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Full text of "History of the Presbytery of Indianapolis"

INDIANA COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COLINTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01715 4011 



Gc 977.202 InSmo 
Moore , A . Y . 

History of the Presbytery of 
Indianapolis 



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Fund. 

PUBLISHED BY TH E PRESBYTEKY^ 




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J. G. DOUGHTY, PRINTER, CORNER CIRC'LK AND MERIDIAN STS. \/ 

1876 






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HISTORY 



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PUBLISHED BY THE PRESBYTERY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

JOHN G. DOUGHTY, PRINTER, CORNER MERIDIAN AND CIRCLE STREETS. 
1876. 



Ml«n County Public Lih^ry 

»0 Weisttr Stre«l 

K> Box 2270 

■pn Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



£ ^' /f f 



Extract from the Minutes of the Presbytery of In- 
dianapolis, in session at Greenwood, September, 1875 • 

" Rev. A. Y. Moore was chosen to prepare a History of the 
Presbytery, to be read at the Spring meeting." 

Extract from the Minutes of Presbytery, in session 

at Southport, April, 1876 : 1360956 

" Rev. A. Y. Moore read a part of the History he had prepared 
of this Pi-esbytery, and he was requested to complete the History, 
and prepare it for publication." 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I. 
Church at Bloomington — Rev. Isaac Reed — Bible Society — 
First Preaching in Indiana — First Churches — Early Times 
— The State Capital is located and named — Organization of 
Church at Indianapolis — Chronological Comparisons 1 

CHAPTER II. 
Louisville and Salem Presbyteries — Indianapolis as a Mission- 
ary Field — First Ordination in the State — Ordination and 
Installation at Bloomington — Organization of Churches at 
Columbus, Franklin, Greencastle, and Greenwood — Pres- 
bytery of Wabash — Synod of Indiana — Difficulties with 
Mr. Bush — Presbytery of Crawfordsville — Difficulties in 
Presbytery — Difficulties Allayed 16 

CHAPTER III, 
Presbytery of Indianapolis — First Statistical Report — The 
Field and its Occupation in 1830 — Decision of Presbytery 
on Representation, Presbytery Resisting Division — Com- 
plaint against Presbytery — Dissensions from Diversity in 
Doctrine — Items — Hopewell — Industrial Aspects and In- 
terests — Southport,. Danville, Greencastle, Shiloh, Bethany 
— The Field at the time of the Great Division of the 
Church 27 



VI CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER I V. 
Action of the Presbytery of Indianapolis in the Great Division 
of the Church — Action of the Presbytery of Crawfordsville — 
Greencastle First — Greencastle Second — Putnamville, Pop- 
lar Spring, Baimbridge, Carpentersville, Bloomington, Co- 
lumbus 43 

CHAPTER V. 
Second Church of Indianapolis — Indianapolis Presbytery, N. 
S. — Enlargement of Presbytery — Ministerial Changes — 
Changes in Churches — Missionary Work — Pastoral Relation 
— Report to General Assembly 50 

CHAPTER VI. 
Presbytery of Indianapolis, 0. S. — Churches Organized — Min- 
isterial Changes — Lessons from the History of Franklin 
Church — Ministerial Support — Missionary Work — Organi- 
zation of White Water Presbytery, and Changes in the 
Boundaries of the Presbytery 59 

CHAPTER VII. 

View of the Field from Reports of Indiana Gazetteer — Num- 
ber of Old and New School Churches, and their Increase 
in Membership — Progress and Prosperity of the Country.. 71 

CHAPTER VIII. 
Indianapolis Presbytery, O. S. — Changes in Churches — Minis- 
terial Changes — State of Religion — Missionary Work — Pres- 
byterial Authority — First Church of Indianapolis — Second 
Church of Greencastle — Numbers 74 

CHAPTER IX. 
Indianapolis Presbytery, N. S. — New Churches — Second Church 
of Indianapolis — Fourth Church of Indianapolis — Green- 
wood — Ministerial Changes — Missionary Work — Danville, 
White Lick, Greencastle, Putnamville, Bainbridge, Bloom- 
ington, Columbus 83 



CONTENTS. vil 

CHAPTER X. 
Numbers — Census Report of the Statistics of the different De- 
nominations in the Field of the Presbytery 92 

CHAPTER XI. 
Indianapolis Presbytery, N. S. — Greenfield Church — Kingston 
and Clarksburg — Edinburg — Sixth Church of Indianapolis 
— Shelbyville — Ministerial Changes — Progress — Reunion — 
Adjournment sine die — Hendricks County — Pvitnam County 
— Bloomington — Columbus — Numbers 96 

CHAPTER XII. 
Indianapolis Presbytery, 0. S. — Changes in Churches — Ministe- 
rial Changes — Deaths — State of the Country — Revivals — 
Reunion — First Church at Indianapolis — Seventh Church 
at Indianapolis — Brownsburg and Clermont — Greencastle, 
Carpentersville, Bloomington — Numbers 107 

CHAPTER XIII. 
Indianapolis Presbytery — Its Boundaries, Members and 
Churches — Changes in Churches — Ministerial Changes — 
Missionary Work — Woman's Presbyterial Society — Revivals 119 



HISTO R Y 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 



CHAPTER I 



Church at Bloomington — Rev. Isaac Reed — Bible Society — 
First Preaching in Indiana — First Churches — Early 
Times — The State Capital located and named — Organiza- 
tion of Church at Indianapolis — Chronological Compar- 
isons. 

1805—1823. 

The Presbytery of Indianapolis comprises within its 
limits the following counties : Putnam, Hendricks, Ma- 
rion, Hancock, Johnson, Morgan, Monroe, Brown and 
Bartholomew. 

The oldest Presbyterian church within this district is 
that of Bloomington, Monroe county. This church was 
organized the 27th of September, 1819. One year be- 
fore this all the rest of the territory now included within 
the bounds of the Presbytery of Indianapolis, except 
Monroe county, was in the possession of the Indians. 
At St. Mary's, Ohio, a treaty was made upon the 3d of 
October, 1818, by the government of the United States 



2 HISTORY OF THE 

with the Delaware Indians, who then occupied this ter- 
ritory, h^f which they transferred it to the United States. 
In the treaty, the right was reserved to the Indians of 
remaining in the country, and occupying it as a hunting 
ground for three years; after this they were to be re- 
moved by the government of the United States to terri- 
tory assigned to them west of the Mississippi.* This 
tract of country purchased from the Delawares was 
called, in the settlement of the country, the IS'ew Pur- 
chase, and known as such. 

The county of Monroe was partly within the limits of 
the New Purchase and partly within the limits of a pur- 
chase made of the Indians by General Harrison at Ft. 
Wayne in 1809 ; a purchase which was one of the chief 
causes that stirred up the hostility of Tecumseh and his 
brother, the Shawnee Prophet, and led to the Indian 
war, which was begun with the battle of Tippecanoe, 
November 7th, 1811. 

The enabling act of Congress which made Indiana a 
State in 1816, devolved upon James Monroe, the Presi- 
dent of the United States, the duty of setting apart a 
township of land for University purposes, in addition to 
the township that had been already granted to the Uni- 
versity of Vincennes. The President designated for the 
State University a township of land in what afterwards 
became Monroe county. Doubtless this assignment of 
land for University purposes led to the speedy settle- 
ment and organization of Monroe county. The county 
of Monroe, which was previously a part of Orange 
county, with the county seat at Paoli, was organized by 
the Legislature of 1818. The county seat was located 
April 11th, 1818, and named Bloomington. This was 

"^Dillon's Indiana, p. 575. 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 6 

six months before the acquisition of the New Purchase 
from the Delawares. 

The first entrance of a Presbyterian or Congrega- 
tional minister within the boundaries of this presbytery 
was, in all probability, made in the fall of 1818. The 
Rev, Orin Fowler, who spent a year in the State under 
the direction of the Connecticut Missionary Society, 
visited Bloomington in the fall of 1818. Mr. Fowler 
thus writes from Carlisle, in Sullivan county, to Rev. 
Isaac Reed, then preaching at IsTew Albany : " I have 
been on a tour to Monroe county, (Bloomington county 
seat), which was very fatiguing ; have been up the Wa- 
bash river to Fort Harrison (Terre Haute), and preached 
in nearly every neighborhood in these several direc- 
tions."* 

In the fall of 1819 the Rev. Isaac Reed, who was then 
preaching for the church of New Albany, made a mis- 
sionary tour into the interior of the State to distribute 
Bibles and to preach. The Bibles, he says, were the re- 
mains of a society which had been formed at Jefierson- 
ville by the agency of the Rev. Samuel J. Mills and the 
Rev. Daniel Smith, during the days of the territorial 
existence of Indiana, and while Colonel Posey was Gov- 
ernor. In 1814, SamuelJ. Mills and Daniel Smith, under 
the combined patronage of the Connecticut and Massa- 
chusetts Missionary Societies, made a journey through 
the States and Territories of the southwest, preaching 
and organizing Bible and other benevolent societies. In 
November of this year, these men visited St. Louis, and 
" preached the first sermons ever heard from ministers 
of their denomination in that French village. "f It was 
to distribute the Bibles of this Bible Society, organized 

*Reecrs Christian Traveller, p. 97. 

fSprague's Annals of the Presbyterian Pulpit, Vol. IV, p. 506. 



4 HISTORY OF THE 

at Jeffersonville by Samuel J. Mills and his colaborer^ 
Daniel Smith, and to preach the gospel " in the regions 
beyond," that the Rev. Isaac Eeed made, in the fall of 
1819, a missionary tour " as far as to the frontier coun- 
ties of Monroe and Owen." By this thread of influ- 
ence, slight, y^t real, and most interesting and precious, 
the organization of the oldest church of the presbytery 
becomes associated with the life and labors of one 
" whose praise is in all the churches," and to whom is 
largely due the organization both of the American 
Board of Missions and the American Bible Society. 

The church at Bloomington was " the first church," 
says Mr. Reed, " formed by my ministry."* Mr. Reed 
became a veteran missionary, and probably organized 
more churches in the State than any other man.f 

The first record we have of a Presbyterian minister 
preaching within the limits of Indiana, is of Thomas 
Cleland, of Kentucky. In the Life of Dr. Cleland we 
find the following : 

'' Transylvania Presbytery had no definite limits in a 
southern direction ; it also included Indiana, etc., on 
the north. In the spring of 1805 I was directed to visit 
Vincennes and the adjoining regions. It was an unin- 
habited route I had to go. A small wilderness trace, 
with only one residence on the way, in the most desti- 
tute part of the way, to entertain me during the night. 
Here was my poor animal tied to a tree, fed with the 
grain packed in a wallet from Louisville, and myself 
stretched on the puncheon floor of a small cabin, for the 
night's rest. All passed ofif, however, without any det- 
riment or discomfort. The next evening made up for 
all previous privations. I was welcomed and agreeably 

^Christian Traveller, p. 93. 

f Historical Discourse, by Rev. J. H. Johnston. 



PRESBYTERY OF lyDIANAFOLIS. 

entertained at the Governor's palace during my stay in 
Viucennes. The late William Henry Harrison, then a 
young man, with a Presbyterian wife, was Governor of 
the Indiana Territory, as it then was. He had recently 
held a treaty with a certain tribe of Indians, who as- 
sembled at Vincennes. 

" The first sermon I preached — and it was the first 
ever preached in the place, at least by a Presbyterian 
minister — was in the council house, but a short time 
before occupied by the sons of the forest. I preached 
also in a settlement twenty miles up the Wabash, where 
were a few Presbyterian families, chiefly from Shelby 
county, Kentucky."* 

It is possible that in Clarke county, which Governor 
Harrison established by proclamation February 3, 1801, 
there may have been preaching, either by some Presby- 
terian or other minister, earlier than the time mentioned 
by Mr. Cleland, when he preached at Vincennes. 

In the Minutes of the General Assembly for 1805, we 
find that about the time Cleland is threading his way 
through the wilderness to Vincennes, Mr. Thomas Wil- 
liamson, a licentiate of the Second Presbytery of South 
Carolina, is appointed to spend three months in mission- 
ary services, -' in the lower parts of the State of Ohio, 
and in the Indian Territory as low as Kaskaskia." 

By Indian Territory in this minute of the Assembly 
we must understand Indiana Territory, which was or- 
ganized in 1800, and embraced all the territory of the 
country west of Ohio, and north of the Ohio river. 
When, in 1803, the Lousiana purchase was made, all of 
the territory west of the Mississippi, and as far south as 
the southern boundary of Arkansas, was added to the 

*Life of Dr. Cleland — Moore Wilstach, Keys k Co., Cincinnati, 
1859, p. 87. 



b HISTORY OF THE 

territorial government of Indiana. In 1805, the terri- 
torial governments of Missouri and of Michigan were 
organized. But it was not until 1809, that the Territory 
of Illinois was established by detaching from the Ter- 
ritory of Indiana the country which is now embraced 
in the States of Illinois and Wisconsin, and that part of 
Minnesota which lies east of the Mississippi. In the 
Minutes of the Assembly for 1806, we iind this resolu- 
tion : " That Mr. Samuel Scott, of the Presbytery of 
West Lexington, be a Missionary for three months, in the 
Indiana Territory, and especially at Vincennes." 

In Mr. Dickey's Brief History, this is the year of 
the date of the organization of the Indiana church, the 
first Presbyterian church organized in Indiana The 
second church organized, was one in the vicinity of 
Charlestown, Clarke county, called Palmyra. It was con- 
stituted in 1807, by the Rev. James Vance, with about 
twelve or fifteen members. When the Charlestown 
church was organized, in 1812, the Palmyra church had 
become almost extinct, and the few remaining members 
were embodied in the Charlestown church. The 
Charlestown church was thus the third church organ- 
ized in Indiana. The fourth was that of Washington, 
Daviess county, with seventeen members, in 1814. The 
fifth, that of Madison, with fifteen or twenty members, 
in 1815. The sixth, that of Salem, in Washington 
county, in 1816. The seventh, that of Blue River, in 
Washington county, with seven members, in 1816. The 
eighth, that of Pisgah, in Clarke county, with fifteen 
members, in 1816. The ninth, that of Graham, in Jen- 
nings county, with seventeen members, in 1817. The 
tenth, that of New Albany, with ten members, in 1817. 
The eleventh, that of Hopewell, in Sullivan county, in 
1817. The twelfth, that of Jefiersonville in Jefferson 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. < 

county, with fourteen members, in 1818. The thirteenth, 
that of New Lexington, Scott county, with twenty mem- 
bers, in 1818. The fourteenth, that of Corydon, with 
seven members, in 1819. The fifteenth, that of Carlisle, 
in Sullivan county, with nine members, in 1819. 

The church at Bloomington was the sixteenth Pres- 
byterian church organized in the new and, growing 
State. It consisted at its organization, of nine persons, 
Henry Kirkham, Mary Kirkham, Dr. David H. Max- 
well, Mary Dunn Maxwell, John Ketcbam, Elizabeth 
Ketcham, Elizabeth Anderson, Elizabeth Lucus and 
Patsy Baugh. Of these persons. Dr. David H. Maxwell 
and John Ketcham were, during their lives, prominent 
and influential citizens. They both took an active part 
in the Indian war that begun with the battle of Tippe- 
canoe. Their families were obliged to seek shelter in 
forts. Ketcham's fort, in Jackson county, the regioa 
of country in which he had first settled when he came 
from Kentucky into Indiana, was considered far out 
from the settlements, and greatly exposed to the savages. 
The fort itself was never attacked by the Indians, though 
invested one night by a party, who succeeded in driving 
oflf the horses belonging to those in the fort. Ketcham 
and a comrade, on an errand to a neighboring farm, 
were waylaid by the Indians, and Ketcham received two 
severe gun-shot wounds, and his comrade was killed. 
In a scouting party under Gen. Bartholemew, he is again 
in imminent peril. Again a comrade falls at his side, 
fatally wounded, and he escapes only by being quicker 
with the fatal aim of his rifle than the savage foe, who 
has singled him out for his victim. 

It was in April, 1818, that John Ketcham moved to 
Monroe county. He built the first mill that was built 
in the county. The meal his family used while the 



« HISTORY OF THE 

mill was built, was prepared by a hand mill, the only 
kind at the time in the county. He was, in time, hon- 
ored with a Colonelcy of the State Militia, because of the 
reputation he had gained in the Indian war. He be- 
came an associate Judge, and served several times as 
Representative in the Legislature. He died February 
7th, 1865, at the age of eighty-three. 

Dr. David H. Maxwell, moved to Bloomington in the 
spring of 1819. He was much in public life. He was 
a member from Jefferson county of the Convention of 
1816, which framed the constitution with which Indiana, 
in December, 1816, was admitted as a State into the 
Federal Union. He was the mover in the convention 
of the clause iij the constitution, which prohibited 
Slavery, for the introduction of which, into the new 
State, as shown in Dillon's History of Indiana, strong 
and persistent efibrts had been made. Dr. Maxwell fre- 
quently represented the county of Monroe in the Legis- 
lature, and was the eighth Speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives. He was for twenty-five years a member 
of the Board of Trustees of the State University, and 
almost constantly the President of that Board. He was 
elected an elder of the church in June, 1823, and served 
the church as such until his death in May, 1854, at the 
age of sixty -eight. 

Of the original members of the church of Blooming- 
ton, two still survive, Mrs. Mary Dunn Maxwell, the 
widow of Dr. D. H. Maxwell, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ketch- 
am, the widdow of Col. John Ketcham. Mrs. Maxwell 
was born in March, 1788, one year before the adoption 
of the Federal Constitution. Mrs. Ketcham was born in 
Rockingham county, Virginia, November 27th, 1781, six 
weeks after tlie surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktovvn. 
Uniting with the church when about twenty years of 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. ^ 

age, she has been a member of the church militant for 
seventy-five years, and in faith and hope, is waiting for 
her admission into the church triumphant.* 

The church at Bloomington was organized in the 
Court House, a log building erected for temporary use, 
and of which a pen photograph remains in the contract 
for its erection, now to be found in the records of the 
county. It was, according to the terms of the contract, 
to be built after the manner of double cabins, the first 
ten feet square, and the second, twelve by twenty, built 
ten feet apart, with an entry between. It was to be ten 
feet high, of round logs, all to be neatly butted, then 
hewed inside and out ; the whole to be covered under 
one roof with four courses of boards on each side ; the 
floors to be out of half timber, well hewed and jointed, 
and two and a half inches thick when they lay on the 
sleepers ; one door (doorway) in each apartment of said 
house, with one window in the largest, the doors to be 
fronting the entry, and shutters made to all and hung 
on good wooden hinges, the house to be chinked with 
short blocks, after the manner with stone, and well 
daubed inside and out and made smooth. 

The dwellings of Bloomington were in harmony with 
its court house. They were log cabins, and dense for- 
ests occupied most of its streets and lots. In this same 
year Fort Wayne was vacated by the United States 
Government as a frontier military post, and it was left a 
small trading post for bartering with the Indians for 
their peltries, the same purpose for which it had been 
first occupied by the French more than a hundred years 
before. 

In 1810, the population of the Territory of Indiana was 

* Mrs. Ketcham, since the above was written, has entered into 
rest, departing this life on Sabbath morning, July 9th, 1876. 



10 HISTORY OF THE 

24,520. But the streams of immigration were beginning 
to flow in rapidly upon the new country, and a commit- 
tee had been appointed by the Legislative Council to 
locate a permanent Capital for the State. This Council 
also petitioned Congress for permission to locate a cer- 
tain quantity of the public lands " lying on the main 
fork of White River," for this permanent seat of gov- 
ernment. The war with the Indians hindered the con- 
summation of this work begun by the Legislative Council. 
In the enabling act of Congress for the organization of 
the State, four sections of unsold land were donated for 
a permanent Capital. In January, 1820, a committee 
was appointed by the legislature to iix the location of 
the State Capital. They located it in June of the same 
year. On the 6th of January, 1821, the Legislature con- 
firmed the action of their commissioners, and on motion 
of Judge Jeremiah Sullivan, of Madison, afterwards, if 
not at the time, an elder of the Presbyterian church, the 
newly established Capital received its name, Indianapolis. 
In the spring of the same year, 1821, in which the Cap- 
ital was located, the man, who but two years before was 
the first settler in the vicinity of Indianapolis, was mur- 
dered by the Indians upon the place upon which he had 
settled, and the horses he had owned were driven oif by 
them. 

In the course of a few months after the location of 
the Capital, a population of some hundreds gathered 
upon the site of the future city. For this population, 
flour and meal were packed on horses through a path- 
less wilderness from the White Water settlement at Con- 
nersville, a distance of sixty miles. This was necessary 
for several reasons. The season was an exceedingly wet 
one, and malignant fever and ague so prostrated the in- 
habitants of the new settlement, that they were unable 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 



11 



to tend the corn which had been planted, and which 
choked by the rank growth of weeds, had brought no 
fruit to perfection. IndianapoUs was not destined to a 
rapid growth in its early days. George Stephenson had 
not yet succeeded in securing the device for rapid trav- 
elling by railway, though working very earnestly and 
hopefully for it. Indianapolis, before the days of rail- 
roads, was too inaccessible a point for rapid growth. 
The first sale of city lots occurred in October, 1821. In 
1831, three-fourths of the town site and donation of the 
government remained unsold. Among the names of the 
first arrivals of citizens after the locatian of the Capital 
of the State, are the names of Dr Isaac Coe, Caleb 
Scudder, James Blake and James M. Ray, names that 
will ever be held in honored remembrance in the history 
of the Presbyterian church in Indianapolis. 

It is a matter of record, that the Rev. Ludlow G. 
Gaines, of Ohio, a missionary of the General Assembly,, 
preached in a grove upon the site of Indianapolis, sev- 
eral months before the lots now covered by the city had 
been offered for sale. The first settlers of the new city 
had the gospel preached to them only when some travel- 
ling minister, overtaken by the Sabbath, paused in his 
journey. This lack of gospel privilege, it is said, was 
rapidly tending to obliterate the distinction between the 
Sabbath and other days. One among the settlers be- 
came deeply engaged in finding means to arrest the 
growing desecration. This was Dr. Isaac Coe. His first 
effort was to organize a Bible class of Christian people. 
This class first met February 20th, 1822. A Sabbath 
school was organized April 6th, 1823. It was adver- 
tised in the Indianapolis Gazette, as the Indianapolis 
Sabbath School. So it was for five years, the Indian- 
apolis Sabbath School, the only one. It was organized 



12 HISTOR Y OF THE 

with thirty scholars, its immbers increasing during the 
year to ninety-eight, with an average attendance of 
forty. James M. Eay was its first Superintendent, al- 
though he was not yet a member of the church. Like- 
wise, James Blake, an active co-laborer in the Sabbath 
School, and in all the outward work of the church, was 
not yet a member of the church. It was in a revival 
in 1830, that these men became by profession of their 
faith, members of the church. 

The Rev. David C. Proctor, a missionary under the 
direction of the Connecticut Missionary Society, entered 
the State late in the fall of 1821. In the fall of 1822, 
although there was yet no church organization at Indi- 
anapolis, arrangements were made with him to preach 
three-fourths of his time at Indianapolis, while every 
fourth Sabbath he preached to the little church at 
Bloomington. Thus the way was prepared for the or- 
ganization of the Presbyterian church at Indianapolis. 
The church was organized July 5th, 1823, in Caleb 
Scudder's cabinet shop, the same place in which the 
Sabbath School had been organized. The Rev. Isaac 
Reed, who in the fall of 1822 had moved to Owen coun- 
ty, writes in his Christian Traveller: 

"My first visit to Indianapolis was through many 
perils of waters by the way, in company with Mr, Proc- 
tor, the 3d of July. On the afternoon of the 4th, I 
preached to the Presbyterian friends at a cabinet ma- 
ker's shop ; and at the same place, on the morning of 
the 5th, I preached as moderator in the formation of the 
church of Indianapolis. The same day two other min- 
isters arrived. The next day was the Sabbath, and there 
were four ministers with this new formed church. The 
church was organized with fifteen members. Dr. Isaac 
Coe and Caleb Scudder were elected elders. A church 



PRESBYTERY 01 INDIANAPOLIS. IS 

edifice had been begun in May before the organization 
of the church, and was so far completed that it was oc- 
cupied at the sacrament of the Lord's Supper on the 
Sabbath, the next day after the organization of the 
church." 

The building committee that carried through the 
erection of this edifice, were Dr. Isaac Coe, James Blake, 
and Daniel Yandes. This church building was thirty- 
four feet by fifty-four. Its cost was fifteen hundred dol-^ 
lars. The cost of the lot was one hundred dollars. 

CHRONOLOGICAL COMPARISONS. 

This church building was erected on the frontiers. Only 
a hundred years before this the foundations of the first 
Presbyterian church building in the city of New York 
had been laid, a building sixty by eighty feet, on Wall 
street, near Broadway, and although contributions for the 
building were solicited and obtained in Connecticut and 
Massachusetts, from the infant church in Philadelphia, 
and also from Scotland, yet for twenty years the church 
struggled on in poverty, assembling in a house without 
galleries, six out of its eight windows being closed with 
boards, poverty preventing their being glazed, and the 
fraction of light being enough for the handful of peo- 
ple.* The churches of Cincinnati and Louisville had 
been organized sometime before the church at Indiana- 
polis. Cincinnati had been laid out in 1789, its first 
Presbyterian church organized in 1790, and its first 
Presbyterian church edifice erected in 1792. Louisville 
had been laid out still earlier. In 1780 the legislature 
of Virginia passed "An act for the establishing the town 
of Louisville, at the falls of the Ohio," naming the town 
in honor of Louis XVI., whose troops were then aiding 

* Webster's History of the Presbyterian Church, pp. 120, 329. 



