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Full text of "History of the San Francisco Bay Region : history and biography"

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HISTORY 

OF THE 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY 
REGION 



BY 

BAILEY MILLARD 



In Collaboration With Able Assistants 



History and Biography 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



PUBLISHERS 

THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. 

CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 

1924 



Copyright, 1924 

BY 

The American Hjstobicai. Society, Inc. 







(,!•:( )\<r,K I'.Ri )\\ x Ti.\"(iLi:v 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY 
REGION 



George Brown Tingley. Among the pioneers whose names figure 
in the early history of CaHfornia, a place of precedence should be accorded 
George Brown Tingley, distinguished lawyer and orator, legislator, 
Mexican war veteran, speaker pro tem of California's First Assembly, 
member of its Second and Third Senates, author of much of the state's 
basic laws, an eminent factor in the election of Lincoln in 1860, and a 
powerful, sustaining influence in the critical period when courage and 
intellectual force were required to save California to the Union. 

His ancestors on both sides served in the War of the Revolution and 
had part in the formation of the government of the new republic. Through 
the Balls of Virginia he was of the same lineage as George Washing- 
ton, being directly descended from Washington's great-grandmother. One 
of Tingley's family served as a statesman under Washington during his 
first presidential term. After the Revolution his great-grandfather and 
his grandfather received land warrants and went from Virginia to Ohio, 
thence to Indiana. George Brown Tingley was born on his father's farm 
adjoining that of Ulysses S. Grant's father in Clermont Countv, Ohio, 
August 11, 1814. 

At the age of eighteen he began reading law in the office of Judge Fish- 
back, of Batavia, Ohio, one of Ohio's most eminent lawyers, whose son 
became law partner of President Benjamin Harrison. At the conclusion 
of his course young Tingley became junior partner of his uncle, William 
J. Brown, an able attorney with a distinguished record in Congress. (The 
late Rear Admiral George Brown was his son.) While pursuing his law 
practice young Tingley took an intensive private course in Latin and other 
university subjects under Doctor Laughlin, a college professor. He 
married Miss Nancy Walker, a Kentucky belle, daughter of Major Walker 
of the War of 1812. 

He was sent to the Indiana Legislature three times. Before the close 
of his second incumbency he resigned in answer to the imperative call for 
recruits for the Mexican war, where he fought valiantly and was in the 

5 



6 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

hottest of that severely contested decisive battle — Buena Vista. Inci- 
dentally he served as war correspondent tor the Indianapolis Sentinel. In 
addition to his home practice ^Ir. Tingley figured with eminent men in the 
circuit courts, among whom and very close to him was Caleb B. Smith, 
afterwards in Lincoln's cabinet as secretary of the interior. The President 
and Mr. Smith enjo3-ed each other socially and so in later years he put 
George B. Tingley in cordial relation and understanding with the Great 
Emancipator. 

"Colonel" Tingle}- ( as he was generally affectionately called despite his 
protests that the title was not properly his ) quickly saw the promise of 
California, and in April, 1849, he started across the plains. Of his party 
was Col. Thomas J. Henley, for twelve years a member of Congress from 
Indiana. These two Argonauts indulged in hunting excursions till finally 
they wandered too far and lost their bearings. Unable to find their wagon 
train, they made the rest of the perilous journey on foot and arrived in 
Sacramento ragged and famished. "Colonel" Tingley at once found his 
Indianapolis friend, John McDougal, who was a member of California's 
First Constitutional Convention and was afterwards governor of the state. 
The two delightedly embraced. Then without further ado McDougal 
cried, as he clapped the new arrival on the back : "George, you are the very 
man we are looking for to run as representative of the Sacramento district 
for the first Legislature. There is to be a big meeting here tonight and 
you will electrify the crowd." "But, John, look at my rags," rejoined the 
tramp from the plains. "O, clothes be d — d !" exclaimed McDougal. 
"And I'm starving," declared George. That apjjeal took eflfect, and they 
repaired to an eating place. 

At evening a great crowd, miners and men of all callings, coming from 
every direction, gathered outside the ramshackle hotel. In tattered red 
flannel shirt, knee and seat-worn trousers, brimless hat and with toes 
out of his boots, Mr. Tingley mounted a barrel, and in the eloquent and 
witty style that had won him three elections in Indiana, addres.sed the 
picturesque and eager crowd. He received the nomination and was elected. 

In the interim be went to the Feather River country, where he panned 
out $50 a day, and wrote to his wife and to his friends in Congress drying 
the wet ink w'ith siftings of gold dust, insteatl of with sand, and eml)eilding 
specks of gold in lines of red sealing wax across the top of the page. 

Mr. Tingley went to the state capital. San Jose, which was over- 
crowded by the great inflow, so that he was obliged to sleep on the big 
table in the assembly chamber until he could find other lodgings. He was 
made sj)eaker |)ro tem and was placed on important committees. 

History declares that the first Legislature of California was comix-ised 
of as fine a body of young men as ever convened for a like purjxjse. The 
Legislature of 1841 niade a thrilling eixxdi, notalily uniciue and it was well 
that the men of it bad clear judgment, quick discernment with j^ractical 
wisdom, strong to i)ersist and with a determination to achieve, dominated 
by a high sense of patriotism and a purpose to hold the new state to the 
best traditions of the Union. A fiery contest was going on in Congress. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 7 

The hiirning (jiiestion of slnxeiv extension and tlie question of admitting 
the Golden State to tlie Union was a topic of ahsorl)ing interest, and one 
that concerned the whole nation. In the fierce hattle at Washington it was 
even proposed tu cut California in two, to make at least one of the halves 
a slave state, and both if possible. Mr. Tingley's uncle was a valued 
member of Congress with strong influence and his nephew from the time 
of his arrival in California kept so far as jxjssible in earnest communica- 
tion with him and with Clay, W'elister and Seward, while holding a deter- 
mination that California should be admitted without delay. It was a testing 
time, and those California lawmakers lost all thought of the lure of gold in 
their deep interest in the welfare of their commonwealth and the nation. 
Mr. Tingley was eager to turn all his attention to his law practice, but not 
while his adopted home and his very country was in peril. It took five or 
si.x weeks to get word to Congress and more than two months for question 
and response. California legislators had dared to put a state into opera- 
tion previous to the approval of Congress. California went ahead acting 
as a state, though she had not yet been admitted to the Union. 

Late in 1850 ^Ir. Tingley was elected to represent the counties of 
Santa Clara antl Contra Costa (this, previous to the creation of Alameda 
County) in the second and third state senates, during which time the 
capital was changed several times. He was on the finance, judiciary, cor- 
poration and public building committees. His name was brought forward 
prominently for the nomination for governor, but he was making arrange- 
ments to go back for his wife and little ones, and so could not spare time 
for the campaign. He received some complimentary votes for the United 
States senatorship. In the dividing of the state into counties he named 
El Dorado County. For a time he was successfully engaged in the practice 
of law at San Jose. He had a good knowledge of Spanish, and among 
his clients were many of the old Spanish dons who owned principalities, 
among them the Picos, the Castros, the Estudillos and the Peraltas. He 
acquired valuable proj^erties, including the Mission San Jose, which he 
together with Beard and Horner ("Tingley. Beard and Horner") pur- 
chased from Pico about the year 1850. 

In 1852, "Colonel" Tingley was nominated on the whig ticket to 
represent the southern district of California in Congress. He polled a 
high whig vote, running far ahead of his ticket, and there were many, in- 
cluding democrats, who declared that by certain rights he could have 
claimed the election. In this campaign he assured his astounded hearers 
that within twenty years peojsle would come across the continent in steam 
cars in a week's time. His prophecy was fulfilled before the twentv vears 
were up. 

Mr. Tingley removed to San Francisco and established himself in the 
practice of law, and maintained rank as one of the distinguished memliers 
of the California bar. He a]>peared in many of the important criminal and 
land cases brought before the courts of the day, and in murder cases it was 
declared impossible to defeat his skill, or for a jury to resist the eloquence 
and sincerity of his honest appeal. He was known, however, to have 



8 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

turned down enormous fees in criminal cases where he felt he could not 
conscientiously defend the accused. 

In October, 1849, at San Francisco, Mr. Tingley was one of a com- 
mittee of five which organized the whig party in California. He was also 
a chief organizer and platform builder of the republican party in California. 
In 1852 he canvassed Northern California for Fremont. 

In 1860 Mr. Tingley at the request of the State Central Committee 
canvassed Northern California for Lincoln. Everywhere he was hailed 
with enthusiasm and strengthened the Union cause. While his arguments 
clinched many a vote, his personality made him many warm and lasting 
friends. It was an earnest, wearing campaign that demanded hard, 
brainy, conscientious work. Every vote counted. It was for a great 
purpose. Noble men all over the United States were giving their best in 
the effort to preserve the Union. He was up early and late, sometimes all 
night. There were also the social sides, with good-fellowship, generosity 
and hospitality that had its part in securing attention and votes. There 
were exhausting rides in the hot sun and in the hurry to reach appoint- 
ments. By stage coach or mule team, over dusty, rough, jolting, nerve- 
racking routes, on horseback, on muleback, over dark mountain trails, 
around precipices, through forests, sometimes on foot, foot-sore and face 
blistered, sometimes along the trail where weeks later at full speed came the 
pony expressman wildly crying out. "Lincoln is elected !" Then, arrival 
at the objective point, exhausted, dirty and throat full of dust, sometimes 
with a band of music and always with a crowd to meet him. Then warm 
handshakes, and drinks and cheers, and a clean-up and food. Finally, 
rousing Lmion speech-convincing arguments interspersed with poetry, 
story, wit and humor. At the close came ap])lause and drinks and innumer- 
able hearty handshakes, then off for the next engagement, at town or min- 
ing camp. Never a respite, never a moment lost — votes, votes, wherever 
there was a doubting man ! But one aim — the election of Lincoln ! Then 
came the wind-up and the feeling of assurance of success. 

And so in that achievement George B. Tingley had his earnest jxirt, 
together with the devoted many who combed the state and had reason to 
rejoice. 

Arriving at San Francisco, he was met by his long-time friend and 
law associate. Col. E. D. Baker, the fartious orator, who had come from 
Oregon to give his help toward the election of Lincoln, whom he had inti- 
mately known in Illinois. 

A few evenings before the election there was a tremendous final rally 
at the American Theatre. Colonel l?aker electrified the audience, and in 
closing his speech dwelt on the invaluable help that had been rendered in 
the Lincoln camjjaign by his friend at the right. "Colonel" Tingley, where- 
ujxjn there were rousing cheers and vociferous calls for "Tingley! Tingley! 
Speech !" But, tired out, he had quickly slip]icd away. 

These two men. Col. E. D. Baker and George B. Tingley, who had 
worked together in San Francisco in famous criminal cases and because 
of their skill and ovatorv had drawn big audiences into the courtrooms, had 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 9 

just concluded a memorable epoch in their lives in divergent fields, but to 
the same purjxjse. Therein they had given their very best to a purpose 
vital to the salvation of their country, the election of Abraham Lincoln. 

In 1881 Leland Stanford was the nominee of his party for the gover- 
norship. He had watched with interest his friend, Tingley, in the Lincoln 
campaign, and now asked him to go out with him in making his canvass. 
No republican had ever been elected to the gubernatorial chair in the Golden 
State, and doutbless the contest would be severe. Here again was a 
question of importance. A reliable, able man ought to be put at the helm. 
California was in peril. Leland Stanford and George Tingley went out 
together and did earnest work among the voters. Others gave their valu- 
able help, and Stanford was elected war governor of California. 

Early in the Civil war, Mr. Tingley, always alert, was foremost in 
unearthing and reporting to Washington a significant movement, the in- 
tention of which was to turn California over to the Confederacy. It was 
frustrated barely in time and in a dramatic way. 

The California Legislature passed Union resolutions, and Mr. Tingley 
was a delegate from San Francisco to the first Union convention in the 
state. The President appointed Mr. Tingley to office. The next year he 
was requested to proceed to Washington for a conference concerning his 
appointment to a position of national imfxirtance. He was to be the guest 
of his friend, Caleb B. Smith, secretary of the interior, and was under 
especially happy auspices to meet President Lincoln, who had expressed a 
desire to see him. He was preparing for the journey when his sudden 
death occurred in his forty-eighth year. The secretary of the interior 
wrote Mrs. Tingley of his grief at the loss of his friend, and conveyed an 
expression of sympathy from the President. It was the passing of one 
of the most constructive minds in the formative j^eriod of our great state. 

When the courts adjourned out of respect to Mr. Tingley's memory, 
high tributes were paid him for his public services, especial mention being 
made of the marked ability with which he had formulated the state's 
criminal laws and its school and homestead laws. Of his professional 
career one judge said on this occasion : 

"George B. Tingley was always the courteous gentleman. He was 
regarded as one of the ablest and at the same time one of the most reliable 
and conscientious members of the bar, a brilliant lawyer of high integrity 
who lived up to the best traditions of the profession." 

Mr. Tingley was survived by his wife and five children. Of these 
there remains one daughter, Mary Viola, who married James H. Lawrence, 
Mexican war veteran, a pioneer democratic leader and editor and news- 
paper owner. Their daughter, Constance V. Lawrence, married Robert 
Armstrong Dean, son of the well known pioneer, Peter Dean. Miss Alice 
Manorah Ludlum is Mr. Tingley's granddaughter, being the daughter of 
Margaret Manorah Tingley, who married Col. Thomas B. Ludlum, colonel 
of a California regiment organized at the time of the Civil war, and a 
noted hydraulic mining engineer. Mr. Tingley's son, George Marshall, 
served in the navy throughout the Civil war. 



10 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Upon the death of Caleb B. Smith, secretary of the interior, L'nited 
States Ambassador Benjamin P. Avery, then editor of the San Francisco 
Bulletin, in his eulogy of the distinguished member of Lincoln's cabinet 
said that years before Caleb B. Smith had been engaged in the practice of 
law with the late George B. Tingley, who. Avery asserted, was in no wise 
inferior to him in ability. 

Rudolph Spreckels. Son of a California pioneer whose constructive 
achievements are represented in the very foundation of San Francisco's 
commercial prosperity, Rudolph Spreckels was actuated by similar con- 
structive impulses, and on many occasions has proved his genius in 
solving and handling the larger problems of business organization and 
administration. Aside from the great influence he has exercised for 
many years in California finance, the distinctive work of Rudolph 
Spreckels has been in the field of political and civic reform. .\ brief 
biography can tell little of his work, and his history is thus revealed 
in the detailed story of the city's commercial and jxjlitical history at 
large, particularly during the past twenty years. 

A son of Claus Spreckels, he was born at San Francisco. January 
1, 1872, and acquired his early education in the public schools of his 
native citv. At the age of seventeen he was employed in his father's 
sugar refinery in Philadelphia. Claus Spreckels built that refinery as 
a means of fighting the sugar trust, and carried on the fight successfully. 
At the age of twenty-two Rudolph Spreckels became president of the 
Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company, owner of one of the great 
sugar plantations of Hawaii. This had been a losing enterprise for 
years. Rudolph and his brother Claus A. bought the property from 
their father and two brothers after a family disagreement. Rudolph 
within a year had the plantation operating on a paying basis. This is 
one of the most interesting chapters in his commercial history, and can 
be touched on only briefly here. 

While the San Francisco Gas Company was involved in a life and 
death struggle with the com])eting company, Rudolph Spreckels acijuired 
stock, went on its Board of Directors, soon reorganized and introduced 
new management on an economical basis, and eventually brought about 
a satisfactory settlement of the gas war. 

History will give the name of Rudolph Spreckels greatest prominence 
in connection with the new San Francisco evolved since the great 
earthquake and fire of 1906. He was a member of the committee of 
fiftv at the time of that conflagration, and was chosen a member of 
the executive committee of five of the San Francisco Relief and Red 
Cross funds which managed the entire relief fund of $0,000,000. During 
the year of the fire Mr. Sjireckels also organized and financed the San 
Francisco graft prosecution, and took a prominent part in the jxilitical 
uprising against corporation control of the state and the city goveriuiient 
This movement, led by Mr. Spreckels, brought one of the first and 
certainly one of the greatest popular victories to the people of the state 



THE SAN FRANCISCO I'.AV KKGIOX 11 

following a long period of corixiration dcjniination. Mr. Spreckels went 
into politics without political ambitions, and he carried on the fight with 
a steadfastness that only a man of most unselfish purjHise and comijlete 
moral integrity could maintain, since he had against him practically all 
the regular politicians and many of the business men. Comparai)le to 
his organization and support of the San Francisco graft prosecution were 
his efforts in liehalf of the State Water and Power Act, which was sub' 
mitted to the voters of California in 1922. The purpose of this measure 
was to provide the necessary machinery for the conservation, develop- 
ment and control of the waters of the state for the use and benefit of 
the people. Mr. Spreckels participated in the framing of this measure 
and was the executive director of the committee which carried on the 
campaign for its passage. Mr. Spreckels has been sustained by a fine 
degree of practical idealism, and though known as a civic reformer, he 
has little in common with the radical theorist whose performances seldom 
measure up to the program of promises. 

From 1906 to 1923 Mr. Spreckels served as president of the First 
National Bank of San Francisco as well as of the First Federal Trust 
Company. He now is president of the United Bank and Trust Company 
of California, City Investment Company, Mission Consolidated Realty 
Company, Pitt River Power Company, Real Property Investment Cor- 
poration, Realty and Rebuilding Company, San Christina Investment 
Company, Western Whaling & Trading Company. He is vice president 
of Pacific Coast Jockey Club, Universal Company, and director of the 
Federal Telegraph Company, Petaluma and Santa Rosa Railroad Com- 
pany, Sacramento & Northern Railroad. He is a member of the Pacific 
Union, The University and Bohemian clubs of San Francisco, the Bur- 
lingame Country Club, the Metroiiolitan Club of Washington, the Down 
Town and Bankers Club of New York. 

On August 5, 1895, Mr. Spreckels married Eleanor J. Jolliffe of 
San Francisco. 

Walter Tcrxbull came to California in the year that marked the 
closing of the Civil war, and in the passing years he rose to a position 
of prominence and influence in connection with civic and business affairs 
in the City of San Francisco, he having long lieen one of the most 
prominent and honored members of the California National Guard, in 
which he attained to the rank of major-general. 

General Turnbull was born in the City of Toronto, Canada, in 1843, 
and there he received his early education, as well as his initial exjjeri- 
ence in connection with the newspaper and printing business, his appren- 
ticeship having been served in the office of the Toronto Globe, one of 
the leading papers of the Dominion of Canada. At the age of twenty 
years General Turnbull set forth for California. He made the voyage 
around Cape Horn and arrived in San Francisco in the vear 1865. Here 
he developed a successful job printing business, and later he became 
manager and jxirt owner of the Alta California, which was in its day 



12 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the leading San Francisco newspaper. The general identified himself 
most loyally and completely with local interests, and was ever a most 
liberal and public-spirited citizen, a man whose sterling character and 
distinctive ability commanded to him unqualified popular esteem. He 
was one of the most enthusiastic workers in the upbuilding of the 
California National Guard, and in the same he received rapid and con- 
secutive promotion, which culminated in his advancement to the rank of 
major-general. In 1896, while he was serving as chairman of the Board 
of Directors of the San Francisco Mining Exchange, his fellow members 
manifested their appreciation and high regard by presenting him with 
a beautiful gold watch. He was actively identified also with the San 
Francisco Stock &: Bond E.xchange, and was a charter member of the 
Bohemian Club. His advanced age did not prevent him from following 
with close and wise interest the trend of events in the World war, but 
his death occurred in 1917, shortly before the United States became 
formally involved in the great war. 

General Turnbull married Miss Virginia Lathrop, who was born in 
the State of Mississippi, and who still maintains her home in San Fran- 
cisco, she being the daughter of the late Col. Benjamin G. Lathrop, who 
was one of the distinguished and specially influential pioneers of Cali- 
fornia. Colonel Lathrop was born in New Hampshire in 1815 and 
was a youth when he joined the militia in Alabama. In this connection 
he participated in much Indian warfare, and he took part also in the 
Mexican war, he having retired from military service with the rank 
of lieutenant-colonel. In 1849, shortly after the discovery of gold in 
California, Colonel Lathroj) formed a party of fifteen men, and they 
made the trip across the plains and arrived in Sacramento County in that 
year. The colonel brought to California the first mill for the crushing 
of quartz, and this he placed in oi:)eration at Auburn, Placer County. In 
1854 he established his home in San Mateo, and he served as a member 
of the Board of Supervisors of San Mateo County. He assisted in 
the organization of the Southern Pacific Railway Company, of which 
he became not only a director but also the treasurer, and he was otherwise 
a prominent figure in the development of California. His son Benjamin 
J. is now a successful banker in the City of London, England. General 
and Mrs. Turnbull became the parents of three children : Ruth, Walter, Jr., 
and Mary. 

Miss Mary Turnbull was graduated from the medical department of 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, and after thus receiving her degree 
of Doctor of Medicine she engaged in the practice of her profession 
in San Francisco, where unqualified success has attended her work, she 
being now a member of the staff of the San Francisco Children's Hos- 
pital and being a specialist in ana'sthesia. She is the wife of George 
R. Murphy, who is a native of the State of New ^'(lrk and who is now 
the Pacific Coast representative of the Electric Storage Battery Com- 
pany. Mr. Murphy was graduated from Columbia University with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and later he received from the same insti- 



THE SAX FRA.XCISCO 15AV REGION 13 

tution the degrees of Master of Arts and Electrical Engineer. He is 
a member of University Club and other representative social organiza- 
tions in San I'Vancisco, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of 
Electric Engineering. George R. and Dr. Mary (Turnbull) Murphy have 
two children: Virginia Lathrop and George R., Jr. 

George Ja.mes Bucknall, M. D., a man of fine character and 
high professional attainments, was engaged in the successful practice 
of his profession in San Francisco for thirty-five years, and prior to 
entering the medical ])rofession he had gained pioneer l^onors in this 
state, as later data in this memoir will reveal. 

Doctor Bucknall was born in Xew York Cit>'. on the 11th oi .August, 
1836, and in San Francisco his long and useful life came to its close 
on the 5th of June, 1907, when death set its seal upon his mortal lips. 
He was a son of Rev. James and Margaret J. Bucknall, the former of 
whom was a native of England and the latter was born in the United 
States. The father was a clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
and held the position of rector of a leading parish in the City of Xew 
York, his death having occurred in 1863, and that of his widow on the 
13th of June, 1882, in San Francisco. 

The public schools of the national metrojx)lis afforded Doctor Buck- 
nall his earlier educational discipline, and thereafter he was a student 
in Columbia College (now university), which institution he left in 1855, 
when about nineteen years of age, to indulge his venturous spirit by 
coming to California. He made the trip by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama, and after his arrival in San Francisco he here attended the 
medical school conducted by Doctor Cooper, this later having devel- 
oped into the Lane-Stanford Hospital of this city. Here he remained 
three years, and in March, 1859, he set forth for Paris, France, where 
he entered L'Ecole de Medicine. There he continued his technical studies 
until the outbreak of the Civil war in the United States, when he returned 
to the home land and tendered his services in the Union Army, in which 
he was made an assistant surgeon. He served in this capacity at the 
battle of Gettysburg, but illness soon incapacitated him for further service 
and resulted in his being given an honorable discharge. Upon recuper- 
ating his health he entered the celebrated New York College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, now the medical department of Columbia University, and 
in the same he was graduated as a member of the class of 1864. He 
then returned to France, and he was engaged in the practice of his 
profession in the City of Paris until 1869, when he came again to San 
Francisco, where he continued in the successful practice of his profes- 
sion during the remainder of his life, known and honored as one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons of the city. In 1871 he served as 
surgeon-general on the military staff of Governor Booth, and he gave 
characteristically loyal and effective service while a meml)er of the San 
Francisco Board of Health. As a man of deep human sympathy and 
tolerance he was instant in charity and benevolence of unostentatious 



14 THE SAN' FR.ANCISCO BAY REGION 

order, while as a citizen he was ever liberal and public-spirited. He 
was actively identified with the California State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and in the work of his profession he 
sj^ecialized in dermatology, in which he gained authoritative status. 

In the historic and picturesque German City of Frank fort-on-the- 
Main, on the 14th of April, 1864, was solemnized the marriage of 
Doctor Bucknall and Miss Alary E. Davis, daughter of John Calvert 
Davis and Elizabeth (Yount) Davis, the former of whom was born 
in England and the latter in Franklin County, Missouri. Mrs. Bucknall 
still maintains her home in San Francisco, as does also her only sur- 
viving child. Margaret Helen, who is the wife of Frederick S. Myrtle, 
publicity editor for the San Francisco Gas & Electric Company. Of 
the two deceased children it is to be recorded that Marie Elizabeth 
became the wife of Frederick Marriott. Her daughter, Alarie Desiree 
Marriott, makes her home with Mrs, Bucknall. George Eugene died in 
Paris in infancy. 

Ale.xander Majors. In that great epic of the plains, the urge of 
civilization from the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast from about 1848 
to the dedication of the great railway system in the '60s which, bound by 
rail the East and West, no more romantic figure than that of Alexander 
Majors was known to the great undevelojied \\'est. A pioneer of seventy 
years on the frontier, a stalwart man of understanding and unique cour- 
age and made of the stuff from which empires spring. 

Alexander Majors was born in the State of Kentucky on the 4th of 
October, 1814, near Franklin, Simpson County. This little boy at the 
age of five was taken by his father, with the rest of the family, to found a 
new home in the wilds of Missouri. In Missouri alxiut 1818 a state of 
nature almost wholly existed ; virgin streams and forests, the streams were 
full of fish and the forests of wild game. For the grazing of animals vast 
tracts of prairie grass grew lush in the virgin soil. Isolation was the 
drawback, and transjxirtation next to imjxissible. To the west of Missouri 
no distinct boundary lines were defined. The Indians were mostly friendly 
in that part of the country and did much trading with the whites in furs. 
Primitive methods of living were employed, and a man to found a home 
had of necessity to marry early, and a helpmeet meant fullv what the 
word im])lied. .Mexancler Majors' first marriage was contracted at the 
age of nineteen. Girls married fref|uently at the ages of fourteen and 
fifteen, showing that economic pressure is a determining factor in marriage. 
Every farmer was, also, his own manufacturer; if he lacked in thrift he 
went without, so no man could envy his neighbor's prosjierity. In some 
jjhases the life was hard and terrible, but it also had its conijiensations. 
That was a time when a man's word was as good as his bond, and jieople 
were in the haliit of looking truth in the face. 

The i>rogress of the Majors family from Kentucky to ^[issouri after 
crossing the Ohio River into the territory of Illinois, a wagon trip, was 
slow and ardumis, the cnuntry being thinly ])<ipul;ited. S(|uatters' log 



p ^ 




<^A-t£yHMyU cLt UiCUa^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO B.W KKGION 17 

cabins were frcini ten tu twenty miles apart. iMoin the ( )kaw River in 
Illinois to the east hank of the Mississippi River opposite Saint Louis, a 
distance of thirty-five miles, there was no settlement whatever. The 
Majors family and their small possession had to be ferried on a fiat boat 
across to Saint Louis, three Frenchmen acc()m])lishing the feat. Saint 
Louis at that time was a villafje of 4,000 inhabitants, mostly French, who 
were chiefly maintained by trading; in furs with the Indians. Everything 
from the Missouri River west was a vast tractless waste, peopled by bands 
of roxing Indians and countless herds of buffalo. 

After living on a farm during his young manhood, with an e\er-in- 
creasing family, the economic stress was becoming acute. A man could 
live on what he could produce, but there was literally no market for over- 
production, as everyone produced and there were no transportation facili- 
ties. Many men in that region wondered if the land would ever be worth 
so much as $5 an acre, taking into account the handicap of no transporta- 
tion,* either by boat or railroad. 

In 184S Alexander Majors decided to go into the freighting business, 
as that a])peared to be the most lucrative occupation for a man with a large 
family. ' As s]X)radic colonization was gradually being estal)lished between 
Eastern centers and the West, and as the subject of transportation had be- 
come acute, conditions seemed to invite such a career for Mr. Majors. 
His knowledge of animals and frontier life were large determining factors. 

With the discovery of gold and ]>recious metals in Montana, Colorado, 
Wyoming and California, a wild rush by adventurous spirits to those 
centers and the means employed by which to get there constitute the great 
epic of the West ; and could it be written picturesquely and forciblv with 
the fire of adventure, the privations and suffering, would constitute a his- 
tory of tremendous human interest. At that time there was no organized 
impulse westward, the ill-advised attempts of individual groups more 
frequently met with disaster than success. Some of the intrepid ones 
reached their goals, but often at the cost of everything that made life sane 
and bearable. The strain and rigors of the trip westward was anticipated 
by few, shoddy outfits, inadequate supplies and animals ill-suited to the 
demands jilaced upon them, all conspired to bring disaster uix>n hundreds 
of the emigrants. Water supplies and sickness were not fullv taken into 
consideration, and it might be truly said that pioneering in the W'est was 
an all around battle for the survival of the fit. Nothing unfit pulled 
through. Traveling equijiment broke down and supplies gave out many 
times before the emigrant had fairly plunged into the wilderness. Hundreds 
dragged along as far as that territory we now call Kansas. Thereabout 
the improvident ones broke down completely — and staved in Kansas, 
being unalile to jiroceed. The claim is made that that is whv Kansas 
became so quickly settled and jxipulated, on account of the "could go no 
further people." 

All the known trails from the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast were 
besprinkled with unknown graves. Thousands of such graves were poorlv 
marked and quickly obliterated by storms and wild animals. The anguish 



18 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

of the broken hearts and lives that had to move on and leave the Ijeloved 
to the wilderness of nature can never be recorded. When near living 
streams the dead were buried as sailors are buried, wrapped in blankets 
or canvas, weighted and thrown into the swiftly moving current, or buried 
in the sand by the water. 

Cholera, once epidemic in the country, took a terrible toll from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. The plague was carried by one emigrant train to 
another group, decimating as it traveled. The scourge reached California, 
and Benjamin Majors, father of Alexander Majors, died of it on the 
banks of the San Joaquin River, and there filled a nameless grave. The 
pitiful graves poorly marked and quickly forgotten were not deterrent to 
the adventurous, the pitiless urge went on, nothing short of conquering 
the vast wilderness could stop the onward rush. 

As time went on an imperative need for an organized transfxjrtation 
system became greater and greater. The earliest method of transpKirtation 
was by muleback on the old Santa Fe trail. A few wagons used the trail 
previous to 1830 and through the years till 1848. when Alexander Majors 
launched his e.xperiment. He began modestly with six wagons and twelve 
oxen to a wagon, and a few reserve animals. 

His first route was along the old Santa Fe trail into New Mexico, a 
distance of 800 miles. This trip, which consumed ninety-two days, was 
eminently successful, the return being heralded among freighters and 
merchants for the splendid condition of men, animals and wagons. This 
trip also marked the quickest time made by ox team. Almost the entire 
trip was through country menaced by hostile Indians. Everywhere 
Mr. Majors observed lawlessness among teamsters and their ilk. drunken- 
ness, gambling, profanity and cl^uelty to animals were everywhere manifest, 
till it sickened his soul. 

Alexander ^Majors was a man of profound religious convictions, and 
he resolved whatever it might cost he would change the outrageous 
state of things. This resolve he executed quickly, and from that time on 
everv man in his employ had to sign a code of rules for clean behavior, 
which read as follows : "While I am in the employ of A. Majors I agree 
not to use profane language, not to get drunk, not to gamble, not to treat 
animals cruelly, and not to do anything else that is incompatible with the 
conduct of a gentleman. .A.nd I agree, if I violate any of the above condi- 
tions, to accept my discharge without pay for my services." 

It worked like a charm. In Mr. ^Iajors' memory no man was dis- 
charged for breach of contract. To further maintain wellbeing and order, 
Sundav was a complete day of rest for men and beasts. Other freighters 
did not concede this seventh day a day of rest. In appreciation of his 
humane treatment, it grew to be a jxiint of honor with every man to live 
up to the letter of the contract. When the Civil war commenced, an 
added clause to the contract made the men swear allegiance to the Govern- 
ment of the United States. Several years afterward, when Mr. Majors 
took over two partners in the business, the same ethical contract continued 
in force. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 19 

Mr. Majors' freighting business grew and expanded to enormous 
proixirtions, and the men were still trained in ways of decency and self- 
resi^ect. Mr. Majors' reputation for honor and sobriety was known from 
coast to coast, he had the respect and friendshi]) of thousands of his 
fellow men. Beside his achievements in the freighting business the out- 
standing influence of Ale.xander Majors was his rigid adherence to law 
and order; and these formative influences reacting ui)on men everywhere, 
were of incalculable benefit as an outpouring of faith in the innate good- 
ness of men at a time when frontier lawlessness was the rule rather than 
the exception. His trains commanding all trails over the plains, law and 
order went hand in hand with every forward movement. Those who 
know what law and order meant in a new and raw civilization will have a 
clear understanding of what Alexander Majors meant to the initial spirit 
of the West. His conquests were not through force, but consideration 
and magnanimity. That was his method of dealing with the Indians. He 
had little trouble w'ith them as corppared to the immensity of his enter- 
prises. Alex Majors seemed to have a charmed life, it was often re- 
marked by his friends. Dozens of times he was exjxjsed to death, but 
every danger seemed to glance away from him. He was a typical American 
in appearance.'tall, straight, with a nobly shaped head and a light and erect 
carriage. He never carried a pound of excess weight. His eyes were 
medium in size of a penetrating blue-gray. His eye was his feature, kindly 
and fearless and understanding. It is told of him, that a man went into 
his office one day to kill him for some fancied grievance. Alex Majors 
ordinarily went unarmed, for he knew to go armed was in itself a provo- 
cation. Mr. Majors, mild of eye and courteous of manner, left the man 
no point for violent attack. He had some difficulty in getting the man 
into shape to talk rationally, which he finally did, grievances melted away 
under his beaming eye and friendly talk. They parted with a hand clasp 
and entered upon an understanding friendship. Many wonderful stories 
were told of Alexander Majors. His was a life of thrills and adventure, 
not especially spectacular, but full of nobility and poise. His generosity 
was prodigal, and his openmindedness and that same generosity were 
large factors in his final loss of fortune. 

For forty years there was a staunch friendship between Buffalo Bill 
(\\^illiam Cody) and Alexander Majors. Cody's father was killed in 
the Kansas war, and Mrs. Cody and her children were going out West 
to establish their home. When a train was making camp one dav, Mr. 
Majors was standing talking to a group of army ofiicers, when he noticed 
a bright-looking, beautiful boy hanging around listening with great in- 
terest. Mr. Majors was surprised one day to see a woman approach him 
with this same little fellow, a lad about fourteen years of age. It was 
Mrs. Cody and Bill. She asked for work for the boy. Mr. Majors asked 
him some questions, and then and there employed him as messenger boy 
to carry dispatches between the different ox trains. He was delighted. It 
was a position of hazard, on account of Indians, but the greater the hazard 
the more he enjoyed it. He grew into a man of great courage and power 



20 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

of initiative. He received a man's wages from the beginning. He had 
to be a man and help his mother, and Alex Majors saw to it that he did. 
He was like a son to the elder man, and years afterward, when the for- 
tunes of Alex Majors were at the lowest ebb, Cody helped him often as 
a son would help a father he loved and respected. Their pride and 
pleasure in each other often ran to funny and amusing demonstrations. 

As the freighting business increased, big demands came from out 
West not only for protection but supplies, and brought about in this wise : 
The Mormons, a band of religious .fanatics living in Salt Lake Valley, 
began to give trouljle to the Government on account of their attacks on 
trains of immigrants going farther west. They constituted themselves 
into bands of robbers to hector, rob and often to kill immigrants. Soldiers, 
officers and sujsplies had to be transported West to meet the exigencies 
of the case. The firm at that time was comjxised of Russell, Majors and 
W'addell. As a result of the trouble with the Mormons the freighting 
firm, in 1858, received large contracts, from the Government to carry sui> 
plies to Utah. At Fort Leavenworth the firm had large warehouses for 
storage, this being the Eastern terminus of the freighting business. With 
these contracts from the Government, under Buchanan, the warehouse 
facilities at Fort Leavenworth were totally inadequate, and one of the 
l)rovisions of these contracts with the Quartermaster General's office at 
\\'ashington was the extension of warehouse accommodation. The carry- 
ing out of this provision constituted the largest single achievement of 
Russell, Majors and Waddell. 

Mr. Majors, in company with Lieutenant Du Barry, of the Quarter- 
master's Department, started up the Missouri River to pick a new ware- 
house site. Thev decided ujxm Nebraska City, Nebraska, on the Missouri 
River. Freight was sent by lioat to Nebraska City and from thence trans- 
])orted overland to Salt Lake l)y ox team to Fort Floyd, fifty miles south 
of Salt Lake City. The merchants of Nebraska City received this project 
with open arms, and rendered all the help they could. Enduring friend- 
ships were established between Alex Majors and many of the splendid 
business men of Nebraska City. In order to facilitate this work, Mr. 
Majors moved his family from the farm near Kansas City to Nebraska 
City. A home was built and there the family resided several years. The 
hospitalitv of the Majors' home was noted the country round. 

The sup])Iies sent to Utah in the year 1858 were enormous, being over 
16.000,000 jxiunds, requiring 3,500 wagons and teams to transjxirt them. 
A\'ith the Fort Leavenworth and Nebraska City headquarters in full 
swing, the firm had all it could do to fill obligations. It took nearly 45,000 
oxen and hundreds of men to accomplish this feat of carrying 16,000,000 
pounds of freight 1,200 miles into the wilderness of adventure. 

In conjunction with the freighting business, an overland mail stage 
coach line was run by the firm between the Missouri River and Denver, 
Colorado. .Xtcbison was the eastern terminus and Denver the western. 
Mr. Majors discouraged the establishment of this line at the time, as the 
traffic did not begin to justify the expense. Two men named John S. Jones 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 21 

and W. II. Russell went ahead with it, however, and gave ninety-day 
notes for equipment, which consisted of mules. Concord coaches, and the 
building of stations at distances of every ten or fifteen miles. Daily trips 
were made in si.x days. The first stage ran into Denver May 17, 1859. 
When the notes fell due Jones and Russell could not meet them. The 
firm took over the line to save their partner. W. H. Russell. In trying 
to make the line a paying projjosition they decided to extend it through 
to Salt Lake City, and the semi-monthly line of Hackaday and Liggett 
running from Saint Joseph to Salt Lake was taken over. The Hackaday 
and Liggett equipment was badly run down, no stations and only a semi- 
monthly service. To bring the old line up to a state of efficiency was the 
first move and to run a thoroughl}- equipped line from the Missouri River 
to Salt Lake City was, they felt, the only means of making it pay. Sta- 
tions were built from Denver to Salt Lake, making a complete system for 
storing grain and housing the relay horses. A stage was run each day 
both ways, schedule time. The trip was 1,200 miles and took ten days. 
This line was operated from the summer of 1859 until ^larch. 1862, when 
it fell into the hands of Ben Holliday. 

On this stage coach line 1,000 Kentucky mules and 300 smaller mules 
to run the mountain passes were used and a large number of finely built 
Concord coaches. It was a fine line and proved of great benefit to the 
Government when Civil war was declared between the North and South, 
as the southern route through Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Smith and 
Saint Louis was not practical for war purposes. This Russell, Alajors and 
W'addell stage route was the same used by the firm for the Pony Express. 
Additional stations from twelve to fifteen miles apart were added to the 
line from Salt Lake to Sacramento, California, the western terminus of 
the Pony Express. 

After the L^nited States mail was given to the Russell. Alajors and 
W'addell stage service, the line became for the first time a paying institu- 
tion, but it went into the hands of Holliday just before the first quarterly 
pavment of $100,000 had been paid over by the Government. Russell 
further involved the firm by ill-advised promises to Senator Gwin of 
California in regard to sponsoring a quick delivery postal service from 
the iMissouri River to the Pacific Coast, without making substantial guar- 
antees of a subsidy from Congress. Russell went West from Washington 
to confer with his partners concerning the project. As in the case of the 
stage coach line, Majors advised against it without the proper pledges. 
He claimed the project so far as the practicability of putting a jxany ex- 
press line through was absolutely sound, as it could be done easily and 
could be made to run the year round, l)ut financially it could not pay 
without subsidy, and furthermore could not ]iay ten cents on the dollar, 
if that. Majors claimed it would bankrupt the firm. There was a tense- 
ness in Congress between Northern and Southern members. Mr. Russell 
strenuously insisted the experiment be made, as he had committed himself 
to Senator Gwin and had been promised a subsidy if the project proved 
feasible. The facts Senator Gwin laid before him were that all his at- 

Vol. II-2 



22 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

tempts to get a direct thoroughfare opened between the State of Cali- 
fornia and the Eastern states had proved abortive, for the reason that 
when the question of a permanent central route came up his fellow senators 
raised the question of the impassability of the mountains during the winter 
months ; that the Northern senators were opfxised to giving the extreme 
South the prestige of putting the line through. This being the case, it was 
a necessity to demonstrate that a central or middle route could be made 
practicable, that if the firm stood back of him in his pledges to Gwin, 
that Gwin would use all his power to obtain a subsidy from Congress to 
pay the expenses of such a line on the thirty-ninth to forty-first parallel of 
latitude, which would be central between the extreme north and south, 
though he could not hope for a subsidy at the start. The firm took a 
sporting chance on it, knowing full well what failure would mean if Con- 
gress did not come to their assistance later. It so transpired that the 
firm had to pay the fiddler, or the entire expense of the Pony Express 
venture, as war was declared and everything went at loose ends. 

Alexander Majors was western executive of the firm of Russell, 
Majors and Waddell, and his long experience on the plains qualified him 
eminently to pass judgment on the practical outcome of projects of all 
kinds. There were two weak points in his character that his family 
grew to know well, and those points were an excess of generosity and 
magnanimity. He could not bear to see Russell humiliated at Washington. 
Russell's manipulations and Majors' generosity were a bad combination. 
The Pony Express was a wonderful success from the point of achieve- 
ment, and made history for the United States, saving California to the 
Union when Johnston was about to deliver her into the hands of the 
South. Quick messages to Washington circumvented such a catastrophe. 

Of all the romantic episodes in American history nothing equals the 
thrill, adventure and pure elemental achievement of the Pony Express. 
The subject would fill a volume of itself. The Pony Express paid scarcely 
ten cents on the dollar, let alone the initial expense. The ponies had to 
be kept up to the very topnotch of efficiency and grain and hay of the 
finest quality had to be trans]X)rted sometimes hundreds of miles to the 
different stations. The outlay for the year and a half the express oper- 
ated cost the firm hundreds and thousands of dollars, but what the Pony 
Express demonstrated in the matter of human courage and grit and 
pointing the way for a transcontinental railway, which it brought about 
twenty-five years sooner than it was thought at that time could be possible, 
was well worth the outlay, and many things are more precious than money, 
and Mr. M.ijors so regarded it. 

The Ponv Express riders and their jxinies made records probably not 
excelled in the world's history. The ])r()ject of the Pony Express route 
was carried through in true s]xirtsmanlike spirit to prove the route prac- 
ticable for all seasons of the year. The messages were written on tissue 
paper, and $5 was charged for one-half' ounce. The schedule was ten 
days from Saint Joseph. Missouri, the eastern terminus, to Sacramento, 
California, the western terminus. Two important messages were carried 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 23 

by Puny Express from Saint Joseph, Missouri, west, a distance of nearly 
2,000 miles, with wonderful sj^eed. One was the carrying of President 
Buchanan's last message to Congress in December, 1860, the time was 
eight days and some hours. The other was the carrying of President 
Lincoln's inaugural address of IMarch 4, 1861, over the same route of 
about 2,000 miles in seven days and seventeen hours. It took about sixty 
days to build the Pony E.xpress line from Salt Lake, Utah, to Sacramento, 
California, as clearings had to be made and huts for su])plies built to 
correspond with like structures used by the stage coach line from Salt 
Lake to the Missouri River. Four or five hundred ponies were em- 
ployed. 190 stations built, 200 men for station keei^ers, and eighty riders. 
The latter showed a daredevil courage amazing to read about. Buffalo Bill 
was one of the riders and with several of the others made marvelous 
records. The average run of ten days beat the Butterfield route by eleven 
days. The Pony Express stations were dotted over a wild country, in- 
fested by road agents and hostile Indians. 

For one month after the express had been in o]>eration a short time, 
all activities had to be suspended on the jxirt of officials of the line, as 
the Nevada Indians went on the warpath, killing and burning. When the 
crash came, Alexander Majors even gave over to his creditors his home 
and furnishings in Nebraska City. They gave back to Mrs. Majors the 
furnishings of the home, and to Mr. Majors a magnificent watch was 
presented with an inscription inside declaring the esteem and respect held 
by the citizens of Nebraska City. 

His first wife bore him seven children, of which the two bovs are 
still living. The second wife bore him four children, of which three are 
living. Her name was Susan Dudley Wetzel, she was from Independence, 
Missouri, but born in Virginia. She was a woman of remarkable beauty 
and sweetness of character and many years the junior of Alex Majors. 
She presided over his home in Nebraska City with great efficiency and 
kindliness. Of the two children living in California one is Greene Majors, 
one-time mayor of Alameda and at present judge of the Piedmont, Cali- 
fornia, court. He is the yovmgest child of Mr. Majors' first marriage, 
and the other, Mrs. Elinor Carlisle, senior member of the A. Carlisle & 
Company firm of San Francisco. In an official capacity she served as the 
first woman school director on the Berkeley, California. Board of Educa- 
tion, and finally on the Chamber of Commerce directorate, from which 
she resigned to move to San Francisco after the big fire in September, 
1823, at which time she lost her old home. Greene Rlajors has one son, 
Dr. Ergo Majors, of Oakland, California. ]\Irs. Carlisle has six children, 
the eldest, Catherine, married to Samuel Van Ornum, a civil engineer of 
Pasadena, California, and Burlington M. Ctirlisle. the manager and director 
of A. Carlisle & Comjxiny, and four children at home. .'\lma, Helen. Albert 
and Grafton. 

Alexander Majors died at Chicago on the first dav of January, 1900. 
His wife died in California in 1915. She was called upon as the widow 
of Alexander Majors in 1913 to unveil the Pony Express monument in 



24 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Saint Joseph, Missouri, as his daughter, Mrs. EHnor Cariisle, performed 
the hke service in unveiHng the Marker at Sacramento March 3. 1923, 
memorials placed by the ladies of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion to commemorate historical events. With the passing of Alexander 
Majors a great soul crossed the Great Divide. A Boston ne\vspa[)er in 
commenting upon his death spoke of him as "the John the Baptist of the 
West, blazing the way for a new civilization," which was the purest tribute 
that could be paid him. 

Henry Bayly, one of the early pioneers of the Pacific Coast, was 
born in London, England, in 1815. but passed the greater part of his 
life in Belgium. In his early manhood he learned the trade of making 
surgical instruments, and lived for many years at Ghent. Belgium, where 
he conducted his manufacturing shops. It was there that he married and 
his children were born. He finally concluded to change his location 
from Europe to America, and accordingly sailed for the Pacific Coast, 
passing southward over the Atlantic around Cape Horn and then up 
along South America and onward until he reached the Bay of San 
Francisco. He made this attractive trip in 1831, and soon after his 
arrival, left the coast and started for the interior, where the big gold 
mines of that period were located. Soon after his arrival at the interior 
camps he was taken seriously ill, and while thus helpless his working 
instruments which reached the coast by another vessel ^-ere sold. 

As soon as he was sufficiently recovered to warrant the trip he came 
back to the bay, opened his shops in San Francisco and resumed the 
work he had followed so long and profitably in Belgium. He was thus 
occupied up to the time of his death in 1856. His remains lie buried 
in Laurel Hill Cemetery. His wife was a native of Belgium and came 
with her husband and children to California. Her name before her 
marriage was Pauline Breynaert. In her girlhood days she attended the 
schools of Ghent, and finally graduated from the University of Ghent 
as midwife and was given a diploma. After reaching California she 
began practicing as midwife in San Francisco and became known profes- 
sionally as Madam Bayly. As long as she was physically able she prac- 
ticed her profession with great success until she finally retired and soon 
afterward passed away in 1881, well advanced in years. 

To Henry and Pauline Bayly were liorn the following children : 1 lenry 
Ferdinand, Charles Alfred and Mathilde. Henry Ferdinand was born 
in Belgium and became a moulder by trade, which occupation he fol- 
lowed the greater portion of his life. He was for many years foreman 
for the Judson Iron Works. Charles Alfred was also a native of 
Belgium, and in early maturity became a druggist and for many years 
conducted his store at the corner of Sutter and Grant avenues. He 
was finally called by death in 1912. Mathilde became the wife of 
George Held of San Francisco, a ]>rominent and successful merchant. 
He is deceased and she died in 1883. Henry Ferdinand Bayly married 
Christina Kammel, who is vet living in San Francisco. She bore her 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 25 

husband six children: Henry, Charles, Alfred, Francis, George and one 
who died in infancy. Charles A. Bayly married Jane Rourke and they 
had the following children : Henrietta, who became the wife of Milton 
E. Blanchard ; Esther, who married J. N. Watson ; Charles A., deceased ; 
Jane, who married John \V. Gough ; Richard W. and James H. Mathilde 
bore her husband six children: George, Henry, Pauline, Charlotte, Rose 
and Alfred. 

The Baylys are generally Protestant Episcopalians, and all are repu- 
table citizens and a credit to their old native country. Nearly all have 
attained meritorious distinction in various walks of life. Charles A. Bayly 
took an active part in local public affairs and finally was elected one of 
the supervisors of San Francisco County, in which capacity he served 
his constituents with notable prominence from 1878 to 1881. He was 
a stanch republican and one of the leaders of his party. 

Phineas V. Blanchard. father of Milton E., was a native of Vermont, 
where he was reared and educated. He came to California in 1852, and 
upon his arrival went to the mines in the interior for some time, but 
finally returned to Vermont, where he married Mary Jane Sergeant, who 
also was a native of Vermont. Soon after their marriage they moved 
to Illinois, where he followed merchandising during the Civil war and 
in 1872 came west to California and located in San Francisco, where he 
operated a dairy ranch in the suburbs with success. He died in 1SS5. 
Their three children were ]\Iilton E., Marion S. and Lena R. Milton 
E. married Henrietta Bayly, as above stated. He is a Doctor of Philoso- 
phy from Harvard, 1901, and head of the Latin department in the Mission 
High School. Henrietta B. Blanchard was for fourteen years teacher 
of singing and head of the vocal department in Mills College, also special 
lecturer at the University of California summer sessions, 1908, 1909, 1915, 
1916; voice teacher in San Francisco since 1901, and sang with Edward 
MacDowell in recitals and with Mascagni in concert. She is chairman 
of the music department San Francisco Federation \\'omen"s Clubs. 1919- 
1923, and a member of the Chaiining Club. San Francisco. The children 
of Milton and Henrietta Blanchard are: Beatrice, now Mrs. E. Dixon 
Freeland, and Francis Bayly Blanchard, a Universitv of California stu- 
dent. Marion S. married Elizabeth Dewing, who is an attornev. Lena R. 
is deceased. The Baylys have distinguished themselves by dignified and 
commendable citizenship, and wherever they have lived have gained the 
confidence and companionship of their neighbors. 

Thomas Louis Mahonev, who became well known during his lifetime 
as a competent and prominent practicing physician, was the son of Dennis 
and Margaret Mahoney and was born in San Francisco in May, 1867. 
He was given a good education in the public schools of the city, and 
while yet in his teens fixed his mind upon a professional career instead 
of one of purely business character. Soon he entered the Cooper Medical 
School, took the full course for a general practitioner as set forth by 
the curriculum, and in due time was graduated with high credit before he 



26 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

had attained his legal majority and while yet in his adolescent period. 
Before receiving his diploma he was forced to wait under the laws until 
he became twenty-one years old before he could be licensed to practice. 

Immediately after receiving his diploma and his permit to practice 
he opened an office, but centered his first efforts on preparatory work 
as interne in the city and county hospital. After serving there with merit 
for some time he began practice from his offices, which were located in 
the neighborhood of his old childhood home. Soon he had a large 
practice and the confidence of the community and the public generally. 
While making specialties of some branches of the practice, he followed 
as a whole a general practice, both medical and surgical, and at the time 
of his death he was the police surgeon of San Francisco. During his 
whole medical career he was identified with many movements to improve 
the health programs of the city, county and state. He took deep interest 
and a prominent part in other non-professional public attempts to improve 
the morals of the people and to purify and rectify the political atmosphere. 
He finally passed away on July 11, 1913. while on a vacation trip at 
Sousalita. He was a member of the Olympic Club and a charter memljer 
of the Dolphin Club. 

While he was yet a young man he married Miss Minnie Pyne. daughter 
of William and Lucy Pyne, the ceremony taking place in 1892. To 
their marriage the following family of children were born : Margaret, who 
became the wife of Valentine Mattingly and has two children, Richard 
Thomas and Philip Earl ; Lucy, who. is now a prominent teacher in the 
San Francisco public schools ; Minnie Elizabeth, who is also a teacher 
in the San Francisco schools ; Thomas Louis ; William Pyne ; Ann, who 
is at the present time a student in the local high school. Both Thomas 
L. and William P. are now busy studying medicine, intending to emulate 
the notable example set them by their competent, reputable and illustrious 
father. Thomas L. has entered the St. Louis University School of 
Medicine. 

William Pyne, father of Mrs. Mahoney, was one of the e.nrly settlers 
of San Francisco, arriving here in the early '60s. He engaged in the 
wool business and did a large and lucrative trade over the whole bay 
region. He finally was forced to enlarge his business until he was 
the conductor of stores at Fifth and King streets and at Fifth and 
Bluxom streets. He really began business here as a clerk and bookkeeper 
combined immediately after his arrival at the dock, but soon had saved 
enough to supply the needed capital to start in trade for himself. No 
doubt he assisted in developing the wool trade of the coast region. It 
was not long after the state was organized that .sheep began to arrive 
here on almost every vessel and from across the mountains in wornout 
herds. Mr. Pyne took much interest from the comnienccnK'nt of his 
business career in all the sheep herds of the state, and particularly those 
of the bay region. It is said that .sheep came on the same vessel that 
brought Mr. Pyne around the Horn. His wife, Lucy, did not come 
with him on this trip, but joined him a year later, coming by way of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 27 

the Isthmus of Panama. From the commencement here they worked 
together in building up their lousiness and in rearing their children 
properl)'. When Mr. Pyne first started independently he was for a time 
associated with Thomas Baily, under the firm name of I'.aily & Company. 
Later he left this concern and started out for himself. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Pyne were born four children, as follows: Sarah, who become the 
wife of Oscar Lynch, and she is yet living. l)ut her husliand is deceased; 
Ann, deceased ; William, deceased ; Minnie, who wedded Dr. Thomas 
Louis Mahoney, as above narrated. 

William Tell Colem.«iN. Many of the men who laid the founda- 
tions of San Francisco's present prosperity were well educated, some of 
them being college graduates with degrees, who sought and found in this 
new environment the broader field for actual work so many of them 
craved. Here where everything was new and teeming with interest ; 
where the possibilities were countless and the opportunities without num- 
ber, they were able to accomplish that for which their talents fitted 
them, and in so doing they left behind them a heritage for their descend- 
ants. One of these men of parts, now passed away, but who in his 
day was a potent figure in San Francisco, was the late William Tell 
Coleman, long associated with extensive shipping interests on the western 
coast. He was born at Cynthiana, Kentucky, February 29, 1824. After 
attending the University of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, he was gradu- 
ated therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Science, having worked 
his way through college. 

The announcement of the discovery of gold in California caused him 
and his brother, DeWitt Clinton Coleman, to cross the plains to Cali- 
fornia in 1849, and they reached Sacramento in August of that year. 
They had had experience in the lumber industry and were used to hard 
work, and upon their arrival at Sacramento proposed to go to the mines, 
but were turned aside from their purpose. William Tell Coleman opened 
a store, and after he had secured an initial experience in this line, went 
into the general mercantile business. As he was fond of mechanics he 
also opened a carpenter shop and worked in it. As he made money he 
invested it wisely, and in the course of time was able to go into the 
shipping business and founded the firm of William T. Coleman Company 
in San Francisco, and his vessels plied between New York City and 
San Francisco. Later on Edward Mott Robinson became associated 
with him. Mr. Coleman continued his active participation in this 
industry until 1888, when the firm discontinued business. His death 
occurred on November 23, 1893. 

When he first arrived in the bay region justice had to be administered 
quickly and vigorously, and he served on the Vigilance Committee in 
1851, and headed the great Vigilance Committee of 1856, and was the 
organizer and the president of the Committee of Safetv in 1877. One 
of the charter members of the Society of California Pioneers, he served 
it as president for some time, and never lost his interest in it and 



28 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

his fellow members. The democratic party always had in him one of 
its most earnest supporters, but he never cared for political preferment 
himself. A man of strong religious convictions, he found in the creed 
of the Episcopal Church an expression for his faith, and during the 
greater portion of his life was a communicant of this church. Made 
a Mason early in life, he was advanced in that order until he went through 
the Commandery. 

In 1852 William Tell Coleman married Caroline Page, who died in 
1896. Thev had seven children, two of whom lived to maturity, namely: 
C. C, who was born in 1859, was in business with his father, and died 
in 1895 ; and Robert Lewis, who was born at "^t'onkers. New York, in 
1870. He was educated in public schools in San Francisco and was 
graduated from Yale University, with the degree of Bachelor of Philos- 
ophy, and from the California University with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. He is a resident of San Francisco. 

Frederick Funstox, a distinguished major general of the United 
States Army, achieved that which makes his name and service a very part 
of American history, and it is but fitting that in this publication be given 
a brief tribute to his memory, especially by reason of the fact that his 
widow resides in her old home city of San Francisco. 

General Funston was born at New Carlisle, Ohio, on the Qth of 
November, 1865, and he was the ranking major general of the United 
States Armv at the time of his death, in February, 1917. He was a son 
of Edward Hoge Funston and Ann Eliza (IMitchellj Funston, who were 
pioneer settlers in the State of Kansas, where the subject of this memoir 
was reared on the homestead farm, he having been but two \-ears of age 
at the time of the family removal to the Sunflower State. His public- 
school discipline in Kansas included that of the high school, and there- 
after he was for two and one-half years a student in the University of 
Kansas. In 1890 he was appointed special agent for the United States 
Department of Agriculture, and in this capacity he took part in the 
Death \"alley expedition in 1891. From 1892 to 1894 he was in Alaska 
and adjacent portions of the British Northwest. He crossed Alaska to 
the Arctic Ocean and traveled from McKenzie River to Bering Sea — a. 
total journey of 3.500 miles. He camped on the Klondike in the winter 
of 1893-94, and floated alone in a canoe down the Yukon River. He 
resigned from the Department of Agriculture and thereafter traveled in 
Mexico. 

In 1896 the future general entered the Cuban insurgent army, as cap- 
tain of artillery, and he won promotion in turn to major and lieutenant 
colonel. He took part in the campaigns of Maximo Gomez and Calixto 
Garcia, and after this service in behalf of Cuban independence he returned 
to the United States, at the inception of the Spanish-American war. He 
was commissioned colonel of the Twentieth Kansas Volunteer Infantry 
May 13, 1898, and with his regiment he went to the Philippine Islands, 
where he participated in the northern Luzon campaign of General 



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THE SAN I'RANCISCO BAY REGION 31 

jMc.Vithur. In this connection General Funston performed an heroic 
deed that shall ever give fame to his name. For crossing the Rio Grande 
River at Calumpit, April 26, 1899, on a small hamboo raft, in face of 
heavv fire, and establishing a rope ferry by means of which the United 
States troops were enabled to cross the river and win in battle, he was 
promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers. May 1, 1899. On February 
14th of the following year he was awarded the Congressional Medal of 
Honor. In the Philippines he continued in campaign service, at the head 
of a brigade, and in an engagement at Santa Tomas he was wounded. In 
January, 1900, General Funston was assigned to the command of the 
Fourth District Department of Northern Luzon. He organized and 
commanded the expedition that resulted in the capture of the insurgent 
leader, Aguinaldo, March 20, 1901. He was commissioned brigadier- 
general on the 1st of the following month, and after his return to the 
United States, before the close of that year, he commanded in turn the 
departments of the Colorado, the Columbia, the Lakes, Department of 
California, and army ser^•ice schools. He returned to the Philippines and 
served as commander of the Department of Luzon, 1911-13; he was com- 
mander of the Department of Hawaii in 1913-14; in January, 1914, he was 
appointed commander of the Second Division of the United States Army, 
at Texas City, Texas. In the following April he commanded the expe- 
dition to Vera Cruz, Mexico, and he served as military governor of that 
city imtil the following November. He was promoted to the rank of 
major-general November 17, 1914. In February, 1915, he was appointed 
commander of the Southern Department, and in March, 1916, he was 
assigned to the general command of the United States forces along the 
Ale.xican border, as well as of the movements of United States troops in 
Mexico, in pursuit of Villa. 

General Funston was distinctly a man of thought and action, and his 
life was an eventful one. He was a stalwart republican, was a vigorous 
writer of articles of political and economic order, and his political faith 
was that of his father, who represented Kansas in the United States Con- 
gress for a period of about fourteen years. It is worthy of mention that 
in the Alaskan experiences of General Funston he was on the spot where 
gold was discovered at Dawson City eight years in advance of this dis- 
covery. The general was much in demand on the lecture platform, and 
was the author of a valuable work entitled "Memories of Two Wars." 
General Funston was one of the most honored and influential members 
of the Spanish-American War Veterans, and was afifiliated also with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His splendid military career 
was terminated by his death in 1917, only two months prior to the time 
when the United States became involved in the great World war. 

On the 25th of October, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of General 
Funston and Miss Eda Blankart, daughter of the late Otto Blankart, of 
whom specific menticju is made in the following sketch. Mrs. Funston 
resides in San Francisco, as do also the three surviving children : Fred- 



32 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

erick, Jr.. Barbara Eda and Eleanor Elizabeth. Arthur McArthur, the 
first child, died at the age of eight years. 

Otto Blankart came to California nearly half a century ago, and 
while he was in the earlier period of his residence here actively identified 
with mercantile lines, it was in the domain of music that he achieved 
his highest reputation and major success, both he and his wife having 
been talented and popular teachers of music here for a long term of 
years and both having been residents of San Francisco at the time of 
their deaths. 

Mr. Blankart was born in Northern Germany, November 25, 1845, 
and his death occurred in 1921, his wife having passed away in 1910. 
]\Ir. Blankart received his early education in the schools of his native 
land, and was a youth of eighteen years when he came to the United 
States, where he passed the remainder of his life and where he repre- 
sented the finest type of loyal American citizenship. He first settled at 
Quincy, Illinois, but in 1874 he established his residence in California. 
His talent as a violinist here brought him into prominence in musical 
circles, and while he was a successful teacher of violin music his wife 
achieved virtually equal prestige as a teacher of piano music. Air. Blankart 
organized the first string quintet club in San Francisco, and was, with his 
devoted wife, a leader in musical affairs in the City of San Francisco, the 
family home having been a veritable treasure-trove of musical instruments 
and a center of much of the musical life of the community, the while it 
was ever known for its cordial and generous hospitality. 

At the age of twenty-three years Mr. Blankart wedded Miss Teresa 
Koehler, who was born and reared in Prussia, her paternal great- 
grandfather having held in Prussia a governmental office similar to that 
of the chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Her 
family were all professional people, and were lawyers or doctors. Of 
the three children of Mr. and Mrs. Blankart the eldest was Elizabeth, who 
became the wife of W. O. Cullen and who is now deceased; Eda is the 
widow of Maj.-Gen. Frederick Funston, to whom an individual memoir 
is dedicated in the preceeding sketch, Mrs. Funston being now a resident 
of San Francisco; and Magdalene is the wife of Frank Howlett, a member 
of the firm of Habenicht & Howlett. of San Francisco. 

William Bramwell Carr was a representative of a pioneer family 
of the old Hoosier State, and his early e.xperiences well fortified him for 
those which he was to meet when he became a pioneer in California, to 
which state he came in the year 1850. He became one of the fine band 
of men who assumed leader.ship in California affairs in tlie early days, 
as may jvell be understood when stated that he was associated with Hunt- 
ington, Crocker and Stanford in the building of the first transcontinental 
railroad that connected San Francisco with the East. He continued as 
one of the prominent, influential and honored citizens of San Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 33 

until his death, on the 12th of May. 1897, and his name and achievement 
are a very part of the historv of this city. 

Mr. Carr was horn at JetTersonville, Indiana, on the 10th of January, 
1833, and was a son of Rev. Joshua and I'atty ( McCauley) Carr. his 
father having Iwen a pioneer cler<,ryman of the Methodist Episcoixil Church 
in Indiana. 

The subject of this memoir gained the major [>ar\. of his early edu- 
cation in Indiana, and was a youth of seventeen years when he yielded 
to the lure of the many wonderful stories told about California incidental 
to the discovery of gold in 1849. It was in 1850 that Mr. Carr made the 
long, weary and hazardous journey across the plains, his sj^ecial companion 
on the trip having been another young man. John M. Swift. Within 
a short time after arriving at Sacramento the two young men made their 
way to the mines, and both were successful in their quest for gold, es\ie- 
cially in connection with the development of the celebrated Comstock 
lodge. Mr. Carr continued his operations in the Comstock district until 
the movement was initiated in San Francisco for the construction of a 
transcontinental railroad. In his great enterprise he became prominently 
associated with other leaders, including Messrs. Stanford, Huntington, 
Hopkins and Crocker, and after the Southern Pacific Railroad had been 
completed he finally sold his interests therein and became associated with 
J. B. Haggin and Lloyd Tevis in the purchase of large tracts of land 
in Kern and Kings counties. He played a large part in the development 
and advancement of those counties and continued his alliance with 
Messrs. Haggin and Tevis until the time of his death. He always main- 
tained his home and business headquarters in San Francisco, and here 
was a director of the Bank of California. He continued his successful 
identification with mining industry until the close of his life. Mr. Carr 
properly merits classification among the founders and liuilders of Cali- 
fornia, and his character and worthy achievement entitle him to enduring 
honor in the state in which he was a pioneer. He was a leader in the 
local councils and campaign activities of the republican party, and so marked 
was his influence in this connection that he became familiarly known in 
California political circles as "Boss Carr." 

January 6. 1864. recorded the marriage of Mr. Carr and Miss Eliza- 
beth Macy, who was born at Nantucket, Massachusetts, and who was 
about sixty-two years of age at the time of her death. Of the three 
children, the two sons, George and Ralph, are deceased, and in .San 
Francisco still resides the only living representative of the immediate 
family, the daughter May, who is the wife of Samuel A. Monsarrat, and 
to whom the publishers are indebted for the data on which is founded 
this brief tribute to the memory of her honored father. 

Gex. Johx White Ge.\rv. first mayor of San Francisco, was born 
near Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, December 
30, 1819, and was of Scotch-Irish descent. His first education was 
received in the common schools, but later he entered JelTerson College. 



34 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Owing to his father's sudden death and loss of property, he was forced 
to leave college and help support the family. He taught school and 
clerked in a commercial house at Pittsburgh, and later studied mathematics, 
civil engineering and law. He was admitted to the bar, but spent his 
life in other occupations. He worked for a time at civil engineering in 
Kentucky, and then became assistant superintendent and engineer of 
the Allegheny Portage Railroad. 

When the war with Mexico began in 1846 he was appointed lieutenant- 
colonel of the Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, took the field 
and commanded his regiment at the engagement of Chapultepec, where 
he was slightly wounded, but the same day again commanded the regiment 
during the fight at Belan Gate. For this meritorious service he was 
promoted to colonel of the regiment, and served as first commander of 
the City of Mexico after it was captured. After the war he was sent 
to San Francisco as its first postmaster, but before going there marched 
his regiment back to Pittsburgh, about 3,000 miles, and he was ordered 
to Mexico City as its first military governor. Then he came to Cali- 
fornia and served as San Francisco's last alcalde and first mayor, or gov- 
ernor, as it was often termed. His term as postmaster began in 1S4S. He 
served as alcalde or mayor and as "Jtidge of the First Instance." These 
offices were of Spanish or Me.xican origin and import. The duty of the 
alcalde combined the present obligations of both sheritt and mayor, whrle 
the Judge of the First Instance presided over courts both civil and criminal 
and had admiralty jurisdiction. Thus Mr. Geary, or Colonel Geary, was 
at the head of about everything in the new state. When appointed 
postmaster of San Francisco he was given authority to establish the 
postal service in all parts of the state as fast as needed. The -State 
Constitution, adopted in 1850, abolished the old Spanish offices, but 
under it Colonel Geary served as first mayor, taking the office in 1850. 
To say merely that he distinguished himself as an ofifice holder would 
be putting it mildly. He went far beyond the ordinary routine of 
office. He possessed discriminating inspiration that anticipated the 
coming events which cast their shadows before, and was swayed by a 
comprehension that took everything into consideration. He pos.sessed 
a master mind tliat encompassed every phase of civic, commercial, munici- 
pal and moral expansion and development, and was endowed with execu- 
tive qualifications that fitted him for any office or combination or compli- 
cation of offices known to human civilization. His statue in iridescent 
marble should now be looking with pride on the people from the park or 
the Plaza. 

He was the first head of San Francisco to rule without a vigilance 
committee. It is said that he ruled "a hectic, turbulent .gypsy city inhab- 
ited by the argonauts of many lands, where lawless adventure, feverish 
aml)ition, deviltry and greed were not curbed liy legal discipline." He 
took charge of almost everything necessary to boost the city to its proper 
level. He supervised the granting of lands, judged civil and criminal 
cases, served as head of the department of education, and guided the state 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 35 

and city boards of health. He assisted in quelling "squatter" riots in 
Sacramento, and even led troops aj^ainst bands of marauding Indians. 
Under his direction the following sign was pasted on the streets one 
day: "i\ll those who would rid the city of r()l)bers and murderers will 
assemble on Sunday at the Plaza." He ])ublicly announced that "the 
peojile's will is linal," which is known to this day as "Geary's motto." 
At the assembly called he appointed a jury of twelve men and a foreman 
to try the prisoners. Law at once became supreme, and history records 
that "no community was ever more harmoniously governed." Here and 
there occasionally duels and lynchings and brawls occurred, but such 
volcanic outbursts now and then shock civilization to this day. Soon 
thefts became rare, and property could be left for the first time unguarded 
on the streets. .Mayor Geary's office was in the Graham House at 
Kearney and Pacific Street. There he presided over the "ayuntiamento" 
while serving as alcalde and over the first council when serving as mayor. 
The jail he used was the old brig "Euphemia," which was stranded in 
the mud at the waterfront. At first the streets were at times impassable. 
One day a sign posted at Clay and Kearney Street read : "This street 
is impassable, not even jackassable." It was proved to be correct when 
it became necessary to improvise a derrick to hoist a donkey from the 
mud. Mayor Geary enforced the grading and planking of the streets. 
He established the practice of using convict labor to improve the streets, 
and even used rows of cookstoves, tobacco boxes and surplus products 
from deserted ships to bridge the muddy highways. He improved the 
health conditions to such a notable degree that many diseases and epi- 
demics were forever banished. City bonds rose in value from only 25 
per cent to face value with interest added. Under his guidance it was 
soon written that San Francisco was the first city "to exhibit to centers 
of civilized life a lesson of thankfulness for good done, of forbearance 
and sacrifice of personal desires, and of zeal and earnestness in rewarding 
real merit." 

When California was admitted to the Union it became necessary, 
first, to decide what was needed and then to adopt a new Constitution. 
Colonel Geary served as chairman of the Territorial Democratic Com- 
mittee during the convention that dissipated the clouds and adopted the 
Constitution. In all his public services he "was calm and dignified in 
his bearing, and businesslike, determined and unflinching in his action." 
And such bearing was necessary. The city then "had none of the 
dignity, the order, the stately metropolitan air of today ; hounds, Sydney 
ducks, rogues and riiTraflf from all over the world infested the town 
following the discovery of gold in the state." 

In 1852, for reasons not manifest. Colonel Geary withdrew from the 
activities and responsibilities here, and went back to his farm in \^'est- 
moreland County, Pennsylvania, and there remained in retirement until 
1856, when he was appointed territorial governor of Kansas, which office 
he held for one year. He then returned to Pennsylvania, where he 
remained until the Civil war broke out, and then promptly entered the 



36 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

service of the Union Army, raised the Twenty-eighth Regiment. Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and took the field. He led his regiment in several 
engagements and distinguished himself at Bolivar Heights, where he 
received a wound. In March, 1S62, he routed General Hill and occupied 
Leesburg, Virginia. On April 25, 1862, he was formally commissioned 
brigadier-general. On August 9, 1862, he was severely wounded in the 
arm at Cedar ^Mountain and was unable to take part in the battle of 
Antietam, which soon followed. At the battles of Chancellors ville and 
Gettysburg he commanded the Second Division of the Twelfth Corps. 
Later his command joined General Hooker on the Cumberland and aided 
in repairing the disaster at Chickamauga. He participated in the battles 
of Wauhatchie and Lookout Mountain, and commanded the Second 
Division of the Twentieth Corps in Sherman's march to the sea. He 
was the first to enter Savannah after its evacuation December 22, 1864. 
Owing to his splendid service at Fort Jackson he was appointed military 
governor of Savannah. At the close of the war he was appointed major- 
general by brevet. In 1866 he was elected governor of Pennsylvania 
and served with distinction for two successive terms, retiring therefrom 
only two weeks before his death on February 8, 1873. 

In early manhood he married Ann Logan, to which union two children 
were born: Edward Ratchford, born in Pennsylvania in 1845, was killed 
in battle at Wauhatchie, Lookout Mountain, October 28. 186vl He left 
Jeflferson College in 1861 to enlist in the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania 
Regiment, then being raised by his father. While serving he became 
captain of Hampton Battery. He was serving as lieutenant of Knapp's 
Battery at the time of his death. He fought at Cedar Mountain, Antietam, 
Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. The second son of the general was 
William L. Geary, born in 1849, at Portsmouth Square, across from the 
Hall of Justice, San Francisco. At the age of twelve years he served 
in the Union Army, first as drummer and then as dispatch bearer. In 
1874 he graduated from the West Point Military Academy and became a 
member of the Regular Army. He served in the Philippines and Cuba 
during the Spanish-.-\merican war. He died at Letterman Hospital in 
1907 with the rank of major. His wife was formerly Agnes Johnson. 

Alpheus Bull, Jr., was a prominent mechanical engineer, one of the 
foremost in his profession on the Pacific Coast. He was a native Cali- 
fornian. and his father was a forty-niner. 

Alpheus Bull, Jr., was born in San Francisco in August, 1861, son of 
Alpheus and Sarah (Acres) Bull. His parents were natives of New 
York State. His father came overland to California in 1849, and after 
some experience on the Coast went back East, married and then brought 
his bride across the plains. He was a minister of the Universalist Church, 
but in subsecjuent years achieved success in financial affairs and at the 
time of his death was (president of a large insurance company. He was 
a member of the California Society of Pioneers and active in several 
other organizations. 



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THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 39 

Alpheus Bull, Jr., was educated in San Francisco, and then took up 
mechanical engineering, a profession to which he devoted many years 
and with a large and successful clientage. He was engineer for one of 
the large electric companies on the Coast for many years. It is inter- 
esting to recall that he was the designer of the famous Dutch Windmill 
in CJoldcn Gate Park. 

Mr. Bull, who died in 1906, married in 1892 Irene Crowell. a native 
of San Francisco. Her father came to California in 1852 and for some 
years was secretary of the California Insurance Comi>any. Mrs. Alpheus 
Bull survives, with home at 3311 Pacific Avenue, and is the mother of 
five children: Mrs. Noble Hamilton, Mrs. Edward U'. Bullard, Mrs. Paul 
J. McCoy, Alpheus HI, and Henry Harding. 

W'lLi.i.xM Fletcher McNutt, M. D. Few men of the medical profes- 
sion in California have been more burdened with the honors and responsi- 
bilities of their profession as a public service than the venerable Dr. William 
Fletcher McNutt of San Francisco. Doctor McNutt came to San Fran- 
cisco many years ago. in 1868, and among other services that permanently 
identify his name with the profession was the incumbency of the chair 
of principles and the practice of medicine in the University of California 
from 1879 until he resigned in 1901. 

Doctor McNutt was born at Truro, Nova Scotia, in the central iX)rtion 
of the province, at the head of the waters of the Bav of Fundv. March 
29, 1838. He was a son of William and Mary (Johnson) McNutt. The 
McNutts are of Scotch origin, though there is no such name in Scotland 
and never has been. In Argyleshire the name was spelled MacNaughton. 
The MacNaughtons were Thanes of Locklay, and a famous fighting 
clan. A branch of the MacNaughton family moved to the South of 
Scotland and settled in Galloway, where the name was spelled MacNaught. 
Many years later John MacNaught. who married a Gordon, moved from 
Galloway to Londonderry. Ireland, accompanied by his four sons. Alex- 
ander, W'illiam, John and Samuel. In Ireland the name is spelled for the 
first time McNutt. 

Alexander, the oldest of the four sons just mentioned, came to America 
with his wife and two sons, William and John, landing in Maryland, where 
their youngest son, James, was born in 1738. The oldest son, Alexander, 
Jr., remained behind in Ireland. Alexander. Sr., settled in Virginia, where 
the son Alexander, Jr., soon joined the family. The latter had several 
experiences as an Indian fighter in Colonial times, and was one of the 
Virginia volunteers under Colonel Washington in Braddock's ill fated 
expedition against Fort Duquesne. where Braddock and most of the 
British soldiers fell. 

Several years after this campaign Alexander McNutt, Jr.. with letters 
from Governor Dinwiddle of Virginia, went to England and obtained 
from King George II grants of land in Nova Scotia. On his return to 
Virginia he organized a colony to take possession of these lands. \\'ith 
his brother William and several others he located parties on his grant at 



40 THE SAX FK.W'CISCO BAY REGION 

the head of the Bay of Fundy in Unsluvv and Truro. Some of the McNutt 
family today are Hying on this property granted in 1761 in the township 
of Truro. 'W'ilHam AIcNutt, Ijrother of Alexander, Jr., was the great- 
great-grandfather of Doctor McNutt of San Francisco. 

From one branch of the AIcNutt family was descended the first 
goyernor of the State of Mississippi. The father of Doctor McNutt 
was a farmer in Noya Scotia, and also held the office of commissioner 
of tide lands and highways. William Fletcher RIcNutt receiyed his early 
education in the schools of Noya Scotia, the Seminary of Lower Proyinces, 
the nucleus of what is now the Uniyersity of Dalhousee at Halifax. He 
frequently walked four miles from home to school with the thermometer 
registering ten degrees below zero. His preceptor was a Scotch mathe- 
matician, and gaye the boy such thorough instruction that the latter excelled 
in mathematics and languages when in college. Subsequently Doctor 
McNutt graduated, in 1862, from the Uniyersity of Vermont. He began 
the study of medicine with the celebrated surgeon, Dr. Samuel Muir, at 
Truro, and assisted him in his surgical operations. For t\yo terms he 
attended lectures at Haryard Uniyersity, and his further education was 
continued in the Philadelphia Hosi)ital. in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in New York, and then abroad in Edinburgh, London and Paris. 
In the meantime, in 186,^ Doctor AIcNutt was appointed an assistant 
surgeon of the United States Nayy, and was soon ordered to report to 
Admiral Porter at Vicksluirg and for a time was Porter's staff surgeon. 
In 1864 he resigned to go to Europe, and in 1865 graduated from the 
Royal College of Surgeons at Edinburgh and the Royal College of 
Physicians in the same city. He went abroad with yery limited means, 
and liyed almost on the plane of poyerty in order to ayail himself of the 
special adyantages in England and Europe. 

Doctor McNutt arriyed in San Francisco in the spring of 1868, and 
all the capital he possessed was about sixteen dollars. Howeyer, perhaps 
none of his contemporaries possessed a better education and professional 
equipment, and in a short time he was busy with a large priyate practice. 
He was also associated as one of the editors of the California Medical 
Gazette. In addition to his seryice of over twenty years in the chair 
of principles and practice of medicine. Doctor McNutt was for fiye years 
California state prison director, under appointment from Goyernor George 
E. Perkins, and he was appointed ])olice commissioner of San Francisco 
by Mayor Tames D. Phelan. Doctor McNutt is a republican, is a Knight 
Templar Mason, and until recently was a member of the Pacific L'nion, 
Haryard, Bohemian, Union League and the Uniyersity Clubs of San 
Francisco. 

In August. 1871, at Hudson, New York. Doctor McNutt married 
Mary Louise Coon, daughter of Henry P. Coon, one of the early mayors 
of San Francisco, whose career is given in the followinc sketch. Doctor 
and Mrs. McNutt had two daughters and two sons: Mary Louise, now 
Mrs. Ashton Howard Potter ; Ruth, wife of Dayid K. C. Brown ; Maxwell, 
who married Florence McDonald; and \V. F.. Jr.. who married Linda 
Muliance. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 15AV REGION 41 

Henry P. Coon, who was mayor of San Francisco from 1863 to 1867, 
was a pioneer physician in the city, subseciuently took up the law. and he 
was likewise successful in business. A great deal of important history in 
the bay district is associated with his name and his career. He was a man 
of fearless character and was one of the famous Vigilance Committee 
of 1856. 

He was born on his father's farm in Columbia County, New York, 
September 30. 1822. and except for one grandmother of French Huguenot 
stock his ancestors were all Colonial Dutch and jjeople who had been in 
New York for generations. His father, Peter S. Coon, was born in 
Columbia County in 1771, son of Samuel and Betsy Coon. Catherine 
Decker, mother of H. P. Coon, was a daughter of Abram and Anna Decker, 
the former born in 1737 and the latter in 1741. 

Henry P. Coon was the youngest in a family of thirteen children and 
he grew up in a good home but without luxury and was trained to habits 
of hard work on the farm. He developed a splendid constitution and 
excelled in horsemanship, swimming and athletic contests. From the 
common schools he entered the Cleverack Academy near Hudson. New 
York, completing the course about 1839. For about a year he taught 
school, and then entered and in 1844 graduated from Williams College 
with honors, and in 1848 received his degree in medicine from a college 
in Philadelphia. Doctor Coon began the practice of medicine at Syracuse, 
New York. He married at Hudson, New York, in 1848. Ruthetta Folger, 
daughter of Obed Worth and ^lary Fitch Folger. The Folgers were of 
old New England stock, the family going back ten generations, to the 
beginning of settlement on the New England coast. Some of the family 
have held high public positions, others have been eminent in commerce, 
in the sea service, and one of them a noted scientist. Mary Fitch Folger, 
mother of Mrs. Henry P. Coon, was 'a beautiful character and lived to be 
more than a hundred years of age, her death being hastened by an accident. 
Several years later, leaving his wife and an infant daughter behind. Henry 
P. Coon came from California by way of the Isthmus, arriving in the 
spring of 1853. Here he engaged in medical practice, also bought a drug 
business and in 1854 founded the San Francisco Chemical Companv. a 
successful manufacturing enterprise that became one of great value to 
the young state. Subsequently he was president of the King ]\Iorse 
Canning Company, manufacturers of canned goods. He owned two 
ranches, aggregating about two thousand acres, one of them now included 
in the site of Stanford University. After leaving the office of mavor he 
was engaged in the real estate and life insurance business until 1870. and 
he personally supervised one of his ranches from 1872 to 1884. During 
the seventies he was a director of a San Francisco fire insurance companv. 

Doctor Coon's wife and daughter joined him in San Francisco in 1855. 
Soon afterward he took up the study of law, and in that found his true 
taste and bent. After the troublesome times that culminated during the 
month of April in the formation of the Vigilance Committee of 1856. 
Doctor Coon having been a zealous and fearless member of the organiza- 

Vol. II-3 



42 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

tion, became its nominee for the office of jxilice judge. Under the consoli- 
dation act uniting the county and city government of San Francisco, he 
was elected police judge, beginning his duties November 15, 1856. He 
served two terms in this office, and did much to realize the expectations of 
the people's party for a clean civic government. For a time after holding 
this office he resumed the practice of medicine. May 16. 1863, as the 
nominee of the people's party, he was elected mayor of San Francisco, 
and by reelection served two terms. 

His term as mayor corresponded with the Civil war and its aftermath. 
He was a courageous and determined leader in that critical time, and he 
also proved his constructive value as a municipal administrator. Many 
important projects were carried out during his term, including the settle- 
ment of title to outside lands, these involving Golden Gate Park, of about 
one thousand acres, and numerous minor parks and other city property. 
One important act of his administration was the widening of Kearney 
Street. Mayor Coon presided at the impressive demonstration and mass 
meeting held to express the sorrow of the city over the assassination of 
President Lincoln. 

Mayor Coon was a republican in national politics, but in all matters 
afifecting the city and state his view was that the main issue was good 
government and honest, capable officials and that party affiliation had little 
to do with them. He actively supported H. H. Haight, a democrat, for 
governor, and the last office he held was that of tide land commissioner 
under appointment from Governor Haight. He was an elder, trustee and 
one of the founders of Calvary Presbyterian Church in San Francisco, 
and of a Presbyterian Church at Menlo Park. He was one of the founders 
for a home for ex-convicts at San Francisco. 

In October, 1877, Judge Coon married Mrs. Hannah Moore Brigham, 
sister of Austin D. Moore of San Francisco and widow of Judge Potts of 
New Jersey and Dr. Brigham. United States Navy. 

Judge and Mrs. Coon had four children : Mary Louise, who became 
the wife of Dr. W. F. McNutt, of San Francisco; Henrv' Irving, who 
married Julia Bray, of Fruitvale, California ; Charles M., who married 
Cassandra Adams, of Menlo Park; and Frederick H. 

Doctor Coon died after a brief illness at the Palace PTotel in San 
Francisco, December 4, 1884. He was buried beside his wife in Mountain 
View Cemetery in Alameda County. 

Louis Pfieffer. The history of San Francisco and the Bay Cities is 
replete with the records of the lives of men who, coming to the Coast 
during the pioneer period of its development, here rose through their own 
efforts to wealth and high position, and who at the same time played their 
part in the wonderful growth of this region. These men jxissessed a broad 
vision and excellent judgment, and many of them were spared to see that 
their faith was justified. One of them was the late Louis PfiefTer, who 
for many years was associated with the shoe industry of San Francisco. 

Born in Germanv, Louis Plieffer was eighteen vears old when in 184.3 



TliE SAN FRA.X'CISCO BAY REGION 43 

he crossed the ocean to that land which has been the Mecca for his country- 
men for so long, and, landing in New York City, made it his home for 
ten years. In the meanwhile gold had been discovered in California and 
westward the trentl of empire had begun to move, and in 1853 tliis wave 
of immigration carried with it Louis Ptieffer, who made the long and danger- 
ous trip by way of the Horn and arrived at San Francisco. He was a 
very practical man, and one who was more inclined toward business 
pursuits than mining, and so w-hile others sought to wrest a fortune from 
the ground, he established himself in a mercantile business, and had one 
of the first shoe stores in the city, located on the Batter)-. In the course 
of time he handled only custom-made shoes, and from this branched out 
into manufacturing shoes, and built up a large industry, in which he 
employed Chinese labor, being the first to use this class of labor in 
manufacturing shoes. Until his retirement, twelve years prior to his 
death, he continued in this business, and became one of the leading shoe 
men of the West. As his profits piled up he invested in real estate, and 
at the time of his death, April 1, 1899, he was a very wealthy man and 
large property owner. 

On June 19, 1847, Mr. PfielTer was married in New York City, and 
he and his wife had the following children born to them, namely : Elizabeth, 
who married a cousin of her father's, a native of Germany who also bore 
the name of Louis PfieiTer ; Christiana, who married Louis Regli, is 
deceased ; Henry, who is a resident of San Francisco ; Louise, who married 
James E. Gibson, lives in San Francisco ; Carrie, who married first 
H. Stuhr, and after his death became the wife of Al Johnson; Charles, 
who is deceased; Julia, who married Stephen I. Simmons; Emma, who 
married Louis Le Stuhr. Mrs. Pfieii'er died Januar\- 10, 1913. 

Stephen I. Simmons was born in San Francisco, July 31, 1863, and 
was educated in the schools of his native city and those of New York 
City, and became a scenic contractor for theatres of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Simmons became the parents of two children : Stephen Earl, 
who married Avis Lucile Van Zandt. has one child, Lucile Helen ; and 
Julia Helen, who married Melville W. Langdon, and they have one child, 
Julia Helen. 

^Ir. PfiefTer had no fraternal connections outside of his membership 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, nor did he care for club 
life, his interest being centered in his home and family. His daughter, 
'Mrs. Simmons, is very active in social and club life, and is president of 
the .Association of Pioneer Women, the Bertola Assembly of California 
Women, and is past president of the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West, also past president of the Congress of Mothers and Parent-Teachers 
Association. For thirteen years Mrs. Simmons was a singer with the old 
Tivoli Opera Company, one of the most popular theatrical organizations 
ever organized on the Coast. 

JoHX FiTZMAURiCE KENNEDY was One of the venerable and honored 
pioneer citizens of San Francisco at the time of his death, which occurred 



44 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

May 15, 1906, after he had maintained his home in California for nearly 
sixty j-ears. He was a mere lad when he made the long and weary \oyage 
around Cape Horn and up the Pacific Coast of South America and onward 
until his arrival in San Francisco in the year 1850. 

IMr. Kennedy was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the 31st of March, 
1835, and was a member of a family of ten children. His parents con- 
tinued their residence in Nova Scotia until their deaths and his father 
was there a farmer by vocation. A son of James J. Kennedy, the subject 
of this memoir received his early education in Hahfax and in the City of 
Boston, Massachusetts, and he was about sixteen years of age when his 
youthful spirit of adventure, fired by the tales concerning California, 
where gold had shortly before been discovered, led him to embark on the 
vessel which gave him transportation around Cajje Horn, as stated above. 
After his arrival in San Francisco Mr. Kennedy here found employment 
in the United States Custom House, and within a short time thereafter 
he engaged in business for himself as a house and sign painter. His next 
advancement in connection with business came when he became a member 
of the firm of Turner. Kennedy & Shaw, which engaged in the wholesale 
lumber trade and developed a substantial business. He was also the 
founder of the first art store in San Francisco, this enterprise having 
originally been conducted under the firm name of Morris, Schwab & 
Company, later by the firm of Morris, Kennedy & Company, and the 
subsequent change having led to the adoption of the firm title of Kennedy 
& Company, which was retained for a term of years. Mr. Kennedy was 
identified also with the building of the Cascade Locks in the Columbia 
River in Oregon, and he continued active in business affairs until the 
close of his long and useful life. He achieved through his own efforts 
a large measure of success, and to him was ever accorded the unqualified 
esteem and good will of the community in which he long maintained his 
home and to the advancement of which he contributed his full quota. 
Though never ambitious for public office, his civic loyalty was shown in 
the effective service he gave as a member of the San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors under the administration of Mayor Blake. He was a Knight 
Templar Mason, and in the Scottish Rite of the time-honored fraternity 
he received the thirty-second degree. He was long and actively affiliated 
with the Caledonian Club, and held in the early eighties the office of chief 
of the same. 

In May, 1862, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Kennedy and 
Miss Alice Nevin, who was born in the City of Boston and who was 
about seventy-five years of age at the time of her death. Of the four 
children the first born, Albert Warren, is deceased; Lulu is the wife of 
Loring B. Doe, of San Francisco, and to her the publishers of this work 
are indebted for the information on which is based this brief memoir to 
her father ; Arthur John is deceased ; and Harry is engaged in the auto- 
mobile business in San Francisco. 



^— -7*=0«aj«^ 



t^au. -/ 



THI<: SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 47 

Jesse Warren Lilienthal. As a lawyer and financier the late Jesse 
Warren Lilienthal was almost equally well known in New York and San 
Francisco. During the years he lived in California his abilities won him 
many important distinctions, not only in business but in organizatons that 
express some of the highest and loftiest purjKises of humanity and of 
social welfare. 

The late Mr. Lilienthal was born at Haverstraw on the Hudson, New 
York, August 2, 1855, son of Max and Pepi-Nettre Lilienthal. He was 
one of eight children. Doctor Max Lilienthal was a Jewish Rabbi, for 
many years identified with one of the leading congregations in New 
York and later in Cincinnati. 

Jesse W. Lilienthal spent his boyhood at Cincinnati, graduated with 
honors from the Woodward High School of that city in 1870. and then 
entered the Cincinnati Law School and at the same time carried on his 
studies in the law offices of Long & Kramer. When he was seventeen 
years of age, in 1872. he graduted from the Cincinnati Law School. His 
early age debarring him from admission to the bar, his father then per- 
suaded him to acquire training and experience as a banker, and going 
to New York he entered the banking house of J. and W. Seligman & 
Company, friends of Dr. Max Lilienthal. Notwithstanding the most flat- 
tering ol?ers from the bank, his love of the law was so great that after 
two years' experience in the bank, he entered Harvard Law School on 
October 3, 1874, as a member of the class of 1876. He was a member 
of the exclusive Pow Wow society, consisting of law students in the 
junior and senior years. On account of ill health Mr. Lilienthal had to 
leave before getting his degree. He traveled extensively over Europe and 
America, and after eighteen months the faculty of the Law School of 
Harvard conferred upon him the honor of giving him, his degree without 
going through the form of examination, so that he is classified as a mem- 
ber of the law class of 1876. This was probably the first case of the kind 
in the history of Han'ard Law School. Soon after graduating Mr. 
Lilienthal entered the law office of Francis N. Bangs of New York, and 
subsequently was offered a partnership with one of the leading law firms 
of New York. This he declined, since it was his desire to achieve success 
wholly on his own merits. He began practice in the New York bar in 
1880 as a partner of Edward D. Bettens, a fellow student of Harvard. 
From 1883 to 1888 Mr. Lilienthal was a member of the committee of 
amendments of the law of the bar association of the city of New York. 
He continued his active associations in partnership with 'Sir. Bettens until 
1893. He was obliged to leave New York on account of his wife's health, 
and the following year he established his home and professional "head- 
quarters in San Francisco, where he lived the last twenty-five years of his 
life. In 1910 he formed the law firm of Lilienthal, McKinstry and Ray- 
mond, and continued in active practice until his death June 3, 1919. Mr. 
Lilienthal was three times honored with the presidency of the San Fran- 
cisco Bar Association, during the years 1914, 1915 and 1916. 



48 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

He was an eminent financier, and his authoritative knowledge of finance 
was many times recognized. When he was thirty-five years of age he 
was called to the City of Mexico by President Diaz to negotiate the state 
loan which had been in the hands of Berlin bankers. In 1913 came the call 
from New York for him to accept the Presidency of the L'nited Railroad 
of San Francisco, and he accepted that responsibility August 2S of that 
year, and held that office until his death. Other business positions were : as 
Director of the Anglo and London Paris National Bank of San Francisco, 
the Anglo-California Trust Company, chairman of the Morris Plan Com- 
pany of San Francisco, director of the Western Meat Company, the Oak- 
land, Antioch & Eastern Railway, the Pacific Hardware and Steel Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Lilienthal was president of the San Francisco Association for 
the Prevention of Tuberculosis ; president of the San Francisco Council 
of the Boy Scouts of America; president of the Recreation League of 
San Francisco ; was president of the committee to provide recreation for 
soldiers and sailors during the World war, vice-chairman of the Red Cross, 
chairman of the United War Works drives, and of the \\'ar Camp Com- 
munity Service. He was a member of the probation committee of the 
Juvenile Court. He belonged to the Harvard Clubs of San Francisco and 
New York, and the Economic Club of San Francisco, which honored him 
with the office of president. 

December 14, 1886, Mr. Lilienthal married Miss Lillie S. Bernheimer. 
of New York City. Mrs. Lilienthal resides in San Francisco, at the old 
home 2027 Sacramento Street. One son, an only child, Jesse W., Jr., also 
resides in San Francisco. 

Phoebe Apperson Hearst, wife of Senator George Hearst, and one 
of America's wealthiest women and greatest philanthropists, was of Vir- 
ginia ancestry and was born December 3, 1842, daughter of Randolph 
Walker Apperson. She was in her twentieth years when she became the 
wife of George Hearst. In the meantime she had taught school for a 
year, and throughout her long life her heart was in the cause of education, 
and she gave to educational objects not only great sums of money but her 
individual efforts. For several years she established and maintained 
kindergarten classes in San Francisco, and maintained other classes at 
Washington, D. C, for nearly twenty years. During that time 90 per 
cent of the kindergarten teachers in the public schools of that city were 
graduates of the kindergarten training process maintained by her. She 
also maintained kindergarten classes at Lead, South Dakota, where her 
principal mining" interests were located. She gave $300,000 to build the 
National Cathedral School for Girls at Washington, and built, equipped 
and maintained for several years a free library at Anaconda, Montana, 
finally presenting that to the city. She also maintained a free library at 
Lead, South Dakota. She defrayed the cost of the comi^etition of the 
best architects of Europe and America for plans for a greater University 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 49 

of California, and erected and equipped the mining building on the Uni- 
versity grounds as a memorial to her husband. The University of 
California is also indebted to her lor valuable additions to its archa;ologicaI 
collections, acquired through exjjeditions equipix;d and financed by Mrs. 
Hearst through Egypt and Peru for exploration. 

Mrs. Hearst died April 13, 1919. She was the first president of the 
Century Club of San Francisco ; was honorary vice president of the 
Golden Gate Kindergarten Association ; served as a regent of the Uni- 
versity of California; was vice regent for California of the Mount 
Vernon Association; was honorary president of the Woman's Board of 
the Panama Pacific National Exposition in 1913. 

