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Full text of "A history of southern Illinois : a narrative account of its historical progress, its people, and its principal interests"

O1S HISTORICAL SURVEY 



A HISTORY 



OP 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 



A Narrative Account of its Historical Progress, its 
People, and its Principal Interests 



BY 

George Washington Smith, M. A. 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 
1912 



11BRMN 

OF THE 

OF 



History of Southern Illinios 



HUGH LAUDEE. Prominent in business circles, recognized as a man 
of force and ability in public life and well qualified for the adminis- 
trative duties of official positions, a welcome addition and an orna- 
ment to every social gathering, and universally commended for his 
uprightness and integrity in all the relations of life, Hugh Lauder, 
of Carbondale, has his standing in the community based on stable and 
enduring ground secured by merit, which he has amply demonstrated 
during his residence of thirty-one years in the city. 

He is a native of Ohio, the great state which rivals and almost 
equals "the Mother of States and of Statesmen" in the number of 
presidents she has given to the Union, and was born in Trumbull 
county on July 15, 1840. His parents were. John and Eliza (Jackson) 
Lauder, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was an industrious and 
skillful blacksmith, and passed the greater part of his life working at 
his forge. But he was a man of very moderate estate in worldly 
wealth, and was able to give his son nothing beyond a common coun- 
try school education, and a limited one at that. 

But the son was game and accepted his portion with cheerfulness 
and gratification that it was as gpod as it was. He began the battle 
of life for himself at the age of fifteen by driving cattle from Trumbull 
county, Ohio, to Chester county, Pennsylvania, which he continued for 
six years, making two trips each way every year. When he reached 
the age of twenty-one he contracted with a butcher to drive a meat 
wagon to the mining towns in his native state and Pennsylvania, and 
after performing this arduous, trying and sometimes dangerous work 
for a time with great fidelity and good business sense, he became the 
purchasing agent for his employer, buying cattle, sheep and hogs in 
large numbers. 

In 1861 he enlisted in the Union army, in Company C, Nineteenth 
Ohio Infantry, for the period of four months, his regiment being a part 
of the 75,000 troops asked for by President Lincoln in his first call 
for volunteers. He took part in the battle of Rich Mountain, Virginia, 
and soon afterward the term of his enlistment expired. He then ar- 
ranged to join the Second Ohio Cavalry as its commanding officer, but 
was prevented from carrying out his intention by illness. When his 
health was restored he engaged in buying live stock on his own account, 
and his operations in this kind of merchandising lasted until 1877, 
without interruption by other business. 

In that year he started a mercantile enterprise of a different char- 
acter at New Bedford, Pennsylvania, which he 'conducted for seven 
years, but during that period also kept on dealing in live stock on the 
same scale as before. In 1880 he located in Carbondale, and here he 
saw fine opportunities for carrying on a profitable business of a dif- 
ferent kind from any in which he had hitherto been engaged. He 
bought timber land in Williamson, Jackson and Alexander counties and 

567 



568 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

manufactured lumber. The land cost him from two to twenty dol- 
lars an acre, and in every case he found the timber worth considerably 
more than the purchase price of the land. 

For twenty-five years he ran his mills, always farming the land he 
denuded of its timber, and throughout that time also kept on dealing in 
live stock, feeding numbers of cattle, sheep and hogs for the markets 
every year. His business in all departments was extensive, the lum- 
ber industry being of such magnitude that at one time he was obliged 
to build his own tramways a distance of six miles in order to get his 
timber out response to the demands on his resources. He is not now 
so largely and variously engaged in business, but he still owns farms 
and superintends their cultivation and improvement. 

Notwithstanding the great extent and exacting nature of his several 
lines of business, Mr. Lauder has found time and always had the dis- 
position to take an active part in the affairs of the city and county of 
his home, and contribute his share of impulse, direction and material 
aid to all worthy projects designed to promote their progress and im- 
provement. He served two terms as alderman from his ward in Car- 
bondale and two as mayor of the city, winning the approval of the peo- 
ple by his course in each of these offices. He is now one of the trustees 
of the Southern Illinois Normal University by appointment of Governor 
Deneen, and secretary of the board by the choice of its other members. 

His political faith is pledged and his campaign services are given 
ardently to the Republican party, to which he adheres from convic- 
tion, as he has never been eager for official station or the cares and 
responsibilities of public life. The offices he has held before and the 
one he is holding now all came to him without his seeking them, and 
because he was deemed capable of filling them with benefit to the in- 
terests over which they gave him supervision, and it was well known 
that he would fill them -with credit to himself. 

Mr. Lauder was married in Trumbull county, Ohio, in February, 
1862, to Miss Harriet Nelson, a daughter of W. S. and Temperance 
Nelson, of that county, where the father was prominently engaged in 
dairying on a large scale. Mr. Lauder has long been a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and is now an elder in the congregation to which 
he belongs, and one of its most faithful and appreciated workers and 
supporters. 

ISAAC K. LEVY. The ability and sterling character of Isaac K. Levy 
have given him distinctive prestige as one of the representative members 
of the bar of his native city and county, and he is engaged in the active 
practice of law at Murphysboro, the judicial center of Jackson county. 
His popularity in his home community has been further shown by his 
having been called upon to serve in the office of state's attorney of Jack- 
son county, in which office his administration has added materially to 
his professional reputation and proved of marked value to the county. 

Isaac K. Levy was born at Murphysboro, on the 1st day of February, 
1878, and is a son of Abraham and Pauline (Rittenburg) Levy, who 
have here maintained their home since 1875, the father having been for 
many years one of the representative merchants and highly esteemed 
citizens of this thriving little city. He whose name initiates this review 
is indebted to the public schools of his native city for his early education, 
which included the curriculum of the high school, and in preparing him- 
self for his chosen profession he here studied law under effective private 
preceptorship. He continued a student in the office of one of the lead- 
ing law firms of Murphysboro until he proved himself eligible for the 
bar, to which he was admitted in 1899. He has since given his attention 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 569 

to the practice of his profession in Murphysboro and his technical powers 
and his close application have combined with his personal popularity 
in enabling him to build up a substantial and representative practice, 
in connection with which he has been concerned in a number of specially 
important litigations. In 1908 he was elected state's attorney of Jack- 
son county, and his incumbency of this office continued until 1912. His 
regime was marked by scrupulous and effective service in conserving the 
interests of the people of the county, and he showed equal facility in the 
handling of criminal and civil cases. He is a close student and never 
presents a. cause before court or jury without careful preparation. He 
takes a lively interest in all that touches the welfare of his home city 
and county, and is known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. 
He is a member of the directorate of the Citizens' State and Savings 
Bank, one of the staunch financial institutions of Southern Illinois. He 
is unswerving ;n his allegiance to the Republican party, in behalf of 
whose cause he has given effectual service, and he is affiliated with the 
local organizations of the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his wife are factors in the social activities of their 
home city. 

On the 29th of June, 1902, Mr. Levy was united in marriage to Miss 
Lillian Hanks, who was born and reared in Jackson county and who is 
a daughter of James Hanks, one of the representative farmers of the 
county. Her paternal grandfather was one of the honored pioneers of 
this section of the state and served at one time as sheriff of Jackson 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Levy have two children, Constance and Jessie 
Virginia. 

WALTER C. ALEXANDER. The fine initiative and administrative 
powers of this well known citizen of Murphysboro, Jackson county, 
have been enlisted in connection with the organization and upbuilding 
of many important industrial enterprises, and through his active 
identification with the same he has gained precedence as one of the 
veritable captains of industry in southern Illinois, where he has won 
large and worthy success through his own ability and well directed 
efforts, the while his course has been so guided and governed as to 
retain to him the unqualified confidence and esteem of those with 
whom he has come in contact in the varied relations of life. As one 
of the representative business men and progressive citizens of south- 
ern Illinois he is eminently entitled to special recognition in this pub- 
lication. 

Walter Carlyle Alexander was born in the city of Glasgow, Scot- 
land, on the 24th of May, 1865, and in both the paternal and maternal 
lines he is, a scion of the staunchest of Scottish stock, the admirable 
traits of which he has well exemplified in his private and business 
career. He is a son of James and Jessie Alexander, and in 1868, when 
he was a child of about three years, -his parents came to America and 
established their residence in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
whence they later removed to Shenandoah, that state. The father was 
an iron-worker by trade and finally came 'to the west with his family 
and located in the city of St. Louis, where he was in the employ of 
the Eagle Iron Works for two years. He was then appointed master 
mechanic in the shops of the Chicago. Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
at Galesburg, Illinois, but he retained this incumbency only a brief 
period. In 1870 he established his home at Murphysboro, the me- 
tropolis and judicial center of Jackson county, where he opened a 
general store, at the corner of Eleventh and Walnut streets. He re- 



570 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tired from this line of enterprise in 1874 and became associated with 
his brother Walter in establishing the Alexander Brothers' foundry 
and machine shop. They built up a large and prosperous business and 
continued to be actively concerned with the same until 1896, when 
they retired, after nearly a quarter of a century of consecutive appli- 
cation to this line of enterprise, through association with which they 
gained secure place as substantial and representative business men 
of this section of the state. James Alexander died on the 4th of 
October, 1899, secure in the high regard of all who knew him, and 
his cherished and devoted wife was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 4th of January, 1908, both having been zealous and consistent 
members of the Presbyterian church. Of their children the subject 
of this review is the younger son, and concerning Mrs. Janet M. Mor- 
rison, a sister residing in Boston, Massachusetts, more specific men- 
tion will be made in another paragraph. 

Walter C. Alexander was afforded the advantages of the public 
schools and completed his dicipline along this line in the schools of 
Murphysboro, which has been his home during the greater part of the 
time since his boyhood days. As a youth he entered the shop and 
foundry conducted by his father and uncle and there he learned the 
trade in its various details. Later he became telegraph operator for 
the Consolidated Coal Company, but after serving six months in this 
capacity he assumed the position of chainman with an engineering 
corps engaged in railroad surveying. He continued to devote his at- 
tention to surveying and civil engineering work for a number of years 
and within five years had risen to the responsible position of transit- 
man. For three and one-half years he maintained his residence at 
Duquoin, Illinois, and followed the profession of civil and mining en- 
gineering in an independent way, and he then returned to Murphys- 
boro to accept the position of manager and superintendent of the 
Murphysboro Water Works, Electric, Gas and Light Company, of which 
he also became a director. He retained this incumbency five years, at 
the expiration of which he resigned, in order to give his time to the 
supervision of the large and important enterprises with which he 
had become identified. He was the organizer of the Chicago & Herrin 
Coal Company, the properties of which are located at Herrin, Wil- 
liamson county, and he is president of this corporation, as is he also 
of the Carterville-Herrin Coal Company. He organized and is presi- 
dent of the Chew Mercantile Company, one of the leading retail con- 
cerns of Herrin ; and was the organizer of the Anchor Ice & Packing 
Company, of Murphysboro, of which likewise he is president. In 1910 
he effected the organization and incorporation of the Murphysboro 
Construction Company, which controls a large business in the con- 
struction of reinforced concrete buildings, dealing in lumber, etc. 
Of this progressive corporation he is president, as is he also of the 
Republican Era Printing Company, publishers of the Era, a daily 
paper, at Murphysboro. Mr. Alexander is secretary and a director 
of each the Murphysboro Telephone Company and the Ohio and Mis- 
sissippi Valley Telephone Company ; is a director of the Murphysboro 
Electric Railway, Light, Heat & Power Company ; a director and also 
secretary of the Murphysboro & Southern Illinois Electric Railway 
Company, controlling important interurban lines and franchises; is 
a director of the City National Bank of Herrin and of the St. Louis. 
Carterville & Herrin Coal Company; and was one of the organizers of 
the Murphysboro Commercial Association, of whose high civic ideals 
and effective work he has been a most zealous and influential ex- 
ponent. Mr. Alexander exemplifies the most loyal and public-spirited 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 57l 

citizenship and his endeavors along industrial and commercial lines 
have been potent in the furtherance of social and material progress 
and prosperity, the while he has ever stood ready to give his co-opera- 
tion in support of those enterprises and measures which have tended 
to conserve the general welfare. His capacity for w<jrk is gigantic and 
he is most content when most busy. He does not, however, fail in 
appreciation of the higher ideals and gracious amenities of social life 
and is genial, companionable and democratic in his bearing, a man 
whose strength, vitality and sterling character promote loyal and en- 
during friendships. 

In politics, though never an aspirant for office of political order, 
Mr. Alexander is found arrayed as a stalwart and effective advocate 
of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands 
sponsor, and both he and his wife are most zealous members of the 
First Presbyterian church of Murphysboro, of which he is a trustee. 
He served several terms as a member of the Murphysboro Board of 
Education, and this is the only civic office of which he has consented 
to become the incumbent. He is affiliated with the Masonic frater- 
nity, the Benevolent and Protective .Order of Elks, and the Knights of 
Pythias, of which last mentioned order his father was one of the . 
organizers of the Murphysboro lodge. 

On the 22d of November, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Alexander to Miss Martha M. Forbes, daughter of Charles and 
Sophia B. (Trowbridge) Forbes, of Oneida, New York, and they have 
one son, Forbes, who was born on the 4th of January, 1907. The fam- 
ily home is one of attractive order and is a center of hospitality, under 
the regime of its popular chatelaine, Mrs. Alexander, who is a repre- 
sentative factor in the social activities of the community. 

Mrs. Janet M. (Alexander) Morrison, sister of Mr. Alexander, 
was born in the city of Glasgow, Scotland, where she was reared and 
educated and where she remained after the immigration of her father 
to America. There was solemnized her marriage to Edward Morrison, 
who was identified with hotel enterprises in his native land (Scot- 
land) and who is now engaged in the manufacturing of office and 
school supplies in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Morrison are members of the Presbyterian church and they have 
a wide circle of friends in their home city. They have five children, 
concerning whom the following brief record is entered: Mary Rhoda 
is the wife of Rhoda Field and is one of the talented musicians of the 
Massachusetts metropolis ; Christina and Katie remain at the parental 
home, as do also James and John, the latter of whom is employed in 
a leading banking institution in Boston. 

EDWARD C. KRAMER merits consideration in this publication by 
reason of his high standing as one of the representative members of 
the bar of his native state, where he has many and important profes- 
sional connections, and also by reason of his influential position as a 
citizen of utmost progressiveness and public spirit. He served four 
years on the bench of the county court of Wayne county and since 
1898 he has maintained his residence and professional headquarters in 
the city of East St. Louis, the metropolis of St. Clair county. He 
has gained more than local prestige as a corporation lawyer and is 
legal representative for a number of important railroad and industrial 
corporations. The Judge is a man of fine intellectual and professional 
attainments and stands as an exemplar of the highest ethics of the 
vocation in which he has achieved so much of success and distinction. 

Edward Charles Kramer was born on a farm in Wabash county, 



572 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Illinois, on the 1st of February, 1857, and is a scion of one of the 
sterling pioneer families of that county, where his parents, Henry and 
Martha Kramer, took up their residence in an early day, the father 
having there devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits until their 
removal to Wayne county, Illinois, in 1873, where they have since 
maintained their home, commanding the high esteem of all who 
know them. Like many another who has gained precedence in the legal 
profession, Judge Kramer found the days of his boyhood and youth 
compassed by the invigorating environment and discipline of the farm, 
but the basic industry of agriculture did not prove adequate to satisfy 
his ambition. He gained his preliminary education in the public 
schools of his native county and supplemented this by attendance in 
normal schools, in which latter he qualified himself for successful work 
in the pedagogic profession, to which he devoted his attention while 
preparing himself for that of the law. He prosecuted his legal studies 
under effective preceptorship and in 1882 was admitted to the bar of 
his native state. He initiated the practice of law at Fairfield, "Wayne 
county, and in that county he continued to reside until his removal to 
East St. Louis, as already noted in this context. His energy, ability 
and ambitious efforts soon gained to him a substantial practice, and in 
1886 he was elected to the office of judge of the county court of Wayne 
county, of which position he continued the incumbent until 1890, the 
while he also served as master of chancery for the county during the 
same period. He was a member of the board of commissioners of the 
Illinois penitentiary from 1893 until 1897, and in 1898 he removed to 
East St. Louis. 

Judge Kramer controls a large and important practice and gives 
special attention to corporation law, in which connection he is attorney 
for the Terminal Association of St. Louis, the Southern Railroad Com- 
pany, the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad Company, the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad Company, the Chicago & Alton Railroad Com- 
pany, the Wabash Railroad Company, and The Wiggins Ferry Com- 
pany. The Judge is a member of the directorate of each the Trenton 
Coal & Mining Company and the Southern Coal & Mining Company, 
for both of which corporations he is attorney. 

In politics Judge Kramer is found aligned as a staunch and effect- 
ive supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, though he has 
shown no predilection for office of political order. He is a member of 
the East St. Louis Bar Association, the Illinois Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. He has attained to the chivalric degrees 
in the Masonic fraternity, in which he is affiliated with the commandry 
of Knights Templars at Olney, Richland county, and in his home city 
he holds membership in the lodge of Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the St. Clair Country Club. Both he and his wife are 
zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church of East St. Louis 
and he is chairman of its boa,rd of trustees. 

On the 15th of September, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of 
Judge Kramer to Miss Laura J. Ellis, of Grayville, White county, this 
state, and they have two children, Kenneth Edward and Pauline Ida. 

ROBERT E. GILLESPIE. The president of the Illinois State Trust 
Company, of East St. Louis, has won precedence as one of the strong 
and influential factors in connection with financial affairs in Southern 
Illinois, and his advancement represents the concrete results of his own 
ability and well directed efforts. He is one of the prominent business 
men and liberal and progressive citizens of East St. Louis, where he 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 573 

has maintained his home since 1907, and is a native of Illinois, with 
whose annals the family name has been long and worthily linked. 

Robert E. Gillespie was born in Johnson county, Illinois, on the 
21st of January, 1878, and is a son of James B. and Mary (Enloe) 
Gillespie. To the public schools of his native county Robert E. Gil- 
lespie is indebted for his early educational discipline, which included 
a course in the high school at Vienna, the county seat. This training 
was effectively supplemented by his attendance in Drury College, at 
Springfield, Missouri, and at the age of nineteen years he was ap- 
pointed deputy circuit court clerk of his native county, a position of 
which he continued the incumbent for three years. Thereafter he 
served one year as assistant cashier of the First National Bank of 
Cobden, Union county, and at the expiration of the period noted he was 
advanced to the position of cashier of the institution. He retained this 
office until 1907, when he removed to East St. Louis and effected the or- 
ganization of the City National Bank, of which he became cashier. In 
the following year this institution was merged into the Illinois State 
Trust Company, of which Mr. Gillespie was elected vice-president. He 
became a potent factor in defining the policies and directing the manage- 
ment of this substantial and popular institution, and appreciation of his 
ability and sterling character was emphatically shown by his election 
to the office of president of the corporation in the spring of 1911. He 
proves a most discriminating and progressive chief executive and to 
him must be attributed much of the success which has attended the 
operations of the staunch banking and trust company of whose adminis- 
trative corps he is the head. 

Liberal and public-spirited in his civic attitude, Mr. Gillespie shows 
a vital and helpful interest in all that concerns the welfare of his home 
city, and in politics he pays staunch allegiance to the Republican party. 
In the Masonic fraternity he has attained to the thirty-second degree 
of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and is also identified with the 
Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is past 
master of his lodge of Free and Accepted Masons and is also a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

In the year 1901 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gillespie to 
Miss Ida Spann, of Vienna, Johnson county, where her father, William 
A. Spann, is a representative lawyer and citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Gil- 
lespie have one child, Martha, and Mrs. Gillespie is a popular figure in 
connection with the representative social activities of her home city. 

PROFESSOR GEORGE HAZEN FRENCH. A man is never doing better 
service to humanity than when he is deyoting himself to raising the 
standards of public health, arousing attention to those things which 
menace it, and through scientific knowledge pointing the way to combat 
disease. One of Illinois' most eminent men, Professor George Hazen 
French, of Carbondale, has been identified with many hard-working 
bodies, men whose efforts have helped towards better things, and in the 
scientific world his name is widely and favorably known. He is a de- 
scendant of the first family of this name to come to America, locating in 
New England about 1620, and was born March 19, 1841, in Onondaga 
county, New York, a son of Hazen Miles and Caroline (White) French, 
farming people of the Empire state. 

George Hazen French attended the public schools of his native vicin- 
ity and the normal school at Cortland, after leaving which he became a 
country school teacher and followed that profession in New York. He 
then came West to Belvidere, Illinois, where he taught in the public 
schools, spent one year in Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, and then went to 



574 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Roscoe, Illinois, where he became principal of schools. About 1868 he 
become connected with the Illinois Agricultural College, and from 1877 
until 1878 served as assistant state entomologist, since which time he has 
acted in the same capacity three terms. In July, 1878, Professor French 
came to the Southern Illinois Normal University, where until 1911 he 
was doctor of natural sciences and curator, and in the year mentioned 
he became curator of the museum, landscape gardening and physiology. 
After years of experiment, study and research, in 1900 Professor French 
gave to the world the result of his years of labor, a treatment for 
epilepsy, and since that time he discovered a bacteria* remedy which kills 
the germ that causes Bright 's disease, and from neither of these has he 
ever taken any financial remuneration, feeling sufficiently rewarded by 
the gratitude and appreciation of those to whom his discoveries have 
been such a boon. His whole life has been spent in bettering conditions 
in Southern Illinois, and his scholarly attainments and scientific emi- 
nence have made him respected by all who know him, while his courteous 
and genial manner have won him hosts of friends among his co-workers 
and pupils. 

Professor French is a fellow of the American Association for the 
Advance of Science, the St. Louis Academy of Science, the Entomolog- 
ical Society of France, the Natural History Society of Lubec, Germany, 
the Entomological Society of New York, the American Entomolog- 
ical Society and the Philadelphia Academy of Science, and also holds 
honorary membership in the Southern Illinois Medical Association. He 
is the author of several scientific books, and has written numerous ar- 
ticles which have been widely copied and referred to, appearing in the 
leading scientific journals. Fraternally he belongs to Irvington Lodge 
of Masons, of which he is a charter member. 

On September 10, 1872, Professor French was married to Miss 
Harriet E. Bingham, who was born in Bureau county, Illinois, daughter 
of Solon P. and Harriet (Foster) Bingham. Professor and Mrs. French 
are members of the First Baptist church, in which he acts' as senior 
deacon. 

JOHN M. CHAMBERLIN, JR. Identified with a line of enterprise 
which has most important bearing in furthering the civic and material 
progress and upbuilding of any community, Mr. Chamberlin holds 
prestige as one of the leading and influential representatives of the 
real-estate, insurance and loan business in East St. Louis and is one 
of the well known, progressive and highly esteemed citizens of his 
native county. He has served in both branches of the state legislature 
and has been accorded other distinctive marks of popular confidence 
and esteem. Broad-minded, liberal and public-spirited in his civic at- 
titude, he shows a vital interest in all that touches the welfare of his 
home city, county and state, and as one of the representative citizens 
and business men of Southern Illinois he is properly accorded con* 
sideration in this publication. 

Hon. John M. Chamberlin, Jr., was born at Lebanon, St. Clair 
county. Illinois, on the 19th of August, 1872, and is a son of John M. 
and Margaret E. (Royce) Chamberlin. After duly availing himself of 
the advantages of the public schools of his native county he entered 
McKendree College, in which excellent institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1890. Having learned the art of telegraphy 
he devoted his attention to the same for a period of five years, at the 
expiration of which he founded the Lebanon Leader, a weekly news- 
paper, in his native town. He continued as editor and publisher of 
the Leader for five years and made the same a model paper of its class. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 575 

A stalwart and effective advocate of the principles and policies 
for which the Republican party stands sponsor, Mr. Chamberlin has 
been a zealous worker in behalf of its cause. In 1900 he was elected 
to represent his native county in the lower house of the Illinois legis- 
lature, and he proved a discriminating and valued member of that 
body in the forty-second general assembly. In the autumn of 1910 
he was elected to represent the forty-ninth district in the state senate, 
and in the same he has made an admirable record for earnest, loyal 
and progressive service, the while he has been assigned to various 
committees of representative order. Senator Chamberlin is a man of 
genial and democratic bearing and has a host of staunch friends in 
the county which has ever represented his home. He controls a large 
and important business in the handling of city and country realty, the 
extendiftg of financial loans upon approved real-estate security and as 
representative of leading fire and life insurance companies. He is 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 

On the 26th of November, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of 
Senator Chamberlin to Miss Lulu M. Farthing, of Odin, Marion county, 
Illinois. She is a representative of one of the well known and honored 
families of Southern Illinois and is a daughter of William D. Farthing, 
a prominent and influential citizen of Marion county. Three children 
have been born to them, John M., Jr., William F. and Mildred. 

HENRY C. ADDERLY, M. D. The world instinctively pays deference to 
the man whose success has been worthily achieved and whose prominence 
is not the less the result of an irreproachable life than of natural talents 
and acquired ability in the field of his chosen labor. Dr. Adderly occu- 
pies a position of distinction as a representative of the medical profes- 
sion at Chester, Illinois, and the best evidence of his capability in the line 
of his chosen work is the large patronage which is accorded him. It is 
a well known fact that a great percentage of those who enter business 
life meet with failure or only a limited measure of success. This is usu- 
ally due to one or more of several causes superficial preparation, lack 
of close application or an unwise choice in selecting a vocation for which 
one is not fitted. The reverse of all this has entered into the success 
which Dr. Adderly has gained. His equipment for the profession was 
unusually good and he has continually extended the scope of his labors 
through the added efficiency that comes from keeping in touch with the 
marked advancement that has been made by the members of the medical 
fraternity in the last half century. 

A native of Missouri, Dr. Adderly was born at Hannibal, that state, 
on the 24th of June, 1854, and he is a son of Rev. Joseph and Hannah 
(Peters) Adderly, both of whom are now deceased. The father was born 
at Waterford, Ireland, in 1816, and he accompanied his parents to the 
United States when but seventeen years of age. He grew to maturity 
in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where his father, William Ad- 
derly, was long engaged as a shoe merchant. Rev. Joseph Adderly had 
two other brothers who entered the ministry of the Episcopal church, 
namely John, who passed away at Pittsburg ; and William, whose dem- 
ise occurred at Des Moines, Iowa. Rev. Joseph Adderly was educated 
at Pittsburg and he entered the Episcopal ministry as a young man. 
Prior to the inception of the Civil war he had charge of a church at 
Hannibal, Missouri, but before the actual outbreak of the rebellion he 
returned to Pittsburg, whence he later removed to Newcastle, Pennsyl-- 
vania. He came to Chester, Illinois, in 1876, and was pastor of the 
Episcopal church here at the time of his death, in 1877. 'He married 



576 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Miss Hannah. Peters, who was born and reared in England and who 
came with her parents to America. Mrs. Adderly was summoned to 
the life eternal at Chester, Illinois, in 1892, and she is survived by four 
children, as follows, Agnes E. is the wife of Samuel Barney, of Elk- 
hart, Indiana ; Elizabeth is the wife of George "Whaley, of East Orange, 
New Jersey ; Dr. Henry C. is the immediate subject of this review ; and 
Alice M. is a professional nurse in New York city. 

Owing largely to the nature of his father's work, Dr. Adderly grew 
up and received his early educational training at different points be- 
tween Pittsburg and the Mississippi river. As a young man he was 
engaged in teaching in country schools for a brief period and in 1872 
he was matriculated as a student in the St. Louis Medical College, in 
which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class 
of 1875, at the early age of twenty-one years. After leaving college he 
located at Kemper, Illinois, where he remained for a period of two years, 
at the expiration of which he established his professional headquarters 
at Chester, where he has since maintained his home. Some years sub- 
sequent to graduation Dr. Adderly returned to his alma mater for post- 
graduate work, and with the passage of time he has had a number of 
important articles published in various prominent medical journals. In 
connection with his life work he is a valued and appreciative member 
of the Randolph County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. During his thirty-five 
years ' connection with the medical profession Dr.' Adderly has gained 
expert knowledge in the various branches of his life work and he is 
recognized as one of the best physicians and surgeons in Randolph 
county. He has been surgeon for the Southern Illinois penitentiary 
for four years, for eight years was secretary of the United States pen- 
sion board at Chester and has also served as county physician. At the 
present time, in 1911, he is serving his fifth term as mayor of Chester 
and his administrations have witnessed the introduction of many im- 
provements for the good of this place, the same including granitoid 
walks, the erection of a city water works and the installation of the 
fire department. But few business enterprises have attracted Dr. Ad- 
derly 's interest, although he joined the promoters of the Chester Knit- 
ting-mill Company about 1904 and took stock in that concern. 

On the 24th of October, 1878, Dr. Adderly was united in marriage 
to Miss Delia Wassell, a daughter of Charles Wassell, a representative 
of one of the old families of Randolph county. Dr. and Mrs. Adderly 
have four children, Joseph C. married Miss Gertrude Morris and they 
reside at St. Louis, Missouri ; Lola D. is the widow of Charles D. Luke 
and she maintains her home at Nashville, Illinois; "William H. is in 
the employ of the Iron Mountain Railway Company at Chester; and 
Miss Bessie remains at the parental home. 

Dr. Adderly is a stalwart Republican in his political proclivities and 
he has ever manifested a keen interest in all matters affecting the wel- 
fare of that organization. He has been a delegate to numerous state 
conventions and represented his district in the Philadelphia National 
Convention, which nominated William McKinley for a second term. 
In fraternal circles- the Doctor is prominent as an Odd Fellow, an Elk 
and a Knight of Honor. While he is not actively identified with church 
work he is in strong sympathy with the aims of all religious bodies and 
contributes liberally to various charitable movements. His citizenship 
has ever been characterized by loyalty" and public spirit of the most 
insistent order and as a man he is affable and sympathetic. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 577 

WILLIAM BRYDEN. A self-made man, who has forged ahead through 
persistency and initiative, is William Bryden, superintendent of the 
Wabash, Chester & Western Railway Company, with headquarters and 
residence at Chester, Illinois. Mr. Bryden was born at Dunmore, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 26th of March, 1866, and he is a son of William Bry- 
den, a practical coal miner during much of his active career. William 
Bryden, Sr., was born in Scotland, whence he immigrated to America 
as a youth. After his arrival in this country he located in Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was employed in the coke and coal fields for a number 
of years and where he was eventually made superintendent for the 
Pennsylvania Coal Company at Dunmore. He came to Illinois in the 
seventies and was superintendent of the Carbondale Coal & Coke Com- 
pany at the time of his demise, in 1878, aged fifty-one years. He mar- 
ried Margaret Brown, who passed away in Carbondale in 1897, and the 
issue of their union were: Miss Agnes Bryden, who was for many 
years cashier of the Carbondale Trust & Savings Bank at Carbondale 
prior to her death in 1909; Mrs. J. E. Craine, of Murphysboro, Illinois; 
Mrs. J. N. Fitch, of Cobden, Illinois, Miss Helen Bryden, a member of 
the faculty of the Southern Illinois Normal University of Carbondale ; 
and William Bryden, Jr., the immediate subject of this review. 

William Bryden was but a child at the time of his parents ' removal 
from the old Keystone state of the Union to Carbondale, Illinois, where 
he received his preliminary educational training and where he grew 
to maturity. As a youth he became interested in railroad work and 
began his career by learning telegraphy at Murphysboro, Illinois. 
His first position as an independent operator was with the St. Louis 
Coal Railroad and his next work was in Chester, from which place he 
went to Cutler as agent and operator on 'the Wabash, Chester & West- 
ville, New Orleans & Texas Railway at New Orleans and at other 
points and when he left that company he spent a few months with the 
Mobile & Ohio and the Illinois Central at Cairo, Illinois. From June 
1, 1885, to May 15, 1886, he was agent at Cutler, Illinois, for the Wa- 
bash, Chester & Western Road; and from June 1 1887 to 1890 he was 
agent at Menard Illinois, and on the latter date he came to Chester as 
assistant agent, acting in that capacity until September, 1893, when he 
was made agent. Subsequently he was promoted to the position of 
trainmaster, and he continued both as agent and trainmaster until 
April 15, 1911, when he succeeded Henry Mason as superintendent of 
the road. 

The Wabash, Chester & Western Railway was built in 1872 and ex- 
tends from Chester to Mount Vernon, Illinois, a distance of 65 miles. 
It passes through the Southern Illinois coal fields and its tonnage con- 
sists chiefly of the output of the mines and of merchandise carried in 
and out along the route. Very little attention is given to passenger 
traffic. Although a dirt road bed is maintained, it is kept in splendid 
condition by the management and its equipment is ample for the needs 
of the company. Superintendent Bryden has grown up with the road 
and he is familiar with every phase of its physical condition, this knowl- 
edge making him particularly well fitted for the important position he 
occupies. Mr. Bryden 's life has been studiously devoted to the service 
of his company. Politics and fraternities have not attracted him and 
his progress is entirely due to his own well directed endeavors. He 
exercises his franchise in favor of the Republican party. 

At Chester, Illinois, on the 12th of March, 1889, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Bryden to Miss Emma Gausmann, who is a daughter 
of Frank Gausmann. a German by birth and a blacksmith by occupa- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Bryden have two children, Margaret and Frank W. 



578 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

JACOB P. GEBLACH. The city of Evansville, Illinois, recognizes in 
Jacob P. Gerlach one of her most worthy citizens, one who 'has the 
welfare of the community at heart, always willing to serve when re- 
quired and who will spare neither time nor labor in any cause or move- 
ment brought for the betterment of the city and county with which he 
has been identified for so many years. As postmaster of Evansville for 
a number of years, and as the editor and publisher of The Evansville 
Enterprise for a longer period, he has been active and influential in 
all affairs pertaining to the advancement and general good of the city, 
and in addition to holding many minor offices in connection with civic 
affairs, has served his city two terms in the capacity of mayor. 

Born in Monroe county, Illinois, January 28, 1867, Jacob P. Gerlach 
is the son of Christian Gerlach, a German farmer. Christian Gerlach 
early in life married Barbara Baum, and they were the parents of Chris- 
tian, of Los Angeles, Jacob P. and John H., of Evansville. Mr. Gerlach 
died in the 'sixties, at their home near Renault, Monroe county, Illinois. 
In later years Mrs. Gerlach terminated her widowhood by marrying. 
Casper Nurnberger, by whom she became the mother of Louis, who 
died in youth ; Mrs. L. J. Stahlman, of Baldwin, Illinois; Mrs. C. Studle, 
of Evansville ; George, of Welga, Randolph county, Illinois ; Mrs. Louis 
Nehert, of Nashville, Kansas ; Rose, of Evansville, and Fred, also a resi- 
dent of Nashville, Kansas. Mrs. Nurnberger died in 1888. 

The early life of Jacob Gerlach was beset by many of the difficulties 
brought to bear by the death of a parent in childhood, and he attained 
his education at the cost of a rather severe struggle on his part. De- 
termined, however, to accomplish more than the ordinary education of 
the average country boy, he persevered in his studies, and in his irregu- 
lar attendance at the Carbondale Normal acquired a liberal knowledge 
of the common branches. He was unable to continue in school for any 
length of time at a stretch, but by teaching in the district schools from 
time to time it became possible for him to attend the Southern Illinois 
Normal University, after which he engaged in teaching regularly. Had 
it not been for the vacancy in the ownership and editorship of the Evans- 
ville Enterprise, it is probable that Mr. Gerlach would have continued 
indefinitely with his pedagogic work, but in the circumstances there 
seemed no one but he to assume those responsibilities, and he undertook 
the editorship of the Enterprise, which later placed him in the way of 
the ownership of a business which has served him well in the years of 
his control. In the fall of 1895, while he was engaged in teaching the 
Pautler school near Evansville, he performed the work of teacher and 
editor both, and shortly thereafter he assumed complete charge of the 
Enterprise, which, has been his principal business occupation since that 
time. The Enterprise is a Republican paper, although established as a 
Democratic paper by its founder, J. M. Shaw, in February, 1895, but 
the paper met with repeated difficulties and the proprietorship was 
changed of necessity. Since it fell into the hands of Mr. Gerlach the 
Enterprise has been conducted rather as a mere medium for the convey- 
ing of local and other news rather than as a mouthpiece for any particu- 
lar brand of politics. While its editor is a Republican, the patrons and 
friends of the paper are of various shades of political belief, and its edi- 
torial column is never known to reflect arbitrary sentiment. It rather 
partakes of the characteristics of any well regulated country newspaper, 
non-partisan in sympathies and calculated to be well received in the 
home. As such it is an unqualified success. 

The civic life of Mr. Gerlach. as briefly noted above, has been some- 
thing above that of the ordinary citizen. On January 11, 1898, he was 
appointed postmaster to succeed H. G. Meyerott, and since that time has 



".'sir*' 

OF THE 
8BVERSITY OF ILUSOH 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 579 

been reappointed to the office twice. He has served his town as its 
treasurer for eight years, and three years in the capacity of clerk. Later 
he was chosen mayor of Evansville, serving with praiseworthy wisdom, 
following which he was elected one of the trustees of. the town, and then 
chosen mayor again in April, 1911. All of which is clearly indicative of 
his standing and ability. Politically Mr. Gerlach is of the Republican 
faith, as before mentioned, and he is recognized as one of the leaders af 
the party in his section by reason of his labors in its behalf and his ser- 
vices as its delegate to various conventions. In his fraternal affiliations 
he has served the Odd Fellows lodge of Evansville for several years as 
its secretary, and he has been clerk of the Modern Woodmen since the 
organization of the local camp, No. 4510, in 1897. In addition to his 
other business interests he is secretary of the Evansville Building and 
Loan Association, a stockholder in the Evansville Telephone Company, 
and president of the Evansville school board. 

On May 26, 1891, Mr. Gerlach was married to Miss Johanna Wick- 
lein. She died February 21, 1892. Mr. Gerlach remarried September 
15, 1896, when he took for his wife Miss Rachel Schroeder, a daughter 
of John Schroeder. The issue of their marriage are Arthur, Ella, Lor- 
etta, Harold and Raymond. 

JOHN T. GALBRAITH. Connected actively with newspaper work for 
a number of years, and owner and editor of the Carbondale daily and 
weekly Free Press during the last eight years, John T. Galbraith has 
been zealous and influential in molding public sentiment in Jackson 
county and directing the thought and action of its people into proper 
channels for the wholesome development and enduring good of the 
region in which he lives and operates. He is wide-awake to the needs 
of the county, and fearless and able in calling attention to them. 

Mr. Galbraith is a native of Illinois, and was born in Wayne county 
on December 11, 1866. His parents were William M. and Elizabeth 
(Casey) Galbraith, both born in Jefferson county, Illinois. The father 
was a merchant until the beginning of the Civil war, and during the 
remainder of his life, a farmer, except while that memorable conflict 
was in progress, and then he was at the front giving a practical and 
heroic proof of his patriotism and devotion to the Union. 

He enlisted at the very beginning of the combat and served to its 
close, serving most of the time as regimental quartermaster of the 
Forty-eighth Illinois Infantry. He stuck to his regiment till "the 
war drum throbbed no longer, and the battle flags were furled," par- 
ticipated in the Grand Review of the whole Federal army in Wash- 
ington, and was then mustered out of the service and returned to his 
Wayne county home. In 1886 he moved his family to Carbondale, 
and in that town he died in 1890. His widow survived him fourteen 
years and passed away in Carbondale in 1904. 

Their son John was educated in the public schools and at the 
Southern Illinois State Normal School. Almost immediately after 
leaving that institution he entered the field of journalism with a de- 
termination to make that his life work. His start was necessarily a 
modest one, his range of work was narrow and his compensation was 
small. But he expected these limitations at the beginning, and was 
prepared to make the most of them. He performed every duty as- 
signed him with his utmost ability and faithfulness, and kept his eye 
over on the brighter light and higher range above him, to which he 
meant to work his way, and his progress was steady and rapid. 

Mr. Galbraith moved to Carbondale with his parents when he was 
but seventeen, and he had therefore a considerable apprenticeship in 



580 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

becoming acquainted with the people and familiarizing himself with 
their industries, customs, habits of thought and aspirations before he 
began his newspaper work. When he did begin it he was able to 
speak the language of their true inwardness and make it potential in 
one common current of persuasiveness for whatever was likely to 
promote their general welfare and advance the development and im- 
provement of the region in which they lived. 

They soon recognized his value and gave his efforts in their behalf 
their ardent support. He became influential among them and was 
acknowledged to be the man for any public duty requiring superior 
intelligence and executive ability. When the census of 1910 was to be 
taken he was appointed census director for his district, and it is high 
praise but only a just tribute to merit to say that he performed the 
duties with satisfaction to both the people of the district and the author- 
ities at Washington. For a number of years he has shown his interest 
in the welfare of his section of the state by membership in the state 
militia, and he is now a lieutenant-colonel on the general staff detail 
in the ordnance department. 

In political allegiance Mr. Galbraith is a pronounced and firmly 
loyal Republican, and one of the wheel-horses in his party's organiza- 
tion. He is now a member of the executive committee of the county 
central committee of the party for Jackson county, and is accorded a 
high rank as an energetic, effective and skillful worker in organizing 
the party forces and directing their work in the county. His religious 
connection is with the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a member 
of the official board of the congregation to which he belongs. 

Mr. Galbraith was married on September 15, 1903, to Miss Carrie 
Dillinger, a daughter of John Dillinger, a prosperous farmer of this 
county with residence in Carbondale. Within the same year Mr. Gal- 
braith bought the Free Press, of which he has ever since been the 
owner, editor and publisher. He has fine capacity and well trained 
faculties for journalistic work, and has applied them with all his force 
to the wise management and steady improvement of his paper. It is 
issued in daily and weekly editions, and conducted with a view to giv- 
ing full, free and exact expression to the wishes of the people and 
promoting their best interests. While in a sense a party organ, the 
paper is essentially a family newspaper, and contributes to the benefit 
and enjoyment of every member of the household and all classes of 
readers. It is very enterprising in gathering and publishing the news, 
and its editorial columns sparkle with light and safe guidance of all 
public questions, local and general. 

Fraternally Mr. Galbraith is a Knight of Pythias and a member of 
the Order of Odd Fellows. He also takes an interest in the cause of 
public education, the general enlightenment of the people, the moral 
improvement of the .community and the graceful and culticating agen- 
cies of social life. No citizen of Jackson county is more highly es- 
teemed, and none is more deserving of the general regard and good 
will of all the inhabitants of his locality. 

GEORGE D. RICH, one of the most prominent farmers and orchardists 
of Union county, is a man who has turned the mind of the scientist and 
investigator to the business of farming. Equipped with the desire to 
know, he has tried numberless hitherto untried fruits and vegetables in 
the soil of his native county, and each time has obtained remarkable 
success, proving not only his own good judgment, but the extreme fer- 
tility of the soil and the adaptability of the climate to a great variety 
of crops. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 581 

During the childhood and boyhood of Mr. Rich he had many oppor- 
tunities to obtain unconsciously the knowledge which in later life made 
him a successful farmer, for, he was born, on the 17th of September, 
1856, on the farm where he spent his youth. His father is John M. Rich 
and his mother is Anna (Uffeiidill) Rich. The mother was born in Eng- 
land in 1828, coming to this country with her father, Michael Uffendill, 
when quite a small child. They first settled at Cairo, Illinois, but later 
went to Eight Mile Prairie, east of Carbondale, where they lived for 
some years. Later they settled in Jonesboro, and here the father died. 

John M. Rich is a native of Alabama, where he was born in 1827, the 
son of Thomas Rich. The latter was one of General Andrew Jackson's 
most valued soldiers, having fought under him in the Seminole Indian 
war. Later, drawn by his desire to serve his country, and by his de- 
votion to his old commander, he returned to fight under "Old Hickory" 
at the battle of New Orleans and during the war of 1812. In 1832 he 
moved from Alabama to Union county, becoming one of its first settlers. 
He had three sons, the youngest of whom is the father of the subject 
of this sketch, and three daughters, all of whom married. The youngest 
of the sons, John M., has become a very successful farmer, gradually 
buying up land until he now owns four hundred acres in different sec- 
tions. He is the father of eight children, seven of whom are living. 

George D. Rich received his education in the Cobden schools, and 
then turned his attention to farming, receiving wise advice and valuable 
training at the hands of his father, with whom he lived until twenty- 
four years of age, when he married Harriet, the daughter of Martin 
Rendleman, on April 28, 1881. Like himself, his wife is a member of 
one of the old pioneer families of the section. After his marriage the 
young farmer started out for himself on a farm which had been deeded 
to him by his father. Assisted by his wife, he saved enough to increase 
the size of his farm until he had fifty-five acres. Here he lived until 
1890, when he sold the place and bought one hundred and seven acres 
of fine land one and a half miles north of Cobden. In 1907 he 
added to his broad fields by buying the Amos Pool place of eighty acres 
across the railroad from his home farm. 

The variety of his crops is almost endless. He has sixteen acres of 
apple trees, most of which are young; twelve acres of asparagus, from 
which he shipped fifteen hundred cases in 1911, in spite of the short- 
ness of the season ; two and a quarter acres of rhubarb, producing an 
excellent crop of three hundred and fifty bushels during this year; and 
five acres of sweet potatoes, but the crop in 1911 was light, aggre- 
gating only one hundred barrels. In 1911 Mr. Rich leased thirty 
acres of bottom land and raised a thousand bushels of fine corn. In 
addition to these crops he raises many varieties of small fruits and 
vegetables, such as blackberries, raspberries, early grapes, tomatoes, 
muskmelons, cantaloupes, cucumbers, peas, beans, Irish potatoes, in fact 
practically any temperate zone fruit or vegetable which he may select. 
One of the most attractive sights on the big farm are the vineyards, 
when the vines are loaded with the purple fruit. It is safe to estimate 
that Mr. Rich has averaged a clear profit of a thousand dollars annually 
from his farming operations in the past thirty years. Mr. Rich is not 
purely a farmer, but is interested in other lines of business owning, 
in partnership with his brother, a sweet potato storehouse in Cobden, 
which is valued at five thousand dollars. 

He believes firmly in the spirit of brotherhood as found in the fra- 
ternal orders and is a member of the local chapter of the Knights of 
Pythias. He is a regular attendant and firm supporter of the Presby- 



582 HISTORY OF SOUTHEEN ILLINOIS 

terian church, and in politics is a strong Democrat, who has been many 
times an active party worker. 

Mr. Rich has had five children, only two of whom are living, namely, 
Claude W. and George R. Having lived in Union county all of his life, 
Mr. Rich has had innumerable opportunities to prove to his friends and 
acquaintances his strength of character, business ability and genuine 
interest in those matters pertaining to the general welfare of the com- 
munity. He is therefore a valued citizen, honored by all who know 
him, a man whom Union county is proud to claim as her own. 

JOSEPH L. MEADS. The old axiom which tells us that kind words 
and gentle deeds live forever is one which not only inspires the mind 
with its sublimity, but its truth is so often brought home to us, and 
so forcibly, that it affords a solace that we do not always feel. A noble 
life invariably begets its full measure of love and veneration, and even 
though myriads of kindnesses done and self-sacrificing efforts are lost to 
earth, there is always the satisfied sense in the mind of the donor of a 
duty well done. All men who have been so graciously endowed with 
that most precious of all human attributes, love for their fellow men, 
have been amply repaid for their self-obligation, generosity and. charity, 
and this truism has been exemplified in the life of Joseph L. Meads, 
than whom there is no better-known or more beloved evangelistic 
worker in the United States. Mr. Meads, who is now a resident of 
Benton, Illinois, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, February 25, 1868, 
and is a son of George W. and Harriet (Hatfield) Meads. 

The Meads family originated in England, where the name was 
spelled Meadows. Little is known of the family other than that George 
W. Meads was born in Pennsylvania, moved in his youth to St. Louis, 
Missouri, and eventually settled in Jackson county, Illinois, where he 
followed carpentry until his death, and that he was a soldier during the 
Mexican war. The Hatfield family was founded in America by Mr. 
Meads' great-grandfather, who came from Ireland as a young man and 
settled in Illinois, where Mr. Meads' grandfather, Andrew J. Hatfield, 
was born. He moved to Jackson county in young manhood, engaged 
in farming and stockraising and became a well known citizen. He died 
in 1870. 

Joseph L. Meads received a common school education and began 
preaching when he was twenty-one years of age. He soon became 
prominent as an organizer of churches, establishing the congregations 
at Murphysboro, Marion, Chester, Creal Springs, Johnsonville, Illinois, 
and Pierceton, Indiana, and others of the Free Baptist denomination. 
He was pastor for a time at Murphysboro and Chester, but gave up 
his charges to engage in work as a Union Evangelist, and he has since 
become one of the best known and most successful evangelistic workers 
in the country, to every part of which he has traveled. He has just 
closed a very successful meeting in Iowa. Possessed of the gift of 
oratory, with an excellent voice and a pleasant appearance, Mr. Meads 
has been an able and successful lecturer. He resides in a beautiful home 
in Benton, where he stands in the highest esteem of his fellow citizens. 
In 1902 he published a book, "Ethen's Overcomings, " which received 
very favorable notices from the press and critics. 

On May 10, 1893, Mr. Meads was united in marriage with Mary 
Estella Waldo, daughter of Richard and Rebecca (Spence) Waldo. 
Richard Waldo, who was a relative of Ralph Waldo Emerson, was born 
in Virginia, and as a young man came to Illinois. He enlisted in the 
Civil war as a member of the Union army, and on its close located in 
business in Marion county, where his death occurred. Rebecca Spence, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 583 

his wife, was a daughter of Daniel Spence, a noted Southern Illinois 
abolitionist, who was also a farmer and well known local Methodist 
Episcopal preacher. Mr. and Mrs. Meads have had six children : Mary 
Eileen, who is in her third year in high school; Joseph L., Richard, 
Nina, and Giles, all of whom are attending school; and Virginia, the 
baby. The family is connected with the Free Will Baptist church. 
Mr. Meads has identified himself with Oddfellowship, and in his poli- 
tical views has supported the principles of the Prohibition party in the 
great work it has accomplished in Southern Illinois during the 
last few years. Mr. Meads' busy and fruitful life has made its impress 
upon the country, and his gentle though manly disposition has made 
him hosts of friends in every section that he has visited. 

JOHN W. MOORE. Every line of business is being successfully prose- 
cuted in the flourishing city of Anna, Illinois, for it is of sufficient im- 
portance to command a large trade from the surrounding country, and 
the people who make it their market demand the best of goods and 
service. One of the enterprising and progressive business men of this 
city is John W. Moore, who has been identified with various lines of 
endeavor, and is now dealing in wholesale and retail groceries and 
seeds, with a trade that extends over several states. Mr. Moore is a 
native of the Prairie State, having been born in Massac county in 1872, 
and is a son of Francis M. and Emma B. (Phillips) Moore. 

Francis M. Moore was born in the state of Indiana in 1838, from 
whence he emigrated as a young man to Massac county, there carrying 
on the trade of blacksmith until his death in 1876. His widow, who 
was born in Tennessee in 1848, brought her family to Anna in 1880, 
and here the youth grew to manhood, securing a somewhat limited 
education in the public schools, as he was compelled to give up his 
studies early in order to contribute to his own' support. He secured 
employment in the mercantile establishment of J. C. DeWitt, with 
whom he resided while working, and continued in that gentleman's 
employ until 1894, at which time he entered the business field 
on his own account on South Railway Street. After three years 
he sold his interests to Mrs. A. I. Jean, and began to work in 
the blacksmith and farm implement business of W. C. Mangold, with 
whom he continued for two years, at which time the firm of Mangold- 
Moore Implement, Hardware & Harness Company was established. 
Mr. Moore was vice-president of this business, which handled imple- 
ments, hardware and harness, and was capitalized at $10,000, but after 
continuing in that line for two years Mr. Moore sold out and bought 
his present business from Mr. DeWitt. He carries wholesale and retail 
groceries and seeds, but the greater part of his attention has been given 
to the wholesale seed trade, which, during the eight years that he has 
been in charge of the business, has increased from $8,000 to $40,000 
sales' yearly. His goods are shipped all over Illinois and into several 
adjoining states, and the manner in which he has carried on his deal- 
ings lias gained him customers that have done business with him year . 
after year. Mr. Moore is possessed of superior business ability, and the 
rapid growth of the Moore Seed Company may be attributed to the 
progressive ideas and methods which he has introduced. His belief 
in the future of Anna has been made manifest by his association with 
movements for promoting the interests of the city, as well as by his 
investment in a number of pieces of valuable real estate. 

Mr. Moore was married to Miss Oma. Peeler, who was born in John- 
son county, in 1874, daughter of J. C. and Nancy (Evers) Peeler, and 
three children have been born to this union : Ernestine, who is five 



584 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

years old; and John C. and Jean C., twins, who are two years of age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and much interested in its work, Mr. Moore at present acting as a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. He belongs to Blue Lodge No. 520 and 
Royal Arch Chapter No. 45, of Masonry, and to the Odd Fellows, all 
of Anna. In political matters he is a Republican, but he has found 
his business duties too engrossing to allow him to enter the political 
field as an active participant. 

JOHN A. HALE, M. D. As practicing physician of Alto Pass and 
founder and editor of its principal newspaper the Enterprise, Dr. 
John A. Hale is one of the busiest and most prominent men in that 
thriving little city. A resident of Alto Pass since 1896, he has in the 
intervening years built up a wide general practice and become well and 
favorably known among those people who go to make up his clientele, 
and his further labors as editor of the Weekly Enterprise have brought 
him a prominence in Union county that renders him a leading figure 
in his community. 

Born December 16, 1866, in Anna, Illinois, John A. Hale is the son 
of Dr. J. I. Hale, a native of Union county, who is proprietor of the 
Hale Sanatorium of Anna, details of his life and work being given 
mention elsewhere in this history of Southern Illinois. 

John A. Hale was educated in the Anna schools, and following 
his public school years he attended and was graduated from the Union 
Academy of Anna in 1886. Later he was graduated from the Beau- 
mont Hospital Medical College, now comprising the medical depart- 
ment of St. Louis University, in March, 1888. He practiced medicine 
for six months at Dongola, then in December of that year he located in 
Olmstead, where he remained for a period of six years in the active 
practice of his profession. From June, 1894, to 1896 he was occupied 
as assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics in Beaumont Hospital Med- 
ical College in St. Louis, and in June of 1896 he located in Alto Pass, 
where he has built up an excellent practice. Previous to studying 
medicine, Dr. Hale had served some little time as a newspaper reporter, 
and from time to time throughout his college career he supplemented his 
income by his earnings in that manner, on a number of occasions 
acting as court reporter. These various experiences were of assistance 
to him when he decided in 1904 to establish a newspaper in Alto Pass. 
He went about the work, and in that year he succeeded in successfully 
launching the Enterprise, and it has been since its inception a well 
patronized and satisfactory newspaper. It is a six column eight page, 
newsy sheet, devoted to the best interests of Alto Pass and its people. 
The plant is thoroughly modern, having a power equipment of approved 
order, with modern presses and other appliances suited to the require- 
ments of such a plant. On the whole Dr. Hale is quite as successful in 
his newspaper venture as with his professional career. 

Dr. Hale is an inveterate student, and has mastered fully the French, 
German and Spanish languages, in addition to which he is widely read 
on all topics touching upon the interests of his professional and busi- 
ness life. He is a well known contributor to a number of the best 
medical journals, and is local surgeon for the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 
Fraternally the Doctor is affiliated with the A. F. & A. M., Odd Fellows 
the Modern Woodmen of Alto Pass. He is also a charter member of 
the Illinois State Academy of Science, the Union County Medical So- 
ciety, The American Medical Association and the Illinois State Medical 
Association. 

In 1891 Dr. Hale was married to Jessie Lewis, of Olmstead, the 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 585 

daughter of Jesse Lewis, a native of Grayson county, Kentucky. They 
are members of the Congregational church of Alto Pass. 

FRANK HOPKINS. A man who has ever been useful in his com- 
munity, and an able assistant in promoting its material interests, Frank 
Hopkins, postamaster at Makanda, has been, a resident of the place for 
many years, and has well performed his part in sustaining the intellec- 
tual and moral status of this section of Jackson county. He was born 
April 13, 1851, near Bloomfield, Stoddard county, Missouri, and is of 
excellent New England stock. 

His father, James Carroll Hopkins, a native of Rhode Island, 
studied surveying when young, and later, as a civil engineer in the 
employ of the United States Government, laid out the Pan Handle sec- 
tion of Texas. He was given a grant of a league and labore of land, 
and as a man and a citizen became so prominent and popular that when 
Hopkins county, Texas, was organized it was named in his honor. His 
death, which occurred in 1858, was the result of a fall. He was a stanch 
Republican in politics, and a strong supporter of John C. Fremont. 
He was a devout member of the Methodist church, in which he often 
preached. When about forty-five years of age he married Lovina 
Sifford, a native of North Carolina, and of the four children born of 
their union two are now living, as follows: Frank, the special subject 
of this brief personal record; and Mrs; M. J. McCullum, of Bloomfield, 
Missouri. A short time after the death of her husband she was acci- 
dentally shot, and her youngest child, then an infant, was killed. 

Brought up in Missouri during his boyhood days, Frank Hopkins 
not only received an excellent training in the various branches of 
agriculture, but as a hunter became an expert in gunning and trap- 
ping. At the age of seventeen years he came to Illinois, locating in 
Williamson county, where he worked during the summer seasons as a 
farm hand, and for two winters attended the district schools. An in- 
dustrious and intelligent student, he acquired an excellent education, 
and subsequently taught school in both Jackson and Williamson coun- 
ties and in southeastern Missouri. When ready to settle permanently 
he accepted a position as clerk in the general store of Captain Bailey, 
who was postmaster, and in the summer seasons had charge of the post 
office, while during winter time he taught school, having been made 
postmaster on March 18, 1872. He subsequently completed the course 
of study at the State Normal School in Carbondale, after which he 
attended Valparaiso University, in Valparaiso, Indiana. He became 
well versed in law, and was admitted to the bar in Missouri, but his pro- 
fessional practice has since been confined to the justice courts. On 
May 30, 1889, Mr. Hopkins was appointed postmaster at Makanda, by 
President Harrison, and served four years, when, under President 
Cleveland's administration, he was relieved. In 1897 he was again 
appointed postmaster, and has served continuously since, being well 
qualified for the position, and popular with the patrons of the post 
office. 

Mr. Hopkins married, May 24, 1885, Melissa J. Johnson, and into 
the household thus established two children have been born, namely : 
David Llewellyn, who is a bridgeman for the Free Bridge at Saint 
Louis ; and John James, whose earthly life was of short duration, 
covering a period of twelve months and twelve days. Mrs. Hopkins is 
a capable and estimable woman, and is now serving as assistant post- 
mistress. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins are valued members of the Con- 
gregational church. 

Politically Mr. Hopkins is an ardent supporter of the principles 



586 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

promulgated by the Republican party, and has filled the various village 
and township offices" with .acceptance to all. Fraternally he belongs 
to Makanda Lodge, No. 434, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of 
Masons, of which he is worshipful past master. 

JOHN FRANK ROBERTS. A native son of Southern Illinois who has 
resided in the city of Cairo and been identified with its commercial 
interests since 1905, John Frank Roberts, vice-president of the Deni- 
son-Gholson Dry Goods Company, is known as one of the leading busi- 
ness men of his section. He came to this city from Jackson county, 
Illinois, where he spent the incipient years of his career, but his birth 
occurred in Williamson county, January 9, 1869. Mr. Roberts' 
parents moved into Jackson county during his childhood, and the en- 
vironment of the country home and the work of the farm was his while 
he passed his minority, and his education was started in the district 
schools and completed in Ewing College and 0. M. Powers' Business 
College, Chicago. 

James B. Roberts, the father of John Frank Roberts, was born in 
Tennessee, in 1842, and about 1844 came with his father, John A. 
Roberts, to Union county, Illinois, the latter being one of the founders 
of the community at Lick Creek, who died at that point. James B. 
Roberts was one of a family of thirteen children, of whom eleven grew 
to maturity, and he began life as a farmer with such preparation as the 
district school of the ante-bellum days afforded. For several years 
after his marriage he was a resident of Williamson county, where he 
was elected to public office and maintained himself honorably as a citi- 
zen and as a man. In political matters he was a Democrat, while his 
religious affiliations was with the Missionary Baptist church. He 
married Miss Caroline Rendleman, a daughter of John Rendle- 
man and a granddaughter of Jacob Rendleman, who founded the 
family in Illinois by settling near Jonesboro, where he passed 
away at the age of seventy-eight years. Inquiry into his activi- 
ties shows him to have "been an extensive farmer and tanner, and to 
have died possessed of a modest fortune. Jacob's father was Dr. John 
Rendleman, who came from Germany and settled on the Yadkin river, 
in Stokes county, North Carolina, in 1757. He was a prominent 
surgeon, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania in the same 
class with Dr. Benjamin Rush, for whom Rush Medical College, Chi- 
cago, was named, and was a soldier of Washington's army, and one 
of those who crossed the Delaware on the stormy Christmas night to 
participate in the battle of Trenton. James B. Roberts died at Anna, 
Illinois, in 1899, and his widow followed him to the grave during the 
next year, at the age of fifty-one. Their children were Charles W., 
a farmer near Makanda, Illinois ; Edward, who is president and man- 
ager of a pharmaceutical business in St. Louis, Missouri ; Stella M., the 
wife of George G. Patterson, an agriculturist near Makanda ; and John 
Frank. , 

John Frank Roberts, who is the oldest of his parents' children, be- 
gan his life seriously as a merchant at Cobden, Illinois, spending six 
years there in the retail business as a general merchant, and then re- 
moved to Makanda, where he carried on a more pretentious business 
and where his success was apparent and acknowledged. Desiring a 
wider field .for his attainments, he seized the opportunity to associate 
himself with the large wholesale dry goods houses of Cairo, and dis- 
posed of his Makanda interests. Purchasing a large interest in the 
Denison-Gholson Dry Goods Company, he was elected vice-president 
thereof and is one of the men of the firm. Wherever he has resided he 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 587 

has responded to the needs and demands of his community with moral 
and material aid, and his present connection adds a new factor in the 
civic improvement of greater Cairo. 

On May 15, 1890, Mr. Roberts was married in Franklin county, 
Illinois, to Miss Effie Link, a daughter of Robert R. Link, one of the his- 
toric characters of Ewing College, and, in conjunction with Dr. Wash- 
burn, its founder. In 1869 Professor Link was graduated from Cum- 
berland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, lived near Nashville prior to 
his coming to Illinois, was actively identified with the Prohibition 
movement in this state, and was frequently a candidate of that party, 
being honored with the nomination for governor of the state just prior 
to his death. He married Elizabeth J. Webb, daughter of a Baptist 
minister of the state of Tennessee, Rev. Elijah Webb, originally from 
the Rendleman region of North Carolina. Robert R. Link passed away 
in 1893, at the age of sixty years, having been the father of: Will C., 
a resident of Benton, Illinois ; Alice L., the wife of John Richeson, of 
St. Louis; Effie, who married Mr. Roberts; and Nancy, the wife of 
Robert F. Hall, of Ewing, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts have had two 
children ; Rosalind, who was born July 8, 1891 ; and Roberta, whose 
birth occurred May 17, 1894. 

ALBERT J. WILL. Of the many industries centered in and around 
Herrin that of the manufacture of soft drinks contributes in a small 
degree to the support of the army of labor and in a large degree to the 
pleasure of that same army. The father of this business in Herrin and 
its present head is Albert J. Will. He is a busy man of affairs, yet he 
has time from his daily work to represent his neighbors in the alder- 
manic counsel, and stands a ready champion of any progressive 
measure. 

Mr. Will was born on the 14th of November, 1874, in Jackson county, 
Illinois. After receiving a thorough education in the district schools 
he turned to farming, which pursuit engaged him during his minority. 
This was the natural course for him to pursue, since his father, D. R. 
Will, of Ava, Illinois, born in Jackson county in 1847 and having spent 
his youth in the country, early became a farmer and has devoted his life 
to the cultivation of the soil and the improvement of his various crops. 
The father of this worthy man was Frank Will, who migrated to this 
section from Pennsylvania when the country was yet a wilderness. This 
sturdy old pioneer and his wife raised a large family of children, now 
scattered widely over the United States. The eldest of these, D. R., 
is the father of the manufacturer. The other children are Freeman, 
a farmer of Jackson county; Cordelia, who married Hardy Gill and 
has since died; Kate, who died as the wife of Thomas Holt; Emma, 
Mrs. Phillip Fager, now living in Murphysboro; the twins, Ervin and 
Ollie, the. former residing in St. Louis, while the latter is the wife of 
Frank Friedline and lives in the state of Washington; Berdie is the 
widow of James Redd, and now makes her home at De Soto, Illinois; 
Jane married J. Childers and lives in Texas ; Nora is Mrs. Jo Schroeder, 
living in Murphysboro; and Julia is the wife of Samuel Partington, of 
the same city. At the age of sixty-five the august founder of this family 
passed away, his home at the time being three miles north-east of Mur- 
physboro. 

D. R. Will married Miss Jeanette Elliot, and their children are: 
Ollie, the wife of Reuben Kinley, living in Los Angeles, California; 
Fred, who has remained near home as a farmer in Jackson county; 
Frank, living in Los Angeles with his sister; and Albert J. The latter 
was onlv a babv of two rears when his mother died, but he was fortunate 



588 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

in that his father married for his second wife Josie Elliot, a cousin of 
his first wife. Three sons were born of this marriage, Homer, an engi- 
neer on the Mobile and Ohio, running out of Murphysboro; Howard, 
of Aurora; and Ross now living in Chicago. 

Albert J. Will on attaining his majority gave up the quiet farm life 
and entered the manufacturing business at Murphysboro, Illinois, as 
a member of the Murphysboro Bottling Company. This business has 
proved a very lucrative one, and although he left Murphysboro in 1905 
and established the Herrin Bottling Company, he still remains a mem- 
ber of the former concern. The growth of his business in Herrin 
necessitated the erection of a concrete building for the housing of 
the factory, its capacity being two hundred cases per day. 

Mr. Will takes a deep interest in politics and is now serving his 
third term as alderman from the First ward. He is in the forefront 
of a movement to establish a system of water works, thinking thereby 
to lessen disease as well as to make the lives of his fellow townsmen 
more comfortable. Also believing that the burden of town improve- 
ments should be partitioned justly, he has favored the special assess- 
ment policy for the laying of concrete walks. 

The first wife of Albert J. Will was Sophia Sundmacher, whom he 
married in Murphysboro, Illinois, on the 1st of July, 1902. She only 
lived a few years, dying on August 17, 1906, and leaving a baby daugh- 
ter, Jeanette J. Mr. Will married his second wife, Mary Steinle, on 
October 11, 1907. She was of German parentage, her father being 
John Steinle, of Minnesota. Christina, John Albert, and Ervin Ross 
are the children born of this union. 

Mr. Will is by inheritance a member of the Republican party, and 
by choice gives it his warm interest and hearty support. In religious 
matters the family are Lutheran, and are prominent in the work of 
this church. 

The courage to go ahead into untried fields, as was shown by his 
giving the comparatively sure success that would have been his had 
he stayed on the farm for the risk involved in starting a new business, 
has continued to evince itself in Mr. Will's dealings with men, for he 
will not swerve from his ideals of justice and fair dealing. It is this 
trait which has been one of the principal factors in placing him where 
he now stands, high in the respect of the community. 

WILLIAM J. FERJST, M. D. Few men are sufficiently versatile to suc- 
cessfully pursue two separate and entirely different vocations during 
their lives. Rare, indeed, does the physician while carrying on a large 
practice become the proprietor of a general merchandise business that 
carries a stock of ten thousand dollars worth of goods, but this has been 
accomplished by Dr. William J. Fern, of Tunnel Hill, who also super- 
intends the operation of four hundred and eighty acres of- excellent 
farming land. Dr. Fern was born November 18, 1846, on a farm in 
Johnson county, and is a son of Lawrence W. Fern. 

James Fern, the grandfather of Dr. Fern, was born in Eng- 
land, and came from that country to the United States in 1823, settling 
with his family in Otsego county, New York, near Cooperstown, where 
he spent the rest of his life. His son. Lawrence W., who was born in 
England in 1814, left New York in 1840 for Texas, but after spending 
some time in the Lone Star state started to return to New York, his 
funds having become low. Stopping in Johnson county, Illinois, he 
began teaching subscription schools in order to secure money to com- 
plete his journey, but, liking the country and seeing its future possi- 
bilities, he filed a claim on Government land, settled down to farming, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 589 

and at the time of his death was the owner of two hundred acres of fine 
land. He married Mrs. Ellendra (Leslie) Ford, a widow who had two 
children, and died July 15, 1894, she surviving him until 1909, when 
she passed away at the age of eighty-seven years. They had the follow- 
ing children : Mrs. Sarah Lemons ; William J. ; Andrew J. ; George W., 
who is deceased ; Mrs. Missouri Whitesides ; Mrs. Anna Simpson ; Mrs. 
Fannie Willis; and Caroline and Florence, who died in infancy. 

William J. Fern was reared on the home farm and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools. In 1865 he began the study of medicine 
in a physician's office, and in 1866 entered Rush Medical College, Chi- 
cago, from which he was graduated February 5, 1868. He began prac- 
tice at Grantsburg, Johnson county, where he continued seven years, 
and after spending one year in Vienna came to Tunnel Hill, in 1876, 
where he has since had a large and lucrative clientele. In 1885 Dr. 
Fern opened a merchandise store, and erected a building in which he 
started the present firm of W. J. Fern & Son, which now carries a ten 
thousand dollar stock and does business throughout Tunnel Hill and the 
surrounding country. Associated with him in this business are his 
sons, Lawrence D. and William, and his son-in-law, Robert S. Gilliam. 
In addition to this large interest Dr. Fern has one farm of two hundred 
and eighty acres and several smaller tracts, and has considerable real 
estate holdings in Tunnel Hill and other towns. 

He is well and favorably known to the members of his profession, 
and holds membership in the Johnson County, Illinois State and 
American Medical Associations, and is fraternally connected with the 
Lodge and Chapter of Masonry and the Odd Fellows. He is possessed 
of considerable more than the ordinary business ability, and is a man 
of progressive ideas and much public spirit. 

On October 14, 1869, Dr. Fern was married to Miss Sarah J. Poor, 
daughter of S. D. and Sarah J. Poor, of Johnson county, and to this 
union there have been born children as follows: Cora, who died in in- 
fancy ; Nora F., who married Robert S. Gilliam ; Lawrence D., associated 
with his father in business, and postmaster of Tunnel Hill since 
January 30, 1907, married Maggie Whitehead, now deceased, and has 
two children, Herbert and Louis ; William, connected with the grocery 
store conducted by his father, married Ada Taylor and has two chil- 
dren, William and Lucille ; and the two youngest children of the sub- 
ject, Charles Otto and Roy, both died in infancy. 

CHARLES W. WHEELER. A seeming incident is oft times sufficient 
to change the whole course of a human life, to alter forever the intents 
and purposes of a plan of action previously decided upon and to es- 
tablish the subsequent fortunes of a generation yet unborn. Thus, 
in the case of Charles W. Wheeler, had he carried out his original plan 
of action and embarked on the South American cruise to which he was 
practically committed by agreement, and for which he was eminently 
fitted by previous experience and by his natural inclinations, it is 
a foregone conclusion that the record of his life and work would read 
differently than is set forth in the following brief history. 

Charles W. Wheeler was born in Stratford, Fairfield county, Con- 
necticut, on October 10, 1840. The Wheeler family had been identified 
with that section of the country since early colonial days, and in the 
struggle for independence various members of the family took active 
and prominent parts. Samuel Wheeler, the grandfather of Charles 
W. Wheeler, was born in those parts on September 10, 1777, lived his 
life there and died on March 29, 1858, at the age of eighty-one years. 
He was a seaman for a time, later a ship chandler, and for many years 



590 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

ran a packet along the shores of the sound. He also owned consider- 
able land in the vicinity of his home. Among his several children 
was Levi, the father of Charles W. Wheeler, born May 20, 1796, and 
passed his life in the vicinity of his birth as a longshoreman and boat- 
man. He married Elvira, the daughter of Abijah and Abbie Betsey 
(Curtiss) Booth, both being members of old families established in the 
Nutmeg state in the early days of the young colonies, and she was born 
September 5, 1805, dying on December 18, 1882. The issue o'f Levi 
and Elvira Wheeler were : Sarah A., who became the wife of Alfred 
Curtiss; Mary E., who married William H. Batterson; Abbie H., who 
became Mrs. W T illia'm Whipple ; Francis Otis ; Charles W. ; and 
Gertrude B., who married Bruce H. Weller. 

The common schools of the vicinity in which he lived and was reared 
gave to Charles W. Wheeler such education as he was permitted to gain 
from books, although he was trained in an atmosphere of thrift and 
industry that stood him in good stead in later life. The home en- 
vironments and his father's example no doubt did much to instill in 
him the love for a seafaring life, and while yet a youth of tender years 
he made many trips along the shore with skippers known to him and 
the elder Wheeler. He worked for a time as a longshoreman, and later 
as a minor clerk with a local merchant he gained some knowledge of 
that business. The sea, however, drew him, and he made all plans to 
embark on a series of voyages to South American ports as handy boy 
and skipper's companion, when he was induced by a relative in Illi- 
nois to join him here. The prospect of seeing life in the western coun- 
try proved alluring to the boy, and he finally abandoned the seafaring 
project and came to Illinois. There he entered the employ of a rail- 
road company with whom his relative was connected, and he remained 
thus until the call for volunteers came at the breaking out of the Re- 
bellion, and he first enlisted in the state service for thirty days at New- 
ton, Jasper county, Colonel S. S. Good being in command of the regi- 
ment and rendezvoused at Mattoon. When he entered the United States 
service at Springfield it was as a member of Company K, of the Twenty- 
first Infantry Volunteers with Colonel U. S. Grant in command. The 
regiment rendezvoused at Springfield, Illinois, and was later ordered 
into northern Missouri, where it scattered the Confederate command 
under General Jeff Thompson, and at Mexico the sick of the command 
of Colonel Grant was left in charge of Mr. Wheeler while the regiment 
moved southward to Pilot Knob. Mr. Wheeler removed his invalid 
camp to St. Louis, and remained there with it until June, 1862, at which 
time he was discharged from the army for disability. During his ser- 
vice he had contracted a form of rheumatism which totally incapacitated 
him for further duties of a military nature, and he remained for 
several- months at Olney, Illinois, while his health was recuperating. 
In 1863 he came to Cairo and found employment with the Adams 
Express Company, where he continued until the close of the war. 
Concluding his service with the Adams Express Company, he entered 
the employ of Gaff, Cochran & Company, a Cincinnati firm doing a hay 
and gram business in the city of Cincinnati, supplying the Govern- 
ment with feed and doing an immense volume of river business under 
contract. Following the termination of his connection with them, Mr. 
Wheeler was in the employ of Trovar Homans & Company and still 
later with the Cairo City Coal Company, in which connection he learned 
the details of management which later enabled him to establish and 
conduct a similar business on his own responsibility, which he did in 
the early seventies. Thereafter he conducted a thriving wood and 
coal business in Cairo until the year 1902, when he retired from that 



OF THE 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 591 

Dusiness and went to live on the farm which he had acquired and 
development in recent years. In 1882 Mr. Wheeler purchased a tract 
of land with a view to making it the family home in later years, and he 
now has a quarter section of farm land under cultivation, which for 
fertility and general productiveness defies competition. There he has 
lived for the past ten years in happiness and content, believing it to 
be the place of all places most suited to the proper development and 
early training of his young children. Every other interest in life is 
secondary to his determination to make a happy home for his family 
and rear them amidst the beauties of nature, and there the retired coal 
merchant of Cairo is spending his closing days in peace and plenty. 

Mr. Wheeler has been twice married. First at Gratiot, Wisconsin, 
to Mrs. Amanda Spense, a daughter of Samuel Bragg. The children 
of their union are: Sarah A., a resident of Jonesboro, Georgia; Ella, 
living in St. Louis, Missouri; Josie, residing in Chicago, all three of 
whom are married; Augusta and Charles, who died in infancy; and 
Charles F., still a member of the family circle. The wife and mother 
passed away at the family home in Cairo in 1895. Mr. Wheeler's second 
marriage made him the husband of Agnes C. Glynn, a sister of John 
P. Glynn, one of the foremost business men at Cairo. The children of 
his later marriage are : Martha, Eugene, Elizabeth, John P., Albert G. 
(commonly known as "Bill"), Abbie and Matthew. 

In retrospection, Mr. Wheeler can recall many an incident and 
thrilling adventure beyond what is the usual lot of man. His early 
seafaring trips when but a lad yield memories never to be forgotten; 
his war experience marks an epoch in his life replete with interest and 
adventure ; and his life is full of memories that make him a most inter- 
esting raconteur, which will never permit him to become other than 
a delightful companion to those with whom he comes in contact. 

The life of Mr. Wheeler has been lived singularly apart from the 
influences of either religious or fraternal organizations and in a politi- 
cal way he is inclined to act independent of party interests, but always 
with a view to the betterment of general conditions. 

DR. ANDREW E. MILLER. "A prince of well-doers in this frail taber- 
nacle of mortality" is Doctor Andrew E. Miller, who is actively en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine at Metropolis, Illinois. Still some 
distance short in years of the meridian of existence, Dr. Miller has al- 
ready attained to the zenith of professional and personal regard amid 
his fellowmen, and is enjoying a measure of esteem that is greatly to 
be desired but rarely attained. 

Dr. Miller was born in Metropolis, July 30, 1871. His intellect- 
ual training was begun in the city schools, and .continued in the South- 
ern Illinois Normal, where be graduated from the classical course in 
1889. His first employment was as clerk in the post office of his native 
town, in which capacity he served under Norman J. Slack, at that time 
the postmaster. Going into a drug store as assistant, he conceived an 
ambition to employ the forces derived from Nature which lay before 
him on the shelves by his own knowledge instead of at the direction of 
others, and consecrated his future life as a disciple of Esculapius. He 
entered the medical department of the Cincinnati University, where 
he finished the course with honors and graduated in May, 1900. Open- 
ing an office in Metropolis, among the people of his childhood, he 
speedily became one of the favored men of his profession. His skill 
as a diagnostician is equaled by his practical application of remedies 
and his skill as a surgeon. He is a member of the local medical society, 
and also of the Illinois State and the American Medical Associations. 



592 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Dr. Miller's father was Henry Miller, a native of Hanover, Ger- 
many, who was born in 1836, and who died at Metropolis in 1909, uni- 
versally respected and esteemed. He came to the United States in 
1856, stopped among the Germans in Cincinnati for many years, and 
pushed on to Illinois just before the outbreak of the Civil War. The 
greater portion of his long and well-ordered existence was passed in 
the vigorous life of a farmer. His success led him in later life to 
enter the banking business as one of the stockholders of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Metropolis. Henry Miller married Minnie F. Thain, 
daughter of William Thaiu, who was also of sturdy Teutonic descent. 
The children were : Dr. Miller, the subject of this sketch ; William, 
whose location is unknown; George, who died in Metropolis leaving a 
family ; Henry ; Benjamin, who died unmarried at Metropolis ; and 
Simon, a resident of LaMesa, New Mexico. 

Dr. Miller is highly regarded in fraternal circles, being a Mason of 
the chivalric rank of Knights Templars, a Knight of Pythias and a 
Red Man. His life is full and well-rounded with one exception. He 
has never fallen a victim to Cupid's arrows. This, to the notion of 
his legion of friends, is the only rift within the lute and they wish in all 
sincerity that it may be the way of providence that in due time he may 
come to be the presiding spirit of a happy home, and arrive at the full 
meaning of good citizenship in all that the term implies. 

ADELBERT LE ROY SPILLEB, familiarly known as Roy Spiller, one 
of the prominent and Influential citizens and leading lawyers of Car- 
bondale, has recently won special regard and high approval in the 
city by his able and successful advocacy of the commission form of 
government, which is now in force in the municipality, but he is en- 
titled to and enjoys general public approval and esteem for many other 
reasons. He is a native of Jackson county, and has passed his life to 
this time (1911) almost wholly among its people. They are therefore 
familiar with his high character and upright living, his ability as a 
lawyer, his worth as a man and his usefulness as a citizen. They also 
know and appreciate all he has done for their welfare. 

Mr. Spiller was born on his father's farm in this county, on Feb- 
ruary 2, 1873. He is a son of William G. and Elma (Bartholomew) 
Spiller, who are well known throughout the county and enjoy in a 
marked degree the regard and good will of its inhabitants. Their son 
Roy grew to manhood on the farm and performed his part of its useful 
but exacting labor, meanwhile attending the public school near his 
home to obtain his elementary scholastic education. This he continued 
at the Southern Illinois Normal University, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1896, and completed at Dixon College, in the city of the same 
name in this state. 

After leaving college he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 
May, 1900. He at once located in Carbondale and began the practice 
of his profession, devoting himself to it generally in all its develop- 
ments, but making something of a specialty of chancery and testa- 
mentary law. During the last six years he has been mastery in 
chancery for Jackson county, and has made an excellent record as such 
by the extent and comprehensiveness of his knowledge and his absolute 
fairness and excellent judgment in applying it to the cases before him. 
He has also rendered the city excellent service as its official attorney. 

Mr. Spiller has always manifested a warm and practical interest in 
the city and county of his home and here done everything in his power 
to promote their welfare. He is a great believer in purity in govern- 
ment, municipal, state and national, and his earnest desire to establish 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 593 

it in Carbondale as far as possible made him a strong and determined 
advocate of the commission form of municipal rule when it was an issue 
before the people, and energetic in all the preliminary work of rousing 
public sentiment in its behalf in the process of making it an issue. 

He has also been useful in promoting the progress and improvement 
of the city and county in many other ways. No undertaking for the 
development or betterment of the community in any way has ever gone 
without his effective practical support since he reached man's Estate, and 
his aid has always been cheerfully given, intelligently guided and fruit- 
ful in good results, both in its own force and in the activity awakened 
in others by his influence and example. 

On December 26, 1906, he was united in marriage with Miss Nettie 
Lenore, the daughter of Samuel and Mary Heiter, prosperous Stephen- 
son county farmers living near Freeport, this state. Two children have 
been born to the union, Elma Lenore and Adelbert Le Roy. The father 
is prominent and enterprising in the fraternal life of the region as a 
member of the Order of Odd Fellows, the Order of Knights of Pythias 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he is a Republican, 
but has never been an active partisan always a good and useful citizen. 

DR. HOSEA AUGUST VISE. The annals of Southern Illinois would 
not be complete without mention of the name of the Vise family and 
chronicles of the part the pioneers of that family took in furthering the 
progress and development of this section of the country. Hosea Vise 
was one of the most renowned and learned Baptist ministers who ever 
preached in Southern Illinois, beginning his ministry in this section 
nearly a hundred years ago. This sturdy pioneer was born in South 
Carolina, in the eighteenth century, and when he struck out for the 
then western wilderness and Indian infested country there ^was no 
public means of transportation for passengers, and his first journey to 
Illinois he accomplished on foot. This was in 1830. He later returned 
to South Carolina in order to conduct his wife to his new field of labor, 
and on this journey Mr. Vise again walked, while his wife rode back 
with him on horseback. Hosea Vise was a man of strict principles and 
great independence of thought and action, and it is stated that when he 
lived in South Carolina he was the only prohibitionist in the county 
of which he was a citizen. During his lifetime he traveled all over the 
southern part of Illinois preaching the gospel wherever he went and 
was known by nearly every family in that section where he was 
familiarly, and lovingly known as Uncle Hosea. In his early life he 
taught school for a time and prepared his own text books, writing them 
with a quill pen. In later years he of course adopted printed books, 
but the library of old volumes which he left to his great-grandson, the 
present Dr. Hosea August Vise, is a valuable one, computed to be 
worth several hundreds of dollars. The Reverend Vise was moderator 
of the Franklin Baptist Association for thirty-one years. He lived to 
an extremely old age, his death occurring on February 11, 1893. Lafe 
Vise, his son, was born in Franklin county, Illinois, where he followed 
the pursuit of an agriculturist. This son in turn became the father of 
Harvey Vise, who was born in Franklin county in 1856 and is now one 
of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of this section of the 
state. He possesses exceedingly large and valuable land holdings and 
also owns and conducts one of the biggest mercantile establishments 
in the county. Harvey Vise is a self-made man who started in com- 
mercial life with a horse and wagon and the grit to establish a little 
store at Macedonia in 1874, when he was only eighteen years of age. 
He prospered greatly, however, and soon became a- man of great in- 



594 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

fluence and power in his community. His public spirit and liberality 
are of the highest and most generous character and to him in large 
measure is due the credit of building the Baptist church at Macedonia, 
and since its erection he has continued to contribute most generously 
to its support. In political matters also he exerts great influence. He 
is a Republican and a large following in Macedonia looks to him as a 
guide in forming and expressing their views on public matters. 

Dr. HRsea August Vise, of Benton, was born in Macedonia, Frank- 
lin county, Illinois, on August 10, 1881, the son of Harvey and Sarilda 
(Plasters) Vise. His mother died when he was but four years of age 
and he has accordingly missed the boon of a mother's love and care. 
After completing his studies in the grade and high schools of his home 
county he matriculated at Ewing College and graduated from that in- 
stitution of learning after a four-year course. He afterwards attended 
Washington University, at St. Louis, and in 1905 graduated from the 
St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Dr. Vise began active practice immediately after receiving his de- 
gree, locating first at Thompsonville, where he remained for two years. 
That field did not offer sufficient scope for his ambition and abilities, 
however, and he accordingly moved to Benton, and from the time when 
he first opened his office here, three years ago, he has enjoyed a large 
and lucrative practice both in Benton and throughout the county. 

On February 28, 1906, Dr. Vise was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Mitchell, daughter of George 0. Mitchell, a resident of Marion, 
Illinois, and manager of the Black Diamond Railroad. Mrs. Vise is 
a woman of charming personality and superior education, having 
attended the Carbondale Normal School for three years. One daughter 
has been born to bless the home of Dr. and Mrs. Vise, Marguerite Eller. 

Dr. ^Vise is active in social affairs as well as professional life in 
Benton and is a leading member of the Elks lodge and of the Masonic 
order. He is a man of keen intellect and progressive tendencies and 
keeps in touch with the latest developments of medical science and 
activities through his membership in the American Medical and the 
State Medical Associations. He is a member of the Baptist church, a 
man of high moral rectitude and unimpeachable personal integrity 
and justly enjoys the confidence of a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances in this section of the state. 

J. H. SCOTT. Occupying a position of prominence among the names 
of the enterprising and progressive men that have contributed largely 
toward the advancement of Eldorado's growth and prosperity is that 
of J. H. Scott, who has rendered splendid service as a public official, 
and as a man and a citizen is above reproach. A son of John L. Scott, 
he was born May 18, 1840, in Bedford county, Tennessee, but was 
brought up in Illinois. His paternal grandfather, John Scott, was 
born in South Carolina, and as a young man settled in Tennessee. He 
served as a soldier in the war of 1812. and under command of General 
Jackson took part in the battle of New Orleans. He spent his last 
years, however, in Southern Illinois, passing away at a good old age in 
Saline county. 

John L. Scott was born and reared in Tennessee, and there married 
Nancy Langley. In 1841 he came with his family to Illinois, settling 
near Springfield. There his wife died, and he subsequently removed 
with his children to that part of Gallatin county, Illinois, that is now 
included within the boundaries of Saline county, settling two miles 
north of the present village of Eldorado, and eight miles north of 
Equality, going there when the country was but sparsely settled, the 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 595 

neighbors being few and far between. Making another removal a 
short time later, he located in Kentucky, where he worked at his trade 
of a millwright, and engaged in milling, remaining there until Ms 
death, in 1853. Of the three children that had been born to him and 
his first wife, but two were then living, namely: J. H., the subject of 
this sketch ; and Julia Ann, two years younger, who is now the wife of 
G. E. Aaron, of Eldorado, Illinois. Besides these two children, he left 
a widow, his second wife, and their two children. 

After the death of his father, J. H. Scott came with his sister, his 
step-mother and his half-sister to Saline county, Illinois, where he had 
a few acquaintances, and where he supposed an uncle was living. 
Finding on his arrival, however, that the uncle had previously died, 
he first lived for a time with a family named Reed, and while there 
became acquainted with John Choisser, whose daughter became the 
wife of Captain William H. Parrish, of whom a brief personal sketch 
is given elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Scott and his sister Julia were 
both subsequently bound out to Mr. Choisser until they should become 
of age, Mr. Scott remaining in the family until long after the death of 
Mr. Choisser, having a good home. He attended school but little, but 
he acquired a practical knowledge of books and events, Mr. Choisser, 
who was a man of great intelligence, encouraging him to study at home 
by the fireside. 

Marrying when young, Mr. Scott rented land and engaged in farm- 
ing until 1862, when he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and 
Tenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, a Saline county company com- 
manded by Captain George E. Burnett. With his regiment he took part 
in the engagement at Nashville, and at the battle of Murfreesborough, 
on New Year's day, 1863, he was struck by a piece of shell, losing the 
sight of his left eye. Nothing daunted, however, Mr. Scott continued 
with his command, serving under Generals Buell and Rosecrans, and 
later marching with Sherman to Atlanta, thence to the sea and up 
through the Carolinas to Washington, where he took part in the Grand 
Review. Mr. Scott was promoted from the ranks to the position of cor- 
poral, and in that capacity was often detailed to special duty, carrying 
reports from headquarters to various commanders. 

Soon after receiving his discharge from the army Mr. Scott began 
work, for a time being employed in a drug store. Subsequently he 
rented a farm, and in addition to raising good crops worked in the store 
of John W. Cox. Having accumulated some money, he then bought, on 
time, the house which he now occupies, and paid eight hundred and fifty- 
seven dollars for eighty acres of land lying just west of Eldorado. He 
afterward traded that property for one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
and has since exchanged several pieces of land, his residential property, 
which he secured several years ago, containing four acres of choice land, 
on which he has erected seven tenement houses, the rentals of which 
bring him in a good annual income. 

For about fifteen years Mr. Scott conducted a general store in the' 
village of Eldorado, carrying on a substantial business. Ever on the. 
alert for opportunities to add to his prosperity, Mr. Scott, with four 
other men of enterprise, organized a company to bore for oil, and has 
the distinction of having started the first oil well in this part of Saline 
county. For ten years, from 1896 until 1906, Mr. Scott sold buggies 
and light vehicles throughout the western and extreme southeastern 
states, traveling in the interests of the Spalding Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Grinnell, Iowa. He was formerly a stockholder and for a time 
the superintendent of the old Eldorado Fair Grounds which are located 



596 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

very near his home, the land being now occupied by the Benlock Camp, 
in which Holiness Meetings are held. 

In April, 1907, Mr. Scott was elected mayor of Eldorado, and under 
his administration many improvements of value were inaugurated. The 
first concrete or brick crossings were laid, as were the first brick sewer 
pipes ; the first grades for sidewalks were made ; and the first iron 
bridges in the town were built ; he also worked hard to secure drainage, 
which the town, lying on a flat, badly needed, and became chairman of 
a committee to find suitable outlet for the drainage of a large district. 
Through his efforts many improvements that are still continued were 
established, great improvements in the sanitary and material condition 
of the town being made, while the foundation for a fine village was 
firmly fixed. 

Mr. Scott is a Republican in politics, although in local affairs votes 
for the best men and measures, regardless of party prejudice. At the 
age of eighteen years Mr. Scott united with the Baptist church, but for 
the past thirty years he has been an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, towards the support of which he is a liberal contrib- 
utor, and has served as district steward. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons ; of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; of the Daughters of Rebekah ; of the Improved 
Order of Red Men; and also belongs to Burnett Post, Grand Army of 
the Republic. 

Mr. Scott has been twice married. He married first, at the age of 
twenty-one years, Rachel R. P. Dodd, who was left an orphan at the 
early age of ten years. She died twenty-five years later, leaving two 
children, namely: Nancy E., wife of J. W. Black, a miner; and Thomas 
J. Scott, who is engaged in the grocery business in Eldorado. Mr. Scott 
married for his second wife, Mrs. Sarah R. (Westbrook) Latham, widow 
of Dr. John F. Latham and daughter of Rev. Samuel Westbrook, a 
pioneer Methodist minister of Southern Illinois, who died at the Scott 
home, in Eldorado, February 14, 1908, aged ninety-seven years. 

R. E. BROWN. The veterinary doctor and surgeon of today recog- 
nizes the benefit of science as applied to his profession, and it is a note- 
worthy fact that, within the last several decades the course in this line 
has become as strict as that of a regular doctor of medicine, while, the 
scope of practice being wider, many of the young men of today are 
taking up the veterinary line in preference. One of the successful vet- 
erinary surgeons of Southern Illinois, who has had a long and varied 
experience in his profession is R. E. Brown, whose chosen field of 
practice is the city of Anna, Union county. He was born in 1871, in 
Tarrant county, Texas, and is a son of A. C. and Emma (Elkins) 
Brown. 

A. C. Brown was born in Anna, Illinois, in 1853, and was a lad of 
twelve years when he accompanied his parents to the State of Texas. 
There he became a member of the State Police, known as the Texas 
Rangers, and met his death at the hands of the Ku Klux Klan, in 1873, 
while in the performance of his duty. His widow remained in Texas 
only a short time after his death, and when R. E. Brown was three 
years old she brought him and his brother, Dr. L. U. Brown, a promi- 
nent veterinary of Ardmore. Okla., to Anna. R. E. Brown received his 
preliminary educational training in the common schools, and spent eight 
terms at the Southern Illinois Normal University, at Carbondale. tak- 
ing a teacher's course. Mr. Brown was engaged in school teaching in 
Union county for seven years, and also worked for a number of years as 
a carpenter and contractor, but eventually turned his attention to vet- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 597 

erinary work, his stepfather having been engaged in that profession. 
He took a course of two years in the National Medical University of 
Chicago, and for the past eight years has been engaged in practice in 
Anna, where he has had considerable success. 

The standard of his science is being constantly raised by just such 
men as Dr. Brown, and his profession is recognized as one of the most 
important. The Government has recognized this fact, and has many 
skilled veterinary surgeons constantly in its employ, to care for the 
health of the valuable stock belonging to it, as well as to pass upon that 
which is to be slaughtered. He uses the latest scientific methods and 
keeps abreast of the latest inventions and discoveries in his profession 
by subscription to various veterinary journals, and his success has won 
for him the confidence of his community. Dr. Brown is general man- 
ager and secretary of the Anna Improvement and Loan Company and 
owns considerable stock therein. 

In 1901, Dr. Brown was married to Miss Mamie West, who was born 
on a farm east of Anna, in Union county, in April, 1881, daughter of 
A. J. and Lucinda West, who still reside on the West homestead. Two 
children have been born to this union : Roy, who was born in February, 
1905 ; and Robert, born in December, 1909. Mr. Brown has associated 
himself with various movements for the advancement of his community. 
His fraternal connections are with the Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor. 
He and his wife are consistent members of the Lutheran church, and 
both are popular in church and social circles. 

FRED LEE LINGLE. In Dr. Fred Lee Lingle, Alto Pass has a skilled 
physician, a worthy citizen and a representative of a family which has 
been closely identified with the history of Union county since its organ- 
ization. He was born October 17, 1881, and is the son of George W. 
Lingle, born in 1850 and yet living on his farm in Cobden, Union 
county, which was the place of his birth. The father of George W. 
Lingle and the grandfather of Dr. Fred Lee Lingle was Henry Lingle, 
a native of North Carolina, and a man of German extraction. In the 
early twenties Henry Lingle, together with several other home-seekers 
from the Carolinas, came to Union county. At one time in the early 
history of that county Henry Lingle owned the piece of land, compris- 
ing one hundred and twenty acres, which is now the site of the town of 
Cobden! When the Illinois Central Railroad went through that region 
in 1855 he sold his entire holdings to Dan Davie at a good figure, and 
then moved out seven miles east of the Cobden townsite, where he 
bought his farm of five hundred acres. His wife, Elizabeth (Vansel) 
Lingle, still lives. Henry Lingle fought in the Mexican war, winning 
a splendid record in his service. His son, George W. Lingle, is the 
owner of a farm of one hundred and forty acres, ninety acres of which 
is a part of the old Lingle farm. He was a prosperous man, and in addi- 
tion to his agricultural interests was for many years the owner of a 
large flouring mill in the northern part of Union county, which he ope- 
rated successfully and profitably. His wife was Amelia C. Brooks, a 
daughter of Larkin Brooks, a native of North Carolina, and she bore 
him four children: Dr. Willis E., of Cobden, Illinois; Dr. Fred Lee, 
of Alto Pass ; George Melvin, on the Cobden farm ; and Naomi. 

Dr. Fred Lee Lingle was educated in the common schools of Cobden 
and in the Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale ; following his grad- 
uation therefrom he began his' medical studies, in September, 1900, in 
the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, and after an attend- 
ance of four years he was graduated in 1904. He immediately began 



598 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

the practice of medicine at Herrin, Illinois, remaining there for six 
months only, following which he practiced for a similar period at 
Pomona, Illinois. On May 6, 1905, Dr. Lingle located at Alto Pass, and 
in the six years of his residence here he has built up an extensive prac- 
tice, covering a territory of seven miles north, ten miles west, three miles 
east and two and a half miles south. 

Dr. Lingle is a member of the Union County and the Illinois State 
Medical Associations, and in a fraternal way is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, local lodge at Alto Pass, and of the A. F. & A. M. 

On December 24, 1905, Dr. Lingle was married to Miss Jennie 
Dameron, of Union county, a daughter of William J. and Elzadah Dam- 
eron. They are the parents of one child, Myrtle Lorena, now three 
years old. Dr. Lingle and his wife are members of the Congregational 
church of Alto Pass. 

REV. ANDREW J. RENDLEMAN. A successful and influential factor in 
connection with educational affairs in his native state and at the present 
time the incumbent of the office of superintendent of the public schools 
of Jackson county, Andrew Jackson Rendleman is a scion of one of the 
sterling pioneer families of Illinois and here, in addition to his specially 
effective work in the educational field, he has served with marked zeal 
and earnestness in the ministry of the Free Baptist church, in which he 
is a regularly ordained clergyman. He is one of the honored and popu- 
lar citizens of Murphysboro, the judicial center and metropolis of Jack- 
son county, and is well known throughout southern Illinois, where he 
has a wide circle of loyal and valued friends. The influence of Mr. 
Rendleman has been potent and benignant in all the relations of life, 
and his work has been in the furtherance of those things which make for 
the higher ideals of human existence. 

Andrew J. Rendleman was born on a farm in Williamson county, 
Illinois, on the 3d of March, 1867, and is a son of Harris and Elizabeth 
(Knight) Rendleman, who continued to reside in this state until their 
death, the father having devoted virtually his entire active career to 
agricultural pursuits and having been a man whose inflexible integrity 
and generous attributes of character gained and retained to him the 
unqualified confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He whose name 
initiates this review passed his boyhood days amid the scenes and under 
the invigorating discipline of the home farm and his early educational 
advantages were those afforded in the district and graded schools of his 
native county. In preparing himself for the profession in which he has 
gained such distinctive prestige and success he attended the Southern 
Illinois Normal University, at Carbondale. Mr. Rendleman initiated 
his pedagogic labors when twenty years of age, and his first experience 
as a teacher was gained in the district schools of his native county, after 
which he continued his successful work in Perry and Jackson counties. 
He organized the graded school at Willisville, Ferry county, of which 
he was the first principal, and later became principal of the schools at 
Campbell Hill. Thereafter he was principal of the East Side school in 
Murphysboro for four years; he next served as principal of the East 
Side school at DuQuoin, Perry county, after which he returned to Jack- 
son county. 

In the fall of 1910 Mr. Rendleman was elected to his present impor- 
tant office, in which his administration has amply justified the popular 
choice. In his election to the position of superintendent of schools for 
Jackson county he was the nominee on the Democratic ticket and over- 
came an adverse majority of fully one thousand votes. a fact which 
offers emphatic testimony to his popularity in the county and the public 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 599 

appreciation of his scholastic and executive ability. Since assuming the 
duties of his office he has accomplished most admirable results in the 
systematizing and unifying of the work of the public schools in his juris- 
diction, and has done much to raise their standard still higher. Mr. 
Rendleman is a valued member of the Southern Illinois Teachers' 
Association and also the Illinois State Teachers Association, in the de- 
liberations and work of both of which he has taken a deep interest and 
active part. At the last (1911) state teachers' meeting he was ap- 
pointed a member of a committee of five to draft a bill for state uniform- 
ity of text-books to be presented to the next legislature for enactment. 

A man of fine intellectuality and perfervid earnestness as a worker 
in behalf of his fellow men, Mr. Rendleman has been amost zealous and 
valued factor in the ministry of the Free Baptist church, in which he 
was ordained in the year 1895. As a public speaker he is forceful and 
convincing and draws upon the rich resources of a well disciplined 
mind. In the ministry, on- the educational platform and as a speaker 
before the various fraternal orders with which he is affiliated he has 
gained a high reputation and his services are much in demand along 
these various lines. In the general work of his church he has served as 
a member of the missionary board and other important subsidiary 
boards and committees, besides which he has been a frequent delegate 
to the general conferences of the church. In politics he is admirably 
fortified in his convictions and gives a staunch allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic party. In the Masonic fraternity he has served as chaplain of his 
lodge ; in the Knights of Pythias he has held the office of primate ; and 
in the Modern Woodmen of America he served one year as consul of the 
camp at Marion, Williamson county, and three years as the incumbent 
of the same office in the camp at Murphysboro. He is a frequent speaker 
before the organizations of the Knights of Pythias and Modern Wood- 
men of America and has represented the same in the state conventiona 
in Illinois. He is also affiliated with the Tribe of Ben Hur. 

On the 28th of April, 1887, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Rendleman to Miss Margaret Monroe, who was born in Jackson county, 
this state, a representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of 
southern Illinois. She was a resident of Jackson county at the time of 
her marriage, and she has been a devoted wife and true helpmeet, and 
an earnest worker in the church, a popular factor in refined social 
activities and a loving and ambitious mother. Mrs. Rendleman is a 
daughter of George W. and Sarah J. (Willis) Monroe, who are now 
both deceased. Mr. Monroe was born in the state of Tennessee, whence 
he came to Illinois when a young man. He became one of the repre- 
sentative agriculturists and influential citizens of Jackson county, and 
did well his part in the furtherance of civic and industrial progress. It 
was his to render valiant service as a soldier of the Union in the Civil 
war. He enlisted in Company K, Fourteenth Illinois Volunteer Cav- 
alry, and the history of this gallant command virtually constitutes the 
record of his long and meritorious career as a soldier of the republic 
whose integrity he assisted in preserving. His service continued during 
practically the entire period of the war and he was with Sherman on 
the ever memorable march from Atlanta to the sea and thence north- 
ward through the Carolinas, while it was also his distinction to partici- 
pate in the Grand Review of the victorious troops in the city of Washing- 
ton. He escaped serious wounds during the four years of service but 
was captured by the enemy and confined for some time in Andersonville 
prison. He was mustered out in the city of Springfield, capital of 
Illinois, and duly received his honorable discharge. His continued 



600 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

interest in his old comrades was shown in later years by his retaining 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rendleman became the parents of five children, all of 
whom are living except William Bert, who died in 1898, at the age of 
nine years. Lillian May, who is a successful and popular teacher in the 
public schools of Jackson county and who is well upholding the prestige 
of the family name as a representative of the pedagogic profession, was 
afforded excellent educational advantages, including a course in the 
Southern Illinois Normal University. Homer Lee, eldest of the three 
surviving sons, completed the curriculum of the high school in Murphys- 
boro and is now employed as salesman in a mercantile establishment in 
this city. Charles Edgar is a member of the class of 1913 in the 
Murphysboro high school ; and Andrew Jackson, Jr., is a student in the 
public schools. 

JOHN P. GLYNN. Pioneers of Cairo who have followed the steady 
ascent of John P. Glynn up life's ladder are agreed that the highest 
encomiums are due to the man who has made such an unbiased and un- 
qualified success of a life which, in its beginning, was attended by many 
hardships and adversities. A more or less cursory review of his early 
life will be of interest to all, in view of his enviable position in the town 
in which he was born and where he has spent his life thus far. 

John Glynn was born in Cairo, Illinois, September 4, 1860. No 
pomp or ceremony heralded his advent as a babe into the city in which 
he was destined to become a prominent and useful citizen, despite the 
untoward circumstances attendant upon his birth. For he was a son 
of the soil, in very truth. His father, a humble and of necessity illiter- 
ate "Son of Erin," immigrated early in life to fair America. While still 
a young man he took a wife. In spite of the trials that go largely to 
make up the sum of human existence, they lived a quiet and happy life, 
both living until about the age of sixty -five years. They were the parents 
of four children who reached years of maturity. Three daughters, Mrs. 
Thomas H. D. Griffith, of Springfield, Illinois ; Mrs. C. W. Wheeler, of 
Mounds, Illinois, and Mrs. John H. Kierce, of Cairo, Illinois, and John 
P. Glynn, the subject of this sketch, and, incidentally, the pride of his 
father's heart. 

It was to this boy, the only son, to whom it was given to stir the 
slumbering fires of ambition in the breast of the Celtic father. Until 
the son began to be a factor in the life of the elder Glynn, life had been 
a quiet and humdrum affair. But the budding boy aroused in him the 
memory of his own youth and the thought of what might have been for 
him had he been blessed with a little of the education which may be 
had for the taking in the country of his adoption. And so young 
John P. was sent to school. It was the plan of the father to enable his 
son to attain a sufficient education to help him do victorious battle with 
the great forces in the industrial world. Michael Glynn himself was 
not a successful man, in the more broadly accepted sense of the word. 
He somehow lacked the peculiar executive ability necessary to the 
proper management of the small draying business he had conducted 
with indifferent success during these years. The growing needs of a 
family of four children, the eldest three being girls, became so pressing 
that when the son John, had reached the age of seventeen and had 
barely begun as a student in Cairo High School, he readily recognized 
the pressing need for young blood, energy and tact in the management 
of his father's business interests. Loath to leave his books, fighting 
sorely against the need to forego, even for a time, the chance to study 
and fit himself for his chosen profession, his sense of duty was such that 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 601 

he bravely decided to surrender his ambition and give his time to the 
upbuilding of his father's draying business, which was the sole means 
of support for the family. 