14 HISTORY OF THE 

the Americans in the war of Independence. The first 
Presbyterian church in Louisville was organized in 1816, 
and its first church edifice erected in 1816. At the time 
of the organization of the Presbyterian church at Indi- 
anapolis, the Kev. Gideon Blackburn had just been set- 
tled as pastor over the Presbyterian church at Louisville. 
In the spring of 1823, the presbytery of Louisville re- 
ported to the General Assembly eleven ministers, thirty- 
five churches, and nine hundred and ten church mem- 
bers. Of these thirty-five churches, twenty -four were 
in Indiana, the church of Indianapolis being the twenty- 
sixth organization of that large portion of the State, 
which was included within the bounds of the presbytery 
of Louisville. 

At this time, July, 1823, the Presbyterian church at 
St. Louis was still without a church edifice. A Presby- 
terian church, consisting of nine members, had been 
organized by the Tie v. Salmon Giddings in St. Louis in 
November, 1817. A brick church building, forty by 
sixty feet, was commenced in 1823, but was not finished 
and dedicated until June, 1825. Its cost was eight thou- 
sand dollars. The debt upon it, it is said, was reduced 
in 1826, by contributions and proceeds of sale of pews, 
to five thousand dollars.* In Detroit, on the 5th of 
August, 1816, an informal organization of citizens of 
Protestant faith was effected by Rev. John Monteith, a 
missionary of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
church. In 1819, a church edifice was erected at a cost 
of seven thousand dollars, more than eleven hundred 
having been obtained by the solicitation abroad of funds. 
In January, 1825, the church, consisting of forty-nine 
members, was reorganized, adopting Articles of Faith, 

*Sprague's Annals, Vol. IV, p. 507. 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANA POLIS. 15 

which fully committed the society to the Presbyterian 
doctrines and form of government.* 

It was not until ten years after the organization of the 
church of Indianapolis, (in June,) 1833, that the first 
Presbyterian church of Chicago was organized, with 
twenty-five members ; sixteen of these members of the 
garrison of Fort Dearborn, and nine citizens of the new 
city which had been laid out three years before. The 
Rev. Jeremiah Porter, who came with troops from Green 
Bay to Chicago in May, 1833, organized the church. 
Its first edifice for worship was a frame, twenty-six by 
forty, and was opened for worship January 1st, 1834. 

* Manual of First Presbyterian Church of Detroit. 



16 



HLSTORY OF THE 



CHAPTER II. 

Louhville and Salem Presbyteries — Indianapolis as a Mis- 
sionary Field — First Ordination in the State — Ordination 
and Installation at Bloomington — Organization of Churches 
at Columbus, Franklin, Greencastle and Greenwood — 
Presbytery of Wabash — Synod of Indiana — Difficulties 
with Mr. Bush — Presbytery of Crawfordsville — Difficulties 
in Presbytery — Difficulties Allayed. 

1823—1830. 

In 1815, upon petition of the Synod of Ohio, the Gen- 
eral Assembly made the Ohio river the dividing line 
between the synods of Ohio and Kentucky. This placed 
Indiana Territory within the boundaries of Miami pres- 
bytery. In 1817, upon petition of the Louisville Presby- 
tery, it was granted by the General Assembly that so 
much of the Synod of Ohio as was west of a line 
drawn due north from the mouth of Kentucky river, 
should be attached to the Synod of Kentucky. In Octo- 
ber, 1823, the Synod of Kentucky constituted all that 
part of its territory lying within the boundaries of the 
State of Indiana into a new presbytery, denominated the 
Salem Presbytery. In October, 1824, the synod added 
to this presbytery all that part of the State of Illinois 
which is north of a line running due west from the 
mouth of White river. At the same time, that part of 
the State which lies south and west of a line beginning 
at the mouth of Green river, running due north twenty 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANA POLIS. 17 

miles, thence north-westward to the mouth of White 
river, was attached to the Presbytery of Muhlenburg. 

INDIANAPOLIS AS A MISSIONARY FIELD. 

In the fall of 1823, the Rev. D. C. Proctor removed to 
Kentucky. "From this time," writes the Rev. Isaac 
Reed, then preaching to the Bethany church, in Owen 
county, " the particular care of the church of Blooming- 
ton and of Indianapolis fell upon me, and neither sacra- 
ments nor baptism were administered in either except 
by my ministry, until the arrival of Rev. Mr. Bush, at 
the latter place, in the summer of 1824, and of Mr. Hall 
at Bloomington, near the same time." * 

While Mr. Reed was thus, through the latter part of 
1823 and the iirst half of 1824, supplying the church at 
Indianapolis, he wrote thus of it to the United Domestic 
Missionary Society, a society which in 1826 became 
merged with the American Home Missionary Society : 
"Indianapolis, the new and permanent seat of govern- 
ment for the State, is a place of great need and high 
hope for a located missionary. I was lately there, and 
the session of the church showed me a written resolution 
of their society, which they design to forward to you. 
This resolution requests the location of a missionary 
there. I encouraged them to forward it. There are 
many reasons why this location should be made. A 
church is commenced there, which has eighteen mem- 
bers, four of them are male persons. A meeting-house 
is built, at least raised and covered in. The congrega- 
tion is willing to raise for your missionary two hundred 
dollars a year. There is a little Baptist church and a 
little Methodist society ; and there is no church of our 
order near enough to unite with these to obtain a minis- 

* Christian Traveller, p. 145. 



18 HISTORY OF THE 

ter ; the nearest is lifty-two miles. It is thought by the 
session, if they can have a missionary for one year, they 
can support him after that time, they have such pros- 
pects from those who are expected to move there within 
a year. Now they look to you, brethren, to appoint 
them one; and he ought to be there as soon as possible. 
The}' want a man of such talents as are favorable to col- 
lecting and embodying society ; one who would be 
willing to become settled. He should appropriate his 
Sabbaths to the town, and have week day appoint- 
ments all about that part of the country." * This 
communication of Mr. Reed to the United Domestic 
Missionary Society was published in their report for 1825. 

In March, 1824, the session of the church at Indianap- 
olis wrote to Mr. George Bush, a licentiate of the Pres- 
bytery of New Brunswick, to secure his services as 
their minister. Mr. Bush came to Indianapolis July 9, 
1824, as a missionary of the Assembly. September 18^ 
1824, he was called to the pastorate of the church upon 
a salary of three hundred dollars, and as much more as 
they could raise. 

In January, 1825, the legislature met at the new capi- 
tal for the first time. The State offices had been trans- 
ferred from Corydon to Indianapolis in the November 
preceding. 

FIRST ORDINATION IN THE STATE. 

On the 4tli of March, 1825, a called meeting of the 
Presbytery of Salem was held in Indianapolis. At this 
meeting of the presbytery Mr. Bush was received, and 
also Mr. Baynard Rush Hall, a licentiate of the Presby- 
tery of Philadelphia. The next day Mr. Bush was 
ordained and installed as pastor of the Presbyterian 

* Christian Traveller, p. 165. 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 19 

church of Indiauapolis. This was the first ordination of 
a Presbyterian minister in the State. The church build- 
ing being still unfinished, the ordination and installation 
took place in the building that was used for the State 
capitol, a large brick court house. The Rev. John F. 
Crowe preached the ordination sermon. The Rev. John 
M. Dickey presided and gave the charge to the pastor, 
and the Moderator of Presbytery, the Rev. Isaac Reed, 
gave the charge to the people. 

ORDINATION AND INSTALLATION AT BLOOMINGTON. 

At an adjourned meeting of the presbytery at Bloom- 
ington on the 12th of the following April, Baynard R. 
Hall, who had charge of the State Seminary at Bloom- 
iugton, was ordained and installed pastor of the church 
at Bloomington. As the church at Bloomington had no 
edifice, the ordination and"' installation services took 
place in the State Seminary building. The Rev. Isaac 
Reed preached the ordination sermon. The Rev. W. 
W. Martin presided and gave the charge to the pastor ; 
and the Rev. John M. Dickey gave the charge to the 
people. The sermon was from II Corinthians 5: 18. 
<'And hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation." 
The sermon was published. 

The church at Bloomington, besides having had Mr. 
Proctor to preach for them one-fourth of his time du- 
ring one year, had had previous to that occasional mis- 
sionary supplies. Among these had been W. W. Martin, 
from Livonia, Francis McFarland, a missionary of the 
Assembly, and Archibald Cameron, of Shelbyville, Ken- 
tucky, in the fall of 1822, the Rev. C. C. Beattie, now 
of Steubenville, Ohio, then laboring in the Wabash val- 
ley as a missionary of the Assembly's Board of Missions, 
preached in Bloomington, also in the spring of 1823. 



20 HISTORY OF THE 

At the time of Mr. Hall's settlement the church had in- 
creased to a membership of thirty. A Sabbath school 
was organized in 1823, and has been held every Sabbath 
morning since. 

COLUMBUS. 

The third church organized within the present limits 
of the Presbytery of Indianapolis, was the church at 
Columbus. This was organized by Rev. John M. 
Dickey, July 3, 1824. It consisted of eighteen members. 
Mr. Joseph Hart was the first ruling elder. Bartholo- 
mew county had been organized in 1821, and Columbus 
was laid out and made the county seat the same year. 
In 1824, the population of the county was 2,690. The 
population of Marion county at this time was about the 
same. That of Monroe county -at the same time was 
3,400. 

The church of Columbifls, it is said,* existed many 
years before it had any settled pastor, or even regular 
preaching. Mr. Dickey, who organized it, supplied it 
at an early day, one Sabbath a month for six months. 
For many years, once each year, he held meetings for 
several days, including the Sabbath, baptized children* 
received members to the church, and administered the 
communion. 

FRANKLIN. 

November 30th, 1824, the church of Franklin, John- 
son county, was organized by Rev. John M. Dickey. 
The church was constituted with the following five 
members : George King, Joseph Young, David W. 
McCaslin, Elenor King and Nancy Young. George 
King and David W. McCaslin, were chosen elders, and 
after a sermon by the Rev. George Bush, they were or- 

* Historical Discourse of Rev. N. S. Dickey. 



PBE.SBYTEBY OF INDIANAPOLLS. ^1 

dained to the office of ruling elder. The session then 
received Jane McCaslin, a member of the church on ex- 
amination. 

Johnson county was organized in 1822. The popula- 
tion of the county in 1824 was 910. The Franklin 
church was the fourth church organized within the pres- 
ent boundaries of the Presbytery of Indianapolis. 

GRBENCASTLE. 

The church at Greencastle, the county seat of Put- 
nam county, was organized with twelve members, by 
the Rev. Isaac Reed, August 12th, 1826. Putnam coun- 
ty was organized the last day of the year, 1821. In 
1824, it had a population of 1,700. Yet, in 1825, from 
Oreencastle west, along one of the main routes to Illi- 
nois, there was a stretch of dense forest unbroken for 
seventeen miles, save by one hut and its adjacent clear- 
ing. " To form this church," writes Mr. Reed, "required 
much previous labor in preaching, visiting and traveling." 

GREENWOOD. 

On the last day of the year 1825, the Rev. Isaac Reed 
organized another church in Johnson county. It was 
the Greenwood church, then called Greenfield. It was 
organized with nine members. The formation of the 
church was efi"ected just two years and three months 
after the arrival of the first two families in the settle- 
ment. The day after this church was organized was 
both New Year's day and Sabbath day. A sermon was 
preached, which was afterwards published with this title: 
" The Foundation Stone," 1 Cor. iii: 2. The sermon, 
when printed, was dedicated to the Rev. Thomas Cle- 
land, D. D., of Kentucky, in these words: 

Every member, sir, of the Greenfield church, has come from your 
bounds, and has been a worshipper in one or the other of your con 



22 HISTORY OF THE 

gregations. This fact, together with my long acquaintance with 
and friendship for you, as a man, a christian, a gospel minister, and 
your pen having so often and so ably moved in defence of that 
fundamental doctrine, which is the subject of the sermon, are my 
apology for using your name in this dedication. 

[Signed,] Isaac Reed. 

Cottage of Peace, February 3i), 1826. 

The Rev. George Bush, as commissioner from Salem 
Presbytery, was a member of the General Assembly of 
1825, the first representative from Indiana in that 
body. 

WABASH PRESBYTERY. 

By an act of the Synod of Kentucky, October 1825, 
Salem Presbytery was divided, and two presbyteries, 
Madison and Wabash, formed. The Columbus church 
fell within the bounds of Madison Presbytery. The 
Wabash Presbytery consisted at its formation of five 
ministers : Samuel T. Scott, Isaac Reed, George Bush, 
Baynard R. Hall and Stephen Bliss. It had under its 
care nineteen churches. Among these were Bloming- 
ton, Indianapolis, Franklin and Greencastle. 

SYNOi) OF INDIANA. 

In 1826 the General Assembly constituted the Presby- 
teries of Missouri, Salem, Wabash and Madison into a 
synod denominated the Synod of Indiana. This synod 
met in Vincennes October 18th, 1826. There were present 
from churches within the bounds of the present Presby- 
tery of Indianapolis, Baynard R. Hall, minister of the 
church at Bloomington, George Bush, pastor of the 
church at Indianapolis, and John Orchard, elder from 
the church at Bloomington. 

DIFFICULTIES WITH MR. BUSH. 

In December, 1826, Mr. Bush, in a sermon preached in 



rHE^SB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 23 

the church at Indianapolis, attempted to prove at length 
that the Presbyterian form of church government was 
not scriptural, but that the scriptural form of church 
government was more like that of Independency. The 
elders of the church remonstrated with him. They 
thought it was inconsistent with his ordination vows. 
They labored and bore long with him, but Mr. Bush 
could not change his views, neither could he cease from 
propagating them. The church therefore felt con- 
strained to apply to presbytery for a dissolution of the 
pastoral relation. This they did in March, 1828. Mr. 
Bush resisted the application of the church. At an ad- 
journed meeting of the Presbytery of Wabash, held in 
Indianapolis, June, 1828, the request of the church was 
granted, and the pastoral relation was dissolved. Mr. 
Bush appealed from the decision of the presbytery to 
synod. A portion of the church and congregation sym- 
pathized with him, and to these he preached at the 
court house. The synod affirmed the decision of the 
presbytery, but with resolutions breathing the spirit of 
fraternal kindness for Mr. Bush, and also blaming in 
some measure the church. The church carried up a 
complaint to the General Assembly of 1829 against the 
synod. When the complaint was taken up, " after con- 
siderable discussion and mature deliberation, it was re- 
solved that this business be dismissed on account of in- 
formality, and that the papers be returned to the respec- 
tive parties." 

The Rev. John R. Moreland, of the presbytery of 
West Lexington, was called October 27, 1828, to the 
pastorate of the church of Indianapolis. Before the in- 
stallation of Mr. Moreland, a new presbytery had been 
constituted by the synod in October, 1829. 



24 HISIORY OF THE 

PRESBYTERY OF CRAWFOKDSVILLE. 

The new presbytery was that of Crawfordsville. The 
north line of Vigo, Clay, Owen and Monroe counties 
was the dividing line between the Crawfordsville and 
Wabash Presbyteries. Samuel Baldridge, John R. 
Moreland, Samuel H. McNutt, George Bush, James 
Crawford, James Thompson, Jeremiah Hill and John L. 
Thompson, were the ministers constituting the new 
presbytery. Thirteen churches were reported to the 
General Assembly of 1830 within the presbytery. Indi- 
anapolis was included in this presbytery. It was to 
have met November 25, 1829, at Delphi, Carroll county, 
but owing to an extraordinary fall of rain, and the 
swollen and impassable state of the streams, the presby- 
tery failed to meet. The moderator called the presbytery 
together at Indianapolis, March 25, 1880. At this meet- 
ing of presbytery, the Rev. John R. Moreland was 
installed pastor of the church at Indianapolis. The Rev. 
James Thompson preached the installation sermon, the 
Rev. Samuel Baldridge presided and gave the charge to 
the pastor, and the Rev. S. H. McNutt gave the charge 
to the people. '' 

DIFFICULTIES. 

At this meeting of the presbyter}' a committee was 
appointed to examine and give certificates during the 
intervals of presbytery, to any ministers from other 
presbyteries who might come within the bounds of 
Crawfordsville presbytery and seek to labor in any of its 
churches. An examination by either one of a commit- 
tee of three, and certificate of approval, seemed to be 
deemed sufficient guarantee to the churches that they 
w^ould not be led astray. The Rev. Jeremiah Hill and 
Elder Cornelius Smock protested against this action 
of the presbytery. Presbytery also requested the Rev. 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. '!■) 

W. W. Woods, a member of Union Presbytery, Tennes- 
see, to desist from preaching in the churches of the 
presbytery, on account of erroneous views, which it was 
supposed he held. 

These, and other things left on record, indicate that 
differences and divisions were springing up among the 
brethren and the churches. 

The second meeting of the presbytery was with the 
Coal creek church, in Parke county, September 30, 1830. 
At this meeting of presbytery the name of George Bush 
was ordered to be dropped from the roll, he having ab- 
sented himself from the meetings of presbytery, and in- 
formed the presbytery that he had renounced the juris 
diction of the Presbyterian church.* 

DIFFICU LTIES AL LAYED. 

At this second nfeetifig^f^ tt^^!lNj^bytery of Craw- 

* There doubtless should? ib|e^dde(Lt<Y,tJiis record the well known 
facts of Mr. Bush's future darefer. Hetiwa determined to consecrate 



his life to literature, and, as t he, , \^pst field for^is exertions, made 
his residence in New York city, and in ISM^ffe was el 
sor of Hebrew and Oriental literaSire inita^University. 



his residence in New York city, and in ISM^ffe was elected profes- 
__ sntal literaSire inita^University. In 1840 he 
commenced the publication onrrs" ""i^fotes. Critical and Explana- 



tory," on the Old Testament. Eight volumes were issued, embrac- 
ing Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Joshua, Judges and Numbers. De- 
voting himself in 1844 to the publication of a monthly magazine, in 
which he discussed the nature of prophetic symbols, he soon mani- 
fested a disposition to recede from the rules of interpretation and 
opinions commonly received in the Protestant churches. In 1844 
Dr. James W. Alexander wrote to Dr. Hall : " Bush is going fast 
over to the New Jerusalem. In the Tribune, he challenges all the 
world to prove the resurrection. He has a book coming out on the 
60ul. He practices Mesmerism. He told me of a lady, who can 
read any one's character by feeling a paper on which he has wi'itten, 
and read me a copy of his own character thus deduced. His talk 
is mild, self-complacent and fascinating. He has a man translating 
the Germen account of the famous Clairvoyante of Prevorst. You 
can imagine nothing of the sort too big for his swallow." What 
Dr. J. W. Alexander perceived in 1844 did not, however, occur till 
1848, when he consented to receive the rite of ordination privately, 
and it was administered to him privately by Dr. Lewis Beers, an 
aged clergyman in the New (Jerusalem) Church, at Danby, New 
York. — [Index Volume Princeton Review, p. 121. 



26 HISTORY OF THE 

fordsville, the action of the presbytery at its first meet- 
ing concerning Eev. W. W. Wood was, upon application 
of the church at Greenwood, reconsidered and reversed, 
and Mr. "Wood received as a member of presbytery by 
letter from the Presbytery of West Union. 

At an adjourned meeting of presbytery, held in Octo- 
ber, 1830, at Madison, during the session of the synod, 
the following members were present : Samuel H. Mc- 
Nutt, James Crawford, Jeremiah Ilill, W. W. Woods, 
James Thompson and M. M. Post, ministers, and John 
Covert and James M. Ray, elders. 

The following action was taken : 

Whereas, Harmony of feeling is especially desii-able amongst 
brethren, in order to secure union of effort, and thus promote each 
other's usefulness as well as happiness ; and. 

Whereas, There are differences of sentiment existing amongst 
the brethren composing the General Assembly, which, by common 
consent, are borne with ; therefore, 

Resolved, That it is inexpedient for this presbytery to enforce the 
resolutions adopted at the last spring meeting on the subject of ex- 
amining ministers, credentials, etc., and that said resolutions be and 
are hereby rescinded. 

With this manifestation of the spirit of peace, there 
was a manifestation of the spirit of missionary zeal. 
Every minister of the presbytery was requested to spend 
ten days of missionary labor, including one Sabbath, in 
the vacancies somewhere in the presbytery, and report 
at th6 next stated meeting. 

At this same meeting of presbytery, the Rev. David 
Monfort, although not present, was received by letter 
from the Presbytery of Chillicothe. Also, the Rev. M. 
M. Post, reporting the prospects of organizing a church 
at Logansport, presbytery advised him to continue his 
labors if he could be sustained, and organize a church 
as soon as he deemed it expedient. 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA FOLIS. 27 



CHAPTER III. 

Presbytery of Indiana'polis — First Statistical Heport — The 
Field and its Occupation in 1830 — Decision of Presbytery 
on Representation, Presbytery resisting division — Com- 
plaint against Presbytery — Dissensions from diversity in 
Doctrine — Items — Hopewell — Industrial aspects and in- 
terests — Southporty Danville, Greencastle, Shiloh, Bethany 
— The field at the time of the great division of the Church. 

1830—1838. 

At the meeting of Synod in Madison, October, 1830^ 
the presbytery of Indianapolis was organized.* The 
action of synod, as recorded in the Minutes of Synod, 
was this : 

Overture l^o. 4 was taken up, and the following reso- 
lutions were adopted : 

Resolved, That Revs. Messrs. John R. Moreland, David Monfort, 
W. W. Wood, and Jeremiah Hill, of the Presbytery of Crawfords- 
ville, and Revs. Messrs. S. G. Lowry and Wm. Sickels, of the Presby- 
tery of Madison, be and they are hereby constituted a nevF presby- 
tery, to be known by the name of the Presbytery of Indianapolis, 
including the counties of Marion, Johnson, Bartholomew, and 
Decatur, and all the territory lying north of those counties ; it 
being understood that the west line of Hamilton, carried norths 
shall be the line between the presbyteries of Crawfordsville and 
Indianapolis ; and further 

Resolved, That said Presbytery of Indianapolis be directed to- 
hold its first meeting at Greensburg on the first Thursday in April 

* The first volume of the Records of the Presbytery is lost. Ex- 
isting records begin October, 1837. 



28 HISTOR Y OF THE 

next, at 12 o'clock m., and that the Eev. John R. Moreland be ap- 
pointed to open the presbytery with a sermon, and preside till a 
moderator shall be chosen ; and in case of his absence, the senior 
minister present shall perform this duty. 

Upon the opposite page is a copy of the statistical re- 
port made to the General Assembly of 1831, by the Pres- 
bytery of Indianapolis at its meeting at Greensburg. 
The Rev. Samuel G. Lowry was its first commissioner 
to the General Assembly, representing the presbytery in 
the General Assembly of 1831. 

At this first meeting of the presbytery the Rev. Eliph- 
alet Kent was received and enrolled. 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 



29 



1 












3 






3 


3 


1 1 


r 


if 

^ 1 


5' 
1 

i 




1 

1 ■ 


if 

If: 


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a! 
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to 




Com. added on 
examination. 


s 


: 










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Com. added on 
certificate. 


i 




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g g i 1 S S 




Total of Com- 
municants. 


g 




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►^ : 5 ^ S 




Total of Bap- 
tisms. 


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o 




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g g i 










Missionary fund 
raised. 


g 

§; 






— 






s g j 


CO ^ 

8 2 




Funds for Com- 
missioners. 




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Theologi'l Sem- 
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raised. 




























Education funds 
raised. 




























Contingent fund 
of the Assem- 
bly. 






hd W '^ ►:;< 

II III 

i •: •" 1 i 1 
5 ?• E r ^ -: 

? ^ p. 


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Columbus. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Greensburg, Ind. 

Noblesville, Ind. 




f 





30 



HISTORY OF THE 



Of the counties included within the present Presbytery 
of Indianapolis, Monroe continued in Wabash Presby- 
tery, and Putnam, Hendricks and Morgan counties in 
connection with the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. 
Brown county was still a part of Monroe, and was not 
organized until 1836. In 1830, the population of the 
counties now included in the Presbytery of Indianapolis 
was thus reported in the United States census : 



Monroe 6,577 

Putnam 8,202 

Hendricks 3,975 

Morgan 5,593 

Marion 7,192 



Hancock 1,436 

Johnson 4,019 

Bartholomew 5,476 

Total 42,470 



In Marion county was the church at Indianapolis. Its 
membership had been increased from thirty at the time 
Mr. Moreland came to it, to one hundred by 1830, forty 
having been received upon examination. At Greenwood, 
the Rev. W. W. Woods was preaching, the church num- 
bering in 1830 sixty-five. 

