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Full text of "History of Salem, N.H."

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DURHAM 

Library Association* 



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HISTORY 



OF 



SALEM, N. H 



Compiled and Written 
by 

EDGAR GILBERT, A. B. 



ILLUSTRATED 



concord, n. h.: 
Rumford Printing Company 
1907 



COPYRIGHT, 1907 

BY 

EDGAR GILBERT 



^ To the Memory of 

(72 William Greenleaf Crowell 

Educator and Public Servant of Integrity and Honor 
cJ this book is affectionately dedicated by 

^L The Author 



"7GG3 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

INTRODUCTION. 

Early History of New England — -Council of Plymouth — 
Mason and Gorges — The Two Conflicting Grants — Appeal 
to the King — -Final Settlement of Province Line — Masonian 
Proprietors — Wheelwright's Deed ..... 4 

CHAPTER I. TOPOGRAPHY. 

Location and Size — Villages — Elevations — Water Courses 
— Spicket River — Captain's Pond — Hitty Titty Pond— 
Canobie Lake — World's End Pond — Soil and Vegetation . 16 



.-^ v 



CHAPTER II. SETTLEMENT. 

Early History of Haverhill — Indian Deed — Granting of 
Land — Fourth Division Lots — Satchwell's Pond — Source 
of First Settlers of Salem(?) — First Schools — Wolves — 
Indian Troubles — Highways — Church Matters — Govern- 
ment — Proprietors and Non-commoners — Methuen Set Off 31 

CHAPTER III. BUILDING THE TOWN. 

Spicket Hill Petition— North Parish Set Off— First Offi- 
cers of the Parish — Parsonage Grant — Meetinghouse Raised 
— First Settled Minister — Burial Ground Laid Out — Church 
Difficulties — Division of the Parish— Petitions for Town- 
ship — Salem Incorporated — First Town Officers— Altera- 
tions in the Lines — Windham — Atkinson Controversy — 
Seeking New Grants — Quit Claim Deed of 1759 — The 
Pound .......... 70 

CHAPTER IV. ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 

Congregational — Baptist — Methodist — North Salem M. E. 
Church— First M. E. Church— Pleasant St. M. E. Church 
— Miscellaneous Religious Notes — Cemeteries and Funerals 129 



VI CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER V. CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 

Early Census Returns — First Tax List — Tax List of 1800 
— Affairs at the Town House — Liquor Traffic — Town 
House Condemned — New Building Proposed — Political 
Notes — Division of Counties — State and National Organ- 
ization — Town Politics — Fremont Campaign — List of Se- 
lectmen — List of Representatives — Senators — Postoffice 
and Mail Service — One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary — Paupers — Town Farm — Water Works — Hose Com- 
panies .......... 155 

CHAPTER VI. EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 

First Schools — Early Teachers — Houses Built — Districts 
Established — History of the Buildings— Old Districts Abol- 
ished — Superintending Committee — Extracts from Reports 
— High School — Salem Social Library — Public Library . 207 

CHAPTER VII. MILITARY HISTORY. 

Lake George Expedition — Boys of '76 — Bunker Hill — Re- 
cruiting Companies — "Association Test " — List of Revolu- 
tionary Soldiers from Salem — Committee of Safety — Rob- 
ert Young Case — Captain Woodbury Imprisoned — Militia 
Organized— War of 1812— Militia Act of 1820— Salem 
Officers in Militia — " Salem Guards " — Mexican War — Out- 
break of the Rebellion — Records of Soldiers from Salem . 231 

CHAPTER VIII. INDUSTRIAL. 

Currency — Sawmills and Lumber — Gristmills — Farming — 
Textile Industries — Hatting — Shoe Industry — Enamel 
Cloth— Board of Trade— Growth of the Villages . . 291 

CHAPTER IX. HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Early Methods of Travel — Paths and Trails — First Roads 
— Oldest Bridge in Salem — Laying Out Roads — London- 
derry Turnpike — Taverns on Turnpike — Macadam Roads 
— Washouts — Other Taverns — Railroad Built — Electric 
Railway Line Opened . . . . . . .310 



CONTENTS. Vll 

Page 

CHAPTER X. ORGANIZATIONS. 

Masons — United Order of Pilgrim Fathers — Grand 
Army of the Republic — Women's Christian Temperance 
Union — Patrons of Husbandry — Women's Relief Corps — 
New England Order of Protection — Junior Order United 
American Mechanics— Daughters of Liberty — Miscellaneous 
Organizations ......... 334 

CHAPTER XL HISTORICAL TALES. 

Widow Harris' Loom — Granny Ober's Witchery — Tavern 
Tales— An Aged Teacher — Tales of Capt. Israel Wood- 
bury — First Baldwin Apple Tree in New Hampshire — 
Odd Items — Kissing and Quilting Parties — Bird Shoot — 
Mary Campbell 347 

CHAPTER XII. KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP . . 362 

CHAPTER XIII. BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOG- 
ICAL. 

Biographies — Tables of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 
from Town Records and Other Sources .... 422 

INDEX OF NAMES. 

INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PORTRAITS. 



Abbott, Daniel A. 
Ayer, James 
Bailey, Stephen 
Buxton, Fred C. . 
Cate, Edwin G. 
Cluff, Aaron Milton 
Cluff, Isaac Newton 
Coburn, Eliphalet . 
Cole, Hon. Wallace W. 
Crowell, William G. 
Davis, Frank D. . 
Duston, Ebenezer . 
Duston, Thomas . 
Emery, David S. . 
Ewins, James 
Gilbert, Edgar 
Gordon, George C. 
Gordon, Howard L. 
Hall, Alvah . 
Hall, Arthur . 
Hall, Clarence 
Hall, Clifton 
Hall, Prescott C. . 
Hall, L. Wallace . 
Kelley, Gilman D. 
Kelley, Mrs. Walter B. 
Kimball, Charles A. 
Kimball, Four Generations 
Kimball, William B. 
Lancaster, Thomas D. 



PAGE 

428 
1 

68 
104 
185 

36 
272 
168 
200 
Frontispiece 
144 
188 
340 
201 
173 
4 
261 
128 

24 
113 
160 
336 
313 
368 

48 
429 
184 
440 
144 
349 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Lancaster, William E. 
Pulver, Willis Du Bois 
Sikorsky, Dr. Vladimir N. 
Smith, Smiley 
Smith, Mrs. Smiley 
Soule, Dr. Lewis F. 
Taylor, Daniel 
Taylor, Henry P. . 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, John Jr. . 
Taylor, Levi W. . 
Taylor, Hon. Matthew H 
Tenney, John F. . 
Thorn, Darius M. . 
Thorn, George W. 
Thorn, Isaac 
Wheeler, Hon. Benjamin R. 
Wheeler, John R. 
Wheeler, Hon. John W 
Wilson, Frank D. 
Woodbury, George 
Woodbury, Hon. Frank 
Woodbury, Isaac . 
Woodbury, John . 
Woodbury, Levi . 
Woodbury, Oliver G. 



RESIDENCES. 



Atwood, John P. . 
Austin, Moses 
Ayer, James 
Ayer, Philip 
Bod well, Warren N. 
Bradford, William 
Brady, John F. 
Chase, Benjamin . 
Coburn, Eliphalet . 
Cole, Wallace W. . 
Crowell, William G. 



Page 

125 

180 

224 

432 

424 

164 

329 

208 

433 

45 

444 

197 

108 

57 

216 

245 

268 

252 

176 

80 

361 

72 

13 

92 

357 

352 



420 

256 

438 

41 

85 

265 

249 

264 

444 

105 

9 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



XI 



Duston, David 
Duston, Ebenezer 
Duston, Obadiah 
Duston, Thomas 
Emerson, Isaac 
Fletcher, Samuel 
Goodwin, Alfred E. 
Gordon, Benaiah 
Gordon, Kimball 
Hall, Alvah . 
Hall, Arthur C. 
Hall, Ezra Baxter 
Hall, Prescott C. 
Hall, Silas 
Hoyt, David M. 
Hunt, Lincoln H. 
Hutchins, Batchelder B 
Jones, George W. 
Kelley, J. William 
Kelley, S. Milton . 
Kimball, Charles . 
La Court, Peter 
Little, Maj. Henry 
Littlefield, Albert L. 
Lowell, John 
Messer, Moses 
Pattee, Seth J. M. 
Pettingill, Jonathan 
Robie, Mrs. Frank 
Rowell, Jacob 
Shannon, Stephen S. 
Sikorsky, Dr. Vladimir N 
Smith, Morton E. . 
Smith, Smiley 
Taylor, Daniel 
Taylor, Matthew . 
Taylor, Matthew H 
Tenney, John F. . 



Page 

425 

433 

240 

409 

384 

129 

345 

416 

341 

337 

8 

52 

233 

192 

389 

160 

385 

360 

392 

61 

12 

65 

121 

404 

321 

73 

417 

393 

33 

136 

421 

365 

89 

388 

16 

48 

412 

405 



xu 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Thorn, Darius M. . 
Thorn, George W. 
Webster, Amos N. 
Webster, Charles . 
Webster, Thomas . 
Wheeler, Fred O. . 
Wheeler, John W. 
Woodbury, Asa 
Woodbury, Isaac . 
Woodbury, Israel . 
Woodbury, John . 
Woodbury, Levi . 
Woodbury, Luke . 
Woodbury, Richard 
Woodbury, Samuel 



Page 

56 
353 

64 
320 
396 
397 
408 
377 

77 
325 
369 
437 
256 
248 
381 



MISCELLANEOUS VIEWS. 



Atlas Worsted Mill 

Baptist Church 

Boat House, Stillwater . 

Bridge near Wheeler's Mill . 

Canobie Lake, from Levi Woodbury's 

Canobie Lake Park, Main Walk 

Canobie Lake Park, Rustic Seat 

Canobie Lake, R. R. Station 

Carbarn .... 

Causeway .... 

Common .... 

Congregational Church . 

Cowbell Corner, Looking North 

Cowbell Corner, Old Mill 

Crosby Wharf, Stillwater 

Dam at North Salem 

Ewins' Store 

Graduates, Methuen High School 

Graveyard and Hearse House 

Graveyard, Intei'ior View 

High School Pupils 



301 

129 

40 

17 

33 

100 

240 

401 

333 

328 

376 

133 

25 

296 

4 

21 

112 

232 

148 

88 

237 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Xlll 



Hitty Titty Pond Road 

Hose House, 'No. 1 

Hose House, No. 2 

Hotel Rockingham 

Lawrence Road 

Library 

Littlefield Farm, Landscape 

Maple Tree, Webster Farm 

Masonic Building . 

M. E. Church, Center . 

M. E. Church, Depot . 

M. E. Church, North Salem 

MiU Site, Millville 

Morrison Store 

New Road, near Stillwater 

North Pond Road, Stillwater 

Panorama View of Salem Center 

Panorama View of Salem Depot 

Pine Grove Cemetery 

Pound . 

Railroad Station, Salem 

Russ Shoe Factory 

Schoolhouses : No. 1 

No. 4 

No. 6 

No. 8 
S picket Path 
Stillwater — A Landscap 
Stone Schoolhouse 
Tavern, Salem Center 
Taylor's Mill 
Tower, Meadowbrook 
Town House, Exterior 
Town House, Interior 
Wheeler's Mill . 
Winter Scenes : 

Below Point A, Looking East 
Center, toward North Salem . 



Page 

28 
204 
192 

96 
316 
228 
356 
169 
372 
140 
144 
137 
292 
413 
320 
324 

16 
176 
152 
128 
344 
304 
212 
217 
221 
224 
312 
120 
208 
332 
297 
364 
153 

80 
304 

176 

400 



XIV 



ILLUSTKATIONS. 



Winter Scenes : 

Electric Line, Toward Nashua 
Looking toward Point A 
Main Street, near Carbarn 

Woodbury Shoe Factory 



Page 

116 

339 
157 

308 



MAPS AND CHARTS. 



Grants to Mass. Bay Co. 


and Capt. John Mason . 






7 


First Plan of Haverhill 


. . . . 






35 


Haverhill Boundaries as 


Originally Laid Out 






37 


Fourth Division Upland 


. 






51 


Plan of Meetinghouse 


. 










90 


Charter Plan of Salem 


. 










104 


Petition Plan 


. 










117 


Locations about 1759 


. 










122 


Map of Salem Center 


. 










364 


Map of Salem Depot 


• 










373 


Map of Town of Salem 


• 








Back Cover 




JAMES AYER 



Foreword. 

Nineteen years ago began the agitation which has resulted in 
the publication of this History of Salem. Many of the older 
citizens Believed that such a work should be undertaken, and 
caused an article to be inserted in the warrant with this in view. 
A committee, of which "William G. Crowell was chairman, was 
chosen to investigate the advisability of the plan. Although no 
money was appropriated, the committee went ahead enthusias- 
tically with their work and prepared a report for the next annual 
meeting. But the result was most disappointing; so little inter- 
est was manifested by many at the meeting that Mr. Crowell was 
compelled, by talking and other disturbances, to desist before his 
report was half finished. 

For a time the matter rested, to be again brought up in 1894. 
From that time several committees were appointed to carry on 
the work of preparing the history for publication, and money 
was raised for the purpose. "William G. Crowell, Matthew H. 
Taylor, Levi W. Taylor, James Ayer, Wallace W. Cole, Frank D. 
Davis and David S. Emery served on these committees at dif- 
ferent times. Some progress was made, but the work was neces- 
sarily slow. The death of Mr. Ayer in the fall of 1905 put a 
stop to the work, and left some doubt as to whether anything 
further would be done. 

At this time the author became interested in the unfinished 
work and proposed to undertake the completion of it. This was 
brought about through the efforts of Mr. Emery and Mr. Cole. 
An article was inserted in the warrant for the March meeting, 
1906, upon which the town accepted the proposition then sub- 
mitted. Work was undertaken at once. The material already 
collected contained many valuable facts and clues which were 
later followed out, although nothing had been written for the 
book. In other words, some of the brick, mortar and lumber had 



2 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

been obtained but the work of building had not been commenced. 
All of the stock had to be cut and fitted to the new material later 
obtained. 

In the preparation of this work the aim has been to combine 
the history of the place with the history of its people — to present 
civil history in connection with genealogy. This is no slight 
matter for a town as old as Salem; the proper proportion of 
space to be given to each of these branches, and still keep the 
whole within the limits of a single volume, is the historian's 
greatest problem. The complete genealogy of even one of our 
old families will make a book in itself, and would be out of the 
question here. Still there must be some way of tracing the rela- 
tion of people to town. The plan adopted is this : to present the 
principal interests of the town, and therewith make mention of 
the men who were prominent in them. This shows the relation 
of men to affairs. For the inter-relation of persons the plan is 
twofold, biographical and statistical. Brief biographies of some 
of the citizens have been given. Also the complete records of 
the town in births, marriages, and deaths have been alphabet- 
ically arranged and included here. By this means the lines of 
each family may be traced so far as they are shown by the 
records. Even a brief consideration will make it evident that 
this is the most acceptable method of an accurate and condensed 
presentation. 

The arrangement selected for the book is topical rather than 
chronological, in order to obtain a unity otherwise impossible. 
Many of the facts mentioned are trivial in themselves, but they 
serve the author's purpose to take the reader back into the life 
of our ancestors and permit him to view that life in the spirit 
of the times. Many of the lists of names are given to supple- 
ment the chapter on genealogical matters. It is the hope of the 
author that the omissions or inaccuracies discovered will be 
charitably overlooked as inherent in a work of this kind pre- 
pared in a short period of time. 

It is hoped that the illustrations in the book will be found a 
valuable collection. They have been prepared with no small 
outlay of time and money, and made possible by the cooperation 
of many of our citizens. 



FOREWORD. 6 

The author would acknowledge his indebtedness to all who 
have so generously given of their time and effort to assist in 
the work; especially to the late Mr. Crowell and Mr. Ayer for 
the part they performed; to the late Mr. Thomas D. Lancaster, 
who by his clear memory furnished many facts regarding the 
early days; to the late Matthew H. Taylor, also to Mrs. Taylor, 
Mr. Charles Kimball, Mr. Ezra B. Hall, Mr. Oscar Hall, Mrs. 
Edith Woodbury and Mr. George Thom, for valuable re- 
miniscences furnished; to Mrs. D. A. Abbott, Miss Helen Fred- 
erick and Miss Ruth Doyen, for assistance with the copy and the 
proof. 

That the work may be found acceptable to the many friends of 
Salem is the earnest desire of the author. 

E. G. 
Methuen, Mass. 

July 24, 1907. 



Introduction. 

Since the present can be satisfactorily interpreted only 
through the illuminating knowledge of the past, it becomes neces- 
sary for us to rehearse the early history of New England, espe- 
cially in its bearing upon New Hampshire and northern Massa- 
chusetts, in order to obtain the setting or historical background 
for the principal theme of our story. The many controversies 
that arose during the early days of the town of Salem were in 
most cases the direct outcome of unsettled disputes in the still 
earlier days of the first grantees of territorial and governmental 
rights. While in no less degree is it true that the success and 
progress of the community were the results of careful planning 
and energetic operation on the part of the builders of the town. 

The early history of Salem is inextricably interwoven with 
that of two of the neighboring towns, Methuen and Haverhill, 
of which it was formerly a part. Lying on the state line be- 
tween New Hampshire and Massachusetts and in part separated 
by it, these towns were compelled to bear great inconvenience 
caused by the unsettled question of location of this boundary 
line. Thus the early history of Haverhill and Methuen will be 
an essential preface to the settlement of Salem, after we have 
followed the earlier stages of colonization of the eastern New 
England wilderness. The interesting story of the discovery, 
exploration and occupation of the lands of the western hemi- 
sphere is not only generally well known in its essentials but is 
also slightly extraneous to the present work and therefore here 
omitted. 

COUNCIL OF PLYMOUTH. 

Our interest is first enlisted in the year 1620, when King 
James I of England gave his approval to an association of noble- 
men and prominent men of England known as ' ' The Council of 
Plymouth for planting and governing colonies in New England 




EDGAR GILBERT. 



INTRODUCTION. 5 

in America." The president of this council was Fernando 
Gorges and the secretary was Capt. John Mason. These two 
names are already familiar to all students of New England his- 
tory, but their influence will be more fully appreciated from the 
fact that they were the two highest officers of this organization 
which was to have such vast territory at its disposal. For the 
king granted to the council all the land in North America lying 
between the fortieth and forty-eighth degrees north latitude — 
that is, from New Jersey to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The 
colonization of this vast region was expected to yield rich profits 
to those who should undertake it. 

Already glowing reports of a fair land, with fine gardens and 
forests, occupied by a noble, healthy race of men, and furnish- 
ing sightly spots for habitations, had been brought home by those 
who had made voyages of exploration, notably Captain John 
Smith, who had visited the New England shores in 1614. The 
attention of many leading men was turned westward and the 
inducements offered by the Council of Plymouth were most al- 
luring. The willingness with which grants of land were made, 
without due investigation into the geography of the country, 
was the cornerstone for long and bitter legal contention in the 
years that were to follow. Captain John Smith had made a 
chart of the coast, and this, with a few brief descriptions, con- 
stituted the principal source of information. But these gave no 
knowledge of the interior, consequently the various grants were 
frequently in direct contradiction to each other. 

MASON AND GORGES. 

Captain Mason and Fernando Gorges of course had the sit- 
uation well in hand, and in the very year that the council was 
formed, 1620, Mason obtained from it a grant of all the land 
between the rivers Merrimack and Naumkeag, to the sources of 
each. This assumed that these two rivers were parallel and ran 
in an easterly direction for the entire length. The Naumkeag is 
the small stream at Salem, Mass., and is only twelve miles long. 

Two years later, 1622, Mason and Gorges obtained from the 
Council of Plymouth a joint grant of land from the Merrimack 
River to Kennebunk in Maine, and extending inland as far as 



6 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

the Great Lakes. This grant, known as Laconia, proved of no 
great importance, as the movement for colonization demanded 
more specific and constricted boundaries. But under the La- 
conia grant Gorges gave a title of land to one David Thompson, 
a business man of Plymouth, England, who, with his wife and 
four men, came, in 1623, to the mouth of the Piscataqua River 
and became the first white settlers in New Hampshire, at Or- 
diorne's Point, Here they built a cabin, planted a considerable 
area of ground, and undertook some trade in furs with the In- 
dians. This small beginning was destined to be the cornerstone 
of the flourishing city of Portsmouth, known as "Strawberry 
Bank" until 1653, when the name was changed by the Massa- 
chusetts General Court. Here we shall later find the seat of 
government of the province — a fitting tribute to the antiquity of 
the town. Thompson (also spelled Tomson) did not remain long 
on his new claim, but in 1626 moved to the island in Boston Har- 
bor, which still bears his name. 

In the same year, 1623, two brothers from England, Edward 
and William Hilton, obtained a grant similar to Thompson's, 
and settled in Cocheco, later called Dover, at the place now 
known as Dover Point. 

THE TWO CONFLICTING GRANTS. 

Up to this time matters had gone smoothly, as there were not 
many instances in which the authority of occupation of the land 
had come into question. In the next two years, however, were 
issued two grants which were in direct contradiction to each 
other and which caused trouble and dissension for nearly a cen- 
tury and a half. It came about in this way: On March 19, 
1628, a charter was granted to Sir Henry Roswell and others in 
behalf of the Massachusetts Bay Company, for jurisdiction over 
all territory between two lines, one "three miles north of Mono- 
mack (Merrimack) River or any part thereof," the other three 
miles south of the Charles River, and extending from the At- 
lantic Ocean to the South Sea, as Lake Champlain was then 
called. The limited knowledge of geography here repeated the 
error found in Mason's deed of 1620, namely the supposition 
that the Merrimack held an easterly course throughout its entire 



INTRODUCTION. I 

length. In March, one year later, King James I gave a royal 
charter to the Massachusetts Bay Company which practically 
recites that given by the Council of Plymouth. And now comes 
the companion piece to this enactment. On November 7, 1629, 
the Council of Plymouth gave Captain Mason a new grant from 
a point three miles north of the Merrimack, extending westward 
into the country sixty miles, thence on this radius to a point 
sixty miles from the mouth of the Piscataqua River in a line 
extending beyond its headwaters. The accompanying chart, 



LJNJ ClAIMfO OT M*SSACI11M£2T_3 JN__ l_J<M 



fllCIISfL LIHC , SUPPOSING Sound Of MERS'MACK IN WEST \ 



MASSACHUSFTTSBAY COMPANY'S GRANT *"* 







Mason's Grant 



after a drawing by George Mitchell, who ran the eastern section 
of the boundary line between the provinces of Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire in 1741, shows the location of these grants to 
Mason, and to the Massachusetts Bay Company. The dotted 
line shows the boundary claimed by Massachusetts after ex- 
ploration had revealed the fact that the Merrimack had its ori- 
gin to the northward instead of in the west. Mason named this 
tract of land New Hampshire after the county of Hampshire 



8 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

in England. It was something more than one third of the area 
of the present state and included approximately the land now 
known as the counties of Rockingham, Hillsborough, Merrimack, 
Strafford, Belknap, and the lower half of Carroll. 

In 1634 Mason bought of Gorges all claim to his share of the 
grant. Doubtless Gorges was influenced to sell by the ap- 
parent difficulty of accomplishing much with so vast, indefinite 
and uninhabited possessions, for he at once turned his attention 
to the development of his colony, which Thompson had started 
at the mouth of the Piscataqua. Mason died in 1635, leaving 
his property to his grandson, Robert Tufton, on condition that 
he take the name of Mason. Robert was but a boy, and very 
soon manifested his inability to manage so large a proposition 
as was before him. Trouble with the Indians caused the New 
Hampshire colonists to seek protection from the better devel- 
oped province of Massachusetts, and very soon this neighbor- 
ing government assumed control of the affairs in Mason's land. 
In fact a decree was issued in 1641 by the General Court of 
Massachusetts to the effect that its northern boundary extended 
to the Piscataqua River. It is significant that just a century 
later the division line between the provinces was permanently 
established. 

In response to the repeated protests of young Mason, the Mas- 
sachusetts legislature established a committee in 1652 to investi- 
gate the boundary question. This committee, with a promptness 
characteristic of the progressive legislators of the Bay State, 
found that the headwaters of the Merrimack were in Lake Win- 
nipesaukee, and at once claimed that their northern line ex- 
tended eastward from a point three miles north of the outlet of 
the lake to a point on the eastern bank of the Piscataqua in the 
same latitude, and westward to Lake Champlain. For did not 
their grant from the Council of Plymouth state specifically 

''three miles north of any part thereof"? This was 

too much for Mason. He saw the futility of appealing to men 
who so well understood how to interpret legal documents, and 
still he knew the validity of his own claim. He would take the 
case to a higher court. After appeals to authorities in England 
the controversy was at last brought before the king. But the 




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INTRODUCTION. 9 

years had flown, Mason had become an old man, the long strug- 
gle had worn upon him, and in 1691 he laid down his arms and 
passed on, leaving as his heirs his two sons, Robert Tufton 
Mason and John Tufton Mason. 

These sons had slight relish for the contest that had wasted 
their father's strength, and promptly sold their claim to Samuel 
Allen. With him the title lay undisturbed, and after his death 
was not demanded by his heirs, who really never felt that they 
had a very good claim to it. 

Meantime the settlement of the province had progressed rap- 
idly, a stable government had been established, towns chartered, 
and the idea of any private ownership of territorial title had 
been nearly outgrown. The province government had taken up 
the quarrel with Massachusetts and the numerous petitions and 
ambassadors to the king succeeded in obtaining a settlement. 
In 1720 Henry Newman, Esq., was appointed agent to prepare 
maps and charts and present the matter to the king, " since no 
headway can be made in dealing with Massachusetts. ' ' This ac- 
tion was brought about by petitions from the several towns, 
especially along the borders, to the General Court or to the Gov- 
ernor's Council at Portsmouth. It will later appear that the 
citizens of Salem were very active in their efforts to secure a 
satisfactory settlement of the line. 

The great importance to the town of Salem of this question 
of the southern boundary of New Hampshire justifies a review 
of the history of the final adjustment. The claims advanced by 
the two provinces were so conflicting as to make it uncertain on 
which side of the line the border towns, as Salem, would be 
placed. 

Between 1734 and 1737, New Hampshire sent two men before 
the king as agents to procure royal intervention in behalf of the 
weaker province. The first of these men was John Ringe, who 
was followed by John Tomlinson. So forcibly did they present 
their case that the king, with the advice of his privy council, 
appointed on April 9, 1737, a commission composed of fifteen 
members, selected from the councillors of the neighboring prov- 
inces of Nova Scotia, Rhode Island, New York and New Jer- 
sey, "for Settling, Adjusting and determining the Respective 



10 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

boundaries of Our said Provinces of the Mass a Bay & New 
Hampshire in dispute as aforesaid." 

According to instructions the commissioners met at Hamp- 
ton on September 1, 1737, and proceeded to hear fully the evi- 
dence and arguments presented for their consideration by com- 
mittees appointed by the legislatures of the two provinces. The 
claim presented by New Hampshire was that the "Southern 
Boundary of Said Province should begin at the end three miles 
North from the Middle of the Channel of Merrimack River 
where it runs into the Atlantic Ocean, and from thence should 
run on a Straight Line West up into the Main Land (toward 
the South Sea) until it meets with His Majesty's other govern- 
ments. ' ' 

Massachusetts' claim was very different, The line was de- 
fined as "beginning at the Sea three English miles north from 
the black Rocks So called at the Mouth of the River Merri- 
mack as it emptied it Self into the Sea Sixty years agoe, thence 
running Parralel with the River as fare Northward as the Crotch 
or parting of the River, thence due North as far as a certain 
tree Commonly known for more than Seventy Years past by 
name of Indicots Tree Standing three English miles Northward 
of said Crotch or parting of Merrimack River, and from thence 
due West to the South Sea." 

This line would follow the river, three miles distant, from its 
mouth to above Franklin, N. H., where the Pemigewasset and 
Winnipesaukee rivers flow together, and thence due west to cross 
the Connecticut River near Windsor, Vt. 

The commission heard all the evidence fairly and ably, then 
adjourned for six weeks to allow the contestants to file appeals, 
should they wish to do so, from the decision of the court, which 
was of the following indefinite purport: If the charter from 
William and Mary to the Province of Massachusetts Bay in- 
cluded all the land to the north of the Merrimack that belonged 
to the late Colony of Massachusetts Bay under the charter from 
Charles I, then the claim of Massachusetts should be upheld. 
But if it did not embrace all this land, then New Hampshire 
was in the right. 

During the six weeks following, both parties were to prepare 



INTRODUCTION. 11 

and file their appeals; and New Hampshire was all but "frozen 
out" by the methods employed by her rivals. At this time Hon. 
Jonathan Belcher was governor of both provinces. He was a 
Massachusetts man and therefore was not greatly delighted that 
the claims of the New Hampshire agents were manifestly more 
potent than those of his own province. For convenience he had 
assembled the legislatures of the two provinces near the place 
of hearing, at the towns of Salisbury, Mass., and Hampton 
Falls, N. H. On the day before the above decision was ren- 
dered, he prorogued the New Hampshire legislature to the day 
before the commissioners were to meet to receive the appeals, 
while the Massachusetts legislature remained in session and care- 
fully planned their appeal. Nevertheless the New Hampshire 
men were ready to act at once upon assembling, and had their 
appeal ready to file, though without the approval of the gov- 
ernor and his council (which he was careful not to have in ses- 
sion). Massachusetts protested against the. appeal on the 
ground that it was not approved, but it was of no use. 

Both parties having appealed, the case went before the king. 
Here New Hampshire was represented by Mr. Paris, a very 
shrewd and learned lawyer, and so well did he present his case, 
also because of the weak opposition of Massachusetts, that on 
August 5, 1740, the king in council rendered the following 
judgment : 

"Ord' d and adjudged 

"That the Northern Boundarys of the Province of the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay are and be a Similar Curve Line pursuing the 
Course of the Merrimack River at three Miles Distance on the 
North side thereof beginning at the Atlantick Ocean and ending 
at a Point due North of a Place in the Plan returned by the 
Commiss' rs called Pawtucket Falls and a Strait Line drawn from 
thence due "West cross the said River till it meets with his Maj- 
estys other Governm' ts . " 

Here we have the settlement of the old error in the early 
geography. To the king and his council it was patent that the 
first grants were intended to be separated east and west, as the 
river was at that time supposed to flow eastward. By this de- 
cision New Hampshire obtained a large area, including about 



12 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

thirty towns more than she had claimed. Governor Belcher 
was ordered to have the boundary line determined and surveyed 
accordingly. But instead of dividing the expense between the 
two provinces, as was intended, he put the whole burden upon 
New Hampshire, as Massachusetts refused to help run a line 
which would take from her so much land. He appointed George 
Mitchell to run the curved line from the Atlantic to Pawtucket 
Falls just above Lowell, and Richard Hazzen as the surveyor for 
the "strait line due west." The entire line was completed in 
1741, and is substantially the same as that recognized today. 
It was surveyed by a joint commission of the two states in 1825, 
as some inaccuracies in the lines of the Mitchell-Hazzen survey 
had been discovered. No agreement as to any change was ar- 
rived at, and the line stood thus until 1885. Then another 
joint commission was appointed by the two states, which made 
extensive surveys and permanently established all lines and 
corners. The finding of this commission was formally accepted 
by the legislatures of the two states, thus settling for all time 
the controversy which had lasted for nearly two centuries. 

MASONIAN PROPRIETORS. 

The decree of the king had put an end to the claim of Massa- 
chusetts for jurisdiction over New Hampshire territory. But 
very soon the question of ownership was to be brought up again 
from a different direction. It happened that John Tufton 
Mason, who had sold his claim to Samuel Allen, had a son, also 
named John Tufton Mason, who came forward in 1746 with a 
claim to the lands of his great great grandfather, Captain John 
Mason, on the grounds that his father and his uncle, Robert, 
had no right to give a deed of the property for a period longer 
than their own lives. He tried to sell his rights to the Province 
of New Hampshire (considerately omitting any claim that it 
should revert in turn to his heirs after his death). The par- 
ties having authority in the province, however, were slow to 
act, while Mason was more than ready to sell. Accordingly he 
turned his attention to private capital. A company was organ- 
ized at Portsmouth, composed of twelve prominent citizens, and 
known as the Lords Proprietors. After careful investigation of 




ISAAC WOODBURY. 



INTRODUCTION. 13 

Mason's claim they bought it for fifteen hundred pounds ster- 
ling. They then set about assuming control of their new prop- 
erty. No attempt was made to oppose the Province government, 
but merely to exercise the rights of ownership over the terri- 
tory. The first meeting of the Masonian Proprietors, as they 
are known to us, was held on May 14, 1748. The first grant of 
land was made December 3 of the same year. 

No attempt was made to exercise authority over the old towns 
already incorporated. Quit claim deeds were given to seven- 
teen of these east of the Merrimack, which had been granted 
by the province without consulting the heirs of Captain Mason. 
Liberal terms were offered for settling new towns in the unin- 
corporated districts. The granting of Salem, which was the 
twentieth of the proprietors' grants, will be referred to in a 
subsequent chapter. The usual method of procedure was to 
give deeds of the land, establish a unified settlement, and then 
obtain a charter from the Province government; but frequently 
this order was reversed. 

By the time of the outbreak of the Revolution nearly all of 
the Mason land had been disposed of. The large number of 
towns in the state, especially in the southern half, which were 
incorporated between 1748 and 1775 is a direct testimonial to 
the recognized validity of the Masonian claim to authority of 
the title, in that the deeds granted by the proprietors were hon- 
ored as incontestable rights. 



"6" 



wheelwright's deed. 

The heirs of Captain Mason were not the only claimants to 
authority of ownership. In the south central part of the prov- 
ince a great chief lived and ruled. His domain extended from 
the foothills of the White Mountains even south of the Merri- 
mack River, and his law was acknowledged by all the tribes 
within this vast tract. This chief was Passaconaway of the Pen- 
nacooks, who were located near Concord. They were a very 
powerful tribe, who largely by the sagacity and prowess of their 
chieftain held dominion over all the tribes in the neighborhood. 
It was the custom of the early settlers to purchase their land 
from the tribe having jurisdiction in that locality. But no 



14 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

sales could be made in this region without the sanction of Pas- 
saconaway, who was, however, very well disposed toward the 
settlers. Now Rev. John Wheelwright desired a grant in the 
southern part of New Hampshire, and in 1638, even within three 
years of the death of Captain Mason, he obtained a deed from 
Wehanownowit, Sagamore of Piscataquacke, with the sanction 
of Passaconaway, whom Wheelwright considered the real owner 
of the land. The grant called for land from three miles north of 
the Merrimack, thirty miles deep from the coast, and about 
square, extending to the mouth of the Piscataqua River. Re- 
servation was made, however, of the "broken-up lands," also 
of the right to fish and hunt. It will be seen that the territory 
was the southeast corner of the state, corresponding very nearly 
with the present county of Rockingham. 

This John Wheelwright was the founder of Exeter, and a 
man of great influence because of his scholarly attainments. He 
had been a citizen of Massachusetts Bay Colony, a right which 
he is said to have forfeited because of his avowed belief in the 
separation of church and state. 

There is another Wheelwright deed, the validity of which has 
been seriously questioned. It is supposed to have been given in 
1629, or nine years prior to that referred to above. The terri- 
tory designated in the two deeds was in part identical, the earlier 
including the larger area. This deed of 1629 has been declared 
a forgery by no less authorities than Hon. James Savage, form- 
erly president of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the 
Rev. Dr. Bouton, president of the New Hampshire Historical 
Society. By others, however, of equal prestige in historical cir- 
cles, the deed is credited as a valid instrument. 

Many of the early settled towns took precautions to secure 
title from the Wheelwright heirs. The Scotch-Irish colony 
which settled Londonderry sent a committee of two, Rev. Mr. 
McGregor and Samuel Graves, to secure a deed from Col. John 
Wheelwright of Wells, Me., in May, 1719. Colonel John was 
grandson of the original grantee of the land. 

The Wheelwright claim never had any direct influence upon 
Salem, as the source of authority here was at Haverhill, with 
the later sanction of the Masonian Proprietors. 



INTRODUCTION. 



15 



We have traced the early settlement of southern New Hamp- 
shire, considered the various conflicting claims to territorial title 
and followed the general steps in the determining of the line 
separating the provinces of New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 
The more specific and detailed treatment of these subjects, which 
will be necessary to the local interest that we as residents here 
feel, has been reserved for its more proper place in the chapter 
setting forth the settlement and early growth of the town. 



CHAPTER I. 

Topography. 

LOCATION AND SIZE. 

The town of Salem is situated in the southeastern part of 
New Hampshire, occupying the extreme southern point of Rock- 
ingham County. It is bounded on the north by Derry, west by 
Windham, south by Pelham and Methuen, east by Methuen, 
Haverhill and Atkinson. The boundary from Pelham-Methuen 
corner to the Haverhill-Atkinson corner is the state line between 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts. The bounds by lines and 
corners, as recorded in the reports of perambulations by the 
selectmen of adjoining towns, show a very considerable varia- 
tion. This may be accounted for in most cases by two causes — 
incorrect allowance for magnetic variation from true points of 
the compass, and errors in making or copying the reports of the 
surveys. Following are the correct magnetic directions for the 
town boundaries ; an allowance of about twelve degrees and 
thirty minutes should be made for the true lines. 

Beginning at the northwest corner of the town, at Lower 
Crank Corner so called, thence south 87° 10' east 556.36 rods, to 
the corner of Derry and Atkinson ; thence south 6° west 36.32 
rods, thence south 25° 15' east 398 rods, thence south 25° 10' 
east 161 rods, thence south 89° 30' west 16.6 rods, thence south 
21° 30' west 371 rods, thence north 89° 30' east 309 rods, thence 
south 25° 30' east 176 rods to the corner of Atkinson on the state 
line, near Captain's Pond; thence by the state line south 49° 56' 
west 508 rods, thence south 7° 54' west 1159 rods to the extreme 
south corner of the town in Strongwater Meadow, thence north 
62° 18' west 691 rods, thence north 87° 53' west 226 rods, thence 
south 79° 19' west 137 rods to the corner of Pelham on the state 
line ; here the boundary ceases to follow the state line ; thence on 
Pelham line north 30° 41' west 375 rods, thence north 67° 6' 




I< 



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PANORAMA VIEW OF SALE} 




ILLAGE FROM SPICKET HILL. 




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c 
i— i 

Pi 




__ 







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TOPOGRAPHY. 17 

west 411 rods to the corner of Windham line; thence on Wind- 
ham line north 42° 30' east 1113 rods, across Canobie Lake, 
thence north 35° east 435 rods, across Hitty Titty Pond, thence 
north 1° 45' east 575 rods to the Derry line at the point first 
mentioned. 

It will be seen that this irregular tract of land has a peri- 
meter of almost twenty-four miles. Its maximum length is 
about eight miles, from the southeast at Strongwater Meadow to 
the northwest at Crank Corner. (This name is derived from the 
fact that the southern line of Derry here makes an offset, like a 
crank on a shaft.) The average width of the town is slightly 
more than three miles. The area is almost twenty-five square 
miles; more exactly, it is 15,889 acres. 

VILLAGES. 

Like almost any town of any considerable area, Salem includes 
within its limits several well-defined villages and hamlets. With 
the single exception of the two main villages, these are separated 
by long stretches of sparsely populated territory. Since the 
development of a community is usually closely associated with 
its industrial growth, we reserve the treatment of the several 
divisions of the town for the chapter on industrial history. 
However, we present here such facts as are needed for an ade- 
quate conception of the topography of the town, by giving the 
location and general description of each village or hamlet. Of 
the former there are three — Salem Depot, Salem Center and 
North Salem ; of the latter five — Canobie Lake, Cowbell Corner, 
Millville, Messer's and Wheeler's Mill. 

The most active community at the present time is Salem 
Depot, which is favored by its location on the line of the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad between Manchester and Lawrence. This 
is a village rendered attractive by its well-kept residences and 
its fine shade trees. Situated in one of the least picturesque 
parts of the town, with, for the most part, a level or slightly 
rolling surface, it owes its beauty largely to the artistic ele- 
ment in the make-up of its citizens. As it is the most recently 
built-up part of the town it has above all the rest the appearance 
of a suburban residential settlement, since the buildings are of a 



18 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

more modern style of architecture than in other parts of the 
town. 

Within the Depot Village are about one hundred and twenty- 
five dwelling houses, two churches, a school house, railroad sta- 
tion, hotel, eight stores, grain mill, large shoe factory, electric 
power plant, post-office, law office, hose company, livery stable, 
blacksmith's shop, barber shop and laundry. The splendid car 
barns of the Southern New Hampshire Electric Railway Com- 
pany are located on the outskirts of the village, toward the Cen- 
ter. By the lines of this company the Depot and Center villages 
are connected with the cities of Lawrence, Lowell, Nashua and 
Haverhill. All of the buildings above named are centered about 
the intersection of Main Street, running nearly due east and 
west, with the Londonderry Turnpike. Both of these roads are 
macadamized throughout this village, giving an added air of or- 
der and neatness to the general effect. 

Leaving this village toward the northwest, one at once comes 
upon the beautiful hills and wooded vales about the shores of 
Canobie Lake. Nay, we are still within the village confines when 
we see from the height of land on Policy Street the road wind- 
ing away up the slope of the western hills, the broad, rolling 
fields separated by the long lines of rough stone wall and studded 
with orchard trees, the farmhouses nestling beneath the shade of 
majestic elms, and beyond, as a background to the scene, the tops 
of waving pines. Along the base of the ridge on which we stand, 
and separating it from the range of hills beyond, flows the brook 
which night and day, summer or winter, makes this spot charm- 
ing with its song, and brings delight to those who will but hear. 

The village next in importance from the population view point 
is Salem Center. This is the patriarchal member of the town 
family. Here is to be found the scene of the early fight for ex- 
istence, when all about were wildernesses teeming with foes. 
Here is the home of the history of the old town; it is Salem. 
This village lies slightly to the southeast from the geographical 
center of the town, upon the banks of the Spicket River. The 
land is even more level than that at the Depot, although on the 
east side of the river it rises to the greatest height within the 
town. The impression which one receives as he passes through 



TOPOGRAPHY. 19 

this settlement is that of a quiet country town, peaceful and 
contented in the possession of its traditions. This effect is due 
largely to the ancient appearance of many of the buildings, not- 
ably the town house and the Ewins building, as well as many of 
the residences. It is due also to the directions of the roads, 
which meet at irregular angles, forming small triangular spaces, 
or squares, rather than intersecting at right angles, as do those 
in more modern towns. In one of these triangles lies the com- 
mon, for one hundred years the site of the meeting house and the 
scene of all town activity. 

At the Center are two churches, two cemeteries, a schoolhouse, 
post-office, store, one large shoeshop and a heel shop, blacksmith's 
shop, town house, public library, hose company, lock-up, and bi- 
cycle repair shop, besides about sixty-five dwellings. 

The electric railway line passes through the village in Main 
Street, which is macadamized as far as Pine Grove Cemetery. 
The Lawrence Road is also macadamized for a considerable dis- 
tance. These smooth, broad roads, lined on either side with beau- 
tiful elms and maples, add no small contribution to the quiet 
dignity of the place. 

Four miles from the Center to the northward lies North Salem, 
a small village situated also on the banks of the Spicket, but un- 
like both of the other villages of the town, it is surrounded by 
rugged hills and wild scenery. It is built up about the enlarged 
junction of three roads, which were originally trod as routes to 
the saw-mill on the upper part of the stream. In this part of 
the town the Spicket crosses the line of the highway three times, 
in each case forming a very attractive bit of landscape. The 
first is where it flows beneath a rustic bridge near Cowbell 
Corner, after splashing its way noisily down a rough channel 
fringed with alder bushes ; again at North Salem Village, where 
it leaves the mill pond on the north side of the road and plunges 
down over a dam built of large, round rocks, which churn the 
waters into a heavy spray; and lastly, just above Wheeler's 
Mill, as the stream broadens out to form the mill pond. 

North Salem boasts but one church, being less populous than 
the other two villages. It has two stores, post-office, schoolhouse, 
cemetery, two woolen mills, and about forty-five dwellings. De- 



20 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

nied the privilege of the railroad, it has not had the opportunity 
for growth that has been the fortune of other communities. 

Besides these three villages there are five hamlets, if they may 
be so called, where the groups of buildings are more or less scat- 
tered. The first of these has been built up about the railroad 
station, the other four about an industrial activity of the past. 

Canobie Lake is a small group of houses near the station of 
that name at the center of the western side of the town, near 
the head of the lake. The houses in the immediate vicinity are 
all in Windham, but there are several more scattered along the 
roads in Salem. There are but three buildings at the railroad — 
the station, blacksmith's shop, and a store in which is the post- 
office. 

Cowbell Corner, situated at the extreme northeast corner, is so 
called because of the small bell that hung in the belfry of a 
woolen mill that stood here some years ago. Once the scene of 
great business activity, the place exhibits today only the dwelling 
houses which were built in its "palmy days" and the ruins of 
the old dam and canal. There are seven houses at the Corner, 
while several others and a schoolhouse are about half a mile 
away. 

Millville, named thus because of the mills and factories which 
were built on Hitty Titty brook, at the foot of the southern slope 
of Zion 's Hill, is a small gathering of about ten houses, a school- 
house, and a shoeshop not at this time in operation. 

Messer's (now called Hampshire Road, though we keep the 
old name because of its historical significance) lies at the extreme 
southeast corner of the town, and consists at the present time of 
about twenty houses, a railroad station, and a schoolhouse nearly 
three quarters of a mile away. The only industry is represented 
by the blacksmith's shop, which at the present time is not in 
use. This settlement flourished long before the building of the 
railroad. 

Wheeler's Mill derives its name from the factory of John W. 
Wheeler, standing on the bank of the Spicket a little over half 
way from the Center to North Salem. The hills here are very 
abrupt, forming a deep ravine through which the river flows. In 
this neighborhood were formerly to be found many spots attrac- 




in 

c© 

US 



<j -f 
a; 






<1 



TOPOGRAPHY. 21 

tive because of their natural beauty; but the recent years have 
seen many a noble pine beside the winding road felled to earth, 
bearing with it the travelers' joy, of which it was the source. 

Besides the mill here are fifteen houses and a schoolhouse, 
scattered along the road for a distance of a mile and a quarter. 

ELEVATIONS. 

Taking as our base of calculations the land at the townhouse, 
we begin at an altitude of one hundred feet above the sea level. 
The central part of the town may be considered a rolling plain, 
approximately enclosed by the Turnpike, Bluff Street and the 
Spicket. From all sides the land slopes gently upward, here 
and there rising to a considerable height. The highest point 
within the town is the summit of Spicket Hill, which is three 
hundred and fifty-four feet above the sea. The outlook from 
this point is charming, revealing the surrounding villages and 
towns hiding among the wooded hills, which rise one above the 
other until they fade, indistinguishable in the dim distance. The 
river can be clearly traced, twisting its crooked way like a huge 
serpent through the broad meadows, now swirling along the foot 
of the great hill, now by a broad bend carrying its murmured 
message to the silent dwellers in the graveyard yonder. 

The second highest land is along the Salem-Windham bound- 
ary, between Hitty Titty Pond and Crank Corner. It is away 
from the road, therefore not very familiar to many residents of 
the town. It is about three hundred and twenty-five feet high, 
and covered with woods. 

About equal in height to this is the hill on the Cross farm near 
Canobie Lake, where the highway is in one part more than three 
hundred feet above the sea. 

The crest of Zion's Hill, toward the north part of the town, 
rises to a height of two hundred and forty-eight feet. Unlike 
Spicket Hill, this elevation has very little timber growth to ob- 
struct the view, a fact which renders it one of the most sightly 
spots in the town. As the road leads directly over the summit 
the view from here is more easily accessible than that from the 
higher eminence to the south. 

The highest part of Policy Street, near the residence of Mr. 



22 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Arthur Hall at the Depot village, is almost exactly on a level with 
the top of Zion's Hill, or nearly, two hundred and fifty feet high. 
We have already spoken of the scenery in this locality as being 
particularly charming. 

Two hills in North Salem should be mentioned here, one near 
King's Corner being twenty feet higher than either Zion's Hill 
or Policy Street, the other known as Pattee's Hill, the same 
height as Zion's Hill, southeast of Cowbell Corner. Toward the 
foot of Providence Hill on the east, and also in the southwest 
part of the town, the land rises slightly above two hundred feet 
in several places. Many of the roads are very conveniently ( ? ) 
laid out directly over these steep hills, a condition, however, by 
no means peculiar to Salem. The early settlers, as a safeguard 
against Indian surprises, built their homes upon the hills. To 
these homes the roads were gradually trodden until they became 
permanent. 

WATER COURSES. 

While the preceding description of the high lands of Salem 
shows them to be scattered fairly uniformly over the town ex- 
cept in the central and southern parts, it is clearly evident that 
there is a general slope toward the south, where the low lands 
open out to join the broad valley of the Merrimack. This south- 
ern declivity is plainly shown by the direction of the water 
courses. The entire area of the town is drained by the Spicket 
River system, which drains seven ponds, four within the town 
and three lying in the neighboring towns to the northward. Each 
of these in Salem, namely, Canobie, Hitty Titty, World's End 
and Captain's, pours out its waters through the brook which bears 
the same name. The entire system is located and traced here by 
separating it into its six members. The convenience of giving 
at this time the history and importance of each member seems 
sufficient justification for digressing from the strictly topo- 
graphical treatment of this part of our subject. Such informa- 
tion as may more properly be placed in some later part of the 
work has been reserved. 



TOPOGRAPHY. 23 



SPICKET RIVER. 



The derivation of the name Spicket is not absolutely certain, 
several accounts having been handed down. The most likely and 
acceptable is that it was taken from a tribe of Indians who in- 
habited the region about the falls in Methuen, known as the Spig- 
gott Indians. Certainly the name has all of the "ear-marks" of 
Indian origin. The spelling is found as Spigot, Spiggot and 
Spigott. The clerks having the responsibility of casting the 
early records were not always proficient in the matter of spelling, 
nor so imbued with the spirit of research as to always trace the 
name to its proper form. This was as true of their own names as 
of the common words of every day usage. But the clerk of 
Haverhill at the time the Spicket was first known to the settlers 
was fortunately a man of rare qualities, a scholar graduated from 
Harvard, Major Nathaniel Saltonstall. His spelling of the name 
of our river, at the time when the Indian name was not yet a 
mere memory, is not the same as we spell it today, but Spiggott. 

Someone has discovered a record of later date, bearing the spel- 
ling "Speekit, " and has ingeniously formulated the theory that 
the original Indian name of the river was too difficult for the 
white men, who requested the Indians to "speak it" again, that 
they might catch the sound. But this is certainly a mere corrupt 
spelling, and from an illiterate source long after the true name 
had been firmly established. 

The Spicket is generally supposed to have its source in Island 
Pond, just beyond the northern boundary of Salem, lying in 
Derry, Atkinson and Hampstead. However, Wash Pond in 
Hampstead empties its waters into Island Pond, and if we con- 
sider this brook to be a part of the river, then the Spicket must 
be said to flow through Island Pond. Still there are several 
other large inlets to this body of water, while there is certainly 
no evidence of an integral current in Island Pond. Thus it 
seems reasonable to designate this pond as the origin of the river, 
rather than Wash Pond. 

About a half mile below the outlet of the pond the Spicket 
enters Salem near Cowbell Corner. The course is along a decliv- 
ity, affording a location for a dam. Formerly the water power 
here was used for various industries. 



24 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Following its southward direction, the stream descends to 
North Salem village, where a second dam was located, at the site 
of the Bickford mill. This has gone to ruin since the erection of 
the large dam at Taylor's mill, near the meetinghouse. Just be- 
low this is the fourth dam on the river after its entry into the 
town. This one is near the Atlas Worsted mill, at the crossing of 
the river and the road. The cut here presented gives a partial 
idea of the scene, showing the ruins of the Taylor mill in the 
background. 

The fifth dam is a third of a mile down stream at Duston's 
mill, and is not plainly seen from the highway. From here the 
river gradually widens out until it comes into the millpond at 
Wheeler's Mill, which is a very pretty little sheet of water close 
beside the road. It was formerly known as Allen 's Pond, named 
from the builder of the dam. 

Below Wheeler's Mill the river flows without artificial obstruc- 
tion beyond the town limits to the dam at Methuen. Before it 
has gone far, however, it receives its first tributary, Providence 
brook, and again close by, the second, Captain's Pond brook. And 
not much over a half mile further on, the stream is again swollen 
by the waters of Hitty Titty brook, very near the farm lately 
owned by the town. Here the river flows beneath the highway 
for the fifth time, and winding its way through the broad Spicket 
Meadows flows through the old "Causeway," on again in the 
meadows to the old bridge near the town house. 

There are three other bridges before the state line is reached — 
that near Thorndyke Foster's, formerly known as Clough's 
Bridge ; the double bridge on the Turnpike near the Kelley farm ; 
and the covered railroad bridge close by the last named. 

A quarter of a mile below the railroad bridge the Spicket re- 
ceives its most important tributary, Policy brook, bearing the 
overflow from Canobie Lake. This is its last increase within the 
town, as World's End brook enters the river after passing into 
Methuen. 

The whole course of the Spicket is crooked in the extreme, due 
to the uneven composition of the soil. The solid, compact earth 
is often found in close proximity to the softer and more yielding 
varieties, turning the current away here and giving away before 




ALYAH HALL. 




"COWBELL CORNER/' (M 612) 



TOPOGRAPHY. 



25 



it just beyond. The length of the stream within the town limits 
is something over ten miles, taking into account the various short 
turns. 

PROVIDENCE BROOK. 

Having its origin in Johnson's Pond, a small body of water 
about a mile south of Hampstead village, Providence brook flows 
in a southerly direction, entering Salem at Hale's Bridge, near 
the present residence of James Cullen. This bridge is on the 
town line, two thirds of it being in Salem and one third in At- 
kinson. The stream then flows through Providence Meadows, 
where many years ago large crops of hay were gathered by the 
early settlers, and joins the Spicket near the Moores Bailey 
bridge. The length within the town is about a mile and a half. 

captain's pond. 

This sheet of water lies in the extreme eastern corner of the 
town, and covers an area of about one hundred acres. The ori- 
gin of the name is somewhat obscure. It was formerly called 
by another name, as spelled in the Haverhill records of 1723, 
"Copls Pond." This may have been intended for Corporal's, 
the spelling being as correct as that in the rest of this record. 

The pond lies in a hollow between two long ranges of highland 
which open toward the west, allowing the passage of the outlet. 
This flows in a northwesterly direction to the Spicket, which it 
meets soon after passing through the ruins of an old dam, form- 
erly the site of Johnson's sawmill. The length of the brook is 
one and one fourth miles. 

HITTY TITTY POND. 

The name as here given is in accordance with spelling em- 
ployed for more than one hundred years, having been derived 
from the name by which the Indians designated this really 
charming lake. It has lately been corrupted into "Hitatit" and 
"Hit-Tit," without any reasonable justification so far as we can 
ascertain. More recently the name Shadow Lake has been ap- 
plied to it, but the old name still holds sway. This is the pond 
about which historians have raised so much discussion — it is the 



26 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"Satch well's Pond" of the Haverhill Proprietors' book of rec- 
ords. Many have declared this pond to be "somewhere just 
west of Methuen village," etc., not having at hand sufficient 
local information to enable them to locate it correctly. Under 
the chapter on Settlement will be found the full statement of the 
facts of this controversy. 

It lies in a wooded hollow among the high hills of the north- 
west part of the town, at the angle in the "Windham line. The 
highway follows the east shore for the entire length of the pond, 
affording one of the most beautiful drives in Salem. Summer 
visitors have recently erected several cottages in the groves along 
the lake-side. 

In years gone by, when the lake filled this entire valley and 
extended far beyond its present limits, the stream from the west- 
ward flowed through the lake near what was then its center; 
but as the waters receded, the higher part of the bed, toward the 
south, was the first to be left above the surface, thus bringing the 
south end of the lake (or that shore toward Canobie station), 
nearer and nearer the entrance of the brook. It must be under- 
stood that this brook, then as now, flowed through the lake. 
Then a still farther recession of the waters left the brook entirely 
outside the lake on the south, in the channel it had been wear- 
ing through so many years. Some of the oldest residents today 
can remember when this was the condition. But this barrier 
between the brook and the lake was gradually worn away by the 
severe freshets of successive springs, and they once more joined 
their waters. As is well known, the brook now just cuts the 
south end of the lake, then with the augmentation there received, 
hurries eastward to join its sister streams. 

A mile and a half from the lake it is formed into a mill pond 
by the dam at Millville, crossing the highway twice near the 
Nathaniel Woodbury place. On through the meadows it flows, 
to "Dud Jones' " bridge on the road to North Salem, then into 
the upper Spicket meadow to join the river near the old town 
farm. The length of the brook from Hitty Titty pond to the 
Spicket is three and a quarter miles. 



TOPOGRAPHY. 27 

CANOBIE LAKE. 

With the exception of Island pond in Hampstead, Canobie 
Lake is the largest sheet of water in this vicinity. It lies on 
the western edge of the town, being about five ninths in Salem 
and four ninths in Windham, and has an area of over five 
hundred acres. The shores are almost entirely of a rocky na- 
ture, with fine sandy beaches here and there. The marshes and 
bogs that are common to most ponds are almost lacking here, 
with the result that the waters are very pure and clear. Fine 
growths of timber have fringed the lake until within a few years, 
when several lots have been cleared, leaving, however, a number 
of groves remarkable for their heavy timber. 

This lake was first known to the settlers by the name of 
"Haverhill Pond," derived from the fact that the original west 
line of Haverhill came close to the east side of the lake. But it 
is doubtful if this name was ever used after the time of building 
in Salem, for we have references to "Policy Pond" in records 
long before the town was chartered or the province line estab- 
lished. The origin of "Policy" is obscure. Hon. J. S. Howe of 
Methuen traces it to the name of an Indian chieftain, who held 
authority over the neighborhood of this lake. This conclusion is 
based partly on an old map which was drawn probably prior to 
1700 and is now in the county commissioners' office in Essex 
County. The spelling here is Polls' Pond, clearly a possessive- 
form. Moreover, the cognomen Polis was by no means uncom- 
mon among the Indian tribes of New England. And the change 
from Polls' to Policy is entirely in accord with the phonetic simi- 
larity of the names. This derivation is by far the most satis- 
factory that has come to our notice, as it is in keeping with that 
of many another name accepted during the early days of the 
town. 

The next change was the deliberate giving up of the name 
Policy, and the adoption in its place of the more euphonious 
Canobie Lake. This was made official by the change of the name 
of the railroad station in 1885. This change took place at about 
the time the lake began to receive the patronage of pleasure seek- 
ers from the neighboring cities. Camps were built about the 
shores, and increased capacity given to the picnic grounds. Fin- 



28 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

ally whole groves were opened up for house lots, and the beau- 
tiful park of the Southern New Hampshire Electric Railway laid 
out on the east shore. A description of this park will be found 
in another chapter of this work. 

Policy brook forms the outlet of this lake, leaving at the 
flume of the Methuen Company, near the southeast end, and 
maintaining a general southeast direction throughout its course. 
In some places this brook is very attractive, as it splashes its 
way over small rocks in its bed or glides beneath overhanging 
trees and bushes, revealing through its crystal waters the silvery 
sands below. The purity of this water is an evidence of the good 
sense of the citizens of Salem, who selected Canobie Lake as the 
source of the town water supply. 

About a mile below the flume the brook is checked by the dam 
at the site of Titcomb's mill and Hall's grist-mill, both burned 
many years ago. From here it turns eastward, crossing Pleas- 
ant Street, the Boston & Maine Railroad and the Turnpike, 
thence doubling on its course to recross the Turnpike and the 
railroad. It flows through Rockingham Park, then receives the 
waters of Porcupine Brook, which rises near Gage's Ledge, and 
crosses the highway twice near the Littlejohn place. Here is 
another site of a grist-mill, the mill-stones still lying there. A 
mile below it flows into the Spicket a quarter of a mile down river 
from the covered railroad bridge, after flowing four and two 
thirds miles from the lake. 

world's end pond. 

In the southeast corner of the town, in a low hollow among the 
hills, lies World's End Pond. Its level is more than forty feet 
below that of Canobie Lake, while the character of the shore is 
as much different as its low position would indicate. The pond 
is surrounded by swamps, or wet land for a large part of the 
distance, with here and there a slight elevation. It is smallest 
of the four sheets of water in Salem, with the exception of Hitty 
Titty Pond. The latter is very long and narrow, while World's 
End is more nearly round. It covers an area of about one hun- 
dred and thirty acres. The bottom is covered with a very deep 
layer of decayed vegetable matter, which forms a yellowish- 




O 

PL. 

H 
H 



H 

H 

h- 1 

Q 
O 



TOPOGRAPHY. 29 

brown mud. The author has pushed a birch pole twelve feet 
into this soft mud, where the water was only six feet deep. The 
entire pond is rapidly being filled with this deposit, as the 
growth of reeds and various aquatic plants is so vigorous and 
extensive as to leave during the summer months only a compara- 
tively small area of clear water, near the middle of the pond. 
As may be supposed, the water lilies here are not to be surpassed 
in luxuriant growth, beauty or fragrance, by those of any pond 
in New England. 

The name World's End was applied to it by the explorers of 
the region, who were the early settlers of Haverhill. After they 
had laid out all of the workable lands near the center of the 
town then clustered about the mouth of Little River as it emp- 
ties into the Merrimack, they began to push out west and north 
toward what is now Methuen. Doubtless this pond did seem to 
them almost like the outskirts of human possessions, consider- 
ing the difficulties of traveling through the wilderness, and the 
proximity of a threatening foe. The name now applied to the 
entire territory around the pond is Stillwater. It is the estate of 
Mr. Edward F. Searles of Methuen, and is described and illus- 
trated in a subsequent chapter. 

The outlet of World's End Pond is the brook of the same name, 
which flows southwest to join the Spicket beyond the state line. 
The length of the brook in Salem is about one and one third 
miles. It crosses the highway just south of the number nine 
schoolhouse, and again on the Turnpike about seventy-five rods 
above Hampshire Road. Here it also crosses the railroad line. 

To the south and west of the pond, and along the brook, are 
rich and extensive meadows which were early sought by the set- 
tlers as a source of an easily obtained supply of hay for their 
cattle. In fact the entire Spicket River system is surrounded to 
a considerable degree by these meadows. This is due to the level 
nature of the land, the frequent damming of the streams, and the 
rich deposits of alluvial soil. 

SOIL AND VEGETATION. 

In general the soil of Salem is light and sandy. In many 
places the surface layer is only a few inches deep, while in others 



SO HISTORY OF SALEM. 

there is not sufficient soil to cover the sand beneath. However, 
where the land is of the rolling nature, very good grass land may 
be found; and in the low lands or broad valleys the deposit is 
not infrequently of sufficient depth and richness to admit of 
profitable farming. The rolling hills in the western part of the 
town furnish good crops of hay and fruit, while the land in the 
southwest is the most productive of general farm crops. A few 
good farms are also found along the Spicket valley in the south- 
eastern section. But with few exceptions the Salem farmer finds 
himself at a great disadvantage when compared with his neigh- 
bor who cultivates the fertile lands along the banks of the Merri- 
mack in the towns nearby. In fact the poor quality of the soil, 
■combined with the several streams from the hills, has tended 
to make Salem an industrial rather than a farming community. 

Among the farm products the most noteworthy are such staple 
varieties as corn, potatoes and beans, as well as the common gar- 
den vegetables. In the fruit line the Baldwin apple is easily the 
leader, while the other varieties common to New England are 
grown in small quantity. 

Another source of income in the town has been the forests of 
heavy timber. Most of these have been cut off within recent 
years, and in many cases the new growth is still light. The old 
growth was principally soft pine, which is superseded by red and 
white oak, maple, birch and some hickory. In a few sections 
are found a few hard pines, and still fewer cedars. Spruce is 
found here and there in the western part of the town. 

The shade trees of the town are principally elms and maples, 
some fine specimens of both being seen in all three of the villages. 
Firs and hemlocks are occasionally used as ornamental trees, 
although their growth in the forests of the town is comparatively 
rare. 

We have not attempted to treat with any degree of complete- 
ness the vegetation of Salem, but merely to mention its principal 
features. Nor do we deem it advisable in this present work to 
take the space necessary for a discussion of the local climate. 
We consider both these elements of a topographical description 
•of the town too well known to the majority of our readers to re- 
quire more than a passing comment. 



CHAPTER II. 

Settlement. 

It would be impossible to understand even a most superficial 
history of the town of Salem without first having a knowledge of 
at least an outline of the history of the mother town, Haverhill. 
Much more is this fact true of our present work. We are to 
study in all of its details the life of Salem, the life of its institu- 
tions — yea, even the lives of many of her individual citizens. 
These institutions and men are the children of similarly situated 
agents in the development of Haverhill. Even the same names — 
indeed the very men themselves, were living in what is now 
Salem, but were then citizens of the more ancient town. 

We are interested in the methods and means, the customs and 
personal traits, the hopes and ambitions, of the early makers of 
our town. The prototype, the raw material, the essence of these 
is more clearly defined by going back beyond the beginning of the 
life of the town as such, to the days when the first settlers began 
to mow the meadows and fell the forests within the present 
bounds of Salem. 

We shall begin then with the settlement of Haverhill, select- 
ing from the wealth of historical material at hand only such fea- 
tures as will throw light on the pages that are to follow. Yes, 
there is a wealth of historical material, thanks to the men who so 
-carefully kept the records of the proceedings of the settlement, 
for the books of the Haverhill Proprietors are a marvel of care 
and neatness, especially when we consider the great difficulties 
usually attendant upon any new venture, much more the build- 
ing of a town more than two hundred and fifty years ago. 

There are several existing histories of Haverhill, notably Mir- 
ick's, written in 1832, and Chase's written in 1861. Most of the 
historical sketches found in county histories and such works are 
put together from material taken from Chase's book, which is a 



32 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

most fitting testimonial to its worth. This material was compiled 
from the records of the proprietors, which are still on file in the 
office of the city clerk at Haverhill. Much of the information 
contained in these former works has no bearing on Salem, while 
at the same time much of the original record that is essential to 
the history might of course be of comparatively slight importance 
in the development of what now constitutes the city of Haver- 
hill, and has been left out of the histories of that town. We 
have therefore used the original sources, where they are explicit 
upon the points under discussion. 

The large numbers of immigrants that came from England 
between 1630 and 1640 scattered all over northeastern Massa- 
chusetts, organizing towns or ' ' plantations, ' ' as they were called. 
The General Court of the colony was not backward about grant- 
ing them privileges and settlement rights, nor were they to be 
deterred in asking for them. The right to lay out a plantation 
in the Indian district of Pentucket was granted to a Mr. Ward 
by the court in 1640. Two years of settlement passed, and the 
inhabitants realized that the best safeguard against molestation 
by the most dreaded foe was the title of the land from the origi- 
nal owners. Accordingly they set about to procure a deed. 

Two chiefs, Passaquo and Saggahew, held the land, but were 
tributary to the great chief Passaconaway, who resided near the 
conflux of the Contoocook and Merrimack rivers to the north of 
Concord. He had been chosen sachem over all the tribes of the 
valley of the Merrimack ; and his tribe, the Pennacooks, were by 
far the most numerous and powerful of this region. He was 
very friendly to the settlers, and used his influence for their pro- 
tection. It is authoritatively stated that he lived to the ad- 
vanced age of about one hundred and twenty years. This chief 
gave Passaquo and Saggahew permission to sell what land they 
possessed in Pentucket. Following is the wording of the deed: 

"Knowe all men by these p r sents that wee. Passaquo and Sag- 
gahew, w th the consent of Passaconnaway ; have sold unto the In- 
habitants of Pentucket all the Land we have in Pentucket ; that 
is Eyght myles in lenght from the little River in Pentuckett 
Westward: Six miles in lenght fro the aforesaid River north- 
ward, And Six miles in lenght fro the foresaid River Estward w 



tb 




M 

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SETTLEMENT. 33 

the Ileland and the River that the Ileland stand in as far in 
lenght as the land lyes by is formerly expressed, that is fourteen 
myles in lenght. And wee the said Passaquo & Saggahew w th the 
consent of Passaconnaway have sold unto the said Inhabitants 
all the Right that we or any of us have in the said ground Ile- 
land & River: And Doe Warrant it against all or any other 
Indeans whatsoev 1 " unto the said Inhabitants of Pentuckett & to 
there hey res and assignes for ever (Dated the sixteenth day of 
November Ann dom — 1642.) 

witnes ou r hands and sales to this bargayne of sale the day & 
yere above written (in the p r sents of us), wee the said Passaquo 
& Saggahew have Received in hand for & in consideration of the 
same three pounds & ten shillings 

John Ward the marke of 

Robert Clements (bow and arrow) 

Tristram Coffyn Passaquo 

Heugh Sherratt 

William white the marke of 

the signe of (bow and arrow) 

Thomas (X) Davis Saggahew. 

Entred & Recorded in y e County Records for Norfolk [lib: 
2: pa . 209] y e 29 th day of Aprill 1671 as attests Tho: Bradbury 
rec." 

Along the left margin is written: "Recorded the first of 
Aprill 1681 among the Records of Lands for Essex at Ipswich 

As attest Robert Lord Recdr. " 

Three pounds ten shillings for eighty-four square miles of the 
fertile valley of the Merrimack, with an island and fourteen miles 
of the river thrown in! Clearly it was the goodwill of the In- 
dians which was purchased rather than the land. It will be ob- 
served that these Indian deeds do not often conform to the 
bounds set by the court in granting the town charters. 

The first grant for a plantation had stated no bounds, and 
there is no record of any until 1667, when the court had the town 
surveyed by the commissioners. Among the province papers is 
a chart showing the dimensions of the town as determined at that 
time. This shows the form to be triangular, rather than rect- 
angular as stated in the deed from the Indians, and also slightly 



34 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

larger. Instead of running eight miles along the Merrimack 
westward from Little Kiver and thence back six miles into the 
country northward, as the original deed designated, the commis- 
sioners laid out a line eight miles due west from the meeting 
house. From the point thus obtained they ran south to the Mer- 
rimack River, then from the same point started again and ran 
due north till the line intersected a line from Holt's Rocks (the 
down-river bound of Haverhill), in a northwesterly direction. 
The accompanying drawing is from the map made at the time. 

The question that interests us here is — where was this line in 
Salem? Very little evidence is to be found in this drawing, as 
no land features, such as elevations or water courses, are shown 
to guide us. In fact, from the lettering on the chart, it is evident 
that the so-called "survey" was more theoretical than actual. 
Lines are marked as "uncertain," which shows that they were 
not actually run out. Again, a north line should make a forty- 
five degree angle with one that runs northwest, while the drawing 
does not show that value. And finally, it requires but a slight 
mathematical knowledge to see that the measurements given on 
the three known lines, eight, twelve and fourteen three quarters, 
could not possibly be correct. 

Two features are, however, definitely located — the meeting- 
house and Holt 's Rocks. If a line eight miles long were laid out 
in a due west direction from the site of the old Haverhill meet- 
inghouse, it would terminate in Salem not far from the No. 8 
schoolhouse. But if this line was ever actually run, the loca- 
tion may or may not have been exactly correct, so that from this 
no definite clue is obtained. Another feature is the farm of 
Major General Leavitt, located somewhere on the north line. 
It is a doubtful question whether this included what was later 
known as the Stanton farm on Policy Street, which is said to 
have been originally the old Leavitt farm. If this is so, Leavitt 
must have owned the land stretching to the eastward in order 
that the old line should have passed through his farm. 

The report of the commission to which the surveying was en- 
trusted states that at the end of the west line they erected a huge 
heap of stones. If this is in existence today, we do not know of 
its location. It also states the line from Holt's Rocks was run 



MAJ. GEN 
LEAVITT 
HIS FARM 



A DUE WEST LI.V 




" this platform of the town of kauerill began by ensign Noise of Sud- 
bury and finished by Jonathan Danforth 16. 3 d m. 1667." 



36 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

northwest; but we do not know what allowance the surveyors 
made for the variation of the magnetic needle, from the true 
meridian, or indeed whether they made any. More than this, the 
earth's magnetic pole has changed considerably in the period of 
nearly two hundred and fifty years. It is evident then that we 
could not lay out the lines today by these directions and have 
them coincide with the original bounds. The only conclusive 
evidence can be furnished by a map which includes both the 
bounds of today and of the original territory, and such a map 
must have been drawn before the location of the old line had be- 
come as obscure as it is today. 

Such a map we have, fortunately. It was drawn in 1759 and 
presented to the legislature in connection with a petition, be- 
ing now preserved in the state archives at Concord. A copy of 
it is reproduced on page 117. By this it is seen that the line 
was coincident with the present northwest line of the town, from 
Hitty Titty Pond to Crank Corner. Following southward along 
the line, one would pass very near the crossing of the electric 
line at Hampshire Road. In Methuen the line led near the pres- 
ent site of the pumping station, across the Pelham Road near the 
Pinney farm, over the hill at the Williams place, and to a small 
island in the Merrimack, just where the river turns. A general 
idea of what ancient Haverhill was, in terms of the towns of 
today, may be obtained from the following map. Just where the 
lines lay in towns to the east of Salem we do not attempt to show 
on this map ; it is not supposed to be exactly correct, although it 
is substantially so. 

Many years ago, when the first settlers of Salem came up from 
the more thickly populated parts of Haverhill to the land which 
had been laid out as their several shares, this line was by no 
means obscure. The land transfers were deeded and recorded 
as. "following Haverhill old line," etc., even after Salem had 
bounds of its own; and from these old deeds, recorded in Con- 
cord and in Exeter, the old line can today be traced with great 
certainty. The author has taken copies of one hundred of these 
deeds, selected so as to fit together and give a fairly complete 
catalogue of the locations of the early families of the town. 
These deeds also show to whom a large part of this land was ori 




AARON MILTON CLUFF. 




Map showing original lines of Haverhill in terms of present towns. 



38 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

ginally laid out by the Haverhill Proprietors, thus helping us to 
trace the ownership from the first. We shall have occasion to 
refer to some of the bounds when we study the opening of the 
new country back from the river. We will first trace the prog- 
ress of the proprietors in building their town. 

Among the first settlers we may mention the men whose names 
appear on the Indian deed. Chase tells us that John Ward was 
probably not the first settler, though he certainly was at the head 
of affairs. The new town was named from his native town of 
Haverhill, in Essex County, England. He was a tower of men- 
tal, moral, spiritual, and we may add, physical strength, which 
combined with an excellent education made him especially well 
equipped for guiding the policy and energy of the settlement 
in paths of justice and prosperity. 

The men came from Newbury, Salisbury and Ipswich, for the 
most part, some, however, not taking up a home until they 
reached Haverhill. The proprietors were the original citizens 
of the place, and in 1645, when the town was incorporated, num- 
bered about thirty-two. Subsequently, newcomers were fre- 
quently voted citizens' rights until the number had reached 
forty-six, after which it remained about the same. They held 
meetings and elected officers, although no records of these are 
found with date prior to 1643. On November 6 of this year, 
they voted to lay out three hundred acres for houselots ; no man 
should have more than twenty acres, this being the lot of a man 
who was worth two hundred pounds sterling. Those of less 
means were to have land in proportional amounts, and all were 
to have proportional rights in the planting land, meadow, and 
common or town property. Thus it will be seen that the plan of 
distribution was based upon a man's wealth. This was so of the 
tax system also, consequently taxes were levied only on land, ac- 
cording to acreage. In all the subsequent divisions of land each 
man received a portion relative to his original lot. This original 
lot was known as the "accomodation grant"; and on several oc- 
casions new accommodation land was laid out to all proprietors. 

All of the land not granted was the property of the town (the 
proprietors of course being the town), and was called the com- 
mon. Certain privileges were voted regarding this common 



SETTLEMENT. 39 

land, at first applying chiefly to timber, that being the first nat- 
ural product. In 1645 it was voted "that every inhabitant that 
will, may make upon the common for every acre of house lot 
which he hath, one hundred of pipe staves and no more ; provided 
he fall no timber for the same within two full miles of the house 
lots : if any shall fall any tree or trees within two full miles of 
the house lots, he shall pay to the use of the town for every tree 
five shillings, and if any shall fell any tree or trees more than 
shall make his proper proportion of staves said he shall pay five 
shillings. ' ' 

The attitude of the people toward the Rev. Mr. Ward is well 
evidenced by the following: 

' ' October the 29 th , 1646, voted by all the Freeholders then 
present at a lawful town meeting that Mr. Ward our Teacher's 
land shall be rate free for his ministry during his life, if he con- 
tinue minister to the plantation, provided he use it himself, but 
if he sell, let or set any of it to hire it shall pay rates propor- 
tionable with our own. And that forty pounds per annum shall 
be paid him by the remainder of the 300 acres for his ministry. ' ' 

This "remainder of the 300 acres" refers to the fact that his 
land was a part of the original apportionment of house-lots. 

The vote designates Mr. Ward as "our Teacher"; certainly 
no word could have been chosen that would convey to our minds 
a more vivid impression of the close relations existing between 
this minister and his people. 

An idea of the close attention that was paid to details in man- 
aging affairs, and also of the extreme republican nature of the 
government, may be obtained from one of the items in the rec- 
ords: 
"December the 9 th 1650. 

"Voted that Mr. Clement and Jn° Eaton are to determine ac- 
cording to there best discretion of the place where Joseph Peas- 
lee & Bartholomew Heath shall set their barns, and where James 
Davis, Jun. shall set his house." 

And this, too, in spite of the fact that Heath was one of the 
leading men of the town. 

It was not long before the three hundred acres became insuf- 
ficient accommodation. The timber was not to be cut in the im- 



40 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

mediate neighborhood except for building purposes, while the 
vales up river and back toward the lakes offered rich resources 
for agriculture. Accordingly, as early as 1650, the settlers be- 
gan to push out west and north, taking up new land which was 
granted them in exchange for their village lots. These then be- 
came common land again. Besides the desire for new land there 
was a tendency to try to consolidate one's possessions. As the 
plough land and meadow lots were of course scattered in differ- 
ent parts of the great town, the work of managing a farm with 
any degree of economy was all but impossible. Therefore those 
having lots in inconvenient locations sought to exchange with 
other citizens for land nearer their homesteads. The best piece 
of planting land was often chosen for the home, and the build- 
ings were then moved from the village to the new site. 

An illustration may be given to show what this scattering of 
the land really meant to the farmers. One of the ancestors of a 
Salem family was prominent in the making of Haverhill, and it 
happens that he then owned one piece of land in what later be- 
came Salem. This man was Daniel Ladd, whose land-holdings, 
as they were in 1659, are given in the records in an inventory of 
the real estate of the town at that time. We copy from the Pro- 
prietors ' book of records : 

"Daniel Ladd's accommodations. Six acres of accommoda- 
tions : Four acres to his house lot ; more or less : Robert Clem- 
ent 's bounding on the east, and Henry Savage on the west. Five 
acres in the plain: William White on the east and John Wil- 
liams on the north. Nine acres up the great river, Thomas Ayres 
on the east and George Browne on the west. Four acres of 
meadow in the east meadow, more or less ; Joseph Peasly on the 
south, and George Browne on the north. One acre and a half 
of meadow in the pond meadow ; James Davis sen on the south, 
and Eobert Clement jun on the north. One acre of meadow at 
Hawkes meadow; John Davis on the South, and Thomas Whit- 
tier on the north." 

"Daniel Ladd's 2 d division, containing twenty seven acres of 
upland, be it more or less ; with sixteen acres of ox-common and 
a half, bounded by George Corles and John Hutchins on the 
west ; by a black oak, a white oak, a red oak, and a walnut on the 




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SETTLEMENT. 41 

south; by a walnut and a white oak on the east, by two white 
oaks and an ash on the north. Three acres of meadow lying 
on Spieket River, bounded by Thomas Davis on the south, and 
Robert Clements on the north : and one spot of meadow at Prim- 
rose swamp, and another spot at the east meadow, at the head of 
the meadow that was John Davis's adjoining to his own. For 
the land that was taken off Daniel Ladd's 3 d division, we added a 
piece on the north side of the highway round the meadow that 
was Goodman Hale's bounded by the highway and Merrie's 
Creek. Third division of meadow containing three acres, be it 
more or less, bound by John Page on the south, a pine on the 
east, his own uplands on the west, and uplands on the north of 
the said meadow, lying in mistake meadow." 

Here is a problem for the most active farmer. His four-acre 
house-lot was in the village, while the rest of his land lay outside 
in all directions, and at distances varying from two to eight miles. 
His planting land was in two lots — one in the plain to the east 
of his house about two miles, the other on the banks of the Mer- 
rimack, perhaps two or three miles to the westward. In his 
second division were twenty-seven acres of upland, which must 
have been situated at least two or three miles to the northward. 
In place of his third division land he had been granted a piece 
near Merrie 's Creek, near the present line between Haverhill and 
Methuen. But if this was inconvenient, what shall we say of 
his meadows, upon which he had to rely for hay? There were 
seven lots, in six different meadows. Two of these were in East 
meadow, three miles from his house ; Pond meadow, slightly 
nearer, to the north, had one lot ; Primrose swamp, two miles 
northwest; then Hawkes' meadow in the east part of Methuen, 
Spieket meadow in the southern part of Salem, and finally Mys- 
tic ("mistake" was a name frequently applied to it in those 
days), in the western part of Methuen! 

Is it any wonder that these men began to exchange land, buy- 
ing here and selling there ? "We do not suppose that these lands 
were in many cases actually taken up. It would have been im- 
possible, with mere trails and paths from one place to another, 
to undertake the-cultivation of more than a small portion of one 's 
estate. 



42 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

The land in many cases had to be cleared before any farming 
could be undertaken, and the timber thus obtained was useful 
for the many buildings needed for the growing town. There 
are always present a few enterprising men whenever a possibil- 
ity of profit suggests itself. Thus in 1651 the need of a sawmill 
had become so apparent that the following action was taken : 

"Voted and agreed upon by the inhabitants that there should 
be a Sawmill set up by Isaac Cousins, and such others of this 
town as shall join with him : The town and they agreeing upon 
terms: viz. That they shall not make use of any timber within 
three miles of the meeting house : Item. That all timber with- 
out the compass of three miles of the meeting house should be 
free for the use of the sawmill : they paying the twelfth hundred 
to the use of the town in general. Item. That the town for 
their use shall have boards and planks at three shillings per 
hundred for such pay as is merchantable. The town also reserv- 
ing to themselves a liberty to make use of what timber they stand 
in need of, though it be without the three miles compass from the 
meeting house." 

Six owners were voted two weeks later — Isaac Cousins, Mr. 
(Robert) Clement, Job Clement, Stephen Kent, William White 
and Theophilus Satchwell. 

This is a fair sample of the careful methods employed by these 
Proprietors to prevent any man or set of men from obtaining 
more than their just share of power or profit. But there was one 
loophole in this agreement; it did not fix the price of work to 
anyone but the town. Evidently this led to misunderstandings 
and then dissatisfaction, for six years later, we find, the follow- 
ing vote was recorded : 
"June 22 nd 1658. 

"It was this day declared, voted & granted that all the former 
privileges granted to the Sawmill or mills are forfeited & accord- 
ingly taken into the town's hands, which vote was acted by the 
major part of the inhabitants." 

Thomas Davis, John Hutchins and Daniel Hendricks were 
then granted the mill privilege, with far more stringent con- 
ditions. They were to furnish all the boards that the town 
needed (which the old mill had failed to do), at a stated price 



SETTLEMENT. 43 

for cutting ; they were to saw for private owners at the price of 
four hundred out of every thousand, but only such as would be 
required by these owners for their buildings ; the inhabitants 
should be supplied with boards and planks for buildings and 
floors at three shillings per hundred. There were other terms 
to the privilege, but these serve to illustrate our point. The 
forests were considered a natural resource, over which no one 
could have a monopolistic right — its revenue should be at the 
disposal of the community. However, these new mill owners 
evidently did not find the business sufficiently profitable to draw 
them into it, as the privilege was again declared forfeited the 
following year. 

Meantime the inner life of the people had not been neglected. 
The first church had been built in 1648, and the minister shortly 
afterwards was granted an increase in salary. This was in 1652, 
when he was voted fifty pounds instead of forty, as formerly. 
Three years later it was ordered that the walls of the meeting- 
house be "plaistered up to the beams" with clay. This was 
the usual method of keeping out the winds. No use of plaster 
is mentioned until a much later period. In fact, the entire finish 
of the buildings was rough. It was over a hundred years before 
paint was used to any extent, even for interior finish. Some- 
times straw was mixed with the clay to prevent it from falling 
out of the chinks between the rough boards. 

In 1656 we notice an example of the care and minuteness with 
which provision was made for Mr. Ward's comfort, for it was 
''voted that he have fifty pounds per annum, to be paid by each 
man in proportion to what he holds ; twenty five pounds of this 
to be paid in wheat or its equivalent." And the men who col- 
lected this tax were deputed "to hire men to cut, make, and 
bring home his hay and wood, and pay them out of his 25 £ of 
rye and Indian corn" 

The town yet lacked one great necessity — there was no black- 
smith. It is hard for us today to realize what this deficiency 
meant to a community in those early times. If we are con- 
templating any construction or repairs we step into the hardware 
store for a supply of nails, bolts, rivets, hinges, hooks, or what- 
ever is needed for the particular work. But at that time, all 



44 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



these and articles of a similar nature were made by hand, slowly 
hammered out, and when finished presented no very elegant ap- 
pearance. It is no wonder that the smith was frequently the 
most influential man in the village. Accordingly then, with this 
important position unfilled, the free-holders of the town began to 
cast about for a man who would come and settle among them, 
there to ply the trade of blacksmith and fulfill the needs of the 
town in this direction. 

It had been the custom of the settlers to go to Newbury for 
supplies of this sort, as that town was fortunate in having sev- 
eral good smiths. One of these men, John Webster, was con- 
sulted in regard to coming to Haverhill to take the privileges 
formerly granted to Isaac Cousins as blacksmith. Cousins had 
failed to live up to his bargain. The terms upon which Webster 
accepted are expressed in the following action of the town: 
4 'July 4 th 1653. 

"Voted and granted at a lawful town meeting that John Web- 
ster should enjoy that six acres of accommodation which was 
formerly granted unto Isaac Cousins & now returned into the 
town's hands, provided that the said John Webster live here, 
five years from the last of March next ensuing, following the 
trade of a blacksmith, in doing the town's work when they have 
occasion, according to his best skill & endeavour: also it was 
agreed that in case he should remove out of the town before the 
said five years are expired then the town is to allow him for what 
improvement he shall make upon the land, or any part thereof; 
by building, fencing, build up of land or the like, as shall be 
judged meet by two men chosen by the said John & the town, 
and those two men are to choose a third man in case they can- 
not agree. Likewise if the said John shall be taken away by 
God's Providence by death, before the end of the said time, then 
all the said accommodations are freely to remain unto any that 
he shall dispose of it unto. ' ' 

Webster stayed in Haverhill only till 1658, when he returned 
to Newbury. The next year the citizens persuaded John John- 
son of Charlestown to accept their offers, and he served the town 
as blacksmith for many years. 

Beginning in 1652 there was a wholesale laying out of land. 




JOHN TAYLOR, JR. 



SETTLEMENT. 45 

which lasted for seven years. This period marks the real be- 
ginning of the history of Salem. In this year the second di- 
vision of upland was laid out beyond Pond meadow, in the north- 
eastern part of the town. It was voted that the men laying out 
this land "shall have two pence per acre for the laying out of 
it, and that beforehand if they demand it. ' ' This was planting 
land, and by no means yet suitable for raising good crops of hay. 
Therefore there followed a demand for meadow land, which was 
met by opening up for distribution the fertile expanse on both 
sides of the Spicket, near the present site of Salem Village. The 
method of choosing lots is best told in the records : 
"January 20 th 1653. 

"Voted and granted that there shall be a second division of 
meadow laid out after the proportion of one acre of meadow to 
two acres of house lot : which is to be done by lot. The first man 
is to have his choice at which end of Spiggott meadow his lot 
shall be laid out at ; and so the rest to follow in order according 
to their lots ; until all the meadow is laid out ; which being done 
the next moving man is to have his choice at which end of any 
other meadow to begin at, and so successively all the rest of the 
moving men to have their choice in the rest of the meadows ac- 
cordingly, until all the shares be laid out. 

"Henry Palmer, Theophilus Satchwell, Daniel Hendricks and 
Thomas Whittier, or any two of them are chosen for to lay out 
the second division of meadow, according to grant and draught 
by lot. They are to lay it out by the last day of June next, and 
are to give notice when they go forth about it." 

There is no record to tell us where each man's land was lo- 
cated ; but according to the foregoing directions, Spicket meadow 
was to be divided first. The following names were the first fif- 
teen drawn, and as we know that the fifteenth received one of 
the Spicket meadow lots, we assume that those preceding must 
have done so : 

1 Bartholomew Heath 9 James Davis sen 

2 Job Clement- 10 John Davis 

3 John Clement 11 Robert Clement 

4 Hugh Sherratt 12 John Eaton 

5 George Corlis 13 Thomas Davis 



46 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

6 John Chenarie 14 Daniel Ladd 

7 Joseph Peasley 15 Mr. John Ward 

8 Henry Palmer 

These names are too familiar, even among the present citizens 
of Salem, to leave any question as to their having been the own- 
ers of land in this section. Thirty-two others received land 
under this division, and may have been among the number 
whose shares were near those above mentioned. 

The first lot, that of Bartholomew Heath, was at the north 
end of the meadow, but as we do not know the dimensions of all 
of the lots, we can only state the order in which they lay down 
along the meadow. 

In 1653 a third division of upland was laid out, at the rate of 
twelve acres to each acre of accommodation, or houselot land. 
The proprietors had just laid out an extensive common, includ- 
ing all the land in the Hawkes meadow district and thence ex- 
tending north and east to the Haverhill bounds. This common 
was to be left intact, the third division land being designated as 
beyond it. Here is the second parcelling of Salem territory. 
The lots in this case were in the east part of Methuen and Salem, 
and must have reached quite or nearly to the Spicket, because 
the next division was located specifically "beyond Spiggott." 
Doubtless the land about Captain's Pond and in Ayers Village 
was laid out in this third division, as this was the first line of 
travel into the country to the north and west. 

It was customary to fence the meadow lots, so as to mark their 
bounds more clearly. Men were appointed for this work, ap- 
parently with considerable power. For it was voted that "if 
any upland should be fenced in while fencing meadow adjoining, 
then it shall remain so forever." If land had been worth much 
this might have furnished a few early specimens of the "tip" 
and "graft" systems sometimes in evidence in our day. 

The town had laid out common land on which the oxen and 
cows were to be turned loose to feed. The ox common was sep- 
arate from the cow common. Both were fenced, and men were 
chosen each year to keep the fences in repair. They were known 
as fence viewers, and are still elected in most towns, though their 
duties have disappeared or decidedly changed. 



SETTLEMENT. 47 

FOURTH DIVISION. 

The next item in the records to claim our attention is undoubt- 
edly the most significant from the standpoint of Salem history 
of all the early acts of the proprietors. It is the granting of a 
strip two miles wide, reaching from the Merrimack River nearly 
to North Salem. It is more important in that it locates for us 
the property of many of the early settlers, gives the first step in 
tracing the history of the present estates of this part of the town, 
and assists us in locating the original west bound of Haverjiill, 
in Salem papers later referred to as " Haverhill old line. ' ' Fol- 
lowing is the complete record of this action : 
"October the 14 th , 1659. 

' ' Voted and granted that there shall be a fourth division of up- 
land laid out beyond Spiggott river, at the proportion of twenty 
acres to an acre of accommodation : if it should so fall out that 
there should be any Meadow found in any of the lots of this 
fourth division exceeding two acres in a piece, it shall remain to 
the town. 

' ' The first lot of this fourth division is to be laid out by Thomas 
Davis' third division of upland on the farther side & so to go 
round by the great river as far as our bounds go : if so be that 
the third division prevent not, & so from the great river which 
is south to run northward to a pond called Satchwell 's pond and 
so Eastward till it be finished: This land is to be laid out ac- 
cording to the lots drawn & every proprietor is to take up his 
land as it lies, joining one to another, and the lots are to be a 
mile in length. 

"Lots drawn for the fourth division. [Lay'd out by Theo. 
Satchwell, James Davis, Jim., Rob. Clement & Rob. Swan.] 



Peter Ayer 


1 


Stephen Kent 


26 






W m Simmons 


27 


Matthias Button 


3 


John Dow 


28 


Jn° "Williams, sen. 


4 


Obadiah Ayer 


29 


Joseph Peaseley 


5 


Thom s Davis sen 


30 


Jn° Chenarie 


6 


Ja s Fiske 


31 


Geo. Corlis 


7 


Jn° Heath 


32 


Daniel Hendricks 


8 


Jn° Ayers 


33 


Thomas Davis 


9 


Samuel Gild 


34 



48 HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Theoph 8 Satchwell 


10 


Tho s Eaton 


35 


Mr. Jn° Ward 


11 


Tho s Ayers 


36 






Rich d Littlehale 


37 


Tho s Sleeper 


13 


John Eaton 


38 


Jn° Johnson 


14 


Henry Palmer 


39 


W m Holdridge 


15 


Barth: Heath 


40 


Tho s Whittier 


16 


Robert 


41 


Robert Swan 


17 






George Browne 


18 


Daniel Ladd 


43 


Nathan 1 Ayers 


19 


William White 


44 


Hugh Sherratt 


20 


Tho s Linfurth 


45 


Robert Ayers 


21 


Jn° Hutchins 


46 


Mr. Joseph Jewett 


22 


Rob* Clement 


47 


Mr. Clement's Executors 


23 


Ja s Davis Jun. 


48 


John Page sen 


24 


Edw d Clarke 


49" 



These directions need a few explanations as to the bounds 
designated. Thomas Davis' third division of upland lay prob- 
ably in what is now ward five in Lawrence, or in the vicinity of 
Glen Forest. The new land was to follow the Merrimack as far 
as the Haverhill line, then follow this line as far north as Satch- 
well's Pond. We have referred to the fact that this pond has 
never up to this time been correctly located. The idea has been 
general that it lay near the Merrimack, probably to the south 
of the present state line. This is probably due to the fact that 
the ponds in Salem are all known by other names, which have 
been in use since the time of the first settlers, while some of 
the small bodies of water in the western part of Methuen have 
been under many names within recent years, usually taken after 
the owners of the neighboring land, and might reasonably be 
supposed to have been known in the early days by this name. 

There can be no question in regard to it when all of the facts 
are considered. We recognize at once the name of one of the 
most prominent men of Haverhill, Theophilus Satchwell, also 
spelled Shatswell, who was chosen as one of the lot layers for all 
of the divisions of land about this time. He was a surveyor, and 
had explored all of the land of the town to locate the meadows, 
ploughland, etc. While on one of his journeys through the for- 
ests beyond the Spicket he came upon a fair sheet of water hid- 




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SETTLEMENT. 49 

den among the hills, which up to this time had been unknown to 
the settlers. It received the name of Satchwell's Pond; but 
shortly after the land was laid out, and men became familiar 
with that part of the town, it was found that there was another 
name. The Indians called it Hitty Titty; at least this is the 
spelling given it by the settlers. The name Satch well's does 
not appear again, therefore, and no further reference is made 
to it. 

Let us review briefly the evidence by which this conclusion is 
reached. In the first place, the west line of Haverhill did not lie 
very near any of the ponds of western Methuen. Mystic Pond 
is considerably more than a mile too far east, and Harris' Pond 
and White's Pond are both outside the line, or on the west. It 
is unlikely that the northern limit of the lots would be deter- 
mined by a pond not within the town. Again, we have copies 
of several deeds of sale of this land, which was north of where 
Salem Depot lies today. But the strongest, in fact the determin- 
ing factor in the discussion, is a deed recorded in Concord, 
which shows that Daniel Ladd's fourth division lot was the west 
bound of a piece of land near David Allen's land in 1755. This 
was the present site of John W. Wheeler's land, and is in the 
same latitude as Hitty Titty Pond. Moreover, the old line ran 
directly through the north end of this pond. 

It is impossible to give at this time the exact location of each 
proprietor's lot in this division but by laying out the line and 
placing the lots which are fairly well defined by deeds or other 
documents, written in most cases many years after the settle- 
ment of this land, some of the other lots can be filled in with a 
tolerable degree of accuracy. 

The directions of the lot layers were to follow the line north 
as far as the pond, making the lots one mile deep east "and west, 
and so Eastwardly till it be finished:" It needed two ranges of 
lots to complete the division, the second in some cases lapping- 
over onto land which had been omitted from the lots of the 
first range. It is not clear, without tracing the history of the 
land in Methuen, to say whether the second range extended as 
far south as the first lots laid out by the river, or ended some- 
where in Salem. 



50 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

The two ranges were separated by a "way" or strip of land 
twelve rods wide. This was intended for a road, or to be 
granted to lot owners to make up for land taken from their 
grants for roads. The lots in the second range were, like those 
of the first, supposed to be one mile deep and wide enough to 
make up the number of acres to which each proprietor was 
entitled, based upon the size of his house-lot in the village. But 
this theoretical plan of the lots was varied at will by the lot lay- 
ers for the purpose of equalizing the amount of meadow and 
other lands which the owners should hold. Consequently the 
lots in many instances did not conform to the general east and 
west plan, but took irregular directions and measurements. 

The map on page 51 is drawn as though the division were laid 
out exactly as the directions stated, since we do not know where 
the departures from this method were made. From a deed of 
the Sanders family we know that Henry Sanders bought in 1728 
the lot laid out to Theophilus Satchwell, No. 10; also lot num- 
ber eight, laid out to Daniel Hendricks, is known to have passed 
by marriage into the Dow family, and included the old Aquilla 
Dow homestead, now owned by Mrs. Frank Robie. Other lots 
may be similarly located, while many are very obscure. It must 
be borne in mind that this map represents the original plan of 
laying out the land, fastened upon a present-day survey of the 
town. As might be expected, the two do not fit together per- 
fectly. The roads are shown as they are today, in order to lo- 
cate the different lots. Even the few lots here indicated may 
not all be correctly placed. But we are confident that should 
anyone desire to trace the early history of any piece of land in 
Salem, he could do so by investing a small amount of time and 
money in the project. It may be added that the author has 
traced the Hendricks, Ladd, Hazen, Satchwell and Swan lots 
and finds them as here indicated. 

There is one important question pertaining to the early his- 
tory of Salem which has been frequently answered incorrectly : 
From where did the first settlers of the town come? It has 
been stated that they were from the Scotch-Irish settlement of 
Londonderry. This idea may be based upon the fact that there 
was no organized community here till 1735, while Londonderry 




Fourth Division of Common Upland of Haverhill, 1659. 



52 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

was incorporated in 1722. We wish, however, to correct this 
error. A glance at the names of the proprietors who received 
land in the fourth division ought to satisfy anyone that Salem's 
pioneers were from Haverhill. These men in many cases gave 
their land to their children or grandchildren, who came up 
here and built homesteads long before the colony of Scotch left 
Ireland, in 1718. For instance, such names as Ayer, Peasley, 
Corlis, Davis, Sleeper, Johnson, Swan, Page, Dow, Heath, Eaton 
Palmer, Ladd, White, Clement and Clark are too closely associ- 
ated with the past of the town to have their priority doubted. 
Only a few years later the families of Hall, Kelley, Woodbury, 
Wheeler, Webster, Merrill, Pattee, Bradley, Duston, Haseltine, 
Sanders, Ober, Eastman, Tyler, Pecker, Kimball, Hastings, 
Haines, Bayley, Silver, Marble, Emerson, Chase, and others, 
came from Haverhill and nearby Massachusetts towns. To be 
sure, many of those prominent in Salem affairs in later years 
did come from Londonderry, including families of such names 
as Dunlop, Nichols, Clendenin, Morrison, Taylor, Thompson, 
Wilson, Corning, Campbell, Rowell, Paul, Gilmore, Alexander, 
etc. ; but even of these, some came to Salem from other places, 
while many who came here from Londonderry had removed there 
from towns farther south and were not related to the original 
Scotch-Irish stock of the early settlers. No, there is absolutely 
no question that the early Salem families were Haverhill fam- 
ilies, and that, too, for a long time after they had moved their 
goods up onto their new land. 

The land to the west and north had proved so desirable that 
in 1658 a third division of meadow was ordered. This lay scat- 
tered about in the different meadows, each man taking his choice 
in the turn in which his name was drawn. 

This was followed three years later by a general movement 
toward individual ownership of land, instead of having so much 
belonging to the town, or proprietors as a body. This tendency 
was due partly to the purpose of obtaining lots adjacent to land 
already received as grants, so as to have the farms more central- 
ized or united; and partly because it was desired to have land 
to sell to the numerous newcomers into town. Again it is the 
old story repeated — a cooperative town is well enough while it 




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SETTLEMENT. 53 

is small, but must meet the strong spirit of individual domina- 
tion over one's property sooner or later. 

Accordingly in 1661 there were three divisions of land, a 
fourth division of meadow and two ' ' addition ' ' divisions. When- 
ever land was laid out the requirement called for so many acres, 
more or less, to each man. The original meaning of this was 
that the land was not uniform in quality or desirability, there- 
fore it would be manifestly unfair to some to measure simply 
by size. The lot layers were to use their judgment and give 
extra measure where the land was poor, and take off some where 
it was extra good. This phrase ' ' more or less ' ' was retained and 
incorporated into the deeds of this land given later, and from 
that has crept into our form for deeds, now, however, being un- 
derstood to mean that the exact amount is not guaranteed. 
There was frequently some land left common lying near each 
division, especially in the case of scattered lots. The addition 
land was made up of such territory, each lot having added to it 
some of the adjacent common land. Thus in this year there was 
an addition to the third division land, of ten acres to each acre 
of accommodation. If it could not be had adjoining the third 
division lot of each owner, then it was to be laid out in some con- 
venient place in the third division neighborhood. The fourth 
division addition was likewise made, ten acres to one of accom- 
modation "added to the breadth of the fourth division lots." 
This finished practically all of the land in Methuen and Salem, 
as far north as Hitty Titty Pond, or with additions possibly 
somewhat beyond. 

We cannot say definitely when the first houses were built in 
Salem territory, but it was probably somewhere about 1700. 
The farmers came to their meadow lots for their hay, and may 
have planted some of the choicest pieces of land ; also the timber 
early claimed their attention, saw-mills leading all other struc- 
tures into the new regions. But it was too great a risk, in the 
face of the treacherous redskins, to attempt to move the fam- 
ilies too far from the blockhouses of the settlements. 

It will nevertheless be interesting to follow these ancestors for 
the remainder of the time that they stayed in Haverhill, that 
we may be better acquainted with them when we find them com- 



54 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

ing to their lands here. They were men who had a high appre- 
ciation of learning, and reverenced their minister, Mr. Ward, 
for his scholarly attainments as well as for his devout attach- 
ment to his calling. Consequently they early sought to provide 
schooling for their children. They engaged Thomas Wasse as 
teacher, at a salary of ten pounds per annum from the town. 
It was voted that he also "shall be paid annually for each pupil 
according to his agreement with the parents. They shall come 
to him to be taught, the town providing a suitable place. Pro- 
vided, he shall not ask more for any child or person than is 
usually given in other towns by the year." This vote was 
passed in 1670, though Chase tells us that Wasse began to teach 
there in 1660. In 1686 the settlement had grown so that the 
number of pupils was sufficient to give the teacher a fair salary, 
without so large an appropriation from the town. He was voted 
three pounds per annum, to be paid in corn, and was restricted 
in his tuition fee to four pence per week for a reader, and six 
pence per week for a writer. The schoolhouse was built in 
1671, next the meetinghouse, so as to be used for the convenience 
of those who did not wish to go home between the morning and 
afternoon church services on the Sabbath. 

In 1700 it was "voted and ordered that Thirty Pounds in 
money shall be raised upon the Inhabitants of Haverhill for 
the maintaining of a Grammar School, and the instruction of 
the children in Reading writing & Cyphering; and that the 
Town at the public cost of the town shall provide for the School 
Master, if he Keep an horse, suitable, sufficient & convenient en- 
tertainment both summer and winter for his horse." Verily, 
the "School Master" must have been slightly backward if he did 
not "keep an horse" under these favorable conditions. 

In 1713 two schoolhouses were built, each twenty feet long, 
sixteen feet wide, and eight feet stud. In the record for the 
next year we find the following vote, which shows that the coun- 
try outside of the village was becoming so well built up that a 
school was needed: 
"Mar. 2; 1714 

' ' Peter Green, Jotham Hendrick, Nath 1 Peasly , Sam 1 Clements,. 
James Sanders, Peter Green Jun, John Page, John Eatton^ 



SETTLEMENT. 55 

Math. Heriman Jun. Joseph Peasley, Abraham Page, Henry 
Sanders, desiring that a School house might be built on the 
Town's cost between Hoghill and the brick hill bridge, or some 
other place near thereabout, that so their children might learn 
to read and write. 

"It was not granted, nor very few if any persons voted for 
it." 

This list of petitioners, most of whom were afterwards citizens 
of Salem, indicates that the men who were to form this future 
town were already located near, if not within, its borders. The 
site of the schoolhouse requested was near the center of the pres- 
ent town of Atkinson, though a little toward the Salem side. 
In those days, in spite of the inconvenience of travel, distances 
were not so appalling to most of the people as they are to us. 
A man would walk from Saleni to Newburyport to make pur- 
chases at the stores, returning the next day. Many of us to- 
day pay a carfare rather than walk from the depot to the town 
house. But with due credit to ourselves, let us assume that our 
ancestors would be glad to do likewise were they here today. 

That there were no schoolhouses at this time in the outlying 
districts is shown by the fact that the town voted to rebate one 
half of Henry Bodwell's school and ministerial tax in 1712, as 
the distance was so far that attendance was difficult. Bod- 
well lived in the part of Haverhill now Methuen, where there 
must have been a considerable number of other persons in as 
bad a plight as he. 

One of the most continuous troubles of the settlers was the 
ravages of wolves, which hung in packs about the outskirts, mak- 
ing havoc in the stock and threatening the safety of travelers 
who were abroad after nightfall. Many are the tales of exciting 
races and hairbreadth escapes in seeking safety from these dread 
animals. Town action was not wanting to stimulate the de- 
struction of this enemy. November 19, 1662, it was voted to pay 
forty shillings to any Indian for every wolf he should kill within 
Haverhill bounds. This shows that there must have been in the 
town Indians who were on good terms with the inhabitants. 
In fact, in many instances of raids by hostile Indians, the people 
of the towns were given valuable assistance by individual In- 
dians who dwelt among them. 



56 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Wolves were always most troublesome as winter came on, 
it being then more difficult to find food. The second winter 
after the above vote was passed, the law was made more gen- 
eral: 
"December the 19 th , 1664. 

"Voted and granted that if any man of this town shall kill a 
wolf or wolves, after the date hereof in this town he shall have 
paid him by the town the sum of forty shillings besides that the 
Country & county by-law alloweth, & this order shall continue 
until that the town see cause to revoke it." 

It was twenty-one years before such cause was seen, when it 
came about in this way. The neighboring towns had suspended 
the payment of bounty on wolves, which led men killing them 
in those towns to bring them into Haverhill and then claim the 
bounty, saying that they killed them there. The payment was 
therefore suspended by Haverhill also. Then came the reaction. 
Men could not afford to spend their time hunting wolves with- 
out some recompense, even if they were numerous. Conse- 
quently, with none of the towns in the neighborhood protected, 
the wolves became more numerous, and therefore more bold — 
because they seldom show fight except when in packs — than 
they were previously. Accordingly, the bounty was renewed in 
1687, but was reduced to fifteen shillings for a full-grown ani- 
mal or seven shillings six pence for a young one. We shall 
find later that the people of Salem were frequently compelled to 
take action in regard to these ravenous creatures. 

INDIAN TROUBLES. 

The depredations of the Indians played a very small part in 
Salem history. The experiences of the Haverhill settlers taught 
them not to wander far from the settlements except when con- 
siderable parties went to a new locality. The first-comers to 
Salem were careful to repair to the blockhouses at night, lest 
the savages should plan a raid upon them while asleep. Most 
of the serious Indian difficulties were over before there were 
many inhabitants in these parts. The raids of 1698 and 170S 
were very disastrous to Haverhill, while some of their fury was 
felt in the scattered settlements to the westward. The only au- 




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SETTLEMENT. bi 

thentic account of capture by Indians here has been confused 
by various writers. We believe that Chase has the best ac- 
count, although we must add some explanations of a local nature. 

Jonathan Haynes and Samuel Ladd were two men of some- 
what advanced age, who lived as neighbors in the western part 
of Haverhill, probably in the present eartern part of Methuen. 
They had each a piece of meadow in the neighborhood of the 
Spicket or just beyond, from which they obtained a large part 
of the food for their stock. On February 22, 1698, they, with 
their two sons, Joseph Haynes and Daniel Ladd, were return- 
ing from the meadow with two loads of hay, hauled by oxen, 
which the sons were driving. The old men were riding horses. 
"When the party was passing along the road by World's End 
Pond, they were attacked by a band of Indians who were re- 
turning north after a raid upon the town of Andover. The In- 
dians numbered fourteen, and were arranged seven on either 
side of the road, having sprung from the bushes where they 
had been concealed. During the excitement and confusion of 
the succeeding few minutes, young Ladd suggested that he try 
to escape on one of the horses, but his father forbade him to 
try it, as the Indians had their guns cocked and presented. Just 
what transpired next we do not know. Chase says that young 
Ladd cut his father's horse loose, and mounting it, dashed away 
amid a shower of ineffective bullets from the foe. He gave the 
alarm as he sped on his way homeward. This cannot be correct, 
however, as he was taken by the Indians at this time. Another 
version of the story states that Ladd's horse escaped and came 
dashing against the door of his master's dwelling, where he fell 
dead. Be this as it may, the two fathers were killed on the 
spot and the sons taken prisoners. The following from Mirick 
tells the rest of the story: 

"The Indians, on being asked why they killed the old men, 
said that they killed Haynes because he was 'so old he no go with 
us;' — meaning that he was too aged and infirm to travel; and 
that they killed Ladd, who was a fierce, stern-looking man, be- 
cause 'he so sour.' They then started for Penacook, where they 
arrived, with the two boys. Young Ladd soon grew weary of his 
situation, and one night after his Indian master and family 



58 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

had fell asleep, lie attempted to escape. He had proceeded 
but a short distance, when he thought that he should want a 
hatchet to fell trees to assist him in crossing the streams. He 
accordingly returned, entered a wigwam near his master's, 
where an old squaw lay sick, and took a hatchet. The squaw 
watched his movements, and, probably thinking that he intended 
to kill her, vociferated with all her strength. This awakened 
the Indians in the wigwam, who instantly arose, re-captured 
him, and delivered him again to his master, who bound his 
hands, laid him upon his back, fastened one of his feet to a 
tree, and in that manner kept him fourteen nights. They then 
gashed his face with their knives, filled the wounds with powder, 
and kept him on his back until it was so indented in the flesh 
that it was impossible to extract it. He carried the scars to his 
grave, and is now frequently spoken of by his descendants as 
the 'marked man.' Some years after, he found means to re- 
turn, and his scarred and powdered countenance produced many 
witticisms at his expense. He was one day walking the streets 
of Boston, and a parrot observing his 'marked' features, vocif- 
erated 'a rogue! a rogue!' Haynes remained a prisoner with 
the Indians some years, and was at last redeemed by his rela- 
tives. ' ' 

There are several stories of conflicts with the savages after 
the settlement of Salem, but none of them are sufficiently au- 
thentic to be given in detail. It is said that Capt. Ebenezer 
Ayer commanded a small band of men who had for their strong- 
hold the old garrison house on the north side of World's End 
Pond, on the Ayer farm. Other garrison houses were at the 
base of Spicket Hill, near the present causeway, and at the 
Larabee farm near Captain's Pond. The former of these was 
the old Peaslee house on the Silas Carey farm. The cellar may 
be plainly seen today among the apple trees just in the rear of 
the Carey cellar. It has been partially filled up recently with 
stones and refuse matter from the adjoining land. Here all 
of the women and children of the outlying farms used to come 
to pass the night. We shall have more to say of this house 
later, as it had many historic scenes affecting the organization 
of the town enacted within its walls. The other house, which 



SETTLEMENT. 59* 

stood about where the present Larabee house stands, was one 
of the first dwellings built in the town. The farm, in fact all 
of the land on that side of the pond belonged at that time to the 
Wheelers. We regret that no detailed stories of the life in these 
garrison houses have been preserved. 

HIGHWAYS. 

The highways of the town, though of such poor character, re- 
ceived considerable attention from the proprietors at their meet- 
ings. It was voted that whenever any man found the highways 
too few to accommodate his property, he might complain to the 
town and they were to choose two men to come and lay them 
out. But poor as might be the highways, the bridges must be 
kept in repair. The negligent attitude of some of the citizens 
in this matter led to stringent measures in 1669 : 

"If committee having in charge the repair of bridges shall 
summon any man to work and he do not appear, he shall be fined 
as follows : 1 man absent 1 day, 5s. ; yoke of oxen absent 1 day, 
2s. 6d. & so in proportion. He shall bring such implements as 
he may have suitable to the work. ' ' 

In 1670 it was voted to have all the highways, both old and 
new, laid out, marked and recorded, and returns made of the 
same. There is, however, no record of any such general returns. 

At a general meeting in 1685 a petition from men in the west 
part of the town was presented, asking that a highway be laid out 
above Spicket River. When the land there was divided suffi- 
cient space was left between the lots to allow for highways. The 
men who had served as lot layers at that time were designated 
to lay out the new highway, in the place which should be most 
convenient to the proprietors of the land. This road was per- 
haps that which was later extended toward Dracut, lying west 
from the falls in Methuen. 

CHURCH MATTERS. 

Several notes regarding religious affairs at this time may prove 
interesting. In 1690, when Mr. Ward was beginning to show and 
feel the breaking down effects of age, the town engaged Benja- 
min Rolfe as his assistant. It took a considerable amount of 



60 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

correspondence before the terms could be arranged, but finally 
it was agreed that he should have a settlement on the parish, 
with "forty pounds per annum in wheat, Rye and Indian," 
and free board to be furnished by Mr. "Ward. In 1693 this ven- 
erable preacher was called to his long home, after faithfully ad- 
ministering to the parish for nearly half a century. The po- 
sition of "our Teacher" in Haverhill is almost exactly repro- 
duced one hundred years later by the work of the Rev. Abner 
Bayley in Salem. Both lived during the building days of their 
respective towns, in the latter half of two successive centuries, 
working from young manhood till the end of their earthly lab- 
ors for the welfare of those among whom they had been held in 
such high esteem. 

Mr. Rolfe served as minister until 1708, when he became the 
first victim of the fiendish savages in their raid upon the town. 
He was followed by several men whose terms of service were of 
short duration. 

In 1710, the Rev. Mr. Joshua Gardner was chosen settled min- 
ister, the church and town concurring in the vote. He was to be 
paid "seventy pounds a year, one half in good passable money, 
the other half in good merchantable corn at money price, besides 
the use of all the parsonage lands in town." 

"We find evidences that the boys of the past were not materially 
different, in some respects at least, from those of the present. 
This extract from the records, dated March 2, 1714, will illus- 
trate : — ' ' Several persons moving that some care might be taken 
to prevent the rudeness and disorderly carriage of the boys in 
the meetinghouse on Sabath days." 

In the same year it was voted to clapboard the parsonage house 
with "good white pine clapboards without sap." This sort of 
finish is an outgrowth of the early custom of plastering the rough 
planks and boards of the houses with clay, and putting thin 
boards over the clay to keep it from falling off. These boards 
were at first called clayboards. 

In 1718 the Reverend Mr. Samuel Chickley was chosen min- 
ister at a salary of one hundred pounds per year. This seems a 
very generous offer for those times. In fact, even today there 
is not a small number of ministers in the country villages who 




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SETTLEMENT. 61 

receive no more than the equivalent of this sum, about five hun- 
dred dollars. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The development of the government had been progressing dur- 
ing the past years. The list of town officers voted for each year 
was fairly fixed by the beginning of the century. In 1700 it 
comprised the following: 

Moderator. 

Town clerk and treasurer (often the same man, but not 

necessarily so). 
Two constables, one for the east and one for the west parts- 

of the town. 
Five selectmen and assessors. 
Three tythingmen. 
Six surveyors of highways. 

Six fence viewers (five years later there were eight). 
Clerk of the market. 
Sealer of leather. 

The constables were collectors of taxes, and frequently paid 
bills against the town, signed by the selectmen, without turning 
the money collected over to the town treasurer. The duties of 
the selectmen were much the same as they are today. The 
tythingmen were supposed to keep order at the meetinghouse 
during divine worship. This office also involved the task of 
keeping the sleepy members of the congregation awake. 

The last division of land was made December 30, 1721, and is 
known as the fifth division of upland. It included all the un- 
divided land in the town, most of which was in the northern part. 
All of the present territory of North Salem was granted at this 
time, as well as the land lying about Island Pond and beyond. 
Several of the lots were reserved for the use of the proprietors. 
The lot layers were Richard Hazzen, Nathaniel Peasly and Tim- 
othy Ayer. 

As showing who were the first owners of the land in the north- 



62 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



ern part of the town, the list of the proprietors is given, 


with the 


number of each man 's lot : 








John Ayers Jr. 


1 


Joseph Peasley 


26 


Mr. Robert Clements 


2 


John Dow 


27 


Joseph Jowitt 


3 


Peter Ayer 


28 


Jno. Page 


4 


Richard Singletery 


29 


Thomas Davis 


5 


Thomas Ayer 


30 


Jn° Williams Sen 1- 


6 


John Hutchins 


31 


Eobert Ayer 


7 


Walter Simons 


32 


James Davis Jun r 


8 


Robert Swan 


33 


Thomas Whittier 


9 


John Chenary 


34 


John Johnson 


10 


Proprietors 


35 


Thomas Sleeper 


11 


Richard Littlehale 


36 


Henry Palmer 


12 


Thomas Eatton 


37 


William Holdrig 


13 


Nathaniel Ayer 


38 


Stephen Kent 


14 


Edward Clark 


39 


Proprietors 


15 


Daniel Lad 


40 


Samuel Guild 


16 


James Davis 


41 


Robert Clement 


17 


James Fiske 


42 


George Brown 


18 


George Corlis 


43 


Mathias Button 


19 


John Eatton 


44 


Daniel Hendricks 


20 


Bartholomew Heath 


45 


Proprietors 


21 


Theophilus Satchwell 


46 


Obadiah Ayer 


22 


Proprietors 


47 


William White 


23 


Hugh Sherratt 


48 


Thomas Linforth 


24 


Abraham Tyler 


49 


Mr. Jno Ward 


25 


James Pecker 


50 



It will be noticed that the drawings were in the names of the 
original proprietors, not those of their heirs. Some few new 
names had been added to the list by this time. 

As the town began to take on larger proportions, it became 
more and more evident that the existing methods of management 
would not suffice. The church was too far away from the two 
growing parts, the west and north, to be a convenient place of 
worship ; nor were the schools distributed as well as conditions 
seemed to demand. Accordingly the inhabitants of the outlying 
hamlets began to send in petitions for separate townships or par- 
ishes. 



SETTLEMENT. 63 

The first of these came from the part of the town now Methuen, 
dated July 5, 1720, and signed by Stephen Barker, Henry Bod- 
well, and others. It requested that a separate township or par- 
ish be set off in the west part of the town. A very earnest dis- 
cussion followed its presentation, after which the meeting voted 
not to grant it. 

Friction between the proprietors, or commoners, and the non- 
commoners began about this time to assume a serious form. The 
latter, of course, had no rights in the meetings, as they were men 
who had come to Haverhill after the first organization of the 
town, and had not been granted proprietors' rights. At this 
period they were becoming more and more numerous, gaining 
thereby increasing inherent power. Evidently it was only a 
question of time when their voice would be powerful enough to 
cause the proprietors to sit up and take notice. 

They maintained that the commoners had no right to issue 
grants of any more public land; but this did not prevent such 
grants from being made. The commoners assumed the attitude 
of calm indifference to the protests of their fellow citizens of 
more recent arrival. Thereupon the inhabitants held separate 
meetings, and arranged to make use of these public lands. The 
year before the proprietors made the fifth division of upland, 
that is in 1720, the non-commoners voted to grant all of the ter- 
ritory within the town beyond Hoghill mill and not interfering 
with the fourth division land, "to those men that have been out 
in long marches in the time of the war, and to others of the in- 
habitants of this Town, that will make speedy settlement on the 
same." This land lay west and north of Hog Hill (in Atkinson, 
still known by the same name), that is, the northeast part of 
present Salem. A committee was chosen to lay it out into fifty- 
acre lots, but we have no evidence that the non-commoners who 
had voted as above really felt that they could secure a title to the 
land. At any rate, the proprietors laid out the fifth division the 
next year, and no protest against their titles given is recorded. 

In March, 1721, a second petition comes from the to-be Me- 
thuen inhabitants to this effect : 

"Whereas there is a certain tract of land in the West end of 
Haverhill containing Fifty or Sixty acres, lying on the south 



64 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

and south west of a Meadow commonly called bare meadow, 
which land, together with a piece of land lying on a hill called 
meetinghouse hill, in times past reserved by our forefathers for 
the use of the ministry, might in hard times make a convenient 
Parsonage ; if by the blessing of God, the gospel might so flour- 
ish amongst us, and we grow so populous, as to be able to main- 
tain and carry on the gospel ministry amongst us. 

"We therefore humbly pray that you would take into consid- 
eration the circumstances we are in, & the difficulty we may here- 
after meet with in procuring a privilege for the ministry; and 
that you would grant, & settle & record the above said lands in 
your Town book, for the above said use, & you will gratify your 
humble petitioners and oblige us & our posterity to serve you 
hereafter in what we may. 

Joshua Swan John Gutterson 

Henry Bodwell John Lad 

Henry Bodwell, jun James Sanders jun 

Danl Bodwell Wm Whittier 

Jas. Bodwell Thos Whittier 

Thos. Masser Ephraim Clark 

James Davis Thos Whittier sen. 

Abiall Masser Mathw Harriman 

Henry Sanders Saml Smith 

Thos Johnson Saml Currier 

Edwd Carlton Jona Clark 

Saml Hutchins Stephen Barker 

Elisha Davis John Sanders." 

John Hastings 

As this was not a request for anything that would weaken the 
cause of the proprietors, it was granted. The petition is inter- 
esting to us in that many of the signers were afterwards citi- 
zens of Salem, while others were the ancestors of some of our 
leading families today. They lived at that time for the most 
part in what is now the east part of Methuen, and near the 
mouth of the Spicket in Lawrence. The land referred to lies 
near the line of the electric road from Lawrence to Haverhill, 
and on the hill at the corner of Arlington and East streets in 
Methuen. On this hill, on the triangular common in front of the 




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SETTLEMENT. 65 

residence of Mr. T. L. Barstow, the meetinghouse was subse- 
quently raised. The graveyard is still there, on the east slope 
of the crest of the hill, not as it formerly appeared, but remod- 
elled by Mr. E. F. Searles of Methuen a few years ago. 

From 1723 to 1725, the final battles between the proprietors 
and inhabitants were fought. The latter appealed to the Gen- 
eral Court to inquire into ' ' ye irregular methods of ye Common- 
ers" in the administration of public lands. The court ordered 
a town meeting for the election of officers, but very few voted 
and no elections were declared. The court, upon hearing of this, 
sent a second summons, couched in no unmistakable terms, where- 
upon a meeting was held and officers elected. The last meeting 
of the two factions jointly was held in 1725, after which the 
town and proprietors each held separate meetings and elected 
each their own officers. But the authority of the proprietors 
over the land was too firmly established to be seriously ques- 
tioned. We shall find them granting land in Methuen and 
Salem long after these communities had been made separate 
towns, just as the Masonian Proprietors of Portsmouth retained 
their rights. 

In December, 1723, a committee of proprietors composed of 
Dea. James Ayer, Nathaniel Peasly and Richard Hazzen, was 
chosen to meet a committee from the non-commoners to hear the 
requests they wished to make regarding the disposal of certain 
public lands. The report of this committee exposes the fact that 
the chief grievance of the non-proprietors was of an individual 
nature; that is, a number of persons had desires for the pieces 
of public land adjoining their own, while some wanted the cow 
common divided, thinking, no doubt, that they would share in it. 
Some of these requested lands were in Salem. These are here 
given, together with a few others that are interesting for their 
oddity : 

"mathew Harriman junr declared yt hee would bee oneasy 
unless all ye fences erected on ye cow comon were demolished & 
itt lay according to ye vote of ye ancient fathers & ye proprietors 
records Burnt. 

"William Johnson would not be easy unless They would fling 
up ye cow common. 



66 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

« 

"All those above accounted are unreasonable in Their de- 
mands & soe acted nothing upon it. All ye other persons under 
written To ye number of about 39 persons Though They had noe 
material! objection against ye division of ye Comons yett since 
They had bore charges lost friends by ye Indians : &C did desire 
some particular pieces of land upon ye proprietors grant of 
which They would bee easy & for ye future rest contented & 
proceeded To request as followeth Jonathan Eastman requests 
20 acres in providence neck 

"Samll marble senr: Twenty acres in providence neck north 
of ye Copls pond farm. 

