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Full text of "A history of Richard County: its geographical boundaries, township organizations, soil, improved and unimproved lands, early settlers, leading farmers .."

Class 

Book_ ._. 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT 



•—•-t^/^OF^tftv^--* 



zELkMM mjm 




mmA'' 




•oITS»»- 



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Geographical Boundaries, Township Organizations, Soil, Improved and 

Unimproved Lands, Early Settlers, Leading Farmers, Bonanza Farms, 

County Officers, City and Town Officers, Professions, Business 

Firms, Mechanical Industries, Schools, Churches, 

Benevolent Societies, Public iMPRcfVEMENTs, 

Railroad Advantages, Etc., Etc., Etc. 



Thoroughly and Impartially Written and Compiled 



r-*-'*vi^B"S"^2/e»<-»-» 



I3:OISuf^OE B- OIS-A-ItTID^^ILiIj. 



COLFAX, DAKOTA. 
PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR. 

1886. 

(^"Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1886, by Horace B. Crandall, in the 
oflSce of the Librarian of Congress at Washingtpn. All rights reserved. 



J^ HISTORY 



RICHLAND COUNTY 



GEOGllArHIOAL BoUNnAllIEa, ToWNSIIIP ORGANIZATIONS, SOIL, IM- 
PROVED AND Unimpiioved Lands, Eaiily Settlers, Leading 
Farmers, Bonanza Farms, County Officers, City and 
Town Officers, Professions, Business Firms, Mechan- 
ical Industries, Schools, Churches, Benevolent 
Societies, Public Improvements, Eailroad 
Advantages, Etc., Etc. 



Thoroughly and Impartially Written and Compiled 



— BY— 



HOEACE B. CEANDALL. 



colfax, dakota, 
published by the author. 

1886. 







To All Persons AVno Have fhom the Eauliest Beginning 

Labored for the Cultivation oe Our 

Eic'H Virgin Soil, for the Material Development of the 

Natural Eesources of Eichland County, 

Also for the Thorough and Priceless Cultivation of Mental. 

Endowments by Educational Agencies, 

And the Growth and Culture of Moral and Keligious 

Forces, and All Others Who Will in the 
Future Work with Muscle, Brain, and Heart to Make Our 

Fair Land "Bud and Blossom as the Kose," and 
Thereby Invite Thousands to Settle within Our Borders 
And Enjoy the Eich Inheritance 
That God Has Given Us, This Historical Work 

Is Most Respectfully and Heartily Dedicated 

By The Author. 



PRESS OF E. K. MORRILL. 
Wahpetox, Dakota. 



TO THE PUBLIC. 



Having lived in this Territory since the 3'ear 1878, and 
in Richland County since 1880, and being- thoroughly identi- 
fied with its interests; having learned b)-- experience and care- 
ful observation the advantages of the same; being heartily in- 
terested in getting as many as possible to settle within our 
bounds, we concluded that the best way was to write a history 
of the county, carefully and specifically, to publish in pamphlet 
form and scatter two thousand of the same, or more, like 
leaves of the forest, hoping thereby that hundreds might be 
Induced to settle in this goodly land. We have a rich soil, 
cheap lands, a healthy climate, an intelligent population, pub- 
lic Improvements, etc., and all are invited to come and share 
with us our many advantages that bat few new countries can 
offer. In presenting this work we have the satisfaction of 
knowing that we have endeavored to give a fair and unvar- 
nished statement as it respects the many advantages of one 
of the best counties in the Red River V^alley. If this book is 
the means of inducing many to settle in our midst, and pro- 
viding all of the inhabitants of the county with historical items 
that will prove valuable to them, not mc:rel}- for the present, 
but for the future, we shall consider that we are fully compen- 
sated for our labors. We know there are short-comings and 
mistakes, but our good intentions must be our earnest plea 
for the exercise of a charitable construction by all of our 
readers. To all persons (and they are man)-) who have 
taken such a lively Interest In the work, and have furnished 
the writer with material aid and many historic facts, v.-e take 
this opportunity to express to each and every one our most 
hearty and unbounded thanks and appreciation. H. B. C. 



Territorial Government. 



. GILBERT A. PIERCE. 

€:0VEiiN0K. - ^ - OAPT M. L. McCORMACK. 

Sechetaky, - - - J ^ RAYMOND. 

TRE..SUBEK, - - - - ^^, CALDWELL. 

Auditor, - - ' ^ GEO. RICE. 

Attorney General, - - GARLAND. 

IT. S. District Attorney, ^ - - 'J'-'^^- TONES 

SnrERINTENDENT or PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ^ - ^^^-^^"^^ 

\ ^ _ ' . . ALEX GRIGGS. 

Railroad Commissioners, -I _ _ . W. H. McVAY. 

^ ' I. E. AVEST, Sec. 



L 4 UREN DITNLAP. 
Commissioner OF lMMiGR.vrioN, - - - "^^^j^j^^.; .^^^YLOR- 
Suryeyor General, - - - ^ D. W. MARATTA. 

U. S. Marshal, " ' " e M DARROW, M.D., Supt. 

Board of Health, - - - ■' tHOS. S. FREK 

Adjutant General, - - - 

JUDICIARY. 

Chief JnBtice-Bartlett Tripp, Yankton. 
\ssociate Justice- C. S. Palmer, Siotix Falls. 
Associate Justic(^W. H. Francis, Bismarck. 
Associate Justice-W. B. McConnell, Fargo 
Associate Justice- W. E. Church, Deadwoo.l. 
Associate Justicf-- L. K. Church, Huron. 

LEGISLATURE. 

COUNCIL. 
President J. H. AVestover, East Pierre. 
Secretary^ A. AY. Ho^vard, Yankton 
Assistant Secretary- AV. G. Eakms, Deuel ( ount.>. 
f^lr-Tilain- Rev. C. B. Austin, Bismarck. 
sLiant-at-Ar,n.-Andrew Thompson, »mekal.a County 
Emt.lUng and Engrossing Clerk--M. B. Kent, XJmon L„unt>. 

Post-office. 
Post-office. , . 

/-I J- T^,^ VP Kennedv. .. .Columbia 

A. C. Huetson 'i.^p'^^^'l ? T AVashaWh . . .Deadwood 

AVilliam Duncan Elk Pom F. J. ^^«-f '^^ \- 3^ i.l city 

John R. Gamble Yankion S. I . NN eiis f .^, 



T2K11IT0KIAL GOTEKNMENT. 



jk. 8. Joiio^i Olivet 

A. M. BoA'dle Mitchell 

B. K. Wagner Springfield 

Eu r. Pettigrew Sioux Falls 

Geo. E. Farmer Howard 

W. B. Cameron Madison 

H. H. Natwick Brookings 

J. P. Dav Mellette 

•X3ol. A. B. Smedley Milbank 



Johnson Niekens Jamestown 

C. F. Eichardson Valley City 

D. H. Twomey Farg» 

C. D. Austin Lisbon 

Geo. H. Walsh Grand Forki 

John Flittie Mayvill* 

P. J. McLaughlin Grafton 

Jud La Moure Pembina 



HOUSE. 

.Speaker — ^George Eice, Flandrau. 
Chief Clerk — -Cassius M. Eeed, Sully County. 
Assistant Clerk — J. G. Hamilton, Grand Forks County. 
Chaplain — -Eev. P. Clare, Bismarck. 

Enrolling and Engrossing Clerk — ^H. H. Pierce, McCook County. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — John A. Monroe, Eoberts County. 



I'ost-oftice. 

Ole A. Helvig Canton 

John Larson Spink 

Eli Dawson Lodi 

Hans Myron Liiicoln 

A. L. Van Osdell Yankton 

Hugh Langan Centerville 

J. P. Ward....: Marion 

J. H. Swanton Menno 

J. A. Parshall Alexandria 

Mark Ward Kimball 

C. E. Huston Huston 

B. M. Clark Plankinton 

P. L. Eunkel Salem 

J. M. Bayard Canistota 

H. W. Smith Sioux Falls 

W. H. Eiddell .... Valley Si)rings 

John Hobert Egan 

J. C. Southwick Denver 

V. V. Barnes DeSmet 

J. A. Pickler Faulkton 

John T. Blakemore .... Highmore 
George W. Pierce .... Castlewood 

M. L. Miller Altoona 

vQeo. H. Johnson Groton 



I'ost-onicc. 

M. T. DeWoody Ipswich 

Eugene Huntington .... Webster 
F. A. Eldridge. . . .Big Stcme City 

A. L. Sprague Custer 

E. W. Martin Deadwood 

H, M. Gregg Spearfish 

A. McCall. Sturgis City 

E. A. Williams Bismarck 

W. F. Steele Steele 

Henry W. C'oe Mandan 

Julius Stevens Cooperstown 

S. E. Stebbins Mooreton 

P. J. McCumber Wahjjeton 

H. S. Oliver Lisbon 

T. M. Pugh EllendaU 

Dr. E. T. Hutchinsim .... Lakota 

W. N. Eoach Larimore 

C. W. Morgan Caledonia 

J. W.Scott Gilbj 

Donald Stewart Minto 

Henry Strong Fort Thomas 

H. H. Euger Grand Harbor 

Patrick McHugh Lougdon 



The Territory of Dakota. 



Ill writing a, history of Kieiilaiid County it will be proper and in 
harmony witli the fitness of things (Richland CJonnty being an im- 
portant factor therein ) to write a short chapter on Dakota. When 
we take into consideraticm the vastne^s ol the Territory and its rich- 
ness in agricultural and grazing lands, together with its mineral 
wealth and unbounded natural resources, we feel impressed that it is 
our duty to make a record in its behalf, so that all into whose hands 
this work shall fall may learn, if they never have, the great^ Avorth of 
this broad and inviting domain. And, while we speak of its advan- 
tages, we also know that it has some disadvantages; and what place 
on earth this side of the "better land" that has not? AVe believe 
there are thousands, and even liundreds of thousands, in the United 
States and foreign lands that can and do appreciate the natural ad- 
vantages of this ''"Western Canaan," and desire to make it their future 
home.'' Already the yearly progress of this Territory has opened the 
■eyes of many who were determined not to see; but facts are stubborn 
things to deal with, and consequently the scales of unbelief have 
fallen from the eyes of those walking in the mists of eastern darkness 
and superstition, who not willingly see and acknowledge that the 
half was never told them, and, if told them, they did not believe. AVe 
have heard of the many visits of "tenderfeet" to this goodly land, 
who, v-hen they first stepped on our shore of ocean prairie expanse, 
walked hesitatingly, as though they had stone bruises on their heels 
nnd corns on all their toes; but, after tarrying a few months and be- 
holding our vast out-door work shops, were completely cured so that 
they walked with elastic step; and, benig thoroughly permeated and 
enthused with the rush, rattle, and rollicking style of the country;, 
being convinced that l^rahis of the finest culture were employed here,- 
as well as those persons of physical force and industry -they have 
become our able advocates wherever they go, and say to doubters and 
procrastinators, "We believed and acted as you do, once; but we 
have been cured, and our capital has been planted in the fair land of 
the Dacotahs, as an evidence of our conversion and the faith we have 
in its possibilities." All persons, in fact, that can appreciate true 
greatness and understand the worth of unnumbered natural advan- 
tages must be advocates for the settlement of our millions of acres of 
unoccupied lands. While the settlement of our Territory and its 



THE TEEEITOEY OF DAKOTA. 7 

prosperity in the past are almost fabulous, nevertheless many mill- 
ions do not believe it a fable now, consequently, others are coming to 
share a part of our rich inheritance, coming from every state in tiie 
Union and the Canadas, as well as from the old monarchies across the 
sea, where the right and might of kings are acknowledged, and where 
they are felt too keenly by the laboring classes, who prefer to come 
and enjoy the freedom aui advantages of our Grand American Re- 
public, that stands as a b ,acon light to all of the old aristocratic mon- 
archies of this whirling planet— a republic that is doing more to in- 
fluence the foreign powe -.^ of earth to adopt better laws and estab- 
lish a higher type of per.:onal freedom than any nation on the globe. 
It is generally conc3ded by all who are fully posted as it re- 
spects the development (,c any new country, and its future possibili- 
ties, that the managers of the railway lines in America are among the 
first to weigh in correct business scales the advant^Tges and disadvan- 
tages of all new countries, and Avhere they see a chance for a golden 
future they stretch out their iron arms across miles of territory to 
objective points, where, with their local traffic along their lines, they 
are ready for the development of the country and to assist those who 
desire to do their part in making the wilderness and the solitary place 
to bud and blossom like the rose and thereby amass a competency for 
themselves for the 6ncoming years. In this respect no land in the 
world has had the confidence of railroad kings to that degree that 
Dakota has had, and even now enjoys, as it respects paying invest- 
ments; and the great network of railroad tracks in Dakota by many 
trunk lines is proof that their confidence in the future of this vast- 
Territory has never weakened: Let us see. If we measure the num- 
ber of miles of railway lines in Dakota, we find that we have as the 
aggregate 2,657-more, in fact, than Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
Nebraska, Kentucky, or Georgia can boast of. The Northern Pacific', 
the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba, the Chicago, Milwaukee, and 
St. Paul, the Chicago and Northwestern, are already reaching out 
their long arms in our Territory and feeling after, with their fingers 
of steel, our golden grains, that can only be numbered by millions of 
bushels. The Burlington, Cedar Eapids, and Northern, the Chicago, 
St. Paul and Omaha, also the Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Pacific^lis 
well as the Rock Island, combinations are creeping Dakotaward, and 
will soon help make a more perfect network of railway lines thaii we 
now have. The aggregate earnings of the railroads in Dakota for 
the past year is $8,783,873, and the taxes paid into the Territorial 
treasury were $286,468. It is a well known fact that there cannot be 
any kind of public improvement in a new country that will enhance 
the value of land like the building of railroads; furthermore, it 



8 HISTORY OP RICHLAND COUNTY. 

affords facilities for marketing grain that are fully appreciated, es- 
pecially by those who have lived for years, perhaps, far removed 
from these important inland highways. 

Again, one of the most potent agencies in the growth and pros- 
perity of Dakota has been the speaking and persuasive power of her 
275 newspapers, leading in numbers all the New England States, ex- 
cept Massachusetts. 

Viewed from an educational standpoint, we see 2,000 school- 
houses, where 2,911 competent teachers are leading their pupils up 
the hill of science, leaving in the rear Vermont, Ehode Island, Flor- 
ida, and any one of fifteen other states that might be mentioned. The 
amount expended for education is $1,786,677. 

The post-offices in Dakota are greater in numbers than twenty 
odd states that might be named, and she furnishes more revenue to 
the Po,st-office Department than thirty-three of the United States. 
Such a record as this we defy the world to match. It affords unmis- 
takable evidence that the inhabitants of this grand territorial empire 
are a reading people. 

Churches are being built on every hand, whose temple spires- 
point heavenward, where the saints of all ages in harmony meet. The^ 
history of church building in Dakota for the past five years is with- 
out a precedent in any territory of the Union. Colleges and univer- 
sities, together with all necessary benevolent state buildings, have 
been and are receiving that Care and consideration to which they are 
entitled, and which is a sure word of prophecy for future growth and 
greatness. The capitol building at Bismarck is worthy and in keep- 
ing with our Territorial grandeur and progress, and will ho sufficient 
for years to come for the gathering of our law-makers. 

"^Mr. Dodge, the statisiician of the Agricultural Bureau at Wash- 
ington, gives us the following summary. He says: "The progress of 
settlement in Dakota has been a marvel of activity and enterprise. 
In 1880 the population was 135,177. The present territorial census 
makes it 415,664, of which there is in southern Dakota 262,515 and 
153 149 in northern Dakota. The number of farms in 1880 was 17,- 
435! They are now reported at 82,467 of which 44,656 are in the 
southern section and 37,811 in the northern section. So eager has- 
been the quest for free homes in this easily cultivated and fertile re- 
gion that the Territory outranks 17 of the 38 states in the number of 
existing farms. It will be a surprise to many that the number of 
farms in Dakota in 1885 is greater than was the number in Nebraska 
in 1880. It exceeds the number in Maine and, of course, that of 
every other New England State. It surpasses the aggregate of Cal- 
ifornia at that date, and of Maryland and Delaware. It is greater 



THE TERKITOEY OF DAKOTA. 9 

tliaii the combined number of Massachusetts, Ehode Ishind and 
Connecticut, and more than all the farms of Oregon, Nevada,' and 
Colorado m the west, and Ehode Island, Delaware, and Florida in 
the east, the six states taken togetiier. Nor are these farms all skel- 
etons. There are five times as many people in the Territory as there 
are farms, and productions loom grandly. In the estimates of this 
department of more than 500,000,000 bushels of wheat last year Da 
kota took position as the eleventh in rank in wheat production. No 
state east of the AUeghanies or south of the Ohio stood before it, and 
even ^^ isconsm held a lower place."' With such a showing as the 
above It IS no wonder that thousands are at a loss to figure correctly 
what Dakota will be at the end of the next decade. 

Of course, there are, as we have stated before, some objections 

to some things here; but as a whole she is the most deserving and 

attractive queen of all the territories, and offers superior advantages 

to all who may desire to settle within her borders. To give a con 

.cise statement of what Dakota is and has accomplished we append 

the to lowing statements, so intelligently arranged in the Ar</us, taken 

from the admirable report of Governor Pierce, transmitted to the 

Interior Department at Washington. It is a grand and brilliant 

-mirror into which the millions are invited to look, as it reflects the 

astonishing facts and figures of the growth and development of our 

.great northwestern territorial empire: 

By the inexorable logic of events the Great American Desert of 
Dakota-^the aboriginal heaven of creation, as General Clark would 
^caii It, lias been transformed into a garden and made to blossom like 
the rose; and the atlases that knew it of old now know it no more 
torever, for it has been completely expurgated from the maps. The 
-.history herein presented is such, perhaps, as no other territorv in so 
short a period of time has ever made. The facts and the 'fir^u^es 
which are given are from the report of Governor Pierce, recLtly 
transmitted to the Department of the Interior at Washington. They 
are therein presented as a whole; but care has been taken in their 
presentation here to separate those of the north from the south in 
view of the great importance that at the present time attaches to those 
two grand divisions of Dakota, north and south of the forty-sixth 
parallel— our " Mason's and Dixon's " line. 

It cannot be denied that they tell a wonderful story of the pro- 
gress and advancement of a portion of our countrv con^.idered by so 
many but a few years ago as almost uninhabitable, at least for a v/hite 
man, and that in respect to its agricultural resources it is without an 
equal. 

The census of 1880 is given collaterally, so that it may readily be 



■j^Q HISTORY OF KICHLAInD COUNTY. 

seen wherein and to what extent the i)oi.nhxtion, wealth, and proriucts 
o£ the Territory have increased. 

AVithcnit further comment liere on the subject, which may be 
discussed from so many and various points of view, we present the 
figures, and let them speak for Dakota^ 



I- of iiihiibitimts 

•of t'iirms 

f iinprovwl hin<l 

t' farms 

f fiiriiiiiiti- iuiplcincnts. 

f li\•(^ stoc-k 

f farm i)r()(Uietk)iis 

r of liorsc'S and inules.. 

r of woi'kiiiH: oxen 

r of milch cows 

r of other cattle 

r of sheep and lambs... 

r of swine 

1- of bushels of barley. • 
i-of bushels of corn.... 

r of bushels of oats 

1- o bushels of wheat — 

■rof tons of hay 

!rof bu. Irish potatoes. 
)ei' of jiounds of b\itter 
■r of pounds of wool... 
• of bushels of lla.\ 




"^ITSui^ata'^he above table develops several very inter- 
esting comparisons and deductions. 

While in cpiantitv and amount in everything except the value ot 
farm productions and' the crops of wheat and potatoes, south Dakota 
excels tlie ncn'th, it will be seen that the ratio of increase during 
the five years from 1SH0 to 1885 has been greater in the north than 
in the south; and more especially is it noticeable in the case of two 
of the principal cererd productions, oats and wheat; and, no with- 
standing the popula;. u and number of farms in south Dal^ta are 
nearly double those in the north, the production or wheat in the lat- 
ter is more than double that in the former, while that of oats is about 

^"^'"'on the other hand, it is observable that the other important ce- 
real, corn, in respect to its production, is beginning to assume large 
proportions, and in this case south Dakota is taking the lead. 

It is also interesting, while considering the enormous production 
of wheat last year, to observe how near the railroad olhcials came to 
cuessing it. Land Commissioner Lamborn, of the Northern Pacific 
railroad, in his communication addressed to Governor Pierce m October, 
1884, and published in his report for that year, ^«f ^^f.^^^^i^^^^j^'^^;;;'- 
servatively, however, as he admits-the wheat production at 30,000,000 
bushels, giving to south Dakota about 10,000,000 bushels; whereas 
in point of fact, it was nearly 13,000,000. It is north Dakota wheie 
the enormous increase is manifest, producing over 25,000,000 bushels. 



THE TEEEITOEY OF DAKOTA. 



11 



There IS still another production in Avhicli at jn-esent south Da 
kota excels^ though it is said that north Dakotr. this year will show 
m respect to it a greater ratio of increase than Hie south, and that! 
flax. There IS no account in the census of 1880 of any flax beins- 
raised in the United States, and the growth of 2,282,788 buThels of 
flax seed in 1884 is perhaps one of the greatest event; in theagiLl 

Dakota's fame aud excellence as a grain-growiii.. territorv n,,,! 
Its pecuha. advantages over so,ne of the .tlder s ates. al-e f^'Z 
seuted m the address delivered by Governor Pierce -ittVeTt ■" 
agricultural fair held at H„on recently. 11^:1;^^. " 
related rather to the yield of corn, oats, an.l wheat per acre thartt 
an,o.u,t of each produced, though in the last named ce'eal Dakot"™^ 
duced more than twrce as many bushels as Kansas, nearly tWtim; 
as many as Nebraska, and more than Kansas and Nebraska co^bired 

So, also an respect to hogs, the all-valuable crop of a corn coun- 
try, the number south of the forty-fifth parallel has increased in a 

tre"ot-:™tifB\"r' '" ^^^^^'f "■-* "' ■»'■"' ^«'»*- ^^^ 

true of south Dakota m respect to the number of milch cows and 
therr pr-oducts mdk, butter, and cheese, showing how, in the"e 

sota, a dairy country, leaving to the north the monopoly that fairlv 
belongs to It, as the greatest producer of the No 1 harf 
latioJ'*'? showing the increase and percentage of increase in popu- 
lation and the most important farm statistics of north and south m 
kota and of the whole Territory from 1880 to 1885 



Number of iuhabitants 

Numlier of farms 

Number of acres improved iaiici' ' 

Number of milch cows. 

No. other cattle, including- ranges' 

exclusive of working- oxen 
JS umber of swine 
Number of bushels of corn' 
Number of bushels of oats 
Number of bushels of wheat' 
Numbei- of pounds of butter. 




tive 



The following averages are -^l^^^h^te^^^^^h^g^^ 



Average No. acres to the total acreao-e 
m farming '^ 

Average value of farms .*."..'. 

Average value of farming implements 
to a farm 

Average value farm products to a"f arm 



North 
Dakota. 

204 

$2,122 

213 
620 



South 
Dakota. 



206 

$1,738 



141 
112 



The 
Territory. 

205 
$1,911 

169 
449 



12 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

In his speech tlie Governor said: "I find that in all kinds of' 
grain, except corn, our yield is larger than in Nebraska or' Kansas,, 
widely noted for their fertility. 

"The average yield of corn in Dakota last year was twenty-seven 
bushels and a fraction per acre; Kansas, according to the census of* 
1880, gave an average yield of thirty bushels, and Nebraska nearly 
forty-one. There are counties in southern Dakota which cannot be 
excelled as corn-producing sections in the world; but this, of course,, 
takes in the whole Territory. 

"In wheat Dakota averaged nearly eighteen bushels, Kansas and 
Nebraska each less than ten. In oats Dakota averaged thirty-four and 
a half, Kansas seventeen and a seventh, Nebraska twenty-six, and so 
on in various kinds of grain, there being scarcely an instance in 
which the yield in Dakota is not from one-fourth to one-half greater 
than in the states mentioned." 

A few deductions drawn from the census of 1880 relative to aver- 
age size and value of farms, farming implements, and farm produc- 
tions of the states above named, in comparison with Dakota, will 
doubtless be worthy of consideration. 

Dakota Kansas Nebraska 

1885. 18S0. 1880. 

Average No. of acres to a farm 205 155 157 

Average value of farms §1,911 11,699 $1,670 

Average value of farming imi)lements 

to a farm 169 113 123 

Average value farm products to a farm 449 377 500 

In respect to the cattle industry of Dakota, which is getting to 
be immense, Land Commissioner Lamborn, in the letter above re- 
ferred to, says: "The stock interest in the Bad Lands are develop- 
ing rapidly, and there are probably 150,000 head of cattle now rang- 
ing on the grazing lands of western and southwestern Dakota." This 
was in October, 1884. The census was taken in June, 1885, and it 
may be interesting and noteworthy, showing the capacity to estimate 
of the Northern Pacific railroad ofiiciais, that there were at the time 
last mentioned — 

Of cattle in the Bad Lands 80,670 

Of cattle in Fall Kiver country 61,258 

Total .141,928. 

and, if we add to this the number ranging over the Black Hills coun- 
try, there will be more than 200,000 altogether. 

" The following is a table accompanying Governor Pierce's re- 
port for this year, Avhich gives the ranch and range live stock for Da- 
kota and the valuation thereof:" 



THE TERRITORY OF DAKOTA. 13 

Horses. Cattle. Sheep. Value. 

Black Hills 9,112 152,865 63,205 $4,203,234 

Bad Lands and Little Missouri... 1,194 80,670 1,719,010 

Upper Missouri 250 501 34,905 

Souris, or Mouse 528 4,131 912 20^,140 

Totals 11,084 238,167 64,117 §6,165,289 

No wonder, with such facts as are here portrayed respecting the 
material prosperity of Dakota, that her assessed value should tower 
up to eighty-four million five hundred ninety-seven thousand four 
hundred ninety-eight dollars. 

In this connection we think it proper to pay special attention to 
the prosperity of the Red Biver Valley and give statements respect- 
ing its unbounded and unsurpassed richness of soil, together with 
all other advantages as a farming belt. There is no reason for doubt 
but that the Bed Biver Valley of the North has greatest advantages 
now as an agricultural district, with future possibilities that cannot 
easily be computed by figures. She is now, as she always will be, the 
cream belt of this Territory, the real Valley of the Nile for this 
western world. 

As it respects the six counties on the west of the Bed Biver and 
their wonderful productions, as compared with the other parts of 
Dakota and a few of the old states, the showdng from a comparative 
standpoint is beyond all precedent. The statements and compari- 
sons touching these counties, as we find them in the Sunday Argus, 
are of great significance, and we will give all readers an opportunity 
to look at the startling facts — statements, no doubt, that will make 
many eastern doubting Tliomases shake their heads and exclaim at 
the same time, "Can it be possible?" Here we have the statements: 

"Dakota's great gro^vi;h and unparalleled resources furnish texts 
for newspaj^er articles all over the reading world. The recent census, 
especially in its compilations, is a mine from which column after 
column may be dug, which, while every statement is true, is as en- 
trancing as any romance drawn from the most fertile imagination of 
the best novelist. Some of the results of comparisons seem beyond 
belief at first, until carefully verified by the facts. 

"Dakota is the wealthiest agricultural region on the face of the 
globe. Ofiicial statistics prove this assertion in the most startling 
manner. The proportion of agricultural earnings to every acre of 
improved land is larger in Dakota than in any state or territory in 
this incomparable Union. 

"Take the six counties on the west side of the Bed Biver; they 
extend from the forty-sixth parallel to the boundary line, making a 
strip about forty miles wide east and west by one hundred and nine- 



24 * HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

tv long north and south, and containing 7,325 square miles, with a 
population of 82,998. The main agricultural statistics are as follows.. 




; 5 E c S , 



THZ TEKKITOEY OF DAKOTA. 15 

THE TAULZT VS. DAKOTA, 

"Here are six counties out of nearly one hundred in the Terri- 
tory, and the increase in development and population is well shown 
in the following comparison, the first column l>eing the figures for all 
of Dakota as presented by the census of ISSO, and the second those 
of the six counties of the tied River A'alley from the census of lSS-5: 

Datoia K. R. Valley 

in 1?S». in ISSw 

Num]>er of farms 17.135 13,583 

Xum1>er of acres of improvetl land 1.15<Mlo 1.725.21S 

Value of farms ^*2-2.4"l.' "St .'<3S.(XM:.S01 

Value of machinery l '1 l.(H)5.591 

Value of live stock . ^ .::71 7.259.CH30 

Value of farm products 5,&18,811 13,809,058 

"By this it will be seen that n3w the Eed River Valley has not 
quite as many farms as the entire Territory' showed in 18S0, but the 
number of acres improved in these six counties is greater by 60,000, 
and the value exceeils the Territory by sl6,000!b;X). The Valley 
shows nearly twice the amount of farm machinery that was in use 
in all Dakota five years ago, while the live stock for the former is 
valuetl at ,^^1,000.000 more thr.n the latter. But the most astonishing 
comparison is the agricultural i)rotlucts. Xow the Valley has a cred- 
it of 813,809,058, while in 1880 Dakota showetl but 85.618,811, hardly 
more than the j>roduction3 of Cass County, which were S5.'202.153. 
These comparisons alone show the great development of Dakota in 
fi.ve years" time. 

THE VAIXEY vs. COX^TICTICrT. 

" The result is just as astonishing when comi^ared with any other 
state, either in whole or in part; it does not matter what state or ter- 
ritory is chosen. Take Connecticut, which has 1.612.18S acres of im- 
proved land against 1,725.21:S in the Bed Biver Valley, the former is 
valued at 8121.C>63.910, three times the amount of the Valley; value 
of maehiner}- is placed at 83,162.128, al>out a million less than the 
six counties mentionevL while the Xutmeg State leads on live stock by 
83,500,000, the figures l^eing given as $10,959,296. These well culti- 
vated acres and the stock thereon return an annual product of 818,- 
010,075, while the Bel Biver Valley produces 818,8C»9.058. 

" The Xutmeg State paid 8197.118 for fertilizers, while the Val- 
ley expended nothing for this purpose. 

•• The value of land per acre in the State is 871. here it is 821; 
the pro-luct per acre in the former is 811, and in the latter 88. 

"The Connecticut farmer, with the market at his door, realizes 
not quite fifteen per cent on the value of his improved land; the Val- 
ley farmer, thousands of miles from market, realizes more than twice 
this amoxmt, or thirty-three per cent on the value of improved land- 



16 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

The Latter has a population of 82,998, while Connecticut has 622,700 
to support. 

THE VALLEY VS. DELAWARE. 

"Take another of the small eastern states — little Delaware brags 
about her wonderful fertility. The census shows these facts: 746,- 
858 acres of improved land, about one-half of the amount in the 
Valley; but the value is nearly equal, the state showing $36,789,672, 
against about a million more here. Of farm machinery and live 
stock the Valley has twice the value in both that Delaware can boast 
of, but the entire agricultural product of the state of Blue Hen's 
Chickens is only $6,320,645, against over twice the amount here. 

"This little State expends nearly a half million dollars for fertil- 
izers — §467,228 — and still, with land valued at §50 an acre, the farm- 
er receives a return of $8.50 an acre, or sixteen per cent, while in 
Dakota it is twice that amount. 

THE VALLEY VS. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

"Take the more eastern states. New Hampshire, for instance, 
which has 600,000 more acres of improved land than the Valley, val- 
ued at $75,834,389, twice the amount for the six counties here. The 
value of machinery and live stock is nearly equal, and the total ap- 
praisement of the product is almost identically the same, New Hamp- 
sliire being $13,474,330, and the Valley §13,809,058. The former paid 
$165,393 for fertilizers, against the latter not one dollar. 

" In the Granit''> State the average value of improved land is $33, 
and the product $5.50 ■>or acre, or sixteen per cent — one-half of the 
returns in proportion to value in the Red River Valley. 

"There is anotn^jr feature which shows the superiority of the 
Territory. The counties mentioned have 7,325 square miles, and the 
State 9,005, showing more unimproved land in New Hampshire than 
in its Dakota prototype, and it is reasonable to suppose that the most 
of this in the State is not capable of production, while nearly all of 
the land in the Red River Valley will prove just as productive as that 
already developed, while the Granite State has 346,991 people to sus- 
tain against 88,998 in the Dakota counties. 

THE VALLEY VS. WESTERN STATES. 

"It may be intimated that it is unfair to compare this new west- 
ern land with the worn-out land of the East. Take three of the rich- 
est western agricultural states — Ohio, Iowa, and Illinois. 

"In Ohio the average value of improved land, as shown by the 
census, is $60, the product averages $8—13 i^er cent, against 33 in 
Dakota. 

"Iowa shows improved land valued at $30, and the product is $7, 
$1 less per acre, and only 23 per cent, against 33 in the Red River Valley. 



THE TERBITORY OF DAKOTA. 17 

"Illinois does not show even as favorably as her sisters mentioned. 
The average value of land is $39, the product is only $4 per acre, 
making the per cent a little over ten, and the Valley is three times as 
high. It is therefore no wonder the Suckers come to Dakota. 

" The percentage of agricultural product to the value of improved 
land per acre is 25 in the boasted State of Missouri, the value per 
acre being $23 and the average product $6. 

STOCK COMPARISONS. 

"The number of horses and mules in the six Dakota counties 
equals the number in Colorado, Montana, and New Hampshire, and is 
four times the number in Rhode Island and seven times Arizona's 
equine census. 

" Of working oxen the Red River Valley has more than either 
Illinois, Indiana, or Iowa. 

"In the way of milch cows even tliis new country excels Rhode 
Island, Arizona, or Montana; and of the number of other cattle the 
two States last named are left in the rear, and also Delaware. 

"Though sheep raising is but in its infancy, the Valley has nearly 
as many animals in its herds as Rhode Island. 

"There are more swine in the Valley than in Washington Terri- 
tory, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Utah, or Nevada. 

"More butter is also manufactured than in Colorado, Louisiana, 
Rhode Island, Utah, or Washington Territory. 

GRAIN COMPARISONS. 

"AVheat is Dakota's great crop, and the amount raised by the 
six Dakota counties is exceeded by but ten states and surpassed the 
amount raised by the State of Kansas in 1880 by one million bush- 
els, Kentucky by seven millions, Nebraska by five millions, New 
York by seven millions, and is one thousand times the crop of Massa- 
chusetts. 

"The hay crop is more than that of Kentucky, Tennessee, or Vir- 
ginia, and most of the smaller states. 

" The potato crop is four times that of Texas or Georgia, three 
times that of Mississippi, and forty times that of Arizona. 

"Iowa and Kansas people delight to state that 'you can't raise 
•corn in Dakota; not a single kernel will grow in north Dakota.' Not- 
withstanding this, the census shows as much corn raised in these six 
counties as in Arizona or Washington. 