The church at Franklin had increased by 1830, to 
eighty-one. In 1829, twenty-one had been received by 
examination. In 1830, twenty-seven were added by cer- 
tificate, and three by examination, making the whole 
number eighty-one. Until November, 1830, those who 
had ministered to the church at Franklin, had been 
with the church as missionary supplies, each for a short 
time only. Those who had thus ministered to the church 
were Isaac Reed, William Duncan, John F. Moreland, 
Jeremiah Hill and W. W. Wood. In I^ovember, 1830, 
the Rev. David Monfort " commenced labors as a stated 
supply or missionary." 

The church at Columbus was reported by the Presby- 
tery of Madison to the General Assembly of 1829, as 
having eighteen members. 

The church at Greencastle, left in its feebleness with- 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANA POLLS. 31 

out supplies, and without a house of worship, had be- 
come extinct. 

In 1829, a church was organized by Rev. Isaac Reed, 
at Poplar Spring, Putnam county. 

In November 1830, a church consisting of ten mem- 
bers was organized by tlie Rev. Isaac Reed, at Putnam- 
ville. 

The church at Bloomington, having built a comfort- 
able brick edifice, and entered into it in 1829, was in a 
prosperous condition, having a membership in 1830, of 
fifty-eight. The Rev. Baynard R. Hall, who had been 
installed as pastor of the church, after a pastorate of 
one year, had asked for a dissolution of the pastoral 
relation, because of his relations to the State Seminary, 
of which he was the first Professor. He was released 
from the pastoral care of the church, but continued its 
stated supply until 1830. 

In 1828 the State Seminary became Indiana College, 
and the Rev. Andrew Wylie, D. D., was elected its first 
president. In 1830, he became the stated supply of the 
church at Bloomington. 

In 1830 the Rev. Isaac Reed was also residing at Bloom- 
ington, having returned to Indiana from Moriah, New 
York, wdiere he had been, for a short period, pastor of 
a Congregational church. He was endeavoring to es- 
tablish a Female School at Bloomington, while also 
laboring as a missionary in the abounding destitutions 
of the rapidly settling country. A bird's-eye view of 
the field at this time shows then, in a population of 
more than forty thousand scattered over these counties, 
seven Presbyterian churches, the strongest containing a 
hundred members, the weakest ten, and all only a few 
over three hundred. There is one pastor, J. R. More- 
laud at Indianapolis, and there are two stated supplies. 



32 HISTORY OF THE 

"W. W. Wood at Greenwood, and David Monfort at 
Franklin, who are wholly given to the work of the 
ministry. One of these, David Monfort, the last month 
but one in the year, has just entered the field. There 
are three other ministers at Bloomington engaged in 
the work of education, but giving a part of their time 
to the work of preaching, the Rev. Andrew Wylie, D. 
D., President of Indiana College, and Baynard R. Hall, 
Professor in the College, and Rev. Isaac Reed, who is 
seeking to establish a school for young ladies, while he 
also gives himself in part to missionary labors. Thus 
contemplating the field, we very clearly perceive that 
the Presbyterians are a feeble folk, yet we have the as- 
surance that they are building in the rock, even the Rock 
of Ages. 

DECISION OF PRESBYTERY ON REPRESENTATION. 

In October, 1831, the Synod of Indiana greatly re- 
duced in size, the presbyteries of the States of Illinois 
and Missouri having been erected by the Assembly of 
1831 into the Synod of Illinois, met in Bloomington. 
At this meeting of Synod the roll of synod shows no 
changes in the membership of the Presbytery of Indian- 
apolis. During the sessions of synod, a resolution passed 
by the Presbytery of Indianapolis was brought up by 
overture before synod. The presbytery in the overture 
asked an answer to the constitutional questions involved. 
The following was the resolution : 

Resolved, That in this presbytery every church be considered 
as vacant, and entitled to a representation in presbytery, where a 
regular pastoral relation has not been formed, according to the 
book of Discipline in the Presbyterian church. 

The overture was not answered until the next meeting 
of synod at Crawfordsville, when it was answered ad- 
versely. The interpretation given by the resolution 



PRESBYTERY Ot INDIANAPOLIS. 33 

respecting the representation of churches, has, however, 
since become the law of the church, having been 
adopted by both Assemblies before the reunion ; by the 
O. S. Assembly in 1847, and the N. S. Assembly in 1851.* 

In the statistical report of the presbytery to the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1882, two new names appear on the 
roll of ministers, James R. Wheelock, stated supply at 
Greensburg and Mill Creek, and John Todd. 

At the meeting of synod at Crawfordsville, just re- 
ferred to, in October, 1832, from the records of synod, it 
appears that S. G. Lowry had been dismissed from the 
Presbytery of Indianapolis to unite with the Presbytery 
of Crawfordsville. 

October 19, the second day of synod, this record is 
made in the minutes : " The synod then solemnly paused 
to record the death of one of their members, the Rev. 
John R. Moreland, who was taken from this world of 
trial and suffering on the 15th inst." 

Mr. Moreland had, a short time previous to his death, 
been released from the pastoral charge of the church at 
Indianapolis. 

PRESBYTERY RESISTING DIVISION. 

Two matters of importance to the presbytery were 
brought before synod. One was a petition by the mi- 
nority of the presbytery to have the presbytery divided. 
The petition was referred to the committee on bills and 
overtures, who reported in favor of the petition and 
recommended the formation of a new presbytery, to be 
called Union, consisting of the counties of Decatur, Bar- 
tholomew, Shelby and Johnson, reserving to John Todd 
and his congregation, and David Monfort and his con- 
gregation, the privilege of remaining connected with the 
Indianapolis Presbytery. 

Moore's Digest, pp. 138-139. 
3 



34 HISTOR Y OF THE 

After considerable discussion, the subject was indefi- 
nitely postponed. 

Mr. Wood then ol)tained leave to bring in the follow- 
ing resolution : 

Resolved, That it is the duty of this synod to furnish the petition- 
ers from Indianapolis Presbytery the information called for in rela- 
tion to the previous steps required of them by the constitution, in 
order that the synod may regularly and constitutionally act on the 
subject of their petition. 

The subject was referred by synod to a committee of 
three, Messrs. Matthews, Williamson and Dunn, to 
report upon before the rising of synod. 

The committee reported the following resolution, 
which was adopted, viz : 

That said members of the minority of Indianapolis Presbytery be 
directed to bring the request for a division directly before the pres" 
bytery, and if the presbytery refuse to concvn- vpith them in petition- 
ing the synod for a division, then they may bring up their petition 
to synod by v?ay of complaint, vehen the synod will consider it 
regularly before them. 

COMPLAINT AGAINST PRESBYTERY. 

Another matter of importance before the synod per- 
taining to the Presbytery of Indianapolis, was a com- 
plaint against the presbytery by Rev. W. W. Woods and 
Rev. J. R. Wheelock. The complaint was against a 
standing rule of presbytery, requiring an examination on 
theology of every minister proposing to connect himself 
with said presbytery, provided any two members should 
require it. After the complaint was heard, the synod 
passed the following resolution, viz: 

Resolved, That without censuring the Presbytery of Indianapolis, 
the complaint be sustained, so far as regards the expediency of the 
standing rule complained of 

To this resolution Messrs. Williamson, Martin and 
Hummer entered their dissent. 



PRE8BYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 35 

The next meeting of synod was at Indianapolis, Octo- 
ber 10, 1833. No change appears to have occurred in 
^he ministers of presbytery during the year. 

DISSENSIONS FROM DIVERSITY IN DOCTRINE. 

Among the first items of business before synod vras 
the presentation of a petition to synod by the Kev. John 
S. Weaver, that synod would attach him to the Presby- 
tery of Indianapolis, as he had been dismissed to said 
presbytery and had as yet had no opportunity to unite 
with it. Synod thereupon ordered : " That the Presby- 
tery of Indianapolis be directed to meet to-morrow 
morning at eight o'clock to afford to Mr. Weaver, and 
also to Rev. Hilary Patrick, an opportunity to present 
their certificates for admission into said presbytery." 

The record states that Mr. Patrick was from the Synod 
of South Alabama. It is not stated what the previous 
ecclesiastical relation of Mr. Weaver was. 

An exception was also made to the records of presby- 
tery, that the application of Mr. Weaver to be received 
into presbytery had been refused without any reasons 
being assigned for the refusal. '1_36095G 

Upon the morning of the second day of synod, the 
stated clerk of the Presbytery of Indianapolis reported to 
the synod that, agreeably to the direction of the synod, 
a meeting of presbytery had been held, and Messrs. 
Patrick and Weaver received. 

The clerk of synod likewise reported that there had 
been put into his hands an appeal from a decision of In- 
dianapolis Presbytery by Rev. James R. Wheelock, also 
a complaint signed by other members of -the presbytery 
against such decision. 

The case in issue, concerning which this appeal was 
taken, was remanded by synod to the presbytery for the 
bringing in of a definitive sentence, and as tnis defect in 



36 HISTORY OF THE 

the proceedings of presbytery occurred in consequence 
of a disorderly withdrawal of the friends of Mr. Whee- 
lock from the presbytery, it was directed, as the readiest 
and most orderly way in the unhappy and difficult case, 
that Mr. Wheelock reserve the prosecution of his ap- 
peal until presbytery had passed a definitive sentence, 
and that .the presbytery meet during the recess of synod 
and issue the case of Wheelock or refer said case to 
synod. 

The case was referred by presbytery to synod. It oc- 
cupied the whole of synod for two days. On the morn- 
ing of the third day a commitlfte was appointed to 
express the judgment of synod. The committee con- 
sisted of Andrew Wylie, J. Thompson, John F. Crowe, 
B. C. Cressy, ministers, and William Alexander, elder. 

The committee made the following report, which was 
adopted : 

" That having taken the subject under their serious considera- 
tion, they have agreed to recommend to synod, for their adoption, 
the following resolutions, viz : 

''Resolved, That it is well known throughout the bounds of the 
Presbyterian church, in the United States, that a difference of 
phraseology and mode of illustration, with regard to the doctrinal 
points referred to, in the charges referred to by Mr. Hopkins, 
against the Rev. J. R. Wheelock, has for a long time prevailed in 
our church, and to a certain degree ought to be tolerated. That in 
using this liberty of expression, ministers of the gospel ought to be 
very careful not to vary from the form of sound words contained in 
the standards of our church, since want of due caution in this 
respect is calculated to give offence, and to awaken unpleasant and 
injurious suspicions in the minds of many people. And that it 
appears from the teeiimony, that Mr. Wheelock has not, in his 
public ministrations, been sufficiently guarded in this respect. 
Nevertheless, the testimony, together with Mr. Wheelock's written 
confession of faith with regard to the points alluded to, does suflS- 
ciently shew that Mr. Wheelock does not hold doctrines essentially 
variant from our standards. 

" In regard to the sixth specification, the synod decide that 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 37 

though Mr. Wheelock is not proved to have uttered a wilful false- 
hood, his language was highly indecorous and offensive ; especially 
as uttered from the pulpit and on the Lord's day. 

"As it respects the prosecutor, the synod are of opinion that there 
is no evidence or reason to believe that he was actuated, in exhib- 
iting charges against Mr. Wheelock, by any other motives than 
such as become him and all other officers and members of the Pres- 
byterian church, who are solemnly bound to be watchful of its 
purity and peace ; yet he appears not to have taken such previous 
steps in the case as the spirit of the standard of Discipline requires. 
Therefore, in view of the whole case, it is further 

"Resolved, That Mr. Wheelock be solemnly and affectionately 
admonished, and he is hereby admonished, in his future public 
ministrations, that he give 'good heed,' and seek to 'find out good 
and acceptable words;' and further, that the prosecutor and all 
other members of our church should be admonished to observe the 
rules jDrescribed in the Word of God and the standards of our 
church, respecting commencing j^rocess against a gospel minister." 

From the foregoing decision the following dissent was 
presented, and ordered to be entered on the minutes, 
viz : 

" The undersigned dissent from the decision of the synod, by 
which they declare that ' testimony, together with Mr. Wheelock's 
written confession of faith, in regard to the points alluded to, does 
not sufficiently shew that Mr. Wheelock does not hold doctrines 
essentially variant from those of our standards,' inasmuch as they 
do firmly believe that the testimony adduced clearly shewed that 
on the subjects of Federal representation, imputation, and the 
atonement of Christ, Mr. Wheelock does vary materially from the 
standards of our church ; and moreover, this testimony was abun- 
dantly confirmed by Mr. Wheelock's written confession. 
"Alexander Williamson, Wm. Sickels, 
" John Finley Crowe, Henderson Bell, 

" John Campbell, William Beale, 

" John List, David McClure, 

•' John Hendricks, John S. Weaver, 

" Matthew G. Wallace, Wm. 0. Ross, 

" David Monfort, James H. Thompson." 



38 HISTORY OF THE 

ITEMS. 

At the meeting of the synod at New Albany in 1834, 
three new names appear upon the roll of the presbytery, 
Thomas Barr, Samuel Hurcl and W. A. HoUiday. 

In September, 1834, the church at Indianapolis called 
the Rev. James McKennan, of the Presbytery of Wash- 
ington, Pennsylvania. He was installed pastor June 
16, 1835. 

In October, 1835, J. R. Wheelock was received into 
Crawfordsville Presbytery by letter from the Presbytery 
of Indianapolis. 

From the roll of Synod at Crawfordsville, In 1836, it 
appears that "Wells Bushnell was received into the Pres- 
bytery of Indianapolis during the year. David M. 
Stewart is also reported in the Assembly's minutes as a 
licentiate of the presbytery. In 1837, Mr. Stewart is 
reported pastor of the church at Rushville, and David 
V. Smock is added to the roll of members as pastor of 
the church at Knightstown. In October, 1837, W. W. 
Woods is received into Crawfordsville Presbytery by 
letter from Presbytery of Indianapolis. 

HOPEWELL. 

Returning now to the history of the cuurches of the 
presbytery, we iind that in May, 1831, the church of Hope- 
well was, by order of presbytery, organized with forty 
members from the Franklin church. In October, 1831, the 
Rev. D. Monfort was installed pastor of the Franklin and 
Hopewell churches, upon a salary of threehundred dollars. 
In explanation of this meagre salary. Judge Banta, in 
his Historical Address at the Semi-centenary Anniver- 
sary of the Franklin church, makes some statements 
which are of general interest, as giving to us a picture 
not only of the industrial aspects and economies or 
household management of Johnson county, but of this 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NAPOLIS. 39 

entire interior reg-iou of country, with its base of sup- 
splies upon the Ohio river, and the farmers, with their 
teams loaded with the produce of their farms for the 
exchange of merchandise, threading their way at suita- 
ble seasons to the distant river towns. The Judge says : 
." The people were still without a market in which to 
sell their surplus produce nearer than Madison, on the 
Ohio river, sixty-five miles away. Wheat was worth 
from twenty-five to thirty-five cents per bushel ; corn 
ten, and oats eight. Good work horses sold at from 
thirty-five and forty dollars per head, to fifty and sixty; 
cows, at from five to ten dollars each ; while all cotton 
and imported woolen goods, and groceries of all kinds, 
cost at least double the present prices. Those in the 
entire county, who were not compelled to toil for daily 
bread and raiment, you could have counted off on the 
fingers of your right hand. The men tilled the soil 
during the tilling season, and cleared land for themselves 
or others during the fall and winter seasons, and spent 
the long winter evenings in making and mending shoes 
for their families, or other domestic labor ; while the 
women not only looked after the ordinary and daily 
affairs of the household, but spun flax, carded and spun 
the wool, and wove linens, flannels and jeans, with which 
all were clothed." 

SOUTHPORT. 

The church at Southport was organized March 30th, 
1833, by W. W. Woods, with twenty-four members dis- 
missed for the purpose from the church at Greenwood. 
The church was named New Providence at its organiza- 
tion. Otis Sprague and John S. iSebern were elected 
elders. Rev. Hilary Patrick labored for the church for 
a short period. The Rev. John Todd also ministered 
to the church for several years. Its membership in 1838 
was forty -one. 



40 HISTORY OF THE 



DANVILLE. 



The church at Danville, Hendricks county, was organ- 
ized by S. G. Lowry in December, 1832, with nineteen 
members. Daniel McAuley, Stephen Mahood and 
Alexander Morris, were elected elders. Mr. Lowry 
preached for some months for the church once a month/ 
The church was without any stated ministry until 1835, 
when Rev. Moody Chase removed to Danville, and took 
charge of the church. A church edifice was erected 
in 1837. Its membership at the time was thirty-eight. 

GREENCASTLE. 

The church at Greencastle was reorganized July 14th, 

1833, with fourteen members, by S. G. Lowry. In 

1834, W. W. Woods commenced his labors with the 
church and remained until 1837. In that year J. R* 
Wheelock took charge of the church and continued 
with it a year and three months. The church wor- 
shipped until 1836 in a log house that had been built 
by the Methodists. In this year they erected a brick 
edifice forty by fifty feet. In 1836 the membership was 
forty-nine, in 1837, it was seventy-five. 

PUTNAMVILLE. 

The church at Putnamville after its organization in 

1830, enjoyed the labors a part of the time for nearly 
four years of Revs. Jeremiah Hill, James Shields and 
S. G. Lowry. At a communion season in August 

1831, nineteen persons were received by letter. In less 
than four years the church had increased to sixty-five. 
W. W. Woods ministered to the church in connection 
with his labors at Greencastle. His labors at Putnam- 
ville continued for nine years. 

BLOOMINGTON. 

At Bloomiugton, the Rev. Ransom Hawley had be- 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. 41 

come stated supply of the church in 1834. Prof. Hall 
had removed to Bedford, Pennsylvania. Mr. Reed not 
succeeding in his efforts in building up a female school, 
had gone to Hanover. A personal difficulty between 
Dr. Wylie, President of the State College, and John H. 
Harney, Professor in the college, who was also a mem- 
ber of the church, led to a church trial, which caused 
no little trouble to the church. The case was widely 
known in its day, passing through presbytery and synod 
to the General Assembly, and sent back by the General 
Assembl}^ again occupied the time of presbytery and 
synod with all its details. The alienations and divisions 
thus originated in the church at Bloomington could not 
but hinder its prosperity. The membership reported to 
the Assembly in 1838, was seventy-two. 

From the minutes of the General Assembly, we find 
the Shiloh church first reported in 1836, but without 
the number of its members. In 1837, its membership 
is reported as thirty-seven. 

The Bethany church is first reported in 1837, with 
thirty members. 

The names of South Marion, Sugar Creek and Eagle 
Creek are in the minutes of the Assembly for 1832. 
Eagle Creek has then a membership of twenty-five, in 
1836, of only nineteen. 

In 1830, the church of Columbus was supplied for a 
time by the Rev. Hilary Patrick. In 1834, the Rev. 
Michael A. Remley resided at Columbus, and supplied 
the church. In 1837, Rev. Windsor A. Smith took charge 
of the church, and supplied it for two and a half years. 
But there was yet no church edifice. The number of 
members reported to the General Assembly in 1838, was 
thirty-five. 



42 



JlhSTORY OF THE 



Danville 

Greencastle .. 
Putnamville.. 
Bloomington. 
Columbus 



,.; 35 

75 

65 

.72 

35 

Poplar Spring 90 

Total 1,042 



From the minutes of the Assembly for 1837 aud 1838, 

we have the membership of the churches as follows : 

Franklin 114 

Hopewell 106 

Indianapolis 172 

Greenwood 132 

New Providence 41 

Shiloh 28 

Bethany 30 

Eagle Creek 28 

South Marion 19 

On this field are the following ministers : John Todd, 
David Monfort, Eliphalet Kent, Wm. Sickels, W. A- 
Holliday, James W. McKennan, Moody Chase, W. W. 
Woods, Ransom Hawley, Andrew Wylie, D. D., and W. 
A. Smith. Of these, Dr. Wylie is President of the 
State College, and wholly occupied with its duties. Kev. 
W. A. Holliday is also engaged in teaching. 

In this field of the present presbytery, there was, two 
years later, a population of more than 84,000 ; by coun- 
ties as follows : 



Monroe 10,143 

Brown 2,364 

Bartholomew 10,042 



Total 84,364 



Marion 16,080 

Johnson 9,352 

Hancock 7,535 

Hendricks 11,264 

Putnam 16,843 

Morgan 10,741 

In this growing population the Presbyterians are still 

a feeble folk, and unhappily divided. How will they 

grow when they are no longer quarreling factions in the 

same church, but divided into two different bodies, each 

harmonious with itself? We shall see, if we follow on. 



PBESB YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. 43 



CHAPTER IV. 

Action of the Presbytery of Indiariapolis in the Great Divi- 
sion of the Church — Action of the Presbytery of Crawfords- 
ville — Greencastle First — Greencastle Second — Putnam- 
ville, Poplar Spring, Bainbridge, Carpenter sville, Bloom- 
ington, Columbus. 

1838—1850. 

In May, 1838, occurred the division of the General 
Assembly, by which the Presbyterian Church became 
divided into two denominations. The division accom- 
plished in Philadelphia in May, 1888, was accomplished 
in the lower judicatories of the church as they were suc- 
cessively convened. Upon the 81st of July, 1838, the 
Presbytery of Indianapolis met at Franklin, at the call 
of the moderator, Eliphalet Kent, for the purpose of at- 
tending to any business which the peculiar state of the 
church at the time, and especially within the bounds of 
the presbytery, might demand. 

We, happily, now have the records of the presbytery. 

ACTION OF INDIANAPOLIS PRESBYTERY. 

The result of this called meeting was that the presby- 
tery adhered to the 0. S. Assembly. Against this ac- 
tion the Rev. Eliphalet Kent, the moderator, the Rev. 
John Todd and Elder Simon Smock, of ^ew Provi- 
dence, protested, declaring their belief that the New 
School Assembly was the true Assembly of the Presby- 



44 HISTORY OF THE 

terian church. The churches of Grreenwood, South 
Marion and Eagle Creek united with these brethren in 
their adhesion to the New School Assembly. 

ACTION OF PRESBYTERY OF CRAWFORDSVILLE. 

A few days previous to the action of Indianapolis 
Presbytery, in regard to the division of the church, the 
Presbytery of Crawfordsville had been convened to hear 
the report of their commissioners to the Assembly and 
take such action as might be deemed necessary. The 
Crawfordsville Presbytery, by a very large majority, ad- 
hered to the New School Assembly; and among the 
churches adhering to the New School Assembly, were 
the churches of Danville, Greencastle and Putnamville. 
The church of Bloomington, within the Vincennes Pres- 
bytery, adhered to the 0. S. Assembly. 

It was a sad thing that irreconcilable differences 
should divide into two bodies the Presbyterian church, 
and make it two denominations. But ic was doubtless 
far better that the churches in which such irreconcilable 
differences existed, should be divided into two denomi- 
nations, each in harmony with itself, and having frater- 
nal regard for the other, and each gradually eliminating 
from itself the hindrances to a true and lasting union to 
be consummated in due time, than to continue in a state 
of unceasing internal strife, in which there was more of 
nominal than real union, and in which the zeal and 
strength of the church were more expended in strife 
upon its diflferences than in pushing forward steadily the 
work of evangelization, in saving the perishing and in 
gaining from the world still wider provinces for the do- 
minion of the Redeemer. Blessed are our eyes, which 
have seen the repellant differences eliminated and the 
reunion consummated. Blessed will be the work of our 
hands as laboring together in the unity of the spirit, 



PHESB YTER Y OF INDIANA POLIS. 45 

this union, thorough and complete as it is, becomes 
more and more efficient in accomplishing the work 
which the Lord has given His church to do. 

GREENCASTLE FIRST. 

After the division of the Assembly in 1838, the Green- 
castle church continued with the New School Assembly. 
At the time of the division, the Rev. J. E. Wheelock 
was ministering to it. But very soon after this, he with- 
drew from connection with the Presbyterian church. In 
the minutes of the Crawfordsville Presbytery (N". S.) 
there is this record, made in March, 1839 : 

Resolved, That the name of James R. Wheelock be discontinued 
on our records, he having left our bounds without a dismission and 
become connected (as we learn) with another ecclesiastical body. 

In the fall of 1840, the Rev. James Shields, who had 
been previously supplying for several months the church 
at Greencastle, became its pastor. This relation contin- 
ued only until 1842. In 1842 an addition was made to 
the church of fifty-six persons. Rev. Ransom Hawley 
was stated supply from February, 1843, to the fall of 
1845. The church continued to increase in numbers du- 
ring these years. In December, 1845, Rev. Thomas S. 
Milligan became stated supply of the church and con- 
tinued in that relation until 1850. Nineteen were ad- 
ded to the church 1847. The number of members 
reported to the General Assembly as in connection with 
the church in 1850 was one hundred and ten. 

GREENCASTLE SECOND. 

In 1849, the second church of Greencastle was organ- 
ized in connection with the Presbytery of Crawfordsville, 
O. S. It was organized by Rev. W. Y. Allen, with thir- 
teen members, some of whom were dismissed by letter 
from the first church. 



46 HISTORY OF THE 

PUTNAMVILLE. 

On the 26tb of November, 1841, the Rev. Ransom 
Hawley commenced his labors in the church at Putnam- 
ville, in connection with the church of Bethany, Owen 
county, for one-half his time. In 1849, a new house of 
worship was erected at Putnamville. In 1850, the mem- 
bership reported to the Assembly was fifty-seven. 