"Stephen Webster Twenty acres north of Copls pond as wee 
goe to providence neck. 

"John "Webster & nathan webster 40 acres to both in provi- 
dence neck." 

As stated in a preceding chapter, this "Copls pond" is Cap- 
tain's Pond. The land which Stephen Webster desired is the 
piece on which his descendants afterwards lived on the north 
side of the pond, west of the property of Mr. Robert Dunbar. 
"Providence neck" is the cut between the two ranges of hills, 
through which the Providence Brook flows. The land which 
Marble asked for was on the west side of the brook, and was 
held by his descendants for a good many years. Formerly there 
was an old path from the north side of Captain's Pond westward, 
past the old site of Johnson's mill on the brook, to an ancient 
fording place near the bend in the Spicket at the foot of Allen's 
(or Long's) hill. 

METHUEN SET OFF. 

July 30, 1724, a petition of Lieut. Stephen Barker and others 
of the west part of the town asked for a township west of 
Hawkes' Meadow Brook. The General Court appointed a hear- 
ing on the petition, to which the proprietors sent Capt. John 
White to remonstrate. The reason for asking was that the dis- 
tance to the center of interests of the town was too great. Also 
the best local government could not be maintained at so great a 
distance. Captain White was armed with a strategic plan for 
obtaining a refusal from the court; he would destroy the cause 
of complaint — distance. His scheme was to provide ferry ac- 



SETTLEMENT. 67 

commodations, such that the people of the west part of the 
town could cross the Merrimack and proceed to Haverhill by the 
short route on the south side of the river, instead of following 
the wide bend around on the north side. He succeeded, and the 
petition was denied. 

That fall, in November, these same men petitioned the propri- 
etors for a schoolhouse. They were a growing community, in 
which it was impossible to educate the children. This request 
was granted, probably with the idea that it might be a means of 
keeping the territory undivided. It had always been the aim 
of the leaders of the proprietors to have this whole great area 
thickly settled and governed as one town; but this was not to 
be. They could scarcely manage the main part of it without dis- 
sesions, which, luckily, were generally satisfactorily healed, ac- 
counting alike for the joy of the town proper and the neglect 
of the outlying districts. On this occasion the proprietors 
granted besides the school a sum of ten pounds a year toward 
paying a minister for preaching that winter, should they engage 
one. 

It soon became evident that the west end must be separated. 
The "ferry accommodations" had failed to make a place, and 
there seemed to be no further excuse for refusing a grant. 

Accordingly, the General Court set off the west part of the 
town as a new town, by the name of Methuen. The council, 
under date of December 9, 1725, issued the first call for a town 
meeting. This was posted as follows : 

"PROVINCE OP MASSACHUSETTS. 



. . 



In Council, December the 9, 1725. Ordered, That Mr. 
Stephen Barker, a principal inhabitant of the Town of Methuen, 
be, and hereby is, empowered and directed to notify and sum- 
mons the inhabitants of the said Town duly qualified for voters, 
to assemble and meet, some time in the month of March next, to 
choose Town Officers according to law, to stand for the year. 

"Sent down for concurrence 

J. Willard, Secry. 



< i 



68 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"In house of Representatives, December 10, 1725, read and con- 
curred 

"Wi. Dudly, Speaker. 

"Consented to, William Dummer." 

This order for the first town meeting was inserted in the war- 
rant. At the meeting held March 9, Lieut. Stephen Barker was 
chosen moderator, William Whittier town clerk; the five men 
whose names follow were the first board of selectmen: John 
Bailey, Ebenezer Barker, Asie Swan, Daniel Bodwell and 
Thomas Whittier. 

An entry under date of January 10, 1726-27 throws light 
upon the origin of our custom of posting warnings for town 
meetings upon the doors of the churches. Before this time it 
had been the duty of the constable to travel to all homesteads in 
the town, informing them of the coming meeting. The action 
of the town is recorded thus: 

"At a legal town meeting on January the 10, 1726-27, upon 
adjournment, upon consideration of the great trouble to the 
constable, by traveling to warn town meetings, the town voted 
and granted unanimously, that warnings being posted up upon 
the door of the house where the public worship of God is carried 
on, fourteen days before the day for the town meeting, shall be 
accepted for a warning for any town meeting in this town, for 
the time to come." 

After the frame of the meetinghouse had been raised, there 
was much discussion in regard to finding another location. Sev- 
eral times the matter was brought before the voters, until finally 
a committee was chosen to investigate the locations suggested. 
They reported that the site already selected was in their opinion 
by far the most convenient place in the town, and it was voted 
to finish the construction of the building. The frame was raised 
in the summer of 1726, and the next spring it was boarded up. 
The meetings were held meantime in various houses in con- 
venient parts of the town. The warrant for the meeting of 
March, 1726-27, was posted upon the door of Asie Swan's house, 
since that was where the religious services were held. 

The bill for framing the meetinghouse was brought in at this 







STEPHEN BAILEY. 



SETTLEMENT. 69 

time. The amount was fifty-four pounds, seven shillings and 
eight pence. 

On March 3, 1728-29, it was "voted to give Mr. Christopher 
Sargent a call to dispense the word of God to us. ' ' After much 
correspondence, of a formal nature, after the manner of the 
times, Mr. Sargent accepted the call and was in due time or- 
dained as minister of the new parish. 

Here we may leave the story of the development of Methuen, 
as it was not very closely related to the history of Salem. Such 
facts as are of importance, however, will be noted in the follow- 
ing chapter, showing their bearing on the organization of Salem. 

As we have no further direct treatment of Haverhill, we may 
in closing state the final facts regarding the proprietors of that 
town. As has been stated, they continued to grant land to par- 
ties in Methuen and Salem for some years. A few of the grants 
of a public nature will be referred to in a subsequent chapter. 
The last meeting was held October 10, 1763. By this time all 
of the public land had been divided, and the management of 
affairs was in the hands of all the citizens. 

The principal facts in the history of this region have been 
considered. The family names mentioned are in many cases 
those of our Salem families of today. The forms of government 
are derived, ready for adoption by the new town which next is 
to become the object of attention. The origin and growth of 
this town, Salem, as such, forms the subject of the next branch 
of our story. 



CHAPTER III. 

Building the Town. 

In the preceding chapters the aim of our treatment has been 
to prepare the way for the development of the town of Salem. 
It is difficult to determine just where this historical background, 
as we may term it, ceases and where Salem begins. It seems 
best, however, to divide the subject where the individuality of 
this community begins to become apparent, at the time when the 
men of this vicinity first banded themselves together for their 
common welfare. 

Accordingly, we have left the records of the older town of 
Methuen which do not treat especially of that part of it which 
afterwards fell to the jurisdiction of New Hampshire. In this 
chapter such Methuen records as give any light upon the par- 
tition of that town, including petitions for a second precinct or 
parish, with the action taken thereon, will be fully presented. 
For such records can only be considered as the first evidences 
of growing activity in the northern part of the town. 

Methuen had scarcely been set off from Haverhill before it 
became very evident that just as the local government at Haver- 
hill was not competent to properly manage the affairs at a dis- 
tance so far away as the village or better settlement near the 
Spicket, so the new town was in turn unable to supply the needs 
of the people settled in the neighborhood of Spicket Hill. We 
find, therefore, as early as March, 1727, an effort was made to 
have another meetinghouse erected in town to accommodate 
those dwelling in the north part. The principal movers in this 
project were Nathaniel Peaslee, John Hastings and Jonathan 
Emerson, who lived in what is now Salem. The voters of the 
town dismissed the request. 

This merely delayed the matter. These men were not the sort 
to be so easily turned down. The next spring another petition 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 71 

was presented, having a slightly larger list of signatures. It 
was as follows : 

"A humble petition to the Town of Methuen in General, of 
us the subscribers. 

' ' In the behalf of difficult circumstances in being remote from 
the public worship of God, whereas we being six miles and up- 
ward from Haverhill or Methuen, where it is kept, so that we 
could not attend the public worship of God, whereas a number of 
us have joined together a part of Haverhill and a part in Me- 
thuen, to carry on the public worship of God, and have hired a 
minister to preach to us, in the west end of Haverhill, which is 
about two miles and half from the furthest of us, now we humbly 
pray, that the Town would pass an act in the Town, to free us 
from the minister rate in Methuen and set us off. Beginning 
at Hawk's Meadow brook's mouth, so running westward about 
midway between James How's and Samuel Clark's, so running 
the course over Spicket river, all the land which belongs to 
Methuen, to join with the party in Haverhill, in carrying on 
the worship of God. 

Samuel Currier John Bailey 

Abiel Kelly Jun. Robert Corgill 

Thomas Eaton Ephraim Clark 

Richard Kelly Daniel Peaslee." 

Abiel Kelly 

This petition suffered a fate similar to that of its predeces- 
sor. But it served to warn the people of the town proper that 
there were men in the north part who were justified in their 
demands for better facilities for worship and education. Early 
in the spring of 1729 a fifty-acre lot was laid out lying north of 
World's End Pond, for the use of a school. It bordered on the 
path which led from the river near Salem Village to the Howe 
Road, now so called. The schools were not given the attention 
demanded by the General Court. This led to the imposition of 
a fine in 1731, which, however, was removed, as a school was ar- 
ranged for during the following winter. In fact, school was 
kept in three parts of the town. Francis Swan was the teacher 
in the southeast part near the conflux of the Spicket and Merri- 
mack rivers, Ebenezer Barker in the west, and Thomas Eaton 



72 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

near Spicket Hill. Each teacher provided a room in his own 
house, where the pupils came together for their lessons. The 
length of the term this winter was one month. 

SPICKET HILL PETITION. 

At the annual meeting in March, 1734, a paper was presented 
known as the "Spicket Hill petition." It was signed by Abiel 
Kelly, Joseph Peaslee, Evan Jones, Benoni Rowell, Richard 
Kelly, Daniel Peaslee and several others of the inhabitants of 
that part of the town. It was worded in the following manner: 

"March the 13, 1733-4. We, the inhabitants of the north part 
of the Town of Methuen, living distant from the public worship 
of God, and laboring under great difficulty thereby; although 
we are but small in number at present, and not able, according 
to appearance, to maintain the public worship of God amongst 
ourselves, yet hoping for the blessing of God on our endeavors, 
we have thought fit to make our request to our fathers and breth- 
ren of said Town, now assembled, to see if they will be pleased 
to give their consent to set us off, to be a distinct parish by our- 
selves. 

"This is the humble petition of the subscribers, that the Town 
would be pleased to grant us a line as followeth, viz. Begin- 
ning at the middle of the World's End pond so called, thence 
running a west line so far until it comes to Dracut line, thence 
running an east line until it comes to Haverhill line. And if 
it please our fathers and brethren of the Town to grant our re- 
quest in this respect, we hope by the blessing of God, we shall be 
enabled to maintain the public worship of God among our- 
selves. ' ' 

The town, as in previous cases, promptly voted not to grant 
the request. But at the meeting held the following October it 
was ' ' voted to add ten pounds more to the minister rate the next 
year, in answer to a petition of Spicket Hill people for some ease 
in their cost of hiring a minister to preach amongst them four 
months in the winter season, the next winter, if they hire one 
four months." 

At the meeting of April, 1735, another petition for a second 
precinct was presented but voted down. 




HON. FRANK P. WOODBURY 




CO 



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2 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 73 

In the fall of this year the town was first officially represented 
in the General Court. Each year the voters had refused to elect 
a representative. This was at last felt to be an unwise policy. 
Therefore, on November 18, 1735, it was voted to have Richard 
Saltonstall, the representative from Haverhill, act also in behalf 
of Methuen. 

In 1735 action was also taken toward building a schoolhouse. 
It was to be "twenty feet one way and eighteen feet the other 
way," and located at some convenient place. It was then voted 
"that the school shall be kept two months at the schoolhouse, 
if the schoolhouse be built, and one month at some convenient 
place at Spickett Hill, where the selectmen shall order it for this 
winter coming. Then, in less than two months, with that lack 
of consistency which characterized so many of the official trans- 
actions of the early times, they voted ' ' not to pay out any money 
this fall for a schoolhouse." The records leave us uninformed 
as to whether the original vote for a term of school at Spicket 
Hill was also nullified by this action. 

NORTH PARISH SET OFF. 

Even in this very year the persistence and determination with 
which a separate parish had been sought was rewarded. At the 
town meeting held December 15, 1735, a petition was presented 
signed by Henry Sanders, Joseph Peaslee and about twenty- 
seven others. The long-continued agitation of the matter had 
served the purpose of acquainting the voters of the town with 
the real and pressing needs of their fellow townsmen. Accord- 
ingly, it was voted to grant their request, which is here pre- 
sented : 

"Methuen, December 15, 1735 The humble petition of us, the 
subscribers, to the inhabitants of this Town, this day assembled, 
humbly showeth ; That, whereas, we the subscribers live at so 
great a distance from the public worship of God in this place, 
that we cannot attend upon it with our families, without a great 
deal of difficulty, we have therefore been at the charge to hire a 
minister to preach to us in a more convenient place, which we 
think is hard for us to do, so long as we are obliged to pay our 
full proportion towards the support of the public worship of 



74 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



God in this place, and although we have of late made our appli- 
cation to this Town for some help under our difficult circum- 
stances, we have been denied any. We therefore pray that you 
would set us off, a distinct precinct by ourselves, according to 
this line following, viz. Beginning at the north side of World's 
End Pond, so running easterly to the south side of Peter Mer- 
rill 's land, and so to Haverhill line ; and from the World 's End 
Pond to a wading place in Spickett river by Jonathan Corliss', 
and so running with a straight line to a pine tree in Dracut line, 
on the south side of Porpepine brook, to Dracut line ; which, if 
you will be pleased to do, you will oblige your humble petition- 



ers. ' ' 



The next step was to obtain recognition by the General Court. 
Within two weeks of the parish grant Henry Sanders had his pe- 
tition drawn up, signed by other citizens, and presented to the 
legislature at a meeting held December 26. The result was an 
order for a legal meeting to be held at the house of Daniel Peas- 
lee. He lived just at the west end of Spicket Hill, only a few rods 
back of the present cellar of the burned house of Silas Carey. 
Peaslee's cellar may now be plainly seen among the apple trees, 
although in recent years it has been nearly filled with rock and 
refuse from the land about it. Henry Sanders lived on Bluff 
Street, and operated the sawmill at the old Clement place, re- 
cently the property of the late William G. Crowell. Both Peas- 
lee and Sanders were powerful leaders in the new community, 
being men of high motives and great versatility. It will be in- 
teresting to trace the close identity of these two men with the 
spirit of progress in the various lines of activity and growth of 
the new parish, district and town. 

Following is the first call for a parish meeting, including also 
the first warrant : 

"Whereas the grate and general court or assembly for ye 
province of ye masachusets bay in new england holden by ajorn- 
ment on wensday 19 day of november 1735 on ye petition of 
henry Sanders and other inhabitants of ye north parish of me- 
thuen in ye county of Essex in ye house of Representitives De- 
cember ye 26 : 1735 is hereby alowed and Impowered to call ye 
first parish meeting all ye freeholders and other inhabitants 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 75 

qualifyed to vote in parish meetings are hereby desired to as- 
semble them selves together at ye house of Daniel peaslee in ye 
north parish in methuen on thursday ye 15 day of this instant 
at ten of ye clock in ye forenoone to act as ye parish shall think 
best on ye following perticulers namely first to choose a parish 
Clerk and other parish oficers as ye law directs to stand till ye 
anual meeting in march next 2 ly to see if ye parish will Raise 
money to pay mr. greenleaf for his preaching with us this win- 
ter that is past and for ye Rest we hiered him to preach with us 
3 ,y to see if ye parish will choose a Committee to lay out a bury- 
ing place 4 Iy to see if ye parish will Raise money to buy a book 
and to defray other parish charges: dated in ye north parish 
in methuen January ye 1 1735/6 henry Sanders by order of ye 
general court." 

At this meeting the first parish officers were chosen. They 
were: Joseph Peaslee, collector; Edward Clark, moderator; 
Peter Merrill, parish clerk; Thomas Eaton, parish treasurer ; 
Henry Sanders, Edward Clark, and Peter Merrill, assessors. 
From this time on the affairs of this part of Methuen were ad- 
ministered very largely by the parish officers. To be sure, the 
men from the second parish attended the town meetings, some of 
them still holding office. Thus Henry Sanders was one of the 
selectmen, and also sent to the Newbury court as a juror from 
Methuen ; also Peter Merrill was a juror to the court at Ipswich. 
The great gain to the north parish was of course in their ability 
to hire a minister who could preach and live among them. 
During the winter of 1834-35 Mr. Greenleaf had been hired to 
preach. Mr. Hale succeeded him, but whether it was the fol- 
lowing year is not clear. At any rate, Mr. Hale was preaching 
here the first winter after the meetinghouse was raised, 1738 
-39. The minister boarded at Richard Kimball's, who received 
two shillings per day for "keeping a minister and his horse." 

PARSONAGE GRANT. 

As a means to help raise money to pay a minister the parish 
desired land which would yield some income. To secure this a 
committee was chosen on March 31, 1736, consisting of Joseph 
Peaslee, Abiel Kelly and John Bailey, to treat with the propri- 



76 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

etors of the common land in Haverhill and Methnen to see if 
they would grant land for a parsonage. The proprietors, how- 
ever, did not see fit to take favorable action on their request and 
the matter was dropped until the next spring. The following 
records from the Haverhill Proprietors' records will best show 
the conditions of the next petition : 

" Haverhill, May 16 th 1737 At a legal meeting of the propri- 
etors of Haverhill by adjournment from the twenty fifth day of 
April last past, The Inhabitants of the Second Parish in Methuen 
petitioning the proprietors of the Common lands in Haverhill 
and in Methuen belonging to said proprietors by their Commit- 
tees appointed for that purpose, viz ; that whereas the Inhabi- 
tants of said parish are now about building a Meetinghouse, and 
sittling a minister in order to the regular carrying on the wor- 
ship of God, amongst them, and being in their infancy and at 
present under great difficulties, with respect to the same, money 
being so very scarce, and there being a considerable quantity of 
common land in Methuen, between land now in possession of W m 
Smith and land of Joseph Peasly, for which you have a right, 
we humbly request you would give or sell us some of said land, 
part for a parsonage and part for the first minister, which may 
hereafter be settled amongst us which may encourage him and 
us and you will oblige your humble petitioners in behalf of said 
parish. 

"Henry Sanders 
"Edward Clark ^Committee" 
"Peter Merrill ] 
This petition received no better attention than had the other. 
It seemed that the proprietors were insensible to the needs of 
those in the outlying districts. The petitioners, however, were 
used to such treatment by this time, and simply waited until the 
meeting a year later, when they presented another request, al- 
most identical in phraseology with the preceding. This time 
their perseverance was rewarded; the meeting was on June 19, 
1738: 

"In Answer to their Petition Voted that fifty Acres be given 
and granted to the Inhabitants of the said parish for the use 
within mentioned and fifty Acres more to their first Ordained 




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BUILDING THE TOWN. 77 

Minister to Encourage him to Settle Amongst them if so much 
Common land there be to be had and that after the bounds of the 
Common Land be settled there by the Committee Appointed for 
that purpose, the same Committee viz John Watts, Edward 
Flynt & Kichard Hazzen, lay out the Same & make return thereof 
to the Prop rs . all to be done on the petitioners Cost. Voted in 
the affirmative. 

"Haverhill, Nov. 6 th , 1738 at a legal meeting of the commoners 
and proprietors of the common and undivided lands of the town 
of Haverhill and Methuen, belonging to said proprietors by ad- 
journment from Sept. 18 th last past Nath 1 Peasley being Mod- 
erator then received the following return, viz — 

"Haverhill Nov. 4 th 1738 We the subscribers being appointed 
a Committee by the proprietors of the common and undivided 
lands in the town of Haverhill and lands in Methuen belonging 
to said proprietors to lay out to the Inhabitants of the second 
parish in Methuen fifty acres of said common land to be appro- 
priated to the use of the ministry in said parish, and fifty acres 
more to the first minister who may hereafter be settled and or- 
dained in the ministerial office in said Parish accordingly at- 
tended the service and laid out the same as followeth viz. Be- 
ginning at stake and stones on the southerly side of the path 
leading to Mitchels Spicket Meadow, formily Mrs Wards 
meadow, thence running southwesterly about ninty three poles 
by land formerly John Eatons, to a black oak tree marked J. E. 
which is a bounds of W m Smiths land thence by said Smiths land 
westerly about one hundred and six poles to a white oak tree 
marked W. S. thence southerly by said Smiths land about fifty 
six poles to a stake and stones, thence northwesterly to a white 
oak tree, marked, by spicket river with M. which line measures 
about eighty poles, thence running up said river and bounding 
on spicket meadow till it comes up to the aforesaid way leading 
to wards meadow and by said path to the bounds first mentioned, 
within which bounds is comprehended the said hundred acres 
which is to be divided hereafter betwixt the minister and in- 
habitants of the second Parish for the use aforesaid in quantity 
and quality 

"Richard Hazen) _, 

t*r x. w ++ r Committee 
"John Watts I 



78 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

' Which return was accordingly accepted and the land therein 
mentioned given and granted for the use within mentioned by a 
free vote of the proprietors. 

"Attest Richard Hazen prp. Clerk." 
A glance at the map will show that this lot lay east of the 
Spicket, bordering on the road which leads from Salem Center to 
Grosvenor's Corner. The road now running past the Wheeler 
farm toward Stillwater did not then exist. In fact the only 
travel was along the paths, which were few and for the most 
part poorly trod.' 

MEETINGHOUSE RAISED. 

With this land at the disposal of the parish, the work of 
settling a minister was greatly facilitated. With the income of 
one hundred acres of good land to build upon, the taxes were 
made much lighter without a decrease in the total to be raised. 
The amount of the minister's tax and other incidental charges 
for 1737 was one hundred and seventy pounds, which was raised 
by vote of the parish. The meetings, both religious and secular, 
were held at Daniel Peaslee's house, as the most convenient and 
acceptable place in the parish; but the demand for a regular 
meetinghouse had been felt for some time, and now became more 
and more urgent. Definite arrangements were formulated, and 
at a meeting held June 27, 1738, it was voted to accept of a com- 
mittee to provide boards for the meetinghouse. The quantity 
ordered was four thousand four hundred and ninety-two feet, 
at three pounds seven shillings per thousand. Daniel Peaslee, 
Evan Jones and Peter Merrill were chosen a committee to make 
a contract with some carpenter to frame it. This was no small 
task, and the committee showed their good judgment in employ- 
ing a man who could do full justice to the undertaking. This 
man was none other than Henry Sanders, he who had already 
done such lasting work in behalf of the parish. He cut the tim- 
bers at his mill during the summer, and fitted them ready for 
raising. The specifications voted called for a building forty- 
eight feet long and thirty-eight feet wide, with a twenty-two foot 
post. The committee having charge of the finishing of the out- 
side were Edward Clark, John Ober, Daniel Peaslee, Henry San- 
ders, and Robert Ellen wood. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 79 

When the frame was about ready the question of location came 
up. A meeting was held on November 8, at which it was "voted 
to have the meetinghouse on the west side of Spicket river, near 
the new bridge." On the following Wednesday, November 15, 
1738, the frame was raised in the presence of the entire parish. 
How well it was put together needs no further evidence than the 
state of its present preservation. In spite of the fact that it has 
withstood the New England storms and gales of nearly one 
hundred and seventy years, meantime having been moved from 
its original location, it is today a staunch and goodly building. 
May the sons and daughters of Salem be ever watchful lest in 
some evil hour this venerable monument to the past, this struc- 
ture which was the center of the life of the new community for 
so many years, should fall the victim to the schemes of some am- 
bitious political faction. Nay more, if any change is ever to be 
contemplated, let the old building be reinstated upon its former 
site on the common, with its ridgepole pointing to the rising sun 
at dawn, and the side entrance open to his noontide beams. Let 
the memories of the past be linked with the dreams of the fu- 
ture as a sane and safe guide for the endeavors of the present. 

In connection with the last mentioned vote we wish to call 
attention to a mistaken belief that has been for a long time prev- 
alent regarding the comparative ages of the two bridges over the 
Spicket at Salem village. All of the "accounts" of the early 
days of the town state that the bridge near the old graveyard was 
the first to be built across the river; that before that was built, 
the various fording places were used. This idea is entirely in- 
correct and without foundation. This bridge was built probably 
in 1735, as it is not mentioned in any records prior to that date, 
and the first reference to it designates it as does the record above 
quoted, ' ' the new bridge. ' ' The old bridge was about where the 
* l causeway" now is, being in a direct line with Old Spicket Path, 
which passed over it. Daniel Peaslee's house was close beside 
this path. The age of this bridge may be conjectured from the 
fact that in 1733 a considerable discussion took place in the town 
meeting at Methuen in regard to repairing it. It was said by 
Daniel Peaslee to be in no safe condition for travel. This mat- 
ter, with the evidence bearing thereon, will be more fully treated 
Tinder the chapter on Highways and Bridges. 



80 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

No effort had been made to induce a minister to make a per- 
manent settlement in the parish up to the building of the meet- 
inghouse. Mr. Hale was again engaged in April, 1739, this 
time for a period of three months ; but before his term expired, 
it was decided to obtain a permanent minister. On June 14, 
1739, it was voted to hire a minister to come on trial, with a view 
to a settlement. Three hundred fifty pounds was voted to de- 
fray parish charges. It will be noticed that this was more than 
double the amount raised only two years before. Henry San- 
ders was chosen a committee to procure, at the expense of the 
parish, the land where the meetinghouse stood. It had not been 
given to the parish by the Haverhill Proprietors. Several meet- 
ings were held in August and September of this year, with the 
result that Mr. Samuel Chandler was selected as a candidate for 
the ministry here. A short stay, however, sufficed to show either 
Mr. Chandler or his congregation that his services would not be 
needed, as the adjourned meeting of September 17 voted to give 
the call to Mr. Abner Bailey. He was evidently well liked, for 
he was formally elected as permanent minister, November 13, 
1739, at a salary of one hundred forty pounds in bills of credit, 
''according as bills of credit are payable at this time." The 
parishioners were desirous of expressing their approval of the 
selection of Mr. Bailey. At the adjournment November 27, they 
voted him a free gift of one hundred fifty pounds, and "as ye 
parish incres in welth and mr bayley's needs Requier mor there 
shall be an adition made to his salery. " Following is Mr. Bay- 
ley's reply to the call for permanent ministry: 

"Gentlemen of the north or Second parish in Methuen In- 
asmuch as you have given me a call to settle with you in the work 
of the ministry I accept of your call hoping that you will not 
neglect to minister to my necessities. 

"Methuen December 24: 1739 

"Abner Bayley" 

In 1740 the tax raised for ministerial and other parish charges 
was four hundred pounds. It was at the beginning of this year 
that the church was organized. At the parish meeting of De- 
cember 24, 1739, when Mr. Bayley's acceptance was presented, 
arrangements were made to hold the first public fast. This meet- 




H 

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FRANK D. WILSON. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 81 

ing was held on Monday, and the fast was appointed to be held 
"ye next wensday come three weeks." This would be January 
16, two weeks preceding the date set for the ordination of Mr. 
Bayley, which took place Wednesday, January 30, 1739-40. 
There were expenses of twenty-eight pounds incurred for these 
exercises, of which fifteen pounds was provided by Edward Clark 
and thirteen pounds by Daniel Peaslee. What these expenses 
were for is not stated, but probably included travel and enter- 
tainment for clergymen who assisted in the ceremony. Elab- 
orate preparations were made in order that this all important 
event might be fittingly observed. It was a double privilege to 
organize the first church and ordain the first settled minister 
at the same time. 

Meantime the work on the meetinghouse had progressed slowly. 
These items for labor in the framing are found: 

pounds shillings 
Henry Sanders 33 5 

Daniel Peaslee 5 7 

John Ober 2 9 

Eichard Dow 1 2-6 

Ebenezer Ayer 3 4 

Thos Eaton 1 4 

Peter Merrill 1 N 11 

Eichard Kimball 3 9 

Ephraim Clark 2 

Fitting up the building for worship was a very slow and tedi- 
ous process. It was a number of years before the inside was 
made to exhibit any finish other than the bare timbers of the 
massive frame. Eough plank benches served as seats, which, 
however, might well have been dispensed with altogether in a 
building which had absolutely no facilities for heating. 

From time to time orders were given for building material 
for twelve or fifteen years. Henry Sanders was paid sixteen 
shillings for building the pulpit, which was on the north side, 
at the middle of the length (the side of the house which is now 
next the river), and was placed high against the wall. This 
compelled the worshipers to tip their heads back at an angle 



82 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

which must have been anything but comfortable, if they wished 
to look at the minister while he preached. 

The windows were small and high above the ground, with no 
glass till 1749, when a bill was presented for "glass and sashes 
for ye meeting house. ' ' It was even later than this that the house 
was laid out into pews, each owner being compelled to build his 
own after having bid off the location at a public auction. The 
pews had high sides, and against these the seats were turned up 
on hinges. After standing during one of the lengthy prayers of 
that time, the weary congregation were ready to drop into their 
seats. As they tipped the seats forward and released them, at 
the sound of the "Amen," each contributed his share to the rattle 
of the seats dropping into place. In later years many of the 
congregation brought small foot stoves, in which were red-hot 
coals. These were placed on the floor inside the pews. But oth- 
ers refused to be so progressive, and held to a stern, rigid, re- 
ligious discipline, which will best thrive in the cold air of a New 
England winter. 

Work on the meetinghouse was paid for at the rate of six shil- 
lings per day. Following are a few items of construction ex- 
penses: April 3, 1739, "voted henry Sanders for one thousand 
and one hundred of bord at ye mill, 3-10-0, to henry sanders for 
haling bords from ye mill to ye meeting-house 10 shillings pr 
thousand, to Oliver sanders for one thousand and one hundred 
of bord at ye mill 3-17-0, to benoney Rowel for one thousand 
bord 3-10-0, to samuel Rowel for 283 feet of board 0-19-8, to 
John Rowel for a hundred and half of bord 0-10-6. ' ' 

November 13, 1739, "voted to Richard dow for going to Chas- 
ter and for bords, three pounds" 

December 17, "voted to abiel kelly for bords, 1-30, to John 
Bayley for underpining 1-10-0, to thomas Eatton for underpin- 
ing 0-12-0; to John Moulton for underpining 1-7-0, to Edwd 
dark Jun'r for a days work 0-6-0" 

December 23, 1739, "voted to Peter merrill for speck and 
hinges 2-18-0 also voted to peter merrill for bords 2-0-0, to 
henry sanders for bords 5-6-3." 

Early in 1740 the pulpit was built, as above stated. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 83 

August 10, 1741, "voted to Richard dow for gutters for ye 
meetinghouse two Pounds and Eight shillings." 

October 29, 1748, "paid to Jeremier Eatton out of ye treas- 
ury for Joinery work 9-0-0 ; pay 'd out of ye treasury for bord 
nails four pound ten shillings. ' ' 

March 10, 1749, "Rackning mad up with the comitte march 
ye 10, one ye a count of ye meeting-house in sashes and glas 
and work and Divers othe things 248-2-6." 

May 6, 1749, "paid out of ye treasure to mathe reed for glas 
Eighteen pounds forteen shilings 18-14-0. ' ' 

By this time the total expenditure on the meetinghouse had 
reached the sum of four hundred nineteen pounds, nineteen 
shillings and six pence. The pews were not yet laid out, nor 
were even the most common conveniences included in the equip- 
ment. Further progress in the improvement of the building will 
be noted as we trace the development of the parish. 

Shortly after the organization of the church, it became neces- 
sary to divide the hundred acres of parsonage as indicated in the 
grant; that is, one half to the parish and one half to the first 
minister, Rev. Abner Bayley. This division was left to a com- 
mittee of three, Daniel Peaslee, Ephraim Clark and Isaac Clough, 
chosen to "decide the parsonage." Mr. Bayley was given the 
northern part of the lot, which part included the so-called 
Kelly 's Plains, now the property of Warren Bodwell and others, 
on the south side of the road to Grosvenor's Corner, be- 
ginning at the Spicket bridge. Mr. Bayley afterwards bought 
land of Daniel Peaslee and others on the north side of the road, 
and built his homestead within easy reach of his church. This 
is the house now occupied by Warren Bodwell, although the al- 
terations made in recent years have entirely hidden the ancient 
frame which is enclosed within. Where Mr. Bayley lived before 
he built this house is not known to us. The deed for this home- 
stead lot was given in 1755 and is designated as "land whereon 
Bayley has erected buildings and now dwells." That is, he 
bought the land after he built and occupied the house, although 
it was probably not long after. The deed defines the bounds as 
beginning at "a swamp white oak in a littel vale by the road 
which leads from the meetinghouse to Swan's ferry;" (this little 



84 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

vale is now evident between Bodwell's and the old Emerson 
honse) thence northeast ten and one half rods, thence east 
thirty-two rods to the edge of a little swamp ; thence ' ' south by 
the fence as it now runs" forty-one rods to said road. This lot 
contained six acres and was sold for nine pounds by Daniel 
Peaslee. It can be readily traced from these directions by any 
one familiar with this part of the town. Mr. Bayley afterwards 
effected other transfers of real estate, but retained this as his. 
homestead lot. The subsequent history of the ancient house will 
be found elsewhere. (See Chapters V and XII.) 

BURIAL GROUND LAID OUT. 

It will be necessary to go back a few years to take up the story 
of the old burying ground near the meetinghouse. At the first 
parish meeting, in 1735, a committee of three, Joseph Peaslee, 
John Bayley and Abiel Kelly, were chosen to lay out a burial 
place. Of course, they had no authority over the land, and 
could merely look about and make the plans for best suiting the 
needs of the community. Nothing definite was done until after 
Mr. Bayley was ordained as minister. He then took the matter 
up in earnest and made known to the Haverhill Proprietors the 
needs of his parish. The following is the complete record as it 
appears on the Proprietors ' book : 
''Nov. 2, 1741. 

"The proprietors being assembled pursuant to the adjourn- 
ment from the Seventh Day of September last past. 

"Then y e Rev d M r Abner Bailey petitioned ye prop 1- in the 
words following viz*. Haverhill Nov. 2 d 1741. To the propri- 
etors of the Common lands in S d Haverhill & Methuen this day 
mett. The Humble petition of S d Abner Bailey is that you 
would be pleased to give or sell to me a small piece of Land Ly- 
ing on the westerly Side of Spicket River between the fourth di- 
vision, and Said River, and between the Upper Spicket Bridge 
and the bridge by Spicket meeting House. Containing by Esti- 
mation about six acres: reserving in the Most Convenient place 
about Three Acres for a burying place and a Training field And 
you will much Oblidge your Humble petitioner Abner Bailey. 

' ' In Answer to which petition ye prop 1- A greed & voted to give 




w 

M- 



h 

O 

H 
O 

H 

Q 
i— i 

02 

35 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 85 

y e Land described in the petition to ye petitioner reserving a 
conveniency for a burying- place & Trainfield & the priviledge 
of a "Way from the Meeting house to Daniel Peaslees bridge if 
it be need full in y e most Convenient place voted in y e Affirm- 
ative Nemine Contradicente. 

"Attest Rich d Hazzen Clerk." 

What a wealth of information is to be found in this single rec- 
ord if we will but read between the lines. In any evidence a 
mere reference to some fact or condition is often more convincing 
than the main assertion. For instance, the manner in which the 
fourth division land is mentioned in this request leaves not the 
slightest doubt that this land ran nearly parallel to the Spicket 
near the two bridges referred to, and not very far distant, as 
the whole lot between the division line and the river contained 
only about six acres. But there was to be a provision for a road 
to the bridge by Peaslee 's ; and if there was only a narrow strip 
of land it is not likely that the road would be laid out so as 
to divide it, but rather would be located so as to leave the re- 
mainder of the land all in one piece. This permits a reasonable 
supposition that the road was reserved at the west side of the 
grant, that is, near the line of the fourth division land. Later 
this road was re-laid and accepted by the town, and is the same 
that now leads from the townhouse to Pine Grove cemetery. 
Thus we can safely conclude that the fourth division lots in- 
cluded the land now occupied by Salem Center and extended 
nearly or quite to the road above mentioned. From other 
sources we already know that this is so, but the way in which this 
new link in the chain of evidence regarding early conditions tells 
the story all by itself is remarkable. 

Of course this record is intended to give us the origin of the 
old burying ground. It does this, but even more. It tells us 
that the lot where the townhouse and library now stand, as well 
as perhaps the level stretch to the northward along the river, in- 
cluding perhaps some of the land across the street, was intended 
for a training field for the militia, for the frequent petty wars, 
Indian difficulties, etc., through which the settlers had passed 
made them realize the value and necessity of keeping up at least 
a slight knowledge of military tactics. 



86 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Still anotjier vital bit of information found in this record is 
that regarding the bridge by Daniel Peaslee's house. This has 
before been spoken of as the oldest bridge in town. Here we 
have a fresh bit of evidence — the record defines the road as lead- 
ing from the meetinghouse to the bridge by Peaslee's, to be re- 
served out of this lot of land. Can anyone interpret this to 
mean that the bridge by Peaslee's was the one near the old grave- 
yard, especially when we know that Peaslee lived near the old 
causeway? And we know that the bridge near Peaslee's was so 
old as to be considered unsafe two years before the bridge by 
the graveyard was built. 

The graveyard was fenced in 1752 with a rude rail fence which 
soon became a subject for discussion at town meetings to see 
whether or not it should be repaired. Thus in 1764 it was 
"voted to mend the fence about the burying ground." The 
next year the following strange vote was recorded : to " Rectify 
the Burying yard Exclusive of those Persons that fenced the 
other in the North Part of the town." This other must have 
been the one near the Atkinson line at James Cullen's. There 
was a considerable settlement in this part of the town, it being 
on the main road from Haverhill to Londonderry. An effort 
was made in 1770 to have a new fence built as the old one was in 
very poor condition. The motion was voted down however. 

In 1773 it was "voted to fence the Burying yard with a Stone 
wall. Voted that the Selectmen Should Not Vendue the Jobb 
of the Burying Yard fence" (to the lowest bidder). It was a 
custom to put public contracts up for sale at auction, or as it 
was termed a "vendue sale." This method was applied to the 
sale of seats in the meetinghouse, the harvesting of crops on the 
parsonage land, the housing and care of the town poor, as well 
as to private sales. The record does not show whether the wall 
was built at once, but as no subsequent action was taken in the 
matter, we may suppose the wall to have been built at that time. 

CHURCH DIFFICULTIES. 

It was many years before the small and scattered parish es- 
caped the financial terrors of its very existence. The town af- 
fairs began to supplant the parish needs in degree of importance 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 87 

soon after the incorporation. At the second town meeting it was 
very magnanimously thought proper to see what terms could be 
made with the "Revern Mr. Bay ley to settel amongst us". Here 
was a new and official sanction to his ministry. This same of- 
ficial authority was soon to neglect to fulfil its part of the obli- 
gation to his ministry. 

In the town records we find many references to repairs and 
care of the meetinghouse. It was ''Voted wd. Sarah Merrill 3 
pounds old taner for sweeping the meeting house in ye year 
1750." In May, 1751, voted to have the two "eand dors of ye 
meeting hous mad and hanged." It was at this time fine spring 
weather, when the necessity for permanent doors would seem to 
be far less urgent than in the winter months just previous. It 
is doubtful what protection had been temporarily provided for, 
the doorways, but it is evident that there was a desire to have 
an improvement before another winter should be at hand. 

The pulpit was far from comfortable, as were also the pews. 
Some sympathetic individuals had an article inserted in the 
warrant to have a cushion obtained for Mr. Bayley; but it met 
its fate at the hands of the voters, thus: January 21, 1754, 
"Voted in ye Negitive Not to by a coshen for ye polpit. " 

But this was far from the most unpleasant action taken by the 
town. With the development of the town government came 
increased expenses, due to improvements made, roads laid out, 
and other obligations, such as caring for the town poor. This 
condition necessitated a higher tax rate, which was felt by many 
to be a great hardship. About this time, too, the currency be- 
gan to depreciate in value, which had a tendency to make mat- 
ters more unsettled than ever. A new system of finances was 
adopted, without, however, discarding the old. The "new 
tenor" was worth more than the old, and the ratio was rapidly 
increasing. Before a level of values was reached, before the 
change of values ceased, the new tenor was worth four times as 
much as the old. This caused a very serious question in re- 
gard to Mr. Bayley 's salary. He had been paid in old tenor, 
but a move was made in 1756 aiming to make up for the depreci- 
ation of the money. But it was "voted not to give Mr. Bayley 
any compensation ' ' for the fall in money values, also not to fur- 



88 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

nish him any form of wood this year. This was the culmination 
of several years of tendency to neglect the obligations to the min- 
ister, which had gradually become more and more apparent 
to that worthy gentleman. Accordingly, when this vote was 
made known, the Eeverend Abner brought a suit against the 
town. This brought them suddenly to their senses, as they real- 
ized that his cause was right and that he was too able a man to 
attempt to trifle with any longer. Offers were at once made for 
a settlement out of court. Mr. Bayley was equal to the occasion, 
however, and presented his own terms of settlement in a proposal 
which was accepted by the town. The form was as follows: 

"Voted that what the town has failed of paying four hundred 
pounds old taner yerly to the revd Mr. Abner bayley shall be 
amedately payd him and the intrest till payd from the time it 
was due that two hondred pounds old taner more shall be ame- 
datly paid to mak up the sink of mony and the town difishenc 
in wood in som masuer and the charges he has been at and that 
he shall be seplied with 25 cords of wood this prasent year ac- 
cording to ye old vot and that he shall have six hondred pounds 
old taner for his salery this prasent year on condition ye said 
ravernd mr Abner bayley with draw ye somons he has sent ye 
town and give ye town a discharge in fool of all demand till 
March ye 1 1757 Apon his reciving as afforsd — voted in ye af- 
f armitive. ' ' 

This proposition had been obtained from Mr. Bayley and pre- 
sented to the meeting by Joseph Wright, John Hall and Peter 
Merrill as a committee. 

At the meeting in May, 1757, those in favor of cutting Mr. 
Bayley were again victorious, and the appropriation of his sal- 
ary was voted down. The folly of this move was apparent very 
shortly, and at a meeting the following September the vote was 
reconsidered and two hundred pounds old tenor appropriated. 
At this meeting it was voted to shorten the time between the 
meetings to three quarters of an hour. To us this brief inter- 
mission would seem a decided hardship, but in those days the 
Sunday worship was a very serious business. By thus bring- 
ing the morning and afternoon services nearer together, most of 
the people were spared a long wait in the cold and dismal church. 







H 

o 

m at 

H 
> 










X 
H 

O 
H 

O 



o 

O 

Q 

■72 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 89 

For they lived at such distances from the place of worship that it 
was impractical to go home and return before the afternoon ser- 
vice. 

Meantime, during these years of trouble over the salary ques- 
tion, several attempts were made to divide the parsonage land. 
A committee was appointed to attend to this matter, but did not 
go at once about it; then in 1760, it was voted that they should 
not divide the lot. 

The next year a committee was chosen to bring in a proposal 
for Mr. Bayley's salary. After due deliberation it was voted 
to allow him one thousand pounds old tenor per year for 1760 
and 1761, together with the usual amount of wood. When the 
final payment was made at the end of this period, the committee 
insisted upon having an unqualified bill of discharge of the ob- 
ligation. Abner had among his many interesting traits a keen 
sense of humor, which at once appreciated the situation. He 
concluded to give them just such a receipt as they wanted. Here 
is the form in which he put it : 

"Salem March 31: 1762. 

"Received of the Town of Salem in the Province of New 
Hampshire the whole of my Sallery in Cash & Wood from the 
beginning of the world to March 5, 1762 One Thousand Seven 
Hundred Sixty & Two. I say received in full 

"by me 
"Abner Bayley." 

As the population increased a demand arose for more pews in 
the church. In 1764 it was voted to take up the "four hind 
seats ' ' and sell the ' ' pue ground ' ' thus obtained. The sale took 
place February 14, 1764, Andrew Balch, inn holder, being ven- 
due master. The two "seets in the mens side and two in the 
woman's" were to be made into four "pues each, of equal big- 
ness." There is a plan in the town records which shows the ar- 
rangement of the pews before this division was made, probably 
drawn about 1760. The accompanying cut is not a reproduc- 
tion of the original, but is drawn so as to preserve the charac- 
teristics, including spelling, of it. The pews numbered 1, 2, 3 
and 4 are shown in the plan on the floor of the body of the 
house. The note just beside them explains that they were in 



\Nrsr 

S 7 A lUS 


Said ^eef fo 
"Ric/iaf-^ Do" 

3b pounds 

o 1 d Tan e r 


DoRE 


I/". IX 

jive j-ett to 

Sandc rs 
SUitltnos 

old Tancr 

fa 


l/ c 13 

j**e fteT 

ft "Richard. 

TaTtc 

fh pounds 
oli Taner 




«"> /f 
/lire, feet and half 

/.Jwicl ttlasseij 
'i'l pounds «(4. 

T*Q."»7€ p 






tY° II 
■f lire feet lio half n 

€dwar$ Clark 

3f p« u-n <Ji ten. 

SU ^ 1 Unos °IJ 
Vaner 








yi>e feet antf half 
to £adujar4 Clark 
bo pounds old. 
Va-ner 


//" /O 
5 f,*T v *«(/• 
To Oliver Sanders 
S~3 powndi ol£ 
t oner 


fa 
■faj 

v. a *- 

.* ^ 

Z ~" 


To Vaniel Dcvf 

1* p°undtolt\ 
TTaner 


(2 /i the pue s ar e 
n?i* ieef Deep 


rY". lb 
f tire feet arid 
half the 

lO JJTl&S 

pue 


fn ^eeT to 
Seth patte.u 
58* p ou-nt) s old 
fa )i c r 


Wo 2 

To IcnaThen 
Cur Us TAe ft.Vi 
ii" pounds oti 
T«""e>* 


Pulpit 


South 

Doif 


t" Is ret Uounq 

<]uvtr J3pounh 

old taljtr 


St j. feet to 

(fidwarc} Cla>-f( 

fifth niyje pounds 

ol<$ Tarter 


J-ij: feef&Hlntchts 
Tt Sotii Patte. 

hi pounif old 
taner 


t/' 7 
five ftet and f 
i fitches to 

Da-n «€ ' 23 »W 
Ij-H ■f^ou.-nSi old 
"tarter 


To j8e.n imari 

Wheler 

lb pound te?z 
Shilhn<? old 
t~o.ne r 


tY°. Z. 
Si X j-ett ftrftihes 
to To-no+U Jol&tti 
39-10 Thirty -nine 
jo o tL"n d ~ta.r\ 
i?Ji I'/i'-nOi 
o I el tii-ner 


t/° J, 
five jT.se t anj 
H intches to 
T^alpk Ho-U 
£J xyoun ds 
e/cj tonef 


3 "^ 










lf>. 3 

to5ono%en Itfarqin 

31 £ 10 s 
old Taner 

Save?! / ec ? 


Est 
Stairs 




Seven feet 
to rjath U Don- 
3 7 pounds 
old Z an er 


East 
Vote 


live feet 
Daniel tf/asey 
J? pounds 

old toner 


tf° f 
firt 

feet 
Vaniei 

1tio.i0.tJ 

$H pou nds 

S t U. i / 1' n 
OS old Ta*itr 



Plan of Meetinghouse, Drawn about 1760. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 91 

the gallery against the front or side of the building. The seats 
or benches in the middle part of the floor are not shown in this 
plan. They were not sold as the pews were, but were occupied 
as free seats. The pulpit was in the center of the north side 
and was raised high from the floor. This is the side which now 
stands next to the river. 

It seems that the town had money at interest in the bank, as 
in 1768 it was voted to use the interest for repairs on the meet- 
inghouse. These repairs were for the most part alterations in 
the seating accommodations, or completion of work which had 
been left unfinished when the house was built. 

The question of dividing the parsonage land with Mr. Bayley 
again came up in 1770, when Jonathan Wheeler, Jr., Daniel Gor- 
don and Jeremiah Dow were chosen a committee to divide it. 
The town voted, on October 8, to accept the division made by the 
committee. It will be remembered that this land had been di- 
vided by another committee nearly forty years before, but for 
some reason the bounds were either indefinite or unsatisfactory, so 
that a new division was deemed necessary. 

Again we find that the floor seats of the meetinghouse were 
needed for a special purpose. This is explained by an article 
inserted in a warrant posted August 31, 1773: "3 ly to See if 
the town will vote the two hind Seats on the Mens Side below for 
the use of those Persons that have a mind to Sit together to Carey 
the Lead in Singing in the Publick worship & if the town dont 
See fit to grant the two Hind Seets then to See if they will allow 
one half of the Seats in the front of the Gallery Both mens and 
womans Side for the Purpose of Singing during the towns Ples- 
ure they Prepairing them on their own Cost with out any Charge 
to the town. ' ' 

When this came up at the meeting it was "voted the two Hind 
Seats below on the mens side be for those that Lead in the Sing- 
ing to Sit in by them selves during the towns Pleasur. ' ' 

This did not satisfy very long. The singers became more am- 
bitious and asked still better accommodations; but at the same 
time they must have shown by their effectiveness in the singing 
that they were worthy of consideration, for in 1777 they were 
voted permission to erect, at their own expense, a pew in the 



92 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

front gallery, four feet on the women's side and three feet on 
the men's side. 

In the records of the next year, 1778, we find an item to the 
effect that Capt. Moody Morse was paid three pounds for taking- 
care of the meetinghouse for that year. Similar entries to this 
are common in the records, sometimes naming men, at other 
times women, who were paid money for sweeping or taking care 
of the house. 

As will be seen by examining the tax lists of the early days, 
the minister's tax was levied and collected separately from other 
taxes; in fact, a separate tax was made for each branch of ex- 
pense, as state tax, county tax, school tax, etc. This gave excuse 
for asking that certain taxes be rebated. In 1774 Esq. Abraham 
Dow was released from paying his minister's tax, on the ground 
that he was not a Congregationalist but a follower of the faith 
of the Church of England. The release was to hold "as long 
as he continues in the persuasion" of this faith. Others asked 
to be released from the tax because they were of other faiths. 
This condition soon became far too common for fair management, 
especially as there were a large number of Scotch-Irish people in 
the western part of the town who professed to be Presbyterians. 
These desired a parish separation, and, as previously stated, were 
permitted to pay their minister's tax to "Windham. But Salem 
voted not to release Presbyterians from the tax; that is, they 
must pay it either in one town or the other. 

DIVISION OF THE PARISH. 

In 1741, just after the church had been organized and the min- 
ister settled, came the third great change in the jurisdiction of 
the parish. First came the separation of the territory from the 
town of Haverhill by the incorporation of Methuen, then the 
setting off of the North Parish, and now by the establishment of 
the province line the land and inhabitants came under the au- 
thority of New Hampshire. This change of relations, while 
settling the long dispute regarding the border territory, caused 
considerable inconvenience to individuals on either side of the 
line. The selectmen of Haverhill were ordered to make an in- 
ventory of all the polls and estates in what was formerly Haver- 




JOHN WOODBURY. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 



98 



hill, keeping separate those on opposite sides of the new line. 
Their report shows that a large part of the strength was cut off 
at this time. The summary is given below : 





OS 

d 
© 

00 
© 


© 

00 

d 
O 


00 


Acres. 


00 
03 
O 

bo 
© 


d 
© 

o 


00 

O 

O 


oo 
© 

00 

s^ 

O 

I— I 

MH 


© 

d 

CO 


bb 
d 

O 


bb 

d 
d 


03 

*— 

DO 

Ph 


i— H 

o 


North of the 


























line . 


215 


158 


9 


458 


308 


152 


19 


2 


239 


346 


135 


20 


South of the 


























line . 


346 


214 


7 


1126 


751 


723 


125i 


10 


266 


540 


184 


128 



A part of this property was in what is now Atkinson, Plais- 
tow or Hampstead, therefore it is not intended to show the 
strength of Salem at this time. The names of the citizens who 
came under New Hampshire government are mostly now repre- 
sented in the families of the north and east parts of Salem, as 
the central and southern parts were then Methuen, and do not 
appear on the Haverhill books. We think, nevertheless, that 
there may be some interest found in the large number of names 
in this list who subsequently located in Salem, as well as in those 
who were then here. The following is from the list of Haverhill 
citizens who lived north of the new line, and includes many men 
who were later taxpayers of Salem: 



Abraham Annis 
John Currier 
John Currier Jr. 
Richard Carlton 
Edward Carlton Jr. 
Timothy Johnson 
William Johnson 
Peter Patee 
Obadiah Perry 
Seth Patee 
Stephen Wheler 
David Copp 
Moses Copp 
Thomas Crawford 



Jonathan Coburn 
John Dow, Jut. 
Stephen Emerson, Jur. 
Peter Easman 
William Easman 
Robert Emerson, Jur. 
Benjamin Emerson 
Jonathn Emery- 
Humphry Emery 
Richard Flood 
Robert Ford 
Joseph Gill 
Moses Gill 
Ebenr Gill 



94 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



John Heath 
James Heath 
David Heath 
James Heath, Jur. 
Richard Heath 
Jonathan Hutchens 
Thomas hall 
Benjamin Heath 
Zacariah Johnson 
Micael Johnson 
Stephen Johnson 
Stephen Johnson Jur 
John Kent 
Jonathn Kimball 
Nathaniel Knight 
Benjamin Smith 
Thomas Smith 
John Smith 
Richard Patee 
Jonathan Wheler 
John Watts 
John Webster 
William Webster 
Daniel Whitiker 
Benjamin Wheler 
John Kezar 
Jonathan Merrill 
Nathaniel Merrill 
James Mills 
Joseph Page 
Jonathan Page 
Caleb Page 
Timothy Page 
Benjamin Richards 
Samuel Stevens 
John Stevens 
Nehemiah Stevens 
Samuel Stevens, Jur. 



William Stevens 
Jonathan Stevens, Jur. 
Joseph Stevens, Jur. 
Samuel Worthen, Jur. 
Jonathn Whitiker 
James White 
Israel Webster 
Thomas Pope 
Edmond Page 
Timothy Noyse 
George Little 
Daniel Little 
George Little Jur. 
Samuel Little . 
Joseph Little 
Caleb Heath 
Joshua Page 
John Hogg 
William Mackmaster 
William Mackmaster Jur. 
Arter Boyd 
Askebell Kinnicum 
Askebell Forsh 
Thomas Davison 
Holbert morrison 
William Hogg 
Walter Mackfortin 
John Stinson 
Thomas Horner 
Alexander Kelcy 
Micael Gorden 
Robert Mackcurdy 
Peter Christy 
William Gilmore 
Paul Mackfarlen 
James Mackfarlen 
James Aclums 
James Adums Jur 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 



95 



Daniel Mackcafee 

Heugh Mackcafee 

James Gilmore 

Samuel Paterson 

William Chambers 

Samuel Graves 

James Graves 

Moses Tucker 

"William Hancock 

Nathll Heath 

Lemuel Tucker 

John Hunkins 

John Atwood 

Othro Stevens 

Eliphelet Page 

John Muzzee 

Wait Stevens 

Samuel Anderson 

Nathll Mackfarlen 

John Mackcaster 

Robert Gilmore 

Johnathan Coborn Jur. 

Daniel Poor 

Jonathan Dusten Jur. 

Moses Trussel 

Capt. Nicolas White 

Francis Smiley 

John Smiley 

Heugh Smiley 

Capt. Christopher Bartlet 

Nathaniel Bartlet 

Johnathan Bradlee 

John Bradlee 

Joseph Beartoe 

Obadiah Clements 

Abraham Chase 

Thomas Cheney 

Josiah Copp 



Timothy Dow 
John Dow 
Peter Dow 
John Dusten 
David Emerson 
Timothy Emerson 
Ephraim Emerson 
Heugh Pike 
Joseph Earwine 
Samuel Eaton 
Thomas Follensbee 
Daniel Gile 
Joseph Heath 
Nehemiah Heath 
John Heath, Jur. 
Samuel Heath 
Joseph Heath, Jur. 
William Heath 
Josiah heath 
Bartholomew Heath 
John Harriman 
Leonard Harriman 
Leonard Harriman Jun. 
Mathew Harriman 
Abner Harriman 
Joseph Harriman 
Henry Haseltine 
Edman Hale 
Johnathan Johnson 
Wid Mary Kimball 
Samuel Kimball 
Jonathan Roberts 
Jonathan Stevens 
Moses Stevens 
Samuel Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Thomas Worthin 
Samuel Worthin 



96 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

John Pollord moses Jackman 

Nathll Tucker Benjamin Pettingall 

Samuel Brown John French 

Benjamin Stone Nathll Gatchell 

Nathaniel Johnson, Jur. 

The most unsatisfactory feature of the new conditions was 
that the territory newly acquired by New Hampshire was with- 
out any form of local government. The Massachusetts towns of 
which it had been a part, no longer had any authority over it, 
nor did the adjoining towns in New Hampshire have any rights 
there. Consequently the people in this vicinity were desirous of 
obtaining official sanction as a local power in themselves. At a 
meeting held January 8, 1741-42, Henry Sanders and Benja- 
min Corning were chosen a committee to confer with the New 
Hampshire government in regard to obtaining a township. 
They submitted a petition to the Secretary of the Council, which 
was read to that body; but on the 28th of the same month, the 
following petition was received by the Governor's Council: 

"Petition of Inhabitants of Methuen — To his Excellency Ben- 
ning Wentworth, Esq r and the Hon ble Council of the Province of 
New Hampshire : 

' ' This Prayer of your humble Petitioners show, That Whereas 
there has been a Petition lodged with your Secretary by Messrs. 
Henry Sanders and Benjamin Corning for a township in that 
part of Methuen which has lately fallen into New Hampshire,, 
with the westerly part of Haverhill as described in said Pe- 
tition : This is the prayer of your Petitioners that said Pe- 
tition be granted. 

Jan y 28 th 1741-2. Bengaman Wheeler 

Samuel Currier Stephen Wheeler 

Richard Kimball Nathan Wheeler 

Samuel Packer Johnathan Wheeler, jun 

Daniel Curey John Gilmor 

Benjamin Hilton John Coffran 

Benony Rowl John Amy 

John Rowl John Loul 

Lemuel Rowl Richard Dow 

Abraham Annis David Louel 




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HOWARD L. GORDON. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 



97 



Timothy Johnson 
William Johnson 
David Dow 
Nathaniel Dow 
Josiah Clough 
Abel Asten 
Jonathan Corlis 
Peter Touring 
Joseph Pesely X marl? 
Isaac Clough 
Ebenezer Ayer 
John Hall 
Robert Ellenwood 
Jonathan Woodbery 
Nathaniel Woodbery 
Samuel Giles 
Ebenezer Woodbery 
John Giles 
John Ober." 



Daniel Pensha 

Richard Kally 

Abiel Kally 

John Ober jun. 

Oliver Sanders 

Joseph Sanders 

John Page 

Samuel Sanders 

William Sanders 

Timothy Sanders 

Joseph Rite 

Benony Rowl, jun. 

Josiah Rowl 

Timothy Swan 

Seth Patey 

Richard Patey 

David Sanders 

Israel Young 

Jonathan Wheeler 

Richard Carlton 
Edward Carlton 

The governor evidently saw the need of some form of author- 
ity in the community, for the part of Methuen which had been 
put into New Hampshire was incorporated into a district on 
March 18, 1741^2. This was known as Methuen District. 
Similarly all the other parts of towns were made into districts, 
as Haverhill District and Dracut District. This arrangement 
was not of great permanency, but served to unite the people un- 
til they could obtain charters for townships. The next year, that 
is June 25, 1743, another petition was sent to the governor and 
council. After rehearsing the existing conditions of lack of town 
jurisdiction, it defines the territory asked for in these words: 

"Wherefore, your Petitioners in behalf of their principals 
most humbly pray that they may be Incorporated into a Par- 
ish or Precinct by the following Boundaries : viz. Beginning at 
the East End of a Pond commonly called & known by the name 
of the Captain's Pond, & from thence to Run to the late dwelling 
house of one Richard Petty now deceased, upon a strait line, 

8 



98 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

and from thence to the North part of Pollicy Pond so called, & 
so mining by said pond to the South West part & then by 
Dracut Line till it comes to the Province Line & so running by 
that till it comes to the place first mentioned, and invested with 
the usual Parish Powers & Privileges within this Province, and 
your Petitioners, as in duty bound shall ever pray, &c. 

"John Ober 
"Daniel Peasely." 

This petition brought no change in the situation, but the prin- 
ciple so often employed before was applied again here — that per- 
severance and persistence are often crowned with success. The 
next petition was drawn and dated "Methuen District, Apr. 4, 
1746." It asked for a township on the ground that there were 
forty-five families represented who had been "at the expense of 
erecting a meeting house & settling a Minister and are com- 
modiously situated to attend the worship of God in s d District." 
It went on to state that these people could not well be united 
with the people of Windham, as they were of a "different Per- 
suasion, they being Presbyterians while we are Congregation- 
alists. ' ' 

This was signed by thirty-one men, whose names appear also 
on the petition of January 28, 1741-42. The result, however, 
was no different from that of the former requests. The course 
was still clear — try again! This time twenty-eight men signed 
a paper dated January 1, 1749, which advanced an argument of 
more serious import than had been used before. It first called 
attention to the fact that the district arrangement was not in- 
ended to be permanent, and asked what was to be gained by fur- 
ther delay. It then stated that the district, by reason of its small 
size, found it difficult to support the Rev. Abner Bayley, who 
had "been here near ten years past without any fixed support." 
To meet the difficulty here set forth, it was suggested that the 
western portion of Haverhill District be added to Methuen Dis- 
trict to form a township. 

While no immediate action followed this petition, the subject 
of incorporation had by this time been definitely brought before 
the governor and his council. 

At this time another petition for land was presented, not to the 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 99 

provincial authorities, but to the Masonian Proprietors. It 
seems that an old grant had never been definitely claimed while 
the land was under jurisdiction of Massachusetts, but after the 
running of the province line, the heirs to the original grantee 
thought fit to obtain a clear title from the proprietors. The re- 
quest is recorded as follows : 

PETITION OF SAMUEL HALE. 

"To the Honourable Theodore Atkinson Esq 1- and the Other 
Proprietors of Masons Right 

' ' The petition of Samuel Hale for Himself and Others Humbly 
Sheweth 

"That whereas a Grant of three hundred Acres of Land was 
made by the Government of the Massachusetts Bay to the Heirs 
of our Grandfather John Hale of Beverley deceased for reward 
of Service in the Canada Expedition Anno 1690 which Grant 
was laid out in Methuen District (so called) Bounded East on 
Haverhill old Line North on Woodbury's Farm West on Land 
Owners unknown South on (Land since known by) Greanleafs 
Farm and was then Claimed by that Province but by the late 
Settlement of the Line it falls within this Prov: & within your 
Claim We therefore Pray that you would Confirm or Quit unto 
us said tract of Land and as in Duty bound shall ever Pray 

Your Petitioners 
Portsmouth New Hampshire) Sam 11 Hale 
March the 1 st 1748/9 J for Himself & Others. 

The records preserved show no action on this petition, although 
the disposition of similar cases might lead us to suppose that the 
request was granted. 

SALEM INCORPORATED. 

It was becoming more and more evident to the men in con- 
trol at Portsmouth that there should be a town government con- 
trolling the territory along the border line ; and as an answer to 
the many petitions came the act of the governor and council, 
dated May 11, 1750. The territory known as Methuen District, 
with considerable additions, was incorporated into a town under 



100 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

the name of Salem. The act of incorporation is herewith pre- 
sented : 

Salem Charter. Province of New Hampshire 

,-p . -j George the Second, by the Grace of 

< ~ , > God of Great Brittain France & Ireland 

' J King, Defender of the Faith &c. 

"To All whom these Presents Shall Come, Greeting Whereas 
our Loyal Subjects Inhabitants of a Tract of Land within our 
Province of New Hampe. aforesaid lying Partly within that 
part of our Province of New Hampshire called Haverhill Dis- 
trict Have humbly Petitioned and requested to us that they may 
be Erected and incorporated into a Township and infranchised 
with the Same Powers & Privileges which other Towns within 
our said Province by Law have & Enjoy and it Appearing to us 
to be Conducive to the General good of our Said Province as 
well as of the Said Inhabitants in Particular by maintaining 
good order & encouraging the Culture of the Land that the 
Same Should be Don Know Ye therefore that We of our Espe- 
cial Grace Certain knowledge -----& for the En- 
couragement & Promoting the Good Purposes & End afores d by 
& with the advice of our Trusty & well Beloved Benning Went- 
worth Esq. our Governor & Commander in Chief & of our Coun- 
cil for Said Province of New Hampshire Have Erected and 
ordained and by these Presents for us Our Heirs and Successors 
Do will & ordain that the Inhabitants of the Tract of Land 
afores d , or that Shall Inhabit and Improve thereon hereafter, 
Butted and bounded as follows (Viz.) Beginning at a Stake 
by the Captains Pond in the Province Line which is a bound of 
the Town of Plastow, Thence North 22 : % West about Three 
miles & an half (Excluding the whole of Theodore Atkinson 
Esq. Farm Situate lying & being on the Said Line) to A black 
Oak Tree near Joseph Palmers land in Londonderry Bounds, 
then South Ninty Degrees West by Londonderry Bounds one 
mile & three Quarters to a White Oak Standing in An Angle 
of Londonderry Line, thence Two hundred ninety Six rods by 
Londonderry line to a Stake Standing in Said Line, thence South 
39 Degrees West nine hundred & fifty two rods to a Stake & 
Stones, thence South Twenty Degrees East One hundred & fifty 
Two rods to a Pitch Pine marked, Thence South Three Degrees 




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BUILDING THE TOWN. 101 

East Seven hundred & twenty rods to a White Oak in the Prov- 
ince Line, thence as the Province Line runs to a Stake by the 
Captains Pond first mentioned And by these Presents are De- 
clared & ordained to be a Town Corporate and are hereby 
Erected & Incorporated into a body Politic & a Corporation to 
have Continuance forever by the Name of Salem, with all the 
Powers & Authority Privileges & Immunities & Infranchises to 
them the Said Inhabitants & their Successors forever All ways 
reserving to us our heirs & Successors all white Pine trees grow- 
ing & being or that Shall hereafter Grow and be on the Said 
Tract of Land fit for the Use of our Royal Navy reserving also 
the Power of Dividing the Said Town to us our Heirs & Suc- 
cessors when it Shall Appear necessary & Convenient for the 
Benefit of the Inhabitants thereof — it is to be understood and 
it is Accordingly hereby Declared that the Private Property 
of the Soil is in no manner of way to be Effected by this Char- 
ter. And as the Several Towns within our Said Province of 
New Hampshire Are by the Laws thereof Enabled & Authorized 
to Assemble & by the majority of Votes to Choose all Such Offi- 
cers as Are mentioned in the Said Laws We do by these Pres- 
ents Nominate & Appoint Cap 1 Richard Kelly to Call the first 
meeting of the Said Inhabitants to be held within the Said Town 
at Any time within Thirty Days from the Date hereof giving 
Legal notice of the Time Place & Design of holding Such meeting 
after which the Annual Meeting in Said Town Shall be held for 
the Choice of Town officers & forever on the Last Wednesday in 
March Annually. In Testimony Whereof we have Caused the 
Seal of our Said Province to be hereunto affixed. Witness Ben- 
ning Wentworth Esq. our Governor & Commander in Chief of 
our Said Province the 11 th Day of May in the Year of our Lord 
Christ one thousand Seven hundred & fifty & in the Twenty 
third year of our Reign. 

"B. Wentworth 
"By his Excellencys Command] 
with Advice of Council I 

Theodore Atkinson Secy. 
"Entered & Recorded according to the original under the 
Province Seal this Eleventh Day of May 1750 

"Pr. Theodore Atkinson, Secy." 



102 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Thus the town was put together from land of Haverhill Dis- 
trict, Methuen District and Dracut District. By the act of 
March 18, 1741-42, all land which had fallen into New Hamp- 
shire by the settlement of the province line was erected into dis- 
tricts bearing the names of the Massachusetts towns from which 
they had been cut off. These districts were to stand until they 
were annexed to other towns or incorporated into towns by them- 
selves. 

The first thing necessary was the election of officers. The first 
town meeting was held May 30, 1750, at which time the following 
officers were chosen : 



Moderator 
Town Clerk 
First Constable 
Second ' ' 
Selectman 



Treasurer 
Tythingman 



Surveyors 

of 
Highways 



Fence Viewer 



Hogreeve 



<< 



Henry Sanders 
Nathaniel Dow 
John Hall 
Benjamin Wheeler 
Nathaniel Dow 
Seth Pattee 
Ens. John Ober 
Jonathan Wheeler 
Richard Dow 
Ens. Richard Kimball 
Daniel Morse 
William Sanders 
Ens. John Ober 
Abiel Austin 
Samuel Parker 
Israel Young 
Edward Carleton 
John Watts Jr. 
Richard Pattee 
Edmund Clark 
Andrew Balch 
Stephen Wheeler Jr, 
Jonathan Woodbury 
Peter Yourin 
James French 
Nathaniel Woodbury 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 103 

Field Driver Obadiah Duston 

John Ober Jr., 

Clerk of ye market, or) ,_ ,. . . _ 

- ., \ Nathaniel Dow 

seeler of waits ^ 

These officers are very nearly the same as the present list, ex- 
cept that the number of men elected has been changed in a few 
cases. For example, the Board of Selectmen has been decreased 
from five to three, and the Surveyors of Highways from nine to 
three. Other minor changes will be noted by comparing the 
above with the present officers. 

BOUNDARY CHANGES. 

Thus at last the people of the Spicket valley had a town of 
their own. The map on page 104 shows the town as desig- 
nated by the charter — in many respects different from its pres- 
ent condition. The changes began shortly after the incorpora- 
tion and were not finally settled until more than seventy-five 
years had passed. 

The first of these was the alteration made in the line between 
Salem and Windham, and was the outcome of a controversy 
which had arisen between Haverhill and Londonderry. When 
the colony of Scotch-Irish immigrants received a charter for the 
large tract of land to the northwest of ancient Haverhill, they did 
not see fit to recognize the line already established as the west 
boundary of Haverhill. Instead they took possession of any and 
all fertile lands in the neighborhood, including portions which 
had been laid out to Haverhill men. When these owners went 
to look up their lands with a view to settling, they found them 
already occupied by the people from Londonderry. This led 
to complaints to the Province of New Hampshire, as well as to 
the General Court at Boston, asking for injunctions to evict the 
usurpers. An investigation followed, in which it was shown 
that the Londonderry claim to this territory was groundless, as 
their charter stated explicitly that their town was "bounded on 
Haverhill west line." At a town meeting of Methuen, August 
28, 1728, a complaint was made of the "Irish people settling on 
the out lands of our township." The main difficulty seems to 
have been in the fact that the west line of Haverhill and Methuen 




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Plan of Salem, copied from the charter. 




FRED C. BUXTON. 




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BUILDING THE TOWN. 105 

had already become an ' ' old line ' ' and was not everywhere recog- 
nized as a valid bound. Matters were still further complicated 
by the chartering of Windham, February 12, 1741-42. This 
charter defined the bounds as "ye Easterly line of said London- 
derry." Immediately a contention over the assessment and col- 
lection of taxes arose. A certain number of persons living near 
the line were taxed by both Windham and Methuen districts. 
Even before the year was ended, these men found it necessary to 
enter a complaint to Governor Wentworth, to the effect that since 
this part of Methuen and Dracut had been erected into a dis- 
trict and had elected officers and levied taxes, the constables of 
Derry and Windham had forcibly taken away their goods on pre- 
tense of a "tax to help support the government," although they 
had already paid their proportion of the province tax to their 
own constable. They also asked support for the ministry, 
' ' which the unsettled condition of affairs had put into a danger- 
ous condition." This petition was "Dated Methuen Desember 
ye 25 : 1742, ' ' and signed by thirteen men. 

The prompt action which was given to this matter was some- 
thing very unusual. Only three days later, on December 28, 
Theodore Atkinson, secretary of the council, wrote letters to the 
selectmen of Londonderry and Windham, ordering them to re- 
turn the taxes collected and warning them against a repetition 
of the offense. 

There were a few men in the western part of the district who 
belonged to the Windham colony, being descendants of the Scotch 
settlers. They naturally wished to remain on their present 
homesteads, but preferred to be under the same authority as their 
kinsmen. Therefore they repeatedly urged that the line be so 
laid as to include them in Windham. The agitation of this ques- 
tion became more and more serious, until in 1747 the town acted 
upon the matter, as shown by the record: 

"Feb. 18-1747 Dan'l Peaslee and Ebenezer Ayer chosen to 
go to the bank to get the line settled between us and Windham. ' ' 

The "bank" was the name applied to Portsmouth. It was a 
shortening of "Strawberry Bank," the name first given to the 
present site of the city of Portsmouth because of a large hill 
covered with strawberry plants which the first settlers found. 



106 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

In all the old records this name is used. Here the seat of gov- 
ernment was located for many years before the settlement of Con- 
cord. As early as 1653 the name had been changed to Ports- 
mouth by order of the court of Massachusetts, of which New 
Hampshire was then a part ; but the old name clung to the town 
for a long time afterwards. 

After the Salem charter was granted the line in dispute became 
a more definite thing, and evidently demanded attention. Ac- 
cordingly, at a meeting of the council at Portsmouth, September 
25, 1751, it was 

"Ordered — that the line between the town of Salem & parish 
of Windham be altered agreeable to the votes of these places, 
and recorded on the back of the charter. ' ' 

Several hearings were held for investigation, during which it 
was agreed that for religious purposes the inhabitants of the dis- 
puted territory (which was given to Salem) might join with the 
people of Windham, if they saw fit so to do. The charter of 
Salem was then revised and new western bounds for the town 
decided and ordered by the council. 

C Province) Province of New Hampshire. 

j Seal f George the Second by the Grace of God 

Salem Charter of Great Britain, France & Ireland, King, 
Altered. Defender of the Faith &c. 

"To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting — 
Whereas diverse disputes have arisen between the inhabitants of 
our town of Salem and the inhabitants of our parish of Windham 
within our Province aforesaid touching the dividing bounds be- 
tween them as the same are described in our charter of incor- 
poration for the town of Salem aforesaid of the 11 th of May in 
the 23 d year of our reign, which said disputes have occasioned 
many petitions and complaints from both parties to our Governor 
& Council of our said Province and whereas the said parties have 
each of them at their respective meetings regularly warned for 
that end agreed upon. Voted & desired an alteration in the lines 
of the said town of Salem as the same are described in the char- 
ter aforesaid and have exhibited the votes of the said town and 
parish respectively thereon together with a Plan of the said town 
of Salem with the desired alteration thereon described and also 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 107 

requesting- that all such persons who now inhabit or hereafter 
shall inhabit on that part of Salem which heretofore was in the 
parish of Windham or paid rates & taxes there may have the 
liberty to joyn with the said Parish in such affairs only as re- 
late to the minister & ministry in said parish if they or any of 
them shall see cause so to do. 

"Now know ye that as well for the town & parish aforesaid 
as for quieting the said parties & putting a stop to any further 
strife or complaints touching the premises — We have thot fit by 
& with the advice of our trusty & well beloved Benning Went- 
worth Esq. our Governor & of our Council of our said Province, 
To Order & Ordain & do by these presents order & ordain that 
in that parte of the bounds of the said town of Salem which 
divides the said town & the said parish an alteration shall be 
made thus Viz: beginning at the white oak mentioned in the 
Salem charter aforesaid as standing in an angle of Londonderry 
line from thence running south about five hundred and twenty 
six rods to Hitty Titty Pond so called — thence south thirty two 
degrees & one half degree west about four hundred rods to a hem- 
lock tree marked S. W. standing near the south west angle of 
Pollicy Pond so called from thence south forty degrees west to a 
White Pine standing in Pelham line, thence by Pelham line south 
thirty four degrees and one half degree east to a white oak stand- 
ing in the Province line and is a boundary mentioned in the char- 
ter aforesaid, thence (without any alteration from the bounds 
mentioned in the charter aforesaid) by the Province line as that 
runs till it comes to the stake by the Captains Pond being the first 
bound mentioned in the charter aforesaid, thence following the 
bounds mentioned in the said charter till it comes to the White 
oak standing on the angle of Londonderry line being the bound 
tree where the alteration made began — And that the said tract of 
land circumscribed within the bounds above mentioned as they 
stand altered from the lines in the charter aforesaid shall be and 
hereby are made the bounds of the town of Salem, the former 
bounds in the charter above mentioned notwithstanding and the 
inhabitants that now are or hereafter shall be settled upon the 
said tract of land & such only shall be deem d & held to be the in- 
habitants of Salem to all intents & purposes excepting such inhab- 



108 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

itants as now are or hereafter shall be upon that part of Salem 
which heretofore was deemed parte of Windham or that paid 
rates & taxes there who shall have the liberty (if they see cause) 
to join with the inhabitants of Windham in all matters & things 
which relate to the minister or ministry in said parish and those 
only — provided nevertheless that all those inhabitants of Salem 
that paid their province tax to Windham proportion shall con- 
tinue so to do till a new proportion shall be made or some farther 
order thereon — Provided also that all such of the present inhab- 
itants as shall desire to join in the above mentioned particulars 
with the inhabitants of Windham shall within six months from 
the date hereof signify such their desire under his or her or their 
hands to the Selectmen of Salem and also to the Selectmen of 
Windham respectively and that all such persons as shall here- 
after become inhabitants of the said tract last mentioned shall in 
the same manner signify their desire to both setts of Selectmen 
aforesaid within six months after their first entrance as inhabit- 
ants there and when they have so done they shall be and hereby 
are excluded from the privilege of voting in those affairs above 
mentioned with Salem and shall be and hereby are exempted 
from any rates or taxes that shall be laid for the support of the 
minister or ministry as aforesaid in the said town, and shall enjoy 
the privilege of voting with and be obliged to do the duty that 
other the inhabitants in Windham do enjoy or are obliged to do 
in relation to the minister or ministry as aforesaid — 

' ' Of all which all persons concerned are to take notice of and 
govern themselves accordingly. 

"In testimony whereof we have caused the Public seal of our 
said Province to be hereunto affixed. 

"Witness Benning Wentworth Esq our Governor & Com- 
mander in Chief of our said Province the 9th day of Janry. in 
the year of our Lord Christ 1752 & in the 25th year of our reign 
By His Excellencys Command^ 

with advice of Council IB. Wentworth. 
Theodore Atkinson See'y 

"Entered & recorded according to the original under the 
Province seal this ninth day of Janry 1752. 

"Pr. Theodore Atkinson, Secy." 




JOHN F. TENNEY. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 109 

This alteration was indicated on the plan of Salem affixed to 
the back of the charter. In the map here presented (see p. 104), 
which is a copy from the original, though not in fac simile, the 
dotted line is the alteration. It will be seen that Salem lost a 
large tract of land lying to the west of Canobie Lake, and ac- 
quired a considerable area in the extreme southwest part of the 
town. 

Although this settlement had been made by agreement of the 
two towns it was by no means satisfactory to all citizens of either 
town. It would have been impossible to make a diyision by 
straight lines which would not put some persons on the wrong 
side. But in those times of unsettled boundaries no hesitation 
was felt in regard to complaining of undesirable conditions or 
asking that frequent and radical changes be made. 

At a meeting of the House at Portsmouth, on Wednesday, May 
9, 1753, the secretary read several papers relating to Salem and 
Windham, and said that "the Council observed yt in ye propor- 
tion for a New [rate] that there were sundry persons taken from 
Salem and put to Wendham which he s d ye Council tho't ought 
to belong to Salem for Reasons which he mentioned and left sun- 
dry papers relating thereto." The Journal of the House has the 
following entry in reference to this matter : 

"And as to the message relating to Salem & Wendham, That 
if the Council tho't proper to take any thing from Wendham and 
put it to Salem the House had nothing to say against it, But that 
the House did not at present apprehend that it lay with them to 
settle any dispute there is between Salem and Wendham relating 
to their Boundary." 

A copy of the petition asking for another re-adjustment of the 
bounds was served on the selectmen of the two towns, together 
with a request that they appear before the Council on certain 
days to show reason why the same should not be granted. This 
petition seems to have died, as there are no further evidences 
of it. 

Another petition was sent to the Council February 2, 1756, 
and was acted upon fifteen days later. It was "voted by the 
Council to grant exemption from payment of arreas of the Prov- 
ince Tax to date, since they had been paid to Windham. ' ' 



110 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

The old question was again raised in 1777, when an article in- 
serted in the warrant for a Salem town meeting, to be held June 
4, stated it to the voters in these words : "to see if the town will 
vote to allow certain men with their respective families and 
estates to be annexed to the town of Windham." At the meet- 
ing this article was emphatically voted down ; but the sponsors 
for it had still another card, which they prepared to play. They 
had enlisted and fought in the regiment of continental troops 
from Windham, still they were taxed in Salem. Thinking that 
this might be an entering wedge for gaining their end, they drew 
up a new petition, this time to the government of New Hamp- 
shire, dated January 3, 1778. After stating all the arguments 
for their case, the petitioners called attention to their relations 
with the people of Windham by saying, "We have always asso- 
ciated and been connected with them as brothers, but have never 
associated with the other inhabitants of Salem." This petition 
came before the House February 27, 1778, and was not granted. 
It was signed by 

Isaac Thorn Thomas McGlaughlin 

Josiah Hadley James McGlaughlin 

William Thom Jr. Hugh Campbell 

William Smith John Campbell 

Jacob Hardy David Nevins 

William Smith Jr. Richard Hennesey 

Solomon Smith Nathaniel Gorrell 

William Gordon Gain Armour 

The people of the west part of Salem paid ministerial taxes to 
Windham, under the provisions of the charter alteration, till 
1797. On March 8, 1798, Windham voted to omit citizens of 
Salem from all future tax lists. 

There was a frequent reopening of the controversy regard- 
ing the line between these two towns until 1807, when it was 
finally settled. It was agreed that each town should choose a 
committee of three, who should determine the line. In case these 
could not agree, they were to choose another committee of three 
neutral men, who should have authority to decide. The towns 
agreed to abide by the decision rendered. Windham delegated 
Samuel Morrison, Samuel Armor and John Dinsmore; Salem 



BUILDING THE TOWN. Ill 

chose Jeremiah Dow, Joshua Merrill and Israel Woodbury. 
These men were appointed March 28, 1806. 

As might be expected, these men were unable to agree, or 
thought a more satisfactory result could be obtained from a neu- 
tral board. Therefore they chose as the final judges Amos Hunt, 
John Varnum and Amos Blanchard, Esq. This board submitted 
their decision January 23, 1807, as follows: " Beginning at 
Lower Crank Corner, thence south 546 rods to the north end of 
Hitty Titty Pond, allowing for variation of the compass from 
1721 to that time, 2° 30' west; thence to the east end of Pollicy 
Pond 420 rods, allowing a variation of 1° 45' since 1752 ; thence 
south 40° west over Pollicy Pond to Pelham line." And this find- 
ing was taken as the authoritative line. The perambulations of 
the lines, as effected by the selectmen from time to time, do not 
often agree in every detail with the accepted lines. The dif- 
ferences are due to very slight errors in the surveying and to 
variation of the magnetic needle. There is a spot on the line 
from Hitty Titty Pond to Crank Corner where it is said to be im- 
possible to obtain a reading on the compass. Here the method 
of running by fore and back sights is absolutely necessary in 
order to keep the direction of the line. At present all of the town 
bounds are clearly determined by stone monuments, which are 
accepted by the adjoining towns, so that all cause for controversy 
is eliminated. 

ATKINSON CONTROVERSY. 

In following the difficulties that arose in the settling of the 
Windham line, we noticed that there seemed to be good causes 
for misunderstandings and differences of opinion. The town of 
Londonderry had long claimed territory which by charter rights 
belonged to Salem ; also the citizens in that part of Salem were 
descended from the settlers across the line, and exerted all their 
efforts to have the line so determined as to put them in Wind- 
ham. Even when the line was settled and understood, attempts 
were made to have it altered. 

On the east side of the town, however, the circumstances were 
very different. Salem had been incorporated seven years before 
Atkinson, but there was an inconsistency in the Salem charter 



112 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

which substantiated the subsequent claim of the neighboring- 
town. Keference to our charter shows that the east bound was a 
straight line from the stake near Captain Pond to the corner 
of Londonderry, but excluding the whole of Theodore Atkinson, 
Esquire's, farm. Now such a line would be impossible, as Mr. 
Atkinson 's land extended far across this straight line into Salem. 
Either the line could not be straight, or the farm could not be 
excluded. There were, however, potent reasons why the farm 
must be excluded. Theodore Atkinson was the secretary of the 
province, and also one of the twelve gentlemen who had pur- 
chased the title of John Tufton Mason. He was a very powerful 
man in New Hampshire at that time. He owned a very large 
estate on the northeast bounds of the proposed town of Salem r 
and when the request for the charter was finally granted, he was 
careful to insert a clause which would efficiently prevent any 
loss of property to him. Doubtless he had in mind the organi- 
zation of the town which he was so soon to have incorporated, and 
to which he gave his own name. This part of the case is very 
easily understood. The question that we do not understand is,, 
why those who Were called upon to determine the line did not 
go back to this fallacy in the charter and make it right. 

The first record that we have of an official attempt to settle 
the discussion is in 1799, when a committee of reference, consist- 
ing of Baley Bartlett, James Duncan, Jr., and Cotton B. Brooks, 
was appointed to decide the controversy between Atkinson and 
Salem. They made, an investigation, then based their finding 
upon the charter and declared the line to be straight from the 
corner of Londonderry to Captain Pond, to a point, however,, 
twenty-five rods west of the bound there claimed by Salem. They 
gave the opinion that the whole of Atkinson's farm belonged to 
the town of Atkinson. 

It really seems hardly credible that such capable men could 
have rendered a decision so self-contradictory; but such is the 
fact. As may be supposed, this did not settle the matter. The 
controversy was at once revived and continued for some years. 
In 1822 an article in the warrant relating to it was not given any 
united support, and it was not for three years later that de- 
cisive action was taken. On January 11, 1825, it was "voted to 




ARTHUR C. HALL. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 113 

chose a Committee to apply to the court of common pleas to es- 
tablish the bounds between Atkinson and Salem." Thornton 
Betton was chosen agent to attend to this work. 

Evidently the work of the boundary commission detailed by the 
court for this case was not acceptable to the town, for on De- 
cember 24, 1825, it was voted that the selectmen be a committee 
to oppose at court the report which this commission were to make 
at Portsmouth. The town records are silent as to the details of 
the action at Portsmouth. However, in the following August, 
1826, the line was established by a committee from the court of 
common pleas, consisting of T. D. Bell and others. The line 
today is as then determined, with the single exception of the 
present short line extending from the Londonderry line south- 
ward. At that time this part of the line was declared to extend 
south twenty-seven degrees east a distance of sixty-two rods. 
This, by the way, is the same direction as that of the lower part 
of this line, near Captain Pond, showing a retention of the orig- 
inal straight line as far as possible. 

In 1844 the line was perambulated by the selectmen of the 
two towns, at which time the short line referred to above was first 
noted. When it was officially determined, which must have been 
at some time between 1826 and 1844, is not clear, as the records 
make no mention of the change. 

The only other line which could have caused trouble at the 
north part of the town was that between Salem and Londonderry. 
A committee from the two towns established this line, their find- 
ing being accepted by the town November 16, 1802. The mem- 
bers of this committee from Salem were Silas Betton, John Clen- 
denin, "William Thorn, Thomas Smith and David Allen. 

SEEKING NEW GRANTS. 

In following these boundary difficulties we have wandered 
far from the time of organization of the town, as it seems best to 
treat the whole subject here. If we return to the early days we 
shall find that many of the original citizens of Salem did not 
care to remain here, preferring to branch out and settle some 
part of the province which was as yet undeveloped. It was 



114 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



scarcely two months after the town was incorporated that a pe- 
tition was sent to Portsmouth asking for a grant of land : 

"Sheweth— 
That your Petitioners Are Inclined to venture into the woods 
And make Settlements of a town, that for themselves & family? 
they are not Accomodated in the towns Where they Dwell, that 
the Land there is so mean and Broaken Cannot for their Own Nor 
the Governments Advantage Enlarge their Improvements — 

"That their is in this Province Great Quantities of his Majestys 
Lands Unappropriated, & Lyes Wast and till Improved will be 
Useless, Capable of Improving and Enlarging the Strength of 
the frontiers, Where your Petitioners would willingly venture, 
And make Settlement under the Like Conditions as other his 
Majestys Subjects Receive Grants — 

' ' Wherefore Your Petitioners Humbly pray that they may Have 
a Grant of Land of the Contents of Six miles Square in Some 
Convenient place Capable of making a good Settlement, Within 
his Majestys Lands afores 3 under such Conditions & Limitations 
As Your Excellency Grants to Others and that Tho s Packer Esq 
may be Admitted On Our Behalf to prefer this Our Petition and 
On Our Behalf do everything Necessary for the Claiming the 
Same and Ascertaining the place where the Same may Lye. And 
Your Petitioners as in duty bound Shall pray. ' ' 

It was signed by men from Pelham and Salem, the larger num- 
ber being from Pelham. The Salem signers were as follows : 



Ebnz Ayres 
Seth Pattee 
Abner Bayly 
Peter merril 
Henry sanders 
John Merrell 
Alexander Gorden 
Jonathan Corliss 
Nath' 1 Dow 
Richard Kimball 
John Hall Jr. 
Richard Patee 



Daniel Dow 
Oliver Kimball 
John Lowell 
W m Kelly 
Richard Dow 
Ralph Hall 
John Bayly 
Edw d Bayly 
Sam" Parker 
W m Sanders 
Tim y Swan 
John Ober 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 115 

The records are silent in regard to the fate of this petition, but 
it is certain that no favorable consideration was ever bestowed 
upon it by the governor or the council. As one reads this list 
of names he feels that had the request been granted, the history 
of Salem would have been greatly changed. Among these men 
were some of the most devoted citizens of the town. A glance 
at the account of the first town meeting will show that nearly 
all of the first officers were included in the above list (see page 
102). 

The most plausible reason for this desire to desert the town 
so newly born seems to be that the spirit of restlessness was upon 
the people. New towns were springing up on all sides, the grants 
for settlement of which were made upon very liberal terms. 
Then, too, the endeavor to secure charter rights for Salem from 
the provincial authorities had been an uphill and discouraging 
task, while a grant from the proprietors would be clean and 
clear cut, and obtained, if at all, with little trouble. Perhaps, 
also, the proximity to Massachusetts, with the possible attendant 
controversies over the boundary, had some weight in urging these 
early town fathers to seek another location. 

About the time of the incorporation of Salem the Masonian 
Proprietors were giving quit-claim deeds to a large number of 
towns of early settlement, as well as grants for new towns. 
Since the landholders of Salem did not succeed in obtaining a 
new location, they thought it best to have their titles to land in 
Salem confirmed by the men who had bought Capt. Mason's claim 
to ownership of this territory. Here is seen again the question 
of priority of claim. This land had been granted by the proprie- 
tors of Haverhill, who had for more than a hundred years exer- 
cised authority over it. Nevertheless the owners thought best to 
receive recognition by the Masonian Proprietors. Accordingly, 
a request was forwarded to Portsmouth, signed by thirty-three 
of the citizens of Salem : 



*' Salem in 
Newhamsher 
Jan r 22 : 1759 



f 



To the Honorable Propreatiers that Clame 

Under Masons Patten tees 

Whereas We the under siners have This Day 



Being informed that there is sume of the inhabetants of the 



116 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Town of Salem afore Said who have Pertitioned or about to 
Pertition to the S d Proprters for the Land in S d Township Tak- 
ing to their Sosierty home they Plese and Whome they Plese 
they Refuse — 

' ' The Humbel Pertition of the We Subscribers to the Said Pro- 
pripeiters that if there is aney Right that belongs to the Propri- 
ters that the Town of Salem in Genrel might be a Quainted With 
it and that Your Portitions Prays that it might Plese your Hon- 
ers to Give the Town of Salem afore S d the Liberty of Purcheus- 
ing By a maigeroty and in So Doing it mighe Prevent a grate 
Disturbence in S d Town your Partitions further Prays that you 
Would Signify in Wrighting Your minds to us before you Doe 
aney thing as to Sale that the Town of Salem afore S d have their 
Voice in the Purches: as Your Portitioners as in Duty Bound 
Shall ever Pray 



Daniel Peaslee 
Ebenezer Ayer 
Jonathan Wheeler juner 
Nathaiel Woodman 
John Baley 
Stephen wheeler 
Caleb Duston 
John Cross 
James Chase 
Israel Young Sen r 
Evan Jones 
Jonthan Wheeler 
Timothy Johnson 
Daniel Massey 
Abial Aston 
Joshua Bay lay 
Benj a Rawlings 



James Hastings 
James Gregg 
John Lowel juner 
Israel young ju r 
Edw d Carlton 
Isaac Clough senr 
Jonathan Collis 
Thomas Duston 
Obadiah Duston 
John Lowel 
Nathaniel merrill 
william wheeler 
william Curtis 
Edw d Clark 
John Corrier 
William Townsend" 



QUIT CLAIM DEED OP 1759. 

The accompanying plan was submitted with this petition. The 
outlined lots are intended to indicate the land which was com- 
mon, or undivided. As the petition indicates, certain persons in 
the town were attempting to take possession of such land and 




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Plan presented with quit-claim petition of 1759. 



118 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

distribute it to those who had no right to it. The request of 
the petitioners that the town be acquainted with the status 
of such land and permitted to purchase it for town use, if the 
citizens saw fit to do so, started a discussion and investigation 
by the proprietors at Portsmouth. They inquired into the in- 
dividual ownership of land as well as the condition of the un- 
granted lots. The result was that these lots were granted to the 
town, and each landowner was given a quit-claim title to his real 
estate within the town. Salem was the twentieth town granted 
by the Masonian Proprietors. The word "tax" is written above 
the name of the town in the record, while a note says "Quit 
Claim, no reservation. ' ' Following is the wording of the grant : 

"Province of ) At a meeting of the Proprietors of the 
New Hampshire C Lands purchased of John Tufton Mason, 
Esq. in New Hampshire, held at Portsmouth in said province on 
the Eighth day of March 1759— 

"Whereas the Persons whose names are hereafter Expressed 
have applied to this propriety for their Right & title to the Lands 
they severally claim in the Township of Salem in the Province of 
New Hampshire, Excepting what is within the Bounds of Lon- 
donderry and in Consideration of their improvements and for 
Encouraging the settlers — 

"Voted that there be & hereby is Granted to the said Persons 
their Heirs & assigns all the Right Title Interest Claim Property 
and Demand of said Proprietors according to the several & Re- 
spective Rights & Claims of said Persons as they have or shall 
Devise the same from the proprietors of Haverhill or other 
Grants made by the Government of the Province of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay and also to all such particular lots of Lands situate 
as aforesaid which any of them hold in Common & undivided. 
But as to the Hundred acres of Land within said township of 
Salem which was appropriated the one half for the first minister 
and the other half for the use of the ministry it is not intended 
to be Comprehended in the foregoing vote. But all the Right 
Title Claim property & demand of this propriety or of the pro- 
prietors first above named be & hereby is granted to the Reverend 
Mr. Abner Bayley his Heirs & Assigns, the one half of said Hun- 
dred acres to be taken where he has made his improvements, and 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 



119 



the other half be & hereby is granted to Remain for the Use of 
the ministry in said town of Salem forever. 



Allin, John 
Ames, Nathan 
Amey, Micah 
Annis, Abraham 
Astin, Abiel 
Ayer, Ebenezer 
Ayer, Ebenezer Jr 
Ayer, James 
Ayer, Peter 
Badger, Joseph 
Balch, Andrew 
Bartlett, Enoch 



Crass, Thomas 
Currier, John 
Currier, Richard 
Day, Abraham 
Dow, Nathaniel 
Dow, Richard 
Dow, Stephen 
Dusten, Caleb 
Dusten, Obadiah 
Dusten, Thomas 
Eastman, Obadiah 
Eaton, Moses 



Bayley, Reverend Mr. Abner Eaton, Thomas 



Bay ley, Humphrey 
Bayley, Jeremiah 
Bayley, John 
Bayley, Jonathan 
Bayley, Joshua 
Beadle, Jacob 
Beadle, John 
Beadle, Timothy 
Beadle, Timothy Jur. 
Browne, Josiah 
Burbank, David 
Carlton, Edward 
Clark, Edward 
Clements, Benjamin 
Clements, Ruth 
Clements, Samuel 
Clough, Isaac 
Clough, Wid. Mary 
Corlis, David 
Corlis, Jonathan 
Corlis, Jonathan Jur. 
Corlis, Jonathan ye 3 a 
Corlis, Joseph 



Eaton, Thomas Jr. 
Emerson, Ithamer 
Emerson, Timothy 
Emery, Doct. Anthony 
Ford, James 
French, James 
George, William 
Gordon, Alexander 
Gragg, James 
Greenleaf, John Esq. 
Greenough, Daniel 
Hall, Caleb 
Hall, Ralph 
Harris, Joseph 
Haseltine, Philip 
Hastings, James 
Hastings, John 
Hazzen, Abigail 
Hazzen, John 
Hazzen, Moses 
Heath, David 
Hilton, Benjamin 
Hilton, Samuel 



120 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



How, John 
Jaquis, John 
Johnson, Heirs of John 
Johnson, Timothy- 
Johnson, William 
Jones, Evan 
Jones, Evan Jr. 
Jones, James 
Kelly, Richard 
Kelly, William 
Kimball, Dinah 
Kimball, Isaac 
Kimball, Jemima 
Kimball, Nathaniel 
Ladd, John 
Lovejoy, Nathaniel 
Lowell, John 
Lowell, John Jnr. 
Marble, Caleb 
Massey, Daniel 
Merrill, John 
Merrill, Nathaniel 
Merrill, Peter 
Messer, Abiel 
Messer, Nathaniel 
Messer, Richard 
Mitchell, Andrew 
Mitchell, Ebenezer 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, Martha 
Mitchell, William 
Mooers, John 
Morse, William 
Ordway, Samuel 
Page, Ebenezer 
Parker, Samuel 
Patee, Asa 
Patee, John 



Patee, Richard 
Patee, Seth 
Peaslee, Daniel Esq. 
Peaslee, Nathaniel Esq. 
Pecker, James 
Rawlins, Benjamin 
Rowell, Benoni 
Rowell, John 
Sanders, Sarah 
Sanders, Oliver 
Sanders, William 
Shepard, Jonathan 
Simons, John 
Smith, John 
Stevens, Joseph 
Swan, Asa 
Swan, James 
Swan, Richard 
Swan, Robert 
Swan, Timothy 
Tenney, Jonathan 
Tippit, John 
Townsend, William 
Uran, Peter 
Watts, John 
Weare, Mesheck Esq. 
Webster, Ebenezer 
Webster, Wid°. Hannah 
Webster, Joshua 
Webster, Stephen 
Webster, William 
Wheeler, Benjamin 
Wheeler, Benjamin Jr. 
Wheeler, Jonathan Jr. 
Wheeler, Stephen 
Wheeler, William 
White, John 
White, Samuel Esq. 




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BUILDING THE TOWN. 121 

Whittier, Joseph Woodman, Nathaniel 

Whittier, Richard Wright, Joseph 

Whittier, Thomas Young, Israel 

Whittier, Thomas Jr. Young, Israel Jur." 

In the original record these names appear in no particular or- 
der. The author has here arranged them alphabetically, to ob- 
tain facility in reference or research. It is to be understood that 
not all of these men were necessarily residents of Salem, but may 
have merely held land here. Most of them, however, did live 
here. Their approximate locations may be found on page 122. 
On the other hand, not all of the residents of that time appear on 
this grant. Some felt their titles to be sufficiently secure to make 
a grant from the Masonian Proprietors needless ; others held that 
these persons had no authority worth considering when it came 
to a question of validity of such titles as the Haverhill Propri- 
etors had given ; and still others did not take interest enough to 
ask for the grant, feeling well content to be let alone. 

The locations of residences of the first citizens of Salem at the 
time of incorporation and just afterwards are determined to- 
day only after extensive research in public and private docu- 
ments. On the accompanying map those which are not very 
doubtful are indicated. Probably all could be definitely fixed 
by studying the records of deeds at Concord and Exeter. 

THE POUND. 

One of the interesting features of the old town life was the 
pound. It was found necessary, in all of the settlements, to 
provide a place where stray cattle and other animals could be 
held for ownership claim. This was of course due to the fact 
that very few of the farms were fenced except near the meadows 
or planting lots. Even such fences as were built around the 
barnyards were for the most part poorly constructed and often 
sadly out of repair. Where cattle were pastured they fre- 
quently found their way into the road, from which it was an 
easy step into some neighboring garden or field. When thus 
trespassing the animal was liable to be impounded. The owner 
must then claim it of the pound keeper, whereupon a fine for 
damage and keeping was imposed. In case no one claimed it, 



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LOCATIONS. 

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BUILDING THE TOWN. 123 

two men were usually called upon to appraise it, the appraisal 
being recorded with the notice of impounding. It was cus- 
tomary to have the town crier give notice of all animals im- 
pounded. If after a time no owner appeared to make claim r 
they were sold. 

The first mention of the pound is found in the Methuen 
records under date of November 30, 1739, and is as follows: 
"Voted that there shall be a pound in some convenient place in 
the North Parish near the meeting house." There is no evi- 
dence that it was built at once, and an entry in the Salem records, 
would seem to indicate that a regular pound was not built until 
1751. For on May 21 of that year the town voted twenty pounds 
old tenor to build a pound thirty feet square. At an adjourned 
meeting the next month it was voted to build the pound "a 
little south of John Page 's house. " It is not known just where 
John Page lived. In 1746 he had a lot of land north of Peter 
Merrill's, east of Hasting 's land bought of Richard Kelly. By 
putting together the bounds of old deeds examined, we come to 
the conclusion that these lots were all near the south side of 
Zion's Hill. This is borne out by the mention in one of these 
deeds of Hitty Titty meadow and brook. It seems that John 
Page must have lived on Bluff Street, near Henry Sanders. If 
so, the location voted for the pound was in that vicinity. Still 
we know that many such votes were not carried out, and it may 
have been so in this case. Be these things as they may, we 
know that the pound was later located at the corner of Main 
Street and Lawrence Road, in what is now the front yard of 
Mr. "Walker Haigh. It stood very near the present corner of 
the sidewalk, until torn down in 1836, as will be noted later. 

Before it was voted in 1751 to build the pound, stray animals 
were confined at the homes of those who captured them. This 
fact is made evident by such notices as the following: "Eantrd 
hear by ordr of Captn Richard Kaley A Sartrn brindel ox som- 
thing high horns coming in six yers old as he soposes branded 
on one home with too aches :H : H : and too kase above ye 
aches & a sort of a crop of ye near ear pounded July ye 28, 
1746 by Captn Kaley" 



124 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Another reads thus: 
"Mathuen District Dsembr ye 30 th 1749— 

"Then wee taking Notes of that Stray Creacher which is at 
ye house of Robrd Ellenwood do valey it to be worth Seaven 
pound old taner. 

"William Leech 
"John ober." 

Each owner had a special mark by which his cattle could be 
distinguished. This custom had grown out of the early system 
of having a large tract of common land upon which all of the 
cattle of the town were pastured. Salem itself never had such 
a common, as it had been divided among the proprietors before 
this part of Haverhill was set off. But the private marks were 
retained and all stock was carefully identified. In 1753 it was 
considered advisable to have these marks recorded. A few of 
the best illustrations are here presented, taken from the town 
records : 

"may ye 8 th 1753. The marks of Cattel and other cretrs. 

"Abial Astens mark of his cattel and other cretrs is a halpany 
ye undr sid of ye laft ear and a halpny ye upr sid of ye right 
ear. 

"March ye 15, 1754 the marks of Alexandr Gordens Cattel 
and other creachers is a crop of ye right ear & a half crop of 
ye upper sid of ye ner ear. 

"The marks of Jonathan Wheler junr Cattel & other crechers 
is a Swalows taill in ye off ear & too Slits in ye Eand of ye ner 
ear. ' ' 

The marks of the other citizens were much like these, except 
that different combinations of marks and locations were em- 
ployed. The spelling in these records, as in many other in- 
stances which we have noticed, is somewhat interesting as speci- 
mens of phonetic production. The two pound notices which we 
have selected exhibit the same characteristics, combined with 
some very unique descriptive composition : 
"Salem in Newhamsheir 

"dsembr ye 10 1754 Taken up and Staayed by John Hall Jr. 
one hafer coming in too yers old marked with a cooprs notch ye 
nndr sid of ye ear and no other artifishel mark and ye Natrel 




WILLIAM E. LANCASTER. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 125 

marks are as foloweth a white face white undr ye duelap whit 
undr ye baley whit the in sid har hind lags whit on har rump 
and a black and whit tail. 

' ' dsembr ye 9 th 1754 Then Joseph Hull and Joseph Mariel did 
and a prised the haffer and stayed by John Hall Juner and ye 
aprisemant is Eaight pounds and ten shilings old taner by these 
too man." 

"Provence of ) galem June fte 2g 175? Taken Up 
Newhampshire \ 

In Damag fessent and Impounded by The Subscriber a Red 
mare Soposed to be fifteen or Sixteen years of age She hath 
no artificial mark Her Nateral marks are as foloweth She Has a 
Star in Her forhead and a Smal Spot of White on Her Nose with 
two wall Eyes and 3 white feet and one Crocked Knee & Severall 
white Spots on Her Back & a Black main & tale 

John Webber jur" 

This red mare was appraised by Richard Kimball and Peter 
Merrill, at sixteen pounds old tenor. There is no information 
as to her disposal. The records contain a large number of entries 
similar to the above, both of cattle impounded and identifications 
registered; but nothing of especial interest is found until we 
come to the year 1767, when John Lowell, Jr., was paid sixteen 
shillings for work done on the pound. Again, in 1833, Daniel 
duff was paid two dollars for making a gate for it. 

Two years later the agitation began which resulted in chang- 
ing the location from the corner where the enclosure had so long 
stood. The first paper was as follows: 

"State of New Hampshire, Rockingham, SS To the Gentle- 
men, Selectmen of the Town of Salem in said County. 

' ' We the undersigned petitioners and inhabitants of said town 
respectfully request that you insert the following articles in your 
warrant for a town meeting, viz — 

"1 To see what disposition the Town will vote to make of the 
Town Pound. 

2 nd To choose a committee to make suitable arrangements in 
regard to a pound, either by erecting a new one, or by taking 
any other method that may be thought expedient for the interests 
of the town — 



> > 



126 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"And as in Duty bound &e. 

"Salem, Sept. 23 d 1835. 
"Earl C. Gordon J. C. Ewins 

Ira "Wheeler John Merrill 

Jonathan Merrill 2 nd Oliver Russ 

Moody Foster John Clendenin' 

David M. Dickey 

At the town meeting a committee of three citizens, John Wood- 
bury, Joshua Merrill and John E. Rowell, was appointed to ex- 
amine the town records, to see if any entries could be found that 
placed any restrictions or conditions on the pound. The select- 
men's orders show bills of the two last named members for one 
dollar each for examining the records. Their report was as fol- 
lows: 
"Salem N. H. February 6 th 1836. 

"We the undersigned having been appointed a committee to 
take into consideration the petition of Earl C. Gordon & others 
praying that the Town Pound may be moved to some convenient 
place, such as the Town shall accept, and to report thereon to the 
next annual Meeting, have met and have taken the subject under 
consideration, and after due consideration do report that the pe- 
titioners have leave to move said Pound to such a place as the 
Town shall accept. Provided said Petitioners shall furnish land 
and erect a good and suitable Pound at their own expense and 
save the Town harmless from any cost or charges of the same, 
and also that the land whereon the Pound now stands be not 
wanted to private use, but that it be converted into a public 
Highway, or common land for the use of the Public. 

John Woodbury" 
Joshua Merrill 
John R. RowellJ 

It seems that the committee either heard or mistrusted that 
some one had designs on the corner lot where the pound stood, 
and therefore inserted in their report the clause referring to pri- 
vate occupation of the land. The meeting adopted the report 
and voted permission to move the pound. It was not very long 
before the facts came to light. The pound was removed and a 
blacksmith shop erected on the spot by Mr. John Marston. This 



i 



Committee. 



BUILDING THE TOWN. 127 

caused considerable discussion, many citizens objecting to this 
violation of the vote of the town. Accordingly, it was again 
brought up at the annual meeting held March 16, 1838, and 
4 ' voted that those that removed the old pound shall build a new 
one in six months to the acceptance of the selectmen. Voted that 
Mr. John Marston have three months to move his shop off the old 
pound ground." 

The new pound was built the next summer, where it now 
stands, opposite Pine Grove Cemetery. The following entry ex- 
plains : 

"Oct. 6, 1838 This day excepted of the pound built by Mr. 
John Marston & John R. Wheeler in room of the former one, now 
standing on the towns land, built free of expence to the town by 
Marston & Wheeler. 

John Kelly Selectmen 

Thomas Webster of 

Benniah B. Gordon Salem" 

It may be that some deal was made whereby Marston obtained 
possession of the old lot. At any rate, he did not move his shop. 
We are told that it stood there in 1844 and was subsequently 
moved just below on Lawrence Road. It is now the dwelling 
liouse of Charles Foster. The pound has not been used, except 
at intervals, for many years. It is now furnished with a growth 
-of small trees and bushes, which speak of years of disuse and neg- 
lect. The old gate is used as a display board for auction sales 
and other kindred interests. The picture here presented was 
taken just after one of the heavy snowstorms of this winter, and 
shows the old pound in all the quiet of its neglected existence. 

We have finished the story of the building of the town struc- 
ture, seen who the fathers of the community were and where 
they lived, in so far as we can locate them, and noted the most 
-salient points in the early relations with the neighboring towns. 
Much of the life of this period has been reserved for the subse- 
quent chapters, such as building of roads, establishing schools, 
and operations of the military organizations. Although we have 
a separate chapter devoted to the religious life of the town, still 
we have presented here the most important facts in the life of the 
-early church. The town was built up through the church, and 



128 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

the history of the old meetinghouse and its environs is the his- 
tory of the town. We shall again frequently return to this build- 
ing period to take up a thread which leads into the history of 
later times — again step back occasionally into the days when the 
modern luxuries of life were unknown, the comforts few, but 
when the meagre pleasures of the simple life were more fully ap- 
preciated than they are today. 




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CHAPTER IV. 

Ecclesiastical History. 

The early history of the religious life of Salem has been told 
in the story of the building of the town. A treatment from a 
denominational standpoint would necessarily begin a half cen- 
tury or so later. However, a few facts which will bear more 
closely upon the Congregational Church are here rehearsed. 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

When the church was organized on January 16, 1740, the cov- 
enant was signed by thirteen men, namely: John Ober, John 
Bayley, Thomas Eatton, Eichard Kimbal, John Bayley, Joshua 
Emerson, Abner Bayley, Abiel Kelly, Nathaniel Hazeltine, Isaac 
Clough, Edward Clark, Richard Kelly and Samuel Currier. 
Others signed it soon afterwards, so that the membership grew 
rapidly. 

There was nothing of importance beyond what has already 
been mentioned, until about a year and a half before the death 
of Rev. Abner Bayley. The last entry in the church records, 
which he himself kept, during his pastorate, under date of Sep- 
tember 22, 1796, in the trembling hand of the aged pastor, is to 
the effect that "After fasting made choice of Mr. John Smith 
for a colleague with our stated pastor." Mr. Smith's was the 
next longest pastorate in the entire list, extending over nineteen 
years, or until 1816. 

For the next three years there was no settled pastor. Finan- 
cial matters were far from satisfactory, the town frequently vot- 
ing not to raise any money for preaching, which of course made 
impossible any continued plan of management. The salary of 
Mr. Smith was for a long while in arrears, that for the last year 
being paid to his heirs some time after his death. But this 

10 



130 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

condition was not peculiar to Salem; other towns exhibited a 
similar state. 

On July 1, 1819, the legislature came to the rescue. An act 
was passed authorizing religious societies to organize for the 
purpose of supporting the gospel and to raise taxes among them- 
selves for this purpose. Accordingly, on the fifteenth day of 
September of that year the Congregational Society in Salem was 
formally organized and equipped with an elaborate constitution 
for its future government. The society then voted to cooperate 
with the old church, which had voted, on February 1 of that 
year, to call Rev. William Balch to the pastorate. His reply, 
dated November 5, 1819, is characteristic of the man as well as 
indicative of the crisis through which the church was passing: 
' ' The great exertions you have made to build up a society broken 
down and scattered seem to make it my duty to cooperate with 
you in an object so desirable and so nearly connected with the 
best interests of this people." He was installed December 1, 
after which he continued with the church for sixteen years. 

In 1835 began the definite planning for a new church. There 
had been considerable discussion for the past few years regard- 
ing the insufficiency of the old meetinghouse for accommodation 
of all the various bands of worshipers of the town, and this so- 
ciety began to formulate plans for its own relief. On July 11 
of that year it was proposed to build, and John Hall presented a 
subscription paper, which was adopted. After nearly four years 
of soliciting, a sufficient amount had been pledged to warrant 
the undertaking. Accordingly, on March 5, 1839, the society 
voted to build a new church at once, the same to be ready for oc- 
cupancy by September, 1840. The time ran over slightly, how- 
ever, as the records tell of the appointing on November 3, 1840, 
of a committee to confer with Rev. Mr. Fisk regarding the dedi- 
cation. He had been the pastor since July 20 of that year. 
The last three years of the pastorate of Mr. Balch had been 
years of disintegration, since the civil contract had been termi- 
nated and there was no regular preaching nor administering of 
the ordinances. The hopelessness of the situation during these 
crucial days was well expressed some years afterwards by Rev. 
William Page, who was the pastor from 1852 to 1858: "Though 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 131 

the prospect of a speedy dissolution of this church to some 
seemed so fair, and almost certain, it did not die. Spectators 
looked on to see the end; but it continued to breathe, and with 
more and more freedom, until, on the ninth of September 1840, 
it arose and stood erect. On that day it received its fourth pas- 
tor, Rev. Jonas Fisk." 

Mr. Fisk had accepted the call of the society two months be- 
fore the ordination. 

The leading spirits of the building work were William H. 
Mayo, John Kelly and Dea. Levi Cluff. 

At the February meeting in 1845, it was "voted to choose a 
Committee of three to make inquiry for a location to erect a 
parsonage house upon." Benjamin Woodbury, Joseph Thom 
and John Pettingill were chosen. A Mr. Gage gave the land to 
the society, and the parsonage was built during the year. The 
wood on the parsonage land by the river was sold to help pay 
for the house. Several times the building has been altered and 
added to, until it presents the appearance now familiar to us. 

On November 3, 1851, "A large Bible was presented for the 
pulpit to the church by Elizabeth Hart, Lucretia L. Bradley, 
and John Page." 

The bell was purchased by subscriptions from more than one 
hundred friends of the church. It was accepted by the society 
August 21, 1851. Mr. Wm. G. Crowell and Dr. John H. Mer- 
rill were the committee chosen by the donors to buy, place and 
formally present it to the society. The bell weighed 1,213 
pounds. 

Furnaces were put into the church in the fall of 1857, being 
first used on December 27. A year later the lamps were refitted 
so as to burn kerosene, instead of the "spirit" oil formerly used. 

Early in the pastorate of Rev. Samuel Bowker, the church 
was extensively repaired and remodelled, being put practically 
in its present condition and re-dedicated November 10, 1874. 
The illustration gives a view of the building today. 

Several interesting items are found in the old records of the 
church. For instance, from the very first pages, dating about 
1741, "voted that Peter Merrill tune the Psalm," and that 



132 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"Thomas Eatton read the Psalm." A song service of this sort 
would seem strange to us today ; the reader would read one line 
of the psalm or hymn, after which the choir would repeat it to 
the chanting tune commonly used, then the next line followed in 
the same manner. In 1827 the society "chose John Kelly to 
see that the Bass Viol and Clarionette be brought into the Con- 
gregational Meeting house for the use of the society." 

The Christian Endeavor Society was founded October 26, 
1886. The most remarkable spiritual results were accomplished 
during the year 1862, when Rev. Joseph Tarlton, the evangelist, 
supplied the pulpit for seven months. During that brief period 
he added twenty-three members to the church roll. 

The membership at different points in the life of the church 
has been as follows : Original number, 13 ; reorganization in 
1819, 98 ; in 1843, 53 ; at the close of 1861, 70 ; at the close of 
1862, 93 ; in 1890, 50 ; at the present time, 1907, 38. 

The list of pastors, with their periods of service, is here given : 

Rev. Abner Bayley, the first pastor, was ordained January 30, 
1740, and died March 10, 1798, aged eighty-two years, in the 
fifty-eighth year of his ministry. 

Rev. John Smith was ordained and settled January 4, 1797. 
and died at Bangor, Me., April 7, 1831. He was dismissed No- 
vember 20, 1816. 

Rev. William Balch was installed December 1, 1819 ; dismissed 
August 6, 1835. 

Rev. Jonas Fisk was ordained September 9, 1840, and dis- 
missed March 8, 1843. 

Rev. William Hayward was employed for a time, closing his 
labors June 6, 1847. 

Rev. Daniel H. Babcock commenced preaching August 22, 
1847, and closed his labors September 15, 1849. 

Rev. John Lawrence commenced preaching November 1, 1849. 

Rev. William Page preached his first sermon December 5. 
1852, and was installed pastor of the church about the 1st of De- 
cember, 1853. He was dismissed, on account of failing health, 
November 30, 1858. 

Rev. John Lawrence was again called to minister to this 
church in May, 1859, and closed his labors May 11, 1862. 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, SALEM CENTER. (M 53) 

(See page 131) 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 133 

Rev. Joseph Tarlton supplied the pulpit from May 8 to De- 
cember 7, 1862. 

Rev. George W. Rogers began to supply the pulpit January 
11, 1863, as acting pastor, remaining until the beginning of 
1869. 

Rev. M. A. Gates commenced his labors, as acting pastor, De- 
cember, 1869, and remained till the close of 1872. 

Rev. Samuel Bowker began his labors as acting pastor, July 
1, 1873, and closed January 1, 1880. 

Rev. George A. Perkins preached from May 16, 1880, to April 
29, 1883. 

H. H. Colburn served as acting pastor from May 20, 1883, 
to April 1, 1890. 

E. B. Blanchard, student in Andover Seminary, began his 
labors May 1, 1890, and continued to May, 1892. 

Rev. Gainer P. Moore was here from May, 1892, to August 
1893. 

Rev. Joseph S. Gove preached for a year, from September, 
1893, to October, 1894. 

Rev. I. Perley Smith followed, serving till December, 1896. 

Rev. William T. Bartley next entered upon the longest pas- 
torate since Mr. Colburn, coming in May, 1897, and remaining 
until October, 1902. 

Rev. Henry A. Coolidge supplied the pulpit from May, 1903, 
to November of the same year. 

Rev. William Ganley began his labors here in February, 1904, 
and is the present pastor. 

The Sunday school now numbers sixty members, and the 
Christian Endeavor twenty. 

The one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the organization 
of the church was observed December 18, 1890. Exercises were 
held in the church both afternoon and evening. At the former 
session an historical address was delivered by the pastor, Mr. 
Blanchard, and short reminiscent remarks were made by former 
pastors and others. 

Although this church has passed through several crises in its 
existence, it has always emerged from them with renewed 
strength and greater unity among its people. 



134 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Some years before the close of the Revolution, Samuel 
Fletcher came from Chelmsford to Salem, where he settled with 
his family, and built the house now occupied by Clement 
McLaughlin (M81). He had been in the war, probably coming 
here after his discharge. His younger children were born after 
he settled in Salem. He was a man of very intense spiritual na- 
ture, and had not been long in his new home when he began to 
put his persuasive powers into use with his neighbors and fellow 
citizens. Soon he built up a considerable following, who were 
banded together into a Baptist Society in 1780. The Fletcher 
homestead was the place of meeting, Samuel having finished a 
part of it as a large hall, where his congregation was wont to 
gather on Sabbath mornings to drink inspiration from his vig- 
orous preaching. We are told how Dorcas Rowell, the great 
grandmother of Benjamin R. Wheeler, who was a daughter of 
the Duke of Reddington and wife of Philip Rowell, used to ride 
on horseback every Sunday from her home (M505) near the foot 
of Allen's Hill to the house of the Reverend Samuel, carrying 
her two little children with her. One of these was her little Dor- 
cas who afterwards became the mother of the late J. R. Wheeler. 

Fletcher died in 1795, after which the society lost its force. 
An effort was made to keep it together, but to no avail. While 
there were still a goodly number of adherents trying to draw or 
drive the backsliders into line, a petition was sent to the General 
Court for rights as a church organization. The paper was as 
follows : 

"The petition of Richard Kimball Jeams Webster and others 
the subscribers inhabitants of the town of Salem County and 
State aforesaid and in its vicinity most humbly shew that thay 
with thare famielies and each of them have long since ben and 
still continue to be of that religos perswaison Called Baptists 
that they have for many years paid and Suported at thare one 
Expence an orthodox Minister of that princable who wos in- 
stalled over the church and congregation and officiated as Such 
utill he wos Called by the providance of God to leave this world 
and in order and for the incouragement of a nother pious and 
orthodox Minister to Setle among us as well to regulate our in- 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 135 

ternal affairs as a Eeligos Society ought to be governed and for 
other pies and Lardable purpuses we and each of us most humbly 
suplycate your Honors that we and each of us may be incor- 
porated into a Society in Salem to have and to hold all the Pow- 
ers Rights priveliges as other incorprated churches and Con- 
gregations professing the Christion Religion in the State afore- 
said possessis and retains and as in Duty bound will ever pray 
Rich d Kimball Lemuel Rowell 

James Webster Nathaniel kelley 

Philip Rowell Joseph harries 

Oliver Sanders Ebenezer Woodbery 

Jacob Rowell Samuel Marbel 

Abner Woodman Asa Corless 

Silas Wheeler John Saunders 

Enoch Merrill Luke Woodberry 

Warren Wheeler Jonathan Patee 

Isaiah Wheeler Jonathan Cross 

Nathaniel Woodman David Wheeler 

Richard Wheeler Aaron Copp 

Richard Kimball Jr. Oliver Dow Jur." 

Jonathan Wheeler 

There is no date on this petition, but from the contents we 
infer that it was about 1796. The next year, 1797, another 
paper, worded very much like the above, and signed by thirty- 
six men, was presented. On December fifth of that year the 
house of representatives granted the petitioners permission to 
bring in a bill. This, however, was not done, and the matter was 
dropped. 

Still the society held together in a loose sort of way, holding 
small meetings now and then. The records of the old Methodist 
Society show a vote passed April 21, 1812, granting the use of 
the meetinghouse (on Bluff St.) to the Baptists whenever the 
Methodists do not want it. This shows that there was a con- 
siderable number of worshipers in this faith at that time, al- 
though we do not know of any records of their doings. 

We find also in these same minutes a record of a call for a 
meeting of members of the Baptist Society at the schoolhouse 
near Joseph Hall's, to take action to raise money and to see 



136 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

what to do about those who call themselves Baptists, but con- 
tribute nothing to the support of any society. The meeting was 
held on May 4, 1805. Israel Rowell was chosen moderator for 
the meeting. The clerk of the society at this time was David 
Wheeler, as appears on the summons. 

From this time on we have no knowledge of activity on the 
part of this denomination until 1858. It was then that a mis- 
sion of the First Baptist Church in Lawrence was started here. 
Rev. Phineas Richardson had charge, being the first preacher. 
He was followed by Mr. John McKinley, and he by Rev. Ed- 
ward Mills, who supplied the mission for two years, closing his 
labors in May, 1861. Mr. McKinley then returned for a short 
while. The services were then intermittent until 1865, when 
Rev. Charles H. Cole collected a few Baptists and organized a 
church on October first. The enrollment consisted of four men 
and eight women, as follows : 

Charles H. Cole, Samuel Pillsbury, Moses D. Rowell, William 
H. Woodbury, Abia Coburn, Marianna B. Cole, Harriet Emer- 
son, Polly H. Goodwin, Ruth Pettengill, Lucy A. Pettengill, 
Sally Pillsbury and Mary A. Rowell. 

The new church was recognized by a council of pastors and 
delegates from neighboring churches, December 20, 1865. Rev. 
W. H. Eaton, D. D., of Nashua preached the sermon, and Rev. 
J. Storer of Chester gave the hand of fellowship. 

Rev. C. H. Cole was recognized as pastor of the church April 
25, 1866, and resigned in July, 1867. The meetings were at 
first held in Union Block, but afterwards in Foster's Hall. This 
was consumed by fire on the night of January 1, 1867, together 
with the organ, Sunday school library and other property of the 
church. Meetings were then discontinued until late in 1868, 
when they were recommenced by Rev. D. Gage. 

Mrs. Clarissa Hovey of Salem gave the church a piece of land 
on which to erect a house of worship ; and in May, 1869, Clar- 
issa Hovey, Thomas B. Middleton and Clarissa H. Middleton 
jointly conveyed a piece of land to the deacons for a church site. 
The lot was ninety feet front, sixty feet back and one hundred 
eighty feet deep. Subsequently the adjoining strip four feet 
front, fifteen feet back the full depth of the first lot was added, 




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ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 137 

making the property as it is today. The church was to be built 
not less than forty by forty-five feet. 