Thus it was that John P. Glynn, with his father's reputation for 
square and honest dealing, and his father's one horse dray as a founda- 
tion for the future, began the upbuilding of a general drayage and 
transfer business which rapidly grew out of all proportions to his most 
sanguine hopes or expectations. For a time the boy found himself in 
a somewhat awkward predicament. He disliked to take the reins of 
authority from his father's hands, but his innate business ability was 
such that he knew that very thing to be what the ultimate success of the 
business demanded. But the father, possessing his own share of wisdom, 
even though not of the variety which makes wealthy men, early recog- 
nized in his bright young son the making of a thorough-going business 
man, and when he saw that his fellow townspeople were inclined to 
place confidence in the boy and, moreover, to throw unusual business in 
his way, and when he saw the ready ability of the boy to handle the 
business quickly, accurately and with the minimum expense and the 
maximum profit, he was glad to shift the burden of responsibility to 
younger shoulders and content to step down to second place and permit 
his stripling son to succeed him as head of the business. Thus, from a 
humble origin, was evolved one of the most flourishing business organ- 
izations known to the city of Cairo. 

The one horse dray soon became a heavy truck of the regulation 
order, drawn by a pair of stout and willing horses. Later another dray 
was added, and gradually the business grew from a mere hauling of 
trunks and boxes and odd jobs of all kinds to a dray and transfer busi- 
ness, embracing every detail of practical and efficient service, such as 
Cairo had never known before and well knew how to appreciate. 

"The boy is father to the man" it is said, and true enough in the 
case of John P. Glynn and his father. The prosperous, ambitious and 
successful boy made the father's later years the happiest of his life, 
and great was his joy in his ability to do so, but no less great was the 
father's pride in the son who had helped him to make a success of his 
later years of business life. 

As the city grew the dray and transfer business of the Glynns ex- 
panded accordingly, and it became obligatory for them to make some 
preparations for future housing. Already John Glynn 's natural busi- 
ness acumen has caused him to acquire various and sundry bits of 
property in the business and residence district of the city, and when 
it became apparent that the crying need of the business was a building 
of commodious space for a home for their ever spreading interests, he 
decided to build in the down-town district. He accordingly, in the year 
1906, erected a three story building on Commonwealth street, at No. 
1214 and 1216, with a depth of one hundred and twenty-five feet. The 
business, however, proved itself in the short space of three years to be 
entirely inadequate to their needs and in 1909 he was encouraged by 
local financiers, who were not slow to recognize his splendid possibili- 
ties, to increase his building. This he did by erecting a similar struct- 
ure at 1210 and 1212 Commonwealth street, immediately adjoining his 
first building. This structure bears the happy distinction of being the 
only absolutely fireproof building in Southern Illinois. It is built 
completely of cement and equipped with a thoroughly modern sprinkler 
and firefighting apparatus, installed at an immense cost, while two 
elevators ply busily to and fro and further bear out its distinctly 
modern character. 

Additional space made it possible for Mr. Glynn to again branch 



602 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

out into hitherto unexplored waters. He now added to his already 
ample outfits complete equipments for the safe and easy moving of 
household goods, pianos, etc., and more modern means of handling 
freight in car load lots. He opened his fireproof storage rooms to the 
public, and gave over a portion of one floor to the business of dealing 
in second hand and new furniture of all kinds. He engaged in the 
furniture and carpet business, and later established an implement, 
wagon and harness line, having a large implement warehouse, covering 
a space of one hundred and twenty -five by two hundred feet. In short, 
this splendid building is entirely given over to the carrying on in its 
various departments and branches the mammoth business which has 
grown apace from the hour of its inception or, more correctly speak- 
ing, since the boy of seventeen years took the reins into his young hands 
and willed to make of his father's ill paying business a financial success. 

Today John P. Glynn commands a place of highest respect in the 
town of his birth and in the lives of all who have known him. Great 
enthusiasm is one of his most marked characteristics. No obstacle is too 
great to be removed by his unfailing optimism and will to overcome 
every difficulty. A brilliant mind, a vigorous body, indomitable will, 
courage and unfailing cheerfulness, all unite to form a combination that 
Fate must surely find hard to vanquish for long. 

Three times has Mr. Glynn fared forth on matrimonial ventures. 
His first wife was Miss Elizabeth McCarthy, who died, leaving a son of 
eighteen years, Joseph Glynn, who has been educated in business meth- 
ods to be his father's helper in his later years. He later married Mary 
Clare Byers, of Nashville, Tennessee, of which union one daughter, 
Marie Byers Glynn, is the result. 

Mr. Glynn, contrary to the average man of Celtic origin, has held 
himself aloof from all political entanglements. He has eschewed every- 
thing that might be calculated to take his mind from the work of con- 
ducting the splendid business of which he is the heart and soul. He has 
never been affiliated with any financial or business society, with the 
single exception of connection with the Building & Loan Association of 
Cairo. The property holdings of Mr. Glynn are of great scope, and 
exceedingly well conducted. One of the finest things ever done for the 
upbuilding of Cairo was the reclaiming by him of a vast tract of swamp 
land in the city and the subsequent erecting of modern homes for ten- 
ants. In myriad ways has the life of John P. Glynn been a boon and 
benefit to the city of Cairo and its people and best of all is the undying 
example of the truth of the old saying: "Great oaks from little acorns 
grow." For in very twith, the splendid organization which has come 
out from the little acorn of honest manly endeavor is today a great oak 
that flourishes abundantly in the city of its establishment and growth. 

GEORGE BARBINGER. Farmers who have been elected to positions of 
trust and honor are not by any means few in America, but it is the 
exception that the tiller of the soil continues to be such long after he has 
won success in any sphere outside his regular calling. The allurements 
of city life in the great majority of cases quickly overcome the inborn 
love of nature unadorned, and the farmer is known by another name. 
George Barringer. of Jonesboro, Illinois, is one of the few. After terms 
in township and county offices he continued to plant, c\iltivate and reap, 
and to raise stock, until he felt it time to retire from active agricultural 
pursuits, at which time he located in Jonesboro and engaged in the real 
estate business, although he still owns considerable farming land, which 
is now rented, in Union county. Mr. Barringer was born on a farm in 
Union county, northeast of Anna. January 2, 1849. and is a son of 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 603 

Charles and Matilda (Hileman) Barringer, both natives of this county. 
Charles Barringer was born September 29, 1825, and for many years 
carried on agricultural pursuits, but after coming to Jonesboro entered 
the mercantile field and was so engaged until about two years prior to 
his death. 

The education of George Barringer was secured in the district and 
town schools, and later he entered a seminary here. He also went to 
Union Academy and the Commercial School for Boys, and while at 
these institutions taught district school for four or five years while 
being engaged in study during the summer months. Giving up the 
profession of teaching, Mr. Barringer entered the tin and stove business, 
in which he continued one or two years, he having furnished the capital 
and his partner the tools, and during 1871 and 1872 held the office of 
deputy assessor. Subsequently he became deputy under Sheriffs Hile- 
man and Nimmo, and in 1878 was elected sheriff of Union county, serv- 
ing in that office for a full term of two years. At that time his health 
failed, and in 1880 he purchased a farm in Union county, on which he 
continued to reside until 1883, then moved to Cape Girardeau county, 
Missouri. In that state Mr. Barringer carried on farming on a tract 
situated near the city of Jackson until the fall of 1891, when he pur- 
chased his present property in Jonesboro, Union county. He now rents 
his land and follows the real estate business, in which he has had con- 
siderable success. He has served as justice of the peace and postmaster 
of Union Point while living on the farm, and from 1894 until 1902 
acted as county superintendent of schools. During his incumbency of 
the latter office, he introduced the eighth grade commencement exer- 
cises, issued certificates to those who passed the examination and re- 
ported to the State Department the first high schools reported from this 
county. Mr. Barringer served as marshal of Jonesboro before he was 
of age, and even at that early time he displayed the same conscientious- 
ness to duty that has characterized his later terms of office. Progressive 
in all matters, he has done much to advance this section, and he is 
regarded as one of Union county's substantial, public-spirited men. 
His fraternal connection is with the A. 0. U. "W., which he joined in 
Missouri, and he also belongs to Jonesboro, Lodge, No. Ill, A. P. & 
A. M. 

Mr. Barringer 's first marriage was to Miss Belle Byrd, of Jackson, 
Missouri, who died August 16, 1891, leaving these children: Georgia 
Belle, who married J. B. Colard, Jr., and died June 28, 1909; Byrd 
Polk, unmarried, who is in the real estate business and owns a pocket 
and carom billiard hall at Cairo; Matilda Hileman, who married J. F. 
Karraker, of Cypress, Illinois; and Mary, who married N. R. Crooks 
and lives in Denver Colorado. Mr. Barringer was married in 1892 to 
Miss Mary Chase, who was born in Jonesboro, daughter of Charles S. 
and Ellen (Cruse) Chase, the former a well-known stone contractor 
and builder, and four children have been born to this union, namely : 
Bessie, Paul, Grace and Ruth. Mr. and Mrs. Barringer and their 
children attend the Methodist Episcopal church. 

JOHN "W. BALLANCE, M. D. The medical profession of Johnson 
county is represented by some of the most skilled and learned men of 
this calling to be found in the state. They have devoted themselves, 
their time, energy and lives to the preservation of public health and the 
alleviation of human ills, but their work is not always appreciated nor 
is it always remunerated as befits the efforts they have expended, yet 
they have cheerfully accepted conditions as they are and have con- 
tinued to carry on the great work without which no community could 



604 HISTOKY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

thrive. One of the successful physicians and surgeons of Johnson 
county who has attained a high place in his profession is Dr. John W. 
Ballance, engaged in practice in his home place, the nourishing city of 
New Burnside, Illinois, where he was born October 6, 1871. 

His father, James H. Ballance, was a son of James H. and a Miss 
(Farland) Ballance, and was fifteen years of age when brought to 
Johnson county from Kentucky in 1851. He was reared on his father's 
farm, and at the age of twenty-one years was married to Jency A. 
Whiteaker, a sister of Captain Whiteaker, and daughter of Hall and 
Elvira (Dameron) Whiteaker, natives of Tennessee. Hall Whiteaker 
was a son of Mark Whiteaker, who came to Southern Illinois in 1818 
and lost his life soon thereafter, while Elvira Dameron was the daugh- 
ter of John Dameron, a Revolutionary soldier and one of the early 
pioneer settlers of Burnside township, Johnson county. In 1862 James 
H. Ballance enlisted in the One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but after one and one-half years' service 
contracted sciatic rheumatism and was invalided home. He served as 
first lieutenant of Company G, under Captain Mark Whiteaker, and 
was stationed in and around Memphis, also doing scout duty in 
Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee, and taking part in a number of 
battles, including Vicksburg. On his return home he resumed his farm- 
ing operations and became a successful and prominent agriculturist, 
accumulating one hundred and sixty acres of land, in two farms of 
eighty acres each, and died in 1909, his wife passing away when she was 
sixty-five years of age. They had a family of seven children, namely: 
George, who is a court reporter and resides in Johnson county ; Thomas, 
an agriculturist of this county ; M. W., a well-known dentist of Marion, 
Illinois; Adam, a physician of Tulsa, Okla; Earl, a bookkeeper of 
Hutchinson, Kansas; Mrs. Sarah Wood; and John W. 

John W. Ballance received his preliminary education in the public 
schools in the vicinity of his father's farm and the Southern Illinois 
State Normal University, at Carbondale, Illinois, and after teaching 
school for two years entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, from which 
he was graduated with the degree of M. D., in 1896. Beginning the 
practice of medicine at Harrisburg, Illinois, he continued there until 
1909, as surgeon for the Big Four Railroad, and in that year came to 
his home town of New Burnside, which has since been his field of prac- 
tice. Dr. Ballance 's skill as a surgeon has been demonstrated in a 
number of complicated and discouraging cases, and as a physician he 
stands among the foremost medical men of this section. He belongs to 
the American Medical Association, the Association of Railway Surgeons 
and the Illinois State Medical Society, in all of which he is well and 
favorably known. As a public-spirited citizen of New Burnside he has 
always given of his time and means in supporting progressive move- 
ments, and although he has never allowed his name to be used in con- 
nection with public office he takes a keen interest in matters that pertain 
to the welfare of his native county. 

Dr. Ballance was married in 1897, to Miss Emma G. Cummings, of 
Chicago, daughter of Charles and Abigail (Hadlock) Cummings, of 
that city, and to this union there has been born one son, Senn, who is 
now four years old. 

PETER WASTIER. Southern Illinois has recruited some of its lead- 
ing financiers from the agricultural districts, men who have spent the 
major portion of their lives in farming and then, on retiring from that 
vocation, have taken up their residence in the cities and villages, where 
r they have made their abilities and influence felt in various lines of en- 



OF THE 
WffERSITY OF ILLIIiGB 



HISTOEY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 605 

deavor. Prominent among this class may be mentioned Peter Wastier, 
president of the Johnston City State Bank, who has retired from agri- 
cultural pursuits and is actively and prominently connected with the 
financial interests of Williamson and Franklin counties. He was born 
on the border line of St. Glair and Madison counties, Illinois, December 
16, 1841, and is descended from Franco-German parents. 

The father of Mr. Wastier, also named Peter Wastier, was born in 
Alsace-Lorraine, Germany, at that time French territory, and he came 
to the United States in young manhood, locating in the St. Louis re- 
gion of Illinois. He was married in Madison county, it is believed, to 
Mary Wesser, who died in 1846, while he survived until 1861, and was 
about seventy years old at the time of his death. He was a laborer, 
humble in his home and without pretentions, and left only a good name 
as a heritage for his children. The issue of his marriage were : Faldine, 
who reared his family at Belleville, Illinois, and died there; Michael, 
who was drowned as a young and unmarried man; Mary, who became 
Mrs. Keinbolt and lived in Minnesota; Henry, who never reached ma- 
ture life, and Peter, of Johnston City. 

Peter Wastier inherited a vigorous physique, plenty of industry but 
little disposition to seek knowledge. Opportunities were not numerous 
then, as now, yet what few passed near him were brushed aside and he 
came to maturity barely able to read and write. He made his home with 
his uncle during the last years of his youth and accompanied him into 
Williamson county. They reached here in 1859, and settled on a 
farm some three miles north of the site of Johnston City. In that 
vicinity Peter located when- he was married, and there he made his in- 
dustry count as a farmer for forty years. Nature provided him with an 
aptitude for business and a general atmosphere of thrift prevaded his 
life from the beginning, and he amassed a competence long before he 
reached the evening of life. When the railroad built through the county 
and made a station at Frankfort, he took advantage of the opportunity 
to realize the possibilities of building a town there, and subsequently 
bought land adjacent and laid off one addition after another until Was- 
tier 's Ninth Addition to Frankfort was platted and disposed of. He 
became connected with a movement to locate a bank there, and was 
made president of the Frankfort State Bank. Having more than met 
his expectation from Frankfort, he invested in property in Johnston 
City, did a little building here, and moved to the city in 1902. His 
known standing and business acumen prompted his associates in the 
Johnston City State Bank to elect him president of their institution, 
and he has occupied that position from its organization. 

Although his age and health would have warranted it, Mr. Wastier 
was not connected with military affairs of his state during the Civil 
war. He lent his sympathy to the Federal cause, and, although a 
civilian, had an experience in the fall of 1863 with a squad of robbers 
passing through the country under the disguise of soldiers. As events 
subsequently revealed, they were "bushwhackers," bent on loot, and 
before they reached the home of Mr. Wastier 's uncle they decoyed two 
neighbors away from their homes and murdered them on the pretense 
of having them show the way. This ruse failed of accomplishment at 
the Wastier home, and when they appeared and stated they wanted 
their horses fed and something to eat themselves, Peter refused to go 
to the barn to feed the horses. They then stated that they did not want 
money but were waiting for food, but Peter slipped outside with a six- 
shooter concealed under his coat and awaited developments through the 
door. Presently he heard the "soldiers" make a demand on his aunt 
for money, and he at once opened fire on the robbers and in turn was 



606 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

shot at by them. But the robbers were as badly frightened as the youth 
and his aunt and made their escape without accomplishing their designs. 

On May 30, 1864, Mr. Wastier was married in Williamson county, 
to Miss Barbara Rigel, who died in February, 1906, leaving these chil- 
dren : Minnie, who died unmarried ; Caroline, the wife of Henry Baker, 
a farmer of this county, and Lucy, who married John Hook, and resides 
near Johnston City, on a farm. In February, 1909, Mr. Wastier was 
married to Mrs. Annie Gardner, in Evansville, Indiana. She has one 
daughter by her former marriage, Mrs. Lula Laubscher, the wife of 
Edward Laubscher, a photographer of Johnston City. 

Although Mr. Wastier was brought up under church influences, he 
has not identified himself with any orthodox denomination. His people 
were Lutherans and his attitude is that of a disinterested spectator of 
the work of the church. Fraternally, he is a member of the Blue Lodge 
of Masonry, and his political views are those of the Republican party. 
Mr. Wastier has never faltered in his upward course nor allowed him- 
self to be discouraged, but has pushed steadily onward, and now is con- 
nected with some of the most substantial institutions in the county, and 
is recognized as one of the most progressive men of his part of the 
state. 

GEORGE H. WOOD, the most prominent druggist in Mounds, Illinois, 
has been a resident of this city since the year 1896. During the period 
of his residence here he has not been in any sense a shirker, but has 
borne with unfailing cheerfulness his share of the burdens of civic life. 

Mr. Wood was born in Genoa, Wisconsin, on October 7, 1870, and 
is the son of David S. Wood. The latter named was born near Albany, 
New York, in 1828. In the early seventies he brought his family to 
Labette county, Kansas, where he engaged in the milling industry, and 
he enjoys the peculiar distinction of having erected at Oswego, Kansas, 
the first grist mill to be operated in the southeasterly part of that state. 
While enroute for the West, Mr. Wood stopped in Ohio, and it was in 
that state that he was wedded to Margaret Choate, who still survives 
her husband, he having died in Mound Valley, Kansas, in 1878. The 
widow now resides in Redondo, California. The issue of their union 
are : Mrs. R. J. Hart, of Sherman, California ; Mrs. Jennie Jones, of 
Pasadena, California ; David M., of Los Angeles, California ; Albert S., 
of Redondo, California; George H., of Mounds, Illinois, of whom we 
write; and Walter E. and Clyde, both of Los Angeles, California. 

George H. Wood was dependent upon the common schools of his 
community for his educational preparation for life's battles. His first 
employment was in a drug store in Mound Valley, Kansas, and it was 
there he received his training in pharmaceutics, in the school of prac- 
tical experience. He later worked at various points in the state, and it 
was while he was employed at Frankfort that the opportunity was 
afforded him to become druggist and assistant clerk for the asylum at 
Osawatomie, during part of 1891 and 1892. Following that period of 
service he came to Illinois and secured the position of druggist for the 
State Hospital for the Insane at Anna in 1894, where he remained for 
four years, coming from Anna to Mounds and engaging in business in 
his chosen profession, which business he still conducts. 

During the years of Mr. Wood's residence in Mounds he has given 
generously of his time and ability to the service of the city of his adop- 
tion. No civic duty has been to him an irksome task. He has served 
his city as both its clerk and treasurer. He has served on the City 
Council of Mounds. He has been mayor of the city, and it was under 
his administration that the era of the granitoid walk was inaugurated 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 607 

in Mounds. He is president of the Mounds Building and Loan Associ- 
ation, as well as being a director of the First State Bank of the city. 
In all of these offices, both of a civic and private nature, he has given 
valuable service, always acquitting himself honorably and creditably. 

Mr. Wood was married in Carbondale, Illinois, June 27, 1893, to 
Miss Ada M. Hickam, a daughter of Curtis Hickam. Mrs. Wood is one 
of three children, the others being Mrs. Dan M. Anderson, of Carbon- 
dale, and Miss Ida Hickam. 

In the fifteen years of Mr. Wood's residence in Mounds he has been 
especially successful in a financial way, and has accumulated a goodly 
share of this world's goods. He is the owner of his place of business, 
as well as his splendid residence and numerous other pieces of valuable 
property in and about Mounds. He is not a man of great fraternal in- 
clination, the only society of which he is a member being the Knights 
of Columbus, of which order he is an enthusiastic and valuable member. 

JOHN D. DILL. Exhibiting in everything he undertakes the all- 
conquering enterprise, tireless energy and sturdy self-reliance of 
Illinois manhood, which has made the great Prairie state one of the 
leading commonwealths of the American Union, built its mighty 
metropolis and other imposing marts of industry and commerce, and 
developed all its enormous resources to their present magnitude and 
power, John D. Dill, of Carbondale, has achieved a success so far in 
life which is gratifying in its character and extent, but is only the 
logical result of his well applied diligence and business capacity. 

Mr. Dill is a native of this state, born in Pope county on September 
30, 1878, and a son of Andrew B. and Miranda C. (Hughes) Dill, long 
residents and highly respected citizens of that county. The father is a 
carpenter and builder, always interested in public improvements and 
the growth and improvement of the region around him, and contrib- 
uting his full share in promoting its advancement. The son inherited 
this trait of his character, and he, too, has taken a great interest and an 
active part in helping to strengthen, improve and make more influential 
every community in which he has lived since arriving at man's estate. 

John D. Dill began his education in the public schools of Johnson 
county and completed it at the high school in Vienna in the same 
county. Soon after leaviner school he went to Sikeston in southeastern 
Missouri, and there clerked for some time in a general store. He 
entered the employ of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company at 
Sikeston in May, 1905, and eight months later was promoted to an 
assisting superintendency. After serving in that capacity two years he 
was promoted to the superintendency and placed in charge of the Car- 
bondale district, in 1908, which includes about thirty-five towns and 
five branch offices, and has thirty-one men regularly employed, all 
under the direct control and supervision of Mr. Dill. He has been a 
resident of Carbondale since February, 1908, and has made rapid 
progress in gaining the confidence and esteem of the people of the city 
and attaining a high rank in its business circles. He is also a director of 
the Citizens Water, Light and Power Company. 

On January 7. 1901, he was joined in wedlock with Miss Martha J. 
Carter, a native of Vienna, Illinois, and a daughter of William H. and 
Cornelia J. (Verhines) Carter, former residents of that city but now 
living in Sikeston, Missouri, where the father is prosperously engaged 
in merchandising. For a number of years before entering mercantile 
life he was a vigorous and successful farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Dill have 
one child of their own, their son, John McMullin, and an adopted 



608 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

daughter, whose name is Bessie M., both of whom are attending school 
in Carbondale. 

The parents belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
active in every phase of its evangelizing and improving work. The 
father is a member of the official board of his congregation and presi- 
dent of the Epworth League attached to it. He is also president of the 
Mt. Vernon District Epworth League, of which the Carbondale organ- 
ization is a part. He takes a great interest in all that concerns the 
League, and is a regular attendant of all its meetings, local, state and 
national. In fraternal relations he is a Freemason and an Odd Fellow. 
In the Order of Odd Fellows he is a past vice grand, and has served as 
treasurer and trustee of his lodge. He was particularly active in this 
fraternity while living in Sikeston, Missouri, but he has by no means 
neglected its claims or those of the Masonic order during his residence 
in Carbondale, and his membership in both is warmly appreciated. 

JUDGE K. C. RONALDS. Long and varied experience in legal juris- 
prudence is not sufficient to fit a man for the high office of Judge of the 
County Court, for he must also be possessed of sound judgment, an 
analytical turn of mind and a keen insight into human nature. Such 
qualities, combined with a high sense of honor and a thorough ground- 
ing in the various cases which form precedence for all judges, must 
ultimately work out to a dignified success. The Hon. K. C. Ronalds, 
judge of the County Court of Saline county, Illinois, is one of the emi- 
nent members of the Southern Illinois legal profession. He was born 
in Grayville, White county, Illinois, June 6, 1878, and there received his 
education in the common schools. He graduated from the high school 
in 1899, studied law in a law office, and was admitted to the bar in 1900, 
and in the following year located in Eldorado. He served as city at- 
torney of Grayville for one term and in a like capacity in Eldorado for 
a term, and was then elected and served as a member of the Forty-fourth 
General Assembly from the fifty-first district. In 1911 he was elected 
county judge of Saline county, and he has since held that office with 
ability and dignity. 

In 1901 Judge Ronalds was united in marriage with Miss Blanche 
Westbrook, and three children have been born to this union, namely: 
Marjory, who is five years old ; Lucille, seven years of age ; and Nairive 
W., who has reached the age of ten. Judge Ronalds is engaged in a 
private practice under the firm name of Ronalds & Grable, and they 
represent a number of the leading fire and life insurance companies. 

JAMES N. WOOD. One of the leading business industries of Anna, 
Illinois, is the plant of James N. Wood, who for twenty years has been 
identified with the commercial interests of this city as a manufacturer 
of boxes, barrels, baskets and fruit packages, and has developed his pres- 
ent enterprise from a small beginning into one of the leading factories of 
its kind in Southern Illinois. Mr. Wood belongs to the class of self- 
made men who have done so much toward building up this section of the 
state. He started in life as a poor boy, without either educational or 
financial advantages, and the success which has attended his endeavors 
has been the result of persistency, industry and a determination to win 
in the face of all obstacles. A native of Johnson county, Illinois, Mr. 
Wood was born in 1855, and is a son of Henry and Nancy (Reed) Wood, 
natives of Tennessee. 

The education of Mr. Wood was limited to several months attend- 
ance in the public schools, and he was obliged to go to work after the. 
death of his father, who was first a farmer in Johnson county and later 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 609 

a teamster in Anna, whence he came in 1869. As a youth Mr. Wood 
contributed to the support of his widowed mother and his younger 
brother, his first employer being R. B. Stinson, who conducted a stave 
and heading factory. During the six years that he remained with Mr. 
Stinson he became familiar with all the details of the business, and after 
leaving his employ worked at the cooper trade until 1891, at which time 
he established himself in business as a manufacturer of barrels, boxes, 
baskets and fruit packages, and the business has grown steadily year by 
year. He now ships his goods to various points, and his sales aggregate 
on an average of $10,000 per annum. Mr. Wood is possessed of excel- 
lent business tact and ability as well as indefatigable energy, and has 
an extensive acquaintance and solid reputation, not only throughout the 
section in which he does business, but also in the counties adjoining. He 
has found time from his business activities to serve his adopted city in 
public positions, was mayor of Anna in 1906 and 1907, and served as 
alderman from the First Ward for two terms, displaying unquestionable 
administrative abilities. His career has been a credit to himself in every 
respect, and creditable to the city in which he has so long lived and is 
so well known. His fraternal connection is with the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

In 1878 Mr. Wood was united in marriage with Miss Margaret 
Faulkner, of Illinois, and they had three children : Charles, who died at 
the age of four years ; Clara, born in St. Louis, who is now the wife of 
Cilus Bishop ; and Susie, who died in infancy. Mr. Wood's second mar- 
riage was to Miss Alice Maxfield, of Union county, and to this union 
there have been born children as follows: Stella and Birdie, who died in 
infancy; Harry, who is engaged in the cooper business in Anna; Fred, 
who is assisting his father in business; Sybil, John and Glenn, residing 
at home ; Ralph, who died in infancy ; Helen ; Robert, who is deceased ; 
and Orlean. Mrs. Wood and the children are members of the Baptist 
church, and Mr. Wood, while not a member of any special denomination, 
has been a liberal supporter of religious and charitable movements. 

WILLIAM P. GREEN. It is with pleasure that the biographer takes 
up the life record of William P. Green, one of the most prosperous and 
best known of the citizens of Cobden and a man who is identified in an 
important sense with its development and that of the country surround- 
ing. A man of strong commercial instinct and of considerable executive 
ability, all enterprises with which he becomes identified seem pretty sure 
of success. For twenty-three years a salesman, he has dealt since 1903 
in coal and ice in Cobden and he is also leasing four valuable farms for 
apple-growing, being associated in this with the Lamer Brothers under 
the firm name of Lamer, Green & Lamer. They have devoted two hun- 
dred and forty acres to this branch of agriculture and have 9,000 fine 
trees, all apple. Since 1900, when they first engaged in this interesting 
work they have made sales to the amount of $11,043 and have 1,200 
barrels in storage, which raises this amount to $15,000. Mr. Green also 
sells spraying machines and has recently sold one car-load of these 
commodities to fruitgrowers. 

William P. Green was born October 28, 1854, in Union county, 
Illinois, the son of William and Cornelia (Bennett) Green. Nathaniel 
Green, the grandfather, an energetic South Carolinian, came to this 
county about 1803. He was the father of Mastin, David and William 
Green. Mastin and David were born in South Carolina and William 
was born in this county in 1806. The father died here soon after and 
the boys located in the Mississippi Bottoms. These brothers are all 
dead. 



610 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

When they located in the Mississippi Bottoms they resided for a time 
with an uncle who managed Green's Ferry on the Father of Waters. 
The boys lived the wholesome, strenuous life of the pioneer, raising 
crops in the summer and in the fall and winter going into the woods 
where they made a flat-boat on which they floated their produce down to 
New Orleans and sold it. They were industrious and thrifty and in 
this way accumulated considerable money. In 1844 they were driven 
out of the bottoms by floods and they went to the hills. David Green 
settled on his farm at Green's Crossing near Cobden and opened a 
general merchandise store at that place in 1854. William Green, father 
of him whose name inaugurates this review, removed to Jonesboro and 
continued farming. He owned a section of land west of that place, and this 
he tilled up to the time of his death in 1865. This good man, who was 
respected and influential in his community, reared a family of four 
children. Florence W., born October 26, 1834, died August 15, 1899. 
He married Annetta Cover January 17, 1865, and their surviving chil- 
dren are as follows: Otis, Daniel, John H., Florence E., James A. and 
Roy. Mollie. second of the subject's sisters, married Calvin Miller first 
and after his death became the wife of A. C. Stage, her present residence 
being in Chicago. The subject is third in order of birth and the young- 
est member of the family is David M., an Arkansas farmer. The father, 
William Green Sr., was one of the organizers of the Union County 
Agricultural & Mechanical Society, which held the first county fair in 
this county. He was a member and deacon in the Baptist church of 
Jonesboro and his hand was given to all good causes. In his time he 
accumulated considerable wealth. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Cornelia Bennett, died in 1855, in the infancy of William, Jr. 

William P. Green received his education in the public schools and 
continued to reside upon the paternal homestead until 1877. Even as a 
very young man he manifested commercial instincts and was most suc- 
cessful as a salesman. He has ever since been active in this line and in 
1880 he established himself independently in the mercantile business, 
in which, as previously mentioned, he remained continuously engaged 
until 1903. His subsequent interests and activities have been touched 
upon. Longfellow has said, "The talent of success is nothing more than 
what you can do well and doing well whatever you do, without any 
thought of fame. ' ' Illustrative of this sentiment has been the life of the 
subject and his career should serve as an incentive and inspiration for 
others. 

No one could be more loyal to the best interests of the section than 
Mr. Green, for it is dear to him with many associations and for over a 
century has been the scene of the family history, of which he has every 
reason to be proud. Whenever he has served in public office it has been 
with faithfulness and efficiency and doubtless even higher honors lie 
before him. From 1908 to the spring of 1912 he served as police magis- 
trate ; he has acted as town clerk several times and for nine years was 
a member of the Cobden board of education. In addition to his activ- 
ities previously mentioned, Mr. Green has other interests of exceedingly 
broad scope and importance and has leased 40,000 acres from the Finley 
Oil & Gas Development Company in Southern Illinois for the purpose 
of prospective oil and gas development. His executive ability, tireless 
energy, engineering skill and genius in the broad combination and con- 
centration of applicable forces, it is safe to say, will make a success of 
this vast enterprise. The company of Lamer, Green & Lamer have 
also recently engaged in the buying and selling of fruits and products 
in carload lots. 

Mr. Green laid the foundations of a happy household and congenial 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 611 

life companionship by his union in 1886 to Ada B. Lind, of Cobden, 
daughter of A. Lind, one of the old residents. Of the five children born 
to them, three are living, namely: Joseph B., of California; Cornelia, 
teller of the Cobden Bank ; and Clarence. The family are active in the 
good work of the Baptist church and the fraternal affiliation of the head 
of the house is with the Knights of Pythias. The name of Green is 
widely and favorably known, the third generation in this section reflect- 
ing the good qualities of the first. 

JOHN L. OZBURN. One of the best known and most highly esteemed 
citizens and representative business men of Jackson county is this well 
known resident of Murphysboro, where he is now engaged in the lumber 
and building-supply business. Mr. Ozburn is a native of Jackson 
county and a member of one of its honored pioneer families. The high 
regard in which he is held in his home county has been significantly 
shown by his having been called upon to serve in numerous city and 
county offices, in each of which his course was such as to justify to the 
fullest extent the public trust reposed in him. His standing in the 
community is such as to entitle him to special recognition in this history 
of southern Illinois. 

John Logan Ozburn was born on a farm in Jackson township, Jack- 
son county, Illinois, on the 20th of February, 1851, and is a son of Lin- 
dorf and Diza Ann (Glenn) Ozburn, natives of Virginia. The father 
of Mr. Ozburn was one of the pioneer settlers of Jackson county and 
here became a citizen of prominence and influence and an aggressive 
and successful business man. In addition to developing an excellent 
farm he also operated a saw and grist mill, and as a citizen he was 
distinctively progressive and public-spirited. He espoused the cause 
of the Republican party at the time of its organization and thereafter 
continued his allegiance to the same until his death. He served as a 
valiant soldier of the Union in the Civil "War, for which he enlisted in 
an Illinois regiment of volunteer infantry and' he became colonel of his 
regiment, which he commanded with marked ability. He met his death 
in 1864, at the hands of a cowardly assassin, this tragic event occurring 
at Carbondale, Jackson county. His widow passed to the life eternal in 
1895, and of their children three sons and two daughters are now living. 

John L. Ozburn is indebted to the public schools and summer schools 
of his native county for his early educational discipline and his initi- 
atory experience in connection with the practical duties and responsi- 
bilities of life was that acquired on the farm. In an independent way 
he was identified with the great basic industry of agriculture for a 
period of ten years, and for a time he was concerned with coal-mining 
operations in his home county. Twenty years thereafter were devoted 
to clerical or official work as bookkeeper and executive, and his record in 
all these relations has been marked by the utmost fidelity and by ef- 
fective service. 

In 1878 Mr. Ozburn was elected county surveyor, and of this office he 
continued the incumbent until 1882, in which year he was appointed 
postmaster of Murphysboro, the thriving judicial center and metropo- 
lis of his native county. He remained in tenure of this office for four 
and one-half years, and in 1894 he was elected county clerk. He held 
this office until 1898 and was forthwith given further evidence of popu- 
lar esteem and confidence in his election to the office of master in 
chancery. The duties of this position engrossed his attention from 
1898 to 1900. and for the ensuing three years he served as deputy county 
treasurer. These brief data show that Mr. Ozburn was retained in 
public office in virtually a consecutive way for a full quarter of a cen- 



612 . HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tury, and the county of his birth gives in its official records due evidence 
of his long and acceptable service as an executive, the while his home 
city has not failed to mark its appreciation in a similar way. Thus it 
should be noted that he has served as city engineer of Murphysboro, 
as a member of its board of aldermen and as city treasurer. Finally 
he was nominated for mayor, on an independent ticket, but he was 
unable to overcome the organized forces of the two dominating parties 
and consequently met defeat, though he received a representative en- 
dorsement at the polls. 

In 1903 Mr. Ozburn purchased the lumber and building-supply 
business which he has since conducted with vigor and success and in 
connection with which he has gained prestige as one of 'the substantial 
and representative business men of his native county. 

In a generic way, where national and state issues are involved, Mr. 
Ozburn gives his support to the principles and policies for which the 
Republican party stands sponser, but in local affairs he has maintained 
an independent attitude to a large extent by giving his support to the 
candidates and measures meeting the approval of his judgment. He 
is affiliated with the Murphysboro lodges of the Knights of Pythias and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and both he and his wife 
are zealous and valued members of the First Methodist Episcopal 
church, of the board of trustees of which he is a member. 

At Mount Vernon, Jefferson county, this state, on the 12th of 
August, 1874, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ozburn to Miss Fan- 
nie Morris, daughter of Rev. Charles W. Morris, who was long in 
zealous service as a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
who passed the closing years of his life at Murphysboro, Illinois. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ozburn became the parents of three sons : Harry O. is cashier 
of the Citizens' State & Savings Bank of Murphysboro; Thomas L., 
who was graduated in the United States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, 
Maryland, as a member of the class of 1902, became lieutenant com- 
mander in the navy and for a year was in command of the battleship 
"Texas." His promising career was cut short by his death, which 
occurred at the Brooklyn navy yard, on the 2d of July, 1911, at which 
time he was thirty-two years of age. He had made an admirable record 
as an officer in the navy and his personal popularity was on a parity 
with his sterling attributes of character. His death was the severest 
bereavement that has marked the ideal married life of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ozburn. George J., the youngest son, remains at the parental home. 

MELANCTHON EASTEBDAT is well known to the citizenship of Cairo 
as one of the early title men of Alexander county. He identified him- 
self with this part of Illinois in 1879 and the business phase of his life 
here has been devoted to making abstracts and examining titles to real 
estate. He has not limited the outflow of his energies to business, how- 
ever, for he has given much time and energy to those great moral and 
spiritual movements that make for the betterment of mankind. He has 
been prominently identified with the movements to save children, to 
encourage temperance, to combat the influence of the saloon and to 
strengthen and extend the church. 

Mr. Easterday has lived in Illinois since 1853, but he was born in 
Jefferson county, Ohio, June 6, 1840. By ancestry he comes from one 
of the old German families of Frederick county, Maryland. His great- 
grandfather, Martin Easterday, was the German ancestor who settled 
upon the noted Carroll Manor, between Middletown and Frederick, 
Maryland. There he passed a peaceful and successful life as a farmer. 
He married a Miss Rheinhardt, and one of their children was Christian 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 613 

Easterday, the grandfather of Melancthon, the subject of this review. 
Away back in the time of Martin Luther and of Melancthon, the great 
German reformers, the first of the Easterdays was found. He was a 
foundling, and it was upon the doorstep of a church on an easter 
morning that the babe was discovered, and when he was taken into the 
church to be christened it was decided to honor him with the name of 
the day and of the religion into which he was baptized by calling him 
"Christian Easterday." In each generation of this family since there 
has been a "Christian." There usually also, has been a Martin, and 
the founder of the American branch was the seventh Martin removed 
from the head of the Easterday house. 

Melancthon Easterday 's father was David Easterday, who was born 
in Jefferson county, Ohio, in 1815. Fifteen years before David's birth 
his father left the Maryland home and brought his family down the 
Ohio river by flatboat and made another home among the frontiersmen 
of that new commonwealth. He died there, and his children grew up 
and scattered to various parts of the land. Christian married Maria 
Stemple, and of this union were born Daniel, David, Martin V., Elias, 
Catherine (who became the wife of 0. J. Cooper and died in Carroll 
county, Ohio), Elizabeth (who married George Gulp and died in Noko- 
mis, Illinois), and Charlotte (who became the wife of William Cooper 
and passed away in Jefferson county, Ohio). 

David Easterday came to mature years with only a moderate edu- 
cation, but he made it serve him in the further acquirement of a fund 
of general information as the years went by. He was a man of studious 
habits, carefully followed the religious and political thought of his day, 
was a member of the Lutheran church and attended its synods and took 
a modest part in its every day life. He married Margaret Zimmerman, 
who died at Nokomis, Illinois, in 1904, at the age of eighty-seven, while 
her husband died in 1892. Their children were Melancthon, the sub- 
ject of this biography; Luther, of Vandalia, Illinois; John Z., of Sidney, 
Nebraska; Elias, of Fredericktown, Missouri; Elizabeth A., wife of 
Monroe Bost, who resides in Irving, Illinois; Dr. George S., of Watson- 
ville, California ; Dr. Jacob S., of Albuquerque, New Mexico ; Sidney 
D., of Greeley, Colorado ; and the Misses Charlotte J. and Maria F., 
of Albuquerque, New Mexico, both ranch women of that section. 

Melancthon Easterday was a lad of thirteen when his father con- 
tinued the family journey, begun by his ancestor, down the Ohio and 
up the Mississippi to St. Louis and established the name on the soil of 
Illinois. He left the steamboat, the "Twin City," at St. Louis and 
crossed the unclaimed domain to Montgomery county and opened a 
farm. In such a country home his eldest son grew up and attended the 
district school, spending some months at the State University, then 
located at Springfield. He taught school for a short time before the 
opening of the Civil war. He enlisted in 1862, at Ramsey, Illinois, in 
Company D, Sixty-eighth Infantry, under Captain J. C. Hall and 
Colonel 'Elias Stuart. The command had its rendezvous at Spring- 
field until it was ordered east to defend the capital. After making 
the trip across the Allegheny Mountains in cattle cars, exposed to the 
cold and rain of early spring, Mr. Easterday was ready for the hospi- 
tal when the command reached Washington and he lay in a hospital 
for several months and was then discharged as unfit for service. He 
resumed teaching first in Shelby county and then at Vandalia for some 
time. He then left the school room to take up service with the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, and on giving up this employment he en- 
gaged in merchandising with a brother at Vandalia. This he con- 
tinued till 1879, when he came to Cairo and established his future home. 



614 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

On taking up his labors in this city, Mr. Easterday purchased a set 
of abstracts, completed them and has grown into the affairs of the town, 
as well as having made for himself a desirable livelihood. He has re- 
mained a private citizen, save as he has aided movements in opposition 
to evil. He is one of the champions of Prohibition and makes his politi- 
cal home in that party. He has served as chairman of the Anti-Saloon 
League and has been for many years actively identified with the work 
of rescuing children and of finding homes for orphans through the 
Orphan Asylum of Southern Illinois, of which he is the secretary. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian church and is clerk of the session. He 
has done active Sabbath-school work both as assistant and as super- 
intendent of the school, and has frequently represented the congre- 
gation at Presbytery. He has often attended the Synod of his church 
and was a delegate to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian church 
at Buffalo in 1904. 

He was married first in Montgomery county, Illinois, his wife being 
Miss Irene Derr. She died, leaving a son, Elmer P., circuit clerk and 
recorder of Pulaski county, Illinois. His second wife was Miss Ada 
J. Dieckman, whom he married in Vandalia, Illinois. She passed away 
within a year, and he married his present wife, Rosa Nagel, February 
22, 1877, in Greenville, Illinois. Their only child is Ruth Olive. 

COLUMBUS BROWN, M. D. Some of the most successful members 
of the medical profession have found their practice and the exhaustive 
study necessary to keep abreast of the constant discoveries of science 
so engrossive as to preclude the possibility of active participation in 
outside matters. Without exception such men have won the confidence 
and approval not only of their patients but those with whom they are 
associated, to appreciate their conscientious fidelity to duty. Dr. Colum- 
bus Brown belongs to this class of medical men and is recognized as 
one of the most able of his profession in Williamson county. Dr. Brown 
was born on a farm between Herrin and Carterville, November 2, 1868, 
and. is a son of Captain John Brown, whose birth occurred in Union 
county in 1826. 

Rev. Jeremiah Brown, the grandfather of Dr. Brown, came as an 
early settler of Illinois from the state of North Carolina, beginning his 
labors as a Baptist minister here in 1845. His children were Grant 
Wagoner ; Captain John ; Mrs. Betty Miller ; Frank, who died in Marion 
in 1893 ; George, who died at Carterville ; Mrs. Mary Davis, who died 
at Creal Springs; and Henderson, whose death occurred in Union 
county. Captain John Brown came into his majority when this section 
was much like the frontier. He had just passed his minority when the 
war with Mexico broke out over the admission of Texas, and he joined 
the army raised to carry on the war. Serving through to the close of 
that struggle, he resumed the duties incident to farm life, which he had 
abandoned only temporarily, and continued to engage therein until his 
death, in February, 1899, save for a period he spent as a merchant at 
Metropolis and Crainville, Illinois. Locating in Williamson county 
prior to the Civil war, he entered the volunteer service in August, 1862, 
and was commissioned captain of Company D, One Hundred and Twenty- 
eighth Regiment, Illinois Infantry, which rendezvoused at Camp 
Butler, Springfield, and was then ordered to Cairo, where it was disor- 
ganized in May, 1864, and all of its officers, save the colonel, discharged. 
Captain Brown then returned home and took up farming again. He 
never entered the political field, being content to serve the Democratic 
party only as a voter. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Martha 
J. Wilkins, was a daughter of Jacob Wilkins, of Union county, and 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 615 

died in June, 1910, at the age of eighty-three years, having been the 
mother of the following children : Fatima, the wife of Ephraim Herrin, 
father of the city of Herrin; Mrs. Josie Herrin, of Creal Springs; 
Gertrude, who married C. H. Murrah and resides in Creal Springs; 
Curtis, living in Boulder, Colorado ; Cornelia, the widow of Isaac Ham- 
mer, residing in East St. Louis; Florence, who became the wife of 
Thomas Stotlar, living in Herrin ; Orion J., who married A. K. Elles, 
of Herrin ; Cora, who married E. T. Steele and lives at Urbana ; and 
Dr. Columbus, of this article. 

Columbus Brown's early life was spent on his father's farm, where 
he worked while attending school at Creal Springs. Equipped to enter 
either a business or professional life, he chose the latter and studied 
medicine at the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, from which he was 
graduated March 29, 1899. He first chose the town of Creal Springs 
for his field of practice and remained there eight years, and since that 
time has practiced in Herrin. He has served as vice-president of the 
Williamson county Medical Society, and is a member of the Illinois, 
Southern Illinois and American Medical Associations. Dr. Brown's 
practice receives his whole attention, but he has shown his public spirit 
by serving as a member of the board of education from the Fourth 
Ward. Like his father, he is a Democrat. 

On August 12, 1902, Dr. Brown was married in Independence, Mis- 
souri, to Miss Lula Slack, daughter of Anthony Slack, a retired mer- 
chant of that city, and sister to Miss Josephine, of Independence, and 
Edward, Anthony and Paul Slack, business men of Kansas City. Dr. 
and Mrs. Brown have had four children, namely : Martha, John, An- 
thony and Curtis. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS LOONEY, M. D. Among those whose activities 
in the field of medicine have made their names well known in Southern 
Illinois was the late William Augustus Looney, M. D., who for more 
than forty years followed his profession in Vienna, and who also at- 
tained an eminent position in public and social life. Starting life as a 
poor lad without influence or financial aid, he earned the means with 
which to pursue his medical studies, and eventually rose to such a high 
position that his death was a distinct loss to the community where he 
labored for so long. William Augustus Looney was born in Henry 
county, Tennessee, April 9, 1831, and was a son of William E. Looney, 
and grandson of Samuel Looney, a native of the Isle of Man, of Scotch- 
Irish descent. William E. Looney migrated from his native state of 
North Carolina to Tennessee, and in 1834 removed to Hinds county, 
Mississippi, where he died in 1836, after spending his life as a stock 
buyer. He married Phetna M. Frazier, daughter of Julian and Eliza- 
beth (McBee) Frazier. 

William A. Looney was two years of age when his father died, and 
his mother engaged in school teaching in order to rear her son and give 
him educational advantages. After her death, in 1855, he removed to 
Illinois and began teaching school in Johnson county, in order to ac- 
cumulate enough money to put him through medical college. He began 
the practice of his profession in Williamson county in 1865, during 
which year he attended a course of lectures at Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, and graduated from that institution in 1868. In 1861 he 
raised the first company for the war in Williamson county, Company 
C, of the Thirty-first Illinois Infantry, of which he was elected captain. 
On November 7, 1861, at Belmont. Missouri, he was severely wounded, 
but took part in the siege of Corinth, after which he was honorably dis- 
charged on accoiint of disability. In January, 1862, he removed to Vienna 



616 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

where he continued to follow his profession until his death, January 
5, 1903. He was one of the leading practitioners of his city, and also 
became prominent in politics, serving with distinction in the State 
Legislature in 1864. His profession connected him with the Southern 
Illinois Medical Association, and he was also a member of Vienna 
Lodge, No. 150, Vienna Chapter, No. 67, and Cairo Commandery, No. 
13, of Masonry. Dr. Looney was a popular comrade of Vienna Post, 
No. 221, G. A. R., and was an intimate friend of General John A. Logan. 
He was a strong feature in the Methodist Episcopal church work of 
Southern Illinois. 

In 1856 Dr. Looney was married in Galloway county, Kentucky, 
to Miss Rachel F. Caldwell, who died in 1872, leaving three children : 
James E., John T. and Fanny A. His second marriage occurred in 
1874, when he married Miss Maria Oliver, who died in 1884, and in 
March, 1886, he was united with Fannie E. Whitehead, in Indiana, 

Fanny E. Whitehead was born in Vienna, Johnson county, Illinois, 
daughter of Charles Fletcher and Maria Theresa (Weismeyer) White- 
head, natives of Illinois and Germany, respectively. Her grandfather, 
Silas Whitehead, who resided near Martinsville, Illinois, reared a family 
of several sons, one of whom, Silas, was a journalist at Marshall, Illi- 
nois. He was a prominent pioneer lawyer and subsequently became a 
judge. Her father was a veteran of the Civil war and wielded a power- 
ful influence among his fellows. Charles Fletcher Whitehead was born 
in 1835, and was reared near Marshall, Illinois, where he received his 
education in the public school. He early learned the tinner and hard- 
ware business at Evansville, Illinois, with an uncle, Thomas Scantlin, 
who was a pioneer of Evansville, Indiana, and but lately died, at the 
age of ninety-eight years and five months. About 1850 the father came 
to Vienna, where he was employed in a hardware establishment. At 
the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in Company M, Sixth Illinois 
Cavalry, in which he served two years, and his death occurred in 1868, 
from the effects of typhoid fever contracted during the war. His first 
wife died in 1860, leaving one daughter, Fanny E., and he married 
(second) Ann Caldwell, who died in 1867, leaving two children, L. C. 
and Henry Parks Whitehead. His third marriage was to Romaine 
Whitney, of near Martinsville, and she now resides at Casey, Illinois, 
and has a daughter, Cassandra. After her father's death, Fannie E. 
Whitehead went to live with an aunt in Pike county, Indiana, who edu- 
cated her, and with whom she was living at the time of her marriage 
to Dr. Looney in 1886. Dr. and Mrs. Looney had three children : Mrs. 
Esther Dill, who resides in St. Louis ; Joseph Whitehead, who is attend- 
ing high school ; and Harold Frazier. 

Mrs. Looney is now the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred 
and forty-three acres situated near Vienna, which she manages success- 
fully. She is a faithful member of the Methodist church, and is widely 
known in religious and charitable work. 

HON. GEORGE E. MARTIN. One of the able and representative mem- 
bers of the Mound City bar is Hon. George E. Martin, who has not 
only won success as a practitioner of law but has also exerted a wide- 
felt and beneficial influence in public affairs, his service as representa- 
tive from the Fifty-first assembly district in the Forty-first General As- 
sembly of Illinois having been marked for its strict devotion to duty 
and a keen discrimination in regard to those interests which largely 
concern the public at large and bear upon general progress. 

Mr. Martin is a native of Franklin county, Illinois, born on a farm 
in the southwest corner of that county on July 7, 1865. Stephen B. 



OF THE 
ttBVEBSITy OF 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 617 

Martin, his father, gave the whole of his active career to agricultural 
pursuits and died on his Illinois farm in 1887, when sixty-four years 
of age. He was born in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1823, was reared 
to farm pursuits, and there acquired an ordinary common school educa- 
tion. In 1857 he left his native state and removed to Illinois, where 
he spent the remainder of his life. Stephen B. Martin was the son 
of Stephen Martin, a native of Virginia, who migrated to Kentucky in 
the pioneer days of that state and made it his final home. Of the 
children born to Stephen Martin and his wife, Stephen B., Clayton, 
Caswell, Melvina and John J., the first and fourth mentioned came 
to Illinois. The other children remained in their native state. The 
sister Melvina married William Stayton and died in Illinois. Stephen 
B. Martin wedded Narcissa J. Russell, a daughter of James S. and 
Lucy (Tiner) Russell, who were prominent farmer citizens of William- 
son county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Russell were the parents of the 
following children: James; Milton; John; Bettie, who became Mrs. 
Benjamin Stocks; Sophronia, who became the wife of Henry Stocks; 
Mary, who is now Mrs. William Chamberlain, of Junction City, Kan- 
sas; Mrs. Martin, who passed away in 1888, at the age of sixty-four; 
and Samuel Russell, the youngest child, who became a very prominent 
man in the public life of Williamson county, Illinois. The patriotism 
of the Russell family cannot be questioned. James S. Russell was a 
veteran of the Black Hawk war, and two of his sons, John and Milton, 
were numbered among the brave and gallant defenders of our National 
life during the war of the Rebellion, each having given up his life as a 
sacrifice to the Union cause. Milton was killed, in the siege of Vicks- 
burg, and John was wounded at the battle of Shiloh and died from the 
effects of his wound while at home on furlough. To Stephen B. and 
Narcissa (Russell) Martin were born four children, namely: Eva, who 
is the wife of John Vaughan, of Herrin, Illinois; Melvina, now Mrs. 
Philip Kirkpatrick, who resides near Paducah, Kentucky ; John L. 
Martin, who married Miss Jennie Hood and who is a prominent 
farmer near Olmstead, Illinois; and George E. Martin, the subject of 
this review. 

Mr. Martin was reared a farmer boy and remained at the parental 
home until past his majority. He finished his literary education at the 
Southern Illinois Normal University and spent nine years in the school 
room as a teacher of country and village schools, his final work in that 
line being as principal of the schools at Ullin, Illinois. This, however, 
he made an initial step to other professional labor, for he had decided 
to take up law, and to this end he began a course of reading under 
Judge Wall, of Mound City. Later he became a student in the law 
department of the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, and 
was graduated from that institution in 1893. He was admitted to the 
bar by supreme court examination in August of his graduation year, 
and at once began the active practice of his profession in Mound City. 
He subsequently entered into partnership with his former preceptor 
under the firm style of Wall & Martin, which relation continues to the 
present time. Possessing all the requisite qualities of an able lawyer, 
Mr. Martin has from the time of his admission to the bar continued in 
practice in Mound City, his labors accompanied by a success that has 
gained for him a place among the representative members of the Pulaski 
county bar. 

He is a Republican in politics, and as such was elected to represent 
the Fifty -first assembly district in the Forty-first General Assembly of 
Illinois, his district comprising the counties of Pulaski, Johnson, Mas- 
sac, Pope and Saline. His service in that body was marked for its 



618 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

vigorous and careful application to the interests of his State and his 
constituency, and the standing which he held among his colleagues in 
the Assembly was attested by his important committee duties. He was 
made chairman of the committee on judicial department and practice, 
and served as a member of the committee on elections, the judiciary and 
insurance committees, and the committee to visit state institutions. He 
was also a constructive legislator, having secured the passage of a law 
increasing the term of school one month, thus requiring a term of not 
less than six months each year instead of five months in all public 
schools of the state. This one accomplishment alone entitles him to 
rank as one of his state 's greatest benefactors, for the law 's good results 
are beyond measure. 

In 1900 Mr. Martin was elected state's attorney of Pulaski county, 
and in 1904 was re-elected to that office. He was renominated without 
opposition in 1908, but resigned the nomination, and has since devoted 
his attention to the private practice of law, though at the present time 
he is city attorney of Mound City. He is a prominent worker in his 
party and has served as a delegate to different Republican county, con- 
gressional and state conventions. 

On December 24, 1895, at Mound City, Mr. Martin married Miss Ada 
L. Read, a daughter of I. W. Read, a veteran Union soldier from middle 
Tennessee. They have one son. Russell Read, born in 1900. Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin are members of Grace Methodist Episcopal church of Mound 
City. 

Mr. Martin is a director of the Mound City Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He represented his lodge of the last named order at a special 
Head Camp meeting in Chicago in 1912, and prior to that, or in 1911, 
had served as a delegate to the Head Camp at Buffalo, New York. 

As a lawyer Mr. Martin is enterprising, able and upright, a careful 
and conscientious counsel and advisor, a strong advocate, and an honor 
to the profession ; his official career was marked for its fidelity to public 
interest; and as a citizen he stands in the highest repute. 

THEODORE M. FOKD is a retired business man of Mound City who 
has passed a third of a century in this city, and has been a particularly 
important factor in the business life of the district with which he has 
been identified for so many years. 

Mr. Ford is a native of McMinn county, Tennessee, having been born 
there on February 3, 1853, his father being William Ford, also a resi- 
dent of McMinn county and of Maryland ancestry. The life of the 
elder Ford was, for the greater part, devoted to the pursuit of mechanics 
in a practical way, he having been for years a millwright and black- 
smith in Tennessee, which was the field of his operations throughout 
the extent of his busy career. He passed away at Irving College, a 
small town near McMinnville, Tennessee, in the year 1900, at the ven- 
erable age of eighty-four years. 

The father of William Ford and the founder of the Tennessee branch 
of the family settled in McMinn county in the early part of the nine- 
teenth century, coming to Tennessee from Maryland. He was the 
father of several children, among them being Margaret, Andrew and 
William, the latter named being the father of Theodore M. Ford, of 
whom we write. William Ford married Elvira Meyers, who passed 
away in 1893, and of their twelve sons and daughters seven attained 
to years of manhood and womanhood. Those now surviving are : James, 
Thomas, Theodore M., Edward, Florence and Elizabeth. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 619 

The early life of Theodore Ford was passed in a country town near 
McMinnville, and his education was, for the greater part, acquired in 
the district school. While yet a mere youth he evinced a strongly 
marked tendency towards mechancis, and at the age of fifteen years 
he began to study the carpenter's trade. He followed that line of work 
for a few years, after which he drifted into the sawmilling industry at 
Paducah, Kentucky, where he was employed for a few years, and he 
later engaged in the same line of industry in Williamsville, Missouri. 
Out of his t wages while employed in these two mills he managed to save 
the money which, combined with his practical knowledge and unfailing 
energy, represented his only assets when he branched out into a mill 
and lumber career on his own responsibility. 

In 1881 he moved to Mound City, and for a short time he operated 
a small shingle mill in Ballard county, Kentucky, later removing it to 
Mound City, where he and his partner, Mr. Alfred W. Williamson, 
conducted it as a lumber and planing mill until he sold out his interest 
to his partner and took up the business of merchandising in Mound 
City. For fifteen years Mr. Ford carried on a general merchandise 
business with most pleasing success, and in the year 1900 he retired 
from active business. However, he did not relinquish all his business 
interests, as he is still more or less involved in various industrial and 
financial organizations, being a stockholder in the Mound City Crystal 
Ice and Coal Company, and in the Metropolis Ice Company, as well as 
in both of the Mound City banks. He is also vice-president of the 
Williamson-Kuhny Mill & Lumber Company in Mound City. 

Mr. Ford has never taken any marked interest in the civic affairs 
of his home city. He is concerned for the welfare of the town, but his 
labors in that direction have not been of the order that would necessitate 
any especial affiliation with local politics. He served as a councilman 
for one term. He is a member of the Mound City Commercial Club, 
in which he is active and influential. Mr. Ford is a' Democrat in his 
political persuasions, and the chairmanship of the County Central Com- 
mittee of his party was pressed upon him for one campaign. 

In the year 1880 Mr. Ford married Miss Ella Williamson, a sister 
of his one-time partner, Alfred W. Williamson. Mr. Ford is not con- 
nected with any fraternal orders, but he and his wife are earnest mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 

WILLIAM HARPER PHILLIPS. During all of the last sixteen years 
William IT. Phillips has been a resident of Carbondale, and through- 
out that period has been carrying on an extensive business which has 
been profitable to him and beneficial to the city and its people. His 
enterprise has given employment to a number of men, kept a consider- 
able sum of money regularly in circulation in the community and 
added materially to the mercantile and industrial activity and im- 
portance of the place and a large extent of the surrounding country. 

Mr. Phillips has lived in several different places, and long enough 
in each to make his merits known to the people and win their good 
opinion and esteem. He was born in Clarksville, Mecklenburg county, 
Virginia, in July, 1846, and is a son of Robert Allen and Caroline 
(Leneave) Phillips, who passed the major portion of their lives in the 
Old Dominion, and their forefathers for many generations had lived 
there. The father was a wagon maker and flourished at the trade 
until the Civil war came and paralyzed every industry in the South. 
Even during that awful conflict he was able to maintain his standing 
and keep his head above water, difficult as it must have been at times. 



620 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

He and his wife passed away in Kentucky, which state had been their 
home a few years prior to their death. 

The son was educated 'at private schools, and by the time he was 
ready to leave them and start a business career for himself the war 
was in full blast, and he determined to join the Confederate army in 
defense of the political theories in which he had been trained. He 
was not yet a man in age, but was one in spirit and courage, and hesi- 
tated not a moment when he heard the voice of duty ordering him to 
the field. He enlisted in Company A, Fifty-sixth Virginia Infantry, 
and, youth as he was, was made second lieutenant of the company. 

His record in the war was like that of many thousands of other 
brave men on both sides of the sanguinary sectional strife. Whatever 
the danger before him, he faced it without flinching ; whatever the 
toil, hardship and privation, he endured without complaining ; what- 
ever the final result, he did his whole duty without shirking; and 
when the flag he followed so faithfully went down in everlasting de- 
feat at Appomattox, he accepted the disaster without repining. His 
regiment took part in the battle of Bull Run and shared in its tri- . 
umph. It also participated in many subsequent engagements, victor- 
ious in some and defeated in others. He was with it to the end of the 
war, and was mustered out of the service in September, 1865, worn in 
body, wasted in wordly possessions, with no employment immediately 
available to provide for his wants, but undaunted in spirit, and still 
ready to encounter the worst that Pate might send him. 

When the army to which he belonged was reorganized in 1863 he 
was made captain of his company ; and in a subsequent reorganiza- 
tion was promoted to major, but his commission for the latter rank 
never reached him. At the end of his military service he returned 
to his Virginia home to begin again the struggle for advancement 
among men, but found the conditions in his native state altogether 
unpromising for a man without means, and likely to continue so for 
many years. He therefore determined to seek better opportunities in 
a state which had not been ground under the iron heel of war, and in 
1869 left Virginia. For a number of years he worked in various 
places at his trade of wagon making, which he had learned under the 
tuition of his father. In 1875 he came to Illinois and located at Car- 
terville in Williamson county. 

There he wrought at manufacturing wagons for a time, then sold 
farming machinery for some years. In 1885 he moved to Marion, the 
county seat, where he remained ten years employed as he had been at 
Carterville. In 1893, beginning in September, he took charge of the 
Scurlock estate for the purpose of winding up its affairs. There was 
a business in the farm implement trade belonging to this estate, and 
when he had the other affairs of the estate all settled and disposed 
of he bought this business and its equipment arid stock, and began to 
carry on the enterprise himself. Subsequently he added furniture, 
hardware and builders' supplies to his lines of commodities, and so 
enlarged his operations and increased his business to considerable pro- 
portions. It is now located in a two-story brick building of substan- 
tial construction, forty by one hundred and thirty-two feet in dimen- 
sions. 

Wherever he has lived Mr. Phillips has taken a warm interest in 
public affairs and done what he could to secure for the interests of his 
community proper control and administration. He was for some 
years president of the board of aldermen in Carterville, and served 
one term as alderman from the ward in which he lived in Marion. In 
Carbondale he has performed all the duties of citizenship in a man- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 621 

ner very creditable to him and servicable to the city and its inhab- 
itants. 

On December 31, 1872, he was married to Miss Cannie Jones, of 
Cerulean Springs, Trigg county, Kentucky, the daughter of a highly 
respected and prosperous blacksmith of that place, Jefferson Jones. 
They have three children, all of whom are living, but only one of them 
in this state. They are : Otis Blakely, a partner of his father in the 
implement establishment ; Maud, the wife of J. P. Daniels, of Wichita, 
Kansas, a traveling salesman; and Grace, the wife of Rush T. Lewis, 
who also lives in Wichita, Kansas, and is likewise a traveling sales- 
man. The father belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is 
a member of the official board of his congregation. His fraternal con- 
nection is with the Masonic order, of which he has long been a mem- 
ber. 

PAYTON S. POPE. For nearly a hundred years the Pope family has 
set the stamp of its influence upon the history and development of 
Southern Illinois, especially in Franklin county, which has served as 
the center of their activities since pioneer days, and in Payton S. Pope, 
the popular clothing merchant of Benton, we find a prominent repre- 
sentative of the present generation of the line. Mr. Pope was born in 
Franklin county, August 12, 1850, the son of Benjamin W. and Abigail 
(Richards) Pope. His father, who was born in South Carolina, moved 
with his parents to Tennessee, and from there migrated to Illinois, 
following his sister, Mrs. Nancy Gasaway, and settling on a farm here 
in 1828. The elder Pope spent his entire lifetime in this section and 
was one of the wealthiest and most widely acquainted men in Frank- 
lin and adjoining counties, it being his boast that at one time he knew 
every family in Franklin and Williamson counties. As the physi- 
cian who ministered to the physical ailment of the people for miles 
around, he was revered and respected beyond the degree of those 
engaged in no less honorable but less human and personal service to 
fellow human beings. He also assisted in protecting the pioneer in- 
habitants against the raids of the Indians who occupied the country 
so extensively in the early part of the nineteenth century, and served 
in the Black Hawk war under DeMent. His death occurred in 1868, 
near the point where Ziegler is now located. 

The Richards family, also, belonged to the pioneers, and our sub- 
ject's maternal grandfather, who was an Ohioan by birth, of Quaker 
parentage, became an early resident of Wayne county, Illinois, where 
he continued to live until the time of his death. Mrs. Pope survived 
her husband five years, the date of her demise being in 1873. Both 
she and her husband were members of the Christian church, and well 
known for their activities in religious affairs. 

Payton S. Pope enjoyed excellent educational advantages and 
after completing the study of the common branches in the grade 
schools attended the institution of learning at Carbondale for a por- 
tion of two terms, was a student at the State University at Cham- 
paign and also went to Ewing College in Franklin county. After 
completing his studies in these institutions he taught school for two 
years and then took up the study of medicine, intending to follow the 
profession of his father for a life work. In pursuance of this inten- 
tion he entered the Missouri Medical College, remaining there for a 
time, but completed his professional course at the Nashville Medical 
College, of Nashville, Tennessee, receiving his degree in 1877. After 
engaging in active medical practice for a time. Mr. Pope discovered, 
however, that his tastes were such as would give him greater satis- 



622 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

faction to take up other lines of work, and he accordingly decided 
to go into business. His first commercial venture was as a live stock 
and grain dealer, his method in this business being to travel all over 
the county buying and selling from farmers to city dealers. Finding 
this line of endeavor profitable, Mr. Pope continued in it for ten 
years. 

In 1886 he made a change in his business operations and purchased 
a general store, in Benton, which he continued to conduct until 1907, 
when he decided to devote his energies exclusively to clothing lines, 
that being the class of stock he has since continued to carry, his 
trade being a very extensive and profitable one. Mr. Pope is a man 
of sagacity and broad business talents and has succeeded in acquiring 
a considerable amount of property. He is the possessor of large in- 
terests, including some valuable coal lands. 

It was in 1877 that Mr. Pope's marriage to Sarah E. Mitchell oc- 
curred. She was the daughter of Jesse G. Mitchell, one of the promi- 
nent residents of Franklin county, he having been up to the time of 
his death, in 1891, engaged in agricultural and mercantile pursuits at 
Locust Grove. His wife survives him and is living in Benton at the 
present time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pope are the parents of four living children: Benja- 
min W., a resident of Texas; Mrs. George Powers, of Benton, whose 
husband is connected with the Hart & Williams Coal Company ; John 
E. and Florence E., twins, whose home is still under the parental roof. 
The family are leading members of the Christian church here, and 
Mr. Pope is especially interested in religious affairs as conducted by 
the church and Sunday-school of his denomination. He is a Prohibi- 
tionist in political faith, a man of high moral standards, staunch in- 
tegrity and progressive thought and action. 

JOHN W. SHAW, member of the State Board of Agriculture, Harris- 
burg, Illinois, was born in what is now Carriers Mills township, Sa- 
line county, March 5, 1866, son of John E. and Mary E. (Cook) Shaw. 
His ancestors were Welsh-English, and his grandfather, Amos Shaw, 
was among the early settlers of Wilson county, Tennessee, from 
whence about 1830 he came up into Illinois and established his home 
in Carriers Mills township, Saline county. Here he spent the last 
decade of his life and died about 1840, at near the age of sixty years. 
He was twice married and had four sons: Le Roy, who was a resi- 
dent of Williamson county, Illinois, was the child of his first wife; 
the other sons, Ambrose, John E. and Hayward, being by his last 
wife. Ambrose settled in Franklin county, Illinois, where his chil- 
dren still live. Haywood never married, and lived and died at the 
home of his brother, John E. 

John E. Shaw was still a child at the time the family came to 
Illinois. He was twenty-three when he and Miss Mary E. Cook were 
married, and his life was spent on his father's farm, where he died 
in the prime of life, at the age of forty-three years. His widow sur- 
vived him ten years, and continued her residence on the farm during 
that time. She was a sister of Mack Cook, of Harrisburg. Of the 
eight children born to them, five reached maturity, namely: Mary, 
who married George Stallings near Harrisburg; Sarah, who is the 
wife of John Chase, also near Harrisburg; Christopher C., a farmer 
at the old homestead, died at the age of thirty-three years; James R., 
who lives retired in Harrisburg; and John W., the subject of this 
review. 

John W. Shaw was three years old at the time of his father's 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 623 

death, and thirteen when he was bereft of a mother's loving care. 
At that early age he drifted around from place to place, a part of the 
time making his home with his brother. He worked by the day or 
the month at whatever he could find to do. Among other places he 
worked 011 the farm of Mr. W. H. Blackman, a brother of J. B. Black- 
man, one of the large realty owners of Harrisburg. One winter he 
cut and hauled wood to pay for his board while he attended school. 
In 1887 he taught school in Missouri. The following year he opened 
a store at Elizabethtown, in company with Thomas Ozment, now a 
merchant at Harrisburg. After being in a general store there four 
years Mr. Shaw sold out. He had only six hundred and fifty dollars 
to invest at the beginning, and at the end of the four years the stock, 
all paid for, was valued at seven thousand dollars. Then he went to 
Marion, Kentucky, where he kept a general store one year. In 1892 
he came to Harrisburg. Here, in partnership with B. P. Weaver, he 
opened a general store under the name of Shaw & Weaver, and was 
identified with this business for a period of ten years. The store 
was then purchased by George G. Mugge, who at one time clerked 
for Shaw & Weaver for thirty-five dollars per month ; now Mr. Weaver 
is a clerk for Mr. Mugge. This business had its inception in a small 
way, but in two years it was the leading mercantile house of the 
town. 

Since he disposed of his interest in the store Mr. Shaw has de- 
voted his energies to agricultural pursuits and stock raising, con- 
ducting operations on a large scale, having a thousand acres of land, 
in three farms, and keeping a large number and high quality of both 
cattle and horses. He is a breeder of both Shorthorn cattle and 
Percheron horses, and at this writing has fifty head of the former and 
twenty-five head of the latter. He is a fine judge of stock, buys, sells 
and trades, and has taken no little pride in the exhibit of his stock at 
the local fairs, also at the State Fair. In 1907 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Agriculture ; at the expiration of his term 
was re-elected, and is now serving his second term. During the early 
part of his identity with the Board he was superintendent of farm 
products. He was afterward made superintendent of heavy horses, 
and under his direction heavy horses became a leading feature at 
the State Fair and is growing in favor here. In 1911 Mr. Shaw visited 
the State fairs of Indiana and Iowa, as representative of the State 
Board, and made special study of the exhibits of horses. 

Politically he has always been a Democrat, and for years has been 
active and influential in the councils of his party. In 1904 he was 
honored by election to the State Legislature, and served as a repre- 
sentative in the forty-fourth general assembly. During this term he 
was a member of the committee on education, also mines and mining. 

Mr. Shaw has a wife and seven children, all at home at this writ- 
ing Elma, Mary. Ardis, Harry E., Ward E., John W. and Wayne R. 
Mrs. Shaw was formerly Miss Mary L. Price, of Hardin county, 
Illinois. 

Fraternally Mr. Shaw is identified with the B. P. O. E., the I. O. 
O. F., and the A. F. and A. M. He has passed all the chairs in the 
subordinate lodge of the Odd Fellows. In Masonry he has received 
all the degrees except those of the Commandery and thirty-third, 
and he has membership in Oriental Consistory and Medinah Temple, 
Chicago. 



624 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

THOMAS M. COOK, retired, now living with his children at Harris- 
burg, Illinois, is one of the venerable citizens of Saline county, of 
which he is a native. He was born March 25, 1828, one mile south of 
Harrisburg, in a pioneer home, the son of early settlers of this locality, 
Thomas and Mary (Hampton) Cook, who were natives of adjoining 
counties, the former in North Carolina and the latter in South Caro- 
lina. Thomas Cook had resided in Tennessee for some time and had 
studied medicine there, and soon after coming to Illinois to establish 
himself in medical practice he met -and married Mary Hampton. 
Smith Hampton, Mary Hampton's father, had moved here from 
South Carolina about 1820, and it was about 1823 that they 
were married. Dr. Cook soon built up a large practice, which he con- 
tinued up to the time of his death, in 1855, at the age of fifty-six 
years. While he lived on a farm the greater part of this time and 
supervised its cultivation, his attention was given chiefly to his prac- 
tice the old fashioned "saddle-bag" practice and he was known in 
the remote parts of the county as well as in the immediate vicinity of 
his home, and by all who knew him he was held in high esteem. Dur- 
ing the Black Hawk war he enlisted for service, but his brother-in- 
law, David Hampton, whom he had reared, asked to go in his place 
and was allowed the privilege. Politically he was a Democrat, and 
his religious faith was that of the Missionary Baptist church, he and 
his wife being original members of Liberty church of that denomina- 
tion, which was near his home. She survived him about twelve years. 
Of their eight children, Sarah, who married Jackson Dodds, a farmer 
of Saline county, died in middle life ; Patience died in Macoupin 
county, Illinois, where she moved with her husband, Absalom Duncan ; 
Elizabeth married Ethelbert Shaw, one of the nephews of John W. 
Shaw ; Benjamin, who lived on the home farm with his mother, died 
in the prime of life, leaving a widow and four children ; Martha, de- 
ceased, was the wife of Jesse Parks, of Williamson county, Illinois; 
Elmira, wife of James C. Ozment, is deceased. 

Dr. Cook had a brother, Turner Cook, who preceded him to Illi- 
nois and was living here when the Doctor came. He afterward re- 
turned to the South, but a few years later came back to Saline county 
and took up his residence at Texas City, where he died at the age of 
eighty-four years. 

Thomas M. Cook, the third born in his father's family, was reared 
on the farm, and spent his life as a farmer until four years ago, when 
he retired and has since made his home with his children. 

At the age of twenty he married Miss Margaret Hamilton, a na- 
tive of Jefferson county, Illinois, about his own age and a daughter 
of Thomas and Mary Hamilton, with whom he traveled life's pathway 
for nearly sixty years, until her death in 1907. Their children are: 
Mary Ann, wife of Richard Oliver, a retired farmer of Harrisburg ; 
Thomas, engaged in the dairy business; Joel, a Saline county farmer 
who died in April, 1911 ; Jackson, of Harrisburg ; and Wilson, also 
of Harrisburg, the last named being a traveling man. 

Like his worthy parents, Thomas M. Cook has long been identified 
with the Missionary Baptist church, he having been ordained a 
deacon in the Bankston Fork church, five miles west of Harrisburg, 
in 1852. And he has so conducted his life, according to the principles 
and ideals he has tried to follow, that he is justly entitled to the high 
respect and esteem in which he is held by those among whom he has 
lived and who know him well. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 625 

WILLIAM BKUCHHAUSEB. The life of the late William Bruchhauser, 
who for more than twenty years was connected with the milling in- 
terests of Anna, Illinois, presents a striking example of industry and 
integrity, and his career was one that should prove inspiring to the 
youths of today who are starting out to win success in the business 
world. Mr. Bruchhauser was born in the province of Waldeck, Ger- 
many, August 15, 1838, and like many other of his worthy country- 
men who in their native land had no other prospects than to always 
work hard and be poor, came to the United States in search of his 
fortune. He was thirty-six years of age when he settled in St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he entered a flouring mill, but soon thereafter re- 
moved to Red Bud, Randolph county, Illinois, and remained there two 
or three years in the same line. He then associated himself with a 
Mr. Melzer, at Worden, Illinois, but after one year removed to Joiies- 
ooro. In 1885 the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Bruchhauser 
came to Anna, where he established the Anna Roller Mills, with 
which he was identified up to within two or three years previous to 
his death. He then handled flour and feed as a retailer, and he was 
engaged in this business when his death occurred after a short illness, 
April 27, 1911. Mr. Bruchhauser was instrumental to a great extent in 
building up the city of Anna, was identified with others in promoting 
several business concerns, and proved himself one of its most active 
and enterprising citizens, as well as a typical, self-made successful 
man. His genial manners and warm-hearted sympathies made for 
him many sincere personal friendships and his death was deeply 
mourned. On July 1, 1906, his three sons purchased the Phoenix Mill- 
ing property from the Union County Milling Company. Mr. Bruch- 
hauser was for eleven years a director of the Anna Building and 
Loan Association. He was a charter member of the Southern Illinois 
Millers Association, and the owner of considerable city property in 
Anna. His religious connection was with the- Kornthal German Lu- 
theran church, of which his wife and children are now members. 

On April 25, 1872, Mr. Bruchhauser was married to Miss Phillip- 
pina Heck, of St. Louis, and they had three children : William P., who 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1874, was city treasurer of Anna 
for two years ; August F., born at Red Bud, Illinois, in 1876, who was 
city alderman for four years and is now identified with the milling 
business at Anna ; and Henry C., born at Worden, Illinois, in 1879, 
engaged in looking after his father's estate at Anna. The three sons 
are now operating the Phoenix Mills, which have a capacity of 100 
barrels per day, while the Anna Mill is used as a retail distributing 
point. 

William F. Bruchhauser, son of William, attended the public 
schools and the schools of the Lutheran church, and grew up in the 
milling business. He has been identified with various public enter- 
prises. The Brothers have been awarded the contract for the Anna 
Water Works, the construction of which will soon be started. They 
are well known in business circles of Anna and the surrounding coun- 
try, and the family name has always stood for honest business dealing 
and public-spirited citizenship. 

THOMAS A. BRADLEY. Ranking hierh among the active and valued 
business men of Johnson county is Thomas A. Bradley, who is not 
only identified with its mercantile and financial interests as one of 
Goreville's leading merchants and bankers, but is a large landholder 
and associated with the advancement of the agricultural prosperity 
of the county. He was born, November 12, 1863, in Williamson county, 



626 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Illinois, where his father, Jasper Bradley, also first opened his eyes 
to the light of this world. 

Jasper Bradley was of pioneer stock, his father, Pleasant Bradley, 
having migrated from North Carolina, his native state, to Illinois 
when young, becoming an early settler of Williamson county. He be- 
came a farmer from choice, and for many years was engaged in his 
independent occupation in the vicinity of his birthplace. He is now, 
however, living 'in Goreville, with his son Thomas. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Elizabeth Nelson, bore him six children, of whom, 
two are living, namely : W. M. Bradley, of Williamson county ; and 
Thomas A., the special subject of this brief biographical sketch. 

Growing to manhood beneath the parental roof-tree, Thomas A. 
Bradley was early initiated into the practical work of general farm- 
ing, although but little attention was paid to his education, his school 
life having been limited to a few terms in the district schools. Com- 
ing to Johnson county in 1887, he, in company with Major Z. Hudgins, 
opened a general store in Goreville. The Major sold his interest in 
the store the following year to H. A. Hudgins, with whom Mr. Brad- 
ley continued in partnership until 1910. In the meantime, in 1898, the 
railroad coming through the town was completed, and the firm of 
Hudgins & Bradley moved to the new site of Goreville and erected one 
of the first business buildings in the new town. In 1889 this enter- 
prising firm, with C. H. Dennison and II. M. Parks, of Marion, and 
M. M. Pickles, opened a private bank in their store, and conducted it 
successfully many years. 

In 1903 the First National Bank of Goreville was organized, and 
is one of the most nourishing institutions of its size in the county, at 
the present time, in 1911, having a capital of twenty-five thousand 
dollars, with a reserve of eighty-eight thousand dollars. Thomas A. 
Bradley has served as its president from the start, while M. M. Pickles, 
now principal of the high school in Anna, Illinois, was vice-president 
until 1910, when he was succeeded by 0. S. Cole; the bank's first 
cashier, W. S. Buckhart, of Marion, was succeeded in 1889 by R. A. 
Parker, of Marion, who served until 1906, when J. B. Hudgins, its 
present cashier, was elected to the position. 

In October, 1910, Mr. Bradley bought out the interests of Mr. 
Hudgins in the mercantile firm, and having admitted his son Ray to 
partnership has since continued the business as head of the firm of 
T. A. Bradley & Son. He carries a stock of general merchandise val- 
ued at six thousand dollars, and has a large annual trade. Mr. Brad- 
ley owns a handsome residence in Goreville, and has an interest in a 
valuable farming estate in Williamson county. 

Mr. Bradley married, in 1887, Alice Hudgins, a daughter of Major 
Z. and Mary (Corksey) Hudgins. Her father was in business in John- 
son county for three score years, for a long time having been engaged 
in mercantile pursuits in Goreville, having been senior member of the 
firm of Hudgins & Bradley for a year or more. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley 
have five children, namely : Carrie, who married W. M. Trovillion, has 
one child, Leon Trovillion ; Ray, in partnership with his father : Rolla 
Lee.; Don B. ; and Muriel. Fraternally Mr. Bradley is a member of 
Marion Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Marion ; 
of Goreville Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Goreville ; 
and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

PHIL C. BARCLAY. A well-known figure in the insurance field, Phil 
C. Barclay, of Cairo, is the manager for Southern Illinois of the Mas- 
sachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, and is the successor of 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 627 

the old firm of P. W. Barclay & Son, which was originated by the 
senior Barclay in 1892 and conducted actively by him until his death, 
in 1907. The Barclay family identified itself with Cairo in 1868, when 
P. W. and J. S. Barclay, his brother, engaged in the drug business as 
wholesalers and retailers, and they continued therein until J. S. moved 
to Oak Park, a suburb of Chicago, and continued the same business 
alone until his death, in 1901. 

P. W. Barclay entered the insurance business late in life. His 
whole business career had been given to merchandising, but he en- 
tered his new field with the same zeal that had characterized his mer- 
cantile efforts, and he made his agency a productive factor for this 
pioneer among life insurance companies. In 1897 his son entered into 
partnership with him, and ten years later became the successor of his 
worthy father. By nativity, this branch of the Barclay family were 
Kentuckians, with a Virginia ancestry. P. W. Barclay was born at 
Russellville, Kentucky, in 1832, and was a son of Hugh Barclay, who 
moved to that state as a young man, established himself in a tanyard, 
and continued that industry while in vigorous life. He married Miss 
Lou Ann Hall, and both died at Russellville, having been the parents 
of nine children. The minority of P. W. Barclay was spent about his 
father's tanyard and in gaining a fair education, and even as a young 
man he became interested in drug work, making it an important part 
of his life work. He was married to Miss Mary F. Crews, daughter 
of Rev. Hooper Crews, of Chicago, but originally of Kentucky, a 
Methodist minister who spent more than half a century in the pulpit. 
Mrs. Barclay passed away in 1896. To Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Barclay 
were born the following children: Phil C. ; Hugh, who died at Tucson, 
Arizona, after spending some years in the government service in Porto 
Rico ; and Mrs. J. A. Naugle, of Cairo, whose husband was prominent 
in railroad circles of Old Mexico for more than thirty years. 

Phil C. Barclay was educated in the schools of Cairo, and after 
completing his education entered business with his father, in which 
he has continued to the present time. He is a native of Chicago, and 
he was married at Versailles, Kentucky, in September, 1881, to Miss 
Fannie Hinkle, a Cairo lady, daughter of Jesse Hinkle, a native of 
Kentucky who lived for many years in Cairo, and later went to Por- 
terville, California, where Mr. Hinkle died. Mrs. Barclay's only 
brother, Robert, died in Cairo in 1910. 

Mr. Barclay is a Master Mason and a member of the Elks Lodge 
of Cairo, and his father was one of the prominent Masons of Illinois, 
being past grand commander of the Knights Templar, past grand high 
priest of the chapter, and a thirty-third degree Mason. Phil C. Bar- 
clay is a member of the Cairo Commercial Club and is secretary of 
the Cairo Board of Trade. He is serving his second term as one of the 
election commissioners of Cairo, has been three years a member of the 
board of education, and is serving his second term as a member of the 
Public Library board of directors. He is a popular member of the 
Alexander Club, the popular social men's club of the city. 

ANDREW J. LYERLY, M. D., physician and surgeon at Jonesboro, 
Illinois, is one of the eminent professional men of this part of the 
State, and his activities as doctor, civic official and public-spirited 
citizen have marked him as a representative of the best type of pro- 
gressive American citizenship, and gained him the respect and esteem 
of his fellow-townsmen and the sincere confidence of a wide circle of 
warm, personal friends. Since locating in Jonesboro, in 1900, Dr. 
Lyerly has identified himself with various movements for the public 



628 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

welfare, his connection with which has caused his election to various 
positions of honor and trust, and in the discharge of his official duties 
he has displayed the same faithfulness and conscientiousness that have 
marked his professional career. 

Dr. Lyerly was born in Union county in 1865, and after attending 
the district schools and teaching for one term, entered Ewing College, 
where he remained for four months. He then taught another term of 
school, and for some time was engaged in farming, in the meanwhile 
diligently pursuing his medical studies. On March 4, 1890, he was 
graduated from the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, and began 
practice at Wolf Lake, where he remained until November, 1900. In 
that year he came to Jonesboro, where he has since built up a large 
patronage. Dr. Lyerly has been a close student, and is the possessor 
of a large and valuable medical library where he spends whatever 
time he can spare from his arduous duties. He has a well-appointed 
office, equipped with the latest inventions of his profession, and every- 
thing that will in any way add to the comfort and convenience of his 
patients. He belongs to the Union County Medical Society, of which 
he has served as vice-president, secretary and treasurer, and also 
holds membership in the Illinois State Medical Society and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. Fraternally he is connected with the Jones- 
boro Blue Lodge of Masons, No. Ill, in which he has passed through 
the chairs, and with the Modern Woodmen of America, of which he 
is at present clerk. Politically a Democrat, the Doctor served for four 
years as postmaster at Wolf Lake, while he was in practice there, dur- 
ing President Cleveland's second administration, and has been elected 
to the office of alderman of Jonesboro. He owns 320 acres of well- 
improved land in Union county, which is operated by tenants, and 
on which considerable fruit is grown. 

In September, 1891, Dr. Lyerly was married to Mrs. Sarah Doty, 
and five children have been born to this union : Frances, Grover, Ruth, 
Esther and Electa, all at home. Dr. and Mrs. Lyerly are consistent 
members of the Baptist church, where he has been an active Sunday 
school worker, and of which he is now deacon. He is known over a 
large territory, has an extensive general practice, and enjoys the con- 
fidence of the people in a marked degree. 

JAMES I. HALE, M. D. After forty years spent in the practice of 
medicine and surgery in the city of Anna, Dr. James I. Hale has risen 
to a foremost position among the medical practitioners of Southern 
Illinois, and during this time has held various positions of honor and 
trust, in all of which he has discharged his duties with the utmost fidelity. 
Possessed of a vigorous and active physical constitution and an attractive 
personality, of a hopeful and ardent disposition, and a man with deter- 
mined and persistent purpose, he is admirably fitted to carry on the great 
work with which he is identified and the kind of a man who will at once 
win the confidence, respect and admiration of those with whom he comes 
in contact. Dr. Hale was born April 16, 1844, in a log cabin on a farm 
which was located on the present site of the city of Anna, and he has 
always resided in Union county. 

The Hale family is of English descent and traces its ancestry in this 
country back to Colonial times, many of the family name residing in or 
near Mayfield, Kentucky, at this time. Dr. Hale's parents, James V. and 
Susan (Hale) Hale, cousins, were both born in Kentucky and came to 
Illinois at an early day, settling in the wilderness of Union county. 
After some time here, James V. Hale returned on a visit to some relatives 
in Kentucky, and as he was never again heard from it is supposed that he 



OMHt 
8ISVERSITY OF ILUK&T, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 629 

was drowned. Later his widow married John Black, a farmer, who died 
one year later, while she survived him many years and died when sixty- 
six. "When he was six years of age, James I. Hale was apprenticed to 
Adam Lence, a farmer of Union county, and by the time he had reached 
the age of eighteen years he had a fair education, most of which he had 
picked up by himself, and had also learned the trades of wheelwright 
and cabinet-maker. In August, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Com- 
panjr C, 109th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was later 
transferred to Company A, Eleventh Regiment. He was early detailed 
to hospital work, and while there was able to read numerous medical 
works, which ended in his decision to become a doctor. On his re- 
turn from the war he located in Anna, and began to study medicine 
under Dr. S. S. Condon, and during the fall of 1868 entered the Chi- 
cago Medical College, attending the winter and spring terms. In 
May, 1869, he felt qualified to begin practice, and subsequently estab- 
lished himself at Saratoga, Illinois, but soon thereafter moved to Pen- 
ninger, where from 1870 until 1872 he acted as postmaster. He re- 
turned to Anna in the latter year, and in the fall of 1873 again entered 
the Chicago Medical College, from which he was graduated in March, 
1874. During the year 1877 Dr. Hale was commissioned surgeon of 
the Eleventh Regiment, Illinois National Guard, with the rank of 
major, in which position he continued for five years, subsequently act- 
ing as local pension examiner for eight years. He was a member of 
the city council of Anna from 1874 to 1876, coroner of Union county 
from 1881 to 1885, and again alderman from 1882 to 1884. Dr. Hale 
was active in establishing Union Academy, now one of the best known 
educational institutions in Southern Illinois, and was one of the 
founders of the Union County News, now published as The Talk, in 
addition to which he has aided materially in the development of the 
building interests of Anna by erecting several brick business struct- 
ures. 

In 1875 Dr. Hale became the prime mover in the organization of 
the Southern Illinois Medical Association, of which he has been sec- 
retary, vice-president and president on various occasions, and he is 
also a member of the American Medical Association which he joined 
in 1884, the Illinois State Medical Society, with which he became con- 
nected in 1896, and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United 
States. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1871, 
joined the Royal Arch Chapter in 1877, and since 1886 has belonged 
to the Knights Templar, serving as master of the local lodge on a num- 
ber of occasions and as High Priest six times. He belongs to Hiawatha 
Lodge No. 219, Odd Fellows, and Lodge No. 315, Knights and Ladies 
of Honor. Dr. Hale has been interested in the work of the Presby- 
terian church, in which he has served as elder, and has given his in- 
fluence and support to various movements of a religious and charitable 
nature. He is a Prohibitionist in his political views. 

On October 17, 1865, Dr. Hale was married to Miss Mary J. Wilson, 
of Caledonia, Pulaski county, Illinois, daughter of John and Ann M. 
Wilson, ea'rly pioneer settlers of that county, and granddaughter of 
George Lingle, who came early to that section from North Carolina. 
Three children have been born to the union of Dr. and Mrs. Hale, 
namely : Dr. John A., who is engaged in practice at Alto Pass, Illi- 
nois, and who married Jessie Lewis, of Pulaski county; Dr. E. V., who 
is engaged in practice with Dr. Martin, at Anna, and who married 
Amelia Spengeman of Carmi, Illinois; and Flora, who married James 
Fitzpatrick, of Anna. 

Dr. Hale is the owner of a finely-cultivated farm of 235 acres located 



630 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

in Union county, on which are two tenant houses, and a part of this 
land is devoted to fruit-raising. He is a stockholder in the First 
National Bank, and also has an interest in a large lumber concern and 
a fruit package company at Anna. The greater part of his attention, 
however, has been given to his profession, and he has build up a repu- 
tation that extends throughout Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri, from 
whence his patients come. He specializes in surgery, chronic diseases 
and diseases of women, and makes no calls except in consultation. In 
1900 he erected a brick hospital building, with fifty rooms and a capac- 
ity for taking care of thirty patients, and this has been recently en- 
larged, being now three stories in height, with basement, and fully 
equipped with elevator service and all modern conveniences. From 
twelve to fifteen patients are treated regularly. In 1905 he opened a 
sanatorium to the public, and since that time has had about 1,900 resi- 
dent patients, or those who remain one week or more. Since that year, 
Dr. Hale has performed 262 surgical operations, and his success in 
many complicated cases has stamped him as one of the leading sur- 
geons of his time and locality. A fearless, untiring, energetic, force- 
ful and thoroughly sincere laborer, Dr. Hale's efforts have borne rich 
fruit, and in naming the eminent medical men of today his name 
should stand among the foremost in the ranks of the men of his 
profession. 

JOHN M. BROWN. Probably there is no better known family in 
Johnson county than that of Brown, which was established here as 
early as the year 1820, and members of which have been prominently 
identified with the agricultural and political life of Southern Illinois 
for many years. It traces its ancestry back to the time when the 
county included the greater part of Southern Illinois, and its founder, 
James Brown, was in all probability the first sheriff of this section. 
One of the worthy representatives of this old and honored family is 
found in the person of John M. Brown, one of the leading farmers and 
stockmen of Cache township, who owns an excellent tract of farming 
land two miles west of the city of Vienna. He was born on a farm 
in the western part of Johnson county, near the Union county line, 
September 21, 1867, and is a son of Samuel T. and Amanda (Dubois) 
Brown. 

James Brown, the grandfather of John M., was born in 1784, in the 
state of North Carolina, and in 1820 migrated to Johnson county and 
became one of the earliest settlers here. He took up a tract of Govern- 
ment land, cleared and cultivated it in pioneer fashion, and rose to 
a prominent position among his fellows, being elected sheriff of John- 
son county. He maintained headquarters at Kaskaskia, and during 
the years that he held his official position his duties caused him to 
travel on horseback all over the southern part of the state. His death 
occurred in 1861. James Brown married Betty Carter, a native of 
Orange county, North Carolina, and among their children was Samuel 
T. Brown, the father of John M., of Cache township. Samuel T. Brown 
was born June 29, 1825, and like his father he became a successful 
agriculturist and well-known public official. He accumulated a vast 
property, but during his later years retired from active pursuits, and 
at the time of his death, September 25, 1897, had disposed of all of his 
land except one hundred and twenty acres. A man who was held in 
high esteem by his fellow-townsmen, he served for more than forty 
years as a justice of the peace, and in every walk of life was known 
as a man of strict honesty and sterling integrity. From his boyhood 
he was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 631 

was always an active participant in all of its work. Mr. Brown was 
married to Miss Amanda Dubois, who was born in Madison county, 
Illinois, March 1, 1830, daughter of Joel Dubois. Mr. Dubois, who 
was a native of Tennessee, migrated to Madison county at an early 
date, but while making a trip to Tennessee by flat-boat was murdered 
in a tavern on the Mississippi river, when Mrs. Brown was a child. 
She died in November, 1907, having been the mother of eleven chil- 
dren, of whom one died in infancy, while the others were as follows: 
Mrs. Nancy J. Mulkey ; James M., who resides at Mount Vernon ; W. 
J., a resident of Carbondale; Wilson B., baggage master at the Cairo 
railroad depot; Mary A., the widow of James Enos; Samuel T., Jr., 
who is engaged in farming in West Vienna; Mrs. Amanda J. Jones; 
John M. ; Alonzo V., who lives at Cypress ; and Mrs. Ella Wilhelm. 

John M. Brown was given the best of educational advantages, at- 
tending first the common schools, and later the Southern Illinois Nor- 
mal University at Carbondale, Illinois. In 1885, when only eighteen 
years of age, he began teaching school, his first charge being at Mos- 
cow, in Union county. During the nine years that followed he taught 
in Union, Pulaski and Johnson counties, and followed farming during 
vacations. The first land of his own, a tract of eight acres which he 
purchased in 1892, was located near the old homestead, and when he 
was married he erected a home thereon. In 1895 Mr. Brown gave up 
teaching in order to give his whole time and attention to agricultural 
pursuits, and in that year sold his first small farm and purchased 
seventy acres situated some distance north of his present place. An 
enterprising and energetic farmer, Mr. Brown invested his earnings 
in more property, and he is now the owner of four hundred and 
twenty-six acres of land. The present home place, a tract of eighty 
acres, was purchased by him in 1908, and during the following year 
he erected a handsome residence, which is modern in every respect. 
Since then he has built substantial barns and outbuildings and a fine 
silo, and has improved his property in many ways. Mr. Brown has al- 
ways been a successful stock-raiser, and since 1907 has given the 
greater part of his time to specializing in Angus cattle, having an 
excellent herd of forty-five head, and for five years has been a large 
buyer and shipper of corn and hay. Most of his shipping is done 
from West Vienna, and his product is about ten carloads of hay and 
fifty of corn annually. Scientific methods in both tilling the soil and 
breeding cattle have always found a stanch adherent in Mr. Brown. 
He has devoted a great deal of study to soil and climatic conditions, 
his land is well drained and tiled, and he makes a regular practice of 
crop rotation, while among his neighbors he is acknowledged to be 
an excellent judge of registered stock. Although his operations have 
been so extensive as to make him a remarkably busy man, he has 
found leisure to participate in events of a social nature, and is a popu- 
lar member of the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Brotherhood, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Royal Neighbors, being affili- 
ated with the lodges of these orders at Vienna. He and his family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Brown was married (first) in 1892 to Miss Ellen Enos, daugh- 
ter of James Enos, and she died in January, 1901, leaving two chil- 
dren : Edith, who is fifteen years of age ; and Blanche, who has reached 
her eleventh year. On December 2, 1906, Mr. Brown took for his 
second wife Miss Leila Mackey, daughter of John C. Mackey, and to 
this union there has been born one child : Waldron M., who was born 
December 9, 1907. 



632 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

OSCAR L. BARTLETT. In the ten years of his residence in Mound 
City, Illinois, Oscar L. Bartlett has, from a small beginning in the 
manufacturing business, steadily upbuilt his factories and enlarged 
the scope of his operations until he is now recognized as one of the 
leading manufacturers of his product (that of hoops, paper plugs 
and meat blocks) in the United States today. 

Oscar L. Bartlett was born in Delaware county, Indiana, April 
20, 1865, and is a son of William T. Bartlett and a grandson of Elisha 
Bartlett, the father of William Bartlett. Elisha Bartlett was origi- 
nally a native of Virginia, and as a young man he moved into Albany, 
Indiana, where he settled and spent the remainder of his life and 
finally passed away at the home which he had established and main- 
tained there. He was the husband of Mary Strong, and William T. 
Bartlett was their first child. They were the parents of nine children 
in all, the others being: James, Reuben, John, Calvin, George, Flora, 
(the wife of Abram Cline), Elizabeth and Minnie (who was the wife 
of Hal Wolverton at the time of her demise). 

William T. Bartlett was born on November 3, 1844, and he lived 
the quiet life of the country boy at their farm home near Albany, re- 
ceiving only such education as the public schools of their district af- 
forded. In early manhood he bought a farm in Delaware county, In- 
diana, and on this place he spent his life. He was a quiet, unpreten- 
tious man, a good citizen, and always a valuable friend and neighbor. 
He was drawn for service in the Federal army during the last year 
of the Civil war and reported for duty, but was furloughed home un- 
til called for. By some oversight, he was never notified to report, and 
technically speaking was in the employ of the Government until the 
day of his death, a peculiar circumstance and of exceeding rare occur- 
rence. 

While still a very young man Mr. Bartlett married Dorothy Bales, 
a daughter of a well known farmer of the Albany district. She was 
born October 25, 1845, being but little more than a year her husband's 
junior, and she died at the family home December 22, 1879. Their union 
was blessed with four children. They were: Oscar L., of whom we 
write ; Mary Wilday, who became the wife of B. F. Houseman and now 
resides in Dunkirk, Indiana ; Nina Bessie, who wedded Charles Clark ; 
and Tina Bessie, a twin of the former, who married Charles Barnes, 
and the two families are also residents of Dunkirk. William Bartlett 
passed away at the family home on July 25, 1903, having survived 
his wife by twenty-four years. 

Oscar Bartlett received in his youth such advantages as were 
made possible by attendance upon the district schools of his locality. 
As a youth he spent some time at work in the logging district, where 
he learned something of the business, and it was there he conceived 
the idea of establishing himself in the milling industry. When, af- 
ter a few years, he saw an opportunity to get into the milling busi- 
ness, in a small way, he readily embraced it, and his first enterprise in 
that line was the establishment of a hoop factory at Eaton, Indiana. 
He devoted his time to this business between 1892 and 1894, after 
which he transferred his operations to Muncie, Indiana, and added the 
process of heading to his hoop manufactory. This plant he conducted, 
exclusive of other interests, until 1901. His practical experience by 
this time was such that he was emboldened to enlarge the field of his 
operations, and in the year 1901 he established his hoop factory in 
Mound City. The industry has grown steadily from its inception, so 
that today his hoop mill has a capacity of fourteen millions of hoops 
annually, and is without any exception the largest plant of its kind in 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 633 

the United States. The products of his factories are now entering 
into the export trade of the country, and butchers in many European 
countries carve their steaks upon a sycamore meat-block made in the 
Bartlett plant in Mound City, Illinois. It is an established fact that 
his factory supplies three-fourths of all the meat-blocks used in the 
United States today, and it would be a difficult feat to find a township 
in this broad land which does not make daily use of at least one 
butcher's block from the plant of Oscar Bartlett. His paper plugs, 
which department he has added in recent years, supplies plugs to 
multitudinous paper mills in the United States, and twenty millions of 
them are annually placed upon the market. The combined industries 
of the Bartlett plant provides a market for a goodly amount of both 
skilled and common labor, and the payroll of the Bartlett interests 
is no small item in Mound City. 

Mr. Bartlett was married February 5, 1887, at Muncie, Indiana, to 
Miss Viola Brandt, daughter of the late David Brandt, an Eaton, In- 
diana, merchant of repute, and Susan (Ashenfelter) Brandt, both of 
German extraction. Mr. and Mrs. Brandt were the parents of three 
children, Mrs. Louie Peterson, William Brandt, and Viola, now Mrs. 
Bartlett. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett is a daughter, Lur- 
leane, now the wife of W. L. Harris, a cotton merchant in New York 
city, and one daughter, Eleanor Lurleane, is the issue of that union. 

Mr. Bartlett is not a man who has displayed any marked interest 
in civic affairs, which is no doubt due for the most part to the neces- 
sarily temporary residence at various points which his scattered busi- 
ness interests have until recent years enjoined upon him. However, his 
operations in the industrial sphere make him a valuable factor in any 
municipality which is so fortunate as to hold any of his varied interests, 
and Mound City owes a deal of her growth and advancement to the in- 
dustry of which Oscar L. Bartlett is the head. 

Mr. Bartlett is a member of the Knights Templar in Masonry but 
beyond that he has no especial fraternal interests. His political in- 
clinations are always in accordance with the demands of the moment, 
independent of party interests. 

FRANK CLEMENTS. The successful son of a distinguished and ven- 
erated father, and the scion of families resident in this country from 
very early colonial times, and strong factors in all phases of its history 
in many localities and all worthy walks of life, Frank Clements, of 
Carbondale, has shown himself to be fully entitled to the high and 
general esteem in which he is held by his exemplification in his own life 
and the manly spirit of his ancestors. 

Mr. Clements was born in Carbondale on September 17, 1865, and 
grew to manhood in that city, attending the public schools for a time 
and completing his academic education' at the Southern Illinois Normal 
University. After leaving the University he clerked in a dry goods 
store in Carbondale a short time, then passed ten years in the same 
capacity in the employ of John V. Farwell, of Chicago. In the great 
metropolis of the "West, which is one of the modern wonders Of the 
world, he manifested the same qualities of upright and elevated man- 
hood that have since distinguished him in his long residence in Car- 
bondale and won the admiration or the friendship of every acquain- 
tance he had there. 

In 1893 he returned to his native city and bought an interest in the 
business of A. F. Bridges, which subsequently became the firm of 
Clements & Etherton. Mr. Clements is also connected in a leading way 
with other business institutions in Carbondale with benefit to them 



634 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

and the public. He is one of the directors of the First National Bank 
and secretary of the Carbondale Mill and Elevator Company. He has 
taken a warm and serviceable interest, too, in the public affairs of the 
community, having served as alderman two years and as a member of 
the board of school trustees twelve years. In these offices he has kept 
his eye firmly on the interests of the people and done all he could to 
protect and promote them. 

In religious faith and alliance he is connected with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and faithfully serves the congregation to which he 
belongs as its treasurer. Fraternally he is a Freemason, and is the 
treasurer, also, of his lodge in the order. Politically he is a Republi- 
can, always loyal to his party, but not an active partisan and never 
desirous of the honors or emoluments of public office, although he is 
everywhere recognized as capable in a high degree of discharging official 
duties in a manner most beneficial and satisfactory to all for whom 
they are performed. 

Mr. Clements is a son of Isaac and Josephine (Nutt) Clements, the 
former born in Franklin county, Indiana, on March 31, 1837. The 
mother's father was Rev. Cyrus Nutt, D. D. LL., D., at the time of her 
marriage president of the Indiana University, and one of the prominent 
and distinguished educators of the country, everywhere recognized as 
such and everywhere revered for his high character as a man, his un- 
affected and impressive piety, and his great intellectual powers, as well 
as for his exact and exhaustive learning. 