"The oat crop of the Valley exceeds all but eleven states and 
territories, and is equal to the crop of the whole State of Nebraska. 

" Dakota is proud of the quality of its barley, but as yet the in- 
dustry is still in its infancy; notwithstanding this, the barley crop of 
ihe Red River Valley was equal to the aggregate raised by the fol- 



18 HISTOllY OF RICHLAND OC'UNTY. 

lowing iiiiipteen states: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Florida, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Ehode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, New 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Georgia, Texas, and Missouri." 



Richland County, 



Being situated ni the head of the ramoxis Red Eiver Valley, it is 
really the Tip-Top County of one of the most remarkable and pro- 
ductive agricultural belts in the world, and is the great railroad gate- 
way to the rich and inviting grain and grass fields of north Dakota 
by tho Breckenridge and Devil's Lake Extension of the great system 
of the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba Railway line; also for 
tho Northern Pacific, Fergus, and Black Hills southwestern rail- 
way ; and it also furnished an open door for the extension of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul combination, the Fargo and South- 
ern Division, by which that famous trunk line system entered the 
RvhI River Yalley of the North, making its way to Fargo, and in the 
near future, no doubt, will push to the regions of No. 1 hard that 
lie beyond. It may be truthfully stated that for "beauty of situa- 
tion," and offering the most inviting advantages, not only to the farm- 
ing fraternity, but to all those who desire educational and church 
privileges, she cannot be excelled when we taJce into consideration 
her juvenile years. Her schools, churches, business houses, mechan- 
ical industries, and the general make-up of society as a whole, with 
its wide-awake population and pushing, industrious, and never-tire 
spirit, all bespeak a bright ami successful future; and these excellent 
advantages are offered to the thousands who intend to seek new 
homes and desire to possess themselves of these extraordinary advan- 
tages on the most encouraging and equitable terms. 

Richland County is bounded on the north by Cass County; on 
the east by the Red River and the Bois des Sioux — the outlet of Lake 
Traverse — the dividing line between Minnesota and Dakota; on the 
south by Roberts County and the Sisseton Reservation, and on the west 
by Sargent and Ransom Counties. It contains, since the southern addi- 
tion, about fifty-five townships and, in round numbers, 1,08G,800 acres 
of land, nearly one-half being originally owned by the Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company. Taken as one comi)let8 whole, these lands, for 
grains, grasses, and vegetables, also for small fruits, are unsurpassed; 
and now thousands of acres besides those occupied can be secured 
at such rates as will warrant great profits in the future. The eastern 
border of the county, -being washed and drained by the Red River 
and Bois des Sioux, with their tributaries the Wild Rice and its 
branches, as well as the Sheyenne— by these, with many coolies con- 



20 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

nected therewith, and scores of lakes in the southwest part of the 
county, the lands are quite thoroughly drained; and those that are 
not are susceptible to thorough drainage at but little expense, com- 
paratively speaking, when we take into consideration the benefit to 
be derived therefrom. While there are a number of sections of low, 
flat land in the county, the time is not far distant when these lands, 
with proper drainage, will be the most valuable of any. Other states, 
that have been settled for a long time, verify this fact. Judging from 
past experience, we knoAv of no investment that can be more profit- 
ably made than that expended for thorough drainage; and in many 
parts of the county farmers who fully believe in the drainage system 
are giving evidence of their faith by their works, and reaping tlie re- 
ward of their doings. The entire length of the eastern border of 
Richland County, along the Bois des Sioux River and the Red, with 
their serpentine fiowings, is some fifty-five miles from south to north, 
the width twenty-four miles from east to west, and about forty-two 
from north to south on the west line, and thirty-eight miles wide at 
the southern extremity. In the southwestern part of the county there 
are numerous lakes, some being skirted with timber and beautified 
with shady groves, in and around which, in the sj)ring and autumn, 
countless fiocks of geese and ducks are found, constituting something 
akin to a hunter's paradise. Fishing and hunting along the rivere 
and watercourses has proved many times to be a pleasant and profit- 
able exercise and a grand opportunity to create a good appetite, even 
for chronic dyspeptics. The wheat fields in the fall, after harvest, 
give a wide scope to those who delight to bag prairie chickens, grouse, 
and snipe. The jack rabbit species are diminishing, and the prairie 
antelope and deer not often seen. 

Judging from the many bleaching bones of the buffalo scattered 
over the plains it is evident that the very nutritious grasses of this 
county afforded fine pasturage for the numerous herds that roamed 
at pleasure over the jjlains of Dakota years ago, before civilization 
claimed their grazing pastures for the home of the pale faces. 

As it respects our rivers and streams, to be somewhat specific, 
we remark, that the AVild Rice with its main channel and circuitous 
way, travels full sixty miles in our county from its place of entrance 
to the place of its departure. Along this river are some of the oldest 
settlements in the county, settlers being attracted along its inviting- 
shores by the many beautiful groves and belts of timber and the su- 
perior richness of the soil and its perfect drainage. Of this river, with 
its headwaters in Sargent County and the west and southwest part of 
Richland County, the main channel runs across townshii) 132, range 
52, southwest corner of township 132, range 51, and northeast corner 



THE COUNTY. 21 

of township 131, range 51; nlso across township 131, range 50, and 
township 131, range 49, and, flowing easterly, touches the northwest 
corner of township 131, range 48, thence, bearing northeast across 
township 132, range 48, it runs north, or nearly so, across township 133, 
range 48, and township 134, range 48, thence across the east i^art of 
township 135, range 49, and nearly through the center, north, across 
township 136, range 49, where the river crosses township 137, range 48, 
Cass County, and the southeast corner of township 138, range 48, 
where it empties into the Bed River nine miles south of Fargo. This 
crooked water artery of our county has a few tributary streams and 
feeders, the Antelope Creek being the principal one, the headwaters 
of the same beginning their flow in the vicinity of the sand hills, 
in the northwest and western part of the county, its two principal 
branches forming a confluence in township 133, range 48, west of the 
village of Dwight, the headcxuarters of the great New York farm, 
through which the Antelope runs eastward with its valuable and high- 
ly prized water supply, thence, suddenly turning its course a little 
west of north, it crosses township 133, range 48, leaving said town on 
the west line of section 5, thence running two miles north, where it 
empties into the "Wild Rice River in township 134, range 48. Along 
the course of this stream and its brandies there are farms of great 
worth being cultivated that would eclipse many farms '^way down 
east,'' towards sunrise, where so much unbelief is entertained, where 
farmers have labored for half a century to make the improvements 
that can be made here in ten years with the greatest ease, and not 
wear out one generation to make a good place for the following 
one. We will state right here, lest we forget it, that lands in Dako- 
ta that have been rated three and four on a scale of five would be 
called number one in the New England and Central States. The 
principal stream that cuts across the northwest corner of Richland 
County in a hurried manner is the Sheyenne River. Dakota has a 
Cheyeime River west of the muddy Missouri, towards the Black 
Hills; but our Sheyenne for northeastern Dakota is one of great im- 
portance, seeming to have taken special pains to travel a long way in 
a zigzag and seri)entine manner just to touch us and measure a few 
miles within our lines, and then on to the north. Its source is in the 
vicinity of Devil's Lake, and, flowing nearly south, it crosses the 
Northern Pacific at Valley City, in Barnes County, then, sweeping 
across Barnes some twenty-five miles after leaving the Northern 
Pacific crossing, it enters Ransom County in a sou.theasterly course, 
and in township 134, range 56, visits our enterprising western metrop- 
olis, Lisbon. Passing on southeastward for a few miles, it turns its 
course, and, running east across townshii) 134, range 55, it sweeps ■ 



22 HISTOIJY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY. 

nortliwnrd, after swinging around the circle, or hall' circle, thereby 
forming the great elbow, or the "Big Bend" of the Sheyenne, as it is 
sonietiuies called, llnnning in this direction for some twelve miles, 
it turns its course eastward, crossing township 135, ranges 54 and 53, 
■where it strikes the west line of Kichland County. Then, crossing the 
iiorthwost corner of townshii) 185, range 52, barely touching the south- 
east corner of township 13G, range 52, it enters toAvnshii) 130, range 51, 
at the southwest corner, and, running nearly northeast across townshij) 
13G, range 51, und the northwest corner of toAvnship 136, range 50, it 
enters Cass Comity, traveling about twenty miles in llichland, then, 
continuing its course in nearly a northerly direction, it empties inti> 
tlie Eed Eiver nine miles north of Fargo, traveling in Cass County 
fully thirly-tive miles. This river, with its tributaries, is the natural 
drainage for millions of acres, and sometimes in the spring of the 
year its volume of water is too great for its banks, and carelessly 
slops oA-er, just like many folks in the world. On the borders of this 
stream there are tine bodies and groves of timber that are quite ex- 
tensive within the bounds of Richland County, frcnn which thousands 
of cords of wotnl and rails have been cut and some buildings construct- 
ed. The farms along this watercourse are celebrated for wheat cul- 
tivation, also growing a variety of crops and being good for stock 
raising. For stock raising no hner or better locality can be found in 
the Bed River Valley. The grasses, the timber, the water, all con- 
spire to make it a very inviting field for those living here, also for 
stock breeders from the East who may visit the West for the purpose 
of engaging is such a lucrative enteri)rise. 

As we have been speaking of the lesser rivers and watercoiu-ses 
in our county, we feel, as we approach oiir eastern Avater-washed 
boundary, that it has an importance that is not easily measured with 
words ov described by them. The Bois des Sioux River is the oiitlet 
of Lake Traverse, a beaxitiful sheet of water resting lazily on the 
lieaillands or the tlividing ridge between north and south, whence its 
waters run north until they are mingled with the Avaters of the Otter- 
tail RiA'er at AVahpeton, the marriage of the tAvo taking the name of 
the Red River, that, Avith its strong, deep ciu-rent, hurries along iu 
its northern roiite, kissing the sloping borders of prririe meadoAA^s 
and beautiful AAoodlands, slaking the thirst of the loAving herds and 
of the thousands of men, Avomeii, and chikb'en scattered along its 
winding Avay, in the Avilderness and prairie Avaste and city full, bear- 
ing frequently on its SAvelling bosom Avater craft Avitli hundreds of 
tons burthen, hurrying Avith other mingling waters to the great Win- 
nipeg reservoir, and then iloAvn the I'hannel of the Nelson River and 
out into Huilson's Bay, the Avaters of Avliich are finally carried into 



THE COUNTY, 23 

the broad Atlantic Ocean, the great water liighway between Europe 
and America. 

As it respects Big Stone Lake, with its ti'ibutary streams and 
rivulets, the sister of Lake Traverse, it moves in an opposite direc- 
tion within its stone -walled slun-es, along its bower-like groves and 
woodlands, that are visited for pleasure in the summer months, mitil, 
finding an outlet in the Minnesota River, with its many feeders to 
swell the volume of its current, it hastens to the Mississippi, the 
"father of waters," and is taken in by the same. This broad 
river expanse, with its mighty current, bping the great water-way of 
the continent, is finally, after traveling thousands of miles, absorbed 
in the great southern reservoir, the Gulf of Mexico, where the ships 
of all nations ride at anchor and their flags are mirrored in the azure 
depths. 

Whether the lied River, that is now barely navigable as far 
south as Wahpeton, the capital town of Richland County, will, with 
the Bois des Sioux and the lakes just mentioned, together with the 
Minnesota River, ever become a navigable waterway to the Missis- 
sii)pi River by receiving appropriations from the government, to be 
expended therefor, we cannot tell; but, if the route is feasible and 
the water-w^ay opened, it woiild be worth millions of dollars to the 
great Northwest as a competing highway in shipping grain from the 
great xlmerican wheat belt to the grain centers of the world, loosen- 
ing very materially the thumb-screws of railroad kings. This pub- 
lic improvement is being discussed very thoroughly now by thous- 
ands of interested men, the most of whom claim it to be wdtliin easy 
reach of an accomplished fact. If it is i)ossible, there being plenty 
of money in the United States Treasury, the inhabitants of the great 
Northwest would favor very strongly an ai)propriation sufficient to 
make the work complete and thereby give employment to thousands 
of unemployed men. In fact, we, personally, favor all necessary ap- 
propriations iov all necessary improvements of our rivers and har- 
bors north, south, east, and west, making us as a nation what we 
ought to be, and which we are justly entitled to be. 

As it respects the soil along the Red River in Richland County 
and the many valuable and productive farms that have been and are 
being cultivated, llie heavy belts of timber and inviting groves and 
woodlands scattered along its border, that haA^e proved to be so 
necessary for the comfort of the early settlers, all these facts are 
well understood by those who have taken pains to look, and can be 
fully realized by those who live in other parts of the country, if they 
will but deign to come and see (for seeing is believing, as it respects 
the advantages alluded to ). The great Apostle to the Gentiles de- 



24 



HISTORY OF KICHLAND COUNTY. 



clared, nearly two thousand years ago, that "faith was the substance 
of tilings hoped for and the evidence of things not seen," but the or- 
der is reversed somewhat in this fast age, so that now Jews and Gen- 
tiles and their numerous progeny, the most of them, at least, must 
see the advantages of this wonder-land before they dare believe. 

As it respects the many inducements otfered to those who may 
desire to settle in this county, they will be noticed more specilically 
when we wTite up the different towns and villages along the lines of 
our railways. However, as it respects the assessed value in the dif- 
ferent toAvns and villages in the county, including the city of Wahpe- 
ton, for the year oi 1885, acconling to the abstract of the tax roll as 
furnished by the CountA* Auditor, it gives tigurcs that must interest 
all at this time and will be valuable for future reference. The fol- 
lowing table from said report tells its owni story : 



TOWNSHIPS. 



Ave 



VALU.A.TION. 



_ !Farmiag-; 
Acres S Lauds i 



Vilhiire [Personal! 
Lots Property! V 



Total 
aluat'n 



Eiijrle 

Wak'Ott township. 
Wiiloott villasre... 

Colfax 

Slieyemie 

Helendiilo 

West Eml 

Grafton 

Altoivrombie 

Dwijrht 



Oontt 



Danton 

Dexter 

Brandenburg' 

Be 1 f o rd 

Sununit 

Fairniount 

De ViUo 

IJrisrht wo od township 

Independent Sehool D. No. 1 of Briahtwood 

I'ark 

Wahpeton 

Total in covinty 



2L8:5»K'y5!f 

27 .347-10; 
4t>.0:>i)-5«l 
Ui,l«>-74i 
52,l>7-l-37l 
iU.197-V>5| 
2y.;Jo6-14i 
42.24^-22; 
4o,822-J>7 
3S,T15-<SJ' 
;U,44o-v<(> 
]7,lKVH)2 
25>,iK)t>-lti 
27,S9«>-70 

;$0.344-52 

;5.SKI0.8,J 
2S,345-«> 

55o-^ 



07,l>2."> ; 

• 4.5m) 
76..Vt(> 
i:5ii.;iir> 

42.r)«iO 
16t.l,l>44 
lltJ.OtO 
llS>,S>SK), 
liv.,0.->U 
2'>.">,.v>t); 
12o,SS'»i 

1112, ir.^ 

&>.:«;,■ 

ia;$.7ti 

llCi.tHt"; 

4">,7S-) 
10I,71U 
ii7,5}0. 
11,267, 

7(>,.")»7: 

18.270: 



7,9S?I 

7,«a> 



4.!^79; 

4.r.{.i, 
4.4t>5: 

I 

1.475 



;!12.9t^ 



47,9^ $ 
51,5<X1 
14,504 
24,081 

2j<,504 
7.9oi> 
7,5S5| 
10,660 
4(\403 
ti2,8S5! 

5(i,5;JS! 

13,S09i 
1H,1S1J 
2;5,l>77 
;U,977' 
25,328 
251,000 
20,5711 
S,183 
ji,083' 
16.»(0 
277.71!> 



145,907 
l,')6,9St) 

27,4*7 
108,266 
158,829 

50,490 
168,229 
116.730 
171.372 
252,670 
296„->5:i 
139,194 
119,811 

87.019 
i;>8,737 
127 ,3? to 

83,010 
122,275 

65,763 

16.300 

98..T37 
6118.977 



; 589,971-48 $2.073.4;X);;? ;!.->2.4831f 82S).496 $ 3,2.^5.409 



RICHLAND COUNTY SCHOOL REPORT. 



Ill giviiig a correct report as possible as it respects the schools 
of Eichlaiul County and the laws in force respecting the same, we 
asked Mr. W. M. House, our efficient County Superintendent, to give 
us a statement, which he kindly consented to do, and we have it in 
tlie following report, which speaks for itself: 

EICHLAND COUNTY SCHOOLS. 

BY W. M. HOUSE, SUrEKIXTEXDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Ill making this sketch I have availed myself not only of the rec- 
ords of the superintendent's office, but also of Territorial reports and 
other soiu'ces of information. At the beginning of the school year 
commencing June 80, 1884, there were 1.781 children of school age 
in the countA" ; of this number 1,312 were enrolled in schools. At 
that time the value of the school property of the county Avas ^34,587. 
There was paid out during the year for school property $8,652, 
making a total valuation of school property in the county of more 
than 843,000. The census of June, 1885, makes the number of per- 
st>ns, fi-oni 7 to 10 years of age, '2,120. There are now 90 schools in 
the county, with an average attendance of about twenty pupils. 

By an act of the Legislature, approved March 8, 1883, a radical 
change and entirely new departure was made in the law for the main- 
tenance of common schools. The provisions of this act applied 
throughout the Territory with the exception of eighteen specified 
counties. Eichland was not one of the excepted counties, but the 
law aj^plied here, and has occasioned a wonderful amount of dis- 
cussion ; and oi^inion has generally been outspoken against the new 
Inw. The new law abolished school districts andrequii-ed the organ- 
ization of school townships. 

The township system is the creation of a large permanent school 
corporation, containing fiom thirty-six to iiinetA* square miles, called 
a school township. Every organized school township is declared a 
distinct municipal corporation for school purposes, and by the proper 
corporate name of the school toASTiship has power to sue and be sued, 
to hold and dispose of any real or personal property, and to manage 
as many schools therein, through one boai'd, as the people may need. 
Throughout each entire corporation taxes, school privileges, and 
choice of schools are equal to all. It is many schools in one corpo- 



26 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

ration, with free choice between the schools by the people, thus saving 
entirely the contests about boundaries and changes of area, divisions 
and subdivisions of school districts. Each head of family sends to 
the school of his choice. It leaves the cost of building each and all 
the school houses upon all the township. The district plan made 
large districts and cjiitinually divided them and arranged their 
boundaries, causing one part to help build a school house for the 
other and then securing division in order, as a last resort, to secure 
the privilege of building another house for themselves. In time a 
part of the two districts would secure separation and form a new one 
to secure the right to build another house. Often other subdivisions 
and rearrangem3iits were male with like effect. There was no divi- 
sion of property, seldom even of money on hand that had been raised 
by tax upon all. Often great struggles occur to keep the district 
entire and thus to secure the taxes, in disregard of school privileges 
of the part seeking separation. The school district plan demands a 
separate school corporation for every school and an isolation of this 
school by barriers of boundary from every person outside, however 
convenient to him it might be. Sometimes the district of least as- 
sessment has the largest number of children. The ability of these 
to maintain schools varies greatly; some would have nine months, 
while other districts could have but four with the same tax rate. I 
have mentioned some of the disadvantages of the old district system. 
And although in some cases the township plan has worked injustice 
to some in this county, I believe the greatest difficulty has been in 
making the change from one plan to another. The new law provided 
for an equalization of the property of the old school districts imme- 
diately on the organization of the school townships. The law pro- 
vided that where a district had taxed itself to build a school house, it 
should be credited with the value of its property, and a correspond- 
ing tax remitted. But as there was, in this county, a more or less 
general belief that the township school laAV would be repealed, in 
many cases the equalization was not made and it became too late to 
legally make it. 

Now that the change has been fully wrought, I believe the town- 
ship system will be found superior in many respects. If school dis- 
tricts be the corporations and three officers required permanently for 
each, we have a vast array of civil officers. The township system 
will not make men more honest or more capable, but it will and does 
select better and more capable men as a rule, and it will continue to 
improve in this respect; it gives fewer occasions for controversies 
relative to boundaries; it equalizes among a large community the 
burdens imposed in the erection, repairs, and outfit of school houses; 



COUNTY SCHOOL REPORT. 27 

it amriliilates forever the possibility of cutting up a population into 
small districts; it leads to tlie erection of more commodious school 
houses, Avith larger accommodations and means of instruction; lastly, 
it is now established and can be made of great benefit to all who 
come within its influence. 



W. M. HOUSE, 

Superintendent of Schools 

FOE 

• BICHLAND COUNTY. 



Office at the Court House, 

WAHPETON. - - DAKOTA. 



WAHPETON. 



This prosperous town, the gateway city of the upper Red River 
Valley, is worthy of being the county seat of one of the very best 
counties in Dakota ; and its history is quite interesting — in fact, really 
romantic in many respects, and many incidents connected with its be- 
ginnings are stranger than fiction. In conversing with Captain Rich, 
•jone of the earliest settlers and present town-site proprietor, also with 
William Root, proprietor of Root's addition, Hon. Folsom Dow, ex- 
sheriff Moses P. Propper, Hon. J. W. Blanding, and John M. Rug- 
gles, Register of Deeds, and many others v.ho in an early daiy set their 
feet for the first time on the eastern border of Richland County, they 
liave given items that in the aggregate cannot but be interesting to 
all who now are living in Richland County, and in the coming years 
Avill interest those who may conclude to make their homes in Wahpe- 

' ton and the surrounding country. We do not expect to make a record 
of all interesting events that have transpired since the first or earliest 
settlement, nor even all facts that have been communicated, but will 
endeavor to spread a few of the most value on the pages of this work. 
Wahpeton, before the year 1869, had been visited by many per- 
sons, but not many real settlements took place until 1869, except 
Blong the rivers, when, in fact, all the lands were included in the 
Sisseton Reservation belonging to the Wahpeto'n and Sisseton tribes. 
The first settlement where Wahpeton is located was called Richville 
until the first post-ofiice was established in 1871, taking the name of 
Chahinkapa (the End of the Woods), and Folsom Dow appointed 
postmaster. But in 1873 the name of the ofl&ce was changed to Wah- 

'peton, and John Kotschevar appointed as postmaster, at which time 
the county was organized. Some of the persons who were living in 
the place from 1871 up to 1873 were M. T. Rich, Folsom Dow, D. 
Wilmot Smith, Ransom Phelps, William Root, Samuel Taylor, Albert 
Chizek, Simon Woodsum, Matt Lawrence, and a few others. 

The ferry boat for the Bois des vSioux River commenced running 
on the 4th of July, 1871, and was run five years under the control and 
captaincy of M. T. Rich, when a new bridge was built, by subscrip- 
tion, across the Bois des Sioux, or the "Wood of the Sioux,"' just 
above its confluence with the waters of the Ottertail River, that 
sweeps down from the northeast, draining the vast territory of the 
Park Region of Minnesota, the union ol the two constituting the Red 



WAHPETON. 2&. 

JRiver. Mr. Bich built the first house, in the year 1871, on the same 
lot where his present commodious residence stands. Said house was 
14x18 feet, with a lean-to or addition to the same 12x18 feet. The 
building was made of hewed logs and sided with pine siding floated 
clovn\ the Ottertail. Jacob Movrin erected the first store building in 
town in 1874, and engaged in general merchandising, following the 
same only one month, when he was instantly killed by lightning 
during a severe thunder shower. Mr. John Kotschevar purchased 
the goods and building, and carried on a successful trade until 1885, 
when he sold out to his brother Jacob, who is doing business at the 
old pioneer headquarters, one of the real historic places in town. 
The next building was constructed by M. T. Eich and John Q. Bur- 
bank on the south side of Dakota Avenue at the corner west of 
Schmitt's Commercial Hotel, where the building now stands. This 
building, although small (16x22 feet), was used by all the county 
officers for their respective duties until the first court-house was con- 
structed. There being no better room for a jail, the attic was used as 
a cooler and reformatory apartment, and was looked upon as a terror to 
evil-doers; but when prisoners were impressed that their punish- 
ment might be too severe, they looked at the attic window as a hope- 
ful way of escape. 

The first school in the early days of Wahpeton was kept in a 
building 12x12 feet in size, and taught by Miss Mary Keating, now 
the wife of Mr. Shea, u prosperous farmer on the Wild Eice Eiver; 
Mnd the second teacher v/as Miss Sarah Eich, now the wife of Hon. 
John C. Pyatt. The number of scholars at the first, as reported, wa« 
fi'om four to five; and, when the weather was extremely propitious, a 
half dozen or more were in attendance, enjoying the great privilege 
of taking their first lessons in climbing the hill of science. If we 
knew the names of these early Dakota pupils, we certainly would 
give them, for they may possibly be heard from in the great arena of 
politics and the intellectual conflicts of life, or become the presiding 
spirits and bright examples for imitation in the well regulated house- 
holds A\here no name is spoken that has that charm which the name 
of mother has. 

In the year 1871 the railway now called the St. Paul, Minneap- 
olis, and Manitoba reached v,dth its iron arms and commercial and 
ho[)efnl interests the village of Breckenridge, now the county seat of 
Wilkin County, Minnesota, where the end of the western division 
was located, round-house and machine shops built that now remain, 
not, however, without the strong probability of their being moved 
over the river to Wahpeton, an event warmly cherished and discussed 
by live Wahpetonians. What the future ^Yi\\ unfold and make mani- 



30 HI8T011Y OF KICHLAND COUNTY. 

fest is lockeil up in the "brainy work and tliong^lit sliop" of James J. 
Hill, Esq., and those associated with him in other plans and projects 
where the most ducats can be seen -and future •■ x)ossibilities the most 
sparkling and inviting. . This pioneer railway., reaching so far to the 
northwest from St. Paid, and then running, north towards Queen 
Victoria's American possessions, afforded great advantages to the 
early settlers, and encouraged thousands ,to settle along its iron path- 
way and work up farms on the vast i)rairie lands of the great North- 
wests, that would have remained untouched fpr years by the farmer's 
plow,- and the soil and sod uncombed by his harrows and drags. 

As heretofore statod, in the year 1871: the Manito])'! raihvay 
touched the Red River Yalley at Breekenridge, . and this hurried up 
the organization of Richland County, which took jAace in 187H, and 
the Indian titles in the county were extinguished. 

Governor Pennington, occupying the gubernatorial chair, ap- 
pointed the county commissioners, design; vting the following named 
gentlemen: J. AY. Blanding, Chairman; 1). Wilmot Smith, M. T. 
Rich. The following officers were appointed to serve until the No- 
vember election of said year, ( 1873 ) : Register of Deeds, Hugh R. 
Blanding; Treasurer, John Quiney Burbank; Sheriff, William Root; 
County Register and ex-officio County Clerk, John M. Ruggles; As- 
sessor, Hans C. N. Myhra. 

At the lirst election, in 1873, there was but one voting precinct, 
and that was Wahpeton, where the i)olls were opened and about sixty 
votes were cast. Reckoning the population at five for every voter, 
there was a population of 300 in the county at that time. The follow- 
ing officers were elected: County Commissioners, John Smidt, 
Chairman; Alex McCall, John Kotschevar; County Treasurer and 
ex-officio Judge of Probate, John Q. Burbank; County Register and 
€x-officio Clerk, John M. Ruggles; County Assessor, Hans 0. N. 
Myhra; Slieriff, Job Herrick; County Sui)erintendent of Schools, 
John M. Ruggles; Justices of the Peace, S. H. Fowler, John Hasle- 
hurst, William Weiss. 

From the year 1873 up to the year 1879 the County of Richland 
was being filled up quite rapidl}^ by persons from all sections of the 
country and representing all nationalities, especially so during the 
years of 1877 and 1878. Wahpeton, during these years, by her 
desirable location and the exceedingly rich farming lands surround- 
ing, enjoying as she did the benefits afforded by the Bois des Sioux 
and the Red Rivers, was adding to her population that class of per- 
sons who have the ambition to go and get to the fi'ont, using their 
combined labors to make of sparse settlements villages, mould and 
erect cities, putting them on the gi-eat highway of prosperity by that 



WAHPETON. 31 

public spirit without wliicli the Avorld would be a hive of drones. 
The writer remembers very distinctly his lirst visit to Wahpeton 
in the spring of 1879, Avhen the beginning of the boom for Dakota 
and its towns began to be felt very sensibly. We were out looking 
for land, having the description in our pocket. Well do we remem- 
ber meeting, for the first time, the county officers as they were sand- 
wiched in their 7x9 court-house, where elbow room was held at a 
premium. Not a single soul amouilg them had a sad countenance, 
but all were affable and extended the right hand of fellowship and 
seemed anxious to talk about lands that were being offered cheap for 
cash. At this time the fathers of the town that I met were as f o 1- 
lows: Messrs. Blanding, Ruggles, Haslehurst, Propper, Eich, Boot, 
and others. They were all as well acquainted Avith the towns, ranges, 
sections, and quarters as a bright school-boy with his alphabet. The 
land that I wished to look at was in the German settlement, in the 
vicinity of Lubinow's, I believe, and, although it was rather late and 
the sun was sinking fast in the west, I inquired for a rig, and Smith 
De Silva was called as being ready for such jobs. We were soon on 
the move, and, when night overtook us, we were at the farm house of 
our mutual friend Mr. L. J. Moore, one of the earliest settlers on the 
Wild Eice. When we asked for lodgings, we found we could stay, 
but it might be a little noisy for us, as there was to be a dance there 
that evening; but our host informed us that there were beds in the 
granary, and we could occupy them. I saw instantly that De Silva, 
our guide, was pleased to think he had a good opportunity to trip 
the " light fantastic toe" to the sound of the violin, which he pre- 
ferred rather than sleeping with his eyes open. Of course, we, be- 
ing called a Methodist and more advanced in years, left the company 
to their own enjoyment, and were soon under cover, half sleeping and 
waking in a kind of musical mood, thinking about the land that we 
were searching after. Our sleep for the night was good, the music 
perhaps acting as a lullaby for us, and we were ready for an early 
start in the morning, De Silva being already up and dressed and anx- 
ious to engage in an exciting day's work to keep the curtains from 
falling over his eyes. We swung around the circle in a somewhat 
zigzag style, feasting our eyes on prairie lands as level and as rich 
as a garden, crossing and recrossing the Wild Eice, making a few 
calls, but gene.-ally finding the farmers gone, and, De Silva not be- 
ing a German linguist, and the writer ditto, by reason of which we 
could not always converse with the ladies, started for Wahpeton, 
concluding that the land was very rich but too far from Wahpeton, 
and to market grain and secure fuel would be too much for any on© 
who was a novice in farming. As a result of our labors we found 



32 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

ourselves in Wahpeton that evening on time for tlie early train, no 
land purchased, and De Silva perfectly satisfied. He never gave us 
any credit for being the means of taking him to a country dance, but 
we parted as good friends and have never seen him to recognize him 
since, but understand he lives in Richland County and is a tiller of 
the soil. 

This year we visited the section of country that we visited at 
that time, and the change is wonderful. We have seen, of late, Mr. 
Moore, and he did not know that we were one of the twain that found 
comfortable quarters at his homestead on said occasion. It was a 
wonder to us where so many young people came from. 

From the year 1879 up to this year, 1886, it is really wonderful 
what a change has taken place. Then the population of Wahpeton 
could not have been over 200 souls, all told; but the census for 1885 
gives us nearly 2,000, and the county at large a population of over 
9,000, a population, to be sure, strongly foreign in the country, but 
in the towns along the lines of our railways there is an increase of 
American nationality, a mixture that warrants great activity of brain 
and muscle for the future. 

For a toAvn not more pretentious than Wahpeton was in the 
years of 1878-80, looked at as she really appears in the beginning of 
188(>, with her 2,000 population, railway advantages, improved highways 
public buildings, school houses, and churches, her benevolent and civic 
societies, banking institutions, steam elevators, and patent roller ilour- 
ing mill, wheat warehouses, hotels, manufacturing establishments, 
and scores of business places, the shoAving is really marvelous. When 
we look at the map of the original townsite oAviied by M. T. Rich, and 
Root's addition, also a number of additions and sub-divisions besides, 
we can see that Wahpeton's growth has attracted the attention 
of capitalists to an astonishing degree, and that its future jirosperity 
must be in i)erfecfc harmony with its past progress and present busi- 
nesslike statiis. As it respects deals in realty or real estate for the 
past twelve months, they have not been many, but the erection of 
new churches and residences and the repairing and additions to those 
that were already built, are signs of a healthy condition not found in 
many towns whose population even exceeds the population of our 
county capital. 

In approaching Wahpeton from any point of compass one of the 
most stately buildings in appearance among other imposing struc- 
tures is the brick court-house with its stone facings, w'hose fine arch- 
itectural completeness for a structure of its size and cost is admitted 
by all to be quite satisfactory, although there are some who would 
prefer to look at a tower with its dome a little nearer the clouds, a 



WAHPETON. 33 

few feet higher fi'om "terra tirma." This is the second court-house 
and jail built, the first, destroyed by fire soon after its completion, 
costing about 825,000, and the present edifice costing in the aggre- 
gate nearly as much. The inhabitants of Eichland County have good 
reason to feel proud of their commodious court-house, which is far 
superior to many in counties that have been orgr.iiizod for a quarter 
of a century. The high school building, built of brick, costing about 
$10,000, crowned with a fine bell tower, is a grand educational mon- 
ument that speaks in language too plain to be misunderstood, that 
the thorough mental culture of the rising generation is not and will 
not be neglected. Professor Crocker, with his able corps of teach- 
ers. Miss Austin and Miss Bandall, in the several departments, is 
giving that vigilant oversight to the educational convention that war- 
rants mental health, strength, and progress that can only be assured 
by the most untiring efforts. The moral and spiritual culture of the 
people is not neglected but well cared for. Wahpeton has six 
churches, two Catholic, one Congregational, one Methodist Episcopal, 
one Baptist, and one Protestant Episcopal. There are four hotels, 
sis boarding houses, two restaurants, one opera house, three banks, 
three steam elevators, besides a number of wheat warehouses; one 
novelty works establishment, four farm machinery agencies, four 
lumber yards, also coal and wood yards, eight stores of general mer- 
chandising, two groceries, three hardware establishments, three 
clothing stores, tw^o furniture warehouses, two drug stores, two hos- 
pitals, two jewelry stores, three millinery and dress-making bazaars, 
three fruit stores, tw^o photograph galleries, one regular boot and 
shoe store, and three boot and shoe shops, two flour and feed stores, 
one roller rink, two livery stables, two wagon and carriage shops, four 
barber shops, two harness shops, one wooden cistern manufactory,, 
one brewery, fifteen saloons, and one beer bottling establishment. 

