 1920 erected a fine modern garage one hundred by one 
hundred and twenty-five feet in dimensions. They are recognized as thoroughly reliable^ 
business men and their progressive methods and excellent service have secured for them 
a large patronage. They are also extensively interested in farm lands in Lane and Ben- 
ton countiee, from which they derive a substantial source of revenue. 

In June, 1910, Mr. Wilhelm was united in marriage to Miss Evelyn Martin of Monroe, 
Oregon, and they have become the parents of three children: Margaret E., who was born 
June 12, 1912; George A., Jr., born June 30, 1917; and Mary A., whose birth occurred 
on the 30th of October, 1919. 

Mr. Wilhelm gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Catholic church, while his fraternal connec- 
tions are with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Columbus. 
He is a man of high personal standing, of marked business integrity and ability, and 
the sterling worth of his character is recognized by all with whom he has been 
associated. 



LESTER MARTIN LEHRBACH, M. D. 

Although one of the youngest members of his profession in Douglas county, Lester 
Martin Lehrbach is readily conceded to be one of the leading physicians and surgeons, 
and he has built up a practice so extensive that it covers the entire county. He was 
born in Wisconsin, a son ot Nicholas and Delia M. (Kidder) Lehrbach, his father 
being a native of Buffalo, New York, where his great-grandfather settled many years 
ago and where he became known as one of the most successful ot old-time merchants 
in Erie county. The grandfather of our subject was a pioneer ot Minnesota, settling at 
Red Wing, and there it was that Nicholas Lehrbach resided until his removal with 
his family to Wisconsin. There he is still living and is acting as an official of the United 
States government. 

Dr. Lester Martin Lehrbach received his primary education in the public schools 
of Wisconsin and his higher training at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, from 
which institution he entered the Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. 
After graduating in 1906 with the degree of M. D., he went to La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
where he served as an interne at St. Francis Hospital. In 1907 he located in Oregon 
and practiced in Junction City for five years. While there he was elected to the city 
council and was president of the Commercial Club. Failing health caused his retire- 
ment from practice for about a year and upon recovering he located in Roseburg in 
1913 and there he has practiced continuously since. He has built up an extensive 
practice and while it is now general he is in a sense a specialist and hopes at some 
future time to devote himself to surgery of the brain and nervous system, in which 
branch he promises a brilliant future. 

In the line of his profession Dr. Lehrbach is a member of the Southern Oregon 
Medical Society, the Oregon State Medical Society and the American Medical Associa- 




DR. LESTER M. LEHRBACH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 203 

tion. Along fraternal lines he is a Mason, being past master o£ the blue lodge, a 
Knights Templar and a Shriner, and he is likewise an Elk and an Odd Fellow. During 
the World war Dr. Lehrbach was very active in war drives and other patriotic move- 
ments. The duties of good citizenship do not rest lightly upon the shoulders of Dr. 
Lehrbach and he does all in his power toward the betterment of the general welfare 
of the community. He is an earnest student of his profession, keeps in touch with its 
advancement and employs the most modern methods in his practice. 



NEWTON CRABTREE. 



Newton Crabtree, an honored pioneer of Oregon and a representative of one of its 
oldest families, his parents having arrived in this state in 1845, is now engaged in 
cultivating a tract of fifty acres of rich and arable land three miles south of Scio. He 
was born near The Dalles, Oregon, October 22, 1845, and is a son of John J. and Melinda 
(Yeary) Crabtree, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Kentucky. At an 
early day the father went to Missouri, where he resided for about five years, and in 
1845 he started from Independence, that state, for Oregon, traveling with ox teams and 
wagons. The party set out on their journey in May and it was not until November that 
they arrived in Vancouver, Washington. Upon their arrival at The Dalles they con- 
structed a raft, upon which they placed their seven wagons, and in that manner pro- 
ceeded down the Columbia river to Vancouver. They spent the winter in Yamhill 
county, Oregon, and in the following spring made their way to Linn county, where the 
father took up a donation land claim. He at once set about the arduous task of clear- 
ing and developlEg his land and after many years of persistent and unremitting labor 
he succeeded in bringing his farm to a high state of productivity, becoming the owner 
of a most valuable property. He was one of the real builders of the west, who bravely 
endured all the hardships and privations of frontier life and aided in laying broad and 
deep the foundation upon which has been built the present progress and prosperity 
of the country. He became a man of prominence in his community and it was in his 
honor that the town of Crabtree was subsequently named. He reared a family of fif- 
teen children, five of whom were born in Virginia, five in Missouri and five in Oregon, 
and six of his sons participated in the Washington and Rogue River Indian wars. The 
twin brother of the subject of this review was Jasper Crabtree, who died about 1890. 
The father passed away on the 28th of March, 1892, at the venerable age of ninety-two 
years, while the mother survived him for six years, her demise occurring in 1898, when 
she had reached the advanced age of ninety years. They were truly cast in heroic 
mold. Braving the dangers of the unknown west they courageously faced the hard- 
ships and privations of that long and arduous journey, devoting their lives to the 
redemption of the Pacific coast region and counting no sacrifice too great that was 
made for the benefit of their home locality. 

Newton Crabtree was reared and educated in Linn county and has here spent his 
life. He attended district school, the schoolhouse being a log cabin, for the country 
was then wild and undeveloped and the Indians far outnumbered the white settlers. 
On reaching mature years he took up the occupation of farming, cultivating a tract 
of land which his father had given him. This he further improved and developed 
and subsequently purchased additional land, but later disposed of the greater portion 
of his holdings, retaining fifty acres, which he is now operating. He has ever followed 
the most progressive methods in the cultivation of the soil and his unabating energy 
and well directed efforts have won for him a substantial measure of success. His land 
is rich and productive and its value is much enhanced by a small stream which runs 
through the farm and which was named Crabtree creek in honor of his father. 

In October, 1871, Mr. Crabtree was united in marriage to Miss Frances Wilson 
and they became the parents of five children: Fred, who died November 26, 1894; 
Nellie, whose demise occurred on the 4th of March, 1906; Maggie, who is the wife of 
Frank Sommer, a farmer of Linn county; Flo, who married C. C. Smith and resides 
in Portland, Oregon; and May, the wife of Arthur Lettenmaier of Oregon City. The 
wife and mother died November 16, 1915, after an illness of six months, and on the 
9th of February, 1920, Mr. Crabtree was married to Emma Bann. 

In his political views Mr. Crabtree is a democrat and he has taken an active part 
in public affairs of his community, serving for many years as a member of the school 
board, while for a quarter of a century he acted as clerk of that body. Fraternally 



204 HISTORY OP OREGON 

he is identified witli the Indepedent Order of Odd Fellows, which order he joined on 
the 3d of November. 18S0, and his religious faith is indicated hy his membership in 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Oregon Pioneers Society 
and is one of the oldest residents of the state, having spent the entire period of his 
life, covering seventy-five years, within its borders. He remembers when the country 
was wild and undeveloped, with only a few scattered dwellings to show that the seeds 
of civilization had been planted. The passing years have brought their influx of 
settlers, and with interest he has watched changing events and in considerable measure 
has contributed to the development of the community, his aid and influence being ever 
on the side of progress and improvement. He has led a busy, active and useful life 
and is widely known and universally honored. 



BUSHROD WASHINGTON WILSON. 

Those forces which have contributed most to the development, improvement and 
benefit of the state of Oregon received an impetus from the labors of Bushrod Wash- 
ington Wilson, whose name is written high on the roll of the honored dead who were 
among the builders and promoters of the great northwest. He was distinctively a 
man of affairs and one who wielded a wide influence. Persistency of purpose and 
unfaltering enterprise enabled him to accomplish his purpose where men of less resolute 
spirit would have failed and in all that he undertook he was actuated by high ideals 
that sought the benefit of his home locality and of the state at large. 

Mr. Wilson was born at Columbia Falls, Maine, July IS, 1S24, and came of a long 
line of hardy forbears. The first representative of the Wilson family in America was 
Gowan Wilson, who in the year 1657 emigrated to this country from Scotland, while 
on the maternal side the ancestral record is traced back to the Pineo family of French 
Huguenots, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1617. Mr. Wilson's maternal grandmother, 
Eliza Pineo, was a cousin of Captain Robert Gray of Boston, who on the 11th of May, 
1792, sailed his ship into the great waterway of the west, to which he gave the name 
Columbia river. Gladly and devoutly she welcomed the explorer home and she ever 
afterward held the hope that some one of her descendants might journey hence and 
explore and aid in the development of that vast unknown portion of our continent later 
to be known as the Oregon territory. 

When Bushrod W. Wilson was ten years old his father removed with his family 
to New York city, where he engaged in business as a millwright. Bushrod, or "Bush," 
as he was called, displayed his energetic spirit by obtaining employment as an office 
boy, first working for Commodore Vanderbilt and later for Horace Greeley, and many 
times, at the end of a hard day's work in the editorial oflices of the old Courier and 
Enquirer, predecessor to the New York Tribune, he slept with Mr. Greeley on bales 
of scrap paper in the press rooms of that publication. During this period Samuel F. 
B. Morse maintained a small, dark office for experimental purposes in the building in 
which the boy was employed and taking a notion to Bushrod he exhibited to the boy 
the first model of the telegraph invention which was soon afterward to electrify the 
world and change the course of communication the world over. 

In 1842, when a young man of eighteen years, Mr. Wilson embarked at New Bed- 
ford, Massachusetts, on the whaling ship Harvest, under command of Captain Tabor, on a 
cruise of three years for whales in the waters of the North Pacific, thus fulfilling the 
desires of his grandmother, Eliza Pineo. He sailed near the breakers off what is now 
known as Lane, Lincoln and Tillamook counties, where he saw the burnt trees which 
to this day point spectral heads heavenward. After the whaling voyage was ended 
he remained for some time in New York and New England, but when the rush to 
California started in 1849, he sailed around the Horn in the ship William Gray, and 
there, with all the crew, abandoned the ship and went to the mines. After a few 
months' fruitlessly spent in the gold districts of the Sierras, he sailed as a passenger 
on the schooner Reindeer up the coast to the mouth of the Umpqua river in Oregon, and 
from there, in company with one shipmate named Barrett, he walked across the coast 
mountains into the Willamette valley. On arriving at the mouth of the St. Marys 
river the two young men obtained employment from William F. Dixon, whose family 
and that of J. C. Avery constituted the first and only settlers at this point, where 
now stands the city of Corvallis. 

It was not long before Mr. Wilson began to take an active part in the develop- 



HISTORY OF OREGON 205 

ment of the Oregon country. At the time of his arrival, in 1850, the population of the 
Willamette valley was meager and the homesteads were widely scattered. There 
was a growing demand for certain manufactured articles and other necessities to be 
brought here from the east and abroad and the Willamette river afforded an avenue 
of transportation the full length of the great valley, one hundred and forty miles 
in extent. He accordingly entered upon the transportation business by means of a 
long bateau, or pole-boat, and plied this avocation a year or more. The lure of the 
land, however, soon seized him and he took up a homestead claim in Benton county, 
which he cleared and developed, continuing its cultivation for some time. He then 
sold his land and started on an expedition to the Owyhee mines of southern Idaho in 
1861, where he purchased and operated mining claims on the river, meeting with a 
substantial measure of success in that venture. It was during that period that he 
also built for Moses Wright the first ferry across the Snake river at a point where 
the town of Lewiston now stands. This he operated for a short time and then returned 
to Benton county, Oregon, where he was called to public office, being elected to the 
position of deputy county clerk in 1862. He was subsequently chosen county clerk, 
to which office he was reelected for fifteen consecutive terms, serving an uninterrupted 
period of thirty years. 

In 1894 he retired from public life to devote his entire attention to his business 
affairs, which had become extensive and important. Ever zealous and enthusiastic 
over the possibilities of Oregon as a great factor in the worth of the nation, in 1874 
Mr. Wilson organized a corporation known as the Willamette Valley & Coast Railroad 
Company, which was designed to construct a railroad from Yaquina bay on the west 
shore of Benton county, across the state of Oregon to a connection with an eastern 
road then building westward, namely the Chicago & Northwestern, thus to effect a 
transcontinental system. Advancing from his own funds the necessary money for 
the surveys, he soon secured the support of other stanch citizens of the state. Including 
the names of G. W. Houck, R. S. Strahan, J. B. Lee, John Kelsay, Sol King, B. R. 
Biddle, P. A. Chenoweth, J. R. Bayley, S. N. Lilly, J. S. Palmer, H. Plickinger, J. C. 
Avery, James Chambers, Henry Toomey, Samuel Case, W. B. Hamilton, J. M. Currier, 
M. Jacobs, T. E. Cauthorn, John Harris, Ashby Pearce, I. B. Henkle, B. R. Job, W. P. 
Ready, J. F. Henkle, J. A. Yantis, Thomas Graham, G. R. Parra, Frank Butler, Herbert 
Symons, F. Cauthorn, Cecil H. Coote. James McLain, A. M. Witham and Zephin' Job, 
all of whom were incorporators or stockholders of the original Willamette Valley & 
Coast Railroad Company or its subsidiaries, the Oregon Pacific Railroad Company, 
now the Corvallis & Eastern, and the Oregon Development Company. These intrepid 
and sturdy pioneers entered enthusiastically into the consummation of their various 
development enterprises and succeeded, despite financial depressions and obstacles 
interposed by jealous competitors of other proposed transcontinental systems, in build- 
ing the most difiicult portion of their system from the coast to the summit of the 
Cascade mountains and establishing a five-day steamer service, with three fifteen- 
hundred ton steamers, between Yaquina bay and San Francisco, with daily train service 
to all points on the line of the railroad. The beneficial result of this system was 
immediately shown by the decline in freight rates of fifty per cent into Willamette 
valley points, which rates were maintained as long as the transportation system of 
Bushrod W. Wilson and his associates was in their own control. Mr. Wilson also 
gave his support to the building of the Oregon & California Railroad from San Francisco 
to Portland and was instrumental in obtaining a federal appropriation for the develop- 
ment of the harbor at Yaquina bay. He thus took an active and helpful part in pro- 
moting the work of public progress and improvement and left the impress of his 
individuality for good upon many lines of the state's development and upbuilding. 

In 1855 Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Priscilla Owsley Yantis, a daugh- 
ter of James M. Yantis, who crossed the plains from Missouri to Oregon in 1852, casting 
in his lot with the early settlers of Linn county. He was a Presbyterian in religious faith 
and an active and zealous worker in behalf of the church, organizing, in association with 
his brother, J. Lapsley Yantis, and others, the first churches of this denomination in the 
northwest, these being at Marysville, now Corvallis, and at Portland. In the early days, 
in order to supply the pulpits of both churches. Dr. Lapsley Yantis would make the ride 
of ninety miles to Portland and return in all kinds of weather, every two weeks, holding 
services alternate weeks in the two cities. Mrs. Wilson came of a family long repre- 
sented in this country, the Yantises and Hamiltons settling in Virginia prior to the 
Revolutionary war and subsequently migrating to Kentucky wih Daniel Boone, while 
later they became residents of Missouri and Oregon. Mrs. Wilson proved a noble 



HISTORY OF OREGON 




until the death of her husband the aims and am- 
^ther «<»« tbe aormntf ferment of both, to vhi<± they set their hearts and 
at purpose, and with a well defined vision of the ultimate great- 
. They becaaae the parents of thirteen children, nine of whom 
of the number attaining positions of prominence in 
Those who survived Mr. Wilson were; Lafayette 
Hamilton. Robert Justice. Thomas Edwin. Minnie 
WashingTMi. Jr. 
palitxal Tievs Mr. WOsmt was a republican and a leader of the party in 
to beeoDie a candidate for the offices of govemm-, 
or Uaited States seaator. bat dedined to serve in a public capacity, owing 
by the manassnent of his extensive btisiness 
Always alire tn tbe daago^ of bad legislation, he was a stanch opponent 
to lie best interests of the pec^le of the state. 
of wtalker tk^ affected his locality alone or were state-wide, and he was 
ia his MMMUMt of laeasHres calcalated to beneSt all of the people of 
practical methods in their attainment. 
to the state. He passed away at 
4. 19Mi at the age at sevesty-six, and Ors^a therein lost c»e of its 
who had left his Impress upon the 
its 



vss h«m ia »«— Wi- Getsaay. Jaly 28, 1848. a^ speait his early Hie ia his aative 

eoaatiy baft cnae ia the ^iw voM ia yaaae ■aahnni aad vas nairied ia Nev Toik 

am me TAtt liay. ISC. to : 

la 

tliis dty 
Xr. Xie«r p aii hi Id a hatf iaienEt ia tte hTian at 

AA streets. Ia UM they 





HISTORY OF OREGON 207 

Grace R., who married Julius L. Meier, of the firm of Meier i Frank, and who is now 
the mother of three children — Jean. Elsa and Julius L.; and M. Monte, who married 
Mildred Rheinstrom of Portland, and has one son. Richard. Like his father, M. Monte 
Mayer is a most progressiTe. energetic and alert business man and carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes. His policy in relation to his em- 
ployes is a most liberal one, actuated by a kindly spirit, for the factory doees upon 
Friday night and business is not resumed until Monday morning, thus glring all em- 
ployes a good rest. Moreover, he is greatly interested in all civic interests of Portland. 
supporting all those activities which have to do with the upbuilding of the city and 
the maintenance of high standards of citiienship. He finds recreation in motoring, 
to which he turns when leisure permits, but his business affairs make large d^nands 
upon his time and energies. His interests have constantly grown in volume and im- 
portance and he is today a well known representative of the commercial and manu- 
facturing activity of Portland. 



HENRY WAG.VER. 



Strong and purposeful, his resources and industry resulting in the accomplish- 
ment of his well defined plans. Henry Wagner has reacaed a creditable position in 
connection with the business interests of Portland. He has an extremely wide acquaint- 
ance in this city, for here his entire life has been passed. His birth occurred here on 
the 5th of September, 1S64, his father being John Wagner, who was bom in Hessen. 
Germany. The father continued to make his home in Germany until 1S51. when attract- 
ed by the opportunities of the new world, he came to the United States, being then a 
youth of fifteen. For a brief period he remained in Xew York but afterward became 
a resident of New Orleans and in the year 1S5S he arrived in San Francisca After four 
years spent upon the Pacific coast he took up his abode in Portland and continued to 
make this city his home until his life's labors were ended in death. No native-born 
citizen displayed greater loyalty to America or a loftier patriotism. He was a most 
active and helpful member of many societies and did everything in his power to pit>- 
mote the growth, extend the business relations and maintain the high civic standards ot 
Portland and the state of Oregon. In early manhood he married Miss Charlotte Hergen- 
roeder. also a native of Hessen, Germany, who passed away in Portland in 1S97. leaving 
two sons. Henry and Alexander, the latter for many years note teller in the First 
National Bank of Portland. The father passed away in 190" when he reached the 
seventy-first milestone on life's journey. 

Henry Wagner displayed marked aptitnde in his studies and was but thirteen 
years of age when he had completed the course at school. He started upon his business 
career by securing employment with C. .\. Landenberger. newspaper publisher, and 
later he attended the Portland Business College in further preparation for the respcm- 
sible duties of business life. When fourteen years of age he obtained a position in 
the dry goods house of Lewis & Strauss, with whom he continued for four years, and 
then he decided that the practice of law would prove a more congenial and perhaps a 
more remunerative business than that cf merchandising. With the end in view of 
becoming a member of the bar he began reading law under the direction of Ellis G. 
Hughes and in 1SS6 was admitted to practice at the October term of the supreme court. 
The following year he took up the wor's of the profession and concentrated his ener- 
gies upon building up a practice. He won many clients and was connected with much 
important litigation. In 1S96 he was elected to the state legislatnre on the republican 
ticket and took his seat as a member of the general assembly. The following year he 
became connected with the Henry Weinhard bwwery and upon the death of Mr. Wein- 
hard in 1904 became one cf the managers of the estate and has so continued to the 
present time. 

On the 21st of June. 1S93. Mr. Wagner was married to Miss Louise Henrietta 
Weinhard, daughter of Henry Weinhard. She passed away October 24. 1905. leaving a 
son, Henry Weinhard Wagner, who was educated in the Portland .\cademy. 

In .social snd musical, as well as business circles. Mr. Wagner has long occupied 
a prominent position. He was one of the organizers of the .\rion Society and of the 
Boyer Glee Club. He also aided in the organization of the Orchestral Union, which 
flourished between ISSl and 1S92. He served five years in the Oregon National Guard 
in Company G — a company noted for its excellency in drill. He has been a valued 



208 HISTORY OP OREGON 

member for many years of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Commercial Club and 
belongs to the Waverly Golf Club, Hunt Club, Arlington Club, Multnomah Athletic Club, 
German Aid Society and Portland Social Turn Verein. His keenest interest outside of 
business is perhaps felt in music, and he has done much to advance the art in Portland 
and to promote a love of music among his fellow townsmen. A lifelong resident of the 
city, he has in every way been loyal to its interests and upbuilding, and he has, more- 
over, in many ways contributed to its progress, leaving the impress of his individuality 
for good upon the development of both city and state. 



WILLIAM CLIFTON CULBERTSON. 

William Clifton Culbertson, one of the best known hotel proprietors on the Pacific 
coast, conducting both the Cornelius and the Seward Hotels of Portland, was born in 
RoUa, Missouri, September 12, 1874. He acquired his education in the place of his 
nativity, supplementing his public school training by study in the William Jewell College 
of Missouri, subsequent to which time he took up the study of law at Liberty, Mis- 
souri, and was admitted to the bar in 1897. He next went to Kansas City, Missouri, 
and became one of the firm of Wallace & Culbertson, in which connection he practiced 
for two years. He then severed his partnership relations but continued an active 
member of the bar of Kansas City, until March, 1913. During his residence there 
he served as a member of the upper house of the city council, and it was largely 
due to his efforts, that the Union depot of Kansas City, was built. 

When Mr. Culbertson left Missouri in 1913, he went to Montana and there en- 
gaged in raising stock on his ranch of eight hundred and twenty-five acres. This 
business he pursued very successfully. In fact at every point in his career he seemed 
to have reached the possibility for the attainment of success at that point. He certainly 
deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, for he was left an orphan at a 
very early age and has long been dependent upon his own resources. He learned 
the printer's trade in his youthful days but was ambitious to make his efforts count 
for much more than he could hope to do if he remained at the printer's trade, and thus 
he qualified for the bar and was admitted to practice. The success there attained 
enabled him to take up stock raising in Montana. In 1919 he came to Portland and 
purchased the Cornelius and Seward Hotels, two of the finest hotel properties in the 
city. He is conducting both of these himself, and there is never a day that he does 
not go through his hotels from basement to garret. He has the best help in the state, 
as he aflirms, and he employs ninety people. There is thorough cooperation between 
employer and employee. His hotels are famous for their management and service 
and "spotless town" appearance. Mr. Culbertson believes in attaining the highest 
standards in hotel service and has made a close study of what the public desires in 
the way of hotel accommodations. 

Through his interest in affairs for the advancement of Portland, Mr. Culbertson 
at once became prominent in the city and has long ranked as one of the most progres- 
sive and enterprising residents here. In his fraternal relations, he is a Mason of 
high rank; is a member of the Mystic Shrine and also a member of the Elks. He be- 
longs to the Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the Kiwanis Club. He likewise 
holds membership in the Portland Ad Club, of which he is one of the directors for 1921, 
the City Club, the Press Club and in the Progressive Business Men's Club, of which he 
is one of the trustees. 

In 1919 Mr. Culbertson was married to Mrs. Catherine Bateson, a native of 
Pennsylvania. She is one of the prominent ladies of Portland and has been very active 
in assisting her husband. It was she who originated the slogans for the two hotels: 
for the Seward Hotel the slogan is "House of Cheer," and for the Cornelius Hotel, 
"House of Welcome," and these slogans have made both of the hotels famous through- 
out the northwest. By her former marriage Mrs. Culbertson has a son, Cornelius 
Bateson, who is sixteen years of age and a young man of fine character. He is now 
five feet, seven and a half inches in height and weighs one hundred and seventy pounds. 
He Is attending the Benson Polytechnic school, pursuing a technical course, and his 
ambition is to be a scientific farmer. Mr. Culbertson has not only gained the respect 
but also the love of his step-son and a close companionship exists between them. 
Mr. Culbertson is a broadly read man and one who always looks at life from a sane 
standpoint. He is always appreciative of the good in others and accepts their faults 




WILLIAM CLIFTON CULBERTSON 



HISTORY OP OREGON 211 

as just human characteristics. He has a host of friends and possesses a wonderful 

faculty for retaining their regard. His earnest and genial manner impresses all who 

meet him with his sincerity, and the sterling worth of his character is evident to 
those who come in contact with him. 



J. M. POWELL, M. D. 



The name of Powell has ever been an honored one in connection with the pioneer 
development and later progress of the state of Oregon and Dr. J. M. Powell, living at 
Monmouth, virtually retired, now looking after his orchard and farm interests, after 
more than forty years of professional work, has been actuated by the spirit of advance- 
ment and enterprise which dominated his forbears and which has been a most effective 
force in the upbuilding of the west. He was born near Albany, in Linn county, Oregon, 
in April, 1852, a son of Franklin S. and Louisa J. (Peeler) Powell, the former a native 
of niinois. The latter was born in Tennessee but was reared in Illinois. The first repre- 
sentative of the family in America settled in Virginia and the name has long been a 
prominent and honored one in the United States. The paternal grandfather, John A. 
Powell, crossed the plains to Oregon in 1851 as captain of a train of emigrants and 
locating in Linn county, took up a donation claim which he cleared and developed and 
also erected a sawmill. He likewise organized and built a church, of which he became 
pastor and served till his death. He was the first missionary Christian minister in 
Oregon, his labors constituting a far-reaching and effective force for good. He was a 
man of prominence in his community and was called to a number of public offices, 
being at all times loyal to the trust reposed in him. He passed away in June, 1881, and 
his wife died about 1887. 

His son, Franklin S. Powell, followed the occupation of farming in his native state 
until 1851, when with his wife he crossed the plains to Oregon as a member of the 
company of which his father was captain, being five months in making the Journey, 
which in those early days was a most hazardous and diflScult one. He was at that time 
about twenty-one years of age and had married just before starting on the trip. Upon 
arriving in the state he took up as a donation claim a half section of prairie land in the 
vicinity of the present site of Albany and this he developed, adding many improvements 
thereto and continuing active in its operation until about 1872, when he leased the -prop- 
erty and removed to Monmouth, Polk county, where he took an active part in supporting 
the college, church and all civic affairs, being a liberal contributor and a large stock- 
holder in building a local railroad. Here he purchased a half section, which is now the 
property of his widow and sons, and for many years engaged in operating his land, 
converting it into a valuable and productive tract, but at length took up his permanent 
abode in Monmouth, where he lived retired throughout the remainder of his life. He 
was very successful in his farming operations and became the possessor of a sub- 
stantial competence, which he had acquired through years of hard and unremitting 
toil. While residing in Linn county he served as justice of the peace, school director, 
and also was master of the first Grange in that section, while his wife, who had success- 
fully followed the profession of teaching in Illinois, became teacher of the first school 
in their neighborhood. Wherever he lived he was called upon for public service by his 
fellow townsmen, who recognized his worth and ability and his public-spirited devotion 
to duty. While residing in Polk county he was chosen to represent his district in the 
state legislature and served during 1889 and 1890 as a member of that law-making 
body, giving earnest support to all the bills which he believed would prove beneficial to 
the commonwealth. While serving as a legislator he was instrumental in having Chris- 
tian College at Monmouth taken over by the state as a normal school, and as chairman 
of the board of trustees of the college he turned over to the state the ten acres of land 
nccupietl by the institution and also its buildings. He was one of the most prominent stock 
raisers in the state and while operating his farm in Linn county was one of the first 
to introduce pure bred Merino sheep into that section, while during his residence in 
Polk county he raised pure bred Cotswold sheep and Angora goats and cattle and he 
led his community in large wheat yields. He was one of the honored pioneer settlers 
of Oregon who shared in the hardships and privations of frontier life and aided in 
laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present progress 
and prosperity of the commonwealth. Mr. Powell passed away at Monmouth, Decem- 
ber 4, 1916, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, but his widow survives and is 



212 HISTORY OF OREGON 

residing at Monmouth, having attained the venerable age of ninety-one years. Her 
reminiscences of the early days are most interesting and she is widely known and uni- 
versally honored and esteemed. 

The son, J. M. Powell, pursued his education in the schools of Linn and Polk 
counties and later entered Christian College at Monmouth, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1873 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1881 the degree of Master of Arts 
was conferred by the same institution. He became a student in the medical department 
of the University of California, from which he was graduated with the class of 1876, 
and afterward opened an office in Monmouth and engaged in practice for a short time. 
Subsequently he removed to Lebanon, where he became associated in practice with 
Ex-Governor Ballard of Idaho, who was a prominent pioneer and politician in Oregon, 
and this relationship was maintained for three years, when he succeeded Dr. Ballard 
and commanded a large field of practice. In 1887 Dr. Powell became a resident of 
Spokane, Washington, and there successfully practiced his profession until 1918. 
Actuated by the laudable ambition to advance in his profession, he has ever been a 
close and discriminating student and in 1887 he pursued a postgraduate course in the 
University of California, while in 1896 he took postgraduate work in Chicago, thus 
greatly promoting his skill and efficiency. Since 1896 he has specialized in major and 
minor surgery and in this branch of the profession has been very successful, his pro- 
nounced ability winning for him a large practice. In 1918 Dr. Powell returned to Polk 
county, Oregon, where he has since resided. He is much interested in scientific fruit 
raising and is devoting the greater part of his attention to his farming interests, but his 
ability as a writer and lecturer on scientific subjects gives him diversion. In connec- 
tion with his brothers he has an orchard of sixty acres, specializing in the raising of 
cherries, prunes, filberts and walnuts. He also grows grain and clover and is Interested 
in the raising of sheep, his scientific and practical methods winning for him a gratifying 
measure of success in each line of activity. In addition he is the owner of property 
in Spokane and is a man of enterprise and business acumen, who is bound to succeed in 
anything which he undertakes. 

In August, 1881, Dr. Powell was united in marriage to Miss Ada Cheadle, a vocalist, 
who passed away in January, 1915, after an illness of three years. The two children 
of this marriage are Richard C. and Cora L. They have been accorded excellent educa- 
tional advantages. The son is a graduate of the University of California, where he 
pursued a scientific course. He is now chief engineer with the Pacific Electric Com- 
pany at San Francisco, California. The daughter is a talented musician and also pos- 
sesses ability as a linguist, conversing fluently in several languages. She completed her 
musical education in Berlin under excellent instructors, with whom she remained as a 
student for three years, and she has become noted as a pianist, ranking with the best 
artists in the country. She made several European tours during her stay in that coun- 
try and now resides in Spokane, Washington. 

In his political views Dr. Powell is a republican and his services have often been 
sought in public connections, but his professional duties leave him little time for outside 
activities. He is, however, intensely interested in educational work and while residing 
in Spokane served for several years as a member of the school board, assisting in the 
work of consolidating five schools, and he was also instrumental in securing the erec- 
tion of the large high school in that city. He is ably carrying forward the educational 
work, instituted by his honored father and has done much to raise the standards of 
education in both Washington and Oregon, realizing its value as a means of preparing 
the young for the practical and responsible duties of life. He is a member of the Oregon 
Fruit Growers Association and was the first United States examiner of pensions at 
Lebanon, serving in that capacity from about 1882. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Woodmen of the World and the Neighbors of Woodcraft and his professional con- 
nections are with the American Medical Association, the Washington State Medical 
Society and the Spokane County Medical Society, becoming one of the organizers of 
the last named society in 1888. He is a member of the Congregational church and 
believes in the brotherhood of all the protestant churches and the universal teachings 
of the Golden Rule. He also organized the Powell Memorial Society, which is com- 
posed of the descendants and relatives of John A., Alfred and Noah Powell. This 
society was founded in 1920, with Dr. Powell as president and historian, and he is now 
engaged in compiling a history of the Powell family and pioneer days. The organiza- 
tion now has a membership of about three hundred and its meetings are held on the 
fourth Sunday in June on the old donation claim of the grandfather, John A. Powell. 
The life of Dr. Powell has been one of intense activity, intelligently directed into those 



HISTORY OF OREGON 213 

channels through which flow the greatest good to the greatest number, and he stands 
a's a man among men, honored and respected for his sterling worth as well as for his 
pronounced professional ability. 



BYRON B. HERRICK. 



That the public service of Byron B. Herrick has been highly satisfactory and credit- 
able is indicated in the fact that since 1892 he has served continuously as county sur- 
veyor of Marion county, having been elected without opposition during the last fifteen 
terms. He possesses unusual mechanical ability and keen business sagacity, and from 
the outset of his business career he has steadily advanced. He was born near Shaw Sta- 
tion, Marion county, August 25, 1862, his parents being Byron B. and Elizabeth (Stanley) 
Herrick, the latter a native of Oregon, and in Marion county, this state, their marriage 
occurred. The father was born in Ohio in 1828 and in 1845 he crossed the plains to 
Oregon, taking up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Marion county. This 
he greatly improved and developed, converting it into one of the highly productive 
farms of the county. For many years he continued to reside thereon and at length he 
removed to Turner, where he lived retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. He 
was twice married and became the father of eleven children, four children being born 
of the first marriage, namely: Byron B., of this review; D. O., a resident of Oakland, 
California; I. I., deceased; and Laura, who is the wife of Lester Shell of Portland. 
Of the seven children of his second union two are deceased and the parents have also 
passed away. 