Isaac Clements, the father of Frank, at the time of his death, which 
occurred on May 30, 1909, was governor of the Soldiers' Home at Dan- 
ville in this state, a position which he accepted on January 6, 1899, 
after a long and brilliant career in other departments of the public 
service and in professional life. It is high praise but only a just tribute 
to demonstrated merit of a high order, and to a disposition that always 
radiated genial sunshine, brightening and warming all with whom it 
came in contact, to state that during his ten years' tenure of this trying 
office he was not known to make one enemy, and he was known to seal 
to himself the cordial devotion and loyal friendship of thousands of 
persons, including not only the inmates of the Home and all their 
friends, but also all the residents of Danville who were brought into 
association with him or heard of his genuine kindness of heart, un- 
varying courtesy and seasoned wisdom. 

The ancestors of Isaac Clements were among the founders of Mary- 
land, being members of the colony which made the first settlement in 
that state under the lead of Cecilius Calvert, the second Lord Balti- 
more. They received a large grant of land in the new colony by a 
"king's patent" which made them owners of "sixteen square miles 
anywhere within Lord Baltimore's domain." They selected as their 
portion and as the home of the family in the new world a tract of the 
designated size on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake bay, on which 
they located and began to take a leading part in the activities of the 
first palatinate on this side of the Atlantic. 

The grandfather of the late governor of the Soldiers' Home fought 
under Washington in the Revolution and felt that great commander 
lean on him for support, even though he walked serenely under his 
mighty burden of care. The father of the governor, whose name was 
Isaac also, was a valiant soldier in the "War of 1812, and in that short 
but significant contest with the mother country well maintained the 
reputation of the family and the glory of the "Old Maryland Line," 
for both he and his wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Burt, were 
born in Maryland in 1790, and lived there until sometime after the war. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 635 

They then moved to Lebanon, Ohio, and some years later to Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, where their son Isaac was born, as has been stated, 
on March 31, 1837. He attended the common schools of the time and 
place, but was not satisfied with the education they could afford him, 
and determined to secure a better one. When he was but fourteen he 
entered a private school, sawing wood and sweeping the school room to 
pay his tuition. In this way he prepared himself for college, and in 
the fall of 1854 matriculated in what was then Asbury but is now De 
Pauw University, at Greencastle in his native state, from which he was 
graduated with high honors in 1859, delivering the Latin oration for his 
class as a mark of his exalted rank in it. 

During vacations he taught school to pay his way through the Uni- 
versity, and after his graduation continued to teach to prepare himself 
for the law. This he did in Illinois, moving to this state a short time 
after he received his diploma. In 1860 he opened a law office in Car- 
bondale, and at once began, taking an active part in politics. In the 
exciting presidential election of that year he supported Mr. Douglas 
for the presidency, but after the election showed his loyalty to the 
Union by opposing the secession sentiment then prevalent in Southern 
Illinois in public speeches vigorous in argument and ardent with pa- 
triotism. 

Before the call for troops to defend the Union was made Mr. 
Clements organized a company of infantry which afterward became 
Company G of the Ninth Illinois regiment, and was chosen its second 
lieutenant. He was mustered into the service on July 27, 1861, and 
remained in it three years, being mustered out on August 3, 1864. His 
regiment took part in some of the bloodiest battles of the war, and he 
was wounded three times, twice at the battle of Shiloh and once at the 
battle of Corinth. 

From the close of the war until his death he was almost continuously 
in office, so well was he qualified for executive and administrative duties. 
In 1868 he was appointed register in bankruptcy, and in 1872 was 
elected to congress. A political upheaval defeated him for re-election 
in 1874, and President Grant at once appointed him pension agent for 
the Southern Illinois district. An act of congress consolidated the two 
districts in the state in 1878, and Mr. Clements retired from office for 
a few months. Before the end of the year, however, Governor Cullom 
appointed him commissioner of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary, and 
he held this position until President Harrison appointed him pension 
agent for Illinois. 

Soon after the accession of Cleveland to the presidency Mr. Clements 
again became a private citizen, and he remained one until 1897, when 
Governor Tanner appointed him superintendent of the Soldiers' 
Orphans' Home at Normal, and thereby found a way out of great 
difficulties he had in connection with the management of that institu- 
tion. He served the state well and wisely in that position until he re- 
ceived his last appointment as governor of the Federal Soldiers' Home 
at Danville. In all these various offices he rendered service so signal 
and satisfactory that there was never a word of criticism of his admin- 
istration of them even by innuendo. 

Mr. Clements became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
while yet a young man, and during all his subsequent years was devout, 
sincere and consistent in his daily exemplification of the teachings of 
Christianity. He was a charter member of John W. Lawrence Post, 
No. 297, Grand Army of the Republic, and its commander several 
years and a member of the Loyal Legion. He also belonged for many 
years to Shekinah Lodge, No. 241, A. F. and A. M., and for two years 



636 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

served as grand orator of the Grand Lodge of Illinois in the Masonic 
order. He was the life and soul of the Grand Army post while com- 
manding it, and a luminous and eloquent expounder of the ritual and 
principles of Freemasonry while serving as grand orator of the order 
in this state. 

When his remains were laid to rest amid the lamentations of the 
whole community, and with the highest funeral honors his companions 
in arms and all other soldiers at hand could pay him, the bench and 
bar of the city and the fraternal organizations to which he had given 
so much life and light attended the funeral in a body, and they all after- 
ward placed on enduring record strong tributes to his merits as a man 
and citizen; his capacity and fidelity to duty in office; his loyalty to 
every obligation he ever took; his obedience to the behests of honor, 
truth, humanity and duty, which exists in the nature of things and need 
not be expressed in formal codes and creeds, and the powerful influence 
for good of his example wherever he had been known and in connection 
with every line of human endeavor in which he had ever been employed. 

"Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright; for the end of that 
man is peace." 

ISAAC RAPP. This venerable and well beloved citizen of Carbon- 
dale, who is the oldest resident of the city, both by reason of the num- 
ber of his years in age and because of the length of time he has had his 
home here, has been elevated to the rank of a patriarch by the esteem 
and affection of the people, who know no better man now living among 
them, and have never known a better one anywhere. They revere him 
for his high character, for his clean and upright life, for the unyielding 
fidelity with which he has performed every duty in peace and war, 
and for the conspicuous services he has rendered to the community as 
one of its founders and most zealous practical workers for the promo- 
tion of its progress and improvement. 

Mr. Rapp was born in Orange county. New York, on June 24, 1830, 
and in 1832 was taken by his parents to New York city, where they had 
decided to reside. He grew to manhood in the great metropolis of the 
Western world and was educated in its public schools. The circum- 
stances of the family were such that he was obliged to leave school at 
an early age and prepare himself for the practical requirements of life 
in this busy sphere. So he was apprenticed to an architect and house- 
joiner to acquire a thorough knowledge of the business. He devoted 
himself particularly and with studious attention to the architectural 
part of the business, which was of great interest to him and well adapted 
to his distinctive bent of mind toward designing and construction work. 

When he had finished his training he became an architect and 
builder, and began operations in New York city. On June 24, 1851, 
his twenty-first birth day, he was married to Miss Georgiana Shaw, a 
native of the Island of Jersey, England, but at the time of the marriage 
a resident of New York. With the establishment of his domestic shrine 
Mr. Rapp found his long cherished desire for a life in a freer and more 
open environment, and one more fruitful in opportunities for a man 
without capital, intensifying year by year, until at length it became 
irresistible. 

Accordingly, in 1856, five years after his marriage, he set his face in 
the direction of the established ' ' course of empire, ' ' the great West, 
determined to become a part of its sweeping enterprise and strident 
progress. He moved to Carbondale that year, and soon after his arrival 
was engaged by the late General D. H. Brush to build him a residence. 
The manner in which he performed this task gave him reputation and 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 637 

standing as a capable architect and builder, and he found his services 
in great demand. 

But when the Civil war descended like a besom of destruction on 
the country, he could not withstand the promptings of his patriotism, 
and in 1862 enlisted for the defense of the Union in Company D, Eighty- 
first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a private. He was at once elected 
second lieutenant of his company and assigned to the commissary de- 
partment on detailed duty. Notwithstanding this assignment he par- 
ticipated in many engagements with the enemy, and saw active service 
in the midst of unrolling columns on many a field of carnage, although 
in none of the great battles of the war. His term of enlistment ex- 
pired in 1863 and he was discharged at the end of it. He then returned 
to Carbondale and resumed his occupation as a contractor and builder. 
The town was then in its embryo, and he found plenty to do, as it was 
on the move and required fiomes for the incoming population and busi- 
ness structures to provide for their wants in trade. He erected many 
of the earlier houses in the city, and many outside of its limits in various 
places in Southern Illinois. He put up a number of the first buildings 
on the Southern Illinois Normal University grounds, and after the dis- 
astrous fire which destroyed most of his work, and that of others, he 
was the leading factor in building new and more ambitious structures 
to take the place of the old ones. 

The course of the patriarch has led him beyond the four score years 
fixed by the sacred writer as the limit of human life, and, in the nature 
of the case, is nearly spent. But he is still hale and vigorous beyond 
many men much younger, and the sunniness of his nature yet abides 
with him, even in larger measure than ever, if that is possible. He 
reminds all who know him of some genial year, hastening to its close 
without doubt, but with its seasons of warmth, and beauty and fruit- 
fulness not yet wholly spent. The people of Carbondale cherish the 
hope that they may have him with them for many years more to brighten 
their lives and keep before them the strong influence of his great ex- 
ample of usefulness and upright manhood. 

JUDGE JAMES P. MOONEYHAM, *of Benton, Illinois, belongs to one 
of the oldest pioneer families in this section of the state, his grand- 
father, Shadrach Mooneyham, having come here with his family in 
1838. One of the members of the household was the son John, who 
became the father of James P. John Mooneyham was born in Alabama, 
on December 23, 1825, and was therefore a lad of thirteen years when 
his parents moved to Illinois. When a young man he purchased a 
farm in Franklin county and was a well known and highly respected 
resident here throughout the remainder of his life. Although he 
naturally favored the principles of the Democratic party in a political 
way, he was not wedded to their precepts and exercised commendable 
independence in his thoughts and actions. He at one time received the 
nomination for sheriff of Franklin county at the hands of an inde- 
pendent aggregation and, although he met with defeat, gave his op- 
ponents a hard run. His ability to fill that character of office did not 
remain unrecognized, however, and he served as deputy sheriff for some 
time under Carroll Moore. 

In the war of the rebellion John Mooneyham, father of the subject, 
championed the cause of the North and served in the army with honor 
and distinction. He was a member of Company I, Thirty-first Regi- 
ment, for a time and was first lieutenant under General (then Colonel) 
John A. Logan. Resigning from the Thirty-first Regiment, he later 
enlisted with the Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry, in which he served first 



638 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

as first sergeant but was promoted and when his company was mustered 
out he was a first lieutenant. The total length of his service in the 
army was three years and eleven months. 

On his mother's side of the house also Judge James P. Mooneyham 
traces his ancestry to early pioneers. His mother was Minerva Man- 
ering, a native of Greene county, Illinois, where she was born on August 
4, 1841, the daughter of James Manering, one of Virginia's sturdy sons. 
Mr. Manering moved to Greene county at a time when the whole 
country was very sparsely settled. He was engaged in agriculture in 
Greene county for several years, but later moved to Franklin county, 
transporting his family and possessions by ox team. In Franklin 
county, near Six Mile Prairie, he secured a fine tract of land from the 
Government, which he cleared and put under cultivation, retaining the 
ownership of this farm throughout his life. The death of Mrs. Mooney- 
ham, the mother of James P., occurred on February 20, 1893, but little 
over a month after the demise of her husband, on January 10, 1893. 
They were both members of the Town Mount Prairie Missionary Bap- 
tist church and were held in the highest esteem by a large circle of 
friends. 

Judge James P. Mooneyham was born near Benton, Franklin 
county, Illinois, December 12, 1871. His early education was such as 
the common schools afforded, but this was later supplemented by the 
better advantages of the town schools and college. He attended at dif- 
ferent times a select school at Benton, the State Normal at Carbondale 
and finally took a two term course at Ewing College, Ewing, Illinois. 
This gave him a good foundation for success at teaching and for five 
years he engaged in that profession. During those years he devoted 
what time he could spare from his regular duties to the study of law, 
reciting under a relative's tuition, and was admitted to the bar in 
November, 1896. 

Judge Mooneyham has filled a number of public offices, both elective 
and appointive, performing state and county service in various capaci- 
ties. His political proclivities are Republican and he has been one 
of that party's most zealous workers in this section of the state. In 
1896, immediately after his admittance to practice, he became a candi- 
date for the nomination for state's attorney of Franklin county and re- 
ceived the honor without opposition at the hands of his party constit- 
uents. The election, however, resulted in his defeat. 

On March 4, 1897, he was offered and accepted the appointment 
of chief clerk at the Hospital for the Insane at Anna, Illinois, at the 
hands of Governor John R. Tanner. He proved himself well fitted for 
the duties of that important position and remained in it until Septem- 
ber 21, 1901, when he handed in his resignation and upon its acceptance 
returned to Benton and took up actively the practice of his profession. 

Judge Mooneyham formed a partnership with W. P. Seeber and 
pursued law work until 1902, when he was elected county judge, run- 
ning on the Republican ticket. During the subsequent four years Judge 
Mooneyham devoted his time assiduously to the faithful discharge of 
his judicial position, then wishing to engage again in private practice 
declined to become a candidate for re-election to the judgeship. He 
re-opened a law office at Benton, conducting it individually for a time, 
but in December, 1908, his old partner, W. P. Seeber, joined him in the 
formation of a firm and the business has since been conducted by these 
two gentlemen. Judge Mooneyham is eligible to plead in all of the 
courts in Illinois and enjoys a splendid practice, not only serving clients 
in Franklin county, but in other parts of the state as well. While he 
devotes his entire time to his large and growing practice he retains an 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 639 

enthusiastic interest in civic and political matters and is a valued ad- 
viser of the leaders in the Republican party. 

On November 15, 1899, occurred the marriage of Mr. Mooneyham 
to Miss Anna Spangler, daughter of Jacob Spangler, and a native of 
Union county, Illinois. 

In social matters as well as business and professional affairs Mr. 
Mooneyham is recognized as a leader and one whose influence is always 
found on the side of right and justice. He is a member of Benton 
Lodge, No. 64, A. F. & A. M., also of W. R. Ward Royal Arch Chapter, 
No. 223, and he likewise is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias order. 
He is a man of broad gauge, liberal and progressive in his ideas and 
methods, and is held in the highest esteem by all who know him. 

FLETCHER A. TBOUSDALE. A resident of Metropolis since 1875, 
Fletcher A. Trousdale, who is associated with the Journal-Republican 
of that city, has devoted his energies to various activities, mercantile, 
journalistic, industrial and political, his life being so interwoven with 
that of Metropolis as to render him a part of the urban fabric. He was 
born January 15, 1846, in White county, Illinois, and grew up on a farm 
near Enfield, being a descendant many generations removed from the 
immigrant ancestor of the Trousdale family, who came from county 
Antrim, Ireland, to America in early colonial days, locating in South 
Carolina. 

The Trousdales of the earlier regime were men of moment in their 
times, noted for their patriotism and ability. Two of the family, at 
least, served in the Revolutionary war, James Trousdale and William 
Trousdale, one of whom was the founder of the family from which 
Fletcher A. is sprung. Soon after the close of the war these two soldier 
brothers removed to Tennessee, taking up the land grants given them 
by the Government for their services during the heroic struggle for 
independence, the grants being located in the vicinity of Clarksville. 
There they spent their remaining days, and there reared their children 
to lives of usefulness, many of their descendants becoming prominent 
in public and professional life. One of them, James Trousdale, a great 
uncle of Fletcher A., served as governor of Tennessee ; Leonidas Trous- 
dale was at one time state superintendent of Public Instruction in that 
state; while others acquired note in ministerial and other professions. 

William McCoy Trousdale, father of Fletcher- A., was born Septem- 
ber 23, 1823, in White county, Illinois, where his father settled on 
leaving his Tennessee home. With the exception of a short time spent 
in the pioneer schools of his day he, was a self-educated and self-made 
man. Choosing for his work the occupation to which he was reared, 
he spent a quiet life on his farm, but as a man of strong personality 
he exerted a marked influence for good in his community, and was noted 
for his ability to tell a good story. He died in September, 1888, his 
death being mourned as a loss to the neighborhood. He married Jane 
Miller, a daughter of Peter and Susan (McCleary) Miller, the former 
of whom was of Scotch-Irish descent, while the McCleary family came 
from Scotland to this country, and took an active part in the Revolu- 
tion. She died aged forty-four years. 

The only member of the parental household to grow to years of ma- 
turity, Fletcher A. Trousdale spent his boyhood days in a semi-frontier 
country, and in the district schools acquired a practical education, be- 
coming fitted for the teacher's profession, which' he followed for a short 
time. Early in the seventies he became traveling salesman for Evans- 
ville and Cincinnati houses. Leaving the road, Mr. Trousdale was for 
a few years engaged in mercantile pursuits in Metropolis, and was 



640 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

later associated with the Massac Iron Company, an industry formed for 
the purpose of manufacturing cast iron water pipe, and which for 
several years was a flourishing concern, going to the wall in 1893, when 
it was sapped of its nourishment by the influence of the trust. While 
connected with that company Mr. Trousdale entered the field of jour- 
nalism, his first association in that line having been with the Metropolis 
Democrat, which was sold to A. N. Starkes, and his second venture with 
the Metropolis Herald, which later became the property of A. T. Barnes. 
On January 1, 1911, Mr. Trousdale, in association with County Super- 
intendent W. A. Spence and Senator D. W. Helm, became identified 
with the Journal-Republican, which is one of the old landmarks of the 
city, having been founded in 1865. This paper is strongly Republican 
in politics, and a vigorous advocate of temperance and good morals. 

In his political beliefs Mr. Trousdale is a Democrat, and acts with 
his party in national and state affairs, where the principles of pure 
Democracy are uppermost, but he has ever lined up with the movement 
for nation-wide prohibition. His fight against liquor is eternal, and 
his antagonism of that interest and of the business of selling poison to 
our citizenship, under license, or otherwise, has a permanent place in 
his make-up. During the first administration of President Cleveland, 
Mr. Trousdale served as postmaster of Metropolis, and in 1896 he was 
elected to represent his district in the General Assembly for one term. 
This service opened his eyes to many things hitherto unknown to him 
in regard to the acts of many of the legislators, and it sufficed to cure 
him of the office habit. Party affiliation means less to him than the 
standing and character of the candidate for public office, and he sup- 
ports men rather than party in both local and state affairs. 

While in the Legislature Mr. Trousdale introduced the question 
of draining the swamp lands of Massac. Union and Johnson counties 
in a bill calculated to bring the subject under agitation rather than with 
a hope of securing legislation favorable to such a move. Since that 
time he has persistently and consistently kept this matter before the 
people, with the result that some eighty thousand acres of hitherto sub- 
merged land will soon be drained, and new farms and new homes will 
spring up in places formerly inhabited by snakes and frogs. So, after 
a score of years of hammering through the press and by his voice, Mr. 
Trousdale sees the culmination of a movement that will add great 
wealth to his county and create a new agricultural district that will 
challenge in fertility the richest garden spots of our national domain. 

Mr. Trousdale has been twice married, his first wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Shelby, having died, in Metropolis, leaving no children. 
He subsequently married, in 1892, Mrs. Grace McCartney Smith, a 
daughter of the late Captain McCartney, to whom reference is made 
elsewhere in this volume. Five children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Trousdale, namely : William, Virginia, Dorothy, Frances Blessing, 
and Stewart, who died in childhood. Mr. Trousdale and his family be- 
long to the Methodist church, and he is a member of the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Order of Masons^ 

H. H. KOHN. The flourishing, prosperous cities and villages of 
Union county, Illinois, have furnished a field for the successful develop- 
ment of the careers of some of the foremost citizens of Southern Illinois, 
and this fact has been demonstrated in no uncertain manner in the life 
of H. H. Kohn, a prominent business man and able public official of 
Anna, whose activities have also served as an example of what may be 
accomplished by the man of industry, perseverance and ability, no 
matter how humble his start in life may be. Mr. Kohn is a native of 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 641 

Europe, and came to America as an orphan boy in 1874, when only thir- 
teen years of age. He had no relatives in this country, nor even acquain- 
tances, but on arriving in Boston managed to secure employment as a 
cash boy at a salary of $2.50 per week, on which he supported himself. 
Later, by his industry and good habits, he was advanced to $3.00 per 
week, and after a year was given the position of bookkeeper with the 
same concern, his wages being again increased. In all Mr. Kohn spent 
two years in Boston, and in 1876, deciding there was a better future for 
him farther West he went to St. Louis, Missouri, and for three years 
was employed as a clerk. 

In 1879, having saved between $300 and $400, Mr. Kohn came to 
the conclusion that he was ready to enter the business field on his own 
account, and subsequently located in Jerseyville, Illinois, where, with 
a friend from the old country he established himself as a general store- 
keeper. This business, however, did not prove such a successful ven- 
ture as had been anticipated, and the partnership was dissolved, Mr. 
Kohn returning to his duties as a clerk. About fifteen months later, 
having established a good line of credit, Mr. Kohn was able to secure 
backing from Mr. A. W. Cross, of Jerseyville, Illinois, and opened a 
store at Chesterfield. Here he was again met by discouraging circum- 
stances, for the mine failed, and the town thus losing the industry 
upon which all business depended, he was forced to close out his stock. 
These several disappointments would have caused some men to lose 
heart, but Mr. Kohn was made of sterner stuff and, nothing daunted, 
started all over again as a commercial traveler for a wholesale house, 
being given the Southern Illinois territory. When twenty-seven years 
of age, on his first trip, he had occasion to visit the village of Anna, 
and was quick to recognize the fact that this was to be some day a pros- 
perous community. Two years later, therefore, he opened a business 
here, and it was successful from the start. He is a director of the 
Anna National Bank, and president of the Commercial Club, having 
been the only incumbent of that position which he has held for two 
years. 

In 1886 Mr. Kohn was married to Miss Peebles, who was born at 
Chesterfield, Illinois, in 1860. She is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Kohn belongs to Lodge No. 520, A. F. & A. M., R. A. C., 
and Knight Templar No. 13, Cairo. Politically a stanch Republican 
he has been active in the ranks of his party, is present secretary of the 
Congressional Committee, and for ten successive years was chairman 
of the County Central Committee. He \vas first appointed a member 
of the board of trustees of the Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane 
by Governor Tanner, and has since received appointments to the same 
office from Governors Yates and Deneen, being an incumbent thereof 
for twelve years up to the present time. In May, 1910, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Deneen a member of the commissioners to dispose 
of lands on Kaskaskia Island. Mr. Kohn's activities have always been 
along lines of progress, and while developing his own interests has 
always been ready to assist in anything that would be of benefit to his 
adopted locality. He bears a high reputation among his business asso- 
ciates, and his advice is often sought on matters of commercial impor- 
tance. As a man who has worked himself up from a poor emigrant boy, 
without .friends or means, in a strange country, to a position among the 
most substantial men of his locality, Mr. Kohn merits the respect in 
which he is held by his fellow townsmen, and as he has been successful 
in making his fortune, so has he been equally fortunate in making 
friends, who are to be found all over this part of the county. 



642 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

FRANCIS A. SWANNER, a progressive hotel man, farmer and mer- 
chant of Parker, Johnson county, was born in Logan county, Kentucky, 
September 7, 1854, but almost all of his life has been spent in Illinois, 
where since attaining his majority he has been prominent in business 
ventures, agriculture and public-spirited movements. His father, 
Richard Swanner, was born in North Carolina, February 9, 1814, a son 
of John Swanner, a native and farmer of Virginia, who died on his own 
farm in Tennessee at a ripe old age. He had nine children, five sons 
and four daughters, of whom Richard, who married Miss Tabitha Hunt, 
of Tennessee, was one of the eldest. 

Richard Swanner and his wife moved from Tennessee to Kentucky 
about 1850, and from the latter state to Southern Illinois about ten 
years later, making the last journey in wagons drawn by oxen, in true 
pioneer style. They settled near Eldorado, Saline county, renting a 
farm there for two years, after which they purchased eighty acres of 
wild land from the Illinois Central Railroad Company, near Carbon- 
dale, upon which they built a rude log cabin in the woods, where they 
resided for three years. When they first came to Illinois they had eight 
children, five of whom were sons, and one daughter was born to them 
after they settled in this state, making a family of nine children. In 
1867 they sold their farm near Carbondale and returned to Eldorado, 
and there purchased a tract of two hundred acres, which was sold in 
1872. At this. time they moved to a farm in Saline county, near Stone- 
fort, but in 1875 disposed of this land and moved to Johnson county, 
one and one-half miles from Parker City, where they purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres, and lived here during the remainder of their 
lives, the father passing away in 1886 and the mother in 1890. 

Francis A. Swanner had but few advantages in the educational line 
in his youth, but during later years much study and close observation 
has made him a well-informed man. He remained at home until twenty- 
four years of age, marrying Miss Malinda Cheat on September 26, 
1878, she being the daughter of Silas and Emily (Vaughn) Choat, of 
Tunnel Hill. Mr. and Mrs. Swanner followed farming in Johnson 
county until 1890, at which time they moved to Parker City, and here 
Mr. Swanner has since carried on a successful general merchandise 
business, and associated himself with various movements of public in- 
terest. In 1892 he was appointed postmaster, and served in that office 
for ten years, displaying great executive ability. He is a great friend 
to education, and although he has no children of his own has been 
prominent in movements that have tended to advance the development 
of the school system in his community. He is the owner of an excellent 
farm of one hundred and fifty-six acres in New Burnside, which he 
keeps well stocked, and it is supposed that the mineral on this land 
contains coal and a quartz that is thought to contain gold. In addition 
to this he has a farm of eighty acres in Tunnel Hill, which is in grass, 
Parker, situated between the Illinois Central and New York Central 
Railroads, being an excellent shipping point. Mr. Swanner has also 
interested himself somewhat in selling railroad ties, and all large 
ventures of a legitimate nature have received his consideration. 

As a citizen and public official Mr. Swanner has discharged his 
duties in the same faithful manner that he displays in his private busi- 
ness. His trade is a large one, not only in Parker but in the surround- 
ing territory for a radius of some miles, and his store is also a market 
for the produce of the farmers, who appreciate his liberal methods as 
to price and a "square deal." 



WWERSITY 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 643 

JOHN L. SCHMIDGALL. It is due to the efforts of the public-spirited 
citizens of Murphysboro that this city is at present in such a flourishing 
condition industrially and commercially, and to the fact that they have 
found time to lay aside their private interests and take up the work of 
promoting the movements that have pertained to the civic welfare. Ex- 
Mayor John L. Schmidgall, a business citizen of high standing and a 
leader of Republican politics in Jackson county, occupies a prominent 
place among the representative men of this class. He has been a resi- 
dent of Murphysboro all of his life, and was born April 17, 1870, a son 
of Henry and Sarah (Cooper) Schmidgall. 

Henry Schmidgall, who is well remembered in Murphysboro as a 
business man of excellent reputation, was a soldier during the Civil 
war, enlisting August 12, 1862, in Company D, Eighty-first Regiment, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and serving until he received his honor- 
able discharge at Vicksburg, August 5, 1865. He had a fine war record, 
and when he took up the occupations of peace was as faithful to his 
city 's interests as he had been to his country 's and "during a long period 
spent in farming and the transfer business established a reputation 
for fair dealing and public-spirited citizenship. His death occurred 
March 20, 1911. 

John L. Schmidgall received his early educational training in the 
public schools of Murphysboro, after leaving which he entered Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, Missouri, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1891, with the degree of C. E. Until 1894 he was engaged 
in civil engineering, and in that year became an operator, but in 1900 
sold out and became the owner of the Schmidgall Coal Company, which 
employs sixty-five men and has an output of two hundred and fifty tons 
of coal daily. Smce his father's death Mr. Schmidgall has been the 
manager of his estate, and he is also a director in the Southern Illinois 
Milling Company. He has been very prominent in Republican politics 
here, and has served the city as alderman for three years, resigning that 
office to accept the nomination for the mayoralty chair, to which he 
was eventually elected and served faithfully and efficiently from 1909 
until 1911. He was for a long period a member of the city school board 
and is now trustee of the township high schools. Formerly he was 
secretary of the Republican County Central Committee, and he now 
serves as a member of the executive board. Mr. Schmidgall is a mem- 
ber of the Illinois Mine Rescue Commission, and has interested himself 
in other movements of a progressive nature. 

On June 16, 1897, Mr. Schmidgall was united in marriage with Miss 
Edna Davis, daughter of G. B. Davis, a well known pharmacist of De Soto, 
Illinois, and three children have been born to this union, namely : Henry 
Arthur, John Raymond and Robert Green. Fraternally Mr. Schmid- 
gall is a thirty-second degree Mason, being past high priest in the 
chapter, a member of the Knights Templar at Cairo and the Consistory 
at Chicago, and he also holds membership in the Elks. Years of activ- 
ities in the business and political fields have given him a wide acquaint- 
ance, and it is safe to say that there is no more popular citizen in 
Murphysboro. 

ALEXANDER S. FKASEB. Conspicuous among the younger generation 
of men who have been active in aiding the upbuilding, growth and 
material improvement of Cairo is Alexander S. Fraser, now serving as 
sheriff of Alexander county. He was born in this city, June 3, 1869, 
coming from pure Scotch ancestry. 

His father, Alexander Fraser, was born in 1832, in Michigan, where 
his parents settled on coming from Scotland to the United States. A 



644 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

natural mechanic, he belonged to that class of industrious citizens who 
make history with their hands only, and whose combined labors are a 
potent force in the development of. every community. During the Civil 
war he fought valiantly in the Federal army, and was afterwards en- 
gaged in business as a coppersmith in Cairo, where he resided until his 
death, in 1884. His wife, whose name before marriage was Mary Eliza- 
beth Morris, survived him many years, passing away in Cairo in 1907. 
Five children blessed their union, as follows: George, who was employed 
in the office of the Illinois Central Railway Company, died while yet 
in the prime of manhood ; Llewellyn, who married Herman Schuh, died 
in Cairo; William P. who is serving as deputy sheriff under his 
brother; Charles lived but a few brief years; and Alexander S. 

Completing his early studies in the city schools of Cairo, Alexan- 
der S. Fraser was graduated from the Glendale Institute, at Kirk- 
wood, Missouri, in 1889. Possessing an unlimited amount of energy 
and ambition, he then embarked in the business of contracting, gen- 
eral construction, grading and paving, and in the course of a few years 
made the firm of A. S. Fraser one of vast importance in the affairs of 
the city. He was one of the bidders in the first paving contract let 
in Cairo, and initiated the work of making a modern town by paving 
Levee and Twenty-eighth streets. The fruit of his labors as a builder 
and contractor may be seen in the Lohr Bottling Works ; the Booker 
Packing Company's buildings; the Cairo Brewery; the Marks block; 
and in many of the finest residences in the city. 

Having inherited the political faith in which he was reared, Mr. 
Fraser is a steadfast Democrat, and in 1910 was selected as the party 
candidate for sheriff of Alexander county, at the election defeating 
his Republican opponent by fourteen hundred votes, which he secured 
in a county that has a normal Republican majority of eighteen hun- 
dred. He has now the distinction of being the first Democratic sheriff 
that the county ever elected. A prominent member of his party, Mr. 
Fraser has been regularly chosen as a member of the Alexander County 
Democratic Committee, and has served his party as a delegate to the 
state conventions. 

On April 3, 1901, Mr. Fraser was united in marriage with Tillie 
Blattau, who was born in Cairo, of German parents, in 1874, and two 
children have been born of their union, namely : William L., who 
died in childhood ; and Elizabeth Llewellyn. Fraternally Mr. Fraser 
is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, in 
which he has taken the Knights Templar degrees; of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; 
and of the Order of Eagles. 

PETER T. LANGAN. A man whose perseverance, industry and busi- 
ness sagacity has been largely instrumental in the establishment of 
one of Cairo's greatest industries is Peter T. Langan, a man in 
whom those potential elements that are essential in every success- 
ful career seem to center. He has been a citizen of Cairo since 1872. 
His advent hither marked the entry of an orphan boy without in- 
fluential friends to equip him for life's battles or to make an open- 
ing for a successful career, and while he has won the fight and placed 
himself upon a footing with the strong men of commercial and fi- 
nancial power in this city, his achievement has only come after many 
sacrifices, numerous disappointments and embarrassing situations, to 
detail which it is not the province of this sketch to do. 

Peter T. Langan was born near Louisville, Kentucky, June 16, 
1859. He was the only child of his parents, and his mother died in 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 645 

1861, soon after which date his father seemed to have abandoned him 
and left him to the care and keeping of his grandmother. When 
she died in 1872 his anchor to a home was cut off, and he came to a 
relative in Cairo. He saw so little of a schoolroom that he can 
hardly be said to have acquired any education as a lad, and the ne- 
cessity of the situation placed him in the employ of a mill owner and 
for two years he took his first lessons about a sawmill, which ser- 
vice proved to be the entering wedge to his greatest achievement. 
Mr. Langan next learned the machinists trade in the shop of J. B. 
Reed, of Cairo, a business that is yet a part of modern Cairo, but 
when he had completed his service he resumed work in a sawmill 
with T. W. Leahigh, and remained with him eight years. He then 
became yard foreman for the Cairo Box Factory with DeMoncourt & Hal- 
liday, and acquired additional education in the lumber business there. 
Having accumulated some little capital, he purchased a sawmill and 
went into the forest region of southeastern Missouri, where he was 
engaged for five years in cutting lumber, during which time he laid 
the real foundation for a business career. Having acquired capital, 
Mr. Langan now returned to Cairo and purchased the old J. V. Al- 
len lumber yard, founded by Samuel Walters, and the main retail 
yard of the city, and from 1892 to the present his time has been de- 
voted to the expansion of his business to cover all departments re- 
lating to house-building and to the development of a planing mill 
business with a capacity requisite to the demands of an area em- 
bracing portions of five states and ranking as a first-class builders' 
supply factory. His mill and yards cover more than three blocks in 
the business section of the city and his various industries give em- 
ployment to a small army of men. He does both a wholesale and a 
are doors, sash, blinds, mouldings, stairs, balusters, newels, stair- 
retail business and his billhead shows that his chief articles of stock 
railings, mantels, frames, dressed and rough lumber, lath, shingles, 
store counters, shelving, scroll sawing and turning, brackets, floor- 
ing, ceiling, weather-boarding, builders' hardware and paints. The 
management of his varied and complex enterprise requires all the 
time that a busy man ought to devote to each working day, and it is 
this continuous application for the past twenty years which has built 
up his inter-state reputation and brought him from the area of rough 
waters to a smooth sea and a safe harbor. 

Mr. Langan is a director in the Cairo National Bank and of the 
Central Building and Loan Association. He is a member of the 
Board of Trade, of the Commercial Club and of the Retail Merchants' 
Association. His attitude toward his city has earned him recognition 
among those who are counted upon to do responsible service for the 
municipality, and he has frequently been selected by the Mayor, as 
well as by the Governor of Illinois, to act as delegate to conventions 
which meet to discuss deep waterways and other subjects pertain- 
ing to improved facilities for domestic transportation. He has ac- 
quired other property interests in Cairo beside his immense mill and 
business property. He is an Elk and a Knight of Columbus, and his 
religious affiliation is with the Catholic church. 

Mr. Langan was first married in October, 1883, and to this union 
there were born the following children : William, who is associated 
with his father in business; Edwin, who is married and in business 
at Mounds, Illinois; and Mabel and Edith. His second marriage was 
with Miss Minnie Rennie, and by this union there are Mary, Jamie, 
Peter T., Jr., Frances Cecile and George Parsons, the latter named in 
honor of the distinguished mayor of Cairo. In conclusion it may be 



646 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

said of Mr. Langan that he has been one of those who have believed 
in the future of his city and by his active and progressive spirit has, 
done much to promote its industrial growth. He has never been actu- 
ated by any narrow, selfish motives, but, prospering himself, he has 
enjoyed the prosperity of others, knowing that the welfare of one 
individual alone never furthers but only retards the growth of a com- 
munity. He has been upright and honorable in all his dealings with 
his fellowmen and has merited the respect and esteem in which he is 
universally held. 

AMBERT D. MORGAN. Among the newer residents in Herrin is one 
who has made for himself a warm place in the hearts of the citizens 
of this town. This is the young lawyer, Ambert D. Morgan. Having 
equipped himself with the best preparation possible, he has put this 
training to such good use that he is fast becoming known as one of 
the most dependable men in the legal profession in his county. A 
convincing tongue and a clear brain ready to grasp the salient points 
of an argument, together with a large fund of legal knowledge stored 
away in his brain, make him a formidable opponent for even the best 
of his fraternity. 

Ambert D. Morgan is a native of the state to whose service he 
has chosen to give his young manhood, being born in Kane county, 
Illinois, on the 29th of October, 1886. His father, Lyman D. Morgan, 
owns a' beautiful country home near Hampshire, and here it was that 
the lad grew up. Small wonder that men find the young lawyer a 
master of persuasive diction. Eloquence is born and bred in open 
fields and under fresh skies, not in smoky cities with all their glow- 
ing picture galleries and theatres. 

Lyman D. Morgan was born in McHenry county, Illinois, in 1844, 
and spent his boyhood near Marengo, acquiring as much of an edu- 
cation as could be obtained from the primitive district schools of 
his day. When his country called for men he gave an eager service, 
enlisting in Company G, of the Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, to fight 
the misguided "Johnny Rebs." His service was such that the opin- 
ions with which he began his term of enlistment, anent the general 
depravity of the enemy, were not likely to be changed as were those 
of his brethren in the Army of the Potomac, for his work was chas- 
ing marauding Indians and fighting bushwhackers, who were dis- 
turbing the peace out on the borders of Kansas and the Indian Terri- 
tory. He was a corporal in his company, while the regiment was 
commanded by Colonel Breckinridge. During the latter part of the 
war his command was ordered to southern Missouri, where a sort of 
intermittent warfare was going on, momentarily exciting and a nec- 
essary duty, but how often must the heart of the boy corporal have 
longed to be over in the blood-stained Virginian valleys where the 
destinies of a people were being hewn out with fire and sword. With 
the restoration of peace Mr. Morgan returned to his deserted farm, 
from whence he eventually moved to Kane county, Illinois. After 
the stirring scenes of his youth he has been content to devote him- 
self to quiet agricultural pursuits during the rest of his life, but when 
the annual encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic rolls 
around he is usually present to exchange reminiscences with his old 
comrades in arms. He has been in command of the local post of the 
above organization, and takes considerable interest in local political 
affairs, his sympathies and support being with the Republican party. 

Lyman D. Morgan married Miss Elizabeth A. Helmer, at Platte, 
Michigan, on the 9th day of May, 1870. She was of Scotch parentage, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 647 

born at Overton, Ohio. Her father, Erastus Helmer, was also a na- 
tive of Ohio. Ambert D. is the fourth of several children, including 
Professor Ora S., principal of the college of agriculture of Columbia 
University, in New York city; Mabel L., of Lansing, Michigan; Izo, 
wife of Earl Crandall, of Kane county; Eugenia, now teaching in the 
public schools of Hampshire; and Judd, a student at the University 
of Illinois. 

This branch of the Morgan family was founded in Illinois by Ly- 
man Morgan, father of Lyman D. When a young man he came into 
this part of the country from New York state, the year being 1835. 
In McHenry county he met and married Polly Thomas, and four chil- 
dren were born to them, Leroy R., who served in the Eighth Illinois 
Infantry during the Civil war and now resides in Platte, Michigan; 
Lyman D. ; Calvin, who died unmarried; and Lucretia, who became 
the wife of D. Bowen and died in Denver, Colorado. 

Ambert D. Morgan prepared himself for college in the high schools 
of Hampshire and Elgin. He was graduated from the former, but 
spent two years in Elgin before entering the State University at 
Champaign. It had always been his purpose to fit himself for the 
profession of medicine, and he entered on his collegiate work with 
that intent, but after two years in the University he was forced to 
leave his books and go to work. The position which he took was 
under the civil service, as postal clerk, running on the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad between Chicago and Carbondale. In addition to his 
duties in this capacity he had the ambition, at the beginning of his 
four years as postal clerk, to take up the study of law in the Illinois 
College of Law, having abandoned the idea of becoming a physician, 
and he had the grit to stick to it until he received his degree in 1909. 
Being now ready for active work in his chosen profession, he re- 
signed from the government service and located in Herrin, as an -at- 
torney at law. During the same year he passed his examinations for 
the bar before the supreme court of the state at Springfield, and was 
admitted to the right to practice in all the state and federal courts 
of Illinois. 

On the 25th of December, 1910, Ambert D. Morgan was married to 
Alberta Eubank, the ceremony taking place in Centralia, Illinois. His 
wife is the daughter of James S. Eubank, a representative of one of 
the oldest families of the county. He is a well known blacksmith, and 
his wife is Olive Whitehead. Mrs. Morgan was born in Williamson 
county, in 1890. A daughter was born of this marriage on December 
16, 1911, Lillian Eugenia. 

Mr. Morgan is a faithful member of the Republican party and is 
interested in the fraternal orders to the extent of belonging to the 
Modern Woodmen. He is also an enthusiastic member of Alpha Kap- 
pa Phi, one of the legal group of college fraternities. 

Mr. Morgan is a man of much promise, one whom his town will 
be proud to own. He now possesses that trait in which the members 
of his profession are supposed to be notoriously lacking, that is, hon- 
esty. The record of his past life tells of too true and fine a nature 
for one not to believe that he will keep his honesty and uprightness 
of purpose in the face of the temptations that will come to him. At 
present his cleverness has won him much admiration and his personal 
charm has brought to him many friends, so that his fellow citizens 
of the older generation look upon him as one of those who will be 
ready to lift the burden from their shoulders when they are ready 
to lay it down. 



648 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

JAMES S. HESTER. A typical example of the virile manhood of 
Southern Illinois is found in James S. Hester. Born in the South, he 
accompanied his parents to Illinois as a youth, resisted the lure of the 
city and of the great West, to which so many of his boyhood companions 
yielded, and after serving his country valiantly as a soldier during 
the Civil war, set himself to the task of extracting wealth from the 
farm. After more than forty years spent in agricultural pursuits he 
has now retired and is enjoying the fruits of his labors as a resident 
of the city of Vienna. 

The grandfather of James S. Hester, B. Hester, was a pioneer set- 
tler of Franklin county, Alabama, and built the first house in 
Franklin, the county seat. -His son, Chesley B. Hester, was born in 
Alabama, and brought his family to Southern Illinois during the fall 
of 1863, when the Union sympathizers, to which class the Hesters 
belonged, were driven from the Southern states. On coming to Illi- 
nois Mr. Hester located on a farm near Vienna, about four miles 
away, having served for eleven months as a member of Company B, 
Sixty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which he had enlisted at 
Corinth, Mississippi, September 11, 1862, and from which he received 
his honorable discharge on account of disability. He never recovered 
from the bad effects of his army service, and died in 1881. He had a 
family of six sons and three daughters, but a number of the children 
died on coming North, on account of the great change in climate. Sa- 
maria is deceased ; James S. is the subject of this review ; John C. 
and Louis are deceased; Emily married a Mr. Dooley; and Alfred 
Henry, Clinton, Hannah and Alabama are deceased. Mrs. Hester 
survived her husband only five days. 

James S. Hester was born October 14, 1846, in Franklin county, 
Alabama, and had not yet reached his sixteenth birthday when he 
enlisted in the same company with his father. He was well grown 
and sturdy and much better able to stand the rigors of army life 
than the older man, and would have completed his enlistment of three 
years had not the war closed some three months prior to that time. 
For some time he was engaged in garrison duty around Corinth and 
luka, Mississippi, as well as Glendale, which was his headquarters for 
ten months, and he then went to Pulaski, Tennessee, and Decatur, 
Alabama, subsequently, in the spring of 1864, going to Chattanooga 
to participate in the battles around that place. He then joined Sher- 
man's division and took part in the famous March to the Sea, and 
was in the fighting all through to Savannah, where he boarded ship 
to Buford, South Carolina. Marching through to Goldsboro, the regi- 
ment went on to Raleigh, North Carolina, where they received the 
news of Lee's surrender amid great rejoicing. Mr. Hester's brigade 
then went on to Richmond, and then to "Washington, D. C., where it 
participated in the Grand Review, and he was mustered out of the 
service June 8, 1865, and paid off and discharged at Springfield, Illi- 
nois. His brave and faithful services finished, Mr. Hester went to 
Dongola by rail and joined the family at Vienna, working on his 
father's farm until 1867. In that year he married and began life 
for himself on a rented farm situated two miles northwest of Vienna, 
but in the next year moved to another farm two and one-half miles 
southwest of Vienna, on which he continued operations until 1879. At 
that time he purchased thirty-two acres of land, and from that time on 
his rise as an agriculturist was rapid, his holdings now amounting to 
two hundred and twenty-three acres of excellent land, which is being 
operated by his sons. In November, 1904, Mr. Hester left the farm and 
moved to Vienna, where he purchased a fine residence and nine lots. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 649 

He has been active in civic affairs and county politics and a hard and 
faithful worker in the ranks of the Republican party, serving at va- 
rious times as school director and road commissioner, and at present 
acting for the second time as a member of the Vienna city council. He 
is a popular comrade of Vienna Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
and he and his family are consistent members of the United Brethren 
church. 

Mr. Hester was married (first) in May, 1867, to Joyce Adeline 
Ridenhower, daughter of A. M. Ridenhower, and she died in 1895, hav- 
ing been the mother of thirteen children, of whom two are deceased, 
William, who passed away at the age of thirteen years, and John, who 
died when six months old, while the survivors are : R. A., A. M., T. P., 
Mary Jane, Nancy Ann, Alfred, Garfield, May, Sarah, Marion Tullis 
and Mrs. Cora Jones. Mr. Hester's second marriage occurred in 1897, 
when he was united with his first wife's sister, Mrs. Mary Jane (Riden- 
hower-Hester) Newby, who married first John Hester and for her sec- 
ond husband William M. Newby, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. 
Hester has fifteen grandchildren. He is one of his community's promi- 
nent and influential citizens, having proved himself as faithful and ca- 
pable in discharging the duties that have fallen to his lot during days 
of peace as he did in his youth as a wearer of the blue during the dark 
days of the Civil war. 

ALBERT W. WILLIAMSON, president of the Williamson-Kuny Mill & 
Lumber Company, has been a resident of Mound City for the past 
thirty years, and it would be indeed difficult to say if any other citizen 
of that city has done more for its development or given greater aid to 
the city and county in the administration of its affairs than has he. 

Albert W. Williamson was born in Chicago, Illinois, November 16, 
1858, in whieh city his father, David C. Williamson, was engaged in the 
manufacture of staves. The latter was born near Oswego, New Fork, 
in 1830, being the son of a farmer and with not more advantages than 
the average country youth is favored with. In his young manhood Mr. 
Williamson engaged in the manufacture of hardwood lumber with a 
small mill near his native town, but he subsequently transferred his ac- 
tivities to Camden, New Jersey, and in the early fifties established him- 
self in Chicago in a manufacturing business. During the ensuing years 
he suffered financial reverses, due to various causes, and he left Chicago, 
taking over the management of a stave mill in Valparaiso, Indiana. He 
was thus occupied until 1866, when he went to Paducah, Kentucky, in 
which town he launched out into business on his own responsibility 
again, and he was connected with the firm of Farley & Williamson as 
one of its partners when he passed away in 1876. 

In the neighborhood where he was born and reared David William- 
son married Miss Angelina Dudley, and she is now a member of the 
family of her son Albert W., in Mound City, at the advanced age of 
eighty-one years. Two children of their union survive: Ella, wife of 
T. M. Ford, and Albert W., of this review. 

Albert W. Williamson was educated in the public schools of Ken- 
tucky. As soon as he arrived at an age when he would be of assistance 
to his father in the business he entered the office of the Farley & Wil- 
liamson Company, where he acquired a concise and far-reaching knowl- 
edge of the technical side of the business, and proved himself so well 
conversant with the intricacies of the business that on the death of his 
parent he remained in the business for five years as the partner of Mr. 
Farley. 

In 1881 he removed from Paducah and established a home in Mound 



650 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

City. For a time he operated a lumber and shingle mill across the river 
in Ballard county, Kentucky, as junior member of the firm of Ford & 
Williamson, but in the year 1885 that plant was brought to Mound 
City and the business continued without any change in its manage- 
ment until in 1893, when Mr. Williamson purchased his partner's in- 
terest in the concern and thereafter conducted the business alone until 
in 1903, when the present firm, the Williamson-Kuny Mill & Lumber 
Company was incorporated with a capital stock of fifty thousand dol- 
lars, since then very materially increased by the earnings of the plant, 
which has flourished abundantly since its establishment. 

The plant of the Williamson-Kuny Mill & Lumber Company is the 
principal industry of Mound City, which boasts a goodly number of 
manufacturing concerns, and has a daily capacity of fifty thousand feet 
of lumber and veneer, with a weekly pay-roll of one thousand two hun- 
dred dollars. 

Mr. Williamson's record regarding his connection with the many 
financial organizations of his city is indeed an enviable one. He is vice- 
president and a director of the First State Bank of Mound City, and 
has been president of the Mound City Building and Loan Association 
since its organization twenty-five years ago, in which positions he has 
done splendid work for those institutions, being in many respects re- 
sponsible for the firm and solid tooting upon which they stand today. 
He has been county commissioner for ten years, and it is generally con- 
ceded that it was through his unceasing endeavor that the county seat 
was retained at its present location no small feat in the face of the 
opposition set forth; while his successful handling and final putting 
through of the bond issue for the erection of a courthouse and jail is a 
service for which his city and county is manifestly indebted to him. 

In all Mr. Williamson's relations to his city has been an attitude of 
service. In 1890 he was elected to the mayoralty, in which capacity 
he served three terms. During his tenure of office many improvements 
in civic affairs came to pass, conspicuous among them being the estab- 
lishment of the concrete or granitoid walk in lieu of the board side- 
walk, and surface drainage by the installation of pumps. Mule-car 
service by the railroad, company between Mound City and Mounds was 
discarded in favor of the locomotive, and steps were taken by means of 
which to encourage manufacturers to establish at this point, admittedly 
an advantageous location when brought to the notice of the outside 
world ; and as a stockholder in the inter-urban railway he largely helped 
to make that railway a possibility. 

In his political activity Mr. Williamson has been the exponent of 
Republican principles and has supported Republican candidates for 
many important offices. It has been his pleasure to frequently see rep- 
resentatives of his party in state conventions and himself a delegate, 
and when occasion demanded he has given freely of his substance for 
the support of the cause. Mr. Williamson is an active member of the 
Commercial Club of Mound City, and has served the Club as its presi- 
dent and variously upon many important committees. 

On June 26, 1893, Mr. Williamson was married to Miss Inez Gulp at 
Anna, Illinois, she being a daughter of Marshall Gulp. The issue of 
their union are a son and daughter, Frederick and Alberta. The fam- 
ily are members of the Congregational church. 

CAPTAIN EZEKIEL J. INGERSOLL. The fabric of human life woven 
by the Fates for the children of men is far too often, nay, almost al- 
ways, of rough and gloomy texture, and presents to the casual observa- 
tion only its darker tints, its rasping and resisting qualities for service, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 651 

and the shadows which inevitably belong to it. There are, there must be, 
bright patches in every expression of it, but for the greater part the 
sombre hues predominate, or seem to, and give class and character to the 
whole web. 

It is a genuine pleasure to chronicle a striking exception to the rule. 
This is to be found in the lives of Ezekiel J. and Harriet Helen (Law- 
rence) Ingersoll, esteemed residents of Carbondale for over fifty-three 
years. Their earthly career, from the time of their union in marriage 
on September 21, 1858, to the present time (1911) has seemed to flow 
steadily on in one calm, full current of active goodness, and to be al- 
together bright with the light shining from their benignant spirits and 
reflected from the happiness they have bestowed on others. 

Mr. Ingersoll was born at Greensburg, Indiana, on November 18, 
1836, and when he was but two years old was taken by his parents to 
Lebanon, Ohio. There he grew to manhood and obtained his education. 
In 1853 he moved to Paris, Illinois, and on June 6, 1859, became a resi- 
dent of Carbondale, which has ever since been his home. Soon after his 
arrival in the city he began business here as a jeweler, in a room of the 
building now occupied by the First National Bank. But this he was 
not destined to continue long without a serious interruption involving 
continued danger to him and apprehension among the numerous friends 
he had in the city even then, after living only a short time among its 
people. 

The Civil war came on and put the patriotism of men all over the 
country to the severest test it had ever known. Early in the contest 
Mr. Ingersoll responded to the call for volunteers to defend the Union 
against forced dismemberment, enlisting on July 20, 1862, in Company 
H, Seventy-third Illinois Infantry, in which he served to the close of 
the conflict. He had received a fair military education by a three years' 
service in a well drilled militia company, and in the Federal army, 
where trained officers were badly needed, his promotion was rapid. He 
passed all the ranks from sergeant-major to captain, reaching the last 
in February, 1863, after the battle of Stone River. In the battle of 
Chickamauga he received a wound, and in that of Franklin another. 
His wounds did not disable him, however, and he was with his regiment 
in other hard fought battles and a great many skirmishes. Near the 
end of the war he acted as major, and at times was in command of the 
regiment, which he handled with intrepid courage and highly com- 
mendable skill and sagacity. 

Mr. Ingersoll 's interest in the welfare of Carbondale and Jackson 
counties, and his services in promoting the progress and improvement of 
both, won for him the regard of the whole people long ago. The resi- 
dents of the city showed their appreciation of his merit and their faith 
in his ability and integrity by electing him mayor four times ; and the 
people of the legislative district theirs by making him their represen- 
tative in the Thirty-eighth General Assembly. In this body he was as- 
signed to several important committees and rendered his district and 
the whole state signal and appreciated service. He assisted in drafting 
the law which transferred the Lincoln monument to the state of Illinois. 
This law proyides that the custodian of the monument shall be an Illi- 
nois soldier as long as one remains in the state. And when the last 
veteran shall have been laid to rest the position must be given to the son 
of a soldier of Illinois, and so on down the line in perpetual succession. 
During the session Mr. Ingersoll also secured an appropriation of forty 
thousand dollars for the erection of the building, on the campus of the 
University, devoted to science, and in many other ways made his pres- 



652 HISTORY .OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

ence in the General Assembly felt greatly to the advantage of the peo- 
ple. 

In fact, during his service in that body he attracted the attention of 
all portions of the state and won the approval of its leading men on 
all sides. Governor Oglesby appointed him a trustee of the Southern 
Illinois Normal School, and he was continued in this position by Gov- 
ernors Fifer, Tanner and Yates, serving in it sixteen years in all. The 
present condition of this great institution shows that it has been well 
managed, and its history during the period of his trusteeship reflects 
great credit on everybody connected with the control and government 
of it. 

In political relations Mr. Ingersoll is an uncompromising Republican, 
and has been from the organization of the party. He called the first Re- 
publican meeting ever held in Jackson county. He assisted in organizing 
the Lincoln and Hamlin Club of Carbondale in 1860, and served as its 
president. He has supported the candidates of the party at every elec- 
tion since then, and expects to stand by the convictions that have guided 
him thus far to the end of his life with unswerving loyalty. . 

In fraternal life he has been an active and enthusiastic member of 
the Masonic order and the Grand Army of the Republic. In the former 
he belongs to Shekinah Lodge, No. 241, and was its worshipful master 
four years. In the latter he holds membership in John W. Lawrence 
Post, No. 297, of which he has been post commander five years and still 
holds the position (1912). He has also been Adjutant of the Southern 
Illinois Soldiers and Sailors' Association. 

As noted above, Mr. Ingersoll was married on September 21, 1858, 
in Paris, Illinois, to Miss Harriet Helen Lawrence, a native and at 
the time of her marriage a resident of that city. On September 21, 1908, 
they celebrated their golden wedding, without pomp or splendor of dis- 
play, but modestly and quietly, in an atmosphere redolent with the fra- 
grance of a half century of true domestic happiness and fidelity, and on 
that occasion received the voluntary and cordial testimony of the whole 
city that they were held in the highest esteem by its people of all classes 
and conditions. 

There was abundant reason for this outpouring of popular approval. 
During the whole time of their previous residence in Carbondale Mr. 
and Mrs. Ingersoll had been potential aids in every good work done in 
the community. In the church, in the Sunday-school, in all organiza- 
tions for the amelioration of human sorrow and the uplifting of mankind 
laboring in the city they had been untiring toilers, and hundreds of un- 
fortunates had been recipients of their bounty. They had reared five 
orphans of other parents from childhood to manhood and womanhood, 
and bestowed on them a full measure of parental care and affection, and 
they had done all their good deeds without ostentation, and from a genu- 
ine love of their fellow creatures. The people of Carbondale revere them 
for the uprightness of their lives, the usefulness of their citizenship, the 
sincerity and largeness of their charity toward all mankind, and their 
intrinsic worth in every way, and were glad of an opportunity to manifest 
their feelings on the subject. 

MRS. DAMIE MOERAY. Some of the most highly improved and produc- 
tive farms of Johnson county are owned and operated by women, and 
among them are found tracts which have remained in the same family 
for many years. Mrs. Damie Morray, of Bloomfield township, belongs to 
the class of women agriculturists who have succeeded in their operations 
because their whole lives have been spent in an agricultural atmosphere 
and they have received the same rigid training that has been given to the 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 653 

male members of their families. Reared on farms, having an intimate 
knowledge of climatic and soil conditions in their neighborhoods, when 
these women are given the management of property they are as well pre- 
pared to get results as the men, and the standard set by the women farm- 
ers of Southern Illinois is something of which the state should be proud. 
Mrs. Morray was born October 10, 1870, in Bloomfield township, and is 
a daughter of Hears P. and Annie (Hester) Fort. 

Mrs. Morray 's parents were born in Tennessee, and in that state were 
married, January 11, 1847. Coming to Illinois during the late 'forties, 
they settled on a farm situated one and one-half miles northeast of Vienna, 
and there resided during the remainder of their lives, Mr. Fort passing 
away May 6, 1882, and his widow following him to the grave July 8, 
1897. They had a family of eleven children, as follows: Amanda L., 
who married a Mr. Hendry and is now deceased ; J. L. ; Emily F., who is 
deceased ; W. G. ; Gustavus, who is deceased ; David W., Samuel H. and 
Margaret V., all of whom are deceased ; Georgia, who married Dr. Thom- 
linson and is now deceased ; Albert, who resides in Texas ; and Damie. 

Mrs. Morray grew up on the homestead farm, receiving an excellent 
training in the duties of domestic life and taking part in much of the 
work on the farm. It was but natural that she should gain much valu- 
able experience as to farming methods, and this has stood her in good 
stead in later years. She was married (first) in 1891, to David Pip- 
pins, a native of Johnson county and a son of Gilbert Pippins, and two 
children were born to them : Edna and Auttie, the latter of whom died in 
infancy. Edna married James B. Garrett, a son of John Garrett and 
Nancy (Harris) Garrett, the former a veteran of the Sixth Illinois Cav- 
alry during the Civil war. One child, James Brooks Garrett, has been 
born to them. David Pippins, who was a farmer near Vienna, and died 
September 17, 1894, was a son of Gilbert Pippins, who served in the 
One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, un- 
der General John A. Logan. 

On December 8, 1898, Mrs. Pippins was married to Joseph Morray, 
and five children were born to this union : William Frank, James Floyd, 
Joseph Eugene, Morris Albert and John Bishop, the last named being de- 
ceased. Joseph Morray was born September 20, 1845, and was a son of 
James Bishop Morray, captain of Company B, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, 
during the Civil war, and saw considerable service. Joseph Morray was 
married (first) to Miss Gussie Haley, who died July 2, 1878, leaving 
three children : Mrs. Minnie Mathis ; Gussie ; and Ollie, who died in in- 
fancy. He married (second) Miss Ola Whittenberg, who died October 8, 
1897, there being three children born to this union : Ralph, Mabel and 
Eulala, of whom Mabel is deceased. Mr. Morray was a successful farmer 
of Johnson county, and at the time of his death, December 29, 1906, 
was the owner of six hundred acres of fine farming land, all of which is 
now owned by his widow and her children, they having purchased the 
interest of the other heirs to the estate. In the home farm there are forty 
acres, on which is situated a handsome farm residence ; forty acres are lo- 
cated one-quarter mile south ; forty-five acres are north one-half mile, and 
three acres are in Bloomfield, the remainder being in Simpson and Burn- 
side townships, which land is leased to renters. 

Mrs. Morray has had considerable success in her operations, and dis- 
plays a progressive and enterprising spirit in regard to movements cal- 
culated to be of benefit to her community. She and her children are 
faithful members of the Methodist church, and all are well and favorably 
known in religious and social circles. 



654 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

SIDNEY C. MARTIN, M. D., who has been engaged in the practice of 
medicine and surgery at Anna, Illinois, for more than a quarter of a 
century, is one of the leading members of the profession in Southern Illi- 
nois, and has also identified himself with business and public life. Dr. 
Martin was born in Union county, January 10, 1851, and is a son of 
Samuel and Matilda (McElhaney) Martin, both families having located 
in Union county at an early day. 

Samuel Martin was born in Jackson county, Alabama, in 1824, and 
was six years of age when brought to Union county by his parents, who 
located on a farm about five miles east of Anna, and in 1851 they moved 
to Port Worth, Texas, where they died. He grew to manhood on the 
old homestead, and spent his life in farming, becoming one of the leading 
agriculturists of his day and serving as county treasurer and assessor for 
five years. His wife was born in Jonesboro, Illinois, in 1827, her parents 
having settled in Union county ten years previous to that time, and owned 
a farm where the town of Jonesboro now stands. Samuel Martin died at 
Anna in 1898. The youth of Sidney C. Martin was spent much the same 
as other farmers' boys, and his preliminary education was secured in 
the common schools. After three years' study in the medical department 
of the Northwestern University, Chicago, he was graduated in 1884 and 
at once settled in Anna, where he formed a partnership with Dr. J. I. 
Hale, with whom he continued to be associated until 1909. Dr. E. V. Hale, 
son of the elder Hale, was admitted to the firm in 1897, and on the dis- 
solution of partnership in 1909, the younger member and Mr. Martin 
formed a connection that has lasted to the present time. Dr. Martin is 
recognized as one of the eminent members of the Union county medical 
profession, and for some years acted as president of the Union County 
Medical Society. He also belongs to the Illinois, Southern Illinois and 
American organizations, and is now serving in the office of health official, 
a position which he has held on several previous occasions. Dr. Martin 
adheres to the principles of the Republican party, and for fifteen years 
has served very acceptably as a member of the school board. The greater 
part of his time and attention have been given to his extensive practice, 
but he has also found time to identify himself with several large business 
enterprises, being at present the president of the Anna Lumber Com- 
pany, a director in the First National Bank of Anna, and a stockholder in 
the Anna Building and Loan Association and the Union Fruit Package 
Company. He is a popular member of the Commercial Club, and be- 
longs to Anna Blue Lodge No. 520, A. F. & A. M., in which he has held 
several offices. 

In 1892, Dr. Martin was married to Miss Minnie Boettner, of Jones- 
boro, Illinois, daughter of J. C. and Julia Boettner, and one daughter 
was born to this union : Esther, born in 1895, who resides at home and is 
now a student in the Union Academy. A close student, a careful ob- 
server, full of energy and possessed of executive ability, Dr. Martin has 
attained a high position in his profession, while the extensive nature of 
the various enterprises with which he has been connected has given him a 
prominent standing in the business world of Union county. 

DOCTOR WILLIAM A. MATTHEWS. In 1868, the very year in which, 
by a pleasant coincidence, a little group of the good citizens of Franklin 
county, Illinois, met together and formulated the plans which resulted in 
the foundation of Ewing College, an institution which, fostered by their 
enlightened and upright ideas, was to constitute a fitting place of edu- 
cational discipline for their children and grandchildren, there was born 
near the city of Birmingham, England, one William A. Matthews, who 
was one day to cross the blue Atlantic and take his place as president of 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 655 

this college. Dr. Matthews is the son of John and Ann (Smart) Mat- 
thews, both deceased. He comes from Welsh and English stock, and, as 
one biographer has said in this connection, "This may account for his 
passion for Evangelism on the one hand and his persistent determination 
to succeed on the other. ' ' "When only a few years of age his parents con- 
cluded to come to this country in search of the wider opportunity which 
they believed America to possess for them and their children. They soon 
found their way to Illinois and located at Centralia. At the age of four- 
teen young William was converted and baptised into the Centralia Bap- 
tist church and in 1888, when only twenty years of age, he was licensed to 
preach by the Fourth Baptist church of St. Louis, Missouri. 

Doctor Matthews, from his boyhood, was ever zealous for learning and 
found his greatest satisfaction in books. He received a very thorough 
training for the ministry, pursuing his studies in the following institu- 
tions of learning: Shurtleff, Ewing, Washington Universities, Morgan 
Park Baptist Seminary and the Divinity School of the University of 
Chicago. He took his Bachelor of Arts degree at Ewing in 1895, M. A. 
in 1898, and in 1904 his alma mater conferred upon him the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity. He has held leading pastorates in St. Louis, 
Missouri, Aurora and Chicago, Illinois, and in 1909 he was summer 
supply at Dr. James Spurgeon's Tabernacle in London, England. That 
was followed by, a three weeks' campaign of evangelism in Scotland. He 
came into international prominence in 1909 by reviewing Professor G. B. 
Foster's Theology before the Baptist Ministers' Conference of Chicago 
in such manner that the Professor's name was dropped from the roll 
of the conference. He is widely known in the central west as a lecturer 
against higher criticism and has made himself a recognized authority on 
the subject. 

Doctor Matthews assumed the presidency of Ewing College in 1910, 
and his incumbency has proved a material, intellectual and spiritual 
blessing to school and student, citizen and community. Under his ad- 
ministration a wise and progressive leadership is bringing the school on 
towards the accomplishment of its purposes and realization of its high 
mission. It has been said of him, "Perhaps no man could have been 
elected to the presidency of Ewing who would bring it greater strength 
or better command the confidence and support of E wing's constituency 
than Doctor Matthews. ' ' 

Dr. Matthews was married to Miss Delia M. Burton, of Upper Alton, 
Illinois, in 1892. They have six children: Stewart, Esther, Ruth, De- 
light, William A., Jr., and Dorothy. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON MATHIS. Many of the men who have been 
instrumental in keeping the agricultural standard high in Johnson 
county have started their careers in other vocations and have been unable 
to resist the call of the soil even though they have attained success in 
different lines. There is a certain fascination in the life of the farmer 
to those who come of families whose main occupation has been the tilling 
of the soil, and one who has returned to farming and achieved consid- 
erable success is George Washington Mathis, of Bloomfleld township, 
who was for many years well known as an educator. Mr. Mathis comes 
of an old and honored Johnson county family, and was born not far 
from his present residence, July 18, 1869, a son of Robert D. and Lucinda 
(Fairless) Mathis. 

John Mathis, the great-grandfather of George W., was a native of 
Virginia, and one of the original pioneers of Trigg county, Kentucky. 
He married Margaret Brown, and in 1846' they migrated to Randolph 
county, Illinois, where both passed away. Among their children was 



656 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

William Mathis, who was born and reared in Kentucky, and was there 
married to Cynthia Scott, of Trigg county, daughter of William and 
Mary (Moore) Scott, and to them were born five children, namely: Rob- 
ert D., Elizabeth E., John B., Margaret A. and James P. William Mathis 
accompanied his father's family to Randolph county, Illinois, in 1846, 
but in 1849 migrated to Johnson county by ox-team, purchased Govern- 
ment land in Bloomfield township, and there built a log cabin and settled 
down to clearing his farm. He spent the remainder of his life in farm- 
ing, and died November 22, 1860, his widow surviving until June, 1888. 
They were well known all over Bloomfield township, and Mr. Mathis had 
the reputation of being an excellent farmer and progressive, public- 
spirited citizen. 

Robert D. Mathis was also born in Kentucky, and was a lad when he 
accompanied his parents to Randolph county. He was brought up there 
and in Johnson county, and his education was secured in the district 
schools of his day. When he was married he settled on rented land, but 
after six years was able to purchase a farm of forty acres, to which he 
added from time to time until he was the owner of a finely-cultivated 
tract of one hundred and forty acres. He was active and influential in 
local Republican politics, and his fellow citizens manifested their con- 
fidence in his integrity and ability by electing him collector of taxes two 
years, township treasurer for ten years and justice of the peace for a 
long period. He was successful in his agricultural operations, and the 
same enthusiasm and conscientious labor that give him a position among 
the substantial men of his district were brought into play in his public 
service, and the manner in which he discharged the duties of his various 
offices stamped him as a man who had the best interests of his commu- 
nity at heart. Mr. Mathis married Miss Lucinda Fairless in 1858, daugh- 
ter of Robert and Matilda (Buchanan) Fairless, natives of Gallatin 
county, Illinois, and they had a family of four children : John P., George 
W., Olonzo F. and Lillian V. 

George W. Mathis was brought up to the life of a farmer, and his 
education was secured in the Bloomfield township and Vienna public 
schools. At the age of nineteen years he began teaching in Bloom- 
field, and in all followed that profession for thirteen years, the greater 
part of this time being spent in Johnson county, and seven years of it 
in Bloomfield. He also had a school for one term in Oklahoma. During 
all this time Mr. Mathis had carried on farming during the vacation 
periods, but it was not until 1903 that he began to give all his attention 
to agricultural pursuits. In 1893 he had purchased a tract of one hun- 
dred acres situated in section 16, Bloomfield township, one mile north 
of the homestead, but in 1896 he sold this and secured twenty acres ad- 
joining his present property. He subsequently disposed of the latter 
tract and bought forty acres, which adjoined thirty-three and one-half 
acres owned by his wife, and he now has the entire tract in a high state 
of cultivation. Mr. Mathis has carried on general farming and his oper- 
ations have been very successful. His land is highly productive and he 
finds a ready market for his cattle in the nearby cities, his stock being of 
a superior grade. Although his own interests have kept him busily em- 
ployed, he has found time to engage in local politics, and he is a member 
of the Republican County Central Committee, and an influential worker 
in his party's ranks in this section. Fraternally he is affiliated with 
Vesta Lodge, No. 340, 1. 0. 0. F., at Vienna. 

On August 23, 1893, Mr. Mathis was united in marriage with Miss 
Minnie E. Morray, daughter of J. B. and Gussie (Haley) Morray, both 
of whom are deceased, and eight children have been born to this union, 
namely : Gussie V., a graduate of the county high school ; Alvin, a stu- 



OF 



IHS 



OF THE 
H3WERSITY OF ILIKGT. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 657 

dent in the eighth grade of public school ; and Mabel E., Kate Lucinda, 
Archie, George, Wayne and John H. 

EDWARD G. BRITTON, as the head of the dairy industry in Mounds, 
has been instrumental in developing to its present high standard that 
line of endeavor in Pulaski county, and he has demonstrated to the 
public the splendid possibilities of the genus bovine as a source of profit 
to the systematic farmer. 

He began the dairy business in the summer of 1890, in an exceed- 
ingly small way, when on August 7th of that year he sold his first 
supply of milk at Mounds. The incident was an unimportant one at 
the time, but it marked the beginning of a permanent industry and one 
which has developed into a gigantic enterprise in comparison with the 
sphere of activity of the average Pulaski county farmer. The few cows 
from which Mr. Britton drew his supply of milk were grazed upon an 
eighty acre tract not his own property, and there were various other 
conditions unfavorable to the best success of a tenant farmer in the 
dairy business. As a result, Mr. Britton decided to become the owner 
of a piece of land whereon to pasture his cattle. He began his opera- 
tions in that direction by securing a portion of the old Fawnbell farm, 
then somewhat run down and abandoned, which served as the nucleus 
of his present domain of three hundred and seventy five acres situated 
one and a half miles north of Mounds. His place is an illustration of 
what can be done by way of restoring land to its original fertility, and 
should act as an incentive for others to do likewise. His infantile 
business expanded with remarkable swiftness and precision, and made 
immediate demand for additional grazing grounds and additional acre- 
age for growing feed, and for more modern equipment for housing and 
feeding his herd. He set about expanding the premises, and the acme 
of his preparations for the care of his stock was reached when in 1908 
he erected a barn one hundred and fifty-four by thirty-six feet with 
an L thirty-six by forty-two, two stories, cement floors, drainage canals, 
with three lines of iron track for suspended feeding car, and with a mow 
capacity of one hundred and twenty -five tons of hay for his eighty cows. 
This building is the chief of its kind in the county, and is supplemented 
by two silos eighteen by thirty feet, with an aggregate capacity of one 
hundred and fifty tons of ensilage each. The results achieved after four 
years of experience with this modern equipment are ample justification 
for the necessary outlay for its construction, and the entire plant, now 
rapidly becoming known as an exclusive Holstein dairy, is a fitting monu- 
ment to the efforts of its proprietor, ably assisted by his companion in 
life during a period of twenty years. 

Mr. Britton was born in Knox county, Ohio, January 5, 1862. His 
father, John Britton, was born at Barnstable, Devonshire, England, in 
1823. He came to the United States as a young man in 1849, stopping 
in Knox county, Ohio. There he married and engaged in farming. In 
the spring of 1862 he came to Effingham county, Illinois, where he pur- 
sued the same vocation until 1883, when he made his final move to Pulaski 
county. He located near Villa Ridge, where he was known as a modest, 
unassuming, straight-forward citizen. His wife was Hannah Beeny, a 
daughter of Joseph Beeny, also from Devonshire, England. In 1897 Mr. 
Britton died, and his widow is passing her remaining years with her 
various children. Of their issue there were Rev. Joseph W., pastor 
of the Methodist church at Mount Vernon, Illinois; Sarah C., the wife 
of Albert Gould, of Weston, West Virginia; Ida Sophia, the wife of 
George Bride, of Pulaski county; Edward G., the subject; Charles 
Samuel, ex-circuit clerk of Pulaski county, head of a mercantile house 



658 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

in Cairo and another in Mound City ; Richmond Lee, a farmer near 
Pulaski, Illinois; and Benson Irving, well known as a business man of 
Mounds, and now a resident of Urbana, Illinois. 

As already intimated, the early environment of Edward G. Brit- 
ton was of a rural nature. The country schools gave him a limited 
education, and the parental roof sheltered him until he had reached 
his twenty-eighth year. In April, 1890, he married Miss Alta A. 
Gould, a daughter of Solon Gould, of Bone Gap, Edwards county, 
Illinois, Mrs. Britton being the eldest of four children, the others 
being Edith, Virgil and Alice Flora. Following his marriage in 1890 
Mr. Britton rented a small farm near Pulaski, and the following year 
came to the vicinity of Mounds, where he was a tenant farmer for 
seven years, and while he was preparing to launch out into the dairy 
business, of which he has made such a signal success, he was engaged 
in the producing of grain. 

Mr. and Mrs. Britton are the parents of two children, Ethel, aged 
eighteen, and Ernest, aged eight. "The family are of the Methodist 
faith, and are identified with all departments in the labors of the 
church. 

CHARLES EVERETT HAMILTON. The creative mind, whatever its lo- 
cation and surroundings, is sure to find expression in some production 
of utility or beauty, even if it be only a meager one, and fall far short 
of the conception of its creator, either through lack of resources or want 
of opportunity to work out its full development. But where the creative 
spirit is strong and the circumstances are favorable, the result is very 
likely to be something of magnitude and great practical value, and if 
not produced wholly for beauty, may still be beautiful in its utility and 
the service it renders to mankind. 

In the case of Charles E. Hamilton, of Carbondale, the spirit is 
strong and the circumstances have been favorable, so that what he has 
achieved is well worthy of close consideration and high praise. His 
productions are works of science directed by high art, and combine in 
their make-up and impressiveness both beauty and utility, service for 
the people of the communities in which they operate, and profit for their 
creator as well as renown for his ability and sweep of vision. 

Mr. Hamilton's life began in Jefferson county, Illinois, on March 6, 
1873, where his parents, William J. and Catherine (Garner) Hamilton, 
were prosperously engaged in farming. He grew to manhood on the 
farm and performed his due part of the labor incident to its cultivation. 
He attended the public school in the neighborhood of the farm, and 
made such good use of his opportunity that he prepared himself for en- 
try at the Southern Illinois Normal University, where he completed 
his academic education. 

The bent of his mind was not toward farming, and he determined to 
become a lawyer. With this end in view he studied law three years in 
offices, and then attended lectures at the Illinois College of Law. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1901 and began practicing in Carbondale, 
continuing his devotion to his profession until 1908. In that year he 
and Dr. Lewis organized the Citizens Water, Light and Power com- 
pany, with a capital stock of seventy-five thousand dollars and him- 
self as vice president and general manager. His company bought out the 
Carbondale Lighting and the Carbondale Water Works companies 
when they were sold by a receiver, but the plants of all are still in oper- 
ation and doing excellent work. 

The light and power plant managed by Mr. Hamilton maintains a 
continuous current three hundred kilowatt force, and his water plant 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 659 

operates with wells four hundred to six hundred feet deep, and amply 
able to supply the demand of one hundred and fifty thousand gallons, 
which is the daily consumption in the city from its mains. Its water 
is pure, clean and invigorating, and is used in all homes for drinking 
purposes in preference to any other. The company also operates a 
twenty-ton ice plant to supply the local demand, and finds the capacity 
of this taxed to its limit owing to the excellence of its output and the 
satisfactory character of its service in distributing this. 

Mr. Hamilton also founded the Benton, Illinois, Hamilton Utilities 
Company, which has a capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars, 
and of which he is also the vice president and the secretary. It sup- 
plies water, light and ice to the city of Benton in the adjoining county 
of Franklin. This company has about the same capacity as the Citi- 
zens Light and Power Company of Carbondale. Both are equipped 
with every modern device of the most approved type for their work, con- 
ducted" according to the best intelligence and latest developments in 
connection with it, and both have come to be prime necessaries to the 
communities in which they operate. 

Mr. Hamilton was married on July 28, 1894, to Miss Dora Hayes, 
of Mt. Vernon, Illinois, a daughter of Richard L. Hayes, a farmer near 
that city. Five children have been born of the union : Ralph Emerson, 
Lola (deceased), Katharine Jewell, Charles Morrison and Helen. They 
are all living and attending school from the home of their parents. The 
latter are devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the 
father is one of the trustees of the congregation to which he belongs. 

In fraternal life he is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He has taken a very active and 
helpful part in the affairs of Carbondale and is now president of its 
school board, a position in which he has served the community since 
1905. In politics he is a Democrat, but he has never been an active par- 
tisan and never sought or desired any of the honors or emoluments his 
party has to bestow. Throughout the county, and in every other locality 
where he is known, he is held in the highest estimation as a man and 
citizen, and a very enterprising and productive business force, both 
through his own efforts and through the efforts he awakens and stimu- 
lates in others by his influence and example. Jackson county has no 
better citizen, and none whom the people deem more worthy of their 
esteem or more representative of their genuine manhood. 

ORANGE HAMPTON RHODES. As the popular proprietor of the lead- 
ing livery business of Vienna, Illinois, Orange Hampton Rhodes is well 
known to the citizens of his community, who have realized and appre- 
ciated the fact that he has endeavored to give them the best of service. 
Mr. Rhodes is an excellent example of the self-made men of whom this 
country is so proud, and is gratified by the fact that whatever success 
has come to him has been brought about by his own efforts. Mr. Rhodes 
was born January 19, 1862, in Wabash county, Indiana, and is a son of 
Ezekiel and Clarissa (Johns) Rhodes, natives of Virginia. 

Ezekiel Rhodes, who was a carpenter by trade, followed that occupa- 
tion in his native state and later in Indiana, where he died in 1864, 
leaving twelve children, seven by his first wife and five by the mother of 
Orange H., whose other children were: Alphonsus Jerome, Martha 
Alice, Margaret Catherine and Elzorah Ellen. The brave mother, al- 
though left in humble circumstances, managed to keep her family to- 
gether, rearing her children to sturdy man and womanhood and fitting 
them for the positions which they later took in life. Her death occurred 
at the home of her son, Orange H., in Vienna, January 31, 1910, at the 



660 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

age of eighty-six years, her birth having occurred in Virginia, January 
23, 1824. 

Orange Hampton Rhodes secured his education in the public schools 
of his native county, and began work at a very early age to do his share 
towards supporting the family. When he was only seventeen years of 
age he went to Benton county, Indiana, where he remained until 1894, 
following various occupations. During the winter months he taught 
school, while in the summer he worked as carpenter, painter, telegraph 
operator, or at whatever occupation presented itself, and thus, by the 
spring of 1894, had enough money to bring his family to Johnson county, 
Illinois. From that time until 1901 he managed a farm for the Hon. 
Pleasant T. Chapman, and the next three years were spent on his own 
eighty-acre farm, which he had purchased from his savings, and he is 
now the owner of one hundred and forty-eight acres of well-improved 
property, located one and one-half miles west of Vienna. In 1904 Mr. 
Rhodes purchased the livery business of Dwyer & Company, at Vienna, 
and he now operates a hack line from the Big Four Depot and to West 
Vienna. All of his equipages are modern in every respect, while his 
horses are well groomed and of good breed. In addition to the livery 
business Mr. Rhodes has been engaged in the hay, grain and coal in- 
dustry, and has built up an excellent trade in Vienna and the vicinity. 
He is a stockholder in the First National Bank, is fraternally connected 
with the Knights of Pythias, and he and his wife are consistent members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church in this city. 

In 1888 Mr. Rhodes was married to Miss Fannie May Ale, of Benton 
county, Indiana, daughter of John and Rebecca Ale, and five children 
have been born to this union, namely : John, who is twenty-one years of 
age, and associated with his father in business; and Robert. Herbert, 
Clarissa and Alice May, who are attending school. Mr. Rhodes is well 
known and very popular in Vienna, where he has displayed traits of char- 
acter that mark him as an excellent business man, a good friend and a 
public-spirited citizen. 

WILLTAM A. NESBITT. William A. Nesbitt is one of the large mer- 
chants in the busy city of Pinckneyville, and has been active in its com- 
mercial life since his advent to that city in 1892. Starting out in a mod- 
est way, his business has increased and developed until it now embraces 
a small system of mercantile houses throughout the county. He was 
fortunate in his equipment, for he started with a fair education, and ac- 
quired the experience necessary to his career as a merchant in one of the 
largest retail stores in Kansas. It might be surmised that in his strug- 
gle for success Mr. Nesbitt has devoted himself solely to his business, 
but this would be a great mistake, for he has been very active in muni- 
cipal affairs, especially along the lines of civic improvement. He served 
for four years on the council, and during this time a general progressive 
movement was inaugurated, he being one of the leaders. 

William A. Nesbitt is a native son of the "Sucker State," having been 
born at Decatur on the 6th of March, 1860. He came of a family that 
had been founded by his grandfather, William Nesbitt, in this part of 
Illinois, and that had ever since furnished men of prominence in the 
affairs of the section. Uniontown, Pennsylvania, was the childhood home 
of William Nesbitt. the elder, and he migrated to Illinois in 1836. Here 
he became prominent among the pioneer agriculturists of the county, 
and was one of the men who did much toward the development of the 
young town. When his farm was repaying some of the time and labor 
that had been spent on it, he found it possible to enter other fields of 
work, and he was uniformly fortunate. Before the close of his thirty- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 661 

one years of residence, he had accumulated considerable capital and was 
placed in the category of the wealthy men of the city. His wife, who 
was Blynda Doyle died in 1844, and he survived her several years, 
dying in 1867. Their children were Henry ; Wilse ; Samuel A., who was 
the father of the present William Nesbitt ; Helen, who became the wife 
of J. Mortin and died at Fort Scott, Kansas, and Sallie Nesbitt, who 
resides now in Decatur. 

Samuel A. Nesbitt was born at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, on August 
27, 1836. He grew up in his father's busy home at Decatur, and almost 
the first thing he learned was the lesson of industry. His education was 
obtained in the Springfield school and as soon as he laid aside his books 
he was introduced to the farming business. From that time forth farm- 
ing was his chief occupation, though he had many other interests. His 
chief source of income was in his fine stock, his horses in particular being 
especially prized. There are many of his neighbors yet living who can 
testify to his knowledge and skill in the handling of horses, and also to 
the sagacity and shrewdness that were necessary qualities to the success- 
ful horse trader of his day. During the Civil war he became an agent 
of the Federal government in the purchase of horses for the army, and he 
added a considerable amount to his material wealth by this connection. 
In 1882 he moved with his family to Kansas, and settled there to a life 
of agriculture, but his heart was back in the land where he had spent so 
many years of his life, and in 1895 he returned to the home of his child- 
hood, and there died on January 28, 1895. 

In 1858, Samuel A. Nesbitt and Elizabeth Willey were married in 
Zanesville, Ohio. She was a daughter of Henry Willey, whose ancestors 
had come to this country in colonial times, from that odd little section 
of the English isle, Wales. These Welsh ancestors entered heart and 
soul into the cause of American independence, and the blue and buff 
never covered more loyal hearts. Mrs. Nesbitt died on January 28, 
1905, at the age of sixty-eight. Mr. and Mrs. Nesbitt were the parents 
of three children, William A. ; Charles C., of the Nesbitt Mercantile 
Company of Percy, Illinois, and Anna, who became the wife of Charles 
Jackson, of Emporia, Kansas. 

William A. Nesbitt 's school days were passed in Decatur and in the 
high school at Monticello, Illinois. His initial plunge into the whirl- 
pool of the business world, was taken upon his entrance into a telegraph 
office with the I. B. & W. railroad. After a year or two of this service 
he decided that he was better fitted for some other line of work and 
chose merchandise for his next venture. He entered the employ of W. 
E. Smith, of Monticello, Illinois, and remained with this firm for several 
years, coming to the conclusion that this was the field of work for him. 
On leaving here he went to Kansas and became associated with one of the 
leading firms of Emporia. He became invaluable to the members of this 
firm, and it was with regret that they let him go at the end of eight 
years. This firm Tanner Brothers and Heed were the advance guard of 
the ' ' cash store, ' ' and their methods of doing business were a fine school- 
ing for any young merchant, as Mr. Nesbitt fortunately realized. 

In 1890 he returned to Illinois for a short time, going from here to 
St. Louis where he entered the large retail house of Nugents. It was 
here that he made the acquaintance of E. R. Hincke, a young official in 
one of the banks, and this acquaintance ripened into a strong friendship. 
Presently the two decided to form a business partnership, and since Mr. 
Hincke was from Pinckneyville, Illinois, they selected this town as the 
site of their undertaking. They chose the spot on the east side of the 
square, where their present store now stands and here they put in a stock 

of dry goods and shoes, and sat down to wait for trade. They did not 
vol. n T 



662 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

have to wait long, however, for their stock was attractive and their prices 
reasonable, and they soon were conducting a flourishing business. This 
was in 1892 and the firm continued as Hincke and Nesbitt until 1898 
when Mr. Hincke withdrew. Since then Mr. Nesbitt has carried on the 
business alone. In 1910 the firm of Hincke and Nesbitt again came into 
existence as a small department store in Pinckneyville, of which Mr. 
Nesbitt was the chief spirit. In 1905 the Nesbitt Mercantile Company 
was established, at Percy, Illinois, and he stands as the promoter of 
this, a still larger concern. He has been very active in the industrial 
development of this little mining town, and was one of the founders 
of its First National Bank, being at present vice-president of the same. 

The close connection that Mr. Nesbitt has had with the life of 
Pinckeyville is evident in the public service that he has given as a mem- 
ber of the town council, for four years. It was during this period that 
the street paving was done, cement walk construction was begun in many 
parts of the city, and a general interest in public improvements was 
revived in the minds of the populace. It is of interest to note that during 
this era of advancement Pickneyville was a dry town, yet the city gave 
ample evidence that it was never more keenly alive, to the great discom- 
fort of those who hold that it takes whiskey to make a live town. 

Mr. Nesbitt was married in Monticello, Illinois, on the 28th' of 
January, 1885, to Miss Emma Hill, a daughter of James A. Hill, a mer- 
chant of that city. Mrs. Nesbitt was born in Monticello in April 23, 
1863. Her mother was Lucia A. Pipher and she and Mr. Hill reared a 
family of five children. Four of Mr. and Mrs. Nesbitt 's children, Gladys, 
Fay, Dick and Verne have completed the high school course in Pickney- 
ville, and have taken additional work elsewhere in special subjects. The 
two younger boys, Neil and Kenneth are yet in the public schools. 

Mr. Nesbitt believes that the Fraternal orders come very close to 
living up to the ideal for which they strive, that is true brotherhood, 
consequently he is a loyal member of the Masonic order, in which he is 
a master mason, and of the Modern Woodmen of America. In his po- 
litical affiliations, Mr. Nesbitt is a Republican. 

FREDERICK C. BIERER, M. D. It is most consonant that in this pub- 
lication be entered at least a brief tribute to the memory of one who was 
for many years the representative physician of Jackson county and a 
rising member of the medical profession in southern Illinois, the man 
whose character was the positive expression of a strong and noble nature, 
and whose life was benignant in its every influence. Dr. Bierer was one 
of the honored pioneers of southern Illinois and was one of the best 
known and most influential citizens of Murphysboro, Jackson county, 
for many years. In addition to achieving distinction and success in his 
profession, in which he proved himself a true humanitarian, he also 
gave his aid and influence in connection with the furtherance of all 
enterprises and measures tending to advance the general welfare, and 
when he was summoned to the life eternal he left the gracious heritage 
of a worthy life and worthy deeds. 

Dr. Frederick C. Bierer was born in Westmoreland county. Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 6th of June, 1820, and was a scion of one of the old and 
honored families of the Keystone state. In preparing himself for the 
work of his exacting profession he availed himself of the advantages 
of Jefferson Medical College in the city of Philadelphia, from which 
famous old institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1843. In the following year he came to Illinois, and it is worthy of 
record that he made the entire journey from Pennsylvania to this state 
with a horse and buggy. Arriving at Effingham, the judicial center of 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 663 

the county of the same name, he shipped his horse and carriage to Jack- 
son county and established himself in Murphysboro. Here he engaged 
in the effective practice of his profession, and incidentally, he lived in 
the full tension of the pioneer days. His services as a physician and 
surgeon were in requisition over a wide area of country, and he labored 
with all zeal and devotion in the alleviation of human suffering and 
disease, giving himself to his work with the utmost self-abnegation, and 
driving and going on horse-back over almost inaccessible roads, under 
conditions that would test the devotion and physical powers of the 
strongest man. When the Civil war was precipitated upon a divided 
nation, Dr. Bierer manifested his intrinsic patriotism by promptly en- 
listing in the defense of the Union. He enlisted in Company H, Twenty- 
seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, and was soon made first 
lieutenant of his company. He proceeded to the front with his com- 
mand and had received the appointment of hospital surgeon when his 
own health became so greatly impaired that he was incapacitated for 
further service, and he was honorably discharged. He then returned 
to Murphysboro and for a period of eighteen years thereafter he was en- 
gaged in the mercantile business, during the greater portion of the time 
in an alliance with Robert Worthen, and later with P. W. Griffith. 

Dr. Bierer was a man of courtly person, marked vitality and most 
progressive ideas. He was ever ready to render his influence and co- 
operation in the furtherance of all enterprises tending to the advance- 
ment of the best interests of the community, and he was always a leader 
in movements of this order. He served as mayor of Murphysboro in 
1869, and thereafter was a member of the city board of aldermen for 
a considerable period. He was one of the originators of the Southern 
Illinois Medical Association, and served several terms as president of 
the same. He was one of the founders of the First Lutheran church of 
Murphysboro, and served as superintendent of its Sunday-school for 
twenty-two years. 

On the 9th of February, 1865, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Bierer to Sabina U. Griffith, a daughter of John J. Griffith, another of 
the pioneers of Jackson county. Of the four children of this union two 
died in infancy. Those surviving are Fred G.. of Murphysboro, of whom 
individual mention is made elsewhere in this work, and Miss Ella Bierer. 

Dr. Bierer passed the closing days of his life in the city of St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he died on the third day of January, 1893, and his name 
is held in reverent memory in the city which so long represented his 
home, and to the development and upbuilding of which he contributed 
in such generous manner. His widow survives and resides in Murphys- 
boro. 

FREDERICK G. BIERER. There is ample evidence that in the case of 
this popular and representative citizen of Murphysboro, the judicial 
center of Jackson county, no application can be made of the scriptural 
aphorism that "a prophet is not without honor save in his own country," 
from the fact that he has gained secure place as one of the representative 
members of the bar of his native city and county and that he is held 
in popular confidence and regard of the highest order. He is a son 
of the late honored Dr. Frederick C. Bierer, to whom a memorial is 
dedicated in another portion of this work, so that further mention of the 
family history is not demanded in the present connection. 

Frederick Griffith Bierer was born in Murphysboro on the first of 
June, 1875, and he is indebted to the public schools of his native town 
for his early education, which included the curriculum of the high school. 
As a youth he was associated to a greater or less extent with the mercan- 



664 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tile business with which his father was connected, and finally he entered 
the St. Louis Law School, which is the law department of Washing- 
ton University in the city of St. Louis. In this institution he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as a member of the class of 
1900, duly receiving his degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted 
to the bar of his native state in October of the same year, and com- 
menced the practice of his profession in Murphysboro, where his suc- 
cess has been on a parity with his recognized ability. He has built 
up a substantial general practice, and is known as an able trial lawyer 
and a wise counsellor. He has served two terms as city attorney, and 
in this office made an admirable record. Mr. Bierer is essentially pro- 
gressive and public spirited, and his interest in all that concerns his 
native city is of the most insistent and loyal order. He is a member 
of the directorate of the Citizens State and Savings Bank, of which 
he was one of the organizers. He is attorney for the Illinois Building 
and Loan Association, as well as of the Murphysboro Park District, 
and is a director of the Jackson County Fair Association. His politi- 
cal allegiance is given to the Republican party, and he takes an active 
interest in the furtherance of its cause. He and his wife are zealous 
members of the First Lutheran church of Murphysboro, in which 
church he is an elder, as well as superintendent of its Sunday-school. 
He is affiliated with the local organization of the Modern Woodmen 
of America, of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, of which last named organization he is past exalted 
ruler. 

On June 1, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bierer to Miss 
Nellie S. Peirson, daughter of John J. and Anna K. Peirson of Mur- 
physboro, where Mr. Peirson is a prominent representative of the real- 
estate and insurance business. Mr. and Mrs. Bierer are popular 
factors in connection with the social activities of their home city, and 
their residence is a recognized center of hospitality. They have one 
son, Frederick Peirson Bierer. 

WILLIAM JACKSON MUERIE. One of the progressive and enterpris- 
ing business men of Johnson county, Illinois, who in spite of discour- 
agements and misfortunes has attained a position of standing in the 
business world, is William Jackson Murrie, the proprietor of a nourish- 
ing general merchandise establishment in the village of Simpson. Mr. 
Murrie is a native of Johnson county, having been born August 24, 
1873, in Simpson township, a son of John J. and Isabel (Benman) 
Murrie, and grandson of Jackson Murrie, one of the old pioneer settlers 
of Southern Illinois. John J. Murrie, who is still living on the old 
family homestead in Simpson township, has been engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits all of his life, and is one of the good, reliable farmers 
of his section. He and his wife have been the parents of eight chil- 
dren, namely: William J., Charles, Effort, John, Daisy, Fred, Edward 
and Ritha. 

William Jackson Murrie received his education in the district schools 
of his native vicinity, and his boyhood was spent like that of other 
farmers' sons, being early reared to habits of industry and integrity, 
and learning all the details of an agriculturist's life. For some years 
he spent the summer months in working on the home farm, and after 
he had completed his education his winters were spent in the timber- 
lands, but in 1895 he decided to try his fortunes in town, and during 
that year and the next was the proprietor of a successful livery business 
in Simpson. He was married in 1896, and for the next two years car- 
ried on farming in Simpson township, but at the end of that time re- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 665 

turned to the town and for two years conducted a small retail business. 
He sold out his interests here in 1900 to go to Tulsa, Oklahoma, where 
he thought he would have a better opportunity of showing his abilities 
in the new country, but after he had established himself there and was be- 
ginning to enjoy a reasonable measure of success his store was destroyed 
by fire and he lost all that he had gained. Returning to Simpson, Mr. 
Murrie did not allow himself to become discouraged, and with his 
father's assistance he started in to make another beginning, conducting 
a store in Simpson until 1904, when he sold out and went to Sikestown, 
Missouri, where he worked in the Farmers Supply Company store 
until 1906, then again returning to Simpson. By that time he had ac- 
cumulated $1,000, and he spent $350 of this for a residence and lot, 
and with the remainder erected a store building and invested in a stock 
of merchandise, and since that time his success has been assured. He 
has one of the largest trades in this section, carries an up-to-date stock 
worth $3,000, and has built a fine, modern residence. Mr. Murrie 's 
success is the result of his perseverance and hard, faithful work, and as 
a self-made man who has been the architect of his own fortunes is en- 
titled to the respect and esteem in which he is universally held. He is 
a popular member of the Modern Woodman of America and the Royal 
Neighbors, and holds a policy in the Johnson County Mutual Insurance 
Company of Simpson. 

In 1898 Mr. Murrie was married to Miss Barbara Ellen Farris, who 
was born in 1876, daughter of the late Thomas and Minerva (Smith) 
Farris, formerly of Grantsburg township, and she died September 20, 
1911, leaving one son. Carl, who is eleven years old. Mrs. Murrie was 
a member of the Royal Neighbors and the Johnson County Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, and had many friends in this community, 
where her loss is deeply mourned. 

L. D. KEITH, M. D. Such rapid strides have been made in the 
medical profession during late years, that the practitioner who would 
keep abreast of modern progress must ever be on the alert to take 
advantage of the various discoveries and inventions constantly being 
made, and consequently the physician of today finds a large part of 
his time given to study and research in order that he may attain suc- 
cess among his fellows. The members of the profession in Illinois 
are fully capable of holding their own with those of other sections of 
the country and of maintaining the high standard set by those who 
have gone before them, and one who has met with a measure of success 
in his chosen calling is Dr. L. D. Keith, whose field of practice is 
the progressive city of Anna, Union county. Dr. Keith is a native 
of this county, having been born in the town of Balcom, in 1865, and 
is a son of Benjamin B. and Sarah I. (Corzine) Keith. The former 
was born in Tennessee, near the town of Murfreesboro, in 1833, and 
died in Union county, Illinois, January 3, 1911, and the latter, a 
native of North Carolina, born in 1830, also passed away here. 

The early education of Dr. Keith was secured in the public schools 
of his native community, and for ten years he was engaged in school 
teaching here, in the meantime entering Ohio Wesleyan College, Del- 
aware, from which he was graduated in 1890, with the degree of A. 
B. His medical training was obtained in Louisville, Kentucky, being 
graduated from the college there in 1896, at which time he came to 
Anna and established himself in practice. His ability was soon 
recognized, and aided by a sympathetic nature and pleasant person- 
ality he was enabled to build up a lucrative clientele. From 1898 
until 1900 he served very satisfactorily as coroner of the county. Dr. 



666 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Keith maintains his membership in the county, and state medical or- 
ganizations. Fraternally, he is a member of Anna Lodge No. 520, of 
the Masonic fraternity. 

In 1891, Dr. Keith was united in marriage with Miss A. Parker, 
who was born in Union county, the daughter of Dr. D. A. and Susan 
Parker, and to this union there have been born three children : Roy, 
who is fifteen years of age ; May, who has reached the age of eight 
years; and John, who is four. Both the Keith and Parker families 
are well known in this section. 

THOMAS B. KERLEY, M. D. Much has been written in this his- 
torical work of the banks and bankers of Southern Illinois. However, 
in estimating the financial strength of this section of the state, the 
banks and bankers of its smaller municipalities are deserving of very 
prominent mention, for they are the tributaries of larger financial in- 
stitutions and have an important part in swelling the stream of the 
state's prosperity. To the village bank conies the farmer from the 
surrounding countryside and deposits the golden fruits of his toil ; 
from the proprietor of that bank its customers may ask and receive 
financial advice; he is their fj-iend and advisor as well as their banker. 
The farm loan, that solid rock of financial investment, is placed with 
him, or is negotiated through some larger banking institution through 
his agency. Upon the stability and security of these smaller banks, 
as well as upon the honor and integrity of those in control of them, 
rests the whole superstructure of the confidence and trust reposed in 
them. In this connection it is not inappropriate to speak of the career 
of Thomas B. Kerley, a well known physician and surgeon, who is the 
banker of Simpson, and one of the most influential men of his part 
of Johnson county. Dr. Kerley was born on a farm in Simpson town- 
ship, May 14, 1865, and is a son of James L. and Mary J. (McKee) 
Kerley. 

The Kerley family, which originated in Ireland, was founded in North 
Carolina, in which state the. grandfather of Dr. Kerley, Thomas Ker- 
ley, was born. He migrated to Giles county, Tennessee, at an early 
day and in 1840 came to Illinois, settling first in Pope county and 
later securing a farm in the "Flat Woods" in Johnson county, this 
land still being owned by a member of the family. 'Thomas Kerley 
married a Miss Meredith and reared a family of fourteen children, 
and she died recently, leaving one hundred and thirty-six descend- 
ants, representing prominent and successful people in every walk of 
life. James L. Kerley, who was born July 21, 1836, in Giles county, 
Tennessee, was four years of age when he accompanied his parents 
to Southern Illinois, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist, 
which he followed throughout his active career. He accumulated five 
hundred acres of excellent land, but this he divided among his chil- 
dren, to each of whom he gave a good tract when they reached matu- 
rity. He was thrice married, his first wife bearing the maiden name 
of Elizabeth Lasley, and she died shortly after their marriage, with- 
out issue. He was married (second) to Mary J. McKee, who was 
born August 20, 1839, daughter of Zachariah and Elizabeth (Wright) 
McKee, and she died February 7, 1879, at the age of forty years, hav- 
ing been the mother of eight children, namely: Sarah Katherine, 
who is deceased ; Joseph A. ; Winnie, who is deceased ; Thomas B. ; 
Alvan, who is deceased ; one who died in infancy ; Gilbert C., deceased ; 
and Mrs. Hattie Ditterlins. Mr. Kerley was married (third) to Miss 
Susan McKee, daughter of Frank K. McKee. and they had one child, 
Chillis, a farmer of Johnson county. James L. Kerley died March 12, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 667 

1910, in the faith of the Primitive Baptist church, of which he was 
a member. One of his county's hest citizens, he was progressive in 
all things, and was the first man in the McKee settlement to use a 
mowing machine. 

Thomas B. Kerley attended the district schools of his native local- 
ity, and until his marriage made his home with his father. He was 
reared to agricultural pursuits, but when he became twenty-one years 
old he decided to enter the medical profession, and with that end in 
view began study with Dr. Joseph H. Simmons. He continued with 
him for two years, in the meanwhile carrying on operations on his 
thirty-five acre tract, and in 1886 entered the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, where he studied during 1886, 1887 
and 1888, graduating in February of the latter year. He at once began 
the practice of medicine at Simpson, where he has continued it ever since. 
A kind and sympathetic physician, a steady -handed surgeon and a cheer- 
ful friend, Dr. Kerley won the respect and admiration of his fellow- 
townsmen long before he opened his banking institution in 1910, on 
December 10th of which year the First Bank of Simpson, a private 
establishment, was organized, with Mr. Kerley as president, J. W. 
Reynolds, vice-president, and Delbert R. Kerley, cashier, and these 
gentlemen, with Story & Klink, of Glendale, Illinois, and N. J. Brooks, 
of Simpson, form the board of stockholders. Since 1907 he has de- 
voted a good deal of attention to farming, and is now the owner of 
two hundred acres of well-cultivated land. Mr. Kerley is so well known 
that his life and character speak for themselves. Having spent all 
his life in this section, he was able to recognize the section's natural 
opportunities, which he improved, and he is now enjoying the well- 
merited reward of his forsight. At the age of twenty-one years he 
joined the Masonic order, and shortly thereafter became connected 
with the Odd Fellows, and he has since been a popular member of 
both fraternities. 

On March 18, 1886, Mr. Kerley was married to Mary E. Simmons, 
daughter of Louis M. and Catherine Simmons, and granddaughter of 
Peter Simmons, a native of North Carolina, who migrated to the ' ' Flat 
Woods" of Johnson county in 1840. Dr. and Mrs. Kerley have had 
four sons, as follows: Granville L., aged twenty-four years, studied 
in the Southern Illinois Normal University, and graduated from the 
St. Louis Medical University in May, 1910, and is now assistant 
surgeon of the Frisco Railroad and is located at Topeka, Kansas ; 
Lindorf L., aged twenty-two years, studied at the Southern Illinois 
Normal University, and graduated at Bloomington Law School, June 
20, 1911, since which time he has been engaged in the practice of law 
at Chicago; Delbert R., aged twenty-one years, who is now acting as 
cashier of the First Bank of Simpson ; and Ollin . R., aged sixteen 
years, who is a student in school. 

NELSON BROWNING. As money, or any other medium of exchange, 
is the lifeblood of business and commerce, it is evident that bankers, 
who manage and control the circulating medium, stand related to the 
public as the physician who has his finger on the pulse of the patient 
and has the power of controlling his constitution for better or worse. 
No member of the business community has a greater responsibility 
than the banker, and any community or city is much to be congrat- 
ulated which has at the head of its finances men of thorough train- 
ing, stanch ability and moral dependability. A banker who is closely 
typical of what is required in the financial manager and leader to 
inspire and retain business and commercial confidence is Nelson 



668 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Browning, organizer of the First National Bank of Christopher and 
first president of the institution. 