Wahpeton has three railroads and three well built depots; one 
grand system of waterworks costing about $50,000, one of the best 
evidences of a healthy public spirit, economy, and convenience; two 
hose companies, and one hook and ladder company, whose members 
are ever on the alert and ready for service at the first fire alarm. 
The three weekly newspapers, the Gazette^ Times, and Mercury, since 
their establishment have contributed largely by their able advocacy 
to the growth of our gateway city for the Upper Eed Eiver Valley. 
There is a Masonic Lodge, one Odd Fellows Lodge, and one Grand 
Army Post of the Kepublic, all well cared for by their respective 
memberships, and each increasing in influence and abounding in 
good works. The Farmers' Association for Richland County has its 
headquarters in the city and its branches established and oflicered in 



84 HISTOKY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. . 

other towns. The members Jiave a A^ery important work on their 
hands, one worthy of all praise and requiring unity of effort. As it 
respects one of the musical departments, it is represented by the 
members of the "Wahpeton Cornet Band," that have gained very en- 
couraging proficiency since their organization, and are capable, as 
they have done in other towns, of sustaining their good name abroad 
as well as at home, where, with their choice selections and artistic 
touches, they have discoursed sweet and appropriate music on many 
occasions. There is nothing in this world like thorough training in 
the arts and sciences, and, in fact, in all professions and callings of 
life, to warrant that perfection, the jn-ice of which is far above rubies 
in the eyes of a critical world. There are six insurance agencies in 
the city, besides a home insurance company with headquarters at 
Wahpeton, the "Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company." It is 
prepared to do a full line of insurance business. It insures against 
loss by fire, lightning, tornados, cyclones, or hail. The by-laws and 
regulations of this company ought to warrant a safe and profitable 
business, as it is officered with men who understand the work 
thoroughly. The legal profession is ably represented by sou^e 
twelve laAvyers, or more, and eight law' firms, all ready for busineiis 
with their legal briefs and Blackstone's lore and literature, and those 
who have written since his day. The followers of Esculapius, who 
are practicing the healing art in Wahpeton, are attending strictly to 
their profession. The medical fraternity is composed of such skill- 
ful men as Drs. Swaine, Keno, Eockwell, Nuckolls, and Wiensma. 
Both schools are represented. All have been engaged in their call- 
ing for years, so that with the theory of medicine there is coupled 
that other important qualification, a "practical knowledge," that 
ought to insure success in treating the many diseases to which the 
human race is exposed. No blessing is fully enjoyed without good 
health. 

SOCIETIES. 

CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

The following historic items respecting the Catholic Church in 
Wahpeton were furnished by the Eev. Father Hepperle, present 
pastor of the society: A few Catholic families came to Dakota in 
the vicinity of Wahpeton in the year 1871. In the year 1872 Rev. 
Father J. G. Tomazin visited the Catholic families for the first time, 
and celebrated mass in the house of the well-known Mr. Albert 
Cliisik. In 1875 the Catholic congregation was organized and num- 
bered about twenty-five families. A parcel of land containing four 
acres was secured fi'om Mr. F. Dow for a cemetery. Services were 



WAHPETON. 35 

held monthly for some time at Mr. John Kotschevar's store. After 
the school- liouse at Breckenridge was finished, that building was 
used for divine worshij). In 1877 funds were raised for building a 
church, for which purpose Mr. M. T. Rich donated three lots. The 
members of the congregation, in deciding the location of the church 
building, formed two parties, the one being in favor of having the 
church built on the four acres secured for a cemetery; the others, 
considering the place too far away from the town at that time, suc- 
ceeded in securing the present location for the church building. This 
building which has since been somewhat enlarged, was located on the 
lots which have been lately destined for a new large church, and for 
which purpose rocks for a foitndation are on the ground. The first 
resident priest was Rev. Father A. Bergman, who arrived October 1, 
1878. He visited occasionally, from this place, Elizabeth and Mc- 
Cauleyville in Minnesota, holding divine service. After two and a 
half years of hard labor he left in July, 1881, and was succeeded by 
the present Rev. Father George Hepperle. The number of Catholic 
families having increased since the building of the Catholic church, 
^he edifice was enlarged in the year 1882. The spire and point of the 
,;hurch being struck by lightning May 17, 1883, were repaired, and 
the spire greatly improved in appearance. The church building and 
parsonage were removed to the present location in 1884. In that 
year the Bohemian families, about fifty-two in number, by consent of 
the Rt. Rev. M. Marty, D.D., built a good-sized and fine appearing 
church for those speaking the Bohemian language. It is only to be 
ascribed to the scarcity of priests that speak their tongue that they 
have not got a priest for themselves, independent from those that 
speak English and German, and who form the original St. John's 
congregation. The number of Irish and German families of St. 
John's church is about ninety-five. Besides the daily service held 
usually at a quarter past 8 o'clock A. M., St. John's congregation has 
service three Sundays a month. In 1881, under the direction of the 
present rector and with the consent of the Rt. Rev. Bishop St. Bon- 
iface, a congregation was organized; and a little church was Ijuilt, 
accommodating the nine families near Barney Station, in the year 
1883. The same year, 1881, Sts. Peter and Paul congregatiiin was 
organized with nine families, and a little church was built in 1882. 
The same year, 1881, St. Joseph's congregation was organized with 
fiiteen families, and a little church built. In the year 1883, the 
Northern Pacific railroad having been finished, and Mooreton Station 
being a matter of fact with a prospect for a little town, four Catholic 
families living there petitioned the Rt. Rev. Bishop for his consent 
to have a little church built at that place. The petition was granted. 



'>f» HIHTOKY OF IHCHLAI^D COUNTY. 

the cliurcli built nivl linislio, I Thero are now nine tV.milies there, 
forming the congregation. 

The Catholic school was c>T)'Mie(l in 1881 by Rev. Father A. Berg- 
man, twenty-three scholars atlejiding. January 2, 1882, school again 
opened, sixty-seven cliildren b-; iag enrolled during the term. From 
September 11, 1882, until June 29, 1883, eighty-nine children Avere 
attending, the average attendance being forty-eight. From Sei)tem- 
ber 10, 1888, to June 80. 1884, ninety-one cliildren attended, the 
average attendance being lifty-f(uir. From September 1, 1884, to 
June 80, 188;'), 118 children attc-nded, the average attendance being 
jifty-six. 

PlHsr ('ONGi;i-:(i\TIONAL CIIUIUIT. 

The First ( Vingregfitional Church of Wahpett)n is in a healthy 
condition ami, considered as a poAver for good, exerting an influence 
that si)eaks in unmistakable language of the saving leaven of the 
Gospel of peace, the moulding a.nd assimilating truths as proclaimed 
by him "who si)ake as never man spake." The following is the 
report furnished by the clerk: The First (Congregational Church 
of Wahpeton, Dakota, was organized with twelve members, on the 
22d day of April, 1881. At the i)resent time there are sixty-one 
members. This society has a line church building, lately repaired 
and l)eautili(Ml internalh*, having been papered iuid painted in the 
most modern and artistic style. The bell that has been placed in 
the toAver is <.)ne of fine tone, and used foi' the. benefit of all the 
churches in the cit}-. The cost of the church building was, at the 
time of its completion, i:?2,200. The parsonage is one of decided 
merit, costing the society full $l,f)00. The first i)astor Avas the Eev. 
M. 8. Hall, Avho serAed the chui-ch from the time of its organization 
up to April, 1882. Then tlie R^v. E. D. Curtiss Avas employed, Avho 
began to officiate July 1, 1882, and remained just cme year, Avhen the 
^e,\. G. B. Barnes, the j)resent ])astor, Avas employed, who com- 
menced his ministrations on tlip 2d day of September, 1888. The 
officers are: Trustees. Sauuiel Taylor, Folsom l)<iw, F. C. Giddings, 
T. W. KeUogg, J. Pi. Ford; Deacons, Samuel Taylor, C. N. AVood, 
E. J. Hughes, Vs'm. AA'l;ite: (^lei-k, J. W. Hayward: Treasurer, 
E. 1). ]3ari.er. 

FI]>ST BAPTIST OHUIU'H. 

The First Baptist Clui'ch in Wahpetoji Avas organizcHl October?, 
1882, Avith nine mend)t>rs, under the able superAisit>n of the ReA*. E. 
E. Tyson, avIio also t)rgani/.e(l a church in Breckenridge, and, as re- 
p<_)rted, the nine members here Avitlnlrew and j\)ined the organization 
in Breckenridge in the month of November, 1885. Then the Rev. C. 
B. RockAA-ell, M. D., As-as chosen pastor. • This st)ciety bought the 



WAHPETON. 3T 

school-house i:i Breckenridge after the new oue was built, and by 
thorough rep firing it was changed into a very convenient meeting 
house, whe:- ; the society holds divine service regularly. The society 
also purchased the school-house in Wahpeton, and the same is used 
for church purposes, where a goodly congregation attends the ministry 
of the word by the pastor, Eev. Mr. Rockwell. The past history of 
this church, its zeal according to knowledge, and present prosperity, 
is really a sure word of prophecy for its future growth and iniluence, 
and at no distant day we hope t(^ see the tens multiplied by thous- 
ands. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

AVe are under great obligations to Mrs. C. M. McNaughtovi, one 
of the elect ladies of the Protestant Episcopal Church, for the Pollow- 
ing facts respecting the organization and growth of this important 
and churchly organization . This society wjis organized by Bishop 
Walker, D.D., at the time he lirst visited the city, on the 15th of No- 
vember, 1881. The first rector, Eev. H. J. Gurr, held service in the 
Opera House, September 17, 1882, and for nearly two years worked 
earnestly for the best interests of the church, endearing himself ic* 
many by his Christian deportment and genial nature ; but this climate 
proved to be unsuited to the health of Mrs. Gurr, and he left for the 
Pacific Coast, where he was in liopes to find for her a more congen- 
ial climate. He left in the month of March, 1884. We will state 
that, previous to the visit of Bishop Walker, Bisho}) Clarkson had 
■\dsited Wahpeton, also Rev. E. S. Peake had held service a few times, 
but Mr. Gurr was the first rector of the society. After the removal 
of Mr. Gurr, Mr. Peake preached a few times, then Rev. flolin Trena- 
man officiated sis months, then Rev. D. Flack five months. There 
are now about twenty communicants. Rev. Mr. Dickey, of the Moor- 
head school, officiates in holding service, and will continue so to d* 
until a rector is secured. The church building is located on the coi-- 
ner of Pembina Avenue and Fourth Street, osting, including jot, 
about $2,700, nearly all of which is paid. The society organized by 
the ladies of this church hns worked so thoroughl}^ that a very respect- 
>ible and encouraging revenue is secured, which has been and is used 
with great discrimination for church work. The m;ile members of 
this congregation, who give their money and iufluence for the inter- 
est and prosperity of the same, are Charles Damerel, Dr. Swaine, A. 
J. Goodhue, W. A. Seely, and J. A. Smith. These persons, together 
with the treasurer of the ladies' society, Mrs. McNaughton, who is 
also the treasurer of the church proper, constitute the church officers. 
We judge from the foregoing and what we have learned from other 
reliable sources that Mrs. C. M. McNaughti^]! lias been a power iia 



38 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

the work of the chnrch in this place, and is hij^hly respected for her 
unselfish and well-directed efforts, 

INDEPENDENT OKDER OF ODD FELLOWS. 

The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, as an organization, is 
one of the most prosperous and popular orders in America, its mem- 
bership is numbered by thousands and tens of thousands, its thorough 
workings and deeds of charity have caused thousands to rejoice as it 
exemplified the principles and significance of " Friendship, Love, and 
Truth," the strong bond of union by which the members of the order 
are bound together, not only in America but throughout the world. 
The following report gives the history of the order in Wahpeton, 
present membership, time and place of meeting, etc., as furnished by 
Mr. Charles Damerel, the Secretary of the order: 

Wahpeton Lodge, No. 38, was instituted May 26, 1882, by Deputy 
District Grand Master Cantieny, with eight charter members, to-wit: 
Brothers James Purdon, Charles Damerel, H. W. Mackie, Stephen 
R. Dunham, Eufus B. Myers, C. K. Farnsworth, Daniel E. Rice, 
Godfrey B. Zillgitt. It holds its weekly meetings in a fine hall, 
tastefully furnished, every Tuesday evening, over Howry's store. It 
has two ante rooms conveniently arranged for sociables, anniversaries, 
entertainments, etc. The society is represeiited by several of the 
prominent business men of Wahpeton. Its progress as a society has 
been marked by constant accession to its membership, which to-day 
numbers about seventy, and v.'ith cash and personal property belong- 
ing to the Lodge of over §1,500. The present elective officers are: 
J. R. Buxton, N. G. ; G. B. Zillgitt, V. G. ; Charles Damerel, Secre- 
tary; B. C. Wilson, Treasurer. 

MASONIC. 

The organization of the Wahpeton Masonic Fraternity is given 
in the following report as furnished by the Secretary: Wahpeton 
Lodge, No. 58, A. F. & A. M. Chartered by Grand Lodge of Dakota 
Territory, June 12, A.D. 1884 Charter Members— Charles H. 
Sleeper, W. M.; H. S. Hyatt, S. W.; E. Dunlap, J. W.; A. J. Good- 
hue, Sec; J. W. Blanding, Treas. ; W. A. Seely, Geo. D. Swaine, 
Henry W. Mackie, A. M. Maxfield, W. F. Crafts, B. L. Bogart, M. T. 
Stevens, R. N. Ink. Present Officers— E. Dunlap, W. M.; H. S. 
Hyatt, S.W.; M. T. Stevens, J. W.; Geo. T. Propper, Sec; J. W. 
Hay ward, Treas. Present Membership — 44. Hall in Howry's Block. 
Meetings — 2d and 4th Fridays of each month. 

SUMNEK POST. 

Sumner Post, No. 57, Grand Army of the Republic, was organ- 
ized April 10, 1884, with a membership of fifteen. It has steadily 
increased, and its present membership is eighty-four, of whom the 



WAHPETON. 



39 



following are the officers: John W. Gregg, Commander; R. B. Car- 
son, Senior Vice Commander; Frank Herrick, Junior Vice Comman- 
der; A. L. Eoberts, Chaplain; H. C. Eeno, Surgeon; C. A. McKean, 
Adjutant; A. Bessie, Quarter Master; C. E. Hinman, Officer of Day; 
S. M. Price, Officer of Guard; W. M. House, Sergeant Major; C. K 
Farnsworth, Quarter Master Sergeant. The Post meets every Thurs- 
day evening at Odd Felk ws' Hall. 

CHAMBER OF COMMEECE. 

The Chamber of Coramerce at Wahpeton was organized May 26, 
1882. Its object is to give public questions organized attention; to 
correct as far as possible public WTongs, abuses of public trust, 
wherever they exist against the welfare of the city. Also to secure 
all necessary city improvements. The present officers of this asso- 
ciation are: A. J. Goodhue, President; James Purdon, Treasurer; 
Charles Damerel, Secretary. 



Real Estate and Loans, 

Money always on hand to place on approved loans 
for long or short time. 



and wild lands bought and sold. Eed River farming 
lands for 



for stocks of goods or any good property. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

WAEPETOJV, - - - DAKOTA. 



Proprietor of 



Excelsior I City Markets. 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Fresh and Salt Meats, Fish, Vegetables, and Oysters, Wholesale and 
Ketail. Horses, oxen, young stock, bought and sold. Liberal 
advances made on commission stock. Sales made on small 

commissions. Highest price paid for hides and furs. References, 

Wahpeton Banks. 



40 



HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY.. 



J. M. RUGGLES, 



m 



?tS^" 



m-' 



%^'^i-^ 



-FOR- 



]Riclilaiid Co^l^ity, 



-SINCE 1S76. — 



Titles to Lands Ctiret'uUy and Critically Examined and Correct 
Abstracts Furnished. 

TAXES PAID FOR NON-RESIDENTS. 

Collections Made and Promptly Remitted. Lands Bouglit and Sold. 
Information Correctly Given When Solicited. 



W^AMPETOW, 



mAMOTA. 



W. A. SEELY& CO., 

I'KOPRIETORS AMJ MANAGKRS OF THE 




Well arranged in all of its appointments. 



,|r^r0|Jt^iiite mtd ^ximtxc 






■i-i=»^*- 



Seati^ng- Oapacit3r aloo-at Si2^ KC-and,reca.. 



A popular resort, under the able and judicious management of 

W. A. Seely & Co. 

WAHPETOJY, - - - DAKOTA. 



WaHFETON. 



41 



One (il the Urst settlers in Walipeton. Has done mucli for the town. 

PHOPEIETOK OF 



"mm 



^Tm * ABDITI« 



Has been honored with the office of Sheriff. Now an industrious and Successful 
Parmer five miles south of Mooreton, Center Township, Dakota. 



r>. OLIA'ER., 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Wood, Brick, Lime, Cement, Hair, and Plaster of Paris. 



^j9 



Lumber by Iho Car Load a Spoc'ialt.v. Also Afrent foi- the Celebrated 

McGORMICK HARVESTING MACHINES, 

For Richland County, Dakota, and Wilkin County, Minn. Twine, Wire, 

and Repiurs always on hand. Office and warerooms at Wabpeton, Sixth Street Betwce* 

St. P. M. & M. and Northern Pacific Railroad Depots. 



Justice of tl 



One of tlie hrst settlers in the county, 

Has held a nuuabci- 



m n 



wr 



Wahpeton, 



Now County Commissioner. 



Dakota, 



All work done in the 

Higlaest Style of tl:i.e ,A.rt. 

Oftice in Peirce's Block, up Stairs. 



42 HISTOKY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

OFFICIAL i^OUNTY BAPER. 

POPULAR, 

COMPLETE, 

, RELIABLE, 

Ridilaiid County Gazette. 



I 






5-S!^ —{5^ <;^2/7/!^-|r-', 






sa?-^TI02srEI^"5^ ^ oi^i^ioe s-ctp^ifxjIes. 



Adcliess E. K. MOKEILL, 



W^AHPETON, - - Dakota. 



WAHPETON. 



43 



Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

AND CITY 



mm 



w 






Office in Howry's Block. 



WAHPETOJV, 



DAKOTA. 



CITY MARSHAL and POLICE DETECTIVE, 

E22:-sz3:e:ri:f'^. 

One of the oldest settlers in Eicliland County. His home farm near 

the city of Wahpeton, containing 160 acres all improved, situated 

on section 6, township 132, range 47. Farm No. 2, located on 

section 31, township 130, range 52 ; 160 acres. 



WFAMPlET&m 



M'AMOTA, 



J. ^%V. BT^^^WI^IIVl^. 



Attorney # Counsellor at Law, 






Negotiates Loans on Real Estate Securities. 
All work connected with 



Surveying Town Sites and Plaiting the same. Tracing Boundary Lines as 
Surveyed by the U. S. Government, a specialty. 



WVAMJPMTOm 



mAMOTA. 



s:WAHPETON 4 POST I OFFICE^ 

Complete in all of its appointments. 






->t ^— ^ t- ij 






Mails quickly distributed and delivered. All employes afPable 

and obliging. 



WAHPETON^, 



DAKOTA. 



44 



HISTORY OF BICHLAND COUNTY. 



M. T. RICH, 

fii'sst ToAVTi I»vopi-ietor, 

-CO) 





y-UTM^l. 



Choice Lots fok Sale. 



Small I=a.3rraerLts IDo-VsT-n, balance on 



Wahpeton, 



Dakota. 



O. K. ULSAKER, 



ouNTY Treasurer 



ELECTED FOK THREE TERMS. 






M M o 



" The Riuht Man in the Rioht Phice." - H. B. 0. 



EFFICIENT. 



HONEST. 



ACCOMMODATING. 



WAHPETON. 



45 



CITY DRUG HEOTJSE, 



-i;v 



HENRY MILLER, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 




GSMM 



H 



H 



Boolsis, Station.er3r, IFapers, 
Paints, Oils, Window Glass, Bird Cages, Toys and Fancy Goods, 

Also JKWELBY and PSCTirRE FltAlTBES. 






r 



AT^ JLi 



AND- 



JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 



Makes Loans. Land Business A Specialty. 



Pays Taxes for Non-residents, Etc., Etc. 



WARPJETOJV, 



DAKOTA. 



JOHN NELSON, 



■DEALER IN- 



M 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

HAS A FULL LIXE OV 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, Etc. 

All heavy goods shipped by car loads at special low rates, therefore can compete with east- 
ern dealers that handle the same goods. Having been a long time in business 
am prepared to give satisfaction to all new and old customers. 
Corner Dakota Avenue and Sixth St. WAHPETOJf, D, 1. 



46 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

1879. 1886. 

CLOSING ITS SEVENTH YEAR, 

The Wahpeton Tiines 

(Formerly Red River Free Press Established April, 1879), is 

The Leading Newspaper 

in Richland County, Dakota Territory. 



THE TIMES is a Seven Column 
Eight-page Newspaper of Broad- 
G-aiige and Upright Principles, Re- 
serving its Kight to Criticise and not 

Desert a Friend. Subscription, $2.00 

per Annum. 

GEO. P. GARBED, 

Editor and Proprietor. 



-^yAHPETON. 



47 







Mercury started by Mercury 



BUSHING Company, 



Dn 



April, 1884, with J. C. Greig as editor. Upon the 18th of 

June, in the same year, the paper was consolidated with the Breck- 

enridge Record under the name of the Mercury, with 



-#^"GRE1G & GLASIER' 

As its Publishers. 



Although starting out in the face of much opposition, it has had 
phenomenal success and at the present day has a 

oipj-oxjzjJ^tion" of eao. 

It is Republican in politics, and the only dollar weekly in the 

County. 

GREIG & GLASIER, Editors and Publishers. 



The above statement tells in most emphatic language what 
a well directed effort will accomplish in any laudable and praiseworthy 
undertaking. The very name of this lively publication, (Mercury), 
is very significant. Mythologically s^Deaking it represents eloquence 
and trade and in fact performs this work. It is in an astronomical 
sense the name of one of the stars nearest the sun and ought to shine 
with great brilliancy. It is, what it purports to be by its name, "a 
messenger and a news carrier," We earnestly hope to see this paper 
succeed, and we know if the same vim and industry marks its future 
years as in the past it will, even in the near future, warrant grand 
profits to its publishers for the capital invested and the brain power 
employed. Its circulation ought to increase rapidly. — H. B. C. 



48 



HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 



CHARLES E. WOLFE, 

Attorney at Law, 

AND SECRETARY OF THE 

Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company, 

WAHPETON, - DAKOTA. 



J. H. MILLER, 



v.^'MmMm, mm 









w 



-OF- 



i^iaia:ij.^^nsrnD coTjnsrT"5r. 



ALSO, FIEST ]\: AYOK OF THE CITY OF AVAHPETON. 



M^AMP'IETO'N, M'AJKQTA, 



THEO. J. HINQTG-EN, 





p^«,FMEF 



Prices Eeasonable. Pictures of any Size or Style Taken. 



Corner Third Street and Dakota Avenue, 



Wahpeton, 



Dakota. 



WAHPETON. 



49 



//. 



All Collections Proinptly Loohecl After. 




10,000 Ect e6 o^ S'CB Jt'VDei VaUe^j ^and |ot Safe, 

Improved and Uniuiproved. 



Front room, ttp stairs, Pcircc's Block. 



W^alhpeHomf MmlkaitGii* 



Edwards & McCulloch Lumber Co., 



-DEALERS IN ALL KINDS UF- 



L 



hR, 



H 



Xjatli. iDoors, and. Sasli. 



P^PER, P^TISTT, and COAL. 



Come aud See XTs. 



.60 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



John Nelson, Pres. E. R. Davenport, Vice Pres. A.J.Goodhue, Sec. and Treas. 

Wahpeton Water Co. 

WORTHINGTON PuMPS. DiRECT PRESSURE. 

-A. i 0-FiJiL.l<TlD * SXJOOESS. 

Greatly Appreciated. 



J. W. HAYWARD, President. 
JOHN JOHNSTON, Vice Pres't. 



incorporated F. C. GIDDINGS, Sec & Mang-'r. 

—1881— A. J. GOODHUE, Treasurer. 



IHE^l^ 



m 



QWPiwTm ^ g.¥#oK, ^ f 3>e,o##. 



Opei-ating steam Elevators and Grain Houses at Milnor and Mooreton, on the Northern 

Pacific Railway, and Erie, Clifford, Pag-e City, and Kin-dred on the St. Paul, 

Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway. 



(j-:3r^MANUFACTURERS OF^-j^e 






BCtB 



0tir. 



WAHPETON. - - - DAKOTA. 



-Pays Special Attention to- 



Suppiying Iron Tubing for tlie same. 
Handles Machinery, and agent for the best Wind Mills. 

WAHPETON, DAKOTA. 



WAHPETON. 



51 



Jacob Xiotsclievai*, 

PROPRIETOR OF THE 



J. 



H 






H 



nDr3r O-ood-s, O-roceries, 

Boots and Shoes, Paints, Oils, Medicines, Hats and Caps, Flour, Feed, 

Wiiliinetoii, - Dakota. 



PIONEER 



And Manufacturer ot 

Everything in Tin, Sheet ® Galvanized Iron, 

Tin or Zinc Koofing- and Guttering-. 

Finest Assortment of Furnishing: Hardware in Dakota. 

JWAMJFJSTdDW, MAMOTA. 



A. L. ROBERTS, 



-DEALER IN- 



fi 



-:33g>-C>. 



Hffl 






a 



-=3og>-i>. 






lf'10)J[mJf/.Mi>\. 



-=^®g^'H'- 






Oi-eeii, I>i*ie4i, {iiicl Camiietl Fi-ixits*, 



:CiGARS AND Tobaccos of the Very Best Brands, 



A larg-e stock of Choice Goods at Low Prices. "A Nimble Nickel is better 
than a Slow Dime." 



Assorted Candies, Etc., 

Choice Goods 
th; 

Opposite Damerel's Hardware Store. WAHPETOJf, DAK. 

CHICAGO * store; 

REEDER & MURNIK, 

Dealers in 





mm% 



Groceries, Crockery and Glassware. 

For Low Prices we Propose to lead the Van. 

WAHPETON, - - - - DAKOTA. 



52 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

HOUGHTON & MUGGLEY'S 

Watch and Jewelry Store, 

WATCHES. DIAMONDS, CLOCKS. SILVER WARE, ETC. 

Repairing a Specialty. Give us a call. 

WAHPETOJY, - - - - DAKOTA, 

iL, m. ewemldjejlij, 

H 

Office with Adolphe Bessie, Dakota Ayenue, 
WAHPETON, - . . - DAKOTA. 



Loans J\''egotiated and Collections Made. 

"W^alipetoii, - - Dakota. 








mm^, M, meilTM, 



_g_^ 



(©.^jf 11 Hi 



MiBife^ 



All work done promptly in a fashionable style. 



'S9 



Notions and Ladies' Underwear. 

Stamping done to order. Terms reasonable. Centrally located. North Side, Dakota Av. 

WAHPETON, - DAKOTA. 



WAHPETON. 

AVnlipetoni CJity 



53 



UVEEY, FEED ,m SALE 



KAY3IO & LAFAVOR, Props. 

The Best of Kigs Farnislied on Short Notice ami at Keasonable Eates. 



F. B. Lafavor, 



STRICT ATTENTION (IIVEN TO ALL 

WAHFJETOJV, - - - DAKOTA, 



Mc CUMBER S- BOGAET, 

LOANS t'ONTEAC'TED ON 



REAL ESTATE 

SECURITIES. 

All Business Accurately and Promptly Executed. 

WAHPETOjY, B. T. 



BEt; HIVK BLOCK 



*^.ts:F*I01VEET?.©fc.£ 



-tgaj^o. 



3aS>- 



-c3el?i>- 



s-::^^-^ 



PIUS HENGEE, Proprietor. 

Has been in businosB since 18TS, imd keeps constiintly on hand one of the largest and best 
stocks of Boots and Shoes in the citj'. jMakinj;- and Repairing' a specialty. 

Wahpeton, - - - Dakota. 



64 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

W. A. SEELY & CO., 

DEALEKS AND JOBBERS OF 

Lumber, Coal, Lime, Hair, Cement, 

Farm Macliiiiery-. Paints, Oils, Belting, 
and Mill Supplies. 

:BES«»T seed OTiAIlVS AL^V^A^irS 0]V HA]Nr>. 

AGENTS FOR 

standard Oil Co., American Lubricating Oil Co., and Philadelphia & Reading Coal Co. 
CAR ORDERS SOLICITED. 



REAL ESTATE DEALERS. 

Improved and Unimproved Farm Lands 

for sale on very reasonable terms. 

Desirable city lots for sale. Taxes paid for non-residents. Special 

attention given to renting improved lands and looking 

after the productions of the same. 

WAHPETON, - - - DAKOTA. 

mHE t CASH t BEE t HIYE f STORED" 

W^- E. HO^Via^", I^i-oprietor, 

DEALER IN 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Boot"^ and Shoes, 

And a Full Line of Yankee Notions. 

All as busy as bees in this hive of mercantile industry. A good 
place to get the worth of your money. 

Walipeton, » _ - _ Dakota. 

DEALER IX 



Stoves, Tinware, Farming Tools, Pumps, Lead Pipe, 

Carpenters' Tools, and eTei-ytliln<? usually kept in a first-class Hardware Store. Asent for 
FAIRBANKS SCALES. Also 

PRACTICAL. PLUMBER, GAS AND STEAM FITTER, 

Hydrants, Street Washers, Pumps, Hose, Etc. 

Fixll Line ori*lTiiiil>ei*!^' and S^teaiix Eitters' Goods. 

WAHPETON, - DAKOTA. 



WAHPBTON. 



55 



J. R. BUXTON, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR 



Suits prosecuted and defended in all courts in Minnesota and Dakota. 

Money to loan on Real Estate and Chattel Securities. Also 

Judge of Probate for Richland County. 



Office in Bee Hive Store, 



Wahpetoji, D. T. 



S. H. SNYDER, 



m 






m, 



EOANS liONTRACTED, 

iiOLLECTIONS HaDE. 



Office up Stairs, Peirce's Block, 



WAEPETOM, 



DAKOTA. 



.J- ^. HIVIITH, Ji-., 

Negotiates Loans on Unincumbered 



11 ^», 




T^ 



P Hi Jll IP ' 



AND CHATTEL PROPERTY. 

Terms Reasonable. Real Estate Exchange. Buying and Selling 
Farm and ciiy property for all who may desire. 

WAHPETOJI, DAKOTA. 



Dakota Avenue. 



Freight, Ticket, t Express 






»:r=t: 



Northern Pacific, Fergus Falls, and Black Hills Railway Office, 

WAHPETON, - - DAKOTA. 



^6 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



G. P. THOMPSON, 

BLACKSMIHING. 

All work done promptly and in a workmanlike manner. 

Horse Shoeing and Plow Repairing a Specialty. 

WAHPETON, DAKOTA. 



ANTON MIKSCHE, 

—DEALER L\— 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

A GREAT STOCK OF 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Provisions, Hats, Caps, 
Boots and Shoes. 

'Choice Potatoes, Butter, Eggs, Etc., always on hand. Goods delivered free of charge. 
Don't forget to look at our New Style of American Sewing Machine. 



Agent for " North German Lloyd." 



Wahpe^&m^ m^alk. 



MT^J A V 



W. H. VVILLARDT, 

Corner Dakota Avenue and Fourth Street. 



Itoops Ooixftstixiitlj^ oil IlaiKl ti Full X^iuo oi" 

FRESH;nD:SALT Meats, 

:E=o-u.ltr3r, <3-am.e, a-n.d. IPisli. 

-Cash Paid for Hides and Furs. 



ADOLPHE BESSIE, 

— DEAI.KR I\ — ' 



MTiJ 



mJLJf ^^ 



i 



IMfii 



y/J 



Customers will find our prices low, and satisfaction warranted. 
We believe in the motto "Live and Let Live." 

Also Deals in REAL ESTATE, MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE SECURITY. 

Terms Keasonable.' WAHPETON, D. T. 



WAHPETON. 



n 



(^\ 



err 



Full Stock on Hand. 
w'ahpetoj^, - - - dakota, 



F. H. BUTLER & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Coal, Lime, and Hair. 

LUMBER, SASH, DOORS, ETC. 
Wahpetou, Wyiiclinere, unci Miliior, Dakota. 



& 



KELLER & OOODHUE, 

DEALEBS IN 



Dry Goods, Groceries, Hats, Caps, Boots. Shoes, Clothingr, 
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Kugs, Etc. 



ROBERT W. BEATTY, 

coisriPEoarionsrEiRXES- 

Wahpeton, Dakota, 



GREEN FRUITS ALWAYS 
ON HAND 



E. TV . J^IIT^X^BTJIMV. 



Dealer Tu 



Fruit, Confectionery, and Cigars, 

M'A MJFIETQ'N, MAM Oj TA , 



58 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 



NOVELTY WOOD AND IRON WORKS, 



CONTRACTOR m BUILDER, 

Manufacturer of Building Finish and General Woodwork, Doors, Sash, 
Interior Finish for Banks, Stores, and Dwellings. Plain Moulding, Wood Tiirning, 
Jig and Circular Sawing. A Machine Shop in connection with this establishment. A 
complete stock of Brass Goods and Steam Pipe Fittings. Engines, Boilers, and Farm 
Machinery repaired. Mill Supplies constantly on hand. Plans and specifications furnished 
on short notice. All work guaranteed. At the old stand- — Whitehouse Novelty Works, 

WAHPETOJ^r, - - DAKOTA. 

CONTEACTOES AND BUILDEES. 

All work done on 

SHOR-T ISrOTIOE 

and in the best and most 

=MODEIlN STYLE= 



Orders Solicited. 

Office, East side of Sixtli Street, near Headquai-ters Hotel. 

WAHFETOJ^, - - - - DAKOTA. 

WILLIAM RIDDELL, 

For all kinds of Mason Work needed, from foundation to cap stone, 
inside and out. Manufacturer of First-class Brick, and furnishes all I3uilding Materials. 

STE^M BOILERS 

set in brick and a specialty made of putting in mantels and fire grates for wood ai;d coal. 

Lime, Flair, and Cement always on hand. All work promptly and 

thoroughly done. Terms reasonable. 

Wahpeton, - - - Dakota. 



WAHPETON. 



59 




Post-office Block, 

B. C "W^IL?^OIV, I*i-opi-ietoi-. 

Daily Papers and Leading Publications always on Hand. 



Sheet Music and Stationery, Ruljber Stamps, Scales, Etc., Furnished on Short Notice. 



A Mucli Needed Institxition. 




etoii ®iti ll00ipfitHl 



Private Infirmary. 

Doctor Swaine's Private Sanitarium for the treatment of diseases 
of both sexes, located on Pembina Avenne, between Fourth and 
Fifth Streets, AVahpeton, Dakota. 