George Hearst. In establishing mining in the Western States on a 
sound technical, systematic and commercial basis, the greatest individual 
factor was probably George Hearst, who acquired the reputation of being 
the most expert prospector and judge of mining property on the Pacific 
Coast, and contributed to the development of the modern processes of 
quartz and other kinds of mining. While the field of his operations 
covered many states, he was essentially a Californian, one of the pioneers 
of the San Francisco District. 

In the closing years of his life he was representing the great State of 
California as one of her United States senators. It is as Senator Hearst 
that " his name has been chiefly distinguished since his death. George 
Hearst was born in Franklin County, Missouri, September 3, 1820, son 
of William G. and Elizabeth (Collins) Hearst. His father was a native 
of South Carolina, and went to Missouri in 1818, some few years after 
Missouri was acquired by the Louisiana purchase. The Hearst family is 
of Scotch descent. It has been in America since 1680. The Collins 
family was of English ancestry, and the father of Elizabeth Collins was 
also a Missouri pioneer. 

George Hearst was born about the time Missouri was admitted to 
the Union and grew up in a frontier country. He worked on a farm, 
but Franklin County at that time was the chief of the principal metal 
mining industry of the United States. George Hearst completed the 
work of a local mining school in 1838. He was especially indebted to 
Dr. Silas Reed, a resident of that section of Missouri, a physician, and 
deeply versed in geology and mineralogy. Doctor Reed loaned young 
Hearst his books on mineralogy and geology. For several years George 
Hearst was engaged in lead mining in Southern Missouri. 

Soon after the news of the discovery of gold in California had 
reached Missouri he joined in the exodus to the Pacific Coast, making the 
journey across the plains in 1850 to Nevada County, then the leadmg 
■placer mining district. For a time he followed the usual custom of gold 
mining with pick, shovel and pan. His commercial enterprise also led 
him into selling and trading claims. In 1859 he brought his early training 
in lead mining into play when the possibilities of the great quartz veins, 
began to be recognized. Going to the Washoe diggings in Nevada, the 



50 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

site of the famous Comstock lode, he began his operations there without 
capital, but with an exceptional knowledge of all the technique involved 
in mining. He began locating claims and trading in them, and soon be- 
came interested in some of the biggest producers in the district. It is 
said that he was rarely interested in any mine that was not a producer. 
About 1870 he joined with Haggin & Tevis, becoming chief partner of 
the firm Hearst, Haggin, Tevis & Company, which gained large profits 
by speculating in mining claims and became the largest private firm of 
mine owners in the United States. Among other large proj)erties de- 
veloped by them was the Ontario Mine in Utah. After securing control 
of the famous Ophir Mine this firm found themselves moderately wealthy. 
It was Air. Hearst who commissioned Marcus Daly to negotiate the pur- 
chase of the Anaconda Aline, one of the greatest mining properties the 
world has known. This mine was subsequently acquired by Mr. Hearst 
and his associates, Haggin, Tevis and Daly. Prior to that they had 
bought the Homestake Mine, a low grade gold mine in the Black Hills of 
South Dakota. 

Senator Hearst had reached the status of a millionaire as early as 1865. 
But this fortune was swept away in a jjeriod of financial depression, and 
he was laboring patiently to recoup his fortune during his early oper- 
ations with Haggin & Tevis. Along with mining he engaged extensively 
in stock raising and farming, and invested heavily in San Francisco 
property, his real estate holdings there contributing in large measure to 
the great fortune he built up. He was a part owner in the Ontario Mine 
in Utah, which for years paid annual dividends of $3,000,000. The 
Senator Hearst ranches for years were the breeding grounds for some 
of the finest cattle and horses in California, and were also experiment 
grounds for diversified farming. 

Senator Hearst was a democrat in political affiliation. He was inter- 
ested in California politics at an early date, and in 1865 was elected to 
the Legislature. He was candidate for governor in 1882. He received 
the democratic vote in the Legislature for LTnited States senator in 1885. 
On March 23, 1885. Governor Stoneman appointed him to fill the vacanc)' 
in the United States Senate caused by the death of John F. Miller. He 
took his seat April 9, 1886, but the republican Legislature on the 4th of 
August elected A. P. \\'illiams for the unexpired term. The Legislature 
which met in January, 1887, was democratic, and Air. Hearst was chosen 
United States senator for the full term. He had served four years when 
his death occurred in 1891. Senator Hearst was buried in Laurel Hill 
Cemetery in San Francisco, and his funeral was notable not only for the 
attendance of many L^nited States senators and rei>resentatives, but for 
the great number of old Californians and veteran miners who came from 
great distances to do him honor. 

On June 15, 1862, Senator Hearst married Phoebe E. .Apperson. 
A brief sketch of her career a])])ears in the preceding sketch. .Among his 
early investments Senator Hearst ac(|uired the San I'rancisco Examiner. 
In 1886 he gave this pajier to his son William Randolph Hearst, who made 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 51 

it the startinj,' pdiiit of his wdiidcrful career as a iie\vsi)a]:)er jiuhlisher and 
puhhc man. Since then Wilham Randtiliih Hearst has become the largest 
newspaper owner in America, and one of the most influential figures in 
American public lives. 

Edw.ard Hardy Clark, who for nearly thirty years has been identified 
with the business management of the great Hearst estate in California 
and New York, is a cousin of the late Phoebe A. Hearst. 

Mr. Clark was born at St. Louis, Missouri, November 19, 1864, son 
of Austin Whitmire and Angeline (Whitley) Clark. He represents old 
Colonial Virginia and Maryland stock on both sides. Several of his 
ancestors were soldiers in the War of the Revolution. His father's mother 
was Phoebe Whitmire, and she was the aunt of Mrs. Phoebe Apperson 
Hearst. The paternal grandmother of Austin Whitmire Clark was Mary 
Hearst, a first cousin of Senator George Hearst's father. The Missouri 
branch of the Clark family came out of South Carolina, but at an earlier 
date was identified with the Virginia family of that name, two of whose 
representatives were Gen. George Rogers Clark, the great soldier who 
conquered the Northwest, and his brother, Governor William Clark of 
Missouri, a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition sent by President 
Jeliferson to explore the extreme northwestern portion of the Louisiana 
purchase. Joseph Clark of Missouri, a first cousin of Austin Whitmire 
Clark and also of Senator Hearst, their mothers being sisters, crossed 
the plains in 1850 with Senator Hearst, and was the intimate associate of 
the Senator until the latter's death. Joseph Clark never married, and he 
lived at the Pacific Union Club from its organization until his death on 
January 6, 1899. 

Austin W'hitmire Clark w-as a resident of Franklin Coimty, Missouri. 
He and a younger brother had crossed the plains to California in 1850, 
when he was eighteen years of age. After two years he went back to 
Missouri and in 1855 married Angeline Whitley, daughter of Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Johnson) Whitley. Austin W. Clark was a successful 
merchant and stock man in Missouri. In 1886, more than thirty years 
after his early experience in California, he determined to return to the 
coast as his permanent home. On March 5 of that year, while at the 
railway station at Fresno, awaiting the arrival of his wife and daughter 
from Missouri, he was accidentally run down by a train and killed. 

In the meantime Edward Hardy Clark had grown up in Missouri, 
had attended schools in Franklin and Dent counties, and had become 
interested in his father's activities. He bought and sold live stock over 
many counties of Southwestern Missouri. He was just twenty-one when 
the tragic death of his father caused him to make a hasty settlement of 
his afifairs in Missouri and join his widowed mother and sister in Cali- 
fornia. He founded a prosperous commercial enterprise in the San 
Joaquin Valley. Mr. Clark was invited by Mrs. Hearst in 1892 to enter 
her office in San Francisco, with the object of becoming the manager of 
the extensive and diversified interests left bv her husband, Senator George 



52 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Hearst. At the age of thirty-two Mr. Clark was put in entire charge of 
these interests, and since then he has carried some of the heaviest re- 
sfwnsibihties of any business man in the country. Since 1895 it has been 
necessary for him to divide his time between San Francisco and New 
York, his summers being sjjent on the Pacific Coast, while New York 
is his home in the winter. Among the many corporations with which he 
is identified he is a director of the Columbia Trust Company, the National 
Surety Company, the Sinclair Consolidated Oil Company, the American 
Metal Company and other corporations in New York; the Mercantile 
Trust Comjjany, the California-Pacific Title Insurance Company, and 
others in San Francisco ; and is also president of the Homestake Gold 
Mining Company of South Dakota, and vice president of the Cerro de 
Pasco Copper JNIining Corporation of Peru, South America. 

During the World war Mr. Clark was treasurer o£ the National 
Security League and a member of the New York Red Cross committees, 
and did everything within his power to advance the cause of the allies 
in that struggle. He has never been active in pwlitics. Mr. Clark is a 
member of the Metropolitan, Midday, Recess, Hudson River cluUs of 
New York, the Pacific Union, Bohemian and Burlingame clubs of San 
Francisco, the France-America Society of New York, and the English 
Speaking Union of San Francisco. His grandfather, Rev. Jacob Clark, 
was a minister of the Presbyterian Church and for some years editor of 
the church paper at St. Louis. 

Mr. Clark married at Fresno, January 30, 1895, Miss Eva Lee Turner, 
daughter of John Benjamin and Frances Elizabeth (Gill) Turner, of 
Colusa, California. Her parents were of early Virginia and Mar\-land 
Colonial stock. Mrs. Clark is a member of St. Thomas' Church in New 
York, belongs to several historical societies, the Colony Club of New 
York, the Francisca Club of San Francisco, the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. In recognition of her activity in the Red Cross during the 
war she received from the French government the Medaille de Recon- 
naissance Francaise. Two little books, privately printed, attest her author- 
ship. Their titles are "Some CoUsins of the Great War." and "California 
Letters of William Gill— 1850." 

Mr. and Mrs. Qark have two children. Edward H., Jr., was a mem- 
ber of the class of 1918 at Yale University when .\merica entered the 
war, was commissioned first lieutenant of the Sixty-third Infantry, 
Eleventh Division, and was in England en route to France with the 
Advance School Detachment when the armistice was signed. August 15, 
1917, at Ross, California, he married Margaret .Mice, youngest child of 
Bishop and Mrs. William Ford Nichols. 

The daughter, Helen Tarleton Clark, was married March 6, 1918, at 
San Francisco, to Howard Gray Park. Mr. Park, a son of Dr. and Mrs. 
C. C. Park of Santa Barbara, was in the class of I'^P' at Yale University, 
left to enter the war, became a first lieutenant of the Three Hundred 
Forty-seventh Field Artillery, Ninety-first Division and was in reser\'e 
for the first armv in France when the armistice was declared. 




> l_ . (r ^l^^-w 



-r «*^ 



THE SAX FRAX'CISCO BAY REGIOX 55 

Frederick L. Lip.man, president of the Wells Fargo Bank S: Union 
Trust Company, of San i-'rancisco, is a native son of the San Francisco 
Bay region, liis father having heen a pioneer of California, and Mr. 
Lipman has been identified with banking in this city for forty years. 

He was born in San Francisco, February 21, 1866, son of Charles 
Frederick and Francis Caroline (Kellogg) t.ipman. His parents were 
born in the East, and of their five children three are now living : Fred- 
erick L. : Mrs. Louise Whitwurth, of Berkeley; and Harrison R., con- 
nected with the Rosenberg Brothers and Company of San Francisco. 

Charles Frederick Lipman came to California in 1850. During the 
early gold days he was engaged in merchandising, and later was in the 
real estate business, dealing and handling his own property, having no 
brokerage business. He was born July 25, 1828, and died January 8, 1873. 
His wife was born Alarch 4, 1840, and died in November, 1894. 

Frederick L. Lipman had limited school advantages as a boy, and 
liljerally educated himself largely through private study and an extensive 
experience with men and affairs. He left school at the age of twelve, 
and for several years worked for the stock brokerage firm of Latham & 
King. Following that he was with a wholesale paper house, but a few 
months later, in 1883, he entered the banking business as assistant note 
clerk in the old Wells Fargo & Company Bank. February 1, 1893, he 
was promoted to assistant cashier, to cashier in 1903, and when the con- 
solidation was effected resulting in the Wells Fargo Nevada National 
Bank in 1905, he continued as cashier of the new institution. L'lwn the 
death of L W. Hellman in 1920 he succeeded that well known California 
financier in the office of president. 

Mr. Lipman in 1891 married Miss Edith Law, a native of Chicago. 
They have three children : Edward Crossley, connected with the Emporium 
Department Store : Robert Lockwood, a graduate of Harvard University 
Law School, now practicing in San Francisco ; and Mary Edith, a graduate 
of the University of California. The family are members of the First 
Unitarian Church, Berkeley. 

Eugene Avy was a youth of seventeen years when he took the 
initiative that gave him in later years the distinction of having been one 
of the famous California pioneers of the historic year 1849. A man of 
intellectuality above the average and of pronounced circumspection and 
judgment in connection with business, he achieved large and worthy suc- 
cess and was long numbered among the prominent business men and 
honored and influential citizens of San Francisco, where his death occurred 
on the 4th of February, 1894, about four months prior to the sixty-third 
anniversary of his birth. 

Mr. Avy was born in France, in June, 1831, and was a son of Alexis 
and Angelique Avy, whose children were four in number. The father 
was a prosperous merchant at Cavainnon, France, but was for a number 
of years a resident of the L^nited States, besides having lived for a time 
in Alexico. 



56 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Eugene Avv acquired his earlier education in the schools of his native 
land, and after accompanying his father to the United States, when he 
was twelve years old, he attended school in New York City, as did he 
later in Mexico, where the family home was maintained for some time, 
the parents having eventually returned to the old home in France, where 
they passed the remainder of their lives. The subject of this memoir 
became a linguist of exceptional ability, he having spoken the French, 
Spanish and English languages with. virtually equal fluency. As previously 
stated, he was seventeen years of age when he came to California, within 
a short time after the parents had returned to France. It was in the 
year 1849 that the young Frenchman thus came from Mexico, by water, 
with about 400 sheep, with which he engaged in the sheep business on a 
pioneer ranch near San Jose. He later sold his stock in a most profitable 
way. but he replenished his herd and continued success fullv identified with 
the sheep industry until 1874, when he established his home and an office 
in San Francisco, where he continued in the wool and commission business 
during the remainder of his signally active and prosperous business career, 
he having been the owner of a number of valuable ranch properties also. 
He was one of the representative figures in the wool and general com- 
mission trade in San Francisco at the time of his death, and in all of the 
relations of life he so bore himself as to merit and receive unqualified 
popular confidence and esteem. He was an active member of the Society 
of California Pioneers, and as a citizen was loyal and progressive, though 
never manifesting any desire for public office or special political activity. 

March 2, 1872, recorded the marriage of Mr. Avy and Miss Albina 
Long, who survives him and still maintains her home in San Francisco. 
Of the children the eldest is Eugene, Jr., who is auditor of the Anglo 
London-Paris National Bank in San Francisco; Angelique is deceased; 
Emilie is the widow of Francis Chapuis and resides in San Francisco, 
as do also the younger sons, Edmond and Robert, who are here identified 
with business affairs. 

Benjamin Sherman Brook.s. The history of San Francisco and 
the Bay Region teems with interesting records of the men who had the 
courage and initiative to brave the perils of the unknown to come to 
California, and who, not perhaps realizing all their dreams of gold, 
sought here, and found, wealth of another kind, and were instrumental 
in building up one of the great cities of the country, and the greatest one 
of the West. One of these men of note bore the name of Benjamin 
.Sherman Brooks, and he was born at I'jridgejxirt, Connecticut, of an old 
and honored family of the East. His family home, which stood intact 
until within the past few years, was a landmark in its day, and would 
even now be considered a marvel of architectural beauty. It was espe- 
cially noted for its banc|uet hall, with wonderfully carved balcony. The 
father of Benjamin Sherman Brooks was an importer, and from associa- 
tion with his line of business this son, and another one. purchased a vessel, 
and in ]!^4'' came to C.nlifornia on their own vessel, the Balance. This 



THE SAN FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 57 

ship was subsequently wrecked. ^lany years later, during some excavat- 
ing at the foot of one of the water-front streets, the rib of the mast was 
found, a relic of olden days indeed. By profession he was an attorney, 
and after reaching San Francisco, devoted all of his time and attention 
to the practice of his profession, and, although oftentimes urged to accept 
a judgeship, refused the honor, preferring to continue at the bar. His 
early home occupied the site of the Fairmount Hotel, one of the famous 
hostelries of the city. 

Mr. Brooks first inarried Miss Annabella Brown, a daughter of 
Capt. Jonathan Brown, of New York City, and they had one child, 
Benjamin. After her death, in 1846. Mr. Brooks married Miss Kate 
Lyon, and they had one child, \\'illiam Brooks, who was born at Brooklyn, 
New York. He w-as but a baby when brought by his parents to San 
Francisco in 1849, when Mr. Brooks returned to the cit}- of his adoption. 
William Brooks attended the old Doctor Huddard's school, and later in 
life was prominent in the conduct of the Spring Valley Water Company. 

Benjamin Sherman Brooks was said to have been the best land lawyer 
in California during the day of his best work, and he was also a man of 
brilliant intellect, noted for his witty sayings, which were rei>eated by his 
friends as choice bits of humor. During a trip to IMexico he learned 
Spanish, and this knowledge was of great value to him in his land prac- 
tice, w-hich branch of his profession became very important. During the 
celebrated Castro versus Tewksberry, he was tlie attorney that made it 
and his own name household ones all over the civilized world for his 
masterly handling of the complicated problems involved. His material 
success resulted in supplying his family with some of the luxuries of the 
times, and Mrs. Brooks had the first brougham in San Francisco. It was 
an elegant equipage, velvet lined, and when she rode out in her fine car- 
riage, drawn by a valuable span of horses, she was the envied of all 
beholders. He received a great deal of well-merited praise for the part 
he played as the good Samaritan to the Chinese six companies, who in 
return for his services presented him with a silver service, inscribed : 
"To Benjamin Sherman Brooks from the Chinese Six Companies for a 
Good Samaritan Act." The death of this excellent man and good citizen 
occurred April 4, 1884. His son William survived him until 1916. 

William Brooks married Alice Foster bloody, a daughter of Edwin 
Moody, who was a prominent yachtsman, and a member of an old New 
England family. He participated in the first international yacht race, and 
won it, and the sail he had placed on his yacht is now used on all ships. 
William Brooks and his wife had three children born to them: Benjamin, 
who is the seventh in order of descent to bear this name, and a civil engi- 
neer of San Francisco, served in the Engineering Corps in the late w'ar, 
and trained 30.000 men to build pontoons. He is married and has one 
child, named Isabel, ^^'alter, who is a resident of San Francisco, is 
married and has one child, Benjamin. Digby Sherman, who lives at San 
Francisco, has one child, Berrington Bickford. For many years the 



58 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Brooks" family home was maintained in the most exclusive residential 
district of San Francisco. 

William M. Gwin. WilHam M. Gwin and General Fremont were 
the first United States senators from California, Doctor Gwin having the 
long term and General Fremont the short one. In the Senate William M. 
Gwin used his efforts and secured appropriations from the National Gov- 
ernment for California institutions that did much to establish San Fran- 
cisco permanently as the metropolis of the Pacific Coast. 

He was born in Sumner County, Tennessee, October 9, 1805, the 
fourth son of Rev. James and Mary (Adair) Gwin. His father was a 
pioneer Methodist minister, one of the leaders in the movement for the 
establishment of the Southern branch of the church, and had also served 
as a soldier on the frontier under Gen. Andrew Jackson. William M. 
Gwin acquired a classical education, studied law at Gallatin, Tennessee, 
but left that to take up medicine, and received his medical degree in 
Transylvania University of Lexington, Kentucky, in 1828. He then re- 
moved to Clinton, Mississippi, and soon had an extensive practice. He 
abandoned his profession in 1833, when President Jackson appointed him 
U. S. marshal for the District of Mississippi. He was closely associated 
with some of the prominent Southern leaders of that time, including 
General Houston, from his native state and the leader of the war for 
Texas independence. In 1840 Doctor Gwin was elected to Congress as 
a democrat, and from that time forward was a great admirer and adherent 
of John C. Calhoun. On account of financial embarrassment he declined 
a renomination for Congress. When James K. Polk became president 
he was appointed to superintend the building of the new Custom House 
at New Orleans. On the election of General Taylor, Doctor Gwin 
resigned and set out for California, arriving on the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Panama on June 4, 1849. He forthwith became a leader in the 
movement to establish a state government, and was elected to the con- 
vention held in Monterey in September to sign a constitution. In De- 
cember, 1849, he was elected United States senator for the long term. 
His labors in the Senate were incessant and his success was remarkable. 
On arriving at Washington he was called to a pri\-ate interview by 
Mr. Calhoun, and he exercised a great influence over the Southern con- 
gressman. It was once remarked about the capital that unless Gwin 
was stopped the nation would be bankrupt from appropriations for the 
benefit of the State of California. He maintained amicable relations with 
all parties, and his hospitable mansion became a neutral ground where 
the leaders of rival factions met on social terms. After the first session 
of Congress, when he returned to California in 1851, the Legislature 
tendered him the thanks of the state for his services. In the following 
session he was a member of the finance committee and was chairman of 
the committee on naval affairs. He secured the establishment of a mint 
in California, the survey of the Pacific Coast, the Mare Island Navy Yard 
and Station, and they carried througli the Senate a hill providing for a 



THE SAX FRANCISCO HAY REGION 61 

line of steamers between San Francisco, China and Japan, by way of the 
Sandwich Islands. He secured a large appropriation ' for the survey of 
several routes across the continent for a railroad, though the undertaking 
of such a project was defeated through the opposition of Southern con- 
gressmen. 

Senator Gwin served his first term from 1850 to 1855. Then after 
an interval he was elected for a second time, beginning in 1857 and serving 
until 1861. In 1863 he went to Paris, and became interested in a plan 
to colonize Northern Mexico, and held several interviews with the 
Emperor Napoleon on the project. He drew up a plan for the colony 
which was approved by Napoleon and subsequently by Emperor Maxi- 
milian of Mexico. However, Doctor Gwin was not given the proper 
cooperation bv the military officials in Mexico and the plan eventually 
failed. Emperor Napoleon once said of Doctor Gwin that he was the 
greatest man he had ever met. 

After the war Doctor Gwin was sent to California, and devoted most 
of his years to his mining interests. He took an active part in politics, 
especiallv in the campaign of 1876. Doctor Gwin died in New York City, 
September 3, 1885. 

On March 3, 1831, he married ]\Iary E. (Bell) Logan, widow of 
General Logan. Two children were born to their marriage : Lucy, who 
married Evan J. Coleman, of Kentucky, and both are now deceased; and 
William 'SI. ' 

William M. Gwin, Jr., was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi, Februarj' 
24, 1848, and was an infant when brought to California. He became 
interested in mining, and for some years was a member of the State 
Shipping Commission. For eight years, from 1869 until 1877, he was a 
member of the State Senate of California. He married Blanch M. May- 
nard, daughter of George F. Maynard, who came to California in 1859 
and during the war between the states was inspector of customs under 
the Confederate government. In 1869 he returned to California, and 
served as auditor of the state. Mrs. Blanch M. Gwin was the mother of 
four children : William M., Jr., Mary Bell, wife of K. R. Kingsbury, 
president of the Standard Oil Company of California; Stanford; and 
Ralph. 

George F. W'elch. Few men could take with more truth the title 
"self made" than the late George F. Welch, native son of San Francisco, 
and none more worthily. He had to breast the blows of circumstances 
sans opportunity save such as he carved out for himself. His was the 
life of a man who surmounted obstacles innumerable, working his way 
unaided from childhood, going out into the world without money yet 
retaining under all circumstances a steady equipoise of soul and a determi- 
nation to succeed. This, being blessed with fine intelligence, moral courage 
and sterling honestv. he did. 

Such a life is worthy of emulation by the young just starting out in 
life, for to peruse an account of his brilliant young life, too soon ended, 



62 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

is to be helped in a practical way. Posterity will give a high meed of 
praise to him, foi* he left a memory invaluable to future generations. 
Strength of character was his most conspicuous possession, and he held 
within himself the vital elements of success, onh- intensified as he solved 
one by one life's painful problems until he graduated as an honor pupil 
from the University of Difficulties. And he was always able to extract 
some little ray of comfort from his hard experiences. 

He was born in San Francisco, and he was a typical Calif ornian in 
the best meaning of that word. From his babyhood he made warm friends 
whom he held in ever growing attachment, for while he cherished the 
ambition to stand high in this world he did not follow the trail of self 
interest but was ever seeking for an opportunity to stoop downward and 
raise manhood higher. He entered the ser\ice of Senator James D. Phelan 
as an office boy, and when he determined to follow the law as his life 
work he entered upon a life few young boys would venture. After 
carrying on his duties of the day he studied far into the night, rising at an 
early hour to secure an hour or so more for his studies. With everything 
against him he yet stood second highest of the candidates for the bar 
upon examination. For many years he was private secretary and business 
manager for Senator Phelan. 

Among many thousands of men born into this world, one will be the 
natural leader of the others, and such a man was Mr. Welch. And out of 
his triumphant leaderships he created confidence, carried conviction, for 
he possessed the rare faculty of thinking things through to their final and 
logical conclusion and on a basis of enduring right and justice. But there 
was no such word as compromise in his \ocabulary, for he always passed 
things through the alembic of his own mind, made sure he was right 
before he acted. 

From his first organization work, as a little boy in St. Peter's Parish, 
the League of the Cross Cadets, he showed his ability as an organizer. 
On January 18, 1902, he was made a member of Percita Parlor, Native 
Sons of the Golden West, and on November 10, 1909, he was made a 
member of the Board of Directors of the Hall Association of that body. 
He was a Grand Knight of the Fourth Degree of the Knights of Columbus. 
In his religion he was a Roman Catholic, possessed of a deep religious 
sense; under the domination of great ideals he had a singleness of aim 
which gave him a solidarity of purpose and a rare purity of aim. He 
was a member and officer of the 01ym]>ic Club and many other organiza- 
tions. After his thorough mastery of the law his rare gift of oratory was 
soon discovered, for he had a lucidity of style and adroit felicity of si)eech, 
an art of graceful expression which made him the delight of his colleagues. 
In politics he was a democrat, and one of the party's most valuable 
speakers, for he had a gift of happy phrases, and was ever ready in 
repartee, an eloquent and fascinating talker. One of his friends said that 
he was possessed of almost more gifts than it was the right of one man 
to own. His social qualities were of the most attractive type, and he 



THE SAN FRANXISCO BAY REGION 63 

won and retained invaluable friendships among all classes of men, from 
the very highest to the lowliest, and if he had a fault it was his extreme 
lovaltv to a friend. 

Mr. Welch was married to Miss Marguerite Bergez, a daughter of 
the late Jean Bergez of San Francisco, a graduate of the Dominican 
College of San Rafael, and they were the parents of two charming 
children, George Bergez and Marie Frances. They had a pretty home 
at 1478 Jackson Street, where Mrs. Welch still lives. 

Just at the threshold of life, with a future big with possibilities, with 
everv incentive to live, Mr. Welch was stricken with illness when the 
"flu" was at its height in San Francisco and soon solved the Great Mystery, 
saw the beautiful dawn of a never ending day, passed into eternity loved 
as few men are, bv his family and friends, honored by the ]3eople of his 
city. His mortal life is ended but the angle of his influence is ever widen- 
ing in beneficence through its having so compassed and aiifected the lives 
of others. He left the best of all legacies to his children, a name unsullied 
by personal misconduct, cowardice or any meannesses, a name which will 
prove to them an open sesame through life. 

Born on January 18, 1880, he was only thirty-eight years of age when 
he passed on, January 3, 1919. Although the terrible epidemic was taking 
awav the stricken by the hundreds, yet the attendance at his funeral was 
one of the largest and the courts of the city adjourned to do honor to him. 

One of the.beautiful tributes to his memory was the memorial book 
prepared by Percita Parlor No. 187. 

Jeane (John) Bergez was one of the most famous of San Francisco's 
restaurateurs. His popular place was a center for hundreds of promi- 
nent business men and citizens in their daily social and business dis- 
cussions, and he proved himself the ideal host and enjoyed a wealth of 
esteem among San Francisco's elect. 

He was born at Cette-Egyne, in Southern France, October 8. 1855. 
For many years he was a leader in the French colony in San Francisco. 
Left an orphan when a child, he acquired a common school education in 
France, and at the age of sixteen came to the United States. He spent 
all his active career in the restaurant business. For a time he worked for 
Mr. Klein, owner of the old Occidental Restaurant, located on W'ashington 
and Montgomerv streets in San Francisco, and one of the famous land- 
marks of the earlv davs. Finally he bought this restaurant from Klein. 
Selling this property, he moved to Pine, near Montgomery, and in that 
location conducted his famous restaurant until the great fire. His select 
clientele marked his establishment as probably the most distinctive of its 
kind in San Francisco. His guests included most of the prominent 
financiers of the district as well as other leading business and professional 
men. and the group of men that assembled daily at the lunch hour was 
jierhaps more nearly representative of the business power of the city than 
any that could be found in the private clubs. 



64 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

After the fire he formed a partnership with Camily Mailhebuan, Louie 
Contard and Louie Lelanne in the old Poodle Dog, known to every 
resident of San Francisco and to hundreds of thousands of visitors. One 
of the interesting features of the Poodle Dog was the daily gathering 
there at noon of many of the city's foremost men, who sat around an 
immense table and discussed affairs of a social and business nature. The 
destiny of many important business undertakings was settled at these noon 
dinners. 

The late Mr. Bergez was a congenial, whole-souled landlord, and per- 
sonally interested in affairs and sports. He was a charter member of the 
Elks Lodge, and a member of a number of clubs, his hobby being hunting 
and fishing. For many years he was active on the local P'rench news- 
paper, and was twice chosen presideijt of the French Hospital. 

Mr. Bergez, who died April 5, 1917, married at the age of twenty-one 
Miss Esther Reis, a native of Utah. They were the parents of five 
children : Louise, who married Thomas Jacques and has one child, 
Beatrice ; Frank, an oil operator living at Bakersfield ; Marguerite, widow 
of the late George F. Welch; Ernest R., of Hanford. California; and 
Louis J. 

Joseph Daniels was one of the veterans of the Mexican war who 
came to California, and he lived in this state the rest of his life, becoming 
prominent as a miner and lumber man. 

He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1809, and died in May, 
1886, at the age of seventy-seven. He was reared artd educated in the 
North, and in 1830 went to Louisiana, and in 1837 became a citizen of 
the Republic of Texas. He remained in Texas until 1846. when he be- 
came a quartermaster in the army during the war with Mexico. Soon 
after its close and following the discovery of gold in California he came 
to this state, and for a number of years was engaged in mining in 
Mariposa County. He came to California in September, 1849, .on the 
steamer Oregon. He also established the first saw mill, which was capable 
of furnishing the government with all the lumber it required and had a 
surplus for private sales besides. He built up a large business as a lumber 
manufacturer. He was also associated with other Californians in using 
prison labor in the construction of the State Prison at San Quentin. 

In 1839, at Houston, Texas, Mr. Daniels married -Ann Van \'ersel, 
a native of New Orleans. She died January 15. 1890. Of her five 
children two survive, both unmarried, Aliss Josephine F., and Sam H. 
Daniels. They live together at 2582 Filbert Street. The late Joseph 
Daniels was a prominent member of the Society of California Pioneers. 

IsAi.\s \\'. TIellman. The character and ability that make for suc- 
cessful and worthv achievement in connection with the activities of life 
were possessed in marked degree by the subject of this muuoir, who 
became a California jiioneer and a ])(>wer in financial o])erations on the 
Pacific Coast. At the time of his death Mr. liellman was president of 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGIOX 65 

the Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank of San Francisco, and as a 
controlling figure in connection with financial affairs on the Pacific Coast 
his influence extended from Los Angeles, California, to Portland, Oregon. 

Mr. Hellman was born in Bavaria, Germany, on the 3d of October. 
1843, where he spent his boyhood and received good educational advan- 
tages. He was a youth of only sixteen years when he severed the ties 
that bound him to his native land and set forth to seek his fortunes in 
the United States. He came to California by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama and arrived in Los Angeles in the year 1859. Here he took 
a clerical position in a grocery store. His exceptional business acumen, his 
sterling character and his self-reliant energy won him rapid advancement, 
and within a period of ten years he became one of the organizers of 
the Los Angeles Banking House of Hellman, Temple and Company. As 
chief partner in this concern he continued his able administration until 
1871, when the bank was merged into the Farmers & Merchants Bank 
of Los Angeles, of which he became the cashier and manager. He thus 
continued his services twenty years and then was elected its president, an 
olTice of which he continued the incumbent until the time of his death, a 
reorganization having in the meanwhile changed the title of the institu- 
tion to the Farmers and Merchants National Bank of Los Angeles. Of 
his administration in this connection the following estimate has been given : 
"Under his direction and as a result of a progressive policy, tempered by 
safe conservatism, the bank came to be recognized as one of the foremost 
financial institutions in the West, continuously carrying a reserve of 
from 50 to 75 per cent of its deposits." 

In 1901 Mr. Hellman was called to San Francisco in connection with 
the reorganization of the old Nevada Bank, of which he became president 
and manager. He continued his administration after the institution 
received charter as the Nevada National Bank and until it was consoli- 
dated with the \\'ells Fargo & Company Bank, under the title of the Wells 
Fargo Nevada National Bank. ^Ir. Hellman continued as president of 
the latter institution until his death, which occurred in 1920. He was 
likewise chairman of the board of Union Trust Company of San Fran- 
cisco, and a director of the United States National Bank of Los Angeles, 
besides being a director of the United States National Bank of Portland, 
Oregon, and the Security Trust & Savings Bank of Los Angeles. A 
few years before the death of Mr. Hellman the following estimate of 
his status was published : "His name is a familiar one in financial circles 
throughout the entire civilized world and without invidious distinction 
he mav be classed as one of the foremost American financiers. He has 
numerous other large and important financial interests, and his real estate 
holdings, which are extensive, cover both urban and ranch properties." 

As an American citizen, ever appreciative of the land of his youthful 
adoption, Mr. Hellman stood exponent of the finest type of civic loyalty. 
He served as a regent of the L^niversity of California, was affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity, and was a valued and honored member of the 
Argonaut, Concordia and L'nion League clubs. 



66 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

On the 4th of April, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of ^Ir. Hellman 
to Miss Esther Neugass, of New York, and she preceded him to the 
life eternal. Of the one son, Isaias W., Jr., specific mention will he made 
in later paragraphs of this memoir; Clara, the elder daughter, is the 
wife of E. S. Heller, a representative lawyer in San Francisco; and 
Florence is the wife of Sidney M. Ehrman. who likewise is a prominent 
member of the San Francisco bar. 

From the same source from which have been drawn the foregoing 
quotations concerning the career of Mr. Hellman is taken the following 
general estimate, written within a few years prior to his death : 

"Long a close student of literature and languages, he fluently speaks 
and reads four tongues. He is found in those circles where men are 
gathered for the discussion of vital themes of far-reaching interest, not 
only affecting his adopted country, but also the questions of international 
importance and relation. He has been a generous ctmtributor to organized 
charity, and his individual gifts are equally notable, although made most 
unostentatiously. His life work has had direct and important bearmg 
upon the history of the West and the building of the great empire of 
the Pacific Coast. His influence is, perhaps, all the greater for the fact 
that it is moral rather than ]X)litical, and is wielded for the iniblic good 
rather than for personal ends." 

Isaias \\'. Hellman, Jr., only son of the honored subject of this memoir, 
followed in his father's footsteps and was an influential figure in hanking 
affairs of broad scope at the time of his death, in 1920, when in the very 
prime of his strong and worthy manhood. Mr. Hellman was born in 
Los Angeles, March 30, 1871, and in his youth received the be.st of 
educational advantages. He was graduated from the L'niversity of 
California in 1892. He was one of the leading representatives of bank- 
ing enterprise in San Francisco, and at the time of his death occupied 
the position of president of the Union Trust Company of San Francisco, 
president of the Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank, to which ]xisition 
he was elected immediately following his father's death, chairman of the 
board of the Columbus Savings and Loan Society, and vice president of 
the Farmers & Merchants National Bank of Los .\ngeles. He was also 
a director of the Spring Valley \\'ater Company and president of the 
Bankers Investment Company, a corporation having lars^e real estate 
holdings in San Francisco. He was active in man\ philanthropic and 
civic activities and at the time of his death was the ])resident of the 
P'ederation of Jewish Charities in San Francisco and treasurer of the 
Congregation Emanuel. 

During the fire of 1906 he was active on the Committee of Fifty, an 
organization which took the active control of the city's affairs during 
that period, with the power of life and death. During the war he 
served on the Capital Issues Committee and had charge of the Liberty 
Loan cami)aigns in the Twelfth l-'ederal Reserve District. 

I. W. Hellman, Jr.. was as much a victim of the Great war as if 
he had been slain on the battlefields of Flanders, for it was the strain 




S^/i^AtyUf- ^n/'zn^yi^ 



THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 69 

and anxiety of tliat period which overtaxed his heart and led to his early- 
passing, for he was only in his fiftieth year when he died on May 10. VJ20. 
Septemher 7, liS98. recorded the marriage of Isaias W. Mellman, Jr., to 
Miss Frances Jacohi, who was born and reared in San Francisco, where 
she still resides, and who is a daughter of Frederick Jacohi. Mr. Hellman 
is survived also by four children: Isaias \V., Ill, holds a position with 
the Union Trust Company of San Francisco; Frederick J. is with the 
Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank; Florence is at Mills College; and 
Marco F. is attending the University of California. 

M.\j. Andrew Moox. The pioneers of San Francisco and the Bay 
cities have nearly all passed away, but they have left behind them a record 
of perhaps the most daring accomplishments and steadfast courage his- 
tory possesses. The development here is due to the vision, foresight and 
untiring industry of the men who had such faith in this great region that 
they were willing to risk their all and brave the dangers of the wilder- 
ness and the savage Indians in order to found an empire, the importance 
of wealth of which they never dreamed, although their hopes were high, 
and their confidence unshaken by adversity. One of the men who is 
responsible for much of the early work of San Francisco and Oakland 
was the late Maj. Andrew Moon, a man of fine education and much 
culture, who won distinction in his new home, and placed it heavily in his 
debt because of his many public spirited actions. 

Major Moon was born in Binghamton, New York, in December, 1800^ 
a son of Dr. William Moon, born in America, but a graduate of the 
medical department of Guy's Hospital, London, England. He was subse- 
quently surrogate judge. His mother was the daughter of Bruce Mac- 
Cormack, of Paisley, Scotland, who came to America, enlisted in the 
Continental Army, and fought in the Revolutionary war. Given an ex- 
cellent early education, at seventeen he decided to perfect himself in 
science and medicine, and placed himself under the tutorship of Doctor 
Stone, a friend of his father, who had charge of the Charity Hospital of 
New Orleans, Louisiana. He later became a member of the famous 
Howard Society, whose members performed such heroic work in the 
cholera and yellow fever epidemics of that city. Subsequently his duties 
took him to Detroit, Michigan, and he was appointed quartermaster of 
military stores and ranked as major under Gen. Louis Cass. He resigned 
and returned to New Orleans and engaged in shipping as owner of the 
Galena, a steamboat plying between New Orleans and St. Louis. As 
part owner of the sailing ship Panama he took passage from New York 
City via Cape Horn for California, the trip consuming nine months. In 
1849 he located at Oakland, California, and had the first survey made of 
this section. The well known Kellesburger Map (official), now in the 
possession of his family, is the result of this survey. A man of enter- 
prise, he began at once to make many improvements, built the wharf at 
the foot of Broadway, gave all the public parks now in that part of 
Oakland, also a block of land to each religious denomination, built the 



70 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

first public schoolhouse and hired Miss Hannah Janes at a salary of 
$150 a month in order that the Oakland children might have prof)er 
intellectual training. 

In 1854, at San Francisco, Major Moon married Miss Mary Willis, 
whose family had produced many fine musicians, among them Richard 
Willis, bandmaster of West Point Military Academy. Major and Mrs. 
Moon became the parents of three children : Milton \\' illis Moon ; Marynia 
E. Moon, whci married Capt. William E. Hall, and they have one daughter, 
Marie Edna Hall, wife of Joseph Pagan, U. S. A. Medical Corps ; and 
Frances Louise Moon, who married D. S. Hallock, of San Rafael, Cali- 
fornia, and they have one daughter, Margaret. 

Many years have elapsed since Major Moon passed from the scene of 
his earthly activities, but what he accomplished lives after him. and his 
honorable life and high character set the standard for others to follow. 
He contributed largely to the funds of the Sanitary Commission during 
the Civil war, also to the James King of William fund and to many other 
public enterprises. He was a particular friend and strong su])ixjrter of the 
Rev. Thomas Starr King in his Unitarian work, and with the work of the 
Sanitary Commission. His holdings in Oakland and San Francisco were 
numerous, for he never lost faith in their future, and his wealth was acquired 
through legitimate channels by the exercise of his good judgment and keen 
business acumen. He was the owner of the famous Milton Willis Mine in 
Nevada County, which sold in London, England, for $1,000,000. He organ- 
ized the first ferry between Oakland and San Francisco, and at that time the 
fare was $1 each way. The boats landed at his wharf at the foot of Broad- 
way. One of the boats was named Milton Willis and was built at North's 
Ship Yard on San Francisco Bay by the husband of Mrs. North-Whitcomb, 
the first school teacher of San Francisco. His charities were many, and 
it was truthfully said of him that no one ever appealed to him in vain 
for help. 

John Selling. Many years have passed since the late John Selling 
was a well-known figure in the business life of San Francisco, but the 
results of his upright life and honorable methods remain and set a standard 
others find hard to reach, for it is of the highest.' His ambition was to 
leave to his children an unblemished name and stainless record, and he 
succeeded in doing both, and it is a jiriceless heritage. 

John Selling was born in Bavaria. Germany. February 5. 1823. and 
died in San Francisco. June 21. 1892. When only fourteen years old he 
came to the L'nited States, landing in New "S'ork City. Even at that 
early age he was able to speak French fluently, and this aptitude for 
languages he later developed to a considerable degree, becoming a fine 
linguist, and acquiring a knowledge of different tongues, among others 
speaking English excei)tionally well. After traveling about in the East 
for a time he went to New Orleans. Louisiana, where his knowledge of 
I'rench was of great value to him. and he was there when the news 
came to the world of the discovery of gold in California. .Xs was but 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 71 

natural, the young man of twenty-live was looking for adventure, and 
he was among the early passengers for California hy the route which 
led across the Isthmus of Panama. Upon his arrival at San Francisco 
he went at once to the mines, but after a brief experience decided to 
return to San Francisco and enter the business lield. His judgment was 
excellent, and in providing for the needs of others he made money, and 
in 1850 was able to return to Germany, where he married Sophia Drey- 
fuss, a native of Bavaria, who died in December, 1894. 

UfKin his return to San Francisco Mr. Selling embarked in the 
wholesale furniture business, but later on moved to Sonoma County, set- 
tling in Petaluma, where he carried on a general merchandise lousiness 
for some years. Once more, however, he returned to- San Francisco, and 
from then on until the close of his useful life he was active in the insurance 
business. He was a zealous Mason, and he belonged to the Society of 
California Pioneers. At different periods of his life he wrote consid- 
erably for the newspapers on current matters, and was always a con- 
structive worker in every field that he entered. The children born to 
him and his wife were as follows: Jacob, born in San Francisco, now living 
in Portland, Oregon ; Eugenia, who married Louie Altman ; Leo. who 
lives at Portland, Oregon ; Doctor Nathalie, who was graduated from the 
University of California with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1894, 
has since engaged in the practice of medicine, becoming one of the leading 
physicians of San Francisco; Simon, who died in December, 1920; Emma, 
who married .Abraham Block : and Samuel. It took more than an ordinary 
amount of courage to fare forth over a long and uncomfortable route 
into the unknown and vision and determination to remain here and develop 
out of chaotic conditions sound business enterprises, and yet the pioneers 
were not lacking in any of these qualities, but set to work at their 
appointed tasks, and many of them achieved fortune and prestige. Some 
fell by the way, but no doubt they would have failed amid anv environ- 
ment. Because of their failure those who did succeed deserve all the more 
credit for overcoming obstacles and laying the foundations of a mighty 
empire on the Western Coast. 

Alex.wder M.vrgo. France has furnished many of California's 
leading citizens, and in this list is found the name of Alexander Margo. who 
was born in France in October, 1827. His parents moved to the United 
States when Ale.xander was a boy of eight years and settled in Ohio. It 
was in the Buckeye State that the subject of this review received his 
schooling, and as soon as he had reached maturity he took out his naturali- 
zation papers. Thus equipped he decided to leave for California, which 
was then in the height of the gold excitement. However, he was delayed 
and it was not until 1852 that Providence jjermitted him to gaze upon 
the Golden Gate, which was undoubtedly a glorious sight to this young 
man who had dreamed of California, gold and prosperity for over three 
years, and after once starting for the land of his dreams had spent many 
months to reach his destination. 



72 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Soon after reaching San Francisco he left for the mines in Tuolumne 
County. After reaching the mines he saw that the men were in need 
of water, so after carrying a few buckets he conceived the idea of building 
a ditch from the source to the mines, and it was from water and not 
from gold that he made his start. He followed the mining industry in 
various capacities until 1875, when he retired and moved to San Fran- 
cisco. 

Alexander Margo married I\Iary Slack, a daughter of Thomas Slack, 
a native of England, who came to California, in 1855 but returned to 
Pennsylvania, leaving two daughters to the Golden State. His younger 
child married J. B. Stetson, a member of the famous California Stetson 
family, and the elder, Mary, as before stated, was married to Alexander 
Margo, and to their union were born four children : Emma, who married 
Granville Stewart, now deceased ; ^^'iIliam, deceased ; James Albert, 
deceased, and Marie, living with her mother who is in her eighty-fifth 
year and remembers the early days of California and can narrate many 
of the tales of the pioneer days with more accuracy to details than most 
of the printed articles the present generation must resort to in order to 
learn of the struggles these pioneer folks experienced in the building of 
the Golden West. 

Alexander Margo passed to his permanent home two years after moving 
to San Francisco. In his passing California lost one of her substantial 
citizens and one of the men who may be called one of the bricks in the 
foundation of our present structure, the Commonwealth of California. It 
is to these pioneers who risked the dangers of the plains and the sea 
that we owe our present prosperity. 

James Hunter, a forty-niner, laid the basis of his fortunes in the 
mines, and later had extended business interests, especially in Mendocino 
County, where he owned a large tract of land, operated lumber mills, and 
some of his property interests are still retained liy his descendants. 

He was born in Ireland in June, 1825, of Scotch parentage, sun of 
John and Elizabeth (Brown) Hunter. His father was a bridge builder 
by trade. The family immigrated to New York when James was a 
small boy, and from there moved to Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, and 
subsequently became territorial pioneers of Iowa, locating in Lynn County. 
James Himter grew to manhood in Iowa, finished his education in the 
public schools there, and in 1849 left for California, being one of the 
first of manv thousands of lowans who have .since made such a large 
element in the population of California. It was a journey of si.x months. 
He was accom])anied by his brother .Andrew and W'illiam Hamilton, and 
they joined a forty- wagon ox train. They had several encounters with 
the Indians and other experiences and hardships common to the overland 
trail. In Octol)cr, 1849, they reached their destination, and James Hunter 
spent his first winter in the mines at Smith Bar on Feather River, putting 
up a hut and taking out a claim. He struck gold at a depth of ten feet, 
and one day's work with the pan brought him $350, and the following day 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 15AY REGION 75 

he took out $1,350 in yokl. His success made his comijetitors envious 
and they tried to run him out, but he stood his ground. Later he sold 
his claim for $1,500, and then removed to Shasta, where he took up 
land and began farming, his chief crop being hay for feed. He and 
his brother .Andrew had bought a stable and also a hotel at Shasta, and 
they operated both of them. They sold hay for feed at fifteen cents 
per pound. vVfter six months James Hunter bought 100 head of cattle 
and rented land from General Frisbie, and later purchased the land and 
continued farming and ranching. He was one of the organizers of the 
Fort Bragg Lumber Company in Mendocino County, operating mills and 
dealing in lumber wholesale. He acquired a large tract of timber land in 
Mendocino County, and converted the timber into ties and shingles. In 
1852 be purchased a tract of about 2,000 acres of land in Solano County, 
near Vallejo. This is the land that is still owned by his descendants. After 
retiring from business he moved to the City of San Francisco, and 
remained an honored pioneer of that city until his death in 1918. 

James Hunter married Celia Stewart, who was born in Iowa, of 
Scotch descent, and came to California in 1852 with her parents, Samuel 
and Sarah (Scott) Stewart, who located at Washington. California, and 
later moved to Mendocino County, where her father was in the lumber 
business. Stewart's Point was named for her father. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hunter have five children : William, now deceased, 
was a mining man and sj^ent several years in the mines of Alaska ; Flora 
Agnes, Harvey and Alena. James Hunter and wife were Presbyterians, 
and he was a memljer of the Vigilantes organization in the early days and 
a member of the Association of California Pioneers, of which his daugh- 
ters Flora and Agnes are also members, ^liss Alena M. Hunter resides 
at 331 Locust Street in San Francisco. 

Timothy Joseph Bailly was a boy at the time when the family 
home was established in California, and through his ability and effective 
service he rose to a position of high trust and importance in the detective 
department of the municipal police system of San Francisco. He sacri- 
ficed his life in pursuance of his official duty, he having been shot and 
killed by Walter Castro, a criminal whom he was attempting to capture, 
on the 3d of August, 1922. Detective-Sergeant Bailly made a splendid 
record as a member of the police department of San Francisco, and by 
his character, ability and loyal service he won and retained secure place 
in popular confidence and good will. 

Mr. Bailly was born in Morristown, New Jersey, on the 22d of January, 
1856, and was a son of John Martin Bailly and Mary (Fair) Bailly, his 
father having been born in France. Of the other children in the family 
the following brief record may be entered : Dr. T. E. is a representative 
physician and surgeon in San Francisco ; Mary Jane is the widow of 
Dr. J. Dyer, and likewise resides in this city; John Martin, Jr., like- 
wise resides in San Francisco, as does also Mrs. Nora O'Neill, a widow. 
The father was engaged in farm enterprise in New Jersey, and after 



76 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

coming with his family to California in 1865 he followed the same line 
of basic industry in Santa Cruz County, where both he and his wife 
passed the remainder of their lives. 

The subject of this memoir was a lad of nine years at the time of the 
family removal to California, and here he early gained practical experience 
in connection with the work of the home farm, the while he attended the 
schools of Santa Cruz County when opjxirtunity offered, his broader 
education having been gained principally through self-discipline. 

In 1887 Mr. Bailly became a patrolman on the police force of San 
Francisco, and within a brief period he won advancement to the jxasition 
of detective. He held the rank of detective sergeant many years, and in 
this connection he made a splendid record of faithful and efficient service, 
his tragic death having taken from San Francisco one of its honored and 
valued officials. Mr. Bailly was an active member of the Widows & 
Orphans Society of the San Francisco Police Department, and as a man 
he was kindly, liberal and charitable, ever ready to aid those in affliction 
or distress. 

In September, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bailly and 
Miss Mary Ann Coonan. Mrs. Bailly's death occurred on April 3, 1924. 
Of the three children Genevieve was the wife of Dr. Francis i\Ieagher, and 
is deceased. The two younger children, Leo Edgar, is a pharmacist by 
])rofession, and Marietta, who is the wife of George E. Knowlton, reside 
in San Francisco. 

William Axford, one of the successful industrialists and useful 
citizens of San Francisco, is a native of the shire or county of Cornwall, 
England, in the southwest corner of that kingdom, his birth occurring in 
February, 1837, and he is the son of James and Ann (Tiddey) .-Xxford. 
Both parents were natives of the same county, where they resided during 
the whole of their lives. Both received the usual English education and 
religious training, and became reputable and respected neighbors and 
citizens. Their son \\'illiam was given a fair education and at a very 
early date in his business career learned the foundry business in the 
shops of his father, who became one of the most noted and leading 
experts of the government foundry business in the British Kingdom. His 
experience with castings of every sort of metal and his skill in melting 
the metal and pouring it into the molds and his dexterity in shaping 
the molds to form tools, machinery and guns gave him a reputation second 
probably to no other foundryman in that country. Both he and his wife 
died there when well advanced in years. 

Their son William, the subject of this memoir, learned the foundry 
business from start to finish under the guidance of his distinguished 
father. Thus in old F.ngland, when only eleven years old. he entered 
the public foundry and under his father's in.struction and direction began 
the ta.sk of his life. Before many years, or about the time he reached 
maturity, he became one of the foremen in the works, and owing to 
his activity and proficiency he continued to occupy such a position with 



THE SAN FRANCISCO HAV KECION 77 

high credit for many years in three dift'erent foundries of gigantic size 
and unusual ca]>acity. Finally, at the conclusion of the Civil war in 
America, he made up his mind to come here, and as soon as convenient 
closed out his affairs in the old country and came to New York City 
in 1866 and immediately moved to I'rovidcnce, Rhode Island, where he 
secured a position in one of the big foundries there. There he remained 
for about four years, or until 1870, when he came across the country 
to San Francisco and renewed his work in the foundries here. His 
capability was fully appreciated by the foundry owners of this city, but 
the remuneration was not wholly satisfactory to him, whereupon, seven 
years later, or in 1877. he established a foundry of his own, which became 
known as the Mission Foundry, at the corner of Twenty-fifth and Noe 
streets. Under his able management this establishment grew^ and thrived, 
and was enlarged as the years passed until it became one of the leading 
establishments of the kind on the Pacific Coast. 

It was the first establishment of its kind in the Mission District. Later 
Mr. Axford concluded to change its location. Accordingly, he constructed 
a suitable structure on Harrison and Treat avenues, between Eighteenth 
and Nineteenth streets, mainly through his own efforts and designs to 
conform to what he knew to be the requirements of the foundry business. 
The results of his masterly work may now be seen in scores of the 
best business and other structures in this city. He had charge of the 
foundry which formed the cast iron for the old Palace Hotel and other 
conspicuous buildings. The foundry required his full time and attentioti 
and he lost no days nor weeks in trifling affairs. At last he retired from 
active work in 1896 and turned the entire establishment over to his 
sons. During his entire business career he never borrowed a dollar to 
aid him in sustaining his foundry. On the other hand he in\ariably had 
a large and available bank account. 

When a young man he married Miss Harriett Goldsworthy, who 
was a native of Redruth. Cornwall County, England, where she w-as 
reared and educated, and where she and William Axford were united in 
matrimony. She passed away in this country after a long and creditable 
life. To their union the following children were born : \\'illiam J., who 
is now one of the managers of the old foundry known as "Mission Foundry 
and Stone Works" ; Walter F"., who is also at work in the old establishment ; 
Allen, who is also occupied there; Harriett J., who became the wife of 
George A. Jackson, a farmer, who has one son, George, now chief engineer 
on the steamship President Lincoln ; Minnie, who married Paul Straple. 
engaged in the butchering business. All members of this well-known family 
are reliable citizens. 

Thomas Nelson, who was one of the historic "forty-niners" of 
California and for many years a well known and prominent citizen, was 
born in Blackburn, Lancashire County, England, in 1818. He was the 
only child of his parents and was given a sound education in his youthful 
days. His father was a successful industrialist, and in the old country 



78 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

became well and favorably known for his sound citizenship and his upright 
character. His son Thomas was brought from the native land to New 
York when he was only fourteen years old. and it was there that he 
received the best part of his mental and moral training. At first he worked 
at various occupations, mainly mechanics of several sorts, and continued 
thus with success until he was getting a comfortable income and had 
amassed enough to secure a good home. Then he decided to change his 
location and surroundings. 

In 1849, the year the whole world was shaken to its foundations with 
the gold panic of California, he came to San Francisco and began work 
as a blacksmith or shoer of horses and mules. This activity soon made 
him well known to all the leading business men of the city. He prospered 
steadily, but finally somewhat changed his occupation, or perhaps added 
another branch to his already successful oj^erations. In a short time he 
was engaged in making a specialty of manufacturing miners' tools, and 
soon had a large trade in this popular and useful industry, there being 
an immense demand for mining instruments. When he first started he 
was in business for himself, but a little later formed a partnership with 
Abner Doble in the steel tool business, with shops and mills located at 
1815 Fremont Street, and ere long they were engaged in conducting one 
of the largest and most profitable shops of the kind in the whole state, 
or along the whole coast. 

But these activities and remunerative- occupations caused him steadily 
to change and enlarge his scojje of business until he was finally engaged 
in a variety of profitable pursuits. He became the California agent for 
the famous Firth & Sons Steel Company of London, one of the largest 
and strongest concerns of the kind in all Europe. He handled large quan- 
tities of their products and scattered them all over the Pacific Coast. 
While attending to his own special business he at the same time laid 
aside sufficient funds to purchase a fine ranch of about 900 acres in San 
Mateo County, not far from San Francisco. He there began the work 
of raising blooded stock of various lireeds, among them being the famous 
Jersey cattle of Great Britain, the first animals being brought in by vessels 
across the Pacific and perhaps around the Cai)e of Good Hoi)e, or thev 
may have been brought from Australia. Soon on his large ranch he had 
a prize collection of the finest milch cows on the whole coast. He was 
thus engaged in active work until he finally reached an age that demanded 
either a partial cessation or an absolute retirement from business cares 
and res])onsibilities. Accordingly, in 1878 he sold out almost everything 
to Mr. Doble and retired from work and anxiety. He passed away about 
the year 1908, respected by everybody who knew him. 

During the early years when San l-"rancisco was in a chaotic condition 
he became a member of the Vigilance Committee that succeeded finallj' 
in restoring order and decency. In time he became a member of the 
British Benevolence Society of San Francisco, also a member of the 
Society of California Pioneers. He was also for many years trustee of 
the Mechanic's Librarv of .San Francisco. In these organizations he occu- 



TlIK SAX FRAX'CISCO I'.AY REGIOX 79 

pied various jx)sitions of trust and responsibility with high credit to 
himself. In 1842 he married Miss Elizabeth Walmsley, and to them was 
born one child, Rachel, who became the wife of William J. Gerrard, of 
San Francisco. Rachel was given an excellent education in the public 
schools, and fmished at higher institutions with high marks and sujierior 
standing. To this marriage were ijorn five children, as follows: William, 
Alfred, Alice, Rodger and Edith. 

William J. Gerrard was born near London, England, November 26, 
1841, and secured a primary school education. He started work when 
he was a boy of ten years, and later learned the trade of carjjenter and 
joiner, and followed that occupation till he came to San Francisco in 
February, 1869. Here he continued the work of carjjentering, and was 
a contractor for store and office buildings, and continued this occupation 
for over forty years, when he retired from active pursuits and is now 
living at his home, 1910 Broadway. He was a member of the Sons of 
St. George for many years, and always took an interest in public affairs, 
though he never desired public office. He is a republican in politics and 
a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Charles Bach was a sterling business man and interesting personal 
figure in the life and affairs of San Francisco for a great many years. 
His family still reside there, and two of his sons carrv on the business 
with which he was identified. 

The late Mr. Bach was born in 1841 at Erfurt, Germany. He was 
educated in the schools of his native land, and in 1868 he came to Cali- 
fornia, five years after his brother, Ferdinan Bach, had come to this state. 
For two years he was employed in his brother's general merchandise store 
at Mokelumne Hill, and in 1871, removing to Jackson, he bought the local 
drug store, learning pharmacy and continuing that business on a profitable 
basis for several years. The W'estern Union Telegraph Companv had 
their office in his drug store, and since they paid a local oi^erator $75 a 
month. Air. Bach learned the -Morse alphabet and the technic of operating 
a telegraph key, and thus earned this salary in addition to his income as 
a druggist. There was much spare time even with all this business, and 
he turned his natural musical taste to learning to play various musical 
instruments. 

Mr. Bach removed to San Francisco in 1874 and entered the employ, 
as bookkeeper, of F. Scherr. malster, at 509-511-513 Sacramento Street, 
between Montgomery and Sansome streets. This was the business to 
which Air. Bach devoted his mature years. In 1880 he was admitted to 
partnership and the firm became Scherr, Bach & Lux. LTpon the death 
of Mr. Scherr Mr. Bach bought out the other interest and continued the 
business alone until 1904. In that year, following a trip abroad to Europe, 
he died while on his return at New York City. 

His business is now known as the Charles Bach Companv. Incor- 
porated, his son Alfred being president and manager of the companv. 
For manv vears it was known as the Pioneer Malt House. This was due 



80 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

to the fact that the original malting plant was a building constructed of 
brick, made in England and brought to San Francisco across the ocean 
and around the Horn. 

The late Charles Bach kept up his musical interests, and for twenty- 
five years sang as tenor soloist in St. Ignatius Church. He was also the 
leader of what was known as the Bach Musical Club, a club of eight 
members which met at his home every Thursday. 

Mr. Bach married Amelia Emilie Rittmeyer. They were the parents 
of five children: Alfred, now active head of the Charles Bach Company; 
Helen, wife of Fritz Treskow, of San Francisco; Margaret, who died in 
1922; Miss Elsie, at home; and Carl, who married Margaret DaSilva. 
Alfred Bach married Louise J. Holling, and they are the parents of two 
children. 

Joseph Rothschild is a native son of San Francisco, and has been 
engaged in the practice of law for many years, has gained distinctive 
success and prestige in his profession, and as an extensive real estate 
owner, he has contributed much to the material advancement of his native 
city. He has been influential in political affairs and had no minor leader- 
ship therein. 

Mr. Rothschild is a son of Henry and Hannah (Mossheim) Rothschild, 
who were natives of Germany and who were young when they came to 
the United States. From Kentucky they came to California, and here 
the father became a prosperous wholesale merchant and substantial and 
honored citizen of San Francisco, where he and his wife passed the 
remainder of their lives, their deaths having occurred in the year 1889. 

Joseph Rothschild acquired his preliminary education in the schools 
of San Francisco, and after advanced training along academic lines he 
entered old Yale University, in which he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1879 as an honor man. His initial work in his profession 
was done in Connecticut, but before the close of the year 1879 he returned 
to California and established himself in practice at San Francisco. In 
1879 he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Connecticut, 
and in the same year, had similar honors conferred upon him by the 
Supreme Court of California. He was admitted to the bar of the .Supreme 
Court of the United States in 1895. 

The passing years have been marked by large and worthy achievement 
on his part, and he has long controlled a substantial and representative 
law business. The civic loyalty of Mr. Rothschild has been significantly 
shown in his management and adjustment of his extensive real estate 
holdings in his native city and state, and he has stood forward as a true 
apostle of civic and material progress. 

He was elected to the Board of Education here in 1889-1890, and the 
flattering vote he received showed his po])ularity with the whole people. 
He is a member of San Francisco Chapter, Royal .A.rch Masons : Doric 
Lodge No. 216, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; past grand presi- 
dent of the Independent Order B'nai B'rith. delegate to B'nai B'rith 



■ THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 83 

National Constitutional Convention in June, 1890, at Richmond, Virginia, 
where he was elected judge of the Court of Appeals, and in May, 1895, 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, he was reelected. 

On March 6, 1913, he was elected president of the San Francisco 
Tunnel League. Me was president of the Exposition Committee of Im- 
provement Cluljs, consisting of eighty-six Improvement Clubs, and was 
president of the South of Market Street Improvement Association for 
several years. He is an appreciative member of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West, and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, B'nai B'rith 
and sons of Israel, in which latter two fraternities he is past grand master 
of the California Grand Lodge, and president of B'nai B'rith Hall Associ- 
ation for ten years. 

In the councils and camjjaign activities of the democratic party in 
California, Mr. Rothschild has long been a prominent figure, and has 
shown much ability in the directing of political forces. He has served 
as chairman of the Democratic County Committee of -San Francisco, and 
also served as vice and acting chairman of the state central committee of 
his party from 1902 to 1906. 

In 1907 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Rothschild and Miss Hannah 
Kahn Tauber, daughter of \V. B. Kahn. president of the Atlas National 
Bank in the City of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Rothschild have no 
children. Their residence is at 2424 Buchanan Street and Mr. Rothschild's 
office is 1103-1108 Chronicle Building. San Francisco, California. 

He is also a member of the Executive Committee of the Greater San 
Francisco Committee and a member of the Yale and Concordia clubs. 

P. Alex.'\nder Bergerot, who is engaged in the successful practice of 
his profession in his native city of San Francisco, as a representative 
member of the bar of this section of the state, has the further distinction 
of being a member of one of the old and influential French families of 
San Francisco, in which city he was born on the 4th of February, 1867. 
.After attending the Lincoln Grammar School and the Lowell High School 
in San Francisco, Mr. Bergerot went to France, the land of his ancestors, 
and there he was graduated at the Academy of Bordeaux as a member 
of the class of 1887, with the degree of Bachelor of Letters. Upon his 
return to San Francisco he fortified himself further in the science of 
jurisprudence by continuing his studies in the Hastings Law School, from 
which institution he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In the 
work of his profession he has proved a resourceful trial lawyer and able 
counselor, and his large and important law business is of representative 
order. He was a member of the charter convention of San Francisco in 
1892, and in the same year was orator of the day at the Fourth of July 
celebration held in this city. He has e.xceptional talent as a public s])eaker 
and is frecjuently called iqxin as an orator at public assemblies of imjxjr- 
tant order. In 1898 Mr. Bergerot was elected a member of the San 
Francisco Board of Education, of which he was chosen president in the 
same vear. In this connection he has given loval and effective service 



84 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

in advancing the work and the standards of the pul)lic schools of his 
native city. He is the attorney for the French- American Bank of San 
Francisco, is known in his profession as a specially able corporation 
lawyer, is a republican in his political allegiance, and as a citizen is liberal 
and i^rogressive. 

El'genio Bianchi, Jr. For sixty years or more the name Bianchi 
has been synonymous with the art of music in San Francisco. When 
Signora Giovanna Bianchi died one of the city papers called her "The 
mother of music in California." Eugenio Bianchi, Sr., was the pioneer 
impresario of San Francisco, and it was largely due to his enterprise and 
influence that this community was favored with some of the greatest artists 
of that time. The musical talents and tastes of the Bianchi familv have 
been continued through the second and third generations, though Eugenio 
Bianchi, Jr., is best known for his attainments in the profession of law. 
He is one of the most scholarly attorneys of the San Francisco bar. 

His parents were Signor Eugenio Bianchi and Signora Giovanna 
(di Campagna) Bianchi, two of the earliest representatives of Italian 
families on the Pacific Coast. The mother represented the ancient and 
distinguished house of the Conti di Campagna of Verona, Italy. They 
came to San Francisco in 1858, and for many years were well known 
operatic artists on the coast. Signor Bianchi and Thomas Maguire figured 
as the opposition managers of Italian opera during the si.xties. Both 
Signor Bianchi and his wife sang in the Maguire Opera House, then 
located on Washington Street, near Montgomery. Later he was manager 
of the old Metropolitan Theatre on Montgomery Street, between Wash- 
ington and Jackson. He was the ])iuneer in the production of some of 
the great operas on the Pacific Coast, including Faust. La Juive, I Mas- 
nadieri, Alacbeth, I Martiri, Attila, Masaniello, Otello, Crispino e la 
Commare, Belisario, Don Giovanni, II Trovatore, Elisir d'Amore, Norma, 
and others. Signora Bianchi had a repertoire of more than forty-five 
operas. He was himself a great artist, one of the best tenors of his time. 
Signora Bianchi was a lyric singer and one of the most finished artists 
who ever played the role of .Vzucena in II Trovatore. During the latter 
years of their lives Signor Bianchi and wife devoted themselves ex- 
clusively to the art of teaching music numbering among their pupils, many 
members of some of the most prominent pioneer families of the Pacific 
Coast. They were also prominently identified with the leading church 
choirs of the metropolis, irrespective of denominational lines, among the 
numl)er. St. Mary's Cathedral, during Archbisho]) J. S. Alemany's regime, 
old St. Ignatius Church. Xotre Dame des Victoires (French), Temple 
Emmanuel and Temj^le Sheritto Israel. These artists both died at San 
Francisco in 18^5, Signor I'ianchi on June 21, just four months after 
his wife. 

Their son Eugenio Bianchi, Jr., was Iiorn in San I'rancisco, March 23, 
1865. He was educated by private tutors, also .?t the grammar and high 
schools, and ]>re]iarcd for tlic law in Hastings I/iw College. He was 



THE SAX FRANCISCO I'.AY REGION 85 

admitted to the bar upon examination before the Supreme Court 
January 9. 1894. and has since been admitted to and has handled a 
large volume of practice before the Federal courts. He also studied 
jurisprudence from the University of Padua, Italy. J\Ir. Bianchi has been 
distinguished among his fellow attorneys for his rare gifts of scholarship, 
and particularly his command of numerous languages. He has acted as 
interpretor or translator where foreign languages were involved in litiga- 
tion. Among the prominent law firms with which he has been identified 
have been those of McClure & Dwindle, W'iggington, Creed & Hawes, 
Stonehill & Payson, Barrows & Dare, Ferral & Payson, Hon. A. D. 
Splivals, Lyman I. Mowry, D. H. Whittemore, Maj. Barma McKinne, 
Chas. L. Patton. He has acted for various companies and corporations 
in the capacity of secretary and adviser, and his attention in later years 
has been devoted almost exclusively to office practice as a counselor. 

Mr. Bianchi married at San Francisco, July 14, 1895, Signorina 
Carmelina Gandolfo, member of another prominent Italian family of the 
Pacific Coast and a Countess in her own right, being of the noble Italian 
lineage of the Conti di Gandolfo. An entire generation of Californians 
has Ijeen entertained by her wonderful voice, a rich soprano, which has 
been heard in innumerable concerts and recitals. She received part of 
her training under the late Signor Eugenio Bianchi and Signora Giovanna 
Bianchi, and after their death she studied under Professor Christopher 
Schmitz and Madame Inez-Fabbri-Muller of San Francisco. Mr. and 
Airs. Bianchi have two daughters, Carmelina and Giovannina. who by 
their talents seem destined to continue the illustrious associations of the 
Bianchi name with the noble art of music. Carmelina is now under instruc- 
tion with the greatest piano teacher of the coast, Hugo ]\Ianseldt. The 
younger daughter is still being trained by her mother. 

Mr. Bianchi is afifiliated with the Native Sons of the Golden West, 
the Loyal Order of Moose, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Knights of 
Columbus, Lincoln Grammar School Association, and is a republican, but 
has never manifested political ambitions. For a number of years he has 
been collecting material preparatory to compiling a history of the leading 
Italian families of San Francisco. 

Benito Qu.\dra was a California forty-niner, and came to San Fran- 
cisco from Valparaiso, Chile. He located in Coyote Hollow in Marin 
County, and was prominently connected with the lumber industry there. 
His wife was Martina Rocques, and they were the parents of two daugh- 
ters, Benita and Carlotta. The latter married Bernardo Fernandez in 
May, 1857, and they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1907. 

The other daughter, Benita, was married in San Francisco, September 
7, 1854, to Francois Angonnet. Francois Angonnet was born in France, 
August 12, 1822, was educated there, and at the age of twenty went as 
a picked soldier with the French troops to Algiers, North Africa, and was 
in the foreign service of the French government there for six years and 
nine months. In 1852 he came to California. He was the first settler to 



86 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

haul cord wood to San Quentin and Ross Landing, now known as Kent- 
field, using an ox team for that purpose. He was a highly respected 
citizen, honest, his word as good as gold, and was well known among 
all the older settlers of San Francisco and the California pioneers. He 
reached the age of eighty-five, passing away June 9, 1908. 

Francois Angonnet and his good wife celebrated their golden wedding 
anniversary in 1904. They were the parents of ten children : Nellie, Mrs. 
C. J. Rader; Mary, born in 1859 and died in 1884; Clara, wife of 
A. Mouze ; Martha A., wife of A. Bonetti ; Frank, who married Mary 
Neulens; Benita, wife of Eugene Godeau ; Lottie, Mrs. J. B. Leith; one 
child that died at the age of eight years ; Charles, who died at the age of 
twenty-one ; and Benard, who married Leona B. Luckhardt. 

Frank Angonnet, son of Francois, has spent all his life in San Fran- 
cisco and vicinity, and by his marriage to j\Iary Neulens was the father 
of two sons : Frank, who was born in August, 1885, and died the same 
year ; and Doctor Claude, born in 1887. Dr. Claude Angonnet is a 
graduate doctor of dental surgery from the University of California, and 
was a volunteer during the World war. After his service he was re- 
apfKDinted by act of Congress in 1921 as senior lieutenant in the navy and 
is now in service at Rhode Island. He married Lita Hoffman. 

Remarks of Edg.\r D. Peixotto at the Grave of William J. Cody, 
"Buffalo Bill." in the Presence of a Number of Citizens of 
Denver, Including Buffalo Bill's Close Friends, A. F. Mayfield, 
Maj. Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill), and John H. Baker, His 
Foster Son, on March 9, 1923, After the Meeting Organizing the 
Pony Express Memorial Association. 



In the beginning, darkness was upon the face of the deep and God 
said, let there be light and there was light. 

Unfortunately, mankind has not comprehended God's light, the light 
of truth, and humanity has gone groping its way throughout the ages in 
the darkness of the deep. 

"Deep into that darkness peering. 

Long I stood there wondering, fearing. 

Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever 
Dared to dream before." 

My dream brought back ancient memories, how man in the ages 
gone had climbed the mountain in his endeavor to get out of the darkness 
of the depths into the light of day. the Light of Truth; how Moses had 
led his little band out of bondage upon the first march for Liberty ; led 
them into the wilderness, where he remained those forty years in order 
that a new generation might come forth under his teachings better to 
understand the principles of freedom. How in time Moses went upwn 
the mountain, on Horeb, for meditation and solitude, and there on the 



THE SAX FRANCISCO RAY REGION 87 

mountain received the Divine Message, the Ten Commandments. Moses 
promulgated the doctrine of thou shalt not ; an eye for an eye ; a tooth for 
a tooth ; hatred for hatred ; revenge for revenge ; resentment for 
resentment. 

Still humanity continued in darkness, with here and there a light 
shining forth, until the Wise Men observed the Star of Bethlehem and 
Jesus Christ brought another Message of Truth to mankind. 

Jesus alone went up into a mountain, upon Sinai, and after his solitude 
and meditation, and he was set, and gave to mankind the Divine Message 
of the Sermon on the Mount that promulgated the doctrine of Peace and 
Good Will toward men, the love of one's neighbor. Jesus the man was 
crucified, but Christ the Spirit lived and lives today, influencing mankind 
to higher and nobler deeds. 

By the excavations that are startling the world today, by the dis- 
coveries in the tomb of King Tutankhamen, we are reminded that in the 
ancient civilization they buried their illustrious dead in the depths of the 
flats in the desert and surrounded the dead with the trappings, the 
splendor, and the material comforts of life as it then existed ; thus illus- 
trating their belief that man remained here on earth, going through the 
same forms after death that he had been accustomed to in life. 

In his advancement through the ages, in his search for truth, man has 
leaped the barriers and ascended the mountains ; he has reached a more 
perfect understanding. 

Standing here in this hallowed spot, I am reminded of other great who 
lie buried. I think of Cecil Rhodes, Empire Builder, founder of Rhodesia 
in South Africa, whose burial place the world may find at Matoppo Hills ; 
whose monument has been erected on Table Mountain near Cape Town. 
When his great work was finished by which he accumulated vast power 
and wealth, as he realized that death would strip him of all his earthly 
possessions, he dedicated his vast fortune to education and the uplifting 
of mankind. 

Robert Louis Stevenson, whose personality and writings combined the 
wisdom of the sage, the dream fancy of the child with the chivalrous 
loyalty and adventurous heart of the boy, found his last resting place in 
the South Sea Islands on his beloved Island of Samoa, high on the 
summit of Mount Vaea. near Valima, the home and the people that he 
loved so well. 

Buffalo Bill, in life you toiled, loved and fought in the open air, the 
hunter, the pathfinder, the warrior. Fitting, indeed, is it, that here on 
Lookout Mountain, amid the surroundings that you loved and cherished, 
where roamed the Indian, the antelope, the buffalo, your spirit should 
find its last mortal resting place. 

I knew you, Buffalo Bill, you of the adventurous heart, as every 
American boy of my generation knew you — ^the greatest hero of the days 
of the romance in the Great West. In book and sjxiken story I heard 
of you. I saw you in the ardor of my youth in my own loved city of 



S8 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

San Francisco ; I saw you in your wonderful Wild West Show in Paris, 
where the enthusiasm of the French hailed you as the great American hero. 

No one can tell the limits of inspiration. I have reason to believe that 
our illustrious and beloved Theodore Roosevelt gained from you some 
of the great inspiration that gathered to his command the Rough Riders, 
and that the same inspiration aided Colonel Roosevelt to lead the charge 
of San Juan Hill and bring another victory to America. 

Every morning a new day is born and is welcomed by the newly 
blossomed flowers. The day reborn, brings the message and the assurance 
that life is eternal ; that death is but a transition from the turmoil of this 
world as we ascend life's mountain a new vision to gain. The waves 
of turmoil are on the surface, the sea of tranquility is fathomless, and as 
death is tranquility, we rest with the conclusion that it leads to the 
fathomless depths of the Beyond, immortality. As the poet wrote: 

"Life, — a little work, a little play 

To keep us going and so good da}', 
A little hope that when we die 

We'll reap our sowing and so goodbye." 

Goodbye, Buffalo Bill, you who toiled, and loved, and fought in the 
free fresh air. Here high on the mountain that you loved, surrounded 
by the immortal monuments made by God, ma}- you rest in peace, and 
bring you to us in your last resting place a better understanding of life's 
vastness and hope of our transition into the Infinite. 

Edgar D. Peixotto. One of the most scholarly lawyers and eloquent 
orators of the San Francisco bar, Edgar D. Peixotto ably represents a 
family that has been one of exceptional brilliancy in the professions for 
several generations. 

Through Spanish-Portuguese ancestry the genealogy of the Peixotto 
family is traced back to the seventeenth century in America, the pioneers 
of the line settling in Rhode Island. The great-grandfather of the San 
Francisco attorney was Moses L. M. Peixotto. The grandfather was 
Dr. Daniel L. M. Peixotto, who was graduated from Columbia 
College in 1816 and for many years was a prominent physician, sur- 
geon and medical author. He was president of the New York County 
Medical Society in 1830-32 and became dean of the College of Medicine 
of Columbia University. The first of the family to arrive in California 
was Benjamin Franklin Peixotto, who was associated in the practice of 
law in Cleveland with Stephen A. Douglas, and came to San Francisco in 
1867. In Cleveland he was one of the noted writers on the famous 
newspaper, The Plain Dealer. On arrival in San Francisco he at once 
commenced the practice of his profession, and continued in it initil 1870, 
when he was appointed by President Grant, United States consul at 
Bucharest, Roumania, where he remained five years, attaining marked 




C^^-^-7:<.^^/T7/^c.c-.'^r^^c^t:^^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 91 

influence, which he used toward securing religious and civil liberty in 
that city. He was tendered the post of consul-general at St. Petersburg 
in 1870, but declined it. Later he was United States consul at Lyons, 
France, until 1885. After his return to America he engaged in the practice 
of law and in editorial writing in New York, notably on the Menorah. He 
was greatly interested in educational and charitable work also, and acquired 
an enviable reputation as a lecturer. 

Raphael Peixotto, brother of Benjamin F. and father of Edgar D., was 
born in Ohio and came to California in 1869. He became a successful 
merchant and married RIyrtilla J. Davis, of Anglo-Virginia ancestry. 
All of their children have achieved distinction in their life work. 

Their son, Maj. Sidney S. Peixotto, has been a leader in social welfare 
work in San Francisco for many years, being founder and former presi- 
dent of the public schools athletic fetes of San Francisco, former president 
of the Pacific Athletic Association and member of the first playground 
commission of San Francisco, and founder of the Columbia Park Boys 
Club. 

Jessica B. Peixotto, sister of Edgar Peixotto, was the second woman 
to receive the Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Cali- 
fornia in 1900. She has studied abroad and has been professor of 
Social Economics at the University of California since 1905. She has 
also served as a member of the State Board of Charities and Corrections 
and has been active in betterment movements. 

Another famous member of the family is Ernest Cliflford Peixotto, 
who was born in San Francisco soon after the family moved here, studied 
art in Paris, and has achieved an international reputation as an artist and 
illustrator. His work has been exhibited in Paris Salon- and in the 
American exhibitions. For many years he has been on the staff of illus- 
trators for Scribner's, illustrating, among many others, some of Roosevelt's 
works. He is the author of a number of books and is a member of 
many artistic and literary organizations in this country and abroad. He 
went to France in 1918. one of eight official artists attached to the 
American Expeditionary Forces. He has recently been appointed by the 
Fontainbleau School of Fine Arts as chairman of the American Com- 
mission of Painting. He has also received the honor of appointment on 
the staf? of General Pershing, in charge of the historical art of the World 
war for the American army. 

Eustace Maduro Peixotto, the youngest member of the familv, was 
born in 1886. After graduating with honors from the L'niversitv of 
California he put his abilities at the service of the playground and recreation 
movement. When the war broke out he enlisted with the first volunteers, 
gaining a commission as lieutenant and serving throughout the war. He 
has since remained in the armv. where he is now a captain in the Fortv- 
fifth Infantry. 

Edgar D. Peixotto was born in New York December 23, 1867, and was 
a year old when his parents came to San Francisco. He was educated in 



92 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the public schools, then entered the Hastings College of Law, graduating 
in 1888, gaining admittance to the bar the January following. He then 
spent the next year in travel in the East and Europe. He then took up 
his life work, the practice of law, in San Francisco, in December, 1893, 
becoming assistant district, attorney under \V. S. Barnes. He at once 
took rank as an attorney of consequence, for with the suavity of conscious 
power he created confidence and carried conviction. To be an attorney is 
one thing, to be an attorney and orator calls for talents of an unusual 
order, not just mastery of the law, and he soon proved himself gifted with 
rare powers of speech, with an adroit felicity of phrase, a crystalline 
lucidity of style. His striking forms of expression, the new beauties of 
verbal effect he disclosed, the supreme art of graceful expression gave 
him triumphant leadership, which he has retained for a third of a century. 
Not only before juries did his great talent find an outlet but on the political 
stump and on social and civic events of moment he won golden opinions 
from his audiences. Personally he soon proved himself a worth-while 
man, broad in his views, wide in his charities, with courage and initiative, 
free from petty restrictions. To no man in the city has his p<ilitical party 
been more indebted, not alone for the magic of his ]:)ersuasive tongue but 
for his ability to think for the commonwealth. And doing it. In inter- 
course with his fellows he won appreciation and affection. 

Among many prosecutions in which he assisted as assistant district 
attorney were those of Patrick Collins, who was hanged for murder, and 
the first trial of Jane Shattuck, who was sent to prison for life, but it 
was in the trial of the notorious criminal, William Theodore Durant, that 
he made one of the most powerful and masterly pleas for conviction ever 
recorded in the annals of criminal trials. Voluminous extracts are often 
quoted as the finest example of jury pleading. John Lawson, the greatest 
authority on criminal law in the United States, included the Durant case 
in American State Reports, and his address to the jury was printed in 
full, copyright being waived. Alvin Sellers in his "Classic of the Bar," 
a compilation of famous cases and court debates, published in 1909, used 
pwrtions of Mr. Peixotto's address. The "Green Bag," the famous 
magazine for lawyers, in its review of the book used these extracts also, 
which are as follows: 

"The brilliant counsel for the defendant, in his opening statement, 
challenged the prosecution to answer the questions : 'Where Blanche 
Lamont was murdered, when she was murdered, and by whom she was 
murdered; and what the motive was.' We are now ready to answer 
these questions. 'Where was she murdered?' in the belfry of the Imnian- 
uel Bajrtist Church. 'When?' on the afternoon of the third of .-Xpril, 
1895, between the hours of 4:20 and 5 o'clock p. m. 'Hy whom?' bv this 
defendant, Theodore Durant. 'What was the motive?' unbridled |)assion, 
that same motive that has ruled and governed the world, made nations 
totter and decay, brought men down from the highest pinnacles in life down 
to brutish beasts ; that same motive that has filled our histories with black 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 93 

pages ; that gave to the Roman Empire such characters as Nero, Tiberius, 
and Caracalla — whose dehght and pleasure it was to see men, women 
and children slaughtered before their eyes to satisfy their beastly desires ; 
that same motive which inspired Gilles de Rays, who was executed in 1440, 
after confessing to the murder of some eight hundred children in eight 
years, to satisfy his {perverted nature; that same motive that actuated 
Catherine de Medici to have women flayed before her eyes to satisfy her 
perverted passion; that same motive that brought out, in the Revolutionary 
period, the monstrous baseness of Marquis De Sade, from which term 
'sadisn' is derived — a term meaning passion and lustful murder, coupled 
with villainies; that same motive that prompted and made into a monster 
Jack the Ripper, the Whitechapel murderer who went about week after 
week, and month after month, in that quarter of London known as White- 
chapel, and there killed fallen women by strangling them and left them 
murdered and dismembered ; that same motive that was the foundation 
of the wonderful work in fiction of the late Robert Louis Stevenson — the 
portrayal of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde ; that same motive that made 
Mr. Hyde satisfy his inhuman feelings, his perverted passion, his uncon- 
trollable desires, by killing, simply for the pleasure of killing, and then 
satisfying his lustful desires, after the killing had taken place; the motive, 
insatiable passion, the fire that consumes, the abyss that swallows all 
honor, fortune, well being, everything. 

"Blanche Lamont had not learned the character of her companion, 
and so, unsuspecting, she entered the little gate of the church, which, 
unbeknown to her, was then the portal of heaven. When she disappeared 
from the sight of Mrs. Leake, she disappeared forever from the gaze of 
mankind until the corpse was found as you have heard it described. What 
happened within that church must forever remain a l^lank, the details 
concealed alone in the breast of Theodore Durant. That is why we asked 
you if you would convict on circumstantial evidence, and \'ou severally 
answered 'Yes.' It was the deed which the man of eye could not see. 
If you ask for further details, we must supply them from our imaginations, 
and mine has been suggested to me by a bit of verse by Blanche Higginson : 

The devil he stood at the gates of hell 

And yearned for an angel above ; 
And he sighed : 'Come down, sweet siren, and learn 

The lesson of passion and love.' 

The angel she leaned from the gates of gold, 

(The devil was fair in her eyes) : 
And she thought it would be very nice if she 

Could lift him up to the skies. 

'My dear Mr, Devil.' she softly replied, 
'Mv home is of comfort and ease, 



94 THE SAN FR--\NCISCO BAY REGION 

And I am very well satisfied where I am, 
And so — if you'll pardon me — please,' 

'I'll hardly venture to go so far, 

Do you, sire, come up to me, 
For I am an angel in Heaven, while you 

Are only the devil, you see.' 

'Too well I know that an angel you are,' 

The devil with cunning replied ; 
'And that is the reason I covet you 

For a safeguard at my side.' 

You'll find the atmosphere balmy and warm, 

And a heart that is wholly thine, 
Here are red roses and passionate bliss. 

And kisses and maddening wine.' 

'Oh come, angel, come; I'll stretch out my arms 

And draw you to infinite rest. 
Arid all the delights of this beautiful hell, 

Asleep, you shall drink on my breast.' 

The angel she leaned from the gates of gold. 

And she clasped him with arms of snow, 
And while she was striving to draw him up. 

The lower she seemed to go. 

'Don't struggle, sweet angel,' the devil he cried. 

As he bore her on passion's swell ; 
'When an angel's arms have embraced me but once, 

She belongs to the devil and hell.' 

The devil and angel entered the house of God. 'Come hither," said the 
devil. 'Let us ascend together the belfry leading toward heaven.' Into the 
belfry went Blanche Lamont and Theodore Durant. There they were 
alone. Passion, predominating in this perverted man, asserted itself; a 
weak maiden fighting for her virtue and honor; a jiervert, fiend and devil 
fighting to satiate an insatiable and overruling passion. His strong arms 
grasped her, his fingers stififened on her throat, her breath stopped, her 
struggles ceased and Theodore Durant was a murderer. 

"No sooner has an act been executed than tlie guilty one starts to 
conceal. The clothes are taken oft and tucked away ; the liody is stretched 
and positioned by the hand of the one who had done the like before. There 
in that fantastic place, on a floor erected high above the ground, with 
her arms crossed on her breast * * * there, alone, unclothed, 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 95 

unhonored, unpraised, unwept, uncoffined and unknelled, with no dirge 
but the wistful vvaihng of the wind, as it whistled in and out of every 
crevice and cranny, the murderer left her; hoping that the time might 
wither and age decay and thus identity might be lost to man forever. Oh, 
what a mistake was that ! Did the murderer for one moment think 
there was a hole deep enough or a tower high enough in this little world of 
ours to conceal such a crime, the mortal remains of that pure girl. Like 
the ostrich, sticking its head in the sand and thinking it has thus hidden 
itself from sight, so Durant hid in crevice and corner the tell-tale gar- 
ments, all of the means of identification of this pure girl, hoping that in 
time nothing but the decayed body, the gaping skeleton, might be dis- 
covered and thought to be that of some poor wanderer who had thus 
mysteriously died. All her apparel, everything * * * have been 
brought here and exhibited to you and are now in court, each severally 
crying out. 'Guilty, guilty — 'twas you, and you alone who did 
it.' It is true, no human eye saw, no human ears heard, save those of 
the dying, strangled girl, and this man who has buried himself in his own 
falsehoods, in his endeavor to save himself from the penalty of his awful 
crime * * *." 

Soon after participating in this noted case Mr. Peixotto decided to 
resign and engage in private practice only. His success has been among 
the greatest in the history of the San Francisco bar. He has a strong 
sense of civic duty, and fidelity to duty had led him to the front in many 
civic movements and few men have rendered more conspicuous service in 
the civic and promotion affairs of San Francisco. He was a member of the 
executive committee for the Portola Festival in 1909, a member of the 
Panama- Pacific International Exposition Company and attornev from 
its organization for the downtown association, one of the leading civic 
bodies of San Francisco. Politically he is a strong republican, and was a 
delegate to the Republican Conventions of 1896 and 1900, serving as secre- 
tary of the California delegation in the latter year. But he could never 
be prevailed upon to accept any public office. He preferred to be the 
driving wheel, and he never lost his grip by wobbling, his friends assert. 

Socially he is a member of the Union League. Olympic and Bohemian 
clubs and of a number of fraternal and civic organizations. 

Ellis Bloch is proprietor of the E. Bloch Mercantile Company at 
70 Market Street, dealers in art work, novelties and curios, a business 
as well known to the thousands of annual visitors to San Francisco as 
to residents of the city itself. 

Mr. Bloch is a native of San Francisco, born Februarv 23. 1860. His 
parents came from France. His father located in San Francisco in 1851, 
and was a clothing merchant many years. Ellis Bloch was educated in 
public schools, and as a youth took up a business career. For nianv 
years he has been an exporter and importer. Air. Bloch has not only 
been a dealer but a student of anthropological relics, and is an authority 



96 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

on the art work of many Indian and Oriental tribes. He brought to 
his place in San Francisco one of the most unique art works in the world, 
a statue made by a Japanese artist of himself. 

Mr. Bloch's first wife was Pauline Mierson of Placerville, California. 
The one daughter of their marriage, Melaine Bloch, is deceased. His 
second wife was Flora Hoffman Walters of San Francisco. By this 
marriage there are two daughters, Juliette and Marie Bloch. 

Mr. Bloch has been interested in a number of charitable institutions. 
He is a member of the San Francisco Associated Charities, and while 
he has never sought any public office he has worked untiringly for the 
civic and commercial welfare of his community. He and John ^IcDougal 
are the onlv surviving niembers of the original charter members of the 
Native Sons of the Golden West. They were initiated in this order 
July 10, 1875. Mr. Bloch is a member of the Eureka Benevolent Society, 
the First Hebrew Benevolent Society, the B'nai B'rith, the Humane 
Society. He is a man of action and not of words, and has given liberally 
to all public enterprises. 

Henry Button. The subject of this sketch was born at Bangor, 
Maine, in 1810, and succeeded his grandfather and father as proprietor of 
a saw mill and lumber yard on the Penobscot River. In September, 1849, 
the mill and yard were destroyed by fire without insurance, that protec- 
tion being less actively developed at that date than now. Disposing of 
the wreckage, Mr. Button joined a party sailing from Boston to New 
Orleans, proposing to reach California by the Southern route and avoid 
the perils of winter in the Rocky Mountains. From New Orleans they 
started for California by the way of Texas, and in the barren waste of 
what is now Arizona encountered hostile Apaches, by whom they were 
driven south into Mexico, where they met roving bands of equally hostile 
Mexicans, the remnants of General Santa Ana's scattered army, who 
stole their animals and drove them back to the East Coast of Mexico. 

Some, disheartened, returned to New Orleans. Those determined to 
continue took passage by a local schooner to Havana, Cuba, where they 
later found another vessel which took them to Chagras, now Colon, the 
eastern end of the Panama Canal : thence by canoe and trail they made 
their way across to Panama, where, after waiting more than a month, 
thev succeeded in securing passage on the steamer Columbia, reaching 
San Francisco, August 6, 1850, having accomi)Iished in a strenuous ex- 
perience of eleven months a journey now made in comfort and luxury 
in five days. 

From San Francisco he started for the mines and joined a number of 
fellow townsmen placer mining on the south fork of the Feather River, 
douljtless in the vicinity of the settlement which has ever since retained 
the name of Bangor. Returning to San h'rancisco in the following sjiring, 
he emploved his earnings in constructing a mill on Gold Street, near 
where Montgomery now strikes the foot of Telegraph Hill and which 
he completed just in time to be destroyed in the conflagration of 1851. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 99 

By that time the wdiiderfiil fertiHty of the hottom lands in the vicinity 
of Stockton had impressed those coming from the rocky soil of New 
England, and joining with a partner he located a promising site, built a 
cabin and put in a crop of wheat, but as it approached maturity encoun- 
tered one of our periodical flood seasons. The river rose and spread 
over the plains and the ripening grain was ruined. 

Returning to San Francisco .still full of faith in the agricultural 
future of California, he entered partnership with A. G. Sherman in the 
hay and grain business located at Pier 7, Stewart Street, which street was 
then a plank wharf built on piles and running from Market Street south 
to the end of Rincon Point and enclosing an interior expanse of water 
extending from Market to Rincon Point, and from Stewart to First Street, 
and in which were parked two or three stranded hulks. 

The east side of Stewart Street was the base of a succession of piers 
extending into the bay. Mr. Dutton's location was Pier No. 7, just south 
of the line of Alission Street, and all the remaining piers were occupied 
by lumber firms, and theirs was probably the first firm established in this 
line of business. 

Like most of the early settlers, Mr. Dutton's first idea was simply to 
"make a stake," as they called it, and in due course return to his home 
and familv, but soon realizing the advantages of California he decided to 
remain and in 1855 sent for his family and became a Californian for life. 

He subsequently bought out his partner and continued at the same 
location, retiring in 1873 in favor of his son, subsequent to whose death 
in 1887 the business was discontinued. 

Mr. Button was always active in citizenship work. He was a member 
of the Vigilance Committee of 1856, and an active participant in the 
Fremont presidential campaign and that of Lincoln in 1860, and in 1S63 
and 1865 was a member of the California Legislature and voted for the 
act which consolidated the City and County of San Francisco and for the 
endorsement by California of President Lincoln's Emancipation Procla- 
mation. 

He was one of the organizing directors of the Fireman's Fund Insur- 
ance Company in 1863, his interest in such protection being probably 
stimulated by his early experiences in conflagration. He served as its 
vice president for several vears, and as a director continuouslv until his 
death, July 22,, 1879. ' ' ' 

William Jay Button was born at Bangor, Maine. January 23, 1847, 
and he was eight years old at the time he arrived in San Francisco. He 
attended the public schools of this city and the city college, completing a 
course in the classics and higher mathematics. This and Oakland College 
were predecessors of the University of California. 

His attention being turned toward the insurance business through his 
father's connection with it, as a director of the Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Company, Mr. Button, in January, 1867, secured the position of junior 



100 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

clerk with the San Francisco agency of the North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Company, continuing there until the following IMay, when the 
Fireman's Ftnid Insurance Company inaugurated its marine department, 
and he became its marine clerk. In 1869 he was made marine secretary 
of the company ; in 1880, general secretary, and in 1886, second vice 
president. In 1890 he became vice president and general manager, and 
in 1900 he was elected president. 

In 1892, the Fireman's Fund having acquired ownership of the Home 
Fire and Alarine Insurance Company, its only locally owned competitor, 
Mr. Button became also president of that company from 1895 until its 
temporary retirement in 1906, following the San Francisco conflagration, 
when the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, under his management, 
and with all records of liability destroyed, successfully met the obligations 
of both companies, aggregating over eleven millions of dollars of losses 
and settled every claim without a single lawsuit — the largest single fire 
loss ever sustained by any company in the world. 

In 1876 Mr. Button became a member of the Board of ^larine Under- 
writers, and from 1888 to 1909 he served as its president, and as chairman 
of its adjustment committee. 

Upon the organization of the Panama Pacific Exposition he was one 
of the committee of three who selected its thirty directors and later became 
one of the five voting trustees, in whose name all of the exposition stock 
was placed. 