Mr. Frye Austin was appointed an agent to convey the piece of 
land owned by the church, on the turnpike. The church was 
erected, and dedicated December 30, 1869. Rev. S. Pillsbury, 
a student at Newton, supplied the pulpit from February, 1870, 
to July, 1871; Rev. Horace Eaton of Wakefield from that time 
till April, 1873. When he left, the church numbered thirty-two 
members. Rev. E. J. Whittemore was called to the pastorate 
May 9, 1873. At his coming an extensive revival commenced, 
in which Rev. E. A. Whittemore, an evangelist, assisted. In 
four months twenty-five converts were taken into the church. 
This pastor closed his work here March 1, 1875. In the records 
of the preceding year is found the first reference to a vestry, 
under date May 13. On January 1, 1875, Tristram C. Adams, 
Thomas B. Middleton and Frye Austin were chosen a committee 
to investigate the matter of building a vestry. Mr. Austin re- 
signed and Alfred E. Goodwin was put in his place on the com- 
mittee. The vestry was finished in the basement and the church 
remodeled during the summer. The debt of $700 contracted at 
the time was provided for two years later. On June 15, it was 
"voted to reseat the house of worship," in accordance with the 
new accommodations. 

In August, 1875, Rev. A. S. Stowell came to the church, being 
ordained September 9 following. In 1888 a steeple was put 
on the belfry and repairs made by Mr. Gilman Corning, whose 
mother, Lydia Corning, was a member of the church. Again 
in 1906 extensive repairs and alterations were made. The old 
steeple and belfry were torn down and a new one built outside 
the main church edifice, but adjoining it. The church was re- 
shingled and painted, a steel ceiling was put into the auditorium, 
and other repairs were made. This work was accomplished 
through the generosity of Mr. Levi Woodbury, whose father and 
mother were among the early members of the church. The new ap- 
pearance of the church is shown in the illustration on page 129. 

The list of pastors since the time of Mr. Stowell is as follows : 

Rev. Miles N. Reed, July 1, 1881 to October 25, 1885. 

Rev. Henry G. Gay, January, 1886, to October 3, 1886. 



138 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Rev. Tilman B. Johnson, October, 1886, to December, 1888. 

Rev. "W. B. C. Merry, January, 1889, to August, 1891. 

Rev. Charles R. Bailey, April, 1892, to August, 1893. 

Rev. Myron D. Fuller, December, 1893, to November, 1895. 

Rev. Joseph H. Fletcher, May, 1896, to May, 1902. 

Rev. George T. Raymond, July, 1902, to October, 1902. 

Rev. John F. Blacklock, December 14, 1902, to the present 
time. 

The membership of the church today is fifty-six, twenty-seven 
of whom are non-residents. The men number fifteen, seven be- 
ing non-residents, the women forty-one. The Sunday school has 
sixty members. In the Christian Endeavor Society there are 
twenty active members and nine associate members. The church 
is fortunate in having a number of members who are wide awake 
and energetic in their enthusiasm for its welfare. 

' METHODIST CHURCH. 

The history of the Methodist interests in Salem have not been 
as unified as have those of the other denominations. True, these 
last mentioned have passed through many critical stages, but 
from all they have emerged without disruption. The Methodist 
society has suffered two divisions, resulting at present in three 
distinct churches. Perhaps one responsible condition in this 
case was the number of men who were strong adherents to this 
faith ; in fact, too much so to think of being attached to any 
other church, but who at the same time lived in parts of the 
town separated by considerable distances. Again, the large 
number of followers has made it possible to successfully main- 
tain separate societies in a small town. 

The original society was organized at Zion's Hill. There is 
some question as to the exact date and place of the first meetings. 
There were no records, the movement having at first the nature 
of neighborhood gatherings. The most authentic sources state 
that the first meetings were held at the house of Jacob Rowell, 
at the top of the hill, in 1803. A picture of the place is shown 
herewith. The barn is of recent construction, but the house 
has very much its original appearance, having been built in 1796. 
The old barn stood near the site of the present one, and was the 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 139 

scene of the meetings after they were too largely attended to be 
held in the house. 

In 1805 Rev. George Pickering of Boston was induced to come 
out to preach to the newly gathered congregation. His exhorta- 
tions led to the awakening of a latent religious intensity which 
soon found means for a definite organization. About three years 
after this, Moses Dow in his will bequeathed a fund, to be con- 
trolled by a board of trustees, for the promotion and support of 
the work of the proposed society. In 1809 a constitution was 
adopted and the society formed. It was known as the Metho- 
dists, and composed of citizens of Salem and Windham. A lease 
of a piece of land on Bluff Street near the Rowell pasture was 
obtained from Jacob Rowell by Isaiah Wheeler and Abel Dow 
for twenty dollars, for such time as the society should continue 
the use of the same for religious purposes. The money earned 
by the Dow fund was available for salary to run the preaching 
services, while part of it could be used for other expenses. The 
church was built in 1809 and continued in the use of the society 
until 1836. A few years later it was sold and moved to the Cen- 
ter. The committee in charge of the plans were Isaiah Wheeler 
and Abel Dow. The building was known as the Methodist Lib- 
erty Meetinghouse. Sixty-one members signed the constitution. 

In 1815 it was voted to have Rev. Mr. Snelling preach one day 
each month for the year, to be paid by contribution. Nothing 
further of importance is found in the record until 1826, when the 
society "Empowered Alexander Gordon to purchase the house 
from Nathaniel Woodbury for the ministers to live in, and pay 
for it out of the funded money." The house was that now 
standing on the northeast corner at Millville. It was repaired 
the next year, and in 1830 the back, which up to that time had 
been left in the rough boards, was finished off. 

In 1832 repairs on the meetinghouse were proposed. Conse- 
quently a committee was chosen to appraise it. The men se- 
lected, as disinterested parties, were Colonel Park, John H. Clen- 
denin, and John Pettengill. At the next meeting this vote to- 
ward repairing was reconsidered, and a motion substituted pro- 
posing to build a new house near Luke Hovey's. In this we see 
the influence of division of opinion, which was soon to separate 
the two factions. 



140 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

The final action came during the year 1836. At a meeting 
held at the meetinghouse on April 5, Asa Taylor was chosen 
clerk of the society. It was voted that Mr. Wilbur "divide the 
Sabbath School books according to his own judgment." The 
building was then deserted as the headquarters of the Methodist 
Society. From this point we must trace separately the two di- 
visions, considering first the reorganized society at North Salem, 
which was the real parent stalk of the old society transplanted. 

NORTH SALEM M. E. CHURCH. 

The first meeting after the dissolution was held at the old 
■sehoolhouse near the river at North Salem (M566) on May 10, 
1836. A committee was chosen to build the new meetinghouse 
then under contemplation. The record is incomplete, so that the 
details of the work of building are not known. Only one other 
meeting was held at the sehoolhouse, then the church was ready 
for occupancy. It was built only one story high, and had but 
the single large auditorium. 

The trustees of the Dow fund had been incorporated by act of 
June 29, 1826, under the name of Trustees of the Dow Fund and 
Donations to the Methodist Episcopal Society in Salem. The 
body consisted of Alexander Gordon, Caleb Duston, Joseph Tay- 
lor, Oliver Taylor, John Ewins, John T. G. Dinsmoor and Sam- 
uel Rowell. The conditions stated that the actual income should 
not exceed three hundred dollars. The board was then organ- 
ized with the following officers : President, Alexander Gordon ; 
moderator, Oliver Taylor; secretary and treasurer, John Ewins. 

The money was in the hands of the old society at the time of 
the partition ; but a few years later the new society at the Cen- 
ter entered suit for a share of it. After some contention, the 
court ordered that it be divided, since some of the members of the 
original bequest were enrolled in the ranks of the plaintiff. 

After the new church (M580) was completed, a summons was 
posted for a meeting of the proprietors of the old Methodist 
meetinghouse. The meeting was held November 23, 1836, and 
was the last act in connection with the old house. A committee 
was chosen to sell the building, consisting of Isaiah Wheeler, 
Alexander Gordon and Richard Dow. 




FIRST M. E. CHURCH, SALEM CENTER. (M 46) 

(See page 142) 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 141 

From this time the old house was used for meetings of various 
kinds. Many amusing stories are told relating facts about some 
of these gatherings. It is said that the crowd of auditors was 
frequently too great to be accommodated within the building, 
and some would repair to the nearby tavern, where they could 
regale themselves with cooling beverages while they listened 
through the open windows to the preaching of the word. And 
after service the tavern was crowded as full as had previously 
been the meetinghouse. After a few years the building was 
moved to the Center and given a berth on Main Street (M8), 
where it stands today, in a battered condition. 

At a church meeting June 3, 1841, it was voted to build a new 
parsonage on land purchased from Mr. Bickford for five hun- 
dred dollars. The society had up to this time used the house 
now occupied by Mr. Fred Rolf (M594). The committee chosen 
for building were Oliver Taylor, Job Kent and Richard Dow. 
They built the present parsonage at (M596). 

For many years the society keenly felt the need of a vestry, 
but had not sufficient means to undertake any further building 
obligations at the time. However, a way was suggested. A 
party of young men proposed to raise the church, put another 
story beneath it, and finish it for a vestry, provided it could be 
used for ten years for purposes of a hall for parties and amuse- 
ments, after which time its title should remain in the church. 
The offer was accepted, and in 1864 the work was done. A 
dance was held to celebrate its completion, which marked the en 
trance of a new and elevated social era for the north village. 
Dances and entertainments were held for the next few years at 
intervals, the society assuming entire control after the stated 
time had elapsed. 

Various additions and improvements have been made from 
time to time, until the church now presents an attractive appear- 
ance in its uniform lines of olden architecture. Its location and 
style are shown on the page opposite. 

The preachers before the separation are given under the next 
heading, First M. E. Church. The names of those who have 
preached at the North Salem Church cannot be obtained at this 
time. 



142 HISTORY OF SALEM. 



FIRST M. E. CHURCH. 



The branch of the old society which went to the Center built 
a church on the site of the present edifice, and took the name of 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church. Repairs and alterations 
were made from time to time. In 1857, the furnaces were put in, 
being first used on October 25. Four years later a new organ 
was put in at a cost of six hundred dollars. It was not until 
1871, however, that the most extensive repairs were made. Then 
the building was enlarged and remodeled, the vane was placed on 
the steeple, and new furnishings obtained for the interior. The 
dedication was held on Tuesday, September 10, 1872. It be- 
came the commodious and comfortable church of today, a picture 
of which is here presented. 

The parsonage is just above E win's Corner, on the Canobie 
Lake Road (M27). It was built by Peter Massey in 1825, after 
his old house on the same site had burned. After it had several 
times changed hands, Carleton Ewins bought it and soon sold it 
to the M. E. Society. 

On October 9 and 10, 1895, the church celebrated the ninetieth 
anniversary of the birth of Methodism in Salem, dating it from 
the time of Mr. Pickering's preaching. The exercises com- 
menced on Wednesday evening, and continued all day and even- 
ing Thursday. 

In giving the list of pastors of this church, we shall go back to 
the beginning of the old society on Bluff Street. The circuit 
system, in which several towns were in a group and supplied by 
the same preacher, was continued until 1831, when Salem was 
made a separate station. The next year, 1832, marked the sep- 
aration of the New Hampshire churches from the New England 
Conference and the establishment of the New Hampshire Con- 
ference. Following are the names of the men who have preached 
in this denomination: 

1805 Rev. George Pickering, then presiding elder of Boston Dis- 
trict ; Rev. Daniel Webb, then Alfred Medcalf assisted un- 
til the following conference. 

1806 Salem united with Salisbury Circuit, Rev. Mr. Medcalf 
pastor. 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 143 

1S07 Rev. Joseph A. Merrill. 

1808 Wm. Stevens, A. Medcalf and Thos. Asbury. 

1809 Asa Kent, Edward Hyde, David Wentworth. 

1810 Asa Kent, Benj. Sabin, John Jewett. 

1811 John Williams, Orlando Hinds. 

1812 Benj. F. Larrabee, Orlando Hinds. 

1813 Leonard Frost, J. W. Hardy. 

1814 Leonard Frost, Aaron Linnmis. 

1815 Ebenezer Blake, E. Marble. 

1816 Philip Munger, John Briggs. 

1817 Philip Munger. 

1818 Bartholomew Otheman. 

1819 Orlando Hinds, under whose influence the great revival 
took place. Among those converted were three men who 
were afterwards widely known as ardent exponents of the 
faith, Samuel Kelly, Caleb Duston and Abraham D. Mer- 
rill. 

1820 Orlando Hinds, J. P. Harvey. 

1821 J. P. Harvey, D. Culver. 

1822 D. Dorchester, James Templeton. 

1823 J. Randall, A. Breck. 

1824 O. Hinds, A. Breck. 

1825 J. Allen. 

1826 H. Foster, S. Fisk. 

1827 Lewis Bates. 

1828 Lewis Bates, Lemuel Harlow. 

1829- '30 L. Bennett, last preacher of the circuit. 

1831- '32 Samuel Norris. 

1833 A. Brigham. 

1834- '35 Warren Wilbur. 

1836- '37 Jacob Stevens. 

1838 S. Cushing. 

1839 O. G. Smith. 

1840- '41 Mathew Newhall. 
1842- '43 A. W. Osgood. 
1844- '45 J. L. Slason. 
1846- '47 A. C. Manson. 
1848- '49 C. C. Burr. 



144 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

1850- '51 W. D. Cass. 

1852 William Hewes. 

1853- '54 G. W. T. Rogers. 

1855 Justin Spaulding, J. L. Trefren. 

1856- '57 J. L. Trefren. 

1858- '59 Elihu Scott. 

1860 G. W. H. Clark. 

1861 Lewis Howard. 

1862 W. H. Jones. 
1863- '64 Irad Taggart. 
1865-'66 0. H. Call. 
1867- '69 T. L. Flood. 
1870- '71 D. W. Downs. 
1872 A. R. Lunt. 
1873-74 Henry Dow. 
1875-77 A. C. Coult. 
1878 N. P. Philbrook. 
1879- '81 E. C. Berry. 
1882- '83 W. C. Bartlett, 
1884 J. Mowrey Bean. 
1885- '86 Mellen Howard. 
1886- '89 A. W. L. Nelson. . 
1889- '90 C. H. Leete. 
1890- '91 J. C. Langford. 
1891- '93 Ernest W. Eldridge. 
1893- '95 Herbert F. Quimby. 
1895- '98 Edgar Blake. 
1898-1901 A. B. Rowell. 
1901- '04 E. S. Coller. 

1904- H. E. Allen, present pastor. 

The church clerks up to the time of separation of the old so- 
ciety were : Jacob Rowell, chosen 1808 ; Joshua Gordon, 1809 ; 
Alexander Gordon, 1812 ; John Ewins, 1813 ; Asa Woodbury, 
1835. Each held office until his successor was chosen. The last 
clerk elected before the separation was Asa Taylor, who became 
clerk of the northern branch. 




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WILLIAM BALCH KIMBALL. 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 145 

DEPOT VILLAGE M. E. CHURCH. 

About the year 1860, when the young village at the Depot be- 
gan to show signs of its future growth, a great need was felt for 
a church in this locality. The small Baptist mission was in its 
infancy and could not be expected to perform the work of an old 
established church. After considering the situation carefully, 
a number of members of the Methodist Church, who lived at the 
Depot, determined to establish a church of that denomination in 
their own village. Mr. Isaac Emerson of Melrose, Mass., who 
has been known in other places for his generous contributions 
to the support of religious work, suggested the immediate erec- 
tion of a house of worship, and donated a piece of land for the 
purpose. This was in the spring of 1861. A subscription paper 
was started and in a few days more than two thirds of the neces- 
sary amount was pledged, so that it was decided to build during 
the coming fall and winter. A building committee, composed 
of George Woodbury, Isaac Thorn and Seth Hall, was chosen. 
They let the contract for construction to Messrs. Copp and Smith, 
work being commenced November 4, 1861. The vestry was fin- 
ished and opened for religious worship the first Sabbath in 
April, 1862. 

Meantime it was thought inadvisable to defer services until the 
new building should be in readiness. Mr. E. Scott, a superannu- 
ated preacher of the New Hampshire Conference, was engaged 
to supply the desk until the ensuing annual conference. The 
first meeting was held October 20, 1861, in Union Block. 

The church edifice was completed in June, 1862, and dedi- 
cated July 1. The service was conducted by Bishop Osman C. 
Baker of Concord. At the quarterly conference held that year 
the new church was formally organized and its members sep- 
arated from the First M. E. Church to the number of twenty -five. 
The officers of this conference were George Woodbury, Isaac 
Thom, Seth Hall, H. C. Piercy and E. Scott. The preacher's 
claim was fixed at three hundred dollars. Following are the 
names of the first members : Annette Aldrich, Nathan Conner, 
Betsey Conner, Millet G. Copp, Rowena Copp, Caroline E. Cor- 
liss, Alice Corliss, Archibald Emerson, Sarah Emerson, Jane 



146 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Gordon, Seth Hall, Jemima Hall, Charles H. Hall, Esther Mid- 
dleton, Isaac Thorn, George "Woodbury, Mary K. "Woodbury, 
Isaac "Woodbury and Caroline "Woodbury. 

The first regular stationed preacher was Rev. L. T. Townsend, 
who was installed in April, 1862. A year later, D. C. Bab- 
cock came. During his stay the membership was considerably 
increased. The claim was raised to five hundred dollars and a 
lot was bought at the Epping Camp Ground. 

From 1865 to 1867 John Currier was pastor. He was fol- 
lowed by Rev. J. W. Guernsey, for whom the salary of the po- 
sition was raised to seven hundred dollars. In 1868, Rev. N. M. 
Bailey began his vigorous work here, remaining for two years. 
Rueben Dearborn preached from '70 to '73, to be followed by 
J. H. Haines. The latter was strong in exhortation and held his 
congregation firmly by his powerful personality. A. W. Bun- 
ker was the choice of the conference in 1876, and remained at 
his Pleasant Street charge two years. C. M. Dinsmore occupied 
the pulpit from 1878 to '81 ; 0. B. Wright from that time until 
1883. In this year J. D. Folsom, one of the ablest preachers of 
this church, entered upon his duties, which he continued for 
three years. E. S. House followed him in 1886 and remained 
until 1888. The next two pastors, Newton M. Learned and L. 
Morgan Wood, preached one year each. In 1890 Fred E. 
White came for a two years' stay, being succeeded by W. A. 
Mayo, who held the charge for an equal term. From 1894 to 
1897 Daniel Onstatt led the flock. He was followed in April, 
1897, by Silas E. Quimby, who held the church for the longest 
pastorate in its history, remaining until 1901. J. Roy Dins- 
more preached one year, then Fred K. Gamble from April, 1902, 
to January, 1905. Frederic T. Kelly was pastor from that date 
to April, 1906. It was then that the present pastor, Rev. Charles 
R. Bair, came. 

The church is at present very strong, having a membership of 
one hundred. The Sunday school has one hundred and ten mem- 
bers, and the Epworth League has fifty. The appearance of the 
church is shown facing page 144. 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 147 

MISCELLANEOUS RELIGIOUS NOTES. 

Besides the three principal denominations which have formed 
the religious history of Salem there have been a number of less 
important sects in evidence at various times. As none of these 
have had a definite organization, there are no records by which 
to trace them. Our information regarding them is therefore not 
complete nor authentic. 

There were a large number of Presbyterians among the set- 
tlers in the west part of the town, who were descendants from 
the Scotch people of old Londonderry. Many of these attended 
the church in "Windham, having been granted the privilege of 
paying their minister tax to that town. 

Formerly the Universalists were strong in the north and cen- 
tral parts of Salem, and held meetings at several homesteads. 
These families, however, have either become scattered or formed 
affiliations with other churches. At the time of the division of 
the old Methodist Society there were several families of Uni- 
versalists near Zion's Hill, They, as well as some other small 
societies, held meetings in the old meetinghouse. Kev. Pr. 
Miner, with his doctrine of universal salvation, found consider- 
able favor with his hearers. 

About 1760, when the town recognized but one church, a sect 
known as Annabaptists came into prominence on the outskirts 
of the town. They became obnoxious to the staid Congregation- 
alists, especially as they made a considerable impression upon 
some of the members. Matters grew rapidly worse, until fin- 
ally the town was urged to take legal steps to suppress this en- 
croachment. Many citizens opposed such measures, but finally 
the advice of legal counsel was sought. After a few years the 
matter was gradually lost sight of, the antagonism became less 
bitter, and no more reference is found to it. But the details 
of the contention indicate a very bitter feeling for more than a 
decade. 

In more recent times other sects have been in opposition. 
Just after the Civil War the Second Adventists began to hold 
meetings in Salem Hall. They were followed, three years later, 
in 1869, by a party of Spiritualists. A Mr. Cook held sittings 



148 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

here to which the townspeople in general were invited. They 
were, however, somewhat disappointed, after the loudly heralded 
claims of the adherents of this faith. The results at the sit- 
tings were declared "not very satisfactory." 

Right upon them came Rev. Mr. Rodman, the Adventist. He 
held meetings in Salem Hall, at which he denounced in the most 
strenuous fashion the "pretensions" of the Spiritualists. His 
arguments were received with considerable approbation, and 
drew very large audiences. 

While the Congregational, Methodist and Baptist churches 
have the only regular organization in town at the present time, 
still there are many followers of other faiths scattered among 
us. There are a number of Roman Catholics, most of whom at- 
tend religious services in the neighboring churches of Methuen 
and Lawrence. 

There have been in the past many instances of baptism by im- 
mersion in different parts of Salem. During the revival move- 
ment of 1858, a large party gathered at Dow's millpond (now 
Duston's) in North Salem to witness the baptism of about twelve 
converts. This was on June 20. Even as late as November 7 
of that year a similar service was held in the Spicket by the old 
bridge at the Center. In this case there was but one person im- 
mersed. 

In studying the old church records, and this of course applies 
more particularly to those of the first church, one is struck by 
the number and fullness of the entries referring to the character 
of the members of the society. It was customary then for each 
to take upon himself a personal oversight of the doings of the 
others. In this respect there is one great difference between the 
early times and our own: people today report the misdeeds of 
others to their neighbors, without making any direct effort to re- 
call the offenders from their evil ways ; then they reported them 
to the church, which very promptly took occasion to call for an 
explanation. The use of strong language was as great an evil 
as the use of strong drink. But whatever the offense charged, 
reparation could be made by a full confession before the church, 
after which forgiveness was voted, since "satisfaction had been 
obtained." With all due reverence for the good intentions of 




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ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 149 

the worthy fathers, we cannot sometimes help wondering if the 
" satisfaction" was personal, from knowing "for a fact" that 
the reports were true. 

CEMETERIES AND FUNERALS. 

We have already referred to the old burying ground at the 
Center, particularly as to the original laying out, fencing, etc. 
Here rest all the dead of the old village with a few exceptions. 
In the rear of the old Marston house (M 51) near the river is a 
small graveyard where a few bodies have been laid at rest. Some 
others were taken to the places of repose of their kindred, to the 
old cemeteries at the west part of the town or near Hale's Bridge 
(M 636). 

In all of these old yards are to be seen the ancient stones, 
bearing inscriptions to tell of those who of yore trod these paths 
and laid the foundations for our today. Time has gradually 
played his customary havoc with the former erectness of many 
of the slabs, but man has once more taken Time by the forelock 
and called a halt. In 1894 the late Mr. James Ayer caused an 
article to be inserted in the town warrant asking for an appro- 
priation to have these old stones reset and straightened. Fifty 
dollars was voted, and again the next year the same amount, to 
complete the work. While Mr. Ayer was engaged in this task he 
copied the inscriptions from all the stones, in order that they 
might be preserved. These are valuable as sources of reference 
in genealogical tracings, especially as the town records are not 
very complete for the births and deaths of the early period. 

The most interesting inscriptions have been selected to show 
the nature of the thought of the fathers in matters pertaining to 
death. The stone bearing the oldest date is in the cemetery at 
Hale's bridge, and is inscribed as follows: 

"Here lies the body of Noia Watts, died in August ye 21, in 
the third year of her age 1750. 

"Old Stile." 

The oldest stone in the Center burying ground is about a foot 
square and bears some letters which are now illegible, but which 
we»e deciphered by Mr. Ayer in 1865 as "Tristram Currier 
1753." 



150 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

We have deaths recorded several years earlier than this, but 
the bodies may have been taken to Methuen or Haverhill for 
burial, as was frequently the case, or the stones if erected here 
may have been destroyed. From about 1764 the number of 
stones marked for each year is larger. The last date is that of 
"Ellen Augusta Gilpatrick, died Apr. 20, 1887, aged 75 y'rs." 
Among the last is that of Mary Campbell's death, February 22, 
1873. She was 88 years old. 

The stone in the old burying ground which probably has for 
us the greatest general interest is that of Rev. Abner Bayley. 
It stands a short distance north of the hearse house, close to the 
wall beside the road. It is shown in the accompanying picture 
three-fourths of an inch from the left hand margin — a large 
dark colored stone with a rounded top. Upon it is inscribed the 
following legend: 

"To perpetuate the memory of the Rev. Abner Bayley, who 
like a shock of corn fully ripe, departed this life March 10 A. D. 
1798, in the 83 d year of his age, and 58 th of his ministry. 

' ' Blessed are the dead who died in the Lord, for they rest from 
their labors and their works do follow them. 

"Ye who proclaim God's messages on earth, 
And preach eternal things of life and death, 
From sacred page the grace of Christ unfold, 
And shine like light in candlesticks of gold, 
Till the last trump calls with tremendous sound 
Awake ! Awake ! ye nations under ground. ' ' 

Some of the ancient stones bear unique verses, which in some 
cases have been copied in later years. Here are a few of the 
best: " 

"Come heathen mortals cast an eye 
And go your way prepair to die 
For die you must 
One day like me 
Be turn'd to Dust" 

This is on the stone of Hannah Cressey, who died in 1763, 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 151 

Another reads : 

"In memory of Judith Currier, daught' r of Deacon Richard & 
Mrs. Elizabeth Currier, who died Nov. ye 18, 1792. JEtat 27. 
'Behold and read as you pass by, 
As you are now, so once was I, 
As I am now so you must be, 
Prepare for death and follow me. 

: J. Marble, Sculptor, Bradford." 



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The young wife of the proprietor of the old tavern now known 
as the Tenney homestead is noted in these words : 

"In memory of Mrs. Lydia Jones consort of Mr. Hezekiah 
Jones, who died March ye 2 nd A. D. 1793. Mt. 21. 
"Friends and physicians could not save 
My mortal body from the grave; 
Nor can the grave confine me here 
When Christ shall call me to appear. ' ' 

The life of Salem's greatest statesman is remembered in these 
words : 

"HON. SILAS BETTON. 

"In the relations of husband, father, citizen, friend and 
neighbor, his memory will be ever dear. He was eminently 
faithful in the discharge of all the duties of his public life. As 
a lawyer he was scrupulously honest and honorable. In remem- 
brance of his many and illustrious virtues, his mourning family 
have erected this simple monument. 

"He was born August 26, 1768, and died January 22, 1822." 

A particularly touching inscription is that recording the death 
of the congressman's daughter: 

"Harriet Betton, second daughter of Hon. Silas Betton and 
Mary his wife, died March 5, 1815, aged 19 years, 11 months 
& 5 days. 

"Formed by nature and fitted by education to be one of the 
brightest ornaments of society, she commanded universal ad- 
miration. Her mind naturally of a superior cast, was highly 
cultivated by study and improved by general literature. Her 
understanding was mature beyond her years. Of a quick per- 



152 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

ception, refined taste, and brilliant wit, her conversation was 
entertaining, instructive and captivating. Her pleasant tem- 
per and benevolent disposition rendered her dear to all her 
acquaintances. 

"Ah! dear remains of one to virtue dear, 
Long thou 'It command the tribute of a tear; 
Oft shall the foot of friendship round thee tread ; 
Oft shall the mourning wail proclaim thee dead ; 
While fleeting memory can recount thy worth, 
And virtue has a name or friend on earth; 
While every excellence has its just desert, 
This spot shall be a favorite, sad resort." 

The tombs bear dates as follows : 

"Erected 1843 
Tristram Haynes, died Aug. 1, 1837, aged 34. 
James Haynes died Dec. 12, 1812, aged 49." 

"Erected 1847 
Frederick W. Bailey." 

"Erected 1856 
Saunders. ' ' 

"Erected 1861 
Messer. ' ' 

The five elm trees in front of the tombs were set out by James 
Ayer and John A. Messer, Nov. 8, 1861. In connection with 
funerals the town records have an interesting item under date 
1811. "Voted that the selectmen should buy a burial cloth for 
the use of said town." This was a large black covering to put 
over the coffin while carrying it to the graveyard. There was no 
hearse in those days, the body being borne on a bier on the 
shoulders of the pall bearers, who were named for this custom. 
The hearse was bought in 1824, and the hearse house at the edge 
of the burying ground built the same year. 

The old coffin, used even after 1830, was scarcely more than 
a wooden box, painted red; this was the regular color. It cost 
three dollars. Many of them were made in the small house in 
the rear of Ewins' store (M 5) by a Gage. At the funeral the 



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ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 153 

coffin was placed on the table in the center of the room where 
all could view the corpse. Certainly these would today seem 
very crude arrangements. 

About the middle of the last century it became evident that 
soon something' must be done to provide for burials in the fu- 
ture, as the old graveyard was about taken up. On June 6, 
1850, the town purchased of John L. Clendenin the Pine Grove 
Cemetery lot, of five acres, ninety-four rods, for $167.62. The 
deed bears the condition that one-third of the lot be reserved 
forever for the use of the town, the other two-thirds to be 
divided into lots and sold, the income from which is to be used 
to improve and ornament the enclosure. An increase in the 
provision for earing for the reserved third of the lot, which in- 
cludes the walks, drives, etc., was made in 1889 by the Corning 
Fund, organized by Gilman C. Corning, the subscriptions to 
which were as follows : 

Gilman C. Corning $100. 

Whittemore Rowell 100. 

Levi Woodbury 100. 

Elizabeth S. Cundy 50. 

Amanda O. Simes 50. 

Warren Emerson 25. 

Mary A. Cochey 15. 

Frank Emerson 15. 

E. B. Taylor 15. 
Dean Emerson 10. 
Stephen Currier 10. 
Stephen Bailey 10. 
Charles Kimball 10. 
J. W. Wheeler 10. 
G. M. Woodbury & Co. 10. 
Charles Austin 50. 
Mary G. Emerson 5. 

F. P. Woodbury 5. 
C. W. Noyes 100. 
W m G. Crowell 10. 

These subscriptions make up a total fund of seven hundred 



154 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

dollars, the income of which is used for the purpose above 
mentioned. 

In addition to this there are smaller funds aggregating 
$1,247.72, which furnish income for the care of the lots of the 
donors. The cut on page 152 shows the general neat appearance 
of the graveyard. 

The town later acquired the piece of land just south of this 
cemetery, known as the William Jones land (M 426), which it 
now holds for future burial purposes. 

In the north part of Salem is the Mount Pleasant Cemetery, 
instituted by an association which bears this name. It is con- 
trolled by a board of trustees of five, from whom a president is 
elected and a treasurer and a clerk. These officers are elected 
at the annual meeting held in January. Only owners of lots 
may be members of the association. Thus this cemetery is in 
a way a private institution; that is, does not come under the 
supervision of the town. 

The land for this burying ground was bought by John Taylor 
of Thomas Duston, Sr., about 1850. Among the first purchasers 
of lots were John Taylor, Kimball Gordon, each of whom took 
about ten lots, John Taylor, Jr., Isaiah Newell, James Taylor 
and Robert Chase. 

The two old cemeteries at Hale's bridge and near the Wind- 
ham line already referred to furnish in themselves the only 
information which we now have in regard to them. The former 
is probably the older, as this part of the town was settled even 
before the village. 



CHAPTER V. 

Civil and Political History. 

We have seen the steps in the building of the town, from the 
first separation as a parish until nearly all of its main lines of 
activity were fairly started. The growth since that time has 
been very gradual. In fact, Salem has never been a town of 
rapid development. What few instances we do find of rapid 
growth have been local, and centered about some industrial 
expansion. 

The best evidence of the size of the town is found in the tax 
lists at different periods during the first years, as the census 
returns were not taken until some time after the town was 
incorporated. The first census was ordered by the provincial 
legislature in September, 1767, to be made in December of the 
same year. No record of the Salem return at this time can be 
found. An inventory of the polls and estates had been ordered 
by vote of the town ten years prior to this census, but nothing 
was done about it. The next year, however, in 1758, the select- 
men were chosen as a committee to take the inventory. The 
following return was made to the legislature in 1783 in com- 
pliance to an order for a return of the males of the town who 
were of military age ; this was during the war, when the govern- 
ment was trying to obtain better information upon which to 
calculate the obligations of the several towns toward support 
of the army, etc : 

"A return of the Male Poles from 21 yrs & upwards for the 
Town of Salem 

"Footed 235. 
"Dated Salem Dec br 15, 1783. 

"Abbit Pettengill J Selectmen 
William Thorn ( for Salem." 



156 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

This return was sworn to before Timothy Ladd, Justice of 
the Peace. It does not give the population, nor even a basis 
upon which to estimate. The first complete census was taken by 
the selectmen in 1786. The House and Senate concurring had 
passed a bill on March 3, 1786, ordering a census of all the towns 
of the state. A penalty of five pounds was to be imposed upon 
any town whose selectmen should fail to comply with the order. 
Here is the return : 

"State of New Hampshire. 
' ' Rockingham S. S. 
"Agreeable to an order Received from the Honor bl House of 
Representatives for the purpose of taking the Number of Inhabi- 
tants we have Proceded and Find the White Males to be five 
hundred thirty and one — 531 

White females five hundred forty & 

four, 544—1075 

Male Slaves 3 

Female Slaves 4 — 7 

"Attest W m Thorn ] Selectmen 

James Webster j>- for 
Richard Kimball Salem 

' ' To the Hon bl Joseph Pearson, Deputy Sec ry . ' ' 

This shows that the town has not grown as fast since the 
Revolution as it did during the early years of its history. The 
recent growth, especially in the neighborhood of the Depot 
village, exceeds by far the most rapid rate of increase of other 
periods. But as in other cases, this has been caused by the 
advent of new and larger commercial and transportation in- 
terests. 

FIRST TAX LIST. 

The first tax list contained in the records is for the year 1754. 
There are fragmentary reports for other years between 1749 
and 1754, but no complete lists are preserved. In this latter 
year the total amount of taxes raised was £144 2s lOd, new 
tenor. The largest part of this sum was paid to Mr. Bayley, 
who received £50 7s 3d, new tenor, and £198 lis, old tenor. The 







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CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 157 

town treasurer had bills for minor expenditures amounting to 
£23 14s 5d. This office was held by Mr. Joseph Wright. The 
schoolmaster, Mr. Josiah Thomson, was paid seventy pounds, 
old tenor, which shows that considerable stress was put upon 
education even thus early. This left in the treasury at the close 
of the year a balance of seven pounds, new tenor, certainly not 
a very princely sum, but still a balance rather than a town debt. 
A list of the taxpayers of this time is here presented. 

As the two constables collected the taxes, both lists must be 
included in order to present the names of all the taxpayers at 
that time. It may be that the same name will be found on both 
lists. This may be due to the fact that the person's property 
was in different localities and thus came under the range of both 
constables. These lists are of great value in determining when 
men came into Salem. The list headed ''Out of town taxpay- 
ers" has several names which were later on the residents' list, 
which indicates that these men must have acquired the land 
some time before they actually took possession. 

In many cases these farms have been handed down through 
the original family to a time well within the memory of the 
present generation. Today, however, these cases are rare. 
Probably not more than a score of the present property owners 
trace their descent to the original owners of the homes where 
they now reside. These few will be noted under the historical 
descriptions of places. 

The first four tax lists after the incorporation of the town 
have not been preserved. The oldest now accessible is that of 
1754, of which the names on one set of papers is here presented. 
The list of Constable Parker for a "ministerial tax," and that 
of Constable "Wheeler for a "town charges" tax together include 
all the names. It is to be understood that this does not repre- 
sent the entire tax that each man paid, but will serve as a line 
for comparative ownership at the time. The original spelling 
is here preserved : 

"A ministerial Rate made and Purposioned one the inhabi- 
tance of the town of Salem October the 30 : 1754 and Delivered 
to Samuel Parker Constabel for the town afore s d to Collect — 



158 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Abial Asten 1 — 9 — 4 

Abraham Anes — 13 — 8 

Ebenezer Ayer 1 — 18 — 

Jonathan Bayley — 8 — 2 

Edw a Bayley 1— 1— 4 

Andrew Balch 0—19— 6 

John Baley 0—17— 4 

Jonathan Corlis 1 — 19 — 

Jonathan Corlis Juner — 12 — 

David Corlis 0—13— 8 

Isaac Clough 1 — 12 — 4 

Josiah Clough 0—16—10 

Isaac Clough Juner — 16 — 2 

"Wyman Clough — 7 — 6 

"W. Sarah Crese 0— 6— 2 

Daniel Crese — 7 — 6 

Joseph Crese — 7 — 6 

Edw d Clark 0—10— 2 

Judice Corning — 2 — 10 

George Corning — 8 — 8 

John Corning — 11 — 8 

Josiah Emerson 1 — 1 — 

John Giles 0—17— 4 

John hall Juner 1 — 7 — 8 

Kapha hall 0—16—10 

David heath 0— 8— 

Jonous Hastines — 9 — 9 

Joseph hull 0— 9— 6 

Oliver kimbel 0—13— 4 

William Leach 0— 8— 2 

John Lowel 1— 2— 

John Merrill 0—11—10 

Peter Merrill 0—13— 4 

David Merrill 0— 8— 4 

Nathaniel Merrill 0— 9— 8 

Joseph Merrill 1—11— 6 

Jonathan Morgin — 12 — 6 

John ober 1—19— 6 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 159 

John ober Juner — 13 — 2 

Isrel ober 0—13— 2 

Abigil Ellenwood 0— 9— 6 

Abial Pitman 0— 9— 6 

Joseph Pitman — 7 — 6 

Joseph Peasle 1 — 2 — 2 

Samuel Parker 1 — 6 — 4 

Timothy Sanders — 9 — 6 

Thomas Silver 0— 9— 8 

James Swan — 9 — 6 

Timothy Swan 1— 0— 

Joshua Thorndiek — 9 — 4 

Jonathan Woodbrey 1 — 4 — 14 

Ebenezer Woodbrey — 14 — 

nataaniel Woodbrey — 14 — 6 

Isral Woodbrey — 12 — 

Joseph Wright 1 — 6— 2 

Hannah Weebster 0—18— 

Peter Youreing — 11— 4 

Arthur Kirkwood — 7 — 6 

Richard Killey Juner — 7 — 6 

w Easter Currier — 4 — 7 

Asa Corlis — 7 — 6 

Samuel Crowell 0— 9— 6" 

The list of the other constable is as follows : 

"A Lest of tax made and Proportioned on the Inhabitants of 

the Town of Salem in the Province of new hampshier ye 30 th 
of October 1754 for Defaring the Charges of the Town Committed 
to Stephen Wheeler Constable of the S d town to Collect — 

John Ashbee — G — 1 

w Susanna alien — 1 — 8 

Jacob Bedell 0— 7 — 8 

John Bedel 0— 4— 6 

Timothy Bedel 0— 4— 5 

Joshua Baley — 4 — 5 

John Clements — 7 — 4 

Nathaniel Clement — 1 — 7 



160 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Nathaniel Clement Juner — 6 11 

E a w d Carlton — 8 

Jethro Clough — 5 — 1 

John Chorier — 4 — 4 

Nath 11 Dowe — 17 7 

Richard Dowe — 15 — 10 

Daniel Dow — 5 — 4 

Ruben Dow — 5 — 9 

Thomas Doston — 7 — 3 

Obdiah Duston — 7 1 

Caleb Duston — 5— 9 

obdiah Eastemon — 7 — 3 

Jonathan Corlis th 3 0— 6— 8 

James frinch — 4 l 

James forde — 3 — 9 

Daniel greenogo — 5 — 

Ban jn Hilton — 7 3 

Joseph Harris — 4 7 

Timothy Johnson — 12 — 11 

John Johnson — 6 11 

william Johnson — 6 — 4 

Richard Kelley 4 1 

william Kelley — 4 4 

Richard Kimball 13 9 

David Meckitips — 6 

John Page 0—17—10 

Daniel Peaslee — 14 

Seth Pete 8 9 

Richard Pate 12 10 

Asa Pate 7 17 

Nathaniel Peaslee Jun r — 3 9 

Benoni Rowel — 5 7 

Benoni Rowel Jun 6 4 

John Rowel 6 1 

Samuel Rowel 5 5 

Josiah Rowel 4 1 

william Sanders 10— 5 

Olever Sanders 11 11 




CLARENCE P. HALL. 




o 

00 



w 

o 

D 



Q 

w 
o 

q 
i— i 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 161 

Samuel Sanders — 4 — 5 

Jonathan Wheeler — 6 — 1 

Jonathan wheeler Jun — 6 — 9 

Banj mn wheeler 0—13 — 

abner wheeler — 6 — 5 

william wheeler 0— 6 — 5 

Nath 11 woodman — 5 — 5 

John watts junr — 6 — 4 

Isriel young — 9 — 10 

Phiplip hoyte 0— 4— 3 

Stephen wheeler 0— 7 — 2 

Benj n Rowlens 0— 8— 

James hadley — 4 — 3 

william Twonson — 7 — 10 

Isriel young juner — 3 — 9 

Richard young — 3 — 9 

Daniel massey 0— 9 — 10 

Robort Elenwood 0— 3— 9 
"A list of Such as Live out of town 

John watts Benj mn Clement 

John Emery william morse 

Thomas Eatton Richard Currier 

Samuel marbel Even Jones 

william weebster Thomas weebster 

Ebenezer weebster nath 11 Chase 

Isriel weebster Thomas Crooss" 
James hastiline Ju r 

The lists in this part of the records are badly confused, so that 
it is difficult to say whether we have here all of the names of the 
time under consideration. In this connection there is a fragment 
of another list, containing names different from those above, but 
still land owners in Salem though probably all living elsewhere. 
The first ten were near the western border : 

"Herig Boyd Samuel Armor 

John Dinsmore Andrew Armor 

Franses Dinsmore Robert Spere 

12 



1 



162 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Georg Spere James Twodol 

Thomas Spere John Bolton 

"the acompt of out town mens Rats 

Ebenezer Ayer jur — 1 — 

Jaremiah Bayley — — 4 

Caleb Hall 0—2—6 

Nathaniel Messer — — 4 

Peter Ayer — — 4 

Mathe Mitchel 0—0—4 

Willm Mitchel 0—0—4 

John Mitchel 0—0—4 

Andrew Mitchel 0—0—4 

Ebenezer Mitchel 0—0—8 

Richard Messer 0—0—2 

Daniel Haseltine 0—0—2 

John Tipet 0—0—3 

Jonathan Swan — — 4 

Samuel Clark 0—0—4 

John Simons — — 4 

Thomas Harris — — 4 



i ? 



Such items bearing upon taxation as are relative to other town 
interests are referred to under their proper headings. As there 
were a few slaves in town the question naturally arose as to 
whether or not they were taxable property. Also, what should 
be the attitude toward free colored citizens. In 1778 it was 
voted that blacks be subject to the same duties and taxes as the 
whites, if free. Black slaves were to be regarded as personal 
property, which was subject to the same rates as real estate. 

An interesting item in the tax vote of 1787 is the stipulation 
of method of payment. According to the list about forty-seven 
per cent, of each man's tax was to be paid in certificates and fifty- 
three per cent, in silver. The collectors for that year were Abner 
"Wheeler and Barnard Kimball. The financial condition during 
this period which followed the war was necessarily unsettled. 
But it was not more so than many of the people . Many lines of 
business had been temporarily stagnated, which made it harder 
for the laborer to obtain a living for his family. This state of af- 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 163 

fairs caused frequent migrations and wanderings of the less 
successful part of the population. Families from other towns 
came to Salem without having any visible means of support. 
They became town charges in many cases, whereupon they were 
summarily "warned out of town" by the constable, and ordered 
to return to the town whence they came. The town records con- 
tain warning after warning in almost endless succession. 

The collectors were paid by varying standards rather than by 
some uniform system. In 1798 they received 6y 2 pence for each 
pound collected. Eight years later the collector was paid 
twenty dollars for collecting a minister's tax of three hundred 
eighty dollars. And twenty years after that, or in 1826, the 
collection of taxes was bid off at auction for three cents on the 
dollar. As the valuation increased and the taxes became conse- 
quently more easy of collection, the collector's pay was reduced 
to a lower and lower rate. Thus in 1847, with a total assess- 
ment of $2,458.37, the collector was paid 1%% ; in 1870, with an 
amount of nearly $12,000, 1 1-3% was paid; andl in 1900, $125 
was paid for collecting something more than $16,000, or % of 
1%. In the last six years the total taxation has increased over 
fifty per cent, or to more than $25,000. Meantime the rate has 
fluctuated between $17 and $23 on $1,000 of valuation. The 
rate for 1906 was $21 per $1,000. 

TAX LIST OF 1800. 

From several viewpoints the property condition of the town at 
the beginning of the last century is extremely interesting. It is 
to be observed that the town treasurer was not deemed an essen- 
tial officer, as in many years none was elected. The collectors 
not infrequently paid the bills against the town. Sometimes 
they were ordered to pay certain taxes over to the selectmen. 
This was especially the case with the school tax; the teachers 
then applied to these officers for their pay. Of course the town 
paid the minister at that time, and the tax for this item was 
received by the collectors. 

In 1800 Joseph Thom and Samuel Clement were the con- 
stables, and the taxes were divided between them for collection. 
The "town tax" and "school tax" were of the same amount 



164 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



each. Besides these two there were the "minister's tax" and 
the "state and county tax." The amount of each given to each 
constable to collect was as follows : 





Minister's. 


Town. 


State. 


School. 


Total. 


To Joseph Thorn . 
" Samuel Clement 


$203.25 
144.58 


$119.70 
117.69 


$127.65 
136.96 


$119.70 
117.69 


$570.30 
516.92 


$347.83 


$237.39 


$264.61 


$237.39 


$1087.02 



By comparing this total, $1,087.02, with the figures quoted 
above, it will be seen that in the next fifty years the total taxa- 
tion did not much more than double. This represents the whole 
amount raised by the town, and was expended under six main 
accounts. 



Expenditures for 1800: 

To state and county, 
town services, 
schools, 
poor, 
bridges, 
minister, 
wood for minister, 



$231.54 

27.05 

314.99 

130.24 

8.70 

300.00 

9.74 



$1,022.26 
About one-third of this total was paid for support of schools. 
Today scarcely one-fifth of the annual appropriation is used for 
this purpose, and yet many citizens are heard complaining that 
even this is too much. It seems that we may have something to 
learn on this point from our ancestors. 

In 1800 the largest tax was paid by Joshua Merrill. If we 
divide the taxes into four groups, namely, state and county, 
town, minister's and school, we can summarize the payments of 
the twelve highest men on the list as follows : 

State 





& 
County 


Town Minister School 


Total 


Joshua Merrill 


3.94 


3.60 7.12 3.60 


18.26 


W ra S. Kelly 


3.59 


3.28 6.49 3.28 


16.64 




DR. LEWIS F. SOULE. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 



165 



Thomas Dow 


2.69 


2.48 


8.64 


2.48 


16.29 


David Allen 


2.99 


2.74 


5.73 


2.74 


14.20 


David Dusten 


2.98 


2.73 


4.68 


2.73 


13.12 


Jesse Merrill 


2.58 


2.36 


5.28 


2.36 


12.58 


Israel "Woodbury 


2.62 


2.30 


5.32 


2.30 


12.54 


Sam'l Webster 


2.57 


2.35 


4.70 


2.35 


11.97 


William Thorn 


2.59 


2.35 


4.65 


2.35 


11.94 


Nath'l Gorrell 


2.46 


2.45 


4.50 


2.45 


11.86 


Oliver Sanders 


2.61 


2.29 


4.53 


2.29 


11.72 


Oliver Kimball 


2.51 


2.29 


4.44 


2.29 


11.53 



These figures show that the minister's tax was the largest of 
the four, and not always in the same ratio to the others. In fact, 
this tax was not determined entirely by the amount of a man's 
property, but partially by the number of his family and their 
relation to the church. This was also true somewhat in case of 
the school tax. 

The following table gives only the amount of the ' ' town tax ' ' 
of each taxpayer in 1800. While this is only about one-fifth of 
each man's total tax, it serves to show the comparative value of 
their property at this time : 



Allen, Lt. David 
Austin, Abiel 
Austin, David 
Austin, John 
Austin, John, Jr., 



$2.74 Austin, Jonathan 

.67 Austin, Moses 

.64 Austin, Nathan 

1.16 Austin, Peter 

.33 Ayer, William 



.39 

.70 
1.14 

.91 

.84 



Bailey, John N. 1.00 

Bayley, Dr. Dudley 1.03 

Bayley, John .55 
Bayley, Wd. of Jonathan .34 

Bayley, William .62 

Belknap, Nathaniel 1.00 

Betton, Silas, Esq., .57 



Boutwell, Sam'l .27 

Bradford, Simon .49 

Bradford, William 1.29 

Brickett, Edmund 1.31 

Brickett, John .59 

Bryant, Andrew .40 



Campbell, Robert 2.19 

Carleton, Nehemiah .74 

Chase, Edmund .27 



Clough, Wyman 
Coburn, Simon 
Copp, Aaron 



.87 
.12 
.15 



166 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Chase, Joseph 


.27 


Corless, Asa 


1.66 


Chase, Samuel 


.85 


Corless, Asa, Jr., 


1.29 


Clark, John 


1.24 


Corless, Benjamin 


.27 


Clement, Samuel 


.89 


Corless, Ens. David 


1.95 


Clement, Stephen 


.27 


Corless, David 


.27 


Clement, "William 


1.12 


Corless, John 


.85 


Clendenin, John 


.59 


Cross, David 


.27 


Clough, Isaac 


.33 


Cross, Jesse 


1.11 


Clough, Josiah 


1.33 


Cross, Lt. Sam'l 


1.44 


Clough, Timothy 


1.13 


Currier, Capt. John 


1.95 


Clough, William 


1.45 






Davis, Moses 


1.13 


Dow, Maj. Thos. 


2.48 


Day, Samuel 


1.41 


Duston, Benj. 


.27 


Dow, Abraham 


.66 


Duston, Caleb 


.74 


Dow, Amos 


1.06 


Duston, Caleb, Jr., 


1.02 


Dow, Aquilla 


1.14 


Duston, David 


2.73 


Dow, Capt. Jeremiah 


1.33 


Duston, Ebenezer 


1.71 


Dow, Oliver 


.50 


Duty, William 


1.34 


Ellenwood, Henry 


.76 


Emerson, Samuel, Jr., 


.62 


Emerson, Jonathan 


.39 


Emerson, Seth 


.69 


Emerson, Joshua 


.91 


Emerson, Simeon 


.82 


Emerson, Michael 


.60 


Emerson, Timothy 


.90 


Emerson, Samuel 


.64 


Endicott, Samuel 


1.33 



Foster, Paul 



.60 



Gage, Ens. John .49 

Gage, Joseph W. 1.53 

Gage, Phineas .27 

Gilmore, Col. James 1.53 

Gordon, Amos .27 

Gordon, Lt. Benjamin 1.58 

Gordon, Henry .27 



Gordon, Joshua .34 

Gordon, Lebenar 1.23 

Gordon, Phineas 1.18 

Gordon, Wells .27 

Gorrell, Gene .33 
Gorrell, Maj. Nathaniel 2.45 

Grandy, Charles .46 



Hall, Elijah 
Hall, Jonathan 



1.70 Haseltine, Jonathan 1.46 

.27 Haseltine, Jonathan, Jr., .27 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 



167 



Hall, Joseph 


1.33 


Hastings, James 


1.08 


Hall, Joseph, Jr., 


.28 


Hastings, Joseph 


1.04 


Hall, Joshua 


.27 


Hassett, Nathaniel 


.54 


Hall, Joshua, Jr., 


.27 


Heath, John 


1.13 


Hall, Varnum 


1.45 


Heath, Joshua 


1.48 


Hardy, Caleb 


.27 






Johnson, Wd. Hannah 


.37 


Jones, Hezikiah 


1.06 


Johnson, Lt. Samuel 


.86 


Jones, Timothy 


.99 


Jones, Evan, Jr., 


2.19 






Kelly, wd. of Elisha 


.35 


Kimball, Barnet 


1.62 


Kelly, Nathan 


.58 


Kimball, John 


.77 


Kelly, Richard 


.99 


Kimball, Oliver 


2.29 


Kelly, Samuel 


1.26 


Kimball, Richard 


2.19 


Kelly, Lt. Wm. Somes 


2.28 






Ladd, Daniel 


1.00 


Little, Ens. Henry 


1.73 


Ladd, Joshua 


.27 


Little, William 


.27 


Lancaster, John 


.88 


Lowell, John 


1.55 


Little, Abner B. 


1.61 






Marble, Samuel 


.98 


Merrill, Joshua 


3.60 


Massey, Jonathan 


.27 


Merrill, Perley 


1.51 


Merrill, Enoch 


1.17 


Merrill, Richard 


.99 


Merrill, Henry 


.27 


Messer, wd. Rachel 


.10 


Merrill, Maj. Jesse 


2.36 


Messer, Richard 


1.22 


Merrill, Jonathan 


.93 


Moreland, James 


.90 


Merrill, Ens. Joseph 


1.21 


Morrill, Philip 


.72 


Merrill, Joseph 


.64 


Morse, Caleb 


1.34 


Nevins, David 


2.05 






Ober, Israel 


.11 


Ordway, wd. Rebekah 


.32 


Ordway, David 


.45 






Page, Ebenezer 


1.66 


Pattee, Eliphalet 


.64 


Page, James 


.89 


Pattee, Jonathan 


.81 



168 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Page, John .40 

Page, John, Jr., .93 

Page, Jonathan .57 

Parker, Ebenezer 1.32 

Parker, Edward .40 

Pattee, Ens. Edward 1.48 

Kemmik, David .27 

Robinson, Stephen .61 

Robinson, Thomas .94 

Rollins, Abel 1.53 

Rollins, Benjamin .19 

Rollins, David 2.02 

Rowell, Israel 1.33 

Rowell, Ens. Jacob 1.57 



Pattee, Richard .27 

Pattee, Stephen .57 

Pettingill, Dan'l .92 

Pettingill, Dea. Isaac .39 

Pettingill, Jonathan .27 

Pettingill, Joseph .76 

Rowell, James .84 

Rowell, Moses D. .27 

Rowell, Philip .96 

Rowell, Richard .27 

Rowell, Samuel .27 

Rowell, William 1.16 

Runnells, wd. Phebe .35 



Sanders, Henry .27 

Sanders, James 1.78 

Sanders, Oliver 2.29 

Silver, Daniel .98 

Silver, Zebediah .34 

Smith, Francis 1.16 
Smith, John • 1.49 

Smith, wd. Phebe .21 



Taylor, Matthew 
Thayer, Benj. 
Thorn, Joseph 



Wardwell, Joseph 1.34 

Webber, Abel .92 

Webster, wd. Hannah .29 

Webster, Col. James 1.77 

Webster, Capt. Jesse 2.22 

Webster, Jesse, Jr., .39 

Webster, Joseph .57 

Webster, Joseph .33 

Webster, Nathaniel, 78 



Smith, Solomon 1.02 

Smith, Lt. Thomas 1.41 

Smith, William .35 

Stevens, Eliphalet .34 

Stevens, Jonathan 1.12 

Stevens, Simeon .97 

Stevens, William 1.28 



1.83 Thorn, William, Esq., 2.35 
.90 Thorn, William, Jr., .27 

.27 Towns, Col. Benjamin 1.91 



Wheeler, Richard 
Wheeler, Silas 
Wheeler, Warren 
Whittaker, Lt. Mitchell 
Whittaker, Moses 
Wilson, John 
Woodbury, Ebenezer 
Woodbury, Elisha 
Woodbury, Ens. Israel. 



1.22 
1.13 
1.23 
.39 
.79 
1.20 
1.31 
1.75 
2.30 




ELIPHALET COBURN. 




ROCK MAPLE IN CURRIER WEBSTER PASTURE, 13 FEET IN 

CIRCUMFERENCE. (M 468) 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 



169 



Webster, Rollins 1.39 

Webster, Dr. Samuel 2.35 

Webster, Thomas .27 

Wheeler, Abner 1.65 

Wheeler, Amos .89 

Wheeler, Lt. David 1.14 

Wheeler, Ens. Isaiah 1.29 



Woodbury, John 
Woodbury, John, Jr., 
Woodbury, Lt. Luke 
Woodbury, wd. Mary 
Woodman, Ens. Abner 
Woodman, Nathaniel 
Worth, Edmund 
Worth, Stephen 



Wheeler, Ens. Jonathan 1.74 

There were twenty-five non-resident taxpayers. 



1.30 
.82 

1.15 
.54 

1.61 

1.61 
.27 

2.39 



From the records under date of 1802 is obtained a list of the 
■"Objects of Taxation." The tax on each is given, as well as 
the number contained in the inventory for that year : 



''Polls 

Stallions 

Horses and mares 



kept 4 winters 
" 3 " 



Oxen 
Cows 
Neat stock kept 4 winters 

(i a a o n 

it ct a i) tt 

Orchard, 10 barrels per acre 
Arable, 25 bushels corn per acre 
Mowing I Tun of Hay per acre 
Pasture, 4 acres per cow, per acre 
Mills IV2 percent of net yearly income. 
Buildings and improved lands i/o of one percent 
Stock in Trade y 2 of one percent. 
Money at Interest % of one percent 
Property in the funds % of one percent" 

For the purpose of comparison, the inventory for one 
years later is here presented ; that is, for 1902. And 
the rapidity of growth of travel by electric cars, as an 



Assessment 
on each 

$1.34 
5.00 
M 
.50] 
.34}. 
.16J 
.50 
.34 
.25] 
.16 j. 
.08 J 
.25 
.16 
.16 
.07 



Number 
in town. 

213 

1 
146 

72 

233 

360 

503 



hundred 
to show 
explana- 



1902 


1906 


456 


506 


338 


292 





4 


601 


568 


36 


6 


62 


20 


3775 


1690 



170 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

tion of the change in the number of animals in town, a part of 
the inventory for 1906 is also given: 

1802 
Polls 213 

Horses 146 

Oxen 233 

Cows 360 

Sheep 
Hogs 
Fowls 

It will be seen that the number of polls was slightly more than 
doubled in a hundred years, while a further increase of more 
than eleven per cent, took place within the last four years. 

Another very noticeable feature of this comparison is the great 
reversal in the number of oxen and horses, and the decrease in 
the number of the latter within the last four years. It is a pe- 
culiar fact that the inventory for 1902 does not show a single 
ox, whereas formerly nearly all heavy work was done by these 
animals. Last year there were four in the town. It is evident 
that some parts of the town have drawn away from their former 
interest in the various activities of farm life. For while the pop- 
ulation and poll list have been steadily increasing, the loss of 
thirty-three cows, five sixths of the sheep, two thirds of the hogs 
and more than half the fowls, in this brief space of four years, 
is indicative of a strong attraction to other than farming occupa- 
tions. 

AFFAIRS AT THE TOWN HOUSE. 

Some of the records of town meetings, warrants, etc., show bits 
of interesting matter regarding the old town house and the men 
at the head of the affairs of the town. Some of these references 
show us that conditions which we are likely to consider peculiar 
to our own time were known to the voters of a century ago. For 
instance, an article in the warrant for 1767 had for its purpose 
"to see if the selectmen shall serve without pay, or if some cer- 
tain sum shall be set aside." The record for the meeting says 
"Voted in the negative," but leaves the reader in blissful ig- 
norance as to which clause of the article the action referred to. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 171 

In our cities and towns today are many voters who would see cer- 
tain officials serve without pay or receive a stated salary. 

There was a strong feeling against vagrants in the early days, 
as is shown by a vote passed in 1770: "Voted that the Select 
men take Proper Care of all Straglers Runing about the Streets 
& Inquire into their Business & if they do not give a Reasonable 
account to take & bind them out to masters that Shall take 
Proper care of them." Perhaps if some such treatment could 
be applied today it would be effective in ridding communities 
of troublesome wanderers who have the traditional distaste for 
work in all its forms. 

In 1781 it was "Voted that Cap. Evan Jones and Richard 
Kimball be a committee to procure 6 barrells of new England 
Rum for Salem and charge the town for it." At first glance 
this looks bad, but it must be borne in mind that the temperance 
standards of a hundred years ago were far different from those 
of today. The record does not state the use to which this liquor 
was to be put; but such entries are by no means rare, while fre- 
quently the purpose is also stated. The repairing of a bridge 
or other similar piece of work was usually accomplished by the 
aid of a few gallons of rum. Such a course was sure to bring its 
own antidote. The abuse of liquors resulted in the various tem- 
perance movements that were subsequently instituted. A law 
was passed putting the sale of intoxicating liquors into the hands 
of the town and authorities. Agents were appointed to attend 
to this business. They at first sold the liquor, but later distrib- 
uted the sale to sub-agents in different parts of the town. In 
time these were given licenses to sell, until the present system 
was gradually developed. 

Early in the last century tavern licenses were granted, includ- 
ing permits to sell spirits, often, however, limited as to the kind 
or amount. Whenever a person took dinner at the tavern he 
could obtain liquor, and usually did so. There are some curious 
accounts among the papers of the town, setting forth the items 
paid for to certain storekeepers or tavern-keepers — and generally 
these early merchants offered tavern accommodations. Here is 
one such paper, which, however, does not always clearly distin- 



172 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

guish between items ordered for paupers and those things in- 
cidental to the transaction of town business : 

Selectmen to Hatch & Spofford Dr. 

1816 March 16. 1 Pt Brandy 50. 30 th 9 gills rum 44— .94 

April 11, 4 qts V/ 2 pints Rum 2.59 2.59 

May 29. Brandy, horse keeping & dinners 2.09 

30 " " " " & paper 2.66 

31 " " " " & rum 2.25 
June 1. " " " " " 2.59 

8. 1 Pint Brandy 40 c'ts. 22 nd Brandy 25 c'ts .65 

" 29 Punch 50 c'ts. July 6. Brandy 50 c'ts 1.00 

July 22 Brandy 75 c'ts Aug 6 5 yds Cambric 1.90) 

Silk & thread 16 \ 2.81 

Aug. 7. De'ld Mrs. Kowell, 1 qt Rum 32 c'ts, 1 Dog 
Bread 17, .49) 

1 lb. Candles 25 c'ts. 1 lb Sugar 17 c'ts. 42 J 91 

De'ld Mrs. Austin's daughter. 
10 Rum 17 c'ts. 13, 1 Dog Bread 17 c'ts. 1 qt. 
Rum 38— 55) 

% tea 34 c'ts 1 lb Sugar 17 c'ts 51 \ 106 

De'ld Austin girl. 

22, lib. Sugar 17 c'ts. 1 Pint Wine 25, Rum 30 72 

Sept. 10 De'ld Austin girl, 1 yd cloth for Miss Young 22 

Brandy 60 c't's 60 

21, Rum, 2 dinners & horse keeping 1.32 

25, Pt Rum 25. also 3 gills 18 .43 

Oct. 15. 2 dinners, horsekeeping & rum 1.42 

Nov. 11. iy 2 pt Brandy 75 c'ts. y 2 pt Shrub 25 1.00 

18, 3 lbs Nails 38 c'ts 2 lbs Putty 25— 63) 

3 dinners, rum & horsekeeping. 1.91 ( 2.54 

Dec. 11 31/2 y'ds cloth for J. B. (J. Bedel). 1.17 

Jan 8 3i/ 2 y'ds cloth de'ld Mr. J. Allen 1.17 

25 1 Pt Brandy 40. Feb. 1, 5 gills rum 56 c'ts) 

Inkstand and horsekeeping ( 1.20 

Feb. 8 Brandy 50, 15 th 1 Box Wafers horsekeeping 

& Brandy 89— 1.39 




JAMES EWINS. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 173 

March 1. Rum 20 c'ts 7 th 1 Pt Rum 40. .60 
11, 1 Quire Paper 24, Dinners, 1.00. Horse keep- 
ing 1 00 2.24 



36.39 
Just prior to 1840, when the temperance movement was begin- 
ning to make its influence felt, several attempts were made to re- 
strict the sale of liquor. In the warrant of 1837 appeared an ar- 
ticle to instruct the selectmen to issue no licenses ; but in the meet- 
ing it was voted down. The next year the article was inserted 
again in a modified form, seeking only to prohibit selling on Sun- 
day except for medicinal use. This time it was passed over. 

About 1855, when the above mentioned law requiring liquor 
agents was passed, the whole business was considerably changed. 
It is interesting to note the large number of sales for "med- 
icinal use. ' ' The first report of the agent here follows : 

LIQUOR AGENT'S REPORT. 

' ' The Agent appointed by the Selectmen of the Town of Salem 
to sell liquors under the act for the suppression of intemperance 
respectfully submits the following 

Report of Liquors Purchased. 

4iy 2 gal. alcohol 80c per gal $32 80 

83% gal N E rum 39 67 

19 gal. cog. brandy, 5 05 per gal. 95 95 

22 gal. wine, 275 per gal. 60 50 

100 Holland gin, 125 per gal 125 00 

comission and truckage 18 62 

freight 2 75 

Whole amount of Purchase 375 28 

And he has made 25 sales of Alcohol, 2g V/ 2 p for mech 
use 2 45 

21 sales Alcohol, 3% g for medicinal use 4 20 

152 sales N. E. rum, 46% g l 1 /^ P, m ed. use 25.69 

17 sales cog. brandy iy 2 g }/% P me< ^- use 1® 50 

31 Holland gin, 5*4 g " 9 24 

2 sales wine, 1 qt 92 

Whole amount sales 53 00 



174 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Remaining on hand 

351/2 g y 2 p alcohol 28 45 

17% g iy 2 p brandy 88 76 

363,4 g 1-2 p N. E. mm 18 05 

943,4 g Holland gin 118 44 

2134 g wine 59 81 

Whole amount of Liquors on hand 313 51 

Respectfully, F. B. Kelly, Agent." 

The business grew rapidly, and two years later the sales 
amounted to $334.06. Of this total the sales for medicinal use 
included 

100 sales N. E. rum 293^ gallons 19.64 

4 sales alcohol 3 qts .83 

826 sales 235y 2 quarts 1 pint N. E. rum 150.68 

160 sales gin, 23% gls V/ 2 pints 40.82 

94 sales brandy, 7% gls 1 pt 3 gills 50.19 

44 sales wine, 5 gls 18.40 

124 sales alcohol, 2iy 2 gls i/ 2 Pt 24.15 

Which indicates how promptly the invalids must have been at- 
tended and how generously they were supplied with a panacea ! 
It did not take many years for this system to run its course. 
The last report was made in 1859, after which the town did not 
manage the sale of liquors. 

One very pressing question before the voters for many years 
was the course to pursue in regard to the townhouse. Some 
favored repairing the building, others erecting a new one. A 
meeting held March 5, 1800, chose a committee to investigate the 
advisability of repairing it. The three men chosen, Oliver San- 
ders, Edward Pattee and Joseph Hall, reported that the house 
was not worth repairing ! This finding may possibly be excused 
on the ground that the committee was in favor of a new build- 
ing. But what was even a longer step, the town voted to accept 
the report! ! Only think — a building that was condemned by 
three men of good judgment in most matters as not worth repair- 
ing in 1800, stood for a century in constant use, meantime being 
moved to a new location, and then at no very great expense 
was repaired and made into the present substantial building. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 175 

Of course the exterior lines of the house have no great beauty, 
except such as appeals to our love and veneration for fine colonial 
relics. But the fine frame, apparently as sturdy as when hewn 
from the native oak by the strong hand of Henry Sanders, is a 
suitable and worthy foundation for any amount of amplification 
and adornment. 

In 1812 it was voted to sell the townhouse and the land ad- 
joining. What prevented the sale we do not know, but certainly 
the vote was never carried out. It became a serious question 
as to money for preaching, and different means of raising it 
were suggested ; but perhaps the folly of selling the only meeting 
place in town became apparent. At any rate, it was voted in 
1816 to raise one hundred dollars for preaching, and two years 
later it was decided to ' ' vendue the parsonage and lay the money 
out for preaching at the old meetinghouse." This meant that 
the parsonage land was to be rented, not sold, to the highest bid- 
der. John Kelly bid it off for $27.10. 

The active agitation regarding the disposition that should be 
made of the townhouse began in 1832 and continued for nearly 
fifteen years with unabated earnestness, until finally it was ended 
by the expenditure of a small amount of money for repairs. The 
erection of the Congregational Church in 1840 did a great deal 
toward settling the disputes, as it relieved the situation of one 
one of the most complicating circumstances, namely that this 
building had been the home of the church for a century, thus 
giving the town government and the church equal rights by rea- 
son of occupation and length of tenure. Some of the plans for 
remedying matters are here presented. 

One of the wildest schemes proposed emanated from the west 
part of the town and was inserted in the warrant for a meeting 
to be held November 5, 1832. "Art. 7. On the petition of 
John Smith and others to see if the town will take measures to 
build a town house on Hovey's Hill, so called, near the center of 
the town, and if so, to see if the town will take measures to build 
said townhouse in common with a religious society in the follow- 
ing manner : The town to lay the foundations and to build the 
walls of the first, or lower story, of brick or stone, and to put on 
the roof. The religious society to finish the lower story suitable 



176 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

to town purposes, and to build and finish a second story of the 
same materials as the first, for a place of public worship, of which 
said society is to have entire control. Said society to be formed 
and to obligate themselves to the town within six months to build 
their part of said house in manner aforesaid." 

The petitioners for this were John Smith 2nd, Tristram Kim- 
ball, Asa S. Austin, Wm. S. Merrill, Francis Smith, John Clark, 
F. S. Smith, "William Thorn, Joseph Kimball, Asa Woodbury, 
Moses Hall and Seth Hall. 

The request received slight attention at the hands of the vot- 
ters, and they summarily "voted to dismiss the article." 

Early in the year 1833, a movement was started for transfer- 
ring the townhouse from the common to its present location. 
Here is the request, copied from the original papers : 
"State of New Hampshire, Rockingham, S. S. 

"To the Hon 1 Selectmen of the Town of Salem in said County: 

' ' We' the undersigned inhabitants and legal voters in said town 
respectfully request that you insert an article in your next town 
warrant, to see if the town will vote that the Congregational 
meeting house be moved from the place where it now stands, to 
the school house common, so called, north of the grave yard, in 
case said meeting house shall be moved and put in as good repair 
as it now is, without any expense to the town whatever, and that 
the town shall have a good and satisfactory bond to that effect,, 
and as in duty bound &c. 

"Salem, Feb. 14, 1833 

"John Clendenin, Peter Massey, Moody Foster, David W. 
Dickey, Charles C. P. Betton, Joseph Gorrill, J. C. Ewins, E. L. 
Noyes, Hazen Lowell, Jonathan Pettingill, Joshua Gordon, Wash- 
ington Woodbury, John Ewins, Luther Emerson, John R. 
Wheeler, John F. White, Sudrick Austin, James P. Ewins, Ab- 
ner Gage, Mark H. Webster, Edward Cook, Samuel Kelly, Dan- 
iel Wilson, Wm. S. Merrill, Enoch Merrill Jr., Luke Hovey, Jo- 
seph Haynes, John Allen, Elisha Smith, Richard Kimball r 
Abiathar Wheeler, Caleb Saunders, Robert Lowell, John Lowell 
Jr., Oliver Hall, Daniel Wheeler." 

At the meeting held in March, 1833, it was "voted to permit 
the meetinghouse to be removed to the schoolhouse common, so 




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HON. JOHN W. WHEELER. 




PANORAMA VIEW UP DEPOT VILLAGE. FP.I iM HOVEY'S HILL. 






/ ** 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 177 

called, in case all damages to said house are made good to the 
satisfaction of a committee to be chosen for the purpose, free of 
any expense to the town. Voted the selectmen be a committee 
to examine the meeting house before and after its removal, to 
see if it is in as good order after its removal as it is now." 

This vote was not carried out at once, and several attempts to 
nullify it were made. The building was not moved until 1838, 
just a century after its erection. 

Another article in the warrant of 1833 aimed "to see if the 
town will vote to move the Congregational meetinghouse from 
where it now stands, unto Luke Hovey's hill, so called, near the 
turnpike." This came up for attention at a meeting held April 
2, 1833, and was dismissed. 

The hill known as Hovey's Hill is in the northeast corner of 
Main Street and Broadway (Turnpike), at Salem Depot. A 
number of citizens of the town living in that section fixed upon 
this hill as an ideal centrally located place for the townhouse. 
The vast majority, however, did not like the* plan to move the 
center of town activity away from the scene of its origin. 

Article 2 of this warrant for 1833 also pertained to the town 
land: "To see if the town will vote to enclose all the land be- 
twixt the burying ground near the Congregational meeting house 
in said Salem, and the town schoolhouse near said meeting house, 
excluding as much room around said schoolhouse as will be rea- 
sonable sufficient for a proper passway to and from said school- 
house." This article also was voted down in the meeting. 

In the warrant for the annual town meeting to be held March 
10, 1835, article 15 was as follows: "On a petition of Chauncy 
N. Jones and others, to see if the town will vote that each re- 
ligious denomination may have an equal right in the Congrega- 
tional meeting house the present year." This meeting did not 
finish all the business on the tenth, but adjourned till the next 
day, when it was voted that each denomination have an equal 
right "according to their poll and estate," and that the select- 
men make the division, provided they would do it without ex- 
pense to the town. 

The next year the vote passed upon this point included the 
rent of the parsonage, the selectmen being chosen a committee to 

13 



178 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

collect the rent and appropriate it according to the vote. The re- 
quest for the article was signed as follows : 

Benaiah B. Gordon H. Bailey 

John B. Webster Saml A. Harris 

John Wilson Jr. John Buss 

Jason Ingals John R. Eowell 

James Webster 2 nd John Wilson 

William L. Buss Jona. K. Gordon 

Mark H. Webster Joseph C. Morse 

Chauncy N. Jones John Woodbury 

This granting rights to other denominations was naturally 
somewhat displeasing to the members of the Congregational So- 
ciety. An attempt was made in 1839, in a warrant dated Novem- 
ber 16, to take a step toward reclaiming the old house: "On 
petition of Frederick W. Bailey and others, to see if the town 
will accept a proposal of the first Congregational Society in said 
Salem, to enlarge, re-build, alter or repair the meeting house in 
which said society worship, and to quit claim a portion of said 
meeting house to said society, and to act anything relating 
thereto. 

"To see if the town will choose a committee to give a deed of 
a portion of said meeting house to said society." 

The voters did not seem to appreciate the merits of this plan, 
and dismissed the article at the meeting held December 2. 

After the building was moved, it became evident that certain 
repairs were much needed. This matter was talked over pro and 
con until some definite plans were settled upon, when a warrant 
was requested for a meeting. This time the favor was asked for 
the militia company instead of a church society : 

"To the selectmen of the Town of Salem. 

"You are hereby requested to call a town meeting to act on the 
following articles, to see if the Town will repair and alter the old 
Congregational meeting house, (so called) to make it a suitable 
town house, viz: To remove the staircase on the southwest side 
and make a suitable room there for the use of the selectmen to 
transact town business. 

' ' To replace all the glass, and repair the doors. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 179 

' ' To floor over the second story and make it level with the girts 
now in the frame, and partition off a suitable passageway to 
enter the same by the southeast door inside. 

"To see if the town will let the second story to the 'Salem 
Guards ' to hold their meetings, and for the safe keeping of their 
muskets and accoutrements, and to transact any other business 
that may be necessary to carry the same into effect. 

"Salem Jan 'y 1,1844. 

Jonathan Massey, John Corning, Edward Cook, John Mars- 
ton, John W. Austin, Nathan Russ, J. C. Ewins, James Ayer, 
Silas Hall, Nath 1 Woodbury." 

Several attempts similar to this were made to put the old build- 
ing into better condition; but not until the March meeting in 

1845 was a plan adopted. This plan was in substance like that 
outlined above. The work was delayed, however, and a new 
vote passed March 12, 1846, supplementary to that of the year 
before. Several of the voters gathered immediately after the 
meeting and framed a request for a town meeting, to reconsider 
the two votes here referred to, and see what course the town 
would take to dispose of the townhouse instead of repairing it. 
Also to see what action would be taken to provide a house in 
which to do town business. These efforts to prevent the repair- 
ing of the building proved futile, and the work of remodelling 
was undertaken. The accounts show bills varying in date from 

1846 to 1851, during which time the house was being put into 
new arrangement. 

Both floors were finished as halls. Downstairs were the select- 
men's room and the town hall, while the room upstairs was 
known as Salem Hall. Many lectures, festivals, dances and other 
entertainments were held in the two halls during the years fol- 
lowing their completion. 

POLITICAL NOTES. 

In the presentation of the facts regarding the building of the 
town we included many references to matters of a political na- 
ture. In those days, however, before the definition of parties or 
the growth of the spirit of combined rivalries, the workings of 
the political powers were too insignificant to require more than 



180 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

passing mention. In fact, Salem has never been known as a fiery- 
political town, except in a few cases where the turbulent stream 
of national discussions forced its way in upon the normally 
quiet elections of the town. A few such heated campaigns will 
be referred to later. 

While we have no complete list of officers appointed by the 
state, some of the early records at Concord give us the names 
of prominent citizens of the town who were appointed to office. 
These, together with some town actions in electing state officers, 
are here briefly reviewed. 

In 1763 it was voted not to choose a grand juryman. Five 
years later a record tells us that "Deacon John Kelly was then 
Draughted out of the Box for a Petit Jury man." 

The next year, 1769, the town elected its first grand juror, 
as is indicated thus : ' ' Liut. Oliver Sanders was Chosen grand 
Juror to Serve at the Next Superior Court to be holden at Ports- 
mouth on the first tuesday of August Next." 

1771. Daniel Massey drawn as petit juror. 

1772. Lieut. Jonathan Wheeler was drawn as grand juror 
and Asa Corless as petit juror. 

1774. Capt. Evan Jones was grand juror, Israel Woodbury 
and Amos Dow petit jurors. At the time these were drawn it 
was voted not to allow petit jurors anything for their time in 
attending court. 

In 1776 Jesse Merrill was appointed coroner for Rockingham 
County, and on July 4 Samuel Emerson was made justice of 
the peace. This latter office was held eight years later by John 
Allen, Esq., and William Duty was the coroner. 

At a meeting of the council held at Exeter, September 19, 
1786, Timothy Ladd was nominated justice of the quorum for 
Rockingham County. 

In 1789 and '90 Abraham Dow was justice of the peace. In 
the latter year Thomas Dow was coroner. 

DIVISION OF COUNTIES. 

The question of dividing the province of New Hampshire into 
counties was given serious consideration first in the late sixties. 
In 1769, when it was proposed to set off a small county on the 




WILLIS DU BOIS PULVER. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 181 

westerly side of the Merrimack, several petitions were sent to 
the governor and his council asking that Salem be one of the 
towns included; that is, that this proposed county should take 
in towns on both sides of the river. Some of the petitions sought 
to include the towns of Sandown, Hampstead, Pelham, London- 
derry, Plaistow, Chester, Bow and others. Among the names 
with which we are familiar are those of William Clendenin, Rob- 
ert Clendenin, John Morrison, Jr., and Matthew Taylor, whose 
families were connected with Salem either at this time or later. 
These requests were not granted, as it was felt that a better 
arrangement would be the grouping of all the towns in the 
southeastern corner of the state into one county. But even 
after the divisions were made, March 19, 1771, by act of the 
provincial legislature, many petitions for changes were presented. 
Two of these came in as many days from the towns above men- 
tioned. The first, January 25, 1773, asked that Salem, London- 
derry, "Windham, Pelham, Pembroke and Concord be put into 
Hillsborough County, as it was too small and Rockingham too 
large for the "publick good." It was also requested that su- 
perior court be held twice a year. There were two hundred and 
fifty-five names on this petition, most of which were from Lon- 
donderry. The other petition came two days later, and was 
read in the house January 27. No action was taken thereon, 
although some few changes were made later, due to the incor- 
poration of new towns. 

STATE AND NATIONAL ORGANIZATION. 

When the war for independence broke out many of the towns, 
then in their infancy, were passing through periods of financial 
stringency. But the spirit of the times is plainly manifested in 
the votes of the citizens under these conditions. For instance, 
at the town meeting in 1775 it was " voted not to raise any money 
to defray expenses this year." And yet the record has another 
vote passed at the same meeting, "voted to furnish the money 
requested to help send delegates from this province to the Conti- 
nental Congress. " It is clearly evident that the congress of the 
provinces, the support of which was urged by province com- 
mittees, was considered a far more urgent cause than the current 
expenses of a town. 



182 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

At a town meeting January 17, 1788, Lieut. Thomas Dow was 
chosen a delegate to the convention to be held at Exeter to accept 
or reject the federal constitution. The convention, consisting of 
fifty members, met on February 13, 1788. A discussion was car- 
ried on till February 22, when adjournment was voted, to meet 
at Concord June 18. When the delegates reassembled they were 
considerably augmented in numbers. After three days of dis- 
cussion a vote was taken on the main question of adoption. The 
result was fifty-seven to forty-seven, in favor of adoption. Lieu- 
tenant Dow voted nay. 

The state constitution was revised by a convention held in 
1791. Amos Dow was the delegate from Salem. After some dis- 
cussion the convention adjourned until January 8, 1792, when 
a committee reported the new form proposed for the consti- 
tution. The convention at first rejected the sixth article, but 
later reconsidered the vote, amended that article, and then voted 
to adopt the whole constitution as amended. The recommenda- 
tion of the convention was submitted to the voters of the state 
for their ratification August 27, 1792. It was adopted by a vote 
of 2,122 to 978. In Salem the vote was 9 to 1 in favor of 
adoption. 

TOWN POLITICS. 

The town meetings were held for a long time on the last 
"Wednesday of March of each year. This was the annual meet- 
ing, others being called whenever any special need presented 
itself. Gradually the advantage of having a day uniform 
throughout the state became apparent. Accordingly the legis- 
lature passed a bill on December 15, 1787, authorizing the town 
to hold its annual meeting on the last Wednesday instead of on 
the first Wednesday. This date was kept until 1804, when the 
second Tuesday of the same month was taken as the day of 
meeting, which is still the custom today. 

In the latter part of the eighteenth century candidates for 
town offices became very numerous. In 1791 there were sixteen 
candidates for senator, and nearly as many for the other offices. 
Not only this, but the number elected was larger than it is today. 
There were fourteen surveyors of highways elected that year. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 183 

The business of an annual meeting could not possibly be handled 
in a single session, sometimes as many as eight adjourned meet- 
ings being necessary before the warrant was disposed of. 

It was about this time that officers began to be designated as 
from the "North part" or the "South part" of the town. At 
the north the Gordons and Dustons wielded a strong influence 
and built up a political following that gave them considerable 
power in the elections. 

But party strife, as incited by national issues, had not yet 
begun to show itself to any degree. No doubt the politicians 
of the town were seriously wrought up in the days of Jackson, 
Harrison and other noted national campaigners. The greatest 
contest, however, came in the days that preceded the War of the 
Rebellion, when parties were shifting, dissolving, reorganizing, 
in an attempt to gain a more secure position. The names of the 
participants in this struggle in Salem are so familiar to us today 
that a brief rehearsal of the story is here presented. 

The trouble began in earnest in March, 1854. At the Whig 
caucus held on the eleventh of the month, John R. Wheeler was 
nominated moderator. This was on Saturday evening. An ad- 
journment was declared till Monday, which gave an opportunity 
for further perfecting the plans for the campaign. When the 
meeting was opened Edwin S. Woodbury was nominated for town 
clerk and Darius M. Thom for representative. Town meeting 
was held the next day, when Thom was beaten by Enoch Taylor 
for representative, but John R. Wheeler was elected moderator. 

It was "discovered" that the warrant had not been posted the 
requisite number of days, and the election was consequently 
illegal. The meeting at once adjourned sine die. A new war- 
rant was posted the next day, March 15, and the election held 
March 31. Wheeler was again elected moderator, Taylor repre- 
sentative, and Joseph Webster was chosen town clerk. The 
selectmen were John R. Wheeler, John Taylor, Jr., and Isaac 
Woodbury. William G. Crowell was overseer of the poor. 

Matters continued in a state of agitation for the following 
year. In the spring of 1855 three caucuses were held on the 
same evening, March 10. The Whigs were at the town hall, 
Democrats at Israel Woodbury's, and a party known as Union- 



184 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

ists at Salem hall. This was about the time of the breaking up 
of the old Know Nothing party. About thirty of its members 
refused to join in the attempts to form a Fremont club. How- 
ever, every effort was made to coerce or drive them into the Re- 
publican party, but without avail. They became known as the 
Americans, and for several years wielded great power in the 
town elections. Many prominent men were in the Know Noth- 
ing party. 

In 1855 the Americans elected their entire ticket, and were 
victorious again in 1856. John R. "Wheeler's election as repre- 
sentative was contested, but without avail. The Whigs and 
Americans united in the convention held at Concord. Among 
the citizens of the latter party were J. C. Ayer, John H. Lan- 
caster, Ansel Merrill, Dr. Jonathan H. Merrill, Samuel P. Kelly, 
Alpheus J. Smith, Charles Pattee, Samuel K. Abbott and others. 

It was during the great Fremont campaign in the fall of 1856 
that the flagstaff on the common was set, the topmast being put 
in place on November 3. No campaign in Salem ever equalled 
this in enthusiasm. The Fremont Club had been organized at 
Salem Hall on August 16, with Levi Emery, Jr., as president. 
During the next few weeks a great boom for Fremont was ex- 
hibited on all sides. Rallies were held, at which the audiences 
were addressed by prominent speakers from various cities in this 
state and Massachusetts, some coming from Boston and vicinity. 
On these occasions torchlight parades were formed, including 
the companies from Methuen and Lawrence. Fireworks displays 
were added to increase the general excitement and ardor. This 
program was persisted in until election day, in order that all 
possible votes from wavering citizens might be turned into the 
Fremont total. 

On election day John H. Lancaster was chosen moderator. The 
vote of Salem was as follows: Fremont 174, Buchanan 170, 
Fillmore 27. Election returns were very slow in arriving, so 
that it was several days before the result was made certain. 
During this time the people of Salem could plainly hear guns 
firing in the direction of Lawrence, telling of rejoicing as the 
returns came in. 

The town meeting of 1858 brought the first victory to the 




SELECTMAN CHARLES A. KIMBALL. 




SELECTMAN EDWIN (4. CATE. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 185 

newly organized Republican party. This was the last year of 
the old political conditions. In 1859 the Know Nothing party 
went out of existence. This was the climax of the readjustment 
that had been going on for the few years past. The Fremonters 
employed all manner of abuse against the Americans, who would 
not unite with them, but who had too great an influence in a 
field so evenly divided to be neglected when counting results or 
votes. Many caucuses were held, and in different parts of the 
town meetings for planning the campaign were convened. This 
is said to have been the most hotly contested election in the his- 
tory of Salem. Every voter was carefully canvassed, and no 
means left by either party to the sole use of the other. The re- 
sult was finally determined by the joining of the Americans with 
the Democrats. 

The town meeting lasted three days, beginning March 8. On 
that day the Republicans elected George N. Austin town clerk 
by a very narrow majority. John F. Tenney, the Democratic 
candidate for moderator, was elected by one vote, and was also 
elected representative. The meeting then balloted three times 
for the second representative, but without obtaining a majority. 
John H. Lancaster was the candidate of the Americans and Dem- 
ocrats, and Joseph Webster of the Republicans. The next day 
the fourth ballot was taken, with the result that Lancaster was 
elected. Also the two united parties succeeded in putting in 
Charles Kimball and Alburtus Coburn as the first two selectmen. 
The Republicans elected George W. Merrill third selectman, 
three auditors, Asa S. Austin, Gilman E. Sleeper and Edward 
Griffin, and the overseer of the poor, Benjamin Foster. 

The next year, 1860, an interesting reaction took place, when 
the Republicans "got square" for the last defeat by electing 
every candidate on the ticket. 

In 1864, when the question of giving Abraham Lincoln a 
second term at the White House was up for settlement, the vote 
in Salem was very close. Many of the friends of the soldiers 
were strongly in favor of McClellan. But he was beaten here by 
three votes, receiving 186 while Lincoln had 189. 

The next party organization was effected on February 25, 
1874. Rev. Dr. Blackmer of Sandwich, the Prohibition candi- 



186 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

date for governor, addressed a meeting in the town hall. The 
party was organized here with John Ellenwood as its president. 

TOWN OFFICERS. 

"We present here the lists of the principal officers of the town 
since 1743. It will be found that usually the selectmen have 
served for more than one term, the rule being that they should 
move up one step each year until three terms have been served. 
This rule, however, has very frequently been reverted, in fact,, 
so often as to become at times almost obscured. It is by no 
means a rare occurrence to have an entirely new board, this 
having occurred fifty-four times since the town was incorporated. 
In ten of these years none of the board had served the town 
before as selectmen, although until the election in 1907 this 
condition had not been the case since 1865. 

LIST OF SELECTMEN. 

1743 Daniel Peaslee, Henry Sanders, Isaac Clough. 

1744 Nathaniel Dow, Daniel Cresy, Henry Sanders. 

1745 Henry Sanders, Nathaniel Dow, William Eichardson. 

1746 Daniel Peaslee, Henry Sanders, William Richardson. 

1747 Henry Sanders, Nathaniel Dow, Richard Kimball. 

1748 Henry Sanders, John Ober, John Hall. 

1749 Daniel Peaslee, William Sanders, Peter Merrill. 

1750 Salem incorporated: Nathaniel Dow, Seth Pattee, John 
Ober, Jonathan Wheeler, Richard Dow. 

1751 Ebenezer Ayer, Benjamin Wheeler, Edward Clark. 

1752 Obediah Eastman, Peter Merrill, Ebenezer Woodbury. 

1753 Daniel Peaslee, Timothy Johnson, Joseph Wright. 

1754 Joseph Wright, Edward Carleton, William Sanders. 

1755 Richard Dow, Peter Merrill, Benjamin Wheeler. 

1756 Peter Merrill, John Hall, Jr., Joseph Wright. 

1757 Obediah Eastman, Joseph Wright, Andrew Balch. 

1758 John Hall, Jr., Joseph Wright, Obediah Eastman. 

1759 Daniel Massey, Edward Clark, Nathaniel Woodman. 

1760 Daniel Massey, Daniel Peaslee, Edward Clark. 

1761 John Hall, Jr., Obediah Eastman, Thomas Douglass. 

1762 John Hall, Jr., Obediah Eastman, Richard Dow. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 187 

1763 John Hall, Jr., Benjamin Wheeler, John Currier. 

1764 Simon Bradford, Timothy Bedel, Jonathan Wheeler, Jr. 

1765 Joseph Wright, Obediah Eastman, John Giles. 

1766 Joseph Wright, Obediah Eastman, John Giles. 

1767 John Hall, Moody Morse, Caleb Duston. 

1768 John Hall, Abraham Dow, John Kelly. 

1769 John Hall, Caleb Duston, John Kelly. 

1770 John Hall, John Kelly, Caleb Duston. 

1771 John Hall, John Kelly, Jeremiah Dow. 

1772 Zachariah Woodbury, Caleb Duston, Daniel Corliss. 

1773 Peter Merrill, Jonathan Tenny, Daniel Gordon. 

1774 Caleb Duston, Jesse Merrill, Jeremiah Dow. 

1775 John Hall, John Kelly, Caleb Duston. 

1776 William Hall, Amos Dow, Richard Messer. 

1777 William Hall, Amos Dow, Richard Messer. 

1778 Moody Morse, John Allen, Zachariah Woodbury. 

1779 Caleb Duston, Jeremiah Dow, Asa Dow. 

1780 Benjamin Bixby, William Thorn, Abbot Pettingill. 

1781 Abbot Pettingill, William Thorn, Thomas Runnells. 

1782 Abbot Pettingill, William Thorn, Thomas Runnells. 

1783 Abbot Pettingill, William Thorn, Thomas Runnells. 

1784 William Thorn, Amos Dow, Benjamin Woodbury. 

1785 Jeremiah Dow, Benjamin Woodbury, Nathaniel GorrilL 

1786 James Webster, William Thorn, Richard Kimball. 

1787 William Thorn, Henry Little, Richard Kimball. 

1788 Caleb Duston, James Webster, Elijah Hall. 

1789 William Thorn, James Webster, Elijah Hall. 

1790 William Thorn, James Webster, Elijah Hall. 

1791 William Thorn, James Webster, Elijah Hall. 

1792 Jeremiah Dow, Richard Kimball, Samuel Webster. 

1793 James Webster, Oliver Kimball, Thomas Smith. 

1794 William Thorn, Elijah Hall, Thomas Smith. 

1795 Jesse Webster, Elijah Hall, David Allen. 

1796 Jesse Webster, Nathaniel Belknap, Silas Betton. 

1797 James Webster, Silas Betton, Thomas Dow. 

1798 James Webster, Jesse Webster, Joseph Wardwell. 

1799 Jesse Webster, Thomas Dow, Elijah Hall. 

1800 Elijah Hall, Joshua Merrill, David Allen. 



188 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

1801 Nathaniel Gorrill, Joshua Merrill, David Allen. 

1802 Elijah Hall, Israel Woodbury, Silas Betton. 

1803 Silas Betton, Israel Woodbury, Hezekiah Jones. 

1804 Israel Woodbury, David Allen, William S. Kelly. 

1805 Joshua Merrill, Jesse Webster, John Clendenin. 

1806 Joshua Merrill, Israel Woodbury, John Clendenin. 

1807 Joshua Merrill, Israel Woodbury, John Clendenin. 

1808 Joshua Merrill, Edmund Brickett, Jedediah Carleton 

1809 John Clendenin, Benjamin Gordon, Richard Pattee. 

1810 John Clendenin, Israel Woodbury, John Allen. 

1811 John Clendenin, Israel Woodbury, John Allen. 

1812 Joshua Merrill, Israel Woodbury, Jonathan Merrill. 

1813 Silas Betton, Joshua Merrill, Jonathan Merrill. 

1814 Israel Woodbury, Jonathan Merrill, Richard Pattee. 

1815 Joshua Merrill, Richard Pattee, John Allen. 

1816 Richard Pattee, John Allen, Pearson Titcomb. 

1817 John Woodbury, John Allen, David Duston. 

1818 John Woodbury, 2d, David Duston, John H. Clendenin. 

1819 John Clendenin, Francis Smith, Jonathan Kimball. 

1820 Joshua Merrill, John Woodbury, 2d, David Duston. 

1821 Joshua Merrill, John Woodbury, 2d, Silas Betton. 

1822 John Woodbury, 2d, John H. Clendenin, John Allen. 

1823 John H. Clendenin, John Allen, Joseph Kimball. 

1824 John Allen, John Woodbury, 2d, Pearson Titcomb. 

1825 Thornton Betton, John Clendenin, John C. Ewins. 

1826 Thornton Betton, John Clendenin, John C. Ewins. 

1827 Thornton Betton, John C. Ewins, John Clendenin. 

1828 Joshua Merrill, John Merrill, Thornton Betton. 

1829 John Clendenin, John Merrill, David Messer. 

1830 David Messer, John H. Clendenin, Joseph Taylor. 

1831 Asa Woodbury, Caleb Prince, Asa Gage. 

1832 Caleb Prince, John Kelly, Nathan Currier. 

1833 Aquila Dow, John H. Thompson, Joseph Thorn. 

1834 John H. Thompson, John F. Tenney (only two). 

1835 John H. Thompson, John F. Tenney, Richard Woodbur> . 

1836 David Messer, John Kelly, John H. Clendenin. 

1837 Richard Woodbury, Joseph Taylor, Abner Gage. 

1838 John Kelly, Thomas Webster, Benaiah B. Gordon. 




SELECTMAN EBENEZER DUSTON. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 189 

1839 John Kelly, Thomas Webster, Nathaniel Woodbury. 

1840 John F. Tenney, Nathaniel Woodbury, Thomas Duston. 

1841 John F. Tenney, John Emerson, Nathaniel Woodbury. 

1842 John Emerson, John Kelly, Moores Bailey. 

1843 David Messer, Moores Bailey, Obadiah Duston. 

1844 Moores Bailey, John F. Tenney, Obadiah Duston. 

1845 David Messer, Obadiah Duston, John Emerson. 

1846 Moores Bailey, John A. Messer, John Marston. 

1847 Moores Bailey, John A. Messer, Richard Woodbury. 

1848 John H. Dunlap, David Messer, Obadiah Duston. 

1849 Moores Bailey, Charles Day, Enoch Taylor. 

1850 Moores Bailey, Enoch Taylor, Charles Day. 

1851 John R. Wheeler, Aaron G. Wilson, Samuel Kelly. 

1852 David Messer, Israel Woodbury, Jr., Obadiah Duston. 

1853 Israel Woodbury, Jr., Levi Emery, Jr., David D. Bailey. 

1854 John R. Wheeler, John Taylor, Jr., Isaac Woodbury. 

1855 Isaac Woodbury, Amos Dow, Willard G. Smith. 

1856 Isaac Woodbury, Joseph Webster, Charles Austin. 

1857 Joseph Webster, Charles Austin, William G. Crowell. 

1858 William G. Crowell, James Taylor, Josiah Cluff. 

1859 Charles Kimball, Albertus Coburn, George W. Merrill. 

1860 George W. Merrill, James Taylor, Edward Griffin. 

1861 George W. Merrill, James Taylor, EdAvard Griffin. 

1862 William G. Crowell, Charles Austin, John Clark. 

1863 Charles Austin, John W. Wheeler, John Clark. 

1864 William G. Crowell, John W. Wheeler, Daniel N. Russ. 

1865 George N. Austin, Matthew H. Taylor, George C. Gordon. 

1866 Matthew H. Taylor, George C. Gordon, Joel C. Carey. 

1867 George C. Gordon, Levi Cluff, Joel C. Carey. 

1868 George C. Gordon, Levi Cluff, Silas Hall. 

1869 Levi Cluff, Silas Hall, William B. Kimball. 

1870 George N. Austin, William B. Kimball, Gilman D. Kelley. 

1871 George N. Austin, William B. Kimball, Gilman D. Kelley. 

1872 Richard Taylor, William B. Bartlett, William G. Crowell 

1873 George H. Taylor, Levi W. Taylor, Levi Cluff. 

1874 Daniel Merrill, Rawson Coburn, Charles Kimball. 

1875 Levi Cluff, William B. Kimball, Willard W. Merrill. 

1876 William B. Kimball, Willard W. Merrill, Charles I. Bowker. 



190 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

1877 William B. Kimball, Charles T. Maxwell, Nathaniel H. 
Paul. 

1878 Matthew H. Taylor, Charles T. Maxwell, Gilman D. Kelley. 

1879 Matthew H. Taylor, Charles T. Maxwell, Gilman D. Kelley. 

1880 Charles T. Maxwell, Joel C. Carey, Richard Taylor. 

1881 Joseph Webster, Joel C. Carey, William R. Wheeler. 

1882 Joseph Webster, William R. Wheeler, Eben B. Wells. 

1883 William R. Wheeler, Charles E. Knight, Peter Batehelder. 

1884 Charles E. Knight, Peter Batehelder, Thomas M. Taylor. 

1885 Charles T. Maxwell, Peter Batehelder, Wallace W. Cole. 

1886 Charles T. Maxwell, Wallace W. Cole, Willard W. Merrill. 

1887 Wallace W. Cole, Fred C. Buxton, William H. Haseltine. 

1888 Charles Kimball, Charles S. Woodbury, Loren B. Mc- 
Laughlin. 

1889 Charles S. Woodbury, Loren B. McLaughlin, Daniel Mer- 
rill. 

1890 Loren B. McLaughlin, Daniel Merrill, Frank L. Woodbury. 

1891 Levi W. Taylor, Frank L. Woodbury, Loren E. Bailey. 

1892 Frank L. Woodbury, Loren E. Bailey, John P. Atwood. 

1893 Charles E. Knight, Frank D. Wilson, Willis Hutchins. 

1894 Frank D. Wilson, Willis Hutchins, Charles T. Maxwell. 

1895 Frank D. Wilson, Forrest M. Martin, Henry P. Taylor. 

1896 Frank D. Wilson, Forrest M. Martin, Wallace W. Cole. 

1897 Frank D. Wilson, Wallace W. Cole, Forrest M. Martin. 

1898 Frank D. Wilson, Wallace W. Cole, Forrest M. Martin. 

1899 Charles S. Woodbury, Prescott B. Emerson, Frank F. 
Wheeler. 

1900 Charles S. Woodbury, Frank F. Wheeler, Prescott B. 
Emerson. 

1901 John C. Crowell, Frank D. Davis, Charles T. Maxwell. 

1902 Benjamin R. Wheeler, Charles T. Maxwell, Lewis F. Soule. 

1903 Frank F. Wheeler, John Turner, Frank D. Davis. 

1904 Benjamin R. Wheeler, Wallace W. Cole, George W. Thorn. 

1905 Wallace W. Cole, Benjamin R. Wheeler, Frank D. Wilson. 

1906 Benjamin R. Wheeler, Frank D. Wilson, Lewis F. Soule. 

1907 Charles A. Kimball, Ebenezer Duston, Edwin G. Cate. 

In 1744 the district was requested to send delegates to the 
General Assembly, which then held its sessions at Portsmouth. 



CIVIL AXD POLITICAL HISTORY. 191 

Accordingly Daniel Peaslee and John Ober were chosen. From 
this time on the delegates were chosen nearly every year. From 
1752 to 1777 Salem and Pelham had one representative jointly. 
And as the balance of voting power was in Salem it was difficult 
for our neighbors to elect one of their own citizens. After ten 
years of such experience an attempt was made to break the chain 
of succession. Major Joseph Wright had been elected to rep- 
resent these two towns, after an election in which Pelham had 
been able to exert but a slight influence. In the journal of the 
House for March 18, 1762, we find record of petitions received 
from Merrimack and Dunstable, signed by large numbers of free- 
holders in these towns, "praying that the election of Mr. Jospeh 
"Wright for Salem and Pelham be set aside being contrary to the 
Constitution and Laws of the Government." That these peti- 
tions met with no favorable action in the House is evidenced by 
the fact that Major Wright held his seat for twelve consecutive 
years, with the same diligent execution of his office that char- 
acterized his career in town affairs. 

Another attempt to prevent the representative from taking his 
seat was made in 1783, in the case of Capt. John Allen. A peti- 
tion signed by forty-eight voters of Salem set forth that "some 
of the voters had not taken the oath of the state before voting, 
as required by the laws of the state, ' ' and demanded a new elec* 
tion. But at once a counter petition was presented, signed by 
ninety-four voters, urging the ' ' great expense and inconvenience 
of a new election," with no possibility of a change in the result. 
Captain Allen took his seat. 

The early sessions of the legislature were held at Portsmouth, 
later alternating between that town and Concord. The first ses- 
sion of the House under the new constitution was held at Con- 
cord, June 2, 1784. Capt. John Allen again was present for 
Salem. 

From 1859 the town has had two representatives, usually re- 
turning them for a second term. Biennial sessions were insti- 
tuted in 1879 and are still held, except in cases of special ses- 
sions. Following is a list of the members of the House from 
Salem : 



192 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

1744 Daniel Peaslee, John Ober. 

1745 Henry Sanders. 

1746 John Ober. 

1747 Daniel Peaslee, Ebenezer Ayer. 

1748 Ebenezer Ayer, John Ober. 

1749 Daniel Peaslee. 

1750 John Ober. 
1752 Henry Sanders. 
1758 William Richardson. 
1762- '74 Joseph Wright. 

1775 Jacob Butler, Jr. 

1776 Caleb Duston. 

1777 Jonathan Wheeler, resigned. 
Jeremiah Dow. 

1778 Jeremiah Dow. 
1779- '80 Timothy Ladd. 
1781- '82 Caleb Duston. 
1783- '84 John Allen. 

1785 Caleb Duston. 

1786 Amos Dow. 

1787 Thomas Dow. 

1788 Jeremiah Dow. 
1789- '92 Thomas Dow. 
1793 James Webster. 
1794- '96 Joseph Wardwell. 
1797- '99 Silas Betton. 
1800 Thomas Dow. 
1801- '04 Jesse Webster. 
1805- '09 David Allen. 
1810- '11 Silas Betton. 
1812- '15 John Clendenin. 
1816 Joshua Merrill. 
1817- '19 Israel Woodbury. 
1820- '27 John Clendenin. 
1828- '30 Thornton Betton. 
1831 Christopher Morrison. 
1833- '35 John Woodbury. 
1836- '37 John F. Tenney. 




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CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 193 

1838- '39 David Messer. 
1840- '41 John H. Thompson. 
1842 John F. Tenney. 
1844- '45 Nathaniel Woodbury. 

1846 David Messer. 

1847 John Woodbury. 
1849- '50 Eichard Woodbury. 
1852 Moores Bailey. 

1853- '54 Enoch Taylor. 
1855- '56 John R. Wheeler. 

1858 Edward S. Woodbury. 

1859 John F. Tenney, John H. Lancaster. 
1860- '61 Joseph Webster, William G. Crowell. 
1862- '63 Henry S. Beckford, Lowell Reed. 
1864- '65 Charles Austin, Isaac Woodbury. 

1866 Edward S. Woodbury, George N. Austin. 

1867 Matthew H. Taylor, George N. Austin. 

1868 John W. Wheeler, Matthew H. Taylor. 

1869 John W. Wheeler, Joel C. Carey. 

1870 Levi Cluff, Joel C. Carey. 

1871 Levi Cluff, Silas Hall. 

1872 Silas Hall, Benjamin R. Wheeler. 

1873 Richard Taylor, Benjamin R. Wheeler. 

1874 Stephen Bailey, Levi W. Taylor. 

1875 Richard Taylor, John W. Wheeler. 

1876 George C. Gordon, John W. Wheeler. 

1877 William B. Kimball, George C. Gordon. 

1878 William B. Kimball, Willard W. Merrill. 
1879- '80 Matthew H. Taylor. 

1881- '82 Gilman D. Kelley. 
1883- '84 Charles T. Maxwell, Joel C. Carey. 
1885- '86 William R. Wheeler, Thornton M. Russ. 
1887- '88 Peter Batchelder, Milton G. Woodbury. 
1889- '90 Milton G. Woodbury, Oliver G. Woodbury. 
1891- '92 Charles Kimball, Thomas Duston. 
1893- '94 Gilman Corning, Wallace W. Cole. 
1895- '96 Frank D. Wilson, Rufus A. Tilton. 
1897- '98 James Ewins, Charles F. Kimball. 

14 



194 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

1899-1900 Benjamin R. Wheeler, Forrest M. Martin. 
1901- '02 John W. Wheeler, Loren E. Bailey. 
1903- '04 Daniel A. Abbott, Howard L. Gordon. 
1905- '06 John W. Wheeler, Rufus A. Tilton. 
1907- '08 John J. Hunt, Charles E. Knight. 

Salem has succeeded in placing seven of her citizens in the 
state senatorship. Their terms of office were as follows : 
1800- '03 Silas Betton. 
1836- '38 John Woodbury. 
1871-73 Matthew H. Taylor. 
1877-79 John W. Wheeler. 
1883- '84 Benjamin R. Wheeler. 
1891- '92 Frank P. Woodbury. 
1905- '06 Wallace W. Cole. 

John W. Wheeler was elected to the governor's council in 
1881, where he served for two years. He has had a very wide 
acquaintance among the public men of the state. 

But one Salem man has ever been honored with a seat in 
Congress. This man was Hon. Silas Betton, who was a member 
of the Eighth and Ninth Congresses, 1803 and 1805, as repre- 
sentative. One other, however, received the nomination, but 
failed of election. This was Hon. John Woodbury, who was 
senator in 1836- '38. 

POSTOFPICE AND MAIL SERVICE. 

In 1786 the first arrangement was made for the regular dis- 
tribution of mail in the state. Portsmouth was the center of the 
system, which employed two posts. They rode alternately, one 
each week. The first started Monday and followed a route from 
Portsmouth to Exeter, Nottingham, Concord, Plymouth, Haver- 
hill, Orford, Hanover, then returned through Boscawen, New- 
field, Canterbury, Epsom, Newmarket, to the starting point. 
The second started Thursday of the next week from Portsmouth 
to Exeter, Kingston, Chester, Londonderry, Litchfield, Amherst, 
returning by way of Dunstable, Salem, Plaistow, Kingston, to 
Portsmouth. This gave each town a mail every two weeks, while 
Exeter was included in both routes. 

Whether this system was long employed we do not know. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 195 

There is no mention in the records at Concord of any change. 
When the Londonderry Turnpike was opened in 1804 the mail 
was transferred to the stage line, coming through Boston to the 
central New Hampshire cities and towns. The first postoffice in 
Salem was in the old tavern at the Center, the proprietor, Phineas 
Gordon, being the first postmaster. It was next transferred to 
the Ewins store in 1814. The stage left the turnpike at Mes- 
ser's and came directly to the Center with the mail. Thence it 
proceeded over the Canobie Lake road, past the Kelley home- 
stead, coming upon the Turnpike again near Gould's mill in 
Windham. Stages which did not carry mail kept the Turnpike 
for the entire course. 

In 1831- '32 Mark Webster was postmaster. He transferred 
the postoffice to the Turnpike, having the room in the basement of 
the Silas Hall house for that purpose. Here he had a small table 
with a single long drawer in which he kept the mail. When a 
person called for letters he would look through the contents of 
the drawer. It was many years before the volume of mail was 
sufficient to warrant or even suggest the use of a box system of 
distribution. No stamps were used; the postmaster took the 
price of postage and marked the letter with a lead pencil as paid 
for. It cost six cents to send a letter, and a proportionately 
large rate for newspapers. 

Each postmaster appointed kept the office wherever most con- 
venient for his business. Thus the location was frequently 
changed. The complete list of postmasters of Salem, with the 
date of appointment of each is as follows: 

Phineas Gordon (established) April 1, 1804 
John Ewins July 1, 1814 

M. A. Webster February 7, 1831 

J. C. Ewins March 27, 1833 

Silas Hall September 29, 1849 

J. R. Wheeler February 1, 1850 

Rawson Coburn April 6, 1855 

G. C. Gordon October 4, 1861 

C. I. Bowker February 5, 1879 

John Austin October 1, 1882 

J. A. Martin . July 29, 1885 



196 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Rawson Coburn April 8, 1886 

James Ewins July 13, 1889 

L. B. McLaughlin July 29, 1893 

G. 0. Reynolds June 16, 1897 

The next postoffice established in town was that at North 
Salem, in 1831. At first the mail was brought only every two 
weeks. In 1837, when J. H. Thompson was postmaster, the ser- 
vice was found very inadequate to supply the demands of the 
lower part of the village. Thompson lived on the hill east of 
Cowbell Corner, and kept the postoffice in the store near the 
river (M 614). He brought the mail once a week from Haver- 
hill in a wooden box about two feet long. It was not until about 
1870 that two mails a week were received at this office. And in 
1880, when a third was added, people thought they were mount- 
ing to the top notch of modern convenience. 

A list of the postmasters at North Salem is here appended: 
N. B. Duston, Jr. (established) July 22, 1831 
J. H. Thompson November 4, 1837 

John Chase February 13, 1838 

E. G. Duston April 29, 1844 

John Taylor June 10, 1850 

M. H. Taylor May 29, 1858 

James Taylor August 2, 1861 

M. H. Taylor April 22, 1862 

W. G. Crowell May 5, 1865 

M. H. Taylor December 11, 1866 

Moses Whitaker May 8, 1871 

G. H. Taylor November 11, 1872 

M. H. Taylor June 11, 1873 

J. H. Taylor May 29, 1879 

L. "W. Taylor December 30, 1884 

G. W. Taylor December 15, 1888 

Thos. Duston April 11, 1893 

L. "W. Taylor October 18, 1894 

M. H. Taylor January 16, 1901 

H. P. Taylor July 3, 1903 

The postoffice at the Depot was established in 1863, when the 
growth of that village first began to indicate something of its 




HON. MATTHEW HARVEY TAYLOR. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 197 

future promise. Six men, covering eight terms, have held the 

office: 

J. C. Carey (established) July 20, 1863 

J. A. Troy August 15, 1870 

R. A. Tilton December 7, 1882 

F. C. Buxton February 28, 1883 

James Ayer August 24, 1885 

F. C. Buxton May 13, 1889 

M. G. Woodbury April 11, 1893 

F. C. Buxton April 16, 1897 

The office has been located in the stores at the Depot, usually 
that of the postmaster. 

The last postoffice within the territory of Salem is at Canobie 
Lake. It was established February 3, 1886. The postmaster 
appointed at that time was Albert O. Alexander, who has held 
the position ever since. 

The mail for Salem and North Salem is brought by the Boston 
& Maine Railroad to Salem Depot, and from there taken to the 
Center by the Southern New Hampshire electrics. Here the 
North Salem mail is turned over to Henry Wilson, who drives 
the stage between these last named villages. From Salem Depot 
a rural delivery route is laid out which supplies mail to outlying 
residents in all parts of the town, except the extreme northeast. 
These are included in the route from Westville. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY. 

One of the most noteworthy civic occurrences in the history of 
Salem was the celebration of the one hundred and fiftieth anni- 
versary of the incorporation of the town. To be exact in date 
this should have come on the eleventh of May. But as the Old 
Home Week observance was planned for the third week of 
August it was thought best to defer the anniversary affair and 
unite the two into one grand celebration. The date was fixed as 
August -14, 1900. Early in the year committees were appointed 
and work begun on the general arrangements. The officers and 
committees selected were as follows : 



198 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

LIST OF OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 
PRESIDENT. 

Charles T. Woodbury. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Charles S. Woodbury, Frank F. Wheeler, 

Prescott B. Emerson. 

SECRETARY. 

John F. Hall. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARIES. 

Daniel A. Abbott, Miss Emma Webber, 

Miss Mary E. Hall, Levi W. Taylor 

TREASURER. 

William E. Lancaster. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Frank D. Wilson, Eugene W. Stevens, 

Kimball M. McLaughlin, Loren E. Bailey, 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Loren E. Bailey, William E. Lancaster, 

Charles H. Mirrick. 

INVITATION COMMITTEE. 

John W. Wheeler, Levi W. Taylor, 

James Ayer. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE. 

E. W. Stevens, Daniel A. Abbott, 

Frank D. Wilson, K. M. McLaughlin, 

James Ewins, Wm. E. Lancaster. 

RECEPTION COMMITTEE. 

Levi Woodbury, Prescott C. Hall, 

Fred C. Buxton, Frank P. Woodbury, 

James Ayer, John W. Wheeler, 

Matthew H. Taylor, George C. Gordon, 

Benj. R. Wheeler, Wallace W. Cole, * 

Thornton M. Russ, Stephen S. Shannon, 

William H. Presby, Forrest M. Martin, 

Levi W. Taylor. 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 199 

MUSIC COMMITTEE. 

Berg. R. Wheeler, Clinton L. Silver, 

John C. Crowell. 

DECORATION COMMITTEE. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Stevens, 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hunt, 

Mr.' and Mrs. Elmer F. Smith, 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Abbott, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace R. Holt, 
John J. Richardson, Charles H. Ayer, 

Miss Alice Perkins, Miss Emma Webber. 

SPORTS COMMITTEE. 

Ernest L. Silver, J. W. Crowell, 

Arthur Cross, David S. Emery, 

William H. Presby, Ernest Woodbury. 

HISTORICAL COMMITTEE. 

James Ayer, Thomas D. Lancaster, 

Matthew H. Taylor. 

DINNER COMMITTEE. 

Loren B. McLaughlin, Kimball M. McLaughlin, 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen S. Shannon, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Wilson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Willis G. Richardson, 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Atwood, 
Mr. and Mrs. David Emery, 
Mr. and Mrs. Loren E. Bailey, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Haigh, 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Joy, 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bolduc, 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer F. Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Weiss, 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan G. Abbott, 

Mrs. Augusta Duston, Frank F. Wheeler, 

John F. Hall, Miss Sarah Coburn, 

Miss Jennie Foster, George Thorn, 

Mrs. Lucretia Holt, John J. Richardson, 



200 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Miss Eliza Merrill, 
Josiah Q. Cluff, 
Mrs. Susan A. Cluff, 



Miss Dora Merrill, 
Edward M. Serrey, 
Fred Woodbury. 



PARADE COMMITTEE. 



Frank F. Wheeler, 
Loren E. Bailey, 
Fred C. Buxton, 
Wilson Brothers, 
Charles S. Woodbury, 
Philip Bergeron, 
Fred 0. Wheeler, 



K. M. McLaughlin, 
F. W. Allen, 
Brady Brothers, 
John Turner, 
Charles F. Kimball, 
Wallace W. Cole, 
Willis G. Richardson, 



Frederick K. Duston. 



GRAND STAND COMMITTEE. 



John C. Crowell, 



James Ewins, 



WiUiam L. Hall, 
Nathan G. Abbott. 

FIRE WORKS COMMITTEE. 

Levi Woodbury, 
Levi W. Taylor. 

BADGE COMMITTEE. 

E. W. Stevens. 



ANTIQUES AND 

Mrs. M. A. McLaughlin, 
Miss Hattie Merrill, 
Miss Annie Shannon, 
Mrs. Augusta Duston, 
Mrs. Oliver G. Woodbury, 
Mrs. John J. Hunt, 
Mrs. Ada Sunderland, 
Mrs. Fred 0. Wheeler, 
Miss Mary Woodbury, 
Miss Ethel Wheeler, 



CURIOSITIES. 

Miss Emma Coburn, 
Miss Minnie Emerson, 
Miss Nellie Gordon, 
Mrs. Ellen L. Taylor, 
Mrs. S. M. Kelley, 
Mrs. P. C. Foster, 
Mrs. Benj. P. Kelley, 
Miss Ida Ryder, 
Miss Jennie Foster, 
Miss Mabel Cole. 



Charles A. Kimball, 
Frank D. Davis, 
James H. Hadley, 
John J. Richardson, 



USHERS. 

" Clifton Hall, 
L. Wallace Hall, 
David S. Emery, 
Ernest R. Woodbury, 



Edward L. Gordon. 




HON. WALLACE W. COLE. 




DAVID S. EMERY 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 



201 



Tnese 
pains to 
tainment 
lated to 

follows : 

Sunrise. 
9.00 
9,30 

11.00 

11.30-12. 

11.00-12. 

12.00 
12.00- 1. 
2.00 



00 
00 



30 



4.00- 6. 
7.30- 9, 



committees worked diligently and spared no labor or 

make the celebration a success. A program of enter- 

for the full day was arranged, including features calcu- 

please residents and visitors of all ages and tastes, as 



PROGRAM. 

Ringing of Bells. 

Firing of Governor's Salute. 

Parade starts at Salem Depot and marches to the 

Center. 

Parade reviewed by Governor at Salem Center. 

Reception to School Children and Aged Citizens. 

Library and Historical Rooms open. 

Sports. 

Ringing of Bells. 

Dinner in Town Hall and Tent. 

Literary Exercises. 

Music by the Band. 

Prayer, Rev. A. B. Rowell. 

Address of "Welcome, President of the Day. 

Reading of Old Home Week Proclamation. 

The Commonwealth of New Hampshire, 

Gov. Frank W. Rollins. 
Music by the Band. 

Historical Address, Rev. Chas. W. Gallagher, D. D., 

Auburndale, Mass. 
The Salem of My Boyhood, 

Hon. Frank L. Beck.ford, Laconia, N. H. 
Music by the Band. 
Methuen and Salem, "Mother and Daughter," 

Hon. J. S. Howe, Methuen, Mass. 
The Town of Salem, 

George C. Gordon, Esq., Salem, N. H. 
Music by the Band. 

The Town and the Church, Rev. S. E. Quimbly. 
The Town and School, E. L. Silver, A. B. 

Library and Historical Rooms open. 
Band Concert and Fireworks. 



00 
30 



202 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

SPORTS. 

100-yard Dash Egg Race (women) 

220-yard Dash Potato Race (boys) 

3-legged Race Potato Race (girls) 

Sack Race Broad and High Jump 

Invitations were sent out to six hundred and eighty-five per- 
sons, who had been residents of Salem, but were then scattered 
in many states from Maine to California. Many of these em- 
braced the opportunity to return to their native town at a time 
when its attractiveness was at its maximum. 

The success of the celebration eclipsed even that of the Old 
Home Week the year before. The day opened heavy and damp, 
but this in nowise dulled the ardor of the expectant throng. 
The program was carried out as planned, no feature failing 
to enlist the appreciation of the spectators or auditors. The 
morning trains brought many visitors into town, and the high- 
ways were lined with vehicles of all descriptions bringing in 
those who lived in the neighboring cities and towns. 

"Wooden tablets or markers were prepared for the historic 
sites about town, giving a brief statement of the significance of 
each feature thus noted. A list of these places was also pub- 
lished in the souvenir booklet issued for the occasion. However, 
this list was incomplete, besides being marred by several glaring 
typographical errors. The visitors strolling about town and 
reading the suggestions upon the tablets were carried back to 
the olden days when the town was young and comparatively 
undeveloped. 

PAUPERS. 

Like all other towns, Salem has always been confronted with 
the problem of caring for the unfortunate members of society 
who cannot provide for their own support. In the early days 
the few cases were met by the generosity of neighbors who kindly 
contributed small amounts of supplies from time to time. If 
such help could not fill the requirements action was taken by the 
town. A case of this character is presented by the records of 
1774. It seems that the death of a mother left her little daugh- 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 203 

ter an orphan, without relations who might take her in. An 
article was inserted in the warrant, "To see what the town will 

do toward the support of 's child, now lying a constant 

charge on the town." The record of the meeting has this very 
heartless item as the outcome of this article : ' ' Voted in the 
negative on this article"! which doubtless means that the voters 
considered it the business of some one other than the town to care 
for this child. 

However, in 1779, the minors were "bid off at vendue" (auc- 
tion) at ten to twelve shillings per week for keeping them. And 
five years later a very unlimited obligation was assumed — ' ' Voted 
that the town of Salem support the widow hilton in a decent 
manner for time to come." Throughout the history of the town 
widows in a helpless state have been generally well cared for, 
both by the town and by individuals. Several such instances are 
noted under other headings. 

During the first part of the last century the paupers were cared 
for by citizens who had bidden them off at auction. The price 
received varied from twenty-five cents to one dollar per week, 
according to the characteristics of the person. If it was one 
who could be of some assistance in the household the bid would 
be lower than for one who would be more of a care. Sometimes 
the entire lot was struck off to one man for a stated sum. This 
method became more and more in vogue as time went on. In 
1824 "the town's poor were struck off to John Kimball for 
$325.00 for the present year." Again in 1830 it was "voted 
to have them taken care of the same as last year, except that 
those who keep them shall nurse them and mend their clothes." 
The contract was let for $490. 

It shortly became evident that the town could maintain its 
poor more economically on a farm of its own than by putting 
them out to citizens. In the years 1833 and 1835 it was voted 
to purchase a farm for the town, but no further action was 
taken regarding it. In 1836 the selectmen were chosen a com- 
mittee to find out the cost of a farm and stock. The next year 
they reported their investigations, and the report was accepted. 
But the figure was beyond the range of vision of the voters, and 
a negative vote on the purchase was the result. 



204 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

About this time a new bone of contention appeared. In the 
state treasury was a certain sum of money which yielded an 
income larger than was required for it. Just what this surplus 
revenue should be used for was a question which was decided 
by giving each town its share. In Salem there was much dis- 
cussion as to the use to which this money should be put. In 
1837 it was voted to leave it and take only the interest on it 
for the support of the primary schools. But the next year it 
was voted to take out the revenue and pay the state tax with 
what interest had accumulated. It seems that nothing was 
done at this time toward obtaining the money. The warrant 
of 1839, March 12, contained a petition of John R. Rowell and 
others to have the surplus revenue used immediately for the 
purchase of a town farm whereon to support the town paupers. 
First, David Messer was chosen an agent to loan the money after 
he should have received it from the state for the town. It was 
loaned on bond and mortgage on real estate to thirty-nine citi- 
zens of the town. Finally David Messer, Joseph Thorn, and 
Richard Woodbury were chosen a committee to buy and stock 
the farm. In 1839 it was thought best to collect the surplus 
revenue, this duty being given Richard "Woodbury. 

Meantime the poor had been cared for in the manner de- 
scribed above. In 1837 they were put out under contract to 
Stephen Duston for $400. It had already been provided, in 
1824, that "should any of the town's poor be taken away by 
death or otherwise before the year expires then the person who 
bids them off shall deduct out of the whole sum a proportional 
sum of what he or she or they were struck off at." Thus the 
town did not propose to pay for more than it obtained. 