Mr. Browning is native to this district, his birth having occurred 
five miles south of Christopher, January 4, 1857, the son of Elijah and 
Mary (Edden) Browning. The father, who survives in honored citi- 
zenship, is a farmer, now retired, and makes his home at Mulkeytown. 
He has been very successful and is a Democrat in his political al- 
legiance. He is a son of Gilbert Browning, a native of Tennessee, and 
one of the first settlers of Franklin county. Gilbert Browning came 
to this locality in the prime of life and lived and died on a farm he 
secured from the Government. He died at the age of seventy-five 
years and was very well and favorably known, and for years served in 
the capacity of justice of the peace. The subject's mother was a na- 
tive of Franklin county. 

Mr. Browning received his education in the public schools and his 
early years were spent amid the rural surroundings of his father's 
farm early becoming familiar with the many secrets of seed-time and 
harvest under the tutelage of that gentleman. He early in life became 
ambitious to establish himself independently and by the exercise of 
industry and thrift was eventually in a position to buy a farm of his 
own. He raised stock and engaged in its commerce and a few years 
later embarked in the dry goods business in Mulkeytown. Sub- 
sequently he disposed of that interest and went into the hardware 
business at Benton. He has always been successful, from the first 
evincing a sound commercial and executive faculty which brings all 
his ventures to fruitful issue. In 1906 he organized the First Na- 
tional Bank of Christopher and became its first president. This thriv- 
ing monetary institution has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, 
a surplus of ten thousand and deposits amounting to two hundred 
thousand dollars. He also owns considerable real estate in Christopher. 

In 1880 Mr. Browning laid one of the most important stones in 
the foundation of his success by his marriage to Mary A. Jones, 
daughter of B. S. Minor, an early settler of Franklin county and a 
very successful farmer and stock raiser, known all over the country. 
Of the children born to their union, two sons are living, Ernest and 
Fred. Mr. and Mrs. Browning are zealous members of the Christian 
church. In politics the subject has Democratic convictions, but takes 
in public affairs only the interest of the intelligent voter. He has 
never found the honors and emoluments of office tempting and has 
never run for office. For a number of years, however, the office of 
mayor was bestowed upon him by the people and he has also served 
as supervisor of Six Mile township. He has extensive agricultural 
holdings and is one of the principal stock-holders in the bank of which 
he is president. He started in life limited in capital, but has been 
very successful and is now one of the wealthiest and most substantial 
men in this- section of the county, to whose interests he is very loyal, 
and to the prosperity of whose institutions he is ever ready to lend 
his support. 

NORMAN J. MOZLEY. The standard of stock being bred today in 
Southern Illinois is so much superior to that of twenty years ago that 
hardly any comparison can be made between them, but it is suf- 
ficient to note that throughout the West dealers are clamoring for 
the Illinois cattle, believing it to be the best obtainable. That 'the 
standard has been raised so high is due to the efforts of a body of men 
who have made stock breeding their life study, and prominent among 
these stands Norman J. Mozley, of Vienna, who owns a large tract of 



T??5; 

OF1HE 
Q&VERSITY OF ILUJw" 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 669 

valuable land in Johnson county, and who, more than any other one 
man, has advanced the interests of the stockmen of this part of the 
state. Mr. Mozley was born January 1, 1861, on a farm five miles 
east of Vienna, and is a son of John T. and Margaret (Worley) 
Mozley. 

The Mozleys are of Revolutionary and Colonial descent, a great- 
great-uncle of the subject, James Mozley, being a Revolutionary sol- 
dier and noted Indian fighter. In 1843 the grandparents of Norman 
J. Mozley, John N. and Agnes (Galloway) Mozley, came to Johnson 
county from Tennessee, the grandfather being one of the county's 
early sheriffs and a participant in the Seminole Indian war. He be- 
came a prosperous farmer, lumberman and miller, and died in 1901. 
John T. Mozley was six years of age when he accompanied his parents 
to Johnson county, and here he engaged in agricultural pursuits and 
became very successful. In 1862 he enlisted as first lieutenant of 
Company B, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, for service during the Civil war, was promoted to the 
rank of captain, and served until the close of the war. With one of 
the hard-fighting regiments of the Prairie state, he saw much active 
service, and among others was at the battles of Corinth, Memphis, 
Island No. 10 and Vicksburg, and after the fall of the latter city his 
regiment was stationed along the Mississippi river to guard the points 
gained. A gallant officer and fearless and faithful soldier, he was 
idolized by his men and highly esteemed by his fellow-officers, and his 
record during the war is conspicuous for the cheerfulness with which 
he discharged every duty. Right up to the time of his death, which 
occurred October 1, 1908, he suffered from rheumatism and heart 
trouble incurred while in the service, but he never expressed a regret 
that he had given of his health and strength to serve his country in its 
hour of need. As he had been a good soldier during the war, in 
times of peace he became a successful farmer and fruit grower. A 
prominent Mason and consistent member of the Christian church, he 
was esteemed as a man of the strictest integrity, and one who had the 
courage of his convictions to express his opinions as to what consti- 
tuted right and wrong in no uncertain manner. At his funeral, which 
was held from the church with which he had been connected for forty 
years, under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity, a great concourse 
of people came to do homage to his memory and to mourn the loss of 
a citizen whose place would be hard to fill. John T. Mozley married 
Margaret Worley, a native of Johnson county, and to them there were 
born four children, two of whom died in infancy, while the survivors 
are Norman J., of Vienna, and Charles A., born in September, 1873, 
who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Lower Penasco, New 
Mexico. 

Norman J. Mozley received his education in the common schools, 
and at the age of eighteen years started his work as an educator, teach- 
ing through the following sixteen years, twelve of which were spent 
in districts near his home. In the meanwhile he carried on farming, 
first on rented land and later on an eighty-acre tract on which he lived 
until 1904, situated near his old birthplace. He added to this tract 
from time to time, and now has four hundred and fifty-five acres, al- 
though at one time he owned seven hundred and two acres in one 
locality, a part of which he sold December 1, 1910. He also is the 
owner of a tract of two hundred and fifty acres situated near Reynolds- 
burg. Since 1891 Mr. Mozley has been raising registered Hereford 
cattle, being the pioneer Hereford breeder of Johnson county, and at 
the present time has two hundred head, although at times his herd 



670 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

contains as many as three hundred cattle. At this time he is the 
owner of the grand champion prize-winning Hereford bull of the 
world, "Prime Lad IX." The firm of Mozley & Son does a business 
in cattle that aggregates ten thousand dollars annually, and, as has 
been before stated, Mr. Mozley has done more than any one man to 
raise the standard of Southern Illinois animals. He is a member of 
the American Hereford Breeders Association and a recognized au- 
thority on matters pertaining to stock breeding. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Lodge and Chapter of Masonry, and he also holds 
membership in the Sons of the Veterans. 

In 1883 Mr. Mozley was married to Mary R. Whitnel, daughter 
of Dr. Josiah and Elizabeth (Miller) Whitnel, the former a native 
of Kentucky and a typical pioneer physician of Johnson county, where 
he practiced medicine from some time prior to the Civil war up to his 
death, in 1900. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mozley : 
Clarence Whitnel, who died in infancy ; John Ladd, a student at the 
Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondale for two years, who 
later pursued a course in agriculture and stock raising in the univer- 
sity at Champaign, and is now his father's partner in the firm of Moz- 
ley & Son, married Grace Lee Hooker, daughter of Dr. Hooker, and 
has one child, Margaret Lee, born in 1910; and Lizzie E., the wife of 
Edward Simpson, who has one child, Melba Miller. The family is 
connected with the Christian church and has been prominent in social 
circles of Vienna. 

ENOS PERRY. Progressive, energetic and enterprising, Enos Perry 
is numbered among the foremost merchants of Goreville, and, with his 
brother, A. B. Perry, owns one of the largest department stores in 
Johnson county. He was born June 15, 1867, in Jackson county, Illi- 
nois, on a farm lying in the vicinity of Carbondale. His father, Archi- 
bald Perry, was born in Tennessee in 1824, and as a youth came with 
his parents to Jackson county, Illinois, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, being engaged in farming until his death, in 1879. He 
married Lucinda Reeder, who was born in 1836 and died in 1909. Of 
the eleven children born of their union eight grew to years of matu- 
rity, as follows: J. N. ; William; George W. ; J. L.; J. A., deceased; 
A. B. ; Mrs. Louise Rosson ; and Enos. 

Gleaning his early knowledge of the common branches of learning 
in the district schools of Jackson county, Enos Perry subsequently at- 
tended Ewing College for a time. Turning his attention then toward 
agricultural pursuits, he was successfully employed as a tiller of the 
soil until 1896. when he opened a general store at Vergennes, Illinois. 
Disposing of that in 1900, Mr. Perry removed to Goreville, Johnson 
county, and having erected a frame building put in a choice assort- 
ment of goods and carried on a substantial business until May, 1906, 
when a disastrous fire caused him a loss of three thousand dollars 
above all insurance. With his brother, A. B. Perry, he then erected 
a fine brick building, and he now carries a stock of general merchan- 
dise valued at nine thousand dollars, in addition to dry goods and 
clothing having groceries, shoes, furniture, hardware, harnesses, stoves, 
etc., every department being amply supplied with first-class goods. 

Mr. Perry married, July 10, 1891, Mary Stout, of Jackson county, 
a daughter of Newton and Susan Stout, and into their pleasant home 
six children have been born, namely: Clyde Arthur, who lived but 
eight and one-half years; Hazel: Clara; Ruth; Grace; and Enos. 
Fraternally Mr. Perry belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America 
and to the Modern Brotherhood of America. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 671 

SAMUEL A. VAN KIRK. The citizens of any community are gener- 
ally very quick to recognize a man's worth and abilities, especially if 
he is in the field of law, and do not require any great length of time 
to demonstrate their appreciation of his good qualities by election to 
positions of honor and trust, and one in whom this confidence has been 
placed on more than one occasion is Samuel A. Van Kirk, a leading 
member of the Johnson county legal profession. Mr. Van Kirk was 
born on a farm near Newville, Cumberland county, Pennyslvania, July 
3, 1858, and is a son of Daniel P. and Anne (Carl) Van Kirk, and a 
grandson of John Van Kirk. 

The Van Kirk family, which originated in Holland, was founded 
in the United States more than two and one-half centuries ago, when 
the first of the name located in New Jersey. His descendants par- 
ticipated to a great extent in the early struggles of the New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania colonists, his sons fought valiantly in the American 
Revolution, and members of the family have been prominent in all 
walks of life, although they have mainly been identified with agricul- 
tural work. Daniel P. Van Kirk was engaged in farming throughout 
his active career, and at the time of his retirement moved to the vil- 
lage of Mechanicsburg, where his death occurred in 1889, his widow 
surviving until 1905. They had a family of children, of whom four 
survived them: Eber J., who was a soldier during the Spanish- Amer- 
ican war, of whom all trace has been lost ; John A. ; Mrs. Margaret 
Pence; Mrs. Jane Hart, and Mrs. Laura A. Lengiser, all living in 
Pennsylvania; and Samuel A. 

- Samuel A. Van Kirk received his preliminary education in Penn- 
sylvania and completed his academic studies in Cumberland Valley 
Institute, after which he taught two terms of school in his native 
state. When he was only eighteen years of age he came westward, 
locating in Newton, Kansas, and taught three years in Harvey county, 
that state. In the meantime he had been pursuing his law studies 
diligently, and on March 23, 1880, he was admitted to the bar. He 
practiced law in Harper and Comanche counties for nine years, served 
as county superintendent of Harper county one term, and in 1889 
joined the rush to Oklahoma, but only remained one year, for in 1890 
he came to Johnson county, Illinois, and was here admitted to prac- 
tice in 1891. Since the spring of 1892 he has resided in Vienna ; where 
he has been connected with some large movements and important legal 
action. He has served three terms as city attorney of Vienna and two 
terms as master in chancery and is now acting as attorney for the 
Cache River Irrigation District Project, covering Johnson, Massac, 
Pulaski, Union and Pope counties, and involving the drainage of 67,- 
000 acres. This is the largest project in Southern Illinois at the present 
time, work having been started January 1, 1911, since which time the 
preliminary work has been completed and calls for an original expen- 
diture of $200,000, although when completed it will represent a total 
value of $1,000,000, which covers the expense of main canals, laterals, 
etc. Mr. Van Kirk has built up a large and lucrative private prac- 
tice, and is considered one of Johnson county's brightest legal lights. 
He is a Republican in his political views and has been an active worker 
in the ranks of his party, and fraternally is connected with the Knights 
of Pythias. He and Mrs. Van Kirk are connected with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

In 1892 Mr. Van Kirk was married to Miss Mattie M. Shoemaker, 
who was born and reared in Johnson county, Illinois, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (Larison) Shoemaker, natives of Tennessee, who came to 
Johnson county prior to the outbreak of the Civil war. Mrs. Van 



672 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Kirk's maternal grandfather, Richard Larison, served in both the Black 
Hawk and Mexican wars, as captain, and his wife's father, a Billingsly, 
was a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Van Kirk have three chil- 
dren, namely: Agnes W., Ethel M. and Samuel A., Jr. As a citizen 
who has identified himself with all movements for the betterment of the 
community, as a public official whose career is without blemish, and as a 
man whose friendships are many and enmities few, Mr. Van Kirk, stands 
as one of his community's representative residents, and as such has the 
confidence and esteem of those who have had dealings with him in any 
way. 

HENRY CLAY CURTIS. This valued business man and citizen of Car- 
bondale, who is now the mayor of the city, is a gentleman of broad views, 
much enterprise and highly commendable and serviceable achievements. 
The fact that he has confined his efforts in the domain of industrial pro- 
motion to the one line of endeavor in which he was trained in youth and 
early manhood has enabled him to attain a higher measure and more con- 
siderable degree of success than he might otherwise have reached, but he 
has capacity and inmpelling power that would have brought good results 
in any line of action to which they might have been devoted with the 
zeal and industry that have always characterized him. 

Mr. Curtis was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, on December 5, 
1859. and is a son of James A. and Mary H. (Land) Curtis, who moved 
to Warrensburg, Missouri, a number of years ago. The father was a 
native of Alsace-Lorraine and the mother was of Southern birth. The 
son received his education in the public schools and at the Illinois State 
University. After leaving that institution he learned the trade of flour 
milling, and after completing his apprenticeship worked for six years 
in a mill at Marissa, which was one of the first roller mills in Southern 
Illinois. From Marissa he came to Ava in this county, and there he re- 
mained employed in a mill twelve years. 

In 1900 he moved to Carbondale, organized the Carbondale Mill and 
Elevator Company, and built its plant. He is president and general 
manager of the company and very active in pushing its business, which 
has grown to large extension under the impulse of his stimulating and 
energetic control. The mill has a capacity of two hundred barrels of 
flour a day, and the elevator has storage capacity for forty-five thousand 
bushels' of grain. In addition to this plant the company has an elevator 
at McClure, Alexander county, with a capacity of twenty thousand 
bushels, and buys on an average five hundred thousand bushels a year. 
It employs regularly twenty-five men, and at times several more. 

Mr. Curtis has been incessant in his devotion to the welfare and 
progress of Carbondale since he became a resident of the city. His 
interest in it has given him high standing with the citizens, and they 
have not been slow to call his ability into the public service for their 
benefit. He has done good work for the community as a member of the 
city council, and in April, 1911, he was elected mayor, the people hav- 
ing found their faith in him fully justified by his course in the lower 
municipal office. Neither are they disappointed in his work as mayor. 
Every interest of the city is carefully looked after by him in his of- 
ficial capacity, and every element of progress and development is vigor- 
ously employed in pushing forward the advance of the municipality 
along lines of wholesome growth and improvement. 

In politics Mr. Curtis is a firm and faithful Democrat, and one of 
the influential and effective workers for the good of his party. He is 
recognized as wise in counsel and energetic in action for its benefit, and 
is regarded as one of its strongest and most capable members in the 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 673 

county. He is also a Prohibitionist in theory and practice, ardently 
desirous of the total elimination of the liquor traffic, but yet not willing 
to sacrifice every other substantial advantage in government for the 
sake of that one reform, however strongly he may feel that it is needed. 

On June 25, 1883, he was married to Miss Katharine Curry of Mar- 
issa, this state, a daughter of James Curry. Three children have been 
born of the union, and all of them are living: Fay, the wife of J. G. 
Bellamy, of Pomona, Illinois, who is a merchant ; Harry Clark, a travel- 
ing salesman for his father's company; and Edward Earl, who is its 
assistant manager. Mr. and Mrs. Bellamy have a son named Curtis and 
a daughter named Kathleen. The younger son, Edward Earl Curtis, is 
also married. He chose as his wife Miss Beulah Strohman, of Carbon- 
dale, a daughter of Otto Strohman, a prominent farmer of Jackson 
county and classed among its most useful and respected citizens. They 
have one child, Edward Earl Curtis, Jr. 

Mr. Curtis is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his 
wife and children also attend its services regularly. He is on the 
advisory or official board of the congregation to which he belongs, and 
takes a leading part in all the work of the local organization. In fra- 
ternal relations he is an enthusiastic adherent of the Masonic order. He 
has his family, what is left of it, under his own roof-tree, are pleasantly 
established in the former home of that once gallant Union general and 
influential United States senator, the late Hon. John A. Logan. He 
purchased the property because of its value and adaptability to his 
needs, but its historical character is also pleasing to him and the hosts 
of friends of the family who frequent it and always find it bright with 
intellectual and social culture and warm with genuine and unaffected 
hospitality. 

CHARLES W. MILLS. It is to such safe, sane and conservative busi- 
ness men as Charles W. Mills, of Vienna, that Johnson county owes its 
present prosperous condition. Those whose only interest in business 
lies in looking after personal gains do little or nothing to advance their 
communities, but the men who have the welfare of their section at heart 
so conduct their operations as to build up and develop the resources of 
the country about them, thus opening up a wider field for the prosecu- 
tion of undertakings calculated to bring out the best interests of the 
localities in which they live. Mr. Mills, the former clerk and recorder of 
Johnson county, and a member of the well known real estate concern 
of the Egyptian Land and Loan Company, was born in Vienna town- 
ship, Johnson county, Illinois, November 1, 1873, and is a son of Elihu 
and Mary (Houston) Mills. 

Elihu Mills was born in 1831, in Jefferson county, Tennessee, and 
migrated to Illinois when he was sixteen years of age with his father, 
John Mills, whose wife bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Manley. 
They first settled in Grantsburg township, in 1847, taking up a tract of 
government timber land and making a comfortable home in which to 
rear their family. Thirteen years after settling in Illinois Elihu Mills 
contracted his first marriage, and in 1864 he was married (second) to 
Mary Houston, who was born and reared in Johnson county. Directly 
after his marriage Mr. Mills settled on a farm in Vienna township, and 
for more than forty years carried on agricultural operations in that sec- 
tion, becoming widely and favorably known. He reared a family of 
four sons and two daughters, as follows : Mrs. Margaret Dixon ; P. N. ; 
Elizabeth, who died in 1882, at the age of thirteen years; Albert W., 
a farmer of Grantsburg township ; Charles W. ; and A. Otto, a farmer 
and teacher in Vienna township, residing on the old homestead. 



674 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Charles W. Mills remained on the farm and attended the district 
schools until he was seventeen years of age, at which time he entered 
the Vienna High school, and in 1890 became an educator, teaching in 
various parts of Southern Illinois for twelve years. While not teach- 
ing he pursued his advanced studies in the Southern Illinois Normal 
School at Carbondale, and in 1903 and 1904 resided on the farm. In 
March of the latter year Mr. Mills was nominated on the Republican 
ticket for the office of circuit clerk and recorder, and during the fall of 
the same year was elected to that office, running two hundred and twenty- 
two votes ahead of his ticket. This office had never paid its running ex- 
penses until Mr. Mills was elected, and at the first semi-annual report he 
turned over one hundred and ninety-two dollars over and above the 
running expenses, and continued to do so until at the end of the term 
he had raised the sum to over two thousand two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars, something unknown to Johnson county prior to Mr. Mills' official 
career. He served for four years in that office, and in 1908 accepted 
the general agency for the Franklin Life Insurance Company. His 
district covers seven counties in Southern Illinois. During his term as 
clerk and recorder of Johnson county Mr. Mills established himself in 
the real estate and loan business, thus gaining considerable valuable ex- 
perience which he was to find of great help to him in his later and larger 
operations. He is the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of fine 
land, one and one-half miles east of Vienna, which he operates as a 
general farm, and also possesses one of Vienna's handsome residences. 
He has been a member of the I. 0. 0. F. lodge since 1900, and is now 
connected with the Encampment, and during the past twenty years has 
been a valued member and consistent attendant of the Christian church. 

On December 2, 1905, Mr. Mills was united in marriage with Miss 
Flarra Luna, in Iron county, Missouri. Mrs. Mills, who for five years 
taught school in her native county, is a daughter of James F..Luna, who 
served in the Civil war and died soon thereafter of disease contracted 
while swimming a river while on a march in the midst of winter. His 
widow, who was Miss Mary J. Mangum, still survives and makes her 
home in Iron county, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Mills have two bright, in- 
teresting children: Mary C., who is five years old; and Lewis W., who 
is three. 

The Egyptian Land and Loan Company was organized April 1, 1910, 
by Charles W. Mills, D. Esco Walker and Noel Whitehead, the latter now 
mayor of Vienna, for the purpose of buying and selling lands and mak- 
ing farm loans. Capitalized at fifty thousand dollars, its operations ex- 
tend throughout Southern Illinois and reach the southwest and western 
portions of the country, also including lands in Wisconsin, Michigan, 
Dakota, Arkansas and Missouri. The concern is a member of the Na- 
tional Real Estate Dealers Association, this membership giving the firm 
rights and abilities to place a prospective buyer in touch with land in 
any part of the United States. Business is done on a fair and sub- 
stantial basis, with equally advantageous conditions for both buyer and 
seller, and the personal element, as far as is possible, is injected into each 
transaction. Loans are made on a safe basis, and as all of the partners 
are men of stability and business integrity, with years of experience be- 
hind them, the firm stands high in realty circles and commands the 
fullest confidence of the general public. Personally Mr. Mills is a genial, 
whole-souled man, who has never made an enemy intentionally, and who 
counts his friends by the hundreds. 

DULY M. DAWSON. Ideas backed with indefatigable energy, the 
desire and power to accomplish big things these qualities make of sue- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 675 

cess not an accident but a logical result. The man of initiative is he who 
combines with a capacity for hard work an indomitable will. Such a 
man recognizes no such things as failure and his final success is on a 
parity with his well directed efforts. For a number of years past Duly 
M. Dawson has conducted the leading furniture and carpet house at 
Herrin, in Williamson county, Illinois, where he is well known as a man 
of impregnable integrity and sterling worth. 

Duly M. Dawson was born near Christopher, Illinois, on the 4th of 
November, 1875, and he is descended from an old Alabama family headed 
by Arfax Dawson, reference to whom is more extendedly made else- 
where in this work. He is a son of Allen and Mary (Vaughn) Dawson, 
the former of whom died in 1877, in Franklin, Illinois, and the latter 
was summoned to the life eternal in Herrin, Williamson county, Illi- 
nois, in 1908, at the venerable age of seventy-four years. The father 
devoted the major portion of his active career to farming operations 
and he long held prestige as one of the most prominent and influential 
agriculturists in Franklin county, this state. Concerning the ten chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Allen Dawson the following brief data are 
here incorporated, James R. is a progressive farmer in Franklin 
county, Illinois ; Francis M. died at Mound City, Illinois ; Mary A. was 
the wife of Robert Snyder at the time of her demise; Susanna married 
Jack Vincent and died in Franklin county; Christopher C. died at 
Herrin and left a family; Lewis Allen is a prominent merchant at 
Herrin ; Lemuel B. resides in Johnston City, Illinois ; Florence I. is 
the wife of Henry Hawk, of Herrin; John M. is a member of the well 
known firm of Dawson Brothers at Herrin ; and Duly M. is he whose 
name initiates this article. 

Under the invigorating discipline of the old homestead farm Duly 
M. Dawson was reared to maturity and his elementary educational 
training consisted of such advantages as were offered in the neighbor- 
ing district schools. This early training he later supplemented by a 
course of study in the Southern Illinois Normal University. For a time 
after leaving college he turned his attention to teaching in a country 
school, thus putting to practical use some of the knowledge he had 
gained in school. For a time he was engaged in farming but believing 
that he could succeed in the general merchandise business and thus 
avoid some of the exposure and monotony of farm life he came to Her- 
rin when this town first started. In 1898 he entered into a partnership 
alliance with his brother, the late Christopher C. Dawson, to open up 
a mercantile concern. In 1906, however, this firm was dissolved and 
Duly M. Dawson opened an implement business here. Two years later, 
in 1908, he disposed of the latter concern and then turned his attention 
to furniture and house fittings. His place of business is the leading es- 
tablishment of its kind in Herrin at the present time and it is wonder- 
fully well equipped as a furniture and carpet house. Mr. Dawson is 
a stockholder in the Herrin Building & Loan Association, being also 
a member of its official board, and he is likewise a stockholder in the 
bank at Sesser, Illinois. He is a man of unusual executive ability and 
his admirable success in life is particularly gratifying to contemplate 
inasmuch as it is entirely the outcome of his own well directed en- 
deavors. 

On the 14th of October, 1894, in Franklin county, Illinois, Mr. Daw- 
son was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Tennie Isom, a daughter of 
Benjamin F. and Caroline (Reynolds) Isorn. The Isom family came to 
Illinois from Tennessee just after the close of the Civil war. Mrs. 
Dawson is one of a family of twelve children, nine of whom are living, 
in 1911. She is a woman of most gracious personality and is deeply 



676 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

beloved by all who have come within the sphere of her gentle influence. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dawson are the parents of five children, whose names 
are here entered in respective order of birth, Earl, Cecil, Ted, Lucile 
and D. M., Jr. 

Like his ancestors, Mr. Dawson is a Democrat but he has kept aloof 
from all political activity. He is connected with a number of fraternal 
organizations of representative character. 

JAMES H. MARTIN. Among the essentially representative citizens 
of Murphysboro, Jackson county, whose influence and activities have 
contributed to the economic and social progress of this favored section 
of the state, stands James H. Martin, who claims the fine old Hoosier 
commonwealth as the place of his nativity, but the major part of whose 
life has been passed in Illinois. He is one of the leading members of 
the bar of Jackson county, and is a citizen of broad views and marked 
progressiveness. He is identified with various important corporations 
in his home city, including the City National Bank of Murphysboro, of 
which he is a director and concerning which specific mention is made in 
other parts of this publication. 

Mr. Martin was born in Ripley county, Indiana, on the 18th day 
of October, 1852. He was a child at the time of his parents' removal 
to Illinois, the family settling in Richland county in 1865. There he 
was reared to adult age and there he availed himself of the advantages 
of the public schools. That he made good use of his opportunities is 
indicated by the fact that as a youth he taught school for some time in 
the country districts, and proved himself an able and popular exponent 
of the pedagogic profession. He early formulated different plans for 
a future career, and decided to prepare himself for the profession of 
law. With this end in view he began his studies under a private pre- 
ceptor and finally entered the law department of the celebrated Uni- 
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he remained until 1880. He 
was admitted to the bar in May of 1880, and shortly afterwards he 
established his home in Murphysboro, Illinois, where he has continued 
in effective practice during the long, intervening years. This interval 
has been marked by worthy accomplishments on his part, and he has 
gained prestige as one of the ablest and most conscientious representa- 
tives of his profession in this section of the state. For a number of 
years past he has given his attention principally to real-estate, common 
law and chancery practice, and along these lines he controls a large and 
representative business. 

In all that pertains to the general welfare of the community, Mr. 
Martin has shown a loyal and public-spirited interest. He has gained 
a secure vantage ground in the confidence and esteem of the community 
in which he has so long made his home. He is a strong advocate of 
the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands spon- 
sor, and while he has given praiseworthy service in behalf of the party, 
he has never been an aspirant for political office. He was nominated 
at one time for the office of judge of the circuit court, but he declined 
the nomination. Since 1908 he has served as president of the board of 
education of the Murphysboro Township High School, and in the line 
of his profession he is attorney for several of the representative corpor- 
ations of his home city, including the Jackson County Homestead Loan 
and Building Association, of which he was the principal organizer. In 
1892 he was appointed attorney for the City National Bank, of which 
he has been a director from the time of its organization. He is at- 
torney for the Murphysboro Telephone Company, as well as the Ohio 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 677 

& Mississippi Valley Telephone Company. In a fraternal way he is 
identified with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 

In the year 1888, on November 13, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Martin to Miss Elizabeth Kennedy, daughter of George and Ellen 
(Ross) Kennedy, for many years residents of Murphysboro. Mr. Ken- 
nedy was engaged in the mercantile business for fully forty years in 
that city, being well and favorably known in the community where he 
has made his home for so many years. Mr. and Mrs. Martin have two 
children: Milford M., who is a student at the Murphysboro township 
high school, and Anna K., who was graduated from the Murphysboro 
high school as a member of the class of 1909, and who is now Mrs. Otis 
F. Glenn. 

CITY NATIONAL BANK OP MURPHYSBORO. One of the strong and ac- 
tively ordered financial institutions of Jackson county and one that con- 
tributes its quota to the commercial and industrial stability of this 
favored section of the country is the City National Bank of Murphysboro. 
The institution is the direct successor to the Bank of Murphysboro, organ- 
ized by James E. Walker and his wife, who owned and controlled the 
business for a number of years. In 1892 the City National Bank was 
organized and incorporated, and business had practical initiation on 
the 25th day of November of that year. At the time of organization 
the total assets of the bank were $112,000, and in the early stages of 
its operations its individual deposits aggregated something less than 
$60,000. The enterprise has been handled with marked conservatism 
and circumspection, and the institution has gained an impregnable 
hold upon the public confidence and esteem, aggregating in bonds alone 
a capital stock of $50,000, and the total deposits now aggregating 
$550,000. In 1895 Mr. Walker and his associates sold their interests 
in the banks to Mr. William K. Murphy and others. Mr. Hardy has 
been chief executive of the institution since May, 1899. 

The bank has a fine modern building of brick, two stories in height 
and twenty-four by sixty feet in lateral dimension. 

HIRAM A. HUDGENS. An honored resident of Goreville, Hiram A. 
Hudgens has for twenty and more years been an important factor in 
advancing the mercantile interests of this part of Johnson county, and 
as an enterprising and keen-sighted merchant has never allowed any- 
thing to escape his observation that might improve his methods of carry- 
ing on business or add to the welfare and prosperity of the community. 
He was born January 31, 1868, in Williamson county, Illinois, a son 
of the late Zachariah Hudgens. 

A native of Tennessee, Zachariah Hudgens came to Illinois with his 
father, John Hudgens, in 1855, locating in Williamson county. Im- 
bued with a fine spirit of patriotism, he enlisted during the Civil war 
in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and served for a year, being commissioned first lieutenant of his 
company. Receiving his honorable discharge from the army, he returned 
to Williamson county, and was there employed in tilling the soil until 
accidentally killed by a locomotive at Marion in 1902. He married 
Mary J. Corksey, who was born in Tennessee, and died in Williamson 
county, Illinois, in 1888, succumbing to an attack of typhoid fever. 
Ten sons and four daughters were born of their marriage, as follows: 
J. B., of whom a brief account appears elsewhere in this work; Robert 
L. ; Hiram A., the special subject of this brief biographical review; 
Joshua : Zachariah ; Herman ; Egbert ; Hugh ; Lee ; Arthur ; Emeranda, 



678 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

deceased, married Dr. Theodore Hudson; Mrs. Mary E. Mclnturff; 
Mrs. Nancy P T Nelson ; and Alice, wife of T. A. Bradley. 

After leaving the district schools Hiram A. Hudgens studied for 
two years in Ewing College, in Ewing, Illinois, and in the fall of 1888 
completed a commercial course in a business college at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. Locating then in the old town of Goreville, Mr. Hudgens was 
there engaged in mercantile pursuits until 1899, when he moved to 
the new town of Goreville, where he continued in business as a partner 
in the firm of Hudgens & Bradley until August, 1910. Since that time 
Mr. Hudgens has been in business alone, having bought out the build- 
ing and stock of his former partner. The building is of bric'k, and he 
carries a fine stock of general merchandise, including a good line of 
dry goods, groceries and boots and shoes, his investment, including 
his stock of goods, exceeding seven thousand five hundred and sixty 
dollars. Mr. Hudgens has acquired a substantial property, owning a 
good residence in Goreville, and forty acres of land lying southwest of 
the village. He is active in public matters, having been village treas- 
urer since the incorporation of the town, and is also treasurer of the 
school district. Fraternally he is a member of Goreville Lodge, No. 
528, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Goreville. 

Mr. Hudgens has been twice married. He married first, December 
23, 1894, Emma Mighell, a daughter of John and Hattie Mighell, early 
settlers of Goreville. She died in 1904, leaving three children, namely : 
Eula, a student in the Southern Illinois Normal University, at Carbon- 
dale; Gus; and Genevieve. Mr. Hudgens married, September 20, 1907, 
Bertie Kelley, daughter of John R. and Harriet Kelley, old and honored 
residents of Johnson county. 

HARRY THOMPSON BRIDGES. Something over five years ago, when 
he took charge of the Vienna Times, Harry Thompson Bridges decided 
that the great country lying in the southern counties of Illinois was 
entitled to and would support a live, clean, up-to-date metropolitan 
newspaper of its own, which should give all the news, all the time, and 
give it correctly and promptly, and under his administration it has 
taken front rank among the leading sheets of this section. Dedicating 
the influence of the paper to the business interests of his adopted city 
and to its development in every way, he has established the publication 
on thoroughly metropolitan lines and the city of Vienna has reason for 
congratulation that the Times is in such safe, sagacious and thoroughly 
clean hands. Harry Thompson Bridges was born January 6, 1872, in 
Johnson county, Illinois, and is a son of Henry T. and Mary E. (Carter) 
Bridges. 

Henry T. Bridges was born February 25, 1831, in Marshall county, 
Tennessee, near the village of Lewisburgh. His father was James D. 
Bridges, a native of North Carolina and a son of Francis Bridges, also 
a native of the Tar Heel State, the latter being a son of William Bridges, 
an Englishman by birth who came to this country during Colonial days 
and settled in North Carolina, where he died. Francis Bridges married 
Sarah Cadle, a daughter of Jesse Cadle, of North Carolina. In 1815 
he migrated to Maury (now Marshall) county, Tennessee, two years 
later moving to Carroll county, where he died after attaining a ripe old 
age. His son, James D. Bridges, was seven years old when the family 
moved to the wilds of Tennessee, and there he married Elizabeth Thomp- 
son, a daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Schefner) Thompson. In 
1833 James D. Bridges went to Mississippi and purchased a farm seven 
miles east of Holly Springs, and for the next six years was engaged in 
farming, following the mercantile business and trading with the Chick- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 679 

asaw Indian tribe. In 1839 Mr. Bridges returned to Tennessee and for 
two years carried on agricultural operations near Dyersburgh, and in 
1841 removed to Ballard county, Kentucky, where he purchased a farm 
and also conducted a smithy. Accompanied by his wife and eight chil- 
dren, in 1844 he set forth for Illinois with a team and wagon and event- 
ually arrived at Vienna, near which village he located on a good tract 
of Government land, and until 1852 was engaged in conducting a smithy 
and manufacturing wagons. He again disposed of his property in the 
last year mentioned and went to Laclede county, Missouri, where he 
carried oh farming and stock raising until his death, in February, 1863, 
his widow surviving until 1882. They reared a family of six children, 
namely: Jesse C., Henry T., Sarah, Charlotte, William and Benjamin. 

Henry T. Bridges was thirteen years of age when the family arrived 
in Illinois. When he was twelve years old he had started to learn the 
trade of blacksmith with his father, and when he was only twenty 
opened a shop of his own in Vienna, which he disposed of in 1880 to 
engage in the grocery business, to which he gave his attention for many 
years. His death occurred in 1902. Mr. Bridges served as police 
magistrate of Vienna for six years and as justice of the peace for a 
quarter of a century, and was a man widely known in fraternal circles, 
belonging to Vienna Lodge, No. 150, A. F. & A. M., Vienna Chapter, 
No. 57 R. A. M., Council No. 67, R. & S. M., and was a charter member 
of Vesta Lodge No. 340, I. 0. 0. F., and Vienna Encampment, No. 53. 
On December 31, 1852, he was married to Miss Mary E. Carter, a native 
of Giles county, Tennessee, and a daughter of Vincent and Elizabeth 
(Rose) Carter. They reared five children: Amanda Bell Cowsert, 
James H., Vesta Hogg, Harry Thompson and William Francis. James 
H. Bridges is now located near Milburn, Oklahoma, and is engaged in 
farming and school teaching. Willie Bridges was born in 1876, and as 
a young man removed to Oklahoma, where he was engaged in the mer- 
cantile business and farming. He was there married to Juanita Burris, 
a wealthy daughter of the Chickasaw Indian Nation, who bore him two 
children : Marion Francis and Zelma. Mr. Bridges died in Emet, Okla- 
homa, May 15, 1903. 

Harry Thompson Bridges worked on the home farm and attended 
public school until he was fourteen years of age, when he came to 
Vienna and became a clerk in his father's store, in which capacity he 
continued for two years. At the age of sixteen years he entered the 
office of the Vienna Times, as " devil, '' and advanced to foreman of the 
printing office, and then to the management of the paper. In 1902 he 
went to Oklahoma, where he became editor and manager of the Tisho- 
mingo News, but in 1906 returned to Vienna and assumed management 
of the Times. Fraternally Mr. Bridges is connected with the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen and the Modern 
Brotherhood of America, of which last-named lodge he is the popular 
secretary. He is a stalwart Republican, and in September, 1911, was 
elected city alderman. His religious connection is with the Christian 
church. 

On July 25, 1896, Mr. Bridges was married to Sena Brooks, of Cape 
Girardeau, Missouri, daughter of Albert and Elizabeth (Farrell) Brooks, 
and four children have been born to this union : Mabel, Harry Thomp- 
son, Jr., Royce Lee and William PVancis. Mrs. Bridges' father was 
born August 10, 1840, and died May 9, 1894, while her mother, born 
December 16, 1837, passed away January 26, 1892. They had seven 
children, as follows: John W., who lives at Cape Girardeau, Missouri; 
Alvin P., of Amarillo, Texas; Albert A., residing at Collins, Montana; 



680 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Mrs. Emma L. Gates, of Enid, Oklahoma ; Mrs. Lela Hertel, of Anna, 
Illinois ; and Mrs. Bridges. 

Mr. Bridges, in addition to his ability as an editor, possesses the 
executive skill requisite to the safe conducting of a first-class paper, 
and with such men at the helm of the ship of journalism we cannot fail 
to find that there is yet something in store for our country and the 
world even better than aught they have seen, and that there is a bright 
future before us that will as far surpass the present as the present 
itself rises above the meanest and most distant past. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM M. WILLIAMS. There are few citizens of Cairo 
who do not enjoy a personal acquaintance with Captain William M. 
Williams, claim agent of the Mobile & Ohio Railway Company for the 
division from St. Louis to Cairo, a man who, though deeply engrossed 
in the concerns of one of this section's largest transportation com- 
panies, has found time to cultivate his social nature and to enjoy the 
pleasures of companionship with his fellow men. As a settler he is one 
of the mile-posts of progress, the span between Cairo's infancy and its 
strong and vigorous life as a metropolis, for he first became a resident 
of the city in 1855. Captain Williams was born near Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, May 4, 1831, a son of Isaac and Mary (Torrence) Williams. 
From Pennsylvania the parents of Captain Williams moved into Vir- 
ginia and then on into Kentucky, and while living there both passed 
away, the mother in 1844 and the father in 1855. She was a daughter 
of Albert Torrence, an Irish gentleman who settled about Fort Pitt, and 
there reared a family, while Mr. Williams was a son of George Wil- 
liams, a native of North Carolina, who tilled the soil in Kentucky, Vir- 
ginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania, and at his death in the last-named state 
left a large family. 

Captain Williams' education came from the country districts of 
Pennsylvania and Virginia, where his father was engaged in farming, 
and he made the best of his youthful opportunities. That he was of 
manly parts early is evidenced by his publishing The Daily Wheeling 
Journal, of Wheeling, Virginia, when only seventeen years of age. This 
gave him an experience of great value in later life and his contributions 
to local publications of recent years reflect the training of the period 
when he was associated with the staff of a newspaper. When he aban- 
doned the paste-pot and the editorial pencil, he engaged in the manu- 
facture of salt at West Columbia, Virginia, in the Kanawha Valley, 
and continued that business until he came to Cairo, Illinois, in 1855, 
and associated himself with a cousin in the wholesale house of Williams, 
Stephens & Company. The firm erected the first brick building in the 
village, the one now occupied by R. Smyth & Company, at Nos. SOS- 
SOT Ohio street, and the business of the concern was important for 
that day of river transportation, but was dissolved in 1859. During 
the four years of Captain Williams' connection with this enterprise he 
chanced to meet many of the distinguished men of the country as they 
passed to and fro, and more than a half a century afterward he con- 
tributed to the local press of Cairo, upon invitation of friends, a few 
articles upon the famous people he had known and his impressions of 
them. Of the old historic characters of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 
he knew them all, and of the very few who made reputations for them- 
selves in other channels subsequently especially the Bard of Hannibal, 
Mark Twain he has a distinct recollection. Leaving Cairo in 1859, 
Captain Williams went to Arizona and engaged in mining as the super- 
intendent of the St. Louis Mining Company. The presence of Amer- 
icans in that (at that time) really Mexican field aroused the antipathy 



OFTHt 
SSTiERSITY OF ILUS^, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 681 

of the "Greaser" population, and they fell to and slew them all but 
the Captain himself, and the enterprise was abandoned. He next joined 
W. S. Grant, who had a government contract for furnishing supplies 
for the troops and animals serving in both Arizona and New Mexico, 
and remained in the West until the outbreak of hostilities ushering in 
the Civil war. He then returned to Washington, D. C., made his final 
report and settlement with the Government, and cast his fortunes with 
the Confederate cause. He was connected with General Van Dorn's 
army, operating in the country east of the Mississippi river, and while 
he took part in the contest was in detached service. He was in the 
vicinity of Vicksburg when that city fell into Federal hands, and then 
terminated his connection with military and took up civil life in the 
city. Entering the river traffic and establishing a small line of steam- 
boats plying in and out of Vicksburg, he did a profitable business 
while he remained a resident of that city. 

In 1870 the wheel of fortune turned toward Cairo again for Cap- 
tain Williams and he returned to this city. He first built a distillery, 
but soon disposed of it, and during the next few years he devoted him- 
self to independent pursuits. In 1880 he entered the employ of the old 
St. Louis & Cairo and Mobile & Ohio Railroad as its claim agent, 
and for a time did the work of the whole system. This field of activity 
has given him the opportunity of his whole life to become acquainted 
with human nature. An account of the hundreds of episodes showing 
the lengths to which mankind will go in an effort to put the railroads 
under obligations, in the experience of the Captain alone, would make a 
salable volume or two and cover a field not yet touched by the pen of 
an author. 

The life of Captain Williams has been so closely given to his em- 
ployers that he has not been a positive factor in his home affairs. He 
has ever been a strong Democrat and has always been capable of giving 
a reason for the faith that is in him, but has lived to see but one of his 
school of politics fill the presidency since the war. He remembers the 
campaign of 1840, and the campaign slogans of each party, and an ap- 
peal to his generous fund of political information brings out many in- 
cidents of the methods used and the leading characters engaged in our 
ante-bellum battles for the presidency. 

Captain Williams was married in Covington, Kentucky, in 1863, to 
Miss Rachel Williams, his own cousin, who died in Cairo in 1904. Two 
daughters were born of this union ; Mary Louise, who passed away here 
May 9, 1911, leaving her father as the last of his family; and Caroline 
Or 'Lea, who died in childhood. The Captain is a Master Mason and a 
consistent member of the Episcopal church. 

In front of his office at the Mobile & Ohio station in Cairo there is 
a small park covered with stately shade trees planted by himself more 
than twenty-five years ago, and upon one corner of this triangular plot 
stands ' ' Captain Billy Williams, ' ' a cannon, a gift to the city from the 
president of the Mobile & Ohio Railway Company, and from the old 
Confederate Fort Morgan, at Mobile, from whence it was transported 
and found a final resting place upon an emplacement erected at the ex- 
pense of Captain Williams and his friend, Colonel W. Butler Duncan, 
of New York City, President of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad Company. 

GEORGE W. NOEEIS. There is no line of business that requires more 
tact, skill or sympathy than that of undertaking, for the funeral 
director, even more than the physician, must discharge duties that make 
him most intimately associated with the families of his community, and 
it is requisite that he who performs the last sad rites must be a man in 



682 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

whom the utmost .confidence can be placed. George W. Norris, the only 
funeral director in the city of Anna, Illinois, has been engaged in this 
business here for more than twenty-two years, and has so conducted his 
establishment as to win the respect and esteem of all who have come 
into contact with him. He is a native of Scotland, having been born 
in 1837, and is a son of Robert and Mary (Miller) Norris. 

Robert Norris was born in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
and was taken to Scotland as a child. There he was married to Mary 
Miller, and they came to the United States in 1847, settling first in Wis- 
consin, where they resided for eleven years, and then coming to Union 
county. Mr. Norris was one of the first tinners to engage in business 
here, and it is still said that he was the best workman in his line that 
the county has known. His wife, who was born January 23, 1816, at- 
tained the remarkable age of ninety-five years, her death occurring in 
Anna, June 5, 1911. 

The education of George W. Norris was secured in the public schools 
of Wisconsin, and as a youth was taught the tinner's trade by his father. 
He followed this line of work until his enlistment, in 1862, for service 
during the Civil war, when he became a private in Company G, Four- 
teenth Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, and served three years as a member 
of that organization, rising to the ranks of sergeant, quartermaster ser- 
geant and orderly sergeant. He participated in a number of bitterly- 
fought engagements, including those during the raid through Georgia 
and that which culminated in Stoneman's surrender, but was fortunate 
enough to escape without capture or wounds. On his return from the 
war, Mr. Norris built a livery stable at Anna, which he successfully 
conducted for fifteen years, but eventually sold that enterprise and es- 
tablished himself in his present line. Mr. Norris has an up-to-date 
establishment in every respect, it being equipped with all the modern 
appurtenances of the business, while his equipages are elaborate and 
proper for every occasion. He is the owner of two farms of 125 acres 
in Union county, these being operated by tenants under Mr. Norris' 
supervision, and are devoted to berries, apples and peaches. Mr. Nor- 
ris also does an extensive business in breeding Shetland ponies, having 
had many years' experience in this line. 

In 1879 Mr. 'Norris was married to Miss Ellen Chandler, of Union 
county, there are four children, as follows: Thomas, born in 1880, who 
married Mary Farrands ; Robert, who married Eva Crowell ; and Mary 
and Georgia, who live at home. The family belong to the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and are well and favorably known to the people of 
its congregation. A Republican in his political views, Mr. Norris has 
never cared for public office, although he served on several occasions as 
precinct committeeman. He belongs to Lodge No. 520, A. F. & A. M., 
and R. A. Chapter No. 45, and for four or five years served as com- 
mander of Post No. 558, Anna Grand Army of the Republic. 

GEORGE A. GODDAED. An excellent representative of the teaching 
force of Johnson county, George A. Goddard, principal of the Gore- 
ville schools, is widely and favorably known in educational circles as 
a progressive and capable instructor, who has won success in his profes- 
sional career through his own merits. A son of Francis M. Goddard, 
he was born July 5, 1877, on a Union county farm, of pioneer stock. 
His grandfather, George Goddard, a native of Pennsylvania, came to 
Southern Illinois in early days and settled in Union county as a pioneer 
farmer. 

Francis M. Goddard was born and brought up in Union county, Illi- 
nois, being reared to agricultural pursuits. In 1893 he moved with his 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 683 

family to Texas, where he resided four years. Returning to Illinois 
in 1897, he purchased eighty acres of land in Johnson county, one and 
one-half miles northeast of Goreville, and has since devoted his time 
and energies to the improvement of his property, his farm being under 
a good state of cultivation. He married Martha A. Gurley, and to 
them six children have been born, one of whom, Edgar, died in infancy, 
and five are living, as follows: George A., the subject of this sketch; 
John W. ; Oscar M. ; Leva ; and Leona. 

Acquiring the rudiments of his education in the rural schools of 
Union county, Illinois, George A. Goddard subsequently lived in Texas 
four years, and while there attended the high school at Howe. He 
completed his early studies at the Southern Illinois University, in Car- 
bondale. and with the exception of a year spent as a merchant in Bun- 
combe, Johnson county, has been engaged in teaching since 1897, dur- 
ing the entire time having taught in Johnson county. For six years 
Mr. Goddard taught in the Salem district, and in 1905 and 1906 had 
charge of the Buncombe consolidated schools, Buncombe having been 
the second town in Illinois to adopt the progressive course of consoli- 
dating its schools. In 1907 he was engaged in mercantile pursuits, and 
in 1908 and 1909 was principal of the schools in Cypress. In 1910 
Professor Goddard accepted his present position as principal of the 
Goreville schools, and has since served in a most creditable manner. 
These schools have an enrollment of one hundred and ninety pupils, and 
employ four teachers, who take the scholars through the grammar 
grades and through the first two grades of high school, their work being 
thorough in every respect. 

Mr. Goddard married, in 1908, Esther Goddard, daughter of Will- 
iam and Fannie (Sturdevant) Goddard, of Buncombe. Since 1897 
Mr. Goddard has been a resident of Buncombe, and a citizen of promi- 
nence. He is much interested in agriculture, having charge of a farm of 
one hundred and thirty acres lying near Buncombe, and likewise having 
title to four hundred and forty acres of timber land in Arkansas. Mr. 
and Mrs. Goddard have one child, Walter 'Owen Goddard. Fraternally 
the Professor is a member of Banner Camp, No. 8366, Modern Wood- 
men of America, at Buncombe; and of Goreville Lodge, No. 797, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Goreville. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

FRANK B. KEEN. Few citizens are better known or more highly 
respected in Franklin county than the popular postmaster of Chris- 
topher, Frank B. Keen, a man who has demonstrated his efficiency as 
a public citizen, his ability as a business man and his sterling worth 
as a citizen. During his incumbency of office he has introduced a num- 
ber of much-needed reforms, and the general satisfaction which is felt 
with the manner in which he has handled the affairs of his administra- 
tion is sufficient evidence of his fitness for the position which he holds. 
Mr. Keen was born in Union county, 'Illinois, November 22, 1875, and 
is a son of James M. and Josepine (Coleman) Keen. 

The grandfather of Mr. Keen. V. B. Keen, was born in Tennessee, 
and came to Illinois with his family about 1869 or 1870. A practicing 
physician, he became known all over Union county, and followed his 
profession until he was more than seventy years of age, retiring some 
time before his death in 19D9, when he was seventy-seven years old. 
On the' maternal side Frank B. Keen is descended from A. W. Coleman, 
also a native of "Tennessee and a farmer by occupation, a vocation which 
he followed both in his native state and in Union county, Illinois, where, 
at his death, he was regarded as one of the substantial agriculturists 



684 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

of his community. James M. Keen was born in Tennessee, in 1856, 
and was still a lad when brought to Illinois by his parents. For a 
number of years he followed carpentry as an occupation, but in 1905 
retired from active pursuits and located in Christopher, where he now 
resides, as does also Mrs. Keen, who was born in Lick Creek, Union 
county. 

Frank B. Keen was reared on a farm and received his education in 
the common schools of Union county and later in Franklin county. 
His first serious occupation in life was that of teaching school, and for 
ten years he was known as an able educator throughout this part of the 
state. He was for one year engaged in the livery business at Chris- 
topher, but since July, 1909, when he was appointed postmaster, he has 
followed the business of dealing in real estate, in which he has met with 
more than ordinary success. The postoffice at Christopher belongs to 
the third class, and for an office of this division does an immense amount 
of business, but as the general service of the department has improved, 
so has Mr. Keen improved and advanced conditions at his station. His 
natural fitness for the position of postmaster resulted in his appoint- 
ment, and his genial, courteous manners have made him verV popular 
with all with whom he comes into contact. His popularity extends to 
the lodges with which he is connected, and he is a general favorite with 
the members of the Odd Fellows, the Red Men and the Modern Wood- 
men of America, in the latter of which he has served as consul. Always 
a stalwart Republican, he has been active in the interests of his party 
here, and, although he has never sought public preferment, has been 
elected police magistrate. 

On January 23, 1897, Mr. Keen was married to Miss Ethel Rea, 
daughter of Frank Rea, a successful retired merchant of Christopher, 
and two children have been born to this union : Thyda and Norma, who 
are both attending school. Mr. and Mrs. Keen hold membership in the 
Missionary Baptist church, and are popular in church and social circles. 

HENRY TERRY. A prosperous and progressive business man of 
Goreville. Henry Terry is an extensive dealer in lumber, and is 
widely known in his official capacity of mayor of the village. He 
was born on a farm in Union county, Illinois, April '8, 1868, of English 
ancestry. 

His father, the late William Terry, was born in Keighley, York- 
shire, England, where he learned the stone cutter's trade. Immigrat- 
ing to the United States in 1854, he settled in Farmington, Missouri, 
and for a time was employed on the mill erected by William Pickles, 
who was destined to become his father-in-law. Poor in pocket when 
he landed in America, he labored industriously at various employ- 
ments, and having saved some money located, in war times, on a 
farm in the vicinity of Carbondale, Illinois. He afterwards began 
farming in Union county, Illinois, on forty acres of land, and suc- 
ceeded so well in his labors that he afterwards bought one hundred 
and twenty-two acres of land in Union county, near the Johnson 
county line, and still later purchased two hundred and sixty acres 
lying near Goreville. He was successful as an agriculturist, and re- 
sided on his farm until 1905, when he retired from active business, 
and lived in ease and comfort until his death, January 20, 1911. He 
was in truth the architect of his own fortune, having worked his way 
upward from a state of comparative poverty to one of affluence, being 
enabled ere his death to establish, or to help establish; his three sons 
in business, and have ample means left for his own use. He was 
reared as a member of the Church of England. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHEEN ILLINOIS 685 

William Terry married, in 1858, in Farmington, Missouri, Fanny 
Pickles, daughter of William Pickles, to whom reference was made 
above, and they became the parents of six children, as follows: 
William G. P., who has charge of the Telephone Company's affairs in 
Goreville; Henry, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned; John 
U. S., an insurance man of Goreville; Mrs. Mary A. Calhoun; Mrs. 
Martha 0. Smith ; and Mrs. Frances J. Henley. Each of the sons also 
owns a farm. 

Brought up in Union county, Henry Terry was educated in the 
district schools, and well trained in agricultural pursuits on the 
parental homestead. When twenty-one years of age he bought a small 
farm, and shortly after took unto himself a wife and began farming 
on his own account in Johnson county, near Goreville, Illinois. He 
continued the management of his own farm of eighty acres until 
1902, and after his father retired from active pursuits managed the 
parental estate, which has recently been apportioned among the 
heirs. In 1902 Mr. Terry embarked in business in Goreville, and has 
since built up a large and lucrative trade as a dealer in lumber- and 
building materials. 

Since coming to Goreville he has taken great interest in pro- 
moting the public welfare, and on April 12, 1909, was elected president 
of the Goreville Town Board, and served so acceptably that in 1911 
he was re-elected to the same positon. Fraternally he is a member of 
Saline Lodge, No. 339, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of Beth- 
any Chapter, No. 623, Order of the Eastern Star; of Goreville Lodge, 
No. 528, Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and of Goreville Lodge, 
No. 612, Daughters of Eebekah. 

Mr. Terry married, March 12, 1891, Luella Parrish, a daughter of 
John and Lydia (Holly) Parrish, who were early pioneers of John- 
son county, Illinois, coming here from their native state, Tennessee. 

LAWRENCE RAMSEY HARRINGTON. While Nature often seems care- 
less in her work, flinging her varied brood recklessly into being and 
leaving all of her offspring to look out for themselves, she is yet 
provident and systematic to a high degree, fitting almost every man 
for some particular work in the world's great industrial contests, 
but usually leaving it to him or his friends to find out what it is. 
She seems to have fitted Lawrence R. Harrington, of Carbondale, par- 
ticularly for the banking business, and he soon found the congenial 
atmosphere for the development and exercise of his special faculties. 

Mr. Harrington is a native of Illinois and has all of a loyal son's 
devotion to the welfare of his mother state. He was born in Gallatin 
county on September 18, 1883, and is a son of John W. and Elizabeth 
(Ramsey) Harrington, prosperous farmers of that county, and stand- 
ing well in the estimation and regard of its people. They furnished 
excellent examples of fidelity to duty in private life and in connection 
with public affairs, and in their characters and conduct represented 
the best elements of the sturdy citizenship of their locality and county. 

Their son Lawrence obtained his education in the public schools 
at the Central Normal College in Danville. Indiana, and the Southern 
Illinois Normal University of this state. Soon after leaving the insti- 
tution last named he located in Carbondale and was appointed assist- 
ant cashier of the Jackson State Bank. He held this position until 
the reorganization of the bank into the Carbondale National Bank, 
and then was made cashier of the new corporation, in which capacity 
he has served it well and wisely ever since. 

He has ever shown an earnest and intelligent interest in the wel- 



686 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

fare of the city of his home, and given it expression in the most prac- 
tical and helpful way. He gave the city excellent service for a time 
as city treasurer and collector of special taxes, securing good returns 
for his efforts in the latter and eminent satisfaction to the people in 
the management of the former position, and winning warm commenda- 
tion for his manner of discharging the duties of each. 

In his connection with the bank he has been a shining success as 
a financier and popularizing force. He has so conducted the office of 
cashier in this strong and admirable institution as to add considerably 
to its body of patrons and the volume of its business, and thus and in 
other ways to strengthen its hold on the confidence and regard of the 
people of the whole county, and of every locality in which it does 
business. He is also secretary and treasurer of the J. A. Patterson 
Company, an extensive dealer in clothing, shoes and kindred com- 
modities, and in that position also is doing good work and achieving 
gratifying results. He is everywhere recognized as one of the most 
".apable and careful business men iu the city, and one of the most 
estimable and useful citizens of the county. 

On February 22, 1911, Mr. Harrington was united in marriage 
with Miss Mabel Patterson, of Carbondale, a daughter of Gabriel and 
Susan (Zimmerman) Patterson, long esteemed residents of the city, 
where for years the father was a leading merchant and grain dealer. 
In religious matters Mr. Harrington gives his faith and allegiance to 
the tenets and regulations of the Christian church, and serves as a 
deacon in the congregation to which he belongs. In fraternal rela- 
tions he is a member of the Masonic order of the Royal Arch degree, 
and also belongs to the Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. His interest in all these fraternities is 
warm and his services to them are valuable and appreciated. 

FRANCIS RODMAN WOELFLE. The shrewd business acumen of the 
financiers of Johnson county have placed the banking institutions of 
this section on a sound foundation, and their knowledge of men and 
conditions has enabled them to pilot their monetary crafts through 
the storms of financial distress that have struck the country and to 
bring them safely into the port of public confidence. The Drovers 
State Bank of Vienna, one of the secure and solid institutions of 
Southern Illinois, is fortunate in having for its officials men with 
unquestioned reputations as safe and far-seeing financiers, and much 
of the credit for the bank's -present prosperous condition must be 
given to its able and trustworthy cashier, Francis Rodman Woelfle. 
Mr. Woelfle is a native of Jonesboro, Illinois, and was born Septem- 
ber 16, 1867, a son of Dr. John M. and Anna (Clark) Woelfle. 

John M. Woelfle was born in Germany, in 1831, and received his 
education in the schools of his native land. Deciding upon a medical 
career early in life, he studied medicine until entering the German 
army, in which he served five years, and in 1848, or thereabouts, came 
to the United States and located at Buffalo, New York. There he 
was engaged in an official capacity until 1859, when he came West 
to Alton, Illinois, and when the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the 
Union army, rising to the rank of captain of Company B, First Mis- 
souri Light Artillery. During his four years of service he partici- 
pated in many important engagements, and was with General Sher- 
man on his famous "March to the Sea." The record he established 
during his military career was an excellent one, but it was equalled 
by his record as a private citizen and member of the medical profes- 
sion. He began to practice in 1867, at Jonesboro, but later removed 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 687 

to Anna, from whence he returned to Jonesboro, and there died in 
1882. He married Anna Clark, and they reared a family of six chil- 
dren, namely: Alpha, Omega, Francis Rodman, Minnie, James and 
Gertrude. 

Francis Rodman Woelfle was educated in the Anna public schools 
and at Centralia, Illinois, being sixteen years of age when he was 
graduated from the high school of the latter city. Entering the mill- 
ing business at Vienna, he began at the bottom of the ladder, and 
when he resigned his position in 1896 he had thoroughly mastered 
every detail of that trade. He then removed to Canton, Missouri, 
where he followed the same line on his own account until 1903, and 
in that year returned to Vienna and became identified with the Dro- 
vers State Bank as cashier and stockholder. He has farming inter- 
ests to the extent of one hundred and fifteen acres in Johnson county, 
and is the proprietor of a successful grain and elevator business at 
Belknap, Johnson county. Fraternally Mr. "Woelfle is connected with 
the A. F. & A. M. having attained to the Knight Templer degree, also 
with I. O. 0. F. lodge and encampment, and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. His religious connection is with the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

In 1889 Mr. Woelfle was married to Miss Carrie Kuykendall, 
daughter of J. B. Kuykendall, and they have had one son, Joseph 
Rodman, who is now a bright and interesting lad of eleven years. 
Mr. Woelfle started out in life empty-handed and may truly be caller 1 
a sef-made man, for he has labored earnestly and untiringly and the 
property he now enjoys is the reward of perseverance and good man- 
agement. He is ever ready to enter into any feasible undertaking 
that will benefit Vienna and is looked upon as one of the city's repre- 
sentative public-spirited citizens. 

GEORGE K. CRICHTON. Among the youth and vigor of the bar of 
Williamson county one who is rapidly gaining prestige as an able 
trial lawyer and well fortified counselor is George K. Crichton, whose 
name forms the caption for this review. Mr. Crichton represents his 
profession in the city of Herrin, among whose numerous industries 
he partially grew up and in which community he has passed from 
the sphere of one who toils to the sphere of one who stands ready to 
plead the cause of him who seeks the courts to adjust a difference or 
to right a wrong. 

Geo. K. Crichton is a native son of Illinois. He was born at 
Staunton, May 16, 1887, and is a son of Lawson Crichton, a mine 
manager in the employ of the Chicago & Carterville Coal Company 
at Herrin. Lawson Crichton was born at Kilmarnock, Scotland, in 
the year 1855. His father was a miner in Scotland and as a youth 
Mr. Crichton himself became interested in the mining of coal. He 
immigrated to the United States and first located at Litchfield, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in mining enterprises for a period of years, at 
the expiration of which he removed to Staunton. Remaining for 
some years in the latter place, he removed thence to Taylorville. He 
familiarized himself with every phase of his calling and, as time 
passed, prepared himself for the position of mine manager. On the 
1st of October, 1906, he came to Herrin, where he entered upon his 
duties with the Chicago & Carterville Coal Company. Lawson 
Crichton was married in his native' land to Miss Jane Kilpatrick and 
concerning their children the following brief data are here incor- 
porated, Lawson R. is a druggist in Denver, Colorado; Cecilia is 



688 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

the wife of B. B. Bulpitt, of Taylorville, Illinois; Isabella remains at 
home, as does also Geo. K., the immediate subject of this review. 

To the excellent public schools of Taylorville, Illinois, Geo. K. 
Crichton is indebted for his preliminary educational training, and 
there he prepared himself for college. At the age of nineteen years 
he was matriculated as a student in Washington University, at St. 
Louis, and was graduated in that excellent institution as a member 
of the class of 1909, duly receiving his degree as Bachelor of Laws. 
He passed the bar examination for the state of Illinois at Chicago on 
the 23d of June of the same year and now has admission to practice 
m all the state and federal courts. While passing his vacations dur- 
ing his university career Mr. Crichton was employed in some capacity 
or other in the mines at Herrin. In addition to receiving a compensa- 
tion for his employment he also secured first hand information about 
the life of a man who digs coal. He thoroughly acquainted himself 
with the actual relations existing between miner and operator ana 
the responsibilities of each. In an industrial field like Williamson 
county an accurate knowledge of mining is an indispensable aid to a 
lawyer in cases involving action for damages or in defending a cor- 
poration from the unjust assaults of injured employes. In 1910 Mr. 
Crichton was appointed master-in-chancery of the city court of Herrin 
and he is serving with the utmost efficiency in that office at the pres- 
ent time, in 1911. On the 18th of April, 1911, he was honored by his 
fellow citizens with election to the office of city attorney of Herrin, 
a position for which he is eminently well fitted. Although young in 
the profession, Mr. Crichton is proving himself one of the most indus- 
trious and capable lawyers in Williamson county. He is a stalwart 
Republican in his political proclivities and his first vote was cast, in 
1908, for President Taft. In fraternal connections he is a valued and 
appreciative member of the grand old Masonic order, with which his 
father is likewise affiliated, and he also holds membership in the 
Improved Order of Red Men and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. In religious matters he attends and gives his support to the 
Presbyterian church, in whose faith he was reared. He is a young 
attorney whose future is full of promise and as a citizen his loyalty 
and public spirit are of the most insistent order. He is unmarried. 

JOSEPH BALLARD REED. The late Joseph B. Reed was the pioneer in 
the industrial field of Cairo. His life here spanned a period of nearly 
half a century, and his foresight in coming into this field opened the 
door of opportunity to himself and developed an industry which con- 
tributed materially to the growth of this city. He led a life of activ- 
ity and the things that he achieved weighed heavily in marking the 
career of the successful man. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, March 
16, 1831, he was a grandson of Thaddeus Reed, born August 25, 1755, 
who was a member of Captain Parker's company in 1775, which 
served in the morning and in the afternoon of the memorable 19th of 
April, 1775, at Cambridge in May, and on the day of the battle of 
Bunker Hill in June. Joseph Reed's father was Thaddeus Reed, a 
Bay state man, born October 1, 1794. and who died at Lowell in 1837. 
Thaddeus Reed, Jr., was twice married, his first wife leaving him a 
son, Henry Stillman Reed, who was the founder of the Bank of Com- 
merce of St. Louis, now the National Bank of Commerce, and was a 
leading financier of the city. Catherine Dow became the second wife 
of Thaddeus Reed, and she died at Boston, Massachusetts, as Mrs. 
Ballard, her second husband having been a well-known journalist 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 689 

and publisher. Three children were born to Mr. Reed by his second 
marriage : Charles, who lost his life along with so many others during 
the fatalities so common to the trip overland to California during the 
early 'fifties; Joseph Ballard; and Miss Phoebe Ann, who died in 
Boston, Massachusetts, in 1911, and is buried in the old cemetery in 
Lexington. 

Joseph Ballard Reed was brought up in Lexington, Massachusetts, 
acquired a fair education, and learned the trade of machinist at Law- 
rence. During the early years of his majority he started West, mak- 
ing his first journey down into Maryland and stopping at Cumber- 
land, where he passed two years as superintendent of a machine 
shop. In 1856 he came on West to St. Louis, and soon became pro- 
prietor of the Laclede Foundry and Machine Shops, and subsequently 
associated himself with a Mr. Mann and engaged in business at the 
foot of Carr Street, on the levee. He built the first tug-boat ever used 
on the Mississippi river in 1861 in that shop, which experiment nearly 
worked a financial disaster with him. He sold it to Jo Gartside at a 
great sacrifice before its usefulness as a tender of heavy vessels be- 
came established, and eventually Mr. Gartside turned it over to the 
Government at a fancy price. This pioneer tugboat was eighty-five 
feet long, with fifteen-foot beam, had a depth of hold of six and one- 
half feet, and was propelled by a six-foot wheel. However, financial 
failure in building the first tug served as a boomerang for Mr. Reed, 
in that it established a demand from the United States for other tugs, 
and he was employed to build them. A small fleet of such craft was 
constructed during General Fremont's regime as commander-in-chicf 
of this department. At the suggestion of the Government, Mr. Reed 
established a branch factory at Cairo in 1863, for the specific purpose 
of doing the repair work on the Federal craft, and his plant turned 
out other work for private parties. Several boats were built at St. 
Louis for the Wiggins Ferry Company, two were built and launched 
for Jo Gartside, and two were also built for Captain Sam Brown, of 
Pittsburg, and were used in the Memphis and New Orleans harbors 
for towing coal barges. A mention of these few contracts serves 
to show that Reed & Mann were important factors in this line of in- 
dustry in the Mississippi Valley, and while engaged as a builder of 
vessels the firm also did an extensive business in mill and boat sup- 
plies, and in this way Mr. Reed drifted into the wholesale hardware 
business in 1868. 

As a citizen, Joseph B. Reed was absorbed in his business. His 
varied enterprises assumed such extensive proportions as to demand 
his personal supervision until the shadows of evening began to fall 
upon his life, and his wholesale house was not less important to the 
firm than the rest. His foundry extended its field to the manufacture 
of mill supplies and machinery for the equipment of machine shops, 
powerful lathes, drills, planes and punches, and the lathe manufac- 
tured there has superseded that of other firms wherever it has been 
tested. So interesting had this vast business become and so secure 
had its foundation been laid that it was with much regret that Mr. 
Reed laid down the reins with which he had driven it so long when 
the infirmities of age came upon him. 

Mr. Reed married Miss Helen Stickney, a daughter of Captain 
Stickney, a seaman of Beverly, Massachusetts, who was engaged in 
the domestic trade, and she still survives her husband. The children 
born to them are as follows : Joseph, who lives in Cairo ; Helen, who 
married a Mr. Knesche, of Wheeling, West Virginia; Frank Stickney, 



890 HISTOEY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

who succeeded his father as head of the Joseph B. Eeed enterprise; 
and Miss Alice. Mr. Reed, Sr., was a man of religious training and 
practice, was a member of the Presbyterian church, and was an elder 
of the congregation in Cairo for many years. 

Frank Stickney Reed was born in Cairo, Illinois, August 8, 1869. 
He was educated liberally in the public schools and was put to learn- 
ing the trade of machinist in his father's shop, worked as a journey- 
man for several years, and was eventually given a commission to rep- 
resent the firm as a traveling salesman, remaining on the road until 
1907, when he took the active management of the business. The 
wholesale house serves territory in the states of Illinois, Missouri and 
Arkansas, and keeps three men in the field as its contribution to the 
order of "Knights of the Grip." The capacity of the factories is 
sufficient for the employment of a small army of men, and the whole 
enterprise brings to Cairo a realization of its position .among the 
effective industries of the city. 

Frank S. Reed was married in Carlinville, Illinois, December 23, 
1890, to Miss Eva Battise, daughter of James Battise, and two chil- 
dren have been born to this union : Russell Stickney, a sophomore in 
the agricultural department of the Illinois University, with pomol- 
ogy as his specialty in view of taking up fruit culture in Washington ; 
and Frank Ballard, a schoolboy in the grades. In their political be- 
lief the Reeds are Republicans. Frank S. is a Knight of Pythias and 
belongs to the orders of Hoo-Hoos and Elks. 

JOHN G. HARDY. A prominent figure in connection with financial 
and other business activities of Southern Illinois and a citizen whose 
influence has been cast in support of progressive measures along both 
civic and material lines, John G. Hardy is known as one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Murphysboro, the judicial center of Jackson 
county, and has done much to foster its progress and prosperity. He 
is president of the City National Bank, one of the solid and popular 
financial institutions of this section of the state and one of which spe- 
cific mention is made on other pages of this work, so that further 
data concerning the same are not demanded in the present article. 

John G. Hardy was born in Vienna, Johnson county, Illinois, on 
the 16th of April, 1859, and is a son of William B. and Malinda (Wil- 
lis) Hardy, natives of Kentucky. William B. Hardy established his 
home in Johnson county, Illinois, in the pioneer days and became one 
of the prosperous farmers of this state, where he was known as a 
man of ability and sterling integrity and where he gained independ- 
ence and definite prosperity through his well directed efforts. Both 
he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in Jackson 
county, and passed to eternal rest secure in the high regard of all 
who knew them. Both were zealous members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. South, and in politics the father gave his support to the 
cause of the Democratic party. Of the four children two sons and one 
daughter are now living. 

He whose name initiates this review has been a resident of Jack- 
son county from his childhood days and here he was reared under the 
sturdy discipline of the farm, in whose work he early began to lend 
his aid. He was afforded the advantages of the public schools and 
the Southern Illinois Normal University, at Carbondale. He forth- 
with put his scholastic attainments to practical test and utilization and 
for four years was engaged in teaching in the district schools. He 
proved successful and popular as an exponent of the pedagogic pro- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 691 

fession, but soon sought other fields of endeavor. In 1884 he was 
appointed deputy county clerk of Jackson county, and he continued 
to be identified with this important department of the county govern- 
ment until 1892, when, upon the organization of the same, he assumed 
the position of cashier of the City National Bank, in the organizing 
of which, as successor of the Bank of Murphysboro, he had been in- 
strumental. In this position Mr. Hardy proved a most discriminating 
and able executive, and the estimate placed upon his services was 
shown by his election to. the office of president of the institution, on 
the 1st of May, 1899. As chief executive he has followed the same 
progressive and duly conservative policies which he had furthered dur- 
ing his services as cashier, and the upbuilding of the large and sub- 
stantial business of this bank has been in large measure due to his 
efforts. He is a thorough and careful business man and his personal 
popularity, which is of unequivocal order, has its basis in the inflexi- 
ble integrity of purpose manifested by him in all the relations of life 
and to his kindly and considerate attitude in his association with his 
fellow men. He is a man of broad views and well fortified opinions, 
is essentially loyal and public-spirited as a citizen, and takes a vital 
interest in all that touches the welfare of his home city and county. 

In addition to giving scrupulous attention to the affairs of the bank 
Mr. Hardy .has given his influence and capitalistic support to various 
other enterprises of important order. He is treasurer of the Mur- 
physboro Telephone Company and also of the Ohio and Mississippi 
Valley Telephone Company ; is secretary and treasurer of the Mur- 
physboro Electric Railway, Heat, Light & Power Company; and is a 
director of the Jackson County Building & Loan Association, besides 
which he is the owner of much valuable real estate in Jackson county. 
In politics Mr. Hardy accords staunch allegiance to the Democratic 
party, but he has not had ambition to enter the turbulent stream of 
so-called practical politics. Aside from his service in the office of 
county clerk his only active association with public office has been as 
a member of the Murphysboro board of education, of which he was 
a director for a long period and at one time president, his interest in 
educational affairs being of most earnest order. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, in their home 
city and are zealous in the various departments of its work. He has 
served for a number of years as a member of its official board and is 
still in tenure of this position. Mr. Hardy is affiliated with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, in which he is a member of the local lodge and chap- 
ter; is prominently identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he is a past grand and which he has represented 
in the Grand Lodge of the state, besides which he holds membership 
in the adjunct organization, the Daughters of Rebekah. In the time- 
honored Masonic fraternity he is identified also with the Order of 
the Eastern Star, and as a member of the Knights of Pythias he also 
holds membership in the woman's auxiliary of the same. 

On the 6th of January, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hardy to Miss Neal, who was born at Murphysboro. Illinois, and who 
is a daughter of the late Henry B. Neal, an honored resident of Mur- 
physboro at the time of his death. Concerning the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hardy the following brief record is entered in conclusion of 
this review: Ruth is the wife of Harry C. Wilson, of Jonesboro, 
Union county ; Nell remains at the parental home ; John G., Jr., is a stu- 
dent in High school; Carl N. and Robert H. are attending the public 
schools of their home city; and Mary E. and Esther both remain at 



692 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

home. The family is prominent and popular in connection with the 
social affairs of the community and the pleasant home is known for 
its gracious hospitality. 

HIRAM H. BURRIS. As a physician and surgeon of considerable and 
even unusual ability, Dr. Hiram H. Burris has achieved prominence in 
the state of Illinois. His fame is not alone confined to the town of 
Dongola where he has made his headquarters since 1898, but he has be- 
come widely known to the medical fraternity throughout the state. 

Born September 20, 1866, in Vienna, Illinois, he is the son of Dr. 
Thomas R. Burris and Malvina (Mulkey) Burris. The father was born 
and reared to manhood in Kentucky, and he was the son of Hiram 
Howard Burris. Dr. Thomas R. Burris practiced medicine in Vienna 
through the best years of his life. He was a veteran of the Civil war, 
having served as a commissary clerk under General McPherson, and 
he died in 1889, after a life of service devoted to his fellowmen. His 
wife, Malvina Mulkey, was a daughter of Dr. Mulkey, and she passed 
away in 1872. Dr. Burris contracted a second marriage, his second 
wife being Mary Scott, of Johnson county. Five children were born 
of his first marriage : Franklin J., Oscar E., Cleon G., Amanda M., 
deceased, and Hiram H. Of his second union, seven children were 
born. They were Stella N., Lucinda E., Thomas S., Mabel, and three 
others who are deceased. 

Hiram H. Burris received his early education in the common schools 
of Johnson county and in select schools of Vienna, under the tutelage 
of Professors Smith and Arnold. When he was seventeen years of age 
he began teaching, and he taught three terms in Illinois and Missouri. 
At the age of twenty he took up the study of medicine under his father, 
and in 1886 he attended the Chicago College of Medicine & Surgery, 
graduating therefrom in the spring of 1889. He was valedictorian of 
his class, and furthermore, received complimentary mention because of 
the fact that he passed his final examinations with the highest standings 
of any student of the college in twenty years. He immediately took up 
the practice of his profession in Vienna, where he conducted a success- 
ful practice for ten years. In 1899 he located in Dongola, and there 
he has found a wide field for his professional labors. His territory 
covers a radius of ten miles, and he has been called a distance of twenty- 
five miles. In 1909 he was appointed surgeon for the Illinois Central 
Railroad Company and elected to the chair of Railway and Emergency 
Surgery at the Chicago College of Medicine, now a part of the Federal 
University, Chicago, filling that position until September, 1911. Dur- 
ing the years of his connection with the Chicago College of Medicine he 
delivered sixteen lectures each term, going to and from his home in 
Dongola to Chicago. Dr. Burris is a member of the Illinois State and 
American Medical Associations, and the Illinois Central Association of 
Railroad Surgeons. In 1889 Dr. Burris was honored by being awarded 
an honorary diploma from the Physio-Medical Institute held in Chi- 
cago in that year. He is a member of the Odd Fellows of Dongola and 
of the Knights of Pythias of Ullin. He has served Dongola as a mem- 
ber of the school board for a number of years, and is deeply interested 
in all matters of an educational nature. His support may always be 
depended upon in any movement tending to improve the civic welfare in 
any way. He is a communicant of the Baptist church. 

Dr. Burris has been twice married. On December 4, 1889, he mar- 
ried Julia A. Bridges, daughter of John S. Bridges, a prominent citi- 
zen of Vienna and for years a justice of the peace. She died in July, 
1891, leaving two children, Nellie Lee and Hiram Ward. The former 




U 7 






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OF THE 

... ,..,.., 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 693 

is now the wife of John Goodman of Dongola, and they have two chil- 
dren: Julia Opal and Joseph Shelby. In 1902 Dr. Burris married 
Laura B. Quenneville of Dongola, a daughter of Louis Quenneville, and 
of French-Canadian descent. They are the parents of one child, Bea- 
trice L. 

NEWTON J. BENSON, M. D. Having by long practice and wide ex- 
perience gained knowledge and skill in his professional career, New- 
ton J. Benson, M. D., of Goreville, occupies a position of note among 
the more successful physicians of Johnson county, while as a druggist 
he has established a substantial business and is closely associated 
with the advancement of the mercantile interests of this part of the 
state. He was born March 6, 1848, in Gallatin county, Illinois, on the 
farm of his father, James M. Benson. 

His paternal grandfather, Charles R. Benson, was born in Virginia, 
a son of Babel Benson, who migrated with his family to Kentucky iu 
the early part of the nineteenth century. In 1821 Charles R. Benson 
came to Illinois, settling in Saugamon county when the country round 
about was in its virgin wilduess. On account of the prevalence of 
malaria and other sickness, he soon returned to Kentucky, and was a 
resident of Logan county until 1831. He then started for Sangamon 
county, Illinois, with his family, but stopped en route in Gallatin 
county, where he entered one hundred and sixty acres of land from 
the Government. Clearing a space in the midst of the deep, wild 
woods, he erected a log cabin, and there resided until his death, which 
was caused, in 1848, from exposure incurred while on a hunting ex- 
pedition. 

James M. Benson was born February 6, 1822, in Sangamon county, 
Illinois, near the present site of the city of Springfield. He spent a 
few years of his childhood in Logan county, Kentucky, afterwards 
living on the home farm in Gallatin county until 1851. Moving then 
to Bloomfield township, Jackson county, he purchased two hundred 
and forty-eight acres of wild land, and on the farm which he im- 
proved lived and labored many years, it being the estate now owned 
and occupied by James S. Benson. In September, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company K, Sixtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under command of 
Captain William C. Goddard and Colonel Toler, being commissioned 
first lieutenant of his company. On November 30, 1862, on account 
of serious illness, he was honorably discharged from the service. 
While in the army he took part in several skirmishes. He was at 
Island No. 10, in the Mississippi, from there going with his comrades 
to Pittsburg Landing, thence to Corinth, Mississippi, and from there 
marched to Tuscumbia, Alabama, thence to Nashville, Tennessee, 
traveling on foot all the \vay and there being discharged. In 1907, 
having by dint of industry and wise management accumulated a com- 
petency, he disposed of his farm, and having given each of his heirs 
five hundred dollars retained the remainder of his wealth and took 
up his residence in Goreville. 

On April 10, 1845, James M. Benson was united in marriage with 
Selinda Slack, a daughter of William and Mary (Finney) Slack, 
natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Virginia. She died April 17, 
1900. Four children were born of their union, namely: Newton J., 
the subject of this brief sketch ; Maggie A. : A. G. ; and James. Mag- 
gie A. became the wife of a Mr. Carson and to them two children 
were born, as follows: Mrs. Maud Whittenberg, who died in early 
womanhood, leaving one child, George W. Whittenberg; and Cora, 



694 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

who married a Mr. Nave, and at her death left one child Ellen Nave. 
A. G. Benson married and has seven children, namely: Mrs. Eva 
Kuykendall, who has two children; John, who is married and has two 
children ; Mrs. Mary Hudgens, who has one child, Earl Hudgens ; 
Arthur, the oldest son; Robert; and Charles and Frank, twins. James 
Benson is married and has two children, Eugene and Daniel. 

Growing to manhood on the parental homestead, Newton J. Ben- 
son began teaching school when eighteen years old, and five years 
later, with the money which he had saved from his scant earnings, he 
bought a farm of forty acres. From 1866 until 1874 he taught school, 
farmed and studied medicine. In 1873 he sold his land, and with the 
proceeds entered Rush Medical College, in Chicago, where he studied 
faithfully for eighteen months. In the spring of 1875 he was grad- 
uated from the University of Louisville, Kentucky, with the degree of 
M. D. Beginning the practice of his profession in Johnson county, 
Illinois, Dr. Benson was associated for three years with Dr. "W. A. 
Looney, of Vienna, and the ensuing three years was there in partner- 
ship with Dr. George Barton. For nearly a quarter of a century 
longer the Doctor continued his residence in Vienna, where he built 
up a good practice, and where, from 1896 until 1907 he was secretary 
of the County Pension Board. In 1907 he opened a drug store at 
Nashville, Illinois, and conducted it a year, when, in 1908, he came to 
Goreville, where he is carrying on a profitable business as a druggist 
and has a large practice as a physician. He has accumulated a fail- 
share of this world's wealth, owing a farm of twenty-five acres near 
Goreville, and having in addition valuable residential and business 
property. 

Dr. Benson is a member of the Southern Illinois, the Johnson 
County, the Illinois State, and the American Medical Societies. He 
is a man of good executive and professional ability, and from 1890 
until 1894 served as assistant superintendent of the Anna Hospital 
for the Insane. Fraternally he is a member of Vienna Lodge, No. 150, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, at Vienna ; and of Geth- 
semane Metropolis Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars, of Me- 
tropolis. Religiously he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

On April 22, 1879, Dr. Benson was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Emma F. (Beal) Cole, a daughter of Stephen and Eliza Beal. who 
migrated from Pennsylvania, their native state, to Southern Illinois 
in 1857 when she was a child of three years. Her first husband, L. 
"W. Cole, left her a widow with one child, Mrs. Margaret A. Keithley, 
whose husband is connected with the Wheeling Canning Company, at 
Wheeling, West Virginia. Mrs. Benson is an active and prominent 
worker in the Order of the Eastern Star, being a member of the Grand 
Chapter of Illinois, and having served as a delegate from Vienna to 
the State conferences. 

GEORGE T. HILEMAN. In these modern days of large combines, the 
fruit growers have found mutual protection and benefits in organiza- 
tion, and all over the country these associations have been formed, many 
of the dealers finding that by electing men of wide and varied experience 
to represent them in official positions they can get better results than 
if they depended upon their own individual efforts. The Anna Fruit 
Growers' Association, of Union county, Illinois, one of the strongest of 
these organizations in Southern Illinois, has been in existence for about 
twenty years, and its growth and development has been largely due to 
the strenuous and efficient labors of its able secretary and manager, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 695 

George T. Hileman. Mr. Hileman was born in Union county, Illinois, 
in 1861, a member of one of the oldest families of this section, his grand- 
parents, Christian and Nancy (Davis) Hileman, having come to Illinois 
from North Carolina as early as the year 1818. His father, Jacob Hile- 
man, was born in Union county in 1825, followed farming all of his 
life and died in June, 1909, and his mother, who bore the maiden name 
of Tina Sifford, was born here in 1827 and died in 1892. 

The early education of George T. Hileman was secured in the dis- 
trict schools in the vicinity of his father's farm, and he later spent two 
years in the Anna public schools. When still a youth he secured a 
teacher's license, and for seven years he was engaged in school teach- 
ing in the country schools, and while thus engaged received instruction 
at the Southern Illinois Normal University, at Carbondale, during the 
summer term of 1882. After he had given up teaching, Mr. Hileman 
accepted a position with a Chicago commission house to solicit fruit 
throughout this section, and continued to be associated with that con- 
cern from 1882 until 1892, in April of which latter year he became 
manager and treasurer of the Anna Fruit Growers' Association. This 
organization now has a membership of sixty, and Mr. Hileman has 
shipped as many as thirteen cars of berries in one day, and twenty-six 
cars of garden truck for the association, the average number of cars 
yearly being around the 500 mark. He has given of his best efforts 
in behalf of the interests of the society's members, and from a strug- 
gling, poorly-organized bunch of farmers it has grown to be a force to 
be recognized in its field. Mr. Hileman is possessed of much executive 
ability, and this added to his wide experience has made him one of the 
most able men in this line of endeavor. He is the owner of a tract of 
thirty-two acres, situated near the city of Anna, two acres being de- 
voted to pie plant, eight acres to asparagus, eight acres to apples and 
the remainder to truck. He has been successful in his farming opera- 
tions, having made a deep study into soil conditions and scientific 
methods. 

In 1888 Mr. Hileman was united in marriage with Miss Hattie 
Bynum, of Saline county, and they are well and favorably known in 
the work of the Presbyterian church. He is a Democrat in his political 
views, and has served Anna as city clerk for one term, but he has been 
too busily engaged in business activities to give much of his time to 
political work. He formerly was a member of the Odd Fellows, but 
has severed his connections with that society in recent years. 

BENJAMIN F. BEAYPIELD, M. D. For the past nineteen years Ben- 
jamin F. Brayfield, M. D., has been engaged in the practice of medicine 
and surgery at Christopher, Illinois, and during this time has firmly 
established himself in the confidence and esteem of the people of his 
community, and gained an enviable position in the ranks of his pro- 
fession. A close student, skilled practitioner and steady-handed sur- 
geon, his success in many cases of a complicated nature has stamped him 
as one of the ablest men of his calling in Franklin county, and on 
numerous occasions he has demonstrated his worth as a citizen. Dr. 
Brayfield was born May 16, 1861, in Franklin county, and is- a son of 
James M. and Olivia (Hammond) Brayfield. 

Walter Brayfield, the grandfather of Dr. Brayfield, was born in the 
state of West Virginia, from whence he moved to Tennessee, and after 
four or five years there came on to Illinois, and here died on a farm in 
1854. His son, James M. Brayfield, was born in Tennessee, and was 
taken to Jacksonville, Illinois, when he was nine years of age. His edu- 
cation was secured in the schools of Jefferson county, and he was reared 



696 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

to agricultural pursuits, successfully following that vocation through- 
out life. At the time of his death, in 1906, he had served as justice of 
the peace for thirty-four years, both in Franklin and Jefferson coun- 
ties, and was recognized as one of the leading and influential men of his 
community. When he first moved to Franklin county he was elected 
county commissioner, on the Democratic ticket, and later served for a 
number of years as county supervisor, and his work was recognized and 
appreciated by his party in Southern Illinois. Mr. Brayfield married 
Olivia Hammond, who was born in Kentucky, daughter of Samuel Ham- 
mond, who brought his family to Franklin county at an early date, be- 
came a successful farmer for his day, and died in 1852. Mrs. Brayfield 
died in 1877, having been the mother of five children, all of whom 
survive. 

After completing the course of study in the public schools Benjamin 
F. Brayfield attended Ewing College for three years with the intention 
of becoming a lawyer, and for a short time devoted himself to studying 
for that profession. Subsequently, however, he decided his talents could 
find a wider field for development in the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery, and in 1890 he was graduated from Washington University, St. 
Louis. Two years later he completed the course at the Kentucky School 
of Medicine, and after spending one year at Duquoin, Illinois, moved to 
Christopher, where he has since engaged in practice. Some years after 
coming here he took a post-graduate course in surgery. 

Dr. Brayfield was married in 1884, to Miss Irena Cochran, daughter 
of Henry Cochran, an early settler and successful farmer of Jefferson 
county, and she died in 1888, leaving one son, Theodore, who is a book- 
keeper with a large firm of Denver, Colorado. In 1892 Dr. Brayfield 
married Beulah Royal, daughter of the Rev. Joseph B. Royal, of the 
Christian church in northern Illinois, and she died in 1909, there hav- 
ing been two children born to this union: L. A. and Helen, both re- 
siding in Christopher. Mrs. Brayfield was a member of the Christian 
church. The Doctor is a prominent Mason, being for two years worship- 
ful master of Goode Lodge, No. 744, at Valier, and belongs also to the 
Knights of Pythias and the Odd Fellows, while his profession connects 
him with the American, State and County Medical Societies. Politically 
he is a Democrat, but the duties of his calling have occupied his time to 
such an extent that he has not found an opportunity to actively enter 
public life. 

JOHN BELL HUDGENS. An active and highly esteemed citizen of 
Goreville, Johnson county, John Bell Hudgens has been cashier of the 
First National Bank for five or more years, a position for which by 
reason of his financial ability and business acumen he is amply qualified. 
A son of the late Zachariah Hudgens, he was born April 26, 1861, near 
Marion, Williamson county, on the home farm, which occupied the 
present site of the town of Hudgens. 

Zachariah Hudgens was born in Tennessee, but was reared in South- 
ern Illinois. In 1855, with his father, John, he settled in Williamson 
county, where during the Civil war, he enlisted in Company E, One 
Hundred and Twenty-eighth Illinois Vohinteer Infantry, in which he 
served for a year, taking part in many important engagements. Re- 
turning home when discharged from the army, he continued to live on 
the farm and was a merchant until his death, in 1902, being then killed 
by a locomotive in Marion. He married Mary J. Cooksey, who was born 
in Tennessee, and died in Williamson county, Illinois, of typhoid fever, 
in 1888. Fourteen children were born of their union, as follows : John 
Bell, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned ; Robert L. ; Hiram A. ; 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 697 

Joshua ; Zachariah ; Herman ; Egbert ; Hugh ; Lee ; Arthur ; Emma Ran- 
dal, widow of Dr. Theodore Hudson, whose son, Dr. Zachariah Hudson, 
is the only surviving heir of the Hudson estate; Mary E., wife of E. 
Mclnturff ; Mrs. Nancy P. Nelson ; and Alice, wife of T. A. Bradley, of 
whom a brief personal account is given on another page of this work. 

Acquiring his early education in the district schools, John Bell 
Hudgens also obtained a thorough knowledge of the art and science of 
agriculture on the home farm, on which he remained, a valuable assist- 
ant, until twenty-four years of age. Locating then at Pulley Mills, he 
embarked in mercantile pursuits, and there, in 1893, in company with 
his father, purchased the flouring mill, and was prosperously engaged 
in milling and as a merchant for six years. Disposing of his mercantile 
business in 1899, Mr. Hudgens transferred his residence and his mill to 
Goreville, and devoted his energies to his milling operations until Decem- 
ber 31, 1906. Being elected cashier of the First National Bank of Gore- 
ville, he assumed the position in January, 1907, and is filling the office 
to the eminent satisfaction of all connected with the institution, and to 
its patrons. 

Mr. Hudgens has been twice married. He married first, in 1883, 
Anna S. L. Mclnturff, a daughter of Adam and Mary Mclnturff. She 
was called to the higher life, in 1893, but ten short years after her mar- 
riage, and at her death left three children, Earl, Guy and Mary Ruby. 
Mr. Hudgens married for his second wife, in 1895, Bertie Fly, daughter 
of Dr. J. J. Fly, of whom a brief sketch may also be found in this 
biographical volume, and into their pleasant home five children have 
been born, namely: Arba Fly, Val, Wilhelma J; Emma Maxcine and 
John Jackson. Fraternally Mr. Hudgens is a member of Fountain 
Lodge, No. 396, Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; of Goreville Lodge, 
No. 7936, Modern Woodmen of America, at Goreville, and also a member 
of Marion Lodge, No. 800, of the Order of Elks. 

JESSE J. FLY, M. D. Illustrating in his own life and works the 
power of energy and perseverance in accomplishing one's purpose, 
Jesse J. Fly, M. D., of Goreville, without adequate means at the start 
obtained a wide and thorough education, and for many years was one 
of the active physicians of Southern Illinois, and is still engaged in 
the practice of medicine to some extent, many of his old-time patrons 
still insisting upon his services. A son of Madison P. Fly, he was born 
in Wayne county, Illinois, November 7, 1846, of English stock. 

The Doctor's paternal grandfather, Jesse Fly, who fought under 
General Jackson at the battle of New Orleans during the war of 1812, 
was a son of John Fly, who, with two of his brothers, immigrated from 
England to the United States in early times and located in Tennessee. 
One of his brothers, who had previously served as a body guard in the 
army of King George the third, settled in one of the eastern states, while 
the other brother made a home in a western frontier town. The great- 
grandfather, John Slover, was a guide in the Crawford expedition. He 
was captured by that same band of Indians at the age of eight and kept 
with the tribe until he was twelve years old. He was again captured 
in the Crawford expedition, was staked out and was to be burned the 
next day, but escaped during the night, working himself loose where 
he was tied. This expedition occurred in 1782. 

Born in Davidson county, Tennessee, in 1824, Madison P. Fly was 
brought to Illinois by his parents in 1826, and grew to manhood on a 
farm in Wayne county. In 1848 he moved with his family to William- 
son county, and in 1854 there purchased a farm lying on the Jackson 
county boundary line, and was there employed in tilling the soil until 



698 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

his death. During the progress of the Civil war, he enlisted, in the 
spring of 1863, in Company E, Eighty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and served six months, when, on account of ill health, he was honorably 
discharged and returned to his farm. He married Sarah Asa, who sur- 
vived him ten years, passing away in 1900. Eight children were 
born of their union, as follows: Mary J., who died in infancy; Jesse 
J., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Elmira Kilken; Sarah, who died at 
the age of twenty-three years ; Mrs. Almarinda Bane, of Carbondale ; 
Mrs. Laura Miller; Mrs. Vinnie Hudgins; and James, who is engaged 
in farming at Marion. 

Spending his boyhood days on the home farm, Jesse J. Fly acquired 
a substantial education in the district schools. In the spring of 1864 he 
enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-fifth Regiment Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served one hundred days as per enlistment. He then 
returned home and at the age of nineteen years began his career as a 
teacher. Two years later, a young man without means, and with no 
other resources than those endowed him by nature, he took unto him- 
self a helpmeet, and during the ensuing five years he taught school 
winters and farmed during seed time and harvest. In the meantime 
he studied medicine, and in 1870 went to Cincinnati to further pursue 
his studies at the Miami Medical College. Beginning the practice of 
medicine in Williamson county, he continued there seven years, when, 
in 1878, he entered the Nashville Medical College, in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and was there graduated with the class of 1878. 

Returning home after receiving his diploma, Dr. Fly purchased a 
farm at Pulley Mills, Williamson county, and resumed his practice. 
Coming from there to Goreville in 1892, he has since won a good posi- 
tion among the successful physicians of this part of Johnson county, 
and is still engaged in the practice of his profession to some extent. 
The Doctor is a member of several medical organizations, including the 
Southern Illinois Medical Society ; the Illinois State Medical Society ; 
the Egyptian Medical Society; and the American Medical Association. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; to 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; to the Order of the 
Eastern Star; and to the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Dr. Fly married, in 1867, Emmaranda Mclntosh, a daughter of 
Elijah Mclntosh, one of the first men to serve as county clerk in Wil- 
liamson county, and his wife, Nancy (Bankston) Mclntosh. A large 
family of children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Fly, namely : Nettie ; 
Carrie, Martha Ann ; Bertha ; Ethel ; Myrtle and Willie, who died in 
infancy ; Eva, Ralph Emerson ; Afton ; and William, also who died in 
infancy. Dr. and Mrs. Fly have twelve grandchildren. Although not a 
theologist, the Doctor is a man of religious faith and belief, being an in- 
dividual and original thinker along the lines of thought expressed by 
Elbert Hubbard, and is a writer of philosophical treatises. He is 
not identified with any religious denomination, and professes no formu- 
lated creed, having faith in the Fatherhood of God, the Brotherhood of 
man, and, with his high regard for purity and mortality, is a believer 
in salvation by character. 

FRANK SEGEL SMITH, M. D. Among the able physicians of John- 
son county, Illinois, whose lives are devoted to the benevolent work of 
alleviating the sufferings of humanity, none stands more prominent than 
Frank Segel Smith, M. D., the pioneer physician and surgeon of the 
Cypress neighborhood, and a member of an old and honored Johnson 
county family which has been well known here for nearly a century. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 699 

Dr. Smith was born October 24, 1866, on a farm in West Vienna, Illi- 
nois, and is a son of Millington S. and Mary (Davis) Smith. 

William Smith, the grandfather of Dr. Smith, was born in Ten- 
nessee, and settled on a farm in Johnson county in 1820 or earlier. He 
reared a large family, and two of his sons, John E. and Barney S., 
served in the Union army during the Civil war. Millington S. Smith 
was born on the homestead farm in Johnson county in 1827, and was 
first married to Miss Mary Davis, who died in 1870, leaving four chil- 
dren, namely : Professor W. Y., graduate of the Southern Illinois Nor- 
mal University, and now a well-known educator of Delhi, Ohio; Mrs. 
Viola Brown, who died in 1900; Millington J., now residing in Texas; 
and Dr. Frank Segel. Millington S. Smith married for his second wife 
Rebecca J. Ring, and to this union there were also born four children, as 
follows: Charles H., a railroad engineer; Walter A., also a railroad en- 
gineer, running out of Carbondale, Illinois; Paul, who resides in 
Marion, Illinois; and Pearl, twin of Paul, who lives in Harrisburg. 

Frank Segal Smith received his preliminary educational training in 
the public schools in the vicinity of the home farm, later entering the 
Southern Illinois State Normal University, at Carbondale, from which 
he was graduated in the fall of 1884. At that time he began teaching, 
and continued to follow that profession in Illinois and Missouri for 
eight years, in the meantime pursuing his medical studies assiduously. 
In June, 1892, Dr. Smith entered the Kentucky School of Medicine, at 
Louisville, Kentucky, and after graduating therefrom with the degree 
of M. D. began the practice of his profession in the country three miles 
northwest of Cypress. In 1899 he went to Buncombe, Illinois, where 
he continued to practice until 1906, and in that year returned to 
Cypress, and now has a practice covering a five-mile radius. Possessed 
of a fine medical library, he is a close student, continually reading up 
in his profession, and since commencing practice has taken a number 
of medical journals and magazines, thus keeping thoroughly in pace with 
the times, and is well posted on all new discoveries and methods in 
medicine and surgery. Deeply sympathetic by nature, and possessed 
of the broadest gauge of humanity, Dr. Smith has surrounded himself 
with many sincere friends, by whom he is worthily esteemed and re- 
spected. He is examiner for eight insurance companies and surgeon 
for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, and belongs to the Amer- 
ican Railway Surgeons Association and the Johnson County Medical 
Society. Fraternally he belongs to the A. F. & A. M. ; the M. W. of A., 
of which he has served twice as state delegate and once as national 
delegate; and the Illinois .Brotherhood, of which he was a delegate to 
the national convention held at Denver, Colorado, in 1911. He comes 
of a deeply religious family, and is a consistent member of the Baptist 
church at Cypress. 

On October 10, 1889, Dr. Smith was united in marriage with Miss 
Arrah M. Shaddrick, daughter of Linnfield and Julia (Hawk) Shad- 
drick, the former of whom still survives, while the latter passed away in 
1880. Four children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Smith, of whom 
two survive : Mary Hazel, who is seventeen years old ; and Gladys Afton, 
fourteen years of age. 

Gus H. BRIDGES. One of the substantial business men of Vienna 
who has been prominently identified with the city's commercial interests 
for many years is Mr. Gus H. Bridges, who is connected with one of the 
leading financial institutions here, the Drovers State Bank, in the 
capacity of assistant cashier. 

Mr. Bridges is a member of the fourth generation of his family to 



700 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

have been residents of Johnson county, his great-grandfather having 
been one of the earliest pioneer settlers in this section, coming to South- 
ern Illinois from North Carolina. One of his sons, Alfred, who was 
born in North Carolina and was brought with the family to Illinois, 
was the grandfather of the present representative of the family, Gus 
H. Bridges. 

Gus H. Bridges was born July 14, 1859. in Vienna, the son of James 
J. and Elizabeth E. (Gibbs) Bridges. His father was born on a farm 
near Vienna in 1830 but after the death of the mother of the family, 
when James J. was an infant, removal was made to town and he subse- 
quently made his home with his uncle, Colonel Bridges. James 
worked in a Vienna store until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he 
enlisted in the army and entered service under arms for his country 
as second lieutenant of Company D, Thirty-first Regiment of Illinois 
Infantry. After several months campaign with that company Mr. 
Bridges returned home and organized Company I, One Hundred and 
Twentieth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and went into the 
field at the head of that company, serving as its commander. The 
company took active part in several important campaigns and battles, 
among them being the engagements at Port Donelson, Shiloh and Gun- 
town, Mississippi. Mr. Bridges later became a provost guard at Mem- 
phis and after long years of patriotic and honorable service was 
mustered out of the army in 1865. Upon returning home to take up 
the pursuits of peace he decided to engage in mercantile endeavors and 
continued to be so employed throughout the remainer of his life, his 
death occurring in 1880. 

On the maternal side of his family Gus H. Bridges comes of illus- 
trious pioneer stock. His mother, Elizabeth E. Gibbs, was born and 
reared in Southern Illinois, and was the daughter of Dr. Worthington 
J. Gibbs, the first practicing physician to locate at Vienna and one of the 
first in Southern Illinois. Dr. Gibbs was a native of Virginia and a 
graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Philadelphia. 
When migrating to Illinois he in company with several other families 
journeyed by way of the Ohio river on a flat boat from Wheeling, Vir- 
ginia, landing without mishap in due course of time at Metropolis, Illi- 
nois. After his marriage to Sebrina Renfraw'he located at Vienna, where 
he built a house on the site now occupied by the Vienna Public Library 
building. His practice extended over a wide territory and the neces- 
sities of the pioneer times compelled him to make many of his journeys 
on horseback over trails, penetrating the country as far distant as 
Jonesboro. He was a great figure in his day, well known and greatly 
beloved, and his death in 1858 removed from the field of action in this 
world one of the most interesting men of this section of the state. His 
family consisted of four children. Dr. J. A. Gibbs, now of Alexandria 
county ; W. J. Gibbs, deceased, who was prosecuting attorney of John- 
son county for many years; Mrs. Maria Benson; and Mrs. Bridges, the 
mother of our subject. 

Gus H. Bridges was an only child, and after completing his educa- 
tion in the public school of Vienna, at the age of seventeen years, he 
became a clerk in his father's store. Later he was given a partnership 
in the business and co-operated with his father in its conduct until the 
death of the latter in 1880. The son continued the business independ- 
ently for several years but subsequently disposed of the store in order 
to turn his attention to other matters. In 1897 he became connected 
with the Johnson County Bank, and two years later accepted the posi- 
tion of assistant cashier of the Drovers State Bank, the duties of which 
office he still discharges. In connection with his other activities he 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 701 

also transacts a large fire insurance business and has represented nine 
of the leading companies since 1904. 

This briefly covers a history of the commercial life of Mr. Bridges, 
embracing his private activities, but he has also been a public official of 
prominence during a considerable portion of the past years. For eight 
years he proved his just title to the reputation of a man of marked 
financial ability and unimpeachable personal integrity by acting as city 
treasurer of Vienna for eight years, and he has also filled the office of 
treasurer of Vienna township since 1901. He is a man of broad inter- 
ests and takes an active part in social and religious affairs of the com- 
munity. The Congregational church numbers him as among its most 
liberal and influential members. In fraternal circles he is held in high 
esteem, holding membership in the A. F. & A. M., belonging both to the 
Blue Lodge and the Chapter, and in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. In every department of life which holds his attention he 
manifests enthusiasm and to whatever he puts his mind and hand ap- 
plies intelligence and energy that compel success. He has a large circle 
of friends and acquaintances and is highly esteemed by all. 