Byron B. Herrick received liberal educational advantages, attending the public 
schools of Marion county, after which he pursued a course at Willamette University, 
making a specialty of surveying. After leaving this institution his first work was 
along agricultural lines and for some time he was employed on a farm. He also taught 
school for two years in Tillomack and Marion county and in 1891 was appointed deputy 
surveyor under W. J. Culver. So eflScient was his work in this position that two years 
later he was elected county surveyor and he has since held this office continuously. Al- 
though several times he has had an opponent in the field, he has won by a handsome 
majority and for the last fifteen terms he has been elected without opposition. He 
has contributed substantially to the successful apportioning and measuring of the 
lands of the county and is loyal to the best interests of those whose material welfare 
is dependent upon him, and the systematic and accurate performance of his duties 
has won for him the admiration and respect of those to whom he has given his services. 
On the 3d of October, 1892, Mr. Herrick v?as married to Miss Jessie A. Barzee, whose 
birth occurred in Oregon and who was a daughter of Clark and Mary (Stewart) Barzee, 
both deceased. The two children of this union are Merze 0., now the wife of Edward 
Jerman, of Portland; and Denzil D., who is a well known musician of Spokane, Wash- 
ington. Mr. Herrick was twice married, his second union being with Winifred Rigdon 
Clark, and their home is at 282 Richmond avenue, Salem, Oregon. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Herrick has been a stalwart 
supporter of the republican party. He holds membership in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, in which organization he has filled all the chairs, including that of past 
grand, and he is also afllliated with the Woodmen of the World and the Elks. He is a 
strong advocate of those measures which he believes will advance the interests of his 
town and county and never withholds his support from any worthy object. He is 
always loyal to any cause which he espouses and faithful to every duty and his record 
as a man and citizen is indeed a most enviable one. 



VERDEN M. MOFFITT. 



Verden M. Moffitt, who was elected to his present position on the 2d of November, 
1920, enjoys the distinction of being the youngest chief of police in the United States. 
being now twenty-eight years of age. He is efficient, fearless and faithful in the dis- 
charge of his duties and is making a most creditable record in office, thus justifying 
the trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. Mr. Moffitt is one of Oregon's native 
sons, for he was born in Salem, July 8, 1893, his parents being A. T. and Sadie E. 



I'U HISTORY OP OREGON 

(Turner) Moffitt. The father is a native of Pennsylvania, of British and Irish stock. 
and the mother was born in Georgia. They came west to Oregon thirty years ago 
and settled in Salem, where they now reside, being widely known and highly respected 
citizens of their community. A. T. Moffitt engaged in business as a contractor and is 
now living retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. He has been prominent 
in political affairs, having served for three terms as a member of the city council, and 
in the election of November 2, 1920, was republican committeeman from Precinct 1. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moffitt have become the parents of five children: Mrs. A. W. Blackburn 
of Corvallis, Oregon; Mrs. M. L. Prunk, a resident of Eugene, Oregon; Victor Lee; 
Russell; and Verden M., of this review. 

The last named was a pupil in the public schools of Salem and subsequently at- 
tended the Capital Normal College, following which he entered Willamette University, 
where he devoted his attention to the study of law and vocal music. He has become 
well known as a vocalist, having a fine baritone voice. On the 9th of July, 1917, he 
enlisted in the motor transport service of the United States army and in May, 1918, 
was sent overseas. He was stationed at Neufchateau, France, and had charge of the 
work of transporting officers to and from various points. He sustained a severe injury 
of one of his legs by running into a shell hole and also was a victim of the influenza 
epidemic. His experiences while overseas were most thrilling and he witnessed scenes 
of carnage and destruction which for many years will remain stamped upon his mental 
vision. He relates that when he came out of the Argonne forest on the 24th of Novem- 
ber, 1918, the ground was still covered with French and German dead, the bodies being 
in a tearful state of decomposition. He returned to the United States on the 20th 
of July, 1919, and at Camp Mills, New York, received his discharge. Upon his return 
to Salem he resumed his law studies, with which he was occupied until 1920, when 
he took up police work under Percy M. Varney, then chief of police. On the 21st of 
May, 1920, he became one of four candidates at the primaries for the office of chief of 
police and at the election of November 2, 1920, he was victorious, contesting the elec- 
tion with J. T. Welsh. Mr. Moffitt's popularity is indicated in the fact that he carried 
every precinct in the city by a majority of two to one — an unprecedented occurrence 
in the annals of Salem. Although the youngest chief of police in the United States he 
is fully qualified for the duties of this important office. He gives careful supervision 
to every detail of the work of his department, is a strict disciplinarian and has in- 
augurated many needed reforms and improvements in connection with the police service 
of the city, being at all times "on the job." He is doing his utmost to rid the city 
of the criminal element and his name has become a menace to evildoers. 

On the 15th of June, 1920, Mr. Moffitt was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Endi- 
cott, a daughter of John Endicott of Rolla, British Columbia, and they have a wide 
circle of friends in the community, Mr. Moffitt being one of the most popular young 
men of Salem. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen 
of the World, the United Artisans and the Masons, belonging to lodge No. 4 of that 
order. He is likewise connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging 
to lodge No. 1, the oldest in the state. His record as a public official is a most com- 
mendable one, characterized by incorruptible honesty and efficiency of a high order, 
and the citizens of Salem feel that with him their lives and property are in safe 
keeping. He regards a public office as a public trust and no trust reposed in Verden 
M. Moffitt lias ever been betrayed in the slightest degree. He has already attained 
an enviable position for one of his years and his energy, determination and laudable 
ambition will undoubtedly secure for him still higher honors in the years to come. 



REV. GREGORY (ROBL), 0. S. B. 

Rev. Gregory (Robl). O. S. B., one of the prominent representatives of the Catho- 
lic clergy in Oregon, is now pastor of the Sacred Heart parish of Portland. He was 
born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1872, a son of Andrew and Margaret Robl. who in 1875 
crossed the Atlantic, becoming residents of Michigan. In 1876 the family removed 
to EUinwood, Kansas, becoming pioneers of that section. In 1888 they made the trip 
to the Pacific coast, arriving at Mount Angel, Oregon, at the request of the Very Rev. 
Adelhelm Odermatt. O. S. B. Mr. Robl followed agricultural pursuits, taking charge 
of the church property and operating the farm. He was born April 27, 1827, and passed 
away April 26. 1907, while his wife died In 1890. 




REV. FATHER GREGORY 



HISTORY OP OREGON 217 

Rev. Father Gregory of this review obtained his education in the seminary at 
Mount Angel, which he entered in 1888, completing his course there and receiving his 
ordination on the 16th of December, 1899, Archbishop Christie officiating, Father Gregory 
being the first priest ordained by that archbishop. He was then made director of the 
seminary, in which he taught moral theology until September 3, 1903, when he took 
charge of the Sacred Heart parish in Portland. Here he has since been located and 
the upbuilding of the parish is largely the result of his labors. When he assumed his 
duties here there were only forty-five families in the parish and today there are two 
hundred and twenty. The value of the property at the time he assumed his labors 
here was about ten thousand dollars, consisting of a newly built frame church and 
parish house, in which was conducted the parochial school and also four lots. The 
buildings had just been completed and were furnished by the Rev. Father. Today the 
property is valued at least at fifty thousand dollars. In 1905 he built a school at an 
investment of five thousand dollars and in 1907 a hall which cost two thousand dol- 
lars, at the same time purchasing the entire block of land. In 1911, at the request 
of Archbishop Christie, he changed the locatfon of the church property, purchasing 
the present location on Benedictine Heights, a part of the twenty-four acres owned by 
the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company. This was acquired at a cost of ten 
thousand dollars and thus Father Gregory has in his hands the property for a Catholic 
settlement. He then sold all of the old property, including the buildings, with the 
exception of the church, for nineteen thousand dollars and began building the parish 
residence which was erected at a cost of nine thousand dollars. He also built the 
school at a cost of twelve thousand dollars, all this being accomplished in 1911. The 
church was removed to its present location on Center and East Eleventh streets in 
1911. Father Gregory built a parish hall at a cost of eight thousand dollars and a 
convent at an investment of ten thousand dollars. This was likewise accomplished 
in 1911. Today the church property is very valuable and most attractive in appearance. 
The new school building is a fireproof structure of brick and tile reinforced. The 
school has an average attendance of one hundred and seventy-five children, with six 
teachers, and a music department is maintained in connection therewith. Today the 
present property holdings of the church are valued at sixty-five thousand dollars. Thus 
Father Gregory has accomplished a great work since taking charge of Sacred Heart 
parish. 

In 1914 he took a trip to Europe and was an eyewitness of the German mobiliza- 
tion during the first week in August. He spent several months in visiting various 
points of interest in the old world, returning to his home with a mind enriched by 
travel and broad experience in European countries. 



MORRIS HOMANS WHITEHOUSE. 

Morris H. Whitehouse, one of the leading architects of Portland, is a native son 
of Oregon and a representative of one of its honored pioneer families. He has spent 
his entire life in the city where he now resides, for he was here born on the 21st of 
March, 1878. His father, Benjamin G. Whitehouse, was for many years connected with 
the business interests of Portland and in Masonry attained high rank, the thirty-third 
degree being conferred upon him in recognition of his service to the order and his 
worth as a man and citizen. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, December 5, 1834. 
When four years of age he removed with his parents to Vassalboro, Maine, where six 
years later his mother passed away. It was five years afterward that his father died 
and he then took up his home with an nncle. Captain Reuben Weeks, a kind-hearted 
farmer of New England, who treated the orphan boy as his own child. There he resided 
until he reached the age of eighteen, assisting in the work of the farm and attend- 
ing school to a limited extent in winter. In 1852 he yielded to the lure of the city and 
returned to Boston, where he found employment in a counting house during the day, 
while in the evening he attended a private commercial college. After a year he was 
promoted to the position of assistant bookkeeper with the firm of Door, Proctor & 
Company. In the fall of 1850 he was sent west by his employ'ers to the lumbering dis- 
trict of Wisconsin at Green Bay, to take charge of the Interests of the firm in manu- 
facturing and shipping lumber to Milwaukee and Chicago, which cities were then in 
their infancy and at the end of two years he returned to Boston. About this time he 
caught the California fever through encouraging letters from friends on the coast, and 



IMS HISTORY OF OREGON 

in February, 1859, started for San Francisco, leaving his young wife in Boston, while 
he sought fortune in a land that promised immediate and large rewards. Going by 
steamer to Panama and thence by land to the western coast, he arrived in San Fran- 
cisco, March 22, 1859. He found the city thronged with thousands of excited gold 
hunters and not being satisfied with conditions there at the end of two weeks he jour- 
neyed northward, arriving in Portland, May 22, 1859. Here he secured employment as 
hotel clerk with S. N. Arrigoni, continuing with him as long as he remained in the 
business. Upon the completion of the overland stage route between Portland and 
Sacramento he was appointed agent for the company and cashier for Oregon, holding 
this position until the office was discontinued on account of the completion of the 
Oregon & California Railway, the first railway into Portland. In September, 1867, 
Mr. Whitehouse became connected with the Portland Gas Light Company and the Port- 
land Water Company, continuing with both companies during their existence. He was 
one of the incorporators of the Portland Gas Light Company and continued as cashier 
and director of the company until it sold out, subsequently becoming connected with the 
Portland Gas & Coke Company. 

The Masonic record of Mr. Whitehouse has probably not been duplicated anywhere 
in the country. He was the first secretary and the first candidate entered, passed and 
raised in Portland Lodge, No. 55, A. F. & A. M., after its organization, which lodge is 
now the largest in the state. For twelve years he served as secretary of the lodge, for 
four years as secretary of Portland Royal Arch Chapter, for eighteen years as secretary 
of Oregon Commandery, K. T. and of the Scottish Rite bodies for twelve years. He also 
served for many years as grand treasurer of the Grand Commandery of the Knights 
Templars, as past almoner and treasurer of Oregon Consistory and as first recorder 
of Al Kader Temple. He was elected a life member of Oregon Commandery. K. T., 
in 1908, and for faithful services as grand treasurer of the Grand Commandery the 
honorary title of past Commander was conferred upon him in 1908. He was coronated 
thirty-third degree Mason by the Supreme Council in Washington, D. C, January 18, 1893. 

On December 15, 1858, Mr. Whitehouse was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Bradley Homans, eldest daughter of Harrison Homans. of Vassalboro, Maine. He was 
absent from his wife for three years during the early part of his married life, Mrs. 
Whitehouse joining him in the summer of 1862 at Portland. They became the parents 
of five children but the eldest son died in infancy. Two daughters, Gertrude and Clara, 
now Mrs. Edward Cookingham and Mrs. E. L. Brown, respectively, are living in Port- 
land. May married H. S. Hostetter, of Washington, D. C, and Morris H., of this review, 
completes the family. 

In 1912 death called Mr. Whitehouse and in his passing the state lost one of its 
most prominent business men and honored pioneers. Throughout the period of his 
residence in Portland he took an active and helpful part in promoting the work of 
public progress and improvement and left the impress of his individuality for good 
upon many lines of the city's development and upbuilding. He was a man of high 
ideals and exalted standards of citizenship, whose irreproachable character and in- 
corruptible integrity fully entitled him to the esteem he was accorded by all who knew 
him. As a pioneer he was not the ordinary type, yet possessed many of the character- 
istics that led to the settlement of the west. In him were born and bred the gentler 
virtues — the virtues that have softened the asperities of harsher natures, whose mission 
it has been to make the rough places smooth, while the mission of men like Mr. White- 
house was to present living examples of the higher traits that embellish civilization and 
make home a synonym for tenderness and love. Both sorts of men are necessary and 
both have nobly performed their work. Their monument is written in enduring char- 
acters in the hearts of tens of thousands now living in happy homes and who recog- 
nize that to the pioneers they owe the blessings they enjoy today. 

The son, Morris H. Whitehouse, was accorded unusual educational advantages and 
in addition to the training received in various schools he grew up in a home of culture 
and refinement — the best of all known institutions for the development of the faculties 
most essential in the attainment of a successful career. Aftei- attending the public school 
he became a student in Bishop Scott Academy, from which he was graduated in June, 
1896, at the age of eighteen. He then entered the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, where he continued tor a year, there resuming his studies in 1902 and complet- 
ing his course in 1906. In recognition of his work at this school, one of the leading 
institutions of the kind in the world, he was awarded the first prize for special students 
for best scholarship in all studies and the honor of first holder of the year 1906 travel- 
ing scholarship. This gave him the opportunity of a year's study abroad, which he 



HISTORY OP OKEOOX 21!l 

spent at the American Academy at Rome, Italy, returning to Portland in 1907. While 
in Europe he made a study of many of the greatest architectural works, ancient and 
modern, and also came into personal contact with many of the most prominent masters. 

Opening an office in Portland in January, 1908, Mr. Whitehouse at once became ac- 
tively engaged in his profession and for five years conducted his interests in partner- 
ship with J. A. Fouilloux, now a resident of New York city. He has since engaged in 
business independently, meeting with marked success. Many of Portland's most not- 
able public buildings are examples of his handiwork, among which may be named the 
following: the University, Multnomah Amateur Athletic and Waverly Country Clubs; 
the Lincoln and Jefferson high schools and the Failing grammar school; the Old Peo- 
ple's Home; the Ladd & Tilton Bank interior and many of the city's most beautiful 
residences and apartments. 

On the 17th of October, 1908, Mr. Whitehouse was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Grey Reed, the ceremony being performed at Salt Lake City, Utah. Mrs. Whitehouse is 
a daughter of James and Georgiana Reed, of Boston, Massachusetts, and is a highly 
educated and accomplished lady. Professionally he is identified with the Oregon Chap- 
ter, A. T. A., the State Board of Architects of which he is serving as treasurer and he 
is also an associate member of the American Institute of Architects. He is an alumnus 
of the American Academy of Rome and a member of the Portland Archaeological 
Society, the Portland Art Association, the University, Waverly, Country and Multno 
mah Clubs and of the last named organization is an honorary life member. Like hisi 
father he has also become prominent in Masonry, having attained the thirty-second 
degree in the consistory and also belonging to the shrine and in his life he exemplifietf 
the beneficent teachings of the craft. He stands high in his profession and is proving 
a worthy successor to an honorable father in contributing to the extent of his abilitj 
toward the upbuilding of the northwest. 



ELLIS F. LAWRENCE. 



Possessing an intimate knowledge of his profession agained through thorough and 
comprehensive study in leading technical institutions of America and Europe, Ellis F. 
Lawrence is classed with the able achitects of Portland and the northwest, his labors 
proving a potent element in the upbuilding and beautifying of the city. A native 
of the east, Mr. Lawrence was born in Maiden, Massachusetts, in 1879, a son of Henry 
Abbott and Annie J. (Howells) Lawrence. The name is an old and honored one in 
connection with the history of this country, representatives of the family having 
gallantly defended American interests as soldiers in the Revolutionary war. The father 
was prominent in business circles of his city as a manufacturer of artists' and engineers' 
supplies, building up a large trade in that connection. 

The son, Ellis F. Lawrence, received liberal educational advantages, graduating 
from Andover Academy and also from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which 
conferred upon him the degrees of B. S. and M. S. In order further to perfect his 
professional knowledge he went abroad and for nearly a year studied in Paris. Re- 
turning to his native land he opened an office in Portland as a member of the firm 
of McNaughton, Raymond & Lawrence, an association that was maintained for four 
years, after which Mr. Lawrence practiced alone for a time. In 1910 he formed a 
partnership with W. G. Holford with whom he still continues and they have been 
accorded a large and representative clientage. They occupy a well appointed suite 
of offices in the Chamber of Commerce building and their office force consists of eight 
employes, the excellence of their work and their reliability in executing contracts 
winning for them high standing in the profession. Many examples of their handiwork 
are to be seen in Portland, among which may be mentioned the Lumbermen's Bank 
building, Westminster Presbyterian church, Albina Branch Library, Fernwood grammar 
school, the Peninsular Park buildings and also many fine residences. They also con- 
structed the buildings for the University of Oregon and Whitman College and as 
leading architects they are well known throughout this section of the country. 

In 1905 Mr. Lawrence was united in marriage to Miss Alice Millett, of Portland, 
Maine, and they have become the parents of three children: Henry Abbott, Denison 
Howells and Amos Millett. Mr. Lawrence has become prominent in many professional 
connections and for two years has been a director of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects. About six years ago he became the organizer of the school of architecture of 
the University of Oregon of which he is now serving as dean. He is a member of 



220 HISTORY OF OREGON 

the committee on education in connection with the American Institute of Architects 
and of the publicity committee of the state organization of the American Institute of 
Architects and is likewise identified with the Oregon Chapter of that society. He 
■was also for one and a half years a member of the city plans commission and is con- 
nected with the Chamber of Commerce, the City Club and the University Club. He 
stands high in his profession and through his labors has not only gained individual 
success but has also contributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding and beauti- 
fying of his city. He is alert and enterprising, thoroughly in sympathy with the 
spirit of the northwest and doing all he can to promote its progress and improvement. 
In every relation of life he measures up to the highest standards of manhood and 
citizenship and is accounted one of Portland's most valued citizens. 



M. G. McCORKLE, M. D. 



Dr. M. G. McCorkle, one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Portland who 
has here practiced his profession since 1902, is a native of Tennessee and a representa- 
tive of an old southern family. He was born September 30, 1871, a son of J. J. and 
Ruth (Hendricks) McCorkle, the former a retired farmer and banker now residing 
in Johnson City, Washington county, Tennessee. They became the parents of sixteen 
children, of whom thirteen are living. 

M. G. McCorkle, the fourth in order of birth, attended the district schools in 
the acquirement of an education, later pursuing a course in an academy and for one 
and a half years was a student in Milligan College, where he took up literary work. 
He next entered the Lincoln Memorial College at Knoxville, Tennessee, which he 
attended for three years and this was followed by postgraduate work in the City Hos- 
pital of New York city, where for two years he served as interne. In 1895 he opened 
an office at Mitchell, Oregon, where he remained for one year and then went to Wood- 
burn, where for six years he continued in practice. In 1902 he took up his residence 
in Portland and here he has remained in the intervening period building up a large 
practice. He maintains his office at No. 804 Selling building and was the first physi- 
cian to locate there. He has studied broadly, thinks deeply and his efforts have been 
of the greatest value to his patients, for he is seldom at fault in the diagnosis of 
cases and his sound judgment and careful study enable him to do excellent profes- 
sional work. He is attached to Good Samaritan Hospital and has been especially 
successful in the treatment of surgical cases. He is also a man of good business ability 
and has important interests in oil lands in Wyoming. 

In 1896 Dr. McCorkle was united in marriage to Miss Blanche George of Brooklyn, 
New York, who previous to her marriage was a successful teacher, and they have be- 
come the parents of a daughter, Lucile, who pursued an English course in the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, and graduated therefrom. The family residence is at No. 481 East 
Eighteenth street, North, and their home is noted for its warm-hearted hospitality. 

In Masonry Dr. McCorkle has won high rank, having attained the thirty-second 
degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory and the York Rite, and also holding member- 
ship in Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland. He is likewise identified 
With the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World and 
the nature of his recreation is indicated in the fact that he is a member of the Port- 
land Gun Club and the Portland Golf Club. Actuated by laudable ambition his pro- 
fessional career has been one of continuous advancement and his life work has been 
one of broad usefulness. He is at all times actuated by high and honorable principles 
and his course has ever been directed along lines which command the respect and 
confidence of his fellowmen and of his professional colleagues and contemporaries. 



JOHN N. MATSCHEK. 



John N. Matschek, who for many years was a prominent and successful candy 
manufacturer and wholesaler of Portland, conducting business under the name of 
the Star Candy Company, was born in Austria, June 6, 1860, a son of John N. and 
Antoinette Matschek, who came to the United States with their son John in 1868, estab- 




DR. M. G. McCORKLE 



HISTORY OF OREGON -I'l:] 

lishing the family home in Portland. The father engaged in farming and dairying 
in the employ of Mr. Sedlock on the land where now stand the old and new Failing 
schools — a district bounded by Reede, Porter and Corbett streets. It was at that place 
that John N. Matschek passed away and his wife's death occurred within a block of 
the old home in the year 1912. 

John N. Matschek attended the public schools of South Portland until he reached 
the age of thirteen years and then started out to provide for his own support by 
entering the employ of the Alisky Candy Company. While thus working he obtained 
all the schooling he could by employing his leisure hours in promoting his education. 
He continued with the Alisky Candy Company for thirteen years and then established 
business on his own account at First and Market streets, manufacturing and whole- 
saling candy under the name of the Star Candy Company, which company was con- 
solidated into Matschek Haradon Company and still later to the Matschek Candy 
Company. He conducted this business to the time of his death, which occurred on 
the 12th of June, 1914, when the business was sold. 

In early manhood Mr. Matschek had wedded Miss Mary Elizabeth Bates, a native 
of Virginia City, Nevada, who came to PortHand with her people in 1871. She became 
the wife of Mr. Matschek on the 27th of December, 1886, and to this marriage were 
born two children: Pearl Lucille, now the wife of C. A. Alphonse, manager of the 
Hyatt Talking Machine Company of Portland, and the mother of one child, Lucille 
Elizabeth; and John N., who married Helen Marsden Rogers, a native of Pennsylvania, 
and has one child, Helen. John N. Matschek is a Scottish Rite Mason who belongs 
to Harmony Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M., of Portland, and to the various Scottish 
Rite bodies, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has also crossed the sands 
of the desert.' He is likewise a member of the Elks Lodge, No. 142, of Portland and 
belongs to the Multnomah Club, to the University Club, the Old Colony Club and the 
Kappa Sigma, a college fraternity. He is thus widely and prominently known in 
social relations and in business circles occupies a creditable position as president of 
the W. C. Allen Candy Company, operating at Nos. 125 and 127 Twelfth street in 
Portland. They are importers and jobbers, representing the Sweet Candy Company 
of Salt Lake City, Utah, and they buy in every market of the world. Something of 
the volume of their business is indicated in the fact that they now employ ten sales- 
men. Thus the name of Matschek is still prominently connected with the candy trade 
of the northwest, for it was in this line that the father started out in business and 
in the same line he continued throughout his active life, winning progress and pros- 
perity as the result of close application, thorough reliability and undaunted enterprise. 
The son displays the same qualities and the name of Matschek has long been an 
honored one in the trade circles of this secti.on of the country. 



HON. WALTER B. JONES. 



Hon. Walter B. Jones, a prominent attorney of Eugene and representative from 
L"ine county to the upper house of the general assembly, was born in Waupaca county, 
Wisconsin, November 5, 1879, a son of George G. and Adeline (Rogers) Jones, also 
natives of the Badger state. The father followed farming in Wisconsin until about 
1891, when he came west and is now living retired near Portland, Oregon. The mother 
passed away in July, 1918. 

Walter B. Jones acquired his preliminary education in the schools of his native 
state and after completing the work of the grades engaged in teaching school during 
the winter months, while through the summer season he pursued the study of law, 
thus continuing for three years. He then became a student in the University of Wis- 
consin at Madison, working his way through that institution, and later pursued a night 
course in law at the University of Minnesota. In 1907 he was admitted to the bar 
in Minnesota and subsequently went to Spokane, Washington, where he became con- 
nected with the Diamond Ice & Fuel Company, remaining with that firm for a period 
of three years. In September, 1910, he came to Oregon, opening a law office in Eugene, 
where he has since followed his profession, and has won a place among the leading 
attorneys of his part of the state. He is a strong and able advocate, presenting his 
cause clearly and forcefully and applying legal principles with accuracy. He has built 
up a good clientele during his ten years' residence in Eugene and is the possessor of 
a valuable law library. In addition to his law practice Mr. Jones has important busi- 



224 HISTORY OF OREGON 

ness interests, being secretary and treasurer of the John-Jones Coal Company of Coos 
county and one of the directors of the American Universal Implement Company o£ 
Portland. 

On the 26th of December, 1903, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Susie 
B. Seaver and they have become the parents of six children, four of whom are deceased: 
Walter B., Jr., died in Spokane, Washington, in 1907; Rodman died in September, 1920; 
while two died in infancy. Those who survive are Marjorie and George. 

In politics Mr. Jones is a republican and in 1917 his fellow townsmen, appreciative 
of his worth and ability, called him to public office as representative from Lane county 
to the lower house of the general assembly. That his services in this connection 
were entirely satisfactory to his constitutents is indicated in the fact that in 1919 he 
elected to represent his county in the state senate, of which he is proving an able 
member, giving earnest and thoughtful consideration to all the vital questions which 
come up for settlement. He likewise received the appointment of juvenile officer and 
served in that capacity for four years. Mr. Jones is also prominent in fraternal 
circles, holding membership in the Masonic order, the Indepedent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Pythias, and he attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. For six years he served as secretary of the Lane County Fair 
Association and thus in many ways has substantially contributed to the development 
and upbuilding of his city, county and state. Mr. Jones deserves great credit for what 
he has accomplished in life, for he is a self-made man who through his own efforts 
secured a college education, and wisely utilizing each opportunity for advancement 
is now entitled to classification with the leading attorneys and representative citizena 
of his section of the state. 



JASON T. ANDERSON. 



Jason T. Anderson, a veteran of the World war, who rendered valuable service to 
the country during the most critical period in its history, is now serving as post- 
master of Harrisburg. discharging the duties of this position most capably and effi- 
ciently. He was born in this city July 3, 1891, a son of Thomas J. and Emma (Thomas) 
Anderson, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Iowa. In 1S72 the father 
went to Nevada and remained a resident of that state until 1S80, when he came to 
Oregon, securing employment in a store in Harrisburg, with which he was connected 
for a period of fifteen years. He was then elected to the office of county assessor, 
in which he served for one term and then returned to Harrisburg, where he engaged 
in the real estate and insurance business from 1902 until 1916, when he was appointed 
postmaster, which office he continued to fill until his death on the 19th of May, 1919, 
when he was sixty-one years of age. He was prominent in the public affairs of his 
community and for fifteen years was city recorder of Harrisburg. The mother survives 
and is now a resident of Portland, Oregon. 

Jason T. Anderson was reared and educated in his native city, attending the public 
and high schools. On completing his studies he was variously employed until 1916, 
when he was made assistant postmaster of Harrisburg. In April, 1918, he enlisted 
for service in the World war and was sent to Camp Lewis, Washington. He was 
assigned to the Twenty-second Engineers and was transferred to Montgomery, Alabama, 
becoming member of Company C. From there he was sent to Camp Merritt and on 
the 30th of June sailed for France. He participated in some of the heaviest fighting 
of the war but fortunately escaped without injury, and at the battle of St. Mihiel was 
placed in charge of a working party which for thirty-two days was subjected to the 
most intensive and continuous shell fire. During this most trying ordeal he handled 
his men with great coolness and good judgment, winning high commendation from 
his superior officer, First Lieutenant Ridgley of Bremerton, Washington. Mr. Ander- 
son was made first-class sergeant and was discharged May 12, 1919, because of his 
father's dangerous illness, arriving home twenty-four hours before the latter's demise. 
The son was then appointed acting postmaster and after successfully passing the re- 
quired examination received a permanent appointment as postmaster in February, 1920. 
He is a most courteous and obliging official and the duties of the office are promptly 
and efficiently discharged. 

On the 12th of October, 1919, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Velma 
Purkerson and they have many friends in Harrisburg. He is a democrat in his political 



HISTORY OP OREGON 225 

views and fraternally he is a member of the Rebekahs and the Indepnedent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to both the lodge and encampment. Mrs. Anderson's religious 
affiliation is with the Christian church. Mr. Anderson is always loyal to any cause 
which he espouses and faithful to every duty and he is a patriotic, public-spirited citizen, 
interested in all that has to do with public progress in the community, his aid and 
influence being always on the side of advancement and improvement. 



GEORGE M. POST. 



George M. Post, a leading architect of Portland now serving as secretary of the 
state board of architecture, is a native of the east. He was born in New London, 
Connecticut, in 18S3 and is a representative of an old New England family, members 
of which fought for American interests as soldiers in the Revolutionary war. He is 
a sou of Owen L. and Mary W. (Palmer) Post, the former a carriage-maker by trade 
and of their family two sons survive: George M., of this review; and Robert P., a 
resident of Stamford, Connecticut. 

George M. Post acquired a high school education and deciding on the profession 
of architecture as a life work he secured work in an office of that character, also 
continuing his studies at home and since 1900 has taken postgraduate work in archi- 
tecture. Going to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he there opened an office in 1907, but at 
the end of a year sought the broader opportunities offered in the west and in 1908 made 
his way to Salem, Oregon, where he was associated with L. R. Hazeltine for two 
years. Subsequently he conducted his professional work independently for a period 
of seven years and then became a resident of Portland where he has since engaged in 
architectural work, devoting his attention to general architectural practice. His ex- 
cellent work and thorough reliability in the execution of contracts have won for him 
a large patronage and many of the fine residences of Salem are examples of his skill 
and handiwork as are also many commercial and public buildings, including the public 
library at Salem, Oregon. 

On the 2Sth of May, 1907, Mr. Post was united in marriage to Miss Eliza M. Ryan 
of New London, Connecticut, a daughter of William S. and Sarah (Bond) Ryan, rep- 
resentatives of prominent New England families, the Bonds being well known in 
financial circles of the east. The only child of this union is Hanford P. 

Mr. Post is secretary of the state board of architecture which owes its existence 
largely to his efforts, for he was the chief factor in securing its passage through both 
branches of the legislature and since its organization has served in the capacity of 
secretary. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects and is also identi- 
fied with the Sons of the American Revolution, the City Club and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the Episcopal church. He maintains his offices in the Railway Exchange building and 
resides in a beautiful home at No. 630 East Twentieth street, in the attractive suburban 
district of Irvington. His professional standing is high and through his activities 
he has contributed in substantial measure to the development and improvement of 
Portland which has greatly benefited by his citizenship. He is ever actuated by 
high and honorable purposes in all relations of life and his many commendable traits 
of character have won for him a large circle of warm friends. 



J. H. GARNJOBST, M. D. 



Dr. J. H. Garnjobst, who since 1913 has been associated in medical practice with 
Dr. E. E. Fisher, an eminent physican and surgeon of Salem, who specializes in general 
surgery, is now devoting his attention to the general practice of medicine and is 
regarded as one of the most brilliant young men to be found in the profession any- 
where in the state. He is a veteran of the World war, in which he, gained extremely 
valuable medical experience, thus greatly promoting his professional skill and ability. 

Dr. Garnjobst is a native of Nebraska. He was born at Crofton on the 1st of 
February, 1889, and came to Salem with his parents, W. F. and Anna R. (Hohf) Garn- 
jobst. After completing his public school education he became a student in the medical 
department of the University of Oregon, pursuing a course in internal medicine and 
Vol. n— 15 



226 HISTORY OF OREGON 

surgery, and was graduated from that institution in 1912. For a time he followed 
his profession in eastern Oregon and since 1913 he has been associated in practice 
•with Dr. E. E. Fisher, a very successful surgeon of Salem. They occupy a fine suite 
of offices in the United States National Bank building, equipped with all of the most 
modern apparatus for surgical operations and every modern appliance for the treat- 
ment of disease. Dr. Garnjobst is thoroughly acquainted with the scientific basis 
upon which his work rests and is correct in the application of his knowledge to meet 
the needs of his patients. During the war with Germany he was commissioned first 
lieutenant and was sent overseas, being made chief of the X-Ray department at Base 
Hospital, No. 98, in France. He saw a great deal of service among the wounded 
in France and thus gained broad knowledge and experience which have since been 
of inestimable value to him in his professional work. While on leave of absence he 
traveled throughout the French Alps, acquiring through close observation a valuable 
fund of information, and he relates may interesting anecdotes of his experiences abroad. 
On the 12th of June, 1912, Dr. Garnjobst was united in marriage to Miss Ruth 
E. Thostrud, a native of Cashton, Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of a 
daughter, Ruth Jean. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and with the Masons, belonging to Salem Lodge, No. 4, and to Oregon 
Consistory, No. 1, of the Scottish Rite at Portland. Although one of the younger 
members of the profession. Dr. Garnjobst is forging steadily to the front, actuated at 
all times by a spirit of enterprise and laudable ambition, and his pronounced ability 
is attested by his professional colleagues and contemporaries. 



ADAM WILHELM, Sr. 