In 1914 Mr. Button retired from the company's presidency, remaining, 
however, on its Board of Birectors and, though relieved from active busi- 
ness, he still continues to be interested in down town matters and is a 
member of the Pacific Union Club, the Presidio Golf Club and the Cali- 
fornia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. For a long 
period he has been a member of the First Congregational Church of San 
Francisco, and for many years has been chairman of its Board of Trustees, 
and is chairman of the trustees of our local Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and a trustee of the Seaman's Church Institute and a director of 
the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children. On November 25, 
1913, The Pacific Underwriter published a brief review of Mr. Button's 
career, at which time it was rumored that he was to resign from the presi- 
dency of the Fireman's Fund. A portion of this is here quoted from that 
journal: "President Button is not to be lost to San Francisco, nor will 
the weight of his influence or his perspicuity be taken from the many civic 
and progressive movements with which he is so closely allied. His per- 
sonality is a large aiid dominant factor in many other avenues than fire 
insurance. He is a man of forceful ojiinions, dogged ]iertinacity, and has 
the courage of his convictions and the ability to sustain them. He is a 
good citizen, jealous of San Francisco's welfare and confident of its future. 
He is loyal to his friends, a devotee to his family circle, a fluent and able 
public speaker and a man given to unostentatious charity. Few men lay 
down the larger portion of their business cares and contemplate the back- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 101 

ward track with the same serene knowledj^e of duties well accomplished, 
services faithfully discharged and trusts honorably acquitted as does the 
retiring president of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company." 

John Christopher Plagemanx. Among the old and honored 
residents of San Francisco, one whose career has touched life on many 
sides and who has made the most of his opportunities is Jtihn Christopher 
Plagemann. A variety of interests have enlisted his attention since he 
first came to the coast in 1868 as a young man of twenty-two years, and 
in his various undertakings he has always exhibited the possession of 
standards of living that have gained him unqualified confidence and 
esteem. 

Mr. Plagemann was born at Bremen, Germany, .Kugust 1'*, 1846, a 
son of Jacob Frederick and Eliese ( Aleyer) Plagemann, the former of 
whom was born at Groon, Germany, in 1805. There were four children 
in the family who lived to maturity: Henry, Frederick, William and John 
Christopher. After receiving a public school education in his native 
land, Mr. Plagemann was apprenticed to the trade of machinist, which 
he mastered and followed until reaching the age of twenty-two years. 
Hearing of the opportunities open for young men of ambition and industry 
in the United States, he decided to cast his fortunes with others of his 
countrymen who had immigrated hence, and left Germany November 14, 
1868, arriving at New York City November 28, and at San Francisco 
December 24, being just in time to assist his brother in trimming his 
Christmas tree. The young man soon found employment at his trade 
at the Etna Machine Works, at First and Tehama streets, whe're he 
remained two years, and for a like period was employed at the Moore 
Brass Foundry. In 1872 Mr. Plagemann went to Hamilton, Nevada, 
where he worked in a machine shop for three and one-half years, but in 
June, 1875, returned to San Francisco, whence he was sent to Sacramento 
and was employed on the locks of the countv jail. In the same year 
he took up plumbing, working first for a Mr. Lemke and then engaging 
in business on his own account, under the business style of J. C. Plage- 
mann, plumber and gas fitter. Mr. Plagemann disposed of his plumbing 
business in 1883 and engaged in the retail liquor business at San Fran- 
cisco, his establishment being located on O'Farrel Street, above Dupont, 
now known as Grant Avenue. After spending ten years in this enterprise 
he bought a controlling interest in San Francisco's slot machine industry, 
and subsequently engaged in the insurance business. He was also made 
a licensed broker, and is still a member of the Brokers E.xchange. .-Xt 
one time he held the office of deputy poll tax collector. Mr. Plagemann 
is a past chief ranger for the Ancient Order of Foresters. 

On July 8. 1876, Mr. Plagemann married Miss Barbara Wessea of 
San Francisco, and to this union there have been born the following 
children: William, who died in 1910; Louis, an engraver at the Shreves 
Jewelrv Company, who married Katherine Kruse ; Johanna, who married 
G. E. Lamont; Max, a scientific glass blower of San Francisco, who 



102 THE SAN FRA.XCISCO BAY REGION 

married Daisy Menke, and he is assistant superintendent of the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company; and Helena, the wife of Alphonse Beck of 
the Kleiber Truck Company. 

Mr. Plagemann is possessed of a splendid baritone voice of pleasing 
tone and wide range, and during the days of the old Orpheum received 
the sum of $450 for an evening's performance. He is soloist of the 
Harmonie Singing Society, an organization of about 300 members, and 
has sung for about forty years under the auspices of the Pacific Ssenger- 
bund. For fifty-two years he has been a member of the San Francisco 
Turn Verein, and for the last two years an honorary member. The 
members of the Harmonie Singing Society presented him, in 1896, with a 
handsome gold medal in token of their esteem. His son-in-law, Alphonse 
Beck, is also a memljer of this organization. 

Isaac K. ^^'HITE, one of the early and adventurous pioneers of the 
Golden State, was born in New York City on the 19th of October, 1819, 
and was the son of Captain William K. and Susan (Shaw) White, who 
were the parents of four children, as follows; William S. and George F., 
twins; Susan and Isaac K. The father, William K., was an old sea 
captain who, no doubt, had sailed round the world many times in the 
sea traffic between ports and nations. Back when he was a young man 
were the famous whaling vo3'ages when vessels often remained out two 
and three years at a time. No doubt Capt. William K., either as captain 
or as one of the sailors or whalers, was a member of the crew on one 
of these whaling eypeditions. At last, while out on the ocean and 
in command of his vessel, during the War of 1812 between the United 
States and Great Britain, he was captured by the English and placed 
in close confinement for four years. Finally he managed to get smuggled 
out of prison, was concealed for a time, and was at last conveyed to 
France and soon afterward was sent to Ireland. He was a Mason and 
an Irishman, which statement seems somewhat contradictory, but is a 
fact. In Ireland he settled down to work, and there passed the remainder 
of his life. Both he and wife died in Ireland. 

Isaac K. White received his education in New York City and came 
out of school in early manhood ready for anything the world might 
offer. He engaged in various occupations in the East, and there remained 
at work until he was about thirty years old, when he came west to 
California via the Isthmus of Panama. He was one of the famous 
"Forty-Niners" who were unable to resist the gold excitement that encom- 
passed the whole world at that time. His trip to the Pacific Coast was 
an unusually eventful one and consumed over six months. He left New 
York March 28, 1840. with a party of thirty-two men from Schenectady, 
on the steamship I'alcon, which stopi-)0(l at Charleston, Savannah. Havana 
and New Orleans, thence to Chagres and Panama. On arrival at the 
Isthmus the party was obliged to purchase a schooner to go up the 
Pacific Coast, as there was no outbound steamship at Panama. The 
schooner proved unseaworthy and leaked so badly that the jxirty was 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 103 

obliged to abandon ber below Cape St. Lucas and landed in small boats. 
Tbe party walked 500 miles to San Diego, where tbev embarked on the 
S. S. Mexico and reached San Francisco October 15, 1849. On landing 
they all went to the shack of Peter Donahue on the water front, where 
they stayed a day or two and then went to the mines at Oroville, Butte 
County, and there Isaac K. White worked for some time, making a pile 
of money. During his subsequent careef here he made four different 
trips back to New York, hoping to better his condition, but each time 
returned to the Golden Gate, which possessed an allurement he could not 
resist or overcome. After 185S he ended his eastern visits and settled 
down to a contented and permanent residence in California, and here 
passed the remainder of his life. 

His first steady business here was in cigar manufacturing at 221 
Sacramento Street, where he soon built up a large trade an,d became 
generally prosperous and prominent. It was from the windows of his 
cigar building that the Vigilance Committee suspended and hung the two 
murderers, Cora and Casey, amid an immense crowd who were doubtless 
all smoking and puling at the famous White cigars. Air. White remained 
in the cigar manufacturing business for the greater part of his industrial 
career, and succeeded in attaining high credit as a reputable dealer and in 
amassing a comfortable income and fortune. He was engaged in the 
business until a few years before his death, which occurred in 1906. He 
took part in the civic and commercial activities of the city, but was not 
attracted by professional politics or official allurements. He was a 
member of St. George's Lodge No. 6, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Schenectady, New York, and also a member of the California 
Society of Pioneers. Back in 1843 he married Miss Anne Frank, a 
descendant of old colonial ancestry, and to them were born four children 
as follows: Elizabeth, deceased; Mary, who became the wife of Henry 
Pierre Tricou, now deceased, they had four sons and one daughter; 
Anne, deceased ; and Nellie, who is still a resident of San Francisco. 

Robert Irving Bentley. The fertile valleys of California pour 
fourth their almost increditable abundance ; the greatest railroad systems 
of the country, combined with wonderful water service, give San Fran- 
cisco and the Bay Cities the best transportation in the world ; and the 
demand for the produce of the Golden State is a constantly augmenting 
one, so that it is but little wonder that some of the most aggressive men 
of their generation are giving their lives and their talents to the conduct of 
great corporations having in charge the preservation and marketing of 
the fruits of the earth. One of these mighty concerns is the California 
Packing Corporation, which is the outgrowth of a number of small con- 
cerns, and its president, Robert Irving Bentley, is one of the most exp)e- 
rienced fruit men of the LTnited States, whose life has been devoted 
to this industry. 

Robert Irving Bentley was born at Chicago, Illinois, July 25. 1864, 
a son of Robert and Frances (Harvey) Bentley. They had tlie following 



104 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

children: Robert Irving, whose name heads this review; Grace and 
Charles H., both of whom are deceased; and Edward F. and Mary, 
both of whom are residents of San Francisco. In 1868 Robert Bentley, 
whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work, came west to California, 
bringing his family with him, and as he was only four years old at that 
time Robert Irving Bentley has been practically reared in this state. 

After attending the public schools of the several localities in which 
his father lived Robert Irving Bentley took a course at the University 
of the Pacific for three years. In 1881, however, during his vacation 
period, he began working in a fruit-packing house, and continued to 
do so during his subsequent vacations, and by the time he had left college 
he had acquired a practical knowledge of the Inisiness that enalaled him 
to secure an excellent position at San Jose with the Golden State Packing 
Company. Later he was with the San Jose Packing Company. In 
1890 he was made manager of the Sacramento Packing Company, and 
continued with it until 1899, when it was sold to the California Fruit 
Canners' Association, and Mr. Bentley was made vice president and 
general manager of the latter. In 1916 the California Packing Corporation 
was formed, of which Air. Bentley was made vice president and general 
manager and he held these offices until 1920, when he was elected to the 
presidency of the company. Under his able management and liberal 
policies this corporation is greatly broadening its field of ojjeration, 
and increasing its annual sales in a most remarkable manner. Mr. Bentley 
is also a director of the Alaska Packers' Association, the Bank of Cali- 
fornia, and of a number of other financial and industrial enterprises. 
He belongs to the Pacific Union Club, the Bohemian Club, and the San 
Francisco Country and Golf Club. 

On June 10, 1886, Mr. Bentley married Georgia Dixon, and they 
have four children, namely : Robert Irving, Jr., who is a resident of 
San Jose; Walter H., who is a resident of Stockton; Esther, who is 
the wife of Stanley Powell, resides at San Francisco; and Katherine. the 
wife of Raymond Phelps, of Chicago, Illinois. The children were all 
born in California. It is a somewhat remarkable fact that while there 
are representatives from every state and country in California, very few 
of the native sons and daughters care to go away from it permanently, 
for they recognize the fact that nowhere else could they find conditions 
in any way comparable to those of their own native state. 

Cornelius Bigley was a native of England, where he learned every 
branch of the tea business, and was one of the first tea importers and 
dealers in San Francisco. Subsequently he was one of the owners of a 
large wholesale grocery establishment, and his enterprise had much to 
do with laying the solid foundation of San Francisco's commercial pros- 
perity. 

He was born in London, and was reared and educated there, his birth 
occurring in 1816. He married in London Katherine Thornhill, and soon 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGIOX 107 

afterward he crossed the ocean to New York, where he was in the tea 
business for several years. 

Mr. Bigley came to San Francisco in 1851, making the voyage around 
the Horn. In 1855 he went back East to get his family. His brother, 
John Bigley, was one of the first white men to go to China as a personal 
representative of EngHsh interests and capital in the tea industry. There- 
fore a knowledge of tea was something of a family business with the 
Bigleys. Cornelius Bigley was an authority on everything connected with 
the growing, importing and handling of tea. A few years after coming 
to San Francisco he established a wholesale grocery business at the corner 
of Qay and Davis streets, first known as C. Bigley, and later as Bigley 
Brothers. Cornelius Bigley continued at the head of this business until 
his death in 1866. He also acquired considerable San Francisco property, 
including the corner at Trinity and Pine Streets, where he made his home. 
He was affiliated with the Indejjendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Of his children only one is now living, Cornelia, a native of San Fran- 
cisco and the wife of Ringold Carmany and a resident of 1900 Leaven- 
worth Street, San Francisco. The other children to reach mature years 
were : John, who was in the express and transfer business ; Daniel, who 
continued in the wholesale grocery business of his father and at one time 
was chairman of the Repul)lican Count}- Committee and died in 1883; 
George, who also continued the Bigley Brothers Wholesale Grocery Com- 
pany, and later was employed in the San Francisco Mint, while his son, 
George Bigley, is now employed in the Income Tax Department ; and Mary 
Jane, who died in 1917. 

The Carmany family was prominently identified with some of the 
important interests of early San Francisco. John Carmany came to Cali- 
fornia in 1858. and after a brief experience in the mines engaged in the 
printing business in San Francisco, and up to 1876 was publisher of the; 
Overland Monthly, his pulilishing offices being at Battery and Washington 
Streets. Cyrus W. Carmany. who also came to San Francisco in 1858, 
was connected with the savings and loan society, the Old Clay Street Bank, 
and for nearly fifty years was cashier. 

Ringold Carmany, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1848. came to 
California at the age of nineteen, and was in the Clay Street Bank as 
accountant, and for nearly thirty-five years with the Anglo-California Bank. 
He has lived retired since 1917. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ringold Carmany have two children : Thornhill, who 
was connected with the Bank of California for twenty-eight years and is 
married and has two children. Robert and Isabel; and Laura, wife of 
Dr. A. C. Rulofson, a dentist, and the mother of two children. Ken- 
neth T. and Carol C. 

Thornhill Carmany is a verteran of the Spanish-American war. He 
served as sergeant in the signal corps in Manila, and served as Secretary 
to General Greeley. 



108 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Robert Watt was a California pioneer who possessed in marked 
degree the sterling character, sturdy independence, resourcefulness and 
mature judgment of the true Scotsman, and he was a pioneer of pioneers 
of mining operators in California. He became a man of prominence and 
influence in public afifairs, and did much to advance the civic and material 
development and prosperity of the city and state of his adoption. 

Mr. Watt was born in the City of Edinburgh, Scotland, in March, 
1832, and was an ambitious youth of nineteen years when he became a 
resident of California, in 1852. His parents, James and Janet (MacAlpin) 
Watt, passed their entire lives in Scotland, representatives of sterling old 
families of substantial standing in Scotland for many generations. The 
subject of this memoir was the youngest member of a fine family of 
eleven children, of whom all attained to adult age except George, who 
died in infancy. All are now deceased, namely: James, John, David, 
Robert, Euphemia, Jane, Grace, Janet and William. Of the sons, William, 
David and Robert came to California and engaged in gold mining for 
many years. 

Robert W'att acquired his early education in the excellent schools of 
his native land, and after coming to San Francisco he attended night 
school, in which he took a course in mining engineering, he having 
become skilled in his profession and Having been in the early days the 
only representative thereof here available for practical service. He 
became actively concerned with mining operations in Grass Valley, Nevada 
County, and he was prominently identified with the mining activities 
at Massachusetts Hill and the Eureka Mine also. He continued his 
professional activities in connection with the mines until 1869, when 
he was elected state comptroller of California, under the administration 
of Governor Haight. He retained his office four years and made therein 
a record of careful and efficient service. He held for many years the 
office of state bank commissioner, and as an engineer and public-spirited 
citizen he was largely instrumental in promoting and constructing the 
first cable-operated street-car line in San Franci.sco, besides which he 
was a zealous worker in connection with securing railroad rights-of-way 
here. In this connection it is well worthy of mention that this work 
done by Mr. Watt contributed in large measure to the success of the San 
Francisco & San Joaquin Valley Railroad Company. This com]iany was 
organized for the purpose of providing a comjieting railroad into San 
Francisco, as the only transcontinental line entering the city was the 
Southern Pacific. Also the entire San Joaquin Valley, comprising one of 
the most productive areas in the world, was entirely at the mercy of the 
one railroad, and an insistent demand had arisen for comj^etition to correct 
the various evils the agricultural population had suffered. 

One of the most important, if not the most imixirtant, factor to 
the successful development of the road was in securing proper rights-of- 
way. In numberless instances the land owners who would be largely 
benefited by the road were the very ones who held up or tried to hold up 
the entire matter by either refusing to part with any jxirtion of their 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 109 

land for a right-of-way or by placing such an exorbitant figure on the 
land desired that it could not be paid. It was here that Mr. Watt 
demonstrated his value to the undertaking. Putting aside his individual 
interests, he visited these districts and personally interviewed these men 
who were holding out. He was fair and just in his views and could see 
the viewpoint of the other side, and this was so evident that he inspired 
confidence in the land owners. The result was that arrangements were 
made fair to both sides and the troubles regarding rights-of-way were 
amicably adjusted. The value of this to the undertaking is almost beyond 
computation. 

-Nlr. Watt was vice president of the Union Trust Company, the Wells 
Fargo Nevada Bank and the Mercantile Trust Company. He continued 
these important banking connections until the time of his death, and like- 
wise his interest in the wholesale drug house of Langley & Michaels, 
the oldest establishment of its kind in San Francisco. He held membership 
in the Bohemian, University, and Pacific Union clubs, and in religion he 
retained the ancestral faith, that of the Presbyterian Church. He was 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, including bodies of its Scottish 
Rite. The death of this honored pioneer occurred on the 11th of Julv, 
1907. 

In San Francisco, on the 12th of November, 1863, was solemniz'ed the 
marriage of Mr. Watt and Elizabeth Dewey Leighton, a daughter of 
James Frederick Elaton, of Hanover, New Hampshire, and Mary Abigail 
Merrill, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who still maintains her home in 
San Francisco. Immediately after their marriage they established their 
home in Grass Valley, California, remaining there four years and then 
removing to Sacramento, where they resided during his term of office. 
The next move was to San Rafael, Marin County, California, where they 
established one of the most beautiful homes in the county, on the site of 
which now stands the Hotel Rafael. Of the children the eldest is Elizabeth, 
who is the wife of Donald Yorke Campbell, of this city; Janet Mac.Alpin 
is the wife of C. O. G. Miller, of San Francisco; William is a representa- 
tive agriculturist in Napa County ; and James and Frederick are deceased. 

WiLLi.\M H.\AS came to California in the year 1868, and in the passing; 
years he gained secure status as one of the representative citizens and 
influential business men of San Francisco, where he continued his residence 
until his death in 1916. 

The town of Breckendorf. in picturesque Bavaria, Germany, figures as 
the native place of the honored subject of this memoir, who was there born 
on the 24th of April, 1849. and who was there reared and educated. Mr. 
Haas was a sturdy, ambitious and self-reliant young man when, in 1864. he 
came to the United States. From New York City he made his way to the • 
State of Mississippi, and he remained in the South until 1868. when he came 
to Idaho City. Idaho, where he remained a short time and then came to San 
Francisco and became associated with his cousins in the importing, export- 
ing and wholesale grocery trade, under the title of Haas Brothers. This 



110 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

became one of the foremost concerns of its kind in San Francisco, the busi- 
ness was developed to large volume, and through its medium largelv AV'illiam 
Haas accumulated a substantial fortune, besides gaining prestige as a loyal 
citizen of distinctive civic progressiveness and liberality. He married Miss 
Bertha Greenbaum, who was born and reared in San Francisco, where she 
still maintains her home and who is a daughter of the late Herman Green- 
baum, to whom a personal tribute is entered in the fullnwing sketch. Mr. 
Haas is sur\-ived also by three children: Florence (Mrs. Edward Bran- 
ston), Charles William, and Ahce (Mrs. Samuel Lillienthal ). 

Herman Greexb.wm, a California pioneer of the year 1850. was a 
young man when he came to this state, and he long held precedence as one 
of the leading merchants in the City of San Franciscn. where he achieved 
worthy success of material order and made for himself reputation as a loyal, 
liberal and public-spirited citizen of sterling personal characteristics. He 
was one of the venerable and honored business men of this citv at the time 
of his death, when fifty-seven years of age. 

Mr. Greenbaum was born in Bavaria, Germany, Xoveml)er 12. 1826, 
and was there reared and educated. Imbued with a desire to establish his 
home in a country offering better opportunities for advancement through 
individual effort, he came to the United States and landed in the port of 
New York City. Then he made his way to South Carolina, and in 1850 he 
numbered himself among the pioneers in the City of San Francisco, where 
he engaged in the mercantile Ijusiness and built up a large and prosp)erous 
enterprise. He was one of the well-known and highly honored pioneer 
merchants of this city at the time of his death. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Rosalie Cauffman, shared with him in many of his pioneer 
exj)eriences in California, and continued her residence in San Francisco 
until her death. Their children were seven in number, namely : Caroline. 
Emil, Bertha, widow of \\'illiam Haas, to whom a memoir is dedicated in 
the preceding sketch, Jose])h, Alfred, Louis and Stella. 

John H. Miller, who came to California in 1875 and began the 
practice of law four years later, was soon afterward attracted into the 
field of patent law. As a patent lawyer his experience and abilities ranked 
him among the first in the work, and in that specialty his work has been 
in an important degree constructive, and he has contributed many funda- 
mental precedents to the body of law and rules affecting patent rights. 

Mr. Miller represents an old and distinguished \'irginia family, and 
was born at Lynchburg in that state, August 26, 1854. His father, William 
A. Miller, died recently at Lynchburg from an accident, at the venerable 
age of ninety-nine years and ten months. His mother's maiden name was 
Margaret A. Henry. She was a daughter of John Henry and grand- 
daughter of the celebrated Patrick Henry, the great Virginia patriot and 
statesman. The founder of the Miller family in Virginia was Thomas 
Miller, who came from the North of Ireland in 1693. His son was 
Samuel, and his grandson, Thomas, was the great-grandfather of the San 





^TTticCu^ 



'K^ 



THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 113 

Francisco lawyer, Thomas Miller served as a captain in the Revolutionary 
war and was wounded at the Battle of Cowpens. He married Ann Ball, 
a member of the family of Mary Ball, mother of George Washington. 
Thomas Miller, son of Thomas and Ann (Ball) Miller, married Frances 
E. Fitzpatrick, and they were the parents of William A. Miller. 

John Henry Miller acquired his early education in private schools at 
Lynchburg, graduated Master of Arts from Richmond University in 1874, 
and after a year as principal of the Locustville Academy in Accomack 
County, Virginia, he came West to California. He taught a term of 
school in Shasta County, then at Napa, and also was a teacher in San 
Francisco. In the meantime he was studying law, and for a year and 
nine months was clerk in the law office of Pringle & Hayne. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1879, and in a few years had built up a successful 
general practice. 

In the general routine of his law practice he was called upon to assist 
in several patent cases, and therefore almost by accident he drifted into 
the practice of patent law as a specialty. Since 1885 his distinguishing 
work has been in that field, and he has since conducted important litiga- 
tion in many states, representing many large corporations. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1888 on 
motion of Hon. W. W. ^lorrow, now U. S. Circuit Judge at San 
Francisco. 

His first great case, and one that reached the Supreme Court, was 
reported as Hendy vs. Ironworks (127 U. S. 370) and is looked upon 
as one of the leading cases on the subject of aggregation. While Mr. Miller 
was unsuccessful in behalf of his clients in this particular case, he laid 
thereby the foundation for his well justified fame as a patent lawver. 
Following the great fire of 1906, Mr. Miller removed to New York City 
and founded the law firm of Miller & ]\Ierwin, though still retaining 
offices in San Francisco. His love for California led him to return four 
years later, and since then he has had his offices in San Francisco. 

Among the important cases in which he has appeared before the United 
States Supreme Court, a few involving large questions may be mentioned 
as follows: Hoskin vs. Fisher (125 U. S. 217), on reissue; Hendv vs. 
Ironworks, already referred to; Boesch vs. Graf? (133 U. S. 697), relating 
to importation of patented articles from abroad; Keyes vs. Eureka (158 
U. S. 150), involving a question of license; Warden vs. Fig Syrup Com- 
pany, relating to fraudulent trademarks ; Smith vs. Vulcan Iron Works 
and Norton vs. Wheaton (165 U. S. 518), leading cases on the construc- 
tion of the Evarts act creating the Circuit Court of Appeals; Belknap vs. 
Schild (161 U. S. 10), involving the liability of the Government for 
infringements of patents; and Singer vs. Cramer (192 U. S. 265), pertain- 
ing to instructions to juries in patent cases. The most imix)rtant of all cases 
was the Bowers Hydraulic dredger litigation, in which he established the 
pioneership of Bowers in that line of endeavor. The members of the 
law profession in general are familiar with most of these cases not so 



114 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

much for their intrinsic interests as for the broad principles proceeding 
therefrom. Mr. Miller has appeared in scores of other cases of hardly 
less importance, and in the course of his practice he has been identified 
with causes in twenty-eight different states of the Union. 

Mr. Miller is a member of the American Bar Association, the .Amer- 
ican Society of International Law, the Patent Law Association, is a repub- 
lican but has steadily declined public office, is affiliated with the Masonic 
■Order, is a member of the National Geographic Society, the Southern and 
Virginian Clubs of New York City, the Bohemian Club, Union League 
'Club, Commonwealth Club and Mechanics Institute of San Francisco. 
During the World war he served on a number of boards, particularly the 
■examining board, and subsequently appeared as a public .speaker before 
many bodies in opposition to the League of Nations. 

At San Jose, California, November 28, 1906, Mr. Miller married 
Miss Susie Jones, of Memphis, Tennessee, daughter of William A. Jones. 

Sessions & Ballinger. W. W. Sessions, one of the early and active 
residents of San Francisco, is a native of Bangor, Maine, where his birth 
occurred about the year 1830. There he grew up on the banks of the Penob- 
scot, and became familiar with both merchandising and farming. He was 
given a good education in the public schools, and when he reached his 
majority he was ready for the independent duties of a strenuous business 
career. Then it was that the gold craze of the Pacific Coast was luring 
many thousands of adventurous fellows all over the Eastern States to come 
West and get rich quick. Mr. Sessions concluded to do so. Two of his 
brothers had gone out there some time before and had reported the out- 
look bright and attractive. 

Finally he boarded a vessel and with others having the same objective 
in view set sail for the Golden Gate. The trip was a long one^Iown 
through the Atlantic, around Cape Horn, then up the Pacific until he was 
finally landed at the port of San Francisco in 1851. He at once joined 
his two brothers, who were engaged in buying and selling and trading 
horses and mules and perhaps oxen, and were located on the hill very close 
to the spot now occujjied by the Fairmont Hotel. They kept enlarging 
their business as the demands required, and at times had on hand as many 
as fifty horses and mules in addition to the ones they were actually using. 
From the start, having all the facilities and means to supply the demands, 
they engaged in the general hauling business, and soon were busy unloading 
the cargoes from* all sorts of vessels and hauling the same to the owners in 
all parts of the city. 

This branch of their business grew so rapidly, owing largely to the vast 
crowds that came pouring in, that they soon made draying a specialty, and 
before many years they were not surpassed in satisfactory service by any 
similar concern on the whole Pacific Coast. When Mr. Sessions finally 
retired from active work he was succeeded by his stepson. W. Robert 
Ballinger, who continued the business with great success and profit and 
steadily enlarged his equipment and operations. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO RAY REGION 115 

Mr. l^allinser was born in Nevada City, Nevada County, California, 
on March 15, 1861, and was there reared to manhood and given a good 
education in the public schools. Soon after reaching maturity he was united 
in marriage with Miss Margaret Christholni, and to this union was born 
the son Fred S., in San Francisco in Deccml)er, 1884. Fred S. was reared 
in San Francisco and received an excellent education in the public schools. 
During his early years he learned engineering, and while comparatively 
young secured a position on one of the steamers as engineer, and in that 
capacity sailed round the world and had a memorable experience. He was 
with the Chamber of Commerce Foreign Relations Committee which toured 
the world in 1921, and it was on this trip that A. F. Morrison died. 

Now the old business of draying is under the control of Mr. Ballinger, 
but has changed its character and usefulness vastly during the last ten or 
fifteen years. When the business was first started a "handful of horses" 
could meet the requirements, but now the concern has a "fleet" of twenty- 
nine motor trucks which, day and night, may be seen on the streets carry- 
ing every conceivable object for the citizens and their associates. It is now 
probably the largest draying company to be found in any city on the Pacific 
Coast. Its equipment is worth in round numbers about $100,000. In reality 
the company has been in operation continuously ever since 1850 when the 
two brothers of W. W. Sessions first came to the coast. 

The other children of William Robert Ballinger are Mabel Mildred ; 
Jessie Graham; William Graham, deceased; Warren N., who is associated 
in business with Fred S. The latter is well and favorably known to the 
citizens and business men of this wonderful city of modern possibilities. He 
is a member of the Elks, of the Masons and of the Native Sons. He has 
before him many years of usefulness and activity. Listen, listen, and you 
will hear his vehicles rumbling down the streets in all parts of this golden 
city. 

Robert R. Thompson. The romantic novels and plays of the speak- 
ing stage and of the movies cannot approach in interest the real adventures 
of the men who came to the Magnetic West before its possibilities were 
more than imagined by a few of the bravest and most enterprising. Had 
it not been for these courageous souls who blazed the long trails across 
the plains it is doubtful if today San Francisco would be in existence, nor 
would a new empire have been added to this country's possessions. 

Prior to the discovery of gold in California there had been a considerable 
exodus to the Coast, with Oregon as the objective point, and as one of the 
pioneers of 1846 Robert R. Thompson, long a commanding figure in the 
life of San Francisco, journeyed West from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where 
he had been born in 1820. He settled near Fort Plains, and began almost 
at once to navigate the Columbia River, and commenced lumbering near the 
present site of Vancouver. He was in Oregon City when the remarkable 
news reached him of the discovery of gold, and joined in the rush to the 
mines. Unlike so many, he was very successful, and made a large fortune, 
but, having done so, sought new fields of activity. Going north to Port- 



116 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

land and its vicinity, he made some investments, and then, returning East 
to his old home, bought 3,000 head of sheep and a large number of horses 
and cattle and drove them across the plains, a most arduous undertaking. 
The selling of these sheep netted him another fortune. Foreseeing that the 
rush to the coast and the subsequent demand for goods of all kinds would 
necessitate the building of many ships to carry the cargoes by water, as 
the land transportation was entirely inadequate, Mr. Thompson, in associa- 
tion with Captain Ainsworth, built and operated the first steamboat on the 
Columbia River, and built other boats. 

Coming then to San Francisco, he entered with customary vigor into 
the work of improving his new home city, and afterward built the first water 
works in Alameda. He organized the Oregon .Steam Navigation Comjxmy, 
and continued interested in it. He was one of the largest stockholders of 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and invested in realty to a very 
considerable extent. 

In 1842 Mr. Thompson married, in Ohio, Miss Harriet Bell, a native 
of Virginia, and they became the parents of twelve children, ten of whom 
reached maturity, and of them but three are now living : Sarah Ann, who 
married Lieut. Col. Otis Wheeler Pollock ; Louis Cass ; and Hettie Bell, 
who married Ivy L. Borden. Lieut. Col. Pollock was an army officer, and 
he and his wife became the parents of two children: Josephine \\'allace, 
who married Ignacio Borda ; and Winnifred May, who married Major John 
C. Fairfax, of the U. S. Army. Mr. Thompson was a man of the highest 
personal character. Well-known in Masonry, he rose through the different 
bodies of the Scottish Rite to the thirty-third degree. It is safe to say that 
no movement of any importance was carried to a successful completion 
during his residence at San Francisco that did not receive his generous sup- 
port, and he originated a number of them. His charities were almost with- 
out number, and it is said of him that he never refused to lend a helping 
hand to those in need. Big-hearted, generous, proud of his city and of 
the entire West, he worked hard for their best interests, and was prouder 
of the fact that he had won and held the confidence and respect of his fellow 
citizens than of his own remarkable success in a material way. Mr. Thomiv 
son and his contemporaries have passed on, but the results of their magnifi- 
cent work remain, and are shown forth in the great city and section they 
developed. 

John Henry GR.\nv. No more significant voucher for the loyalty of 
Mr. Grady to his native state and no more distinctive evidence of his personal 
jjopularitv could lie otTercd than the statement that he is Past Grand Presi- 
dent of tile organization of the Native Sons of the Golden West. He is a 
prominent representative of the real estate business in San P'rancisco, and 
is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of this city, as is evident 
when it is noted that his birth here occurred on the 2M of July. 1852. 

Mr. Grady is a son of James Henrj^ and Mary (Dolly) Grady, and his 
father, a native of Ireland, came to California in November, 1S40, the ever 
memorable year that marked the discovery of gold in this state. James 



THE SAX FRAXXISCO BAY REGION 119 

H. Grady was prominently identified with pioneer gold mining both in Cali- 
fornia and Nevada, in which latter state he assisted in the de\elopment 
work in the celebrated Comstock district. He continued his association 
with mining activities during virtually his entire career in the West, and his 
death occurred in 1874, his widow passing away in 1884 and both having 
been earnest communicants of the Catholic Church. Of the nine children 
John H., of this review, is the eldest, and the other surviving children are 
Kate Frances (Airs. Jasper Fishbourne) Robert. Theodore and Emma 
(Mrs. James McFadden). 

John H. Grady gained his early education in the schools of Tuolumne 
County, and after his return to his native city of San Francisco he here 
became identified with the furniture business. In 1881 he was elected city 
and county tax collector, an office which he retained two terms, and there- 
after he gave a characteristically effective service during his tenure of office 
as deputy state treasurer of California. He has been for a long period suc- 
cessfully established in the real estate business in San Francisco, and his 
operations have had direct influence in connection with civic and material 
advancement, both before and subsequently to the great earthquake and 
fire that wrought disaster in his home city. He gave three years as fire com- 
missioner of San Francisco, and he has given his influence and cooperation 
in furthering measures and enterprises advanced for the general good of 
his city and state. 

Mr. Gracii.- has been one of the most active, enthusiastic, popular and 
influential members of the Native Sons of the Golden West, and in the 
meeting of the organization at Sacramento in 1882 he was elected (jrand 
President of the order. Mr. Grady is a devout communicant of the Catholic 
Church, as was also his wife, whose death occurred August 17. 1919. 

In San Francisco was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Grady and Miss 
Eleanor Nellie Rourke. who likewise was born and reared in California. 
Of the thirteen children of this union eleven still survive (1923) the loved 
and devoted mother, namely: Gertrude, wife of L. J. Carl, of San Fran- 
cisco ; Henry F. ; Benvenuta L...wife of Edward J. Lynch, a leading attorney 
of San Francisco and Grand First Vice President of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West; Grover : Irene now Sister Benvenuta of the Holy Family 
Catholic order in San Francisco; John H., Jr.. Florence P.. Ralph M.. Ray- 
mond, Ruth, and Donald. 

John Lloyd Terry. Whether as a gold miner following the days 
of forty-nine or in other business affairs. John Lloyd Terry was uniformly 
successful, and a man greatly admired for his enterprise and sterling 
character. 

He was a native of Boone County, Kentucky. When he came out to 
California in 1847 he made the voyage around the Horn. In 1851 he 
went back to Kentucky by the same route, and in 1852 moved to Texas, 
where his people were pioneers. In 1853 he married America Hale Rag- 
land, a lineal descendant of Lord Ragland of England. He was one of 
the mounted volunteers of the Mexican war. 



120 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry crossed the plains, she as a bride, in 1853. The 
train in which they were members was attacked by Indians, and one child 
was taken away and was not recovered until some years later at IMarys- 
ville, California. On coming to California Mr. and Mrs. Terry settled 
at Placerville, Placer County, and from there moved to a little town known 
as Devils Gate. Some of his family recall a time when he had so much 
gold that he took the covers of? the bed and spread it all over the mat- 
tress and then slept with a gun under his head. It was familiarly said 
that he had a tub of gold. After his early mining experiences he moved 
to Sonoma county and bought a beautiful home, where the family lived 
for forty-six years. In pursuit of his quenchless business enterprise he 
finally went to Leadville, accumulating lumber and other supplies for the 
building of a complete store, but after six weeks was taken with pneu- 
monia and died June 6, 1879. 

Mr. Terry and wife had nine children, six of whom reached mature 
years: jMargaret R., now living at 1814 Vallejo Street in .San Francisco, 
was married in February, 1879, to Charles C. Johnson, of Galveston, 
Texas, and by that union had one daughter, Mabel Elliot, now the wife 
of Dr. I. E. Hoska, of Tacoma, Washington. Airs. Johnson after the 
death of her first husband married Nelson Laurence Nelson, a native of 
Sweden, who came to California thirty-one years ago and engaged in 
business as an importer of teas, coffee and olive oils. Laura Eugenia, 
the second child, now deceased, was the wife of J. O. Newhall, of San 
Francisco. Jefferson Davis Terry is a hydraulic engineer living in Hum- 
boldt County. Clara Belle is the wife of Wilbur Hayes, of Santa Cruz, 
California. The daughter /\merica died when sixteen years of age. Vic- 
toria Aneva is the wife of Edward Acker, and they live in Merced County. 

Mrs. N. Laurence Nelson, the eldest daughter of John Lloyd Terry, is 
a member of the Association of Pioneer Women of California and is its 
past president. She is president of the Woman's Pacific Coast Press 
Association, and has been elected to the office for the third time. 

Mrs. J. O. Newhall (deceased) was a writer of prominence and up 
to the time of her death had published seven different novels. The 
youngest daughter of Mrs. W. E. Hays of Santa Cruz who was Belle' 
Terry, third daughter of John Lloyd Terry, is a musical genius, drawing a 
royalty from her own compositions, both vocal and instrumental. 

W'lLLiAM Henry Keli.ey was a California pioneer of the year 1852, 
and possessed all of the qualifications of a real pioneer, being physically 
strong, brave, unflinching in time of danger, fearing nothing and equal to 
any emergency. 

He was horn at Morrell, Prince Edward Island, Canada, November 2. 
1821, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Webster) Kelley, and of English and 
Scotch ancestry. His grandfather. Dr. James Kelley. of Ipswich, England, 
was a celebrated surgeon who lost his life during a plague of yellow fever on 
iin Ens/lish man-of-war. Peter Kellev. his father, was a native of Prince 



THE SAX FRANCISCO HAY REGION 121 

Edward Island, was a shipbuilder by occupation, and toward the close of 
his life devoted his time to scriptural study, and often supplied a pulpit of 
the Presbyterian Church. He finally joined his son in California, and on 
his arrival in Mendocino his first question was "Is there a place of worship 
here, William?" "Not yet, but we intend tt) have one soon," rej^licd his 
son. "We must or I will not remain," said Peter Kelley. And he 
immediately orf^anized a church, which bejjan with eight members, and 
exists today. 11 is wife, Elizabeth Webster, was a strong and splendid char- 
acter, a daughter of Theophilus and Flora (MacKenzie) Webster, of 
Charlottestown. 

William Henry Kelley was the oldest of ten children, and was obliged 
to leave home early in life and earn his own fortune. In his youth he gained 
practical experience in the miller's trade and business. He possessed splen- 
did health, strong intelligence, and his ambition for success bore fruit. He 
and his brother Gregory went to Panama in 1850 and secured a tract of 
land on the Chagres River. Suddenly l)()th were attacked l)y cholera. 
Though desperately ill and distracted over his brother's death, \ViIliam H. 
Kelley managed to crawl out of his bed and bury $2,000 in the chimney of 
his room. When the Doctors appeared he said : "You neglected my brother, 
and if you neglect me you get nothing, for my money is out of your reach ; 
but if you save me, I'll pay you well." They saved him. 

In 1852, on his arrival in California, he was immediately impressed with 
the great promise of this country and resolved to make it his permanent 
home. In a brief time he took out citizenship papers. The Redwood belt 
proved more attractive than gold mining, and proceeding to Mendocino in 
July, 1852, he contracted to supply the mill of the first Redwood Sawmill 
Company with logs. In 1860 he secured a large tract of land at Casper in 
Mendocino County, and with his partner. Captain Rundle, built a mill in 
1861. This he operated successfully until he sold it in 1864 to its pre.sent 
owners. 

Mr. Kelley was always a republican and used his efforts for that party, 
and was for many years a ]\Iason of high standing. At the age of eighteen 
he became a member of the Presbyterian Church, and always favored that 
denomination, though ten years before his death he built a Baptist Church 
in Mendocino. His widow at her death deeded this to the Baptist Associa- 
tion. 

William Henry Kelley lived to the good old age of seventy-five, pass- 
ing awav at his home in Mendocino Decemljer 5. 1896. In June, 1855, he 
married Elizabeth Lee Alice Owen. Her father, Arthur Owen, was born 
in Cardiff, Wales, was educated in London, and was a member of the firm 
Welch and Owen, shipbuilders of Charlottetown. Prince Edward Island. 
Her mother was Mary Jardine, of Ecclefechan, Scotland. Mrs. Kelley was 
reared on Prince Edward Island, and she shared with her husband many 
pioneer experiences in California. Four children were born to their mar- 
riage: Daisv Shirley Kelley. who became the wife of Ale.xander Mac- 
Callum; Russell Blair Kelley, who died at the age of twenty-three; Elise 



122 THE SAN FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 

Alice Kelley, a resident of San Francisco and widow of Louis Phillippe 
Drexler; and Otis William Kelley, who married Annie A. Maguire. 

Louis P. Drexler was one of the great constructive leaders in the 
afifairs of the great West. He was a pioneer, and his enterprise was 
shown in many directions, and all his varied undertakings indicated his 
great capacity and ability. His home was in San Francisco the last twenty 
years of his life, but he had been financially interested in California real 
estate and industries long before that. 

He was born in old Virginia. The Drexlers were of German ancestry, 
while his mother's people, the Prossers, were of Welsh ancestry. Both 
families came to this country in the Colonial period, before the War of the 
Revolution. His great-grandfather Prosser at one time owned most of 
the land on which the modern city of Richmond, Virginia, is situated. 
In his ancestry were soldiers, a maternal uncle being an officer in the 
War of 1812, and there were men of prominence in the professions of 
law and medicine. He was a cousin of former Justice Ray of the Supreme 
Court of Missouri. 

When Louis P. Drexler was a child, the family removed to New Orleans, 
where his father was private secretary to General Gaines. His father died 
there, and Louis Drexler lived for a time in Kentucky and in Ohio, and 
attended school in several states of the J^Iiddle West. 

In 1854, when a vouth, he helped fit out a merchandise train at St. Louis, 
and went overland with o.x team to Salt Lake City. He engaged in business 
there and was succeeding admirably when in 1857 Brigham Young issued 
his edict ordering all the Gentiles to leave. Accordingly he left the Mormon 
capital and located in Washoe County, Nevada, where he became a prom- 
inent farmer and stock raiser. He possessed the quality of energy, cour- 
age and resourcefulness needed for success in those days and under pioneer 
conditions. He carried to a successful conclusion the first ditch built to 
irrigate the Truckee Meadows. As a resident of Washoe County he 
became a candidate for the Legislature in 1864. when General McClelland 
was candidate for the presidency. When the inining lioom struck Nevada 
he showed his usual foresight and prudence. While one of his ventures 
in particular lost him a large sum of money, he was on the whole greatly 
prospered by his mining interests. In 1865 he removed to Virginia City 
and engaged in the banking business and invested heavily in real estate, 
built quartz mills, and at the same time retained his land and cattle interests. 
In his broad and well ordered Inisiness activities in Xe\ada he amassed a 
fortune. In 1880 he was elected a member of the Legislature from Storey 
County, Nevada, being the first time the state went democratic. In the 
meantime he had been making investments in California, during numerous 
visits to the state. In 1880 he purchased a large tract of land around 
Fresno, containing the property subsequently developed as the Fresno 
Vineyard Company, of which Mr. Drexler was president and manager. 

Mr. Drexler established his home in San Francisco in 1881. He 
employed his wealth and business experience in many developments that 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 123 

added to the wealth and prosiierity of the state in those years. He became 
vice president of the company that Iniilt and operated the pioneer woolen 
factory, a business discontinued by the other stockholders and officers. 
This is practically the only enterprise in which he was not successful.- He 
was president of the California Jute Mill, was a director of the Giant 
Powder Company, a director of the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
and was owner of valuable real estate in San Francisco and thousands of 
acres over the state, including large bodies of land in Tulare County, in 
Colusa and Yolo counties. He also retained his interests in mines in 
California and Arizona. 

Louis P. Drexler died in 1899, leaving a record not only of phenomenal 
success in business Imt also of good citizenship and a life always actuated 
by human sympathy, liberal support of charitable and benevolent objects. 
He was a democrat in jjarty affiliation, though he manifested his independ- 
ence by supporting other platforms and tickets. He was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, but practically all his social interests were con- 
centrated in his home. In 1893 Mr. Drexler married Miss Elise A. Kelley, 
daughter of William H. Kelley, a California citizen whose career is 
given in the preceding sketch. Mr. and ^Irs. Drexler have no children. 
Mrs. Drexler has maintained a deep interest in children, and since the death 
of her husband has endowed a large and well equipi>ed Convalescent Hos- 
pital and School for Crippled Children near Palo Alto. Her home is at 
1 Russian Hill Terrace. 

C.\PT. Samuel Blair was one of the interesting figures in the com- 
mercial and industrial interests of early California, and for many years 
a resident of San Francisco. 

He represented a Scotch Covenanter family of the highlands of Scot- 
land, son of Samuel and Jennie (Maxwell) Blair. Restless as a boy, he 
determined to follow the sea, shipping as a cabin boy with a relative, 
Captain Fullerton. He remained on the sea until he became master of 
his own ship, soon after which he retired, but continued to manage 
extensive shipping interests and in that way amassed a large fortune. 

The shipping interests were concentrated on the Pacific Coast, and he 
employed a fleet of six ships carrying coal from the Seattle coal mine 
which he owned to San Francisco. Among his other interests he was 
original owner of the Glen Blair Lumber Mill. 

He was a staunch republican in politics after becoming an American 
citizen, and was a faithful attendant and liberal supporter of the Pres- 
byterian Church of San Francisco. 

At San Francisco, June 22, 1861, Captain Blair married Miss Abigail 
Birnum Kelley. They were married by Rev. Dr. Scott. She was of 
Scotch and English ancestry, a young lady of beauty and talent, and 
after her marriage made herself prominent in San Francisco society, 
entertaining most charmingly in her beautiful home on \'an Ness Avenue. 
Captain and Mrs. Samuel Blair had two children : William Samuel Blair, 



124 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

who died in 1916, a year after the death of his mother ; and Miss Jennie M., 
who survives and lives in San Francisco. 

Harris Weinstock possessed many of the intrinsic quahties of great- 
ness, and these he developed and showed forth in noble character and in 
achievement that shall ever reflect honor upon his name and memory. To 
California Colonel Weinstock meant much, and the state and its welfare 
meant much to him. Of fine intellectuality and high ideals, he translated 
his ideals into practical service and helpfulness, and he brought his mind 
to the consideration and promotion of those things which make for the 
general good of humanity. 

Harris Weinstock was born in the City of London, England, on the 
18th of September, 1854, and his death occurred August 22, 1922, as the 
result of a fracture ot the skull, an injury received when he was thrown 
from a horse. Mr. Weinstock was an infant at the time of the family 
removal from England to the United States, and until he was twelve years 
of age he attended the public schools of New York. In this connection 
the following appreciative statement has been written : "How well he built 
ujxin this meager educational foundation . is amply evidenced by his suc- 
cess in later life and by the calls upon him for responsible service by the 
Governor of California and the President of the United States." 

Colonel Weinstock was a youth when he came to California, and here 
he found employment as a clerk in a country store. Before he attained 
to his legal majority he and his half-brother, David Lubin, combined forces 
and their very limited capital in an independent business venture. The 
two young men, pioneers of California, opened a modest little store at 
Sacramento, and this establishment, known at that time as the Mechanics 
Store, is to be considered as the nucleous from which was evolved the great 
San Francisco mercantile house of Weinstock, Lubin & Company. Con- 
cerning this period in his career Mr. Weinstock, in speaking of the strug- 
gling firm of which he was thus a member, wrote as follows : "We had 
just one great ambition, and that was to be able to look every customer 
squarely in the eye and feel that he was being treated as we would like 
to be treated if we were the customers. We had blind faith that such a 
business policy must spell ultimate success, and that the business ethics 
involved would, sooner or later, bring us prestige. We lived to see the 
day when this small and obscure beginning revolutionized the whole 
method of retail shopping in our sphere of commercial influence." Growth 
and prosperity finally marked the enterprise of the young men, and since 
1888 the business has Ijeen conducted under the corporate title of Wein- 
stock, Lubin & Company, (^f the high standing and effective service of 
this representative mercantile house of San Francisco it is quite unneces- 
sary to speak further in this brief menn)ir. At the time of iiis death 
Colonel Weinstock was president also of the Weinstock-Nichols Company, 
dealers in automobile supplies, and he had been for many years a director 
of the D. O. Mills Bank of Sacramento. 





^^^^Z^^-^^^^^A^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 127 

From an ai)i)reciativc article prepared ))y C. E. Grunsky at the time of 
the death of tho hdiuircd subject of this memoir are taken the following 
extracts, with minor paraphrase : 

"Despite his devotion to his family and the insistent demand which 
business affairs made upon his time and energies, he found time to be of 
service to his state and country. He joined the National Guard of Cali- 
fornia in 1881, and within the ensuing fourteen years passed through the 
successive grades from private to lieutenant colonel. In 1887 he was 
appointed a member of the Board of Trustees of the State Library of 
California; in 1891 he was elected a member of the Board of Freeholders 
of Sacramento to frame a new charter for that city; he was appointed in 
1897 a member of the California State Board of Horticulture; in 1908 
he was designated by Governor Gillett as special labor commissioner to 
investigate labor laws and labor conditions in foreign countries ; four 
years later he was called upon by Governor Johnson to investigate and 
report upon the free-speech disturbances at San Diego resulting from 
the attempts by the authorities to suppress street speaking by members of 
the Industrial Workers of the World. In 1913 Mr. Weinstock was 
selected by Governor Johnson to become a member of the American com- 
mission charged with the study of European systems of rural credits, and 
was by his associates made vice president of this commission. In the 
same year he was called by President Woodrow Wilson to serve as a 
member of Industrial Relations Commission, and a few months later he 
was made a member of the California Industrial Accidents Commission, 
by Governor Johnson. In 1915 he was appointed a member of the Cali- 
fornia State Rural Credit Commission, and he was active in the work of 
this commission to the time of his death. In the same year, too, when 
the position of State Market Director was to be filled, it was natural that 
Governor Johnson should select Mr. Weinstock for this position. Here 
was an exceptional opportunity for constructive work which Mr. W'ein- 
stock could not overlook. Instead of acceding to the demand for the 
establishment of free markets, he looked deeper and found that the best 
protection that' the grower could get would result from cooperation with 
the individual growers. Through his efforts associations were formed of 
the producers of the various classes of farm products, and a large measure 
of stability of business has come to the grower as a result. 

"During a trip in the East he noticed the poor condition in which the 
California grapes reached the Eastern market, and also the fact that the 
Malaga grapes from Spain were being auctioned oft' and a better price 
obtained for them. The result of his investigations led to the lietter pack- 
ing of grapes and the auctioning of them, and this has been of incalculable 
benefit to the grape growers of California. 

"At the time of his death Mr. Weinstock was a member of the executive 
board of the National Civic Federation ; he was vice president of the 
Jewish Publication Society of America ; he was one of the founders and 
the first president (1903-1907) of the Commonwealth Club of California, 



128 THE SAX FRA.XCISCO BAY REGION 

and was an active memlier of numerous other civic and social organizations 
of representative order. Among his writings may be mentioned 'Jesus the 
Jew' ( 1902). and 'Strikes and Lockouts' (1909). Among his public bene- 
factions was the establishing at the University of California of the Barbara 
Weinstock Lectureship on Morals of Trade, this lectureship being dedi- 
cated to his wife." 

From a tribute paid to the memory of Colonel Weinstock by the Com- 
monwealth Club of California are taken the following quotations: "When 
Colonel Weinstock joined the club its name was casually known to a very 
few. When he left the presidency, after five years of service, there was a 
growing membership of nearly 400 good citizens and the foundation of 
the usefulness of the institution had been laid. Had it not been for this 
unselfish service of President Weinstock it is not at all certain that this 
club would have endured. In his death we have lost not only a member 
and a man whom we resi)ected and loved, but the one who undoubtedly 
made possible the estalilishment of this club as a respected institution of 
statewide scope. * * * He laid the foundation upon which he have 
built. He was a good man. a wise counselor and a faithful friend." From 
the same source are drawn further quotation, slightly modified : "These 
activities and interests of Colonel Weinstock were but the outward ex- 
pression of a constructively sympathetic and noble heart and of an active 
mind directed largely toward problems of public welfare." Of Colonel 
Weinstock's attitude as a citizen no better idea can be conveyed than by 
quoting from an address, before the Commonwealth Club, in which he 
characterized Theodore Roosevelt as his ideal of the highest type of 
American manhood : "Let us take him as an example for our political 
action ; let us in common with him have convictions and the courage of 
our convictions ; let us not hesitate to perform duty, even when that duty 
means sacrifice. Let us not be good citizens only when it pays to be good 
citizens ; but rather let us aim to be good citizens when it does not pay 
to be good citizens. That, after all. is the test. * * * You and I 
deserve no credit if we are good citizens when it costs nothing to be a 
good citizen. Our citizenship is put to the test only when a sacrifice must 
be made to perform our duty. Let us have what has been called the 'two- 
o'clock-in-the-morning courage.' Let us not calculate when a duty is to 
be performed whether or not it will carry with it a penalty. Let us rather 
forget penalties ; let us forget rights, and realize that the most sacred 
claims upon us are the duties which citizenship carries with it." 

The domestic chapter in the life history of Colonel Weinstock shows 
fidelity in its every relation, and his widow and children are sustained in 
the gracious memories attaching to him and his home life. On the 24th 
of February, 1878, was solemnized his marriage to Jkliss Barbara Felsen- 
thal, of San Francisco, and she still maintains her home in this city. F"our 
children likewise survive the honored father: Alice is the wife of Burton 
A. Towne. of Lodi ; Helen is the wife of Samuel Frankenheimer. of 
Stockton ; and Robert and Walter remain in San Francisco. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 129 

Lewis Slessingek came to California shortly after the close of his 
service as a soldier fighting for the Union. In San Francisco he became 
l)rominent as a shoe manufacturer, and was in business there more than 
forty years. 

Mr. Slessinger was born in Bavaria, June 6, 1837, and came to 
America as a young man. He lived in Baltimore until the beginning 
of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a Union soldier in the Tenth 
Indiana Regiment. He participated in the first important battle of the 
war, and was in service doing his full duty until the end. 

In 1865 he came to California, and at once entered the service of a 
shoe factory at San Francisco, and subsequently bought out the business 
and developed the largest shoe manufactory west of the Rocky Mountains, 
known as Porter, Slessinger & Company. The plant was located at the 
corner of Clay and Market streets, and the business headquarters were 
at Battery and Market streets. Mr. Slessinger finally retired from the 
active management in 1906. He was a solid and substantial business 
man and also identified with civic and social affairs. He was a member 
of Thomas Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was head of 
a committee which met President Harrison when the latter came to 
California. He was a charter member of the Pacific Yacht Club and 
was affiliated with the Inde{)endent Order of Odd Fellows. 

November 23, 1867, Mr. Slessinger married Caroline Price, daughter 
of William Price. The Price family came to California around the Horn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Slessinger were the parents of five children: Mary, wife 
of David Bucklaman; Hilda, wife of Harry S. Davis; Leonard; \\'alter, 
who serv'ed as a soldier in the Spanish-American war and is now deceased ; 
and Cora, wife of J. JMarymont, and the mother of one child, Caroline. 
Mrs. Harry S. Davis was first married to Mr. Rothschild, and by that 
union had two sons. Edward and Maurice, both of whom were World 
war soldiers, Edward with the engineer and Maurice in the air forces. 
These made the third generation of the family to serve in the armv 
fighting for the United States. 

Samuel Hopkins is one of the progressive business men of the 
younger generation in his native city of San Francisco, where he is one of 
the principals in the Union Ice Company, which was organized by his 
father. 

Mr. Hopkins was born in San Francisco on the 27th of April, 1886, 
and is a son of E. W. and Georgiana (Smith) Hopkins. The Hopkins 
family name was closely and proniinently associated with pioneer railroad 
construction in California, and had classification with the names of other 
great railroad builders of the early days, including Huntington and 
Stanford. E. W. Hopkins was connected with railroad construction in 
the San Francisco district and also with that of the Southern Pacific 
system. 

After ha\ang profited by the advantages of the public schools of his 



130 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

native city, Samuel Hopkins was for a time a student in Leland San- 
ford, Jr., University, and his entire business career has since been in 
connection with the operations of the Union Ice Company, which is one of 
the important industrial corporations of San Francisco. 

On the 26th of June, 1912, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hofy- 
kins to Miss Elyce Schultz, who likewise was born and reared in San 
Francisco. Mrs. Hopkins is a daughter of George A. Schultz, whose father 
came to California in 1856 and who accumulated a fortune of approxi- 
mately $1,000,000 through his active alliance with mining industry in 
California and Nevada, he having been the principal owner of the famed 
old Comstock mine and having had close business alliance with Mackey 
and other early leaders in mining enterprise of broad scope and impor- 
tance. 

George A. Schultz was born in San Francisco on the 28th of June, 
1864, and after receiving good educational advantages he became asso- 
ciated with the wholesale liquor business founded by his father. In this 
connection he became one of the substantial and highly respected business 
men of his native city, and here he continued to reside until his death 
in 1906. 

Frederick Croudace. One of the prominent figures in the early life 
of San Francisco was Frederick Croudace, who for years was connected 
with the drug trade and the publishing business, and was associated 
with some of the progressive movements of the city. He was bom at 
Newcastle, England, May 1, 1842, and was educated at the famous 
Christ Hospital for the profession of medicine, his father being one of the 
celebrated physicians of London, and desiring that his son follow in his 
footsteps. 

In the late '60s Frederick Croudace came to the United States, direct 
to San Francisco, and opened one of the early drug stores of the city, 
and continued to conduct it for a few years. He was an earnest, sincere 
man, and one who had no interest in politics. In his youthful days, in 
his father's house, he had been brought into contact with such master 
minds as Huxley and Spencer, friends of his father, and his growing 
intelligence no doubt was stimulated accordingly. In his new home he 
formed a lasting friendship with Daniel O'Connell, and the two con- 
ceived the idea of an association of congenial spirits, which they embodied 
in the organization known as the Bohemian Club, now one of the most 
famous of San Francisco. 

During 1879 Mr. Croudace married Irene Hamilton, and they became 
the parents of a daughter, Lenore, a most talented lady. She was gradu- 
ated from the public schools of her native city, and the University of 
California, and began her literarv' career by writing for the college 
paper. Still later she was connected with the Bulletin, and contributed 
dramatic criticisms and special articles. Miss Croudace published three 
books, "The Opening Vista," "The Misty Day" and "The Burning 




VMl'.S l'.. (iKlCl'.X 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 133 

Gauze," all of which have had a wide circulation, and were very favorably 
received. 

The Croudace family is one of the oldest and most honored of England, 
dating back to the Norman period. Mr. Croudace traced his close con- 
nection with the same house as the Duke of Norfolk. Mrs. Croudace 
also comes of an old English family. 

Frederick Croudace was a man who enjoyed social companionship, 
and in addition to the connections he formed with the Bohemian Club, 
enjoyed his membership with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
which he joined when the order was organized. He was spared to 
reach an honorable old age, and passed away January 28, 1916. In his 
passing his city lost a substantial citizen, and his family a kind and 
loving husband and father. Mr. Croudace always took a deep pride in 
the work of his talented daughter, encouraging her efforts for woman 
suffrage and political reform, and appreciating and understanding their 
results as could no other person. 

James E. Green found his physical health permanently impaired by 
hardships entailed by his service as a gallant young soldier of the Union 
in the Civil war. But he did not permit this measureable infirmity to cur- 
tail his activities, and he did much constructive service in connection with 
the world's work — mainly along agricultural lines. He was a 
pioneer of the West, came to California in 1870, in broken health, and 
here he lived to a large extent retired from active business during the 
remainder of his life, his death having occurred near Ventura, California, 
in the year 1907, and his widow being still a resident of this city. 

Mr. Green claimed the old Buckeye State as the place of his nativity, 
by having been born at New Lisbon, Miami County, Ohio, in the year 1841, 
and having there been reared and educated. He remained at the parental 
home until the outbreak of the Civil war, when, at the age of twenty years, 
he went loyally forth in defense of the Union. He took part in various 
engagements, and after his health became so impaired as to make him 
ineligible for further service at the front he received his honorable dis- 
charge, his membership having been in an Ohio volunteer regiment of 
infantry and later years having been marked by his affiliation with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. It was not long after the close of the war 
that Mr. Green came to the West and became a settler near Cloverdale and 
engaged in a general ranch business. With the basic industries of agri- 
culture and horticulture he continued his active association for a number 
of years, within which period he was for a time a resident of Washing- 
ton Territory. 

At Preston, California, in the year 1876, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Green and Miss Mary A. Paris, who was born in Honolulu, a 
daughter of Rev. John D. Paris and a representative of an old and hon- 
ored Virginia family. After residing a few years in Washington Territory 



134 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Mr. and Mrs. Green came to California, where he passed the remainder 
of his hfe, as previously noted. Mr. Green was a man of sterling char- 
acter and fine mentality, generous and benevolent and ever ready to aid 
those in affliction or distress, both in a material way and by kindly coun- 
sel. He commanded uniform popular confidence and esteem, and was a 
worthy citizen in all respects. The only child, John Harrison Green, 
was born in Washington, December 20, 1877, and is now a resident of 
San Francisco. 

Mrs. James E. Green has been for thirty-nine years a successful and 
much loved teacher in the schools of San Francisco, and she now gives 
much time and thought to missionary service under the auspices of the 
Congregational Church, notably in the teaching of Chinese children. She 
is zealous in both church and educational work, and her gracious per- 
sonality has endeared her to all who have come within the sphere of her 
benignant influence. 

William Thomas has been engaged in the practice of law in California 
for forty-six years and is known as one of the leading corporation lawyers 
of the state. He has continuously maintained his residence and pro- 
fessional headquarters in the City of San Francisco, where he is the 
senior member of the representative law firm of Thomas, Beedy & 
Lanagan. 

A scion of an old and distinguished colonial American family of New 
England, Mr. Thomas has not been content to bask in the light of 
ancestral prestige, but in the passing years has marked his course with 
large and worthy achievement in his profession, as well as a man o£ 
affairs and a liberal and public-spirited citizen. Isaiah Thomas, great- 
grandfather of him whose name initiates this review, was a man of great 
prominence and influence in Massachusetts, and was a close personal 
friend of Benjamin Franklin. He was for many years postmaster at 
Worcester, Massachusetts, where he founded the newspaper known 
as the Worcester Spy, besides which his was the distinction of having 
founded the American Antiquarian Society. An entablature on the steps 
of the city hall of Worcester bears the following inscription : ".At this 
place Isaiah Thomas intercepted the messenger from New York, assembled 
the people and read to them the Declaration of Independence." The 
honored patriot to whom this reference is made was the great-great- 
grandfather of William Thomas, the California lawyer. 

William Thomas was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, September 5, 
1853, and is a son of Benjamin Franklin Thomas and Mary .'\nn (Park) 
Thomas. Benjamin F. Thomas became one of the foremost lawyers of 
the old Bay State, gained high reputation as an orator, served as a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, was at one time ])residcnt of 
the Suffolk Bar Association of Boston, and he added to his fame by his 
able service as a representative of his state in the United States Congress. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 135 

While William Thomas abjures all claim to juvenile precosity, it is a 
matter of record that in 1869, at the age of only fifteen years, he proved 
himself eligible for and was admitted to Harvard University, in which 
he was graduated at the age of nineteen years, in 1873. with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. He forthwith entered the law college of Harvard, 
and from the same he received in 1876 his degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
He has ever maintained vital interest in his alma mater, and at the 
present time is the president of the Harvard Law School Association. He 
had the distinction of being elected the fifth president of the Harvard 
Law School Association, a position that had previously been held by 
many men of special prominence in American history, including James C. 
Carter. Joseph H. Choate. Oliver Wendell Holmes. He was seven years 
president of the Harvard Club of San Francisco, and was the organizer 
and first president and is now an honorary member of the University 
Club of this city. He is a charter member of the Commonwealth Club, 
and is actively identified also with the Bohemian Club. He was the first 
president of the California Water & Forest Association. 

In May, 1877, the year following that of his graduation in the law 
school, Mr. Thomas came to California and established his residence in 
San Francisco, where he has since continued in the active practice of his 
profession, which he has dignified alike by his character and by his splendid 
achievement. In his professional work he has largely confined his activities 
to corporation law. and in this connection has apjieared in some of the 
most important litigations in the legal history of the state, including the 
case of Waite vs. the City of Santa Cruz, in which he enforced a $360,000 
bond issue which had been claimed to be defective, and forced the city to 
raise the amount by taxation, this case having been carried by Mr. 
Thomas, as attorney for the plaintift'. to the highest Federal Court in Cali- 
fornia and having resulted in the significant victory noted. Of a significant 
and most commendable work achieved by Mr. Thomas the following esti- 
mate has been given: "In assisting the losers in the great fire of 1906 
to secure their insurance from recalcitrant companies, Mr. Thomas had 
a prominent part. In the fall of that year, in company with Oscar 
Sutro. he went to Germany as the representative of the clients of some 
sixty law firms, and secured $7,000,000 in settlement of claims which 
four German companies had refused to pay. The imixirtance of this 
achievement will readily be recognized, not only by the -San Franciscans 
who went through the great disaster but also by those whose acquaintance 
with the catastrophe and its effects was gained only through the public 
prints." 

The exceptional initiative and executive powers of Mr. Thomas have 
come prominently into play aside from the work of his profession. He 
was the organizer of the California Fruit Canners' Association, which 
has been a powerful agency in furthering the fruit industr\- of California 
and especially in making a market for preserved California fruits. Mr. 
Thomas having become the first president of this association and having 
served three years. He has been president of the Pioneer Land Company 



136 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

from the time of its organization. He organized this corporation, con- 
cerning which the following record is available : "This was the company 
which first exploited the famous Tulare County citrus belt, where the 
production of oranges is growing by leaps and bounds and threatening 
the prestige of the celebrated Southern California citrus district, as the 
fruit ripens several weeks earlier than in the south, and before there 
is danger of frost. The thriving town of Porterville, promoted by this 
company, is the center of this fast-growing district." Mr. Thomas was 
the organizer of the California Title Insurance Comjxiny, and gave many 
years of service as the head of its legal staff. 

Loyal and progressive in his civic attitude, Mr. Thomas has had no 
desire for the activities of practical politics and no ambition tor public 
office. He was for two years a trustee of the California Home for the 
Feeble Minded in San Francisco, and contrived to retain for five days 
the office of police commissioner of his home city, his resignation having 
been prompted by his finding the duties of the office not to his liking. 
Mr. Thomas has been essentially a man of thought and action, and in all 
of the relations of his long and constructive career in California he 
has honored and been honored by the state of his adoption. 

In March, 1875, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was at the 
time a student in Harvard University, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Thomas and Miss Emma Gay, and she has continued the gracious 
and popular chatelaine of their attractive home in San Francisco. They 
have four children: Molly is the wife of Latham McMullin; Helen is 
the wife of Frederick Kimble ; Benjamin Franklin is the only son ; 
and Gertrude is the wife of Roger Bocqueraz. 

William Ambrose Bissell, one of the active business men and 
prominent citizens of California, who died in 1917, was a native of the 
State of New York, his birth occurring at Geneva, Ontario County. He 
was the son of Bishop William Ambrose, who for many years was a 
distinguished citizen and renowned reformer of the State of Vermont. 
William A. was reared in New York and was given an excellent education 
and high moral training in his adolescent period. He finished at the 
high schools and the universities, and upon reaching maturity was ready 
for the taxing and exacting duties of existence on this earth. He decided 
not to follow a professional career, but no doubt made up his mind to 
take his chances in the various industrial pursuits which are open to all 
American citizens. 

At last he concluded to go to the Pacific Coast, and accordingly boarded 
a vessel, probably at New York Harbor, sailed down the -Atlantic and across 
the Gulf, crossed the Isthmus of Panama j)erhaps on mules or horses, sailed 
again on the water to the northward and finally was docked at San 
Francisco. He arrived in California the same year the Southern Pacific 
was constructed or finished, but it was ready too late for his trip. At that 
time railroad activities and problems were numerous and alluring, and 
they had their efl'ect on William A. Bissell, who finally became associated 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 137 

with Mr. Huntington in the construction of railway sections in different 
parts of the West. JMr. Huntington had already distinguished himself 
in railway constructive work, and now, aided by Mr. Bissell, organized 
an association consisting of some half dozen capable contractors and 
workers and superintendents, and they began the task of building branch 
and other lines for the Southern Pacific Railway system. Thus they 
were occupied for several years and were the means of assisting greatly 
in the gigantic work of opening up the western lines of the through 
continental routes across the Rockies. 

At first, when he began his railway duties, Mr. Bissell established his 
residence in Sacramento, because it was handier to reach the lines where 
he was at work from that point than from any other that jxissessed modern 
conveniences. At a later date he became an official of the Southern Pacific 
system and was thus employed for a number of years. Finally he resigned 
his position with that company and accepted the post of traffic manager 
for the newer Santa Fe Railway system, and soon became one of the promi- 
nent and masterly managers of that route. But he did not confine his 
business designs and adventure with the railway. Step by step as the 
years rolled along he became interested financially with many other busi- 
ness concerns, and in the end, by persistent and sagacious industrial meth- 
ods, managed to lay aside a comfortable fortune for his family. At the 
same time, while thus occupied, he became known not only as one of the 
leading and capable railway officials of the state, but also gained a high 
reputation as a superior citizen and an upright and exemplary public 
servant. 

He was a charter member of the Pacific Union Club, and also of several 
golf and yacht clubs, in all of which he occupied various official positions 
with credit and eminence. He was the only member of his father's 
family to locate permanently in California. In early manhood he married 
Miss Cora C. Mesick, of Sacramento, who bore him three children, as 
follows: William, of San Francisco, who is engaged in engineering; 
Ernest, deceased; Daniel, also deceased. Of these children, \\'illiam mar- 
ried Martha Snow, who has borne him three children : William Ambrose, 
Martha Jane, and Louis Thordike. The parents of these children are 
among the worthy, reputable and neighborly residents of this great city. 

Charles S. Fechimer. The pages of history teem with the adven- 
tures of soldiers of fortune and captains of great industries ; they deal 
at length with the exploitation of politicians, but there is little record of 
the daily happenings of the rank and file of everyday people, and yet they 
are the ones who really make up the real life of any nation, and are the 
verv backbone of the United States. Es]>ecially is this true in the western 
communities, which would have never come into existence had it not been 
for the patience, the resourcefulness, the foresight and the determined 
persistence of the pioneers, who, many of them, never sought publicity, 
but were content to pursue their ordinary vocations, satisfied with the 
attaining of a fair competence and the winning of the confidence and 



138 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

respect of their fellow townsmen. These pioneers have passed on to the 
rewards of another world, but what they accomplished remains and 
enriches the lives of those of the present and the rising generation, and 
will play a determining part in the history of those yet to come. 

There were many men of this caliber during the early days of San 
Francisco and the Bay Region, and one who is deserving of special 
mention because of his upright life and sterling characteristics w^as the 
late Charles S. Fechimer, of Oakland and San Francisco, who for many 
years was connected with the mercantile life of both cities. 

Embued with that spirit of adventure so common to the youths of any 
country and all periods. Charles S. Fechimer set out for the El Dorado of 
the West in 1852, when only nineteen years old, and made the trip by 
the long and wearisome journey around the southern extremity of South 
America, known as the Capie Horn route. Upon his arrival at San 
Francisco he looked about him and decided up)on locating at w'hat was 
then known as San Pablo, now the City of C)akland, and there he became 
the proprietor of a small store. From the start he was successful, for he 
was a born merchant, and he built up wide and important connections, 
and did a large trade. Subsequently he transferred his transactions to 
San Francisco, and for years operated the Plaza Store, which was opjwsite 
the old Plaza on Kearny Street, and this became one of the renowned 
mercantile establishments of its day. His business interests were impor- 
tant, and he devoted all of his time and attention to them, and never cared 
for outside attractions, his family circle affording him all the distractions 
and pleasures he wanted and he never could be induced to unite with any 
fraternities or societies. 

When he was twenty-two years old Mr. Fechimer married Miss 
Hannah Bloch, who had come to San Francisco from Europe. She died 
in 1894, and he died in December, 1904. They became the parents of six 
children, of whom those living are: Airs. Charles Adler, of New York 
City; Airs. Alelville Fechimer, of New York City; and Aliss Alinnie 
Fechimer and Airs. Harold Brunn, of San Francisco. 

William Waldo AIakvi.x arrived in the City of San Francisco in the 
year 1850, and the prospect that confrcmted him was not pleasing, as he 
found that the stock of woodenware which he had shii^ped to this port 
by way of Cape Horn had been placed on the wharf and there destroyed 
by fire prior to his arrival, the entire wharf having been swept away. He 
proved himself e([ual to the emergency, however, and eventually he gained 
in the state of his adojition a large and worthy measure of success in 
Inisiness affairs. Air. Alarvin was one of the venerable and honored jiio- 
neer citizens of California at the time of his death, in 18'M. his widow 
having passed away in 1894. 

Mr. Marvin was born at Oswego, New York, in the year 1818, and 
his youthful education included a college course. After his arrival in 
San Francisco, in 1850. when he found that his stock of woodenware 
had been destroyed, as above noted, he made his way to the gold mines 



&.?7y7^aA^- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 141 

near Sacramento, where he became acli\ely identilicd witli uperatiims, 
as was he later in the vicinity of Georj,'eluwn. At Georgetown he con- 
ducted for a term of years the Marvin Hotel, and later he engaged in the 
piano and general mnsic hnsiness in Sacramento, where he became promi- 
nent in mimici])al affairs and gained precedence as a substantial business 
man well worthy of the unqualified popular esteem which he ever com- 
manded. In that city lie and his wife passed the closing years of their 
lives. He was a republican in political allegiance, and he and his wife 
held membership in the Presbyterian Church. The maiden name of 
Mrs. Marvin was .Amelia LeFevre, and she was a daughter ui Col. Daniel 
LeFevre, of New York State. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin became the parents 
of five children, of whom three are living at the time of this writing, in 
1923: Frank William, who was born in 1847, died in March, 1920. He 
received the advantages of the public schools of Sacramento, and in 
1875 he established his residence in San Francisco. Here he was employed 
in mercantile establishments for some time, and eventually he became a 
principal in the wholesale boot and shoe house of the Williams-Marvin 
Company. He was one of the most loyal and public-spirited citizens of 
San Francisco, and served a number of years as president of the local 
Good Government League. He was instrumental in the settling of street- 
car strikes and other labor troubles, and took the deepest of interest in 
all that touched the well-being of his home city. He was prominently 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he received the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite, besides having been an influential 
member of California Commandery of Knights Templar and the local 
temple of the Mystic Shrine. In 1876 Mr. Marvin wedded Miss Sarah 
Anna Caldwell, who was born in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
James and Martha (Wilson) Caldwell, who established their home in .San 
Francisco in 1862, Mr. Caldwell having been a successful contractor and 
builder in this city at the time of his death, in 1878, at the age of fifty-three 
years, and his widow having j^assed away in 1902. Frank W. ^larvin 
eventually sold his interest in the wholesale boot and shoe business of 
the Williams-Marvin Company and became associated with his son Harvey 
LeFevre in the establishing of the Marvin Shoe Company, a wholesale 
concern. The son, Harvey L., died in August, 1920, only a short time 
after the death of the honored father. He was born in 1877, was grad- 
uated in the University of California, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy, and practically his entire active career was one of close and 
effective association with the shoe business. He was a past master of 
Golden Gate Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and was promi- 
nent in other branches of the Masonic fraternitv, he having served as 
high priest of the California Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters. 
He was a staunch advocate of the principles of the republican party and 
an active member of the First Presbyterian Church. Genevieve Leonard, 
second of the children of Frank Marvin, was born in 1880, became the 
wife of William ( )gle Blasingame, and her death occurred in 191.^. Mor- 



142 THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 

ence Wilson, the younger daughter, is the wife of Edgar Dixon Hand, of 
San Francisco. 

James Osborne, M. D., of San Francisco, has heen a resident of 
CaHfornia somewhat more than thirty ^-ears, and though his health was 
impaired when he came to this state, his personal experience has proved 
anew the claims of California in the line of vitalizing salubrity, for the 
doctor, now (1923) seventy-five years of age, is in the best of health 
and still actively engaged in the practice of his profession, with office 
headquarters at 2531 Sutter Street. Doctor Osborne came to California 
in 1892, after many years of constructive medical and surgical work in 
England, he having there established and conducted an hydropathic hos- 
pital that gained patients from all parts of the world. The doctor also 
gave years of service as ship surgeon on sea-going vessels, and his life 
has been replete with interesting e.xperiences and adventures, as well as 
with large and worthy achievement in the work of his exacting profession. 

Doctor Osborne was born in the City of Glasgow. Scotland, March 10, 
1848. His father, David Osborne, was a prominent business man in the 
citv, and the enterprise with which he was thus connected many years 
is continued by two of his sons, .Alexander and Robert. The late .Alexander 
Osborne, a brother of David, was for forty years an alderman of Glasgow, 
in the Guild Hall of which city a portrait of him is hung, besides which a 
Glasgow street is named in his honor. It may be noted that in Glasgow 
the service of alderman is given without compensation of financial order. 
Mrs. Janet (Wallace) Osborne, mother of him whose name initiates 
this review, was a lineal descendant of the great Scottish patriot Sir 
William Wallace. 

In his native citv Doctor Osborne received the best of educational 
advantages along both academic and professional lines, as is evidenced 
by the statement that he received from the historic University of Glasgow 
the degress of Bachelor of Medicine, Master of Surgery and Doctor of 
Medicine. His initial work in his profession was in the capacity of 
assistant at Windermere, where he remained several months. Thereafter 
he was retained as surgeon on a ship plying between England and New 
Zealand, a connection in which he made the return \oyage, at the close 
of which he was appointed surgeon on an Anchor Line steamshiji plying 
between Glasgow and New York. He retained this position two years, 
and he then engaged in private practice at Huddersfield, England, where 
he served also as a railway surgeon. .After six years had passed he met 
with an accident, his health save way. and he passed several months in 
India. .After his return to Huddersfield his health again suffered impair- 
ment, and finally he went to Bournemouth, England, where he erected 
and equipped the hydropathic hosjiital that under his management gained 
wide repute and drew clientage from most diverse parts of the world. 
After conducting this hospital eight years Doctor (Osborne fortified him- 
self in information concerning the invigorating climate of California and 
determined here to establish his home. Upon coming to the state he 



THE SAX 1-RANCISCO BAY REGION 143 

settled at Bakersfield, where there was a large English colony, and after 
there remaining aliont one year, he liegan seeking for a location where 
the summer heat was not so intense. He made an extended tri]) through 
the state and finally decided that the City of San Francisco offered the 
maximum attractions and advantages, a decision that has been verified 
in his experience here and one that he has never regretted. The Doctor 
became surgeon for the Doctor Reed Alilitary Academy, but his still delicate 
health led him to retire from this position and go to Mud Springs, south 
of Placerville. There he purchased a gold mine, the oix-ration of which 
he continued for an interval. He next purchased a ranch of sixty acres, 
fortv acres of the tract lieing planted to fruit, this being in Santa Cruz 
County, where he remained three and one-half years and where he quite 
regained his physical health and energies. 

In the year 1902 Doctor Osborne sold his ranch, up'n which he had 
made numerous improvements, and he thereupon resumed the practice of 
his profession in San Francisco, where he has ever retained high reputation 
as a skilled physician and surgeon and as one whose professional steward- 
ship has been of the most loyal order. He has retained a substantia! prac- 
tice and representative clientage for a long period of years. 

In connection with the great fire in San Francisco Doctor Osborne was 
one of the many to meet loss. He specially deplored the destruction of his 
fine library of approximately 4,000 volumes, the most of which he had 
brought from England, many of the books having been been virtually price- 
less. From the fire the Doctor was able to save a large picture and a 
mattress — rather incongruous salvage. For three weeks after the great 
disaster in his home city he had 1,500 persons in his care, professionally 
and, in a way, of earnest humanitarian service. Since the great fire the 
Doctor has maintained his office headquarters at his home, 2531 -Sutter 
Street. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the Cali- 
fornia State Medical Society and the San Francisco County Medical 
Society. He and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian Church. 

Doctor Osborne has various capitalistic interests of important order. He 
is a stockholder in the extensive oyster plant at Apalachicola, Florida, and 
in the Diatomaceous Earth Company in the State of Nevada. The mammoth 
plant of the oyster company in Florida has an area of 61,000 square feet. 
The company propagates and raises its oysters and controls a large whole- 
sale trade. This concern is said to have the largest oyster-canning plant in 
the world, and is to add to its output shrimps and crabs. The bay on which 
the plant is established is a vast natural oyster bed, and the company in 
which Doctor Osborne is interested has there planted 500,000,000 oysters, 
the bivalves growing to remarkable size in the period of one year. The 
Nevada venture is in the non-metallic mineral silica, a vast mountain of 
which is owned liy the company, and at the time of this writing, in the fall 
of 1923, the company is erecting a mill for the treatment of the product and 
the placing of the same in marketable form. 

At Huddersfield, England, on the 5th of August, 1875, was solemnized 
the marriage of Doctor Osborne and Miss Annie Freeman, daughter of 



144 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the late \\'illiam Freeman, a prominent and influential citizen of Yorkshire, 
England. To Dcictor and Mrs. C)sborne have lieen born seven children: 
Jessie is the wife of Newton Holman, who is engaged in the automobile 
business at Los Angeles, and they have three children. Edward Wallace is 
deceased, and is survived by one son. Florence is the wife of Bertie Day. 
son of the surgeon general of the British Army. Mr. and Mrs. Day reside 
at Santa Cruz, California, and their children are si.x in number: Harold, 
who is associated with the Geary Street Raihva}-, is married and has two 
children : Ethel, widow of William Atkins, has one daughter, and they 
now reside in the home of her ])arents. Doctor and Mrs. Osborne ; Reginald 
is married and resides in San Francisco, where he is employed in the 
municipal electrical department; Gordon, likewi.se married, is assistant 
manager of the San Francisco fire department. 

Louis F. Holtz. Prominenllv identified among tlie pioneers of 
California was the late Louis F. Holtz. whose life was one of earnest 
endeavor, and whose labors were productive of excellent results. His 
descendants are still numbered among the representative people of the 
state he assisted in developing. Mr. Holtz was born in 1S34. in a little 
hamlet in Northern Germany near the Prussian border. His father had 
acquired quite a reputation as an architect and was an officer of the 
Hanovarian cavalry, but his death, occurring when Louis F. Holtz was 
only eight years old, left his widow and child alone to meet the hardships 
of life as best they might. 

Until he was thirteen vears old, Louis F. Holtz remained at schoc>l, 
and when he left had laid the foundation for a good, practical education. 
For the next two years he was employed by a mercantile establishment, 
and while there acquired a knowledge of drawing up imixirtant papers, 
and something about accounting. At the age of fifteen years he entered 
upon another phase of his career, going with the Hershall. commanded 
by his uncle, and as a member of its crew he visited the leading harbors 
of the world, reaching that of San Francisco in 1851, at which time the 
whole world was excited over the discovery of gold in California. 
Mr. Holtz. like so many others, could not resist the lure of the golden 
metal, and, leaving his ship, spent the next ten years in gold mining. In 
1862 he was elected sheritY of Monteray County, and also held the oflfice 
of coroner of that count v. In 1S64 he returned to San Francisco, and 
for twelve months was in the employ of the W. T. Brewing Company. 
and then transferred his services to the John von Bergen Company, 
maintaining the latter connection until 1871. Mr. Holtz then embarked 
in the wholesale trade on his own account, in ixirtnership with Messrs. 
Tavlor and Bentel. but later sold his interest to his partners, and in 1882 
formed the house known as N. von Bergen & Company. In 1882 Mr. Holtz 
was nominated by the democratic party as its candidate for the offices 
of assessor of San Francisco city and county, was elected by a handsome 
majoritv. and so ablv discharged the duties ]icrtaining thereto tint he 





^&^ 




^ o^:^U^i^^x.^^i^O 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 147 

effected a saving to the taxpayers of $59,753 while in nitk-e. The death 
of this most excellent man occurred when he was fiftv-two years old. 

Mr. Holtz married Matilda .\shley, who bore him three children: 
Frederick A., who is deceased; Lillian, wife of Roger Lyons, of New 
York; and Alice A., who married George Blair, a son of Thomas M. and 
Matilda (von Schroeder) Blair. Mrs. Holtz was a daughter of Capt. 
John Sydney Ashley, who was a civil engineer by profession and one of 
the first superintendents of streets of San Franci.sco. Among notable 
examples of his work is the construction of the fort at Fort Point. 

Mr. Blair's grandmother, Mrs. Sophia von Schroeder, left a widow 
with a babv daughter, came to California by way of Cape Horn in 
1848. She sunk wells, sold water, had the first boarding house and first 
laundry of San Francisco, and in the course of time acquired large property 
interests. Her daughter, Matilda, attended school on the site of the old 
Palace Hotel. At the early age of fourteen years she was married to 
Thomas M. Blair, first sergeant-at-arms of the San Francisco Stock 
Exchange, which office he held at the time of his death, August 5. 1878. 
He was a member of the first volunteer fire company. Columbia 11, and 
later was lessee of the Platts Hall, California Hall, and opened the Lake 
Merritt Boathouse at Oakland. For some years he belonged to the old 
California Theatre Boat Club, and was in many other ways a notable 
figure of his day. Mr. and Mrs. George Blair have two children : 
Mrs. Clarence Neum of New York City; and Dr. L. H. Lyons of San 
Francisco. 

Charles August Christian Duisenberg. The greatest heritage any 
man can leave to his family is a good name, one unblemished by any dis- 
honorable action, and the record of a life of good deeds and charitable 
impulses. Material prosperity comes second, but when both are combined, 
fortunate indeed are those left behind, for they can then enjoy with a 
free conscience, and with grateful remembrance, the comforts the fore- 
sight and enterprise a loved one has provided. The widow and children 
of the late Charles August Christian Duisenberg hold this attitude with 
reference to their inheritance from him, and are free in expressing their 
conviction that the honorable record he made and the re])utation he sus- 
tained for honorable business dealing is their priceless heritage. 

Charles August Christian Duisenberg was born at Bremen, Germany, 
July 20, 1825, a son of one of the prominent merchants of that city. On 
December 12. 1847, he left his native land for Val]>araiso, Chili, but had 
not much more than arrived there than he, with the rest of the world, 
received the astounding news of the discovery of gold in California. A 
young man. seeking his fortune, and full of adventure, he set forth for 
the El Dorado, and arrived at San Francisco September 18, 1849. Mr. 
Duisenberg even at that age was a wise and sagacious man. Having been 
reared in the mercantile business, he immediately recognized that there 
was a great opportunity awaiting the pioneer merchants, and with C. F. 
Mebius established the mercantile firm of Mebius & Duisenberg, on Kearney 



148 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Street. The partners had built up a large trade and were doing well when 
their store and stock of goods were wiped out in the fire of 1851. With 
characteristic energy Mr. Duisenberg immediately reestablished himself 
in business, but once more suffered a heavy loss in the fire of 1852. 

In the fall of 1854 he returned to his native land, and upon his return 
came as German Consul at San Francisco, and continued to act in a 
diplomatic capacity for many years thereafter. Because of this, and of 
his well-known high character, his fellow countrymen sought his advice, 
and he long was a power among them, and never ceased to befriend them. 
For many years he was a worshiper at the services of Saint Mark's Church, 
and he was one of its most generous and prominent members. He was a 
director and Vice President of the Society of California Pioneers and 
President of the German Benevolent Society. For many years he was 
agent for the German Lloyd Steamship Company at San Francisco. 

On December 7, 1868, Mr. Duisenberg married Minna Gross SchupflE, 
a native of Germany, and a daughter of one of its prominent men. She 
is a writer of note, and among her best-known works are two books on 
the beautiful flowers of California. Mr. and Mrs. Duisenberg became 
the parents of the following children : Augusta, Charles, Edward, Vir- 
ginia, (who is Mrs. Von Herwarth) and Walter and several who are 
deceased. 

Mr. Duisenberg died February, 1894. He was not only an exemplary 
man, but a generous, genial and sociable gentleman, and one who was 
beloved by a large number of people. His family were devoted to him, 
as they had every reason to be, for he was a kind and loving husband and 
a careful father whose self-sacrificing love for his children was shown 
forth on every occasion. Nothing gave him more pleasure than to enter- 
tain his many friends in the midst of his loved ones, and his was one of 
the most popular homes in the city. Mr. Duisenberg has passed on, but 
he has left in his train a record of fine deeds and kindly actions, and his 
memory is tenderly cherished by those who knew him. 

A. E. Bolton, whose death occurred September 17, 1921, long held 
prestige as one of the able and representative members of the California 
bar. He never manifested ambition for political preferment, but was 
content to render undivided allegiance to the profession which he signally 
honored and dignified by his character and achievement and in which he 
won a large measure of success. Aside from the vocation of his choice, 
his interests centered in his home and family, and thus he did not identify 
himself with fraternal organizations. He was a man of broad intellectuality 
and fine legal mind, and in his quiet and unobtrusive way he justified 
himself fiilly in all of the relations of a significantly busy and useful 
life. He was one of the prominent and honored members of the San 
Francisco bar at the time of his death. 

Mr. Bolton was born in the City of Cleveland, Ohio, in the year 1852, 
and was a scion of Colonial New England ancestry. When he was si.x 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 149 

years of age his parents established the family home on a farm near 
Cleveland, and there he gained in his boyhood and early youth a plethora 
of experience in connection with the arduous work of the farm, the while 
he attended the district schools of the locality, principally during the winter 
terms. He was a sturdy youth of eighteen years at the time of his father's 
death, and within ninety days thereafter, following the course of his 
ambition, he left the farm and entered the preparatory department of 
Oberlin College, one of the important educational institutions of the Buck- 
eye State. Of him it has been said in this connection that "he studied as 
hard as he had previously worked," and the abrupt change from the open 
life and heavy labors of the farm to the sedentary application which was his 
in the class room and indefatigable study greatly impaired his health. His 
physician informed him that he must permanently abandon school and 
studv and live an out-door life if he hoped to maintain his physical well- 
being. Under these conditions Mr. Bolton made his way to Denver, 
Colorado, and in the bracing atmosphere of that state he fully recovered 
his physical power. With a sound mind in a sound body he now felt 
justified in following again the course of his ambition, and he began 
reading law in the othce and under the effective preceptorship of Frace & 
Rodgers, the members of which firm were leading lawyers in the City of 
Denver at that time, .in the '70s. He fortified himself solidly in the 
science of jurisprudence and in 1876 he came to California, gained 
admission to the bar of this state and established himself in practice at 
Santa Cruz. There he remained a number of years, within which he 
gained substantial success in his professional work. During the major 
part of this interval he held the office of city attorney. One of his con- 
temporaries in practice at Santa Cruz was Hon. J. A. Barham, and the 
two there cemented a close, enduring and mutually appreciative friendship. 
In 1880 Mr. Bolton had gained financial status and professional prestige 
which justified his fulfilling one of his most cherished ambitions, long 
deferred. This was realized in his marriage to Miss May Wilcox, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1884, to gain a broader field of professional 
activity, he removed from Santa Cruz to San Francisco. In the meanwhile 
his friend, Mr. Barham, had removed to Santa Rosa and there developed 
a large and important law business. The impaired health of Mr. Barham 
led that distinguished citizen and lawyer to make earnest solicitation that 
Mr. Bolton join him at Santa Rosa and assume partnership in the law 
business which he had there built up. The law firm of Barham & Bolton 
became one of the foremost in that section of the state and was concerned 
in many litigations of major importance. After a son of Mr. Barham had 
been admitted to the firm, Mr. Bolton eventually felt free to retire from 
this partnership and return to San Francisco. He resigned at this juncture 
a large and lucrative practice, but his professional achievement at San 
Francisco fully justified the change of location. It may be noted in 
passing that Mr. Barham later became influential in politics, and for 
manv years represented his district in the United States Congress. 

After his return to San Francisco, Mr. Bolton formed a professional 



150 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

alliance with Philip G. Galpin, for many years one of the leading members 
of the local bar, and the firm of Galpin & Bolton thereafter maintained 
foremost place at the bar of San Francisco until the alliance was finally 
severed by the death of the junior member, whose name merits enduring 
place on the roster of those who have honored the legal profession in 
California by large and worthy achievement and by fine ajipreciation of 
professional ethics. Mr. Bolton is survived not only bv his widow, l)Ut also 
by two children, Arthur W. and May \V., both of whom remain with 
their widowed mother. Arthur W. Bolton, was graduated in the law 
department of the University of California, was admitted to the bar in 
1918, and is engaged in the practice of his profession in San F"rancisco. 
where he is well upholding the civic and professional honors of the name 
which he bears. 

Joseph L. Tharp. Born in the same town as President Harding. 
Joseph L. Tharp came to California in early days, and identified himself 
with the newspaper and political interests of the state. He made a name 
for himself in the army before he came to California, for though he was 
born July 22, 1836, in Marion. Ohio, he did not identify himself with this 
state until 1876, his enlistment in the Civil war having been from Mattoon, 
Illinois. After serving as a private in C\)mpany B, Seventh Illinois Infantry 
for three months he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant in Com- 
pany K, One-Hundred-Twenty-sixth Infantry. He reached the rank of 
captain in July, 1865, and retired as a major. He was at the capture of 
Fort Henry, and was wounded at the battle of Shiloh. and was also in the 
engagements at Vicksburg, Fort Donaldson and Little Rock. 

When he came to San Francisco it was as a veteran, and with many 
war laurels he was welcomed. Courage in battle implies many other talents, 
for those who can face death calmly often feel ecjual to facing whatever 
difticulty life offers, and Major Tharp plunged with enthusiasm into the 
crowded civilian life of the city. He identified himself with the Rural 
Press and other publications, including the Examiner, and went into politics 
as well. Identified for years with the republican party, he was appointed 
to the office of registrar of voters, which he held for two years, and he 
was also for a time an officer at San Quentin State Prison. . 

Major Tharp was married on February 23. 1867. to Miss Julia Ann 
Rapier, a native of Missouri. They had one daughter, Julia, a native of 
California, who is married to Edward E. 'S'oung, an architect of San Fran- 
cisco. Mr. and Mrs. Young have five children. Edward Joseph. John Davis. 
Phyllis, Julia Clara and Yolanda. 

Major Tharp was always a devoted and enthusiastic member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, the Order of the Loyal Legion and other 
patriotic societies and was buried with military honors at The Presidio. 
He passed away July 8, 1913. 

As the (irand .Army of the Republic is dwindling da\' liv dav. very 
few remain to tell the story of the glorious battles fought on American 
■soil, or to preserve the ideals of patriotism, courage and high endeavor that 



•THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 151 

became a great motive power in the nation through the efforts of the 
veterans, ahvays keyed up to the highest pitch of brilliant and effective 
action. Viewed in this light as a unit in a great national movement that has 
controlled much of the life of the nation since 1865, Major Tharp was one 
of the most interesting figures of the generation that has passed, and it is 
hard to estimate how much the community owed him in the upholding of 
the imjjerishable ideals of the nation. 

He will be remembered as long as California has a history, as long as 
the tradition of great courage is a stimulus to effort and progress in every 
walk of life. As a public official and as a newspaper man he was dis- 
tinguished for his integrity and straightforwardness of purpose, and was 
exceptional in everything he undertook in placing the public welfare 
unequivocally before his own private interests. 

George Grant Gere, M. D., who died in 1918, was for many years 
a distinguished surgeon of California, and his home and work had identified 
him with the City of San Francisco nearly forty years. 

He was born at Greene in Shenango County, New York, December 27, 
1848, son of Horatio Nelson and Juliana D. (Grant) Gere. His grand- 
father, Silsby Gere, was a soldier in the Revolution and was specially 
commended by Anthony Wayne for his service at the storming of Stony 
Point. Silsby Gere married a relative of Gen. Ethan Allen. This branch 
of the Gere family was established in New England in 1636. Juliana D. 
Grant, mother of Doctor Gere, was of the same family as General Grant. 
Her father. Dr. Isaac Grant, joined the Continental army at the age 
of fifteen and served throughout the Revolution. He married Hannah 
Tracy, granddaughter of Deacon Jedediah Tracy, of Connecticut. Through 
this branch of the family the ancestry is traced in unbroken line to some 
of the earliest noble families of Scotland and England, and also to 
William the Conqueror. 

Horatio Nelson Gere, father of Doctor Gere, was one of the pioneers 
of Nebraska. He went to that territory with other families from New 
York and Pennsylvania, and established the Table Rock settlement. How- 
ever, his chief home was at Pawnee City, and it was there that George 
Grant Gere spent most of his boyhood. Doctor Gere started to get into 
the army early in the Civil war, but was denied that wish until 1864, 
when, at the age of sixteen, he joined the First Nebraska Veteran 
Cavalry. He was in active duty on the frontier, and was in several 
Indian campaigns. He served under General Connor. Two of his older 
brothers were Union soldiers, and one of them, John N. Gere, was killed by 
the Indians after the war. Another brother, Charles H. Gere, became one 
of the distinguished citizens of Nebraska, and for many years was editor 
of the Daily State Journal at Lincoln. 