When it was definitely decided to buy a farm a bargain was 
made with John Palmer for the place formerly owned by Evan 
Jones, the town taking possession about 1843. From this time 
on the annual report of the town officials included the report of 
conditions, financial and other, at the town farm. 

Religious meetings were occasionally held there under the 
auspices of one or another of the societies of the town. This 
was calculated to help to cheer those who were inmates, and 




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CIVIL AND POLITICAL HISTORY. 205 

make them feel that they still had friends among the people of 
the community. 

The buildings were old and somewhat dilapidated. After a 
few years it became evident that extensive repairs would soon 
be necessary. Some proposed abandoning this place, in view 
of which a meeting was called September 20, 1856, to see about 
a new location. The plan was not countenanced, however, by 
the voters, as a better solution for the problem was found. In 
1857 a new house was built at a cost of $2,332.37. This is the 
one now standing on the farm. 

The number of inmates was at times small. Since about 
1900 the number has been very small, only from one to three 
or four. In 1902 it was proposed to sell or lease the farm, two 
articles to this effect appearing in the warrant. They were 
passed without any considerable support. Article 9 of the war- 
rant of 1905 was more successful. At that time it was voted to 
sell. The price obtained was $7,458.42, which was turned over 
to the town treasurer. Since the sale the town has sent its few 
paupers to the county farm at Brentwood. 

SALEM WATER WORKS. 

The water system of Salem was installed by a private com- 
pany composed of citizens of the town. 

The town made a contract with this company in 1903 for a 
term of twenty years at $1,200 per annum for municipal pur- 
poses and fire protection. This included thirty-four hydrants. 
It was believed, however, that it was advisable for the town to 
own its own water works. Accordingly a law which had been 
passed by the legislature in 1901, which gave the town authority 
to issue notes for the purchase of the property of the private 
company was taken advantage of at the town meeting in March, 
1904. At this time the town voted to raise $50,000 on notes for 
purchasing the water works, and chose Chas. F. Kimball, K. M. 
McLaughlin and Arthur C. Hall a committee to attend to the 
matter, then to become the Salem Water Board for managing 
the system. The money was obtained from E. H. Rollins & 
Sons of Boston on town notes. 

After the system was established Mr. Elwell of Exeter, one 



206 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

of the Board of Underwriters came to Salem, in response to a 
request for reduced insurance rates. The pressure was tested 
at both villages, with and without hose. He stipulated that in 
order to secure the reduction the means for fighting fires must 
be made more effectual by certain improvements. These were 
readily complied with. There was to be a fire department in 
each village with a chief and assistant. The Depot company, 
Hose No. 1, was organized first, and the house erected on land 
donated by Wallace W. Cole. The house, which is a two-story 
building, is near the corner of the Turnpike and Main Street. 
It is shown in cut facing page 204. The committee for building 
the house and purchasing the wagon were David S. Emery, 
Walter and James H. Hadley. This is the first equipment the 
town has ever had since the days of the old handtub. The 
second floor of the building is fitted up as a recreation room, 
where the members of the company can hold meetings or meet 
for a social evening. 

The new house was formally accepted by the selectmen on 
May 13, 1905. Exercises were held during the afternoon and 
evening, and supper was served for the invited guests. The 
company numbers twenty men, of whom David S. Emery is 
chief and Walter Hadley assistant. The house for Hose No. 2 
at the Center was built last year. It is a fine building, cen- 
trally located beside the common, and serves the double purpose 
of fire house and lockup. The company is not yet as fully 
organized as No. 1 company, because of lack of money. The 
chief is John Richardson. 



CHAPTER VI. 

Educational Matters. 

The first references to schools within the limits of Salem are 
found in the Methuen records, at the time when Spicket Hill 
settlement was on the point of demanding for itself parish 
rights. After the province line was settled the new district took 
measures to provide education for its youth. At a district 
meeting held November 8, 1744, it was "voted to hire a man to 
keep a school one month or two this winter." 

This precipitated a discussion as to the location of the school, 
since all desired to have it convenient to their own localities. 
A meeting was held December 21 to settle this momentous issue, 
at which it was decided to keep the school in four places in the 
parish. Although nothing is left by which we may locate ex- 
actly, the distribution of inhabitants at that time would lead us 
to infer that the school was kept near the present village a part 
of the winter. We must understand that the term was short for 
each place, as the schoolmaster went from one part of the parish 
to the next, giving to each about one-fourth of the time for 
which he was engaged. This made' a very meagre education, but 
was as much as could be provided under the circumstances. At 
one time the school was kept in the house of Abial Kelly, near 
the Robert I. Smith place, and it is possible that this was also 
the location of it at this first session. The other places were 
near the province line, where a considerable number of families 
were then living; also near tlie Baxter Hall place or a little 
farther southwest, which was the scene of some of the very old 
settlements. The fourth school was kept near the Atkinson 
line, well up toward the present No. 3 district. 

Arrangements were made with some citizen for the use of a 
room in his house. Perhaps his children were given their in- 
struction in payment therefor. We find numerous bills re- 



208 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

corded as paid to various persons for boarding the schoolmaster. 
And as he usually lived for the time being where he had his 
school, this furnishes some evidence of the location of the 
"throne of wisdom." At a later period the teacher was often 
hired for the part of the town where he lived only. This, how- 
ever, was when the terms were longer than at first and school 
was kept simultaneously in different places. 

In 1755 and 1757 it was voted not to hire a schoolmaster. 
Money was evidently extra scarce. But the next year they 
" voted to raise 200 pounds old tenor for support of the schools, 
every part of the town to raise its share." This last clause 
brought its result in the meeting of 1759. If all parts of the 
town were to raise the money, then all parts were to have the 
advantage of it. It was "voted school in the four korters of 
the town," and also that they "hire a riting, sifering, and 
reding scool master." Unless some one of these important 
branches was made to include spelling it would seem that a 
sadly needed department of the school was quite lacking. 

The amount of money raised for schools, as well as the length 
of the term, was directly proportioned to the appreciation of the 
benefits derived and to the success of the crops, and inversely 
proportioned to the stringency of means and to the niggardly 
tendency of those who had no children to directly profit by the 
school. These factors frequently gave strangely inconsistent 
results. For instance, from 1764 to 1768 the amounts raised 
per year in pounds, old tenor, were as follows: 1764, 300: 
1765, 60; 1766, 300; 1777, 20; 1778, 25. In 1770 a tremendous 
fight took place because of the persistence of a large number 
in refusing to raise money. Three meetings were held, at each 
of which it was voted not to raise any money for schools. At 
the last of these meetings the following men were so indignant 
that they had their dissent to this vote recorded: Maj. Joseph 
Wright, Moody Morss, Jonathan Tenny, Peter Merrill, Eben- 
ezer Page, Joshua Bayley, Richard Cresey, Day Emerson, John 
Hall, Oliver Kimball. 

Not only were these citizens enraged, but a more serious con- 
sequence followed. There was a public statute to the effect that 
any town which did not provide suitable schools, including a 










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HENRY P. TAYLOR. 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 209 

grammar school, for at least a certain part of each year, should 
be liable to a fine. In 1774 a fine was imposed upon the select- 
men for not complying with the provisions of this law. Again 
the voters displayed their meanness by refusing to reimburse 
these officers for the town fine which they had paid from their 
own pockets. The vote is recorded thus: ''Voted not to clear 
the selectmen of the fine imposed on them for not keeping a 
grammar schol during the whole of the year past." But this 
was evidently the last straw, for at the next meeting steps were 
taken to straighten out the tangled threads of public policy. 
Robert Young was chosen a committee to go before the assembly 
to obtain permission to substitute a reading and writing school 
for a grammar school. It was also voted to clear the selectmen 
from any fines for not keeping a grammar school, and to reim- 
burse David Gordon, one of the selectmen the year before, for 
the fine which he had paid. Young must have been successful 
in his errand, as no further mention is made of fines. 

In 1788 the town voted 45 pounds for schools. From this 
time on there was more systematic management in school affairs. 
The hardships endured by all during the war period had without 
doubt been largely responsible for the spirit of opposition which 
had dominated the meetings of the preceding years. 

For the interest of many whose families were in Salem at this 
early period, a list is here given of the men and women, for 
women were then just beginning to find employment as teach- 
ers, who conducted the schools between the years 1788 and 1796 : 

John L. Bod well Paul Pettingill 

Caleb Morse Samuel Dinsmore 

Micah Chaplin John Dinsmore 
Son of Lieut. Samuel Johnson Timothy Jones 

Son of John Dow Sargent Rogers 

Merriam Pattee William Craig 

Sally Woodbury Timothy Ladd Jones 

Jonathan Emerson Isaac Pettingill 

Pattee Hodskins William Gage 

Son of David Hall Moses Hastings 

Thomas Robinson Silas Dinsmore 

15 



210 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

John Webster William Hall 

Benjamin Poor Paul Foster 

Kichard Messer John McFarlin 

Capt. Daniel Gordon William Smith 

Enoch Merrill Simeon Taylor 

Lydia Fletcher Levi Dow 

Jedediah Hastings Moses Dole 

Susanna Colby William Smith, Jr. 

In 1794 the schools were taught by nine men, who received a 
total amount of £43 3s 4d, besides their board, which was paid 
by the town to those with whom they lived. It will be seen that 
the number of schools was becoming somewhat large to be well 
managed, except by some single head or superintendent, and 
that method had not yet come into vogue. The warrant of 1793 
had an article to raise money by taxation for building school- 
houses in the different districts of the town. It was voted down 
at the meeting. Again in 1798 a repetition of the request: 
"To see if the town will raise any more money than the law 
obliges tham for the support of schools or will take any method 
to build school houses and divide the Town in districts." A 
committee, of whom Dea. Samuel Webster and Capt. Jeremiah 
Dow were members, was chosen for districting the town and 
deciding the number of houses, locations and time limits for 
building. Their report, however, was rejected, although it was 
very much like the one accepted shortly afterward. 

SCHOOLHOUSES BUILT. 

The article was again inserted in the warrant of 1800, this 
time with complete success. The committee chosen is another 
demonstration of the statement that the good soldier becomes the 
respected citizen. Nearly all of them held military titles, though 
not for service in the Revolution, but because of activity in the 
militia organized some years after the close of the war. They 
were Maj. Thos. Dow, Capt. Jesse Webster, John Clendenin, 
Ens. Edward Pattee, Maj. Jesse Merrill, Oliver Sanders, and 
Lieut. Thos. Smith. The instructions to the committee are ex- 
pressed in the vote which accompanied their appointment: 

"Voted that the committee shall not interfere with any Class 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 211 

which have built a School house or are under obligations for 
building one — Excepting as it respects individuals within the 
limets of Such Class or Classes who have not Paid their propor- 
tion towards building such a school house, Voted that the select- 
men shall make an Estimate of the sum necessary to build and 
finish a school house in each district as made by the committee 
and to assess the polls and estates of the town accordingly and 
if any district has built a school house or are under obligations 
to build a school house the individuals composing such a District 
shall have a drawback or an order for their proportion 

"Voted that the foregoing Committee shall make their return 
to the Selectmen of their doings in Devideing the town into 
Distrects at or before the tenth day of June next in writeing." 

It was also voted that the selectmen should see to it that a suit- 
able schoolhouse be built in each district indicated before the fol- 
lowing December. 

There is no record of the divisions made by this committee, 
although they are referred to in subsequent records, as in an 
act of 1820. But the districts were roughly the same as those 
later established. 

To show the relative weight of the school expenditures at this 
time to the total outlay by the town, these figures for 1800 will 
be of interest. The teaching cost $217.76 

board 58.71 

wood 38.52 



Total for schools $314.99 

The total expenditures of the town were $1,022.26, of which 
nearly one third was for schools. This, of course, had no ref- 
erence to the new buildings about to be erected. 

Several groups of men undertook the erection of buildings, for 
which their schoolhouse tax was abated. Here are some of 
these groups: 

Joseph "Wardwell Isaiah "Wheeler 

Mitchell Whittaker Hezikiah Jones 

James Page Timothy L. Jones 

Silas Betton William Stevens 



212 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

John Clendenin Oliver Emerson 

W m Little Stephen Currier 

Ens. Henry Little James Jones 

Michael Emerson Caleb Morse 

John Page, Jr. Abner B. Little 

Samuel Endicott Richard Kimball 
Andrew Bryant 

The total allowed on this house was $109.35. Each man gave 
either labor or material. This was without doubt the old house 
which stood where the library now is, it having been sold and 
moved west on Main Street when the new house was built. It is 
now part of the house of James E. Sloan. We have evidence that 
it was built prior to 1810, and probably as above mentioned. 

Another building was put up at a cost of $166.33. It is next 
to impossible to positively locate all of these early buildings. 
We can, however, approximate it by the residences of those who 
were interested or instrumental in the erection. The following 
names of builders seem to indicate that this building must have 
been the old house opposite the ' ' Stone House, ' ' so called, at the 
corner of Main and Policy streets. Certainly the schoolhouse 
here was very old, having been built before most of the others 
in town. The donors were: 

John Smith Abel Rollins 

Joseph Merrill Robert Campbell 

Samuel Kelly Jesse Merrill 

David Nevins John Woodbury 

Nathaniel Gorrell Oliver Kimball 

Stephen Worth Elija Hall 

David Rollins Ebenezer Page 

A bill paid at this time by the town to the amount of $21.50 
to Richard Pattee, "in full for a schoolhouse built," gives us 
the location of another of the old buildings. Pattee lived then 
very near the present site of No. 9 schoolhouse. There were 
several houses in the vicinity, and it is not unlikely that the first 
building was erected convenient to these families. This suppo- 
sition is strengthened by the fact that in 1824, when the new 
districts were divided, the district here was given the name of 




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EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 213 

the owner of the nearest house, Pattee having moved his resi- 
dence to the Whitebridge farm on the turnpike in 1804. If 
$21.50 paid the full cost of the building, this worthy citizen 
must have given the lumber and labor, asking pay only for such 
supplies as he could not supply except by purchase. 

Abatement of the schoolhouse tax was made also in case of 
eight citizens who had together paid $44.83 toward the building 
of a schoolhouse. These men were: 

Phineas Gordon Peter Austin 

Joshua Gordon Jonathan Merrill 

John Austin Enoch Merrill 

John Austin, Jr. David Austin 

They lived not far from the meetinghouse, and may have con- 
tributed toward the cost of the house at the Center. 

In addition to the money thus paid, as assistance to benevo- 
lent citizens who were willing to bear a part of the expense, the 
town raised and paid out for other buildings a considerable sum. 
The total schoolhouse tax assessed February 25, 1801, was 
$1,528.10, certainly a very generous sum for those days. Several 
houses were built in other parts of the town than those above 
mentioned. 

One building put up at this time was at North Salem, just at 
the foot of the short hill on the road leading from Atlas mill to 
the church, and between the road and the river on the north 
side of the bridge. It had a very large fireplace and long plank 
benches, at which five or six pupils could sit. These benches 
extended to the walls on both sides of the room, with a single 
aisle down the middle. It was a favorite trick of the boys at 
the back of the room to slip to the floor and crawl down toward 
the front of the room beneath the benches. However annoying 
this pastime may have been to the teacher, it of course furnished 
huge enjoyment to the ever expectant neighbors of the offender. 

The exterior presented no artistic color scheme, never having 
been deprived of its pristine beauty of natural wood. About 
1838, after long usefulness in behalf of the numerous offspring 
of the old families of that portion of the town, the old house was 
demolished. The passer-by today would little dream that this 



214 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

quiet spot by the river was once the seat of culture of this 
formerly very active community. 

On February 26, 1803, settlement was made with Israel Wood- 
bury for building a schoolhouse, the amount being $174.25. 
This was probably somewhere in No. 7 district as now divided. 
The men who taught the schools during the few years following 
this great increase in the efficiency of the educational system 
included : 

Caleb Morse Benj. Humphrey 

Timothy Ladd Nathaniel Haseltine 

Richard Messer Moses Herriman 

John Merrill John Emerson 

Jonathan McCollom Joshua Page 

Oliver Taylor William Smith 

On March 14, 1809, the first "committee to inspect schools" 
was elected. It consisted of three members, Silas Betton, Caleb 
Morse and John Ewins. 

In 1820 the attendance at the schools of the two north districts 
became so small that a request was presented to the town meeting 
to have them consolidated to save expense of one teacher. How- 
ever, the request was denied. 

DISTRICTS RE-ESTABLISHED. 

At the meeting held February 29, 1824, it was "Voted to dis- 
trict the town into school districts and have them numbered and 
recorded. ' ' A committee for the purpose was chosen as follows : 
John Clendenin, Jonathan Merrill, John Allen, Joseph Thorn, 
Joshua Merrill, Henry Merrill, Nathan Russ, Jr., William Cluff 
and Joseph Taylor. 

As above stated, the districts had been established in 1800, 
although we can find no record of their boundaries. But the 
make-up of this committee indicates that one man was taken 
from each of the original districts. At any rate nine men were 
chosen from different parts of the town and nine districts were 
subsequently defined, corresponding nearly to the locations of 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 



215 



the members of the committee. The districts were recorded 
under the following numbers and names : 

No. Name of District. 

1 William Somes Kelly District 

2 Joshua Merrill 

3 Joseph Taylor 

4 David Duston 

5 Amos Wheeler 

6 Joseph Merrill " 

7 Simeon Emerson 

8 William Cluff 

9 Henry Merrill " 

These corresponded very nearly to the ten districts of the town 
at the present time, the principal change having been made at 
the March meeting of 1852, when District No. 4 was divided into 
4 and 10. A petition had been presented in 1844, setting forth 
that the town had not been divided into districts according to 
legal requirement. The selectmen reestablished the lines of the 
nine districts, making them more closely defined than they had 
been previously. 

In 1830 the "Literary money" was voted to the Prudential 
Committee to be expended equally in the school districts. A 
vote along a similar line was recorded under date of 1837, to the 
effect that the share of surplus revenue which should come to the 
town be left in the state treasury, only the interest being drawn 
for use in the primary schools. We shall see that this money 
was later used to buy the town farm. 

In 1835 the superintending school committee were required to 
do nothing but "examine the teachers." And the next year 
they were "released from visiting the Schools during the year." 

Sales of property by the tax collectors, for default in paying 
the school tax, were by no means uncommon. They were auction 
sales and were held at Messer's Inn, Carey's store or other public 
places. 

The dates of erection of the present buildings in some of the 
districts are here given in so far as they are known to us : 

No. 1. After the demolition and sale of the old building here, 



216 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

the structure now used as the library was erected. It was raised 
September 18, 1861, and opened December 2 of the same year. 
The first teacher was Charles C. Talbot, afterwards of Lawrence. 
Early in the 90 's agitation for a more adequate building was 
started, but without a great deal of headway at first. In 1894 
an article was inserted in the school warrant, asking that the 
building be enlarged or raised or a new one built. Not until the 
next year was the solution completed. In 1895 the present 
attractive building on the plateau was built at a total cost of 
$4,194.70. It has frequently been mentioned as one of the 
prettiest country schoolhouses in the state, a distinction which 
we believe is justified. 

There is an amusing episode recorded in connection with the 
early endeavors of this district to obtain better quarters. In 
1857, on March 28, the district voted to raise $300 to build a new 
schoolhouse to replace the old red building next to the town- 
house. A wit from one of the other districts, upon hearing the 
amount appropriated for an up-to-date house remarked, ' ' Smart 
district that." 

No. 2. This district seemed doomed to disappointment from 
the very first. The original building was set on land near the 
road, at the northeast corner of Wheeler and Poverty streets. 
It was the "little red schoolhouse" of which so much has been 
said, and which was so common in New England a hundred years 
ago. Thomas D. Lancaster and Stephen Webster were pupils 
here. 

About 1835 James Webster bought the farm which included 
the schoolhouse lot of David Wheeler. He moved the house back 
into the field and then sold it to be removed to Haverhill. 
Through some technical oversight the district had failed to 
possess itself of a deed of the building, consequently it went with 
the land. This caused considerable commotion in the district, 
until the town gave permission to prosecute the parties who 
moved the schoolhouse. We do not know that such action was 
ever taken, however. 

Many of the citizens of this district petitioned for permission 
to pay their school tax to Atkinson, Methuen or some other dis- 
trict in Salem, since they could obtain there better conveniences 




GEORGE W. THOM. 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 217 

for their children. Many such requests were granted. Partly 
as a result of this and partly to the location of the division lines 
between districts, the number of pupils in the two first districts 
has been very unevenly divided. In 1862 Mr. Scott, the super- 
intendent, called attention to this fact in his report. No. 1 was 
overcrowded with ninety pupils, while No. 2 had only six or 
seven. 

The next building erected by this district was on land donated 
by Leonard Merrill, a short distance north of the corner on the 
west side of Poverty Street. It was built about 1839, and subse- 
quently burned. The last building was built at the northeast 
corner of the road on the north side of Captain's Pond. It was 
used until the neighborhood had no children of school age, when 
it was sold and moved away. 

No. 3. The original building stood about twenty rods south 
of the Daniel Taylor place (M 630), near the turn in the road, 
on the west side. It was built about one hundred years ago, 
and used until about 1860, when it was torn down. The present 
building (M 627) was erected at about that time. The school 
reports furnish less information in this case than in that of 
any other building in town. 

No. 4. The original building here stood in what is now Mrs. 
Louise Ball's field, close beside the dam of the Atlas mill. It 
was torn down about 1838 and a new one built near the Thomas 
Duston place. This was a red building and was used until 
about 1853, when the brick structure now in service was built. 
The red one was then moved to No. 10 and made a part of that 
building. The brick house was finished January 1, 1853, and 
a dance was held to celebrate the completion. This was one of 
the first schoolhouses in Salem to be equipped with other than the 
plank benches heretofore used. Many citizens of the district 
held that these were "plenty good enough," but the building 
committee in charge, John Taylor, Kimball Gordon and Isaiah 
Newell, were determined to keep up to the times and take advan- 
tage of such improvements as were reasonable. It is needless 
to say that a long trial was not needed to convince even the most 
sceptical of the superiority of the new desks. 

No. 5. There was an old building here in use up to 1873. of 



218 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

which we have not much information. It was sold when the 
present schoolhouse was built in the early winter of 1873, and 
was used as a shoeshop by F. P. "Woodbury. The new building: 
furnished a greatly improved accommodation for the pupils of 
the district. It cost $1,500. 

No. 6. No district in town has passed through so many 
changes in its home for the pupils as has No. 6. The first habi- 
tation of which we know was a small building on the northeast 
corner of Main and Policy streets. The sill stones can still be 
discerned in outline, although buried beneath the sods. This was 
probably built at the time of the first districting of the town in 
1801, and was in use for about twenty-five years. The late 
George Woodbury attended school there three or four terms. 

About 1825 the stone house was built by John Merrill, who 
owned the land where the old building stood. The town paid 
him $300, and gave him the old schoolhouse, in exchange for the 
stone house. This was used until the new building was put up 
in 1873. Toward the last of its years of service it was entirely 
too small to fulfill the demands of the rapidly growing village 
at the Depot, and at last had to give way to its successor. It 
was then sold to William L. Bradford for a very inconsiderable 
sum — about thirty-five dollars. 

The committee for building the new house was Charles Kim- 
ball, Isaac Thorn and Samuel P. Kelly. The cost of the build- 
ing, which was designed for a graded school, was $3,500. It 
stood where the present house is for twenty-one years, being 
consumed by fire in 1894. This put the town to the necessity 
of rebuilding. This time the construction committee was 
Ephraim A. Peabody, Charles F. Kimball and Edric A. Wade, 
M. D. The total cost of the building was $4,415.08. 

No. 7. We do not know much of the history of this district. 
In 1847 and thereabouts a great deal of discussion took place 
regarding the location of the schoolhouse. Several meetings were 
held, committees chosen, but nothing was accomplished except 
the incurrence of expense to the district. At last a building 
was put up near the house of Samuel Palmer, east of the corner 
where the present house is located. It was there in 1859, and is 
described as a small red building. At one time the school was 
kept for a time in the old shop now standing at Thorn's Corner. 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 219 

No. 8. Here is the only schoolhouse in town which admits no 
priority of station to another building, it being the only original 
house in use for school purposes. The date of its erection is 
probably near the opening of the last century. It has been 
greatly changed in appearance, both inside and out. The floor, 
like that of every old building in town, was laid sloping toward 
the teacher's desk, the back part being raised several feet. The 
pupils had to take care of the buildings in the early days, and 
used to come back Saturday mornings occasionally to scrub the 
floors. This work consisted in pouring pailfuls of water down 
at the upper end and sweeping it with a broom as it flowed to- 
ward the front. The long wooden benches were thus arranged in 
tiers across the room, an arrangement which gave the teacher a 
better view of his pupils. However, there was serious complaint 
later that those sitting near the back had to breathe impure air 
because of their elevation, also to suffer from heat during the 
summer term. When the house in this district was remodeled, 
in 1864, the floor was laid level and modern desks introduced. 

Mr. Baxter Hall has a book of records of the old district, 
beginning at 1828. Among the names of men who served as 
Prudential Committee are those of nearly all citizens of the 
district who were at all prominent in the neighborhood and town 
affairs. Mr. Hall is the only present resident of the district 
who still occupies the family homestead of the early days. In 
the accompanying cut of the buildings may be seen the last view 
of it before its demolition, as a new house is now under process 
of construction. At the last school meeting (held in March, 
1907,) the town voted to raise $2,000 for a new building to 
supply the growing demand for accommodation in this district. 

No. 9. The old schoolhouse in this district, located somewhat 
north of the present site, had been several times repaired up to 
about 1860, when its condition was such that further outlay on 
it was deemed inadvisable. Consequently several terms passed, 
especially during the winter months, when no school was kept 
here. But in 1864 the present building was erected, being con- 
sidered at the time a very fine home for the school of the 
district. 

No. 10. This, being a comparatively new district, had no old 



220 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

schoolhouse. When the new brick building in No. 4 was built 
in 1853, the old house, which had stood north of the Thomas 
Duston place, was moved, after having been taken down, to the 
hill in No. 10, and built into the present schoolhouse. It was 
raised May 8, 1854. 

The old system of districts for school management was done 
away with in 1885, when the whole town was merged into one 
body for conducting educational affairs. Meetings are held 
-annually, apart from town meetings, and have jurisdiction over 
all matters pertaining to schools. 

For many years a Superintending School Committee was em- 
ployed, under legislative enactment, for the general supervision 
•of all the districts. These men reported annually to the town 
regarding conditions and results of the year preceding. Some 
of these reports are interesting in the extreme. Each incumbent 
felt himself called on to present a dissertation upon the duties 
of parents in school interests. Without question the advice given 
in this way was sorely needed then, but no more so, perhaps, 
than in many cases today. By far the most interesting of these 
reports is the oldest, of which we have a copy. It outlines the 
duties of the committee as prescribed by law, and then proceeds 
to indicate some of the things that militate against the proper 
performance of them. It is remarkable that the conditions here 
set forth, as long ago as 1848, are the same as those which today 
furnish such a weighty problem to school authorities, even in 
our large city school systems. Some extracts from this report 
are here presented, together with a few paragraphs taken here 
and there from reports of other superintendents : 

' ' The Sup. School Committee for the town of Salem, for 1847, 
submit the following report. 

"The duty of said Committee will be found in the R. S., Chap- 
ter 73, which your Committee deem proper to embody in this 
report. We wish every person may read attentively, and for 
once know what the law is, and what alterations have been made. 

"Chap. 73, Sec. 2 — It shall be the duty of said Committee to 
examine every person proposing to teach any district school in 
such town ; to visit and inspect every school, at least twice a 
year; to inquire into the regulation and discipline thereof, and 




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EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 221 

suggest any necessary alterations, to examine the proficiency of 
the scholars, and to use their influence that all the youth of each 
district attend and profit by the school therein. 

"Chap. 73, Sec. 11 — The Superintending School Com. shall 
determine and direct the class books to be used in the district 
schools of the town; and the parents, masters, or guardians of 
the scholars, attending such schools, shall supply said scholars 
with the books so directed to be used. 

"Chap. 73, Sec. 11. — If any poor child attending any district 
school is destitute of the necessary class books, the selectmen 
shall provide such books at the expense of the town, upon appli- 
cation therefor. 

"We have copied, at length, these sections, that every person 
may know the duties involved upon this com. All will see by an 
Act, passed by the Legislature, June, 1846, that Sec. 5, Chap. 
73, is repealed, and the Town has no right to vote to dispense 
with the examination of Schools. It is not in the power of the 
Town, by their vote, to repeal a State Law; if individuals feel 
grieved, they must apply to the Legislature for the remedy. 

"We may differ from some of our friends in regard to this 
new law, but we are of the opinion it is one of the best acts ever 
performed by that grave body, and hope it will remain un- 
changed, at least, until this generation shall have the advantage 
of a common school education. It must be apparent to every 
one who takes any interest in our district schools, that the pal- 
pable neglect of this Town to have their schools examined, has 
been the means of bringing them into almost the deplorable 
situation we found them. We have found over thirty different 
kinds of books in the schools ; some of them we could not tell what 
they were, they had neither cover nor title-page. Now, we would 
ask, how came they there ? It was for the want of a Sup. School 
Com. to have examined the schools and directed what books 
should have been used, and this ought to have been done ten 
years ago. This multiplicity of books found their way into the 
schools by the fancy of every new master or mistress that was 
employed. 

"Your Committee saw the necessity of a change; that some 
standard books must be adopted, and we were unanimous that 



222 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

most of the old books should be excluded, and these instructions 
were given at the commencement of every school. "We gave our 
reasons for it, — that teachers could not do their duty, and 
children could not get their equal share of instruction. For in- 
stance, allowing thirty scholars in a school, and each one has a 
different book, the teacher would have only six minutes to each, 
(this is allowing three hours in the forenoon, and three in the 
afternoon, the usual school hours,) who wonders that our chil- 
dren have not learned any thing for years past; and because 
they did not, the blame, in most cases, has been wrongfully 
thrown upon the teachers. Now, we say, had every district 
complied with the wishes of the Committee, but five or six dif- 
ferent books would be in use, and this would bring the school 
into five or six classes, and instead of six minutes to each scholar, 
they would have nearly half an hour to each class, and instruc- 
tion to one in the class is instruction to all; and here is a gain 
of twenty to twenty-five minutes to each scholar and the same 
increased gain if they belonged to more than one class. 

' ' There is another reason, why all the books in town should be 
alike, if a family should move from one district to another, there 
would be no change of books required, and furthermore, those 
now used could be passed from the eldest to the youngest in each 
family ; and should the direction of the Committee be fully com- 
plied with, our schools here after will not be overwhelmed with 
all kinds of books, and we assert with great assurance that the 
cost for books for the next three years will not be as much as 
the cost for new books at every new school under the former 
confused regulation would cost for one single year. 

"We have found some opposition in the discharge of our duty. 
Some person says we have no right to direct the books. We 
referred them to the Revised Statute, Chap. 73, Section 11. 
Another says it is wrong to go into the schools it disturbs them ; 
and some children when they find out that the committee is 
coming will keep away from school, no doubt but this is true, and 
no doubt they are bad scholars too, and the fault is not their 
own altogether, for if they were under good parental discipline 
at home, they would never run away from school and, mark 
ye ! if that scholar is a boy, before he is thirty years old, would 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 223 

give all he may then possess if he had learned to read and write 
his own name. Others say, there will be a new Committee next 
year, and then there will be more new books required. If there 
is a change in the Committee you will make it yourselves, and 
the conduct of a new Committee is not chargeable to this Com- 
mittee, and furthermore, whatever change there may be, no 
prudent men will advocate a change of books until they know 
the result of this change. 

"Others say, to examine the schools it will cost too much! 
Why it cost more than all the literary money we get, and there- 
fore, let it go ! This is not the only requirement of the law. It 
must be done if there is no literary money. The expenses of the 
Sup. School Com. for the last year is one cent and eight mills 
on the amount of the taxes raised in town, which would increase 
a poll tax two cents and seven mills. Away with this mincing 
and squirming about a few dollars and cents where the education 
of our children is a consideration, the grand lever which raises 
man above the beast, the foundation of all social and religious 
freedom. Will you give your children money, or will you give 
them education? Give them the former and it will soon take 
wings and be gone. Give them the latter, and it is there, an 
everlasting monument, an ornament to your family, an honor to 
society, and a blessing to mankind. Is there a parent, a master 
or guardian in this town that will turn a deaf ear to the request 
of your Committee, and still persist that the old books are good 
enough, and allow them each a different book, and by doing so 
cheat your children out of one hour and perhaps an hour and a 
half of tuition, every day while your school may keep, we hope 
and trust that there are but a few who will differ from us and 
to that few we would earnestly recommend that they had better 
dispense with some unfashionable luxuries which they indulge 
in, and procure the required books for the education of their 
children. 

' ' But one or two complaints have been made to the Committee 
for disorderly conduct or disobedience of school regulations, and 
on examination we found the circumstances as in most such cases 
to be the fault of parents and not of the teachers, and we would 
recommend to all such parents that if they intend to direct the 



224 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

schools they had better come to the school house and not send 
their orders by their children. Great care has been taken in 
the examination of the literary proficiency of applicants, and in 
several instances certificates have been refused. It has often 
been said, and too often practised upon this town, 'that anybody 
can keep a school in Salem;' some of these applicants however 
have been obliged to find a school somewhere else, as their quali- 
fications were not sufficient to meet the views of this committee. 

"We would add in conclusion, and repeat for the third time, 
that the town will chose the Sup. School Committee by ballot. 

"All of which is respectfully submitted, 

" John L. Clendenin ) Sup School 
"John Ayer C Committee" 

Also a word from J. Lewis Trefren, superintendent in 1858 : 

"Another evil against which your committee and teachers 
have to contend is a want of interest on the part of parents in 
visiting the schools ; though some interest is manifested by some 
parents; yet there are others who never see their children in 
the schoolroom. No man in town would consent to place his 
farm, cattle and horses in the hands of an entire stranger and 
never go near him and see how he managed. And yet they do not 
hesitate to send their children to the guardianship of a teacher 
whom they do not know and never go near him to learn how he 
proceeds in the guidance of their minds and hearts. Alas, that 
it should be so. Vain, comparatively, will be all the efforts of 
the teacher to form the mind and heart of the child, unless they 
are met by corresponding efforts on the part of the parent." 

Mr. E. Scott, in his report of 1862, saw fit to add the following 
to the contributions of his predecessors: 

"If 'order is heaven's first law,' it certainly should be the 
first in the schoolroom. Without good order it is simply impos- 
sible to have a good school. Let every teacher understand this, 
and that order is to be insisted on first, last and all the way 
through the term. It is no way, except a very bad one, to allow 
scholars to take their own course for the first few days in the 
hope of more easily introducing discipline afterward. Such a 
course will involve a failure in ninety-nine cases in a hundred. 
Either such schools will become demoralized or at best prove an 




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DR. VLADIMIR N. SIKORSKY 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 225 

essential failure. The teachers task is sometimes rendered ex- 
tremely difficult and unpleasant by the manifest want of sym- 
pathy and cooperation on the part of parents. Some are 
strangely unwilling to have their children governed at school 
and thoughtlessly take part against the teacher in any conflict 
in which their children are parties. Let children once learn 
from their parents that they think the teacher ought not to 
govern them, or cannot, and the teachers task at once becomes a 
very arduous one. Still the teachers prerogative is well defined, 
his duty plain; he must govern the school, whether parents 
approve or disapprove. For incorrigible offenders, there is a 
short way and an effectual one ; if a scholar cannot be governed 
in school let him be excluded from it. Evil example is conta- 
gious. 'One sinner destroyeth much good.' Better one suffer 
than many." 

Even this left ample opportunity for succeeding officials to 
"ring a new change" on the old theme. We present but one 
more specimen, from the pen of Mr. George W. Rogers in 1866 : 

' ' A WORD TO PARENTS. 

"Parents inflict a great wrong upon their children when they 
take them from school at too early an age for the sake of the 
advantage derived from their labor. Suppose they can earn 
half as much as a man on the farm or in the shop, ought they 
to be obliged to do so? Or, if the child wishes to leave school 
himself for this purpose, is it right to allow him? Certainly 
not. For by and by both parents and child will see what has been 
lost in suffering the precious opportunities our Common Schools 
afford to pass by unimproved. It is a loss that is hard to make 
up when the deficiency is felt. It is more than a question of 
dollars and cents." 

Do not the arguments herein contained seem valid, especially 
when we consider that the work for the nine schools of the town 
was done on an expenditure of only $700.04? It is the pains- 
taking effort of men such as comprised this committee that has 
gradually brought up the standard of Salem schools. 

Various means have been resorted to to raise money for school 
purposes. In these attempts the village districts were better 

16 



226 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

situated and therefore usually more successful. On one occa- 
sion the people of No. 1 district held a school festival in Salem 
Hall to raise funds for necessary expenses. It was on January 
17, 1865, when the stringency of war times made money a little 
scarce. The success of the affair may be judged by the fact 
that ninety dollars profit was realized. It was expended as 
follows: Seventy-five dollars for teaching to March first, six 
dollars for fuel, and nine dollars for prizes to be awarded 
efficient pupils. This gives an idea of salaries paid at that time. 
Miss Laura Haynes taught the term above referred to. Men 
were paid higher wages. The following term was of only eight 
weeks instead of twelve, during which school was conducted by 
L. Everett Fogg, who received ninety-two dollars for teaching 
and board. 

There is one homestead in Derry which was placed under 
Salem school jurisdiction by legislative enactment of June 28, 
1859. By this act George A. Goodhue of Derry was annexed 
to School District No. 4 in Salem, with all the liabilities and 
privileges as fully and completely as if located in Salem. It 
was also provided that all such persons as in the future should 
reside on said homestead should come under this act. The wis- 
dom of this bill is apparent when the relative distances from 
the Goodhue place to the schools of both towns are considered, 
and more especially since all trade and travel from there nat- 
urally turns to North Salem. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Salem has never had a high school. "When parents have 
desired to give their children educational advantages beyond 
the scope of the local schools they have sent them usually to 
Pinkerton Academy in Derry or to Tilton Seminary. A few 
pupils have attended the normal schools at Plymouth, N. H., 
Salem, Mass., or Lowell, Mass. The school most closely asso- 
ciated with the interests of Salem, however, has for several years 
been the Methuen High School. This school has graduated a 
large number of Salem boys and girls, many of whom have sub- 
sequently completed their education in the colleges and univer- 
sities. Since the passage of the state law in 1901, compelling 



EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 227 

all New Hampshire towns, which had no high schools, to provide 
that grade of education in some adjoining town, nearly all high 
school pupils from Salem have been sent to Methuen. The tui- 
tion charge has been forty dollars per year for each pupil, a 
part of which is returned to the town by the state. The picture 
on page 228 shows the high school boys and girls of Salem on 
board the electric car at Point A, en route for Methuen. The 
opening of the electric line of the Southern New Hampshire 
Company furnished a quick and economical means of transpor- 
tation of pupils to and from school, reduced rates having been 
granted by the company. This means much to the success of 
the pupils, since one of the most exhausting influences to boys 
and girls attending school is a long, tedious ride before and 
after the session. The value of easy access cannot be estimated 
in terms of dollars — experience has proved it to be a question 
of physical health and conservation of vital nerve energy. 

Last year there were twenty-one pupils from Salem in the 
Methuen High School, two of whom graduated in June, 1906. 
During the past year there were nineteen, five of whom grad- 
uated June 21, 1907. The group picture of these five graduates, 
taken just after graduation, on the high school lawn, is shown 
on page 232. 

The school report for the year ending August 1, 1906, the 
last issued, shows a total enrollment for three terms in all nine 
districts of 859 pupils, an average for each term of 286. The 
number of different names registered during the year was 329, 
of which 180 were boys and 149 girls. Fourteen teachers were 
employed during the year in the twelve schools. There are two 
grades in the No. 1 building, and three in No. 6. The total 
expenditures were $6,652.23. The board consisted of Frank D. 
Davis, Clinton L. Silver and Seth M. Pattee. This board has 
full charge and management of school affairs, except the pay- 
ment of bills, which is attended to by the school treasurer, James 
Ewins. 

The office of superintendent of schools was created in 1826, 
when Rev. William Balch was first elected to that office. Vari- 
ous methods of supervision have since been employed with 
equally various degrees of success. The old plan of having a 



228 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

prudential committee for each district, who should engage the 
teachers and have general control of the running of the school, 
was discarded at the time of consolidation of the districts in 
1886 in accordance with the new state law then passed. In 
June, 1901, the towns of Hampstead, Epping and Salem were 
formed into a Supervisory District by a joint meeting of the 
school boards of the three towns held in Hampstead. Mr. Edgar 
E. Hulse was elected superintendent for the district, at a salary 
of $1,200 per year. Epping and Salem were each to pay two 
fifths, and Hampstead one fifth, of this amount. But under 
the state law sanctioning such districting of the towns it was 
provided that one half the sum paid should be returned to the 
town by the state; consequently the net cost to Salem was only 
$240 per year. 

Mr. Hulse was succeeded in 1904 by Harry A. Brown, at 
which time a new district was formed by Salem and Hudson. 
In 1905 Hudson voted to discontinue the supervision, and 
Salem, unable to bear the full expense of engaging an efficient 
superintendent, and unable to arrange cooperation with another 
town, was forced also to follow the action of Hudson. 

In the spring of 1907, after a period of two years of super- 
vision by the school board, a new arrangement was made by 
which Atkinson, Hudson and Salem formed a supervisory dis- 
trict and employed Mr. J. E. Wignot as superintendent. 

The schools of the town will graduate twelve pupils this year, 
who will be sent to Nashua to take the high school examinations. 

SALEM SOCIAL LIBRARY. 

In 1798 an act was passed by the state legislature incorporat- 
ing a body of men to be known as the Proprietors of the Social 
Library in Salem. They were Rev. John Smith, Thomas Dow, 
David Allen, William Thom and Andrew Packs (?). We do 
not know how long the organization existed, or the nature of its 
work. If its records are preserved, they are obscure from the 
present demand for them. 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

For some years public-spirited citizens looked forward to the 
institution of a public library in the town. Not until 1893, 







v 

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EDUCATIONAL MATTERS. 229 

however, did a means present itself. At that time the state 
offered one hundred dollars' worth of books to a town which 
would raise one fourth of that amount toward equipping a 
library. Salem took advantage of the offer by voting at the 
annual meeting in 1893 to raise twenty-five dollars. The books 
were received in due time and put into one of the rooms of the 
toAvn house. Here the first distribution took place, February 
17, 1894, at which time thirty-six books were drawn out. This 
was the home of the library until the fall of 1895, when it was 
moved into the present building, then just vacated by the school 
of the district, which had been transferred to the new school- 
house. 

The prime mover in the establishment of the library was the 
late Wra. G. Crowell, to whose untiring efforts so much of sub- 
stantial progress in the town was due. Several citizens con- 
tributed generously to the fund for providing books. Mr. David 
Bailey gave $550, Mr. Charles H. Tenney, $500, Mr. Levi Wood- 
bury, $100. Smaller amounts were given by Gilman Corning, 
J. M. Tenney, Wm. G. Crowell, Stephen Bailey, Charles Austin, 
Eliphalet Coburn, Levi W. Taylor, T. M. Russ, Warren Emer- 
son, Wallace W. Cole, James Ewins, Daniel W. Tenney, John 
Taylor, Frank Emerson, Charles Kimball. 

The first board of trustees comprised William G. Crowell, 
Matthew H. Taylor and Charles Kimball. Since that time the 
following citizens have served on the board: James Ayer, Clin- 
ton L. Silver, Wallace W. Cole, Levi W. Taylor, John F. Hall, 
Benjamin R. Wheeler, Loren B. McLaughlin, Daniel A. Abbott 
and Lorenzo F. Hyde. The last two, with C. L. Silver, con- 
stitute the present board. 

The first librarian was Ernest L. Silver. He was followed 
by Mrs. Susan A. Cluff, who held the position until 1907, when 
she ' resigned. Mrs. D. A. Abbott, the present librarian, was 
appointed to succeed Mrs. Cluff. 

The year after the library was founded the town appropriated 
fifty dollars toward its maintenance. After this the state law 
demanded a certain percentage of the total taxation value of 
the town for support of the library. This sum was then $78.30, 
and has since increased to $86.40. In 1896 the town raised 



230 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

fifty dollars in addition to the legal requirement, but in 1897 
no extra sum was voted. This, however, was the only year in 
which an addition to the required amount has not been voted, 
varying from forty dollars to one hundred and twenty-five., 
Besides this money for books and expenses, occasional extra 
appropriations have been made for repairs on the building. 
All in all, this new department of the educational work of the 
town has not been a very expensive undertaking, while it has 
been of very great value to the people. Here is an excellent 
field of work for philanthropic citizens — a new up-to-date 
library, well stocked, would be a very acceptable addition to 
the town. 

From the last report of the librarian it may be seen that the 
total number of volumes in February, 1907, was 2,038 (to which 
about 75 have since been added). Besides these there are 336 
bound volumes of public documents and reports, and 832 paper 
covers and pamphlets. The library is open only on Saturdays. 
Books are boxed and sent to North Salem and the Depot, a sys- 
tem of blank slips for home use being employed for drawing 
the volumes. The total number of volumes issued from Feb- 
ruary, 1906, to February, 1907, was 4,942, an average of 95 
each week. The expense of the institution for last year, includ- 
ing repairs, was $328.71. 



CHAPTER VII. 

Military History. 

In all of the military activities of the state and nation Salem 
has taken an important part. As a border town it has felt 
more keenly than some others the influence of the interests of 
two states, an influence which perhaps widens the common sym- 
pathies and demands a more prompt response to the call of a 
common cause. Also, since the vast unsettled territory to the 
north left the town exposed during its early days, its first citi- 
zens, and through them the later generations, were imbued with 
that spirit of resolution and daring that has been so conspicuous 
in its soldiers upon the field of battle. 

The town had hardly begun its existence when the troubles 
on the Canadian border demanded attention. Men were sent to 
different points, those from Salem being assigned to the Lake 
George expedition. That their service was duly appreciated is 
shown by action of the voters in 1758, after the return. Those 
men who had gone on the campaign requested to be "Released 
of their Rates for Their Heads for all That went from This 
Town The year Past." This request was voted down. Not 
even their polltax could be abated as a return for their service 
to the province. But we are not told what pay they received 
from the province ; it may have been considered sufficient with- 
out extra recognition from the town. 

After this affairs were little influenced by thoughts of war 
until the threatening clouds of the Revolution began to darken 
the sky. Salem was near enough to Massachusetts to be fully 
informed of the doings of that active colony in the strenuous 
years immediately preceding the outbreak of hostilities. The 
ordinary topics of conversation gave way to the various specu- 
lations regarding the outcome of the impending quarrel. Mean- 
time men were laying plans for really serious business. The 



232 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

more excitable and enthusiastic among the younger citizens were 
making arrangements for organizing military companies, while 
those of the "town fathers" who had keen foresight began to pre- 
pare for a call to the defense. In 1774 a supply of ammuni- 
tion was purchased for the town, as is shown by a vote taken 
early in the next year: 

"Ordered that Richard Dow constabel to Pay himself four 
Pound tane Shilings and Eleven pence it being for Lead and 
flints for a town stock of emonation and for the Expense a goin 
after it and for warning persons out of the town in ye 1774 — 

' ' Dated march ye 28 1775. " ' ' 4 : 10 : 11 

This "warning persons out of town" was a method then in 
vogue for being rid of paupers who had moved here from other 
towns. They were given a certain length of time within which 
they must leave the town. Not infrequently they were actually 
deported by the constable. Sometimes persons of undesirable 
characters, not paupers, were thus summarily dismissed from 
the town limits. 

With all minds keyed to the highest tension, the suspense 
increasing daily and men eager to show their fidelity to their 
country by striking a blow for freedom from the prosecution 
which had become so unbearable — this was the condition in 
which our ancestors awaited the next piece of news. Then 
came the reports of the fight at Lexington, Mass., on April 19, 
1775. From the mass of confused stories of the affair the real 
facts could not be obtained for a few days. Meantime there 
had been great excitement among the inhabitants of the town, 
many conferences were held, with the result that the selectmen 
posted the following notice for a town meeting: 

"At the Desire of Some Inhabitants of this town we have 
Hereby Notified the Inhabitants of this town to meet at the 
Public meeting House in Salem on tuesday the 25 th day of April 
Instant at three of the Clock in the afternoon in order to Raise 
a Propper Number of men for the Defense of the Country and 
also to make Some Provision for their Pay if Called for. 

"John Hall ) Select 
"Dated April ye 22—1775." "John Kelley j men 




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MILITARY HISTORY. 238 

Wait two weeks for a meeting after its notice was posted? 
Not they! Three days was all too long at such a time. Even 
the following record of this meeting, if read somewhat hurriedly, 
will be seen to speak the excited condition of the mind which 
framed it: 

" At a meeting of the Inhabitants of this town on the 25 day of 
April 1775 then voted to Enlist 30 men for the Defense of the 
Country if Called for: Voted Six dollars per month for Each 
man when Called for: Voted the Select men be a Committee to 
Provide Provisions for the Enlisted men when Called for." 

John Stark, afterwards the famous general of the American 
army, on hearing of the battle at Lexington, left his sawmill in 
Londonderry and, mounting his horse, hurried to Cambridge. 
He left word that all of his neighbors who should go, join 
him the next day in Medford. On the following morning he 
received a colonel's commission, since he had made a good mili- 
tary record in the service of the British and American com- 
bined forces during the French and Indian war of 1754 and 
the following years. Stark was well known in New England 
and used his well-earned prestige to help raise troops. He 
enlisted eight hundred during the first day, and several com- 
panies reported later. 

Among these was the company of Elisha Woodbury, who had 
been chosen captain of the recruits from Salem. A few of the 
men had joined other companies, and were not in Stark's regi- 
ment. The work of organization was fairly finished when the 
appointment of Washington as commander-in-chief of the Con- 
tinental forces was announced on June 15. During the night 
of the 16th the troops worked on the intrenchments on Breed's 
Hill, better known as Bunker Hill, and with the dawn of June 
17 began the second brilliant and memorable chapter of the war. 
The British army in Boston, on seeing the redoubt above frown- 
ing down upon them, resolved to dislodge the saucy rebels. The 
story of the ensuing conflict is too well known to need rehears- 
ing here. It will be remembered that Colonel Stark's regiment 
was given the defense of the left of the American line. Captain 
Woodbury's company, composed of the men from Salem, Pelham 
and Windham, experienced here their first battle. When the 



234 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



ammunition was exhausted and it was evident that the position 
could not be maintained, the Americans made one last desperate 
resistance with bayonets and clubbed muskets, then beat a re- 
treat, after suffering a loss of about four hundred and fifty 
men, while the British lost more than a thousand. Colonel 
Stark withdrew his regiment in almost perfect order, exhibiting 
throughout the fight that coolness and mastery which gave him 
his success. 

Captain Woodbury 's company lost two men ; Moses Poor was 
killed and Ephraim Kelley wounded. Both were privates from 
Salem. There may have been other losses from this company 
which are not mentioned here for the reason that only the Salem 
men are here followed. The list of Captain Woodbury's fellow- 
townsmen who were in the battle of Bunker Hill, together with 
their rank, company and regiment is here given : 



LIST OP SOLDIERS OF SALEM, N. H., IN THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL. 

RANK. COMPANY. REGIMENT. 



Amy, Heman 


Private. 


Woodbury 's. 


Stark 's 


Austin, Abiel 


1 1 


i t 


1 1 


Bailey, Enoch 


( c 


1 1 


i < 


Bradford, William 


I i 


i i 


i i 


Bailey, Dudley 


Fifer. 


Hutchins'. 


Reed 's. 


Cole, Solomon 


Private. 


Woodbury 's. 


Stark 's 


Corliss, Jonathan 


Lieut. 


i i 






Corliss, Emerson 


Private. 


t i 






Currier, John 


c t 


i i 






Duty, William 


Corporal. 


1 1 






Duston, Obadiah 


Private. 


< 1 






Gage, Andrew 


i i 


1 1 






Gage, Job 


i i 


Towne 's. 






Hall, Benjamin 


Sergeant. 


Woodbury 's. 






Hall, David 


Private. 


i t. 






Hall, James 


4 ( 


i 






Harris, Joseph 


it 


< ( 






Hazelton, Jqnas 


i t 


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Heath, Joshua 


Sergeant. 


i c 






Hardy, Jac6b 


Private. 


Perkins'. 


Gridley 


Howard, John 


a 


1 1 


t 


i 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



235 



Kelley, Ephraim Private. Woodbury's. Stark's. 

McNellie, John 

Parsons, Stephen 

Perry, William 

Poor, Moses (killed) 

Roque, Bryan 

Rowell, Lemuel 

Rowell, Israel 

Wheeler, Abner Drummer. 

Woodbury, Elisha Captain. 

Woodbury, Elisha, Jr. Private. 

Woodbury, Luke Corporal. 

Woodbury, Jonathan Private. 

A note shows that Captain Woodbury received pay at the rate 
of six pounds per month, and Ensign Jonathan Corliss had sev- 
enty shillings per month. Corliss was subsequently made lieu- 
tenant, and Luke Woodbury, a corporal at Bunker Hill, was 
appointed ensign Nov. 7, 1776. 

For some reasons it might be found convenient to have all of 
the information here given concerning each man placed together 
under one heading. But the enlistments were at irregular times 
and for irregular terms of service, which would cause such an 
arrangement to lose all of its coherence and become a meaning- 
less mass as far as the sequence of the stages of the war or the 
unity of the town 's part in the war is concerned. It has seemed 
far better to keep the arrangement as nearly chronological as 
possible, so as to bring out more vividly the attitude of the town 
at different periods of the conflict and to bring the troops back 
to the town in groups as they were discharged. 

The men who were really keen to go to the war and were sit- 
uated so that they could go are found enrolled in Colonel Stark's 
regiment. Many others, whose stress of circumstances or obtuse 
enthusiasm prevented their joining their neighbors, began to 
plan at home how they might raise a company of militia for 
the common cause when needed. 

Arrangements were begun for forming some sort of company, 
but as no further evidence for immediate need was presented 
the organization was allowed to remain unfinished for a few 



236 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

months. But in August several meetings were held to complete 
the establishment of a militia to be ready for the service of the 
country if needed. Committees were appointed to confer with 
those of neighboring towns in regard to having a general organ- 
ization of the various companies that should be formed. Two 
companies were raised, one in the north part of the town and 
one in the south part. The south company was commanded by 
Capt. Joshua Swan. The other officers were : First lieutenant, 
Thomas Robinson ; second lieutenant, Abbott Pettingill ; ensign, 
Oliver Kimball, Jr. The committee chosen to consult with other 
towns consisted of Robert Young, Jonathan Tenney, Thomas 
Douglas and John Hall. The north company had the follow- 
ing officers : Captain, John Allen ; first lieutenant, Richard 
Dow ; second lieutenant, Samuel Johnson ; ensign, Daniel Gor- 
don. Four men were also chosen to consult with out-of-town 
companies — Richard Dow, Benjamin Bixby, Ensign Henry Little 
and William Hall. 

In 1776 an article was inserted in the warrant asking that the 
town purchase the land in front of the meetinghouse for a pa- 
rade ground. 

The land referred to is that now occupied in part by the Meth- 
odist church and dwelling houses along Main Street and Law- 
rence road, and extending from these streets to the river. This 
lot was afterwards the scene of musters of the militia companies, 
and was known as the "Marston land." The town at this time, 
however, refused to consider the matter and the article was 
voted down. 

Although these companies were not put into the field as soon 
as organized, individuals were in the Continental service very 
early in the war. Aaron Copp was a corporal in Capt. Jeremiah 
Gilman's company, Col. John Nixon's regiment, when it was in 
camp on "Winter Hill, Sept. 30, 1775. Also there were men in 
the army at Cambridge in 1775, as is shown by the fact that the 
town was reimbursed fifty-six pounds, twelve shillings, six pence 
' ' for pay roll for men to Cambridge in 1775. ' ' Who these latter 
men were, however, is not stated. 




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MILITARY HISTORY. 237 

In October, 1775, a war inventory was taken by order of the 
government. The statistics for Salem are given as follows : 



All males under 16 


296 


Males from 16 to 50 not in the Army 


151 


All males above 50 


49 


Persons in the Army 


47 


All females 


539 


Negroes 


2 




1084 


Powder, 43 pd. 




.Fire Arms, 104 




Town Stock of Powder 71 lbs. 




Dated October 4 th , 1775 t John Kelley ] 


Select 


Caleb Preston ^ 


men. 



The within account Sworn to 

before me John Hall, Town Clerk. ' ' 

This inventory, coming as it does at this time, is interesting 
to us from several considerations. It is the first authentic 
census of Salem at the period of the Revolution. The provincial 
legislature had ordered a census in 1767, but we cannot find any 
return of its accomplishment. These figures here give us the 
population of the town as 1,084 persons. It will be interesting 
to see how this compares with some of the later returns, for 
instance within our time. (See Chapter V.) It shows that 
there were in the army at this time forty-seven men. Besides 
those mentioned above we find some other Salem men enlisted, 
and even at an earlier date. Joseph Clough was in Capt. Gil- 
man's company June 12, 1775. He was then twenty-five years 
old. But there was the company under Capt. Elisha Woodbury 
in which there must have been at least thirty-eight Salem men, 
as that number of blankets were furnished by John Hall and 
John Kelley, the selectmen, at a cost of twenty-two pounds six 
shillings three pence. The bill was drawn May 27, 1775, Caleb 
Duston giving a receipt for the goods from the Committee of 
Supplies. 

It was felt by the men in charge of affairs in the colonies that 



238 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

there should be some general public expression of the attitude of 
the people toward the cause of independence. Such an expres- 
sion would serve not only to indicate the spirit of the country, 
but also to put each man on record with himself, which was an 
end greatly to be desired in those days of uncertainty. The 
psychological principle of outward expression as a stimulus to 
inner feeling, such as is seen in the signing of a pledge, was 
recognized, although perhaps not as such, and put into practice. 
A form of pledge was circulated in 1776 throughout the col- 
onies for signatures. It was known as "The Association Test," 
and was drawn as follows : 

"We, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise 
that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our 
Lives and Fortunes, with Arms, oppose the Hostile Proceedings 
of the British Fleets and Armies against the United American 
Colonies. ' ' 

This was calculated to find out who were loyal to the American 
cause and who were the "Tories." Still this was not always 
a safe basis upon which to judge a man. The natural conser- 
vatism of the English type of mind, as opposed to the caprice 
of mental action of the south European, made it impossible for 
some of our ancestors to fully grasp, especially in the few years 
of the development of estrangement between the colonies and the 
mother country, the idea of an independent government. The 
casting aside of the support and protection of the power to 
which they had been reared to look with reverence was a step 
not to be lightly contemplated nor hurriedly undertaken. It 
indeed needs a liberal mind to shake off in the reasoning period 
of middle age the outgrown doctrine which has been instilled 
into it during childhood and youth. 

The Test was signed in Salem by one hundred and seventy; 
thirty-six refused to sign it. In the whole of New Hampshire 
eight thousand one hundred and ninety-nine signed, while seven 
hundred seventy-three refused. 

In March, 1777, the town of Salem was supposed to have one 
hundred ninety-eight men between the ages of sixteen and fifty 
from which to draw for recruits. The troops raised here were 
to be put into Col. Josiah Bartlett's Seventh regiment. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 239 

In April, however, two companies were raised in this vicinity, 
one by Richard Dow, the other by Jeremiah Dow. Together 
they included eighteen Salem men, enlisted for a period of three 
years. But instead of being put into the Seventh Regiment un- 
der Colonel Bartlett, they were assigned to Captain Robinson's 
company in Col. Nathan Hale's Second Regiment. 

RICHARD DOW'S COMPANY. JEREMIAH DOW's COMPANY. 

Nathaniel Chase Thomas Currier 

Aaron Copp "*Solomon Coal (Cole). (He 

* Joseph Harris was aged 35. Left the com- 
* Israel Rowell pany at Albany; no cause 

* James Rowell given, but later was wounded 
*Richard Clement at Stillwater, Sept. 19, 1777.) 
*Ebenr Easman *Israel Hull 

* Samuel Smith *Asa Bixby 
*W m Morland *W m Woodbury 

Andrew Gage * Israel Woodbury, Jr. 

*Moses Copp Nathel Clark 

* James Young Lemuel Rowell 

Samel Silver 
Heman Ame. 

They were mustered May 6,' 1777. Those whose names are 
starred (*) were mustered out and paid October 16, 1778. A 
note says that Luke Woodbury was ensign of this company, 
although his name does not appear in the above list. 

At a town meeting held April 2, 1777, means for raising 
troops were discussed. It was voted to offer as an extra induce- 
ment for enlisting a bounty of sixty dollars to each recruit. A 
committee of nine men was chosen to have charge of the enlist- 
ing. They were Richard Messer, William Hall, Amos Dow, Capt. 
Richard Dow, Benj. Bixby, Capt. Elisha Woodbury, Capt. Sam- 
uel Kelley, Capt. John Allen, and Lieut. Zechariah Woodbury 
( ?) (Should this last be Clough?) 

On April 22 an additional bounty of forty dollars was voted 
to those who should enlist for three years. The two companies 
above mentioned were raised under this bounty, as is shown by 
this record in the town books: 



240 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"May 8, 1877. Each of the following received $100. town 
bounty in full, to 3 jr. soldiers. 

Israel Hull James Rowel 

Samuel Smith AsaBixby 

Israel Woodbury Thomas Currier 

Richard Clements Ebenezer Eastman 

Israel Rowell William Moorland 

Moses Copp William Woodbery 

William Woodland 
Attest Zech W. Colog ( ?) 

Joseph Harris, Jr. 

Soloman Cole 
Attest 

William Hall 
Richard Messer. ' ' 

There is an irregularity in the record in the name of William 
Woodland. There was no such person in Salem at this time. 
William Woodbury and William Moreland (spelled otherwise) 
were the only two men whose names might be confused, and they 
both appear in this list. It would seem also that if a name were 
to be separately attested the name of the testator should be in its 
proper form. This Colog is evidently intended for Clougli. 

The payment of this bounty must be met by taxes. Thus a 
special soldiers' rate was levied in 1777, amounting to seven hun- 
dred seventy-one pounds thirteen shillings nine pence four farth- 
ings. 

After Capt. Jeremiah Dow's company had been put into Capt. 
Robinson's command Dow raised another company. It was as- 
signed to Lieutenant Colonel Welch's regiment of volunteers, 
and joined the Continental army September 27, 1777. Follow- 
ing is the roster of Salem men, which we assume were the only 
ones mustered at this time: 

Capt. Jeremiah Dow Daniel Silver 

Lieut. David Gordon David Messer 

Ensign Richard Kimbal John Merril Jun r 

Sergeant Jonathan Massey Henry Woodbury 

do Benjamin Woodbury Dudley Currier 




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MILITARY HISTORY. 



241 



Corporal Jn° Moore Bayley 
Ditto Seth Pattee 
Fifer David Merrill 
Privates — 

Nathan Webster 

Timothy Swan 

Abner Wheeler 

Robert Bradford 

Asa Morse 



Abner Woodman 
Warren Wheeler 
Joseph Hastings 
James Corliss 
George Amy 
Daniel Ladd 
Simon Johnson 
John Lancaster 
Emerson Corliss 



Ward Clark Young 

The company served one month and ten days, when they were 
mustered out. They received "pay for the time necessary to 
travel at regular wages," besides traveling expenses. The com- 
pany was at Battenkill on October 12. Here Ens. Richard Kim- 
ball and Private Simon Johnson were allowed to return home, 
with an allowance of ten days to travel the two hundred miles. 
That is, their discharges were dated forward ten days and they 
were paid accordingly. 

Meantime there was a new recruiting at Salem to supply in 
Colonel Bartlett's militia regiment and for Colonel Drake's regi- 
ment. The men were mustered in October 2, 1777, and paid in 
advance for one month : 



Daniel Messer 
Daniel Peaslee Merrill 
Lieut Benj Hall 

" Abijah Wheeler 
Isaac Clough 
Josiah Thissel 
Eben r Woodbury 
James Hastings Junr. 



David Bussell 
William Pattee 
John Gage 
W m Clough 
Eben r Duston 
Caleb Marvel (Marble) 
James Webster 
Jonath 11 Gorden 



Thos. Clark Bailey 

This is the record as given in the State Papers. From com- 
parison with another record, however, it appears that this must 
be the company of Capt. Jesse Page, which was raised as part of 
Colonel Drake's regiment (commanded at the time by Colonel 
Bartlett), for the reinforcement of the Northern Continental 
Army. If this is so, some of the men enlisted some time before 

17 



242 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

being mustered, perhaps early in September. They served about 
three months. 

At about this time the finances of the town were somewhat 
low, causing a decrease in money paid to soldiers. On November 
11, 1777, it was voted "no consideration to the commissioned of- 
ficers, or to men who had enlisted under officers out of the state ; 
or to any except the one year men who had been in the Canada 
campaign, and these should have five dollars." 

The men who went on the Canada expedition were : 

Hugh Campbell Jacob Hardy 

David Nevins Josiah Hardy 

Natl Gorril William Smith Jr. 

Sam'l Templeton Solomon Smith 
William Gordon ~ Margaret Smith 

Thorn 8 McGlauthlon William Thorn 

Richard Hennesy John Moorland 

William Smith James Moorland 

Besides these sixteen names there is a list of men entitled to 
bounty in 1778, but we have no record of their enlistment at this 
time. They were undoubtedly all in the Canada party, since it 
is certain that most of them were : 

W m Duty Jonathan Emerson 

Luke Woodberry Emerson Corlis 

W m Bradford Israel Rowell 

Elisha Woodbury Ebenezer Woodbury 

Mark Duty James Woodberry 

Isaac Clough Joseph Hall 

Lemuel Rowell John Woodman 
Andrew Gage 

"Ordered Ens 11 Richard Kimball constable to pay Amos Dow 
Thirty pounds twelve shillings for money lent the town to hire 
soldiers. Dec. 4, 1779." This bit of record is self-explanatory. 
There are a number of others very much like this in the book of 
that period. Money was borrowed also from Richard Kimball, 
Simon Johnson, Joseph Merrill, Richard Dow and others. 

July 26, 1779, five men were paid forty pounds each for one 
year of service: Jonathan Stevens, Jr., Nathaniel Kelly, Wil- 



MILITARY HISTORY. 243 

liam Morlin (Moreland), Friend Noyes, and David Hammons. 
James Niekson (Nickerson) was paid sixty pounds for one year 
of service. Another list gives Nathaniel Kelly, Friend Noyes 
and Jacob Hardy each twelve pounds nineteen shillings two pence 
for "Bounty for one year." 

Five men were enlisted in the Seventh Regiment of militia for 
the defense of Rhode Island in 1779 : 

John Clement July 28 David Buswell Aug. 11 

Loammi Pattee Ebenezer Lancaster " 

Jonathan Smith, July 27 ; abode Salem ; for Atkinson. 

Here the "for Atkinson" means that Smith was enlisted as 
one of the quota of men which that town was supposed to furnish 
for the war. A certain number was demanded from each town, 
according to the male population of military age, that is, sixteen 
to sixty years. Before the close of the war the great demand 
for troops compelled the enrollment of many boys and old men 
who were considerably outside these age limits. 

In 1779 Aaron Copp was discharged. He was a sergeant in 
Captain Stone's company, Colonel Scammel's regiment, and had 
been wounded in the left wrist at Bemis Heights, October 7, 1777. 
As his wound disabled him for service he was pensioned for thirty 
shillings per month. 

Lieut. Col. Jacob Gale, in making his returns to Major General 
Folsom under date of October 28, 1779, gives the names of seven 
men who were mustered July 21, 1779 for Plastow for a term of 
one year. He must have made an error, as these men are listed 
in the muster rolls, from which his report was supposed to be 
made, as for Salem. A glance at the names leaves us in no doubt 
that they belonged here : 





Age 




Age 


Jacob Hardy 


27 


Frend Noyes 


17 


David Hammond 


26 


Jonathan Stevens 


18 


Willi m Morland 


19 


Nathaniel Kelly 


16 


James Nixson 


22 






To this list is added : 








Simon Clemments 


19 


for Atkinson July 26. 




(Simeon Clements) 









244 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Only seven men were enlisted here in 1780. These were mus- 
tered at Kingston, June 27, 1780, by Josiah Bartlett, to serve till 
December 31 of the same year. The same names are given in 
the muster roll of recruits, also on the pay roll of that year : 

John Howard David Silver 

Nat 1 Pike John Lowell 

Moses Cross Nehemiah Stanwood. 

Daniel Stanwood 

Rations for the army were called for in 1781. A town meet- 
ing was held when it was "voted the selectmen be a committee to 
procure beef for the soldiers from this town." 

Only one name is given for the Salem contingent in Capt. 
Sam'l Cherry's 9th Co., Col. Geo. Ried's Regt., light infantry, 
February 14, 1781 — the name of "Sam 1 Silver, private." 

Four more were mustered April 6, 1781, for three years, by 
Maj. Gen. Samuel Folsom, to fill up New Hampshire regiments. 
We can find no record of the length of time these men served, 
but the war was of course over before their time expired. They 
were: 

Names Age Names Age 

John Howard 35 Daniel Bradley 18 

Moses Heath 19 Peter Cross 16 

Later in this year thirteen Salem men were in the company of 
Capt. Jacob Webster in Colonel Reynold's regiment of New 
Hampshire militia. They marched in three detachments, on 
September 27, 28 and 30. Eight of the names in the list are 
omitted from another record supposed to contain the names of 
men in Captain Webster's command. The first five here given 
are those contained in both lists, while the last eight are found 
only in one : 

Simeon Clement Joseph Clough 

Jedediah Hastin (gs) David Hammond 

Abial Heath William Moreland 

Jacob Handey James Nixon 

Jacob Silver Fred Noyes 

John Stevins 

Nath 1 Kelly 

Jacob Hardy 




ISAAC THOM. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



245 



As far as we can ascertain there are no other papers preserved 
by the state which give records of soldiers from Salem. The 
movements of the several bodies of troops are not followed here. 
Histories of the campaigns of the war would be more appro- 
priately devoted to such information. The dates given, however, 
will enable anyone to place a certain man in this or that stage of 
the war. 

In the foregoing records many of the names appear more than 
once, sometimes with a slightly modified spelling. They are 
given just as they occur in the papers on file in Concord. But in 
order that the list of these soldiers may be more readily examined 
and comprehended, a full summary in alphabetical arrangement 
is here given, with the ranks indicated in so far as they could 
be obtained. Names with no rank given are privates. Those 
whose names are preceded by an asterisk (*) were in the battle 
of Bunker Hill. 



SALEM SOLDIERS IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

*Austin, Abiel 



Amy, George 
*Amy, Heman 



*Bailey, Dudley, fifer 

*Bailey, Enoch 
Bailey, Thomas Clark 
Bayley, John Moore, Corp. 
Bixby, Asa 



Bradford, Robert 
*Bradford, William 
Bradley, Daniel 
Buswell, David 



Campbell, Hugh 
Chase, Nathaniel 
Clark, Nathaniel 
Clement, John 
Clement, Richard 
Clement, Simeon 
Clough, Isaac 
Clough, Joseph 
Clough, William 
*Cole, Solomon 



Copp, Aaron, Sergt. 

Copp, Moses 
*Corliss, Emerson 

Corliss, James 
*Corliss, Jonathan, Lt. 

Cross, Moses 

Cross, Peter 

Currier, Dudley 
* Currier, John 

Currier, Thomas 



246 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Dow, Jeremiah, Capt. 
Dow, Richard, Capt. 
Duston, Ebenezer 



*Duston, Obadiah 
Duty, Mark 
*Duty, William, Corp. 



Eastman, Ebenezer 



Emerson, Jonathan 



*Gage, Andrew 
*Gage, Job 

Gage, John 

Gordon, David, Lt. 



Gordon, Jonathan 
Gordon, William 
Gorrill, Nathaniel 



*Hall, Benjamin, Lt. 

•Hall, David 

*Hall, James 
Hall, Joseph 
Hammond, David 
Handey, Jacob 

•Hardy, Jacob 
Hardy, Josiah 

•Harris, Joseph 
Harris, Joseph, Jr. 



Hastings, James 

Hastings, Jedediah 

Hastings, Joseph 
•Hazelton, Jonas 

Heath, Abiel 
•Heath, Joshua, Sergt. 

Heath, Moses 

Hennessey, Richard 
•Howard, John 

Hull, Israel 



Johnson, Simon 



•Kelley, Ephraim 
Kelly, Nathaniel 



Kimball, Richard, Ens. 



Ladd, Daniel 
Lancaster, Ebenezer 



Lancaster, John 
Lowell, John 



Marble, Caleb 
Massey, Jonathan, Sergt. 
McGlauthlon, Thomas M. 
•McNellie, John 
Merrill, Daniel P. 
Merrill, David, fifer 
Merrill, John, Jr. 



Messer, Daniel 
Messer, David 
Morel and, James 
Moreland, John 
Moreland, William 
Morse, Asa 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



247 



Nevins, David 
Nickerson, James 



Noyes, Friend 



*Parsons, Stephen 
Pattee, Laommi 
Pattee, Seth, Corp. 
Pattee, William 



* Perry, William 
Pike, Nathaniel 
Toor, Moses 



*Roque, Bryan 
*Rowell, Israel 



Rowell, James 
*Rowell, Lemuel 



Silver, Daniel 

Silver, David 

Silver, Jacob 

Silver, Samuel 

Smith, Jonathan 

Smith, Margaret 

Smith, Samuel 



Smith, Solomon 

Smith, William 

Smith, William, Jr. 

Stanwood, Daniel 

Stanwood, Nehemiah 

Swan, Timothy 

Stevens, Jonathan (or John) 



Templeton, Samuel 

Thissell, Josiah 

Thorn, William 

Webster, James 

Webster, Nathan 

Wheeler, Abijah, Lt. 
*Wheeler, Abner, drummer 

Wheeler, Warren 

Woodbury, Benjamin, Sergt. 

Woodbury, Ebenezer 
*Woodbury, Elisha, Capt. 
* Woodbury, Elisha, Jr. 



Woodbury, Henry 
Woodbury, Israel 
Woodbury, Israel, Jr. 
Woodbury, James 
"'Woodbury, Jonathan 
*Woodbury, Luke, Ens. 
Woodbury, William 
Woodman, Abner 
Woodman, John 
Young, James 
Young, Ward Clark 



It is to be understood that the foregoing list is taken entirely 
from state papers on file in Concord. The incomplete nature of 
all records of that period, however, forbids the conclusion that 
all soldiers from Salem are here included. Doubtless many 
others served in the Continental army, and we have very good 
evidence in a few such cases. One set of returns to the town 



248 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

authorities, in fact the only returns found on the town records, 
gives the following ten names together with eleven which are 
included in the preceding list: 

Andrews, John Jordan, Eleazer 

Bradbury, Daniel Pattee, James Paul 

Campbell, Daniel Symonds, James 

Crosden, "William Taylor, William 

Haywood, John Wheeler, Isaiah 

There are also others which are found in no official records that 
we have examined, but which nevertheless are supported by 
sufficient evidence to establish beyond a doubt their services in 
the Revolution. Among these may be found names as follows: 

Austin, Moses Rollins, Moses 

Kimball, Oliver Runnells, Thomas 

Kimball, Oliver, Jr. Woodbury, Daniel 

Another valiant soldier, who made a fine record for bravery 
and skill as an officer during the war, was Col. James Gilmore. 
He did not enlist from this town, however, but lived in Windham 
near the southwest end of Policy Pond. But after the war he 
came to Salem and resided in the north part of the town in the 
house still standing and known as the Obadiah Duston house. 

That the spirit of the war had invaded all minds cannot be 
better attested than by the fact that this little town furnished to 
the army at least one hundred and fifty-five men, although the 
war census showed the total male population of military age to 
be only one hundred and ninety-eight. 

In these stirring scenes and exciting times men who were 
loyal to the cause of the colonies kept a watchful eye upon all 
who were from any cause suspected of sympathizing with the 
British. A committee was organized in each colony for the pur- 
pose of checking any form of action on the part either of individ- 
uals or parties which might be inimical to the cause of liberty. 
This body was known as the Committee of Safety. In New 
Hampshire, Col. Josiah Bartlett was chairman, and the head- 
quarters was at Exeter. 

The judgments of this committee were very stern, frequently 
involving considerable terms of imprisonment for persons con- 







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MILITARY HISTORY. 249 

victed before it. This fact caused some cases to be brought to a 
hearing which were not founded upon any valid grounds for 
action. The most flagrant offense was attacking the government 
of the colonies in any of its branches. Almost as bad was an 
expression of opinion favorable to the interests of Great Britain. 
It will be seen that these grave charges might reasonably be 
brought against men who were the most loyal to their country. 
For it is well known that in every liberal form of government 
an inevitable feature of the political life is the opposition to the 
party in power. And the more sane and resolute this oppo- 
sition, the higher the degree of perfection to be expected in 
administration of affairs. Moreover, the opposition must have 
liberty to express opinions, in order that any mismanagement 
may be exposed and made to feel the force of public opinion. 

In the period which we are studying the man who would 
express dissatisfaction with existing conditions of public man- 
agement must needs expose himself to the liability of arrest and 
trial on the charge of being an enemy to the state. And in the 
face of all the problems and difficulties of the great struggle mat- 
ters were of course most likely to be in a condition which would 
evoke criticism. This furnished an opportunity for unscrupu- 
lous men to find a means of vengeance upon those with whom 
they were at variance. 

If such a man bore a grudge against another he and his friends 
would endeavor to provoke the opponent to criticism of the 
government or army. After that it was not difficult to prefer 
charges to the Committee of Safety. This was by no means an 
uncommon practice, nor was the committee relieved of the ardu- 
ous duty of investigating and checking many real menaces to 
the welfare of the state. The most important case from Salem 
which was entered was the widely known prosecution of Robert 
Young. 

ROBERT YOUNG CASE. 

This case presented some very exceptional features. The prin- 
cipal was a man who was most zealous in his interest in public 
affairs, who had held many offices of responsibility and trust in 
the town, and who had the courage to speak his convictions in 



250 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

unmistakable terms. Many of the leading men of the town 
were involved in the case, some for and others against the de- 
fendant. For some time the whole community was wrought up 
over the features of the case as they developed through the evi- 
dence presented. This evidence, mostly in the form of deposi- 
tions, is here presented, as best able to tell the story. 

The trouble seems to have begun about the time Rev. Samuel 
Fletcher first instituted the preaching of the Baptist doctrine in 
the town. Young evidently did not hold views in accord with 
those presented and probably was not backward in so stating. 
This was not pleasing to many of the followers of the worthy 
preacher, and caused them to harbor unpleasant feelings toward 
this opponent. Dr. Moody Morse was one of the aggrieved party 
and was ready to take Young to task for his insolence. Morse 
was a candidate for appointment, by the Congress of New Hamp- 
shire, as justice of the peace in the province. Young's remarks 
regarding this office furnished Morse a pretext for bringing com- 
plaint before the Committee of Safety. The result was the issue 
of a warrant for the arrest of Young : 

"State of New ) In Com tee of Safety. 

Hampshire C Exeter, Aug st 18 th 1781. 
"Sir. 

' ' You will receive herewith a Warrant for apprehending Robert 
Young of Salem, which you are requested to deliver or convey 
to the Officers most likely to do the business effectually. Some 
names of Witnesses are inserted in the Summons & if it shall ap- 
pear to you by examining the List of evidences that any material 
ones are omitted you are directed to put in their names, provided 
the number added shall not exceed two or three. 

"I am &c 

"John Calfe, Esq r . 
"State of New } In Com tee of Safety. 

Hampshire X Exeter, August 18, 1781. 

"To the Sheriff of the County of Rockingham his Under 
Sheriff or Deputy or either of the constables for the Town of 
Salem in said State — 

' ' Greeting — 

"Whereas information has been given to this Committee, that 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



251 



Robert Young of Salem in the County aforesaid yeoman has been 
guilty of sundry Practices inimical to the United States, 
' ' Therefore — 

"You are hereby required in the Name of the Government & 
People of said State forthwith to apprehend the body of the 
said Robert Young if he may be found in your Precinct, and 
bring him as soon as may be before the Committee of Safety for 
this state to be examined touching the matters alledged against 
him that he may be dealt with as to justice may appertain. 
Hereof fail not and make Return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon. M. Weare, Presid 1 

"Please to Summons for Evidence 

Moody Morse, of Salem, Gentleman 
Stephen Currier do Yeoman 
Thomas Dow do do 

Thaddeus Butler, of Pelham, Physician 
Abbott Pettingill do Gentleman 

Evan Jones Do Do 

Philip Rowell of Salem, Yeoman 
Israel Rowell Do Do 

Timothy Dustin Do Do 

William Duty Do Do 

Jesse Webster Do Do 

Henry Sanders Do Do 

Nathaniel Woodman Do Do 
Phineas Gordon Do Do 

Timothy Ladd Esq. of Salem 
Oliver Emerson of Methuen, Currier 
Abner Wheeler of Salem Yeoman 
Silas Wheeler of Salem Do 
Samuel Merrill of Haverhill, Gent n 
John Cochran of Windham Yeoman 
James Cochran Do Do 

Peter Harris of Methuen Yeoman" 

Several of these witnesses sent their testimony in writing. 
Enough of it is here presented to show the character of the state- 
ments against the defendant. The above names were, however, 



252 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

submitted by Moody Morse, and were designed to furnish a 
strong chain of convicting evidence. 

Meantime there seems to have been no attempt to take Young 
into custody. He still held his place of prominence in town, 
and kept his former political backers. This in itself shows that 
his guilt was not an acknowledged fact. But to put on the 
finishing touch of injury to his opponents, he was a leader at the 
town meeting held on October 8, 1781, to take action on the 
lawsuit against the town by Samuel Fletcher, Abraham Dow 
and Jeremiah Dow. At this meeting Young was chosen one of 
a committee to choose men to ' ' referee ' ' the trial of this lawsuit. 

On November 2 a second warrant was issued for his arrest. It 
was then decided to hold his trial November 29. Accordingly a 
new summons was issued for witnesses. But this time the com- 
mittee had names of many citizens who were ready to defend 
Young. This list, taken with the one above, will indicate the 
large number of public men of Salem who were involved in this 
controversy. 

Summons issued November 23, 1781, by Josiah Bartlett, chair- 
man of the Committee of Safety, to Rev. Abner Bayley, Nathan- 
iel Peabody, Samuel Little, Abraham Dow, Josiah Gage, John 
Allen, Benjamin Town, Edward Petty, Jonathan Tenney, Thomas 
Douglas, John Hall, John Kelly, Nathaniel Pettingill, John Pet- 
tingill, William Thorn, Thomas Runnells, Capt. Benjamin Bixby, 
Samuel Clement, John Heath, and Asa Greeley Tenney, Henry 
Little to appear before the committee at Exeter on Thursday, 
November 29, 1781, to give evidence relative to Robert Young. 

When the trial opened the depositions of the witnesses were 
presented. One of these in particular, though not committed to 
either party, shows the true character of the controversy. It 
was from the Rev. Abner Bayley, who had watched with anxiety 
and pain the growing schism in his people. It ran thus : 

"Gent n 

"My Age, declining State of Health, connections &c I hope 
will sufficiently excuse my not waiting on you. As to the affair 
before you relating to Robert Young I suppose you will concur 
with me that to suppress prejudices & a party Spirit & see to it 




LIEUT. COL. JOHN R. WHEELER. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 253 

the Laws are carried into due execution are the best methods to 
promote our religious & political Safety. 

' ' Your Humble Servant 

"Abner Bayley 
"To the Hon ble the Committee of Safety at Exeter." 

In the following depositions by the accusers may be seen the 
spirit or feeling which lay at the bottom of the whole matter. 
Each is evidently drawn up along the lines of the others, and the 
element of suspicion forms a heavy part of the evidence. 

"The Deposition of Moses White of Lawfull Age to testify & 
to say that I being at the House of Robert Young on Feb. 1 th 1777 
Then & there Heard the s d Young say, That he thought, that the 
Present unhappy Day was brought upon us by Handcocks & 
Adams, & that they ware the leaders of faction, that they ware a 
bringing the Poor People all into Slavery, that they ought to 
have their Heads Taken off, for they only wanted to be made 
Kings & Rulers, that the Congress of New Hampshire had been 
Setting all the last summer had done nothing only voated one 
another into office & Run the Province Twelve Thousand Pounds 
into Debt, & that one of the Presidents of the Congress had told 
him as much, That they had been at him after Rates but he swore 
that he was not agoing to pay any till they ware Lavy nd Consti- 
tutunally, That the Congress of New Hampshire was agoing to 
Choose a Justis of Peace for the Town of Salem that he under- 
stood it Lay d between Doct r Morse & Mr. Hall, that he did not 
begruteh him the office, for in less than a year he would loose 
his Head, — That they ware agoing on at Cambridge to Ruin us 
all, that they ware a percel of Pickpockets, that he thought it 
necessary that the People Should Rise & Desperce our army or 
make them alter their Course, that one halfe of their Province 
ware of his Oppinion, That if we had delivered up Handcock 
& Adams when Gen 1 Burgoyne wrote out a Letter to Gen 1 Lee 
things would have been Settled before this time and further saith 
not. 

"April 15, 1776 Moses White 

"Swan to before Moody Morse at Salem April 15, 1776" 

There is a glaring inconsistency in dates in this document. 



254 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

White testifies that the statements of Robert Young here con- 
tained were uttered February 1, 1777, while his deposition is 
made and witnessed April 15, 1776, or nearly one year earlier. 
Either the 1776 should be 1778, an error having been made in 
recording the evidence, or Moody Morse made a bad mistake 
here. It does not seem likely that so astute a practitioner as he 
would let so evident an error slip by him. 

"This may Certify whom it may Concern that the Subscriber 
have heard Robert Young Say that he heard the Hessians ware 
Coming! & he wished to God they ware here now! & that he 
would not fight the British Troops till they had Got this side 
Merrimack river, nor then till they had got this side the State 
line ; & that he nor none of his would go into the army : and that 
I have a Strong Susspicion he is Carring on enemical Plans 
against the United States. 

"Jeremiah Dow" 

' ' This may Certify whom it may Concern that we the subscrib- 
ers heard Robert Young say he wished the British Troops had 
the Congress and Dam them they would have them soon ; also he 
was always Against the French & am Still : & he 'd take up Arms 
to go & fight them Any time and have heard said Young Curse 
the French Sundry times : we have heard him Curse the General 
Court & say they ware a Cussed Corrupt Court they kupt ye 
Divil at helm ; also have heard him tell the Soldiers they ware 
Cussed fools if they marched one Step till they had all their 
money for the State are Sunk now we also Suspect Said Young 
Carring on enemical Plans Against the United States. 

"Also that he Said he was always against the Common Cause 
of the Country & am still & every farthing of money that was 
taken from him was against his will "Moody Morse 

"William Duty" 

After fixing up this last piece of evidence Morse obtained 
from his friend Evan Jones a deposition to show Young's atti- 
tude toward the recruiting of soldiers, to which work he had 
frequently been assigned. 

"This may Certify whom it may Concern that I the Sub- 
scriber heard Robert Young Say he would be Drawn in Quarters 



MILITARY HISTORY. 255 

Before he would Comply with Such Damm d Arbitrary Acts as 
to (Class [?]) to get Soldiers; have also heard him Curse the 
French; I Still Suspect him the S d Young to be Practiseing 
Against the Common Cause of Amarica 

"Evan Jones." 

This concludes the important evidence brought against the 
defendant. There was a great deal of testimony at the hearing 
which was of no real significance, while many witnesses had 
stories very much like the preceding depositions. It may be 
seen that one of the heinous crimes of those times was to "curse 
the French." And this is not to be wondered at when we con- 
sider the important part played by the government and army 
of France in the winning of independence for the American 
colonies. And there was also a force operating among the com- 
mon people of the country which perhaps eclipsed the gratitude 
due for these official acts, namely the admiration for and appre- 
ciation of brilliant individual services by such men as Jean de 
Lafayette. 

Among the documents which threw light on the testimony was 
a letter written in the early part of the proceedings, in which 
the writer attempted to deprive the prisoner of the privilege of 
consultation with his friends. 

' ' To the Hon ble Comittee of Safety for the State of New Hamp- 
shire: I have the inclosed papers [depositions against Young] 
on hand, Send them to your Honors for further Consideration; 
they not being in full to what may be said on the matter, but 
think if matters are conducted with Prudence Something will 
Appear of Consequence ; When the man be apprehended Should 
think proper that the officer have Orders that he Speak to nobody 
Especially his friend as to Political Affairs 

"Am with Due Kegards. 

"Your H'ble 

"Moody Morse." 

We present also four depositions for the defense, one of which 
is signed by three prominent men. These show clearly the 
other side of the evidence, and might be supposed to have great 
weight with the Committee, coming as they do from men who 
express their opinions with due deliberation and fairness. Let 



256 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

the reader, after following the evidence, judge the case for him- 
self and see if he does not concur with the committee in its 
finding. 

"Salem, Nov. 28, 1781. 

"Gent m I am old & not well & therefore cant wait on you. 
But as to Robert Young I know of nothing in his conversation 
& conduct Enimical to the united states & accordingly he has 
been frequently improved as a committeeman in Town business 
to good acceptance. 

"John Hall. 

"To the Hon bIe the Committee of Safety at Exeter" 
"Gents — I by summons am Inform 3 that there has Ben a 
Complaint Exhibited against Robert Young; My business and 
helth Will not admit of my Personally Appearing; therefore I 
must Communicate my Sentiments in writing. Respecting Mr. 
Youngs Polliticle Sentiment; I have had an Intermate acquaint- 
ance with him and He allways appear 3 friendly Government 
And Good Society that he dispis d those that are not friends to it 
he appears to be a Strenuous Opposer to the present Desorders 
that Have arisen in this Town in Perticulor He has Repetedly 
ben chosen a Committee man to hire Soldiers and other Town 
business to good Exceptance That the Complaint that is Caried 
in against Mr. Young appears to me to be out of Prejudice 

"Thomas Runnels" 

"Gen* Our business is Such that we cannot Leavit But hav- 
ing Ben Inform 3 by Summons that there has been a Complaint 
Enter 3 Against Robert Young; by Doct r Moody Morse; which 
Complaint it Seems He Indevours in Part to Support by his 
own Evidence think it our Duty to Give you an Idea of his 
Common Caharactar (with Respect to truth) we Stand ready 
to support it that it has ben Common with him to raise and 
Spread fals Slanderous reports of his Neighbours; more Aspe- 
cially where there has Prejudices arisen This we Suppose to be 
the Case Respecting Robert Young who Has appear 3 to be a 
Stranuous opposer of Disorders that Have arisen in this Town ; 
of which Doc 1 Morse has ben A Prinsable promoter; we further 




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MILITARY HISTORY. 257 

Declare that it has been Reported that in his appeals to Heaven 

he has Gone Beside the truth. 

"Thad 8 Butler 
"Henry Little 
"Jonath 11 Tenny 

"To the Committee of Safty at Exeter." 

' ' To the Honourable Committee of Safty now siting at Exeter 
— Gentlemen, I have Rec d a Summons from Your Honours to 
appear on thursday the 29 th of this Instant For to give in Evi- 
dence Relating to what I know of Mr Robert Young- being 
Enimical to the United States and by Reason of the badness of 
the Weather and other surcomstances I Cannot attend, but this 
may Certify that I have been Intimately acquainted with Mr. 
Young he has been a Committee for the purpose of Raising men 
for the Carrying on the war against the Common Enemy and 
gave the greatest satisfaction to the Town and has always paid 
his proportion of Tax for that purpose, and I have often heard 
him Say he would Do any thing in his power to promote the 
good of the Cuntry, and from all I Can learn the Complaint 
has been Exhibited wholly on account of his not agreeing with 
those which follow one Fletcher who has set up Preaching and 
Exhorting in the Town 

"John Kelly 

"Adkinson Nov r 24 th 1781" 

The finding of the committee indicates the impression among 
the members that the charges against Young were not sustained 
by the evidence presented. Doubtlsss he had said some uncom- 
plimentary things about the government, but it was through a 
desire for improvement rather than in a spirit of antagonism. 
The spirit in which remarks of such a nature are made could 
easily be misrepresented. The Committee have thus recorded 
their action: 

"This day Robert Young appeared before this Committee, 
who was apprehended on Suspicion of being inimical to this 
and the United States; after examining Sundry Evidence Or- 
dered that the said Robert Young should give Bonds for his 
good Behavior and that he should appear before the General 

18 



258 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Court or their Committee when called thereto. Which Bond 
was given in presence of said Committee of Safety. 

"C. S. Nov. 30, 1781." 

The Committee seem to have been justified by the outcome of 
Young's period of probation, for no more complaint was made 
against him, and in less than a year his bond was released. 

"Robert Young requesting of this Committee that his Bond 
might be given up. It is the Opinion of this Committee that 
as he is acquitted, said Bond might be given up, which was 
accordingly done. 

"C. S. Sept. 7, 1782." 

In connection with this and other similar cases it is interest- 
ing to note a sequel. In 1787 Joshua Clement and others sent 
to the General Court a petition against Moody Morse, Esq., for 
maladministration of his duties as Justice of the Peace. They 
had plenty of direct evidence of his abuse of his power. After 
deliberation on the facts of the case the Court decreed the im- 
peachment of Morse. 

We wish that personalities might have been excluded from 
this treatment of the case of Robert Young. The incident is of 
importance more because it sets forth the tension of public feel- 
ing and discloses a few of the internal causes of dissatisfaction, 
than that it has to do with the prosecution of an offender. That 
there were valid grounds for criticism of governmental acts 
there is no doubt. But a just criticism, from an impetuous 
man, might appear almost anarchistic in its tendency. From 
another viewpoint the case is important as exposing the extreme 
partisanship that was rampant in our town at this time, rather 
than that it is a quarrel of a few of the citizens. Under such 
strained relations in a community men are liable to go beside 
themselves in their zeal to make their cause triumphant. 

As an illustration of the incongruities of this period of inter- 
regnum we may refer to a case earlier in the war. It seems well 
nigh incredible that Capt. Elisha Woodbury, the hero of Bunker 
Hill, should have been sent to prison on a charge of disloyalty, 
less than three years after that battle. Yet such was the case, 
as is witnessed by the action of the Committee of Safety: 

"A warrant was issued from the Committee in consequence of 



MILITARY HISTORY. 259 

which Elisha Woodbury was apprehended & examined & sent 
to prison. 

"C..S. Nov. 13, 1777." 

After vainly trying to obtain a release he sent a petition the 
next April to the Committee, asking permission to appear before 
them. They gave him license to appear before the Court of 
General Sessions sitting at Portsmouth. This did not accom- 
plish anything immediate, and in June he sent another petition. 

"The Committee upon reading the petition of Capt. Elisha 
Woodbury of Salem praying to be liberated &c 

"Voted, That a letter be sent to the Selectmen & Committee 
of said Town, Notifying them that Woodbury was to be heard 
upon s d Petition on Thursday y e 9 th Instant &c also gave a per- 
mit for said Woodbury to appear before the Committee at the 
Time above mentioned 

"C. S. July 1, 1778." 

"The committee liberated Capt. Elisha Woodbury from his 
Confinement to the Town of Salem he having taken the oath 
of fidelity to the States. 

"C. S. July 9, 1778." 

Whatever may have been his words or actions, it is difficult 
for us to believe the captain had any desire for harm to the 
cause of the colonies. His earnest effort to exonerate himself 
before the Committee is an indication that he had been misinter- 
preted and his attitude toward the country misconstrued. 

After the war, during the period of reconstruction, many 
vexing problems involving political and civic strife presented 
themselves for solution. We shall leave all such for treatment 
under the proper chapter heads and endeavor to follow the 
military interests through the early history of the new nation. 

A militia has been maintained in the state of New Hampshire 
during most of the years since the Revolution. The early 
records, however, are extremely meagre, giving little or no 
information of a detailed nature. 

By act of the General Court, Nov. 11, 1784, the militia of 
Salem was put into the Seventh Regiment of the state. On 
Dec. 27, 1792, it was transferred to the Eighth Regiment, Sec- 
ond Battalion, in which it has since been enrolled. 



'260 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

We know nothing of the militia of those days, since not even 
at the adjutant-general's office are there any records. Even 
in the War of 1812 the names of Salem soldiers are entirely 
wanting. In fact, no companies were enlisted in the towns for 
this war, and of the individual soldiers who took part the 
addresses are not given in the records. Doubtless some men 
from Salem were enlisted in the army at that time. However, 
the town records have an entry of a vote taken in 1815 to pay 
twelve dollars per month for "those of the militia who went in 
defence of Portsmouth." But there is no list of the men who 
received pay under this vote. In the years directly following 
the war there was an increased interest in the militia, and com- 
panies were formed in nearly all of the towns. The state took 
the matter in hand in a systematic way in 1820 by the passage 
of an act intended to unify and centralize the service. Such 
sections of this act as are necessary to show the plan of organ- 
ization are here given. Arrangements for musters are included 
in the act, as well as conditions of exemption from duty. Men 
might, by furnishing sufficient evidence of cause, be excused 
from military duty either conditionally or absolutely. All other 
male citizens of requisite age must serve. Any one conditionally 
excused must pay two dollars a year — namely physicians and 
those who have held commissions in the militia of any state in 
the Union for a less term than four years. Those who might 
be absolutely excused included all federal officers; all stage- 
drivers and ferrymen carrying United States mail; all pilots 
and mariners; all officers of the state or of any college or acad- 
emy; all ministers; all judges and registers; all who have held 
commission in the militia of any state for a term of four years: 
all fire engine men not exceeding eighteen to an engine ; and all 
persons of the religious denomination of Quakers or Shakers. 
It was also provided that the towns should furnish rations for 
their troops at muster. The other important features are con- 
tained in the following extract: 

"State of New Hampshire 

"In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 

twenty 
"An Act for forming, arranging and regulating the Militia 




GEORGE 0. GORDON, 



MILITARY HISTORY. 261 

"Sec 2 And be it further enacted 

' ' 8 — That the companies in the Towns of Londonderry, Salem, 
Pelham and Windham shall constitute the eighth regiment 

"Sec 3 

' ' 3 — And be it further enacted That the eighth, eleventh, sev- 
enteenth, eighteenth and thirty eighth regiments shall compose 
the third brigade 

"Sec 4 And be it further enacted That each and every free, 
able bodied white male citizen of this State resident therin, who 
now is or here after shall be of the age of eighteen years and 
under the age of forty five years, or who may hereafter come 
to reside in this State (except such as are herein after absolutely 
excused) shall severally and respectfully be enrolled in the 
militia by the Captain or commanding officer of the Company 
within whose bounds such citizens shall reside, . 

"Sec 9. And be it further enacted. That every commanding 
officer of a Company shall parade his company on the first Tues- 
day of May annually at one of the Clock in the afternoon, for 
the purpose of inspecting, examining and taking an exact ac- 
count of all equipments of his men and for correcting his com- 
pany roll, in order that a thorough inspection of each Company 
in the State may be made. 

"Sec 41. And be it further enacted That the Colonels or 
commanding Officers of the several regiments shall assemble the 
officers of their respective regiments at some convenient and 
central place within the same, once at least every year armed 
with swords, muskets and bayonets; and it shall be the duty of 
the commanding officers aforesaid to instruct or cause said offi- 
cers to be instructed by some person qualified therefor, in the 
lefsons of the soldier, the squad, the platoon the company and 
the battalion, the notice for such meetings to be ifsued to the 
officers in the same manner as for regimental muster. 

"Sec 44. And be it further enacted That each regiment 
shall turn out for inspection and review once in every year and 
no more ; which shall be between the first day of September and 
the fifteenth day of October : and the respective major generals 
shall sometime in the month of July in each year ifsue their 
orders to the brio-adier generals within their divisions directing 



262 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

them to order the several regiments in their brigade, at such 
times within the time specified in this act as such major general 
shall direct: and the brigadier generals receiving such orders 
shall on or before the twentieth day of August of each year, in 
brigade orders, ifsue the same to the several Colonels composing 
their brigades, accompanied with such directions relative to 
their discipline as they may think proper to make, leaving it dis- 
cretionary with the field officer of the respective regiments to 
appoint the place of meeting and no Colonel or commanding 
officer of a regiment shall oblige to call out his regiment without 
such order. And it shall be the duty of each major-general to 
review at least three of the regiments composing his division in 
each year : and the brigadier generals shall review such regiments 
in their brigades as shall not be reviewed by the major generals : 
So that each regiment called out agreeably to the provisions of 
this act shall be reviewed either by its major general or its 
brigadier general. 
"Dec 21. 1820 

"Samuel Bell Gov." 

There had been companies in town previous to the passage of 
this act, but this brought the muster into full sway as far as out 
of town companies were concerned. In the same year of this 
enactment a muster had been held on the "Little Land," so 
called, the broad plain just west of the old Tom Nevins place 
(now owned by Morton L. Smith) on the road from Salem 
Village to Canobie Lake. 

The militia companies were not uniformed, but had as accou- 
trements a gun, knapsack, canteen and cartridge box. Thomas 
D. Lancaster tells us they were "a pretty hard looking set," 
and by picturing in our minds a heterogeneous collection of 
humanity from the shops and farms, clad in all the varying 
qualities of homespun clothes, we can readily agree with him. 

At first the men received thirty-one cents each from the town 
on muster days to purchase a dinner. But this was increased 
in 1835: "Voted to authorize the selectmen to pay the soldiers 
and officers of this town 19 cents in addition to the legal require- 
ment of 31 cents for muster days." Muster day attracted large 
crowds. The visitors came in the morning and stayed until the 



MILITARY HISTORY. 263 

troops departed in the evening. There were nine or ten com- 
panies in a regiment, and the local companies assembled in 
Salem, Londonderry, Derry and Pelham in different years. In 
Salem musters were held on four level tracts of land near the 
village : the ' ' Little Land ' ' above referred to ; the Marston land, 
which took in the square enclosed by Lawrence Road, Main 
Street, around by the bridge by the old cemetery to the river, 
most of the houses which now fringe this lot having been built 
more recently; "Kelly's Plains," east of the Isaiah Kelly place 
(now W. E. Bodwell's) ; and "Clendenin's Plains," on the low 
plateau north of the schoolhouse at the village, formerly a part 
of the farm of John Clendenin, who lived in the house now 
owned by Clinton L. Silver. 

In Pelham the muster ground was near the tavern of Joshua 
Atwood, who was an officer in the militia. He is described as a 
huge man, weighing three hundred and twenty-five pounds, and 
looking a veritable giant when mounted on his large horse. 

On one occasion the boys thought it would make the muster 
more like the real thing if they could introduce a little camp 
life. So they procured tents and went over to Pelham the night 
before the muster. But unfortunately a severe frost which was 
running ahead of schedule time struck the town the same night, 
causing a panic in the camp of the invaders and a disorderly 
retreat to a nearby store, where the friendly offices of an ancient 
stove enabled the leaders to reorganize their forces before the 
break of day. 

A full list of the officers of the Salem companies, in so far as 
they are given in the records of the adjutant-general, is presented 
here. Of the early records we have only the name of Abraham 
Dow, who was lieutenant-colonel in the Twentieth Regiment in 
1787, '88, '89. The others are in the Eighth Regiment. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS OF EIGHTH REGIMENT. 
Name. Rank. Date of Commission. 

John Kelly Major June 16, 1825 

Lieut.-Col. June 30, 1826 

Colonel June 26, 1827 

Thornton Betton Paymaster July 17, 1826 

Adjutant Sept. 5, 1827 



264 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Date of Commission. 


Thornton Betton 


Major 


Oct. 14, 1831 




< i 


Lieut.-Col. 


June 21, 1832 


William B. Merrill 


Colonel 


June 25, 1833 


Asa S. 


Austin • 


Lieut.-Col. 


Sept. 4, 1837 


Ira W 


. King 


C i 


July 18, 1842 


William L. Bradford 


Major 


July 1, 1843 


John R. Wheeler 


Lieut.-Col. 


Jan. 1, 1845 


John I 


i. Clendenin 


Major 


Dec. 27, 1848 




i t 


Lieut.-Col. 


June 30, 1849 




< i 


Colonel 


June 28, 1850 


John A. Messer 


Adjutant . 


July 30, 1850 


John , 


Ayer 


Quartermaster 


April 9, 1851 


Frederick Kimball 


Paymaster 


April 9, 1851 






CAVALRY. 




Charles Pattee 


1st Lieut. 


April 7, 1819 




i i 


Captain 


April 16, 1830 


Seth Emerson 


2d Lieut. 


June 30, 1821 




< i 


1st Lieut. 


May 24, 1822 


Andrew Clendenin 


Captain 


May 24, 1822 


Daniel Bradford 


Cornet 


April 7, 1823 




FOURTH COMPANY INFANTRY. 


Date. 


Capt. 


Lieut. 


Ensign. 


1815 


Samuel Emerson 






1816 


David Messer 


Richard Woodbury 


John Kelly 


1817 


Richard Woodbury John Kelly 


Asa Woodbury 


1822 


John Kelly 


Asa Woodbury 


John Smith 


1824 


John Kelly 


John Smith 


Sam'l Gorrill 


1825 


John Smith 


Sam'l Gorrill 


Ezekiel Foster 


1827 




Jonathan Kimball 


Wm. S. Merrill 


1828 


Wm, S. Merrill 


Sam'l B. Pettingill 


( Sam'l B. Pettingill 
I Mark H. Webster 


1830 


Sam'l Pettingill 


Mark Webster 


John A. Messer 


1831 


Mark Webster 


John A. Messer 


Edward Cook 


1832 


John A. Messer 


Edward Cook 


John Haseltine 


1834 


Edward Cook 


John Haseltine 


Gardner Cross 


1834 


John Haseltine 


Gardner Cross 


Asa S. Austin 


1835 




Asa S. Austin 


Joseph Gage 


1836 


Asa S. Austin 


Joseph Gage 


Isaiah Woodbury 


1837 


Isaiah Woodbury 


Washington Kimball 


Isaac Thorn 




CO 



< 

D 

a 

D 

o 

Q 
i— i 




K 

Q 

Q 

P3 
M 

h- 1 
(J 



MILITARY HISTORY. 



265 



Date. 


Capt. 


Lieut. 


Ensign. 


1839 


Isaac Thorn 


Washington Kimball 


Wm. L. Bradford 


1840 




Wm. L. Bradford 


James M. Haynes 


1841 


Wm. L. Bradford 


James M. Haynes 


Lowell Reed 


In 1841 this was chanc 


;ed to the Third Company. 


1842 




Lowell Reed 


Josiah Cluff 


1843 


Lowell Reed 


Josiah Cluff 


Wm. B. Gage 


1845 


Josiah Cluff 


Wm. B. Gage 


Leverett Silver 


1845 




Leverett Silver 


Stephen Bailey 


1847 


Leverett Silver 


Stephen Bailey 


Philip Ayer 


1849 


Stephen Bailey 


Philip Ayer 


Andrew J. Silver 


1850 


Philip Ayer 


Andrew J. Silver 


John Q. Adams 


1851 


Andrew J. Silver 


John Q. Adams 


Robert B. Lowell 


1854 


Levi Cluff, Jr. 







NINTH COMPANY INFANTRY. 

Caleb Wheeler was captain of cavalry in this company in 
1819, having been lieutenant in 1815. The infantry officers 
were as follows: 



Date. 


Capt. 


Lieut. 


Ensign. 


1815 


Edmund Adams 


James Webster 


Same 


1817 


David Currier 


Isaac Wheeler 


Same 


1819 


Isaac Wheeler 


Caleb Duston 


Same 


1822 




John Russ 


Isaiah A. Duston 


1823 


John Russ 


Isaiah Duston 


Abiatha Wheeler 


1824 




Abiatha Wheeler 




1825 


Abiatha Wheeler 


David Allen, Jr. 


Hiram Allen 


1827 


David Allen, Jr. 


Hiram Allen 


Israel W. Hall 


1829 


Hiram Allen 


Israel W. Hall 


Benaiah Gordon 


1830 


Israel W. Hall 


Benaiah Gordon 


Asa Taylor 


1832 


Benaiah Gordon 


Asa Taylor 


Joshua Webster 


1833 


Joshua Webster 


Moody Foster 


Wm. E. Lancaster 


1834 


Wm. E. Lancaster 




John Russ 


1835 


John Russ 


Luther Emerson, Jr. 


Sam'l Woodbury 


1836 


Luther Emerson, Jr, 


, Sam'l Woodbury 


Simon A. Harris 


1837 


Sam'l Woodbury 


Simon Harris 


William L. Russ 


1838 


Wm. L. Russ 


Nathaniel Bailey 


Phineas Corning 


1839 




Phineas Corning 


Horace Noyes 


1840 


Ira W. King 


John R. Wheeler 


Gilman Stickney 


In 1840 this company 


was made the Eighth 


Company. 


1842 


John R. Wheeler 


Rawson Coburn 


Nathaniel H. Paul 


1845 


Rawson Coburn 


Nathaniel Paul 


Ebenezer G. Duston 


1847 


Stillman Simons 


Ebenezer Duston 


David D. Bailey 


1848 


Ebenezer Duston 


Thomas D. Lancaster 


Richard Taylor 


1850 




John W. Wheeler 


Matthew H. Taylor 


1851 


John W. Wheeler 


Matthew H. Taylor 


John G. Duston 



266 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

In connection with this company there is record of a notice 
of a muster: 

"To the selectmen of the Town of Salem, 

"You are hereby notified that the regimental muster for the 
Eighth regiment, will take place at Pelham, near Joshua At- 

wood's Tavern, in the town of , on the fourteenth day 

of September, and that the number of men liable to do duty in 
the 8 company of Infantry in said regiment under my command 
is fifty. 

"Salem, August 26, 1843, 

"John R. Wheeler 

"Captain or Commanding Officer of said Company." 

Even a superficial examination of these lists of officers is suf- 
ficient to enable one to locate the two companies in the town. 
Just as the line of division was between the north and south 
parts when the militia companies were first organized, during* 
the early years of the Revolution, so also was it when the state 
troops were reorganized. The Fourth (later the Third) Com- 
pany was the south command, while the Ninth (later the Eighth) 
Company was from the northern part of the town. But the 
line was by no means rigidly defined, and frequently men and 
officers of one company lived in the other part of the town. 

There was a company of artillery in the Eighth Regiment, 
composed largely of men from towns other than Salem. In its 
earlier days, before the organization of the "Salem Guards." 
Salem contributed largely to its list of men and officers. The 
following officers are noted: 



Date. 


Capt. 


First Lieut. 


Second Lieut. 


1819 






Benj. "Woodbury 


1821 




Benj. Woodbury 


Thomas Duston 


1823 


Thomas Duston 


Simeon Duston 




1825 


Simeon Duston 






1831 






John Dunlap 


1832 




John Dunlap 


Obediah Duston 


1834 


Obediah Duston 







Perhaps the most interesting of all the Salem military organ- 
izations, certainly of those not enlisted in time of war, is the 
"Salem Guards Artillery Company." When we speak of ser- 
vice to the state or nation, of course we do not compare this 



MILITARY HISTORY. 267 

company with the bodies of men who followed the stars and 
stripes through the terrible years subsequent to 1775 and 1861. 
That would be most remote from our purpose. But for pic- 
turesque individuality the Guards certainly are entitled to the 
first award. 

To begin with, it was an independent organization, in no way 
affiliated with other such interests in the state. Also it was 
purely local. It was organized by John Leverett Clendenin,. 
who was for many years the most prominent man in Salem in 
many respects. The company was designed for the duty ex- 
pressed by its name — that of guarding the town of Salem. 
Therefore the town paid for the services at muster and on other 
occasions. The armament consisted of a six-pounder brass can- 
non, which was very carefully lodged in a gunhouse built oppo- 
site Clendenin 's house near the later site of the home of the late 
Abraham H. Merrill, now the property of Charles H. Allen. 
This gunhouse was moved in 1853 to its present site near the 
Temple Roberts place on Bluff Street. 

The uniform of the Guards was the crowning glory of the 
whole equipment. It consisted of white trousers, with a broad 
stripe down the side, tucked into high-top boots of hard leather. 
These boots were polished to a brilliant luster for exhibition 
days. The coats were of light blue, cut full below the belt so 
as to flare out slightly. The shoulders were ornamented with 
large epaulets, while at the waist was worn a belt and sword. 
Above this artistic array of finery appeared a black hat similar 
to that worn by the hussars. One of the members of the Guards 
describes it as "a stovepipe hat without a brim, and having a 
very small vizor." On the top of the hat, at the front, was a 
huge yellow plume, with long drooping pendants which shed 
over the whole hat and responded gracefully to the solicitations 
of the amorous breeze. We regret that we cannot resurrect one 
of these uniforms for the purpose of a photograph. But they 
seem to have disappeared. We can easily imagine the envious 
glances of the militia companies, with no uniforms other than 
those of the daily occupations, when they beheld the gorgeous 
spectacle presented by the Guards at muster. And it goes with- 



268 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



out saying that the fair sex involuntarily followed the irresist- 
ible beckoning of the yellow plumes. 

The town records contain several entries regarding this com- 
pany, from which a partial list of the members may be gathered. 
The officers, for the short period of the existence of the organ- 
ization — 1843 to 1851 — are given below ; they were elected every 
two years. John L. Clendenin was captain and John Brown 
first lieutenant from 1843 to 1849. Charles Kimball was chosen 
captain in 1849 and served in that capacity until 1851, when the 
company was disbanded. During these two years John Ayer 
was first lieutenant. 



Date. 


Second Lieut. 


Third Lieut. 


1843-5 


Isaac Pattee 


Richard Taylor 


1845-7 


Richard Taylor 


Albert Holbrook 


1847-9 


Albert Holbrook 


Charles Kimball 


1849-51 


Wm. B. Ayer 


Frederick Kimball 



The town usually voted one dollar for each member for pay 
for services for one year. The enrollment for 1848 is shown 
from the payroll for that year. 

"Rec'd of John L. Clendenin, Collector, the sums set against 
our respective names, in full for military services for 1848 



John Dix 


1.00 


William F. Stevens 


1.00 


Charles Austin 


1.00 


William K. Morrison 


1.00 


Samuel Palmer 


1.00 


William Thorn 


1.00 


John P. Foster 


1.00 


Daniel Taylor 


1.00 


James A. Bryant 


1.00 


J. L. Clendenin 


1.00 


Daniel W. Emerson 


1.00 


William Abbott 


1.00 


Jesse Ayer 


1.00 


John W. Cluff 


1.00 


Hiram Webster 


1.00 


John B. Palmer 


1.00 


Charles M. Russ 


1.00 


George R. Austin 


1.00 


Samuel P. Kelly 


1.00 


Horace Pettingill 


1.00 


William B. Ayer 


1.00 


Charles Kimball 


1.00 


Sylvanus P. Massey 


1.00 


Benj. P. Cole 


1.00 


Nelson Emerson 


1.00 


John McLaughlin 


1.00 


Moses A. Kelly 


1.00 


John Bodwell Jr. 


1.00 


"Gridley B. Rowell performed duty once. 








"John L. Clendenin 






"Captain." 




HON. BENJAMIN R. WHEELER. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 269 

Also the following record is from the town books : 

"Sept. 27, 1849 

"List of those who performed military duty in First Company 
of Artillery, commanded by Charles Kimball — 

Clinton Ewins Levi duff, Jr. 

Alonzo How Daniel Hunt, Jr. 

Miles Hall H. P. Stevens 

John Q. A. Kelley Isaachar 0. Foster 

Moses Whittaker Joseph K. Haseltine 

Benjamin H. Smith Benjamin A. Cole." 

Charles A. Adams 

The Guards were disbanded in 1851, at the time of the act 
abolishing the mustering of the state militia. This act, passed 
July 5, 1851, removed the requirement for active duty by the 
militia, except when called out to suppress a riot or other dis- 
turbance. This meant practically the disbanding of the militia. 

An extract from the "Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary 
or Military service" of June 1, 1840, will doubtless prove inter- 
esting, in that it shows who such pensioners were in Salem at 
this time and with whom they resided. 





Age. 


Resided with. 


Martha Harris 


96 


Dudley W. Jones 


Sarah Hastings 


76 


Sarah Hastings 


Lydia Webster 


83 


Thomas Webster 


Moses Austin 


85 


Moses Austin 


Maria Stevens 


88 


Tristram Kimball 


Elisha Woodbury 


78 


Elisha Woodbury, Jr 


Israel Woodbury 


80 


Israel Woodbury 


Elizabeth Woodbury 


77 


Elizabeth Woodbury 



The part played in the Mexican war by soldiers from Salem 
is as obscure as in the War of 1812. Since there was no general 
call for troops no local companies were enlisted. The records 
of individuals could doubtless be obtained at AVashington, but 
the state records in the office of the adjutant-general make no 
mention of them. We have unofficially, however, names of three 
men from Salem : Moses D. and Hiram Rowell, brothers, and 
Hiram Roby, who now lives at the Depot with Mr. John Hunt. 

Our interest next centers in the great struggle of the Rebel- 



270 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

lion. The story of that war which won for America so much, 
and at so terrible a cost, has been far too ably told to permit 
us even to give a review of it in these pages. Nevertheless some 
features of it are too closely related to the history of our town 
to be omitted entirely. The records of the town for this period 
are notably quiet in regard to military affairs, a condition due 
probably to the absence of so many of the men naturally active 
in town matters, and to the commonness of the subject. All 
minds were concerned with the war, and doubtless it seemed 
commonplace material for inserting in town records. 

We have collected such entries as throw any light upon the 
doings of the times, and give them here in the form of a running 
commentary. These extracts from the records are interspersed 
with items from the contemporary journal of the late James 
Ayer. 

As the first indication of local interest in the controversy over 
slavery, the town caught up the excitement felt in Massachusetts 
over the arrival of a fugitive slave in Boston in 1858. Before 
this time there had been much discussion on the subject of the 
strained relations between the two great sections of the country, 
but the slave hunter at our very doors put things in an entirely 
different light. Then on Dec. 2, 1859, came the news of the 
fate of John Brown, who was to be executed that day. The sen- 
timent here was that the sentence was only just. However 
hearty might have been the approval of his desire to free the 
slaves, his methods were open to denunciation. 

The first of May, 1861, the first instalment of Salem troops 
marched for the front. They were enlisted for three months 
and were under command of Capt. Jeremiah D. Drew. He 
returned to Salem in August of the same year and raised another 
company of volunteers, this one numbering one hundred men. 

On June 24, 1861, five men from Salem went to Methuen and 
enlisted in the company being recruited there. They then went 
to Fort Warren in Boston Harbor, preparatory to going South. 
These men were Nelson Emerson, Daniel W. Kelly, William 
Kelly, Charles T. Pattee and Charles Lewis. When the Fourth 
of July arrived there was no celebration in Salem. All minds 
were too deeply engrossed with thoughts of fireworks and noise 



MILITARY HISTORY. 271 

of a more significant character to have any great relish for 
breaking the stillness in a spirit of play. 

Sept. 21, 1861, it was voted to pay, in accordance with the 
state law, a sum of money not exceeding twelve dollars per 
month to families of indigent soldiers. 

Aug. 12, 1862, the town voted a bounty of three hundred dol- 
lars for all enlistments of three years. Sixteen days later it 
was voted that all who should enlist for a period of nine months 
should receive a bounty of two hundred dollars. These two votes 
applied to volunteers. No drafting of recruits was done till 
later in the year. 

About this time the effects of the hard life in the camp and 
on the field had begun to be evident in the clothes of the soldiers. 
Shirts, stockings and small articles were greatly needed and not 
easily furnished at so short notice. One form of relief was put 
into operation in towns all over the country. It was carried 
on in Salem by the "Soldiers' Aid Society," which was com- 
posed of the ladies of the town. They met for the first time, 
Sept. 12, 1862, in the town hall. Throughout the remainder of 
the war these meetings were kept up, giving those at home who 
were so anxious for the "boys" at the front an opportunity to 
lend a hand toward making things more comfortable for them. 

On Nov. 1, 1862, the Drafting Commissioners were at the town 
hall preparing the lists for the drafting of soldiers in Salem. 
In September of 1863 the town voted to pay each drafted man 
or his substitute three hundred dollars. They also voted to raise 
a sum not exceeding twelve thousand dollars to be paid in 
bounties. Every volunteer was to receive six hundred dollars. 
This proved somewhat too steep, and it was voted, Dec. 5, 1863, 
to give each volunteer three hundred dollars, and to advance the 
state and national bounty, making a total of seven hundred and 
two dollars. The quota of men from Salem was at that time 
twenty-three. 

Other records of this time are similar to the foregoing, being 
for the most part the transaction of routine matters relative to 
the soldiers. 

The eleventh day of April, 1865, was a day of rejoicing 
throughout the North. The occasion was the surrender of Gen- 



272 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

eral Lee to General Grant at Appomattox Court House two days 
before, on April 9th. The communication facilities were not 
then what they are today, consequently authentic news was not 
to be had for a day or two after the events which transpired in 
the southern country. And by the close of the war people had 
learned not to rejoice or celebrate a victory until the report of it 
had been confirmed. On this occasion the village was illumi- 
nated, bells rung, guns fired, drums beat and fireworks set off. 
Here certainly was sunshine at last, after four years of gloom. 

But how quickly the whole countenance of things is changed. 
The assassination of Abraham Lincoln plunged the whole coun- 
try into the deepest grief. All signs of mourning possible were 
displayed by the people of the land. In Salem on the day of 
his funeral, April 19, 1865 (the anniversary of the battle of 
Lexington), services were held in the Congregational church. 
The pulpit, gallery and lamp fixtures were draped in white and 
black. Many residences were also draped in mourning emblems. 
The flags of both the Democrats and Republicans were lowered 
and trimmed with black. On that day all paid a farewell 
tribute to the great leader who had passed. 

The surrender of Johnston to Sheridan on April 26, 1865. 
finished the last branch of the Confederate army. The war over, 
the soldiers were soon at home again, taking up their previous 
occupations. Many never returned, some have only visited their 
native towns, having found acceptable fields for their abilities 
elsewhere. Before we let them go, however, we shall present 
to the reader the war records of all soldiers who enlisted from 
Salem. 

INDIVIDUAL RECORDS OF SALEM SOLDIERS IN THE WAR OF THE 

REBELLION, 1861-'65. 

These records are taken from the state rolls, in the adjutant- 
general's office at Concord. Owing to the fact that men from 
one town were frequently "credited" to another, usually as sub- 
stitutes, many names appear in this list that had no residential 
connection with Salem. The names starred (*.) were residents 
of Salem at the time of enlistment; three others, Rufus A. Til- 
ton and Jonathan Twitchell of the Fifth Regiment, and Horace 




ISAAC NEWTON OLUFF. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 278 

Hunt of the Seventh, have become residents since the war. The 
remainder of the names includes some born in Salem but living 
elsewhere at the time of enlistment, as well as those merelv 
credited to the town to make up its quota. 

In the naval records are names of eleven men credited to 
Salem. Eight of these were in no way connected with the town 
and are therefore not given in the following list. Two others 
were "born in New Salem," which was perhaps meant for this 
town ; their records are at the end of this list. The one resident 
of Salem whose name appears on the navy rolls is Daniel G. 
George, whose record may be found under Miscellaneous Organ- 
izations, Company D, First Massachusetts Cavalry, from which 
he was transferred to the navy. 

The following abbreviations are used in these records : 

A. C. — Army corps. Muse. — Musician. 

Adjt. — Adjutant. N. H. V. — New Hampshire Vol- 

App. — Appointed. unteers. 

Capt. — Captain. Orel. — Ordinary. 

Captd. — Captured. Priv. — Private. 

Corp. — Corporal. Re-enl. — Re-enlisted. 

Disab. — Disabled. Regt. — Regiment. 

Disch. — Discharged. Sev. — Severely. 

Enl. — Enlisted. Sub. — Substitute. 

Exch. — Exchanged as prisoner. Tr. — Transferred. 

Gd. — Gained after missing. Unas 'd. — Unassigned. 

Hosp.— Hospital. V. R. C— Veterans' Relief 

I. C. — Invalid Corps, changed Corps. 

to V. R. C, March 18, 1864. Wd.— Wounded. 

Mis. — Missing. Wds. — Wounds. 



19 



274 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FIRST REGIMENT. 



Name. Company. 

Austin, John E. H 

*Bailey, Isaiah II 

*Bailey, Rufus II. H. H 

Bailev, 8 e wall B. I 

*Conlon, Patrick H 

*Drew, Jeremiah D. H 

Duston, Jackson K 

Hall, Edgar A. K 

Hall, Jacob B. H 

*Kelley, George L. H 

*Lowell, Melvin H 

*McDerniott, James II 

*Roberts, Isaac II. H 

* Sleeper, Gilman E. K 

* Smith, William B. II 
*Stinehour, Nelson P. H 
*Taylor, George W. H 
*Thayer, Calvin C. H 
*Thorn, Henry B. H 
*Wheeler, Benjamin H 
*Wheeler, Benjamin R. H 
*Willey, John H. H 
*Woodworth, Albert A. H 



Date of Enlist- 
ment. 



Age. 