. The marriage of Mr. Bridges and Miss Zora Wise, a daughter of 
John Wise, of Johnson county, occurred on October 20, 1880. Two 
children blessed this union, James J., who lives in Vienna, and Charles 
A., who is a tonsorial artist and also resides in this city. 

DANIEL, E. KELLY, a retired builder and contractor of Cairo, Illi- 
nois, is one of the many sons of Erin who have begun life with an ex- 
ceeding great handicap, but who, in spite of adverse circumstances that 
would have crushed and defeated less determined men, have advanced 
step by step in the activities of life until they have found themselves 
firmly established upon the topmost round of the ladder. 

Such a man is Daniel E. Kelly, and in the city of Cairo he is re- 
garded by all as a bright and shining example of the winning power 
of pluck, perseverance and diplomacy a combination hard indeed to 
beat wherever it is found, but which renders an Irishman well nigh in- 
vincible. 

Daniel Kelly was born in the village of Castletown, Bearhaven. 
county Cork, Ireland, May 11, 1835. His parents were in good circum- 
stances, and the death of his mother when he was a child of two years 
and the father passing away the following year left little Daniel in an 
orphaned state before he was old enough to realize the misfortune that 
had fallen to his lot. The father on his deathbed gave the child into 
the care and keeping of his maternal grandparents, who welcomed him 
gladly for his mother's sake. When they had done with life Daniel 
was passed on to the care of an uncle on his mother's side, with whom 
he remained until he reached the age of seventeen years. While with 
his uncle the lad had few enough advantages, their circumstances being 
such as to preclude any but the simplest privileges. He attended the 
parish school when he might and made himself generally useful about 
the family home at all times, until when he reached the age of seventeen 
years an uncle residing in New Haven, Connecticut, sent for the boy 
to come to him. Daniel was overjoyed at the prospect of getting away 
from the little seaport town where he had been mewed up for so long, 
as it seemed to him. and hailed with delight the idea of seeing America. 
He sailed from Liverpool on the steamer Jacoba Westervelt and was at 
sea from May llth to June 27th, a significant fact in view of the pres- 
ent day facilities for a speedy passage across the big pond and when 
he met his uncle in New York he had but a few stray shillings in his 
pocket, but such a store of good cheer and sturdy ambition in his gen- 



702 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

erous heart that life looked a very delightful thing indeed to him. His 
uncle, immediately recognizing the boy's lack of schooling, succeeded in 
keeping him in school for a year, when he found work in a woolen fac- 
tory. He worked there for a few months, until he had an opportunity 
to go with a carpenter as his apprentice. That idea appealed strongly 
to him, and he went to work with the carpenter, but before he had 
learned his trade the carpenter left the country, leaving Daniel upon 
his own resources. 

It was at this juncture that he left the home of his uncle, Cornelius 
'Sullivan, and went on a visit to another uncle in Easton, Pennsyl- 
vania, where his sister, Mrs. Patrick Moran, also resided. He found it 
pleasant to be with one of his own immediate family again, and he de- 
cided to seek whatever employment he might find there and remain in 
Easton, for a time at least. He found work assisting a mason in work 
on the bridge piers across the Delaware river. He went on to Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, in the spring of that year to pay a visit to an aunt 
there, and incidentally to see a bit more of the Eastern country. His 
stay there, however, was short, owing to the fact that labor conditions 
were unsettled and unfavorable at the time, and he moved on to Havre 
de Grace, Maryland, where he again worked at the carpenter's trade for 
two years, by which time he had grown to be considered a very efficient 
workman, and a most dependable one. It was about this time that ill- 
ness seized him, and he went back to Easton, Pennsylvania, where he 
might be with his sister again. His health and strength renewed after 
a few months, he decided to make a start for the "West, and he got as 
far as Steubenville, Ohio, where he followed his trade until the year 
1857. Prom there he went on to Chicago, reaching the city on March 
4th, the day of the inauguration of President James A. Buchanan. In 
1859 he went to Bloomington, where he worked at his trade until the 
year 1863, and it was then he first came to Cairo, Illinois, the city which 
has known him from then until the present day. His first permanent 
employment in Cairo was in the capacity of a mechanic in the employ 
of the United States Government at the ship yards, where he served 
under Captain Pinick, chief in command at the port, and under the su- 
pervision of the well remembered Romeo Priganza, who was in charge 
of the construction work going on in the yards. Although not an en- 
listed man, he took the oath of allegiance, and remained in the employ 
of the Government throughout the war of 61-65. After the close of the 
war he was honorably dismissed from the service, and it was then he 
took up the business of building on his own responsibility. His first 
work of importance was the building of the home of Sheriff Morgan, 
which place is now the residence of Hon. W. B. Warner. Among many 
fine examples of the craftsman's art are, notably, the Buder Building at 
Eighth and Washington streets, the two Oehler houses on Washington 
street, the Howe residence on Walnut street and the colored school 
building on Thirty-fourth street, and many others, all of which serve 
to closely identify Mr. Kelly with the successful builders of the early 
construction period of the city, and establish him as an able exponent 
of the master builders craft. 

Mr. Kelly continued his activities in his chosen work until his sons 
reached man's estate, when they, with their father's help, successfully 
launched and conducted a planing mill business in Cairo. The Senior 
Kelly then retired from the contracting business, in which he had real- 
ized such splendid success, and entered the planing mill as superintend- 
ent of the factory and general adviser to his sons. There he remained 
until the advancing years made it necessary for him to suspend his ac- 
tivities, in part at least, and since his retirement he has lived quietly 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 703 

among his children, giving a part of his time to the conducting of his 
personal affairs, and enjoying a season of well earned rest. 

In the year 1862 Mr. Kelly married Miss Helen Kennedy, of Gales- 
burg, Illinois. She was a native of county Tipperary, Ireland, and in 
every way calculated to be a proper helpmeet for the husband of her 
choice. In 1906 Mrs. Kelly departed this life at the family home in 
Cairo. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were the happy parents of four children: 
Edward, Daniel M., Mortimer F. and F. B., the three oldest sons com- 
prising the firm of Kelly Brothers Company of Cairo, and F. B. is now 
'a resident of Louisiana, engaged in the lumber business. 

Mr. Kelly is a staunch Republican and a protectionist always. In 
his capacity of a member of the city council of Cairo for years he served 
the city with enthusiasm and intelligence. Many of the improved con- 
ditions of the city may be traced directly to the untiring labors of 
Daniel E. Kelly while he served on the Board of Aldermen, and his am- 
bition to see Cairo one of the most modern cities in Southern Illinois 
has resulted in greater benefit to that city than any other one influence 
that might be named. His civic pride is one of his strongest inherent 
traits, and which, coupled with his willingness to serve, his generosity 
and marked executive ability, have combined to make him a factor in 
the upbuilding of the city of his adoption that cannot possibly be over- 
estimated. 

Although fast approaching the four score mark, Mr. Kelly still pre- 
sents the aspect of a man of middle age. A man of splendid bearing, 
hale and hearty, the spark of youth still flashing in his typical Irish eye, 
Mr. Kelly is a splendid example of the upright, honorable and alto- 
gether successful man of business. 

CHARLES E. INGRAHAM. In the early growth of a young city the de- 
velopment of its civic life useually rests with a small coterie of far sighted 
men, who are willing to sacrifice personal advantage for the sake of the 
good of their city. To such a group belongs Charles E. Ingraham. Al- 
ways standing for progress and the betterment of social conditions, he 
first had an opportunity to set forth his principles in the general field 
as editor of a newspaper, later in the political field as mayor of his city 
and lastly in the industrial field as manager of the Interurban Electric 
Company. Many of the mile stones of progress were set by this enter- 
prising man during his twelve years of citizenship in Herrin, and his 
influence is now always strongly felt in any forward movement. 

Mr. Ingraham has been reared from infancy in Illinois, but this 
state may not claim him save as an adopted son, since he was born in 
Parke county, Indiana. Soon after his birth, on the 3rd of January, 
1865, his father, Henry R. Ingraham, moved to Tuscola, Illinois, where 
he soon became an influential citizen. Mr. Ingraham was a native of 
the state in which his son was born, his father, Andrew W. Ingraham, 
having left the friendly fields of his birthplace in the "Old Dominion" 
to settle in Tippecanoe county when the land was young and the life 
that of a pioneer. A. W. Ingraham was a farmer who dug stumps, split 
rails and fought both the Indians and disease that ravaged the uncleared 
country. His mother was a member of the well known Warwick family, 
and his wife was Martha Rerick. He died in Vermilion county, In- 
diana, many years before the civil war which was to bring much suffer- 
ing to the two sons whom he left. 

Of these two, Washington Ingraham was a captain in one of the 
Illinois regiments during the war, and he was killed in action during 
the Atlanta campaign. The other son, father of the present head of the 
family, enlisted in Parke county, Indiana, and was honored by the first 



704 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

lieutenancy of his company. His regiment became a part of the famous 
corps of ' ' Pap Thomas ' ' and saw much hard service in the Army of the 
Cumberland. Unfortunately the whole regiment was captured by the 
Confederates and Lieutenant Ingraham, with the rest of his command, 
was sent to "Old Libby" at Richmond. Here, weakened by the disease 
and hunger that the Confederates, at the end of their resources, had no 
way to alleviate, he patiently endured the rigidity of the strict military 
discipline and the foulness of his surroundings. Before succumbing 
to the fate of so many of his fellow prisoners he was exchanged and 
again joined the ranks of the Blue, serving till the end of the war. 
Soon after its termination he moved to Illinois, becoming a neighbor of 
that interesting study in political psychology, Joe Cannon, who then 
lived at Tuscola. As a veteran who had made a brave record during the 
war and as a sturdy supporter of the Republican party, his popularity 
was soon universal, as was shown by his election, with scarcely no oppo- 
sition, to the office of county treasurer. The upright honesty with which 
for years he fulfilled the duties of this office caused the greatest satisfac- 
tion to be expressed by his fellow citizens when, upon the election of 
Mr. Cannon to Congress, he appointed his old neighbor postmaster of 
Tuscola, a post filled by him for a number of years. 

About the beginning of the Civil war, Henry R. Ingraham married 
Emily Isham, and they became the parents of five children : "William, 
of Clifford, Williamson county, Indiana ; Andrew W., of Indianapolis, 
Indiana; Charles E., of Herrin, Illinois; Laura, the wife of Prank 
Wheaton, of Seattle, Washington. The father died at the age of fifty- 
six, and the mother still resides in Tuscola, Illinois. 

The education of Charles E. Ingraham was received in the public 
schools of his home town of Tuscola, and when he started out in life for 
himself he turned to the soil for a living, his farm being near his old 
home. At the age of twenty, on the 19th of November. 1883, he was 
married in Tuscola to May Armstrong, the daughter of John W. Arm- 
strong. Six years later he moved to Southern Illinois, locating in Ma- 
kanda, where he engaged in the mercantile business. Seeing a chance 
for launching his real ambition and for the expression of those princi- 
ples through which he was later to become a force for good, Mr. Ingra- 
ham gave up his mercantile business and entered journalism in a modest 
way, establishing the Makanda News. With the birth of the new town 
of Herrin he decided to transfer his interests to that town and moved 
his paper and office, establishing the first paper of the town. The name 
of the paper remained The News but the name of Herrin took the place 
of Makanda. With the paper as a medium no opportunity was lost to 
advertise the merits of Herrin, so that with the growth of the town 
came the prosperity of the paper. In 1900 Mr. Ingraham, feeling that 
in spite of the population of the town consisting of only a thousand peo- 
ple the building of a light plant was not only feasible but would add 
greatly to the advantages of the town, joined the movement in a finan- 
cial way and gave his time to carrying the work through to its success- 
ful consummation in 1900. The paper which he had conducted as an 
independent weekly he sold to its present owner, Mr. Trovilian, and 
since the sale has devoted himself to the management of the electric 
business. 

While the absorbing interests and problems of a fast growing town 
held the attention of Mr. Ingraham. he clung to his father's politics and 
fought many battles under the standard of Republicanism, becoming 
known as a daring leader of that party in Williamson county. With 
greater leisure to study economic conditions and a closer contact, 
through his industrial work, with the men who work with their hands, 



..,.-.. 

OF IHE 
H3SVERSITY OF 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 705 

he espoused the cause of Socialism and is now as eager for the success 
of its policies as he once was for that of Republicanism. His altruistic 
tendencies were early shown during the formative period of Herrin, 
when he urged radical measures along the line of public improvements, 
especially in matters of education. He insisted upon a county high 
school and upon the building of modern school houses with well 
equipped laboratories and gymnasiums. But he was in advance of 
his time and it was not until Herrin was incorporated that he was able 
to make his voice heard. As the first mayor of the new town, he started 
at once on his campaign for better facilities for education and for other 
much needed aids toward the health and comfort of the public. The 
battle was not won at once, .but by slow degrees first his co-workers and 
then the citizens of the community saw the wisdom of his ideas, and 
now some of the things he desired have become a fact. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Ingraham are: Nellie, the wife of 
Allen Kilbreth, of Clifford, Williamson county; Nettie, now Mrs. John 
Kemp, of Herrin ; Edna, who is Mrs. Thomas Bowie, of Centralia, Illi- 
nois ; and Emily, the wife of Adolphus Bradshaw, of Herrin. Two chil- 
dren, William and Ruth, remain at home. 

A busy and successful business career, a happy family life, the 
respect of his acquaintances, the affection of his friends, what more 
could a man ask, but Mr. Ingraham, carrying the principles of the 
brotherhood of man in his heart, is still pressing forward in his search 
for more chances to help his fellow men. Truly the town is fortunate 
that counts him her citizen. 



REAL ESTATE pENppQ ROBERT EAGLE RENFRO. The rapid progress 

REAL ESTATE LOANS an( ^ development of Southern Illinois has 

AND INSURANCE made the real estate trade active and extensive 

CARBONDALE ILL ^ or many years, given the loan business great 

opportunities and kept the fire insurance com- 

panies in very active and profitable operation. These conditions have 
also furnished many men with business and employment, and been, as 
they always are, of great benefit and service to the region in which 
they have obtained. 

One of the most energetic, enterprising and successful men engaged 
in the triple business specified, in Carbondale is Robert E. Renfro, who 
has been occupied in these lines of endeavor since 1893, and in the 
course of his activity in them has been of great service in stimulating 
the growth and development of all Southern Illinois, throughout which 
his operations have been conducted in a manner very creditable and 
profitable to him and satisfactory to all with whom he has had dealings. 
Mr. Renfro was born in Elizabethtown, Hardin county, Illinois, on 
May 25, 1873, and is a son of the late John H. B. and Emeretta Leona 
(McClellan) Renfro, prominent citizens of that county, the story of 
whose lives is briefly told in this work. The father, as will be seen by 
reference to the sketch of him, was treasurer of Hardin county four 
years and county clerk there seventeen years. He was afterwards a law- 
yer and pension attorney until his death, in October, 1908. 

His son Robert E. began his education in the public schools and com- 
plete it at the Southern Illinois Normal university, from which he was 
graduated in 1893. After his graduation he began his career in busi- 
ness in the department of real estate, loans and fire insurance. He has 
found the business so congenial, and has made it so profitable, that he 
has continued his connection with it and steadily enlarged his opera- 
tions ever since. As has been stated, his dealings now extend all over 
Southern Illinois, and often involve transactions of considerable magni- 



706 . HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tude. He is regarded as master of his line of endeavor, and no one 
questions the excellence or accuracy of his judgment in reference to the 
value of real estate or the future possibilities of any tract under im- 
provement. 

The public affairs of his city have also deeply interested Mr. Ren- 
fro, and made him an advocate of the highest moral tone attainable in 
the government of the city. On a recent occasion he was the candi- 
date of the anti-saloon party for mayor, but the hour was not ripe for 
the conditions he and that party advocated, and he was defeated at the 
election. This did not dampen his ardor for good government, however, 
and he has ever since kept up his demand for it and for every other 
form of improvement. 

The nature of his business makes him energetic and effective in pro- 
moting the extension and growth of the city and the development and 
betterment of every locality in which he operates. But this only quick- 
ens and intensifies a disposition that exists in his very character and 
make-up as a man and citizen. For he is in all things essentially and 
practically progressive by nature. In fraternal relations he has active 
membership in two of the benevolent societies so numerous among men, 
the Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. In political matters he 
is an unwavering Republican in national contests, but has never been 
desirous of a political office except the local one mentioned above, and 
this his friends induced him to seek for the good of the city. His re- 
ligious connection is with the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work 
of which he is very active and energetic, being a member of the of- 
ficial board of the congregation which has the benefit of his serviceable 
membership. 

On Sept. 4, 1895, Mr. Renfro was joined in marriage with Miss 
Beulah Witt Storm, a daughter of Oliver P. and Emma H. (Haley) 
Storm, of Jonesboro, Illinois, where her father was a merchant at the 
time of his death, in 1888, and for many years prior to that. She and 
her husband have two children, their sons Donald McClelland and 
Robert Kennon, who are still bright links that bind the whole family 
into one of the most agreeable family circles in the city of their home, 
and help to make the household one of its most attractive and popular 
social resorts. 

JOHN H. B. RENFRO. A native of southern Tennessee, not far from 
the border line of Alabama, but becoming a resident of Illinois at an 
early age, years before the dense cloud of the Civil war shrouded our 
country in gloom, the late John H. B. Renfro, of Carbondale, where his 
life ended on the 26th of October, 1908, grew to manhood in an atmos- 
phere very different in its political character from that in which he was 
born. And when the destructive besom of sectional strife swept the 
land, leaving a trail of blood and ruin in its wake, he joined the forces 
gathered to save the Union from dismemberment, and fought valiantly 
for the flag under which his life began. In his military service he 
manfully exemplified the valor and resourcefulness of the citizen sol- 
diery of Illinois on one .side of the momentous conflict, as he would 
probably have exemplified the same qualities in the military spirit of his 
native state on the other if he had remained in the locality of his 
birth and been reared under the influence of its political teachings. 

Mr. Renfro came into being on January 2, 1842, in Lincoln county, 
Tennessee, and in his boyhood he came to Hardin county, Illinois, where 
he became established as a farm hand and later took up a tract of wild 
land which he transformed into a well improved and productive farm. 
His parents joined him here. He had obtained what education he was 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 707 

able to secure in the public schools. During his boyhood he had wit- 
nessed several public auctions of slaves, which he never thought right, 
and at the beginning of the war he enlisted in the Federal army, in 
Company C, Forty-eighth Volunteer Infantry, of which he was third 
sergeant. He took part in the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson 
and the sanguinary battle of Shiloh. In the last named engagement he 
was wounded in the right lung and disabled for further service for a 
time, but after recovering his health he rejoined his regiment. He re- 
mained with it until August 27, 1864, when he fell from a wagon and 
broke one of his arms. This accident occurred in the neighborhood of 
Jonesboro, Georgia, and from there he returned to his Illinois home. 
His brother Phenix, who was a boy at home, while hunting got blood on 
his clothes, and being suspicioned of the ambushing and killing of two 
northern soldiers was sentenced to be shot. The crime, however, was 
committed by a neighbor, who came to Phenix Renfro and told him of 
the circumstances and asked him to get his brother, who was a northern 
soldier, to save him, but if he could not that he, himself, would come 
forward in time to save him. Our subject, however, saved his brother. 
J. H. B. Renfro was discharged from the service on March 25, 1865, and 
resumed his residence in Elizabethtown, Hardin county, this state. In 
the fall of the same year he was elected treasurer of the county, and was 
reelected in 1867. In 1869 he was elected county clerk, and this office 
he filled with great acceptability to the people of the county for a con- 
tinuous period of seventeen years. 

Mr. Renfro was first married on May 4, 1870, to Miss Emeretta 
Leone McClellan. They had two children, their sons Robert E. and C. 
Duncan Miller Renfro, both of whom are residents of Carbondale. 
Their mother died on November 9, 1892, and on April 29, 1894, the 
father contracted a second marriage, uniting himself with Miss Fannie 
J. Holden, of Carbondale, he having become a resident of this city in 
1888. They became the parents of five children, four of whom are 
living. They are: Harvey L., Anna Lois, Laura Jeannette. and Mar- 
garet Josephine. A son, named Samuel B., died a number of years ago. 

During his residence in Carbondale the father served two years as 
township clerk, two years as city attorney and four years as police mag- 
istrate and won general approval by the manner in which he discharged 
the duties of each of these positions. In fraternal life he was a Free- 
mason for a long time, and also belonged to the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. In the latter organization he was a past commander of John 
W. Lawrence Post, No. 297. Throughout his long service in public life, 
in the army and in civil offices he never shirked a duty or gave one 
slight attention. His citizenship was valued wherever he was known, 
and was worthy of the regard it won. 

THOMAS L. CHERRY. This enterprising business man, wide-awake 
promoter and universally esteemed citizen of Carbondale has resided 
in Southern Illinois twelve years, and in the city of his home at this 
date since 1901, having located here in December of that year to take 
a position in the employ of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 
He has impressed the people favorably from his advent in the city, for 
he has sterling qualities as a business man and as a citizen that wear 
and grow in value as the community becomes more familiar with them. 

Mr. Cherry is a native of Kentucky, born in Bowling Green, War- 
ren county, of that state, on April 19, 1876. His parents are R. H. 
and Elizabeth (Reeves) Cherry, still residents of Kentucky. They 
are fine representatives of its sturdy and elevated citizenship and ex- 



708 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

emplify in all the relations of life the best traits and characteristics 
of upright and estimable American manhood and womanhood. 

The father was a school teacher in the years of his late youth and 
early manhood, and for fifteen or twenty more was engaged in rail- 
road construction work. 

The son was educated in the public schools and at McKendreo 
College in Lebanon, Illinois, which he attended in 1895 and 1896. 
Subsequently he pursued a course of special training at the Bowling 
Green Business College of the Cherry Brothers in Bowling Green, 
Kentucky, his native town. 

In July, 1896, Mr. Cherry formed a partnership with C. E. Hamil- 
ton, under the firm name of Hamilton & Cherry, for the purpose of 
conducting a real estate and insurance business, and a little later 
the firm added an abstracting business, organized to cover the whole 
county of Jackson. The real estate and insurance partnership lasted 
until January, 1910, when Mr. Cherry bought Mr. Hamilton's interest 
in it, and has since carried it on alone. He also still owns a one-half 
interest in the abstract business. This is conducted by the Twin City 
Abstract Company, and he is the president and manager of the com- 
pany. 

The public affairs of his city and county have always deeply inter- 
ested Mr. Cherry and he has given them close, careful and helpful at- 
tention. He has served as alderman of Carbondale, and in many other 
ways has shown his abiding devotion to the welfare of the commu- 
nity. His public spirit impels him to earnest activity in behalf of 
every worthy enterprise for its betterment, and he is always counted 
on to be one of the most forceful agencies in promoting and bringing 
to a satisfactory conclusion any project that will add to the conven- 
iences and comfort of its population. 

On March 2, 1902, he' was married to Miss Alice S. Vanden, a 
daughter of Joseph and Minnie Vanden, prominent residents of St. 
Louis, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Cherry have four children, their sons 
Richard Vanden, George Thomas and Luther Allen, and their daugh- 
ter Alice Sarah. 

Of the fraternal societies so numerous among men, and which 
they find so helpful in their beneficial and so enjoyable in their social 
features, Mr. Cherry has joined but two, the Freemasons and the 
Knights of Pythias. His religious connection is with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and in the congregation which has the benefit of 
his membership he is assistant superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
All the work of the church enlists his interest and has his active and 
effective aid. 

WILLIAM HENRY JOHNSTON. Although a resident of Johnson county 
for only two years, William Henry Johnston, of Bloomfield township, 
has spent his whole life in Southern Illinois, and has won recognition 
among the agriculturists here as a man who has brought the vocation 
of farming to a science. Years of experience have convinced him 
that scientific methods bring the best results, and the success that 
has attended his efforts is evidence of the justification of his belief. 
Mr. Johnston was born on a farm in Phillips township, White county, 
Illinois, December 7, 1851, and is a son of David and Matilda J. 
(Whiting) Johnston. 

James Johnston, the grandfather of William Henry, was born in 
Ireland, and immigrated to the United States as a young man, set- 
tling first in Pennsylvania, where he was an overland teamster from 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 709 

Pittsburg to Philadelphia for some years. In 1820, or thereabouts he 
became a pioneer settler of White county, and the rest of his life 
was spent in agricultural pursuits. David Johnston was born in 
White county in 1827, and was there married to Matilda J. Whiting, 
a native of Posey county, Indiana. They had nine children, four of 
whom are living: David W., John E., Mrs. Ada M. Wilson and Wil- 
liam Henry. Mr. and Mrs. David Johnston settled down in White 
county to carry on farming. When the Civil war broke out he en- 
listed in Company K, Eighty-seventh Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, but after one year of faithful service contracted chronic 
rheumatism and was discharged on account of disability. He re- 
turned to his farm and after recovering to some extent again took up 
the peaceful vocation of tilling the soil, continuing as a farmer until 
his death, which occurred December 14, 1886. 

William Henry Johnston was educated in the common schools of 
White county, and until he was twenty-seven years of age resided on 
the old homestead. At that time he was married, and subsequently 
purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, which he success- 
fully operated until April 10, 1909. He then moved to his present 
property in Bloomfield township, which comprises one hundred and 
twenty acres of excellent soil, and here he has carried on general 
farming. Mr. Johnston has always believed in crop rotation, and 
wherever he has been located has made a careful study of soil and 
climatic conditions. The operation of the latest power farm machin- 
ery and the hundred and one things that go to make scientific farming, 
and without which no agriculturist can attain his full measure of 
success, have always claimed his careful attention, and he keeps 
himself abreast of the new discoveries and inventions by subscription 
to the leading farm journals. His life has been a busy one, but he 
has found leisure to have his share of enjoyment, and is a popular 
member of the Tribe of Ben Hur, the Mystic Workers of the World 
and the Odd Fellows at Crossville. 

On April 24, 1879, Mr. Johnston was married to Mrs. Mary J. 
(Solomon) Mallett, who had one child by a former marriage, Mrs. 
Mary Cordelia Ramsey. Five children were born to this union : 
Chester Francis, who died in infancy ; and Lillie Myrtle, John Henry, 
Ida Belle and Sarah Jane. Lillie Myrtle married, January 1, 1908, 
Clyde R. Crowder, of Johnson county, and has two children : Flora, 
born October 15, 1908 ; and Bernice. born November 10, 1910. John 
H. was married August 5, 1908, to Miss Bertha Wall, of White county, 
and now resides in Johnson county. 

Mr. Johnston comes of good old Southern Illinois pioneer stock, 
and is a worthy representative of a family that has been identified 
with this section of the state for so many years. He has always 
proven himself a public-spirited citizen, and is at all times ready to 
lend his assistance to movements which he calculates will be of benefit 
to his community. His fellow-townsmen recognize his ability as an 
agriculturist, and his upright principles have surrounded him with a 
number of warm, personal friends. 

EDWARD E. WOODSIDE, M. D. The records of Southern Illinois show 
that the physicians of that locality are fully abreast of modern scien- 
tific progress and discovery and that the men belonging to this most 
important of all the learned professions rank with the foremost in the 
land. Edward E. Woodside, M. D.. who is well and favorably known 
throughout this part of the state, located in Johnston City for the 

Vol II 1 



710 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

practice of medicine upon the completion of his professional work 
in College. He is not a new man to Williamson county, for he was 
born near Creal Springs, February 4, 1876, and took his literary work 
in the schools of that town. His father, the Rev. William Wesley 
Woodside, is a merchant in Marion and also engaged in the work of 
the ministry of the Missionary Baptist church as supply pastor, but 
for a number of years was a minister with a regular charge. 

Rev. William Wesley Woodside was born in Johnson county, Illi- 
nois, in 1851, was a farmer's son, and was educated in the common 
schools. His father, Joseph P. Woodside, established the family 
name in Illinois, and was himself born in Tennessee, where his father, 
Peter Woodside, was a settler from Ireland. Joseph P. Woodside 
came to Illinois during the 'forties, and passed his life as a farmer 
in Johnson county. He married Dicy Snyder, who has attained the 
advanced age of ninety years, and is still living at Marion, Illinois. 
The children of this union were the Rev. William W. and Mrs. L. P. 
Yandell, of Marion. William Wesley Woodside engaged in profes- 
sional pursuits when a young man. He studied law at West Plains, 
Missouri, and was admitted to the bar there, but subsequently gave 
up the profession and returned to Illinois, where he engaged in public 
school work as a teacher of the district schools. When about thirty- 
five years of age he was converted, and soon thereafter he entered 
the ministry, carrying on religious work in this section of the state 
for a number of years, as above stated. In years gone by he was 
known as a factor in Democratic politics, having been chosen as a 
candidate for county office on several occasions. Rev. Woodside mar- 
ried Anna Kimmel, a daughter of Joseph Kimmel, a native of Ger- 
many and a tiller of the soil. The children born to this union were 
as follows : Dr. Edward E. ; Mrs. John Brooks, of White Ash, Illinois ; 
D. E., of Marion ; Elsie, who married Charles Jenkins, of Marion ; 
Mrs. Ray Chamness, of White Ash ; Mrs. Erne Moss, of Marion ; and 
Ray Ben and Don, still residing at the parental home. 

In preparation for a professional career Dr. Woodside attended 
the State University of Missouri, where he did much of the scientific 
work necessary for a medical course, and then entered Rush -Med- 
ical College, from which he was graduated in 1905. He came to 
Johnston City and entered at once upon his work as a physician, but 
has returned almost annually for professional work of a post-grad- 
uate nature in Chicago institutions. He is a member of the County 
Medical Society, of the Southern Illinois Medical Association, of the 
Illinois State Association and of the American Medical Association. 
As a citizen of Johnston City Dr. Woodside has done service as a 
member of the council, and acted in that capacity when the move- 
ment for extensive sidewalk improvement took form. His politics 
are those of the Democratic party, and he is at present president of 
the board of education. 

On September 16, 1901, Dr. Woodside was married in Columbia, 
Missouri, to Miss Anna Cummings, daughter of Jerry Cummings, 
who was once well known in Metropolis, Illinois. Fraternally Dr. 
Woodside is a Master Mason, and is also connected with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Elks, the Owls and the Tribe of Ben Hur. He is a 
Missionary Baptist in belief and practice. Alert of mind, capable in 
every respect, possessing the entire confidence of his patients and 
exercising a large degree of influence in public movements in his local- 
ity. Dr. Woodside is a forceful figure in the affairs of Johnston City, 
and is respected not only in his profession but by all with whom he 
has been associated in anv way. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 711 

LAWRENCE G. NEWTON, who belongs to the younger generation of 
business men of Southern Illinois, is proprietor of the Newton Jew- 
elry Company, of Vienna, a firm established twenty-eight years ago, 
which is widely and favorably known to the jewelry trade throughout 
this part of the country. Although still a young man, Mr. Newton 
has mastered every detail of the business with which he is connected, 
being an expert watchmaker, optician and engraver, and as a shrewd 
business man has won a place for himself among the leading men of 
this city. He was born in Vienna, December 24, 1889, and is a son 
of William N. and Anna (Harvick) Newton, and a grandson of James 
K. Newton. 

James K. Newton was born in Pope county. Illinois, October 25, 
1845, a son of Isaac and Phoebe (Murphy) Newton, natives of Rhea 
county, Tennessee, a grandson of Joseph Newton, of North Carolina, 
and great-grandson of John Newton, who, with his brother Isaac, 
came from England about the year 1700 settling in North Carolina, 
where they became large land holders and slave owners. When six- 
teen years of age Joseph Newton went into the American army as a 
substitute, fighting in the battle of the Cowpens and in the march of 
the Bloody Trail, his service during the Revolutionary war covering 
three months, although he belonged to the patriot army six years and 
nine months. He married Ann Stephens, of North Carolina, reared 
a large family, and died in Johnson county, Illinois, in 1842, at the 
age of eighty years, his wife passing away in 1847. James K. Newton 
was reared on a farm in Pope county, Illinois, and at the age of 
twenty years was married to Melissa C. Allmond, who died, leaving 
one son, William N. He was married (second) to Julietta Pulkersou, 
and they had two sons : Thomas J. and Miles G. Mrs. Newton died 
May 25, 1883. 

William N. Newton was born in Pope county, and as a young man 
established the present firm of the Newton Jewelry Company, of 
Vienna, with which he was connected until 1909, in that year remov- 
ing to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on account of failing health, and 
there established himself in the jewelry business, and he has since 
prospered and accumulated quite an estate. He married Miss Anna 
Harvick, and they have had two children : Lawrence G. and Eugene, 
the latter a photographer of Vienna. 

Lawrence G. Newton was educated in the Vienna public and high 
schools, and began learning the watchmaking and jeweler's trade in 
boyhood, since which time he has continually advanced himself in 
his chosen work. His establishment, in the conducting of which he 
succeeded his father in 1909, will compare favorably with any of the 
concerns in the large cities, being fitted with every known appliance 
and equipment of the trade, and having a large, varied and up-to-date 
stock. The engraving department is one of the principal features of 
this store, Mr. Newton himself being an expert engraver by hand, 
and a graduate of the Horological Institute of Chicago. He makes a 
specialty of optical and technical work, being a graduate of the 
Chicago Engraving School and the Detroit School of Optics, com- 
monly known as the Detroit Optical College. The business is system- 
atized to an exactness rarely excelled, and quality predominates in 
the twelve thousand dollar stock of watches and ornamental jewelry 
carried in the store. Mr. Newton enjoys a large trade, and it is his 
purpose to further extend the wholesale and commission end of his 
business, which already covers a wide territory. 

Mr. Newton is one of the new school of business men, being pro- 



712 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

gressive in all things, an adherent of modern methods and enterprising 
in all matters that he undertakes. He is active in movements having 
for their object the advancement of Vienna, and is alive to all topics 
of a public nature, although the extent of his business interests has 
prevented him from entering politics. He is a faithful member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and is fraternally connected with 
the Jr. 0. U. A. M. and the M. P. L., in both of which he is very pop- 
ular. 

Concerning the marriage of Mr. Newton the following excerpt is 
quoted from one of the local papers : 

"Within ten minutes after the New Year was ushered in, and im- 
mediately after the bells stopped ringing on Sunday night last at 
12 :10 a. m., at the Methodist parsonage in Vienna, Larry Newton and 
Miss Maudie Beals were made husband and wife, the Rev. Mr. Mc- 
Kown of the Methodist Episcopal church officiating. Mr. Newton is 
one of our home grown young men who stands high in the community, 
his whole life being known to us all. Successful in business, sober and 
industrious always, he has won lots of friends. Miss Beals, too, is 
well known to our people. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Beals, who have resided here aboiit five years. She, like her 
parents, is deservedly popular and entirely worthy the hand of any 
young man. Both pretty and intelligent, she will know how to create 
sunshine in their new home, and with their many friends and well 
wishers the News joins in extending them its best wishes for. a long 
and happy married life." 

LEROY G. KEITH. A man who is closely identified with the affairs 
of Union county and who has more than a material interest in the 
welfare of this section of the state is Leroy G. Keith. Born on the 
same farm where he now lives, of a father who also called Union county 
his birthplace, it has been Mr. Keith's aim to bring as much prosperity 
as possible to the land which holds him by such strong ties. Therefore 
he has warmly advocated and practised scientific farming in order that 
the land might be brought to the highest state of efficiency. 

Mr. Keith was born in Union county, on the fourth of August, 1879, 
his parents being John J. and Elizabeth (Rendleman) Keith. His 
grandfather, Samson R. Keith, had settled in Union county in 1820, 
having previously lived in Kentucky. John J. Keith, born in 1828, 
grew to manhood on the old Keith homestead. Starting out in life 
practically penniless, he became an orchardist, soon devoting the larger 
part of his time to growing the peaches for which this section of Illi- 
nois is well known. He was thus one of the pioneers of the orchard in- 
dustry. From this small beginning he gradually bought up the tracts 
adjoining his farm, until at the time of his death he had acquired seven 
hundred acres. This large property is now owned jointly by his sons 
Harry and Leroy. His wife, who was the daughter of John S. Rendle- 
man, one of the pioneer settlers of Union county, was born in 1841, and 
died in 1903. Of their four children the daughter Bertha is the wife 
of Roy Rinehart, a merchant of Anna, one of his sons, B. F., is a mer- 
chant of Alto Pass, and the other two sons are farmers. 

Leroy Keith received his early education in the schools of Union 
county, continuing his studies at the Anna Academy, from which he 
graduated in 1899. He then returned to the farm where he has since 
resided. Upon the death of his father he and his brother Harry took 
charge of the estate, selecting the farm as their share. Leroy received 
three hundred and thirty acres, to which he has since added the Joshua 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 713 

Lewis place of eighty acres, planted entirely in fruit trees. The larger 
part of his orchard consists of apple trees, covering about one hundred 
acres. From these trees he gathered in 1911 twenty-four hundred bar- 
rels of apples, selling them at an average price of two dollars and a 
half per barrel. Forty acres of his land is in Elberta peaches, princi- 
pally young trees, in spite of which he had two thousand crates of 
peaches in 1911. This year he also shipped two thousand, fifty pound 
packages of rhubarb from twenty acres, and three thousand crates of 
tomatoes. He has in his employ five men in winter, but in the summer 
eight men are needed to handle the work of the farm. These men are 
all gaining a valuable knowledge of the best kind of farming from Mr. 
Keith, who realizes that in this industry science is taking a leading part. 
He not only has the most modern farm machinery, up-to-date buildings 
and accommodations for the live stock, but his beautiful residence is 
equipped with steam heat and acetylene lights. The contrast between 
this luxurious life of the modern farmer and the life of his grandfather, 
tilling practically the same soil, is too striking to pass over without 
comment. 

Mr. Keith is much interested in fraternal organizations, believing 
that they are a great force for good and for advancing the cause of the 
brotherhood of man. He is a member of the Masonic order, affiliating 
with the Alto Pass Chapter. He is also a Modern Woodman of the 
World, as well as belonging to the order of the Eastern Star. His posi- 
tion as School Director is an example of the way in which he fulfills 
his duty toward his fellow citizens. 

On the 30th of November, 1902, the successful young farmer mar- 
ried Myrtle A. Cauble, the daughter of Willis Cauble, of Alto Pass. 
Three children were born to Mr. Keith and his wife, namely: Ethel, 
Gordon and Virginia. Mrs. Keith is a member of the Congregational 
church. 

Mr. Keith, being a man of sterling character, counting many of the* 
influential men of the community his friends and able to exert a wide 
influence for good, must be regarded as an example of that type of 
man which makes the modern student of society point to the farm when 
looking for the highest and best type of American manhood. 

JOHN C. DEWITT. Among the successful self-made men of Southern 
Illinois, probably no business citizen has been the architect of his own 
fortunes to a greater extent than John C. DeWitt, general manager 
of the Union/ Fruit Package Company, of Anna, and a man whose activi- 
ties in the discharge of public duty have reflected the greatest credit 
upon his administrative abilities. Mr. DeWitt was born on a farm 
three and one-half miles south of Anna, in Union county, Illinois, in 
1855, and is a son of Bennett M. and Elizabeth (Cruse) DeWitt, the 
former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Illinois. 

John C. DeWitt began life as a farmer boy, and his early education 
was secured in the district schools of Union county, but the greater 
part of his training was obtained in the school of hard work, as his 
father met his death while serving as a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war, at Jackson, Tennessee, and his mother passed away dur- 
ing the same year, 1863. Being thus orphaned at a tender age, young 
DeWitt went to work as a laborer in the timber business, accepting such 
employment as he could find and seizing every opportunity that pre- 
sented itself to better his condition. Of a thrifty and industrious 
nature, when he was twenty-three years of age he had accumulated 
enough capital to enter the merchandise business in Johnson county, 
and after six years there, requiring a wider field for his operations, he 



714 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

located in Anna, where he carried on the same line for twenty years 
and developed one of the leading establishments of its kind in this sec- 
tion, finally selling out to John W. Moore. In 1906 he entered the fruit 
package business as general manager of the Union Fruit Package Com- 
pany, in which he is also a large stockholder, and this company is now 
doing a business aggregating $16,000 per annum, and he is also inter- 
ested as a director in the First National Bank of Anna and the Anna 
Lumber Company. 

Mr. DeWitt first entered the political field in 1902, when he was 
elected county treasurer and collector, and served in those offices for 
four years, his first year being marked by the increase in the county's 
assessments of $200,000, while for the four years in which he was the 
incumbent of the collector's office the total increase was over $800,000. 
His excellent services in this capacity were appreciated by the people 
of his community, and when he became a candidate on the Democratic 
ticket for the office of alderman he was elected by a handsome majority 
and was returned to that office several times. He is president of the 
Southern Illinois Fair Association and a member of its executive com- 
mittee, and has identified himself with various public-spirited move- 
ments, to which he has given freely of his time and means. He is 
prominent and popular fraternally as a member of Blue Lodge No. 520 
and Royal Arch Chapter No. 45, of the Masonic order, and also belongs 
to the Odd Fellows. 

Mr. DeWitt was married to Miss Delia Shaddrick, who was born in 
Union county, in 1862, and they have been the parents of the follow- 
ing four children : Julia M., who died July 28, 1898, when nineteen 
years of age; Stella Mae, who died in infancy; Elsie E., who died 
August 31, 1905, at the age of twenty years; and Calla, who is fifteen 
years of age and resides at home with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. De- 
Witt are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and have always 
been active in its work, Mrs. DeWitt being especially interested in the 
Sunday School, while Mr. DeWitt is a trustee of the church. Both 
are widely known in charitable work, and as the possessors of numerous 
friends and acquaintances in Anna are popular in Anna's social circles. 

ALBERT N. SAUER. The milling interests of Southern Illinois are 
naturally large, as this section of the state is a prosperous grain coun- 
try, and in this field a number of the prosperous business men of Jack- 
son county have expended their best efforts. Murphysboro is well rep- 
resented in this line by Albert N. Sauer, a business man of the younger 
generation, whose whole experience has been in this line, the Reliance 
Milling Company, of which he is the president, being one of the lead- 
ing business establishments of the city. Mr. Sauer was born at Evans- 
ville, Randolph county, Illinois, February 20, 1884, and is a son of 
William and Elizabeth (Grob) Sauer, one of the highly esteemed cou- 
ples of Randolph county. 

William Sauer was born in Randolph county, in 1845, and was 
reared on the farm of his father, who was an early settler of that sec- 
tion. At the age of twenty years he embarked in the milling business 
at Evansville, and there he has continued to follow the same line ever 
since. Mrs. Sauer was a daughter of George Grob, also a farmer and 
an early settler of Randolph county, and she and Mr. Sauer have five 
children : Barbara, who is the wife of the Rev. William Morton, of 
Quincy, Illinois ; and Henry, Albert, Edward and Anna. Mr. Sauer 
has been identified with Republican politics at Evansville. and both he 
and his wife are active in the work of the German Evangelical church. 

Albert N. Sauer 's early life was spent at Evansville, where he re- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 715 

ceived his early education in the public schools, later attending the 
Sparta High School, McKendree College and the Barnes Business Col- 
lege, at St. Louis. On completing his course at the latter institution he 
came to Murphysboro to engage in the milling business, in which he had 
gained experience as a youth in his father's mill, and at first acted as 
bookkeeper and assistant manager. He is now president of the Reliance 
Milling Company, in which his brother, Edward G. Sauer, is also in- 
terested, a plant with a capacity of six hundred barrels per day, which 
employs a force of twenty-five men. This mill has an extensive trade 
throughout this territory, and bears a high reputation in the business 
world. 

In 1905 Mr. Sauer was married to Miss May Thorpe, of Murphys- 
boro, daughter of the late Joshua Thorpe, and two children have been 
born to this union, namely: May Louise and William. Mr. Sauer has 
been known as an active worker in the ranks of the Republican party 
in Murphysboro, and for a time was a member of the city council. He 
belongs to the Elks and the Knights of Pythias, and attends the German 
Evangelical' church, while Mrs. Sauer is a Presbyterian. Since locating 
in Murphysboro Mr. Sauer 's business interests have demanded a great 
deal of his attention, but he has always managed to find time to lend 
his aid to movements of a progressive nature, and he can be relied upon 
to support anything that promises the betterment of Murphysboro in 
any way. He is widely acquainted through this section of Southern 
Illinois, and his friendships are many. 

GEORGE W. JAMES. A most worthy representative of one of the 
pioneer families of Union county is Mr. George "W. James. "Well known 
and highly respected not only for his upright and honest business ca- 
reer, but for his fine personal qualities, his popularity has grown with 
each year of his long residence in his home county. 

George W. James, the oldest son of Wilson and Huldah (Abernathy) 
James, was born near Wolf Lake in Union county, on the 6th of October, 
1847. Wilson James was the son of George W. James, who migrated 
to Kentucky from Virginia when that state was sending so many of her 
best sons over the Blue Ridge into the Blue Grass country. Kentucky 
continued to be his residence until about 1820, when this sturdy fron- 
tiersman again moved, this time to Union county. He was one of that 
small number who first settled in this region, and should be remembered 
with gratitude by its present residents as one who helped to smooth 
the pathway. Wilson James was also a pioneer, in that he was one of 
the first to discover the great adaptability of the soil to the growth 
of fruits. In 1853 he moved from the Wolf Lake farm to the place 
where his son now lives. Upon this farm he spent the remained of 
his life, devoting his energies to farming and especially to the raising 
of fine apples. In June, 1866, he succumbed to the dread disease, small- 
pox, which was widely prevalent after the Civil war. He left a family 
of six children, all of whom are living. 

On the death of his father George W. James found himself with the 
responsibility of a family of young brothers and sisters. Facing the 
situation courageously, young as he was, he became the sole support 
of the family. The mother died on the 8th of April, 1862. Uncomplain- 
ingly he bore the burden, and with the help of his eldest sister and by 
means of hard work and shrewd management he cared for his sisters 
and brothers until they were grown or married. 

Having thus given so much of his life for others he deserves the 
success which has been his. His home farm, two and a half miles from 
Cobden, contains one hundred and forty-five acres, and in addition to 



716 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

this he owns several farms near Alto Pass, aggregating seven hundred 
acres. Mr. James, following in his father's steps, has made a specialty 
of apples, having planted twenty-five acres of his orchard farm in this 
fruit. He has the distinction of raising the earliest apple in this sec- 
tion, the Transparent Apple, by name. Constant study of conditions 
and attention to the details of apple growing enabled him, in 1911, to 
grow a crop of so fine a quality that the price per barrel for which he 
sold it was larger than that received by any other grower. He produced 
about seven thousand bushels, selling the whole for six thousand dol- 
lars. At one time he had forty acres of his farm planted in peaches, 
but now, with the exception of a lot of young trees just beginning to 
bear, he has only five acres of this fruit. In 1911 he received an excel- 
lent price for his crop of eight hundred bushels of Captain Edes and 
Elbertas. On one of his other farms, managed by his son, fifteen 
hundred bushels of rhubarb, amounting to twenty-five hundred pack- 
ages, were raised on twenty acres. Besides thee principal crops Mr. 
James believes in diversified farming and raises a great variety on his 
various farms. 

Fraternally Mr. James is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows of Alto Pass and has always been an active member of the 
organization. In his religious belief he is a staunch supporter of the 
doctrines of the Baptist church. 

In 1868 Mr. James was married to Mrs. Nancy (Condon) Morris. 
His wife is a daughter of James and Mary S. (Adams) Condon, both 
of whom were native Tennesseans. Mrs. James was born in Nashville, 
Tennessee, her family having moved to Union county in 1859. Mr. and 
Mrs. James have two children, George "W., who lives near his father, 
and Fontain E., who is living on a farm near Alto Pass. The older son 
married Ann Reese, the youngest daughter of Captain John Reese, al- 
so a native of Tennessee, and the younger son married Ava Asbury, 
the daughter of C. M. Asbury. 

Having had heavy responsibilities thrust upon him early in life, 
knowing what it meant to work early and late, enduring many priva- 
tions Mr. James' sympathy and kindliness toward all who need a help- 
ing hand have won him the affectionate regard of his fellowmen and 
he is fortunate in living to see the fruits of his labors returning to him 
tenfold. 

MRS. W. T. DWYER. The city of Vienna suffered the loss of one of 
its most valued and highly respected citizens when, on May 20, 1904, 
there passed into the land beyond Mr. William T. Dwyer. Mr. Dwyer, 
although a native of Ohio, where he was born January 19, 1856, lived 
the greater part of his life in Vienna, having been brought here by his 
parents, Dennis and Eliza (King) Dwyer, when he was but a young 
child. 

Dennis Dwyer came to Southern Illinois from Columbus, Ohio, in 
the early fifties and purchased a large piece of land, which included the 
site upon which Vienna is now built. His wife, Eliza King in maiden- 
hood, was born in Ireland, but came to Vienna before the village was 
of any consequence in size, and although now seventy-eight years of age 
her faculties are remarkably clear and she recalls many interesting events 
of the early pioneer days. She is at the present time residing with her 
daughter, Mrs. F. M. Pruett, at Harrisburg. 

William T. Dwyer for many years followed in his father's footsteps 
and was a successful agriculturist until the year 1899, when he decided 
to make a change and went into the livery business in Vienna. A1-- 
though he was a man of only average school education, he possessed 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 717 

more than average business ability and succeeded in accumulating much 
valuable property during his lifetime. Among his most valuable hold- 
ings were some rich coal lands near Harrisburg, and stock in the Drov- 
ers State Bank, with which financial institution he was connected from 
the time of its establishment until his death. Mr. Dwyer was through- 
out his life a devout member of St. Pauls Catholic church, a man of 
sterling character, liberal in his ideas and methods and possessed of 
many personal qualities that endeared him to all with whom he came 
in contact. His remains lie buried in the cemetery at New Burnside, 
Illinois. 

Mrs. Minnie Dwyer, widow of W. T. Dwyer, is now a leading resi- 
dent of Vienna. She was before her marriage Miss Minnie Kiley, the 
daughter of Timothy and Hannah (Cahille) Kiley, of Cairo, in which 
city Mrs. Dwyer was born and reared. Her father was a native of Ire- 
land, as was also her mother. Mr. Kiley was a miller by trade and 
when twenty years of age came to Cairo from his native land, to gain 
for himself opportunities for advancement which America so gener- 
ously affords her adopted .sons. His marriage to Hannah Cahille took 
place after his arrival at Cairo, where he engaged in the milling busi- 
ness. Besides Mrs. Dwyer, Mr. and Mrs. Kiley were the parents of 
one other child, M. J. Kiley, of Cairo. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Dwyer occurred in 1894 and to them 
were born five children. Williamette died in August, 1910, at the age 
of sixteen years. The others reside at home with their mother, John 
William being sixteen years of age, E. Kiley, fourteen years; Julia 
Dorothy, twelve years; and Bessie ten years old. 

Mrs. Dwyer is a woman of culture and superior intelligence and 
possesses executive ability to a marked degree. She is a member of the 
Vienna Library Board, and secretary of the Board of Education. She 
discharges the duties these positions entail in a most creditable man- 
ner and her advice is highly esteemed by her colleagues. Mrs. Dwyer is 
also an active club woman, is one of the most influential members of 
the Vienna Woman's Club and has held the office of president in that 
organization during 1909 and 1910. A leader in social and educational 
life, a woman of charm and pleasing personality, she leads a life of 
activity and usefulness and holds the respect and admiration of a 
legion 'of friends throughout the community. 

CHABLES H. CHASE, manager of the Jonesboro Store Company, of 
Jonesboro, Illinois, and a man whose whole business career has been 
spent in this city, is thoroughly experienced in his present line and is 
one of this section's self-made men. He was born in Jonesboro, Union 
county, in 1864, and is a son of Charles S. and Eleanor (Cruse) Chase, 
the former of whom was born in Herkimer county, New York, came to 
Jonesboro in 1859, and spent the remainder of his life at his trade, 
that of stone cutter, his death occurring in this city, where his wife 
spent her whole life. 

The education of Charles H. Chase was secured in the public schools, 
and as a youth he learned the trade of stone cutter with his father, fol- 
lowing that occupation for a period covering eleven or twelve years. 
At that time he decided to turn his attention to the mercantile busi- 
ness, and for some time was employed as a clerk in various stores in 
Jonesboro. In 1904 the Jonesboro Store Company, a firm dealing in 
groceries and notions, was organized, with a capital of $1,000, and Mr. 
Chase became manager and a stockholder. The business has had a 
steady growth, due in no small degree to Mr. Chase's energy, industry 



718 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

and progressive ideas, and now has an excellent trade and carries a 
complete line of staple and fancy groceries and an excellent stock of 
notions of all kinds. The life of Mr. Chase has been that of the average 
plain, unostentatious business man. He has been successful in the 
things that he has undertaken because he has given of his best efforts 
in their accomplishment and in all matters has had a scrupulous regard 
for his word. He enjoys the reputation of being a business man of 
great ability and the highest integrity, and is very popular with his 
business associates and all who know him. He is a Democrat in his 
political views, but his business affairs have kept him so busily en- 
gaged that he has never entered the political field, although he takes an 
active interest in matters pertaining to the welfare of his community. 
Fraternally, he is connected with the Court of Honor. 

Mr. Chase was married in 1890, to Miss Amy May Dougherty, an 
estimable young lady of Jonesboro, granddaughter of the late Lieut. 
Gov. John Dougherty. She is a consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian church at Anna, and is widely known in church and social 
circles. Mr. and Mrs. Chase have had one child who died in infancy. 

D. Esco WALKER. The rapid advance of the realty interests of 
Southern Illinois during the past decade has effected the organization 
of some of the largest land corporations in the history of the state, and 
has brought to the front men of vastly more than ordinary business 
talents, who have had the welfare of their community at heart and have 
bent every energy in the development of this section of the coun- 
try. Prominent among these public-spirited citizens may be mentioned 
D. Esco Walker, of Vienna, Illinois, president of the Egyptian Land 
and Loan Company and of the Johnson County Abstract Company, 
senior member of the leading fire insurance agency firm of Johnson 
county, Walker, Mills & Whitehead, and a man whose success in busi- 
ness may be said to have been achieved by his consummate business 
methods and sound principles. Mr. Walker was born August 30, 1883, 
on a farm five and one-half miles east of Vienna, and is a son of George 
W. and Mahalya (DePoyster) Walker. 

William Walker, the great-grandfather of D. Esco Walker, was a 
native of Virginia, of Scotch-Irish descent, who migrated to Tennessee, 
and during the 'fifties came to Johnson county, Illinois, where he filed 
government land and spent the remainder of his life in agricultural 
pursuits. His son, N. J. Walker, was born in Tennessee and came with 
the family to Johnson county, but some time later went to Texas, where 
he resided for three years, returning to Johnson county in 1862 in 
order to escape conscription in the Confederate service, the W T alkers be- 
ing Union sympathizers. Settling on a farm in Grantsburg township, 
he engaged in farming, and there resided until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1897. He married Rebecca Clay, and among their children 
was George W. Walker, who was born in Texas in 1859, and spent his 
life in farming, and at the time of his death, which occurred February 
14, 1908, he was the owner of one hundred and forty-eight and one-third 
acres. He was first married to Mahalya DePoyster, daughter of Thomas 
and Rebecca (Farless) DePoyster, who came from Tennessee at an early 
day and settled in Johnson county, Illinois, and to this union there 
were born two children: D. Esco and Mrs. Parmelia Clark, of Peoria, 
Illinois. Mr. Walker's first wife died in 1888, and in 1891 he was mar- 
ried to Martha Arabella Stout, of Johnson county, daughter of Park 
A. and Nancy Ellen (Stockdale) Stout, and three of the eight children 
born to this union are now living: Cove, Beulah and Beatrice. 
The Stout family came originally from Tennessee, migrated thence to 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 719 

Kentucky, and came to Illinois during the 'fifties. Mrs. Stout belonged 
to the Kentucky Stockdales. 

D. Esco Walker was educated in the district schools of his native 
township and in the Southern Illinois State Normal University at 
Carbondale, and began teaching school in 1901. He taught three years, 
his last being in the Vienna High School, and during 1904 and 1905 
served as assistant postmaster of Vienna. On January 1st of the latter 
year he became business manager and associate editor of the Vienna 
Times, also retaining his position of assistant postmaster until August 
1, 1906. On August 29th following, on account of poor health, he re- 
signed his position with the newspaper, and engaged in the Abstract, 
Real Estate, Insurance and Loan business, incorporating his abstract 
business March 10, 1911, under the corporate name of the Johnson 
County Abstract Company. This company possesses the only complete 
set of abstract books in Johnson county. In addition to being president 
of this concern, he serves in a like capacity with the Egyptian Land and 
Loan Company, a firm capitalized at fifty thousand dollars, of which 
C. "W. Mills is secretary and Noel Whitehead, treasurer, and is senior 
member of the firm of Walker, Mills & Whitehead, the heaviest fire 
insurance agency in Johnson county, representing ten companies. Mr. 
Walker finds time from his other duties to manage a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres owned by the Egyptian Land and Loan Company, 
has owned and operated several other farms in Johnson county; owns 
one-fifth interest in the farm of one hundred and forty-eight and one- 
third acres left by his father, in addition to a dwelling and four city 
lots in Charleston, Coles county, Illinois, and a residence lot in Afruit- 
land, Texas, and is interested in Doyles Consolidated Mines Company, 
of Colorado. His politics are those of the Republican party, and fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, No. 651, Vienna, 
Romeo Lodge ; and American Council, No. 77, Jr. 0. U. A. M., of Vienna. 
He is a deeply religious man and is regularly ordained minister of the 
Missionary Baptist church. 

On December 25, 1906, Mr. Walker was married to Eva Simmons, 
of Johnson county, daughter of C. R. and Mahalya (Benson) Sim- 
mons. C. R. Simmons was a son of Wiley Simmons, who died in 
July, 1911, at the age of seventy-four years, the latter being the son 
of Wiley Simmons, Sr., who came to Johnson county from Tennessee 
during the early forties, entering land in Bloomfield township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Walker have three children: Frances Mahalya, who was 
born October 17, 1907; D. Esco, Jr., born September 12, 1909; and- 
Evalyn Majenta, born January 7, 1912. 

Throughout his entire business career Mr. Walker has associated 
himself only with those enterprises which proved themselves thor- 
oughly legitimate in every way, and his own business dealings have 
stamped him as a man of the highest integrity, on whose career there 
is not the slightest stain or blemish. He can look back over a career 
of usefulness to his community and his fellow citizens, and taking his 
past as a criterion the future holds much in store for him. 

IRA J. HUDSON. Give to a man the instincts and ability of a mer- 
chant by birth and he will sooner or later identify himself with that 
particular line of business, regardless of what his early training with 
reference to other pursuits may be. Many a man has made his mark 
in the field of merchandising, lacking the very desirable advantages 
of education and training. How much greater, then, is a man's 
chance for ultimate success in business when he is fortified with a 
liberal general education in addition to that great fundamental ne- 



720 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

cessity, natural ability. The career of Ira J. Hudson particularly em- 
phasizes this truth, as a glance at his record will amply confirm. 

Ira J. Hudson was born in Clinton, Kentucky, July 19, 1877, being 
the son of Henry J. Hudson, now a merchant in Mounds, Illinois, but 
born in Hickman county, Kentucky, near Clinton, in 1853. He was 
the son of another Henry Hudson, who became a resident of the Corn- 
cracker state in about 1835, coming there from Virginia and acquir- 
ing a tract of farm land near Clinton, for which he paid the nominal 
figure of two dollars and a half per acre. Henry Hudson, the Ken- 
tucky pioneer, had no brothers, but he had three sisters : they were 
Mrs. Morris Brown, of Hannibal, Missouri ; Mrs. Sichling, the wife of 
Dr. Sichling, of Ullin, Illinois; and Mrs. Maryon Woodard of Clin- 
ton, Kentucky. He was the husband of Amanda Spicer, who bore 
him six children, as follows : Mary J., who married J. Vaughan and 
spent her life near Clinton, Kentucky; Sarah E., who became the wife 
of H. H. Harmon, and also passed her life near Clinton; Mrs. T. F. 
Gwyn, of South Columbus, Kentucky; Henry J., of Mounds, Illinois; 
and Martha Ellen, the wife of J. V. Brady, of Chaffee, Missouri. The 
remainder of his life was passed in Hickman county, Kentucky, and 
there he died in 1900, having reached a venerable age. 

The early life of Henry J. Hudson was spent as a farmer in his 
native county. The usual common school advantages of a youth of 
that period were his, and on reaching years of manhood he married 
Miss Annette Lentz, a daughter of Paul Lentz, of German birth, and 
a settler of Hickman county from North Carolina. "When Henry J. 
Hudson came to Illinois in 1881 he continued his life as a farmer until 
the birth and early development of the railroad activities at Mounds, 
Illinois, when he went to that city and engaged in business in a mer- 
cantile way, conducting a grocery business of a particularly thriving 
nature for years under the firm name of H. J. Hudson and Son. In 
1909 he was succeeded in that business by his son, and he subse- 
quently opened a small confectionery establishment on the same 
street, where he is still conducting a lively and lucrative business. 
Henry J. Hudson is a Republican in his political convictions, and he 
comes from a family with pronounced Southern sympathies, which 
statement is considerably emphasized by the fact that two of his 
brothers-in-law served in the Confederate army. The issue of his 
marriage with Annette Lentz, previously mentioned, are Ira J., of 
Mounds, Illinois; Henry, cashier of the Cotton Belt freight office at. 
Cairo, Illinois ; Omer, in the service of the Illinois Central at Mounds ; 
Bertie, married to Van Pope, but now deceased; Otis, a doctor who 
took his medical degree some years ago and practiced for a time in the 
Southern Illinois Penitentiary at Chester, but is now located at 
Mounds ; and Paul and Ray, both in the employ of the Illinois Central 
at Mounds. 

Ira J. Hudson as a boy and youth was a regular attendant at the 
common schools in Ullin, Illinois. At the age of sixteen he was grad- 
uated from the Friendship School in Pulaski county, Illinois, and laetr 
spent two years at the Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale. 
Following that he read law for a year in the law department of 
McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois. He then engaged as a 
teacher, and he served in that capacity for several years in the coun- 
ties of Pulaski, Jackson and Alexander, in all of which places he held 
an admirable record for careful and efficient service. His last work 
as a teacher was performed in the year 1900, .when he became asso- 
ciated with his father in the mercantile business. In 1905 he took 
service with the Illinois Central and became night foreman at Mounds. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHEEN ILLINOIS 721 

a responsible position which he held for several years, severing his 
connection with that company in 1909, at which time he took over the 
business then being conducted under the name of H. J. Hudson and 
Son, and he has conducted that business successfully since that time, 
always improving, expanding, and in every way reaching out after 
trade, and generally demonstrating his inherent ability and capacity 
for successful merchandising. 

Mr. Hudson politically is a Republican, and has been more or less 
active in the affairs of his party for a number of years. He is now 
serving his fourth term as city clerk of Mounds, thereby showing him- 
self to be sufficiently public spirited to encumber himself with the 
cares of office in addition to the manifold responsibilities of every- 
day life. He is identified with a number of fraternal societies, in all 
of which he is prominent and active, among them being the order of 
Odd Fellows and the Modern "Woodmen of America. He is a past 
master in Masonry and has served as deputy grand master. In his 
church relations he is of the Methodist Episcopal faith. 

On June 13, 1901, Mr. Hudson was united in marriage with Miss 
Retta Gher, a daughter of Dr. G-her, of Makanda, and they are the 
parents of one child, Ira J., Jr. 

G. RILEY HUFFMAN. Although not a native of Illinois, this promi- 
nent merchant and influential and progressive citizen of Carbondale 
has been a resident of Jackson county ever since he reached the age 
of nineteen, a period of twenty-six years. He is therefore well ac- 
quainted and closely in touch with its people, and fully in sympathy 
with their public spirit and all their industrial, mercantile and com- 
mercial aspirations, as well as with the highest and best expression 
of their social life. 

Mr. Huffman is a native of Virginia, having been born in Wythe 
county, in the Old Dominion, on July 25, 1866. He is a son of Joseph 
D. and Sophia (Brown) Huffman, extensive planters in that county 
before the Civil war, and still engaged in tilling the soil there and 
giving an agreeable example of the rural life of that portion of the 
country. They were great sufferers from the waste and prostration 
of all business occasioned by the war, and during the boyhood and 
early youth of their son Riley its wounds, material and commercial 
as well as in the persons of its soldiers during the conflict, were still 
painfully Adsible. 

He worked with his father on the old plantation until he was nine- 
teen years of age and in the meantime attended the public school in 
the neighborhood of his home when he could be spared from labor. 
At the age mentioned he became dissatisfied with the prospects before 
him in a state so cruelly desolated by sectional strife, and determined 
to seek more favorable conditions in one of the newer and more pro- 
gressive commonwealths of the great and growing West, where the 
noise of enterprise was loud and every stroke of human energy 
brought immediate and gratifying returns. 

Accordingly he bade farewell to the scenes and associations of his 
boyhood, and came courageously to Jackson county, Illinois, expatri- 
ating himself from home and friends to make his bed with strangers 
and work out his destiny among them. He hired himself to a farmer 
in the county, and for a year or two worked as a farm hand during 
the busy seasons and attended school during the winter months. His 
pay was meager and his progress toward independence and conse- 
quence among men, the goal of his ambition, was slow. But he was 
frugal and prudent, and in time accumulated enough money to pay 



722 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

his way through a course at Dixon College in Dixon, Lee county, this 
state, which prepared him for usefulness more in accordance with 
his tastes and ardent aspirations. 

After leaving college he taught school four years in Jackson county, 
then clerked in a grocery store in Murphysboro for a time. He be- 
came enamored of the business and bought the store and good will of 
his employer, and this he conducted successfully and profitably for 
twelve years. At the end of that period he came to Carbondale and 
bought a grocery store, having disposed of the one he had in Murphys- 
boro. In 1904 he purchased a furniture and undertaking establish- 
ment and formed the Huffman Furniture Company, of which he is the 
president and general manager, and has been from the organization 
of the company. This company carries on an extensive and active 
trade in furniture and does funeral directing in the most scientific and 
artistic manner. It has a high reputation for the excellence of its out- 
put in the mercantile line, and is universally commended for the ele- 
vated character of its work in burying the dead. Mr. Huffman gives^ 
every detail of the business his vigilant personal supervision, and 
leaves nothing undone to secure the best results in every department 
and feature of it. He also owns farms in the county and supervises 
the cultivation of them. 

He was married on December 26, 1895, to Miss Maggie Will, of this 
county, a daughter of George and Arab (Bouscher) Will, who live on 
and cultivate one of the county's well improved and highly developed 
farms, which they have made it since they became its owners and took 
charge of its management. Mr. and Mrs. Huffman have six children, 
Bernice, Nyle, Otis, Ana, and their twin son and daughter, Paul and 
Pauline. All of them are living and members of the parental family 
circle. The parents are devoted and serviceable members of the Chris- 
tian church, and the father is one of the deacons of his congregation. 

Mr. Huffman has taken a decided and fruitful interest in the fra- 
ternal life of his community, working zealously for the good of his 
several lodges, and giving them the full benefit of his intelligence and 
enterprise. He is a Knight of Pythias, with the rank of past chancel- 
lor ; an Odd Fellow, with the rank of past grand ; a trustee of the local 
lodge of the Order of Elks, and a Modern Woodman of America. He 
has served as a member of the school board eight years, and was a mem- 
ber of the city council when the new form of municipal government 
was put in operation. 

ULYSSES E. SMITH. To be called upon to serve his fellow citizens 
in many public capacities, and to perform those duties in a manner 
to win universal acclaim, has been the experience of Ulysses E. Smith, 
present postmaster of Metropolis. For many years he has been con- 
spicuously connected with the official life of Massac county. De- 
scended from Revolutionary and patriotic stock, he is a member of 
one of the pioneer families of that county. Mr. Smith was born in 
Massac county, December 28, 1866, and was reared in the community 
of New Columbia, where his youthful activities were dictated by his 
farm environment. His father is the Rev. Green W. Smith, whose 
life has been devoted to religious work as a missionary Baptist 
preacher, to his vocation as a farmer and in a public capacity as an 
officer of Massac county. Rev. Smith was born in Massac county, in 
1846. Like Lincoln, his early education was won through his per- 
sonal efforts and attendance at such subscription schools as were 
maintained from time to time in the neighborhood where he resided. 
At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the United States navy and was 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 723 

assigned to a gunboat which operated on the Tennessee and Cumber- 
land rivers during the last year of the Civil war. He passed through 
the service without untoward incident, although he witnessed and par- 
ticipated in many stirring scenes, and returned to his old home to re- 
sume the peaceful occupation of farming. 

His insight into Bible themes made him a powerful preacher. In 
this respect he followed the example of his father, Rev. Americus 
Smith, a pioneer Baptist preacher. The latter was born in South 
Carolina, in 1812, and came to Illinois in 1818, the year that it was 
admitted to the Union. He died in September, 1892. His father was 
a son of a Revolutionary soldier, and he entered land in Massac county 
and acquired title from the Government, which farm is now the prop- 
erty of his son, Green W. Smith. His father is also buried in this 
county and is believed to be the only soldier of the Revolution whose 
remains hallow its soil. 

Americus Smith married a Miss Emerson, who died early in the 
Civil war period, and who was the mother of Green W. ; Susan, who 
married K. L. Presgrove and died in Johnson county, Illinois; Rebecca, 
who became the wife of Carroll English and resides in that county; 
Mary, wife of Pleasant Thacker, of that county; and Margaret, wife 
of James Walker, of Metropolis. Green W. Smith married Elizabeth 
A. Morse, a daughter of Ulysses A. Morse, who came to Illinois from 
Princeton, Kentucky, M'here he married Laney Vickers. The children 
of Rev. and Mrs. Smith are: Elizabeth, wife of 0. R. Morgan, an 
attorney of Vienna, Illinois; Americus A., who is engaged in farming 
in Massac county ; Rhoda, who is Mrs. J. H. Cagle, of Metropolis ; and 
Calvin P., a farmer near the home community in Massac county. Rev. 
Green Smith was chosen by the Republican party of Massac county 
as assessor and treasurer, and filled the office one term, following which 
he was elected sheriff and served for four years. He then resumed the 
direction of his farm and the performance of his church duties, which 
made increasing demands upon his time. 

Ulysses dropped into the routine that had ordered the lives of his 
ancestors as he grew to manhood and began to take his place in affairs. 
The common schools of the country round about New Columbia gave 
him his early education. He came to Metropolis in 1898, to take the 
deputyship under Sheriff John W. Evers, and during his four years' 
incumbency of the place became so conversant with its duties and re- 
sponsibilities that he was nominated by the Republicans as the suc- 
cessor of Mr. Evers, was elected and served from December, 1903, to 
the same month in 1906, and on the eighteenth of January, 1907, he 
was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt to be postmaster 
of Metropolis. He succeeded Fred R. Young, and was appointed for 
his second term on January 16, 1911, by President "W. H. Taft. 

In referring to his political life there is little to add to the ref- 
erences already made. He had served his party on county committees 
and in its general councils. In 1904 he was a delegate to the Repub- 
lican state convention, and participated in its deliberations, being 
under county instructions for Gov. Richard Yates. His business con- 
nections show him to be a stockholder of the Central Pence and Ma- 
chine Company, of Metropolis, and a director of the concern. 

Mr. Smith was married in Johnson county, Illinois, November 22, 
1885, his wife being Miss Alice Morgan, a daughter of B. R. Morgan 
and Julia (Lemons) Morgan, both natives of Rockingham county, 
North Carolina. Their family consisted of seven children. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Smith has been productive of Ray, who married Annie 
Teague, follows farming and has a son, William Edward ; Inez, a High 
School student in Metropolis ; and Clarence, who died in infancy. 



724 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Since becoming postmaster Mr. Smith has seen the office raised to the 
second-class, and the rural delivery service extended by the addition 
of a fourth carrier. The office was denominated a postal savings insti- 
tution in 1911. 

LEWIS B. TUTHILL. One of the able young legal practitioners of the 
Union county bar, who is also proprietor of the largest insurance busi- 
ness in the county and owner of a valuable farm, is Lewis B. Tuthill, 
who has not allowed himself to be tied down to one occupation, but has 
shown his versatility by succeeding as an agriculturist, in his profession 
and as a business man. Mr. Tuthill 's family is well known in Anna, 
and he was born in this city, July 20, 1880, a son of Harlan P. and 
Emma S. (Hubbard) Tuthill. 

Harlan P. Tuthill was born November 2, 1842, in Virginia, Illinois, 
and as a young man studied law and entered the insurance field, build- 
ing up the largest business of its kind in Union county. He subse- 
quently became cashier of a private bank of which C. M. Willard was 
the owner, but later took a like position with the First National Bank, 
where he remained for nineteen years. A stanch Republican, Mr. 
Tuthill was active in the ranks of his party here and served for a 
number of years as city attorney of Anna. He was also active in the 
work of the Presbyterian church, and at the time of his death, which 
occurred November 2, 1909, was serving in the capacity of deacon. In 
1877 Mr. Tuthill was united in marriage with Miss Emma S. Hubbard, 
a native of Ohio, and she still survives her husband and makes her home 
at Anna. They had these children: Russell, a graduate of Hanover 
College, class of 1902, who is unmarried and engaged in agricultural 
pursuits at Tamms, Illinois ; Lewis B. ; and Sophronia D., who attended 
the Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and now lives in 
Anna with her mother. 

Lewis B. Tuthill received his early education in the public schools 
of Anna, and later entered Illinois State University, Champaign, being 
graduated from the law and literary departments thereof, with the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Law in 1904. While at college 
he was a member of the Phi Delta Theta and Phi Delta Phi fraternities, 
and during 1903 had the honor of being manager of the football team. 
After completing his collegiate course he came to Anna, where he en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession, subsequently going into the 
insurance business with his father, whom he eventually succeeded. 
Mr. Tuthill now has the largest business of its kind in the county, and 
represents ten fire insurance companies, one life insurance company, 
one employers' liability company, one bonding company and one live- 
stock insurance company. He is a director of the First National Bank 
of Anna and of the Anna Lumber Company, and owns 120 acres of 
excellent farming land in Union county, having twenty acres of apples, 
six of strawberries and one of pie plant. This farm is now rented and 
yields him good returns. Mr. Tuthill inherits his father's business 
ability, and to this he has added the enthusiasm that is only possessed 
by those who are in love with their work. That he has succeeded in all 
of his ventures is not surprising, for progressive ideas, coupled with in- 
herent business acumen and a spirit of industry are conducive to suc- 
cess in any line. 

In 1904, Mr. Tuthill was married to Miss Leeta DeWolf, of Prairie 
City, Iowa, and one daughter was born to this union: Mary DeWolf, 
born January 15, 1907. Mrs. Tuthill is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, while her husband, although not a member of any especial de- 
nomination, supports all creeds liberally. His politics are those of the 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 725 

Republican party, and on various occasions he has been chosen as a can- 
didate for offices within the gift of his fellow townsmen. From 1904 
until 1910 he served as city attorney of Anna, and in 1907 was nomi- 
nated on the Republican ticket for the office of member of the State 
Legislature, but owing to political conditions here at that time met 
with defeat. He is a popular member of I. 0. 0. F. Lodge, No. 576, and 
Anna Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 520, and is president of the Union 
Club. 

WILLIAM THOMSON, M. D. Although among the comparatively 
young men in professional life, William Thomson, M. D., has attained 
success by devotion to toil in his profession, and is now in the enjoyment 
of a lucrative practice and the esteem and confidence of all in the vil- 
lage of Belknap, his chosen field of endeavor. Dr. Thomson is a native 
of Johnson county, having been born at Simpson, September 4, 1884, a 
son of John and Mary E. (Cornish) Thomson. 

Eli Thomson, the paternal grandfather of Dr. Thomson, was born in 
Tennessee, and settled in Johnson county, where he took up govern- 
ment land at an early day and became a prominent agriculturist. The 
maternal grandparents of the Doctor, Eli and Emily Cornish, came 
from Scotland to America, settling first in West Virginia and later 
removed to Johnson county. John and Mary Thomson were both born 
in Tennessee and accompanied their parents to Illinois as children, after 
marriage settling on a farm, and later moving to Simpson, where they 
now reside. 

The early educational training of William Thomson was obtained in 
the public schools of his native county, and later he entered the South- 
ern Illinois State Normal School, at Carbondale. In the fall of 1905 
he became a student in Barnes Medical College, St. Louis, Missouri, 
and in 1909 was graduated therefrom with the degree of M. D. Imme- 
diately thereafter he started to practice in the village of Belknap, where 
he has a large and steadily increasing practice. He is a member of sev- 
eral medical associations, and stands as high in the esteem of his fellow 
practitioners as he does in that of the public. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of America. 

In 1908 Dr. Thomson was married to Bertha Marberry, of Simpson, 
daughter of Wiley and Zue Marberry, and they have one child : Wil- 
liam Glen. Dr. Thomson's office is conveniently situated in the heart of 
the business portion of the village. Constant perusal of numerous 
medical journals and magazines to which he is a subscriber has made 
him well read and kept him in constant touch with the recent discov- 
eries and inventions of his profession. He is eminently fitted for his 
profession, beiner a close student, a sympathetic practitioner and a 
lover of the work to which he has decided to give his activities. 

GEORGE HUTHMACHER. Prominent among those men who have ad- 
vanced their communities by developing the commercial interests of 
their sections, and to whose efforts must be given the credit for the pres- 
ent high business standing of Southern Illinois, may be mentioned 
George Huthmacher, a prominent lumber and hardware dealer of Mur- 
physboro, whose entire life has been spent within the confines of Jack- 
son county. A business man of more than ordinary ability, he has 
proven his worth also as a citizen, and no man stands higher in the 
respect and esteem of his fellow townsmen. George Huthmacher was 
born February 1, 1869, at Sandoval, Illinois, and is a brother of Charles 
Christian Huthmacher. 

George Huthmacher 's early life was spent at Grand Tower, whence 
VOL n ii 



726 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

his parents moved when he was not yet two months old, and at this 
place he grew to manhood, receiving his education in the public schools. 
In 1888, after completing his studies there, he went to St. Louis to take 
a course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College, and in 1890, on his 
return, was appointed deputy sheriff of Jackson county, an office he 
held until 1894. In 1896 Mr. Huthmacher went to Joplin, Missouri, to 
engage in the furniture business, but after spending eighteen months 
there sold out, and in the fall of 1898, with his brother, A. J. Huth- 
macher, purchased the old Jackson County Lumber Company. In 1905 
hardware was added to the company's stock, and the business, under 
Mr. Huthmacher 's management, has grown steadily from its inception, 
now carrying the largest stock of hardware and lumber in Southern 
Illinois. In addition to this the brothers are the owners of an asparagus 
farm of forty acres, the work on which is superintended by A. J. Huth- 
macher, and the firm also deals to some extent in stock. Mr. Huth- 
macher has always been possessed of progressive ideas, one of which is 
that the community in which it is located will grow with it, thus open- 
that the best way to develop a business is to conduct it in such a manner 
ing a wider field and greater opportunities. Such a policy is bound to 
benefit any section, and for this reason, if for no other, the firm is a 
valuable addition to the city's industries. An able and astute business 
man, Mr. Huthmacher has taken advantage of every opportunity that 
has presented itself, but his dealings have been along strictly legitimate 
lines, and his popularity is assured with all who know him. His ability 
and administrative capability have been recognized by his election to 
positions of honor and trust, and as a nominee on the Democratic ticket 
was elected to the office of alderman. Fraternally his connection is 
with the Elks, and he also holds membership in the Hoos-Hoos, an or- 
ganization of lumber men. 

HON. MILES FREDERICK GILBERT, LL. B., whose career at the bar of 
Cairo 'has been long and honorable, was born in Alton, Illinois, on Sep- 
tember 11, 1849. His father, Judge Miles A. Gilbert, belonged to the 
Hartford branch of this New England family of Colonial origin. Judge 
Gilbert was born at Hartford, Connecticut, and his lineage runs back 
into the history of the English Gilberts whose men of distinction con- 
tributed to the art, science and literature of the island empire when a 
mere kingdom marked its boundaries and when chivalrous knighthood 
made "merry England" and furnished food for the poetic imagination. 

The family of Gilberts in America originated with the arrival of five 
brothers from Norfolkshire, England. These distributed themselves to 
the colonies of Virginia, Massachusetts and Connecticut. At Hartford 
and New Haven two of the brothers made their homes. Miles A. Gil- 
bert was a son of Merritt Gilbert, who died in Tolland, Connecticut, 
and he grew up in the collegiate atmosphere for which the "Nutmeg" 
commonwealth is famous. He abandoned the scenes of his childhood 
when he was about eighteen years of age for a life conquest in the Mis- 
sissippi Valley. He lived for many years at old Kaskaskia, the first set- 
tlement in Illinois. From thence he removed to Alton, at which time 
he, with the late Judge Breeze, entered a tract of Government land, 
upon part of which the city of Cairo now stands. He removed to Ste. 
Genevieve county, Missouri, and there he was elected county judge and 
remained on the bench for sixteen years. In the discharge of his official 
duties he demonstrated much ability, administered justice impartially 
and won the plaudits of a pleased people. His citizenship abounded in 
integrity and unselfishness, and honor was stamped upon his public and 
private life. At Alton he was married to Miss Ann E. Baker, a daugh- 



fit LIBRARY 

OFINE 
MWERSITT OF 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 727 

ter of Senator David J. Baker, a scholarly gentleman and a graduate of 
Hamilton College, New York. Mrs. Gilbert died on July 14, 1893, leav- 
ing two sons, William B., a distinguished member of the Cairo bar, and 
Miles Frederick, the subject of this review. Judge Gilbert passed away 
in St. Mary's county, Missouri, in 1904. Through his mother, a Miss 
Tuttle, he was a descendant of Revolutionary stock, his maternal grand- 
father having worn the Continental uniform and having given his ser- 
vice toward winning our independence. 

Miles Frederick Gilbert completed his course in the Alton high 
school and then became a student of Washington University, St. Louis. 
A threatened breakdown of his health soon forced his retirement from 
that institution, and after recuperating for a time he entered the Penn- 
sylvania Military College at Chester, Pennsylvania. After finishing 
there his work in literature and the sciences he enrolled as a student in 
the law department of Harvard College and was graduated in law Janu- 
ary 29, 1869, receiving the degree of LL. B. 

While preparing for his profession his studious habits manifested 
themselves and a decided love for books has characterized him all 
through life. He decided on the law as his profession very early in life 
and began reading on this subject before his entrance at Harvard, in 
the office of Haynie, Marshall & Gilbert in Cairo, and was admitted to 
the bar upon examination of a committee composed of States Attorney 
McCartney and Judge Olney. After his work at Harvard was com- 
pleted he entered upon the practice of law in Cairo, January 1, 1870, as 
a member of the firm of Green and Gilbert. In 1875 he was admitted 
to practice in all the federal courts and in 1892 before the supreme 
court of the United States. During the past quarter of a century his 
practice has invaded the domain of corporation business, and the suc- 
cess of his efforts tells more convincingly than words how effective his 
labors have been. 

His connection with business affairs in Cairo has been well known, 
like that of his political life. He administered upon the interests of the 
Board of Trade and of the -Loan and Improvement Assocation as presi- 
dent of both organizations. He is a member and officer of the Episco- 
pal church and has represented his parish in the Diocesan Synod and 
the Diocese as a deputy to the General Convention for nine years. He 
served on the committee on constitutional amendments, served eight 
years as Judge of the Court of Review of the American Church (Epis- 
copal) in United States, and is one of the board of trustees of the West- 
ern Theological Seminary and is a member of its board of incorpora- 
tors. He is chancellor of the Diocese of Springfield and one of the 
Governors of the Country Club. 

In politics Mr. Gilbert is a Democrat. He is chairman of the Alex- 
ander County Central Committee of his party ; has served as president 
of the Illinois Club, and of the Alexander Club, also serving the latter 
on its governing board ; and for nineteen years was a member of the 
board of education, and its president for ten years. 

Mr. Gilbert was married in Alton, Illinois, October 18, 1875, to Miss 
Addie Louise, a daughter of Amasa S. Barry, of Chicago. Mr. Barry 
was a wholesale druggist in his vocation. He married Miss Katherine 
Riley. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert: Nellie, now 
Mrs. Samuel Halliday, of Cairo, and Edward L., one of the capable 
young business men of this city. 

JUDGE ALFRED COMINGS is one of the few men still in active life 
whose residence here covers the period of the Civil war. Since 1862 he 
has occupied a place among the body politic of the city and has for 



728 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

more than forty years of that time been connected with public affairs. 
For nearly a third of a century he has been justice of the peace for the 
second precinct, and has therefore been a prominent actor in the drama 
of municipal litigation. Born at Cornish, New Hampshire, December 
24, 1830, Alfred Comings is descended from Colonial ancestry on both 
sides of the house. His remote ancestor and the founder of the Comings 
family was 'Isaac Comings, born in the north of Scotland in 1601, who 
came to America in 1632 and settled at Ipswich, Massachusetts. One 
of his great-grandsons was Leonard Comings, the direct ancestor of 
Judge Comings, tracing down through Samuel L. and Uriel, the latter 
the father of the Judge. Uriel Comings was born at Cornish, New 
Hampshire, in 1793, passed his life in the sawmill industry, also op- 
erated a gristmill, and had some ability as an architect. There were 
patriot soldiers in the Revolution among his forefathers, and his char- 
acteristics reflected the strong points and fighting stock of these loyal 
Americans. 

Uriel Comings married Sarah Robinson, a lineal descendant of 
George Robinson, who left his native Scotland in 1680 and settled in 
Massachusetts. From this old patriarch three Georges descended in a 
direct line and were grandfathers, far removed, of Sarah. The third 
one was Rev. George Robinson, her grandfather, and his son, David, was 
her father. Sarah Robinson was born February 28, 1793, and was the 
exact age of her husband. She passed away in 1878, and he died two 
years later. Of their eight children Alfred is the only survivor. The 
issue in order of birth were : Farris, born in 1817 ; Warren, who was 
two years younger; Samuel L., born in 1811, who was killed in the bat- 
tle of Antietam and is buried in Baltimore ; Nellie M., born in 1815, who 
married W. F. Smith ; Angeline, born in 1823, who became the wife of 
Gilman Bartlett ; Dr. David L. M., born in 1825, who was a surgeon in 
the Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers during the Civil war and died 
in the service in 1863 ; Uriel L., born in 1829, who was honored with the 
position of doorkeeper of the lower house of the Legislature of New 
Hampshire for ten years and postmaster of Windsor, Vermont, for 
twelve years; and Judge Alfred, who is the youngest of the family. 

Judge Alfred Comings' boyhood and youth were passed in the 
healthful atmosphere of an ancient community, and his education was 
secured without much ado, he being a part of the domestic circle until 
he reached the age of twenty-six years. In 1856 he came to Illinois and 
located at Decatur, where he spent two years teaching school, and he 
then went to Sangamon county and taught there until his departure 
for the war in 1862. While in Sangamon he made the personal ac- 
quaintance of Abraham Lincoln, then attaining a national reputation 
and engaged in expounding Republican doctrines. He became a stanch 
partisan of "Honest Abe," and has steadfastly remained an adherent 
of the party the great war president honored. His patriotism prompted 
Judge Comings to enlist in the Illinois Vounteers, and he joined Com- 
pany F, Seventieth Infantry, and was commissioned captain of the 
company. Orrin T. Reeves was colonel and the regiment was assigned 
to the duty of guarding Confederate prisoners at Camp Butler from 
June until September, 1862. Judge Comings was then detailed to take 
one thousand two hundred prisoners to Vicksburg for exchange. He 
was conveyed down the river on the boat "Albert Pierce," and ar- 
ranged his exchange with General Robert Olds and returned to his 
regiment at Alton. On October 23, 1862, the whole company was 
mustered out. On November 2nd, Judge Comings was paid off in 
Springfield, and there met Hon. Newton Bateman, then state super- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 729 

intendent of public schools, who sent him to Cairo to take charge of 
the public schools. 

After a year with the schools of Cairo Judge Comings entered the 
postoffice as a clerk, remained a year, and then took a position in the 
paymaster's office here. This position gave him a vivid insight into 
the methods of graft practiced by his superior. With the termination 
of this employment he engaged in the commission business and con- 
tinued it here four years. Returning to the government service, he 
was appointed ganger at Cairo, holding that position three years, and 
spent the next nine years as bookkeeper for a wholesale whiskey house. 
At the end of that time he organized the first building and loan asso- 
ciation of Cairo and named it after the city. He was chosen its first 
secretary and has held that offce in the Cairo Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation ever since. 

In 1870 Judge Comings entered city politics and was elected police 
magistrate, an office which he held by repeated elections for twelve 
years. He was chosen justice of the peace some thirty years ago and 
has been biennially elected to it since. He is a Republican, and during 
the early years of Republicanism he was an active participant in county 
and congressional conventions and was a delegate to the national con- 
vention of 1884 when Blaine and Logan were nominated. He is a 
Master Mason and belongs to the subordinate and encampment of Odd- 
fellowship. In addition he is a member of the Elks Camp at Cairo, 
and of the Commercial Club of this city. 

Judge Comings was married at Newbury, Vermont, to Miss Maria 
E. Jordan, a daughter of the Rev. E. Jordan, of the Methodist church. 
She died at Metropolis, Illinois, where the Judge lived for some years, 
in 1868. The children of this union were : Lenora B., who married 
H. E. Ince and is now deceased; and Elmer E., born November 25, 
1861, who grew up in Cairo, spent five years in Buenos Aires, South 
America, where he married Miss Sarah Morse, an English lady, and is 
now identified with the Cairo Building and Loan Association ; and 
Walter, the third child of the Judge, who married Maggie McEwen, 
and died in 1889, leaving a daughter. The second wife of Judge 
Comings was Sarah A. Mason, who died in 1891, leaving one child: 
Alfred B., who is a court reporter in Mississippi, and who married 
Miss Julia E. Tierney. Judge Comings was married the third time 
to Mrs. Adelaide Cundiff, a daughter of Moses Phillips, of Vermont. 

WILLIAM D. LYERLY. The present efficient state's attorney, Wil- 
liam D. Lyerly, of Jonesboro, has, during the thirteen years that he 
has been practicing before the Union county bar, proven himself one 
of the bright legal lights of Southern Illinois and a man of much more 
than ordinary administrative and executive ability. An able and un- 
tiring official, he has ever been faithful in his discharge of the duties 
of his high position and relentless in his prosecution of those who have 
disregarded the laws of the state, but a high sense of justice has tem- 
pered his actions always, and he has ever been ready to assist those 
whose misfortune it has been to have become the victims of circum- 
stance. Mr. Lyerly is a native of Union county, Illinois, and was born 
April 28, 1872, a son of John and Melvina M. Lyerly, farming people 
of Union county who are now living retired in Jonesboro. 

William D. Lyerly attended the district schools, and graduated from 
the Union Academy, Anna, in 1892. During the next six years he was 
engaged in teaching school in Union county, and during this time 
prosecuted his law studies. Eventually he entered the law offices of 
Judge Crawford, in Jonesboro, and he was admitted to the bar in 1898, 



730 HISTORY OF' SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

at which time he began practice. In 1908 Mr. Lyerly was elected 
state's attorney, having served very acceptably in the office of city at- 
torney from 1898 to 1903, and as president of the board of education 
from 1905 to 1909, and during the fall of 1910 he was the candidate 
of the Democratic party for Congress, but met with defeat. Several 
of his cases have gone to the Supreme Court, where Mr. Lyerly 's con- 
tentions have been upheld. He has identified himself with various 
business enterprises of a large nature and is now a director of the 
Union County Milling Company and president of the Jonesboro Plank 
Road Company. Mr. Lyerly is a man of whom it can be said he has 
chosen well. He possesses the courage of his convictions and has been 
fearless in championing what he believes to be just and right. He has 
the gift of oratory, which has been admirably displayed in a number of 
important cases, and his thorough knowledge of law and jurisprudence 
has made him an almost invincible opponent. 

In 1901, Mr. Lyerly was married to Miss Ethel Nusbaum, who was 
born at Jonesboro, October 27, 1879, daughter of the Rev. D. S. Nus- 
baum, Baptist pastor at Jonesboro. Mrs. Lyerly was for several years 
engaged in teaching in the public schools of this place. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lyerly : Martici and Edna, aged eight 
and seven years respectively. The family is connected with the Bap- 
tist church, in which both Mr. Lyerly and his wife are very active, he 
now being a member of the board of trustees and for seven years su- 
perintendent of the Sunday school. Fraternally he is connected with 
Blue Lodge No. Ill, Jonesboro, and Chapter No. 45, Anna, of Masonry ; 
Lodge No. 241, of the Odd Fellows; the Modern Woodmen and the 
Order of the Eastern Star, No. 163, in all of which he has been through 
the chairs, while Mrs. Lyerly is a member of the last-named order. 
The family is widely known in this section, and both Mr. and Mrs. 
Lyerly enjoy the respect and esteem of an exceptionally large circle of 
friends. 

DANIEL McCALL, was born September 21, 1861, in Mississippi, and 
is a son of Robert R. and Mary "E. (Dawson) MeCall. Thomas Mc- 
Call, the grandfather of Daniel, was a native of North Carolina and 
was of Scotch-Huguenot descent, and it is said that the founder of the 
family in this country served in a Pennsylvania regiment during the 
war of the Revolution. Robert R. McCall, son of Thomas and father 
of Daniel, was born near Nashville, Tennessee in 1825, and there be- 
came a farmer and minister of the Christian church. Later moving 
to Mississippi, he became a plantation owner and slave holder, but at 
the outbreak of the war was a Union sympathizer and counseled his 
kinsmen to leave Mississippi until that struggle should be ended. He 
followed them in 1863. when all Union families were compelled to leave 
the state. In January, 1865, he came to Illinois with his family and 
settled on a partly-improved farm of forty-eight acres five miles north- 
west of Vienna, on which had been erected an old log house. At first 
the hardships and privations of the little family were many, but with 
sturdy pluck and perseverance Mr. MeCall continued to labor in cul- 
tivating his land, and success eventually came to him in a small way 
and well-merited manner, and when he died, in June. 1883. he was a 
highly-respected citi?en of his community. His wife, Mary (Dawson) 
MeCall, was a daughter of John M. Dawson, a native of Tennessee, 
who migrated to Mississippi, and a granddaughter of John Dawson, of 
English descent. She died in 1900. at the age of seventv-one years. 
The children born to Robert R. and Mary (Dawson) MeCall were as 
follows: Dr. Robert M. ; Frances, who died in infancy; Victoria and 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 731 

Rebecca, who died when about thirteen years of age; Thomas and 
James, who died in infancy ; William, who died while studying medi- 
cine at Indianapolis, Indiana; and Daniel. 

Daniel McCall received only a slight common-school education, in 
the old Smith schoolhouse, as when he was a youth he was very indus- 
trious and preferred hard work in the open air to studying in the close 
schoolroom. He is practically self-educated, and is very well read, 
having been a close student all of his life. He worked for his father 
until the latter 's death, and after that always made his home with his 
mother, a woman of great intelligence and good judgment, whose ad- 
vice and teachings were greatly prized by her children. Before he was 
of age Mr. McCall had purchased sixty acres of land adjoining the old 
homestead, and later added a twenty-acre tract to this, and subse- 
quently eighty acres more. In 1889 his health became impaired, and 
on the advice of his physician he gave up farming, sold his property 
and moved to Vienna, where in 1890 he established himself in the liv- 
ery business. This he successfully carried on until 1896, when he sold 
out and again took up farming, but his health again failed and he was 
compelled to once more sell his land and move to the city, where for 
some time he was engaged in the grocery business. He could not re- 
sist the temptation, however, to return to the tilling of the soil, and 
in March, 1903, he bought his present property, a fine tract of one 
hundred and fifty acres located near Vienna, where he has since been 
engaged in farming and stock breeding. His buildings are in fine con- 
dition, and include a handsome residence, good substantial barns, 
necessary outbuildings and a modern silo. There is no doubt that Mr. 
McCall could have succeeded in any line to which he cared to turn 
his attention, as whatever has claimed his activities has prospered. 
Farming, however, is the vocation that he prefers to follow, and his 
standing among Johnson county's agriculturists is exceptionally high. 
He has not cared to enter the political field, nor is he connected with 
any secret societies, his only interest outside of his farm being his 
membership in the Christian church, in the work of which he and his 
family have been active. 

Mr. McCall was married (first) in 1884, to Miss Mary "Winchester, 
who died in 1885, without issue. His second marriage was to Miss 
Josephine Stout, daughter of William and Anna (Boomer) Stout, and 
seven children have been born to this union : Mary ; Anna and Wil- 
liam, who died in infancy; and Ruth, Robert Lee, Lillie and George 
Edward. 

ELMER PEARL EASTERDAY. It was twenty-five years ago, or in 1887, 
that Elmer Earl Easterday first took up his residence in Mound City, 
Illinois, and during that period he has been identified with the office 
of circuit clerk of Pulaski county, first as a deputy, and since 1904 as 
the incumbent of that office. 

He was born at Vandalia, Illinois, July 23, 1866, and at the age of 
thirteen accompanied his father, Melancthon Easterday, who receives 
individual mention elsewhere in this work, to Cairo, where the follow- 
ing three years were spent in the public schools of Cairo. He was a 
high school student when he abandoned his studies to take up practical 
business life in the office of his father. There he familiarized himself 
with the land titles in Alexander county and did clerical work as a 
compiler of a set of individual records until 1887, when, having at- 
tained his majority, he separated himself from parental associations 
and began an independent career at Mound City. He here established 
himself as an abstractor of titles, having gained a thorough and practi- 



732 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

cal knowledge of the business while in the office of his father, and has 
continued in that line of business to the present time. His training and 
ability in that direction led to his appointment the year of his advent 
to Mound City as deputy to B. L. Ulen, then circuit clerk of Pulaski 
county, and he later served eight years in a similar capacity for C. S. 
Britton during the latter 's incumbency of the circuit clerk's office. 

In 1904 Mr. Basterday was himself elected circuit clerk of Pulaski 
county as a Republican, and in 1908 was re-elected to the office, his 
last election being without opposition. During this long service, he 
has compiled a set of records for himself besides doing a vast amount 
of other work while a deputy, and his acquaintance with the condition 
of titles in Pulaski county exceeds that of any other of its citizens. He 
has also served twelve years as police judge and is president of the 
Board of Education of Mound City. In all of his public service he has 
proved a faithful, prompt and capable official, discharging his duties 
with a sense of conscientious obligation, and as a citizen he has so lived 
as to command the highest respect of his community. 

He is a prominent figure in the fraternal circles of his city. For 
many years he has served as secretary of the Blue Lodge of Masons at 
Mound City ; is a past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias, 
has been a delegate to the Grand Lodge of that order and was made 
chairman of the committee on necrology in that body; is a past noble 
grand of the Mound City Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and has served his lodge in the Grand Lodge of the state; is 
sachem of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men ; worthy 
patron of the Masonic auxiliary order, Order of the Eastern Star ; and 
is a member of the Modern "Woodmen of America and the Pythian Sis- 
ters. He also holds a membership in the K. M. K. C. of Cairo. 

On May 26, 1890, at Mound City, Illinois, Mr. Easterday was united 
in marriage to Miss Bertie Kennedy, a daughter of William R. Ken- 
nedy, whose father served as the first sheriff of Pulaski county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Easterday have one son, Floyd Easterday, who is now a trav- 
eling salesman for the U. S. Gypsum Company of Dallas, Texas. 

WILLIAM S. HILL. The Carbondale Herald, a weekly publication, is 
a bright, clean, newsy journal, decidedly Republican in its views, and is 
ably conducted by two gentlemen of talent and ability, William S. Hill, 
the subject of this sketch, having charge of its editorial department, 
while his son, Burt E. Hill, is business manager. A son of John Mc- 
Dowell Hill, William S. Hill was born in Monroe county, Illinois, July 
10, 1843, coming from Virginian ancestry. 

John McDowell Hill was born in Virginia in 1816. Six years later 
he was brought by his parents to Monroe county, Illinois, where he was 
brought up and educated. Succeeding to the occupation of his ances- 
tors, he became a tiller of the soil, and continued in that independent 
occupation until his death, in March, 1845, ere reaching manhood's 
prime. He was a man of sterling worth, and a member of the Baptist 
church. He married Nancy Gooding, of Belleville. Illinois, and she 
survived him upwards of half a century, dying in Jackson county, Illi- 
nois, in 1902. 

The only son of his parents, William S. Hill was a small child when 
left fatherless. He lived with his mother in Belleville, Illinois, until 
teven years of age, when he went to Randolph county, where he was 
employed on a farm near Percy until 1861. Going to Chester, Illinois, 
in 1864, he established a small printing business, which he conducted 
for seven years. From 1868 until 1880 Mr. Hill was engaged as a 
painting contractor at Steeleville, Illinois, and the following ten years 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 733 

was actively engaged in mercantile pursuits in Cutler, Perry county. 
Going to DuQuoin, Illinois, in 1890, he founded the DuQuoin Herald, of 
which he was the manager for two years. Coming to Carbondale in 
1892, Mr. Hill started the Carbondale Herald, but soon afterward sold 
the paper to John H. Barton, and worked in its office as city editor. In 
1910, in company with his son, Burt E. Hill, Mr. Hill purchased the 
paper, and has since continued its editorship. 

Mr. Hill married, in Chester, Illinois, in 1865, Eliza Servant. Her 
father, the late Colonel R. B. Servant, was born at Old Point Comfort, 
Virginia, in 1801, and died in Chester, Illinois, in 1870. He was a man 
of much prominence and influence, and in addition to representing his 
district in the Illinois State Legislature for six years was for several 
terms judge of Randolph county. Of the eight children born of the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Hill, seven are living, namely : "W. C., of Chi- 
cago ; Nancy 0., wife of N. S. Weiler ; Burt E., business manager of the 
Herald; Parker L. ; Jennie, wife of W. O. Hern, of Carbondale ; Samuel 
G. ; and Eva R. 

Burt E. Hill was born July 5, 1875, in Randolph county, Illinois, 
and received his early education in the public schools of that and Jack- 
son counties. Active, industrious, and possessing undoubted executive 
ability, he is now meeting with well-merited success as business mana- 
ger of the Carbondale Herald, which he, jointly with his father, owns. 
A Democrat in politics, he has rendered the city excellent service as an 
alderman, having represented the Fourth ward for two terms in the 
City Council. He is a member of the Christian church, and contributes 
generously towards its support. He married, in 1903, Etta Brantley, 
who died November 11, 1907, leaving one child, Margaret Hill. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of 
Masons, to which his father also belongs ; of the Knights of Pythias ; the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; and to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

WILLIAM OSCAR HEARN. Disease, accident, ordinary sickness "the 
thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to" render necessary in 
every community good drugs and medicants in sufficient quantities to 
meet requirements and within easy reach when they are needed, which 
is often with the utmost haste. The men who deal in these indispens- 
able articles, and deal squarely with the public in handling them, are 
public benefactors and entitled to high consideration from those who 
are the beneficiaries of their enterprise. 

For this reason, and because of his excellent character as a man, 
his public spirit and progressiveness as a citizen, his engaging social 
qualities and his ample and up-to-date provision for the wants of the 
people in his lines of trade, William 0. Hearn, one of the successful 
and capable druggists of Carbondale. is held in the highest esteem by 
the residents of the city and the county of Jackson in which it is lo- 
cated. He has been connected with the drug trade in the city but seven 
years, and merchandising in it on his own account but one, but he has 
won their confidence by his ability in his chosen line of work and his 
integrity and square dealing in all his transactions with them. 

Mr. Hearn was born in Carbondale, on April 30. 1881, and is a son 
of William L. and Mary (Pulley) Hearn. The father is a contractor 
and builder, and the evidences of his skill and capacity in his line of 
work are to be found in all parts of the city in residence and business 
structures, and also in some of the more pretentious works of public 
improvement put up for the enlarged comfort and convenience of the 
people. He takes a great interest in the growth and progress of the 



734 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

city and county, and is always willing to do all he can to aid in pro- 
moting this and providing for the general welfare of the community in 
every way. 

The son received a high-school education, and after being gradu- 
ated therefrom studied pharmacy at the State University in Chicago, 
from which he was graduated in 1904. He then returned to his native 
city and began his business career as a clerk with E. K. Porter. On 
May 1, 1910, he purchased the E. S. Patten Drug Store, now known as 
"The Hearn Drug Store, " and that name has become synonymous with 
excellence in goods, skill in pharmacy and uprightness in dealing. This 
was the first drug store established in Carbondale. 

It is to be said to the credit of Mr. Hearn that although he is still 
a young man in years and much younger, even, in business, he is very 
enterprising both in studying the wants of the community and in pro- 
viding for them ; and also that he is not only skillful but conscientious 
in the application of his science to the practical requirements of his 
trade. His prescription department is directly under his personal su- 
pervision at all times, and is all that full knowledge and the utmost 
care can make it in the purity of its drugs and the manner in which 
they are compounded. 

On June 21, 1905, Mr. Hearn was united in marriage with Miss 
Jennie S. Hill, a daughter of W. S. Hill, editor of the Southern Illinois 
Herald, one of the wide-awake and progressive newspapers published 
in Carbondale. Mr. Hearn is a deacon in the Christian church and the 
secretary of its Sunday-school. Fraternally he is a Freemason, a Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America and a Knight of Pythias, and at this time 
(1911) is chancellor commander of his lodge in the order last named. 