The Infirmary is handsomely furnished throughout, heated with 
furnace, well lighted and ventilated. A competent nurse is in con- 
stant attendance and both German and Scandinavian Language 
spoken. The culinary department is under the supervision of Doctor 
and Mrs. Swaine. Competent and trustworthy cooks employed. Every 
patient is provided with a diet suitable to the requirements of the 
case. The infirmary is provided with a choice library for the use of 
patients. Every effort made to make it as little like a public hospital 
as possible. Dr. Swaine, in charge, has aimed to furnish all the com- 
forts of a home, and all the advantages and facilities of a liosx)ital. 
The result is a model institution, a credit to the city, an honor to 
Dakota, and a monument to the enterprise of Doctor Swaine, who has 
his office in the building. The terms are from $10 to $20 a week, ac- 
cording to the case, location and size of rooms, nursing, etc. 

Write for particulars, giving a history of the case. Address, 
Geo. D. Swaine, M. D., Wahpeton, D. T. 

Pioneer Shaving Parlor 

AND 




Dakota Avenue, Near Post Oflice. 



C3-. B. ZILI-iOITT. Frop.. 

WAHPETON, DAKOTA. 



m 



HISTOKY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



ALEX STERN, 



AARON STERN. 



y^ 



MAX STERN. 



H 



i^^a 



CLOTHING, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

HATS, CAPS. BOOTS, SHOES, TRUNKS and YALISES. 

Walipeton, Dak. Fargo, Dak. 

J. N. JITRQENSElSr, 

MAXUl''At:TUKKK OP AND DEALUll IN 



Saddles, Blankets, Whips, Boots and Shoes. 



KEPAIKING DONE NEATLY AND WORK WARRANTED. 



WAHPETON, 



DAKOTA. 



Fearer Brothers' 






©S3^ 



■^'w 
li*l\ 



^ 



^^^@^ 



W 



All work Rrtistically done and satisfaction given. 

Also dealers in Picture Frames. Prices as low^ as tlie times will war- 
rant. Studio over Northwestern Bank, in Peirce's Bloct. 

WAHPETON, - - _ - DAKOTA. 

JAMES PURDON & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



->t ^ ■ ^ h 



CLOTHING, HATS AND CAPS, 



W'^ 



Boots and Shoes, Groceries^ Etc. 

Green, Dried, and Canned Fruits. A Specialty Made 
of the Choicest Brands of Tea. 



Opera Hous^e Block. 



WAEPETOM, DAKOTA. 



WAHPETON. 61 



Ileal gstitte 



GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

Eepresentiiig some of the best companies doing business in the Ter- 
ritory. Special attention given to 

Real Estate and Chattel Loans, 

(Collections made and remittances promptly attended to. 



And all information pertaining to business freely given. 

H. E. GROTTEM, 

DEALER IN 

aRA-TI^T, FLOUR, and FEED, 

Full Supply Always on Hand at 

Business Established in 1880, and Trade Constantly Increasing. 
WAHPETO.'N', - DAKOTA. 

SCHULER & MACKIE, 

DEALERS IN 

Lime, Hair, Brick, Cement, 

PLASTER PARIS. 

General Contraclors and Builders. Builders of Coniljinatioii and Wood Bridges, 
Evidences of Work in the City that as Mechanics they are First-class. 

TWAMPETQN, - - » MAELdDTA. 



62 



HISTORY OP RICHLAND COUNTY. 



WILLIAM F. ECKES. PROPRIETOR. 

=1First-Class A_ccomm.ocLatioiist= 

First Hotel Built in the CoTintv. 

Well Patronized. 4- Charges Moderate. 

M^AMP^MTON, = ^ MAMQ>TA. 



Er^I "^"^^CHOIV. 



J 



Proprietor of the 



;^ 



Meals furnished at all hours. Choice Cigars, Candies, Green Fruits, Bread, 
Pies, Cakes, in fact, a general and choice stock of goods always on hand needed in such 

an establishment. For parties, wedding occasions, etc., meals furnished 

in the best style of the season. All kinds of cake furnished on short notice and in the 

most artistic and toothsome manner. 



A.t tlTe Old t^tancl. 



WAHPETOJf, 



DAKOTA. 



GJ-eoi^oe lir-eidlei-'s 



Popular I Boarding I House, 

Well patronized. Special pains taken to make all guests welcome. 

Tables abundantly furnished with substantial luxuries. Terms for week and day board 

Reasonable. Centrally located, South Side Dakota Avenue. 



Mr. George Kreidler Manufactures AVooden Cisterns of all sizes, 
sets the same and puts them in working order. Cisterns shipped to 
other to-\vns if desired. Prices low, orders solicited. 



^i^rrON^ GILLES 



MANUFACTURES 




Of the Best Quality. 

All of his wori: Avarranted to give satisfaction. Gives special atten- 
tion to repairing. Shop near the Times office, 



WAHPETON, 



DAKOTA. 



WAHPETON. 63 



COUNTY SHERIFF 

of Riclilaiicl County, Dakota. 



-o- 



R. N. INK. E. H. CARTER. 

Have money to loan on first-class securities, at reasonable rates 
and long time. Both members of this firm have been residents in 
county since its early settlement. Have made a specialty of locating 
settlers and giving valuable information. Are acquainted with the 
people and thoroughly posted as it respects the quality of land in 
different parts of the county. No loans made only in Kichland 
County. All lands offered as security personally inspected by us. 
In all our business transactions reasonable satisfaction guaranteed,- 
and patronage respectfully solicited. 

Wahpeton, - - Dakota. 

FRED E. STAUFF, 

AN EFFICIENT 



Foi- three years up to March, 1886. 

Mr, Stauff owns a productive farm in the south part of the county. 
His home is in Wahpeton. 



J^. U. SIVO^W^, Esq., 

ASSISTANT 

County Treasurer 

^^ ••=• A TvT T^ n^ T?lO> T^*- >- 



::AND clerk 



Has been an honored citizen in town for years. An excellent scribe and pei.oi. all bis 

work with precision. 

WAHPETOJV, - - - DAKOTA. 



THE ST. PAUL. MINNEAPOLIS. AND MANITOBA RAILROAD. 

This great railway of the Northwest, with its main lines and 
many branches, has been worth millions of dollars to the inhabitants 
that occupy the farming lands along its iron tracks, by increasing 
the price of the same and affording ample facilities for shipping the 
productions of the soil to a ready market. The country through 
which the main lines run, with ramifications of their branches through 
Northwest Minnesota and the Eed River Valley in Dakota, all lie 
within the world-renowned wheat belt of No. 1 hard. In many in- 
stances the managers of this great system of railway traffic and inter- 
state commerce did not wait for the settlement of the country first, 
but with great forethought they planted their lines in advance of the 
settlers, and left them to follow after, affording a grand opportunity 
for thousands who were anxious to possess the rich lands of the North- 
west, to get near their future homes by riding in palace cars and 
shipping their stock and household effects on fast freight lines. 
This great railroad enterprise seemed to fairly enthuse and give new 
life to the population moving west, and to the great wheat belt of the 
globe, which was the principal cause of the rapid settlement of the 
country. It seems, really, that the managers of this comjoany were 
very grasping, and, some might say, avaricious, when with their 
long iron arms and steel fingers they reached across a stretch of 
country vast enough to carve out empires, running from St. Paul 
and Minneapolis to the very threshold of Queen Victoria's Ameri- 
can possessions, taking the golden grains from the wheat fields of 
Manitoba and the many towns along their line of marching to the 
front, and also are laying down their iron bands on the pebbly shore 
of Devil's Lake and reaching out to the Turtle Mountain region, and 
will soon tap the Queen's dominion in that region to gather up and 
control the increasing local trafiic of that rapidly growing land; and 
we would not be surprised if in the near future there would be a con- 
nection of this line with the Canada Pacific, in which event this 
would be the shortest route from the Pacific Coast to St. Paul of any 
now in existence, and everybody knows that the shortest lines from 
and to great commercial centers and objective points are the most 
popular and the best patronized. The great traffic between Amer- 
ica, Japan, and China and the growing Asiatic countries of the 
old world will be on the shortest routes by sea and land. These 



THE ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, AND MANITOBA EAILROAD. 65 

facts have a great significance, that tell what the logic of events will 
bring to pass for the vast and rapidly developing country that is yet 
really in her swaddling garments. This company is not shut up in 
the great twin cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, but from the great 
wheat fields of the Northwest they have an outlet to the proud 
Zenith City that is now sw;iying its scepter over the great growing 
commerce of the unsalted sea of America, whose waters are the great 
highway by which the millions of bushels of grain shipped at Duluth 
find their way to the grer.t -grain centers of the Eastern world. 
It was really a red letter day for Wahpeton and the Upper Eed 
River Valley when the railroad bridge was constructed across the 
Bois des Sioux river and the iron rails laid down for the steam engine 
to cross over, drawing its palace cars and heavily loaded freight cars. 
Yen, more than this ; when the rails were stretched out to the north- 
west in the direction that the eyes of the managers of this tliorough- 
f are had been looking for years from the Breckenridge outlook, this 
iron gateway to the rich lands of Eichland County and the regions 
beyond that afforded connections with the great railway systems of 
the East was fully appreciated by the early settlers. The Brecken- 
ridge extension of the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba railway 
crossed over into Dakota in the fall of 1880, and Wahi:)eton, Dwight, 
Colfax, and Walcott all began to be talked of as stations that would 
be good trading points in the future. Wahpeton, being the - only 
town really in existence, felt the pulsations of the new life imparted 
to her by this grand movement on the part of the railroad managers 
and her popidation increased rapidly, and her business houses and 
fine residences multiplied to an astonishing degree. Dwight, Colfax, 
and Walcott were really but embryo towns at that time; but during 
the five years that have elapsed they have been established and all 
are good trading points; and, being situated in the finest wheat sections 
of the Valley, with their steam elevators, where many thousand 
bushels of wheat are sold annually, we see steam mills, hotels, stores 
of general merchandising, groceries, drug stores, meat markets, 
machine shops, etc., besides a wonderful increase in productive acre- 
age, and farm buildings multiplying. Of course, as in all new coun- 
tries, the settlers have to undergo many privations; but the worst is 
past, no doubt. 

Since the great boom of 1880, '81, '82, and '83, the business in real 
estate sales and exchange has been light; and there has been a 
shrinkage in values, but the check will prove at the last to be a valu- 
able experience, and the people of the country Avill learn how to 
manage their affairs with greater economy and forethought, which 
will insure permanent growth and prosperity. While these facts are 



66 HISTOllY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

quite significant, as a whole the county at the present time has very 
inviting iiekls for those who may desire to settle in our midst. As 
an evidence of what progress there has been made in Eichland County 
along the line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba Railway, we 
publish the report of Mr. A. Manvel, the general manager of the 
road. He says that they "have in Eichland County 38.18 miles of 
track, the laying of which was completed about November 1, 1880. 
The elevator capacity on our line in said county is given to us as 
340,000 bushels, and the shipments of wheat from our lines in the 
county on the crop of 1884 were 600,000 bushels." Of course, this 
report from the general manager refers specially to the shipment of 
wheat out of the county, and nothing else; but there must be a great 
amount of business done on this railway in other commodities shipped 
into the county, such as lumber, farm machinery, dry goods, and 
miscellaneous freights, which could only be expressed in the aggregate 
by large figures. However, the traffic in wheat is very significant. 



DWIGHT, 

The village of Dwiglit is beautifully located on the line of the 
■St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba railway, about seven miles nearly 
west of Wahpeton and about 225 miles northwest from St. Paul. It 
is the headquarters of the great New York farm owned and ably man- 
aged by the Dwight Parm and Land Company. The tov\'ii bears the 
name of tli3 president of said company, the Hon. J. W. Dwiglit 
(recently deceased), of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York, wlio 
was a member of Congress from the Twenty-sixth Congressional 
District for a number of terms. The buildings for farm purposes are 
all first-class, with all necessary appurtenances thereunto belonging. 
All these are built on the south side of Antelope Creek, occupying a 
fine and elevated site. 

But the village proper is. located on the north side, occupying a 
very tine location overlooking the prairie landscape that in the sum- 
mer time is decidedly picturesque. At this i)lace there is one large 
round elevator run by steam, the capacity of which is fully 60,000 
bushels, and a feed mill connected therewith, all belonging to the New 
York company. There are two wheat warehouses besides, one belong- 
ing to Cargill Brothers and the other to private parties, where thou- 
sands of bushels are marketed. The entire aggregate of shipments 
from this point is large. There are man}' })rosperons farmers living 
in the vicinity, their business being naturally tributary to this point, 
besides the business connected with the great wheat x>lfiiitation. 
There is one large double store of general merchandising, Johnson & 
Company ( formerly M. O. -Tohnson ) being proprietors, the rooms of 
which are crowded full of all kinds of goods and wares needed in a 
country town. Mr. Johnson came from Chicago at the very begin- 
ning of business operations at this point, and, being full of Norwegian 
vim, and having an eye to business in all departments of trade needed 
in a country store, he has succeeded admirably, and the company prob- 
ably sells as many goods over its counters as any dealer in Richland 
County, and its efficient clerks are ever ready to wait on customers at a 
moment's notice. 

There is one hotel, the Eureka House, built by the New York 
company and run successfully by William T. Ward, who is ahvays 
ready to wait on customers. There is one lumber yard, two blacksmith 
shops and one wagon shop, one harness shop, two saloons, and three 
farm machinery agencies. 



68 HISTORY OP EIC'HLAND COUNTY. 

If ihe tliousanus who live in the land of the Pilgrim Fathers along 
the once "wild New England shore," and in other eastern and south- 
ern localities, could look ux:)on tho fair face of these jjrairie farms and 
the beautiful hnid-.i (Uj of which good farms can be made in live years, 
the soil astonishingly productive, there would be the greatest exodu» 
from the places referred to that was ever known from any country. 
The time will come when there will be more enlightenment da^aiiug 
upon the minds of those who now look at this broad expanse of 
prairie-ocean through mists and fogs that gather around their Doubt- 
ing Castle's outlook. Time is the great interpreter of facts and their 
legitimate sequences. The following report, as furnished b}^ Mr. John 
Miller, the Superintendent of the Dwight Farm and Land Company, 
together with valuable items given by Mr. John E. Yerkes, the pres- 
ent book-keeper, is v/orthy of a careful and candid perusal. This 
report, in the aggregate, is very remarkable, and speaks in very plain 
English what can be accomplished by well- directed efforts in such an 
enterprise as herein described — an enterprise that has attracted the 
attention of thousands of close observers living east and west. 

THE DWIGHT FARM AND LAND COMPANY, 

Dakota, was organized in the fall of 1879, in Richland County, own- 
ing about 19,000 acres, with a cash capital of !?150,000. The company 
also purchased in the year 1880 about 8,000 acres more, making a total 
of 27,000 acres in this county, which is the amount, or nearly so, now 
owned. In the year 1882 the company pui-chased, in Steele County, 
Dakota, 32,000 acres more. The managing officers began to open up 
the lands in Richland County in 1880. That year they broke and 
backset about 5,000 acres, and commenced their building operations 
on a large scale the same year. They have continued from year to year 
to add to their farm buildings as their necessities demanded, and contin- 
ued to increase the number of acres cultivated, so that now they have 
in complete order 8,500 acres ready for crop for this year, 1886. This 
well-managed company now has a storage capacity for grain aggregat- 
ing 150,000 bushels, and included in this storage capacity it has two 
steam elevators and several large granaries. 

The Hon. J. W. Dwight, of Dryden, Tompkins County, New 
York, after whom the company and the village — the headquarters of 
the company — were named, was the originator of the comx)aiiy and its 
able and efficient president since the time of its organization until his 
unexpected death, which occurred on the 26th day of Novend^er, 1885. 
The officers of the comjjany, up to the time of th^ demise of its 
distinguished president, were as follows: Hon. J. W. Dwight, Presi- 
dent; Hon. F. M. Finch, of Ithaca, New York, Judge of the Court of 
Appeals, Yice-President; Hon. H. B. Lord, of Ithaca, New York, 



DWIGHT. 69 

Secretary and Treasurer; and John Miller, formerly of Dryden, 
Tompkin.i County, New York, but now a resident of Dwight, the 
efficient Superintendent. The Hon. Douglass Boardman, Judge of 
the Supreme Court and president of the First National Bank of 
Ithaca, New York, was elected President after the death of Mr. 
Dwight. 

The operation of the company in carrying on the great work 
necessary to be performed has been highly satisfactory, and the 
growth and phenomenal development of Richland County have sur- 
passed the most sanguine expectations of this land company. The 
crops of the company have been uniformly good, and, Avhile during 
the past tv^^o years the price of wheat has been rather low, the net 
results of each year show a handsome ijrofit, and at no time have 
the members of the company felt more confident of the future growth 
and rapidly increasing wealth of Kichland County than they do now. 
They are thoroughly convinced that stock can be raised warranting 
great profits to all persons who may engage in the same. Their 
attention was first called to this great farming industry by their own 
experience in wintering the horses and mules used on this great Avheftt 
and grain plantation. It was found that they thrived exceedingly 
well upon hay alone, and although the weather was cold, yet, with a 
.slight protection, owing to the dryness of the climate they came out in 
the spring in fine condition — much better, in fact, than they would in 
a v.'^armer climate with damp, chilly atmosT)here and deep winter mud. 
The company has built a long barn that will hold 150 head of cattle, 
and intends to engage in the business of raising horses and cattle, 
believing fully that in a few years Bichland County will be knov>'n as 
one of the best stock counties in the Red River Valley, as well as a 
great grain-growing county. 

In use on this farm there are about 200 horses and mules, 44 bintl- 
ers, 8 steam threshers, 50 gang and sulky plows, 45 seeders. The com- 
pany has graded about fifty miles of road, and has four railroad sta- 
tions upon its own land in Richland County. It successfully raises 
wheat, oats, and barley. 

The cultivated portion of this farm is in three diviRions, with 
headquarters at Dwight. The subordinate force is made up of a head 
book-keeper, an assistant book-keeper, a general foreman of division 
one, a general foreman of division two, a foreman of machinery houses, 
one foreman of stables, and one gang foreman for about every -fifteen 
laborers. O. J. Wakefield is the wheat inspector at Dwight and over- 
seer of the 60,000-capacity elevator at that place. The elevator busi- 
ness of this company consists largely in handling its own crop, but it 
handles besides a large amount for other farmers. 



70 



HISTOEY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



i '11F 18^ W¥ "^(Y cM <^^si^^ii Mm 

!^ liU jm .» jiT^ .^ JM M.. 

V/::. 7. WARD. PROPRIETOR 



m. 1^' 



''a^ 



All guests made welcome and their wants well cared for. Accommo- 
dations ample and terms reasonable. 

In connection with the hotel, 



Blacksmith and Wagon Maker, 



mmM 



^Mm 



I ''^:iraip 



SIM 



Plow work and repairing farm machinery a specialty. Terms 

reasonable. 



DWIGHT, 



Dakota. 



Proprietor of 

GHT Meat Market. 

A full line of meats kept on hand to suit customers. 

O-i-v^e izs a Oa.ll. 

B WIGHT, - - - DAKOTA. 



3. Xv. OLtTI^s?riiETV, 

DEALER IN 



LUMBER, WOOD, AND COAL 



Sasli, Doors, and MouUliiigs, 



DWIGHT, 



Dakota, 



DWIGHT AND COLFAX. 71 



PROPRIETOR OP^ 

City Meat Market. 

A clioice selection of meats always on hand. 

i^OsLslx I^E^ldi. for Hides:^ 

DWIGHT, - - DAKOTA. 



IVt. O. .TOHTVSOIV A^ CO., 

DEALERS IN 

RY Goods is Clothin 



BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, and CEOCKEEY, 

A full line of 

HARDWARES AND ^FURNITURE. 

Foreign tiiicl Domestic 

EXCHANGE BOUGHT f SOLD, 

Passage tickets to all European points. Collections promptly made 
and accounted for. 

A full stock of 

Flour, [Feed, Seed Wheat, Grass, Clover, and Flax Seed. 

General agent for 

Farm Machinery and Twine. 

DWIGHT, - - - DAKOTA. 

]\£attlii£is «fc IJ-VTcIoIpli, 

Practical II Millers, 

AND DEALERS IN 

COLFAX, ^ . . DAKOTA. 



COLFAX. 

Colfax is located on the line of the St. Paiil, Minneapolis, and Mani- 
toba railway, twenty miles northwest from Wahpeton, about eight miles 
west from the Red Eiver — the dividing line between Minnesota and 
Dakota — and three and a half miles west from the Wild Bice Eiver. 
This town is fully thirteen miles northwest from D wight; nearly seven 
miles southeast from Walcott, and eight and a half miles from Aber- 
crombie. The townsite is on section 32 (east half of the northwest 
quarter), township 1'65, range 49. The land was entered as a tree 
claim in 1879 by H. B. Crandall, who also entered the northeast quar- 
ter of the same section as a homestead. Mr. Crandall at that time 
was pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Fargo, and a resident 
of that city. Then there Avere thousands of acres subject to entry 
belonging to the government; but by 1883 the chances were all gone, 
or nearly so, and the lands now owned by those who made entries or 
purchased from first settlers. Then the population in the county was 
very scattering, the largest settlements being along the rivers. 

The first house on said homestead was moved thither from Fargo 
on two wagons side by side dravv'n by two teams, a distance of thirty- 
five miles. The house was 12x14 feet, double roof. It had been used 
on a homestead in Cass County, but after final proof was moved into 
Fargo and purchased by the writer for a residence in Eichland 
County. The building was firmly fixed on square timber supports, 
6x0 inches 24 feet long, which were used as reaches or couplings for 
the wagons. Loading, placing, and arranging stove, bed, feed, breaking 
plows, chairs, tables, and stools, not forgetting the necessity of a full 
larder, was really no small job. Spectators looked on with a good deal 
of curiosity, and said that to move a building thirty-five miles across the 
country was rather a doubtful undertaking. Starting late in the after- 
noon on the 19th day of May, 1880, seven miles were measured by sun- 
down—the writer and Mr. Stack, of Fargo, accompanying the expedition 
to see that no serjous mishap took place. It was near the school- 
house on the old Norman road where we put up for the night. A 
kind Frenchman furnished hay and stable room for the teams, as well as 
milk for our coffee. Our cook was not a Frenchman, but rather of a 
Hibernian type. Supper was prepared and disposed of quickly; and, 
appetites being good, no fault was found with the edibles. In a short 
time the members of the crew were off in the land of visions, dream- 



COLFAX. 73 

ing, perhaps, of western homes, bonanza farms, Dakota villages and 
cities with their bustling thousands, the click and hum of farm 
machinery and threshing machines with their steam engine attach- 
ments, long trains of cars loaded Avith No. 1 hard thundering along 
to reach the eastern grain markets ; or, perhaps, di'eaming of a general 
break-down of our wagons and oiir itinerating house dumped in the 
ditch. 

Nevertheless, the dawning of a new and beautiful day appeared, 
and at an early hour we were all moving toward our point of destina- 
tion, and, there being no serious detention during the day, between 
sundown and dark we were safely landed on the homestead. Another 
night was passed comfortably, and early in the morning of Maj^ 21, 
1880, the land for our building site being broken, the house was 
placed in position, points of compass observed, and a general leveling 
up took place, and our move for so many miles came to a successful 
termination. The additions to said house since that time have fur- 
nished room enough so that the original room is used now for the 
parlor, all of which is still occupied by the writer. 

During the year 1880 the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba 
railway was surveyed, running across section 32, and the station was 
located, Mr. Crandall granting the right of way. A large depot v^'as 
built at the close of the year, and a good side-track placed in position. 
A section house was erected about the same time, and the construction 
and freight trains with passenger cars were moving up and down the 
line as lively as the exigencies of business traffic demanded. The 
telegraph line was soon in working order, and the wires fairly throb- 
bing and pulsating with messages. William Finney, from Eau Claire, 
Wisconsin, vras the first operator and station agent, keej^ing the liooks 
and doing the lousiness for stations farther north until said towns were 
supplied with station agents and operators. Mr. William Johnston, 
from Kingston, Canada, now deceased, was the next station agent at 
Colfax, and the next was Mr. John H. Lewis, from Iowa, who is now 
the one that manipulates the electric key, keeps the books, and acts 
as American Express agent. 

February, 1881, the townsite of Colfax was surveyed by Mr. J. S. 
Stack, and the plat, containing eighty acres, was recorded on the 19th 
day of March of said year. The first building put up on the original 
townsite was the store and hotel block, size 36x60 feet, two stories, 
being at that time one of the largest buildings in the county. It was 
erected in the winter of 1880-1 by Mr. Stack, and located on lots 11 
and 12, block two, corner of Broadv/ay and Second Avenue, the same 
being donated by the town proprietor. The south half below and all 
the room above was used for the Headquarters Hotel, and the north 



74 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

lialf below was put in order for a store room and filled with a large 
stock of general merchandise. The hotel and store were owned and 
managed by Mr. Stack, S. G. Hofford and O. T. McCormac being 
employed at tlie first as clerks. The business done at this stand and 
the amount of goods sold were great, being on an average yearly, as 
we have been informed, $30,000. The stock of goods was sold by Mr. 
Stack to O. W. Lind in 1882, Avho continued in business until the fall 
of 1884, when he closed out and went to Billings, Montana. A general 
business of merchandising is carried on now by Mr. H. E. Crandall, 
from Cresco, Iowa, The hotel property was sold by Mr. Stack, 
including furniture, to Meyers and McCormac for $4,500. After the 
death of Mr. McCormac Mr. Hofford became a partner in the business. 
However, they finally dissolved and ga.ve up hotel keeping. Mr. H. E. 
Crandall, who rented the hotel from Farnham & Lovejoy, is now 
having a good patronage. 

The steam flouring-mill was erected 1881 by Matthias & Eudolph, 
who came from Menomonee, Wisconsin. There are three run of 
stones, them achinery being di'iven by a 30-liorse power engine, Mr. 
Crandall, in order to secure the permanent location of this mill, 
donated six lots for the millsite and three lots for residences to the 
said firm, besides a donation of $1,000 bonus. The Hon. Schuyler 
Colfax, through the agency of Col. Tyner, paid $100 of the $1,000, and 
the farmers about $150 more; the balance was paid in full by the 
town proprietor, who took a receipt for the same. 

While drilling a well for r water supply for the mill a vein of 
coal was pierced at the depth o" about 100 feet, from three to four 
feet deep as nearly as could be measured by the use of the drill, 
Avhich fact created such an excitement that a coal company was organ- 
ized at once, and a shaft was put down some forty feet, near the mill. 
The members of this coal company, not having a practical knowledge 
of the work and the material necessary, and the workmen being inex- 
perienced and the obstacles to overcome more than had been antici- 
pated, the work for the time being was abandoned, to be renewed 
again by a new organization, which also proved to be a failure for 
nearly the same reasons. The question has been asked by many, and 
a correspondence has been carried on by other parties with the 
writer, respecting this reported coal-find. The answers have been 
" that some fifty men were witnesses of the work of the drill while 
passing through the vein, and specimens of the coal were abundant 
and the quality tested and pronounced good by experts employed in 
Pennsylvania coal mines. We noAV say, it is our firm conviction 
that there is coal at Colfax in paying quantities, if in searching for 
the same the work could be done by men of experie^ice, who under- 



COLFAX. 75 

stand and Avould use the materials necessary. Coal has been found 
along the Sheyenne River and other localities in ilichland County, 
and we have no doubt but that the time will come when coal in abund- 
ance will be found in the Red River Valley and other portions of 
Dakota. Also there are those who firmly believe that there are hid- 
den reservoirs of petroleum that will be reached in the future. Natural 
gas has been discovered in a number of places, as well as coal, and 
where gas and coal can be found it would not be strange if this natural 
illuminating and lubricating oil could be found in the bosom of 
Mother Earth. Consolidated capital, well employed, is necessary to 
be brought into use to make thorough work, not only in searching for 
coal but for all the valuable treasures of mineral wealth locked up in 
the hiding-places beneath our feet. 

The wheat warehouse of James F. Cargill was built in 1881, with 
a capacity of about 15,000 bushels, and Clarence Hurlbut employed 
as the first wheat buyer, taking in about 45,000 bushels the first year. 
Since then repairs have been made, a steam engine and machinery 
employed to elevate the grain, and the capacity of the building en- 
larged so that some 25,000 bushels can be taken care of. A flowing 
well ninety feet deep supplies the water at the elevator. The receipts 
at this station annually since the beginning have been from 75,000 to 
150,000 bushels, including mill trade. Another elevator is needed at 
this point, and the competition thus created would be healthy and 
profitable. The post-ofiice at Colfax was established in the beginning 
of the year 1881, and H. B. Crandall appointed postmaster. In July, 
1882, Mr. Crandall resigned and recommended the appointment of 
Mr. McCormac as postmaster, he having served as assistant. He was 
appointed and commissioned and held the oflice seventeen days, when 
A. H. Tyner, son of General James Tyner, Postmaster General under 
Grant, was appointed, and the oflice removed to the Tyner store on 
the Colfax addition to the original townsite; and he held the oflice 
until 1883, when he sold out and Mr. William Johnston was appoint- 
ed. He soon died, and Mr. H. E. Crandall was appointed, and the 
office and store building, goods and all, were moved on to the original 
townsite. Mr. Crandall is the postmaster at the present time. He 
was in the war of the Rebellion over four years, engaged in many 
battles, was wounded twice, and is now a pensioner. Mr. A. H. Tyner 
went to Ellendale, Dakota, and was appointed postmaster there , and 
held the oflice until the new administration appointed a man to take 
his place. He was an eflicient and accommodating oflicer of the gov- 
ernment. 

The land platted on the north of the original townsite through the 
agency of Colonel N. N. Tyner, the active agent for Mr. Colfax, ex- 



76 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Vice President and the remainder of the half-section, we understand 
has been disposed of to Hay & Co., of Minneapolis. Also the half- 
section belonging to Mr. Colfax on section 33, joining Mr. Crandall's 
homestead on the east, has been sold to Potter & Thompson, Minne- 
apolis real estate agents. Mr. Colfax, ex- Vice President, visited the 
town that bore his name in 1881 in company with Colonel Tyner, his 
agent at Fargo, and at that time manifested a good deal of interest, 
not only in the prosperity of Colfax, but in the development of 
Dakota as a whole. However, to have a town named after him was 
no new thing for this was the sixteenth town in the states and terri- 
tories that bore the name of this distinguished American that had 
such a sudden and sad taking off. Colfax has been quite appro- 
priately called the "Fountain City," as it has four artesian wells, the 
one lately put down by the railroad management being the greatest 
of all. It is 130 feet deep, about the same as the one at the steam 
niill, and has flowed five barrels a minute. The water-tank holds 
1,600 barrels. The hotel and elevator wells are not as deep. The 
steam mill has been sold of late for $10,000, being purchased by par- 
ties in New York, and it was understood at that time that patent 
rollers v^ould be put in during the present season. This mill has 
been largely patronized by the farmers in exchanging wheat for flour 
and getting feed ground for their stock; but the flour in an open 
market could not compete with the patent flour of the country. If 
patent rollers had been put in at the first, and a more economical 
engine used, the driving of which would not have taken more than 
half the fuel, the owners thereof would be thousands of dollars ahead 
of where they are now. It is folly to suppose that the old process of 
making flour can compete with the new patent process. This is an 
age of improvement, and the industries of the world move at light- 
ning speed, controlled by men whose brains are on fire with th& 
activities of life, born of thought well beaten like gold. 

The soil where Colfax is located is of the black sandy loam varie- 
ty, and the same west, northwest, and southwest. East of the rail- 
way track along the Wild Rice river is a heavier soil. There is a 
large amount of rich vegetable mould in all the lands of the Red 
River Valley. Where there is a mixture of sand it is a warmer soil , 
and for a variety of crops is considered the best, especially for corn, 
oats, small fruit, and vegetables. The flat hea\^ lands along the riv- 
ers are considered the best for wheat, and a stronger soil. There are 
but few acres in Richland County, however, but what with good cul- 
tivation will richly repay the tiller of the soil. There are excellent 
chances in this locality to secure good wheat and grass lands. The 
booming time for most towns in Dakota that have passed through one 



COLFAX. 77 

fever boom is ended, and the towns along the railway lines must 
grow, perhaps, less rapidly, jbut much more healthy as the country 
improves in wealth around them. A patient, after having a high run 
of fever, is in great danger of having sinking spells and congestive 
chills, unless carefully watched and the right kind of remedies time- 
ly administered. In the business world, when the booming spirit 
runs high, it is very safe to calculate that there will take place, sooner 
or later, a business chill. If all necessary remedies are at hand and 
used at the right time , many business disasters may be avoided. Busi- 
ness, however, like water, finds its proper level periodically, and all 
the financial and commercial doctors in the world have not learned 
yet "the how" to steer clear of the breakers and rocky shores when 
the waves run high. Even a Jay Cooke with all of his experience in 
in financial piloting, not only for himself, but for the government, did 
not get into harbor where there were safe moorings as soon as he ex- 
pected. While there are thousands of business men who with all 
their push and vim in financial matters have failed, and many now 
suffering, we have thought that these very men were entitled to a 
great deal of credit from the fact that just such men keep the com- 
mercial world in motion, and even although they may fail, many get 
on their feet again in short order and push to the front. Judging 
from the present indications, from a business stand point, we think 
there must be, in the the near future, a healthy business revival, but 
it will be of the conservative, discriminating kind. It seems that for 
months business stagnation has not been confined to any particular 
locality, but in fact it has been felt in all the civilized portions of the 
world. It is one of the great causes that is now disturbing old Eng- 
land, Germany, Kussia, Austria, Italy, and Spain. All are anxious for 
a healthy business reformation. 



78 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



-DEALER IN 



H 



pr: 



H 



11 



H 



Orelers promptly filled and hay shipped to any point 
on railway lines. 

THie Nutritious Grasses of Kichlaiicl County are un- 
surpassed, 

&OLFAX, - - - DAKOTA. 

Olivei* I>a>icls«;on, 



And Steam Eleyator Manager, 

For Cargill Brotliers. 

An expert at the business, popular with the farmers,and has a big run. 
Golf 0,03 s - - McchaCa^ 

CAKGILL BROS., 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 



9MiM 



miM 



Mm m 



Lar^e Dealers in Wheat. 

HLIGHEST PRICES F»^ID, 

COLFAX, - - - DAKOTA. 

JAMES S. STACK, 



SEAL ISTATE J^GENT 

All papers in realty transactions, final proof, and conveyancing made 
out on short notice and according; to law. 



COLFAX. 



DAKOTA. 



COLFAX. 



19 



PETER STEOHAUER, 






=^ 1W '^M 1W 



All kinds of work done in the best and most substantial 
style. Repairing a specialty. 



COLFAX, 



DAKOTA. 