Apr. 20, '61 28 
Apr. 19, '61 23 
Apr. 19, '61 20 
Apr. 27, '61 35 
Apr. 25, '61 22 
Apr. 17, '61 39 
Apr. 18, '61 25 
Apr. 19, '61 21 
Apr. 20, '61 18 
Apr. 25, '61 25 
Apr. 25, '61 22 
Apr. 26, '61 23 
Apr. 19, '61 24 
Apr. 27, '61 30 
Apr. 19, '61 18 
Apr. 20, '61 21 
Apr. 19, '61 23 
Apr. 22, '61 30 
Apr. 25, '61 24 
Apr. 20, '61 25 
Apr. 25, '61 21 
Apr. 24, '61 21 
Apr. 20, '61 21 



Date Mustered 
In 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 7, '61 

May 7, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 7, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 

May 4, '61 



Rank. 

Corp. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Capt. 

Corp. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Capt. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Corp. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 

Priv. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 



*Adams, John W. 
*Goodwin, Aaron 

" " re-enl. 

*Randall, George W. 
Roberts, Orsino 

" " re-enl. 



F and S Dec. 5, '63 31 Dec. 8, '63 Chaplain 

B Apr. 23, '61 20 Not mustered in 

May 15, '61 June 1, '61 Priv. 

C May 13, '61 21 June 1, '61 Priv. 

I Apr. 24, '61 21 Not mustered in 

May 23, '61 June 7, '61 Priv. 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 



Austin, John E. II 

" " re-enl. 

Bailey, Rufus E 



Sept. 12, '61 28 Sept. 18, '61 Corp. 
Feb. 20, '64 Feb. 28, '64 
Aug. 28, '61 41 Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 

VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE MONTHS. 



275 



Promotion or Transfer. 

See 4 N. H. V. 



Wounded or Killed. 



See 5 N. H. V. and Miscel. Organizations. 

See 9 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 7 N. H. V. 

See 15 N. H. V. 

See 15 N. IT. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 7 N. H. V. 

Court marshalled and 

See 11 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. 

See 2 N. H. V. 

See 4 N. H. V. and V. R. C. 



Mustered Out or Discharged. 



Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 

Aug. 9, '61. [Md. 

disch. July 28, '61, Sandy Hook, 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 
Aug. 9, '61. 



ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

disch. Dec. 19, '65. 
had enl. for 3 months [Ft. Schuyler, N. Y. H. 

wd. July 2, '63, Gettysburg; died, wds., Aug. 17, '63, 
See 9 N. H. V. disch. disab., Aug. 28, '61, Wash- 

had enl. for 3 months [ington, D. C. 

mis. July 2, '63, Gettysburg ; gd. must, out June 21, '64. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

App. Sergt. [23, '65. 

wd. May 15, '64, Drewry's Bluff, Va., must, out Aug. 
Corp. Sept. 30, '62 disch. Sept. 27, '64. 



276 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Name. Company, 

*Bodwell, Christopher A. H 

" " re-enl. 

* Bod well William J. H 

" " re-enl. 

*Drew, Edgar H. H 

*Drew, Jeremiah D. F and S 

Duston, Jackson C 
" " re-enl. 

*Emerson, Daniel W. H 

Estey, Horace P. K 
" " re-enl. 

*Fletcher, James F. H 

* Foster, Charles C. H 

" " re-enl. 

*Foster, Hiram B. H 
" " re-enl. 

Hall, Edgar A. C 
Hall, James T. 

*Hibbert, Joseph H 

*Lowell, Robert E. H 

*McDermott, James II 

" " re-enl. 

Monahan, John F 

*Pettee, Richard N. H 

*Roberts, Isaac H. H 

*Rowell, Moses D. H 



Date of Enlist- . _„ 
ment. Age - 

Aug. 19, '61 25 

Jan. 1, '64 

Aug. 30, '61 25 

Feb. 26, '64 

Aug. 30, '61 14 

Aug. 20, '61 39 

Aug. 19, '61 25 

Feb. 18, '64 

Sept. 13, '61 37 

Aug. 15, '61 22 

Feb. 24, '64 

Sept. 16, '61 27 

Aug. 30, '61 22 

Feb. 21, '64 

Sept. 16, '61 22 

Feb. 21, '61 

Aug. 19, '61 21 

Sept. 23, '61 30 

Aug. 20, '61 21 

Sept. 11, '61 30 

Aug. 19, '61 23 

Feb. 20, '64 

Dec. 27, '64 21 

Sept. 11, '61 27 

Aug. 28, '61 25 

Sept. 2, '61 30 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 
Date Mustered 



In. 



Rank. 



Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Jan. 1, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Muse. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv.f 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 
Sept. 18, '61 Muse. 
Sept. '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Feb. 28, '64 

Dec. 27, '64 Priv. (sub.) 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 
Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 



*Rowell, Walter B. H 

* Simons, Levi W. H 
*Smith, Benjamin H. I 

Smithford, Charles H. E 

*Wheeler, Benjamin H 

* Wheeler, Benjamin R. C 



Aug. 19, '61 23 Sept. 18, '61 Corp. 

Sept. 2, '61 35 Sept. 18, '61 Corp. 

Sept. 11, '61 32 Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 

Dec. 16, '64 26 Dec. 16, '64 Priv. (sub.) 

Sept. 17, '61 25 Sept. 18, '61 Corp. 

Sept. 9, '61 21 Sept. 18, '61 Sergt. 



Wilson, William K Dec. 12, '64 22 Dec. 12, '64 Priv. (sub.) 

*Woodbury, Rodney. C. H Sept. 17, '61 23 Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 

*Woodworth, Albert A. H Aug. 19, '61 21 Sept. 18, '61 Corp. 

*Conlon, Patrick H Aug. 19, '61 22 Sept. 18, '61 Priv. 

fEnlisted as private, appointed major, Sept. 3, '61, mustered in major. See 1 N. H. V. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 277 

-Concluded. 
Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 



Corp. 



killed, May 16, '64, Drewry's Bluff, Va. 



must, out, Aug. 23, '65. 
disabl. and disch., May 3, '62, Jacksonville, Fla. 
App. Lt. Col., Dec. 1, '63. See 1 N. H. V. disch., disab., Sept. 17, '64. 
See 1 N. H. V. 

disch. Sept. 1, '65. [Isl., S. C. 
See V. R. C. disch., disab., July 12, '63, Folly 

died, dis., Jan. 24, '65, Pt. of Rocks, Va. [Vt. 

Corp. ; tr. to 26 Co., 2 Batt'l, I. C, Sept. 1, '63, disch. Sept. 19, '64, Brattleboro, 

[Aug. 23, '65. 
Corp. mis. Aug. 16, '64, Deep Bottom, Va.;gd. ; must, out, 

Corp. must, out, Aug. 23, '65. [Va 

Tr. to Battery M, 1 Art., U. S. A., Oct. 8, '62, disch. Sept. 19, '64, Petersburg, 

[See 1N.H. V.] disch., disab., Jan. 12, '62, Hilton 

Corp. killed, May 16, '64, Drewry's Bluff, Va. [Head, S. C. 

deserted, July 30, '63, Hilton 

[Head, S. C. 
See 1 N. II. V. must, out, Aug. 23, '65. 

must, out, Aug. 23, '65. 
died, dis., Sept. 19, '62, Beaufort, S. C. [Isl., S. C. 

Corp. See 1 N. H. V. disch., disab., Oct. 5, 63, Morris 

Tr. to 1 Co., 2 Batt'l, I. C, Sept. 26, '63 ; tr. to Co. H, 13 Reg't V. R. C. ; tr. to 
[41 Co. 2 Batt'l, V. R. C. ; disch., Sept. 19, '64, Hartford, Ct. 

died, dis., Oct. 9, '62, Salem. 

disch., disab., Oct. 24, '63 Morris Isl., S. C. 
disch., disab., Nov. 17, '62, Beaufort, S. C. 
Sergt. Maj., June 13, '65 must, out, Aug. 23, '65. 

See 1 N. H. V. must, out, Sept. 27, '64. 

2 Lt., Co. F, June 12, '62, wd. May 16, '64, Drewry's Bluff, Va. 
[App. 1 Lt. Co. B Sept. 12, '64, not must. ; See 1 N H. V. 
[App. Capt. Co. H, Nov. 9, '64., not must. ; disch. Nov. 5, '64, as 2 Lt. 

must, out, Aug. 23, '65. 
must, out, Sept. 27, '64. 
See 1 N. H. V. and V. R. C. must, out, Sept. 27, '64. 

App. Corp. See 1 N. H. V. disch., disab., Nov. ^3, '64. 



278 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 



Name. 

Bailey, George W. 
*Bailey, Rufus H. H. 
Chase, Henry A. 
Farry, James 
Hamblett, Aaron 
McDonald, John 
Morritz, Emil 
Tilton, Rufus A. 
Twitchell, Jonathan C. S. 



*Bodwell, Charles 

Cooksin, Calvin 

Cooper, Edward M. 

Donley, James 

Drew, Edward 
^Foster, Benjamin D. 
^Foster, Issachar O. 

Jones, Franklin 

Kelley, Isaiah M. 

Marsh, Henry T. 

Morton, George 

Thomas, John 

Wiggin, Cyrus H. 

Woodbury, Sylvester O. 



Company. 


Date of Enlist- . 

ment. Age - 


Date Mustered 
In. 


Rank. 


K 


Sept. 16, '61 22 


Oct. 12, '61 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 16, '61 20 


Oct. 12, '61 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Aug. 15, '64 25 


Aug. 15, '64 


Priv. (sub.) 


I 


Sept. 16, '64 39 


Sept. 16, '64 


Priv. (sub.) 


C 


Aug. 15, '64 19 


Aug. 15, '64 


Priv. (sub.) 


E 


Sept. 15, '64 24 


Sept. 15, '64 


Priv. (sub.) 


D 


Aug. 11, '63 37 


Aug. 11, '63 


Priv. (sub.) 


Band 


Sept. 9, '61 25 


Oct. 26, '61 


3 Class Muse 


B 


Oct. 20, '61 27 


Oct. 21, '61 


Priv. 






SIXTH REGIMENT 


G 


Nov. 13, '61 20 


Nov. 28, '61 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Jan. 2, '64 33 


Jan. 2, '64 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Dec. 31, '63 29 


Dec. 31, '63 


Priv. 


F 


Dec. 31, '63 22 


Dec. 31, '63 


Priv. 


I 


Jan. 2, '64 22 


Jan. 2, '64 


Priv. 


G 


Oct. 17, '61 18 


Nov. 28, '61 


Priv. 


G 


Nov. 1, '61 35 


Nov. 28, '61 


Priv. 


I 


Sept. 6, '62 44 


Sept. 9, '62 


Priv. 


G 


Nov. 6, '61 37 


Nov. 28, '61 


Priv. 


A 


Jan. 1, '64 19 


Jan. 1, '64 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Jan. 2, '64 25 


Jan. 2, '64 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Jan. 2, '64 20 


Jan. 2, '64 


Priv. 


K 


Dec. 31, '63 27 


Dec. 31, '63 


Priv. 


G 


Oct. 11, '61 28 


Dec. 9, '61 


Priv. 



Austin, John W. 
*Bailey, Charles E. 
*Bartlett, David 

Hall, Jacob B. 

Hunt, Horace W. 
-fJackman, George K. 

Jennings, Jonathan 
* Kimball, Edmund G. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

B Nov. 1, '61 44 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 

B Aug. 14, '62 23 Aug. 21, '62 Priv. 

B Sept. 23, '61 40 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 

B Sept. 26, '61 19 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 

B Aug. 13, '62 29 Aug. 21, '62 Priv. 

B Nov. 1, '64 27 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 

B Aug. 14, '62 21 Aug. 21, '62 Priv. 

B Sept. 23, '61 32 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 

t Residence was given Danville. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 2 i 9 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 

See Miscel. Organizations. disch., disab., Oct. 22, '62, Newport News, Va. 

See Miscel. Organizations and 1 N. H. V. disch., disab., June 4, '62, Washing- 
Sent for'd to a Reg't Aug. 27, '64 ; no further record A. G.'s office, [ton, D. C. 

deserted, Oct. 10, '64, near Petersburg, Va. 

disch. June 9, '65, Washington, D. C. 

deserted, Apr. 18, '65, near Burkeville, Va. 

Tr. to Co. E, to 16 Co., 2 Batt'l, V. R. C, Aug. '64 ; disch., disab., June 19, '65, 

[Washington, D. C] must, out, Aug. 8, '62, Harrison's 

App. 1 Sergt. ; wd. June 3, '64, Cold Harbor, Va. [Landing, Va. 

[App. Capt. Co. K, Oct. 28, '64; tr. to Co. H ; must, out, Oct. 28, '65. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

disch. Dec. 24, '64, Concord. 
Supposed to have deserted en route to Reg't. 

deserted, Jan. 7, '64, Albany, N. Y. 
deserted, Mar. 24, '64, Harrisburg, Pa. 
mis. May 6, '64, Wilderness, Va. 

killed, Aug. 29, '62, Bull Run, Va. ['64. 

wd. June 24, '64, Petersburg, Va. ; must, out, Nov. 28, 

disch., disab., Dec. 26, '64, Hancock Sta., Va. 
killed, Aug. 29, '62, Bull Run, Va. 
Tr. to Co. C, 21 V. R. C. ; disch. July 28, '65, Trenton, N. J. 

Supposed to have deserted en route to Reg't. 
No record after sent to Reg't. 
Corp., July 1, '65. must, out, July 17, '65. 

mis. Sept. 17, '62, Antietam, Md.; gd. Oct. 12, '62. [ington, D. C. 
[Corp., wd. July 26, '64, Petersburg, Va. ; disch., disab., Oct. 26, '64, Wash- 

EXLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

Tr. to Co. K, Jan. 1, '62 ; disch., disab., June 5, '63, St. Augustine, Fla. 

Captured, July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C; died, dis., Jan. 3, '64, Richmond, Va. 
Re-enl. and must, in, Feb. 27, '64 ; died, dis., June 3, '65, Wilmington, N. C. 
See 1 N. H. V.; kiUed, July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C. [mouth Grove, R. I. 
App. Corp. ; wd. July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C. ; disch., disab., Dec. 30, '63, Ports- 
App. Corp. July 13, '62. died, dis., Sept. 26 '62, Beaufort, S. C. 

Corp., Dec. 12, '64. . disch. June 26, '65, Goldsborough, N. C. 

disch., disab., Sept. 1, '64, Hilton Head, S. C. 



280 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Name. 



Kimball, Warren E. 
♦Newell, Charles 
Sargent, Samuel P. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 



Company. ^L^^- 



n _- Date Mustered 
A S e - In. 



Rank. 



E Aug. 14, '62 22 Aug. 21, '62 Priv. 
B Sept. 23, '61 24 Nov. 1, '61 Priv. 
F Dec. 2, '61 34 Dec 2, '61 Priv. 



♦Taylor, George W. 



B Sept. 21, '61 24 Nov. 1, '61 Sergt. 



*Beckford, William A. F 

♦Cluff, Benjamin W. D 

Woodbury, Frank D. G 



EIGHTH REGIMENT. 

Nov. 8, '61 19 Dec. 20, '61 Sergt. 

Dec. 20, '61 25 Dec. 31, '61 Priv. 
Mar. 26, '62 19 Mar. 26, '62 Priv. 



NINTH REGIMENT 



Bailey, Sewall B. B 

*Blye, William H. C 

♦Bradford, Joseph D. C 

♦Haley, Michael C 

*Kelley, Charles H. C 

*Kelley, Jerome C 

*Kelley, John Q. A. • C 

Moreland, Benaiah D 

♦Robinson, John C 

♦Wilson, Silas Henry C 

♦Woodbury, James D. F 



June 6, '62 35 July 12, '62 Priv. 

July 5, '62 29 July 24, '62 Priv. 

June 11, '62 20 July 22, '62 Priv. 

June 14, '62 40 July 22, '62 Priv. 

June 4, '62 38 July 22, '62 Priv. 

June 5, '62 34 July 22, '62 Corp. 

June 6, '62 36 July 22, '62 Priv. 

Aug. 7, '62 25 Aug. 9, '62 Priv. 

June 4, '62 25 July 22, '62 Priv. 

June 4, '62 26 July 22, '62 Priv. 

June 6, '62 19 Aug. 6, '62 Priv. 



Austin, Benjamin F. I 

Carlin, Patrick I 

Clapf, Charles E 

♦Harwood, Henry J. F and S 
Wilson, Henry G 



TENTH REGIMENT. 

Aug. 11, '63 21 Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 

Aug. 11, '63 25 Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 

Aug. 14, '63 28 Aug. 14, '63 Priv. (sub.) 

25 Aug. 19, '62 Asst. Surg'n. 

Aug. 11, '63 21 Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 



MILITARY HISTORY. 281 

— Concluded. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 

wd. and cap'd, July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C. ; died, July 19, '63, Charleston, S. C 

captured, July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C; exch. Jan. 1, '64; must, out, Dec. 27, '64 

Corp. Nov. 6, '63; re-enl. and must, in Feb. 28, '64, app. Corp. ; Sergt, Dec. 28, '64 

[awarded " Gilmore Medal " for gallant conduct before Charleston, S. C. 

[must, out, July 20, '65. 
See 1 N. H. V. App. 2 Lt. Apr. 29, '62 ; wd. sev. July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner, S. C. ; 

[app. 1 Lt. Aug. 7, '63 ; killed, Feb. 20, '64, Olustee, Fla. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

1 Sergt. June 1, '63 ; 1 Lt. Dec. 16, '63 ; wd. May 17, '64, Bayou de Glaize, La.; 

[See Miscel. Organizations. must, out, Jan. 18, '65. 

died, dis., Dec. 29, '62, New Orleans, La. 
Corp. May 27, '62 ; wd. Oct. 27, '62, Labadieville, La. ; 

[Q. M. Sergt. Oct. 18, '63 ; must, out, Jan. 18, '65. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

Deserted, Sept. 30, '62. See 1 N. H. V. 

Deserted, Aug. 23, '62, at Concord. [ton, D. C. 

mis. Dec. 13, '62, Fredericksburg; gd. ; disch., disab., Apr. 15, '63, Washing- 
wd. Sept. 17, '62, Antietam, Md. ; disch., disab., Jan. 1, '63, Ft. Schuyler, 

must, out, June 10, '65. [N. Y. Harbor. 
App. Sergt. Jan. 1, '63 ; 2 Lieut. Co. I Nov. 1, '64, not must. ; 

[I Lieut. Co. C, Feb. 1, '65 ; must, out, June 10, '65. 

mis. Sept. 30, '64, Poplar Springs Church, Va. ; gd. ; must, out, June 10, '65. 
Tr. to band, 1 Brig., 2 Div., 9 A. C. Oct. 1, '62, as 2 class Muse. ; 

[died, dis., Aug. 31, '63, Camp Dennison, Ohio. 
Corp. ; wd. Dec. 13, '62, Fredericksburg ; died, wds., Jan. 2, '63, Washington, D. C. 
See 1 N. H. H. Art. disch., disab., July 28, '63, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

wd. July 30, '64, mine explosion, Petersburg, Va. ; 
[Tr. to Co. F, 13 V. R. C, Mar. 8, '65 ; disch. June 28, '65, Concord. 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

Tr. to Co. D, 2 N. H. V. June 21, '65 ; must, out, Dec. 19, '65. 

Corp. ; tr. to Co. D, 2 N. II. V. June 21, '65 ; must, out, Sept. 25, '65. 

disch. May 15, '65, Ft. Monroe, Va. 
died, dis., Mar. 17, '63, Suffolk, Va. 
captured, June 3, '64, Cold Harbor, Va. ; exch. Mar. 20, '65 ; disch. May 24, '65. 



282 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 



Name. 

Abbott, Leonard I. 
*Bodwell, John G. 

Butler, Charles 

Canfield, Alexander M. 
*Chase, William H. F. 
*Cole, William G. 
*Conner, Ogilvia 

Holland, Thomas H. 

Jameson, John 

Leonardi, Antonio 

McFarland, John 
*Pattee, John B. 



Company. 


Date of Enlist- . 

ment. A8e * 


Date Mustered 
In. 


Rank 


G 


Dec. 29, '63 28 


Dec. 


29, 


'63 


Priv. 


E 


Aug. 15, '62 20 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Dec. 22, '63 22 


Dec. 


22, 


'63 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Dec. 22, '63 26 


Dec. 


22, 


'63 


Priv. 


E 


Aug. 15, '62 24 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


Priv. 


E 


Aug. 15, '62 18 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


Priv. 


E 


Aug. 15, '62 22 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Dec. 22, '63 22 


Dec. 


22, 


'63 


Priv. 


Unas'd 


Dec. 17, '63 24 


Dec. 


17, 


'63 


Priv. 


C 


Dec. 17, '63 23 


Dec. 


17, 


'63 


Priv. 


B 


Dec. 17, '63 35 


Dec. 


17, 


'63 


Priv. 


E 


Aug. 15, '62 21 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


Priv. 



Raferty, John 
Roloff, Ferdinand 
Scribner, George 



Springsteel, Benjamin 


J. C 


Dec. 


17, 


'63 39 


Goodwin, James R. 


C 


Jan. 


1, 


'64 15 


^Roberts, John A. 


A 


Dec. 


16, 


'63 36 


Bishop, Edward 


A 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 26 


Delaney, James 


C 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 28 


Dudley, Thomas 


C 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 22 


Frank, John 


D 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 22 


Gulien, James 


D 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 23 


McMann, Owen 


E 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 22 


Myers, George W. 


E 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 36 


O'Reilley, John 


E 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 35 


Rose, Gamaliel 


E 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 27 


Scott, George 


F 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 22 


Towns, Oscar W. 


I 


Aug. 


21, 


'62 26 


Williams, Thomas 


F 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 24 


Wilson, Frank 


F 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 26 


Wood, Reuben L. 


G 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 24 


Wright, Joseph 


F 


Aug. 


11, 


'63 21 



Unas'd June 22, '64 21 June 22, '64 Priv. (sub.) 
Unas'd Dec. 17, '63 32 Dec. 17, '63 Priv. 
Unas'd Dec. 29, '63 21 Dec. 29, '63 Priv. 

Dec. 17, '63 Priv. 

TWELFTH REGIMENT. 

Jan. 1, '64 Muse. 
Dec. 16, '63 Priv. 

THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 

Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv- (sub.) 
Sept. 20, '62 Priv. 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 
Aug. 11, '63 Priv. (sub.) 



MILITARY HISTORY. 283 

ENLISTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 

Tr. to Co. G, 6 N, H. V., June 1, '65 ; must, out, July 17, '65. 

died, dis., Dec. 28, '62, Falmouth, Va. 
Supposed to have deserted en route to Reg't. 
No record after starting for Reg't. 

wd. sev., Petersburg, Va., June 20, '64; disch. June 5, '65. 
wd.May 12, '64, Spottsylvania, Va. ; must, out, June 4, '65. 
wd. Dec. 13, '62, Fredericksburg, Va. ; died, dis., Dec. 2, '63, Camp Nelson, Ky. 
Supposed to have deserted en route to Reg't. 
No record except muster and descriptive rolls. 
Tr. to Co. C, 6 N. H. V. June 1, '65 ; must, out, July 17, '65. 

died, dis., Sept. 1, '64, Washington, D. C. 
Corp. ; wd. May 12, '64, Spottsylvania, Va. ; captured, July 30, '64. 

[mine explosion, Petersburg, Va. ; par. Oct. 18, '64 ; must, out, June 4, '65. 
No record after starting for Reg't. 
No record after starting for Reg't. 

No further record. ['65, Baltimore, Md. 

Captured, Sept. 30, '64, Poplar Springs Church, Va. ; exch. ; died, dis., April 3, 

ENLISTED POR THREE YEARS. 

disch. June 8, '65, as Priv. 
Entered 18 A. C. Base Hosp., Pt. of Rocks, Va., Sept. 29, '64 ; sent Dec. 19, '64, 
[to Reg't ; no further record. 

THREE YEARS. 

Deserted Oct. 10, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. 

disch. May 28, '65, Camp Lee Hosp., Va. 
Deserted, Oct. 19, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. 
Deserted, Oct. 10, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. 

Deserted, Oct. 10, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. [ville, Ga. 

Captured, May 16, '64, Drewry's Bluff, Va. ; died, dis., Oct. 20, '64, Anderson- 
Tr. to 17. S. Navy, Apr. 1, '64, as Ord. Seaman ; deserted, May 4, '64. 
Served as Hosp. Steward till disch. at his own request, Mar. 12, '68. 
Deserted, Oct. 9, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. 
Deserted, Oct. 8, '63, near Portsmouth, Va. 

must, out, June 21, '65. 
Tr. to IT. S. Navy, Apr. 6, '64, as Ord. Seaman ; deserted, Mar. 17, '65. 
Tr. to IT. S. Navy, Apr. 28, '64, as Ord. Seaman ; disch. Aug. 4, '65, as a Seaman. 

killed, Sept. 29, '64, Ft. Harrison, Va. 
Deserted, May 30, '64, White House Landing, Va. 



284 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Name. 

Sliamboo, Charles 

♦Austin, Milton F. 
*Bodwell, John P. 
*Carew, William E. 
♦Chaff, Franklin W. 
♦Cluff, Isaac N. 
♦Cluff, Leverett C. 

Currier, Benjamin G. 
*Dolloff, Cyrus S. 
♦Foster, James H. 
♦Gordon, George C. 
♦Gould, Charles W. 
♦Hall, Benjamin F. 
♦Hall Charles H. 
♦Hanson, Collins M. 
♦Heselton, Stilman B. 
♦Kelley, Simon C. 
♦Kelley, Edwin H. 
♦Kelley, George L. 
* Kimball, Charles G. 
♦Lee, Oliver 
♦Lowell, Melvin 
♦Mansfield, William F. 
♦McArthur, John C. 
*Morrison, Iddo K. 
♦Mosher, Edward B. 
♦Pattee, George H. 
♦Prince, John L. 
♦Sloan, David 
♦Smith, James W. 
♦Stanton, William L. 
♦Woodbury, Henry W. 

♦Townsend, Luther T. 
Woodbury, Louis A. 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 
Rank. 

Unas'd Aug. 6, '64 34 Aug. 6, '64 Priv. (sub.) 



rnmnnnv Date of Enlist- A Date Mustered 
company. me nt. Age> In. 







FIFTEENTH REGIMENT 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 21 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 15, '62 38 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 5, '62 24 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Corp. 


K 


Sept. 10, '62 18 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 11, '62 23 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 10, '62 27 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 41 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 13, '62 29 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 11, '62 25 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 10, '62 27 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Sergt. 


K 


Sept. 5, '62 23 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Nov. 3, '62 28 


Nov. 


6, '62 


Capt. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 21 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 11, '62 23 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


E 


Sept. 6, '62 25 


Oct. 


9, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 13, '62 24 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 11, '62 18 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 26 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Corp. 


K 


Nov. 6, '62 20 


Nov. 


12, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 33 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 10, '62 23 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 15, '62 18 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 15, '62 37 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 13, '62 35 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Wagoner. 


K 


Sept. 8, '62 44 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 11, '62 20 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 18 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 10, '62 34 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Corp. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 31 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 12, '62 20 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 


K 


Sept. 15, '62 44 


Oct. 


16, '62 


Priv. 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 

F and S Oct. 30, '62 27 Nov. 13, '62 Adj't. 
D Nov. 13, '62 18 Nov. 13, '62 Priv. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 285 

THREE YEARS. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 

Name appears on must, and descriptive rolls ; no further record. 

NINE MONTHS. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
App. Sergt. Mar. 1, '63; must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
died, dis., Aug. 2, '63, Memphis, Tenn. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
Corp. Mar. 26, '63 ; reduced to ranks, June 18, '63 ; must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
See Miscel. Organizations. must, out, July 23, '63, to re-enl. 

See 10 N. H. V. must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
killed, June 10, '63, Port Hudson, La. 
See 1 N. H. V. must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
See Miscel. Organizations. must, out, July 23, '63, to re-enl. 

See 1 N. H. V. disch. Aug. 13, '63 ; died, dis., Aug. 22, '63, Salem. 

died, dis., Mar. 27, '63, Carrollton. La. 
See Miscel. Organization. disch. July 23, '63, to re-enlist. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63 ; died, Aug. 14, '63, Concord, 
killed, June 14, '63, Port Hudson, La. 
See Miscel. Organizations. must, out, July 23, '63, to re-enl. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 
died, dis., Aug. 10, '63, Buffalo, N". Y. 

must, out, Aug. 13, '63. 

NINE MONTHS. 

must, out, Aug. 20, '63. 
must, out, Aug. 20, '63. 



286 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Hunt, George L. 
*Kelley, Charles O. 

Perry, Kimball S. 
*Webster, Isaiah N. 



Company. 
I 

H 
K 
I 



Date of Enlist- 
ment. 



Age. 



Date Mustered 
In. 



Rank. 



Mar. 22, '65; 1 yr. 38 Mar. 22, '65 Priv. 

Feb. 10, '65 ; 1 yr. 18 Feb. 10, '65 Priv. 

Mar. 27, '65 ; 1 yr. 41 Mar. 27, '65 Priv. 

Mar. 17, '65 ; 1 yr. 18 Mar. 17, '65 Priv. 



*Wheeler, Benjamin F. G Feb. 9, '65 ; 1 yr. 29 Feb. 9, '65 Priv. 



FIRST REGIMENT, NEW 



Kershaw, Edward 



* Powell, Joseph 8. 



* Bradford, William L. 
*Dix, Henry J. 
*Emerson, Nelson 

* Foster, Sidney A. 
Goodwin, Charles 

*Kelley, Walter B. 
*Lundberg, Charles 
*Maxwell, Charles T. 
^Merrill, Willard W. 
*Middleton, Thomas B. 

Sumner, George 
*Wilson, Silas Henry 



*Emerson, Daniel W. K 13 Regt.; Aug. 31, '64 39 Aug. 31, '64 Priv. 
* Wood worth, Albert A. E 18 Regt.; Nov. 14, '64 24 Nov. 14, '64 Priv. 



L 


Dec. 13, '61 


21 


Dec. 27, '61 

FIRST 


Priv. 

COMPANY 




June 2, '63 


28 


June 2, '63 


Priv. 






FIRST REGIMENT N. H. V. 


L 


Sept. 19, '64 


18 


Sept. 20, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 12, '64 


19 


Sept. 14, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 22, '64 


42 


Sept. 22, '64 


Sergt. 


L 


Oct. 14, '64 


18 


Oct. 14, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept 28, '64 


20 


Sept. 29, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 10, '64 


24 


Sept. 10, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 10, '64 


18 


Sept. 10, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 10, '64 


22 


Sept. 10, '64 


Corp. 


L 


Sept. 10, '64 


22 


Sept. 10, '64 


Priv. 


L 


Sept. 13, '64 


27 


Sept. 14, '64 


Priv. 


X 


Sept. 13, '64 


25 


Sept. 14, '64 


Corp. 


L 


Sept. 7, '64 


28 


Sept. 14, '64 


Sergt. 

VETERAN 



Gardner, Charles 



u. s. COLORED 
K 127 Inf.; Aug. 15, '64 26 Aug. 15,'64 Priv.(sub.) 



MILITARY HISTORY. 

ONE AND THREE YEA11S. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. 



287 



ENGLAND VOLUNTEER CAVALRY. 

Deserted, Feb., '62, Pawtucket, R. I. 

HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

Corp. Jan. 20, '65. 

HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



App. 1 Sergt. ; See Miscel. Organizations ; 
Tr. to Co. A, June 10, '65 ; 



See 9 N. II. V. 



RESERVE CORPS. 



Mustered Out or Discharged. 

must, out, July 29, '65. 
must, out, July 29, '65. 
must, out, May 6, '65. 
must, out, July 29, '65. 
must, out, July 29, '65. 



must, out, Sept. 11, '65. 



must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, Sept. 11, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 
must, out, June 15, '65. 



See 4 N. H. V. ; deserted, Sept. 1, '65, Portland, Me. 

See 1 and 4 N. H. V. ; disch. Nov. 14, '65. 



TROOPS. 

Tr. to Co. B. ; 



must, out, Oct. 20, '65, Brazos Santiago, Tex. 



288 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Name. 

*Ames, John W. 
♦Austin, Orion 

Bailey, George F. 
*Bailey, George W. 
*Bailey, Jesse O. 

Bailey, Orin Albert 
*Bailey, Rufns H. H. 
*Beckford, William A. 
*Breck, Elijah F. 
*Emerson, Nelson 
*Hanson, Collins M. 

*George, Daniel G. 



Company. 

Co. H, 22 Mass. Inf., 
Co. E, 13 Mass. Inf. 
Co. F, 6 Mass. Inf., 
Co. D, 1 Mass. Cav., 
Co. D, 1 Mass. Cav., 
Co. L, 1 Mass. Cav., 
Co. D, 1 Mass. Cav., 
Co. B, 3 Inf., U. S. A., 
Co. G, 39 Mass. Inf., 
Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., 
Co. A, Headq'ters Troops, 
Dept. of the Gulf, 
Co. D, 1 Mass. Cav., 



Date of En- 
listment. 

Sept. 6, '61 

July 16, '61 

Apr. 16, '61 

Feb. 8, '64 

Feb. 22, '64 

Sept. 20, '61 

Feb. 16, '64 

Mar. 29, '61 

Aug. 20, '62 

July 5, '61 

July 24, '63 



,_„ Date Mus- 
Age - tered In. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Rank. 

32 Sept. 6, '61 Priv. 

20 July 16, '61 Priv. 
24 

24 Feb. 8, '64 Priv. 

43 Feb. 22, '64 Priv. 

20 Sept. 23, '61 Priv. 

22 Feb. 16, '64 Priv. 
19 Priv. 

30 Sept. 2, '62 Priv. 

38 July 5, '61 Priv. 

24 July 24, '63 Priv. 



Sept, 16, '61 21 Sept. 17, '61 Priv. 



*George, John H. 

*Hopkins, Frank 
*Kelley, Daniel W. 
*Kelley, William H. H. 
*Lee, Oliver 

*Lewis, Charles A. 
*Mc Arthur, John C. 

*Merrill, Charles H. 
*Newell, Samuel T. 
*Pattee, Charles T. 
*Pattee, George H. 

*Richardson, Oakley E. D 
♦Tebbetts, Charles W. 



Co. D, 1 Mass. Cav., 



Sept. 16, '61 19 Sept. 17, '61 Priv. 



Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., July 

Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., July 

Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., July 

Co. A, Headq'ters Troops, July 

Dept. of the Gulf, 
Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., July 

Co. A, Headq'ters Troops, July 

Dept. of the Gulf, 
Co. B, 23 Mass. Inf., Oct. 

Co. I, 1 Art. U. S. A., Apr. 
Co. B, 14 Mass. Inf., July 

Co. A, Headq'ters Troops, July 

Dept. of the Gulf, 
Co. M, 2 Mass. H. Art., Dec. 
Co. C, 19 Mass. Inf., Aug. 

U. S. NAVY. 



5, 


'61 18 


July 5, 


'61 Priv 


5, 


'61 24 


July 5, 


'61 Priv 


5, 


'61 21 


July 5, 


'61 Priv 


24, 


'63 34 


July 24, 


'63 Priv 


5, 


'61 18 


July 5, 


'61 Priv, 


24, 


'63 38 


July 24, 


'63 Priv 


21, 


'61 18 


Oct. 21, 


'61 Priv. 


11, 


'61 17 




Priv. 


5, 


'61 25 


July 5, 


'61 Priv. 


24, 


'63 21 


July 24, 


'63 Priv. 


15, 


'63 19 


Dec. 28, 


'63 Priv. 


17, 


'61 19 


Aur. 28, 


'61 Priv. 



Man, Roy ; age 39; enl. Apr. 13, '63, at Boston, as Landsman; 

disch. from " Seneca " as Ord. Seaman, June 13, '64, 
Massey, Leverett; age 24; enl. Aug. 11, '62, at Boston, as Seaman; 

disch. from receiving ship, New York City, 



MILITARY HISTORY. 289 

ORGANIZATIONS. 

Promotion or Transfer. Wounded or Killed. Mustered Out or Discharged. 

wd. and captured, June 27, '62; released; disch., disab., Mar. 14, '63. 
wd. June 21, '64; must, out, Aug. 1, 64. 

Corp. Mar. 19, '64; disch. June 17, '65. 

disch. June 29, '65. 
disch. June 17, '65, Worcester, Mass. 
Tr. to Co. L, 4 Mass. Cav. ; disch. Aug. 2, '65. 

See 1 and 5 N. H. V. ; disch. July 9, '65. 

See 8 N. H. V. ; disch., disab., Sept. 5, '61, Washington, D. C. 

disch. May 30, '65. 
See 1 N. H. H. Art. ; disch. July 8, '64. 

Tr. to Co. I, New Orleans Inf., Dec. 27, '64; disch. June 1, '66, New Orleans, La. 

[See 15 N. H. V. 
1 Sergt. Feb. 8, 63; tr. to U. S. Navy, May 7, '64, as an Ord. Seaman, under name of 
[William Smith; served on U. S. S. "North Carolina," "Chicopee," and " Hart- 
[ford " ; volunteered from " Chicopee " as one of crew of Picket Laurel No. 1; 
[captured, Oct. 27, '64, Plymouth, N. C, while one of party destroying the rebel 
[ram "Albemarle"; received medal for this act; paroled; disch. Apr. 26, '66, as 
[coxswain of " Chicopee." 
Corp. Nov. 24, '63; app. Sergt. May 1, '64; disch. to accept promotion; 
[app. 2 Lt. Co. D, 5 Mass. Cav. Sept. 27, '64; must, out, Oct. 31, '65. 

died. Apr. 21, '62, Derry. 
wd. May 19, '64; died, May 23, '64. 

must, out, July 8, '64. 
Tr. to Co. I, New Orleans Inf., Dec. 27, '64; disch. July 23, '65, New Orleans, La. 

[See 15 N. H. V. 

captured, May 19, '64; released; disch. Jan. 26, '65. 
Tr. to Co. I, New Orleans Inf., Dec. 27, '64} disch. June 1, '66. 

[See 15 N. H. V. 

died, dis., July 5, '62, Annapolis, Md. 

disch., disab., Dec. 7, '63, Ft. Independence, Boston, 
must, out, July 8, '64. 
Tr. to Co. I, New Orleans Inf., Dec. 27, '64 ; disch. July 23, '65, New Orleans, La. 

[See 15 N. H. V. 

must, out, Sept. 3, '65. 
App. Hosp. Steward, Jan. 1, '65; must, out, June 30, '65. 

u. S. NAVY. 

Served on U. S. S. "Ohio," "Niphon," "Flag," and "Seneca"; 
time expired. 

Served on U. S. S. " Ohio," " Princeton," and " Potomska " ; 
Oct. 26, '63, time expired. 



20 



290 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

After the war there was naturally very little desire for mili- 
tary matters in the state, and on July 9, 1869, the legislature 
passed an act to suspend encampments of the militia for a period 
of five years. In 1874 this was extended for five years more. 
But two years later, July 18, 1876, a new law was enacted, 
ordering regular drill of all militia companies in the state. There 
has been no company in Salem since this time. 

The outbreak of the war with Spain drew several of the young 
men from Salem into the army, either as regulars or volunteers ; 
but to trace them, or even ascertain the names of all of them 
would require much time and research. Those who enlisted in 
the regular army, those in the volunteer companies raised in 
Lawrence, Mass., and those recruited into New Hampshire regi- 
ments of volunteers would needs be traced through entirely dif- 
ferent channels. Even if this were done, it is unlikely that the 
results would justify the work. 

We have reviewed the history of Salem in times of war, fol- 
lowed her soldiers through their military careers, and watched 
the support at home for those on the field. And we can proudly 
say that when the crisis came, when the need was great, as in 
'76 and again in '61, Salem gave bountifully of her best. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Industrial. 

While this chapter is necessarily of a miscellaneous nature, 
it is as unified as varying items and sections will permit. Be- 
sides the growth of individual industries, that which in many 
instances depended directly upon it is here included, namely the 
development of the villages or hamlets about such industries. 
The few items regarding financial conditions, in addition to 
those elsewhere mentioned, are placed in this chapter for lack 
of a more appropriate place. 

CURRENCY. 

In order that the value of the money of the first days of the 
town may be understood, a comparison found in the records 
of 1750 is here presented. An account was to be paid in "old 
tenor," which was said to be worth only one fourth of the value 
of the "new tenor" at that time. One pound old tenor was 
accepted as value of one bushel of Indian corn; then a pound 
new tenor would buy four bushels of corn. 

The steady rise in Rev. Abner Bayley's salary, to make up 
for the shrinkage of the money value, is also an indication of 
the rate of that shrinkage. In the ten. years from 1753 to 1763 
his salary rose from 250 pounds to 1,075 pounds. Certainly 
the old tenor was becoming very cheap. 

The first mention of decimal currency in the Salem records 
occurs in the record of the annual town meeting of 1766. An 
article had been inserted in the warrant: "3 ly if the town votes 
to give any Compensation for Catching of the wolves to See 
how much money the town will Vote a head for Catching of 
those wolves which are the Destroyers of our Substance." The 
meeting voted ten dollars per head as a bounty on the creatures. 



292 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

However it was not until about 1800 that taxes and other town 
accounts were rendered in terms of dollars and cents. 

SAWMILLS AND LUMBER. 

The ancient sawmills represented the first industry of the 
town. Almost before the settlers began to take up their claims- 
in this region timber was cut and sawed here and hauled to 
places where building was going on. These mills were operated 
by water power, being located on the Spicket or its branches. 
One of the first was on Hitty Titty brook at Millville. When 
and by whom it was built is not known, but it was owned and 
operated during the early days of the town by Henry Sanders. 
Here the frame for the meetinghouse was prepared, as were 
also boards and planks for the building. 

Another very old mill was on the Spicket at North Salem, 
near Cowbell Corner. It was operated by Seth Pattee as early 
as 1769, as it is mentioned in the laying out of a road at that 
time. The Clendenin family afterwards obtained the property 
and conducted the business until about 1840. The mill was 
torn down about fifty years ago. It stood on the north side of 
the bridge, a short distance up stream. The dam is still there 
at the head of the canal that brought water to the gristmill that 
stood on the south side of the road. 

Near the wide horseshoe bend in the Spicket at the foot of 
Allen's (Long's) Hill was an ancient fording place where the 
path from Poverty Street, near the Bradley farm, met the road 
leading to Hale's mill. This path passed near an old mill site, 
the dam of which may still be seen on Captain's brook, a short 
distance above its junction with the river (M 653). Here the 
Johnson family owned a sawmill during the first years of the 
building of the town. There were William, Samuel and Tim- 
othy, all of whom had an interest in the mill at one time or 
another. In 1765 a gristmill had supplanted the sawmill, and 
was owned by Edward Carlton. This is found in the deed of 
sale by Carlton to Samuel Clement at that time. When Carl- 
ton obtained possession we do not know, nor when the mill dis- 
appeared. Eighty years ago the place looked very much as it 




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INDUSTRIAL. 293 

•does today, the large rocks showing clearly the ruins of the old 
dam. 

A short distance below the Atlas mill at North Salem is the 
old Duston mill (M 546). Here in 1832 was Hatch's shingle 
mill, soon afterwards converted into a sash and blind factory. 
Although the origin of this building is not known, it is not 
likely that it was built as early as those named above; because 
of the small fall of water the places of greater head were first 
chosen, while the less powerful falls were constructed later. 
This mill has been used for various purposes of late years, one 
being the manufacture of shoddy, operated by Levi W. Taylor. 
It was recently purchased with a view of installing an electric 
light plant. 

The sawmill of Nathaniel Duston was near the road on the 
south side of the Spicket at North Salem on what is now the land 
of Mrs. Jennings (M 565). It was equipped with an old-fash- 
ioned "jig-saw," which ran up and down, for sawing logs into 
planks. Duston sold it to Richard Taylor, and he to Matthew H. 
and Levi W. Taylor. They did an extensive business here for 
some years. The building was finally torn down by Richard, 
who built where the Atlas mill now stands. 

The last stationary sawmill of the town was at Millville, owned 
by Wm G. Crowell (M 490). It was not far from the ancient 
ruins of Henry Sanders' mill. It was operated first by a Mr. 
Clement, who owned the property here bordering on the brook. 
Mr. Crowell operated it until 1885, after which he used portable 
sawmills in his lumber business. 

The sawing of the town has been done entirely by these port- 
able mills in recent years, several contracting firms acting as lum- 
ber brokers. Wallace W. Cole and Isaac C. Brown, the latter 
of Methuen, have been largely interested in this business. 

GRISTMILLS. 

These institutions, long since gone from among the industries 
of Salem, with the single exception of the modern mill at the 
Depot, were formerly very essential to the life of the com- 
munity. During the years when the settlers were taking up their 
claims the cornbread was one of the staple articles of diet. And 



294 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

in later years, although white flour could be obtained, it was too 
expensive compared with rye and Indian meal to find favor with 
the industrious and frugal people of that time. 

To the first inhabitants the luxury of ground meal was not 
common. The corn had to be carried a long distance to the mill, 
over paths not any too easy to travel. The cheaper and easier 
way was to pound the corn in a mortar and bake it after soaking 
in water. The product of this process was known as "bannock," 
and was prized as a treat fit for a king. As the land came into 
a better state of cultivation the corn crop rapidly increased. 
Large fields of corn were a part of the adornment of every farm, 
being at the same time an essential means to the livelihood of 
the household. Then the gristmill became a necessity, and se^ 
cured a location at each convenient waterfall. 

One of the first was at Cowbell Corner, at the southwest corner 
of the crossing of the road and river (M 613). Being on the 
main road from Londonderry to Haverhill this mill gathered a 
large trade. More than one hundred years ago it was operated 
by John and Benjamin Clendenin, brothers of William, who had 
the old Pattee sawmill across the road. Later John Taylor 
bought the property of the Clendenin family, after which the 
gristmill was run for a time by Nathaniel H. Paul. It was torn 
down by Mr. Taylor about 1860. Mr. Paul afterwards bought 
the place and built the shoddy mill on the site of the old build- 
ing. 

The Clement mill (M 653), formerly referred to as Johnson's 
sawmill, was in operation several years, certainly before the Rev- 
olution. This had the patronage of the families about the Cap- 
tain's Pond and Spicket Hill districts, which were at that time 
numerous. 

At some time the old mill on Hitty Titty brook (M 488) must 
have been equipped for grinding, as the old millstones are still 
near the dam, nearly buried under the soil which has been ac- 
cumulating during all these years. Of the early owners nothing 
is known, but the "Woodbury and Sanders families later held 
partnership control of the property. One of the stones may be 
seen in the cut on page 292, taken this year. 

On Policy brook, near the crossing of the road leading to Pel- 



INDUSTRIAL. 295 

ham, stood the mill of Edward Griffin, who ground here for some 
time (M 235) . This was the rendezvous of all the farmers of the 
west part of the town. Grain was brought from miles around, 
to be ground into meal. The old mill was burned about 1875, 
being owned then by Baxter Hall. It was not rebuilt. How- 
ever, Charles Burns has lately built a house not far from the site 
of the mill. 

Another miller had his stand at the dam in North Salem about 
where the passage way or entrance to the Atlas mill leads from 
the road (M 542). Here again we cannot trace the history of 
the mill far back. It is safe to say that the fine water head here 
would have been sufficient inducement to build here very early. 
In 1832 it was an old building. The miller was then Nathaniel 
Duston, who later sold to Richard Taylor, probably about 1860. 
He discontinued grinding after about eight or ten years, when 
the mill lay idle. It was then taken down and a sash and blind 
mill built a little farther from the road. 

The old mill (M 318) near the No. 8 schoolhouse, on the brook 
by the residence of James Littlejohn, was operated last by Tris- 
tram Kimball, and still longer ago by William Clough. There 
is some question as to the age of this mill, but it is believed to 
have been very old. One of the millstones lies half buried in the 
bed of the brook, while the other forms the doorstep of the Little- 
john house. 

FARMING. 

The advantages and disadvantages of Salem as a farming town 
are too well known to require more than passing reference here. 
The general rocky and sandy nature of the soil forbids any exten- 
sive agricultural undertaking, but small tracts of fertile lowland 
furnish good accommodation for gardening and hay raising. The 
markets of the neighboring communities of Methuen and Law- 
rence are supplied to a considerable extent with vegetables from 
the Salem farms. In addition to the farmers of long residence 
in the town there are a large number of families from the south 
European countries — Italy, Turkey, Syria, Armenia — now carry- 
ing on extensive farming industry. These people are hard 
working, prudent families for the most part, and seem appre- 
ciative of the opportunities here afforded the workingman. They 



296 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

are reclaiming many of the farms which would otherwise lie 
idle and in waste, abandoned by the original owners. 

Formerly practically every landholder was a farmer, having 
large tracts of corn and other grains, which were to furnish food 
for the family as well as the stock during the winter. 

A century ago the farmers were often in need of more hands 
than the household afforded, and would take as apprentices for 
certain periods of years, boys who had no parents to make them a 
home. Such cases were regulated by contract before the select- 
men, the boy and master being parties thereto. The following 
will serve as an illustration of the form of such agreement : 

"This indenture made this twenty-first day of June, 1821, be- 
tween Jacob Ordway of Salem in the County of Rockingham 
and State of New Hampshire & Joshua Merrill & Silas Betton, 
selectmen and overseers of the poor of the said town of Salem, 
of the one part, and Isaac Wheeler of said Salem, Gentleman, of 
the other part, witnesseth, that the said Jacob Ordway being of 
the age of fourteen years of age and upwards, not having any 
father, mother or any relation in said town nor in the state able 
to support him, and having applied to the sd selectmen for assist- 
ance both of his own free will and accord, and by and with the 
consent of the said selectmen, place and bound himself apprentice 
to the said Isaac Wheeler, to .be taught in the trade, science & 
occupation of husbandry, which the said Isaac Wheeler now car- 
ries & in the winter seasons in the art of shoe making, and to 
live with serve him, and continue with him as an apprentice from 
the day of the date hereof, until the Sixth day of May, which 
will be in the year of our Lord, one thousand and twenty eight, 
during all which term the said Jacob Ordway, as apprentice as 
aforesaid, shall well and faithfully serve, demean himself, and be 
just & true to him the said Isaac Wheeler as his master, and keep 
his secrets & obey all his master's lawful commands. He shall 
do no hurt nor damage to his master in his goods or estate or 
otherwise, nor willingly suffer any to be done by others ; he shall 
not embezzle or waste his master's goods, nor lend them without 
his consent & shall not traffic, nor buy or sell with his own goods 
without his master's leave; he shall not play at any unlawful 
game, nor haunt taverns or grog shops; he shall not commit 




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INDUSTRIAL. 297 

fornication, nor contract matrimony ; he shall not at any time 
absent himself without his master's leave, but shall in all things 
demean and behave himself toward his said master during said 
term. 

"And the said Isaac Wheeler on his part for the consideration 
aforesaid doth covenant promise & agree to teach and instruct 
his said apprentice or otherwise cause him to be instructed as 
aforesaid in the best way & manner he can, and cause him to be 
instructed in reading and writing and in arithmetic as far as the 
Rule of three, if he be capable of learning the same, and shall 
allow unto his said apprentice, meat, drink, washing, lodging & 
apparel & all other necessaries both in sickness and health during 
said term, & at the expiration thereof, give him two suits of 
clothes, one for every day and one for Sundays, and pay him 
fifty dollars. In witness whereof the parties have interchange- 
ably set their hands & seals the day & year above written. 
Signed sealed & delivered in presence of, 

"Isaac Wheeler (seal) 
"William Taylor Joshua Merrill (seal) 

"Charles C. P. Betton Silas Betton (seal) 

"James Ordway (seal)" 

We have several specimens of this character, some of them 
making other prohibitions than those found in this contract, such 
as playing cards and staying away from divine worship. As a 
rule this method of disposing of youthful paupers proved satis- 
factory. Parents frequently "bound out" their sons to serve 
apprenticeships at some trade, usually for terms of from three 
to five years. 

An extremely interesting sidelight upon the commercial prob- 
lem which confronted the early farmer is furnished by a peti- 
tion received by the general court of New Hampshire at the 
beginning of the Revolution. We are today inclined to think 
that adverse circumstances of any nature are peculiar to our 
own time and generation. The trusts are omnipotent male- 
factors, bent only on the destruction of the laboring people, 
newly sprung into existence, and already attaining stupendous 
growth. This is only one of the terrible evils which we face, 
while we envy the freedom from such oppression enjoyed by 



298 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

our ancestors. But the petition referred to soon reveals the 
error. 

At the outbreak of the Revolution there were committees of 
safety in most towns, organized for the purpose of protecting 
all local interests. These committees from the Merrimack Valley 
towns, Salem, Methuen, Andover, Plastow, Haverhill and 
others, met at Haverhill, February 29, 1776, to remonstrate 
against the extortionate prices then charged for goods. They 
drew up a petition to the ' ' Council and House of Representatives 
of the Colony of New Hampshire." The sub-committtee in 
charge of the drafting of it had for its chairman Isaac Reding- 
ton. The subject of the complaint is best found in the paper 
itself, of which a section is here presented. It stated that the 
"hon ble american Congress" had forbidden any advance of prices 
above the rate for the previous twelve months, and went on to 
show how the statute was being disregarded without compunc- 
tion. 

"That it is generally said that Numbers of Persons among us 
and in our neighborhood from selfish Principals and Disregard- 
ing the public welfare have advanced the prices of their goods 
to Near Double what they used to sell them for and that many 
of them have Endeavoured to engross the most saleable artickles 
and bought them up at the retaill price and Immediately ad- 
vanced upon that retaill price above thirty percent it is also 
said that the farmers upon like selfish motives have hoarded up 
Corn Grain and other Necessaries of life or sold them out at the 
most Exorbitant prices that the Laboring People and those not 
concerned in this unjust Commerce oppressed both by the farmer 
and the merchant are groaning under their burthens and will be 
unable much longer to Endure them that we fear a spirit of 
Discontent Tumult and Disorders will rise among us unless 
speedily prevented by the Interposition of this Hon ble Court the 
fatall consequences of which may be a Disunion and Backward- 
ness in or Defection from the Common Cause of America. 

"Wherefore your Petitioners humbly pray this Hon bIe Court 
would take the Premises into their serious Consideration and 
apply such speedy and effectual Remedy to the Evills above 



INDUSTRIAL. 299 

complained of as may seem Proper and as in duty bound shall 
Ever pray, &c 

"Isaac Redington Chairman Haverhill Feb r y e 29: 1776.— " 

Probably the court felt itself powerless to correct so prevalent 
an evil. Certainly there was no legislation of a socialistic nature 
enacted. The man who was so fortunate as to have a corn sup- 
ply continued to sell it for the highest price he could obtain. 

In the very early days the farmers were sorely troubled by 
wolves. The town provided a bounty for these pests on several 
occasions, one of which has been noted above. March 27, 1751, 
at the annual meeting, it was voted to pay ten pounds for killing 
a grown wolf, and three pounds for a young one. 

A queer vote was recorded in 1765, to the effect that each 
man "who has four oxen or more shall have a sled four feet 
from outside to outside." This must have been aimed at the 
tendency to load too heavily on a narrow sled, thus cutting or 
digging into the road. 

In 1807 was passed another vote that simply bewilders our 
wonted belief in the progress of today. It was that eight hours 
should constitute a day's work on the road, for a man or a cart 
and oxen! Verily history does repeat itself. 

TEXTILE INDUSTRIES. 

The northern part of Salem has been the home of most of the 
textile working within the town, six separate locations providing 
accommodation for water-power mills. 

paul's mill. 

Beginning at the north the first of these sites is at Cowbell 
Corner, where N. H. Paul had a fair-sized shoddy mill from 
1865 to 1875, on the site of the old Clendenin gristmill. The 
accompanying picture shows the building (M 613) with the small 
bell in the tower. The size and tone of this diminutive bell 
suggested the name by which this corner has since been known. 
The brick house at the left of the picture is the old William 
Clendenin residence, now occupied and owned by Herbert Par- 
ker (M612). 



300 HISTORY OF SALEM. 



beckford's MILL. 



Almost down to North Salem village is the second of these 
mill sites, where the old Beckford stocking mill was situated 
(M 593). At first cotton batting was made here, afterwards 
stocking yarn. The building must have been built early, per- 
haps for sawing or grinding, as it was very old in appearance 
as long ago as 1830. Not more than four or five hands were 
employed. The machinery, including a picker, set of cards, 
and an old loom for weaving rag carpets, remained in the build- 
ing long after it was neglected. It finally went to ruin. 



taylor's mill. 



The most extensive business ever done in town in this line was 
earried on at the Taylor mill, opposite the Methodist church. 
There had been an old wooden mill here very early, but the na- 
ture of the work done is not known. James Alexander owned 
and operated it in 1802, when it was the second mill in town in 
point of value of taxable property and product. There was a 
rude dam which held up a considerable head of water (M A 2). 

John Taylor moved here and bought the property of Alexander 
in 1833. Edward Pranker soon joined him, when they took up 
the manufacture of woolen goods as Alexander had done. They 
repaired the old mill and operated it for a time, gradually add- 
ing to its size. In 1845, after he had been running alone for 
some time, Taylor tore down the old mill and built the brick 
mill. In 1870 this burned, but was rebuilt by M. H. Taylor 
the next year. A new wheel-pit and penstock had been put in 
soon after the first brick mill was built, giving greatly increased 
power. The dam was raised and extended at the same time, 
permitting the control of a much larger water reserve than had 
been possible before. About fifty hands were employed, the 
work being on flannel goods. In 1863 John Taylor sold the busi- 
ness to M. H. Taylor, Richard Taylor and Charles Austin. They 
added a new section to the building, nearly doubling the ca- 
pacity of the plant. The pay-roll then was raised to about one 
hundred names. Soon after this Richard withdrew from the 
company. 




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INDUSTRIAL. 301 

After the mill was rebuilt in 1871 it was operated for a time 
by M. H. Taylor, then leased to Walton, Haigh & Simpson. 
This firm manufactured a lightweight cloaking that was used 
for waterproof garments. In 1878 this mill also burned. The 
ruins are still in about the condition in which they were directly 
after the fire. They may be seen in the background of the 
illustration of the lower dam (see page 21). 

A picture of the mill as it appeared during its most flourishing 
period is here shown. The view is taken from the hill directly 
south of the mill, looking north. (Page 297.) 

ATLAS MILL. 

The next mill, that of the Atlas company, is one of the two in 
town now engaged in textile industry (M 543). The present 
building was put up after the sash and blind factory here ceased 
business. J. W. "Wheeler did some weaving here after the burn- 
ing of his mill, from 1879 to 1881. Since then various uses 
have been made of the plant. In 1887 the Woodbury shoe shop 
was located here, remaining for a few years. Then W. H. Han- 
son started making woolen goods, which he continued until 
1905, when the Atlas company was formed. There had been, 
in 1902, a merger company formed under which Mr. Hanson 
still acted as manager. It was incorporated under the name of 
the Granite State Worsted Company, for the purpose of "spin- 
ning, weaving, and the manufacture of woolens, worsteds and 
other cloths." The members of the corporation were Levi W. 
Taylor, Greenleaf C. Bartlett, Howard L. Gordon, Wallace W. 
Cole and William H. Hanson. The appearance of the mill is 
shown on the opposite page. 

duston 's mill. 

The Duston mill, already referred to under Sawmills, was for 
many years operated by Amos Dow in the yarn and stocking 
business. He was killed in 1855 at the mill by the accidental 
discharge of a gun. After that Obadiah Duston carried on the 
business, being succeeded by his son Thomas. For about a year 
just prior to 1880, Levi W. Taylor had a small shoddy mill in 
connection with the plant. In 1881 Thomas Duston was making 



302 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

men's socks, mittens and gloves, employing during the busy- 
season about twenty hands. 

wheeler's mill. 

At Wheeler's mill a good manufacturing business has been 
built up by degrees. Here was. the oldest water right and mill 
privilege on the Spicket, with the possible exception of that at 
Cowbell Corner, held by Pattee. The Allen family owned it 
before the town was incorporated, David being the proprietor 
of the mill. In 1802 it was still in the family and rated in the 
inventory as the most valuable business in the town (M 513). 

In later years, up to perhaps 1838, the property was owned 
by Henry S. Beckford, who did a small carding and dyeing 
business. After his failure Leonard Morrison bought the place. 
It is to be understood that each new proprietor took the entire 
property, living in the Allen house opposite the mill. Morrison 
stayed about ten years, then sold to John Taylor, Jr. Meantime 
the business was growing, demanding more room, so that the mill 
was enlarged from time to time. Taylor sold in 1856 to James 
Bailey and Dr. Merrill. Two years later Merrill sold his in- 
terest to John W. Wheeler. In 1860 Charles and George Austin 
had the business for a short time, selling to Mr. Wheeler, who 
has owned it since that time. 

In 1872 the old wooden mill was burned. Nothing was then 
done with the property until four years later, when the first 
brick mill was erected. It was very much like the present mill. 
The construction work was done in the summer of 1877. Only 
two years later, on May 23, 1879, this building also was con- 
sumed by fire, again to be rebuilt in 1881, as shown on page 304. 

For some time the principal goods made here have been flan- 
nels, blankets, etc. After the burning of Taylor's mill this was 
for several years the seat of the largest mill business in town. 

titcomb's mill. 

Near the small pond at the Fairmount House (M 236), stood 
a two-story wooden mill, used for various industries. It was a 
stocking factory at one time. Mrs. Burgin says the first match 
she ever saw was made there. It was burned and rebuilt. Tit- 



INDUSTRIAL. 303 

comb had a mill here, later occupied by Griffin, then by John 
Hall. The last building burned about 1843. 

SALEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

In 1835 a number of men at Millville organized for the purpose 
of carrying on a manufacturing business. They were incor- 
porated June 27 of that year into The Salem Manufacturing 
Company, the members being Samuel W. Clement, John Corn- 
ing, Nathaniel Woodbury and Peter Massey. Their charter per- 
mitted them to engage in cotton, woolen, iron and other lawful 
manufactures, at or near Clement's new mill, in Salem. It 
further stated that they were permitted "To hold and convey 
real & personal estate of every kind and any amount not exceed- 
ing the sum of five hundred thousand dollars." 

HATTING. 

One of the principal industries of Salem at one time was 
hatting. Small shops were located in different parts of the 
town. At the Center Jedediah Carlton had a factory beside 
the Spicket, on what was later known as the Joseph Webster 
place. It stood close by the river, not far below the bridge. This 
was in the early years of the last century. Here it was that 
Caleb Saunders learned the hatter's trade. 

Another shop was at Messer's, on the corner of the road lead- 
ing to the Hutchins farm. This belonged to Frederick Messer, 
who lived in the house now owned and occupied by Leverett 
Dyson. 

Straw hats were braided at home by hand. Frequently the 
women of the household used this business as a means to procure 
a little "pin-money," or even, as in one instance of which we 
know, to buy material for building the homestead. 

SHOE INDUSTRY. 

Of late years the principal business of Salem has been the 
manufacture of shoes. Both the Center and Depot have en- 
joyed largely the fruits of this industry, while North Salem and 
Millville have had some degree of prosperity from it. For 
many years before the large factories were built many small 



304 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

shops were scattered throughout the town. At first each family 
made its own shoes, and it was a rare thing to find a man who 
had not at some time in his life taken a hand at the business. 
Then as the division of labor became more strongly marked some 
families made shoes, while others, whose land may have been 
extra good, raised the crops, and so on. From this condition it 
was but a few more stages to the practice of today. The small 
shops are mentioned in Chapter XII ; here we are concerned 
mainly with the two establishments which today furnish employ- 
ment for more men and women than all of the other factories 
combined. These are the T. M. Russ shop at the Center and the 
Woodbury factory at the Depot. 

The Russ family are seemingly shoemakers by nature. These 
men have been in the business in Salem for more than forty 
years. In 1866 Daniel N. Russ built a large shop 80x30 feet at 
the foot of Gordon's Hill (M 74). This was operated until 
October 21, 1871, when it burned. Soon after he built another 
on the Lawrence road, which was operated for some years, but 
now stands idle (M 404). In 1877 T. M. Russ began to make 
women's, misses' and children's pegged shoes in a small wooden 
building just west of his present shop (M 69). This was after- 
wards used as a heelshop by Gordon Bros., who occupied it when 
it burned. Meantime the business at the site of the present 
shop (M 70) had rapidly developed. Jesse Ayer had built a 
wooden shop here which was rented to John R. and Benj. R. 
Wheeler, who were doing business in it when it burned in Oc- 
tober, 1876. They at once undertook the erection of a new 
brick building which was erected during 1877. On the date of 
completion, January 2, 1878, a warming was held in the place. 
There was a large gathering, who enjoyed a fine supper served 
on the spot. Shortly afterwards T. M. Russ bought this factory 
of the Wheelers, trading his small shop close by. The brick 
shop also burned, after which Mr. Russ erected the present struc- 
ture in 1886. It is 100 feet long by 30 feet wide and has the 
neat appearance shown in the cut on page 305. 

The other large business is that conducted by Hon. Frank P. 
and Isaiah Woodbury at the Depot (M 144). F. P. Woodbury 
was formerly engaged in shoe manufacturing in North Salem and 




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INDUSTRIAL. 305 

at Millville, where he had several shops. On the site just west of 
the present shop at the Depot (M 145), Isaiah Woodbury had a 
shoe shop. The present business has been built up rapidly, start- 
ing in the front part of the building, then taking in the central 
portion, which was formerly used for a barn, and shortly after- 
wards being augmented by the addition of the large square part 
of the factory, which formerly stood by the track on the west 
side, where it was the shoe factory of P. C. Hall. The cut on 
page 308 is a good representation of the plant today. 

The shoe business at the Depot village was first conducted on 
a large scale by P. C. Hall, who built several shops and was 
also interested in several out-of-town firms who did business here. 
These shops are described under the historical descriptions of 
places, Chapter XII. 

An industry which is closely allied to the shoe business is that 
of engraving dies for the stamping of labels for shoe linings, etc. 
This work is done in Salem by Edward L. Gordon at his resi- 
dence (M 63). It is very fine manual work, requiring a skilled 
hand and accurate eye. Mr. Gordon makes the stamps for the 
large shoe manufacturers of Newburyport, Salem, Mass., and 
Lynn, employing two men to assist him in filling his orders. 

ENAMEL CLOTH. 

For a few years about 1880 a considerable business was done 
in Salem by the Evans Artificial Leather Company. On March 
22, 1877, P. C. Hall sold this company the shoeshop which he 
then owned on the present site of the Heath stable by the railroad 
crossing (M 166). The stock of the concern was largely adver- 
tised, and elaborate plans circulated for the building up of the 
plant. But on January 12, 1880, the factory burned, and with 
it the block of James Troy, on the site of Hotel Rockingham. 
The business was then transferred up the track to a point just 
south of the brick building now standing and last used as the 
oxalic acid factory. Here a large brick factory was built and 
the business reestablished. The oxalic building was built later 
as a part of the equipment. But again the flames claimed the 
property as their victim — the main factory burned March 20, 

21 



306 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

1883. This finished the business as far as Salem was concerned. 
The loss at this last fire was estimated at forty thousand dollars. 

METHUEN COMPANY'S WATER RIGHT. 

As the right of private companies to hold flowage and drainage 
privileges is obtained usually from individual land-owners, the 
town records are reticent in regard to the origin of such rights. 
The first reference in the Salem records to the Methuen com- 
pany's rights at Canobie Lake is found in the account of dam- 
ages paid by that company in 1843 for washouts on the road 
near Hall's mill (M 235). Four years later the company desired 
to secure more tenable flowage rights, so purchased the privilege 
from the owners of land adjacent to the pond. The first deed 
was from Israel Woodbury, Jr., in 1847. Others soon followed: 
Jonathan Stickney, 1847 ; Abel Dow, 1849 ; Charles L. Haseltine, 
1849; Isaiah "W. Haseltine, 1849; Jeremiah Morrison, 1849; 
Joseph A. and George P. Cross, 1853 ; Richard Woodbury, 1854. 
The wording of this last deed is indicative of the sense of all 
— "meaning and intending to convey to said Company the right 
to flood with water or drain all the land I now own as the dam 
and floom now are. ' ' 

After the company had repaired the dam a serious discussion 
arose as to whether or not they were flowing higher or draining 
lower than at the time of the above deeds. A lawsuit was hinted 
at, but evidently thought inadvisable. 

SALEM BOARD OF, TRADE. 

During the industrial growth of the town frequent instances 
have occurred where some well directed effort might have re- 
sulted in inducing manufacturers to locate their works here. 
In a town meeting held April 18, 1879, it was "voted to exempt 
from taxation all who will come to town and build and do busi- 
ness with capital of not less than $5,000." However, a more 
active inducement, an interest which would search out prospec- 
tive parties, was needed. Not until the spring of 1906 was a 
definite step taken. At that time the Salem Board of Trade was 
organized with a membership of forty-nine, the names of whom 
are taken from the signatures on the constitution : Wallace W. 



INDUSTRIAL. 307 

Cole, Arthur C. Hall, James Ewins, E. A. Peabody, Howard L. 
Gordon, David S. Emery, John J. Richardson, Wm. E. Lancas- 
ter, C. H. Borchers, L. E. Bailey, J. F. Fournier, L. "Wallace 
Hall, Geo. W. Thorn, Francis E. Higgins, James C. Willett, 
Woodbury J. Brown, Vladimir N. Sikorski, Frank P. "Woodbury, 
Alberton W. Clark, L. Henry Bailey, Daniel A. Abbott, Joseph 
Bailey, Lewis P. Brady, George A. Brady, Peter LaCourt, John 
A. Brista, David Hird, Paul Hannagan, Wm. Ganley, Chas. R. 
Bair, Charles F. Kimball, K. M. McLaughlin, Fred C. Buxton, 
W. DuBois Pulver, Warren Emerson, Ernest Woodbury, Isaac 
C. Brown, Frank D. Wilson, E. A. Wade, Lewis F. Soule, C. F. 
Morrison, G. M. Woodbury, John T. Gagnon, R. J. Macartney, 
Levi W. Taylor, John C. Crowell, Charles W. Joyce, Willis G. 
Richardson. 

Officers for the year were elected as follows : President, W. 
W. Cole; Vice Presidents, Jas. Ewins, D. S. Emery; Treasurer, 
C. F. Kimball; Secretary, W. D. Pulver; Auditor, H. L. Gordon; 
Directors for three years, F. C. Buxton, L. W. Taylor, D. S. 
Emery; Directors for two years, I. C. Brown, W. W. Cole, Jas. 
Ewins; Directors for one year, F. P. Woodbury, F. D. Wilson, 
E. A. Peabody. 

The object of the board, as stated in the constitution, is "to 
forward such movements as shall tend toward the prosperity of 
the town of Salem." 

Regular meetings of the board are held on the second Wednes- 
day monthly. In April, June, September, November and Jan- 
uary the entire association meets in conjunction with the direc- 
tors. 

The members of the organization keep a lookout for any busi- 
ness enterprises which might benefit the town by their location 
here, and take measures to induce proprietors of such interests 
to settle here. 

GROWTH OF VILLAGES. 

Salem Center was developed principally as a farming com- 
munity, with the general industries which usually are found 
attendant upon such circumstances. Small shoeshops, hatshops, 
or weave rooms, all operated by manual skill rather than by ma- 



308 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

chinery, were the rule here. The growth was more steady and 
covered a longer period of time than was the case at the Depot 
or at North Salem. Among the men who were instrumental in 
building up here before the Civil War may be mentioned John 
Clendenin and his son, John Leverett, Moores Bailey, Isaiah 
Kelly, John Marston, John R. Wheeler, Earl C. Gordon, John 
C. Ewins, Moody Foster and others. Just after the war the shoe 
business took its great boom. Then Daniel and Thornton Russ, 
Benj. R. Wheeler, Joseph Webster, Ed. S. Woodbury, all helped 
to make the village busier, and therefore a better place of resi- 
dence. 

Salem Depot was probably never dreamed of as the site of a 
village before the railroad was built. And had it been put 
through the Center and North Salem, as was proposed at the 
time, it is likely that this locality would now be taken up with 
level farms rather than thickly placed dwellings. But even the 
railroad could not turn the trick at once. Before the war very 
little change had come about. In 1859 there were only nineteen 
houses and nine other buildings here, all told. The great devel- 
opment came in the years between 1860 and 1880. And if to one 
man more than another the credit is to be given, that man is 
Prescott C. Hall. It seemed that every building which he 
touched turned into a shoeshop ; and he was also instrumental, 
either directly or indirectly, in building many of the dwellings 
now in this village. He did in a way for this village what John 
Taylor had done for North Salem. 

Other men who were potent factors in the good work here were 
Moody Foster, Joel C. Carey and Phinnie C. Foster. Others 
were doing their share in many other ways to build up the place. 
Of more recent results are the operations of Frank P. and Isaiah 
Woodbury. Their large shoe factory does much to keep up a 
prosperous condition here. 

North Salem was to a greater extent than any other part of 
the town built up by the thrift and industry of one man. When 
John Taylor located there in 1833 there were only ten dwellings 
and five other buildings in the village. The dwellings, indicated 
by map numbers, were 550, 556, 560, 564, 541, 534, 573, A 4, 594, 
598. The other buildings were a shingle mill 546, sawmill 565, 




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INDUSTRIAL. 309 

gristmill 542, schoolhouse 566, store 568, woolen mill A 2. As his 
sons grew up they became interested in these buildings as well as 
in others. A glance at the Map Key, Ch. XII, for numbers be- 
tween 535 and 600 will give an idea of the part played by this 
family. Working along at the same time were Nathaniel Duston, 
Thomas Duston, Nathaniel Paul, Alexander Gordon, Daniel Tay- 
lor, Matthew H. Taylor and the three sons of John Taylor, John, 
Jr., James and Richard. 

Millville was built up very early about the mill of Henry 
Sanders, Bluff Street- being one of the oldest settled highways 
in town. 

Messer 's was developed about the intersection of Dracut Path 
(now Hampshire Road) and Methuen country road, receiving a 
later augmentation through the business instinct of the Messer 
family. 

Cowbell Corner began with the old sawmill and was given 
new life by the Clendenin family about one hundred years ago. 

The question of the oldest house in Salem is a difficult one to 
answer. From all the evidence at hand, carefully weighed, the 
author believes the Moses Messer house, M 376, to be the oldest 
frame now retaining its original service as a dwelling. The form 
of the roof has been altered but otherwise the main structure is 
the same. Others which press closely upon this for the distinc- 
tion may be mentioned, the order in which they are here ar- 
ranged, however, indicating nothing of their comparative ages: 
George Jones, M 398 ; D. W. Felch, M 633 ; Baxter Hall, M 332 ; 
Henry Hudson, M 341 ; Warren Bodwell, M 423 ; also the timber 
of J. W. Kelley's house, M 352, although it was rebuilt when 
moved to the Turnpike. There are many other very old houses, 
which might be of even greater antiquity than these if the whole 
fund of facts could be unearthed. But from the information 
now at hand, the honors must be awarded as stated. 



CHAPTER IX. 

Highways and Bridges. 

The earliest settlers had one doubtful advantage in travel not 
possessed by the citizens of today — they were free to choose their 
paths where they would through the unbroken wilderness. 
Their method of choice brings to our attention one fundamental 
difference between road building in those times and today. 
Then the road or path owed its existence to some newly built 
homestead; now the homestead is built because of the road. 
This is of course not always the case at either time; but the 
early inhabitants had the land granted them before there was a 
settler in this region. Then by slow stages they pushed outward 
from the older settlement at Haverhill and built their homes on 
what seemed the most acceptable pieces of land. In many in- 
stances the summit of one of the large rolling hills was selected 
as the most favorable location. Here the settler and his family 
were more secure from the attacks of the savages than they 
would have been in the lowlands. The favorite mode of attack 
in daylight was to watch from a distance until the father or 
brothers had gone to the fields, then fall suddenly upon the 
defenceless women and children; but the experience of the 
Haverhill citizens had been sufficiently severe to make those who 
ventured out into the wilderness extremely careful. Thus we 
find that the first settlers of the Center district were on and 
around the great Spicket Hill. Even long before these settlers 
came there was a flourishing farm on the top of the height of 
land now Policy Street, owned by the heirs of Major- General 
Leavitt. In the north part of the town Zion's Hill and the 
heights near No. 3 schoolhouse were first to receive the new 
inhabitants. And here we return to our original discussion — 
the roads followed the farms, that is, led from one to another, 
or from some house toward the distant town until it came into 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 311 

the path from some other dwelling. This explains why so many 
of the roads lead directly over the hills, when a far easier and 
shorter way could have been chosen along a nearly level course. 
These old hill roads have in most cases been retained to the pres- 
ent day. Examples of these are the last three mentioned above. 
In the first case, however, the road is now so constructed as to 
form a complete circuit about Spicket Hill. The old path led 
directly over the summit, and is the finest illustration, both in 
its original condition and in its present excellent state of preser- 
vation, within a radius of many miles, of the trail or path that 
was so common in these forests two hundred years ago. This 
path came through the lowlands to the east of the hill, up over 
its eastern slope, along the length of its brow and down the 
long decline toward the river on the west. Toward the foot of 
the hill it wound around slightly toward the north, past the 
house of Daniel Peaslee, and over the river near or over the 
causeway, so called. From here it turned northward, following 
the general direction of the river, but sending a branch off along 
Hitty Titty Brook to the sawmill near what is now known as 
Millville. The name Spicket path is generally applied only to 
the part from the river eastward to Haverhill. That is, it was 
the path by which the Haverhill Proprietors came to their lands 
along the upper Spicket for hay and timber. 

The houses that stood on the crest of the hill have long since 
disappeared. Here Evan Jones had his first house, also proba- 
bly the elder Massey and one of the Kelly families. The cellar 
of the Peaslee house may now be seen among the apple trees 
near the ruined cellar of the house of Silas Carey. As the land 
became more thickly settled the top of the hill was deserted for 
the more productive land in the valleys, which had been culti- 
vated under difficulties because of the distance from the build- 
ings. Evan Jones took up his abode on the land afterward occu- 
pied as the town farm. Daniel Massey built a house on the 
north side of the road near Wilson's Corner, toward the cause- 
way. Abiel Messer went down the other side of the hill to the 
place now owned by Robert I. Smith, and built his house very 
near the corner of the road leading to the Stephen Bailey place. 
The historical map gives the locations of all of these places, of 



312 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

which descriptions are included in the key. The outline of the 
old path is also traced, showing the branch that led at a later 
period toward the bridge near the town house. A picture of 
the path is here presented, taken in the spring of 1907. It will 
be seen that the preservation of the old trail is perfect for the 
short distance shown. Years of travel over it had so hardened 
the earth that during all these succeeding years no trees have 
grown up in it, in spite of the fact that the timber of the hill 
has several times been cut off and a new growth sprung up, each 
time leaving the path bare as before. In some places the per- 
sistent offspring of the pine have succeeded in taking root, but 
these have not yet attained any considerable size. 

A path which has long since been converted into a highway 
was that leading from Haverhill to Dracut, along the south side 
of World's End Pond. This was older than Spicket path, but 
not so interesting today, because none of its original appearance 
is preserved. Dracut was incorporated as a town in 1705, or 
forty-five years before Salem, and this old path was a means of 
communication between the two settlements for several years 
before that date. It is practically certain that the first house 
built in the territory now Salem was on this trail, near the 
crossing of the Turnpike, or perhaps nearer the pond. There 
were log houses on this road so old that they were in ruins dur- 
ing the early days of Salem. These are described in the accom- 
panying map key. This path was formally laid out as a road 
by the town of Methuen in February, 1735, three rods wide, and 
extending from the south side of World's End Pond westward 
to the Spicket. This is the road now in use over the course 
named. 

It is to be observed that the above action was taken in the 
year that the Second Parish of Methuen was set off. If we go 
back two years, to 1833, we shall have the first record concerning 
the facilities of travel in what is now Salem. It has been re- 
ferred to in a preceding chapter. Daniel Peaslee, who lived 
beside Spicket path as it wound around the base of the great 
hill at its west end, had requested the town (Methuen) to take 
some action to repair the bridge near his house over the Spicket. 
He described it as being unsafe to travel over. No action was 




r ^i^&«&.£%4Z: 



y.^>4 






OLD SPICKET PATH. 




PRESCOTT C. HALL. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 313 

taken at this time, as another project was on foot. The new 
settlers, who were becoming more numerous at about this period, 
were locating on the south side of the hill and in the fertile 
valleys down both sides of the river. Consequently there was a 
growing demand for a bridge farther down stream than the old 
one at the causeway. Moreover, a road had been trod along the 
south slope of the hill, leading from the farms and meadows 
there to the larger settlement at Haverhill. Also the men who 
had bought land in the western section desired a shorter route 
by which to reach it. Consequently a bridge was built near 
the site afterwards selected for the meetinghouse. This was 
known as the "new bridge," to distinguish it from the older 
one up river at Peaslee 's. In all of the records for the next three 
years following the building in 1735, this bridge is referred to 
by this name. After 1738, the year of the erection of the meet- 
inghouse, the new bridge was designated frequently as "the 
bridge near the meetinghouse." The old bridge continued in 
use during the dry weather, the river then being low. But it 
had settled so that during the freshets the water was too high 
for fording. At such times travel was turned down along the 
meadow on the east side of the river, to the new bridge. It 
seemed a strange reversal of conditions that during the progress 
of construction of the new iron bridge last year the way was 
again turned up along the river and across the old causeway, 
which thus repaid its obligation of a century and three quarters. 

Writers of historical sketches have held to the idea that the 
first bridge over the Spicket in Salem was this one of 1735. It 
will be seen that this opinion was not based on facts of record, 
but upon the tradition that passengers from north of the hill 
used to come down the meadows to cross the "new bridge." 
The tradition did not explain the conditions from which it 
derived its existence; but this is the characteristic of tradition 
wheh gives it its mystic charm. 

The travel over these trails was at first on foot or horseback. 
Wagons were not used, the burdens being slung on horses or 
drawn on sledges or drags by oxen. In this way heavy loads of 
supplies were brought from Haverhill, Newbury and even 
Salem, Mass., and Boston. The paths were narrow and usually 



314 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

smoothly trod, especially those leading from one settlement to 
another. Many of the fields and forests in Salem are now trav- 
ersed by these old paths, but they are so obliterated as to be 
in most eases indiscernible. 

After the incorporation of the towns these trails were either 
abandoned or laid out wider as accepted highways. The in- 
stance cited above was the first case of the kind in Salem. The 
next was on March 9, 1736, when the town meeting at Methuen 
laid out a road "Beginning at a pine tree marked by the high- 
way near the old mill formerly in possession of Benoni Rowell, 
then running northwesterly on the southerly side of said tree, 
and crossing the land of John Rowell, John Amme, Benoni 
Rowell, Nathaniel Peaslee, Joseph Peaslee and land of Henry 
Sanders, to a white oak marked by Policy pond." From the 
names here mentioned this road would appear to be from near 
the mouth of Captain 's Brook up across the hills toward Canobie. 
It could hardly have been Bluff Street as it is today, being too 
far to the north. 

At the next annual meeting, in March, 1737, Methuen laid 
out a road ' ' from Mitchell 's meadow over the new bridge, thence 
northwest over land of Page, Eaton, Richard Dow, David Dow, 
to road leading to Londonderry." Mitchell's meadow was on 
the east side of the Spicket, upon which it bordered, and about 
opposite the Stephen Bailey farm. From here to the bridge the 
road was south of the road now leading by "Warren Bodwell's, 
being nearer the river. It may still be made out in places, and 
there is evidence of a house some distance from the present 
residence of Robert I. Smith. After crossing the bridge, the 
road followed nearly the course of the present road past No. 1 
schoolhouse, the Crowell and Dow homesteads, and on to Charles 
Kelley's farm near Canobie Lake. 

We define these roads to indicate that they were in use for 
some years before Salem became a town, as well as to locate the 
possessions of some of the early inhabitants. 

At the last meeting above mentioned the road from the Center 
to the Depot was laid out, as running from the new bridge 
westerly, passing "near a sloe," near a sunken bridge, to a 
small brook, and to Policy Brook near the Haverhill old line. 
The "sloe," or slough, must refer to the lowland south of the 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 315 

carbarn, but the sunken bridge is not so evident. Perhaps some 
reader may have some light on the matter. The small brook is 
that on the land of Charles F. Kimball. The road here probably 
was south of Main Street and more in a direct line, as it crossed 
Policy brook near the Fairmount House, and no mention is 
made of an abrupt turn such as is now made at the Stone house. 
After the incorporation of Salem most of these roads were laid 
out anew and accepted by vote of the town. To convey an idea 
of the comparative age of some of our roads, as to whether they 
are colonial descendants or of more recent construction, we here 
give a list of them as far as possible. 

The record of the first of these, laid out the next month, is 
given ad literatim, since it is one of the principal roads of the 
town, from Methuen to Salem Center. Not only this, but it 
follows almost exactly the road now in use between the two 
towns. Such changes as have been made will be noted after 
the original course has been traced. However, one of the val- 
uable features of these road records is, as was stated above, the 
location of property of the settlers. And in this respect this 
record of the Methuen road is the finest specimen in the entire 
collection. All that is necessary is enough information to posi- 
tively locate the road, then each item of the directions may be 
easily interpreted. Following is the record: 

"Salem June ye 26 th 1750 A rod layd out from ye provinc 
Line beynd Jams Swans to ye to ye meeting hous three rods wide 
in ye maner foolowing begining at ye provinc line at a pich pine 
markt H Standing on ye wast sid of the rod thane roning north 
to a black oak marked H from thane to a whit oak markt H 
from thane throw betwen Jams Swons barn and Joseph rights 
house Crosing ye rod that leeds from gages f arry to pelham and 
so throw ye Said Swons and rights land to ye eand of ye sd 
rights land to a whit oak markt H standing on ye wast sid of 
ye rod from thane throw Sd swons land to a black oak markt H 
from thane to a black oak Standing just within Nath 11 Wabstrs 
fane marked H thane to a whit oak marked H standing betwen 
sd wabstrs hous and barne from thane to a black oak marked H 
on ye south Sid of the Worlds Eand brook from thane as ye 
rod now gos to a small whit oak markt H standing on ye wast 



316 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

sid of the rod that was formaly layd out by the town of haver- 
hill to petr Bruers madow from thane as the rod is now trod 
to ye corner of ebn r Ayrses feeld near Thomas Silvers from 
thane to ye brig Josiah Cloghs hous to ye corner of the Sd 
Clough fenc and from thane along by the est sid of of the hill 
to a pitch pine marked H Standing near abial Astons field from 
thane to ye est corner of sd Astens hous from thane as ye rod 
now goes to ye meeting hous. 

Voted that this within rod John Ob e r "1 Select 

Stand apon condison that the Nath 11 Dow i men 

man that owns ye land Sath patee 

whar ye rod is layd out give ye land" 

The first point to notice here is furnished by our informa- 
tion from a later source, namely, that the Turnpike was not 
then built (not until 1804), nor was the piece of road from 
the Hoyt place to "Westmoreland," the western entrance to Mr. 
Searles' "Stillwater" estate. The road began at the province 
line near the house of George E. Townsend and led up over the 
hill, probably a little west of the present road. James Swan 
lived in the house afterwards known as the Butler or Tootell 
place, while Joseph Wright's farm was just east of it, on the 
south side of the road from World's End pond. Swan's barn 
was also on this side of the road. The record calls this the road 
from Gage's Ferry to Pelham; it is the old Haverhill-Dracut 
path also. The highway then crossed this old road and con- 
tinued in what is now the road from L. A. Watjen's to West- 
moreland. The next point obtained is that Nathaniel Webster 
lived about here, his house and barn being on opposite sides of 
the new road, not far south of World 's End Pond brook. Peter 
Brewer's meadow was near Foster's bridge, and the road laid 
out to it by Haverhill came in near George Jones' place. Eben- 
ezer Ayer's field came to the corner near the old Pattee house, 
but we cannot now say just where Thomas Silver lived, though 
it was certainly near that corner. Josiah Clough (Cluff) lived 
at the corner, but whether where the Foster house stands is 
doubtful. The bridge here was for many years known as 
Clough 's bridge. From this point the road is easily traced along 
the side of the long hill and directly past the house of Abiel 




P3 

H 

O 



Q 
O 

H 
O 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 317 

Austin, later the Amos Webster place. From here to the meet- 
inghouse it may or may not have been exactly as it is today, but 
probably has not been greatly altered, as the houses along the 
road were gradually built up, instead of being erected under 
the boom influence of a new road. 

By the way, this Clough bridge was washed away by a freshet 
some thirty-five years later, and when replaced brought forth 
an interesting entry on the records : 

"Ordered Amos Dow (Treas) to pay Elisha Woodbury Seven- 
teen Shillings and Six pence it being for warning out People out 
of the town and for rum he provided for the Building of Clough 
Bridge January the 29: 1789." 

We infer that the weather must have been considerably cold 
when the bridge was built ! 

The road to North Salem was laid out the next day. With the 
exception of the portion near Wheeler's mill, it was about the 
same as today. As it passes over Long's hill in a straight line 
and continues a short distance in this direction it is the same 
as the original road. But where it now dips down to the north 
toward the mill it then continued straight on, meeting the pres- 
ent road near No. 10 schoolhouse. As wagons bringing grain 
in later years to the gristmill which was there little by little 
formed a new path, and deserted the straight line higher up on 
the hillside, other traffic did likewise until the old road was 
abandoned. There is an old cellar hole some distance back of 
the former residence of Wallace W. Cole, where Richard 
Wheeler, father of John A. Wheeler, lived. In 1811 the town 
"voted to exchange the road that formerly went by Richard 
Wheeler's . . . and accept the road that leads by Allen's 
mills in lieu of the former. ' ' 

In so far as the rest of the roads are known they are given, 
with the respective dates of laying out. In most cases the roads 
had been in use before these dates, often for several years. Some 
which are not sufficiently definite in the records to be located 
have been omitted here. Following are the dates and locations : 

June 27, 1750 — Wheeler Street, so called, from the bridge near 
the town farm land to the Country Road, which was the name 
applied to the North Salem road. Properly speaking this should 



318 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

not be called Wheeler Street, as that name was applied more 
especially to the part from the corner by Daniel Merrill's east 
to the Atkinson line, past the Larrabee and Emerson places, 
which were first settled by the "Wheelers. 

November 14, 1750. Poverty Street, from Daniel Merrill's 
corner to the bridge at Hale's mill, near residence of James 
Cnllen. This had been a very old road, settled early because of 
its proximity to the old Haverhill and Londonderry road, which 
comes down over Providence Hill and continues up through the 
No. 3 district and past Cowbell Corner. 

May 6, 1752, from near the bridge by Hale's mill, down by the 
old cemetery near the Jesse 0. Bailey place, to the foot of Long's 
hill. This crossed the river at what was afterwards known as 
Bailey's bridge, by the Moores Bailey homestead. 

May 26, 1752. The road known as Silver Street, because of 
the number of families by that name living there at one time. 
It was laid out from the province line to the corner near the 
Jennings and Joy places, thence past the Little John farm to 
Clough's crossing and on to the corner at Thorn dyke Foster's. 

In 1752 another "road with gates and bars," by which a toll 
road is indicated, was laid out from the corner where No. 8 
schoolhouse now stands to the old Dracut path above referred 
to. This followed nearly the same course as the present road 
does, by way of Kelley's crossing and the Turnpike. We are not 
positive in this case, as the whole record of the road is not clear 
in its references to adjoining property. Of course such refer- 
ences, as well as those to other roads crossed or terminated on, 
are the best means by which to follow the directions of the 
road. 

1754, a bridge referred to as "over ye back river near Tim- 
othy Johnsons" was repaired by him with plank and an allow- 
ance of seven pounds, old tenor, made him for the work. Tim- 
othy lived near the junction of Captain's brook with the Spicket. 
Whether the bridge referred to was the one near Moores Bai- 
ley's or not is uncertain. The Spicket was sometimes called 
Back Eiver, but the bridge may have been farther down river 
just below the horseshoe bend. 

March 31, 1756 — voted to "except ye rod layd out from ashbe 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 319 

(Ashby's) to winhah line," also "the rod layd out from ye rod 
that goes by Samuel Sandres to the old brig By timothy bells 
corne so over the hill Northly to Isrel Young Jrs house, ' ' in both 
cases provided the persons through whose land the road goes 
shall give the land. Both these roads were in the vicinity of 
Policy Pond, but their exact location is unknown. 

In 1757 it was voted to pay one pound five shillings per day 
for work on the roads, also the same for a cart and yoke of oxen. 
Two roads were accepted that year, one from Edward Bayley's 
to the road from Jonathan Woodbury's to David Heath's, the 
other from Abraham Annis' to Caleb Hall's. The first of these 
led to Policy Street, the second farther south and west, perhaps 
not now in existence. 

October 7, 1761, voted to accept the road laid out from Oliver 
Kimball's to the road leading from Jonathan Woodbury's to 
the meetinghouse. Oliver Kimball lived in an old log house 
near the place recently sold to the New Hampshire Breeders' 
Club by Charles Kimball. The road to which this road from 
Kimball's (now Pleasant Street) extended was what corre- 
sponded with Main Street, but perhaps a little farther south. 
In 1765 a road was accepted from Major Wright's to John 
Bayley's. 

Another road was from Major Wright's to Samuel Huse's in 
Methuen, in place of the proposed road, passing between Wright's 
and Swan's. This Maj. Joseph Wright was a very influential 
man in the town, holding many offices for a long period. He 
lived at the corner of the new road from Stillwater, south of the 
pond, which took the place of that formerly passing the Thomas 
Webster or Evans place. This explains the offset in the road 
from the Hutchins or Townsend place to Westmoreland. The 
proposed road between Wright's house and James Swan's barn 
was in a straight line with that now by the house of L. A. Wat- 
jen, while this substituted was farther east and is the one now 
used. Those familiar with the road at this corner as it was 
twenty years ago will remember the old cellar with the lilacs 
surrounding it at the southeast corner of the roads. This was 
where Wright lived. He subsequently sold to a Page and he to 
David Messer, who tore down the house. 



320 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

A third road was laid out from Wright's to David Burbank's 
"in Room of the Road that was Laid out by Haverhill formerly 
to the South of Said Road." This one we cannot locate. 

In 1766 it was "Voted to allow a Road Laid out from Pelham 
Line at William Meloons Normost Corner; to the Road that 
leads from John Morlings to James Twodwils . . . ' : This 
is also a doubtful road. Moreland lived at Thorn's Corner, but 
we do not know about Twaddle's place. If he lived to the 
northward this road may be the one past the Capt. Richard 
Woodbury homestead to No. 7 schoolhouse. 

1767 — "Voted to accept of the Road as it is now trod from 
the Province line near Richard Curriers to the meeting house & 
by Richard Dow Lankester John Ashby & So on to Windham 
Line. Also road from the meetinghouse to Jonathan Wood- 
bury's, as it is now trod. Also from Province line near Evan 
Jones' as it is now trod over the old Casway & So on by Esqr. 
Beedel Richard Dow Jun. So on to the Road that Leads from 
Capt Sanders to the meeting house." Here is something really 
interesting and important. Richard Currier lived at the later 
Stephen Currier farm. The first mentioned road was the one 
used from this point to Salem Center, thence past No. 1 school- 
house to Canobie Lake. The last part of this road has perhaps 
been altered, as a record two years later refers to a road ac- 
cepted to take the place of that by Ashby 's. 

The road from the meetinghouse to Jonathan Woodbury's 
followed Main Street and Policy Street nearly as they are 
today. Jonathan lived near the farm now owned by Albert 
Littlefield. 

The third named road was from Wilson's Corner westward. 
The crossing of the river was known then as now as the ' ' Cause- 
way." The origin of the name is somewhat uncertain. The 
most likely account which we have is that the original road 
across this part of the river was built across the meadow upon 
stumps and stakes thrown and driven down for a bed. A 
rough plank and log bridge spanned the narrow channel of the 
stream. It is probable that this rude structure was built very 
early in the settlement of the town, perhaps soon after 1700. 
The rich meadows on the west side of the Spicket furnished ex- 




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THE OLD LOWELL HOMESTEAD (M 418) 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 321 

cellent hay crops to the proprietors long before they began to 
build their homesteads here. And some means of transporting 
it across the river would have been provided. The continuation 
of the road was toward North Salem, perhaps as far as Bluff 
Street. 

1768. A road was accepted from Hedgehog brook to Joshua 
Heath's, provided it be made as good as the one then in use. 
This was the road south of the brook, toward Kelley's crossing. 

Another road accepted this year led from Jesse Merrill's to 
the road from Thorn's Corner to Hedgehog brook. This road 
is not now open, and may never have been used after its accept- 
ance. 

1769. The road just mentioned from John Moreland's at 
Thorn's Corner, was laid out beyond the brook and around to 
Oliver Kimball's. 

This year another was laid out from near Joseph Gile's to 
Caleb Duston's, thence to Pattee's sawmill. The sawmill was 
at North Salem, and Caleb Duston lived at the present site of 
the Gordon farm near Mt. Pleasant cemetery. If, as is sup- 
posed, Gile lived near King's Corner, on the north base of 
Zion's Hill, the road here indicated was the one now in use 
from King's to North Salem. 

A few other roads were laid out this year, but are not impor- 
tant. It was voted to raise seventy pounds lawful money to be 
expended on the highways. Each man worked out his share of 
highway taxes on the road near his land. This was sometimes 
not required because of repairs on a bridge or some similar work 
which had been performed. 

In 1771 the town refused to accept the road from near 
Stephen Currier's to John Lowell's. Lowell lived in the old 
house which stood opposite ''Willow Clump" farm, now owned 
by Fred 0. Wheeler. This was the old Lowell homestead, being 
for many years in the family. Fifty years ago a Wilson lived 
there. The house was torn down by Mr. Wheeler. The accom- 
panying cut represents it as it appeared just prior to its demo- 
lition. 

At the meeting held March 25, 1772, it was voted to pay a 
man for working a day on the road two shillings ; for a yoke of 

22 



322 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

oxen, one shilling six pence, and for a "cart and wheels," eight 
pence. This is the first mention of the use of wheels which ap- 
pears in the records, and shows that a premium was placed on 
them in comparison with the drag more commonly used for 
such rough teaming. 

The records of the roads laid out could probably all be inter- 
preted so as to obtain the locations if we had a complete knowl- 
edge of the property ownership at that time. But to obtain 
this would require examination of all deeds of property since 
recorded. For any particular farm this could be obtained, but 
to attempt it for the whole town would be beyond the compass of 
any town history. We have extracts from many old deeds, by 
which some of the principal historic places are better known. 

THE LONDONDERRY TURNPIKE. 

By far the most gigantic and important undertaking in the 
road building line that Salem has ever experienced was the con- 
struction of the great road known as the Londonderry Turnpike. 
This road has long been the main avenue of travel to points 
north and south of the town, forming as it has since the building 
of the railroad the highway connection between the stations. 
The project was undertaken by a private corporation, which was 
given its power by the General Court in legislation enacted June 
12, 1804. John Prentice, John Dinsmoor, John Montgomery, 
William A. Kent and James Pinkerton had petitioned the court 
for power to build a toll road from Butters' Corner in Concord 
to the state line near Andover bridge. The conditions of the 
permission are best shown by the record of the act: 

' ' An act to incorporate a company by the name of the London- 
derry Turnpike Incorporation." This gave to nine men and 
their associates and successors, the authority requested. They 
were John Prentice, John Phillips, Jr., Thomas W. Thompson, 
John Montgomery, William A. Kent, James Pinkerton, John 
Dinsmoor, Isaac Tom (Thorn?) and George Reid. 

After rehearsing the preliminaries of organization the act 
in Sect. 3 states that the above named are "empowered to survey, 
lay out, make and keep in repair a Turnpike Road four rods wide 
in such route or track as in the best of their judgment shall com- 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 323 

bine shortness of distance with the most practicable ground from 
Butter's Corner in Concord to the state line near Andover 
Bridge. ' ' It was provided that in case of any dispute over com- 
pensation for land, the superior court should decide the ques- 
tion. 

Very minute provisions were made for maintenance. This 
was to be provided for by tolls, to be collected from passengers 
on the road. The proprietors were empowered to erect and fix 
as many gates or turnpikes as should be necessary to collect the 
tolls from persons traveling, also to appoint as many toll gath- 
erers as they might think proper. The toll rates were as follows 
for one mile, the charge for any distance being proportional 
to the number of miles : 

"for every 10 sheep or swine lc 
" " 10 horses or cattle 2c 

sulkey chair or chaise with one horse and two 
wheeles 2c 
for every horse and rider, or led horse lc 

chariot, coach, stage, phaeton or chaise with two 
horses and four wheels, 4c 
for every carriage of pleasure the like sums according to the 

number of wheels and horses drawing the same, 
for each Cart or other carriage of burden drawn by one 

beast lc. 
for each cart, waggon or other carriage of burden drawn by 
two beasts, 1 cent and a half, if drawn by more than two 
beast, one cent for each additional yoke of oxen or pair of 
horses, 
for each sleigh drawn by one horse one cent — if drawn by two 
horses, two cents; if by more than two horses one cent for 
each additional horse, 
for each sled drawn by one beast, one cent; if drawn by two 
beasts one cent and a half; if by more than two beasts, one 
cent for each additional yoke of oxen or pair of horses." 
To prevent persons from evading the toll it was provided that 
anyone who should leave the road instead of passing the gate, 
for the purpose of evading, should be charged three times the 



324 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

toll rate. If the gate-keeper should leave the gate temporarily 
it must be left open. 

No toll could be collected from a person driving his carriage 
to or from public worship^ or a funeral; or with his own horse, 
team, or cattle in going to or from the mill or on common or 
ordinary business of family concerns within the town where such 
person resided. Also an officer or soldier of the militia under 
arms, while passing to or from the place of duty, was exempted 
from paying toll. 

To prevent the company from realizing too great a benefit 
from this privilege granted from the people it was stipulated 
that at the end of every six years an account should be rendered 
the supreme court. If this showed a net earning of more than 
nine per cent the rates for the future were to be reduced. 

Where the turnpikes or gates should be erected on roads al- 
ready in use they should not affect the travel thereon. This 
was because some few parts of the new road would pass over 
highways already established, and in many cases would cross 
them. These highways were still to be open to free travel. 

It was provided that after the expiration of a period of forty 
years the state should have the privilege of taking the road for 
a public highway by paying the proprietors the amount of money 
invested with nine per cent per annum less the tolls actually re- 
ceived. The state did this before the forty years had passed, 
at the request of the proprietors, at more favorable terms. 

At the annual meeting held March 28, 1831, it was voted to 
accept the Turnpike as a free road on petition of Tristram Kim- 
ball, Asa Gage and others. In 1836 John H. Clendenin was 
chosen a committee ' ' to oppose the laying out of the Londonderry 
Turnpike as a free public highway. ' ' We do not know that any 
results came from this action. Certainly the gates were out of 
use and tolls discontinued about 1840. 

This road was practically a straight line from Concord to Bos- 
ton, by way of Andover bridge, now known as the Falls bridge at 
Lawrence. The halfway mark, as determined at the time, was 
a rough stone set into the ground beside the road nearly opposite 
the residence of Levi Woodbury. When C. H. Tenney rebuilt 
the wall along his property he set this stone among the others 




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HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 325 

so that it projects a foot or more above the top of the wall, 
that the designation might be preserved. At that time Lawrence 
was still nearly half a century into the future, Andover extending 
to the Merrimack on the south side and Methuen on the north. 
Through the medium of this turnpike the slaughtering business 
for which the town of Brighton, Mass., became noted received a 
great impetus. An easy and direct route was furnished for 
drovers from the north country. From both sides came streams 
of cattle pouring into this great way, pushing on toward the 
markets of Boston, many of them traveling over a hundred miles. 
Kegular stations were established at intervals, equipped with 
many commodious barns for putting up the droves over night. 
These will be referred to below. Even turkeys were driven over 
the road, several thousands often going in one drove. But for 
them no established halting places had charms to offer sufficient 
for their consideration. When the shades of evening had 
reached a certain degree of density, suddenly the whole drove 
with one accord rose from the road and sought a perch in the 
neighboring trees. The drover was prepared for such a halt, and 
drew up his covered wagon beside the road, where he passed the 
night. Usually the equipment included two or three men, two 
well trained shepherd dogs, a horse and covered wagon which 
carried the bed and a small stove, together with the necessary 
food supply. Turkeys were in those days not as uncommon on 
the farms hereabout as they are today ; and it was not unusual for 
a small flock of them to join a drove as it was passing through. 
On the other hand, stragglers from the drove frequently found 
agreeable companions in local flocks and tarried instead of pur- 
suing their course. 

The drovers, however, were only one of the numerous classes 
who found this great road convenient. All lines of business 
came to depend more and more upon it for travel. Tradesmen 
and merchants passed over it to and from Boston, which was 
then as now the center of trade. Stage routes with tavern ac- 
commodations were established and well patronized. Some of 
these will be here mentioned. 



326 HISTORY OF SALEM. 



TAVERNS. 



There were three taverns on the Turnpike within Salem, not 
all flourishing for the same length of time, but each fulfilling 
its own peculiar need. 

The first of these was the old Pattee place, now known as the 
Whitebridge Farm, and owned by J. W. Kelley, about a mile 
from the state line. This homestead was built in 1804, after 
the Turnpike had been surveyed and was considered a certainty. 
Laommi Baldwin, the engineer in charge of the survey, made 
his headquarters at the home of Richard Pattee, which afforded 
tavern accommodations. It stood very near the present site of 
No. 9 schoolhouse, and was torn down, the old timbers being used 
for the new house. Baldwin was sure that a location on the 
new line would be desirable, and his advice was followed. 

The new house was built square and roomy. Commodious 
barns were built on the south side, a little farther from the road 
than .the house stood. It is said that more than four hundred 
horses have been cared for there in one night. When General 
Lafayette passed through Salem in 1825 on his way from Bos- 
ton to Concord, he was entertained at this house. A turkey din- 
ner was provided and no pains were spared to give him a 
handsome welcome. The story has it that the refreshments 
poured were of such high quality that many of the party were 
in the best of humor before their departure. The large brick 
oven and massive chimney is still in its original condition, as, 
indeed, are many of the features both interior and exterior. 

The old Tenney homestead on the hill near Canobie Lake sta- 
tion was for many years a favorite tavern. The trade at this 
house, however, was of a different class from that at the Pattee 
Tavern. Here the local country people for several miles around 
were wont to come to take the stage en route for Boston or Salem, 
Mass. And when left here on a night trip returning, they would 
not infrequently put up until morning, when they could better 
and more safely set out for home. This house was kept by 
Hezekiah Jones for many years, and later by John F. Tenney. 
The sightly location here had been early selected as a site for a 
homestead, old cellar holes testifying that houses had stood near 
this place in the past. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 327 

The other tavern was that at Messer's Crossing, now known as 
Hampshire Road, built by Capt. David Messer in 1804. Like 
many of the old houses, this was built in part of material from 
an older structure. Messer was living in the old house which 
he had bought of Joseph W. Page, formerly the home of Maj. 
Joseph Wright, at the corner of the road from Methuen and the 
Dracut Path. When the Turnpike was built he tore down the 
old house and built a new one for a tavern. He foresaw the 
possibility of a flourishing business, subsequent events demon- 
strating that his vision was well grounded. The barns stood just 
to the south, across the road now leading toward the depot. 
This tavern was the favorite stopping place for drovers. Large 
droves of cattle and sheep were turned into the field south and 
west of the barns, to rest before continuing their way. Even 
after the railroad was built this station furnished an excellent 
trading place for stock on the way to the markets of Boston and 
vicinity. The old house was used as a dwelling for many years 
after its service as a tavern ceased. Time and weather worn, it 
at last fell into a state of dilapidation from which it was rescued 
by the hand of the firebug in 1896. 

Soon after the building of the Turnpike houses began to spring 
up along the way, some erected there while others were moved 
from sites nearby. The road itself was intended to be straight, 
and is nearly so. However, the lowland just north of the 
Spicket at the Whitebridge Farm made it advisable to turn the 
course slightly to the west, the bend being made at the bridge. 
The reverse turn is just above the railroad crossing, thus making 
a wide curve around the low ground. 

The land through which the Turnpike runs in Salem is some- 
what loose and sandy, so that it has been difficult to keep a firm 
top on the road. For many years the repeated repairs with 
gravel afforded only temporary relief, the footing for horses 
being equally as poor as the tread for the wheels. In 1904, on 
September 10th, the town at a special meeting voted permission 
to Mr. Edward F. Searles to macadamize the Turnpike from 
Messer's to Salem Depot, and also the piece of road southeast of 
this stretch as far as the state line near the farm of George E. 
Townsend, formerly the Hutchins place. This joined the 



328 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

macadam road from Methuen, making one unbroken stretch 
from Lawrence to the Depot. Two other public-spirited land 
owners of Salem, Mr. Charles H. Tenney and Mr. Levi Wood- 
bury, completed the work from the Depot to the Windham line 
at Canobie Lake. 

This was the beginning of building this kind of road in Salem. 
Since that time the town has several times put in long stretches 
of macadam road. It is unlikely that this work will cease before 
all of the main roads of the town have been converted. At pres- 
ent the Turnpike, as already stated, the entire length of Main 
Street from the "Stone House" at the corner of Policy Street to 
Pine Grove Cemetery, and the Lawrence road from the Center 
to the Webster place, are the roads macadamized. 

The bridge over the causeway was repaired in 1805. It be- 
came more and more evident that something more permanent 
must be done here. The road was very insecure and the bridge 
narrow. This condition was ended to a large degree in 1857, 
when the work of filling and grading here was let to Contractor 
Sullivan of Lawrence. Nearly $500 was spent on the work, 
which was a fair amount considering the cheapness of labor and 
materials. A man then received one dollar per day, also the 
same price would hire a yoke of oxen. Plank sold for $12 per 
thousand and other supplies at corresponding prices. The work 
was not finished this year, and in 1859 new abutments were laid 
for the west bridge, and the whole widened to twenty-five feet 
in the clear. The work was done under direction of William 
Sullivan as before, at an expense of $548. 

When the electric line was laid the causeway was again 
widened and straightened, putting it in the present condition. 

In 1830 two roads were laid out in the east part of the town. 
One was from Bryant's Corner, so called, where Bluff Street 
meets the North Salem road, thence eastward over Johnson's 
bridge past the old town farm to the road near Daniel Merrill's. 
This road had been traveled to some extent before. The other 
was a new road, and led from Wilson's Corner to the corner 
at Daniel Merrill's. Formerly the road from Hale's mill at 
the foot of Providence Hill had extended only as far as this 
corner, the travel then branching either to Haverhill on the 




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DANIEL TAYLOR 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 329 

east or turning west to Salem. On this road, now known as 
Poverty Street, was a place known as "Liberty Bars," where 
now the road on the north side of Captain's Pond joins. From 
1830 to 1835 a great deal of discussion was carried on at town 
meeting regarding a proposed road from Joshua Merrill's, by 
the town farm, to the Atkinson line by way of Liberty Bars. 
It had been previously laid out in 1804, surveyed from the meet- 
inghouse over the causeway. This is found to be the case with 
many roads; they become largely disused and are then relaid 
and accepted or are discontinued. 

The road opposite the present site of the townhouse was very 
narrow and had a considerable bend in it until 1802, when John 
Clendenin sold to the town a strip of land in the form of a 
triangle with the vertex at the tavern. It was sixteen rods 
long and two rods wide at the northeast end. This allowed the 
road to swing off to the west to a w r ider and less curved course. 

The trees along Main Street and Lawrence Road between the 
Methodist and Congregational churches were set out May 6 and 
7, 1858, by James Ayer and others. The maples in front of the 
residence of B. R. Wheeler and those across the street were set 
out May 14, 1858, by John R. Wheeler and Francis B. Kelley. 

The road to the residence of Loren E. Bailey, on the hill 
above No. 6 schoolhouse, was laid out September 28, 1883. 

In 1905 the New Hampshire Breeders' Club petitioned the 
town for permission to close a part of Pleasant Street, near, the 
Kimball and Woodbury homesteads, and substitute a road a 
little farther to the west. Permission was granted and the fine 
piece of macadam now there was constructed. 

Another comparatively new road is that from near the old 
Kelley homestead at Canobie Lake, passing Hitty Titty pond 
and coming into the road from Gould's mill in Windham to 
King's corner. This road furnishes a short route from North 
Salem to Canobie Lake, the junction with the old road being 
just halfway between the two places. It was built in 1891, the 
contract work being done by Truel & Rowe. The total cost was 
$2,833.50. The drive along the shore of the lake is one of the 
most attractive in town. The road is nearly level here, and fol- 
lows the windings of the water edge, shaded here and there by 



330 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

large pines, oaks and maples. The cut on page 48 shows a 
view near the north end of the road, looking toward North 
Salem. 

The last long road built by the town was that now known as 
the "New Road," from the Depot to Woodbury's Corner, at 
Millville. The history of this road dates back a good many 
years. A meeting was held on July 9, 1857, "to see if the town 
will vote to lay out a road from the Depot to Nathaniel Wood- 
bury's." The request was voted down! Nor was this the 
only instance. For from that time until the favorable vote was 
finally obtained the promoters of this project have presented 
the matter at intervals to the voters, working persistently till 
their end was accomplished. Meantime the route was surveyed 
several times, each time varying slightly from the preceding. 
One route, laid out just before 1880, lay slightly to the east of 
the road as built, and continued on from Millville to a point 
near Wheeler's mill. 

In the warrant for the annual meeting in 1905, Article 21 
stated: "By request. To see what sum of money the town 
will vote to raise towards building the new highway at Salem 
Depot to Bluff Street, so called, as per petition in hands of se- 
lectmen." Under this article an appropriation was made. The 
work was done by Loren E. Bailey and Charles Dow, at a total 
cost of $1,608.41. 

WASHOUTS. 

In 1843, early in June, the dam at the flume in Canobie Lake 
was broken down, letting out an enormous amount of water with 
a great rush. The roads and bridges along the brook were seri- 
ously damaged, in some places to the extent of being impassable. 

A more general and far more disastrous washout was caused 
by the great freshet in March, 1864. The winter had been un- 
usually tenacious, with many heavy snowstorms. On March 6 
a very heavy rain fell, continuing all night. The next morning 
the bridges over the Spicket at the town farm, causeway and 
Thorndyke Foster's were washed away. At the bridge near the 
old graveyard the water was up to the planking, while just by 
the east end where the road was then low the flood rushed across 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 331 

at a depth of three to four feet, washing into carriages as they 
crossed. All travel was forced to this point as the other bridges 
were down. At a culvert under the tracks of the Manchester 
& Lawrence railroad, a bad accident occurred. The freshet had 
washed out the underpinning causing the roadbed to collapse as 
a train passed over. The fireman and engineer are said to have 
been brothers, living in Manchester. The former was killed 
and the latter so badly scalded that he was removed in a hopeless 
condition. No others were hurt, but the engine was demolished 
and several cars badly damaged. 

The taverns on the Turnpike have already been treated, but 
they were by no means the only places in town where travelers 
could find accommodation. The most renowned hostelry of 
Salem was the old tavern at the Center. The age of this relic 
would be far from the positive part of a description. The house 
certainly antedated by many years the taverns on the turnpike. 
Phineas Gordon, who died in 1812, kept tavern here a long time 
before 1800. Probably a date about 1765 would not be far from 
correct as the time of erection. It stood opposite the common 
on the northwest corner of the roads, where now the wall forms 
a long curve beside the road leading to the schoolhouse. Here 
was the headquarters for all travelers to this vicinity. The 
postoffice was here, mail being brought by the stage. For this 
purpose the mail stage left the Turnpike going north at Mes- 
ser's, passed by way of the Center over the road by the present 
schoolhouse, striking the Turnpike again near Gould's mill in 
Windham. Exciting scenes were enacted at this old place. 
Political meetings were planned and reviewed here, and social 
gossip sifted and discussed. Here the people would assemble to 
see the stage pull in, and to greet the new comers or returning 
wanderers. The old house had many proprietors in the course 
of its history. They are not all known, although those of the 
later period are well remembered. After Gordon died Joseph 
Gorrell kept the tavern ; he was there in 1820 certainly, and prob- 
ably later. In 1853 Rawson Coburn kept it, in 1853 and before. 
Daniel Moody moved in in April, 1855, but did not stay long. 
Warren Brickett was here in 1857 and Ezra Robinson in 1867. 
William H. Bryant was the last proprietor, he keeping nearly 



332 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



till the fire. It was then owned by a Boston party. On Septem- 
ber 3, 1876, an unsuccessful attempt to burn it was made. The 
next night, however, September 4, 1876, it was burned to the 
ground. The accompanying cut gives an excellent idea of the 
location of the building, with the Ewins block beside it. 

Several other houses about town have at one time or another 
been used as hotels or taverns. One of these is the present home 
of Isaac "Woodbury (M 184) where his brother, George, for many 
years conducted an excellent house for transient guests. Another 
of a similar nature was the house of Francis B. Kelly at the 
Center (M 10). Much older than either of these are two at 
North Salem; the Mirick house (M 603), where William Johnson 
kept tavern until 1827, when he sold to Abner Mirick, who also 
conducted the same business; and the old house which formerly 
stood where S. M. Pattee's residence is now (M 625). This was 
the old Dow place, where Lieut. Thomas Dow kept tavern for 
many years prior to 1800. Besides these there were many places 
where tavern licenses were issued from time to time, generally 
for shorter periods only, and for the purpose of selling liquor. 
In fact, about 1800, and in the succeeding years the records were 
plentifully interspersed with these tavern licenses, some of 
which, however, were for regular hotel purposes rather than 
merely liquor selling. 

Just beside the old tavern at the Center stood the ' ' Frog Tav- 
ern," as it was nicknamed. This building fulfilled various pur- 
poses, from a tavern to a shoe shop, and even a schoolhouse. It 
had a somewhat shady reputation during the larger part of its 
existence. 

MECHANICAL TRANSPORTATION. 

Most of the conditions of travel in the past have been de- 
scribed. Mention will be made briefly of the advent of changes. 
In 1847-48 the railroad was put through from Manchester to 
Lawrence. This of course sounded the deathknell to travel over 
the Turnpike, at least to any considerable extent for long dis- 
tances. 

A half century later the electric line was built. In 1901 the 
Haverhill & Southern New Hampshire Company petitioned for 




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permission to lay a line of tracks through Salem. It is now but 
a question of a half hour to either Haverhill or Lawrence, and 
an easy ride to Lowell or Nashua. 

Besides furnishing these advantages the company has built 
the beautiful pleasure resort, "Canobie Lake Park," within the 
limits of the town. This furnishes attraction for thousands of 
people from the neighboring cities and towns. Two views of 
the grounds are here shown, doubtless familiar to most of our 
readers. (See pp. 100, 240.) 

The system here is well equipped with a commodious car barn, 
one of the finest in New England. The cut on page 333 fur- 
nishes a suggestion of the efficiency of such a plant. Power is 
supplied from Portsmouth by high potential lines, here to be 
converted by five large sets of rotaries into low potential current 
for use in the motors. 



CHAPTER X. 

Organizations. 

As the social interests of life are of great importance in any 
stage of civilization, so no record of the progress and actions 
of any community could be complete without giving due atten- 
tion to this feature. And since the fraternal orders are the 
unified expression of social instincts, they have been here se- 
lected as the most fitting medium for the presentation of the 
inter-relation of our citizens. The principal facts in the life 
history of each of the permanent social organizations of the town 
are here presented in as condensed a form as possible. Also men- 
tion is made of a few of the more temporary gatherings. 

SPICKET LODGE, NO. 85, F. AND A. M. 

The first fraternal organization of Salem, both chronologically 
and consequentially considered, is Spicket Lodge, No. 85, Free 
and Accepted Masons. In the spring of 1866 a number of men 
in Salem took Masonic degrees in St. Mark's Lodge of Derry, 
which at that time held jurisdiction also over this vicinity. Soon 
afterwards these in conjunction with local Masons of other 
lodges conceived the idea of securing a charter for a lodge here. 
In the autumn of that year a petition was sent to the Grand 
Lodge, but through some informality was not received. The 
brethren, however, continued to hold meetings in order to per- 
fect their preparation in the lectures and work of the several 
degrees, until January 7, 1868, when a dispensation from the 
Grand Lodge empowered them to work under the name of 
Spicket Lodge, No. 85. On June 10 their charter was obtained, 
and on September 3 the lodge was regularly consecrated by Dep- 
uty Grand Master Stanley, under the direction of Most Worship- 
ful Grand Master Alexander M. Winn, who was present with a 



ORGANIZATIONS. 335 

delegation from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State 
of New Hampshire. 

The organization was effected November 26, 1868, with the 
following roster: 

George K. Whitney, W. M. ; James A. Troy, S. W. ; George C. 
Gordon, J. W. ; John H. Lancaster, Treas. ; James Ayer, Sec; 
Daniel N. Kuss, Sr. Dea.; Benj. R. Wheeler, Jr. Dea.; Jos. Web- 
ster, Sr. Steward; Levi Cluff, Jr. Steward; Rufus A. Tilton, 
Marshal ; Rev. C. A. Bradley, Chaplain ; Charles C. Talbot, Chor- 
ister; Levi W. Taylor, Pursuivant; Franklin W. Cluff, Tyler; 
James Ayer, Representative. 

The members were George N. Austin, Stephen Bailey, Giles 
Bennett, Ebenezer G. Duston, Thomas Duston, Loring R. Had- 
ley, John H. Havey, Lewis A. Hunt, George Lightfoot, George 
W. Lowell, Joseph Marston, William C. Morrill, Samuel T. 
Newell, Edward W. Reed, George W. Rogers, Richard Taylor, 
John W. Wheeler, John R. Wheeler. Honorary members: 
Nathaniel B. Duston, John R. Rowell. 

The meetings were at first held in the town hall. It was later 
proposed to build a hall, and on April 4, 1872, a meeting of 
stockholders for the proposed building was held. In 1873 the 
lodge was moved to its new quarters. Regular communications 
were first held on the Thursday before each full moon, but this 
was subsequently changed to the second Thursday of each month. 

The list of Past Masters of the lodge is as follows : George K. 
Whitney '68- '69, James A. Troy '69- '70, George C. Gordon 
'70-73, Daniel N. Russ '73- '74, Dr. George C. Howard '74-77, 
Benjamin R. Wheeler 77-79, George C. Gordon 79- '80, Levi 
Cluff '80- '82, Charles T. Maxwell '82- '84, William R. Wheeler 
'84- '86, Nathan G. Abbott '86- '89, Josiah Q. Cluff '89- '95, 
Clifton S. Hall '95- '97, James Ewins '97- '04, Amos J. Cowan 
'04- '05. 

One of the most successful social events of the lodge was the 
festival held in the town hall on January 30, 1879. Several 
days were spent in decorating and preparing the hall for the 
occasion. Payson's orchestra of Haverhill was engaged to fur- 
nish the music. The gathering was very large, filling every 
available space, and a goodly financial reckoning was the result. 



336 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



The total number enrolled since organization is 140, of whom 
77 are now members of the lodge. 

Following are the present officers: 

James E. Sloan, W. M.; Wallace W. Cole, S. W.; Frank D. 
Wilson, J. W. ; William E. Lancaster, Treas. ; James Ewins, 
Sec. ; Martin A. Cashen, S. D. ; James H. Hadley, J. D. ; Lewis- 
F. Woodbury, Chaplain ; Alanson E. Irish, Marshal ; Fred S. 
Webster, S. S. ; Guy A. Lewis, J. S. ; George W. Palmer, Tyler; 
James H. Hadley, Rep. to G. L. 

GRANITE COLONY, NO. 11, U. 0. P. F. 

Granite Colony, No. 11, United Order of Pilgrim Fathers,, 
was instituted March 6, 1880. It is the second oldest order m 
Salem. There were thirty-nine charter members: 



Alfred S. Stowell 
Ella L. Stowell 
Edric A. Wade 
Mary S. Wade 
Charles B. Smith 
Lucy S. Smith 
Sidney P. Gage 
Laura A. Gage 
John Hunt 
Hattie A. Hunt 
George H. Colburn 
Emma R. Colburn 
Phineas C. Foster 
Abbie C. Foster 
John Woodbury 
Hannah J. Woodbury 
Loren E. Bailey 
William W. Clark 
George W. Thom 
Newton P. Bodwell 



George H. Webster 
Nettie J. Webster 
Daniel Howe 
Lydia A. Howe 
John W. Hanson 
Almena C. Hanson 
Isaac C. Pattee 
Joel C. Carey 
Willard W. Merrill 
Robert R, Whittier 
Louisa J. Austin 
Sarah J. Austin 
Madella J. Major 
William F. Rowell 
James Ayer 
James A. Troy 
Thomas A. MorrLi 
Mark P. Thompson 
Alfonso Alexander 



The first officers were: Ex-Gov., E. A. Wade; Gov., Alfred" 
S. Stowell; Lieut.-Gov. Ella L. Stowell; Sec'y, Chas. B. Smith; 
Collector, Geo. H. Colburn; Treas., Willard Merrill; Chaplain, 
Emma R. Colburn ; Sergt.-at-Arms, W. F. Rowell ; Dep 'y Sergt- 




CLIFTON S. HALL. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 337 

at- Arms, Abbie C. Foster; Sentinel at I. G., Lydia A. Howe; 
Sentinel at 0. G., Daniel Howe. 

Meetings are held on the first and third Mondays of each 
month in Pilgrim Hall (M 157). 