GEORGE H. HUFFMAN. Rapidly the ranks of those who took active 
part in the Civil war are thinning. One after another the gray-haired 
veterans are going to join their comrades in a land where bloodshed 
and suffering are unknown. Comparitively few of the defenders of 
the flag in the 'sixties are now left who are able to hold their own 
in the keen struggle of present-day commercial life. Physical infirm- 
ities have long since compelled the great majority of the survivors to 
drop out of the race. Yet here and there are to be found exceptions. 
Now and then a sturdy old warrior is found whose eye is as bright 
and whose step is as firm as those of the younger generation, and who 
yet finds keen enjoyment in a struggle in which he is pitted against 
the sons and grandsons of his comrades of other days. Such a man is 
George H. Huffman, the well-known stock buyer and dealer of Vienna, 
who, although more than sixty-six years of age, has declined to fall 
behind in the rapid march of American progress, and stands today a 
sturdy type of American enterprise. Mr. Huffman was born Decem- 
ber 30, 1845, on a farm in Guilford county, North Carolina, and is a 
son of Hillary and Salome (Clapp) Huffman, and a grandson of Joshua 
Huffman, whose father was a native of Germany. 

Hillary Huffman took his family from North Carolina to western 
Tennessee, and from the latter locality, in 1860, to Johnson county, on 
account of his Union sympathies. Settling on a farm near Vienna, Mr. 
Huffman engaged in agricultural pursuits, and there his death oc- 
curred at about the time of the close of the Civil war. lie and his 
wife had children as follows : John J., Catherine Elizabeth and Sarah 
Ellen, all of whom are deceased ; George H. ; Mary Ann, who died in 
infancy ; J. C., who lives in Grand Tower, Jackson county ; and Mrs. 
Alice Meredith, who resides in Lincoln. Nebraska. 

George H. Huffman received a common school education, and when 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 735 

still a lad learned to operate machinery, his first employment being in 
his father's mill in North Carolina. In the spring of 1863 he enlisted in 
Company G, Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry, under Captain William Prick- 
ens and Colonel Capron, in General Sherman's army. His first service 
was around Knoxville, Tennessee, from whence he went to Big Shanty, 
Kenesaw Mountain, served around Atlanta and Macon, and partici- 
pated in the famous "March to the Sea." At Mulberry Creek, 
Georgia, he was taken prisoner by the enemy, and was confined for 
eight months and seven days in various Confederate prisons. He was 
at the terrible place of confinement at Andersonville, and when re- 
moved to Charleston he and his fellow-prisoners suffered the dangers 
and agony of mind of being under the bombardment of their own 
troops. He was then taken to Florence, South Carolina, and eventually 
to Goldsboro, North Carolina, and from the latter place succeeded in 
making a daring escape. From eight hundred to one thousand men 
were under the supervision of three lines of guards, the prisoners' 
camp being located near a pine woods. Mr. Huffman discovered that 
a large pine tree had fallen over the line of the wall, and during the 
night climbed into the branches, and under the cover of darkness 
worked his way out. At nine o'clock he found himself in a ravine, and 
during that day managed to place three miles between himself and his 
pursuers. He was then hidden by Lazarus Pearson, a Quaker farmer, 
at whose home he remained for seven days, when he was given the 
Friend 's exception papers, for which the good man had paid the Con- 
federacy the sum of five hundred dollars. With Henry Preston, a fel- 
low-refugee, to whom had been given the Quaker's son-in-law's papers, 
and accompanied by Pearson's two daughters, Mr. Huffman then wenb 
through the Confederate cavalry lines. Later, at Wilmington, North 
Carolina, with William Pickens and a Mr. Cox, Mr. Huffman was again 
captured with a gang of recruits, but during the next day managed to 
get away at Newbern, which was held by the Union forces. From 
thence he went to Annapolis and safety, and was sent from that point 
to the barracks at Camp Butler, where he was mustered out of the 
service in the spring of 1865. At the beginning of his career Mr. 
Huffman served as a scout for the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry, the 
Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, the Fifth Iowa Cavalry and the Fourth 
Illinois. Cavalry, and while engaged in this service in Carroll county, 
Tennessee, received a wound in his right thigh which many years later 
developed into a large tumor, which it was necessary to remove. 

After his gallant and faithful service Mr. Huffman returned to the 
occupations of peace and developed into an excellent citizen. His first 
employment was at the blacksmith trade, which he followed until 1869, 
being engaged by contractors on the Big Four Railroad at Tunnell Hill 
when that railroad was under construction, and there his knowledge 
of machinery stood him in good stead. After this he engaged in farm- 
ing and the implement and farm machinery business, subsequently 
opening a mine at New Burnside, which he operated for three years, 
but sold it on the completion of the railroad, and in 1873 moved to a 
farm of two hundred acres located in Simpson township. In 1879 Mr. 
Huffman took his family to Metropolis, in order that his children might 
be educated iinder Professor Bowlby, and continued to live there until 
1884, Mr. Huffman in the meantime managing his farm as well as a 
sawmill in Johnson county. He returned to the farm in 1884, and for 
a few years conducted an implement business as well as a meat and 
produce enterprise in Vienna, but gradually gave up his other interests 
as his livestock business grew, and to this he now gives the greater 
part of his time and attention, the farm having been sold in 1905. His 



736 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

livestock business now totals sixty carloads or sixty thousand dollars 
annually, while he does an annual business in horses and mules that 
amounts to fifteen thousand dollars. He owns one of the finest resi- 
dence properties in Vienna, valued at three thousand five hundred dol- 
lars. On February 7, 1894, Mr. Huffman met with a serious accident, 
in which he lost his left arm, but he has not allowed this handicap to 
interfere with his business activities. A public-spirited citizen who is 
always ready to do his share in looking after the interests of his com- 
munity, Mr. Huffman served as treasurer of Johnson county for four 
years, beginning in 1899. However, he has not been a seeker after the 
spectacular, but has kept the even tenor of his way. He has been con- 
tent with the ordinary rewards of life, and thus it is that we find him 
today one of the few of his generation who are still able to continue the 
daily routine of business. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, and is very popular with the comrades of Vienna post, while 
his religious connection is with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In 1870 Mr. Huffman was married to Miss Marian Jones, daughter 
of the Hon. Thomas Jones, former representative and a leading man of 
his day in Johnson county. Twelve children have been born to this 
union, of whom nine survive, as follows : Mrs. Marion McConnell ; Mrs. 
Gertrude Allard ; Mrs. Clara Gillespie ; Mrs. Dollie Palmer ; Mrs. Daisy 
Carter; Mrs. Mamie Eagan, of Chicago; Mrs. Pearl Whielen, of Ste- 
ger, Illinois ; Charles G., an attorney of Vienna, Illinois ; and Frances 
Marion. 

SAMUEL H. REES. The modern pharmacist is a man of many call- 
ings, for he is expected to bear upon his shoulders the burden and 
responsibilities of others, and not only must he understand his own 
profession thoroughly, but he must be able to rectify and detect the 
occasional blunders of the medical fraternity, to give kindly advice to 
those unwilling or unable to call in a physician, and to at all times 
place his establishment and time at the disposal of the general public. 
The course of training is long and arduous and the fitting up of a mod- 
ern store expensive, and no other line of human endeavor demands 
such prolonged hours of service, so that the pharmacist of today, in 
order to be successful, must be a man whose love of his chosen voca- 
tion is placed above all other things. One who has proven worthy of 
the trust and confidence placed in him, and a man who has been prom- 
inent in public life, is Samuel H. Rees, owner of the only pharmacy at 
Belknap, a man than whom there is no more highly esteemed nor pop- 
ular citizen in the community. He was born on a farm in Jackson 
county, Illinois, March 11, 1861, and is a son of the late Dr. Alonzo 
P. and Jane (Krews) Rees. 

James L. Rees, the grandfather of Samuel H. Rees, was a native 
of Virginia, of German descent, who migrated to Tennessee and thence 
to Jackson county, Illinois, where he became one of the earliest set- 
tlers. Dr. Alonzo P. Rees was born and reared in Tennessee, and as . 
a young man took up the study of medicine, which he practiced for 
many years in Jackson, Johnson and Pulaski counties. He was one 
of the earliest practitioners of this section, and at the time of his death, 
in 1887, when he was fifty-eight years of age, no man was better 
known or more sincerely liked in this part of the state. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Jane Krews, was born and reared in Jack- 
son county, and died in 1895, at the age of fifty-six years. They had 
a family of seven children, as follows: Samuel H. ; John D., who is 
engaged in the clothing and general merchandise business at Owens- 
boro, Kentucky ; H. F., who is a United States rural free delivery car- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 737 

rier; Mary D., the wife of Samuel D. Peeler, one of the leading agri- 
culturists of Cache township ; Martha P., wife of T. E. Williamson, of 
Claremore, Oklahoma; Anna, the wife of J. D. Copeland, of Blythes- 
ville, Arkansas ; and Nellie, the wife of W. P. Weeks, of Joppa, Illinois. 
Samuel H. Rees spent his boyhood on the home farm and attended 
the district schools until he was fifteen years of age, at which time he 
came to Belknap and secured employment as a clerk in the drug store, 
also attending school in the winter and doing sawmill work until he 
was twenty years of age. In 1881 he took a position in a drug store 
at Vienna, where he remained until 1884, and then went to Murphys- 
boro, where he followed the same line until the summer of 1886. At 
this time he came to Belknap and purchased the business which he 
has continued to conduct for the past quarter of a century, his popu- 
larity being so great with the people of his community that no rival 
establishment has offered competition. Until 1910 he was the owner 
of a farm near Belknap, but in that year disposed of it, and he also 
has engaged in life insurance work, but the major part of his atten- 
tion has been given to his pharmacy. He has a full and up-to-date 
line of drugs, proprietary medicines, and other articles usually found 
in a first-class drug establishment, and his business extends all over 
Belknap and the surrounding country. He is the owner of his own 
residence and the building in which his business is carried on. A 
stanch Republican, Mr. Rees has, up to a year or so ago, taken an ac- 
tive interest in the success of his party, in the ranks of which he has 
ever been a willing and faithful worker. Enjoying to the fullest de- 
gree the friendship and confidence of the men high up in the coun- 
cils of the party, he has always sought rather to assist his friends than 
himself, although at various times he has been mayor, alderman and 
school director of Belknap, and has shown marked executive ability. 
He started in life without a dollar, his business in Belknap having 
been opened on borrowed capital, with no other security than his per- 
sonal word, but he was soon able to repay the loan and to build up a 
profitable business. He has been, however, a man of many charities, 
and in giving assistance to his friends has often embarrassed himself in 
a financial way. A faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
Mr. Rees has been liberal in supporting its movements, and, being a 
modest, unassuming and unostentations man, the extent of his char- 
ities will probably never be known. Fraternally he is popular with 
the members of the Masons, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Odd 
Fellows and the Tribe of Ben Hur, to all of which he belongs. During 
ing President Cleveland's first administration Mr. Rees was appointed 
postmaster at Belknap, and again, on August 1, 1902, he received the 
appointment to that position, serving therein until April 15, 1911. 

In 1885 Mr. Rees was married to Miss Ella Hartman, of Chester, 
Illinois, daughter of Tobias and Mary A. Hartman, the former of 
whom is now deceased, while the latter resides in Washington, D. C., 
and six children have been born to this union, namely: Walter A., a 
Methodist minister at Gillette, Arkansas, who is married and has a 
son, William ; Guy H., a barber by trade, and now an attendant at the 
hospital at Kankakee; Mrs. Blanche Carter, who has one child, Glen; 
Theodore, a carpenter by trade, who resides at Gillette, Arkansas ; and 
Edith and Helen, who reside at home with their parents. 

AURELIUS GREEN HUGHES. The shadow of adversity hung darkly 
over this valued citizen and public official of Carbondale even before 
his birth. Its gloomy pall continued to droop around him in his child- 
hood and youth, and was never lifted until by his own efforts he totally 



738 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

dispelled it by boldly challenging Fate to do her worst and making his 
own way in the world to consequence and standing among men by his 
own efforts and in spite of her displeasure. When she found out the 
mettle he was made of, and realized that he did not tremble under her 
frowns, she changed her demeanor toward him, as if weary of tor- 
menting him, and became all smiles and generosity. 

Mr. Hughes was born in Franklin county, Illinois, on April 8, 1862, 
and is the son of Granville and Adaville (Clark) Hughes, natives of 
Tennessee. The father was a farmer in that state, and prospering as 
such according to the standard of his time and locality. But he was not 
spared to continue his labors and put himself in a position to make 
any provision for his family after his death. This occurred sometime 
before his son Aurelius was born, and after the sad event the mother 
moved to Illinois. She died soon after giving birth to her son, and he 
was left in early infancy to the care of an uncle. This relative reared 
him to the age of twenty-one, and gave him such school facilities as his 
circumstances allowed. The uncle, E. L. Hughes, was a farmer in Jack- 
son county, this state, but had a struggle for his own advancement, and 
the nephew was obliged to take his part in the work of the farm and 
make his schooling secondary to that. He did not repine at this, for 
he felt within him the stirring of a spirit of enterprise and self-reliance 
which kept him inspired with the hope of better things, and he has since 
realized them. 

After attaining his majority Aurelius G. Hughes worked in mines 
four years, and then returned to farming. For three years he worked 
industriously and to good purpose on farms he rented, then bought a 
farm on credit. As he paid for one tract of land he puchased another, 
and kept on in this way until he owned 200 acres. He was living at 
that time in Williamson county, and there he bought and sold a great 
deal of land, becoming a considerable dealer in real estate of an agri- 
cultural character. All the while his fortunes were mending and he 
was forging ahead in the struggle for progress among men. He gave 
his own affairs close and careful attention, but did not neglect the pub- 
lic interests of the county in which he lived, and devoted to them a fair 
share of his time and energy. For many years he served his locality 
as school director, and for nine as road commissioner. That his ser- 
vices were faithful, intelligent and progressive, and that the community 
found them highly useful is proven by the universal appreciation in 
which they were held and the warm commendations passed upon them 
by all classes of the people. 

In 1902 he moved to Carbondale and became the proprietor of a 
hotel, the Hundley House. He managed his business in this enterprise 
with his customary energy and close attention to every detail, and was 
making an extended reputation for the house, when a disastrous fire 
destroyed it and its contents a few months after he took charge of it, 
and he once more became a tiller of the soil, also engaging in the livery 
business. He was not dismayed by his misfortune, and lost no time in 
repining over it. He went at his farming operations and livery trade 
as if he meant to make them compensate him for what the fire had 
robbed him of, and he did it in the course of time. 

In 1907 Mr. Hughes was elected county supervisor of Jackson 
county. He was re-elected in 1909 and again in 1911, and has been 
chairman of the board during the 1909 and 1911 terms. His services in 
this position have been well and wisely rendered, and are accounted as 
of great advantage to the county. They have been twice submitted to 
the judgment of the people, and in both cases have been handsomely 
approved by them. To those who know the facts the reason is patent 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 739 

enough. He is intelligent, progressive and knowing, and he applies 
all his powers to the work of his office, just as he does to his own affairs. 
He is prudent and careful, too, of the public funds at the command of 
the board, and as the county receives good work and secures excellent 
results from his official industry without any extravagant outlay, its 
people cannot but be well pleased, and they do not hesitate to say 
they are. 

Mr. Hughes was married on September 30, 1884, to Miss Clara 
Clark of Carbondale. They have two children: Harmon A., who is as- 
sociated with his father in conducting the operations of the farm; and 
Louis D., who is a physician in active practice at Delaware, Oklahoma. 
He was graduated from the medical department of the St. Louis Uni- 
versity at the age of twenty-one. 

The father is a Republican in politics and active in the service of his 
party, although he never allows partisan considerations to outweigh his 
sense of duty in the administration of his office. In connection with 
that his first concern is the welfare of the people, and he has no other. 
In fraternal circles he belongs to the Odd Fellows, the Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Carbondale Lodge of Elks, and takes an earnest 
interest and an active part in the proceedings of all his lodges. He 
is one of the Jackson county's most reliable and useful citizens. 

OLIVER M. FEAIM. A man of enterprise and progressive ideas who 
has done much to develop the interests of Johnson county, especially in 
the line of reclaiming farming lands from the swamp and timber, Oliver 
M. Fraim, of Belknap, Illinois, has associated himself with ventures of 
an extensive nature and is now considered one of the leading business 
men of his community. As the promoter of various enterprises he has 
done much to develop the best resources of this section, and for a num- 
ber of years he has been identified with railroad contract work and the 
automobile industry, while his present large general merchandise house 
has grown from a small beginning into one of the leading stores of its 
kind in this part of the county. Mr. Fraim was born April 14, 1864, in 
Mt. Vernon, Indiana, and is a son of Elvis Linch and Margaret (Meek) 
Fraim. 

Elvis Linch Fraim was born in Indiana, whence his father, a native 
of the East, had come at an early day and engaged in the packing busi- 
ness. Elvis L. as a young man interested himself in flat-boating from 
Indiana points to New Orleans, and when the Civil war broke out he 
enlisted and served until its close in the Union army. On his return he 
engaged in farming near the town of Flora, Illinois, where he died in 
December, 1911. He married Margaret Meek, daughter of Isaac Meek, 
a cabinetmaker who was city clerk of Kinmundy, Illinois, up to the time 
he was eighty-two years old, and they had a family of six children, 
namely : Emma, Mattie, Lula, Maggie, Oliver M. and William E. 

Oliver M. Fraim was educated in the schools of Loogootee, Indiana, 
and when sixteen years of age became a clerk in a store owned by 
Daniel A. Goodman, who was engaged in the timber business in South- 
ern Illinois, with headquarters at Indianapolis, Indiana. In April, 
1893, Mr. Fraim was made a flattering offer by a South Bend concern, 
but his employers refused to release him, and in August of the same 
year, when they asked him to take a lay-off, he decided to branch out on 
his own account. He had traveled extensively over the south in the in- 
terests of his firm, and had filled important contracts for the railroads of 
Southern Illinois, and is still an extensive tie and timber buyer, fur- 
nishing the ties for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. On his 
return from Indianapolis, in 1893, he located in Belknap, where he 



740 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

opened a restaurant, and also engaged in the buying and selling of wheel 
spokes for Eastern firms in Ohio, Indiana and Eastern Pennsylvania. 
He soon built up a big store trade, which has grown into the present large 
general merchandise business, with an investment of ten thousand dol- 
lars. Also, during this time, he contracted with the Big Four Railway 
Company to furnish their piling and timber for extensions, and with the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad for their piling at Joppa and their 
inclines. From the beginning of the automobile industry until Septem- 
ber, 1907, when he retired from the field, Mr. Fraim furnished seventy- 
five per cent of all the spokes that were put into automobile construction 
throughout the United States. Mr. Fraim is also an agriculturist, and 
was the pioneer in the development of bottom or swamp land. He 
would buy farms considered practically worthless, for a few hundred 
dollars, would cut the timber, drain the swamps, and sell the same 
property for around three thousand or thirty-five 'hundred dollars. 
Quick to see and grasp an opportunity, Mr. Fraim 's operations have cov- 
ered a wide field and have brought him into contact with a number of 
the leading business men of his section. Although he is shrewd and keen 
in his dealings, he has always respected the rights of others, and his busi- 
ness standing wherever he has operated is high. As mayor of Belknap 
he gave the city an admirable business administration, during which 
many needed reforms were introduced. Fraternally he is popular as a 
member of the Belknap Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and he and his family 
are members of the Belknap Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
has served as a trustee for the past ten years. 

In 1883 Mr. Fraim was married to Miss Mattie West, of Belknap, 
daughter of Lemuel West, a native of Ohio, and they have had a family 
of seven children, namely: Eric, a minister at Port Sanilac, Michigan, 
who is married and has four children, Beatrice, Irene, Elden Morton 
and Virgil Ray; Floyd, in the timber business in Louisiana, is married 
and has two children, Elizabeth and Harvey Oliver; Grace, the wife 
of S. D. Martin, a barber of Belknap, has one child, Hazel ; Fred ; Mrs. 
Hazel Matheny; Ray McKinley and Mabel reside at home with their 
parents. 

HUGH SEYMOUR ANTRIM. One of the prominent business citizens 
of Cairo, whose activities in the commercial world have been such as 
to make his name familiar to the large grain-buying firms of Southern 
Illinois, and who has also interested himself in the public welfare of 
his adopted city and with social and religious matters, is Hugh Sey- 
mour Antrim, head of the H. S. Antrim Grain Company and president 
of the Cairo Board of Trade. Mr. Antrim was born at St. Louis, 
Missouri, October 14, 1867, and during the following year his father, 
John Antrim, brought his family to Cairo, where he had been engaged 
in business during the Civil war, and where he passed the remaining 
years of his life. 

The progenitor of the Antrim family, according to tradition and 
history, came to the United States as a member of Penn's Colony, be- 
ing of Scotch and Irish descent. The grandfather of Hugh S. Antrim, 
Joel Antrim, came from the Keystone state of Indiana during the early 
history of the latter commonwealth, and there died. John Antrim was 
born in Madison, Indiana, in 1830, and there spent his youth in a modest 
clerkship. He began life with little more than an elementary educa- 
tion, became a flatboatman when nearing his majority, and ran the 
Ohio river for several years, passing late in the 'forties and during the 
early 'fifties the site of Cairo when a single house marked it. When 
he left the river he engaged in merchandising at Metropolis, Illinois, 



BHYERSITY 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 741 

but left that point and came to Cairo, being a merchant in the latter 
city during the Civil war, while it was occupied by Federal troops. 
He made the intimate acquaintance of Generals Grant and Logan and 
other officers of high rank, a fact which served him advantageously later 
on in life. Going from Cairo to St. Louis, Mr. Antrim carried on a 
mercantile business in the latter city for a rather brief period, when 
he returned to the city at the junction of the big rivers and died here 
in 1904. He became a stockholder in the old First Bank of Cairo, 
contributed as a public-spirited citizen toward the general welfare of 
the town, took a citizen's interest in politics as a Republican and was 
highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a Knight Templar 
Mason and past high Priest of his Chapter, and was a consistent and 
liberal member of the Presbyterian church. He married Eliza Parr, 
a daughter of Eli Parr, an agriculturist of Concordia, Kentucky, where 
Mrs. Antrim was born, and she died in 1892, having been the mother of 
the following children: John, who is a traveling salesman out of 
Cairo; Albert, who passed away in 1891, unmarried; Nellie May, who 
became the wife of John A. Haynes and died in 1899 ; Addie P., who 
married Fred A. Kent, of Chicago; Miss Viola, who lives in Chicago; 
Hugh Seymour; and Walter S., who died at New Orleans in 1899, leav- 
ing a son, Charles F. Antrim, of Chicago. 

Hugh Seymour Antrim was educated in the Cairo graded schools 
and began his business career at the age of fourteen years as a clerk 
in the grain firm of C. M. Howe & Brother. He became a member of 
the firm in 1900 and succeeded to the business in 1906. His business 
is a purely domestic one and embraces the handling of food-stuffs as 
a shipper to points affording the best market for grain. In his public 
relation to the community Mr. Antrim is active among the commercial 
interests of Cairo. He is president of the Cairo Board of Trade and 
has represented his city as a delegate from that body in various meet- 
ings over the country, Chicago, Washington, D. C., St. Louis and 
Kansas City, and as a delegate to the Deep Waterway conventions he 
represented his city at Washington, December 7, 1911. He served as 
a member of the city council from the Third ward of Cairo for one 
term, and is a member of the Commercial Club and a director of the 
Central Building and Loan Association. He is a Master Mason and 
past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, and past exalted ruler of the 
B. P. 0. E., representing that order as delegate at Detroit in 1910, 
and at Atlantic City in 1911. 

On October 9, 1894, Mr. Antrim was married at Carbondale, Illi- 
nois, to Miss Claribel McNeal, of Denver, Colorado. Her father was 
the late Judge R. T. McNeal, prominent in church and at the bar of 
Denver, and founder of the Women's College of Colorado. He passed 
away January 14, 1911, and he and his wife, who was a Miss Ellett, 
of Virginia, had seven children. Mrs. Antrim was educated in Potter's 
College, Bowling Green, Kentucky, and she and Mr. Antrim have 
three children, namely : Hugh Seymour, who is a junior of the Cairo 
High school; Walter Ellett, a freshman in the same school; and Vir- 
ginia. Mr. Antrim has brought up his household in the Presbyterian 
church, and was trustee of the congregation during the erection of the 
new house of worship of that faith some years ago. 

CHARLES WEHRENBERG. The life of Charles Wehrenberg, Sr., since 
he became a citizen of the United States, has been rife with activity, 
in both a political way and in his private citizenship. Coming to 
America as a young man he early fell a victim to the charm of public 
life, and he has been a vital force in every movement which compelled 



742 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

his attention from the beginning of his life as a citizen up to the pres- 
ent time. 

Charles Wehrenberg was born in Coeslin, Pomerania, one of the 
small states of the German Empire, on January 31, 1848. He is the 
son of Frederick W. and Adelaide (Egel) Wehrenberg, and he is the 
sole survivor of their four children. The father, Frederick W. "Weh- 
renberg, came to America in 1864 and did a considerable prospecting 
about with a view to finding a suitable location, it being his intention 
to bring his family and settle in America. He became engaged in 
farming near Mound City, Illinois, and it was while thus occupied that 
his son Charles came over to pay a visit to his father and, if possible, 
persuade him to return to the home in the Fatherland. However, 
before he was able to influence the elder Wehrenberg to that end, the 
father fell suddenly ill and died in 1868. Charles Wehrenberg had 
by that time become so attached to America, recognizing in it as he 
did the splendid opportunities for the future that lay at every hand 
that he himself was unwilling to return to his home in Germany, and, 
instead, settled down in the home his father had prepared for them 
and took up the business of farming where the father had left off. 

The early education of the young man had been somewhat beyond 
that of the average German youth, he having secured a liberal edu- 
cation in the Royal Prussian Gymnasium, and he was thus well fitted 
for the duties of public life, which attracted him from the beginning 
of his residence in America. 

Mr. Wehrenberg lived quietly on his farm and devoted himself 
industriously to that pursuit, becoming widely known throughout the 
county as a practical and successful agriculturist, and it was not until 
the year 1889 that he permitted his energies in that line of endeavor 
to abate somewhat, at which time he was elected to the office of sheriff 
of Pulaski county, and he moved into Mound City to take up the 
duties of that office. In the year 1885 he was named for the offices 
of assessor and treasurer by the Democratic party, whose cause he had 
adopted when he became a citizen, and he was duly elected to those 
offices, ably and satisfactorily performing his duties while still re- 
taining the actual management of his farm. He served one term in 
that capacity and another in that of sheriff of his county. While the 
encumbent of the latter named office his was the arduous task of main- 
taining order during the Switchmen's strike of 1892, and later in the 
Universal strike of the Illinois Central Employes of 1894. An inter- 
esting incident of the latter difficulty was the sending by the Illinois 
Central of a carload of Pinkerton men to be sworn in as deputies. Mr. 
Wehrenberg, however, in his official capacity, declined their aid, be- 
lieving that he would have better results with the aid of his own 
constituents as deputies. Of the thirteen capital crimes committed 
during his tenure of office, Mr. Wehrenberg was successful in arrest- 
ing and bringing to trial all of the murderers, and his entire admin- 
istration was marked by the same efficient performance of every duty, 
however slight, that characterized his private life and made him a suc- 
cessful man of business. 

At the expiration of his term as sheriff Mr. Wehrenberg gave over 
his active farming interests and engaged in the real estate business. 
He also acquired the insurance agency of Bradley & Roberts, and 
since that time he has controlled the major portion of all the under- 
writing business done in the county seat. He is still interested in 
farming, however, and is an extensive holder of farm land, regarding 
it as the safest form of investment for the conservative buyer, and 
believing it to be the property which promises the most secure support 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 743 

against the day of adverse circumstances which the future may unfold 
for even the most prosperous. 

On April 16, 1873, Mr. Wehrenberg married in Pulaski county 
Miss Mary Curry, a daughter of James Curry and a grand-daughter 
of Judge J. M. Thompson, widely known throughout this country and 
one of its pioneers. The issue of this marriage were : Frederick, who 
died in early childhood ; Adelaide, wife of Michael Murphy, of Mound 
City; Charles, Jr., who has followed in the footsteps of his father and 
is at present sheriff of Pulaski county; and Flora. Lola and Mollie, 
three fair young daughters who were called home within a brief period 
and whose loss the family mourns irreparably. 

Mr. Wehrenberg is a Master Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and is a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

HON. JOHN PRESTON MATHIS. Trained faculties and an enlightened 
understanding, in these modern days, contribute materially to individ- 
ual success, and more and more is the world at large asking for educated 
men, not only for the accepted professions, but also for those along 
agricultural lines and in the field of politics. The trained thinker is 
demanded for the deciding of public questions which, while they may 
be perplexing problems to the general public, must be clear to the law 
maker. In Hon. John Preston Mathis Johnson county, Illinois, has a 
man of scholarly attainments, one who for more than a decade was an 
educator himself, and one who has made his knowledge a stepping-stone 
to positions of great public responsibility. Mr. Mathis was born on a 
farm in Bloomfield township. Johnson county, July 26, 1867. and is a 
son of Robert D. and Lucinda (Fairless) Mathis, grandson of William 
Mathis, a native of Kentucky, great-grandson of John Mathis, of Vir- 
ginia, and great-great-grandson of John Mathis. 

The great-grandfather of John P. Mathis was one of the pioneer 
settlers of Trigg county, Kentucky, and was married to Margaret Brown, 
settling in Randolph county in 1846. "William Mathis. one of his sons, 
migrated to Southern Illinois in 1849, coming with his wife and four 
children in an ox-eart. and bought land from the Government in Bloom- 
field township, on which he erected a log cabin. The remainder of his 
life was spent in agricultural pursuits, and his death occurred Novem- 
ber 22, 1860. His wife was Cynthia Scott, of Kentucky, a daughter of 
William and Marv (Moore) Scott, and they had a family of five chil- 
dren, namely: Robert D., Elizabeth E.. John B., Margaret A. and 
James P. 

Robert D. Mathis was born in Trigg county. Kentucky, January 18, 
1836. and was thirteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to 
Johnson county. After his marriage he lived on rented land for six 
years, but eventually purchased forty acres in Bloomfield township, and 
added thereto until he was the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and 
forty acres. A stanch Republican and a leader in his party's counsels 
in his section, he served as justice of the peace for seventeen years, col- 
lector of taxes two years and township treasurer ten years, and was 
honored and respected as a self-made man. a useful citizen and an honest 
and capable public official. He and his family were connected with the 
Methodist church. Robert D. Mathis married Lucinda Fairless, a 
daughter of Robert and Mahala (Buchanan) Fairless. of Gallatin 
county, Illinois, and they had a family of children as follows: Ellen, 
who is deceased ; William and James, who died in boyhood ; John Pres- 
ton ; George W. ; Alonzo S. ; and Mrs. Lillie Elkins, who is deceased. 
Robert D. Mathis died in October. 1900. 

John Preston Mathis was educated in the common schools of Bloom- 



744 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

field township, in a select school and in the Southern Illinois Normal 
University, at Carbondale, and during the fall of 1888 began teaching 
school. During the eleven years that followed he became well known as 
an educator in Bloomfield and Vienna townships, and during one term 
he had charge of a school in Missouri. Always an industrious and pro- 
gressive citizen in all things, Mr. Mathis carried on farming operations 
while teaching, in addition to attending select schools during the spring 
terms. It was not until 1900, after the death of his parents and his 
retirement from the homestead to Vienna, that Mr. Mathis accepted his 
first public office. At that time he became deputy county clerk, a posi- 
tion which he held until the ^all of 1902, and he then served as deputy 
sheriff until 1906, when he was elected sheriff of Johnson county on the 
Republican ticket, and capably discharged the duties of that office for 
one term. He was chosen his party's candidate in the fall of 1910 for 
the office of state representative, was elected by a comfortable majority, 
and the work he has done as a member of the Legislature has shown that 
his fellow citizens made no mistake when they chose him to look after 
their interests. Although he makes his residence in Vienna, Mr. Mathis 
still carries on farming, and owns two fine tracts, of ninety -five and 
eighty-one acres, respectively. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons, the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America, in all 
of which his popularity is great. 

Mr. Mathis was married in 1902 to Miss Sarah Elizabeth Whiteaker, 
daughter of Captain Mark Whiteaker, and they have one child, Evelyn 
Gertrude, who is now three years old. 

JOSEPH B. BUNDY. Presenting as it does a worthy example to the 
rising generation, the life of Joseph B. Bundy, of Carbondale, Illinois, 
which from early boyhood has been one of assiduous industry, untiring 
energy and unquestioned integrity, is well deserving of being sketched, 
however briefly, in the pages of this volume. Possessing untiring per- 
severance, Mr. Bundy in his youth educated himself and rose to posi- 
tions of honor and trust in the educational field, and since giving up 
that profession has been prominently identified with various large busi- 
ness enterprises, being at present auditor of the Ohio and .Mississippi 
Valley, and the Murphysboro Telephone Companies. Mr. Bundy was 
born in Saline county, Illinois, April 9, 1868, and is a son of Thomas 
and Octave (Phillips) Bundy. 

Thomas Bundy was born in 1829, in Wilson county, Tennessee, and 
was reared on a farm, coming to Illinois in 1861, and settling on a farm 
in the western part of Saline county, where he spent the remainder of 
his life, his death occurring April 25, 1892. He was a prominent agri- 
culturist of his day, was a stanch Democrat in his political views, and 
his religious faith was that of the Baptist church. The Bundy family is 
of French descent, the family name being originally spelled Bundeie, 
and first located in this country in North Carolina during Colonial 
days, from which members migrated to Ohio, Tennessee, Illinois and 
Missouri. In 1857 Thomas Bundy was married to Octave Phillips, also 
of Tennessee, and she survives her husband and lives on the old home- 
stead in Saline county, a firm believer in the teachings of the Christian 
church. They had a family of five daughters and five sons, and of 
these children Joseph B. Bundy was the fourth in order of birth. 

Joseph B. Bundy 's early life was spent on the old home farm in 
Saline county, and his early education was secured in the rural schools, 
made of logs, in which they were taught the "Three R's" and spelling 
from the old blue-backed spelling book. He grew to manhood on the 
farm, and on reaching his maturity moved to Harrisburg, the county 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 745 

seat, to make his home with his uncle, who was serving as county judge. 
During the summer he worked on his uncle's farm, with the under- 
standing that he should be allowed to attend school, but in 1884 was 
prevailed upon to come to Carboudale and enter the Southern Illinois 
Normal University. His limited means necessitated the strictest econ- 
omy, and before the close of the first year he had gone into debt one 
hundred dollars to complete his schooling, but during March, 1885, he 
passed the examination of the county superintendent of schools and re- 
ceived a teacher's certificate. He then returned to the old homestead, 
but secured a school known as the Hiller Schoolhouse, five miles west 
of Carbondale, where he taught a five months' term at a salary of thirty- 
five dollars per month. He then re-entered the normal school for the 
spring term of 1886, and in the meantime secured a school known as 
the Keown Schoolhouse, just south of the city, for a six months' term at 
forty dollars per month, in the spring following again entering the nor- 
mal. He next taught the same school at forty-five dollars per month, 
and during the following winter secured a school north of town at fifty 
dollars per month for six months, each spring term being spent as a 
student in the normal school. At this time he was elected principal of 
the Grand Tower schools, at sixty-five dollars per month, but resigned 
this position to enter the normal school for the year of 1889-1890. In 
the spring of the latter year he was elected principal of the East Side 
school of Murphysboro, at seventy-five dollars per month, a position 
which he held for two years, during the latter year receiving an ad- 
vance of ten dollars per month. At this* time, lacking but a few subjects 
to complete his course, Mr. Bundy completed his work in the normal 
school, going back and forth between the two cities, and in the spring of 
1892 was again elected to the same position, at a ten-dollar increase, but 
resigned this office to become superintendent of the public schools at 
Nashville, Illinois, the county seat of Washington county, and continued 
there for six years, during which time he built up the high school at- 
tendance from eighteen to one hundred and forty-seven pupils and 
placed it upon the list of accredited high schools of Illinois. In 1898 
Mr. Bundy gave up his school work to enter the telephone and electric 
light business in Carbondale, and has associated himself with various 
other enterprises, including the hardware and implement business. The 
possession in which he takes the greatest pride, however, is the old 
homestead, which he has purchased, and on which he has made numerous 
improvements. Mr. Bundy 's business qualifications have been univer- 
sally recognized, and his associations in the business world of Southern 
Illinois have been such as to make him one of this section's most influen- 
tial men. His political principles are those of the Republican party, 
but he has not engaged in public life, and is not a member of any fra- 
ternal associations. His religious affiliations are with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

HON. GEORGE ~W. ENGLISH. It would be hard to find a better illus- 
tration of the facility with which, under the liberal institutions of this 
great country, a man of ability and integrity may rise to any station, 
perhaps, among the most exalted, than is afforded in the history of the 
Hon. George W. English, now serving his third term as representative in 
the State Legislature, and who is fast ascending the ladder of public 
fame. Mr. English was born May 9, 1866, on a farm in Johnson county, 
Illinois, six miles east of Vienna, a son of Manuel C. and Rebecca 
(Smith) English, who both now reside on the old homestead. 

Mr. English's great-grandfather, Abraham English, came from 
county Kerry, Ireland, with his brother, James English, and settled at 



746 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Roanoke, North Carolina, during Colonial days. Abraham later re- 
moved to the Pedee River, in South Carolina, while James went North 
to Vermont, and was with Ethan Allen at the battle of Ticonderoga. 
Abraham English furnished the horse that carried the messenger bear- 
ing the news to the band of patriots that a company of Royalists were 
camped on the Pedee River, which culminated in the dispersing of that 
company. His son, Jonathan English, grandfather of George W., was 
born on the Pedee River in 1812, and became a large land owner in the 
South, but gave up a part of his land and came North at the time of the 
Seminole war, and settled in Illinois in 1846, spending the remainder of 
his life in Massac county, where his death occurred in 1891. 

Manuel C. English was born in Marshall county, Kentucky, April 
17, 1842, and when the Civil war broke out became a member of Com- 
pany B, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which he served three years, participating in numerous 
engagements and establishing an excellent war record. He was mar- 
ried to Rebecca Smith, who was born in the northern part of Massac 
county, Illinois, September 5, 1843. She was of Swedish-Scotch des- 
cent, her grandfather being an Emerson of Scotland, whose ancestors 
had originally come from Sweden, and he married Elizabeth McDonald. 
Mrs. English's father, Americus Smith, a native of North Carolina, was 
a Baptist minister, who commenced preaching when he was twenty 
years of age, and continued to preach the Gospel until he reached the 
age of seventy-five years. He came to Illinois in 1814, and at the battle 
of the Regulators against the Flatheads, at Fort Massac in 1846, he 
laid down the Bible to take up arms in behalf of law and order. It is 
believed that Sergeant McDonald, of Revolutionary fame, is also a 
member of this family 011 the maternal side. Manuel C. and Rebecca 
(Smith) English had the following children: Caddie Elizabeth Barham, 
who died in 1884, the mother of two children ; George W. ; Julia Vic- 
toria, who died January 20, 1912, the wife of H. A. Roundtree, has two 
sons and five daughters; and Charles Americus, of Mayfield, Kentucky, 
has a family of four sons and four daughters. 

George W. English remained on the home farm until he was twenty- 
four years of age, and his primary education was secured in the public 
schools. In 1883-4-5 he attended Ewing College, and he subsequently 
entered Illinois Wesleyan University, at Bloomington, from which he 
was graduated in law in 1891. In 1893 he entered into practice at 
Vienna, in partnership with H. M. Ridenhouse, of this city, and when 
that gentleman died in 1896 Mr. English took over the practice of the 
firm and has since followed it alone. He was elected to the office of city 
attorney of Vienna, and during his incumbency of that office he dis- 
played vigorous action and strict enforcement of law and order in 
the community. In 1888 he held a commission as aide-de-camp on the 
staff of Colonel Frank McCrillis, and in May, 1907, he was appointed to 
the staff as counselor of the state commander of the Sons of Veterans, 
of which he is a member. In 1906 his long and faithful labor in the 
ranks of the Democratic party in this section was rewarded by his elec- 
tion to the office of member of the Illinois State Legislature, and he is 
serving his third term in that high position, representing the Fifty-first 
district. Fraternally he is connected with the A. F. & A. M. and the 
R. A. M., the I. 0. 0. F., the K. of P., the Order of the Eastern Star, 
the Modern "Woodmen and the Royal Neighbors. His wife is an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is the teacher of 
the Bible class. 

On September 23, 1894. Mr. English was married to Miss Lillie M. 
Farris, of Johnson county. Illinois, daughter of Thomas G. and Mary 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 747 

A. (Gillespie) Farris, natives of North Carolina. Mr. Farris was of 
French descent and was reared near Salisbury, North Carolina. He 
and his wife removed to Tennessee, from whence they came to Illinois, 
where they first met and were married, and here Mr. Farris was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1894. His widow, who sur- 
vives him, resides on the Johnson county homestead. Mr. and Mrs. 
English have four sons : Thomas Farris ; George W., Jr., Virgil Carroll 
and William Jefferson. 

Mr. English has invariably commanded the respect of his co-workers 
in the Legislature, creating the impression that he is a man of judgment 
and convictions, one who could voice his sentiments before a body politic 
when there was occasion. He has administered the affairs of his office 
with marked ability and success and no districts have possessed a more 
creditable representative either in appearance or capability. His pop- 
ularity is evidenced by the fact that he has been victoriously returned 
to his high office although the opposition parties have made the most 
strenuous efforts to defeat him, thus proving that the people have faith 
in him and have long since become convinced that his policies are as safe 
and sure as they are broad, generous and progressive. 

HALL WHITEAKER, M. D. It is ordinarily conceded that when a man 
has made an unqualified success of one profession he has done all 
that the demands of ambition require, and may then be permitted to 
rest upon his laurels; but in the case of Dr. Hall Whiteaker he has not 
been content to be known and regarded only as one of the ablest ex- 
ponents of the medical profession in his locality, but has found new 
"worlds to conquer" in the field of politics. 

Dr. Hall "Whiteaker was born at New Burnside, Illinois, October 
17, 1869, and is the son of Captain Mark Whiteaker, of Vienna, 
Illinois, one of the leading citizens of Johnson county and its ex- 
sheriff. Captain Whiteaker was born in Massac county, Illinois, in 
1833, being the son of Hall Whiteaker, Sr., who migrated to Illinois 
from Pennsylvania, and later moved from Massac county to Johnson 
county, in which county he lived and died finally at his home in New 
Burnside in the year 1842. Hall Whiteaker, Sr., married Elvira 
Dameron, and of their six children five are still living. 

Their eldest child was the son, Mark, and his early educational ad- 
vantages were of the sort peculiar to Johnson county in the early 
forties. W T hen he reached his majority and found the responsibility 
of man's estate upon him he engaged in farming, in which he was 
occupied until the opening of the Civil war, when he promptly en- 
listed in the Federal army and was commissioned captain of Company 
G, One Hundred and Twentieth Infantry, serving in General Grant's 
army in its preliminary advance upon Vicksburg. He saw active ser- 
vice at Corinth, Guntown and Shiloh, subsequent to which engage- 
ments he was discharged for disability. Following the close of the 
war and the return of natural conditions once more, Captain White- 
aker was elected sheriff of his county under a Republican administra- 
tion, of which party he was a staunch supporter, and served in that 
capacity for four years. 

Before the war Captain Whiteaker had married Miss Elizabeth 
Deaton, a daughter of William Deaton, who came to Illinois from 
Alabama. The issue of their union are : Arista, the wife of I. N. Mc- 
Elroy, state agriculturist for the penitentiary at Chester, Illinois ; 
Martha, who is Mrs. 0. E. Burris, of Simpson. Illinois; Geneva, wife 
of Dr. A. I. Brown of Vienna, Illinois; Dr. Hall, the subject of this 
sketch ; Dr. William J., of Pulaski, Illinois ; Elizabeth, who married 



748 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

J. P. Mathis, of Vienna, Illinois, a member of the General Assembly ; 
and Gertrude, the wife of A. L. Compton, a merchant of Mound City. 

Hall Whiteaker was a student in the common schools of his home 
town until mid-youth, when he took a complete course in the North- 
ern Illinois Normal and Business College at Dixon, Illinois. He fin- 
ished the teacher's course there, following which he took his place in 
the school room and served three years in the capacity of a teacher. 
It was not his wish or intention, however, to spend his life teaching 
school, and at the time he gave over his labors in that field he had 
already become possessed of some of the elementary rudiments of the 
study of medicine through private reading under careful supervision, 
and he became a student at the Foreman School of Medicine, preced- 
ing which he took a course of lectures in the Indianapolis School of 
Medicine. Following his studies at the Foreman School he went to 
Arkansas, where he successfully passed the examinations of the state 
board of health and went on to Garner, Arkansas, where he became 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession. At the close of 
two years' practice there he had completed his course of medical study 
with the Barnes Medical College, now a part of the Washington Uni- 
versity of St. Louis, graduating from" that school in 1893 and locating 
at Hodges Park, Illinois. After sixteen months of practice there he 
removed to Olmstead, as offering a wider field for his talents, and there 
he remained for seven years, enjoying an enviable reputation in that 
place, and in 1901 he came to Mound City, where he has since taken 
high rank in his chosen profession. 

The enthusiasm of Dr. Whiteaker for his profession has led him to 
identify himself with various medical societies, conspicuous among 
which are the Southern Illinois Medical Association, The Illinois State 
Medical Association, The American Medical Association, and also the 
Association of Surgeons of the Illinois Central System, embracing the 
sub-systems of the Indiana Southern and the Yazoo & Mississippi Val- 
ley Railways. Dr. Whiteaker is local surgeon for the Illinois Central 
at Mound City. In the years 1907 and 1909 he fortified his already ex- 
tensive course of study by taking post graduate work in the New York 
Polyclinics, and has left nothing undone that might be calculated to 
aid him in the successful demonstration of his chosen work. 

True to the principles of his early home influence Dr. Whiteaker on 
reaching his majority manifested a more than casual interest in political 
matters, his sympathies being with the Republican party, as were his 
father's. His splendid mental equipment for public life, combined with 
his zeal for party interests and his willingness to bear his share of the 
burdens of party labors, resulted in his being led into convention work 
from time to time, and he served ably in various senatorial, congressional 
and state conventions as the delegate of the Republican party. His 
ward in Mound City made him its councilman, which, with his previous 
service, manifested eloquently his especial fitness for safe and conserva- 
tive work in the General Assembly. Accordingly he was nominated by 
primary September 15, 1910, receiving the largest vote ever accorded to 
a candidate for that office in those parts, a very speaking circumstance 
with regard to his high position in the hearts of his fellow men in the 
town and district where he is best known. As a member of the General 
Assembly he quickly attained to places of importance on that body. He 
was chairman of the committee on state institutions; a member of the 
committees on drainage and waterways, federal relations, fraternal and 
mutual insurance, miscellaneous subjects and railroads, roads and 
bridges. During the session he took the opposition on the proposed 
civil-service legislation, and made a strong effort to secure some legisla- 



HISTOEY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 749 

tion touching upon the profession of medicine and its practice. In his 
campaign he took active part in the labors of the party, and stumped 
the district in the interests of his party and himself. 

Fraternally Dr. Whiteaker is a thirty-second degree Mason, being a 
member of the Mound City lodge, of the Cairo Chapter and Command- 
ery, and of the Oriental Consistory in Chicago. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Congregational church. 

On September 29, 1891, Dr. Whiteaker married Miss Cina West at 
Belknap, Illinois, a daughter of Joshua West, of Massac county, a 
veteran of the Union army. 

GEORGE A. HICKMAN. Wnen a man has chosen one of the professions 
as his life work he must be prepared to make many sacrifices and to 
always hold his own interests in abeyance to the demands of his chosen 
occupation. Legal practitioners have always found this to be true, and 
it is especially so when a lawyer has been selected to fill a position of 
trust in his community, for, leaving all thought of self aside, he must 
give of his time, his strength and his talent in the interests of his fellow- 
citizens, his labors often being reimbursed only with a sense of duty 
well done. George A. Hickman, state's attorney at Benton, Illinois, is 
one of the conscientious young officials of that town, and as a member 
of the legal firm of Hickman & Hickman has an extensive practice. Mr. 
Hickman was born in Benton, Franklin county, Illinois, May 3, 1876, 
and is a son of Zachary and Julia (Johnson) Hickman. 

Snowden Hickman, the paternal grandfather of George A. Hickman, 
was born in North Carolina and as a young man moved to Tennessee, 
where the remainder of his life was spent in agricultural pursuits. His 
son Zachary was born to Wilson county, Tennessee, and came to Illinois 
in 1860, settling in Saline county, from whence he enlisted in the Civil 
war as a surgeon. He continued in the Union service until the close of 
the war and then returned to Saline county, where he married Miss 
Julia Johnson, who was born in Wisconsin, daughter of Mark Johnson, 
a native of New York, who moved to Wisconsin in young manhood and 
spent the remainder of his life in Milwaukee county. After his marriage 
Zachary Hickman moved to Franklin county, where he is today the 
oldest practicing physician, as well as the owner of a fine farm. 

George A. Hickman was educated in the Benton public and high 
schools, and studied law in the offices of Hart & Spiller, being admitted 
to the bar in 1897. He succeeded to the practice of his former em- 
ployers, who moved from Benton, and in 1909 entered into partnership 
with his brother, the firm style being Hickman & Hickman. This firm 
has handled some of the most prominent cases tried here in recent years, 
and have won a reputation that extends far beyond the limits of their 
city. George A. Hickman has always been a stalwart supporter of the 
principles of the Democratic party, and has worked hard and faithfully 
in the interests of that organization. In 1908 his loyalty to his party 
was rewarded by his nomination to the office of state's attorney, and he 
was elected to that office in the ensuing election that fall by a handsome 
majority. In addition to his official duties, in the discharge of which he 
has demonstrated marked ability, and his work in his private practice 
Mr. Hickman finds time to look after his farm, a finely-cultivated tract 
in Franklin county, where he raises pure bred horses and fancy poultry. 
He is very popular in the social circles of Benton, and belongs to the 
B. P. 0. E. and the M. W. A., of which latter organization he was con- 
sul for three years. Mr. Hickman has never married. 



750 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

HON. PLEASANT T. CHAPMAN. Everywhere in our broad land arise 
leaders of men, individuals who, from some inherent qualities which 
usually cannot be forecast, push their way irresistibly to the front, and 
in periods of financial danger and doubt skillfully guide their fellowrnen 
to prosperity again. The Hon. Pleasant T. Chapman, ex-member of 
Congress and a well known financier of Southern Illinois, has been 
identified with numerous enterprises of importance in this part of the 
state, and is a member of a family that has been connected with the 
interests of John county for more than a century, where he was born 
on a farm October 8, 1854, a son of Daniel C. and Mary Rose Chapman. 

The Chapman family is of English descent, and was founded in this 
country by the great-grandfather of Pleasant T. Chapman, Daniel Chap- 
man, a Revolutionary soldier, and his brother, Samuel J. Chapman, who 
fought through the war of 1812-14. Daniel Chapman came to Johnson 
county, Illinois, in the year 1800, from New York, and some years there- 
after several of his sons followed him West, one of whom, also named 
Daniel, the grandfather of Pleasant T., came in 1818 and located on a 
farm four miles east of Vienna, where he spent the remainder of his life. 
The history of the Chapman family has been closely intertwined with 
that of Johnson county, and for more than one hundred years members 
thereof have been prominent in various walks of life. Daniel C. Chapman, 
the father of Pleasant T., served in the Mexican war. and on his return 
home was elected to the office of sheriff of Johnson county, in which he 
served three terms. He and his wife, who survives him, had a family of 
eight children, as follows : Pleasant T. ; J. C., who is engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in Johnson county ; Sidney A., deceased, who was the wife 
of A. G. Benson, and had four children; Mary E., the wife of J. N. 
Benson, assistant deputy warden of the Chester Penitentiary; Daniel L., 
who is deceased, left two children, and his widow, Kate, is now teaching 
school in East St. Louis; Estella, wife of Mayor Noel Whitehead, of 
Vienna, has three children; Ida C., the wife of D. "W. Whittenburg, 
cashier of the First National Bank of Vienna, has two children; and 
Charles H., of Philadelphia, national bank examiner of the eastern 
district of Pennsylvania, has one child. 

Pleasant T. Chapman attended' the common schools of his native 
vicinity, and all the surrounding circumstances of his youth combined 
in a remarkable degree to hasten the development of his character and 
to enable him to constantly store up that quality of knowledge which is 
a condition of leadership and success in a generation eminently prac- 
tical and looking mainly to material results. Later he entered Mc- 
Kendree College, at Lebanon, Illinois, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of A. B. in 1876, and then began teaching school, in the 
meantime assiduously devoting his spare time to study of the law. He 
was admitted to the bar at Mount Vernon, Illinois, in 1879, when he be- 
gan the practice of his profession, and during that same year was ap- 
pointed county superintendent of schools, later serving four years by 
election to that office. In 1884 his eminent abilities were recognized by 
his election to the county bench, and in 1888 he was reelected to that 
position, and from 1890 to 1902 served as state senator from the Fifty- 
first district. He was then a member of the Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth and 
Sixty-first Congresses, being elected from the Twenty-fourth district, 
and his record as a member of that august body is one of which he may 
well feel proud. Quickly winning the confidence of its members, he 
became one of its wisest and most willing workers. Arduous work in 
the committee rooms, personal conferences with his fellow men and with 
the departments of the government, and careful care of the interests of 
even the most humble constituent, made his incumbency of his high of- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 751 

fice an eminent one and stamped him as one of his state's most con- 
scientious legislators. 

Mr. Chapman has been one of the leading financiers of this section 
for many years and is the oldest bank president in point of continuous 
service in Southern Illinois. The First National Bank, of which he is 
now president, was organized in 1890, having formerly been a private 
bank. He has served in the capacity of bank president for a quarter 
of a century, and for more than thirty years has been identified with 
the mercantile interests of Vienna. He is the owner or is interested in 
two thousand acres of land in Johnson county, and no important enter- 
prise feels that its personnel of official members is complete that does not 
bear his name. 

In 1882 Mr. Chapman was married to Miss May Copeland, formerly 
a teacher in the Vienna schools, daughter of John W. and Mary (Smith) 
Copeland, of Massac county, and three children have been born to this 
union: Daniel Ward, special agent for the National Fire Insurance 
Company, of Chicago ; Marian, the wife "of Lieutenant Paul Raburg, 
U. S. Cavalry, located at Fort Russell; and Ralph D., who is a student 
in the Illinois University. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, are well known in church circles, and lib- 
eral supporters of all movements of a religious or charitable nature. 
He is a member of the Union League Club of Chicago, and is fraternally 
connected with the Masons, in which he has attained to the thirty-second 
degree, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the Sons of the 
American Revolution. Mrs. Chapman is regent of the local chapter 
(named after the great-grandfather of Mr. Chapman) Daughters of the 
American Revolution and is widely known in social circles of the city. 

True to his friends, loyal to his party, ardently devoted to the town 
of his adoption, Mr. Chapman was as much a conspicuous and faithful 
member of that great body of intelligent citizens who control the des- 
tinies of the country as he is today, and always has been, wise in counsel, 
original in conception, shrewd in management and fearless in the exe- 
cution of those plans which he believes will result in prosperity to the 
city, the state and the nation. 

The First National Bank of Vienna was organized October 7, 1890, 
having been preceded by a private bank of which the Hon. Pleasant T. 
Chapman was the president. This institution enjoys a prestige among 
financial concerns in Illinois rarely equalled, and is noted for the many 
able citizens and financiers who have been connected with it. Among 
these may be mentioned : Hon. P. T. Chapman, whose record it is need- 
less to here repeat ; George B. Gillespie, now senior attorney for the New 
York Central lines at Springfield ; C. Cohn, former director and one of 
the original organizers, now located in San Bernardino, California, and 
one of the leading business men of that state ; L. 0. Whitnell, a former 
director, now Illinois attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railway ; Robert 
Gillespie, president of the Illinois Trust Company, East St. Louis ; John 
B. Jackson, banker at Anna, Illinois; Charles H. Chapman, national 
bank examiner for eastern Pennsylvania; J. F. Mackay, cashier of the 
Merchants State bank; William M. Grissom, president of the Merchants 
State Bank of Centralia, Illinois ; L. 0. Walker, cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Cobden, Illinois; Richard Chapman, assistant cashier of 
the State Bank of Mounds. Illinois; and D. W. Chapman, assistant 
cashier of the City National Bank of East St. Louis. This institution is 
capitalized at sixty thousand dollars with a surplus of sixty thousand 
dollars, and the present board of directors is made up of the following 
well known citizens: Pleasant T. Chapman, D. W. Whittenberg (who 
has been a bank cashier for the past twenty-five years), W. M. Grissom 



752 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

of Centralia, J. P. Mackay of Centralia, J. K. Elkins, W. L. Williams 
and 0. H. Rhodes. 

FRED HOOD presents to Mound City a splendid example of bril- 
liant young manhood, who at the early age of thirty-three has accom- 
plished that which many have failed to attain in a life time of effort. 
As state's attorney for Pulaski county he occupies an enviable posi- 
tion in the political affairs of his city and county, and he is steadily 
mounting higher in the pathway of success. 

Fred Hood was born in Johnson county, Illinois, March 31, 1878. 
He is the son of James W. Hood, who at the time of the birth of Fred 
was a merchant in New Burnside, Illinois, having come to Illinois from 
Hardeman county, Tennessee. James W. Hood was born in Alabama, 
in 1839. "When he came to Illinois in the year 1862 he settled at Mount 
Pleasant, Union county, later passing on to New Burnside. He was 
a member of the old and aristocratic family of Hoods of South Caro- 
lina, his father also having "been a James Hood, who passed away in 
Union county, Illinois, in the year 1882, and who was the father of 
thirteen children, from whom a dozen new families have sprung. 

As a young man James Hood, the .father of our subject, was en- 
gaged in merchandising, and the towns of New Burnside and Olm- 
stead, the latter his present home, have known him intimately through- 
out the entire course of his business life. He married Victoria Maxey, 
a daughter of an early settler from Tennessee, then engaged in the 
farming industry in Union county, Illinois. Mrs. Hood having been 
born in Tennessee in 1854. She, however, is the second wife of her 
husband, he having a daughter, Mrs. Virginia Martin, of Olmstead, 
Illinois, the product of an earlier marriage. His union with Victoria 
Maxey was blessed with three sons-. Fred, of whom we write; Harry, 
an attorney in Cairo, Illinois; and Barney, who died in the early days 
of his young manhood. 

Fred Hood passed his boyhood days as a pupil of the common 
schools of his home town, and in the autumn of 1894, when he was 
sixteen years of age, he entered the Southern Illinois Normal School. 
The next year he became a student at the Southern Collegiate Institute 
at Albion, Illinois, and the year following that he completed a course 
in the Dixon Business College, at Dixon, Illinois. Thus equipped with 
a working knowledge of the technicalities of business, flanked by his 
common school training and his limited University experience, he took 
up the study of law in the office of Judge W. A. Wall, of Mound City. 
After reading with Judge Wall sufficiently to prepare him for entry at 
a law school, he entered the Northern Illinois College of Law at Dixon, 
Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1900, with the degree of Master 
of Laws. 

At the close of his college career Mr. Hood found it expedient to sup- 
plement his finances in some manner, which he did by serving for two 
years as principal of the village of Olmstead schools. He then joined 
his brother Harry, and the two opened offices in Mound City, under the 
name of Hood & Hood, attorneys. 

In the year 1904 Fred Hood was appointed to the office of master in 
chancery, a signal honor for one of his years and experience, in which 
capacity he served for one year and a half. He was elected city attorney 
in 1907, serving one term, and in 1908 was elected states attorney under 
a Republican administration. His constant affiliation with party affairs 
has brought him a wide acquaintance with state political leaders and 
other men of prominence, and it is but reasonable to assume that a ca- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 753 

reer which has opened so auspiciously cannot fail to be crowned with 
the highest honors that his fellows can bestow. 

Mr. Hood was married in Mound City, on September 1, 1909, to Miss 
Blanche Boyd, a daughter of Hon. Thomas Boyd, a lawyer and banker of 
that city. Mrs. Hood is a young woman who is well fitted to assist her 
husband most efficiently in the many duties devolving of necessity upon 
a man of his position. One son, Frederick, Jr., has been born of their 
union. 

Mr. Hood is a member of Caledonia Lodge, No. 47, A. F. & A. M., and 
is its past master, having represented it in the Illinois Grand Lodge. He 
is also a Knight of Pythias and member of Modern Woodmen of America, 
as well as being a member of the Congregational church of Mound City. 

WILLIAM P. SLACK. Valiantly aiding in the defense of his country 
and its flag in war and contributing directly and materially, according 
to his opportunities and resources, to its industrial and mercantile great- 
ness and power in peace, William P. Slack, of Carbondale, has proven 
himself a useful man in everything he has put his hand to, and a citizen 
altogether worthy of the high esteem in which he is held wherever he is 
known. 

His life began at New Hope, Bucks county, in that great hive of in- 
dustry, Pennsylvania, where almost every form of human endeavor finds 
fruitful expression and adds to the wealth of the country. He lived in 
his native county from his birth on January 12, 1844, until he reached the 
age of ten years, and began his scholastic education in the schools of 
Philadelphia, which were easily accessible from his home. In 1854 his 
parents, Henry and Rachel (Kitchin) Slack, decided to leave their 
Eastern home and establish a new one in the West, where everything 
was new and opportunities for advancement were eagerly bidding for 
takers of the right caliber. 

Accordingly, in that year they moved their family to Freeport, Illi- 
nois, where for a time the father continued the mercantile enterprise 
he had previously conducted in Pennsylvania. From Freeport the 
family moved to Pana in Christian county, and afterward to Cairo. He 
engaged in merchandising in all these cities, and his son attended school 
in them in turn until the beginning of the Civil war. When that 
momentous conflict opened he was fired with patriotic zeal for the sal- 
vation of the Union, and determined to join the forces mustering for 
its defense. 

On August 26, 1861, when he was but little more than seventeen 
and a half years of age, he and his brother Charles enlisted in Com- 
pany G, Fifth Illinois Cavalry. The regiment was soon on the march 
for St. Louis, Missouri, and while it was in that state saw active ser- 
vice in a number of skirmishes. From St. Louis the command pro- 
ceeded to Pilot Knob, and from there to Helena, Arkansas, making its 
way sometimes without opposition, and sometimes being compelled to 
wrest the right to advance from obstinate opponents in arms who made 
determined resistance. 

The army division to which the Illinois troops were assigned at 
length reached the scene of intense hostilities and took part in the bat- 
tle of Sligo in the vicinity of Vicksburg. William Slack was the bugler 
of his regiment, and the stirring calls he put forth from his bugle al- 
ways gave the troops fervor for a fight and animated them for the 
charge. His term of enlistment expired in September, 1863, and on the 
sixteenth day of that month he was released from the service. 

From the excitement of the battlefield, the ardor of the march, the 
ennui of the camp, and all the other exacting conditions of war, he re- 



754 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

turned to Cairo and became a clerk in a clothing store, with which he 
was connected in that capacity until 1869. He then opened a store of 
his own, which he conducted until 1882, when he sold it and moved to 
Carbondale. Here he again engaged in merchandising in the clothing 
trade, and continued his operations in that line of endeavor until June 
3, 1898. On that date he was appointed postmaster, and he has filled 
the office ever since, having been reappointed three times. 

Mr. Slack was united in marriage with Miss Orpha Crabb, a native 
of Indiana and a popular school teacher in Southern Illinois. They had 
three children, all of whom are living : Emma, who is the wife of Frank 
Rendleman, a wholesale fruit merchant in Chicago ; Harry L. ; and 
Mary, the wife of Lee Haldeman, a prosperous plumber in Anna, Illi- 
nois. Their mother died, and the father contracted a second marriage, 
uniting himself with Miss Louie Olmstead, of Anna, Union county, in 
this state. His political faith and allegiance are given without stint or 
reservation to the Republican party, and he is one of the most ar- 
dent and effective workers in the county for its success in all campaigns. 
Fraternally he is a Freemason of the Royal Arch degree and with the 
rank of past master in his lodge. He also belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic and holds his membership in John W. Lawrence Post, 
No. 297, at Carbondale. 

JUDGE WILLIAM A. WALL. Twenty years or more of efficient service 
in the professional, business and political circles of Southern Illinois 
has made the life record of Judge William A. Wall, of Mound City, 
an honored one, and the fact that he is a native son of Southern 
Illinois and has spent his whole life in this section of the state well 
entitles him to representation in this volume. 

Judge Wall was born in Union county, Illinois, August 17, 1864, 
and grew to manhood near the village of Western Saratoga, that county. 
Pleasant recollections center around the old Pleasant Ridge school 
where as a youth he acquired his earlier education, and a backward 
look over those years recalls experiences closely akin to those of Whit- 
tier's "Barefoot Boy." He subsequently spent two terms in the South- 
ern Illinois Normal University and a like period was spent in the 
Union Academy at Anna, Illinois, his work in college having been 
alternated with several months of teaching in country schools. His 
professional preparation was obtained in the law department of the 
Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, from which he was 
graduated in 1890. He was admitted to the bar by examination be- 
fore the supreme court the year of his graduation, and on April 15, 
1890, he began the practice of his profession at Mound City, Illinois, 
where his ability soon placed him in the front rank of attorneys and 
where as the years have passed he has directed his professional labors 
to the acquirement of success and prominence. He associated him- 
self with Judge Joseph P. Robarts, late judge of the Southern Illinois 
judicial circuit, and the firm of Robarts & Wall existed until Judge 
Robarts was elevated to the bench. Then by arrangement the late 
Judge Caster became a member of the firm, the style being Wall & 
Caster, and remained so until death claimed the junior member in 
1909. Judge Wall then formed a partnership with ex-district attorney 
George E. Martin, and Wall & Martin is the foremost legal firm of 
Pulaski county. 

Judge Wall's practice has been general and, save in a few in- 
stances, none of it has been of historic interest. His connection with 
much of the litigation growing out of the State Drainage act, creating 
a drainage district in this section of Illinois and forcing the adjust- 



T"\ *'"*'' 

'ft ',": 
SWER5ITY OF HUE 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 755 

merit of many matters in the courts, even to the supreme court of the 
state, is well known to have been extensive. Also his connection with 
suits involving the interpretation of the fire insurance laws of the 
state by the supreme court was the means of placing a new decision 
before the people regarding the admissibility of evidence in a suit 
brought for the collection of a fire loss. In this particular case the 
plaintiff was the defendant in a prior suit brought by the insurance 
company for burning his property for the insurance. A witness for the 
plaintiff said that he burned the barn, among other things, yet the 
defendant was acquitted. Subsequently the defendant and the wit- 
ness against him got into an altercation and the witness was killed. 
Then the defendant brought suit against the insurance company for 
the amount of his policy and the company offered to introduce the tes- 
timony of the deceased witness as part of the defense. This move was 
checked by an objection of Judge Wall, the plaintiff's counsel, that 
such testimony was incompetent for use in the case, and was sustained 
in the circuit court. The defense appealed the case and the judg- 
ment was affirmed. 

The official and professional career of Judge Wall have paralleled 
each other, for they both began the same year of 1890, the former 
with his election to the office of county judge. He served one term 
and in 1896 was elected a member of the State Board of Equalization, 
to which office he was re-elected in 1900 for another term of four 
years. In that body he served on the railroads committee, the com- 
mittee on farm lands and town lots, and was chairman of the auditing 
committee. In 1904 he was appointed a member of the Cache River 
Drainage Commission and was chairman of it during his two years' 
service. The commission formulated plans for draining eighty-five 
thousand acres of land in the counties of Massac, Johnson, Union and 
Pulaski, the largest drainage district in the state. In December, 1909, 
he was appointed by Governor Deneen to fill the vacancy in the office 
of county judge caused by the death of Judge Caster, and was elected 
to that office without opposition in November, 1910. It will thus be 
seen that for over twenty years Judge Wall has been in the active and 
continuous service of his state, and in each position that he has filled 
his service has been marked for ability and the conscientious discharge 
of duty. 

Judge Wall is a staunch supporter of Republican politics and in 
that sphere is the same forceful and influential man as in law and 
official life. He ascribes to his mother, a woman of strong mind and 
character, much of the influence which shaped his political views and 
dominated his choice of party affiliations. He was chairman of the 
Pulaski County Central Committee for ten years and was the head 
of the judicial committee of his judicial district for twelve years. He 
has been a delegate to every Republican state convention for a score 
of years and has frequently been chairman of the county delegation, 
and was a delegate to the longest and noisiest convention ever held 
for selecting a judicial candidate, the one finally nominating Judge 
Robarts. 

Judge Wall has not only attained prominence and usefulness in 
his community along professional lines and in public life, but his keen 
business instincts and unvarying faith in Southern Illinois have made 
him a man of large and substantial properties. He is vice-president 
of the First State Bank of Mounds, and holds stock in the First State 
Bank and the First, National Bank of Mound City, in the First 
National Bank of Ullin and in the First State Bank of Grand Chain. 



756 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

He is a stockholder in the Mound City Building and Loan Association 
and in the Mounds Building and Loan Association. 

Judge Wall is a son of James B. Wall, a retired farmer now re- 
siding in Mound City. The latter was born February 22, 1842, at 
Lebanon, Tennessee, and came to Illinois in 1864 with his father, Byrd 
Wall, who settled in Union county. Byrd Wall married Malinda John- 
son, and of his twelve children James B. was the youngest. James B. 
Wall married Miss Anna Wright, a daughter of Ambrose and Melissa 
Wright, also from Tennessee, and William A. is the eldest of their 
twelve children, the following of whom came to mature years: Wil- 
liam A. ; Agnes, who married William Penrod ; Clementine, wife of 
Andrew Wright ; Sherman B. ; and Maude, the wife of Frank Southall, 
of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. 

Judge Wall was married first in Mayfield, Kentucky, January 8, 
1882, to Miss Louie Kaltenback, who died November 9, 1897, leaving 
a son, Warner. He married his present wife in Mound City, June 5, 
1907. She was Miss Margaret Browner, a daughter of the late Thomas 
Browner, who came to the United States from county Wexford, Ire- 
land, where he was born in 1831. His wife, who was Mary McCarthy, 
died in Mound City in 1911, ten years after his own demise. Two 
other children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Browner: Michael F., the 
mayor of Mound City for a dozen years, and Miss Mary Browner, who 
also resides in Mound City. 

In his social and fraternal connections Judge Wall is a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

The large figure of Judge Wall has the commanding air of vigor, 
of will and of strong personality, and everything about him testifies to 
his integrity, yet he is the most courteous and affable of men, his 
warm heart and cheerful disposition making friends and intrenching 
him in the good will and esteem of his fellow citizens. 

JACKSON L. HAMMOND. Prominent among the live, up-to-date news- 
papers of Southern Illinois is the Anna Democrat, published at Anna, 
Union county, a weekly publication with a large circulation which 
wields a large influence in its section of the state. This paper's rapid 
growth and the high standard attained by it, has been brought about 
by the efforts of its capable editor and general manager, Jackson L. 
Hammond, who holds an enviable position in Illinois journalism. Mr. 
Hammond is a product of the East, having been born in Hagerstown, 
Washington county, Maryland, in 1865, and was brought to Illinois 
by his parents in 1867 the family spending three years at Forreston, 
Ogle county, where his father had a charge as Lutheran minister, and 
five years at Shuey's Mills, Wisconsin, where young Hammond first 
attended school. He then spent two years at Sharon, Wisconsin, and 
twelve years at Princeton, Iowa, and took a two-year classical course at 
Carthage, Illinois. Mr. Hammond first entered the newspaper busi- 
ness with Joseph Gill, at Murphysboro, Illinois, where he learned the 
details of making up a successful sheet, but left that connection to 
become chief clerk at the Illinois Southern Hospital for the Insane 
at Anna. After four years, during which time he had an excellent 
record as a public official, Mr. Hammond took charge of the fortunes 
of the Anna Democrat, both in the editorial and advertising lines, and 
in his operations has been exceptionally successful, building up the 
circulation of the paper and giving its advertisers such good returns 
for their money as to increase its patronage exceedingly in that line. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 757 

The Anna Democrat aims to give its readers the best news, local, na- 
tional and international, to be accurate in every statement made and 
to keep its 2,160 subscribers fully informed as to what is going on 
around them and in the outside world. Its editorials have been 
timely, interesting, virile and snappy, and the humorous features of 
the news have not been overlooked. Although his journalistic duties 
have been heavy and have demanded a great deal of his attention, Mr. 
Hammond has found time to act in a public capacity, and the con- 
fidence and esteem in which he is held by his fellow townsmen was 
evidenced during the last election, when he was unanimously elected 
clerk of Anna, it being the sixth consecutive time he has held this 
office. His political views are those of the Democratic party, and he 
is recognized as a leader, not only as a citizen who has ever been ready 
to work hard in the ranks of his party, but as the able editor of a 
newspaper that does much to influence a large number of people to its 
views. Mr. Hammond is a self-made man, the success which he has 
attained having come through the medium of his own hard, persistent 
efforts. Fraternally, he is connected with the Court of Honor, and 
his progressive spirit caused him to be instrumental in organizing the 
Commercial Club of Anna, of which he was secretary the first two 
years. 

On September 11, 1894, Mr. Hammond was united in marriage with 
Miss Martha Aden, of Dongola, Illinois, and they have had two chil- 
dren, both of whom reside at home : Mary Prances, aged thirteen years ; 
and Josiah, who is ten years old. 

ALBERT S. TIBBETS. Like many of the successful journalists of 
today, Albert S. Tibbets, owner and editor of the Jonesboro Gazette, of 
Jonesboro, Illinois, started his newspaper career in the humble position 
of "devil," and has devoted his whole life to the gathering and distrib- 
uting of news, gradually working his way up the ladder of success until 
he now stands in the front rank of the men of his profession in Southern 
Illinois and is an acknowledged power in the local political field. Mr. 
Tibbets is one of the self-made men of his section, and the success which 
has finally rewarded his efforts has come only after years of discourage- 
ments and disappointments. Born at Auburn, Sangamon county, Illi- 
nois, in January, 1858, Mr. Tibbets is a son of Hiram and Martha 
(Wilson) Tibbets. His father, who was a farmer and fruit grower, 
came to Jonesboro in 1868 and died two years later, and his widow sur- 
vived until May, 1897, when she passed away in this city. 

Albert S. Tibbets attended school until he was fourteen years of age, 
at which time he began to contribute to the support of the family. He 
secured a position in the office of the newspaper of which he is now the 
owner, beginning as "devil" and rising from position to position until 
1893, when he purchased the journal from his father-in-law. The 
Jonesboro Gazette was established in 1849, and is one of the oldest in 
Southern Illinois. It is now published weekly and has a paid-up circu- 
lation of 1,200. It is a Democratic organ, but aims to present to its 
readers a fair, unbiased opinion on all matters of importance. A neat, 
well-printed sheet, its pages are devoted to the interesting news of the 
day, together with all the local happenings and terse, well-written edi- 
torials. It has endeavored to educate the reading public into discourag- 
ing sensational matter, the management believing that a clean, reliable 
newspaper will be the means of ultimately developing the best interests 
of the community. Mr. Tibbets has been loyal to the Democratic party, 
and was for many years secretary of the County Democratic Central 

Committee. He has identified himself with various business enterprises 
VOL n is 



758 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

and is at present a stockholder in the Fruit Growers Package Company 
of Jonesboro. 

In 1887 Mr. Tibbets was united in marriage with Miss Esther 
Bouton, who was born in 1860, at Jackson, Michigan, daughter of 
Thomas F. Bouton, a well-known newspaper man of Southern Illinois, 
for twenty-five years editor of the Jonesboro Gazette, and five children 
have been born to this union, namely : Jennie, who married Noah R. 
Cluster, and resides at Gary, Indiana ; John A., unmarried, who is 
business manager of the Gazette and fraternally is connected with 
Jonesboro Lodge No. Ill, A. F. & A. M., and the Order of the Eastern 
Star, in both of which he is very popular; and Thomas, Esther and 
Elizabeth, who live at home with their parents. The family is connected 
with the Baptist church. Mr. Tibbets is widely known in newspaper 
circles throughout this section of the county, and as a representative of 
the type of men who have been the architects of their own fortunes has 
the respect and esteem of all with whom he has come into contact. 

JAMES FRANKLIN HIGHT. Probably there is no better known figure 
in Southern Illinois than the Hon. James Franklin Hight, judge of the 
County Court of Johnson county, a man universally respected as a 
public official, known as an efficient and practical agriculturist, and a 
preacher of wide reputation at various evangelistic meetings. In 
every walk of life Judge Hight is well worthy the esteem and respect 
in which he is held, and no citizen enjoys to a greater degree the warm 
personal friendship of so many of his community's people. He was 
born April 17, 1858, on a farm in Grantsburg township, Johnson 
county, Illinois, and is a son of Robert D. Hight, a native of Ten- 
nessee. 

William Hight, the great-grandfather of Judge Ilight, was a native 
of North Carolina, and his brother, Robert Hight, fought as a soldier 
during the war of 1812, serving under General Andrew Jackson at 
New Orleans, and later fighting valiantly in the Indian wars, partici- 
pating in the battle at Horse Shoe Bend, where the power of the 
Indians was broken. Robert D. Hight 's brother, Archibald Hight, 
fought in the Civil war. In 1844 Robert D. Hight came to Southern 
Illinois with his father, Sion Hight, and settled in Grantsburg town- 
ship, where he purchased an improved farm and also entered Govern- 
ment land. Some of his first land had been granted during President 
Van Buren's time, and a number of the old deeds and grants in pos- 
session of the family were made out over the signature of President 
Fillmore. Robert D. Hight became a very successful farmer, and at 
one time owned eight hundred acres of land, also being prominent in 
county affairs and serving as sheriff and county commissioner. He 
died March 20, 1880. Mr. Hight was married first to Miranda 
Smith shortly after settling in Illinois, and she died a few years later. 
His second wife was Mrs. Ann (Vanderbilt) Donaghy, widow of W. B. 
Donaghy, and he married for his third wife Eliza Lorina McCorkle, who 
became the mother of Judge Hight and Alonzo D. Hight. She died 
September 9, 1875, at the age of forty-three years. In 1876, Robert D. 
Hight married for his fourth wife a widow, Mrs. Nancy (French) 
Conley, and she survived him some years but is now deceased. Mr. 
Hight had two daughters by his first marriage, and two sons by each 
of his second and third marriages, named as follows : Mary and Miranda, 
both deceased ; Milton L., who is engaged in farming ; 'Robert Marshall, 
who is deceased; James Franklin; and Alonzo Decatur, a lawyer of 
Poplar Bluff, Missouri. 

James Franklin Hight was reared on the home farm and attended 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 759 

the old log and frame district schools, his boyhood being spent much 
the same as that of other farmers' youths of that day. He is remem- 
bered to have been the leader of the lads in his neighborhood in games, 
sports and all kinds of frolics. The year after he completed his stud- 
ies in the old Grantsburg school he returned as teacher and for the 
next twenty years, off and on, was engaged in teaching, varying this 
profession with farming and preaching. For the past twenty-three 
years he has been a preacher in the Church of Christ, and is an evan- 
gelist of renown and ability, having held evangelistic meetings in 
several states. As an orator and exhorter he has taken part in a 
number of religious discussions, in which he has defended his positon 
in a proper manner and earnest spirit. In political matters he is a 
Republican, but is inclined to be independent, reserving the right to 
cast his vote for the candidate whom he deems best fitted for the 
office. In December, 1885, he was commissioned justice of the peace 
in Massac county by Governor Richard Oglesby, and a quarter of a 
century later was commissioned by the former governor's son, Acting- 
Governor John G. Oglesby. He has always resided on a farm, and 
now has a tract of fifty-five acres in Vienna township, situated eight 
miles from Vienna. He has found time to spare from his religious 
and official duties to engage in hunting, his favorite sport, and main- 
tains a fine pack of foxhounds. Judge Hight belongs to the Brother- 
hood of America, and also is connected with the Farmers' Union, of 
which he served as county, state and local champlain in 1910. 

On March 19, 1882, Judge Hight was married to Mary Isabella 
Presgrove, of Massac county, daughter of D. F. and Sophia (Curtis) 
Presgrove, and nine children have been born to this union, as fol- 
lows : Joy, who is the wife of William Poe ; Alonzo R. D. ; Atha, who 
married Harris Clymore ; Zenia, who is deceased ; Frank ; Dewey, who 
is deceased; Mary; and two unnamed children who died in infancy. 
Judge Hight has two grandchildren : Ruth and Bernice Poe. 

The popularity of Judge Hight is beyond the question of a doubt. 
As a leader of movements calculated to benefit Johnson county in an 
educational, commercial, spiritual or social way, he has given his in- 
fluence and means freely and gladly, and has done his full share in 
building up and developing the community. His home life has been 
beautiful, while the extent of his charities will probably never be 
known as he has given in a quiet, unostentatious manner. A true 
Christian gentleman, he well merits the high esteem and respect in 
which he is held. 

JAMES MARCUS ETHERTON. Merchant, public official, banker and 
promoter, and influential factor for the good of his city, county and state 
in many ways, James M. Etherton, of Carbondale, is well and favorably 
known in all parts of Illinois as one of the leading citizens of his county 
and one of the most progressive and public spirited men in the state. 
He has turned his hand to several different lines of activity and made a 
good record in them all ; succeeding where others have failed or won 
but moderate triumphs; expanding small enterprises into affairs of 
moment ; arresting public thought and action and forcing it into line 
with his own for the general welfare, and generally exhibiting the high- 
est traits of broad-minded, enterprising and highly serviceable citizen- 
ship. 

Mr. Etherton has a special interest in Carbondale from the fact that 
he was born and reared in the country near Carbondale and began his 
education in its schools. It has also been the seat of all his business 
operations, and is in its present-day development and strident progress 



760 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

largely the creature of his energy and stimulating and directing intelli- 
gence. His life began here on April 5, 1862, and he is a son of William 
and Miami (Reynolds) Etherton, prosperous farmers of Jackson during 
the lifetime of the father. The father, who died some years ago, was 
born in Jackson county, Illinois. The mother, who is still living, is a 
native of England, and the father's ancestors were also residents of that 
country for many generations. The mother is a relative of former Gov- 
ernor Reynolds of this state. 

Their son James M. grew to manhood in Carbondale. He completed 
his education at the Southern Illinois Normal University, from which 
he was graduated in 1899. After leaving school he started in business 
as a merchant in charge of a general store, and he is still connected with 
that line of mercantile life, and conducting his trade on a large scale. 
He is also one of the three owners of the William T. Phelps Land and 
Coal Company and its manager. The holdings of the company are 
located in Saline county, Illinois, and embrace fourteen hundred acres 
of choice mineral deposit and land valuable for other purposes. The 
mines on this land are undeveloped as yet. 

In addition to his other possessions Mr. Etherton owns a consider- 
able block of the stock of what is now the Carbondale National Bank, 
and is its president, an office which he has held for a number of years, 
and filled with great credit to himself and benefit to the city and county 
in which it is located. He has largely increased its resources, patronage 
and usefulness and made it one of the leading financial institutions in 
the southern part of Illinois, with a record second to none for pro- 
gressiveness in business and wisdom and prudence in management. 

Mr. Etherton is a firm and faithful Democrat in his political faith 
and allegiance, and one of the strongest men in ability and influence in 
his party. He served as a member of the Carbondale school board three 
years and two terms as a member of the city council. He has also 
served two terms as a member of the city council. He has also served 
two terms in the lower house of the state legislature as a representative 
of the Forty-fourth legislative district, and in this office he showed his 
interest in the state and its people in a very conspicuous and bene- 
ficial way with excellent results. 

In the house to which he was twice elected he served on the commit- 
tees on appropriations, education, fish and game, the geological survey, 
and banks and banking. He introduced and secured the passage of a 
bill making an appropriation for the erection of the Woman's Building 
at the Southern Illinois Normal University. He took an earnest interest 
in this bill and worked it through the house by a hard fight in which he 
was obliged to battle for every foot of his ground. He also secured ap- 
propriations for other extensive public improvements, and labored ard- 
uously to promote not only the cause of education but every other inter- 
est of the people of the state. In consequence of his extended public 
service he has become acquainted with every party man of prominence 
in both of the leading political organizations, and it is greatly to his 
credit that he is cordially esteemed by them all. 

On the 21st of September, 1884, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Levina Jane Lee, of Pomona, a daughter of Dr. A. M. Lee of that city. 
Three children have been born of the union, all of whom are living. 
They are Leona, Ruby and James Everett. The parents are devoted 
members of the Baptist church, and the father has been one of the trus- 
tees of the congregation to which they belong during the last seven 
years. Both are active workers in the church, with responsive hearts 
and open hands for all the demands its benevolent and Christianizing 
agencies make upon them, and ready at all times to perform any duty 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 761 

they can in its service or for the benefit of those to whom it ministers. 
They are among the best and most useful citizens of Jackson county, 
and are universally recognized as in that class and esteemed accordingly. 

CABBONDALE NATIONAL BANK. The Carbondale National Bank is 
an outgrowth of a much humbler and more unambitious financial insti- 
tution, which was known as the Jackson State Bank, and was founded 
in October, 1898. Its officers were: S. W. Dunaway, president; W. W. 
Clemens, vice president, and F. T. Joyner, cashier. The capital . stock 
was twenty-five thousand dollars, and on this basis the bank did a good 
business of considerable magnitude and with excellent service and 
steady benefits to the city of Carbondale and county of Jackson. 

But in time the demands outgrew its resources, and in February, 
1905, it was reorganized as The Carbondale National Bank, with a cap- 
ital stock of sixty thousand dollars and a surplus of twelve thousand 
dollars. The present officers are : James Etherton, president ; F. M. 
Hewitt, vice president, and Chas A. Gullett, cashier. The wisdom of 
the reorganization and enlargement of the institution has been amply 
shown in the increased advantages it has provided for the city and its 
people, and the alacrity with which they have made use of them. The 
deposits at this time (1911) amount to two hundred and sixty-five 
thousand dollars, and the business of the bank is very extensive, active 
and comprehensive. 

The institution conducts a general banking business, embracing 
every approved feature of modern banking, and meets all requirements 
with promptness and in the most satisfactory manner. It has a savings 
department and pays four per cent interest on time deposits. The busi- 
ness is conducted on the first floor of a fine three-story brick building, 
twenty-six by one hundred feet in dimensions, which it owns. The 
second and third floors are devoted to office and lodge purposes, and are 
much in demand for the uses for which they were designed, as they are, 
like the portion of the edifice used by the bank, modern in every respect, 
and provided with every convenience and desirable feature in equip- 
ment. 

A brief sketch of the life of James M. Etherton, the president of the 
bank, will be found preceding this article. He is accounted one of 
the best business men in the county, and his services to the bank have 
been striking in their magnitude and value. He has aided greatly in 
popularizing the bank, increasing the volume of its business and aug- 
menting its strength and reputation in banking circles locally and 
throughout the state. In his management of its affairs he combines a 
serviceable progressiveness with a prudent conservatism, making the 
institution as liberal in its policy and dealings as due care for absolute 
safety will allow, but never risking anything beyond this limit, however 
great the temptation or bright the promise, although eager at all times 
to secure for it all the patronage and profit he can. He conducts the 
bank as he does his private interests, and with as much care for its 
stockholders and depositors as he exercises for himself in the manage- 
ment of his own business. 

JOHN GRAHAM MULCASTER, agent of the Illinois Central Railroad at 
Makanda, Illinois, and a citizen who has been identified with the realty 
interests of Southern Illinois for some years, is a veteran of the Span- 
ish-American war, and a member of an English family of great 
antiquity, which traces its lineage back to the year 1066. His father, 
Richard Mulcaster, was a son of Thomas Mulcaster, a younger 
brother of Lord Mulcaster, of Ravenglass, England, and the family 



7fi2 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

home in England, "Brackenthewaite, " an estate of one thousand 
acres, has been in the possession of the family for more than six hun- 
dred years. Mr. Mulcaster was born October 1, 1876, in Monroe 
county, Illinois. 

Richard Mulcaster was born at Carlisle, county Cumberland, Eng- 
land, June 1, 1829, and received excellent educational advantages, 
being sent to Oxford College, but before graduating therefrom en- 
listed in the English navy during the Crimean war, and served until 
the close of that struggle. On his return to England he was for two 
years engaged in civil engineering, and then went to Toronto, Canada, 
and later, in 1857, to Troy, where he assisted in laying out the town. 
He then returned to his native country, but at the time of the break- 
ing out of the Civil war came to the United States, and remained in 
New Orleans until the close of the war, being employed by the Con- 
federate Government as a civil engineer, although he never enlisted 
in the Southern army. When the war had closed he came North, 
and settled in Monroe county on the Mississippi river, near Modoc, 
where he purchased a farm, but subsequently removed to Waterloo, 
Illinois, and became a school teacher and justice of the peace. In 
1884 he located in Jackson county, purchasing a farm in Degonia 
township, and there carried on agricultural pursuits and conducted a 
general merchandise store until 1892, when he retired from activities. 
His death occurred in Murphysboro, March 4, 1894. In 1867 Mr. Mul- 
caster was married to Miss Mary Ilickman, at Kimmswick, Jeffer- 
son county, Missouri, and she is still living, making her home at St. 
Louis, and has been the mother of seven children, of whom John Gra- 
ham is the fourth in order of birth. She is a member of the Episcopal 
church, of which her late husband was also an attendant, and his poli- 
tical belief was that of the Republican party. Mrs. Mulcaster, in 1849, 
when a child, was a member of a party bound for California in prai- 
rie schooners, journeying via St. Joseph, Missouri, and Salt Lake, and 
this same party followed on the heels of the one which was extermi- 
nated in the Mountain Meadow massacre. 

John Graham Mulcaster attended the country schools of which his 
father was the teacher from the time he was six years old until he 
was ten, at which early age he entered the Murphysboro High School, 
and was graduated therefrom four years later. He then secured em- 
ployment in the general office of the St. Louis Ore and Steel Company, 
where he worked eighteen months, and then became an employe of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, remaining one year and com- 
pleting a course in telegraphy. Leaving that firm, Mr. Mulcaster 
went to work for the Mobile & Ohio Railroad, where he spent three 
years as an operator, resigning to accept a position with the Illinois 
Central Railroad, with which he was connected at the time of the out- 
break of the Spanish-American war. Enlisting in the Seventh United 
States Signal Corps, under Captain J. B. Inman, of Springfield, Mr. 
Mulcaster served in General Shafter's army at Santiago, Cuba, and 
then went with General Miles' expedition to Porto Rico, remaining 
there until the close of the war, after which he assisted in putting 
in the telegraph service throughout that island. He was mustered 
out of the service at Chicago, in December, 1898, and shortly there- 
after re-entered the service of the Illinois Central as railroad agent 
at Herrin. Since that time he has held the same positions at various 
stations, and is now located at Makanda. Mr. Mulcaster has invested 
his money in real estate, and now owns considerable property at 
various places in Illinois and Oklahoma. 



HISTOKY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 763 

On May 6, 1900, Mr. Mulcaster was married to Miss Ella Walker, 
of Carterville, Illinois, daughter of J. B. Walker, a prominent farmer. 
Mr. Mulcaster is an earnest worker in the ranks of the Republican 
party, and his loyalty has been rewarded by election to the offices 
of alderman and village clerk. He is a member of the ancient and 
august order, A. F. & A. M., of the Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias, and he and Mrs. Mulcaster attend the Baptist church. In 
all matters pertaining to the welfare of his adopted locality Mr. Mul- 
caster has shown the greatest interest, and his aid and influence may 
always be counted upon to forward movements of a progressive na- 
ture. He is widely known through Southern Illinois, and wherever 
he has been stationed has had hosts of friends. 

C. R. WALSER, D. D. S. The dental surgeons of Union county are 
represented by as fine a body of men as can be gathered anywhere in 
the country. They have taken the present exhaustive course which has 
reduced the care, preservation and restoration of the teeth, and the 
treatment of the various disorders attendant upon them, to an exact 
science. The dentist of today is a man thoroughly trained under the 
supervision of experts, and after the exacting course of study has been 
taken, he must keep abreast by reading and attending lectures of all 
discoveries and improvements of his profession. One of the leading 
exponents of dentistry in Union county is Dr. C. R. Walser, the oldest 
practitioner in point of continued practice in the city of Anna. 

Dr. Walser was born and reared in Edwards county, Illinois, and 
his youth was spent on his father's farm, in the vicinity of which he 
attended the district schools. Subsequently he secured a teacher's li- 
cense and for the .next five years was engaged in teaching school, during 
which time he attended the Southern Illinois Normal University at Car- 
bondale. He first took up the study of dentistry in the Central Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, at Louisville, where he took a course of three years 
and graduated in 1897, and this was later supplemented, in 1903, by a 
course of post-graduate work in the Chicago Dental College. After 
his graduation from the Kentucky school, Dr. Walser settled in Anna, 
and now has not only the largest but the best practice in this city and 
many of his patients come from all over Union and the surrounding 
counties. His suite of offices is splendidly equipped with all the appli- 
ances known to dental science, and he is thoroughly proficient, some of 
his work having been really remarkable and attracted much interest in 
his profession. He is president of the Jefferson Union and County 
Dental Societies, and his fraternal connections are with the Masons, the 
Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. Dr. Webster has 
taken an active part in public matters, and his record as a member of 
the school board shows that he has been a faithful official who carefully 
guarded the interests of the educational institutions of his community. 
His belief in the future of Anna has been made manifest by the pur- 
chase of a number of pieces of real estate in the city. 

Dr. Walser was married in 1902, at Jonesboro, Illinois, to Miss Delia 
Kiest. who came from northern Illinois, took a course in music and was 
educated at Chicago and Dixon, Illinois. Five children have been born 
to this union, namely : Delford Roy, Clayton Kiest and Edith Mildred, 
all of whom are attending school ; and Elsie Winifred and Morris 
Franklin, at home. Dr. Walser is a trustee of the Lutheran church, of 
which his wife is a consistent member. Both are very popular socially 
and in their church connections. Dr. Walser is an excellent dentist, 
conscientious, skilled and progressive, and from the very first practice 



764 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

has prospered. He has the full confidence of his city, not only as a pro- 
fessional man, but as a good citizen and a pleasant, genial compnion. 

EMMET FRANKLIN THROGMOETON. The most admirable feature of 
life in the United States is the possibility offered to all of its native born 
citizens without regard to wealth or inherited rank, to attain to any 
position, no matter how lofty. The most influential of our statesmen, 
the most successful of our manufacturers, merchants and bankers, in 
fact, our brilliant, conservative and intelligent men in the various pro- 
fessions and occupations, are largely self-made, and are justly proud of 
the fact that what they possess, in material wealth or public honor, has 
been earned through their own efforts. One of Johnson county's most 
progressive and enterprising young citizens, Emmet Franklin Throg- 
morton, at the time of whose election in 1906, at the age of twenty-four 
years, was the youngest county clerk in Illinois, is already widely known 
in the educational and political fields, and has placed himself in his 
present high position by the exercise of those inherent qualities which 
go to make for success. 

Emmet Franklin Throgmorton was born near the old town of New 
Burnside, Johnson county, Illinois, December 17, 1882, and is a son of 
Josiah and Elizabeth (Reeves) Throgmorton. The Throgmorton family 
originated in Throgmorton street, London, England, and two members 
thereof came to the United States, founding the Throgmorton family 
and that of Morton. One settled in Pennsylvania, of whom the late 
Levi P. Morton, vice-president of the United States descended, while the> 
other located in North Carolina and was the progenitor of the Johnson 
county Throgmortons. Josiah Throgmorton, the grandfather of Em- 
met P., was born in North Carolina, from whence he migrated to Ten- 
nessee and thence to the southeastern part of Johnson county during 
the Civil war, in which two of his sons, Pinckney and John, served val- 
iantly. John was among the missing after the battle of Shiloh, and 
was probably killed in that engagement. Josiah Throgmorton was a 
Christian minister and established the Old Bethlehem Christian church, 
preaching in the various pioneer churches of Johnson county from the 
time of his arrival, and carrying on extensive farming operations. He 
married Martha Pierce, of North Carolina, who later moved to Tennes- 
see and thence to Johnson county, Illinois, and she died in Williamson 
county, in 1910, when ninety years of age, he having passed away in 
1888. 

Josiah Throgmorton, son of Josiah and father of Emmet Franklin, 
was born in Johnson county, Illinois, and was here married to Miss 
Elizabeth Reeves. She was born in 1854, in Marshall county, Ken- 
tucky, daughter of Abner Reeves, a native of Virginia, who migrated 
to Kentucky over the old Daniel Boone trail, fought during the Civil 
war in the Confederate army, and died from the effect of wounds di- 
rectly after the war had closed. Mrs. Throgmorton came to Johnson 
county with her sister, Nancy Reeves, riding all the way from Marshall 
county on horseback. Josiah Throgmorton died in 1899, at the age of 
forty-four years, one of the best-known men of his community, and at 
the time of his death was serving in the office of county commissioner, a 
position which he had held for some years. He and his wife had eleven 
children, of whom nine are now living, as follows: Martha; Arthur, who 
is married and has two children ; Emmet Franklin ; Almus, who mar- 
ried Miss Hettie Snyder and has one child ; and Walter, Nellie, Norris, 
May and Robert at home. Walter, Nellie, Norris and May are gradu- 
ates of the Southern Illinois Normal School, and are now engaged in 
teaching school. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 765 

Emmet Franklin Throgmorton remained on the home farm, and 
received his primary education in the public schools, completing his 
course in 1900. In the next year he entered the Southern Illinois Nor- 
mal University at Carbondale, Illinois, pursuing a teacher's course, and 
for three years attended college in winters and taught school in sum- 
mers, thus working his way through. He taught school during the win- 
ter of 1905-1906 -and in the fall of the latter year was elected to the of- 
fice of county clerk, received the re-election in the fall of 1910, and still 
holds that position. Mr. Throgmorton 's rise has been remarkable for 
such a young man, but he is eminently fitted to discharge the duties of 
his office, and has the full confidence of the people of the county. He 
takes a deep interest in the cause of education, and all that tends to- 
wards the advancement of the moral, physical or material welfare of his 
community. Fraternally he is connected with Ozark Lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows, Romeo Tent No. 53, Knights of Pythias, Vienna Lodge and Royal 
Arch Chapter of Masons, and the Modern Woodmen of America, at 
Vienna. 

In 1906 Emmet Franklin Throgmorton was united in marriage with 
Miss Leah Bass, who was born and reared in Johnson county, Illinois, 
a former teacher and daughter of A. H. and Jane (Albright) Bass, na- 
tives of North Carolina, who migrated to Tennessee and thence to 
Johnson county. Mr. and Mrs. Throgmorton have one son : Joseph. 
Mr. Throgmorton is one of the best-liked young county officials that 
this section has known, being popular with all classes, and he has already 
shown himself capable of advancing far in the field politic. 

Arthur Throgmorton, brother of the county clerk, and now serving 
as deputy clerk, was born August 18, 1880, on his father's farm in 
Johnson county, and worked on his father's farm until twenty -one 
years of age, in the meantime securing a district school education. For 
five years thereafter he taught public schools in Johnson county, and 
spent five terms in the Southern Illinois Normal University. In April, 
1906, -he was appointed deputy county clerk, and again in 1910, and he 
still holds that office. He is a member of the Modern "Woodmen of 
America, and is a consistent attendant of the Christian church of 
Vienna. He was married, May 16, 1907, to Miss May Murrie, daugh- 
ter of William and Margaret (McFatridge) Murrie, members of one 
of Johnson county's oldest and most highly respected families, and two 
children have been born to this union: Robert, who is three years of 
age, and Marguerite, who is two. Like his brother, Mr. Throgmorton 
has numerous friends in Vienna, and he is known as a capable, hard- 
working and painstaking official. 

JAMES C. CARTER. Among the most enterprising and energetic busi- 
ness men of Cypress, Illinois, James C. Carter stands well to the fore- 
front. Mr. Carter has had a career that has led him into various lines of 
endeavor at different periods and in every instance he has achieved 
conspicuous success. His grandfather, Samuel Carter, a native of Vir- 
ginia, was the first of the family to become a settler in Southern Illinois, 
he having brought his family to this section in 1861. He lived to the 
advanced age of ninety-one years and died in 1870. One of his sons was 
Jonas C. Carter, who was born in Tennessee, married Elizabeth Buford, 
also a native of that state, and they became the parents of James C. 
Carter, whose life this sketch briefly outlines. He was one member of a 
family of nine children, but only one brother and one sister are now 
living, namely, Stephen and Mrs. Ethel Wilkinson, whose husband is 
deceased. One of his brothers, William L., was accidentally killed in 
October, 1902, another died of a congestive chill in 1884, and a sister, 



766 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Ellen, succumbed to an attack of the measles when thirteen years old. 
Jonas C. Carter, the father of this family, and his wife lived on a farm 
in Cache township until 1881, when they removed to a home in Union 
county and are now residing on a farm there. 

The birth of James C. Carter occurred July 20, 1864, in Cache town- 
ship, Johnson county, Illinois. During his boyhood James attended the 
district school of his neighborhood and worked on the farm when school 
was not in session, continuing thus until twenty years old. He pursued 
his education further at Anna, Illinois, studying under the direction of 
Professor John R. "Dean. Securing a teacher's certificate, he engaged 
two terms as instructor and then entered McKendree College, and 
finally completed a four-year classical course there, teaching and study- 
ing alternately. 

After acquiring his college diploma Mr. Carter devoted a number of 
years to continuous pedagogical work, in 1890 returning to Johnson 
county and teaching there. He was principal of schools at several points 
at different times during his career as a teacher, filling that position at 
Grand Chain, Pulaski county, Belknap, Johnson county, in 1893, 1894 
and 1895 ; and was also at one time principal of Wetaugh schools in 
Pulaski county, continuing there two years. 

In 1898 Mr. Carter made an unsuccessful race for the office of county 
superintendent of schools, and the same year received the appointment 
of Cypress postmaster, attending to the duties of that office and teaching 
a country school at the same time. 

In the summer of 1900 Mr. Carter purchased a stock of merchandise 
and turned his attention to business and discontinued school teaching as 
a profession. Ill health compelled him to resign his postmastership and 
dispose of his store, which he sold to Wilhelm Brothers. In 1902 he was 
able, however, to renew his activity as a merchant and he re-ourchased 
his old business and has ever since been engaged in merchandising and 
various other pursuits. He has been at all times closely identified with 
the growth and development of Cypress, and has done a prosperous busi- 
ness in his lines, increasing its volume to -meet the demands of an in- 
creasing population in that thriving town. He erected a fine brick 
business block here in 1910, a portion of the space in which is devoted 
to his five thousand dollar stock of merchandise. Previous to locating 
in the new building Mr. Carter suffered the loss by fire of his entire 
store stock, valued at seven thousand dollars. 

In addition to this business he is the owner of several other fine 
properties, including a considerable acreage of real estate. He possesses 
a fine residence in the west part of town, has a farm of one hundred 
and sixty-three acres west of Cypress and another, containing one hun- 
dred acres, east of town. He devotes a portion of his time to superin- 
tending the raising of fine stock on his farms, including horses and hogs, 
and also owns a valuable herd of Hereford cattle. His industrial hold- 
ings include a sawmill for the manufacture of commercial lumber. Mr. 
Carter is an expert in timber and lumber matters, it having been when 
teaching school that he first became interested in timber and land, by 
trading in which he secured the funds that went for the purchase of his 
first store. 

While giving personal attention to his many business interests Mr. 
Carter has yet found time to perform his full duty as a citizen and at 
times as a public official. He was elected a member of the board of 
county commissioners in 1904, and continued to serve in that capacity 
until December, 1910. He was elected to that office on the Republican 
ticket, and proved to be an exceedingly efficient man for the office. 

The Methodist church counts Mr. Carter as among one of its most 



* Ifct 

8iVfisirr OF 







fe <7\S&Hs<s^&~rJ 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 767 

devoted and influential members. He is also a lodge man of promi- 
nence, belonging to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows. 

The marriage of Mr. Carter occurred in 1887, when he took as his 
wife Miss Minnie Mowry, of Johnson county, daughter of John and 
Nancy Mowry. They have a family of three children, the eldest, a son, 
being a young man of twenty -two years; Ray C., nineteen years of age, 
and Fay, a daughter, aged fifteen years. 

Mr. Carter is a citizen of the highest type, the weight of whose influ- 
ence in all matters of moral and civic import is always found on the 
right side. He is a man of superior attainments, true to every trust, 
public or private, and enjoys the admiration and respect of friends and 
associates in every walk in life. 

LEON EMORY DENISON. In every community there are leaders, men 
of superior ability, energy, judgment and intelligence, who whether 
in the professions or in the business world, not only attain prominence 
in their particular line of endeavor, but at the same time are large 
factors in the advancement of their community along all lines of prog- 
ress. One of the foremost business men of Cairo, Illinois, is Leon 
Emory Denison, who as president of the Denison-Gholson Wholesale 
Dry Goods Company and as a partner in the firm of W. T. Wall & 
Company, proprietors of a large department store, has done much to 
promote the commercial importance of Cairo. 