POPLAR SPRING, BAINBRIDGE AND CARPENTERSVILLE. 

The church of Poplar Spring had been divided in the di- 
vision of the church. The majority adhered to the 
New School body. The name of the church was 
changed io 1843 to Bainbridge. It reported in 1850, a 
membership of forty-three. The Old School portion of 
the' church were organized into a separate body in 1839. 
They numbered at the time of organization, seventeen 
members. This became the Carpentersville church. It 
reported in 1850, a membership of twenty-seven. 

BLOOMINGTON. 

The Rev. Ransom Hawley, who, as stated supply took 
charge of the church at Bloomington in 1834, contin- 
ued in that relation to the church until the tall of 1841, 
when he removed to Putnamville. During Mr. Haw- 
ley's ministry at Bloomington, eighty-three persons were 
received into the membership of the church, thirty-sev- 
en upon profession, forty-six by letter. At this time the 
church of Bloomington was receiving aid from the Board 
Missions to the amount of a hundred and a hundred and 
fifty dollars a year. 

In the spring of 1843, the Rev. W. W. Martin removed 
from Livonia to Bloomington, and became stated supply 
of the church. He remained two years, and then re- 
turned to Livonia. During these two years, twenty- 
six persons were added to the church, sixteen by pro- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAFOLIS. . 47 

fession of faith, ten by letter. The number of members 
reported to the Assembly in 1845, was eighty-four. In 
the report of 1846, this number was reduced to sixty- 
eight. 

Upon the return of Mr. Martin to Livonia, the Rev. 
Alfred Ryors, Professor in the State University, the 
college having become the State University in 1839, was 
invited to supply the pulpit for a year, or until a pastor 
could be secured. Mr. Ryors accepted the invitation, 
and ministered to the church for a little more than two 
years, untilJuly, 1847. These were years of great bless- 
ing to the church. The members of the church had a 
mind to work. They sought and obtained the labors of 
a colporteur to distribute tracts and religious books 
among the people. The congregation was divided into 
districts by the elders, and a personal responsibility for 
each district laid upon the elder to whose oversight it 
was entrusted. The spirit of the Lord moved upon the 
hearts of the people, and one and another was added to 
the church. For more than a year this spirit of earn- 
est work was manifested by the people. Doubtless with 
this spirit of work there was a spirit of prayer. In the 
meantime the Synod of Indiana met with the church in 
1846, no doubt strengthening and confirming the church. 
In the spring of 1817, there was a deepening and grow- 
ing interest. At this time the minister and session 
sought for help. Upon the 21st of May, the Rev. Dr. 
Nathan R. Hall, of Kentucky, came to Bloomiogton by 
invitation to assist in a protracted meeting. Dr. Hall 
preached for ten days, preaching at 9 a. m., having an 
inquiry and prayer meeting at 3 p. m., and preaching 
again at 7 p. m., with a meeting for prayer, exhortation 
and inquiry following. During these meetings thirty- 
eight persons were received upon profession of their 
faith. A number were received a short time afterwards. 



48 HISTOR Y OF THE 

The number received during Prof. Ryors' ministry was 
seventy-two, sixty-three upon profession of faith, nine 
by letter. 

In July, 1847, the Rev. Levi Hughes was invited to 
supply the church for a year. Mr. Hughes had been 
received into the church of Bloomington upon profes- 
sion of his faith not quite four years before. He was 
at that time studying law. His convictions of duty turned 
him to preparation for the ministry. After he had 
completed a three years' course of theological study in 
the Seminaries at New Albany and Princeton, he was 
invited to become the stated supply of the church at 
Bloomington. He accepted the invitation, and after 
this term of service he was called and settled as pastor. 
This pastorate only continued, however, until the spring 
of 1851, when Mr. Hughes removed to Logausport, hav- 
ing accepted a call to the iirst Presbyterian church of 
that place. 

In 1850, the membership of the church at Blooming- 
ton as reported to the General Assembly, was one hun- 
dred and twelve. 

COLUMBUS. 

The historical records of the church at Columbus are 
very meagre. The Rev. B. M. Nyce supplied the church 
during a term of years between 1840 and 1850. Under 
his ministry, the first Presbyterian church edifice was 
erected in Columbus. It was built about the year 1841, 
mainly as a result of Mr. Nyce's persistent and indom- 
itable energy. The church was then very feeble, and 
considered itself too poor for such an undertaking, Mr. 
Nyce himself, aided by a few ladies, solicited subscriptions 
in material, work and money, and when they could get 
no more commenced the work and pressed it until the 
means were exhausted. Then it stood still and the pro- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 49 

cess of procuring means and then expending was again 
repeated. Thus the work progressed until it was final- 
ly completed, without debt, at a cost of about twelve 
hundred dollars, 

Mr. JSTyce's labors in building the church, in teaching 
in the county Seminary, which he did for several years, 
and his preaching were spoken of in the highest terms 
by those who knew him and his work. The church 
paid him a salary of one hundred and seventy-five dol- 
lars, all they could raise. Several seasons of religious 
interest were enjoyed during his ministry. Mr. J^yce 
left Columbus in 1849. In the fall of 1849, Mr. Charles 
Merwin was called to supply the pulpit for one year. 
During this year several were added to the church. 
The number of members reported to the General Assem- 
bly of 1850, was ninety. 



50 HISTORY OF THE 



CHAPTER V. 

Second Church of Indianapolis — Indianapolis Presbytery, N. 
S. — Enlargement of Presbytery — Ministerial Changes — 
Changes in Churches — Missionary Work — Pastoral Pela- 
tion — Report to General Assembly. 

1840—1850. 

SECOND CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

One of the first important effects within the Presbytery- 
following the great division in the Presbyterian Church, 
was the formation of the Second Presbyterian church 
of Indianapolis. This was organized by Rev. James H. 
Johnson, November 19, 1838, in the Marion county sem- 
inary, a small brick building standing, until 1860, at the 
south-west corner of University Square. The original 
members of the church were fifteen in number. Their 
names are as follows : Bethuel F. Morris, Daniel Yandes, 
Luke Munsell, Lawrence M. Vance, Mary J. Vance, 
Sidney Bates, William Eckert, Alexander H. Davidson, 
Robert Mitchell, William S. Hubbard, Joseph F. Holt, 
Margaret R. Holt, John L. Ketcham, Jane Ketcham and 
Catherine Merrill. On the 20th of November, the day 
after the organization, they issued a call to Rev. Sylves- 
ter Holmes, of New Bedford, Massachusetts. The call 
was declined. Some weeks later, January 15, 1839, they 
invited Rev. John C. Young, of Danville, Kentucky, to 
become their pastor, but this overture also was unsuc- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 51 

cessful. The Rev. Elihu Baldwin, president of Wabash 
College, was solicited to take charge of the new church. 
He likewise declined. On the 13th of May, the Rev. 
Henry Ward Beecher, then of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, 
was called to the pastorate. He accepted the call, and 
entered upon his work in the church July 31, 1839. At 
this time the church had increased to a membership of 
thirty-two. The county seminary was occupied for one 
year as a place of worship. The church then went into 
its own edifice, occupying at first the lecture room. 
Soon, however, the house was completed, and its dedica- 
tion occurred October 4, 1840. 

INDIANAPOLIS PRESBYTERY, NEW SCHOOL. 

A second effect of importance following the division 
of the Presbyterian church into Old and New School, 
was the formation of the New School Presbytery of In- 
dianapolis. 

The Rev. Eliphalet Kent, and the Rev. John Todd, 
with the churches within the bounds of Indianapolis 
Presbytery adhering to the N. S. Assembly, had, in the 
adherence of the majority of that presbytery to the O. 
S. Assembly, become connected with the Presbytery of 
Madison. In October, 1839, the synod of Indiana, N. 
S., passed the following: 

Resolved, That the Presbyteries of Madison and Crawfordsville be 
divided, and the Presbytery of Indianapolis formed, embracing the 
following territory, viz : The counties of Morgan, Johnson, Shelby, 
Kush, Hancock, Henry, Marion, Hendricks, Hamilton and Madison. 
Said presbytery to meet at Franklin, on the last Thursday of March 
(1840), at 11 o'clock a. m. The Rev. John Todd, or in his absence 
the next oldest minister present, shall preach the opening sermon, 
and preside until another moderator be chosen. 

In accordance with the above order of synod, the 
Presbytery of Indianapolis (N. S.) met at the appointed 
time at Franklin. The Rev. John Todd having de- 



52 HLSTORY OF THE 

ceased, the sermon was preached by the Rev. Moody 
Chase. The presbytery was opened with prayer by the 
moderator jyro tem. The Rev. Moody Chase was chosen 
moderator, and Henry Ward Beecher, temporary clerk, 
and subsequently stated clerk. The members present 
were : Ministers, A. G. Dunning, Moody Chase and 
Henry Ward Beecher; elders, Garret Sorter and E. N. 
H. Adams. Rev. E. Kent, another member, was absent. 
At an adjourned meeting of the presbytery, held at In- 
dianapolis the next month (April), the Rev. P. 8. Cle- 
Jand was received by letter from the Salem Presbytery. 
The churches included within the original limits of the 
presbytery were the following : Danville, Brownsburg, 
New Winchester, Second Indianapolis, New Providence 
or Southport, Greenwood, South Marion, afterwards Mt. 
Pleasant, Eagle Creek, Highland, Sugar Creek and 
Batavia. 

At the meeting of the General Assembly (IST. S.) in 
1840, the territory in south-east Indiana, which had be- 
longed to the Synod of Cincinnati, was attached to the 
Synod of Indiana. At the meeting of the synod in Oc- 
tober, 1840. so much of the territory added to the synod 
by the act of the Assembl}^ as was north of Decatur and 
Ripley counties was added to the Presbytery of Indian- 
apolis. 

ENLARGEMENT OF PRESBYTERY. 

In October, 1845, the presbyiery was enlarged by the 
following action of synod : 

Besolved, That the county of Boone, embracing the Rev. Thomp- 
son Bird and the churches of Lebanon, Bethel and Thorntown, be 
detached from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville and attached to the 
Presbytery of Indianapolis; and that the county of Decatur, em- 
bracing the Rev. Jonathan Cable and the church of Sand Creek, be 
detached from the Presbytery of Madison and attached to the Pres- 
bytery of Indianapolis. 



PBESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 5 3 

Previous to this enlargement of the presbytery, there 
was frequent failure of a quorum at appointed times of 
meeting. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

In October, 1841, William N. Stimson, who had been 
received as a licentiate from the Presbytery of Cincin- 
nati, was ordained as an evangelist at a meeting of the 
presbytery in Highland church. 

At this meeting of presbytery, Rev. Alvah G. Dun- 
ning was dismissed to the Presbytery of Cincinnati. 
Presbytery also appointed Messrs. Cleland and Chase to 
visit and spend one Sabbath at Noblesville before the 
next stated meeting Likewise W. N. Stimson and 
Henry Ward Beecher were to visit and hold communion 
service with the church at Danville, spending a Sabbath 
with the church. 

In April, 1842, Rev. Moody Chase was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. 

Presbytery in session at Danville, April, 1843, re- 
ceived from the Presbytery of Cincinnati and ordained 
Mr. H. Hanmer, who was ministering as stated supply 
to the church at Danville. " Mr. Hanmer," writes one 
of the elders of the church concerning him, " was a 
young man of talent and piety, and much beloved by his 
people. Before the close of the iirst year of his minis- 
try, he became insane and was taken to his home in 
Connecticut by his friends." In 1859 his name was 
dropped from the roll. 

In August, 1843, presbytery, in session at Indianapo- 
lis, licensed Mr. Charles Beecher. In September, 1844, 
he was dismissed to the care of the Presbytery of Lo- 
gansport. 

In November, 1845, Rev. Benjamin M. Nyce was 
received from Salem Presbytery. April, 1846, Rev. 



54 HISTORY OF THE 

James McCoy was received from Logansport Presbytery. 
Also B. F. Stuart, a licentiate, was received from the 
Presbytery of Cincinnati and ordained. November, 
1847, he was dismissed to Salem. 

April, 1847, Rev. Theophilus Lowry was received 
from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. He was with 
the church of Danville until the spring of 1849. In Sep- 
tember, 1850, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of 
Crawfordsville. 

In September, 1847, the labors of Henry Ward Beecher 
in the Second church of Indianapolis closed, and in Oc- 
tober a letter of dismission was granted to him by pres- 
bytery " to join the body with which the Plymouth 
church, Brooklyn, N"ew York," was connected. From 
the beginning of Mr. Beecher's ministry in the Second 
church there was a gradual and hopeful growth. In the 
beginning of 1842, a very precious revival was experi- 
enced. At three communion seasons, held successively 
in February, March and April, 1842, nearly one hun- 
dred persons were added to the church on profession of 
their faith. Early in the following year, at the March 
and April communions, the church had large accessions, 
as it had also in 1845. During this pastorate of more 
than eight years, the membership of the church had 
increased to two hundred and seventy-five. 

From September, 1847, to April, 1848, the Second 
church of Indianapolis was temporarily supplied by 
Rev. Shubert Glranby Specs. 

In September, 1848, Rev. Abraham S. Avery, who 
had been employed by the missionary committee as the 
missionary of the presbytery, was received from Patas- 
kala Presbytery, Ohio. 

Mr. Avery was soon prostrated by sickness, and unable 
to continue his missionary labors. In his sickness he 



PRESS YTER Y OF INDIA NA POL IS. 5 5 

was not forsaken by bis bretbren, but received tbeir 
sympatbies and substantial aid, wbile tbe funds contrib- 
uted to missionary purposes were employed in securing, 
during tbe summer of 1849, at twenty dollars per montb, 
tbe labors of Mr. George Davis, a licentiate of tbe Pres- 
bytery of Cincinnati. 

October, 1848, Clement E. Babb, a licentiate of tbe 
Presbytery of Dayton, was received. A call from tbe 
Second church of Indianapolis having been placed in his 
hands, and having signified his acceptance, he was or- 
dained and installed pastor of the church. 

October, 1848, Rev. W. H. Rogers was received from 
the Presbytery of Cincinnati. 

April, 1849, Amos Jones, a licentiate of the Presby- 
tery of Cincinnati, was received. At an adjourned 
meeting of presbytery in May, he was ordained. He 
was stated supply of the church at Danville until 1853. 

September, 1849, Rev. Sylvanus Warren, of the Pres- 
bytery of Athens, Ohio, was received. His labors were 
<?onnected Avith the American Tract Society. In Sep- 
tember, 1850, he was dismissed to Salem. 

Also, in September, 1849, Rev. Benjamin F. Cole, of 
tbe Presbytery of Crawfordsville, was received. A call 
from the churches of Thorntown and Bethel was put 
into his hands, and, having accepted the call, a commit- 
tee was appointed to install him. His installation was 
reported at the next meeting of presbytery. 

April, 1850, James McCoy was dismissed to Presbytery 
of Salem. 

CHANGES IN CHURCHES. 

In August, 1842, the New Pisgab church was organ- 
ized. 

In September, 1844, the organization of Stouey Creek 
church was reported to presbytery in session at Nobles- 



56 \HISTOR Y OF THE 

ville. Also the organization of a church at Edinburgh 
was reported, and it was further ordered that the mem- 
bers of the church of Batavia, in the neighborhood of 
Edinburg, be enrolled among the members of the church 
at Edinburg, and the name of the church of Batavia be 
dropped from the- roll. 

April 1846, the organization of the church of Ander- 
sontown was reported, also of the churches of Pendle- 
ton and Upper Sugar Creek. These two last churches, 
however, seem to have never been fully organized, and 
they had but a short and sickly existence. April, 1847, 
the organization of a church at Greenfield, Hancock 
county, was reported. 

September, 1850, the Sand Creek and Clarksburg 
churches sent a request to the presbytery for permission 
to unite with the Felicity Presbytery of the Free Pres- 
byterian church. The request was complied with, and 
the names of these churches dropped from the roll. 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE. 

April, 1848, Rev. J. Cable, Rev. E. Kent and Dr. W. 
H. Wishard, were appointed a committee to employ a 
missionary. A co-operating committee of one from 
each church in the presbytery was appointed to raise 
funds for the support of the missionary. This mission- 
ary committee was more than a nominal one. It suc- 
ceeded in accomplishing missionary work. 

REPORT OF HOME MISSIONARY COMMITTEE. 

September, 1849, the Committee on Home Missions 
made the following report, which was adopted : 

" The survey of our field of labor awakens painful feelings. So 
much territory lying waste, nominally under our care yet never rep- 
resented at our meetings. Your committee recommend a more sys- 
tematic effort to meet the wants of the perishing souls, which Prov- 
idence has crowded around us. And to secure this object, they sug- 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLm 57 

gest, that presbytery elect annually a Boai-d on vacancies, sup- 
plies and destitutions, to consist of two ministers and one elder, 
which shall meet as often as once in two months, and may meet 
oftener in case of special business. That this Board be instructed 
to secure men for our vacant churches and destitute territory as 
fast as possible. That this Board have no power to pledge the pres- 
bytery for money without a special vote, but that the presbytery 
recommend them and their work to all our churches, and will vol- 
untarily aid them in raising funds for such objects as they present. 
That the churches that have no stated preaching be directed to apply 
to the Board between the meetings of presbytery for supplies, and 
that the Board secure members of presbytery to visit those places 
occasionally. 

COMMITTEE ON PASTORAL RELATION. 

The presbytery, with its increasing strength, and gird- 
ing itself for presbyterial mission work, took also the 
following action respecting the pastoral relation : 

Presbytery believes that it is the policy and interest of the Pres- 
byterian church, and that it would be for the glory of God and the 
good of the community at large, to establish a permanent relation 
between the preachers and the people, according to our excellent 
form of government. Chapters 15 and 16, which provides for and 
enjoins the settling of a pastor over every church, when it shall be 
practicable. That for the want of such permanent relation, the 
churches are suffering, not only the want of the stated means of 
grace, but all the interests of the church are languishing. Semina- 
ries and schools, Sabbath schools, Tract distribution, Missionary 
operations, and all the means of building up an intelligent church 
and evangelizing the world, are entirely wanting or are in a lan- 
guishing condition. Therefore 

Resolved, 1st, That we advise every church to secure a permanent 
pastor as speedily as possible. 

Resolved, 2d, That this presbytery will not, unless for very pecu- 
liar reasons, agree to grant the relation of stated supply between a 
minister and church longer than one year. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PASTORAL RELATION. 

September, 1849, the Committee on the Pastoral Rela- 
tion made the following report : 



58 HISTORY OF. THE 

That the churches of Greenwood, New Providence and South 
Marion have been enjoying the labors of Brother Cleland for many 
years without installing him pastor, and they recommend that pres- 
bytery appoint a committee to meet those churches and confer with 
them on the subject between this and the first day of December, 
and secure, if they can, a compliance with the rule of presbytery 
on the subject. 

Messrs. Babb and McCoy, were appointed a committee as above 
recommended. 

As the result of this actiou, a call for the pastoral ser- 
vices of P. S. Cleland was made by the churches to 
which he had been so long ministering, and in May, 
1850, he was installed by a committee of presbytery. 
The pastorate was happy and endured for many years. 

REPORT OF 1850 TO GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

The Presbytery reported to the Assembly of 1850, 
thirteen ministers, twenty-one churches and eight hun- 
dred and twenty-one members. Of these churches, ten, 
containing six hundred and twenty-five members, were 
within the boundaries of the present Presbytery of 
Indianapolis. 



PBESB YTEB Y OF INDIA NA POLIS. 5 9 



CHAPTER VI. 

Presbytery of Indiana'polis, 0. S. — Churches Organized — 
Ministerial Changes — Lessons from the History of Frank- 
lin Church — Ministerial Support — Missionary Work — 
Organization of Whitewater Presbytery, and Changes in 
the Boundaries of the Presbytery. 

1838—1850. 

PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS, OLD SCHOOL. 

We turn now to the Presbytery of Indianapolis, Old 
School. 

In the fall of 1838, the pastoral relation between the 
church of Hopewell and Eev. D. Monfort was dissolved, 
that Mr. Monfort might give his undivided labors to the 
church at Franklin. Application was made through 
the presbytery to the Board of Missions for aid to the 
amount of two hundred dollars. The salary was five 
hundred. The presbytery returned the application to the 
church with directions that they make a vigorous effort 
to increase the amount subscribed for their pastor's sup- 
port. This vigorous effort resulted in cutting clown the 
application to the Board of Missions to one hundred and 
fifty dollars. 

CHURCHES ORGANIZED. 

May 18th, 1838, Rev. David V. Smock organized a 
church at Greenfield, styled Hancock church. Wm. T. 
Templeton, an elder from said church, was admitted to a 



60 HISTORY OF THE 

seat in presbytery. Supplies were appointed for several 
successive years for this church. A new church was 
organized in connection with the!New School Presbytery 
in the spring of 1847. 

September, 1839, the organization of a church at An- 
dersontown was reported to presbytery. Rev. Robert 
Irwin was appointed to supply it one Sabbath. In June, 
1846, the name of this church was dropped from the roll. 
In 1846, the organization of a church at Andersontown 
was reported to the New School Presbytery. 

The Presbytery of Oxford having organized the 
churches of Muncietown and Stony Creek, supposing 
said churches to be within their territory, and having 
reported these facts to the Presbytery of Indianapolis, 
these churches were taken under the care and placed 
upon the roll of presbytery in 1839. 

The organization of the following churches is reported 
in successive years: 

New Burlington, April, 1841, 

Middletown, April, 1842. 

Union, Decatur county, April, 1843. 

Amity, Hamilton county, April, 1844. 

Windsor, Randolph county, April, 1844. 

Newcastle, April, 1844. 

Yorktown, September, 1845. 

Concord, Rush county, September, 1845. 

Georgetown, Brown county, December, 1845. 

Napoleon, September, 1846. 

Harmony, Bartholomew county, April, 1848. 

New Prospect, Johnson county, September, 1850. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

Mr. Joseph G. Monfort was received October 1838, as 
a licentiate from the Presbytery of Oxford. He became 
supply of the Greensburg and Sand Creek churches for 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 61 

six months, giving to each church one half his time. 
April, 1839, he was ordained and installed pastor of these 
congregations. October, 1842, he was released from the 
pastoral care of these churches to prosecute an agency 
for the endowment of the Theological Seminary at New 
Albany. May, 1845, he was again installed pastor of the 
church at Greensburg. 

W. G. Holliday was dismivssed to Crawfordsville Pres- 
bytery, October, 1838. 

April, 1839, Rev. Robert Irwin and Rev. Michael Car- 
penter were received from the Presbytery of Oxford. 

Rev, Robert Irwin was supply of the church at Mun- 
cietown. He received a call to the church in 1843, for 
one half of his time, and was installed pastor. The 
name of the church was changed in 1846, to Muncie. 

April, 1839, tlie pastoral relation between J. W. Mc- 
Kennan and first church at Indianapolis was dissolved. 
By request of the church, Mr. McKennan was appointed 
supply of the church until next meeting of presbytery. 

September, 1839, a call having been given to Rev. 
James W. McKennan by the congregation of Cross 
Roads, Washington Presbytery, and he having stated 
his acceptance of the call, it was ordered "that he be 
furnished with the proper testimonials and be required 
to repair to the Presbytery of Washington, that the 
proper steps may be taken for his regular settlement." 
September, 1839, Wm. Sickles became supply of Shi- 
loh for one half of his time. April, 1843, he was dis- 
missed to the Presbytery of Oxford, again received from 
Oxford September, 1844, and in June, 1846, dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Madison. 

April, 1839, J. S. Weaver was dismissed to the Pres- 
bytery of Oxford. 

April, 1840, Rev. Sayrs Gazely was received from the 
Presbytery of Cincinnati, a call having been presented 



62 HISTORY OF THE 

to him by the church of Hopewell. Having accepted 
it, he was installed the third Saturday of May, by "W. 
Sickles and D. Monfort, a committee of presbytery. 
In April, 1842, this pastoral relation was dissolved. 

November, 1840, Mr. Colvin McKinney, a licentiate of 
Oxford Presbyter}^ was received, and it being deemed 
necessary that he should be invested with full ministerial 
power in the churches of Shelbyville and St. Omar in 
which he was laboring, he was ordained as an evangel- 
ist. Of his examination we find these records: "Mr. 
McKinney delivered his sermon, which was not deemed 
satisfactory, it being partly extemporaneous. Resolved, 
that Presbytery require of Mr. McKinney a written dis- 
course on the subject assigned as a part of trial with- 
out regarding the unwritten sermon preached before us 
yesterday as any part of trial. Mr. McKinney presented 
a written sermon on the subject assigned, after which 
he was further examined on Theology, which sermon 
and examination were sustained." June, 1843, Mr. Mc- 
Kinney was dismissed to Oxford Presbytery. 

In December, 1840, Mr. Phineas D. Gurley, a licenti- 
ate of the Presbytery of Forth River, was received, or- 
dained and installed pastor of the First church at In- 
dianapolis. In June, 1842, the church determined to 
build a new house of worship. It was occupied in 
May, 1843, and completed in 1846, at a cost of between 
eight and nine thousand dollars. In the second year of 
Mr. Gurley's ministry, forty-two members were received 
upon profession of their faith. For four successive 
years the church was increased with goodly numbers on 
profession of their faith. In November, 1849, the pas- 
toral relation of Mr. Gurley to the church was dissolved. 
There was received into it during his ministry, two hun- 
dred and seventeen persons, one hundred and lifty-eight 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 63 

of these upon profession of their faith, and fifty-nine by 
letter. The total membership reported to the General 
Assembly in 1850, was two hundred and six. 