Following his military sen-ice George G. Gere took up the study of 
medicine at Pawnee City, and after three years entered the Eclectic 
Medical Institute of Cincinnati, where he graduated Doctor of Medicine 
in 1871. Following that he practiced with his former preceptor at 



152 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Pawnee City about four years, then practiced in the mining district of 
Utah, and in 1877 came to California. For several years he enjoyed a 
general practice in Tulare County, but seeking a broader field for his 
talent removed to San Francisco in 1881. For many years he was 
regarded as one of the most accomplished surgeons in the citv. On coming 
to San Francisco he served as professor of anatomy from 1881 to 1886 
in tht California Medical College, and was professor of surgery in that 
institution from 1886 to 1906. He was author of lectures on "Callopractic 
Surgery," and made many other contributions to medical and surgical 
literature. He was for two years secretary and two years president of the 
State Eclectic Medical Society, was a delegate to the National Eclectic 
Medical Association for a number of years, president of the San Fran- 
cisco County Society of Physicians and Surgeons, and was a member of 
the Board of Examiners of the State Eclectic Medical Society. He was 
also secretary of the trustees for the California Medical College. 

Doctor Gere was past surgeon of Lincoln Post No. 1, Grand Army 
of the Republic, and was a member of California Lodge No. 1, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons. In 1890 he married Miss Sarah J. Wood. 
He was survived by Mrs. Gere and four children, Harrison, Cecil, George 
and Raymond. At the time of his death his son Harrison was serving 
with the armed forces in France, while the son Raymond was in training 
at Camp Lewis. 

Peter Nicholas Remill.\rd was a sterling California pioneer who 
became one of the influential citizens and business men of Oakland and 
the San Francisco Bay district in general. He was one of the founders 
of the large and important industry conducted under the title of the 
Remillard Brick Company, an enterprise that was established more than 
sixty years ago. The death of I\Ir. Remillard occurred in August. 1904. 
in Oakland, and the business is now conducted by his widow and daughter, 
whose home is maintained at 2042 Vallejo Street in the City of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Remillard was born in Montreal, Canada, in .\pril. 1837. and 
was there reared and educated. In 1854, an an aspiring and self-reliant 
youth of seventeen years, he came to California and identified himself 
with gold-mining operations. At the age of twenty-four years he estab- 
lished his residence at Oakland, where he started a brick yard above Lake 
Merritt. and later his brothers, Hilaire and Edward, joined liim in this 
manufacturing enterjirise. the firm of Remillard Brotliers. l)ecoming 
owners and operators of three brick manufacturing plants, one in what 
is now Richmond and two in East Oakland. In 1879 the business was 
incorporated under the title of the Remillard Brick Company, and 
this name has been retained during the long intervening years. For a 
number of years the Remillard brothers conducted also a contracting 
business in connection with their brick industry, and in this connection 
also they su])]ilied the brick for the erection of the old Palace Hotel in 
San Francisco and many large and important buildings at Oakland, the 




0B ^ 



■I 




m. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO liAY REGION 135 

brothers having been for forty years the only brick building material 
dealers in Alameda County, where they still have the only building brick 
plant. In 1882 the company established a large yard at Pleasanton. In 
18')0. a yard at Greenbrae, Marin County, and in 1892, a yard at San Jose, 
Santa Clara County, having over vlOO men in their employ. 

In January, 1867, at San Francisco, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Remillard and Miss Cordulc Laurin, who likewise was born in the 
City of Montreal, Canada. Of the four children of this union, the eldest 
was Philip, who continued a resident of Oakland and associated in busi- 
ness with his father until his death in 1901. Emma resides with her 
mother and sister in San Francisco; Walter is deceased; Lillian remains 
with her widowed mother, with whom she is associated in the ownership 
and control of the large and prosperous business conducted under the 
original title of the Remillard P)rick Company, the mother and daughter 
having acquired after the death of Mr. Remillard the interests which 
his brothers' heirs held in the business, the brothers having died two 
and three years before the death of P. N. Remillard, and have con- 
ducted the same most successfully since that time, with three large and 
well equipped plants, located resi^ectively in Oakland, Pleasanton and 
San Jose, with offices also in the City of San Francisco. 

Mr. Remillard was known for his fine character and this man was 
honored by his many friends, and of whom it was said that his word was 
as good as his bond. He was interested in all things pertaining to the 
uplifting, intellectual and the good of the community. He was one of 
the founders of the first Unitarian Church of Oakland, and one of the 
first members of the Athenian Club and other organizations of the same 
city. 

Gabriel K. Stevenot was a California pioneer, reaching San Fran- 
cisco in August, 1849. He was a Frenchman, liberally educated, being 
trained as a mining engineer at the University of Nancy in Nancy, 
France. .After coming to California he located and developed a rich 
mining section at Melons, Carson Hill, in Calaveras County. He was 
also interested in merchandising, and at one time owned the Morgan 
Mine in Nevada. He had served a brief time as a soldier in the French 
armv. In California he became a republican, was a member of the Cali- 
fornia pioneers and a Catholic. His wife was Phyllis Cline. Her father 
at one time was judge of the Supreme Court of Nancy, France. 

Emil K. Stevenot, son of Gabriel K., has one sister, Mrs. Marie 
Gerrike. Emil Stevenot was born in Alsace-Lorraine, at Strausburg, 
February 11, 1846. He graduated with high honors from Heidelberg 
University, and also prepared for the profession of mining engineer. In 
1863 he came to America and became associated with his father, then 
president of the Melons Mining Company. In 1870 he left the mines 
and, moving to San Francisco, established a laboratory and plant for the 
refining of borax, having discovered a process for manufacturing borax. 
Subsequently concentrated borax came into general use and the demand 



156 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

for refined borax increased until it was no longer profitable to manufacture 
it. In 1879 Emil Stevenot returned to his mining interests in Calaveras 
County, but in 1890 moved his home to Sonoma in order to give his chil- 
dren the benefits of educational facilities. He had a fine ranch there, 
and also maintained a chemical laboratory for general assaying. He also 
maintained an office in San Francisco. 

In 1872, at San Francisco, Mr. Emil Stevenot married Miss Sarah 
Stephens. Their children are: F. G. Stevenot, at present a member of the 
California Legislature; Mrs. Nellie Everson ; Archie, superintendent of 
the Carson Hill ]\Iine ; Joseph, formerly a major in the United States 
air service, now engaged in electrical engineering in the (Jrient ; Cassimer 
and Leon, both at home. 

Ernest Gabrielle Lyons was one of the sterling pioneers and repre- 
sentative business men of San Francisco, where he continued his residence 
and was actively identified with manufacturing enterprise until his death, 
in 1892, at the age of fifty-eight years. 

Mr. Lyons was born in the City of Paris, France, July 28. 1834, and 
was reared and educated in his native land. He was a youth when he 
came to California, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, in the '50s, and 
here his initial activities were in connection wfth mercantile business. 
LTpon establishing his residence in San Francisco he engaged in the 
manufacturing of syrups and liquors, and in this line of enterprise he 
eventually built up a large and prosperous business, he having been one 
of the successful, ]X)pular and progressive citizens and business men of 
San Francisco at the time of his death. He was a member of the local 
French Club and was affiliated with the Masonic Fraternity. 

In the year 1864 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Lyons and Miss 
Emily Buses, who likewise was born in France, and of the surviving chil- 
dren of this union the eldest is Alice, who is the wife of Henry Kahn, 
and who now resides in Paris, France; Ida is the wife of J. C. Raas. who 
is the executive head of a business he has founded for the manufacture 
of glace fruits, cherries, syrups and fountain supplies; Huge, who was 
born in San Francisco, and is still a resident of this city, as is the next 
younger of the children, Mrs. Hortense Raas; Roger is a resident of New 
York, where Edmond also resides. The widowed mother maintains her 
home at the Fairmtmt Hotel, .San Francisco. 

William Henkv Coombs was one of the distinguished native sons 
of California and a representative of one of the very early jMoncer families 
of this commonwealth, he having been a resident of the City of San 
Francisco at the time of his death. 

Mr. Coombs was born in Yolo County, California, in 1846. His 
father, Nathan Coombs, was one of the first settlers of that county. 
Nathan Coombs was born in the Cape Cod district of Massachusetts in 
1826. When he was a small boy his mother took him to the Territory of 
Iowa, and he grew up near Aluscatine. His father had died, and his 



THE -SAX I'RAXCISCO BAY REGION 157 

mother was then the wife of Doctor Carpenter. In 1842 the family 
went across the plains to Oregon, and in 1843 Nathan Coombs came to 
California and settled in Yolo County. From there in 1845 he removed 
to Napa and bought the farm which he owned until his death. He laid 
out the town of Napa, and was elected one of the first members of the 
State Legislature of California. He was a liberal contributor to public 
improvements, a noted stock man, breeding and raising tine horses, and 
at the time of his death, December 26, 1877, he was regarded as one of 
the largest landholders in California. 

At Sutter's Court, California, Nathan Coombs married Miss Isabelle 
Gordon. The marriage ceremony was performed by General Sutter 
himself. The father of the bride was a California pioneer, a native of 
Pennsylvania and of Scotch ancestry. It was on the Gordon ranch of 
Yolo County that the historic meeting was held proposing to make a free 
state of California under the "Bear Flag," and Miss Isabelle Gordon 
assisted in making that noted emblem for the new commonwealth. 

After due preliminary education William Henry Coombs received 
appointment as a cadet in the United States Military Academy at West 
Point, and in this institution he was graduated as a member of the class 
of 1868. At the academy he won special distinction for his fine horseman- 
ship, he having learned to ride excellently when a mere boy, owing 
largely to his youthful interest in horse racing, in which fine sport his 
father was a pioneer and leader in California, Nathan Coombs having 
brought in the early days two of the finest horses exploited in turf 
events in California. After his graduation at West Point William H. 
Coombs was ordered to service with the Eighth United States Cavalry, 
on the Pacific Coast, but on the 1st of November, 1869, he resigned his 
place as a second lieutenant in this command and entered the United 
States revenue service. He later became one of the prominent civil engi- 
neers in his native state, and in this connection had charge of the state 
geological survev. He was a man of fine character and distinctive talent, 
and he made his life count for good in its every relation. He had much 
to do with civic and industrial progress in California, and was promi- 
nently identified with the organizing of the California State Agricultural 
Society, to the success of which he gave much time, thought and energy. 

Mr. Coombs chose as his wife Miss Katherine Ramey, whose parents 
came to California from the State of Kentucky. Mrs. Coombs passed the 
closing years of her life in San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. Coombs became 
the parents of five children : Lotus, Jewell, Tiny, Gordon and Muriel. 
Miss Muriel Coombs became the wife of Joseph Gyle, who was born and 
reared in California, and in the City of San Francisco they maintain their 
home at 3125 Jackson Street. Mr. and Mrs. Gyle have one child. Joseph 
Francis, who is five vears of age at the time of this writing, in the winter 
of 1922-23. 

John Sarslev Barrett was a vital and ambitious young man when, in 
1850, he numbered himself among the pioneers of California, and here he 



158 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

passed the remainder of his long, worthy and useful life. His widow is now 
•one of the venerable and loved pioneer women of San Francisco. 

Mr. Barrett was born in Ireland, June 29. 1826, and was reared and 
■educated in his native land, he having been a youth when he came to the 
United States and settled in the City of Boston. With the discovery of 
gold in California in the ever memorable year 1849 there came to this state 
a. great influx of gold-seekers and others desirous of trying their fortunes 
in the Golden West. Mr. Barrett was one of this valiant band of pioneers, 
he having crossed the plains to California in 1850, as noted above. In San 
Francisco he became connected with a clothing store estalilished on what is 
now Montgomery Street, where was then centered the principal business 
district of the frontier city. He continued his association with business 
enterprise in San Francisco a number of years, and thereafter served with 
characteristic ability as secretary of the California Supreme Court. Dur- 
ing his incumbency of this position he resided at Sacramento, the capital 
city, and in 1877 he established himself independently in the stock-brokerage 
business in San Francisco, where he continued for several years his success- 
ful operations along this line of enterprise. He then purchased a farm 
property, moving thereto, and gave his attention to its improvement and 
general management. He remained on this attractive niral homestead until 
his death. Air. Iiarrett was arrayed loyally in the ranks of the democratic 
party, and was a zealous communicant of the Catholic Church, as is also 
his widow. 

In the year 1864 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Barrett and Miss 
Mary Murphy, and they became the parents of a fine family of twelve 
children, of whom seven are living at the time of this writing, in the winter 
of 1922-3, namely: Nellie, Mary, .Alice, Katherine, Josephine, Frank and 
Edward. The son Emmett married and was survived by one child, Clara, 
who was taken into the home of his mother, by whom she was reared. 

Joseph Musto was horn in the historic old city of Genoa. Italy, in 
September, 1829, the second in order of birth of the seven children of 
Giovanni and Caterina Musto, the names of the other children being here 
recorded: Luigi, Giovanni, Antonio, Gaetamo, Peter and Rose (Mrs. 
Bacigalupi ). 

Iose])h Musto was reared and educated in his native city, and he was 
an ambitious and as])iring youth of twenty-one years when he came to the 
United States, in 1850, and disembarked in the ]xirt of New York City. In 
the following year he numbered himself among the pioneers of California, 
and within a .short time after his arrival in San Francisco he made his 
wav to the gold-mining camps in Sandy Gulch. He was successful in his 
mining ojierations there, and after a short time he established general 
stores at Virginia City and (kild Hill. Later he returned to San Fran- 
cisco, and here he and his brother Giovanni established one of the city's 
first marble-manufacturing enter])rises. under the title of Musto Brothers. 
They built up a substantial and prosj>erous business. Joseph Musto was one 
of the venerable pioneer citizens and honored and veteran business men of 
San Francisco at the time of his death, in January, 1904. In the year 1849, 





/^'^t^-c-^Zo 



THE SAN FKANCISCU BAY REGION 161 

shortly before coming to this country, he had taken part in the war in his 
native land, he having been a member of the militar\- stall or guard of 
King Carlo Allierto, and having taken jxirt in the battle of Novara, inci- 
dental to which the King abdiaited the throne of Italy. 

In New York City was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Musto and 
Miss Maria Sturla, who likewise was born and reared in Italy, and who 
survived him for twenty years. She was a devout communicant of the 
Catholic Church, as was also her husljand. Of the seven children the 
eldest was Madame Emilia Tojetti, deceased, who was instrumental in 
establishing the Music Liljrary in the San Francisco Public Library ; Misses 
Margaret and Laura still reside in San Francisco ; Florence, deceased, was 
an ardent worker for Child Welfare and the organizer of the San Francisco 
Mothers' Congress; Carlotta is the wife of J. B. Keenan, of San Francisco; 
and Clarence and Guido are engaged in the marble business in this city, as 
able successors of their father in this line of business and as loyal and 
progressive citizens. 

Holms Newton. The .American Eternal City, standing on its manv 
hills overlooking the Golden Gate, is an enduring monument to the vision, 
the courage and wonderful endurance of the pioneers of the middle portion 
of the last century, not only of the city itself, but of the state. Some of 
those sturdy men who dared the dangers of the long trail and the unde- 
veloped wilderness at its end did not locate on the Coast, but e.xerted them- 
selves in equally necessary labor in the interior, and the results of their 
lives of self-sacrifice have gone to swell the \'olume of prosperity of .San 
Francisco. One of the men, whose descendants are now enjoying the 
multiplied advantages of San Francisco, but who, himself, was content 
with working in behalf of and living at Lincoln, Placer County, was the 
late Hollis Newton, one of the original "Forty-niners." 

Hollis Newton was born on a farm near Norwich, Schenango County, 
New York, near the historical old Fort Ticonderoga, and was one of a 
family of fourteen children born to his parents. His boyhood was spent 
in the environments of his birthplace, but with all of the voung life swarm- 
ing in the old home there was need for some to leave for less restricted 
districts, and Hollis was the one who yielded to the call of adventure, and 
when still a youth set out alone to seek his fortune. He made his wav 
through the East, and on into the \\'est as far as Chicago, then but a muddy 
little village on the shores of one of the great inland seas. At that time he 
was only eighteen years old, and it was but natural that when the wonder- 
ful news of the discovery of gold reached Chicago he should have been 
one of the first to join the great caravan which for years afterward was to 
move westward, bringing in its wake the forces of civilization and develop- 
ment. He and his companions had no adequate conception of the perils 
and hardships of such a journey ; all they saw was the gleam of gold at 
the end of their v\-anderings. 

The wagon train which the ambitious youth joined was a typical one, 
setting forth full of high hopes, and gradually diminishing in numbers and 
equipment until, after the horses succumbed to exhaustion, Mr. Newton and 



162 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

a companion separated from the rest, and with sixty-jxjund packs on their 
young shoulders set out on foot to reach their El Dorado. In after years 
he used to relate in thrilling words the hardships of that final lap. which 
outdistanced anything they had hitherto undergone, although but little had 
been lacking. Early in the trip they had been attacked by hostile Indians, 
who disputed, whenever jxissible, each league of the way ; by venomous 
rattlesnakes, and suffered from the aridity of the Great American Desert. 
However, after these two young men went forth by themselves they had all 
of these dangers to combat and the added ones of loneliness, lack of water, 
and actual destitution. Death would have been, without doubt, their pfir- 
tion had it not been for the fortunate meeting with a Government train from 
which they obtained water and supplies. 

These young men finally reached Coloma, El Dorado County, and, as 
was not unusual in those days, found a stranger willing to trust them for 
food and equipment, and with this kindly assistance were able to begin 
their search for the metal for which they had risked their lives many times 
over. A very interesting account of Mr. Newton's early experiences was 
published in the Santa Paula Chronicle under date of Julv 6, 1900. in con- 
nection with the reminiscences of George G. Sewell. from which the follow- 
ing is quoted : 

"I then became acquainted with a young man from Chicago, Hollis 
Newton, who, like myself, had saved a few hundred dollars and anxious to 
invest, which we did in fifteen head of gentle Spanish milch cows with 
calves at their sides ; at that time there were very few eastern cows in the 
state. We had learned that milk was worth S2.00 a gallon in the 
mines, and green feed excellent throughout the country, and, purchasing a 
mule to pack our blankets as well as our camp equipage, we started for 
Grass Valle\-, Nevada County, which we reached the third or fourth night, 
and awoke the next morning to find over a foot of snow on the ground and 
not a pound of hay for our poor cows, so we at once turned back for the 
valley and brought up at a deserted cabin on the Auburn River, Placer 
County, near where Lincoln now stands, and where my former partner still 
resides. 

"My partner taking a part of our cows to Gold Hill, a mining camp a 
few miles above us, leaving the remainder with me, I went to Sacramento, 
twenty-five miles distant, purchased twenty-five hens at $5.00 apiece, 
which with the butter I made, then worth $1.50 a pound, paid very well. I 
remember the first eggs I ever sold, fifteen dozen, which I took to Sacra- 
mento in a milk bucket, for which I received $45.00; and from the chickens 
I raised from those twenty-five hens I took in $800 and had 150 of the best 
of them left from which I expected to make enough the next year to go 
home like a nabob. Everybody expected at that time to make enough in a 
year or so and go home. But my chickens became diseased, prices came 
down, and I did not realize as well from the 150 as from the twent\-five the 
year before. My partner and myself in 1S52 located the section of land. 640 
acres, upon which we squatted, as state school land, paving $1.25 per acre, 
improved the same by enclosing with a good, substantial fence, and good 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 163 

farmhouse and outbuildings, but becoming tired of our way of living with 
no women around, we both got married." 

Having heard enthusiastic accounts from Mr. Sewell of a favorite 
niece, Mr. Newton went back East and visited in Vermont with his partner's 
family in order to meet the young lady. His heart was captured, however, 
not by her, but by her sister, and to her Mr. Newton was married, at 
Shoreham, Vermont, September 7, 1859. Her maiden name was Martha 
Sewell. Mr. and Mrs. Newton became the parents of eight children, six 
of whom survived their parents: Mrs. Louise Allen, of Lincoln; Mrs. 
Janette Fuller, Airs. Lizzie Aldrich and Mrs. Gertrude Parks, of San Fran- 
cisco; Mrs. F'rances Nowell, of Juneau, Alaska; and Martha .Sanders, of 
Lincoln. Mrs. Newton was spared to celebrate not only her golden anni- 
versary, but to round out a happy married life of fifty-one years, si.K months 
and si.x days. Mr. Newton's useful life ended January 11, 1911, when he 
was eighty-one 3-ears, six months and six days old. 

Mr. Newton not only successfully fought and conquered the enemies 
to progress and civilization in California, but when the unity of the nation 
was in peril he enlisted in the Federal army, was commissioned a captain, 
and served with distinction during that terrifically- fought conflict, and at its 
close received his honorable discharge. For fifty-two years he was a con- 
tinuous resident of Placer County, and for the last twelve years of his 
life he resided at Lincoln, having retired from active participation in his 
different undertakings. He was an honored member of the Indej>endent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and his funeral services were held under the auspices 
of that fraternity. In part a contemporary journal says of his death ; 

"The immediate cause of death was dyspnoea, labored breathing, and 
arteriosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Doctor Davis was the attending 
physician and did that which he could to relieve the sufferer, but Father 
Time had decreed that the earthly career of this good man must end and so 
he passed to that great beyond from which no traveler returns ; and in his 
passing, this community and Placer County loses a man who has done much 
toward the upbuilding of this great state, one who through hardship and 
toil had won his way." 

Erwin Reese Broughton, a native son of California, was a young 
man of sterling character and had marked for himself a secure place as a 
citizen and as a business man at the time when his career was cut short 
by his untimely death, on the 9th of January, 1919, about four months 
prior to the thirty-second anniversary of his birth. 

Mr. Broughton was born at Alodesto, Stanislaus County, California, 
on the 18th of April, 1887, and was a son of James Richard and Jane 
(Bates) Broughton, he having been the elder of the two children and his 
only sister, Esther, being still a resident of Modesto, as are also his 
parents. James B. Broughton has been prominently identified with the 
banking business at Modesto for fully forty years, has served as mayor 
of that fine little city, and is one of its prominent and influential citizens. 

The public schools of his native place afforded Erwin R. Broughton 



164 THE SAN FRANXISCO BAY REGION 

his earlier education, and in 1910 he completed a commercial course and 
was graduated from the University of California. He then became asso- 
ciated with the Klamath Development Company in the State of Washington, 
but within a short time he returned to Modesto and assumed the position 
of cashier in his father's bank. When the nation became involved in 
the World war Mr. Broughton removed to San Francisco and took charge 
of the Liljerty Loan department in the Federal Reserve Bank. He gave 
most effective service in furthering subscriptions to the various Govern- 
ment war loans and was active in other branches of patriotic service in the 
community. He continued his connection with the Federal Reserve Bank 
until his death, and his sterling character and gracious personality won 
to him hosts of friends in both business and social circles. He was 
affiliated with both the York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic 
fraternity, as well as with Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and was 
a member of the Psi Upsilon college fraternity. ■ 

On the 22d of July, 1912, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brough- 
ton and Miss Olga Junguluth, whose maternal grandfather, Nicholas 
Ohlandt, was a pioneer in San Francisco, where he became a citizen of 
much influence, he having been president of the German Loan & Savings 
Society and also of the National Ice Company of this city. Since the 
death of her husband Mrs. Broughton has continued to maintain her home 
in San Francisco, and in her bereavement she has been sustained and 
comforted by the companionship of her two children, James Richard II 
and Nicholas Ohlandt. 

William S. Blake was an old time Californian, and widely known 
throughout the state in mining circles, an occupation he followed for a 
great many years. 

He was born near McKeesjxirt. Pennsylvania, in 1840. He came to 
California early in 1860, suffering from a wfiund in the thigh and the loss 
on his left eye. having received these injuries in the Civil war. He decided 
to come out West and try to strike it rich in the mines, having heard of 
the wealth to be had for the looking. His early mining ventures were 
in and around Cherokee Flat, until that district was worked out. He 
met with varying success, at one time refusing $250,000 for a set of seven 
mining claims, these same claims later proving worthless. He then moved 
to Sacramento, where he took uj) a section of rich farm land upon which 
he resided for a number of years. The mining fever again came upon 
him, and in the course of his travels around California he became con- 
nected with a group in the opening of some old S])anish quick silver 
mines which had lain undiscovered for years. This venture turned out 
very successful, the mine becoming one of the greatest quick silver pro- 
ducing properties in the state. 

William S. Blake was the father of the following children : Charles E., 
John S., Maggie A., Nellie V.. Maude C. and Myrtle A. Charles E. 
Blake, whose home is at 718 Hayes Street in San Francisco, was born in 
Chico, California, Novemlier 3. 1863. He was reared and educated in 




^:2^^Y 



THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAY REGION 167 

Califi)rnia, Imt in 18''1 went I'.ast. living in St. Louis for a number of 
years. He married Elizabeth jane Pritchett. in Memphis, Tennessee, and all 
their three children were born in the East, they being Milton C, aged 
twenty-one; Roy G., aged eighteen; and Vera I., aged si.xteen. 

Cv.MiLLic M. SoL.XHi. When you think of San Francisco, 
you think of good hotels and good eating places, and there 
stands out prominently in the mind of the connoisseur 
"Solari's," that i)opular yet exclusive sjxit near the St. Francis. 
This is the monument which jierpetuates the name of Camille 

-^ -,^ M. Solari, who was familiarly known to his many friends by 

OOLARIJ the applied name of "Joe," and who made a life work of 
catering to an exacting public. 

Mr. Solari was born in Switzerland, on the 14th of May, 1859. where 
he gained his rudimentary education. He was a lad of eleven years when 
he came to the United States, and associated himself with his uncle, who 
was proprietor of that famed old Solari restaurant in New York City. 
By careful application and extreme frugality it was only a few years 
until he was able to purchase a restaurant of his own. Later he moved 
to \\'ashington. D. C.. where he conducted one of the finer restaurants 
in the capital city, until financial reverses com])elled his retirement. 

Leadville. a booming mining town of Colorado, attracted his attention 
and, undaunted by his seeming failure, he there successfully operated 
the Vendome Hotel. 

An attractive and responsible position was offered him in 1893 with 
the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. This he accepted and ably filled 
until the great hostelry was destroyed in the fire of 1906. He made this 
disaster a stepping stone in his career, and proved his resourcefulness and 
his loyalty to the stricken city by opening the first exclusive restaurant 
after the fire. 

For a year and a half he maintained his establishment at 911 Ellis 
Street, and in 1908 equipped and opened the beautiful and exclusive res- 
taurant, which still bears his name, at 354 Geary Street. 

He determined to serve to his patrons only the best which the market 
afforded, and gathered around him an organization of exjierts. To this 
he added his radiant personality. So successfully did he build that since 
his demise. October 22. 1917. his work goes on imder the able management 
of his widow, and "SoIari"s" is known not only to San Franciscans but to 
the traveling public the world over. 

George R.'WSCHert was a California jMoneer. was a member of the 
Vigilantes organization in the early days of San Francisco, and his name 
became well known throughout this part of the state. 

He was a native of Xew York State. He married Hannah Brower, of 
New Jersey, whose people at one time owned the property where Trinity 
Church of New York Citv stands. George Rauschert came to California 



168 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

by way of the Isthmus. He was a glass blower by trade, and he estab- 
lished perhaps a pioneer factory for the making of glass in San Francisco. 
He continued glass manufacture for a number of years and later operated 
a ranch in Sonoma County. He died at Elmira, Tolano County, June 8, 
1889, and his wife died July 12, 1877. George Rauschert and wife had 
three children. The son George H. became a prominent rancher and 
stock man in Monterey County. 

The daughter Mary Louise married Henry Dwight Stevens, a native 
of Mississippi, who came to San Francisco around the Horn in the early 
'50s. They were married in San Francisco, April 18, 1854. Mr. 
Stevens established the old Blue Wing saloon, a famous place in San 
Francisco for a number of ^-ears. Later he bought a ranch near Sonoma, 
engaged in general farming there, and subsequently sold that property and 
moved to Vallejo, where he was employed in the navy yard. He died in 
1906, at the age of seventy-seven, and his wife died on January 18, 1916, 
aged eighty. She was a charter member of the Association of Pioneer 
Women of California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stevens were the parents of nine children: Emma L. ; 
Harry, of Vallejo; Charles R., deceased; William M. and George H., 
of Vallejo; Jennie, wife of Joe Edge, of Vallejo; and three others who 
died in childhood. 

Emma L. Stevens was married September 2, 1870, to William Burton, 
a native of England and a cabinet maker by trade. He was employed for 
a number of years at Mare Island in Vallejo, California. He died in 
1920, aged seventy-four. Mrs. Burton, whose home is at 1558 Eleventh 
Avenue in San Francisco, was born in this city. She is the mother of two 
children. Her daughter, Ida L., is the widow of George Hunt, who died 
in 1922. Her other daughter, Annetta R., is the wife of Ralph Whitcomb, 
of San Diego, and their three children are: Raymond B., Earl S. and 
Thelma. 

Robert Brotherton. A well-known man in the earlier days of San 
Francisco, Robert Brotherton proved himself of real value to his com- 
munity, and set a standard in his extensive building and contracting 
operations that is still followed. He was a man of many activities, and, 
although not a native-born American, evinced in all that he did those 
sterling traits of character which have been so essential in ail of the stages 
of the development of this country. Mr. Brotherton was horn in Ire- 
land, in 1830. but was brought to the United States when just a small boy, 
and during his formative period was in an environment which brought out 
all that was good and self-reliant in the lad, and laid the foundation for a 
useful and successful manhood. 

In the early '50s he went to Australia, and that colony continued to 
be his home until 1865, when he returned to the United States, and. 
settling permanently at San Francisco, entered upon his business of 
contracting, in whicli he was to achieve so gratifying a success. He was a 
man who lived up to the spirit of his contracts, as well as to the letter of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 169 

them, and the fact that he was the contractor was ample guarantee of the 
best of workmanship and highest grade of materials. A far-sighted man, 
he knew property values, and selected as the site of his home a location in 
a totally undeveloped district. He was spared to see this portion of the 
city become a choice residential section. Mr. Brotherton had great faith 
in the future of San Francisco, and bought heavily of its realty, and these 
investments later yielded a handsome income. Later on in life he left the 
more strenuous field of contracting for that of an insurance adjustor, 
and in this, as in everything he undertook, he was successful. Probably 
one of the reasons for his great prosperity lay in the fact that he devoted 
himself to his business, and had no time or inclination for outside diver- 
sions, although he did take a great interest in Saint Luke's Episcopal 
Church, and was one of its founders. 

In 1851, prior to his sailing for Australia, Mr. Brotherton married 
Sophia Barnes. Their daughter Alice married Andrew Valleau. !Mr. 
and Airs. \'alleau had two children : Robert Brotherton Valleau and Bessie, 
who married Hamilton Murdock, insurance broker and an active mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and the Masons. 

Mr. Brotherton has p>assed from the scene of his former endeavors. 
His work, however, remains as a lasting monument to the good, solid, 
virtues his life exemplified. Mr. Brotherton is still living, being now 
ninety-four years old. Without the courage, initiative and high purpose 
of the pioneers San Francisco and California itself would never have been 
developed, and a great empire would have been lost to this country. Mrs. 
Valleau, who was born in Melbourne, Australia, has every reason to be 
proud of the stock from which she sprung, and does right in preserving in 
an enduring form the record of the achievements of those who have gone 
before them. 

Bexjamix Fraxklix McKinley was one of the honored pioneer 
citizens and representative business men of San Francisco at the time of 
his death, on the 11th of December, 1912. He was eighty years of age at 
the time of his demise, and had been a resident of California for many 
)-ears. 

Mr. McKinley was bom at New Lisbon, Mahoning County, Ohio, a 
place that is now an important industrial city, and he is indebted to the 
schools of the old Buckeye State for his early educational discipline. Mr. 
McKinley was a young man of ambitious purpose when he came to Cali- 
fornia in the year 1859, and here his initial activities were in connection 
with the mining of gold, wliich was then at its height. After continuing 
his connection with the mming industry several years, his first settlement 
having been near Sacramento, he turned his attention to the lumber busi- 
ness, of which he eventually became a leading representative in the City 
of San Francisco. He had the first saw mill in the vicinity of Sacramento, 
and upon coming to San Francisco he engaged in the lumber and coal 
business, being at the head of one of the largest concerns of the kind in 



170 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the California metropolis. He also became prominent and influential 
in public aiifairs. He was a stalwart advocate of the principles of the 
republican party, and as its candidate was elected a member of the 
State Legislature, he having been one of only four republicans thus vic- 
torious in that year, which was marked by a democratic landslide. He 
made a record of loyal and effective service in the Legislature, and in all 
the relations of life he so bore himself as to merit and receive the con- 
fidence and respect of his fellow men. He later served for several years 
as assistant postmaster of San Francisco, and was connected with the 
Postoffice Department at the time of his death. 

In the year 1S73 Archbishop Alemany performed the marital cere- 
mony that united the life destinies of Mr. McKinley and Miss Mary Alice 
Daly, a native of Ireland, who had come to the United States with her 
mother and other memjiers of the family at a yery early age. At the time 
of the marriage she had been a resident of San Francisco for several years. 
Since the death of her husband Mrs. McKinley has continued her resi- 
dence in San Francisco, a city dear to her through many hallowed 
memories and associations. Mr. McKinley is survived also by two chil- 
dren, Benjamin L. and Marie Josephine, both residents of San Francisco, 
where the son is engaged in the successful practice of law, as one of the 
representative members of the bar of his native city. Benjamin L. 
McKinley is affiliated with the Native Sons of the Golden West, with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Young Men's Institute, and 
the Knights of Columbus. 

James N. Thane. The lure of California was as potent in those 
earlier days as it is today. When to the romantic stories of the first voy- 
ageurs was added the report of the gold discoveries, adventurous spirits 
the world over started for San Francisco. 

Measured by the facilities, knowledge and experience available to these 
pioneers, the difficulties they had to contend with have no jjarallel in today's 
commercial and industrial life. These hardships and adventures developed 
self-reliant men, capable of endurance and carrying on under all circum- 
stances. To these men is due the credit fc)r laying the foundation of 
achievement from which the present day super-structure has been built. 

From far off places as well as from the busier marts of the world 
they came. New Brunswick contributed more than one of her citizens, 
and one of them whose influence was impressed ujxin the commerce and 
industry of his day was James N. Thane. Born in 1S25, he early grew 
to be a man of affairs in the lumber and shi])ping trade out of St. John, 
New Brunswick, and with the first word from California he fitted out 
two vessels, loading them with lumber for San I'^rancisco. These ves- 
sels came round the Horn, arriving in San Francisco in early 1850. . 

Conditions were very unsettled. Everyone rushed to the mines. There 
was little or no demand for lumber for the moment, and so it was some 
while before the vessels' cargoes were finally dis])osed of and the vessels 




J. vine:- X. THAXE 



THE SAN FRANCISCO I'.AV Rl^iloN 17:} 

themselves eventually tunictl intu store ships. Later Mr. I'hane operated 
two small vessels in trading hetween San Francisco and the Sandwich 
Islands, as then known. .Afterwards he was connected with the firm of 
Samuel Price & Company, and in liS5S, when the l<"raser River gold e.xcite- 
ment Ijroke out and a new El Dorado was supposed to have been dis- 
covered there, he went to Victoria, liritish Columbia, and oiK'ned a branch 
house of the above firm, lie continued there in business until his death. 

In 1851 Mr. Thane married in San P'rancisco l'"rances R. Kinney, 
who came to the city round the Horn, arriving also early in 1850. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thane had five children born to them, Joseph E., Frances J., 
.Arthur F., James N. and .Mice L. The family have resided here since 
1866, and these children are all alive. 

Of the sons, Arthur F. Thane was liorn in 1860 and educated in the 
public schools of San Francisco. He sought early to follow his father's 
footstepf by getting into the shipping business. In 1880 he entered the 
employ of J. W. Grace & Company, which later on assumed the name of 
W. R. Grace & Company, of which it was always a branch. .After a long 
service here Mr. Thane went to Valparaiso. Chile, where he remained two 
years, finally severing his connection with Grace & Company in 1890. 

He continued in the export business for some years, finallv establish- 
ing his own firm under the name of .A. F. Thane & Company, of which 
he was the head until its voluntary retirement recently. Mr. Thane 
still holds interest in mercantile afTairs, although not now so activelv 
engaged as formerly. 

James Robert Bolton was a man of distinguished ability and to him 
it was given to wield great influence in connection with business affairs of 
broad scope and importance in the pioneer period of California history, 
besides which he was one of the substantial capitalists and honored and 
influential citizens of San Francisco during the later years of his long and 
useful life. Here his death occurred January 28, 1890, onlv ffiur days 
])rior to the seventy-third anniversary of his birth. 

Mr. Bolton was born at Jamaica Plains, New York, on the 24th of Janu- 
ary, 1817, and was the eldest son of James Robert and Mary Ann (Clav) 
Bolton. At the age of fourteen years Mr. Bolton entered the service of the 
New York mercantile house of Bolton, Fox & Livingston. In 1839. a short 
time after attaining to his legal majority, he left New York as supercargo 
of a vessel consigned to Jecker, Torre & Company of Mazatlan. Mexico. 
Upon his arrival at that Mexican city he assumed a clerkship with the firm 
above mentioned, and he became also vice consul of the United States at 
Mazatlan, where he was acting consul for some time during the absence 
of the regular incumbent. In 1847, owing to the outbreak of the war 
between Mexico and the United States, Mr. Bolton came to California. He 
remained for a time at Monterey, then the capital of California, and then 
returned to Mexico. In 1850 he came again to California, for the primary 
purpose of here forming a partnership with William E. Barron and for 



174 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the purpose of assuming the active supei"intendenc\- of the New Almaden 
quicksilver mines in Santa Clara County, a property at that time owned 
by Barron, Forbes & Company of Tepic, and Jecker, Torre & Company of 
Mazatlan. Under the title of Bcilton, Barron & Company there was 
developed in San Francisco an extensive banking and mercantile business, 
and a large part of this business was with ^Mexico. The partnership was 
dissolved in 1859, and Mr. Bolton retired to reside permanently in San 
Francisco, where, principally by large and judicious investments in real 
estate, he became a substantial capitalist. He was a citizen of fine character 
and fine achievement, and in his various capitalistic interests and their order- 
ing he did much to aid in the advancement of San Francisco along both 
civic and material lines. 

As a young man Mr. Bolton married Paula Estrada, nee Montafio, who 
was born in ]\Iexico, on the 29th of June, 1828, and whose death occurred 
only a little more than a year ]jrior to that of her husliand, she having 
passed away November 14. 1888. Of the ten children of this union only 
three are living at the time of this writing, in 1923: Man' Ann, Eliza 
Montafio and Robert Clay. His son John Montafio married Alagdalena 
Pacheco. and they became the parents of seven children: John Robert. 
Teresa Rosaria, Henry Clay, Ramona. Alfonso, Juanita and Mabel Claire. 
Mary Ann Bolton became the wife of John C. Alvarado. son of former 
Governor Juan B. Alvarado. and the one child of this union is John B. Alva- 
rado. After the death of her first husband ]\Irs. Alvarado became the wife 
of Charles A. Bond. Frances Pauline was the wife of David Ernest Mel- 
liss, Ph. D., of San Francisco, who died in 1914. The one child of the 
union is Bolton David Melliss. Robert Clay Bolton, born July 28, 1865, is 
one of the respected citizens and well-known native sons residing in San 
Francisco. The maiden name of his wife was Mabel Eddy, and their 
children are Elizabeth Clay Bolton and Frances Pauline Bolton. 

Martin Murphv. Jr., was one of the very earliest pioneers of Cali- 
fornia, coming some years before the .\merican conquest. Some of his 
descendants still live in the state, several of them at San Francisco. 

He was born in County W'exford, Ireland, in 1807, and represented 
a family whose genealogy runs back to the dim dawn of Hibernian tradition. 
His father had been in America for eight years when Martin Murphy 
started to cross the ocean to join him on .\]iril 9. 1828. He cmtiarked on 
a packet bound from Wexford for (Juebcc. The vessel encountered trouble 
and had to return to t!ic harbor at XVaterford. I'lventually Martin Murphy 
found another boat and reached Quebec. He married Mary I'ulger in the 
French Cathedral, Quebec, Canada, on July 18, 1831. They lived in 
Canada until 1842, and then became pioneers in the Missouri Valley, where 
the most important establishment of the little settlement was a mill. On 
account of the malarial conditions and lack of school and religious advan- 
tages he started for the Pacific Coast, leaving the Missouri River May 24. 
1843, and arrived in California l)y way of tlie N'ulia River, where their 
daughter Elizabeth was born December 25. 1844. This was one of the 



THK SAX FRANCISCO P.AV REGIOX 175 

very early parties to cross the plains with CaHfornia as their objective. On 
the way they met an Indian named Truckee, and in recognition of the help 
given by this friendly red man the party named Truckee River in California. 

It is a matter of record that the first Sui)remc Court of California State 
was held at ^Martin Murphy's ])lace, in a buiUling of wooden timbers, most 
of which had been l)rougbt from the East by ship around the Horn. 

The children of Martin Murphy and wife included; Patrick \V., wlio 
twice represented his district in the Legislature; Bernard D., who served as 
mayor of San Jose, and represented Santa Clara County in both Houses of 
the Legislature ; Mary Ann, who married Richard Carroll, of San Fran- 
cisco ; Ellen G., who married J. R. Arques of Santa Clara County ; and 
James T., who became a grain merchant at San Jose, and was one of the 
first land commissioners of the state. 

Richard Carroll, who married Mary Ann Murphy, was born in Cali- 
fornia, October 27, 1845, son of John and Mary ( McGrath) Carroll. His 
jxirents were natives of Ireland, and they were likewise among the first 
settlers of California. Richard Carroll was educated in Santa Clara College 
and for many years was engaged in the import and e.xport business at San 
Francisco, where he died August 28, 1890. He and his wife had three 
children : John Carroll, of San Francisco ; Elizabeth, widow of William 
Whittier ; and Gertrude, who married Lytle Hull and lives in New York. 

Halleck V.\n Pelt Deming, whose death occurred on the 18th of 
October, 1899, was little more than a hoy when he came with his father 
and his two older brothers to San Francisco, in 1S52, but he gained 
prestige as one of the pioneers in the flour-milling industry on the Pacific 
Coast and was long a prominent and influential figure in industrial and 
commercial circles. He was one of the honored pioneer citizens of San 
Francisco at the time of his death. 

The ancestral lines of the subject of this memoir trace back to the 
Colonial period in ^American history, and he himself was a native of the 
old Hoosier State. He was born at Shelbyville, Indiana, March 8, 1836. 
and was the youngest in the family of three sons, the other two being 
Joseph Grove and Edmund Orr. The parents, Horace and Emmeline 
(Orr) Deming had a measure of pioneer honors in Indiana, their marriage 
having been solemnized in 1825 and the death of the mother having 
occurred August 29, 1846. It was in the year 1852 that the father and 
three sons came to California, as above noted, ant! in this state Horace 
Deming continued to maintain his home until his death, which ficcurred 
September 11, 1882, at Santa Rosa. 

Halleck Van Pelt gained his early education in the schools of Indiana, 
but his broader education was acquired through self-discipline and practical 
exjjerience. He was sixteen years of age when he accompanied his father 
and brothers to California, and the three brothers founded the old Capital 
Mills in San Francisco, the property and business having eventually been 
sold to the Sperry Flour Company. The subject of this memoir continued 
his active alliance with the milling industry during \irtually his entire 
Vol. n-9 



176 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

business career, which was marked by large and worthy success. His 
operations became of extensive order and involved his ownership of well 
equipped mills at Tacoma and Seattle, \\'ashington, as well as San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles and Fresno, California. Mr. Deming was a man of 
fine energy and enterprise, mature business judgment and progressive 
ideas, so that he made his value felt both in connection with material 
advancement and civic affairs. In the most significant sense he was a 
loyal and public-spirited citizen, and such were the sterling attributes of 
his character that he ever received the high regard of his fellow men. His 
interests centered in his home and his business, and he had no ambition 
for political activity or preferment. 

On the 28th of September, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Deming and Miss Mary Brown, who was born in England, in 1843. 
Their devoted companionship continued nearly a quarter of a century and 
was broken only by the death of the loved wife and mother, who passed 
to eternal rest on the 6th of January, 1895, they having been in Paris, 
France, at the time of her death. Of the three children the first two, 
Nellie E. and William Halleck, are deceased, and the one surviving member 
of the immediate family circle is the daughter, Florence Agnes, who is the 
wife of Charles K. Harley, of San Francisco. 

John I. Sabin was one of the great men in the extension of the 
modern facilities of communication in America. He began his career as 
a telegraph operator, and was one of the early telegraphers on the Pacific 
Coast. Subsequently his attention was attracted to the new art of 
communication by telephony, and only a few years after the perfection 
of the telephone by the late Doctor Bell he started the first telephone 
exchange in California, and in subsequent years was the recognized 
master and executive head of the telephone system of the state. 

He was born in New York City, October 3, 1847, and was reared 
and educated in the East. At the age of fifteen he left the public schools 
of Brooklyn to enter the messenger service of the Independent Telegraph 
Company of New York. After an apprenticeship of five months he 
was sent to New Brunswick, New Jersey, to open an office as operator 
on the new line then building between New York and Philadelphia. 
After three months he was transferred to White Plains, New York, and 
in order to care for his widowed mother and sister he also purchased 
and conducted a newspaper route and stationery business. After a 
time he sold out his news business and the company transferred him 
to New York City, where he became night operator on the western press 
lines of the United States Telegraph Comixmy. It was about the close 
of the Civil war that he sought new opportunities in the great W'est, 
joining the Collins overland telegraph expedition, formed for the purf)ose 
of building a line from San Francisco to the mouth of the Amoor River 
in Siberia. Several thousand miles of this great project for telegraphic 
communication across the Behring Strait was constructed and Mr. Sabin 
was established on the Russian side at Plover Bay in Siberia as an operator 




SABIX 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 179 

for over a year. In the fall uf 1867 he returned to San Francisco, and 
for several years was an operator in the employ of the Western Union, 
being stationed at Salt Lake, Helena and other places. The inauguration 
of the new Atlantic cable had put an end to the costly attempt to establish 
telegraphic communications with Europe by practically an all-land route. 

In 1870 he was made manager of the Los Angeles ofiice of the Western 
Union Telegraph Com]xiny, but after a year returned to San Francisco, 
where' he married in 1872. In less than a year he was promoted to 
superintendent of the supply department of the Western Union, and after 
that his advancement was rapid. 

Air. Sabin early appreciated the possibilities of the telephone, which 
had first attracted attention when exhibited at the Philadelphia exposition 
in 1876. With the cooperation of George S. Ladd, Air. Sabin formed 
the American District Telegraph Company in San Francisco, in 1877, this 
being the first telephone company on the Pacific Coast. It was a 
local exchange in San Francisco, though the company by its charter 
had privileges extending all along the coast from Washington to Arizona. 
The enterprise was a success from the start. He then organized the 
Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Company. This system was the founda- 
tion of the elaborate system covering the entire Pacific Coast, of which 
John I. Sabin became the head. The Sunset Company was succeeded 
by the Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Company, which came 
to include all the lines at the coast. Mr. Sabin continued the process 
of developing minor telephone systems and uniting them until he had 
strung a network of wires over the Pacific Coast. For many years he 
was president of the Pacific Stites Telephone and Telegraph Company 
and became known as the "Telephone King." He was master of prac- 
tically everything connected with telephony, from the electrical technique 
to the business management. He was the highest paid executive officer 
in the telephone business at one time. 

In 1901 Mr. Sabin was called to take the post of manager of the 
Chicago Bell Telephone Company, and also became president of that 
company. This company at the time represented a consolidation of all the 
Bell companies west of Buffalo. His salary as president of the Chicago 
Bell Telephone Company was $35,000 a year, and his salary as president 
of the Pacific States Company gave him a total of $60,000 a year. He 
remained in Chicago nearly two years, and put the telephone system 
of that section on a solid foundation. He then resigned and returning 
to San Francisco continued as president of the Pacific States Telephone & 
Telegraph Company until his death on October 10, 1902. 

Mr. Sabin married in 1872 Miss Laura Parkins. Mrs. Sabin survives 
her honored husband, with home in San Francisco. They were the parents 
of three daughters : Mrs. R. W. Payne, Mrs. A. W. Bjornstead and Irene. 

WiLLi.\M Freeman Burb.^xk. The name of William Freeman 
Burbank is associated with the history of San Francisco and Los Angeles, 



180 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

■and he was one of the most potent factors in the development of their 
cultural interests both as an author and as the active head of several pub- 
lishing companies. His public accomplishments, which were numerous, 
were always of a constructive character, and he left the world the better 
and happier for his passage through it. William Freeman Burhank was 
born at San Francisco, September 19, 1860, a son of Judge Caleb and 
Charlotte Freeman Burbank. 

Reared at San Francisco, he was carefully educated by watchful 
parents, first attending the public schools of that city and those of Oakland, 
and later was graduated from the University of California with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. Although fully qualified for the practice of law, 
he did not enter the profession, his attention ha^■ing been turned in another 
direction, and he became associated with Frank Leach, later superintendent 
of the United States Mint at San Francisco, and A. B. Xye, late state 
comptroller, in the establishment of the Oakland Enquirer, and for several 
years was secretary of the Enquirer Publishing Company. Desiring to 
ifoaden himself, he traveled in the East, and in 1892 went south to North 
Carolina, where he purchased the Winston-Salem Sentinel, one of the 
leading newspapers of that state. While there he was elected president 
of the North Carolina Press Association, and was a delegate to the National 
Editorial Association in July, 1894, on which occasion he was one of the 
appointed speakers. 

In 1895 Mr. Burbank moved with his family to Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, where he founded the Los Angeles Record. For the following 
five years he was one of the very active public men of Los Angeles, and 
in addition to giving his newspaper considerable attention he found tmie 
to serve as a director of the Los Angeles Public Library, to which position 
he was appointed in 1897, and also to serve as a director of the Southern 
California Academy of Sciences, the University Club, and the Provident 
Mutual Building and Loan Association. In December. 1897, he was a 
delegate to the Fifth National Irrigation Congress at Phoeni.x, Arizona, 
and was selected to respond to the address of welcome. In 1900 Mr Bur- 
bank sold the Record to the Scripps-McRae interests, and returned to his 
native city, where he devoted his time to his business and civic interests 
of that city and Oakland. He was a director of the Security Bank of 
Oakland ; also of the United States National Bank of San Francisco, whicli 
was later merged with the Merchants National Bank. 

As a student and man of letters Mr. Burbank published thousands of 
articles and many poems, of which his "Shasta" and his translations of 
the Spanish poets are the best known. In 1914 he published a fine transla- 
tion of the great Spanish play "Belshazzer." 

Always interested in ])ublic affairs, he took an active part in the conven- 
tion which revised the charter of San Francisco. In 1906, after the great 
fire, he was one of the first to show his faith in the future of San Fran- 
cisco by promptly constructing a building, now the Hotel Plaza, on his 
projjerty at the corner of Post and .Stockton streets. 

Mr. Burbank married March 15, 1893, Mrs. Blanche Walkerley, of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 181 

Oakland, California, formerly Miss Blanche Buswell of Troy, New York. 
The Buswells are from an old American family of Revolutionary stock and 
English descent. Isaac Buswell was one of the first settlers of Salisbury, 
Massachusetts, and was one of the first ten land holders there. Mrs. Bur- 
hank, with their two sons and three daughters, survive him, his death 
having occurred at (Oakland, February 10, 1916. The sons are: W. Free- 
man Burbank, manager of the Plaza Hotel, at Post and Stockton streets. 
He is a graduate of Stanford Law School, class of 1916, and was admitted 
to practice, but after a short period assumed the management of the hotel. 
Addison Buswell Burbank, who attended Santa Clara University, is an 
artist of New York City. He was a student of the Art Institute of Chicago. 
He married Miss Jessie Cain, of Chicago, and has one daughter, Nancv 
Buswell Burbank. The daughters are : Misses Blanche, Eleanor and 
Mildred, at home with their mother. Miss Eleanor, who attended .Stanford 
University, Miss Mildred, of the University of California, and Miss 
Blanche, of the College of the Pacific, of San Jose. 

I 

Charles Harvey Bentley held worthy precedence as one of the sub- 
stantial and representative business men and progressive and liberal citizens 
of his native City of San Francisco at the time of his death, which occurred 
December 30, 1922, as the result of a stroke of apoplexy. He was suddenly 
stricken and fell dead while attending, in company with his son and 
daughter, the Stanford-Pittsburgh football game at the field of Lelaiid 
Stanford, Jr., University. Fie had been apparently in good health, and 
his death came as a shock to his business associates and the general com- 
munity in his home city, where his circle of friends was coincident with 
that of his acquaintances. Mr. Bentley was vice president of the Cali- 
fornia Packing Corporation, of which his older brother, Robert, is 
president, and he was a director in other representative California 
corporations. 

Mr. Bentley was born in San Francisco on the 28th of August, 1869, 
and thus was but fifty-three years of age at the time of his death. He 
was a son of Rev. Robert Bentley and Frances (Harvev) Bentlev. the 
former of whom was born in England and the latter in the .State of New 
York. Rev. Robert Bentley, a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, became a resident of San Francisco in the year 1868, and in Cali- 
fornia he held various pastoral charges, the while he made a record of long, 
able and faithful service in the work of the ministrv, he having been a 
resident of San Francisco at the time of his death, in 1900. and his widow 
being now (1923) a resident of Berkeley, this state. 

In the public schools of California, Charles H. Bentley continued his 
studies until he had completed the curriculum of the high school at Oakland, 
and thereafter he was graduated in the University of California, with the 
class of 1891 and with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He was a 
popular figure in the athletics of the university, and gained as an under- 
graduate no little fame as an amateur athlete. For a time he was employed 
in the records department of the university as assistant to John .Sutton, the 



182 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

recorder. In this connection it may be noted that he was affiliated with the 
Phi Beta Kappa and the Beta Gamma Sigma college fraternities. 

After leaving the university Mr. Bentley was for eight years actively 
associated with the Sacramento Packing Company, and in this connection 
he gained familiarity with all details of the fruit-packing indu.stry. Shortly 
after the organization of the California Fruit Canners Association Mr. Bent- 
ley became sales manager for the organization, of which his elder brother 
was made the general manager. With this association the two brothers 
continued their connection until they withdrew to become identified with 
the organizing of the California Packing ComjMny in 1916, Robert Bentley 
assuming the office of general manager of the new corporatit)n and Charles 
H. Bentley that of sales manager. Of this important and well ordered 
corporation, which developed a large and substantia) business, the subject 
of this memoir was vice president at the time of his death. 

While a resident of Sacramento Mr. Bentley served as a member of the 
City Council, 1895-98. In 1907 he was president of the Sacramento Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and in connection with this organization he formulated 
and carried out a plan for supervising adjustments made by insurance 
companies in the settling of local claims. In 1907 Air. Bentley became a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Sacramento Public Library. In 
San Francisco he was a valued member of the Pacific Union, the Bohemian, 
the Commonwealth, the Commercial, the Chit Chat and the University 
Clubs, of which last mentioned he was president in 1913-14-15. He .served 
as a member of the board of library trustees and public reading rooms from 
1907 and for two years was president of the board. 

In 1917, soon after the nation became definitely involved in the World 
war, Mr. Bentley identified himself actively with the National Council of 
Defense, and he gave efifective service as a member of the executive staff 
of the food administration, under Herbert Hoover, besides having been 
a member of the local war-industries board. He was a man whose char- 
acter was the positive e.xpression of a noble and generous nature, he was 
an able business man and was a citizen whose loyalty was ever shown in 
effective personal stewardship. 

Septemlier 30, 1899, recorded the marriage of Mr. Bentley and Miss 
Margaret Wilder, and her death occurred in July, 1905. The two children 
of this union are Harvey Wilder, born November 19, 1900, and a student 
in Yale Universitv at the time of his father's death: and Margaret Wilder, 
born July 19, 1905. 

In September, 1908, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bentley and 
Miss Florence Ikall Hush, who survives him, as does also their daughter. 
Florence Beall Hush Bentley, born November 5, 1915. One son, Charles 
Harvey Bentley, Jr., died .Xpril 8, 1913, in infancy. 

Cari. Mokitz Volkman. Many of the men resjionsible for the earlier 
development of San Francisco an<l the Bay Region have gone to their 
last reward. Their former activities know them no more, but they are 
not forgotten, nor is the result of their work lost, for it lives on in the 





^^^p^^/^^ 



^-^-r ^e-t't^. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 185 

life of the city and state today, and tliose who come after them are 
1)oncf"iting by what was acconiphslicd \>y tlic forerunners. One of the 
men wlio accumphshed much not only in a business way but in other direc- 
tions, for he was a man of broad sympathies and humane charities, was 
the late Carl Moritz Volkman of San Francisco. He was born at Bautzen, 
Saxony, Germany, September 23, 1840, and his parents, both of whom 
have long been deceased, were also Germans by birth. 

Carl Moritz Volkman was very carefully educated, having had the 
advantage of attending a Freemason school, a ])rivate institution, in his 
native country. Ambitious to advance himself, he left Germany for the 
United States in 1861 and arrived at Baltimore, Maryland, on the day 
when he reached his majority, and the next day he began working in a 
nursery of that city. For two years he continued that work, but in 1863 
decided to try his fortune in San Francisco, and made the long journey 
westward by way of the Isthmus of Panaina. 

After his arrival in the city he became one of the early purveyors of 
fruit and vegetables of San Francisco. Later he established C. M. Volk- 
man & Company, dealers in dry seeds, and continued president of this 
company until his death. This was one of the very prosperous houses of 
this kind, and through its operation and other interests Mr. Volkman 
became very successful. His means increasing, he began to increase his 
charities, and for twelve years was a member of the Board of Directors 
of the German Old Peoples Home at Fruitvale, California. Many of his 
benevolences, however, were not known to the public, for he was not given 
to proclaiming his own virtues. He was long a member of Hermann 
Lodge Number 127, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and one of the 
earliest meml)ers of the First English Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Volkman was twice married. He and his first wife, Louise, had • 
the following children : Amalia, is the wife of A. N. Kellner, of Eden- 
vale, California; Frederika, who is the wdfe of C. W. Marwedel, of San 
Francisco ; Bernhard. who is a resident of Dawson, Alaska ; and Hortense, 
Arthur, Eda, Mauricfe, Erwin and Elfie, who are all residents of San 
Francisco. On September 14, 1907, Mr. Volkman married Helen Wettig, 
who survives him. The death of this most excellent citizen and good man 
occurred July 17, 1920. His success was all the more commendable in that 
it came through his own, unaided efforts, for he had to work hard for 
all he secured. Such men as he set an example others would do well to 
follow. He was equally successful in making friends, for he possessed 
those sterling traits of character which bind men together in lasting asso- 
ciation, and his memory is cherished by many in addition to those of his 
home circle and immediate associates. 

Judge Norton P.\rkf.r CHIP^r.\N was until recently presiding justice 
of the District Court of Ajipeals of California, of the Third A])pellatc 
District, at Sacramento, holding this position since l'X)5. Tie has had a 
distinguished record in the state, with a long list of services both on and 



186 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGIOX 

off the bench. He came to California with an impressive record as a soldier 
and officer of the great Civil war. 

Judge Chipman was born at Milford Center, Union County. Ohio, 
March 7, 1835. son of Xorman and Sarah Wilson ( Parker 1 Chipman. 
His parents were born in X'ermont. and his father was a pioneer merchant 
in Milford Center. Ohio, and moved to Iowa, and he died at Clinton, 
that state, at the age of eighty-six, and the mother died at Washington, 
Iowa, when nearly four score. 

Judge Chipman, only survivor in a family of five children, attended 
the common schools of Ohio and Iowa, and finished his preparatory 
education in Washington College and in Mount Pleasant Academy in Iowa. 
In 1859 he graduated from the Cincinnati Law School, in the same class 
with "Uncle" Joe Cannon of Illinois. Judge Chipman was a delegate in 
Congress from the District of Columbia in 1871. the same year that Joe 
Cannon began his long service as a member of the House of Representatives 
at W ashington. 

Judge Chipman began the practice of law at Washington. Iowa, in 1859, 
but was scarcely settled in a professional routine when the Civil war broke 
out. He enlisted at the second call for volunteers, in April. 1861. and was 
made lieutenant of Company H. and adjutant of the Second Iowa Infantry. 
He was commissioned major of that regiment September 23. 1861. and 
colonel and additional aide de camp on April 17. 1862. on the staff of Maj.- 
Gen. Henry W. Halleck and assigned to duty on the staff of Ma j .-Gen. 
Samuel R. Curtis and became his chief of staff. He was seriously wounded 
at Fort Donelson in February, 1862, and reported as dead. When able to 
resume his duties he reported to Major-General Curtis, then commanding 
the forces in Arkansas. From there he was called to special duty with the 
war department at Washington in 1863. These duties brought him in 
personal contact with President Lincoln and the Secretary of War, and 
on several occasions he was detailed for duties of a highly hazardous nature. 
He served as a memlier of the special staff of President Lincoln when the 
latter made his famous Gettysburg speech. On March 13, 1865, he was 
commissioned brigadier general of volunteers for "meritorious service in 
the Bureau of Military Justice." As judge advocate he tried several cases 
before the military commission, one of these being the trial of the infamous 
Captain Wirtz. commander of Andersonville Prison. Judge Chipman is 
author of "The Tragedy of .\ndersonville," published in 1911. He was 
honorablv nuistered out of .service of the Government on November .50, 
1865. 

Judge Chipman resumed the practice of law at Washington. D. C, 
and in 1871 was chosen a delegate to Congress from the District of 
Columbia, serving in that cajiacity until 1875. In the latter year he made 
his first visit to California, and in 1876 settlecj here ]X'rnianently. engaging 
in the practice of law. l-"rom 1807 to 1*^05 he was commissioner of the 
Supreme Court of California. I'pon the organization of the District Court 
of Api^eals he was appointed presiding justice in 1905 of the Third Dis- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 15AY REGION 187 

trict, and in Nuveinher, 1906, was elected to that otiice and remained <in 
the bench until he resigned on account of ill health in 1921. 

Judge Chipman has exerted his personal influence in many ways for the 
development of California's resources. lie helped organize the California 
State Hoard of Trade, now the California I)e\elopment Association, and 
was president of' the former for many years and is a director of the latter. 
He wrote many articles published under the auspices of the board, and by 
the general press advocating the utilization of California's preeminent 
opportunities for fruit growing and other lines of agriculture. 

Judge Chipmgn was one of the early organizers of the Grand .Vrmy of 
the Republic, and served as adjutant general of the national organization 
under Gen. John A. Logan, commander-in-chief. In this capacity he 
issued tiie order creating Memorial Day. Judge Chipman is a member 
of the Union League Club of San Francisco and the Sutter Club of Sacra- 
mento. At St. Louis, Missouri, January 30, 1865, he married Mary Isabel 
Holmes, a native of St. Louis. Her father, Robert Holmes, was a lumber 
merchant of that city. Mrs. Chipman died February 5, 1919. 

Julius Baum was a self-reliant and ambitious youth when he came 
to California in 1852, and initiated a business career that long marked him 
as one of the representative men of affairs in the City of San Francisco. 
He achieved distinctive success in his well ordered and diversified business 
activities, and as a citizen he stood exemplar of steadfast loyalty and fine 
personal stewardship. He was one of the honored and influential citizens 
of San Francisco at the time of his death, which occurred on the 17th of 
March, 1894. 

In the little village of Diesbeck, not far distant from the City of 
Nurenberg, Germany, Julius Baum was born in the year 1833, and in 
his native place he acquired his early education. He was but si.xteen years 
of age when he severed the ties that bound him to his native land and set 
forth to seek his fortunes in America. He made his way to the City of 
St. Louis, Missouri, where he was employed three years. He then, in 
1852, came to California and became identified with the general merchan- 
dise business in San Francisco. From a modest inception he develojjed 
a substantial and prosperous business, in which he was the senior member 
of the firm of Baum & Schrier from 1869 to 1886. In the latter year he 
here engaged in the grain brokerage business, and' he continued as one 
of the prominent local representatives of this line of enterprise for a long 
period of vears, the while he was an honored and valued memlier of the 
San Francisco Produce Exchange. Mr. Piaum found other mediums for 
the exercise of his initiative and constructive jxiwers as a business man. 
He was the founder and became the president of the Vulcan Powder 
Works ; he was vice president and at one time princiixil owner of the 
Sutter Street Railway Company; he was a director of the Union Insur- 
ance Company ; and was actively interested in other important coriwrations 
of high standing. At the time of his death he was recognized as one of 
San Francisco's most substantial and wealthv business men. and as a 



188 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

citizen he was always a leader in liljeral supfxirt of measures and enter- 
prise advanced for the general good of the community. He was one of 
the earliest members (No. 11) of the Temple Emanu-El, and was one 
of the founders and the treasurer of the Mason Street Jewish congrega- 
tion, his religious faith ha\ing been expressed in his daily life and his 
devotion having been shown in his regular attendance at church services 
and in his liberal sup])ort of religious work. His charities were many 
and unostentatious, and he was actively identified with the Eureka 
Benevolent Society and other charitable and philanthropic organizations. 
On the 14th of April, 1864, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Baum 
and Miss Clara Waller, of New York City, and she is now one of the 
venerable and loved pioneer women of San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baum became the parents of si.x children, of whom five are living: Mrs. 
Samuel Bauer, Mrs. Charles Schlessinger, Miss Helen, Benjamin J. and 
Arthur W. Mr. and Mrs. Baum also adopted and reared two nephews, 
Edward and Samuel Louisson, the former passing away in 1919. 

Peter Harder became a resident of San Francisco in the j'ear 1873, 
and here he established the first hotel on the water front, this popular 
old-time hostelry having been known as the Clipper Hotel and having 
been the favored stopping place and home of masters and other officers 
of sea vessels when they arrived in this port, besides which the effective 
service of the hotel, its homelike atmosphere and the jxipularity of its 
genial proprietor caused it to become the home of many of the pioneer 
citizens of the period, who there established jjermanent residence. Mr. 
Harder was generous to a fault, kind and tolerant in his judgment, and 
ever ready to lend a helping hand. He assisted many seafaring men to 
buy interests in vessels, and through his financial aid several shipmasters 
were able to purchase property and establish homes in Alameda County. 
This veteran and honored hotel man continued in business at the .Mameda 
Exchange in San Francisco until 1918. and thereafter he here lived 
virtually retired until his death, on the 3d of January, 1922, his passing 
having brought sorrow to his host of friends, especially those who had 
enjoyed the hospitality of his hotel. Mr. Harder was liberal in his civic 
attitude but never had any desire for si)ecial political activity or for public 
office of any kind. He was affiliated with Crockett Lodge No. 139, 
Ancient Free and .Xccepted Masons, and with California Chapter No. 183, 
Order of the Eastern Star, besides which he was a jxtpular member of the 
Sciots and other representative local clubs. 

The district of Holstein, Germany, in which Mr. Harder was born, 
was at that time under the dominion of Denmark, and the date of his 
nativity was November 7, 1852. He was one of a family of seven children, 
and the family name of his mother was Nagal. His father was engaged 
in the hotel business in Holstein. not far distant from the City of Hamburg, 
and also conducted a provision store, both he and bis wife having there 
continued to reside until their deaths. 

Peter Harder was indebted to the schools of Germaiiv for his earlv 




A^cv^'i^iuv^bA^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 191 

education, and gained as a Iniy and youth much of practical experience 
in connection with his father's hotel. In 1873, about the time of attaining 
to his legal majority, he established his home in San Francisco, and here 
his ability, sterling character and well ordered enterprise combined to 
gain to him substantial business success and a secure place in community 
esteem. He was one of the veteran hotel men of the city and his widow 
still maintains her home here. 

On the 20th of September, 1877, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Harder and Miss Clara Placke, who likewise was born in Germany, 
and in San Francisco reside also the three surviving children of this 
union: Alma is the wife of \V. E. Baker; Dr. Walter G. is a successful 
physician and surgeon, the maiden name of his wife having been Clara 
Camj^e ; and Clara Harder is the wife of Sumner Cahill. 

Charles Bundsciiu, who died at San Francisco, September 30, 1910, 
was a Californian nearly half a century, and one of the most prominent 
men in the state in vine growing and vine manufacture. Successful in 
business, he also expressed the very highest type of citizenshij), and he 
was the admiration of his many friends for the breadth of his culture 
and the varied interests that enlisted his time and attention. He was a 
student and scholar, and had one of the finest private libraries in San 
Francisco. His library was perhaps the greatest loss in the San Fran- 
cisco fire. 

He was born at Mannheim, Germany, in 1842, and received the 
benefit of a very thorough education in German schools and universities. 
In 1862 he came to America, and for six years was identified with mercan- 
tile lines in California. From 1868 until his death his time and abilities 
were most successfully bestowed upon viticulture. With his father-in-law, 
Jacob Gundlach, he founded the well known Rhinefarm vineyard and 
winery in Sonoma County, and for many years was head of the Gundlach- 
Bundschu Wine Company. The best cellar of the oldest and rarest wines 
in California was destroyed when this company's process prop>erty fell prey 
to the flames of the San Francisco fire. He was an expert in the science of 
viticulture, and made his own example and enterprise count for the perma- 
nent development of grape growing. He used his pen to contribute many- 
articles to the press and periodicals on California grapes and the fine 
qualities of the wine. He was an active member of the old State Viticul- 
tural Commission, was also identified with the California Promotion Com- 
mittee and did much to advertise and prove the quality of California wines 
by his efforts as contributor at world's fairs and other expositions. 

Writing at the time of his death, one of his close friends said : 
"Charles Bundschu was a man of fine feeling and sentiment. Therefore 
he loved poetrv and song with a pleasure which only pwets know. Indeed, 
he was a poet himself, and has gained a wide reputation for his poetry, 
both in German and English. Charles Bundschu kept alive that high 
and noble spirit which characterizes the best who come here from the 



192 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

German Fatherland. He was a leader, especially among the (ierman- 
American citizens of San Francisco. He was president of the German 
Benevolent Society for several years, and was always prominent in every 
movement for the social betterment of the city. One of his latest civic 
activities was to organize the German festival and ceremony at which 
the Goethe-Schiller monument was recently placed in Golden Gate Park." 
He also helped found the Altenheim, or German C)ld People's Home, at 
Fruit vale. He was a member of the Bohemian Club, and had been presi- 
dent of the Loring Singing Society. He was one of the founders and 
for years vice president and a director of the San Francisco Merchants' 
Association. 

By his marriage to Miss Francisca Gundlach, who survives him, he 
was the father of six children, Louise, wife of R. M. Sims, Carl, Walter, 
Alma, Rudolph and Ralph Bundschu. 

Jacob Gundlach, father of Mrs. Bundschu, was born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, and came to the United States in 1850, the voyage from Germany 
to San Francisco lasting just a year to the day. He acquired a large 
tract of land in Sonoma County, and there became a pioneer in grape 
growing, being associated with his son-in-law, Charles Bundschu, in the 
growing of grapes and the manufacture of wine. He married Eva Hoff- 
man. Jacol) Gundlach died in 1894, at the age of seventy-six. 

E. WiLLARD Burr. The discovery of gold in California ojjened an 
epoch of development unprecedented in the history of the world. The 
realization that gold lay free in the streams of the state, only waiting to 
be gathered up by the first arrivals, set men's blood aflame and brought 
them streaming overland in an almost endless tide of humanity. The 
ships entering the San Francisco harbor on their long journey into the 
northern waters of the Pacific, or bound for Oriental shores, were left 
stranded as their crews deserted them for the gold fields. Some, however, 
did not enter the wild chase after "easy money," but with cooler wisdom 
went into legitimate lines of business, and in supplying the needs of others 
for the necessities of life reaj^ed a reward oftentimes much greater than 
that which would have been theirs if they had yielded to the lure of 
adventure. 

E. Willard Burr, one of the ])ioneers of San I'^nnicisco, was born clear 
across the continent from what was to be his home city for so many years, 
in Rhode Island, March 7, 1809, a son of Nathan Miller I'urr and Lucy 
Burr. He was educated in the East, and then took to the sea, and came 
to California in order to secure crews for whaling vessels. When these 
ships arrived in San Francisco the men deserted to join in the mad hunt 
for gold, and it was four years before the comjiany recovered one of 
their shij)s, the Powhatan. With the men gone, ancl some of the ships 
taken l)y them, Mr. P>urr was without a job, but he was not borne off his 
feet l)v the excitement, but was clear-headed enough to see that this was 
destined to become the greatest tr;iding jwint of the western coast, and 
decided to remain in it. He settled here iKTmanenlly in 1851, and the 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 193 

following year his family joined him. The harbor was filled with deserted 
vessels, and, purchasing one of them for $700, Mr. Ikirr transformed it 
into a home for his family, and at the same time went into the wholesale 
grocery business. His affairs prosjK'red, and he l)ecame interested in 
iiiany lines of business. Subse(juently he organized the Savings & Loan 
Society, commonly called the old Clay Street Bank, the first savings 
bank on the Pacific Coast, and continued its president for twenty-one 
years. Also prominent in civic affairs, he served as one of the first mayors 
of San Francisco, and gave the city such a business-like administration 
that the expenses were cut from $l',500.000 to $300,000. His long and 
useful life ended July 20, 1894, antl in his passing the cit\' lost a most 
worthy citizen. 

In 1831 Mr. Burr married ^liss Abljie Miller Child, and they became 
the parents of si.x children: Willard C, Clarence, Lucy, Mary Newell, 
Edmund C, and one who is deceased. Edmund C. Burr was born in 
1846, and when he was eighteen years old he left San Francisco and went 
to England, where he attended the Royal School of Mines, and then con- 
tinued his studies in chemistry and mining in Germany. Returning to his 
native land, he was connected as superintendent with large mining enter- 
prises for a number of years and subsequently used his professional 
knowledge in the refining of sugar, and has improved and perfected a 
number of processes used in this important industry. 

In October, 1875. Edmund C. Burr married Anna Barnard, a native 
of Nantucket, Massachusetts, and they became the parents of the following 
children : Elsie, who married Harry Overstreet, Alice and Marian. 

Kenneth R. Kingsbury. Mr. Kingsbury was only forty-three when 
he was elected, in 1919, president of the Standard Oil Company (Cali- 
fornia). 

He was born at Columbus, Ohio, January 21, 1876, son of Francis 
Homer and Mary Isabella (Wilson) Kingslsury. In 1886 the family 
moved to Orange, New Jersey, where Kenneth Raleigh Kingsbury finished 
his common school education. He prepared for college in the Newark 
Academy, and in 1896 at the age of twenty finished his literary education 
in Princeton University. For a year following he was a student of nyning 
engineering in the Columbia University School of Mines, -\fter a few 
months of e.x})erience in the nn'nes of Idaho he returned East, and in the 
closing days of 1897 he began his service with the Standard Oil Company 
assisting in the construction of a pijie line for the Southern Pipe Line 
Company at a salary of $60 a month. When this construction work was 
ended he accepted a job as fireman in one of the pumping stations in 
Maryland, shoveling coal. From that he went back to construction work, 
then did duty as a ganger at a pum])ing station near Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
. vania, all this time putting in a twehe-hour day, se\en days in the week. 
Two years later when operations shut down he immediately went to the 
26 Broadway office of the Standard Oil Company, and was put into the 
accounting department at a $50 a month job. 

These were his fighting years, his years of study of the oil industry 



194 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

from various angles. For about two years he sold candles, greases and 
other specialties in Jersey City, Hoboken and Bayonne, and not only sold 
the materials listed in his catalogue, liut built up new business. In a 
course of a few years he was a man of mark in the Standard Oil organiza- 
tion, being assigned duties in some specially difficult districts, developing 
the lubricating oil and grease departments of the company in North 
Carolina and \Vashington, and in 1903 returning to New York for duty in 
the lubricating department of the home office. 

In 1906 he was made agent of the Standard Oil Company (California) 
at New York, under H. M. Tilford, president of the company. When the 
Standard Oil Company of New Jersey in December, 1911. was dissolved, 
Mr. Kingsbun,- was promoted to second vice president of the Standard Oil 
Company (California), and in June, 1912, closed out the New York office 
and removed to California. Two years later he was chosen vice president, 
and in the spring of 1919 elected president. 

In the ten years following 1912 the Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia increased its capital stock and net earnings more than eightfold. 
The company is now engaged in all branches of the petroleum business- 
production, transportation, manufacturing and marketing — and has a per- 
sonnel of approximately 20,000. It produces oil in California, and has 
been prospecting new fields in Texas, Montana, the Philippines, Alaska, 
Colombia, Ecuador and Argentina. 

The company has not only been extremely successful in building up its 
production and marketing facilities, but also in handling all problems aris- 
ing from the contact of management and employes. The fact that 
Mr. Kingsbury had to raise himself out of the ranks of lowest paid 
workers and that his fellow directors have similarly come up from the 
ranks, has afforded them an understanding of employes' problems and 
enabled them to devise and carry out unusual methods of relationship. 
Throughout the company there exists close personal contact between 
managers, superintendents and foremen, and those under their direction. 
Among the numerous policies for the betterment of the status of the 
employe, some have to do with his financial welfare, other with his mental 
attitude toward his work, and others with his health. The employe is 
assured of a pension, of medical service, regular vacations, and hours of 
employment averaging eight instead of the twelve which Mr. Kingsbury 
endured. 

One of his business associates paid this tribute to the president of the 
Standard Oil Company (California) : "Kingsbury came up from the 
• bottom, and on the way he mastered the oil business, and jxirticularly that 
of the Standard Oil Company of California. He is keen for facts, and with 
a remarkable memory he retains them for use when needed. His chief 
characteristic {perhaps is his courage and si^eed of decision. .V great faculty 
for concentration on whatever problem is before him helps in this respect. 
The affairs of a company like this, which is in all phases of the oil business 
from producing to marketing, are most diverse in character, but Kingsbury 
seems to know all about all dc])artments, and in addition has a broad 
knowledge of general conditions." 




J<-/_ 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 197 

Since coming to San Francisco, Mr. Kingsbury has worked for the 
welfare of the Pacific Coast not only through his company but also 
through other organizations. He was for the first two years president of 
"Calilornians Inc.," a non-profit organization that has accomplished a re- 
markable national educational program in proclaiming conservatively the 
real assets and attractions of the State of California. Mr. Kingsbury is 
also a director of the Anglo and London Paris National Bank and of the 
Del Monte Properties Company. He is a republican, a Presbyterian and 
a member of the Masonic Order. His glubs are the Pacific-Union, Uni- 
versity, San Francisco Golf and Country, all at San Francisco; the Nassau 
of Princeton, the India House and Princeton Club of New York, Burlin- 
game Country, Marin Golf and Country and McCloud River clubs of 
California. 

On March 14, 1917, he married Mary Bell Gwin Follis, of San 
Francisco. 

William A. Giselman, a lawyer of high attainments, did not find it 
expedient to engage in the practice of his profession after establishing his 
home in California, but as a specially resourceful and careful executive 
he gave long and effective service as trustee of the estate of Judge Hast- 
ings, the founder of the Plastings Law School in San Francisco. In this 
city Mr. Giselman continued his residence, an honored and influential 
citizen, until the time of his death, which occurred November 16, 1910. As 
a citizen he manifested the same fine spirit of loyalty that characterized him 
in his service as a gallant soldier of the Union in the Civil war. 

Mr. Giselman was born in Germany, June 24, 1845, and was voung 
when he came to the United States. He received good educational advan- 
tages and supplemented his early training by lifelong study, reading and 
research, his intellectual horizon having become one of speciallv wide scope. 
He was one of the first to enlist in defense of the Union when the Civil 
war was precipitated on a divided nation, and as a member of a cavalry 
regiment he took part in many important battles, including those of Shiloh 
and Vicksburg, and he continued in active service until the close of the 
war, he having won promotion to a commissioned office. In later years 
he vitalized the more gracious memories and associations of his military 
career through his appreciative affiliation with Thomas Post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He came to California immediately after the 
close of the war, and here he passed the remainder of his long and worthy 
life, which exemplified high ideals and was marked by constructive achieve- 
ment. 

The year 1875 recorded the marriage of Mr. Giselman and Miss Anna 
M. Dillon, who still maintains her home in San Francisco. Two children 
likewise survive the honored father, Mrs. Grace Lange and Marshall W., 
both likewise residents of San Francisco. 

William Lewitt. M. D. The name of Lewitt is connected with the 
medical history of California, and with its State University, as three of 
the name have filled the same chair in the medical department of this 



198 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

institution during the past half a century. The first of the name. 
Dr. WilHam Lewitt, was born in England, in 1820, and became so well 
known in his profession that his services were secured as a member of 
the medical department of the University of Alichigan. While on the 
stafif of that body he made a record which brought him an offer from the 
University of California, and, accepting it, he went West to California 
in the early '70s and remained with the university until his retirement 
from the profession. His death occurred in August, 1883. 

The second physician to be connected with the University of California 
was Dr. William B. Lewitt, son of Dr. William Lewitt. He was a native 
of Michigan, where he was born in 1857. He was graduated from the 
Detroit Medical College and Columbia University, receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1877, and when only twenty-one years old came 
to California. He, too, became connected, as before stated, with the 
University of California, and filled various chairs in its medical department 
until 1912, when he was taken away by death, at that time being the only 
one of the older members of the faculty at the university with the excep- 
tion of Doctor McNutt, who survives him. Dr. William B. Lewitt special- 
ized in children's diseases, and did more than any other one man in the 
state to conquer many of the dread scourges of childhood. Had his useful 
life been longer spared his research work would have resulted in still 
greater benefits to humanity, but he died in April, 1921. In addition to 
his work at the university and his very large private practice he was con- 
nected with the Children's Hospital of San Francisco, and after his death 
a most beautiful memorial was prepared by his associates in the hospital 
and presented to his widow. 

Dr. W. B. Lewitt was married at the commencement of his career, and 
he and his wife became the parents of the following children: Grace, who 
is the wife of Edmund Allison; and Frederick C, who was graduated in 
medicine from the University of California. He is the third of the name 
of Lewitt to be connected with the medical department of the University 
of California. No good man passes away and leaves a blank. The results 
of his life work remain behind him, and are a monument to his ability, 
more enduring than any created of marble or granite. Especially is this 
true of the physician, whose work is of such a nature that its benefits 
are shared by his associates for the good of the entire human race. Chil- 
dren yet unborn will, many of them, owe their lives and freedom from 
numerous diseases to the skill, untiring devotion and vast knowledge oi 
Dr. William B. Lewitt, the good physician of the children of San Fran- 
cisco. While he took the part of a good citizen in different civic enter- 
prises, his chief interest was centered in his professional labors, as was 
that of his father, and the standard of excellence and self-sacrifice they 
raised is being bourne by Dr. Frederick C. Lewitt, a worthy son and 
grandson of most worthy forebears. 

Arthur H. Barendt. .\ well known citizen and attorney of San 
Francisco is Arthur H. Barendt. His practice is a general one. but of 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 199 

late years has become more and more confined to corporation and probate 
matters. 

Arthur H. Barendt was born at Liverpool, England, a son of John E. 
and Isabella A. (Crowe) Barendt, the latter a native of England. The 
former was born in Danzig, East Prussia, Germany, though the descendant 
of an old Dutch family whose most notable member was Capt. William 
Barentz, the e.xplorer and discoverer of Barentz Sea in the Arctic Ocean. 
Mr. Barendt's father became a resident of Liverpool, England, before he 
had reached his majority, and there he lived imtil his death. For many years 
he was engaged in the wool brokerage business, and became a man of 
means. Of his nine children, Arthur H. Barendt and Guy H. Barendt 
of Webster, North Dakota, were the only ones to come to the United 
States. After the Dutch dyke builders emigrated from Holland to Danzig 
one of the early representatives of the family was made a "frei herr" 
of that city and was presented with a key to the city in recognition of his 
military services. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Barendt brought the 
famous Swedish singer Jenny Lind to Liverpool just before she started 
out on her first triumphal visit to the United States. 

Arthur H. Barendt was educated in the public schools of his native 
city, Liverpool College and the Liverpt)ol School of Science and Arts, 
winning in the latter institution Earl Derby's prize as the first student 
and two medals in 1S8L and the blue ribbon of the Whitworth Scholar. 
Coming to the United States, Mr. Barendt located at San Francisco in 
1884, and for years was active as a newspaper man, during this period, 
however, preparing himself for the practice of law. In December, 1897, 
he was admitted to the bar, and subsequently gained the right to practice 
before the Federal courts. Immediately after being admitted to the bar 
he opened his office, and has steadily risen in his profession and public 
esteem. 

A strong democrat, Mr. Barendt has always been active in his party, 
and in 1909 was appointed commissioner of the Dejxirtment of Public 
Health of San Francisco, by IMayor Taylor. Mayor McCarthy removed 
him. but Mr. Barendt successfully contested the mayor's action in the 
courts, and in 1911 was reinstated with those of his fellow commissioners 
who had been removed with him and whose cause he espoused with his 
own. His fellow commissioners immediately elected him president of 
the board, and he has held that office for twelve years consecutively. 

The Iroquois Club holds his membership, and he is one of its e.x- 
presidents. Reared in the faith of the Church of England, he has afifiliated 
with the Protestant Episcopal Church since coming to the United States. 

In 1921 Mr. Barendt married Helen I. Brayton, a member of the old 
Massachusetts family of that name. 

Arthur Brown, Jr., prominent San Francisco architect, represents 
a pioneer California family. His father was a native of Scotland, and 
when a young man came to America. He was an engineer, and identified 
with the building of railroads in Canada and throughout the Eastern 



200 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

states. Arthur Brown, Sr., coming to California in 1863, became identified 
with the Central Pacific Railroad, and in later years was superintendent 
of bridges and buildings for the Southern Pacific. He died March 7, 
1917. Arthur Brown, Sr., married Victoria Adelaide Runyon in 1870. 

Arthur Brown, Jr., was born at Oakland, California, May 21, 1874. 
He graduated Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the Uni- 
versity of California in 1896 and then spent several years abroad as a 
student in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, where he graduated in 1901. 
Since returning to San Francisco and beginning practice in 1904 he has 
done work that has made his name known in his profession and art all 
over the Pacific Coast. He is a member of the firm Bakewell & Brown, 
architects. Some of the work done by this firm includes the Berkeley 
City Hall, the Burlingame Country Club House, the City Hall at San 
Francisco, the Horticultural Building at the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition, and the beautiful Library of Stanford University. 

Mr. Brown was associate architect for the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition Company, 1912-15. During 1918-19 he was professor of theory 
of architecture in the University of California, and he had also been a 
lecturer on architecture in Harvard University. Mr. Brown is a member 
of the American Institute of Architects, the Beaux Arts Society, the 
Societe des Architects Diplomes par le Gouvernment, and is a correspond- 
ing member of the Institute de France and a Chevalier of the Legion 
d'Honneur de France. Mr. Brown is a Beta Theta Pi and a member of 
the University, Pacific Union, Olympic, Cercle de TUnion and Burlingame 
clubs. 

His offices are at 251 Kearney Street, San Francisco. He married 
Miss Jessamine Garrett, of Seattle, Washington, and they have one 
daughter, Victoria. 

Epiir.mm Howard Tryon, whose death occurred at his home in San 
Francisco on the 15th of August, 1921, was reared and educated in 
California, was a representative of one of the honored pioneer families 
of this state, and here- he became a prominent and influential figure in 
industrial and commercial circles, as one of the leading woolen manu- 
facturers on the Pacific Coast. 

Mr. Tryon was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, June 20, 1853. and was 
a boy at the time of the family removal to California, where his uncle 
became a pioneer settler in what is now Yolo County, and there estab- 
lished the first woolen mill in California. The parents passed the remain- 
der of their lives in this state, and the family name was continued during 
the long intervening years to be identified with the woolen manufacturing 
industry in California. The subject of this memoir actjuired his carlv 
education in the ])ublic scliools of the pioneer days in California, and 
later was graduated from the Heald Business College in San Francisco. 
After leaving school he became actively identified with his uncle's manu- 
facturing business, and he eventually came into control of the business, 
which he developed from one of modest order to the largest enterprise 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 203 

of the kind in the state. In the manufacturing of woolen goods he 
maintained a mill at Sacramento, and also one at Stockton, the large 
and important business being still conducted untler his name and his only 
son having the active management thereof, the general offices of the 
concern being maintained in San Francisco. 

Mr. Tryon was a citizen of marked liberality and progressiveness, was 
a stalwart in the ranks of the republican party in California, and was a 
delegate to the Republican National Convention of 1916, when Hon. 
Charles E. Hughes was made the nominee for President. He was 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and 
was one of the honored and influential members of the Union League Club 
of San Francisco, of which he served as president and the members of 
which presented him a fine hall clock in token of their high esteem and 
their appreciation of his effective administration as chief executive. 

In the City of Sacramento, in the year 1882, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Tryon and Miss Addie I. Eskridge, who was born and 
reared in California, to which state her parents, A. W. and Elizabeth A. 
(Zumwalt) Eskridge, came in the early '50s, they having been honored 
pioneer citizens of this state at the time of their deaths. Mrs. Tryon 
still maintains her home in San Francisco, as does also the one son, 
Lorin H., who was here born in San Francisco on the 15th of January, 
1892. Lorin H. Tryon, as previously noted, has succeeded to the manage- 
ment of the business long and successfully conducted by his father. He 
is a Native Son of the Golden West, and is a member of the Union League 
Club and the Olympic Club of San Francisco, the while he has standing as 
one of the representative business men of the younger generation in his 
native city. Prior to the entry of the United States in the World war 
he was a member of the Citizens' Home Guard and when war was declared 
between Germany and the United States he enlisted in the Ninety-first 
Regiment and served as a private for a period and went over to the front 
and was with the noted regiment through all its battles. He was promoted 
to a captaincy, and returned to the United States with this commission 
in 1919. The maiden name of his wife was Ola \\'illet, a daughter of 
Walter B. Willet, of San Francisco. They are the paretits of one son, 
Willet Howard Tryon. 

Tristram \\'. Sheldon. D. O. One of the oldest osteopathic physicians 
in San Francisco, if not in the state, is Dr. Tristram W. Sheldon, of 323 
Geary Street. Doctor Sheldon has been located in the Bay City for twenty- 
three years. The first osteopath in the state. Dr. A. C. Moore, preceded 
him about five years. Doctor Sheldon is a man of broad experience, and 
his long residence in San Francisco has gained him a following that is 
most gratifying. 

The Sheldon family is of English ancestry and was settled in New 
England before the Revolutionary war. Doctor Sheldon was born at 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts, June 11, 1861, son of Thomas and Julina 



204 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

(Hilton) Sheldon. His parents were also natives of Massachusetts. 
Doctor Sheldon attended the grammar and high schools of his native city, 
and soon afterward began learning a trade in a pattern and model making 
shop. He finally rose to the position of superintendent of those shops in 
Fitchburg. After an e.xperience of ten years he engaged in business for 
himself as a manufacturer of incubators and brooders in New Jersey. 
He was in that line of work for some two or three years, and left it to 
prepare for a professional career. 

Doctor Sheldon attended the original schocil of osteopathy, the .\. T. 
Still College at Kirks ville, Missouri, where he graduated with the Doctor 
of Osteopathy degree in June, 1900. A few days after getting his diploma 
he arrived in California, and after a few weeks at Vallejo moved to San 
Francisco, and on July 15 of that year engaged in practice. Doctor Shel- 
don apart from the success that has attended him individually, rendered 
important service to his profession in the early days in overcoming the 
prejudices and giving osteopathy its true rank among the established schools 
of medicine. He is a member of the American Osteopathic Association, the 
California State Osteopathic .Association, belongs to the Optimist Club of 
San Francisco and the Atlas Club of Kirksville, Missouri. 

In his younger years in Massachusetts he served ten years in the Massa- 
chusetts National Guard. For three years he was captain of Company B 
of the Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, and subsequently was inspector of 
rifle practice for that regiment. He is a republican voter. 

At Pittsburg, his home town in Massachusetts, he married in 1S86, Miss 
Cora B. Snow, who was born in Massachusetts, daughter of Flbridge 
G. Snow. Mrs. Sheldon died, leaving one son, Elbridge T. Sheldon, who 
is a machinist living at Fitchburg, j\Iassachusetts. On June 30, 1890, 
Doctor Sheldon married Miss Mary E. Briggs, who was born at Peterboro, 
New Hampshire, daughter of Zilpah J. Briggs. The only child of this 
marriage, a son, died in infancy. Mrs. Sheldon attends the Seventh Day 
Adventist Church. 

Marion Turnev, D. O.. is consistently to be designated as one of 
the representative e.xponents of the science of osteopathy in California, 
where she has been engaged in the successful practice of her profession 
for a period of fifteen years. She has continuously retained her maiden 
name in connection with her professional service, but is the wife of 
Dr. Lewis L. Hull, with whom she has been associated in practice during 
the period above noted. Dr. Lewis L. Hull is a graduate Doctor of 
Osteopathy, and in his practice specializes in the diagnosing and treatment 
of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. Both he and his wife ])assed 
examinations before the California State Board of Medical Examiners, 
by which they were granted certificates as physicians and surgeons. 

Doctor Turney was born in Clarke County. Wisconsin, and is a 
daughter of Fletcher and Martha (Burt) Turney. who now reside in 
South Dakota, where the father is engaged in the roofing business. Fletcher 
Turney is a scion of a Scotch family ihat was founded in .\merica in the 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 205 

Colonial days and that gave patriot soldiers to the Continental Line in 
the War of the Revolution. He was born in Ohio, and became a pioneer 
settler in South Dakota, where he took two claims to Government land, 
prior to the construction of railroads, and where he was for a number of 
years engaged in the raising of live stock, he having contributed worthily 
to the development and progress of South Dakota. His wife was born 
in the State of New York, of Revolutionary stock and of English descent. 

Doctor Turney was a child when her parents initiated their pioneer 
experience in South Dakota, and much of her early education was received 
in the public schools of Plankinton, that state. Ambition and personal 
appreciation led her to adopt the profession of osteopathy, for the work 
of which she thoroughly fortified herself by completing a course in the 
Still College of Osteopathy, in which she was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1907, her husband having been a member of the same class 
and each having received the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy prior to their 
marriage. For seven months after thus receiving her degree Doctor 
Turney was engaged in practice at Mitchell, South Dakota, where her 
marriage was solemnized in the meanwhile. She and her husband then 
came to California and established themselves in associate practice at 
Redding. Eighteen months later they made a most circumspect and fortu- 
nate change of residence, by removal to San Francisco, in which metro- 
politan center they have long controlled a large and representative practice. 
The Doctors' first office here was at the corner of Twenty-second and 
Mission streets, whence they later removed to a downtown location, their 
present handsomely appointed offices being in the Western States Life 
Building, at 995 Market Street. Both have gained high rank in their pro- 
fession and are doing splendid service in the alleviation of human suff'ering 
and distress. Doctor Turney is a communicant of St. John's Church, 
Protestant Episcopal, and at the time of this writing, in the autumn of 
1923, she is serving as Worthy Matron of Ivy Chapter No. 27, Order 
of the Eastern Star. 

Dr. Lewis L. Hull was born at Fort Dodge, Iowa, and is a son of Jesse 
L. and Mary E. (Hodges) Hull, both natives of Indiana, of English-\Velsh 
ancestry, the respective families having been founded in America many 
generations ago. Mr. and Mrs. liull, now venerable in years, reside in 
San Francisco. Doctor Hull received a liberal education, and has made 
his influence altogether benignant in the work of his profession. He is a 
veteran of the Spanish-American war, and he was one of the promoters 
of the California Silk Mills and the Pacific Silk Mills, in each of which 
corporations he became a director. 

Dr. Lewis L. and Dr. Marion (Turney) Hull have two children, 
Ehzabeth and Philip, both of whom are attending (1923) the public 
schools in their home city. 

Edward M. Greenwav has been identified conspicuously with a number 
of interests and organizations in San Francisco, and is one of the most 
popular citizens. 



206 THE. SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

He was born in New York State, November 4, 1851, son of ^^'illiam 
W. T. Greenway, a native of Virginia, and his wife, Mary Williams, who 
Tvas born at Roxbury, Massachusetts. ' 

Edward M. Greenway was educated in St. John's College at Annapolis, 
Maryland, completing his course there in 1871. He came to California 
in 1875, and at San Francisco was employed in the Nevada Bank with Mr. 
Louis McLane, whom he had known in Baltimore. He remained with 
this bank five years and then for five years was with the Anglo Bank 
Company and after that was assistant secretary of the Ophir Mining 
Company. In 1886 Mr. Greenway engaged in the wine business, repre- 
senting Frederick De Barry & Company, and in 1890 he became a traveling 
representative, covering a large part of the world, making many trips to 
Europe. He continued his trips abroad until 1914, in which year he 
returned to America on the steamer Fatherland, which is now the converted 
and remodeled Leviathan, the largest boat in the world. Mr. Greenway 
was in Seattle at the time of the San Francisco fire in 1906, and lost all 
his personal property. 

In a social way he had charge of the dances of the Friday Night Club, 
and has been active in the Bachelors and Benedicts ball. He gave the first 
ball in the Little Palace Hotel after the big fire, while the people of the 
city were living in tents. He gave the first ball in the Fairmont Hotel 
after it opened, about one year after the fire. Both balls were in celebra- 
tion of his birthday, and he has given birthday balls for the last twenty 
years. He christened the opening of the Hotel Alexander with a bottle 
of "Gorton Rouge." Mr. Greenway was in the wine business for thirty- 
two years, representing the fine French importations. His territory was 
west of the Rockies, and he made two trips annually from Bisbee. Arizona, 
to Great Falls, Montana. 