The name of Adam Wilhelm is closely associated with the history of Benton 
county and the development of western Oregon. His keen business discernment and 
highly developed powers of organization have carried him into important relations and 
many of the largest business enterprises in this section of the state owe their inception 
to him. There is great honor due him not only on account of the individual success 
■which he has achieved, but also because of the part which he has taken in the work 
of upbuilding and development in the northwest, which has greatly prospered by his 
activities, and he is numbered among the builders of Oregon, who by their labors have 
made possible that superior civilization which is now one of the characteristics of 
the commonwealth. As head of the firm of A. Wilhelm & Sons he is operating the 
largest department store in western Oregon outside of Portland, maintaining branch 
establishments at Corvallis and Junction City, and he is also one of the prominent 
financiers of the state, being the organizer and largest stockholder of the Monroe 
State Bank and a stockholder in the Benton County State Bank at Corvallis and the 
Corvallis State Bank and also in a bank at Spokane, Washington. 

Mr. Wilhelm was born at Mintz, Germany, December 10, 1846, a son of Adam and 
Agnes (Foust) Wilhelm, also natives of that country. There the father engaged in 
the making of wine and in 1848 he emigrated to America, making his way to Wis- 
consin, where he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land in the vicinity 
of Sheboygan. This he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for a period 
of thirty-five years. He also engaged in the hotel business at Sheboygan, and in 1883 
he came to Oregon, taking up his abode in Monroe, where he continued to reside the 
remainder of his life. He passed away about 1910, when eighty-three years of age, 
and the mother died in 1907 at the age of seventy. 

Adam Wilhelm was but two years of age when his parents emigrated to America 
in 184S and he was reared and educated at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, remaining at home 
until after his marriage. He then went to St. Cloud, Wisconsin, where he engaged 
in the hotel business, conducting that enterprise until 1S70, when he came to the 
Pacific coast country, going first to San Francisco, and thence by boat to Oregon. 
For four months he resided in Portland and at that time he could have purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres in the heart of the city for the sum of eighteen hundred 
dollars, but he was desirous of securing a larger farm and with that end in view 
made his way to Benton county, purchasing eight hundred acres of land in the vicinity 
of Monroe. He also bought a notion store and liquor business in the town, thereby 
establishing the nucleus of the present large department store of A. Wilhelm & Sons. 
Subsequently he purchased about four thousand acres of land, of which he is still 



HISTORY OF OREGON 227 

the owner. In the conduct of his mercantile interests he displayed sound Judgment 
and keen discernment and his enterprising and progressive methods, his carefully 
selected stock and his reasonable prices soon won for him a good patronage which 
has steadily grown from year to year until the business has now assumed extensive 
proportions. Mr. Wilhelm has admitted his sons to a partnership, the business now 
being conducted under the firm style of A. Wilhelm & Sons. They carry a large and 
attractive line of goods, including farm implements and automobiles, and are accorded 
a large patronage, the firm name being a synonym for reliability and enterprise. In 
1S96 Mr. Wilhelm turned his attention to the manufacturing field, establishing the 
A. Wilhelm & Sons Flour Mills, the capacity of the plant being one hundred barrels per 
day. He also built a large mill at Harrisburg, Oregon, which in 1919 was destroyed 
by fire, and he likewise erected a fine mill at Junction City, which he subsequently 
sold. He is the owner of a large warehouse at that point and there erected a fine 
modern garage, which is operated by his son, George A. Wilhelm, and he also owns 
another garage in the town, which he uses as a storehouse for his cars. He has two 
large garages at Corvallis, where he handles all the most popular types of cars, in- 
cluding the Overland, Stevens and Nash cars and trucks and the Cleveland tractor. 

In financial circles of the state Mr. Wilhelm is equally prominent and well known. 
He was the organizer and is now the largest stockholder of the Monroe State Bank, 
which is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and has deposits amounting to two hundred 
thousand dollars, and he is also interested in the Benton County State Bank of Corvallis, 
the Corvallis State Bank, and is a stockholder in a bank at Spokane, Washington. He 
is thus continually broadening the scope of his activities with good results and what- 
ever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion, for he possesses keen 
insight into business affairs and situations and his plans are well formulated and 
promptly executed. 

In February, 1S67, Mr. Wilhelm was united in marriage in Kiel, Wisconsin, to 
Miss Elizabeth Mueller, a daughter of Mathias and Mary Mueller, natives of Prance. 
Her parents emigrated to America, and going to Wisconsin, cast in their lot with its 
pioneer settlers. The father engaged in farming in the vicinity of Sheboygan and 
was very successful in his operations, continuing a resident of that section of the state 
until his demise. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm were born nine children: Adam, Jr., who 
has charge of the business at Corvallis; George, who died at the age of three years; 
Mathias, who is connected with the store at Monroe; Louise, who died when fourteen 
years of age; Bernard, also assisting in the conduct of the business at Monroe; Sarah, 
at home; Louie, who died at the age of seven years; Lawrence, who is managing busi- 
ness interests in the state of Washington; and George A., in charge of the business at 
Junction City. The wife and mother passed away at Los Angeles, California, after 
a two days' illness, on the 23d of February, 1916, at the age of seventy years. 

In his political views Mr. Wilhelm is a republican. His first presidential vote was 
cast for Horace Greeley and he was a stanch supporter of democratic principles and 
candidates until the Wilson administration, since which time he has adhered to the 
republican platform. In religious faith he is a Catholic and he is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus. Mr. Wilhelm has great faith in the future of this section of 
the country, to which his extensive investments amply testify, and he is the heaviest 
taxpayer in Monroe, paying sixty-five per cent of the tax of the town. He is dis- 
tinctively a man of affairs and one who wields a wide influence. Those forces which 
have contributed most to the development, improvement and benefit of the state have 
received impetus from his labors and his life record is a most creditable one, showing 
what can be accomplished through individual effort and determined purpose when 
guided by intelligence and sound judgment. 



VIVIAN C. STAATS, B. S., M. D. 

Dr. Vivian C. Staats, a successful physician and surgeon of Dallas, is a native of 
this state, his birth having occurred in Airlie, Polk county, April 1, 1883. He is a 
son of Clarence E. and Sarah E. (Tarter) Staats, also natives of this county, the 
former born in 1858 and the latter in 1863. The family has long been represented 
in this state. The paternal grandfather, Isaac W. Staats, left his home in New York, 
New York, and made the journey across the plains with ox teams, arriving in Oregon 
in 1845. Settling in Polk county, he there took up a donation claim and at once set 



228 HISTORY OF OREGON 

about the work of clearing and developing his land, which through untiring effort 
and determination he at length succeeded in converting into a valuable and productive 
tract. He continued to cultivate and improve his land until 1888, when he met an 
accidental death by drowning. His wife, Orlena M. Staats, passed away in 1908 at 
the advanced age of eighty-eight years. Their son, Clarence E. Staats, was reared 
and educated in Polk county and on starting' out in life independently he engaged in 
farming, purchasing a tract of land twelve miles south of Dallas, which he continued 
to operate until 1919, when he took up his residence in the town and is now living 
retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. The mother of the Doctor also survives. 

Vivian C. Staats was reared in his native county and there attended school, later 
pursuing a course in the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis, from which he was 
graduated in 1904. He then entered the medical department of St. Louis University 
and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1908. His high scholarship won him 
the position of interne in a St. Louis hospital, where he gained valuable practical 
knowledge. In 1909 he opened an office in Dallas, where he has since continued in 
practice, his successful treatment of disease winning for him a large practice. He is 
classed with the leading physicians of Polk county, for he has been a close and dis- 
criminating student of his profession, and his knowledge and ability have constantly 
developed. He also has invested in farm lands in the county and is the owner of a 
valuable prune orchard of forty-five acres. 

On the 6th of September, 1906, Dr. Staats was united in marriage to Miss Letha 
M. Agnew, of San Antonio, Texas, and they have become the parents of a daughter, 
Eva Burnice, who was born September 18, 1914. In his political views the Doctor 
is a democrat, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He is a Scottish Rite JIason and a member of the Shrine and he 
also is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the 
World and the United Artisans. His professional connections are with the medical 
societies of Polk, Marion and Yamhill counties, the Oregon State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. He has always made his professional duties his 
first consideration, being most thorough and conscientious in the performance of the 
work that devolves upon him in this connection. His life is a busy and useful one, 
and he is a man whom to know is to esteem and honor. 



ELLIOTT E. WHITE. 



Elliott E. White, engaged in the hardware and implement business at Browns- 
ville and also serving as mayor of his city, is a man of enterprise and progressive 
business methods whose efforts are bringing to him substantial and well deserved 
success. He was born in the southern portion of Pennsylvania, near the city of Emmits- 
burg, Maryland, in October, 1862, a son of Elliott and Clarissa Jane (Waybright) 
White, both of whom were natives of the Keystone state. The father engaged in 
farming in Pennsylvania and during the Civil war he enlisted for service in the north- 
ern army, becoming a member of the Pennsylvania Infantry, with which command 
he remained for ninety days. On the expiration of his term of enlistment he was 
honorably discharged and returned to the pursuits of civil life, his health being much 
impaired by the hardships and privations he had endured while in the service of his 
country. Going to Illinois, he resided for about six years in that state and in 1877 
went to Kansas, where he purchased land, which he improved and developed, continu- 
ing its operation until his demise in 1900, when he was flfty-six years of age. The 
mother survives and is yet a resident of the Sunflower state. 

Elliott E. White attended school in Illinois, Kansas and Nebraska and remained 
at home until he attained his majority, when he engaged in the cultivation of rented 
land. Having carefully saved his earnings he was subsequently able to purchase land 
in the vicinity of Hutchinson, Kansas, and this he continued to operate until 1906, 
when he came to Oregon. Turning his attention to mercantile pursuits, he engaged 
in the hardware and farm implement business at Brownsville and has since been 
active along that line. He carries a large stock of shelf and heavy hardware and also 
deals in farm implements, handling the Case tractors, and he is likewise agent for the 
Willys Overland cars. He has a well appointed establishment and his thorough relia- 
bility, progressive methods and reasonable prices have secured tor him an extensive 
patronage. He is watchful of every detail of his business and of every indication 




ELLIOTT E. WHITE 



HISTORY OF OREGON 231 

pointing to success, and his close application and unfaltering energy have been the 
dominant features in his advancement. 

In July, 1889, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Clara Macklin of Kansas, 
and they have become the parents of three children, namely: Ina, who married V. E. 
Weber and resides in Portland, Oregon: Ethel B., who is a teacher of music at Tilla- 
mook, Oregon; and Blanche M., a teacher in the public schools of Portland. 

In his political views Mr. White is a republican and he takes an active and promi- 
nent part in the affairs of his community, being a most progressive and public-spirited 
citizen. In the fall of 1918 he was elected mayor of Brownsville and in 1919 he assumed 
the duties of his office, which he is now capably discharging. His administration is 
proving most beneficial, for he has been instrumental in securing many needed munic- 
ipal improvements, including the grading, graveling and paving of streets, which work 
he finally succeeded in putting through after much opposition. He also served as a 
member of the city council for some time, in which connection he also rendered valuable 
and important service to the municipality. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic 
order and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, actively and helpfully interested in the 
work of the church, in which he is now serving as one of the elders. His genuine 
worth, his fidelity in office, his reliability in business and his progressiveness in citi- 
zenship have made him highly respected, and his worth is acknowledged by all who 
know him. 



ALBERT G. PRILL, M. D. 



Dr. Albert G. Prill, who for almost a quarter of a century has engaged in the 
practice of medicine and surgery at Scio, has won an enviable position among the 
prominent representatives of the medical profession in Linn county. He was born in 
Springville, New York, May 5, 1869, a son of John and Mary (Tardell) Prill, natives 
of Germany, who emigrated to America in 1842. They settled in Erie county. New 
York, where the father purchased land thirty miles south of the city of Buffalo, and 
to its cultivation and improvement he devoted the remainder of his active life. At 
length, however, he retired and took up his residence in Springville, New York, where 
his death occurred in 1917, when he was more than ninety years of age. The mother 
survived him for but two years, passing away in 1919, at the venerable age of eighty- 
six years, and both were highly respected in the community where they made their 
home. 

Their son, Albert G. Prill, attended the public and high schools of Springville, 
New York, later becoming a student at the Griffith Institute. Deciding upon the 
practice of medicine as a life work, in 1886 he entered the medical school of the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, from which he was graduated with the class of 1890. Soon there- 
after he came west to Oregon and opened an office in Salem, but after six months 
removed to Lebanon, Oregon, where he continued in practice until 1896. That year 
witnessed his arrival in Scio, Linn county, and he has remained a resident of this 
city, his professional skill and ability winning for him a liberal patronage. In addi- 
tion to his private practice he has conducted a hospital containing six beds for the 
past four years, two trained nurses being in attendance at the institution. He is a 
skilled physician and surgeon, whose professional experience has been broad and varied 
and whose ability has been constantly promoted, not only by experience but by wide 
reading and study, which have kept him abreast with the advancement that is being 
continually made in the methods of medical and surgical practice. 

In June, 1889, Dr. Prill was united in marriage to Anna C. Satterly Bates and 
they became the parents of two children, both of whom died in infancy, Ariel V., pass- 
ing away in August, 1891, when a year old. 

In his political views the Doctor is a republican and an active worker in behalf 
of the party. For the past twelve years he has served as city health officer and he 
was also mayor of Scio for three terms of one year each and is now filling that office 
for the second two-year term. His administration has proved most beneficial to the 
interests of the city and when first elected to the office of mayor he was instrumental 
in securing the installation of municipal lighting and water systems and during his 
present tenure of office he is improving the power plant by putting in sixty thousand 
dollars' worth of new equipment. He also was a member of the town council for a 
number of years and his interest in the cause of public education is indicated in the 



232 HISTORY OF OREGON 

fact that for eighteen years he served as a director of the local school board. In fact, 
he is interested in everything that tends to promote the welfare and advancement of 
his community and was one of the organizers of the Linn County Fair Association, 
of which he was president for eleven years. For the past twelve years the fair has 
been held at Scio, but in future the meetings of the association will take place at 
Albany. Dr. Prill is much interested in the study of ornithology and is a recognized 
authority in that science. He has made some very fine collections and has donated 
valuable specimens to the State University at Eugene, to the Smithsonian Institution 
at Washington, D. C, and to the museum at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, con- 
stantly adding new specimens in the way of mounted birds, eggs and Indian relics 
to the museum of the State University. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian, and 
fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the chapter, commandery and 
shrine. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights 
of Pythias, while his professional connections are with the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Oregon State and Central Willamette Medical Societies, and of the 
latter organization he served for one year as president, thus indicating his high stand- 
ing among his colleagues and contemporaries in the profession. The activity of Dr. 
Prill in relation to the public welfare has been of wide scope and no man has done 
more to further the interests and upbuilding of the town. His life has at all times 
measured up to the highest standards and he has ever stood as a man among men, 
honored and respected for his sterling worth as well as for his pronounced professional 
ability. 



HOMER S. WOOD. 



Homer S. Wood, the efficient postmaster of Independence, to which office he was 
appointed in 1916, is widely and favorably known in this section of Oregon, where he 
has spent the greater part of his life. He is a native of Oregon, his birth having 
occurred at Brownsville, in Linn county, December 30. 1877. His parents, John H. and 
Addie E. (Sperry) Wood, are natives of Missouri and of Brownsville, Oregon, respec- 
tively. In 1875, when a young man of twenty years, the father started across the 
plains with ox team and wagon for Oregon as a member of a band of emigrants and 
on reaching this state settled at Brownsville, where for twelve years he followed the 
carpenter's trade. Since first coming to Oregon he has made two trips to the east 
but has always returned to his home in the northwest, having great confidence in the 
future of this section of the country. Following his residence in Brownsville he 
removed to Albany, where he remained for two years, after which he spent a short 
time in Portland. He then went to Hardman, Oregon, and for two years engaged in the 
raising of sheep, subsequently resuming work as a carpenter, following his trade at 
Heppner for two years, after which he went to Arlington, Oregon, and there conducted 
a furniture business until 1898. In that year he took up land in Gilliam county, 
Oregon, which he cleared and developed and to which he has since added by purchase 
being now the owner of over nine hundred acres of valuable and productive land, upon 
which in 1920 he raised a wheat crop which netted him forty thousand dollars. He 
has been very successful in the conduct of his business interests and is classed with 
the substantial and progressive agriculturists of his part of the state. He has taken 
an active and prominent part in political affairs and in the '90s was the democratic 
candidate for state representative from his district but met defeat at the polls. He 
is now seventy-four years of age and his wife has reached the age of sixty-five. They 
have a large circle of friends who entertain for them the highest regard and respect. 

Their son. Homer S. Wood, was reared at Arlington and there attended the public 
schools, later pursuing a three years' course in the Oregon Agricultural College at 
Corvallis, but previous to this had been employed for five years in the depot at Arling- 
ton, where he learned telegraphy. In 1901 he took up a homestead in Gilliam county 
but after proving up on his claim he sold it to his father. Subsequent to his gradua- 
tion from college he became connected with the firm of Balfour, Guthrie & Company, 
acting as their wheat buyer in Oregon and Washington. He remained in the employ 
of that company for a period of eight years and then purchased sixteen acres of land 
near Vancouver, Washington, which he continued to cultivate until 1909. In that year 
he removed to Independence, where he began work at the carpenter's trade, which he 
had learned in young manhood, and was active as a contractor and builder until 



HISTORY OF OREGON 233 

1916, when he was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson to the ofiBce o£ postmaster 
of Independence and is now serving in that capacity, his term of office expiring in 
1924. He is proving most capable as a public official, discharging his duties promptly, 
faithfully and efficiently. H8 is also cultivating twenty-two acres of land adjoining 
the city, of which twelve acres are devoted to the growing of hops, and he likewise 
is engaged in raising pure bred white Leghorn chickens, his residence being within 
the city limits. He is leading a busy, active and useful life and his enterprise, diligence 
and determination have been potent factors in the attainment of the prosperity which 
he now enjoys. 

On the 20th of July, 1902, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Eva Robinson, 
a daughter of Asa V. and Angle (Osborn) Robinson, the former a native of Kentucky 
and the latter of Oregon. The father came to this state about 1S49. settling in southern 
Oregon, where he resided for several years and then removed to Independence. Here 
he engaged in the drug businass and successfully conducted his store tor many years, 
passing away in 1915, while the mother's demise occurred three years later, or in 1918. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wood have become the parents of three children, namely: Winona, aged 
seventeen, who is a student in the State Normal school at Monmouth; Dorothy, who 
is fourteen years of age and is a high school student; and Dale, aged twelve, now 
attending the public schools. 

Mr. Wood gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and in religious 
faith is a Baptist, while fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs, the Eastern Star, and is also a Chapter Mason. He is 
regarded as one of the leading citizens of the community in which he makes his home 
and his progressiveness has been a potent element in its continued development. 



WILLIAM A. EACHTEL. 



The work of improving the public highways in northwestern Oregon is ably cared 
for by William A. Eachtel, roadmaster of Multnomah county, to which office he was 
appointed in 1918. Mr. Eachtel is a native of the south. He was born in Memphis, 
Tennessee, November 25, 1864, and is a son of Andrew and Sarah (Lloyd) Eachtel, 
the former a native of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Manchester, 
England. The father was an expert mechanic, being especially skilled in the work of 
constructing steam engines. In the early '70s he removed with his family to the west, 
taking up his residence in Los Angeles, California, where he remained for two years 
and then made his way to Virginia City, Nevada. There he continued to make his 
home for three years and then went to Bingham Canyon, Utah, where he set up the 
first hoisting engine in the state erected by a non-believer in the Mormon faith. Being 
favorably impressed with business conditions in that section of the country Mr. Eachtel 
there took up his permanent residence and was joined by his family the following year, 
both he and his wife passing away in that state. Of their children William A. was 
the eldest, the others being Thomas, Charles, George, Frank and Emily. 

In the common schools William A. Eachtel acquired his education and when fifteen 
years of age started out in life independently, securing work in the smelter at Murray, 
Utah, where he was employed for eight years. He then went to Pueblo, Colorado, 
where for eight years he was foreman of a company, subsequently returning to Salt 
Lake City, Utah, but remained there for only a year and then came to Oregon to take 
charge of the smelter at Linnton operated by the Portland Smelting & Refining Com- 
pany. He was thus employed for four years and then became furnaceman of the old 
Germania smelter at Salt Lake, where he remained for two years. His next posi- 
tion was that of engineer for the Linnton (Ore.) Slaughter House and after spending 
four years in that capacity he went to Everett, Washington, as foreman of the Everett 
smelter. However, he was obliged to abandon that line of work, which was proving 
very detrimental to his health, because of the noxious fumes from the metal which 
resulted in lead poisoning from which he suffered on seven different occasions. He 
then went to Polk county, Oregon, as engineer and acting foreman for the Pacific 
Cooperage Company, with which he was connected for two years. In 1904 he was first 
employed by Multnomah county as tool dresser and engineer and in the following year 
was placed in charge of the convicts who were engaged in working on the public high- 
ways and in the quarries. In the spring of 1906 he was transferred by the county 
court to the Kelly Butte quarry where he supervised the work of building the quarry 



234 HISTORY OF OREGON 

and installing machinery, liaving everything in operation by the 6th o£ September, 
1906, and he also constructed the quarry at Linnton. His excellent work in this con- 
nection led to his appointment to the position of superintendent of quarries in 1908 and 
in the following year he was made superintendent of all county machinery and prop- 
erties and given charge of the work of planning and supervising all county institutions. 
In 191S he was appointed county roadmaster and in addition to the duties of this ofiSce 
is still acting in his former capacities, now having under his supervision about five 
hundred county employes. He thus has charge of all roads, bridges, ferries, quarries, 
road construction work, county machinery and properties in Multnomah county and 
his is a most responsible position. He is fully equal to the heavy demands made upon 
him in this connection and is discharging his duties in a thoroughly capable and 
efficient manner, his services being of great value to the county. Like his father he 
is an expert mechanic and is thus able intelligently to direct the labors of those under 
his charge, securing excellent results. « 

In 1886 Mr. Eachtel was united in marriage to Miss Gertie Hengeveld, a resident 
of Pueblo, Colorado, and of Holland Dutch descent, who has passed away. They be- 
came the parents of five children: William, who is in charge of the Kelly Butte 
quarry; Grace, who married A. R. Fairbanks, a civil engineer; Gertrude, the wife of 
Howard Cross, a teamster; Charles, an expert automobile mechanic, who received his 
instruction at the Benson Polytechnic school and who enlisted as a soldier in the 
World war, being at Camp Eustace when the armistice was signed; and Nellie, the 
wife of W. J. Boland, a bricklayer by trade. 

In his political views Mr. Eachtel is a stalwart republican, active -in support of 
the principles and candidates of the party but without ambition for office holding, his 
positions having all been obtained through appointment. He is a member of the 
Grange and fraternally is identified with the Rebekahs, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of which he has been a member for thirty-four years, the Eastern Star and is 
a Scottish Rite Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine. He also holds membership 
in the Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the American Association of Engineers. 
As roadmaster of Multnomah county he has done much to improve the public high- 
ways of northwestern Oregon, thus greatly aiding in developing the resources of the 
state and the worth of his work is widely acknowledged. Moreover, he is deserving of 
much credit and honor as a self-made man, who, starting out In life empty-handed, has 
worked his way steadily upward, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, his individ- 
ual merit and ability winning for him a position of prominence and importance and 
he stands today a splendid type of American manhood and citizenship. 



HON. ROBERT M. VEATCH. 



Hon. Robert M. Veatch, who is now living retired at Cottage Grove, was formerly 
prominently identified with legislative activities in the state 'and has done much to 
shape public thought and opinion, leaving the impress of his individuality upon the 
history of the state, and in his public service he has ever looked beyond the exigencies 
of the moment to the opportunities and possibilities of the future. Mr. Veatch was 
born in White county, Illinois, June 5, 1843, a son of Isaac and Mary (Miller) Veatch, 
the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Georgia. The father was a 
cabinet-maker and blacksmith, and removing to eastern Illinois when that section of 
the country was largely a wilderness, he there followed his trade. Subsequently he 
went to Iowa and in that state worked at his trade and likewise engaged in missionary 
work until 1880, when he came to Oregon, residing with his son Robert at Cottage 
Grove and also with another son, until his death in 1882. The mother had long pre- 
ceded him to the Home beyond, her demise occurring in 1846. 

Robert M. Veatch acquired his early education in Iowa, but his educational oppor- 
tunities while there residing were very limited, as he was obliged to work for his 
board and had but little time to devote to study. Thinking to find greater oppor- 
tunities in the Pacific coast country, he crossed the plains to California in 1864 with a 
wagon train. Three months were spent in the Golden state and he then came to 
Oregon to join his three brothers, who were residing in Lane county. They induced 
him to remain and he continued his education in the schools of Creswell while later 
he was for one year a student in the Eugene Academy. He likewise attended the 
Willamette University tor a year and subsequently was graduated from the State 




HON. ROBERT M. VEATCH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 237 

Agricultural College at Corvallis with the class of 1S71. In order to meet the expenses 
of securing an education he had been compelled to incur a debt of three hundred dollars 
and he resolutely set himself to the task of meeting this obligation. He at first engaged 
in the profession of teaching, which he successfully followed for a period of seven 
years, imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge he had acquired. He then 
purchased a farm six miles east of Cottage Grove and in securing this property was 
obliged to borrow the sum of three thousand dollars, paying interest on the same 
at the rate of twelve per cent. With resolute and determined spirit he began the 
cultivation and improvement of the land, which he continued to operate for a period 
of ten years, converting it into a valuable property, free from all indebtedness. In 
the meantime his fellow citizens, recognizing his worth and ability, had called him 
to public office and in 18S2 he was elected to represent his district in the lower house 
of the state legislature. He rendered such valuable and effective service in that con- 
nection that in 1884 he was honored with reelection, while in 1886 he was called to 
the state senate, and reelected in 1S88, being accorded a larger majority at each succeed- 
ing election. As senator and representative he gave thoughtful and earnest considera- 
tion to the vital problems which came up for settlement, earnestly supporting all bills 
which he believed would prove beneficial to the commonwealth, and his legislative 
career was one over which there tell no shadow of wrong nor suspicion of evil. Fol- 
lowing his service as state senator he was appointed registrar of the land ofBce at 
Roseburg, Oregon, which office he filled most creditably for four and a half years and 
then resigned to engage in the hardware business at Cottage Grove. He was thus 
active from 1896 until 1917 in connection with his two sons, but at the latter date dis- 
posed of his mercantile interests and is now living retired in the enjoyment of a 
well earned rest. 

On the 13th of March, 1872, Mr. Veatch was united in marriage to Miss Seraphina 
Currin who passed away February 28, 1884, after a short illness. Mr. and Mrs. Veatch 
became the parents of three children: Henry H., who resides in Cottage Grove; 
Ermine, who is the wife of J. E. Young, a leading attorney of Cottage Grove; and 
John C, who is filling the office of assistant United States attorney in Portland. 

For a number of years Mr. Veatch served as mayor of Cottage Grove and in this 
connection rendered most important public service, giving to the city a businesslike 
and progressive administration characterized by many needed reforms and improve- 
ments. As a public official his activities have thus been varied in extent and no man 
has done more to further the interests and upbuilding of his city and state, his in- 
fluence being ever on the side of progress and improvement, of right and reform. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party. He was appointed by Governor 
Chamberlain as a delegate to the Trans-Mississippi Congress at Portland. Also 
elected as delegate to the National Democratic Convention, held in Kansas City, which 
nominated William J. Bryan. His connection along fraternal lines is with the Masonic 
order, whose beneficent principles have ever been a guiding force in his lite. Mr. 
Veatch is a self-made man who has gained success and prominence through individual 
merit and ability. Although at times he had to confront difficulties and obstacles in 
his career, his determined purpose enabled him to press steadily forward to the goal 
of success and his life record is one of which he has every reason to be proud. 



EDMUND J. LABBE, M. D. 



Dr. Edmund J. Labbe, physician and surgeon, was born in Portland, Oregon, Decem- 
ber 15, 1872, a son of John and Angeline (Mathiot) Labbe. The father was born in 
France and came to Oregon in 1861. He established the second grocery store in Port- 
land about 1862, conducting the business under the firm style of Labbe Brothers. He 
remained actively connected with the trade until 1890, when he retired from business. 
His wife was a native of Ohio and was but an infant when brought to Oregon in 1857, 
the family settling on French Prairie in that year. Her parents had emigrated from 
France, where her brothers and sisters were born, but Mrs. Labbe's birth occurred 
after the parents had arrived in the new world. She survived her husband for only 
three years, passing away in Portland in 1911. 

Dr. Labbe spent the days of- his boyhood and youth in his native city and after 
attending the public schools went east to become a student in the University of Vir- 
ginia and also attended Columbia University of New York. It was in the latter 



238 HISTORY OF OREGON 

institution that he pursued his professional course and was graduated with the M. D. 
degree in 1S95. He is now limiting his practice to obstetrics and dise.ases of children 
but for some time continued in general practice. For three years he practiced in the 
New York Hospital and in the Sloan Hospital before entering upon the work of his 
profession in Portland in 1S98. He is now serving on the staff of the Good Samaritan 
Hospital in Portland and is regarded as an expert in the branches of the profession 
in which he now specializes. 

Dr. Labbe was with the Red Cross in the World war, having charge of children 
in the devastated areas. He held a captain's commission and was turned over by the 
American army to the Third French army because of his recognized usefulness to the 
French, owing to his command of the French language. At Evian he established a 
hospital for children, who were sent back from behind the German lines and for seven 
months was the physician in chief of that hospital, with a staff of seven assistant phy- 
sicians, one dentist, twenty nurses and fifteen Red Cross aides under his supervision. 
He has some most interesting as well as most pathetic pictures of the American soldiers 
at the front and also of the French refugees and the story of the misery that was 
caused by Germany's attempt to establish a world rule is to him a most familiar 
one by reason of the suffering and misery which was brought on through the horrors 
of war. 

Dr. Labbe was married to Miss Olive L. Tappen of New York City, and they have 
two children: John T., nine years of age; and Louise E. Dr. Labbe is a member of 
the Phi Kappa Psi, a college fraternity, but has not taken upon himself many member- 
ship relations, preferring to concentrate his efforts and energy upon his professional 
duties, which are constantly growing in volume and importance. He is accorded a 
liberal practice in Portland in addition to his hospital work and is a recognized author- 
ity upon obstetrics and children's diseases. 



LEE M. TRAVIS. 



Lee M. Travis, who since 1901 has engaged in the practice of law at Eugene, spec- 
ializing in the field of commercial law, deserves classification with the able attorneys 
of his part of the state. He was born in Howard, Steuben county. New York. June 20, 
1874, his parents being the Rev. Gould J. and Ella (Ford) Travis. The father's birth 
occurred in Poughkeepsie, New York. He had the advantage of liberal educational 
training, attending Hamilton College and also becoming a student at the Rochester 
(N. Y.) Theological Seminary. In 1889 he came to Oregon, being called to the pastorate 
of the Baptist church at Eugene, with which he was continuously connected until he met 
death in a runaway accident. He exerted a strongly marked influence for good in the 
community and his genuine personal worth was recognized by all who knew him. He 
was prominent in the Masonic order. 

Lee M. Travis attended school in the east to the age of fifteen years, when he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Oregon, subsequently becoming a student 
in the University of Oregon, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. 
Imbued with the spirit of patriotic devotion to his country he volunteered for service 
in the Spanish-American war, enlisting in 1898 as a member of Company C, Second 
Regiment of Oregon Volunteers, and was sent to the Philippines, where he served with 
his regiment until honorably discharged at the close of his term of enlistment. 

Choosing the legal profession as a life work he pursued the regular course of study 
in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated from that institution 
with the class of 1900, at which time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. In 
the meantime, however, he had been admitted to the Oregon bar at Salem in 1899 and 
on the 1st of January, 1901, he opened an office in Eugene and has since successfully 
practiced his profession in this city, specializing in the field of commercial law. His 
practice is large and of a distinctively representative character and his devotion to his 
clients' interests is proverbial. He is a strong and able lawyer, clear and concise in 
his presentation of a cause, logical in his deductions and sound in his reasoning, while 
;n the application of a legal principle he is seldom, if ever, at fault. He has a well 
appointed law office and is the possessor of a large library, with whose contents he 
is familiar. 

In 1893 Mr. Travis was united in marriage to Miss Lillian Baker, a daughter of 
Fred C. Baker, who is the editor of the Tillamook (Ore.) Headlight. Mr. and Mrs. 



HISTORY OF OREGON 239 

Travis have become the parents of two children: Frederick and Gould. He takes an 
active interest in political affairs and is recognized as one of the local leaders of the 
democratic party, having served as chairman of the county central committee. He was 
a member of the Panama Canal Commission for the San Francisco Exposition in 1915. 
Mr. Travis is well known in various fraternal organizations, holding membership in 
the Acacia Fraternity, while in Masonry he has attained high rank, belonging to Eugene 
Lodge, No. 11, A. P. & A. M., in which he is a past master; Eugene Chapter, No. 10, 
R. A. M.; Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 3, K. T.; and Al Kader Temple A. A. 0. N. M. S. 
He is likewise a member of Eugene Lodge, No. 357, B. P. O. E.; Eugene Camp, No. 115, 
W. 0. W.; Eugene Aerie, No. 275, F. 0. E.; and the Order of the Hoo Hoos. His ideals 
of lite are high and he utilizes every opportunity to climb to their level. His life is 
actuated by a spirit of progressiveness that recognizes and utilizes opportunities and he 
is widely known in this part of the state through his professional, fraternal and political 
relations. 