1#J 



KANUTE GUNNESS, 



IP 31 J 



m 



And Machinist. 

Sjjecial attention given to repairing plows and farm macliinery. 
ALL WORK WARRANTED. 

Colfax, - - - Dakota. 

M. M. CMANJDjAJLIL, 



vm w^mwrnsmm 



im 



ISToteir-y F"u.TDlio, 



-AND- 



u 




ICE OF THE PEAC 



H 



Improved and' unimproved lands for sale at reasonable rates. Any 

information respecing lands and the advantages offered 

to settlers freely given. 



COLFAX, 



DAKOTA, 



80 



HISTOET OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



H. E. Crandall, 



-DEALER IN- 



Dry Goods and Groceries, 

HAEDWAKE, CROCKERY and TINWARE, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

HATS, CAPS, BEADY MADE CLOTHING, 

I3Pe.XJC3-S AND l^EXDIOinSTES. 



Paints, Oils, Books, and Stationer 
ALSO PROPRIETOR OF 



r^^ -mtr^Mfr^imw m 1^)1 



And Postmaster. 

COLFAX, - . . DAKOTA. 



JOHN H. LEWIS, 

THE EFFICIENT 



Station and Express Agent 

Tele8:rai>h Operator, and Book Keeper. 
In tlie enii3loy of tiie Ooiiipanr tor two j eai-s, 

COLFAX, - . DAKOTA. 



WALCOTT, 



Walcott is located on the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba 
Railway — Breckenridge Extension, twenty-seven miles northwest 
from Wahpeton, twenty-five miles southwest from Fargo, and two 
hundred and forty-four miles northwest from St. Paul. It is within 
some live miles of the Sheyenne River, about four miles west of the 
Wild Rice, and nine miles west of the Red River. It was located 
in the year 1880 by Frank E. Walcott, and surveyed by J. W. Blan- 
ding, Esq., and the village j^lat recorded in the month of January, 
1880. The location of this town is in a good section of wheat and 
grass lands and surrounded by a farming community that has fur- 
nished a good business from the beginning. The soil where the vil- 
lage is located is a dark sandy loam, warm and productive, but along 
the rivers the soil is heavier, consisting of a black vegetable mould 
rejnited for the growth of No. 1 hard, and yet, as the prairie lands 
away from the rivers are being more thoroughly cultivated and 
drained the crops are growing better every year, and for a variety 
of crops — mixed farming, the black sandy loam land of Richland 
County is unsurpassed. Stock raising in the vicinity of AValcott is 
receiving more attention every year as well as in other parts of the 
county, and this industry is bound to be one of the leading ones in 
the Red River Valley. As a wheat market and place of business 
Walcott has been one of the best from the beginniiig. The leading 
men of the town, who at the first began business operations at this 
point when it required strength, nerve, vim, and capital, when there 
• was a broad expanse of wild prairie land, a grand play ground for the 
antics and breezy freaks of old King Boreas, when the country was 
sparcely settled and many would inquire, "Where are our customers 
coming from?" were the following: Frank E. Davis, Gilbertson, 
Nipstad, Hagen, Helling, Judy & Furber, Steelhammer, C. W. Childs, 
Brunson & Johnson, and others, who from the beginning and since 
that time have been among the most active business factors of this 
lively town. 

The following summary of the business represented and carried 
on at Walcott tells its own story: It has two steam elevators, Avhere 
there are thousands of bushels of No. 1 hard marketed every year. 
The M. and D. Elevator has a capacity of 30,000 bushels, the North- 
.w astern elevator, 30,000 bushels ; H. M. Kellogg, general merchan- 



82 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

dise; Johnson & Co., general store; Exchange Hotel, C. AV. Childs, 
proprietor; Scandinavian Hotel, H. B. Home, proprietor; meat mar- 
ket, C. AV. Childs; farm machinery, represented by three active 
agents, H. M. Kellogg, C. Gilbertson, and Nipstad Bros.; black- 
smith, A. G. Steelhammer; milliner, Mrs. Hendricks; drugstore. Dr. 
J. H. Johnson; hardware, furniture, etc., Frank E. Davis, agent; 
carpenters, K. Thompson, K. O. Garness ; post-office, F. E. Walcott, 
P. M., also notary public and express agent; H. B. Rome, station 
agent; also three saloons. The members of the Walcott brass band 
know how to use their horns artistically. Walcott has suffered, since 
her establishment as a business point, a heavy loss by fire ; one large 
hotel, on the south of the track, built by F. E. Walcott, where pas- 
sengers took their breakfast for months, also one of the steam ele- 
vators, which has been rebuilt, besides a commodious depot that Avent 
uj) in smoke, and now rebuilt. The country around Walcott as well 
as other towns along the railway lines has improved greatly during 
the past six years, notwithstanding the late death of the big boom. 
At the present time it is still more encouraging for a healthy growth 
in the future. At Walcott there is a fine school house where in the 
past there have been religious services and a flourishing Sunday 
school. For some months they have had no pastor. The village of 
Walcott is incorporated, and the schools and town government are 
carried on and conducted according to the specifications and grants 
.of their charter. 



WALCOTT. 



83- 



JOHNSON & C03IPANY, 

Dealers in 



Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, Shoes, Hats and Caps, 

Ready ]\{Iade Clotliirig. 
Walcott, . - - - Dakota. 



JAMES KOGERS, 



^®i^ xT^tZ <■- 



iraiLI 



r^w- 



AND 



A Faithful Worker and Time Observer. 

Walcott, - - _ Dakota. 



rHAlVIi: IK. WALCOTT, 

Original Town Proprietor, 



C^l 



. jC J. 



C^f' 



IN'otai^y Fiiblic, 

Postmaster and Collection Agent. Steamship Tickets Sold, Etc. 
WATLOOTT, - - - 



I>AI£OTA.. 



i^ 



o; 



C ^V. CHILI>S5«, IPi-opi-ietoi-, 

A good place to stop. Special attention given to the wants of cus- 
tomers. A liberal patronage solicited. 

TKIRMS REA-SOISr^BLE. 

Also proj)rietor of 

City Livery Stable ^) ]>d:eat Market 
Walcott, - - - Dakota.. 



84 HISTORY OP RICHLAND COUNTT, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Farm Machinery, 

WAGONS and CARRIAGES. 

All customers will find a full line of goods at reasonable rates. Give 
us a call and we will satisfy you as it regards quality and price. 

"Walcott, - - - I>tiliota, 



.A.. Cr. HteelliaiTiniei 

illT ILlOl 



! fiHBIi 

i Mi 



Special attention given to 

Horse Shoeing, Plow and Machinery Repairing. 

A lively nickel better than a slow dime. 
TT^LCOTT, - - . DAKOTA- 

STATION AND EXPRESS AGENT. 

TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, 

In the employ of the company thirteen years, also proprietor of the 
Scandinavian hotel, where all guests are well cared for. Ta- 
\ bles well supplied, clean beds and a homelike resort. 

Walcott. - - - Dakota.. 

DEALER IN 

Hats and Caps, Boots and Shoes, 

Groceries, and Crockeiyware, 

Also a general dealer in farm machinery, etc. 

WAIiCOTT, - - DAKOTA. 



WALCOTT. 



85^ 



J§. A. HEBEL., 




IS' 




f 



AND WHEAT BUYER 
Village Clerk, School Secretary. 

Wl^AlLCCDTT, - - MAlKdDlPA. 



Walcott Hardware and Furniture Store, 



EI?,j\TSrii E. I>.^"\^IS, .^g-ent. 



A full line of 



At reasonable prices. Farmers and all avIio desire goods 
in oi^r line will be liberally dealt with. 



Walcott, 



Dakota. 



J. H. JOHNSON, M. D., 

Also Proprietor of 



m 



'^M^W'' 



Prescriptions carefully i)ut up, and professional calls 
l)romptly answered. 



Walcott, 



Dakota. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY, 



The Wadena and Fergus Falls branch of this great trunk line 
from St. Paul and Duluth to the Pacific Coast was the second road 
to enter Wahpeton and pass through the country almost directly 
west. It is another competing line to the great grain centers o£ the 
East, and is of incalculable advantage to Piichland County, Wahpeton 
its county seat, and the towns located along its line, and will enhance 
the value of real estate in the county many thousands of dollars. No 
doubt but that in the near future this line will be pushed beyond 
Milnor and soon touch the eastern bank of the great Missouri River, 
and eventually will have a continuous route to Southwestern Dakota, 
when millions of gold and sih'er and precious metals will be brought 
out of their hiding places and help to make up the immense traffic 
that must pass over this anticipated but projected highway of com- 
merce to the great objective points towards sunrise. 

A company that has accomplished such herculean feats in build- 
ing a great trunk line from the points we have mentioned to the 
Pacific slope, in the face and eyes of destructive financial panics such 
as the world never witnessed before, and many oi3stacles that were 
not in the count of general railway possibilities, surely has the abil- 
ity, when the time comes, to extend its iron arms to the Black 
Hills, giving them a very Avarm commercial embrace that will put a 
new business life into that far away but very rich jiart of our grand 
territorial empire. A railroad company that has a grant from the 
government of near 50,000,000 acres of land can do even more than 
this. When this is accomplished, the inhabitants of this county will 
realize more than ever the worth of this great branch of this great 
anaconda railway that nearly spans the American continent. Then 
all will begin to realize the true significance that was foreshadowed 
when it entered the eastern portals of our county, and passed on to 
shake hands with our western neighboring city, Milnor, and looking 
to the objective points above mentioned. 

The following report was furnished by assistant General Manager 
Odell, concerning the shipments from the different stations for the last 



]S^OETIIERN PACIFIC RAILWAY. 87 

fiscal year, ending June 30, 1885. From Walipeton, 73,403 bushels; 
Ellsworth, 96,003 bushels; Fairview, 142,583 bushels; Mooreton, 87,496 
bushel; Barney, 15,300 bushels; Wyndmere, 57,760 bushels; mak- 
ing a total for the fiscal year of 472,545 bushels. The total amount 
shipped from the said stations commencing July 1 and ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1885, five months inclusive, is as follows: Wahpeton, 4,710 
bushels; Ellsworth, 49,446 bushels; Fairview, 61,220 bushels; Moore- 
ton, 73,925 bushels; Barney, 16,275 bushels; AVyndmere, 32,216 
bushels; making a total for five months of 237,832; for seventeen 
months, 709,377 bushels. 

Capacity of the elevators and warehouses at stations on the 
Northern Pacific, Fergus, and Black Hills Railroad in Kichland 
County: AVahpeton, 30,000 bushels; Ellsworth, 20,000; Fairview, 60,- 
000; Mooreton, 25,000; Barney, 15,000; Wyndmere, 55,0000; total, 
205,000 bushels. 



LIST OF LANDS OWNED BY THE NORTHERN PACIFIC li. E. CO. 



TERMS OF SAT.E. 

One-sixth down, remainder in five equal annual installments, with 7 

per cent interest. 

No discount for cash. The preferred stock of the Company will 
be received at par in payment of principal or interest. 

A rebate of one dollar per acre will be made for the area broken 
and put under cultivation within the first two years after sale, or up 
to time of final payment, if such pajanent be made before the expir- 
ation of said two years. The amount of such rebate must be deduct- 
ed from the last payment on the land, and no rebate will be allowed 
for breaking done after full payment has been made. 

The Company reserves 400 feet for right of wayalong ii;s main 
line, or 200 feet for any branch or ojjerated line that may be built 
■across this land; also reserves the right to take Avater from, over, or 
through the land sold. 

Purchasers will be required to fence the right of way of the 
main, branch, or operated lines of the Company, when built across 
these lands. 

The "ratings" shown on this list are those fixed by the Laud 
Examiners to show the quality of the land, the best land being rated 
a,s 1, and the poorest as 5. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 
To purchase these lands, apply to 

R. J. WEMYSS, Gen'l Land Agent, 

St. Paul, Minn. 



m 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND (TOUNTY. 



TART OF SECTION. 



4^ 



■2 
2 
If 

1 

3 

2i 
2i 
2| 

2i 

2 

2* 

1| 
2 

1^ 

n 

2 

1| 
2i 

■2-J 
21 

1§ 
2i 
3 

u 

u 

ll 
1* 

2| 

3 

3H 

3Jr 

3| 



west half oi: northwest quarter ~~~~ 

southwest quarter, 
northwest quarter, 

ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
northeast quarter, 

nw quarter, sw quarter, and se quarter, 
east half of southeast quarter, 
southwest quarter of southwest quarter, 
northeast quarter, 

southwest quarter and southeast quarter, 
whole, 

sw quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, ne quarter, 
northwest quarter, and northeast quarter, 
south half of southwest quarter, 
northwest quarter, 
southeast quarter, 
northwest quarter, 

ne quarter, se quarter and sw quarter, 
northwest quarter, 
east half of southeast quarter, 
northeast quarter of northwest quarter, 
southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 
northeast quarter and northwest quarter, 
northeast quarter and southeast quarter, 
northwest quarter, 
southwest quarter, 
whole, 

ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
whole, 
whole, 

se quarter, ne quarter, sw quarter, nw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw qurater, se quarter, sw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
northeast quarter, 

nw quarter, se quarter and sw quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
3i;ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
3^ine quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter 



E 



Acres 



Price 

per 

Acre. 



3^ ne quarter, n^v quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 



Si 

2^ 
3 



ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, ne quarter, 

northeast quarter, 

southeast quarter, southwest quarter, 

northwest quarter, 

se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 



o 

5 

29 

3 

5 

5 

15 

15 

3 

3 

5 

7 

9 

13 

17 

25 

25 

29 

29 

■do 

35 

:l 

1 

5 



il31 

it 

132 
131 



132 



133 



47 80, 
160 
160 
643, 
161. 
481, 
80 
40 
160. 
320 
563. 
618. 
320 
80 
160 
160 
160 
480 
160 
80 
40 
320 
318, 
321, 
160 
160 
634, 
160 
640 
636 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
160. 
480 
642 
641. 
623 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
633, 
160 
"i320 
"1160 
"i640 



24 



F,9 



28 



7. 

7. 

7.50 

10. 

10. 

9. 

10. 

8. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

8. 

8.50 

8. 

8.50 



10. 

10. 

10. 

9.50 

9. 

5. 

10. 

8. 

6. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

6.25 

6. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

7. 

5. 

6.50 

5. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC LANDS. 



89- 



PART OF SECTION. 



S 



T 



R 



Acres 



3 |sw quarter, ne quarter, se quarter, 

2i^! northwest quarter, 

3 ise quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 

3 se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 

'2| northeast quarter, northwest quarter, 

2| southeast quarter, southwest quarter, 

2'i se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 

2^^ se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 

3 northeast quarter, 

2^ northwest quarter, 

2 'I north half of northwest quarter, 

2 w half of se quarter, se quarter, of se quarter 

2ie half of sw quarter, sw quarter of sw quarter 

2ine quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, |1.> 

2 I southwest quarter, 23 

9, south half of northwest quarter, l-^-^ 



133 



125 

25 

27 

29 

31 

31 

33 

35 
7|134 
7 " 



521480 
160 
640 



Price 

per 

Acre. 



2i 

3' 

2^ 

3 

3-1 

2l 

3 

3 



ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 

whole, 

whole, 

whole, 

whole, +111 

ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 11 

whole, 
,, whole, 
2^ ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 

3 I whole, 

2^:northeast quarter, 

2'|sontheast quarter, 

3 Iwhole, 

2i ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 

2|- se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 

3n,ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 

3;^ine quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 



49 



50 



51 



3 
3 
3 

2 

91" 



n half, ne quarter and se quarter, ne quarter, 
s half of se quarter, ne quarter of se quarter, 
w half, nw quarter and ne quarter nw quarter, 
w half, sw quarter and se quarter, sw quarter, 
ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, sw quarter, 
northeast quarter and northwest quarter, 
southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 
^., northeast quarter and northwest quarter, 
2i southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 
3'inortheast quarter and nortliwest quarter, 
2=^ 'southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter and nw quarter, 
northeast quarter and northwest quarter, 
southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 
se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 
northeast quarter, 



2Jf 

3 
3 
2-1 



15 
17 

19 
21 

25 

25 

27 

31 

1 

3 

5 

7 

7 

7 

7 

9 

11 

11 

13 

13 

15 

15 

17 

19 

19 

21 

23 



640 
319.67 

319.87 

640 

640 

160 

178.76 

80 
120 
120 
628.06 
160 

80 

640.50 
637.48 
633.34 
634.40 
640 
640 
640 
640 
634.78 
640 
660 
660 
660 
"1637.80 
521638.98 

641.36 

642.24 

120 

120 

106.20 

106.84 

640 

320 

320 

320 

320 

320 

320 

480 

307.99 

308.07 

640 

160 



6.50 

7. 

6. 

6. 

7.50 

7. 

7. 

7. 

6. 

7. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

8. 

8. 



6. 

5. 

5.50 

5. 

5. 

6. 

5. 

5. 

6. 

5.50 

5.50 

6.50 

5. 

7. 

6.50 

6. 

5. 

6. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

6. 

6.50 

6.75 

6.75 

6.50 

6. 

6.50 

6.50 

7. 

6. 

6. 

6.50 



90 


HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY 


• 










0) 

be 
p 


PART OF SECTION. 


S 


T 


E Acres 


Price 

per 

Acre. 


3 


southeast quarter, i23 


134 


'5"2 


160 


6. 


2i 


northwest quarter, 


23 


a 


1 (( 


1160 


7. 


32 


southwest quarter, 


23 


u 


" 


160 


5. 


3i 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 


25 


a 


1 ii 

1 


,640 


5. 


^ 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 


27 


a 


i " 


'640 


5. 


4 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 


29 


a 


(1 


,640 


4. 


4 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter. 


31 


a 


" 


620.02 


4. 


3| 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter. 


33 


it 


li 


640 


5. 


4 


ne quarter, nw quarter, se quarter, svr quarter, 


35 


11 


11 


640 


4. 


3 


west half of northwest quarter, 


1 


135 


50 


82.36 


5. 


3 


southwest quarter. 


1 


a 


(£ 


160 


5. 


3| 


whole, 


3 


li 


li 


641.04 


5. 


3 


whole, 


11 


a 


11 


640 


5. 


3 


whole, 


13 


iC 


11 


640 


5. 


^ 


north half of northeast quarter. 


25 


a 


11 


80 


6. 


2i 


north half of northwest quarter, 


25 


a 


11 


80 


6. 


3^ 


northwest quarter aiid southwest quarter. 


3 


a 


51 


323.51 


5. 


3^ 


northeast quarter, 


5 


a 


u 


163.38 


450 


4 


sw quarter of nw quarter, w half of sw quarter, 














and se quarter of sw quarter, 


5 


" 


(( 


160 


4.50 


3-i 


whole. 


7 


a 


li 


62496 


4.50 


3 


whole. 


9 


a 


11 


640 


450 


3 


southeast quarter and west half, 


15 


a 


11 


480 


5. 


3i 


whole, 


17 


iC 


li 


640 


4.50 


3 


whole. 


19 


a 


ii 


628.56 


5. 


2f 


whole, 


21 


u 


11 


640 


5. 


2^ 


whole. 


29 


a 


11 


640 


5. 


2^ 


whole. 


31 


a 


li 


633.76 


5. 


22 


se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter. 


33 


a 


ii 


640 


5.50 


4 


e half, sw quarter, and s half of nw quarter. 


1 


li 


52 


560.78 


4. 


4 


southwest quarter of northeast quarter. 


3 


a 


" 


40 


4. 


4 


southeast quarter. 


3 


a 


li 


160 


4. 


4 


southeast quarter of northwest quarter. 


3 


u 


ii 


40 


4. 


4 


w half of sw quarter, se quarter of sw quarter. 


3 


a 


11 


120 


4. 


4 


s half of ne quarter, nw quarter of ne quarter, 


7 


a 


11 


120 


4. 


4 


northwest quarter and south half, 


7 


a 


u 


435.68 


4. 


4 


whole. 


9 


a 


11 


640 


4. 


3f 


whole, 


11 


a 


a 


640 


4. 


4 


whole. 


13 


li 


ii 


640 


4. 


4 


whole. 


15 


ii 


ii 


640 


4. 


4 


whole. 


17 


a 


(1 


640 


4. 


4 


whole. 


19 


a 


a 


600.16 


4. 


4 


whole. 


21 


a 


11 


640 


4. 


3i 


whole, 


23 


li 


ii 


640 


4. 


2| 


whole. 


25 


a 


li 


640 


5. 


3| 


west half and southeast quarter, 


27 


ii 


11 


480 


4. 


4 


whole. 


29 


ii 


11 


640 


4. 


3^ 


whole. 


31 


ii 


11 


607.36 


4. 


3| 


whole, 


33 


li 


a 


640 


4. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC LANDS. 



91 



PART OF SECTION. 



s 



Price 

R Acres per 

Acre 



n 

3 

2 

21 

3" 

3i 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 



24 

4 

4 

4 

4 



'a 
31 

2! 



2i|northeast quarter and southeast quarter, 35jl35 

3^lnortliwest quarter and southwest quarter, 351 " 

3 s half of nw quarter and sw quarter, 15 136 

4 southwest quarter, 17! " 

3 whole, 19j " 

4 sw quarter of nw quarter and sw quarter, 2l| " 
whole, 29 
whole, 31 
whole, 33 
northeast quarter, 7 
southeast quarter and northwest quarter, 7 
southwest quarter, 7 
northeast quarter, 9 
southeast quarter, 9 
northeast quarter of southeast quarter, 11 
southwest quarter of northwest quarter, 11 
northwest quarter of southwest quarter, 11 
south half of southeast quarter, 13 

3||northeast quarter and northwest quarter, 15 
3|- n half of se quarter, sw quarter of se quarter, 15 
3| n half of sw quarter, sw quarter of sw quarter, 15 
3 se quarter, ne quarter, nw quarter, 17 

3 east half of southwest quarter, 17 

2| s half of sw quarter, nw quarter of sw quarter, 19 
southeast quarter, 23 

se quarter, sw quarter, ne quarter, 27 

south half of northwest quarter, 27 

south half of southeast quarter, 31 

south half of southwest quarter, 31 

3^! south half of northeast quarter, ' 33 

3^ southeast quarter and southwest quarter, 33 

3-J; south half of northwest quarter, 33 

2h northeast quarter, 35 

northwest quarter, 35 

s half of se quarter, ne quarter of se quarter, 15 
south half, 25 



52 320 15.50 
"1320 1 4. 



51 



50240 
"|l60 
622.14 
200 
640 
618.08 
640 
160 
279.40 
119.64 
160 
160 

40 

40 

40 

80 
i320 
120 
120 
480 

80 

87.49 
160 
480 

80 

80 



b. 

4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 
5. 

4.50 
7. 

6.50 
6.25 
5. 
7. 
5. 
5. 
5. 
5. 

4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
6.50 
6.50 
4.50 
4.50 
I 4.50 



75.101 4.50 



80 

320 

80 

160 

160 

52,120 

^'320 



4.50 

4.50 

4.50 

6. 

4.50 

5. 

5. 



The terms offered by this comi:)aiiy, as above stated , will prove to 
be to any jjurchaser about as liberal as the terms offered by the gov- 
ernment; especially when all the disadvantages are tfdcen into con- 
sideration in securing a patent, put through the regular government 
mill, and all the red tape requirements of the same. Within the lim- 
its of the government grant to this company, all persons are required 
to pay the maximum price, §2.50 per acre, instead of the minimum 
price $1.25 per acre. The rulings of the land commissioners of late 
as it respects entries or filings on public lands are a source of a great 
deal of distraction, causing a delay in securing titles which is work- 
ing a great injury to many. 



MOORETON. 



This station on tlie Northern Pacific and Black Hills Railway, is 
twelve miles west of "Wahpeton and bears the name of Hugh Moore, 
Esq., proprietor of the Antelope Farm. It is situated in the midst 
of a fine agricultural district and one of the best wheat stations on 
this line in the county. The town plat was recorded on the 17th day 
of June, 1884. It has a fine elevator and one patent roller flowering 
mill run by steam under the careful management of Mr. J. M. Kra- 
mer; two wheat warehouses, one hotel, one Catholic church, one 
store of general merchandising, two saloons, and two blacksmith 
shops. Mr. Butala settled at this point in 1882, and has been en- 
gaged in mercantile business ever since. Mrs. Butala, the devoted 
wife and affectionate mother, was killed by lightning during a thun- 
der storm in the summer of 1885, leaving an interesting family of 
children and a sadly afflicted husband. All were standing near her 
side in the upper story of the store building where Mr. Butala and 
family lived, Avhen the unexpected summons came. The Catholic 
church at Mooreton was erected in 1884, and there are some twelve 
families who are connected therewith. The prosperity of this sta- 
tion depends largely on the individual efforts of those who ought to 
be particularly interested. 



ANTELOPE FARM. 

Hugh Moore, Proprietor, contains 5,000 acres, with 2,500 under 
cultivation. The land is a warm, sandy loam and well adapted to 
variety of crops. Expects to engage in stock industry, raising the 
short horn breed. Has now 200 head and will increase his herd to 
1,000, and reduce the acreage of wheat to about 1,000 acres. This 
farm is situated on the Antelope Creek. There are about fifteen 
buildings on this farm well constructed and sui'rounded by a fine 
grove, maple^ ash, Mountain oak, spruce and evergreens, with a nice 



ANTELOPE FARM. 9S 

plant of small fruits, currents, gooseberries, raspberries, strawberries, 
etc. One barn, 30x120, one 32x80, one 25x40, one granary and office 
40x45, men's quarters 20x30 with addition 16x20. There is a large 
pig pen, poultry house and root cellar, also a blacksmith shop where 
the work of the farm is done. The residence is a double house, one 
20x24, the other 20x36. The farmers cottage 20x24 with a conven- 
ient addition. Mr. Moore is from NeAvburgh, N. Y., and since he as- 
sumed the proprietorship and superintendency of this large farm has 
taken sjjecial pains to make this large capital plant a success. The 
crops growing on this place in 1885 and just ready for harvest was 
nearly all destroyed by a hail storm that was unusually severe at this 
point, although not wide spread. The loss was carefully estimated 
at $20,000. However, Mr. Moore is not discouraged, but full of am- 
bition to make up his loss in the near future by the "try, try again," 
go-a-headitiveness, principle. No doubt but that success for the fu- 
ture years will fully make up for past short comings. No man has 
been more thoroughly imbued with a public spirit than the j^roprie- 
tor of the Antelope Farm. This plantation is about two miles north- 
west from Mooreton, a station on the Northern Pacific Railway, where 
Mr. Moore is largely interested, having built a patent roller flouring 
mill that is now being run successfully. 

Proprietor of the 

Mooreton Steam Roller Mills. 

Capacity Seventy-five Barrels Per Day. 

The flour made at this mill is of a superior qualit}' and the volume of business is 

i: creasing. A fine elevator in connection with this mill where many 

thousand bushels of wheat are marketed every year. 

MOORETOJy, - - - DAKOTA. 

MATTHIAS BUTALA, 

Dealer in 

Ready Made Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Crockery, Hardware. 

Also buys and sells wheat, and carries on a full line of 

business necessary in a farming district. Prices 

as low as tlie times will permit. 

MOORETOJf, - - - -. DAKOTA. 



WYNDMERE. 



Wynclmere is the most westerly station in E,ichland Connty, sit- 
uated in the township of Dexter, on the Northern Pacific Railway 
about twenty-six miles west of Wahpeton, the county seat. The orig- 
inal town plat was filed on the 16th day of January, 1884, located on 
the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of section 12, town- 
ship 132 north, of range 52 west; Joseph D. Meyer, proprietor, J. 
Hansman, proprietor of the addition to the original townsite, filed 
his plat for record on the 27th day of May 1884. AVyndmere is a 
central trading point for a large section of excellent grass and wheat 
lands. In this locality farming lands can be bought at reasonable 
rates, from four to ten dollars an acre, and there are many fine open- 
ings for stock raising, besides wheat growing, where the grasses are 
of the most nutritious varieties. The many tons of buffalo bones 
that have been gathered and shipped from this locality^ are sure evi- 
dence that these animals knew where their best pasture lands were 
located. There are two stores of general merchandise at this point, 
where a large amount of goods are sold annually; good hotel accom- 
modations in the large section house, kept by Mr. Tilley, one l)lack- 
smitli shop and one saloon. Hilliard Borthers sells farm machinery 
at reasonable rates. There is a very commodious depot at Wynd- 
mere. ■ The steam elevator at this point has a capacity sufficient for 
the needs of the place. Nearly all the wheat shipped over this line 
of railway finds a market at Dulutli. For the next ten years the im- 
provements in this town and the surrounding country must be very 
encouraging. The Hilliard Brothers, W. H. Morgan, the Carltons, 
Barnes, aiid others are laboring to accomplish this hopeful result. 
There is no school house at Wyndmere, but Mrs. Capt. Wilcox is em- 
ployed as the efficient teacher, who occujjies a school room, provided 
by the school board, and is devoting her time to the thorough training 
of the students. A good school-house will soon be built, which is 
greatly needed. 

^HILLIARD^BROTHERS, ' 

Dealers in 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

Hardware, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Tobacco, Cigars, and Notions. 

Also Flour, Feed, and Fuel. 
WYJVDMERE, - - - DAKOTA. 



AVTXDMEEE. 95' 



LEWIS PFOFFENBACK, 



ill 




All work done in a workuiaulike manner. Special attention given to 

HOFISE SHOEIl^TO. 

Plow and farm machinery repairing. Als<i 

WYNDMERE, ... - DAKOTA. 

Deal Of ii) 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

Dry Groocls, Gri'ocex'ies, 

Boots, Shoes, Crockery. Also deals in Coal and Wood, 

Mr. Morgan is Notai-y Public and does a good deal 
of oflieial business. 

WYJ^DMERE, - - - DAKOTA. 

G. L. CARLTON, 

Dextex*, - - Dakota. 

Homestead located in Maxell, 1880. South lialf of northwest quar- 
ter and north half of southwest quarter, section twenty-four. Frame 
house, granary, barn, etc. Plenty of good water. Fine grove sur- 
rounding buildings. Strawberries, raspberries, currants, etc. School 
house on the farm one hundred yards north of house. Well bred' 
horses, cattle, and hogs. 

L. D. CARLTON, 

DEXTER, - - - DAKOTA. 

Located homestead in March, 1880. Southeast half of section 24, 
township one hundred and thirty-two, range 52. Two and one -half 
miles south of Wyndmere, two story frame house 16x24, granary and 
other buildings worth about one thousand dollars. AVell 26 feet 
deep with stone curbing, never fails to supply an abundance of pure" 
cold water. Farm all under cultivation. 



DEXTER. 

Dexter is one of tlie townships in the western tier of the county, 
and extends twelve miles north and south by six miles in width. The 
whole township is well adapted to diversified farming. While the 
southern half is generally high and rolling, especially suitable to 
agriculture, the northern portion is more level and better adapted to 
stock-raising. The Wild Eice river flows through from west to east. 
Elk creek rises in Lone Star Lake, in the northwest and Hoavs south- 
east through the town. Mr. Dexter Carlton, (for whom the town was 
named) with his sons, Lowell D. and George L., were the advance 
settlers and located farms in the northern half of the township, two 
and one-half miles south of Wyndmere. The young men reside on 
their adjoining farms and are ])rosperous. L. D. Carlton harvested 
and threshed, last year, 1,750 bushels of wheat and believes that 
jjluck and perseverance lead to succes in Dakota. G. L. Carlton 
raises a good crop of corn every year, and during the summer of 1885 
threshed 3,000 bushels of small grain. He devotes particular atten- 
tion to stock-raising. Three miles southwest of Wyndmere is the 
farm and elegant residence of Mr. M. H. Barnes. 

Smyth's Lake, in the southern part of the township, is a magnif- 
icent sheet of water and has become quite a resort in the summer for 
hunters and sportsmen. Mr. E. C. Smyth has a pleasant location on 
the shore of this lake. He has surrounded his residence with a beau- 
tiful grove of various kinds of timber, and his farm v/ith that adjoin- 
ing owned by his sons James E. and Joseph H., is a bonanza of 1,000 
acres. James E. Smyth and Miss Flora Williams were the first 
couple married in the town. At that early day the nearest minister 
was many miles away, and at the bride's home, the residence of Mr. 



DEXTER TOWNSHIP. ' 97 

W. M. House, the ceremony was gracefully and pleasantly performed 
by Justice L. D. Carlton. Mr. James R. Smytli is tlie best machinery 
expert in the county, and was for several years manager of the Ante- 
lope and Keystone bonanza farms. Mr. A. E. Otterburn, formerly 
of Berlin, Wisconsin, and later of southern Minnesota, is one of the 
substantial farmers of this township. He has a beautiful farm one- 
half mile from Smyth's LaLe, and his buildings, cultivated fields, and 
beautiful groves are indeed a handsome monument to energy and 
enterprise. Adjoining Mr. Otterburn's farm and extending near the 
lake lies the farm of Mr. AV. M. House, whose buildings are beauti- 
fully located and surrounded by trees, which form the finest body of 
growing timber in the township. The following names are of resi- 
dents of the town, all of whom own and reside on farms that are well 
worthy of extended notice, but space does not allow : William Eobbins, 
George E. Parks, William R. Parks, A. F. Carey, John R. Smith, 
Ford Brothers, Goolsby Brothers, Hobson & Bailey, H. McDonald, 
William Orr, B. F. Schuster, T. A. Wilkinson, George Owen, C. M. 
Shaffer, Mark Walters, John A. Wesner, John Wacha, Peter Waclia. 
Agnew Brothers, and many others. Dexter Township claims the 
honor of being the home of the tallest man in the Territory. Mr. 
Mack Agnew is very nearly seven feet in height. He is a young man, 
scarcely of age, of excellent deportment, and if appearances can be 
trusted has a brilliant future before him. The interests of this town- 
ship with resi^ect to general merchandise, lumber, hotels, shipping, 
etc., are Avell represented by able and reliable business men, whose 
names appear in the W yndmere page. The township is abundantly 
supplied with water, not only by lakes and streams, but nearly every 
farm has a well of pure cold water. The soil is a black loam from 
one to two feet in dej)tli, with clay subsoil, and is of the general char- 
acter peculiar to the Red River Valley. Great advantages for new 
settlers are found here. Like all new countries there are some who 
will sell for about the cost of their improvements, and if you want 
to " go west, young man," come to Richland County, Dakota. 

The above description of Dexter Township was kindly furnished 
the Editor by W. M. House. 

~ A. E. OTTERBURN, 

Of Dexter, located a pre-emption in 1881 on the southwest quarter 
of section twenty-two, township 131, range 52. Frame house 
16x24, stable 16x50, granary, etc. Surrounded by grove of box 
elder, cottonwood, willow, plum, balm of gilead, etc. School-house 
one-fourth mile from buildings. Seventy-five acres under cultiva- 
tion. Stock raising a specialty. 