- He is a member of the Bohemian Club, the Pacific Union Club, the 
Olympic Club, the Menlo Park Golf and Country Club, the University 
Club, a charter member of the San Francisco Golf and Country Club at 
Ingleside, and is a member of the Burlingame Country Club and belongs 
to the Sons of the American Revolution. 

4^ ■■ 

Henry L. Shannon. In developing hydro-electrical projects Henry 

L. Shannon of San Francisco is not only adding to his prominence and 

large means, but he is rendering a public service not easily over-estimated, 

for his experience and organizing ability enable him to carry through to 

successful completion undertakings that in less capable hands would not 

mature. His ojierations have no local limit, and his rejnitation in his special 

line is state wide. Henry L. Shannon was born at St. Louis, Missouri, 

September 10, 1853, a son of John and Charlotte Arthelia Shannon. They 

crossed the plains to Sacramento, California, when Henry L. Shannon was 

a baby, and he was reared in that city, and attended its public schools. 

For two years Mr. Shannon studied law, and then changing his plans 

for a career, became a mining engineer, and for thirty years gave his 

attention to this line of work. His activities then led him to branch out into 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 209 

electrical engineering, and he became the owner of the Waters Northern 
California Power Company, which was subsequently sold to the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company for $10,000,000. Investing then in the Shasta 
Power Company, he became its president and general manager, and so 
developed that property that it was sold to the Pacific CJas and Electric 
Company for $1,750,000. At ijrcsent he is interested in developing hydro- 
electrical projects. His operations in Deer Creek, Tehama County, are 
attracting considerable and favorable attention. Mr. Shannon was a pioneer 
of salt water liathing projects, and i)lanned to put the baths on the site now 
occupied by the Emporium. He secured a fifty-year lease on the ground 
at a rental of $1,100 per month, but finally abandoned it. His efforts in 
this connection finally resulted in the establishment of the Lurline Baths 
at Larkin and Bush streets l)y Harrison, Hoteling and Spreckels. 

Many mining men, covering a period of many years, had tried to lease 
the famous Trinidad Mine in Sinaloa, Mexico, and Mr. Shannon suc- 
ceeded where the others failed. The story of this bonding is interesting. 
A man named Wamble who knew of the Trinidad Mine and knew the 
owner, Alsua, by sight, was in a bar room in Mexico and listened to a 
discussion of how some Americans had jumped some of Alsua's property. 
Seeing Alsua in the room, he spoke up, saying that while he did not know 
Alsua, he understood that he was a fine, Spanish gentleman and the jump- 
ing of the claims was an outrage ; that while he was an American he was 
not that kind of an American and that the jumpers should have their heads 
blown ofif. This expression of sentiment caused Alsua to seek him out, and 
a close friendship sprung up which led to the owner offering Wamble 
a bond on the mine. Later, when Wamble returned to San Francisco, he 
mentioned the occurrence to Mr. Shannon. The latter had the offer verified 
by wire, and it resulted in the bonding of the property. It was placed 
through Brown Brothers of London, England, and sold for $1,500,000. 
This was in about 1885. 

In 1896 Mr. Shannon married Geraldine Cecelia Buckley, a daughter 
of M. J. Buckley, of San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. Shannon became the 
parents of three children : Henry L., Junior, who died Februarv 14, 1920; 
Geraldine; and Gerald, who is a member of the Bov Scouts of America. 
Mrs. Samuel Shortridge, wife of Senator Shortridge, is a niece of Mr. 
Shannon. In political faith Mr. Shannon is a democrat, but he has been 
so occupied with his business affairs that he has never cared to enter public 
life. 

William C. Sh.xrpsteen has been a resident of California since his 
infancy, is a representative of a family to which is due a goodly measure 
of pioneer distinction in this state, and he has been engaged in the practice 
of law in the City of San Francisco for a period of nearly forty years, 
except for a period of fourteen years during which he lived and practiced 
at Tacoma, \Vashington. The best voucher for his status as a citizen and 
lawyer is that afforded in the broad scope and importance of his law 



210 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

business, which is of general order and which involves his retention of a 
representative clientele, his law offices being established at 801 Mills 
Building. 

Mr. Sharpsteen was born, in the City of Milwaukee, W'isconsin, July 
9. 1863, and is the only surviving member of a family of four children 
born to John R. and Catherine (Crittenden) Sharpsteen. The subject of 
this review was not yet one year old when, in 1864, the family came to 
California. John R. Sharpsteen had been engaged in the practice of law 
in Wisconsin, and he became one of the able, honored and distinguished 
members of the California bar. In 1879 he was elected a justice of the 
Supreme Court of California, and was serving his second term at the time of 
his death, in December, 1892. He was a man of fine legal talent and great 
judicial acumen, and his name shall ever have high place in the annals of 
legal and civic history in California. His widow survived him by somewhat 
more than a decade and was summoned to the life eternal in July, 1906, 
both having been earnest members of the Congregational Church. Judge 
John R. Sharpsteen was a democrat in political allegiance, and was 
long and actively affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 

The preliminary education of William C. Sharpsteen was acquired 
in the public schools of San Francisco, and in 1885 he was graduated from 
the Hastings College of Law, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws and 
with virtually coincident admission to the California bar. During the 
long interi-ening years he has been engaged in active general practice at 
San Francisco, with a record of substantial and worthy achievement as a 
resourceful trial lawyer and well fortified counselor. He has considered 
his profession well worthy of his undivided allegiance, aqd thus has had 
no ambition for political activity or public office, though he is a staunch 
advocate of the principles of the democratic party and is a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen. He and his family are communicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, and he is a member of the Commonwealth Club, a rep- 
resentative organization in the City of San Francisco. 

Mrs. Nellie S. (Thompson) Sharpsteen, wife of the subject of this 
review, was born and reared in California, and is a daughter of the late 
Lucius Thompson. Mr. and Mrs. Sharpsteen have five children: Miss 
Katherine is a teacher in the San Luis (.)bisjx) High School; John L. is 
engaged in the work of his profession, tliat of mechanical and electrical 
engineer, with residence in Alameda and headquarters in San Francisco ; 
Dr. Jay R. is a leading physician and surgeon engaged in practice at 
Alameda, and specializes in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose 
and throat ; Benjamin L., who is now at the parental home, was in the 
nation's military service in the World war period and is now on the staff 
of the Oakland Tribune; and Eleanor S. Xurthup is assistant superin- 
tendent of Grand Island Hospital. Grand Island, Nebraska. 

William Chilton Clark was one of the pioneers in the electrical 
development on the Pacific Coast. For many years he was associated with 
the Waterhouse Brothers as head of the San Francisco Electric Light 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 211 

Company, and helped install the first arc system of electric lighting in 
that city. 

The late Mr. Clark was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1852. He 
represented a very distinguished family. His grandfather, James Clark, 
was born in Virginia in 1779, and as a child moved with his family to 
Clark County, Kentucky. He became a lawyer, served in the Legislature, 
as judge of Kentucky courts, was elected to Congress, and in 1836 was 
chosen Governor of Kentucky, an office he was filling at the time of his 
death in 1839. 

A son of Governor Clark and father of William C. Clark was Judge 
Robert C. Clark, who was born in Kentucky in 1814, and prepared himself 
for the law there. He practiced law in St. Louis for several years, and 
in 1852 came across the plains to California, locating in Sacramento, where 
for thirty years he was regarded as one of the ablest members of his pro- 
fession. In 1860 he was elected judge of the Sacramento County Court, 
and he filled that office for twenty years. Under the new constitution in 
1879 he was elected judge of the Superior Court, and was on the bench 
when he died, Januarj' 27, 1883. Judge Clark married Sarah M. Wilco.x, 
a native of Ohio. 

William Chilton Clark was the only son of his parents who arrived 
at maturity and was an infant when brought to California. He was reared 
and educated in Sacramento, and as a youth began as a clerk for the 
Wells-Fargo E.xpress Company, and later was in the Sacramento offices 
of the Central Pacific Railroad. He was also teller in the bank of 
D. O. Mills S: Company at Sacramento. 

In that city, February 25, 1875, he married Sallie Russell, daughter 
of Patrick Henry Russell. Patrick Henry Russell was one of the dis- 
tingm'shed California pioneers and was born in Simpsonville, Kentucky, 
w-as married in Missouri and in 1852 came across the plains, being five 
months on the journey. There was one mule team and the others were 
oxen. One of his brothers was shot during the journey by the Indians, 
but recovered, but another brother was shot and died on the trip. Mrs. 
Clark was an infant when this trip was made, and learned to walk before 
they reached California. Her father first tried mining, but with little 
success, and then established one of the first grocery stores in Sacramento. 
Subsequently he was in business as a wholesale grocer at Virginia City^ 
and became closely associated with Charles Crocker and other big men in 
California. He came to San Francisco, retired from business in 1892, 
and died in 1906, at the age of eighty-four. Mrs. Russell died in 1914. 

After his marriage William C. Clark moved to San Francisco, and 
was cashier for the hardware firm of Carolan, Corv & Companv. With 
the first development of electric lighting he became interested in that new 
field, and acted as manager for the Waterhouse Electric Company. This 
system was acquired by the Westinghouse Company in 1889, and Mr. 
Clark was continued as manager of the San Francisco office. This posi- 
tion placed all the interests of the Westinghouse Company on the Pacific 
Coast under his direction. Later, when financial adversities overtook the 



212 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

W'estinghouse Company, the California office was discontinued and Mr. 
Clark was called to Pittsburgh and became assistant treasurer and general 
manager of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. By 
1895 his health had become so impaired by the rigorous climate of Pitts- 
burgh that he returned to California. He resumed business here in con- 
nection with the Union Scale and Manufacturing Company. Mr. Clark 
was interested in installing the first electrical lighting equipment in China, 
and also in the installation of the first acetylene gas plants in New Zealand 
and Australia.. 

Mr. Clark died on February 28, 1905, and is survived by Mrs. Clark, 
whose home is at 302 Laurel Street in San Francisco. She has two 
daughters. Miss Laura and Aliss Elsie, both at home. 

Jasper O'Farrell was a California pioneer whose arrival in the state 
anticipated the historic discovery of gold, and he, as a skilled civil engineer 
and a man of much prevision, played a large and influential part in the 
early development and upbuilding of San Francisco and also in the general 
industrial advancement of the state in the pioneer era of its history. He 
was one of the honored ])ioneer citizens of San Francisco at the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was about fifty-five years of age. 

Mr. O'Farrell was born and reared- in Ireland, where his father was 
a farmer, and he there received good educational advantages, including 
training for the profession of civil engineer. In 1843 Mr. O'Farrell 
crossed the Atlantic Ocean to the LTnited States, and before the close of 
that year he had completed the voyage around Cape Horn to San Fran- 
cisco. In 1846 he was authorized, Ijy Washington Bartlett, San Fran- 
cisco magistrate, to survey the city, and he was one of the engineers who 
laid out San Francisco, and O'Farrell Street in this city was named in 
his honor. Mr. O'Farrell surveyed and laid out much of the land in 
the central part of San Francisco, and the blocks which he defined com- 
prised fiftv acres each, with streets on all four sides of the s(|uare blocks. 
In this important service he did a work of excellent order and of enduring 
value, and in comiKnsation he was given grants of Spanish land, he 
having been at one time the owner of more than one-half of the land now 
comprising Sonoma County. In 1848 he surveyed and platted the now 
attractive little City of Benicia, Solano County. Mr. O'Farrell had in 
the early days much of leadershi]:) in public affairs in California. He 
seri-ed with characteristic ability and loyalty as a member of the State 
Legislature, and he was one of the pioneers in the development of Sonoma 
County, where, on his extensive ranch, he maintained his home and reared 
his children. The maiden name of his wife was McChristian. .she having 
been born in one of the New England states, of Scotch ancestry. Of the 
children it is to be recorded that Elena is now a resident of Sonoma 
County ; John and Florence are deceased ; Gerald is a resident of Sonoma 
Countv; Minnie is the wife of Daniel Leahy; Cathol married Miss 
Margaret Gleason and they maintain their home at Sonoma ; and Louis 
is deceased. Elena, Cathol and Gerald O'Farrell all reside on the old 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 215 

O'Farrell ranch at Freestone, Sonoma County, California. The ranch is 
called .\naly Ranch, named after Jas])er O'FarreU's father's estate in 
Ireland. 

John O'Farrell was born vn the Anal\ Ranch in .Sonoma County and 
received his education in the public schools and St. Mary's College in 
San Francisco. His uncle, John, a brother of Jasper, founded the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Comjjany and John O'Farrell went to work as a purser 
on one of the boats running between San F"rancisco and Monterey. He 
later went into the real estate business in San Francisco, under the firm 
name of O'Farrell & Lang. In 1895 he again took service with the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company, and was lost at sea on the Steamship 
Valencia off the AX'ashington coast in 1905. John O'Farrell took a promi- 
nent part in civic affairs and was identified with all progressive move- 
ments. He was a member of the Olympic Club. 

He married ]\Iiss Mary Loughran, a native of Missouri and a daughter 
of Thomas P. Loughran, of the commission firm of Loughran & Breeze. 
Thev became the parents of four children: Evelyn, wife of T. Morris 
Dunn, in the manufacturing business in Portland, Oregon; Marguerite, 
wife of R. E. Coft'man, associated with Blake. Moffatt &: Towne in San 
Francisco; Rispah. wife of Denis C. Gleason, a merchant of Phoenix, 
Arizona, and Jasjier, assistant cashier of the Mission Savings Bank in 
San Francisco. 

Albert Pauldixg Brayton. In business, industry and education the 
name Brayton is associated with many unusual achievements in California. 

The late Albert Paulding BraMon was for many years a San Fran- 
cisco manufacturer, and was a brother of Rev. Isaac Bravton, who 
'deser^-es a lasting place in the history of education in California. Rev. 
Isaac Brayton was a brilliant scholar, a graduate of Hamilton College in 
Nev^' York, and soon afterward came to California in pioneer times. 
At Oakland he established Brayton College, which for a time was the 
most noted seat of learning on the Pacific Coast. Brayton College became 
the College of California with Rev. Isaac Brayton as its president, and out 
of that institution has been developed the great Lhiiversity of California. 
Rev. Isaac Brayton was also editor of the Pacific, a paper widelv read 
in pioneer times. He helped promote the first railway in Oakland in 1864. 
Stricken with a lingering illness, brought on bv overwork, he passed awav 
in 1869. 

Albert Paulding Brayton was born in Watertown, JefTerson County, 
New York, in 1828. He was a nephew by marriage of Gen. Joseph 
Hooker, and the influence of General Hooker had much to do with the 
mature life and career of Mr. Brayton. \\'hen he was about twenty-one 
years of age Albert P. Brayton, who had been liberally educated, like 
his brother, became an instructor at Springer Institute, a seminarv for 
young ladies in New York City. In that connection he became associated 
with the late Dr. Lyman .Abbott, one of the. greatest teachers and ministers 
America has produced. 



216 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

]\Ir. Brayton arrived at San Francisco in 1851. He rented the famous 
Stockton Ranch, and a fire shortly afterward destroyed practically all 
his property. Subsequently he engaged in the drug business at Marysville, 
and in that venture enjoyed exceptional success. In 1861 Mr. Brayton 
was instrumental in starting the Pacific Iron Works, under the firm 
name of Rankin, Brayton & Company. This business was the old God- 
dard Iron Works and was purchased by Mr. Brayton and Mr. Rankin 
and the name changed. Until 1887 this establishment manufactured a 
great deal of the machinery used in the mines on the Pacific Coast. Finally, 
realizing the vast possibilities of hydraulic engineering, Mr. Brayton 
founded the Pelton Water Wheel Company. He thus became a pioneer 
in the water power development of California. The Pelton W^ater Wheels 
were famous all over the world, and were used not only in this country 
but in England, France, Russia and Japan. 

Albert P. Brayton not only proved his ability as a business man, but 
was deeply interested in the welfare of his home city, and personally 
was beloved by all who came in contact with him. He had much to do 
with early day politics in San Francisco, and was a leader in the Vigi- 
lantes. Once he was asked to allow his name to go before a convention 
as candidate for the nomination for governor, but he declined. 

His oldest son, Albert P. Brayton, Jr., was vice president and manager 
of the Pelton Water Wheel Company until his death in 1902. The second 
son, Edward Lacy Brayton, then succeeded as -president of the com- 
pany, and continued it until ill health forced him to dispose of his interests 
in 1922, and he died in July of the same year. The only daughter of 
Albert P. Brayton is Miss Louise, who resides at 1300 Sacramento Street. 

Robert M. Loeser, M. D., was a man of high intellectual and profes- 
sional attainments. He had a somewhat adventurous spirit, was fond of 
travel and new experiences, and thus much of his career was apart from 
the profession for which he had admirably equipped himself. Doctor 
Loeser was a resident of San Francisco at the time of his death, and 
passed away at the age of fifty-seven years. 

Dr. Robert M. Loeser was born in the City of Brooklyn. New York, 
on the 16th of April, 1865, and in his native commonwealth and in Switzer- 
land and Germany he received in his youth excellent educational advan- 
tages, which he later supplemented by attending Harvard L^niversity. In 
New York City he was thereafter graduated in Bellevue College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, and his early service in his profession was given in 
the State of New York. In the '80s Doctor Loeser made the long 
voyage around Cape Horn and up the coast to California, and after re- 
maining a few years in San Francisco he went to Texas, where for ten 
vears he was a member of the famed Company D of the Texas Rangers 
and gained broad and varied experience in frontier life. After his return 
to California he put his fine scientific ability to practical use by serving 
as a member of the faculty of the chemical department of Leland Stanford, 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 217 

Jr., University, and he had also speciallj' high standing in his profession. 
He was a Knight Templar Mason, and in the Scottish Rite of this time- 
honored fraternity he received the thirty-second degree and was a life 
member of Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine, having demitted from 
Denver, Colorado. He was a member of the Pacific Union Club, a life 
member of the Press Club of San Francisco and the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club. He was one of the well known and highly honored 
citizens of San Francisco at the time of his death, which occurred on the 
30th of May, 1922. 

The rear 1895 recorded the marriage of Doctor Loeser and Miss 
Katharine Foster, she being a niece of Hon. John W. Foster, who served 
as Secretary of State of the United States under the administration of 
President Benjamin Harrison. Doctor Loeser is not survived by children. 

Joseph Gladding Chittenden. In recalling names and personalities 
once very familiar in the business life of San Francisco in connection with 
large mining interests, Joseph Gladding Chittenden comes to mind as an ex- 
ample of hardy enterprise and sterling character. He came to California in 
the days following the great stampede of 1849, thirty years old and of East- 
ern education and culture, and while the rough life of the frontier at that 
time was never acceptable, he understood it as being the quick uprooting of 
manv old home ties and conventionalities, and the lack of authority to 
regulate and control undisciplined men. During the many years that he 
spent in the mining camps of the West, in a general way he earned and 
preserved the respect of his associates, and among them numbered many 
personal friends as long as he lived. 

Mr. Chittenden was born at Stephentown. Rensselaer County. New 
York, Mav 30, 1826. He came of English ancestr)- and Colonial stock. His 
mother belonged to the ancient Jngraham family of Leeds. England, and 
his father to one of the old families of Devonshire, members of which 
came to New England after the close of the Pequot war. Air. Chittenden's 
line of ancestors crossed the Atlantic and found safe harbor in 1630 in what 
was called the New Haven colony, in the town of Guilford, which they 
helped to found. In memory of their old English homes the colonists 
when financially able built their new residences stout and strong and after 
the architecture of old England. Thus generation after generation passed 
away and still the old Chittenden mansion withstood the ravages of time, 
and when, within the memory of the present generation, it was purchased 
by the Daughters of the American Revolution, it was the oldest building 
standing in Guilford, Connecticut. 

Joseph S. Chittenden came to California in 1856. by the isthmus route 
and before the railroads were built. It is not probable that he had ever 
had any mining experience before coming to the great West, but the life 
suited him and he prospered in it and continued his interest in mining 
enterprises until his death. 

In 1844 Mr. Chittenden married Miss .\nn Alarian Green, who was 
born in Rensselaer County, New York, and two daughters were born to 



218 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

them: Alice Brown Chittenden, wlio in 1887 was married to Charles 
P. Overton, has one daughter, Miriam, who is the wife of James F. Cronier 
of San Francisco ; and Carrie Louise, who is the widow of Capt. William 
Taylor, whose death occurred in his Eastern home. For many years he 
sailed vessels from this port and one is still in service. In earlier days 
Captain Taylor made a record trip on a sailing vessel between Liverpool 
and Philadelphia that has never been beaten. Captain and Mrs. Taylor 
had two sons, William Chittenden Taylor and Joseph Ingraham Taylor. 
William Chittenden Taylor is chief chemist in what is probably the most 
extensive glass company in the L'nited States, and has the distinction of 
being the inventor of the unbreakable pyrox solution so important in 
chemistry. Joseph Ingraham Chittenden is an industrial engineer in the 
Goodyear Tube Company plant. 

Alice Brown Chittenden is known all over her own and in other 
countries as an artist. She was born in San Francisco and early developed 
great artistic talent, even painting with correctness in childhood. When 
sixteen years of age she attended an art school for one year, and then 
began her wonderful flower pictures that brought her the title of Rose 
Painter of the Pacific Coast. She has always taken much interest in 
teaching her art and at the ])resent time and for many years has been 
teaching in the California School of Design and also as art instructor 
in San Francisco. Her portraits, especially those of children, have been 
admired and praised when exhibited in San Francisco and New York City, 
and in 1908 her paintings were accepted in the Paris salon. 

Mrs. William Taylor is a singer of note and is well known in this 
capacity both in San Francisco and in Eastern cities. 

Charles George L.\mbert has Iieen a resident of California since 
1894, and has here found ample scope and opportunity for successful 
achievement in connection with the civic and material progress of San 
Mateo County, at the judicial center of which he is a leader in the real 
estate business, a member of the firm of Lambert & Walters. At Redwood 
Citv the firm maintains well appointed oftices, and its substantial operations 
involve the handling of both urban and country real estate. 

Mr. Lambert was born in England, on the 17th of January, 1872, and 
is a son of Charles and Mary (Upward) Lambert, representatives of old 
and honored families of England. Mr. Lambert was reared and educated 
in his native land, and was a youth of twenty-two years when he came to 
the United States and established his residence at Belmont, San Mateo 
County, he having been accomixmied by one of his sisters and the latter 
being now a resident of the City of San Mateo. Air. Laml>ert arrived at 
Belmont in August, 1894, and within a short time thereafter he removed 
to Redwood City, the county seat, where he became manager of a real 
estate concern. He continued his activities in this connection for a period 
of sixteen vears. made a record of splendid constructive adiicvement, 
and then engaged independently in the same line of business as a member of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 219 

the firm of Lambert i^ Walters, known as utie of the most vital, progressive 
and successful in this tickl of real estate activities. Mr. Lambert takes 
loyal interest in all that touches the welfare of his home cit)' and county, 
and is one of the representati\e business men of Redwood City, with 
secure place in popular conhdence and esteem. He is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Udd Fellows and the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. 

In June, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Lambert and 
Miss Lillie Belle Harrison, who was born at Belmont, this county, a 
daughter of Alfred Harrison. Mr. and Mrs. Lambert have two children. 
Norma Eileen and Norbutus. 

James D. Brown is one of the older native sons of California, and 
has been actively' associated with business, professional and public work 
in San Francisco for nearly half a century. 

His father, the late David B. Brown, was one of the interesting and 
forceful characters in the pioneer days of California. A native of County 
Tyrone, Ireland, he came to California early in 1851, making the journey 
around Cape Horn. For several years he. followed mining in Tuolumne 
County, and then returned to the Bay region. As a partner of Captain 
Emerson he established the first lime kiln at Mountain View. They owned 
20,000 acres of land in that section, and because the value of land was so 
low they finally let it go for taxes. David B. Brown next became interested 
in the hoop manufacturing business, practically controlling the hoop 
industry on the Pacific Coast. He supplied among others the Spreckels 
Company, and after cutting all the hazel out of California he sought the 
raw material for manufacture in Washington and Oregon. He continued 
in that business until his death. His wife, Margaret ^IcGowan, was also 
a native of County Tyrone, Ireland. 

Their son, James D. Brown, was born in Santa Clara County, Cali- 
fornia, March 10, 1853. He was educated in public schools of San 
Francisco, and having in mind a professional career as a physician, he 
studied abroad for five years in Ireland and in France. Not being satis- 
fied with a medical career, he returned to San Francisco, in 1876 and 
for five years was in the wholesale grocery business. About that time 
he studied and made himself proficient in shorthand, and for twelve years, 
from 1881 to 1893, acted as court reporter for the Police and Superior 
courts of San Francisco. In 1893 Mr. Brown took the management of one 
of the big typewriter companies, and that was his business here until the 
big fire of 1906. For the past fifteen years he has been occupied largely 
with notarial work and his duties as a commissioner of deeds. 

Mr. Brown has had an active part in republican politics. He has 
represented his party in County, State and National conventions, including 
the McKinley Convention in Philadelphia and the Roosevelt Convention 
in Chicago. He is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks of San Francisco, the Rotary Club and Stanford Parlor of the Golden 



220 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

West. He and his wife are members of Calvary Presbyterian Church, 
and Mrs. Brown is a very active member. 

On March 7, 1887, he married Miss Alice Digges, a native of San Mateo 
County, where her father, Robert Digges, was a farmer. They have two 
children, a son and a daughter. The son, David B. Brown, was a student 
in the University of California when America entered the World war, 
and enlisted in the Eighth Engineers Corps, and afterwards was transferred 
to the Eighteenth. He was one of the first to go to France, and one of the 
last to leave; He was engaged in Government work under Capt. Hugh 
Wiley, and is now a salesman for the Anderson-Smith automobile. 

The daughter, Marrianne G. Brown, graduated from the University 
of California, and died durinsj the influenza epidemic, on October 29, 1918. 
By her marriage to \N'illiam Payne, she was the mother of one son, 
James \\'. Payne. 

Alexander Madison Rosborough was one of the able and honored 
members of the bar of Oakland and a pioneer representative of his pro- 
fession in California, his earlier activities in this state having touched 
various lines aside from the work of his ])rofession. 

Judge Rosborough was born in South Carolina, in 1815, and was a son 
of Dr. Alexander Rosborough and Jane (Porter) Rosborough, both vener- 
able residents of Tennessee at the time of their death. Alexander- M. 
Rosborough was reared in Tennessee, and received the best available edu- 
cational advantages there presented. He served with a Tennessee command 
in the exp>editions against the Creek Indians in Alabama and the Seminole 
Indians in Florida, in the '30s, his discharge from this service having 
occurred in 1837. Thereafter he was a student in the University of East 
Tennessee, in which he was graduated in 1840. He read law at Columbia, 
that state, and in 1843 was licensed to practice, he having engaged in 
practice at Columbia and having been for a time concerned in the publish- 
ing of a newspaper at that place. He later had editorial supervision of the 
Nashville Daily Whig. In 1850 the Tennessee Mining Company was 
formed to operate in the newly discovered gold fields of California, and 
Judge Rosborough came to California in the capacity of superintendent for 
this comjiany. He passed the fir.st winter in mining operations in El- 
dorado Cdunty, and in 1851 he became a member of the editorial staflf of 
the Evening Pica\une in San Francisco. In 1852 lie engaged in the practice 
of law in Trinity County, and became one of the founders of Crescent City. 
He served for a time as special Indian agent, and finally engaged in the 
practice of law at Yreka. In 1855 he was elected judge of Siskiyou County, 
and in this office he served four terms, of tlu-ee years each, save for the 
latter part of the fourth term, he having resigned in I860. an<I having there- 
after served about nine years as district judge of Modoc, .'^hasta. Trinity 
and Siskiyou counties, his retirement occurring in 187^. He was a peace 
commissioner at the close of the Modoc Indian war. In 1880 TuHge Ros- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 221 

borough removed to Oakland, and this city continued the stage of his suc- 
cessful professional activities during the remainder of his career. 

In 1861 Judge Rosborough married Miss Xellie Raunes, who was born 
in Maine, and the children of this union were two sons and one daughter. 

Charles Curtiss Judson was a young man of twenty-two years when 
he, together with his parents, grandmother, two sisters and a brother, came 
to California in the year 1857, having made the journey by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama, arriving in San Francisco on the 14th of February 
of that year. 

He was long and prominently identified with large and important 
industrial interests in the state of his adoption, and was one of the sterling 
and honored pioneer citizens of San Francisco at the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 16th of April, 1913, leaving surviving him his widow, 
Susan A. Trenouth, a son Chester William, and daughter. Pearl, the 
latter of whom is the wife of Frank Alton Somers of San Francisco. 

Mr. Judson was born in the State of New York, on the 21st of Novem- 
ber, 1834, and was the eldest of five children of James and Ann (Easter- 
brook) Judson, the former born in 1814, and the latter of whom was born 
in 1915 in Devonshire, England. The other four children were Charlotte 
Ann, Sophia Cornelia, Mary and Henry Clay, all likewise deceased, the 
daughter Mary's death occurring in the East before the family came out 
to California. 

Charles C. Judson was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm, and is indebted to the schools of his native state for his early 
education. L'pon his arrival in San Francisco he became associated with 
the business interests of his uncle, Egbert Judson, who was long one of 
the prominent and influential citizens and substantial capitalists of San 
Francisco he having been the owner of the Judson Powder Works, a 
principal in the Judson Iron Works and a large stockholder and director 
of the Giant Powder Company, besides which he gave his influence and 
financial cooperation in the upbuilding of other important industrial con- 
cerns. 

The subject of this memoir was entrusted with large responsibilities 
in connection with the management of his uncle's business interests, and 
with these interests he continued his close alliance throughout virtually 
his entire active career. He was loyal and liberal as a citizen, took deep 
interest in all that touched the welfare of his home city and state, and 
though he was a staunch republican he had no desire for pxDlitical activity 
or public office. 

Though a protestant in his religious views, he was not affiliated with 
any particular church. 

WiLLi.\M Harrison Mills was one of California's ablest editors and 
newspaper men. He was not only one of the successful men in the tech- 
nical and business details of newsjxiper work, but his usefulness and 
influence became state wide. His influence in state affairs was inspired by 

Vol. 11-11 



222 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

his fine sense of justice, his hberal humanitarianism and his steadfast 
purpose to better conditions about him. 

He was born in Fayette County, Indiana, September 12, 1836, was a 
young man of about twenty-five when he came to California. His parents 
were Rev. Ephraim and Mary (W'oorster) Mills. They were natives of 
Kentucky, and represented some of the substantial families in the Blue 
Grass section of that state. However, they were opposed to slavery, and 
freeing their own negroes they moved with a group of other neighbors 
from Fayette County, Kentucky, to Indiana, and as pioneers were influen- 
tial in naming the Indiana county after their old home in Kentucky. 
Ephraim Mills was an ardent abolitionist, and made that doctrine an 
intimate part of his preaching of the Gospel. He died in 1850. 

William Harrison Mills was fourteen years old when his father died. 
He then went to Illinois to live with his sister Sarah, wife of Joseph 
Graham, of the manufacturing firm of Graham & Roberts. From 1856 to 
1861 he made his home with his mother at Wilmington, Ohio. Upon her 
death in 1861 he rejoined Mr. and Mrs. Graham and came to Cahfomia 
together. 

In California for a short time Mr. Mills was superintendent for the 
contracting firm of Stone & Hayden at San Quentin. While there he 
witnessed the cruel treatment of prisoners, and the scenes inspired in him 
a lifelong fervor for prison reform. It was largely through representa- 
tions made by him that Rev. C. S. Haswell, then a member of the Legis- 
lature, influenced the passage of the Goodwin act, establishing the credit 
svstem for good behavior among prisoners. A number of years later 
Governor Perkins appointed Mr. Mills a member of a commission to inves- 
tigate prison conditions. The two other members of that commission were 
Robert Watt and George W. Gibbs. 

Mr. Mills in 1863 became editor of the Rescue, a small newspaper at 
Sacramento. His editorials soon attracted attention and the paper built 
up a substantial circulation on the strength of his individual writings. 
Soon afterward he was offered the editorship of the Record, rival of the 
Sacramento Union, then one of the great newspapers of the state. The 
Record under the management of Mr. Mills soon outstripped the Union, 
and in time the Union was acquired by the Record. Mr. Mills consolidating 
them as the Record-Union. His big achievements in journalism were made 
while editor of the Record-Union for a period of over a quarter of a 
century. He not only made this a great and powerful pap>er, but also 
made it an instrument for the social welfare, and brought to the paper the 
services of such able writers at George F. Parsons and Henr}' George. 

In 1883, while still continuing the management of the Record-Union, 
Mr. Mills became land commissioner of the Central Pacific Railroad. He 
took this office fnade vacant by the death of R. B. Redding. He was 
attracted to the duties, as they presented him an opixirtunity to work up the 
colonization movement and advocate the irrigation of desert lands and 
scientific farming. Mr. Mills was founder of the California Press Asso- 
ciation of the State Board of Trade. For C. P. Huntington he took to 
Paris in 1900 a complete exhibit of the products and resources of the 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 223 

states through which the Southern Pacific and Central Pacific passed and 
this was only one example of his untiring work to exhibit and advertise 
the "resources of the community. He inaugurated the movement for forest 
protection, and was also one of the first to advocate breaking up the great 
ranches into small farms and attracting the substantial small farmer. 
Fortunately he lived to see some of his ideas lor the irrigation of the 
interior valleys taken up by the federal and state governments, and plans 
outlined which subsequently have brought about the watering of 13,000,000 
acres of arable soil. Mr. Mills was also a prime mover in the plan for the 
protection of the state's immense and valuable forests of redwood, pine, 
spruce, cedar and fir. Fie wrote constantly, and while some of his choicest 
writings are buried in the files of his newspapers, others with a special 
purpose have been kept in more permanent form. One of these was an 
essay he wrote in 1898 entitled "The Purpose of Our Nation in the Present 
War," which attracted the attention of President McKinley and Robert G. 
Ingersoll. Mr. Alills was a member of the University Club, the Unitarian 
Club and the Chit Chat Club, and wrote some of the most notable essays 
for these bodies, one of them being the "Panama Canal" and another 
"John Wesley and Evolution." Mr. Mills was a constant student, and had 
a surprising range of general information. He was a brilliant conversa- 
tionalist, and a convincing speaker on public occasions. His rare gifts and 
his professional work attracted to him some of the greatest men of the 
West. One of these was Collis P. Huntington, who invariably chose 
Mr. Mills to preside over the famous banquets given by that captain of 
industry. Mr. Mills personally was generous, kindly, charitable, a sincere 
friend, and was a foe of artifice and deception. 

One of the first public institutions he advocated after establishing his 
paper, the Rescue, was the building of the Good Templars Orphanage at 
Vallejo, and he largely financed this enterprise and the institution still 
stands as a monument to his zeal. He was a member of the First Unitarian 
Church and a close friend of its able minister, Horatio Stebbins. Mr. 
Mills died May 25, 1907. 

In 1867 Air. Mills married Maria Elizabeth Haswell, daughter of 
Rev. C. S. Haswell, a prominent figure in the early days of California. 
Mrs.' Mills survives her honored husband. Her children, all now deceased, 
were Ruskin Mills, Irving Wood Mills, Ardella Mills, and Elizabeth, who 
became the wife of George Edw-ard Crothers of San Francisco, and was 
also a noted artist and poet. 

Daniel A. Rvan is engaged in the practice of his profession in his 
native Citv of San Francisco, is a representative of one of the sterling 
pioneer families of this state, and as a prominent member of the Native 
Sons of the Golden West he was elected grand president of this splendid 
organization in the vear 1910. Mr. Ryan controls a large and important 
law business, has appeared in connection w-ith litigations of sjiecial promi- 
nence in connection with the annals of California jurisprudence, and has 
won specially high reputation as a trial lawyer of exceptional power and 
resourcefulness. His law offices are maintained in the Hearst Building. 



224 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Mr. Ryan was born in San Francisco, on the 24th of August, 1873, 
and is a son of Daniel and Mary (Crowley) Ryan, who became the 
parents of seven children. The death of the father occurred in 1898 and 
that of the mother in 1910. Daniel Ryan came to California in the '50s 
and engaged in the tanning business at San Francisco, where later he was 
for many years successfully engaged in the livery business. He was 
one of the well known and highly esteemed pioneer citizens of San Fran- 
cisco at the time of his death, and both he and his wife were zealous 
communicants of the Catholic Church. 

The preliminary education of Daniel A. Ryan was acquired in the 
parochial and public schools of his native city, and thereafter he com- 
pleted a thorough course in the Christian Brothers College in this city, in 
which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He finished 
college when seventeen years of age and forthwith entered the law office 
of General W. H. L. Barnes, under whose able preceptorship he carried 
forward his law studies until he was admitted to the bar in 1894, when 
twenty-one years of age. He continued his professional alliance with 
General Barnes for a period of ten years, during which he was actively 
identified with the handling of virtually all cases taken up by General 
Barnes. In his independent practice Mr. Ryan has specialized in trial 
work, and he has won many cases of major importance, including the 
famous Indian Basin litigation, in which he represented the State of 
California and recovered to the commonwealth and the City of San Fran- 
cisco sixty-three city blocks, for which the sum of $800,000 was paid, 
instead of that of $2,500,000, which had been demanded. He was attor- 
ney for Hermans in the California building case, in which he won another 
noteworthy victory. He is frequently called upon to represent other 
members of the bar as an assistant or principal in the trial of important 
cases, and he has done also a large amount of probate work. 

Mr. Ryan is a leader in the local councils and campaign activities of 
the republican party, in which he served as chairman of the California 
State Central Committee, besides having been chosen chairman of the 
first State Central Committee of the progressive wing of the party, at 
the time when the late Col. Theodore Roosevelt was the progressive can- 
didate for the presidency of the United States. 

Of Mr. Ryan's influential and appreciative affiliation with the Native 
Sons of the Golden West mention has already been made in this review. 
He is affiliated also with the Knights of Columbus and the Woodmen of 
the World, is a member of the Olympic Club in his native city, and he 
and his wife are earnest communicants of the Catholic Church. 

In the year 1904 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ryan and 
Miss Josephine Cooney, and they have three daughters, Elaine, Kathleen 
and Mary Marguerite. 

Henry .St. Goar. a man of engaging personality and of exceptional 
ability as a financier, established his residence in San Francisco in the year 
1892, and here engaged in the stock and bond brokerage business, of which 
he became a prominent and influential representative. He was the founder 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 227 

of the important brokerage firm of PoUitz & Company, financial pro- 
moters and financiers of sugar industries in Hawaii, and with this concern 
he continued his connection as a leading executive until his death, which 
occurred on the 8th of May, 1922. Mr. St. Goar made and left a distinct 
impress upon the civic and business life of his adopted city, was a man 
of talent and of fine character, and in all of the relations of life commended 
himself to the confidence and good will of his fellow men. 

Mr. St. Goar was born in the historic old City of Frankfort-on-the- 
Main, Germany, a son of Meyer St. Goar, and he was sixty-seven years 
of age at the time of his death. His father was a leading banker at Frank- 
fort, and the subject of this memoir received in his native land not only 
his early education but also his initial experience in the banking business, 
this experience having thereafter been amplified by connections in England 
and France. 

Mr. St. Goar married Miss Nellie Oppenheimer, who was born at Nice, 
France, a daughter of Sir Charles and Lady Oppenheimer, and since the 
death of her husband Mrs. St. Goar has elected to continue her residence 
in San Francisco, where her home is at 2025 California Street. Mr. St. 
Goar is survived also by four children : ]\Irs. Erna L. Mee, whose husband 
is a representative member of the San Francisco bar ; Fred H. and Charles 
E., who are successfully engaged in the stock brokerage business in this 
city ; and Mrs. Helen Gunther, whose husband is a commissioned lieu- 
tenant in the United States Army. 

Samuel Murray. A resident of San Francisco for more than sixty 
years, probably no one has taken a keener interest in the development of 
this great Pacific port than Samuel Murray. His own business activities 
have kept him in close touch with the port, and his time and influence 
have been freely enlisted in any program looking toward the development 
of the waterfront district. It is a fact that gives him more than ordinary 
distinction that for forty-five years he has owned and conducted in the 
same location one of the largest machine shops with particular facilities 
for the equipping of ships in San Francisco. 

His life since the age of seven has counted its years around San Fran- 
cisco Bay. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts. July 28. 1833. Wil- 
liam Murray, his father, was a native of Scotland, and on coming to 
America, took the position of foreman under Thatcher McGowan for the 
ship building firm of Donald McKay on the Mystic River in Massachu- 
setts. In 1860 he came to San Francisco with his family on jMcGowan's 
ship, the Electric Spark. He died in 1865. having spent the intervening 
vears in San Francisco, following the carpenter's trade. His \vife. Mary 
b. Murray, was born in Ireland, and of their four children, \\'illiam, 
Elizabeth, Adelaide and Samuel, Samuel is now the only survivor. 

Samuel ^Murray after coming to San Francisco attended public schools, 
and at the age of sixteen became self supporting through his service as an 
office bov for the Minton Navigation Company. This connection was soon 
severed in order that he might learn the machinist's trade. He found 



228 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

employment and opportunity in that direction in the bohing business with 
Hawkins & Cantrell on Beale Street between Howard and Folsom streets. 
After twelve years of faithful service he engaged in business for himself, 
in 1880, at the corner of Beale and Folsom streets. In that one location 
he has kept his plant, growing and prospering, and has a shop in which 
thirty-two men are employed at the present writing. His work is largely 
in hoisting engines and all kinds of marine apparatus. Some very credit- 
able improvements and inventions are the result of the mechanical genius 
of Samuel Murray. In 1882 he built the very first logging engines in the 
country, and also built the first electric hoist on the coast, for the Duns- 
muir Coal Mines. In 1882 he patented and built the first friction engines. 

His business activities have brought him in touch with nearly all the 
prominent men who have lived in California since pioneer times, and he 
knew personally some of the most famous of the old. pioneer Californians. 
He has been heart and soul interested in the waterfront district, and his 
personal activities have added something to its development. He has 
never sought a public office, and has never been active in political circles 
beyond voting the republican ticket. He was at one time a member of the 
Dolphin Club, is a Catholic, and a member of San Rafael Lodge of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. From 1872 to 1881 Samuel 
Murray was a member of the First Regiment, National Guard, of Cali- 
fornia. 

He married at San Francisco, in 1885, Miss Katherine Hickey. She. 
too, was born in Boston, her father, William Hickey, coming West and 
for many years was a well known San Francisco contractor. Five chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Murray : Harry, the oldest, now 
associated with his father in the machine business, graduated from the 
University of California in the class of 1912, and is a member of the 
Bohemian Club and the Corinthian Yacht Club. Samuel Murray, Junior, 
also associated with the Murray ^Machine Shop, graduated from the San 
Rafael High School, is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and married on November 3, 1913, Miss Ruth Dunne, daughter 
of Peter F. Dunne, of San Francisco. The only daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Murray is Adelaide, at home. Benjamin \\'., a graduate of the San 
Rafael High School, served with the Merchant Marines dui'ing the war, 
is now a marine engineer who has been in the employ of the Watson NaNn- 
gation Company, the Admiral Line and the Dollar Steamship Company, 
and is a member of the Order of Elks. Leo P., the youngest of the fam- 
ily, is a draughtsman in his father's shop, is a young man of exceptional 
technical equipment, having graduated Bachelor of Science in 1921 and 
Master of Science in 1^122 from the UniversHty of California. He is a 
member of the Corinthian Yacht Club and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Homer S. King. The values that abide in character, energy, and the 
op]-)ortunities of American life are illustrated notably in the career of 
Homer S. King, long a citizen of San Francisco and numbered among 
the foremost forces of its social and business life. There was that in 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 229 

Mr. King's physical and moral heritage that both prompted and supported 
the activities and the notable successes of his life. He came of the Amer- 
ican foundation stock — by blood English, freed from old world restric- 
tions and energized by generations of American life. Mr. King was born 
in Ohio, in 1841, whence his family in a previous generation had mi- 
grated from its original home in Pennsylvania. In 1852 his parents 
joined the movemeni that brought to California the adventurous and hardy 
spirits by which it was redeemed from the wilderness. In the American 
occupation of California there was much that has given it a distinctive 
character — a history, a temperament, even a romance, that is today a spe- 
cial inspiration of its people. At the age of twelve we find Homer King 
a schoolboy at Sacramento, no brother to the whining lad of which 
Shakespeare tells us, but a bright little cheerful boy prompt in his studies 
and aiding by boyish industries the fortunes of his family. Everywhere 
and always those who are doing the active work of the world are on the 
lookout for building efficiency, and thus it came to the notice of the man- 
ager of the Wells Fargo Express Service that here was a lad of promise. 
Homer was invited into the employ of "Wells Fargo," beginning at the 
bottom of a ladder, whose successive rounds, attained in orderly fashion, 
engrossed a large part of the energies of his life and carried him to an 
eminence early attained and long sustained. 

We have not far to seek for the qualities that brought this bright and 
winsome lad first to the attention, and ultimately to the presidency of 
what through the whole history of California has been one of its creative 
forces. "Wells Fargo" to the world of the Pacific Coast was what Adams 
& Co., the American E.xpress and a dozen other agencies in combination, 
were to the world of the Atlantic. It came into being as the agency of 
transportation, a financial promoter and the guardian of the golden era 
of California. It reached into every mining camp from Mexico to the 
British boundary, in all places commanding confidence, always a trust- 
worthy, helpful, stabilizing and civilizing force. The first essential of 
such an agency is man. Not men in the abstract, but men of special 
endowment and with the powers of judgment and character that command 
respect and sustain confidence. ' The generation that knew James H. 
Latham (whose discerning eye discovered young Homer King), Lloyd 
Tevis, John J. Valentine and others of the fine old Wells Fargo organiza- 
tion, is gone, but there remains in grateful memory the record of the 
great service that these men gave to California. 

It is one of the truest of the many fine observations of David Starr 
Jordan that the world makes way for the man that knows where he is 
going. There was never an hour from the day when at the age of twelve 
Homer King entered the office of Wells Fargo, that he did not know 
where he was going. He was going to a rounded manhood by a route 
whose milestones were to be faithful service, efficiency, integrity, and the 
command of universal respect and confidence. That young Homer ever 
in his fondest dreams visualized himself in the development that he ulti- 
mately attained is not likely. His eye and his mind were ever less upon 



230 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

himself than upon the duty of each day. He learned early and made 
the foundation philosophy of his life the maxim that whatever is worth 
doing is worth doing we'll. From the simple mechanics of handwriting, 
to the development of character that made his signature in a great finan- 
cial crisis a symbol of public confidence, he did all things well. 

First at Sacramento, later at Virginia City, Nevada, ^Ir. King served 
Wells Fargo in various capacities. Later he established himself inde- 
pendently as a stock broker in San Francisco. It was a time when the 
older figures in the Wells Fargo organization were "letting go." There 
was a call for new blood and a search for it led to a man still in middle 
life, whose earlier activities in the Wells Fargo service had emphasized 
his capability, and Homer King was brought again into Wells Fargo — 
an enlarged Wells Fargo now e.xpanded to include a widely extended 
banking system. To the presidency of this system Homer King was 
invited at the age of forty-two. The historical development of Pacific 
Coast finance following Mr. King's entrance into it is a tempting theme. 
There is connected with it at some jxjint pretty much everything that is 
reflected in the conditions of today. But we are writing not so much of 
finance as of the man Homer S. King. As to his career at the head of 
the Wells Fargo banking system, it is sufficient to say that he grew steadily 
year by vear in public confidence until his name became a symbol of 
character and capability in the financial world. In 1905 Mr. King was 
called to the presidency of the Bank of California when there was needed 
the sustaining power of an unquestioned personal prestige. 

When the great disaster of 1906 came upon San Francisco Mr. King 
was president of the Bank of California and president of the San Francisco 
Clearing House. The city lay in ruins. There was widespread confusion 
and while it would be an extravagance to say that there was apprehension, 
it is none the less true that there were many questionings as to what might 
be lost in the universal wreck. It fell to Homer King to give to a de- 
pressed city the assurance that stabilized its hopes and restored its con- 
fidence. In this great emergency, as at all other times, he faced foursquare 
to the storm, unshaken and calm in a situation which brought forth the 
sympathy and assistance of the whole world. By no means insensible to 
the stress of emotion, Mr. King never lost the powers of calculation or 
the powers of judgment. Calling together a small group of financial 
men he commanded their cooperation, and in their name secured from 
remote sfiurces the means to quiet jKipular apprehension and restore con- 
fidence. Through his agency the San I'^rancisco Mint. hapi)ily not involved 
in the common ruin, became the banking center of San Francisco. Mr. 
King made pul)lic announcement that the leading iianks of San I""rancisco 
would meet all obligations. The first day following this pledge tlie streets 
near the Mint were thronged, long lines leading up to the paying wickets. 
The second day the number of apjilicants was notably fewer. By the 
fourth day there were practically none to demand accounting. The inci- 
dent is one of tremendous significance, not merely in its demonstration 
of the character of the financial organization of San Francisco, but of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 231 

the spirit of ;i coninumit)', which not even under stress of disaster lost 
faith in those it had been accustomed to trust. 

But it was not to be expected that a disaster so great should find its 
cure in a day. There came later the panic of 1907, with San Francisco 
in the early state of its recrudesence, sharing in the depression that affected 
the whole country. In a financial sense the nation was tied up. There 
was security more than enough, but money was not to be had. It is 
written in the Constitution of the United States that only the Govern- 
ment has the power to give to tither than gold and silver the values of 
money. Unless there was to be universal ruin in San Francisco it became 
necessary, despite the constitution and the law, to supply what was needed 
for the life of the community; and at this point Air. King and his associ- 
ates of the San Francisco Clearing House determined upon a bold stroke. 
Calling upon the hanks to deposit their securities in temporary quarters 
established at the Mint, the Clearing House upon its own accord issued 
certificates in sums great and small and asked the community to accept 
them in current exchanges. Thus came into existence what that day 
called and this day remembers as "Homer King money." It was truly a 
bold stroke, one that in ordinary times would have involved those who 
made it in embarrassments not pleasant to contemplate. But under the 
necessities of the time, in combination with the public confidence that in 
a sense legalized what imder the circumstances was a necessary step, the 
law conveniently bound up its eyes and gave if not formal sanction, that 
which served in its stead. 

In the year 1910 there was under way in San Francisco the great 
project of a world exix)sition in celebration of jierhaps our greatest 
national achievement, that of the Panama Canal. To this end it was 
necessary to raise by various means, including a popular subscription of 
many millions of dollars, a colossal fund. It was inevitable that Mr. King 
should be drawn into this project. He became president of the organiza- 
tion, an able head in the era of preparation, retiring only when the enter- 
prise had gotten firmly on its feet and on the high road to assured suc- 
cess. Many years of strenuous life had given Mr. King a desire to be 
released from responsibility. All his life he had longed for the pleasures 
of travel and of closer association with his family. Up to that time, life 
had given him everything but leisure. He resigned the presidencv of the 
Bank of California, he asked and found relief from the burden of The Ex- 
position. He silent something more than a year in the various countries 
of the old world, returning to his home in 1911. Thereafter his career 
was that of retirement from active life. But retirement is a relative 
■term. There are those who in retiring in a sense cease to live. It was not 
so with Mr. King. And here it is pertinent to say that of the many social 
needs of our relatively new world of America, and jiarticularlv of the 
newer world of the Pacific states, is men of established prestige dissoci- 
ated from active connections. In plenty we have men of talent, men of 
capability in varied lines, but among us there are too few who stand so 
detached as not to be under some presumptive association with active 



232 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

life, tending to self interest or to bias in social and business judgments. 
In San Francisco through the remaining days of his life Mr. King held 
this high post, his name associated with unquestioned integrity, with 
business capability, with pubHc spirit, a name of universal respect and 
of wide individual esteem. So through his remaining years stood Homer 
King, retired in a sense, Ijut still a recognized figure in the life of San 
Francisco, a stabilizing factor amid the changing tides in a world of 
material rivalries and of social progress. 

It is pleasant to remember that life gave to Homer King on its domes- 
tic side that which matched the material fortunes of his career. In the 
year 1874 he married Aliss Summit Brown, a daughter of Mr. Smith 
Brown of Napa County, one of that company who braved the desert and 
found his way to California. The history, the tradition, the character of 
the Brown family matched and complemented Mr. King's own heritage. 
Smith Brown was of the old .American stock, his forefathers being among 
the original settlers of Narragansett Bay. His wife, j\lrs. King's mother, 
likewise was of New England breeding, a member of the Thayer family 
associated with the earliest times of New England. Children came early 
to the Homer Kings, two daughters and a son. The family home in 
San Francisco became a center in which the domestic pieties and the 
refinements of a generous social life have unto this day been happily 
mingled. 

George W. Pratt. There is usuall\- a fundamental motive and guid- 
ing force in the careers of men of large afifairs. In the case of George 
W. Pratt, a native son of California and a civil engineer by profession, that 
motive is discerned through his successful efforts in the management and 
development of large landed properties. Though a young man he has already 
figured in some of the notable transactions and constructive developments 
in the highly specialized farming districts of Central and Southern Cali- 
fornia. While most of his ojx^rations have been in the southern part of the 
state, Mr. Pratt for a number of years has maintained his home and offices 
in San Francisco. 

He was born in Mariposa County, California. June 11, 1880. His 
father, John M. Pratt, a native of Georgia, and of Revolutionary stock of 
English descent, served as a confederate soldier during the Civil war. He 
was a Methodist minister, and in the early days was a circuit rider. After 
the war he came out to California, and then removed to Oregon where he 
was known as the "Cowboy Minister." He possessed the spirit and talents 
to make him a very jxipular as well as an influential religious worker. For 
several years he enjoyed the distinction of being the champion rider in 
Western Oregon. At the time of the Great San Francisct) lire he was at 
the Russ House, and from there removed to Highland Springs in Lake 
County where he died a few weeks later on May 2. 1906. llis brother, 
J. W. Pratt, has been recorder of Marijwsa County for the last twenty 
years, and another brother, Charles P. Pratt, was assessor of tliat county 
for a long time, but is now living retired there. 



I 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 235 

John M. Pratt married Louisa A. Lewis, who is now a resident of 
College City, Colusa County, California, and is of a family of American 
Revolutionary stock and is Scotch-English in ancestry. She was born in 
MariiK)sa County. He father Jacob Lewis, a pioneer known to all the 
people of that district, was born in Missouri, came to California in 1849, 
and operated a stage station at Lewis, a place named in his honor. 

Educated in the jniblic schools of Merced County and the Pacific 
Methodist College at Santa Rosa, George W. Pratt found his first employ- 
ment in the civil engineering department of the .Santa Fe Railway. He 
was in the service when the Santa Fe built the road into Richmond, marking 
the beginning of that prosperous suburb of San Francisco. He was with 
the engineering corps of the Southern Pacific Company in Santa Barbara 
County, when the gap between Surf and Elwood was bridged. He was 
then one of the engineers efl^ecting line changes in Humboldt Valley of 
Nevada, and after that returned to Santa Barbara to engage in Iiusiness for 
himself, handling lands and surveying. Mr. Pratt was a resident of Lompoc 
from 1901 to 1910 and since the latter year has made San Francisco his 
headquarters, his offices being in the Phelan Building. 

Mr. Pratt attributes much of his success to the kindly interest and 
advice of George Roberts, one of the pioneers of California, who promoted 
the Lompoc colony and put on the first subdivision in Santa Barbara County. 
A man of strong character, he made friends with all, and in the opinion of 
Mr. Pratt he was the most universally loved man he ever saw. When Mr. 
Pratt was only twenty-one years of age Mr. Roberts placed him in charge 
of his interests, and it was the earnest effort of the young man to justify 
this faith that led him from one success to another. Mr. Roberts died at 
San Jose at the venerable age of ninety years. 

Since then Mr. Pratt has been handling lands in large tracts. He sub- 
divided the Santa Rosa ranch, the Jalama and Alisal ranches and is now 
handling the Jesus Maria ranch in the northern part of Santa Barbara 
County, near Santa Maria. He sold to the California Packing Corporation 
4,000 acres five miles ea.st of Merced. The corporation has developed this 
as the Del Monte orchard, the largest young orchard in the world. Mr. Pratt 
was one of the organizers of the Planada Fruit farms adjoining the Del 
Monte, and this entire tract of 3,300 acres has been planted, mostly to figs. 
Mr. Pratt personally owns 160 acres of this tract, planted to Kadota figs. 

He sold and still retains an interest in the old Murphy ranch near 
Turlock. probably the finest dairy ranch in California. It is known as the 
Humboldt ranch, comprising 1,000 acres, with 160 acres in grapes and 300 
acres devoted to the dairy farm. There are 200 head of cows on this ranch. 
Many other large properties have been similarly handled by Mr. Pratt, and 
in every case gratifying success has marked his enterprise. 

At present he is handling the lands of the Marshall interests in Los 
Angeles, E. J. Marshall of that city being one of the largest land owners 
in the world, owning the Chino ranch at Los Angeles, the Jesus Maria 
ranch of Santa Barbara, and the Los Palomas ranch of Mexico. Mr. Pratt 
igave the County of Santa Barbara a nineteen-acre park from the Santa 



236 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Rosa ranch, nine miles east of Lompoc on the Santa Inez River. This is 
known as the Santa Rosa Park. 

Another prominent interest of Mr. Pratt is the Return Mining Company 
of Nye County, Nevada, of which he is president. This company has 
recentl}' resumed operations and is undertaking new installation of stamp 
mill and tables. It is a free milling gold and silver property with a shaft 
of 100 and 122 feet and levels at 50, 100 and 175 feet. Some idea of the 
value of the propc/ty can be gained from the statement that the ledge is 
thirty feet in width with surface assays showing $3.26 and the bottom 
of the shaft showing better than $700 per ton. 

With the large responsibilities represented by these interests briefly 
described, Mr. Pratt has rendered his public service largely through his 
business, and has had no time for the diversions of politics. He is 
republican, is af^liated with Santa Barbara Lodge No. 613, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and Lompoc Lodge No. 57, Knights of Pythias. 

He married at San Francisco, February 19, 1923, Miss Alice S. Smith. 
She was born in that city, as was also her mother, and her father was one of 
the early pioneers of California. 

David Crockett Crockett was a California pioneer whose surname 
and place of birth had significant historic suggestion, which was further 
fortified by his having been given the personal name of the great frontiers- 
man, David Crockett, who was his own uncle. 

Mr. Crockett was born in Gibson County, Tennessee, November 12, 
1829, and in that state he was reared to manhood. In 1850, about the 
time of attaining to his legal majority, he made his way from Tennessee 
to Missouri, and in 1852 he and a companion set forth on horseback for 
California, bringing with them to this state a hand of horses. After here 
selling the horses, which had been brought across the Isthmus of Panama, 
Mr. Crockett engaged in the carpenter trade in San Francisco, assisting 
in the construction of some of the first buildings of that city. He later 
worked at gold mining in Sonoma County. He finally returned to Mis- 
souri, where was solemnized his marriage to Miss Esther M. Snyder in 
1853, and in 1857 he returned to California, accompanied by his family, 
the long and hazardous journev across the jilains having been made with 
wagon and ox team. He established the family home in Sonoma County, 
and later he purchased a ranch in L'kiah \'alley, where he resided a few 
years. He then removed to Ukiah, the present judicial center of Mendo- 
cino County, where he Ijecame ]>roprietor of the Plaza Hotel, Iiesides which 
ne for a time conducted the Hartlett Springs health and pleasure resort of 
the earlv davs in Lake County. In 1868 he was elected sheriff of Men- 
docino Countv, an office to which he was reelected in 1870 and in which 
he gave a most vigorous and effective administration. Thereafter he 
served fourteen years as justice of the ])eace in Ukiah Township. He 
was a charter memlier of the Christian Church at L'kiah, organized in 
1859, and he continued as one of the honored and influential pioneer citi- 
zens of Mendocino Countv until his death, March 4, 1916. His wife. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 237 

who was l)uni April 4. 1836, survi\c'cl him ahmit three years and was 
eighty-three years of age at the time of her death. Mr. Crockett was a 
nephew of the famous Tennessee frontiersman and Mexican war soldier, 
David Crockett, in whose honor he was named. In conclusion is given 
brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Crockett, two of 
the number having died in early childhood: Roljert J., who was born 
November 5, 1854, is now deceased; John T., who was Ijorn September 
17, 1856, resides in the City of Los Angeles; Sarah Catherine is deceased; 
William Rodney resides in San b'rancisco ; jeannette is deceased; Isabella 
is the widow of Samuel Haines and resides at Oakland; Martha Irene 
is the wife of Ira Shipley, of San Francisco; Eiugene C. resides in Los 
Angeles ; David C. maintains his home at Mendocino City ; Joseph Ralph 
is a resident of San Francisco, and Jessie V. is the wife of Ray Truitt 
and resides in Santa Cruz. 

Henry Brown Hunt. There are few stories that stir the emotions 
of real Americans more thoroughly than the epic which relates to the 
great hegira to the Golden State in 1849, and to be permitted to hear this 
story from the lips of one who participated is a privileged indeed. Not 
only is Henry Brown Hunt, of San Francisco, a '49er, but almost all of 
his long, busy and useful life since then has been passed in California. 

Henry Brown Hunt was born at Phillipsburg, Warren County, New 
Jersey, in 1836. His parents were Daniel Simpson and Margaret (Nixon) 
Hunt, both of whom were natives of New Jersey. 'On the paternal side 
the early ancestry was Scotch, while on the maternal side it was German. 
During Mr. Hunt's infancy his father conducted a hotel at Phillipsburg, 
but he met with an early death, and when six years old the bov accompanied 
his mother to New York City and it was there that he attended school, 
and no doubt helped his mother, as good sons do. He was thirteen years 
old when a relative, about to start for California, urged his mother to 
permit Henry to accompany him and finally obtained her reluctant con- 
sent. They took passage on the steainer Oregon out of New Y'ork for 
San Francisco, by way of the Isthmus of Panama. The vessel proved 
seaworthy, the noted Isthmus was crossed in a very different manner 
than at present, and the travelers reached San Francisco on April 1, 1849. 
Mr. Hunt's uncle had carried a stock of goods with him. and immediately 
opened a general mercantile store in the young city, shortly afterward 
adding banking facilities to the business, and in his young nephew he 
found a very capable assistant. The latter remained with his uncle until 
1852, when he returned East in order to again attend school, making 
the long journey alone in spite of its dangers without misadventure, 
and for two years attended a superior school in New Haven. Connecticut. 

In 1854, accompanied by his mother, he again covered the distance 
to California. He had expected to resume his place in his uncle's store, 
but on reaching San Francisco, discovered that his uncle had met with 
business misfortune. Therefore he went on to Sacramento, where he 
became clerk in the old Orleans Hotel. In 1856 Mr. Hunt established 



238 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

a business of his own at Oroville, in Butte County, and prospered there 
until the discovery of gold in the Frazer River district led hiin to invest 
all his savings in prospective mines there, and, like almost every other 
pioneer at one time or another, found his prospects worthless and his 
money gone. He had, however, a well established character and found 
no difficulty in borrowing enough capital to get him back to Oroville, where 
he resumed business and profiting by experience, confined his efforts to 
what he had on hand and again prospered. In 1864 he was elected treas- 
urer of Butte County and served two years in that office, when he returned 
to Sacramento, where he became connected with the wholesale firm of 
Power & Company, but, his excellent sense of business judgment very 
shortly afterward led to his returning to San Francisco, in 1867, and this 
city has been his home ever since. Until 1872 he was connected with the 
firm of E. Martin & Company, when he became a partner in the house of 
E. Chiesvich & Company, which association continued for three years. 
In 1875 the firm of Moore, Hunt & Company came into existence, the 
senior member, G. H. Moore, being a resident of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and the other partners, Henry B. Hunt and C. Denser, both belonging to 
San Francisco. In the rapid growth and prosperous continuance of the 
business of this firm Mr. Hunt took a very active part for many vears. 

Mr. Hunt married at Downieville, Sierra County, California, in 
September, 1872, Miss Emma Cole, a native of Brooklyn, New York, 
and three children were born to them : Anna, who became the wife of 
Dr. E. M. Short; Emma, who married Harry Rice Bostwick, engineer 
and capitalist : and Henry Cole Hunt. 

During a great part of Mr. Hunt's life he lived in stirring times, and 
it was while he was a resident and active business man at Oroville that 
he had considerable military experience. He was elected captain of the 
Oroville Guards, and it was during his captaincy of this organization that 
his company, with five other companies, held a tournament near Marys- 
ville, which resulted in Captain Hunt's company winning the prize of 
$500. This money was presented to the school board and was the founda- 
tion of a fund that ultimately constructed one of the most substantial 
school buildings in that section. Later Captain Hunt was appointed by 
General Bidwell adjutant of the Fifth Brigade, and during the absences 
of his superior officer, became acting brigadier-general. It was at Oroville 
also that Mr. Hunt joined the Masons and Odd Fellows, and became a 
past grand in the latter organization. 

Leander S. Sherman is one of the veteran and leading representa- 
tives of the music business on the Pacific Coast, and has long been the 
active executive head of the San Francisco music house of Sherman, Clay 
& Companv, which controls a business that extends into the various states 
along the Pacific Coast, branches being maintained in various cities, with 
the headquarters establishment as. one of the old and popular concerns 
of San Francisco. 

Mr. Sherman was born in the City of Boston, Massachusetts, on the 





jeci^^i^i oLeA^ 



<:?y <^^/tl£/z>M< 



Gt/M. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 241 

28th of April, 1847, and is a son of Jacob and Cleopatra (Loud) Sherman, 
the other children- of this union being Clara A., Sarah Swan, Filena T. 
and Flora M. After the death of his first wife Jacob Sherman married 
again, and the names of the children of the first marriage arc here noted : 
Charles H., Edwin Alvin, Samuel G., Mary, Elizabeth and Catherine. 
In Massachusetts, Jacob Sherman was a successful manufacturer of furni- 
ture, his specialty being in church furniture, and after long held place as 
one of the substantial business men of Boston. He finally, in 1861, came 
with his family to San Francisco, where he remained until his death, at 
the age of sixty-nine years. The Sherman family was founded in New 
England in the Colonial period of our national history, and in its various 
branches there have been numerous representatives of prominence and 
influence in various walks of life. Leander S. Sherman gained his early 
education in the schools of his native city, and was a lad of fourteen years 
at the time of the family removal to California. His first business expe- 
rience in San Francisco was gained in the establishment of his brother-in- 
law, W. K. Vanderslice, a manufacturer of silverware, and after a short 
period he found employment in the music store of J. T. Bowers, the while 
he availed himself of the opportunity of taking piano lessons. After 
A. A. Rosenberg purchased the music business of Frisbv & Scott, ]Mr. 
Sherman was in his emplo_\- three years, at the expiration of which, in 
1870, he purchased the stock and business, which under his vigorous 
management rapidly expanded in scope and which eventually was developed 
into the extensive enterprise now controlled by Sherman, Clay & Com- 
pany. He was the president of this pioneer corporation and relinquished 
this office to his associate, Mr. Clay, ujxDn the anniversary of his fiftieth 
year of business life, taking then the chairmanship of the board. 

The corporation now has precedence as one of the oldest and largest 
music houses on the Pacific Coast. He is a director of the San Francisco 
Savings & Loan Society, and is a director also of the Market Street 
Railway Company. Mr. Sherman has long been a prominent and popular 
figure in the business and social life of San Francisco, and is here a 
member of the Pacific Union Club, the Commonwealth Club, the Com- 
mercial Club and the Bohemian Club. 

On the 4th of October. 1873, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Sherman to Miss Catherine Neuer, who is deceased, and who is sur- 
vived by three children : Frederick Royal is vice president of Sherman, 
Clay & Company and resides in Oakland ; Claire is the widow of 
W. D. McCann, and Elsie Pond is the wife of Julian H. Alco of San 
Francisco. 

Edward P. Buckley. From the time of his arrival in San Francisco 
as a California '49er until he retired thirty years later, Edward P. Buckley 
was prominently identified with business, civic and public affairs. He 
was one of the resourceful and high minded citizens of San Francisco 
in the early days, and is still represented by his family here. 

He was born at Mitchelstown, Ireland, March 27, 1827, son of Patrick 



242 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

and Mary (Murray) Buckley. When he was seven years of age his 
parents came to America, and he grew up in New York State, attending 
public schools and college at Albany. After leaving college he went to 
New York City and found employment, by means of which he earned 
the money needed to pay his passage to California, traveling by ship 
around the Horn to San Francisco, where he arrived July 24, 1849. His 
first location was at Sacramento, where he worked in a general store three 
weeks, getting wages of $14 a day. On returning to San Francisco 
he and Mr. Macondray established a mercantile store. They were burned 
out soon afterward. Later he was appointed commissary to General 
Fremont's regiment, whose headquarters were in Los Angeles, to which 
point he traveled l)y horseback. Subsequently Mr. Buckley was in the 
commission business for a number of years as a tea importer. 

He finally retired from business in 1880, and died March 20, 1893, 
leaving a large estate. In 1858 Mr. Buckley married Maria Louisa Gray, 
daughter of Rev. William J. Gray. Mrs. Buckley survived her husband 
almost exactly twenty years. The late Mr. Buckley served as a member 
of the early Vigilance Committees of California and was also a charter 
member and director of the Society of California Pioneers. He and his 
wife had four children : Mary, widow of Preston Robson : Florence G., 
deceased ; Mabel H., wife of Lew E. Stanton, and Edward M. Buckley. 

Charles Stuart Holmes. A name of eloquent association in the 
commercial and civic life of San Francisco since pioneer days has been 
that of the late Charles Stuart Holmes. The interests acquired by him 
in his lifetime are represented in the Holmes Investment Company, one 
of the large owners of realty property in San Francisco, with many 
interests elsewhere, including Limber on Vancouver Island in British 
Columbia. One of the well known modern office buildings in the business 
district of San Francisco is the Foxcroft Building, an eight-story stnicture 
on a ground area 77 by 122 feet, owned by the corporation and named in 
memory of the birthplace of the late Charles Stuart Holmes. 

Mr. Holmes was Imrn at Foxcroft, Maine, in 1832. His father, James 
Stuart Holmes, was an early member of the !\Iasonic order, and his descend- 
ants cherish a Masonic apron worn by his father, James Stuart Holmes, in 
.the Masonic Lodge with George Washington in Massachusetts. 

Charles Stuart Holmes was twenty years of age when, in 1852, he 
came to California by way of the Isthmus. He first sought out the mining 
district, but contracting typhoid fever he came to San Francisco. During 
the Civil war he was a member of the California militia. At San Francisco 
his first employment was as stevedore with the lumber company in which 
he .subsefjuentlv rose to president. When he entered its service this firm 
was known as Renton, White & Company. From his labors as stevwlore 
he ])ut aside his savings until he was able to buy out Mr. White, and thus 
l)ecame one of the partners in what was from then on known as Renton, 
Holmes & Company. This firm was the San l-'rancisco end of tlie great 
Port Blakely Mill Company of Puget Sound. Captain Renton managed 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 243 

the northern end. This became at the time the largest mill and exporting 
company in the world, shipping lumber to every quarter of the globe. The 
executive head of the business at San Francisco was the late Mr. Holmes. 
To his vision it was largely due that the business was expanded to its 
enormous proportions until the company had its agents all over the world 
and owned and operated a large fleet of lumber vessels. In the early days 
of the Inisiness, when Charles S. Holmes was most active, an organization 
of this kind had none of the facilities of the modern telephones, tyj^ewriters 
or stenographers, the voluminous lousiness details being handled entirely 
by hand. 

Mr. Holmes finally sold out with his associates his interests in the Port 
Blakely Mill Company in January, 1903, to a group of Michigan and local 
capitalists. After that he lived practically retired until his death in 1906, 
at the age of seventv-four. Mr. Holmes was a man of unusual education 
and culture. Before coming to California he had taught school in the Fox- 
croft Academy. He was very active both in mind and body, and omnivorous 
reader and possessed strong character and personality, was liberal and 
tolerant, respecting the religious and political convictions of others, and he 
made a success of everything he undertook. 

Frank James Batchelor. Just as the New World, when it was in 
the throes of development, attracted to it the best minds of the old one, so 
did the West in its period of expansion attract those of the East. Especially 
did California and its neighboring states hold out offers of unexcelled 
opjxirtunities so that few young men of the last century could resist the 
lure, and, vielding to it, found in their new environments the stimulating 
influence they had lacked before. Many are the instances of rapid and 
substantial advancement of men who, doubtless, had they remained in the 
East, might not have risen above the ordinary. 

Frank James Batchelor, for many years connected with the mercantile 
life of San Francisco, and who attained to great prominence in its hard- 
ware branch, was born across the continent, at Rome, New York. November 
16, 1853. His father was a member of the dental profession, and, seeking 
a better opening, took his family to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the lad was 
reared in the latter city, then still somewhat in its infancy. After com- 
pleting a public school education Frank James Batchelor learned the hard- 
ware business, and proved adept at it. He came to California in about 
1890. In the course of his business operations the necessity arose for the 
issuance of a proper hardware sj^ecialty catalogue. The most thorough 
search failed to discover any man capable of getting out such a catalogue, 
and so, urged by the paramount importance of the task, Mr. Batchelor 
undertook the work for the Schwabacher Company of Seattle, and carried 
it through to a successful completion. He became known to the hardware 
trade all along the Coast and in much of the continguous territory, and was 
considered bv many as the best hardware buyer in the country. For many 
years he was associated with the San Francisco firm of Miller, Schloss & 
Company and later with the Dunham, Carrigan & Hayden Comixiny, with 
Vol. n— 12 



244 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

which he held the position of head Ijuver up to tlie time of his death, Julv 
22, 1916. 

On July 25, 1876, Mr. Batchelor married Miss Fannie S. Shedd, who 
was born in Vermont. They became the parents of four children, two of 
whom survive, namely: Robert Franklin, in the electrical business at 
Redondo Beach, and Roxy Sophia, at home with her mother. Mr. Batchelor 
was long a member of the Olympic Club, and his death was deplored by his 
associates in it. as it was by all who had the honor of his acquaintance. An 
Episcopalian, he was a member of Grace Cathedral, and was very generous 
in his support of it. Mr. Batchelor has passed from the sphere of earthly 
endeavor ; his former avocations know him no more ; silent and empty is 
his home without his loving presence, and yet the man did not live in vain. 
Through his upright and honorable methods of doing business, his strict 
adherence to the creed of his church, and his loyal patriotism, he set an 
example that is most inspiring to the rising generation, and an urge to 
better Christianity and good citizenship. The legacy of an untarnished 
name is after all the best heritage a man can leave to his descendants, and 
this, in conjunction with a material prosperity, he handed down to his. 

Fletcher Hamilton, who served ten years in the office of state 
mineralogist, is an acknowledged authority on mining in the West, and has 
had a wide range of practical experience in mining both as an engineer 
and operator. 

He brought that bureau from obscurity to a prominent and valuable 
organization of inestimable service in the state. The state mineralogist 
when he took charge had a personnel in the office of eight, and when he 
retired the office personnel was seventy employes. Much more important 
was the fact that the office in this town came to be looked upon by practical 
mining men as a source of real assistance to them, and the bureau served a 
great purpose in stimulating the development of the mineral resources of 
California until it now ranks as the leading mineral producing station in 
the Union. Since leaving the office of state mineralogist, Mr. Hamilton 
has resumed his professional work on his own account, and among other 
duties is now engaged by the United States Senate Commission on gold and 
silver inquiry, and is carrying on hearings in all the gold and silver produc- 
ing states, with the object of laying before the President and Congress the 
condition of those industries at the present time, from which repwrt some 
possible relief may be planned to counteract existing normal conditions. 

Fletcher Hamilton is a native son of California. He was born in San 
Francisco, September 4, 1882. His father bore the name of .Alexander 
Hamilton, was born in New Brunswick, Canada, and came to California 
in 1868. He had l)een prominent in Masonry in Canada. At San Francisco 
he took the post of secretary and cashier of Rafael, Weil & Com]wny, and 
served until his death. His wife was Clara (Smith) Hamilton, also a native 
of New Brunswick, and now deceased. 

Fletcher Hamilton attended ]Htblic schools in San Francisco, including 
the Lowell High School, and graduated in l'X)4 with the degree Bachelor of 




-^4»^^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 247 

Science in mining from the College of Alining of the University of Cali- 
fornia. After graduating he spent a year as surveyor and engineer for the 
Kimberly-Montana Gold Mining Company in the Jardine District of 
Montana, and then for two years was engineer and assistant manager of 
the Dairy Farm Mining Company in Placer County, California. He then 
became an independent operator as a mining engineer in Durango, Mexico, 
for two years, returning to his native state in 1909. He then resumed his 
mining operations in California and in Nevada, and during the years 
191 1-13 operated the Placer property in Plumas County. He was appointed 
state mineralogist January 21, 1913, and was head of that department of 
the state government until February, 1923. 

Since then he has established offices as a consulting engineer of mining 
and petroleum, and has a large general practice. In addition to this and his 
work for the United States Senate Commission he is operating a property 
twelve miles from Wickenburg, Arizona, the plant including a 250-ton 
cyanide plant. 

During the Panama-Pacific E.xjxjsition Mr. Hamilton was a member of 
the International Bureau of Awards. He is interested in republican politics, 
and is a member of the Commonwealth Club, University Club, Engineers 
Club, Le Conte Geological Club, American 'Institute of Mining and 
Metallurgy, the American Gold and Silver Institute and in the American 
Mining Congress, served on the advisory board and was vice president for 
California in 1922. His university connections were with the Chi Phi 
Fraternity and Golden Bear Society. 

Mr. Hamilton married at Sacramento, January 19, 1907, Miss Ruth 
Stephenson. She was born in that city, a daughter of the late C. H. 
Stephenson. The two children of their marriage are Heath Hamilton, a 
student in the Castelleja School at Palo Alto, and Fletcher Hamilton, Jr., 
attending the William Warren School at Menlo Park. 

James Riley. One of the celebrated "forty-niners" of California was 
James Riley, the subject of this sketch. He was born in 1826 as a British 
subject on the Emerald Isle, and was there reared to maturity and given a 
fair education. Soon after reaching his majority he learned of the won- 
drous gold movement to California, and in 1849 he determined to join the 
adventurers. Fully equipped for the hazardous movement, he boarded the 
steamer John C. La Grande and in due time reached San Francisco Bay. 
He came by wa}- of the Isthmus of Panama and by way of the Shagras trail. 
At that time many preferred to cross the plains, despite the Indians, rather 
than go by way of the Isthmus, but he found it safer and easier to go the 
roundabout way. 

He at once went to the mines in the interior, but after a period of fair 
success he became one of the first "packers." That term does not fit with 
the same term now. Then a "packer," with trains of untamed prairie 
horses or stubborn mules, conveyed goods of every description from jx)int 
to point in the interior or along the coast. At first Air. Riley was one of 
the packers for the Bull & Baker Comixmy, and conducted trains from 



248 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Sacramento to Shasta and elsewhere, particularly to W'eaverville in Trinity 
County. 

After a time he quit this occupation and purchased a land grant which 
is now known as the Glen Ranch, and was soon engaged in the serious prob- 
lems of pioneer agriculture and stock raising, soon making a specialty of 
blooded horses and jacks. He became one of the greatest and most suc- 
cessful "sportsmen" of California, was a lover of race horses, and with 
his brother Christopher owned and conducted the first and largest race 
track in the state, in Colusa County, in the early '50s. They were among 
the first persons to bring pure blooded horses and jacks to the West. Both 
became famous for their fine and fast horses. Air. Riley was an upright 
and prominent citizen, and took much interest in state advancement and 
in the public welfare. He passed away in January, 1901, and his widow 
died in 1920, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. 

When Mr. Riley made his trip to California, via the Isthmus, it was 
from New Orleans, where he had resided for a time, .\fter living in Cali- 
fornia for seven or eight years he returned to Philadelphia in 185S, and 
there married Ellen Dwyer, who was also a native of Ireland. To James 
and Ellen Riley were born six children, of whom four are living, Mary 
R., who married C. J. Coghlan, a native of New York, now deceased. He 
was a resident of Chicago until the great fire in that city, when he came to 
San Francisco. James E., the eldest son, occupies the old ranch at Palermo, 
California ; Edward H. also resides on the ranch ; Ella married B. James 
Kingdon, now deceased ; Margaret and Thomas F. are deceased. The 
Coghlan family are Helen Irene, who married William E. Switzer, and 
Cornelia Marian, who married John Lawrence Mesple. 

George Washington" Towle. who died May 23, 1914, at his home in 
San Francisco, when in his seventy-eighth year, was the last surviving 
member of the pioneer lumber firm of Towle Brothers, who started oper- 
ations in the great California pine forest in Placer and adjoining counties 
in the Sierras as early as 1859. They built up and developed a tremendous 
industry, employing hundreds of men in logging and saw milling camps, 
and at one time operated probably a score or more of mills. 

George \A'ashington Towle, who gave more than forty years of his 
own active life to California lumbering, was born at Corinth, \'ermont, 
February 22, 1836, and represented rugged New England ancestry. He 
was a descendant of Philip Towle. who settled in New Hampshire in 1655. 
The late Mr. Towle was a member of the California Society and of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, his member.ship in that order being based 
upon the record of his grandfather, Brackett Towle, who was a lieutenant 
of New Hanpshire troops in the war for inde]')endence and took part in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. Some of the land awarded him is still in the family. 
The house he and his father were born in, in Orange County, Vermont, 
still stands. 

George \\". Towle was reared on a New England farm, ac(|uired a com- 
mon school education, and was twenty-one years of age when he started for 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 249 

Califdinia by way i>f the Isthmus of Panama. He arrived in San Francisco 
on Thanksgiving day, 1857. He at once moved tn Dutch I-'lat in Placer 
County, wliere for a time he was engaged in mining and teaming. His 
brother Allen, subsequently the senior member of Towle Brothers, had 
preceded him to the county. In 1859 a younger brother, Edwin, joined 
them and some years later became one of the firm. About 1854 a small 
water power mill had been erected a short distance from Dutch Flat, and 
this was the mill acquired by Towle Brothers in 1859. In succeeding 
years the partners Iniilt mills at Lost Camp, Kearsage, Donner Lake, Ala- 
bama, Canon Creek, and also operated mills at Texas, Bear Valley and 
Burnett in Placer County and several other mills in Nevada County. 
Exentually they founded the town of Towle, from which ix)int they dis- 
tributed the product of their factories, embracing rough and finished lumber, 
milhvork and sash and doors, to a line of retail yards of Placer and Nevada 
counties. Their box factories were amoyg the first in the state to engage 
in the manufacture of sugar and yellow pine fruit containers. The Towle 
Brothers acquired about 30,000 acres of timber land, and at one time had 
aliout thirty-five miles of narrow gauge railroad. The caboose built by 
them and known as the "directors' car," now reposes on the grounds of 
]Mrs. Towle's home in Placer County. The firm was part owner of the 
first pulp mill established on the Pacific Coast. In the early operations of 
the company they furnished a large part of the lumber used by the Central 
Pacific Railroad in the construction of snow sheds, trestles and for other 
purposes. The company also made the pump rods for the deep mines in the 
State of Nevada. 

George \V. Towle in 1902, as the only sur\iving member of the firm, 
sold the forest interests to another company, and in 1904 established his 
home at 2500 Broadway, in San Francisco, where with his devoted wife he 
lived out his remaining years and at his death left an unsullied name and a 
comfortable fortune. 

He was a member of the lodge of Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at Dutch Flat. 

Mr. Towle was still a young man at the time of his marriage to Miss 
Frances A. Staples at Dutch F'lat on June 5. 1873. She was born in the 
State of New York and came to California in the early days, in company 
with her mother, to join her three brothers in Dutch Flat, and it was here 
she met Mr. Towle. James Staples, her eldest brother, first came to Cali- 
fornia, around the Horn, with the first gold rush, and engaged in mining. 
He returned to New York and in 1852 brought his brothers, John and 
Charles, back to California with him, crossing the plains with a herd of 
cattle which they drove to Sacramento. Dutch Flat in those days was near 
the main line of both eastern and western travel. The road was known as 
the Dutch Flat and Donner Lake road. Edwin Towle, another brother of 
the subject of this memoir, likewise came to California and joined his 
brothers, all of whom passed the remainder of their lives in this state. 
George W. Towle was seventy-eight years of age at the time of his death, 



250 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

and his widow now maintains her home in San Francisco, in the Stanford 
Court Apartments. 

Clement Pelham Bennett, whose death occurred in San Fran- 
cisco on the 28th of October, 1913, was a young man when he established 
his home in this city, and as an expert in the writing of shorthand he 
became a pioneer court reporter in California. As a reporter he retained 
a position with the Federal Courts in San Francisco for many years, 
and he was still in active service in this responsible office at the time of 
his death — a man of fine mind and heart and of that sturdy and noble 
character that invariably begets popular confidence and esteem. 

Mr. Bennett was born in the City of London, England, and was a 
son of Charles and Gertrude Bennett, both likewise natives of England. 
Charles Bennett was one of the early and proficient stenographers in 
England, and also was a promoter ancl financier of musical art, both he 
and his wife having been residents of London at the time of their deaths. 

The subject of this memoir received collegiate advantages in his native 
land, and thereafter continued his studies in the City of Paris. He 
had perfected himself in stenography before coming to the United 
States, and was, as before stated, a young man when he established his 
home in San Francisco, he having come to California by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama. He was a recognized leader in his profession in this city 
during all the years of his residence here, and was specially popular among 
the judiciary and leading members of the bar of the city and district. 
He was liberal and public-spirited, and took lively interest in all matters 
pertaining to the welfare of his home city and state. He was a popular 
member of the Olympic Club and the Pacific Yacht Club, and his religious 
faith was that of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

On the 10th of November, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Bennett and Miss Clara Bayhouse. who was born in the State of Iowa, 
of English and German lineage, and she still maintains her home in San 
Francisco, the only child, Herbert, being a resident of Portland, Oregon, 
where he is representative of an important eastern importing and exporting 
corporation. 

Mrs. M. V. B. MacAdam has gained a place of ])rominence and 
marked success as a rei)resentative of the real estate business in the metro- 
politan district of San Francisco. In her gracious ])ersonality and sjiecially 
noteworthv achievement she stands exponent of the best in .-Xmerican 
traditions and spirit, and it is most gratifying to be able to ofTer in this pub- 
lication a brief review of her career and her distinguished ancestral history. 

Madalena Victoria Brocklebank was born in the City of New York, on 
the 30th of June. 1863, and is now the only remaining .-Xmerican represen- 
tative of the fine old Brocklebank family that was founded in .\merica in 
the earlv Colonial era, she having also direct kinship with Sir Thomas 
Brocklebank, of England. Mrs. Madalena Victoria. (Brocklebank) 
MacAdam is a daughter of John Wesley and Catherine (Waugh) Brockle- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO HAY REGION 253 

bank, the names of the other three children of the family being as here 
designated: Lambert DeForest, Pierre I^aRue and John Charles Fremont. 
Tlie original American progenitor of the Hrocklebank family came to 
Rowley, ^lassachiisetts, in the year 1630, and he was massacred by the 
Indians while serving as a soldier in the King I'hilip Indian war, a monu- 
ment to his memory being in evidence as one of the historic objects of 
interest at Sudbury, Massachusetts, and his old home being preserved as 
an historic landmark of the old Bay State. From this ancestor 
Capt. Samuel Brocklebank, Mrs. MacAdam is a lineal descendant in the 
seventh generation. John Wesley Brocklebank was long and successfully 
identified with the lumber business in the City of New \'ork, where he and 
his wife continued to maintain their home until their death. 

Mrs. MacAdam was afforded the advantages of Miss Ranney's Semi- 
nary in New York City, and also those of Binghamton College, at Bing- 
hamton, that state. Her marriage to George Harrison MacAdam, a New 
York lawyer, was solemnized February 28, 1889, and the one child of this 
union is Katherine Madalena, the wife of Lieut. -Com. Martin Jonas Peter- 
son, of the United States Navy, who is now retired from service, their 
home being in San Francisco. 

In 1900 Mrs. MacAdam came to California on a pleasure trip, and so 
favorably did San Francisco and its advantages impress her that in 1902 
she here established herself in the real estate business, in which .she has 
since continued with unequivocal success. In 1910 she effected the incor- 
poration of the M. V. B. MacAdam Company, Inc., and under this title 
her large and important general real estate business has since been con- 
ducted. She is the only woman in San Francisco to be at the head of a 
real estate corporation, and before her retirement from active participation 
in the corporation was the only woriian member of the .San Francisco Real 
Estate Board, of which she served on the membership committee, and she 
had the further distinction of being the only woman to be an active mem- 
ber of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. While Mrs. Mac.Vdam 
has shown marked initiative and administrative ability in connection with 
business affairs of broad scope and importance, she retains the patrician 
bearing and instincts and the social graces which mark the true gentle- 
woman. She is a Daughter of the American Revolution, and a Colonial 
Dame, and, through ancient ancestral prestige of French order, she has 
the rare distinction of being a premier member of the Societe de Noblesse 
(Society of the Nobility). She is an active and popular member of the 
California Real Estate Association and formerly served as chairman of 
its woman's committee. 

In conducting her e.xtensive real estate business Mrs. MacAdam always 
enlisted the loyal cooperation of able and valued assistants, and she is 
distinctly to be designated as one of the representative business women of 
California. 

Henrv S. Flood was little more than a boy when he came from Ireland 
to California at a date so early as to give him pioneer distinction in this 



254 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

commonwealth, where he passed the remainder of his hfe and accounted 
well in worthy achievement and helpful influence as a citizen and l)usiness 
man in San Francisco. 

Mr. Flood was born in the City of Dublin, Ireland, in 1833, and there 
he gained the rudimentary education which he later effectively supplemented 
by the practical lessons gained in the course of a busy, active and useful 
career. He was sent to San Francisco by Eugene Kelly to become an 
apprentice boy in the Kelly mercantile establishment in this city, and as a 
boy and youth he profited fully by the experience thus gained. Eventually 
he became a member of the representative mercantile firm of McClure, 
Flood & McClure, and he was a popular contemporary of such pioneer 
citizens as Ralph Wiel and M. H. De Young, the latter having been one 
of his fellow students in a night school in San Francisco in the early days. 
He continued throughout his active career a leading representative of the 
dry goods business in San Francisco, and he was one of the honored 
pioneer citizens of this city at the time of his death, June 12, 1898. In 
the early days Mr. Flood served as a member of the volunteer fire depart- 
ment of San Francisco, and he was always known for his civic loyalty 
and liberality. 

The wife of Mr. Flood, to whom he was married in the year 1864, was 
born in the State of New York, and she survived him several years. They 
are survived by twin sons, George and James, and by one daughter, 
Agnes F., who is the wife of Karl F. Kraft, of San Franci.sco. Both 
of the sons still reside in this city, both are married, and George is the 
father of one son, Bruce P., while James has two sons, Randolph and 
Raymond. Mr. and Mrs. Kraft became the parents of four children, three 
of whom are living, Katherine, Elizabeth and Warren Hamilton. The 
fourth child, Harry, died in 1911. 

John Rueger was a well known pioneer and business man of the 
San Francisco Bay district, his home for many years being at Benecia. 

He was born in Switzerland, and in 1834. as a youth, came to this 
country. He went back to Switzerland in 1838, married, and of this 
union three children were born. liis wife died in 1842. and in 1843 he 
married again. The only child of this marriage, Charles Rueger, now 
lives at Benecia. 

John Rueger in 1847 came to America again, settling at Detroit, and 
was living there when the gold rush started to California. At St. Joseph, 
Missouri, he prepared for the overland journey to California, and left 
there May 8, 1849. His party first started out with horses, but these 
were soon abandoned and they drove oxen the rest of the journey. The 
party immediately preceding and one that followed were stricken with 
cholera, but John Rueger and his sons were saved, largely on account of 
some bitters he carried with him. These bitters were afterwards put on 
the market by one of his friends, .\fter landing at Marysville lie engaged 
in prospecting for gold, and in 1854 moved to Benecia and established a 
brewerv, the first business of that kind north of San Francisco. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 255 

In 1856 .2*lr. Rueger brought his family from Switzerland, being nine 
months on the voyage around the Horn. He was a charter member 
of the Marysville Lodge of Masons, was a member of the Pioneer Asso- 
ciation and a democrat, though seeking to pass his ballot for the man 
best fitted for ofiice. At one time he was city treasurer of Benecia. 
^Ir. John Rueger died in 1900, at the advanced age of eighty-five. 

One of his daughters, Alsie Rueger, was the mother of Mrs. Emil 
Grigg, a resident of San Francisco. 

Gex. John Gorham Chandler. Among the many officers of the 
United States Army who have sjjent portions of their lives in California, 
the late Gen. John Gurham Chandler, who after his retirement from the 
army lived retired in Southern California, had some interesting associa- 
tions with the very early days of the West and Southwest, having been one 
of the young lieutenants on duty here in the years following the taking over 
of California from ilexico. He was on the active list of the army for over 
forty years, including four years of service during the Civil war. 

General Chandler was born December 31, 1830, in one of the most 
historic communities in New England, Massachusetts. His parents were 
Daniel and Susannah Chandler. He grew up there, and in 1848 entered 
\\'est Point ^lilitary Academy, where he graduated in 1853. On July 1 
of that year he was brevetted a second lieutenant in the Third Artillery, 
and was commissioned second lieutenant December 24, 1853. 

One of his first experiences as a young officer made him a participant 
in one of the noted tragedies of the United States military establishment 
in f>eace times. The Third Artillery was the first regiment designated 
for duty on the Pacific Coast after California was taken over by the 
United States. A large part of this regiment, with commanding officers 
and other army men, embarked on the new side-wheel steamship San 
Francisco, bound around the Horn for California in December, 1853. 
Off the Virginia capes the vessel encountered a great storm, proved un- 
seaworthy, but by the heroic devotion and discipline of the army officers 
and the crew it was kept afloat for several days, until those who had 
survived the storm were taken on board other vessels. Lieutenant 
Chandler was one of the survivors, and for a number of years before his 
death was the only living surviving officer of this marine disaster. Most 
of the early years of his service were spent in the far West, in Garrison 
duty and in Indian campaigns in California. Oregon and also in L'tah. 
He was promoted to first lieutenant May 31, 1856, and served as regi- 
mental adjutant from December 27, 1857, to May 17, 1861. He had 
command of the soldiers acting as escorts for a party of Government sur- 
veyors who were running surveys and making a reconnaissance of Arizona 
territory. \\'hen the surveyors selected the site for a territorial capital 
it was Lieutenant Chandler who suggested the name of the Great American 
historian Prescott for the new capital. 

During the Civil war General Chandler served in the Quartermaster's 
Corps, being commissioned captain assistant quartermaster May 17, 1861, 



256 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

lieutenant-colonel quartermaster volunteers, January 1, 1863, serving in 
that capacity until August 1, 1865. He was present at many important 
battles in the jMiddle West, including Shiloh and Perryville, the siege of 
Port Hudson, the Saline Pass and Red River expeditions, including the 
battles of ^Mansfield and Pleasant Hill. He was with the Third Army 
Corps in Texas. For services during the Civil war he received on March 
13, 1865, three brevets, major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel. 

On January 18, 1867, he was commissioned major of the Quarter- 
masters Corps, was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, deputy quartermaster 
general March 4, 1879, to colonel assistant quartermaster general December 
11. 1892, and when under the age limit he was retired December 31, 1894, 
he had completed forty-'One years of service. By act of April 23, 1904, 
he was advanced to the rank of brigadier-general, retired. 

After 1891 General Chandler made his home at Los Angeles. He 
became a vestryman in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, and was one of 
the very popular men in army circles. He died at the age of eighty-four, 
on June 21, 1915. 

His wife was Louise Carnegie Stevenson, a descendant of the noble 
famil)- of Carnegie, with a genealogy running back nearly a thousand j-ears. 
She was born at Gore, New Zealand, and died August 7, 1901. Her 
father, Col. J. D. Stevenson, was a member of the famous Stevenson 
Regiment of 1840 and prominent in California in the early period of 
the American occupation. When Colonel Stevenson died in 1902, at the 
age of ninety-two, the City of San Francisco suspended business on the 
day of his funeral as a tribute to his memory. 

Logan Bertram Chandler, surviving son of the late General Chandler, 
has been prominently identified with the insurance business in California 
for a number of years, and is now assistant manager of the Liverpwol, 
London & Globe Insurance Company in San Francisco. 

He was born at Oswego, New York, December 17, 1879, and has 
lived in California since 1891. He was educated in private schools and 
the University of California, with the class of 1902. He then took up the 
fire insurance business at Los Angeles, remaining in that city until 1918, 
when he came to the headquarters at San Francisco, as assistant manager 
of the Liverpool, London & Globe Insurance Company. 

L. B. Chandler is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, a 
member of Al Malaikah Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Los Angeles, 
and the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. He and his wife are 
members of the Episcopal Church. He married at Berkeley, California, 
April 4, 1923, Miss Helen Ingraham Bailey. She was born in San Fran- 
cisco, daughter of Captain Bailey of the United States Army. Her 
maternal grandfather Hart was for many years consul general to Belgium, 
and her mother's brother, John F. Swift, was American minister to 
Japan. 

Jacob Henry Bau.man was one of the pioneers in the Suisun Valley 
of Solano County, was a very industrious citizen, achieved prosi)erity, and 
gained the honor and esteem of a large community where he lived. 




JACOB H. BAUMAN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGIOX 259 

He was born in Brc\aria. Germany, in July, 1823, of Brevarian French 
parentage, and his life came to a close in 1907, when he was eighty-four 
years of age. He was reared in his native land, came to the United States 
in 1842, landing at New Orleans, lived in ( )hio for a time, and soon after 
the discovery of gold on the Pacific Coast set out for California in 1849, 
traveling by way of Panama. He worked in the mines for a time, and 
the first money he earned in that way he used to purchase a watch. Sub- 
sequently he returned to Missouri and to Ohio, and trailed a band of 
cattle over the plains through Nevada to California in partnership with 
Andrew Stevenson. Many of these cattle were lost while passing through 
Nevada, the animals foundering themselves on the abundant grass in that 
state. He settled in the Montezuma Hills of Solano County, later mo\ing 
to Suisun Valley, where he was one of the pioneers in developing an 
orchard in his section of the state. He continued the general oversight 
of his interests until his death. 