L. GUY LEWELLING. 



L. Guy Lewelling, attorney at law who is filling the office of city recorder of Albany, 
is a native of Nebraska, his birth having occurred at Kearney, September 8, 1882. He 
is a son of Asa and Amanda V. (Hord) Lewelling, the former a native of Illinois and 
the latter of Virginia. For a considerable period the father was an instructor in the 
Illinois Reform School, but owing to ill health was obliged to resign that position and 
went to Nebraska, taking up a homestead near Kearney. This he improved and de- 
veloped and while there residing was elected county clerk of Phelps county, in which 
office he served for one term. In 1892 he crossed the plains to Oregon, hoping that 
the milder climate of this state would prove beneficial to his wife's health. He settled 
in Linn county, where he rented land, but following his wife's death in 1895 he removed 
to Albany and while here residing was appointed deputy sheriff, serving in that ca- 
pacity for four years or two terms. During his second term in the office he married 
Mary E. Blevins, a daughter of Andrew J. and Alvilda Blevins, who were pioneers of 
Oregon, coming to this state in the early '50s. Following the completion of his service 
as sheriff Asa Lewelling resumed his farming operations, in which he has continued, 
being now seventy-five years of age. He is an honored veteran of the Civil war, having 
served as a member of an Iowa regiment. While in Texas he was captured and in 
company with three others managed to escape from prison and make his way to safety. 
His uncle, Alfred Lewelling, established the first nurseries in this state at Milwaukie, 
and in the museum of the Oregon Historical Society is to be seen the first cherry tree 
planted in the state by Mr. Lewelling. These trees were hauled across the plains from 
Iowa with ox teams and were then transplanted in the soil of Oregon. 

L. Guy Lewelling was but ten years of age when he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Oregon and his early education was acquired in the schools of 
Nebraska and of Albany, Oregon. Subsequently he became a student in the Albany 
College and was graduated therefrom in 1899, when seventeen years of age. He then 
taught school in Benton and Linn counties for two years, after which he went to 
Salem and there attended night school for one year, pursuing the study of law, for it 
was his desire to become a member of the bar. That his education was obtained under 
difficulties is shown in the fact that in order to meet the expenses of his schooling he 
secured employment at the state prison, which was then under the supervision of 
Governor Chamberlain, who later became United States senator from Oregon. Enter- 
ing Willamette University, he there pursued a law course, still continuing his work at 
the prison, and was graduated from Willamette University in June, 1911, at which time 
the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. In the same month he was admitted to the 
bar and coming to Albany he opened an office and has continued in practice here. In 
1915 he was elected city recorder and municipal judge and his efficient service in that 
connection won him reelection in 1917 and in 1920 he was elected district attorney 
taking office January 1, 1921, in which position he is discharging his duties most 
capably and efficiently. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he is 
regarded as a most able jurist. 

On the 13th of October, 1912, Mr. Lewelling was united in marriage to Miss Edna 
Blevins and they have become the parents of two sons: Asa Lorenzo, who was born 
April 4, 1915, and Alfred Blevins, born July 11, 1920. Mr. Lewelling gives his political 



240 HISTORY OF OREGON 

allegiance to the republican party and in 1912 he was elected to represent his district 
in the state legislature, where he gave earnest and thoughtful consideration to all the 
vital questions which came up tor settlement and earnestly fought for the support of 
bills which he believed to be of great benefit to the public at large. His fraternal 
connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Masons and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and in the last named organization he has attained 
high rank, having passed through all the chairs in the lodge and also filled the office 
of exalted ruler. He is patriotic and public-spirited and during the World war ren- 
dered important and valuable service to the government as a member of the executive 
board during the Liberty Loan campaigns and also served on the Council of Defense 
and the Legal Advisory Board, laying aside all business interests and devoting his 
time and aid to the support of his country at this most critical period of its history. 
He is a splendid example of American manhood and chivalry and his standing as lawyer 
and citizen is of the highest. 



JAMES P. FAILING. 



Portland, the Rose City, with its broad thoroughfares, its splendid business enter- 
prises, its beautiful homes, magnificent churches and schools, grew to its present pro- 
portions within the memory of James F. Failing, whose name is inseparably associated 
with the history of the city and its development. For many years he was closely 
connected with mercantile interests and at the time of his d6ath was the oldest hard- 
ware merchnnt on the coast. In various other ways he left the impress of his indi- 
viduality and ability upon the records of the state, for he figured not only in commercial 
but also in banking circles and was active in connection with the educational and 
moral progress of the community. He was born March 24, 1842, in the city of New 
York, so that the width of the continent long separated him from his birthplace. 
His parents were Josiah and Henrietta (Ellison) Failing, the former a native of New 
York, while the latter was born in Charleston, South Carolina. The father came to 
Oregon in 1851 with his two sons, Henry and John W., making the trip by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama and proceeding northward along the Pacific coast to the Columbia 
and thence to Portland. James F. Failing journeyed westward in company with his 
mother, a sister and one brother, making the trip around Cape Horn and joining the 
husband and father at Portland. 

James F. Failing was at that time a youth of but eleven years. He had begun 
his education in the schools of his native city and continued his studies in Portland, 
attending the old Portland Academy, which at that time was known as the Portland 
Academy and Female Seminary. He started out in the business world as a clerk in 
his father's store, a general merchandise establishment which was conducted under 
the firm style of J. Failing & Company. It was located in the heart of the Portland 
settlement by the Willamette at a point now designated as First and Oak streets. For 
a time Mr. Failing clerked for a brother, with whom he remained in business for sev- 
eral years and then became a partner in the firm of Corbett, Failing & Company, 
which for an extended period was one of the foremost firms conducting business in 
Portland. This hardware business still continues under the name of the Failing-Mc- 
Calman Company, in which Mr. Failing's three sons, Edward J., John C. and Frederick 
E., are interested. Mr. Failing was president of the firm at the time of his death, 
although he has not been active in the conduct of the business from 1900. His store 
was among the first two or three merchandise establishments in Portland and for some 
years was the oldest hardware business on the coast. Mr. Failing did not confine 
his efforts entirely to one line, however, for in 1877 he became a director of the First 
National Bank and was still senior director of the establishment when he passed away. 
He was likewise a representative of the directorate of the Security Savings & Trust 
Company. 

On the 27th of May, 1880, Mr. Failing was united in marriage to Miss Jane J. 
Conner, a daughter of John Conner, of Albany, Oregon. Piv« children were born of 
this marriage, all of whom are living, namely: Edward J., Kate W., John C, Henri- 
etta C. and Frederick E. The daughter Kate has for a year and a half been engaged 
as a Baptist missionary in Soutli India, now located in Ongole, in the Guntur district. 

Throughout his life Mr. Failing was a most consistent and earnest member of the 
First Baptist church of Portland, now known as the White Temple. He served for 




JAMES F. FAILING 



HISTORY OP OREGON 243 

many years as its treasurer and was a trustee and deacon at the time of his demise. 
He was lilcewise in former years a director of the Young Men's Christian Association 
and his interest in educational activities was manifest in his service as a trustee of 
McMinnville College for several years. He was active in the Oregon Pioneer Society, 
was a member of the Oregon Historical Society and of the Auld Lang Syne Society. 
He long gave his political allegiance to the republican party. While he was never an 
office seeker he stanchly supported all movements for the public good and his worth 
as a man and a citizen was widely acknowledged. As a merchant his name ever stood 
as a synonym for integrity and enterprise in business and the character of the inter- 
ests which he conducted brought to Portland a considerable share of trade, leading to 
its further development as the years passed. Throughout the intervening period from 
1853 to the time of his death on October 19, 1920, or for more than two-thirds of a 
century, James F. Failing lived in Portland and witnessed the development of the 
city from a small town containing only one or two streets — the principal ones being 
Front and First streets near the river — to a city of metropolitan proportions with all 
of the advantages and opportunities of the older east, while its beauty as the Rose 
City has become renowned throughout the world. Mr. Failing ever took an active part 
in furthering those interests which have had to do with public progress and improve- 
ment and his aid was ever on the side of advancement. The worth of his work can 
scarcely be overestimated, as there was no line of development — material, intellectual, 
social, political or moral — in which he was not keenly interested and bore his part 
in bringing about the results which make Portland a Mecca to every tourist to the 
Pacific coast. 



C. EDWIN STANARD. 



C. Edwin Stanard, a lifelong resident of this state, who for over three decades has 
been continuously connected with mercantile interests of Brownsville, is a man of 
most enterprising and progressive spirit, constantly taking forward steps along busi- 
ness lines. His entire life has been passed in this vicinity, for he was born three and 
a half miles northwest of Brownsville, February 22, 1860, a son of A. W. and Eliza- 
beth (Hill) Stanard, the former a native of New Hampshire and the latter of Missouri. 
In 1852 the father started across the plains from Missouri with ox teams, Oregon being 
his destination. Settling in Linn county, he took up land near Brownsville, which he 
cleared and developed, adding thereto many improvements which greatly enhanced its 
value. He also engaged in stock raising and was very successful in all of his business 
enterprises, being classed with the substantial men of his community. He continued 
to reside upon his ranch until two years before his demise, when he removed to 
Brownsville and there lived retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. His posi- 
tion was one of prominence in his section of the state and he filled many important 
public otBces, serving as county clerk of Linn county for two terms and also as mayor 
of Albany. He likewise represented Linn county in the state legislature for two 
terms, giving careful and thoughtful consideration to all the vital questions which 
came up for settlement, his aid and influence being ever on the side of advancement and 
improvement. He passed away in 1917, while the mother's demise occurred in 1916. 
Coming to Oregon in pioneer times, they shared in the hardships and privations of 
frontier life and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been 
built the present progress and prosperity of the state. Their confidence in the future 
of Oregon was great and they lived to see it justified. 

Their son, C. Edwin Stanard, was reared and educated in Linn county, attending 
the public schools of Albany, and for one year was a student in the State University at 
Eugene. He then entered business life as clerk in a store in Brownsville, where he 
remained from 1878 until 1880. Having carefully saved his earnings until he had 
accumulated the sum of four hundred dollars, he started a little notion store in 
Brownsville, which he successfully conducted for three years, when he was appointed 
postmaster of the town by President Harrison and served in that capacity for a period 
of five years, proving a courteous and capable official. In 1889 he engaged in general 
merchandising in partnership with a Mr. Cable and this association was maintained 
for twenty years, at the end of which time Mr. Stanard purchased the interest of 
his partner and admitted his son, H. Wayne Stanard, into the firm, which then became 
known as C. E. Stanard & Son, under which style it is now operating. They carry an 



244 HISTORY OF OREGON 

extensive and carefully selected stock of general merchandise and their courteous treat- 
ment of patrons, reliable and progressive business methods and reasonable prices have 
secured for them a liberal patronage. Mr. Stanard is a man of keen business discern- 
ment and sound judgment and in the conduct of his business affairs has met with well 
deserved success. He has also become interested in farm lands in Linn county, from 
which he derives a good revenue, and whatever he undertakes he carries forward to 
successful completion. 

In October, 1S81, Mr. Stanard was united in marriage to Miss Olive Averill and 
they have become the parents of two children: H. Wayne, born in October, 1SS4, is 
now a member of the firm of C. E. Stanard & Son and is ably assisting his father in 
the conduct of their extensive mercantile business. He married Edna Hodson, by whom 
he has two children, Boyce and James; Lela F. married W. F. Whealdon and they 
reside at Portland, Oregon. 

In his political views Mr. Stanard is a democrat and he has been called to positions 
of public trust, having for several terms served as mayor of Brownsville and has also 
filled the offices of councilman and school director, his services in these connections 
proving of great value to the city. His fraternal relations are with the Woodmen of 
the World and the Masons, his membership being in the Royal Arch Chapter, and in 
religious faith he is a Baptist. As a business man his course has been marked by 
steady advancement, for he has closely studied trade conditions and the wants of the 
public and in conducting his store has made it his purpose to be always ready to meet 
public needs and demands. He is everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, possess- 
ing many sterling traits of character which have been of value in the upbuilding and 
progress of the community and which have won for him the high regard of all who 
know him. 



JOHN G. EUSON. 



John G. Euson, Portland representative of the General Steamship Corporation, 
which has its headquarters in San Francisco, comes of a family long connected with 
maritime interests. He is, as it were, "to the manner born," inheriting his love of 
the sea from his ancestors. His grandfather was a British naval officer and his father 
was a British subject and a seafaring man in his early life. 

John G. Euson was born in Portland, May 7, 1890, and in the acquirement of his 
education passed through the successive grades in the grammar and high schools and 
later attended the Portland Business College. He completed his education in 1907 and 
at once entered upon the line of activity to which he has since devoted his efforts. He 
first entered the employ of the American Hawaiian Steamship Company, with which he 
was connected until 1917, when he entered the United States navy. He entered the 
United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, where he received a paymaster's commis- 
sion and was assigned to sea duty, running to France, the North Sea and the Medi- 
terranean. On the 1st of October, 1920, Mr. Euson, who had been representative for the 
Parr-McCormick Company at Portland, took charge of the local office of the General 
Steamship Corporation, bringing to his new position the experience which he had 
gained as a former representative of the American Hawaiian, the Columbia-Pacific and 
the Parr-McCormick steamship interests. The General Steamship Corporation operates 
a line to South America, New Zealand, Java and Australia and from coast to coast ports. 



O. L. PRICE. 



O. L. Price, executor of the Pittock estate and vice president of the Northwestern 
Bank of Portland. Oregon, is an alert, wide-awake and enterprising young business 
man. He was born April 25, 1877, in Champaign county, Illinois, where he attended the 
common schools while spending his youthful days on the home farm. The summer 
months were devoted to the work of the fields and his training was of a character that 
enabled him readily to recognize the real values of life and its opportunities. He seems 
to possess in large measure the spirit of enterprise which has been the dominant factor 
in the upbuilding and development of the northwest and the soundness of his business 
judgment is indicated in the fact that he was made the sole executor of the Pittock 



HISTORY OF OREGON 245 

estate and also one of the trustees which position puts him in touch in an official way 
with all of the Pittock interests. His business activities are of a very broad character, 
for he is now the secretary and a member of the board of directors of the Oregonian 
Publishing Company, is the vice president and a member of the board of the Portland 
Trust Company and is on the board of over twenty other corporations representing a 
varied line of industrial and commercial interests, all identified with the Pittock estate. 
He is the vice president of the Northwestern Bank and is a man of most sound judg- 
ment and keen discrimination, readily determining between the essential and the non- 
essential in all business affairs. His knowledge of the law has been of immense benefit 
to him, for in 1900 he was admitted to the bar, having graduated from the Pacific College 
of Newbure. He practiced law for six years and served as legal and confidential adviser 
to Mr. Pittock, and his comprehensive knowledge of the business thus gained qualified 
him for the onerous and responsible duties which he took up as executor of the estate. 
In 1903 Mr. Price was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Behirrell of Portland, 
and they have two children, Hazel Mary and Betty. Mrs. Price is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Beharrell, who came to Portland in the '80s, and her father is now local 
manager for Haywood Brothers & Wakefield. Mr. and Mrs. Price occupy an enviable 
social position and high regard is entertained for them by all with whom they have 
been brought into contact. 



FLOYD D. MOORE. 



Floyd D. Moore, now serving for a second term as county clerk and recorder of 
Polk county, is a courteous and obliging official, thoroughly fitted for the work of his 
office, into which he has introduced a number of new methods and short cuts which 
have greatly facilitated the discharge of his duties, making his services very v^lu-ible 
to the public. He has also gained prominence as an educator and is a man of broad 
culture and high intellectual attainments. 

Mr. Moore was born at Moorefleld, Nebraska, May 4, 1888, and is a son of A. A. 
and E. A. Moore, natives of Illinois, where the father followed farming pursuits. Sub- 
sequently he went to Nebraska and there took up land, which he cleared and developed, 
his father and two brothers also becoming residents of that part of the state, and it 
was upon a portion of this land that the town of Moorefield was later founded, being 
named in honor of the family. In 1901 A. A. Moore drove across the country to Wyo- 
ming, settling in Wheatland, where for three years he engaged in the transfer business. 
He then made the overland trip to Oregon, first locating in Merrill, where he conducted 
a dairy for a year, at the end of which time he removed to Talent, Oregon, and there 
resided for some time. In 1912 he became a resident of Monmouth, Oregon, purchasing 
a farm on which he still makes his home, being now sixty-nine years of age, while the 
mother is sixty-one. 

Their son, Floyd D. Moore, pursued his education in the schools of Nebraska and 
Wyoming. He accompanied his parents on their removal to the Pacific coast country, 
driving a mule team from Wyoming to Oregon. Desirous of securing the best educa- 
tion obtainable, he worked his way through the normal school at Ashland, Oregon, where 
he injured his hip in a game of football. His work in that institution later enabled 
him to secure a life certificate by examination in 1917 as a teacher in the schools of the 
state and he then filled various positions in Portland. 

In 1910 he went to Portland and later followed work as foreman for a contractor, 
doing concrete and excavation work. In the year 1912 he became injured while working 
in this capacity, which necessitated the removal of the hip joint. After recovery from 
this operation he became engaged in teaching school in the state of Washington and 
later was principal at Marquam in Clackamas county, Oregon. He was principal of the 
Sylvan school near Portland for two years. During this time he decided to enter the 
regular profession and became a student in the night school of the North Western 
College of Law where he remained for a year and also pursued a business course dur- 
ing the same time in the Lincoln high school, attending the night sessions in the above 
mentioned schools. Subsequently he became assistant superintendent of the schools of 
Polk county, in which position he served for three years, most capably performing his 
work in that connection. Previous to this, however, he had still further qualified for 
educational work by attendance at the Monmouth (Ore.) Normal school, where he was 
an active member of the council of the student body and also gained prominence as an 



246 HISTOKY OF OREGON 

orator. He thus became exceptionally well fitted for his work as an educator, impart- 
ing clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired and doing much 
to improve the curriculum and the methods of instruction followed in the county. He 
has ever held to high ideals in relation to the schools and has contributed in marked 
measure to the educational advancement of the state. He has not, however, abandoned 
his desire to become a member of the legal profession and is still pursuing his law 
studies. In 1918 Mr. Moore was elected to the office of county clerk and recorder of 
Polk county and his excellent service in that connection led to his reelection without 
opposition, so that he is still in that office. He is systematic, prompt and accurate in 
his work and all departments of the office are efficiently managed, his services proving 
most satisfactory to the public. He has also made investments in farm lands and his 
determined spirit and laudable ambition have been salient features in the attainment 
of success. 

On the 24th of August, 1919, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Marion 
Bliven of Salem, Oregon, who for several years was a successful teacher in the Polk 
county schools. In his political views Mr. Moore is a republican, doing everything in 
his power to advance the welfare of the party and promote its success. He is promi- 
nent and active in public affairs in his section of the state and served as chairman of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Association of Polk county, while for two years he has been 
president of the local Chautauqua Association. He is a member of the city council 
and his influence is always on the side of progress and improvement. His wife is a 
member of the Methodist church and her life is influenced by its teachings. Fraternally 
Mr. Moore is identified with the Masonic order, in which he has held office, and he also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias, being a past chancellor commander of the lodge. 
He is also connected with Abd-Uhl Atef Temple of the Dramatic Order of the Knights 
of Khorassan at Portland and with the Modern Woodmen of America, serving as clerk 
in the last named order at Dallas, Oregon. Mr. Moore is ever ready to give his support 
to measures for the promotion of the public welfare and as a county official he has 
discharged his duties in such a way as to earn the encomiums of the general public. 
He is a self-made man and is deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished, 
lor he started out in life empty-handed and has worked his way steadily upward by 
persistent energy and unfaltering enterprise. His record should serve to inspire and 
encourage others, showing what may be achieved when there is the will to dare and 
to do. 



J. O. WILSON. 



J. O. Wilson, head manager for the Woodmen of the World, was born in Port Huron, 
Michigan, August 23, 1883, and was a little lad of six years when in 1889 he accompanied 
his parents to Montana. His father, Lewis Wilson, became a stockman of that state and 
the son can readily recall the time when they were forced to mount their horses and in 
all haste make for the post in order to escape the outrages of the Indians, the family 
seeking needed protection at the post. The mother, who bore the maiden name of 
Sophronia Church, has passed away. 

In his youthful days J. O. Wilson was a pupil in the public schools near Chinook, 
Montana, and afterward attended the Montana University at Helena and completed hia 
education by a special business course in Caton College at Minneapolis, Minnesota. He 
then returned to Montana and lor one year was connected with the fruit industry In 
that state. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Wilson became manager lor the Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, a position which he occupied for three years. He then went to 
Spokane and took up the fraternal work of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, re- 
maining in that connection for two years. Later he removed to Portland and acted as 
district manager for the Woodmen of the World for two years, at the end of which 
time he was elected clerk of the Portland camp and filled the office for a decade. In 
June, 1920, he was elected head manager for the entire order in the United States, 
which has its headquarters at Denver, and he makes trips four times a year to that 
city. He is the youngest man who has ever filled this position and such was the con- 
fidence reposed in him that he was elected by unanimous vote. The membership of the 
order is now over one hundred and thirty-five thousand and there are five thousand in 
the Portland camp, this being the largest beneficiary camp of any beneficiary order in the 



HISTORY OF OREGON 247 

United States. Mr. Wilson is a member of many fraternal organizations. He possesses 
the ready adaptability, tact and fraternal spirit that makes him so popular in the dif- 
ferent organizations and, moreover, he is a most impressive orator. His efforts are 
contributing much to the upbuilding of the Woodmen of the World and in Oregon alone 
there are now twenty-three thousand members. 

In 1903 Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Clara Will, a daughter of John 
H. and Susanah (Schreckenghast) Will, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, both representatives 
of old American families. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have been born four children: 
Laverne, Harriet, Lorena and Ilo Will, the last named being ten years of age. Mr. 
Wilson is the owner of large property interests in Montana, which he inherited from his 
parents. He is an alert and enterprising business man, possessing splendid powers of 
organization and executive ability. He has always taken an active interest in repub- 
lican politics and was one of the managers of the C. A. Bigelow campaign. He stands 
loyally by any cause which he espouses and manifests a most progressive spirit in his 
support of anything which he undertakes to do. 



CLYDE N. JOHNSTON. 



Clyde N. Johnston, district attorney for Lane county, to which oflice he was elected 
in the November, 1920, election, is justly classed with the able lawyers of Oregon. He 
was born in Logan, Hocking county, Ohio, September 19, 1886, a son of Thomas and 
Josephine (lies) Johnston, also natives of the Buckeye state. The father was likewise 
an attorney, who in the early days became a resident of Fostoria, Ohio, where he engaged 
in the practice of his profession during the remainder of his life, winning a place of 
distinction at the bar of the state. He passed away in November, 1913, but the mother 
survives. 

Clyde N. Johnston was reared and educated at Fostoria, Ohio, and subsequently en- 
tered the law school of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1-908 with the LL. B. degree. He then became associated with 
his father in practice at Fostoria, thus continuing for one year, and in 1909 came west to 
Oregon. For a year he taught school at Cove, Union county, and in 1910 and 1911 was in 
the employ of the Union Meat Company at Portland. He was assistant principal of the 
high school at Eugene from 1911 until 1915 and in the latter year removed to Junction 
City, where he opened a law office. He has since practiced his profession in this city 
and has built up a good clientage, for he has displayed marked ability in the conduct 
of intricate cases. In November, 1920, he was elected to the office of district attorney for 
Lane county, for which he was the nominee on both tickets. He is making an excellent 
record in office, carefully safeguarding the legal interests of his district and at all times 
proving worthy of the trust reposed in him by his constituents. Since 1915 he has also 
served in the office of city attorney and is giving excellent satisfaction in that connec- 
tion, his ability in the line of his profession being widely recognized. He prepares his 
cases with great earnestness, thoroughness and care, presents his cause clearly and 
cogently, and by reason of the unmistakable logic of his deductions wins many cases. 

On the 9th of September, 1908, Mr. Johnston was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Hollopeter, a daughter of Dr. Charles and Eva (Hatfield) Hollopeter. the former a native 
of Ohio and the latter of Kentucky. The father, who was a physician, followed his pro- 
fession in Fostoria for a numlrer of years and in 1903 came west to Oregon, opening 
an office in Portland, where he successfully practiced his profession during his remaining 
years. He passed away in 1917 and the mother survived him for but a year, her death 
occurring in 1918. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston have become the parents of two children: 
Janet, who was born June 7, 1915; and Helen, born April 10, 1918. 

Mr. Johnston gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has taken 
a most active and prominent part in public affairs of his locality, serving for one term 
as mayor of Junction City, and while a resident of Fostoria, Ohio, he served for eight 
months as chief executive of the city and also filled the office of justice of the peace. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and along the line of his profession he is identi- 
fied with the Oregon State Bar Association. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. While residing in Eugene Mr. Johnston 
devoted his summer vacation periods to work as a member of the Fire Patrol in the 
interests of the timber association and the government and during his connection with 



248 HISTORY OF OREGON 

the high school of that city he also acted as athletic director. While the World war was 
in progress he served as chairman of his committee for several local drives and thus 
rendered valuable assistance in promoting the work of the government. The activity 
of Mr. Johnston in relation to the public welfare has thus been of wide scope. He has 
ever been loyal to any public trust reposed in him and at all times his record has been 
such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. He has ever conformed his 
practice to the highest ethical standards of the profession and Lane county numbers 
him among her most able attorneys and valued citizens. 



THOMAS WHITEHORN. 



Thomas Whitehorn, president of the Corvallis State Bank and a leading figure 
in financial circles in Benton county, is also prominent in other connections, having 
been one of the organizers of the Pacific States Insurance Company and the Portland 
Cement Company, and he is likewise the owner of considerable city property. He pos- 
sesses executive ability of a high order and is a man whose plans are well defined and 
promptly executed. Mr. Whitehorn was born in London, England, February 7th, 1859, 
a son of Thomas and Sarah (Stratton) Whitehorn, also natives of that city. The 
father there engaged in business as a butcher and also became known as a veterinary 
surgeon. He passed his entire life in his native city and his demise occurred in 1903, 
while the mother was called to her final rest in 1901. 

Their son, Thomas Whitehorn, was reared in the city of London and his educa- 
tional opportunities were very limited, but he has learned many valuable lessons in the 
school of experience and through broad reading and study has become a well informed 
man. When about twelve years of age he became a sailor, his first employment being 
on the River Thames. For four years he followed a sea-faring life but at length tired 
of that occupation and on the 6th of August, 1878, he arrived in Astoria, Oregon. He 
at first worked as a farm hand and also engaged in fishing on the Columbia river, 
being thus employed for four years. He then went to Cornelius, Oregon, where for a 
year he engaged in business and in December, 18S3, he removed to Corvallis. For 
nineteen and a half years he was engaged in the conduct of a profitable business enter- 
prise in the city and then disposed of his interests, owing to ill health. He was not 
content to lead a life of inactivity, however, and in 1913 he became one of the organ- 
izers of the Corvallis State Bank, of which he was chosen president and has since served 
in that capacity. The bank has enjoyed a healthful growth from the beginning and 
the success of the institution is attributable in large measure to the business sagacity, 
enterprise and close application of Mr. Whitehorn. It is regarded as one of the sound 
financial institutions of Benton county and the other officers of the bank are John 
Fulton and John W. Hyde, vice presidents, and A. A. Schramm, cashier and 0. G. 
Wooten, assistant cashier, all of whom are substantial and representative business men 
of their section of the state. The bank is capitalized for fifty thousand dollars, has a 
surplus and undivided profits amounting to thirty-one thousand, seven hundred and 
ninety-one dollars, its deposits total six hundred sixty-four thousand, four hundred and 
four dollars, while its resources have reached the sum of seven hundred forty-six 
thousand, one hundred and ninety-five dollars. Mr. Whitehorn is a man of splendid 
executive ability and was one of the organizers of the Pacific States Insurance Com- 
pany and the Portland Cement Company. He erected the first and largest fraternity 
house in Corvallis and is owner of considerable city property, including several business 
blocks. His interests are thus broad and varied and his name in connection with 
any enterprise insures its success, for whatever he undertakes he carries forward to 
successful completion. 

In August, 188S, Mr. Whitehorn was united In marriage to Miss Katherine Wells 
and they became the parents of two sons: Claude D.. the elder, is a prominent business 
man of Marshfield, Oregon; Thomas W. was but seventeen years of age at the time of 
the outbreak of the World war and leaving school he enlisted in the navy. He was 
first placed aboard the U. S. Cruiser Frederick, from which he was later transferred 
to five other vessels. At the end of a year he won promotion to the office of first gun 
pointer and during his term of service made seven long voyages. He received his dis- 
charge in August, 1919, and is now continuing his studies at the Oregon Agricultural 
College. 

In his political views Mr. Whitehorn is a democrat and fraternally he is identified 




^^ ^:^/%:A:£c 



<::^yj^yx^ 



HISTORY OF OREGON 251 

with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, being a charter member of the Albany 
lodge, and he is also connected with the Knights of Pythias, having joined the order 
in 1SS4. Mr. Whitehoru is a self-made man who has gained success and prominence 
through individual merit and ability. Although he started out in the business world 
empty-handed he is today a man of affluence and the most envious cannot grudge him 
his success, so honorably has it been won and so worthily used. He is everywhere 
spoken of as a citizen of worth, possessing many sterling traits of character which have 
been of value in the upbuilding and progress of the community and which have won 
for him the high regard of all who know him. 



A. C. BARBER. 



A. C. Barber, who since the 1st of August, 1919, ha.5 served as state insurance 
commissioner, is most acceptably filling that oflice, discharging his duties with effi- 
ciency and conscientiousness. He was born in Daviess county, Indiana, a son of Nelson 
and Mary Barber. The father was an honored pioneer of Indiana, his ancestors emigrat- 
ing from Vermont to that state in 1814, and the mother was also a native of the 
Hoosier state, her parents having removed to that section from Kentucky. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Barber have passed away. 

In the common schools of his native city A. C. Barber acquired his education, after 
which he pursued a business course in Valparaiso College at Valparaiso, Indiana. In 
1906 he came to Portland, Oregon, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to join the general 
agents of the National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh. He remained a 
resident of that city until 1912, when he became deputy in the state insurance depart- 
ment at Salem and state fire marshal, his excellent service in those connections lead- 
ing to his appointment as state fire insurance commissioner by Governor Olcott on the 
1st of August, 1919. He is well qualified for the position, having a thorough knowledge 
of the insurance business, and is proving most competent and faithful as a public 
official. 

Mr. Barber is much interested in photography and has done some notable work 
along amateur lines. He has been very successful in obtaining pictures in their natural 
colors, securing direct colors of lantern slide size, a very recent achievement in 
photography and a result most difficult to obtain. He has perhaps the best collection 
of colored landscapes on the coast and has made remarkable progress along this line. 
He is a man of high principles and substantial qualities, progressive and reliable in 
business, loyal in citizenship and at all times displaying devotion to the duties that 
devolve upon him. 



JOHN N. CASEY. 



As vice president of the Powers Furniture Company, John N. Casey is a prominent 
figure in industrial circles of Portland where he has resided since 1879, or for a period 
of thirty-two years. He is numbered among the wide-awake and aggressive business men 
of the city and actuated at all times by a progressive spirit and unfaltering determina- 
tion he has contributed in large measure to the successful management of the under- 
taking, which is one of the leading furniture establishments of the city. 

Mr. Casey is a native of Wisconsin. He was born at Necedah, August 16, 1S65, a son 
of Patrick and Margaret (Clancy) Casey, both natives of Ireland, and married in Balti- 
more, Maryland. As a boy the father emigrated to America and in 1862 he made his 
way to Wisconsin where he became connected with the lumber industry. There he 
resided until 1879, when he removed to the Pacific northwest, the family home being 
established in Portland. To Mr. and Mrs. Casey were born eleven children, namely: 
Harriet, Ellen, Margaret, Catharine, John N., William H., Edward P. and Fred S., all 
living, and Louise, Fannie and an infant child, who have passed away. 

John N. Casey, the fifth in order of birth, obtained a high school education, 
after which he pursued a course in Armstrong's College of Portland. He first 
became identified with the Powers Furniture Company in 1888 and for five years 
continued in their employ, after which he was connected with the Gadsby Furniture 
Company for a period of eleven years. At the end of that time he returned to the 



Z02 



HISTORY OF OREGON 



Powers Furniture Company, with which he has since continued, his faithful, con- 
scientious service and excellent business ability winning him merited promotions until 
1906 he was made vice president and manager, in which capacities he has sine* 
served. He possesses a thorough understanding of the principles of merchandising, 
executive ability of a high order and a keen insight into business conditions. He 
keeps in close touch with what is being done in all the departments and has succeeded 
in maintaining a high degree of efficiency in the operation of the business, which is one 
of the oldest and most reliable industrial enterprises in the city. 

In 1891 Mr. Casey was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Sharkey, a representative 
of one of the old families of Portland, and they have become the parents of five 
children: Margaret, at home; William Allen, who in April, 1918, enlisted for service 
in the World war and died at Fort Monroe on the 18th of October of the same year, 
a victim of the influenza; John F., who died in infancy; Edward T., a student at 
Columbia University of New York city; and Charles, who is attending grammar 
school. 

Mr. Casey is identified with the Rotary Club and the Woodmen of the World and in 
religious faith he is a Catholic. He is a prominent and active member of the Knights 
of Columbus of which he is a past grand knight and is now serving as chairman of the 
building committee. He resides in an attractive home at No. 537 East Twenty-first, 
North, which he erected in 1911 and the family is prominent in social circles of the 
city. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen who has justly won a place 
among the leading merchants and business men of Portland and he is bending every 
effort and energy toward the legitimate advancement of his house. 



A. C. COOKE. 



One of the old and reliable industrial enterprises of Portland is the Ira F. Powers 
Furniture Company, of which A. C. Cooke has served as secretary since its organ- 
ization under the present firm style. He has devoted his entire life to this line of 
activity and is therefore thoroughly familiar with every phase of the business, while 
his initiative spirit has enabled him to formulate plans which have resulted in the 
enlargement and substantial growth of the undertaking. 

Mr. Cooke is one of Oregon's native sons and has been content to pass his entire 
life within the borders of the state, finding in the Switzerland of America an equable 
climate, unrivaled scenic beauty and excellent business opportunities. He was born 
in Clackamas county on the 5th of April, 1863, a son of William W. and Martha 
(Young) Cooke, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Missouri. 
In the Iron state their marriage occurred and in 1852 they started for Oregon, 
traveling by ox team. On reaching this state they settled in Clackamas county, the 
father taking up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres in the vicinity 
of Damascus. By hard and unremitting labor he at length succeeded in clearing 
one hundred and sixty acres of his land, which was covered with a dense growth of 
timber. He passed away in 1875, while the mother's demise had occurred in the 
year 1872. They became the parents of eight children, namely: Sarah, Mildred, 
Fannie, Henry, Albert, John, A. C. and James. 