Mr. Denison was born in Marion, Illinois, May 29, 1870. His 
father, the late Hon. Charles H. Denison, of Marion, Illinois, was a 
prominent financier and man of affairs in that locality who had made 
Marion his home and the scene of his business activities from 1870 
until the time of his death in 1909. Charles H. Denison was born 
at Seneca Falls, New York, August 31, 1837, the third of seven chil- 
dren. His father, Edward Denison, a native of Vermont but of Irish 
descent, was born in 1789 and died at Marengo, McHenry county, Illi- 
nois, in 1872. At Utica, New York, Edward Denison married Evelina 
Hitchcock, who was born in LTtica in 1808 and was of 'English lineage. 
They removed to Huron county, Ohio, in 1841 and thence to McHenry 
county, Illinois, in 1849. There Edward Denison spent his life as a 
farmer and died in 1872, as stated, but was survived by his wife until 
July, 1886, when she passed away at the home of her son in Marion. 
Charles H. Denison was reared on a farm in McHenry county and re- 
mained a resident of that county until his marriage, in 1869, when he 
removed from the northern part of the state to a farm near Bainbridge, 
Williamson county. There he alternated farming and dealing in live 
stock with school teaching until 1873, when he took up his duties as 
circuit clerk of Williamson county, to which office he had been elected 
as a Democrat. In the meantime he had removed his family to Marion, 
and upon the expiration of his official term as circuit clerk, engaged in 
the drug business with W. H. Bundy, but sold out two years later and 
gave his attention to handling real estate and live stock until 1890. 
In that year he entered banking', opening a private bank under the 
firm name of Searing & Denison, with a capital of thirty thousand 
dollars. From that time until his death he was identified with the 
banking interests of Marion and was a financier of recognized ability, 
conservative yet progressive. On July 24, 1902, the present Marion 
State and Savings Bank was incorporated, with a capital of sixty 
thousand dollars, of which Judge Denison, as he was familiarly called 
by his friends, was the largest stockholder and was president. At the 
time of his death he was one of the wealthiest men of Williamson county, 



768 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

owning besides his bank interests farm lands in that county valued at 
fifty thousand dollars, and other realty of an equal value in Marion, 
Illinois, and in St. Louis Missouri. He was for several terms mayor 
of Marion, his service in that office beginning in 1903. On March 21, 
1869, Charles H. Denison married Mary E., daughter of Dr. Samuel 
H. and Mary A. (Smith) Bundy, the former of whom was a surgeon in 
the Thirty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war, which 
regiment was raised and commanded for a time by General John A. 
Logan. Mrs. Denison, who was born in DeKalb county, Tennessee, in 
1848, still survives and occupies the old home in Marion, where she 
brought up her family. To this union were born : Leon Emory Deni- 
son, the immediate subject of this review; Edward Everett Deni- 
son, a graduate of Yale University and of his own University of Illi- 
nois, and now a prominent attorney -at-law in Marion, Illinois; Lora B., 
now the wife of Charles E. Lane, president of the Union Station Bank 
of St. Louis, Missouri ; and Samuel B. Denison, who died at Marion, 
Illinois. 

Leon Emory Denison is a Harvard man, and was graduated from 
that well known and historic institution in 1896, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. After his graduation he immediately entered upon 
an active business career, first as the associate of his father; then later 
he aided in founding what is now the Carterville State and Savings 
Bank. A few months after that he engaged in the retail merchandise 
business at Marion, Illinois, from where he went to St. Louis Missouri, 
where he was connected with the Rice Stix Dry Goods Company. He 
remained there six years and during that time acquired a great deal 
of valuable experience and information bearing on the line of business 
he has since followed so successfully. In 1904 he came to Cairo, Illi- 
nois and formed the Denison-Gholson Dry Goods Company, a wholesale 
firm with a capital of fifty thousand dollars. This company was 
composed originally of Roy Gholson, D. L. Mark, J. F. Roberts and 
Mr. Denison. A reorganization was effected in 1910, the capital in- 
creased and Mr. Denison was promoted from the office of vice-president 
to that of president. In January, 19.11, another reorganization oc- 
curred and the capital was made two hundred thousand dollars. The 
company erected its own business house of six stories on a plot one 
hundred by one hundred and twenty-five feet, is represented on the 
road by ten salesmen, and gives employment in the house to some thirty 
of Cairo's citizens. Mr. Denison has further emphasized his faith in 
Cairo as a commercial city by entering extensively into the retail trade, 
being an equal partner in the large department store of W. T. Wall & 
Company, one of the fine establishments of its kind in Cairo. Having 
enjoyed the advantages of a splendid education and a good business 
training, and being possessed of industry and admirable commercial 
judgment, Mr. Denison 's position in the business circles of Cairo were 
soon established after his advent to that city, and today he stands in 
the fore of its most successful business men. 

Since his residence there he has entered heartily into every move- 
ment which would promote the growth and welfare of the city, and in 
this direction he affiliates as a member of the Cairo Board of Trade and 
the Commercial Club. His educational attainments and happy social 
temperament render him a valued associate in the different clubs and 
orders to which he belongs. He is a charter member of the Elks Club 
at Marion, Illinois, belongs to the Alexander Club at Cairo, and is a 
member of the governing board of the Cairo County Club. Frater- 
nally he is a Royal Arch Mason and a past chancellor commander of 
the Knights of Pythias. In political affairs he is a Republican. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 769 

At Litchfield, Illinois, on June 14, 1905, occurred the marriage of 
Mr. Denison and Miss Mary E. Bennett, a daughter of Dr. B. E. Ben- 
nett. Mr. and Mrs. Denison have two sons Richard Charles and Leon 
Emory. 

LEWIS A. DAWSON is a member of the well known firm of Dawson 
Brothers, of Herrin, whose connection with mercantile enterprises here 
has been continuous and somewhat varied during the past decade. 
Their present business has developed into one of the extensive feed and 
flour houses in Williamson county, and the personnel of the firm com- 
prises Lewis A. and his brother John M. Dawson. The brothers are 
both indigenous to the soil of Franklin county. Lewis A. Dawson was 
born on a farm near Christopher, Illinois, January 27, 1864, and John 
M. was born on the same estate November 8, 1871. They are sons of 
Allen Dawson, who became identified with the region of Franklin county 
before the dominion of Williamson was set off from it. Allen Dawson 
was born in the state of Alabama in 1822 and he accompanied his father, 
Arfax Dawson, to Illinois about the year 1835. The family on its ar- 
rival in this state located near what subsequently became Christopher, 
where Allen died in 1877. His life was devoted to agriculture and the 
rearing of his family, and his public service embraced the incumbency 
of the office of county commissioner of Franklin county, to which posi- 
tion he was elected as a Democrat. 

Arfax Dawson, just after the close of the Civil war, decided to re- 
move with a portion of his family to Texas, the journey being made by 
wagon and team. Texas was then dangerous ground for a man from 
the north to tread upon without military protection, as Mr. Dawson dis- 
covered when nearing Dallas. In the vicinity of that city he was set 
upon by rebel sympathizers, who presumed that he was arrayed against 
them during the war, and they murdered him upon some pretext. His 
family remained in Dallas county and a number of his descendants are 
still inhabitants of that section of the state. The Dawsons were natives 
of Alabama and of course entertained southern ideas and the same po- 
litical sentiment. None of the sons of Arfax participated in the war 
of the rebellion. His children were Allen, Ephraim, George, Judy and 
Catherine. Allen Dawson married Mary Vaughn, and the Dawson 
Brothers of this sketch are members of a family of thirteen children. 

Lewis A. and John M. Dawson both grew up under the invigorating 
influence of the old homestead farm and they acquired their somewhat 
limited educational training in the neighboring district schools. They 
.left the farm to engage in business in Herrin in the year 1900, and 
Lewis A. gained his first experience along mercantile lines as a clerk for 
his brother, C. C. Dawson, engaged in the grocery business in this city. 
Discovering an opening for an exclusive feed business in Herrin, he as- 
sociated himself with his present partner and opened a store at the cor- 
ner of Jackson and Mulberry streets, where their place of business, two 
hundred by forty feet in lateral dimensions, contains their feed mill and 
carload stocks of feed and flour. They manufacture all their feed stuff, 
save bran, are heavy shippers of corn to Herrin to meet the demand of 
this industrial community, and their flour comes to them in lots of ten 
cars, which they job out to dealers in Herrin and the country normally 
tributary thereto. Recently the brothers have added implements to their 
stock in trade and this department promises a favorable return for the 
money and effort expended. As previously intimated, the Dawson 
brothers are stanch Democrats in their political adherency. 

On February 14, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of Lewis A. Daw- 
son to Miss Margaret Dial, a daughter of Minyard Dial. Mr. and Mrs. 



770 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Dawson became the parents of four children, of whom Basil is deceased. 
Bessie and Nellie remain at home with their parents and Roily is en- 
gaged as office man in the Dawson Brothers' store. 

John M. Dawson married Miss Etta Whiteside, a daughter of Frank 
Whiteside, of Herrin. This union has been prolific of three children. 
Kenneth, Helen and Joe Vaughn. The Dawson Brothers rank among the 
most prominent citizens of Herrin, where they are ever on the alert to 
do all in their power to advance progress and development. They are 
honored for their fair and straightforward business dealings and hold a 
high place in the confidence and esteem of their fellow men. 

BYFORD H. WEBB. A practicing physician since 1906, Dr. Byford 
H. Webb has in five years made rapid strides in his profession, ac- 
complishing more in that brief period than is given to many men even 
more happily situated in a much longer time. He has gone so far 
towards making a permanent reputation for himself that his future is 
practically assured, and it is not too much to predict for him a bril- 
liant future in the field of his chosen profession. 

Born in Ewing, Franklin county, Illinois, on May 19, 1881, Byford 
H. Webb is the son of Dr. L. M. and Amanda (King) Webb. Both 
parents were born in Franklin county, and Dr. Webb, the elder, was 
a well known physician for forty years in Ewing. He was a most suc- 
cessful man in his profession and when he. died, in 1906, he left a 
goodly estate, as well as a reputation for honor and fair-mindedness 
that will live for all time. He was known and loved throughout 
Franklin county for his kindly generous nature, many of the admir- 
able traits of his father, Elijah Webb, living in him. Elijah Webb 
was one of earliest settlers in Franklin county. He was a Baptist 
preacher, and the church at that time being in a primitive state of 
organization, Reverend Webb traveled extensively through Illinois in 
the interests of the work. He was well known and universally 
esteemed throughout the state, his work and ministry being of a 
nature that endeared him to all who came in contact with him. The 
maternal grandfather of Byford Webb is William King, one of the 
first born in Franklin county. Mr. King is now eighty-six years of 
age, and lives on his old homestead near Ewing. He was one of the 
founders of Ewing College and is a life member of its board of trus- 
tees. He has always been active in educational promotion and his 
efforts in that direction have been amply rewarded. Mr. King is a 
well-to-do man, having been particularly successful in a material way. 
He is the owner of eight hundred acres of fertile Illinois land, in 
addition to a number of other valuable realty holdings. 

Byford H. Webb followed his common school training with a four 
years' course at Ewing College. At the conclusion of that course 
he entered the Medical Department of St. Louis University, graduat- 
ing therefrom in 1906, and receiving his well earned degree of M. D. 
He began his practice in Ewing and remained there actively engaged 
in his professional work until he had succeeded in defraying the cost 
of his education. In 1909 he moved to West Frankfort, and since 
his establishment there he has been favored with a most pleasing prac- 
tice, and in which he has been unusually successful, his standing in 
West Frankfort being of an order that precludes any possibility of 
any but a highly successful career. 

Dr. Webb is a member of the County and State Medical Associa- 
tions, being active and prominent in both societies, and is affiliated 
with the Masonic order. He is a Democrat, but is not deeply inter- 
ested in political matters. He is a member of the Baptist church. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 771 

In 1907, while residing in Ewing, Dr. Webb married Madoliene 
Jones, the daughter of Henry Jones, of Marion. Mr. Jones is the 
post-master of Marion, Illinois. Dr. and Mrs. Webb are the parents of 
two children Maurine, aged three years, and Byford Lewis, born in 
1912. 

WILLIAM W. WILEY. The life of William W. Wiley of Anna, Illi- 
nois, carries a lesson for the youth of today who feels that he has been 
handicapped in his struggle to win success in the business field or a place 
of prominence among his fellows. Mr. Wiley, at the very outset of life, 
before he had left boyhood, sustained a misfortune under which one of 
less sterner makeup would have given up, totally discouraged, but his 
has been the nature to overcome his affliction and to fight his way steadily 
forward, until today he holds a prominent place in the city's business 
life and no man in his community enjoys to a greater extent the respect 
and esteem of his fellow-townsmen. Mr. Wiley was born at Jonesboro, 
Illinois, October 22, 1851, and is a descendant on his mother's side, of 
Winstead Davie, the founder of the city of Anna, and a grandson of the 
well-remembered and much-beloved lady in whose honor the city was 
named. 

Abel Wiley, the paternal grandfather of William W., was born in the 
state of Maryland, and was there married to Rebecca Richardson. He 
died near the city of Anna in 1867. 

Ben L. Wiley, son of Abel, was born in 1821, in Jefferson county, Ohio 
and as a youth was engaged in carpentry and the grist milling business 
with his father, subsequently engaging in school-teaching. At the out- 
break of the Mexican war he became a soldier in the United States army, 
but the war was nearly ended when he reached Santa Pe, and his princi- 
pal service was with the commissary department. In 1845 he located in 
Vienna, Johnson county, Illinois, and subsequently settled in Jonesboro, 
from whence he enlisted in the Civil war in 1861, and served as lieuten- 
ant-colonel of the Fifth Illinois Cavalry until 1863, when he was trans- 
ferred to the provost-marshal's office at Cairo, remaining there until the 
close of the war. His death occurred in Jackson county, Illinois, in 
March, 1890. In 1850, Mr. Wiley was married to Miss Emily Davie, who 
was born in Jonesboro in 1830, the daughter of Winstead and Anna (Wil- 
lard) Davie. Winstead Davie was born in 1797, in Rowland county, 
North Carolina, from whence he removed in his youth to Tennessee, and 
came from the latter state to Jonesboro, Illinois, in 1818 or 1819. 
Winstead Davie had the misfortune to be a cripple from birth 
and was compelled to use crutches, but in spite of this became 
a very successful business man and was well known to the mill- 
ing trade of this section, having moved his business from Jones- 
boro to Anna in 1858. A merchant by occupation Winstead Davie 
brought a stock of bankrupt goods from Tennessee, disposed of them here 
and returned the money to the creditors. He rose to a place of promi- 
nence in Union county and was elected to all the county offices with the 
exception of that of sheriff, and for some years taught school in a room 
in the Court House. He followed the general merchandise business in 
Jonesboro and Anna until six or seven years prior to his death, which oc- 
curred in the former city, in July, 1885. The city of Anna, which was 
named after his wife and was formerly known as Jonesboro Station, was 
laid out in lots by Mr. Davie. Anna (Willard) Davie was born in Ver- 
mont in 1809, and died in December, 1880, at Jonesboro, and was the 
mother of these children : Daniel, who is eighty-five years of age and a 
resident of Jonesboro ; Emily, who married Mr. Wiley ; Mrs. Mary Per- 
rine, who lives at Anna and is seventy-three years of age ; Mrs. Nannie 



772 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Brown, sixty-seven years old, who also lives at Anna ; and Mrs. Walton, 
who met her death in a railroad accident in 1907. 

William W. Wiley attended the public schools until he was eleven 
years of age, at which time he lost his eyesight. During the next five 
years he attended the Jacksonville Institution for the Blind, where he 
learned the trade of broommaking. He then returned to a farm near 
Makanda, where for ten years he continued making brooms, and even- 
tually came to Anna where he established himself in a little business, 
keeping candy, tobacco and cigars to sell while he still occupied him- 
self with broommaking. His business gradually grew to include school 
supplies, and after ten years he was able .to give up broommaking and 
give his whole attention to his store, which has subsequently become one 
of the largest bookstores here and does a large business. During the 
thirty years that Mr. Wiley has been a merchant here he has gained the 
esteem and respect of all who know him. A cheerful, industrious 
worker, he has never allowed himself to be discouraged, and the success 
that has attended his efforts is but a just reward for his years of faith- 
ful endeavor. 

Mr. Wiley was married (first) in 1881, to Mrs. Mary Greer Glascow, 
who was born in Jonesboro in 1852 and died in 1895, having been the 
mother of these children : W. Davie, who married Floy Halstead, is 
engaged in business with his father, and has one child, Helen ; and Ber- 
tha, who lives at home with her father. Mr. Wiley's second marriage 
was to Miss Helen Short, a native of Kansas, who was born in 1858, and 
died at Anna in 1907, there being no issue. Mr. Wiley is a consistent 
member of the Presbyterian church and takes a great interest in its 
work. His kindly and genial manners have made him very popular 
with the people of his community, and he has hosts of friends through- 
out the city. 

VIVIAN 0. BOGGS. Having tried his hand at many different things 
in various parts of the country, Vivian 0. Boggs has been content at 
last to settle down near his old home to the life of a prosperous mer- 
chant. His varied business experiences equipped him well for his 
present occupation, and the drygoods store which he bought, as re- 
cently as 1909, is one of the most popular trading places in Dongola. 

Vivian O. Boggs, was born in 1878, a Christmas gift to his parents, 
F. G. Boggs and Emma (Norfleet) Boggs, for his birthday was the 
25th of December. F. G. Boggs is a native of Marion county, Illi- 
nois, having been born and reared on the farm where he now resides, 
and where his son was born. His father was Clark Boggs, who is 
supposed to have emigrated from one of the eastern states at an early 
date. Clark Boggs was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil 
war and laid down his life for his country, being buried in Tennessee 
where he died. F. G. Boggs was born in 1852. His wife, Emma Nor- 
fleet, is the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Norfleet, who was a na- 
tive of Tennessee. They had three sons, Vivian 0., Victor and Earl. 
The father is one of the most respected and admired men in Marion 
county, and some of his son's success is no doubt due to the qualities 
he inherited from his father. 

Vivian 0. Boggs was educated in the common schools of his home 
county, and then studied for three years at the Southern Illinois 
Normal school at Carbondale, Illinois. Later he spent one year at 
Monmouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois and finally finished his work 
by taking a course at Brown's Business College in Centralia. Illinois, 
in the fall of 1901. His first position was held with the Harrison 
Machine Works, at Belleville, Illinois. He remained in their sales 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 773 

department for one year as stenographer and bookkeeper, and then 
became assistant purchasing agent for Armour and Company for the 
same length of time. Butler Brothers of St. Louis offered him a posi- 
tion as house salesman, and he accepted, remaining with them for a 
year. The next two years he spent in the employ of various firms, 
all the while storing up for future use many bits of business 
knowledge and valuable experience. During parts of 1907-08 he was 
engaged in a hardware business at Flat River, Missouri, and on the 
18th of January, 1908, he removed to Dongola, where he began to put 
his experience to good use as a manager of the store which he after- 
wards bought. He purchased this general merchandise and dry goods 
business in 1909, and the trade has so increased that he has been 
forced to add to the amount of stock carried, until it is now valued at 
$10,000. 

Mr. Boggs believes thoroughly in the principles adhered to by the 
fraternal orders, and is himself a Modern Woodman of America, and 
also belongs to the Royal Neighbors of Dongola. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian church of Belleville, Illinois, and in the absence 
of a church of this denomination in Dongola, he is a faithful attendant 
at the Lutheran church in his home town, believing that in religious 
matters a broad minded attitude is most desirable. 

In 1904, Mr. Boggs married Anna May Eimer, a daughter of 
Charles G-. Eimer, of Belleville, Illinois. They have only one child, 
Leland C. G. Boggs. 

Although the years that Mr. Boggs has spent in his present home 
have been comparatively few yet he, being originally from this sec- 
tion of the country, naturally has the welfare of the community at 
heart and is glad of any chance he may have in the building up of 
Dongola. In this short time he has made many friends in the district, 
as well as among the many patrons of his store. 

CORNWALL E. KIEKPATRICK. The combination of human attributes 
which yields success in many fields, though a rare one, is embodied in 
the subject of this review. Fire insurance, farming, dealing in fruit, 
vegetables, seed, oats and coal, the picture business, whatever he has 
turned his hand to has given a balance on the right side of the ledger, 
so carefully has he studied and so carefully has he wrought, and in 
addition to successfully pursuing these lines of endeavor he has served 
for the past twenty years as secretary of the board of trustees of the 
Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane. Mr. Kirkpatrick was born 
in Point Pleasant, Ohio, January 10, 1852, and is a son of Cornwall and 
Amy (Vance) Kirkpatrick. 

Cornwall Kirkpatrick was born in Ohio, and as a young man moved 
to Mound City, where he was for some years engaged in the pottery busi- 
ness. Later he came to this city and for a long period was the owner of 
the Anna Pottery, which he was conducting at the time of his death. 
His wife, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, also died in Anna. Cornwall E. 
Kirkpatrick was seven years of age when brought to Anna, and his 
education was secured in the public schools. For four years he was 
engaged in the picture business, then becoming proprietor of a phar- 
macy, but after three years entered the employ of the American Express 
Company, whose agent he was for twenty-six years, and in the meantime 
was also engaged in business with "W~. N. Corlis. He now handles whole- 
sale fruit, vegetables, seed, oats and coal and does a business aggregating 
eighty thousand dollars per year, and for thirty years has dealt in fire 
insurance, representing the Phoenix, Continental, New York Under- 
writers and Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Companies, in addi- 



774 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tion to owning a fine farm of forty-five acres, on which he carries on 
truck gardening. 

From his father, who was a lifelong Republican, he inherits an inter- 
est in public matters which has manifested itself in his active work in 
politics. This has been more than local, his counsel carrying weight 
among the county leaders, and he has served as alderman of Anna and 
secretary of the Republican County Central Committee for six or eight 
years. Twenty years ago he succeeded his father as secretary of the 
board of trustees of the Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane, a 
position which he has very ably filled till the institution went into the 
hands of the board of control. Both in his business and public relations 
Mr. Kirkpatrick has displayed more than ordinary ability, and his 
standing as a business man and citizen is exceptionally high. Frater- 
nally, he is connected with Blue Lodge No. 520 and Royal Arch Chapter 
45, of Masonry, and I. 0. 0. F. Lodge No. 291 and Encampment, in 
both of which he has gone through the chairs, while in the Encampment 
he has been treasurer for the past fifteen years. He is very popular with 
the members of both orders. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick was married in 1878, to Miss Frank Hubbard, who 
was born in Indiana in 1858, and to this union there have been born 
children as follows: Harlow B., Olive M., Harriet V., Cornwall E., 
John R., Margaret F. and Hubbard. Harlow B. Kirkpatrick, a gradu- 
ate of the Union Academy and the University of Illinois, taught at the 
latter institution, and Syracuse (New York) University, went to the 
Philippine Islands on two occasions for the United States Government, 
and at the present time is harbor engineer for the Sanitary District of 
Chicago. He married Miss Elizabeth Hileman and resides at 
LaGrange. Olive M., graduate of Union Academy, Anna, married Rev. 
William Baker, pastor of the Episcopal church of Bloomington, Illinois. 
Harriet V. is a graduate of Union Academy and resides at home, as does 
Cornwall E., who graduated from the Anna High School and has been 
on one trip to the Philippines as engineer for the United States Govern- 
ment. John R. Kirkpatrick is living in Los Angeles, California, where 
he is in the employ of the American Express Company. Margaret F. 
and Hubbard are living at home, the former being a graduate and the 
latter a student of Union Academy. The family is connected with the 
Presbyterian church of which Mr. Kirkpatrick has been elder for a 
number of years. 

CLYDE DUNBAR HARRIS. Prominent among the best citizens of Don- 
gola, and a man who possesses the esteem and good-will of all who 
come in contact with him is Clyde Dunbar Harris, superintendent of 
the Dongola Public Schools. He has occupied that responsible posi- 
tion but a short time, but in the months that have elapsed since he 
became the incumbent of the important office he is so successfully 
filling, he has found favor with his fellow citizens, and is conducting 
his work in fullest confidence of the support and loyalty of the entire 
community. 

Clyde Dunbar Harris is the son of Frank R. Harris, a native of 
Union county, and a former teacher. He died in 1894. His mother 
is Minnie Lane Montgomery, the daughter of Dr. E. L. Montgomery, 
who settled in Union county in 1866. He came thence from Louisiana, 
where he was a slave owner before the war, being the possessor of 
fifty-five slaves, who worked a large plantation for him. Dr. Mont- 
gomery served in the Confederate army as a cavalryman during the 
war. He fought valiantly for the cause of the south, giving of his 
substance freely, and at the close of the war he found himself to be 



HISTOEY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 775 

financially ruined. His father was an itinerant Presbyterian minister 
who helped to spread the gospel among the early settlers and among 
the Indians of Louisiana and Mississippi. 

Dr. Montgomery studied medicine at Keokuk, Iowa, graduating in 
1868, and he practiced his profession at Mill Creek until the time 
of his death in 1898. His daughter, Minnie Lane Montgomery and 
the mother of Clyde Dunbar Harris, has been thrice married. Her 
first husband was William Karraker, and she bore him two sons, 
Oscar and Charles Karraker. By her second marriage, when she be- 
came the wife of Frank B. Harris, she became the mother of a son 
and daughter; Clyde Dunbar and Grace, the latter dying at the age 
of nine months. Her third husband was Thomas Jasper Karraker, a 
well-to-do farmer in the vicinity of Dongola. Two children have been 
born of this latter union : Oral and Lois. 

Clyde Dunbar Harris was born April 15, 1889, on a farm in Union 
county. He passed through the common schools of his home town, 
and later attended the Southern Illinois Normal University at Car- 
bondale, graduating therefrom in the spring of 1911. In that same 
year he was elected to the position of superintendent of the Dongola 
schools. He is ably assisted by a corps of six efficient teachers, and 
the schools have an enrollment of two hundred and thirty-three 
pupils. The curriculum of the schools includes a four year high school 
course, which is up-to-date and thorough in every detail. Mr. Harris 
has already shown especial ability in his line of work, and a brilliant 
future for him is freely predicted. 

ANDREW J. PICKRELL. The lawyer-postmaster of Anna, Illinois, An- 
drew J. Pickrell, needs no introduction to the people of that city. That 
he is well and favorably known is evidenced by the office to which he has 
been appointed each term without opposition since March 1, 1903, and 
which he now holds and fills so acceptably. Mr. Pickrell was born Octo- 
ber 19, 1854, on a farm near Mount Pleasant, Union county, Illinois, and 
is a son of John and Hannah Pickrell, and a grandson of a Virginia 
planter who removed from that state to Tennessee. John Pickrell was 
born in Tennessee, and migrated to Illinois at an early age with his par- 
ents and early in life engaged in agricultural pursuits in Union county, 
from whence he enlisted for service during the Civil war, in Company I, 
One Hundred and Ninth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was for many years a well-known and prosperous farmer of Union 
county. He died in Anna after a residence there of thirty years, at the 
age of eighty-one years, his burial taking place under the auspices of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, of which he had been for a long period 
a popular comrade. His wife, who before marriage was Hannah Dick- 
son Wiggs was a native of North Carolina. She also died in Anna, aged 
seventy-two years. 

Andrew J. Pickrell was given the benefit of a good education, at- 
tending the common schools of Union county, the Sam Harwood school, 
of Carbondale, and Ewing College. During the next three years he 
studied law in the offices of M. J. Inscore, and in 1889 was admitted to 
the bar, practicing from that year until 1903. From 1898 until 1900 he 
served the people of Anna as city attorney, and during his incumbency 
of that office revised the city ordinances. In 1894 when the Republican 
party was casting about for a suitable candidate for the office of State 
representative, Mr. Pickrell 's name was brought forth, and in the elec- 
tion which followed he received the largest vote ever polled for a can- 
didate for that position. Although he only served one term, Mr. Pick- 
rell made his presence felt in the Legislature, being fearless in cham- 



776 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

pioning the issues which he felt would benefit his constituents, and serv- 
ing as a member of the Judiciary and four or five other committees. 
One of the most important bills advocated by him was one to regulate 
the express companies, placing them under control of the Railroad and 
Warehouse Commission. When he was first appointed postmaster of 
Anna, the postoffice here belonged to the third class, but the business has 
nearly doubled during his incumbency and it is now a second-class office. 
He has ably kept pace with all improvements in the department, and 
has demonstrated his capability and efficiency in every way. He is 
courteous,' considerate and obliging, has been one of the best and most 
popular postmasters Anna has known, and it is certain that when 
he leaves the office he will have added hosts of friends to those he al- 
ready has. The highest compliment that can be paid to Mr. Pickrell is 
the general opinion of all who know him that he is a man who does his 
duty as he sees it, and that he is upright, fearless and absolutely sin- 
cere. He has been popular in fraternal circles, and is connected with 
Lodge No. 520, A. F. & A. M. and R. A. M., Chapter No. 45, at Anna; 
with Cairo Commandery No. 13, and with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

PLEASANT W. ROSE, M. D. One of the prominent physicians of 
Southern Illinois, whose skill and ability have gained him a wide and 
enviable reputation, and as a consequence a large and liberal clientele, is 
Pleasant W. Rose, M. D., of Cypress, Illinois, where he is the proprie- 
tor of a drug establishment. Dr. Rose was born on a farm in Grants- 
burg township, Johnson county, August 25, 1877, and is a son of Pleas- 
ant W., Sr., and Mary Elizabeth (Farris) Rose, farming people of this 
county. 

The Rose ancestry can be traced back to Revolutionary times, several 
of the name having fought as soldiers in the Colonial army. The 
grandfather of Dr. Rose, also named Pleasant, was born in Hardin 
county, Illinois, in 1812, and lost his father in early childhood. His 
mother took her little family to an unimproved farm in Pope county, 
Illinois, where the boy grew up to the hard life of the pioneer farmer, 
and at the age of twenty-two years was married to Mary Ann Ellis, of 
North Carolina, a member of a poor but honorable pioneer family. Pos- 
sessed of untiring energy and a strong determination to succeed, he 
worked hard throughout his life and eventually was rewarded by be- 
coming the possessor of an excellent farm in Grantsburg township, 
where his death occurred in 1873, his widow surviving him a little over 
a year and dying December 4, 1874. They had five children, as follows : 
Mary, the widow of D. C. Chapman ; J. E. ; Sydney A., the wife of J. W. 
Damron; Maria; and Pleasant W., the father of Dr. Rose. 

Pleasant W. Rose was born and reared on the farm on which he 
now resides in Grantsburg township, and was married there October 29, 
1868, to Mary Elizabeth Farris, a native of Tennessee, eight children 
being born to this union, as follows: Arista A., who married W. C. 
Graves,- formerly a merchant of Vienna, Illinois, but now the owner of 
a valuable ranch in the State of Colorado ; Ida, who is deceased ; Mary, 
the wife of Dr. H. W. Walker, a well-known physician of Grantsburg; 
Lillie, the wife of Isaac L. Morgan, deputy state fish warden and real 
estate and insurance agent at Vienna ; William ; Dr. Pleasant W. ; Sid- 
ney; and James W., who is deceased. Pleasant W. Rose, Sr., who now 
lives on a finely-cultivated farm of two hundred and seventeen acres, is 
enjoying the fruits of his many years of industrious labor. He is 
known as a practical, sensible man of affairs, a public-spirited citizen 
and leader of the Republican party in his community, and a man who is 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 777 

devoted to his home and family. He has the entire confidence of the citi- 
zens of his community, who recognize in him the type of citizen who has 
the best interests of his locality at heart. 

Dr. Pleasant W. Rose received his early education in the common 
schools of Grantsburg township, later attended the Vienna High School, 
and in 1896 entered Barnes Medical College, at St. Louis, Missouri, from 
which he was graduated April 12, 1899, with the degree of M. D. He 
began the practice of medicine at Grantsburg, but in 1900 went to Simp- 
son, where he remained for five years, then going to Granite City, where 
he remained two years. He came to Cypress in 1907, and here has built 
up an extensive practice, traveling through the rural sections in a 
radius bounded by four miles north, three miles west, seven miles south 
and three miles east of Cypress, finding his high-power automobile very 
convenient in taking him to the home of his patients. In his profession 
he has steadily arisen until he now occupies a foremost place in its ranks, 
and as a business man he has been equally successful. On coming to 
Cypress he erected a fine corner business block, where he has established 
a drug business, handling all goods to be found in a first-class establish- 
ment of its kind, valued at more than six thousand dollars. The Doctor 
belongs to New Columbia Lodge, No. 336, A. F. & A. M., and holds mem- 
bership in the Johnson County Medical Association, the American Medi- 
cal Association and the Association of Railway Surgeons, and was for- 
merly local surgeon for the Illinois Central Railroad at Simpson. 

On May 16, 1901, Dr. Rose was married to Nancy E. (Ellis) Mount, 
widow of John L. Mount, of Pope county, and a daughter of John and 
Mary Ellis. She has two sons by her former marriage: J. Leo, who is 
twenty years old ; and William Ellis, who is fifteen years of age. 

FRANK A. SABIN, M. D. Fifty years of devotion to his profession 
is the record of Dr. Frank A. Sabin, a veteran physician of Anna, Illi- 
nois ; fifty years of his life given to the calling which he chose as his 
work in young manhood; a half century of time spent in the allevia- 
tion of the ills of mankind. Such indeed is a faithful service, a 
record of which no man could be ashamed. Beginning his career as 
a follower of his profession in the East, cheerfully following its call 
to the West, always giving of his best in its service, never sparing 
himself that the task to which he had devoted himself might be com- 
pleted, Dr. Sabin 's life has surely been a useful one, and he may now 
look back over the years that have passed with a sense of duty well 
done and take a pardonable pride in the accomplishment of a great 
work. Dr. Sabin was born in 1835, in Berkshire county, Massa- 
chusetts, and is a son of Dr. Milieu and Millescent Sabin, the former 
born in 1860 and the latter in 1804, both in Berkshire county, the 
father dying in Madison county Illinois in 1879, and the mother pass- 
ing away in 1899, at Anna. 

The Sabin family first came to Illinois in 1856, locating in Bond 
county, where Dr. Sabin was engaged in surveying for three years, 
and at the end of that time returned to the East, where he studied 
medicine with his father. Entering the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York, he was graduated therefrom in 1860, and in 1861 
finished his studies in the Berkshire Medical College. After spending 
a short time in New York, in February, 1862, he came to Troy Madi- 
son county, Illinois, and began practice with Dr. John S. Dewey 
Thinking, like many others, that the South would soon be defeated 
and that the Civil war could not last more than a year, Dr. Dewey 
enlisted in the Union army, leaving his practice in charge of Dr. 
Sabin but he was compelled to spend three years in the service. After 



778 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Dr. Dewey's return, Dr. Sabin continued in practice in Madison 
county for twenty-four years, then going to Vermilion, South Dakota, 
where he was for four years engaged in his profession. He spent the 
following two years in Fort Scott, Kansas, and in 1892 came to Anna, 
where he has since resided. A deep thinker and constant student, Dr. 
Sabin has ever devoted himself to research and study. His sympa- 
thetic nature and kind and gentle personality have aided him greatly 
in his labors, and have made the aged physician one of the best be- 
loved of his profession. 

In 1865 Dr. Sabin was married to Miss Anna E. Lytle, who was 
born in Tennessee in 1846 and died at Anna in 1901, and they had two 
children : Edward and Mary. Edward, who was born in 1875, at- 
tended the college at Maryville, Tennessee, for two years but was com- 
pelled to give up his studies on account of ill health. For five years 
he was engaged in teaching but since that time has been engaged in 
the work of the Young Men's Christian Association. He is a member 
of Masonic Blue Lodge No. 520, Anna. Miss Mary Sabin was born 
in 1880, attended Beloit (Wisconsin) College, and during 1903, 1904 
and 1905 taught in Union Academy, Anna. She is unmarried and re- 
sides with her father. Dr. Sabin 's brother, Dr. "Wallace F. Sabin, 
who also makes his home with him, is a retired lieutenant of the Regu- 
lar United States Army, which he joined in 1869 and from which he 
retired in 1909, having served many years as a surgeon. 

Dr. Sabin is a Mason and has been through the chairs, belongs to 
R. A. Chapter No. 45, and was made a mason in 1863. In 1858 he 
joined the Odd Fellows, went through the chairs and took the En- 
campment degree. He is a member of the county, State and Southern 
Illinois medical associations, and is secretary of the county board of 
pension examiners. A consistent member of the Presbyterian church, 
he has been an elder therein for nearly fifty years, and has been a 
member of the Sunday school since 1841, of which he was superintend- 
ent for a quarter of a century. His political beliefs are those of the 
Republican party, but he has never sought public preferment. 

MRS. MINNIE J. DONAGHT. One of the oldest families whose name 
figures in the history of Southern Illinois is that of Donaghy, the first 
representative of that house having come to this section from France in 
the first year of the nineteenth century. This Donaghy married a Miss 
Chapman after his arrival here and they became the parents of one 
son, William B. Donaghy, Sr., father of William B. Donaghy, the late 
resident of Vienna of whom we are writing and- whose demise occurred 
in 1898. The first Donaghy did not remain long in this country, but 
returned to France, leaving the son, William B., Sr., to be reared by 
his uncle, Daniel C. Chapman. After his return to his native land 
nothing further was ever heard of Mr. Donaghy and it is supposed that 
he met his death in some manner unknown to his relatives at the time. 
The first William B. Donaghy was three times married, his first wife 
having been a Miss Jones, the second a Miss Kennedy, and the third a 
Miss Vandervent, and she became the mother of William B. Donaghy, 
whose life this sketch briefly outlines, and who was born January 30, 
1849, on a farm near Vienna. As the death of the elder Donaghy which 
occurred seven days before the birth of W. B., Jr., and, his mother having 
died when he was six years old, he was raised by step parents. He in- 
herited his portion of the estate and subsequently bought out the in- 
terests of the other heirs in the old homestead. Beginning with a farm 
of eighty acres, he cultivated it with skill and success. He combined 
farming operations with teaching school, and was able to accumulate a 



TEfc IWRMW 

35- m 
IfflWERSITY OF ILLIWHS 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 779 

large amount of property during his life. Among his properties was 
one fine farm containing one hundred and sixty acres, located near 
Vienna, and another of equal size situated near Bethlehem in John- 
son county. Mr. Donaghy was a public spirited citizen who took an 
active interest in all matters pertaining to the public weal. He filled 
various township offices during his lifetime and was clerk of Vienna 
township for several terms. His death on July 24, 1898, removed 
from the community one of its most valuable citizens and his death 
was sincerely mourned by a host of friends by whom he was held in 
universal high esteem. 

Mr. Donaghy was, on October 9, 1873, united in the holy bonds of 
wedlock with Miss Miranda J. Scott, who still survives her late hus- 
band. Mrs. Donaghy, who was born in 1851, is the daughter of James 
and Theresa (Fort) Scott, both Kentuckians. James Scott, who 
settled in Kentucky in 1850, was a son of William Scott, born in Scot- 
land, and he married Mary Conrad, who was born in Ireland. Theresa 
Fort was the daughter of William Fort, a native of Kentucky. 

Mrs. Donaghy is the mother of six children, as follows: William 
B., a resident of Spokane, Washington, and father of two children, 
William B., Jr., and Dorothy Elizabeth; Mrs. Annie Maud Miller, of 
Fresno, California, mother of one child, William Glenn; Mrs. Minnie 
D. Weirick, also of Fresno, California, mother of two children, Dorothy 
Margaret and Joseph Roy; Mrs. Flora Myrtle Smith, of Fresno, Cali- 
fornia, mother of one child, Myra; John M., of Spokane, Washington; 
and Nellie M., a graduate of the Vienna High School, and who lives 
with her mother. 

CHARLES E. "McCLiNTOCK. One of the most substantial representa- 
tives of the financial interests of Cypress, Illinois, is Mr. Charles E. 
McClintock, president and owner of the Bank of Cypress, a financial 
institution of high standing and assured stability second to none in 
Johnson county. Mr. McClintock resided upon the Franklin county 
farm on which he was born, January 27, 1870, during the first twenty- 
two years of his life. The McClintocks were among the early pioneers 
of this section of the state, and the grandfather of our subject, Samuel 
McClintock, who was a native of Ireland, first resided in North Caro- 
lina, but later settled in Southern Illinois, coming here in the early 
forties. Mr. McClintock 's father, Andrew Jackson McClintock, was 
born in North Carolina, and came from that state with his father, who 
settled here as above mentioned. His mother, who was before her mar- 
riage Louisa J. demons, was born in Tennessee. The father spent his 
life in agricultural pursuits, and died on the farm in 1893, while the 
mother is still living. 

Charles E. McClintock was a member of a family of ten children and 
had six brothers and three sisters, whose names were as follows: Samuel 
C., Emma Ellen, Andrew J., John W., Robert L., Moses C., Edward E., 
Martha J. and Mary L. His first entrance into the mercantile world 
took place when he was in his twenty-second year, when he engaged in 
business in Old Frankfort. Illinois. In August, 1899, Mr. McClintock 
disposed of his store at that point and removed to Johnston City, 
Williamson county, purchasing there a stock similar to that which he 
carried at Frankfort, and now conducts a business there of sufficient 
proportions to make it profitable to carry fourteen thousand dollars 
worth of goods on the shelves. Mr. McClintock has been very successful 
in this as in other lines of commercial activity in which he has a part, 
and is entitled to personal credit alone for what he has attained, for he 
has gained all through his own unaided efforts. 



780 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Ten years ago he became actively interested in banking operations 
through his connection as stockholder of large holdings in the First 
National Bank of Johnson City. He now owns an interest in several 
other financial organizations, possesses a large amount of real estate in 
this and other states and is rated as one of the weathiest men of this 
part of the state. He owns valuable real estate properties in Johnson 
City; St. Louis, Missouri; St. Elmo, West Frankfort, Marion, Grand 
Tower and Cypress, Illinois, and at other points in Missouri has one 
hundred and eighty acres of land, while at Austin, Texas, he owns one 
thousand one hundred acres the value of his entire acreages being esti- 
mated at in the neighborhood of thirty thousand dollars. 

On June 15, 1911, in company with William Orwan Hall, his son-in- 
law, Mr. McClintock purchased the Bank of Cypress, Mr. Hall assuming 
the position of cashier of the institution, which does a general banking 
and loan business. He is now engaged in making arrangements for the 
incorporation of the Cypress State Bank, with a capital of twenty-five 
thousand dollars, the stockholders to be among the citizens, business 
men and farmers of Cypress. 

In 1891 occurred the marriage of Mr. McClintock and Belle Jordan, 
of Franklin county, a daughter of Elijah W. and Nancy C. Jordan. 
Four children have blessed this union. One died in infancy and the 
three living are: Nola May, wife of William Orwan Hall, previously 
mentioned as cashier of the bank ; Ruby Fay and Lena Ruth. 

Mr. McClintock is a man of deep religious convictions and is a benev- 
olent contributor to all churches. In fraternal circles he is highly 
esteemed as a prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and of the Woodmen of the World. He is an influential factor in 
all movements looking to the highest development of this section of the 
state and is a gentleman of unimpeachable integrity as well as extensive 
experience and broad business ability. 

T. LEE AGNEW, A. B., M. D. One of the leading members of the 
Southern Illinois medical profession, who has held many positions of 
trust and has discharged the duties that have been delegated to him in 
a manner calculated to win and maintain the confidence and esteem of 
his entire community, is T. Lee Agnew, A. B., M. D., president of the 
Union County Medical Society, whose field of practice since 1900 has 
been the city of Anna. Dr. Agnew was born at Makanda, Jackson 
county, Illinois, in 1871, and is a son of Dr. Frank M. and Harriet E. 
(Elmore) Agnew. Dr. Agnew 's father, who is the oldest practicing 
physician in Jackson county, was born in Ohio, in 1840, and his mother 
in Tennessee in 1846, and both are now living in the town of Makanda, 
whence they came as young people. 

T. Lee Agnew attended the public schools of Jackson county, after 
leaving which he attended Ewing College for three years in Franklin 
county. In 1888 he went to Jackson, Tennessee, and entered the South- 
western Baptist University, from which he was graduated in 1892 with 
the degree of A. B., having been a member of the Alpha Theta Chapter 
of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. While at Ewing College he was phyto- 
gian, and at Jackson was a member of the Appolonian Literary Society, 
winning the gold medal for oratory. Although greatly interested in his 
studies, Dr. Agnew did not neglect his physical needs, and was one of the 
best shortstops and pitchers that the Jackson baseball team ever had. 
In 1892 he entered Marion Sims College of Medicine, at St. Louis, which 
is now connected with the St. Louis University, and he was graduated 
therefrom in 1895 with the degree of M. D., having taken a special 
course in internal medicines. During the next five years he was en- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 781 

gaged in practice with his father at Makanda, and he then came to 
Anna, which he has since made his home, and where he has built up an 
extensive practice. Dr. Agnew is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and 
the Modern Woodmen, of which he is medical examiner, as he is also 
of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, the Bankers Life Assurance Com- 
pany of Des Moines, Iowa ; the Northwestern Life Assurance Company, 
the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, the Travelers Life In- 
surance Company and the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company. He 
is president of the Union County Medical Society, of which he was sec- 
retary for four years and one of the reorganizers after it had been dis- 
solved, and is connected with the state and national bodies. As a mem- 
ber of the board of health, Dr. Agnew successfully handled several small- 
pox epidemics, and his labors here in every way have been conducive 
to the public welfare. His politics are those of the Democratic party, 
but he has not found time from his professional duties to enter the 
public field as an active participant, although he is deeply interested in 
all that pertains to the progress and development of his section. 

January 18, 1899, Dr. Agnew was married to Miss Edna E. Elling- 
ton, who was born in Jackson, Tennessee, at which place he met her as 
a schoolmate. They are consistent members of the First Baptist Church, 
in which he has been a deacon for some years, and he was for a long 
period associated with Sunday school work, acting as teacher, secretary 
and superintendent. A man of scholarly tastes and able to throw light 
on almost any subject connected with his profession, yet drawing from a 
fund of rich experience and ripened knowledge, Dr. Agnew is also a man 
of rare sympathy, great kindness of heart and magnetic personality. 
Possessing a fine presence, a cheerful manner and an invigorating voice, 
he is destined for great things in the happy future that stretches before 
him, as a reward for his years of faithful, painstaking preparation for 
the noblest work in which a man can engage. 

CHARLES A. C. PARKER, M. D. In the country around Dongola, no 
figure is so welcome as is that of Dr. Charles A. C. Parker. Beginning 
his life as a young man in the service of the public as a school teacher, 
he saved his small monthly stipend in order that he might continue 
to give his services to his fellow men, as their physician. Dr. Parker 
has been a practicing physician for nineteen years, and in spite of hav- 
ing spent only four of these in Dongola, he is loved as loyally as 
though he had spent all of his life among the people of this section. 

Charles A. C. Parker was born on the 7th of September, 1863, 
in Pocahontas, Tennessee. He was the son of Rev. I. A. J. Parker and 
Jane J. (Clary) Parker. The father is one of the oldest ministers of 
the Christian church in the state of Illinois, his years of service being 
over two score. When Dr. Parker was a baby of two years the family 
left Tennessee, emigrating to Massac county, Illinois and settling in 
the little town of Metropolis. Soon afterward they again moved this 
time to Johnson county, near Buncombe. The parents now reside in 
Vienna, where they are revered for the beauty of character which is 
shown so clearly in their daily lives. They are the parents of eight 
children, Dr. C. A. C. ; Lucas, who is a printer and undertaker at 
Vienna; Gus, living in Larned, Kansas; Lillie, staying on the old home 
place ; Willis, or better, Rev. W. E. Parker, at present a student at 
Harvard University ; Rev. Beverly P. the well loved Christian minister 
at Roselle, Kansas; Ethel, now Mrs. Marbury of Leverett, Illinois: 
Myrtle, the wife of the Rev. Sears of Maroa, Illinois. 

Dr. Parker was educated in the common schools of Johnson county, 
and when he was no more than a school boy himself, at the age of 



782 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

seventeen, he began teaching. He taught eight terms in all ; five terms 
in Union county, three in Johnson and four in Moscow. His success 
as a school teacher was marked. He had the gift of sympathy and 
understanding, and children gravitated to him naturally, though in 
his schools everyone knew they dare not misbehave, for his rule 
though tender was firm. He now studied medicine under Dr. Dick 
of Union county for one year and then in 1890 his great desire was 
fulfilled and he entered the doors of the Marion Sims Medical College 
as a student. On the 25th of April, 1892 he was graduated and im- 
mediately began the practice of his profession. The first year he 
spent at Mt. Pleasant and then located near Cypress where he re- 
mained from 1893 to 1906. During this year he moved to Campbell 
Hill in Jackson county, Illinois, where he remained for the next two 
years. In the spring of 1908 he came to Dongola, and with these years 
of experience behind him he has been able to make himself indispen- 
sable to the people of this section. His practice is very large, and 
much scattered, so that sometimes this faithful practitioner is forced 
to drive sixteen miles or so to cure a cold. It is worth while, for no 
where is there a class of men who do a greater amount of good than 
the country doctor, and no where can one win a more true and loyal 
set of friends than in just such work. In accordance with his doc- 
trine of brotherly love, he is a firm believer in the good of fraternal- 
ism. He is a member of the Masonic order of Dongola, is a Modern 
Woodman of America, belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America 
and to the Royal Neighbors. 

His affiliation in religious matters is with the Baptist church, where 
he is a regular attendant. In 1881 he was married to Mary A. Henard. 
the daughter of Francis M. and Lucretia A. (Bridges) Henard. They 
have five children, three of whom are married and have families of 
their own. Marie C. is Mrs. Hinkle and the mother of two children. 
Loren and Leland. Charles M. is a railroad conductor and lives at 
Salem, Illinois, with his two sons James and Jack, and his wife, who 
was Ina Bridges. Eva E., who married W. 0. Holshouser lives at 
Cypress, with her family of four children, Wanda, Hazel, Paul and 
Joseph. The two youngest, Mary Edith and Zillah are still at home. 

Dr. C. A. C. Parker is interested in things outside of his profes- 
sion, which is rather rare for scientific men. He is vice-president and 
stockholder of the new First National Bank of Dongola, which opened 
for business on the 30th of September, 1911. He is also the owner of 
a brick business block and a fine residence in Dongola. 

Dr. Parker must have received his tendency to battle with disease 
from his long line of fighting ancestors. His father was a soldier all 
through the Civil war, fighting under Colonel Moss on the Union side. 
The grandfather of the doctor, Aaron Parker also fought during the 
Civil war and died of chronic dysentery during this period, so the 
doctor comes naturally by his fighting propensities. 

JAMES C. STEWART, M. D. Many of the physicians and surgeons of 
today are devoting their energies to certain special lines, believing that 
in this way they accomplish much more good than if they spread their 
efforts over a wider field. One of the men who has achieved success in 
his chosen walks of life and has made his name a representative one in 
the profession of medicine, is Dr. James C. Stewart, who is engaged in 
practice at Anna, Illinois, and makes a specialty of diseases of the eye. 
Dr. Stewart was born at Buncombe, Johnson county, Illinois, in 1866, 
and is a son of Thomas B. and Sarah J. (Lovelace) Stewart, retired 
farming people of Illinois, who now make their home in St. Louis. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 783 

James C. Stewart received his early education in the common schools 
of Johnson county, after leaving which he entered the Southern Illinois 
Normal University, at Carbondale, which he was compelled to leave on 
account of ill health six months before graduating. During the next 
four years he was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Johnson 
county, in the meantime diligently pursuing his medical studies, and he 
then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at St. Louis, from 
which he was graduated in 1891. Subsequently he took a general post- 
graduate course at the Illinois Post-graduate Medical School, Chicago, 
from which he graduated in 1900, having given special study on diseases 
of the eye, and in 1891 he began practice at Goreville, Johnson county. 
After seven years of successful practice at that place, Dr. Stewart came 
to Anna, where he has since built up a large clientele. He has retained 
the confidence of a large body of patients through his success in a num- 
ber of complicated cases, is a close and careful student, a steady-handed 
surgeon and a sympathetic friend and advisor, and keeps himself well 
posted on the latest discoveries in his profession by subscription to 
numerous medical journals. He is a member of the Union County Medi- 
cal Society, the Illinois and Southern Illinois Medical Societies and the 
American Medical Association, has been connected with the American 
Association of Railway Surgeons for some years, and also belongs to the 
Joint Association of Surgeons of the Illinois Central, Yazoo and Missis- 
sippi Valley and Indiana Southern Railway Companies. Fraternally, 
the doctor is connected with the local lodge of Masons, No. 520. He and 
his wife are consistent members of the Presbyterian church, in which he 
now acts as a member of the board of trustees. Dr. Stewart is one of 
Anna's most public-spirited citizens, and can always be found in the 
front rank of any movement which will prove of benefit to his profession, 
to the cause of education, or to his adopted city. 

In 1892 Dr. Stewart was married to Miss Ada P. May, of Marion, 
Illinois, and four children have been born to this union, namely : Don 
B., who was born October 25, 1896, and is now attending the Union 
Academy, at Anna; Beryl J., who died at the age of ten years; Victor, 
who' died when ten years old ; and Fay, who passed away when an infant 
of eighteen months. Dr. Stewart has a well-appointed suite of offices 
in Anna, where he is also the owne~ of a modern residence property. 

WILLIAM T. LAUGHLIN. The history of this section of the state would 
not be complete did it not contain conspicuous mention of William T. 
Laughlin, a leading citizen of Johnson county, at present mayor of Cy- 
press, and also a well known merchant of that city. Mr. Laughlin is a 
man whom Johnson county claims particularly as its own, this having 
been the place of his nativity, his birth occurring on a farm near Tunnel 
Hill on August 12, 1865. Mr. Laughlin is the grandson of Dr. George 
Laughlin, of Scotch descent, a native of Kentucky, and a practicing phy- 
sician well known in early days here. It was Dr. Laughlin who erected 
a mill at Millstone Bluff about 1848. 

The parents of William T. Laughlin were Richard Harris and Eliza- 
beth Marilla (Simmons) Laughlin. The father was born and grew to 
young manhood near Princeton, Caldwell county, Kentucky, the year of 
his birth being 1827. When twenty years old he became a settler on a 
farm near Millstone Bluff in Pope county, but later purchased a farm 
near Tunnel Hill and resided there for a period. After a time he dis- 
posed of that land and returned to Pope County, and located near his 
first home there, on the line between two counties. At a subsequent date 
he secured the ownership of a farm just across the line in Johnson 
county, where he lived until the time of his death, in 1884. His wife 



784 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

preceded him to the other land, her demise having occurred on March 20, 
1882. They were the parents of nine children, but four of whom grew 
to maturity and but two of whom are now living, these being Samuel W. 
and William T., the latter the subject of this sketch. Richard H. Laugh- 
lin did valiant service in fighting for his country and was an active par- 
ticipant both in the Mexican war and the war of the rebellion, serving 
in the former conflict under General Scott. At the very outbreak of the 
Civil war he offered his service to the cause of freedom and enlisted as 
a member of Company I in the Thirty-first Regiment of Illinois Infan- 
try, under command of John A. Logan. He continued' to serve under 
Logan until that splendid soldier's promotion to a major-generalship. 
Mr. Laughlin was with his company in every engagement in which the 
Thirty-first Regiment fought, was severely wounded in battle before the 
close of the war, and was discharged on account of disability. 

William T. Laughlin worked on the farm and attended school when 
the district school of his community was in session until the death of his 
father in 1884. He then fitted himself to take up the profession of teach- 
ing and secured his first school in Williamson county when twenty-one 
years of age. He taught twelve terms in that county and four terms in 
Johnson county in the country schools, and then decided to equip him- 
self for higher work. In the furtherance of this purpose he entered the 
State Normal School at Carbondale in 1895, took a four years' course at 
that institution, and after completing his studies there continued the 
work of teaching until 1904. Two years previously, in 1902, he had set 
himself up in business in a modest way as a merchant in Cypress, and he 
now decided to give his whole attention to that interest. He has been 
very successful in this effort and does a large business, carrying regu- 
larly a stock of goods valued at three thousand dollars. 

Mr. Laughlin has always taken a leading interest in public affairs, 
being an energetic citizen of the best type, and was in 1911 honored with 
election to the presidency of the Town Board of Cypress. He is promi- 
nent as well in leading social and religious circles of the community, is 
a member of the Baptist church, and fraternally is affiliated with the 
A. F. & A. M., in which he has attained the Royal Arch degree, the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

The first marriage of Mr. Laughlin was solemnized in 1887, when Ida 
C. Gill, daughter of Stephen T. and Mary (Hutchinson) Gill, became his 
wife. She was the mother of two children, Harry and Charles, and died 
in 1893. In 1904 Mr. Laughlin was married to Mrs. Stella M. Adams, a 
daughter of George and Cis Lynch, of Johnson county. This union has 
been blessed in the birth of four children, Herschel Lynch, aged six 
years; Virgil, aged four years; Byron Wadsworth, two years old; and 
Vernon Winifred, an infant. 

GEORGE W. COUGHANOWR. As postmaster of Dongola almost contin- 
uously since 1889, George W. Coughanowr is perhaps the best known 
man in this city. Certain it is that no man in Dongola has given better 
service to the city, or served more faithfully in any public office, than 
has he. He received his first appointment from Benjamin Harrison in 
1889, and with the exception of those years covered by the administra- 
tion of Grover Cleveland, has been the incumbent of the office continu- 
ously. He has seen the office grow in size and importance until it has 
been raised to a third class station, the advance taking place in 1906. On 
the whole, his services to the city, both in his official capacity and as an 
open-minded, straightforward citizen, have been of a character that 
would be difficult to estimate. 

George W. Coughanowr was born on February 1, 1849, at Lebanon, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 785 

Ohio. He is the son of Henry W. Coughanowr, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and - - (Powell) Coughanowr. Henry W. Coughanowr 
removed from Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1851. In 1853 he settled in 
Paris, Illinois, and engaged in the shoe business, being a shoe-maker by 
trade, in which business he prospered most agreeably, and where he 
remained until 1865, when at the close of the Civil war, he removed 
with his family to Carbondale. There the elder Coughanowr engaged 
again in the shoe business, adding also harness manufacturing. He re- 
mained there, occupied thus until his death came in 1886. They reared 
a family of seven children, namely: Louisa, now deceased; William, 
also deceased ; Isaac Newton, killed in battle at Stone River during the 
Civil war; Henrietta, died at Carbondale; Mary, who married Charles 
Curl and resides at Paris; Josephine, married E. Patton, and George W. 
of Dongola. 

George W. Coughanowr lived as other boys until he reached the age 
of fourteen, at which time he left home and enlisted in the Union army 
as a drummer boy. He was a member of Company H, Sixty-fourth 
Illinois Volunteers, and served his country with as much devotion, hero- 
ism and bravery as any veteran of the great Civil war. With his regi- 
ment, he saw service under General Sherman, and he took an active 
part on many a bloody field. His first battle was at Snake Creek Gap, 
and he was at Dallas and the battle of Kenesaw Mountain. He was in 
the siege of Atlanta and participated in Sherman's famous "march to 
the sea. ' ' Throughout the entire period of his service he saw continuous 
skirmishing and fighting, and whether on march or on the field of battle, 
the youthful drummer boy lent inspiration to his comrades, arousing 
their flagging energies to deeds of greater valor. From Savannah they 
went to Beaufort, South Carolina, marched through the Carolinas, was 
at Raleigh, North Carolina, when Lee surrendered, and later partici- 
pated in the Grand Review at Washington. He was mustered out with 
his company on July 15, 1865, and returned home to Illinois, passing 
through the hardships and vicissitudes of army life unscathed, and 
with a memory stored with the manifold incidents and adventures 
attendant upon a three years' service in the drum corps of the Union 
army while engaged in a great war. 

Settling down to quiet civil life again, he entered his father's estab- 
lishment in Carbondale and learned the shoemakers' trade. Later he 
clerked in a dry goods store at Grand Tower and following that he served 
in the same capacity in Carbondale and Carterville. He removed to 
Dongola in 1879, and was occupied as a clerk in that city until 1906. 
He was appointed postmaster of Dongola during President Harrison's 
administration, holding the office continuously, except for the interval 
of time covered by Grover Cleveland's administration, as previously 
mentioned. Up to 1906 he handled the post-office in conjunction with 
his other duties, but since it was raised to a third class post in 1906 he 
has given his full time and attention to the position. On December 20, 
1911, he was reappointed for an additional four years. 

In 1881 Mr. Coughanowr married Rosa Davis, daughter of Syran 
Davis, a one time sheriff of Union county. Mr. and Mrs. Coughanowr 
are the parents of one child, Bertha, who ably assists her father as 
Deputy postmaster. 

Mr. Coughanowr is a member of the Dongola lodge A. F. & A. M. 
and of the Anna post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He is also a 
director and stockholder of the First National Bank of Dongola. As a 
firm adherent of the Republican party, he has always taken an active 
interest in political affairs of his county, and his support and aid are 



786 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

always to be relied upon in any movement that may be calculated to 
add to the welfare of the community. 

ALFRED E. POWELL. When a man is desirous of obtaining any in- 
formation concerning mines and mining at Coulterville he is usually 
referred to Afred E. Powell, who is at present operating the leading 
coal mining property in the district. He has been identified with tho 
mineral belt of the St. Louis coal regions all of his life and has spent 
more than a third of a century in active mining, so he is amply able 
to speak with authority on the subject to which he has devoted so 
much of his life. 

He was born at Chiltenham in St. Louis county, Missouri, on the 
20th of July, 1865, and as a child came with his father into the region 
around Belleville, Illinois. Here he spent his youth, managing to pick 
up here and there scraps of learning and as a lad of ten becoming 
a wage earner. His father was John Powell, who had been connected 
with mines in various capacities from his youth, which had been spent 
in the mines of England. He was a native of Staffordshire, the year 
of his birth being 1816. He married Thirza Pierce, and hoping to 
find better conditions for labor in the United States, they migrated 
hither in 1848. About the time of their arrival the cholera plague 
was raging, but they passed safely through it and lived in this coun- 
try for a third of a century, dying in 1881. Only one other member 
of their family ever settled in America. This was a brother of John's, 
William Powell, and he died in Chiltenham, leaving two children. 

John and Thirza Powell were of the best type of English emigrant, 
modest and plain in manner, of great industry, with few matters of 
greater significance, than the regulation of their domestic affairs, 
capable of causing them either interest or concern. John, believing 
that the policies best suited to our form of governemnt were to be 
found in the platform of the Republican party, adopted the politics 
of this party and was always a loyal member. They had three chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom was Arthur, a mining man of New Baden, 
Illinois; Thomas H. who is identified with his brother's mine at Caul- 
terville, and Alfred E., the youngest. 

Alfred E. Powell seemed destined to become a miner from the 
very nature of his environment, and it is a significant fact that 
although he dropped the industry a number of times, sooner or later 
he was irresistably drawn back into it. He first took a job at "trap- 
ping" at Belleville and remained in that district till 1889, when the 
Consolidated Coal Company, having discovered his executive powers, 
sent him to Peoria, Illinois, as the manager of one of their mines. At 
the end of two years, finding that their confidence in him had not been 
misplaced, he was transferred to Gillespie in a like capacity. He re- 
mained here for eighteen months, and then, as a mechanical engineer, 
he went to St. Louis. He soon gave up this profession, and engaged 
in a merchandise, furniture, coal and feed business. In 1903 he came 
to Coulterville, Illinois, and leasing a mine that had just been opened 
up west of the town, he set to work and developed the property and 
operated it very successfully for two and a half years. 

Again abandoning mining, Mr. Powell now engaged in a general 
merchandise business in Coulterville. His interests were really in the 
mining business however, and when he saw an opportunity to secure 
the fine property of which he is at present lessee, he was willing 
enough to give up his mercantile business. He took possession of his 
new mine on the 19th of May, 1908, and has operated it ever since. 
The property is very valuable, being the most productive mine at 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 787 

\ 

Coulterville and giving employment to seventy-five men. The daily 
output is four hundred and fifty tons. 

His connections with the civic affairs of Coulterville has been 
rather that of a quiet citizen, with an inclination to vote his senti- 
ments and to perform such public functions as he is called upon to 
do. He has served on the town board and was a faithful and effi- 
cient member. In political matters he supports the Republican policies 
and in the world of the fraternal orders is a member of the Odd 
Fellows. 

He was married at Belleville, on the 20th of November, 1886, to 
Miss Bessie Marsh, a daughter of Daniel Marsh, who was a coal opera- 
tor of that district. The latter was a well known and popular man 
who claimed old England for his birthplace. His wife was Bessie 
Glover and his daughter Bessie was one of six children. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Powell are Leroy, who is the general sales agent of 
the Randolph Coal and Mining Company, which is the official name 
of the Powell property in Coulterville, and one daughter, Miss Elva 
Powell. 

HON. NOEL WHITEHEAD. Among men everywhere there must always 
be leaders. Persons not naturally demonstrative to too great a degree, 
with a high regard for the rights of others, and possessing proper ideas 
as to the best means of advancing the interests of their communities, are 
doubtless best fitted for leadership. They do not always attain to that 
position, but when they do their very character serves as a guarantee 
that the tasks intrusted to them will be well and faithfully performed, 
and that portion of the world which comes under their influence will be 
bettered in its condition because of their services. Noel Whitehead, 
whose admirable administration of affairs in discharging the duties of 
the office of mayor of Vienna has established the wisdom of the assertion 
that he would prove as able an official as he has a business man, 
although still a young man, has had a remarkably busy career and is 
connected with some of the leading industries of this section in an offi- 
cial capacity. Mayor Whitehead was born March 7, 1874, in Tunnel 
Hill, Johnson county, Illinois, and is a son of Sylvester and Mary 
(Brooks) Whitehead. 

Sylvester Whitehead was born in the state of Arkansas, in 1849, 
and came to Johnson county, Illinois, in 1854 with his father, James 
Whitehead, and his brother, John, who served in the Civil War four 
years under General John A. Logan, participating in the battles of 
Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain and 
various other smaller engagements, and participated in Sherman's fam- 
ous "March to the Sea." He died in 1906. The grandfather of Mayor 
Whitehead was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Johnson county for 
the remainder of his life, and his son Sylvester was reared to the life of 
a farmer, but forsook the soil to engage in mercantile pursuits in the 
town of Tunnel Hill. He served as postmaster at that point for many 
years, was a successful business man, and became the owner of much 
valuable property, and at the time of his death, September 1, 1909, was 
one of his section's most highly esteemed citizens. Mr. Whitehead 
married Mary Brooks, who was born in 1849 and died in 1898, and they 
had a family of four children, of whom three died in infancy. 

Noel Whitehead attended the public schools of Tunnell Hill, the 
Cape Girardeau (Missouri) Normal School and the Southern Illinois 
Normal University, and in the spring of 1893 completed a business 
course at Quincy, Illinois. He then entered into partnership with his 
father in the mercantile business, where for two years he served as as- 



788 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

sistant postmaster, and in 1895 came to Vienna and became assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank, of which his father at that time was 
vice-president. In July, 1898, he returned to Tunnel Hill, where he 
took charge of the business, retaining his interest therein until 1906, in 
the meantime maintaining a residence at Vienna. Since April, 1910, Mr. 
Whitehead has been connected with the Egyptian Land and Loan Com- 
pany, of which he was one of the organizers, the present corporation 
consisting of D. Esco Walker, C. W. Mills and Mr. Whitehead. The 
company does a large general land and loan business, and has holdings 
throughout this part of the state. Mr. Whitehead is the owner of four- 
teen hundred acres of Johnson county farming land, is a stockholder in 
the First National Bank of Vienna, and has varied interests all over this 
section. He has all the essential qualities of a successful business man. 
Quick to perceive, ready to act, he meets minor business questions with 
quiet ease, while, careful to act rightly, larger matters are the subject of 
his full consideration. Honorable and honest in affairs, thoroughly in- 
formed on general business questions, logical in reasoning, considerate 
and broad in his judgment of general business conditions and ten- 
dencies, and a most certain and intuitive judge of the character of men, 
Mr. Whitehead proved his capability to successfully handle his own af- 
fairs, and the people of Vienna were quick to see that he would be 
equally successful in handling the affairs of the city. In April, 1911, he 
was elected to the mayoralty chair, and his administration has shown 
that his fellow citizens' confidence was not misplaced. Mayor White- 
head is very well known in fraternal circles, belonging to the Blue 
Lodge, Chapter and Consistory of the Masonic order; the Independent 
Order Odd Fellows, the Knight of Pythias, Marion Lodge No. 800, Bene- 
volent Protective Order Elks, and the Order of the Eastern Star, while 
his wife is a well known member of the Daughters of the American Rev- 
olution. 

On August 21, 1893, Mr. Whitehead was married to Estella Chap- 
man, daughter of Pleasant T. and Mary Chapman, and three children 
have been born to this union : Noel Paul, Clinton Sylvester and Mary 
Estella. Noel Paul is attending a private military academy at Staunton, 
Virginia, while the other children are students in the Vienna public 
schools. 

WILLIAM P. SEEBER. One of the leading young professional men of 
Franklin county, Illinois, is found in the person of William P. Seeber, of 
Benton, who, as a lover of his profession, that of law, has pursued it upon 
the same methods as the scholar in science quietly, enthusiastically and 
industriously, bringing to it the highest intellectual qualities and attrib- 
utes of character, which have given him an enviable reputation and 
earned for him conspicuous success. He is a native of Franklin county, 
and was born February 17, 1878, a son of William D. and Florence 
(Pope) Seeber. 

W. M. Seeber, the paternal grandfather of William P., and the pro- 
genitor of the Seeber family in America, was born in Germany, and 
came as a young man to America, settling in the state of New York, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. William D. Seeber, his son, 
was born in the Empire state in 1844, and was seventeen years of age 
when he came to Illinois and settled in the southwestern part of the 
county. He soon engaged in farming, winning himself a place among the 
substantial citizens of Franklin county, who, recognizing his ability in 
handling his own affairs and rightly surmising that he had the ability 
to handle matters of a public nature, elected him, in 1878. to the office of 
sheriff of the county, he being the first Republican to hold that position. 



(RRYERSITY OF ILUMR 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 789 

Mr. Seeber is now serving his third term as county clerk, his office being 
in Benton, and he is known and respected throughout this part of the 
county. His wife is a consistent member of the Christian church, and is 
active in movements of a religious or charitable nature. Her father, 
Benjamin Pope, was born in Illinois, and was a member of one of the 
old pioneer families of this state. 

William P. Seeber received his early educational training in the public 
schools of Benton, and graduated from the Benton High School in 1898, 
immediately after which he entered the law office of Plannigan & Can- 
trell, having decided to become a member of the legal profession. When 
only twenty-one years of age, and still a law clerk, he received the nomin- 
ation for the office of state 's attorney, but in the ensuing election, in 1900, 
he was defeated by a small majority. In 1904 he was again the recipient 
of the nomination for this office, and this time was elected, and while an 
incumbent thereof he completed his law studies and was admitted to he 
bar in 1908. A that time Mr. Seeber formed a partnership with Mr. J. P. 
Mooneyham, and they now practice in all the courts and have built up a 
large and lucrative practice. Mr. Seeber is considered one of the brightest 
young attorneys in Southern Illinois, and he is also possessed of keen busi- 
ness judgment, and honest in all of his dealings. He is enthusiastically in 
favor of those things that stand for the right and bitterly opposed to dis- 
honesty and underhandedness, and is ever interested in the welfare of his 
friends. He has the happy faculty of drawing men to him, and enjoys the 
utmost confidence of those with whom he has come in contact. He has 
been an active worker in the ranks of the Republican party and has 
served as a delegate to a number of county conventions and two state 
conventions. He is prominent fraternally as a member of the Court 
of Honor, and is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias at Ben- 
ton. A hard and industrious worker, Mr. Seeber has given all of his 
attention to his practice, with the result that he is able to enjoy the 
good things of life. 

In 1899 Mr. Seeber was united in marriage with Miss Elfie Harrison, 
daughter of Isom Harrison, who now lives at Mulkeytown, Franklin 
county and was one of the earliest settlers of this county, where he is 
universally respected. He now lives retired, being past eighty years of 
age, and is a popular comrade of the G. A. R., having served through the 
Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Seeber have been the parents of four children : 
Earl and Charles, who are attending school, and Dayton and William, 
who died in infancy. Mrs. Seeber is a member of the Christian church, 
and regularly attends its services in Benton. 

EBERHARD BUCHEE. Among the growing industries of Cairo that 
represented by Eberhard Bucher, the packing and provision business, 
is a positive factor in the force gradually driving the city forward. 
This industry was conceived in many years of application to the retail 
meat business by Mr. Bucher, and is the outgrowth of a demand for 
an establishment where fresh meats could be supplied to a retail trade 
that promised to sustain a considerable plant and thereby open a new 
market for hogs, cattle and sheep. Mr. Bucher 's experience as a 
butcher and his knowledge of the whole scheme of operating a success- 
ful packing house has been vast, and at his suggestion of the promo- 
tion of such an industry capital came forward and formed the E. 
Bucher Packing Company in 1904, erected substantial buildings of 
brick, capitalized the company at thirty thousand dollars, and opened 
the plant with a capacity of two hundred and fifty cattle a month, 
six hundred hogs and sheep. An ice plant in connection furnishes a 
cold storage department for the company and for the public use and 



790 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

the management has developed a healthy trade and achieved such re- 
sults as prove the wisdom of its promoters in making their investment. 
Mr. Bucher is president of the company, Joseph Bucher is the vice- 
president, and Wilbur B. Thistlewood is the secretary and treasurer. 

Eberhard Bucher first came to Cairo in 1881. He was then unable 
to speak our language without difficulty, and had been in the United 
States only one year. He was born in the town of Gravensburg, in the 
Grand Duchy of Wurtemberg, Germany, March 4, 1857. He was 
brought up on a small farm in the community where his ancestors had 
resided for many generations, and received the school training required 
under the German laws. His father was Alois Bucher and his mother 
Maria Miller, and Eberhard was the first child born in a family of 
eleven, among them being: Silas, a farmer at Mounds, Illinois; Joseph, 
of Cairo; Stephen, a farmer of Freeport, Illinois; Carl, who is one of 
the firm of wagonmakers of Cairo, Maloney & Bucher; Theresa, the 
wife of William Becker, of Freeport, Illinois; and Mary, the wife of 
J. P. Love, of Cairo. Four are deceased. 

When Eberhard Bucher had finished his education he was put to 
learning the trade of butcher and sausage-maker, and was in Switzer- 
land at this time, the scene of his labors being in Wintertur, Canton 
of Zurich. He remained there until his trade was completed, and 
came to the United States in 1880, sailing from 'Antwerp for Phila- 
delphia, and being thirteen days at sea. He was bound for Cincinnati, 
and when he had reached that city he had but ten dollars left, but se- 
cured work as a sausage-maker and after a year came on to Illinois 
and located at Cairo. Here he resumed his trade in the employ of 
Jacob Walter, but only a few months elapsed before he became a joint 
proprietor of a small meat business in Clinton, Illinois, but he shortly 
disposed of his interests at that point and returned to Cincinnati to 
resume his trade of sausage-making with his old employer. On again 
returning to Cairo Mr. Bucher took his old position with Mr. Walker, 
and for a few years thereafter changes were frequent, for he joined 
in the purchase of a saloon with John Johnson, and the two conducted 
it a year, when he disposed of his interest and resumed the meat busi- 
ness in partnership with John Hege. However, he soon became sole 
proprietor of the firm and conducted this place some nine years, count- 
ing the period one of the most successful eras of his life. At this junc- 
ture the packing idea took possession of him, and he engaged in the 
business as a member of the firm of Bucher Brothers & Company. At 
the end of six years he had purchased all the other interests and con- 
ducted the business alone until ill health caused him to seek a partner. 
He took in R. B. Woodford, and Bucher & Woodford were associated 
together for a year, when Mr. Bucher again came into full possession 
of it. It was about this time that he conceived the idea of enlarging 
the packing industry in Cairo and promoted the E. Bucher Packing 
Company, as above detailed. 

On April 14, 1883, Mr. Bucher was married in Cairo to Miss Dora 
Dunker, daughter of Henry Dunker, who came to this country from 
Hesse, Germany, was a carpenter and then a member of the Cairo po- 
lice force, and lost his life in the performance of duty. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Bucher are as follows: Carl E., who lives in Cairo 
and is connected with the E. Bucher Packing Company ; Maria Theresa, 
who married Carl Karcher, of Cairo ; Anna, who is bookkeeper for the 
E. Bucher Packing Company ; Eberhard, Jr., who is the salesman for 
the concern; and Doris. His politics Mr. Bucher exhibits only at 
election time, when he usually votes the Democratic ticket. He is a 
Knight of Columbus, and is a faithful member of the Catholic church. 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 791 

Mr. Bucher's business is his monument. It is the result of quick fore- 
sight, practical energy and much ability, which have marked his whole 
career and are characteristic of the man. His success is but the logical 
result of ability turned along proper channels, and he is worthy of the 
respect and esteem which are generally tributes paid to the self-made 
man. 

JONATHAN C. WILLIS. "When in time to come the pioneer days of 
Southern Illinois are given thought with their roster of strong, sturdy 
men and brave hearted women, the name of the late Jonathan C. Willis, 
who died at Metropolis, February 26, 1911, will be among the first re- 
called. To have lived eighty-four useful, eventful years is not given to 
many, and to far fewer does the experience come to evolve from the 
chrysalis of an unlettered boy into the associate of generals, of gov- 
ernors and men who control the destinies of states and of nations. Such 
was the experience of Jonathan C. Willis, whose romantic life furnishes 
another illustration of the fact that the best efforts of the writer of fic- 
tion do not surpass the records of facts that are unveiled in every-day 
life. 

Jonathan C. Willis was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, June 27, 
1826. He was a son of Richard W. Willis, and a grandson of Captain 
Richard Willis, a North Carolina soldier of the Revolutionary war. The 
family is not only one of the original American families, but its con- 
nection with the Colonies runs back to the settlement of the two Caro- 
linas. About 1667 it is said that seven brothers of this name came over 
from England and scattered themselves through Virginia and the Colo- 
nies, and some of the subsequent generations gave parentage to the Cap- 
tain Willis mentioned as Revolutionary patriot in this sketch. Richard 
W. Willis settled in Gallatin county when he brought his family to Illi- 
nois. There he is believed to have passed away, and there his son, Jona- 
than C. grew to be a youth of eleven years. The mother was Catherine 
Brigham Willis. The boy did not get much education, as he took up the 
work of a man at the age of seventeen, engaging in commerce on the 
Ohio river. 

In 1843 Jonathan C. Willis located at Golconda, Illinois. He had 
been ten years a resident of the state at that time, and the next nine 
years he followed the river, operating flatboats, which constituted the 
principal means of conveyance for heavy freight transmission at that 
time. The extensive acquaintance that he cultivated during these years 
encouraged him to enter politics, and he became a candidate for sheriff 
of Pope county. He was elected in 1852 and again in 1856. In 1859 he 
removed to Massac county and resumed traffic on the river as wharfboat- 
man at Metropolis, continuing in this until his enlistment for service in 
the Union army. He volunteered in the Forty-eighth Infantry, under 
Colonel Duff Heney, and was made regimental quartermaster. His war 
record was characterized by brave and faithful service. In the cam- 
paign around Fort Donelson he was severely injured, being thrown 
from his horse, and on this account was furloughed home for recupera- 
tion. While recovering from his injuries he was appointed deputy pro- 
vost marshal and continued in the military service until the end of the 
war. 

Many of the lately returned veterans were proffered posts of public 
service by their grateful people, and soon after the war closed Mr. Willis 
was induced to re-enter politics. In 1868 he was elected a member of the 
lower house of the Illinois General Assembly. The following year Gen- 
eral Grant, who was then president, appointed him collector of revenue 
for the Thirteenth Illinois District, and he remained in that important 



792 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

post for fourteen years. On leaving the federal service he was called 
upon to serve the people of his home county, who elected him county 
commissioner in 1883, and county judge in 1886. Governor Joseph Fifer 
in 1891 attached him to the state service by appointing him a member 
of the Board of Railroad and Warehouse Commissioners. In 1900 he 
received the federal appointment of supervisor of the census for the 
sixteenth district of Illinois, his last official service. 

These activities abroad did not preclude Mr. Willis taking an active 
interest in affairs of his home town. He was elected mayor of Metro- 
polis in 1871. He was senior member of the firm known as the Empire 
Milling Company, located at Metropolis; he was a stockholder of the 
City National Bank ; and for ten years prior to his death was vice presi- 
dent of the Ohio River Improvement Association. He was a past master 
in Masonry, and a member of the Chapter and Commandery. 

His wife was Miss Fannie E. Ward, daughter of Jacob Ward, whose 
parents came from the neighborhood of Enniscorthy, Wexford county, 
Ireland. The marriage of Mr. Willis and Miss Ward took place on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1859, at Raleigh, Kentucky. Five children were born to them : 
Richard W. and Mrs. J. C. Courtney, of Metropolis; Thomas E., of East 
St. Louis; John G., of Chicago; and Jay C., who is carrying on the coal 
business, at Metropolis, of himself and his father, and which was estab- 
lished by the latter after his retirement from his prolonged public 
service. 

Jonathan C. Willis lived among and had an intimate acquaintance 
with Illinois men of a strenuous and eventful age, the formative period 
of the state. He became acquainted with General John A. Logan when 
they were young men at county fairs and race track meets. They rode 
races against each other, and their acquaintance and friendship contin- 
ued all through the notable later career of the general. He knew General 
Grant personally, and was a close associate of the first Richard Yates, 
Illinois' war-time governor. His friendly intimacy with General John 
M. Palmer and with other historic men of the state made famous by the 
incidents of the Civil war, is a matter of gratification to the home friends 
of Mr. Willis. His vigorous body and brain were exponents of the right 
living and right thinking of the early times, and he reaped his reward in 
the full measure of years that crowned his life, exceeding by sixteen the 
Biblical ' ' three score and ten. ' ' Jonathan C. Willis used well those tal- 
ents and attributes with which he was endowed. In his identification 
with the commerce, the business and the politics of Southern Illinois, he 
established a record of achievement that is worthy of the emulation of 
the ambitious youth of coming generations. A pioneer of pioneers, he 
lived to see the wonderful attainments of science and industry of our 
own day, and full of years and honors was summoned to the reward that 
awaits those who labor not in vain. 

WILLIAM WALTER THOMAS. Nearly a quarter of a century spent in 
breeding strawberries covers the business career of William Walter 
Thomas, of Anna, Illinois, who, from a small and humble beginning 
has built up one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the country, 
an industry to the development of which he has given some of the best 
years of his life and in which he has had remarkable success. Mr. 
Thomas has not confined himself to his breeding interests alone, for he 
has always identified himself with movements of a nature calculated 
to develop and enlarge the business activities of Anna, but he takes 
special pride in the work which he chose as the medium through which 
to gain a position among the leading men of his section, and it has 
been through individual ideas and original experiments that the 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 793 

Thomas Pure-bred plants have reached their perfection. Mr. Thomas 
is a product of Union county, and was born in 1871, a son of James 
Thomas, a native of England, one of the earliest fruit growers of South- 
ern Illinois. 

Mr. Thomas attended the district schools of Union county, and 
from earliest boyhood has made his own way in the world. At the age 
of eighteen years he established himself in a nursery and fruit-grow- 
ing business, but gave up the former when he became interested in the 
growing of strawberry plants, and year by year this industry has 
grown until now the Thomas Pure-bred plants have a reputation that 
extends all over the country. After long and extended study as to 
what was the most perfect soil in which to grow his plants, what con- 
ditions suited them best in climate and what were the hardiest and 
most productive varieties, he began to experiment with the different 
plants, and he has succeeded in developing a product that it would be 
hard to better, either in vigor, stamina, excellence of quality or amount 
of production. It is one of Mr. Thomas's chief sources of pride that 
the same customers purchase his goods year after year, and he also 
considers that a pleased customer is the best advertisement that he 
can secure for his goods. The growth of his business has been sure 
and steady, rather than phenomenally rapid, but the growth has been 
constanty increasing, and one of the most important features of it is 
that it has been caused as much by the honest and above-board deal- 
ings of the firm as by the excellence of the article Mr. Thomas has to 
sell. He is president of the Jonesboro Store Company, at Jonesboro, 
Union county, and with a business associate owns and operates 200 
acres of land at Makanda, which are devoted to apples, peaches and 
pears. This is in addition to his plant business. 

Mr. Thomas has been active in political matters, and at present is 
serving as chairman of the Republican County and Congressional Com- 
mittees. Fraternally, he is connected with Lodge No. 520, of Free and 
Accepted Masons, of which he has been master several times, is con- 
nected with the Royal Arch Chapter, and is also affiliated with the 
Eastern Star, of which Mrs. Thomas is also a member. They are as- 
sociated in the work of the Presbyterian church, and are well and 
favorably known in church and charitable work. 

In 1890 Mr. Thomas was married to Clola McGuire, who was born 
in Jackson county, Illinois, in 1871, and two children have been born 
to this union : Edna, a student of Belmont College, Nashville, Tennes- 
see, who now resides at home and is twenty years of age ; and James 
William, sixteen years old, who is attending college at Lebanon, Ten- 
nessee. 

ROBERT "W. ALSBEOOK. The milling interests of Johnson county 
form one of this section's most important industries, and the cities of 
New Burnside and Vienna, lying in the center of a great grain district, 
have become leading shipping points. The firm of Alsbrook Brothers, 
proprietors of the Farmers Mill and Elevator Company, the leading 
milling concern of Johnson county, has been built up by Robert "W. and 
Arthur B. Alsbrook, who have become prominent factors in the business 
world of Johnson county, and the junior member of the company, 
Robert W. Alsbrook, of New Burnside, is the subject of this review. 
Mr. Alsbrook was born October 30, 1872, at Marion, Illinois, and is a 
son of Stephen Wesley and Sarah (Blankenship) Alsbrook, and a 
grandson of a native of Wales, who immigrated to the United States at 
the age of twenty-one years, settled first in Pennsylvania, and later 
moved to Tennessee, where he was engaged in farming until his death. 



794 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Stephen Wesley Alsbrook was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, 
and was reared to agricultural pursuits, coming to Southern Illinois in 
1859, when he was thirteen years of age. He located at Marion, Illinois, 
and was first engaged in farming, but later established himself in the 
drug business, in which he continued until his death, in 1872. He mar- 
ried Sarah Blankenship, daughter of Isom Blankenship, of Williamson 
county, and they had two sons, Arthur B. and Robert W. 

Robert W. Alsbrook was not born until about six months after the 
death of his father, and his education was secured in the schools of 
Marion and New Burnside, and in Creal Springs College, which he 
attended for two years. In 1888 he became railroad telegraph operator 
for the St. Louis and Paducah Railroad, which is now a part of the 
Illinois Central system, and in 1889 went to Paducah, where he was 
station agent and telegraph operator. In 1894 he entered the service of 
the N. C. & St. L. R. R., and until 1895 was city passenger agent at 
Memphis, but in that year took a trip to California and worked for the 
Southern Pacific Railroad for two years and as bookkeeper on the 
Leland Stanford ranch for one year. He returned to New Burnside in 
1898 and became a member of the Alsbrook Store Company, where he 
continued until 1909, and in 1910, with his brother, bought the flouring 
mill at New Burnside, establishing the firm of Alsbrook Brothers. In 
March, 1911, they purchased the elevator and mill at Vienna, and the 
capital invested in this enterprise exceeds sixteen thousand dollars. 
The capacity of the New Burnside mill is sixty barrels per day, and the 
elevator at Vienna has a storage capacity of thirty thousand bushels, 
and eight men are employed. In 1911 a new elevator was erected at 
New Burnside, with a capacity of ten thousand bushels, and the mill is 
doing such a thriving business that it is necessary to keep it running 
night and day. In the accomplishment of their work the brothers have 
very little time, and today even they are harder workers than any of 
their employes, and their success in business is largely attributed to the 
close personal attention they have always given every detail in their 
business, they never allowing goods to be misrepresented in any man- 
ner. As a business man Mr. Alsbrook is recognized as possessing the 
utmost ability, push and energy, and as a citizen none stand any better. 

Mr. Alsbrook is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and the Odd Fellows. 
He and his mother, with whom he resides at New Burnside, are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and have been prominent in its 
work. 

EZRA B. PELLETT. One of Murphysboro 's old and honored citizens, 
who has been connected with this city's business interests for nearly a 
half a century, during which time he has established an enviable repu- 
tation as a man of integrity and probity, is Ezra B. Pellett, a veteran of 
the Civil war and a man who well merits the esteem and confidence in 
which he is held by the citizens of his community. Mr. Pellett was born 
June 7, 1839, in Pike county, Pennsylvania, and is a son of Calvin and 
Eunice Pellett, the former of whom was for many years connected with 
the agricultural and lumber interests of the Keystone state. 

Mr. Pellett received a public school education, and was reared to the 
life of an agriculturist, following farming until he was twenty-two years 
of age. He then became a clerk in a general store in his native state, but 
in 1865 came to Murphysboro to assist in surveying land for the Mount 
Carbon Coal and Railway Company, helping in the whole survey to 
Grand Tower. On completing this enterprise he established himself in 
the merchandise business at Murphysboro, July 1, 1865, continuing in 
the same until 1882. In 1865 he was appointed postmaster, without 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 795 

solicitation upon his part, the salary connected with this office at that 
time being fourteen dollars per month. He served very efficiently in 
that capacity for eight years and five months, and then became part 
owner of a mine at DeSoto, but in 1900, after it had been partially de- 
stroyed by fire, he disposed of his interests and went to Thebes, Illinois, 
to assist his son, William S. Pellett, who was engaged in the drug busi- 
ness there. William S. Pellett was born in Murphysboro, August 19, 
1866, and received his education in the public schools, after leaving 
which he became a clerk in a drug store and later purchased an estab- 
lishment of his own. In 1892 he located at Thebes, where he accumu- 
lated quite a property, and served as trustee of the village of Thebes 
and as city clerk and assistant coroner of Alexander county, and he 
died in that village September 27, 1906. He was a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and was connected religiously with the Presbyterian 
church. His father is now engaged in settling up the affairs of his 
estate. 

On May 24, 1864, Ezra B. Pellett was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary A. Lord, who was born in Honesdale, Wayne county, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Solomon Z. Lord, who was connected with the Dela- 
ware and Hudson Canal Company as collector for fifty-five years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pellett now have two children living: Sarah, who married 
Henry Trobaugh, a farmer of Jackson county, and now lives at Pon- 
tiac, Illinois, and Albert Lord, a machinist with the M. & 0. Railroad, 
located at Murphysboro, who married Pearl Batson, of Carbondale, and 
has two children, Edwin and Russell. 

Mr. Pellett is a stanch Republican in political matters, and has 
served as alderman of Murphysboro for three terms. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Masonic order, being past high priest of Royal 
Arch Chapter, No. 164, and past master and secretary of his lodge. He 
is well known in religious circles, and serves as trustee and treasurer of 
the First Presbyterian church. In August, 1862, Mr. Pellett enlisted 
for service in the Union army, as a member of Company I, Twenty- 
fourth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was with that regi- 
ment until it was mustered out of the service, participating in numer- 
ous battles, among which were Antietam and South Mountain. He had 
an excellent war record, and his record as a citizen has been equally 
high. His long business career in this city is without a blemish, and 
his children may be proud of the good name he has established and 
handed down to them. 

EDWARD LEIGH GILBERT. The call of the business life is today widely 
irresistible, and we frequently find brainy and aggressive young men 
who by inheritance and native gifts might be thought to belong nat- 
urally to the "learned professions" departing from their family tradi- 
tions and entering the, perhaps, broader fields of "business." Thi; 
lure of these various enterprises draws alike the talented sons of phy- 
sicians, clergymen and lawyers. Mr. Edward Leigh Gilbert conspicu- 
ously illustrates this condition in this city. He is a scion of one of the 
early families of Cairo, is the only son of the Hon. Miles Frederick Gil- 
bert and grandson of Judge Miles A. Gilbert. His father is mentioned 
at length elsewhere in this work. Edward Leigh Gilbert was born in 
Cairo and in a special and honorable sense belongs to this his native 
city. The date of his birth was December 23, 1877, and he is therefore 
in the very prime of his active and successful life. He is not only a 
product of one of the eminent professional families of this city but also 
of the splendid system of public schools of which the city is justly 
proud, he having been graduated from the high school here in 1896. 



796 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

Upon his graduation his inclination diverged him at once from the 
ancestral profession of the law and he embarked upon a business 
career. He started upon his training in this direction by accepting a 
clerkship in the office of H. H. Candee, one of the large writers of tire 
insurance in Cairo, and remained with this employer until January, 
1905. Having mastered the principles and details of this important 
and complex business, Mr. Gilbert launched forth for himself by pur- 
chasing the insurance agency of Thomas J. Kerth. Having found the 
field to which he is well suited by ability, he has since devoted his 
active mind and excellent capacities to the general insurance business, 
in which he has made a great success. The prominence he has achieved 
is indicated by the fact that in 1907 he was elected secretary of the 
Central Building and Loan Association, the largest one in Cairo. His 
interest in education and his efficiency in that field is shown by the 
fact that in 1897 he was elected secretary of the board of education 
and still occupies that position. 

Mr. Gilbert is associated prominently with several of the leading 
fraternal organizations, being an active member of Cairo lodge. No. 
237, A. P. and A. M., Cairo Chapter, No. 71, and Cairo Commandery, 
No. 13, and he is past exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Progressive 
Order of Elks. He is a member of the Alexander Club and of the 
Country Club. He aligns himself with Democracy upon straight poli- 
tics, but has done his whole duty with casting his ballot. 

Mr. Gilbert is happily married and his home is blessed with two 
children. His marriage took place in a distant city, but the bride was 
a native of Cairo. He was married at Coronado Beach, California, 
September 8, 1904, to Miss Emma Halliday, a daughter of Major Ed- 
win "W. Halliday, reference to whom is made in this work. Mrs. Gil- 
bert was born in Cairo and received her education in the city schools. 
Their children are Esther and Edward L., Jr. 

JEAN HARGRAVE. One of the successful business men of Jonesboro, 
Illinois, belonging to the younger generation, Jean Hargrave, has illus- 
trated in his career the opportunities that are presenting themselves to 
the youths of today who are possessed of enterprise, have the ability and 
are not afraid of hard, persistent labor. Mr. Hargrave is at present a 
member of the well-known mercantile firm of Hargrave & Linneman, 
whose operations cover the city of Jonesboro and the surrounding coun- 
try for a radius of some miles, yet but a few short years ago he began his 
business career on borrowed capital. He was born in Jonesboro, in 
1881, and is a son of E. P. and Julia (Hunsaker) Hargrave. 

E. P. Hargrave was born in Union county, near Jonesboro, in 1851, 
and during the greater part of his life was engaged in operating a saw- 
mill. In 1898 he came to Jonesboro and established himself in a mer- 
cantile business, which he successfully carried on until 1905, and in 
that year retired. His wife, who was born south of Jonesboro in 1854, 
died in July, 1906. Jean Hargrave attended the public schools in the 
vicinity of his home, and as a young man worked in his father's saw- 
mill, later becoming a clerk in the store at Jonesboro. In 1905, at the 
time of his father's retirement, he formed a partnership with Prank A. 
Linneman, and bought the stock and fixtures of his father's place, and 
they now have a stock of merchandise worth twenty thousand dollars. 
Mr. Hargrave has been successful because he possessed the courage of his 
convictions, and when his opportunity came he was quick to recognize it 
and not hesitant about grasping it. His confidence in the future of Jones- 
boro and its commercial interests was pronounced, and this confidence 
has been justified by the development of the prosperous and rapidly- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 797 

growing business of which he is the head. His success, however, has 
not been a matter of chance, as he is possessed of abilities that would 
no doubt have enabled him to succeed in whatever line or in whatever 
locality he found himself. 

On January 1, 1905, Mr. Hargrave was united in marriage with Miss 
Mamie C. Spence, of Anna, Illinois, daughter of J. L. Spence, a brick 
mason who died in 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Hargrave are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mr. Hargrave 's father is at pres- 
ent acting as deacon. He is a member of the Jonesboro Blue Lodge, No. 
Ill, A. P. & A. M. In political matters he is an adherent of Democratic 
principles, but he has been too busily engaged with his business interests 
to enter the political field as an active participant. Mr. Hargrave is 
known as one of the rising young business men of his locality, and in 
very popular with all who know him. 

THOMAS JAMES COWAN. One of the old and honored citizens of 
Vienna, Illinois, now living retired in his comfortable home and enjoy- 
ing the fruits of his long period of labor, is Thomas James Cowan, who 
for fifty-four years lived on the same farm in Johnson county. He has 
been a witness to various wonderful changes that have taken place in 
Southern Illinois, and as the developer of a large tract of land can 
justly lay claim to having done his share in advancing the interests of 
this section. Mr. Cowan was born July 13, 1833, on a farm in western 
Tennessee, and is a son of David Cowan and a grandson of Stephen 
Cowan, who was born in Virginia. 

David Cowan, who was a native of North Carolina, migrated at an 
early day to Tennessee, and there died in 1833. He married Lucinda 
Gray, also a native of the Tar Heel state, and they had a family of six 
children: Mrs. Sarah Venable, John, Martha, Mrs. Caroline Moore, 
David and Thomas James, of whom the last-named is the only survivor. 
After the death of her first husband Mrs. Cowan married a Mr. 
McDougal, and they had two children : Jackson, who is deceased ; and 
Rhoda Ann Gill, who resides in California. Mrs. McDougal passed 
away in 1846. 

Thomas James Cowan was but twelve years of age when his mother 
died, and he went to live with his brother-in4aw, L. B. Venable, in Ten- 
nessee, and worked on his farm. In 1850, when Mr. Venable migrated 
to Johnson county, Illinois, young Cowan continued to reside with him. 
The year of his marriage, in 1856, he purchased forty acres of land in 
township 12, range 3. He was successful in his operations from the 
start, being industrious and enterprising, and gradually added to his 
farm from time to time until he had increased it to one hundred and 
forty acres, and had continued to live on the same farm .for fifty-four 
years. In addition he had owned other land, but had disposed of it. 
On September 16, 1910, feeling that he had earned a rest, Mr. Cowan 
sold his farm at a good price, came to Vienna and purchased a resi- 
dence and four building lots, and settled down to a life of ease and 
quiet. He belongs to the A. P. & A. M. at Vienna, in which he is pop- 
ular, and his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church, in the work 
of which she is well known. 

In 1853 Mr. Cowan was married (first) to Mary Clinton, who died in 
1859, leaving one child, Lucinda, who married a Mr. Walters and has 
four children, namely : John, who has three children ; Clarence, also the 
father of three children ; Mary Estella, who has two children ; and 
Edna. Mr. Cowan's second marriage occurred in 1860, to Mary Jane 
Worley, who was born March 9, 1842, on a farm in township 12, range 
3, and lived there all of her life until moving to Vienna. She is a 



798 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

daughter of Hiram F. and Venils (Graves) Worley, natives of John- 
son county, Illinois, and Missouri, respectively. Hiram Worley was 
born in 1814, a son of Isaac Worley, one of the very earliest pioneers of 
Johnson county, who migrated from North Carolina and settled in 
Elvira township. Hiram Worley died January 21, 1882, and his wife, 
March 25, 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Cowan there have been born ten chil- 
dren, namely : Martha M., who married William Nobles, has one child, 
Dr. Charles Nobles, who has a son, William Arthur; David J., an at- 
torney of Peoria, Illinois; Thomas J., a farmer in Johnson county, three 
and one-half miles east of Vienna, has two children, Mary and Ruth ; 
Mary V., deceased, who was the wife of Dr. Hale ; Adolphus, who died 
at the age of four years ; three children who died in infancy ; Gertrude, 
who married a Mr. Gore and has two children, Mary and Maud; and 
John, an attorney of Vienna. The last named was born May 6, 1880, 
and was reared on his father's farm and educated in the district 
schools, the Vienna High school, from which he was graduated in 1901, 
and, after he had taught school for two terms, the Southern Illinois 
Normal School at Carbondale. He began the study of law in the of- 
fices of his brother, David J. Cowan, of Peoria, and was admitted to the 
bar in June, 1910, since which time he has built up a successful practice. 
Many are the changes and improvements that have been made since 
Mr. Cowan first engaged in farming in this part of the country, and 
many are the anecdotes and incidents of early days that he can call to 
mind. He has had some decidedly interesting experiences, and bears 
the distinction of having lived through an incident that but few men 
can lay claim to. In the spring of 1866, March 20th, this section of the 
country was visited by a terrific cyclone, which swept the Cowan and 
Worley farms. It played the usual eccentric and unexplainable tricks, 
unroofing and wrecking the log cabins, laying low the fences and de- 
stroying the forests, and carrying the safe, which held the papers of 
the Worley family, from their farm to Shawneetown, a distance of sixty 
miles. The Cowan place was badly damaged, but the farm of Hiram 
Worley was literally devastated, every building being wrecked. Mrs. 
Worley was mortally injured and died in five days as a result of her 
injuries ; a son, Thomas Jackson Worley, aged six years, suffered a 
broken hip and was crippled for life ; a little son, Isaac Worley, was 
killed outright, while every member of the family and all the hands 
employed on the place were injured to a greater or less degree, but the 
Cowan family was fortunate enough to escape with its members un- 
injured except for a few minor bruises and scratches. The memory o'f 
that terrible day is still fresh in the mind of the venerable citizen who 
has seen so many important events take place during his long and hon- 
orable residence here, and who in spite of his advanced years is still 
possessed of all of his faculties. He has taken a lively interest in all 
that has pertained to the welfare of his community, and as a citizen who 
has borne a part in developing his section is held in high esteem and 
respect by all who know him. 

ROBERT D. MATHIS, cashier of the First National Bank of Mound 
City, Illinois, is a young man who has by his industry and sturdy ap- 
plication succeeded in establishing himself firmly in the ranks of the 
more conservative business men of his city. Mr. Mathis was born at 
America, Illinois, on March 14, 1877, and is the son of Dr. J. B. Mathis, 
a practicing physician of Mound City, and who has been a resident of 
Pulaski county for many years. 

Dr. Mathis was born in Trigg county, Kentucky. January 5, 1840, 
he being a son of W. Mathis, who came to Illinois in 1849, settling two 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 799 

miles north of Vienna, where he resided until his death, in 1860, at the 
early age of forty-seven years. He also was a native of Trigg county, 
Kentucky, and a son of John Mathis, who came to Kentucky from Vir- 
ginia as a young man. The latter named was born in Virginia, in 
1790, and passed the best years of his life as a planter in his native 
state. He came to Illinois during the war of 1861-5 and died in Ran- 
dolph county. His wife was one Margaret Brown, of Virginia, and 
they were the parents of nine children, as follows : William, James, 
Leonard, Thomas, Preston, Elizabeth, who became the wife of James 
Hester ; Matilda, who died unmarried ; Eleanor, the wife of William 
Izell at the time of her demise ; and Malinda, who married an Izell, a 
brother of her sister's husband. 

Mr. Mathis pursued the vocation of his father, in which he had 
been wisely trained. He married Miss Cynthia Scott, a resident of 
his county and a daughter of William Scott. Mrs. Mathis died in 
1888, leaving children to mourn her loss. They were the parents of 
Robert D., who died in Johnson county, Illinois; Elizabeth E., who 
became the wife of James Pippins and resides in Dallas, Texas ; Dr. 
J. B., of Pulaski county, Illinois; Margaret A., who married Jacob 
Rebman and died in Johnson county, Illinois ; and James Preston 
Mathis, who left a family in the same county when he died in 1903. 

The early training of Dr. Mathis was received in the rural schools 
of the district in which he was reared. He later was graduated from 
the Eclectic School of Medicine in Cincinnati, Ohio, after which he 
established himself as a physician in America, Illinois, now more 
than forty years ago. In 1899 he removed to Mound City, where he 
has lived a quiet, industrious life, absorbed in the manifold duties of 
his chosen profession, and content to end his days in the unpreten- 
tious manner peculiar to his whole life. He was married in Johnson 
county, Illinois, to Mary S. Mason, a daughter of James Mason, who, 
like Dr. Mathis, was a native of Trigg county, Kentucky, where Mrs. 
Mathis was born in 1846. The issue of this union are J. W. Mathis, 
of America, Illinois ; Dr. John B. Mathis, of Ullin, Illinois ; Maurice 
P. Mathis, an attorney of Konowa, Oklahoma ; Robert D. Mathis. 
the subject of this sketch ; Archie M. Mathis, of Tamaroa, Illinois ; 
and Mrs. H. P. Neadstine, of Mound City. 

Robert D. Mathis was educated in the public schools of his home 
town and in the Dixon Business College at Dixon, Illinois. After 
his graduation he taught school for two terms in the district schools 
of Pulaski county, but abandoned the work early in search of em- 
ployment more lucrative and more suited to his inclinations. He 
went from there to Texas, where he became a bookkeeper for the 
Texas Coal & Fuel Company, at Rock Creek. Texas, a coal town in 
the vicinity of Mineral Wells. He occupied that berth for five years 
and in 1904 returned to Illinois and took employment with the Wis- 
consin Chair Company, of Mound City, as a bookkeeper. Following 
that he engaged in the drug business for a year, when he sold out and 
went into the railroad service as agent, serving principally at Mounds, 
Illinois, until the year 1910, in which year he was appointed cashier 
of the First National Bank of Mound City, his present position. 

On May 27, 1906, Mr. Mathis was married in Fort Worth, Texas, 
to Miss May Roberson, a daughter of J. A. Roberson of Ardmore, 
Oklahoma. They are the parents of three promising young sons: 
Robert D., Jr., Curtis Reagan and John B. Mr. Mathis is a member 
of several fraternal societies, among them being the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Improved Order 
of Red Men. 



800 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

EDWARD KININGER POKTER. A resident of Carbondale during the 
last thirty years, and for twenty-eight years of that period one of the 
city's active, enterprising and progressive merchants, Edward K. Por- 
ter, a leading druggist in this section, has secured a firm footing in the 
regard and good opinion of the business world of Southern Illinois. 
And, as he has also taken an earnest interest and a serviceable part in 
the public affairs of the city and county, he has risen to corresponding 
esteem among the people generally as a wide-awake, progressive and 
public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. Porter was born at Salem, Illinois, on January 2, 1860, and is a 
son of Alfred and Lucy (Kininger) Porter. The father was an indus- 
trious, skillful and prosperous shoemaker for a number of years, then 
turned his attention to farming with good results. He had adaptabil- 
ity to circumstances and resourcefulness in meeting requirements, how- 
ever unexpected they were, and so made all his efforts in whatever oc- 
cupied his intention tell to his advantage and steady advancement. 