Mr. Bauman was a Knight Templar Mason and very much interested 
in this fraternity. He married Mary Amelia McMullen. Her father, 
John McMullen, came across the plains to California in 1854, and was 
one of the pioneers in the Suisun Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Bauman were the 
parents of five children, and three grew to mature years. John W. and 
Elvin H. are farmers of Suisun Valley, Solano County; Elvin H. is mar- 
ried and has one daughter, Elinor Jane, at school ; Lottie Mae is the wife of 
William Pierce, of Suisun, where he is engaged in large agricultural 
pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce are the parents of four children: Norman 
Elliot and William, Jr., who are both freshmen at Stanford University ; 
Charlotte Mae, attending Miss Burke's School ; Lewis attending grammar 
school. 

Mr. Pierce is a native of Solano County and a son of Lewis Pierce, 
who was prominently identified with the early historv- of California, par- 
ticularlv of Solano County. Lewis and his four brothers were large 
propertv owners and he was largely influential in having Fairfield named 
as the county seat of Solano County. William Pierce has always en- 
gaged in agriculture, developing the home place of his father, the house 
which he now occupies being one of the old landmarks. It was con.structed 
in 1887. He has developed about 400 acres in orchards and has a large 
vinevard. He was one of the pioneers of Solano County in reclaiming 
the marsh lands there. Vy) to the present time he has reclaimed 1.400 
acres of this great marsh, which he has planted to grain. Mr. Pierce is 
a member of California Commandery No. 1, Knights Templar, and Islam 
Shrine of San Francisco. William Pierce has a younger brother, Lewis 
Pierce, who is engaged in cattle raising in Solano County. 

AuRELius E. Buckingham. Among the names linked with that 
wonderfully interesting period that saw the settlement of San Franciscc 
was that of Buckingham, a name that has been honorably identified with 
this citv ever since. A representative member of this old family was thf 
late Aurelius E. Buckingham, was for many years prominent in business 
circles and usefully associated with civic development. 



260 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Aurelius E. Buckingham was born at San Francisco, April 4, 1865, 
and was a son of Capt. Aurelius A., a native of Connecticut, and Ellen 
Proctor (Smith) Buckingham, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and 
descendants of a long line of New England seamen. Capt. Aurelius A. 
Buckingham in 1847 brought one-third of Stephen's regiment to Cali- 
fornia, via Cape Horn, landing at Monterey. He lost his life on one 
of the pilot boats which foundered just outside the Golden Gate. 

^Ir. Buckingham was educated in his native city, and in 1883 embarked 
in the real estate and insurance business here in association with his brother, 
the late George H. Buckingham, under the firm style of Buckingham & 
Company. For a number of years this firm did an extensive business and 
built up an honorable reputation that was known far and wide along the 
coast. ^Ir. Buckingham continuing his active interest until his death, as the 
result of an accident, on November 2, 1907. He was never politically promi- 
nent, but his good citizenship was recognized in his public spirit and support 
of law and order. He was a Knight Templar Mason and a member of 
Islam Shrine of San Francisco, a member of the Unitarian Church, which 
his parents had founded, and he belonged to the Bohemian Club and the 
Native Sons of the Golden West. 

^Ir. Buckingham married Miss Rose A. Luchinger, of the University 
of California, class of '88. She was born also in San Francisco and has 
spent her life in this city. Her father, who at the time of death was 
first vice president of the Humbolt Bank, had an early life of considerable 
adventure. Henry Luchinger was born in Switzerland, December 28, 
1817, and died in San Francisco January 30, 1893. He was an industrious 
and remarkably intelligent youth, but at the age of fifteen years, although 
he was able to speak four languages fluently, he could not command a 
higher wage than a sixpence a day, and that did not satisfy his ambition. 
He therefore made his way to Paris. France, where he maintained himself 
until a1)le to cross the Atlantic Ocean to America, and in 1843 landed in 
the Port of New York. From there he made his way to Mexico City, 
Mexico, where he was employed by a Spanish family to teach German 
to a son, and he remained in RIexico City until 1848, when the discovery 
of gold in California caused him, with others, to begin preparations to go 
in search of it. 

A long overland journey being ahead of them, Mr. Luchinger and 
his comrades purchased horses, but carefully disguised themselves in 
beggar's rags, because of danger from robbers on the way. but Mr. Luch- 
inger had a belt around hs waist in which he had concealed $5,000 in 
gold. On arriving at Mazatlan, the party sold their horses and went 
aboard a ship that could convey them no farther than Ensenada, Lower 
California, wliere they again bought horses and continued along the coast 
toward San Francisco, finding the Catholic missions on the route very 
helpful. In 1849 they reached the Village of San Francisco, and found 
that manv had preceded them. It hapix^ned to be "steamer" day, and the 
line of liopcful and homesick sojourners from away back across the Rocky 
Mountains that expected mail reached for three miles from the door of 
the post oflice. 



THE SAN FRANeiSCO BAY REGION 261 

Mr. Luchiiiser immediately l)ej;an his search for s^old. At that time 
the main implement aloiitj the rivers was the primitive rocker, and his 
inventive and resourceful mind soon saw where it could he greatly improved. 
He went on to Stockton, and there hegan the manufacture of his iniprcned 
rocker, for which he found sale at $5 each as fast as he could manufacture 
them. Later he went into the furniture business at Stockton, and resided 
there until 1862 and then moved to San Francisco. In 186.3 he became 
salesman for the California l^'urniture Company, later establishing a furni- 
ture business of his own, the Boston Furniture Company, at No. 735 Market 
Street, property which is still owned by the family. In 1869 he became 
first vice president of the Humbolt Bank. His wife died when his youngest 
of six children, Mrs. Buckingham, was but eighteen months old, and she 
is the only survivor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Buckingham had three sons: Fisher Aurelius, B. S., 
who is a graduate of the University of California, married Helen Merrill, 
a daughter of E. H. Merrill, of San Francisco. They have two sons, 
John Merrill and Allen Aurelius; Henry Proctor, M. D., a graduate of 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, is a resident doctor of the 
Hahnemann Hos])itaI. He married Martha Anne Stanyan, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Stanyan, and George Luchinger, B. S., a graduate 
of the University of California, during the war ser\-ed in the United States 
Navy. Mrs. Buckingham is past president of the Women's Auxiliary 
of California Pioneers and of the Charming Auxiliary, and is a member 
of the First Unitarian Church. 

James Franklin Parks was a sturdy and ambitious youth of nineteen 
years when he made the journey across the plains from Missouri to Cali- 
fornia, and virtually six months represented the j>eriod of the long overland 
trip made with wagon and ox team. Mr. Parks arrived in California in 
the year 1854, and he was one of a comparatively few of the pioneers 
who continued active alliance with mining operations from the early days to 
the later period of present-day prosperity and progress. In 1887 Mr. Parks 
became connected v^'ith the famous Kennedy mines, near Jackson, Amador 
County, California, and there he remained, as manager and superintendent, 
until the time of his death, which occurred October 8, 1903. His w^idow 
resides in San Francisco, and to her the publishers of this work are in- 
debted for the data on which is based this brief tribute to the memory of her 
husband, one of the honored pioneers of California. 

Mr. Parks was born at Warsaw, Cooper County, Missouri, on the 9th 
of September, 1835, and thus he was sixty-nine years of age at the time of 
his death He was the second child in a family of nine children, and con- 
cerning the others only the briefest of record can here be given : ^Martha is 
deceased; Mrs. Mary Atkisson, a widow, still resides in ^lissouri ; Almira 
is the widow of Richard Melton and resides in Lincoln Countv, Missouri; 
Emma and Julia are deceased, as is also Alexander; Susan still lives in 
the old home town of Warsaw, Missouri ; and Thomas is deceased. Samuel 
and Christine Parks, parents of the subject of this memoir, were sterling 



262 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

folk of prominence in their community in Missouri, the father having there 
owned and operated a large landed estate, having served as judge in his 
community and having been three times elected to the Missouri Legislature. 
Samuel Parks died in the year 1876, and his widow, surviving him more 
than thirty years, was of venerable age at the time of her death in 1908. 

James F. Parks received his youthful education in the schools of his 
native place and, as already noted in this context, he was nineteen years of 
age at the time of his arrival in California. For a brief j^eriod he was 
employed in the mining camps on Kings River, and thereafter he was con- 
nected in turn with the Pinetree Mine, in Bear Valley, Mariposa County, 
and the Gold Hill Mine in Nevada, of which latter he was foreman. In 
1870 Mr. Parks joined in the gold stampede to White Pine, Nevada, and 
later he became foreman of Indian Valley Mine in Plumas County, Cali- 
fornia. In 1873 he became foreman of the Keystone mines in Amador 
County, where he continued his effective service in this capacity for a period 
of fourteen years. He then, in 1887, becar^^ associated with the Kennedy 
mines at Jackson, that county, where he held the office of superintendent 
at the time of his death. Mr. Parks took deep interest in all that concerned 
the progress and prosperity of the state to which he came as a pioneer, and 
his genial and noble iJersonality gained to him a host of friends. 

On the 8th of October, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of ]Mr. Parks 
and Miss Mary Pheby, who survives him and who maintains her home in 
San Francisco. Mrs. Parks was a native of England, coming to Mariposa 
County, California, in early days with her parents, James and Elizabeth 
Pheby, the former being a mining man and continuing in that business all 
his life. Of the four children of Mr, and Mrs. Parks the eldest is Lillian, 
who is the wife of John F. Davis, a well known attorney of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Davis are the parents of four children: Miss Mary Lillian, 
at home; Miss Ruth, at home; John Parks Davis, a junior in the Uni- 
versity of California; and Janet, at school. Samuel Thomas, who married 
Josephine Ortman, of Stockton, is a prosjjerous farmer near Stockton. 
Mary Elizabeth is the wife of F. W. ]3radley, jiresident of the Alaska- 
Treadwell Gold Mining Company. Mr. and Mrs. P)radley have four sons: 
Worthen. attending the L'nivcrsity of California; James Parks, at school; 
Sewall, at school ; and John Davis, at school. James Franklin died in 
1920, when about forty years of age. He was born in Amador City, 
Amador County, where he was known and loved by all. He was a pros- 
perous and popular mining operator, associated with the Plymouth Gold 
Mining Company in Amador County. His life was so lived that his name 
will be recalled with appreciation and affection by his friends and associates, 
and his memory will luni.; linger in their hearts. 

F. Arthur IT.ammkr.s.mith. .\ native son of San Francisco and a 
resident of that city and vicinity all of his life, F. Artiiur Hanmiersmith's 
interests make him prominent all up and down the Pacific Coast, (Xirticu- 
larly in the mining district of the far north. He is an executive official in 
one of the largest mining corjKirations in the .Maska gold fields, the 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 265 

Alaska- Treadwfll (luld Mining Company. His oftices in San Francisco 
are in the Crocker lUiikling. 

Mr. Hammersmith, who is a man of self attainments, having raised 
himself to husiness leadership, was horn in San Francisco, April 15, 1875. 
His father. John A. Hammersmith, was horn in Ccrmany and came to 
California early in the '50s. 

F. Arthur Hammersmith was only twelve years of age when his father 
died. His education was therefore limited to the opportunities of the local 
schools, attending the grammar school and the commercial high school. 
For six months of his hoyhood he was em[)loyed in the real estate offices 
of Tevis and Fisher. 

He was seventeen years old when on Novemher 15, 1892, he went to 
work for the Alaska-Treadwell Gold Mining Company. He has been 
associated with that organization through all its great developments for 
over thirty years, his fidelity and mastery of the husiness bringing him 
promotions until he is now secretary-treasurer and a director of the com- 
pany. The Alaska-Treatlwell Mining Company increased its operations on 
its Alaskan properties from 240 stamps to 960, making it at one time the 
largest stamp mills in the world. The Alaska-Treadwell Company is 
operating other properties than those mentioned, including the silver lead 
mine at Mayo in the Yukon territory, 100 miles east of Dawson. From 
the latter 4,000 tons were shipped in 1923. Mr. Hammersmith is also a 
director of the Alaska-Juneau Gold Mining Company, whose projjerty and 
operations lie opposite the Treadwell. He is the California sales represen- 
tative of the Bunker Hill and Sullivan Mining and Concentrating Com- 
pany, which operates one of the largest silver-lead mines in the world, and 
located at Kellogg, Idaho. 

Mr. Hammersmith is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of San 
Francisco Lodge No. 3, Benevolent and Proctective Order of Elks, belongs 
to the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, San Francisco Commer- 
cial Club, Rotary Club of San Francisco, Union League Club, Common- 
wealth Club and also to the California Development Association. He 
married. April 18, 1900, Caroline Forderer, daughter of the late Joseph 
F. Forderer. Her father was proprietor of the Forderer Cornice \\'orks 
in San Francisco. The one daughter of Air. and Mrs. Hammersmith is 
Margaret Edith, attending the Girls' High School in San Francisco. 

Sarah Dwyer. One of the interesting pioneer women of San Fran- 
cisco bore the maiden name of Sarah Dwyer. A number of her descendants 
are still living in this district. 

She was born at Dexter, Maine. Her first husband was David Lane, 
by whom she had one daughter, Mary Marcella. They went to New 
Orleans, Louisiana, where he died in 1852. After his death she married 
John Batiste. To this union were born four children, one of whom reached 
mature years. After the death of her second husband Sarah Dwyer. accom- 
panied by her two daughters, came around the Horn in an old sailing vessel 
and after a three months' vovage reached San Francisco in 1864. 



266 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Many old timers of San Francisco remember her as a very competent 
and genial hotel proprietor. She first operated the hotel where the Sailors 
Home now stands. She operated another on the north beach, and finally 
one at the corner of Broadway and Montgomery streets. She was in busi- 
ness at the last named place until her death in 1884. Her two daughters 
were Mary Lane and Sarah Batiste. The latter is the wife of James Devlin, 
and now lives at Honolulu. 

Mary Lane married John Sousa, a native of Portugal. Mr. Sousa 
sailed the seas for four years, landing at San Francisco in 1849, and going 
at once to the mines in Placer County. He engaged in mining for eleven 
years and with more than ordinary success. After leaving the mines he 
went to Monterey, where he became one of the organizers of the first 
\\'haler Company there. Later he organized another Whaler Company at 
Point Lobo, and these companies operated along the coast as far north as 
the Bering Sea. After finally retiring from his marine interests John 
Sousa obtained a land grant some eighteen miles from Monterey, com- 
prising about 1,600 acres. Here he engaged in cattle raising. He also had 
several thousand acres of range land. He started ranching with forty-seven 
head of cattle. The bear and mountain lions became so destructive that in 
three days he had only seven head left. He counted as many as twenty- 
seven lions in a bunch. He used ])oison to get rid of these destructive pests. 
When John Sousa located at Monterey the village contained only five adobe 
houses. He continued to be interested in ranching until his death in 1903, 
at the age of sixty-seven. His original ranch is still owned by his family.' 

John Sousa and ]\Iary Lane became the parents of nine children : Fran- 
cisco, who was a cattle man at King City, California, and died in 191*^, at 
the age of forty-nine; ^Lary D., wife of Fred D. Warnock, of San Fran- 
cisco, and she has one son ; .-Xnna L., wife of Steve Patterson, of San Jose ; 
Clara, wife of Thomas J. Drai:)er, of 649 Cole Street, San Francisco, and . 
they have a son and a daughter ; Jess, in the steel business in Seattle, married 
and the father of one son, Ramon ; Orleana, wife of John Sherman Bar- 
thorpe, in the steel business in Seattle, in partnershij^ with J. F. Draper ; 
Sarah, wife of Joseph Cummings, of San Francisco, and they have one son, 
Leo Joseph; John, of San Francisco; Florence, wife of Antone Silva, of 
King Citv, California: Joseph, of San Francisco and James, who occu- 
pies the old ranch near Montere\-. The family are all Catholics. 

Isaiah W. Lees was a ix)lice officer of San P'rancisco over forty-seven 
years, served as chief of police, and was one of the most famous criminal 
officers on the Pacific Coast. 

He was born in Lancashire. England. December 25, 1830. youngest 
child of John and Elizal)clh Lees, llis father was a veteran of the Na- 
poleonic wars, being uniler lire in the battle of Waterloo in 1815. He was 
only nineteen when he left the army. When Isaiah W. Lees was nine 
months old his parents came to .America and settled at Paterson, New 
Jersev, where his father died about two years later. Isaiah W. Lees had 
limited opportunities during his youth. He attended the public schools of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 267 

Patersoii, and as a boy was apprenticed to learn the locomotive and 
machinery hnilding trades. He served his a])preiiticeship in the old Rogers 
Locomotive Works at Paterson, and subsequently was employed in the 
Colt Revolver Factory. 1 lis daughter, Mrs. Leigh, now treasures the first 
Colt revolver he made. \Mien between seventeen and eighteen years of age 
he had advanced to such a jwint of efticiency in his work that he was sent 
to Cuba to set up some machinery. From there he came to .San Francisco, 
arriving on the Mary Francis, by way of Panama. December 20, 1S48. 
/\mong the passengers on that boat was John Nightingale, who subse- 
quently became an alderman in the City of San Francisco and who was 
instrumental in securing for Mr. Lees a place on the police force. At that 
time the San Francisco police department comprised only eight men. 

Mr. Lees joined the force October 26, 18S3, when he was not cjuite 
twenty-three years of age. He served continuously forty-seven years and 
two months, retiring in January, 1900. 

When he was nineteen years of age Mr. Lees went back to Paterson, 
New Jersev, and was married there on Feljruary 22, 1850. His bride 
followed him to San Francisco in 1852. Mr. Lees owned and operated the 
first tug on the San Francisco Bay, known as the Fire Fly, in 1852. His 
wife induced him to sell the boat and three weeks later it blew up. It was 
the most ardent desire of Mrs. Lees that her husband should achieve the 
highest promotion, to that of chief of police, but she died just nine weeks 
before this promotion was made. 

Mr. Lees was also chief of detectives. As a criminal officer he had to 
go abroad, to "Scotland Yard." London, several times on important cases, 
one of which was the famous Duncan case. His picture hangs in Scotland 
yards to represent one of the great criminal officers of his day. It was 
Captain Lees who founded the Rogues Gallery, which became popular 
throughout the United States and abroad, and he used his own money to 
make the original collection of pictures for this purpose. At the time of 
his death he possessed a wonderful criminal library, and this sold for 
$6,000. At his death he was president of the Veteran Police Association. 

He died December 21, 1902, just four days before his seventy-second 
birthday. Chief Lees and wife had five children, three of whom died in 
infanc\\ The only son to. reach mature years was Frederic, who married 
Margaret Sheehan, and died February 21, 1903. The only surviving 
daughter is Ella, who was born October 31, 1859, and is now Mrs. Ella 
Leigh, of 1133 Hayes Street. 

Louis Bertix was one of the sterling California pioneers of the his- 
toric year 1849. and he became one of the representative business men 
and honored and liberal citizens of San Francisco, in which city he con- 
tinued til maintain his home until 1867. He then returned to France, and 
died there at the age of eighty-three, in 1909. He and his wife were born 
and reared in fair old Normandie, France, and they were young folk 
when they left that ancient province and came to the United States, with 
California as their destination. They made the long and weary voyage 
Vol. n-13 



268 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

around Cape Horn, and arrived in San Francisco in the year 1849. 
Mr. Berlin was a skilled confectioner, had learned his trade in his native 
land, and had transported to California his equipment for the starting of a 
confectionery business. Upon his arrival, hov^rever, he left this outfit on 
board the vessel, as the tarifT duty and landing charges on the same were 
so high as to make its value to him one of negative order. Thus depri\ed 
of the means of starting a business along the line of his trade, the resource- 
ful pioneer established the first public laundry in San Francisco, and this 
he conducted until the great rush to the gold fields in 1852 was initiated, 
when he turned his attention to prospecting and mining. He became asso- 
ciated in the ownership and operation of a gold mine at Weaverville, Trinity 
County, and there he continued his mining activities until the mine was 
washed out, in 1862, when he returned with his family to San Francisco. 
His son Leonce C. had been liorn at Weaverville, March 10, 1835, and was 
eight years of age at the time of the return to San Francisco. Here Louis 
Bertin then found opportunity to establish himself in the confectionery 
business. He associated himself with the late Peter Job, and they con- 
ducted what was then considered a specially elaborate confectionery store, 
at the corner of Sutter and Montgomery streets. This enterprise was 
made one of successful order, and Mr. Bertin continued as one of the 
substantial business men of this city until his retirement and return to 
his native country in 1867. His name merits a place on the roll of the 
honored pioneers of California. 

Leonce Charles Bertin, as noted in the foregoing paragraph, was born 
at Weaverville, in 1855. and is thus entitled to affiliation with the Native 
Sons of the Golden West. He has long been numbered among the promi- 
nent and influential business men and progressive citizens of San Fran- 
cisco, where he is executive head of the Bertin & Lepori Company, ex- 
porters, importers, wholesale liquor dealers and manufacturers of cof?ee, 
with a large and modern plant at 520-522 \\'ashington Street, his home 
being at 1470 Jackson Street. 

In San Francisco Leonce C. Bertin attended tlie old Washington Gram- 
mar School, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of '67. 
It is interesting to record in this connection that in 1922 he became 
a charter member of the Washington Grammar School Association, which 
has a membership of about 150 former pupils, many of whom are now 
citizens of prominence and influence, including Theodore Roberts. This 
is to be a perpetual organization, and only those who have been graduated 
in the school for forty years are eligible for membership. Mr. Bertin 
advanced his education by going to the ancestral home in France, where 
he continued his studies until 1870, when he returned to San I'rancisco. 
Shortly afterward he here found employment in connection with the 
cofifee business, with which he has continued his alliance during the long 
intervening years and of which he has become one of the leading repre- 
sentatives in the Pacific Coast country. He familiarized himself with 
all details and phases of the coffee industry, and the business of his 
present company was founded in 1879. The plant of the company escaped 



THE SAX IRA.XCISCO BAY REGION 271 

destruction in the great earthquake and fire that brought disaster 
to the city, but indiscriminate pilfering greatly depleted the stock and 
did other damage to the establishment in that trying period of the city's 
history. The handsome residence of Mr. Bertin, on Jackson Street, was 
however, burned in the great conflagration, and his financial losses reached 
a total of about $50,000. The company made prompt proviso for con- 
tinuing operations, and within eight days after the fire the business was 
again running at virtually full capacity. 

Mr. Bertin is a liberal and i)rogressive citizen, and has won high place 
in the business circles of his native state. He is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity and the Improved Order of Red Men. 

In the year 1881 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bertin and Miss 
Caroline Grasselly, and they have three children: Charles L., Leonce J. 
and Henriette. Mr. Bertin visited Europe again in 1877 and 1907, and 
now has in contemplation a fourth European tour, in which he will be 
accompanied by his only daughter. 

Col. Frederick J. Amweg is a distinguished San Francisco engineer. 
His life work, covering a period of almost half a century, has identified 
him with important engineering construction east and west and in the 
far Pacific. He has designed and built railroads, bridges, large public 
buildings, and at the present time he is engaged as chief engineer on one 
of the largest building projects in San Francisco Bay. 

Colonel Amweg was born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1856, 
and represents distinguished American ancestr\' on both sides. His {parents 
were John M. and ^largaret H. (Fenn) Amweg. In the paternal line 
he is descended from an ancester who arrived at Philadelphia from the 
German Palatinate on September 15, 1729, settling in Cocalico Township 
of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The family resided there for five 
consecutive generations, all of them engaged in farming. Colonel Amweg 
had a cousin on the paternal side, W. H. Spera, who was major of the 
Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry and had the distinction of commanding 
General Sheridan's escort on his famous ride to Winchester in the Shenan- 
doah Valley campaign. 

On the maternal side Colonel Amweg is a great-grandson of Theo- 
philus Fenn. who was an officer in the American Colonial forces under 
General Wolfe in the Canadian cam]5aign, participating in the storming 
and capture of Quebec, at the end of the French and Indian war. He is 
also a lineal descendent of Theodore Sedgwick, an American Federalist, 
politician and jurist, who was a soldier in the Revolutionari- war, was a 
delegate to the Continental Congress from Massachusetts from 1785-86 
and in 1789 was elected a member of the first Congress, serving until 
1796, when he was elected a member of the United States Senate, in which 
body he sat until 1799. From 1802 until his death in 1813 he was a 
judge of the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Another relative in the same 
line was the Gen. John Sedgwick, one of the most brilliant Union officers 
who lost his life at Spotsylvania Court House during the Civil war. 



272 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

John M. Amweg, father of Colonel Amweg, was captain of Company' 
I of the One Hundred Twenty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers of the 
Civil war. He was born in Cocalico Township, Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, and followed the profession of the law. His wife, Margaret H. 
Fenn, was born in South Canaan, Connecticut. 

Frederick J. Amweg was reared at Lancaster and Philadelphia, and 
graduated in 1876 in civil engineering and architecture. For nine years 
he was in the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, department 
of bridges and buildings, and during the latter part of that period had the 
title of assistant engineer of bridges and buildings. Next he was employed 
by the City of Philadelphia to design and take charge of the construction 
and erection of the Cantilever Bridge spanning the Schuylkill River on 
the line of Market Street. From 1889 to 1898 he was engaged in private 
practice, handling a number of structures of both a public and private 
nature. He acted as chief engineer for the City Avenue and German- 
town Bridge Company in charge of the construction of the bridge over 
the Schuylkill River on line of City Avenue in Philadelphia, and was also 
chief engineer in charge of the erection of the new Radford Bridge at 
Radford, Virginia. 

After more than twenty years of professional activity in the East, 
Colonel Amweg in 1899 was called to Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, as 
•chief engineer to take charge of the designing and installation of an elec- 
tric street railway company in that city. After completing this road, 
thirty miles long, he had charge of the construction of an interurban 
electric railway built in the mountains, and also of two wharves in Hono- 
lulu and a large pier at Hilo, Hawaii, besides several large buildings. 

Colonel Amweg has been identified with San Francisco since 1904. 
In that year he engaged in private practice as consulting engineer and 
manager of construction. Some of the work that shows his skill and 
professional trustee include a number of large office buildings, Hahnemann 
Hospital, Southern Pacific Railway Hospital Building, Kern County 
Courthottse, Sati Alateo Courthouse. I'^resno Hotel, a large warehouse in 
San Francisco Harbor, freight warehouse for the Santa Fe Railway and 
now, as noted above, he is chief engineer in the designing and develop 
ment of an extensive pier and terminal buildings in San Francisco Bay, 
for the San Francisco Terminals Corporation. Following the great fire 
and earthquake he did much reconstruction work for the L'nited Street 
Railway Company. Colonel Amweg's offices are at 251 Kearny Street. 

He was commissioned chief of engineers in the National Guard of 
California, with the rank of colonel, in A]>ril. 1908. At his request he 
was retired with the rank of colonel during the World war to enable him 
to accept commission as major of engineers in the Engineer Officers Re- 
serve Corps. United States Army. Colonel Amweg was made a member 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers March 7, 1888. of the Amer- 
ican Association of Engineers in 1920. was elected to membership the same 
vear in the .American .Association for the .Advancement of Science. He 
has been a member of the .Sons of the American Revolution since Februarv 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 273 

10, 1902, and has been a member of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion since October 20, 1892, and is treasurer of the California Com- 
manderv of the Legion. He was made a member of Masonic Lodge No. 
368 at ' Philadelphia October 15. 1878, of Oriental Chapter No. 183, 
Royal Arch Masons, in 1879, of Knights Templar Commandery in 1882, 
having membership in Commandery No. 16 in California; of the Scottish 
Rite Consistory of Pennsylvania in 1885, is a member of Islam Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine, became a charter member of Lodge No. 616 of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Honolulu in 1SK)0, and is a 
member of the Commonwealth Club of California. 

Colonel Amweg married, October 10, 1883, at Philadelphia. Miss 
Blanche E. Parsons. Thev have two children : Blanche Ethel, born August 
14, 1885, and Frederick j., Jr., born October 5, 1891. 

J.\MES Burgess Stetson. One of the most valuable men the State of 
Massachusetts gave to California was James Burgess Stetson, a pioneer and 
the son of a pioneer. He attained his majority on the long five months' 
trip around Cape Horn, thus securing not only the exceptional opportunity 
of an early residence in San Francisco, but the opportunity to grow up with 
the city and to make felt the impalpalile quality of enterprise and initiative 
which he possessed in such overflowing measure. He brought with him- 
the full assurance of the success he ultimately attained, for he staked his 
faith on many difficult enterprises which he fostered, promoted and carried 
to that success which few other men could have made possible. His daunt- 
less courage carried him through arduous tasks, complicated by downright 
hard work and against great odds, but he always "snatched victor\- from 
the jaws of defeat." 

^Ir. Stetson was born in ^larshfield, Massachusetts, on the 27th of 
March, 1834, of old Colonial ancestry, his parents also natives of that state. 
His father was William Stetson, his mother. Sallie (Sherman) Stetson. 
He was the oldest of the four children attaining maturitv. His brother 
Charles is now a resident of Oakland, California, his sister Sarah became 
the wife of Donald Beadle and is now deceased, as is the sister Anna, who 
was the wife of Charles C. Wheeler. 

;\Ir. Stetson was educated in the schools of his native state, and when; 
he had reached his twentieth year decided to join his father in California 
and embarked on a sailing vessel, the long voyage undertaken bv so manv of 
our pioneers. Five months passed Ijefore he reached San Francisco, where 
his father had been one of the earliest of the pioneers in the gold fields. He 
at once joined his father in Columbia and the first day of his operations indi- 
vidually he panned out $250 in gold. 

Despite his success he only remained in the gold fields one year as an 
operator, engaging then in the hardware business in Columbia. Soon after- 
ward he returned to San Francisco, taking up the same line of business, as 
a member of Osgood & Stetson. The firm was soon firmlv established, and 
in a few years Mr. Stetson purchased the interest of his partner, continuing 
under the title of James B. Stetson & Company. Later he became a member 



274 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

of the well known hardware firm of Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, today 
one of the leading firms of San Francisco. 

Mr. Stetson did not confine his attention to the hardware business, for 
he was a man of affairs, possessed of a dynamic energy, ability, talent and 
genius in business that made him an outstanding figure. 

He was president of the California Street Calile Railway, holding that 
responsible position for twenty-four years, and was its incumbent at the 
time of his death. He was also president of the North Shore Railroad 
until its absorption by the Northwestern Pacific Railroad. He was the 
man instrumental in effecting the construction of the Hyde Street branch 
of the California Street Cable Railroad Company of San Francisco, and 
always took an active interest in its operation. There is no doubt that his 
untimely demise was hastened by overwork on this line after the fire, in 
connection with its rehabilitation. 

Mr. Stetson felt that it was necessary, not alone for the interests of 
the stockholders of the company, but for the transportation facilities of 
the city, that the road should be put in operation as quickly as possible. 
The destruction of the powerhouse on Hyde Street had seriously injured 
the machinery, and supixisedly competent engineers declared that a new 
main drive shaft would have to lie installed, involving the shutdown of the 
road for at least a year. 

The main drive shaft had been wari>ed about one-sixteenth of an inch, 
and the engineers declared that it could not be straightened to a perfect 
alignment. Mr. Stetson looked the \i\ant and shaft over carefully and con- 
ceived the idea of heating the shaft under a volume of oil, turning it slowly. 
This was done, and his idea came to a full and perfect fruition, for the 
system worked perfectly after this was done, the road being in oi)eration in 
August of that year instead of lieing out of service a full year. It not 
onlv saved the stockholders an immense sum of money, but was of incal- 
culable benefit to the general trans])ortation system of the city. It was in 
like manner he handled many problems arising in his business life. But 
the work on the Hyde Street problem told on him, for he gave it his per- 
sonal attention from early morning until late at night, coming home com- 
pletely exhausted. The great mental and physical strain was too much for 
a man of his years to undertake, i)Ut his firm determination to go on with 
it until success crowned his efforts carried him through to his usual triumph, 
but it unquestionably shortened his life. 

Soon after Mr. Stetson commenced his business lite in San Francisco 
he served the city well as a member of the County Hoard of Sujiervisors, 
and in the early '80s he was chairman of the important finance committee. 
He was also president of the .'\tlantic Dynamite Comixmy, and was 
the mainspring of many enterprises which he brought into life and sub- 
sequent prosperity. His numerous accomplishments brought him into 
contact, in an exceptionally intim.ite manner, with a variety of griiups of 
men. He was a ix)wer in himself, and his brilliancy always made its mark. 
He was as ]Mominent in club and social circles as in the business world, 
giving to both the best he hail, high intentions, noble and dauntless courage 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 275 

and the uiK|iicnchabIe love he felt for his fellovvnien. He had that rare gift 
which defies analysis, but is termed personality, and he loved laughter and 
good fellowship, evoking both by his bonhomie. 

Mr. Stetson was a popular member of the Pacific Union Clulj. the 
Bohemian Club and the Teal Duck Club. He was elected president of the 
latter club successively, and after each hunting trip always wrote up the 
varied ex]>eriences of the memliers in a way that was a delight to them all 
and was looked forward to as much as the actual hunting trips. In his 
later years he found his chief diversion and recreation in hunting trips, 
having always been especially fond of this sport. Every year on his trips 
to the Teal Duck Club he was accompanied by some of the best known men 
of the city, and they declared they enjoyed the personal contact with 
Mr. Stetson more than they did the shooting. 

Mr. Stetson had an irresistible way of saying things and his bon mots 
were widely quoted. As a reconteur he had no peev. and his audiences hung 
upon every word. He possessed an infectious sense of confidence and 
enjoyment, and a most felicitous manner, together with a fine and delicate 
wit, and always that palship of closest sympathy. His most serious stories 
were so interspersed with illuminating illustrations that they gripped the 
mind more powerfully than columns of arguments could do. In his home, 
where he delighted in giving dinner parties to the men of affairs with whom 
he was associated, he was always made the center of enjoyment, for he 
possessed the power of fusing the thoughts of others to his own, of 
bringing out the best in them for mutual enjoyment. 

At the Pacific Union Club, where he usually lunched, he was always 
the dominant figure, and he would sit surrounded by groups of his asso- 
ciates, all enjoying his flow of anecdote, sure of a good half hour. Above 
all, he had the gift of naivete, and he always clothed even his most trivial 
stories in piquant dress. He was just as brilliant in discussing the questions 
of the hour. It was thus he gained the jiersonal influence which makes him 
today rememliered by the friends of social, club and sjxirt life, of whom 
he po.ssessed thousands. 

Mr. Stetson was also interested in many financial affairs, his capitalistic 
interests being extensive and varied. At the time of his death he was a 
director in the Merchants National Bank of San Francisco. 

On the 6th of June, 1860, Mr. Stetson married Miss Mary Slack, who 
died at the age of fifty-two. They were the parents of four children : Sarah, 
the widow of Chauncey Rose \\'inslow, now maintaining her home in San 
Francisco; Nellie, the wife of Robert (Ixnard, of San Francisco; Albert 
L.. deceased; and Harry N., a substantial capitalist and influential citizen 
of Burlingame. 

r^Ir. Stetson passed away on the 11th of August. 1912, but while his 
mortal life is ended the angle of his influence is ever widening, through his 
life having so encompassed and impressed itself upon his friends and 
associates. 

John Rees Joxes came to California twenty-five years ago as a 
minister of the Presbyterian Church.. He held several pastorates in the 



276 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

state, but after qualifying for the bar changed his work to the profession 
of .lawyer and for twenty years has handled an extensive practice in North- 
ern California, chiefly in the San Francisco Bay district. He has his law 
offices in the Chronicle Building in San Francisco. 

Mr. Jones was born at Usk, Monmouthshire, England, December 9, 
1867, son of William and Mary (Rees) Jones, both of Welsh ancestry, 
his mother a native of Wales. His father was born in England, and on 
bringing his family to the United States, settled at Streator, Illinois, then 
a new mining town which was attracting a number of his fellow country- 
men. He was a contractor there. John Rees Jones was educated in the 
public schools in Illinois, and finished his literary education at Park Col- 
lege, near Kansas City, Missouri, where he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1890 and later the degree of Master of Arts was con- 
ferred upon him by his alma mater. In preparation for the ministry he 
pursued his studies for two j-ears at the McCormick Theological Seminary 
at Chicago, one year at the Omaha Theological Seminary, where he was 
graduated, and he also took post-graduate work in theology and philosophy 
at Auburn Seminary in New York. After being ordained a Presbyterian 
minister Mr. Jones was pastor of a church at Manilla, Iowa, 1897-98. then 
spent a brief time at Huron, South Dakota, and in 1898-99 was pastor of the 
Central Presbyterian Church at Los Angeles. He also preached one year 
at Vacaville and one year at Redding. \\'hile he was at Redding he com- 
pleted his law studies, and was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court 
in 1904. 

Mr. Jones remained at Redding for several years, building up a success- 
ful law practice. Subsequently he moved his offices to Oakland and then 
to San Francisco, and for a number of years has been well known as a 
specialist in corporation and probate law. 

Mr. Jones has also taken an active part in republican politics. He was 
candidate for Congress from the First California District in 1912. He was 
active as a speaker in the national campaign of 1924. He belongs to the 
various Scottish Rite bodies of Masonry at San Francisco, and is a member 
of the First Presbyterian Church at Oakland. His home is at San Anselnio. 

Mr. Jones married at Redding, California, January 6, 1904, Miss V'ance 
Rohm, a native of Pennsylvania. Her father. Dr. J. T. Rohm, was mayor 
of Redding when his daughter was married, and was one of the democratic 
leaders in the northern part of the state. Mrs. Jones is a graduate of the 
Lowell High School and is active in club work and for two terms has l)een 
director of the California Club. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have one son, Vance 
Rhys Jones, born October 27, 1913. 

Elias Bowers Marsh was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. July 2, 
1823, the third child of a family of seven — three brothers and tiiree sisters. 

His father, Elias Marsh, born March 17, 1793, married Mary Louisa 
Eccleston, an Episcopalian, .■\i>ril 8, 1819. was a liirthright member of the 
Societv of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, his people being Quakers 
from Rahroy, New Jersey. 




ELIAS B. MARSH 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 279 

His mother, Mary Louisa Ecclcston, burn St'ptember 25, 1797, was 
the gramklaughter of Sir John Ecclcston, who came to this country from 
England and settled in Maryland a few years before the Revolution. 

Jutlge John Bowers Ecclcston, his mother's brother, an Episcopalian, in 
1819, was elected to the General Assembly of Kent County, Maryland, 
and practiced law until 1832, in which year he was appointed an associate 
judge of the Second Judicial District of jMaryland and in 1851 was 
elected by the counties of the "Eastern Shore" a judge of the newly estab- 
lished Court of Appeals. 

Archbishoj) Samuel Ecclcston, his mother's half-brother, first Catholic 
archbishop of Baltimore, was made president of Saint Alary 's College, 
Baltimore, in 1828. In 1834 he was made assistant bishop to old 
Bishop Whilfield, and at the former's death in 1834 received the pallium 
fron^ Rome. He died April 23, 1851, at his country residence attached to 
Georgetown convent. 

Mr. Marsh was reared and educated in his native city and at the age 
of twenty-five, gold having been discovered the year before in California, 
set forth on the long and perilous journey to the new Eldorado going by 
boat to Galveston, Texas. There, on April 2nd and 3rd, he received the 
necessary papers showing American citizenship attested by Elisha A. 
Rhodes, notary, and countersigned by Hamilton Stuart, mayor of Galves- 
ton. Traveling westward overland, on the 13th of June, he was granted 
free pass-porte through the Republic of Mexico by Tomaz Salgado, 
Mexican official at "Norte, " Chihuahua, and eventually reached the west 
coast of Mexico, where he embarked and arrived in San F^rancisco in the 
autumn of 1849. 

Mr. Marsh first interested himself in mining, and then entered upon 
mercantile pursuits in San Francisco, being at one time, among others, a 
member of the firm of Marsh and Mercardo, wholesale licjuor merchants, 
and of Turner, Marsh and Osgood, imjxirters and exporters. He was 
also interested in ranches and in "tulle" lands along the Sacramento and 
San Joaquin rivers. 

He retired from active business when in the prime of life, and passed 
the remainder of his days in Oakland and San Francisco. His death 
occurred May 25, 18S^5, when nearly seventy-two years of age, his widow 
surviving until May 21, 1918, when she ])assed away at about the age 
of eighty. 

He was buried in the pit)neer plot at the old Masonic Cemetery among 
his pioneer comrades, but later his remains and the original monument 
were transferred to the lona churchyard at Cypress Lawn Cemetery. San 
Mateo County, and placed lieside those of his wife. 

In the ]>arty "crossing the plains" with Mr. Marsh was Mr. Crittenden. 
Mr. Marsh's interesting diary of the trip was destroyed in the San Francisco 
fire, April 18, 1906, but his passport is in the possession of his son. 

In the poineer days in San Francisco Mr. Alarsh served as a member 
of the "Vigilance Committee" and was an active member of the first 
\olunteer fire department. He was an honored member of the Society of 



280 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

California Pioneers, with which lie was actively identified at the time of 
his death. 

Having hecome acquainted in San Francisco, at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick MacCrellish, on May 6, 1861, in the same city, the cere- 
mony lieing performed hy Bishop William Ingraham Kip, at Grace Church, 
Mr. Marsh wedded Miss Elizaheth Thomson Garwood, who had accom- 
panied her parents shortly l)efore to California, coming by boat and by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama. Thus she shared with him the exjieriences of 
the early days in California. 

Mrs. Marsh was also a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the 
daughter of George Mosley Garwood and Elizabeth Garwood, grand- 
daughter of Capt. Richard Garwood, the great-granddaughter of Capt. 
John Dennis and the great-great-grandniece of Col. John Dennis, all of 
Philadelphia, the two latter assisting in the estalalishment of American 
independence. 

Of the four children, three daughters and a son, all of whom reside in 
San Francisco, the eldest is Elizabeth Louise, the widow of Charles Stet- 
son Wheeler; Mary Eccleston. the wife of William M Fitzhugh ; Elsie 
Nina, the wife of Nathan M. Moran ; and the son, Eccleston Bowers 
Marsh. In 1924, surviving Mr. and Mrs. Marsh are all four children, 
ten grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren. 

Arrill..\ga Musical College. 2315 Jackson Street, San Francisco. 
"Music washes from the Soul the dust of everyday life." It may fittingly 
be called the barometer of the spiritual and artistic progress of a com- 
munitv. Nothing, therefore, is of greater interest to everyone than the 
establishment and development of our musical institution. 

Such an institution, especially well adapted to its California setting, 
is the Arrillaga Musical College, which perpetuates the ideals and influence 
of Santiago Arrillaga, father of the founder, Vincent Arrillaga. Thirty 
years before the incorixiration of this institution Signor Arrillaga estab- 
lished himself in San Francisco, and through his teachings, composition 
and concerts became the svmbol of progress to all musical aspirants. 

Signor Arrillaga was a descendant of Col. Jose Joaquin Arrillaga. a 
governor of California under Spanish rule. He was an honor student 
of the National Conservatory of Madrid, and his memory is perpetuated 
there by a memorial tablet erected to his name. For his extraordinary 
musical achievements he was decorated by the Queen of Spain. He also 
studied under Marmontel in Paris. Upon arrival in this country he was 
accompanist entour with Mme Patti. 

Signor Arrillaga began teaching in San I'rancisco in 1877. Among 
some of his early pui)ils were Leland Stanford, C<ira Jane Flood and repre- 
sentatives of all the old aristocratic families, lie played the first organ 
driven bv hydraulic jxiwer in San Francisco, and was organist at the 
Spanish Church for forty years. 

Upon the enduring rciiutation of Santiago .Arrillaga tlic .Xrrillaga Musi- 
cal College was founded bv his son. \'incent .\rrillaga. iiresent director of 



THE SAN FRAXnSCO P.AY REGION 281 

the college. Vincent Arrillaga naturally received his early musical educa- 
tion from his venerable parent, but later sought contemporary development 
in the East and abroad. 

By his brilliant pla\ing he was awarded a scholarship by the Chicago 
Musical College, and studied also at the /Vmerican Conservatory. In 
London he completed his studies at the Virgil Piano School, becoming 
a professor at that school. Having satisfied himself in two more years 
of the administrative re(iuirements of musical education, he returned in 
1908 to San Francisco and incorporated the Arrillaga Musical College. 

The college building is fully equipped to carry out its work. It is a 
three-story building, containing a large recital hall, in which is installed 
an up-to-date electric two-manual organ. 

Achille Artigues, for many years the moving spirit of St. Mary's 
Cathedral, is president of the school and heads the department of organ. 

The violin department is headed by Joseph IM. W'illard, for the past 
eight years a member of the Symphony Orchestra. 

Mrs. Isaura Quiros Arrillaga, e.xponent of the Italian Bel Canto, is a 
vital force in the group of active personalities that constitute the splendid 
faculty. She devotes her time to teaching the art of singing, and is much 
in demand for recitals of Spanish music in costume. Her early studies 
were conducted privately in Alexico City, after which she graduated from 
the National Conservatory with highest honors as a pupil of Prof. Roberto 
Marin. After completing her studies in Mexico she went to Italy, studying 
under Italian masters, and after her return appeared as a member of the 
Mexican National Opera. She came to San Francisco in the summer of 
1921. 

Other members of the faculty include George Edwards, organist of 
the First Unitarian Church, a well known compwDser ; Raymond White, 
organist of Notre Dame des Victoires ; Mynard Jones ; Miss Frances 
Dwight \\'oodbridge ; Opal Franklin ; John C. Hadley, teacher of harmony 
and piano; Carl Rollandi ; Albert Vendt ; Emil Hahl ; Ednah Sullivan; 
Miss \V. Rogers, and many other competent teachers in the different 
departments, which represent every phase of musical accomplishment. 
Courses in dancing are conducted by Virginia Reed. 

The splendid faculty and broad curriculum of the Arrillaga Musical 
College places it among California's foremost distinctive and traditional 
institutions of art. 

Blanche Leonor.\ Heiss S.\nborn, M. D. While for many years a 
member of the regular medical profession in San Francisco, Doctor Sanborn 
has also performed notable service as a worker in the comparatively modern 
field of applied psychology. She is an authority on all branches of this 
subject, not only in its abnormal phases but in the application of its essential 
principles to the daily life and conduct of normal individuals. 

Doctor Sanborn belongs to the pioneer families of California, though 
she was born in Portland. Oregon. She was brought to San Francisco 
when onlv six weeks old. Her father was Lazarus Colin, who came to 



282 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

California around the Isthmus in 1852. Her mother was Virginia Harriett 
De Young, sister of ^I. H. Charles and Gustavus DeYoung, and of Mrs. 
Louis Elkus. The maternal grandmother, Amelia DeYoung came to 
California with her children in 1854. 

Doctor Sanborn received much of her education in the East. She 
is a graduate of Notre Dame and St. Paul's Academy at Baltimore, and 
her medical education was in a homeopathic school, the Hahnemann 
Hospital College of San Francisco, where she was graduated Doctor of 
Medicine in 1899. For three years she also studied music and art abroad, 
and has unusual talent with the brush as well as in literary craftsmanship. 

In 1890 she was married to Otto Von Heiss, a German naval officer 
at Kiel, where her son, Harold Louis Charles Heiss, was born. Her second 
husband was Arthur Byron Sanborn, who was born in 1856, the first 
white baby in Jackson, .Vmador County, California. Mr. Sanborn died 
in 1911. He was one of the founders and the third past master of Jewel 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. His father was owner of 
the old Sentinel Hotel. A. B. Sanborn for a time edited the Sentinel 
and also the Wonder at Sacramento. Doctor Sanborn has had strong 
literary inclinations since early childhood. Unknown to her parents she 
contributed to a boys' and girls' magazine when she was ten years of age. 
She still writes for many magazines and newspapers, and has written 
and produced a number of amateur plays. Her aquaintance with A. B. San- 
born was made while she was a contributor to his magazine. 

Her son, Harold L. Heiss, served as a sergeant with the .American 
troops in the World war. Doctor Sanborn, herself, was constant and 
untiring during the war {>eriod. giving almost all her time to the cause. 
She is a member of the Volunteer Medical Service Corps, and would have 
gone overseas except for the armistice. She served as president of a 
Red Cross auxiliary captain of the Woman's War Army, and a member 
of the Woman's National Service League. 

She stands verv high in Masonic circles, being a member of the Past 
Matrons and Past Patrons .Association of the Eastern Star, is the first 
past matron of Ideal Chapter and also of Jewel Chapter, both of which 
she organized. Her husband was the first patron of Ideal Chapter. Her 
son is past worthy patron of Ideal Chapter, Order of Eastern Star, and 
the youngest worthy patron the order ever had. Doctor Sanborn is a 
charter member of the first American Legion Coast Auxiliary, is (juarter- 
master of Daybreak Outpost and president of Advance Post No. 266, 
Auxiliarv of the American Legion. .She is ]>ast president and also the 
present president of the San l-~rancisco Club of .Aiiplied Psychology, is 
past ]iresident of the New Era Ivxpression Society, a member of the Uni- 
versitv Fine Arts Society, president of the Ideal Club and Red Cross 
Auxiliary No. 205, and a member of the Pacific Coast Woman's Press 
Association. 

Her address in San Franci.sco is 1321 Jackson Street. In her work as 
a psychology lecturer she has exercised an extensive range of influence not 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 285 

only among individuals but among groups all over the world, and many 
unusual tributes have been paid her as an inspiring leader and teacher. 

Her son Harold married Clara I'^osljerg, of San b'rancisco, and they 
have two children, Dorothy Clara and Robert Louis. 

Her grandfather's ancestors on the maternal side in 1208 were knighted 
by the King of hrance for services rendered to the crown, and the families 
of both the mother's parents had to flee to America during the reign of 
terror when so many of the nobility lost their lives. 

H.MG P.-^TiGLXN. In connection with general cultural and fine-arts 
prestige, California owes much to the distinguished sculptor whose name 
initiates this paragraph and who is an honored citizen of San Francisco, 
his reputation in his chosen field of art production having liecome inter- 
national. 

Mr. Patigian was born in the City of Van, Armenia, January 22, 1876, 
and has inherited his full cjuota of the ideality and arti.stic talent that have 
significantly marked the Armenian race. He is a son of Avedis and 
Marine (Hovsepian) Patigian, persons of exceptional culture, and his 
early education was acquired under the effective personal direction of his 
parents and by attending the American Mission School in his native city. 
In the domain of art he is self-educated, and that his talent has found 
means for e.xalted expression is signified in the splendid work which he 
has achieved. W'ays and means had to be consulted, and not without 
travail, discouragerrtent and opposing forces did the young artist make 
his way forward to the goal of his ambition. At the age of sixteen years 
Mr. Patigian entered u\Km a practical apprenticeship to the trade of sign- 
painting, and from this modest beginning he developed skill in j>en and 
charcoal drawing and in paintings in oil and water colors. He eventually 
gained a monopoly of the sign-painting business at Fresno, .California, to 
which state he came when he was fourteen years of age, and finallv he 
removed to San Francisco to study drawing and anatomy. About the 
year 1901 he obtained a position as illustrator for the San Francisco Bul- 
letin, and with this pajiier he continued his service four vears, the while 
he gained reputation for the surpassing artistic excellence of his illustra- 
tions for the Sunday editions. His ambition to become a scuptor was 
quickened while he was still a boy, and finally he rented an old studio 
on Clay Street, and there, in a distinctly esoteric or secret way, he began 
to give his s])are moments to the develoj>ing of his talent as a scuptor. 
In 1904 he com]ileted and cast his first serious piece of sculpture. To 
this he gave the title of "The Unquiet Soul," and when it was exhibited 
at the rooms of the local Press Club all beholders were astounded to find 
that the work was that of the obscure young newspajjer illustrator. In 
a local paper two and one-half columns were devoted to describing this 
splendid work and its author. ]\Ir. Patigian was greatly encouraged hv 
the favoralile reception thus given to his first production, and in cuntinuing 
his work he rented an old art gallery that had been a part of the re.sort 
known as Woodwards Gardens. Here he produced several small pieces. 



286 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

including busts, and after eight months had passed, an old German 
capitalist came to San Francisco from Eureka for the purpose of having 
made a statute of the late President McKinley. He was referred to 
Mr. Patigian, and after investigation gave the commission to the voung 
artist, who received a retaining fee of $2,500, the completed work to be 
turned out for $15,000. The successful achievement of this commission 
placed Mr. Patigian on the high road to success and reputation in the 
profession of his choice. The AIcKinley statute, of bronze, is of heroic 
size — more than eight feet in height, and by good fortune it was saved 
at the time of the great fire of 1906 that brought disaster and virtual 
physical ruin to San Francisco. This noble statute is now placed at 
Areata, this state. 

Relieved of financial limitations, Mr. Patigian then sought the inspira- 
tion and advantages offered abroad, and there he modeled the work en- 
titled "Histoire Ancienne" (Ancient History) that was accepted at the 
125th official expMDsition of the Salon des Artistes Francais, in 1907. 
\\'hile in Paris he came in contact with all the great masters of sculpture 
and other fine arts, including the great Rodin. In 1908 he returned to 
San Francisco. He then established his studio at 923 Polk Street, where 
he continued his productive work during the ensuing fourteen years. He 
then took possession of the present studio, which he had personally de- 
signed and erected. 

In the autumn of 1912 Mr. Patigian made another trip to Europe for 
recreation and for the purpose of developing ideas for work assigned him 
in the production of all sculptural details on the Palace of iMachinery for 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition. For this building he designed and pro- 
duced gigantic allegorical figures of "Invention," "Imagination," "Steam 
Power," and "Electricity," each sixteen feet in height. The other works 
for this palace were spandrels for the exterior and interior arches, also 
allegorical genii and disciples of machinery-. He was appointed a member 
of the International Jury of Awards, Hors Concours, in thb department 
of sculpture at this exposition, and there exhibited his "Vanity," "Diana," 
"Apollo," and two busts. In the period between 1916 and 1919 Mr. 
Patigian produced several large works, including the Colonel Blethen 
memorial for the Seattle Times Building at Seattle; "Bucephalus," and an 
heroic bust of General Funston, this being unveiled in the City Hall of 
San Francisco. In 1920-22 Mr. Patigian was president of the Bohemian 
Club, for two terms, being created an honorary life member by the club 
at the expiration of his terms of office. In 1921 he executed an heroic 
statue of General Pershing, which was unveiled in Golden Gate Park on 
Armistice Day in 1922. He created a bronze shaft entitled "An allegory 
of Achievement," which in 1^121 was presented to Mr. Charles M. Schwab 
by the Pacific Coast Shipbuilders. :\t the present time he is working on 
a statue of Abraham Lincoln for San l'"r;uicisco, which promises to be 
one of his great works. .A most ai>preciative account of the work of 
Mr. Patigian was written by Kineton Parkes and appears in his two 
volumes entitled "Sculpture of Today," in which is also reproduced a full 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 287 

fxige engraving of his well-known statue "At Play." He is one of the 
sixteen American sculptors to whom Mr. Parkes has given first promi- 
nence in his hook. .Among other works of Mr. Patigian may be men- 
tioned the (niardian Angel for the Dolbeer Mausoleum, San Francisco; 
the Rowell Jklonument, Fresno ; statue of Lieutenant (ioyernor J. "SI. Eshle- 
man, at the University of California; the })edinient of the Metropolitan 
Life Building, San Francisco ; Tympanum group and figures of arts, 
sciences, etc., for the 1\L H. De Young Memorial Aluseum, San Francisco; 
an heroic idealistic head of .Abraham Lincoln owned by the Bohemian 
Club; a half statue of William Greer Harrison in the loge of the Olympic 
Club and numerous other pieces, including jxirtrait busts, has reliefs, 
statuettes, etc. He is a member of the National Sculpture Society, the 
American Federation of Arts, and the Societe des Artistes Francaisi In 
addition to his membership in the Bohemian Club he is a member of the 
Family Club, the Press Club and the Olympic Club of his home city. He 
was for five years actively affiliated with the California National Guard. 
January 1, 1908, recorded the marriage of Mr. Patigian and Miss 
Blanche Hollister, of Courtland, her father having been a California 
citizen of prominence and influence and having served as a member of 
the State Legislature. Mr. and Mrs. Patigian have two children, Hollis, 
a daughter who is ten years of age at the time of this writing, in the 
spring of 1924, and Haig, Jr., who is a lad of five years. 

Arthur William Foster, a director of the Anglo and London Paris 
National Bank, a former railroad builder and president, and prominently 
identified with the development of the agricultural and other resources of 
Northern California, has been a resident of -San Francisco nearly a half 
century. 

He was born in County Tyrone. Ireland, in 1850. He was educated in 
public and private schools of his native land, and during 1874, while on a 
visit in California, decided to locate here permanently. After his return 
from Ireland he established himself in business in San Francisco as a 
member of the stock brokerage firm of S. B. Wakefield & Company. Uf>on 
the death of Mr. Wakefield in 1886 he continued the business as sole owner 
under the name A. W. Foster & Company. 

His primary interest in the development of California land resulted 
from his purchase in 1890 of more than 2,000 acres on the Russian River, 
kngwn since as the Hopland Stock Farm. What he has done there in the 
development of a general farm, specializing in fruit, pure bred live stock and 
poultrv, has amply proved to his own satisfaction that California farming 
is both profitable as well as a splendid means of recreation for a city man. 
His poultry department has come to be considered the largest and best 
equipped in California. 

Subsequent investments have brought Mr. Foster the ownership of 
over 20,000 acres. These investments brought to his attention the country 
served bv the San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad, formerly known 
as the Donahue Road. In 1893 he and associates purchased the controlling 
interest in this road at auction, and for a number of years thereafter he 
was president of the railroad. As a means of increasing traffic for the rail- 



288 THE SAX FRAXXISCO BAY REGION 

road he recognized the value of the timber resources in Mendocino and 
Humboldt counties, and promoted the Cahfornia Northwestern Railway 
Company, which built and operated a forty mile extension, reaching the 
Redwood timber lands adjacent to the present town of W'illits. Willits was 
practically founded by Mr. Foster, and one of his sons is president of the 
Bank of Willits, and manages the Foster interests in that section of the 
state. Mr. Foster was instrumental in founding a lumber mill there, and 
immense quantities of lumber product have gone out of that region over 
his railroad. In 1906 he disposed of his interest in the railroad to the pres- 
ent Northwestern Pacific Railway Company, and retired as president on 
January 1, 1907. 

This development work will undoubtedly be recognized for manv years 
to come as a great individual achievement. Next to that in importance 
ranks his Irmg service as a regent of the University of California. He was 
first appointed in 1900. For ten years he was chairman of the finance 
committee, subsequently its vice chairman, and a couple of years ago he 
was appointed chairman of the board of regents while a new president of 
the university was being sought.. He has been consistently devoted to the 
great ideal of making the University of California the crowning feature of 
the educational program of a great state. Particularly ha!s lie been inter- 
ested in the Davis farm of the university, and it was largely the result of 
his personal attention and his visiting practically every agricultural college 
in the United States for the purixise of combining at Davis the best 
features of each. At the time of the World war he was a dollar a year man 
for the Government. He owns a large and beautiful estate in Marin 
County, at San Rafael, where he purchased a home in 1885. Mr. Foster 
in 1910 was selected by the late Andrew Carnegie as one of the trustees of 
the Carnegie foundation for international peace. Pie is a director of the 
Market Street Railway Company of San Francisco, and was a director and 
treasurer of the Panama Pacific International Exposition at San Fran- 
cisco. In 1883 he chartered Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine, becoming 
its first illustrious patriarch and was grand potentate in 18S5. He is also 
a member of the Pacific Union, the Bohemian and Olympic clubs. 

In 1876 he married Miss Louisiana Scott. Her father. Rev. Dr. William 
Anderson .Scott, was founder of the Calvary Presbyterian Church, and the 
San Francisco Theological Seminary, now located at San Anselmo. 
Mr. Foster is himself aftiliated with the Presbyterian Church, and his 
interest and contributions largely made possible the erection of the present 
Saint John's Presbyterian Church at .\rguello Boulevard and Lake Street. 

Mrs. Albert Woodburn Scott is one of the ix)pular native daughters 
of San Francisco, where she still maintains her home, and she is not only 
a daughter of a well known California ]>ioneer, but also the widow of a 
sterling citizen who likewise gained a measure of ])ioneer distinction in 
this state. 

(ieorgc Washington Smith, father of Mrs. Scott, was born and reared 
in the South, and was a representative of a family estal)lislied in that 



L 




THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 291 

part of the United States in a very early day. Mr. Smith was a young 
man when he came to Cahfornia, in 1854, and cast in his lot with the 
pioneers of San Francisco, a frontier town that then gave little assurance 
of becoming a metropolis. Mr. Smith made his way through the various 
settled districts of California, and had his quota of experience in the 
untrammeled wilds, but he eventually returned to San Francisco and 
established his residence on the former beautiful Rincon Hill. He became 
one of the influential and honored citizens of San Francisco, and here 
he and his wife continued to reside until their deaths. 

Mrs. Scott, whose maiden name was Georgiana Caroline Smith, 
was born and reared in San Francisco, received in her youth excellent 
educational advantages, and in the passing years she has advanced her 
cultural activities through study and wide reading, and made a genuine 
and enduring impress as a gracious gentlewoman. Her husband, the 
late Albert Woodburn Scott, was born and reared in New England, was 
graduated from Williams College, and about the year 1857 he came from 
the State of Vermont and numbered himself among the pioneer business 
men of San Francisco. Here he engaged in the hay and grain business, 
which he developed to large volume, and it is pleasing to record that this 
business is now continued under the effective management of his son and 
namesake, Albert W., Jr. 

At the time of the now historic earthquake and fire that brought 
disaster and desolation to San Francisco, the beautiful home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott, at Page and Buchanan streets, was saved from destruction 
in the great fire that raged all about the place and came within a block 
of the home. This fine home was thrown open as a ])lace of refuge, 
and was one of the official relief stations in the stricken city. Mrs. Scott, 
with deep sympathy and much resourcefulness, took active charge of 
reHef work, in which representative bankers, lawyers and other professional 
and business men did well their part, while those of more humble and 
lowly station were likewise instant in kindly helpfulness. The Scott family 
had made a voyage to the South Sea Islands and had arrived at the home in 
San Francisco about a week prior to the great disaster. In the same year, 
1906. all except one of the warehouses maintained in connection with Mr. 
Scott's business were destroyed by fire. In addition to being used for 
immediate and direct relief work after the great fire the Scott home 
likewise figured as a receiving station for .supplies sent to the stricken 
city from the other cities and states of the Union. From this generous 
home were in this way distributed more than 2,000 outfits for infants 
whose parents had lost their all in the great catastrophe. .Albert Woodburn 
Scott was one of the loyal and progressive citizens and representative 
business men of San Francisco at the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1908, as the result of an organic disorder of his heart. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Scott spent six years in European 
travel, and she was sojourning in the City of Berlin after the inception 
of the World war, she having there remained eight months after the war 
was initiated, and having returned home in the year 1915. 



292 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Airs. Scott has long been a popular leader in social and cultural circles 
in her native city and state. In 1917-18 she had the distinction of serving 
as president of the Forum Club, the most exclusive woman's organization 
of the kind in San Francisco, and, in fact, in the entire State of California. 
Mrs. Scott is still referred to as the "war president" of this distinguished 
club, and as its executive she led its various service-activities during the 
World war period. The cIuIj made immediate registration at the national 
capital, and indicated its readiness to do everything jxissible to further 
welfare work and general patriotic service. The beautiful club rooms 
were converted into a veritable workshop for the Red Cross auxiliarv. 
From May, 1920, until May, 1922, Mrs. Scott held the office of president 
of the representative civic organization known as the California Club, 
and at the time of this writing, in the spring of 1924, she is serving as 
president of the Palace Hotel unit of the American College Club. Her 
gracious personality has won to her a host of friends, and in the various 
clubs with which she has been so prominently identified her election to 
office has l)een compassed invariably without the a])]>earance of an opixising 
candidate. 

Mrs. Scott has been for many years a leader in the Red Cross 
activities, and she has given generously of her influence and direct service 
in the furthering of benevolent and philanthropic work, the while she 
has been a true apostle of civic progress and uplift. Her name has 
been placed on the honor roll of the California State Federation of 
Woman's Clubs, and this is but one of many tributes paid to this gracious 
daughter of California by her native commonwealth. 

John Isaac. Redwood City, judicial center of San Mateo County, is 
one of the attractive and progressive municipalities of the region to which 
this publication is devoted, and its civic and its varied interests were 
effectively advanced through the service of John Isaac, especially in his 
capacity of newspaper editor and juihlisher. Mr. Isaac was long a 
]M-ominent factor in newspaper enterjirise in California, and wielded spe- 
cially large and lienignant influence in the advancing of horticultural indus- 
try in this favored commonwealth. 

Mr. Isaac was born in Hertfordshire, England, .August 23, 1847, and 
was a lad of thirteen years at the time of the family removal to the United 
States, where he early entered upon a practical apprenticeshij) to the 
printer's trade in the office of a news]«per in the City of Salt Lake. As a 
vouth he accom])anicd his paternal grandparents in their migration across 
the i)lains to Salt Lake City, the journey having been made with a train of 
ox teams. At Salt Lake City he found employment with the Deseret News. 
and was connected also with the office of the Salt Lake Tril)une for some 
time. Upon coming to California he founded the San Bernardino Times, 
the first pa]>er to be issued in the now vital city of San Bernardino. He 
later was connected with the .\lta, California, Chronicle and b'xaminer, and 
still later he assumed control of the California Home and Farm, of which 
he was the founder, at San Jose. He made this one of tlie leading farm 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 29J. 

and household publications in California, and the paper gained a wide and 
substantial circulation. His deep and well fortified interest in horticulture 
led to his heint:; made a member of the California State Board of Horticul- 
ture, with which he continued his valued services fourteen years — until his 
retirement in the year 1''07. Mr. Isaac was the first horticultural commis- 
sioner of San Mateo County, and he was much in demand as a lecturer on 
horticultural subjects, his services in this cajjacity having been widely ex- 
tended through the state. His death occurred November 20, 1915. 

In 1895 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Isaac and Miss EditK 
Penman, who was born and reared in California, and the one child of this 
union is John Robert, who was born in 1898. and who is now editor of the 
Redwood City Times-Gazette, a weekly paj^er that is one of the oldest in 
California, it having been founded in 1859. The Times-Gazette is an 
effective exponent of local interests and also of the principles of the repub- 
lican party, this party having received the uncjualified allegiance of the sub- 
ject of this sketch and of his son, who is well maintaing the journalistic 
prestige of the family name. 

Wellington Gregg. It is sometimes difficult to understand the work- 
ings of ])rovidence or to submit blindly when one of the most useful of 
citizens is removed from his sphere of action just when life offers most to 
him, but those left behind can only rejoice that he was spared to accomplish 
as much as he did, and to be proud of his upright life and honorable career. 
When the City of San Francisco was notified of the sudden death of 
Wellington Gregg, the news came as a profound shock, for he had not much 
more than passed the half century mark, and the need for his services in the 
numerous financial, commercial and industrial institutions with which he 
was connected was urgent. 

Wellington Gregg was born at Bell Mills, Tehama Countv, California, 
October 27 . 1871, and from the time he was seven years old was a resident 
of San Francisco. He was a son of Wellington and Katherine (White) 
Gregg, the former now deceased, but the latter still living. She was born 
while her parents were crossing the plains to California. The elder Welling- 
ton Gregg came to California in 1847. and died at San Francisco in 1918,. 
like his son, while sleeping. Three children of the elder Wellington Gregg 
and his wife survive, namely: Harry and William Gregg, and Mrs. Leon 
F. Asten. 

The i)ublic schools of San Francisco educated the younger Wellington 
Gregg, and when he was sixteen years old he entered the emplov of the 
Crocker National Bank as a messenger, and continued with this institution 
the remainder of his life, rising through the various stages to be its vice 
president. His interests, however, were not confined to this one concern, 
for he was connected with many, among them being the Del Monte 
Properties Com]iany, the Santa-Cruz-Portland Cement Companv, the 
Moore Shipbuilding Company and many others, in all of which he held some 
ofticial position or other. He was a thirty-second degree Mason and 
belongecl to Islam Temple. Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 



294 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Shrine. Well known as a clubman, he maintained membership with the 
Burlingame Country Club, the Pacific Union Club, the Bohemian Club, the 
Family Club, the San Francisco Golf and Country Club, the Presidio Golf 
Club and others, and was an ardent golf player. 

On November 2, 1891, Mr. Gregg married Leonie Hiribarren. and they 
became the parents of two children : Enid, who married Stuart Haldorn and 
lives at San Francisco; and Ethel, who married Daulton Mann, of San 
Francisco, and has one son, Daulton, Junior. \\'hile Mr. Gregg died in his 
sleep ver\' suddenly, he had suffered from several attacks of heart disease 
and pleurisy, but, having recuperated at Coronado, was considered well on 
the way to recovery when death came quietly and summoned him. He was 
a man whose salient characteristic was efficiency. Whatever he undertook 
he did well, and he was able to inspire confidence in himself and in the enter- 
prises with which he was connected, all of which benefited by his sage coun- 
sel and executive ability. Genial by nature, he made friends everywhere, 
and was held in affectionate comradeship by legions. 

Isaac H. Morse has been a resident of California for more than half 
a century, has been prominently identified with important industrial and 
commercial interests here, and is now living virtually retired in his home 
city of San Francisco. A loyal citizen and progressive business man, he 
has wielded much influence in connection with civic and material develop- 
ment and advancement in his home city and state, and he is si>ecially 
entitled to recognition in this publication. 

Mr. Morse, a scion of fine Colonial New England ancestry, was born 
at Manchester, Massachusetts, August 31, 1847, and is a son of 
Capt. Joseph H. and Mary E. (Girdler) Morse, both likewise natives of 
Manchester. Of the six children the first two, \\'illiam and Joseph H., Jr., 
are deceased, as is also the third son, Benjamin G. ; Mary E. is the wife of 
William Wilkins, of Bolinas, Marin County. California; Isaac H., of this 
review, was the next in order of birth; and Fremont, a resident of San 
Francisco, is the executive head of the United States coast and geodetic 
survey. Capt. Joseph H. Morse followed a seafaring life, and, like many 
others of those who held to this vocation under the early conditions when 
sailing vessels were employed, he met with many and varied experiences, 
adventures and perils. As a sea captain he was serving as chief mate of 
the ship Glide when that vessel was wrecked on the Fiji Islands, and 
there he remained two years among the cannibal islanders of the mystic 
South Seas before he was able to make his esca|)e. He continued his sea- 
faring life until 1868. making his home in his native town of Manchester. 
He came to California in that year and established his home at Bolinas, 
where his death occurred in the middle '70s, his widow passing away 
about the year 1893. 

In the schools of his native town in the old Bay State Isaac H. Morse 
acquired his early education, and in 1866, at the age of eighteen years, 
he came to San Francisco, and here took a position as bookkeei>er. In 
1872 he became associated witli the firm of C. Tames King of Williams 



THE SAN FRANXISCO BAY REGION 297 

& Company, engaged in the fruit-canning business, and later he became 
one of the principals in this important concern, the title of which became 
King. Morse & Company, with later incorporation under the title of the 
King-Morse Canning Company. He continued the executive head of this 
flourishing business from 1872 to 1899, in which latter year the California 
Fruit Canners' Association was organized and all leading canning concerns 
in the state were merged into the new organization, there having been 
only two other canneries of this order in the state when Mr. IMorse became 
identified with the industry. In 1890 he organized the Union Can Com- 
pany, of which Joseph Black became the president, and in 190.3 the plant 
and business were sold to the American Can Company. 

Mr. Morse retired from active business in the year 1900, his health 
having become greatly impaired by a complete nervous breakdown. He 
has since made two trips around the world, and through this diversion 
did much to recuperate his physical wellbeing. 

In 1866, the year of his arrival in San Francisco, Mr. Morse here 
became a member of the First Congregational Church, with which he has 
continued his affiliation during the long intervening period. He was elected 
a deacon in 1882, and in 1893 became senior deacon of this church, of 
which he has served as a trustee a full quarter of a century, besides having 
held also the office of moderator, and has been a leader in all the progres- 
sive movements of the church, which is recognized as the leading house of 
worship on the Pacific Coast. While now retired from active business, 
Mr. Morse continues to take lively interest in all that concerns the welfare 
and advancement of the city and state that have long represented his home. 
He is a republican in political adherency, and is a member of the Comrrion- 
wealth Club of San Francisco. 

On the 31st of April, 1874. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Morse 
and Miss Mary Tourtelotte, a daughter of the late Henry Tourtelotte, who 
was a native of the State of Rhode Island and whose death occurred in 
San Francisco in 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Morse have no children. 

Rt. Rev. William Ford Nichols came to San Francisco in 1890, at 
first as assistant, then as Episcopal Bishop of California, and since 1895 
has been Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of San Francisco. During the 
past third of a century the religious life of the Pacific Coast had no more 
conspicuous and influential figure than Bishop Nichols. This statement is 
fully proved by the many responsibilities accorded him, and the honors 
marking the steadily increasing esteem in which he is held. 

Bishop Nichols was born at Lloyd, New York, June 9, 1849, son of 
Charles Hubert and Margaret Emilia (Grant) Nichols. He is in the ninth 
generation from Francis Nichols, one of the original proprietors and 
settlers at Stockford, Connecticut, in 1639. In a map his house lot is 
chartered among the seventeen families who comprise the beginning of this 
settlement. This Francis Nichols came from England, and some genealo- 
gists relate him to the family of Sir Richard Nichols who captured and 
named New York. Bishop Nichols' fourteen grandchildren are therefore 



■298 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

in the eleventh American generation from Francis Nichols. The father of 
Bishop Nichols was a New York State farmer. 

William Ford Nichols attended the Dutchess County Academy at 
Poughkeepsie, the Poughkeepsie Collegiate School, and at the close of the 
'Civil war he was one of the members of the School Corjjs that i)araded to 
commemorate the death of President Lincoln. In 1S66 he entered Trinity 
College of Yale University at Hartford, Connectitcut, where he was gradu- 
ated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1870, then entering the Berkeley 
Divinity School at Middletown, Connecticut, where he graduated in 1873. 
In the same year Trinity College conferred upon him the Master of Arts 
degree. The degree Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him in 1888 by 
Trinity College and also by Kenyon College at Ganbier, Ohio. 
Bishop \\'illiams of Connecticut ordained him a deacon of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in 1873 and a priest in 1874. A brief record of the 
service of his ministry through half a century is as follows: 

He was private secretary to Bishop Williams from 1872 to 1876, and in 
1873-1875 was assistant in Holy Trinity Church at Middletown. He was 
rector at Saint James Church at West Hartford and Grace Church at 
Newington, Connecticut, from 1875-7, and rector of Christ Church at 
Hartford from 1877-1887. From 1882-87 he was memlier of the standing 
committee of the Diocese of Connecticut, and in 1884 was chosen a member 
of the delegation from the Diocese of Connecticut to the Seabury Seminary 
at Aberdeen, Scotland. He acted as assistant secretary of the House of 
Bishops in 1886. From 1887 to 1890 he was rector of Saint James Church 
at Philadelphia. 

On June 24, 1890, in Saint James Church, Philadeliihia, he was conse- 
crated bishop coadjutor of California, tlie ofhciating bishops being John 
Williams, Quintard, Nealy, Niles, Whittaker, Littlejohn. Adams, Scar- 
borough, Whitehead and Henry C. Potter. While bishop coadjutor he really 
had full charge of the great diocese of California, arriving at San Francisco 
during 1890 and was consecrated in June. 1890. In 1893 he was consecrated 
bishop of California, and two years later, in 1895, he helped create the 
diocese of Los Angeles, comprising the greater jiart of Southern California. 
In 1910 he shared in the creation of the missionary district of San Joaquin, 
both being taken from the original diocese of California. 

In 1893 Bishop Nichols founded and became dean of the Divinity 
School of the Pacific, a post he held thirty years, until 1'123. During 1885 
and 1887 he had acted as professor of church history in the Berkeley 
Divinity School at Middletown, Connecticut. Bisho]) Nichols suggested 
and unveiled the prayer botik cross in Golden Gate Park at San Francisco 
on January 1, 1894. He organized the House of Church Women in 1905 ; 
acted for the presiding bishop in receiving the missionary district of Hono- 
lulu in 1902; was a niemlier of the mayor's relief committee during the 
fire and earthtjuake days of 1906; shared in founding the great cathedral 
in 1907 : and has served at various times on arl)itration committees in San 
Francisco laljor troubles. He had a share in founding the National Sea- 
men's Church Institute of America and also the local Seamen's Church of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO \'..\\ REGION 299 

San Francisco, and acted as honorary president of both. He was president 
of the Province of the Pacific from 1915 to 1922. He presided at the con- 
secration of Bishop .Mooreland in 1899, of Bi.shop Restorick in 1902, of 
Bishop Sanford in 1911 and Bishop Coadjutor Parsons in 1919 
Bishop Nichols had some influence in bringing for its first meeting on 
the Pacific Coast the National Church General Conference to San 
Francisco in 1901. 

With all the heavy burden of administrative responsibilities Bishop 
Nichols has found time for a great deal of literary production. Besides 
published sermons and many articles in j^eriodicals he is author of the 
following: On the Trial of Your Faith, 1895; A Bit of Elizabethan 
California, 1894; Character, a Founder's Day Address at Stanford Uni- 
versity, 1900; A Father's Story of the Fire and Earthquake, 1907; Apt 
and Aleet, 1909; Some World Circuit Saunterings, 1913; Why a Sir 
Francis Drake Association in California, 1922; Days of My Age, 1923; 
and Memories Here and There on the Fourth Bishop of Connecticut, the 
Rt. Rev. Dr. John Williams, 1924. His recent book, entitled, "Days 
of My Age," is largely a book of auto-biography and reminiscence, and 
a store of historical description and record of San Francisco during the 
thirty odd years of the bishop's residence. 

Bishop Nichols is a member of the Beta Beta Chapter of the Psi 
Epsilon College Fraternity. In politics he has usually voted with the 
republican party. He is an honorary life member of the Pacific Union 
Club of San Francisco and was a member of the University Club of 
Philadelphia from 1888 to 1890. 

At Christ's Church, New York City, May 18, 1876, he married Clara 
Quintard. daughter of Edward Augustus and Mary ( Gilespie ) Quintard. 
The Quintard family, of Huguenot ancestry, w^as identified with the early 
Colonial days of New York City. Her father, Edward Augustus Quintard, 
was for many years president of the Citizens Savings Bank of New York. 

Bishop Nichols is the father of five children, and, as mentioned above, 
has fourteen grandchildren. The members of the younger generation 
are scattered over the earth from Boston to Shanghai. His oldest child 
is Rev. Dr. John Williams Nichols, dean of the Divinity School of St. 
Johns University at Shanghai, China, who married Julia Zabriskie of New- 
York. Mary Evelyn Nichols, who died in 1917, was the wife of Phillip 
Moyland Lansdale, president of the bank of Palo Alto, California. William 
Morse Nichols, assistant to the president of the Yellowstone Park Hotel 
and Transportation Company, married Dean Child. Clare Quintard 
Nichols is the wife of Charles Ferdinand Mills, a vice president of the 
First National Bank of Boston. Margaret Alice Nichols was married 
to Edward Hardy Clark, Jr., who has charge of the credit department 
of the ^Mercantile Trust Company of California at San Francisco. 

James Sanderson. M. D. A graduate of both medical and osteopathic 
colleges. Dr. James Sanderson has performed a notable service in both 



300 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

branches of the profession, and has a large and successful practice in the 
City of San Francisco. 

He has spent most of his life in California, but was born in Boston, 
^Massachusetts, November 6, 1886. His parents, Sidney and Ruth ( Dartt) 
Sanderson, were born in Nova Scotia, where the Sandersons were estab- 
lished in early times. They now reside at Los .Angeles. Sidney Sander- 
son for many years was engaged in the manufacture of packinghouse 
fixtures and tramways. 

Dr. James Sanderson spent the first eighteen years of his life at 
Boston, where he attended grammar and high schools, and spent one 
year in Harvard University. Coming to California in 1904, he sub- 
sequently entered the Los Angeles College of Osteopathy, and was gradu- 
ated with the Doctor of Osteopathy degree in 1910. Doctor Sanderson 
in 1914 graduated with the Doctor of Medicine degree from the Pacific 
College of Los Angeles. 

For four years he practiced in Fresno. Another California community 
that came to know and appreciate his services as a professional man in 
Janesville in Lassen County, where he remained also four years. Since 
1918 he has his home and office in San Francisco, and has conducted a 
general practice of both medicine and osteopathy. His address is 466 
Geary Street. 

Doctor Sanderson during the ^^'orld war enlisted in the navy and was 
commissioned an ensign. He was assigned duty as cost inspector at the 
Bethlehem Ship Building Corporation in San Francisco. He was given 
an honorable discharge in June, 1919. Doctor Sanderson is affiliated with 
San Pedro Lodge No. 996, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; is 
a member of Richmond Lodge No. 375, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
also belongs to the California bodies of the Scottish Rite. He is patron 
of Golden Gate Chapter No.- 1 of the Eastern Star, and Mrs. Sanderson 
is also a member of that chapter. 

On December 1, 1910, he married Miss Harriet Saunders. She was 
born in Fresno County, California, where her father, Scott Saunders, was 
a substantial farmer. IMrs. Sanderson is a graduate nurse of the Cali- 
fornia Woman's Hospital. Both attend the Episcopal Church. 

' Roy Thurstox Kimb.^ll. One of the quiet, substantial citizens of 
San Francisco, Rov Thurston Kimball, has shown efficiency and energy 
in evervthing he has undertaken, and during his residence of nearly half 
a centurv in California has won rank among the able business men. He 
is still active in executive resixinsil)ility, though past the age of three score 
and ten, being vice president of the Marvin Shoe Comixiny in San 
Francisco. 

He was born at Northfield, New Hamp.shire, .August 2, 1846, of old 
Colonial and Revolutionary stock, being of Scotch-English ancestry on 
both sides. His jxirents were Joseph and Harriet (Rogers) Kimball, 
both natives of New Hampshire. His father was a farmer. 

Roy Thurston Kimball was educated in the New Hampshire Con- 




^^^^nvuC<je^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 303 

ference Seminary, now known as the Tilton School. It was and is a 
noted old preparatory school, and Mr. Kimball has recently undertaken 
with others the organization of the Tilton Loyalty Club, made up of 
former students of the old New Hampshire Academy. When Mr. Kimball 
was sixteen years of age his father died, and soon after that event he 
went to Portland. Maine, and for seven years was connected with the 
canned goods business. It was in 1875 that he came to California, and 
the first two years he spent at Napa, engaged in a tannery business. Prac- 
tically his entire business exjierience in California has identified him with 
the leather industry in some form or other. Removing from Napa to 
San Francisco he was engaged in the tanning business until about 1880, 
when he organized a corporation known as the Norton Tanning Company. 
He became president and was sole manager of the business throughout its 
perioil of existence for about thirty-five years. He laid the foundation 
of his solid prosperity in that business. After selling out he was practically 
retired from his responsibilities until August, 1920. Upon the death of 
Mr. Frank Marvin he was induced to accept the post of vice, president 
and director of the wholesale firm of the Marvin Shoe Company. A few 
months later H. L. Marvin died, and then Mr. Kimball assumed the full 
control of the business in behalf of the widows of Frank and Harvey L. 
Marvin, being still vice president of the company. He has other invest- 
ments in business interests in San Francisco. 

Mr. Kimball is a York and Scottish Rite Mason, retaining membership 
in the lodge in Maine. He was one of the early members of Islam Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine and also an early Knight of the Golden Gate Com- 
mandery. He is a republican, but has never been active in politics. He 
still retains his membership in the Episcopal Church at Tilton, New 
Hampshire. 

In 1916 Mr. Kimball married Dr. Edna Field, who died in 1921. Doc- 
tor Field was one of the pioneer women physicians of San Francisco and 
the Pacific Coast. She, like her husband, was a native of New Hampshire, 
her father being a physician and a surgeon in the Union Army during 
the Civil war. She finished her college education in Maine, and in 1883 
graduated with the medical degree from Cooper Medical College of 
California. For upwards of forty years she continued in practice, being 
a sj^ecialist in diseases of women and children. In cooperation with 
Doctor Wanzer and Dr. Charlotte Brown she established the Children's 
Hospital of San Francisco, and for many years was its attending physician. 

Most Rev. Ed\v.\rd J. Hanna, D. D., archbishop of San Fran- 
cisco, was born at Rochester, New York. July 21, 1869, son of Edward 
and Anne (Clarke) Hanna. The Hanna family is of Scotch descent, have 
lived in Ireland for many generations, and some of its branches have been 
identified with the United States since Colonial times. Edward Hanna, 
father of the archbishop, came to this country from Ireland in 1837, and 
subsequently was engaged in the lumber business. 

Edward J. Hanna was educated in the Rochester Free Academy, after 



304 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

which he went to Rome, Italy, and attended the College of Propaganda, 
beginning in 1879. He subsequently attended the University of Cambridge, 
England, in 1901, and the University of Alunich, Germany. He was 
ordained a priest of the Catholic Church in Rome in 1885, and in 1886, 
after public examination, was given the degree Doctor of Divinity. He 
remained as a teacher in the College of Propaganda during 1886-87, and, 
returning to America, served as professor of theology at St. Bernard's 
Seminary at Rochester from December, 1893, until December, 1912. 

In 1907 he was nominated Coadjutor Archbishop of San Francisco, 
but failed to receive confirmation of Rome on account of the charge of 
modernism, a charge sul)sequently disapproved and dropped. On October 
22, 1912, he was appointed by Pope Pius X as Auxiliary Bishop of San 
Francisco, and on December 4, 1912, was consecrated Bishop of Titopolis. 
He was appointed Archbishop of San Francisco June 1, 1915. 

While representing the authority of the Church of Rome, organizations 
and individuals of all creeds and classes in California have come to appreci- 
ate the clarity and wisdom of Archl)ishop Hanna's expressions in matters 
of general importance, his disinterested public spirit and the sincerity 
of his devotion to the common interest and welfare of humanity. He is 
an honorary member of the Pacific Union Club, and since September 16, 
1913, has been a commissioner of immigration of California and is now 
president of the commission. 

He is also chairman of the executive committee of the .Archbishops of 
the United States and is chairman of the Natit)nal Catholic Welfare Council, 
which has charge of all Roman Catholic activities in the United States, 
with headcjuarters at Washington. 

George Marshall Dill is a native son of California, and for a 
number of years has been prominent in business there as an importer 
and exporter. 

Mr. Dill was born at San Francisco, October 9, 1882. He is a great- 
great-grandson of Com. Oliver H. Perry, who first established commercial 
relations between .\merica and the Empire of Japan. Mr. Dill comes of 
a family that has long been identified with the Oriental trade. 

George Marshall Dill was educated in public schools, including the 
Hearst Grammar School, and was a member of the first graduating cla.ss 
from the Mission High School in 1901. Soon afterward he established 
the firm Dill-Crosett, Inc., and this importing and exix)rting business 
is now the Dill-Coppage, Inc., of which Mr. Dill is president. He is 
well known in commercial circles in the Orient. Among the many trips 
he has made across the Pacific, three of them were made wliile he was 
a memljl-r of government and state commissions, handling such subjects 
as Japanese ownershi]) of land in California and tariff adjustments in 
China. 

Mr. Dill is a member of various Civic clubs, Social and Golf clubs, and 
for eight years has been a director of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce and for ten years chairman of its Foreign Trade Committee. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO HAY REGION 30.-) 

He married Miss Edna Fay. daugliter of Phillip F. Fay. Her father 
was one of the founders of the San Francisco Stock Exchange. Mr. and 
Mrs. Dill have one child, (ieorge Marshall Dill, Jr.. horn in 1917. 

Edwand F. Tre.xdweli.. In the volume and value of the interest repre- 
sented probably no California attorney has enjoyed a larger general prac- 
tice within the last quarter of a century than Edw.^rd F. Trcadwell, of 
San PVancisco. His work has been almost entirely in civil practice, anfl 
he has handled cases and has acted as counsel in litigation involving land, 
water and other property rights all over the Pacific Coast. The reputa- 
tion achieved by him in general practice has been greatly extended through 
his attainments as an author, legislator and municipal chief. 

For fifteen years, from 1907-1922, Mr. Treadwell was the leading 
counsel for the firm of Miller iS: Lux, Inc. Miller i^ Lux, as practically 
all Calif ornians know, has been the largest stock and cattle, land-holding 
corporation on the Pacific Coast, with assets running into many millions 
of dollars, and controlling an immense domain of millions of acres of 
land, largely in California, but also in Oregon and Nevada. In their 
stock-raising and other operations the firm employed a great army of 
workers in their different oflices, camps, slaughter houses, etc., and depots. 
As head of the legal department of the corporation Edward F. Treadwell 
was the master mind in handling the property and representing the firm 
in defense of their interests through the courts of the Pacific Coast state. 
Only recently Mr. Treadwell won a great inheritance tax suit involving 
more than $17,000,000, representing as counsel the Henry Miller estate. 

A native son of California, Mr. Treadwell was born at Woodland 
May 19, 1875. He was liberally educated, attending the University of 
California and its law department, the Hastings College of Law, where 
he graduated with honors with the Bachelor of Laws degree in 1897. 
From 1897 to 1907 he practiced as a member of the legal firm of Mastick, 
Van Fleet & Mastick, and from 1907 to 1922, acted as general counsel 
for Miller & Lux, Inc. He was one of the leading attorneys assembled 
in many great cases involving water litigation in California, Nevada and 
Oregon, including cases before State and Federal courts involving con- 
flicting claims uixjn the water resources of the San Joaquin, Kern and 
Fresno rivers in California; the Walker and Ouinn rivers in Nevada, and 
the Silvies and Malheur rivers in Oregon. 

Mr. Treadwell was a member of the California General Assemblv in 
1901 and 1905. I'Vom 1906-1908 he was a member of the commission 
on revenue and ta.xation. He was the first mayor of Burlingame, and 
served as chairman of the Board of Trustees of that city. From 1908-1911 
he was honored by being selected as president of the Greater San Francisco 
Association, and he was also the attorney for the East Bay Municipal 
Water District in Alameda County. He served as attorney for the South- 
ern California Edison Company and the West Sacramento Levee District. 

His book. "The Constitution of California." which has passed through 
five editions, is regarded as the standard authority on that subject by 



306 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION' 

lawyers and students of political science. Mr. Treadwell is a republican, 
belongs to Mission Lodge No. 169, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Alission Chapter No. 79, Royal Arch Masons, and California Commandery 
No. 1, Knights Templar, and is a member of the Commonwealth Club 
and the San Francisco Commercial Club. 

He married at San Francisco, March 31, 1901, Miss Eulila May Ayres. 
They have three children: Earl Francis, Willard Brewster and Marshall 
Gwrin. Mr. Treadwell's office is 315 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

Charles Hexry Spear, who is chairman of the State Board of 
Harbor Commissioners of San Francisco, with offices in the Ferry Build- 
ing, is a native son of California and has had some more than ordinary 
relations and connections with the life and affairs of the San Francisco 
Bay district, both in business and public affairs. 

]Mr. Spear was born at Sonora, in Tuolumne County, California, June 
1, 1862. His parents, Frederick A. and Elizabeth (Hatch) Spear, were 
both natives of Alassachusetts, born and reared in the eastern part of the 
state, the latter at Boston, and represented some of the old Colonial English 
and Revolutionary stock of that section of New England. They met and 
married in Boston. Frederick A. Spear came to California in 1850, by 
way of the Panama route, first engaging in mining, and for a number of 
years was in the drug business at Sonora and later at Stockton. 

Charles Henry Spear as a boy attended the public schools. He has 
been a resident of the San Francisco Bay district more than forty years. 
He was in the mercantile business in Berkeley until 1887, when he estab- 
lished a general brokerage office in San Francisco, and was closely and 
successfully identified with that work until 1910. In that year he retired 
from business, with every intention of indulging himself in the life of a 
man of leisure, and was able to keep up that program for twelve years, 
when he gladly accepted an opportunity to reengage in the brokerage 
business. Air. Sjjear was first appointed a harbor commissioner in 1903, 
by Governor Pardee, serving through that administration. Thus it came 
about that he was harbor commissioner at the time of the great fire of 1906. 
In the histon,- of that disaster and its aftermath Mr. S]iear figures promi- 
nently and has repeatedly been given credit for the fact that through his 
personal efforts much of the shipping and wharves were saved from the 
flames. In 1923 the present Governor Richardson again appointed 
Mr. Spears harbor commissioner. In that capacity he has been regarded 
as the father of the big movement now under way at the waterfront at the 
foot of Market Street to build a $350,000 subway to relieve the congestion 
at that point. This subway is 980 feet in length, and when completed will 
give relief to all the West Side Market Street traffic as well as the street 
cars and pedestrians. 

Mr. Spear has been a resident of Berkeley since 1882. Through all 
the years he has been active in the local, civic and political affairs, repre- 
senting the republican party on the county and state central committees, 
and has attended the national conventions as an alternate. He is a former 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 309 

county recorder of Alameda County. Mr. Spear was one of the free- 
holders who framed the first city and county charter for Alameda 
County. While this charter was defeated, the judgment of most citizens 
is that in time its provisions must be adopted, since it will affect the 
merging of seven municipal governments into one and vastly increase the 
efficiency and econom\' uf the local government. Mr. Si)ear in this case 
has proved his vision, and that quality has made him a highly desirable 
and valuable citizen of the state as well as his home locality. Fraternally 
he is affiliated with Berkeley Commantlery of the Knight Templar Masons, 
Is'lam Temple of the Mystic Shrine at San Francisco, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Chamber of Commerce, and is a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

On April 20, 1887, he married Miss Tillie R. Burnette, who was born 
at Berkeley, where her father, Peter Burnette, was a merchant. Three 
children ha\e been born to Mr. and Mrs. Spear, both sons natives of 
Berkeley. The daughter, Florence, is the wife of Charles B. Mills, a gen- 
eral insurance man at Berkeley. Frederick A. Spear, the older son, is in 
the general insurance business at Oakland, is married and has one son, 
, Charles Ellis Sjjear. The second son, Burnham C. Spear, is now in the 
mercantile business at San Francisco, is married and has a daughter, 
Barbara Lou. 

Peter H. Burnett, who was the first constitutional governor of 
California under American rule, was a lawyer by profession, was a pioneer 
of pioneers, and he lived forty-five years after leaving the executive chair. 
Grandchildren and other descendants are still living in California, several 
of them in San Francisco. 

He was born at Nashville, Tennessee, November 15, 1807, and died 
at San Francisco, May 17, 1895. His father was a farmer and carpenter. 
The name for generations had been Burnet, and Peter H. was the first 
of the family to add a "t," and all his brothers followed suit. He spent 
his early life in Tennessee and in Missouri, and sofne of his p)oIitical 
opinions were formulated by residence in those states. While in the 
mercantile business in Missouri he failed and became involved in a large 
indebtedness. That he might be able to cancel his obligations and restore 
his wife to health he looked to the new Northwest as far back as 1843, 
when he took his wife and six children by ox teams to Oregon. At that 
time this territory was a subject of dispute between the United States 
and Great Britain. In Oregon he became a farmer, lawyer, legislator 
and judge. In that time he helped to establish the provisional government. 

In 1848 he came to California with the first gold emigration from 
Oregon. After w-orking in the northern mines for a few weeks he settled 
at Sacramento and entered on law practice, and in 1849 was made judge 
of the Superior Court by Bennett Riley, military governor. Soon after 
his arrival he became the lawyer and agent of Gen. John A. Sutter, 
the great landlord of Central California. Removing to San Francisco, 
where his family rejoined him, he opened his law office. His profession, 



;]10 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

his manners, his business judgment and habits of life made him si)eedily 
and favorably known. In 1852 he paid to his old business partners in 
Missouri the last dollar of his debts, which had aggregated $28,740. 

In the first gubernatorial campaign the candidates were not nominated 
by regular conventions, but were put forward by public meetings. Col. 
J. D. Stevenson called a democratic meeting on Portsmouth Square, and 
upon his nomination Peter H. Burnett was declared democratic nominee 
for governor. Other meetings nominated John W. Geary, democrat, 
W. S. Sherwood, whig, John A. Sutter and W.AI. Steuart, independents.* 
The people gave Burnett 6,716 votes, Sherwood, 3,188, Sutter, 2,20f, 
Geary, 1,475, Steuart, 619. Governor Burnett was elected November 13, 
1849, and was inaugurated December 20 of the same year. Owing to a 
flood in the Sacramento River and his private property becoming en- 
dangered and needing his attention, he resigned the office January 9, 1851, 
while the Legislature was sitting at San Jose. He then resumed law 
practice in partnership with William T. Wallace and C. T. Ryland, who 
afterward married his daughters. He gave up law practice in 1854 and 
in 1856 made his first sea voyage, visiting New York City. His last two 
public speeches were made in opposition to the great Vigilance Committee 
in 1856. In 1857 he was appointed a supreme judge by Governor Johnson, 
and filled out an une.xpired part of a term, nearly two years. In 1863 he 
with others founded the Pacific Bank and for many years was its presi- 
dent. After 1880 he lived retired. In a book of recollections of his life 
he laid down a rule of particular interest because of his own integrity in 
paying his debts : "If a man once goes through insolvency or bankruptcy, 
or compromises with his creditors, or indulges in unreasonable expenses, 
he is unworthy of credit." 