In February, 1843, the pastoral relation between D. Y. 
Smock and the church at Knightstown was dissolved. 
June, 1843, calls from the churches of Hopewell and Shi- 
loh were put by presbytery into his hands. He accept- 
ing, was installed by committee of presbytery. This 
pastoral relation was dissolved in July, 1850. 

September, 1845, John Dale, a licentiate of Salem 
Presbytery, was received, ordained and installed as pas- 
tor ot the church at Knightstown, for two-thirds of his 
time. This pastoral relation was dissolved in March, 
1850, and in April following, Mr. Dale was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Logansport. 

August, 1843, George S. Pea, who had previously 
been received as a licentiate from the Presbyter}- of Ox- 
ford, was ordained and installed as pastor of the church 
of Ebenezer. This pastoral relation was dissolved April, 
1844. Mr. Rea was dismissed September, 1846, to the 
Presbytery of Iowa. 

The Rev. T. A. Hendricks, who had been licensed by 
the presbytery April, 1841, was ordained and installed 
pastor of the churches of St. Omar and Shelbyville. 
This pastoral relation was dissolved April, 1845, on ac- 
count of ill health of the pastor, disabling him for his 
work. Mr. Hendricks was dismissed April, 1847, to the 
Presbytery of Vincennes. 

In October, 1846, the Rev. Francis Monfort was re- 
ceived from the Presbytery of Oxford and installed over 
the churches of St. Omar and Concord, 

September, 1847, J. M. Wampler, a licentiate of Ox- 
ford Presbytery was received. He ministered to the 
church of Shelbyville, and was ordained June, 1848. 



64 HISTORY OF THE 

He was dismissed April, 1849, to the Presbytery of 
Logansport. 

In September, 1844, B. F. Woods, a licentiate of Sa- 
lem Presbytery, was received. In May, 1845, he was 
ordained and installed pastor of the Bethany and New 
Providence churches. This pastoral relation was dis- 
solved April, 1848. 

J. C. King, a candidate under the care of the presby- 
tery, was licensed April, 1844. September, 1845, he was 
ordained and installed pastor of the church of Sand 
Creek for one-half his time. 

D. A. Wallace, a candidate under care of presbytery, 
was licensed April, 1844. In June, 1847, he was or- 
dained and installed as pastor of the church of George- 
town for one-half his time. This pastoral relation was 
not of long continuance. Mr, Wallace was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of White Water July, 1849. 

In April, 1844, W, A. Holliday was received from 
the Presbytery of Oxford. September, 1847, Mr. Holli- 
day's name was dropped from the roll, he having united 
with the Associate Reformed Church. April, 1849, be 
was again received from that body. 

April, 1848, John Ross was received from Presbytery 
of Oxford. 

September, 1848, D. D. McKee was received from the 
Presbytery of Alleghany. 

July, 1849, Henry I. Coe, a licentiate of the Presby- 
tery of New Brunswick, was received. He was ordained 
March, 1850. 

At the same time, Hugh Marshall was received on 
probation as a foreign minister from the Presbytery of 
Armagh, Scotland. A few months afterwards he was 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Green Brier. 

March, 1850, Isaac L. Lyon, a candidate under the 
care of Albany Presbytery, was received and ordained. 



PBESBYT^EY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 65 

September, 1850, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of 
Iowa. 

July, 1850, James Gallatin was received from the 
Presbytery of Iowa. 

September, 1850, the pastoral relation between Dr. 
David Monfort and the church of Franklin was dis- 
solved. Dr. Monfort was also granted a letter of dismis- 
sion to the Presbytery of White Water. Presbytery 
passed the following resolutions : 

Resolved, 1st, That in dismissing Dr. Monfort, for twenty years a 
father in the presbytery, we can not do justice to our feelings with- 
out expressing gratitude to the Head of the church, who has so long 
spared to us his valuable life, labors and counsels. "We shall part 
with him with sincere regret, and our best wishes and prayers shall 
follow him to any new sphere to which he may be called. 

2d, That a copy of this minute be sent with the dismission, prop- 
erly certified. 

3d, That the presbytery sympathize with Dr. Monfort's late 
charge in their destitution, and hope they may be soon supplied by 
a regular pastor, and be eminently prospered by the King of Zion. 

FRANKLIN. 

Judge Banta, in his history of the Franklin church, 
gives succinct statements of the blessed results of this 
long pastorate. He also gives illustrations in his narra- 
tive of facts of the baleful and blighting results of bitter- 
ness, alienations and strifes upon the interests of the 
church, the salvation of souls, and the glory of Christ. 
Such teachings from the history of any of our churches 
ough not to be forgotten. 

In the history of the church of Franklin, alluded to, 
these statements are made : " During the years of Dr. 
Monfort's preaching here, the record shows that two 
hundred and seventy-nine in all united with the church, 
one hundred and forty-nine on profession, and one hun- 
dred and forty-eight on certificate. In 1839, from July 
5 



6b HISTORY OF THE 

21st to 28th, eighteen converts were admitted. From 
this on to 1842, yearly additions both on certificate and 
examination were made, but no special manifestation of 
God's grace appears until January of that year, when 
from the 5th of that month to the 19th of the month fol- 
lowing, thirty-seven were taken into the church on pro- 
fession. This ingathering brought the membership, at 
the date of the presbyterial report, made in April of the 
following year, up to one hundred and eighty-seven. 
But from thence on to 1851, a period of nine years, 
there was a slow but sure decline." " Right here," says 
Judge Banta, " one of the most impressive lessons which 
the history of this church presents may be learned. 
During the years which mark the decline of this church 
under Dr. Monfort's pastorate, a bitter and unrelenting 
personal warfare was waged between certain of the 
members. I know nothing of the merits of this contro- 
versy ; I know not who was right and who was wrong. 
But for an examination of the records, I would not have 
known of any difficulty at all, and I therefore censure 
no man, no party ; I only note the fact of the dissension. 
No doubt during these gloomy years the pastor preached 
with all the clearness that marked his sermons of former 
years; no doubt his appeals were as persuasive and his 
exhortations as eloquent; no doubt sinners felt the ar- 
rows of conviction, but the war within the camp went 
furiously on, and inquirers sought other folds or turned 
their backs on the church forever. All the actors in 
that whirl of strife are dead save one. Their bodies have 
returned to the dust, and their sad difficulties have dis- 
appeared with them. The merits of their controversy 
no one now knows or cares to know. How insignificant 
it must have been, and yet how baleful in its influence 
upon the cause of Christianity. Brethren, let us take 



PBESB YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. 67 

the lesson to our hearts. Forever let us sink out of 
sight and memory every element of controversy, every 
vestige of discord." 

SUPPORT OF THE MINISTRY. 

From the begining, presbytery was clear and decided 
in its teachings, and in the use of its authority as to the 
support of the ministry. In September, 1838, the fol- 
lowing overture was presented : Should not every 
church have one or more deacons regularly elected and 
ordained, to take care of the poor and manage the pe- 
cuniary matters of the church ? This was answered in 
the affirmative, and the churches which had not deacons 
were directed to have that office filled so soon as prac- 
ticable. 

In April, 1839, the following resolutions are passed : 

Resolved, ] st, That presbytery earnestly recommend to the early 
attention of their churches the minute adopted at the last session 
of presbytery as to the election and ordination of deacons. 

Resolved, 2d, That the special and faithful attention of the dea- 
cons be requested to the prompt collection of the pastor's support 
regularly ; and that the members of t^e churches be earnestly so- 
licited both to subscribe sufficient amounts for the comfortable 
support of their pastor or supply, and also to make that subscrip- 
tion available for such purpose by its being regularly paid. 

At this same meeting of presbytery, the churches 
were called upon to report settlement with their pastors 
and supplies. All reported full settlement, except the 
churches of Franklin and Rushville. These were di- 
rected to settle their arrearages, and present the evidence 
of a settlement with their pastors at the next stated 
meeting. 

The following resolution was also passed : 

Resolved, That it be enjoined upon the deacons of our churches 
to report to presbytery, at its regular meetings, the state of the ac- 
counts between congregations and their pastors, the nature and 



68 HISTORY OF THE 

extent of their pecuniary engagements with each other, shewing 
the exact amounts unsettled, together with the general character 
of their respective congregations in meeting all congregational en- 
gagements. The foregoing is charged as an official duty, which 
deacons may not neglect. 

MISSIONARY LABORS OF PRESBYTERY. 

An earnest application was sent to the Board of Mis- 
sions by the commissioner to the General Assembly, in 
1840, that at least one missionary should be sent that 
year to labor within the bounds of the presbytery. 

At the spring meeting of the presbytery in 1841, the 
presbytery was divided into four districts for missionary 
labor. Two ministers were assigned to each district, 
and the duty laid upon them of performing at least two 
weeks missionary labor in their several districts before 
the next stated meeting of presbytery. 

This scheme of labor was afterwards modified, but in 
various ways much missionary labor was done by the 
members of presbytery. 

MEETINGS OF PRESBYTERY. 

The meetings of presbytery were made meetings for 
preaching and holding religious services, and reaching 
the people through them, as well as for the transaction 
of ecclesiastical business. Special topics were assigned 
before hand, and several special discourses were fre- 
quently preached during a meeting of presbytery. Pres- 
byteries met generally on Thursday, and continued in 
session until after the vSabbath. At the second meeting 
of presbytery at Muncie, in August, 1842, which begun 
on Thursday night and continued until after Sabbath, it 
was resolved to hold an intermediate meeting before the 
regular spring meeting. The time fixed for this meet- 
ing was October. It was held with the Lewisville 
church in Rush county, a church whose name was short- 



PRE8B YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. 69 

iy afterward changed to Ebeuezer. The following were 
the appointments for preaching at this intermediate 
meeting : 

W. Sickles, on " Faith." 

D. Monfort, on '' Baptism." 

P. D. Gurlej, on " Prayer." 

R. Irwin, on " Repentance." 

J. G. Monfort, on " The Judgment." 

These intermediate meetings, with preaching upon 
special topics, were held for several years. They doubt- 
less were designed for accomplishing missionary work. 

WHITE WATER PRESBYTERY. 

In 1848, the General Assembly, upon overture from 
the Synod of Indiana, made the line between the States of 
Indiana and Ohio the line between the Synods of Indiana 
and Cincinnati. The Synod of Indiana in session at 
Hanover, October 1848, ordered the formation of the 
Presbytery of White Water, embracing the counties of 
Ohio, Dearborn, Ripley, Decatur, Franklin, Rush, Fay- 
ette, Union and so much of the counties of Henry and 
Wayne as lies south of the National road, or in the Pres- 
bytery of Indianapolis, except the church at Knights- 
town. 

PRESBYTERY OF MUNCIE. 

October, 1848, the Synod of Indiana also ordered the 
organization of the Presbytery of Muncie. In 1849, the 
General Assembly made the National Road the dividing 
line between the Synods ot Indiana and northern Indi- 
ana. By this action, the First church of Indianapolis 
and Rev. P. D. Gurley and Rev. W. A. Ilolliday, were 
transferred to the Presbytery of Muncie, and the Pres- 
bytery of Indianapolis, Old School, was without a church 
in Indianapolis. 



70 HISTORY OF THE 



BLOOMINGTON. 



By order of Synod in October, 1848, Monroe county^ 
with the church of Bloomington, then in the Presbytery 
of New Albany, was added to the Presbytery of Indian- 
apolis. Levi Hughes, pastor elect of the church of 
Bloomington, a licentiate of Presbytery of New Albany, 
was also received. He was ordained and installed pas- 
tor November 3d, 1848. 

OWEN AND PUTNAM COUNTIES. 

The Synod in 1849, further enlarged the presbytery 
by adding to it Owen county, and the part of Putnam 
county south of the National Road with the church of 
Vandalia, and Rev. Thomas Whallon. 



PRESBYTERY Oi INDIANAPOLIS. 71 



CHAPTER VII. 

View of the Field from JReports of Indiana Gazetteer — 
Number of Old and New School Churches and their 
increase in Membership — Progress and Prosperity of the 
country. 

Looking at the field occupied by the present Presby- 
tery of ludianapolis, we find from the imperfect sketches 
of the Indiana Gazetteer, published in 1849, the follow- 
ing statements respecting the occupation of this field 
by other denominations. These statements, combined 
with the United States census reports of 1850, will give 
us a more thorough knowledge of the field and its re- 
ligious condition than we can perhaps otherwise obtain. 
There is no statement made of the churches and ministers 
in Bartholomew county. Its population in 1850 was 
12,486. In Brown count}', "there are six churches, one 
for each of the denominations of Presbyterians, Metho- 
dists, United Brethren, Christian, (or Campbellite) Old 
Christian, (or New Light,) and Baptists." The popula- 
tion was 4,846. In Hancock county there are " twelve 
churches, mostly belonging to the Methodists and Bap- 
tists." There are " five lawyers, fourteen physicians, 
thirteen preachers." The population was 9,686. In 
Hendricks county, " the prevailing religious denomina- 
tions are Methodists, Baptists, Christians, Friends, Pres- 
byterians and Lutherans." There are thirty-six churches 



72 HISTORY OF THE 

and twenty ministers of the Grospel. The lawyers num- 
ber six, and physicians twenty. The population is 14,083. 
In Johnson county there are " twenty-two churches, 
mostly belonging to the Baptists, Methodists and Pres- 
byterians." There are " five lawyers, twenty-one physi- 
cians, twenty-nine preachers." The population was 
12,100. Marion county is described as having " forty 
lawyers, fifty physicians, forty preachers and thirty-six 
churches, of which the Methodists are most numerous, 
then follow Baptists, Christians, Presbyterians, Luther- 
ans, Friends, Episcopalians, Catholics, Seceders, Univer- 
salists, etc." The population of Marion county in 1850, 
was 24,103. Of Morgan county it is said " the religious 
denominations which have erected churches are as fol- 
lows : Cumberland Presbyterians one, Lutherans one, 
Baptists five, Reformers or Christians ten, Friends three, 
Methodists fourteen." There are " seven lawyers, twen- 
ty physicians, thirty preachers." The population was 
14,576. Of Monroe county the chronicler facetiously re- 
marks, there are " nine lawyers, ten physicians, and 
preachers too tedious to mention." No mention is made 
of the churches in the county. There were some 
eight Baptists, nine Christian and twelve Metho- 
dist churches. One Presbyterian, two Cumberland Pres- 
byterian, one Associate, one Associate Reformed, one 
Old Side Covenanter, one New Side Covenanter. The 
population was 11,286. In Putnam county there were 
" twenty-nine Methodist, fifteen Baptist, twelve Chris- 
tian and five Presbyterian churches." The population 
was 18,615. As to the number of ministers reported in 
the Gazetteer, the author in his Introduction says : "It 
may be said that from the number of preachers of the 
gospel represented to be found in the various counties, 
it will be supposed there is much more religious instruc- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 73 

tion given than is actually the case. The quality is per- 
haps the only thing in dispute. A part of it is not in- 
ferior to any other, but a part too, was correctly de- 
scribed by one who, when receiving furs and skins for 
his salary, was asked 'whether it was not poor pay ? ' 
' Yes,' he said, 'but he gave poor preaching in return.'" 

In this field there were, in 1850, twenty-four Presby- 
terian churches ; thirteen New School, eleven Old 
School. In these churches there were eighteen hun- 
dred and fifty-nine members ; nine hundred and twenty- 
five New School, and nin^ hundred and thirty-four Old 
School. In 1838, the membership was one thousand 
and forty-two. In 1850, the increase had become eighty 
per cent. The population had increased from eighty- 
four thousand in 1840, to something more than one 
hundred and twenty thousand in 1850, an increase of 
something less than fifty per cent for that time. 

But the mere increase of population does not mark 
the real progress and prosperity of this region of coun- 
try. The construction of railroads and telegraphs opens 
a new era of activity and enterprise. In 1838, when the 
great division of the Presbyterian Church occurred, Indi- 
anapolis, although the capital of the State, was but a 
good country town with a population of twenty-five 
hundred. In October, 1847, the Madison and Indianap- 
olis railroad was completed and the locomotive first en- 
tered the city. City, Indianapolis had become by vote 
in March, 1847, and in the actual establishment of city 
government in May, 1847. Six months after the rail- 
road reached Indianapolis the telegraph came, and des- 
patches by the wire were first sent as far east as Rich- 
mond May 12, 1848. The population of the city at this 
time was about six thousand. In 1850 it was a little 
more than eight thousand. 



74 HLSTOR Y OF THE 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Indiayiapolis Presbytery, 0. S. — Changes in Churches — Min- 
isterial Changes — State of Religion — Missionary Work — 
Presbyterial Authority — First Church of Indianapolis — 
Second Church of Greencastle — Numbers. 

1850—1860. 

Following on the history for the next tvveuty-iive 
years, of the churches and presbyteries within the 
boundaries of the present presbytery, our limits will for- 
bid anything more than a suggestive outline with a 
statement of results. Within the Presbytery of Indian- 
apolis, O. S., we find the following 

CHANGES IN CHURCHES. 

April, 1852, the organization of the church of Boggs. 
town was reported to presbytery, with a membership of 
thirty-six. 

The Third Church of Indianapolis, having been trans- 
ferred by the General Assembly of 1852, from the Pres- 
bytery of MuDcie to the Presbytery of Indianapolis, was, 
in July, 1852, enrolled among the churches of the pres- 
bytery. This church had been organized September, 
23, 1851, by a committee of Muncie Presbytery. 
Eighteen members from the First Church of Indianapo- 
lis united in its organization. 

, April, 1854, the organization of the church of Donald- 
son, with twent}'-nine members, was reported; also, the 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 75 

organization of the Union church, with fourteen mem- 
bers, and of the Greenwood church, with nine members. 

September, 1854, the organization of a church at Ed- 
inburg, with twenty members, was reported. 

September, 1855, the organization of a church at 
Greenfield, with eighteen members, was reported. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

April, 1851, the pastoral relation between Levi Hughes 
and the church at Bloomington was dissolved, and Mr. 
Hughes dismissed to the Presbytery of Logansport to ac- 
cept the call of the First Church of Logansport. 

April, 1851, II. I. Coe was dismissed to the Presby- 
tery of Muncie. 

James Gallatin was dismissed at the same time to the 
Presbytery of Cedar, Iowa. 

April, 1851, J. A. McKee was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Madison. In the following June he was in- 
stalled pastor at Franklin. April, 1860, this pastoral 
relation was dissolved, on account of the failing health 
of the pastor's wife and the necessity of a change of 
climate. In October, 1860, Mr. McKee was dismissed 
to the Presbytery of St. Paul. 

April, 1851, David Stevenson, a licentiate, was re- 
ceived from the Presbytery of Elizabethtown. He was 
ordained June, 1851. July, 1852, he was installed pastor 
of the Third Church, of Indianapolis. October, 1860, 
this pastorial relation was dissolved on account of the 
failing health of the pastor. 

June, 1851, J. C. Caldwell, a licentiate, was received 
from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville, and ordained 
and installed at Shelby ville. He was released from his 
pastoral charge September, 1856, and dismissed to the 
Presbytery of St. Paul, April, 1857. 

June, 1851, H. L. Vannuys was licensed, and April, 



76 HISTORY OF THE 

1853, dismissed to put himself uuder the care of the 
Presbytery of Lake. 

June, 1851, R. M. Overstreet was licensed, ordained in 
September, 1851, and after laboring in the church of 
Georgetown and elsewhere in the missionary work of 
the presbytery, was dismissed in October, 1852, to the 
Presbytery of Palestine. 

July, 1852, C. G. McLain, D. D., was received from 
the Classis of Montgomery, New York. Dr. McLain es- 
tablished in Indianapolis a large and flourishing school 
for young ladies, under the name of the McLain Sem- 
inary. He died in 1860. 

July, 1S52, Thomas Alexander was received from the 
Presbytery of Crawfordsville. He was stated supply of 
the church in Bloomington. September, 1854, he was 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Brazos, Texas. 

July, 1852, Orlando Clark was licensed. September, 
1857, he was dismissed to put himself under the care of 
the Presbytery of Miami. 

October, 1852, E. K. Lynn was received from the 
Presbytery of New Albany. He was installed at Hope- 
well in the succeeding November. He was released 
from his pastoral charge in April, 1853, and dismissed 
September, 1854, to the Presbytery of Palestine. 

April, 1853, Alfred Ryors, D. D., was received from 
the Presbytery of Hocking. Dr. Ryors was president 
of the State University at Bloomington. He was dis- 
missed to the Presbytery of Madison April, 1854. 

September, 1853, J. L. Martin was received from the 
Presbytery of Louisville. He labored in the churches 
of Georgetown and Shiloh for a time, and was dismissed 
to the Presbytery of Vincennes April, 1855. 

December, 1853, David Monfort, a licentiate, was re- 
ceived from the Presbytery of White Water, ordained 



PBESBYTEBY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 77 

and installed at Knightstown. He was released from 
this pastoral charge April, 1858, and in September fol- 
lowing dismissed to the Presbytery of White Water. 

April, 1855, F. H. L. Laird was received from the 
Presbytery of New Albany. He was stated supply at 
Bloomington for a year, and dismissed to the Presbytery 
of Potosi October, 1856. 

April, 1855, A. C. Allen was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Crawfordsville, and installed at Hopewell. 
The pastoral relation was dissolved July, 1859. 

September, 1856, Wm. Sickles was received from the 
Presbytery of Madison. 

April, 1857, Lowman Hawes was received from the 
Presbytery of Milwaukee. He was installed at Bloom- 
ington in May following. November, 1857, he was re- 
leased, and dismissed to the Presbytery of Madison, to 
accept the call of the First Church of Madison. 

April, 1857, Blackburn Leffler was received from the 
Presbytery of Sangamon. He was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Vincennes April, 1859. 

April, 1858, John Gilchrist was received from the 
Presbytery of White Water. He was installed over the 
church of Sugar Creek June, 1858, for one-half his 
time. 

June, 1858, E. C. Sickles was licensed, and dismissed 
to put himself under the care of the Presbytery of St. 
Louis. 

April, 1859, L. G. Hay was received from the Presby- 
tery of Allahabad, India. 

J. J. Smythe was received at the same time from the 
Presbytery of Orange. After serving the church at 
Shelbyville until November, 1860, he was then installed 
its pastor. 

April, 1859, T. M. Hopkins, was received from the 



78 HISTOR Y OF THE 

Presbytery of Miami. He was called to the pastorate 
of the church at Bloomins^ton. After several failures 
of committees appointed by presbytery for the installa- 
tion services, he was finally installed in October, 1860. 
April, 1860, J. F. Smith was received from the Pres- 
bytery of White Water. November, 1860, he was in- 
stalled pastor of the church of Hopewell. 

STATE OF RELIGION. 

In September, 1851, mention is made in the records 
of presbytery of a deplorably low state of religion in ' 
most of the churches. Because of this low state of 
religion, a day of fasting and prayer was appointed. 
At the following spring meeting, this record is made : 
" In view of the statements made by brethren, in their 
conversation on the state of religion in our bounds, of 
the gracious dealings of the Lord among us, it was 
moved that we spend a short season in thanksgiving to 
God for what he had done for our churches, beseech- 
ing him at the same time for greater blessings." In 
September, 1855, record is again made of a very low 
state of religion in the churches of presbytery. April, 
1858, mention is made of greatly increased religious in- 
terest, and of large accessions to some of the churches. 

The Third church of Indianapolis had steadily grown 
from its original membership of eighteen in 1851, until 
in 1860, it reported a membership of one hundred and 
eighty-two. 

The largest church in the presbytery, was the Hope- 
well church, which reported two hundred and sixty-six 
members. 

MISSIONARY WORK. 

During this decade, the presbytery for several succes- 
sive years sought for an intinerant missionary to sup- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 79 

ply the vacancies. Not succeeding in this, the mem- 
bers of presbytery, with great diligence and zeal, labored 
among their destitute churches and fields. 

PKESBYTERIAL AUTHORITY. 

Nor was the presbytery lacking in the exercise of its 
control over the churches, when in its judgment such 
control was demanded. In April, 1857, Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Kee applied for a dissolution of the pastoral relation be- 
tween himself and the church at Franklin. After hear- 
ing the parties, presbytery took the following action : 

Resolved, 1st, That the request be not granted. 

Resolved, 2d, That the church at Franklin be recommended to 
strengthen their session by the accession of two or more elders. 

Resolved, 3d, That the session be directed to discipline any mem- 
ber of said church who shall continue to pursue a course calculated 
in their judgment to be divisive or destructive to the peace, unity 
and purity of the church in Franklin. 

Resolved, 4th, That a committee of three be appointed with ad- 
visory power to aid the session in carrying out this action, and that 
the chairman of said committee be directed to make known this 
action to the church on next Sabbath. 