98 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



WM. M. HOUSE 

Located land in spring of 1881, on south half of section 21, township- 
131, range 52. "Was a few days in advance of every other settler in 
that vicinity, and thus secured first choice of land. The farms of that 
locality and all within a range of several miles are perfectly adapted 
to agriculture. The surface is high and rolling, while the nutritious 
natural grasses make abundant pasture and hay. Timothy grows 
well, and diversified farming is the rule. The farm consists of a home»- 
stead and a tree claim; two liundred and twenty acres are now under 
cultivation. On the homestead is a frame house sixteen by twenty- 
four with an ell, a stable sixteen by thirty, a granary eighteen by 
twenty-six, two good wells wliich supply excellent water and an. 
abundance for a hundred head of stock in all seasons. The buildings 
are surrounded by a fine grove. On the tree claim is now growing a 
fine forest of maple, white ash, box elder, cotton-wood, and black w^al- 
nut, making the finest body of cultivated timber in the townshijj, and 
one of the best of the county. Post-office, Wyndmere or Walipeton. 



R. C. SMYTH 

Moved from Canada to Dakota, aiid settled in the town of Dexter, 
Krichland County, 1881. His Lake Side Farm contains 488 acres^ 
section twenty-eight, townshij) one hundred and thirty-one, range 
fifty-two, and has two hundred acres under cultivation, bordering on 
Smytli Lake. This lake is two miles long by three-fourths of a mile 
•wide, with a sandy pebbly shore. The soil in this locality is excellent 
for wheat and stock raising. A good school-house within a quarter of 
a mile. Smyth and sons own about 1,200 acres of land. 



N. P. NELSON, 
B Id A. C K S 1%I I T H[ I W G 9 

Repairing Farm Machinery, AVagon and Carriage AVork, a Specialty .- 
FAIRMOUNT, DAKOTA. 



FAIRMOUNT. 



The Fairmoiint village plat was filed, for record June 5, 1884, at 
1 o'clock P.M. This new town on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
railway — Fargo & Southern division, is fifteen miles south of Wahpe- 
ton, situated in the center of an excellent farming district that is 
naturally tributary to it, where there are thousands of bushels of 
the golden cereals sold every year. The soil of the land is very rich 
in this locality and the surrounding country, and there is a luxuriant 
growth of grasses on the natural meadow that supplies the farmers' 
stock with those wonderfully nutritious productions which grow in 
the upper Red River Valley. For some two seasons certain districts 
near Fairmount have been visited by heavy storms during the sum- 
mer, but the farmers are not discouraged and are using due diligence 
to improve their wheat plantations, aiid are breaking up new land 
that liids fair to increase the crop acreage very materially. Fair- 
mount has lively hopes of becoming an important railway station on 
the Dakota Midland railway. There is a steam elevator with a capac- 
ity of 40,000 bushels, and one wdieat warehouse. Since harvest there 
have been shipped from this station 115,000 bushels of grain. There 
are at Fairmount one store of general merchandise, two grocery 
stores, one blacksmith shop, one farm machinery agency, and a full 
supply of lumber, coal, and wood, furnished by reliable parties. 
There is a Baptist church at Fairmount, where regular weekly serv- 
ices are held. Among the farmers in and near this locality we will 
mention the following-named gentlemen: Josejih C. Henvis, L. P. 
Baker, W. A. Easton, E. K. Crafts, J. F. Williams, U. A. Griffin, 
D. S. Brown, A. H. Gallup, J. H. Bostwick, O. H. Perry, and John An- 
derson. 



THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 



oi^ I^^^IX^3^vd:oTJI^^'z?. 



Was organized October 9, 1881, with nine members, by Rev. G. W. 
Huntley, General Missionary for North Dakota of the American 
Baptist Home Mission Society. Elder E. S. Thomas is the present 
pastor. This church owns one block in Fairmount, donated by Mrs. 
Hannah S. Henvis. The church edifice is 20x30 feet; the jjarsonage, 
of good size, costing $1,300. The present membership is fifty, and 
the condition prosperous. 



100 



HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 



R. S. TYLER, 

TOWNSITE PROPRIETOR AND 

REAL ESTATE DEALER. 

T^INELY LOCATED LOTS 

J^OJ? SALE ON REASOXABLE TERMS. 



I^k jjnt£ of |oH Jlaiigrs from |^ifi:niu-fiiT to |)nr |]uiulrccl and jfiftn jjollarf 



Parties wlio desire to pnrcliase lots can obtain all necessary- 
information by addressing 



B, S. TYLER, 



FARGO. 



DAKOTA. 



Joseph C. Henvis, 



PROPRIETOR OF 



GRANDYIEW STOCK FARM. 

SeveiT- Hiiiidr-ecl Aei-es, 35() Inapi^oved; Buildings, 
ft Fine Farm. Ho\Tr?e, t^vo Bani.r«, and a Gi'anary: 
also tAvo Tenant Houses, costing- in the aggre- 
gate about Thirty-live Hundred Dollars. 

MR. HENVIS PAYS SPECIAL ATTENTION TO RAISING 



JB US' 



M^ 



STOCKS 



}t SHORT HORN CATTLE AND %f 



^j 



SHROPSHIRE DOWN SHEEP. 



Also Proprietor of LAKESIDE FAE.M, located on the banks of Lake Johanna, 

Sec. 36, Tp. 130, E. 51. Fifty acres of Beautiful Timber, of great value, 

on this farm. Mr. Henvis settled in Fairmount in the year 1879. 



FAIKMOUNT AND ABERCEOMBIE. 



101 



B. ^A^. & J. A. SCHON^VEILER, 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Crockery and Glassware, 

. And a FvJl Line of PROVISIONS. EFTRICES REASONABLE. 

FAIRMOUNT, DAKOTA. 

S. S. PAINE, 

DEALER IN 

WOOD, LUMBER, FARMERS' ' SUPPLIES, 

AND A FULL LINE OF 

One of the first dealers in WAHMMO-UMT, M'AM^TA, 



N, DAVIS, JR., 

DEALER IN 



i^Muums 



TOILET PERFUMERY, NOTIONS, ETC. 

—<^ — ALS O — -=^>— 

Postmaster, Justice of the Peace, and Notary Public. 

FAIRMOUNT, DAKOTA. 



JOHNSON & TWETO. 

PROPRIETORS OF 



-fef 









Plenty of room for all the guests. Tables well supx^lied, and 
special pains taken to accommodate customers. 



AMMm^mOMMTLm, 



IBAMBTA. 



FO.^7 ABERCROMBIE. 



There is no plac i vvitliin the bounds of Eichland County, and, in 
fact, none in the Northwest, that has more historic facts and interest 
cdustering around it than Fort Abercronibie. It has a military record 
that is exceedingly interesting; but all of its history never can be 
written only in what might be called a fragmentary style. And if we 
can only gather up the most important fragments, they even will be 
read with great interest by those Avho desire to know more of frontier 
life and the early dawn of advancing civilization that seems to be 
marching wdth quickened pace towards the golden sunset lands of the 
far West. It seems almost impossible to realize that but a few years 
ago there was such an important military i)ost as Fort Abercrombie, 
that figured so largely in the settlement of the country, having been 
a point where millions of supplies were shipped from St. Paul; 
where many soldiers were stationed, commanded by officers of the 
Government who made a grand record for themselves; a place where 
the maddened warlike Sioux besieged the citadel with the flourish of 
tomahawk and war-club and the ringing volleys of the best riiles 
made in America , as they, from ambush and tree-top, used them with 
the precision of trained sharp-shooters, making many brave Ameri- 
cans bite the dust; and that now there is hardly a trace or sign of 
those important events. The fort has disappeared, and so have many 
that were engaged in the conflicts. The old military reservation is 
now covered with farm-houses , and the tillers of the soil with plow^ 
and harrow^ are making the soil laugh with golden harvests; and the 
X^lace wdiere the United States cavalry a few years ago made the eai-th 
trenil:)le with their furious haste to meet the foe; where the skulking 
Sioux with their war paint meant, mischief; where the thousands of 
buffalo roamed at i)leasure, now can be heard the hum, rattle, and 
music of farm machinery; and the military camps have given way to 
growing towns and cities, and instead of the Indian war-whoop we 
now hear the shrill whistle of the steam engine, as it passes over the 
iron track, with its villages on wheels heavily freighted with the 
traveling thousands w^io, in palace cars, are crowding our great North- 
west to find homes and business worth looking after. 

Fort Abercrombie was established in 1858, on the west bank of 
the Eed Eiver, now in Eichland County, and about fifteen miles from 
where Wahpeton is located. The post was abandoned after an occu- 
pancy of a little over a year, and the property sold at a great sacrifice. 



FOET ABERCKOMBIE. 103 

It was rebuilt in July, 1860, under command of Major Day. In July, 
1861, the major with his two companies were ordered to AVashington. 
Major Markham with his two companies took command. In 1862 all 
full regiments were ordered south to join the United States forces, 
and Captain Inman, a Baptist clergyman, was the next in command, 
with companies from the 4th regiment, stationed at Fort Snelling. 
He soon left for the front, crossing the Red River on the ice, and 
Captain Yanderhock, with two companies of the 5tli Minnesota voL 
unteers, took command. On the 19th day of August, 1862, the 
Indian massacre began at the old town of Breckeinidge, where the 
hotel was burned and a number lost their lives, among them one by 
the name of Russell. In cue week the attack was made on the Fort. 
The stage-driver, Charlie Snell, was killed in the hotel at Brecken- 
ridge, and, a chain being fastened around his body, the Indians 
dragged it around the well with demon hate until a deep path was 
made by the repeated operation. The Saskatchewan and Fort Garry 
mail bags 'weve gutted and the mail scattered in every direction over 
the prairie; mail from the McKenzie River was also intercepted. 
The soldiers, with Judge McCauley, gathered up as much of the mail 
as possible, and it was forwarded to its destination. A family at " Old 
Crossing," on the Otter Tail sixteen miles from Breckenridge, was at- 
tacked, and a man by the name of Scott was killed; his mother was 
badly wounded, but was brought to the Fort and cared for until she- 
fully recovered. A boy about twelve years oi age was captured by 
the Sioux and carried into captivity, but finally ransoined through the 
agency of a Catholic priest, and sent to St. Louis to his grandparents. 
It is reported that Mr. Stone and Judge McCauley weie lodging 
together in the Fort when there was an alarm that the Indians were 
about making an attack, and all were up and ready in a short time. 
None were more deliberate and thoughtful at this time than Judge 
McCauley, who got out of bed and carefully attended to his toilet, 
putting on his paper collar with excellent precision and correct 
adjustment of neck-tie, when the announcement was made that the 
alarm was false. " No doubt," he said, " I was impressed that it was 
unnecessary to hurry much." The Judge has heard of his respect 
for toilet many times since; it is a good joke, but he takes it all in 
good part. At this time some seventy persons had come to seek pro- 
tection in the fort, and all were ordered to do military duty. A train 
of seventy teams with Indian goods and supplies that was going to 
Red Lake came to the Fort for protection, and all the men were 
organized into a company. It was estimated that there Avere 1,500 
Indians surrounding the Fort waiting for a good chance to make a 
furious assault For weeks there had been no mail from St. Paul or 



104 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

the outside world, and everybody was anxious to know the facts about 
the extent of the Indian massacre and the progress of the Rebellion. 
A In-ave citizen by the name of AY alter S. Hill offered to take the 
chances of carrying the mail to St. Paul, providing he could lie fur- 
nished with a fleet horse and an escort of soldiers to protect him until 
he was out on the broad prairie beyond the strip of woods on the 
creek east of McCauleyville. A call was made for volunteers to act 
as an escort, and thirty-two responded to the call. At this time there 
were Indians in ambush just across the river from the Fort, and some 
had been using their sharp-shooters from the tops of trees. An 
attack on the outward bound escort was expected, but all was still and 
not the turn of a leaf was heard. Hill was soon flying toward St. 
Paul with his fleet charger, loaded with news from afar for many 
anxious ones who had become weary of looking in vain for many long 
weeks. Hill was successful in his undertaking. As the escort was 
returning, an attack was made on the brave thirty-two, and two of the 
number were shot, Edward AYright and a soldier by the name of 
Shulty, and the remainder scattered and came straggling into the fcn-t 
as best thej^ could. /_Mr. Shulty, when found, had his head cut off', 
also his arms and legs, and he had been disembowelled liy the incar- 
nate demons, his head being coflined in the abdominal cavity. Mr. 
Y^'^right was also badly mutilated, and his father was exceedingly 
furious at the post commander because he had not prevented the 
awful tragedy from taking place. At one time a party was organized 
to go and drive in stock that was some twelve miles below the ferry 
crossing. A half-breed Chippewa gave a war-whoop which was well 
understood by the Sioux, and he Avas riddled Avith bullets. A Mr. 
Lull was in advance, and was shot through the leg. All turneil back 
without venturing farther. The firm of Harris, AYliitford «.V: Bently, 
who were engaged in the transportation of goods from St. Paul to 
this point and thence by flat-l)oat to Fort Garry, had a farm south of 
Al)ercrombie on the Minnesota side. This was in 1862. They put 
in the government herd fourteen yoke of oxen and eight head of 
horses for protection; but the wily Sioux surrounded and took posses- 
sion of them by driving them to the Indian headquarters. The total 
number of the herd was three hundred. The first attack having been 
made, Mr. AYhitford, in company with Mr. Harris, was killed on his 
way from Fort Garry to Fort Abercrombie. He had .'5o,000 of the 
Hudson Bay Company's drafts. This firm was ruined by the loss of 
$14,000; afterward, however, the government paid the company 
$9,000. The Fort was besieged full seven weeks, when about 2,000 
men under Ca}:4^ain Burger came to relieve the imprisoned and 
strengthen the fort. On the return of a part of this force to St. Paul 



FORT ABEPiCIlOMBIE, 105 

.about seventy -live Avomen and children were transported. It appears 
tliat Edward A. Stokes, the man Avho assassinated Jim Fiske, had been 
out on the plains hunting, and he came to the Fort with others for 
protection, and was Avith the escort Avhicli was under military protec- 
tion enroute for St. Paul. Truly wonders will never cease! There 
were four companies left at the Fort to protect it after the escort had 
left, which took place in October, 18G2. Captain Burger vras relieved, 
and Major Camp took command; he was shortly relieved by Captain 
Chamberlin of Hatch's battallion, who was finally superseded by 
General C. P. Adams, now of Hastings, Minnesota, who was in com- 
mand until 1866. Then Major Hall, of the 10th United States In- 
fantry, took command, and General Adams was ordered back to be 
mustered out of the service. The United States mail was carried 
under military escort until the year 1866. The fort was kept up un- 
til 1877, when it was abandoned, and in 1878 the government buildings 
were sold and scattered over the prairie, where, with repairs, they 
made homes for some of the early settlers. 

The following-named persons were the post commanders at Fort 
Abercrombie from the time of its establishment until it was aban- 
doned: General Abercrombie, Major Day, Captain Markham, Captain 
Inman, Captain Vanderhock, Captain Burger, Captain Pettier, Major. 
Camp, Captain Chamberlin, General C. P. Adams, Captain Whitcomb, 
Major Hall, and General Slidell. Changes were frequent at first be- 
cause all were needed south as fast as they could be spared. 

The military cemetery near the Fort was the resting jjlace of 
many who had laid down their arms forever, and not a few think it 
would have been much more in keeping with the fitness of things i£ 
the ground had been i^urchased by the government, and the city of 
the dead put in order and a monument erected in memory of the 
fallen heroes, and all surrounded with an iron fence. The govern- 
ment, however, carefully exhumed and removed the remains to Fort 
Lincoln. Seventy-three graves were opened, and all that remained of 
the earthly tabernacles was placed in pine boxes and transported to 
the cemetery on the Missouri slope. Colonel Tyner, with great care 
and tender affection, superintended the removal of the remains of the 
departed; and noAv the place where our country's brave defenders 
slept for a season is furrowed by the plov,^ for the production of 
wheat and other grains. 



John Haslehurst, deceased, an early settler, was born in Oneida 
'County, Nev/ York, in the year 1833, and died September 6, 1881. 
He Avas post trader and postmaster at Fort Abercrombie, wdiere he 
settled in 1875. He was Notary Public, County Commissioner, Judge 



106 HISTORY OF RICHLAND GOUNTY. 

of Probate, Clerk of tlie Court, and Justice of the Peace. His 
remains were interred in the government burial ground at the Fort; 
but at the time the sqri.diers' remains were removed to Fort Lincoln 
his were taken to Minneapolis and buried in Lakewood Cemetery, 



The new town of Abercrombie is located on the Fargo & South- 
ern railway line — a part of the great railroad system of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad, about one-lialf mile west of the Fort 
Abercrombie grounds and the old ferry waterway. The town is 
about fifteen miles north of Wahpeton and thirty-two miles soutli of 
Fargo. At this station there are a good depot, steam elevator, two 
stores, one hardware store, two hotels, one drug store, one meat mar- 
ket, one blacksmith shop, two lumber yards, one law and justice's 
office, three farm machinery agencies, and a weekly newspaper just 
started. The Abercrohihie Scout. There is a good school-house about 
half a mile south. Eev. AVilliam Edwards, pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church, holds regular weekly services in Hutchison's Hall. 
The society contemplates building a church in the near future, as 
some hundrecte of dollars have been subscril^ed for the purpose. This 
church was organized on July 16, 1885, by a council of ministers and 
laymen from sister churches. The present membership is nineteen. 
The pastor, William Edwards, formerly of AYalcott, has been labor- 
ing with this church from its organization till now. The deacons 
are J. LaValley and E. M. Hackett; church clerk, Mrs. E. M. Hack- 
ett. It is rather discouraging in all new countries to get all church 
machinery in mot: on, and yet when the motive power is fully under- 
stood the battle is h: If fought. Gosx)el leaven is always at work, and 
its ])rovince is to leaven the entire mass. 



David McCauley, although living at McCauleyville, Minnesota, 
opposite the site of old Fort x-Vbercromljie, is one of the best posted 
men in respect to the history of the Fort there is in the West; and in 
the write-up of said interesting military post, furnished the editor 
Avitli many valuable items. Mr. McCauley was born on the 27th da}^ 
oi: July, 1825, in Merrimac, Hillsborough County, NeA^' Hampshire. 
He was educated at the Nashua and Hancock high schools. A machin- 
ist l)y trade, he moved to Boston in 1846, and removed to Manches- 
ter, New Hampshire, in 18o0, and engaged in the book and stationery 
and paper-hanging business. In the fall of 1858 he went to St. Paul, 
riding in a stage from LaCrosse, Wisconsin, and was employed as 
distributing clerk in the post-office. In 1861 he came to Abercrombie 
and took charge of the sutler's store, express and post-office business, 
and Avas post sutler until 1864. Then he settled at McCauleyville 



FOKT ABERCEOMBIE. 107 

and engaged in the mercantile and transportation business, and 
bought 620 acres of hind located by minor half-lireed scrip, taking 
quit-claim deeds. When the heirs became o»i' age, the land according 
to law still belonged to them ; and over 400 acres of this land are still 
in dispute. Mr. McCauley purchased again from said heirs over 200 
acres. In 1867 he built a saw-mill at the Fort costing 5it;l2,000, and 
run it four years, cutting 5,500,000 feet of lund)er out of logs run 
down the Otter Tail Eiver into the Eed River. Lumber sold for §40 
pev thousand. Lumber from this mill was used in building Forts 
Pembina, Totten, Ransom, Wadsworth, now Sisseton, and much found 
a market at Fort Garry. The lumber used in building the first hotel 
at Moorhead was made at the Fort and sent overland at a cost of iii^SO 
per thousand. Also that used in Imilding N. K. Hubbard's first 
store at Moorhead and other buildings. He put up from 800 to 3,000 
tons of hay yearly for the government, and from 500 to 3,000 cords of 
wood. "When the international l)oundary line was being surveyed, 
all supplies were sent from Fort Abercrombie. The inen employed 
wintered at the Fort; and there were also 1,800 mules and horses 
wintered at the same place, consuming 3,000 tons of hay. In fact 
Fort Abercrombie was the great distributing point for the great 
Northwest, and the headquarters and center of civilization, under the 
fostering care of the United States government. Mr. McCauley, hav- 
ing lived at McCauleyville since the early days, has held important 
offices, such as court commissioner, county superintendent of schools, 
town clerk, justice of the peace, and postmaster. 

JOHN EGGER 

Settled on the Red River in 1869, moving from Minnesota. He 
owns in all 480 acres on section 28, the west one-half being railroad 
land. Over 200 acres are improA-ed. He has a house, barn, and 
granary, the total cost of which is about $3,000. He is engaged in 
raising wheat, the greatest yield being 35 bushels per acre, and the 
least 27 bushels. Mr. Egger has stock and farm machinery in abund- 
ance. 

THOMAS C. THORESON, 

A farmer living half a mile north of Abercrombie, has 160 acres on 
section 32, town 135, range 48, of which 120 acres are well improved. 
He has a good house and convenient outbuihliugs. His wheat went 
3'^^ bushels to the acre. 

JOB HERRICK, 

^Ylio is a farmer, came from Tioga County, Pennsylvania, and settled 
in 1868, on his farm, the southwest quarter of section 20 and north- 



108 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

east quarter of section 29. His farm is finely situated on tiie Eed 
Hiver, and lie has 180 acres improved. There is a good house and 
barn on this farm. The average wheat production is eighteen bush- 
els per acre. 

E. M. HACKETT, 

A farmer, has 160 acres — southwest quarter of section 5, town 134, 
range 48. One hundred and fifteen acres of this farm are improved. 
It is supplied with house, granary, and stable; also a famous artesian 
well, 132 feet in depth, which flows twenty-four gallons a minute. 
Mr. Hackett settled on his farm the 20th of May, 1879. Mrs. Lydia 
and Miss Cora A. Sears have nice farms on the southeast quarter of 
section 6, town 134, range 48, of which eighty acres are improved. 
Abercrombie, D. T. 

JOHN WOLD, 

A farmer, settled in 1871. He has a total of 400 acres, of which 260 
are improved, on section 18, town K4, range 48. He has a good 
house, an extra granary two stories high, and other convemient out- 
buildings. Stock-raising a specialty. His pasture is an excellent 
one of 80 acres; average yield of wheat 24 bushels per acre. Aber- 
crombie, Dakota. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW ^ 

LOANS NESOTIATED AND COLLECTIONS PEOMFTLY ilABS. 

ABiEMCMOMMlIlS, - » =■ U^AMOTA, 

S. C3-. HOFFOPIID, 




-SUCH AS- 



Saint Paul Binders, 

JOHN DEERE PLOWS, 

Harrows, Horse Rakes, Lumber Wagons, 

Audi WuTst-Clccss O'peiL a/iicl Top Mugc/ies. L 
TWINE FURNISHED AT THE LOWEST RATEslv 

ABKKCKOMBIE, DAKOTA. 



ABEKCROMBIE. 



109 



m. <^. MAMNAMir'-'S 



Addition to Ab ercrqmbie, 

FiHE AND WELL-LOCATED LOTS 

For Sale at Eeasonable Prices. Terms of payment can be ascertained 

by addressing 

E. G. BABNABY, - - - MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



DON J, CLARK, 






TtK 



MM WMAmS 






LOANS NEGOTIATED. 



Set i. led in 1880 on his farm, sontheast quarter of section 5, township 

134, range 48. All improved. Buildings: A good 

House, Barn, and Granary. 

ABERCROMBIE, - - DAKOTA. 

C. T. HUGHES, 

PROPRIETOR OF 



!ITY MEAT M 



A GOOD SUPPLY OF 

And Terms Reasonable. Give us a call. 

ABCRCROMBIIi:, ------ DAKOTA. 



■1 



\Oi) ^^^6> 






\m 



CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL RAILWAY 

STATION AND EXPRESS AGENT. 

ALSO TELEGRAPH OPERATOR. 
ABERCROMBIE, - - - - DAKOTA. 



110 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

DEALERS IN 

HARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, 

A Full Line of Goods always on hand, at Low Prices. 

GEORGE A. HAMMER, 

DEALER IX 

TTamislies, ID3rest\:Lffs, Oa,r"bon Oil, 

LAMPS AND CHIltlXEYS. 

j^^Prescriptions Carefully Prepared. ABERCROfVIBIE, D. T,^ 

CAKRIAGrE AND WAGON WORK 

Done and Satisfaction AVarranted. 

Special Attention to Horse Shoein(^ and Plow Repairing. 

ab£j? cr ombie, dako ta . 

HIKE WICKLEIN, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Merchants Hotel, 

i<7:e:.bj:e^ the hdex^oi:. 

Customers Avell Cared for at Reasonable Rates. 

ABERCROMBIE, DAKOTA. 



ABEECllOMBIE. Ill 



Kindred & Tyler, 



^^ 






Village Lots, Finely Located, offered for Sale at Reasonable Terms. 






:j|dcj3s hem ^pomin-Mn U ^m parattr^lr uu^ M^^^i ^telfers. 



For particulars address 

R. S. TYLER. - - FARGO, DAKOTA. 



John F. Hutchison, 

Choice Lots for Sale, near Original Townsite. 

.Settled on liis homestead six years ago. Has a fine grove of timber 
on the banks of Red River. Soil exceedingly rich. 

-<§o8> ^ci,a^ <30g>- 

Mrs, Nellie Hutchison, 

Postmistress. 
Post-Office north of De})ot, in a building erected for the purpose. 



J^ Choice Line of aROCERTES 

At the Post-Office, sold at Reasonable Prices. 

AmiSM€MQ'MMEM, . . . IDAM&TA. 



CHRISTINE. 



Christine is located on the Fargo & Southern railway, about 
twenty-two miles south of Fargo, on section 25, town 136, range 49, 
m the midst of a fine farming district. This is the railway station 
for the town of Eagle, and must be a good trading point. Christine 
has one steam elevator, a lumber-yard, two stores of general mer- 
chandise, one hotel, and one boarding house. We have endeavored 
to get a statement from the railroad officers giving the number of 
bushels of wheat shipped at different i)oints on the line for the past 
year, but have utterly failed. Other railroad reports were quickly 
given. We were anxious to have the county get the credit of all the 
shipments, so that the aggregate could be published in due form. 
Parties visiting Christine will be pleased with the fertility of the soil 
and the general appearance of the country. There are well located 
town lots for sale at very reasonable rates. 



GENERAL DEALER IN 

Dtj Goods and Groceries, Hardware, 

Crockery, Glasswa:;', Boots, Shoes, Ileady-made Clotlung-, Yankee Notions. 

GOODS CHEAP FOR CASH. CHELSTINE D T 



'■^a Oo 



H 



iri 



^J.Ml 



'9 



D 



rROPRIETOR 



-(^nd. ZSeal Estate iDealer. 

Parties who desire to purchase Town Lots can get all necessary 
information by adcbessing 



J^. S. TYLER^ 



FARGO, D. T. 



CIVIL TOWNSHIPS. 



TCIAGLE. — The town of Eagle is finely located, nearly all of the 
-*-^ area lying bstween the Red and Wild Rice Rivers. It was set- 
tled in an early daj^, and the towns and the improvements taken as a 
whole are very creditable. The soil is very rich and the surface level 
.and smooth, with good drainage along the rivers. It is enough to 
say that the township of Eagle is one of the very best in Richland 
County. 

HANS KINDE 

Settled on his farm on the Wild Rice July 3, 1873, on section 4, town 

135, range 49, having 320 acres, of which 210 are well improved. On 
■this farm are a house, horse and cow barns, granary, etc. There is 
.a pasture of 80 acres in connection. The highest amount per acre 

raised is 26 bushels, the average of wheat about 15. Mr. Kinde has 
.been very successful in his farming operations, and is fully prepared 

to do all farm work in time. 

K. E. FLAA 

'Came to America in 1870, moved from Wisconsin to Richland County 
in 1878, and settled on section 26, town 135, range 49. The farm 
buildings are on section 25. There are 240 acres in this farm, 130 
acres being improved. This farm is situated on the Wild Rice ; and 
the soil is very productive. Mr. Flaa has a fine herd of horses, cattle, 
and sheep. 

EINER S. HOEL 

Came to America in 1868, and spent two years in Wisconsin, then 
moving into the far famed Red River Valley in 1870. He made a 
choice of farming lands on the Wild Rice River, on section 34, town 

136, range 49, having 400 acres, all improved. Mr. Hoel has a fine 
herd of stock numbering 63, consisting of horses, cattle, and sheep. 
There are a good house, large barn, and capacious granary, all cost- 
ing about $4,000. The average yield is 18 bushels, but as high as 
40 bushels per acre has l:)een raised on this finely located farm. 

ERICK SKAUGE 

Came to America in 1868, and moved to the Red River Valley, Dako- 
ta, in May, 1879. He has a farm of 320 acres on the Wild Rice, 
located on sections 20, 22, and 27, town 136, range 49, all improved. 
The buildings are a good house, barn, and granary, costing about 



114 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

.§2,500. He owns sixty head of horses, cattle, and sheep. Soil, ex- 
■ cellent; average yield of wheat 22 bushels to the acre. There is a 
line grove of timber on this farm. 

ANDREW POSSUM 

Came to America in 1868, and settled in Eichland County in 1871. 
His farm contains 400 acres of choice land, over 200 being improved. 
The house, barn, and granary cost about !i?o,000. He has forty head 
of cattle and horses. Average yield of wheat, 20 bushels The farm 
is situated on the Wild Rice, sections 21 and 22, town 136, range 49. 
>0n this place is a fine body of young timber. 

"OARRIE. — The Sheyenne River, with its deep-cut channel and 
-^ skirtings of fine belts of timber, and the rolling lands, with 
springs and occasional rivulets, in the vicinity of Barrie, make the 
place more like a down-east location than any other })lace in the 
County, unless it be in the vicinity of the Helendale farm. Barrie 
was settled quite early — in fact, at the beginning of the settlement of 
Richland County. The old settlers like Messrs. D. A. Knuppenburg 
and sons, Lancaster, Worthington, Morgan, Page, and others were 
the volunteer and pioneer settlers that have worked up fine farms, 
and assisted in the work of civilization. It is quite evident that there 
is not a more pleasant locality in the county for an interior town than 
Barrie. There, are wood, water, wheat, corn, and grazing lands that 
make the owner of the same feel very much at home. No place in 
.the county has produced as fine corn as has been raised in the vicin- 
ity of Barrie, and buckwheat has been grown very successfully. 
Among the bluffs and in the timber stock is protected from the 
storms; and it is really a wonder why people will move their caravans 
of stock to the far away Montana, instead of possessing the very 
inviting grass lands of the Red River Yalley, where railroads can be 
found on every hand and a good jnarket even at their door. Who- 
ever lives to see the end of the present decade will witness the order 
and practice now prevailing quite significantly reversed. There is at 
Barrie a school-house where religious services are held quite fre- 
quently, and if the })eople would unite they could build a church at 
this point, with the help that could be secured from the Church Ex- 
tension Society. In sparsely settled districts less of the sectarian 
and more of the fraternal spirit would work a reformation that would 
be a sufiicient reason for the appointment of a special thanksgiving 
day. Then churches would be built, that are now so much needed, 
and a new order of things inaugurated that would l>e a harbinger of 
a new dis})ensation which would practically interpret the Biblical 
declaration, "Peace on earth, and good will to men." Even in some 



WEST END AND GKAFTON TOWNSHIPS. 115 

towns and cities this new order of cliurcli work would have a prac- 
tical fitness in harmony with the much desired reign of "do unto 
others as you Avould like to have others do unto you." 

Vl/'EST ENDc- There is not, within the bounds of Kichlaud 
County, a better chance to get lands cheap than in this town- 
shi}). It is considered that the soil is light, and yet it is Avarm and 
productive and full of vegetable matter mixed Avitli sand and sandy 
loam, that Avill, with good cultivation, produce excellent crops of oats, 
barley, corn, and vegetaliles. While there are some of the lands 
good for Avlieat, it is not, as a whole, considered as Avheat land, and 
yet many of our Eastern neighbors would rejoice if they could have 
as good soil as can be found in the above-mentioned locality. For a- 
stock ranch or the raising of stock, it is exceedingly well adapted to 
such an industry. The groAvth of the grasses is luxuriant and the 
nutritious qualities of the same are so rich in iiesh-making proper- 
ties that stock fed on this hay during the winter and well cared for, 
come out in the spring as smooth and sleek as the mountain deer. 
Kight here we A^enture the assertion that in a feAV years, Avlien the 
lands of the county are Avell drained and the farmers till the soil even 
indifferently aa^cII, there Avill be rich farmers in the western part of 
the county that will be capable of measuring arms agriculturally Avith 
those Avho live on the flat wdieat lands along the rivers. Now, to be 
sure, the toAvm is rather, sparsely settled, but there are a number of 
farmers aa'Iio have lands Avell tilled and productive. Hon. S. E. Steb- 
bins, AAdio Avas in the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany for nine years as one of the appraisers of their lands, made the 
report that even the sand hills were a good place for stock-raising 
and the culture of small fruits. Among the sand hills, as they are 
sometimes called, although it Avould be a hard job to find one a hun- 
dred feet high, there are large yields of the dAvarf cherry, and if this 
land groAvs cherries so easily, it must be a fine spot for the groAvth of 
the early grapes, straAvberries, raspberries, and the early Russian 
variety of apples. In fact, in any locality in Richland County heard 
from, small fruits and large vegetables can be produced abundantly. 
Already raspberries and straAvberries are being i:>roduced A^ery easily 
and quite abundantly by the writer and many others. 

4"1 RAFTON is composed of two congressional townships, num- 
bers i;-33 and 134, range 50. This township is quite Avell drained in 
the central portion by the branches of the Antelope Creek. The soil 
throughout is a black sandy loam and about equally divided as it re- 
spects Avheat and grass land. It is an exceedingly fine stock range, 
and the time is coming Avhen it AA'ill be occupied by men of means 



116 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

wlio know iiow to utilize tlie great advantages to l3e found in this 
township. The Antelope Farm is situated in this township, and is a 
fine farming center. Of course, the dry lands of this township are 
not as strong for the growth of wheat as lands along the rivers, and 
yet for a variety of crops and grasses it will be in the future fully as 
valuable as the river lands, if well cultivated with proper drainage. 
This township upon the whole is rather sparsely settled now, and 
there are fine opportunities for those who desire to get cheap lands 
to ftvnii themselves of these golden opportunities. There are farm- 
ers in the Red River Yalley who have in five years subdued the 
soil and got it in better condition than farmers East in wood}^ and 
stony districts can do in a full quarter of a century. This is not the 
country where farmers have to do a great deal of hoeing and scratch- 
ing to cover a hill of potatoes or to hoe the land after it is planted. 
All the people in the West desire of their eastern friends, and espe- 
cially those who have been living on the ragged edge of farming, is to 
come west and look for themselves, leaving their old prejudices and 
doubts behind. Among the leading farmers in Grafton we would 
notice Ole Abrahamson, Neil Campbell, Charles Ewan, the McDon- 
alds, Ruthford, Hugh Moore, Schnider, AVilkes, and others. There 
is plenty of room in this township for a colony of fifty farmers, who 
could plant their capital so that encouraging profits could be realized 
with industry and economy. Parties living East in the timbered dis- 
tricts who have to pay from two to ten dollars for clearing land 
and then have stumps, stones, and roots to wrestle with for years, can 
get their breaking done for two dollars and fifty cents an acre and 
have all into crops within one year. 