At his death Governor Burnett left a valuable estate. His children 
were Dwight J., Mrs. Martha Letitia Ryland, Romietta J. Wallace, 
John M., Armstead L. and Sallie C. Poe. 

John M. Burnett, second son of Governor Peter H. Burnett, whose 
career is reviewed in the preceding sketch, was for many years jirominent 
at the bar of San Francisco. He was l)orn in Liberty. Missouri, l-'ebruary 
4, 1838, and was a small child when the family crossed the ])lai!is. 

After coming to California he attended private schools, and in 1858 
graduated from Santa Clara College, now the university, and subsequently, 
in 1859, receiving his Master of Arts degree there. He took up the study 
of law, and began its practice about 1868. For many years he was re- 
garded as one of the leading authorities on ])robate law in San Francisco. 
John M. Burnett at one time served as inheritance tax appraiser. He was 
the first man to make the rule of cf|ual pay for e(|ual service for men and 
women in the ]iublic schools of San b'rancisco. lie served as school direc- 
tor, and was deeply interested in public affairs. 

John M. liurnett, who died July 21, 1916, married on .April 17. 1863, 
Miss Ellen Casey. She was born in New Jersey in 1842, graduated from 
a convent at Montreal, Canada, in 1856, and soon afterward arrived in 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 311 

California and was a teacher in the old Union Grammar School in San 
Francisco until her marriage. She jiersonally superintended the education 
of her own children until they were twelve years of age. 

John M. Burnett and wife had nine children, two of whom died in 
infancy. The others include: Myra B. Bennett, deceased; Sarah C, Mrs. 
Margaret B. Jewel; David M., who was admitted to the bar in Santa Clara 
County, and became a probate and corporate lawyer; Andrew C, who 
died at age of eighteen; Harriet B., who married John J. Dorgan; and 
Mary C, a resident of San Francisco. 

Ellen C.\sev Burnett, a past president of the Woman's Au.xiliary 
of California Pioneers, is one of the last survivors of a group of women 
who came to California when it was still largely a mining community. She 
was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, July 18, 1839, daughter of Andrew 
and Mira (Hennigan) Casey. Her parents were born in Ireland, and 
died in Jersey City when Ellen was a mere child. The latter went to public 
schools in the neighborhood, and later to the Convent of Congregation of 
Notre Dame, Montreal, and received a teacher's degree in San Francisco, 
She came to San Francisco by way of Panama, arriving May 22. 1856. 
She taught in the Union Street School, the site of which is now occupied 
by the ungraded school. She taught five years, leaving the profession 
at the time of her marriage. On April 27. 1863. at St. Ignatius Church, 
San Francisco, she became the bride of John M. Burnett, a sketch of whose 
life precedes this sketch. 

]\Irs. Burnett is a member of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Society 
of California Pioneers. She was also a charter member of the Century 
Club of California, and took an active part in Catholic parochial and 
charitable affairs. Her home for many years has been at 333 Spruce Street 
in San Francisco. Her children are : Mira Burnett Bennett, now deceased, 
assistant librarian at Mills College at the time of her death : Sarah C. Bur- 
nett, an evening school teacher; Margaret Burnett Jewel, who has two 
children; David M. Burnett, a lawyer in San Jose, who has two children; 
Harriet Burnett Dorgan. a resident of San Jose, whose two sons died 
in early \-outh and one daughter in infancy; and INIary C. Burnett. 

HiR.\M Ch.\mpl.\in Smith, a resident of California for half a cen- 
tury, is still an active business man in San Francisco. His name is promi- 
nentlv identified with the lumber industr}', both in this state and in Canada 
and Old Mexico. 

Mr. Smith was born in 1849, in what was then one of the most heavily 
timbered districts in the Central \\'est, ^lanitowoc, Wisconsin. He grew 
up in the atmosphere of logging camps and saw-mills. He acquired a public 
school education in Wisconsin. Coming to California in 1874 he first 
located at Santa Rosa, and soon went into the Redwood district, at what 
was then called Stump Town, now Guerneville. For two years he was 
engaged in logging and sawmilling there, and then moved to Tyrone, near 
the Russian River, on Dutch Dill Creek. From there he made his head- 



312 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

quarters at Stockton for many years, as a member of Moore & Smith Lum- 
ber Company. In 1888 the business headquarters were moved to San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Smith has extended timber interests in British Columbia and in 
Mexico. He was heavily interested in the lumber industry of the Puget 
Sound region, with plant at Port Discovery, the first port of entry on the 
straits. Some years ago Mr. Smith was a member of a syndicate that 
built flunes from the Sierra Nevada Mountains down King's River, and 
at the end of the flunes established sawmills, planing mills, sash and door 
and box factories. The flunes brought the mountain water fifty-four miles 
to the mills at Sanger. In later years Mr. Smith centered his interest in 
Old Mexico, where he has acquired investments in both mining and timber 
properties. He is a republican in politics. 

Melville Calvert Threlkeld, of San Francisco, has built up a 
unique business, one without a competitor or ri\al in his field. This 
business is that of conimi.ssary contractor, represented by an intricate 
organization operating approximately over 14.000 or 15,000 miles of 
railway lines, including all of the Southern Pacific lines from Portland to 
Louisiana, and also the Western Pacific and the Northwest Pacific lines. 
Along these far stretching lines of steel he conducts between 300 and -WO 
boarding camps. In conjunction therewith he also maintains and operates 
a wholesale grocery estalilishment. enabling him to buy direct from the 
original sources of supply and carrying goods through to the consumer at 
reasonable prices, afifording an excellent service to the men who are em- 
ployed on railway construction work. Mr. Threlkeld owns all the accom- 
panying equipment, employs an army of cooks and traveling stewards, 
and in large part eliminates the objectionable features that are usually 
associated with camp life. This great business which he has built up, 
of which he is the only sjjecialist and contractor of this kind in this section 
of the West, is the result of approximately thirty years' effort on his i>art. 
Through the services of his organization the railroads are relieved of great 
annoyance and exj^ense involved in maintaining a commissary department 
of their own. 

Mr. Threlkeld was Ijorn in Raleigh, Illinois, January 13. 1869. His 
father, C. W. Threlkeld, was born and reared on a farm in Kentucky, 
his ancestors moving to that state during the lifetime of Daniel Boone. 
He spent an active life as a Baptist minister, and now lives at Stuart. Palm 
Beach County, Florida. The mother of the San Francisco contractor 
was Elizabeth Handlin, who was born in Kentucky and is now deceased. 
She was a descendant of the Pickens family of Revolutionary fame, and 
was a second cousin of Samuel Clemens ( Mark Twain). 

Melville Calvert Threlkeld acc|uired his earl\' education in Alfred 
University in Allegany County, New York, where he met the future Mrs. 
Threlkeld, who was also attending the university. Soon afterward he 
came West, and in 1893 was employed in connection with the government 
survey of township and section lines in Xexada and California. In 




^-^i^^ \U..^.^-^^i(-^^^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 315 

January, 1894. he started with the Simthcrn Pacific Railroad Company's 
maintenance of way department. The late Lieut. -Cov. John M. Eshelman 
was a protege and employee of Mr. Threlkeld for a number of years 
prior to his entering the University of California and before becoming 
prominent in the political life of the state. Toward the latter ]>art of 
1894 Mr. Threlkeld was advanced to foreman and sul)se(|ut'ntly advanced 
to general foreman of the maintenance of way dei>artnient of the Southern 
Pacific Comi>any. 

Mr. Threlkeld engaged in business for himself as a commissary con- 
tractor in 1895. He displayed a real mastery and genius for this very 
difficult line of work, so much so that the Southern Pacific Company in- 
creased his resixjnsibility a division at a time until by 1917 he was given 
the entire maintenance of way contract over the Pacific system of that 
great railroad corporation. He also took a contract with the Northwest 
■Pacific along the same lines and the Associated Pipe Lines Oil Comptmy. 
While the railroads were under Federal control during the World war 
he was asked to take over the Western Pacific and the affiliated lines under 
similar contracts, and in 1921, the Atlantic system of the Southern Pacific 
Company. On January 1, 1924, he took similar contracts for the Southern 
Pacific de Alexico, so that he now has, as stated above, between 14,000 
and 15,000 miles under his control. His wholesale grocery plant, the 
adjunct of his business as a commissary contractor, located at 45-49 
Hubbell Street, San Francisco, was started in association with Mr. Blohm, 
and since the death of the latter Mr. Threlkeld has been the sole proprietor. 

As a diversion from the heavy responsibilities of his main business Mr. 
Threlkeld is reclaiming and developing several hundred acres of the 
Suisun marshes. He is a republican, though never active in politics, is 
a member of the hospitality committee of the Chamber of Commerce, 
and belongs to the Bohemian Club, San Francisco Golf and Country Club, 
Union League Club and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In 
Masonry he is affiliated with Durant Lodge No. 268, Free and Accepted 
Masons, Berkeley Royal Arch Chapter, was captain general under the 
dispensation and third commander of Berkeley Commanderv, Knights 
Templar, and is a member of Islam Temple of the Mystic Sbrine. 

He married at Oakland in 1899 Miss Annie Rogers Fryer. Mrs. 
Threlkeld was born in Shanghai, China, where her father. Dr. John Fryer, 
for many years was in charge of the Chinese Government Department of 
Translation at Shanghai, from which place about thirtv vears ago he 
came to California and was made professor of Oriental Languages of the 
L'niversity of California and is now professor emeritus, with home at 
Berkeley. Mrs. Threlkeld is a member of the Town and Countrv Club, 
the San Francisco Golf and Country Club and the Woman's .Athletic Club. 
The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Threlkeld are John Handlin Threlkeld 
and Melville Calvert, Jr. The latter is a freshman in the University of 
California. John Handlin Threlkeld graduated in chemical engineering 
from the University of California in 1923, and is now associated with his 
father in the contracting and grocery business. 
Vol. n-15 



316 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Miss Helen Colburn Heath. A resident of San Francisco since 
early childhood. Miss Heath's remarkable career in the realm of song has 
come to be regarded as a permanent asset of the coast city's artistic achieve- 
ments. Miss Heath is a soprano solist of rare charm and voice who has 
afforded a medium for authoritative interpretation of an unusually wide 
range of music covering pretty well the field of vocal expression from 
grand opera and oratorio to the minor lyrics. 

Born in Texas, Miss Heath spent her childhood days in New York 
and Massachusetts. Her father was Benjamin Heath, born in Cambridge- 
port, Massachusetts, in 1845. When the Civil war broke out he was a 
student in the Annapolis Naval Academy, and served through the war 
as master's mate. After the war he followed the profession of civil 
engineering, and, coming to California in 1890, he held the position of chief 
of the Bureau of Streets in San Francisco in 1901-02. He was a member 
of Starr King Lodge of Masonry and Thomas Post, Grand Army of 
the Republic. In 1878. at Fort Worth, Texas, he married Emma M. 
Colburn, of Massachusetts. She was musically gifted, and has been the 
constant inspiration and critic of the musical career of Miss Heath. 

Miss Heath came to San Francisco with her mother in 1892. Her 
father had come here some time previously to open up an old gold mine 
in Tuolunne County which had belonged to his uncle, Nathaniel Heath, 
who came out to the Pacific Coast in pioneer times, identifying himself 
with the early~days in San Francisco, where among other associations he 
was one of the original members of the First Baptist Church. Miss Heath 
is a direct descendant of Maj. Nathaniel Heath of Revolutionarv' days, 
and is corresponding secretary of the La Puerta de Ore Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolution. 

In San Francisco Miss Heath attended the Clement Grammar School, 
graduating with honors and receiving the Denman Medal. Next came 
the Girls High School, where under the encouragement of the teacher in 
voice she definitely set her mind upon the study of singing with a view 
to making it her profession. The three years in high school were followed 
by a similar period in the Von Meyerinck School of Music, where she 
fully concentrated her attention uptm her musical studies. In the course 
of her activities at the musical school there appeared in her a decided talent 
for the ojiera. She api>eared with success in many costume recitals and 
excerpts from operas in school exhibitions. 

In Decemlier, 1901, the old Grand Opera Company, from the Metro- 
politan Opera House of New York, visited San Francisco for two weeks. 
There was recruited locally, a semi-solo chorus for the Meistersinger's 
performance, and Aliss Heath was one of the eight chosen and received 
praise from \\'alter Damrosch, the conductor for the German opera, for 
her performance. The chief soloists on that occasion were: Johanna 
Gadski, Schumann-Heink, David Bispham, Edouard De Reske and Mr. 
Dippel. While this appearance was a great inspiration. Miss Heath did 
not have sufficient funds to go abroad and prejxire herself for an operatic 
career. Instead, she turned to the only field open to young singers in 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 317 

San Francisco at that time, doing church and concert work and teaching. 
This has heen the main field of her work ever since, varied with occasional 
performances in costume for club affairs. Her histrionic ability has caused 
her to do her liest work while in costume. She has sung for nearly every 
denomination in San I'^rancisco, being for seven years soloist at the First 
Baptist Church, then a number of years in the First Unitarian Church, 
and for a long time a member of the choirs of the synagogues, being one 
of the soloists of Temple Emanuel at the present time. She has given 
several concerts on a large scale and apj^eared in many large towns of 
California for the woman's clubs. For two years after graduating from 
the Von Meyerinck School of Music she was associated with it as voice 
teacher, and since then has conducted her own classes, giving several 
successful pupils' recitals. She is a member of the Pacific Musical Society, 
the San Francisco Music Teachers' Association, the San Francisco Brown- 
ing Society, the Channing Auxiliary and the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. The summer of 1908 was spent in Boston for further study, 
and there she coached for oratorio roles with Arthur Foote, a well known 
organist and comp)oser, and sang for his illustrated lectures in the Uni- 
versity of California during the summer school of 1911. The summer 
of 1912 she spent in Europe, coaching in London with Sir George Henschel 
and Francis Korbay, and perfected her studies in German, French and 
Italian with native teachers. She coached for tone diction with Louis 
Graveure, stage technique with Mary Fairweather. and studied Franz and 
Schumann with Oscar Weil. 

Miss Heath gave her graduating song recital at old Steinway Hall in 
1901, her first professional concert in 1902, her third concert was given 
in 1908, and her fourth in 1912. She was soloist in Schumann's Paradise 
and Peri in the Greek Theatre. May 1. 1904, this starting the custom of 
the Sunday Half Hour of Music. She appeared as soloist in the Blessed 
Damosel. given at the College of Pacific, May 30, 1918. She appeared 
in the Overseas Military Band Concert at the Greek Theatre May 13, 
1918: was soloist at the memorial service for Charles Gardner Lathrop 
at Stanford Memorial Chapel, September 1, 1914; soloist for the Bac- 
calaureate Service at Stanford Memorial Chapel in June. 1918; soloist in 
the Creation for the Santa Rosa Choral Society in ^lay, 1914, and in 
Elijah for the same society in October, 1917; sang with IMinetti Orchestra 
in a series of student's concerts in Civil Auditorium in May, 1916. Miss 
Heath has always been interested to help local composers present their 
work, singing songs by Abbie Gerrish-Jones at Serosis Hall in November, 
1914; songs bv Emmet Pendleton in the Greek Theatre. May, 1919; songs 
bv Rosalie Hausman in the Greek Theatre in August. J919; Dorothy 
Crawford's compositions in the Fine Arts Building in September, 1918; 
by Wallace Sabin in .\pril. 1918. She was soloist in the Manning Chamber 
Music Concerts in 1923. and her latest appearance was before the Pacific 
Musical Society in December, 1923, when she sang Joan D'Arc in appro- 
priate costume. 

Her scrap-book contains programs of many more events equally im- 



318 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

portant, but the above is sufficient to show the scope of her work and variety 
of style. Recently she sang before the microphone to listeners as far away 
as Seattle and Maryville, and this radio performance brought her many 
personal notes of appreciation from a widely scattered audience. Her 
street address is 2505 Clay Street. 

Paul D. IMichelson, Jr., M. D., one of the popular and representa- 
tive physicians and surgeons of the younger generation in the City of San 
Francisco, is a native son of California and a scion in the third generation 
of a sterling pioneer family of this commonwealth. His paternal grand- 
father, Capt. Paul Michelson, was a native of Norway and sailed his own 
ship from that land to California at the time of the pioneer gold rush to 
this state, he having made the \oyage by way of Cape Horn, and having 
later been engaged in navigation up and down the Napa River in Cali- 
fornia. 

Doctor Michelson was born at Napa, this state, July 17, 1893, and is a 
son of Paul D. and Louise Pauline [ Khein ) Michelson, both of whom 
were born in ,the City of San Francisco. August Khein, maternal grand- 
father of the Doctor, came from Germany to the United States prior to the 
Civil war, in which conflict he served as a gallant soldier of the Union. 
A bullet which he received in the fleshy part of his heart while thus a 
soldier remained there embedded fifty-seven years, and it was somewhat 
ironical that his death should have resulted from septicemia attendant 
upon a small cut which he received in one of his feet. Martin Michelson, 
an uncle of Paul D. Michelson, Sr., served in the battle between the 
Monitor, Merrimac and the ship Cumberland. He was one of the soldiers 
on the ship when it was rammed by the Monitor and was one of the few 
survivors who swam ashore. Paul D. Alichelson and his wife still main- 
tain their home at Napa, where he is serving as treasurer of Napa County, 
he having previously been engaged in the shipping business in the Napa 
Valley, and in his youth having been associated with his father's activities 
along the Napa River. It is interesting to record that he and his wife 
were born on opposite sides of Telegraph Hill in San Francisco. 

In the public schools of Napa Doctor Michelson continued his studies 
until he had duly profited by the advantages of the high school. He 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at San Francisco, gradu- 
ating with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, being a member of the class 
of 1921. and initiating the practice of his profession at San Francisco 
in August of that year. 

Enduring honor and distinction i)ertain to Doctor Michelson for the 
patriotic and gallant service which he gave in the World war. He was 
with the Thirty-second Division of the .A-merican Expeditionary Forces in 
France during a period of eighteen months, beginning in January, 1918, 
and for five months of this period he was at the front, where he partici- 
pated in the great military movements of Chateau Thierry, the Meuse- 
Argonne. liesides being in similar service in .-\lsace-Loraine. He was badly 




K_ja 




^^^(L^'^i^ 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 321 

gassed, and otherwise lived up to the full tension of the great conflict in 
which he worthil_v won the Distinguished Service Cross. 

A brother of Doctor Michelson, Melvin Oliver Michelson, tried five 
times to get into service during the World war and was finally accepted in 
the signal hatallion, of which he became sergeant and was stationed at 
Camp Fremont. He is at present manager of the Florsheim & Shafer 
Shoe Company of San Francisco. He married Helen Schiley. of Colorado, 
and they have one baby girl, Beverly Helen. Doctor Michelson's sister, 
Miss Louise Pauline, is a student at the University of California. Another 
brother, Benjamin Franklin Michelson, is an employe in the new business 
department of the Bank of Italy in San Francisco. He tried to enlist 
during the war but was rejected on account of physical disability. 

Doctor Michelson is a member of the American Legion and of Alpha 
Kappa Kappa (Beta Chapter), a member of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the San Francisco County Medical Society, and is affiliated 
with the Native Sons of the Golden West, the Woodmen of the World and 
the Knights of Liberty, of which last mentioned fraternal-patriotic order 
he is the grand surgeon. In politics he gives stalwart allegiance to the 
republican party. 

It may well be understood that Doctor Michelson places high valuation 
uixm the jjersonal letter of commendation which he received from 
Maj. Murdoch M. Kerr, One Hundred and Nineteenth Field Artillery, 
Medical Corps, United States Army, under date of April 22, 1919, extracts 
from the text of which are here reproduced : 

"This soldier while with our organization did valiant service and at all 
times acted as a brave, cool-headed, fearless and intelligent first-aid man 
whose constant thought was the sp)eedy alleviation of the injured and sick 
soldier. Mr. Alichelson is young and strong of body, and was always 
ready to render a service to the injured and do his full dutv as a soldier, 
regardless of the risk to himself, and many times this valiant soldier 
rescued the wounded in the midst of a hail of enemy shell fire, nor did he 
ever tire of doing for others — in fact, he seemed not to know the meaning 
of fatigue while sen-ing through five fronts as given below, where he dis- 
tinguished himself times too numerous to mention, but will go on his 
record: Toul Sector, Alsace-Lorraine, June 8-22, 1918; Alsace Sector,, 
June 26-July 22; Aisne-Marne oflfensive, July 27- August 24; Oise-Aisne, 
August 27-September 1 1 ; Meuse-Argonne, September 26 to November 7. 

"Now on the eve of our departure to the United States, this ambitious 
young soldier is leaving France to return to his own native land, and it is 
with a feeling of mixed pride and regret that we are parting with such 
men as P. D. Michelson, Jr. Pride in that we have known him and that 
which he has accomplished, and regret his leaving us for the uncertainty it 
brings as to when, if ever, we shall meet again. 

"I have no hesitancy in recommending this deserving voung soldier to 
anyone in need of help. The sufferings and privations he endured while 
serving his country well merit him anv favor that can be bestowed Oues- 



322 THE SAX FRAN'CISCO BAY REGION 

tions received and answers freely given concerning this young man at 
any time." 

James Hansen Hoyle is master of one of the oldest lines of business 
which, in its modern phases, brings responsibilities unknown to the boni- 
face of old. Mr. Hoyle is known throughout the San Francisco Bay district 
as the genial proprietor of the Terminal Hotel of San Francisco. 

He is a native son of California, born April 16. 1880, in one of the 
greatest gold mining camps in the world, Grass Valley. His father, [ohn E. 
Hoyle, was of old American stock and had a typical characteristic of adven- 
ture and enterprise that brought him in pioneer times to the great West. 
He visited nearly all the successive mining discoveries, and his experience 
took him to all parts of the Pacific Coast. From pure love of the Inisiness 
he became one of the leading mining men of the state. In 1873 John E. 
Hoyle married Miss Mary Josephine Smith at Virginia City, Nevada. At 
that time Virginia City was the richest silver and gold mining camp on 
the coast, there being over two hundred million dollars actually in sight 
in the valley. The Sharon, Ralston crowd and the Flood, Mackey and 
O'Brien and the Fair crowd were all fighting together for advantageous 
jxisitions in getting out the wealth of the Comstock Lode. Over 25,000 
people lived in Virginia City then. Three children were born to John 
Hoyle and wife. John, born in 1874, Reuben, born in 1876. and James H., 
born in 1880. Subsequently the family moved to San Francisco because of 
the many advantages offered there. 

James H. Hoyle was educated in San Francisco, and as a youth took 
up the electrical business. His ambition caused him to go up to the northern 
part of the state, under the shadow of Mount Shasta, where his early suc- 
cesses were in the hotel business. He took up the hotel business in addi- 
tion to other interests. Mr. Hoyle has seemed possessed of a fervor, 
energy and zest that has made life's battles and troubles a source of con- 
stant enjoyment, and he has succeeded in everything he has undertaken. 
For several vears he was proprietor of the Lorenz Hotel at Redding, and 
then took charge of the celebrated Golden Eagle Hotel at Sacramento. His 
success in the hotel field caused him to seek opportunities for the highest 
exercise of his talent, and accordingly he returned to San Francisco, the 
metropolis and seaport of the state. During the yast ten years or more 
new developments in San Francisco have come along Market Street, toward 
the ferrv. where many of the newest and finest office buildings have been 
erected, and among the noted buildings in that district none is better 
known than the Terminal Hotel, of which the host is James H. Hoyle, 
and whose personality has come to pervade every corner of the Terminal. 
Mr. Hoyle has been manager of the Terminal House for eleven years, 
since 1913, and has been responsible for the reputation that hotel enjoys 
up and down the coast. Naturally affable and agreeable, he has made 
many friends. The Terminal Hotel has 300 modern rooms, and adjoining 
it is the no less famous auxiliary, Hoyle's Tenninnl Tavern, one of the 
most ixipular dining ]>laces in San l-'rancisco. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 323 

Mr. Iloyle in 1918 married Miss Evelyn Miller of San Francisco. 
Recently Mr. Hoyle sold the Norniandie Hotel, on Sutter Street, above 
Van Ness Avenue, after having made this hotel famous as one of the 
most popular family hotels in the entire city, so popular in fact that it 
maintained a long waiting list for prospective guests. Since giving over 
the Normandie Hotel, Mr. Hoyle has concentrated his full time and 
energies upon the Terminal. 

Mr. Hoyle is affiliated with the Mystic Shrine and Elks, and belongs 
to the California Golf Club. His out-of-door life and its activities exercise 
a strong fascination upon him, and he satisfies this by automobiling and 
frequent visits to his beautiful country place on the San Francisco peninsula 
near Los Altos. He has over thirty-three acres in his country place, with 
a beautiful home, and develops fruit and flowers. It is situated about two 
miles from Los Altos, and is reached by one of the most delightful motor 
trips around the bay. 

Henry Oliver Wait had been in business in the East for a number 
of years before he came to California, and after a career as a merchant 
in pioneer times he took up life insurance, and was one of the first men 
to engage in that business at San Francisco. 

He was born at Montreal, Canada, August 1, 1817, son of Henry 
William and Marie (LaPorte) Wait, his father a native of New York 
and his mother of Canada. Henry O. Wait acquired a liberal education, 
attending the \\'orknian College at Montreal. As a young man he served 
as a member of the regiment of the Queen's Cavalry. For several years 
he was a traveling representative of a wholesale clothing house at Montreal. 

Mr. Wait arrived in California in the spring of 1850, and for several 
years interested himself in the mining district. He then established and 
operated a store at Grass Valley, handling general merchandise and dealing 
in hides and tallow. After disposing of his interests at Grass Valley he 
entered the insurance business as a representative of the New York Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, and built up a large volume of business for that 
corporation in California. 

Mr. Wait died in 1901. He had moved his family to San Francisco 
to have educational opportunities for them. He married in Canada Miss 
Sarah Readman, who was born at Whitby, England, daughter of John 
Readman and Sarah (Breckenridge) Readman. Her people were wealthy 
and prominent in England, and her oldest brother became Archbishop 
Readman of the Episcopal Church. Henry O. \\'ait was a member of the 
California Pioneer Society and served on the Vigilantes Committee in 
the early davs. Mrs. Wait was one of the best loved women in Nevada 
Countv and elsewhere where she lived, and was always looking for oppor- 
tunities to render aid and comfort to others. She passed away in 1889. 

He and his wife had a large family of children, namely: Henry Wil- 
liam, deceased; Helen M., widow of Thomas H. Day, of San Francisco; 
Sara C, deceased: Elizabeth A. ; Julia E., widow of Charles E. E. Towne, 
a railroad man of Oakland; Isabella E., widow of William I. Evans, and 



324 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

her home is in Seattle, Washington, where she has eleven living children; 
Fred, of San Francisco, a retired contractor and builder, who died January 
9, 1924 ; Frances E., widow of John Granger Hill, who for years was a 
machinist in the Union Iron Works ; George, a carpenter and builder, who 
died in 1920; Alfred M., of Portola ; and Edward, who died in infancy. 

Elizabeth A. Wait, a native of Grass Valley, Nevada County, was 
married to Ethan Ailing Scott, who for a number of years was treasurer 
of the Black Diamond Coal Company, a wholesale coal and shipping busi- 
ness, at San Francisco, and died in 1887. He was born in Dowagiac, Alichi- 
gan. Mr. and Mrs. Scott had two sons. Ethan Wait Scott is a graduate 
of the University of California and carries the degrees Doctor of Medi- 
cine and Doctor of Dental Surgery. He served in the navy during the 
war, and is at this writing practicing his profession of dental surgery in 
San Francisco. -He married and is the father of one son, Robert Ethan 
Scott. Lieut-Col. Minot Everson Scott, also a graduate of the University 
of California, with the degree Doctor of Dental Surgery, served through 
the World war, and at this date is serving as dental surgeon at The Presidio, 
San Francisco. He married Florence Edith Shreve, a native of Lake 
County and a daughter of Alvy and Edith Shreve. They are the parents 
of two sons, Minot Ellis Scott, a student at Stanford University, and 
Ethan Alvy Scott, attending the New Mexico Military Institute at Roswell, 
New Mexico. 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Scott married for her second husband Howard Rus- 
sell Hurlbut, twenty years advertising manager of the San Francisco Call 
and later with the Bulletin. Mrs. Hurlbut's home is af. 907 Noe Street. 
She is a member of the Daughters of California Pioneers. 

Cornelius Becker is a native of the "Keystone State," his birth 
occurring at Germantown in 1821. He attended the public schools in that 
state, and in the end was well prepared for the duties of life, receiving a 
thorough education and the proper training for sound citizenship. In early 
manhood he crossed the ocean to Germany, where, at Frilnirg, he took a 
special course in mining engineering, and remained there until he was duly 
graduated with distinction. He then returned to Pennsylvania, and soon 
afterward came West to Missotiri. After a short period in that state he 
started for California, and stopped at Sonora in 1848, thus beating the 
" '49ers" by a full year. He did not go by way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
but joined an ox-team wagon train, probably at Leavenworth, Kansas, and 
came across the Rocky Mountains and passed through all the vivid exj^eri- 
ences of the "Overland Route." After he had been here for two or three 
years he returned to Missouri, for the purpose of bringing his family out to 
the Pacific Coast, which had won his most ardent admiration. But the over- 
land route was too severe and dangerous, so he returned by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama, bringing his family witli him, riding across the 
Isthmus on mules trained for the service. On the Pacific tiiey passed up 
along the coast on the ship Moses Taylor, and landed at San Francisco in 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 327 

1853. They immediately went on to Stockton and from there to Sonora in 
Tuolumne County. 

Soon afterward he entered the mines in the gravel region at .-Xmerican 
Bar, in Placer County, and mined as far north as Oregon Gulch in Trinity 
Countx'. But the Civil war was now raging, and calls for troo])s spread all 
over the Pacific Coast. .-Vccordingly Mr. Becker enlisted in the Union regi- 
ment under Colonel Baker, and soon afterward this band of gallant boys 
started eastward across the plains via Salt Lake City. The trip was long 
and tedious, hut the boys were rugged and full of vim and pep, and finally 
reached Saint Louis. ]\Iissouri. There the regiment entered the service, 
and served bravely until the end of the struggle, mainly on the western end 
of the battle line. When peace was concluded Mr. Becker returned to Cali- 
fornia, resumed his former occupation, and died in 1865, after a laborious 
and useful life, and is remembered by scores of old friends to this day. 

In early maturity he married Elizabeth Muenie, who was a native of 
Virginia and an earnest Huguenot. Their wedding occurred at Corondelet, 
a Huguenot settlement near Saint Louis, Missouri. Of their twelve chil- 
dren three lived to maturity: Christopher H.; Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of Conrad Diehl, of Oakland, and Catherine B., who married Otto 
Kaufi'mann, of San Diego, California. The Baker or Becker family traces 
its .American ancestry back to the memorable colonial times. 

Christopher H. Becker was born in .Saint Louis, Missouri, in 1851, and 
reached the Pacific Coast in 1855 with his father and mother. He was edu- 
cated mainly in the private schools of Oregon Gulch at first, but later 
attended the old Broadway School in S^n Francisco, and still later the 
Lincoln School on Fifth Street, between Market and Mission streets. Dur- 
ing this period he took lessons in German in order to prepare himself for a 
full course in that language in the old country. In 1865 his parents sent 
him to Germany, where he at first entered a preparatory school at Giesen 
and took a strict course in botany. He then entered the university proper, 
and was duly graduated as a forester in the class of 1870. 

In 1872 he returned to San Francisco, and soon afterward was joined 
in marriage with Miss Anna Margaretta Schindel, who was a native of 
California. She passed away in 1915. Christopher H. Becker lived for 
some time in Alameda, where he served as a newspaper reporter, and be- 
came the owner of all the newspaper routes in Alameda. He finally sold 
all his holdings and property in that city and came to San Rafael and pur- 
chased a newspaper route. Later he came to Sausalito and continued his 
newspaper business, but finally sold all out and in 1904 opened a large book 
and stationerv establishment in a large brick building which he had erected 
in 1893. Finally he sold everything and retired from the active cares and 
duties of life. 

His children are as follows : Capt. John O., who is a machinist by trade 
and at present has charge of the Nuevo Island light house : Catherine A., 
who became the w-ife of Ira E. Noyes. of Vineburg, Sonoma County; 
Philip Sheridan, who is a boiler maker and resides in Oakland. Christopher 
H. Becker was one of the organizers of the Sausalito Mutual Loan Associa- 



328 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

tion in 1885, and has served as its president for several terms. He also has 
taken much interest in local politics, and has served as mayor of Sausalito 
for seN-eral terms, with much credit. He is a member of the Foresters 
Court of Sausalito, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of San 
Rafael. He was transferred to Mill Valley Lodge, being a charter member 
of Mill Valley Lodge No. 356, Free and Accepted Masons, of Mill Valley; 
is a Royal Arch Mason, also a mem1)er of the California Council of San 
Francisco; of Golden Gate Commandery No. 16, Knights Templars; of 
Islam Temple, Ancient .Arabic Order Noliles of the Mystic Shrine, and of 
the Mill Valley Chajner of the Order of Eastern Star. He is a faithful 
member of the Lutheran Church. 

Charles Rensselaer Havens is a native son, and for over half 
a century his activities have been identified in a prominent way with 
San Francisco's commerce and affairs. He is vice-president and treasurer 
of Grant & Company, with headquarters at 114 Sansome Street, but 
with interests outside the city. 

Mr. Havens was born at Sacramento, June 24. 1858, son of Howard 
Havens, and of old American ancestry. The family was founded by 
George Havens, who came from Wales to .America in 1639. The Havens 
family were intermarried with a number of Colonial families of prom- 
inence. The father of Howard Havens was Rensselaer Havens, who was 
engaged in the wholesale grocery business in New York City under the 
firm name of Jenkins and Havens. He was one of the subscribers who 
lent their credit to the United States Government following the War of 
1812, when this country had no credit abroad. During that war Rensselaer 
Havens and his partner operated privateers under letters of marque, the 
two most noted of their privateers being the l)rigs Warrior and the 
General Armstrong. The latter was destroyed by the British at Port Fayal. 

Howard Havens was one of the distinguished men among the Cali- 
fornia "forty-niners." He came to California that year by the Tehauntepec 
route, across the Isthmus and by the steamer Oregon. He and his asso- 
ciates brought with them the bricks and other structural material for 
what eventually was the old Hall of Records at Merchant and Kearney 
streets. On arrival here the materials were sold, and ILiward Havens 
went into the mines near Placervilie and later at C^eorgetown. After giving 
up mining as an occupation he embarked in mercantile lines in San Fran- 
cisco and later in Sacramento. It was at the request of J. Mora Moss 
that he went to Sacramento as treasurer for the Sacramento Valley Rail- 
road and continued with that c(ir]>iration until it was sold to the Central 
Pacific interests. Leland Stanford desired that lie remain in Sacramento 
and continue in an ofticial cajxicity in furtlier railroad developments, but 
he acted upon his determination to return to .San I-'rancisco. Here he 
took up banking, and for the rest of his active life was identified as a 
jxirtner with the banking house of Donohoe. Kelly it Company. When 
the bank was incorporated lie was made vice-jiresident, and upon the 
death of Joseph A. Donohoe liecame president of tlie corporation. He 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 329 

finally resigned and spent the declining years of his life retired. He died 
at Alameda in his eightieth year. 

Some of the finest qualities of the California pioneer were represented 
in the character of Howard Havens. He was brave, strong, self reliant 
and equal to every exigency. Many stories have been told to illustrate 
his force of character, which the following anecdotes will serve to point. 
One notorious character, "Yankee Jim." came in to the mining camp to 
shoot up the place where Howard Havens was, and the latter coolly took 
away his gun and threw the desperado out. When he was seventy-five 
years of age, after leaving a California street car, he was held up at 
the jx)int of a gun. Havens betrayed no fear, questioned his assailant, 
and finding the man really hungry, handed him out a dollar and secured 
a promise that the highwayman would give up his dangerous calling and 
hunt for work. Howard Havens was a member of the old Vigilante Com- 
mittee in San Francisco in the early days. Incident to and in connection 
with the unwritten history of the Vigilante days and at the time that the 
waters of San Francisco Bay came up to First Street and stores were built 
out over the piling, a typical "bad man" of the day. named Stewart, had 
been captured by a Vigilante crowd. The mob of captors, crazed with 
excitement, proiX)sed to chain the prisoner to the piles below. On ascer- 
taining their intent, which if consummated would have resulted in the 
man being drowned by the incoming tide, Havens took the crowd in hand 
and pointed out to them that in their excitement they would be defeating 
their own ends and finally induced the captors to turn their prisoner over 
to the proper authorities. In due course Stewart was properly tried 
and punished. For about sixteen years, until he resigned, ]\ir. Havens 
served as treasurer of the Society of California Pioneers. 

Howard Havens died in December, 1899. After coming to California 
he met and married Asenath C. Randall. She was born in Maine and 
came to California as the guest of Captain and Mrs. Johnson, the former 
an old sea captain. She was of Revolutionary stock and Scotch descent. 

Charles Rensselaer Havens was reared in San Francicso where he 
attended the Lincoln grammar school, and was a pupil in the City College 
during the time Professor Veeder was at the head of the school. Through 
all his active career, since completing his education, he has been identified 
with the organization of which he is now an executive. That was originally 
the firm of Murphy, Grant & Company. He began his duties with it as 
clerk. At that time Murphy, Grant & Company operated the largest 
■wholesale dry goods store in San Francisco. Mr. Havens rose to the 
post of vice president and executive director in the business. When the 
firm was dissolved it was succeeded by Grant & Company, and this 
organization now confines its attention to business as an investment, real 
estate and farming corporation. Mr. Havens has been vice president 
and treasurer of this enterprise since it was organized. Among his side 
investments he owns and operates a 1,500-acre ranch. 

He has been a republican but never active in politics. He is i>ast 
president of Yerba Buena Parlor No. 84 of the Native Sons of the Golden 



330 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

West, is a member of the Pioneer Society and the commercial club. 
IMr. Havens married Miss Lizzie Whipple. She was born in San Fran- 
cisco, daughter of Hugh L. Whipple, who for many years was a partner 
in Murphy, Grant & Company. The one daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Havens 
is Helen Randall Havens, A. B., M. A., who married Russel R. Ingels. now 
a rancher of Mendocino County. She has two daughters, Elizabeth Jane 
and Mary Helen Ingels. 

Louis H. Mooser, one of the successful realtors of his native city, was 
born November 30, 1866. His father, \\'illiam, and mother, Louise 
(Michel) Mooser, natives of Geneva, Switzerland, and New York City, 
respectively, came to San Francisco in 1854; they were married in 1861. 
They were the parents of six children, all of whom are living, namely: 
Joseph H., a resident of San Francisco; Dr. Charles E., a practicing 
physician of Reno, Nevada; Louis H., the third in order of birth; 
William, Jr.. an architect practicing his profession at San Francisco, also 
residing in San Francisco; .'Mice, the wife of Eugene A. de St. Germain; 
and Albert H.. ca.shier of the Nevada County Bank at Grass Valley. Cali- 
fornia. The father was an architect of this city, where he died in 1895. the 
mother surviving him until 1921. 

Growing up in his native city, Louis H. Mooser attended its public 
schools. His first connection with the business world was as an employe 
of the Brunswick-Balke Collender Company, with which he remained for 
several years. He then entered the employ of the late Henry Pichoir, who 
had extensive mining and financial connections. It was during this asso- 
ciation that he absorbed and became so proficient in finance and accounting. 
After the death of Mr. Pichoir in 1893, he entered what was to become his 
life work. Until 1920 he conducted a real estate brokerage business, but 
since has been profitably engaged as an operator in real estate. 

As a broker he e.xerted his influence toward upbuilding that profession. 
He was elected a director and eventually became the president of the Real 
Estate Board, and has always given liberally of his time and energy toward 
the establishment of those rules and statutes under which the profession 
has become an ethical influence in our business life. 

Notwithstanding these activities he has always taken an active part in 
public afifairs, believing that good citizenship calls for participation in 
politics. Together with such prominent citizens as James D. Phelan, 
Gavin McNab, Franklin K. Lane, Charles W. Fay and others he established 
good gfivernment in San Francisco in 1896 and years following. He served 
as chairman of the Democratic County Committee for several years. 
President Woodrow Wilson appointed him surveyor general for the State 
of California, in which position he acquitted himself with credit. 

Picing an enthusiastic Calif ornian. Mr. Mooser joined the fraternal 
order of the Native Sons of the Golden West in 1895. and immediately 
became one of its active leaders. He was elected grand president in 19l4. 
He has devoted himself to the manifold activities of this patriotic order 
with enthusiasm, and it is in its work that he takes his greatest pride. He 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 333 

also is secretary of the Eagles Hall Association, but is not active in the 
order, only serving it in an official capacity. W'hetiier in business, politics 
or fraternal work. Mr. Mooser has earned distinction for his progressive 
methods and high honor. He has always been known as a hard fighter for 
principle, and his word is his bond. 

In 1890 Mr. Mooser married Guadalupe Gaxiola, a native of Sonora, 
Mexico, and they became the parents of five children, three of whom are 
living, namely: Louis. Jr.. Ynez Heath and Carlos E. Mooser. 

Carl C. Rohlffs. The ambition, courage and self-reliance that led 
Car! C. RohlfTs to sever the ties that Ixiund to him to home and native land 
and to set forth when little more than a boy to seek his fortunes in the 
United States, characterized him in later years in an especially alert, vigor- 
ous and successful business career. He came to California ere the pioneer 
had waned, and later he became the pioneer of pioneers in developing the 
fish-packing industry in Alaska. He was a man of fine character and 
splendid initiative and constructive ability, and California continued to be 
his home until his death. 

Mr. RohlfFs was born in Germany, on the 20th of December. 18.39, and 
he died in 1891, while on a pleasure trip to Europe. He was a member of a 
family of two children, and his father was in the service of the German 
government, with sufficient income to provide well for the family and to 
give the children at least fair educational advantages. The subject of this 
memoir attended well ordered private schools in his native land, and was the 
only member of the immediate family to come to America. He was a mere 
youth when he arrived in San Francisco, whence he soon made his wav to 
the gold mining camps in Tuolumne County. Upon his return to San 
Francisco he here engaged independently in business as a contractor and 
builder, and later he developed a substantial and prosperous business in 
supplying provisions to vessels entering this port. In this last connection 
he became well known to seafaring men, and incidentally gained informa- 
tion concerning the great quantities of fish to be found in Alaskan waters. 
He conceived the idea of developing a fisheries business in that Arctic 
region, and in harmony with his well formulated plans he commissioned 
the mate of a vessel to transport barrels and salt to Alaska, where he began 
the packing and outshipping of fish. The second season he himself went 
to the headquarters at Nushegock. Alaska, where he erected and equipped 
the first fish cannery to be established in that territory. Under the title of 
the Arctic Packing Company he developed so prosperous a business that 
within a few years six other companies were organized and engaged in 
the same line of industry. Though Mr. RohlfFs became president of his 
company, he received no salary for his service either as chief executive or 
as bookkeeper for the company. As a slight token of esteem, however, the 
company presented him with a very handsome watch, chain and locket, 
which he highly treasured. The company owned and operated eventually 
a fleet of several vessels, and on one or more of these gold was brought out 
of Alaska long before the historic gold rush to that land. After the death 



334 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

of Mr. Rohlffs nearly all of the fish-packing companies in the Alaskan 
trade were combined under the title of the Alaska Packers' Association, 
but in the meanwhile Mr. Rohlffs had reaped large profits from the enter- 
prise which he had thus initiated and which he had carried forward with 
characteristic ability. The business interests of the coast owe an everlast- 
ing debt of gratitude to Mr. Rohlffs for his farsighted vision in establishing 
the salmon canning industry on the coast. He was the originator of the 
idea, and from his start the business has grown to mammoth proportions, 
causing the investment of millions of dollars, giving employment to thou- 
sands of men and the product is distributed over the entire world. It now 
ranks as probably the most permanent and far-reaching industry of the 
entire coast. The ramifications of the industry reach to almost every line 
of business, and the result has been the bringing of untold millions of 
dollars to the coast through the different lines benefited thereby. In 1889 
Mr. Rohlffs and his wife made a pleasure tour in Europe, and in 1891 they 
again went abroad, it having been on this trip that he was taken ill and that 
his death occurred. His mortal remains were laid to rest in San Fran- 
cisco. His death occurred May 22, 1891, and his widow has since continued 
to maintain her home in San Francisco. His company as well as the 
Karluk River Canners' Association drew up beautiful sets of resolutions 
upon his death, and had them engrossed and sent to the family as a mark 
of respect. Mr. Rohlffs was a republican in political allegiance, and was 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and for many years was a member 
of the Schuetzen Club. 

On the 18th of May, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Rohlffs 
and Miss Marie Vogt, who likewise was born in Germany. Two children 
likewise survive the honored father : Walter V. resides in San Francisco 
and is a mining engineer by profession, and Miss Ella M. remains with her 
widowed mother. Walter Rohlffs was born in San Francisco, in May, 
1877, and was educated in the public and private schools of the city. He 
then attended the University of California, and afterwards continued his 
education in Freiburg, Germany, and was graduated from the university 
with the degree of metallurgical engineer. Later he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Science from the University of Pennsylvania. Returning to 
San Francisco he entered the practice of his profession, where he has since 
remained. He married .A.lma Cahill, a native of California. 

James C. Patrick found it well within his powers and ambitions to 
exercise large and benignant influence in connection with the civic, indus- 
trial, commercial and general material development and upbuilding of the 
City of San Francisco, where he established his home in the late '50s, when 
he was a young man of twenty-nine years, and where he long held prece- 
dence as one of the leading Intsiness men and honored and influential citizens 
of this metropolitan ctjmmunity. Of staunch Scotch ancestry, Mr. Patrick 
claimed the old Empire State of the Union as the place of his nativity, 
his birth having occurred in the City of .Mbany. New York, on the 19th 
of April, 1830, and he having there been reared and educated. Upon com- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 335 

ing to San Francisco Mr. Patrick here became identified with the wholesale 
hardware establishment of Alvord & Company, the title of the concern 
later being changed to Richards, Patrick c& Company, and this house being 
still in existence and having precedence as the oldest wholesale hardware 
concern in the United States. 

All things that concerned the well being of his home city ever enlisted 
the loyal and helpful interest of Mr. Patrick, his civic liberality was pro- 
nounced, and his heart was attuned to human sympathy and tolerance, 
with the result that he was ever ready to lend his cooperation in the support 
of charitable and benevolent institutions and activities, and to give in a per- 
sonal way assistance to those in affliction or distress. His mature judgment 
in regard to business alTairs brought him large influence in local commercial 
circles, and he was called upon to serve as president of the Chamber of 
Commerce and also of the Alerchants Exchange, besides which he was a 
trustee of both the Mechanics and the Mercantile Libraries of San Fran- 
cisco. He was looked to for leadership in the furtherance of enterprises 
and measures projected for the development and advancement of the city, 
and he never failed in constructive service along these lines. He was the 
virtual founder of the San Francisco Benevolent Society, and his counsel 
and active interposition did much to make this organization justify in 
effective service the title which it bore. He had no desire for the honors 
or emoluments of political office, but was a stalwart advocate and supporter 
of the cause of the republican party. He was a zealous member of the 
Presbyterian Church, as is also his widow, who is now one of the venerable 
and loved pioneer women of San Francisco, and he was a charter member 
of the Bohemian Club of this city. 

In the year 1865 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Patrick and 
Miss Margaret Harrington, who was born in the City of Toronto, Canada. 
Of the five children of this union two are living, Benjamin and James 
Milton, both of whom are representative business men of San Francisco. 
Mr. Patrick died April 18, 1885. 

Beverly L. Hodghead, residing in Berkeley, California, is a lawyer, 
having his office in San Francisco, and has been engaged in the practice of 
his profession for more than thirty years. He is widely known throughout 
the Bay district on account of his connection with the legal profession and 
his activity in civic affairs, both in San Francisco and the East Bay section. 
He was born near Lexington, Virginia. March 21, 1865, the son of 
Rev. Alexander L. and Mary E. Hodghead. He was educated in California, 
and has spent most of his life in this state. He attended the University of 
California, and completed his legal education in the Hastings College of 
the Law. where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in June, 
1891. He represents a large number of corporations and business interests. 

Mr. Hodghead was the first mayor of the City of Berkeley, serving in 
that capacity during the years 1909-11, and was a member of the Board of 
Freeholders which prepared the charter of that city, the first commission 
form of charter adopted in California. 



336 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

He was president of the Commonwealth Club of California for five 
3-ears, 1913-1917. The Commonwealth Club is a large civic organization, 
being composed of the leading business and professional men of the state 
and having now a membership of over 3,500. 

Mr. Hodghead is now, 1924, the president of the Bar Association of 
San Francisco, and also president of the John A. Roebling's Sons Company 
of California, one of the oldest and largest manufacturing and commercial 
corporations of the state. He married in Oakland, June 5, 1894, Nelle M. 
Eckles. They have two children, Beverly E. and Evelyn E. Hodghead. 

Donald Frazer Tillinghast, one of the distinguished citizens and 
prominent business men of Sausalito, California, was born in San Fran- 
cisco on the 12th of September, 1853. and died there on the 11th of 
December, 1921. His parents were William H. and Anna (Langton) 
Tillinghast, who for many years were conspicuous residents of this portion 
of the state. His earliest American ancestor. Pardon Tillinghast, landed 
at Providence, Rhode Island, from England. William H. was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was there reared and educated. He was 
an active and- competent business man for the greater part of his busy life, 
and went to Valparaiso, Chili, when twenty years of age, where he re- 
mained until 1848. He then sailed for San Francisco, where he at once 
embarked in the mercantile pursuit. In addition he was for years Pacific 
Coast agent for the North British and Mercantile Insurance Company. He 
was also for a long time manager of the Bank of British Columbia in San 
Francisco. He was one of the incorporators of the Sausalito Land and 
Ferry Company, and also of the North Pacific Coast Railroad Company. 
His capacity to handle successfully the affairs of any large business con- 
cern was recognized, admitted and established. His honesty, ability and 
proficiencv were self-evident. He was a member of the Vigilantes, the 
Volunteer Fire Companies of San Francisco and the California Light 
Brigade. National Guards of California. 

He and his wife became the parents of five children, as follows: 
Donald Frazer, subject of this memoir ; Isabelle. who is now deceased ; 
Harry, who is also dead ; Eva and William DeSilver. who now resides at 
Piedmont, California. 

Donald Frazer Tillinghast received an excellent education in San 
Francisco, in private schools. Telegraph Hill was to him an historic place. 
After completing his education he engaged in the fire insurance business in 
connection with the business firm of Falkner. Bell and Company, and 
remained actively at work with them for several years. He was at the 
same time connected with several other companies engaged in the same 
occupation. As a whole he e.xhibited superior capacity for business, just 
as his father had shown before him, and amassed a comfortable fortune 
for himself and his family. He served creditably as president of the 
Sausalito Land and Ferry Company, and was its treasurer and one of its 
directors at the time of his death. At the time of his retirement, in 1906, 
he was serving as superintendent of the agencies of the Pacific Coast 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 337 

branch of the London and Lancanshire Insurance Company and was later 

Sausalito agent for the same company and the Liverpool and London and 
Globe Insurance Company. He was a charter member of the Cedars Club 
and a director of the States Savings Bank of Oakland. He was an active 
member of the San Francisco Yacht Club, and an exempt member of the 
Sausalito Volunteer Fire Department. He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church, and became one of the founders of Christ Church in 1876, of 
which he became an active and distinguished member, occupying various 
positions of trust and responsibility much to his credit. With the single 
exception of senior warden, he occupied every layman ixisition in that 
church. His fidelity to the church was pronounced and decisive. In addi- 
tion he took deep concern in the upbuilding of the city and in the advance- 
ment of morals and the instruction of the growing youngsters of the city. 
On the 22d of September, 1920, he was joined in marriage with 
Caroline Allibone Scholfield, of New Jersey, a daughter of John Polhemus 
and Elizabeth (Allibone) Scholfield. 

William DeSilver Tillingh.-\st. \\"hile now practically retired, 
William DeSilver Tillinghast is one of the prominent men in insurance 
circles in the San Francisco Bay district, and for forty years was actively 
identified with one group of companies, commanding a large business for 
them and handling their interests with a degree of fidelity and efficiency that 
won him his reputation. 

Mr. Tillinghast was born in San Francisco, February 7, 1861, and is a 
son of William H. Tillinghast, a prominent pioneer San Franciscan whose 
career is given in the preceding sketch. The son was educated in private 
schools in San Francisco. His first business experience was as a clerk in the 
commission house of Welch and Company. For a year he was in the assay- 
ing department of the Sausalito Smelting Works. Following this he became 
associated with the Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Company in 
San Francisco, and to that organization he gave the best work of forty 
years of his life, until in 1922 when he was retired with a pension. How- 
ever, he is still acting as a fire insurance agent for this companv at Pied- 
mont, where he has his handsome home at 220 Mountain Avenue. 

Mr. Tillinghast is a republican voter, is an exempt volunteer fireman of 
Sausalito, and his chief avocation for many years has been vocal music, 
as he possesses a fine voice and for a number of years has sung second bass 
and has been an active member of the Oakland Orpheus, appearing in many 
concerts given liy that organization. j\Ir. Tillinghast married at Piedmont, 
April 24, 1912. Miss Louise Christine Childs. She was born in Massa- 
chusetts. Ijeing the daughter of the late George A. Childs. of the California 
Furniture Company of San Francisco, and Susan L. Childs, both natives 
of Massachusetts. 

WiLLi.\M George Marcy, who came to California in 1847, was one 
of the distinguished pioneer citizens of Alameda at the time of his death, 
at a veneralile age, and a tribute to his memory is'consistently entered in 
this publication. 



338 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Mr. Marcy was born at Troy, New York, October 18, KSLS, and was 
a son of Hon.' William Earned Marcy and Dolly ( Newell) Marcy. Judge 
William L. Marcy was born in Massachusetts, December 12. 1786, and 
was graduated in Brown University in 1808. He served as a gallant officer 
in the war of 1812, and thereafter engaged in the practice of law at Troy, 
New York. In 1820 he became adjutant general of the State of New York ; 
in 1823 he assumed the office of state comptroller: in 1829 he was elected 
a justice of the Supreme Court of the state; 1831 he was elected United 
States senator, an office which he resigned the following year, to assume that 
of governor of New York, he having been twice reelected governor ; in 1839 
he was appointed commissioner to adjust Mexican claims ; in 1845 he became 
United States secretary of war; and in 1853 he became secretary of state 
in the cabinet of President Pierce, his death having occurred July 4, 1857. 

After receiving liberal educational advantages. William G. ^larcy be- 
came associated with banking in All^any and New York City, and at the 
age of twenty-one years he was made paying teller in the Bank of Com- 
merce, New York City, this having then been the largest l)ank in the 
United States. In 1846 he was commissioned captain in the commissary 
department of the United States Army, and as such, with the First Regi- 
ment of New York Volunteers, he came to California with his command in 
1847. He arrived in San Francisco March 20 of that year and thereafter 
was stationed at the military headquarters at Monterey, in charge of the 
commissary and quartermaster departments, until the close of the Mexican 
war. He was elected secretary of the first State Convention of California, 
and afterward he was associated with the first state printing service of 
California. In 1853 Mr. Marcy was appointed paymaster in the United 
States Navy, an office which he retained seventeen years and in which he 
saw service in various parts of the world. One of his cruises was made in 
the old frigate Cumberland, then flagship of the .American squadron, the 
vessel having been sunk by the Confederate iron-clad Merrimac, in Hamp- 
ton Roads, in the earlier period of the Civil war. 

After his retirement from public service Mr. Marcy was for a number 
of years engaged in business in San Francisco, and he ]3assed the closing 
period of his life in well earned retirement, with a ])leasant hc^ne at .\lameda. 
He served one term as a trustee of the municipal government of .\Iameda, 
and he was an honored member of the Society of California jiioneers. 

In 1842 Mr. Marcy was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Forman 
Thompson, her paternal grandfather. Thomas Thompson, having served 
as a patriot soldier in the Revolution and having been one of the most in- 
fluential citizens and property iiolders of Monmouth County, New Jersey. 

Samuel Congdon H.\rdin'g. an honored California pioneer of the 
historic years of 184*'. was a man of many varied activities: his sterling 
character and his influential service gave him inviolable ])Iace in tiic confi- 
dence and high regard of all who knew him. Prohai)ly not one of the early 
"pioneers" or old "fire vam])s" of San Francisco was more widely known 
than "Sam" Harding, as he was familiarly called, .^n humanitarian in the 



Tin-: SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 341 

broadest sense of the term; his benevolent disposition and charitable im- 
pulses have gladdened the hearts of many during his more than thirty years 
residence in San Francisco. It was his custom for years at the "Holiday Sea- 
son" to devote several days to collecting clothing, food and financial assist- 
ance for the benefit of the Ladies' Protection and Relief Society, and for 
the Protestant Orphan Asylum, he being a veritable "Santa Claus" to the 
wards of those institutions ; in fact, the "Community Chest" for their sup- 
port — ever seeking opjsortunity for aiding those in affliction or in need — 
a self-appointed stewardship, animated by deep human sympathy and 
tolerance. His personal benefactions were manifold and unostentatious, 
known only to himself and to the recipients of his kindly acts. 

Mr. Harding was a member of the Society of California Pioneers, and 
a "\'igilante," member of the Vigilance Committee headed by William T. 
Coleman. Also of the Exempt Fire Company, having been one of the 
original volunteer firemen of San Francisco, belonging to Pennsylvania 
No. 12 Fire Company. At the time of his death he was treasurer of "The 
Exempts," and a director of that organization for many years. Actively 
affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, belonging to 
San Francisco Lodge No. 3 from the time of its inception. He was also 
an active member of the republican organizations of San Francisco, his 
political allegiance having been given previously, with unfaltering loyalty 
to the old whig party. He was successively marshal of the Grant, the 
Hayes, and the Garfield Invincibles, and during the last campaign got up 
from a sickbed to lead in a torchlight procession. 

Born, of Quaker parentage, in Bristol, Rhode Island, July 26, 1825, he 
in his young days followed a seafaring life starting as cabin boy, his two 
brothers, first and second mates, under the command of Capt. John Harding, 
their father, who was master of his own vessel. He was one of the officers 
of the ship France, which was chartered, by the United States Government, 
to carry provisions to General Scott's troops in Alexico, where he did enter 
the Quartermaster's Department, remaining there until the close of the 
Mexican war. Returning to New York, he was made an officer of the 
quartermaster's propeller Massachusetts, bound for Oregon with troops 
and stores. When arriving at the Sandwich Islands, the news of the discov- 
ery of gold in California was first learned. He, with a number of others, 
took passage on the whale ship James Monroe for Yerba Buena, after- 
wards known as San Francisco ; the Rev. T. Dwight Hunt, the pioneer 
clergvman of California, also being one of the passengers, arriving Jiuie 2. 
1849: 

Mr. Harding was appointed the first inspector in the Customs House, 
under the first collector of the port, but soon resigned and started out in 
search for gold, going to Big Bar, on the ]Mokelumne River, where he 
"struck it rich," and then returned to resimie his place in the Customs 
House. He built the Crescent House on the north side of Pacific Street, 
between Kearney and Montgomery streets, and after running it a year, 
leased it to the Police Department. He was largelv instrumental in making 
the office of chief of police an appointive life position, through a police 



342 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

commission ; heretofore it had been an elective one — and succeeded in 
having, by great effort, his close friend, Patrick Crowley, the first to be so 
appointed. When Charles Brenham was elected mayor, Mr. Harding was 
appointed captain of police, and when the city was redistricted, was chosen 
constable of the first township, holding that office for two terms. After- 
wards he was selected to fill a vacancy as constable of the second township, 
was chosen by the people at a general election, to the same office for three 
successive terms, and held it until the office was abolished. 

To leave out Samuel C. Harding in a discussion of the collection business 
of San Francisco would be like writing a history of geometry withofit an 
Euclid, of Rome without a Caesar, or of France without a Napoleon. He 
was the founder of the Harding Law and Collection .Agency, which gained 
high repute throughout the Pacific Coast region, and which gave service to a 
large and representative clientage of banking and mercantile concerns. 
From 1850, for thirty years, until the time of his death, S. C. Harding was 
the confidential agent of the largest corporations and most prominent 
business men of the community. He threw himself into the financial and 
commercial interests of the city, with an ardent industry that at once and 
always commanded success, and to him is to be awarded the honor of pro- 
moting and establishing important interests that concern the material pros- 
perity of this community. His forehandedness in acting, his quick grasp of 
the salient points of a proposition, his business tact and executive ability 
were ever conceded by his contempories in business. His widow, with the 
aid of advisers, connected with the institution for a score of years, con- 
tinued on the business for some years, maintaining its leadership, on the 
same policy that originally established and fixed its high standing. 

Mr. Harding never fully recovered from the remarkable surgical opera- 
tion, and one rarely attempted by medical men. which was performed upon 
him by Drs. Beverly Cole. James Murphy, and Police Surgeon Clarke, 
who undertook the dangerous and delicate task of removing a part of the 
breastbone and a part of a rib. crushed in an accident. The wound after 
four months failed to heal, when typhoid-pneumonia developed, ending un- 
expectedly in his death. His funeral took place from Grace Cathedral, 
Rev. Dr. Piatt officiating, up to that time one of the largest funerals 
ever seen in San Francisco. The pallbearers were Robert J. Tiffany and 
William G. Doolittle, from the Society of Pioneers; William Martin and 
Capt. John Short, from the Exempts, and Samuel Newman and .Mfred 
Perrier from the Elks. 

]\Jr. Harding was one of the gallants of the days of '49 and here in San 
Francisco, on June 20. 1852. wedded Miss Margaret Mary Gibson Harris, 
a beautiful English lass, daughter of Peter Harris, who had recently come 
to America with his family, settling in the South. They arrived in San 
Francisco, from New Orleans, in September, 1849. ^Irs. Harding, a 
woman of strong character, gentle and kindly by nature, was a native of 
Liverpool, England. She was one of the earliest and a continuous member 
for fifty years of Grace Episcopal Church. March, 1869, by a vote of the 
board of managers she was elected a life member of the Ladies' Protection 



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THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 345 

and Relief Society, in whicli charity she, in her cjuiet way, manifested 
continual interest. She survived her husband nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury, his death having occurred December 18, 1880, and that of his widow 
on January 15, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Harding were the parents of three 
children, all reared in San Francisco, one son and two daughters. The 
younger tlaughter, Harriet Eugenia Baker, married Thomas Lee De Camp 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, and died at the age of twenty-four, on June 24, 1882, 
just a year and a half after the death of her father, without issue. Charles 
Mortimer Harding, the only son, was for some time in his father's business, 
and two months and a half after the death of his mother, at the age of forty- 
five years, unmarried, died March 30, 1905. The eldest daughter, Mary 
Theresa, married in 1875, John Steele McLain Gamage, born in Saint Louis, 
Missouri, March 31. 1849, a son of Armstrong Gamage, superintendent 
of the Mount Eden Salt Works, also a nephew of Sam Gamage, one of the 
early pilots on the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Mr. J. S. McL. 
Gamage was superintendent of the Pacific Bo.x Factory of San Francisco, 
and furnished much of the woods worked into the finishings of the first 
Palace Hotel. He died in 1906 before the great earthquake and fire. Two 
sons were born of this marriage, Jule Congdon Gamage, born January 11, 
1876, and Harry Charles Gamage, born October 6, 1877. 

The former on attaining his majority became manager of the Harding's 
Law and Collection office. He married a daughter of William A. Lewis, 
now deceased, a pioneer rancher of Petaluma, California. The two children 
from this marriage were Jule Congdon, Jr., who died in childhood, and the 
daughter, Gwyneth, born June 8. 1899. in San Francisco, is now married 
to Arthur Wallace Wilde, interested in the salmon fisheries and canneries 
in Alaska. 

Harry Charles Gamage, a graduate of the University of California and 
of the Boston School of Technology, was well known as an electrical and 
consulting engineer. He was also the inventor of several patents. He died 
in Xew York, January 9, 1924. His one child was named for his mother. 

The only one now living of the Harding familv is Mrs. Mary T. 
Gamage, residing in San Francisco and widely known for her civic and 
welfare activities and her part in the securing of woman's suffrage in 
California. Mrs. Gamage. during the highly important six years of the 
suffrage effort in that state, -devoted her entire time, her fine abilities, and 
social gifts to bringing the happy day of woman's freedom. She filled the 
office of treasurer of the California Equal Suffrage Association, guarding 
well its funds, and helping to replenish them by her own strenuous efforts. 
She was the president of the San Francisco Equal Suffrage League, and 
led or participated in almost every branch of the work — legislation, finance, 
social affairs, literature, propaganda, etc. She took the suffrage banners 
on to New York and Baltimore, after the victory in her own state, to par- 
ticipate in the woman's parades in those cities. She spoke often from the 
"soap box," wherever it might be. She was among the best woman 
speakers, having her subject well in hand, with a clear, strong, vibrant 
voice, showing oratorical talent of a high order, and was ever readv to 



346 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

gather the impromptu crowd. She organized the first club of women, 
poHtically, in San Francisco, and spoke, in many parts of the state, during 
the campaign of Air. Wilson for president. She is a perfect e.xamplar of 
the true "pioneer spirit." 

Frederick P. Stone, whose death occurred in San Francisco in March. 
1913, had been a resident of California about forty-eight years and was 
living virtually retired from active business at the time of his death. In 
his distinguished service as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war he fully 
upheld the ancestral military prestige, his paternal grandfather, George 
Stone, having been a patriot soldier from New England in the War of the 
Revolution, and his maternal grandfather, Silas Call, having served as 
captain of his company in the War of 1812. In his service as a soldier in 
the Civil war the suljject of this memoir gained the rank of captain. 

Captain Stone was born on the parental homestead farm, near Bos- 
coyne. Merrimac County. New Hampshire, on the 24th of March, 1841, 
and his death occurred only a few days prior to the seventy-second anni- 
versary of his birth. He was a son of Peter and Ruth (Call) Stone, who 
passed the greater part of their lives in the old Granite State, where the 
father gave his active career to farm enterprise. They came to California, 
and finally passed away in Santa Rosa after residing there a number of 
years with their daughter, Mrs. Emma R. Swett. Captain Stone had a 
number of brothers and a sister, there having been eleven in the family. 
Of them Mrs. Swett is still living, now residing in Berkeley, California. 
An elder brother. Silas, was prominent in educational circles in Boston u\i 
to the time of his death some years ago. and a younger brother. Nathan 
Stone, was active in business circles in San Francisco and in Mexico until 
he passed away at Los Angeles in 1912. 

Captain Stone was afforded the advantages of the common schools of 
his native county, and also those of a well ordered military academy in New 
Hampshire, an institution in which he was graduated. He was a youth of 
twentv vears when his ])atri(itism led him to make jirompt resjionse to 
President Lincoln's first call for volunteers to aid in the ]>reservation of the 
integrity of the nation. On the 8th of October, 1861, he enlisted for 
service as a soldier of the Union, and on the 17th of the following 
December he was mustered in. at Concord, New Hampshire, as sergeant of 
Company I (Ca])t. Stephen R. Swett), New Hampshire Battalion. First 
New England Volunteer Cavalry, commanded by Col. Robert B. Lawton. 
A\'ith this regiment he jiarticipatcd in the following named engagements : 
Front Roval, Cedar Mountain. Groveton. second battle of Bull Run. 
Chantillv. Mountxille, Hartwood Church. Kelley's Ford. Stonenian's Raid. 
Brandv Station. Thoroughfare Ga]). Middlebury. Rajiidan Station. He wa.s 
honorably discharged at Catlett's Station. Virginia, on the 2d of January, 
1863, and soon afterward he reenlisted. as a veteran, and was made first 
lieutenant of Comixmy D (Capt. Lorenzo D. Coue). First New Hampshire 
\'iilunteer Cavalry. Col. John L. Thompson commanding. With this com- 
mand he was an active participant in numerous engagements, including the 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 347 

following named : Hanover Court Hoyse, Cold Harbor. White Oak Swamp, 
Nottoway Court House, Roanoke Station, High Bridge, Stony Creek, 
Winchester. Summit Point, Charlestown, Kearneyville. Berryville, 
Opequon. Front Royal Pike, Gooney Manor Grade, Wilford, Waynes- 
borough. Columbia Back Roads (or Middletown). Lacy's Springs, second 
Waynesborough. North Creek. Shenandoah (or Mount Jackson). He was 
made first sergeant of his company March 1. 1S03: was commissioned 
first lieutenant on the 15th of April. 1864. and was advanced to the office of 
captain on the 10th of June. 1865. by reason of gallant and meritorious 
service in action. Captain Stone was captured June 18. 186,^. near Middle- 
bury. Virginia, and after having been confined thirty-five days in Libby 
Prison he was jjaroled and rejoined his command. At Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, September 21. 1864. he was again captured by the enemy, and was 
returned to Libby Prison, whence he was later transferred to Salisbury, 
North Carolina, his final incarceration having been at Danville, Virginia, 
where he was paroled after five months of imprisonment. Captain Stone 
received his final and honorable discharge July 15. 1865. at Conccjrd. New 
Hampshire, and had been in service during virtually the entire period of 
the war. save during his period of captivity. 

On the 17th of August, 1865, Captain Stone, a gallant young veteran of 
the Civil war, was united in marriage with Miss Lovilla H. Sanborn, and 
shortly after their marriage they came to California, via the Isthmus of 
Panama. 

For a short time after his arrival in San Francisco he was engaged in 
the milk business, but soon made connection with the publishing house of 
A. L. Bancroft & Company, in their law book department, where he rapidly 
rose and became manager of that department. 

Through his etTorts many very valuable works in the law were pub- 
lished ; in fact, it may be said that he was one of the leading men in the 
law book ])ublishing business on the Pacific Coast. 

Mr. Stone was later instrumental in forming a merger of the law book 
department of A. L. Bancroft & Company with the firm of Sumner Whit- 
ney & Company, a concern in the same line of business, and this combina- 
tion of interests was launched as the law book publishing house of Bancroft- 
^\'hitney Company. The immediate and continued success of this new 
enter]jrise was largely due to Mr. Stone's initiative and sound business 
judgment. He later became president of this corporation, a position which 
he held for many years and up to the day of his demise. 

IMr. and jNIrs. Stone's companionship of forty vears was severed bv 
the death of the wife and mother in Se]rtember. 1906. the three surviving 
children of this union being Charles F., Josephine L. and Hubert B. 

Charles F. Stone is living at Paloalto and is connected with Stanford 
University. He is married and has one daughter. Ruth, who received 
many high honors from the University of California, from which she 
graduated with degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. She 
became professor of bacteriology of the university, and married Dr. A. C. 



348 • THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Alvirez, a professor of that institution, in which they are both engaged in 
teaching at the present time. 

Josephine L. Stone married H. E. A. Railton, who for many years has 
been connected with the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. They iiave two 
children : John and Richard, Ijoth students at the University of California. 

On the 13th of June, 1907, in San Francisco, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Captain Stone and Mrs. Eleanor (Clayton) Humphreys, who still 
mamtains her home in this city. Captain Stone was an appreciative and 
hcjnored member of the Grand Army of the Republic and also of the 
California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. He 
was a man of sterling character, and his civic loyalty was ever on a parity 
with that which he manifested while serving as a soldier in the Civil war. 
Mrs. Stone is a popular figure in the social life of her home city, and is 
here affiliated with the Order of the Eastern Star. 

Charles Gay Hooker was one of the early pioneers of California, 
and for many years successfully identified with business as a merchant, 
first at Sacramento and then in San Francisco, where members of his 
family still reside. 

He was a native of Hinsdale, New Hampshire, born in November, 
1822, son of Henry and Mary (Daggett) Hooker. He was reared and 
educated in New England, and married Maria Cecelia Osgood, who was 
born at Northfielci, Massachusetts, September 3, 1836. Rev. Thomas 
Hooker was the founder of New Haven, Connecticut, and a contemixjrary 
of Cotton Mather in the religious world. Stephen Hooker was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary war. Charles Gay Hooker was thirty years of age 
when, in 1852, he crossed the plains to California. On reaching Sacra- 
mento he built a store and opened a stock of hardware, and continued there 
until the great flood in 1861, which destroyed so much of the business of 
the city. The waters reached the second story of the Hooker home. Leav- 
ing Sacramento at that time, Mr. Hooker removed to San Francisco, built 
a home on Bush Street, and this residence stood for more than forty years, 
until the great fire. He also moved his hardware business to this city, on 
California Street, between Front and Davis streets, next door to Brittian & 
Company, and for many years Hooker t^ Company was one of the leading 
establishfnents of the kind in the city. He was one of the founders of the 
First National liank. and served as president of the Merchants Exchange 
Bank. Mr. Hooker devoted his active attention to the l)usiness until ill 
health caused his retirement. He was a member of the Pacific Union Club. 

Mr. Hooker died in 1905, and his widow, in 1907. They were the 
parents of five children: Charles Osgood, of Burlingame ; Robert May, of 
San Mateo ; Miss Jennie May, a resident of 925 Goiigh Street, San Fran- 
cisco ; Bessie Augusta, wife of George Lent; and Florence, who died when 
seventeen years old. 

Charles (Osgood Hooker is a native son and has s|ient practically all 
his life in the San Francisco Bay district. For a number of years he has 
been well known in the stock and bond business. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 349 

Mr. Hooker was born at Sacramento, California, August 10, 1860. 
He acquired a public school education, prepared for college in Phillips 
Academy at Exeter, New Hampshire, and then attended Harvard Univer- 
sity. At the conclusion of his studies he returned to California, and for a 
number of years was actively associated with the agricultural implement 
firm of Hooker & Company. In 1906, just prior to the big fire, he sold 
his interest, and since then he has been engaged in the stock and bond 
exchange business. He is also a director in the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany of San Francisco. His father was one of the old stockholders in this 
corporation. He is also a director of the San Francisco & Sacramento 
Railroad. 

yir. Hooker is a member of the Pacific Union Club, the San Francisco 
Golf and Country Club and the Burlingame Country Club. He and his 
wife are members of the Episcopal Church. His home is at San Mateo. 
He married at San Francisco, February 5, 1905, Miss Ella Good, who was 
born in San Francisco. Her father, \V. Frank Good, was a prominent 
lawyer of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Hooker have one son, Osgood Hooker. 
The son is a graduate of the Pomfret School, of Harvard University, and 
during the World war attended the Officers' Training School at Augusta, 
Georgia. He was commissioned a second lieutenant and was under orders 
to go abroad when the armistice was signed. 

Thomas B. Evans, who is now living retired from active business, has 
the distinction of being the oldest native son born of white parents in San 
Francisco, where his home is situated on a part of the tract of land that was 
secured by his father at the time when California was still largely under 
Spanish regime, his land having been a Spanish land grant. When it is 
recorded that Thomas B. Evans was born at San Francisco on the 3d of 
February, 1847. revelation is at once made that his parents were numbered 
among the very early pioneer settlers here, the father having come to Cali- 
fornia nearly a decade prior to the historic discovery of gold which ushered 
in the remarkable development and settlement of this favored common- 
wealth. 

Mr. Evans is a son of Captain John and ]\Iargaret (Kinkle) Evans, and 
is the eldest of their four children, the others being John, Henry and 
Annie (widow of Capt. H. L. E. Meyer). Captain Evans died in the 
year 1884, and his wife, who was the widow of John Buncombe, died in 
1906. Of the first marriage were born three children : Sarah, Mary and 
Margaret. 

On a whaling vessel owned and commanded by himself, Capt. John 
Evans arrived in the Port of San Francisco in the year 1842, and it appears 
that he then abandoned a seafaring life. He was among the first to becoine 
actively associated with gold mining oj:)erations at Sacramento and later 
in Nevada, and within a short time he returned to San Francisco, where 
he owned a Spanish land grant of 160 acres, a property which he improved 
and developed to an appreciable extent and on a part of which his son, 
Thomas B., now resides, as previously noted in this review. Captain Evans 



350 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

was one of the sturdy pioneers who aided in the initial development and 
progress of San Francisco, and was a suhstantial and honored citizen of 
California at the time of his death. 

Thomas B. Evans, now the oldest native-born citizen residing in San 
Francisco, gained his youthful education in the i)ioneer schools of this 
city, and supplemented this discipline bv attending Santa Clara College, at 
Santa Clara. For a number of years thereafter he gave his personal super- 
vision to his ranch property in Napa County, and after his return to San 
Francisco he eventually became one of the prominent and successful con- 
tractors and builders in this city, he having continued his activities in this 
important line of enterprise until 1890, since which time he has lived 
virtually retired, in the enjoyment of the returns from former years of 
successful business achievement. He has been loyal and influential in civic 
affairs in his native city and state, and was for three terms a member of 
the California Legislature, his political support being given to the reinib- 
lican party. IMr. Evans has witnessed the splendid advancement of Cali- 
fornia to one of the great commonwealths of the Union, and has satisfaction 
in knowing that he has had a part in this civic and material progress. He 
has so ordered his course in all of the relations of life as to merit and 
receive the unqualified esteem of his fellow men, and it is specially grati- 
fving to be able, to accord to this venerable and honored native son a tribute 
in this history of the region in which the greater part of his life has been 
passed. 

Mr. Evans was a young man at the time of his marriage to Miss Matilda 
Sahling, and of the children of this union three are living, all being resi- 
dents of San Francisco: Marguerite (Mrs. Ernest W'hitehead), George 
Herbert and Louise. 

Charles William Decker. D. D. S. For over half a century, in fact 
since 1869, Charles William Decker has devoted his time and energy faith- 
fullv to the profession of dental surgery. He has made an enviable repu- 
tation in his profession in San Francisco, and his record has been one of 
progressive efficiency in every department of his science. 

Doctor Decker is a native son of California, born in Sutterville, in 
Sacramento County, March 31, 1855. His parents were John Jacob and 
Martha B. (Dornfjeif) Decker. His father as a boy worked as a clerk in 
the .'^stor House at New York, and for the greater part of his life was in 
the hotel business. He left New Orleans in 1849 bound for California by 
way of Cape Horn, a six months' journey, and reached Sacramento Janu- 
ary 10, 1850. His mother started from Saint Louis in 1852, traveling by 
way of the Isthmus of I'anama, and after a long journey reached Sacra- 
mento the same year. She was detained at Panama with the chagres fever. 
John J. Decker started the old City Hotel of Sacramento, and left that city 
in 1858 for San Francisco. He was also in the Eraser River mining district 
in Western Canada for a time. 

Charles William Decker attended the ])uhlic schools at San Francisco, 
graduating from the Lincoln Grammar School in 1869, He left the gram- 




'^~ ALJ:, /A^.;^ /%^. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 353 

mar school one Friday afternoon and the following Monday morning went 
to work in a dental office, and has been identified with that science and pro- 
fession ever since. He has now practiced dentistry over fifty-three years, 
and is the oldest practitioner in the State of California. For over forty- 
two years has had his offices in the Phelan Building, 760 Market Street. In 
addition to his early training under the tutelage of the famous Dr. Charles 
E. Blake he also attended the Pacific Medical College, now the medical 
department of Stanford University, and in 1874-75 he graduated with the 
degree Doctor of Dental Surgery from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. For a time he was lecturer on anesthetics and extractions in 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Doctor Decker for over forty 
years has been manufacturing the chemically pure nitrous oxide gas for 
extracting teeth. He is now the only dentist in the United States who still 
makes and gives his own manufactured nitrous oxide gas, made daily at 
his offices. 

Doctor Decker was for many years a director of the Building and Loan 
Associations of San Francisco. He served two terms as a member of the 
Board of Education of San Francisco. He has refused a great many offers 
for public honors, and while most of his time has been taken up with his 
profession, he has served in an unostentatious way the best interests of his 
community. 

Doctor Decker is now the president of the Lincoln Grammar School 
Association of San Francisco, numbering some 480 members. This asso- 
ciation has in view the erection of a colossal monument of the revered 
Abraham Lincoln, costing $100,000. He is a member of the California 
State Historical Society and the San Francisco Historical Society of the 
State of California and he has also been president of the Palo Alto Humane 
Society, also president of the Palo Alto Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals. 

Doctor Decker has also been much interested in civic affairs at Palo 
Alto, having started the Palo Alto Improvement Club as one of the pioneer 
civic bodies of the place, and also the Palo Alto Civic League. He is a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, is president of the Masonic Temple 
Association, and is a staunch republican in politics. He has worked for 
good government and has been a member of numerous pwlitical clubs and 
societies. At one time Doctor Decker had membership in fiftv-four clubs, 
associations, lodges, etc., but at the present time has given up all these 
memberships except a few. He was one of the founders of the Union 
League Clul) of San Francisco, and a member of the celebrated Dirigo 
Republican Club and founder of the Republican League of State Clubs. He 
is a past master of Palo Alto Lodge Ko. 346, Free and Accepted Masons, 
past high priest of California Chapter No. 5, of the Royal Arch Masons, 
past commander of the Palo Alto Commandery No. 47, Knights Templar, 
past grand president of the Native Sons of the Golden ^^'est, 1887, past 
grand dictator of the Knights of Honor, 1890, and has been a past high 
official in manv other societies. He is now a trustee of Palo Alto Lodge of 
Elks No. 1741. 



35i THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Doctor Decker married at Oakland, California, Aliss Charlotte Courts. 
She was born in London, England, and died in 1904. Her father, William 
Courts, is a native of London and is now deceased. Her relatives were 
prominent in political and social life and educational alifairs in England, one 
being a professor in Oxford University, another a private secretary to 
a baroness, and another president of the London Stock Exchange. 
Doctor Decker has two children. Ethel Alartha is the wife of Bart J. Ney, 
of Vallejo, and has two sons, Charles Thomas Ney and Bart J. Ney, Jr. 
The son, Charles Mortimer Decker, married Florence W'ooster, and has 
two children, Charles Conkling Decker and Florence I. Decker. He also 
has been a practicing dentist for the past twelve years. 

William Pinkney Toler was a pioneer who was actively identified 
with the events that led up to the admission of California as one of the 
sovereign commonwealths of the United States, and he had the distinction 
of unfurling the Stars and Stripes at Monterey July 7, 1846, besides having 
lived to participate in the semi-centennial of this event, in 1896. He was an 
active and honored member of the Society of California Pioneers, and was 
one of the picturesque figures in the history of this state. 

Mr. Toler was born December 23, 1826, at Caracas, Venezuela, where 
his father. Hopeful Toler, was then serving as American consul in Lajara. 
Hopeful Toler was a native of Virginia and served as a soldier in the War 
of 1812, he having finally returned to Virginia from Venezuela and having 
later served many years as L'nited States consul in Porto Rico. Eventually 
he became connected with the diplomatic corps in Washington. D. C. As a 
vouth William P. Toler held for a time a jwsition in the oftice of the 
attorney general of the United States, and it was through Henry Clay 
that he received appointment as a midshipman in the United States Navy, in 
1841, when he was but fourteen years old. In the same year, largely by 
reason of his thorough knowledge of the Spanish language, he was made 
an aide-de-camp on the stalY of Commodore Thomas A. P. Jones. Of the 
activities of Commodore Jones in connection with the assumption of United 
States control of California at the time of tlie Mexican war. history tells 
the talc, but it is to be noted that it was as a memlier of the staff of the 
Commodore that Mr. Toler came to California and had the honor of un- 
furling the United States flag at Monterey. Mr. Toler retired from the 
navy in 1848. and in 1850 he was assistant to the alcalde of San Francisco. 
He became identified with business affairs, and his connection therewith 
continued until 1870. Thereafter he lived virtually retired, in Alameda 
County, until the time of his death. 

In 185v^ Mr. Toler. whose mother was a Spanish lady, married Maria 
Antonia Peralta. whose home was near San Leandro, California, and the 
one child of this union was a son, J. Hoyt Toler. 

Charles P.iiiL.MER was one of the pioneer lawyers of Calrfornia, was 
concerned in many imjxirtant litigations of early and later years, and was 
for a long peritxl engaged in the i)ractice of his pmfession in San Fi-ancisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 355 

and (Jakland. He was one uf the honored pioneer citizens of Berkeley at 
the time of his death, in 1897. 

Mr. Pahner was horn in Connecticut and was grackiated in Yale Univer- 
sity, in which institution he studied law. 1 le came to California in 1850, and 
was for a time engaged in mining in Eldorado and Nevada counties. He 
next engaged in lianking at l-'olsom, Sacramento County, and in 1877 he 
estahlished his residence in .Mameda County, which continued to represent 
his home until his death. He founded the ( )akland Paving Company and 
was its attorney many years. He was a stalwart and able advocate of the 
principles of the republican party and was affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity. He married Harriet Day, who came with her parents to Cali- 
fornia in 1855, her father, Sherman Day, having been a civil and mining 
engineer and having surveyed the wagon road over the Sierras, before the 
advent of railroads, besides having held for a number of years the office 
of United States surveyor, at San Francisco. 

Joel Russell was one of the sterling pioneers of Alameda County and 
here gained prosi^erity through his own ability and elTorts. He became 
one of the large land-owners of the county, was influential in community 
affairs, and here his death occurred February 19, 1888. 

Mr. Russell was born in Waterford. Maine, July 16, 1822, and he was 
reared and educated in the old Pine Tree State, where he was graduated in 
Bethel .Academy. He was one of the adventurous young New England 
men who came to California, by the Cape Horn Route, shortly after the 
discovery of gold in this state. He arrived in San Francisco in March, 
1850, and for a short time he was engaged in contracting and building at 
Stockton. He had experience in the mines of Northern California. He 
finally turned his attention to agricultural enterprise in Alameda County, 
and his advancement and success were won entirely through his own ef- 
forts. He l)ecame one of the large landholders of the county, and he was 
admitted to the practice of law. He served as attorney of the town of 
Hayward, and was the candidate of the prohibition party for governor 
of the state in the election of 1866. He became a member of the republican 
party at the time of its organization, and later transferred his allegiance to 
the prohibition jsarty. Through his extensive ranch interests he was able to 
contribute much to industrial progress in .Alameda County. 

In August, 1856. Mr. Russell wedded Miss Caroline jNI. Bartlett, a 
native of Oldtown, Maine, and they became the parents of two sons and 
one daughter. , 

\\'iij,i.\M Henry P.^rrish was a gallant young soldier of the Union 
in tiie Civil war, in which he served three years and one month, as a mem- 
ber of Company G, Forty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge August 13, 1864. In October of the same 
year arrived in California, and here he was for seven years connected with 
])laning-mill ojierations. He then turned his attention to the teaming and 
draying business, and eventually he developed the largest and most im- 



356 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

portant business of this kind in the City of Oakland. He continued his 
active association with this Ijusiness until his death, and it was cnntinued 
under the management of his sons. 

Mr. Parrish was born in McHenry County, Illinois, January 24. 1841, 
and in the State of Wisconsin he was reared to the age of seventeen years. 
He was employed in a store at St. Louis, Missouri, at the inception of the 
Civil war, and he forthwith returned to Illinois where he enlisted, at 
Rockford, July 13, 1861, as a meml)er of the regiment with which he saw 
long and active service and took part in many engagements. In later years 
he was an honored member of Lyons Post, G. A. R., at Oakland, he was an 
honorarv member of the Veteran Association of the Pacific Coast, and he 
was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Odd Fellows. He wedded Miss Catherine Machwirth, a native of Buffalo, 
New York, and she survived him, as did also five of their six children. 

Robert F.\rrellv was one of the California pioneers of 1849, and he 
eventually developed, in Alameda County, one of the finest fruit ranches in 
this part of the state. He was actively concerned in the march of progress 
in this county and was one of its veneral)le and honored pioneer citizens 
at the time of his death. 

Mr. Farrelly was born at Parkesburg, Pennsylvania. Februar\- 24, 
1824, and he was reared and educated in the City of Philadelphia. As a 
youth he learned the carjsenter trade, and he was but twenty-five years of 
age when he came to California. Here he found active demand for his 
services as a carpenter, and he was thus emjiloyed in San Francisco until 
March, 1850. He was similarly engaged at .San Jose Mission during the 
ensuing vear, and in 1851 be established his residence at San Lorenzo, in 
what is now Alameda County. He purchased land and turned his attention 
to farming. He sold his land in 1859, and in 1860 he purchased the land, 
on Stanley road, near Oakland, which continued his place of residence dur- 
ing the remainder of his life and there he was a pioneer in the growing of 
fine cherries and other fruits, his reputation in this line of industry having 
far transcended the limitations of California, as his cherries found sj>ecial 
favor in the jirincijial eastern markets. He was a director of the Bank of 
San Leandro from its organization until his death, and was a substantial 
stockholder in other banks. 

Mr. Farrelly was a staunch republican, and he served two terms as 
county treasurer, besides having been for si.x terms a member of the 
county board of supervisors. In 1852 he wedded Miss Henrietta Wilson, 
who was born at Pulaski, Pennsylvania, in 18,57, and who came to California 
in 1851, her father having been a pioneer of this state. Mrs. I'arrelly sur- 
vived her husband. 

Edson .'\d.\ms. the honored founder and first settler of the City of 
Oakland, was for forty years a resident of the -San Franciscco Bay District 
and did much to advance its develo])nient and progress. His death oc- 
curred December 14, 1888. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 357 

Mr. Adams was horn in Fairtickl Cnunly, Cunneclicnt, May 1<S, 1824, 
and after his school days he was identitied with New England business enter- 
prise untl 1849, when he came to California. He arrived in San Francisco 
in July of that year, and he soon made a careful investigation of the Bay 
district, with the jmri^ose of estal)lishing a town. In May, 1850. he took up 
160 acres of land in what is now the center yf Oakland, and he was actively 
concerned in the ])latting of the new town and the development and [progress 
of what is now the l)eautiful City of Oakland. He continued as one of the 
influential and honored citizens of Oakland until his death. In 1855 
Mr. Adams married Miss Hannah J. Jayne, and they became the parents of 
two sons and one daughter. 

Edson Adams stood exponent of all that is best in loyal, honorable and 
constructive citizenship, and it was his to do splendid service in the up- 
building of one of the fine cities of the state of his adoption, the while he 
ever commanded unqualified popular confidence and good will. 

\\'iLLiAM Edw.^rd Dargie, who was for many years the editor and 
jjublisher of the Oakland Tribune, made this one of the strong and influen- 
tial papers of the state and he long held prestige as one of the prominent 
and honored representatives of journalism in the Pacific Coast country. 
His death occurred in 1911. 

Mr. Dargie was born in San Francisco, March 13, 1854. and is a son 
of the late John and Eliza G. Dargie. honored California pioneers. As a 
youth, Mr. Dargie entered upon a ]>ractical apprenticeship to the printer's 
trade, in the office of the San Francisco Bulletin, and he liecame a specially 
skilled workman. Thereafter he gained experience as a reiK)rter for the 
same paper. He supplemented his earlier education by attending the Uni- 
versity of California for a time, and in this connection he supported him- 
self by continued service as a reporter for the Bulletin. In July, 1866, he 
received financial assistance that enaliled him to purchase a controling 
interest in the Oakland Trilnme, and it is a matter of record that he made 
this one of the influential metroixilitan newspapers of the state. 

Mr. Dargie was a vigorous advocate of the cause of the repulilican 
party and was influential in its California councils. In 1883 he became 
postmaster of Oakland, and in his regime of four years he greatly raised 
the standard of service in the office. He made a record of admirable serv- 
ice as a member of the state senate, 1889-91, and thereafter he gave his 
close attention to the management of his newspaper business until his 
death, February 10, 191-1. He was long affiliated wtih the Masonic fra- 
ternity, was a member of the Athenian and Nile clubs at Oakland, and 
held membership in the Union League, Family and Press clubs of San 
Francisco. 

In 1881 Mr. Dargie was united in marriage to Miss Erminia Peralta, 
who survived him. They became the parents of two children, a daughter 
who died in infancy, and William E.. Jr.. who was approaching manhood 
at the time of his death. 



358 THE SAX FRAN'CISCO BAY REGIOX 

Augustus Daniel Splivalo, whose death occurred on the 12th of 
December. 1911, was a boy at the time when the family home was estab- 
lished in California, and here he passed the remainder of his life, which 
was marked by distinguished achievement in the legal profession and by 
large and worthy influence in jjuIjHc affairs. He was long numbered among 
the representative members of the San Francisco bar. was elected in 1873 a 
representative of San Francisco County in the State Legislature, and in the 
Centennial year, 1876, he was a repul)lican nominee for the United States 
Senate, his defeat having been the result of normal political exigencies. 
Wr. Splivalo was known as a brilliant advocate, won many noteworthy vic- 
tories in connection with causes of marked importance, and his broad 
scholarship, both academic and professional, made him a specially resource- 
ful counselor. He was not only a brilliant and honored member of the bar 
and a leader in the councils of the republican party in California, but his fine 
scholarship included command of both Latin and Greek, as well as English. 
French, Italian and Spanish, each of which he spoke with great fluency and 
accuracy. He was long and actively affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 

A scion of distinguished Italian ancestry. Mr. Si)livalo was horn on a 
vessel that was at the time off the coast of Chili, the Santa Teresa, which on 
a subsequent voyage was wrecked near Santa Barbara, California. He was 
born on the 24th of May. 1840. a son of Captain Stephen and Teresa 
(Balzano) Splivalo. both natives of Italy. The two younger children who 
attained to maturity are Caesar and Mrs. Helen Swett, both residents of 
San Francisco. Capt. Stephen Splivalo was a skilled navigator and long 
followed a seafaring life, in command of vessels. In this connection it is 
worthy of special note that he had command of the vessel on which the 
.first Chinaman came to California, indeed, to the United States. 
Captain Splivalo came to California in 1849. and after a time he resumed 
his career as a sea captain. About the year 1851, however, he established 
his family home at Stockton, California, and thereafter he lived virtually 
retired until Iris death, in 1891. His widow jMssed away in 1897. 

The early childhood of the subject of this memoir was passed in Peru, 
and he was about eleven years old when the home was established at Stock- 
ton. California, where he acquired much of his preliminary education. In 
1859 he was graduated from Santa Clara College, from which he received 
the degree of Master of Arts, and was u]> to that time the youngest i)erson 
to be graduated from the institution, he having been nineteen years of age. 
Thereafter he fitted himself with characteristic thoroughness and recej^tive- 
ness for the legal profession, was duly admitted to the bar and forthwith 
engaged in the active practice of law. He continued his professional activi- 
ties during the remainder of his life. and. as already stated in this context, 
he won distinction, success and honor in his ]irofession. the ethics of which 
he ever observed with appreciative punctility. 

On the 24th of May. 1875. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Splivalo 
and Miss Catalina Portener Xoe, who still maintains lier home in San 
Francisco. Concerning the children of this union the following brief data 
are available: Rose is the wife of Leo Solomon, of Alameda, this state; 



THE SAX FR.\XCISCO BAY REGION 359 

Stella is the wiie of Da\-id J. Martin, of San Francisco; Augustus Daniel, 
Jr., died when about thirty years of age ; Edward R. is manager of one of the 
leading steam laundries in San Francisco ; Lydia died in childhood ; Irene is 
the wife of .\lbert Shaw, of Placer County-; Oswald M. is associated with 
the United Cigar Company of San Francisco ; and Horace B. remains with 
his widowed mother and is associated with business affairs in his native dty. 

Victor Howakd Metcalf, who is a national figure, is best known as 
former secretary of commerce and labor and former secretary of the na\-)- 
in the cabinet of President Roosevelt. The San Frandsco Bay District, 
however, has known Mr. Metcalf for nearly half a century in the capacity 
of a verj- able law\-er and a capable man of affairs. 

He was bom in Utica, New York, October 10, 1853, a son of William 
and Sarah P. Metcalf. He graduated from the Utica Free Academy in 

1871. and from Russell's Military- Academy at New Haven, Connecticut, in 

1872. He spent the following four years in Yale Universit>-, graduating 
in the law course in 1876. In that year he was admitted to the Coimecticut 
bar, the foUowing year was admitted to the Xew York bar, and for a time 
practiced in his native city. 

Mr. Metcalf has been a member of the Oakland bar since 1879. He 
conducted a large and successful practice there for a quarter of a century. 
He also became active in republican politics, and in 1898 was elected to 
represent the Third CaUfomia District in the Fift}--sixth Congress. He 
was a member of Congress from 1899 to 1904, resigning from the Fifty- 
eighth Congress on July 1, 1904, to accept the position of secretary of the 
Department of Commerce and Labor under President Roosevelt. He 
occupied that post in the cabinet imtil December 16. 1906, and then became 
secretan.- of the navy. ser\-ing until December 1, 1908. 

It was while Mr. Metcalf was secretary- of the navy that the great 
-American fleet accompUshed its remarkable demonstration of making a 
voyage around the world. 

Mr. Metcalf married Emily Corinne Xicholson, of Oakland, April 11, 
1882. His home is at 245 Perkins Street, Oakland. 

Francis Henry Druffel, an honored California pioneer of the year 
1850, lived \-irtually retired in the Cit>- of San Francisco for many vears 
prior to his death, which here occurred on the 31st of December, 1893. 
a few months prior to the seventieth anniversani- of his birth. 

Mr. Druffel was bom in Germany, on the 6th of May. 1824. and was 
there reared and educated, his father ha\-ing there been engaged in the 
baken.- business, and the subject of this memoir ha\-ing there learned in 
his youth the baker's trade. His two elder brothers. John and Casper, like- 
wise are deceased. Mr. Druffel was a ^■ital and ambitious young man 
when he severed the ties that bound him to home and native land and set 
forth to seek his fortunes in the United States, .\fter his arri\-al in this 
country he remained for a time in Xew York Ciri-. and then embarked 
on the vessel that transported him on the long and ever hazardous vo>-age 



360 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

around Cape Horn, with California as his destination. He arrived in 
San Francisco in 1850, and after having passed an interval in the mining 
districts he returned to San Francisco, where he established and success- 
fully conducted the Empire Bakery, at the corner of Bush and Mason 
streets. He continued this enterprise until 1864, gained a competency and 
after his retirement from active business he continued to maintain his 
home in San Francisco until his death. He was affiliated with the Druids 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and though he was ever a 
loyal and liberal citizen he had no desire for political activity or prefer- 
ment. 