A. C. Cooke, the seventh in order of birth, pursued his education in the schools 
of his native state, becoming a pupil in the old Central school which stood on the 
present site of the Portland Hotel. On starting out in the business world he became 
connected with the furniture business as upholsterer for J. W. Birmingham, with whom 
he continued for thirteen years. In 1893 he established business relations with the 
Ira F. Powers Manufacturing Company with which he has since been identified, 
serving as secretary from the time of its incorporation as the Ira F. Powers Furniture 
Company in 1903. The business hris expanded from year to year until it has now 
reached extensive proportions, the warehouse occupying a floor space of one hundred 
and thirty thousand feet, while eighty people are employed in the conduct of the 
enterprise. They handle everything in the line of house furnishings and the firm 
name is a synonym for reliability, integrity and enterprise. As secretary of this 
large undertaking Mr. Cooke is proving entirely equal to the responsibilities which 
devolve upon him and his services are regarded as very valuable in promoting the 
business. 

In 1886 was solemnized the marriage of A. C. Cooke and Miss Valeska Yost, a 



HISTORY OF OREOON 253 

daughter of Professor R. Yost, a well known musical artist. They have become the 
parents of three children: Herbert A., a prominent attorney of Portland; Robert R., 
tire expert for the Paciflc States Rubber Company of Portland; and Alfred E., who 
is attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Cooke is a stanch republican, active in support of the 
principles and candidates of the party but not an office seeker, although he has 
frequently been solicited by his friends to accept positions of public trust. His interest 
in the development and upbuilding of his city is indicated by his membership in the 
Chamber of Commerce and he is also identified with the Woodmen of the World. He 
is regarded as one of the substantial and progressive business men of Portland and 
the fact that he has continued in the field which he entered as a young man is one 
reason for his gratifying success. He is a man of worth to the community by 
reason of his high principles and substantial qualities and many are proud to 
call him friend. 



PERCY M. VARNEY. 



Percy M. Varney, now serving as parole officer of the state penitentiary and who 
previous to this appointment was chief of police of Salem, was born in Lima, New 
York, May 17, 1892, a son of Rev. George R. and Emma (Tibbets) Varney. The 
father, a Baptist minister, has presided over churches of that denomination in various 
states of the Union and during the childhood of their son, Percy, the parents resided 
for a time in Spokane, Washington. Rev. George R. Varney, D. D., is now serving as 
pastor of a church at McMinnville, Oregon, and his labors have been an effective force 
for good in the various communities which he has served. Of their family Roy M., now 
thirty years of age, is residing in Portland. He married Jessie Fresh of Baker City, 
Oregon, and they have become the parents of three children, Dorothy, Evelyn and 
Donald. The other children of Rev. and Mrs. Varney are: Percy M., the subject of 
this review: and Lois B.: Bernice; and Phillip, all attending college. 

Percy M. Varney attended the schools of McMinnville, Oregon, and was graduated 
from the high school of that city in 1911, which he followed by a year's course in 
the University of Nevada. In 1912 he arrived in Salem, becoming identified with the 
police force here. Later he served for two years as constable and was then elected 
chief of police for a term of two years, but at the end of thirteen months resigned in 
order to accept his present appointment as parole officer of the state penitentiary, his 
duty being to secure employment for all paroled men and look after their general 
welfare. His constant aim is to perform his duty to the best of his ability and as 
parole officer his services are proving very valuable to the state. 

On the 1st of January, 1914, Mr. Varney was united in marriage to Miss Ethelyn 
E. Allison of McMinnville, and they have become the parents of a daughter, Esther E. 
He is interested in all that pertains to the welfare of community, commonwealth and 
country and his influence is ever on the side of advancement and improvement. He 
regards a public officer as a servant of the people and he is most conscientiously dis- 
charging the duties of his present position, his record being at all times characterized 
by efficiency, reliability and integrity. 



JAMES LAWRENCE GUTHRIE. 

James Lawrence Guthrie, vice president of the firm of Hill & Company, Inc., and 
manager of its automobile and tractor department, is a prominent figure in business 
circles of Harrisburg, where he is known as a man of integrity and reliability. He 
was born in Jacksboro, Jack county, Texas, October 16, 1S84, a son of James P. and 
Eva (Amos) Guthrie, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. 
In 1883 the father went to Texas, where for two years he engaged in farming, and 
then returned to the Blue Grass state, there following agricultural pursuits for several 
years. Subsequently he removed to Missouri and purchased land in Newton county 
which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for several years. Eventu- 
ally he went to Montana and there resided with his sons until his death, which 



25-1 HISTORY OF OREGON 

occurred in October, 1913. The mother also passed away in that year, her demise 
having occurred in January. 

James L. Guthrie was reared and educated in Missouri and on starting out in 
the business world secured employment as a street car conductor in Carthage, Mis- 
souri, being thus engaged for four years. Going to Salt Lake City, Utah, he was similarly 
employed in that locality for three years and then went to Montana, purchasing two 
sections of land in that state, which he operated tor a period of five years. He then 
traded that property for land in Lane county, Oregon, in 1917, but after cultivating 
the tract for six months he exchanged it for a stock of hardware in Harrisburg, 
Oregon. This establishment he conducted for a short time, when he consolidated his 
business with that of Hill & Company, of which he is now vice president, and he is 
also manager of the automobile department. They carry a seventy thousand dollar 
stock of hardware, harness, implements, furniture, carpets, rugs and general house 
furnishings. They also have the agency for the Ford cars and Fordson tractors and 
have recently erected a fine garage at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. Mr. Guthrie 
is a man of keen business acumen, thoroughly reliable and enterprising, and as vice 
president of Hill & Company he has contributed in substantial measure to the 
growth and expansion of the business, which is now one of large volume and import- 
ance, its annual sales exceeding the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

On the 10th of February, 1906, Mr. Guthrie was united in marriage to Miss Alma 
Safer and they have become the parents of two children: Pauline, who was born 
November 25, 1908; and Marion James, born March 15, 1917. In his political views 
Mr. Guthrie is a democrat and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, while his 
fraternal connections are with the Masons, the Eastern Star, the Rebekahs and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Throughout his career he has closely applied himself 
to the work in hand and has steadily advanced, each forward step bringing him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities until he is now numbered with the sub- 
stantial business men of his part of the state. His sterling traits of character are 
manifest in every relation of life and his record is a most creditable one. 



ALBERT SUTTON. 

Among the leading architectural firms of the northwest is that of Sutton & Whit- 
ney, of which Albert Sutton is the senior member. Thorough preliminary study and 
later practical experience have well qualified him for his chosen life work and he is re- 
garded as one of the most able architects in the Pacific coast country. Mr. Sutton 
was born in Victoria, British Columbia, June 6. 1867, a son of John and Anna B. 
(Dolan) Sutton, the former a native of Delaware, Maryland and the latter of Boston, 
Massachusetts. The family has long been connected with the history of this country, 
representatives of the name having defended American interests in the Revolutionary 
war, while John Sutton, the father, rendered valuable service to the federal govern- 
ment during the Civil war as an engineer in the Pacific squadron of the navy. Follow- 
ing his marriage in 1850 in New Orleans, he went with his bride to California in 1852, 
going by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He always followed a seafaring life and was 
lost in Alaskan waters in January, 1873. In the family were nine children: Julia, 
Margaret, Mave, James, Jennie, John, Ada, Albert and Herbert. 

In the public schools of Portland Albert Sutton pursued his education, after which 
he pursued a scientific course in the University of California. He then became identi- 
fied with the Southern Pacific Railroad as architect of buildings and bridges and 
remained in the employ of the company for three years. He was connected with archi- 
tectural work in Tacoma, Washington, from ISSS until 1895 and in the latter year 
went to San Francisco, California, where he followed his profession until 1910. During 
the next two years he was not active in business, residing on his ranch at Hood River, 
Oregon. In 1912 he became a partner of Harrison A. Whitney, a prominent architect 
of Portland, establishing an oflSce in this city under the firm style of Sutton & 
Whitney and this relationship is still maintained. Their excellent work and thoroughly 
reliable and progressive business methods have secured for them a large and con- 
stantly increasing patronage, so that they have become well known as leading archi- 
tects throughout the Pacific northwest. They have established an office in Tacoma, 
Washington, of which Mr. Sutton has charge, dividing his time between Portland and 
Tacoma and they have erected many of that city's most substantial and beautiful 




ALBERT SUTTON 



HISTORY OF OREGON' 2.17 

business edifices. They are now engaged in constructing tlie Multnomah County In- 
firmary at a cost of one million dollars, the Meier & Frank Warehouse, costing one 
million dollars and the Scottish Rite Cathedrals in Portland and Tacoma, and were 
the architects who designed the Hood River Library regarded as one of the best 
arranged institutions of the kind to be found anywhere in the United States. He also 
constructed many apartment houses and dwellings and has built up a large business 
in California, having remodeled the State Capitol at Sacramento. He also designed 
the Farmers & Merchants Bank at Oakland, the John A. Roebling"s Sons Company's 
building at San Francisco, said to be one of the best examples of fireproof construc- 
tion in the country and the Pacific Hardware & Steel Company's buildings. They have 
thus extended their interests over a broad field and are considered experts in their 
line of work. 

Mr. Sutton has been married twice and by the first union he has two children. 
Alberta and Anna. In 1909 he wedded Maria L. Hewitt, of Tacoma, and their children 
are Rocena and John Hewitt. In his political views he is a republican, interested in 
the welfare of the party but not an office seeker. He is a member of Zeta Psi, a col- 
lege fraternity, and is much interested in athletic sports, belonging to the college base- 
ball and football teams. The Oregon Chapter of the American Institute of Architects 
numbers him among its members and he is also identified with the Tacoma Chamber 
of Commerce. He is a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree in 
the Scottish Rite Consistory and his life has ever been guided by the beneficent teach- 
ings of that order. He is thoroughly familiar with the scientific principles under- 
lying his profession and his activities have ever contributed to public progress and 
improvement as well as to individual success. He resides in Tacoma and is widely 
and favorably known throughout the Pacific northwest, his high professional attain- 
ments and sterling characteristics winning for him the respect and esteem of all with 
whom he has been associated. 



JUDGE JOHN BURNETT. 



In the death of Judge John Burnett of Corvallis, Oregon lost one of its most dis- 
tinguished jurists and statesmen. He was a leader in the ranks of the democratic 
party and left the impress of his individuality and influence as well as his ability upon 
the history of the state. Judge Burnett was born in Louisiana, Pike county, Missouri, 
on the banks of the Mississippi, July 4, 1831, a son of Benjamin F. and Jane (Johnson) 
Burnett, natives of Kentucky. About 1820 the father removed to the west, becoming 
one of the early pioneers of Pike county, Missouri. 

His son, John BuAiett, was reared and educated in that locality and there continued 
to reside until 1849. when he became one of the gold seekers and crossed the plains to 
California. He followed mining on American river and also handled stock, remaining 
active along those lines in the Golden state until the spring of 1858, having in the 
meantime returned to the east and recrossed the plains a second time. In the above 
mentioned year he came to Oregon, taking up his residence at Corvallis, Benton county, 
where he began the study of law in the office of Colonel Kelsey. In 1860 he was 
admitted to the Oregon bar and at once took up the practice of his profession in Cor- 
vallis. His talent and ability in his chosen life work soon won recognition and he 
became known as one of the most eminent representatives of the legal fraternity in his 
section of the state, being accorded a large and representative clientage. In 1870 he 
was called to public office, being elected county judge of Benton county, in which 
position he served for four years. In 1874 he was called to still higher honors, being 
elected associate justice of the supreme court of Oregon, his term expiring in 1876. He 
then resumed the private practice of law and two years later was elected to represent 
Benton county in the state senate, where he served as chairman of the judiciary com- 
mittee. He carefully studied the problems which came up for settlement and gave 
earnest support to all the bills which he believed would prove beneficial to the com- 
monwealth and his record as legislator was a most creditable one. In 1882 he was 
appointed by Governor Thayer judge of the second judicial district to fill out the 
unexpired term of Judge Watson and on the completion of his services in that connec- 
tion he once more took up his private practice, in which he continued active to the time 
of his demise. Judge Burnett was a man of superior intellectual attainments and he 
filled some of the most important offices within the gift of the people of his district. 

Vol. 11—17 



•i.is HISTORY OP OREGON 

While upon the bench his decisions were characterized by a masterful grasp of every 
problem presented for solution and by marked equity. He was strictly fair and im- 
partial in all of his rulings and his decisions were sustained by higher courts upon 
appeal. He was a man of wide legal learning and ranked with the most eminent 
jurists of the state. Judge Burnett was also interested in agricultural pursuits, owning 
a valuable farm of one hundred acres, of which he devoted twenty-five acres to the raising 
of prunes, and he also engaged in raising fine stock on his place, which is situated 
near the city of Corvallis. 

In June, 1859, Judge Burnett was united in marriage to Miss Martha Hinton, who 
was born in Franklin county, Missouri, September 28, 1838, and is a daughter of Hon. 
Rowland B. and Elizabeth (Bramell) Hinton, the former a native of Franklin county, 
Missouri, and the latter of Virginia. In 1846 the father crossed the plains to Oregon 
with ox teams, being six months in making the journey. He arrived in Benton county 
in 1847 and there took up a donation claim, which he cleared and developed, con- 
tinuing to operate his land for several years. About nineteen years prior to his demise 
he sold that property and purchased land in Lincoln county, which he cultivated for 
about eight years and then sold, removing to Monroe, Benton county, where he resided 
with his sons throughout the remainder of his life. His wife passed away in 1853. To 
Judge and Mrs. Burnett were born seven children, namely: Ida, who married T. 
Callahan, a merchant of Corvallis, who died November 8, 1914; Alice, whose demise 
occurred October 8, 1891; Burke T., who died June 11, 1862; John C, who passed away 
on the 22d of July, 1877; Martha J., who is the wife of R. H. Houston, a prominent 
hardware merchant of Corvallis; Brady, a resident of Canyonville, Oregon; and Bruce 
whose home is in Portland. 

In his political views Judge Burnett was a democrat and a leader in the councils 
of his party. In 1865 he was made a presidential elector and also served as mayor of 
Corvallis for several terms, being first elected to the office in May, 1891. He gave to 
the city a most efficient and businesslike administration, characterized by needed reforms 
and improvements, his influence being ever on the side of advancement and improve- 
ment. Fraternally he was identified with the Masonic order, belonging to the blue 
lodge and the chapter, and in religious faith he was a Congregationalist. Judge Burnett 
passed away in March, 1900, at the age of sixty-nine years, after an illness of two 
weeks, and his death was most keenly felt by his associates, friends and relatives and 
Irreparably by his family, for he was a devoted husband and father. In every relation 
he was true to high and honorable principles and never faltered in the choice between 
right and wrong but always endeavored to follow the course sanctioned by his conscience 
and good judgment. He was a man who would have been an acquisition to any com- 
munity, his irreproachable character no less than his achievements giving him a 
Commanding position and compelling his recognition as one destirfed to lead in anything 
he undertook. 



JOHN W. FERGUSON. 



John W. Ferguson, who since the 1st of July, 1919, has served as a member of the 
state Industrial accident commission, is also well known in other connections, being an 
expert public accountant, and he was for four years state insurance commissioner. His 
activities have thus covered a broad field, showing him to be a keen and intelligent 
business man with a rapid grasp of details and clear insight as regards financial con- 
ditions. He was born in Mascoutah, St. Clair county, Illinois, April 9, 1854, a son of 
George W. Ferguson, a native of Baltimore, Maryland. The father engaged in business 
as a contractor and builder and In 1850 he became a resident of Illinois, removing to 
St. Louis, Missouri, in 1880. In 1852 he married Rebecca E. White, a native of New 
York, and both passed away in St. Louis, the mother's demise occurring in 1899, while 
the father was called to his final rest In 1901. 

In the public schools of Illinois John W. Ferguson acquired his education, and 
entering the business world he became a telegraph operator in the employ of the 
Western Union Company in their St. Louis office. He was subsequently promoted to 
the position of manager of their office at Marshall, Texas, and followed telegraphy for 
five years, or until the 1st of January, 1878, when he went to Nebraska, crossing the 
Missouri river by ferry at Plattsmouth. He settled at Lincoln and became identified 
with the Burlington Railroad Company, being employed in the despatcher's office for 



HISTORY OF OREGON iT)!! 

several months. In April, 1878, he was appointed deputy clerk of Lancaster county, in 
which office he served for two years, and he then became general traveling collector for 
the Marsh Harvester Company, his territory comprising the South Platte district and 
the counties on the northern border of Kansas. In 1883 he went to Minden, Nebraska, 
where he made his first independent venture in commercial circles, establishing a farm 
loan and banking business, serving as vice president of the Kearney County Bank until 
1898. In 1893 he was appointed registrar of the United States land office at Lincoln. 
Nebraska, serving for four years under the administration of President Cleveland and 
for one year under President McKinley. 

On the 4th of July, 1903, Mr. Ferguson came to Portland, Oregon. In July, 1904, 
he was appointed chief deputy of the tax collecting department of Multnomah county 
and served in that capacity for two years. From 1906 until 1911 he was engaged in 
auditing, including the accounts of the Title Guarantee & Trust Company and the 
Oregon Trust & Savings Bank of Portland and all the offices of Multnomah county, the 
latter audits covering a period of ten years, also making regular audits for Baker and 
Douglas counties, Oregon, and Wahkiakum county, Washington. In September, 1911, he 
was appointed state insurance commissioner by Governor West, which position he filled 
until January, 1915. In April of that year he became a stockholder of the Columbia 
Life & Trust Company of Portland, of which he was made comptroller, and served 
in that capacity until the business was sold in 1917. He then resumed his business as a 
public accountant and was active along that line until the 1st of July, 1919, when he 
was appointed by Governor Olcott as a member of the state industrial accident commis- 
sion, in which capacity he is now serving, rendering excellent service in that connec- 
tion, for he is a man of unquestioned business ability and integrity, with broad 
experience along many lines of activity. 

On the 14th of November, 1884, Mr. Ferguson was united in marriage to Miss 
Myrta G. Willits, a native of New Boston, Mercer county, Illinois, and they have 
become the parents of two children: Guenn and John W., Jr. Fraternally Mr. Fergu- 
son is a Mason, having membership in Minden Lodge No. 127, A. F. & A. M., which he 
joined in 1885; Washington Chapter No. 18. R. A. M.. Portland, Oregon, with which 
he became affiliated in 1904, having been demitted from Kearney Chapter No. 23, R. A. M., 
Kearney, Nebraska, which he joined in 1886; Oregon Commandery No. 1, K. T., of 
Portland, Oregon, having been demitted from Mt. Hebron Commandery No. 12, K. T., at 
Kearney, Nebraska, which he joined in 1887; and he belongs to Sesostris Temple, 
A. A. O. Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Lincoln, Nebraska, holding membership there 
since 1889. His club relations are with the Progressive Business Men's Club of Port- 
land, Oregon, and the Commercial Club of Salem, Oregon. Mr. Ferguson is a member of 
the American Institute of Accountants of New York and the Oregon State Society of 
Certified Public Accountants. He has been called upon to fill many positions of public 
trust and in his work he has ever been most thorough, efficient and painstaking, endeav- 
oring at all times to perform his duty to the best of his ability. As a business man and 
as a public official Mr. Ferguson has made an excellent record and his course has been 
characterized by integrity and honor in every relation, commanding for him the 
respect and goodwill of those with whom he has been associated. 



ISIDOR KAUFMAN. 



Isidor Kaufman, who is closely associated with the history of commercial devel- 
opment in Portland, has for many years been engaged in the manufacture and sale 
of hats and his success in this venture is indicated in his recent purchase of some of 
the most valuable down-town realty of the city. A native of Roumania, he was born 
in Bucharest, April 27, 1881, and there received his commercial education and studied 
several languages. His father, Philip Kaufman, who was also born in Bucharest, became 
a grain merchant and died about seventeen years ago. The mother, who bore the 
maiden name of Liza Goldstin, has also passed away and, like the others of the family, 
she was a native of Roumania. The household numbered five sons and two daughters 
and three of the sons are now in America, one being in Los Angeles and one in New 
York. 

The third brother on this side of the Atlantic is Isidor Kaufman of this review, 
who came to the United States in 1903, landing in New York, where he resided for a 
vear. In 1904 he crossed the continent to Portland and here entered the hat business 



2(i0 HISTORY OF OREGON 

as a manufacturer. He has since conducted this enterprise and also does both a 
wholesale and retail business in the sale of hats. He manufactures all kinds of hats 
and was the first merchant to place upon the market a two-dollar hat, while his five- 
dollar bat, as he believes, is the best manufactured in the entire country for that 
price. He has likewise established a cleaning and reblocking department and employs 
six men and women in cleaning hats alone. He sells to the trade outside of Portland 
and enjoys an enviable reputation as a progressive business man. He has recently 
purchased a valuable lot at the northeast corner of Third and Stark streets, for which 
he paid thirty-five thousand dollars, and upon this lot he maintains one of his retail 
salesrooms — for he has several. 

About seventeen years ago Mr. Kaufman was united in marriage to Miss Pauline 
Adler, a native of Roumania, and to them have been born four children: Louis, Ernest, 
Harry and Sidney, all natives of Portland. One of his sons, Louis Kaufman, fifteen 
years of age, has won fame as a violinist. 

Mr. Kaufman is widely known in fraternal and club circles. He has taken the 
Scottish Rite and Shriner degrees of Masonry, is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, with the B'nai B'rith and with the Portland Press Club. He is 
actuated by a most progressive spirit in all that he undertakes and deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, as he has steadily worked his way upward. Some 
years ago he returned to Europe to study the hat industry in all of its phases and 
returning to America has since given his patrons the benefit of the knowledge and 
experience which he there acquired. 



WILLIAM RIDDELL, SR. 



William Riddell, Sr., a substantial farmer and stock raiser of Polk county, re- 
siding two and a half miles west of Monmouth, is a native of Scotland, his birth 
having occurred in Aberdeen, October 12, 1844. His parents, James and Isabelle 
(Tytler) Riddell, were also natives of the land of hills and heather, where the father 
followed the occupation of landscape gardening. He spent his entire life in his native 
country, passing away in October, 1905, while the mother's demise occurred in April, 
1908. 

Their son, William Riddell, Sr., was reared and educated in Scotland and on 
starting out to earn a livelihood was first employed as a farm hand and later took 
up the work of landscape gardening, with which he was connected for three years. 
In 1866 he sought the opportunities offered in the new world, residing for a time in 
Canada and also in the state of California. In 1870 he came to Oregon, renting land 
in Linn county, which he continued to operate for seven years, and then removed 
to Polk county, purchasing a section of land two miles west of Monmouth. He has 
cleared and developed two hundred and seventy-five acres of the tract, adding many 
improvements and bringing the land to a high state of productivity as the result of 
his indefatigable labor, determination and industry. Of the original section he has 
sold all but four hundred acres, but has purchased additional land and now owns 
eleven hundred acres in all. For the past thirty years lie has been engaged in raising 
pure bred Angora goats and Cotswold and Lincoln sheep, generally keeping on hand 
six hundred head of the former and four hundred head of the latter. He exhibits his 
stock at the state fairs and live stock shows and in 1920 was an exhibitor at all of 
the principal fairs held in the state of Washington. He is one of the best known stock- 
men in the northwest and has been very successful in his operations along that line, pos- 
sessing an intimate knowledge of the business. He is interested in modern develop- 
ments along agricultural lines; believes in scientific methods and keeps abreast of 
the times in every way. 

On the 1st of December, 1869, Mr. Riddell was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
M. Rae, and fhey became the parents of nine children, namely: Mary I., Margaret, 
William, Jr., David, James, Edward, John, Ernest and Leslie. Three of the sons are 
in partnership with their father, assisting him in his farming and stock-raising opera- 
tions. The wife and mother passed away December 14. 1907, after a short illness, and her 
loss was the occasion of deep sorrow to her family and to her many friends in the 
community where she had so long resided. 

Mr. Riddell gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for two 
terms he served as county commissioner. He is a member of the Presbyterian church 



HISTORY OF OREGON 263 

and his life is ever guided by its teachings. His genuine personal worth and his 
activity in a useful line of endeavor have combined to make him one of the enter- 
prising and representative men of this section whose careers have been influential 
factors in agricultural development. 



PHILIP V. W. FRY. 



Portland has always been free from the boom conditions which produce inflated 
values in real estate that ultimately must bring disaster to some investors. On the 
other hand the steady growth of the city has resulted in a gradual and substantial 
advance in realty prices and the real estate men of Portland have constituted an import- 
ant element in the city's growth and improvement. To this class belongs Philip V. W. 
Fry, who in 1910 formed a partnership under the firm name of Stewart-Fry & Company. 
Since the death of Mr. Stewart, Mr. Fry has conducted the business under his own name. 
He was born September 4, 1883, in the city which is still his home, and is a son of 
Willis B. Fry, a native of New York, who came to Portland in the early '70s and 
assumed the northwestern management of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He 
occupied that position for twelve years and then went to California, becoming Pacific 
coast manager for the same company. Ten years ago he resigned the position which 
he had so ably filled for a long period and is now living retired at Pasadena, California. 
In early manhood he wedded Anna Van Wagenen, also a native of New York, who died 
in 1891, and a daughter, Elsie, has passed away. 

Philip V. W. Fry, the son of the family, was educated in the public schools of Oak- 
land, California, and when nineteen years of age became identified with the insurance 
business. Later he turned his attention to the real estate business in Oakland and in 
1908 returned to Portland, where he established a real estate office and has since been 
active in this field. He handles only inside property, both improved and unimproved. 
In 1910 he formed a partnership with F. W. Stewai't, under the firm name of Stewart- 
Fry & Company, and in that year and the succeeding one they made some of the 
largest sales in Portland, running as high as five hundred and seventy-five thousand 
dollars, while many of their sales were in the two hundred thousand dollar class. Mr. 
Fry is a very energetic young man and possesses a large outlook on affairs. He has 
operated in various sections of the city and wherever he goes is quoted as an authority 
on realty values. He has been instrumental in putting over some of the largest deals 
in Portland and has an extensive clientage who recognize that progressiveness, enter- 
prise and reliability are among his dominant qualities. He is now serving on the 
appraisal committee of the Portland Realty Board. 

In politics Mr. Fry is a republican and is a most ardent worker for clean politics, 
being identified with many of the wholesome and purifying influences which have been 
springing up in the political parties in recent years. He is an active member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and his cooperation at all times can be counted upon to further 
any plan or measure that is of civic worth to his native city. 



COE A. McKENNA. 



Coe A. McKenna, who through his real estate operations has contributed largely 
to the development and upbuilding of Portland and who is associated with many of the 
organizations which are constantly working for the improvement and progress of 
the city, was born in Omaha, Nebraska, October 22, 1887. His father, Francis I. 
McKenna, was a native of Ohio and was also a realty man. He came to Portland, 
April 1, 1889, and here established a real estate oflice, which he conducted to the time 
of his death in 1914, operating largely on the peninsula, where he had large holdings. 
He founded the United Artisans, a fraternal organization, which has its headquarters 
in Portland and is today the wealthiest organization of its kind per capita in the 
United States. They have recently purchased a fine modern building on Broadway 
and Oak streets in Portland. Francis I. McKenna was united in marriage to Miss 
Laura Linebaugh, a native of Ohio, who also passed away in 1914. 



2C4 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Coe A. McKenna was but two years of age when brought by his parents to the 
Pacific coast and in the public schools of Portland he pursued his education, passing 
through consecutive grades to the high school and afterward attending Columbia 
University of Portland. He then went to Indiana, where he became a student in Notre 
Dame University, and he likewise attended the College of Political Science of George 
Washington University in Washington, D. C, being there graduated with the Bachelor 
of Arts degree in February, 1910, and the Master of Arts degree in June of the same 
year. 

With his return to Portland Mr. McKenna entered business as the successor of 
his father, who retired at that time and turned the business over to his son. The 
latter has since conducted a general real estate office at 82 Fourth street and handles 
his own property. He is thoroughly familiar with realty values, has built many homes 
in Portland, thus transforming unsightly vacancies into attractive residence sections, 
and he takes great Interest in the development of the city. 

Mr. McKenna's public work has been of an important character and his labors have 
been far-reaching and resultant. He is the president of the Portland Realty Board, 
also vice president of the Northwest Real Estate Association and a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and City Planning Commission for the City of Portland. He 
is likewise chairman of the Industrial Development Committee of the Associated Civic 
Clubs. This is a most important position, the personnel of the committee being com- 
posed of representatives from several of the leading organizations of Portland. These 
men are constantly studying business conditions and the opportunities for Portland's 
improvement and Mr. McKenna, as chairman, is doing splendid work in this connection. 
In June, 1921, Mr. McKenna was appointed by Governor Olcott, a member of the 
Committee on Tax Investigation for the State of Oregon. 

In 1912 was celebrated the marriage of Coe A. McKenna and Miss Lillian C. 
O'Brien, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. O'Brien, early residents of Portland. Her 
father is the general manager of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company and is 
president of the Portland Terminal Company. To Mr. and Mrs. McKenna have been 
born three children: James Francis, Patricia Ann and Coe A. J. Mr. McKenna is 
much interested in politics and gives stalwart support to the republican party. He 
belongs also to the Commercial Club, the Press Club, the United Artisans and the 
Multnomah Club. He is appreciative of the social amenities of life and his personal 
characteristics are such as make for popularity among all with whom he comes into 
contact. 



JAMES McCAIN. 



In the demise of James McCain at his home in McMinnville in August, 1919, Oregon 
lost one of its most noted criminal lawyers and honored pioneers, who for nearly 
seventy years had resided within the borders of the state. He was a man of high pro- 
fessional attainments and his probity, his sincerity and his genial and kindly nature 
drew to him a host of friends and admirers to whom his memory will ever remain a 
blessed benediction. In every relation he was true to high and honorable principles and 
never faltered in the choice between right and wrong, but always endeavored to 
follow the course sanctioned by conscience and good Judgment. 

Mr. McCain was a native of Indiana and in 1853, when but eight years of age, was 
brought by his parents across the plains to Oregon, the family home being established 
near Sheridan, in Yamhill county, where the father took up a donation claim. The 
son here attended the common schools, after which he pursued a course in McMinn- 
ville College and later took up the study of law under the preceptorship of P. C. 
Sullivan, whose daughter he subsequently married. He was admitted to the bar In 
September, 1868, and going to Dallas, Polk county, he there opened an office but 
shortly afterward removed to La Fayette, which was at that time the county seat 
of Yamhill county. Following the removal of the county seat to McMinnville he here 
took up his residence and subsequently became associated in practice with Hon. William 
T. Vinton, a most harmonious relationship, which was continued under the firm style 
of McCain & Vinton until the demise of the senior partner. They became known as 
the leading attorneys of their section of the state and their superior professional 
attainments won for them a large clientele. Mr. McCain became noted among lawyers 
for his wide research and the provident care with which he prepared his cases. 
While well grounded in the principles of common law when admitted to the bar, he 



HISTORY OF OKELiOX 26r, 

continued throughout his professional life a diligent student of those elementary prin- 
ciples which constitute the basis of all legal science and this knowledge served him 
well in many a legal battle before the court. He specialized in criminal law and was 
very successful in the trial of cases, defending a greater number of men charged with 
murder than any other attorney in Oregon, and in no instance was the death penalty 
imposed upon one of his clients. He was equally successful as a prosecutor and as a 
criminal lawyer he gained a state-wide reputation. His high professional ability led 
to his selection for public office and he was elected to the office of district attorney for 
the third judicial district, which comprised Marion, Linn, Polk, Yamhill and Tillamook 
counties, serving in that capacity for two terms, having also filled the position of post- 
master of McMinnville, Oregon. His official record was a most creditable one, character- 
ized by strict integrity and the utmost devotion to duty. 

Mr. McCain was united in marriage to Miss Electa Sullivan, a daughter of P. C. 
Sullivan, and her demise occurred in 1906. They became the parents of three daughters, 
namely: Ethel, who married William Palmer, a resident of Washington; Ivaline, the 
wife of James Wells of Los Angeles, California; and Mabel, who married O. H. Parker, 
a resident of McMinnville. In his political views Mr. McCain was a progressive 
republican and for fifty years was one of the leaders of his party in Yamhill county. 
He was a man who would have been an acquisition to any community, his irreproach- 
able character no less than his achievements giving him a commanding position and 
compelling his recognition as one destined to lead in anything he undertook. 



SAMUEL W. GAINES. 



An excellent farm property of two hundred acres pays tribute to the care and 
labor bestowed upon it by its owner, Samuel W. Gaines, who dates his residence in this 
state from 1852 and is therefore entitled to classification with Oregon's honored 
pioneers. He was born in Andrew county, Missouri, January 24, 1843, a son of Willis 
and Louise (Crowley) Gaines, natives of Kentucky. The father followed the occupation 
of farming in the Blue Grass state and about 1838 removed to the west, taking up 
land in Andrew county, Missouri, which he cleared and developed, continuing to reside 
thereon until 1852, when with ox teams and wagons he started across the plains for 
Oregon. He made the trip in three months and fifteen days, establishing a new record, 
for in those early days it usually took about six months to accomplish the long and 
arduous journey across the plains. Upon his arrival in Linn county on the 15th of 
August, 1852, he purchased a half section of improved land and two hundred bushels 
of wheat, for which he paid the sum of fourteen hundred dollars, and devoted his atten- 
tion to the further cultivation and improvement of his property, later acquiring two 
other farms, which he subsequently gave to Samuel W. Gaines and his brother. The 
father continued the operation of his ranch until 1887, when he removed to Sodaville, 
Oregon, where he lived retired until his demise on the 3d of September, 1888, at the age 
of seventy-eight years. He had long survived the mother, who passed away February 
15, 1854. 