And not only did presbytery resolve, but at its fall ses- 
sion, upon report of the committee it had appointed, it 
proceeded to discipline. The benefits of this mainten- 
ance of the order and discipline of the church by the 
presbytery, are manifest from the concluding paragraph 
of a page of Judge Banta's history of the church of 
Franklin. He thus speaks of Mr. McKee's labors : 
" The year following Rev. Mr. McKee's entry upon his 
labors here, the membership of the church went down 
to one hundred and fifteen — twenty-nine members hav- 
ing been dismissed, and seven having died. Bat in 
1852, the gains began to exceed the losses, and with the 
exception of two years, this has been the case ever since. 
In that year a refreshing revival came to bless the la- 



80 HISTORY OF THE 

bors of the new pastor. The good work seems to have 
commenced in the last of February, and it continued up 
to the middle of April, during which interval forty per- 
sons in all were added on profession of their faith. In 
the spring of the succeeding year, another shower came, 
and twenty-five converts were added, which, with the 
addition of those who joined on certificate, brought the 
membership up to one hundred and eighty six, the high- 
est number then ever reached. In 1854, the number 
was carried up to one hundred and ninety-four, but this in- 
crease was mostly due to the admissions on certificate. 
It is evident to one who peruses the records of this 
date, that a church trouble is again brewing. What the 
cause was, I am sure I don't know. All I can say is, 
that in 1854, only five converts were added; in 1855, no^ 
o?ie, in 1856, three, and in ISbl , not one ! Other work 
seems to have required the attention of the people du- 
ring these gloomy years. The younger members of the 
congregation appear to have been seized about this time 
with a mania for dancing, while the older brethren had 
more serious business of their own on hand. A temp- 
est had arisen — a controversy was up — a first class 
church quarrel was on the carpet, and while the breth- 
ren were cutting and threshing this way and that way 
at each other, no recruits ventured to come from the en- 
emy without. How eloquently do these mute figures 
plead ^or peace within the church ! " 

The paragraph of Judge Banta's history immediately 
succeeding to these statements, is that which shows the 
benefits of the watchful care of the presbytery and its 
maintenance of the order and discipline of the church. 
" In 18o8," continues this historian of the Franklin 
church, " the smoke of this conflict having disappeared, 
God smiled again upon the labors of Mr. McKee, and 



PRESBYTEBY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 81 

in February, Marcli and April of that year, fifty-eight 
were added on examination." 

FIRST CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

The'Rev. John A. McClung, D.D., of Maysville, Ken- 
tucky, was installed as pastor of this church December 
31, 1851. This relation continued until dissolved, Sep- 
tember, 1855, on account of ill health of the pastor. 
The Rev. Thomas M. Cunningham, of St. Louis, was 
called as pastor December 12, 1856, and continued until 
May, 1860. The membership of the church reported in 
1860 was two hundred and thirteen. 

SECOND CHURCH OF GREENCASTLE. 

This church was ministered to by Rev. J. M. Mc- 
Chord for about four years after its organization. He 
was succeeded by Rev. E. W. Fiske, who began his 
ministry with the church in 1854. It reported, in 1860, 
one hundred and ten members. 

NUMBERS. 

In 1860 the presbyter}^ consisted of eleven ministers 
and sixteen churches, containing fourteen hundred and 
forty-one members. Fourteen of these churches, and 
eleven hundred and ninety members were within the 
boundaries of the present Presbytery of Indianapolis. 
In connection with the Old School body, there were also 
several other churches of Muncie and Crawfordsville 
Presbyteries, besides the First Church of Indianapolis 
and Second Church of Greencastle, which are now 
within the boundaries of the present Presbytery of Indi- 
anapolis. These were New Hope, Carpentersville and 
Clermont. There was also a German church in Indi- 
6 



82 HISTORY OF THE 

anapolis, which, after appearing for a series of years 
in the reports of Muncie Presbytery, disappears. The 
total of the membership of the Old School churches is 
one thousand seven hundred and forty. 



PRESBYTER V OF INDIANAPOLIS. * 83 



CHAPTER IX. 

Indianapolis Presbytery, N. S. — New Churches — Second 
Church of Indianayolis — Fourth Church of Indianapolis 
— Greenwood — Miyiisterial Changes — Missionary Work — 
Danville, White Lick, Greencastle, Putnamville, Bain- 
bridge, Bloomington, Columbus. 

1851—1860. 

April, 1851, the organization of the Second Church of 
Franklin, with a membership of twenty two, was re- 
ported to presbytery. 

In the spring of 1851, because of the blessing of God 
upon the labors of C. E. Babb, pastor of the Second 
Church of Indianapolis, the church edifice became too 
small for the congregation, and it became a question 
with the church whether to enlarge their building or to 
colonize and form another church. The pastor advised 
the latter. In presbytery, which convened September 
4, 1851, Mr. Babb reported that there was great need of 
another church in Indianapolis, and that efforts were 
being made to organize another church. In conse- 
quence of this report presbytery passed the following 
resolution : 

That we resi^ectfully recommend to the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Indianapolis, to take into consideration the propriety 
and importance of forming another chvirch of our order in that city ; 
and, that if they should embark in such an enterprise, they shall 
have our sympathy and co-operation. 



84 . HISIORY OF THE 

After a full interchange of opinion, September 30, 
1851, the session of the Second Church resolved that it 
was desirable and practicable to form a colony and or- 
ganize another Presbyterian church. On the 30th of 
November, 1851, twenty-four persons, dismissed from the 
Second Church, were organized into the Fourth Presby- 
terian Church of Indianapolis. 

September, 1857, the organization of the church at 
Zionsville, with six members and one elder, was reported 
to presbytery. 

April, 1860, the Second Presbyterian Church of Madi- 
son county, with ten members, was reported to presby- 
tery. 

SECOND CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

On account of failing health, the Rev. C. E. Babb was 
released from pastoral care of this church January 3], 

1853. April, 1854, he was dismissed to the Presbytery 
of Cincinnati. 

The church remained vacant a full year. January 1, 

1854, Rev. Thornton A. Mills, to whom a call had been 
extended by the; church the previous October, entered 
upon the duties of the pastorate. He was received from 
the Presbytery of Cincinnati, and installed February, 
1854. Under the ministry of Dr. Mills the church 
steadily grew, although there were no seasons of revival. 
February, 1857, Dr. Mills was released from pastoral 
charge of the church, to enter upon the duties of Secre- 
tary of the General Assembly's Committee on Education, 
to which he had been elected towards the close of the 
year 1856. August, 1857, the church gave a call to the 
Rev. George P. Tindall. Having accepted the call, he 
was received by the presbytery from the Presbytery of 
Dayton, October, 1857, but was not installed until June, 
1859. The year 1858 was a year of revival throughout 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 85 

the land. The Second Church, from April, 1858, to 
April, 1859, received to its membership fifty-three on 
profession of faith and sixteen by letter. The member- 
ship reported in 1860 was one hundred and ninety-five. 

FOURTH CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

The Fourth Church in the beginning of 1852, secured 
for its minister the Rev. George M. Maxwell. He was 
received from the Presbytery of Franklin, August, 1852. 
He first served the church as stated supply. He became 
pastor elect April, 1854, and was installed February? 
1856. On account of failing health, he was released 
from his pastoral charge, December, 1858, and dismissed 
to the Presbytery of Cincinnati April, 1860. 

During the ministry of Mr. Maxwell in the Fourth 
Church, after nearly six years of struggle, the church 
dedicated its first house of worship at the corner of Del- 
aware and Market streets. Its membership, at that 
time, had increased to one hundred and fifteen. In the 
spring of 1858 a large accession was reported of thirty- 
three by profession and twenty by letter. 

October, 1859, A. L. Brooks was called to the church. 
He entered upon his labors immediately, and was re- 
ceived by the presbytery from the Presbytery of Chicago, 
April, 1860. The church reported in April, 1860, only 
eighty-five members. 

GREENWOOD. 

The pastor of the Greenwood church, P. S. Cleland, 
continued steadily on in his labors through this decade 
in the history of the presbytery, and the second decade 
of his labors with the Greenwood church. September 
17, 1853, the third house of worship erected by the con- 
gregation, was dedicated to the worship of God. The 
year 1853 was marked by a season of special religious 



86 HISTORY OF THE 

interest. There was also a revival in 1856, resulting in 
larger additions to the church than at any other time 
during the ministry of Mr. Cleland. Twenty-eight per- 
sons were received upon profession of their faith. In 
1860, there was reported a membership of one hundred 
and twenty-six. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

To those already mentioned as occurring in this peri- 
od of the history of the presbytery, the following are to 
be added : 

April, 1851, E. Scofield was received from the Presby- 
tery of Cincinnati. He was at different times supply 'of 
the Highland and Second Franklin churches; also of 
Pendleton, Anderson and Greenfield. These were all 
missionary churches, with a membership of three, in the 
smallest reported, Pendleton, and of twenty-three in the 
largest. Highland. Mr. Scofield was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Hamilton, September, 1853. September, 
1858, he was again received from the Presbytery of 
Hamilton, and ministered to the church at Anderson. 

April, 1851, Mr. Nyce was dismissed to Felicity Pres- 
bytery. 

September, 1851, J. Fairchild was received from the 
Presbytery of Crawfordsville. His labors were first in 
Hancock county. He afterwards was supply of the 
Highland and Second Franklin churches. September 
1856, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of Ft. Wayne. 

August, 1852, John Stewart was received from the 
Presbytery of Lexington. April, 1853, he was dismissed 
to the Presbytery of Madison. 

April, 1853, W. A. McCampbell was received from 
the Presbytery of Green River. He became stated sup- 
ply of New Providence or Southport. He was permit- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLRS. 87 

ted to labor in his new field but a few months. He was 
removed by death, August, 1853. 

April, 1853, J. Brownlee was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Madison. He was installed pastor of the 
church at Connersville, June, 1853. April, 1855, he was 
released from the pastoral care of the church. Septem- 
ber, 1859, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of Kan- 
sas, having previously labored for some time without 
the bounds of the presbytery. 

September, 1853, B. F. Cole was released from the 
pastoral care of the churches of Thorutowu and Bethel, 
and dismissed to the Presbytery of Pataskala. 

September, 1854, W. R. Stevens was received from the 
Presbytery of Trumbull. He became supply of Thorn- 
town and Bethel. September, 1856, he was dismissed to 
the Association of Minnesota. 

April, 1855, W. H. Rogers was dismissed to the Pres- 
bytery of Salem. His principal lield of labor in the 
presbytery had been Noblesville. 

April, 1855, S. E. Wishard was licensed. April, 1857, 
he was dismissed to put himself under the care of the 
Presbytery of Schuyler. 

September, 1855, A. S. Avery was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Alton. He had been for several years 
without a charge. 

September, 1855, W. A. McCorkle was received from 
the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. April, 1856, he was 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Fox River. 

April, 1856, Philander Anderson was received from 
the Presbytery of Fort Wayne. He remained in the 
presbytery without charge. 

September, 1856, E. B. Smith was received from the 
Presbytery of Harmony. He supplied the church of 



»» HISTORY OF THE 

Connersville, and September, 1857, was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Clinton. 

September, 1856, George H. White, a licentiate of 
Fourth Hartford Association, was received. He was or- 
dained an evangelist November, 1856, and went as a 
missionary to Turkey under appointment from the 
American Board of Foreign Missions. 

October, 1857, Franklin Putnam was received from 
the Presbytery of Dayton. He became stated supply of 
Thorntown and Bethel. While engaged in this field, he 
was removed by death in the summer of 1859, and so 
ceasing from labor entered into heavenly rest. 

September, 1858, J. O. Blythe was received from an 
Independent church of Philadelphia. September, 1860, 
he was dismissed to the Third Presbytery of Philadel- 
phia. 

September, 1859, D. A. Bassett was received from the 
Presbytery of Madison. He became stated supply of the 
church at Connersville. 

September, 1860, W. N. Stimson was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Greencastle. He had been for several 
years without charge, but for several years before supply 
of New Pisgah and Sugar Creek. 

September, 1860^ Isaac De La Mater was received 
from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. He became 
stated supply of Thorntown and Bethel. 

MISSIONARY WORK. 

Presbytery labored faithfully to supply the vacancies 
and destitutions of their field. Strenuous exertions were 
made to supply vacant churches with the stated ministry 
of the word at least a portion of the time. The mis- 
sionaries of the presbytery generally had in charge sev- 
eral small churches. The larger part of the funds for 
the prosecution of the missionary work within the 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 89 

bounds of the presbytery, was raised within the presby- 
tery. The balance was supplied through the American 
Home Missionary Society. 

The salaries paid the missionaries were but meagre, 
while their hardships were many. One received two hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars a year ; one hundred from 
the Home Missionar}^ Society, and one hundred and 
seventy-five from two churches. Another missionary- 
had a salary promised of three hundred and seventy -five 
dollars ; one hundred and seventy-five from the Home 
Missionary Society, two hundred from two churches. 
Of this two hundred promised, the churches would fall 
short fifty dollars. Another brother had five hun- 
dred a year, paid to him quarterly by a member of the 
Second Church. Had this good brother of the Second 
Church continued to be responsible for a series of years 
for that necessary support of a missionary, which the 
field itself could not be made to yield, doubtless the re- 
gion occupied instead of continuing a moral and spirit- 
ual wilderness to so large an extent as it is at the present 
time, would have been like a garden of the Lord. 

But while missionaries were thus laboring on scanty 
stipends, city ministers received but eight hundred dol- 
lars a year. This, however, was paid quarterly, not as 
it happened, and all paid, and not simply a considerable 
portion of it. 

In 1859 the Synod of Indiana transferred the church 
of Laurel Hill and the county of Franklin from the 
Presbytery of Madison to the Presbytery of Indianapo- 
lis. The church of Laurel Hill was a feeble church of 
ten members, and this transfer of the synod only 
widened the missionary ground of the synod. 

DANVILLE. 

In Danville, Hendricks county. Presbytery of Green- 



90 HISTORY OF THE 

castle, the Rev. Amos Jones continued his ministry until 
March, 1853. He was succeeded by Rev. B. F. Cole, 
who labored in the church for three years. The sum- 
mer after the departure of Mr. Cole, Rev. S. E. "Wishard 
ministered to the church. Rev. H. L. Dickerson became 
supply of the church in the fall of -1857. A new church 
building was dedicated in December, 1858. March 31, 
1860, Mr. Dickerson was called to the pastorate of the 
church. The membership reported in 1860 was one 
hundred and seven. 

WHITE LICK. 

The church of White Lick, which was organized from 
members of the Danville church, first appears on the 
roll of presbytery in 1854. Its membership increased 
from twelve in 1854, to thirty-eight in 1860. 

GKEENCASTLE. 

The first church of Greencastle was ministered to by 
Rev. T. M. Oviatt, from 1851 to 1855. He was succeed- 
ed by Rev. Henry Rossiter. In 1860, the membership 
reported was one hundred and six. 

PUTNAMVILLE AND BAINBRIDGE. 

Putnamville was ministered to by Rev. Ransom Haw- 
ley one-fourth of his time. It enjoyed a season of revi- 
val in 1852. Its membership in 1860 was forty. 

The Bainbridge church, which was in connection with 
the Crawfordsville Presbytery, N. S., reported in 1860 a 
membership of eighty-nine. 

BLOOMINGTON. 

In June, 1852, a Presbyterian church, New School, 
was organized, with eleven members, in Bloomington. 
This church was in connection with the Presbytery of 
Salem. It was ministered to statedly, by Rev. John M. 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 91 

Bishop, a portion of his time. After 1854, Professor 
Elisha Ballantine, of the State University, supplied it 
for several years upon the alternate Sahbaths, upon 
which Mr. Bishop v^as absent. The membership re- 
ported in 1860 was seventy-seven. 

COLUMBUS. 

The church of Columbus, in connection with the 
Madison Presbytery, N. S., was supplied from 1850 to 
1853 by Rev. J. Brownlee. In June, 1853, the Rev. N. 
S. Dickey became its stated supply. It reported in 1860 
a membership of one hundred and twenty-nine. 



92 \HISTORY OF THE 



CHAPTER X. 

Numbers — Census Report of the Statistics of the different 
Denominations in the field occupied by the Presbytery. 

In the Presbytery of Indianapolis, JST. S., there were, 
in 1860, twelve ministers, eighteen churches, and eight 
hundred and three members. Of these eighteen churches, 
only nine were within the boundaries of the present 
Presbytery of Indianapolis. Of these nine churches, 
five were small, aggregating only sixty-seven members. 
The other four churches contained a membership of four 
hundred and fifty-seven. The membership of the nine 
churches was five hundred and four. In the seven other 
New School churches that were within the bounds of 
the present Presbytery of Indianapolis, there was a 
membership of five hundred and eighty six, making a 
total membership in the New School churches of eleven 
hundred and ten. 

This number, added to the seventeen hundred and 
forty of the Old School churches, would make the mem- 
bership of the Presbyterian churches within the boun- 
daries of the present presbytery to have been, in 1860, 
two thousand eight hundred and fifty. 

This is not so rapid an increase of the members of 
the Presbyterian church upon this field as in the prece- 
ding ten years of its history. It is only an increase of 
little more than fifty per cent., while the increase of the 
preceding decade was eighty per cent. But the rate of 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 



93 



increase is greater than that of the population. The 
population of the counties within the presbytery in- 
creased from a little more than a hundred and twenty 
thousand (121,736) to something over a hundred and 
fifty-eight thousand (158,853), an increase of little more 
than thirty-three per cent. In 1850, the proportion of 
the membership of the Presbyterian church in the field 
of the presbytery was about one to sixty-five of the 
population. In 1860, the proportion is one to fifty-five. 

CENSUS REPOET. 

The United States census report of 1860, more com- 
plete and accurate than that of 1870, gives the following 
religious statistics of the field occupied by the presby- 
tery : 

Bartholomew county, with a population of 17,865, 
has — 

3 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $1 ,450. 



9 Baptist 
6 Christian 
1 Friends' 
4 Lutheran 
1 Moravian 
25 Methodist 



7,750. 
7,650. 
1,200. 
1,900. 
3,500. 
17,800. 



Brown count}'^, with a population of 6,504, has — 

1 Presbyterian church, with property valued at $400. 
9 Baptist " " " " " 600. 
3 Christian " " " " " 420. 
6 Methodist " " " " " 2,450. 
Hancock county, with a population of 12,802, has — 

2 Christian churches, with property valued at $3,700. 



2 Baptist 


" 


800. 


6 Lutheran " 


" 


" 3,750. 


14 Methodist 


" 


" 8,000. 


3 Union " 


" 


" 1,054. 


1 Presbyterian " 


no property. 





94 HISTORY OF THE 

Hendricks county, with a population of 16,953, has- 

4 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $10,000. 
11 Baptist " " " " " 4,750. 

9 Christian " " " " " 6,400. 

4 Friends' " " " " " 14,000. 

11 Methodist " " " " " 3.700. 

Johnson county, with a population of 14,854, has — 

9 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $15,450. 
16 Baptist " " " " " 10,375. 

11 Christian " " " " " 8,300. 
18 Methodist " " " " " 10,125. 

1 Roman Catholic " " " " " 400. 

Marion county, with a population of 39,855, has — 
9 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $92,960. 

" 31,200. 

" 4,600. 

" 8,000. 

" 27,000. 

" 6,500. 
800. 

" 100,905. 

" 19,000. 
Monroe county, with a population of 12,847, has — 

2 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $10,500. 
9 Baptist " " " " " 3,500. 

10 Christian " " " " " 5,000. 

13 Methodist " " " " " 14,100. 

1 Cumb'rl'nd Pr. " " ' " " " 800. 

2 Reformed Pr. " ' " 2,000. 

2 United Pr. " " " " " 3,200. 

Morgan county, with a population of 16,110, has — 

26 Methodist churches, with property valued at $23,800. 

4 Baptist " " " " " 11,800. 

12 Christian " " " " " 11,800. 
2 Episcopal " " " " " 800. 
6 Friends' " " " " " 6,100. 
1 Cumb'rl'nd Pr. " " " ' " 1,000. 
1 Rom'n Catholic " " " " " 300. 



10 Baptist 
3 Christian 
1 Congregational 
1 Episcopalian 
5 Friends' 

1 Lutheran 
32 Methodist 

2 Roman Catholic 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. ^ t> 

Putnam county, with a population of 20,681, has — 
8 Presbyterian churches, with property valued at $18,700. 

18 Baptist " " " " " 11,690. 

14 Christian " " " " " 14,700. 

27 Methodist " " " " " 42,350. 

2 Cumb'rl'nd Pr. '' " " " " 3,200. 

The term churches, denoting particular organizations 
or congregations, gives no definite information concern- 
ing the strong or weak, the prosperous or declining con- 
dition of particular organizations. Yet the term church, 
denoting an individual congregation, has definite ideas 
of organization, of life, of power, of influence, connected 
with it. And in the absence of more complete know- 
ledge, the United States census report of the number of 
the churches of the difl:erent denominations in the field 
occupied by our presbytery, and especially in connection 
with the value of the property possessed by these 
churches, gives us much valuable information and per- 
haps clearer and more accurate knowledge of the whole 
field than can otherwise be obtained by us. 



96 HISTORY OF THE 



CHAPTER XI. 

Indianapolis Presbytery, N. S. — Greenfield Church — Kings- 
tori and Clarksburg — Ediyiburg — Sixth Church of Indi- 
anapolis — Shelby oille — Ministerial Changes — Progress — 
Reunion — Adjournment sine die — Hendricks County — 
Putnam County — Bloomington — Columbus— Numbers. 

1861—1870. 

Renewing our history of the Presbytery of Indianap- 
olis, New School, we will find it in the progress of the 
next ten years growing in numbers, strength and 
efiiciency. 

February, 1861, it received the church of Greenfield, 
which was at the time in connection with the Old 
School Presbytery of Indianapolis. It also received J. 
T. Iddings, a licentiate of the Presbytery of Kaskaskias, 
0. S., and installed him pastor of the Greenfield church. 
But at the next meeting of presbytery, in April, citations 
were issued for the trial of Mr. Iddings, for forgery of 
the certificate of licensure, upon which he had been re- 
ceived into the presbytery. After long and wearisome 
trials before presbytery, and in synod, he was found 
guilty and deposed from the ministry. The church of 
Greenfield was visited by committees of presbytery at 
various times, but had become alienated from the pres- 
bytery, and in the spring of 1866 reunited with the Old 
School Presbytery. 



PRESS YTEB Y OF INDIA NAP LIS. 9 7 

May, 1863, the Second Church of Franklin was dis- 
solved, and the stated clerk directed to furnish the re- 
maining members with letters to unite with such 
branches of the church of Christ as they might elect. 

April, 1864, the churches of Kingston (formerly Sand 
Creek) and Clarksburg were received into the presbytery. 
They had left the presbytery years before, because the 
General Assembly had not taken such action upon the 
subject of slavery as they thought should be taken. They 
had united with the Felicity Presbytery of the Free Pres- 
byterian Church. The civil war and emancipation procla- 
mation of the President of the United States, by which 
the system of slavery was destroyed, took away the 
standing place and removed the necessity of the exist- 
ence of a Free Presbyterian Church, and these churches 
now returned to the old fold with a largely increased 
membership. 

September, 1864, the reorganization of a church at 
Edinburg was reported to presbytery. 

The Sixth Church of Indianapolis, called Olivet at the 
time of its organization, was established by the Second 
Church. In June, 1867, a committee was appointed by 
the Second Church to buy lots and build a chapel in the 
south-western part of the city. A site was selected at 
the corner of Union and McCarty streets. A building 
was begun in September. In October it was completed. 
The 20th of November a church was organized with 
twenty-one members. It was reported to presbytery 
April, 1868. In the spring of 1870 it reported one hun- 
dred and eleven members. 

April, 1861, presbytery received under its care the 
First German Church of Shelbyville, with one hundred 
and twenty-five members. 
7 



98 HISTORY OF THE 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

August, 1861, L. P. Webber, a licentiate of Dayton 
Presbytery, was received and employed as presbyteriai 
missionary. November, 1861, he was ordained. Sep- 
tember, 1863, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of San 
Jose. 

October, 1861, John IS. Craig and John B. Logan, 
members of the Presbytery of Holston, Tennessee, un- 
able to get their letters from their presbytery on account 
of the war, were received without them. 

Anderson was for a series of years the scene of the 
labors of J. S. Craig ; afterwards Noblesville. J. B. 
Logan, as stated supply and home missionary, occupied 
various fields. 

April, 1862, A. L. Brooks, stated supply of the Fourth 
Church of Indianapolis, and D. A. Bassett, stated sup- 
ply of the church of Connersville, were dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Chicago. 

May. 1863, A. A. Jimeson was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Dayton. He was pastor elect of the church 
at Connersville. April, 1865, he was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Sciota. 

May, 1863, A. T. Rankin was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Ripley. He was stated supply of the Kingston 
and Clarksburg churches. 

September, 1863, C. H. Marshall was received from 
the South Congregational Association of Illinois. He 
was stated supply of the Fourth Church of Indianapolis. 

September, 1863, T. A. Steele was received from Salem 
Presbytery. He labored as home missionary for one 
year, and was dismissed September, 1864, to Salem 
Presbytery. 

September, 1863, G. P. Tindall was released from the 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 99 

pastoral care of the Second Church of Indianapolis, and 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Washtenaw. 