THE FAIRVIEW FARM. 

John Q. Adams, of Chicago, is proprietor; W. S. Judd, the efficient 
manager in opening up the farm. This is a model farm in every 
respect, located in town 182, range 49, in the town of Center, twelve 
miles west of Wahpeton. Total number of acres 4,000, all improved. 
The residence cost S2,000. There are a convenient office, a barn 
40x200 feet, machine house 30x210, machine hall 40x80, granary of 
40,000 bushels capacity, elevator of 60,000 bushels capacity, wagon 
shed, and all necessary outbuildings. There are 6,000 young trees 
growing on this place. There is a railroad track three miles long 
from the Northern Pacific to the headquarters of this plantation; 18 
miles of ditching, and 12 miles of graded road on the farm. An ar- 
tesian well, 230 feet deep, flows three barrels a minute. One hundred 
mules are used, and 80 hands employed in the summer. Here is a 
full supply of farm machinery. The farm was established in 1881, 
W. S. Judd being manager up to Janutiry, 1886, W. P. Adams now 



CENTER TOWNSHIP. 117 

being manager. This farm lias telephone connection with AVahpe- 
ton, requiring 15 miles of wire. 

ALBERT CHIZEK 

Came from the old country to America and settled in Wisconsin, 
coming from said State to Wahpeton in 1871. He has a grand farm 
of 280 acres, just north of toAvn, all imi:)roved. His buildings — house, 
barn, granary, etc., cost ^^,000; and his farm is in excellent condition 
for successful cultivation of the soil and stock raising. He has thirty 
head of cattle, and expects to enlarge his operations by varied farm- 
ing. Mr. Chizek has held important county offices, and is one of the 
pioneers. 

JAMES F. SHEA 

Came to Dakota in 1873, when only 18 years of age. After traveling 
through Dakota, Idaho, and Montana, and parts of British America, 
he returned to Kichland County in 1877, and there located 320 acres 
of land on the banks of the Wild Rice. He married. May 2, 1881, 
Miss Mary E. Keating, the first school teacher in Eichland County. 
Mr. Shea noAv has a very xjroductive farm of 800 acres, 600 improved, 
and good farm buildings. The average yield of wheat is 20 bushels 
per acre. He is thoroughly devoted to and greatly interested in ag- 
ricultural pursuits, and pays strict attention to raising draft horses 
and speedy roadsters. Horses for sale at reasonable rates. Mr. 
Shea is a horse doctor and veterinary surgeon. 

HERMAN HERMANSON 

Settled in Richland County in 1878, eight miles west of Wahpeton. 
He has a farm of 480 acres, all improved. His buildings consist of 
house, barns, granary, 'sheds, etc. ; cost about $1,500. A very fine 
location and lands very productive. 

Z. S. HOWE, 

Farmer, settled in Kichland County on the 11th of June, 1873, on the 
AVild Rice River, four miles west from Wahj^eton. The soil of this 
farm, like all the land along the river, is very i^roductive. Mr. Howe 
has 140 acres well improved. Good farm buildings have been erect- 
ed. He, like most of the farmers in Richland County, begins tc> 
understand fully the value of varied farming, rotation of crops, and 
stock-raising. He is well fixed. 

J. P. BRAND, 

Farmer, settled in the county on his homestead in 1879, moving from 
St. Croix County, AVisconsin. Home farm is located about nine 
miles west of the county seat, on southeast quarter of section 24, 
town 132, range 49, near the AVild Rice, with 140 acres thtn-oughly 



I 



118 HIKTOHY OF EIOHLAND COUNTY. 

cultivated. Has conTenient house and barn, costing about $1,000. 
His total acreage is 320. When he came to ]3akota, he borrowed 
$100, and now has property w^orth $6,000. The school-house for Dis- 
trict No. 2 is on this place. 

FREEMAN ORCUTT 

Settled in Wahpeton in 1878, and the same year located his farm 
of 480 acres seven miles west of this town, on section 8, town 132, 
range 48. He has 240 acres improved. The soil is rich and well 
adapted to the growth of wheat and grass. 

S. E. STEBBINS 

Selected his land in 1871) on section 17, town 131, range 49. He set- 
tled on the same in 1881, moving from Minnesota; now has 500 acres 
improved, and has convenient buildings — house, barn, and granary. 
He intends to erect neAv buildings soon. The past year he had 320 
acres of wheat — 7,400 bushels, and 3,400 bushels of oats. Mr. Steb- 
bins pays a good deal of attention to the raising of horses and cattle, 
and favors very strongly the Polled Angus (hornless) breed. His 
blooded horses are exceedingly fine. The farm is located about 
13 miles west of the county seat, near Mooreton. 

DAVID JOHNSON 

Came from England, and settled on his farm on the Wild Eice Eiver 
in the year 1880, on section 4, town 132, range 48. His farm contains 
150 acres, all improved; his buildings consist of a fine farm house, 
barn, and sheds for farm machinery. The soil is extremely rich, and 
the average yield of wheat per acre has been tT.-enty-seven bushels— 
a grand record. His ])lace is beautiful for situation and highly 
prized. 

CHARLES MALE 

Has a fine farm on the AVild Rice, located on section 9, town 132, 
range 48. In this farm there are 240 acres, all improved and in ex- 
cellent condition. He has a good residence, barn, granary, two 
machine houses, and all necessary outbuildings. Having settled ou 
his farm in the year 1872, he is thoroughly posted in the manage- 
ment of his farm, and knows how to make the most of his calling. 
He moved to Eichland County from Michigan. 

D. W. ANDRUS 

Settled in Richland County in 1879 on section 8, town 132, range 49, 
near Mooreton on the Northern Pacific, Fergus, & Black Hills rail- 
way. His farm contains 160 acres, all improved. This farm is finely 
located, and he, with the help of his sons, ig making a fine home. 
His house, stables, sheds, and graiiary are convenient. He, like 



CENTER AND DANTON. 119 

many others, began farming in Dakota without many extra dollars, 
bvit is now nicely fixed, having a good place to spend the evening of 
his days. 

WILLIAM ROOT 

•Settled in Kichland Connty in 1871 on land embraced in Root's Ad- 
dition to the Village of AVahpeton, i)latted in 1880, on northeast 
quarter of section 8, town 132, range 47. He moved on to his farm in 
the town of Center three years ago, in July. His farm, containing 
480 acres, is located on the south half of section 29 and northeast 
quarter of section 33, 180 acres being under cultivation. He has 
a house, barn, granary, machinery house, and root cellar. Mr. Root 
says he has tested the cultivation of low lands, and by thorough 
drainage, ploughing, harrowing, and rolling, found them to be the 
most productive of anj^, and if he was to piirchase land again would 
select those in preference to others. 

L. J. MOORE 

Settled on his farm on the Wild Rice River on the 18th of April, 
1872. Farm is located on section 9, town 132, range 48, including 
240 acres, all improved. The buildings cost fully $3,000. He makes 
wheat growing and stock-raising a specialty. In the year 1877, on 
the 28th of December, he sowed spring wheat which averaged 35 
bushels per acre. On the 7tli of March, 1878, he sowed wheat, and 
the yield was 25 bushels to the acre. Mr. Moore, being one of the 
earliest settlers in the county, and ever ready for a good turn, has 
rendered valuable services to many looking for lands, who frequently 
pulled his latch string and asked for lodgings and for information. 
His farm, like that of many others, will be looked upon as one of the 
old land marks, where no traveler was ever turned away. The Editor 
can testify to the truth of this statement. Mr. Moore came from 
Michigan, and with the live dollars he had in his pocket when he 
came, has been remarkably lucky with his investments, and has a fine 
home where he can spend the sunset of life very comfortably. 

T| ANTON.— The Nulph Brothers, Mr. Springer, Cuslkman, Ka^m- 
mer, and others, are prominent farmers in the township of Dan- 
ton, and are interested in the material improvement and develop- 
ment of the county. Parties who desire to secure good farming 
lands in this locality can obtain all necessary information from the 
above named gentlemen. 

THE CLEVELAND FAKM. 

Mr. J. B. Wilcox was well known in the western part of Richland 
County, and i^rominently identified with farming interests in the 
township of Danton, until the time of his death, which took place 



120 HISTOHY OF P.ICHLAND COUNTY. 

.after an illness of one short week with typhoid pneumonia, lieing 
buried on the 1st day of May, 1885, in the Danton cemetery. Mr. 
Wilcox was born in Chenango County, N. Y., in the year 1829, his 
father, the Eev. Ira "Wilcox, a Methodist clergyman, being for many 
years connected with a Methodist Episcopal Conference in said state. 
Mr. Wilcox, in his youthful days, had a strong passion to become a 
sailor, and following his inclination he went to sea, and for years Avas 
on board ship doing the duties of a sailor. But a sailor's life on the 
'"bounding billows" did not cure his desire for travel, and leaving 
the ocean he came west and settled in Vernon County, Wisconsin, in 
1851. He soon commenced steamboating on the Mississippi Eiver, 
working his way up from the position of watchman to that of cai)tain, 
which office he held for many years in the employ of the well known 
"Diainond Jo" Company, making his home in the village o£ Yictc^ry, 
where he bought at different times considerable grain at his own 
warehouse. From this x^lnce he came to Eichland County in 1882, 
buying lands from W. A. Kindred, knov\'n as section 21, township 
132, range 51. These lands were Thought on a wheat purchase basis. 
. Soil excellent, and two hundred acres were broken the first year, and 
within three years all broken and devoted to wheat culture. Asso- 
-ciated with Capt. Wilcox were Uxo gentlemen, one withdrawing, and 
the other, Mr. West, of Caledonia, Minn., remaining. In 1882 build- 
ings were constructed. Crops were good, but, the price of grain 
being low, there was a necessity for a change, and gentlemen from 
Cleveland, Ohio, bought the land, and, having thousands of acres be- 
sides, the plant was known as the Cleveland Tarrn, and Capt. Wilcox 
appointed as superintendent, who acted in that capacity until stricken 
down by death in the midst oi the activities of life. He was also 
Justice of the Peace. Mr. A. Hilliard, of AVyndmere, is now the 
.superintendent of the said farm. There are 1,280 acres of land under 
cultivation. The farm is in good condition, and the general manager, 
Mr. William H. Waite, makes the work of the same a success, assisted 
by Mr. Hilliard. The editor is under many obligations to Mrs. 
'Capt. Wilccx for the historic items from her facile pen that he has 
recorded. 

X>ELFORD. — This township has some of the most productive 
farms in Eichland County, and the Wild Eice Eiver running 
through the township affords most excellent drainage for most of the 
land. It is astonishing how rapidly the improved farms take on the 
appearance of lieing settled for a quarter of a century. It is hard to 
calculate what the improvements will be during the next ten years, 
judging from what has been accomplished during the past decade. 
The township of Belford has many acres that can be purchased at 



BELFOUD AND BllANDENBURG. 121 

reasonable rates by those wlio desire to secure rich farming lands, as 
the settlers in said township would readilj- testify. 

THE KEYSTONE FAEM. 

O. F. Schonbloni, President, Bradford, Pennsylvania; W. A.- 
Pullman, Treasurer, New York City; F. H. Sowle, Superintendent. - 
This farm is located in the township of Belford, townships 131 
and 132, range 50, containing about eleven sections on the north side 
of the Wild Eice. There are some three thousand acres improved. . 
and the soil is of an excellent quality. The buildings on this farm 
are large and convenient. There is a commodious house, two large 
granaries, one with a capacity of 30,000 bushels. The management 
has graded some seventeen miles on the lines for the benefit of the 
farm, and in doing so many farmers have been greatly l)enefitted by 
this wise, profitable, and public-spirited improvement. Mr. Sowle 
has furnished undisputed eAddence of his ability to manage this lib-- 
eral capital investment. 

ORANDENBUIIG.— This is one of the best townships in Rich-- 
land County, which includes what is known as the German Set- 
tlement. There were settlements along the Wild Rice River as early 
as 1869. Up to the present time, during the years that have intervened, . 
what with the cultivation of the soil, the opening up of productive farms, . 
the erection of convenient farm buildings and churches, the changes ■ 
have been really wonderful. Among the prominent farmers we 
would mention, Mr. Warner and sons, Frederick Stoltenow, the Bohn 
Brothers, Lubenow Brothers, AVilliam Weiss, J. M. Crawford, Frank L. 
Dwyer, Divet Brothers, and others. George Warner, Sen., settled in 
1873, his farm located on sections 14 and 22, township 131, range 49. 
This is one of the best farms, having about 300 acres improved, and 
the buildings, house, barns, granaries, and shops good. Frederick 
Stoltenow has a farm of 320 acres on sections 13 and 14, excellent 
buildings. Bohn Brothers settled in 1872, and have fine farms. In 
fact, during this year there Avere a large number who settled in the 
county along the Wild Rice River. The soil is a black sandy loam,, 
quite level, and in the township there are some grand natural pro- 
ductive meadows with very smooth surface. The prices of improved 
farms per acre are from fifteen to thirty dollars, unimj)roved from 
five to ten. There are in this township three school-houses costing 
about $1,500, and three churches. There are two high truss combi- 
nation bridges crossing the Wild Rice. This river runs through the 
township nearly from west to east. The population of Brandenburg 
is about three hundred, mostly Germans, and increasing very fast. 
Parties living east who desire to locate in a rich farming locality, 
especially those of German extraction, would be highly pleased Avith 



122 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

this locality. A large amount of wheat raised in Brandenburg is 
marketed at the elevator on the Fairview Farm. 

FRANK L. DWYER 

Settled in Eichland County in 1880. Farm situated on sections 29 
and 32, township 131, range 49, containing 320 acres, 200 acres im- 
proved. Buildings — house, barn, and granary, cost about twelve hun- 
dred dollars. Has eleven acres set out to trees, consisting of differ- 
ent varieties. Soil black sandy loam. Land near the AVild Bice. 
Farm about twenty miles southwest from Wahpeton, in the vicinity 
of the German settlement. 

T\E VILLO. -This township has an area of two townships, join- 
■^ ing Brightwood on the east and Fairmount on the west. x\s a 
whole it is rather sparsely settled, and there are yet opportunities to 
secure good lands at reasonable rates. The township is well adapted 
to the growth of a variety of crops. It is celebrated for its natural 
meadows and nutritious grasses. Messrs. Spaulding and sons, Haney, 
and Parsons are among the leading farmers of the township. Mr, 
Parsons is a gentleman of literary attainments and a writer of culture 
and ability. He came from the East, where most of the settlers came 
from. Parties who desire to engage largely in stock-raising AAould 
find this a fine field for operation. 

W. SPAULDING AND SONS 

Have farms in DeVillo containing, in the aggregate, 960 acres, located 
on sections 24, 25, and 26, town 130, range 48. They settled on this land 
March 17, 1879. Five hundred and forty acres are cultivated, and 
90 are seeded to timothy. Number of horses and cattle, 32; value of 
farm buildings, S4,000. The annual average of wheat yield, about 23 
bushels; oats, 45 bushels. Strawberries, raspberries, and currants 
are raised^successfully. On this farm is a beautiful grove of cotton- 
w^ood, white willow, box elder, white ash, black walnut, butternut, 
elm, fir, spruce, pine, and arbor vitse. This was the first place culti- 
vated in town; on this land the first family settled; here the first ser- 
mon was preached, the fii'st Sunday-school organized, the first birth 
and funeral occurred, and the first post-oflice established in the town. 
Also the first store and blacksmith sho}) were located here. Parties 
who desire more specific information can write to the persons men- 
tioned above. 

ORIGHTAVOOD.— The township of Brightwood includes 144 
"^ square miles, and includes townships 129 and 130, ranges 49 and 
50 west. It is bounded on the north by the township of Belford, on 
the east by De Yillo, on the south by the Sisseton Reservation, and 
on the west by Park township. The soil, as in all the rest of the Bed 



BlilGHTWOOD. 123 

River Valley, is very fertile. In the eastern part it is a Avarm sandy 
loam, low and level, while in the western part it is high and stony. 
It is ready for seeding about two weeks earlier than the land nearer 
the Red River. 

beictHTWood stock farm 
consists of 2,000 acres, 900 of which are seeded down and 300 
fenced. The stock consists of ten head of Polled Angus, imported 
by the owner, fifteen head of thoroughbred Short Horns, and seventy- 
five head of graded, twenty-five horses, fifty sheep, and much 
young minor stock. Mr. Hankinson makes a specialty of thorough- 
bred Short Horn cattle, and has also liiany tine wool sheep. The 
buildings cost $15,000, and are among the most imx:)osing of 
any in the county. His house is said to be the finest in the county. 

There are in the township seven fresh water lakes, namely, Dietel, 
Horseshoe, AVillard's, Hidden Lake, Tvdn, and Ryan's Lake, and 
lastly and most beautiful, " Elsie Etta," formerly Taylor's Lake. 
This promises to be a great summer resort in the near future. There 
are tAvo prominent woody points of land extending beautifully far 
out into the water. South of one of these points, "Towne's Cape," 
is the only part of the lake not having a sandy bottom. The water 
here is from eight to twenty feet deep. , There abound in the depths 
of this lake the cat-fish and minnow, but steps are being taken to 
stock it with pickerel. Among those who figure prominentl}^ in the 
early history of this township the first was "Old Joe," who built the 
first residence in the timber, on the site where the elegant residence 
of R. H. Hankinson now stands, between Lake Elsie Etta and Lake 
Mittag in the more dense part of timber, being in breadth from two 
to forty rods, and a mile in length. The first white settler was Mr. 
Carpenter, who surrendered his claim to Ben Taylor, of Wahpeton, 
from whom Mr. Hankinson ])rocured his place. Among others are 
Mr. Borgen, H. G. Wiilard, L. A. Towne, W. F. Marquardt, C. M. Green, 
William Smith, and J. W. Ryan. There are about 100 voters in the 
township. The independent school district was organized in 1885. 
First term of school commenced November 1, under the new organ iz- 
tion, with Miss Minneaxie A. Folsoni as teacher. There were twenty 
names enrolled during this v/inter term. Church services are held 
in the school-house at regular intervals. There are already four 
schools in this toMaiship, with an average of fourteen pupils. 

The following record as it respects the stock on Mr. Hankinson's 
celebrated stock farm is evidence that the most celebrated thorough- 
breds are receiving special attention. The finest Polled Angus bull 
in the Northwest, AVaterside Success, Scotch, No. 3,675, Vol. 8, 
III. Book, Victoria Family, stands at the head of the herd. He has a 



124 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

fine herd of Short Horns, high grades of horses, Oxford Down 
sheep, Poland China swine. Also special attention is paid to poul- 
try, such as the Toulouse and Emden mammoth bronze turkeys, Pekin 
ducks, white Guinea fowls, and the Langshan chickens. As it re- 
spects variety of timber, there are sixty acres, consisting of oak, elm, 
bo?v-elder, ash, hackberry, willow, and basswood. Natural fruit includes 
plums, gooseberries, raspberries, cranberries, currants, grapes, etc. 
Cultivated fruits consist of apples, plums, cherries, grapes, straw- 
berries, currants, and raspberries. Lake "Elsie Etta" is supplied 
by springs on the western shore, and the surface of the water is two 
feet and eight inches higher than the water of surrounding lakes, and 
really higher than the wagon road between the lakes. The depth of 
this lake is from ten to twenty feet, with sandy and pebbly bottom 
and shore. The Avater is excellent for either stock or domestic pur- 
poses. The water for the house and the stock is forced from this 
lake by windmill power. The buildings consist of a residence, horse- 
barn 50x75 feet; cattle barn 32x75 feet, and one 20x60 feet; granary, 
blacksmith shop, machinery sheds, store, and tenant buildings. The 
stock of general merchandise in said store is being sold by Mr. Hank- 
inson at reasonable rates, and is a great convenience for the farmers in 
said locality. The house on this celebrated farm deserves special 
mention. It is of the "Queen Anne" style of architecture, large and 
commodious, being three stories high; has a hardwood finish, with 
all modern imi)rovements, such as bathrooms, hot and cold water, 
etc. The aggregate cost of all the buildings on this farm is nearly 
$25,000. 

The editor is under obligations to Miss Folsom and Mr. AV. M. 
House for many items of interest in the foregoing statements, fur- 
nished them by Mr. Hankinson. 
"DARK. — This townshij) includes four congressional townships, and 

the land is high and rolling, intersi^ersed with fine meadows 
which afford a sufiicient quantity of excellent hay. The soil is a rich 
sandy loam well adapted for wheat and other grains not easily affected 
by drought or heavy rainfalls. Good unimproved lands are worth 
from three to five dollars per acre, and improved lands from ten to 
fifteen dollars per acre. The Jewell Nursery Company, of Lake City, 
Minnesota, has an excellent stock farm in this township. There are no 
large wheat farms, but a great proportion of the land is occupied by 
actual settlers, each of Avliom has a farm ranging from fifty to three 
hundred acres. The leading farmers are Messrs. Stiles, Dare, Myers, 
Brewster, Smith, DeLong, and Keller, who own farms containing 
from 160 to 320 acres well improved. Four years ago there was not 
a wheat field in the township. Stiles, Brewster, Smith, and McMil- 



PAEK. 125 

Ian Avere among the early settlers. There are seven school-houses in 
the township, which amply accommodate the wants of resident school 
children, of whom there are aboiit 135. 

JOHN M'MILLAN 

Settled in the township of Park, Richland County, 1883, moving 
from St. Croix County, Wisconsin. His farm contains 160 acres of 
fine productive land, situated on section 12, township 130 north, of 
range 51 west. There are seventy-live acres improved. Buildings — 
house 20x24 with an ell 16x24 Cost of all buildings $1,200. Average 
yield of wheat, twenty bushels per acre. Building stone plenty near 
by. Sv/an Lake and three smaller lakes in this township. Grass 
grown in this locality is exceedingly line. 

R. B. MYERS. 

Florendale stock farm. Park Township, is located on section 30, 
township 130, range 52, 320 acres. Buildings — house, barn, granary, 
etc., cost about $3,500. About forty-five head of horses and cattle, 
thirty-five head of sheep and swine. Grades of stock, Ayrshire, headed 
by a Polled Angus bull. 

UNDERWOOD & EMERY. 

The stock farm of Underwood & Emery, located in southeast cor- 
ner of Park Township, contains about 2,000 acres. Buildings on said 
farm consist of house, two large barns, and cattle sheds. AVind- 
mill power is used to elevate water supply, grind feed, churn butter, 
etc. About 175 head of cattle, 20 brood mares, and swine in abund- 
ance. Some 800 tons of hay cut annually. The proprietors of this 
farm own the Jewell Nursery, Lake City, Minn. 



KONGSBERG. 



Kongsberg post-office, its location and history, together with a 
brief statement of the country surrounding, the time of settlement, 
and so forth, has been kindly furnished by Mr. H. C. N. Myhra, 
one of the earliest and best known citizens of Hichland County, one 
-who has been honored by many offices and places of trust, some of 
which he continues to hold. 

H. C. N. Myhra is one of the old settlers, who on the 'ilst day of 
June, 1871, with his family, his brother John Myhra, and Oliver A. 
Erickson, settled on the Wild Rice River, he bringing with him from 
Rushf ord, Minnesota, a yoke of oxen, wagon, cow, household goods, and 
$500. Provisions were very high, and he visited Alexandria, Minnesota, 
in the fall of 1871, and purchased flour, groceries, salt, potatoes, ten 
bushels wdieat, and other necessaries for his family. The next year 
he raised about 200 bushels of Avheat, which Avas sold mostly to his 
neighbors for seed. At that time it was not deemed advisable to 
break up much land, as the Indian title had not been extinguished, 
and no filing could then be made. However, Mr. Myhra filed his 
homestead apx^lication. No. 84, at Pembina, Dakota. The prairie was 
Avild in appearance for years, but by degrees the government land 
was taken up and cultivated. On the 19th day of September, 1879, 
Kongsberg post-office was established, and H. C. N. Myhra appointed 
postmaster. The mail route extended from Wahpeton to Fargo via 
Kongsberg, Fort Abercrombie, Dakota,andMcCauleyville, Miller's Sta- 
tion, Holy Cross, and Moorhead, Minnesota. Three trips weekly were 
required. After the comj)letion of the Breckenridge extension of the 
St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Manitoba Railroad, the mail was sent to 
Dwight station, and Kongsberg has now its mail twice a week. Mr. 
Myhra still holds the office of postmaster. In the last quarter of 1885 
twenty registered letters were sent from said office, which is a cred- 
itable showing. For years H. C. N. Myhra was county assessor of 
Richland County. In 1880 he was census enumerator for the Sisseton 
and Wahpeton Indian Reservation, and in 1885 was appointed b}' 
Major A. W. Edwards, Sui^ervisor of Census for North Dakota, as 
enumerator for four congressional townships in Richland County. 
His work was done in the best style, he receiving special commendation 
from the examining committee. Several offices of trust have been 
held by Mr. Myhra, and he now holds the offices of justice of the 
peace, notary public, postmaster, school treasurer, and county com- 
missioner, besides ])eing insurance agent and agent for several of the 
leading steamship lines, and also a member of the firm of Johnson & 
Myhra, doing business in agricultural implements at Dwight, Dakota, 
at which place Myhra owns a house and several lots. 



HELENDALE STOCK FARM, 



This well known farm is deserving of more than passing notice,, 
from the fact that it is the first farm in northeastern Dakota opened 
for the purpose of breeding fine stock. It is located in the extreme 
northwestern corner of Eichland County, the Sheyenne Kiver running 
through its entire length near its southern boundary, and is a beau- 
tiful combination of hill and valley, of rolling and level, wooded and 
prairie lands, with living springs and running brooks, easily divided 
into parts suitable for agriculture, grazing, and meadow; a tract of 
land that, in the same area and in solid body, equally Avell adapted 
by nature for a stock farm, cannot be found anyAvhere in the North- - 
west. A visitor to the farm can easily imagine that he has, in some 
mysterious way, been transported from the j)lains of Dakota to an- 
other country, the entire surroundings being so entirely unlike what 
is usually seen around our prairie homes. The central point, or' 
headquarters of the farm, section 33, township 136, range 52, is some 
forty miles northwest from Wahpeton, about the same distance south- 
west from Fargo, westward some fifteen miles from the towns of Wal- 
cott and Kindred, on the line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Mani- 
toba Railway, and seven miles due south from Leonard, on the Fargo ■ 
Southern Branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The owner, J. B. 
Power, Esq., Land Commissioner of the St. Paul, Minneapolis, - 
and Manitoba Railway, first discovered this particular spot while, in 
1875, he was making a general tour of exploration of the country,.. 
and was so impressed with its beauty and natural adaptability for a 
stock farm, that he at once selected and purchased some 2,000 acres, 
and immediately christened it "Helendale," from the given name of 
his wife, a delicate and well deserved compliment to that excellent 
lady. Circumstances prevented his opening the farm until the year 
1880, when, with his brother, "W. A. Power, as resident manager, 
preparations were commenced for carrying out the intentions formed 
at the time of purchase. Since then Mr. Power has added to his ■ 
original purchase, until now the farm contains some 6,120 acres, with 
some 500 under cultivation, over ten miles of fencing, and buildings 
ample for the accommodation of his stock. Mr. Power projoosed 
from the first the creation of a herd of high grade cattle by crossing 
the pure bred Short Horn on the hardy native stock of the country, 
and has consistently kept that purpose in view with the most flatter- 
ing results. His ideas as to this, as exj)ressed to the writer, are: 



128 HISTOEY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

" Our farmers need a class of improved native bred stock for general 
iise, stock that by natural hardiness of constitution, and brought up 
under the same conditions in Avhich they have to live, will be a source 
of profit. Cattle reared for the show ring will not do; the hardy na- 
tives in themselves are not just the thing, but a proper admixture of 
pure blood with that of the native will give what is needed, and the 
result from such breeding, as you now see at Helendale, says all that 
is necessary in favor of the course we have adopted. We have the 
best lot of general purpose cattle in the Northwest, and challenge 
comjietition with any other herd of equal number wherever it may be." 

At the commencement of the second season Mr. Power decided 
to add other stock, and is now breeding draft horses, sheep, and hogs, 
as well as cattle. 

Referring to the stock on the farm more in detail, we will first 
mention the herd of cattle, noAv numbering some 230 head. At the 
head stands Eclipse, a fine light roan Short Horn, bred by Lord Lovat, 
of Beaufort Castle, Scotland, and imported by Mr. Power in the spring 
of 1884, when but sixteen months old. Next stands Ben Butler, No. 
58,931; then Art, No. 58,790; then Blizzard, No. 58,965, and some six 
or eight more young fellows, all registered in the American Herd 
Book, well fitted for the range or to lead any farmer's herd. Among 
the pure-bred cows, some sixteen in number, we notice Pomona, Jennie 
June, Hose of Bath, Florinda Belle, Maria Wood, Belle Barrington 
Bates, Boston Belle, Belle of Springfield, direct decendants of the 
imported Young Mary, Phyllis, Flora, and other noted English fam- 
ilies, all splendid specimens of their kind. These pure bred animals 
are kept as the nucleus around which to build up the herd of high 
grades that make up the great bulk of what is now on the farm, 
from which are sold only such surplus bulls as are not required for 
use on the place. With the exception of some fifty head of selected 
natives from the first purchases in 1881, the remainder of the herd 
are a splendid lot of grades, most of them raised on the farm, of 
from |- to ^ blood. 

The horse stock (some seventy-five in number) is principally 
of the Percheron-Norman breed, unexcelled in this country for gen- 
eral purposes on the farm and for heavy work in the toAvns and cities. 
At the head stands the imported stallion Grovnor Duke, next comes 
Prince of Helendale, a magnificent dark dapple gray i^ grade; 
then the four-year-old colt Brilliant, raised on the farm, a direct 
descendant of the noted imported stallion Brilliant, owned by M. W. 
Dunham, from a magnificent 1 Norman mare, owned by Mr. Power. 
There are noAv on the farm about fifty head, direct decendants of 
Grovnor Duke, and Mr. Power with justifiable pride points them 



HELENDALE FAKM. 129 

out as being equal to any that can be found on any breeding farm in 
the states. The sheep, numbering aboiit 220 head, are a well bred 
Hock of the heavy Cotswold, one of the best known mutton breed. 
By use of pure bred bucks the original flock has been improved up- 
on until now it is, in appearance and for use, equal to one entirely 
pure bred. The wool clip for the past two years lin.; averaged S\ 
pounds per head, and the quality of mutton so fine that special orders 
are in for every animal that goes to the butcher's block. To improve 
the quality of the wool, Mr. Power purchased, over a year ago, a 
couple of pure bred Shropshire Downs, and the cross has proved 
equal to all expectations. The favorite hog at Helendale is the 
Berkshire, and of the number carried through the past winter is as 
fine a lot of brood sows as can l>e found on any farm in the cotn- 
growing regions of Illinois or Iowa. To still further improve this 
stock a pair of pure breds, Trip, No. 14,999, and Diadem, No. 11,G88, 
have lately been purchased. 

The buildings on the farm were erected for use, not show, yet are 
well modeled, neatly painted, grouped for convenience in dividing 
the different kinds of stock, also with an eye to safety in case of fire, 
and are nicely arranged for the uses intended. The three principal 
stock barns are each 30x75 with box stalls. Near by are a cattle shed 14x 
200 with room for seventy-five head, with feeding trough and stanchions, 
for young stock; a main. building surrounding three sides of a hollow 
square, with four compartments, each 20x40 feet, ample room for 100 
head; a hog barn 10x125; sheep shed 18x200; a hog house for breed- 
ing, 16x24 with wings ; granary 30x75 with storage room for 16,000 
bushels of grain, barns for working stock and milch cows, store house, 
room for feed mill, carpenter and blacksmith work shops, ice house, 
and office, besides the dwelling house. The visitor to Helendile is 
impressed with indications of careful expenditure, close management, 
a permanent business, and an assurance that the proprietor has per- 
fect faith in his ability to work out profitable returns from his in- 
vestment, knowing that he has built on a sure foundation. Incairy- 
ing on the business of this farm, Mr. Power \\a% not been satisfied 
with knowing only general results, but by methods peculiarly his 
own, has been studying and determining many matters in detail that 
are of great general benefit to the people at large, for the knowledge 
thus gained he freely gives to the public, hoping thus to stimulate an 
industry that heretofore has been neglected principally from the 
mistaken idea that our climate and other conditions are unfavorable 
to the profitable production of live stock. In reply to the suggestion 
that his success in the business and his freedom in giving to every 
one the methods adopted to make it profitable will induce others to 



130 IIISTOEY OF EiCHLAND COUNTY. 

go into it, tlms creating competition, reducing profits, and so on, Mr. 
Power says: '"i would like to see every farmer in Eichland County 
a producer of live stock ; the business cannot be overdone, the greater 
the interest created the better the demand for improved stock; com- 
petitition brings wiili it the necessity for improvement. I will take 
my chr.nces wiih tlie rest in the race for prizes. The more stock vv^e 
have the more buyers there will be looking it up, the better the stock 
the, better the prices we will obtain and the more money we can bring 
into the county for such product the more prosperous we will become. 
If our experiences at Helendale are of any help to any one, he is 
welcome to them." 

A farm like Helendale, and farmers such as Col. Power and his 
brother W. A. Power, are a benefit to any community, and Pichland 
County feels a justifiable pride in having such within its limits. 



BLANDING BROTHERS' 

First and second addition to City of Wahpeton. Three blocks 
west of N. P. depot. Four blocks from Hi. P. , M. and M. depot, and 
one block from the proposed site of the union depot. The land is 
the highest and dryest of any addition in the city, and the only addi- 
tion where good well water can be ol)tained. This addition includes 
seven acres of young timber which would make a fine public park. 

J. S. & W. D. Blanding, Proprietors. 



D.B.NEWMAN, 

Physician and Surgeon. Special attention given to the treatment of 
all eye and ear diseases. Dr. Newman comes well recommended. 
Abercrombie, Dakota. 



FEARER & GREENE'S 

Popular Photograph Gallery. All work artistically done and satisfac- 
tion given. Copying and enlarging from old pictures in India ink, 
water colors, crayon, and oil. Also dealers in picture frames. Prices 
reasonable. Studio ^n Peirce's Block, Wahpeton, Dakota. 