Samuel W. Gaines attended school for a short time in Missouri but the greater part 
of his education was acquired in Oregon, for he came to this state with his parents 
when nine years of age. At that time the country was still wild and undeveloped and 
he pursued his studies in the district schools of Linn county, the schoolhouse being a 
log cabin of crude construction. In 1859 he became a student in the high school at 
McMinnville, Oregon, and remained with his parents until he reached the age of 
eighteen, when he married and established a home of his own, operating a farm which 
his father had given him. For eight years he continued to cultivate that property, to 
which he added many improvements, and then traded it for his present ranch of two 
hundred acres, which he has greatly improved and developed. The land is now rich 
and productive, but when he purchased the tract it was covered with timber, and it 
required long years of arduous and unremitting toil to bring about its present high 
state of development. Mr. Gaines has also cleared and developed two other farms 
and his life has been a most busy, active and useful one. crowned with well deserved 
success. He thoroughly understands the science of agriculture and farming is to him a 
most congenial occupation. Although seventy-seven years of age, he is as vigorous 
and active as a man of fifty, indicating that his life has been well lived. The home in 
which Mr. Gaines and his family reside was erected in 1852, but he has since remodeled 



266 HISTORY OF OREGON 

it, adding many modern improvements and conveniences. For nine years he specialized 
in the raising ot pure bred poultry, having as many as thirty varieties, and was very 
successful along that line of activity. 

Mr. Gaines has been married four times. His first union was with Miss Susan 
South, whom he wedded on the 19th of September, 1861, and they became the -parents 
ot tour children, namely: Coleman, who is a farmer residing near Crabtree, Oregon; 
Addie, the wife ot J. H. Poindexter of Scio; Ida, who married R. H. Graham and 
resides near Monitor, Oregon; and Almona, who died in 1878. The wife and mother 
passed away in February, 1878, and on September 1st of that year Mr. Gaines was 
united in marriage to Susie Beard, by whom he had two children: Theodore, a resi- 
dent of the state of Washington; and Beta, who died at the age of nine months. Mrs. 
Gaines passed away in 1887 and on the 12th of June, 1888, Mr. Gaines wedded 
Margaret Graham, whose demise occurred in 1900. His fourth union was with Eliza- 
beth Crabtree, whom he married on the 22d of January, 1899. She was born in 
Missouri in 1840, her parents being John J. and Melinda (Yeary) Crabtree, the former 
a native of Virginia and the latter of Kentucky. In 1845 her parents emigrated from 
Independence, Missouri, to Oregon, becoming pioneer settlers of Linn county, where the 
father became a substantial farmer and a man of prominence in his community, the 
town of Crabtree being named in his honor. He passed away on the 28th of March, 
1892, at the venerable age of ninety-two years, while the mother's demise occurred in 
1898, when she had reached the advanced age of ninety years. They reared a family of 
fifteen children, of whom five were born in Virginia, five in Missouri and five in Oregon, 
and six of the sons participated in the Washington and Rogue River Indian wars. 

In his political views Mr. Gaines is a democrat and he is much interested in the 
cause of public education, having served on the school board for a number of years. 
Mrs. Gaines is a Baptist in religious faith and her life is guided by its teachings. Mr. 
Gaines has worked diligently and persistently as the years have passed, meeting the 
hardships and privations of pioneer life and overcoming the difficulties and obstacles 
that always confront one in business. Industry has been the basic element in his 
success and he is now classed with the prosperous farmers and honored pioneers of 
his section ot the state. 



WILLIAM WOLF HICKS, M. D. 

Dr. William Wolf Hicks, a man of advanced scientific attainments, who since 
April, 1909, has been engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Junction 
City, was born at Ligonier, Indiana, July 21, 1872, a son of William R. and Barbara 
E. (Wolf) Hicks, the former a native of Yorkshire, England, while the latter was 
born in Ohio. The father was brought to America by his parents when but eight 
years of age and in the schools of this country he pursued his education. During the 
Civil war he proved his loyalty and devotion to his adopted country by enlisting as a 
member of the One Hundred and Sixty-fourth Ohio Infantry, with which he served 
for over four years, participating in many hotly contested battles and enduring many 
hardships and privations. After the close of the war he went to Indiana and there 
followed his trade of carpenter, builder and cabinet-maker for several years, subse- 
quently purchasing land which he cleared and developed, erecting thereon substantial 
barns and outbuildings and converting it into a valuable property, which he operated 
the remainder of his life. He became a man of prominence in his community and was 
several times called to public office. He passed away in March, 1913, at the age ot 
seventy years, while the mother's demise occurred in September, 1902, when she was 
fifty-nine years of age. 

William W. Hicks attended the district schools in Indiana and later pursued a 
preparatory course in Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio, after which he en- 
tered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Cincinnati, where he was a 
student for three years, completing his fourth year in the study of medicine at the 
State University ot California at Los Angeles. Actuated by the laudable desire to 
obtain a good education, Dr. Hicks worked his way through college and when he 
arrived in Oregon on the Sth day of July, 1902, his cash capital consisted of but 
twenty dollars, of which amount ten dollars was required for the state examination. 
After his admission to practice he went to La Fayette, Yamhill county, Oregon, and 
there he opened an office, but remained only for a period of four months and then 



HISTORY OF OREGON 2C7 

went to Ashland, Oregon, where he practiced until 1905. For the next two years 
he followed his profession at St. Johns, Oregon, and then went to Silverton, there 
maintaining an office until 1909. In that year he went to San Francisco and com- 
pleted a postgraduate course of six months in the College of Physicians & Surgeons, 
thus promoting his proficiency in his profession. In April, 1909, he located for prac- 
tice in Junction City, where he has remained. His long practice and his close study 
have developed a high degree of efficiency that places him in the front rank among 
the able physicians and surgeons of his section of the state and his practice is now 
extensive and of a most important character. He is local surgeon for the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company and has ever kept in touch with the trend of modern pro- 
fessional thought, research and investigation through wide reading and study. Dr. 
Hicks has not limited his attention to his professional activities, but is a man of 
excellent business qualifications, identified with many of the leading mercantile interests 
of his section of the state, being a stockholder in the Lane County Fruit Growers Asso- 
ciation, the Pacific States Fire Insurance Company and the Junction City Warehouse 
Company. He also has extensive property holdings, being the owner of a valuable 
ranch of one hundred and eighty-four acres and another comprising one hundred and 
eighty-six acres, both in Lane county. They are well improved farms and he is now 
leasing them and he is likewise the owner of city property, which he leases. He owns 
the building in which his office is situated and also his residence, which consists of 
eight rooms and is one of the finest and most modern homes in Junction City. He has 
great faith in the future of this state, which he has clearly demonstrated by his 
extensive investments in real estate, in which he has met with an unusual degree of 
success and has been instrumental in inducing several families from his home state 
to locate in this region. He is thoroughly familiar with the topography of the state and 
the countless opportunities here offered to the man of energy, ability and determina- 
tion, and has made several trips over the state, traversing the country with teams 
before the era of the automobile, greatly appreciating the wonderful scenic beauty of 
Oregon. 

On the 28th of January, 1917, Dr. Hicks was united in marriage to Miss Katherine 
E. Swank and they have a large circle of friends in the city where they reside. The 
Doctor is a republican in his political views and has ever been interested in the welfare 
and progress of his community, serving as a member of the town council. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church, and his professional 
connections are with the Oregon State and Central Willamette Medical Societies and 
the American Medical Association. He is a patriotic and loyal American and while 
a resident of Indiana was a member of Company C, Indiana State Guard, with which 
he served for three years. During the recent war with Germany he became a member 
of the Volunteer Medical Corps, in which connection he rendered most important and 
valuable service to the country, and he was also active in promoting all local drives. 
Dr. Hicks is numbered among the self-made men who owe their advancement and 
prosperity directly to their own efforts, for he started out in life empty-handed and by 
his perseverance has gained the place which he now occupies as a distinguished mem- 
ber of the medical profession, a progi-essive and enterprising business man and a 
patriotic, public-spirited citizen. 



JAY F. POWELL. 



Modern agriculture requires for its development an efficiency and thorough knowl- 
edge which amounts almost to a science and it is becoming recognized as an occupation 
in which practical methods result in a high degree of prosperity. Jay F. Powell in 
the cultivation of a valuable and productive farm of one hundred acres situated two 
and a half miles northwest of Monmouth, exemplifies the truth of this statement. His 
entire life has been passed in Oregon and he is a worthy representative of one of 
its best known pioneer families. He was born in Linn county, Oregon, March 2, 1869, 
and is a son of Franklin S. and Louisa Jane (Peeler) Powell, extended mention of 
whom is made elsewhere in this work in connection with the sketch of Dr. J. M. 
Powell. 

Jay F. Powell was but five years of age at the time of the removal of the family 
to Polk county and in the public schools of Monmouth he pursued his education, later 
becoming a student in the State Normal school, from which he was graduated with 



2fi8 HISTORY OF OREGON 

the class of 1889. He then foi- a time assisted his father in the cultivation of the 
homestead and subsequently studied vocal music in the conservatory at Quincy, 
Illinois, after which he toured the country as a member of a male quartet, also doing 
professional singing in Portland churches and during political campaigns. On his 
return home he again became associated with his father in the operation of the 
home farm, being thus active until the latter's retirement. He now resides on the home 
place, having inherited forty-iive acres of the estate following his father's demise, and 
has also purchased an additional tract of fifty-six acres, so that he is now the owner 
of one hundred acres of rich and productive land. He follows the most progressive 
methods in the cultivation of his farm, upon which he has placed many improvements, 
converting it into one of the attractive places of Polk county. He is also engaged in 
stock raising, specializing in the breeding of high grade Cotswold sheep, and his labors 
have ever been of a constructive nature, intelligently carried forward, resulting in the 
attainment of substantial success. He is also a stockholder in the First National Bank 
of Monmouth and his investments are wisely and judiciously made. 

On the 15th of June, 1905, Mr. Powell was united in marriage to Miss Augusta 
Mulkey and they became the parents of two children, namely: Morris M., born No- 
vember 3. 1906; and Wallace J., whose birth occurred November 27, 1907. Both are attend- 
ing school. The wife and mother passed away in October, 1908, after a year's illness, 
and her loss was deeply felt by her family and a large circle of friends, owing to her 
many lovable traits of character. 

In his political views Mr. Powell is a republican and is much interested in educa- 
tional work, having served as school director and clerk for the past twenty years. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Yeomen, and his religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Christian church, in the work of which he is actively interested, 
serving for a number of years as director of the choir. His genuine personal worth 
and his activity in a useful line of endeavor have combined to make him one of the 
enterprising and representative men of this section whose careers have been influential 
factors in agricultural development. 



GEORGE L. PARKER. 



One of the important commercial enterprises of Portland is the G. L. Parker 
Markets, Parker's Market, City JIarket, and Beaver JIarket, of which George L. Parker 
is proprietor and in this connection is at the head of large business interests, his 
annual sales reaching more than a half million dollars. He is also a well known turf- 
man, owning some of the finest bred harness stock in the country. Mr. Parker is a 
native of Canada. He was born in Toronto in 1S64, a son of Captain George and 
Jane (Hoag) Parker, the former an English ofllcer and the latter a native of Canada 
and of Scotch descent. Emigrating to Canada, the father became superintendent of 
a Toronto steamship line, retaining that position for many years. He passed away 
in 1920 at the age of eighty-two years, while the mother's demise occurred in 1880. 
In their family were six children: E. M., a resident of Toronto, Canada: George L., 
of this review; Arthur E., who passed away at his home in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1919; 
Harry, who died in 1919 as the result of a railroad accident; Lillian, who became the 
wife of Major C. Smith of Toronto; and Minnie, the wife of Harry Wells, also a resi- 
dent of Toronto. 

In the schools of Canada George L. Parker pursued his education to the age or 
sixteen years, when he went to Chicago, where he secured a position in a meat market 
and has since devoted his attention to this branch of business activity. In 1886 he left 
Chicago and making his way to Portland entered the employ of L. Zimmerman, who 
was at that time one of the leading meat packers and later became president of the 
board of aldermen during the administration of Mayor Williams. For a number of 
years Mr. Parker was identified with Mr. Zimmerman's business interests in tnis city 
opening the Franklin Market, which was the first retail market employing twenty or 
more meat cutters and clerks and was owned by the Union Meat Company. In 1892 
he went to Tacoma, Washington, where he established and managed the Bay City 
Market, later becoming manager of the Pacific Packing Company's plant. He returned 
to Portland in 1S95 and purchased the Franklin Market, continuing in this connection 
for three years. In 1899 he went to Butte, Montana, and in connection with the 
Walker & Gibbs Live Stock Company spent four years in that city and in Anaconda, 




GEORGE L. PARKER 



HISTORY OF OKEGOX 1^71 

dividing his time between the two places. On the expiration of that period he returned 
to Portland, where he engaged in business independently, opening a market at No. 149 
First street. In order to establish this enterprise he was obliged to borrow the sum 
of nine hundred dollars, which amount was loaned him by William S. Ladd, one of 
the pioneer bankers of the city, although he had no security to offer, Mr. Ladd trusting 
implicitly to his integrity and honor. That he made no mistake in so doing is indi- 
cated in the present standing of Mr. Parker, who attributes the greater part of his 
success to the timely assistance given him by Mr. Ladd. For sixteen years Mr. 
Parker remained at his location on First street and then removed to Nos. 169-171-173 
Fourth street, where he is now located, conducting Parker's Market and the City Market. 
He also owns and operates the Beaver Market on Yamhill street between Fourth and 
Fifth. He has devoted his entire life to the line of work in which he started as a 
young man in Chicago and has therefore become thoroughly informed regarding all 
phases of the meat and stock industries, so that his efforts have been rewarded with 
a gratifying measure of success. An indication of the extent and importance of his 
operations is given in the fact that he has in his employ thirty-five persons and 
his annual business sales aggregate more than a half million dollars. He is recognized 
as a man of excellent business ability and power of organization, whose transactions 
have ever been characterized by strict honor and integrity. 

It was while a resident of Butte, Montana, that Mr. Parker met and married Miss 
Effie Finch, a native of Elkhart, Indiana, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Finch, 
the former a native of the state of New York while the latter was born in St. Thomas, 
Ontario, Canada. For many years her father followed railroading as a locomotive 
engineer. Two children have been born of this marriage: Janice, a sophomore at Bryn 
Mawr College, and Helen, attending St. Helen's Hall at Portland. The family reside 
in a fine home at No. 531 East Eighteenth street. North. 

Mr. Parker is a prominent Mason, belonging to the Scottish Rite Consistory and 
to Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and his interest in the welfare and progress 
of his city is indicated by his membership in the Chamber of Commerce. He is also 
identified with the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club and acts as timekeeper for all of 
its official sporting events. He is likewise connected with the Portland Community 
Service, the International Live Stock Shows, the Auld Lang Syne Society, the Old 
Colony Club and is a life member of the Multnomah Club and of the Irvington Club, State 
Automobile Association and Harness Horse Association. He is much interested in 
the welfare of state and county fairs for the purpose of breeding better live stock. 
Mr. Parker is fond of harness racing and enters his horses at all county fairs in 
Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia and at state fairs. He maintains his 
stables at the Salem fair grounds and they are in charge of Frank Ragsdale, who has 
been a successful driver and* trainer in this country and Canada for many world 
known stables. 

Starting out in life with no capital except the determination to succeed, Mr. Parker 
has attained success and stands today as a splendid example of that peculiarly Ameri- 
can product — a self-made man. He has known how to make the most of his oppor- 
tunities and his well developed powers have brought him the preeminence that fol- 
lows superior ability and concentrated effort. He is a forceful factor in business circles 
of Portland and is accounted one of her foremost citizens. 



ARGUMENTO THURLOW. 



Since 1894 Argumento Thurlow has been identified with the Powers Furniture 
Company, being at one time a part owner in the business, while he now has charge 
of the basement. He has also filled many offices in the Masonic order and has been 
accorded the honorary thirty-third degree, ever guiding his life by the beneficent teach- 
ings of the organization. Mr. Thurlow is a native of Ohio. He was born January 20, 
1850, in Caldwell, Noble county, a son of William and Sally Ann (Morris) Thurlow, 
the former a native of Ohio and the latter of West Virginia. The father followed the 
occupation of farming and thus provided for his family of six children, namely: Argu- 
mento, Sophronia, Mason, Minnie, William and Annie. The family is of English origin 
and has been established in America since the sixteenth century. 

The youthful days of Argumento Thurlow were spent upon his father's farm and 



■2T2 HISTORY OF OREGON 

in the common schools he pursued his education. He remained at home until the early 
'70s, when he went to Kansas where he resided until 1874 and then made his way to 
Portland, Oregon. Here he entered the employ of the firm of Donly, Beard & Powers, 
which later became known as the Powers Furniture Company and he has since been 
identified therewith. His conscientious service and excellent business ability soon 
won recognition, resulting in merited promotions and carefully saving his earnings 
Mr. Thurlow at length became part owner in the store. He recently sold his interest 
to the Powers Furniture Company. He has seen the business develop from year to 
year until it has become one of the largest enterprises of the kind in northwestern 
Oregon, the firm name being a synonym for reliability, integrity and enterprise. To 
the work of expansion and development he has contributed in large measure and is now 
in charge of the basement of the store, most capably managing the interests of his 
department. His long connection with the firm has given him an intimate knowledge 
of the business and he is thus able to supervise intelligently the work of those under 
his charge. 

On August 25, 188'8, Mr. Thurlow was united in marriage to Miss Mary L. Slackpole, 
of Salmon Falls, New Hampshire, and they have become the parents of two children, 
William and Elvira, the latter a student at the University of Oregon. The son was 
formerly employed as a bookkeeper and during the World war enlisted in the navy, in 
which he served for two years as machinist's mate on a submarine chaser. He has since 
joined the Merchant Marine service and is serving as engineer on the U. S. S. West 
Naveria, now making his fourth trip to China. 

Mr. Thurlow resides in a beautiful modern home at No. 134 East Fifty-fourth 
street and the family occupies a prominent position in social circles of the city. He is 
one of the most prominent Masons in the state, having joined the order in 1873 at Fort 
Scott, Kansas. He is now a member of Harmony Lodge, No. 12, F. & A. M., of which he 
has three times been master and he is also a past high priest of the chapter, a past 
commander of Oregon Commandery and a past potentate o£ Al Kader Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is a charter member of the Knights of Constantine and in January, 
1920, was accorded the honorary thirty-third degree in recognition of valuable service 
rendered the order. He is also identified with Gul Reazee Grotto No. 65. M. 0. V. P. E. R., 
and is a member of the Grange at Oswego, Oregon. For nearly a half century he 
has been a resident of this city and has witnessed much of its growth and development, 
bearing his full part in the work of advancement and improvement. Through the wise 
utilization of each opportunity presented he has won success in the business world and 
his course has been characterized by integrity and honor in every relation, commanding 
for him the respect and goodwill of all with whom he has been associated. 



HON. GEORGE B. DORRIS. 



Hon. George B. Dorris, who for over half a century engaged in the practice of law 
in Eugene, has lived retired since 1918 in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. His 
birth occurred in Nashville, Tennessee, on the 7th of March, 1832, and he is a son of 
Samuel F. and Susanna (Pitt) Dorris, natives of North Carolina. Following his mar- 
riage the father went to Nashville, Tennessee, and there followed the carpenter's 
trade, residing in that city until his death. The mother is also deceased. 

George B. Dorris, the youngest of their family of twelve children, consisting of 
eight sons and four daughters, was reared and educated in his native city and there 
learned the tinner's trade, being apprenticed when about ten years of age to Snow, 
Treppard and Payne, of Nashville, Tennessee, where he was engaged in the business 
for a number of years. In 1861, when twenty-nine years of age, he sought the oppor- 
tunities offered in the west and made his way to Crescent City, California, where he 
worked at the tinner's trade with his brother Ben, for a few years following that 
trade in Crescent City and during his leisure hours he studied law, for it was his 
desire to become a member of the bar. November 29, 1865, he came to Oregon and in 
the same year was admitted to practice at Eugene, passing his bar examination before 
Judge Riley E. Stratton, then a member of the supreme court of Oregon, and at whose 
request he had come to Oregon. Mr. Dorris continued in practice until the time of 
his retirement in 1918. He had practiced his profession continuously in Eugene for 
a period of fifty-four years and had the distinction of being the oldest practicing lawyer 



HISTORY OF OREGON 273 

in the city. He was connected with a number of important law cases and the list of 
his clients was an extensive and representative one. He was always careful to conform 
his practice to a high standard of professional ethics, never seeking to lead the court 
astray in a matter of fact or law nor withholding from it the knowledge of any fact 
appearing in the records. His preparation of a case was always most thorough and 
comprehensive and he seemed not to lose sight of the smallest detail bearing upon 
his cause. 

On the 15th of May, 1866, Mr. Dorris was united in marriage to Miss Emma A. 
Hoffman, at Jacksonville, Oregon, and they became the parents of three children: 
Emma C, who is now the wife of C. A. Hardy, a prominent attorney of Eugene; May, 
who married J. E. Bronaugh of Portland, Oregon; and Stella, the wife of Dr. C. A. 
Macrum, a resident of Mosier, Oregon. 

In politics Mr. Dorris is a democrat and he has taken a prominent part in public 
affairs of his community and state. For one term he served as mayor of Eugene, giving 
to the city a most businesfelike and progressive administration, characterized by many 
needed reforms and improvements, and for twelve years he was a member of the 
city council. In 1870 he was elected to the office of representative to the state legisla- 
ture and as a member of that body gave thoughtful and earnest consideration to all 
the vital and important questions which came up for settlement, fighting earnestly 
for the support of bills which he believed to be of great benefit to the public at large. 
His fraternal connections are with the Masonic order and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and his religious faith is that of the Baptist church. Mr. Dorris is numbered 
among the oldest residents of Eugene, having taken up his abode here in 1865, and 
during the period that has since intervened he has watched with interest the city's 
growth and progress, with which he has been closely identified, doing everyting in his 
power to promote its advancement along material, intellectual, social, political and moral 
lines. His life has been an honorable and upright one and" his example may well be 
followed by those who have regard for the things which are most worth while in life. 



JACOB RANDAL DAVIS. 



The entire business career of Jacob Randal Davis, who for many years was 
prominently identified with mercantile and financial interests of Shedd, was marked 
by steady progression, resulting from close application and indefatigable energy, 
prompted by laudable ambition. He was born in Knox county, Illinois, February 20, 
1849, a son of Peter and Harriet (Cannon) Davis, natives of Kentucky. In early life 
the father removed to Indiana and there followed farming. Subsequently ue went to 
Illinois, settling in Knox county, where for many years he devoted his attention to 
the cultivation of his land, but at length he removed to Wataga, Illinois, and there 
lived retired throughout his remaining years, his death occurring on the 15th of 
March, 1871. The mother survived him for two decades, and passed away in November, 
1891. 

Jacob R. Davis was reared and educated at Wataga, Illinois, and also attended 
the district schools of Knox county. When but fifteen years of age he responded to 
President Lincoln's last call for troops in the Civil war and served for three months, 
or until the close of the conflict. After receiving his discharge from the service he 
engaged in railroad work as a brakeman and thus continued until his foot was acci- 
dentally crushed, when he was obliged to abandon that line of activity. For several 
years thereafter he\was employed in drug stores and in dry goods establishments and 
in 1878 he came to the west, settling in Linn county, Oregon, where he operated rented 
land until 1889. In that year he removed to Shedd, where for about two years he 
was employed in a store, at the end of which period he purchased a half interest in 
the establishment and engaged in general merchandising under the firm style of Grume 
& Davis. Subsequently Mr. Crume sold his interest to C. J. Shedd and the firm then 
became known as Davis & Shedd. From 1908 until 1912 Mr. Davis' daughter Zella was 
a partner in the business, which was then operated under the firm style of Davis, Shedd 
& Davis. In 1912 the firm was incorporated as the Davis-Shedd Company, and Mr. 
Davis continued active in the management of the enterprise throughout his remaining 
years. He was an energetic, farsighted and resourceful business man whose life was 
marked by constant progress, resulting from the attainment of his objective in the 
business world, and through his efforts the business of the company increased from 



l>74 HISTORY OF OREGON 

year to year until it assumed extensive proportions. They carry a large and carefully 
assorted stock of general merchandise and their enterprising methods, reasonable 
prices and courteous treatment of patrons have secured for them a liberal patronage. 
Being a man of resourceful business ability, Mr. Davis extended his efforts into other 
lines and was one of the stockholders of the Bank of Shedd from its inception. 

On the 31st of August, 1876, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Dora 
Botsford, a daughter of Josiah C. and Azubah (McCloud) Botsford, the former a native 
of Canada, while the latter was born in Ohio. The father was a prominent and suc- 
cessful merchant of Wataga, Illinois, and was also active in public affairs of that 
locality, serving for many years as postmaster. In 1869 he removed to Missouri, pur- 
chasing land in Carroll county which he developed and improved, continuing its 
operation until his demise on the 22d of April. 1903, while the mother passed away 
August 18, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of a daughter, Zella May, 
who was born August 5, 1883, and is now a stockholder in the Davis-Shedd Company. 
She married Charles W. Kennedy and they make their home 'in Shedd. 

Mr. Davis was a republican in his political views, and his religious faith was 
indicated by his membership in the Jlethodist Episcopal church. Fraternally he was 
identified with the Masonic order and the Eastern Star, with which Mrs. Davis is also 
connected, and through his membership in the Grand Army post at Albany, Oregon, 
he maintained pleasant associations with his old army comrades who bravely fol- 
lowed the stars and stripes on the battle fields of the south. Mr. Davis passed aw^y 
on the 27th of April, 1913, at the age of sixty-four years, and in his passing the com- 
munity lost one of its valued citizens, his associates a faithful friend and his family a 
devoted husband and father. He was a successful business man, diligent and deter- 
mined in all that he undertook, and his record proves that success and an honored name 
may be won simultaneously. Mrs. Davis is a stockholder in the Davis-Shedd Company 
and also in the Bank of Shedd and is an excellent business woman, capably managing 
her interests. She has long been a resident of Linn county, where her fine womanly 
qualities have endeared her to a large circle of friends. 



GEORGE F. FULLER. 



George F. Fuller was a western man and in his life displayed the enterprising 
spirit characteristic of the development of the Pacific Coast country. He was born 
in Chico, California, November 17, 1860, and was graduated when seventeen years of 
age from the California high school. He came to Portland in 1881, the year in which 
he attained his majority, and later sailed on the upper Willamette, being employed 
as fireman on various steamboats. Still later he was on the R. R. Thompson, a steamer 
plying between Portland and Astoria, and for thirteen years served as its chief engineer. 
On the 6th of May, 1898, he was appointed United States inspector for boilers and 
occupied this position of responsibility for eighteen years, or until his death, which 
occurred December 7, 1916. 

On the 10th of September, 1890, Mr. Fuller was married to Miss Eva Jerome, a 
daughter of the late Captain George and Nancy (Shepard) Jerome. Her father was 
born in Stockport, New York, in 1823, and when seventeen years of age was sailing 
out of Atlantic ports in the coasting trade and to the West Indies. After following 
this branch of marine business for several years he came to California in 1849, re- 
maining on the Sacramento river and in the mines until 1852, at which time he came 
to Oregon and began steamboating on the Canemah. Later he found employment 
on the Willamette until she was brought over the falls, being the only man on board 
when she made the perilous trip. He was next employed on the steamers. Onward, 
Surprise and Elk, accompanying the boiler of the latter steamer in its celebrated flight 
skyward at the time of the explosion. Captain Jerome was afterward in the employ 
of the People's Transportation Company, through nearly the whole of its corporate 
existence. During his forty years on the river he ran nearly all of the time on the 
Willamette, spending the last fourteen years of his life on the Yamhill route in the 
service of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Companv. He died in Portland in Novem- 
ber, 1886. 

In early manhood he wedded Nancy Shepard, who was born in Canton, Illinois, 
and came with her parents to Oregon in 1853. Both Captain and Mrs. Jerome, there- 



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GEORGE F. FULLER 



HISTORY OF OKEGOX 277 

fore, were among the earliest settlers of this state and he was most closely associated 
with the development of its navigation interests. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fuller was born a daughter, Frances Evelyn, the wife of Alfred 
Smith of Portland, who was president of the Columbia river shipbuilding corporation 
during the war and president of the Smith-Watson Iron Works of Portland. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith are the parents of one child, Alfred Fuller Smith. 

Mr. Fuller gave his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally was 
a Mason, loyal to the teachings and purposes of the craft. He believed firmly in its 
principles concerning the brotherhood of man and was always ready to extend a helping 
hand wherever it was needed. 



MRS. MARY E. LENT. 



The old idea that woman's activities must be confined to the home have long been 
consigned to oblivion, for woman has proven herself the intellectual equal of the 
stronger and sterner sex and has won success in almost every avenue of business 
outside of those which demand purely physical strength. In the real estate field Mrs. 
Mary E. Lent of Portland has operated most successfully for a number of years. She 
was born in Cumberland county. Illinois, August 19, 1877, and there attended the 
public schools to the age of seventeen. When twenty years of age she was married 
and through association with her husband, who was an attorney, she mastered the 
details of the real estate business and also of the abstract business and likewise 
acquired a sufficient knowledge of law to encourage her to apply herself to its study, 
with the result that she expects soon to be admitted to the bar of Oregon. 

Mrs. Lent is a daughter of Philip and Margaret (Haddock) Hosney. Her father, 
a native of Illinois, was a farmer and business man who died when his daughter was 
but three years of age. The mother was likewise born in Illinois and has also passed 
away. In her native state Mrs. Lent spent her girlhood and maidenhood and came to 
Portland in 1904. In 1906 she entered her present business, known as the hotel 
and apartment house leasing and brokerage business. She has dealt largely with 
women and has been most successful, as she feels that a woman instinctively knows 
another woman's wants, with but very little explanation needed. Some of her deals 
run as high as one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars and she employs five 
people, having an office in the Northwestern Bank building. She enjoys the entire 
confidence of her clients and has handled the business interests of one lady for sixteen 
years. While she has competition in her special line of business she is the acknowledged 
leader in that field and it is said that she practically never shows a buyer but one 
place, because she always knows just exactly what the purchaser desires. 

Mrs. Lent makes her home at No. 126 East Thirty-fourth street, where she enjoys 
life with a very charming daughter, whom she has reared and educated and who 
in 1921 was graduated from Catlin's Private School for Girls. She is an accomplished 
musician, having given much time to the study of instrumental music, and she is 
now also taking up vocal music, possessing a rare contralto voice. Mrs. Lent is a member 
of the Eastern Star and is a past officer of the Rebekah lodge. Mrs. Lent is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and also of the Portland Woman's Research Club. She 
also belongs to the Unitarian church and along business lines is connected with the 
Interstate Realty Association. She has for fourteen years been successfully engaged 
in real estate dealing in Portland, largely specializing in hotels and apartment houses, 
and there is much that is unique and original about her business. She has displayed 
marked initiative in developing and carrying out her plans and now has an extensive 
clientage that makes the undertaking a profitable one. 



LOUIS H. COMPTON. 



Louis H. Compton, who since February 1, 1920, has served as warden of the state 
penitentiary, is proving a most efficient officer, maintaining strict discipline and at 
the same time treating the inmates of the institution with kindness and consideration. 
He is a veteran of both the Spanish-American and World wars, and in the latter conflict 



278 HISTORY OF OREGON 

rendered noteworthy service, being awarded the Croix de Guerre by Marshal Petain 
and also receiving five citations. 

Mr. Compton was born in Odessa, Missouri, November 16, 1883, a son of G. M. 
and Anna (Peyton) Compton, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Ken- 
tucky. The father was a veteran of the Civil war, serving in the Confederate army. 
He removed to Idaho in 1890 and homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land 
east of Caldwell. Poth parents have passed away. 

In the public schools of Caldwell, Idaho, Louis H. Compton acquired his education, 
subsequently completing a business course. On starting out in the business world 
he became an employe in a wholesale house at Boise. Idaho, and then enlisted in the 
United States army, becoming a member of D Troop of the Fourth Cavalry, with which 
he was sent to the Philippines, spending twenty-two months on the islands and seeing 
a great deal of active service. On receiving his discharge Mr. Compton returned to 
Boise, resuming his position with his former employers, with whom he remained 
for two years. He then came to Salem, Oregon, as local secretary for the Young Men's 
Christian Association and was thus active from 1911 until 1916, when the trouble with 
Mexico arose and he went to the border as first lieutenant in the Third Oregon Infantry, 
winning promotion to the rank of battalion adjutant. After demobilization he resumed 
his secretarial duties and was thus engaged until the 25th of March, 1917, when he 
was again called to the service. His regiment was mobilized at Clackamas, Oregon, 
and was sent to Camp Greene, South Carolina, going from there to Camp Mills, 
Long Island. In December, 1917, they were transported to France and there was con- 
siderable excitement on the trip over, tor just as they were entering St. Nazaire, 
France, their destroyers sighted the submarines. After arriving in France Mr. Comp- 
ton acted as provost marshal for the first few months. His regiment and division were 
made a replacement unit and during the entire war engaged in drilling raw troops to 
replace the units at the front. Seeing no chance to get to the front through ordinary 
methods Mr. Compton asked one of his friends, an officer in the Twenty-third In- 
fantry, to use his influence in getting him assigned to his regiment. This was accom- 
plished late in July, 1918, and Mr. Compton was assigned to Headquarters Company. 
Twenty-third Infantry, and given command of the Thirty-seven Millimeter and the 
Stokes Mortar Platoons. Discovering that the thirty-seven millimeters and the Stokes 
mortars were not being used effectually, he asked for a consultation with the lieutenant 
colonel, who W3S then the technical officer of the regiment. The interview was granted 
and Mr. Compton's plans were submitted and subsequently adopted by the regiment, 
the brigade and the entire Second Division. Following the St. Mlhiel engagement his 
command was mentioned in regimental orders. The next drive in which he partici- 
pated was on the Champagne front, in a sector known as St. Etienne Aux Armes. 
Here they took over a difficult task from the French, the latter having been unable to 
make any headway tor some time. On the morning of October 1. 1918, the attack 
was begun and the division continued to advance. On the afternoon of October 4th 
Mr. Compton was gassed by phosgene and mustard gas and was twice wounded, receiving 
a machine gun bullet in the left arm. and later was wounded in the left leg by a shell 
fragment. He refused to go to the rear after the wound in his arm, although it totally 
disabled that member, and he also refused to go to the rear for treatment of the leg wound 
until he was no longer able to walk. He was sent to a hospital for treatment and it 
was over a montli before he recovered from his Injuries. For his bravery and gallantry 
in action he was awarded the French Croix de Guerre by Marshal Petain and he also 
received five citations. He was discharged from the hospital November 11, 1918. the 
day on which the armistice was signed, and started back to rejoin his command, then 
en route to the Rhine, but did not regain his regiment, being assigned to criminal 
investigation work in a branch of the United States army secret service, owing to his 
familiarity with the French language and certain other qualifications. He continued in 
this line of work until his return to the United States in February. 1919, with the 
One Hundred and Sixty-second Oregon Regiment, and was mustered out at Camp 
Lewis, Washington, March 27. 1919, after two years and two days of service. His is 
indeed a most creditable military record and one of which he has every reason to be 
proud, showing him to be a man of the utmost courage and bravery, willing to sacri- 
fice his life if need be in defense of his country and the interests of democracy. 