Total number of members enrolled since organization is 195 
benefit members and seven social members; at present there are 
95 benefit members and one social member. Twenty-one mem- 
bers have occupied the governor's chair: Alfred S. Stowell, Jas. 
Ayer, S. P. Gage, M. P. Thompson, G. W. Thorn, J. J. Hunt, E. 
D. Barstow, S. A. Merrill, R. H. McDonald, D. S. Emery, W. H. 
Merrill, Thos. B. Middleton, C. H. Webster, L. E. Bailey, Dan- 
iel Onstott, J. H. Hadley, Eliza S. Emery, A. C. Hall, Helen M. 
Bailey, F. D. Davis, Geo. H. Webster. 

The twentieth anniversary was observed May 7, 1900, and the 
twenty-seventh, March 18, 1907. Also public installations are 
frequently held. 

The present officers are as follows : 

Ex-Gov., Arthur C. Hall; Gov., Geo. W. Thorn; Lieut.-Gov., 
Hattie A. Hunt; Sec'y, Grace L. McDonald; Treas., Frank D. 
Davis; Coll., John J. Hunt; Chap., Emma A. Hadley; Sergt.- 
at-Arms, Hattie I. 'Morrill; Dep. Sergt.-at-Arms, Nellie C. Stev- 
ens; Sentinel at I. G., Alburton W. Clark; Sentinel at 0. G., 
Geo. H. McDonald. 

GRAND ARMY. 

Gilman E. Sleeper Post, No. 60, G. A. R., was granted its 
charter July 1, 1881. The members included in the original 
list were Benj. E. Chase, Jas. A. Troy, Moses D. Rowell, Joseph 
D. Bradford, Wm. L. Bradford, T. D. Parish, Benj. R. Wheeler, 
Chas. W. Grant, J. C. Twitchell, Geo. C. Howard, Jas. J. Walch, 
Isaiah N. Webster, David Sloan, Chas. C. Foster, Chas. T. Max- 
well, and Issachar 0. Foster. 

From these the first officers were chosen: 

Com., Benj. R. Wheeler; S. V. Com., Jas. A. Troy; J. V. Com., 
Benj. E. Chase; Adj't, Chas. W. Grant; Q. M., Thos. D. Parish; 
Surg., Dr. Geo. C. Howard; Chap., Chas. 0. Kelly; 0. of Day., 
J. C. S. Twitchell; 0. of Guard, Chas. C. Foster. 

Meetings were first held in Union Hall, Troy's Block, Salem 

23 



338 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Depot, on the first and third Saturday of each month. Later 
held in town hall, now in Masonic hall on second Saturday of 
each month. Sixty members have been enrolled since organiza- 
tion, of whom twenty are still in the post. Each year the post 
turns out on Memorial Day, May 30, to decorate the graves of 
the departed comrades. 

The following comrades have been in command of the post: 
Benj. R. Wheeler, Jas. A. Troy, Benj. E. Chase, David Sloan, 
J. C. S. Twitchell, Chas. E. Conant, Orlow Austin, Asa C. Gor- 
don, John W. Hanson, Chas. C. Foster. 

The present officers are: Com., Chas. E. Conant; S. V. Com., 
Win. H. F. Chase; J. V. Com., Chas. T. Lundberg; Adj't, Benj. 
R. Wheeler; Q. M., Chas. C. Foster; 0. of Day, Jas. D. Wood- 
bury; 0. of Guard, Robert I. Smith. 

women's christian temperance union. 

The cause of temperance was first seriously agitated about the 
middle of the last century. About 1840 Oliver G. Woodbury 
walked to Lowell to secure the services of Rev. Alonso A. Miner 
for a temperance lecture. This lecture, the first of the kind 
Mr. Woodbury had ever heard, suggested to him a field for great 
service to his fellows. He turned his attention more to the sub- 
ject, until about five years later he was asked to deliver a lecture 
before a picnic party which had planned an outing in some grove. 
From this time on the agitation became more and more ener- 
getic, temperance lectures being frequent from 1853 to '60. 
About 1872-74 liquor raids were instituted and prosecutions 
of sellers undertaken. This continued through 1880, but the 
houses of ill fame were very numerous in the town. The oppo- 
sition, however, became more united, until on October 1, 1883, 
the W. C. T. U. was organized, with the following charter mem- 
bers, fourteen in number : Mrs. A. P. Noyes, Mrs. M. K. Wood- 
bury, Mrs. Sarah E. Gage, Mrs. L. J. Conner, Mrs. H. C. Reed, 
Mrs. Sarah Goodwin, Mrs. A. R. Folsom, Mrs. M. G. Thorn, Mrs. 
Etta E. Chase, Mrs. G. H. Colburn, Misses Rowena Hall, Ida 
Thorn, Ellen Kimball, Sarah Austin, L. J. Austin. The first 
officers were: Pres., Mrs. A. P. Noyes; 1st Vice Pres., Mrs. G. 



ORGANIZATIONS. 339 

"Woodbury; 2d Vice Pres., Miss Sarah Austin; Sec'y and Treas., 
Mrs. A. R. Folsom; Cor. Sec'y, Mrs. H. C. Reed. 

Meetings are held the first Friday of each month at the homes 
of the members. The twentieth anniversary was celebrated at 
the Pleasant Street M. E. Church, October 1, 1903. There was 
a large attendance. Dinner was served, followed by addresses 
and music. The union now numbers twenty-five members. The 
present officers are : Pres., Mrs. L. A. Andrews ; 1st Vice Pres., 
Mrs. C. Hadley; 2d Vice Pres., Mrs. Sarah Goodwin; 3d Vice 
Pres., Mrs. K. M. McLaughlin ; 4th Vice Pres., Mrs. Moses Page ; 
Sec'y, Mrs. F. D. Davis; Treas., Mrs. Sarah Goodwin. 

SALEM GRANGE. 

Salem Grange, No. 168, P. of H., was organized February 3, 
1892, instituted by Dist. Deputy Thomas H. White. There were 
forty-one charter members, including Joseph Emerson, Thos. 
Duston, Augusta M. Duston, S. S. Shannon, Isaac S. Campbell, 
John M. Taylor, Mabel Taylor, L. W. Taylor, Ellen Taylor, Let- 
tie C. Maxwell, I. 0. Frost, Chas. T. Maxwell, Sarah D. Hart- 
ley, Robert I. Smith, Levi Cluff, A. M. Spurr, Mrs. A. M. Spurr, 
Loren B. McLaughlin, George Taylor, John P. Atwood, Etta J. 
Atwood, Jennie D. Smith, E. A. Larrabee, Lillian Larrabee, 
Wm. G. Crowell, Benj. Wheeler, Emma Hall, K. M. McLaugh- 
lin, Mrs. S. A. Martin, Ernest W. Eldridge, William R. Wheeler, 
N. G. Abbott, Mrs. L. B. McLaughlin, J. W. Wheeler, Mrs. J. 
W. Wheeler, Mrs. Geo. W. Taylor, D. C. Rundlett. 

The first officers were: Master, Chas. T. Maxwell; Overseer, 
Amos M. Spurr; Lecturer, Mrs. Geo. W. Taylor; Steward, John 
M. Taylor; Asst. Steward, Robert I. Smith; Chap., Rev. E. W. 
Eldredge; Treas., Thos. Duston; Sec, D. C. Rundlett; Gate- 
keeper, L. W. Taylor; Pomona, Mrs. J. M. Taylor; Flora, Mrs. 
Thos. Duston; Ceres, Mrs. Chas. T. Maxwell; Lady Asst. Stew- 
ard, Miss Lillian M. Larrabee ; Purchasing Agt., Geo. W. Taylor ; 
Ins. Agt., Levi W. Taylor. 

Meetings are held at Masonic Hall every second and fourth 
Friday of the month. During the first five years 206 members 
were enrolled, 37 coming in together in the fall of 1893; dur- 
ing the second five years 87 more were enrolled. The member- 



340 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

ship at the time of the celebration of the tenth anniversary in 
1902 was 177. During the third five years, up to January 1, 
1907, 50 names were added to the roll; present membership 
is 159. 

The Past Masters are Chas. T. Maxwell, John M. Taylor, Benj. 
R. Wheeler, Mrs. Susan A. duff, Frank L. Woodbury, Fred E. 
Woodbury, Wm. A. Frost. 

The present officers are : Master, Wm. A. Joy ; Overseer, John 
M. Richardson ; Sec, Margaret M. Richardson ; Lecturer, Mrs. 
John J. Richardson; Steward, Alfred Perry; Asst. Steward, 
Christie A. Bodwell; Chap., Mrs. Evelyn M. Haigh; Treas., Mrs. 
Lizzie J. McLaughlin; Gate-keeper, Geo. F. Smith; Pomona, 
Emma W. Smith; Flora, Mrs. Neva Smith; Ceres, Mrs. Hattie 
E. Joy; Chorister, Mrs. W. E. Lancaster; Pianist, Elsie Silver; 
Lady Asst. Steward, Mrs. Harriet F. Bodwell. 

women's relief corps. 

Gilman E. Sleeper, W. R. C, No. 73, was instituted December 
19, 1891, with the following twenty-eight charter members : 

Isabel M. Austin Drusilla P. Kimball 

Clarissa A. Middleton Almena C. Hanson 

Charlotte A. Hadley Celestia E. Nudd 

Ella A. Webster Mary A. Rowell 

Elizabeth E. Foster Hannah D. Bradford 

Susan C. Norris Georgie F. Conant 

Sarah M. Byron Elizabeth Fletcher 

Carrie B. Webster Mattie J. Crowell 

Alice M. Austin Susan A. Cluff 

Almena C. Harrison Mary J. Wheaton 

Laura J. Connor Emma A. Hadley 

Julia M. Gordon Clara M. Haigh 

Elizebeth J. Foster Florence L. Fletcher 

Susie J. Hilton Lizzie F. Childs 

The first officers were: Pres., Georgie F. Conant; Sr. Vice, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Fletcher; Jr. Vice, Mrs. Julia M. Gordon; Sec, 
Mattie J. Crowell; Treas., Mrs. Susan A. Cluff; Chap., Mrs. 
Mary J. Wheaton; Conductor, Mrs. Emma A. Hadley; Guard, 
Mrs. Clara M. Haigh; Asst. Con., Florence L. Fletcher; Asst. 
Guard, Mrs. Lizzie F. Childs. 




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ORGANIZATIONS. 341 

Meetings are held on the second Saturday of each month in 
Masonic Hall. 

The organization was worked up by Asa C. Gordon and Joseph 
Byron, who visited the ladies of Salem, Windham and Ayers 
Village. 

The past presidents are Mrs. Georgie F. Conant, Mrs. Lizzie 
F. Childs, Mrs. Julia M. Gordon, Mrs. Susan Cluff, Hattie A. 
Morrill, Mrs. Emma Hadley. 

The corps at the present time numbers 14 members. The 
present officers are : Pres., Lizzie F. Childs ; Sr. Vice, Charlotte 
A. Hadley; Jr. Vice, Elizabeth J. Foster; Sec, Hattie Cava- 
naugh; Treas., M. Jennie Kezer; Chap., Georgie F. Conant; 
Con., Emma A. Hadley; Guard, Clara M. Haigh; Asst. Con., 
May E. Webster; Asst. Guard, Blanche M. Webster. 

ENTERPRISE GRANGE. 

Enterprise Grange, No. 281, P. of H., was instituted Septem- 
ber 4, 1899, by Deputy Thos. H. White of Harrisville. The of- 
ficers were installed by State Master N. J. Bachelder of Concord. 
They were: Master, Geo. W. Thom; Overseer, C. F. Kimball; 
Lecturer, Mrs. Lucretia E. Hall; Steward, Geo. C. Farr; Asst. 
Steward, DanT A. Lanigan; Chap., Mrs. Ella M. Thorn; Treas., 
Forrest M. Martin; Sec, Mrs. Helen M. Bailey; Gate-keeper, E. 
E. Noyes; Ceres, Mrs. Emma E. Woodbury; Pomona, Mrs. Lena 
M. Kimball; Flora, Anna Belle Hadley; Lady Asst. Steward, 
Mrs. Emma C. Rowell; Organist, Ida L. Hill; Chorister, Mrs. 
William F. Rowell; Finance Committee, A. C. Hall, Wm. H. 
Clark, Frank W. Hadley; Executive Committee, John Turner, 
Chas. S. Woodbury, C. F. Kimball. 
There were fifty-one charter members: 
Mr. & Mrs. C. F. Kimball John Brady 

F. M. Martin Chas. Kimball 

C. A. Kimball Edward E. Noyes 
David Hird Frank Hadley 

John Brista Anna Belle Hadley 

" Elmer G. Bailey Geo. Farr 

John Turner Helen M. Bailey 

Wm. H. Clark Geo. W. Thom 



342 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Mr. & Mrs. Dana Call Lydia Andrews 

" Arthur C. Hall Daniel A. Lanigan 

Wm. A. Thorn J. H. Helberg 

Chas. S. Wood- Wm. H. Chase 

bury Mrs. H. C. Norris 

" Albert Littlefield John M. Hanlon 

Wm. F. Rowell Clifton S. Hall 

L. Wallace Hall Gertrude Woodbury 

Lillian M. Rowell Ida L. Hill 
Maud Barstow 

Meetings are held on the second and fourth Mondays of each 
month in Pilgrim Hall. 

Since the organization there have been 150 members enrolled; 
at the present time there are 101. Five members have been 
Master — Geo. W. Thorn, Edward E. Noyes, John Turner, Chas. 
A. Stevens and Mrs. Annie B. M. Stevens. 

The officers at present are : 

Pres., Mrs. A. B. M. Stevens; Overseer, Mrs. Betsey Little- 
john; Lecturer, Chas. A. Stevens; Steward, Chas. W. Joyce; 
Asst. Steward, Mrs. Mary Longley; Chap., Mrs. Emma Rowell; 
Treas., A. C. Hall; Sec, E. E. Noyes; Gate-keeper, G. A. Mor- 
rill; Pomona, Mrs. Helena J. Kelley; Ceres, Eva A. Noyes; 
Flora, Florence M. Rowell ; Lady Asst. Steward, Mrs. Emma A. 
Hadley; Pianist, Bessie M. Kezer; Finance Committee, Arthur 
G. Kelley, Elmer G. Bailey and Robert W. Peacock; Executive 
Committee, John Turner; John Brista, George Brady. 

NEW ENGLAND ORDER OP PROTECTION. 

Canobie Lodge, No. 406, New England Order of Protection, 
was organized August 26, 1904. The list of charter members 
includes Daniel A. Abbott, Lewis F. Soule, Nellie E. Aehorn, 
Edward A. Gage, Chas. E. Peabody, Herbert F. Copp, Luther S. 
Bancroft, Everett J. Brown, Philip Bergeron, Edward J. Spurr, 
Roger Perry, Frank D. Davis, Frank H. Ray, John C. Nichols, 
Judson L. Kezer, Lewis F. Woodbury, Charles F. Morrison, 
Chas. W. Joyce, Mary J. McKinnon, Vladimir Sikorsky, Harry 



ORGANIZATIONS. 343 

Haigh, Alfred Perry, Percy J. Call, Mary A. Dunbar, C. H. 
Hinchcliffe, Henrietta Hinchcliffe. 

List of first officers : 

Jr. Past Warden, F. D. Davis; Warden, Judson L. Kezer; 
Vice Warden, Daniel A. Abbott; Sec'y, Edward J. Spurr; Fin. 
Sec'y, Roger Perry; Treas., John C. Nichols; Chap., Mary J. 
McKinnon; Guide, Alfred Perry; Guardian, C. F. Morrison; 
Sentinel, Chas. W. Joyce; Trustees, Lewis F. Woodbury, Percy 
J. Call, Edward A. Gage. 

Seventeen members have been initiated since organization; 
the present number is 32. The meeting nights are the first and 
third Tuesdays of each month, meetings being held in Pilgrim 
Hall. 

The present officers are: Jr. Past Warden, F. D. Davis; 
Warden, C. W. Joyce; Vice Warden, Sarah Morrison; Sec, 
Annie B. M. Stevens ; Fin. Sec, Percy J. Call ; Treas., Mary J. 
McKinnon; Chap., Agnes 0. Haigh; Guide, Lewis F. Woodbury; 
Guardian, C. F. Morrison; Sentinel Harry Haigh; Trustees, L. 
F. Woodbury, F. D. Davis and M. Howard Ayer. 

j. o. u. A. M. 

There are two Councils of the Junior Order of United Ameri- 
can Mechanics, Washington Council, No. 11, and Rockingham 
Council, No. 28. The former is at the Center, the latter at 
North Salem. 

Rockingham Council, No. 28, J. 0. U. A. M., was instituted 
May 28, 1888, with the following list of officers : 

Junior Past Councillor, Geo. M. Woodbury ; Councillor, James 
A. Huson; Vice Councillor, Chas. P. Tabor; Rec Sec, Thos. B. 
Gilbride; Asst. Rec. Sec, Geo. E. Piper; Fin. Sec, Oliver G. 
Woodbury, Jr.; Treas., Linus L. Chase; Conductor, David W. 
Felch; Warden, Herbert W. Harris; Inside Sentinel, Elmer E. 
Conley; Outside Sentinel, John J. Hunt; Trustees, E. E. Cfonley, 
H. W. Harris, Moses C. Hall. 

The charter members and other matters pertaining to the first 
year of the Council cannot be obtained, as records, since the 
books were burned December 16, 1899. 



344 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Meetings are held every Monday evening at eight o'clock in 
Taylor's Hall, North Salem. Up to the present time thirty- 
three observances of a social nature have been held, including 
anniversaries, suppers, etc. 

The Past Councillors are J. A. Huson, Chas. P. Tabor, Thos. 

B. Gilbride, 0. G. Woodbury, Jr., Linus L. Chase, David W. 
Felch, H. W. Harris, E. E. Conley, J. H. Hunt, Moses C. Hall, 
J. E. Long, S. M. Pattee, Geo. A. Pattee, W. S. Pattee, H. P. 
Taylor, J. T. Littlefield, C. J. Palmer, Jr., W. E. Palmer, L. L. 
Hunt, W. E. Palmer, A. B. Jennings, I. D. Woodbury, C. H. 
Mirick, David Willey. 

The number of members at present is 39; the total number 
enrolled since organization is 86. 

Following is the list of present officers: 

Councillor, A. B. Jennings; Vice Coun., C. P. Nichols; Rec. 
Sec, S. M. Pattee; Asst. Rec. Sec, J. T. Littlefield; Fin. Sec, 

C. J. Palmer, Jr.; Treas., L. L. Hunt; Chap., W. E. Palmer; 
Con., W. H. Rolfe; Warden, S. L. Duston; In. Sent., R. A. 
Jennings; Out. Sent., I. A. Bartlett; Trustees, W. H. Palmer, 
H. P. Taylor and W. E. Palmer. 

Washington Council, No. 11, J. 0. U. A. M., was organized in 
1893 by seven men, who secured a charter. Several members 
were admitted before the privilege of the charter membership 
was closed, until the lodge had a good number with which to 
begin its career. About two hundred members have been en- 
rolled; the present membership is 31. 

Meetings are held the second and fourth Wednesdays of each 
month in Masonic Hall. The officers for the current year are: 

Past Councillor, Newell H. Tilton; Councillor, Harold P. 
Haigh; Vice Councillor, Andrew Coleman; Rec. Sec, Lorenzo 
F. Hyde; Asst. Rec. Sec, Benjamin Austin; Treas., Elmer F. 
Austin; Fin. Sec, George H. Coleman; Warden, George H. 
Smith; Conductor, George McDonald; Inside Sentinel, John 
Morris; Outside Sentinel, Thomas Holt; Trustees, John J. Rich- 
ardson, Walter Haigh, Lorenzo F. Hyde. 

DAUGHTERS OP LIBERTY. 

Golden Rule Council, No. 4, Daughters of Liberty, was insti- 
tuted January 7, 1892, with thirty charter members. The meet- 







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ORGANIZATIONS. 



345 



ings were held on the first and third Saturdays of each month, 
in Masonic Hall at the Center. The membership January 1, 
1900, was forty-three. The Council afterwards disbanded and 
returned their books to Concord, consequently we have no list 
of the charter members or first officers. The officers for 1900 
were: 

Past Councillor, Frank N. Emerson; Past Assoc. Councillor, 
Mary N. Drew; Councillor, William Drew; Assoc. Councillor, 
Mary E. Gordon; Vice Councillor, Joseph Long; Assoc. Vice 
Councillor, Anna Long; Rec. Sec, Grace B. Emerson; Asst. Rec. 
Sec, Jennie Palmer; Fin. Sec, Laura Goodhue; Treas., Henry 
P. Taylor ; Guide, Emma F. Coburn ; Inside Protector, Gertrude 
Hastings; Outside Protector, Cora Winning; Trustees, Mary 
Gordon, Jennie Palmer, Frank Emerson. 

MISCELLANEOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 

There have been other societies and orders in Salem, most of 
which had a short existence. The Farmers & Mechanics' Club 
was one of the most promising of these, but the meetings were 
held only for two years. On January 17, 1885, a meeting of 
those favoring the organization of the club was held in Masonic 
Hall. Wm. G. Crowell was chosen President and John F. Hall, 
Secretary. At a meeting held a week later a committee was 
chosen to draft a constitution — Chas. Kimball, Ruel F. Wheeler 
and Wm. G. Crowell. At the meeting on January 31, Levi Cluff 
was chosen Treasurer and Rules & Regulations were adopted. 
Art. 2 of these gives the purpose of the movement: "The ob- 
ject of the Association shall be to encourage the cultivation of 
Fruits, Farm Crops and Mechanical Industries." 

The list of members shows what a gathering of substantial 
citizens of the town this club presented : Abraham H. Merrill, 
Joseph W. Emerson, Stephen Currier, Wm. H. Haseltine, Ruel 
F. Wheeler, Mason B. Presby, Frank M. Upton, Charles Kim- 
ball, Elbridge Larrabee, George Wilson, Israel T. Foster, H. B. 
Sills, Wm. G. Crowell, Levi Cluff, Chas. T. Maxwell, Isaac 
Woodbury, C. Frank Kimball, Otto F. Cress, John W. Wheeler, 
William R. Wheeler, Darius M. Thorn, George W. Noyes, Joseph 
Cleveland, John F. Hall, Jacob W. Kelley, Isaehar 0. Foster, 



346 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

John F. Smith, H. H. Colburn, Charles W. Mann, Jasper H. 
Johnson, Horace Carlton, Oliver G. Woodbury, Wm. B. Kimball, 
Alonzo G. Wilson, Silas Hall, Jesse C. Silver, Theodore W. Fel- 
lows, Wm. H. Clark, John Brady, George M. Adams. 

A membership fee of fifty cents was charged. Meetings were 
held regularly until April 20, 1887, at which discussions, read- 
ings and singing were features of the exercises. 

A political club known as the Order of the United Americans 
was organized at the house of Francis Smith, April 26, 1858, in 
preparation for the fall campaign. Among the members were 
James Ayer, John H. Lancaster, Ezekiel D. Sargent, and Hiram 
Webster. (See Ch. V.) 

There was for a number of years a lodge of Good Templars 
at the Center, organized January 14, 1866. One year later an 
anniversary was observed. We have not the full data regard- 
ing the society. 

The Order of the Golden Cross was instituted in Salem on 
May 7, 1880, by A. Morrison and Mr. Morgan of Lawrence. It 
was a benefit society and did not last a great while. 

There was a branch of the Provident Mutual Eelief Associa- 
tion here in the seventies. 

There have been other organizations, of more or less tempor- 
ary nature, formed for either social or business purposes; but 
either they were comparatively unimportant or data concerning 
them is wanting. 



CHAPTER XI. 

Historical Tales. 

There is in the story of the life of every community a mass of 
legend, tradition and neighborhood gossip, much of which is, 
perhaps, most fitly characterized by the term "yarn." To omit 
this from the printed record would, to many minds, be almost 
sacrilege, while to include it really does contribute much to the 
acquaintance with the times and people of the past. 

All such material as does not fall properly elsewhere under 
the topical divisions of the book are "thrown in" here without 
any attempt at arrangement, but still fulfilling its own mission. 
The object of this section is intended to amuse rather than to 
instruct — to furnish a browsing place where one may find food 
for reflection upon the home life, the interests and experiences 
of the men and women who "trod the same paths and saw the 
same sun ' ' that we ourselves enjoy. 

The veracity of these stories is not vouched for by the author. 
They are whispered by the tall soft pines along the hillsides and 
murmured by the brooks, whose waters roll along their crooked 
ways — you may hear them if you will but stroll and listen. 

Besides the stories many bits of genealogical information, 
notes on schools, industries, map locations, etc., are here in- 
cluded. All such are authentic, but are better presented by ex- 
panding here with explanations than in the condensed form of 
their respective chapters. 

WIDOW HARRIS ' LOOM. 

Before the days of the incorporation of Salem there lived in 
this neighborhood a man by the name of Joseph Harris, whose 
father also was Joseph. He and his wife, Martha, were living 
on a sunny hill by the brook which turned the: wheel of Henry 
Sanders' sawmill, when in later years the news came that the 



348 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

British had fired on American troops at Lexington. Joseph got 
down his musket and powder horn and prepared to leave for the 
scene of action as soon as a call should come for assistance. We 
do not know anything of him after he went into the army. But 
we can pick up the thread of the story of Martha many years 
after. 

She had a large hand loom, on which she wove cloth to sell. 
By this means, aided by her cow and garden, she managed to 
eke out a living. But disaster overtook her. The little house 
on the hill fell a victim to the angry flames, only the huge chim- 
ney remaining in its original position. Willing hands, however, 
assisted her in saving her great loom. With undaunted courage 
she placed this with its massive square frame up against the 
chimney, secured pieces of board and nails, and built herself a 
house. In this she lived until she became very old, still keeping 
her cow and her garden. She then was granted a pension for 
her dead husband. With this she built a new house, small but 
comfortable, on the site of her former dwelling. This was after- 
wards moved by the town authorities to the town farm, whither 
she had gone, as a more comfortable home could there be pro- 
vided. Before she went there she lived with her grandson, 
Dudley Jones, whose house was just across the brook from her 
own. The government pension list for 1840 for soldiers and 
widows of the Revolution gives her age then as ninety-six years. 

The cellar of her house may still be seen on the crest of the 
gentle rise of land just north of the Dudley Jones bridge (form- 
erly called Widow Harris' bridge), on the east side of the road. 
A small oak has in recent years reared its sturdy top, as if to 
mark the spot where this humble cottage stood. 

GRANNY OBER'S WITCHERY. 

About the time of the Revolution, John Ober lived on the 
Bricket Bradley place (M 651), and John W. Wheeler's great 
grandmother lived on the Larabee place (M 442). There was 
an old path across lots, passing near the west end of Captain's 
pond, called "Ober Path." Old Granny Ober lived with John, 
and used to come over to Wheeler's for milk. One day she was 
told by Esther (Mrs. Wheeler) that there was none to be spared. 




THOMAS D. LANCASTER. 



HISTORICAL TALES. 349 

This enraged the old woman, and she threatened, "You'll be 
sorry," as she stormed from the house. 

The next morning, when Esther went to milk, she found the 
cow on her back. The neighbors were called to help get her up, 
and thought the occurrence very strange. The next morning 
she was all right, but on the second she was down again. Mrs. 
Wheeler now suspected that Granny Ober had bewitched the 
cow. She rushed into the house and got a carving knife, with 
which she cut off a portion of the cow's tail and ears. Carry- 
ing them into the house in her apron, she poked over the coals 
and threw in the ears and tail, holding them down until they 
were consumed. She said they "sputtered and blazed terri- 
bly." Shortly afterwards Abner Wheeler, who lived next door, 
where Captain Beveridge's house now stands, came in and said, 
"Heard the news? Granny Ober has got into the bush and 
scratched herself terribly, burned her ears off, and burned to 
death in the fire." Doubtless the cow was not further troubled. 

This Abner, by the way, was called "King of the Wheelers." 
When a company of persons belonging to the family were on a 
certain occasion talking in separate conversation until there was 
a considerable commotion in the room, he arose and put up his 
hand saying, "Huh! listen to me, I'm a man of sense." 

TAVERN TALES. 

There is an interesting book in possession of the Hall family, 
which throws some light on the prices of commodities a century 
ago. It is the account of Hezekiah Jones when he lived in the 
house later known as the Tenney homestead. Here he kept a 
tavern and store when the Turnpike was first built. Here are 
some of the prices for which he sold goods : 

Mackerel, 6c lb ; pork, 6c lb ; butter, 12c lb ; beef, 4c lb ; nails, 
4!/2 lbs, 38c; calfskin, $1.42; cheese, 7c lb; veal, 6c lb; chickens, 
10c each ; oats, 67c bu. ; y 2 bu. salt, 44c ; cider, $1 bbl ; bowl of 
milk and lodging, 20c ; breakfast and lodging, 28c. 

From the account it appears that the proprietors of the Turn- 
pike paid lc commission for every meal furnished their employes 
or members of the company. 

Dolly Jones, his wife, received $4 for weaving 32 yds. table 
linen (atl2i/ 2 c). 



350 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

The book shows that he kept the tavern business until 1822. 
It also gives the following birth dates of himself, his wife and 
children : 

Hezekiah Jones, b. June 13, 1769. 

Dolly Head, b. November 9, 1775. 

Anna Jones, b. November 9, 1790. 

Lydia Allen Jones, b. August 4, 1797. 

Chauncey Newell Jones, b. October 15, 1799. 

Caroline Betton Jones, September 3, 1804. 

Dolly Head Jones, b. July 12, 1807. 

Amos Head Jones, b. September 8, 1809. 

Charles Hildreth Jones, b. September 10, 1815. 

In those days a man's labor brought fifty cents a day, and his 
yoke of oxen the same price. The men's clothing was often 
made by women who went about from house to house tailoring, 
generally staying a week or more at a place. The cloth sold for 
about sixty cents a yard. It was woolen, and so coarse that 
"you could shoot peas through it." The first wetting made it 
shrink until it was very thick and hard. It is almost unneces- 
sary to add that a suit of this material was sufficiently durable 
to wear for many years. 

Mrs. Lydia Merrill, a daughter of Capt. David Messer, has 
left us some interesting stories of life at the old Messer Tavern 
and of life in that community. She went to school in the old 
No. 9 house, which stood some distance north of the present 
building. Her teachers were Richard Messer, Robert Campbell, 
James Miltimore of Derry, Persis Sargent, Hannah Webster, 
Lucinda Currier, and Lucretia Page Bradley. She describes 
Lafayette's passage through Salem: "I saw him as he passed 
father's house. He was on horseback, and wore a big hat, 
broad brimmed, which he took off in response to the greetings 
of those who were present. His horse was of medium size, and 
carried his head low; he was a good looking horse, and sleek. 
The stirrups shone like silver. The general paused just a mo- 
ment to acknowledge greetings. I think he had stayed in An- 
dover over night." 

Mrs. Merrill tells of the domestic life also: "Turkeys were 
roasted by hanging in front of the fire in the fireplace, and meat 



HISTORICAL TALES. 351 

also was cooked in the same way. A pan was set on the hearth 
to catch the drippings. Afterwards 'tin kitchens' were used. 
These were long tin affairs which were pushed up against the 
fireplace, open next to the fire, with the other sides closed. They 
were about two feet high, raised upon legs about three or four 
inches long. The food to be cooked was placed in dripping pans 
inside the 'kitchen.' The great heat from the back log was 
caught by the metal case, which was long enough to reach 
across the entire front of the fireplace, and there confined for 
the cooking. The large fireplaces had brick ovens where bread, 
pies, brown bread and beans were baked. The fire was built 
up hot until the oven was right, then allowed to burn low as the 
oven could hold the heat until the baking was finished. 

"Dutch ovens were sometimes used. This was a hanging pan 
with a grooved cover, on which coals were placed. This was 
then hung on the crane over the fire, when the heat above and 
below would soon cook the food in the pan. 

"The crane was the large iron arm that swung from the side 
of the fireplace. It was provided with hooks and trammels, 
which were flat bars of iron bent so as to hang over the crane, 
and pierced with holes so that a hook could be inserted at dif- 
ferent heights. Thus a kettle could be raised or lowered at 
will. I have been often to the Bailey house to get fire to use 
at home. Afterwards a tinder box and flints were used to get 
fire; the flints were struck together making sparks which fall- 
ing into charred paper ignited it." 

She remembered the dedication exercises at the completion of 
the Bunker Hill monument, being an eye witness of the event. 
A cannon was raised to the top, carrying a man astride, who 
pushed his feet against the wall to keep the cannon from strik- 
ing. After it was raised it was discharged from the top. Mrs. 
Merrill tried to put her hand on the capstone before it was 
raised to be placed, but the crush was so great that she could 
not get within reach. 

When John Ewins kept the store at the corner, and Granny 
Ladd was just across the street, there was a jolly company of 
loiterers in the neighborhood almost any evening. On one oc- 
casion a number were in Ewins' store, spinning yarns, when 



352 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

"Jock" Emerson happened along. His fertile brain at once 
associated a certain few present conditions, among them being 
the large empty crockery crate which stood just around the cor- 
ner of the building. Placing this carefully in front of the door, 
open side uppermost, he rushed into the store and shouted, 
"Bun for.it, fellows, there's a h — 1 of a row over to Granny 
Ladd 's ! " It was a race to see who would be first on the scene 
— but, alas, like Napoleon at Waterloo, they had not counted on 
the "Sunken Road." The crockery crate received a tangled 
mass of heads, arms and legs, while the vocabulary spattered 
upon the atmosphere would have staggered a Western broncho 
buster. The account hints that "Jock" was missing from the 
neighborhood for several days. 

AN AGED TEACHER. 

Living at Windham Depot is a man nearly eighty-five years 
old, who was a teacher in Salem fifty or sixty years ago. This 
is William C. Harris, a member of a family of teachers, his four 
brothers and four sisters, all now dead, having taught, as well 
as his father and grandfather. He sends the following remin- 
iscence of his work here: 

"My first school was in the westerly part of the town in 
District No. 7, called the Woodbury district, from the fact that 
there were seven families of that name in the district. The 
schoolhouse was called Dark-entry schoolhouse, because there was 
no window in the entry until the fall of 1846, at which time the 
schoolhouse was thoroughly repaired. 

"I commenced teaching there the Monday after Thanksgiving 
of that year, having between forty and fifty scholars, and re- 
ceiving as wages the first term $14 per month and board. In 
those days it was the custom to employ male teachers in the 
winter and female in the summer. 

"I continued teacher of this school for four successive win- 
ters. The first I boarded with Capt. Isaac Thorn; the second 
and third with Capt. Richard Woodbury ; and the fourth winter 
'boarded around,' at the homes of the scholars. This custom had 
its advantages, as it gave the teacher a chance to get better 
acquainted with the children and their parents. 




OLIVER G. WOODBURY, 




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HISTORICAL TALES. 353 

"The parents manifested much interest by frequently visit- 
ing the school, and by carrying their children to and from school 
when it was poor walking. 

"I took to this school a set of Fowler's outline maps, which 
I had just purchased from their publisher at a teachers' insti- 
tute in Derry, and the daily use of these added much to the 
interest in geography. They were so well liked that the dis- 
trict paid for them and kept them. 

"In packing my trunk to go to this school I put in a singing 
book and an oak ruler. The former was much used, the latter 
was not taken out of the trunk until I went home at the close 
of the term, and it was not taken again. Good order was main- 
tained in all the schools which I kept, without resorting to 
corporal punishment. 

"Mr. Smiley Smith sent eight children to school who were 
natural singers, and the Gorrell children, four in number, were 
good singers, and we had singing in school almost every day, 
which added much to the interest of the school. Occasional 
spelling matches were held in the evening, which were inter- 
esting and profitable. 

"The third winter, 1848^9, after finishing the term in this 
district, I taught the winter term of seven weeks in No. 5, called 
Zion's Hill district, now known as Millville, boarding with 
Nathaniel Woodbury. I had about forty scholars there; one of 
the boys, Frank Goodhue, became of age and voted at town 
meeting before the term closed. 

"The older pupils used to get up what were called kitchen 
dances, a man named Shedd furnishing music on the violin. 
These dancing parties absorbed so much attention as to detract 
very much from the interest in the school. The schoolhouse was 
an old one, much out of repair. The floor under the desks was 
an inclined plane, rising to the back, and occasionally an ink- 
bottle or a half-eaten apple would come rolling down in front 
of the teacher's desk. 

"The next two winters (beginning January, 1851), I taught 
in the stone schoolhouse, District No. 6, receiving $20 per month 
and board. I boarded with Silas Hall. The schoolhouse had 

24 



354 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

just been repaired in the fall of 1850, and new single desks and 
chairs had been put in, sixty-four in number. The first winter 
there were sixty-eight pupils that attended more than two weeks, 
with an average attendance of fifty-eight. The next winter 
there were sixty-seven, with an average of fifty-five. 

"When the house was repaired, the old door on the north 
end had been closed up and a new one made on the south end, 
and a large entry built on. This we often used for a recitation 
room, where the older pupils would assist the teacher by hearing 
the little ones read and spell. In this school also, outline maps 
were introduced, which were of great benefit in the study of 
geography. 

1 ' Several of the older boys of this school, when grown to man- 
hood, engaged in honorable and profitable business, and became 
quite wealthy. Of this number may be mentioned Prescott C. 
Hall, Edwin M. Stickney, George, Milton and Charles Tenney 
and Levi Woodbury. The two last named have shown a very 
commendable spirit in spending a portion of their wealth in im- 
proving and beautifying the old homesteads on which they were 
born. 

"William Calvin Harris." 

The meagre living of many of the early people of the town 
is well illustrated by an anecdote of the Emerson family. Mrs. 
George Jones' great grandfather, James Emerson, one year lost 
all his seed corn. This was a serious state of affairs, where so 
much depended on the crop for making meal. White flour was 
almost unknown then, rye and corn meal being the staple food 
stuffs. He walked to Newburyport and brought home on his 
back half a bushel of corn. This he divided, putting away 
what he wanted to plant and pounding the rest in a mortar, to 
be made into johnnycake. When it was baked each of the chil- 
dren was given a piece about three inches square and the rest 
was hung from a rafter for breakfast next morning. 

Mrs. Jones' grandmother, Rachel Stevens, worked for Dr. 
Howe in Haverhill, where she received fifty cents a week for 
her services. It seems that one of the old laws designed to pre- 
vent too luxurious equipment, stipulated that a private house 
should not have more than ten pairs of sheets. The doctor had 



HISTORICAL TALES. 355 

thirty pairs. So Rachel put the extra ones between the feather 
beds and mattresses. When the men came to take the inven- 
tory she told them she had only so many besides what were on 
the beds, thus avoiding the tax for the extra sheets. 

There are two stories told by Mr. Levi Woodbury, which ap- 
peared in the souvenir book issued at the time of the one hun- 
dred and fiftieth anniversary celebration. They are so good 
that they are reproduced here : 

TALES OF MY GRANDFATHER. 

Dedicated to the Boys and Girls of Salem. 
My young friends: 

I will try to relate to you, as near as I can from memory, two 
stories my dear grandfather told me a long, long time ago, and 
how I hung upon every word with child-like interest and the 
many, many times I importuned him to repeat them until they 
were so impressed upon me that I remember them as well as 
though told to me but yesterday. 

Why I dedicate these stories to j^ou, the young folks of our 
town, is because I wish to impress upon your young minds the 
trials and hardships your ancestors and forefathers had to 
endure, and that you may cherish their memory for the many 
blessings you enjoy through their devotion to country, for the 
welfare of their own and future generations. Grandfather was 
born December 10, 1759, and lived to the good old age of ninety- 
nine years and ten months. 

I was always interested in adventurous stories and being fond 
of my grandfather and he of me, I was continually coaxing him 
to tell them, but the two that I am going to tell you are the ones 
that made a lasting impression upon me. 

When grandfather was about seventeen or eighteen years old, 
the colonies rebelled against the mother country, old England, 
for good and sufficient reasons, as you all know. He enlisted 
and went forth to battle for our independence. And the history 
of that revolution tells us how gallantly our forefathers fought, 
the brave deeds done, their hairbreadth escapes, etc. And our 
great and glorious country, today, shows how well their de- 
scendants have taken care of the great republic, given them by 



356 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

those noble men and women, by their sacrifice of life and treas- 
ure, as a sacred inheritance for all generations. 

Right well has our noble flag been defended and the principles 
of our republic have been upheld, unto this day, and we can 
justly and proudly say, that we are the most powerful republic 
on earth and respected by all nations. 

But I am digressing from those stories I promised you. Well, 
grandfather bade his people good-bye, joined his regiment and 
for seven long years did not return. He was stationed in north- 
ern New York. There the measles broke out in camp, and be- 
came epidemic; as fast as they recovered the soldiers were sent 
to the front. When grandfather was nearly well the camp was 
surprised by a marauding tribe of Indians, and those who tried 
to escape were slain, but grandfather being too weak to run was 
taken prisoner and carried to the St. Lawrence River and across 
to Canada, where he was turned over to a wealthy Frenchman, 
who held him as a vassal for a long time, even after the war 
was over. But by the aid of a half-breed he managed to escape 
and recross the St. Lawrence in a canoe, and when on American 
soil struck out through the wilderness for Salem, his home. His 
parents had given him up for lost, supposing he was dead, as 
the war was over and they had heard nothing from him. 

He walked all the way or nearly all the way to Salem, and on 
a Sunday he arrived, barefooted, hatless, and with but very 
scant clothing, at his father's door with his trusty gun upon his 
shoulder. It was no wonder that his playmate whom he left at 
home when he went to war, a lad by the name of Amos Wheeler, 
whom his parents raised, seeing him at the door, fled in fright, 
crying "Israel's ghost!" But grandfather reassured him by 
saying, ' ' Amos, ghosts do not carry guns. ' ' So Amos came out 
from his hiding and then such handshaking and embracing by 
those two fast friends was never seen before. It seems that 
great-grandfather and mother had gone to church and left Amos 
at home to guard the house. After Amos had explained the 
absence of grandfather's parents and had heard some of his 
adventures related, they saw my great-grandfather and mother 
coming up the road, both on one horse, she on a pillion as they 
rode in olden times. And what did Amos do but run to meet 



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HISTORICAL TALES. 357 

them, crying at the top of his voice, ' ' Israel has come, Israel has 
come," greatly to the chagrin and consternation of the old peo- 
ple, who upon that very Sunday had listened to prayers by their 
good pastor for their dear boy whom they expected was surely 
dead. So Amos got a sharp cut from the riding whip, with the 
remark that it was a sad time for jokes (Amos had the repu- 
tation of being something of a joker). So Amos ran, brought 
grandfather's gun and said, "See his gun, do you believe me 
now ? ' ' And then grandfather came out, and his mother fell into 
his arms and his father embraced him and all were happy in the 
reunion. 

And there was great rejoicing in the whole town. 

The other story I promised is about wolves attacking one of 
our old citizens of Salem, and one I believe grandfather told me 
a score of times. I do not remember the man's name, but I do 
remember the location of his house, and it was near where now 
lives one of Salem's respected citizens, the Rev. Abram "Wheeler 
(now Wallace W. Cole). 

At the time this occurred Spiggot Falls (now Methuen, 
Mass.,) was the nearest trading post or frontier store, and peo- 
ple living in that locality had to go there for their groceries, and 
this man, who was chased by wolves, had been to Spiggot Falls 
to do some trading. He went on horseback and carried saddle- 
bags to bring home his purchases, among which was codfish. 
He was jogging along home when he heard that awful blood- 
curdling howl he too well knew, the howling of wolves. It was 
getting quite late and he was still a mile or more from home, 
wife and little ones. He put spurs to his horse and with voice 
and whip put poor Dobbin to a breakneck pace, a race for life, 
home and dear ones. But the ugly wolves gained and gained 
on him, and came so near that the leaders of the pack began to 
snap at the horse's heels, when a happy thought struck him, 
and he pulled out of the saddle-bags a codfish and threw it 
among the hungry beasts, and while they were devouring the 
fish he made quite a gain on them. So when they came after 
him again he gave them another fish. He was now nearing 
home, but his good and brave wife had heard the howling of the 
wolves and the fast running of a horse, and well knew it was 



358 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

her husband, followed by those savage beasts. So she fastened 
her children in the house, ran to the barn, opened the big door 
and held it so her husband could ride in, which he did, with the 
whole pack but a few feet behind. But she shut the door and 
they were safe. But through that long night they had to stay 
in the barn and their children were fastened in the house. 

Now, my dears, if I have not wearied you by these long drawn 
out stories, I am happy. And I trust they may interest you so 
far as to cause you to give a little thought to what the old set- 
tlers, our forefathers and mothers, had to endure to make a 
town. And our good town, by its thrift and prosperity, shows 
that we are true sons, daughters and descendants of those hardy,, 
honest and God-fearing pioneers. Let us all try to do our best 
to improve and beautify our town, so that those who follow us 
will honor us as we today gladly do honor to our worthy an- 
cestors. 

FIRST BALDWIN APPLE TREE. 

The Baldwin apple has gained such a high place in the esti- 
mation of the country that the origin and history of this fine 
species of fruit are worthy of our knowledge. 

About 1790 Col. Loammi Baldwin of Woburn, Mass., while sur- 
veying a route for the Middlesex canal, came upon a native apple 
tree on the Butters farm in Wilmington, Mass., the fruit of which 
he believed in. After grafting it into his orchard he was free 
to give the fruit and scions to many of his acquaintances. Bald- 
win 's name for his favorite apple was ' ' Pecker, ' ' after the marks 
on the bark of the tree made by the woodpecker. The apple be- 
came so generally appreciated in Baldwin's day that at a business 
meeting of the agricultural society, when he was present, a vote 
was taken that with his consent the apple should be renamed the 
"Baldwin." 

When the Londonderry Turnpike was projected, Mr. Baldwin 
was engaged to make the survey. He made his headquarters for 
some time at the house of Richard Pattee, which stood very near 
the old willow tree now just north of the No. 9 schoolhouse 
(M 390). One day he asked why they did not raise some apples, 
adding jokingly that their fruit was only an apology for the real 



HISTORICAL TALES. 359 

article. When he returned from a trip home he brought some 
scions and put them into a tree about six rods north of the house, 
remarking that they were the first scions of the Baldwin apple 
set in New Hampshire. The tree grew to a diameter of nearly 
three feet, and bore fine Baldwins until 1888, when it was blown 
down by a gale. Sections of the trunk have been preserved, one 
having been requested for the State Agricultural College at 
Durham. 

The site of the tree is now a part of the farm of J. W. Kelley, 
who owns the Pattee place. 

ODD ITEMS. 

The first cast-iron plow in Salem or Windham was introduced 
by Isaac Emerson. He also had the first glass lantern in Wind- 
ham, and the first horse rake in Salem. The rake he bought of 
John Patten of Derry. 

Both the great-great-grandfather and great-grandfather of 
S. M. Pattee were in the Revolution. The gun carried by the 
former is now in possession of George Gordon, while the powder 
horn of the latter Mr. Pattee has. The former also served under 
Washington in the campaign in which Braddock was defeated. 
His wife picked fifty pounds of ribwort tea, which she carried to 
Boston on horseback in the fall of 1776. 

One reason for the frequent shifting of the early roads was 
their undeveloped condition. There was little or no grading 
done in many places, such work as was put into highways being 
for the most part near swamps or bridges. Fences were rare ; as 
late as 1756 (and probably for some years after) there was not a 
rod of stone wall between the old meetinghouse and North Salem. 

The wooden fence around the common was built in June, 1859. 
A part of it may be seen in the picture of the Old Tavern. 

In the decade preceding the Civil War, many social gatherings 
were held in different parts of the town, some of them being of a 
very interesting character. For instance, a ' ' kissing party ' ' was 
held in Salem Hall, February 19, 1856. It was so well liked by 
all who attended that another was at once planned ! In the same 
year Gilman E. Sleeper and Kimball Poor, of Atkinson, started a 
waltzing school. In 1853 John Blaisdell of Methuen had a sing- 



360 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

ing school in the town hall. Five years later George Hodgdon 
also conducted one. In fact, these schools for reading, dancing, 
singing, etc., were very common during these years. 

The quilting party was a great favorite. We happen to have 
an account of one held in 1861 at Andrew J. Silver's, where his 
son, Clinton, now lives. It may interest some of our readers to 
know who attended : 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Webster Mrs. Thos. D. Lancaster 
" James Ayer " Rawson Coburn 

Wm. G. Crowell " Gilman E. Sleeper 
" J. H. Lancaster " Prescott B. Emerson 

" Joseph Buxton Miss Sarah A. Woodbury 

George N. Austin ' ' Susan Wheeler 
Ed. S. Wood- " Ellen Ayer 

bury Simon Kelly 

George C. Gor- Henry Philbrook 

don Miss Elizabeth Ayer 
" Laroy Rogers and others 

At some of the socials refreshments were served, each person 
sometimes bringing some delicacy from home. On one occasion 
at the town hall, in 1860, porridge and hulled corn were passed 
and eagerly disposed of. 

The first piano brought into Salem was that of Mrs. J. L. Clen- 
denin. The second was that of Mrs. Jonathan Merrill, brought 
in September 7, 1856. 

There was a band here about 1867, known as the Salem Cornet 
Band. Kelly Webster was leader in 1872, when they played at 
several political demonstrations. In 1873 they had a teacher 
from Manchester, Mr. Walter Dignam. 

Before this, in the spring of '54, about twenty-five young men 
organized the Calathumpian Band. Their uniform was a white 
shirt or frock, with red stripes, a conical hat about fifteen inches 
high of white cardboard, with red stripes and ribbons flying from 
the peak. The instrumentation included the following: a tin 
horn three feet long, cymbals, triangles, pieces of steel drill, post 
horn, tin pans, snare drum and bass drum. The band serenaded 
newly married couples and "played" at huskings. 









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HISTORICAL TALES. 361 

There were two election day customs. One was to provide a 
turkey dinner. In North Salem the favorite place was at 
Benaiah Gordon's, near the brick schoolhouse. The other diver- 
sion was a shooting match. This was sometimes merely target 
work. The range was laid across the river from near the school- 
house (library) to the Emerson field, a distance estimated then 
at sixty-five rods. But frequently it took the form of a "bird 
shoot." Sides were chosen and the party sought the woods. A 
partridge counted five, a blue jay one, etc. The losing side had 
to furnish a treat, with the aid of which the evening was made 
a time of jollification. A number of the party, under the guid- 
ance of punch provided, usually found delight in loading their 
guns half full of powder and firing into the air to celebrate. It 
has been said that the rest of the party thoroughly enjoyed the 
result of this exhibition. 

A curious entry is found in the selectmen's book of a century 
ago: "Feb. 22, 1804, ordered Moses Whitaker to pay Hezikiah 
Jones four dollars it being for Rideing three Days after the 
thief that Stole Joseph Thorn's horse." 

Mary Campbell was the keeper of the tollgate at what is now 
Canobie Lake Station. Her house stood close beside the turn- 
pike on the east side. The cellar may still be plainly seen in the 
bushes in the fork between the Millville and North Salem roads. 
She was a very tall, angular woman, with muscles like a man, 
developed by the active life she led. She kept a gun in her 
house, with which she was said to be very proficient. In the 
wide forests that then surrounded her habitation many a par- 
tridge fell beneath her unerring aim. But she was not depend- 
ent entirely upon her own efforts for her supply of game. The 
large cat that shared her board was so well trained that he con- 
tributed largely to the fare. His favorite prey were rabbits, 
which he killed and dragged home, often from considerable dis- 
tances. He would then sit by and watch his mistress skin and 
prepare to cook the animal. It is needless to say that he was 
given a generous helping at mealtime. 

Doubtless there are many other good stories known to our 
readers. These were selected as giving a view of a few of the 
"characters" of the town, and some of the diversions of people 
in general. 



CHAPTER XII. 

Key to Historical Map. 

It must be borne in mind that the object of this chapter, in- 
cluding the map, is twofold — first, to present the history of the 
places in Salem in so far as it has been obtained; and, second, 
to record in a permanent way the plan of the town as its exists 
today. Both these aims are intended to interest the readers of 
the present and future alike. The origin, development, changes 
in ownership, and connections with or relations to historic events, 
of the homesteads or buildings of Salem, will be interesting now 
and hereafter. And the same may as truly be said of the 
geographical information furnished by the map itself. 

The descriptions here presented are taken from a multiplicity 
of sources, among which may be mentioned documents of a legal 
nature such as deeds, wills, surveys, etc., private papers as let- 
ters, diaries, accounts, memoranda and genealogical data, and 
finally verbal statements of persons who have been acquainted 
with the places of the town. Necessarily then, some of the 
statements here found are inaccurate because of faulty sources, 
while most of the descriptions are more or less incomplete sim- 
ply because men do not write the data concerning property, and 
when they die much of it is lost. Where conflicting sources are 
found the author has obtained all the related evidence possible, 
and then drawn what seems the most likely conclusion. Where 
the facts are wanting and mere suppositions are presented, a 
question mark (?) follows the doubtful feature. 

The system of numbers for the sites is entirely arbitrary, but 
may be roughly summarized as follows : 

1 to 100, vicinity of the Center. 

100 to 250, vicinity of the Depot. 

250 to 300, southwest corner of the town. 

300 to 425, southeast corner of the town. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 363 

425 to 500, a strip east and west across the town. 

500 to 600, vicinity of North village. 

600 to 653, along northeast boundary. 

On the large map the numbers at the Center and Depot vil- 
lages are partly omitted to avoid crowding. Enlarged maps of 
these two localities are provided, with numbers inserted. Wher- 
ever the designation M 26 (or any other number) is found it is 
to be interpreted as indicating the map location of the feature 
mentioned. 

The character of the figure type before each description indi- 
cates the nature of the site ; if the number is set in bold face 
type a place of historic interest is indicated. Whenever the 
building has disappeared the word site will appear directly af- 
ter the number in the key, and on the map is indicated by an 
open square. An illustration for any number is indicated thus: 
(Cut, p. — .) Where a name follows directly after the number, 
it indicates the present occupant of the place. 

The dates given are not intended to be considered exactly 
correct. The main purpose of giving them is to distinguish be- 
tween old historic places and those of more recent origin. For 
instance, when the description says "built about 1880," it may 
be as far as five or ten years from exact, or it may be correct 
— but it serves to tell the reader that the place is not of early 
origin. In all cases the author has given the date as nearly cor- 
rect as he could obtain it. 

1. Clinton L. Silver. Built probably soon after 1750, by 
Major Henry Little, who was Sealer of Leather in 1774. 
Abner Little then lived here. Next James Jones, whose 
daughter John Clendenin married. Their son, John 
Leverett Clendenin, lived here. Mr. Mansfield occupied 
prior to about 1858, then he sold to Osgood, he to Andrew 
J. Silver in 1859. House is built by compass facing 
south; possibly road at one time ran south of the house. 
Rare tree east of house — buttonwood, very old. Cut, 
p. 121. 

2. Herbert Haigh. Owned by Emma Kelley ; was a shed or 
shop to M 3, moved by Alfred Page and made into a 
dwelling about 1875. 




Salem Center 

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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 365 

3. Emma Kelley. Many years ago the old Gage house stood 
here, burned over 80 yrs. ago. Gage was father of Mrs. 
Sam'l Kelly. Present house built for store by J. L. 
Clendenin. Alfred Page, father of Mrs. Kelley, bought 
of Moody Foster in 1855, and converted into a dwelling ; 
he lived upstairs, kept store down. 

4. Frank Emerson. Formerly stood on Aquilla Dow place, 
M 459 ; he had carpenter shop in one end, Mrs. Dow had 
weave room in other. "When Gilman Coming's father 
bought Dow place Gilman moved it to present site. Was 
first used for a store, then made into dwelling. Lorenzo 
Chase lived here 1860. Mr. Emerson bought about five 
years ago. 

5. Very old house. In Revolution times Joseph Hull and 
wife lived here ; both died here later. Then an old man 
named Gage made coffins. In 1820 Caleb Morse, son 
of old Dr. Morse, lived here, and kept school, may have 
been here for some time before. Isaiah Kelly went to 
school here to Morse. He was also sexton and grave 
digger, took care of old meetinghouse, managed funerals. 
Last occupied by Elbridge Mitchell, whose widow now 
owns. 

6. James Ewins. Probably built about time of Revolution. 
Joseph Wardwell kept store and tavern ; he was town 
clerk in 1793 and representative in 1796. An old weather- 
beaten sign hung out at the corner of the building, pro- 
claiming the tavern. Was bought by John Ewins when 
he came to Salem in 1805 ; he was a Harvard graduate ; 
owned large area of land on west side of village; kept 
store here for fifty-three years. With exception of five 
years from 1878-83 when Nathan G. Abbott had the 
store, it has been in Ewins' family continuously. James, 
father of present owner, was proprietor before the busi- 
ness was sold to Abbott. Mr. Ewins lives in the flat on 
the second floor. Cut p. 112. 

7. Willis G. Richardson. Built by Lorenzo Chase for wheel- 
wright shop, on former Ewins land ; later made into 
dwelling. There was a long shed here with a store up- 



366 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

stairs, later used for a shoe shop ; it stood in rear of the 
house. Moved to M 67. 

8. The first Methodist meetinghouse. It formerly stood on 
Bluff St., M 494, where it was built in 1809 ; moved to 
present location 1836. Then used as shoe shop by Thos. 
Ewins and J. R. Wheeler. Geo. N. Austin kept grocery 
store here in 1859, and had postoffice also. Now idle. 

9. Horace Silver. Built 60 yrs. ago by Simon Harris, son 
of Dr. Harris; "Washington Woodbury was the contrac- 
tor. Has been sold several times. Edmund Cook, the 
musician, lived here 1855. 

10. E. 0. Douglas; Henry 0. Annis. Old house; "Priest 
Balch" lived here, and owned the west part, Eben Noyes 
owned the east half. They had bought of James Ewins, 
who built it about 1820 ( ? ) for a two-tenement house. 
Mrs. Balch left her part to Wm. B. Ayer, who sold to 
Francis B. Kelley. Noyes' sons sold to Warren Hasel- 
tine, whose estate was sold at auction after his death. 
Kelley then bought this half of the house for $450. 

11. Dr. V. N. Sikorsky. Formerly an old meetinghouse at 
Windham, over 100 yrs. old. It was brought here by 
Jonathan Pettingill, who afterwards lived in it. It has 
the original frame; is not boarded, but clapboards are 
fastened directly to the studding. Pettingill made cof- 
fins, which sold at $3 each. Cut p. 365. 

12. Site of blacksmith shop of Earl C. Gordon. It was 
moved to very near M 67 and afterwards burned. 

13. Mrs. L. D. Merrow. Built by Earl C. Gordon, 1856. 
An old house with low back roof stood on same cellar, 
was home of Joshua Gordon; it was one of the oldest 
houses in town. 

14. Mrs. John Lancaster. Mr. Lancaster built the house in 
1853. 

15. George N. Rolf. He built about 1870 ( ?). 

16. Ed. Smith Woodbury. Built by Nathan Russ, 1867, out 
of material from the old barracks torn down at Concord 
after the disbanding of the militia. It has been occupied 
by N. R. Bodwell, Mark Blood, Chas. Kimball, John 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 367 

French, Mrs. Hitchings, Frank Woodbury, and the pres- 
ent owner. 

17. Thomas D. Lancaster. He built, 1900. 

18. John Morrison. Was formerly a shop, part of old build- 
ing now standing, M 67 ; was moved about twenty years 
ago and made into dwelling. 

19. Charles E. Maxwell. He built, 1866. 

20. Lascelles C. Wallace. Owned by Wm. M. Smith. It is 
the Amos Emerson place, formerly the old Nelson Dus- 
ton place. 

21. Morton E. Smith. Built by Moody Foster, after the old 
house here burned (?). This was the old Thomas Nev- 
ins place. He was a brother to David's father David, 
thus great uncle to Henry C. He was a hot headed old 
fellow, and burned his barn when he saw the sheriff 
coming to attach his property. He subsequently died on 
the poor farm. The plain to the westward is the ''Little 
Land," where muster was held, 1842. Last three occu- 
pants before present owner were Walter B. Kelley, Albert 
Robinson, then Josiah Clough. Cut, p. 89. 

22. William Wallace Smith. Built by Moody Foster about 
1850. Wm. Rowell lived here ( ?) ; died 1853. 

23. Nathan G. Abbott. Built 1861 by George Roberts. 
Land in the rear known as Clendenin's Plains ; muster 
here, 1849. 

24. No. 1 schoolhouse. Built by contractor Lewis Killam, 
1895. Total cost, $4,194.70. Land bought of J. H. and 
W. E. Lancaster. Cut, p. 212. 

25. Charles H. Allen. Built by Mansfield in 1858. He lived 
here after he sold the Clendenin place, M 1. Later Ab- 
raham H. Merrill lived here. The gun house of the 
Salem Guards Artillery Company stood near the road 
between this place and M 26. It was moved to near 
M 455, where it is now used as a shed. 

26. Lizzie Bailey. Built by Simon Kelley. 

27. M. E. parsonage, Rev. H. E. Allen. Built, 1825, by 
Peter Massey, after his old house here was burned. Gil- 
man Corning lived here. Carlton Ewins bought, after- 



368 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

wards sold to M. E. Society. James Ayer lived here 
from 1853 to 1880, it being a two-tenement house at 
that time. 

28. Site of Old Tavern, one of the first in town. Phineas 
Gordon is the first proprietor of whom we have definite 
knowledge ; he was first postmaster, 1804 ; died here 1812. 
Stage from Boston to Concord brought the mail. John 
Clendenin owned the property after Gordon. Joseph 
Gorrill kept the tavern in 1820 and later. Rawson Co- 
burn was proprietor about the middle of the century. 
Dances were frequent in the hall at this time. A great 
celebration was held here March 22, 1855, in honor of the 
Know Nothing victory. Daniel Moody took possession 
April 4, 1855 ; followed by Warren Brickett, 1857 ; Ezra 
Robinson, 1867. The last proprietor was Albert L. 
Armor. He gave up business a short time before the 
fire. William H. Bryant owned ( ?) the property, which 
was idle, when on September 3, 1876, an attempt to burn 
it was frustrated. The next night, however, the building 
was fired and entirely consumed. (One source says that 
a Johnson of Boston owned it.) The location and ap- 
pearance are very well shown by the cut, p. 332. 

29. Site of Frog Tavern. It was a building of various util- 
ity, built by Moody Foster about 1850, back from the 
street for a barn, then moved out and made into tavern. 
Fred Bailey had tavern here. A. H. Davis and E. S. 
Woodbury had shoeshop here about 1860. Was used for 
schoolhouse in '68 or '70 ; Grace Vincent and Belle Moul- 
ton were two of the teachers. It was burned the spring 
after the old tavern was, June 3, 1877. B. R. Wheeler 
had a shoeshop there at the time. 

30. W. H. Rollins. Original house built by Moody Foster 
about 60 yrs. ago. Hon. John Woodbury, once candi- 
date for congress, lived here; also Ed. S. Woodbury; 
Rawson Coburn lived here, 1857, after he sold Tavern. 
This house burned June 3, '77, at the time of "Frog Tav- 
ern" fire. Then the present house was built later in the 




L. WALLACE HALL. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 369 

same year, and has been known as the William H. Bryant 
place ; he kept a hotel here up to a few years ago. 

31. Newell H. Tilton. Formerly a stable at M 30; Moody 
Foster moved it to present location and converted into 
dwelling. E. S. Woodbury lived here about 1857. 

32. Mrs. John Woodbury. Old historic house, origin not 
known, but built before 1800. Hon. Silas Betton, repre- 
sentative, state senator, member of 8th and 9th congresses, 
1803-07, high sheriff of Rockingham County, etc., lived 
here, and very likely built. He sold to David W. Dickey, 
tax collector, 1832, prominent in town affairs. Dr. John- 
son H. Merrill lived here; also T. D. Lancaster, '61-'66. 
The house was at first one story, afterwards raised. 
Cut, p. 369. 

33. Mrs. Lucretia D. Holt. Built by Ezekiel D. Sargent 
about 1860. Chas. Sleeper next owned, then Horace 
Silver. 

34. Public Library. Original sehoolhouse site. School lot 
extended to graveyard. Original house built 1801, stood 
till 1861, when it was sold to David Sloan for $26. He 
moved to M 72 and it is now part of that house. It was 
"little red sehoolhouse," and stood partly where library 
is, but nearer road and slightly nearer townhouse. The 
present building was raised September 18, 1861. Used 
as sehoolhouse until new one, M. 24, was built. Cut, p. 228. 

35. Town House. Raised on common, 1738, framed by 
Henry Sanders, all hand hewn oak timbers. Cut, p. 80, 
shows the framing of the roof. Rev. Abner Bayley 
preached here 50 yrs. Moved 1838 to present position. 
Several times condemned, but still as staunch as of yore. 
Cut, p. 153. 

36. Salem Common. Meetinghouse, M 35, stood here for 
100 yrs. No other building ever stood on this lot. 

37. Old Graveyard. Laid out Jan. 25, 1736; committee were 
Joseph Peaslee, John Bayley and Abiel Kelly. Fenced, 
1752. Hearse house built 1824. Spruce tree just north 
of hearse house set out by James Ayer, April 1, 1857, over 
grave of his wife's mother. He also straightened the 
headstones, 1894-95. Cuts, pp. 88 and 148. 

25 



370 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

37 1-2. Hose House No. 2. Built, 1906. The basement is fitted 
with cells for a lockup. Built on the cellar of the old 
Fosdick house, called the ' ' graveyard house, ' ' because of 
its proximity. Fosdick lived here 100 yrs. ago, perhaps 
built. He was a blacksmith, also had a store and sold 
"spirits" in 1806. Then Dr. Dodge occupied; several 
changes in tenants, owned by Carlton Ewins. Moody 
Foster once lived here and sold shoes in basement. At 
the time it burned, perhaps 15 or 20 yrs. ago, was owned 
by Mrs. Tilton. Cut, p. 192. 

38. D. C. Woodbury. Built by Sam'l Batchelder from two 
small shoeshops, one of which he brought from M 39. 
He had a shoeshop here in 1854. 

39. "William Perry. Built by Amos Webster about 1850. 
Later known as the Joseph Webster place. The hat shop 
of Jedediah Carlton stood beside the river in this yard 
100 yrs. ago. 

40. Shop ; now used for cobbling by Chas. T. Maxwell. Orig- 
inally built by Silas Betton for his law office. Then 
Gilman Corning did shoe business; later Greenleaf C. 
Bartlett had his law office here. 

41. Mrs. David Bailey. This is the John C. Ewins home- 
stead, built by him out of the material of old house torn 
down in "Ewins Woods," M 409, perhaps 60 yrs. ago. 
Has been in family ever since ; Ewins owned land on this 
corner as far as the Congregational church. 

42. Site of "Granny Ladd's" store. Small cottage house 
stood here on the corner, where old Mrs. Ladd had a small 
store and sold liquor a century ago. Said that she "sold 
her thumb ' ' a good many times — used to put thumb down 
inside measure when holding it to measure out liquids, as 
molasses or liquors, so as to help fill it. John C. Ewins 
had store here about 1830. Mrs. Ira Wheeler lived here 
later, died 1853. Miss Elizabeth Clement and Mrs. B. M. 
Chase occupied when burned on night of February 28, 
1858. Earl C. Gordon, who lived at M 13 had large barn 
at M 68 ; he had opposed liquor-sellers ; and incendiary 
was hired to burn his barn ' ' at the corner. ' ' Ewins ' barn 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 371 

stood in rear of this cottage, also long sheds ; firebug mis- 
took the corner indicated and burned Ewins' barn instead 
of Gordon's. Two horses and some other animals were 
burned to death; cries of horses were heartrending, but 
sliding doors were so secured that they could not be 
opened. Another barn was then moved here from across 
street, later torn down, and lot graded level. 

43. Emma Coburn; Benj. R. Wheeler boards here. Built 
1835 by John R. Wheeler ; sold to Rawson Coburn, 1864. 

44. Shop of B. R. Wheeler, now used by him as a bicycle 
salesroom and repair shop. 

45. Charles Herbert Smith. Built for dwelling by John W. 
Austin, perhaps 1850 ; certainly he owned it in 1866, and 
then remodelled it. 

46. First Methodist Episcopal Church. Built in 1836, en- 
larged and remodelled 1872. Cut, p. 140. 

47. Walker Haigh. Built 1855 for shoeshop of Joseph 
Webster; carpenter was Wm. B. Ayer. Mr. Haigh 
bought and converted into house. 

48. Site of the Pound. Built here in the early days of the 
town. Torn down 1836, new one at M 428 built to re- 
place it. John Marston's blacksmith shop then located 
here; moved south, is now residence of Chas. Foster, 
M 49. 

49. Chas. C. Foster. Was formerly Marston's blacksmith 
shop, stood at M 48. Moved here about 1845; rollers 
were used, with 40 yoke of oxen to draw it ; men did not 
understand that the rollers must be placed carefully, and 
they interfered, causing great difficulty. 

50. Daniel A. Abbott. Built by John Hall during the war. 

51. Silas Ballou; Francis Flagg. The old John Marston 
house; he built it and lived here. The land from here 
to the Spicket was known as Marston Field, where mus- 
ter was held, 1820. He sold to Gilman D. Kelley, 1860. 
Later John Langley owned, then by Mary (Langley) 
Smith, now by her son, Charles Henry Smith. 

52. Charles Henry Smith. Built by either John Clendenin 
or Joseph Gorrell partly out of an old shoeshop on M 3. 



372 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

Gorrell died here after lie left the Tavern. Hiram Mer- 
rill, also Edward Cook once lived here. Later known as 
the Paul Foster place. 

53. Congregational Church. Built 1840; repaired and re- 
modelled 1876 ; bell hung 1851. Cut, p. 133. 

54. "William Scott. Built by Joseph Buxton since the war; 
now owned by heirs of Dean Emerson. 

55. Charles H. Ayer. Built by his uncle, Jesse Ayer, about 
1870 (?). 

56. Mrs. John White. Built by Herbert Haigh. 

57. Lewis F. Woodbury. He built, 1900 ( ?). 

58. Mrs. Ida Smith. Built by Ben Huston. 

59. Eliza Smith. Built by her. 

60. Eev. William Ganley. Built by Cong. Society for par- 
sonage, 1845, on land given by Mr. Gage. First built low 
studded, ' ' easy to heat ; ' ' afterwards raised ; enlarged and 
altered several times. 

61. Thornton M. Russ. Built by Benj. R. Wheeler, about 
forty years ago. 

62. Mrs. Susan Freeman ; Mrs. Lizzie Langley. Built by 
John R. Wheeler, 1865. 

63. Edward L. Gordon. Built by his father, Geo. C. Gordon. 

64. John Frank Hall. Was shoeshop of Amos Webster and 
stood at M 406; moved by Gilman E. Sleeper (?) and 
made into a dwelling. 

65. Robert B. Oakes; Harry Haigh. Built by John Hall 
(father of J. F.) for a blacksmith shop. After his death 
Frank made it into a dwelling. Wm. Taylor owned; 
John Austin bought it at auction of his estate, and sold 
to Mrs. J. H. Lancaster, who now owns. 

66. Blacksmith Shop. Built by J. F. Hall, 1877. W. W. 
Cole bought it at auction of Wm. Taylor estate. Occu- 
pied by E. O. Douglas, blacksmith. 

67. G. E. Whitford. Built out of a long shed in rear of John 
Dix house, M 7, by Earl C. Gordon for blacksmith shop. 
D. N. Russ bought and made into shoeshop; then it was 
converted into a dwelling. In 1857 the upstairs was 
used by Davis & Mudgett from Derry as a paint shop. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 373 

68. Masonic Building. Erected 1872-73. The foundation 
was laid during summer of '72, after Earl Gordon's barn 
had been moved away, June 13 ; frame raised June 13, 
'73 ; first meeting in hall October 9, '73 ; dedicated No- 
vember 12, '73, in presence of Masons and their families ; 
banquet and social dance. Post office moved in Novem- 
ber 20, by Earl Gordon, P. M. A. N. Russ had grocery 
store. C. I. Bowker later kept store and P. 0. Cut, p. 372. 

69. Site of shoeshop. T. M. Russ began work here, 1877 ; 
later was Gordon Bros', heelshop, when burned. 

70. Shoeshop of T. M. Russ. Wooden shop first here built 
by Jesse Ayer, occupied by J. R. and B. R. Wheeler when 
burned, October, 1876. Then they built brick shop, 1877, 
and traded it to T. M. Russ for his shop, M 69. Brick 
factory burned and Russ rebuilt, 1886, present shop. 
Cut, p. 304. 

71. Lorenzo F. Hyde. Built by Chas. Tibbetts after shoe- 
shop fire, which burned former house here, originally a 
small shoeshop of Austin. 

72. James E. Sloan. Built by David Sloan, 1861. Part of 
it is old schoolhouse from M 34. 

73. John Austin. Built before Civil War by Andrew J. 
Silver. Larrabee bought, repaired, and built the barn. 

74. Site of Daniel N. Russ' Shoeshop. Burned October 21, 
1871. It was 80x30 feet, built 1866 in southwest corner 
of present rectangular field by road. This hill called 
"Gordon's Hill." 

75. Peter Bolduc. Built by Lorenzo Chase about 1890 (?). 

76. William H. Ayer. Built by his father, Wm. B. Ayer. 

77. Gayton O. Reynolds, P. M. Built by Ed. Smith Wood- 
bury, 1866. 

78. Charles E. Merrill. Built by Jerome Kelley, in 1866. 
His daughter married Elliot of Haverhill, who sold to 
present owner. 

79. Sheds and barns of K. M. McLaughlin. 

80. Kimball M. McLaughlin. Built by Walter Pettingill 
about forty years ago. 

81. Clement McLaughlin. Probably built during the Revo- 



374 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

lution by Rev. Samuel Fletcher, who came to Salem at 
that time. First Baptist meetings held here. Existing 
letter dated 1794 says he "has been preaching here for 
several years past." Samuel's son, Joel, swapped places 
with Amos Gordon (brother to Joshua), who sold to Sam- 
uel Kelly. His heirs sold to Mrs. J. H. Lancaster, who 
now owns the place. Cut, p. 129. 

82. Angus McAskell. Built from structure which stood near 
M 67, formerly brought from North Salem, M 578. 
Owned by K. M. McLaughlin. 

83. L. E. Haskell. Built by him about 1900. 

84. Leslie W. Colburn. Built by Thos. B. Middleton. I. B. 
Lamson later owned; his heirs sold to Langmaid, he to 
present owner. 

85. Charles E. Knight. Built by Moses Kelley. There was 
an old house here, the home of Enoch Merrill, 80 yrs. 
ago. He was often seen standing or sitting on the door- 
step, razor in hand, shaving himself without a glass — 
needed no safety razor, either. The old house was torn 
down about the middle of the last century. 

86. Daniel Howe. Built by him, 1906. 

87. Ben Haigh. The old Wilson place. Daniel Wilson was 
an old man when he lived here 80 yrs. ago. He sold to 
James Middleton. The old house has been repaired, but 
is still the same structure. 

88. William M. Smith. Built by him about 1904. 

89. Elmer F. Smith. Built by him about 1904. 

90. Charles E. Lewis. Built by him in 1906. 

91. William Dunbar. Built by him about 1905. 

92. Robert Dunbar. Built by him about 1905. 

93. Car Barn of Haverhill & Southern New Hampshire Elec- 
tric Railway. Built 1902. It is the headquarters of this 
division of the road. Equipped with rotary transform- 
ers ; power received from Portsmouth. Cut, p. 333. 

94. Site of the Bailey farm. The house stood on the knoll 
just west of the car barn ; it disappeared before the time 
of any present resident of Salem. Did Nathan Bailey live 
here before he was at M 188 ? 

95. Frank Besse. Built about 5 yrs. ago. Now known as 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 375 

"Meadow Bright," formerly "Salem Inn." The old 
house of Joseph Haines was burned on this site 20 years 
ago. 

96. Edward Smith. Built by him about 5 yrs. ago, on site 
of Joseph Haines' barn. Haines owned this property 
over 75 years ago. 

97. Ben. Simpson. Built by him about 4 yrs. ago. 

98. Harlan P. Robbins. Built by him about 4 yrs. ago. 

99. Bertron A. Drummond. He built, 1906. 

100. Mrs. Clara Jones. She built about 1901. 

101. Phinnie Knapp. Moved here from M 142 ; was shoeshop 
of Isaiah Woodbury. 

102. Charles H. Cronin. Built by Moody Welch about 1872. 
He sold to Cronin. 

103. James McKinnon. Built by Moody Welch about 1870. 
He sold to present owner, then built M 102. 

103y 2 . Charles H. Borchers. Built 1907. 

104. Baptist Church. Built 1869. Vestry and other im- 
provements, 1875. New steeple built 1906. Cut, p. 129. 

105. Mrs. Silas Hall. Built by her about 1904. 

106. Store and barbershop, of George H. Webster. Mrs. 
White lives upstairs. The old "Mud Shop" stood here, 
so called because of low land. E. E. Foster had shoeshop 
in it when burned in 1881, appraised at $2,950. Present 
building erected by Webster soon after the fire. 

107. Philip Bergeron. Built by him about 1901. 

108. Mrs. Rose Wheelock. She built, perhaps, 20 yrs. ago. 

109. Allen McKeen. Built by him, 1904. 

110. Joseph Desmarais. Built by Thos. B. Middleton in 1867. 
He moved the old Luke Hovey house, which stood here, 
to M 158. 

111. Store of Desmarais. He built for plumbing shop three 
years ago. 

112. Mrs. Lottie Gilman. She built, 1907. 

113. George Pattee. Built by him, 1907. 

114. Henry Blair. Built by Clarence Whippie about 4 yrs. 
ago. 

114%. Clarence Whippie. Now being built. 



376 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

115. Mary Berry. Built near M 110 for innersole and stif- 
fening shop. In 1862 Henry Chase made it into a house ; 
Middleton bought it before he built his new house, M 110, 
and moved it to the present site in the fall of 1866. 

116. Joseph Bailey. Formerly owned by Mrs. Mosher. Built 
perhaps 30 yrs. ago. 

117. Mrs. Lottie Gilman. Owned by Mrs, Woodbury and Miss 
Kimball. Built about 1885. 

118. Mrs. Stevens ; Mrs. Pike. Owners same as M 117. Very 
old house. 

119. Formerly the Silas Hall place; now owned by W. W. 
Cole. One of two oldest frames in this village (other 
is G. W. Thorn's). Mark Webster had postoffice here, 
1831-32, in west basement. Kept the mail in ordinary 
table drawer, all thrown in together. This was ' ' Salem, ' ' 
the only P. 0. in town up to 1831, when North Salem 
P. 0. was instituted. The stage came up the Turnpike 
once a week with the mail. Cut, p. 192. 

120. Martin Casson. Built on Turnpike by Jas. Fletcher, for 
heelshop. Now owned by W. W. Cole. 

121. Hose House No. 1. Built 1905. Cut, p. 204. 

122. E. B. Bassett's Grocery Store. Built 1902 by J. H. Hel- 
berg, after his store was burned in the big fire the winter 
before. Originally the blacksmith shop, now M 161, stood 
here, and was store of Fred Bailey. That was then moved 
and J. C. Carey built the store burned, as above noted. 

123. Grain Mill of C. F. Kimball & Son. Built by them, 1905. 
Has storage capacity of 150 tons, grain elevator, 15,000 
bushels. They formerly carried on the business at their 
farm, M 328. 

124. John Hunt. Built by him about 1904. 

125. Howard L. Gordon. He built, 1903. 

126. William H. Smith. Built by H. L. Gordon, 1902. 

127. Frank P. Woodbury. Built by Moody Foster about 1857. 
After his death present owner bought. 

128. George Coleman; E. A. Evans. Built by McAvoy, who 
still owns. 

129. A. P. Perry. Formerly blacksmith shop, and stood just 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 377 

north of M 154. Later P. C. Hall made it into shoeshop ; 
then Elliot Goodwin moved to present site and made into 
dwelling. 

130. Henry A. Meehan ; John Stevens. Built by Elliot Good- 
win (?), who lived here for a long while before the 
Civil War. 

131. George M. Beal. Built by Fred Foster, 1890 (?). 

132. Emery E. Blaisdell. Built by Moody Foster. Chas. Pet- 
tingill lived here 1859. 

133. Mrs. Sarah Gage. Built by Moody Foster about 1861. 

134. James Fletcher. Built by him, 1857. 

135. John Richardson. Built by Eobert M. Dickey, 1859. 

136. Misses Emerson. Built about 1866. 

137. George Richardson. Old house; Gil. Merrill lived here 
50 yrs. ago. 

138. Mrs. Hartwell. Built by Willard Merrill, 1867. His 
heirs sold to Rouel Wheeler. 

139. Frank Plumb. Built by him 10 yrs. ago. 

140. William Morrill; Henry Chase. The latter built it in 
1866. 

141. Lee Hussell. Built by Wm. Bodwell forty years ago. 
He sold to Henry Kimball ; now owned by Mrs. Kimball. 

142. Site of house burned about 1897. It was the Jephtha 
Ames place, 1830. Later E. Gage lived here; then Mc- 
Nish. Frank Plumb owned it when burned. 

143. Charles Norris. Built by Wallace Hall, 1860. 

144. Woodbury's Shoeshop. Put together since the Civil War 
from three different buildings. Center part was barn 
here, rectangular north section was shop of P. C. Hall, 
about opposite freight depot. Cut, p. 308. 

145. Site of house formerly used as shoeshop by Isaiah Wood- 
bury. Moved, is now M 101. 

146. Site of house built by Isaac Thorn. Moved, is now M 189. 

147. Oxalic Acid Building. Last used for acid factory. Built 
by Evans Artificial Leather Co., 25 yrs. ago. Formerly 
Isaac Thorn's lumber storehouse stood here. Evans Co. 
had large factory just south of this site, burned March 
5, 1883 ; had been here about 2 yrs. Present building 



378 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

was used for a thread factory for about a year before the 
acid business came. 

148. Boston & Maine Freight Depot. 

149. Frank Chase. Built by Nathan Connor, 1860. Sold to 
B. & M., who now own. 

150 Union Block. One of the oldest buildings in this vil- 
lage ; was saw- and grist-mill, supplied with water by the 
brook from the meadows above. Isaac Thorn remembered 
drawing logs into the sawmill April 30, with snow three 
feet deep. Was idle for a long time after water supply 
failed. Then five men formed sort of company and con- 
verted into dwelling; Joel Carey, Silas Hall, Ed. Griffin, 
Isaac Thorn, and Geo. Woodbury. Four tenements were 
finished upstairs, while the lower floor was used for shoe- 
shop. The north end downstairs was made into a meet- 
ing hall. Here the Baptists first held their meetings. 
Later the Methodists started also. School was kept dur- 
ing the week, using the same seats. 

151. Site of a dwelling built by Moody Foster about 1868; 
he rented it. Was owned by Mrs. Plumb when burned, 
1901. 

152. Site of dwelling built by P. C. Hall about 1865. He 
lived here for a time. Mrs. Orlando Woodbury occupied 
when burned, 1901. 

153. Site of shoeshop built here by Moody Foster about 1860. 
P. C. Hall had shop in it before it was moved to M 168. 
A large new shop was erected 1880. It was idle, owned 
by F. P. Woodbury when burned, 1901. 

154. George Roberts. Built for residence of blacksmith. The 
shop stood just north, and was made into a shoeshop by 
P. C. Hall, later moved by EUiot Goodwin to M 129. 

155. Boston & Maine Depot. Built by M. G. Copp, about 
1867. The original depot was an old house formerly 
occupied by Elliot Goodwin 60 yrs. ago when the R. R. 
was put in. It stood just north of the present laundry, 
M 156 ; a new depot was built where the present one now 
stands, and Dan'l Butler lived in the old house. The new 
depot was moved to Windham, where it is now the freight 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 379 

depot, and the present depot built here. The first old 
house was burned three years later, June 20, 1870; was 
occupied by Calvin Boardman. Cut, p. 344. 

156. Laundry of Chin Cow. Moody Foster built for stable 
about 1860; soon after made into dwelling. 

157. Pilgrim 'Block. Built by Moody Foster about war time, 
M. G. Copp being the contractor. The west wing was 
added later. Now occupied on ground floor by Fred 
Newton's dry goods store and John Hanlon's barber 
shop. Pilgrim Hall is on the second floor. 

158. Charles Morrison; George Pattee. Built by T. B. Mid- 
dleton in 1881, on site of old Luke Hovey house, which 
had been moved here from M 110, and burned April 4, 
1875. Now owned by McAvoy. 

159. J. McCarthy. Built by Geo. Roberts for a stable over 
40 yrs. ago. Wm. L. Bradford bought and made into a 
house. 

160. Joseph F. Fournier. Built by Corson 40 yrs. ago. 

161. Blacksmith shop of J. F. Fournier. Moved here; was a 
store at M 122. 

162. Lewis Marshall. Built by Geo. H. Webster about 1885. 

163. Simeon Barnett. Built by Asa Livingston about 1890. 

164. Carpenter Shop, now disused. Built by Asa Livingston 
of barn brought from North Salem, M 591. 

165. Power Plant. Built by F. P. Woodbury & Son 10 yrs. 
ago, and turned over to Salem Light & Power Co., Sept. 
1, 1906. 

166. Heath's Stable. P. C. Hall built a shoeshop here out of 
lumber from the barracks torn down at Concord, after the 
militia was disbanded. He sold to Evans Artificial 
Leather Co., March 22, 1877. It burned January 12, 
1880. 

167. Drug Store of Dr. Soule. Built by Buxton about 1895, 
for storehouse; afterwards made into drug store. 

168. Hotel Rockingham. Built by M. G. Copp for J. A. 
Troy, dedicated July, 1880. The building formerly 
here was brought from M 153, and burned with Evans 
Co. plant, January 12, 1880. It contained store of J. G. 



380 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Meade, P. 0., telegraph office, and upstairs tenement, oc- 
cupied by Slater, engineer for Evans Co. ; it was owned 
by Troy; totally destroyed. The present building was 
raised and remodelled in 1906, the front ground floor 
remaining unchanged. It is occupied by F. C. Buxton's 
store, with P. 0., H. L. Gordon's insurance office, W. D. 
Pulver, law office, and Wilson Bros.' grocery store. The 
hotel occupies the rear ground floor and the entire upper 
part of the building. Cut, p. 96. 

169. David S. Emery. Built for Nathaniel Whittier about 
1872. 

170. James Hadley. Built about 1895 by E. A. Tilton. 

171. Site of one of first houses ever built in this village. The 
house was torn down ; barn blown down in heavy wind 
about 1830. Joseph Webster lived here, probably also 
his father. 

172. Dr. Edric A. Wade. Built by his father about 1890. 

173. Henry Sanborn. The old house here, Eunnells place, 
was torn down. Present house built by Welch; next 
owned by James McKinnon. Now owned by N. H. 
Breeders' Club. 

174. Mrs. Gilman D. Kelley. Built by Wm. Bradford, 1880. 
Foye bought of Mary Bradford, sold to Wheelock, he to 
Mrs. Kelley. 

175. John Woodbury. Built by Isaac C. Noyes, 1876. 

176. Site of Jonathan Merrill place; he was called "Captain 
Jock," militia officer. His son, William, father of Mrs. 
Warren McKay of Methuen, also lived here. This was 
the first house on the street, and originally was settled 
by a Hall, who owned a large tract of land south of here. 
The building was torn down. Merrill had a hat shop 
just south of the house. He moved to the Center and 
kept tavern about 80 yrs. ago. 

177. Mrs. Kolfe. Built by M. G. Copp about 1865. Thos. B. 
Middleton afterwards lived here, and sold to present 
owner. 

178. W. A. and C. E. Buzzell. Built by B. H. Woodbury, 
perhaps 1855. He sold to Thos. Emerson. Geo. Austin 
also owned at one time. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 381 

179. Charles D. Lewis. Built by James Smith. He was in 
company with M. G. Copp, whom he bought out. Burned 
about 1897, occupied at the time by John Bailey and Ed. 
Glenn. It was rebuilt. Now owned by heirs of John 
Woodbury. 

180. Methodist Episcopal Church. Built by Copp & Smith, 
1862. Cost slightly over $3,000, as material was then 
very cheap. The frame was raised on a very windy day 
in fall of 1861. Cut, p. 144. 

181. Rev. C. R. Bair; M. E. Parsonage. Built by Isaac Emer- 
son of Melrose. He sold to Capt. Henry C. Piercy, who 
died, after which the property was given to the society. 

182. Isaiah Woodbury. He built about 35 yrs. ago. 

183. Mrs. Prescott C. Hall. He built in 1863. Cut, p. 233. 

184. Isaac Woodbury. Built by Moses Austin about 1840. 
Austin's daughter married P. C. Kelly (son of Samuel), 
who sold to Geo. Woodbury. He kept hotel here. Cut, 
p. 77. 

185. Mrs. Jones. Built by Chas. Kimball, 1880. Now owned 
by his daughter, Miss Nellie E. Kimball. 

186. Walter Woodbury. Built by Chas. Kimball, 1880. 

187. Fred C. Buxton; Rufus A. Tilton. Built by B. H. 
Woodbury, 1845. He sold to Edward Griffin, he to Isaac 
C. Noyes, he to Evans Co., from whom Tilton obtained 
the place. 

188. George W. Thorn. Probably oldest house now standing 
in this village. Nathan Bailey lived here up to 75 yrs. 
ago. He was a brazier and had a shop near the road. 
The house was then of the old style, long low-back roof, 
like the Lowell house shown on p. 321. After Bailey, 
Oliver and Alvah Hall lived here. In 1854 Isaac Thorn 
bought and remodelled it, leaving the frame intact. Two 
years ago the building was partly gutted by fire, then 
rebuilt as seen today. Cut, p. 353. 

189. Mrs. R. A. Buxton. Built about 1880 by Isaac Thorn on 
cellar now at M 146. Moved to present location and 
made into dwelling. 

190. Lester Hall. Built by his mother, Louisa Hall, in 1854. 



382 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

191. Site of Alvah Hall place. He built, 1854. Later Wm. 
Bradford lived here. Chas. Morrison occupied when 
burned, 1896 ( ?) . Cut, p. 337. 

192. Henry Colburn. Built by Corson about 1870. 

193. Fred French. He built about 1892. Chas. Hutchins was 
the contractor. 

194. C. H. Pillsbury. Previously Chas. Day lived here after 
he sold M 415 to F. F. Wheeler. 

195. "Walter Hadley. Built by Richardson, about 1875. 

196. Frank Ryerson. Built by Wm: Bradford about 1875. 

197. Loren E. Bailey. He built, 1883. 

198. Miss Lillian Kelly. Her father bought it of Alden Pres- 
cott, who built it about 1880. 

199. Arthur Matthews; A. E. Irish. A house built here by 
Connor had burned, when Mrs. Allen rebuilt about 1900. 
Before Connor built there was a cellar here of the Wm. 
Merrill place very long ago. 

200. Mrs. Chase; Fred Maxwell. Built by Mrs. Isaac Chase, 
perhaps 1865. 

201. Charles Rowell. Built by P. C. Hall about 1865. Later 
Moses Rowell lived here. 

202. Patrick Mahoney. Built about 1870. W. W. Haselton 
lived here, then Burnham. 

203. Frank Thorpe. Built by P. C. Hall, out of barracks 
lumber. 

204. Sadie Gage. P. C. Hall built out of barracks. 

205. Frank Hadley. Calvin Boardman once lived here. Built 
from barracks by P. C. Hall. 

206. Oscar Hall. Built by P. C. Hall, 1866. 

207. Luther M. Tuttle. Built by Prescott Hall or his brother 
just north of M 143 for shoeshop. Then Prescott moved 
it here about 1880. 

208. Henry Manning. Built by Chas. F. Kimball, 1907. 

209. Charles Frank Kimball. Built by Fiske, from Boston, 
on land bought of Perham, who lived in W. W. Cole's 
house. John Taylor, Jr., bought of Fiske ; his son, Leon- 
ard succeeded him, and sold to Kimball. 

210. No. 6 Schoolhouse. First building on this site, erected 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 383 

1873, burned 1894. Present one built 1895. Cost 
$4,415.08. Cut, p. 221. 

211. Mrs. Graves. Built by her about 1900. 

212. Wallace W. Cole. The old Capt. Joseph Cook place. 
Present house built by Perham, who tore down the old 
Cook house. Perham sold to Poole, he to P. C. Hall, he 
to Abram Wheeler, of whom Cole bought. Cut, p. 105. 

213. Charles Quimby. Built by W. W. Cole, 1905. 

214. Aaron O. Alexander. Built by W. W. Cole, 1905. 

215. Mrs. Leonard Taylor. Built by Chas. Hill, 1897. 

216. Dennis P. Sullivan. Built by John Keefe, 1897. 

217. Benjamin Simpson. Built by John Hunt, 1898. 

218. Daniel Lanigan. Built by Ben Kimball, 1897. 

219. Mrs. Robert McDonald. Built by Edward Wells, 1895. 

220. Percy Call. He built about 1899. 

221. Mrs. Charlotte Hadley. She built, 1892. 

222. Willis Hall. Built by him, 1901. 
222%-. Charles Borchers. He built, 1905. 

223. Rev. John F. Blacklock. Baptist Parsonage. Built by 
the society, 1897. 

224. Mrs. Elizabeth Kilburn. She built, 1897. 

225. Edward Merrill. Built by Chas. Merrill about 38 yrs. 
ago. Owned by Chas. S. Woodbury. 

226. Site of original schoolhouse of this district. Built prob- 
ably 1801 ; sold to John Merrill about 1825, when he built 
the Stone House ; he afterwards sold it to Mrs. Runnells, 
and it was moved to her place, M 173. Mary Campbell 
taught here, David Nevins being one of her pupils. Geo. 
Woodbury went to this building 3 or 4 terms. 

227. Old Stone Schoolhouse. Built about 1825 by John Mer- 
rill of Policy St. He received $300 and the old building 
across the street. It was sold to Wm. L. Bradford for 
about $35. Now owned by Wm. D. Bradford. Cut, 
p. 208. 

228. John Taylor. Built by D. D. Fisk, about 1883. 

229. Alberton W. Clark. Built by his father, Wm. Clark, 
perhaps 60 yrs. ago. 

230. Davis Bradford. Built by W. L. Bradford more than 
35 yrs. ago. 



384 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

231. James Cameron. John Merrill built, 40 yrs. ago. Re- 
modelled by Chas. Hall soon after. Owned by Jas. Cum- 
ming. 

232. James Cumming. He built about 4 yrs. ago. 

233. Point A. Transfer Station of Electric Road. Cut, p. 339. 

234. Small store near transfer station. 

235. Charles Burns. Built by him, 1907, near the site of the 
old gristmill. Phineas Rollins ground here in 1834. 
He sold to Mark Webster, who was a powerful, active 
man, a carpenter, at one time postmaster. He sold to 
Methuen Co., as they wanted the water right. Ed. Grif- 
fin later ran the mill ; then Mansfield, who sold to Baxter 
Hall. The latter owned when it burned in 1875. 

236. James A. McLachlan. There was an old house here and 
a mill by the pond. An Englishman named Burpee had 
stocking mill 75 yrs. ago. Friction matches later made 
here. Mill then used for machine shop. This burned, 
and Titcomb erected a new one which Griffin and John 
Hall used for carriage factory later, then shingle mill. 
This burned, and the old house with it, in 1842, and was 
never rebuilt. The present house was erected soon after- 
wards. Ben Cole lived here, and perhaps ( ?) built the 
house. Known later as the John Taylor place. It is now 
a hotel, the "Fairmount House." 

237. Frank Rowell. He built it 4 yrs. ago. 

238. Point C. Transfer Station of Electric Road. 

239. Ephraim A. Peabody. The old Andrew Merrill place, 
probably a century old. 

240. Francis E. Higgins. Built by Costello Kenney 30 yrs. ago. 

241. Edward E. Noyes. Built by Benning C. Noyes, 1879. 

242. Joseph Bradford. He built, over 20 yrs. ago. 

243. Lucy J. Ayer. Built by L. E. Bailey, who lived here 
short time; sold to Jas. Ayer, 1881. Cut, p. 438. 

244. Charles Borchers Lumber Mill. Formerly property of 
A. E. Goodwin, who built about 1883. 

245. Mrs. Alfred E. Goodwin. Mr. Goodwin built, 1883. Cut, 
p. 345. 

246. Charles A. Stevens. Built by Thomas B. Middleton 
about 1885. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 385 

247. The old Campbell place; Mary was born here. Later it 
was the Stanton homestead. Now owned by Arthur C. 
Hall. 

248. Arthur C. Hall. Built by him, 1898. Cut, p. 8. 

249. Frank D. Davis. Built by Loren E. Bayley, 1881 ; sold 
to Davis in 1882. Formerly a barn of the Leavitt family 
stood near this site. 

250. Edward Couilliard. Built by Geo. Dowry about 50 yrs. 
ago, after the old house burned. 

251. Site of George P. Cross place, torn down, 1897. 

252. George M. Cross. Built by Geo. P. about 1890. 

253. Charles 0. Cross. An old house; formerly the Robert 
Emerson place. 

254. Everett Brown. Built by his grandfather, James L. 
Brown, over 50 yrs. ago. 

255. William Gale. The old Isaiah Woodbury place. 

256. Ephraim O. Richardson place. Deborah Rollins lived 
here; very old house. 

257. West Graveyard; burials here in the early days of the 
town. 

258. Site of the Daniel P. Merrill place ; before that it was the 
Arnos Hall homestead. Charles Merrill, son of Daniel, 
sold to Obadiah Duston, and he to Vickery, the last occu- 
pant. The house burned last year, 1906. 

259. John Heaps. Formerly the Eliphalet Gage house. 

260. B. E. Davis. The old Abner Gage place. A very old 
house stood where barn is, known as "Granny Hull 
house;" Hull lived here about fifty yrs. ago, and some 
time (?) before. Isaac Corliss owned the place, sold to 
Morris, he to Berry, 1895. The old house by the barn 
was used in 1850 as shoeshop by Gage, Messer, Rowell, 
and others. 

261. Ed. Seaver. The old Corliss homestead. Isaac, father 
to Charles of Methuen, son of Elliott, sold to Nelson Mes- 
ser, now of Boston. Before this house was built there 
was a very old celler here, the evidence of some very 
early habitation. 

262. Alec Paquin. He bought of Isaac Corliss, who built and 
lived here after he sold the old homestead. 

26 



386 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

263. E. J. Manore. Originally built by Nathaniel Gorrell ( ?) . 
Joseph Cross lived here, sold to his nephew, Samuel. 
Later Elihu Scott owned, then Wm. Bartlett. 

264. Walter Hall. Built by Hiram Hall about 1850. Alvah 
Hall was the carpenter in charge. 

265. Jesse Burgin Place. Built by Kimball Cole; afterwards 
enlarged by Mr. Burgin after he bought of heirs of Hiram 
Cole (he died here of small pox). Mrs. Burgin now 
owns. 

266. George Noyes. The old John "Woodbury farm ; he moved 
to the Center ; it had been owned by his father. Hawkes 
lived here for some years; his heirs left about 1885. 
Then Cal Boardman lived here; afterwards Jones occu- 
pied. 

267. Nelson Forsaith. Was originally a shop on the Gardner 
Cross place, M 273 ; his son, Henry, moved it here, Web- 
ber having given him land to put it on; the ell was 
brought from the Richard Woodbury place, M 275. Mrs. 
David Cross lived here, 1849; then John Partridge 
bought. 

268. George Prince. The old Webber farm. Three genera- 
tions of Abel Webbers lived here in 1840. House built 
by Abel, grandfather of Mrs. Burgin. In the pasture 
are cellar holes, where many years ago lived the man of 
whom Webber bought the land. 

269. James A. Ryder. He built in 1889. 

270. Charles Burns. Built probably by Samuel Palmer after 
he tore down an old house here ( ?). Afterwards Abner 
Gage, Jr., owned and occupied. 

271. Site of house of Jesse Burgin. He lived here with his 
first wife. 

272. No. 7 Schoolhouse. Called "Dark Entry Schoolhouse, " 
because there was no window in the entry until it was re- 
paired in 1846. It is an old building. 

273. Elmer Bailey. Built by Robert Bradford originally. He 
sold to Gardner Cross, he to John Wardwell about 1874. 
Peter Batchelder next bought, then sold to Bailey. The 
old house burned, 1893 ; Bailey rebuilt. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 387 

274. Robert Peacock. "Daddy" Stevens lived here up to 
1840. Then David Loud came. He was boiling down 
cider when house caught fire and burned flat. He rebuilt. 

275. Homestead of Capt. Israel Woodbury. Later known as 
Capt. Richard Woodbury place. Present house built 
about 1860, after part of old house had been moved to 
M 267. Capt. Israel's father, Israel, bought the farm 
from town of Londonderry, 1757, or '59 ( ?). The chest- 
nut and horse chestnut trees in front set out by John 
Woodbury about the time of erection of present house. 
Cut, p. 248. 

276. Charles Leavitt. The old Wm. Bradford place. He 
lived here until after 1840 ; then moved to M 230. Abner 
Gage, Jr., lived here, then Masterman, then present 
owner. Cut, p. 265. 

277. Site of James Webster place. Original house was torn 
down, and rebuilt by Webster. This burned, 1890. 

278. Frank L. Woodbury. Built by Wm. Woodbury in 1858. 
Frank's father, Hiram, bought of Wm. 

279. Mrs. Lavina Kimball. Her husband, Washington Kim- 
ball, built it in the 50 's. 

280. Homestead of Samuel Woodbury. Ebenezer had set- 
tled on knoll 10 rds. south of this house (cellar site shown 
on map) ; that house was burned, then he built present 
in 1807. Samuel afterwards lived here. Cut, p. 381. 

281. Charles S. Woodbury. Built by his father, Hiram, in 
1845. 

282. Homestead of Samuel Gorrell. Very old house. He 
lived here in 1848. Formerly his ancestor, Nathaniel, 
built it (?). 

283. Isaac Emerson. Isaac Cross, uncle to Geo. P., lived here 
long time before Emerson, and may have built it. Cut, 
p. 384. 

284. Site of William Thorn's house. Was a cottage. A long 
barn stood east of house. Burned, 1891. 

285. Site of old Thom Homestead. Joseph Thorn built and 
lived here. Darius Milton Thom was living here when 
burned, 1891. Cut, p. 56. 



388 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

286. Storehouse. Built for workshop by Isaac and Darius 
Thorn. Upstairs was once used for school ; wagons stored 
downstairs. 

287. Site of William Moreland's house in 1750. It stood here 
when these roads were laid out by the town. This place 
later called Clark Land. 

288. Site of Lowell Reed place. Stood here in colonial days. 
John Ellenwood bought of Reed, tore down the old house 
and rebuilt. Then sold to Gus Barker, who owned when 
burned, March 25, 1882. Fire started in barn in evening ; 
euchre party was held here, guests had just departed. 
Later Cal Boardman bought the farm. 

289. Joel Ed. Richardson. His father, Joel, bought of Emery. 
Known as Levi Emery place. The house is very old. 

290. John Turner. Built in 1824 by Smiley Smith (father 
of James, in Methuen). The Smiths were here when the 
town was incorporated. Place now called ''Mountain 
View Farm." Cut, p. 388. 

291. Site of John Clark house. It burned down, perhaps 40 
yrs. ago. Is said to have looked very old in 1830. Be- 
fore that John's father lived here. Very sightly location. 

292. John Cunliffe. Built by him, 1906. 

293. Homestead of Edward Woodbury. Built perhaps a cen- 
tury ago. J. C. Sails recently owned for a few years. 

294. George Brady. Built by him, 1903. 

295. John F. Brady. The old Elisha Woodbury house stood 
here; he was captain of a company at Bunker Hill. 
Brady bought the farm, 1856. Tore down old house and 
built present. Cut, p. 249. 

296. Charles Morley. Built about 1904. 

297. Calvin Jennings. Built by him about 1845. This was 
formerly part of Elisha Woodbury farm. 

298. House built perhaps 20 yrs., owned by Jennings (?). 

299. The old Towns farm. Mrs. Booth lived here 15 yrs. ago. 

300. New house built here within a few years. 

301. Daniel Silver Homestead. He lived here a century ago, 
and later; built a one-story house. Afterwards Noyes 
raised it and put piazza on. The Silvers came in here 
when this district was new. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 389 

302. Homestead of Andrew Jackson Silver, who built it. Troy 
lived here about 1870. 

303. Asa Silver place. Later his son, Leverett, lived here. 

304. Josiah Clough place. The house was old before he came 
here ; it was moved to this location ( ? ) . 

305. Site of John Messer house. It disappeared more than 
75 yrs. ago. Said that he gave place to Daniel Silver to 
take care of, and never returned. 

306. House built 4 or 5 yrs. ago, on land part of Wilson farm. 

307. Ambrose Turner. The Wm. H. Clark farm ; he brought 
a barn from M 299 and made it into a house ; then tore 
down an old barn at the Center and rebuilt here; about 
1865. 

308. New house, now building. 

309. William A. Joy. The old Asa Corliss Homestead. 
Nancy, daughter of Asa, Jr., married Cyrus Wilson, who 
lived here many years. Joy came in 1872. 

310. Frank Findeisen. Built by John Bodwell, on land 
bought of Asa Austin. 

311. Site of Isaiah Heath place. It was very old house ; grad- 
ually went to ruin and fell. 

312. Alvan Kingsley. Built by him about 1895. The old 
house which previously stood here was the Asa Austin 
house, built by Heath after his colonial relic across the 
street became uninhabitable. Jake Huse lived here be- 
fore he moved to Methuen. Heath was prudential com- 
mittee in 1828, Austin in 1851. 

313. Arthur R. Metzner. Built about 15 yrs. ago by Herbert 
Slack, who tore down the old house. It was the Tristram 
Kimball place; had long low roof. 

314. Albert E. Weinhold. He built, 1905. 

315. Herman A. Graichen. Built by him, 1901. 

316. No. 8 Schoolhouse. The only original house of the 
group built in 1801 which is now in use. Remodelled in 
1864. Formerly had pitched floor and wooden benches. 
New building now being erected on adjoining lot west. 
Cut, p. 224. 

317. Arlon Davis. Built by him about 5 yrs. ago. Originally 



390 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

the Clough place; this family owned all the land in the 
neighborhood. Wm. Clough lived here in the old house, 
1859. Sold to Jacob Albert about 1875, afterwards 
burned. 

318. Site of Gristmill of Tristram Kimball, destroyed over 60 
yrs. ago. One of the millstones is now in the brook, the 
other is a step at Little John's. 

319. James Littlejohn. Formerly the home of Elijah Jen- 
nings, who lived here in 1859. 

320. David Hird. Built by a Clough. Ben Clough lived 
75 (?) years ago; Plaisted in 1859. 

321. John Brister. Built by him about 2 yrs. ago. 

322. Baxter Hall. Original house is now the ell. Front part 
built about 1833. Joshua Hall came from England and 
settled here ; bought large tract of land between 1725 and 
1740, and built on this site, doubtless first a log house 
which was later replaced by what is now the ell, one of the 
oldest houses in town. Cut, p. 52. 

323. Blacksmith shop of Hall family. Four generations have 
worked here — Joshua, Moses, Seth and Baxter. The 
frame has been recently reboarded to preserve it, as it is 
the oldest shop in town. 

324. Cellar for new house, now building. 

325. Charles Frye place, built 1905. 

326. Blethen Place. Built 1903. The old house here was 
burned in 1877. Jud Averill lived in it, had bought of 
Emerson. It was the Dexter K. Cole farm ; he built the 
house, 1820. 

327. Isaac Woodbury Homestead. Brick part built by his 
father, Asa, in 1822 ; the rear part is older. Land form- 
erly bought of Elisha (?) Hall, was a part of the large 
Hall farm. Cut, p. 377. 

328. Frank Kimball farm. Built by his father, Chas., 1878. 
Sold to N. H. Breeders' Club, 1905. 

329. Site of the original Kimball Homestead. Built by Oliver, 
occupied by Oliver, Jr., Joseph, Charles. 

330. Site of Charles Kimball house. Built by him, 1850. 
Sold to N. H. Breeders' Club, 1905; burned that fall. 
Cut, p. 12. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 391 

331. Site of log house, built probably about 1750, when Kim- 
ball family first settled in Salem. The land was bought 
in 1736. Oliver, Jr., was born here. 

332. Fred Wight place. He lived here before moving to 
North Salem. Built about 20 yrs. ago by Jas. Fletcher, 
to rent. 

333. House of John W. Hall of Methuen. Built by Ed. 
Kelly about 12 yrs. ago. 

334. John Hall. Built by Rob 't McDonald about 1885. 

335. Sarah Coburn. Built by Philando Swett, perhaps 20 yrs. 
ago. Cass later occupied. 

336. Venetian Palace Hotel, Peter LaCourt, proprietor. Built 
by him, 1906, for lodging house. Also agency for fur- 
nishing Italian laborers. Cut, page 65. 

337. House now building. 

338. Sylvester 0. Woodbury. Built by Miles Hall, 1846. 
When E. E. was put through this was cut off from the 
Kimball farm ; the company offered to move it across the 
road, but Hall refused. Chas. Kimball owned, and sold 
to Woodbury during war. 

339. Ira S. McKeen. Built by Oliver Euss, Jr., 1850. He 
had lived in the old house since his marriage, 1836. His 
father had formerly occupied the old house, after he 
moved from the place in Ewins' woods. Peabody sold 
to McKeen in 1892. 

340. Edward Sheppard. Built by Ira McKeen, 1906. 

341. Henry Hudson. This house looked as old in 1830 as it 
does today. Moses Austin, veteran of the Eevolution, 
lived here; then his son, Moses, who had lived on Ewins' 
farm, moved here also ; they lived here in 1840. Sold to 
Wm. S. Kelley, who worked for Austin; he lived here 
1859. Cut, page 256. 

342. Willard Jones. Uriah Merrill lived here in 1830 ; Oliver 
Euss, Sr., came here after his son was married ; he was a 
relation of Merrill's. McCormiek was here in 1859. 
Like M 338, this house was shut in by the advent of the 
E. E. Its position also indicates that it stood here before 



392 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

the Turnpike was built, and was suffered to remain ; it is 
unlikely that the proprietors would have permitted the 
erection of a house in the road after it was laid out. 

343. James Foster place. Now vacant. The old house was 
burned and rebuilt 15 or 20 yrs. ago. 

344. August Ditrich. Built about 70 yrs. ago by Ezekiel Fos- 
ter. 

345. Jonathan Pettingill place. Now vacant. Built by him 
probably (?) when he married Alice Clough, 1811. 
Cut, p. 393. 

346. Orin Cluff. Built about 1850 by Levi Cluff. Formerly 
was old, low-roofed house here, owned by three Levi's. 

347. Milton G. Goodwin. Built by him about 40 yrs. ago. 
Originally the Levi Cluff, Jr., place. 

348. Noah Hamel. He built, 1904. 

349. Elisha "Woodbury place. Later Benj. Woodbury lived 
here. (On map this is incorrectly marked as a site.) 

350. John Turner place. Built by him, then sold when he 
moved to M 290. 

351. Benjamin Kelley Homestead. His widow and sons now 
occupy. Built 1863 by Jonathan Ballard. Sold to Kel- 
ley, who raised another story. Old house formerly here 
was burned; Samuel C. Gallagher lived there, 1852, be- 
fore Ballard. 

352. J. William Kelley. Old historic house, built by Richard 
Pattee, 1804. The frame was taken from the original 
homestead which stood at M 390, and was a tavern. 
When the Turnpike was built the new location promised 
better business. There were four large barns, which 
stood just southeast of the house; said that 400 horses 
were put up here in one night. Traders used to stop 
here with their stock, mainly horses, as the cattle were 
more easily cared for at Messer's. Lafayette stopped 
here for dinner when he went to Concord in 1824; tur- 
keys were stuffed and roasted in the big brick oven which 
is still in its original condition. The southwest room 
was the barroom, and it is said that on the memorable 
occasion a goodly supply of refreshment was provided, 







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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 393 

much to the satisfaction of some of the marquis' train. 
For many years this place was a stage station. It was 
sold to Capt. Henry Piercy, who sold to Gilman D. Kel- 
ley, 1863. Cut, p. 392. 

353. Edward Cartwright. He built about 15 years ago. 

354. Site of Deacon John Pettingill place. Was once a toll 
station; Roxanna (Messer) Haselton lived here. Known 
as the Loud, also Keefe, and Bailey place. Joseph Loud 
owned, then his son David; old Mrs. Loud died here 
1857 ; then Roswell Richardson lived here, it being 
owned by his son-in-law Barnes. He sold to Keefe, who 
lived here with Bailey (they married sisters). William 
Bailey lived here 1895. (Deacon Pettingill went from 
here to the place in Methuen later known as the Elijah 
Hall place, now the Sylvester Blodgett place.) Very 
long ago the grandfather of Jason Ingalls lived here. 
The old building was torn down and the present one 
erected on nearly the same site about six years ago. 

355. Henry Trempler. He bought the land of Mrs. Bodwell 
and erected the house, about 1890. 

356. Burt M. Hoyt. Built by his grandfather, Benj. P. Hoyt, 
1834. 

357. David M. Hoyt. Was formerly the ell to the Joel Sar- 
gent house, M 358. It was used for a store and silver- 
smithy. Edward Pattee once lived here; Sam Sawyer 
(brother of Ebenezer of Methuen) lived here in 1845. 
When John A. Messer was married he moved it away 
from the main house and converted into dwelling. 
(Cut, p. 389.) 

358. Site of Joel Sargent house. He lived here and kept 
store in the ell; probably built the place before 1800. 
Early in the last century it was occupied by Theophilus 
Haseltine; later by Nathaniel Gorrill, Nathaniel Foster 
and his two sons, and Elijah Hall and family. The last 
occupant was Jud Averill. It was torn down in Feb- 
ruary, 1903. 

359. Boston & Maine Railroad depot, Hampshire Road, for- 
merly called Messer 's Crossing. The name was changed 



394 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

at the request of Mr. E. F. Searles, August 4, 1898. 
The old freight depot was burned by an incendiary, Aug. 
12, 1859. 

360. James G. Martin. He built about 1893. 

361. Theo Jagger. Built by James Lyons about 1875. He 
lived here a short time, then sold. 

362. Site of Lieut. Seth Emerson house. Torn down by 
Loren E. Bailey 20 yrs. ago. It was a low, one story, 
building with a pitched roof; the hall ran clear through 
the middle of the house. There is an old well in the 
field several rods distant. Seth was a militia officer in 
1821. 

363. Henry Caron. 

364. Ed. Wright. Built by John Havey about 15 yrs. ago. 

365. "William Hearn. Built by John Havey about 25 yrs. ago. 
The former house here was built by John A. Messer in 
1861 ; he had a store in it ; it burned in 1880. 

366. Site of barns and slaughter houses of Capt. David Mes- 
ser. He did a very large butchering business here. 
Burned "night before the Fourth," 1896; incendiary. 

367. Site of the Old Messer Tavern. Built by David Messer, 
1816, out of material partly obtained by tearing down the 
old Joseph Wright house, M 378. At first had two rooms 
on each floor; additions afterwards put on. Sargent's 
blacksmith shop stood close to the house, where the ell was 
later built. The establishment sported an oval sign on 
which was displayed a rising sun; it hung at the south- 
east corner. This hostelry was a favorite resort for dro- 
vers on their way from up country with cattle. Many 
were left here ; others driven to Brighton. Dances, shoot- 
ing matches, etc., were frequently held here. Capt. 
David was one of Salem's most' capable and most re- 
spected citizens. After the Messers were gone, the place 
fell into bad repute. It was last occupied by Jud Aver- 
ill. Burned by an incendiary, Nov. 6, 1896. 

368. Leverett Dyson. The old Frederick Messer House. 
Formerly stood near small clump of trees just east of 
M 371, near the road. Ten years after Turnpike was 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 395 

built it was moved here by Richard Messer. Capt. Sam- 
uel Emerson owned before Messer. Frederick left to his 
daughter, Susan (Messer) Bodwell, who sold to Chas. 
Robbins. Dyson bought the place, 1893. The ell for- 
merly stood near the corner of the road south of the 
house, and was used by Frederick as a hatshop. 

369. Site of a store owned by David Messer, kept at different 
times by Sam Sawyer, E. S. Woodbury, Bodwell & King, 
Eliphalet Tenney, Noyes, Woodbury & Silver; all sold 
rum here. Burned hallowe'en, Oct. 31, 1876. 

370. Heaps Bros.' blacksmith shop. Built by David Messer 
about 35 yrs. ago (?). 

371. George L. Page homestead. Moved here in 1869 from 
site of Gilbert Bowen 's house on Pelham Street, Methuen ; 
had formerly stood on site of M. E. Church in Railroad 
Square. The roof was subsequently raised. 

372. George E. Townsend. The old Capt. Samuel Emerson 
place, supposed to have been built before the Revolution. 
Its first owners are obscure. Emerson was captain of 
4th Regt. Militia in 1815. Asa Gage lived here, 1840; 
"Uncle Nat" Webster rented it for a time, then John 
Messer lived here until 1858, when he sold to B. B. 
Hutchins. The place was next sold in 1901 to Town- 
send, who tore down the old house and built the one now 
standing. Cut, p. 385. 

373. Site of tanyard of Samuel Emerson. It was discontinued 
sometime before 1840 and buildings moved to west side 
of street; one is now M 374. 

374. John Fielding. Formerly stood across street, was part 
of tanning plant. Samuel Pettingill once lived here. 

375. Wilson Dyson. Built by Enoch Butler about 1890. 

376. Moses Messer Place. One of the oldest in town. Rich- 
ard Messer bought of James Swan in 1765, and the build- 
ings were not new then. His son Richard lived here, 
whose children, including Moses, Frederick and David, 
were born here. Moses retained this homestead. After 
his death 'Leif Tenney bought in 1832; he changed the 
roof from the original low gambrel to the present pitched 



396 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

style. Chas. Butler next owned, and sold to Thomas 
Tootel. It is now vacant, owned by E. F. Searles. Cut 
p. 73. 

377. Louis A. Watjen. Built by him about 1895. Formerly 
called ' ' Page field, ' ' part of Messer farm. 

378. Site of home of Major Joseph Wright in 1750. He was 
very influential citizen. The property next belonged to 
Joseph W. Page, father of Lucretia (Page) Bradley. 
He sold to David Messer, who first lived here after he 
left the home, M 376. In 1816 he tore the house down 
and put the material into the tavern on the Turnpike. 
Just east of the house was a large rock which was blasted 
out and taken to Methuen as part of foundation of Me- 
thuen Co.'s mill. The lilac bushes about this old cellar 
were still flourishing when destroyed by E. F. Searles, 
about 1897, to build the new road. 

379. Thomas Webster place. Built by him. Later owned by 
Evans of Salem Depot. Now property of E. F. Searles. 
Cut, p. 396. 

380. Lodge at Meadow brook. Built by E. F. Searles, about 
1896. 

381. Amos N. Webster farm. Home of his grandfather, 
Samuel. One of the oldest houses in town. Built in 
1770. Now owned by E. F. Searles. It has been dis- 
mantled. The author lived here for two years after 
Amos "Webster left. The cut on p. 64 shows the original 
lines of the house. 

382. Site of home of Samuel Day. He moved to Windham. 

383. Stillwater Estate buildings ; built by E. F. Searles from 
1898 to 1905. Cut, p. 120. 

384. House moved here from Methuen about 1900 by E. F. 

Searles. 

385. Westmoreland; lodge built by E. F. Searles about 1897. 

386. John Latham. Built by Tom Lee about 30 yrs. ago. 
Later owned by David Crompton. Present owner has 
been here about two years. 

387. James Hassett place. Now part of Stillwater estate. 
Hassett bought land of Jere Frye and moved house from 
Methuen; later added to it. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 397 

388. Charles Andrews. Built by Gilman D. Kelley about 25 
or 30 yrs. ago, for his daughter, Mrs. Wm. Hunt. 

389. No. 9 schoolhouse. Built 1864. Original house stood 
short distance north. 

390. Site of original Richard Pattee homestead. He kept tav- 
ern. Loammi Baldwin, the surveyor of the Turnpike, 
stayed here. Persuaded Pattee to move to Turnpike. 
He brought the first Baldwin apple tree into New Hamp- 
shire; scions were grafted onto a tree a short distance 
from the house. It bore excellent fruit until blown down, 
1888. The old stump may still be seen just north of 
No. 9 schoolhouse. The old house here was taken down; 
it was very old; the timbers were used for the present 
house, M 352. 

391. Martin Luther. The old buildings were burned March 
22, 1879 ; present house built soon afterwards. Originally 
the Merrill homestead. 

392. John Woodbury farm. Formerly the Emery place. Now 
owned by E. F. Searles. 

393. Site of Barnard Kimball house. It was burned about 
1845; Benj. Day lived here at the time. The barn was 
moved to M 394. On the corner opposite stood the 
blacksmith shop of George Kimball. This site has re- 
mained undisturbed since the fire. 

394. Ozro H. Butler. The old Benj. Day place. Butler came 
here 38 yrs. ago to live with his uncle, Hezekiah Foster, 
who bought of Day. 

395. Site of the Ayer Homestead. The first house here was 
built by Lieut. Ebenezer Ayer as a garrison against the 
Indians, about 1730. It was of heavy logs, and stood 
west of the later house, and nearer the road. His grand- 
son, Ebenezer, tore down the old blockhouse and built 
the house now standing back in the field, M 396, where it 
was moved by E. F. Searles in 1900, after the farm be- 
came a part of Stillwater estate. The cut on p. 41 
shows the house in its original position by the road. 

396. Ayer house as now located. 

397. Adams place. Built by John Currier, 1776. It was a 



398 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

low-back roof. The large elm tree was set out by John 
Currier, 1780. School was kept here; there was a large 
place called the "Beacon Hole," into which the teacher 
threatened to put unruly pupils. The house was altered 
by E. F. Searles after purchasing. 

398. George Jones. House very old, built by T. Webster 
Emerson about 1760. His son, James, was born here, 
1763. Mrs. Jones' mother was an Emerson, married a 
Tyler. Cut, p. 360. 

399. Site of W. P. Merrill house. Built by Perley Merrill 
perhaps 50 yrs. ago. Later moved to Broadway, Me- 
thuen. 

400. Baldwin Pattee place. Built by Dean Bodwell out of a 
barn. James Bodwell built the ell. 

401. Israel Thorndyke Foster place. Built about 50 yrs. ago. 
Now occupied by Miss Jennie Foster and her mother. 
There was an old house here nearer the road, formerly 
the Clough place. Josiah Clough (now spelled Cluff) 
owned all the land in this vicinity in 1750, joining that 
of his kindred in the later No. 8 district. 

402. Albert Palmer. Built by him. He tore down the old 
John Pettingill house which stood here, and dug out the 
well which had been closed fifty years. It may now be 
seen beside the road, fitted with a large sweep. 

403. John Shaw. Built by Willard G. Smith, perhaps 30 yrs. 
ago. 

404. Shoeshop of D. N. Euss. He built about 1875. 

405. George "W. Palmer. Built by D. N. Russ. 

406. Isaiah Webster. He converted shoeshop of Amos Web- 
ster into this dwelling. 

407. Charles H. Webster. The original house stood on south 
side of lane as indicated on the map. It was the home 
of Abiel Austin, 1750. Later passed into several hands. 
J. C. Carey and Hon. Jacob Emerson of Methuen were 
both born here. John Clendenin secured the property 
from the Austins by a mortgage, after the present house 
was built. The old house was torn down. Amos E. 
Webster then bought of Clendenin. Cut, p. 320. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 399 

408. George Randall. Known as the Richardson place. Leon- 
ard Richardson bought it for his mother. Mary Richard- 
son lived here 75 yrs. ago ; she married Chas. Palmer. 

409. John C. Ewins' farm. He bought of John Russ, in 1820, 
but Ewins' family never lived on the place. Moses Aus- 
tin lived here before he moved to the Turnpike; he set 
out some apple trees, later called "Austin Sweets" — very 
fine ; one tree still bears fruit. The old house was after- 
wards taken down and rebuilt at M 41. Oliver Russ once 
lived in the old house ; then John Bodwell, who was here 
in 1835. On the land beyond was an old cellar, belong- 
ing to heirs of Samuel White. 

410. Clinton Ewins. Built by Wm. B. Ayer, perhaps 1850. 
Later Richard Russ lived here. 

411. Fred Tootel. The old Sally Bailey place. She lived 
here early in the last century. 

412. Charles H. Kelley. Formerly Geo. Palmer, who bought 
of Jerome Kelley. 

413. J. W. Palmer. Built by Weston Palmer, 1874 (?). 

414. Mrs. Benjamin A. Newcomb. Horace Robinson once 
lived here. 

415. Frank F. Wheeler. Built by Chas. Day, 1854. The 
original house was built by Simeon Hastings in 1804 ; he 
sold to Josiah Fox in 1830, he to Day in 1840. Day 
moved the old house just east, where it is now a shed. 
Rouel F. Wheeler bought the place of Day, 1873. 

416. Robert Lowell place. Built by Hazen, son of John, 1825 ; 
he sold to his brother, Robert. Now used for a chop- 
per's camp. 