September, 1864, H. A. Edson was received from the 
Presbytery of Niagara. He was called to the pastorate 
of the Second Church of Indianapolis November 5, 1863 ; 
began his ministry in the Second Church January 17, 
1864, and was installed April 26, 1865. 

April, 1865, Joseph Swindt was licensed. He was or- 
dained June, 1866, and dismissed to Ripley Presbytery 
September, 1866. 

March, 1866, W. L. S. Clark was received without 
credentials. He had been laboring for some months 
under direction of the Committee on Home Missions. 
September, 1867, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of 
St. Louis. 

September, 1866, Isaac De La Mater was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Hamilton. He had labored for several 
years as stated supply of the church at Thorntown, and in 
1863 was commissioned chaphiin of the seventy-second 
regiment of Indiana volunteers. 

December, 1866, the pastoral relation of P. S. Cleland 
and the church at Greenwood was dissolved, after a 
ministry of twenty-six years, ten as stated supply and 
sixteen as pastor. The reason for the dissolution of the 
pastoral relation urged by Mr. Cleland was impaired 
health, that, made it perilous for him to continue his 
pastoral labors, and impossible for him to discharge the 
duties of pastor. Mr. Cleland, who had become stated 
clerk of presbytery in 1859, continued to discharge the 
duties of stated clerk until April, 1869. In September, 
1869, after laboring thirty years within the bounds of 
the presbytery, his labors at Greenwood antedating the 
organization of the presbytery, he was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of Smoky Hill, Kansas. 



100 HISTORY OF THE 

April, 1867, Alexander Parker was received from the 
Presbytery of Madison, He was stated supply of the 
church at Connersville. 

April, 1867, George D. Parker was licensed. He was 
ordained October, 1867, labored at Edinburg, and was 
dismissed to Vincennes September, 1869. 

April, 1867, Thomas G. Bartholomew was licensed, 
ordained April, 1869, and dismissed to the Presbytery of 
Lansing April, 1870. 

September, 1867, Horace Bushnell, Jr., was received 
from the Presbytery of Madison, and became stated sup- 
ply of the Southport church. 

April, 1868, J. B. Brandt was received from the Pres- 
byter}^ of Wabash. His first work was in connection 
with the Sixth church of Indianapolis 

Rufus Nutting, Jr., was received at tlie same time 
from the Presbytery of Illinois, and G. H. White dis- 
missed to Windsor Association, Vermont. 

April, 1868, Alexander Keid was received from the 
Presbytery of Madison, and installed pastor of the 
church at Anderson. 

April, 1868, Frederick F. Friedgen was received from 
the Presbytery of Madison. He was stated supply of 
the First German Church of Shelbyville. 

December, 1868, Luman A. Aklrich was received from 
the Presbyter}^ of Cincinnati, and installed pastor of 
the Sixth Cliurch of Indianapolis. 

September, 1869, II. L. Dickerson was received from 
the Presbytery of Greencastle. He became stuted sup- 
ply of the church at Edinburg. 

July 2, 1870, J. H. Eschmeier was received from the 
Indiana Classis of the German Reformed Church, and 
installed pastor of the First German Church of Shelby- 
ville. 



PRESBYTERY Ot INDIA XAPOLIS. 101 



September 0, 1866, Claiborne Young, one of tlie oldest 
members of tlie presbytery, died at liis own residence in 
Boone county, at the age of sixty-six. 

June 19, 1867, Tbornton A. Mills, D. D., Secretary of 
the General Assembly's Committee on Education, fell 
dead from a stroke of apoplexy as he was stepping from 
the ferryboat at Hoboken, ISTew Jersey. So, absent 
from the body, he entered into the presence of the Lord. 

PROGRESS. 

During this period of ten years, the years 1866, 1867 
and 1870 were marked with the greatest increase to the 
churches. The narrative for 1866 says: "We desire 
to express our gratitude to God for the increased pros- 
perit}' of many of our churches since the last report to 
presbytery. The influence of the numerous revivals du- 
ring the last winter is apparent in the large and atten- 
tive congregations, the earnest prayer meetings, and the 
growing Sabbath schools, of which not a few are able to 
speak." 'The revivals of 1868 prevailed in a larger num- 
ber of the churches, and resulted in large additions. In 
1870, two of the churches of the presbytery were blessed 
with very large additions. The church of Kingston re- 
ceived one hundred and twenty-two upon profession of 
faith ; the Second Church of Indianapolis one hundred 
and twenty -six. 

During this period, the Second Church of Indianapo- 
lis began and completed its second house of worship. 
Ground was broken for the structure at the corner of 
Pennsylvania and Vermont streets in the spring of 1864. 
The corner-stone was laid May 14, 1866 ; the chapel was 
first occupied December 22, 1867, and the completed ed- 
ifice w^as dedicated January 9, 1870. The entire cost of 



102 HISTORY OF THE 

the property was about one hundred and five thousand 
dollars. 

REUNION. 

The first mention made of reunion in the records of 
presbytery is in April, 1865. Then, Rev. Wm. Phelau 
is present as a delegate from White "Water Presbytery, 
and presents to the presbytery a series of resolutions 
from the White Water Presbytery on the subject of the 
reunion of the two branches of the Presbyterian church. 
The following resolutions were passed b}^ the presbytery : 

First. That the presbytery cordially reciprocate the sentiments 
and action of the White Water Presbytery on the subject of the 
union of the now divided Presbyterian church. 

Second. That we instruct our commissioners to the next General 
Assembly to co-operate in any measures which may be proposed in 
the Assembly which, in their judgment, may have a tendency to 
bring about a harmonious and honorable blending of the two 
branches of the Presbyterian church. 

Third. That Rev. A. A. Jimeson and Elder P. H. Roots be 
appointed to convey to the White Water Presbytery, either in 
person, or otherwise, our sincere Christian salutations, and our 
, willingness to co-operate in bringing about a union so desirable. 

Fourth. That Rev. C. H. Marshall and Elder W. N. Jackson be 
appointed delegates to the Indianapolis Presbytery, 0. S., which is 
to meet in Indianapolis next week, and extend to that body our 
fraternal greetings and our readiness for an organic union with 
their branch of the church as soon as in the providence of God the 
way is open. 

The final action of the presbytery on the subject of 
reunion is in September, 1869. 

An overture on the reunion of the two branches of 
the Presbyterian church, O. S. and iN". S., was received 
from the General Assembh^, through its stated clerk, 
propounding the following question, and directing that 
a report to the Assembly of the answer given should be 
made before November 1, 1869: 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 103 

" Do yoii approve of the reunion of the two bodies 
claiming the name and rights of the Presbyterian church 
in the United States of America, on the following 
basis, namely : 

' The reunion shall be effected on the doctrinal and 
ecclesiastical basis of our common standards: the Scrip- 
tures of the Old and New Testaments shall be acknowl- 
edged to be the inspired word of God, and the only 
infallible rule of faith and practice; the Confession of 
Faith shall continue to be sincerely received and adopted 
as containing the system of doctrine taught in the Holy 
Scriptures; and the Government and Discipline of the 
Presbyterian church in the United States shall be 
approved as containing the principles and rules of our 
polity.' " 

The vote being taken on this overture, it was answered 
in the affirmative by a unanimous rising vote, and pres- 
bytery directed that a special record should be made of 
the names of all voting. The list follows : 

Ministers. Churches. Elders. 

Philips. Cleland 

John S. Craig Noblesville H. F. Chappell. 

Charles H. Marshall Indianapolis, 4th Samuel Merrill. 

John B. Logan Edinburg Henry Ewing. 

Rufus Nutting, Jr 

Philander A nderson 

Alexander Parker 

Henry L. Dickerson Thorntown John Higgins. 

Archibalds. Reid Anderson, 1st Jacob Beachler. 

Arthur T. Rankin Kingston J. B. Hopkins. 

Francis F. Friedgen Shelbyville, Ger Henry Burkher. 

Hanford A. Edson Indianapolis, 2d Edwin J. Peck. 

Horace Bushnell, Jr Southport Samuel Moore. 

Greenwood Garret Sorter. 

Luman A. Aldrich Olivet C. P. Wilson. 

John B. Brandt 



104 HISTORY OF THE 



FINAL ADJOURNMENT. 



July 3, 1870, at the close of installation services in the 
First German church, in Shelby ville, " the Presbytery of 
Indianapolis, N. S., as existing prior to the reunion, 
adjourned sine die, with thankfulness to God for all the 
good it had been permitted to do, and for that union, 
which gives hope for greater good in the future." 

HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

The Danville church enjoyed the ministry of W. L. 
Dickerson until February, 1868, when the pastoral rela- 
tion was dissolved by tlie Presbytery of Greencastle. 
W. L. Lee succeeded to the pastorate of the church 
July, 1868. The number reported in the church, 1870, 
was one hundred and forty-four. 

The church at White Lick reported at the same time 
sixty-three. 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The Rev. Henry Rossiter ministered to the church at 
Greencastle until December, 1868. W. A. Bosworth 
became, in 1869, supply, and was supply for one year. 

In January, 1864, a new house of worship, begun some 
years before, was dedicated to the worship of God. The 
membership in 1869 was one hundred and four. Organic 
union with the Second church had been completed in 
the spring of 1870, and a membership of two hundred 
and fifty is reported in connection with the Presbytery 
of Crawfordsville, O. S. In the Second church there 
was, in 1869, one hundred members. 

The Bainbridge church reported in 1870, seventy 
members. 

In 1865, the Rev. Ransom Ilawley ceased his labors in 
the Putnamville church as stated supply. When he 
ceased his labors, he had been ministering to the church 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIANA POLLS. 105 

one-fonrth of his time for twenty-fonr years. Kev. 
Johu Hawks became stated supply of the Putnamville 
church for one-fourth of his time. The membership 
reported in 1870, was eighty-nine. 

BLOOMINGTON. 

The church at Bk)omington was supplied by Rev. 
John M. Bishop one-half of his time until 1865, when 
he was installed as pastor by the Salem Presbytery. 
Until this installation, Prof. Ballantine supplied the 
church one-half the time. In the fall of 1867, Mr. 
Bishop was released from the pastorate of the church, 
to accept a call to the church at Rockville. Prof. Bal- 
lantine at this time, became stated supply of the church 
and ministered to it for two years. In the tall of 1869, 
this church, the Second Presbyterian church of Bloom- 
ington, made arrangements for united services with 
the First church. These services continued until April, 
1870, when the organic union of the First and Second 
churches was consummated. The Second church had at 
the time of this union, a membership of sixty-eight. 

COLUMBUS. 

This church was ministered to by Rev. iSI. S. Dickey, 
until November, 1870, when he terminated his labors 
with the church, closing a ministry to it of seventeen 
years. The membership reported in 1870, was one hun- 
dred and seventy. 

At the time of the linal adjournment of the India- 
napolis Presbytery, N. S., there were connected with it, 
fifteen ministers and nineteen churches, with a member- 
ship of nineteen hundred and fifty-nine. Of these 
churches, eight are within the bounds of the present 
presbytery, and had a membership of one thousand and 



106 HISTORY OF THE 

thirty-six. The other seven churches that were iu con- 
nection with JSTew School presbyteries, had a member- 
ship of six hundred and seventy three. The total mem- 
bership of all the churches, was seventeen hundred and 
seventeen. 



PRE8B YTEB Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. 107 



CHAPTER XII. 

Iiidianapolis Presbytery, 0. S. — Changes in the Churches 
— Ministerial Changes — Deaths — State of the Country — 
Revivals — Reunion — First Church at Indianapolis — Sev- 
enth Church of Indianapolis — Brewnshurg and Clermont 
— Greencastle, Carpentersville, Bloomington — Numbers. 

1861—1870. 

In this last decade of the history of this presbytery, 
we note first the changes in the churches. 

In Apri), 1861, the Edinburg church was dissolved, 
and by request of its members they were united with 
the church at Franklin. 

April, 1865, the name of New Providence church was 
changed to Acton. 

April, 1865, the church of Greenwood was dissolved. 

April, 1866, the Greenfield church, reporting a mem- 
bership of one hundred and thirty-eight, was received. 

October, 1867, the organization of the Fifth church 
of Indianapolis with eighteen members, was reported to 
presbytery. 

October, 1867, the church of Bloomington, with its 
pastor, T. M. Hopkins, was transferred to the Presbytery 
of New Albany. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

April, 1861, A. B. Morey, a licentiate of the Presby- 



108 HISTORY OF THE 

tery of Albany was received. The succeeding month of 
May he was ordained and installed at Franklin. 

April, 1861, J. B. Vawter was licensed. Marcli, 1868? 
he was dismissed to pnt himself under the care of the 
Presbytery of Dubuque. 

September, 1861, Charles Axtel was received from the 
Presbytery of Rock River. He was installed at Knights- 
town in the following October. April, 1864, he was re- 
leased from his pastoral charge. In September, 1865, 
he was dismissed to the i'resbytery of Dubuque. 

September, 1861, P. R. Yamitta was received from the 
Presbytery of Hillsboro. His labors were in the Bible 
cause. 

September, 1861, G. G. Heckman was received from 
the Presbytery of Milwaukee. October, 1871, he was 
installed pastor of the Third church of Indianapolis. 
This pastoral relation was dissolved in October, 1867, 
and Dr. Heckman dismissed to the Presbytery of Albany 
to accept a call from the State Street Church, Albany. 

June, 1862, B. F. Wood was released from the pas- 
toral care of the Bethany church. 

June, 1862, F. Senour was received from the Presby- 
tery of Louisville. March, 1863, he was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Chicago. 

June, 1862, J. H. Vannuys, a licentiate of the Pres- 
bytery of Donegal, was received. April, 1863, he was 
dismissed to put himself under the care of the Presby- 
tery of Rock River. 

September, 1862, Levi Hughes was received from the 
Presbytery of St. Paul. This brother losing his hearing, 
and becoming entirely deaf by exposure while preach- 
ing in Minnesota, became, notwithstanding this great 
affliction of being totally deaf, an earnest and successful 
evangelist. He labored for some time as evangelist and 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 109 

missionary in the presbytery, and then became agent 
for Hanover College. He was dismissed to the Presby- 
tery of New Albany in October, 1867. 

April, 1863, W. AV. Sickles was received from the 
Presbytery of New Albany. 

April, 1864, J. Q. McKeehan was received from the 
Presbytery of Madison. May, 1869, he was dismissed 
to the same presbytery. 

C. H. Raymond was received at the same time from 
the Presbytery of White Water. April, 1866, he was 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Oxford. 

April, 1865, S. E. Barr was received from the Presby- 
tery of New Albany. May following he was installed 
at Hopewell. 

April, 1865, N. S. Palmer was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Crawfordsville. His labors were principally 
in connection with the American Tract Society. 

April, 1866, James Gilchrist was received from the 
Presbytery of White AVater, He was stated supply of 
the Bethany church. April, 1870, he was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Crawfordsville. 

April, 1866, R. B. Abbott was received from the Pres- 
bytery of White Water. He was stated suppl}^ of the 
church at Knightstown. In April, 1867, he was dis- 
missed to the Presbytery of St. Paul. 

April, 1866, J. J. Smythe was released from the pasto- 
ral care of the church at Shelbyville. April, 1867, he 
was dismissed to the Presbj'tery of Erie. 

September, 1866, R. M. Overstreet was received fi-om 
the Presbytery of Central Texas. 

April, 1867, C. P. Jennings was received from the 
Presbytery of Logan sport. He labored in connection 
with the church at Shelbj'ville. Dissatisfied with the 
reunion of the Presbyterian church, he united with the 



110 HISTORY OF THE 

Protestant Episcopal church, and his name was dropped 
from the roll of the presbytery April, 1870. 

April, 1867, Isaac W. Monfort was received from the 
Presbytery of White Water. His labors were in con- 
nection with the church at Greenfield. 

September, 1867, W. B. Chamberlain, a licentiate ot 
the Presbytery of Madison, was received. He became 
stated supply of the Fifth Church of Indianapolis, and 
was ordained October, 1867. 

April, 1868, L. B. W. Shryock was received from the 
Presbytery of New Castle. He was installed at Knights- 
town in the fall of 1868. 

September, 1868, Robert Sloss, a licentiate of the 
Third Presbytery of New York, was received. Receiv- 
ing and accepting a call from the Third Church of Indi- 
anapolis, he was ordained and installed. 

April, 1869, J. C. King was dismissed to the Presby- 
tery of Iowa. 

April, 1870, J. R. Walker was received from the In- 
diana Presbytery of the United Presbyterian church. 

DEATHS. 

The death of John Gilchrist, pastor of Sugar Creek 
church, is recorded in the minutes of the sessions of 
presbytery in April, 1863. 

In the minutes of the sessions of presbytery, in Sep- 
tember, 1864, the death of William Sickles, at the age 
of three score and ten, is recorded. Also the death of 
John F. Smith, in the prime of his life, and pastor of 
the church at Hopewell at the time of his decease. 

STATE OF THE COUNTRY. 

September, 1861, the presbytery passed the following 
resolution : 

Resolved, That this presbytery hereby expresses its cordial ap- 
proval of the resolutions adopted at the late meeting of the Assem- 



PEESB YTER Y OF INDIANAPOLIS. Ill' 

bly, in regard to the state of the country, and express the hope that 
the churches under its watch and care will continue instant in 
prayer, that the constituted authorities of the nation may be sus- 
tained in their efforts to suppress this rebellion, and bring the con- 
flict which has been precipitated upon us, to a speedy and suc- 
cessful issue. 

The following resolutions were also passed : 

Resolved, That we are sensible of the evil effects of the present 
state of our national affairs upon the kingdom of Christ, and we do 
earnestly urge upon the churches under our care the necessity of 
frequent and persevering prayer for the presence of the Holy Spirit 
to withstand those worldly influences which threaten to secularize 
the church and render ineffectual the preaching of the word. 

Resolved, That we recognize higher relations and duties than those 
imposed by civil governments, and would therefore earnestly ap- 
peal to our brethren in the Southern States to unite with us in sup- 
plications to our common King and Saviour, that he may bless our 
country with a speedy, righteous and permanent jDeace. 

Resolved, That we recommend to all our ministers and churches 
the propriety of observing the day of prayer appointed by the Pres- 
ident of the United States. 

April, 1863, the following resolutions were passed : 

Resolved, 1st, That presbytery enjoins upon all the churches under 
its care the full and faithful observance of the day of fasting and 
prayer, as recommended in the recent proclamation of the Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

2d. This presbytery, as an ecclesiastical court, called to witness 
for Christ before the world, can-not refrain a public expression of its 
gi'atification that the resolution of the Senate of the United States, 
asking the appointment of a day of fasting, makes such distinct 
mention of our Lord Jesus Christ as the heaven-appointed way of 
access to God the Father. This recognition of our Divine Mediator 
by our national authorities is as gratifying as it is rare. Our hope 
for our country grows strong as we see our rulers giving heed to the 
divine injunction : Be wise, now, therefore, oh, ye kings ; be 
instructed, oh, ye judges of the earth ; serve the Lord with fear and 
rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest He be angry and ye per- 
ish from the wav when His wrath is kindled but a little. 



112 HISTORY OF THE 



In the year 1862 a quiet, but efficient work of grace 
was wrought in many of the churches. Christians were 
revived. This was the especial feature of the work, a 
deepening of the piety and a quickening of the activity 
of Christians. Sinners also were converted. In the 
church of Hopewell forty were added to the church on 
the profession of their faith. 

In the year 1866 " blessings of more than ordinary 
magnitude and preciousness " were bestowed upon the 
majority of the churches. One church received into its 
membership, upon examination, forty-eight, another 
thirty-eight, another thirty, another twenty-seven, other 
churches less numbers. 

Of the beginning of 1869 it is said : " During the 
latter part of April the city of Indianapolis was visited 
by a remarkable outpouring of God's spirit. During the 
refreshing which followed in the month of May, June 
and July, the churches in that city under the control of 
this presbytery received a special blessing, both in the 
ingatliering of new members and in a general quicken- 
ing of spiritual life among the members." 

In the spring of 1870 it was reported that in nearly all 
the churches there had beeu a deep religious interest, 
and in many of them most remarkable works of grace. 
In the cburclies of Franklin and Hopewell, immediately 
following the week of prayer, God's spirit had been 
poured out above what they could ask or think. 

In the Franklin church one hundred had been 
received on examination ; in the Hopewell church, sev- 
enty-seven ; in the Fifth Indianapolis, thirty-five; in 
the Third, one hundred and thirty-two. 

REUNION. 

April, 1865, Rev. C. H. Marshall and Elder W. N. 



PRESB YTEB Y OF INDIA NA POLIS. 113 

Jackson, of the Indianapolis Presbytery, N. S., appeared 
in the Old School Presbytery, and presented the action 
their body had taken on the subject of reunion. The 
following action was taken : 

Resolved, 1st, That this presbytery hail with unusual pleasure the 
presence in our sessions of the brethren, Rev. C. H. Marshall and 
Ruling Elder W. N. Jackson, corresponding delegates to this body 
from the Presbytery of Indianapolis, N. S. 

2d, That we heartily reciprocate the action of that presbytery 
looking to a harmonious and honorable blending of the two 
branches of the Presbyterian church in the United States. 

3d, That the Rev. George C. Heckman and Ruling Elder James 
Blake be appointed principals, and Rev. A. B. Morey and Professor 
Daniel Kirkwood their alternates, as delegates to convey our 
Christian salutations and brotherly love to the Presbytery of 
Indianapolis, N. S., at its next stated meeting at Edinburg, on the 
15th of September next, with the expression of our earnest, prayer- 
ful desire for an organic union between our respective bodies, when 
such shall be the will of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

As the subject of reunion came up time after time in 
its progress toward consummation, there were various 
discussions, and various resolutions were passed. The 
record of the linal and decisive vote in September, 1869, 
in response to the action of the General Assembly, is: 
Resolved, That we answer the overture of the General 
Assembly on the subject of reunion of the two bodies 
claiming the name and rights of the Presbyterian church 
in the United States, in the affirmative. Ayes, 15 ; 
nay, 1, 

FIRST CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

The Rev. J. Howard Nixon, of the Presbytery of 
Troy, was called to the pastorate of this church, Decem- 
ber 17, 1860. This pastoral relation was dissolved April 
14, 1869. The Rev. R. D. Harper, D. D., was called 
April 22, 1869. The membership of the church in 1870, 
was three hundred and fifteen. 
8 



114 HISTOR Y OF THE 

In the fall of 1864, the foundation of the third church 
ediiice erected by this church was laid at the corner of 
Pennsylvania and New York streets. The following 
year the chapel, containing a lecture room and Sabbath 
School rooms, was erected. The corner stone of the 
main portion of the building was laid July 23, 1866. 
The editice was completed and opened for the worship 
of God, December 29, 1868. The cost of this building 
was between one hundred and four and five thousand 
dollars. 

SEVENTH CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

One Sabbath day, early in the year 1865, Wm. R. 
Craig, a resident of ihe south-eastern part of Indiana- 
polis, was much disturbed by a rude and lawless troop 
of boys. Their repeated and flagrant violations of the 
Sabbath, and unruly conduct generally, had often out- 
raged the feelings of the staid old Scotchman, but never 
to such a degree as on this occasion. He now for the 
first time began seriously to debate with himself the 
question of a remedy. He finally decided that a Sab- 
bath School, by reaching the consciences of the offenders 
would, in the course of time, eft'ect a thorough and hist- 
ing cure. Being an elder of the First Church, he ap- 
plied to his brethren for help. They williiigly co-oper- 
ated with iiim. A Sabbath School was established. Its 
first session was in the room of a carpenter shop, be- 
longing to Peter Routier, on Cedar street. The number 
of scholars at the first session was seven. The school 
rapidly increased. Through the exertions of James M. 
Ray of the First Church, a site was secured in Fletcher's 
addition, donated by Calvin Fletcher, Sr., A. Stone, W. 
S. Witt, Elisha Taylor and James M. Hough. The 
Board of Church Extension pledged five hundred dol- 
lars to the erection of a building, and the First Church 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLLS. 115 

took upon itself the responsibilty of carrying the enter- 
prise through. A building was erected at a cost of over 
three thousand dollars, and December 24, 1865, dedica- 
ted to the service of God. The First Church appropri- 
ated live hundred dollars to the support of a mission- 
ary in the field. W. W. Sickles first undertook the 
work. Becoming discouraged, he resigned in the spring 
of 1866. Thomas Gait, a licentiate of Chicago Presby- 
tery and member of the Theological Seminary in Chi- 
cago, labored in the field during the summer of 1866. 
September, 1866, C. M. Howard, from the Presbytery of 
St. Paul, was invited to occupy the field. November 
27, 1867, a church was organized with twenty-three 
members. Six of these, including an elder, W. R. 
Craig, were from the First Church. Mr. Craig was the 
first elder of the Seventh Church. Mr. Howard served 
the church as stated supply until October, 1869, when, 
on account of failing health, he withdrew from the field. 
He was succeeded by Rev. J. B. Brandt, who served one 
year, when being elected Superintendent of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of the city, he resigned. 
He was succeeded by Rev. L. G. Hay. From April, 
1868, to April, 1869, sixty-three were added on profes- 
sion of their faith, and a membership of one hundred 
and twenty-two reported in the spring of 1869. The 
membership reported in 1870, was one hundred and 
forty and four. 