Mr. Compton then returned to Salem and again took up his work as secretary 
for the Young Men's Christian Association, but at the end of six weeks was appointed 
parole officer by Governor Olcott. Eight months afterward Dr. R. E. Lee Steiner, 
who was then warden of the state penitentiary, returned to his former position as 



HISTORY OF OREGON 279 

superintendent o£ the Oregon State Hospital and Mr. Compton was appointed his suc- 
cessor, taking up the duties of his new office on the 1st day of February, 1920. His 
military experience and his criminal investigation work in connection with the French 
secret service have been of great assistance to him in his present position, enabling 
him so to direct his energies as to produce most beneficial results. He is devoting 
much thought and study to the work in which he is engaged, maintaining an excel- 
lent system of discipline and at the same time doing everything in his power to im- 
prove conditions for the inmates of the institution, so that they may receive a new out- 
look upon life and thus become useful members of society. 

On the 21st of March. 1910, Mr. Compton was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
V. Sharpe, a native of Clackamas county, the ceremony being performed at Boise, 
Idaho, and they have become the parents of a son, David Richard, now three years of 
age. Fraternally Mr. Compton is connected with the Masons, belonging to Pacific 
Lodge, No. 50, and to Salem Lodge, No. 336, B. P. 0. E. He is vice commander of the 
local camp of the American Legion and is also a member of the Foreign War Veterans. 
He stands as a high type of American manhood and chivalry and progress and patriotism 
may well be termed the keynote of his character, being manifest in every relation of his 
life. In civic office he manifests the same fidelity and devotion to duty which he showed 
in the military service of his country and his record is an unblemished one, command- 
ing for him the admiration and respect of all. 



JUDGE WILLIAM S. McFADDEN. 

Judge William S. McFadden, who passed away at Corvallis, April 30, 1916, was 
one of the most eminent and widely known jurists of the northwest. Coming to Oregon 
in 1873, he opened a law office in Corvallis, where he continued in practice to the time 
of his demise, his high professional attainments winning for him a large patronage. He 
was most careful to conform his practice to the highest standard of professional ethics 
and at all times proved himself an able minister in the temple of justice. 

Judge McFadden was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1846, 
a son of Thomas and Alicia (Chapman) McFadden, who were also born in that part of 
the state, the latter being a niece of Alexander Campbell, the founder of the Christian 
church. The father followed farming in Pennsylvania until 1883, when he made his 
way to Oregon, taking up his residence in Corvallis, where he continued to reside 
thi'oughout the remainder of his life. He passed away December 20, 1897, having long 
survived the mother, whose demise occurred in September, 1863. 

Their son, William S. McFadden, was reared and educated in Washington county. 
Pennsylvania, and Bethany, West Virginia. Taking up the study of law at Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania, he completed his professional course and was admitted to the bar 
in 1872. In the following year he came to Oregon, opening an office at Corvallis, 
where he continuously engaged in practice until the time of his demise. He was at 
one time associated in practice with E. R. Bryson, now a resident of Eugene, Oregon, 
and in 1910 entered into partnership relations with Arthur Clarke, under the firm style 
of McFadden & Clarke, under which name Mr. Clarke still continues the business. Judge 
McFadden's pronounced ability in his profession was widely recognized and he became 
one of the best known attorneys of the Pacific northwest. In the early days he was 
called to California on legal business, making the journey of three hundred miles on 
horseback. This was a very hazardous undertaking at that period, fraught with many 
hardships and dangers, but he was successful in his mission, clearing his client, and 
for his services he received a fee of three hundred dollars. His broad experience and 
high professional standing led to his selection for public office and he served as district 
attorney and also sat upon the bench of the county court. He was a man of wide 
legal learning, seldom, if ever, at fault in the application of one of the principles of 
jurisprudence. His record as a judge was a most creditable one. He was strictly 
fair and impartial in all of his rulings and his opinions were sustained by higher 
courts upon appeal. In addition to his professional activities Judge McFadden was 
also interested in farm properties, owning five hundred acres of valuable and pro- 
ductive land in the vicinity of Junction City, which is now in the possession of his 
widow. He was also the owner of eight residences in Corvallis, which he rented and he 
held sixty-six lots at College, but these he later sold. He was a man of sound judgment 



280 HISTORY OF OREGON 

and keen discernment and was most successful in the conduct of his business affairs, 
his dealings ever being characterized by the strictest integrity. 

On the 3d of April, 1873, Judge McFadden was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Lane, a daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (McElroy) Lane, natives of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. The father engaged in the livery business and also was superin- 
tendent of a number of mail routes, carrying the mail by stage. He passed away in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1905 and the mother's demise occurred in 1872. 
To Judge and Mrs. McFadden were born six children, namely: Julian, who is pro- 
prietor of the Julian Hotel at Corvallis; Hugh, a resident of Eugene; Burke, who is 
engaged in farming near Junction City; and Agnes, Alicia and Mary, all of whom are 
deceased. The wife and mother passed away October 27, 1888, after a long illness, 
and on the 25th of December, 1889, Judge McFadden wedded Miss Sallie Lane, a 
sister of his first wife. They became the parents of six children: Bryan, who served as 
captain of an Infantry company for two years in the World war and was twice wounded, 
was formerly associated with his father in practice at Corvallis but is now following 
his profession at San Gabriel, California; Julia and Helen, twins, the former a trained 
nurse at Portland, who for two years during the World war was engaged in profes- 
sional work overseas, while the latter is employed as bookkeeper with the First Na- 
tional Bank of Corvallis; Curran L., a druggist at Athena, Oregon, who was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant of Company K, Corvallis, and saw two years' service in the 
war with Germany, spending one year in France; Grattan, who died January 29, 1899, 
at the age of two and a half years; and Murius, who is a student at the Oregon Agri- 
cultural College and is much interested in athletics, being a member of the football 
team. 

In his political views Judge McFadden was a stalwart democrat and a leader in the 
ranks of the party. Fraternally he was identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and his religious faith was indicated by his membership in the Christian 
church. His was a most creditable record, characterized by devotion to duty in every 
relation, and in his passing the state lost one of its eminent jurists, the community one 
of its valued citizens, his associates a faithful friend, and his family a devoted hus- 
band and father. 



STEPHEN T. CHURCH. 



In a history of Oregon, its settlement, its business development and its progress 
along various lines, the name of Stephen T. Church figures prominently, for at various 
periods he was closely associated with mercantile interests and with the development 
of navigation. He was born at Lackawanna, Pennsylvania, in 1831, a son of Stephen 
and Harriet Church. He spent his early life in the Keystone state and acquired his 
education in the schools there. He was ambitious, however, to try his fortune else- 
where and when twenty-one years of age, in company with other young men. he 
outfitted with ox teams and wagons and started tor the west. They traveled across the 
entire breadth of the continent to Oregon, arriving in the fall of 1852 after many weary 
months of travel across the hot stretches of sand and over the high mountains until 
at length their vision was gladdened by a sight of the gi-een valleys of Oregon. 

From that time until his death Mr. Church remained a resident of this state and 
lived to witness its development from a wild and unsettled region, largely inhabited 
by Indians, into a populous and prosperous commonwealth having all of the advan- 
tages known to the older east. With his partner Mr. Church engaged in mining on 
Althouse creek in southern Oregon and there they operated very successfully and are 
still operating. Mr. Church also established a store and purchased mules and con- 
ducted a pack train between Oregon City and the mines, having twenty-eight pack 
mules. At the time of the Indian war. however, the government took over his mules 
and the mines. As it was no longer possible for him to continue in the business he 
became associated with Joseph Teal in a mercantile enterprise at Eugene. Later he 
removed to Harrisburg, where he again engaged in merchandising in association with 
Asa and David McCully. While thus connected with the McCully brothers he likewise 
engaged in the transportation business, which they conducted under the name of the 
Peoples Transportation Company and Mr. Church was thus identified with navigation 
interests to the time of his death, their boats plying between Harrisburg and Oregon 
City. In all that he undertook Mr. Church was actuated by a most progressive spirit. 




STEPHEN T. CHURCH 



HISTORY OF OREGON 283 

He was constantly seeking to improve conditions and the company built a breakwater 
at the falls at Oregon City, a part of which is still standing. He readily recognized 
the opportunities that lay before the new commonwealth and ever sought to con- 
tribute to public advancement and improvement as well as to promote his individual 
interests. 

In 1857 Mr. Church was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Lister, a daugh- 
ter of William and Catherine Lister who were natives of England and came to the 
United States in early life, afterward removing to Oregon where they settled in 
pioneer times. The father of Mr. Lister had previously come to the United States 
and purchased a ticket for Kentucky but was never heard from again. It is supposed 
that he died of cholera. William Lister afterward crossed the Atlantic and took up 
his abode in Kentucky where he resided until March, 1853, and then started by ox 
team for Oregon, arriving there in the fall. He then secured a donation claim of three 
hundred and twenty acres in the Mohawk valley. 

Two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Church: Harriet I., now the wife 
of Dr. A. J. Giesy of Portland; and Elizabeth Luella, the wife of Lewis G. Clark of the 
firm of Woodruff & Clark of Portland. They also had one son, Samuel W., who died 
in early life. The death of Mr. Church occurred in 1872 and thus passed away one who 
had been a valuable contributor to the pioneer development of the state. The naviga- 
tion company with which he was connected did what no other company ever accom- 
plished, raising and lowering the tariff according to its value at that time. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Church was both a Mason and an Odd Fellow and was most loyal to the 
teachings and high purposes of these organizations, exemplifying in his life the benef- 
icent principles upon which they are founded. 



JOHN M. JONES. 



John M. Jones, the popular and efficient postmaster of Portland, received his 
present appointment on the 26th of August, 1920, and has the distinction of being one 
of the first men chosen as the head of the post office department in the larger cities of the 
United States because of their fitness for office without regard to party affiliation. He 
is exceptionally well qualified for the discharge of his duties in this connection, hav- 
ing been connected with the work of the department from the age of nineteen years and 
through faithful and conscientious service has won continuous promotions until his 
position is now one of large responsibility. Mr. Jones is one of Oregon's native sons. 
He was born in Roseburg on the 23d of August, 1871, and is a son of Joseph and 
Rowena (Wright) Jones, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Missouri. The 
paternal and maternal grandfathers of the subject of this review, George Jones and 
John M. Wright, emigrated to Oregon in pioneer times, casting in their fortunes with its 
early settlers. The father, who was of Welsh descent, engaged in farming in this state 
and his demise occurred in 1913. The mother survives and is now residing in Spokane, 
Washington. The surviving children of the family are Elmer, Emma, John M., Ralph, 
Rowena and Elizabeth. 

John M. Jones acquired a high school education and when nineteen years of age 
he was appointed mail carrier by Postmaster George Steele, this being previous to the 
establishment of the civil service system. For twelve years he served as carrier and 
was then appointed office clerk, remaining in that position for a year. His next pro- 
motion made him assistant superintendent of city deliveries and after a year in that 
office he became superintendent of carriers, serving in that capacity for ten years, 
following which he was made superintendent of mails and for six years had charge 
of that work. On the 6th of April, 1920, he became assistant postmaster, in which 
office he served until the 26th of August of that year, when he was appointed post- 
master, being selected to fill that office because of his qualifications therefor without 
regard to party affiliation. His long experience in the department has given him an 
intimate knowledge of the work and he is meeting every requirement of the position, 
proving one of the most capable postmasters the city has ever had. 

In 1910 Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Mame Schaible, of Michigan. 
and they reside at No. 916 East Taylor street. He is a veteran of the Spanish- 
American war and a member of the Chamber of Commerce, supporting all of the plans 
and projects of that organization tor the upbuilding of the city and the extension 
of its trade relations. He is also a member of the Ad Club and the Kiwanis Club. In 



2,S4 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree and also belongs to the commandery 
and shrine and is likewise identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while 
for recreation he turns to fishing, hunting and motoring. As postmaster of Portland 
he is making a splendid record and is a man of honorable purposes and high principles 
who commands the respect and confidence of all with whom he has been associated. 



HERBERT E. WALKER. 



Herbert B. Walker, assessor of Lane county, Is a native of this county, his birth 
having occurred at Pleasant Hill on the 12th of July, 1875. He is a son of Albert S. 
and Sarah L. (Higgins) Walker, the former of whom was born in Missouri and the 
latter in Massachusetts. The father crossed the plains to Oregon in 1853 with his 
parents, the journey being made with ox teams, and the family endured many hard- 
ships and privations en route. In young manhood Albert S. Walker learned the trade 
of blacksmithing and wagon making, which he followed at Springfield, Oregon, for 
several years. At length, however, he abandoned that line of work and engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business at Springfield, in which he was quite successful, 
remaining actively connected therewith the remainder of his life, his death occurring 
in September, 1915. The mother survives and is now a resident of Eugene. 

Their son, Herbert E. Walker, was reared and educated at Springfield, Oregon, and 
learned the trades of blacksmithing and cabinet-making under the direction of his father. 
He followed that line of work until 1913, when he was elected recorder of Springfield, 
serving in that office for four years. He then secured employment in the shipyards 
at Raymond, Washington, there remaining for one year, and in July, 1919, was appointed 
county assessor of Lane county to fill out the unexpired term caused by the death 
of D. P. Burton. At the regular election in November, 1920, he was elected without 
opposition, to a four-year term. In which position he is serving and in a most able and 
conscientious manner, is discharging the duties which devolve upon him in this 
connection. 

In October, 1904, Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Vista Pearl Morgan, 
a daughter of Henry L. and Ellen (Hunsacker) Morgan, natives of Missouri. The 
fatner crossed the plains in 1847 and settled in Lane county, Oregon, becoming one 
of its early pioneers. For several years he engaged in the cultivation of a farm in 
this section and also followed the trade of a carpenter. At length, however, he retired 
and took up his abode at Lowell, Lane county, where he passed away in 1914. The 
mother survives and resides in Eugene. 

Mr. Walker's fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Woodmen of the World and the United Artisans. His political allegiance is given 
to the republican party and his religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His entire life has been passed within the borders of the state and the spirit of 
progressiveness which predominates in the west prompts him to do everything in his 
power to aid his community and commonwealth. He possesses many substantial and 
admirable traits of character and all with whom he is acquainted speak of him in 
terms of high regard. 



ASA B. STARBUCK, M. D. 



Dr. Asa B. Starbuck, who since 1907 has engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery at Dallas, is widely and favorably known in this section of the state, for his 
birth occurred four miles west of Salem, in Polk county, June 6, 1876. His parents, 
Thomas H. and Almira B. (Gibson) Starbuck, were natives of Ohio and Illinois, re- 
spectively. In 1864 the father accompanied his parents on their Journey across the 
plains to Oregon, the family locating on a farm in Polk county, which became the 
birthplace of the subject of this review. The father engaged in farming in this sec- 
tion of the state until 1887, when he removed to Portland in order to give his children 
better educational advantages. He has since made that city his home and has been 
very successful in his undertakings, becoming the owner of valuable real estate, and 
is also engaged in preaching the gospel as a minister of the Seventh Day Adventist 
church. He has reached the age of seventy-seven years but retains his mental and 



HISTORY OF OREGON 285 

physical vigor and is yet an active factor in the world's work. The mother also sur- 
vives. In 1852 she crossed the plains with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Davis Gibson, 
as members of a train of emigrants, and as they journeyed along the Platte river 
they became victims of the cholera epidemic, losing half of their party. The father 
had previously made the trip to Oregon in 1848, and being pleased with the country, 
returned to the east and succeeded in inducing others to locate on the Pacific slope. 
Taking up a homestead claim in Polk county adjoining the Starbuck ranch, he here 
engaged in farming throughout the remainder of his life, passing away at the age of 
eighty-two, while his wife's demise occurred about 1902, when she had reached the 
venerable age of ninety-two years. 

Asa B. Starbuck attended the schools of Polk county and of Portland, being 
eleven years of age when his parents became residents of that city. Subsequently he 
became a student in the Walla Walla College at Walla Walla, Washington, from which 
he was graduated in 1899, and in 1902 he entered the medical department of the State 
University of Oregon, graduating with the class of 1906. For a year thereafter he was 
interne in St. Vincent's Hospital at Portland, where he gained valuable experience, and 
in 1907 he opened an office in Dallas, where he has since followed his profession. He 
has through the intervening period built up a large practice and is accounted one of the 
most able and successful physicians of this part of the state. He has studied broadly, 
thinks deeply, and his efforts have been of the greatest value to his patients, for he 
is seldom at fault in the diagnosis of cases and his sound judgment and careful study 
enable him to do excellent professional work. He also has invested in farm lands 
in the county and has a seventy-acre prune orchard, supplied with the most modern 
equipment in the way of buildings and driers. 

On the 30th of July, 1913, Dr. Starbuck was united in marriage to Miss Ruth 
Beaver and they have become the parents of three children, namely: Mary E., who 
was born June 9, 1914; Almira E., born August 18, 1917; and Thomas B., whose birth 
occurred on the 7th of December, 1918. 

In his political views the Doctor is a republican, and fraternally is Identified 
with the Knights of Pythias and is also a Scottish Rite Mason and member of the 
Shrine. His professional connections are with the Medical Societies of Polk, Marion and 
Yamhill counties, the Oregon State Medical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. He is a patriotic and loyal American and during the World war had charge 
of the sale of War Savings Stamps in Polk county and also conducted all of the local 
drives, for which he raised the sum of four hundred thousand dollars in Polk county. 
He likewise served as a member of the Council of Defense and was chairman of the 
Red Cross county committee, thus rendering most important and valuable aid to the gov- 
ernment in its hour of need. He is a lover of his profession, deeply interested in its 
scientific and humanitarian phases and puts forth every effort to make his labors 
effective in checking the ravages of disease. He is a man of strict integrity and high 
ideals, who in every relation of life exemplifies the highest standards of American 
manhood and citizenship. 



WALTER E. WADSWORTH. 



Walter E. Wadsworth, secretary-treasurer and general manager of Hill & Com- 
pany, Inc., conducting one of the leading mercantile establishments of Harrisburg, was 
born in Marion, Indiana, December 21, 1865, a son of Ariel S. and Sarah Wadsworth. 
the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Kentucky. The father, who 
was a contractor and builder, removed from Massachusetts to Indiana at an early period 
in the development of that state, Indianapolis at that time being but a village. In the 
vicinity of that town the father purchased a tract of land which he operated in addition 
to his work as a contractor and builder, and he continued to reside in that locality the 
remainder of his lite, passing away in 1878. The mother survived him for several 
years, her death occurring in 1892. 

Their son, Walter E. Wadsworth, was reared and educated in Indianapolis, attend- 
ing the public schools and a business college of that city. On starting out in the busi- 
ness world he engaged in work as a bridge carpenter and later became a contractor 
and builder. Going to Missouri, he constructed practically all of the buildings in 
Thayer, Oregon county, and continued in that line of work for a period of twelve 



2S6 HISTORY OF OREGON 

years. He then went to Arkansas and engaged in the conduct of Hotel Wadsworth 
at Eureka Springs, of which he was proprietor for three years. On the e.xpiration of 
that period he traded his hotel property for twenty-one hundred acres of timber land 
in the southeastern part of Arkansas, which he still owns. He next became traveling 
representative for the Racine Sattler Company of St. Louis, which he represented on 
the road for six years, his territory comprising southeastern Missouri and Arkansas. 
In 1908 he came to Portland, Oregon, as salesman for the Moline Plow Company, with 
whom he continued for about nine years, or until 1917, when he removed to Harrisburg, 
Oregon, and purchased an interest in the firm of Hill & Company. Inc., which he 
has since served as secretary-treasurer and general manager. The company deals 
in house furnishings of all kinds, implements, etc., and conducts one of the largest 
mercantile establishments in this section of the state, their annual business trans- 
actions now exceeding the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. They have 
just completed a fine modern garage one hundred by one hundred feet in dimensions, 
at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars, tor which Mr. Wadsworth drew the plans and 
also supervised the work of erection. The company also has the agency for the Ford 
and Fordson products and the business is very extensive and profitable, conducted 
along the most modern and progressive lines. Being a man of resourceful business 
ability, Mr. Wadsworth has extended his efforts into various lines and has become 
the owner of valuable oil holdings in Kansas. He also has twenty-one hundred acres 
of timber land in Arkansas, of which one thousand acres is virgin oak, and he is 
likewise a stockholder in the Harrisburg Lumber Company. He is a farsighted and 
sagacious business man, whose interests have been most wisely and carefully con- 
ducted, bringing to him a gratifying measure of success. 

On the 10th of November, 1885, Mr. Wadsworth was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara P. Yates and they have become the parents of five children: Elmer L., Aileen, 
Fern, Dwight and Jennie L. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party and his religious faith is indicated by his attendance upon the services of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He is prominent in fraternal circles, belonging to the 
Masons, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and in the last named organization he has filled all the chairs and is one 
of the grand officers of the Grand Encampment of Oregon. Mr. Wadsworth has led 
a busy, active and useful life, employing every opportunity to advance, and his success 
is the direct result of his close application and laudable ambition, while at all time^ 
his career has been such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. He is 
everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, possessing many sterling traits of 
character which have won for him the high regard of all who know him. 



WILLIAM S. TURNER. 



William S. Turner, a consulting civil and electrical engineer, residing in Port- 
land, is widely known through his professional connections not only in this country 
but in foreign lands as well. He was born in Quincy, Illinois, was graduated from 
Knox College, and in preparation for his professional career attended Cornell Univer- 
sity, from which, after a two years postgraduate course, he received the degree of 
Master of Science. He located for the practice of his profession in New York city in 
1888 and there became well known as an engineer and contractor. From 1899 until 
1907 he was construction engineer with J. G. White & Company, engineers of New 
York city, and was New Zealand representative for two years. From 1908 until 1911 
he was the northwestern manager for W. S. Barstow & Company, engineers of New 
York city, in charge of the Portland. Oregon, office, and he is now practicing his pro- 
fession independently as a consulting and electrical engineer, with offices in the 
Spalding building in Portland. He makes special investigations, examinations and 
reports, physical and financial valuations, draws up specifications and plans, and 
supervises construction and equipment in connection with railroads, electric railways, 
electric lighting systems, hydro-electric power plants, water supply and irrigation 
systems. He had charge of the electrification and equipment of about one hundred 
miles of steam railroad for the Ft. Dodge, Des Moines & Southern Railway Company, 
was in charge of construction work on seventeen miles of railroad track for the 
Youngstown & Southern Railway Company, of Youngstown, Ohio, was the builder 
of the roadbed, and had charge of the track and overhead construction, for the 



HISTORY OF OREGON 287 

Washington & Great Palls Electric Railway Company, and other Washington, D. C, 
suburban lines, was the engineer on about thirty miles of high tension electric trans- 
mission lines for the Long Island City Electric Company, has been the builder of 
numerous power plants and trolley systems in the south, including those of the 
Capitol Railway Company at Washington, D. C, Augusta Street Railway Company of 
Augusta, Georgia, Washington, Alexandria & Mt. Vernon Railroad at Alexandria, 
Virginia, and many others. He has done important work, as well, in the Mississippi 
valley and upon the Pacific coast. He installed a complete system of underground 
conduits and cables for business districts, for the Portland Railway, Light & Power 
Company, and has executed important contracts and engineering work for the Oregon 
Electric Railway Company, the Portland Cordage Company, the Pacific Power & Light 
Company, The Portland Gas & Coke Company, and many other corporations. 

On the 19th of May, 1891, Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Miss Helen Sewall 
of Clarinda, Iowa, a daughter of Caleb Marsh and Catherine (Summer) Sewall, the 
former, a Baptist minister, while both were natives of Maine, and have now passed 
away. Mrs. Turner was born in Hamilton, Illinois, and was educated at Quincy, 
Illinois, where she attended the University, but did not graduate. She is now suc- 
cessfully engaged in the real estate brokerage business, making a specialty of the 
beautiful suburban district south of Portland, along the west bank of the river that 
includes Revira, Riverdale, Riverwood and Palatine Hill, and also some of the more 
desirable large properties in other parts of the city. She has offices in the Spalding 
building in connection with Mr. Turner. The residence of Mr. and Mrs. Turner is 
located in Riverdale. They became the parents of two children, Katharine Savage, 
now deceased, and Edmond Sewall, twenty-five years of age, who is an electrical 
engineer with the Pacific Power & Light Company. He is a graduate of Stanford 
University of California. Both Mr. and Mrs. Turner are members of the First Con- 
gregational church of Portland and Mrs. Turner belongs to the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. Mrs. Turner has spent much time abroad, having gone with 
her husband when he was engaged in professional work in foreign lands. They are 
both enthusiastic supporters of Portland, and do everything in their power to upbuild 
the city and promote those forces which are vital to the welfare and progress of the 
northwest. They are people of liberal education, innate culture and refinement, and 
they occupy an enviable social position, while both Mr. and Mrs. Turner have gained 
a creditable place along the lines of business to which they devote their energies. 



HON. ALFRED BLEVINS. 



Hon. Alfred Blevins, a pioneer of Oregon and a veteran of the Indian wars, for 
two terms represented his district in the state legislature and is now one of the 
leading agriculturists and influential citizens of Linn county, operating a valuable 
ranch of one hundred and sixty acres located one and a half miles west of Tangent. He 
was born in Kentucky, October 24, 1837, of the marriage of Isaac and Eliza (Maupin) 
Blevins, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Kentucky. In early man- 
hood tlie father followed blacksmithing and in 1S40 he removed to Missouri, purchasing 
land in Henry county, which he continued to operate until the 12th of May, 1850, when 
with ox teams he started across the plains for Oregon, arriving in the Willamette 
valley in the following October. While crossing the Cascade mountains he was caught 
in a snowstorm and was obliged to abandon five wagons there. He proceeded with the 
two remaining wagons and it was not until the following summer that he was able 
to recover those which he had left in the mountains. On arriving in Oregon he took 
up land in Linn county and this he cleared and developed, continuing its cultivation 
throughout the remainder of his life. He died in 1885 at the age of eighty-four years 
and the mother passed away in 1889, when she had reached the venerable age of 
ninety years. 

Their son, Alfred Blevins, was educated in the schools of Missouri and Linn 
county, Oregon, being thirteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to this 
state. When eighteen years of age he volunteered for service in the Indian war and 
after three months' service he was discharged in 1856. Later he re-entered the service, 
going with a wagon train engaged in hauling supplies to the soldiers who were fighting 
the red men, and was thus connected with Indian warfare tor about a year. After 
receiving his discharge he returned home and for a time followed farming but 



288 HISTORY OF OREGON 

subsequently went to California and for seven years was engaged in mining in that 
state and in southern Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. On the expiration of that 
period he returned to Linn county and purchased his present ranch of one hundred 
and sixty acres, situated one and one-half miles west of Tangent. Of this he cleared 
about twenty acres, which in its present highly developed state gives little indication 
of its raw and unimproved condition when he became its owner. He has made a close 
study of the needs of the soil and climate in relation to the production of crops here 
and everything about his place indicates that he follows practical and progressive 
methods. He has since operated his ranch with the exception of seven years spent in 
the warehouse business in Tangent and two years at Corvallis, where the family resided 
during the time the son was pursuing his studies. All of the features of the model 
farm of the twentieth century are found upon his place and it is one of the attractive 
farms of Linn county. 

On the 18th of September, 1870, Mr. Blevins was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisiana Maxey, who was born in Monroe county, Missouri, June 8, 1852, and is a 
daughter of John J. and Laura (Morris) Maxey, the former a native of Kentucky 
and the latter of Ohio. When but three years of age the father was taken by his 
parents to Missouri and in 1860 he started for the west with the intention of settling 
in Oregon, but went instead to California. However, after residing in the Golden 
state for four years he made his way to Oregon and in Linn county he operated 
rented land for some time, later purchasing a tract which he improved and developed, 
continuing its cultivation for several years, when he went to Idaho and there made 
his home with his children, passing away in that state in March, 1899. He had 
survived the mother for a decade, her demise having occurred in 1889. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Blevins were born nine children, of whom seven survive, namely: Wade H., 
Clara, Alfred, Georgiana, Edna L.. Hattie and Glenn. Those deceased are: Alice, who 
died in October, 1871, when but an infant; and Laura, who was born in March, 1874, 
and died in 1891, at the age of seventeen years. 

In his political views Mr. Blevins is a democrat and in public affairs he has taken 
an active and prominent part. In 1883 he was chosen to represent his district in the 
state legislature and his creditable record in office won for him reelection in 1892. In 
his public service he ever looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the oppor- 
tunities and possibilities of the future. He closely studied all the vital questions 
which came up for settlement and was a stalwart champion of many measures which 
found their way to the statute books of the state and are proving of great value to the 
commonwealth. He has likewise served as road supervisor and in public office he 
always stood for development and for constructive measures. He holds membership 
in the local Grange, and fraternally he is identified with the Masons. Coming to this 
state in 1850, when a boy of thirteen, the various experiences of pioneer life are familiar 
to Mr. Blevins, and through his industry and enterprise he has contributed to the 
substantial development and progress of the section in which he lives. He can 
remember when many of the well cultivated farms were covered with a dense growth 
of forest trees and when great stretches of land that are now thickly populated 
presented no indication of civilization. He has made good use of his time and in the 
evening of life can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future 
without fear. 



HOLDEN HARGREAVES. 



Holden Hargreaves spent his last days in Portland where he lived retired from 
business in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. He had been engaged in building and 
contracting for many years but put aside activities of this character when he became 
possessed of a comfortable fortune that rendered further labor unnecessary. He was 
born near Manchester, England, in 1851, a son of James and Jane H. Hargreaves. He 
spent the first nineteen years of his life in his native land and then determined to 
try his fortune in the new world, where he arrived in 1870. After three years he 
returned to England, but in 1877 came again to the United States. In that year he made 
his way to Illinois, where he resided for a brief period and then removed to Mani- 
toba, Canada, in connection with three of his brothers, their residence there covering 
a period of eight years. At the end of that time they made their way to the northwest, 
settling at Portland where Holden Hargreaves continued to reside until his demise. 




HOLDEN HARGREAVES 



HISTORY OF OREGON 291 

For several years he was engaged in contracting and building and later established 
a planing mill at Roseburg, which he operated for a few years. He then retired from 
active business and made his home in Portland throughout his remaining days. He 
owned the first planer ever brought into the state. It was originally the property of 
Dr. John McLoughlin and was in a mill which Mr. Hargreaves purchased, and was 
later given to the city museum. It was industry and close application that brought 
to him the success which enabled him eventually to live retired and enjoy the fruits 
of his former toil. 

During the period which Mr. Hargreaves spent in England after first coming to 
the new world, he was married, in 1874, to Miss Maria Tattersoll, a daughter of James 
and Elizabeth Tattersoll. Eight children were born of this marriage: Fred, William, 
Robert, John H., James A., Jane, Florence M., and Helen F., the last named being the 
wife of C. Watson. 

Mr. Hargreaves was a member of the order of United Artisans for several years. 
In politics he maintained an independent course, voting according to his own judg- 
ment without regard to parties. He belonged to the east side Baptist church and 
always endeavored to follow its teachings. His life, therefore, was characterized by 
worthy motives and honorable deeds. He passed away at his home in Portland, Febru- 
ary' 20, 1918, and was interred in Mt. Scott Cemetery. 



JAMES R. LINN. 



James R. Linn, president of the Marion Hotel Company, is also the owner of 
several ranches in the state, in addition to valuable city real estate in Salem, and he 
is likewise a leader in the political circles of his party in Oregon. He is a most public- 
spirited and progressive citizen whose influence has ever been on the side of advance- 
ment and improvement and his efforts have been potent elements in promoting the 
development and upbuilding of Salem and of the state at large. 

Mr. Linn is a native of Pennsylvania. He was born in Huntingdon county, June 
5, 1868, a son of James W. Linn, who became a pioneer farmer in western Iowa. His 
brother. Rev. Hugh Linn, was a minister of the Methodist church, preaching the gospel 
in Pennsylvania and Iowa, his labors proving effective forces for good in the sections 
of the country which he served. 

Coming to the west by way of Colorado and Utah, James R. Linn, at the age of 
twenty-one, became superintendent of the farm for the State Home for Feeble Minded 
in California and on the 1st of April, 1896, he came to Salem, entering the employ 
of George W. Hubbard, for whom he acted as hop buyer, also engaging in growing 
hops on his own account. In 1897 he formed a partnership with Russell Catlin, the 
firm engaging in the growing and buying of hops, and this relationship was maintained 
until 1915. Mr. Linn, however, continues his hop-growing activities and is the owner 
of several ranches in the state, also raising grapes and berries. He owns several busi- 
ness blocks in Salem and is president of the Marion Hotel Company, which operates 
one of the best hotels in the state. The city finds in him an enthusiastic advocate, his 
Interest being manifest in tangible cooperation with movements for its development 
and progress, many of its most modern improvements being directly attributable to 
his efforts. In 1897 he went to Dawson, Alaska, and for one year engaged in mining 
in that vicinity. 