417. Fred O. Wheeler. Built 1845 by Stephen Bailey. Orig- 
inally the Nathaniel Haselton place until 1820, when 
David Bailey moved here from Cowbell Corner (also 
called Heathen Corner). The old house was gambrel 
roof; was taken down in 1877. There was an old cellar 
just east of the house, with birches 15 ft. high in it as 
early as 1840. Cut, p. 397. 

418. Site of the old Lowell place. The old homestead of 
John Lowell, one of the town fathers. Last occupied 



400 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

by Nathan W. Wilson; torn down by Stephen Bailey 
about 30 yrs. ago. Cut, p. 321. 

419. Site of Abiel Kelley house. Wm. Somes, his son, also 
later Colonel John, lived here. Built by Abiel after he 
left his former location on Spicket Hill. 

420. Robert I. Smith. Built by Walter Pettingill. He sold 
to Hitchings. About opposite this house, on north side 
of road, eight rods from the wall, was the Currier house 
where Stephen, the grandfather of the late Stephen, was 
born. 

421. Charles King (of Haverhill). He built about 1905. 

422. Melzar A. Turner. Rev. Wm. Balch lived here in 1830. 
His widow (perhaps he, too,) afterwards lived in the 
village. This house is very old. 

423. Warren E. Bodwell. The Abner Bayley house. Built 
by him probably about 1750. At any rate, he bought 
the land of Daniel Peaslee in 1755, and the deed said 
"whereon Bayley has recently erected buildings and 
now lives." We do not think it possible, as has been 
supposed, that the church was organized in this house, 
but rather in Daniel Peaslee 's; "recently," in those days 
of newness could not have meant a period of fifteen years. 
Isaiah Kelly lived here after Bayley; then Nathan R. 
Bodwell. Cut, p. 85. 

424. Mrs. L. J. Perkins. The old Dr. Morse place. The 
Morse house was burned before 1820, and no building 
was erected till 1875, when the present house was built. 
The barn, however, remained after the fire ; Dr. Emerson 
used to keep his pair of white Arabian horses in it. 

425. Warren Emerson place. Dr. Luther Emerson lived 
here. It is an old house. 

426. Site of "Granny" Jones' little house. It stood among 
the boulders. She was wife of Wm. Jones, and daugh- 
ter of "Widow Harris." She kept a cow, hog and some 
turkeys here. "Bill" planted this whole lot. Later the 
town bought the land, and holds for cemetery purposes. 
The cut on p. 400 covers this and the woods at the rear. 

427. Pine Grove Cemetery. Land bought of John Clendenin 
in 1850. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 401 

428. The Pound. Not the original, but the one built in 1838. 
John Marston got the land of Clendenin, and he and 
John Wheeler built and gave to the town. Last used in 
1863, when James Ayer was field driver; he drove Mc- 
Laughlin's and Hunt's cows to pound for doing damage 
on land of John R. Jones near Widow Harris' bridge. 

430. L. H. Woodbury. 

431. Site of Silas Carey's house, burned about 1900. 

432. Site of Daniel Peaslee's house. The cellar can still be 
seen, although now nearly filled with rocks and refuse. 
He was one of the founders of the town. The house was 
a block house, heavily planked, for protection against 
the Indians. The women and children came here to stay 
nights in times of disturbance. The first parish meet- 
ing was held here January 16, 1736. It stood beside Old 
Spicket Path, which wound down the slope of the hill 
toward the old causeway bridge. 

433. Loren B. McLaughlin. The old house, occupied by his 
father, John, burned on this site October 1, 1856. The 
present building was erected soon afterwards. 

434. Elmer F. Austin. Formerly the Ira Pettingill house, 
moved here from John Kimball place, M 436. 

435. Site of the Jones house. Stood just west of the Kimball 
barn. The cellar is still here. When the frame was 
raised the Jones boys and Duty boys had a terrible fight ; 
all were active, husky fellows who delighted in a little 
"mixup." 

436. John Kimball homestead. Over 100 yrs. old ; now owned 
by F. D. Wilson. 

437. Site of Daniel Massey house. This cellar is in an ex- 
cellent state of preservation, not far from the road among 
a clump of trees. The house was probably built before 
the Revolution. 

438. Mrs. Lucy Kimball. This also is a very old house; 
known as the J. B. Gardner place. 

439. Frank D. Wilson. The old Richard Kimball homestead. 
The farm was bought by Aaron G. Wilson, the old house 
torn down and the present erected about 1845. 

27 



402 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

440. Capt. Edwin Beveridge. Built by Leonard Emerson, 
1850. The old house which stood here was built by 
Abner, "King of the Wheelers." The street was called 
Wheeler Street, because of the number of this family 
settled here. When Leonard Emerson came here from 
Haverhill he bought the place. Prescott Emerson was 
born here; his brother, Leverett, inherited it. His heirs 
sold to Butler, he to E. S. Woodbury, he to Beveridge. 

441. Prescott Emerson. Tuttle Wheeler lived here. It was 
at one time the Hubbard place. Then Capt. Isaac 
Wheeler occupied; also John Dix. Then Daniel Emer- 
son got possession. Its origin is not known. 

442. Ada (Larabee) Gibson. Built by Geo. Larabee, 1871, 
when he tore down the old house. This had been built 
by Stephen Wheeler in 1739. It was a block house, 
where people from all around the pond used to come to 
escape Indians. Isaiah Wheeler afterwards lived here; 
Richard, grandfather of John W., was born here. When 
Leonard and Daniel Emerson came up from Haverhill 
the latter bought this place. His son, Augustus, sold 
to Nathaniel Chase, and he to Larabee. 

443. Stephen Webster. Built by Stephen Wheeler, father of 
David, perhaps 100 yrs. ago. Sold to James Webster, 
father of Stephen, about 1825 by David Wheeler. Web- 
ster had lived on north side of pond, where his father, 
also James, had settled some time before the Revolution, 
M 447. 

444. Original site of No. 2 schoolhouse. It was sold, 1835 
(and moved to Haverhill) by James Webster; the dis- 
trict had no deed of the building, and much controversy 
and discussion resulted from the sale. 

445. Charles Merrill. Built by Dea. Thomas Smith. Capt. 
Jesse Smith lived here. Leonard Merrill, father of Dan- 
iel, bought of Maj. Joshua Merrill about 1820. 

446. Robert Dunbar. Originally the Rollins homestead 
(spelled also Rawlings). The Websters lived next door, 
and named one of their sons Rollins Webster. He after- 
wards came into possession of this place. Then John A. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 403 

Wheeler, who was a young man at the time, came to live 
with Webster, who was older. Webster also took Mary- 
Stevens to bring up. Subsequently Wheeler married 
her, and the old man (Rollins Webster) gave them the 
place. After Wheeler, Wm. Haseltine owned. He sold 
to Smith, and he to Dunbar, 1906. 

447. Elbridge G. Eeed place. He was murdered here about 
20 yrs. ago. Settled by Capt. James Webster before the 
Revolution. Warren Webster (brother of Rollins) lived 
here. Eaton owned about 1830 or a little later; then 
Moody Foster. Is now vacant. Between this place and 
the brook, going west, near the brook on the south side 
of the road is the site of the Abraham Dow place. (Not 
on map.) 

448. Last site of No. 2 schoolhouse. It was built here, 1849. 
Given up about 12 yrs. ago. 

449. Site of No. 2 schoolhouse in 1839, after the old one at 
M 444 had been sold. The land was donated by Leon- 
ard Merrill. The building was burned. 

450. L. G. Spencer. The old Maj. Joshua Merrill place. Orig- 
inally owned by the Johnsons. They adopted Joshua, 
and left the farm to him. Then his son, John, lived 
here. 

451. Daniel Welch. The old Salem Town Farm. Origin- 
ally all this land here belonged to the Johnsons. Evan 
Jones then bought here and built the house. After his 
death Mrs. Jones lost the property through perfidy, and 
afterward died a pauper, on her own home! The town 
bought of John Palmer in 1843, and in 1857 tore down 
the old buildings and erected the present set at a cost 
of $2,300. The town sold the property in 1905. 

452. Site of Dudley Jones' house. He moved it here from 
his mother's place, M 426, and she went to live with him. 

453. Site of Martha Harris' loom. The cellar of the burned 
house may still be seen, guarded by the sentinel oak 
which is growing beside it. (See Chapter XI for story.) 

454. Frank M. Roberts. The old Temple Roberts place. 
Later owned by his son, John. 

455. Mrs. Susan (Roberts) Smith. The J. A. Bryant house. 



404 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

456. Mrs. Peabody house. (Birthplace of Mrs. John Graham 
of Methuen.) 

457. William G. Crowell homestead. David Corliss bought 
this farm of Hezikiah Jones in 1819. His daughter, De- 
borah, married Joseph Armstrong. Their daughter, Me- 
linda, married Wm. G. Crowell, and came into possession 
in 1847. Mrs. K. M. McLaughlin now owns. Cut, p. 9. 

458. Clayton F. Record. Built by Chas. Kimball 25 or 30 
yrs. ago. Present owner has been here about 12 yrs. 

459. Mrs. Frank Roby. This farm was originally laid out to 
Daniel Hendricks in 1659, as his fourth division lot. 
Later Nathaniel Dow married a daughter of one of the 
Hendricks family, and his son, Jere, and grandson 
Aquilla, successively owned the property. Aquilla sold 
in 1836 and went to Exeter. The original house here 
was of logs, with a very small cellar. The present one 
was built by Jeremiah Dow. It has many marks of 
antiquity — hand-made nails, hewn timbers, etc. Built, 
probably, about the time of the Revolution. Cut, p. 33. 

460. Charles Lundberg. Built by him about 25 yrs. ago. 

461. E. J. Nickerson. The old Frye Austin house. Probably 
100 yrs. old. 

462. Howard Moulton. The D. W. Woodbury place. 

463. Site. A cellar of which we have no data. 

464. Dana Call. This was an old house. Abner Gage lived 
here about 1835. Ten years later Washington Kimball 
occupied for a short time, just after it had been remod- 
elled. Alvah Hall did the work. 

465. Abner D. Gage. Built by Stephen Webster about 50 
yrs. ago. He had lived on homestead M 468, and when 
his father's property was divided he had this for his 
share. The farm extended to the Turnpike. 

466. Austin A. Drake. The Tenney homestead. Probably 
built by Hezikiah Jones just after the Turnpike was put 
through. He kept tavern here until 1827. The up- 
country people came here for their supplies. Also trav- 
elers to and from Boston and Salem, Mass., used to 
stop here. John F. Tenney 's brother, then John F., 




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405 



kept the tavern. Gilman D. Kelley lived here, 1850, for 
a few years. A few years ago Chas. H. Tenney of Me- 
thuen bought his boyhood home and now keeps it with 
appropriate diligence. Cut on opposite page. 

467. Benjamin E. Chase. Built, 1785. The Prince place. 
Chase has been here over 40 yrs. Cut, p. 264. 

468. Currier Webster place. Hiram Webster owned and 
reared his family here. David Nevins was born here. 

469. Albert Littlefield. Built probably before the Revolu- 
tion. Gilman D. Kelley lived here in 1855, bought of 
Jonathan Stickney. The farm was formerly owned by 
Capt. Obadiah Eastman, whose house stood by the two 
large chestnut trees across the road (see cellar on map). 
Cut, p. 404. 

470. Cellar hole near the lake; not known who lived here. 

471. Israel Woodbury homestead. He was father of Levi, 
who was born here. He bought the place in 1895 and 
has repaired and improved. Cut, p. 325. 

472. Summer cottage of Levi Woodbury. Built by him, 
1895. Cut, p. 437. 

473. Boston & Maine depot, Canobie Lake. Cut, p. 401. 

474. O. A. Alexander, store and postoffice. The old store 
here burned about 10 yrs. ago. 

475. Site of shoeshop which belonged to Mary Campbell. The 
blacksmith shop now stands on nearly the same spot. 

476. Site of Mary Campbell's house. She kept the tollgate 
for proprietors of the Turnpike. 

477. Charles Kelley. The Richard Kelley homestead. Built 
1824, by the third Richard. The old house, which stood 
about 20 ft. in front of the present location, was torn 
down. Samuel Kelley lived here after his nephew, Rich- 
ard, had married Sibbel Fletcher. 

478. Site of Ebenezer Saunders place. It was the Oliver 
Saunders homestead. Burned about 12 yrs. ago. 

479. Site of Daniel Saunders homestead. He and his brother, 
Caleb, were born here. Their father moved to Canada 
about 1810 and took them. But they both mounted the 
horse and rode together back to Salem. 



406 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

480. Lincoln H. Hunt. The Luke Woodbury homestead. 
He was a hero of the Revolution. The old house was 
burned September 24, 1904. It had had many owners; 
McMara lived here, 1859 ; it was once known as the 
Partridge place. At the time of the fire the Advent 
chapel at the fork of the roads was destroyed. The old 
house is shown by cut on p. 256. Hunt built the new 
house in 1906. Cut, p. 160. 

481. John Littlefield. The J. Corning place. The old house 
was torn down in 1893. It had been the tavern of 
Chauncy N. Jones; later residence of Capt. Jonathan 
Merrill. Present house has been built about 10 yrs. 

482. Joe Dumont place. 

483. Walter Roby house, built about 15 yrs. ( ?). 

485. Milton Kelley. The old Clement house. The Clement 
heirs sold in 1881 to E. Coburn, of whom Kelley bought. 
Cut, p. 61. 

486. Ice-house built by Kelley. 

487. H. P. Stevens. Built by Milo Shedd, after he sold his 
former residence to Dean Emerson. 

488. Site of the old gristmill. (Should be farther from the 
bridge on the map.) When it was built the partners 
could not agree as to whether it should be placed here 
or at the lower dam. It was finally put at the lower 
dam, although the dam here had been partially built and 
the millstones prepared. The appearance of the place 
has led to much romantic speculation regarding the his- 
tory of the mill. But there is some doubt whether it was 
ever built. The location, however, which is charming, is 
shown in the cut on page 292. The millstone will be 
noticed on the embankment; the other lies just below 
the ruins of the dam. 

489. Shoeshop. Formerly operated by William Woodbury. 

490. The old Clement sawmill stood where the present build- 
ing is. Henry Sanders' mill was also here. Wm. G. 
Crowell last operated the old mill. It was torn down, 
then the present building erected by the Rowells. 

491. Mrs. Mary Woodbury. The Nathaniel Woodbury home- 
stead. Built by him, 1825. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 



407 



492. Herbert W. Harris. Built by Wm. Woodbury. 

493. George Woodbury. Was Methodist parsonage when 
meetinghouse was at M 494. Formerly owned by Jacob 
Rowell. Very old. 

494. Site of the old M. E. meetinghouse. Built here prior 
to March 31, 1809. Moved after the society divided in 
1836 to M 8. 

495. Site of H. T. Kimball house. Built by Jonathan and 
Israel Massey, who lived here. 

496. Site of Clement's barn. It was burned. 

497. No. 5 schoolhouse. Built, 1873; cost, $1,500. 

498. William A. Kimball. Bought of Dean Emerson, who 
bought of Milo Shedd. On this site stood the old house of 
Hope Bedel. He died here of small pox after he re- 
turned from the French and Indian War in 1765. He 
was buried 10 ft. deep in the field opposite the house. 

499. Site of Milo Shedd 's first house; burned (?). 

500. Horace W. Hunt. Very old house; formerly home of 
Jonathan Massey, 1854. Israel Eowell lived here long 
ago. 

501. George Hunt. Built by " Priest " Bennett, the Methodist 
minister. Hunt bought of J. Q. A. Kelly. 

502. Site of Henry Sanders' house. It stood on the knoll 
just west of the brook. The lines of the cellar can be 
plainly seen. 

503. Site of Joseph Page place. Silas Wheeler lived here. 
Wm. Duty lived just east of this site, nearer the road. 

504. Colon Whiteley. The Andrew Bryant place. John 
Ewins, grandfather of James, lived here. 

505. William Williams. The old Philip Rowell place. Built 
about time of Revolution. John R. Rowell lived here 
later. 

506. Mrs. Buck. Built by her 12 yrs. ago (?). 

507. Orrin C. Reed. Built by his father, 1876. The old 
house had burned, 1874. This was formerly the Si- 
monds place. 

508. George Pattee. Built by J. W. Wheeler, 1882. The old 
house here had burned in 1878. It was a little east and 



408 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

nearer the road; the original David Allen house. The 
hill was called Allen's Hill. His daughter married Ben- 
jamin Foster, and they lived here ; had a shoeshop in one 
part of the house. 

509. Alfred Jones. Built either by Nate Smith's father or 
grandfather over 80 yrs. ago; both lived here at same 
time. 

510. Stephen Ball ; Joseph Beaudin. Built by J. W. Wheeler, 
1882. 

511. John Goodier. Built by John Taylor about 1855. 

512. John W. Wheeler. Built by John Allen about 1800. 
David Allen lived here, 1825. His widow lived here, 
1832. Eichard Wheeler married Sarah Allen ; named his 
son John Allen (father of John W.). Each mill owner 
lived in this house. While Daniel Saunders (afterwards 
founder of Lawrence) was running the mill, his sons, 
Daniel and Caleb, were born here. Cut, p. 408. 

513. Wheeler's mill. Built, 1881, by John W. There was 
very early a mill site here, which has been improved al- 
most continuously. For a full description see Chapter 
VIII. Cut, p. 304. 

514. Sanatorium of Dr. Sikorsky, now closed. Formerly resi- 
dence of W. W. Cole. Built by the Aliens; John lived 
here, 1825; Leonard Morrison in 1855 (?). 

515. Site of Richard Wheeler house. Cellar is now here. 
The road formerly ran straight across here instead of 
down by the mill. John A. Wheeler was born here; re- 
mained till he went with Rollins Webster. 

516. The original Rowell homestead. Built by Jacob Rowell 
in 1796. He was called "Uncle Jake." First Methodist 
meetings held here in 1803. Geo. Pickering and Lorenzo 
Dow both preached here. Cut, p. 136. 

517. Site of Amos Dow place. Built by him. Amos Wheeler 
(brother to Day) lived here in 1840. The house was torn 
down. 

518. Rodney Woodbury. The old Day Wheeler place; built 
perhaps 70 yrs. ago. 

519. The Abraham Woodward place. There was an old house 







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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 409 

here before the present one was built. (Sam'l Wood- 
ward, who lived in the "Sandbank House," M 541, was 
father of Abe and of the step-mother of Dan'l Rowell). 
Dan and Asbury Rowell lived here in 1850. 

520. Edith Woodbury. Built by her husband, Edwin, about 
1860. The house previously stood just south; was a 
one-story structure, the old Hastings homestead, very 
old. James Hastings' father came to Salem in 1757 and 
built log house where barn now stands across street from 
house. 

521. Johnson place. House has been burned and remodelled 
several times. Probably Samuel Johnson was first set- 
tler here. Wm. Lancaster owned it later; came from 
Boston when his son, Thomas D., was a child. Sold to 
Henry Walker, a sea captain, about 1830. 'Leif Coburn, 
Ezra Bennett and Ira Sanborn have since owned it. 

522. Ernest P. Atwood. The old homestead of Nathaniel 
Woodman, father of Dr. Benj. Woodman. Wm. Lan- 
caster once owned the place. Job Coburn bought in 
1835. Miss Sarah Coburn has lived here until recently. 

523. Site of Perley Ladd place. John Ladd was one of first 
settlers in this locality. The family kept the place 
through three more generations — Joshua, Perley, Elmer; 
then was sold to Edwin Woodbury, then to his brother, 
Alonzo. Wm. Barrett owned and lived here when it 
burned. 

524. Site of Aaron Goodhue house. He bought it of Job 
Coburn. The place originally settled by George Amey. 
It was a very old house ; burned in 1904. Was owned at 
the time by F. B. Goodhue and rented to Lawrence par- 
ties. 

425. John King. Originally the Moses Whittaker home- 
stead ; he was a Revolutionary soldier ; probably built the 
house. His daughter married Abraham Woodward, and 
sold the place to Stephen Duston about 1830. He gave 
the place to John King's mother, who took care of him. 
Ice-house, built 15 yrs. ago. 

Summer Camps. 




410 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

530. Just at the junction of the new road by the lake with the 
old road, at the top of the hill, is an old cellar not marked 
on the map. A butternut tree two feet through grows 
in it, showing that the house has been gone a good many 
years. It is believed to have been the homestead of John 
Giles, who lived in this vicinity when the town was incor- 
porated. The cellar marked is the site of the Calley ( ? ) 
house, of later date. 

531. Site of the Snell house. Meloon once lived here. The 
house was burned. 

532. Joseph Mackie. He came from North Andover in 1903. 
Built by Nelson Chaplin, perhaps 40 yrs. ago. 

533. Lizzie Gordon. Built by Kimball Gordon. This was the 
old Caleb Duston farm; he was a great Methodist, held 
meetings here in the house next. Mrs. Mary MacLean 
now lives here. Cut, p. 341. 

534. Old Caleb Duston house. Kimball Gordon lived here be- 
fore he built M 533. 

535. Formerly part of 534. 

536. Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Laid out by private corpora- 
tion about 1850. 

537. Franz Gross. Built by Richard Taylor, 1852. He sold 
to his father. At the auction of his estate Chas. Austin 
bought; sold to Geo. W. Lincoln, he to John Shea, he to 
present owner. 

538. House of W. W. Cole, who bought at auction of Wm. 
Taylor estate. Built by James Taylor out of a barn 
moved from M 574 ; he sold to Wm. Taylor. 

539. Mrs. Nathan Smith. Built by her husband about 1900. 

540. Mrs. Hattie Edwards. Built by Oliver Taylor of Atkin- 
son. Now owned by Mrs. N. Smith. 

541. Site of Samuel Woodward house; later Rufus Kimball 
lived here. Torn down about 20 yrs. ago. 

542. Site of gristmill, close to the road. It was here in 1832. 
Later sash and planing mill stood a little back. (See 
Chapter VIII.) 

543. Atlas Mill. Formerly cider mill stood here. (See Chap- 
ter VIII.) Cut, p. 301. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 411 

544. House of Wm. H. Hanson. Built by him about 12 or 15 
yrs. ago. Owned by Joseph Jackson of Lawrence. 

545. Site of cider mill of Thos. Duston. It was blown down 
4 or 5 yrs. ago. On these plains long ago stood tall yel- 
low pines, whose tops had been broken off through age. 
The part left standing was called "candle wood," of 
which the settlers used to make tar. But the Indians 
came to get it for lights and torches. The settlers tied 
scythes on long poles and drove the Indians away. 

546. Duston 's Mill. (See Chapter VIII.) 

547. Tenement built to accommodate mill help by Thos. Dus- 
ton more than 30 yrs. ago. 

548. Site of blacksmith shop of Chas. Mirick. It was here 
only a few years, about 1900. 

549. House built by Chas. Mirick about 12 yrs. ago. 

550. Frank Nichols. Built before 1830, on site of very old 
house built by Nathaniel Woodman after he left Zion's 
Hill. He was the first to put an axe into the forests 
which grew on this hill. Rooms of old house were 20 ft. 
square. "Woodman raised enormous crops of corn here 
after he cleared the land. He brought potash from the 
mill and put ashes all over the land. David Duston 
bought the place of him. Robert Chase once owned. 
Wm. Colby sold to Nichols. 

551. George Hastings. Built by Jonathan Page about 30 yrs. 
ago. J. W. Wheeler bought at collector's sale, and sold 
to Hastings. 

552. James Gregg. Built by J. W. Wheeler, 1881. 

553. Burton Sleeper. Built by David Duston for a joiner's 
shop, 40 or 50 yrs. ago. He lived here afterwards, then 
Obadiah Duston bought it to rent. 

554. Charles Plummer place. Built by David Duston before 
he built M 553. Later he sold to Plummer. Just oppo- 
site, on west side of road, stood house of Copp long ago. 
This was called Copp's Hill. 

555. No. 10 schoolhouse. Raised May 8, 1854. Partly built* 
from old one at M 561. 

556. Old Obadiah Duston place. The original house was the 



412 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

wooden part; brick part was added over 60 yrs. ago. 
Col. James Gilmore, the Revolutionary officer, lived here 
after the war. Cut, p. 240. 

557. Mrs. Spates. Built by Amos Dow about 1850. Hannah 
Hallowell, sister to Thos. Duston, lived here. 

558. Mrs. Edwin Duston. Built by Thomas Duston, 1846. 

559. Loren Hunt. Built 20 yrs. ago by Lewis H. Hunt. In- 
creased and altered since. 

560. Edwin Cate. The Thomas Duston homestead. Built 
probably in colonial days, on site of a former house. Re- 
mained many years unfinished; remodelled about 1890. 
Cate bought, 1902. Cut, p. 409. 

561. Site of schoolhouse, used after 1838, till 1854. "Was old- 
fashioned, slightly pitched floor. 

562. Charles Smith. Built by Amos Duston about 1880 (?) ; 
he lived here for some time. 

563. Moved here by Richard Taylor to rent when he lived on 
Jennings place, M 564. 

564. Martha Jennings. Built by Richard Taylor, 1867. The 
house here before had burned. It was built by Eben- 
ezer Duston about 1850, after he had torn down the old 
house which stood here many years. Nat Duston had 
lived in it. 

565. Site of sawmill in 1859, run by Nat Duston. Sold to 
Richard Taylor, he to M. H. Taylor. Finally torn down 
and moved across street. 

566. Site of schoolhouse — the original one of this district. 
Was rough, unpainted building with a huge fireplace, 
long wooden benches reaching across to sides of room, 
with only one aisle down the middle; floor was pitched 
toward the teacher's desk. Torn down in 1838. 

ARLINGTON MILLS PROPERTY. 

A 1. John Taylor homestead. Built by him in 1844. Also 
the home of Matthew H. Taylor. Cut, p. 412. 

A 2. Site of Taylor's mill. In 1802 (and probably earlier) 
James Alexander had a small wooden mill here, second 
in business only to Allen's. Bought by John Taylor, 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 413 

1833 ; gradually enlarged till 1845, when he tore it down 
and built a brick mill. This burned, 1870; rebuilt by 
M. H. Taylor; burned again in 1878. The ruins are still 
standing. Cut, p. 297. 

A 3. Site of an old weave shed which was moved here and 
made into a two-tenement house, about where the sheds 
now stand. In 1852 Nathaniel Paul moved it to M 576, 
where it burned in 1884. 

A 4. Old James Alexander house. John Taylor first lived 
here with his family after coming to Salem. It was built 
before 1800. 

A 5. Tenement house moved here by John Taylor about 1836. 
The Arlington Mills Company bought all of this property 
and land for water right, extending to and about Island 
Pond, of Mrs. M. H. Taylor in 1905. Jesse Shirley now 
occupies the Taylor homestead, having the care of the 
gates for water supply at the outlet of Island Pond. A 
powerful dam was built there soon after the purchase of 
the property. 

567. Joseph Nichols. The old Ebenezer G. Duston place. 
There was a small building here in 1833. This has been 
enlarged to present size. 

568. Matthew Taylor place. In 1832 Christopher Morrison 
kept a store here. Richard Taylor lived here before he 
built his house at M 570. Matthew Taylor moved in soon 
after Richard left. Mrs. Taylor lived here until her 
death five years ago. Cut, p. 413. 

569. Tenement house owned by Richard Taylor's heirs. Part 
was brought from M 534 by Richard, additions put on, 
and store kept here by him. Fred Erkhart lived here 
when he had blacksmith shop at M 579. 

570. Miss Laura Taylor. Built by her father, Richard, about 
1850. 

571. James Rolfe. Built by Henry Newton, 1860. 

572. Herbert French. Built by Wm. Taylor about 1880. 
Fitted for grocery store. Mrs. Hattie Edwards sold to 
W. P. Clark, who had store for a short time, then sold to 
present owner. 



414 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

573. Old Benaiah Gordon homestead; recently owned by 
Charles Nichols. The wooden part is very old, one of 
seven houses in this village in 1832. Benaiah built the 
brick part about 1835. His father may have been 
brought up in the old house. John Taylor bought of 
Gordon. He sold to his son, James, he to Wm. Taylor, 
at the settlement of whose estate it was bought by Chas. 
Nichols. Cut, p. 416. 

574. Mrs. Eliphalet Coburn. Built by Matthew Paul about 
1853. Wm. Taylor later owned, sold to Geo. A. Smith, 
now of Methuen, who lived here, then sold to Daniel 
Taylor, he to Coburn. Cut, p. 444. 

575. No. 4 schoolhouse. Built, 1863. Cut, p. 217. 

576. Two-tenement block owned by Levi Taylor. Built by 
Daniel Taylor about 1888. 

577. Vacant store, previously occupied by Fred S. Webster. 
Built by Nathan Smith about 8 yrs. ago. 

578. Vacant building, formerly store and postoffice, about 8 
yrs. ago. This was the ell of the building which stood 
on the corner, moved to Main St., is now M 82. 

579. Site of blacksmith shop. Richard Taylor moved an old 
shanty here. Fred Erkhart was the smith, later Milt 
Kelley. Burned after a short time. 

580. Methodist Episcopal Church. Built 1836, one story, af- 
terwards raised and vestry built below. Cut, p. 137. 

581. Henry P. Taylor's store. Built 1900, after the former 
building had burned in 1898. The first building was 
erected by John Taylor about 1840. The store was con- 
ducted by him, then by Chas. Austin, M. H. Taylor, Wm. 
G. Crowell, Daniel Taylor, John Austin, Nathaniel Paul, 
Matthew Paul, George and Henry Taylor. The business 
since the new store was built has been in the hands of the 
present proprietor. The property is owned by Mrs. M. 
H. Taylor. Cut, p. 137. 

582. Site of three tenement block of Mrs. M. H. Taylor, 
burned 1898. Built by John Taylor, 1851. 

583. Two-tenement house owned by Mrs. M. H. Taylor. Built 
by John Taylor, 1846. 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 415 

584. Henry P. Taylor. Built by Chas. Austin, 1856. Bought 
by John Taylor about 1862. Now owned by Mrs. M. H. 
Taylor. 

585. Tenement house of Mrs. M. H. Taylor. Built by Henry 
Newton, 1848. Bought by John Taylor about 1859. 

586. Ebenezer Duston. Built by Isaiah Newell, about 1865. 
Sold to present owner at auction after Newell's death. 
Cut, p. 433. 

587. Daniel Taylor house. Built by Isaiah Newell about 
1844. Isaac Hastings once owned. Now the property 
of Levi "W. Taylor. 

588. Levi Taylor house. Built by his father, Daniel, about 
1875. 

589. Mrs. Edmund Simons. Built by John Taylor for tene- 
ment, about 1855. Several lived here after he sold to 
Burns. There was an old house in the rear (not on 
map). Jonathan Pattee lived there about 1825; Wash- 
ington Gordon's father lived there later; Nat Paul about 
1850. Finally torn down by John Taylor. Just south 
of this was an ancient cellar in 1832 ; nothing is known 
about it. 

590. Site of blacksmith shop, built here by John Taylor when 
he built the first brick mill. Later moved to its present 
location across the street, M 595. Taylor sold to Burns. 

591. Lewis Hall. There was a wheelwright shop built here 
by Livingston. Wm. Taylor bought and made into a 
house. Hall bought about 10 or 15 yrs. ago. 

592. Beckford house. Moved from near M 533 before 1840. 
Formerly a blacksmith shop of one room ; gradually 
added to till present size was reached. 

593. Site of mill of Henry S. Beckford after 1840, when he 
failed at Wheeler's mill. There was a very old mill 
here in 1830, where cotton batting was made, later stock- 
ings. The idea that there was ever a considerable indus- 
try here is erroneous ; there is not sufficient water power 
available for any large scale operations. 

594. Fred Rolf. Formerly the old Parsonage ; an old house 
even 80 yrs. ago. 



416 HISTORY OP SALEM. 

595. Blacksmith shop ; moved from across street, M 590. 

596. M. E. Parsonage. Built, 1841, by society. Now occu- 
pied by Rev. Henry Candler. 

597. John P. Atwood. Built by Mrs. Caverly (great-aunt of 
Atwood) about 1862. 

598. John P. Atwood homestead. Built about 1840 by his 
grandfather, John, whose wife said she earned the money 
to buy the bricks by braiding hats. Cut, p. 420. 

599. Site of old "Bill" Rowell place. No buildings have been 
here since about 1825. 

600. Site of the Ebenezer Duston farm and homestead, later 
owned by his son, Ebenezer, Jr. Built by Ebenezer 's 
father, David. Burned in 1902; occupied at the time 
by Carlton "Whitney, owned by his brother. Cut, p. 425. 

601. "William Meloon. Built by James Crossley about 30 yrs. 
ago. Sold to Ebenezer Duston. 

602. Julius Strauch. Built by Geo. Goodhue 30 yrs or so ago. 

603. Adeline Mirick. An old house ; Wm. Johnson kept tav- 
ern here, sold in 1827 to Abner Mirick, who continued 
the business. 

604. Site of blacksmith shop. It stood just at the entrance 
to the lane, and disappeared over 90 yrs. ago. Samuel 
Chase, brother of Simeon, was the smith. 

605. Charles Head. Built by him about 13 yrs. ago, on the 
cellar of old house built before 1770 by Samuel Chase ; 
Simeon was born in it. The site was unimproved after 
the old house disappeared, perhaps 60 yrs. ago, until 
Head built. 

606. Luther Chase. Built by him perhaps 15 yrs. ago, on site 
of old house built about 80 yrs. ago. 

607. Charles Head house. Probably 100 yrs. old; built by 
John and Benj. Clendenin, who lived here. 

608. Site of Goodwin & Chase's store. Stood only a year or 
so, before 1900, then burned. 

609. Site of blacksmith shop; stood nearly opposite "Wilson's, 
close to river. 

610. J. Henry "Wilson. Very old house. David Bailey, father 
of Stephen, kept store here 80 yrs. ago. It was said that 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 417 

his will contained a legacy to the school district which 
was never collected. Back of the house near the brook 
were the potash works of Clendenin, formerly owned by 
a Dow. 

611. Site of William Clendenin 's sawmill. It was torn 
down about 50 yrs. ago. 

612. Herbert Parker. Built probably by Wm. Clendenin, 
who lived here. Later Nat Paul lived in it. Parker 
bought in 1894. 

613. Site of gristmill of John and Benjamin Clendenin. John 
Taylor bought the property, together with all the land 
from his mill to Island Pond, about 1860. Nat Paul ran 
the gristmill for a time, then Taylor tore it down. In 
1865 the shoddy mill was erected on the same site. From 
the bell on this mill the Corner derived its name. See 
cut, p. 296. This burned April 29, 1875. 

614. Site of John Thompson's store. Later conducted by Col. 
Richard Bailey. Thompson had postoffice here in 1837. 
Bailey sold a good deal of liquor while he was here. The 
building now stands just east, M 615. 

615. John Chamberlain Palmer. Formerly stood at M 614 
and was store. Obadiah Duston sold to Nat Paul, he to 
Palmer about 1890. 

616. Site of cider mill of Edmund Adams, about 80 yrs. ago. 
It stood beside the road just on the crest of the hill. 

617. Site of John Thompson place. He bought the farm 
from Edmund Adams, who lived in the old house in the 
rear. He then built this house, perhaps 1835, and sold 
the old house. Later Col. Richard Bailey bought the 
property and lived here. The house burned about 1890. 
The old house had been the tavern of James Dow, and 
this hill was called Dow's Hill. John H. Dunlap bought 
the house and moved to M 618. Both cellars can still be 
seen, that of the later house being very indicative of the 
excellence of this site for a residence. 

618. Hattie Dunlap place. Formerly stood in rear of M 617 
and was Dow's tavern, later residence of Edmund Adams. 
Moved here by John H. Dunlap about 1840 ( ?). 

28 



418 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

619. John H. T. Dunlap. House and shop, built here by him. 

620. George Hastings place. Built 65 yrs. ago by Seth Pat- 
tee; sold to John Dunlap, then to Nancy (Brown) Tib- 
betts, mother of Mrs. Geo. Hastings. 

621. Shoeshop of George Pattee. 

622. George Pattee. Built by him, 1865. 

623. Sewall Campbell. Still under course of construction. 

624. Clarence E. Eowell. Built by John Dearborn about 50 
yrs. ago; sold to John Pinkham. J. C. Palmer bought 
about 15 yrs. ago, then sold to Geo. Hastings. 

625. Seth M. Pattee. Lieut. Thomas Dow had a tavern here 
a century and a quarter ago. Also a Copp, Aaron ( ?) 
lived here. J. H. T. Dunlap at one time occupied. The 
old house was burned and new built shortly afterwards, 
about 1902. Cut, p. 417. 

626. Ed. Atkins. Built, 1850, by David Duston, Jr. He sold 
to Washington Gordon, father of Geo., who lived here 
till 1905. 

627. No. 3 schoolhouse. Built about 45 yrs. ago. The old 
building stood at the turn of the road south of the Daniel 
Taylor place, M 630, on west side. It was torn down. 

628. Daniel Hall place. The Hall house was torn down by 
Daniel Taylor and the present one built about 1860, on 
the same cellar. 

629. This site mark should be about 20 rods south of M 630, 
where the old schoolhouse stood. 

630. George H. Twombly. Built 1855 by Daniel Taylor, on 
cellar of the old James Taylor house, which he had built 
about 1800. Cut, p. 16. 

631. Jonathan Pattee's Cave. He had a house in these woods 
70 yrs. ago ; took the town paupers before the town farm 
was bought. This is a wild but beautiful spot among 
rough boulders and soft pines, about which the most 
wierd and fantastic tale might be woven. There are sev- 
eral caves still intact, which the owner used for storage 
purposes. 

632. Stephen Shannon. Built by Joseph Taylor about 1800. 
He had three sons, each of whom settled in the neighbor- 



KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 419 

hood; Enoch remained here on the homestead; Daniel 
went to his Uncle James ' place, M 630 ; Asa settled on the 
old Clement place, M 639. Enoch's daughters later 
owned the homestead; one of them is Mrs. Shannon. 
Just east near the turn in the road formerly stood a 
brickyard. Cut, p. 421. 

633. David W. Felch. The original Matthew Taylor place, 
one of the oldest houses now standing in Salem. He 
came here from Londonderry. Joseph Taylor was born 
here about 1780, and his father, Matthew, was born in 
1746. We think the house must have been built in the 
decade preceding the Revolution, since we have not the 
exact date of Matthew's settlement in Salem. After the 
death of Enoch the place was sold to Ebenezer Duston, 
who sold to the present owner. Cut, p. 48. 

634. Hannah Brickett place. (In Atkinson.) 

635. Isaac Hale place. (In Atkinson.) 

636. North Graveyard. First burial date known is 1750. ' 

637. Jesse 0. Bailey place. The Ordway girls lived at M 647, 
and wove linen goods by hand. Bailey went there to 
live; they gave him this piece of land, upon which he 
built the house from an old shop moved from the Brickett 
place. 

638'. George Duston. Built by him 12 or 15 yrs. ago. 

639. David Duston. Very old house, built by Clement, who 
lived here many years. In the rear was an old log house, 
also built by the Clements. This road was called Clem- 
ent Road after 1830. Jos. Taylor owned, and left to his 
son, Asa. Sold to David Duston, thence to David, Jr. 
On this farm was a field with an old cellar, where a Par- 
ker used to live ; also a part near the road, just east 
with another cellar, called the Townsend place. (Neither 
of these is on the map.) 

640. Marble place. Samuel and Jonathan Marble owned the 
farm in Colonial days. Now vacant, owned by D. Dus- 
ton. Joel Ames lived here, 1857; Samuel Clark, Jesse 
Ball and others have occupied it. Very old house. 

641. Davis house. 



420 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

642. Site of building formerly a store on Woodman's Hill, 
near M 550, kept by David Duston's mother. Was 
moved here ; then Moses Woodbury occupied ; also Geo. 
Renew (said to have weighed 316 lbs.), who worked for 
Moores Bailey. 

643. Site of Moores Bailey house, stood at the crest of the hill 
by the river; cellar still there. The house was torn 
down by J. W. Wheeler about 15 yrs. ago. Last occu- 
pied by Benj. Smith. 

644. James Cullen. Built by Nathan Currier; Isaac Hale 
helped with the work. The Bean family afterwards lived 
here. Michael Cullen, father of James, bought of 0. 
Duston in 1871. This was originally the Dudley Cur- 
rier homestead ; the old house stood exactly on the town 
line, and the road followed the line straight from the 
base of Providence Hill to Hale 's bridge, instead of bend- 
ing at these two points as it now does. This would make 
the present house nearly in the original road, or just 
west of it. 

645. John King. Built by Isaac Alexander, son of James, 
who formerly owned Taylor's mill. He was a mason, 
who claimed to have worked on every lighthouse in 
U. S. His step-daughter sold to Colby, he to Fuller. 
Present owner bought in 1905. Came from Quebec to 
Lawrence when 15 yrs. old. The state line makes a 
sharp angle, the vortex of which is marked by a hole 
drilled in the back doorstep of this house. 

646. (Map error; no location here.) 

647. Jesse Ordway place. He lived here after the Revolu- 
tion. Had two daughters. Jesse 0. Bailey named for 
him. David Bailey lived here after Ordway, then Oba- 
diah Duston 2d. The Ordways were a very old family 
in Salem. The place is now owned by Jacob Blotner. 

648. Site of Daniel Pettingill house. Built for Warren Web- 
ster, who once lived here. Burned many years ago. 

649. Site of Jonathan Rowell house. Formerly owned by 
father of Jesse 0. Bailey, who built it. He was a black- 
smith and had a shop nearby. 




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KEY TO HISTORICAL MAP. 421 

650. Site of John C. Downing place. Built out of an old 
carpenter's shop which stood at corner near Daniel Mer- 
rill's, M 445. Downing was a remarkably polite man. 
Just across the street stood the house of Aaron Copp, the 
Revolutionary soldier. (Not on map.) 

651. Site of Brickett Bradley place. This is part of the orig- 
inal Colonel Atkinson farm. John Ober lived here dur- 
ing the first years of the town. Later Nathan Currier 
occupied and worked the farm for the Atkinsons "at 
halves ; ' ' here he made money enough to build the Cullen 
house. Ben Wilson in 1832 ran the farm in the same 
way. Bradley bought it, and repaired the buildings. 
Sold to Chas. Merrill. Finally burned. 

652. Site of the Brickett ( ?) place. Jo Bedel lived here; af- 
terwards a Wheeler, perhaps about 1800. The cellar is 
in the woods just north of the Captain brook. 

653. Site of Johnson's sawmill on the brook. There was af- 
terwards a gristmill here, sold in 1765 by Edward Carl- 
ton to Samuel Clement. The stones of the old dam now 
lie scattered or heaped in the bed of the brook. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Biographical and Genealogical. 

It would be manifestly impossible to include within one vol- 
ume the genealogies of all the families of Salem, much less when 
that volume must also present the history of the town. The 
older families, as Kelly, Woodbury, Kimball, Messer, Merrill, 
"Webster, Hall, Gordon, Wheeler, Duston, and a score of others, 
would each require a book in itself ; and it would be unfair to 
give these space to the exclusion of other smaller or more recent 
families. Moreover, the author believes there are two very suf- 
ficient reasons why a full genealogical treatment in a look of 
this sort is undesirable and out of place : first, because the infor- 
mation which it would contain must be obtained almost entirely 
from the family in question, to whom, therefore, this book would 
not be a source of information ; and, second, because people out- 
side of that particular family would care little about its geneal- 
ogy. On the other hand, any new facts which can be given to 
aid people in making their genealogies should by all means be 
furnished. And they are included here in a form that does not 
leave out any family in Salem, taken from the vital statistics of 
the town records. All of the births, marriages and deaths re- 
corded on the town books are given, with also a supplementary 
collection taken from unofficial sources. Any material enclosed 
in parentheses has been obtained from some source other than 
the record where it occurs, and is here inserted for completeness. 
For example, the maiden names of mothers in the birth tables 
may have been taken from the marriage records or from private 
papers, etc., and are not official, although believed to be correct. 
The entire lot has been arranged in three tables, as follows: 

Table I includes only town records. 

Table II is made up partly of records taken from the town 
books which were overlooked in the arrangement of Table I. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 423 

All such are preceded by an asterisk (*). The rest of this table 
is taken from various unofficial sources, including cemetery in- 
scriptions, family Bibles and private papers. 

Table III consists entirely of deaths of former residents who 
have been brought to Salem for burial within the past seven 
years. 

These three tables do not furnish the complete records of 
every family, for two reasons : much of the genealogy of these 
families was made outside of Salem ; and on the other hand 
the town records are not in any sense complete. However, we 
believe that by combining the three tables most of the required 
data may be found. All of the entries in Table II are not from 
Salem sources; many of these births, deaths and marriages 
occurred out of town, but have been introduced to make the 
information more complete. 

Duplicate names with different birth dates in the same family 
indicate the death of the first child of that name. A question 
mark following any item indicates that that particular portion 
of the record is obscure or was found to conflict with some 
other good authority. 

There is one fact in connection with these records which will 
come as a great surprise to many of the families of the town: 
that is in regard to the spelling of names. The author has been 
told very positively that there is no connection between two 
branches of a family which vary in the spelling of the name. 
This applies of course to the old families, as matters of spelling 
were not then of any great moment; and to three families in 
particular. The Kelly and Kelley families are one, coming from 
old Abiel Kelly whose son Richard's name is spelled both ways 
in the records. The Cluff family of today was Clough in the 
early days of the town. It was, however, sometimes pronounced 
and even spelled Clow, but only in rare instances. Also Saun- 
ders was originally Sanders, descended from the same line as 
Henry Sanders, one of the fathers of Salem. We cannot say 
that these names were not spelled in one way or another before 
the family came from England. The matter of spelling is 
unimportant — the blood is identical. Other names which come 
under this explanation are Cressy and Cressey, Clark and 



424 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Clarke, Larry and Larey, Astin and Austin; also Merrill and 
Kimball are spelled in a few cases with only one 1. In regard 
to the Rawlings, Rawlens, Rollins and Rollings families, the 
data is not sufficient for the author to determine whether more 
than one unit is represented ; they are probably the same. Sarah 
is used interchangeably for Sally, and Mary for Polly, Bette 
for Betty; also Anna, Nanna, and Ann in some instances. 

A few brief biographical sketches have been prepared. Much 
other information of this nature will be found incidental to the 
subjects of the several chapters. 

WILLIAM GREENLEAF CROWELL was born in Methuen, 
Mass., December 21, 1816. Through both of his parents he came 
from Revolutionary soldiers, his maternal grandfather having 
fought at Bunker Hill. He was a nephew of Benjamin Green- 
leaf, the mathematician, whom he resembled in his interest in 
all educational matters. "When very young Mr. Crowell learned 
the tanning and currying trade, but failing health compelled 
him to abandon it in 1840, at which time he came to Salem. In 
1846 he married Melinda I. Armstrong, at the old David Corliss 
homestead, where she was born and where they lived until his 
death. For some years he engaged in farming, which he gave 
up for the wood and lumber business. In 1860 he became inter- 
ested in the old Clement sawmill at Millville, which he soon 
after purchased and then operated until 1885. He then sold it 
and used portable sawmills. 

In town affairs Mr. Crowell was ever active and watchful for 
the best interests of the town, pursuing a policy of economy and 
clear business administration. He served for many years as 
selectman, tax collector, representative, and also held many pri- 
vate positions of trust. Always interested in the schools, he 
worked to raise them to a high standard. He was the leader in 
founding the Public Library, being one of the Trustees. When 
the History of the town was first projected, he it was who worked 
so enthusiastically to have it undertaken. He was also very 
prominent in the work of the church, making himself especially 
useful in the musical interests. When a young man he taught 
both vocal and instrumental music, being considered proficient 
with the violin, 'cello and bass viol. He was chorister at the 




MRS. SMILEY SMITH. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 425 

Congregational church for about twenty-five years. "When the 
W. C. T. U. of Salem was organized he was one of the first 
honorary members. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Crowell: a son, 
John C, now in Maine, and two daughters, Mary Elizabeth, de- 
ceased, and Mrs. K. M. McLaughlin. Mr. Crowell died at the 
old homestead January 28, 1897. Resolutions on his death were 
adopted at the annual town meeting in March, 1897, and also by 
Salem Grange, of which he was a charter member. 

JAMES AYER, son of James and Joanna (Wheeler) Ayer, 
was born in Haverhill, Mass., Jan. 26, 1830. When he was about 
seven years old the family moved to Boston, where James at- 
tended school until he was twelve years of age. He then came 
to Salem, living with his brother John on the Amos Wheeler 
farm on Zion's Hill. In 1843 he was apprenticed to learn the 
woolen manufacture, at Taylor's mill. The next year he began 
his apprenticeship with N. H. Paul in the shoe business. This 
work he followed, in various branches, until about 1885. Mr. 
Ayer married in 1852 Laura Ann Messer, daughter of John A. 
Messer; they had no children. He was a charter member of 
Spicket Lodge of Masons, also of Granite Colony of Pilgrim 
Fathers; he also was a member of the Provident Mutual Relief 
Association of Concord. In politics he was a Democrat after 
the first few years of his maturity, when he voted with the 
Whigs. For many years he was prominent in town affairs, hav- 
ing been postmaster at the Depot under Cleveland, and town 
clerk for several years. He was for some time a member of the 
Democratic state committee and candidate for senator in 1873. 
Possessed of a keen memory, he was deeply interested in his- 
torical affairs and well posted on the genealogies of many of the 
old families of the town. He was a member of the history com- 
mittee for the town, holding the place at the time of his death. 
He was a contributor to several newspapers and periodicals, 
furnishing many interesting sketches of Salem and its people. 
His death came Nov. 23, 1905, in his seventy-sixth year. 

WALLACE W. COLE was born in Boxford, Mass., Nov. 19, 
1855. When eighteen years of age he went to Amesbury to 
learn the trade of carriage making, after which he was engaged 



426 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

in Andover as a carpenter for five years. In 1876 he came to 
Salem, where by his straightforward principles he soon made 
many friends. He has had nearly every office with which his 
fellow townsmen could honor him, including six terms as select- 
man, two in the legislature, and several years as a trustee of 
the public library. Besides this he is one of the seven senators 
whom Salem has furnished the state, and was chosen a member 
of the constitutional convention in 1900. 

After coming to Salem Mr. Cole engaged for a time in the 
building trade, but in 1897 went into the meat business with 
Charles A. Dow, who soon after retired. In 1902 he sold the 
business and turned his attention to wood and lumber, in which 
he has been connected with I. C. Brown of Methuen. He was 
married to Ida D. Colby December 28, 1878. They have eight 
children, three of whom are married. 

ISAAC WOODBURY, son of Asa and Sarah (Thorn) Wood- 
bury, was born in Salem August 11, 1822. After his gradua- 
tion from South Newmarket Academy he was employed in a 
dry goods house in Boston, until his father's death called him 
to manage the farm. At one time he was engaged in raising 
Devon cattle, selling fine-blooded stock in several neighboring 
states. His farm was of about one hundred and fifty acres and 
under a high state of cultivation. This he sold two years ago 
to the New Hampshire Breeders' Club. 

Mr. Woodbury's first marriage was to Caroline W. Parker of 
Cohasset, by whom his children were born. They were six in 
number: Albert A., Isaac F., Sarah E., wife of John W. Hall 
of Methuen, Mary C, wife of Charles E. Austin of Somerville, 
Mass., Charles H., and John P. His second marriage was to 
Martha C. Smith of Putney, Vt. The first and last of his chil- 
dren are dead. In politics he is a Republican and always inter- 
ested in the welfare of the town. He has been selectman for 
three years, representative for two, and county commissioner for 
three. He is a member of the Methodist church of more than 
sixty years' standing, having been actively interested in pro- 
moting the cause of temperance. He has been class leader and 
superintendent of Sunday school for many years. Since sell- 
ing his farm he has occupied his brother's place at the Depot 
village. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 427 

FRANK D. WILSON was born February 15, 1858, in Salem. 
His parents were Aaron G. and Abby (Bailey) Wilson. He re- 
mained on his father's farm until twenty-one years of age, when 
he left home and engaged as a clerk in a store. This line of busi- 
ness he followed until 1890, part of the time being in Jbusiness 
for himself in Salem, five years as a clerk in the grocery store of 
F. C. Wilson & Co., of Haverhill, and three years here with F. 
C. Buxton under the firm name of Buxton & Wilson. In May, 
1905, the present firm of Wilson Bros, was established, the broth- 
ers turning their attention from the milk and farming business 
which had occupied them of recent years. 

Mr. Wilson married December 25, 1886, Etta L. Foster. He 
has been very strong in politics, a follower of the Republican 
standard. He has been selectman for eight terms, and was rep- 
resentative in 1895-96. Besides these he has held many other 
town offices, always receiving very flattering votes and filling the 
offices with credit to himself and to the town. 

ALVAH HALL was born in Salem, December 3, 1805, and 
died here February 16, 1885. He was the son of Jonathan and 
Susanna (Kimball) Hall, and grandson of Joshua, who is said 
to have been a Revolutionary soldier, although his name does 
not appear on the muster rolls at Concord. Mr. Hall married 
Nancy Coburn of Pelham. He was a carpenter and contractor, 
and worked at his trade throughout his life. 

CLIFTON SENTER HALL, third son of Prescott C. and 
Mary A. (McCurdy) Hall, was born in Salem, April 22, 1870. 
He attended the public schools of Boston, and later graduated 
from Bryant & Stratton Commercial College. In 1893 he en- 
tered the wholesale paper house of John Carter & Co., and is now 
a stock owner and buyer in the company. He married October 
31, 1906, Elizabeth Scott Carter of Roxbury, Mass. He is a past 
master of Spicket Lodge, A. F. and A. M. 

JOHN TAYLOR was born in England, March 25, 1788. He 
married Mary Hutchinson, who was born in England, May 12, 
1788, and died in Concord, N. H., March 16, 1866. He came to 
America with his family in a sailing vessel. After a voyage of 
six weeks, they landed in May, 1827, at a wharf near Haymarket 
Square, in Boston. 



428 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

He was a weaver, and learning of a flannel mill in Andover, 
Mass., he left his family in Boston, took the stage in search of an 
opportunity to work. Upon being told that his help was needed, 
he immediately returned to Boston and moved his family to An- 
dover. The three oldest children, Ann, John, Jr., and James, 
found employment in the same mill with their father, which was 
run by Howarth Bros. In the fall of 1827, he secured a position 
as weaver in Sutton 's Mill, North Andover. From here he moved 
to Lynnfield, and in June, 1833, formed a partnership with 
Edward Pranker in North Salem. After a short time Mr. Taylor 
bought Mr. Pranker 's interest and built a large brick mill on the 
site of the one which now stands in ruins. This he operated un- 
til September, 1863, when he retired, selling out his interest to 
Richard Taylor, Charles Austin and M. H. Taylor, who con- 
tinued the business under the firm name of Taylor, Austin & Co. 

He was very successful in his business enterprises, leaving at 
his death quite a large sum. He died in North Salem, N. H., 
January 2, 1864, leaving three sons and five daughters. Most 
of the houses in North Salem village were built by him and his 
family. 

DANIEL A. ABBOTT was born in Salem, December 26, 1864. 
He is the son of Nathan G. and Ellen (Ayer) Abbott. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the public schools of his native town, 
Pinkerton Academy of Derry, and East Maine Conference Sem- 
inary at Bucksport, Me. 

Mr. Abbott attends the Methodist Church at the Center. He 
is a member of Canobie Lodge, 406, N. E. 0. P., and of Salem 
Grange. His occupation is shoemaking, in the factory of T. M. 
Russ, where he has been for a number of years. In town affairs 
he is always interested and active, having served in various ca- 
pacities — auditor, supervisor, clerk of school district, and trus- 
tee of the public library. He is now the town clerk, in which 
capacity he has served for several years. In 1903-04 he was 
representative to the General Court. 

He married Hattie F. Austin, daughter of Orlow and Isabelle 
(Merrill) Austin, September 18, 1889. They have one son, 
Arthur, born October 9, 1891. 

BENJAMIN R. WHEELER, son of John R. and Susan (Dix) 
Wheeler, was born in Salem, April 20, 1840. He early took up 




MRS. WALTER B. KELLEY. 




DANIEL A. ABBOTT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 429 

the shoe business, at which he worked with his father until the 
call for troops in 1861. He enlisted as a private in the First 
Regiment, serving until the expiration of its three months' term. 
Returning home he at once enlisted in the Fourth Regiment, 
being mustered as sergeant. The next year he was made second 
lieutenant of Company F ; was wounded May 16, '64, at the bat- 
tle of Drewry's Bluff, Va. In the fall of '64 he was appointed 
first lieutenant of Company B, and then captain of Company H. 
He was not mustered into these last two ranks, however, as he 
was discharged November 5. The morning after his discharge 
he was, though technically a private citizen, called upon to take 
charge of the regiment, in the absence of the commanding officer. 
The troops did not go into action, however, as the enemy did not 
make the threatened attack. 

After the war he engaged in the manufacture of shoes with 
his father. He married Laura H. Vincent, by whom he had one 
daughter, Blanche, now Mrs. Frederick E. Woodbury. Mr. 
Wheeler has been a leader in town affairs for many years, has 
served as selectman for four terms, was representative in 1899- 
1900, and senator in 1883-84. For more than forty years he 
has been almost continuously in town, county or state office. He 
is a member of the G. A. R., Masons, and Grange. 

WILLIAM B. KIMBALL, son of John and Maria Kimball, 
was born in Salem, February 3, 1837. For more than fifty years 
he remained in the town, then moved to Haverhill. His educa- 
tion was obtained at Hopkinton Academy and Tilton Seminary. 
He was selectman from 1874 to '77, and representative in '77- '78. 
He always held a strong interest in town affairs, maintaining 
that the right way was ever the best. From boyhood he was a 
member of the Congregational Church, in later years being one 
of the trustees. In this capacity his sound judgment and warm 
sympathy were alike a boon to pastor and people. In 1867, De- 
cember 5, he married Eliza A. Bailey of Salem. Four children 
were born to them, two sons and two daughters. He died at his 
home in West Haverhill, March 10, 1904. 

EBENEZER DUSTON, a member of the old Duston family 
of Salem and Haverhill, was born in Salem, May 22, 1844, of 
Ebenezer and Charlotte (Gage) Duston. His early life was 



430 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

spent in attending the district school and working on the home- 
stead farm. Here he lived with his elder sister, Miss Charlotte 
A. Duston, until her death in 1896. In April of the next year 
he sold his place and moved to his present residence. He was 
married December 1, 1897, to Sarah Crossley, who lived only 
until March 23, 1899. Mr. Duston was elected selectman in 
1903, but owing to poor health was compelled to resign at once. 
He was again elected in 1907 and is now a member of the board. 

GEORGE W. THOM, son of Isaac and Lois Ann (Whittier) 
Thorn, was born at the old Thorn homestead at Thorn's Corner, 
November 25, 1848. He was about six years old when his father 
moved to the place on Main Street, where he still resides. On 
February 7, 1872, he married Mary G. Austin, who died in 1893. 
They had one son, Joseph I., who is now in Boston, and one 
daughter, Flora A., who lives at home. Mr. Thorn is a building 
contractor, and erected many of the houses at the Depot as well 
as in other parts of the town. He has been selectman one year 
and a member of the school board five years. For thirty-five 
years he has been a member of the Methodist Church, Pleasant 
Street, having served on the building committee when the build- 
ing was erected. He is a member of the Grange and Pilgrims, 
in which lodges he has held many offices, being at the present 
time in the governor's chair of the latter. 

WILLIS DU BOIS PULVER was born in Luzerne, N. Y., 
June 24. 1871. His paternal ancestors were among the Dutch 
settlers of Columbia County, N. Y., in 1662; on his mother's side 
he comes from the French Huguenots, who came to New York 
in 1634. After leaving Glens Falls Academy he went to the 
University of Maryland in the city of Baltimore, where he was 
graduated in 1898 with the degree LL. B. He practised in Balti- 
more, then for three years in Oakland County, Mich. In 1904 
he went to Nashua and from there to Salem in 1906. Here he 
was instrumental in organizing the Board of Trade, of which he 
is secretary. He is also president and general manager of the 
Salem Lighting and Power Co. 

CLARENCE PRESCOTT HALL, oldest son of Prescott C. 
and Mary A. (McCurdy) Hall, was born in Salem, December 
19, 1861. His education, begun in the schools of his native 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 431 

town, was pursued in the Boston schools after his parents moved 
to that city. He graduated from Bryant & Stratton Commercial 
School, after which he was associated with his father in the boot 
and shoe business. Afterwards he went to Kansas City, Mo., and 
entered the banking business. He is now living with his mother 
at the family residence in Salem. 

LEVI W. TAYLOR, son of Daniel and Ruth M. (Duston) 
Taylor, was born at North Salem on March 20, 1845. He was 
educated at Atkinson Academy and Tilton Seminary, after 
which he remained for a short time with his father on the farm. 
After a year in the employ of Flanders Bros., the dry goods 
dealers at Haverhill, he went into business in 1865 at the general 
store at North Salem. This he continued until 1895, with the 
exception of three years when John Austin owned the business. 
During these three years Mr. Taylor was engaged in the shoddy 
business with Thomas Duston. He has been engaged in the 
lumber business, buying timber lots and using portable sawmills. 
In politics he has been a Democrat, having held the office of 
selectman for two years, representative in 1874-75, and post- 
master for ten years under Cleveland's and McKinley's admin- 
istrations. He is a member of Spicket Lodge, No. 85, of Masons. 

About six years ago Mr. Taylor moved from Salem to Me- 
thuen, but has still retained his interest in the affairs of his 
native town. He is one of the owners of the Atlas Manufac- 
turing Co., and a director of the Methuen National Bank. He 
has managed the settlement of estates in this vicinity for many 
years, and recently turned his attention to speculative interests 
in Cuba. He married first Lizzie Brown of Windham. After 
her death he married Ellen L. Taylor, October 4, 1877. They 
have one daughter, Mabel, who married Edward S. Phillips. 

DR. LEWIS F. SOULE was born in Phillips, Me., September 
4, 1869. His parents were Samuel W. and Caroline (Sweetser) 
Soule. His education was continued in Westbrook Seminary 
after he left the public schools. Here he fitted for Bowdoin 
College, where he graduated from the academic department in 
1895 and from the Medical School in 1898. After a course of 
professional study at Harvard University, he came to Salem, 
where his practice has steadily increased. He has been on the 



432 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Board of Health for several years and selectman two years. Dr. 
Soule is a member of Spicket Lodge of Masons, the New England 
Order of Protection, and the Grange. He is one of the charter 
members of the Board of Trade and is keenly alive to the inter- 
ests and action of the town. 

STEPHEN BAILEY, the third son and seventh child of 
David and Abiah (Hazeltine) Bailey, was born February 23, 
1820, in the northern part of the town at what is known as 
"Heathen" or "Cowbell" Corner. Before he was a year old 
he moved with his parents to the south part of the town, to the 
place known as Willow Clump Farm. Here he resided for the 
remainder of his life. 

Equipped with a district school education, he began early in 
life to learn the trade of a shoemaker, for which he showed con- 
siderable aptitude and a great liking. He was not apprenticed, 
but worked with his father until he was able to perform every 
part of the work of making a shoe. This business he followed 
until about 1875, when he turned his attention to the cultivation 
of his farm, which was one of the best in town. 

In 1845 he married Miss Hannah M. Cluff, also a native of 
Salem. To them two children, a son and a daughter, were born, 
both of whom are living. His married life extended over a 
period of more than fifty-six years, his widow still surviving. 

In his political belief he was a staunch Democrat. His relig- 
ious affiliations were with the Universalist Church, although he 
was not a member. He had held several town offices, and in 
1874 was a member of the state legislature. Spicket Lodge of 
Masons counted him among its members. In business he was 
uniformly successful, and had the confidence and respect of his 
fellow-citizens. Honest in purpose, upright in character, he 
passed to the higher life in the eighty-third year of his age. 

ARTHUR COBURN HALL was born in Salem, February 28, 
1863, second son of Prescott C. and Mary A. (McCurdy) Hall. 
He attended the public schools until his parents moved to Bos- 
ton, after which he graduated from the grammar and high 
schools of that city, and from Bryant & Stratton's Commercial 
School. From 1886 to 1892 he was engaged in the shoe business, 
both manufacturing and jobbing. He then became associated 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 433 

with John Carter & Co., Inc., of Boston, wholesale paper dealers, 
as assistant treasurer, and still continues in this company. 

He married Lucretia Esther Ward of Roxbury, Mass., June 
14, 1893. Two children have been born, Marion, August 20, 
1894, and Ralph Macurdy, February 27, 1902, who died January 
3, 1903. They resided in Roxbury until 1898, when they re- 
moved to Salem, having built the residence on Policy Street. 

JOHN TAYLOR, the son of John and Mary (Hutchinson) 
Taylor, was born in Bury, Eng., August 26, 1816. He came 
with his parents to this country in 1827, landing in Boston after 
a voyage of six weeks. His first home in America was in An- 
dover, Mass., and he followed the family fortunes through sev- 
eral changes of location, till his father settled in North Salem 
in 1833. In 1847 he bought the old mill where now the so-called 
"Wheeler mill is located, and manufactured frockings and yarn 
till 1856, when he moved to Haverhill, Mass. In 1865 he and his 
brother, James, bought an interest in the Franklin (N. H.) mills, 
and he moved to that town. He conducted the mill several 
years, and then retired from active business. He represented 
the town of Franklin in the Legislature in 1872-73. He was 
one of the incorporators of the savings bank and also of the 
national bank of that town, serving on the boards till his removal 
to Salem in 1888, where he resided till his death in 1901. He 
was a man of excellent judgment, conservative, just, helpful, a 
despiser of sham, a safe counsellor, a worthy citizen. 

LEVI WOODBURY was born in Salem, October 17, 1834, 
son of Israel and Eliza J. Woodbury. Was educated in the 
public schools and worked on his father's farm until he was 
eighteen, when he learned the shoemaker's trade and followed 
his trade until he was married in 1861 to Miss Nancy J. 
Wheeler, daughter of David and Sarah Wheeler of Atkinson. 
He was then appointed station agent and telegraph operator at 
Windham, now Windham Junction, and associated himself with 
Messrs. Barret & Thomas of Nashua and Mr. Geo. W. Hughes 
of Windham in the lumber business, and for six years following 
conducted a very successful business. At the end of six years, 
having cleaned up all the available wood and timber land con- 
tiguous to the station, he resigned his position as station agent 

29 



434 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

and went to Washington, D. C, to learn the hotel business. En- 
gaged himself as steward at the St. James Hotel and held that 
position for two years, when he leased a restaurant in the then 
new Masonic Temple and did a thriving business until the sum- 
mer of 1873. At that time he leased the St. James Hotel, refitted 
and refurnished it throughout and opened it on the European 
plan on the 2d of November, the same year, and has been the 
proprietor ever since. In 1890 Mr. Woodbury conceived the 
idea of putting a first-class line of steamboats on the Potomac 
River and through his efforts and those of his bosom friend, Mr. 
John Callahan, who was a steamboat constructor and transpor- 
tation man, accomplished what Mr. Woodbury is very proud of, 
having now six big staunch steamboats and doing a fine business 
between Washington, Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Newport 
News, Va. 

Mr. Woodbury is president of the company. In 1895 he pur- 
chased the old homestead where he was born, repaired the build- 
ing and built a cottage by the lake where he spends his summers. 
He has taken a great interest in improving his land, building 
stone fences, etc., and in connection with Mr. Edward F. Searles 
and Mr. C. H. Tenney, in macadamizing the Turnpike from the 
Massachusetts line to Windham line, N. H. He has recently re- 
paired the First Baptist Church in Salem in memory of his 
father and mother, who were some of the first who established 
the church. His father, Israel Woodbury, was a well-known and 
respected citizen of Salem, a mason by trade and later a con- 
tractor and builder, having built the first block on Essex Street, 
Lawrence, known as Merchants' Row, for Mr. David Gleason of 
Methuen, Mass. He died in 1879, aged 73 years. His widow, 
Eliza, survived him until 1901, when she passed away at the age 
of ninety, known far and near as one of the sweetest and dearest 
of souls, loved and respected by all. 

Mr. Levi Woodbury is the eldest of five children, having 
two sisters and two brothers. His eldest sister, Mary, married 
Mr. Lewis Saunders of Salem and died in 1862 ; his brother, 
Charles 0. Woodbury, who lives in Washington and is connected 
with the St. James Hotel, has two children, a son and daughter ; 
his brother, Milton G., is with him in Washington, as is also his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 435 

sister, Mrs. A. C. Foster. Mr. Woodbury is a Master Mason, 
still holding true to his old lodge the St. Mark, No. 44, of Derry, 
New Hampshire, a Knights Templar, a Shriner, and also belongs 
to the Scottish Rite. Mr. Woodbury has been a director in the 
Central National Bank of Washington for twenty years, is a 
charter member of the Board of Trade, and has always taken a 
keen interest in the improvements of the national capital. 

GEORGE C. GORDON, son of Earl C, was born May 27, 
1835, in Salem, where he has held his residence ever since, with 
the exception of the past ten years of temporary residence in 
Boston. He enlisted in Company K of the Fifteenth Regiment, 
New Hampshire Volunteers, in September, 1862, and remained 
in the service until the close of the war. He was a member of 
the board of selectmen for the three years following, '65- '68, and 
representative in 1876-77. In 1880 he was appointed inspector 
of customs at the port of Boston, a position which he still holds. 

LESTER WALLACE HALL, the youngest son of Prescott 
C. and Mary A. (McCurdy) Hall, was born in Boston, Mass., 
September 7, 1874. He attended the public schools in Boston, 
graduating from the English High School. He was graduated 
from Boston University with the degree of bachelor of laws in 
1897, and subsequently admitted to the Suffolk bar and also to 
the New Hampshire bar. His law practice began in the office 
of Senator W. W. Towle of Boston. Since that time he has been 
in practice in Boston and Salem. In politics he is a Democrat, 
being a member of the State Democratic Committee. He is also 
a member of Spicket Lodge, No. 85, of Freemasons. 

HOWARD LEE GORDON, son of George C. and Hannah M. 
(Woodbury) Gordon, was born in Salem, August 3, 1872. He is 
a life-long resident of the town, having been engaged in the in- 
surance and real estate business. He is one of the charter mem- 
bers of the Board of Trade. In 1903-04 he represented the 
town in the State Legislature. He married Laura L. Smith of 
Salem, December 6, 1893, to whom two children, Earl and Doro- 
thy, have been born. Mr. Gordon's office is in the Rockingham 
Hotel building, of which he is one of the owners. 

GEORGE WOODBURY was born February 1, 1819, of Asa 
and Sarah (Thorn) Woodbury. He received his education at 



436 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

South Newmarket Academy. Most of his life was passed in the 
hotel business and farming. He married Mary K. Emerson, Oc- 
tober 7, 1841. Their only child, Charles S., lived only about a 
year. In 1891 they celebrated their golden wedding. Both were 
loyal workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church, he being one 
of its founders. She died October 11, 1897, leaving him alone 
for nearly eight years. His death came May 31, 1905, in his 
eighty-seventh year. 

DANIEL TAYLOR, son of Joseph and Hannah (Currier) 
Taylor, was born in the north part of the town on February 11, 
1815. His life was spent largely in the lumber business and 
farming. For a time he made a specialty of getting out ship 
timber, sawing the logs at Hale's mill, so called, near the Atkin- 
son-Salem line. On October 7, 1841, he married Ruth M. Duston, 
a descendant of Hannah Duston of Indian fame. They had two 
sons, Joseph Hiram and Levi W., the former of whom is not now 
living. Mr. Taylor was a good business man, possessed of ex- 
cellent judgment and exhibiting to a marked degree the sterling 
traits of character of his ancestors. During his lifetime his in- 
dustry and frugality enabled him to accumulate a considerable 
property. He died April 20, 1901, at the advanced age of 
eighty-six years. 

JOHN REDDINGTON WHEELER, son of Benjamin and 
Dorcas (Rowell) Wheeler, was born in Goffstown, January 17, 
1812, but came to Salem in his infancy. Early in life he learned 
the shoemaker's trade, in which he attained the proficiency which 
gave him his later success as a manufacturer. This business he 
followed for more than forty years. In 1864 he took his son, 
Benj. R., as a partner in the business. They built the first brick 
factory which stood on the present site of the T. M. Russ estab- 
lishment. Here they did a large business, having previously be- 
come well established in the wooden shop on the same site. 

Mr. Wheeler married on July 4, 1836, Susan Dix of Reading, 
Mass. Three children, all now living in Salem, were born to 
them, Mrs. Lizzie D. Langley, Benj. R., and Mrs. Susan E. Free- 
man. His home life exemplified the same high principles that 
dominated his public works. He was a leader in the First M. E. 
Church, and also a member of Spicket Lodge of Masons. 




RESIDENCE OF LEVI WOODBURY. (M 472) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 437 

In political and civil matters he had strong opinions, always 
adhering rigidly to right and justice. He served the town in 
many capacities, as selectman, postmaster, representative, and in 
many other town offices. His interest was strong in the old 
militia, in which he rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel. The 
disbanding of the troops was the only obstacle to his further 
advancement. He retained his mental and physical vigor to the 
last, quitting his toils August 24, 1896, aged eighty-four years. 

OLIVER GORDON WOODBURY, son of Nathaniel and Abi- 
gail (Gordon) Woodbury, was born in Salem, December 26, 1820. 
He worked his way through Atkinson Academy, and then through 
West Newton Academy, showing the great pluck which he pos- 
sessed. He then taught school, being later very successful as 
one of the teachers in Newton High School, and afterwards in a 
seminary. One of the greatest interests of his life was the advo- 
cation of temperance. He was the means of inaugurating much 
of the temperance agitation of the middle of the last century. 
On June 2, 1846, he married Mary Augusta Kingsbury of Need- 
ham, Mass., of whom his eleven children, five daughters and six 
sons, were born. 

After twenty-five years of teaching, Mr. Woodbury entered the 
Universalist ministry, preaching for a like period of time. 
Among his stations were Barnstable, Mass., Hartland, Vt., and 
Westmoreland and Chesterfield, N. H. During this time he was 
also superintendent of schools in Hartland and Chesterfield. He 
has also held that position in his native town. He died in Salem, 
December 14, 1897, nearly seventy-seven years old. 

EDWIN G. CATE, son of William H. and Mary M. (Smith) 
Cate, was born in Meriden, N. H., February 28, 1860. He was 
reared in that town, attended the public schools, and was after- 
ward sent to New Hampton Institute to finish his education. 
On June 10, 1890, he was married to Miss Ivanette Shaw. They 
remained at Meriden until 1902, when they came to Salem and 
bought the farm known as the Thomas Duston place, in North 
Salem. Mr. Cate is by trade a carwright, having been employed 
for some years by the Boston & Maine Railroad. This he has 
abandoned, however, finding the care of his farm more conducive 
to health than was his former work. He was last March elected 
a member of the selectmen, which office he now holds. 



438 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

JOHN WOODBURY was born on the old family homestead 
known as the Capt. Richard Woodbury place, November 25, 1835, 
of Richard and Betsey (Emerson) Woodbury. Most of his life 
was spent here in the farming occupation. On May 20, 1865, he 
married Hannah J. Kimball. Their two sons, Charles T. and 
Chester T., are graduates of Dartmouth College, the former in 
the class of 1895 and the latter in 1907. Charles is now principal 
of the high school in Fitchburg. Mr. Woodbury was a firm 
adherent to truth and justice, ever ready to support the cause of 
right irrespective of party. He died January 8, 1898. 

ISAAC THOM was born in December, 1813, at the old home- 
stead at Thorn's Corner. He was the son of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth (Cross) Thorn. In his occupation as a farmer he was uni- 
formly successful, combining good judgment with untiring in- 
dustry. He married, March 30, 1842, Lois A. Whittier, who 
lived five years longer than he, dying in 1897. He had been a 
charter member of the First M. E. Society, and later when the 
Pleasant Street organization was instituted he was one of the 
founders. He was overseer of the poor at the time the new 
buildings at the town farm were erected, also tax collector the 
same year, 1857. His only lodge affiliation was with the Good 
Templars when they existed here. Mr. Thorn died April 14, 
1892, at the age of seventy-eight years. 

FRANK DALE DAVIS was born in Boston, Mass., May 21, 
1859, of Thomas P. and Sarah F. (Atwood) Davis. After grad- 
uation from the old Brimmer school he entered the employ of 
the Nashua Iron and Steel Co., at their Boston office. In 1882, 
owing to failing health, he was advised to quit the work of the 
office and seek a country location. In August of that year he 
purchased of Loren E. Bailey the farm where he now resides. 
He was in the employ of P. C. Hall & Son, shoe manufacturers, 
from 1884 until they sold to Crain, Hall & Co., still continuing 
in his former position. Subsequently he was employed by J. E. 
Farrar & Co., and E. Roswell, both shoe firms, then for three 
years with Alfred E. Goodwin, the contractor, four and one-half 
years in the grocery store of J. C. Carey, and for the past nine 
years in the sole leather department of F. P. Woodbury & Co.'s 
shoe factory. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 439 

In 1881 he married Miss Luella E. Welch of Lowell. They 
have two daughters: Sarah Josephen, who was graduated from 
Methuen High School in 1902 and married, in 1906, Prof. John 
William Crowell, class of 1901, Dartmouth College ; Marion 
Pauline, also a graduate of Methuen High School in the class 
of 1907. 

Mr. Davis is a Republican, and has held many offices in town. 
When the Australian ballot was first introduced he was elected 
moderator and served for eight years. In 1906 he again received 
the nomination, by both parties, and was elected. He has been 
selectman, member of the school board and school district clerk 
both before and after the adoption of the town district system. 
He was formerly a Congregationalist, but owing to the distance 
of the church from his home, he united in 1892 with the First 
Baptist Church at Salem Depot, of which he has been one of the 
most active members. He has held the offices of chorister, church 
clerk and superintendent of Sunday school. He is a member 
of Granite Colony, U. O. P. F., and of Canobie Lodge, N. E. O. P. 

VLADIMIR NICHOLAS SIKORSKY, the son of a Russian 
nobleman, was born at Kieff, June 14, 1867. Here he grad- 
uated from the gymnasium (corresponding to our high school) 
in 1889, and in January, 1890, entered the Imperial University 
at Moscow, from the medical college of which he was graduated 
October 18, 1895, with the degree of M. D. For the next two 
years he took a special course in France and Germany, coming 
to this country about ten years ago. Here he was married in 
Manchester, N. H., November 20, 1897, to Maria Kuezeh-Igna- 
tieff of Russia. They have two daughters, Lucy Nina, born Jan- 
uary 13, 1899, and Jeanette Vera, born February 9, 1901. They 
have resided in Salem six years. 

Dr. Sikorsky is a member of the New Hampshire Medical 
Society, American Medical Association, Gynaecological Society of 
Boston, and associate physician and surgeon at Elliot Hospital at 
Manchester. He is medical examiner for three insurance com- 
panies, the New York Mutual, Connecticut Mutual and John 
Hancock. He is a member of Salem Grange, Granite Colony, 
U. O. P. F., and also a thirty-second degree Mason, Knight Tern- 



440 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

plar of St. George's Commandery, and Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine of North America, at Concord, N. H. 

PRESCOTT COBURN HALL was born in Salem, March 16, 
1834, of Alvah and Nancy (Coburn) Hall. He was educated in 
the Salem schools and Tilton Seminary. At the age of eighteen 
he entered upon his business career as a clerk in a store in Hav- 
erhill. After some five years he returned to Salem in 1856 and 
began in a small way the manufacture of shoes at the Depot. 
His unusual success induced him to remain in the business, 
which he constantly enlarged until 1888, when he sold out. At 
the time of his retirement he owned four large factories, one each 
in Salem, Natick, Lynn, and Topsfield, employing about 1,500 
hands. His business at the Depot did much to build up this 
village, and many of the residences here were built by him, either 
directly or indirectly. 

In 1859 Mr. Hall married Mary Ann McCurdy, daughter of 
Daniel McCurdy of Dunbarton, N. H. Of their union four sons 
were born, Clarence P., Arthur C, Clifton S., and Lester Wal- 
lace. In 1863 he built the residence at the corner of Main and 
Pleasant streets, where the family have since resided. He died 
June 9, 1906. 

FRED C. BUXTON, son of Joseph and Rhoda Ann (Kimball) 
Buxton, was born in Salem, June 12, 1859. His education was 
received at Atkinson Academy and Pinkerton Academy in Derry. 
He has been prominent in affairs of the town, though not always 
seeking office. When only twenty-seven years of age he was 
elected selectman. He is now serving his third term as post- 
master, having held the position more than sixteen years. For 
the same length of time he has been agent for the American 
Express Company, and was treasurer of the Salem Water Com- 
pany from its organization. For many years he has been estab- 
lished at the Depot in the newspaper, periodical and stationery 
trade. Mr. Buxton is prominent in fraternal circles, being a 
member of the Masons, Odd Fellows, Pilgrim Fathers, and 
Grange. He married Etta S. Tilton, November 27, 1887. They 
have one son, Harold T., born February 22, 1896. 

MATTHEW H. TAYLOR, one of the substantial residents of 
Salem, was born in Derry, N. H., November 29, 1829. He is the 




KIMBALL FOUR GENERATIONS. 
Charles Allen. Charles Franklin. 

Charles Lester. Charles. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 441 

son of Matthew and Louisa (Paul) Taylor, both natives of Derry. 
He is a direct descendant of Matthew Taylor, who, with his wife, 
Janet, came from Londonderry, Ireland, and settled in London- 
derry (now that part of Derry, N. H., known as Derry Dock) 
in 1722. From Matthew the descent comes through William, 
Adam, Matthew to Matthew H. His father, Matthew, a mason 
by trade, married in 1828. In 1846 they moved to Salem, N. H., 
where he died in August, 1877. His mother, Louisa Paul, 
daughter of Matthew and Mary (Morrison) Paul, lived in Salem 
until 1891, when she went to Haverhill, Mass., where she died 
in November, 1901, at the advanced age of ninety-five years and 
five months. She was a descendant of the Paul and Morrison 
families. 

Matthew H. Taylor has resided in Salem since 1846. As he 
has always been in active business life under the harsh discipline 
of experience, his education has been one of progress. When 
about twenty-five years of age he started in a mercantile business 
at North Salem. He continued in this for several years ; then, 
in company with Richard Taylor and Charles Austin, forming 
the firm of Taylor, Austin & Co., engaged in the manufacture of 
flannels at North Salem. After a short time Richard Taylor 
withdrew and the business continued under the name of Austin 
& Taylor. Affairs were conducted very successfully for seven 
years, when the mill was totally destroyed by fire. Mr. Taylor 
bought Mr. Austin's interest and rebuilt the mill, when it was 
again totally destroyed by fire in October, 1878. For a number 
of years Mr. Taylor was engaged in the wood and lumber busi- 
ness. In September, 1884, he started a grocery and provision 
store with three of his sons, in Lawrence, Mass., under the name 
of Taylor & Co. 

Mr. Taylor has filled many positions of public trust and re- 
sponsibility. He has served four years as selectman, during 
two of which he was chairman of the board. He represented the 
town in the State Legislature of 1867-68 and of 1878-79. In 
1871 and 1872 he served as state senator from the second district, 
and was town moderator for fifteen years. He was a member of 
the school board for eleven years, and for four years chairman of 
the board. In politics he is a Republican. Since 1854 he has 
been identified with the Masonic order at Haverhill, Mass. 



442 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

Mr. Taylor married Ellen, daughter of John Taylor, a woolen 
manufacturer of Salem. She was born in Lynnfield, Mass., Jan- 
uary 20, 1832. They have had twelve children, all born in 
Salem on the old homestead — Ellen Louisa, born September 7, 
1854, married, October 4, 1877, Levi W. Taylor of Salem, one 
daughter, Mabel, resides in Methuen, Mass. ; John Harvey, born 
July 20, 1856, married, December 23, 1880, Emma J. Adams of 
Derry, resides in Lawrence, Mass., overseer for Lawrence Gas 
Co.; Thomas Matthew, born September 6, 1857, married, Feb- 
uary 9, 1892, Josephine L. Beeley of Lawrence, one daughter, 
Vivian, resides in Lawrence, Mass., meat and provision dealer; 
Mary Ann, born August 27, 1859, married, November 30, 1887, 
John S. Crosby of Methuen, resides in North Andover, carpen- 
ter; Charles Martin, born November 29, 1860, married, Feb- 
ruary 5, 1890, Sarah J. Blood of Derry, children, Marion F., 
Hazel, Charles M., Jr. Marion died at the age of four years ; re- 
sides in Lawrence, Mass., engaged in the wholesale and retail 
grocery business; George Webster, born January 6, 1863, mar- 
ried, April 11, 1889, Laura M. Eaton of Seabrook, resided in 
North Salem, engaged in the grocery business, died December 
31, 1898 ; Henry Paul, born October 29, 1864, married, August 
8, 1900, Jennie A. Palmer of Derry, resides in North Salem, en- 
gaged in the grocery business and everything usually found in a 
first-class country store ; Cora Frances, born September 16, 1866, 
resides in Methuen, teacher in Boston; Laura Etta, born Feb- 
ruary 3, 1869, married, October 22, 1902, George E. Hussey of 
Andover, resides in Andover, Mass., assistant superintendent of 
public works, died April 22, 1907 ; Eva Belle, born January 3, 
1872, married, March 10, 1894, Harry B. Hamilton of Boston, 
children, Mildred H., Leon B., resides in Lawrence, Mass. ; Effie 
Gertrude, born January 29, 1875, married, July 5, 1905, Edgar 
Gilbert of Methuen, have one daughter, Maud ; Fred Lee, born 
April 4, 1878, resides in Methuen, is manager for his brother, 
C. M. Taylor, in his Broadway grocery store. 

CHARLES KIMBALL ; the four generations were all born in 
Salem, on the old homestead farm on Pleasant Street-, Charles, 
April 18, 1822; Charles F., March 15, 1853; Charles A., July 17, 
1876, and Gharles L., August 6, 1902. They have been success- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. 443 

fill farmers, keeping well abreast of the times. In affairs of the 
town they have always manifested a keen interest. Charles was 
identified with the militia, being an officer. Charles F. and 
Charles A. were both educated at Tilton Seminary. They have 
been in the grain business since 1901. Two years ago they 
erected the large grain elevator and storehouse near the Depot, 
where the business has been largely increased. 

Charles F. was a member of the school board for several years, 
collector of taxes, and a member of the committee to purchase 
the Salem water works. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

Charles A. and his grandfather have both served the town as 
selectmen, the former being a member of the present board. 

THOMAS DUSTON was born in Salem, August 1, 1841. He 
was a descendant of Thomas and Hannah (Emerson) Duston, 
prominent in the Indian troubles in Haverhill, his father being 
Obadiah, and his mother Ann (Whitaker) Duston. He was 
educated at Atkinson Academy and retained throughout his life 
a fondness for books and general reading. He was engaged in 
the manufacture of stockings, mittens and gloves, as well as fine 
yarn, operating in his mill near his home in North Salem. He 
was also interested in farming and lumber, and for a time in the 
undertaking business. In 1866, on January 25, he married 
Agusta M. Griffin, who still resides in Hampstead where she has 
been for about a year. Mr. Duston was a Democrat, serving 
as selectman, tax collector and representative. He served as 
postmaster at North Salem from his appointment in 1893 until 
his death. As a member of Masonic and Grange lodges he was 
very enthusiastic, having served as chaplain and treasurer in the 
latter organization. He was president of the Squamscot Savings 
Bank at Exeter. His death occurred September 1, 1894. 

JAMES EWINS, son of James and Mary (Bean) Ewins, was 
born in Salem, N. H., on November 25, 1860. His attention was 
early in life turned to the business of the store, as his grand- 
father and father preceded him in the grocery business in which 
he is now established. With the single exception of the five 
years from 1878 to '83, during which time N. G. Abbott con- 
ducted this store, it has been in the family since his grandfather, 



444 HISTORY OF SALEM. 

» 

who was here fifty-three years. In 1887, on March 9, he married 
Mary F. Bodwell, by whom his daughter, Dorothy, was born. 
Mrs. Ewins died in 1890. In 1894 he married Ida E. Willey 
of Lawrence. He has been town clerk since 1893, with the ex- 
ception of one year, and was in the Legislature in 1897-98. 
He is a member of Spicket Lodge of Masons. 







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LEVI W. TAYLOR. 



Table I, Town Records: Births. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Oct. 


9, 1891 . 


A.bbott, Arthur H. 


Daniel A. 


Hattie F. Austin 


Dec. 


26, 1864 


44 


Daniel A. 


Nathan G. 


Martha Ellen (Ayer) 


Aug. 


30, 1899 


fl 


Gladys B. 


Daniel A. 


Hattie F. Austin 


Mar. 


7, 1862 


14 


James N. 


Samuel K. 


Lucretia 


Feb. 


13, 1829 


Adams, Amos 


Edmund 


Elisabeth 


July 


10, 1824 


ii 


Benjamin 


u 


ii 


Dec. 


26, 1854 


ti 


Charles Willard 


Tristram C. 


Prudence B. (Foster) 


Oct. 


23, 1874 


tt 


Clarence F. 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 


22, 1819 


tt 


Edmund, Jr . 


Edmund 


Elisabeth 


July 


25, 1858 


a 


Edwin Augustus 


Tristram C. 


Prudence B. (Foster) 


Jan. 


15, 1815 


a 


Eliza 


Edmund 


Elisabeth 


Oct. 


19, 1862 


44 


Frank E. 


Tristram C. 


Prudence B. (Foster) 


Dec. 


26, 1854 


44 


George Millard 


ii 


it 


Feb. 24, 1809 


il 


Hannah T. 


Edmund 


Elisabeth 


Dec. 


19, 1810 


41 


John K. 


ii 


it 


July 


8, 1817 


41 


Margaret 


ii 


ii 


Oct. 


10, 1812 


44 


Mary 


ii 


ii 


Oct. 


5,1832 


it 


Tristram Currier 


Barzilla 


Susan Currier 


Aug. 


12, 1899 


tt 


Willard James 


George M. 


Mary Lydle 


May 


7, 1851 


it 


F. 


John 


Mariah 


Jan. 


26, 1860 


H 


(Twins) F. 


Tristram C. 


Prudence B. (Foster) 


Oct. 


19, 1862 


44 




ii 


it 


Feb. 


20, 1891 


44 




Charles A. 


Alice E. Merrill 


Jan. 


25, 1872 


Alburtus, George 


C. M. 


Lucy 


June 


7, 1776 


Allen, 


, Ann 


John 


Anna 


Aug. 


12, 1799 


44 


Anna 


David 


Jemima 


Nov. 


6, 1769 


44 


David 


John 


Anna 


Dec. 


27, 1801 


44 


tt 


David 


Jemima 


June 


19, 1896 


(4 


Eva Louise 


Charles 


Eva L. Kempton 


Aug. 


28, 1809 


it 


Harriet Kimball 


David 


Jemima 


May 


5, 1806 


44 


Hiram 


John 


Rachel 


Dec. 


6, 1780 


14 


John 


ii 


Anna 


Dec. 


5, 1803 


44 


»t 


ii 


Rachel 


May 


13, 1813 


(4 


" T. Gilman 


David 


Jemima 


Oct. 


28, 1771 


44 


Lydia 


John 


Anna 


May 


2, 1801 


44 


CI 


ii 


Rachel 


Mar. 


17, 1751 


44 


Mary 


David 


Susanna 


Mar. 


6, 1804 


44 


" Boys 


it 


Jemima 


Oct. 


17, 1782 


44 


Ruth 


John 


Anna 


June 15,? 1807 


44 


Samuel B. 


• i 


Rachel 


April 


1 22, 1778 


44 


Sarah 


it 


Anna 


May 


16, 1807 


44 


u 


it 


Rachel 


Dec. 


20, 1773 


41 


Susanna 


ii 


Anna 


Jan. 


26, 1900 


44 


Walter Norris 


Fred W. 


Ida B. Norris 


July 


4, 1739 


Ame, 


Sarah 






Mar. 


29, 1868 


Anderson, George E. 


George 


Mary J. (Kelley) 


Dec. 


23, 1874 


M. 


ii 


Dora 


June 


28, 1741 


Annis, 1 Abigail 


Abraham 


Elisabeth 


Sept 


. 11, 1759 


44 


Abraham 


ii 


Mary Hilton 


May 


28, 1837 


44 


Elisabeth 


ii 


Elisabeth 


May 


30, 1753 


44 


Hannah 


ii 


Mary Hilton 


May 


24, 1751 


(1 


Joseph 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 


30, 1757 


" 


Lydia 


ti 


ii 


Sept 


.21,? 1749 


it 


Mary 


ii 


ii 


Sept 


. 1, 1755 


44 


Ruth 


ii 


•i 


Aug, 


, 19, 1749 


44 


Sarah 


ti 


ii 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Give 


n Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


May 28, 1739 


Annis 


, Stephen 


Abraham 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 4, 1901 


Arlitt 


, Aubert 


Paul William 


Alice Kezia Widdop 


Aug. 6, 1902 


it 


Edward August 


Herman G. 


Christina L. Flockerzi 


Sept. 26, 1899 


a 


Gustave W. 


tt 


it 


Sept. 15, 1896 


t* 


Louise Elizabeth 


tt 


it 


Aug. 14, 1883 


Armstrong, Harvard Milton 


Joseph W. 


Sarah Jordon 


Nov. 2, 1769 


Asten 


, Azubah 


Abiel, Jr. 


Joanna 


Aug. 26, 1790 


i< 


1 1 


John 


Patience 


July 25, 1797 


u 


Betsey 


Peter 


Meriam Corning 


April 8, 1775 


ff 


David 


Nathan 


Sarah 


Feb. 18, 1783 


ft 


Dolly 


John 


Patience 


Nov. 13, 1761 


II 


Hannah 


Nathan 


Sarah 


Jan. 20, 1781 


tf 


tt 


John 


Patience 


June 21, 1765 


ft 


Joanna 


Abiel, Jr 


Joanna 


July 25, 1778 


f f 


John 


John 


Patience 


Aug. 17, 1767 


It 


Lydia 


Abiel, Jr. 


Joanna 


Oct. 16, 1787 


II 


Lydia 


John 


Patience 


Aug. 10, 1769 


II 


Molly 


Nathan 


Sarah 


June 15, 1791 


II 


Moody 


Peter 


Meriam Corning 


Jan. 4, 1756 


II 


Moses 


• Nathan 


Sarah 


May 12, 1794 


If 


Nathan 


Peter 


Meriam Corning 


July 29, 1785 


II 


Nathaniel 


1 1 


ii 


Feb. 26, 1758 


II 


Peter 


Nathan ' 


Sarah 


April 25, 1785 


II 


Rebecca 


John 


Patience 


Mar. 18, 1788 


II 


Samuel 


Peter 


Meriam Corning 


Nov. 15, 1766 


It 


Sarah 


Nathan 


Sarah 


Mar. 10, 1804 


Astens, Mary Tucker 


Moses 


Mehitable 


Feb. 3, 1801 


it 


Moses 


it 


1 1 


Nov. 30, 1906 


Atkins, Charles S. 


Edward A. 


Grace M. Bailey 


Dec. 27, 1904 


it 


Merrill Benjamin 


ti 


it 


April 10, 1860 


Atwood, Almira A. 


Jeremiah C. 


Mary (Adams) 


May 30, 1882 


tt 


Irving S. 


John P. 


E. J. Coburn 


Sept. 15, 1906 


it 


Lawrence Coburn 


Ernest Parker 


Martha J. Dietzel 


Jan. 24, 1897 


ii 


F. 


John P. 


Etta J. Coburn. 


Aug. 19, 1842 


Austin, Abby Caroline 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


Sept. 8, 1743 


it 


Abial 


Abial 


Sarah 


Sept. 15, 1792 


it 


tt 


John 


Patience 


Feb. 16, 1729-30 


" 


Abigail 


Abial 


Sarah 


Oct. 26, 1859 


ii 


Alice 


George N. 


Sarah A. C. (Smith) 


Oct. 19, 1794 


ii 


Amos 


David 


Molly 


Aug. 2, 1808 


ii 


Asa Stevens 


Abial 


Ann (Stevens) 


Sept. 13, 1800 


it 


Benjamin 


John 


Patience 


June 18, 1886 


ii 


Wade 


Elmer F. 


Alice Rowell 


Oct. 2, 1800 


ii 


Cordelia 


Abial 


Ann (Stevens) 


Feb. 9, 1804 


it 


David Minott 


David 


Molly 


May 29, 1740 


ii 


Dolly 


Abial 


Sarah 


April 23, 1873 


it 


Eben A. 


John 


Josephine Duston 


July 26, 1856 


ii 


Edward Woodbury 


George N. 


Sarah A. C. (Smith) 


Nov. 16, 1848 


ii 


Elmer M. 


John W. 


Susan 


Oct. 6, 1849 


tt 


George Allison 


George N. 


Sarah A. C. (Smith) 


April 19, 1826 


ti 


Riley 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


May 22, 1853 


it 


Georgianna 


George N. 


Sarah A. C. (Smith) 


Aug. 21, 1824 


it 


Gilbert Lafayette 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


July 6, 1819 


it 


Granville Bailey 


Thaddeus 


Rhoda 


May 1, 1728 


it 


Hannah 


Abial 


Sarah 


Aug. 29, 1888 


ii 


Harry E. 


Elmer F. 


Alice M. Rowell 



TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS : BIRTHS. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Jan. 25, 1869 


Austir. 


i, Hattie F. 


Orlow 


Bell M. (Merrill) 


April 7,1845 


ii 


Henrietta Estelle 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


Mar. 6, 1797 


ii 


Jane Little 


John 


Patience 


Aug. 25, 1751 


ii 


John 


Abial 


Sarah 


Sept. 27, 1802 


ii 


" Worthy 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Sept. 29, 1837 


ii 


Julia Mehitable 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


May 9, 1808 


ii 


Laura 


David 


Molly 


Sept. 4, 1840 


41 


Louisa Josephine 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


Feb. 20, 1838 


l( 


Lucinda 


Asa S. 


Hannah P. (Hackett) 


Aug. 20, 1749 


II 


Lydia 


Abial 


Sarah 


Feb. 24, 1860 


II 


(MahlonE.) 


Charles 


Mary (Taylor) 


April 27, 1803 


II 


Maribe 


Abial 


Ann (Stevens) 


Feb.22, 1735-6 


II 


Mary 


Abial 


Sarah 


Aug. 10, 1828 


II 


" Jane 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


May 16, 1904 


II 


Maud Everline 


Albert M. 


Orrie L. Felch 


Mar. 23, 1733 


II 


Nathan 


Abial 


Sarah 


Aug. 29, 1810 


It 


" Nye 


David 


Molly 


Nov. 12, 1836 


II 


Orlando 


Asa S. 


Hannah P. (Hackett) 


Sept. 7, 1842 


II 


Orlo 


it 


it it 


Aug. 27, 1748 


II 


Rachel 


Abial 


Sarah 


Feb. 23, 1795 


II 


ii 


John 


Patience 


Oct. 15, 1834 


II 


Ruth Helen 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


Mar. 27, 1805 


II 


Sally Fletcher 


Abial 


Ann Stevens 


Oct. 24, 1737 


II 


Sarah 


Abial 


Sarah 


Oct. 17, 1832 


II 


" Ann 


Moses, Jr. 


Mary (Coburn) 


Dec. 14, 1804 


II 


Sudrick Randal 


John, Jr. 


ti ii 


Dec. 10, 1798 


II 


Thaddeus 


David 


Molly 


June 30, 1800 


II 


Welthy Pattee 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Mar. 3, 1870 


II 


F. 


Orlow 


Isabell M. Merrill 


July 4, 1880 


II 




John 


Jose Duston 


June 15, 1S76 


Averill Carrie 


Mason 


Nellie (Halles) 


Feb. 21, 1874 


ii 


Sadie 


Samuel J. 


Christina 


Jan. 31, 1741 


Ayer, 


Abigail 


John 


Mary 


June 9, 1896 


" 


Alice Marian 


Charles H. 


Emma Haigh 


Dec. 13, 1850 


ti 


Benjamin Francis 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 


Sept. 9, 1851 


(1 


Charles Forest 


John 


Esther E. (Perkins) 


Oct. 29, 1846 


it 


" Henry 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 


June 9, 1896 


tt 


" Wesley 


Charles H. 


Emma Haigh 


Sept. 19,1876 


CI 


Cora E. 


Benjamin F. 


Helena M. (Stott) 


Sept. 7, 1767 


(1 


Ebenezer 


Timothy 


Elisabeth 


Feb. 9, 1786 


tt 


it 


William 


Mary 


Sept. 28, 1753 


tt 


Elisabeth 


Ebenezer 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 28, 1782 


I< 


Elizabeth 


William 


Mary 


Sept. 4, 1870 


It 


Ella M. 


Andrew 


Sarah A. Kelly 


Aug. 14, 1855 


It 


Esther Mehitable 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 


July 23, 1848 


It 


Frank Perkins 


John 


Esther E. (Perkins) 


Mar. 21, 1853 


II 


Hannah Maria 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 


Feb. 22, 1790 


it 


Jesse 


William 


Mary 


Jan. 31, 1822 


II 


ii 


Ebenezer 


Martha 


May 28, 1746 


II 


John 


John 


Mary 


Aug. 7, 1897 


tt 


Leroy R. 


William H. 


Etta M. Payne 


Jan. 12, 1893 


it 


Lois M. 


it 


it 


Aug. 17, 1780 


»t 


Mary 


William 


Mary 


Dec. 9, 1782 


ti 


" 


Samuel 


Anna (Currier) 


Aug. 9, 1902 


it 


" Beulah 


Charles H. 


Emma Haigh 


Dec. 20, 1843 


it 


" Elisabeth 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Dec. 7, 1844 


Ayer, 


Martha Ellen 


William B. 


Paulina G. (Kelly) 


April- 5, 1860 


it 


Melinda L. 


it 


it 


Jan. 23, 1864 


ii 


Milton S. 


ii 


ii 


Oct. 12, 1857 


ii 


Paulina Clymelia 


it 


it 


Nov. 3, 1758 


ii 


Philip 


Ebenezer 


Elizabeth 


April 20, 1820 


ii 


ti 


ti 


Martha 


Oct 27, 1906 


ii 


Ralph Herbert 


Milton Howard 


Eva L. Berry 


Dec. 22, 1897 


ii 


Ruth Elizabeth 


Charles H. 


Emma Haigh 


Sept. 1, 1754 


ii 


Samuel 


Ebenezer 


Elisabeth 


June 6, 1784 


ii 


Sarah 


William 


Mary 


May 17, 1772 


ii 


Susannah 


Isaiah 


Hannah 


May 13, 1788 


i< 


it 


William 


Mary 


Dec. 7, 1742 


ii 


Timothy 


John 


Mary 


Dec. 8, 1899 


it 


Westley B. 


Charles H. 


Emma Haigh 


May 23,1752 


ii 


William 


Ebenezer 


Elisabeth 


Dec. 11, 1818 


ii 


Balch 


ii 


Martha 


Nov. 16, 1862 


ii 


H. 


William B. 


Paulina Q. (Kelly) 


May 11, 1867 


it 


F. 


Andrew A. 


Sarah (A. Kelley) 


Sept. 11, 1S69 


" 




ii 


it 


Sept. 27, 1872 


it 


F. 


ii 


ii 


Aug. 25, 1900 


Azarant M. 


Avagine 


Mary Azarant 


Mar. 20, 1810 


Bailey, Abigail 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


Sept. 9, 1842 


ii 


Adaline Caverley 


Moores 


Ann 


Mar. 11, 1840 


■i 


Almira Webster 


ii 


ti 


June 30, 1824 


it 


Anna 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


Mar. 1, 1904 


ii 


Areline 


Arthur C. 


Helen F. McDermott 


Sept. 9, 1842 


ii 


Caroline Cluff 


Moores 


Ann 


Aug. 2, 1814 


it 


David 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


Mar. 24, 1822 


it 


Elisabeth 


ii 


it it 


June 5, 1837 


ii 


Eliza Atwood 


Moores 


Ann 


May 11,1876 


ii 


Ethelyn M. 


Loren 


Helen M. 


Aug. 20, 1842 


ii 


Frances Ann 


Jesse O. 


Sarah 


Sept. 21, 1839 


ii 


George Washington 


ii 


it 


Sept, 23, 1890 


ii 


Harriet A. 


Elmer G. 


Abby W. Fogg 


Sept. 9, 1874 


ii 


Helen 


Loren E. 


Helen M. Simpson 


Feb. 11, 1883 


ii 


Henry 


ii 


it 


Jan. 18, 1838 


ii 


Isaiah 


Jesse O. 


Sarah 


Oct. 27, 1858 


ii 


James B. 


James W. 


Adaline (Dow) 


Nov. 12, 1843 


ii 


Jane Merrill 


Moores 


Ann 


Aug. 1, 1841 


ii 


John Moores 


ti 


ti 


Sept. 14, 1847 


ii 


Joseph Webster 


it 


it 


April 27, 1881 


•i 


Josie H. 


Loren E. 


Helen M. Bailey 


Sept. 21, 1839 


ii 


Leoye W. 


Jesse O. 




Oct. 8, 1812 


it 


Louisa Ann 


John 


Betsey 


Mar. 26, 1811 


ii 


Madison 


it 


ii 


Dec. 28, 1845 


ii 


Marantha Louise 


Moores 


Ann 


Feb. 8, 1813 


ii 


Mary 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


April 7, 1836 


ii 


Mary Ann 


Moores 


Ann 


July 31, 1809 


ii 


" Jane 


John 


Betsey 


April 11, 1856 


it 


Medora Effel 


Stephen 


Hanna M. (Cluff) 


Feb. 7, 1850 


ii 


Osmon Oleander 


it 


ii 


July 31, 1811 


ti 


Ozias 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


Mar. 3, 1843 


it 


Rebecca Smith 


Jesse O. 




Mar. 1, 1841 


ti 


Rufus Henry 


it 




June 3, 1816 


it 


Sarah 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 







TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. 


Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Dec. 10, 1814 


Bailey 


, ServvallBacheltor(?) John 


Betsey 


Feb. 23, 1820 


f« 


Stephen 


David 


Abiah (Haseltine) 


Mar. 10, 1818 


ft 


Susan 


tt 


it 


Aug. 28, 1845 


ft 


Wallace 


Jesse O. 




May 29, 1851 


II 


M. 


David D. 




Feb. 26, 1874 


u 




Osmond C. 


Abby E. Shute 


Mar. 13, 1747 


Baylej 


-, Aaron 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Jan. 1, 1742 


CI 


Abigail 


tt 


tt 


Mar. 9, 1756 


If 


Amos 


Jonathan 


Martha Clark 


May 13, 1745 


II 


Asa 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Sept. 3, 1776 


II 


Benjamin 


William 


Mary 


Mar. 2, 1789 


II 


Webster 


Dudley 


Martha 


Nov. 22, 1748 


(1 


Cyrus 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Feb. 23, 1788 


II 


ii 


John 


Lydia 


Aug. 30, 1750 


II 


Daniel 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Feb. 10, 1769 


II 


" Tenney 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


Jan. 3, 1770 


II 


Deborah 


Jr. 


Sarah 


June 2, 1781 


II 


Dudley 


John 


Lydia 


July 13, 1785 


II 


it 


Dudley 


Martha 


May 26, 1752 


II 


Elizabeth 


Abner 


Mary 


July 19, 1808 


II 


Eliza Haseltine 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


Jan. 18, 1760 


II 


Hannah 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


Nov. 27, 1765 


II 


Isaac 


Joshua 


Sarah (Dawes) 


Mar. 7, 1790 


II 


Isaiah 


John 


Lydia 


April 26, 1756 


It 


Israel 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Aug. 11, 1765 


II 


it 


Moses 


Elisabeth 


Oct. 19, 1759 


II 


Jesse 


ii 


tt 


Dec. 26, 1810 


II 


" Ordway 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


May 1, 1783 


II 


John 


John 


Lydia 


Dec. 25, 1764 


(1 


Jonathan 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


Aug. 4, 1803 


it 


" Kenney 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


May 27, 1745 


It 


Joseph 


Joshua 


Sarah Dawes 


Sept. 3, 1776 


II 


it 


William 


Mary 


Aug. 1, 1747 


II 


Joshua 


Joshua 


Sarah Dawes 


June 20, 1777 


II 


it 


Jr. 


Mary 


Mar. 17, 1763 


II 


Kezia 


Moses 


Elisabeth 


June 27, 1750 


II 


Lavinia 


Abner 


Mary 


Jan. 26, 1776 


II 


it 


John 


Lydia 


Sept. 16, 1764 


II 


Levi 


Moses 


Elisabeth 


Jan. 6, 1778 


It 


Lydia 


John 


Lydia 


Dec. 31, 1786 


II 


Martha 


Dudley 


Martha 


June 14, 1746 


II 


Mary 


Abner 


Mary 


Jan. 8, 1753 


if 


tt 


Edward 


Elizabeth 


Dee. 4, 1783 


II 


Mehitabel 


Dudley 


Martha 


Jan. 29, 1758 


II 


Molly 


Jonathan 


(Clark) 


Mar. 25, 1785 


tf 


Moores 


John 


Lydia 


Jan. 24, 1772 


II 


Olive 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


April 12, 1773 


II 


Phebe 


John 


Lydia 


Jan. 22, 1776 


II 


Phinehas 


Joshua, Jr. 


Mary 


Jan. 30, 1775 


II 


Rachel 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Sarah 


Decs. 3, 1781 


II 


Robbards 


Dudley 


Martha 


June 3, 1813 


II 


Roxanna 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


Jan. 17, 1820 


(1 


Rufus 


it 


it 


Feb. 8, 1767 


II 


Samuel 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


Dec. 9, 1816 


II 


" Liscomb 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


Mar. 13, 1758 


If 


Sarah 


Abner 


Mary 



6 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


April 16, 1772 


Baylej 


-, Sarah 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Sarah 


Jan. 29, 1774 


It 


ii 


William 


Mary 


Jan. 31, 1758 


if 


Susanna 


Joshua 


Sarah (Dawes) 


Mar. 18, 1763 


ft 


" 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 1, 1780 


11 


Thomas 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Sarah 


Jan. 7, 1762 


it 


Clark 


Jonathan 


Martha (Clark) 


Sept. 28, 1805 


*t 


William 


Phinehas 


Lydia 


Sept. 13, 1906 


Bair, Donald Webb 


Charles A. 


Grace Baker 


Oct. 13, 1823 


Balch, 


Benjamin Wadsworth 


Rev. William 


Sarah 


Dec. 10, 1757 


a 


John 


John 


Mary 


Jan. 9, 1859 


Ball, Harry W. 


Jesse P. 


" B. 


April 25, 1869 


" Mary F. 


it 


ii 


Oct. 21, 1904 


Bancroft, Gertrude Elsie 


Luther Samuel 


Bertha May Nichols 


Feb. 21, 1880 


Barker 


Nathan A. 


Melia L. McClenen 


Dec. 19, 1858 


Barnes 


Joseph 


Laura 


June 22, 1869 


Barrett, William J. 


William J. 


Caroline 


Oct. 14, 1882 


Barstow, Charles N. 


Edward D. 


Cora E. Troy 


Feb. 7, 1888 


ii 


Edward F. 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 15, 1884 


Barteaux, Eva Gertrude 


Judson 


Nellie Tarbox 


May 18, 1856 


Bartlett, David L. 


David 


Sarah E. (Alexander) 


Feb. 21, 1850 


ii 


George Albert 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 4, 1859 


ii 


Herbert F. 


ii 


ii 


May 15, 1879 


it 


Isaac A. 


George A. 


Emma Ordway 


Feb. 5, 1877 


A 




ii 


ti 


Aug. 30, 1902 


Bartley, Irving Dana 


William T. 


Carrie B. Webster 


April 9, 1857 


Batchelder, Alice Estella 


Samuel 


Eliza (Ann Vittum) 


Sept. 27, 1858 


ii 


Mary Etta 


ii 


n 


Dec. 17, 1859 


Bean 




Jesse 


Sarah J. 


Aug. 14, 1862 


Beckford, Nella A. 


William A. 


Mary J. 


June 16, 1749 


Bedel, 


Abiel 


Timothy, Jr. 


Elisabeth 


Oct. 20, 1766 


tt 


Anna 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 22, 1760 


f 1 


Cyrus 


ii 


n 


Mar. 29, 1747 


ft 


Dorothy 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 7, 1747 


tf 


Hannah 


John 


Judith Colbe 


Mar. 30, 1753 


ft 


Hope 


Timothy 


Dorothy 


May 21, 1758 


(f 


Jairus 


ii 


ii 


May 8, 1770 


tl 


Jane 


Joshuah 


Sarah 


Mar. 12, 1752 


ft 


John 


John 


Judith Colbe 


Sept. 24, 1777 


tf 


Joseph 


Joseph 


Sarah 


Sept. 18, 1760 


tf 


Marriam 


Timothy 


Dorothy 


Oct. 6, 1749 


tf 


Martha 


John 


Judith Colbe 


Mar. 15, 1772 


tt 


Mary 


Timothy, Jr. 


Elisabeth 


Aug. 3, 1755 


tt 


ii 


ii 


Dorothy 


May 12, 1764 


tf 


Moody 


it 


Elisabeth 


Sept. 18, 1767 


tt 


Naomi 


Joshua 


Sarah 


Jan. 28, 1743 


tt 


Robert 


John 


Judith Colbe 


Feb. 6, 1763 


tt 


Ruth 


Timothy, Jr. 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 23, 1751 


ft 


Timothy 


it 


ii 


July 8, 1745 


Bedell 


, Jacob 


Jacob 


Mary 


April 5, 1748 


ii 


Joseph 


it 


ii 


July 10, 1740 


ii 


Joshua 


ii 


it 


Mar. 16, 1742 


it 


Naomi 


ii 


ii 


Mar. 9, 1753 


ii 


Richard 


ii 


it 


Sept. 1, 1751 


ii 


Ruth 


ii 


ii 


Mar. 8, 1861 


Bell, Laura N. 


Arthur 


Eliza A. 


April 16, 1892 


Bergeron, Joseph A. 


Philip 


Louisa Bourier 





TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS: BIRTHS. 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


April 24, 1895 


Bergeron, Joseph N. 


Philip 


Louisa Bourier 


July 31, 1902 


" " P. C. 


It 


tt 


Oct. 2, 1893 


" Mary L. 


• 1 


tt 


Dec. 7, 1796 


Betton, Caroline 


Silas 


Mary 


Jan. 15, 1803 


" Charles CotesworthP 


it 


it 


June 8, 1807 


" George Onslow 


tt 


tt 


April 1, 1795 


" Harriet 


tt 


tt 


June 1, 1805 


" Mary Jane 


i< 


n 


April 3, 1800 


" Thornton 


tt 


tt 


Feb. 19, 1792 


" Wealthy Johnson 


tt 


tt 


April 22, 1895 


Biron, Clara M. 


Peter 


Alexina 


Aug. 11, 1777 


Bixby, Benjamin 


Benjamin, Jr. 


Peggy 


April 6, 1790 


(i el 


George 


Sarah Annis 


Jan. 19, 1781 


" Daniel 


Benjamin, Jr. 


Peggy 


Aug. 18, 1779 


" Elisabeth 


tt 


tt 


Oct. 14, 1788 


" George 


George 


Sarah Annis 


April 28, 1773 


" Joseph 


Benjamin, Jr. 


Peggy 


May 30, 1783 


" Peggy 


tt 


tt 


Aug. 19, 1771 


" Sarah 


it 


tt 


Nov. 2, 1903 


Blaisdell, John Everett 


Emery Edward 


Emma Wilkes 


July 24, 1896 


Blake, Everett Buell 


Edgar 


Charlotte Woodman 


June 7, 1881 


Blanchard, Maud E. 


George W. 


Hattie A. Merrill 


Mar. 23, 1881 


" M. 


Mark 


Ellen A. Lemoy 


June 24, 1898 


Blemer, Charles William 


Frank 


Teresa Mullen 


Nov. 25, 1887 


Blethen, Henry B. 


H. Fred 


Abbie Bradford 


July 7, 1893 


" Mona A. 


tt 


tt 


Feb. 12, 1903 


Blotner, David 


Joseph 


Rebecca R. Dick 


July I, 1900 


" Fannie 


Charles 


Bella Lajwand 


Oct. 12, 1899 


" Jake 


Jacob 


Rebecca Dick 


July 8, 1898 


" Jennie 


n 


tt 


Mar. 19, 1905 


" Leon 


tt 


it 


Dec. 30, 1906 


41 


It 


tt 


Feb. 29, 1880 


Bly, Flossie Morse 


William A. 


Abbie A. Hall 


Jan. 17, 1881 


Bodwell, Alice M. 


Frank W. 


Susan Mace 


Jan. 15, 1860 


" Charles M. Kelley 


Nathan R. 


Lois A. (Kelly) 


May 12, 1861 


" Clare L. 


William J. 


Cynthia M. (Merrill) 


April 18, 1879 


" Clarence Porter 


Newton Porter 


Ida T. McMusters 


July 2, 1899 


" Daniel L. 


Warren E. 


Annie E. Butler 


Feb. 22, 1889 


" Grace W. 


tt 


it 


Mar. 29, 1890 


" Henry W. 


tt 


tt 


July 1, 1864 


Isabel M. 


John P. 


Alice C. 


Nov. 15, 1855 


Lucy M. 


Nathan R. 


Lois A. (Kelly) 


June 14, 1862 


" Mary F. 


tt 


n 


May 31, 1893 


" " L. 


Warren E. 


Annie E. Butler 


Dec. 20, 1785 


" Philip 


William 




Jan. 10, 1898 


" Rachel 


Warren E. 


Annie E. Butler 


Sept. 23, 1854 


" Warren E. 


Nathan R. 


Lois A. (Kelly) 


Nov. 10, 1851 


" M. 


William 


Dorothy A. (Bradford) 


Oct. 12, 1899 


Bonton, Mary 


Octave 


Betsey Bealand 


July 9, 1905 


Borchers, Evelyn Constance 


Charles H. 


Myrtie Ramsdell 


Dec. 29, 1901 


Boutin, Ernest 


Octave 


Betsey Bailey 


July 7, 1902 


" Joseph E. 


Eugene 


Anna Bergeron 


Dec. 21, 1870 


Bradford, Alvah W. 


William L., 2d 


Mary K. 


Oct. 17, 1782 


" Anna 


Robert 


Hannah (Eatton) 


Feb. 12, 1789 


(i ft 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


Oct. 31, 1821 


" " C. 


tt 


Hannah (Austin) 



8 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


May 15, 1809 


Bradford, Betsey 


William 


Hannah (Austin) 


July 5, 1858 


ii 


" R. 


Jesse W. 


Abigail B. (Morse) 


Feb. 28, 1848 


ii 


Charles A. 


ti 


it 


July 2, 1796 


ii 


Daniel 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


April 22, 1860 


ii 


David C. 


William L. 


Eliza H. (Gage) 


Nov. 18, 1812 


it 


Dorothy 


William 


Hannah (Austin) 


April 16, 1904 


it 


" May 


" D. 


Mary A. Estes 


Oct. 4, 1780 


ii 


Elisabeth 


Robert 


Hannah (Eatton) 


July 6, 1784 


ii 


it 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


May 1, 1808 


ii 


it 


Robert 


Mehitable (Cross) 


April 9, 1884 


ii 


Evans A. 


Charles H. 


Catharine L. Whipple 


Oct. 10, 1805 


ii 


Hannah 


William, Jr. 


Hannah (Austin) 


Sept. 18, 1816 


ii 


Jesse W. 


it 


tt 


Feb. 6, 1781 


ii 


John 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


July 26, 1803 


it 


" Gilman 


" Jr. 


Hannah (Austin) 


Sept. 22, 1823 


it 


" Monroe 


Daniel 


Abigail (Emerson) 


July 11, 1843 


ii 


Joseph D. 


Jesse W. 


Abigail B. (Morse) 


May 14, 1810 


ii 


Mehitable 


Robert 


Mehitable (Cross) 


Nov. 13, 1792 


it 


Olive 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


Feb. 12, 1845 


it 


Oliver M. 


Jesse W. 


Abigail B. (Morse) 


April 2, 1837 


it 


Oscar F. 


ti 


1 1 


June 13, 1819 


it 


Rachel A. 


William, Jr. 


Hannah (Austin) 


April 16, 1841 


it 


ti 


Jesse W. 


Abigail B. (Morse) 


Nov. 2, 1779 


•t 


William 


William 


Anna (Cross) 


May 21, 1902 


ii 


H. 


" D. 


Mary A. Estes 


Sept. 13, 1814 


ii 


" Leonard 


Jr. 


Hannah (Austin) 


Oct. 28, 1846 


it 


" L. 


Jesse W. 


Abigail B. (Morse) 


Sept. 15, 1871 


ii 




Joseph D. 


Hannah Wallace 


June 30, 1873 


it 


(Twins) 


it 


" Page 


Mar. 29, 1903 


ti 




William Davis 


Mary A. Estes 


Dec. 27, 1905 


Brady, 


George Lewis 


George 


Minnie Hayden 


May 19, 1870 


it 


Joseph C. 


John 


Hannah 


Mar. 5, 1904 


Brancroft, Claud Earl 


George T. 


Mary Lena St. Peere 


Jan. 21, 1898 


Breckels, William Francis 


Joseph H. 


Edith J. LeFurgy 


June 18, 1797 


Bricket 


, Anna 


James 


Anna (Wheeler) 


Feb. 15,1795 


ii 


Ralph 


ii 


it 


June 25, 1803 


Brickett, Benaiah Clement 


Joseph 


Hannah 


Mar. 27, 1807 


it 


Dudley Kimball 


Thomas 


Susanna 


Aug. 2, 1803 


it 


Leonard 


Edmond 


Betsy 


Mar. 31, 1796 


it 


Lydia 


ti 


t* 


July 1, 1794 


it 


Prudence 


Edmond 


Betsy 


Oct. 26, 1873 


Bridge: 


3, Eliza J. 


Joseph 


Belinda E. (Myrick) 


Sept. 18, 1869 


it 


Luther M. 


Luther C. 


Caroline T. 


Dec. 23, 1876 


it 


Mary L. 


Joseph 


Belinda E. (Myrick) 


Jan. 1, 1902 


Brothers, Lizzie Gordon 


Benjamin 


Sara Camps 


May 10, 1871 


Brown, 


, Emma 


Edgar 


Ellen Hunt 


Jan. 5, 1905 


ti 


Everett Henry 


Everett 


Mary Bell 


Aug. 9, 1881 


it 


Fred H. 


Charles F. 


Emma A. Clark 


April 10, 1884 


ii 




" 


it 


Aug. 11, 1893 


it 


M. 


George E. 


Lucy A. Nichols 


May 10, 1859 


Bryant 


, Emma F. 


Charles M. 


Sarah F. 


April 1879 


Burges, Frank D. 


Augustus D. 


Lizzie R. Burges 


Feb. 20, 1891 


Butler, 


Alice Edna 


Ozro H. 


Ella A. Smith 


Oct. 3, 1899 


ii 


Edith Lee 


ti 


it 


Nov. 23, 1885 


it 


Florence Lillian 


ii 


it 


Aug. 8, 1884 


ii 


Myrtle Grace 


it 


1 1 



TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS: BIRTHS. 



9 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


July 30, 1856 


Butler, Ozro H. 


Daniel 


Lavinia S. 


July 15, 1858 


Rufina L. 


41 


tt 


Mar. 30, 1860 


CI 


Charles P. 


Laura 


July 25, 1887 


lc 


OzroH. 


Ella A. Smith 


June 12, 1859 


Buxton, Frederick C. 


Joseph 


Rhoda A. (Kimball) 


Feb. 22, 1896 


" Harold T. 


Fred C. 


Etta S. Tilton 


June 18, 1862 


" John W. 


Joseph 


Rhoda Ann (Kimball) 


Nov. 17, 1906 


Buzzell, Barbara May 


William A. 


Emily J. Cummings 


May 24, 1905 


Call, Agnes Arline 


Percy J. 


Agnes T. Simpson 


Jan. 10, 1898 


" Arthur Simpson 


it 


tt 


Jan. 6, 1900 


if ft 


it 


ti 


Nov. 7, 1903 


" Charles Wesley 


Charles H. 


Alice B. Coulliard 


June 11, 1784 


Cambell, Mary 


Robert 


Elizabeth 


Feb. 25, 1747 


" Robert 


Hugh 


Margaret 


Nov. 26, 1786 


ft II 


Robert 


Elizabeth 


Sept. 8, 1782 


" William 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 12, 1888 


Cameron, Mabel L. 


James 


Christina Jennings 


Sept. 9, 1906 


Candler, Douglas Edward 


Henry 


Bessie Scolland [son 


July 9, 1872 


Carey, Alma L. 


Joel C. 


Hannah A. D. Richard- 


Aug. 25, 1865 


" Charles H. 


Silas 


Deborah A. 


Mar. 26, 1872 


" Frank C. 


Silas A. 


Deborah 


Nov. 17, 1868 


" Rosalia W. 


tt 


tt 


May 13, 1801 


Carlton, Isaac 


Nehemiah 


Lydia Hall 


Mar. 21, 1799 


" Jedediah Perkins 


tt 


ii 


Dec. 29, 1797 


Polly Hall 


tt 


it 


Sept. 18, 1774 


" Reuben 


Joseph 


Mehitable 


Dec. 2, 1781 


Carpender, Christopher 
Rymes 


Anthony 


Dorothy 


Aug. 28, 1897 


Cassidy, Vincent Harold 


Michael J. 