BROWNSBURG AND CLERMONT. 

The church of Brownsburg was organized in 1867, 
with seventeen members. It was ministered to by Rev. 
George Long. It erected a substantial brick edifice, and 
reported in 1870, a membership of thirty. The neigh- 
boring church of Clermont, reported m 1870, a mem- 
bership of fourteen. 



116 HISTORY OF THE 

GKEENCASTLE. 

The Second Church of Greencastle continued under 
the ministry of Dr. Fisk until the reunion. He then 
became stated supply of the united church, which re- 
ported in 1870, as has been already stated, a member- 
ship of two hundred and fifty. The membership of the 
Second Church reported in 1869, was one hundred. Du- 
ring the winter of 1869 and 1870, eighty persons were 
received upon profession of faith into the united church. 

CAKPENTERSVILLE. 

The church of Carpentersville reported, in 1870, a 
membership of seventy-one. 

BLOOMINGTON. 

In 1863 a new church edifice was dedicated to the 
worship of God. This church edifice was built under 
the ministry of T. M. Hopkins, whose energy and zeal 
in the work were untiring. During the ministry of Mr. 
Hopkins one hundred and seventeen members were 
added to the church, sixty-one upon examination, fifty- 
six by letter. In January, 1869, Mr. Hopkins, accept- 
ng a call to the First Church of Piqua, Ohio, was 
released from the pastorate. In March, 1869, A. Y. 
Moore, of the Presbytery of Lake, was called to the pas- 
torate. As pastor elect of the First Church and stated 
supply of the Second, he ministered to the united con- 
gregation from October, 1869, to April, 1870. During 
this time the Spirit of God was poured out upon the 
people, and thirty-two persons were received into the 
two churches upon profession of their faith, twenty-five, 
to the First Church, seven to the Second. In April the 
two churches became united as the Walnut Street Pres- 
byterian Church of Bloomington. A. Y. Moore was 
called to the pastorate, and installed by the Presbytery 



PRESB YTER V OF INDIA NA POLLS. 117 

of New Albany. The Second Church, during its his- 
tory, had received into its communion, up to the fall of 
1869, one hundred and four persons by examination and 
seventy-four by letter. At the time of the union of the 
two churches it had a membership of sixty-eight. Up 
to October, 1869, there had been received into the com- 
munion of the First Church, from the time of its organi- 
zation, four hundred and eighty-nine persons. Of these, 
two hundred and sixty were received upon profession of 
their faith, two hundred and twenty-nine by letter. The 
membership of the First Church at the time of the union 
was one hundred and sixty-eight. In the spring of 1870 
the Walnut Street Church had a membership of two 
hundred and thirty-six. 

NUMBERS. 

In the Presbytery of Indianapolis, 0. S., there were, 
in 1870, eleven ministers and fifteen churches, wnth a 
membership of two thousand one hundred and sixty- 
seven. Of these churches twelve were within the bounds 
of the present presbytery. They had a membership of 
eighteen hundred and thirty-one. The other Old School 
churches in the bounds of the present presbytery aggre- 
gated a membership of nine hundred and twenty-six, 
making a total membership in the Old School churches 
of two thousand seven hundred and lifty-seven. The 
membership of the New School churches, within the 
bounds of the present presbytery, seventeen hundred and 
seventeen, added to the membership of the Old School 
churches, gave a membership of four thousand four hun- 
dred and seventy-four to the churches within the bound- 
aries of the present presbytery at the time of its organi- 
zation, July 5, 1870. 

The population of the counties within the presbytery 
was, in 1870, 188,729. It was, in 1860, 158,534. The 



118 HISTORY OF THE 

increase was between twenty-five and thirty-five per 
cent. The membership of the churches in 1860 was 
2,850 ; in 1870, 4,474. The increase is between forty 
and fifty per cent. And the proportion of membership 
to population in 1870 is a fraction less than one to forty- 
five. In 1860 it was one to fifty-five; in 1850, one to 
sixty-five. Our church is thus seen to have been grow- 
ing, not only with the growth of the population of the 
country, but also at a steady rate of progress more rap- 
idly than that of the population of the country. 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 



119 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Indianapolid Presbytery — Its Boundaries, Members and 
Churches — Changes in Churches — Ministerial Changes — 
Missionary Work — Women's Presbyterial Society — Revi- 
vals — Progress. 

1870—1876. 

PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

After the reunion of the Old and New School branches 
of the Presbyterian church, the Presbytery of Indianap- 
olis, as established by the Synod of Indiana, South, met 
in the Third Presbyterian church of Indianapolis, at 9 
p. M., July 5, 1870, and was called to order and consti- 
tuted with prayer by Rev. Ransom Hawley, according 
to the following order of the Synod : 

" That the churches located in the counties of Putnam, Hen- 
dricks, Marion, Hancock, Johnson, Morgan, Monroe, Brown, Bar- 
tholomew, containing about thirty-two ministers, be constituted in 
the Indianapolis Presbytery. 

" That the Presbytery of Indianapolis, as this day erected and 
defined by this Synod, is declared to be, and is the legal successor 
to the Presbyteries of Indianapolis, 0. S., and Indianapolis, N. S., 
formerly occupying in greater part the same territory ; and is enti- 
tled to succeed to, and does succeed to all the legal and ecclesiasti- 
cal rights, privileges, franchises, records, books, papers and property 
of each of said other presbyteries. And that Rev. R. Hawley be, 
and he hereby is, appointed convener, to convene, open and consti- 
tute said Presbytery of Indianapolis, in this house, this evening at 
9 o'clock." 



120 HISTORY OF THE 

Rev. R. Hawley was elected Moderator, and A. B, 
Morey Clerk. 

The following was the roll of presbytery : 

Ministers Present. — B. F. Woods, A. C. Allen, L. G. 
Hay, A. B. Morey, C. H. Marshall, H" A. Edson, S. E. 
Barr, N. S. Palmer, H. Bushnell, Jr., W. B. Chamber- 
lain, J. B. Brandt, R. Nutting, L. A. Aldrich, R. Sloss, 
N. S. Dickey, A. Y. Moore, R. Hawley, A. R. Naylor, 
R. D. Harper, D. D., E. W. Fisk, D. D. 

Ministers Absent. — J. B. Logan, W. W. Sickles, J. VV. 
Monfort, George Long, W. J. Lee, E. Ballantine, J. 
Greene, E. Wright, C. K. Thompson, John Scott, M. A. 
Remley. 

Churches JRepresented. — First Indianapolis, W. Sheets* 
Columbus, C. H. Paddox ; Walnut street, Bloomington, 
James Small ; Southport, S. Moore ; Greencastle, J. 
Allen; Second Indianapolis, C. F. Smith; Brownsburg, 
E. D. Selent; Carpentersville, G. II. McKee ; Bain- 
bridge, J. Brown ; Third Indianapolis, J. Blake ; Fourth 
Indianapolis, R. M. Stewart ; Fifth Indianapolis, E. A. 
Cobb ; Olivet, C. Wilson ; Seventh Indianapolis, H. C. 
Husted. 

Churches not Represented. — Franklin, Greenwood, Hope- 
well, Shiloh, Acton, Highland, Bethany, Danville, 
Georgetown, New Pisgah, New Prospect, Boggstown, 
Union, Greenfield, Edinburg, Donaldson, Oak Grove, St. 
Louis Crossing, New Hope, Clermont, White Lick, Put- 
namville. 

CHANGES IN CHURCHES. 

September, 1870, the churches of New Pisgah and 
New Prospect were consolidated under the name of 
New Pisgah. 

September, 1870, presbytery, by request, provided sup- 
plies for Stilesville, in Hendricks county, where a Sab- 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 121 

bath school had been organized, but where there was no 
church of Presbyterian order. At the meeting of pres- 
bytery, April, 1871, the organization of a church near 
Stilesville was reported. It was enrolled as the Hen- 
dricks County Church, The name has since been changed 
to Hebron. A church edifice has been built, and a mem- 
bership of forty-five was reported April, 1876. 

September, 1871, presbytery appointed a committee to 
organize a church at Indianola. It has received the 
name of Eighth Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis. 
The field of this church was first occupied by the Meth- 
odists. It was an exceedingly hard field. Having been 
abandoned by the Methodists, three young members of 
the Third Presbyterian Church, H. H. Fulton, E. L. 
Williams and John G. Blake, established a mission Sab- 
bath school in the building that had been occupied by 
the Methodists, Out of their labors and this mission 
school grew tbc Eighth Church, Tlie first report to 
presbytery, April, 1872, was a membership of twenty - 
four, eighteen received upon profession of faith and six 
by letter, April, 1876, the membership was one hun- 
dred and twenty-eight. 

At a special meeting of presbytery, February, 1872, a 
committee was appointed to organize the N^inth Presby- 
terian Church of Indianapolis. April, 1872, the organi- 
zation of this church was reported, with a membership 
of twenty. Fourteen had been received by letter, and 
six upon profession of their faith. The field of this 
church was first occupied with a Sabbath school organi- 
zation. It was known as the " Saw Mill Mission." The 
first school was not prosperous, and becoming extinct, 
another was established in July, 1870. The leading 
spirits in the new organization were Gen, Ben. Harrison, 
Dr, C. C, Burgess, Ebenezer Sharpe, Capt. E. P. Howe, 



122 HISTORY OF THE 

I. C. Hays and others, all members of the First Presby- 
terian Church. Rev. L. G. Hay took charge of the mis- 
sion, and after the organization of the church was its 
stated supply for several years. The membership re- 
ported April, 1876, was one hundred and thirty. 

April, 1872, the church of St. Louis Crossing was dis- 
banded. 

September, 1872, the Highland church was disbanded. 

The Memorial Church was organized March 12, 1873, 
with thirty-one members, thirty received upon certifi- 
cate, one upon examination. The origin of Memorial 
Church is to be traced to the action of the session of the 
Second Presbyterian Church, in the winter of 1869-70. 
It was the desire to signalize the memorial year of Pres- 
byterian reunion by another mission. Lots were pur- 
chased and a chapel erected in the north-east quarter of 
the city, and a Sabbath school established. The enter- 
prise was not at first successful, and it was proposed at 
one time to sell the property and abandon the mission. 
But better counsels prevailed. The Young Men's Asso- 
ciation of the Second Church was entrusted with the 
work, and it was prosecuted with vigor, resulting in the 
organization of the church. April, 1873, Rev. H. A. 
Edson, released from the pastoral charge of the Second 
Church, entered upon the labors of the field of the Me- 
morial Church. A site was at once purchased for a per- 
manent church edifice, and contracts let for the building. 
The corner-stone was laid for the new structure April 7, 
1874. The chapel and Sabbath school rooms of the new 
building were occupied for worship for the first time 
Sabbath, March 7, 1875. The church has been self-sus- 
taining from the first. It reported April, 1876, a mem- 
bership of two hundred and eighty-eight. 

April 18, 1875, the Eleventh Presbyterian church of 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 123 

Indianapolis was organized. It reported, April, 1876, a 
membership of forty, twenty-three had been received by 
letter, seventeen upon profession of their faith. Rev. 
B. F. Woods has been stated supply of the church. 

June 14, 1876, the Twelfth Presbyterian church of 
Indianapolis was organized. 

MINISTERIAL CHANGES. 

The Emperor of Brazil, Dom Pedro, when he saw in 
Machinery Hall of the Centennial Exposition, the record 
of the number of the revolutions of the great Corliss en- 
gine, more than a million, that had been made from the 
beginning of its working wittily remarked, " that beats 
the South American Republics for revolutions." The 
frequency of changes among the ministers of Indianap- 
olis Presbytery, is a fitting subject for imperial wit. An 
acknowledged evil both to churches and ministers, it 
manifestly demands a remedy. We note these changes 
from 1870 to 1876. 

September, 1870, I. W. Monfort was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of St. Paul. 

September, 1870, W. J. Lee was released from the 
pastoral care of the church at Danville. April, 1873, 
he was dismissed to the Presbytery of Osage, Missouri. 

September, 1870, L. A. Aldrich was released from the 
pastorate of the Sixth church of Indianapolis. Septem- 
ber, 1871, he was dismissed to the Presbytery of Cin- 
cinnati. 

September, 1870, J. G. Williamson was received from 
the Presbytery of New Albany. He was supply of the 
Bethany church until failing health disabled him from 
preaching. 

In the fall of 1870, E. W. Fisk, D. D., was installed 
pastor of the church at Green castle. This pastoral re- 



124 HISTORY OF THE 

latioii was dissolved April, 1872, that Dr. Fisk might 
devote his labors to the Female College of Indiana. 

October, 1870, W. B. Chamberlain was installed pas- 
tor of the Fifth Church at Indianapolis. October, 1872, 
he was released from this pastoral charge, and dismissed 
April, 1873, to the Presbytery of Mankato, Minnesota. 
September, 1875, he was again received from the Pres- 
bytery of Mankato, leave given him to labor without 
the bounds of presbytery, and September, 1876, he was 
dismissed to the Presbytery of Council Bluffs. 

April, 1871, R. D. Harper, I). D., was released from 
the pastoral care of the First Church of Indianapolis, 
and dismissed to the Third Presbytery of Philadelphia. 

April, 1871, Joseph E. Scott was received from the 
Presbyteiy of West Jersey. He was stated supply of 
the Sixth Church ot Indianapolis for one year, and then 
entered upon the iield of Foreign Missions in eastern 
Turkey. 

April, 1871, Alexander Parker was received from the 
Presbytery of White Water. October, 1871, he was in- 
stalled pastor of the church at Columbus. 

April, 1871, n. L. Dickerson was received from the 
Presbytery of Crawfordsville. After laboring as stated 
supply for two years with the Edinburg church, he was 
dismissed April, 1873, to the Presbytery of Crawfords- 
ville. 

April, 1871, N. S. Dickey was dismissed to the Pres- 
bytery of Mattoon. 

April, 1871, Ambrose Dunn was received from the 
Presbytery of New Albany. Ilis field of labor since, 
has been the Greenwood church. 

April, 1871, R. B. Herron was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Cincinnati. lie labored for a season as pas- 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 125 

tor elect of the Danville church, is now stated supply 
of Brownsburg and Shiloh. 

April, 1871, the pastoral relation between A. B. Morey 
and the Franklin church was dissolved, and he was dis- 
missed to the Presbytery of Cincinnati, to be installed 
pastor of the Fifth Church of Cincinnati, a call from 
which church had at a previous meeting of presbytery 
been placed in his hands. 

June, 1871, C. H. Raymond was received from the 
Presbytery of Dayton. In the following July, he was 
installed pastor of the Seventh Church of Indianapolis. 

September 1871, J. P. E. Kumler was received from 
the Presbytery of Viucennes, and in October following, 
installed pastor of the First Church at Indianapolis. 
July, 1875, application was made to presbytery by Mr. 
Kumler, for release from this pastoral charge that he 
might accept a call to the Third Church of Cincinnati. 
The First Church of Indianapolis resisted the appli- 
cation of their pastor to the presbytery, and it was not 
granted. In September the application was renewed by 
the pastor, and was granted, and he was dismissed to 
the Presbytery of Cincinnati. 

April, 1871, James Williamson was licensed to preach 
the gospel. October following he was ordained and 
installed pastor of the churches of Acton and Boggs- 
town. October, 1875, he was released from the pastoral 
care of the Boggstown church. 

April, 1872, S. E. Wishard was received from the 
Presbytery of Sangamon, and installed pastor of the 
Franklin church. 

April, 1872, J. B. Logan was dismissed to the Presby- 
tery of Crawfordsville. September, 1873, he was again 
received. 

April, 1872, S. S. Bergen was licensed to preach the 



126 HISTORY OF THE 

gospel. November, 1872, he was ordained an evangel- 
ist. April, 1872, he was dismissed to the Presbytery ot 
Austin, Texas. 

May, 1872, J. B. Brandt was installed pastor of the 
Sixth Church of Indianapolis. 

May, 1872, John Dixon was licensed to preach the 
gospel. May, 1873, he was dismissed to put himself 
under the care of the Presbytery of Boston. 

June, 1872, Robert Sloss, accepting a call to the Foiir- 
teenth Street Church of New York city, placed by pres- 
bytery in his hands, was released from the pastoral care 
of the Third Church of Indianapolis, and dismissed to 
the Presbytery of New York. 

April, 1873, Augustus L. Williams, a licentiate, was 
received from the Presbytery of Lansing. He was 
stated supply of the church at Greencastle for eighteen 
months. September, 1875, he was dismissed to the Cen- 
tral Presbytery of Philadelphia. 

April, 1873, J. A. Williams was received from the 
Presbytery of Austin. He became supply of the church 
at Edinburg. September, 1875, he was dismissed to the 
Presbytery of White Water. 

April, 1873, J. R. Mitchell was received from the 
Presbytery of White Water, and installed pastor of the 
Fifth Church of Indianapolis. 

April, 1873, the pastoral relation of H. A. Edson and 
the Second Church of Indianapolis was dissolved, and he 
entered upon his work in the Memorial Church. 

September, 1873, E. B. Mason was received from the 
Puritan Association of Ohio, and installed pastor of the 
Fourth Church of Indianapolis. 

October, 1873, J. L. Withrow, D. D., called by the 
Second Church of Indianapolis, was received Irom the 
Central Presbytery of Philadelphia, and installed. This 



PRE8B YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 127 

pastoral relation was dissolved June, 1876, that Dr. 
Withrow might accept a call to the Park Street Church, 
Boston. 

December, 1873, G. W. F. Birch was received from 
the Presbytery of Ebenezer, Kentucky, and installed 
pastor of the Third Church of Indianapolis. This pas- 
toral relation was dissolved June, 1876. 

April, 1874, George Long was dismissed to the Pres- 
bytery of Logansport. 

May, 1874, Lucius I. Root was received from the 
Presbytery of Mattoon, and installed pastor of the 
church at Greencastle. This pastoral relation was dis- 
solved, Januar}', 1876, and a letter of dismissal given to 
Mr. Root to the Presbytery of Alton. 

May, 1874, Charles T. White, D. D., was received 
from the Presbytery of Chemung. He became stated 
supply of the church at Greeniield, and was dismissed 
June, 1876, to the Presbytery of White Water. 

May, 1874, William Armstrong was received from the 
Presbytery of Portsmouth. 

May, 1874, John R. Sutherland, a licentiate, was 
received from the Presbytery of Chicago, ordained and 
installed pastor of the Eighth Church. He was released 
from this pastoral charge November, 1875, and dis- 
missed to the Presbytery of Grand Rapids. 

June, 1874, S. E. Barr was released trom the pastoral 
care of the Hopewell Church, and dismissed to the Pres- 
bytery of Fort Wayne. 

September, 1874, N. F. Tuck was received from the 
Presbytery of Louisville. 

January, 1875, E. L. Williams was licensed. June, 
1876, he was ordained and installed pastor of the Eighth 
and Twelfth Churches of Indianapolis. 

April, 1875, L. P. Walker was received from the Pres- 



128 HISTORY OF THE 

bytery of Mattoon, and in May following installed pas- 
tor of the Ninth Church of Indianapolis. 

April, 1875, Edwin Black was received from the Pres- 
bytery of Mattoon, and installed pastor of the Hopewell 
church. 

April, 1875, M. M. Lawson was licensed to preach the 
gospel. September, 1875, he was dismissed to put him- 
self under the care of the Presbytery of Marion. 

April, 1875, Henry L. Nave was licensed. June, 1876, 
he was ordained and installed pastor of the church at 
E din burg. 

December, 1875, R. J. L. Matthews was received from 
the Presbytery of Cairo. 

April, 1876, E. H. Post was received from the Presby- 
ter}^ of San Josfe. He became supply of the church at 
Danville. 

April, 1876, John H. Harris was received from the 
Presbytery of Cincinnati. He became supply of the 
Bethany church. 

DEATHS. 

Since 1870 four of the members of presbytery have en- 
tered, through the gates of death, into the presence and 
joy of their Lord. 

Charles H. Marshall died at Indianapolis, January 27, 
1872, at the age of forty-eight. 

Charles K. Thompson died at Carlisle, February 8, 
1872, at the age of sixty-one. 

Edward Wright died at Bloomington, November 10, 
1872, at the age of sixty-eight. 

N. S. Palmer died at Franklin, November 24, 1873, at 
the age of tifty-two. 

MISSIONARY WORK. 

Rev. J. B. Logan was employed in 1870-'71 as presby- 
lerial missionary. By instruction from the presbytery, 



PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 129 

one result to be aimed at by the missionary was the 
grouping of feeble churches and combining them in the 
support of a minister, so that they would require no 
aid from the Board of Missions. This object having 
been attained, and the churches supplied with ministers, 
no new fields outside of Indianapolis opening for occu- 
pation, the services of the presbyterial missionary were 
discontinued at the close of September, 1871. 

September, 1876, but two churches were reported as 
receiving aid from the Board of Missions, the Eleventh 
Church of Indianapolis and the church of Georgetown. 

The amount annually contributed to the cause of 
home missions, since 1870, has been, on an average, a 
little more than $3,250. A large portion of this has 
been expended on mission churches within the city of 
Indianapolis. 

The work of Foreign Missions has not received so large 
an amount from the churches. The annual contribution 
from the churches of the presbytery to the cause of For- 
eign Missions, has been about $2,000. 

woman's mission work. 

September, 1872, a resolution of presbytery earnestly 
commended the Women's Board of Missions to the ses- 
sions and women of the churches of presbytery. In a 
number of the churches, missionary organizations of the 
ladies of the churches were formed. September, 1874, 
the following resolution was passed by presbytery : 

Resoloed, That we request a committee of three ladies, members 
of our church, to communicate with all the churches of the presby- 
tery, requesting them to eflFect the organization of a Woman's Mis- 
sionary Society, and to secure the appointment of one or more del- 
egates from each church to be present at the next meeting of 
presbytery. 

Mrs. J. P. E. Kumler, of the First Church of Indian- 
9 



130 HISTORY OF THE 

apolis, Mrs. J. Clark, of the Franklin church, and Mrs. 
C. 11. Raymond, of the Seventh Church of Indianapolis, 
were appointed this committee. 

At the next stated meeting of the presbytery at Indi- 
anapolis, April, 1875, a number of ladies, delegates from 
their missionary societies, assembled and organized a 
presbyterial society. Thirteen societies were reported 
to them as organized within the bounds of the presby- 
tery. Upon invitation of the Ladies' Presbyterial Soci- 
ety, the Woman's Board of the JSTorth-west met in Indi- 
anapolis, April, 1876. The meeting of this board, 
through the presence of the Spirit of the Lord, was a 
glorious occasion, and great good was accomplished. 
The ladies are quietly but earnestly pursuing their work 
in the different churches, meeting also in their presby- 
terial society at the time of the stated meetings of pres- 
bytery. 

REVIVALS. 

Every year since 1870 there have been revivals in 
some of the churches of the presbytery. The year of 
1872-'73 seemed to be most barren of results in the con- 
version of souls and additions to the churches. The 
year of 1873-74 was a year of revivals, and additions 
were made in goodl}' numbers to many of the churches. 
The year of 1874-'75 was also a year of blessing, and 
still more signally the year of 1875-76. During this 
last named year six hundred and sixty-one were added 
to the churches on profession of faith. The next largest 
accession to the churches was in 1873-'74, when five 
hundred and two were added on profession of faith. 
The least number added was in the year 1872-73, when 
two hundred and twenty were added on profession of 
faith. 



PRESB YTER Y OF INDIA NA POLLS. 131 

PROGRESS. 

One church a year has been added since 1870 to the 
roll of the churches of presbytery. All of these churches 
have a promising future. Five are in Indianapolis. 
One, the Memorial Church, is already one of the strong 
churches of the presbytery. Several new church build- 
ings have been erected. According to the United States 
census report the value of church property held in 1860 
by the Presbyterian churches within the bounds of the 
present presbytery, was a little less than $150,000. The 
estimated value of property now held by the churches is 
about $600,000. 

During the last six years, the churches have received 
into their communion, upon profession of their faith, 
two thousand four hundred and seventy-six (2,476) mem- 
bers, and by letter, one thousand eight hundred and fif- 
teen (1,815.) The present membership of the church is 
five thousand eight hundred and nineteen (5,819,) an in- 
crease in membership since 1870, of more than thirty- 
three per cent. The number of churches is thirty-eight, 
the number of ministers forty. Of these ministers ten 
are without charge, some by reason of the infirmities of 
age, others for other reasons. One is a Professor in the 
State University, another is a Foreign Missionary. The 
efiective ministerial force of the presbytery, is twenty- 
eight ministers. The field is rich and will become richer 
and more productive with cultivation. It is the central 
region of the State in which it lies. From Indianapolis, 
the Capital of the State, streams of influence will go 
forth constantly to all parts of the State. And through 
the great missionary organizations of the church, the in- 
fluence of this field, in common with that of all other 
parts of the Presbyterian church in our land, is to go 



132 PRESBYTERY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

forth into all the world. But in the field itself, there are 
many spiritual wastes to be made, through the blessing 
of the Lord upon labor, to blossom as the rose. "Arise, 
O Lord, into thy rest, thou and the ark of thy strength. 
Let thy priests be clothed with righteousness, and let 
thy saints shout for jo3^" 




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