Mr. Linn's labors have ever been of a character that have contributed to public 
progress and prosperity as well as to Individual success. He was a prominent factor 
In the creation of the state highway commission and has always taken an active part 
in the formation of every subsequent commission, showing extraordinary ability in 
suggesting the right men to fill these positions. He is an indefatigable worker for 
the highway and believes it to be one of the greatest factors in promoting the future 
progress of the state, and that it will mean as much to the future history of Oregon 
as her industries. It was largely through his efforts that the bond issue was put 
through, and he has implicit faith in the future of this section of the country, being 
a man of wide vision who is thoroughly alive to the wonderful possibilities of the 
Pacific northwest. Mr. Linn is a close personal friend of Irvin S. Cobb, America's most 
noted jouralist and humorist, upon whom has descended the mantle of Mark Twain, 
and it was owing to Mr. Linn's influence that Mr. Cobb was induced to make the trip 
through Oregon which resulted in his writing an article entitled "A Quest in Youbet- 



292 HISTORY OF OREGON 

cherland," a description of Crater lake, which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post 
of January 1, 1921. This article has been widely read throughout the country and has 
created much interest, which will undoubtedly result in securing for Oregon large 
numbers of enthusiastic tourists. 

Ih 1917 Mr. Linn was united in marriage to Miss Farris Stecker, a native of 
California. Mrs. Linn is a woman of unusually bright mind and cooperates with her 
husband in all of his business affairs, theirs being a most congenial and happy union. 
By a former marriage Mr. Linn has a daughter, Paula, who married Charles Dundore. 

Mr. Linn gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is one of the 
most active and influential men in the ranks of that party in Oregon, having an intimate 
knowledge of political affairs in the state and a comprehensive understanding of ques- 
tions affecting both state and national welfare. He wields a potent influence in political 
circles of Oregon and was largely instrumental in securing the election of Governor 
Oswald West. Industry has been the keynote which has unlocked tor Mr. Linn the 
-portals of success. Thoroughness and diligence have characterized all of his work and 
in business circles he has long occupied a prominent place. Throughout the period 
of his residence in Oregon he has taken a most active and helpful part in the work of 
progress and improvement, his industry and enterprise having been effective forces in 
promoting the development and upbuilding of the state along many lines. He has a 
wide circle of friends in Oregon and all who know him esteem him for his sterling 
worth, tor they have found him trustworthy in every relation of life. 



EDWARD J. SHARKEY. 



The name of Sharkey has long been a prominent and honored one in industrial 
circles of Portland and as head of the firm of P. Sharkey & Son, Edward J. Sharkey is 
ably carrying forward the business established by his father. He is engaged in the 
manufacture of horse collars of superior quality and is now conducting a most extensive 
business, finding a ready sale for his product in many foreign lands as well as the 
Dnitffl Stales. Mr. E. J. Sharkey was born September 1, 1S60, a son of Patrick Sharkey. 
The father was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, on the 17th of March, 1835, his 
parents being John and Katherine (Carroll) Sharkey. John Sharkey was a farmer 
by occupation and was connected with agricultural pursuits on the Emerald isle until 
about 1843, when he brought his family to America. He took up a donation land claim 
in Canada and began the development of a farm. 

Patrick Sharkey was the third in a family of seven children and pursued his edu- 
cation in the schools of Ireland and also of Prince Edward island. He learned the 
trade of a harness and collar maker at Georgetown, which is situated on Prince 
Edward island, and when twenty-three years of age went to St. Johns, New Brunswick, 
where he worked at his trade for two years. He then removed to Grand Falls, where 
for four years he conducted a general store, after which he sold out and went to Boston 
and there enlisted in government service as a harness-maker and was sent to Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee. After the war he returned to Baltimore, Maryland, there following 
his trade for eight months. His next removal took him to Wheeling, West Viriginia, 
where tor twenty years he continued to make his home, devoting his attention to the 
harness business. Being a great reader he learned much about the Pacific coast and 
making a trip here in 1883 he was so well pleased with the country that he returned 
to the east, disposed of his business there and again came to the northwest. Settling 
at Portland he established a harness and collar factory on a small scale on Union 
avenue, between Washington and Alder streets. This was the first collar factory in 
Portland. As opportunity offered he increased the business and later removed to 
Union avenue and Taylor street, where he continued to conduct the enterprise until his 
demise, which occurred on the 20th of August, 1902. Some time prior to his death he 
admitted his son, Edward J. Sharkey, to a partnership in the business. Patrick Sharkey 
always gave his political allegiance to the republican party and in religious faith he 
was a Catholic. 

On the 4th of November, 1859, Patrick Sharkey was married to Miss Elizabeth 
McClement, a daughter of Patrick and Elizabeth (Miller) McClement. Mrs. Sharkey 
was born on the same day as her husband, the place of her birth, however, being in 
County Derry, Ireland. She came to the British province in America when four years 
of age, her parents locating on a farm near St. Johns, where their remaining days 



HISTORY OF OREGON 293 

were passed, and in that locality she resided until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Sharkey 
became the parents of nine children: Edward J., the firstborn, is the subject of this 
review; Josephine is the wife of Charles Sweeney, a locomotive engineer residing In 
Portland and they have three children, Irene, Grace and Edmund; Katherine is the 
wife of Frank Southard of Portland and they have five children, Harry, Helen, 
Catherine, Mildred and Elizabeth; Louise married John Casey of Portland, by whom 
she has four children, Margaret, Allen, Edward and Charles; John P., who is engaged 
in the real estate business in Portland, married Jennie Graham and they have four 
children, Graham, Clement, Ellis and Herman; Helen became the wife of Rudolph 
Zeller of Portland and they have become the parents of three children, Phillip, Rudolph 
and Marie; William T., who is connected with the collar factory, married Cecelia Cahill, 
by whom he has two children, Gertrude and Helen. Mr. Patrick Sharkey was one of 
the substantial business men of Portland and during the period of his residence in 
this city developed an enterprise of considerable proportions. 

Edward J. Sharkey, the eldest in his father's family, obtained his education in the 
common schools of Wheeling, West Virginia, and after laying aside his textbooks 
assisted his father in the conduct of the business, first in Wheeling and later in Portland, 
becoming thoroughly familiar with every phase of its development. In 1903 the factory 
on Taylor street, Portland, was destroyed by fire and the plant was then removed 
to Union avenue at the corner of Oak street, where the business is still located. 
The work instituted by the father is now being carried forward by the son who has 
greatly enlarged the scope of the business, which now gives employment to thirty-five 
persons. The firm of P. Sharkey & Son is the only institution in the west which 
manufactures horse collars exclusively. The superiority of their product has secured 
for it a large sale and the trade has extended east of the Mississippi river, while 
they also do a large exporting business, shipping to Australia, the islands in the 
Pacific ocean, the South American countries and to the Orient. Mr. Sharkey gives 
careful oversight to every phase of the business and is constantly seeking to increase 
the efficiency of his plant, to improve in any way possible the quality of the product 
and to extend the trade of the company to new territory. 

In 1S86 Mr. E. J. Sharkey was united in marriage to Miss Frances Virginia Davis, a 
representative of an old family of Virginia of Welsh descent and they have become the 
parents of four children: George E. and Mary E. are twins. The former is now assistant 
manager of his father's business and is also acting as oflJce manager, while the latter 
is the wife of Dr. P. T. Meaney, of Portland; Ralph L., the next of the family, is a 
prominent physician of Portland. Enlisting for service In the World war he was 
commissioned lieutenant and was aboard the U. S. S. Antilles when that vessel was 
sunk by a German submarine, floating for four hours upon a raft before rescued; 
William P., the youngest of the children, is now a medical student at the University of 
Oregon. 



MALL & VON BORSTEL. 



Among the leading real estate firms of Portland is numbered that of Mall & Von 
Borstel, whose activities have constituted potent factors in the development and 
improvement of the city. W. H. Mall, the senior member of the firm, was born in 
Memphis, Tennessee, in 1864, a son of W. H. and Elizabeth (Curban) Mall, natives of 
Germany, who emigrated to the United States. The father engaged in business as a 
carriage manufacturer and his death occurred in Denver, Colorado, in 1871. Soon 
afterward the mother removed with her family of four children to Portland, where she 
subsequently married Herman C. Von Borstel, father of the junior member of the 
present firm of Mall & Von Borstel. In 1872 and 1873, when a small boy, W. H. Mall 
sold flowers in the theaters of Denver and in 1874 removed with the family to southern 
California, where he also engaged in selling flowers and notions, thus contributing to 
the support of the family. Returning to Portland in 1879, he engaged in selling cigars, 
fruit, etc., on the Stark street ferryboiits which were used to transport passengers 
across the Willamette river before the construction of a bridge. Subsequently he estab- 
lished a fruit store in East Portland and this he later sold, in 1889 opening a real 
estate business which he has since conducted, handling chiefly industrial properties. 
He is a member of the realty board, the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club and Auld 
Lang Syne Society. 



294 HISTORY OF OREGON 

Herman Von Borstel, the junior partner, is a native of tliis city, born in 1880. His 
fatlier, who was a native of Germany, emigrated to the United States and in the early 
'70s became a resident of Portland, where he engaged in the real estate business, in 
which he won a substantial measure of prosperity. After his graduation from high 
school the son pursued a course in a business college and on entering the industrial 
world engaged in the real estate business, in which he has since successfully continued. 
He formed a partnership with W. H. Mall under the firm style of Mall & Von Borstel 
and they are numbered among the leading real estate firms of the city. They have 
negotiated many important realty transfers and are thoroughly conversant concerning 
property values in this city. 

Mr. Von Borstel served as president of the Portland realty board in 1919 and was 
a member of the consolidation committee appointed by the governor of Oregon. He 
is very active in the club life of the city and in Masonry has attained the thirty-second 
degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory. He is also a prominent member of the Shrine 
and during the recent convention of that branch of the order held in Portland was 
chairman of the entertainment committee. The members of the firm are numbered 
among the city's most prominent and progressive business men and through their 
activities are doing much to promote the improvement and upbuilding of Portland, 
where they are widely and favorably known. 



0. W. HOSFORD. 



O. W. Hosford, who is at the head of the Hosford Transportation Company of 
Portland, was born in Vancouver, Clarke county, Washigton, February 27, 1859. His 
father, Chauncey Osborne Hosford was born amid the Catskill mountains in the state 
of New York in 1821 and made an overland trip by ox team to Forest Grove, Oregon, 
in 1845. Through the winter following his arrival he taught school in Salem, Oregon, 
and in 1847 he went to California, in which state he was united in marriage to Miss 
Asenath Glover. While a resident of California he joined the ministry and returned 
to the Clatsop plains in Oregon, where he engaged in preaching and became a circuit 
rider. When he first arrived in Portland in 1S47, there were only thirteen houses in 
the village, all of which were built of logs. The present site of the city was then 
comprised within three homestead claims. After residing for some time in Portland, 
Rev. Hosford went to Vancouver, Washington, and there in 1S59 built the first Metho- 
dist church, of which he became the pastor. He later returned to Oregon and while 
devoting his life to the ministry he also entered upon mercantile pursuits and was 
thus connected with commercial interests for six years. At one time he owned all of 
the land which now comprises the reservoirs at Mount Tabor, Portland, and he passed 
away on Mount Tabor in 1913. His wife's death also occurred there when she was 
sixty-nine years of age. An uncle of 0. W. Hosford of this review was Frank Glover, 
who crossed the plains to California in the same train as that of the famous Downer 
party, most of whom perished at Downer Lake, in the heart of the Sierras, in the deep 
snow. It is said that this ill fated party drew lots to see who should be sacrificed to 
provide food for those who remained, and Mr. Glover was among those sent back with 
the rescue party who succored the survivors. 

0. W. Hosford pursued his education in the public schools of Mount Tabor and at 
the age of twenty-eight years took up steamboating on the Willamette and Columbia 
rivers and became half owner of the steamboat Lucy Mason, which plied between Port- 
land and Woodland in Cowlitz county, on the Lewis river. It was in the fall of 1887 
that he began steamboating, his company being known as the Lewis River Transporta- 
tion Company. With this enterprise he was connected until 1892, when he sold out 
and purchased the business of the Washougal and La Camas Transportation Company, 
owners of the steamer lone. He then operated this steamer for sixteen years, in which 
time he received a master's license in 1S92. In 1906 he disposed of his interests in 
the navigation line and established the Hosford Transportation Company and entered 
the towing business in connection with his sons, 0. J., who is the secretary and treas- 
urer of the company, and L. C, who is assistant manager, while Mr. Hosford is the 
president. The company engages in towing logs for the various sawmills along the 
Willamette and in this connection has developed a business of substantial proportions. 

In 1883 Mr. Hosford was united in marriage to Miss Bertha M. Baker, a native of 
Chicago, Illinois, whose parents came to Portland in the late '70s. Their son, L. C. 




O. W. HOSFORD 



HISTORY OF OKEGON 297 

Hosford, wedded Marion Kelly, of Illinois, while the elder son, 0. J. Hosford, wedded 
Frances Kleggitt a daughter of an early pioneer. 

Mr. Hosford has long been greatly interested in politics and gives his support to 
the republican party. He was elected to the state legislature for the term of 1919 and 
1920 and in the fall of the latter year was reelected. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is one of the oldest representatives of 
the order in Portland. He has also taken high degrees in Masonry and is a member 
of the Mystic Shrine. His entire life has been passed in the northwest and since 
attaining adult age he has taken advantage of the business opportunities here offered 
and has not only built up a large business in connection with the transportation 
company but has also become the owner of valuable city and farm lands. For more 
than sixty years he has been a witness of the growth and progress of the northwest 
as the country has emerged from pioneer conditions and taken on all of the advan- 
tages of the older east. He rejoices in what has been accomplished and well may he 
be proud of Oregon's record for its broad and fertile valleys have been carefully culti- 
vated, its splendid timbered regions have yielded many a fortune and all of its natural 
resources have been developed, leading to steady industrial and commercial progress, 
resulting in the building of a great empire west of the Rockies. Mr. Hosford has always 
been thoroughly imbued with the spirit of determination and of enterprise that charac- 
terizes the Pacific coast country and thus he has advanced step by step to the goal of 
success in all of his business endeavors. 



JAMES S. COOPER. 



James S. Cooper, who is now living retired at Independence, devoting his attention 
to the supervision of his extensive property interests, was for a considerable period 
prominently identified with financial affairs in Polk county, acquiring thereby a sub- 
stantial competence which now enables him to rest from further labor. He is a man of 
high personal standing, of marked business integrity and ability, and is regarded 
as one of the most substantial and valued citizens of his community. 

Mr. Cooper was born in Lawrence county, Missouri, January 9, 1841, and is a son 
of E. E. and Nancy (Wann) Cooper, natives of Kentucky. The father was a Baptist 
minister and a son of Henry Cooper, who also engaged in preaching the gospel. The 
family has ever been noted for its loyalty and patriotism and Frederick Cooper, the 
great-grandfather of James S. Cooper of this review, enlisted in 1777, when but seventeen 
years of age, as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, defending American interests at 
York Pennsylvania, under command of Captain Lart. His grandson, E. E. Cooper, 
removed to Missouri in 1839, taking up a homestead on Rock Prairie, near the present 
site of Halltown, in Lawrence county. This he cleared and developed, also continuing 
his ministerial labors, and remained a resident of the state until 1863, when with ox 
team and wagon he crossed the plains to Oregon, settling on a farm in Spring valley, 
Polk county. There he again engaged in farming and in preaching the gospel until 
1876, when he removed to Salem, where he resided for two years and then took up 
his abode upon a farm in West Salem. He there passed away on the 12th of August, 
1880, and the mother's demise occurred at Independence, May 30, 1891. They reared a 
family of twelve children, nine of whom were born in Missouri. 

Their son, James S. Cooper, was reared and educated in Missouri, pursuing his 
studies in one of the pioneer log schoolhouses. In 1860, when a young man of 
nineteen years, he crossed the plains to California, where he engaged in the teaming 
business, residing in that state for a period of four years, during which time he made 
thirteen trips across the Sierras to Virginia City, Nevada. In February, 1864, he 
started for Oregon by the overland route, reaching Spring valley, Polk county, on the 
19th of March. There for a short time he conducted a small dairy and then made his 
way to Marion county, where in six months he made five hundred dollars by cutting 
wood and was thus enabled to pursue a course of study in McMinnville College. He 
subsequently purchased land in Polk county and for two years was active in its opera- 
tion. He then sold the property and went to eastern Oregon, where he remained for 
two years, or until 1873, when he returned to Polk county and bought a farm west of 
Salem, which he continued to operate for two years and then sold. In 1875 he established 
a livery and stage business in Monmouth, of which he remained the proprietor until 
1878, when he removed to Independence and here engaged in a similar enterprise for 



298 HISTORY OF OREGOX 

two years. The next five years were devoted to the conduct of a brokerage business 
and in 1885 he opened a private bank, which he operated until 1889, when he became 
the organizer of the First National Bank of Independence, of which he was made 
president. In 1900 Mr. Cooper sold his interest in the bank and has since devoted 
his attention to the supervision of his extensive property interests, having made 
judicious investments in city and farm realty. He is the owner of several business 
blocks in the city which were erected by him and he also has extensive timber inter- 
ests in the state. He likewise owns two valuable farms, one of two hundred and thirty- 
eight acres and the other comprising seven hundred and twelve acres, and for the past 
thirty years he has engaged in hop raising on an extensive scale. His initiative spirit 
and notable ability have carried him into important relations and through his activi- 
ties he has contributed in substantial measure to the development and upbuilding of his 
section of the state. 

Mr. Cooper has been married twice. On the 7th of January, 1869, he wedded Miss 
Frances 0. Graves and they became the parents of tour children: Estelle M. became 
the wife of C. E. Ireland on the 5th of October, 1898, and they reside in Portland; Dora 
Edith married Major G. M. Parker, Jr., of the Thirty-third United States Infantry, and 
they are now residing in Panama; Ella Pearl was married on the 6th of June, 1904, to 
W. D. Moreland, a veteran of the World war. He went overseas as a captain and for 
gallant and meritorious service on the field of battle was promoted to the rank of 
major; Clarence T. was born June 30, 1879, and passed away in October of the' same 
year. The wife and mother died in August, 1879, and in March, 1883, Mr. Cooper was 
united in marriage to Mrs. Jennie McNeal Logan, by whom he has four children: Mabel 
is the wife of George M. Williams and they reside in Centralia, Washington; Frances, 
married John R. Krause and they make their home at Aurora, Oregon; James Shelby, 
Jr., born March 3, 1888, is an accountant with the Oregon Steel & Iron Company in 
Portland. He is also a veteran of the World war, enlisting on the 12th of May, 1917. He 
went overseas on the 1st of March, 1918, as second lieutenant in the Motor Transport 
Corps and returned with the rank of captain, his distinguished service winning for 
him merited promotion. He received his discharge on the 24th of October, 1919. Gen- 
evieve is at home with her parents. 

In his political views Mr. Cooper has always been a stalwart republican, casting his 
first presidential ballot for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. He is a leader in the ranks of his 
party and was a delegate to the national republican convention at Chicago in 1888, 
which nominated William H. Harrison for president. He is much interested in the 
welfare and progress of his community and was elected in 1904 joint representative 
for Lincoln and Polk counties, serving in the 1905 session of the Oregon legislature. 
For two terms he served as mayor of his city, giving to the municipality a most progres- 
sive and businesslike administration. He has also been a member of the city council, 
serving as president of that body at the time the town was incorporated. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the chapter and council, and his religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church, while his wife is 
atfiliated with the Methodist church. In business affairs he has ever been found 
thoroughly reliable as well as progressive, winning a good name as well as a substantial 
competence. He takes a deep interest in everything relative to the welfare of the 
district in which he lives and has been most earnest in his support of those projects 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. His life has ever been an upright 
and honorable one and his sterling worth is attested by all who know him. 



HOWARD M. COVEY. 

In 1905 Howard M. Covey established a small automobile business In Portland 
and his energy, progressiveness and business ability are indicated in the fact that 
he is today proprietor of one of the largest enterprises of the kind in the Pacific 
northwest. A native of Texas, Mr. Covey was born in Jefferson on the 19th of Novem- 
ber, 1875, a son of M. W. and Susan A. (Grant) Covey. The father was a soldier in the 
Confederate army during the Civil war, previous to which he had been a large slave- 
holder and the owner of an extensive plantation in the south. 

It was on this place that his son, Howard M. Covey, was reared and in the 
public and high schools of Texas he pursued his education. On starting out in life 
independently he engaged in the bicycle business in Texas, there remaining until 1903, 



HISTORY OF OREGON 299 

when he sought the broader opportunities offered in the west to an ambitious and 
energetic young man. Coming to Oregon he decided on Portland as a place of 
residence and in 1905 purchased the business of the Lee Automobile Company, estab- 
lishing a small enterprise of that character. His initiative spirit, progressive methods 
and reliable dealings soon won for him a good patronage and his business has grown 
steadily from year to year until he is now conducting one of the largest automobile 
enterprises in the Pacific northwest. In 1911 he erected his present building — a fire- 
proof structure, thoroughly modern in its appointments, affording a floor space of 
seventy-seven hundred feet. He has the state agency for the Cadillac car and is the 
agent for Multnomah county of the Dodge Brothers car, giving employment to approxi- 
mately one hundred people. His business is arranged in separate divisions, including 
the sales, garage, parts, electrical and used car departments and the repair and paint 
shops, each of which must be self-supporting and is placed in charge of a competent 
man, who makes a daily report of the business transacted in his branch of work. The 
business is thus thoroughly systematized and conducted along the most efficient lines, 
resulting in substantial and gratifying returns. 

Mr. Covey resides with his mother in the American apartments and his sister 
Edna makes her home in Dallas, Texas. His interest in the development and up- 
building of his city is indicated by his membership in the Chamber of Commerce and 
he is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Press, Golf, 
Multnomah, Anglers and Rifle Clubs, turning for recreation to hunting, fishing and 
motoring. He is one of Portland's most enterprising, progressive and aggressive busi- 
ness men, who in attaining individual success has also contributed in substantial 
measure to public progress and prosperity and his worth to the community is widely 
acknowledged. 



A. R. JOHNSON. 



Among those who have been active in directing real estate operations in Portland 
is A. R. Johnson, member of the Johnson-Dodson Company. He was born in Denmark, 
September 12, 1879, and was a lad of five years when he came to Oregon in 1884, with 
his parents. Christian and Catherine Johnson. His father engaged in the canning 
business in Astoria until his death, which occurred in 1885. He had conducted the 
business under the name of the Scandinavian Cannery and subsequent to his demise 
this was merged into the Columbia River Packers' Association. The mother survived 
her husband tor many years, passing away in Portland in 1914. 

A. R. Johnson attended the public schools of Astoria and when nineteen years of 
age entered the general merchandise business in connection with his brother, Fred J., 
opening a store at Astoria. They sold out there about eleven years later and turned 
their attention to real estate, with oflSces in the Board of Trade building in Portland, 
and five years later Mr. Johnson removed his oflSce to the Northwest Bank building. 
He is now conducting his operations as a member of the firm known as Johnson- 
Dodson Company. They handle inside improved property and residences and l;ave just 
closed a deal for seventy-two hundred and fifteen acres on the Columbia river, between 
Portland and Astoria, which they will subdivide into forty-acre tracts. This land will 
produce fine berries and fruits and is also good for diversified farming. This is a 
gigantic undertaking which they have assumed and it is hard to realize at this time 
the great benefits which the improvement of these small tracts will mean to the 
state. The district will support at least two hundred families. Already they have 
families settled on the property from both the middle west and the east and many 
others are prospective buyers. The land is being sold at thirty dollars per acre, with 
one-fourth down and the balance in terms to suit the purchaser, and it is generally 
known that the land will yield about one thousand dollars per acre annually when 
planted to berries. Mr. Johnson has contributed through his real estate operations 
in large measures to the development, settlement and progress of Portland and the 
surrounding country and is a most energetic and progressive business man. He attacks 
everything with a contagious enthusiasm that cannot fail to produce results. 

In 1905 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Minnie Lenart of Astoria. He is a member 
of the Commercial Club, of the Realty Board and of the Knights of Pythias. He has 
lived in the northwest practically throughout his entire lite and Is widely known in 
Portland and around the Columbia river district. He is actuated by a most progres- 



300 HISTORY OF OREGON 

sive spirit in all that he does and has handled large realty interests in Portland. His 
careful management, his thorough reliability and his undaunted energy bring to him 
the most gratifying measure of success. 



C. H. RAFFETY, M. D. 



For a half century Dr. C. H. Raffety was a well known Portland physician and 
while his professional services were of great value to many in this section of the 
state, he also found time to devote to civic affairs and was constantly laboring for 
the promotion of interests which had for their object the upbuilding and benefit of 
the community. 

Dr. Raffety was a native of Macoupin, Illinois, born September 2, 1839, and was 
a lad of thirteen years when in 1S52 he journeyed westward with his father, S. D. 
Raffety, who settled in Washington county, Oregon. In acquiring his education Dr. 
Raffety attended the Pacific University at Forest Grove and afterward became a student 
in the Willamette University at Salem. His brother. Dr. David Raffety, also of Port- 
land, was licensed to practice medicine soon after C. H. Raffety had completed his 
medical course and they entered into partnership relations, winning a prominent 
place among the successful physicians and surgeons of the northwest. Dr. Raffety 
not only engaged in the medical practice but also established a drug store soon after 
opening his office in Portland in 1869. He always held to high professional standards 
and ever kept in touch with the trend of modern professional progress, constantly 
broadening his knowledge by reading and research. 

In 1873 Dr. Raffety was married to Miss Almeda Smith, a daughter of Captain 
John Smith, at one time government agent in the Warm Springs Indian reservation. 
Dr. Raffety was a member of the Masonic fraternity and when he passed away his 
brethren of the order had charge of the burial. He had always been deeply interested 
in civic affairs and the progress and upbuilding of his city and state and several times 
he was called to public office. During his term as mayor of East Portland he was 
appointed a member of the city water commission, in which office he served for eighteen 
years and was largely instrumental in having the water from Bull Run piped into 
the city. This alone would entitle him to the gratitude of all present and future 
residents of Portland, for no city is supplied with better water than that which comes 
from snowcapped Mt. Hood. His life was one of usefulness to his fellowmen. A 
modern philosopher has said, "Not the good that comes to us", but the good that comes 
to the world through us, is the measure of our success," and judging by this standard 
Dr. Raffety was a most successful man. 



DAN JOHNSTON. 



Dan -Johnston, a prominent attorney practicing at Albany, was born near Virden, 
Macoupin county, Illinois, September 23, 1882, a son of Isaac N. and Emily F. (Chapman) 
Johnston, natives of Macoupin county, Illinois. The maternal grandfather of Mr. 
Johnston of this review was one of the earliest settlers in Macoupin county, going to 
that section of Illinois from Tennessee in 1830. He was a farmer by occupation and 
followed that pursuit in Macoupin county during the remainder of his life. He was 
familiar with Indian warfare, having served as a soldier in the Black Hawk war. and 
he was one of the worthy pioneers of his section of the state. Isaac N. Johnston, the 
father of Mr. Johnston, also followed farming in Macoupin county, Illinois, and remained 
a resident of that section of the state until death called him on the 14th of January, 
1896, when he was fifty-two years of age. He was an honored veteran of the Civil 
war, in which he served tor three years as a member of Company E, One Hundred and 
Twenty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The mother has also passed away, her 
demise occurring in June, 1912, when she had reached the age of sixty-two. 

Dan Johnston was reared and educated in the district schools of Macoupin county, 
Illinois, and then entered Valparaiso University of Valparaiso, Indiana, as a law 
student, receiving his LL. B. degree from that institution upon his graduation with the 
class of 1910. In June of that year he was admitted to the bar of Indiana and in the 
following month came to Oregon, where he was admitted to the bar. Opening an 




DR. C. H. RAFFETY 



HISTORY OF OREGON 303 

oflSce in Albany, he has here continued in practice and in the interval that has elapsed 
has built up a good clientele. In 1915 he was called to the office of city attorney of 
Albany and so acceptable were his services in that connection that in January, 1919, 
he was honored with reelection and also acted as city attorney of Harrisburg, Oregon, 
for several years. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he pre- 
pares his cases with great thoroughness and care, readily recognizing the value of any 
point as applicable to his cause. Mr. Johnston has not confined his attention to his 
professional interests but has also been active in commercial lines, being secretary of 
the D. E. Nebergall Meat Company, which operates a packing plant and retail market. 
He is also secretary of the Far West Manufacturing Company, engaged in the manufac- 
ture of ladders, cedar chests, wheelbarrows and wood specialties. 

On the 27th of May, 1910, Mr. Johnston was united in marriage to Miss Ada D. 
Douglas, a daughter of E. D. and Rose (Haymon) Douglas, natives of West Virginia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston are the parents of two children: Prances Rose, who was born 
in December, 1914; and Robert D., born in January, 1916. 

Mr. Johnston gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. He is a Knights Templar 
Mason and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge and the B. P. 0. E., while 
along the line of his profession his identification is with the Linn County Bar Associa- 
tion. Mr. Johnston is patriotic, loyal and public-spirited and on March 5, 1904, enlisted 
in the United States navy, from which he was discharged March 4, 1908, as chief 
yeoman. During the war with Germany he rendered important and valuable service to 
the government in promoting the Liberty Loan campaigns and other war measures, 
devoting a large part of his time to that work, all personal interests and considerations 
being laid aside. He is a representative of America's best type of manhood and his 
colleagues and contemporaries speak of him as an able lawyer and one whose ability 
has brought him prominently to the front. 



RALPH E. WILLIAMS. 



For the past decade Ralph E. Williams has been a resident of Portland and his 
entire life has been passed in Oregon, where he has gained for himself a prominent 
position as a representative of the banking fraternity. He is also interested in agricul- 
ture, horticulture and in timber, nor is he unknown as an influential factor in political 
circles. He was born in Polk county, Oregon, September 14, 1869, his parents being 
J. J. and Alice (Eckersley) Williams. The father was born in Tennessee in 1832, 
and removed from that state to Missouri but became an Oregon pioneer of 1845, at 
which time he took up his abode in Polk county, where he homesteaded. Throughout 
the Intervening period to his death he was identified with agricultural interests, passing 
away in 1915. His wife was a native of England and in the early '50s with her brother, 
Otho Eckersley, came to Oregon, the Eckersleys also becoming identified with the 
pioneers of the state. Mrs. Williams passed away in 1874. 

At the usual age Ralph E. Williams became a pupil in the public schools of his 
native county and afterwards attended high school and La Creole Academy at Dallas, 
Oregon. He initiated his business career as a bank clerk in the Dallas City Bank in 
1889 and since that time has made continuo.us progress in financial circles. In 1901 
he was elected to the cashiership o£ the Dallas City Bank and was elevated to the 
presidency in 1905, since which time he has remained at the head of the institution. 
This does not comprise the scope of his business, however, for in 1905 he organized and 
was elected president of the Dallas National Bank and in 1906 organized the Bank 
of Falls City, of which he became president. In 1911 he removed to Portland and 
further extending his business connections he is now president of the Tillamook 
County Bank. He is active in the management of all the various banking institutions 
with which he is associated and is regarded as a most forceful and resourceful business 
man, ready for any emergency and for any opportunity. He has operated extensively 
in hops, timber, wheat and realty. His landed possessions include several farms in 
Polk county and a large wheat ranch in eastern Oregon. 

In the year of his removal to Portland Mr. Williams was married in this city on 
the 3rd of December, 1911, to Miss Grace Moyes, a daughter of D. C. Moyes of Portland, 
and they have become the parents of one son and one daughter, Ralph Williams, Jr., 
seven years of age; and Harriet, aged four. Mr. Williams is well known in club circles. 



304 HISTORY OF OREGON 

belonging to the Arlington and Waverly Country Clubs, the Press Club, the Multnomah 
Amateur Athletic Club, also to the Chamber of Commerce of Portland and to La Creole 
Club of Dallas. Fraternally he is a Mason and has attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands 
of the desert. He likewise belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and holds- 
a life membership in Salem Lodge. He has long been reckoned with as a factor in 
political circles of the state, was elected in 1914 tor a tour years term as republican 
national committeeman from Oregon and in 1918 was re-elected to serve until 1922. 
He thus took active interest in shaping the recent campaign, which gave to the party 
an overwhelming victory, exceeding all others in the history of the nation. As a member 
of the republican national committee he was made a representative of the sub-committee 
to handle the national convention in Chicago and in seniority as to service is ranked 
by only one member. This position he has filled since 1908 and his present te'rm expires 
in 1922. Through the same period he is serving as Pacific coast member of the 
executive committee of the republican national committee. During the 1916 campaign 
he was instrumental in bringing about harmonious action between progressive repub- 
licans and the republican organizations. The consensus of public opinion places him 
among the eminent men of the state. 



HAROLD A. SWAFFORD. 



Harold A. Swafford is well known in mercantile circles of Linn county as mill 
manager of the Crown Willamette Paper Company at Lebanon. Mr. Swafford is on© 
of the sons of the state, his birth having occurred in Oregon City, February 10, 1890. 
His parents were James L. and Temperance (Rands) Swafford, the former born in 
Oregon and the latter in Stacyville, Iowa. For many years the father engaged in the 
real estate business in Oregon City, in which he won a substantial measure of success. 
He was a man of prominence in his section of the state and for several terms served 
as county treasurer of Clackamas county, ably discharging the duties of that office. He 
remained a resident of Oregon City until his death in August, 1914, when he was sixty 
years of age. The mother survives and still makes her home in Oregon City. The pater- 
nal grandfather of Harold A. Swafford was one of the early pioneers of this state. He 
crossed the plains with ox teams to Oregon In 1852 and took up land in Clackamas 
county which he improved and developed, continuing Its cultivation until his demise 
In 1908. 

Harold A. Swafford was reared and educated in his native city and on starting out 
in the business world became connected with the Crown Willamette Paper Company, 
which was at that time known as the Willamette Pulp & Paper Company. His energy, 
abil