Catherine Casey 


Dec. 16, 1869 


Chaplin, Philip A. 


Nelson 


Lizzie 


April 5, 1876 


" M 


tt 


1 1 


Jan. 23, 1881 


p 


it 


tt 


Aug. 1746 


Chase, Abel 






July 9, 1864 


" Abram I. 


Robert 


Esther (Duston) 


Nov. 21, 1887-J 


! " Alice Lillian 


Linus L. 


Laura C. Hall 


Dec. 9, 1858 


" Catherine O. 


Nathaniel 


Catherine S. 


Jan. 20, 1788 


" Daniel Clark 


Samuel 


Betty 


Oct. 17, 1862 


" Ellsworth L. 


Robert 


Esther (Duston) 


June 23, 1860 


" Emma E. 


tt 


tt 


May 18, 1884 


Ethel M. 


Linus 


Laura C. Hall 


Feb. 1, 1780 


" Ezra 


Samuel 


Betty 


Feb. 25, 1785 


" Hannah Ely 


tt 


tt 


June 29, 1861 


" Harriet 


Nathaniel 


Catherine S. 


Aug. 9, 1800 


" Samuel 


Joseph 


Anna 


Nov. 19, 1778 


" Sarah 


Samuel 


Betty 


June 26, 1782 


" Simeon 


tt 


tt 


Jan. 5, 1864 


" William H. 


Nathaniel 


Catherine S. 


Feb. 3, 1878 


Chatham, Mary M. 


William 


Jane 


Mar. 14, 1888 


Childs, David A. C. 


tt p_ 


Lizzie F. Sloan 


Dec. 5, 1893 


" Walter Edward 


Charles E. 


Jennie A. Davis 


Dec. 2. 1906 


Christian, Alfred 


Medard 


Minnie La Farrier 


May l, 1788 


Clark, Abner 


David 


Anna Woodman 


Feb. 8, 1888 


" Ada 


Albertus W. 


Annie Thompson 


Mar. 3, 1843 


" Adaline 


John 


Jane Maria 


April 22, 1873 


Asa E. 


Abraham L. 


Mariah F. 



10 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 




of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Aug. 10, 1793 


Clark, Benjamin 


John 


Ruth (Morril) 


Jan. 14, 1813 


tt 


ii 


Samuel 


Alice 


Mar. 28, 1882 


ii 


David 


David 


Anna (Woodman) 


Nov. 17, 1799 


ii 


Deborah 


John 


Ruth (Morril) 


May 29, 1860 


ii 


Delia E. 


William H. 


Senaty 


Aug. 8, 1905 


ii 


Dorris May 


Alburton W. 


Annie E. Thompson 


Aug. 28, 1894 


ii 


Earl M. 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 9, 1759 


ii 


Edward 


Edward 


Ruth 


Oct. 17, 1874 


it 


Flora B. 


William H. 


Cynthia J. 


Oct. 3, 1788 


ii 


Fred 


Charles F. 


Lizzie L. Ellis 


Sept. 1871 


ii 


Freeman C. 


Abraham L. 


Maria J. Clarke 


June 8, 1869 


ii 


Harry J. 


W. Henry 


Samantha 


Oct. 29, 1901 


ii 


Herbert Levi 


Alburton W. 


Emily A. Thompson 


May 24, 1784 


ii 


John 


David 


Anna (Woodman) 


July 29, 1751 


ii 


Joseph 


Edward 


Ruth * 


April 16, 1885 


ii 


Lena 


Alburton 


Annie E. Thompson 


April 5, 1754 


if 


Mary 


Edward 


Ruth 


Aug. 14, 1786 


ii 


Nathaniel 


David 


Anna (Woodman) 


Nov. 22, 1871 


ii 


Neva 


William H. 


Samantha J. 


Oct. 24, 1756 


it 


Phebe 


Edward 


Ruth 


April 2, 1796 


ii 


Ruth 


John 


Ruth (Morril) 


Jan. 8, 1864 


ii 


Samuel H. 


William H. 


Samantha 


July 17, 1862 


it 


Ulla L. 


ii 


ii 


April 22, 1851 


ii 


M. 


John 


Jane 


Oct. 16, 1872 


Clegg, Laura E. 


James 


Sarah E. 


Sept. 4, 1769 


Clement, Bartlett 


Philip 


Phebe 


Oct. 29, 1781 




" Benaiah 


John, Jr. 


Susanna (Massey) 


Feb. 24, 1780 




" Hannah 


ii 


it 


Nov. 18, 1804 




" John W. 


Stephen 


Mary (Woodman) 


July 30, 1788 




" Joseph Wardwell 


Richard 


Mehitable Runels 


July 24, 1783 




" Mary 


John, Jr. 


Susanna (Massey) 


Jan. 1, 1807 




" Mehitable 


Stephen 


Mary (Woodman) 


Aug. 15, 1767 




" Phebe 


Philip 


Phebe 


Feb. 17, 1784 




1* 41 


Richard 


Mehitable Runels 


June 19, 1811 




" Sally Webster 


Stephen 


Mary (Woodman) 


Oct. 8, 1767 




" Samuel Whitaker 


William 


Sarah 


Aug. 14, 1778 




Stephen 


ii 


it 


Feb. 5, 1809 




" Susanna Clark 


Stephen 


Mary (Woodman) 


May 13, 1786 




" Thomas Runels 


Richard 


Mehitable Runels 


Nov. 21, 1802 


Clendenin, Almira 


John 


Betsey (Jones) 


Oct. 29, 1791 




" Anne 


ii 


it 


Sept. 6, 1821 




" JohnH. 


Benjamin 


Sally 


July 6, 1806 




" " Leveret 


John 


Betsey (Jones) 


Sept. 11, 1804 




" Robert 


Robert 


Sukey H. 


Mar. 11, 1794 




" Susanna 


John 


Betsey (Jones) 


April 21, 1896 


Cleveland, George Julius 


Rev. Willis M. 


Ida M. Robinson 


May 2, 1894 


Cleversy, Morris Merrill 


William 


Amelia Oikle 


July 2, 1899 


Clinton, Earl Edward 


Horace 


Emma Cleversy 


Jan. 18, 1898 




" Freddie Horace 


ii 


ii 


Dec. 20, 1900 




" George William 


ii 


ii 


April 2, 1745 


Clough, Abigail 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


July 10, 1785 




ii ii 


ii 


Martha 


May 6, 1777 




" Abner 


William 


Abigail 


Mar. 26, 1828 




" Alice Charlotte Thurza Benjamin 


Rachel (Austin) 


April 11, 1779 




" Amos 


Josiah 


Martha 


Dec. 1, 1808 




ii ii 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 



TABLE I, TOWN. RECORDS : BIRTHS. 



11 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Sept. 19, 1821 


dough 


, Azubah A. 


Benjamin 


Rachel (Austin) 


Dec. 8, 1769 


it 


Bayley 


William 


Abigail 


July 28,1798 


it 


Benjamin 


ti 


Hannah (Messer) 


Mar. 24, 1745 


It 


Bethiah 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


Jan. 10, 1773 


ll 


Cyrus 


William 


it 


Dec. 14, 1782 


(i 


Daniel [vens 


Josiah 


Martha 


Mar. 31, 1812 


il 


" HaseltineSte- 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


June 10, 1783 


it 


Darius 


William 


Abigail 


Feb. 18, 1740 


li 


David 


Jethro 


Mary 


June 10, 1775 


il 


Dorcas 


William 


Abigail 


July 20, 1738 


l* 


Ebenezer 


Jethro 


Mary 


Mar. 14, 1776 


ii 


Elijah 


Wyman 


Sarah 


June 4, 1747 


il 


Elisabeth 


Jethro 


Mary 


Aug. 18, 1779 


it 


ii 


William 


Abigail 


April 3, 1784 


ii 


Ellice 


tt 


Hannah (Messer) 


Jan. 17, 1768 


it 


Enoch 


it 


Abigail 




ii 


it 


Wyman 


Sarah 


Dec. 10, 1781 


ti 


Esther 


Josiah 


Martha 


Sept. 27, 1787 


ii 


Esther 


Isaac 


Hannah Page 


Jan. 24, 1795 


ll 


Ezekiel 


William 


" (Messer) 


Feb. 18, 1742 


ll 


Hannah 


Jethro 


Mary 


Dec. 17, 1757 


ii 


it 


Isaac, Jr. 


Hannah 


May 25, 1794 


ii 


i< 


it 


" Page 


Dec. 14, 1803 


ii 


ii 


Wyman, Jr. 


Lydia (Kelly) 


June 16, 1823 


n 


" Maria 


Benjamin 


Rachel (Austin) 


Dec. 8, 1773 


ii 


Hart 


John, Jr. 


Susanna 


Mar. 27, 1723 


ii 


Isaac 


Isaac Lent 


Sarah 


April 23, 1753 


|( 


it 


" Jr. 


Hannah 


April 11, 1790 


li 


ii 


ii 


" Page 


Jan. 12, 1782 


ii 


Jeremiah 


William 


Abigail 


Mar. 10, 1755 


li 


John 


Isaac, Jr. 


Hannah 


May 31, 1780 


il 


ii 


William 


" (Messer) 


May 15, 1774 


li 


Jonathan 


Josiah 


Martha 


Aug. 17, 1771 


li 


Josiah 


ii 


it 


Aug. 8, 1817 


ii 


it 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


Oct. 13, 1747 


ii 


" Jr. 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


May 15, 1766 


ii 


Judith Hall 


Wyman 


Sarah 


Sept. 4, 1825 


ll 


Laura Jane 


Benjamin 


Rachel (Austin) 


Oct. 22, 1775 


ll 


Lavinia 


Josiah 


Martha 


Dec. 18, 1777 


ii 


ti 


John, Jr. 


Susanna 


April 16, 1799 


li 


Levi 


Wyman, Jr. 


Lydia (Kelly) 


July 2, 1781 


II 


Loas 


William 


Abigail 


Dec. 24, 1744 


ll 


Lydia 


Jethro 


Mary 


July 31, 1770 


it 


Martha 


Josiah 


Martha 


June 22, 1810 


il 


" Phebe 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


Mar. 17, 1735 


li 


Mary 


Jethro 


Mary 


Jan. 11, 1750 


ii 


it 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


Jan. 16, 1780 


li 


Molly 


Isaac 


Hannah Page 


April 5, 1784 


il 


Moses 


Josiah 


Martha 


Dec. 27, 1736 


il 


Nathaniel 


Jethro 


Mary 


April 11, 1782 


ii 


Olive 


Isaac 


Hannah Page 


Mar. 25,1872 


ll 


Osmond 


Jonathan G. 


Nancy 


April 16, 1749 


it 


Phineas 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


Sept. 24, 1777 


ii 


Phinehas 


it 


Martha 


Dec. 12, 1815 


il 


Rebecca Allener 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


Mar. 24, 1749 


u 


Ruth 


Jethro 


Mary 



rz 






HISTORY 


OF SALEM. 

* 




Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Oct. 29, 1784 


Clough, Ruth 


Isaac 


Hannah Page 


Mar. 11, 1769 


II 


Sally 


Josiah 


Martha 


Oct. 22, 1854 


W 


Samuel 


tt 


Abigail Hastings 


Nov. 20, 1772 


a 


a 


tt 


Martha 


Dec. 9, 1813 


tt 


ft 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


July 23, 1761 


it 


Sarah 


Isaac, Jr. 


Hannah 


April 4, 1764 


Ci 


«t 


Wyman 


Sarah 


Mar. 31. 1796 


u 


*i 


" Jr. 


Lydia ( Kelly) 


Mar. 8, 1779 


a 


Stephen 


William 


Abigail 


Dec. 8, 1743 


ci 


Thomas 


Jethro 


Mary 


July 3, 1751 


1* 


Timothy 


tt 


tt 


July 24, 1769 


It 


tt 


Wyman 


Sarah 


Sept. 10, 1807 


14 


Trina 


Daniel 


Rebecca (Stevens) 


Feb. 10, 1754 


If 


William 




Mary Austin 


Oct. 4, 1726 


II 


Wiman 


Isaac 


Sarah 


July 4, 1752 


11 


it 


Josiah 


Abigail Hastings 


Oct. 28, 1767 


tt 


Wyman 


Wyman 


Sarah 


Aug. 30, 1765 


11 


Zacceus 


William 


Abigail 


Nov. 27, 1763 


II 


Zevinah 


tt 


tt 


Mar. 19, 1872 


if 






Nancy J. Clough 


Jan. 29, 1838 


Cluff 


Aaron Danford 


Ezekiel 


Sally (Hawkins) 


Jan. 23, 1843 




i 


" Milton 


tt 


tt 


Feb. 5, 1862 




t 


Abbie J. C. 


Benjamin 


Anna M. 


April 2, 1836 




• 


Benjamin Ward 


Ezekiel 


Sally (Hawkins) 


Mar. 18, 1862 




t 


Esther A. 


John W. 




Feb. 17, 1844 




t 


Franklin Washington 


Josiah 


Asenath (Silver) 


Dec. 14, 1859 




t 


Fred F. 


Benjamin W. 


Amanda 


Mar. 17, 1839 




l 


Isaac Newton 


Ezekiel 


Sally (Hawkins) 


Mar. 23, 1826 




i 


John William 


John 


tt 


0,ct. 11, 1840 




i 


Leverett Clarence 


Josiah 


Asenath (Silver) 


May 2, 1827 




i 


Levi 


Levi 


Sally (Cluff) 


Aug. 9, 1834 




< 


Louisa Jane 


Ezekiel 


" (Hawkins) 


Aug. 12, 1825 




i 


Lydia 


Levi 


" (Cluff) 


Sept. 6, 1827 




II 


Mary Ann Bailey 


John 


tt 


Aug. 8, 1869 




t 


Maud Mildred 


Frank W. 


Ellen 


April 10, 1874 




t 


Phinnie A. 


John W. 


Mary 


Aug. 27, 1820 




i 


Sally Messer 


tl 


Sally 


Nov. 5, 1864 




LI 


F. 


Josiah 


Mehitable (Palmer) 


Feb. 7, 1S61 




I 


F. 


it 


tt 


Jan. 4, 1898 


Coane, John Henry 


John H. 


Mary F. Crabbe 


Nov. 13, 1898 


Coates, Ernest 


Thomas 


Priscilla Wright 


Aug. 22, 1803 


Cobu 


irn, Abigail 


Simon 


Ruth 


June 19, 1869 


(1 


Alburtis L. 


Charles G. 


Abby F. 


Sept. 14, 1849 


■ 1 


Emma Phidelia F. 


Rawson 


Hannah P. (Kimball) 


Nov. 4, 1861 


II 


George A. 


Alburtus 


Charlotte C. 


Feb. 28, 1860 


II 


Juliett 


tt 


(I 


July 8, 1805 


II 


Mary 


Simon 


Ruth 


Oct. 18, 1873 


It 


Susan F. 


Charles G. 


Susan Welch 


May 8, 1868 


41 


Willis B. 


tt 


Abby A. 


Feb. 19, 1791 


Cochran, Betsey Reed 


James 


Elisabeth 


Nov. 19, 1792 


ti 


James 


tt 


tt 


Oct. 25, 1870 


Colburn, Helen A. 


George H. 


Emma R. Hall 


Oct. 7, 1860 


Colby, Ada D. 


William G. 


Frances E. Dow 


Jan. 13, 1874 


it 


Gertie M. 


tt 


tt 


Oct. 7. 1860 


t< 


IdaD. 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 15, 1871 




II 


Sarah 


tt 


ft 





TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRT 


HS. 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Jan. 24, 1774 i 


Cole, Benjamin 


Solomon 


Mehitable 


Dec. 3, 1841 


" " Kimball 


Dexter K. 


Jerusha 


Sept. 6, 1814 


" Betsey Webster 


Kimball 


Rebecca (Austin) 


Oct. 3, 1812 


" Dexter Kimball 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 7,1858 


" " N. 


Dexter K. 


Jerusha 


Dec. 2, 1787 


" Elisabeth 


Adam 


Olive 


May 24, 1843 


" " Angelina 


Dexter K. 


Jerusha 


Sept. 16, 1884 


" Gertrude Colby 


Wallace W. 


Ida D. Colby 


July 1, 1808 


" Henry Taylor 


Kimball 


Rebecca (Austin) 


Oct. 23, 1816 


" Hiram Cotting 


•i 


tt 


Nov. 25, 1810 


" James Loyd 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 1, 1806 


" John Austin 


«t 


t« 


Feb. 2, 1776 


" Kimball 


Adam 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 26, 1779 


(i tt 


Solomon 


Mehitable 


Apr. 28, 1780 


u t< 


Adam 


Elisabeth 


Nov. 15, 1804 


" Lydia Foster 


Kimball 


Rebecca (Austin) 


Jan. 26, 1880 


" Mabel 


Wallace W. 


Ida D. Colby 


Mar. 1, 1777 


" Mary 


Adam 


Elisabeth 


Jan. 20, 1781 


" Samuel 


Solomon 


Mehitable 


Nov. 15, 1775 


" Solomon 


t. 


tt 


Sept, 27, 1844 


" William Gilbert 


Dexter K. 


Jerusha 


Dec. 24, 1903 


Coleman, Bessie Caroline 


George H. 


Lola Stratton 


Sept. 9, 1S87 


" Charles A. 


tt 


it 


Dec. 2, 1895 


M. 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 29, 1830 


Collins, John Lawrence 


John 


Sarah Johnson 


Jan. 23, 1869 


Conley, Frank M. 


James L. 


Lucy E. 


Dec. 15, 1873 


" Marlon 


it 


tt 


Aug. 13, 1887 


F. 


Thomas 


Kate Johnson 


Dec. 20, 1893 


Connor, Ruth H. 


George H. 


Ida B. Norris 


May 25, 1862 


" George H. 


Ogilvia 


Louisa J. (Hall) 


Mar. 26, 1838 


Cook, Alice 


Edward 


Fidelia 


Feb. 2, 1836 


" Edward 


tt 


tt 


Feb. 1, 1869 


" Eunice C. 


Samuel 


Hannah 


Dec. 2, 1840 


" Hannah P. 


Edward 


Fidelia 


July 27, 1814 


" Lucy Peabody 


Joseph 


Rebecca 


July 1, 1834 


" Sarah E. 


Edward 


Fidelia 


Aug. 19, 1785 


Copp, Daniel Greenow 


Aaron 


Sarah (Greenough) 


Dec. 25, 1860 


" Emma 


Millett G. 


Rowena 


Nov. 13, 1869 


" Mary E. 


tt 


tt 


Aug. 27, 1904 


Corkhill, Albert Alderoft 


Robert 


Florence Alderoft 


May 18, 1779 


Corliss, Abel Merrill 


Asa 


Rebecca 


Oct. 3, 1789 


" # Abiah 


Daniel 


Susanna (Pattee) 


July 6, 1754 


" "Aliddea 


Jonathan, 3d 


Aliddea Emerson 


Jan. 27, 1772 


" Asa 


Asa 


Rebecca 


May 27, 1811 


11 It 


Benjamin 


Eliza 


April 10, 1775 


" Benjamin 


Asa 


Rebecca 


Jan. 10, 1866 


" Charles L. 


Isaac B. 


Caroline E. 


May 25, 1761 


" Daniel 


Moor 


Lydia 


June 17, 1759 


" David 


David 


Hannah 


Dec. 14,1778 


u it 


Asa 


Rebecca 


July 20, 1757 


" Ebenezer 


David 


Hannah 


Mar. 22, 1758 


" Elihu 


Moor 


Lydia 


July 20, 1755 


Elisabeth 


David 


Hannah 


Oct. 22, 1768 


IC II 


Asa 


Rebecca 


April 29, 1787 


II It 


Daniel 


Susanna (Pattee) 


April 11, 1898 


" Hazel Elliott 


Charles S. 


Josie D. Elliott 



1 :\ 



14 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of I 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Dec. 6, 1896 


Corliss 


, Hermon Leroy 


Charles S. 


Josie D. Elliott 


Jan. 1, 1751 


ii 


James 


Jonathan, 3d 


Aliddea Emerson 


April 13, 1753 


it 


Jesse 


" Jr. 


Rachel 


April 11, 1787 


«i 


John 


Daniel 


" (Bayley) 


July 15, 1796 


ii 


Jonathan 


John 


Sarah (Whittier) 


Mar. 21, 1773 


K 


Joseph 


Asa 


Rebecca 


Nov. 15, 1781 


ii 


Judith 


Daniel 


Susanna (Pattee) 


Aug. 1, 1768 


ii 


Lydia 


Moor 


Lydia 


Oct. 10, 1784 


ii 


Mary 


Daniel 


Susanna (Pattee) 


July 13, 1813 


ii 


" Jane 


Benjamin 


Eliza 


Dec. 2, 1765 


ii 


Moor 


Moor 


Lydia 


Aug. 26, 1804 


ii 


Nathaniel Q. 


David 


Betsey (Gorril) 


Sept. 26, 1759 


ii 


Olive 


Moor 


Lydia 


June 6, 1782 


ii 


ii 


Asa 


Rebecca 


July 1, 1873 


it 


Phebe A. 


Isaac B. 


Caroline E. 


April 13, 1767 


ii 


Priscilla 


Asa 


Rebecca 


April 10, 1792 


ii 


ii 


Daniel 


Susanna (Pattee) 


May 18, 1755 


ii 


Rachel 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Rachel 


June 8, 1770 


!• 


Rebecca 


Asa 


Rebecca 


Jan. 3, 1781 


ii 


Rhoda 


ii 


ti 


June 27, 1752 


ti 


Samuel 


Jonathan 3d 


Aliddea Emerson 


Aug. 1, 1777 


ii 


ii 




Deborah Bayley 


Nov. 11, 1794 


ii 


Sarah 


John 


Sarah (Whittier) 


Jan. 14, 1760 


ii 


Susanna 


Moor 


Lydia 


July 31, 1809 


it 


Timothy Emerson 


Benjamin 


Eliza 


Mar. 10, 1750 


ii 


William 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Rachel 


Sept. 21, 1774 


ti 


ii 




Lydia 


Dec. 28, 1765 


it 


Woodbury 


Asa 


Rebecca 


May 15, 1756 


Corning, Benjamin 


George 


Anna 


Oct, 23, 1760 


ii 


Ezra 


it 


ii 


June 19, 1758 


ii 


John Woodbury 


George 


Anna 


Sept. 15, 1756 


ii 


Judith 


John 


Merriam 


May 30, 1755 


ii 


Nathaniel 


ti 


ii 


July 31, 1884 


ii 




Samuel C. 


Emma J. Seclair 


Nov. 1870 


Corson 


, Abby J. 


Josiah G. 


Amanda 


Oct. 1, 1892 


Cosgrove, Isidore M. 


James 


Edith M. Merrick 


Dec. 1875 


Cotting, Mabel E. 


William G. S. 


AddieE. (Colby) 


Aug. 12, 1886 


Crawford, M. 


James 


Alma Flanders 


Nov. 9, 1761 


Cressy 


, Benjamin 


Daniel 


Eunice 


April 13, 1774 


ii 


ii 


Joseph 


Loue 


Dec. 22, 1757 


ii 


Daniel Asby 


Daniel 


Eunice 


Jan. 23, 1755 


i< 


Elisabeth 


ii 


it 


April 18, 1766 


ii 


ii 


Joseph 


Loue 


Sept. 24, 1767 


ii 


ii 


ii 


** 


Nov. 11, 1768 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


Aug. 5, 1763 


ii 


Eunice 


Daniel 


Eunice 


Nov. 8, 1764 


ii 


Hannah 


Richard 


Susanna 


May 26,1772 


ii 


Hezekiah 


Joseph 


Loue 


Sept. 3, 1762 


ii 


Jabez 


Richard 


Hannah 


Aug. 22, 1764 


ii 


Jonathan 


Joseph 


Loue 


Sept. 14, 1760 


ii 


Mehitable 


ti 


it 


April 9, 1776 


ti 


Noah 


ii 


ii 


Mar. 31, 1762 


ii 


Ruth 


ii 


it 


Sept. 2, 1770 


it 


Sarah 


ii 


it 


July 10, 1759 


ii 


ii 


Daniel 


Eunice 


Mar. 24, 1895 


Cronin 


, Paul C. 


Charles H. 


Alma L. Cary 







TABLE I, TOWN ] 


SECORDS: BIB 


:ths. J 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Oct. 26, 1785 


Crosby, Ebenezer 


Ebenezer 


Susannah (Kimball) 


Aug. 24, 1783 


44 


Elizabeth 


44 


44 


Dec. 10, 1888 


44 


Elmer E. 


Walter H. 


Lizzie J. Stone 


July 6, 1788 


II 


Mehitable 


Ebenezer 


Susannah (Kimball) 


July 10, 1890 


41 


William W. 


Walter H. 


Lizzie J. Stone 


Mar. 1, 1756 


Cross 


, Abigail 


Rapha 


Abigail 


Dec. 14, 1762 


it 


Anna 


44 


44 


June 19, 1772 


44 


David 


Abiah 


Sarah 


Dec. 25, 1781 


(4 


Elisabeth 


Samuel 


Hannah (Woodbury) 


Mar. 11, 1903 


11 


Elsa Estelle 


George M. 


Alice M. Haseltine 


Aug. 3, 1869 


14 


Ernest 


Alonzo L. 


Cornelia 


Sept. 10, 1904 


44 


George A. 


George M. 


Alice M. Haseltine 


Aug. 5. 1786 


44 


Hannah 


Samuel 


Hannah (Woodbury) 


May 15, 1897 


44 


Harriet A. 


George P. 


Alice M. Haseltine 


Jan. 28, 1804 


44 


Ira 


Samuel, Jr. 


Abigail 


May 1, 1784 


44 


Isaac 


Samuel 


Hannah (Woodbury) 


Oct. 23, 1774 


44 


Jesse 


Abiel 


Sarah 


Aug. 12, 1789 


44 


Joseph 


Samuel 


Hannah (Woodbury) 


June 16, 1899 


44 


Marian 


George P. 


Alice M. Haseltine 


July 14, 1758 


44 


Moses 


Rapha 


Abigail 


Feb. 13, 1806 


44 


Nathaniel Belknap 


Jesse 


Anna (Dow) 


Nov. 14, 1760 


44 


Rapha 


Rapha 


Abigail 


Nov. 20, 1893 


44 


Ruth A. 


George P. 


Alice M. Haseltine 


July 14, 1765 


44 


Sarah 


Ralph 


Abigail 


May 27, 1777 


44 


44 


Abiel 


Sarah 


Sept. 26, 1767 


44 


Susanna 


Ralph 


Abigail 


May 21, 1770 


44 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Sarah 


Mar. 20, 1877 


Crowell, John W. 


JohnC. 


Rebecca F. Pool 


Nov. 18, 1879 


44 


Margaret A. 


44 


44 


May 22, 1887 


Cullen, James William 


James 


Lizzie Binningham 


Jan. 2, 1877 


44 


F. 


William 


Ellen 


Nov. 20, 1740 


Currier, Abigail 


Samuel 


Esther 


Oct. 1, 1773 


44 


Abigail 


Stephen 


Mary 


June 3, 1797 


44 


44 


Dudley 


Sarah 


July 14, 1748 


44 


Alice 


Samuel 


Esther 


Oct. 18, 1791 


44 


Amos 


Dudley 


Sarah 


June 21, 1817 


44 


Asa 


David 


Anna (Gordon) 


July 17, 1821 


44 


Benjamin G. 


44 


44 


July 10, 1770 


44 


Betty 


John, Jr. 


Jemima 


Apr. 17, 1745 


44 


Dudley 


44 


Elisabeth 


Aug. 17, 1740 


44 


Elisabeth 


Samuel 


Esther 


May 17, 1782 


44 


44 


Dudley 


Sarah 


Oct. 2, 1746 


44 


Esther 


Samuel 


Esther 


July 2, 1777 


44 


44 


Stephen 


Mary 


Oct. 6, 1860 


44 


Fred L. 


Daniel S. 


Metrassa 


Apr. 17, 1743 


44 


Hannah 


John 


Elisabeth 


July 7, 1775 


44 


41 


Stephen 


Mary 


July 1, 1777 


44 


44 


John, 3d 


Susanna (Howe) 


Aug. 30, 1794 


44 


44 


Dudley 


Sarah 


July 25, L833 


44 


Harriet Elisabeth 


David 


Anna (Gordon) 


June 29, 1747 


44 


James 


John 


Elisabeth 


Sept. 27, 1786 


44 


John 


Dudley 


Sarah 


May 22, 1774 


44 


Joshua 


John, Jr 


Jemima 


Jan. 20, 1771 


44 


Mary 


Stephen 


Mary 


July 3, 1772 


44 


Mehitable 


John, Jr. 


Jemima 


June 17, 1784 


44 


Nathan 


Dudley 


Sarah 



15 



16 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Aug. 18,1741 ( 


Durrier, Nathaniel 


John 


Elisabeth 


Sept. 29, 1739 


i« 


Peter 


tt 


it 


Jan. 7, 1752 


«« 


tt 


tt 


ti 


Aug. 20, 1862 


tt 


Rosetta 


Daniel S. 


Matrassa 


Sept. 2,1752 


it 


Samuel 


Samuel 


Esther 


Oct. 24, 1742 


it 


Sarah 


tt 


it 


Aug. 13, 1769 


tt 


1 1 


Stephen 


Mary 


June 1, 1789 


ft 


it 


Dudley 


Sarah 


Aug. 17,1749 


tt 


Simeon 


John 


Elisabeth 


July 3, 1813 


ft 


Sophia Ann 


David 


Anna Gordon 


June 25, 1787 


ft 


Stephen 


Stephen 


Mary 


May 9, 1796 


tt 


Sukey 


John, 3d 


Susanna (Howe) 


Dee. 2, 1780 


ft 


Tristram 


ti 


ti 


Mar. 24, 1861 


ft 




William E. 


Ada A. 


June 17, 1903 


Davis, Ada Maria 


Emerson A. 


Maria Hutchins 


Oct. 8, 1890 


ft 


Albert W. 


Alphonso 


Bertha Clark 


Sept. 2, 1860 


tt 


Alfred 


Alfred H. 


Abby M. 


Dec. 23, 1790 


it 


Betty 


Isaiah 


Deborah (Abbott) 


Nov. 20, 1902 


tt 


Edith M. 


Frank 


Mabel Hutchins 


June 4, 1857 


tt 


Edwin A. 


Alfred H. 


Abby M. 


Dec. 2, 1901 


it 


Emerson Charles 


Emerson A. 


Maria Hutchins 


Dec. 22, 1898 


it 


Fanny Elizabeth 




" Davis 


May 10, 1898 


it 


Frankie Emerson 


Frank 


Mabel B. Hutchins 


Oct. 9, 1887 


it 


Marion P. 


" D. 


Luella E. Welch 


Nov. 7, 1901 


it 


Melvin Byron 


Frank 


Mabel Hutchins 


Nov. 19, 1866 


it 


Ralph E. 


Alfred H. 


Abby M. 


July 22,1882 


it 


Sarah J. 


Frank D. 


Luella E. Welch 


June 25, 1900 


tt 


Viola M. 


" E. 


Mabel Hutchins 


July 25, 1739 


Dawes, Hannah 


Joseph 


Sarah 


Feb. 4. 1743 


1 1 


William 


ti 


" 


Dec. 4, 1860 


Dawson, Willis H. M. 


William 


tt 


Sept. 12, 1775 


Day, 


Abraham 


Samuel 


Martha 


Aug. 30, 1790 


tt 


Benjamin 


it 


Hannah 


Nov. 5, 1819 


tt 


Eliza Ann 


Benjamin 


Ann (Kimball) 


July 13, 1840 


it 


George Henry 


Charles 


Louisa 


Nov. 25, 1822 


tt 


Hannah Mary 


Benjamin 


Ann (Kimball) 


Nov. 29, 1844 


tt 


Mary Louisa 


Charles 


Louisa 


April 17, 1821 


tt 


Rebecca 


Benjamin 


Ann (Kimball) 


June 16, 1778 


tt 


Rebeckah 


Samuel 


Martha 


May 8, 1853 


tt 


Rosina Jane 


Charles 


Louisa 


Feb. 23, 1788 


ti 


Samuel 


Samuel 


Hannah (Annis) 


Sept. 14, 1842 


tt 


Sarah Mariah 


Charles 


Louisa 


Dec. 17, 1903 


Dessault, Janette Moran 


John Lewis 


Nettie Kelley 


Mar. 6, 1861 


Dickey, M. 


Robert M. 


Caroline E. 


April 11, 1901 


Dietrich, Helen Lydia 


August 


Annie Dimlich 


Jan. 11, 1904 


ii 


Lydia Martha 


it 


1 1 


Jan. 29, 1890 


Ditchett, Thomas 


Thomas 


Annie M. Delaney 


April 15, 1860 


Dolloff, Alice J. 


Cyrus S. 


Susan S. Renou 


July 1, 1895 


Donovan, F. 


Joe 


Minnie L. Woodbury 


April 30, 1776 


Dov 


j, Abel 


Asa 


Mary Wheeler 


Sept. 12, 1737 


ti 


Abigail 


David 


Abigail 


Mar. 10, 1775 


it 


Abraham 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Oct. 23, 1777 


it 


tt 


tt 


ii 


Oct. 10, 1808 


tt 


tt 


Abraham 


Sally 


Mar. S, 1804 


tt 


Albridge 


Oliver 


Sukey (Thayer) 







TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. 1< 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 




Df Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Mar. 15, 1852 


Dow 


-, Alvin Edson 


Amos 


Maria E. Morrison 


May 17, 1787 


it 


Amos 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Jan. 29, 1790 


II 


it 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


April 23, 1771 


II 


Aquilla 


it 


it 


April 5, 1743 


• 1 


Asa 


Richard 


Phebe (Heath) 


May 29, 1778 


l| 


Benjamin 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


Oct. 1, 1767 


II 


Bette 


Richard, Jr. 


Mary 


Sept. 9, 1884 


II 


Betty 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


April 22, 1774 


II 


Caleb 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


Mar. 15, 1880 


II 


Charles Albert 


Charles A. 


Ada D. Colby 


June 7, 1772 


(1 


Cyrus 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


June 11, 1779 


II 


Daniel 


Percy 


Deborah 


May 14, 1802 


II 


Eliza 


Abraham 


Sally 


Feb. 11, 1778 


II 


Elisabeth 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


April 20, 1753 


II 


Elizabeth 


David 


Mary Brown 


Sept. 1, 1768 


II 


Ellis 


Oliver 


Hannah (Pattee) 


Nov. 26, 1744 


II 


Enoch 


David 


Mary Brown 


Oct. 20, 1770 


It 


Eunice 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


Feb. 4, 1754 


11 


Evan 


Reuben 


Alidea (Jones) 


Dec. 5, 1781 


II 


it 


Thomas 


Elisabeth (Jones) 


Nov. 2, 1784 


If 


Fannie 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


Nov. 16, 1872 


it 


Frances H. 


Gilman C. 


Hannah J. Kelly 


Oct. 18, 1818 


II 


George 


Aquila 


Deliverance(Delia Dow) 


June 24, 1809 


II 


" Halleburton 


ii 


ii it 


Sept. 4, 1740 


II 


Hannah 


David 


Abigail 


July 18. 1762 


II 


it 


Oliver 


Hannah (Pattee) 


Feb. 7, 1778 


II 


it 


Percy 


Deborah 


Feb. 26, 1782 


It 


Hephizibah 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


July 18, 1794 


II 


Heseziah 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


May 17, 1774 


II 


Isaiah 


Richard, Jr. 


Mary 


April 9, 1773 


II 


Jeremiah 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


Mar. 22, 1802 


It 


it 


Aquila 


Deliverance (Delia Dow) 


Mar. 27,1792 


II 


John 


ii 


ti it 


April 17, 1799 


11 


it 


it 


it ii 


Jan. 20, 1783 


II 


Jonah 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


April 27, 1792 


II 


Jones 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Oct. 26, 1812 


II 


Lavinia 


Oliver 


Sukey (Thayer) 


Dec. 30, 1805 


it 


Leonard Milton 


Aquila 


Deliverance(DeIia D ow 


Aug. 23, 1877 


It 


Lillian A. 


Gilman C. 


Hannah J. 


Nov. 29, 1809 


f 1 


Lorenzo 


Oliver 


Sukey (Thayer) 


Aug. 18, 1798 


It 


Louisa 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Mar. 17, 1763 


II 


Lucy 




Mehitable Bayley 


April 24, 1881 


II 


Lura E. 


Charles A. 


Ada Dow 


May 7, 1776 


II 


Lydia 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


Dec. 17, 1743 


It 


Mary 


David 


Abigail 


Oct. 13, 1749 


• 1 


it 


tt 


Mary Brown 


Sept. 8. 1761 


II 


Mehitable 


Abraham 


Susanna 


June 7, 1769 


II 


it 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


April 23, 1870 


II 


Milly C. 


Gilman C. 


Hannah Jane 


Mar. 23, 1789 


II 


Moses 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


May 10, 1767 


11 


Nathaniel 


Jeremiah 


Lydia Kimball 


Mar. 20, 1748 


II 


Nith 


David 


Mary Brown 


Nov. 25, 1751 


If 


Olif 


Daniel 


Rebeckah (Peaslee) 


July 28, 1735 


II 


Oliver 


Richard 


Phebe (Heath) 


April 24, 1766 


II 


ii 


Oliver 


Hannah (Pattee) 


July 17, 1770 
2 


it 


Olli 


Richard, Jr. 


Mary 



18 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Sept. 2, 1754 


Dow 


, Peasle 


Daniel 


Rebeckah (Peaslee) 


Mar. 14, 1758 


ti 


Phebe 


Oliver 


Hannah (Pattee) 


June 16, ]750 


it 


Phineas 


Daniel 


Rebeckah (Peaslee) 


Nov. 28, 1796 


" 


ii 


Aquila 


Deliverance) Delia Dow) 


Feb. 24, 1780 


tt 


Rachel 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Sept. 23, 1776 


II 


Rebecca 


Percy 


Deborah 


July 18, 1795 


it 


Rebeckah Clendenin 


James 


Anna 


Mar. 25, 1791 


ii 


Relief 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


June 29, 1796 


ii 


it 


ii 


ii 


Sept. 7, 1729 


ii 


Reuben 


Richard 


Phebe (Heath) 


Oct. 1, 1739 


ii 


Richard 


it 


II 


Oct. 11, 1780 


ii 


ti 


Asa 


Mary (Wheeler) 


Feb. 11, 1766 


ti 


Solomon 


Richard, Jr. 


u 


Aug. 26, 1748 


" 


Stephen 


tt 


Phebe (Heath) 


April 19, 1756 


ti 


Susanna 


Abraham 


Susanna 


Mar. 12, 1786 


ii 


Hoyt 


Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Jan. 22, 1802 


ii 


Thayer 


Oliver 


Sukey (Thayer) 


Aug. 19, 1753 


ll 


Thomas 


Abraham 


Susanna 


May 10, 1773 


ii 


Zelliah 


Daniel 


Rebeckah (Peaslee) 


Oct. 17, 1776 


ii 




Thomas 


Elisabeth Jones 


Aug. 9, 1783 


ii 




ii 


tt 




Dowry William 


George 


Joanna 


July 10, 1851 


ii 


F. 


George 


Joanna 


Jan. 30, 1866 


<i 


F. 


it 


it 


Feb. 8, 1891 


Drap 


er, Helen Pike 


Alvah E. 


Mary A. Duston 


Aug. 20, 1906 


Drummond, Ralph Edmund 


Bertron 


Sarah Williams 


Jan. 22, 1899 


Duch 


arme, F. 


Thofllle 


Elsie Pichuines 


Oct. 22, 1896 


Dumont, Arthur 


Joseph 


Milina Babeuian 


Jan. 11, 1899 


it 


Elizabeth Elois 


it 


Mellinda Babuean 


Oct. 25, 1906 


Dusault, Milton Leo 


John Louis 


Nettie Edna Kelley 


July 28, 1763 


Duston, Abiah 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Mar. 15, 1759 


ii 


Abigail 


Obediah 


Abigail 


June 25, 1759 


ii 


Amos 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Dec. 12, 1773 


it 


Benjamin 


Timothy 


Abigail 


Sept. 8, 1773 


ii 


Betty 


Peter 


Betty 


June 14, 1768 


ti 


Caleb 


Caleb 


Phebe (Marble) 


May 4, 1796 


t« 


ii 


" Jr. 


Susanna 


Aug. 13, 1882 


ii 


Charles D. 


Edwin 


Clara Duston 


Feb. 7, 1882 


ii 


Clarence G. 


George F. 


Emma Duston 


July 26, 1861 


i« 


Cynthia J. 


Obadiah, 2d. 


Harriet 


Sept, 20, 1762 


it 


David 


ti 


Ruth 


Sept. 21, 1756 


ii 


Ebenezer 


Thomas 


Abiah 


May 2, 1822 


ii 


Guile 


Nathaniel Bel- 
knap 


Dorothy 


Mar. 10, 1841 


ii 


Elisabeth 


Obadiah 


Anna (Whitaker) 


June 20, 1764 


ii 


Hannah 


Caleb 


Phebe (Marble) 


Dec. 22, 1783 


ii 


ti 


Peter 


Betty 


Sept. 2,1790 


ii 


ii 


Ebenezer 


Phebe (Duston) 


M ly 27, 1833 


ii 


ii 


Obadiah 


Anna (Whitaker) 


Oct. 11, 1838 


ii 


Harriet 


ti 


it 


Jan. 29, 1881 


ii 


A. 


Edwin 


Clara Duston 


Mar. 6, 1798 


ii 


Isaiah Ayer 


Caleb, Jr. 


Susanna 


Feb. 22, 1778 


it 


Jonathan 


Peter 


Betty 


Aug. 17, 1775 


ii 


Joshua 


Timothy 


Abigail 


Aug. 9, 1752 


ii 


Mary 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Sept. 13, 1768 


ti 


ti 


Timothy 


Abigail 







TABLE I, TOWN K 


ECORDS: BIRTHS. 1! 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Feb. 24, 1786 


Duston, Moody 


Thomas 


Abigail 


April 3, 1750 


(i 


Moses 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Dec. 10, 1788 


14 


Nabby 


Stephen 


Molly (Massey) 


Aug. 14, 1771 


II 


Nathaniel 


Peter 


Betty 


Sept. 9, 1778 


II 


it 


Timothy 


Abigail 


May 23, 1792 


II 


" Belknap 


Ebenezer 


Phebe (Duston) 


Feb. 8, 1757 


II 


Obediah 


Obediah 


Abigail 


June 4, 1781 


II 


Peter 


Peter 


Betty 


Jan. 8, 1836 


It 


Ruth 


Obadiah 


Anna (Whitaker) 


Jan. 8, 1764 


II 


Simeon 


it 


Ruth 


Oct. 27, 1770 


II 


Sophia 


Timothy 


Abigail 


Dec. 24, 1780 


II 


it 


it 


it 


Dec. 21, 1754 


II 


Stephen 


Thomas 


Abiah 


July 5, 1791 


II 


Susannah 


Stephen 


Molly (Massey) 


Dec. 10, 1747 


II 


Thomas 


Thomas 


Abiah 


Nov. 24, 1783 


II 


it 


Timothy 


Abigail 


Aug. 1, 1841 


II 


II 


Obadiah 


Anna (Whitaker) 


Feb. 5, 1875 


II 


" Montgomery 


David, Jr. 


Sarah E. 


Oct. 6, 1765 


II 


Timothy 


John 


Ruth 


Nov. 26, 1771 


II 


ii 


Timothy 


Abigail 


Mar. 1, 1797 


II 


ii 


Benjamin 


Sarah (Rowell) 


Sept., 1789 


II 


Tryphena 


Timothy 


Abigail 


June 6, 1851 


II 


F. 


David, Jr. 


Nancy (Nichols) 


Oct. 20, 1851 


II 


F. 


Obadiah 


Harriet 


Feb. 21, 1870 


II 


M. 


David, Jr. 


Sarah Ellen Wardwell 


Mar. 29, 1877 


II 


F. 


ii 


it 


Dec. 4. 1779 


Duty, Abigail 


William 


Mary Rowell 


Aug. 15, 1787 


ii 


Benjamin Rowell 


ii 


ii 


Feb. 12, 1785 


ii 


Charles Carpender 


ii 


ii 


May 13, 1783 


ii 


Hannah 


ii 


41 


Nov. 7, 1774 


ii 


Mary 


ii 


II 


Aug. 11, 1789 


ii 


Nathaniel Peabody 


ii 


II 


April 4, 1778 


ii 


Phebe 


it 


II 


July 4, 1781 


it 


William 


it 


II 


Oct. 25,1755 


Eastman, Anna 


Obadiah 


Mehitable 


June 22, 1753 




" Caleb 


ii 


ii 


(After 1763) 




ii ii 


ii 


ii 


June 23, 1758 




" Ebenezer 


ii 


ii 


Aug. 23, 1905 




" Edna May 


Clarence S. 


Annie L. Tyler 


Jan. 20,1745 




" Hannah 


Obadiah 


Mehitable 


Mar. 12, 1774 




" James 


ii 


ii 


Sept. 13, 1769 




" Jesse 


ii 


it 


Feb. 21, 1780 




Mehitable 


ii 


it 


April 27, 1747 




" Obadiah 


it 


ii 


Oct. 5, 1777 




ii ii 


ii 


ii 


July 31, 1771 




" Sarah 


it 


ii 


Dec. 25, 1762 




" Simeon 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 1, 1750 




" Timothy 


ii 


it 


Oct. 27, 1891 


Eld 


ridge, F. 


Ernest M. 


Hattie A. McLane 


April 9, 1748 


Ellenwood, Benjamin 


Robert 


Abigail 


June 15, 1745 




" Mary 


ii 


ii 


Aug. 29, 1742 




" Nickles 


it 


it 


July 10, 1771 


Ellingwood, Benjamin 


John 


Elisabeth 


June 18, 1762 




" Ebenezer 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 14, 1761 




" Elisabeth 


ii 


■i 



20 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Aug. 23, 1767 


Ellingwood, Hannah 


John 


Elisabeth 


Sept. 28, 1773 


fi 


Henry 


ti 


tt 


June 28, 1769 


it 


Isaac 


ft 


tt 


Oct. 30, 1765 


<t 


John 


it 


it 


Dec. 29, 1795 


<* 


Lydia 


Robert 


Phebe 


Sept. 21, 1762 


Elinwood, Mary 


Samuel 


Sarah 


May 7, 1773 


Emerson, Abigail 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


Mar. 10, 1838 


tt 


Anna Augusta 


John 


Ruth 


Jan. 28, 1862 


it 


Bertha E. 


Prescott B. 


Sarah A. 


Jan. 1, 1831 


it 


Charles 


Luther 


Patience 


Sept. 25, 1848 


it 


" Nelson 


Nelson 


Mary H. (Kelly) 


Oct. 7, 1764 


i< 


Day 


Day 


Anna (Pattee) 


Sept. 21, 1767 


ti 


Dorcas Savery 


it 


1 1 


Aug. 26, 1808 


it 


Dudley Bailey 


Jonathan 


Patty (Bailey) 


Nov. 18, 1771 


tt 


Elisabeth 


Day 


Anna (Pattee) 


Aug. 18, 1807 


tt 


ft 


Samuel 


Abigail 


Oct. 10, 1811 


it 


tt 


James 


Rachel 


Feb. 14, 1848 


it 


ti 


Joseph W. 


Harriet 


Feb. 28, 1785 


ti 


" Bailey 


Jonathan 


Rhoda 


Aug. 21, 1813 


it 


Elisabeth M. 


Luther 


Patience 


Aug. 30, 1833 


it 


Emily Frances 


John 


Ruth 


Oct. 10, 1790 


tt 


Erasmus 


Jonathan 


Abigail (Page) 


April 28, 1872 


it 


Frank N. 


Nelson 


Mary Silver 


Mar. 12, 1821 


it 


George 


Luther 


Patience 


Aug. 4, 1775 


it 


Hannah 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


Dec. 10, 1803 


tt 


tt 


James 


Rachel 


Feb. 23, 1846 


tt 


" Jane 


Nelson 


Mary H. (Kelly) 


Oct. 24, 1798 


ti 


Harriet 


Samuel 


Abigail 


Jan. 17. 1802 


it 


tt 


Simeon 


Patty 


July 7, 1842 


it 


" Maria 


John 


Ruth 


Aug. 1, 1763 


1 1 


James 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


Sept, 12, 1823 


n 


Janett 


Luther 


Patience 


Feb. 9, 1778 


it 


Jemima 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


Mar. 18, 1774 


it 


Joanna 


Day 


Joanna 


Oct. 6, 1800 


if 


tt 


Jonathan 


Abigail (Page) 


Sept. 8, 1799 


tt 


John 


Simeon 


Patty 


April 10, 1828 


tt 


" B. 


Luther 


Patience 


Jan. 19, 1840 


tt 


" Henry 


John 


Ruth 


June 18, 1766 


tt 


" Ober 


Timothy 


Mary 


Sept. 9, 1762 


tt 


Jonathan 


Day 


Anna (Pattee) 


Aug. 12, 1819 


tt 


Joseph "W. 


Luther 


Patience 


May 26, 1804 


tt 


Joshua 


Simeon 


Patty 


June 10, 1844 


ft 


tt 


John 


Ruth 


Mar. 24, 1783 


tt 


" Bayley 


Jonathan 


Rhoda 


Mar. 1, 1785 


tt 


Judith 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


April 7, 1817 


tt 


Julia Ann 


Luther 


Patience 


June 8, 1802 


ti 


Laura 


Samuel 


Abigail 


Nov. 12, 1815 


it 


Luther 


Luther 


Patience 


Nov. 14, 1832 


ti 


Martha 


it 


ti 


June 11, 1780 


it 


Mary 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


April 12, 1863 


tt 


" C. 


Norris 


Cornelia (Emerson) 


Mar. 30, 1770 


tt 


Molly 


Timothy 


Mary 


Jan. 22, 1798 


tt 


Ralph 


Samuel 


Nancy 


Feb. 22, 1825 


it 


Rufus 


Luther 


Patience 


Aug. 18, 1781 


tt 


Salla 


Jonathan 


Rhoda 


Feb. 2, 1771 


tt 


Samuel 


T. Webster 


Hannah 







TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. *1 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden' Name. 


Sept. 


28, 1805 


Emerson, Samuel 


Samuel 


Abigail 


Sept. 


1835 


" Sylvester 


John 


Ruth 


Nov. 


1, 1769 


" Timothy 


Day 


Anna (Pattee) 


April 


13, 1774 


it it 


Timothy 


Mary 


Dec. 


27, 1853 


" Warren 


Joseph W. 


Harriet 


May 


29, 1782 


" Webster 


T. Webster 


Hannah 


July 


4, 1796 


ii ti 


Samuel 


Nancy 


Mar. 


8, 1860 


it 


Prescott B. 


Sarah A. 


Jan. 


27, 1887 


Emery, Henry Stowell 


David S. 


Lizzie S. Hadley 


Jan. 


18, 1890 


" Irene Pearl 


ii 


Eliza " 


April 11, 1881 


" Walter D. 


it 


ii ii 


Aug. 


8, 1869 


Entwistle, William 


William 


Martha 


Aug. 


1, 1906 


Erbert, Ralph Herman 


Herman C. 


Lizzie A. Hall 


June 


27, 1905 


" Ruth Hall 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 


16, 1811 


Evans, Elias, Jr. 


Elias 


Mahala 


Nov. 


4, 1804 


Ewins, Alexander 


John 


Mehitable 


Aug. 


9, 1833 


" Alphonso 


James P. * 


Elisabeth (Stickney) 


June 


9, 1830 


" Clinton 


John C. 


Eliza 


Dec. 


5, 1889 


" Dorothy 


James 


Mary F. Bodwell 


June 


4, 1802 


" Ebenezer Carlton 


John 


Mehitable 


Mar. 


9, 1826 


" George 


" C. 


Eliza 


Nov. 


27, 1860 


" James 


James 


Mary (F. Bodwell) 


Aug. 


22, 1797 


" " Pinkerton 


John 


Mehitable 


Nov. 


12, 1825 


" John 


James P. 


ti 


Feb. 


6, 1800 


" Carlton 


John 


ii 


Mar. 


8, 1873 


" Louisa ' 


Clinton 


Louisa H. Scott 


Jan. 


22, 1809 


" Margaret 


John 


Mehitable 


Aug. 


11, 1830 


" Mary Peaslee 


James P. 


ii 


Mar. 


8, 1807 


" Mehitable 


John 


ii 


Sept. 


6, 1827 


" Stephen Clement 


James P. 


ii 


Dec. 


4, 1812 


" Thomas H. 


John 


ii 


June 


18, 1869 


" William W. 


Clinton 


Louise H. (Scott) 


Feb. 


20, 1861 


ii F- 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 


11, 1880 


Fanington, Belle Spofford 


Willis S. 


Ella M. Spofford 


July 


23, 1904 


Farr, Everett Alton 


George 


Annie Belle Hadley 


May 


3, 1896 


Farwell, Herman G. 


Lewis E. 


Emma E. Taylor 


April 


21, 1892 


" Warren A. 


ii 


ii 


June 


13, 1851 


Faulkner, M. 


Samuel 


Lydia (A. Woodbury) 


Sept. 


25, 1906 


Felch, Doris Isabell 


Clarence E. 


Ethel Maud Mackie 


Sept. 


27, 1887 


" Gertrude May 


David W. 


Ida J. Conley 


Jan. 


3, 1906 


" Leroy Wesley 


Otis B. 


Helen M. Lane 


Mar. 


28, 1883 


M. 


David W. 


Ida J. Conley 


July 


12, 1889 


M. 


ii 


ii 


Apr. 


7, 1892 


ii p t 


ii 


ii 


Oct. 


3, 1903 


Fenton, Mildred Elene 


Dennis 


Grace Wells 


Nov. 


18, 1900 


Finger, M. 


David 


Celia Groman 


Nov. 


27, 1876 


Finn, Edward 


James 


Agnes 


July 


27, 1873 


" James 


it 


it 


Jan. 


18, 1876 


Fleming, Charles E. 


Edward 


Mary E. Tyler 


Nov. 


22, 1897 


" Hartley Thomas 


Thomas A. 


" E. Pickles 


Mar. 


16, 1899 


" Margaret M. 


John William 


Maggie E. McGuinness 


Jan. 


12, 1881 


ii p_ 


Edward 


Mary E. Tyler 


June 


30, 1781 


Fletcher, Betty 


Samuel 


Sibbell 


Sept. 


4. 1870 


" Florana L. 


James F. 


Elizabeth 


Mar. 


7, 1869 


" George B. 


ii 


ii 


Oct. 


9, 1798 


" Joel 


Samuel 


Sibbell 



22 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of Given Name 

Birth. of Child. 

Oct. 9, 1784 Fletcher, Samuel, Jr. 

Sept. 17, 1887 " Sophronia 

Feb. 25, 1828 Floyd, Joseph 

Oct. 19, 1896 Fluet, Ferdina 

Nov. 28, 1900 " Joseph Arthur Alfred 

Oct. 9, 1872 Foote, Mary L. 

Feb. 4, 1871 " Moody Foster 

Oct. 9, 1892 " Walter S. 

May 25, 1887 Forbes, John Merrill 

Oct. 19, 1894 Foster, Alta Irene 

Aug. 9, 1844 " Benjamin Day 

Dec. 27, 1838 " Charles Curtis 

Oct. 15, 1860 " " H. 

Mar. 13, 1837 " Elisabeth Ann 

Dec. 18, 1873 " Ernest 

May 8, 1798 " Ezekiel 

Nov. 27, 1834 " " Hale 

Mar. 10, 1870 " Fred Dewey 

June 23, 1807 " Hannah Woodbury 

Aug. 12, 1865 " Harvey W. 

26, 1875 " Henry P. 

27, 1838 " Hiram Bertis 

24, 1824 " Israel Thorndike 

10, 1825 " Issachas Ober 

2, 1836 " James Henry 

13, 1796 " " Lovett 

Aug. 13, 1819 " John Paul 

Mar. 11, 1842 " " Woodbury 

24, 1830 " Judith Ann 

27, 1842 " Julia Adaline 

22, 1870 " Leon L. 

Nov. 13, 1869 " Marlow A. 

Jan. 1, 1828 " Martha Jane 

7, 1822 " Mirriam Jane 

10, 1791 " Paul 

Aug. 13, 1832 " Prudence Brown 

Oct. 18, 1900 " William Leslie 

May 29, 1869 " Willis M. 

Aug. 24, 1851 " F. 

Mar. 26, 1860 " F. 

Aug. 13, 1906 Fournier, Bertha Stella 

July 10, 1873 Fraler, M. 

2, 1902 Freeland, Edna Frances 

4, 1885 Freeman, Alice Talbot 

7, 1902 " Willis Elroy 

4, 1896 French, Marian 

28, 1864 " Wilfred A. 

Sept. 21, 1859 " William L. 

Sept. 29, 1899 Frye, Grace Helen 



Aug. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Feb. 



Feb. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



Mar. 
Oct. 



June 
Dec. 
Dec. 

May 
Aug. 



Father's 
Name. 

Samuel 
George B. 
Michael 
Albert E. 

Benjamin A. 

14 

Walter H. 
Charles A. 
Fred D. 
Ezekiel 

u 

Hiram B. 
Phineas 
Charles C. 
Paul 
Ezekiel 
Isaiah W. 

James H. 
Orra I. 
Ezekiel 



Paul 

Ezekiel 

Phineas 

Ezekiel . 
it 

Charles C. 
Hiram B. 
Ezekiel 
James M. . 
Paul 
Ezekiel 
Leon Leslie 
James H. 
John Paul 

u 

Joseph T. 

James 

Willard E. 

Gershom 

John E. 

Fred G. 

Hosea 
it 

Joseph 



Mother's 
Maiden Name. 

Sibbell 

Aliva N. Marden 

Betsey 

Zenaide Lamontague 
ii 

Mary E. Green 

Minnie L. Woodbury 
Mary M. Mason 
Irene E. Gollon 
Prudence (Kelly) 
ii 

Lucy J. 

Roxanna (Woodbury) 

Elizabeth Lowell 

Martha 

Prudence (Kelley) 

Juliette 

Polly J. Foster 

Julia A. 

Lizzie E. (Kimball) 

Prudence (Kelley) 



Martha 

Jane (Austin) 

Roxanna (Woodbury) 

Prudence (Kelley) 
<i 

Elizabeth E. (Lowell) 

Lucy J. 

Prudence (Kelley) 

Sarah 

Martha 

Prudence (Kelley) 

Eva Annie Scott 

Julia A. 

Sabra A. 

Exilda Vidal 

Ellen 

Lizzie L. Silver 

Susan E. Wheeler 

Florence Little 

Helen A. Colburn 

Eliza A. (Austin) 
ii 

Nellie J. Hall 



April 14, 1833 Gag ?, Abner Dinsmore Abner 
May 4, 1870 " Bertha L. " D. 

June 22, 1903 " " Myrtie Edwin E. 

Mar. 25, 1787 " Betsy John 

Sept. 8,1745 " Daniel, Jr. Daniel 



Judith 

Ruth H. 

Lillian Stimpson 

Hannah Duston 

(Ruth) 







TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


oi 


! Child. 


Name. 


Maiden, Name. 


Jan. 1, 1813 


Gage 


, Eliphalet 


Abner 


Judith 


July 21, 1792 


u 


Hannah 


John 


Hannah Duston 


Dec. 23, 1829 


41 


" Jane 


Abner 


Judith 


Sept. 5, 1786 


(( 


John 


Stephen 


Sarah (Cross) 


May 25, 1798 


t( 


" Adams 


John 


Charlotte (Swan) 


Mar. 10, 1835 


ft 


" Haseltine 


Abner 


Judith 


Feb. 16, 1815 


n 


Joseph 


it 


" 


Feb. 21, 1822 


14 


Mary D. 


it 


It 


Jan. 13, 1859 


tt 


" J. 


" D. 


Ruth H. 


May 4, 1870 


II 


Mirtie E. 


ii 


,f 


Sept. 23, 1794 


II 


Nancy 


John 


Hannah Duston 


Nov. 26, 1789 


II 


Phebe 


it 


" 


June 20, 1743 


II 


Ruth 


Daniel 


(Ruth) 


April 23, 1818 


ti 


Sarah N. 


Abner 


Judith 


Oct. 30, 1780 


41 


Stephen 


Stephen 


Sarah (Cross) 


April 7, 1783 


II 


it 


it 


it 


Feb. 12, 1903 


Gagne, Grace Arline 


Lyndon A. 


Jennie Tyrie 


Nov. 18, 1904 


it 


Linwood Alfred 


ti 


ti 


Sept. 3, 1882 


Gagnon, Emma 


John T. 


Mary Twamble 


Nov. 5, 1876 


it 


Frank 


ti 


Asrame (?) 


July 3, 1884 


ft 


John 


it 


Mary Twamble 


May 23, 1904 


Gangochain 


Osgian 


Bazhar Garabedian 


Dec. 21, 1906 


Garabedian, Kirqor 


Sarkis 


Annie 


Aug. 15, 1905 


1 


" Median 


ii 


ii 


Sept. 7, 1858 


Gardi 


aer, Sarah E. 


Jonathan B. 


Martha H. 


April 3, 1902 


Garland, Joseph Alfred 


Alfred M. 


Ruth Heaps 


July 17, 1900 


tt 


Mary Alice 


ft 


ti 


Aug. 3, 1862 


Garside, Albert P. 


Walter 




Dec. 19, 1861 


George, Fred 


Lyman 


Eliza F. 


Dec. 26, 1893 


tt 


Laura May 


Fred P. 


Josie M. Spollett 


Oct. 23, 1898 


tt 


Raymond R. 


it 


it 


Oct. 21, 1890 


Gerrah, F. 


Frank H. 


May E. Armor 


Nov. 3, 1881 


Gibson, Fred 


Luther 


Ada Larrabee 


Oct. 25, 1745 


Giles, 


Ebenezer 


John 


Martha 


Feb. 8, 1763 


tt 


it 


ii 


Mary 


Sept. 8, 1742 


n 


Elide 


ii 


Martha 


Mar. 17, 1769 


tt 


Elisabeth 


it 


Mary 


April 2, 1767 


<t 


John 


ii 


it 


April 3, 1765 


*t 


Lydia 


it 


ti 


Sept. 16, 1758 


tt 


Molly 


it 


it 


Nov. 21, 1769 


tt 


Phebe 


Joseph 


Susanna 


July 22, 1771 


tt 


Samuel 


John 


Mary 


Nov. 22, 1760 


tt 


Sarah 


it 


it 


May 24, 1902 


Gilman, Ernest Dana 


Dana E. 


Sarah Dudley 


Aug. 2, 1861 


Goodhue, Edith Lura 


Franklin A. 


Almira W. 


Mar. 16, 1859 


tt 


Frank B. 


ii 


it 


Oct. 10, 1842 


Goodwin, Alfred Elliot 


Elliot 


Polly (Hall) 


April 27, 1870 


tt 


Julia M. 


George O. 


Diantha 


Jan. 16, 1878 


tt 


Leonard O. 


ti 


Emma 


June 20, 1779 


Gordon, Abigail 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


Oct. 27, 1782 


ft 


it 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


Jan. 12, 1786 


n 


it 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


Mar. 17, 1797 


t i 


ti 


Joshua 


Mary 


May 31, 1845 


a 


Albert Brigham 


Benaiah B. 


Phebe (Haskell) 


April 7, 1750 


ft 


Alexander 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


July 29, 1776 


(i 


ii 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 



23 



24 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Jan. 14, 1786 


Gordon 


, Alexander 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


June 6, 1777 


41 


Amos 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


April 16, 1792 


II 


Anna 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


Mar. 29, 1839 


11 


Asa Currier 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


Feb. 9, 1802 


41 


Benaiah Brigham 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


Nov. 29, 1752 


11 


Benjamin 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


June 23, 1764 


41 


ii 


ii 


Hannah (Stanley) 


June 13, 1828 


(4 


ii 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


Feb. 9, 1771 


11 


Betty 


Alexander 


Hannah (Stanley) 


Feb. 23,1785 


II 


ti 


Jonathan 


Esther (Sanders) 


April 9, 1799 


II 


n 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Feb. 11,1902 


It 


Carl Edward 


Edward L. 


Lucy H. Faulkner 


Dec. 7, 1832 


It 


Charles Kimball 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


June 2, 1800 


II 


" Phineas 


Joshua 


Mary 


Sept. 24, 1830 


It 


Christopher Morri- 
son [wood 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


Aug. 27, 1808 


II 


Cuthbert Colling- 


Phineas, Jr. 


Mary (White) 


Mar. 15, 1743 


II 


Daniel 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


April 26. 1768 


14 


ii 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Feb. 21, 1801 


44 


it 


Lebbeus 


Polly 


June 28, 1768 


It 


David 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


Feb. 21, 1904 


14 


Donald Woodbury 


Edward L. 


Lulu H. Faulkner 


April 23, 1898 


II 


Dorothy Minerva 


Howard Lee 


Laura L. Smith 


Dee. 10, 1895 


• 1 


Earl 


ii 


it 


Aug. 15, 1804 


14 


" Clap 


Joshua 


Mary 


April 14, 1838 


II 


Ebenezer Bailey 


Jonathan K. 


Betsey (A. Merrill) 


Nov. 6, 1865 


11 


Edward E. 


John H. 


Rebecca L. 


Nov. 24, 1864 


II 


" L. 


George C. 


Hannah M. 


June 22, 1798 


II 


Eliza 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


Aug. 7, 1901 


II 


Elvira May 


George F. 


Ella Louisa Walker 


Jan. 31, 1788 


It 


Esther 


Jonathan 


Esther (Sanders) 


April 21, 1810 


II 


George Phineas 


Phineas, Jr. 


Mary (White) 


Aug. 24, 1836 


It 


Greenleaf Clark 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


Dec. 23, 1758 


11 


Hannah 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


Oct. 3, 1782 


II 


" Woodard 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


July 13, 1788 


II 


ti 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


July 26, 1773 


tl 


Henry 


Alexander 


Hannah (Stanley) 


Aug. 3, 1872 


44 


Howard L. 


George C. 


" M. Woodbury 


Oct. 12, 1780 


44 


Isaac 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


May 13, 1790 


44 


John 


it 


14 


Jan. 28, 1777 


44 


" Hancock 


Alexander 


Hannah (Stanley) 


Oct. 19, 1806 


41 


" Saunders 


Joshua 


Mary 


Dec. 5, 1744 


4t 


Jonathan 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


June 29, 1774 


If 


it 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


Sept. 12, 1809 


• 1 


Kimball 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


Sept. 25, 1834 


II 


Joseph Haskell 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 
Phinehas 


Phebe (Haskell) 


May 10, 1775 


It 


Joshua 


Abigail (Currier) 


April 5, 1770 


tl 


Judith 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


April 4, 1806 


f 1 


Laura 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


June 14, 1766 


II 


Libbeus 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Nov. 17, 1803 


II 


Louisa 


Phineas, Jr. 


Mary (White) 



TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS: BIRTHS. 



25 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Aug. 2, 1760 


Gordon, 


Lydia 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


April 24, 1899 


n 


Majorie F. 


Edward L. 


Lula H. Faulkner 


April 18, 1762 


it 


Margaret 


William 


Martha 


Oct. 26, 1802 


if 


Mary 


Joshua 


Mary 


Mar. 31, 1806 


II 


" Ann 


Phineas, Jr. 


" (White) 


Dec. 29, 1873 


II 


" E. 


George 


Ann (Sweeney) 


Nov. 6, 1774 


it 


Mehitable 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


June 1, 1806 


II 


ii 


Libbeus 


Mary 


Nov. 20, 1859 


II 


Minnie 


George C. 


Hannah M. 


Nov. 12, 1792 


1. 


Molly 


Jonathan 


Esther (Sanders) 


Aug. 22, 1798 


II 


Oliver 


Joshua 


Mary 


May 12, 1772 


II 


Peaslee 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


July 28, 1754 


II 


Phebe 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


Nov. 22, 1799 


II 


ft 


Lebbeus 


Polly 


Sept. 17, 1841 


" 


" Elisabeth 


Benaiah B. 


Phebe (Haskell) 


June 26, 1746 


II 


Phineas 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


April 18, 1770 


11 


ii 


Jonathan 


Esther Sanders 


June 18, 1781 


ii 


Phinehas 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


April 9, 1799 


II 


Polly 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Sept. 1, 1783 


II 


Richard 


Phinehas 


Abigail (Currier) 


Feb. 25, 1777 


II 


Ruth 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Mar. 5, 1803 


II 


Sally George 


Lebbeus 


Polly 


Oct. 31, 1762 


li 


Sarah 


Alexander 


Susannah (Pattee) 


July 25, 1897 


it 


Seth Clifford 


Edward L. 


Lulu H. Faulkner 


Jan. 20, 1803 


It 


" Pattee 


Amos 


Susannah (Pattee, 2d) 


April 19, 1790 


tl 


Sophia 


Benjamin 


Deliah (Wheeler) 


Oct. 22, 1796 


II 


Susan 


ii 


■1 


July 3, 1772 


li 


Susanna 


Daniel 


Mehitable 


Jan. 23, 1808 


It 


Susannah 


Amos 


Susannah (Pattee, 2d) 


April 23, 1748 


t( 


Bells 


Alexander 


" (Pattee) 


April 19, 1805 


tt 


Washington 


Amos 


(Pattee, 2d) 


Mar. 9, 1779 


II 


Wells 


Alexander 


Hannah (Stanley) 


Aug. 2, 1766 


II 


Willard 


ii 


ii ii 


June 33, 1828 


II 


ii 


Benaiah Brig- 
ham 


Phebe (Haskell) 


Sept. 27, 1759 


II 


William Jennison 


William 


Martha 


Dec. 25, 1851 


II 


M. 


Augustus 


Harriet A. 


Mar. 20, 1778 


Gorrell, 


Elisabeth 


Nathaniel 


Jane 


July 13, 1790 


ti 


Fanny 


ii 


ii 


May 25, 1776 


ii 


Gain Armour 


it 


it 


July 15, 1774 


ti 


Jane 


it 


tt 


April 28, 1782 


tt 


John 


u 


tt 


Sept. 14, 1796 


it 


Joseph 


tt 


tt 


Aug. 14, 1801 


tt 


Louise 


tt 


tt 


July 13, 1780 


tt 


Mary 


tt 


tt 


May 12, 1784 


tt 


Nathaniel 


tt 


tt 


April 4, 1786 


a 


Samuel 


it 


tt 


June 24, 1792 


it 


" Armour 


tt 


tt 


April 15, 1895 


Grant, 


F. 


Horace W. 


Nettie E. Hastings 


Dec. 15, 1885 


Greeley 


', Helen A. 


George A. 


Helen A. Hall 


Aug. 25, 1899 


Greenwood, Flora Frances 


William 


Sadie B. Colby 


Aug. 23, 1821 


Gutterson, Samuel Webster 


James 


Polly 


Oct. 15, 1903 


Hadley 


, Carl Edward 


Walter F. 


Sadie Nudd 


Oct. 22, 1869 


tt 


Charles 


Charles W. 


Ellen 


Jan. 8, 1901 


tt 


Ernest Henry 


Walter F. 


Sadie P. Nudd 



26 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


July 6, 1884 


Hadley, Hattie C. 


Aaron S. 


Charlotte A. Green 


Oct. 18, 1895 


c 


tt 


James H. 


Emma A. Morrill 


Oct. 6, 1899 


c 


Mildred Mona 


Walter F. 


Sadie P. Nudd 


Mar. 28, 1893 


i 


Walter E. 


James H. 


Emma A. Morrill 


Sept. 16, 1867 


<( 


M. 


Charles 


Annie 


Dec. 27, 1876 


Haigh, Addie A. 


Allen 


Abbie (M. Stott) 


Nov. 2, 1891 


a 


Chester 


Ben 


Ann 


May 21, 1888 


a 


Effle 


tt 


tt 


Nov. 16, 1889 


tf 


Lester 


a 


tt 


Nov. 2, 1870 


a 


Lydia M. 


Fred 


Anna 


April 9, 1899 


u 


Maurice Herbert 


Herbert 


Clara M. Foster 


July 24, 1893 


a 


Ralph 


tt 


tt 


April 16, 1887 


it 


Walter 


tt 


tt 


Dec. 5, 1851 


Haley, Albert 


Michael 


Frances M. 


July 15, 1858 


(C 


Charles 


tt 


tt 


July 16, 1853 


u 


Frances D. 


tt 


ti 


Nov. 24, 1856 


a 


Georgianna Henryett 


tt 


tt 


Nov. 24, 1856 


a 


John Henry 


tt 


tt 


April 24, 1862 


u 


Maria J. 


ti 


tt 


June 27, 1851 


Hall 


, Abbie Ann 


Silas 


Abigail (Morse) 


Oct. 15, 1771 


ii 


Abiah 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


July 28, 1785 


ii 


Abner Bayley 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Oct. 20, 1838 


tt 


Adaline Jane 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


Dec. 26, 1799 


ti 


Albridge 


Joseph 


Rhoda 


July 30, 1826 


II 


Alice 


Israel W. 


Polly (Stickney) 


Sept. 19, 1808 


II 


Allen 


Jonathan 


Susanna (Kimball) 


Dec. 10, 1805 


it 


Alvah 


tt 


tt 


Dec. 9, 1835 


a 


" Wallace 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


Feb. 1, 1784 


(i 


Amos 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Dec. 31, 1802 


it 


it 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


Feb. 28, 1862 


tt 


Arthur C. 


Prescott C. 


Mary A. 


Aug. 13, 1802 


a 


Asa 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


May 13, 1838 


ft 


it 


Daniel F. 


Susan 


June 19, 1748 


II 


Babe 


Raphe 


Abigail 


July 21, 1776 


ft 


Benjamin 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Sept. 3, 1839 


it 


" Franklin 


Seth 


Phebe 


April 28, 1757 


II 


Benoney 


Raphe 


Abigail 


Nov. 19, 1799 


it 


Betsy Kimball 


Jonathan 


Susannah (Kimball) 


Sept. 12, 1777 


it 


Caleb 


William 


Frances 


June 26, 1837 


it 


Caroline Elisabeth 


Seth 


Phebe 


July 9, 1841 


tt 


Charles Herman 


a 


ll 


Dec. 19, 1861 


tt 


Clarence P. 


Prescott C. 


Mary Ann 


April 22, 1870 


it 


Clifton Senter 


tt 


tt 


Nov. 19, 1768 


it 


Collins 


David 


Mary 


Dec. 11, 1804 


tt 


Daniel Foster 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


Sept. 19, 1785 


tt 


Wood 


William 


Frances 


Sept. 16, 1744 


tt 


David 


Raphe 


Abigail 


Aug. 21, 1786 


it 


tt 


David 


Mary 


April 20, 1837 


tt 


Delia Ann 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


Dec. 7, 1741 


tt 


Ebenezer 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Mar. 22, 1772 


ft 


tt 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


Sept. 19, 1842 


tt 


Edgar Allen 


Allen 


Sarah (Emerson) 


Aug. 3, 1757 


tt 


Elijah 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Aug. 23, 1794 


it 


II 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Dec. 8, 1775 


it 


Eliphalet 


David 


Mary 


Mar. 14, 1780 


a 


ii 


tt 


ti 



TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS: BIRTHS. 



•27 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden, Name. 


Jan. 21, 1774 


Hall 


, Elisabeth 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


Mar. 13, 1792 


II 


it 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


July 1, 1807 


H 


ti 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Mar. 17, 1818 


li 


" Eaton 


Elijah 




Aug. 17, 1872 


tt 


Elizabeth M. 


Ezra B. 


Lydia J. 


Sept. 17, 1801 


l< 


Ellice 


Jonathan 


Susannah (Kimball) 


April 8, 1843 


ci 


Emily Rosettee 


Alvah 


Nancy 


July 10, 1754 


41 


Enoch 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


April 2, 1770 


II 


tt 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


Dec. 8, 1S06 


11 


Esther 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


April 30, 1852 


ft 


Evaline A. 


Oliver 


Louisa Coburn 


April 4, 1845 


It 


Ezra Baxter 


Seth 


Jemima 


Jan. 28, 1902 


II 


Florence Loretta 


William L. 


Ada L. Clevesey 


Dec. 25, 1871 


n 


Frank C. 


F. C. 


M. J. Peabody 


Sept. 30, 1779 


ti 


Frederick 


William 


Frances 


Jan. 9, 1890 


tt 


George W. 


John 


Susan Benny 


June 12, 1769 


II 


Hannah 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Mar. 12, 1790 


it 


ii 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Oct. 20, 1800 


li 


it 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


Aug. 10, 1808 


M 


ii 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


Jan. 4, 1798 


tt 


" Webster 


Jonathan 


Susannah (Kimball) 


Oct. 28, 1833 


it 


" Woodman 


Moses W. 


Abigail 


Jan. 11, 1845 


it 


Helen Amanda 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


Nov. 29, 1839 


II 


Hiram Augustus 


Oliver 


Louisa 


Sept. 5, 1835 


it 


" Scott 


Seth 


Phebe 


Dec. 30. 1770 


li 


Isaac 


Rapha 


Ruth 


May 4, 1843 


it 


" Austin 


Moses W. 


Abigail 


Dec. 15, 1804 


ii 


Isaiah 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


Feb. 5, 1799 


it 


Israel Woodbury 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


May 4, 1843 


li 


Jacob Bunker 


Moses W. 


Abigail 


June 5, 1751 


it 


James 


Raphe 


it 


Oct. 19, 1778 


ii 


«i 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Aug. 2, 1792 


il 


<■ 


David 


Mary 


April 30, 1831 


II 


" Taylor 


Daniel F. 


Susan 


April 21, 1809 


if 


Jeremiah Smith 


Joseph 


Esther (Woodbury) 


Aug. 21, 1765 


it 


Jesse 


Rapha 


Abigail 


Jan. 14, 1735 


1 1 


John 


John 


Sarah 


April 27, 1757 


tt 


»i 


" 3d 


Loue 


Jan. 6, 1767 


it 


ii 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Nov. 30, 1804 


it 


n 


Moses 


Anna (Foster) 


Sept. 26, 1819 


it 


" Nelson 


Elijah 




Sept. 1, 1772 


it 


Jonathan 


Joshua 


Lydia 


Oct. 6, 1749 


1 1 


Joseph 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Feb. 12, 1759 


ii 


it 


Raphe 


Abigail 


May 16, 1768 


it 


ii 


Joshua 


Lydia 


Sept. 10, 1775 


tt 


" Cross 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


Sept. 30, 1902 


if 


" Thomas 


William 


Katherine Laughlin 


Oct. 18, 1743 


it 


Joshua 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


July 15, 1775 


it 


1* 


Joshua 


Lydia 


May 13, 1763 


ti 


Judith 


Raphe 


Abigail 


Nov. 20, 1796 


it 


ii 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Jan. 28, 1821 


ti 


" Pettengill 


it 




June 18, 1775 


li 


Kimball 


Rapha 


Ruth 


Oct. 30, 1874 


ft 


Lena M. 


Oscar O. 


Etta G. 


Aug. 21, 1846 


1 1 


Lester L. 


Oliver 


Louisa Coburn 


Mar. 30, 1807 


li 


Lidia Groves 


Jonathan 


Susanna (Kimball) 



28 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Dec. 25, 1858 


Hall. 


, Lillie Josephine 


Mar. 10, 1815 


II 


Louisa 


Mar. 1, 1842 


it 


" Jane 


Feb. 7, 1836 


tt 


" Wheeler 


May 17, 1822 


if 


Lucy Jane 


Mar. 14, 1774 


it 


Lydia 


Aug. 5, 1787 


ii 


tt 


July 20, 1751 


it 


Mary 


July 20, 1754 


it 


ft 


Sept. 28, 1769 


it 


ii 


May 3, 1774 


a 


ii 


Dec. 24, 1806 


it 


ti 


Sept. 17, 1812 


it 


II 


April 3, 1771 


ft 


Mehitable 


Jan. 9, 1779 


if 


Moses 


July 28, 1799 


it 


" Webster 


Oct. 21, 1873 


<t 


Nellie J. 


Nov. 22, 1803 


it 


Oliver 


May 4, 1843 


it 


" Oscar 


April 3, 1828 


it 


Otis F. 


May 5, 1795 


it 


Peasey (?) 


Aug. 26, 1746 


it 


Peter 


Aug. 6, 1777 


ii 


ii 


June 5, 1753 


it 


Phebe 


April 18, 1761 


ii 


ii 


June 15, 1810 


it 


tf 


April 9, 1794 


if 


Polly 


Mar. 7, 1799 


11 


" Baldwin 


Mar. 25, 1805 


11 


a 


Mar. 16, 1839 


Ii 


Prescott Coburn 


Feb. 27, 1902 


if 


Ralph Macurdy 


Nov. 1, 1773 


ii 


Rapha 


July 20, 1742 


tl 


Richard 


Sept. 14, 1800 


If 


" Ingalls 


Jan. 21, 1850 


II 


Rowena E. 


Feb. 19, 1801 


it 


Sally 


Nov. 13, 1766 


it 


Samuel 


Oct. 19, 1806 


ii 


tt 


Mar. 1, 1734 


it 


Sarah 


Feb. 19, 1777 


tt 


" 


June 12, 1858 


it 


ii 


July 10, 1841 


it 


" Euphemia 


Aug. 14,? 1782 


it 


Seth 


July 31, 1808 


if 


tl 


April 9, 1812 


fl 


Silas 


April 13, 1801 


It 


Stephen Kimball 


Nov. 7, 1807 


ii 


Stillman 


Feb. 25, 1739 


11 


Susanna 


Sept. 27, 1755 


ii 


tt 


Aug. 28, 1780 


ii 


u 


May 18, 1811 


ii 


it 


Dec. 4, 1874 


if 


"Warren S. 


Dec. 10, 1747 


it 


William 


May 1, 1768 


it 


" 


April 4, 1771 


(i 


ii 


Mar. 3, 1869 


11 


Willis L. 



Father's 


Mother's 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Silas 


Abigail W. (Morse) 


Moses 


Anna (Foster) 


Oliver 


Louisa Coburn 


Daniel F. 


Susan 


Elijah 




Joshua 


Lydia 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


John 


Mary 


" Jr. 


it 


Joshua 


Lydia 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


Jonathan 


Susanna (Kimball) 


Joshua 

ii 


Lydia 
ii 


" Jr. 


Rachel 


Ezra B. 


Lydia J. (Parline) 


Jonathan 


Susannah Kimball 


Oliver 


Louisa Coburn 


Israel W. 


Polly (Stickney) 


William 


Betty (Webster) 


Raphe 


Abigail 


James 


Elisabeth (Barker) 


Raphe 

11 


Abigail 
ii 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


William 


Betty (Webster) 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Benjamin 


Hannah 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


Arthur C. 


Lucretia E. Ward 


David 


Mary 


Raphe 


Abigail 


Farnum 


Sarah 


Oliver 


Louisa Coburn 


Elijah 


Elisabeth (Currier) 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


Moses 


Anna (Foster) 


John 


Sarah 


Joshua 


Lydia 


Charles R. 


Sarah E. 


Alvah 


Nancy (Coburn) 


David 


Mary 


Moses 

ii 


Anna (Foster) 
it 


Joshua, Jr. 


Rachel (Bailey) 


Amos 


Dorcas (Woodbury) 


John 


Sarah 


" 3d 


Loue 


Joshua 


Lydia 


Jonathan 


Susanna (Kimball) 


Ezra B. 


Lydia J. (Parline) 


John, Jr. 


Mary 


Ebenezer 


Deborah 


David 


Mary 


Oscar O. 


Etta G. 



TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS : BIRTHS. 



2& 



Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


Of < 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden .Name. 


Doc. 31, 1851 


Hall, Willis M. 


Allen 


Sarah (Emerson) 


Mar. 11, 1860 


II 


M. 


Hiram 


Charlotte J. (Merrill) 


Mar. 29, 1860 


ll 


M. 


John W. 


Sarah H. (Woodbury) 


May 19, 1863 


Hamblett, John W. 


George W. 


Mary 


Aug. 9, 1859 


Hamlet 


:, Milton 


it 


" J. 


Nov. 10, 1874 


Hammond, F. 


Edward 


Kate 


Jan. 28, 1777 


Hardy, 


Benjamin 


Jacob 


Mary 


Jan. 7, 1801 


ii 


James Sherburne 


Manley 


Sarah 


Mar. 19, 1805 


u 


Manley " 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 6. 1803 


n 


Samuel Eaton 


cti 


«t 


Feb. 22, 1773 


ii 


Smith 


Jacob 


Mary 


April 17, 1892 


Harris, 


Augusta C. 


Herbert W. 


" F. Woodbury 


Sept. 28, 1749 


u 


Elisabeth 


Joseph 


Joanna 


May 16,1895 


u 


Ethel O. 


Edward D. 


Amanda Tewksbury 


Jan. 12, 1885 


it 


Fred Woodbury 


Herbert W. 


Mary Woodbury 


Mar. 25, 1906 


II 


Harriet Medora 


t( 


ii 


July 6, 1774 


It 


Joanna 


Joseph, Jr. 


Martha 


Aug. 16, 1751 


11 


Joseph 


it 


Joanna 


Oct. 21, 1758 


It 


Mary 


ti 


ii 


June 20, 1793 


it 


tt 


Titus 


Phebe (Jones) 


Oct. 17, 1893 


II 


Oliver G. 


Herbert W. 


Mary F. Woodbury 


April 16, 1756 


II 


Patience 


Joseph 


Joanna 


Sept. 29, 1753 


ii 


Sarah 


it 


ii 


Nov. 15, 1776 


ft 


u 


" Jr. 


Martha 


Sept. 23, 1896 


ii 


Stillman Kingsbury 


Herbert W. 


Mary F. Woodbury 


May 6, 1889 


Hart, Edward E. 


Johnson 


Cynthia Morse 


Sept. 1, 1830 


Harvey 


-, Harriet Frances 


James 


Ruth 


Mar. 13, 1834 


it 


James Madison 


tf 


ii 


July 23, 1832 


ii 


Julia Ann 


a 


it 


Sept. 2, 1799 


Haseltine, Absalom 


Jonathan 


Judith Hall 


Aug. 25, 1809 


n 


Alonzo Smith 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Mar. 6, 1802 


ii 


Amos 


Jonathan, Jr. 


Sally 


Feb. 25, 1826 


it 


Catherine Nancy 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Nov. 11, 1817 


it 


Charles Hastings 


ii 


ii 


Sept. 26, 1877 


ti 


Cora M. 


William H. 


Carrie 


Sept. 25, 1760 


(I 


Daniel 


Daniel 


Abigail 


Dec. 29, 1761 


it 


Deliverance 


ii 


ii 


April 18, 1767 


It 


Ebenezer 


Jonathan 


Lydia 


Sept. 25, 1891 


it 


Edna Viola 


William H. 


Carrie E. McNeil 


Jan. 4, 1813 


ti 


Eliza Jane 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Sept. 21, 1881 


(t 


EllaK. 


William H. 




Dec. 1, 1768 


it 


Follansbee 


Nathan 


Elisabeth 


June 26, 1888 


ti 


Fred 


John 


Celestia A. Bean 


Oct. 2, 1819 


ti 


Harriet 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Feb. 15,1798 


ti 


Jephthah 


Jonathan 


Judith (Hall) 


May 17, 17J7 


it 


Jonathan 


ii 


Sarah (Kimball) 


Aug. 30, 1769 


it 


Joseph 


it 


Lydia 


Jan. 18, 1862 


II 


Kate 


ti 


Elizabeth A. 


Mar. 15, 1890 


II 


Lena May 


William H. 


Clara E. McNeil 


Jan. 23, 1811 


II 


Life Augustus 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Aug. 27, 1782 


11 


Lydia 


Jonathan 


Sarah (Kimball) 


May 5, 1876 


tl 


Mark P. 


William H. 


Carrie E. McNeil 


June 30, 1815 


it 


Mary Ann 


Nathaniel 


Betsey (Smith) 


Mar. 5, 1765 


it 


Mehitable 


Jonathan 


Lydia 


Jan. 20, 1890 


II 


Pearl C. 


John C. 


Celestia A. Bean 


Feb. 26, 1889 


ti 


Ruth 


William H. 


Carrie E. McNeil 



30 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maideu Name. 


Aug. 


8, 1779 


Haseltine, Sarah 


Jonathan 


Sarah (Kimball) 


Mar. 


17, 1766 


" Susanna 


Nathan 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 


4, 1885 


" Winslow W. 


Winslow W. 


Lavinia A. Corry 


Dec. 


28, 1751 


Hastings, Asa 


Jonas 


Lydia 


May 


7, 1756 


" Bayley 


James 


Mary (Foster) 


Mar. 


21, 1891 


" Bertha May 


George W. 


J. Gertie Tibbetts 


June 


2, 1753 


" Ednor 


Jonas 


Lydia 


Aug. 


25, 1791 


" Fanny 


James 


Sarah (Clough) 


Mar. 


11, 1893 


" Gladys G. 


George M. 


Gertrude Tibbetts 


Aug. 


17, 1767 


" Hannah 


James 


Mary (Foster) 


Jan. 


14, 1751 


" James 


i. 


• I 


Nov. 


17, 1796 


<i it 


ii 


Sarah (Clough) 


Apr. 


9, 1758 


" Jedediah 


it 


Mary (Foster) 


Aug. 


15, 1765 


II d 


«i 


it 


Nov. 


3, 1769 


" John 


ii 


ii 


Apr. 


11, 1744 


" Jr. 


John 


Rebecca Kelley 


Nov. 


9, 1754 


*' Jonas 


Jonas 


Lydia 


Nov. 


9, 1747 


" " Jr. 






Jan. 


25, 1753 


" Joseph 


James 


Mary (Foster) 


July 


9, 1756 


" Lydia 


Jonas 


Lydia 


Feb. 


24, 1758 


«, (i 


ii 


1, 


Feb. 


17, 1801 


" Mary 


James 


Sarah (Clough) 


Sept. 


12, 1762 


" Moses 


,1 


Mary (Foster) 


Oct. 


12. 1745 


" Richard 


John 


Rebecca Kelley 


Feb. 


6, 1759 


" Samuel 


Jonas 


Lydia 


Nov. 


19, 1797(8) " Sarah 


James 


Sarah (Clough) 


Apr. 


12, 1750 


" Timothy 


John 


Rebecca Kelley 


Feb. 


13, 1793 


" Zabud 


James 


Sarah (Clough) 


Sept. 


16, 1888 


ii p 


George M. 


Jennie E. G. Tibbetts 


Nov. 


28, 1815 


Hatch, Lewis Melvin 


Arioch M. 


Susan Prescott 


Feb. 


3,. 


Havey, Mary Effie 


John 


Delia Gardner 


Oct. 


25, 1797 


Hayford, Lydia 


Samuel Riley 


Jerusha 


Dec. 


29, 1798 


Riley 


it 


,4 


Oct. 


6, L800 


" William 


ii 


II 


June 


28, 1817 


Haynes, Almira 


David 




Dec. 


16, 1811 


Betsey 


it 




Jan. 


10, 1816 


" David 


ii 




Dec. 


18, 1808 


" Mary 


ti 




Sept. 


30, 184 i 


Haywood, Sarah Morton 


William H. 


Lydia 


Aug. 


21, 1896 


Hazeltine, M. 


Ernest C. 


Hattie V. Sanderson 


June 


30, 1869 


Hazen, Charles Elmer 


Daniel Cass 


Flora Morrison 


Oct. 


6, 1861 


i< 


A. 


Ann M. 


Oct. 


2, 1864 


Head, Adrien E. 


Charles 


Barbara Ann 


Oct. 


27, 1869 


Angie B. 


■i 


i« 


Dec. 


2, 1861 


" Annie F. 


ii 


1 1 


July 


20, 1859 


Sarah E. 


ii 


it 


Dec. 


16, 1905 


Heaps, Charles Harold 


Joseph 


Carrie Alberta Haigh 


Mar. 


13, 1903 


" Ralph Samuel 


Samuel H. 


Agnes M. Gearin 


July 


9, 1901 


" Roland John 


" 


ii 


Sept. 


30, 1901 


" William France 


Joseph 


Carrie Alberta Haigh 


Aug. 


12, 1764 


Heath, Abiel 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


July 


29, 1805 


" Alva 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


July 


2, 1778 


" Benjamin 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Aug. 


29, 1767 


" Daniel 


ii 


ii 


Sept. 


16, 1745 


" David 


David 


Anna 


June 


25, 1770 


41 ** 


Joshua 


Dorothy 





TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS : BIRTHS. 6 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden, Name. 


Nov. 26, 1782 


Heath, Dorcas 




Hoppy Page 


Sept. 24, 1797 


" Edward 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


Sept. 24, 1756 


" Elisabeth 


David 


Anna 


Mar. 4, 1772 


CI CI 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Sept. 24. 1795 


" Isaiah 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


June 12, 1765 


" James 


David 


Anna 


Sept. 10, 1780 


ii ii 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Oct. 8, 1788 


" Joanna 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


June 21, 1760 


" John 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


April 4, 1791 


a it 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


Nov. 9, 1776 


" Joshua 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Mar. 1, 1754 


" Judith 


David 


Anna 


Jan. 20, 1774 


" Lydia 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Nov. 8, 1794 


ii ii 


Daniel 


Martha (Merrill) 


July 20, 1760 


" Moses 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Jan. 12, 1748 


" Sarah 


David 


Anna 


Sept. 22, 1782 


it <i 


Joshua 


Dorothy 


Mar. 4, 1792 


" Simond 


Daniel 


Martha (Merrill) 


Mar. 20, 1750 


" Susanna 


David 


Anna 


Feb. 12, 1803 


" Wealtha 


John 


Joanna (Asten) 


Dec. 15, 1891 


Henderson, F. 


Charles 


Amanda I. Palmer 


Sept. 1, 1871 


Hesenius, M. 


George 


Margaret Conner 


Sept. 18, 1873 


M. 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 22, 1849 


Hicks, James P. 


Joseph 


Sarah P. 


Mar. 7, 1876 


" William W. 


William G. 


Lizzie 


Aug. 8, 1782 


Hibberd, Abel 


Jonathan 


Sarah 


Aug. 18, 1862 


Hibbert, Martha A. J. 


Joseph 


Frances 


April 30, 1905 


Higgins, George Warren 


Francis E. 


Edith A. Smith 


Mar. 8, 1860 


Hildreth, Frank L. 


Joseph O. 


Harriet L. 


July 11, 1886 


Hill, Austin 


Henry 


Margaret Miles 


Mar. 12, 1892 


" William A. 


William R. 


Ida M. McAvoy 


Dec. 24, 1859 


Hills, Clarence L. 


John R. 


Sarah A. 


April 25, 1858 


" Jerome K. 


" K. 


N. 


April 26, 1906 


Hird, Bessie Maude 


David 


Mary A. Shackleton 


July 15,1895 


" John S. 


it 


ii 


Aug. 26, 1899 


" Martha 


it 


it 


Feb. 21, 1898 


" Nancy 


it 


ii 


May 2, 1904 


" William Brista Atkinson " 


ii 


Jan. 29, 1844 


Holbrook, Edward Laton 


Albert M. 


Lucy A. 


Sept. 16, 1845 


" Ellen Gertrude 


(i 


K 


Jan. 13, 1847 


" Mary Imogene 


■I 


it 


Oct. 5, 1863 


Holmes, Annie 


Crawford 


Mary 


Mar. 1, 1887 


House, Raymond A. 


Elwin P. 


Shirley D. F. Grow 


Feb. 18, 1782 


How, Ebenezer 


Ebenezer 


Hannah 


Aug. 7, 1788 


" Hannah 


*i 


ti 


Feb. 17, 1786 


" James 


ii 


ii 


Mar. 29, 1784 


" Parker 


ii 


ii 


April 11, 1870 


Howard, Fred A. 


George C. 


Georgianna W. Smith 


Dec. 10, 1776 


" John 


John 


Lydia 


Mar. 28, 1799 


" Joseph Harris 


ii 


Joanna 


Mar. 26, 1781 


" Peter 


ii 


Lydia 


Oct. 3, 1882 


Howe, Ether M. 


Daniel 


" M. Mears 


Oct. 16, 1898 


Howes, George M., Jr. 


George M. 


Margaret Smith 


Aug. 23, 1871 


Hoyt, Benaiah 


D. M. 


Lydia A. 


April 14, 1876 


" Frank 


David 


Nettie 


Oct. 1806 


Hubbard, Eliza 


John 


Sarah 



32 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


ot 


• Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Sept. 25, 1831 


Hubbard, William Chase 


Rodney 


Sally 


Nov. 25. 1875 


Hudson, Ella M. 


Robert S. 


Sarah 


Nov. 16, 1887 


ii 


Ernest 


Henry 


Margaret Smith 


Nov. 2, 1894 


ii 


Fay P. 


James A. 


Sadie S. Stratton 


Sept. 15, 1874 


ii 


Francis E. 


Robert 


Sarah 


Oct. 16, 1896 


t« 


Grace Evelyn Phcebu 


s William A. 


Emma M. 


Sept. 7, 1756 


Hull, 


Elisabeth 


Joseph 


Rebeckah 


Feb. 2, 1754 


(1 


Israel 


ii 


" 


Oct. 29, 1776 


ii 


ii 


Israel 


Lydia 


Dec. 3, 1851 


Hunkins, F. 


Moses 


Mary J. 


July 30. 1888 


Hunt, 


Chester E. 


Lincoln H. 


Violet Bennett 


Nov. 26, 1905 


h 


Dorris Mildred 


ii 


ii 


Nov. 14, 1869 


«« 


Eva M. 


Lewis A. 


Ruth (Duston) 


Sept. 2, 1858 


tt 


Flora B. 


George L. 


Huldah N. 


Dec. 6, 1869 


ii 


Frank N. 


John N. 


Harriet (Duston) 


Sept. 24, 1864 


i< 


Hattie B. 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 17, 1873 


ii 


Lizzie D. 


Lewis A. 


Ruth Duston 


July 6, 1862 


si 


Lola H. 


John N. 


Harriet (Duston) 


Feb. 28, 1875 


14 


Mabel S. 


Horace W. 


Rosetta W. 


June 24, 1899 


11 


Marion C. 


Lincoln H. 


"Violet Bennett 


Nov. 12, 1892 


11 


Maurice Westley 


41 


ii 


Jan. 18, 1897 


II 


Mildred Ruth 


JohnH. 


Emma F. Chase 


July 22, 1870 


11 


Otis A. 


Horace W. 


Rosetta A. 


July 30, 1864 


11 


Walter M. 


George L. 


Huldah 


July 8, 1895 


11 


Warren L. 


Lincoln H. 


Violet A. Bennett 


Sept. 30, 1861 


II 




George L. 


Huldah 


Dec. 27, 1886 


11 




Lorin L. 


Annie G. Ball 


June 21, 1892 


11 


M. 


John H. 


Emma F. Chase 


May 1, 1870 


Huse, 


, Jacob P. 


Jacob P. 


Martha O. 


May 1, 1892 


Huson, Fred R. 


James A. 


Sadie S. Stratton 


May 9, 1896 


it 


Verna A. 


ii 


ii 


Aug. 26, 1906 


Hussell, Lewis Franklin 


Lee O. 


Florence M. White 


April 18, 1892 


Huston, F. 


Benjamin T. 


Clara A. Robinson 


Dec. 12, 1861 


Hutchins, Edwin 


Batchelder B. 


Nancy F. 


July 14, 1870 


it 


Willis 


ii 


«i 


Mar. 17, 1887 


Inghi 


im, Frank E. 


Alonzo 


Linda Heustis 


May 27, 1903 


Irish, 


Paul Hortin 


Alanson E. 


Lovina Fortiere 


Mar. 4, 1860 


Jackman, John 


John B. 


Dorcas M. (Prescott) 


Oct. 25, 1876 


Jackson, Alice A. 


" M. 


Carrie 


June 9, 1892 


Jameson, Charles Willis 


John 


Levina R. Bettam 


Aug. 6, 1885 


ii 


Howard Grover 


•' 


ii 


Oct. 30, 1858 


ii 


Lydia 


ti 


Julia A. 


Mar. 10, 1772 


Jaqu 


is, Abigail 


" Jr. 


Rachel 


Dec. 15, 1775 


it 


Abraham 


it 


it 


Dec. 15, 1765 


ii 


Amos 


John 


Abigail 


April 29, 1768 


ii 


Mehitable 


ti 


it 


Aug. 25, 1773 


it 


Sarah 


" Jr. 


Rachel 


June 27, 1865 


Jennings, Christiana A. 


Calvin V. 


Lydia S. Nichols 


Mar. 30, 1882 


it 


Howard Vicory 


ii 


ii 


Mar. 7, 1862 


11 


Jonathan 


ti 


it 


Nov. 9, 1896 


ii 


Marion Artilee 


Charles E. 


Effie E. Sampson. 


Sept. 8, 1893 


ii 


"Virian M. 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 21, 1770 


Johnson, Dorothy 


Simon 


Judith 


Aug. 13, 1772 


ii 


Eunice 


ii 


ii 







TABLE I, TOWN RECORDS: BIR1 


'HS. 66 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


June 13, 1776 


Johnson, Hannah 


Samuel 


Abia 


May 9, 1888 


ii 


Iris 


Tillinan B. 


Ruth Lotta 


Mar. 19, 1778 


ii 


Isaiah 


Simon 


Judith 


April 1, 1775 


14 


John 


Samuel 


Abia 


Sept. 18, 1801 


II 


Judith 


ii 


Judith 


Mar. 18, 1773 


II 


Lydia 


ii 


Abia 


May 17, 1775 


II 


Phebe 


Simon 


Judith 


Aug. 17, 1798 


it 


Samuel Liford 


Samuel 


tt 


Oct. 19, 1771 


(I 


Sarah 


it 


tt 


Feb. 21, 1800 


II 


it 


tt 


tt 


May 15, 1762 


II 


Timothy 


. tt 


Abia 


Mar. 3, 1781 


II 


William 


Simon 


Judith 


July 10, 1904 


Johnston, James Drummond 


John Thomas 


Christina McAskill 


May 6, 1823 


Jones, 


Alexander T. 


William 


Hulda(W. Harris) 


Nov. 9, 1790 


ft 


Anna 


Hezekiah 


Lydia Allen 


June 1, 1894 


a 


Arthur H. 


Fred D. 


Harriet Paine 


April 29, 1798 


it 


" Sawyer 


Timothy 


Lucy 


Dec. 17, 1902 


II 


Beatrice May 


Alfred 


Mary Ann 


Mar. 26, 1815 


«( 


Caleb Y. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


June 15, 1800 


«f 


Clirissa 


Timothy 


Lucy 


July 17,1807 


(i 


Dudley W. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


Dec. 27, 1754 


II 


Elisabeth 


Evan 


Rachel 


Oct. 19, 1869 


K 


Everett E. 


George W. 


Maria E. 


Aug. 26, 1900 


ii 


George Henry 


Alfred 


Mary Ann Perry 


May 19, 1825 


n 


Henry P. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


June 16, 1769 


II 


Hesekiah 


Evan 


Rebeckah 


April 28, 1817 


(i 


Hezekiah Y. 


William 


Huldah (W. Harris) 


Feb. 27, 1896 


it 


Hugh K. 


Frank H. 


Bertha E. Kittredge 


Aug. 27, 1807 


ii 


John Franklin 


Timothy 


Lucy 


Mar. 1, 1811 


ii 


" R. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


Aug. 14, 1761 


ii 


Lydia 


Evan 


Rebeckah 


May 27, 1821 


ii 


Margaret E. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


Oct. 3, 1805 


ii 


Martha Allen 


ii 


ti 


Nov. 26, 1765 


ii 


Mary 


Evan 


Rebeckah 


April 11, 1802 


ii 


" Ann 


Timothy 


Lucy 


Aug. 4, 1876 


ii 


Minnie 


William N. 


Emma 


May 7, 1819 


it 


Nathan B. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


July 18, 1767 


ii 


Phebe 


Evan 


Rebeckah 


July 3, 1759 


ii 


Rachel 


it 


ii 


Feb. 20, 1813 


ii 


Ralph H. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


Aug. 12, 1905 


ii 


Robert Gardner 


Alfred 


Mary A. Perry 


May 3. 1809 


ii 


Sarah S. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


June 23, 1771 


ii 


Timothy Ladd 


Evan 


Rebeckah 


Jan. 11, 1804 


it 


William G. 


William 


Hulda (W. Harris) 


Oct. 26, 1875 


Joy, Eva 


A. 


Hattie E. Hartwell 


May 15, 1901 


Joyce, Harry Harding 


Charles William Mertie Maud Harding 


June 27, 1902 


Judge, Frank 


Joseph A. 


Ethel Burgess 


Oct. 2, 1901 


Karkerian, Mary 


Paul 


Sarah Onioner 


April 19, 1753 


Kelley, Abijah 


William 


ii 


Aug. 30, 1750 


ii 


Abner 


ti 


ti 


Mar. 5, 1849 


ii 


Albert J. 


Isaiah M. 


Mirriam J. (Foster) 


Aug. 13, 1804 


ii 


Anna 


Richard 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


April 30, 1887 


ii 


Burton Ellsworth 


Samuel M. 


Emily J. Rowell 


July 15, 1849 


ti 


Charles Otis 


Francis B. 


Mary A. 


Mar. 2, 1894 
3 


ii 


Cora B. 


Charles G. 


Clara B. Merrill 



34 



HISTORY OP SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Sept. 13, 1851 


Kelley, Eldorah M. 


Francis B. 


Mary A. 


Dec. 23, 1760 


i< 


Esther 


Richard 


Esther 


Feb. 19, 1807 


ii 


tt 


it 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


Aug. 19, 1809 


u 


Fanny 


ti 


tt 


May 29, 1854 


ii 


" Ellen 


Samuel 


Anna M. 


Dec. 29, 1857 


ii 


Frank Trefren 


Francis B. 


Mary A. 


April 11, 1857 


ii 


George M. 


Isaiah M. 


Mirriam J. (Foster) 


Feb. 22, 1852 


it 


Isaiah 


it 


tt 


May 28, 1860 


it 


John L. 


Charles H. 


Mary J. (Silver) 


Mar. 20, 1858 


it 


Lucinda O. 


William S. 


Ruth L. Silver 


April 14, 1768 


ti 


Lydia 


Richard 


Esther 


Jan. 27, 1894 


it 


Mabel Frances 


J. William 


Alice H. Goodwin 


Nov. 6, 1756 


it 


Mehitable 


Richard 


Esther 


Aug. 20, 1754 


it 


Moses 


tt 


tt 


April 1, 1763 


it 


Nathaniel 


tt 


tt 


May 15, 1885 


it 


Nettie Edna 


Samuel M. 


Emily A. Rowell 


April 27, 1896 


it 


Rachel Hayward 


J. William 


Alice H. Goodwin 


Sept. 20, 1758 


tt 


Richard 


Richard 


Esther 


Feb. 1, 1802 


it 


Samuel 


tt 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


Feb. 24, 1764 


it 


Sarah 


William 


Sarah 


Sept. 16, 1757 


tt 


Simon 


tt 


tt 


Feb. 13, 1859 


tt 


M. 


Samuel P. 


Mary J. (Austin) 


Mar. 14, 1860 


it 


F. 


Isaiah M. 


Mirriam J. (Foster) 


Oct. 18, 1862 


Kelly, 


, Addie Maria 


Walter B, 


Eliza J. 


Aug. 8, 1800 


it 


Amos 


William Somes 


Mary 


Sept. 5, 1775 


it 


Anne 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


April 24, 1823 


it 


Asa 


Richard 


Betsey 


Jan. 24, 1864 


it 


" Burton 


Asa 


Charlotte 


April 29, 1763 


it 


Benjamin 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


Jan. 29, 1799 


it 


tt 


tt 


Anna (Smith) 


Mar. 21, 1830 


tt 


" Franklin 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Feb. 9, 1851 


it 


" Payson 


Gilman D. 


Mary 


Sept. 2, 1815 


tt 


" Webster 


Richard 


Betsey 


July 24, 1799 


ti 


Betsey 


Richard 


Sibbel 


Dec. 19, 1830 


it 


Charles Eaton 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Nov. 29,1823 


ti 


" Herbert G. 


Samuel 


Betsey 


Jan. 22, 1826 


tt 


Charlotte Jane 


• t 


it 


Aug. 24, 1797 


tt 


Daniel 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


June 27, 1837 


ti 


" Webster 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Feb. 20, 1843 


it 


Edwin Hamilton 


William S. 


Ruth (L. Silver) 


April 4, 1772 


it 


Elisabeth 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


May 3, 1796 


tt 


it 


William Somes 


Mary 


Jan. 22, 1819 


ii 


Eliza Ann 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


May 31, 1803 


tt 


" Hall 


Samuel 


Anna 


Jan. 27, 1862 


it 


Ellen E. 


Jerome 


Ellen E. 


Sept. 26, 1830 


it 


Emeline 


Samuel 


Betsey' 


Aug. 12, 1862 


it 


Fidelia J. 


William S. 




April 13, 1875 


it 


Flora M. 


Charles O. 


Emma A. 


April 13, 1820 


ii 


Francis Brown 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Aug. 7, 1862 


tt 


Frank D. 


George L. 


Kate 


Feb. 28, 1871 


tt 


Freddie 


Moses A. 


Mary C. 


Dec. 3, 1835 


it 


George Lafayette 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Mar. 6, 1828 


ii 


" Washington 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Jan. 24, 1824 


ii 


Oilman D. 


Richard 


Betsey 


Aug. 4, 1806 


it 


Hannah 


Abijah 


Ruth Clough 


Feb. 26, 1821 


it 


Hall 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 









TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. 


Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


June 


22, 1876 


Kelly, 


, Harris M. 


Moses A. 


Mary C. 


July 


10, 1864 


it 


Isabel E. 


George L. 


Kate 


Oct. 


12, 1790 


a 


Isaiah 


William Somes 


Mary 


June 


29, 1825 


a 


" Milton 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Sept. 


14, 1864 


a 


Jacob W. 


Oilman D. 


Mary 


Mar. 


16, 1828 


a 


Jerome 


Samuel 


Betsey 


May 


27, 1792 


a 


John 


William Somes 


Mary 


June 


16, 1802 


a 


a 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


Dec. 


20, 1818 


(t 


" Adams 


Samuel 


Betsey 


Jan. 


29, 1765 


it 


" Emery 


John 


Hannah 


Dec. 


3, 1825 


a 


" Quincy Adams 


(i 


" (Hall) 


Aug. 


19, 1766 


a 


Judith 


cc 


u 


Aug. 


19, 1877 


a 


Lillie M. 


Charles O. 


Emma A. 


June 


19, 1833 


a 


Lois Ann 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


June 


17, 1826 


a 


Louisa 


Richard 


Betsey 


Mir. 


13, 1818 


a 


Lucy Jane 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Feb. 


20, 1794 


a 


Lydia 


William Somes 


Mary 


July 


2, 1794 


a 


tt 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


Dec. 


22, 1791 


a 


" Fletcher 


Richard 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


Feb. 


13, 1770 


a 


Mary 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Oct. 


1809 


a 


" Ann 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


Aug. 


18, 1816 


tt 


tt a 


Samuel 


Betsey 


Oct. 


27, 1864 


it 


" E. 


Simon C. 


Hattie F. 


May 


16, 1823 


a 


' " How 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Dec. 


11, 1845 


a 


" Jane 


Moses A. 


Sarah Ann (Silver) 


April 


29, 1865 


a 


" Lizzie 


Walter B. 


Louisa J. 


Aug. 


11, 1788 


tt 


Mehitable 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


Dec. 


7, 1827 


tt 


" Kimball 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Dec. 


24, 1815 


a 


Moses Austin 


h 


tt 


Feb. 


16, 1790 


a 


Nathaniel 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


April 


29, 1861 


II 


Nettie L. 


Walter B. 


Jane 


Mar. 


17, 1804 


tt 


Obadiah Duston 


Abigail 


Ruth Clough 


Sept. 


18, 1822 


a 


Paulina Q. 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Dec. 


14, 1796 


tt 


Phebe 


Richard 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


July 


28, 1793 


a 


Polly 


i< 


tt 


Jan. 


14, 1808 


a 


Prudence B. 


William Somes 


Mary 


Sept. 


15, 1765 


tt 


Kebecca 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


July 


19, 1789 


if 


Bichard 


Richard 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


Nov. 


2, 1848 


tt 


" Oilman 


Oilman 


Mary (Upham) 


Mar. 


8, 1846 


«i 


Boxanna 


William S. 


Ruth (L. Silver) 


Mar. 


24, 1786 


tt 


Sally 


Nathaniel 


Sally 


Feb. 


26, 1768 


a 


Samuel Dole 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Oct. 


1, 1769 


tt 


tt 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


Mar. 


14, 1789 


tt 


n 


William Somes 


Mary 


Sept. 


5, 1832 


it 


tt 


Richard 


Betsey 


Dec. 


21, 1820 


tt 


" Prescott 


Samuel 


tt 


Dec. 


27, 1777 


tt 


Sarah 


a 


Elisabeth 


Feb. 


12, 1798 


a 


tt 


William Somes 


Mary 


July 


3, 1846 


tt 


" Ann 


Isaiah M. 


Miriam J. (Foster) 


Feb. 


9, 1787 


a 


Sibbel 


Richard 


Sibbel (Fletcher) 


Feb. 


23, 1834 


tt 


Susan Hall 


John 


Hannah (Hall) 


Sept. 


5, 1775 


a 


Susanna 


Samuel 


Elisabeth 


May 


8, 1780 


a 


a 


c< 


tt 


Nov. 


8, 1838 


a 


Walter Balfour 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Nov. 


3, 1801 


n 


Wealthy 


Samuel 


Anna (Smith) 


Jan. 


8, 1840 


a 


Wm. Henry Harrison John 


Hannah (Hall) 



35 



36 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


Sept. 27, 17 Kelly, Wm. Somes 


John 


Hannak (Hall) 


April 12, 1814 


ft 


ft ft 


Isaiah 


Lucy (Eaton) 


Nov. 9, 1851 


a 


M. 


Herbert 


Jane 


Feb. 27, 1852 


■4 


M. 


William S. 


Ruth (L. Silver) 


Mar. 10, 1852 


(1 


M. 


Samuel P. 


Mary (J. Austin) 


Jan. 25, 1862 


ff 




(, 


ii 


Aug. 2, 1873 


it 


M. 


Charles O. 


Emma Gardner 


Dec. 16, 1876 


ft 


F. 


Samuel, 2d 


Ann M. 




a 




Charles H. 


Mary J. (Silver) 


Jan. 10, 1824 


Kershaw, Elisabeth 


James 


Hannah (Phihen) 


Dec. 7, 1825 


tt 


William 


ii 


ii 


Jan. 31, 1903 


Kezer, 


Doris Esther 


Judson L. 


IvaM. Jackson 


May 25, 1892 


it 


Eunice Mary 


<t 


ci 


Mar. 13, 1892 


a 


(Twins) M. 


Frank H. 


Jennie M. Harding 


July 31, 1903 


Kirkorian, Jacob 


Paul 


Sarah Horsa 


Jan. 17, 1794 


Kimball, Abial 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


April 24, 1766 


ft 


Abigail 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Mar. 6, 1776 


ft 


Abner 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Sept. 4, 1816 


a 


Adaline 


Isaac 


Judith 


July 18, 1797 


a 


Alvah 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Jan. 18, 1785 


tt 


Anna 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Jan. 15, 1845 


a 


Aroline Francenah 


Charles 


Celenda (Haseltine) 


Oct. 30, 1862 


U 


Barzina 


Simeon 


Catherine 


Aug. 15, 1786 


a 


Benjamin 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


Dec. 19, 1799 


a 


Betsy 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Feb. 3, 1808 


a 


Betsey 


Richard 


Esther (Currier) 


July 2, 1802 


ft 


Catherine 


ii 


ii 


April 18, 1822 


a 


Charles 


Joseph 


Rebecca (Hazeltine) 


May 11, 1865 


a 


" A. 


Charles P. 


Araminta F. 


July 17, 1876 


a 


(i 


Charles F. 


Martha (E. Copp) 


April 23, 1842 


tt 


" Oilman 


Washington 


Lavina (Merrill) 


Aug. 6, 1902 


tt 


" Lester 


Charles A. 


Lena M. Hall 


Mar. 10, 1783 


tt 


Ebenezer 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Dec. 1, 1783 


tt 


Elisabeth Wheeler 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


Jan. 12, 1752 


tt 


Elizabeth 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Feb. 25, 1772 


tt 


t« 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Aug. 6, 1860 


tt 


Eliza A. 


Simeon H. 


Catherine 


April 28, 1847 


it 


Ellen Childs 


Henry T. 


Elisabeth C. (Rowell 


Aug. 1, 1735 


tt 


Esther 


Richard 


Esther 


June 16, 1768 


tt 


a 


it 


Lois (Pattee) 


April 30, 1781 


tt 


a 


tt 


a 


Feb. 24, 1800 


ft 


a 


tt 


Esther (Currier) 


Mar. 19, 1885 


tt 


" Middleton 


John H. 


Annie B. Middleton 


Oct. 22, 1877 


tt 


Florence B. 


William B. 


Eliza (A. Bailey) 


July 16, 1895 


tt 


Luella 


Milan E. 


May E. Askey 


Dec. 1, 1781 


tt 


George 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Sept. 24, 1868 


tt 


Gertrude A. 


William B. 


Eliza (A. Bailey) 


May 22, 1739 


tt 


Hannah 


Richard 


Esther 


July 9, 1770 


tt 


tt 


ii 


Lois (Pattee) 


Sept. 4,1797 


ft 


" Currier 


CI 


Esther (Currier) 


Sept. 12, 1842 


tt 


J. 


John 


Maria 


Feb. 16, 1805 


ft 


Harriet 


Richard 


Esther (Currier) 


April 24, 1816 


tt 


tt 


Joseph 


Rebecca (Hazeltine) 


April 19, 1821 


ft 


Isaac 


Isaac 


Judith 


Aug. 6, 1811 


tt 


Isaiah Wheeler 


Jonathan 


Jemima Wheeler 


Mar. 7, 1820 


ft 


James Jones 


K 


ii 







TABLE I, TOWN 


RECORDS: BIRTHS. 


Date of 


Given 


Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


May 23, 1776 


Kimball, Jemima 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


May 18, 1769 


c( 


John 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Oct. 7, 1788 


(t 


tt 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Sept. 16, 1791 


tt 


tt 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Aug. 18, 1870 


a 


" w. 


William B. 


Eliza A. (Bailey) 


Feb. 17, 1789 


u 


Jonathan 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


Dec. 25, 1786 


ft 


Joseph 


Oliver, Jr. 


Marj' (Allen) 


Oct. 25, 1795 


it 


tt 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Mar. 18, 1825 


a 


" Allen 


Joseph 


Rebecca (Hazeltine) 


June 11, 1816 


a 


Kubael Converse 


Jonathan 


Jemima (Wheeler) 


July 31, 1870 


tt 


Leburton H. 


William B. 


Eliza A. Bailey 


Oct. 11, 1869 


u 


Lillia A. 


Charles W. 


Mary 


June 14, 1778 


tt 


Lois 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


Sept, 22, 1810 


ft 


u 


it 


Esther (Currier) 


April 10, 1813 


a 


Louisa 


Jonathan 


Jemima (Wheeler) 


Dec. 30, 1819 


a 


Mariah 


John, Jr. 


Rhoda (Hastings) 


June 7, 1862 


a 


Marietta 


Henry T. 


Eustena S. (Rearnsbatl 


Feb. 13, 1748 


tt 


Mary 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Mar. 23, 1779 


ft 


11 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Feb. 3, 1779 


ft 


" Woodman 




Widow Betty Kimball 


Sept. 18, 1764 


it 


Mehitable 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


June 80, 1776 


tt 


11 


Richard 


Lois (Pattee) 


Aug. 6, 1777 


tt 


11 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


May 4, 1782 


tt 


Molly 


Oliver, Jr. 


Mary (Allen) 


April 16, 1789 


tt 


tf 


it 


11 


Jan. 22, 1861 


tt 


Nellie E. 


Charles 


Belinda 


Dec. 27, 1801 


it 


Oliver 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Dec. 7, 1745 


tt 


" Jr. 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


June 22, 1818 


ft 


" Saunders 


Jonathan 


Jemima (Wheeler) 


July 1, 1819 


ft 


Rebecca 


Joseph 


Rebecca (Hazeltine) 


Dec. 27, 1803 


ft 


Rebeckah Dow 


John 


Azubah (Asten) 


Dec. 9, 1831 


ft 


Rhoda A. 


11 


Maria 


May 21, 1746 


ft 


Richard 


Richard 


Esther 


June 23, 1774 


tt 


11 


11 


Lois (Pattee) 


April 3, 1840 


tt 


Ruflna Mehitable 


Washington 


Lavina (Merrill) 


Aug. 12, 1780 


it 


Ruth 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


April 20, 1906 


a 


" Ella 


Charles A. 


Lena M. Hall 


June 22, 1814 


a 


Sally J. 


Jonathan 


Jemima (Wheeler) 


May 14, 1758 


tt 


Sarah 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Mar. 23, 1773 


tt 


11 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


June 15, 1858 


tt 


" J. 


Henry T. 


" (C. Rowell) 


Sept. 28, 1828 


tt 


Simeon H. 


John 


Maria 


April 22, 1831 


ft 


Stephen Porter 


Stephen B. 


Cynthia 


Mar. 8, 1818 


tt 


Susanna 


John, Jr. 


Rhoda (Hastings) 


Feb. 28, 1750 


tt 


Susannah 


Oliver 


Mary (Ober) 


Oct. 26, 1779 


ft 


Susannah 


Oliver, Jr. 


Mary (Allen) 


April 27, 1760 


tt 


Suse 


Oliver 


" (Ober) 


Dec. 2, 1786 


tt 


Tristram 


Barnard 


Elizabeth (Ayer) 


Sept. 11, 1817 


tt 


Washington 


Joseph 


Rebecca (Hazeltine) 


May 8, 1823 


tt 


William 


Isaac 


Judith 


Feb. 3, 1837 


tf 


" (Balch) 


John 


Maria 


Jan. 8, 1841 


tt 


Zelia Etta 




Rebecca 


Mar. 18, 1870 


tt 


(Twins) 


Charles W. 


Mary J. 


July 23, 1905 


King, John Albert 


John E. 


Jennie I. Ross 


Aug. 1, 1887 


" Walter Edmund 


11 


11 


Mar. 5, 1834 


Knight 


Harriet Elisabeth 


Charles 


Elcy 



38 



HISTORY OF SALEM. 



Date of 


Given Name 


Father's 


Mother's 


Birth. 


of 


Child. 


Name. 


Maiden Name. 


April 2, 1836 


Knight, Mary Ann 


Charles 


Elcy 


June 5, 1883 


Kress 


Eva Bell 


Otto F. 


Lizzie J. Fuller 


Mar. 5, 1901 


Kuenstler, Annie Minnie 


Albin 


Annie Heinze 


May 24, 1905 


« 


Selma Rosa 


it 


it 


Sept. 10, 1773 


Ladd, 


Daniel 


Daniel 


Dorothy 


Aug. 28, 1808 




Dorothy F. 


Joshua 


Sally (Merrill) 


July 27, 1762 




Elisabeth 


Daniel 


Dorothy 


Mar. 1, 1816 




Emeline 


Joshua 


Sally (Merrill) 


May 15, 1810 




Esther M. 


tt 


it 


Jan. 23, 1818 




Hannah D. 


a 


tt 


Feb. 7, 1806 




Isabel 


a 


IC 


Sept. 14, 1764 




Jesse 


Daniel 


Dorothy 


June 24, 1779 




John 


tt 


CC 


Sept. 13, 1775 




Joshua 


tt 


II 


Mar. 2, 1812 




Perley M. 


Joshua 


Sally (Merrill) 


Aug. 17, 1776 




Ruth 


Daniel 


Dorothy 


Dec. 18, 1804 




Sampson 


Joshua 


Sally (Merrill) 


Feb. 28, 1770 




Samson 


Daniel 


Dorothy 


Mar. 19, 1784 




Vashti Duston 




Elisabeth Ladd 


May 25, 1905 


Lanagan, Edward Alan 


Daniel A. 


Ethelyn M. Bailey 


Nov. 1, 1902 


K 


Eunice E. 


tt 


CC 


April 13, 1870 


Lancaster, Willie E. 


Thomas D. 


Maria M. (Pattee) 


Aug. 23, 1768 


Lankester, Henry 


John 


Mary 


Oct. 7, 1769 




Jerusha 


CC 


CC 


June 13, 1779 




Polly 


ct 


ct 


Nov. 15, 1783 




Sally 


CC 


CC 


Nov. 11, 1773 




Thomas 


CC 


CC 


April 19, 1771 




William 


CC 


it 


Aug. 19, 1865 


Larey 


, Elvira E. 


George 


Ellen (Jennings) 


Dec. 6, 1874 


Larrabee, Mabel 


Elbridge 


Caroline A. (Day) 


April 17, 1875 


Larry 


, Clarence A. 


George H. 


Ellen L.