:miscellaneous matters, 



CLIMATE. 

The writer was born in Monroe County, western New York, and 
lived there several years during his boyhood. He spent ten years in 
Pennsylvania and Michigan, and a quarter of a century in Wisconsin^ 
before coming to the Ked River Valley in 1878. Since then he has 
known what out-door traveling and exposure to all kinds of Aveather 
means, and has experienced the extremes of heat and cold, from 90 
degrees above zero, in the shade, in summer time, to 36* below in 
winter. Yet, he has not witnessed worse storms in Dakota than he 
has seen in the states mentioned. He can say that the dry atmos- 
phere of this country, with the mercury 25 below, is not as penetra- 
ting as that along the coast in the Eastern and Southern States with 
the thermometer marking only 10 degrees below. As it respects 
electrical storms and manifestations, no one can tell where they are 
the most frequent — certainly not in Dakota. Let any one consult, 
the reports sent out from the signal stations of the United States as 
it respects storms and storm centers, and see if Dakota is not as free 
from storms as any locality. 

An able report from Major Edwards was made in one of his 
statements, respecting the subject under discussion, which was as 
follows: " The annual mean temperature of Fargo, the commercial 
and financial metropolis of the Red River Valley [forty-seven miles 
north of Wahpeton] coincides with that of central Wisconsin, central 
New York, and southern New Hampshire. Its spring temperature, 
which is 45 degrees, is the saine as that of Illinois, northern Ohio, 
central and southern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, two and a half 
degrees of latitude south of it. Its summer temperature is 70.6 de- 
grees, the same as that of middle Illinois and Ohio, soiithern Pennsyl- 
vania, Long Island, and New Jersey. Its autumn temperature is 45.9 
degrees, similar to northern New York. Its winter temperature is 
16.1 degrees and similar to New Hampshire and lower Canada. Win- 
ter in the Golden Northwest, if it is colder than in the middle states 
by the measured thermometer, is far less cold to the sense, and it is 
much more jjleasant than the winter of the seaboard states, where 
the damp coldness quickly penetrates, making apparently a slight 
degree of cold almost unendurable." 

In a pamphlet published by E. K. Morrill, in 1881, he says of the 
atmosphere of the Red River Valley "that it is dry and pure. A cer- 



132 HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

tain railroad land agent lias aptly used the words, 'a valley soil, a 
mountain climate.' The words, applied to Richland Coiinty, are not 
devoid of truth. Fogs are not frequent or dense, and the mirage is a 
common phonomenon. The dry air makes persons less sensitive to' 
the cold. Thirty degrees below zero in the valley feels about like 
zero on the coast. 

" The summer weather is delightful, as the nights are cool and 
the days not sultry. The weather of midwinter is also very fine, the' 
air being clear and calm, and the temperature even. Thunder storms 
frequently occur in the summer, but a rainy day, as the term is gen- 
erally understood, is almost unknown. In the winter there are but 
few stormy days, although the dry snow often drifts when the sky is= 
clear." 

colonies; 

We most respectfully invite all associations or colonial societies 
East, who are making calculations to organize and establish colonies 
in the West, and especially in the celebrated Avheat belt of the nation, 
to visit Richland County; and in sending out this invitation we only 
voice the feelings of thousands living in the county, who are ready to 
assist in every possible manner and extend the right hand of fellow- 
ship to all who will come and view our inviting prairie lands and ac- 
cept the superb advantages offered. As stated in this book, it Avill be" 
seen that Richland County has wonderful advantages, such as rail- 
roads, schools, churches, fine county buildings, flourishing towns, 
.scores of business houses, mechanical industries and manufacturing 
establishments. As it respects the health of Richland County, it is 
decidedly remarkable for health, and any person who may doubt the 
healthf ulness of the same is most respectfully invited to correspond 
with any of the resident physicians, who would most gladly answer 
any letters of inquiry touching this vital qviestion. As it respects 
any information that you may desire, more than you can learn in 
this, write to any of the county officers or real estate dealers — in fact, 
to any responsible party — and all answers will corroborate state- 
ments or intimations herein contained. 

WAHPETON PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Mitchell J. Courtney began teaching here in 1879, continuing until 
the spring of 1881. At this period the village had commenced its lively 
growth. The summer term of 1881 Avas taught by Miss Sarah Purdon, 
now the wife of the present j)rincipal, who had about fify scholars en- 
rolled. The fall term of this year was taught by W. G. Crocker, as 
was also the winter term of 1882. He had an enrollment of over 100 
pupils, the largest number in attendance at any one time, however, 
being only sixty-three, and the average only about fifty. 



WAHPETON PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 133 

A new school-house was erected beside the one then in use, and 
H. B. Heninger and Miss Purdon were employed to teach the sj^ring 
and fall terms of 1882 and also the winter term of 1883. Mr. Heninger 
will long be remembered by the citizens of Wahpeton and Breckenridge 
by those highly entertaining contributions to the AV^ahpeton Times, 
entitled " Chronicles," describing in a rather satirical manner the expe- 
diences of several physicians during the smallpox scare which prevailed 
in the " city of the plain." 

Upon the resignation of Mr. Heninger, Mr, A. M. Maxfield was 
selected to complete the school year, and during this term an inde- 
pendent school district was organized having a school board of ten 
jnembers, who deemed it necessary to erect a more commodious build- 
ing. In the fall of 1883 Mr. Crocker and Miss Flora Austin were em- 
ployed for the ensuing year. Meanwhile the new building was finished, 
and the old ones, having been sold, Avere moved to another part of the 
town, where they are now used, the one as a hospital, the other as a 
chapel. The same teachers, with the addition of Miss Lottie Randall, 
entered the new school-house on the first Monday in September, 1884. 
During the following year 222 scholars were enrolled. 

The same corps of teachers was engaged for the year beginning 
August 31, 1885, but on account of an increased attendance another 
teacher was needed, and this time Miss Nettie McKean, one of the 
first graduates of the AVahpeton high school, was employed as princi- 
pal's assistant. Of th e.nuraber who have received a preparatory course 
in Wahpeton schools, two young men are continuing their course of 
study in Carleton College, at Northfield, and several teachers of marked 
ability are employed throughout the county. 

One of the surest signs of an awakening interest in educational 
matters among the parents of children attending school in this city is 
the remarkably good attendance during the last winter term, which 
was over ninety per cent of the number enrolled; and it is the fixed 
pur})ose of the present Board of Education to make these scliools an 
ornament to the town, an inducement to those seeking a new Western 
home, and a lasting monument of earnest and self-sacrificing eiforts in 
behalf of education. For the foregoing facts our readers are indelited 
to Professor Crocker. 

WAHPETON METHODIST CHURCH. 

First Methodist sermon preached in Wah})eton by a missionary in 
.1873, at a room over John Kotschevar's store. The Methodist people 
joined with others in organizing a union Sunday-school May 2, 1880, 
with James Boss as superintendent and Samuel Taylor assistant. First 
Methodist class organized Dec. 7, 1880, by Bev. J. B. Starkey, P. E., 
and contained ten members, with E. K. Morrill as leader. First quar- 



134 HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY. 

terly meeting Feb. 20, 1881, when nine more members united. First 
meeting of Ladies' Aid Society March 21, 1881; Mrs. G. W. Nichols, 
president; Mrs. P. H. Hackett, secretary. Membership included Mrs. 
Louis Hatton, Mrs. George Pease, Mrs. E. K. Morrill, and others. Kev. 
B. L. Patterson, the first pastor, officiated from March 27 to Aug. 28, 
1881. May 3 of that year the Methodists organized a Sunday-school 
of their own (E. K. Morrill being elected superintendent) at Schott!s 
hall, where services were held during the summer. Eev. P. J. Laird 
finished out the year. Kev. C. I. A. Harris was sent to this charge by 
the Conference of 1881, but remained only four months. Eev. A. J. 
Hayner served one year, beginning with the Conference of 1882, and 
was succeeded by Rev. H. W. Troy, now in his third year, who has 
accomplished a great work for the church. During his second year the 
society was incorporated, and a house of worship built at a cost of about 
$2,500, the dedicatory sermon having been preached by Bishop Foss 
Dec. 6, 1885. In September, 1^85, the North Dakota Mission Confer- 
ence held its second annual session in this church. The membership 
of the chvirch is at present about seventy. The Ladies' Aid Society 
has a large membership, well officered, and is an invaluable help in all 
enterprises of this church. 

The Wahpeton Mission of the Evangelical Association was organ- 
ized in 1875, by Julius Gongel. He. had three appointments, which 
have i:|^creased to ten. In 1883, under C. Oertli, a church valued at 
$1,400 was built on the AVild Pice fifteen miles southwest of Wahpeton. 
The other appointments are around Brightwood and Colfax and Man- 
ston, Minn. The membership has increased to fifty. Arnold Oertli 
is the preacher in charge. 

EICHLAND COUNTY AGEICULTUKAL ASSOCIATION. 

Organized Dec. 22, 1883; Samuel Taylor, Pres. ; S. E. Stebbdns, 
1st V.-Pres.; J. C. Henvis, 2d Y.-Pres.; D. A. Knuppenburg, 3d V.- 
Pres. ; H. C. N. Myhra, Sec; L. J. Moore, Treas. ; J. M. Stevenson, 
Sergt.-at-Arms. Present officers: S. E. Stebbins, Pres.; E. E. Ink 
and Wm. Eoot, Y.-Prests. ; Geo. B. Spink' Sec; Samuel Taylor, Treas. 
Total membership, about 200. Eecently changed into a branch of the 
Territorial Farmers' Alliance. 

The Farmers' Mutual Hail Insurance Company for Eichland County, 
with headquarters at Wahpeton, was organized Feb. G, 1886, and the 
following officers duly elected: Hon. S. E. Stebbins, Pres. ; O. H. Perry, 
Y.-Pres. ; John Shippam, Sec. ; Samuel Taylor, Treas. Its plan is to 
assess its members just enough to meet the actual losses of the season. 
The names of the officers will inspire public confidence in its man- 
agement. . 



PERSONAL MENTION. 



J. W. Blanding, one o£ the oldest settlers, B. in New Milford, 
Susquehanna Co., Pa., March 10, 1819, settled in Grant Co., AVis., in 
1844. Removed to Wahpeton in May, 1872. Has held important 
offices, Surveyor for U. S. Govt., Commissioner, and County Survey- 
or. Has surveyed many town sites since he came to Dakota. Al- 
though well along in yeers, he is very active, and has done much for 
the settlement of the county. 

M. T. Rich, B. in Albion, Oswego Co., N. Y., March 4, 1832, set- 
tled in Wtihpeton July 22, 1869, is proprietor of original townsite of 
"Wahpeton. Has been made wealthy by selling real estate. Being 
one of the first settlers, the county was called "Rich-Land." 

R. B. Myeks, B. in Berlin, Wis., 1854, moved to Olmsted Co., 
Minn., 1862. Graduated at Ann Arbor University Law School. 
Moved to Wahpeton 1879. Engaged in practice of law with John C. 
Pyatt, and afterwards with Pyatt <fe Purcell. Elected Judge of Pro- 
bate 1881, now Superintendent of Agencies Northwestern Mutual 
Insurance Company, Wahpeton. 

Chakles J. Glasier, B. in Cleveland, O., June 18, 1858, came to 
AVis. 1859. Published at Richland Center the Observer. Settled in 
Breckenridge 1881. Engaged in publishing Wilkin County Record, 
which was merged in Wahpeton Mercarxj; and is now one of its editors 
and proprietors. 

Don. J. Clark, B.- June 4, 1852, at St. Albans, Vt., moved to 
Minn. 1864, settled at Fort Abercrombie 1880. Has a fine farm near 
the P'ort. Is a Justice of the Peace for said town, and greatly inter- 
ested in the growth and prosperity of the country. 

Charles Damerel, B. at Exeter, Devonshire, England, Jan. 14, 
1822, came to America Oct., 1842, located in Rochester, N. Y. En- 
gaged in business 12 years. In 1854 settled in Juneau, Wis. From 
thence to Hastings, Minn., 1856. Engaged in business there until 
1881. Came to Wabpeton 1881. Engaged in hardware business, con- 
tinuing same to date. 

Wm. E. Purcell, B. in Flemington, N. J., Aug. 3, 1858. Ed- 
ucated at Reading Academy, and studied law with J. Voorhees & 
Large. Admitted to bar 1880. Came to Wahpeton Aug., 1881, and 
formed partnership with Myers & Pyatt, constituting law firm of 
Myers, Pyatt k Purcell. Since retirement of Mr. Myers, 1882, firm 



136 HISTOllY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

has been known as Pyatt & Purcell. Is having a large and lucrative 
practice. 

FiiANK L. Dayyek, B. in Huron Co., O., Oct. 16, 1842, moved with 
his parents to St. Croix Co., Wis., 1853. Enlisted in army on Aug. 
17, 1862, served until Sept., 20, 1865, when he was honorably dis- 
charged. Came to Eichland County 1880, and engaged in farming. 
Mr. DAvyer is one of the Covinty Commissioners, and a faithful officer. 

^\. S. Lauder, B. in Orleans Co., N. Y., Feb. 9, 1856. Educat- 
ed at St. Croix Collegiate Institute, Wis. Bead law with Wellington 
Vannatta. Settled in Wahpeton, May, 1881, and opened law office. 
Has been in company in the practice of law with J. A. Kennedy, also 
with C. E. Wolfe. Is now County Attorney, having been elected 1884. 

John C. Greig, B. at Yaletta, on Island of Malta, Oct. 20, 1863. 
Educated at CoJ.lege in Aberdeen, Scotland. Came to America 1882. 
Settled at Madison Wis. Came to Wahpeton April 16, 1884. En- 
gaged in publication of AVahpeton Jfercuri/, and is now one of its 
editors and pro])rietors. 

John Nelson, B. in Norway, 1850, came to America 1873. Settled 
in Breckenridge. Employed as clerk in a dry goods store live years. 
Engaged in mercantile business with C. M. Fisher in Breckenridge 
until 1881, when he settled in Wahpeton. Engaged in general mer- 
chandising to present time. His career as a dealer has been one of 
marked success. Is Pres. of Wahpeton Water Co., and has been 
Vice-Pres. of National Bank. 

D. Oliver, B. in Potosi, Grant Co., Wis., 1846. Came to Breck- 
enridge, 1879. W".; grain insx^ector in employ of Peter Hanson <k 
Co. two years. Commenced business in AV'ahpeton 1881, and has 
been prominently engaged in l)uilding up the business of the town. 

Rev. Gustav Oftedal, B. in Norway, 1849, came to America 
1877. Educated at Christiania. Spent four years in Minneapolis as 
pastor (jf a Lutheran Church, thence to Alexandria, Minn., 1883, and 
served as pastor three years. Came to Red River Yalley 1884. Set- 
tled in town of Eagle. Is present pastor of Liitheran Church about 
hve miles northeast from Colfax. 

Hon. John C. Pyatt, B. in New Jersey, July 31, 1857. Educated 
and studied law in Flemington, said state. Came west and was em- 
ployed as 2d engineer in running N. P. line of Ry. through to Miles 
City, M. T. Settled in Wahpeton 1880, and opened a law office in 
Breckenridge and Wahpeton. Was appointed Clerk of Territorial 
Legislature 1881. Was elected as a member of the Dakota Legisla- 
ture 1882, and made an honorable record in said body. Was appoint- 
ed deputy Dist. Atty. for this Co., 1880, and served in said capacity 



PEBSONAL MENTION. 137 

wp to fall of 1884 Is now Pres. of City Council, being duly elected 
to said office April, 1885. Married to Miss Sarah A. Kicli, daughter 
of M. T. Eich, Nov. 1884. Is senior member of law firm of Pyatt & 
Purcell, and their practice in the courts, and the business connected 
with their profession, is exceedingly large and hopefully increasing. 

Geo. D. Swaine, M. D., B. in Marquette Co., Wis., Feb. 1, 1850. 
Graduated at Eush Medical College, Feb. 19, 1873. Settled in Wah- 
peton. May 12, 1882. Was Co. Coroner one term, and is now mem- 
ber of' City Council. Dr. SAvaine's City Hospital is one of the 
important institutions of Wahpeton, and fills an important niche. 

AY. A. Power, B. Oct. 16, 1842, atPittsfield, Berkshire Co., Mass. 
AVent to Geneseo, 111., with his parents, 1859. Enlisted in Co. B. 9th 
Eeg't. Ills. Vol. Cavalry (Col. Albert G. Brackett ) Sept., 1861. Mus- 
tered out of service Nov., 1865. AYounded twice in action, and taken 
prisoner once during the Hood-Thomas campaign against Nashville, 
1864. Served as engrossing clerk in Minn. Legislature during ses- 
sion of winter of 1865-6. In railroad and express employ for seven 
years. In Surveyor General's office, Minn., for three years. Has 
been connected for years with farming and stock raising interests. 

J. E. Buxton, B. in N. Y., March 14, 1850. Settled in Newburgh, 
N. Y., early in life, and spent 26 years in that city. Graduated at 
Newburgh Academy at age of 17 years, and received highest prize in 
a contest for oratory. Bead law in office cf Judge Little, and admit- 
ted to practice in courts of N. Y., 1871. Held office of magistrate 
and acting recorder eight yrs. Came to AYalij)eton 1882, and com- 
menced to practice law, which calling he has continued to the present 
time. Elected to the office of Probate Judge 1884. 

EiCHAKD H. H.iNKiNSON, B. at Grand Eapids, Mich., Sept. 7, 
1842. Lived on a, farm in Kent Co. with his parents until Aug., 1861, 
when he enlisted in Co. D., 8th Mich. Y^oL Infantry. Discharged on 
account of wounds Jan. 30, 1863. Ee-enlisted soon after in 13th 
Mich. Light Artillery, and remained in service until close of war. 
Settled in Minneapolis and entered the service of the Northwestern 
Telegraph Co. Served said company as foreman and superinten- 
dent of construction and assistant general superintendent. In 1878 
organized Northwestern Telephone Exchange Co., now part of the 
Erie Co. July 1, 1881, moved to Eichland Co., and is proprietor of 
Brightwood farm, fully noted in another department of this work. 

John M. Euggles, B. Mar. 15, 1847, at Holley, Orleans Co., N. Y. 
Moved to North Fairfield, O., 1854; South Bend, Ind., 1856; Ligonier, 
1861 ; Elkhart, 1862. Enlisted May 10, 1862 ; discharged 1865. Moved 
to Holley, N. Y., 1865. Attended Holley Academy 3 yrs. Moved to 



138 HISTORY OF RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Ligonier, Ind., 1868 ; engaged in Inmlier l^nsiness. Moved to Eichland 
Co., Jan. 4, 1872. Has been Register of Deeds since Jan. 1, 1877. 

Dr. J. H. Johnson, B. 1839 in N. Y. Graduated at Buffalo Medi- 
cal University. Enlisted during war, belonging to the cavalry service, 
and after his discharge, 1868, settled in Mich. Came to Walcott Aug., 
1885, and is having an excellent practice for a new country. 

W. E. Howry, B. in Lebanon, Warren Co., O., Mar. 8, 1847. Edu- 
cated at Normal University, Lebanon. Commenced dry goods If usiness 
1868 in said toAvn. Thence came to Wahpeton 1883, where he has been 
successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits. 

W. A. Seely, B. in Cleveland, O., 1850. Moved to St. Louis 1860, 
and engaged in mercantile and banking business. Came to Wahpeton 
from St. Louis 1881, where he has been engaged in lumber and fuel 
business. His business transactions since he came to Wahpeton amount 
to Js;600,000. 

Eey. H. AV. Troy, A.M., B. in Iowa Jan. 8, 1859. Educated at 
Upper Iowa University graduating 1881. Joined Minn. Conf. at its 
session held at Ij'argo. Was appointed as pastor of Wadena charge, 
where he remained 2 yrs. , and v.^as then stationed at Wahpeton by 
Bishop Simpson. Is closing up his third year successfully. Is Pres. 
of N. AV. Mutual Ins. Co., Wahpeton. 

Frank E. Walcott, p. in Natick, Mass., Nov. 2, 1847. Educated 
at Natick and Ft. Edward Institute, N. Y. Moved to Chicago, Mar., 
1868. Engaged as commercial traveler rei)resenting Chicago Avhole- 
sale houses. Came to Walcott from Bochester, Minn., Thanksgiving 
day, 1880. Located and platted townsite. In spring of 1881 became 
associated with H. M. Kellogg. Has been postmaster since establish- 
ment of office, and is now justice of the peace and notary public. 

Hon. S. E. Stebbins, B. 1830, at Brookline, Windham Co., Yt, 
Beceived common school and academic education, and followed various 
occupations, but was always inclined to farming. Enlisted during war 
in Co. K., 1st Minn. Regt. Moved to Eichland Co. from Minn. 1880, 
and engaged in agriculture. In general election, 1884, elected member 
of territorial legislature, where he made an honorable record. 

John McMillan, B. 1824 in Ireland. At age of 23 emigrated to 
Penn. Came to Wis. 1855. Enlisted in army 1861, and was 3 yrs. in 
the service. Came to Eichland Co. 1882. Lives in Town of Park, 
engaged in farming. Is now serving as Co. Commissioner, to which 
office he was elected 1885. Is earnestly devoted to the interests of this 
growing country. 

B. L. Bog ART, of the law firm of McCumber & Bogart, B. in Ohio, 



PEESONAL MFNTION. 139" 

June 27, 1859. Received a normal school education. March 28, 1879, 
settled in AValipeton, Vliere he has been paying strict attention to 
business, and is being amply rewarded for his untiring efforts. The 
£rm McCumber & Bogart is having a large and lucrative practice. 

Adolphe Bessie, B. in Amsterdam, Holland, 1836. Came to 
America 1851. Enlisted in U. S. Army 1852. Was in war of Eebel- 
lion. Mustered out 1864. Came from Brooklyn, N. Y.,to Wahpeton 
1884. When in service of U. S., visited, as early as 1854, the military 
station where Fort Abercrombie was located. Is one of a family of 
31 children, all by one father and mother, and not a tAvin among 
them. Seventeen of them are now living. 

M. H. MopjiiLL,. B. at E. Canaan, Grafton Co., N. H., 1860. Lived 
in Iowa from 1862 until a few months before coming to AVahpeton. 
Graduated at Charles City, Iowa, high school. Served four years 
apprenticeship in office of Floyd County Advocate, that place. Came 
to Wahpeton Nov., 1879, and has g/own up Avith liichland County 
Gazette and country. 

John Kotschevak, B. in Austria, 1847. Came to America 1867. 
Settled at Cold Springs, Stearns Co., Minn. Moved to Richland 
County 1874, and engaged in mercantile business in Wahpeton, con- 
tinuing until 1885. Pioneer merchant in the toAvn. 

A. L. RoBEiiTS, B. in N. Y. City, June, 1836. Moved to Buffalo, 
N. Y., 1848, and lived there five years. In 1860 moved to Prescott, 
Wis. Enlisted in army April, 1861, as private. At close of war was 
Brevet Capt. and Quartermaster of Iron Brigade. Came to Wahpeton 
from Prescott, AVis., 1883, and engaged in the grocery and provision 
trade. 

D. Bell, B. in AVest Va., Sept. 25, 1829. Moved to Stark Co., O.,. 
1831. In spring of 1869 moved to Rochester, Minn., and remained 
ten years, thence to Fergus Falls in 1871. Moved to AVahpeton 
Feb., 1885, having purchased Headquarters Hotel, and is noM^ pro- 
prietor of same. Spent 25 years in mercantile business and 15 years 
in keeping hotel. 

A. H. Snow, B. in A"t. Came to Dakota in spring of 1880 and 
settled in Wahpeton. AVas employed in office of Register of Deeds 
two years. Since that time has held position of deputy Co. Treas. 
Is a man of sterling character, a good citizen, and always fovind on 
the best side of all questions pertaining to the best interests of gov- 
ernment. 

R. N. Ink, Sheriff', B. in Seneca Co., O., May 19, 1856. Had 
Normal school education. Came to Richland Co. 1878, and engaged 
in farming. Settled in AVahpeton 1881 and engaged in real estate 



14G HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

and loan business. Married to Alta M. Owen, of Ohio, Jan. 28, 1882. 
Elected Sheriff in fall of 1884. • 

H. W. Mackie, B. in Maine, July, 1839. Moved to Lockhaven, 
Pa., 1858, then* moved to Mass., and lived there 13 years, then to St. 
Paul in 1877. In April, 1879, came to Wahpeton and has followed 
his calling closely and prosperously as a builder and contractor. 

O. K. Ulsaker, B. in Norway. Came to America June, 1871. 
Worked for farmers in Goodhue Co., Minn., three years. Attended 
St. Olaf's Academy, Northfield, five months during 1875; Luther 
College, Decorah, Iowa, during 1876-77. Came West May, 1877. 
Bought land on Sheyenne River in Piichland Co., and commenced 
farming. Was elected to office of Co. Treas. foi* Pvichland Co., Nov., 
1880, and is holding same office for third term. Married to Sissel O. 
Huss, of Nicollet Co., Minn., July 25, 1885. 

P. J. McCuMBER, B. in 111., 1858. Moved to Minn, in early life. 
Educated in common and high schools and graduated at Ann Arbor, 
Mich., University, Law Dej^artment, 1880. Settled in Wahpeton 
1881 and engaged in practice of law. Elected City Justice two terms, 
and elected to Territorial Legislature 1884. Made for himself a fine 
record as a legislator. An eloquent advocate for all needed legisla- 
tion. Has a bright future before him, if there is any significance in 
past success. 

J. H. Miller, first Mayor of the City of Wahpeton, B. in Oneida 
Co., N. Y., 1844. Moved from there to 111. 1851, and 1867 moved to 
Iowa and engaged in farming. Aug. 11, 1862, enlisted in army, where 
lie served nearly three years, being engaged in several battles. Wound- 
ed five times. Honoralily discharged 1865 for disability. Came to 
Wahpeton from Iowa 1878. Engaged in business of selling farm 
machinery. Elected to Territorial Legislature in fall of 1880, and 
was one of the hard and efficient workers in that body, taking special 
pains to secure the county seat at Wahpeton. Is now Clerk of Courts 
and popular with the masses. His election to the Mayoralty of 
Wahpeton was at the first charter election, April, 1885. The above 
record is all the eulogy necessary. 

Frank Gray, B. in Flemington, N. J., 1860. Attended schools 
in native town until 1880. Went to Kansas City, Mo., and remained 
one year, returned to Flemington and entered law office of P. S. 
Kuhle. Then moved to Iowa and entered law class of State Univer- 
sity, Iowa City, graduating with the class of 1883. Came to Dakota 
in said year. Spent some time in office of Pyatt & Purcell, and in 
office of J. H. Miller, Clerk of Dist. Court, until Feb., 1885, then 
opened law office. Elected City Justice April, 1885. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 141 

Moses P. Proppek, settled in Walipeton 1871. Moved from 
Mich, to Yankton, thence to Richland Co. Was dei)uty sheriff 1874. 
Elected sheriff' 1876 and held the olHce continuously to Jan., 1885. 

A. E. SuNDERHAUF, Co. Auditor, B. 1859 in Leipzig, Saxony. 
Graduated at Eoyal Saxon State Polytechnical school. Came to- 
Walipeton 1883. Was the very efficient deputy auditor during the- 
term of Fred E. Stauft". Is a rapid writer, quick enumerator, and al- 
ways ready to do duty and magnify his office. 

Charles E. Wolfe, B. at Nicollet, Minn., Nov. 13, 1859. Edu- 
cated at Maidvato. Remained in Minn, until 1880, when he came to 
Walipeton. Studied law and was admitted to the bar in fall of 1884. 
Now vSecretary of N. W. Mutual Ins. Co., Walipeton. 

W. M. House, B. 1848, in Alleghany Co., N. Y. Moved with 
parents to Mich. , 1860. Received common school education. At age 
of 16 enlisted as private in First Mich. Cavalry. After close of war 
entered union and high school, Corunna, Mich., and completed course 
of study. Taught graded and advanced school three years. Came to' 
Dak. 1881, and engaged in farming. Now Co. Supt. of Schools. 

Geo. p. Garred, Editor Walipeton Times, B. in Lawrence Co.," 
Ky., Dec. 22, 1852. Moved with parents to Winona, Minn., 1862,.- 
thence to Austin, Minn., Dec, 1869. Was apprenticed to newspaper 
business under Davidson & Basf ord, of Austin Hefjister, serving three 
years without loss of time. Has been continuously in the business- 
up to date, having purchased Hed River Free Press, Breckenridge, 
Minn., 1880, moving same to Walipeton 1881, establishing Walipeton 
Times. Married to Miss Lena Trost, Jan. 3, 1882. 

H. M. Kellogg, B. in Champlain, N. Y., 1832. Educated in said 
town, and engaged in general merchandising. Moved to Wis. 1854,. 
thence to Minn, in 1860. Emigrated to Red River Valley and settled 
at AValcott 1881, engaging in merchandise, lumber, and machine 
business. Conducts business on large scale. • 

FoLSOM Dow, B. in N. H. Came to Yankton, Dak., 1870, and 
thence to Walipeton 1871. Was first postmater and first Justice of 
the Peace in Walipeton. Has been Co. Supt., Dist. Atty., and Co. 
Treas. Located his claim, s.w.|, sec. 8, tp. 132, r. 47, at an early date, 
and sold same to Hubbard k Tyler, of Fargo, 1880, at which time 
same was platted. N. P. depot stands on this land. Is holding office 
of Justice of the Peace and practicing law. Fills quite a niche in 
the history of Richland County. 

E. K. Morrill, B. in Springfield, Sullivan Co., N. H., July 6, 
1825. Educated at N. H. Conference Seminary under instruction of 



142 HISTOKY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 

Prof. R. 8. Rust and Prof. Dyer H. Sanborn. Came west and settled 
in Iowa, 1862. In 1879 came to Walipeton and purchased tlie ItlcJi- 
land County Gazette. Has continued its publication to present time, 
Avhicli of itself is an evidence of a grand success. 

James Puedon, B. in Ontario, Canada, 1840. Came to Alexan- 
dria, Douglas Co., Minn., tlience to Walipeton 1880, engaging in 
mercantile business. Is now engaged in same calling. 

M. T. Stevens, B. in Auburn, N. Y., March 31, 1837. Came to 
Lake City, Minn., 18()9 and engaged in milling and steamboat busi- 
ness. Came to Walipeton 1882, and engaged in liardAvare business, 
where he is now having a good trade. 

Frank E. Davis, B. in Lincoln, Mass., Aug. 26, 1842. Moved to 
Natick in said state 1852. Educated at Natick, and graduated at 
Comus Commercial College of Boston. Engaged in boot and shoe 
business in Natick, and thence moved to Walcott, in Feb. 1881, and 
engaged in hardware business. Mr. Davis is one of Co. Com'rs. 

M. O. Johnson, B. in Norway, 1843. Came to America 1855. 
>Settled in Chicago, thence came to Dwiglit, 1880, engaged and contin- 
ues in mercantile business with great success. 

N. Davis, Je., B. in Delaware, June 2; 1852, remained 18 years, 
then took up abode in Philadelphia, where 12 years were spent in a 
wholesale dry goods house. Came to Fairmount, April 24, 1882, 
where he is now engaged in business, being Postmaster and Justice 
of the Peace. 

J. R. Haeeis, McCauleyville, B. in Ind., 1838. Came to Red 
River Yalley in 1857. Formed copartnership with Wliitford & Bent- 
ley, and engaged in transportation of merchandise from St. Paul to 
Ft. Abercrombie and thence on flat boats to Ft. Garry. Continued 
same until 1862. Is now in mercantile business with marked success. 

John Millee, B. in Dryden, Tompkins Co., N. Y., Oct., 1844. 
Educated at Dryden Academy. Early engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness in his native town, where he remained until 1880, when he came 
to Dwiglit as General Supt. of the great N. Y. Farm. Has, from the 
beginning to the present time, honored his position and assisted very 
materially in making this great enterprise a grand success. 



THE EICHLAND COUNTY GAZETTE 

Has become a great power for good in AVahpeton and the surrounding 
country. It is a fixed principle Avitli Mr. Morrill not to allow anything 
-of an objectionable character to appear in his journal. He endeavors 
to publish a newsy family paper worthy of the city and county where 



NEWSrAPEllS. 143 

lie lias planted liis capital and labored so snccessfnlly in advertising 
tlie land of tlie Dacotalis, and especially tlie upper Eeil River Valley. 
He now lias a fine, capacious building on Dakota Avenue, with plenty 
of room for liis large and small presses, and lias every reason to feel 
proud of liis business quarters. He lias been fortunate in having sons 
trained for the work, who have at all times stood at their posts and 
performed their labors in the most painstaking and }n'aisewortliy man- 
ner. Mr. Harry Morrill, the-eldest son, is one of the most proficient 
young men at the business known in this section of newspaperdom. 
The pulilication of the lileJihiud (Jaunty Gazette was comtnenced 
the middle of April, 1879; by William Borgen. He sold his interest 
in the paper to E. K..Morrill, the present pro]n'ietor, who took control 
of it in season to publish one issue the same year, which was dated 
December 27, 1879. Quite a number of the patrons of the paper had 
become dissatisfied with its management, and the new proprietor as- 
sumed control under the most discouraging circumstances. The county 
w^as thinly settled, and Wahpeton contained but a, small number of 
inhabitants. Almost everything was crude and unhandy, whereby the 
task of publishing a paper was made difficult and arduous. But Wali- 
peton had been made the county seat, and this fact was about the only 
thread upon which to suspend a slender hope for future prosperity. 
Until July 29, 1881, the Gazette was the only publication in the county. 
Much earnest work had then been bestowed upcui it, making it a medium 
for advertising the superior advantages of the county end town, and an 
encouraging development had already taken place. The Gazette had 
continued to enlarge the circle of its infiuence and increase the number 
of its friends. To Folsom Dow, Esq., belongs the credit of being the 
first to subscribe and jiay in advance after it came into the hands of 
the present proprietor. 



THE WAHPETON TIMES, 

Since its establishment in Wahpeton with its new name, has been very 
active in its management and successful in securing a fine patronage 
by writing up the advantages of AVahpeton and the county and country 
at large. It has a fine subscription list, a well-arranged office and 
commodious building, and seems to be greatly encouraged by its past 
labors and present life-work. George P. Garred, its editor and pub- 
lisher, believes fully in the future possibilities of the Thnes^ from his 
standpoint, at the beginning of the new year 1886 and the years that 
are to follow. It is the hearty wish of the writer that the Times and 
all the papers of the county be in the future a growing success, as they 
have in the past, and wield a powerful influence for good, that their 
past success and ability would warrant. 



144 



HISTORY OF EICHLAND COUNTY. 



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LARGEST HOTEL IN RICHLAND COUNTY. 



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