On the 6th of May, 1854, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Druflfel 
and Miss Anna Magnus, and she was about seventy-eight years of age at 
the time of her death. Of their children the first two, Mary and Oscar, 
are deceased; Henrietta is the wife of Harrison Houseworth, of San 
Francisco; Daisy is the wife of Augustus F. Lawton, of this city; Oneida 
is the widow of Benjamin Austin and resides in San Francisco ; and 
Delos O. is a resident of this city 

Nathan Keese Masten, one of the well-known and prominent resi- 
dents of San Francisco, was born on the 5th day of jMay, 1821. in the 
City of Troy, New York, to Henry Van Warren and Hannah (Nichols) 
Masten. The Masten family came to the British Colonies from Holland 
before the Revolutionary war, and fought and bled for the cause of 
freedom. 

Nathan K. Masten grew to manhood in the City of Troy, New York, 
had a good public school education, and went into the merchandise busi- 
ness. He was thus occupied at the time the "Gold Wave" from the Great 
West swept over the Eastern states. Being young and adventurous, he 
became infected with the general e.xcitement and accordingly boarded the 
steamship "Pacific" in the harbor of New York City on January, 1849, 
with nearly 200 other passengers, and started for the inviting Pacific 
Coast. It was a long and thrilling adventure down the Atlantic Coast past 
the Falkland Islands, the Strait of Magellan, Tierra del Fuego, then up 
the Pacific and finally into the Bay of San Francisco. Thus Mr. Masten 
became one of the historic "Forty-niners," the descendants of whom will 
forever boast of the establishment of their homes on the Pacific Coast in 
1849. 

Mr. Masten reached the harbor of San Francisco on the 5th of August, 
1849, and started for the mines in the interior, but owing to the eager 
crowds which swarmed the gold area he became discouraged and returned 
to San P'rancisco and engaged in the wholesale grocery business with John 
Matoon and E. W. Burr, under the name of Burr, Matoon & Masten. 
Records show that this company did a large wholesale business from the 
start, outfitting newcomers to the coast and sending sui)plies to the mining 
camps, and thus became one of the founders of the big concern which for 
many years did a profitable business on Front Street, between California 
and Sacramento streets. He did not, however, confine his business activi- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 361 

ties to the wholesale business, but took an active and prominent part in the 
development of the city. He was one of the founders of the Hibernia 
Bank and one of its al)lest directors. At a later date he became cashier 
■ of the V'nst National Gold Bank, which imixjrtant position he held with 
distinction for many years, and when the Nevada Bank was organized and 
put in oi^ration, he was one of the leaders and served as cashier of that 
bank for many years. Later he became the financial agent for the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company, and, realizing the fertility of the 
beautiful Tempe Valley in Arizona, he built the Maricopa & Phoenix 
Railroad and remained the president of that railroad until his death. He 
was appointed one of the commissioners to select a site for the San Fran- 
cisco postofifice. Mr. Masten was one of the great men of San Francisco, 
his honor and integrity were of the highest, and he proved himself a suc- 
cessful and sujjerior financier. He was a member of the California Pio- 
neers' Association and of the Union League Club. 

Mr. Masten's death occurred May 6, 1901. He left a large family of 
sons and daughters. In 1851 he married Miss Emelia Antonia von Falk- 
enberg, daughter of John H. and Mary Anna von Falkenberg, who immi- 
grated from Schlezwig-Holstein and settled in Lima, Peru, where their 
three daughters were born, Mrs. Masten born in 1836. During the gold 
rush in 1849 they also came to San Francisco, and located on Waverly Place, 
where they continued to reside for many years and became prominent and 
well-to-do citizens. Thus Mrs. Masten, a girl in her early "teens," became 
a "Forty-niner." She was a beautiful and accomplished woman, and 
became a leader in the select social set which formed in the early days in 
South Park, where most of her children were born. 

The following are the children who may claim descent from those 
hardy pioneers: Edmund C, who was for many years a stock broker in 
San Francisco, and later and until his death resided in Portland, Oregon ; 
Marguerite, wife of Frank I. Kendall, of Oakland; Frederica, wife of 
Pedro M. Wessel ; Mary Rosa, wife of Dr. Frank P. Wilson; Emelia Car- 
lotta, wife of Horatio S. Manning; Josephine, wife of Peter J. Dunne, of 
San Jose; Joseph M., assistant cashier of the Crocker National Bank of' 
San Francisco; Irene G., wife of Phil K. Gordon; Georgiana, wife of 
W. F. Perkins; Louis C, who is engaged in the real estate business in 
San Diego, California; Jane F.. wife of Col. Thomas J. Powers; and 
Alice H., widow of William L. Si:)encer. 

William Henry Chamberlain has had a long and active connection 
with the San Francisco bar. He was also in the newspaper business for a 
number of years, and his abilities as an organizer have made him well 
known throughout this part of the state. 

Mr. Chamberlain is a native son of California, born in Tuolomne 
County, October 3. 1855, son of Charles Henry and Susane Gower 
(Wilson) Chamberlain. His parents were born in Maine. His father 
was in the newspaper business, and at one time editor of a paper in Maine. 
After coming to California as a "Forty-niner" he engaged in mining. From 



362 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

the first he took a prominent part in public affairs, and was elected justice 
of the peace at a time when that office was one of great importance. He 
finally moved into the San Joaquin Valley, and while there was elected 
a member of the State Legislature and for several years was receiver of 
public monies, being appointed to that office in 1867, and holding it for 
nineteen years. His wife was one of the pioneer women in public affairs 
in California, and was especially interested in the Women's Temperance 
League. 

William Henr\' Chamberlain, only child of his parents, was educated 
in public schools and in McClure's ^Military Academy, and graduated from 
the University of California in 1876. Newspaper work was his first pro- 
fession. For two years he was editor of the Oakland Transcript, one of 
the oldest papers in the state. For another jjeriod of two years he was 
principal of the schools at San Leandro, and leaving that work he was 
until 1887 in the office of the general auditor of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road. For five years he was a national bank examiner. Mr. Chamber- 
lain in 1892 suffered a breakdown in health, and after recovering he was 
admitted to the bar, and now for thirty years has handled a large volume 
of legal practice at San Francisco. 

Several social and political clubs and associations attest his abilities as 
an organizer. One of them is the Diego Club. He organized Company G 
of the Second Infantry, National Guard, and was its captain. From 1888 
to 1894 he was president of the Republican League of California. He 
also organized the Jonathan Club, and was its president when this was one 
of the leading political clubs of the state. 

In 1876 Mr. Chamberlain married Geraldine M. Preston, a native of 
San Francisco, and daughter of O. J. Preston, who for many years was a 
leading lumber dealer of that city. Mr. Chamberlain lost his wife after 
a marriage companionship of forty years, in 1916. They were the parents 
of three children: Charles Preston, a certified public accountant, who has 
headquarters in his father's office; Gerald W., a resident of Southern 
California; and Henry W.. who died in March. 1922. Both Charles P. 
and Henry W. volunteered for service in the Siianish-American war. but 
did not leave the camp at San Francisco. Henry W. was in the regular 
army, in Comjjany G of the Twenty-seventh Infantry, and was with the 
American forces in Siberia during the World war. 

Edgar Reeve Brv.ant, M. D., left upon his native State of California 
the distinct impress of a i:)ersonality marked by distinguished intellectuality 
and professional ability, and he was a recognized leader in the advancing 
of the benignant system of Homeopathic medicine not only in this state 
but in a general way. His fine sense of professional stewardship was 
shown alike in his private practice and his service in connection with 
educational work, while it ])ermeated and dignified also his thought and 
action as a citizen. Doctor Bryant was one of the leading physicians 
and surgeons in the City of San Francisco at the time of his death. 

Doctor Bryant was born at Gilroy, Contra Costa County, California, 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 363 

on the 6tli of May, 1866, and was a son of Dr. Berryman Bryant and 
Henrietta Frances (Reeve) Bryant, his father having been one of the 
representative pioneer physicians of this state. The subject of this memoir 
received the best of educational advantages of preliminary order, and 
thereafter was graduated from the University of the Pacific, as a member 
of the class of 1885 and with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, the 
supplemental degrees of Master of Philosophy and Master of Arts 
having been conferred upon him in 1888 and 1903, respectively. In 
1889 he was graduated from the celelirated Hahnemann Medical College 
in the City of Philadelphia, and after thus receiving his degree of Doctor 
of Medicine he passed somewhat more than three years in Europe, where 
he did effective post-graduate work in leading medical schools and hos- 
pital clinics. In 1899-1900 he was resident physician in Hahnemann 
Hospital in New York City, and from 1893 until the close of his life 
he was engaged in the practice of his profession in the City of San 
Franci.sco. In 1898 he was called to the professorship of surgery in the 
Hahnemann Medical College of the University of the Pacific : he served 
as surgeon of the City and County Hospital in San Francisco ; he was 
for some time president of the board of directors of the Homeopathic 
Sanitarium in this city ; he was a director of the Hahnemann Medical 
College of the University of the Pacific ; and he gave effective service 
also as a director of the local Hahnemann Hospital. The Doctor was 
an influential member of the American Institute of Homeopathy, was at 
one time president of the California State Homeopathic Medical Society, 
and held also the presidency of the San Francisco Homeopathic Medical 
Society. 

Doctor Bryant took a i)rominent part in the movement for smoke 
abatement in San Francisco, and otherwise gave evidence of his intense 
ci\'ic loyalty and public spirit. He was a staunch advocate of the prin- 
ciples of the republican party, was an active member of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, was vice president of the Bryant Investment 
Company, and in the Masonic fraternity he advanced to and received the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He was aftiliated with the 
various York Rite bodies also, including Golden Gate Commanderv of 
Knights Templar, and was also a director of the Golden Gate Command- 
erv, besides holding membership in the local temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was a member also of the Society of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, the California Pioneers, and the Native Sons of the 
Golden West. He was a member of the Commonwealth and Bohemian 
clubs of San Francisco, and was a communicant and member of the 
vestry of St. Luke's Church, Protestant Episcopal, in which liis widow 
continues an earnest communicant. 

On the 3d of May, 1899. was solemnized the marriage of Doctor 
Bryant and Miss Betty Tisdale, of San Jose. California, and the one 
child of this union, born shortly after the death of the father, is Edgar 
Reeve Bryant II. I\Irs. Bryant is a daughter of William Tisdale, who 
was born at Utica, New York, a son of W. Lawrence Tisdale, and 



364 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

who was one of the pioneers of the year 1849, which marked the discovery 
of gold in California. William Tisdale was prosperous in his early mining 
enterprise and became one of the influential business men and honored 
citizens of San Jose, where he was the founder of the First National 
Bank, of which he became president, as was he also of the Security 
Trust Company. He was a leading figure also in various other local 
corporations, including the San Jose Gas Company. Both he and his 
wife continued to reside at San Jose until their death. 

Harris S. Allen has spent the greater part of his life in the San 
Francisco Bay District, in newspaper and publicity work. He is the 
owner of the Allen Press Clipping Bureau. This is one of the oldest 
establishments of the kind in the country, having been founded by 
Will M. Clemens in 1888. This bureau has been conducted by Mr. Allen 
for thirty years, and ranks as one of the most successful and the largest 
west of Chicago. 

H. S. Allen was born at Carson City, Nevada, June 8, 1870. His 
father. Rev. George B. Allen, was a pioneer Episcopal clergyman of the 
West, occupving the pulpit of the Episcopal Church in Carson Citv from 
1868 to 1877 and from 1877 to 1887, St. Johns, Petaluma, California. 
He spent his last years at Oakland. Mr. Allen's mother was Nancy 
M. Angell, a direct descendant of Roger Williams. Slie was born at 
Providence, Rhode Island, December 11, 1834, died in Oakland, 1918, 
surviving her husband only a few weeks. Her grandmother, Olive 
(West) Angell, was a daughter of General West of the revolutionary 
forces of Rhode Island. 

Harris S. Allen attended jiulilic schools at Petaluma and in the 
University of California. He graduated Bachelor of Philosopliy with 
the class of 1892. During college and afterwards he was a reporter 
on the Oakland Enquirer, the San Francisco Call and the San Francisco 
Examiner. 

After college he and his brother, Lewis W. Allen, made a trip through 
Euroj^e. On returning in 1894 Mr. .Allen bought the Press Clipping 
Bureau, which he developed by eslal)lishing branches in Los Angeles ana 
Portland, Oregon. 

At San Francisco, March 28, 1900, Mr. .\llen married Miss .Mice 
Mayhew. Mrs. Allen was l)orn in Minnesota, her father, Frank J. May- 
hew, is president of the Western Casket Company at Oakland, California. 
Mrs. .Allen is a member of the Woman's .Athletic Club. Their two 
children are Barbara Allen, born 1906, and Lewis Mayhew .Allen, born 1908. 

Mr. Allen is a memlier of the Delta Ka])pa Ej)silon college fra- 
ternity, the University Ckib, tlie Brockaway Tahoe Country Club, the 
Press Club and the Commonwealth Club, jlis home is at *'55 Clayton 
Street. San Francisco. He has a summer place in Marin County at 
Baltimore Park. His inddor hobl)y is ]>rints and his outdoor hobby is 
horseback riding and hiking and the jjreservation of tlie territory around 
Mount Tamalpais as a game and park preserve. This was accomplished 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 365 

during his administration as president of the Mount Tamalpais Conser- 
vation Club. 

Arthur Rathirst Crane, who has l)een a memlier of the San 
Francisco liar for fifteen years, has earned distinction in liis profession 
and also in military life. He is a veteran of the Spanish-American war, 
has rendered im]K)rtant service in the National Guard, and was with the 
colors during the World war. 

Mr. Crane is a member of an old and notable American family and 
was born at Richmond, Virginia, December 24, 1869. Three Crane broth- 
ers came to America from England in 1623, first locating at Bound 
Brook, New Jersey. Jasper Crane moved to New Haven, and was an 
early governor of that colony. John Crane became prominent in New 
York City. Rufus Crane was the member of the family with the dis- 
tinguished record in the Revolutionary war. 

A. Judson Crane, father of Arthur B. Crane, was a native of Vir- 
ginia, and a brilliant lawyer and orator, being known as "Silver Tongued 
Crane." He was an old-line whig in politics, and became a personal 
friend of President Lincoln. During reconstruction days he was appointed 
by President Lincoln L'nited State district attorney, and acted as recon- 
struction mediator between the factions. For a time he was associated 
in law practice with George G. Vest, United States senator from ]\Iis- 
souri. He died about 1893 and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery. 
The citizens of Richmond erected a six-foot stone monument over the 
grave. 

The mother of Arthur Bathurst Crane was Sarah Ellen Florence 
Smith, of King and Queen County. Virginia. She was one of the 
noted beauties of her time, and was descended from an old Colonial 
family of Virginia. She entertained President Pierce and other presi- 
dents of the United States. Through her mother she was a descendant 
of the noble family of Bathurst, England. One of them was a contem- 
porary of the English poet Pope, and during a period of Pope's illness 
he completed the last two or three cantos of "Pope's Essay on Man." 

Arthur Bathurst Crane has a sister, Louisa Woods, of Baltimore, for 
many years regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution. His 
brother, Charles T. Crane, for forty years was president and cashier of 
the Farmers & Merchants National Bank of Baltimore. 

Arthur Bathurst Crane was educated in the public schools at Bal- 
timore, attended Johns Hopkins University two terms, and both before 
and during the Spanish-American war attended the army service schools 
at Washington and also at Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. Crane studied law 
for three years under James B. Wells at San Antonio, Texas. He was 
admitted to practice in that state in 1894, and was engaged in the work 
of his profession there for several years. 

He served in the Philippines with the Signal Corps during the Spanish- 
American war period, and for two years of his residence in Texas he 
was a second lieutenant in the First Texas Infantrv of the National 



366 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Guard. Mr. Crane located in San Francisco in 1908 as a Government 
law clerk for the Signal Corps. He served as law clerk and auditor of 
the Signal Corps from 1915, and during the World war was a military 
storekeeper for the United States .Signal Corps stationed at San Fran- 
cisco, at Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, and at Camp Gordon, at 
Atlanta, Georgia. After the armistice he returned to San Francisco, and 
has a large and important general practice as an attorney in the Chron- 
icle Building. A large part of his clientele is among war veterans. He 
is a member of Nelson A. Miles Camp No. 10, United Spanish War 
Veterans ; of Post No. 466, Veterans of Foreign Wars, is a past com- 
mander of Daybreak Outpost of the World war, is past commander 
of Harold W. Roberts Unit No. 6, at San Francisco, United Veterans 
of the Republic. On December 1, 1923, he was appointed judge-advocate- 
general of the United Veterans of the Republic. He is also a member 
of the Military Order of the Serpent, the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, the Public Spirit Club, the American and State Bar associations, 
and the Civic League and Odd Fellows and Elks. 

Charles L. Patton is a native son of California, and for over thirty 
years has been an active member of the San Francisco bar. In his 
profession success has come to him gradually in proportion to the 
successive years and the increasing experience that has enabled him to 
handle large and important matters covering all branches of general prac- 
tice. 

Mr. Patton, who is also widely known for his prominence in the 
Masonic order, was born at Petaluma, California, June 24, 1864, son of 
Charles and Elizabeth L. (Clark) Patton. His father came from Mis- 
souri to California in 1848. As a pioneer he engaged chiefly in farming 
and work at his trade as a carpenter, and died in 1873. 

Charles L. Patton was nine years of age when his father died. The 
next year he and his widowed mother went east to Philadelphia, and 
in that city he was reared and educated. He read law there, and in 
1885, at the age of twenty-one. returned to California, was admitted to 
the bar in 1887, and since that year has been one of the hard working 
attorneys of San Francisco. Mr. Patton has only once appeared in 
politics as a candidate. That was in 1898, when he was nominated as 
candidate for mayor against James D. Phelan. 

The chief enthusiasm outside of his jirofession has been Masonry. 
He has held nearly all the honors and l)een accorded most of the resjxin- 
sibilities in connection with the various branches of the order in Cali- 
fornia. Fie has been master of his Lodge, high priest of the Chapter, 
past commander of the Knights Templar, is past grand commander of 
the Grand Lodge, past high ])riest of the Grand Chapter, is the oldest 
living grand master of the old Grand Consistory of the state who was 
given the supreme honorary thirty-third degree of the Scottish Rite, in 
1894. and in 1893-94 served as illustrious jxitentate of Islam Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine. At the jircscnt time Mr. Patton is president of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 367 

the Order of High Priesthood of the Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
is chairman of the committee on jurisprudence of the Grand Chapter, and 
one (if the committee on jurisjirudence of tlie Cjrand Lodge. 

Charles August Jaxke came to CaHfornia in the gold rush days 
of '49, and as a contractor erected some of the very early homes and 
other huildings around the bay. He was especially interested in the 
development of that section known as Belmont, in what is now San 
Mateo County. 

He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1809, and he married there 
Dorothy Peterson, who w^s born on one of the Islands of the North 
Sea in 1814. In 1849 the family came around the Horn on an old 
Clipper ship, and Mr. Janke brought with him on the trip the material 
for six portable houses. He set up these houses, and at once engaged 
in .a successful business, as a building contractor. He had served his 
apprenticeship and had become a very thorough workman in Germany. He 
erected the old amusement hall of the Turnverein, and managed this for 
several years. He secured a tract of land and established Belmont Park, 
opening it and developing it and putting it on the market, and continued 
to operate Belmont Park proper until his death. He died in 1881, and 
his wife passed away at the age of sixty-three. 

They were the parents of three children. Both sons are now deceased. 
Charles Ferdinand owned and operated a bottling works, and married 
Louise Shaburg, who now lives at Belmont, and has four children, named 
Rose, Dora, Lulu and William. William August, the second son, was 
general manager of his father's business, and married Nellie Turk, who 
is living, with three children. Augusta. Carl and Doctor Walter, a dentist. 

The only living child of the late Charles A. Janke is Elizabeth Dorothy, 
whose home is at 1010 Valencia Street in San Francisco. She is tlie 
wife of Amosa P. Johnson, who was born at Delhi, New York, and 
early learned the profession of photographer, came to California in 
1856, and owned and operated the old pioneer gallery. Mrs. Johnson 
has seven living children : Elizabeth, whose first husband was John Hopper, 
and is now the wife of Smith Carr; Amos P., president and manager 
of the Title Insurance Company of San Diego, California, and past 
grand master of the California Lodge of Odd Fellows; Phoebe, wife 
of John Kaech. of Belmont; Anna M., wife of James A. Jensen; Edna; 
Adelia, wife of Louis Van Neer. of Belmont: and Emma, whose first 
husband was Clyde L. Burton, and she is now the wife of Oscar Oakes. 
Mrs. Elizabeth D. Johnson is a member of the Association of Pioneer 
Women. 

Mrs. W. B. Hexrici. society editor of the San Francisco Examiner. 
is descended from one of the oldest pioneer California families. Her 
grandfather. Dr. J. E. Pelham. who was of English ancestry, was a Vir- 
ginian, and a graduate of the L'niversity of \'irginia. He came out 
to California by way of the Horn during the gold rush, establishing 



368 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

himself in Shasta. With the true spirit of valor which typifies the pioneer 
woman, his wife, Sarah, and her two little girls followed him, going 
by boat to New York and coming over the Isthmus. While crossing 
the Isthmus, the little daughter, Sarah, then five years of age, was stolen 
by bandits and held for $100 ransom. Upon payment of this sum by 
the terrified mother little Sarah was returned unharmed and they con- 
tinued on their perilous journey. Soon after reaching California Mrs. Pel- 
ham died, and the two daughters were placed in the first convent at 
Marysville. 

Sarah Pelham while growing to young womanhood made regular 
trips from Marysville to Shasta by stage to visit her father. Upon 
one occasion, something happening to the stage while fording a stream, 
she was carried to safety by a handsome young messenger for the \\'ells 
Fargo Company, S. D. Brastow. This was the beginning of a romance 
that terminated in the marriage of the hero and the beautiful daughter 
of the South, though not without much opposition from Doctor Pelham, 
who had brought his Southern prejudices with him around the Horn. 
However, romance and the spirit of the \\'est counted paternal disap- 
proval as a small barrier. 

S. D. Brastow was descended from a long line of New England min- 
isters, and succeeded only in his third attempt to escape his prescribed 
destiny of the same calling. His first two attempts were thwarted each 
time by the captain of the ship, who returned the errant youth to his 
father, but the third time he succeeded in' reaching the land of adventure 
and gold. Upon arriving in California, young Brastow, then seventeen 
years of age, became a Wells Fargo messenger, and was identified with 
that pioneer Western transix)rtation service and organization throughout 
his entire career. As a stage messenger he had adventures that were as 
thrilling as any accounts of early days in the West. Many times he 
was bound and gagged by bandits, narrowly escaping death in defending 
the treasures that were transported on the stage. He became one of 
the first members of the Bohemian Clul) in San Francisco, and for many 
years served as its treasurer. 

The two daughters of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Brastow are Mrs. W. B. 
Henrici and Virginia Brastow, both well known in the newspai^er world 
and to the pulilic. Miss Brastow is now engaged as a writer for Eastern 
magazines, while Mrs. Henrici has the heavy l)urden of resixmsibilities 
represented in the position of society editor of the San Francisco ICxam- 
iner. Mrs. Henrici's eighteen-year-old son, Rafael Brastow Henrici, is 
preparing to enter the University of California. 

Frederick Alexander Harrison was born in San Francisco on the 
31st of December, 1857, and here his death occurred July 27, 1910. By 
his sterling character and worthy achievement he honored the state of his 
birth, and virtually his entire active career was marked by close and 
etTective association with hanking enterprise in the City of San Francisco. 
He was a son of James and Isabella (Lawless) Harrison, and his mother 



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i 



I'I'lTl'.R ClimSTAL 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 371 

was a first cousin of Sir Isaac Bock, a famous barrister in the City of 
Dublin, Ireland. 

The preliminary education of Frederick A. Harrison was acquired in 
the schools of San Francisco, and later he was graduated in Santa Clara 
College, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Within 
a short time after leaving college he became connected with the local 
Comptoir d' Escompte, a branch of the national banking system of France, 
all United States representatives of the French institution having now 
been discontinued. He served many years as the cashier of this branch 
institution in San Francisco, and gained rank as one of the able and valued 
factors in the financial activities of his native city. He was an appreciative 
and public-spirited citizen, ^nd was ever ready to do his part in supporting 
measures and enterprises projected for the good of his home city and state. 

December 3, 1885, recorded the marriage of Mr. Harrison and Miss 
Eugenie Chrystal, a daughter of Peter and Anna (Clinton) Chrystal, the 
former of whom was born at Lynn, Massachusetts, June 24, 1820, and 
the latter of whom was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 21, 
1837. Mr. Chrystal was one of the sterling pioneers of California, to 
which state he came in 1850, at the height of the gold rush, and he was 
successful in his gold-mining operations in the early period of his career 
in this state. He was later one of the organizers of the firm of Chrystal & 
Dimmick, from which was developed the present large and important 
wholesale concern of A. P. Hotaling & Company of San Francisco. Mr. 
Hotaling entered the employ of the original firm, and at one time became 
so discouraged with prospects in California that he decided to return to 
the East, a course from which he was deflected by the advice and counsel 
of Mr. Chrystal, and he eventually gained rank as one of the most sub- 
stantial and influential business men of San Francisco. Mr. Chrystal 
finally returned from active business, and he and his wife established their 
residence in Paris, France, where their seven children were born. Pierre, 
the eldest of the children, was reared and educated in France and became 
a specially talented musician. He remained in France until the summer 
of 1881, when he came to the United States, where he died at his home 
in Oakland in 1892. Jacques, the second son, holds a resixjnsible position 
in the First National Bank of San Francisco. The third child died when 
young. Alice is the widow of Charles E. Hickox and resides in the 
City of Cleveland; Cecile, the wife of Charles H. Shiels, died May 4, 
1917; George, born November 14, 1876, died in New York City. The 
members of the Chrystal family have been earnest communicants of the 
Catholic Church, and i\Irs. Chrystal was for some time a member of the 
choir of St. Francis Church in San Francisco. 

Peter Chrystal died July 5, 1881. In the last year of his life he had 
invested heavily in mining stock controlled by James P. Flood. A suit 
had been started only a short time before against Mr. Flood, but the 
last illness and death of Mr. Chrystal left the management of the suit 
to a young attorney and members of the Chrystal family always have 
been completely convinced that the victory of this attorney and dishonesty 



372 THE SAX FRAN'CISCO BAY REGION 

on the others were responsible for the compromise of the suit and the 
loss or destruction of papers and securities that represented nearly the 
entire fortune of Peter Chrystal. Following his death and deprived 
of his counsel, and guiding hand, Mrs. Chrystal suffered an almost com- 
plete financial collapse and was comjjelled to sell her jewels and paint- 
ings, and other jjersonal and household ornaments in order to provide 
small sums of money to educate her two youngest daughters. Mrs. Chrys- 
tal's health began to fail towards 1899 and UXX). During the last thir- 
teen years of her life she was physically entirely helpless, though she 
retained the keenness of her mind, and her cheerful spirit was undi- 
minished to the end. She passed away June 27, 1915. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison had one child, a son, Maj. Ralph C. Harrison, 
born at San Francisco, March 12, 1889. He was graduated from Santa 
Clara University in June, 1905, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
entered the United States Army in 1908 and served continuously in the 
Coast Artillery until his return from the World war, when he was retired 
for physical disability, after being confined to the Letterman Hospital for 
nearly two years. He saw much active service as major of the Seventy- 
first Company in the Argonne, Meuse, and was provost marshal of the 
territory bounded by St. Germain to the Italian border after the armistice. 
He married Cali Phillips, the daughter of Col. and Mrs. Charles Leonard 
Phillips, on January 3, 1914. They have two children, Eugenie, born at 
Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco, September 24, 1914, and Ralph 
Chrystal, born at Fort Monroe, Virginia, April 27, 1916. 

George Washington Frink was a young man when he came to 
California in 1850, and numbered himself among the pioneers of San 
Francisco, and in the passing years he effectively brought his ability and 
powers to bear in enterprise that contributed to the civic and material 
development and progress of his adopted city. He was long recognized 
as one of the prominent and influential representatives of the real estate 
business in San Francisco, and his activities in this line continued until 
the time of his death, on the 30th of October, 1902. His widow passed 
away October 1, 1914. 

Mr. Frink was born at West Troy, New York, a representative of 
a family early founded in the old Empire State, where his parents. Isaac 
and Mary (Haight) Frink, continued to reside until their death. Mr. 
Frink acquired his early education in the schools of his native place, and 
thereafter was for some time a student in historic old Girard College, in 
the City of Philadelphia. When the discovery of gold in California, in 
1849, resulted in a great tide of migration setting toward the New ICldo- 
rado, Mr. Frink was one of those who set forth to seek his fortunes in 
the new wonderland. He arrived in San Francisco in the early part of 
the year 1850, and for a number of years he owned and conducted the 
old Tehama Hotel, at the corner of Montgomery and Clay streets, a 
portion of this building having stood until 1906, wiien it gave place to 
a modern structure. Finally Mr. Frink turned his attention to the 
real estate business, and his discrimination, mature judgment and pro- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 373 

gressive policies made him soon a leader in this line of enterprise in the 
California metropoHs. He became senior member of the firm of Frink 
& Wilde, which built up an extensive and prosj^erous business and which 
incidentally did much to further the general advancement and prosjierity 
of San Francisco City and County. Of this firm Mr. Frink continued 
a member until his death, and the record of his life is one of earnest 
endeavor and worthy achievement, his sterling attributes of character 
having commended him to the confidence and good will of the commu- 
nitv which so long represented his home and the stage of his constructive 
activities. He was liberal and loyal as a citizen, l)ut had no desire for 
public office of any kind. He was long and actively affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity. 

The year 1859 recorded the marriage of Mr. Frink and Miss Minerva 
Kennedy, who likewise was born in the State of New York, and after 
a devoted companionship of more than forty years, the death of the 
husband and father severed the gracious ties that had made the union 
one of ideal order. Of the four children the eldest is George Kennedy 
Frink, who continues a resident of San Francisco; Abby is the wife of 
Mr. Bickel, of this city; and the other two children are deceased. 

Bailey Millard, the author of this history, was bofn in Markesan, 
Wisconsin, in 1859. As a boy he went with his parents to Minnesota 
in 1867, and was educated at the State Normal School at Mankato. He 
learned the printer's trade in the office of the St. Peter Tribune, and 
afterward went to St. Paul, where he worked first as a printer and then 
as a contributor to the St. Paul Pioneer-Press. 

In 1878 he went to Ogden, Utah, where he was editor of the Evening 
Dispatch. Going to San Francisco in 1880, he became a reporter on the 
Chronicle. There he married Martha B. Hawkins, a singer who" was 
was studying for the operatic stage, but who gave up her career to 
become his wife. He became one of the editors of the Chronicle, but 
in 1S91 transferred his activities to the San Francisco Morning Call, of 
which he became city editor. He rendered such conspicuous service to 
the Call that W. R. Hearst, the proprietor of the Examiner of that city, 
engaged him as city editor of that paper in 1892 and afterward as nevvs 
editor, night editor and Sunday and literary editor. 

While doing newspaper work he wrote three books, beside contributing 
many short stories and {xjems to New York magazines and the Saturdav 
Evening Post. He also traveled to the Klondike and to Nome, and as a 
result of these travels wrote "The Lure o' Gold," which was on the 
best selling list of novels in 1904. Two years before that time he gave 
up newspaper work altogether and lived in Marin County and also in 
Berkeley, writing for the magazines. 

In 1905 he went to New York with his family and became the editor 
of the Cosmopolitan Magazine. Afterward he was for a time the editor 
of the Munsey Magazine. While living in and near New York for an 
eleven-year period he wrote many short stories and articles for the 
magazines and also published "The Sea Hawk," a novel, in the year 1911, 



374 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

several years before the Sabatini novel of that name made its appearance, 
"Schoolma'am Island" and other romances. 

In January, 1916, he returned to San Francisco, and was engaged 
in editorial work and feature writing for the Examiner. In 1917 he 
went to Los Angeles, where he worked in the same capacity for the 
Los Angeles Examiner, another Hearst paper. He was called back 
to San Francisco in August, 1918, and given the editorship of the San 
Francisco Evening Bulletin. In 1920 he left the Bulletin and returned 
to Los Angeles to engage in the automobile tire business. In the mean- 
time he had begun his "History of the San Francisco Bay Region," and 
as he did not remain actively engaged in the tire trade for long he spent 
much of his time in San Francisco. His wife dying in January, 1922, 
before the history was completed, he gave up all literary work for a 
time, having become, as he said, unfitted for it because of his grief over 
his great loss. But after a few months he took heart again and com- 
pleted the history, which is the only one containing all the annals of the 
bay cities and the entire bay region. 

Mr. Millard is the father of two children, Elmer S. Millard and 
Gladys E. Dwiggins, the one of San Francisco and the other of Los 
Angeles. He is at present an editorial writer for the Los Angeles Times. 

Bernard Ulmer Steinman, who passed the closing years of his 
long and useful life in the City of San Francisco, was a pioneer of 
California and was but a boy when he came to this state, alone and 
dependent upon his own resources. He gained high place as a man of 
affairs and as a loyal and public-spirited citizen who was specially prom- 
inent in connection with the development and advancement of the City 
of Sacramento, where he long maintained his home. 

Mr. Steinman was born in Cologne, Germany, and was a baby of 
nine months at the time of the family immigration to the United States. 
Here his mother died while he was yet a child, and he was only eleven 
years of age when he set forth for California, making the voyage from 
New York via the Isthmus of Panama. The ticket with which he had 
been provided for the passage was securely placed in his handkerchief, 
but the youngster was too ill and confused to remember this on its being 
called for, with the result that the captain of the vessel comj^elled him 
to work his way over as compensation. It was in the year 1S58 that 
Mr. Steinman thus arrived in the Golden State, somewhat startled, per- 
haps, at finding the lost ticket, cause of all his difficulty, still nestling in 
the folds of his handkerchief. 

Selling match boxes on the streets of Sacramento was one of the 
first occupations of the poor little newcomer. However, the ability of 
the promising youth was early recognized by Leland Stanford, who 
made him his protege. .'\ warm and lasting friendship was afterwards 
cemented between the two men. which proved mutually profitable, for 
it was Mr. Steinman who suggested the idea to Mr. Stanford to become 




/t//jS£uyt^'t^*^^< 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 377 

a candidate for the United States Senate, in which that distinguished 
Calif ornian served later with marked ahility. 

For a number of years Mr. Steinnian was the proprietor of the Sacra- 
mento Depot Hotel, and durinjf this j>eriod he aspired to a place on 
the board of directors of the Sacramento Gas and Electric Company. 
Told to his face by one of the directors in the presence of the entire 
board, that this particular ambition of his could never be realized, he 
bluntly informed all of them that he would l)e president of the comjiany 
when this particular director would not even be associated with it.- And 
not only did this state of afifairs actually come to pass, but Mr. Steinman 
assumed the presidency of the Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank of 
Sacramento as well as that of the Gas and Electric Company. 

After being twice elected supervisor of the City and County of 
Sacramento, he served two terms as mayor of the state capital. Under 
his most progressive administration Sacramento was changed from a 
sleepy, good-sized town of wooden sidewalks to a live and rapidly growing 
city, desirous of adopting the most modern of civic improvements. 
Mr. Steinman rightly earned the title of "father of the new and greater 
Sacramento." and the Sacramento Bee said that he accomplished more 
for the city in seven months than all his predecessors in as many years. 
Because he commanded unqualified popular confidence and esteem. Mayor 
Steinman was able to solve a critical problem in connection with the labor 
question without trouble, his coolness, courage and thorough understand- 
ing of the situation surmounting all obstacles. 

Mr. Steinman's success was not only due to his determination to 
become a prosperous and accomplished man himself, but also to the aid 
he gave other men to do likewise. In his work of building men, he would 
set down-and-outers from all walks of life on their feet again, give 
them a chance to begin their lives anew, and from this point on leave 
them alone to work out their own salvation or failure. Many prominent 
men in California today owe the success of their achievements to the 
earlv opportunities afforded them by Bernard Ulmer Steinman. 
. Mr. Steinman was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, was a stal- 
wart republican in politics, was a charter member of the Sutter Club of 
Sacramento and a member of the Union League Club of San Francisco, 
and was a zealous and influential leader of Temple Emanu-El. the first 
Jewish church in San Francisco. After his retirement from active busi- 
ness, Air. Steinman traveled a year in Europe, and upon his return to 
California he estalilished his residence in San Francisco, where he passed 
the remainder of his years. 

In private life the remarkable personality of the man was everywhere 
evident. He was especially fond of- youth, and entered into their games 
and pleasures with the joy and vigor of one of them. His never-ending 
fund of stories and anecdotes made him an invaluable asset at the socials 
of the older folks. 

In 1877 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Steinman to Miss 
Fannie Sachs, of Cincinnati, who still maintains her home in San Fran- 



378 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

cisco. Of the four children of this union, two are Hving: Irving I., who 
was born at Sacramento, on the 18th of August, 1878, and who became 
president of the California Numismatic Society, having written much 
valuable material on the subject of numismatics, died on the 16th of 
February, 1922; Henrietta (Etta) is the wife of Arthur Allen Frank, of 
San Francisco; Lillian is the wife of Max Samuel, also of this city; and 
Ulmer died at the age of ten months and ten days. 

Benjamin Ide Wheeler, president emeritus of the University of 
California, was the actual administrative head of the university for a 
period of twenty years, a period of remarkable constructive progress, dur- 
ing which time the university broadened and improved its facilities and 
its service so as to rank as one of the foremost American institutions in 
higher education. Doctor Wheeler was born in Randolph, Massachusetts, 
July 15, 1854, son of Benjamin and Mary E. (Ide) Wheeler. For many 
years he has enjoyed high rank among the foremost American scholars, 
particularly as a philologist. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Master 
of Arts degrees from Brown University, his Doctor of Philosophy degree 
at the University of Heidelberg in 1885, and Brown, Princeton, Harvard, 
Yale and Johns Hopkins, and a number of other universities have 
bestowed upon him the honorary Doctor of Laws degree. The Uni- 
versity of Athens, Greece, conferred on him the honorary Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1912. He is a Phi Beta Kappa, has membership in many 
learned societies including the American Philological Association, Amer- 
ican Historical Association, American Oriental Society. Doctor Wheeler 
was instructor in Latin and Greek in Brown L^niversity, was an instructor 
at Harvard, and for many years a member of the faculty of Cornell Uni- 
versity, where for over ten years he held the chair of philology. On July 
18, 1899, he took up his duties as president of the University of California 
and his actual service of twenty years continued until July 15, 1919. Since 
this date he has been president emeritus and professor of comf>arative 
philology. 

Doctor Wheeler in 1895-96 was professor of Greek literature at the 
American School of Classical Studies in Athens, and in 1909-10 served as 
Roosevelt professor at the University at Berlin. He is the author of a 
number of monologues and books on philological subjects, including "In- 
troduction to the History of Language," published in 1890. He also 
wrote "Die Organisation des hoheren L'nterrichts in den Vereinigten 
Staaten von Nordamerika," published in Munich, 1897, and a life of 
Alexander the Great. He is a member of the University Bohemian, 
Pacific Union and other clubs and other organizations in San Francisco 
and elsewhere. 

Doctor Wheeler married, June 27, 1881, Amey Webb, of Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

Harry Manvh-i-f. Wright. The work of distinctive importance that 
identifies Harry Manville Wright in the California bar was his long service 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 379 

as master in chancery for the I-'ederal Courts in Northern Cahfornia. In 
this capacity he heard some of the weightiest cases involving pubhc utilities 
and other corjxirations in contract interpretation. Mr. Wright is a native 
son and intellectually is regarded as one of the most brilliant members of 
the San Francisco bar. 

He was born at San Francisco April 14, 1872, son of John and Amelia 
(IManville) Wright, his father a native of Tennessee and his mother a 
native of New York. His mother came to California as a young girl in 
1852, traveling in a wagon drawn by ox teams from Illinois over the 
plains. Her father was Isaac Manville, who was of on old Connecticut 
family of Huguenot extraction. John Wright came to California by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama in Februarv, 1850. He was of the Scotch-Irish 
migration from North Carolina to Tennessee and of Revolutionary stock. 
He was an iron worker, and did iron work and manufactured iron tools at 
Sacramento until 1856, after which he was a resident of San Francisco. 

Harry Alanville Wright attended public schools in San Francisco and 
graduated with the class of 1894 from the University of California, taking 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. He was winner of the university medal at 
his graduation and was also head of the university cadets. He is a member 
of Phi Gamma Delta and of Phi Beta Kappa fraternities. After leaving 
the university Mr. Wright taught three years in the Boys' High School 
that is now known as the Lowell High School in San Francisco. Going 
East he spent two years in the Harvard Law School and on his return 
took the examination and was admitted to the bar, beginning his work as 
an attorney in January, 1900. 

During the first year of mining excitement in Alaska Mr. Wright went 
to Nome and for one summer acted as attorney for one of the largest 
mining corporations. He was in Alaska and a witness of the scenes repre- 
sented and depicted in the Rex Beach story of "The Spoilers." In 1901 
he became associated in practice with Louis Titus, subsequently becoming 
his partner in the law firm of Titus, Wright and Creed. The firm did a 
general practice but mostly in corporation law and some admiralty practice. 

After 1907 Mr. Wright resumed individual private practice for three 
years, at the end of which time he was appointed standing master in 
chancery in the United States Circuit Court for the Northern District of 
California. W'hen that court was abolished he was transferred to similar 
duties in the United States District Court. For the first five years he had 
no opportunity for any private practice, since due to the illness of 
Judge DeHaven the entire equity calendar had to be heard by the master. 
After that the only cases referred to him were those of large importance 
that would take many months in hearing and therefore unduly burden the 
calendar of the district court. These cases covered all branches of the 
federal jurisdiction. Among the more notable of them was the pioneer 
rate fixing controversy between the Contra Costa Water Company of Oak- 
land and that city invohing the water rates for 1904-5. Also there was 
the rate fixing controversy between the Spring Valley \\'ater Company 
and the City of San Francisco, in which eight suits were filed, one each 



380 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

year from 1907 to 1914, these suits being consolidated for a hearing. 
Involved in connection with them was the validity of the supervisors' 
order relative to water rates, the ownership of $2,750,(XX) of impounded 
moneys and the final valuation for the purpose of rate fixing of the 
property of the Spring Valley Water Company. Master in Chancery 
Wright also heard the litigation between the Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany and the City and County of San Francisco concerning rates fixed by 
the city for gas for the years 1913 to 1915, inclusive, in which about 
$1,500,000 of impounded money was at stake and the judicial valuation 
of the gas plants of the plaintifif. Another case is known as the United 
States versus Curtis Collins and Holbrook Company, in which eighty 
suits by the United States to cancel timber entries for alleged fraud were 
consolidated for hearing. Another was the Ocean Shore Railway Company 
receivership proceedings, besides many others, including a number of 
hearings as to infringement of patents. 

All of this experience has made Mr. Wright one of the recognized 
authorities on corporation contracts and matters involving federal juris- 
diction in California. He resigned as master in chancery at the end of 
1919, engaging in private practice in association with John S. Partridge. 
He still acts as master in chancery of the court when occasion arises under 
special orders of appointment, and his private practice outside of the court 
has been largely concerned in water litigation. His offices are in the 
Foxcroft Building. 

Mr. Wright is affiliated with Durant Lodge No. 368 of the Masonic 
order at Berkeley. He is a member of the Pacific Union Club, Claremont 
Country Club, the Commonwealth Club and is a director of the Western 
Iron Works of San Francisco. A republican, he has taken little part in 
f>arty organizations. 

He was married in Illinois on August 4, 1905. Mrs. Wright is a 
native of that state, and the daughter of John S. Barber. They have one 
child, John Barber Wright, who is now a student in the Hitchcock Military 
Academy. 

Clarence Mark Smith. For forty years Clarence Mark Smith has 
been general agent at San Francisco for the Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Company in his native State of Wisconsin. He was an educa- 
tor and learned the fundamentals of banking there. He has been respon- 
sible for a large share of the Pacific Coast business of the Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, and is also prominently identified with 
banking and other concerns. 

Mr. Smith was born in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, a mile and one- 
half above the Illinois state line, August 5, 1854, .son of Wilham Harrison 
and Ann Livingston Smith. His parents were both of English ancestry, 
his father a native of New York State and his mother of Connecticut. 
She is related to the well-known Cass family of Los Angeles. William 
Harrison Smith was a pioneer settler in Wisconsin and followed the 
business of contracting and building, and also farming. Clarence Mark 




(j^^Zy^^C^*^ (l^ ^/-^Cc*^;^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 383 

Smith attended public schools at Benhams Corners in Wisconsin, and 
later taught the public school when seventeen years of age, in the Town 
of Half Day, Illinois, ten or twenty miles from Chicago. On returning 
to Benhams Corners he attended an academy established by Mr. M. M. 
Rice in Wisconsin, and later took a course in the Normal School at Osh- 
kosh, Wisconsin. He passed the examination and was awarded the teach- 
ers' certificate. About that time he induced his father to purchase twelve 
acres adjoining the home farm place, for the reason that neither liked 
their neighbor. The price, including a residence, was between $400 and 
$500, a very high price for land at that time. To induce his father to 
undertake this obligation he promised to stay with him until it was paid for. 
The next winter the superintendent who had given him his certificate 
asked him to take what was designated as No. 1 School at Summers. He 
was selected because of his rugged physique, since physical strength as 
well as mental proficiency was required in the handling of the class of 
rough students. This school, as was customary among many schools in 
frontier country districts, had gained its reputation through the custom 
of the boys' throwing the teacher out of doors. Nothing of the kind 
happened after Air. Smith took charge, and after establishing law and 
order there he was induced to take charge of a similar school, where he 
again proved himself master of the situation. He was next made prin- 
cipal of the school at Union Grove in Racine County, Wisconsin. While 
he was there the president of the normal school recommended him for the 
position of principal of the high school at Sturgeon Bay in Northeastern 
Wisconsin. He was principal there from 1877 to 1881, and from his 
earnings, paid off the mortgage on his father's farm. In 1880 he was 
elected superintendent of schools of Door County, Wisconsin. In 1881 
the opportunity was presented of buying out a bank that was about ready 
to fail. He took the bank "lock, stock and barrel," reorganized it, and 
though it had very small capital, nearly everybody in the county knew 
him and had confidence in his integrity. The institution was soon on a 
paving basis. Along with banking he wrote considerable life insurance, 
and was interested in other commercial enterprises. 

On his own resources, and through his close reliance, Mr. Smith 
made for himself a considerable reputation in that section of Wisconsin 
as an able young business man. Then, in 1885, having sold his interests, 
he moved to California, bringing with him a commission as superintendent 
of the agency system for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Milwaukee. Since that year he has been general agent of San 
Francisco, and he has made the Northwestern one of the most favorably 
known of the Eastern insurance companies on the Pacific Coast. At the 
close of 1924 Mr. Smith plans to retire from the jxisition in order to have 
his time free for his individual interests. A number of years ago he 
bought the control of the Security Savings Bank of Visalia, serving as 
president for a number of years. After selling out his interest in that 
institution he bought control of the Merced Bank, and also acted as its 



384 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

president. He was also interested in the Woodlake National Bank, and 
has a number of investments that make him a factor in the financial world. 

Mr. Smith is a republican, though he has never been in politics as a 
candidate for office. He is affiliated with Alameda Lodge, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Golden Gate Commandery, Knights Templar, Islam 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine of San Francisco, and is a member of the 
Bohemian and Commonwealth clubs and the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Mr. Smith's first wife was Miss Amy Bell, whom he married in Wis- 
consin. She died in California, leaving one daughter, Daisy B., wife of 
Edwin J. Thomas. Edwin J. Thomas is associated with Mr. Smith in the 
insurance agency. Mr. Smith married for his second wife Miss Alice 
Prescott, a native of Minnesota, daughter of Rev. George \V. Prescott, 
of that state. 

Guy p. Hull is one of the representative business men and most 
progressive citizens of Redwood City, the judicial center of San Mateo 
County, where he is associated with his only brother, Asa Edward Hull, 
in the conducting of a large and well equipped retail hardware establish- 
ment, he being the executive head of the concern. 

Mr. Hull was born at San Carlos, San Mateo County, California, on 
the 19th of April, 1869, and is a son of William Whipple Hull and Rosa 
Hull, who were born and reared in the State of New York and who came 
to California as pioneers of the year 1851. William W. Hull was the 
first man in San Mateo County to engage in the manufacturing of brick, 
and he supplied the brick for the old Palms Hotel and many of the leading 
business buildings of Redwood City, he having been an influential figure 
in connection with the civic and material development and upbuilding of 
San Mateo County, and both he and his wife having here continued their 
residence until their death, the names of both meriting place on the roll of 
the honored pioneers of California. Of the four children the subject is the 
elder of the two sons, and the one surviving daughter is Mrs. May Shields, 
the other daughter having died in infancy. 

Guy P. Hull acquired his early education in the public schools of his 
native county, and as a young man he entered railroad service, in which 
connection he was employed in California. Arizona and Nevada. After his 
retirement from this vocation he became associated with his brother in 
establishing the hardware liusiness which has grown to be the largest and 
most important enterprise of its kind at Redwood City. He takes loyal 
interest in all things touching the welfare of his native county and home 
city, and though liberal and public-spirited he has manifested no desire for 
political preferment or public office of any kind. He is fond of outdoor 
sports, esi>ecially hunting, and one of his hobbies is duck hunting, in which 
invigorating sjwrt he has made an excellent record year after year. He is 
a i>ast grand trustee of the l-'raternal Order of Eagles, and is affiliated 
also with the Benevolent and Proctective Order of Elks and the Native 
Sons of the Golden West. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 385 

Christian John Bauer was an ambitious German youth of eighteen 
vears when he came to San Francisco, about the year 1866. and in his 
initial activities he was somewhat handicapped by reason of the fact that 
at the time of his arrival he was utterly unfamiliar with the English 
language, in which he could not speak a single sentence. His alert mind 
soon enabled him to o\erconie this difficulty in large measure, and in the 
passing years he proved his resourcefulness and his sterling integrity by 
productive activities that brought to him prosperity. He was for many 
years successfully engaged in the restaurant business in San Francisco, 
and was one of the prominent and popular representatives of this line of 
enterprise at the time of his death, December 31, 1913. 

]Mr. Bauer was born in Baden, (jermany, in 1848, a son of Christian 
John Bauer, Sr., and Barbara (Zimmerman) Bauer, the father having 
been a farmer in that section of Germany. Of the other three children 
in the family it may here be recorded that Ludwig is a resident of San 
Jose, California, and that Elizabeth and August are deceased. The sub- 
ject of this memoir profited by the advantages of the excellent schools of 
his native land, and, as above noted, he was eighteen years of age when 
he established his residence in San Francisco. For two years he was here 
employed in connection with the dairy business conducted by George 
Hartman, and after he had so carefully saved his earnings as to be in 
possession of $4,000 he engaged in the dairy industry for himself. He 
continued his successful operation in this business during a period of ten 
years, and thereafter he continued successfully in the cafe or restaurant 
business during the remainder of his long and worthy career. His per- 
sonality gained to him jxjpular confidence and good will, and he was one 
of the substantial citizens of San Francisco at the time of his death. 

On the 24th of October, 1876, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Bauer and Miss Amelia Sahling, who still resides in San Francisco 
and who is now the wife of C. A. Lea Vine. Louis Bernard, the only 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Bauer, is deceased. 

Henry J. Curry has not found it necessary to go outside the borders 
of his native county to find a stage for .successful business activity, and he 
is one of the progressive and influential citizens and men of affairs in 
Contra Costa County, where he is the owner of a large amount of valuable 
real estate and is president of the El Cerrito Land &: Improvement Companv, 
in the organization of which he played a large part. He was one of the 
organizers also of the Sunset View Cemetery Association, which has 
brought about the platting and development of the beautiful Sunset View 
Cemetery at Berkeley, he being the vice president of this association. He 
is established in the undertaking business in the City of Martinez, and now 
has the distinction of being, in matter of consecutive indentification with the 
business, the oldest funeral director in his native county. 

Mr. Curry was born at Clayton, Contra Costa County, June 19. 1865, 
a son of the late James R. and Ellen (Callahan) Curry, both of whom 
were residents of this county at the time of their death. Tames R. Curry 



386 THE SAX FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

was born in Jackson County, Missouri, and was little more than a boy when 
he gained pioneer honors in California, he having made the journey across 
the plains and having early established himself in the livery business at 
Clajlon, besides which he ran the first stage from Antioch to Oakland. 
It was in the '50s that he was thus engaged, and he had the characteristics 
that made him fully able to cope with difficulties and emergencies at a period 
when law and order here were in the making. He was a man of the 
picturesque pioneer type, determined, resourceful and self-reliant, and he 
so ordered his course as ever to merit and receive the confidence and 
respect of his fellow men. He finally disposed of his property and business 
interests at Clayton, moved to Martinez, the county seat, and here lived 
retired until his death in 1908, at the age of seventy-two years. He was 
a scion of an old American family of Scotch-Irish lineage, and his wife 
was born in Ireland, she having been young at the time of her parents' 
immigration to the United States. In addition to Henry J., of this review, 
these honored pioneers are survived also by three other sons : Charles E., 
who served as auditor of Contra Costa County, is now living retired, in 
the City of Portland, Oregon ; Bert is engaged in the undertaking business 
at Richmond, Contra Costa County; and Thomas Reuben is jxjstmaster at 
El Cerrito, this county, where also he is engaged in the mercantile business. 

The public schools of Clayton afforded Henry J. Curry his youthful 
education, and in 1883 he began driving the stage between Clayton and 
Martinez, a distance of fourteen miles, his resjx)nsibilities including also the 
transporting of mail and express, .-\fter having been thus engaged two 
and one-half years he established himself in the livery business at Martinez. 
He continued this enterprise until 1898. and in the meanwhile, in 1892, he 
was elected county coroner, an oftice of which he continued the efficient 
incumbent during a period of sixteen years, within which he was on two 
occasions elected to this position as the only successful candidate on the 
ticket of the democratic party in the county. Since 1898 he has continued 
as one of the successful representatives of the undertaking business in 
Contra Costa County. His original undertaking establishment, at Point 
Richmond, he eventually turned over to his lirother Bert, who still conducts 
the same, and he continued his undertaking business at Martinez. In 1913 
he here erected the fine modern building in which his business is conducted, 
the structure having been built at a cost of $40,000. On the site of the 
building he owns half a block of land, and at the time of this writing, in the 
autumn of 1923, he is erecting a beautiful chaj^l as an adjunct of his 
undertaking business, this chapel being in its design, equipment and apiMiint- 
ments of the most modern and consistent type. One of the finest residence 
properties in Contra Costa County is that owned and occupied by Mr. 
Curry and his family, near the courthouse at Martinez, and this home is 
pointed out as one of the show places of the county. 

Mr. Curry has been signally liberal and progressive as a citizen, and 
large and well earned success has attended his business activities. He gave 
many years of service as president of the Contra Costa County .Xgricultural 
Societv. and retained this position until the society ceased to hold its annual 



THE SAN* FRANCISCO BAY REGION 389 

fairs. Mr. Curry is now the owner of the famous John Muir homestead 
at Alhambra Valley, Contra Costa County, this property including five acres 
of ground and the beautiful old house, which was erected at a cost of 
$26,000. 

For more than a quarter of a century Mr. Curry has been affiliated 
with Oakland Lodge No. 171, Benexolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
at Martinez he maintains aftiliation with the I. D. E. S., and at Pinola 
with the U. P. E. C. He has been a leader in the councils and campaign 
work of the democratic party in California, was for several years a 
member of its State Central Committee, and was for twenty-five years 
chairman of the Democratic County Committee of Contra Costa County. 
Before the adoption of the direct primary system in elections he was 
a delegate to the county and state conventions of his party with almost 
uninterrupted regularity. 

January 1, 1890, recorded the marriage of Mr. Curry and Miss Mollie 
K. Kelly, who was born and reared at Martinez, a daughter of James R. 
Kelly, long in service as a member of the county board of supervisors. 
Mrs. Curry is a member of the California State Federation of Woman's 
Clubs, and is president of the Woman's Improvement Club of Martinez. 
Her sister, Miss Alice E. Kelly, is principal of the Martinez grammar 
school. 

Edward Fitzm.xurice. Early records of San Francisco show that 
one of the men largely responsible for much of the upbuilding of the city 
was Edward Fitzmaurice, one of its successful merchants, and a citizen of 
high repute. He was born in County Kerry, Ireland, in 1837, a son of 
Garrett and Bridget Fitzmaurice. Edward came to the United States in 
1852, and after one year's stay in San Francisco went to Benicia and later 
to reside permanently in the vicinity of Vallejo, of which, with General 
Vallejo and others, he was one of the founders. He then sent to Ireland 
for his parents and two brothers. Edward Fitzmaurice was educated in 
church schools and college, and was given special training on the violin. 
He became a pioneer merchant of Vallejo. and made the first contract to 
supply, during the regime of Admiral Farragut, the Government at Mare 
Island with its meats, and this contract he continued for many years, be- 
sides holding other ■ Government contracts of importance. He invested 
largely in real estate there and at San Francisco, and was a man of large 
means. A staunch democrat, he gave his party a loyal su]>port and was 
always interested in politics. He affiliated with all church people, but 
adhered in faith to the Catholic Church. 

Edward Fitzmaurice married in New York Hannah Holland, a daugh- 
ter of Martha and John Holland. Mr. Holland was a cattle raiser upon a 
large scale. Mr. and Mrs. Fitzmaurice became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Annie, who married E. J. Brown, both of whom died, leav- 
ing three sons and one daughter; Martha, who married John R. Hanifv. 
mentioned below ; and five who are deceased. Both Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Fitzmaurice were sjxired to their children into a rijie old age. she dying at 



390 THE SAX FRAX'CISCO BAY REGION 

the age of sixty-five years, and he when he was seventy-three. They were 
still living at Vallejo at the time of their deaths. 

John Ryder Hanify lived about forty-eight years in the San Francisco 
Bay district. He was born in New York State in 1862, and was about 
fourteen years of age when he came to California, after having finished 
his education in a boys' school. He always regarded it as part of his sin- 
gular good fortune to have found employment as an office boy, at $4 a 
week, with the lumber firm of A. D. JNIoore & Company. Mr. Moore, a 
university graduate and a gentleman of high caliber, with the bookkeeper 
were the only other two people in the office. At the age of seventeen 
John R. Hanify was getting $60 a month. Soon afterward occurred a 
tragic taking off of the bookkeeper, and young Hanify succeeded to his 
place and by a resourcefulness that characterized him always, he managed 
to fill the position creditably. From that he was advanced to general man- 
ager. The firm established a number of lumber yards at Stockton and 
at points in the San Joaquin Valley, and the business of the home office 
was to keep the yards supplied with stock shipped in from Washington, 
Oregon and California mills. By 1897 Mr. Hanify was getting a salary 
of $600 a month and an interest in the profits. In that year he resigned 
to engage in business for himself as an agent for lumber manufacturers, 
and during the next twenty-five years he built a business as a wholesaler 
in which he controlled a fleet of steam schooners and sailing vessels ply- 
ing between Puget Sound and various Northern and Southern California 
ports and also to foreign ports, and his interests also included several mills 
in the Redwood timber district of California. Air. Hanify for a number 
of years ranked as one of the wealthiest captains of industr\- on the coast, 
and his place of business on Market Street was only a block away from 
the office where he secured his first job at $4 a week. 

Mr. Hanify was a member of the Chamber of Commerce, serving a 
number of years on its committee of appeals, and was an active member 
of the Pacific Union Club, Bohemian Club, Olympic Club and the San 
Francisco and Corinthian Yacht clubs. He was one of the most enthusi- 
astic yachtsmen on the coast. With his sloop \\'estward he won the King 
George Cup during the Panama-Pacific Exposition, and with his boats he 
was winner of many other trophies, yacht racing having been the sport 
which appealed to him most from boyhood up. 

Mrs. John R. Hanify, whose maiden name was Martha Fitz- 
maurice, was born in the City of Vallejo, December 10. 1860. She was 
educated at boarding school, and was graduated with honors in 1876. She 
was married in her native citv. May 10, 1881, to John R. "Hanifv, who 
rccentlv lost his life in a yachting accident on San Francisco Bay. May 6. 
1922. He was a man who stood very high in liusiness circles. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hanify had no children. 

Coming of a family always interested in civic aflfairs. Mrs. Hanify 
has used her large means and leisure to promote different worthy 
objects. Prior to the war of this country with Spain she had become 
interested in the work of the American Red Cross. .After the fire and 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 393 

earthquake in San Francisco the Red Cross became nationalized, and 
chapters were formed, the first one being organized in Marin County by 
.Mrs. Hanifv, who was chairman of the society. Mrs. Hanify has been 
very zealous in behalf of women's clubs, and assisted in building the first 
woman's club house in the city. She was a member of the Ladies' Board 
of the Panama-Pacific Exposition. She also belongs to the California 
Club, the Sorosis Club, the Woman's Athletic Club, the San Francisco 
Musical Club, and the Woman's Catholic Council, and is active in pro- 
moting such projects as the Children's Aid, which furnishes the services 
of hospital clinics to the Infant Shelter and other charitable institutions 
for the poor. In these various organizations she finds much to interest 
her and awaken her sympathies, but her large benefactions are not con- 
fined to them by any manner of means. She feels that her wealth is a 
sacred trust and that it is her duty as a good citizen and Christian to 
alleviate the suffering of those less fortunate than she, and in so doing 
she believes she is carrying out the wishes of her parents and husband. 
Few ladies of San Francisco stand any higher in public regard than she, 
and she has won this commendation many times over by her charities and 
public spirit. 

Joseph Russell Knowl-^nd. One of the best known figures in the 
political and public life of the Bay district during the past quarter of a 
century has been Joseph Russell Knowland of Oakland, banker, publisher 
and former congressman. He was born in Alameda, California. August 5, 
1873, son of Joseph and Hannah (Bailey) Knowland. His father was an 
earlv settler in California, for many years engaged in the lumber business 
on the Pacific coast. Joseph R. Knowland attended public schools, finish- 
ing his education in the University of the Pacific. He then became associ- 
ated with his father in his lumber and shipping interests, and for many 
years has had important business affiliations as an executive in manufac- 
turing, public utility and banking institutions. He is president of the 
Bank of Alameda, and a director of the First National Bank and American 
Bank of Oakland. 

For several vears he has been president and pulilisher of the Oakland 
Tribune. He has taken a continuous interest in public affairs since early 
manhood. At the age of twenty-five he was elected to the Assembly from 
the Forty-seventh District, serving in the sessions of 1899-1900, and 
was reelected for a second term. In 1902 he was elected a member of 
the State Senate, serving a term on the committee on banking. In 1904, 
in the Fifty-eighth Congress, he was nominated to fill out the unexpired 
term of Victor H. Aletcalf. who had become secretary of commerce and 
labor in President Roosevelt's office cabinet. He was also elected to the 
full term of the Fifty-ninth Congress, and continued to represent the 
Sixth California District in Congress until 1915. He became a member 
of the committee on the Interstate and Foreign Commerce, and was 
esf)eciallv active in matters affecting the Panama Canal. In 1914 he was 
republican nominee for the United States Senate. 



394 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Mr. Knowland is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Alason, also 
belongs to the Consistory and Mystic Shrine, and for eight )-ears served 
as grand officer of the Native Sons of the Golden West. 

For a number of years he has interested himself in the movement to 
preserve historic landmarks in California, becoming president of the 
California Landmark League. He married, April 2, 1894, Miss EUie J. 
Fife, of Tacoma, Washington, who died in July, 1908, leaving three 
children. On September 28, 1909, Mr. Knowland married Emelyn S. 
West, of Virginia. 

George Hendry Kellogg was a California pioneer, and for many 
years identified with San Francisco business. 

He was a native of Massachusetts, and lived for a number of years at 
Sheffield in that state. He married Katherine D. Flint, of North Reading, 
Massachusetts. In 1850 they came to California and established their 
home at San Francisco, but subsequently moved to Redwood City, where 
they lived until 1866. On his return to San Francisco Mr. Kellogg became 
a partner in the firm of Flint, Peabody & Company, and was actively asso- 
ciated with that business organization for many years. He was a faithful 
member of the First Congregational Church. 

Kate, the only daughter of George H. Kellogg and wife, was reared 
in San Francisco, and in 1866 was married to Mr. Joseph Hutchinson. 
Her home is at 2701 Green Street in San Francisco. Her husband's 
father was James Sloan Hutchinson, who came to California in 184'), and 
was conspicuously successful in the mining world. He was also interested 
in the old Sather Banking Company. One of his active interests outside 
of business was his memliership and work in the Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals. 

Mrs. Joseph Hutchinson became a successful lawyer at Palo Alto. 
She has three children : Joseph Kellogg, who is now a partner in the law 
firm of Knight, Boland, Hutchinson & Christian at San Francisco, and 
married Katherine Hooj^er ; Katherine Hutchinson, wife of E. H. Post, 
and James Sloan Hutchinson. 

Peter Connolly has been a resident of California nearly half a 
century, and for many years was engaged in his business as a landscape 
architect, doing much of the fine work in the improvement of homes 
in and around San Francisco. 

Mr. Connolly was past eighty years of age when he passed away on 
April 26, 1924. He was liorn in Comity Galway, Ireland, and had very 
few educational opiXDrtunities. As a young man he went to England 
and served an apprenticeship as a landscaj)e gardener there. On com- 
ing to America he lived for a short time in Pennsylvania, and in 1875 
came to California. Mr. Connolly's services were in great demand among 
property owners and also in public work. For some time liis work was 
done in Menlow Park, and subsequently he laid out many of the fine 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 395 

homes in and around San Francisco. Many years ago he built the 
home in the city where he Hved. 

Mr. Connolly and Miss Julia Egan married at St. Mary's Cathedral 
in San Francisco. She was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, and died July 
27 , 1906. Three children were born to their marriage and two are now 
living. Mary C. is the wife of Edwin C. Mills, and their children are 
Jack Raner Clark and Juliette Frances Clark. The son, Laurence 
J. Connolly, is a carpenter of Stanford University, and is married and 
has one child, Isabelle. Mr. Connolly and family are Catholics, and he 
has always voted as a democrat. 

M. Earl Cummixgs. One of the prominent figures in the art world 
in California, Melvin Earl Cummings, pursued his early studies in San 
Francisco, continued his learning abroad, and during the period of his 
mature work as a sculptor has executed some of the best known pictures 
and designs in marble and bronze in and around San Francisco. 

He was born at Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13, 1876, son of 
M. E. and Ardelle (Clawson) Cummings. His father was a banker, 
and in 1886 located in San Francisco. M. Earl Cummings attended public 
schools in Salt Lake City, including the Salt Lake Business College, was 
a pupil in an academy at Logan, Utah, and in San Francisco pursued 
the study of art in the Mark Hopkins Art Institute. He went abroad, 
remaining three years at Paris, and was a pupil of Douglas Tilden and 
also studied under Louis Nole and Mercia, both prominent features in 
the Beaux Art School at Paris. 

Since returning to America Mr. Cummings has made San Francisco 
his home. He has modeled two national monuments : The Float Monu- 
ment at Monterey and the Burns Monument in Golden Gate Park. Some 
of the most impressive sculptured pieces in Golden Gate Park represent 
his art. He modeled the figure of Rubin Lloyd, and designed and mod- 
eled the famous "Pool of Enchantment," situated in front of the main 
entrance to the De Young Museum. The figures in the pool are of 
bronze. He was sculptor of the fountain at Washington Square and 
the fountain in front of the music stand in the park. 

Many deserved honors have been conferred upon him. He is now 
one of the park commissioners of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, and for eighteen years has held a professorship in the University 
of California. He is an honorary member of the Bohemian Club and 
the Pacific Union Club, and is a member of the' Academy of Science. 
His home is at 3966 Clay Street. 

On June 7, 1905. Mr. Cummings married ^liss Guadalupe Rivas. Her 
father. Dr. Isaac Rivas. born at Durango, Mexico, came to California 
in 1869 as consul from Mexico, and for many years practiced his pro- 
fession as a physician and surgeon with distinguished success. He was 
one of the pioneer memliers of the Bohemian Club, joining in 1873. 
Doctor Rivas died in 1907. His charming daughter is a native San 



396 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Franciscan. Mr. and Mrs. Cummings had two children: Ramsdel, born 
in 1908, and Christine, born in 1909. 

Gilbert James Vax Vlack, M. D., came to San Francisco in the 
year 1869, and his exceptional professional ability and gracious person- 
ality gained and retained to him secure vantage-place as one of the repre- 
sentative physicians and surgeons of the city, where he built up a large 
practice of general order and where he was the physician who opened 
the first free clinic in the city — a work that gave evidence of his abiding 
liuman sympathy and his fine sense of professional stewardship. Doctor 
Van Vlack was in the very prime of his life at the time of his death, 
which occurred January 27, 1883. 

Doctor Van Vlack, whose paternal lineage traced back to staunch 
Holland Dutch origin, as the name indicates, was born in the Province 
of Ontario, Canada, in the year 1843, and was a son of Elias and Sarah 
(Johnson) Van Vlack. Elias Van Vlack was born in Poughkeepsie, 

New York, in 1812, and was a son of and Elizabeth (Pryme) 

Van Vlack, the latter a native of Virginia. The other four children 
of Elias and Sarah Van Vlack were John, David, George and William. 
The father was a lawyer of ability, and was long engaged in the practice 
of his profession in the Province of Ontario. He was venerable in 
vears at the time of his death, in 1896, and both he and his wife 
remained in Ontario until their. deaths. 

Doctor Van Vlack received excellent educational advantages as a 
boy and youth, and in preparation for the work of his chosen pro- 
fession he entered the celebrated ^IcGill University, in the medical 
college of which great Canadian institution he was duly graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine and Surgery — besides which he later 
gained a fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
the City of Edinburgh, Scotland. After his graduation he further forti- 
fied himself by the experience which he gained in one year of con- 
nection with Bellevue Hospital, New York City, and in 1869, as pre- 
viouslv noted, he established himself in practice in San Francisco, his 
untimely and lamented death having terminated his able service about 
fourteen vears later — January 27, 1883. The Doctor became an active 
and valued member of the California State Medical Society, and was 
identified also with the American Medical Association. He was a Knight 
Templar Mason. 

In the year 1870 was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Van Vlack 
and Miss Katherine Severio, who survived him a term of years. Of 
the two children the firstborn was Herbert James, who became a talented 
and successful architect and who was a resident of San Francisco at 
the time of his death. Isabelle is the wife of James Hall Bishop, of 
San Francisco. 

James H. Bishop was born in San Francisco, February 14, 1873, a 
son of Thomas Benton Bishop and Josephine Hall Bishop. T. B. Bishop 
was an eminent lawyer and came to San Francisco in the '60s, being 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 399 

a member of the firm of Garher, Boalt &• Bishop. This firm was par- 
ticularly prominent in law practice, and handled the largest civil cases 
in San Francisco. Mr. Bishop was one of the owners of the famous 
old paper, Alta California. Mrs. Bishop was a daughter of Dr. James 
Hall, one of the greatest geologists in the world. He was president of 
the Geological Society of America and was a member of the Pacific 
and the Union clubs before their consolidation as the Pacific Union 
Club. He and his daughter and two eldest sons, James and Tom, in 
1897 were special guests of the Czar of Russia in a trip all over 
Russia and Siberia. Mr. Bishop, who died February 7, 1906, was the 
father of four children: James, Thomas Porter (deceased), and twins, 
Frank and Edward, the latter of whom is deceased. 

James Bishop graduated Bachelor of Arts from the University of 
California with the class of 1898 and from Hastings Law College Doctor 
of Laws in May, 1901. He was admitted to practice law, but never 
followed that profession, as he preferred a business life and is now 
president of the T. B. Bishop Company of San Francisco. May 29, 
1901, he married Miss Isabelle Van Vlack, and they are the parents of 
two children : James Hall Bishop, who is attending Stanford University, 
and Isabelle, a graduate of Miss Burke's school. Mrs. Bishop is a 
charter member of the Francisco Club and the Woman's Athletic Club ; 
a memlier of the San Francisco Golf and Country Club, and for many 
years was a member of the Century Club. 

George Atherton, who died in 1887, when about forty years of 
age, passed virtually his entire life in San Francisco, where his father 
established the family home in the memorable year 1849, which marked 
the gold rush to California. His father acquired a large grant of land 
from the Spanish government, and named it Valparaiso Park. A con- 
siderable ]X)rtion of the tract is now included in beautiful Atherton 
Township in San Mateo County, a locality named in honor of George 
Atherton's father. He was of English ancestry, and became a resident 
of Chili, South America, where was solemnized his marriage to a young 
Spanish woman of much charm and patrician lineage. Miss Dominiga Goni. 
On coming from Chili to California the father became one of the pioneer 
representatives of real estate enterprise in San Francisco. He and his 
wife passed the remainder of their lives in San Francisco and Atherton. 
Their other children besides George were: Alejandra. Elena, Frank, Isa- 
bell, Faxon and Frank; Florence, the only living child, is the wife of 
Edward L. Eyre. 

George Atherton was born in Chili, and wa's a child at the time 
the family moved to San Francisco, where he was reared and educated 
and where he was long and actively identified with business and civic 
aflfairs as a citizen of prominence and influence. 

George Atherton died at sea on his way to Valparaiso, Chili, on the 
Chilean man-of-war. Pilcomano, whose admiral and commander, Goni, 
was a cousin of Mr. Atherton. 



400 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

George Atherton married Miss Gertrude Horn, whose career as a 
distinguished woman of American letters is briefly given in the following 
sketch. To their marriage were born two children, George, now deceased, 
and Muriel, the wife of Albert B. Russell, of San Francisco. 

Gertrude Athej<ton, whose novels and other literary work have 
brought her an international reputation, was born in San Francisco, Octo- 
ber 30, 1857, a daughter of Thomas L. and Gertrude (Franklin) Horn, 
and a great-grandniece of Benjamin Franklin. She was educated in 
private schools and by private teachers, and married George H. Bowen 
Atherton, of Menlo Park, California, whose career is given in the preceding 
sketch. 

Gertrude Atherton has lived abroad much of the time since her hus- 
band's death. Her best known books are : "The Doomswoman," "A 
Whirl Asunder," "Patience Sparhawk and Her Times," "His Fortunate 
Grace," "American Wives and English Husbands," "The Calif ornians," 
"A Daughter of the Vine," "The Valiant Runaways," "Senator North," 
"The Aristocrats," "The Conqueror," "The Splendid Idle Forties," "A 
Few of Hamilton's Letters," "Rulers of Kings," "The Bell in the Fog," 
"The Traveling Thirds," "Rezanov," "Ancestors," "The Gorgeous Isle," 
"Tower of Ivory," "Julia France and Her Times," "Perch of the Devil," 
"California — An Intimate History," "Before the Gringo Came," "Mrs. 
Balfame," "The Living Present," "The White Morning," "The Ava- 
lanche," "Sisters in Law," and "Black Oxen." 

George Whittell, whose death occurred March 26, 1922, was for 
many years a prominent business man and capitalist of San Franci.sco, 
with large interests in real estate and the owner of much valuable prop- 
erty. He was a director and stockholder in the Associated Oil Company 
of California, as well as in many banking and financial institutions. 

He was born January 29, 1849, at Mount Vernon, New York, the 
son of Hugh and Adeline (Duncombe) Whittell. His father had come 
to California as early as 1848, and had some ex|)erience in mining ojjera- 
tions, but being possessed of indejiendent financial resources, he was not 
especially identified with the pioneer activities of California, sjjending 
much of his time in travel both in this country and abroad. 

The late George Whittell ac{|uired his education in Paris. The fam- 
ily lived in France and other European countries for a number of years. 
When a young man he came to California and associated himself with 
Murphy, Grant & Company of San I'Vancisco. Later he continued inde- 
pendently and became a jirominent figure in realty affairs. George 
Whittell was known and greatly respected for his high commercial integ- 
rity and business judgment. He was also closely identified with and 
highly esteemed in the social life of San Francisco. 

For fifteen years he was an officer of the Militia of California, was a 
republican in politics and a Catholic in religion. He was a member of 
the Pacific-Union, University, and Hurlingamc clubs, also a member of 
the Metropolitan clubs of New York and Washington, 




^^^ h^f&jgf^^ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 403 

At Dresden, in 1879, he married JMiss Anna Luning, daughter of 
Nicholas and Ellen (Dempsey) Luning. 

Since the death of her husband Mrs. W'hittell continues to make her 
home in San Francisco. There are two sons, George Whittell, Jr., and 
Alfred Whittell, an adopted son. 

George Whittell, Jr., a son of the late San Francisco real estate 
dealer and owner, George Whittell, Sr., was born in San Francisco, in 
1882. He was liberally educated, and his business career has been iden- 
tified with his father's interests. He is now one of the executors of the 
Whittell estate. 

During the World war he was with the Italian Red Cross, and was 
decorated in recognition of his services. At the close of the war he 
returned to San Francisco and resumed his work with the Whittell inter- 
ests. While in France during the war period he met a charming Parisian 
girl, Miss Elia Pascal, and they were married in Paris, December 22, 1919. 
George Whittell takes a great interest in sports. He is owner of a 145- 
foot yacht, the Elia, equipped with twin Diesel engines. He is a member 
of the San Francisco Yacht Club, the Burlingame Club, the Menlo Coun- 
try Club and the Metropolitan Club of New York. 

His associate e.xecutor of the Whittell estate is Alfred WHiittell, who 
was born at San Francisco. January 15, 1892. He finished an engineer- 
ing course in Yale University, graduating with the class of 1914 and the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. He is also a graduate of the Penn- 
sylvania Military College of Chester, Pennsylvania, where the degree of 
Civil Engineer was conferred. After graduating he was associated with 
the Standard Oil Company in an engineering capacity until the outbreak 
of the war. 

Enlisting, he was made lieutenant in the Signal Corps of the Ninety- 
first Division, and saw active service in France during the struggles of 
the Argonne, St. Mihiel and in several engagements in Belgium. He 
was honorably discharged April 7, 1919, with the commission of lieu- 
tenant. Since his return to this country he has devoted his entire time 
to the management of the \\'hittell interests. His diversions are golf, 
hunting and fishing. Alfred Whittell is a member of Islam Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at San Francisco, and belongs to both the York and 
Scottish Rite bodies of Masonry. He is a member of the Pacific Union 
Club, the University Club, the Burlingame Club, the Menlo Country Club, 
the Olympic Club and the Yale Club of New York. 

On August 19, 1917, at San Francisco, he married Miss Louisa Kaye. 
She was born in Bakersfield, California, daughter of a prominent attor- 
ney of that city, W. \\'. Kaye. Their two children are Alfred, Jr., and 
Marie Louise Whittell. 

Charles William Slack was born at Milroy, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 12, 1858. He graduated from the University of California in 1879, 
with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; graduated from Hastings 



404 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

College of the Law in 1882, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws; was 
appointed a judge of the Superior Court, San Francisco, in 1890, was 
elected for the full term of six years in 1892, and resigned in 1898. He 
has practiced his profession in San Francisco since his resignation. He 
was a regent of the University of California from 1894 to 1911, was 
for several years a professor of law and dean of the faculty in Hastings 
College of the Law. Has been a director of Hastings College of the Law 
since 1903, and vice president of the board of directors since 1918. 

Charles Henry Crocker is a native son who has been a prominent 
figure in connection with the industrial and commercial life and civic 
affairs of California, and is one of the influential and public-spirited cit- 
izens of San Francisco. 

Mr. Crocker was born at Sacramento, this state, August 29, 1865, a 
son of Henry S. and Clara Ellen (Swinerton) Crocker. His early educa- 
tion included a three years' course in the University of California, and he 
is now president of the H. S. Crocker Company, wholesale stationers and 
printers, of which he had previously been the treasurer. He is president 
of the Alameda Sugar Company, and is vice president of the American 
National Bank, the Union Sugar Company, Ltd., and in the World war 
l^eriod he served as lieutenant commander of the LTnited States Naval 
Reserve Corps. He is a republican, and has membership in the Bohemian, 
Press, Commercial, Olympic, Country and Pacific Motor Boat clubs. 

In 1905 Mr. Crocker married Miss Carlotta L. Steiner, of Elkhart. 
Indiana. 

John Sylvester Drum, a prominent representative of banking enter- 
prise in the San Francisco Bay region, was born at Oakland, California, 
April 16, 1872, a son of John Sylvester and Sarah Jane (Gass) Drum. 
After a course in St. Ignatius College, San Francisco, he attended the 
Hastings College of Law, the law school of the University of California, 
and was graduated therein as a member of the class of 1804, with attendant 
admission to the California iiar. He was engaged in the practice of law 
in San Francisco until l'XD9. Mr. Drum was president of the Savings 
Union Bank & Trust Company from 1910 until its consolidation with the 
Mercantile Trust Company, in 1920, and of the latter he is now the presi- 
dent. He is a director of the Pacific Gas & Electric Comixmy, the Cali- 
fornia Gas & Electric Corporation, the San Francisco Gas & Electric Coni- 
panv, the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railways, the East Bay Water 
Company, the California Pacific Title Insurance Comjwny, and the Vose- 
niite Valley Railroad Company. 

In the World war period Mr. Drum served as Northern California 
state director for war savings stamps, besides having been appointed, by 
President Wilson, a member of the capital issues commission, under the 
War Finance Corjxjration act. He was president of the American Bank- 
ers Association in 1920-1921. 

Mr. Drum is a democrat in ixjlitical allegiance, is a communicant of 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 405 

the Catholic Church, ami has membership in Pacific Union, University, 
Olympic, and Burlingame Country clubs. In 1908 he married Miss Georgia 
A. Spieker, of San Francisco. 

Samuel Morgan Shortridge, representative of California in the 
United States Senate, 1921-1927, has been for forty years engaged in the 
practice of law in the City of San Francisco. 

Senator Shortridge was born at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, August 3, 
1861, a son of Rev. Elias \V. and Tabitha C. Shortridge. He was admitted 
to the California bar in 1884 and has since been established in the practice 
of his profession in the City of San F"rancisco, besides having long been 
influential in the jxjlitical affairs of the state. The senator was a presi- 
dential elector from California in 1884, 1900 and 1908. He is affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity, the Elks and the Red Men, and is a member 
of various representative clubs, including the Pacific Union, Union League, 
Commonwealth, Press, Masonic, Menlo Country, and Bohemian. 

In 1889 occurred the marriage of Senator Shortridge to Miss Laura 
Gashweiler, of San Francisco. 

LuciEN Shaw, chief justice of the California Supreme Court, was 
born at Vevay, Indiana. March 1, 1845, a son of William and Linda Reus 
Shaw. In 1869 he received from the Indianapolis Law College the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and thereafter he was engaged in practice at Bloom- 
field, Indiana, until 1883. He then came to California and engaged in 
practice at Fresno. In 1886 he removed to Los Angeles, and there he 
was judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles Countj' during the period 
of 1889-1902. Since 1903 he has been a member of the California 
Supreme Court, of which he was made the chief justice in 1921. He has 
served as president of the Los Angeles Bar Association, is a republican in 
jxilitics. and he maintains an office in the City of San Francisco, with an 
attractive home at Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles County. In 1873 was 
solemnized the marriage of Judge Shaw to Miss Hannah J. Hartley, of 
Raisin Center, Michigan. 

William Cary Van Fleet has served since the spring of 1907 as 
judge of the United States District Court of the Northern District of 
California, and had previously been a justice of the California Supreme 
Court. 

Judge Van Fleet was born at Maumee City, Ohio, March 24, 1852, 
and his early education was received in public and private schools. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1873, was assistant district attorney of Sacra- 
mento County, California, in 1878-1879, and in 1881-1882 he was a mem- 
ber of the Lower House of the California Legislature. He was a member 
of the board of directors of the state prison in 1883-1884, and thereafter 
served on the bench of the Suj^erior Court until 1892, when he resigned. 
He was a justice of the State Supreme Court in the period of 1894-1899, 
and has been judge of the United States District Court of the Northern 



406 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

District of California since April 2, 1907. He was a member of the Cali- 
fornia Code Commission, 1899-1903, and a member of the republican 
national committee, 1900-1904. He has served as a trustee of the Cali- 
fornia State Library, and is a life trustee of Hastings College of Law, 
University of California. He is a member of the Pacific Union Club and 
the San Francisco Golf and Country clubs, and at Sacramento has inem- 
bership in the Sutter Club. The judge is a member of the vestry of 
St. Luke's Church, Protestant Episcopal, in his home city of San Fran- 
cisco. In 1877 Judge Van Fleet wedded Mary Isabella Carey, whose death 
occurred in the following year. In 1887 was solemnized his marriage to 
Elizabeth Eldridge Crocker. 

Andrew Jackson Moulder came to California as a pioneer of the 
year 1850, and he wrote his name indelibly on the history of the state 
and especially that of his home city of San Francisco. A man of high 
ideals and broad intellectual ken he had much of leadership in popular 
sentiment and action, and he was esi^ecially prominent in formulating 
and advancing the educational system of the young commonwealth in 
the early days. 

Named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson, in whose administration 
as president of the United States the father of Mr. Moulder served as 
comptroller of the currency, the subject of this memoir was born in 
the City of Washington, D. C, on the 7th of March, 1825, the youngest 
of the thirteen children of Hon. John N. and Mary (Uhler) Moulder, 
he having been an infant at the time of his mother's death, February 13, 
1826, and but fourteen years old at the time of his father's death, 
January 7, 1839. Though a scion of a family of social distinction and 
civic influence, the orphaned boy was left with virtually no patrimony, 
but profited well by the educational advantages that were his, including 
a brief course in Columbia College (now George Washington University) 
at Washington and those of the admirable school conducted by the great 
and good Benjamin Hollowell at Alexandria, Virginia, this preceptor 
having been one of the leading educators of that period. -As a youth 
Mr. Moulder made an excellent record of achievement as a teacher in 
the schools of Fauquier County, Virginia, where lie was thus engaged 
for a period of seven years. Immediately after his arriwal in .San Fran- 
cisco, in 1850, he took an editorial jxisition with the San Francisco Herald, 
the leading daily i)ai)er of the day in this city, his salary having been 
$4,500 annually. In 1854 he was elected to the office of city comptroller, 
and so careful and efficient was his administration that at the expiration 
of his first term he was reelected, thus serving two consecutive terms. 
Under the resourceful planning and direction of Mr. Moulder was 
organized and established the first state normal school of California, he 
having been at the time state suiK'rintcndent of public instruction, an 
office to which he was elected in 1857, his name meriting a prominent 
and honorable place in connection with the history of eilucational work 
and service in this now great and favored commonwealth. In 1808, 




^iL^^l^L^Ci/^ . /?L,n^^^l£-t, 



THE SAN I'RANCISCO BAY REGION 409 

unilcr the administration of Governor Ilaight, Mr. Moulder was appointed 
a nicnil)cr of tiie I'oanl of I'legents of the University of California, and 
in 1880 he was appointed a trustee of the Free Puhlic Lilorary of San 
Francisco. As one of the early menihers of the Golden Gate Park 
Commission his service was a constructive factor in the development 
of that playground and heauty spot, redeemed from the "sand hills." 

The death of the revered and distinguished pioneer to whom this 
memoir is dedicated occurred on the 4th of October, 1895, and the story 
of his life continues to offer both incentive and inspiration. His widow, 
now venerable in years, still resides in San Francisco, where her circle 
of friends is limited only by that of her acquaintances. 

On the 30th of October, 1867, solemnized the marriage of Mr. Moulder 
anil Miss Louise Piournonville, whose father was a representative physi- 
cian and surgeon in the City of Philadelphia. Of the five children, the 
eldest is Augustus B., who is established in business in San Francisco as 
an imjxjrter and exporter; Louise, is the wife of Harry Rogers Smith, of 
this city; Charlotte is the wife of Charles Carter Nichols, and they likewise 
reside in San Francisco ; Hamilton L. is deceased ; and Andrew Bayard is a 
civil engineer in the service of the Metropolitan Electric (elevated) 
Railroad in the City of Chicago. 

Hiram Warren Johnson has proved one of the most loyal, even as he 
is one of the most distinguished, of the native sons of California, which he 
has represented with great ability in the United States Senate, the while 
his name was one of those most prominently brought forward in connec- 
tion with the repulilican nomination for President of the United States in 
1924. 

Senator Johnson was born at Sacramento, California, September 2, 
1866, and is a son of Grove Laurence and Aimie ( DeMontfredy) Johnson. 
He attended the University of California until he had partially completed 
the work of his junior year, and thereafter he read law in the office of his 
father. He was admitted to the bar in 1888 and thereafter was engaged 
in practice at Sacramento until 1902, when he established his residence in 
San Francisco. Of his great service as one of the prosecutors in the 
celebrated municipal graft cases in San Francisco adequate mention is 
made on other pages of this work. He was governor of California in the 
period from 1911 to I'M 7, and in his second term he resigned the office, 
March 15, 1917. In 1912 he was one of the founders of the progressive 
party, and in that year was the party's nominee for vice president of the 
United States. In 1917 he was' elected to the United States Senate, his 
record of service being now a part of the history of that legislative body. 
Of his prominence as a representative of the progressive .wing of the 
repulilican party and his ai)i)earance as a candidate for nomination for 
the presidency of the United States in 1924 it is not necessary to sf)eak 
in detail in this brief sketch. 



410 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

Senator Johnson is affiliated with the Native Sons of the Golden West 
and also with the Masonic fraternity. The year 1886 recorded his mar- 
riage to Miss Minnie L. McNeal, of Sacramento. 

Elias Jackson Baldwin, who, under the more familiar title of 
"Lucky Baldwin," wrote his name large on the pages of California his- 
tory, and one of his most important achievements was in the establishing 
and developing of the great and splendid Santa Anita Rancho, long one of 
the show places of the Los Angeles region, a beautiful domain that passed 
into the jxjssession of his daughter, Anita M. 

Elias J. (Lucky) Baldwin was born in Butler County, Ohio, April 3, 
1828, and was a representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of 
that state. He was reared on a pioneer farm in Northern Indiana, and 
received good educational advantages. At the age of twenty years he 
married a daughter of Joseph Unruh. In 1846 he engaged in the grocery 
business at Valparaiso, Indiana, and later he opened a hotel and general 
store at New Buffalo, Michigan. Later he conducted a large hotel at 
Racine. Wisconsin. In 1853 he crossed the plains to California, and in 
the early days he became a motivating force in various lines of business 
and industrial enterprise. In the '60s he was one of the most successful 
and influential of speculators who made fortunes in connection with min- 
ing stocks, and his connection with the affairs of the Bank of California 
constitutes an important chapter in the history of financial affairs in Cali- 
fornia. He erected the famous Baldwin Hotel in San Francisco, and he 
gave to San Francisco also one of the finest of its early theater buildings. 
He was one of the greatest of the nation's horsemen, and the American 
turf has had no more ])icturesque figure. He contributed much to civic 
and material development and progress in California, and his name merits 
a place of honor on the pages of the history of this great commonwealth. 
Mr. Baldwin acquired large and valuable projjerty interests, made and 
lost several fortunes, and he was a millionaire at the time of his death, 
which occurred March 1, 1909. 

By his first marriage Mr. Baldwin became the father of two daugh- 
ters, one of whom died in infancy, 'ihe family name of his second wife 
was Cochrane, and for his third wife he wedded Jane Virginia Dexter, 
their only child being Anita. The fourth marriage of Mr. Baldwin was 
with Lillie C. Bennett. 

Peter Ferdinand Rathjens. Though almost a I'jcnnilcss and friend- 
less youth when he arrived in California in 1885, Peter Ferdinand Rath- 
jens has enjoyed a steadily accumulating fortune as a San Francisco busi- 
ness man, and is one of the very prosiK-nius and jxipular citizens here. 

He was born in llokstein, Germany, June 7, 1868, son of William and 
Geshe (Jarr) Rathjens, and is of Danish ancestry. His father was a ship 
carjienter. Peter F. Rathjens was six years old when his mother died and 
seven when his father passed away. An orphan hoy, he worked on a farm 
for his board and clothes and attended public schools more or less reg- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 411 

ularly until he was fifteen. At that a<je he came to the United States, 
landing in New York, and subsequently came to California, reaching Sac- 
ramento March 4. 1885. 

His first employment in the vicinity of Sacramento was on a farm. He 
then went to work in a dairy, milking twenty-five cows, and in 1887, came 
to San Francisco and learned the Initcher's trade. He was employed for a 
time in the Grand Central Market, and in 1891, four years after coming 
to San Francisco, he started a modest enterprise of his own. This was 
the making of sausages. He did all the work himself, and without special 
machinery. While manv notable changes have been made in his liusiness, 
he is still at the original location. He had the satisfaction of seeing his 
enterprise develop and he was proprietor of a prosperous plant with a 
number of employes at the time of the great earthquake and fire of 1906. 
That calamity destroyed his plant, but he was one of the first to rebuild 
in that part of the city. The water company refused to turn on the water 
for him, and consequently he bored a well on his own pro[>erty, striking 
a flow of pure water. He still uses this water supply. Six months after 
the fire Martin Kupfer bought a half interest in the firm, and the business 
is now Rathjens & Kupfer. It is no longer simply a local plant, the 
product being wholesaled and distributed all over California. The average 
daily consumption of the plant is about 900 hogs, made into sausage, boiled 
ham, bacon and similar high class products. 

Mr. Rathjens is also president of the Consumers Yeast Company of 
Oakland, and is a director and vice president of the Franklin Building & 
Loan Association. In 1893 he married ]\Iiss Lizzie Imsick, who was born 
in Hanover, Germany, and was four years of age when brought to America 
by her mother. Mr. and Mrs. Rathjens have two children. Fred was a first 
sergeant during the late war, and is now manager of the Consumers Yeast 
Company. The son Taylor is still in school. Mr. Rathjens is afifiliated 
with Crockett Lodge No. 139, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Cali- 
fornia Commandery. Knights Templar, and the Mystic Shrine, and belongs 
to the Druids No. 139, the 01ym])ic Club and the Sons of Hermann. He 
has been active in republican jxilitics, and has attended a number of con- 
ventions as a delegate. Mr. Rathjens was King of the Schuetzen Verein 
in 1909. This organization was started at San Francisco in 1859. During 
his term of office he gave a banquet on December 1 to celebrate the fiftieth 
anniversary jubilee, and there were 400 members in attendance at the Fair- 
mount Hotel. Mr. Rathjens has been the architect of his own destiny, 
has succeeded in business, is jxapular in commercial and social circles, 
and one of the very solid citizens of the community. 

Hallock Wright is a native son of California, his father having been 
a pioneer, and his own name has been associated prominently with the 
commercial life of San Francisco for many years. He is now an insurance 
broker in the Balboa Building at 593 Market Street, and does an extensive 
business, representing all departments and branches of life, fire and casualty 
insurance. 



412 THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

His father was John H. Wright, who was born at Glastonbury, Massa- 
chusetts, March 4, 1826. He came to California by sailing vessel around 
the Horn, reaching San Francisco June 30, 1849. He was then a young 
man of twenty-three. From 1849 until 1865 he was in the hardware busi- 
ness at Marysville with John V. Hallock. In 1865 he came to San Fran- 
cisco, and was in the hardware business for himself on Montgomery Street, 
under the Masonic Temple, until 1869, his firm being John H. Wright & 
Company. In the latter year he removed to Los Angeles, and was one of 
the early wholesale general merchants of that city, associated with the firm 
of Caswell, Ellis & Wright. Their establishment was located on Los 
Angeles Street. In 1875 the health of John H. Wright failed and he 
retired, and died in 1879. 

He married Ellen McClellan, who had come to California across the 
plains with ox teams. Her father was Michel McClellan, who arrived in 
California at Sutter's Fort, and for many years was a farmer in Najxi 
County. There were fourteen children in the McClellan family. John 
H. Wright and wife had three children, Hallock and Paxton, both of whom 
were born at Marysville, and Elizabeth Helen, who was born at Los 
Angeles. Paxton Wright was born in 1865 and died in 1909, having for 
many years been in the merchandise Ijrokerage business. The daughter, 
Elizabeth Helen, who was born in 1872, married Charles L. Davis, who 
died in 1918. Mrs. Davis has two children : Hallock G. Davis, aged twenty- 
four, a graduate of the Anna}X)lis Naval Academy and an ensign in the 
United States Navy ; and Charles Paxton Davis, aged twenty-one, an 
employe of the Luckenbach Steamship Company. 

Hallock Wright was born January 3, 1859. and attended a kinder- 
garten in Marysville until his parents came to San Francisco in 1865. Here 
he attended the Lincoln School, and at the age of sixteen graduated from 
high school in Los Angeles. Mr. Wright had his first experience in the 
insurance business in 1875 as representative at San Franci.sco of the 
Trans- Atlantic Fire Insurance Comjiany. In 1877 he became identified 
with Spruance, Stanley & Company, wholesale liquors, and was an active 
meml)er of that house until the time of the fire in 1906. Then followed 
a tri]) to Euro])e for his health, and he returned to San Francisco at the 
close of 1<X)6. Following that until V>\7. Mr. Wright was manager of the 
Merchants P)ank ]>uilding, and since then has been an insurance i)roker. 
He is a republican, and his home is at Alameda.