The son secured a common and high school education, which he 
extended by private study and reading. He attended the pharmacy 
department of the State University at Champaign, from which he was 
graduated in 1885, legally qualified to practice pharmacy in all its 
departments. Prior to this time, however, he had served as clerk in a 
drug store in Moberly, Missouri, during the year 1879. He was also 
in the same capacity in Carbondale from 1881 to 1893, except while 
attending the University. In this way he obtained both practical and 
theoretical knowledge of the business, and was well qualified to con- 
duct it in the most acceptable and capable manner when he became 
possessed of a drug store of his own in 1893. 

In that year he bought an interest in the store of P. A. Prickett, 
and the name of the firm conducting the establishment became Prickett 
& Porter. The partnership lasted until 1902, when Mr. Porter pur- 
chased Mr. Prickett 's interest in the business and became its sole pro- 
prietor. Since then he has carried it on alone, keeping pace with the 
progress of events and the course of trade, meeting all the require- 
ments of the community in his line, and winning a steadily increasing 
volume of patronage. He handles drugs, paints, oil, wallpapers, and 
all kindred commodities, and keeps his stock in each up to the utmost 
demand and filled with the latest productions of the factories. The 
prescription department is a specialty to which he gives his personal 
attention, and in this he uses only the best and purest drugs, and com- 
pounds them with the greatest care and highest skill exhaustive study 
and long practice can give him. 

Mr. Porter has given close attention to the public affairs of the 
city, county and state of his residence, and rendered the people valuable 
service in the performance of public duties, especially in connection 
with the cause of public education. He has for years been a member 
of the city school board, and under the administration of Governor 
Tanner was treasurer of the Southern Illinois Normal University. 
When Governor Deneen first became the state executive, Mr. Porter was 
again appointed to this important position, and he still retains it. His 
second accession to it was in 1905, and his incumbency has been un- 
broken since that year. 

It is an easy inference from his' repeated appointment to this office 
that Mr. Porter is a loyal Republican. But while he is always active 
and effective in the service of his party, he does not let his partnership 
interfere with his business or overbear his sense of duty to his com- 
munity. In reference to these interests he is non-partisan, but none 
the less energetic, enterprising and progressive. No move for the de- 



TRt IIBRMW 

'Jf- IHt 

HWERSITY OF ILUN6IS 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 801 

velopment or improvement of Carbondale or Jackson county goes with- 
out his effective aid, and in contributing his help he is found to be 
both wise in counsel and intelligent, practical and zealous in action. 

On the 26th of May, 1886, Mr. Porter was united in marriage with 
Miss Nellie Davis, of Carbondale, a daughter of John and Martha Davis, 
esteemed residents of this city, from which the father covered an ex- 
tensive territory as a traveling salesman. Mr. and Mrs. Porter had 
two children : Margaret, who is the wife of Harlan P. Curd, of Amarillo, 
Texas, auditor of the Santa Fe Railroad; and Evelyn, who is living at 
home with her father and is a student in the Southern Illinois Normal 
University. Mrs. Porter ended a very useful and appreciated life on 
April 28, 1899. For years she had been an ardent and faithful worker 
in her church, the Methodist Episcopal, and in the activities of the 
Women's Club, of which she was a charter member. Her hand was 
ready and open, too, in connection with all worthy charitable work in 
the community. Mr. Porter is a member of the official Board of Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and fraternally he is a Freemason. In this 
order he gave his lodge valued service for years as secretary. 

JOHN E. CARE. As a leading member of the Williamson county 
bar, with a field of practice at Johnston City, John E. Carr has varied 
his professional career with sallies into real estate and with financial 
transactions as a promoter of banking enterprises at various points in 
the state, and has otherwise identified himself with the material and 
substantial side of life. Born near Parrish, Franklin county, Illinois, 
in October, 1867, Mr. Carr is a son of John S. and Eliza (Estes) Carr. 

John S. Carr, a farmer-mechanic, settled in Franklin county, Illi- 
nois, during the 'forties, and died there in November, 1875. He was 
born in Wilson county, Tennessee, developed a genius for mechanics, 
became a gunsmith and combined it with farming after coming to 
Illinois. His father was Dr. Richard Carr, who was born and reared 
in North Carolina, came out to Tennessee with his six brothers, and was 
married (first) to Jemima Sawyer, who died after the birth of the 
following children: Wilson ("Dock") Carr, who never married, came 
over to Illinois and later went to Missouri, where he invented the now 
famous "Missouri Meerschaum," and died in Macedonia, Illinois, when 
about ninety years of age ; Allen, who left a family at his death at 
Duquoin, Illinois; Thomas R., a tailor, followed a desire to go to Europe 
shortly after the Civil war, spent several years in France, where he was 
married, and returned to the United States a childless widower, his 
death occurring at St. Charles, Illinois ; John S. ; Mrs. Thomas Trovil- 
lion, who spent her life in Pope county, where she died, leaving a 
family; and Sarah, who married Elisha Compton and died near Mace- 
donia, Illinois, having a family. Dr. Richard Carr was married a sec- 
ond time, and three children were born to this union; Eliza, the wife 
of Thomas Austin, of Creal Springs, Illinois; Betty, who married a 
Mr. Wrenshaw, of Pope county, where she died ; and ' ' Peter, ' ' who 
became the wife of James Ferguson and passed away in the same 
county. 

John S. Carr married Eliza Estes, a daughter of Laban Estes, a 
pioneer of Franklin county from Tennessee, and she died from the 
kick of a horse in December, 1894, having been the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : James and Charles, who are living in Franklin 
county; John E., Ernetta, the wife of Charles Rains, of Frankfort, 
Illinois, for many years a teacher in this section; and several children 
who died in infancy. 

John E. Carr attended the Hayes school, as his home district was 



802 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

called, then the graded schools of Crawford's Prairie, and finally the 
Lebanon, Illinois, institutions. Having come up under country en- 
vironment, he was unable to free himself from the farm until past 
his thirtieth year. Mr. Carr prepared himself for the law by three 
years of reading in the office of Judge W. H. Williams, of Benton, and 
was admitted to the bar on examination at Mount Vernon in 1896. He 
utilized every opportunity to adapt himself to his prospective profes- 
sion, in literary societies in the country and in "mock courts," and 
even in actual lawsuits before the country justice, his first case in court 
being one in which he volunteered to defend a country youth who was 
charged with disturbing the peace. Still an understudy at the bar, 
he faced two talented but unlicensed officials as prosecutors, and a 
court that was less wise than he looked. Replying to the proposition 
of the prosecution to separate the witnesses, Mr. Carr quoted the law 
holding that witnesses should not be separated save in capital offense. 
This court sustained this position as being the law and in the jury 
trial which followed the boy was cleared. 

In the spring of 1897 Mr. Carr came to Johnston City and opened 
an office for practice and has maintained one here since. Much of his 
civil business has arisen from relations of employed and employer in 
this industrial community and his legal work covers a multitude of 
causes of no interest save to the litigants themselves. He has taken 
advantage of the growth of Johnston City to deal in real estate and 
early in the history of the city he joined Mr. Ed Duncan in platting 
and exploiting an addition called Duncan's First Addition. Follow- 
ing the success of this, the gentlemen began dealing in coal lands and 
in handling many large deals for the time earned a reasonable profit 
for themselves. He subsequently dissolved with Mr. Duncan and has 
continued buying and selling, building business houses and residences 
and taking generally an active part in the material growth of the town. 
The rather sudden acquirement of capital led Mr. Carr to enter the 
banking business. He promoted, with others, the first financial institu- 
tion in the city in August, 1894, the Johnston City State Bank. He 
is attorney for the Citizens State Bank here, and helped to organize it; 
organized and operated for a time the West Frankfort State Bank, the 
First National Bank of Westfield, of which he was the first president ; 
was the first president of the Dahlgren State Bank, Dahlgren, Hamil- 
ton county, and its organizer ; and this was the first state bank of that 
county ; a private bank at Joppa, Illinois, the first bank of the place ; 
a private bank at Cypress, Illinois; the Farmers Bank at Pulaski, Illi- 
nois ; the Bank of Brownstown ; the Peoples Bank of Loogootee, Illi- 
nois ; the Bank of Simpson, Johnson county ; the Farmers Bank of 
Oakdale ; the Citizens Bank of Hagerstown ; and the Farmers Com- 
mercial Bank of Fordyce, Illinois. He is still interested in a few of 
these institutions. 

Mr. Carr is a Republican. His relation to party matters in Wil- 
liamson county has been merely that of an interested spectator, while 
in his native county he was for many years chairman of his township 
committee, for a long time a member of the county committee, and was 
chairman of the county convention which first endorsed the candidacy 
of Senator Hopkins and declared for Mr. Roosevelt, the first county 
to do so in Illinois. He served Johnston City as its attorney for several 
years, and fought its legal battles of various descriptions through the 
early years of its municipal history. 

On December 24, 1902, Mr. Carr was married in Mount Vernon, 
Illinois, to Miss Flore A. Burton, a daughter of W. R. and Margareitte 
(Tolly) Burton, of Dahlgren, Illinois. Mrs. Carr is the oldest of three 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 803 

children, the others being : Mrs. Ada Lockett, wife of ex-County Clerk 
Lockett, of Hamilton county; and J. Otowell Burton, for many years 
postmaster at Dahlgren. Mrs. Carr studied music in Bwing College 
and later took further instruction in Missouri, and is an accomplished 
player and vocalist. 

WILLIAM F. SPILLER. As business man and lawyer, as citizen and 
head of a family, William P. Spiller has shown himself worthy of a 
prominent place in this record of those who may justly be called the 
makers of Southern Illinois. His success has been achieved not only 
through native ability of a high order but through constant persistance 
and untiring industry, qualities which others have marked in him 
through his long career in the county. Most of what he has gotten since 
his father's death, while a member of the Union army in the second year 
of the Civil war, has been acquired through his own efforts, so that all 
honor is due to him who has won alone so honorable a place in the gen- 
eral esteem. He was born in Franklin county, Illinois, on the 27th of 
February, 1858, the son of Perian B. and Nancy Catherine (Osteen) 
Spiller. His mother was born in Franklin county, in the year 1839, 
and his father was born in Wilson county, Illinois, in 1834. His father 
was a farmer, who responded to President Lincoln's call for troops and, 
enlisting in Company A, One Hundred and Tenth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, was stricken with fever in 1862 and died of the illness. John 
Spiller, the paternal grandfather of William P., was either born or 
came to Williamson county, Illinois, when a mere boy, there settling 
upon a farm and spending his entire life in the pursuit of agriculture. 

The maternal grandfather of William F. Spiller, William Osteen, 
came to Franklin county, Illinois, in 1819, one of the very first men to 
choose this vicinity as a permanent place for settlement. He became 
widely known throughout the region as a farmer, a circuit Christian 
preacher and as a doctor, in all three of which callings he achieved a high 
name throughout Franklin county. It is interesting to note that at the 
time Mr. Osteen first settled in the county his nearest neighbor lived in 
a house five miles distant from his own; the forests were dense and un- 
cleared ; roads were old creek beds or rather narrow trails ; Indians were 
more frequently to be met with than white men ; and he was obliged to 
make the journey hither to the far west, as it then seemed, in an awk- 
ward ox-cart, drawn by a single oxen. A far cry, indeed, those times 
from our present era of coast to coast limited trains, seventy millions of 
population and high specialization. Mr. Osteen passed to his eternal 
reward in 1880, one of the most mourned men of his day. 

William F. Spiller, the immediate subject of this brief personal 
record, received his early education in the common schools of the 
county, later taking two terms of instruction at the old Frankfort 
Academy, later finishing his education at the normal college in Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, where he was a student for five terms. Before going 
to Valparaiso Mr. Spiller taught two terms of public school in order 
to save expenses and enable him to get further normal training, and 
upon his graduation he went to Columbus, Kansas, for one year and 
there studied law, later returning to his native state and for six terms 
continued to teach in the public schools. At the end of that time he 
moved to Benton, Illinois, and was made deputy county clerk, an of- 
fice which he continued to hold with honor to himself and satisfaction 
to the community until 1884, when he left that office to become circuit 
clerk. In 1888 he began the practice of his profession and made a 
start of what has since proved to be a worthy and successful career 



804 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

at the bar. In 1892 he was elected to the office of state's attorney, 
served one term, and then returned to private practice. 

Politically Mr. Spiller has always accorded his allegiance to the 
party of Jefferson, Jackson and Cleveland, and has stood high in the 
local councils of the Democratic party. 

On the 25th of February, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Spiller to Miss Ella Harrison, daughter of Captain Isham Har- 
rison, one of the pioneer settlers of Franklin county. Mr. Harrison 
was a captain in the Union army during the Civil war, achieving dur- 
ing his four years' service a name that was known from one end of the 
country to the other. To the union of William and Ella Spiller were 
born two children. Laura Pearl Spiller has graduated from the Car- 
bondale Normal College and has since become a stenographer in her 
father's office. Her sister Clara remains at home. The whole family 
are members of the Christian church, and leaders in the good works 
that it has fostered. 

Fraternally Mr. Spiller is a Chapter Mason. He has a large and 
nourishing practice that carries him into all the courts, and he has 
acquired more than a local reputation for the conduct of difficult cases. 
His business of recent years has grown to such proportions that he has 
been obliged to take in a partner, and since 1910 C. H. Miller has been 
associated with him in his undertakings. 

CYRUS P. TREAT. Fertile Massac county, Illinois, has been the 
Mecca of many business men from states to the east. Among their 
number is Cyrus P. Treat, president of the City National Bank of 
Metropolis, who is also treasurer and manager of the Central Fence and 
Machine Company. Nearly a score of years have passed since he num- 
bered himself among its citizenship, and concentrated his efforts on 
the enterprises which have carried his name to such high place among 
its people. Mr. Treat was born on a farm in Summit county, Ohio, 
November 24, 1842. He comes of New England stock, his father, Richard 
B. Treat, having come out from Litchfield, Connecticut, and established 
himself on a Summit county farm in the Buckeye state. The senior 
Mr. Treat, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Connecti- 
cut, about 1805, and married Miss Amorette Hutchins, who died at 
about the same age as her husband. She was a sister of Hon. John 
Hutchins, who represented an Ohio district in the lower house of 
Congress. Richard B. Treat was the father of eight children, of which 
number those surviving are: Harriet, who became the wife of Lemuel 
P. Wolcott and resides in Tallmadge, Ohio ; R. B. of San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia ; Orange S., of Tallmadge, Ohio ; Amorette, who is the wife 
of Rev. J. S. Upton, of Oberlin, Ohio ; Cyrus P., of Metropolis, Illinois ; 
and Flora, wife of Charles H. Sackett, of Tallmadge, Ohio. 

Cyrus P. Treat started life with only the knowledge that could be 
imparted by the country schools of that time and place. Just before 
coming of age he left the old home and struck out for himself. He 
first found work around "Warren, Ohio, and there met and fell in 
love with the young lady who later became his wife. Having acquired 
confidence in his own efforts and abilities, the big city became his next 
ambition. He went to Cleveland, Ohio, studied bookkeeping and gen- 
eral office work and for eighteen years was associated with firms of 
high standing in that community, among them the Roberts Manufac- 
turing Company. He worked his way into the esteem of his employers 
and was regarded as one of their confidential and most trustworthy 
men. From Cleveland Mr. Treat went to Fostoria, Ohio, where he 
recognized a good business opening. For four years he was engaged 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 805 

there in the manufacture of barrel hoops. Then he came to Jllinois, 
locating in the community which has since been his home. 

In Metropolis his business abilities speedily secured for him the 
confidence of the citizens and it was not long before they asked his 
services in a public way. He served eight years as president of the 
Board of Education, and remembering the drawbacks that had en- 
compassed his youth through the paucity of the country school curri- 
culum, he took especial pleasure in developing the Metropolis schools 
and in co-operating with the efforts of all who had that end in view. 
He was mayor of the city from 1908 to 1910, during which time the 
city sewer system was installed, an event that marked an epoch in the 
history of the city. All departments of the civic scheme of affairs 
were systematized and brought to a high standard under Mr. Treat's 
administration. 

Mr. Treat was married, July 11, 1866, to Miss Emma Purington, a 
daughter of Rev. N. B. Purington, a Presbyterian minister, of Warren, 
Ohio. Mrs. Treat's death occurred at Metropolis, July 23, 1911. Helen, 
wife of S. C. Miller, is the only child of their household. A little 
granddaughter, Emma Louise, graces the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mil- 
ler. Mr. Treat is a man of commanding presence, in appearance and 
in actuality a leader among men. Austerity is not, however, one of 
his characteristics, but he is courteous and affable in all his relations 
with those about him. He has been a deep student of symbolic, capit- 
ular, cryptic and chivalric Masonry, and has been honored by his 
fraters far beyond the usual lot of man. He is past master of Metropo- 
lis Lodge No. 91 ; past high priest of Metropolitan Chapter No. 101 ; 
past commander of Gethsemane Commandery No. 41, at Metropolis; 
and has been a member of the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand 
Commandery of Illinois. His religious faith is Presbyterian. 

L. JASPER HESS, president of the Anna National Bank, and of the 
W. "W. Stokes Company, at Anna, Illinois, is an excellent example of 
the successful business citizens of Southern Illinois whose early train- 
ing has been secured in the agricultural line, and whose education 
along the lines of the strict discipline of the farm has formed the foun- 
dation upon which their subsequent success has been built. Mr. Hess 
is a native of Union county, Illinois, and was born on a farm four miles 
southeast of Anna, in 1849. His education was secured in the common 
district schools of his neighborhood, and he held membership in the 
first free school in this locality. Combined with the farming opera- 
tions to which he devoted himself, Mr. Hess spent the winter months 
as a teacher for eight or ten years, thus augmenting his income, and 
when he was twenty-eight years of age he was able to leave the Missis- 
sippi Bottoms and purchase a tract of 160 acres of good land one and 
one-half miles east of Anna. There he settled down to cultivate a prop- 
erty, engaging in both farming and stock raising, and developed a 
property that compared favorably with any of its size in this part of 
the county. He was elected sheriff of Union county in 1902, and in 
1904 he came to Anna, sold his farm, and continued to act as sheriff 
until 1906, when his term expired. He spent fifteen months in Cali- 
fornia, and on his return became president of the W. W. Stokes Com- 
pany, a large agricultural implement business, the affairs of which 
he has handled very successfully to the present time, also acting as 
president of the Anna National Bank, one of the solid and substantial 
financial institutions of this section. 

Mr. Hess has been a prominent Mason for some years and now 
holds membership in Lodge No. 520 and R. A. Chapter No. 45. He is 



806 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

a trustee of the Presbyterian church, in the work of which he has been 
very active, and is also a member of the board of trustees of the Union 
Academy. A Democrat in politics, he served as a member of the county 
board from 1889 to 1895, and for twelve years prior to coming to Anna 
acted as township treasurer. To his official positions Mr. Hess has 
brought the same conscientious regard as to duty, and the same princi- 
ples of honesty and integrity that have characterized and made suc- 
cessful his business activities. He is strong in his ideas of right and 
wrong and fearless in defending his opinions and principles, although 
he is not bigoted and is ever ready to recognize and respect the rights 
of others. Those whose affairs have been placed in his charge have the 
utmost faith and confidence in his ability to handle them satisfactorily, 
and any enterprises with which his name is connected it is safe to feel 
will be conducted along legitimate lines. Mr. Hess has been a member 
of the official board of the District Fair of Anna for some years, and 
identifies himself with all movements calculated to make for progress. 
Very fond of travel, Mr. Hess has proved an exceptionally interesting 
writer for the papers on the customs of the various countries to which 
he has gone, and this was especially demonstrated in 1900, when he 
attended the Paris Exposition, and during his trip visited all the prom- 
inent points in Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, France, England 
and Ireland. 

In 1907, Mr. Hess was married to Mrs. Eliza (Hess) LeRoy. She 
has a son, Dr. Emory LeRoy, born to her first marriage. Dr. LeRoy 
was born June 4, 1885, and first attended Union Academy for six 
years, graduating therefrom in 1903. He then spent two years in 
McKendree College, Lebanon. Illinois, at the end of which time he en- 
tered Northwestern University, Chicago, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of M. D., in 1909. He spent one year in St. Vincent's 
Hospital, Toledo, Ohio, and on August 18, 1910, sailed for Vienna, and 
studied also in Berlin, Germany. He is now in Chicago, engaged in 
research work 

ROBERT H. WING. In considering those among New Burnside's citi- 
zens whose activities have been directed toward developing that city's 
industries, and whose foresight has been rewarded in a most substantial 
manner, prominent mention should be given Robert H. Wing, of the firm 
of R. H. Wing & Company, who after a career that has been remarkable 
in the rapidity with which he has attained success finds himself the head 
of the largest general merchandise business in Johnson county, with the 
exception of Vienna. His industry and hard and faithful labor have 
advanced him from a poor but ambitious youth to a place among the fore- 
most business citizens of his community, and he may certainly lay claim 
to being a self-made man in all that the term implies. Robert H. Wing 
was born November 4, 1878. on a farm near Golconda, in Pope county, 
Illinois, and is a son of William H. and Mary A. (Tune) Wing. 

William H. Wing was born November 12, 1844. in Robinson county, 
Tennessee, and is a son of Allen H. and Nancy F. (Shaw) Wing, natives 
respectively of Alabama and Tennessee, who moved to Kentucky in 
1847. William H. Wing enlisted, August 15, 1862. in Company D, 
Eighth Kentucky Cavalry, and saw service in Tennessee and Kentucky, 
being principally engaged in skirmish and police duty during this 
service of twelve months. He re-enlisted August 6, 1864, in Company 
C, Seventeenth Kentucky Cavalry, under Colonel Samuel F. Johnson, 
but for the greater part of this service was sick, being ill in the hospital 
for four months. He was honorably discharged September 20, 1865, 
and on December 18th of the same year migrated to Southern Illinois, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 807 

first locating on a farm near Golconda, Pope county, where he resided 
until 1880. In that year he moved to Stonefort, but a few months later 
removed to a farm about ten miles from New Burnside, and after living 
there for two years settled in the village, where until his retirement he 
was engaged in timber work and as a manufacturer of staves. He is 
a member of William Lawrence Post, No. 794?, Grand Army of the Re- 
public. In 1869 Mr. Wing was married to Miss Mary A. Tune, daugh- 
ter of Robert B. and Jane (Knott) Tune, of Tennessee, who later moved 
to Pope county, Illinois, and four children were born to this union, 
namely: Robert H., Charles Edward and Cora Nell, one dying in in- 
fancy. 

When Robert H. Wing was four years of age his parents moved to 
New Burnside, where he received his education in the common schools. 
As a youth he showed his industry and enterprise by accepting odd jobs 
during vacations, while other youths of his neighborhood were at play, 
and when he was eighteen years old he began to work during vacations 
as a clerk in the post office. His first regular employment was as a sec- 
tion man on the Big Four Railroad, when he was twenty-one years of 
age, but after four years decided he could better himself in the mercan- 
tile field, and subsequently secured a position with P. W. Riddon, the 
New Burnside merchant. Later he was employed by Alsbrook Brothers 
& Company, with which firm he continued for five years, and in the fall 
of 1909 entered the employ of Dennison & Gholson Dry Goods Company, 
wholesalers of Cairo, Illinois, where he gained six months of very valu- 
able experience. In March, 1910, feeling that he had sufficiently learned 
the details of the business, Mr. Wing formed a partnership with E. F. 
Throgmorton, of Vienna, and purchased the business of P. W. Riddon, 
Mr. Wing's former employer. It is now housed in a handsome brick 
building sixty by fifty feet, two stories and basement, which has a stock 
worth fifteen thousand dollars, including an excellent line of groceries, 
general .merchandise, dry goods, hardware and harness, an undertaking 
business being carried on in connection. He also owns two warehouses, 
several building lots and other real estate, and the total investment of the 
business aggregates a sum of about twenty-one thousand dollars. This 
business, which is the largest in the county outside of Vienna, requires 
the constant service of five salesmen. It is due to the business ability and 
progressive ideas of Mr. Wing that this large enterprise has been built 
to its present proportions. He has always possessed the happy faculty 
of being able to recognize an opportunity and the ability to carry and 
venture through to a successful conclusion, and has associated himself 
only with those movements which have promised a profit through legiti- 
mate dealings. He belongs to the Odd Fellows and the Mystic Workers 
of New Burnside, and with his family attends the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the work of which he has been active. He is popular with 
business associates and all who know him, and has numerous warm, per- 
sonal friends through the city, who are always sure of a sincere welcome 
at his home, one of the hospitable residences of New Burnside. 

On January 23, 1902, Mr. Wing was married to Miss Marietta Goings, 
daughter of Pinckney and Serilda (Dills) Goings, of New Burnside, 
both of whom are now deceased. 

HENRY H. JENKINS, secretary and treasurer of the Murphysboro 
Paving Brick Company, one of the largest industries of Jackson county, 
has been connected with the business interests of Murphysboro for a 
number of years, and has become a recognized power in the commercial 
world. Possessing business ability of more than ordinary capacity, he 
has assisted materially in developing the resources of Murphysboro, and 



808 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

as a public-spirited citizen of much civic pride has lent his influence to 
movements calculated to be of benefit to his community. Mr. Jenkins 
was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1874, and is a son 
of Thomas C. and Ann (Williams) Jenkins. 

Thomas C. Jenkins, who for more than twenty years was closely as- 
sociated with the coal mining industry in this section, acted as a general 
foreman and contractor, and developed properties all over the state, 
among which were the Big Muddy Coal and Iron Company, the Garkite 
Coal Company, and other large coal mines in Jackson and Williamson 
counties. Henry H. Jenkins received a public school education, and 
under his father was initiated into the developing of coal mines as a 
youth. At the age of nineteen years he entered the company stores as 
a clerk, and also spent some time in the West, but in 1896 returned to 
Murphysboro, and with Peter Schneider opened a plumbing establish- 
ment under the firm name of Schneider & Jenkins. Associating him- 
self with William H. Hill, a well-known contractor of East St. Louis, 
Mr. Jenkins next laid the first street paving and a part of the first 
sewerage system in Murphysboro, Carbondale and Johnson City, and 
the water works in the first-named city, and for some time was also 
identified with the diamond drilling business. He and Mr. Hill then 
formed a partnership under the firm style of Jenkins & Hill Company, 
street paving contractors, and in January, 1909, the Murphysboro Pav- 
ing Brick Company was organized, with Mr. Hill president, and Mr. 
Jenkins secretary and treasurer. This firm has grown rapidly and now 
gives employment to one hundred and twenty-five persons, the plant 
covering twenty-five acres of ground. Approximately eleven million 
finest-grade paving bricks, of all sizes and weights, are manufactured 
yearly and are shipped to the various large cities for distribution, al- 
though the bulk of the business is done in the towns of southern Illinois, 
where the Murphysboro product is used almost exclusively. 

Mr. Jenkins was married September 9, 1895, to Miss Minnie Schnei- 
der, and they have had two children : Lillian Maurice and Anna May. 
Fraternally Mr. Jenkins is connected with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Elks. In all that pertains to the welfare of Murphysboro in any 
way Mr. Jenkins has shown an active interest, whether it be in the 
direction of education, religion or social improvement, and he has 
proven that the confidence and esteem in which he is held in this city 
have not been misplaced. 

HENRY HASENJAEGER. A man whose preseverance, industry and 
business sagacity has been largely instrumental in the establishment of 
one of the most, important industries of Alexander county, Henry 
Hasenjaeger deserves more than passing mention in this work. He has 
lived here since 1863, was for years a prominent soda water manufac- 
turer, and is now in retirement, with his sole business connection as 
vice-president of the Cairo Brewing Company. To recount the muni- 
cipal vicissitudes of Cairo since Henry Hasenjaeger has lived in the 
city would be to narrate the story of its development from almost its 
day of swaddling-clothes to its status as the metropolis of Southern Illi- 
nois, and his relation to it has been as a silent witness, contributing 
only so much as his modest enterprise, spoke its importance in the in- 
dustrial acclaim. By nature modest, and with the timidity becoming 
a young foreigner schooled to the quiet of home life, Mr. Hasenjaeger 
has played no part in the official life of Cairo. He brought here little 
besides his mother tongue and a being filled with industry, and upon 
the latter he sat his dependence for an honorable and successful career. 
Mr. Hasenjaeger was born in the village of Werther, Province of West- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 809 

phalia, Germany, and is the only surviving child of the eleven born to 
his parents. The others who grew to maturity were : William, who 
died in Vincennes, Indiana, leaving a family ; Carolina and Charlotte, 
who passed their lives in the Fatherland ; Adolph, who joined the Dutch 
navy and died while serving in the West Indies; Louisa, who spent her 
life in the vicinity of her birthplace. 

According to the laws of his native land, Henry Hasen jaeger spent 
eight years in school. His father, who was a blacksmith, and around 
whose shop he picked up many useful lessons before he thought seriously 
about life, put him to work in the coal mines as the close of his school- 
days, and he followed that trade while he remained in the old country. 
In 1863 he sailed on an old converted whaler, the "Ostedius," from 
Bremen to New York, and after a voyage of several weeks landed at 
Castle Garden, the once-famous gateway to American opportunities. 
Coming directly to Cairo, he initiated himself into American ways as 
a helper in a blacksmith shop, and after he had accumulated sufficient 
capital established himself in the soda water business on Commercial 
street, in which he continued until 1903. This business, although 
modest in its inception, attained immense proportions, and when Mr. 
Hasenjaeger sold out there were employed a small army of employes 
and the plant covered eight lots. The Cairo Brewery now occupies the 
site of his old enterprise, and for two years after he sold out Mr. Hasen- 
jaeger was actively identified with this concern, but overwork caused 
a physical breakdown and he was compelled to become only an onlooker. 
He was made vice-president of the brewing company upon its organiza- 
tion and the directorate has selected him continuously since. In a 
modest way he has been a builder of Cairo, having improved his real 
estate opposite the brewery, and for the past quarter of a century has 
lived there. 

Mr. Hasenjaeger was married to Miss Carolina Helfrich in Cairo, 
daughter of Charles Helfrich, and she passed away November 2, 1911, 
the children of this union being : Rudolph, of Cairo ; Emma, the wife 
of Morris Fitzgerald, of this city; Katie, who lives with her father; 
Lillie, the wife of Fred Hoffman, of Mound City, Illinois; and Henry, 
who also resides at the parental home. When he has exercised his 
elective franchise, Mr. Hasenjaeger has done so as a Democrat, and his 
fraternal affiliations have been with the Odd Fellows. 

CHARLES A. JACKSON. The business men of the city of Benton, Illi- 
nois, are an up-to-date, progressive class of people, and one of the 
most influential and best known of them is Mr. Charles A. Jackson, har- 
ness manufacturer. The extensive saddlery factory, known as the A. D. 
Jackson Saddlery Company, and now conducted by Mr. Jackson, was 
established many years ago in a small way by his father and has grown 
to its present important proportions through the exercise of energetic 
modern methods and the sagacious management of the Jackson's father 
and son. 

Charles A. Jackson is of English-Irish descent and was born in Ben- 
ton, Illinois, June 12, 1866. His mother was before her marriage Jennie 
R. Dudley, a daughter of Charles Dudley, a native of Virginia, whose 
parents were in turn of English birth. She was born in Kentucky, on 
July 20, in the year 1834, and died in Benton, Illinois, February 5, 1904. 
His father was A. D. Jackson, who was born in Chester, county, Penn- 
sylvania, on February 9, 1829, to which state his grandfather, David 
Jackson, migrated from Ireland in 1828, becoming a farmer and living 
in that locality until his death, in 1880, at the advanced age of eighty- 
four years. 



810 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

A. D. Jackson first became a resident of Illinois in 1855, when he 
settled at Shawneetown and occupied his time in a commercial way as 
a traveling harness journeyman, working by the day. He was careful 
of his earnings and worked industriously and, being of an ambitious 
temperament, soon managed to establish a small shop in Shawneetown, 
which he conducted for six months. Benton was then a small town just 
starting to grow, and Mr. Jackson, encouraged to establish his business 
there by his friend, Sam K. Casey, opened up a small harness store in 
August, 1855. This was the beginning of the present Jackson harness 
and saddlery manufactory. The trade at the little shop grew gradually 
but steadily and the capacity of the store and factory was increased year 
by year. His death occurred on May 11, 1906. He was throughout his 
lifetime president and treasurer of the business, was known as -a man 
upon whose word complete reliance could always be placed and his in- 
tegrity in every particular was of the most unquestionable character. 
He was one of the few men of his time in this section that voted for Lin- 
coln for president in 1860 and 1864, as Franklin county was inclined 
strongly toward Democracy. 

The firm conducting the harness business was incorporated in 1897, 
in which year a bad fire destroyed the store, entailing a loss of forty 
thousand dollars, as no insurance was carried on the building and stock. 
The place was rebuilt, however, and is now of sufficient size and capacity, 
covering practically a city block, to adequately handle the large business 
transacted not only with customers in Illinois but many clients in the 
surrounding states of Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri. 
Three traveling representatives are employed to visit the trade and take 
orders in these states. 

Charles A. Jackson, upon whose able shoulders has devolved the man- 
agement of this business since the death of his father, was educated with 
the idea in view of his assuming these responsibilities in time. He was 
sent to the high school of Benton and later, in 1884, went to Bryant & 
Stratton's Business College in St. Louis, Missouri. After completing 
his studies at these schools he went into the store and learned the busi- 
ness thoroughly by practical training in every department, and is com- 
plete master of every phase of harness and saddlery manufacturing. He 
represented the company on the road for fifteen years and has accord- 
ingly a personal acquaintance with a large number of his customers. 
After the death of his father he was elected president and treasurer of 
the corporation and also general manager of the business, which is cap- 
italized at forty thousand dollars. 

Mr. Jackson was first married in 1893, to Miss Daisy Webster, a 
daughter of Byron Webster, a leading druggist of Benton and a veteran 
of the Civil war. She died in 1894, and in 1901 Mr. Jackson again 
entered the bonds of matrimony, this time espousing Miss Carrie Lay- 
man, the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Lemen) Layman, natives 
respectively of Franklin and Monroe counties, this state. Mr. Layman 
was a lawyer of distinction, and after a long and honorable career died 
in 1892, leaving behind him an enviable reputation and a considerable 
fortune. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are the parents of two children, Eliza- 
beth and Charles A. Jr., both of whom are attending school. Mrs. Jack- 
son is an active member of the church of the Baptist denomination. Mr. 
Jackson belongs to the Masonic fraternal order and is also a Chapter 
Mason. While he is interested in all matters touching public weal, he 
has never engaged actively in political affairs. His private business in- 
terests occupy his time fully, as in addition to his manufacturing and 
merchandising of harness he has extensive real estate holdings to look 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 811 

after. He is a man of unimpeachable character and is highly esteemed 
throughout the community for his many admirable qualities. 

ARTHUR B. ALSBROOK, senior member of the well-known milling firm 
of Alsbrook Brothers, of Vienna and New Burnside, and a man who has 
for many years been prominently identified with large business ventures 
in Johnson county, is one of those citizens who have conducted their own 
affairs in such a manner as to help to develop the resources of their com- 
munity and to stimulate the healthy growth of trade. He was born 
October 30, 1870, at Marion, Illinois, and is a son of Stephen Wesley and 
Sarah J. (Blankenship) Alsbrook, natives of Tennessee. Stephen Wes- 
ley Alsbrook, who was the youngest of a family of fourteen children, 
migrated to Southern Illinois at an early day, settling in Marion, where 
at the time of his death, in 1872, he was the proprietor of a drug store. 
He and his wife, who was a daughter of Ispm Blankenship, of Tennessee, 
had two sons : Arthur B. and Robert W. the latter of New Burnside. 

Arthur B. Alsbrook was educated in the schools of Marion and New 
Burnside, to which latter place he was brought by his mother in 1877, 
and when nineteen years of age became station agent for the Big Four 
Railroad at Tunnel Hill, and also acted as telegraph operator. In 1890 
he was sent to Paducah, Kentucky, as agent of the Cairo Short Line, 
which is now merged with the Illinois Central, but in 1893 gave up his 
position to engage in the mercantile business with a Mr. Clymer, under 
the firm name of Alsbrook, Clymer & Company. Buying out Mr. Cly- 
mer 's interest in the business, Mr. Alsbrook continued to carry on the 
business under the name of the Alsbrook Store Company, which became 
the largest of its kind in the county, handling implements, threshing 
machinery, sewing machines, etc., the annual business exceeding forty 
thousand dollars, and covering the counties of Pope, Johnson and Wil- 
liamson. Mr. Alsbrook managed this business at New Burnside for six- 
teen years, or until 1909, in December of which year he sold out. In the 
meanwhile he had also engaged to some extent in the fire insurance busi- 
ness, and had superintended the operation of a farm of six hundred and 
ninety-two acres, which had started as a tract of eighty acres, and to 
which Mr. Alsbrook added from year to year, specializing in apple grow- 
ing and at one time having fifty acres of apple-bearing orchard. In 
October, 1910, with his brother, he engaged in the milling business at New 
Burnside, purchasing the flouring mills and elevator at New Burnside, 
and in March, 1911, .the brothers purchased the J. B. Kuykendall Mill- 
ing Company's interests at Vienna. "Mr. Alsbrook has a total invest- 
ment in realty at New Burnside and Vienna in excess of fifteen thousand 
dollars, while his interest in property, grain, etc., exceeds thirty-five 
thousand dollars. The mills, which work night and day, employ four- 
teen men, and the daily capacity is flour, sixty barrels ; meal, forty bar- 
els, and feed, three tons, while the elevator capacity is sixty-five thousand 
bushels. Mr. Alsbrook owns a handsome residence at Vienna, and all of 
his activities have been directed toward assisting in forwarding move- 
ments for the betterment of his community. He belongs to New Burnside 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and Vienna Chapter, R. A. M., as well as to the 
Odd Fellows at New Burnside. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist church and have been active in its work. 

In 1898 Mr. Alsbrook was married to Miss Victoria Boulden, of 
Carbondale, Illinois, daughter of Henry N. and Harriet Josephine (Tise) 
Boulden, natives of France who now. live at Dermott, Arkansas, Mr. 
Boulden being the proprietor of a successful lumber business. Mr. and 
Mrs. Alsbrook have had one child: Sarah Josephine, who is thirteen 
years old and a student in the Vienna schools. 



812 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

SIMON- WILLAED, M. D., is one of the comparatively few Americans 
who can trace his ancestry back as far as the days of the coming of the 
"goode ship Mayflower," but the line of descent is well connected and 
his claim authenticated by completes! details. He is a descendant of 
Major Simon Willard, of English birth, who crossed to the New World 
in the early years of the seventeenth century and settled in New Eng- 
land in 1640. There he took active part in the life of the young colony 
and passed the remainder of his life. His descendant, Jonothan Willard, 
spent his life in the then newly born "Green Mountain State," and it 
developed upon Jonothan Willard, second, to fare forth to unexplored 
sections of the country, he eventually established a new branch of the 
Willard family in the valley of the Mississippi and Ohio. 

Jonothan Willard, second, starting out on his journey into strange 
lands, took the then popular means of locomotion and came down the 
Ohio river by flatboat, and up -the Mississippi as far as Cape Girardeau, 
where he died and was buried. His widow and four children then 
settled in that portion of the country now known as Union county, Illi- 
nois, where she passed away in the year 1872, at the venerable age of 
ninety-nine years, ten months and five days, all but reaching the centen- 
ary mark. She was Miss Nancy Atkins before her marriage, and the 
children born of her union with Jonothan Willard were: Elijah, born 
November 25, 1803, and who died April 30, 1848 ; Willis, born March 
20, 1805, and died May 12, 1881 ; Anna, born November 28, 1809, married 
Winstead Davie and passed her life in Union county, Illinois, and it is 
she for whom the little city of Anna, Illinois, was named. She died in 
Jonesboro, Union county. William was the youngest child of the Jono- 
than Willard family, he having been born August 24, 1811, and died June 
1, 1843. 

Willis Willard was a youth just entering his teens when the family 
lot was cast in with the fortunes of the 'new country at the junction of 
the great waterways of the west, and he was at the age of about twenty- 
five years when he began the business of trading in and about the old 
town of Jonesboro, Illinois. His entire life was spent in a commercial 
way, and after his retirement in 1873 he lived but a few years. He was 
of Democratic persuasion, although not deeply interested in the politics 
of his section, and he lived apart from the influences of the church or 
other society. He was married to Frances C. Webb, who was born at 
Cooperstown, New York, June 17, in 1817, and died at Chicago, Illinois, 
January 25, 1883. 

The father of Frances (Webb) Willard was the widely known pioneer 
Henry L. Webb, who came into this part of Illinois from New York in 
the year 1818, and in company with a Mr. Alexander settled at America, 
Illinois. Subsequently Mr. Webb and Mr. Alexander were partners in 
the work of exploiting the townsites of Trinity, situated at the mouth 
of Cache Creek; America, some fourteen miles above the mouth of the 
Ohio river; and Caledonia, a river point near to Grand Chain. Mr. 
Webb had been in Illinois only about two years when the Black Hawk 
war broke out, in which he took an active part, and when the war with 
Mexico was declared he enlisted promptly and was commissioned lieu- 
tenant colonel of an Illinois regiment, and served throughout the cam- 
paign under General Taylor. During the fifties he went to Texas, where 
he became interested in business ventures, and was there when the Civil 
war opened. The sympathies of Colonel Webb remained firm with the 
state of his adoption, and he joined the Confederate forces. Later he 
was made inspector general of the Confederacy for Texas, an official 
position of considerable note. After the close of the war he remained 
in Texas at his home until the last years of his life, when he began to feel 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 813 

the ties of kin and earlier associations drawing him, and he returned 
to Illinois, where he peacefully spent his remaining days, finally passing 
away at Makanda, Illinois, October 5, 1876, at the age of eighty-one 
years. The life of Colonel Webb was full of activity from first to last. 
Wherever he found himself, he was a man of affairs. Possessed of an 
unusually high order of intelligence and of a markedly progressive spirit, 
he was always a man of power and note, and was a splendid type of early 
American manhood and citizenship. 

Colonel Webb was the son of General Samuel B. Webb, aide de camp 
to General Washington during the Revolutionary war. He was com- 
missioned a brigadier general for valiant service, and among the many 
engagements in which he actively participated were Bunker Hill, White 
Plains and Trenton. Among the children of Colonel Henry L. Webb 
were : James Watson Webb, father of Dr. Seward Webb, of New York 
city, and a Mrs. Morrell. Colonel Webb was married at Hudson, New 
York, to Mary Ann Edmonds, a sister of former chief justice Edmonds 
of New York state. This marriage was productive of several children, 
and among those who reached years of maturity were : Frances C. Webb, 
Lydia Edmonds, Henry Watson Webb and Catherine Louisa. 

The children of Willis and Frances (Webb) were: Henry, who died 
in 1865, leaving one child ; Elijah, a resident of Durango, Mexico ; Willis 
J., who passed away December 22, 1884, leaving two children ; Mary 
Ann, the widow of Dr. M. M. Goodman, now a resident of Riverside, 
California; and Dr. Simon, the youngest of the family, a resident of 
Mound City and of whom we write. 

The boyhood days of Dr. Willard were passed in the town of Jones- 
boro, where his father had passed the best years of his life and where 
he carried on a commercial business. It was after he had reached his 
sixteenth year that he made up his mind to equip himself for the duties 
of life by acquiring a wider education than was possible to attain in 
Jonesboro, and he became a student in the Pennsylvania State College. 
After completing his sophomore year there he did the preparatory work 
for the medical course. He took his senior year in that study in the 
medical department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, and 
was graduated from that institution in 1884. Upon his graduation he 
returned to the old home in Jonesboro, Illinois, where he began the prac- 
tice of his profession, but after some little time decided to take a course 
in dentistry, which he did, completing a course in that study in the Chi- 
cago College of Dentistry in 1889. Following his studies in that de- 
partment he came to Mound City and practiced dentistry for two years, 
after which time he resumed his original profession, that of medicine, 
to which he has given his attention from that time to the present day. 

Dr. Willard has passed his life in the quiet companionship of his 
books, his friends and his antiquities. His nature is one which finds 
unalloyed pleasure in the pursuit of old and historic relics and mementos, 
and" his collection of family heirlooms and treasures is one to delight the 
soul of the connoisseur. His home and office are veritable treasure-troves, 
rich as they are in rare antiques and mementos of every variety, some 
invaluable as family heirlooms, and others of great intrinsic value be- 
cause of their very rare and antique qualities. Among the many unique 
and delightful articles to be seen in his collection are odd and beautiful 
pieces of china which graced the banquet table of his English ancestor, 
and of his later ancestor of Revolutionary times ; a wine glass from the 
the table at which General Washington was dined and wined ; shooting 
irons of ancient pattern and peculiar to the early civilization period ; 
and many other relics dear to the heart of the collector, although the 



814 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

interest of Dr. Willard in his collection is chiefly on account of the bear- 
ing it has upon his ancestry. 

Dr. WiHard has lived unpretentiously and happily serene in the 
performance of his professional duties, and unhampered by the cares of 
public life, for which he has never evinced any interest or inclination. 
Save for a few years of service on the Mound City Board of Education, 
a duty which he performed because he regarded it as such, the singular 
freedom of his life has never been broken in upon. His interest in 
fraternities caused him to become an Odd Fellow, and he has also taken 
the Scottish Rite degree of Masonry and the Commandery degree of the 
York Rite. His political convictions, in accordance with the ancestral 
faith, are purely Democratic. 

HON. WILLIAM NICHOLAS BUTLER. One of those who both as public 
official and prominent citizen have been important factors in the mould- 
ing of Cairo's municipal history, Hon. William Nicholas Butler is 
presiding judge of the First Judicial Circuit of Illinois, with which 
section he has been identified since childhood, and his participation in 
the public affairs of this portion of Illinois and of Alexander county, 
his home, has been varied and important. He was born at Berlin, 
Green Lake county, Wisconsin, August 16, 1856, in which state his 
father had spent considerable time in the Government Indian service, 
and upon the conclusion of which he took his family to Columbia 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1859. His father was Comfort Edgar But- 
ler, whose native place was Ithaca, New York, being born there October 
23, 1824, the family having been founded at that locality by Daniel 
Bayard Butler, the father of Comfort E., and the community of Strat- 
ford, Connecticut, furnished this bit of human migration. In this part 
of the Nutmeg state the first Butler settled as an English immigrant 
in 1839. 

Daniel Bayard Butler married Elsie Edgar, who was born in Orange 
county, New York, a daughter of the Rev. Edgar, and she died at 
Canton, Pennsylvania, in 1880, the mother of Comfort Edgar and 
Helen. The latter married William H. Nichols and now resides with 
her daughter, Mrs. George E. Man, whose husband has been in the 
United States consular service in European cities for many years. 
Daniel Bayard Butler passed his life as a journalist and was in the 
newspaper business at Geneseo and Rochester, New York, and was as- 
sociated as a publisher with old Dr. John Harper, the father of Harper 
Brothers, the famed New York publishers. Early in the 'forties he 
started for the Pacific coast by the way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
and while crossing the isthmus dropped out of sight completely, and 
is believed to have perished there. 

Comfort Edgar Butler grew up under a pure and intellectual in- 
fluence, among associates whose hojnes abounded in culture and where 
the Puritan air still echoed the music of Colonial days, and his educa- 
tion came rather from contact with the public effort and from absorption 
from his fellows than from doing a course in an institution of learning. 
Clerical work seemed to be his forte, and his life was devoted to it 
wherever he was permanently located. He exercised his suffrage first 
as a Whig, then as a Republican, but took no part as a partisan poli- 
tician. He was a man of extreme modesty, held aloof from any appear- 
ance of forwardness, and while he was reared under strict church dis- 
cipline, he took no part in church work himself. Upon the issues of 
the Civil war he lost little time in offering himself as a volunteer sol- 
dier. He enlisted in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, first in Com- 
pany I, Thirty-first Infantry, and subsequently in Company A, Seven- 



THt UBRMW 
& \it 
OF 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 815 

ty-fourth Infantry, in the Army of the Potomac. He was acting quar- 
termaster and later chief clerk at headquarters of the Department of 
Virginia, and passed thrpugh the service without untoward incident, 
being discharged in September, 1865, after a faithful service. He then 
joined his family at Canandaigua, New York, and was a clerical man 
until he .went South on an experiment in 1869. He was induced to be- 
lieve that the state of Texas offered the chief elements desifed by the 
home-seeker, but after spending a few months at Columbus, that state, 
became convinced of its unadaptability to the Northern ex-soldier at 
that time. 

Returning North with his family the same year, Mr. Butler settled 
at Anna, Illinois, and followed his favorite vocation there until his 
death, June 25, 1888. He married Miss Celesta A. Carter, a daughter 
of Cyrus Carter, who was sixth in descent from Rev. Thomas Carter, 
the pioneer minister of Woburn, Massachusetts, and a graduate of the 
theological department of Oxford University, England. Cyrus Carter 
was born at Rutland, Vermont, and was a son of David Carter, whose 
forefathers were active participants in the Colonial wars and the war 
for American independence, and who shed lustre upon their family as 
civilian gentlemen as well. Cyrus Carter was born March 6, 1798, was 
a tanner, pump-maker and farmer, and at different times lived at 
Darien and Canandaigua, New York, at Janesville, Berlin and Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin, and at Anna and Cairo, Illinois, and died in the last-named 
city October 6, 1891. His wife was Esther Saunders, and their chil- 
dren were: Marietta, who became the wife of Dr. Waldo Allen and 
died in Wisconsin; Celesta Ann, born August 19, 1833; Olive Fidelia, 
who married Owen Townsend, of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Four chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Butler, namely : Cyrus Waldo, who 
is unmarried and resides at Seattle, Washington; Judge William 
Nicholas; Genevieve, the wife of Charles Lyons, of Silver City, New 
Mexico ; and Olive Dacy, who is the widow of Edward H. Myers, of 
Washington, D. C. 

After the public schools of Anna, Illinois, William Nicholas Butler 
entered the University of Illinois, and graduated therefrom June 7, 
1879. His tuition was largely earned by his own industry as a car- 
penter, at the printer's case, clerking in a store and teaching school. 
He first read law with Judge Monroe C. Crawford, his first recollec- 
tions of whom were as a barefoot boy peeping into the door of the 
courtroom at Jonesboro, where the Judge was presiding over the scales 
of justice, and thirty-four years after which event the former barefoot 
boy defeated the dignified and scholarly Judge for the same position 
on the Bench. In the autumn of 1881 Judge Butler entered the Union 
College of Law at Chicago, where he was a classmate and seatmate of 
William Jennings Bryan. In 1882 he entered the senior class of the 
Albany (New York) Law School and graduated in 1883, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. In August of that year he located in Cairo 
and took a Government position in the internal revenue service, under 
General C. W. Pavey, collector. 

In the fall of 1884 Judge Butler entered politics actively as a can- 
didate for state's attorney, was nominated by the Republicans of Alex- 
ander county and elected for a term of four years, and was three times 
re-elected to the office. From 1895 to 1897 he was corporation counsel 
for the city of Cairo. He has served the public schools here as a mem- 
ber of tne board of education six years, being chosen upon the issue of 
the building of the high school, and was elected a judge of the First 
Circuit to fill a vacancy, December 12, 1903, and after serving almost 
six years was chosen his own successor at the November election of 



816 HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

1910, for a six-year term. His activity as a Republican can be estim- 
ated by a reference to his party service. He was chairman of the Cen- 
tral Committee of his county six years, was chairman of the Republican 
committee of the Supreme Court District and of the Republican 
judicial committee of the First Circuit for the year 1889 ; was an alter- 
nate to the Republican National Convention of 1888 and was seated 
with the delegates from Illinois and aided in nominating General Har- 
rison for the presidency. He was captain and adjutant of the old 
Ninth Regiment of the Third Brigade, Illinois National Guard, from 
its organization. He served for a long period as president of the 
Alumni Association of the University of Illinois, and is now a member 
of the Ancient Free & Accepted Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 
His religious connection is with the Presbyterian church. 

Judge Butler was married, October 28, 1885, at Fairbury, Illinois, 
to Miss Mary Mattoon, daughter of Franklin and Caroline A. (Straight) 
Mattoon. Mrs. Butler's father died in early life, leaving two children: 
Mary and Franklin G. The latter entered the Indian service as a 
young man, became agent at Fort Berthold, North Dakota, held the 
same position at the Crow agency, and was later appointed head of the 
consolidated agencies in Idaho, resigning from the service to engage in 
banking at Forsyth, Montana. Mrs. Mattoon subsequently married 
Samuel Rogers, and is now one of the household of Judge and Mrs. 
Butler. The latter 's children are : Comfort Straight, who graduated 
from, the University of Illinois in 1909, and from the law department of 
the George Washington University at Washington, D. C., in 1912, and 
is now a practicing attorney in St. Louis, Missouri ; William Glenn, a 
student in the agricultural department of the University of Illinois; 
Franklin Mattoon, who is attending the Cairo High School; Mary, who 
has completed her course in the same institution ; Helen, who died in 
1906 in childhood ; and John Bruce, who is a student in the graded 
public schools of Cairo. 

CHARLES EDWARD FEIRICH. A new but valued addition to the legal 
fraternity in Carbondale, having been a resident of the city less than 
three years at the time of this writing (1911), Charles Edward 
Feirich has already made his mark in large and enduring phrase in 
professional circles in this part of Illinois, and won the regard of the 
people as a man and a citizen. He has been unostentatious in his 
course, and whatever he has achieved in the way of reputation in gen- 
eral and standing at the bar is based on demonstrated merit, substan- 
tial attainments, creditable work and genuine worth. 

Mr. Feirich is a native of Buffalo, New York, where his life began 
on November 1, 1886. In that city his father, Charles A. Feirich, is a 
prosperous carpenter, and during the minority of the son maintained 
his wife, whose maiden name was Anna Kreinbring, and their offspring 
in modest but real comfort, and gave his children all the educational 
advantages he was able to provide for them, doing all in his power to 
open to them the way to a better condition in life than he enjoyed 
himself. 

One of the children at least, Charles Edward, the only one of whom 
we have knowledge, responded to the parental solicitude with every 
power at his command, determined that no lack of effort on his part 
should defeat his father's designs and ardent desires. He received a 
high school education in Buffalo, which he supplemented with more 
advanced instruction at the Metropolitan Select School, and through- 
out his course from the beginning strained every nerve to make the 
best use of his opportunities. After completing his academic train- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 817 

ing he studied law in the law department of Lake Forest University, 
and was admitted to the bar in December, 1904. With the world 
open to him for choice of a place in which to begin his practice and 
build his professional career, he deemed the great metropolis and 
commercial center of the Middle West the most attractive, and lo- 
cated "in among its throngs of men." He soon afterward became 
connected with the legal department of the Illinois Central Railroad 
as secretary to the road's chief counsel, Judge J. M. Dickinson. 

In this excellent field of operation and school of broad practical 
development Mr. Feirich remained five years, gathering light from 
the great luminaries of the legal firmament with whom he came in 
contact from day to day, all the while extending his knowledge of 
the law and of human nature, and improving his opportunities for 
making acquaintances among men of large mold, superior endowments 
and comprehensive attainments. His advantages were exceptional, 
it is true, but they would have been of no benefit to him if he had 
not been of the caliber to fully appreciate and properly use them, and 
assimilate the mental and professional pabulum they furnished in 
such abundance and high quality. 

In 1909 he moved to Carbondale, eager to stand on his own foot- 
ing and work his own way forward without the assistance of adven- 
titious circumstances, and in July of the following year formed a 
partnership with W. W. Barr, under the firm name of Barr & Feirich. 
Mr. Feirich is the local attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, in Jackson county, and the firm represents a number of 
banks, corporations and other fiscal, commercial and industrial insti- 
tutions. It stands in the front rank at the bar in Southern Illinois, 
and its members have amply shown that it belongs there. 

On June 11, 1907, Mr. Feirich was united in marriage with Miss 
Jennie Cottrill, of Buffalo, New York, a daughter of John J. Cottrill, 
one of the leading teaming contractors in that great and striding 
city on the lakes. Two children have been born in the Feirich house- 
hold, both sons, Charles Cottrill and John Kenneth. The parents 
belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, and the father is a mem- 
ber of the board of stewards of the congregation in which they hold 
membership. In fraternal circles he is allied with the Masonic order 
and the Order of Odd Fellows. He is as zealous in his attention to 
the interests of these fraternities as his professional duties will allow 
him to be, fully appreciating their value as moral and social agencies 
in the community, and his membership is highly appreciated in each. 

JUDGE WILLIAM WILLS BARE. The bench and bar of Illinois have in 
several generations been adorned with names enjoying world-wide 
distinction, and a worthy representative of the profession is Judge 
William Wills Barr, of Carbondale, whose native ability and experi- 
ence have fitted him for the various positions he has filled, in which 
he has met grave questions with good judgment and general satisfac- 
tion. Judge Barr is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having oc- 
curred in Center county May 8, 1845. His parents were James S. 
and Charlotte B. (Stage) Barr, also natives of Center county, Penn- 
sylvania. The father was a man of ability and culture, and his useful 
life was devoted to teaching, the subject benefitting greatly from his 
enlightened tutelage. Judge Barr passed the usual number of terms 
behind a desk in the village school room, and having come to a con- 
clusion as to the profession he meant to follow he matriculated in the 
Bloomington (Indiana) Law School, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1867, at the age of about twenty-two years. He had 



818 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

first begun his legal studies the year previous in the office and under 
the direction of Hon. F. M. Youngblood, of Benton, Franklin county, 
Illinois. In April, 1867, he was admitted to the bar and opened an 
office in Benton, where he met the usual fortunes of ambitious young 
barristers, the dull days being followed by the acquirement of pres- 
tige and practice. He continued to reside in Benton for almost a 
decade and in 1876 removed to Carbondale, where he has ever since 
made his home. His success has been the logical outcome of his 
excellent equipment, which gained him early recogniton as 1 one of 
the ablest of Jackson county lawyers. He has a good legal mind and 
a strong power in marshalling and presenting significant facts so as 
to bring conviction. His good standing as a lawyer has been stamped 
with approval by his elevation to the bench, his eight years' service 
as judge of the county court of Jackson county, being bounded by 
the years 1886 and 1894. In the meantime he administered the law 
with a fair and impartial hand and won highest commendation of 
the bar, regardless of political affiliation. 

Judge Barr is one of the local standard bearers of the Demo- 
cratic party and from his earliest years he has been loyal to its arti- 
cles of faith, having pored over the pages of its history and found 
inspirations in its high traditons. A man of public spirit of the type 
which has ever found expression in deeds rather than words, it is 
small wonder that he should have been selected for several positons 
of public trust. In 1866 he was appointed master of chancery of 
Franklin county, for a term of two years, and in 1870 was elected to., 
represent his district in the twenty-seventh general assembly of 
Illinois. In 1872 he was elected state's attorney of Franklin county, 
filling that positon for four years, and in 1886 he was elected county 
judge of Jackson county, in which office he was continued by re- 
election until 1894. 

Almost since the attainment of his majority Judge Barr has been 
a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he has ever exemplified in 
his own living those ideals of moral and social justice and brotherly 
love for which the order stands. He is also associated with the An- 
cient Order of United "Workmen and has been grand dictator of the 
Knights of Honor for the state of Illinois. 

On October 15, 1870, he was married at Tamaroa, Perry county, to 
Miss Alice G. Breinzer, a native of Philadelphia, and their idealty 
happy union has been blessed by the birth of two daughters, Jessie 
G. and Bertha A. Their home is a hospitable one and the members 
of their household enjoy an enviable position in social circles where 
true worth and intelligence are received as the passports into good 
society. The judge is a very popular citizen, his honorable life and 
commendable characteristics, combined with a genial, kindly manner, 
having won him a host of warm friends. 

R. A. CARLILE. One of the progressive and enterprising business 
men of Anna, Illinois, who has built up a flourishing business through 
the force of his own efforts, and the excellence of whose work insures 
him a steady income in his field, is R. A. Carlile, who since 1906 has 
been the proprietor of a paint store in this city. Mr. Carlile is a 
Southerner, having been born at Crystal Springs, Mississippi, in 1866, 
a son of R. W. and S. A. (Ballard) Carlile, the former a native of 
South Carolina, and the latter of Mississippi. R. W. Carlile, who was 
a laborer by occupation, came to Anna in 1873, and here his death 
occurred, while his widow, who survives him, makes her home in this 
city. 



HISTOEY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 819 

B. A. Carlile was seven years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to Anna, and his education was secured in the public schools. 
After completing his studies he decided to enter the painting trade, 
which he learned in Anna, and until 1906 was engaged as a painter 
and decorator for others. In the year mentioned, Mr. Carlile estab- 
lished himself in business, and he has since built up a large trade in 
a general line of paints, wall paper, glass and picture moulding, hav- 
ing a complete and up-to-date stock in his line. He also does contract 
work in painting, paper-hanging and decorating, and hires a number 
of skilled assistants. He has become known as a skilled workman 
and one who can be relied upon to do first-class work, which has been 
the cause of his handling some large contracts, many of the large 
buildings and modern residences of the city bearing evidence of his 
handicraft. 

In 1891 Mr. Carlile was united in marriage with Miss Mable Sloan, 
who is a native of Illinois. They are consistent members of the Anna 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mrs. Carlile has been a Sunday 
school teacher for twelve years. Fraternally Mr. Carlile is con- 
nected with Anna Blue Lodge, No. 520, in which he is master, and 
Anna Chapter No. 45, R. A. M., and he is popular with the members 
of both bodies. 

S. J. HARRY WILSON has been superintendent of the public schools 
of Pinckneyville for the past five years. At the age of twenty he 
entered the profession of teaching, and his interest in and enthusiasm 
for the work would not permit him to stand still. 

Pinckneyville is his native town, and here he was born December 
6, 1877. His first school experience was at the "Brick School," two 
miles south of the town. Later he attended the city schools, and was 
always a close student and a wide reader, and possessed of a remark- 
ably retentive memory. The home of his boyhood was well supplied 
with the best books. His father was the late William Gill Wilson, who 
was prominently identified with the building up of Pinckneyville in 
the capacity of carpenter and builder. He was born three miles south 
of Pinckneyville. October 17, 1841. His father was James Steele 
Wilson, who, with his father, Alexander Wilson, migrated about 
1830 from Dickson county, Tennessee, to this state, and passed his 
life here as a farmer dying in 1880 at the age of sixty-five. This 
James S. Wilson was a pillar in society. His wife was Anna Lucinda 
Chambers, who died in 1879. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, of whom William G. was the eldest. The others were Samuel 
B., who served in the Union army during the Civil war as a sergeant 
of Company D, Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry Volunteers, and died in 
Perry county in 188], at that time being a school teacher and farmer. 
Emma married W. C. Milligan. and passed away in Perry county in 
1901, Mary became the wife of William Johnson, and died in 1887. 
Tirza, Mrs. John A. Kimzey. and they removed to Evans, Colorado. 
Lucinda is Mrs. John N. Hughey, of Kearney, Nebraska. James died 
just as he had reached maturity. 

William G. Wilson in his youth was ambitous and determined to 
succeed in his chosen occupation, and would have enjoyed nothing 
better than a technical education had circumstances permitted, but 
hard times and the outbreak of the war between the states put an 
end to all such dreams. He did, however, receive a very good com- 
mon-school education, but. at the age of nineteen he cast aside all 
thoughts of work (for he was just beginning to learn the carpenter's 
trade) and enlisted in Company A, of the Thirty-first Illinois Infan- 



820 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

try, commanded by Colonel John A. Logan. The young soldier took 
part in many battles, the first among them being those of Fort Henry, 
the attack on Fort Donelson, and the battles of Champion Hills. He 
was in the Vicksburg campaign, and was wounded at the above named 
battle of Champion Hills. However, he was not long out of his place 
in the ranks, but was discharged from the hospital in time to join 
the army and take his share in the fighting at Big Shanty and Kene- 
saw Mountain, and to march with the boys in blue towards Atlanta. 
After he had participated in the battle of Atlanta his term of enlist- 
ment expired and he was discharged and returned to Pinckneyville. 
He soon became an active builder, and received many large contracts, 
among which were the old Murphy-Wall & Company Bank building, 
the Court House, the public school building and the United Presby- 
terian church (of which organization he was a staunch member). 
Many of the best residences in the city and in the surrounding coun- 
try are also monuments of his skill and fidelity to his business. As 
a veteran, he took a great interest in the affairs of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and was one of the most active members of the organ- 
ization. In politics he was a Republican. His death occurred Jan- 
uary 9, 1905. In this he left as his widow Sarah J., a daughter of a 
prominent citzen, Samuel M. Woodside, M. D. Their wedded life had 
extended from March 8, 1866. 

This Dr. Woodside came to Pinckneyville from Princeton, Ken- 
tucky, in 1832. He served as major in the State Militia, practiced 
medicine for many years, and was a pioneer in fruit culture and one 
of the founders of the old Perry County Agricultural Society, whose 
first county fair was held in the Court House in 1857. He died in 
1885, aged seventy-one years. Mrs. Woodside was formerly Miss 
Eliza Pyle, and Mrs. Wilson was one of a family of seven children, 
of whose ancestry some were patriots of the American Revolution. 
Mrs. Wilson survived her husband half a dozen years, dying June 17, 
1911. Three children survive. Of these Gilbert A. is a mechanic, 
following in the path of his father, and lives in Pinckneyville ; Belle 
R., who is the wife of James F. Richmond, of Cutler, Illinois, and the 
subject of this sketch. 

A desire to know it did not matter upon what subject, filled the 
mind of this youngest of the Wilson children from his earliest days, 
and when he was graduated from the high school in his home town 
in 1896 he was bent on pursuing his studies still further. He there- 
fore went to the Southern Illinois Normal University at Carbondalc, 
where he remained for two years. On his return home he began at 
once to teach in the grades of the school in which his boyhood lessons 
had been learned. He continued in this work two years and then re- 
turned to Carbondale, where he graduated in 1902. During 1902 and 
1903 he was principal of the schools of Tamaroa, and the next year 
he returned to Pinckneyville and served as principal of the High 
School three years. He was not an applicant for another term, and 
through the fickleness of politics was compelled to teach away from 
home one year. He was elected principal of the Safford School of 
Cairo, Illinois, and taught there during the school year 1906-1907, 
when he again came back to his present positon as Superintendent 
of his home school. The course of study here is graded, covering a 
period of four years, a year of advanced work having been added by 
Mr. Wilson. The school has grown in numbers since Mr. Wilson 
took charge, the enrollment in 1912 being six hundred and fifty-three. 
To take care of these pupils a corps of fourteen teachers is required. 

As an educator, Mr. Wilson is greatly interested in the work of 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 821 

the various professional associations of which he is a member, believ- 
ing in the advantages of organization. He is a member of the State 
Teachers' Association, and also of the Southern Illinois Teachers' 
Association. He is also very active in religious matters, a member 
and a deacon of the First Baptist church of Pinckneyville, also the 
treasurer of the church and a teacher in the Sunday-school. 

On the 28th of March, 1907, he was married in Pinckneyville to 
Elsie Smith, a daughter of Rev. W. S. D. Smith, a prominent citizen, 
whose family is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. One daughter, 
Lorraine, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson on the 14th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1909. 

EDGAR B. DICK, M. D. Starting out in life with his sole capital the 
heritage of a good name, supplemented with courage to endure, 
strength to labor and patience to wait, Dr. Edgar B. Dick, of Christo- 
pher, Illinois, has fought his way to a place among the eminent med- 
ical men of his part of the state, and as a representative of the self- 
made man presents in his career an example to the younger genera- 
tion which it would do well to emulate. Dr. Dick, who was born 
September 12, 1874, had the good fortune to be born of worthy parents, 
his father, James F. Dick, being an early physician of Union county, 
Illinois, and a native of Galloway county, Kentucky, and his mother 
a member of an honorable Southern family. James Dick, his pater- 
nal grandfather, was a son of Irish parents, and was born in Penn- 
sylvania, from whence he removed to Ohio and later to Kentucky, en- 
gaging there in agricultural pursuits until his death, at the age of 
eighty-five years. On the maternal side, Dr. Dick's grandfather was 
David Furchase, also of Irish parentage, who was born in Kentucky 
and spent his life in that state, dying at the age of ninety years. Dr. 
James F. Dick was born in 1837, in Galloway county, Kentucky, and 
there early took up the practice of medicine, which he followed from 
the time he came to Union county, Illinois, in 1875, until his death, 
December 5, 1910. A well-known physician, he became influential in 
the ranks of the Democratic party, and at one time was a candidate 
for the office of coroner of Franklin county. His religious belief was 
that of the Episcopal church, while his wife, a native of Graves county, 
Kentucky, died in the faith of the Presbyterian church in 1881. 

Edgar B. Dick secured his early educational training in the com- 
mon schools of Union county, which he left at the age of seventeen 
years to work as a telegrapher. After spending seven years in the 
employ of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, in the meantime 
saving his wages carefully, he started studying medicine, and when 
he had been under his father's preceptorship for one year, entered 
Marion Sims Medical College, St. Louis, and was graduated therefrom 
in 1896. lie began the practice of his profession in the northeastern 
part of Union county, where he continued for seven years, and then 
came to Christopher, which has since been his field. He has been 
remarkably successful in his practice, which is now conceded to be 
the largest in Christopher, is ranked among the most skillful and 
efficient surgeons of his county, and has earned the respect and grati- 
tude of his patients. A thoughtful, studious man, whose absorption 
in his profession is remarkable, he is also a man of broad outlook on 
life, and is thoroughly versed not only in his profession, but also 
upon all matters of general interest to his community. He is a val- 
ued member of the Franklin County and Illinois State Medical Socie- 
ties and of Goode Lodge, No. 704, A. F. & A. M. Dr. Dick has mani- 



822 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

fested his belief in the future prosperity of Christopher by investing 
in valuable real estate here, and is the owner of a fine home. 

In 1892 he was married to Blanche Maude Rowan, daughter of 
Samuel and Catherine Rowan, early settlers of Jackson county. Mr. 
Rowan, who was an agriculturist and a veteran of the Civil war, was 
for some years prominent in Republican politics, and died in 1891. 
Five children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Dick, namely : Han- 
nau, Ohmann and Gaston, all of whom are attending school ; and 
Aired and Neoma Marcella, at home. The family is conected with the 
Christian church. 

WILLIAM H. GRANT. Southern Illinois boasts a goodly number of 
charming and wide-awake cities, but of the many which he "tried out" 
Sparta offered more attractions to William H. Grant in the way of a 
suitable location for a home and profitable business than any of the 
others. For more than a quarter of a century he has carried on a 
constantly growing business in that thriving city, and there he has 
builded a home and there reared to years of young womanhood a family 
of seven girls who are now variously occupying the positions in life 
for which they are best fitted. 

William H. Grant was born at Richview, Illinois, April 8, 1854, and 
his childhood was passed at numerous points in the state, frequent 
change of residence being necessitated by the occupation of the father, 
Robert H. Grant, widely known throughout Southern Illinois as one of 
the most capable millwrights in the state. He was born in Scotland 
in 1822, where he grew up and learned his trade. When a young man 
he came to America, finding in the rapidly developing country an 
abundance of work in his particular line. Southern Illinois offered a 
splendid field for his labors and his life for the major part was spent in 
that state, although his early residence in America was spent in the 
East, and he erected mills in Buffalo, New York city and other large 
cities in the east, while he operated in Chicago, St. Louis and other 
western cities after locating in Illinois. The career of Robert Grant 
was a particularly active one, but the constant changing about pre- 
vented him from forming any but home ties. He married in early 
life, his bride being Sarah J. Allen, a native of Vermont. They were 
the parents of a son and two daughters, viz: William H., of Sparta; 
Ada, now of Ava, Illinois; and Fannie, who married W. G. Wagner, 
and is now deceased. In 1870 Mr. Grant died while operating a mill 
at Ava, Illinois. His wife had died ten years before, and both are now 
resting in a Sparta cemetery. 

William H. Grant's schooling was confined to the public schools of 
the various towns in which his family resided and a course of study at 
the Indiana Normal University at Valparaiso. His first position was in 
the store of George W. Walters, a well known merchant of Rockwood, 
Illinois, where he served in the capacity of a clerk ; later he engaged 
with P. N. Holm at Evansville in a similar position. He lived quietly 
and frugally, ambitious to become sufficiently endowed with this world's 
goods that he might venture into the business world on his own respon- 
sibility, and it was but a few years until he was able to invest in a 
small stock of drugs in Evansville as a result of his savings. That vil- 
lage first saw him as a business man of Randolph county, and from 
then to the present day he has forged steadily ahead, enlarging, reach- 
ing out, upbuilding and generally carrying out the policies of a pro- 
gressive, ambitious and capable man of business. In the spring of 1884 
Mr. Grant moved to Sparta, where he was known well and favorably 
from his early youth, and entered into business there, for a time rent- 



HISTORY OP SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 823 

ing a store building. The demands of the business soon made it the 
part of wisdom to build for himself, and he erected a store near the 
Broadway Hotel, in which place he carried on the business for a num- 
ber of years. Then, following the trend of the business activities of 
Sparta, he purchased what is known as the old Stamm property and 
moved into it, improving and enlarging to meet his requirements. It 
was then that he decided on a building site for his home, and he pur- 
chased twenty acres adjacent to the city limits and there he erected a 
comfortable, commodious and modern residence. In addition to the 
two properties above mentioned, Mr. Grant is a holder of many fine 
and valuable titles in real estate. His business profits and revenues 
from other sources have been for the most part invested in and about 
Sparta, where he has an enviable standing as a property owner and 
successful business man. Mr. Grant is a Republican, and while he 
maintained a city residence he acted as a member of the council, 
where he gave praiseworthy service in assisting to regulate the affairs 
of the city. 

While Mr. Grant was yet a resident of Evansville, Illinois, in 
November, 1882, he married Miss Elizabeth Wehrheim, a daughter of 
John Wehrheim, prominent in Evansville as a merchant, miller and 
farmer, and a man of German birth. Mr. and Mrs. Grant became the 
parents of a beautiful family of seven daughters, named below in the 
respective order of their birth : Mary A. finished the Sparta schools, 
graduated from Knox College, Illinois, with the degree of B. S., was 
a student in the University of Chicago for a time, and is now a mem- 
ber of the teaching staff of the St. Louis public schools. Fannie E., also 
a graduate of the Sparta high school, was later graduated from the 
Syracuse (N. Y.) University with the degree of A. B. She is now the 
wife of Henry Russell, of New York city. Nellie A. is a graduate of 
the Northwestern University School of Oratory ; she spent one year as 
teacher of elocution and expression in the University of Alabama and 
another year in the Wausau, Wisconsin, high school in a like capacity. 
On March 9, 1912, she became the wife of Louis Withers Evans of Potts- 
town, Pennsylvania. Florence, after completing a full course in the 
Sparta schools, was duly graduated from the Washington University, 
St. Louis, taking the A. B. degree, and is now engaged in newspaper 
work as a special contributor to the society columns of a St. Louis 
paper. In December, 1911, she was elected head of the department of 
physical culture and hygiene for women at Washington University, hav- 
ing taken her degree at the latter institution in June previously. Dur- 
ing her four years at Washington University Miss Grant specialized in 
gymnasium work and hygiene, and took the highest honors in those 
branches ever granted to any student. She is the first student of the 
institution who ever received an appointment as head of a department, 
and the only instructor who had not taught elsewhere before coming 
to Washington University. The members of the faculty consider her 
appointment an especially high honor to her, as well as to her alma 
mater. Ethel is now a student at the University of Schwedt-on-the- 
Oder in Germany, pursuing the study of music and the languages. 
Wilma is at present a student in the Sparta high school and Louise is 
yet an attendant at the grade schools of that city. 

JUDGE BENJAMIN WINFIELD POPE is a representative of that numer- 
ous and brilliant family who have been identified with Franklin county 
since their ancestors established themselves there during the early part 
of the nineteenth century. Pope's Prairie, named in honor of them, 
marks the locality where they first settled. From this first family has 



824 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

sprung a long line of men who have made a place for themselves in 
the legal and medical professions, as well as in the business world. Of 
this number Judge Pope holds a prominent place. Judge Pope has 
been called upon to serve in many offices, both politically and in a 
judicial capacity. His contact with many men has thus given him a 
broad insight into the conditions and motives that influence the deeds 
of his fellow men, consequently with his broad knowledge of the law 
he is able to act with so true an understanding and with so clear a mind 
that justice is synonymous with his court, a rather unusual thing in 
these days of corrupt judges and packed juries. 

Benjamin Winfield Pope was born in Franklin county, on the 20th 
of October, 1853, his father being Dr. Benjamin F. Pope, Sr. His 
grandfather was Benjamin Pope, a distiller, who spent all of his days 
near Dresden, Tennessee, where Dr. Pope was born on the 24th of May, 
1825. The latter lived in Tennessee until 1849, when he migrated to 
Illinois and started on the medical career for which he had been pre- 
pared in his native state. The only other member of the family to 
come hither was a brother, Dr. H. B. Pope, who spent his life in Frank- 
lin county, and left on his death a large family who have become 
prominent in the life of the county. 

Dr. Benjamin F. Pope gave the vigorous strength of his early years 
to his medical work, and built up a large and flourishing practice He 
won a broader reputation, however, as a citizen filled with the "milk 
of human kindness," and when his practice came to be too large and 
heavy a burden he abandoned it and came to DuQuoin to engage in 
commercial pursuits. He came to DuQuoin on the 2nd of January, 
1865, and became a member of the firm of Pope and Company, dealing 
in General Merchandise. After a few years devoted to this business 
he went into the retail lumber business, which formed his occupation 
during the remainder of his life. He bought the beautiful property 
at the corner of Mulberry and Franklin streets in DuQuoin, and here 
he died on the 23rd of January, 1902. His most striking characteristic 
was his genuine sympathy and interest in the poor, afflicted and un- 
fortunate, and he never refused to help those who were suffering. He 
was especially kind to the negroes who came his way, feeling a great 
sympathy for his weaker brethren, who were unable to cope with the 
intellect and experience of the white race. 

On the 4th of February, 1849, Dr. Pope married Emeline Harrison, 
a daughter of Benjamin W. Pope. She was his second cousin, and was 
born in Bedford county, Middle Tennessee, on the 8th of June, 1828. 
She is now spending her declining years in the happy companionship 
of her son, the Judge. She and Dr. Pope became the parents of five 
children, three of whom are living : Byron J. died when a young man ; 
Pleasant V. is a merchant of DuQuoin ; Ida I. also died in youth ; Ben- 
jamin W. ; and Sarah E., who is the wife of G. F. M. Ward, of Mt. 
Vernon, Illinois. From the nature of his calling Dr. Pope was a man 
of wide acquaintance, and to know him was to be numbered among the 
ranks of his friends. He made no pretense to religion, but probably 
followed the Golden Rule much closer than some who attend services 
every Sunday. He was moderately interested in fraternal organiza- 
tions, being a Master Mason. 

Judge Pope was educated for a professional career, what shape this 
should take being left for him to decide. He was a student in the 
University of Illinois, in Washington University at St. Louis, and finally 
graduated from the law department of the Union College of Law in 
Chicago, in 1878. On his return home he expected to immediately begin 
to practice, but the spirit of altruism, which was so strong in his father, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 825 

cropped out in the son. The public schools had fallen into a bad con- 
dition and since no one seemed very anxious to straighten out affairs 
Judge Pope took the task upon himself. For two years he acted as 
superintendent and at the end of the time was thankful to doff the garb 
of a school master and don the cap and gown of the lawyer. 

He opened a law office in 1880 and went industriously to work to 
make up for lost time. His success attracted the attention of his party 
to him, and he was appointed to fill out an unexpired term as state's 
attorney. Following this he was elected county judge and served one 
term. When President Cleveland went into office he appointed Judge 
Pope postmaster, and he served as such for fifty-one months, taking 
office during the second term of President Cleveland's administration. 
He succeeded E. M. Harris and was succeeded by Harry B. Ward. In 
1899 the people showed their appreciation of the faithful services that 
he had rendered by electing him mayor, and it was while he was the 
incumbent of this office that the sewerage, water-works and electric light 
systems were installed. He served as mayor eight years at DuQuoin 
In 1909 he was elected city judge, a position with unlimited jurisdiction, 
and he is well known and popular in the circuit court districts of Chi- 
cago, East St. Louis and Southern Illinois as a trial judge. 

He is a Democrat without intense partizenship, and fraternally is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Eagles. He is unmarried, 
devoting his life to the comfort and well being of his mother. The long 
line of offices which he has held speak for themselves and show how high 
he stands in the regard of his fellow citizens. His highest ambition is to 
uphold the law and see that justice is done to rich and poor alike. 

WILSON GASKINS, a retired citizen of Harrisburg, Illinois, was born 
February 23, 1835, one mile and a half southwest of the present Harris- 
burg court house, a son of Southern Illinois pioneers. 

William Howard Gaskins, his father, was a native of Kentucky, 
born in 1808. His father, a native of North Carolina, had moved to 
Kentucky and subsequently to Illinois, he accompanying them. In 
frontier style they established their home in Saline county. Among 
the other early pioneers of this locality was Harry Pearson, whose farm 
was two miles south of the Gaskins home, Mr. Pearson having come 
here from Sumner county, Tennessee, where on March 18, 1815, his 
daughter, Juliet Jane, was born. On February 19, 1833, William 
Howard Gaskins and Juliet Jane Pearson were united in marriage, and 
as the years passed by their home was blessed in the birth of sons and 
daughters to the number of ten, of whom Wilson, whose name introduces 
this sketch, was the oldest. The others in order of birth are as follows : 
Louisa, deceased wife of William H. Dove ; Susan, deceased wife of 
Robert H. Davis ; Melvin, who married a Miss Vincent, is deceased ; Har- 
riet, widow of William Huddleston, of Harrisburg; Malbury, a veteran 
of the Civil war, is a retired resident of Harrisburg ; Bettie, wife of James 
Kane, died in early womanhood ; Jonathan, who had served as deputy 
sheriff of Saline county, died in young manhood; Amerine, wife of J. 
C. Connell, died in middle life ; and Elijah, a retired farmer, is now at 
the head of a meat market at Harrisburg. The father of this family 
had served in the Black Hawk war. While he was a farmer all his 
life, he was handy with tools and was recognized as the mechanic of the 
neighborhood. He was a fine base singer and a worker in the Baptist 
church, of which he was a consistent member for many years. His 
home was headquarters for the ministers who visited this locality, and 
not only the ministers but also many persons in other walks of life 
enjoyed his genial whole-heai-ted hospitality. While he had a strong 



826 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

constitution, he was a victim of pneumonia, and died May 26, 1869. His 
widow survived him eight years, and died October 20, 1877. 

Wilson Gaskins remained on the farm with his father until he was 
twenty-three years of age, when he began farming operations on his 
own account. As a boy he helped thrash the wheat by the old time 
method of having the horses tread it out, after which it was passed 
through a sieve. And he assisted, too, in the grinding of the grain. 
This in a horse power mill made by the father. Harrisburg, or rather 
where Harrisburg now stands, was then called Crusoe's Island, as the 
low land surrounding this site was not infrequently under water. Here 
young Gaskins spent many a day binding oats. He farmed and dealt 
in live stock for a number of years. Afterward he owned and operated 
a sawmill, and still later was engaged in the grocery business. His 
milling interests took him to various points along the Mississippi river, 
but for the most part his various operations have been conducted at 
Harrisburg, where he has from time to time made investments and 
erected buildings, including both business blocks and residences. 

Mr. Gaskins has always been more or less interested in politics, al- 
ways posted and always ready with a good argument. He has even 
been a staunch Republican and has often attended both the county and 
district conventions of his party, but he has never been an office seeker. 
For more than twenty-five years he has been a Mason in good standing, 
his identity with that order including the Royal Arch degrees. 

Mr. Gaskins has been twice married. On January 27, 1860, he wed- 
ded Elizabeth E. Largent, a native of Scioto county, Ohio, and a daugh- 
ter of John and Jane Largent. She died in March, 1882. The fruits 
of this union were three children: John Henry, who died in 1881, at 
the age of nineteen years; Mary Alice, wife of J. S. Ferguson, died 
October 26, 1908, and Moses B., of Harrisburg. The last named was 
born in 1865, and for some years has been interested in real estate and 
in the Harrisburg Fair Ground, also in a bakery in this city. Mr. 
Gaskins' second wife was Miss Jennie Johnson, of Tuscola, Illinois. 
They were married May 17, 1893, and her death occurred October 26, 
1901. 

All his life Mr. Gaskins has been an expert with the gun, and now, 
although past his seventy-fifth milestone, his aim is true and his love 
of the sport is as keen as ever. For some years he has been a member 
of the Hayti Hunting Club, of Hayti, Missouri, which place he visits 
annually in the hunting season. He has some fine trophies in the way 
of deer skins, one from a deer he shot after he was seventy-four and 
another after he was seventy-five. 

WILLIAM P. GEEANEY. The life story of William P. Greaney, of 
Cairo, Illinois, at the present time chief deputy sheriff of Alexander 
county and also actively identified with the fire insurance business of 
that city, furnishes another instance ,of the possibilities in store for any 
American youth who, with a stock of energy, push and ability, may 
raise himself from a humble position and become a factor in the business 
and public life of his community. 

Mr. Greaney is a native son of Illinois, but is a direct descendant 
on both the paternal and maternal sides of sturdy Irish stock. He was 
born at Cairo, on February 19, 1870, to James Greaney and his wife, 
who was Miss Hannah Queeney prior to her marriage. Both parents 
were born -in Ireland, the father in Ballaghar, county Galway, in 1845. 
He was married to Hannah Queeney at Queenstown, county Cork, of 
their native land, and brought his bride to the United States directly 
upon the close of the Civil war. He, however, had immigrated to this 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 827 

country prior to his marriage and had become a resident of Cairo as 
early as 1861, remaining a resident of that city for nearly thirty years, 
or until his death in 1890. He was a Democrat in politics and was 
well known as a staunch supporter of his party. His public service 
comprised work in the city council as a representative of the old Fifth 
ward. To James and Hannah (Queeney) Greaney, the latter of whom 
still survives, were born the following children: Celia, widow of 
Charles Hessian, of Cairo ; William P., the subject of this sketch ; Annie, 
now the wife of George Shaw, of Cairo ; John B., who is secretary and 
treasurer of the New York Store Mercantile Company, of Cairo ; Robert 
J., a traveling salesman for the same firm; Joseph E., of the mercantile 
firm of Ehs & Greaney, of Cairo ; and Miss Rose Greaney, who is the 
companion of her mother and resides with her in Cairo. 

William P. Greaney acquired his education in the parochial schools 
of Cairo, and took up the responsibilities of life at the early age of 
twelve, when he became a cashboy for the New York Store Mercantile 
Company. His ability and steadfastness soon won the attention and the 
confidence of the firm, and at different times he was advanced until he be- 
came a bookkeeper. He had been with this firm about fifteen years 
when he resigned to take up the duties of bookkeeper and teller for the 
Alexander County National Bank, a position he retained for a number 
of years, or until December, 1910, when Sheriff Frasier appointed him 
his chief deputy in his office. 

Meanwhile, in 1899, Mr. Greaney established a fire insurance agency 
in Cairo, which he conducted along with his other work in the bank, and 
has seen the business grow from its incipiency to the second agency in 
size in the city. Thus, from a modest beginning, Mr. Greaney has made 
his way to the front in the business life of Cairo by ability, honorable 
business methods and an unconquerable desire to succeed, and his suc- 
cess commands the more admiration because it is wholly the result of 
his own well-directed efforts. 

In his political affiliations he is a Republican. He was elected city 
treasurer in 1894, serving two years. He also served as deputy city 
treasurer under Treasurers John W. Gholson, Thomas Mehoney and 
August Schneider, and is now an alderman from the Seventh ward of 
the city. He is a progressive and public-spirited citizen, and all move- 
ments that tend toward the prosperity and advancement of Cairo and 
of his state receive his warm support. In this direction he served at 
different times as a delegate to the Illinois waterways meetings and was 
also commissioned to take part in the rivers and harbors convention at 
Chicago in 1911. He is a member of the Cairo Board of Trade, the 
Commercial Club and the Alexander Club. 

In Cairo, on November 14, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Greaney and Miss Loretta Carroll, a daughter of James Carroll. Mr. 
Carroll, who is a native of the Emerald Isle, has also served Cairo as an 
alderman and is now a dealer in real estate. Mr. and Mrs. Greaney 
have three children: Lynette, Marion and Carroll. 

Mr. Greaney inherits the sunny temperament and happy social qual- 
ities of the sons of Erin's Isle, is a devoted churchman and a man of the 
highest integrity. Fraternally he affiliates with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
which order he represented as a delegate in their annual national con- 
vention at Chicago in 1911. 

The soldier instincts of Mr. Greaney find expression as a member 
of the Fourth Infantry of the Illinois National Guards. Upon the or- 
ganization of Company K, at Cairo in 1904, he was commissioned 
captain and has served so since. Though the company has seen no 



828 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

further service beyond having been called out twice to protect a prisoner 
about to be lynched, the Captain and his command evinced that coolness 
and promptness upon those occasions that left no doubt in the minds of 
any one as to what their conduct would be if called to the field of battle. 

JUDSON EUGENE STRONG, M. D. One of the leading members of 
the medical profession in Southern Illinois is Judson Eugene Strong, 
of Cairo, who for nearly thirty years has been engaged in practice in 
this city, and who is widely known among medical men of this section. 
He was born at Cleveland, Ohio, November 27, 1854, and is a son of 
Asaph C. and Harriet M. (Pelton) Strong. The great-grandfather of 
Dr. Strong, one Judge Strong, moved from Connecticut to Ohio in 
1812, acquired a large body of land about the city of Willoughby, and 
became a prominent character of this locality. His son, Thomas J., 
was born in 1803, passed his life on the Strong estate as a farmer and 
died in 1876, at Wycliffe, Ohio. Asaph C. Strong was born at Wil- 
loughby, Ohio, in 1826, and was reared on the old homestead place. As 
a young man he moved to Cleveland, where for a number of years he 
was employed as a postal clerk on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railway, his service ending at the time of the Ashtabula disaster of 
1876. He then engaged in other pursuits, farming occupying much of 
his time until his death in 1884. Mr. Strong married (first) Harriet 
M. Pelton, who was born February 11, 1828, and died July 18, 1861, 
and they had two sons: Edgar C. and Judson Eugene. For his second 
wife Asaph C. Strong married Lucy B. House, and a daughter, Harriet 
L., was the only child of their union. 

Judson Eugene Strong graduated from the high school in Cleve- 
land in 1873, attended Western Reserve College, at Hudson, Ohio, for 
a time, and then took up the study of medicine, graduating from the 
Homeopathic Hospital College in 1880. He began his professional 
career in Clinton, Michigan, subsequently located in Hillsdale, that 
state, and from there came to Cairo within a few months, where he has 
continued in practice with steadily increasing success. Dr. Strong was 
married (first) at Hudson, Michigan, June 17, 1879, to Miss Emma 
Elnora Fauver, who died March 13, 1882, and left two daughters : May- 
bell, of Chicago; and Mrs. Florence Bayley, also of that city. Mrs. 
Bayley has twin sons: Stanley and Safford. On March 9, 1887, Dr. 
Strong was married at Olney, Illinois, to Miss Julia Ellen Nail, 
daughter of the Rev. Richard John and Harriet (Logan) Nail, and 
four children have been born to this union, namely: Judson Eugene, 
Jr., an electrical engineer in the employ of the Chicago Edison Com- 
pany, born April 6, 1888 ; Harriet Alice, born November 26, 1889 ; Mar- 
garet Logan, born November 28, 1892 ; and Julia Allen, born June 14, 
1898. 

Rev. Richard John Nail was a Methodist minister, and was born in 
Chatham county, North Carolina, in 1816, received a collegiate educa- 
tion, and after spending many years in the ministry of his church died 
at Lawrenceville, Illinois, in 1863. His grandfather was an English- 
man who established his first American home in Virginia, and later re- 
moved to Chatham county, North Carolina, where Rev. Nail's father 
was born in 1780. The old English founder of the family identified 
himself with the cause of American independence, and was commis- 
sioned a major in the Colonial army during the Revolutionary war, 
meeting his death in the battle of Guilford Court House. His wife 
was a Miss Glass, and seven sons and two daughters were born to them. 
The father of Rev. Richard J. Nail was the youngest child, and was 
first married to Mary Thompson, a lady of English descent. After 



OMht 
BBYERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 829 

his marriage he moved out to White county, Illinois, and there Richard 
J. and the three other children grew up. Rev. Richard Nail was mar- 
ried (third) to Mrs. Harriet (Logan) Hill. By her marriage to 
Thomas B. Hill Mrs. Nail had four children: J. Edgar, who resides 
in Wisconsin ; Randall, who was among the slain in the battle of Chick- 
amauga; Mary, who died at Olney, Illinois; and Thomas who died in 
infancy. Rev. Nail by his third marriage had two children: Harriet 
Alice and Julia Ellen, the latter of whom married Dr. Strong. The 
Logan family were from Dublin, Ireland. James Logan was a brother 
of Dr. John Logan, the father of General John A. Logan, a famous 
figure in the Civil war. James Logan was the father of four children: 
John and James, both physicians, the former of whom spent his life 
in Carlinville, Illinois, and the latter in Missouri ; and Elizabeth and 
Harriet, who both became wives of Rev. Richard J. Nail. 

WILLIAM 0. EDWARDS is an attorney of Pinckneyville who has been 
identified with the public life of that city for a number of years, and 
who has done his full share towards the advancement and upbuilding 
of that city in the years of his residence there. He was born in Perry 
county, Illinois, on February 28, 1869, and is a son of a pioneer family 
of that county. His father was Captain Mortimer C. Edwards, born 
in that county on March 14, 1838, and a son of William Edwards, who 
came to Illinois from Ohio and whose birthplace was in the state of 
Vermont. He died in Pinckneyville about 1850. He was a lawyer, 
and passed his life in the profession, being popular and prominent in 
the community in which he was located. He married Jeanette Brown 
on May 29, 1832, and she lived to reach the age of seventy-one years. 
The issue of their union were : Cordelia, who married Lewis Hammack 
and later died in Perry county ; Mortimer C., who became the father 
of William 0., of this sketch ; Gilbert, who passed away at an early 
age; and Reverend William W., who spent many useful years in the 
ministry of the Methodist church and is now dean of the Lincoln Law 
College in Springfield, Illinois. 

Mortimer C. Edwards attended a Masonic school in Lexington, Mis- 
souri, and was liberally equipped for a literary career. He studied 
law in the office of Lewis Hammack and was admitted to the bar in 
Pinckneyville. On August 26, 1862, Mr. Edwards enlisted in Company 
C, Eighty-first Illinois Infantry, as first lieutenant in Captain Arm- 
strong's company, Colonel James Dollins in command of the regiment. 
During Mr. Edwards' service he participated in sixteen engagements, 
among them being Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill and 
Vicksburg. He was in the thick of the fight at Guntown, Mississippi, 
and in the Red River expedition, and was promoted to the command 
of his company on June 30, 1864. He was in General Logan's Division 
of the Seventeenth Army Corps, commanded by General McPherson, 
and was mustered out August 5, 1865, lacking but a few days of having 
completed his term of enlistment. Once more taking up the life of the 
civilian, Captain Edwards entered upon the practice of law in Pickney- 
ville, continuing there throughout his life, save for three years when 
he was a resident of Haskell county, Kansas. While in the west he 
was active in his profession and was elected county attorney of his 
county. He returned to Illinois, owing to his dislike for the Kansas 
climate, and once more resumed his citizenship at his birthplace. He 
was states attorney of Perry county one term, and as a Republican and 
a worker for the cause of the party he had a wide acquaintance with 
leaders in Illinois Republican politics and with prominent men of the 
Civil war period, such as Grant, Logan and Palmer, and with a host 



830 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

of other men who did valiant service in putting down the rebellion. 
Captain Edwards was a man of worthy Christian character and prac- 
tices and at various times served the Methodist church as a steward and 
trustee. He married Miss Harriet M. Edwards, a daughter of Alonson 
Edwards, whose people were likewise natives of Vermont. She was 
born September 7, 1839, and is still living, although Captain Edwards 
passed away on January 21, 1905. Those of their children who reached 
years of maturity are Emma, the wife of Julius A. Biby, of Pinckney- 
ville, and William 0., of this brief review. 

William 0. Edwards, after completing his high school training, en- 
tered McKendree College, from which institution he was graduated in 
1893, with the degrees of A. B. and of LL. B. In 1893 the master's 
degree was conferred upon him. After finishing his studies there he 
engaged in school work for two years or more, following which he 
opened a law office in Pinckneyville, as his father, Captain Edwards, 
had done before him. He has since then been active in the practice of 
his profession there, being admitted to the bar upon his diploma be- 
fore Judge Burrough's court. In his political affiliation he has been a 
Republican always, and has been reasonably zealous in the furtherance 
of the interests of the party. 

On June 8, 1899, Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Etta L. Root, 
a daughter of Reverend Edmund and Mary A. Schamalia (Rhodes) 
Root, of Lebanon, St. Clair county, who came to Illinois from New 
York state in earlier years. Reverend Root was a Methodist minister 
in Illinois for many years, his connection being with the Southern Illi- 
nois Conference. He died in 1894. Mrs. Edwards is one of the fol- 
lowing children, namely: Lou, the wife of Scott French; Anna, who 
married Reverend M. Minor ; Littie, who became the wife of M. J. 
Goings; Etta, the wife of Mr. Edwards; and Mary, who became the 
wife of Reverend P. F. Blake, living in Montana. Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
wards have two children: Margaret Corinne and Gilbert Harold. The 
family are members of the Methodist church, and Mr. Edwards has 
represented his congregation in the lay electoral conference and is a 
trustee of the local church. 

WILLIAM SCOTT CANTRELL. It is one of the most encouraging facts 
which can anywhere exist that in this country a large proportion of 
those individuals who, by their public service, have attained a greater 
or less degree of eminence, or mayhap, by their professional or busi- 
ness acquirements and talents, have risen by their own exertions. In 
this sketch there will be found something to encourage the exertions 
of those youths who, without fortune or influential friends, are strug- 
gling to overcome obstacles in the acquirement of wealth and position. 
They will see in the example before them how difficulties were sur- 
mounted and what was achieved by close application and perseverance. 
William Scott Cantrell was born in Benton, Franklin county, Illinois, 
February 6, 1851, and is a son of Tilman B. and Euphemia D. (New- 
man) Cantrell and a grandson of Richard Cantrell, a native of Tennes- 
see, who brought his family to Illinois at an early day and spent the re- 
mainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. 

Tilman B. Cantrell was born in Tennessee and accompanied his par- 
ents to Franklin county, Illinois, becoming the first merchant in the 
dry goods business in the village (now city) of Benton, in which he 
continued until his death, on the 14th day of May, 1873. He was a 
Democrat in politics, but never cared for public office. His wife, who 
was a native of Franklin county, Illinois, died in 1901, in the faith of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which her husband was also a con- 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 831 

sistent member. They were the parents of eight children, three of 
whom died in their infancy and one after having reached his manhood, 
and four still survive, as follows : George C., who is cashier of the First 
National Bank of Benton ; Mrs. Mary A. Brownlee and Mrs. Kate C. 
St. Clair, who reside in St. Louis, Missouri; and William Scott, who 
still resides in the City of Benton, the place of his birth, and who has 
the distinction of being the second oldest inhabitant of Benton that 
was born in the town now living there. He received a common school 
education and attended the Indiana State University for two terms. 
Deciding upon the law as a profession, he began its study in the office 
of Youngblood and Barr at Benton, Illinois, in 1870, and during the 
winter of 1871 attended Judge Andrew D. Duff's Law School at Shaw- 
neetown, Illinois. He was admitted to the bar in June, 1873, and en- 
tered at once upon the practice at Benton, Illinois. His first law 
partner was the Hon. Francis M. Youngblood (now deceased), a very 
prominent lawyer in Southern Illinois. This partnership continued 
for several years, and until Mr. Youngblood moved to Carbondale, Illi- 
nois. His next partnership was with Judge R. H. Flannigan, which 
continued until 1892, when it was dissolved on account of Judge Flan- 
nigan 's election as state's attorney. He then formed a partnership 
with the Hon. .Daniel M. Browning (now deceased), with whom he was 
associated until 1893, when Judge Browning having been appointed 
by President Cleveland as commissioner of Indian affairs, moved to 
Washington, D. C. In January, 1893, Mr. Cantrell was appointed as 
chairman of the railroad and warehouse commission of the state of 
Illinois, by Governor Altgeld, in which position he served until the 
election of Governor John R. Tanner in 1896. In 1884 Mr. Cantrell 
was elected state's attorney of Franklin county as a Democrat, and 
served four years. He has always been a staunch Democrat and has 
been quite active in state and national politics. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Democratic State Committee from the twenty-fifth Con- 
gressional district since 1908. He has a large personal acquaintance 
with public men of both parties not only in Illinois but in many other 
states. For twenty-three consecutive years he was a member of the 
committee of appeals and grievances of the Grand Lodge of the An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons of Illinois, and never failed to be 
present at every meeting during the entire period. 

On March 2, 1882, Mr. Cantrell was married to Miss Mary Jane 
Burnett, daughter of Charles Burnett, a prominent citizen and lead- 
ing attorney of Shawneetown. Four children have been born to this 
union : Charles A., who is engaged in the mercantile business ; Mary A., 
who is a graduate of the high school and the Perry School of Oratory 
at St. Louis; Ruth L., who will graduate from high school in 1912; 
and Tilman B., who is attending the public schools. Mr. Cantrell and 
his family are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is a past master of the local Blue Lodge of the Masonic order and 
belongs also to the Elks, Knights of Honor and the Knights of Pythias. 
He is pleasing in his manner, genial, generous and charitable, and very 
popular among his friends. He enjoys a lucrative law practice, and 'is 
the attorney for all the railroads in Franklin county, as well as other 
large financial institutions. He is always in the forefront for public 
improvements in his city and is a highly respected citizen. 

NORMAN W. CONNAWAY, M. D. Although practically a newcomer to 
the city of Christopher, Illinois. Dr. Norman W. Connaway has 
already established himself in the confidence and esteem of the 
people here, and has taken his rightful place among the leading med- 



832 HISTOEY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

ical men of Southern Illinois. Like many other of our prominent phy- 
sicians, at the start of his career he decided that the human body was 
too great and too intricate a work, its possibilities for disease and im- 
perfection too vast, to make it possible for any one man to completely 
master the causes, symptoms and cures for weaknesses affecting every 
part of it, and early concluded that if he devoted his time to specializ- 
ing, and giving his time and talents to investigations having direct 
relation to certain diseases and their cures, he would accomplish a 
great life work, providing these investigations were successful and 
their results properly applied. His accomplishments in the years fol- 
lowing the completion of his education are the best proof of his entire 
success. Dr. Connaway was born in Jefferson county, Illinois, August 
21, 1870, and is a son of Oliver A. and Lavina (Mount) Connaway. 

The Connaway family is of Scotch-Irish descent, and William Con- 
naway, the grandfather of Dr. Norman W., was born in the state of 
Indiana and came to Illinois in 1854. He settled on a tract of land in 
Jefferson county, improved and cultivated it, and became one of the 
leading farmers of his district, dying about 1893, with a satisfactory 
competency. His son, Oliver A. Coimaway, was born at Montezuma, 
Parke county, Indiana, and was a lad of ten years when he accompa- 
nied the family to Illinois. Like other farmers' sons of his day, he 
obtained his education in the public schools when he could be spared 
from the duties of the home place, and for some time he attended the 
schools at Dix. Reared to agricultural pursuits, he has been engaged 
therein all of his life, and still makes his residence on the old home- 
stead in Jefferson county, where he is known as a competent farmer 
and sterling citizen. He is a stanch Democrat in his political views, 
and with his wife and children attends the Missionary Baptist church. 
He married Lavina Mount, whose father came to Jefferson county, 
Illinois, from Tennessee, dying soon thereafter, and they have had five 
children, all of whom survive. 

Norman W. Connaway received his education in the public schools 
of Dix, and in his youth purchased a farm, intending to give his life 
to the vocation of tilling the soil. Subsequently, however, he decided 
a career lay before him in the field of medicine, and after considerable 
preparatory study he entered the St. Louis College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, in 1902. Graduating from that well-known institution in 
1906, Dr. Connaway established himself in practice at Woodlawn, 
Jefferson county, but in 1908, deciding that he needed a larger field, 
he came to Christopher, where he has since remained. Dr. Connaway 
makes a specialty of women's diseases and abdominal surgery, and at 
present is probably performing more operations that any surgeon in 
the county. He has won his own eminent position in his profession 
through years of close application to his chosen work, and the success 
which has come to him stamps him as one of the leading surgeons of 
this section. He finds leisure to keep up his membership in the Odd 
Fellows and the Royal Neighbors, of which latter his wife is also a 
member, but his professional duties have kept him too occupied to act- 
ively enter the political field. 

On August 7, 1895, Dr. Connaway was married to Miss Ida Phillips, 
daughter of Joseph Phillips, who served with distinction in the For- 
tieth Illinois Volunteers, under General John A. Logan, in the Civil 
war. He was on one occasion badly wounded and captured by the 
enemy, but made a daring and thrilling escape before his captors could 
place him in prison. After the war he returned to his farm, and was 
successfully engaged in the peaceful pursuits of tilling the soil until 
His death in 1908. The three children of Dr. and Mrs. Connaway, 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 833 

Glenn, Beatrice and Cleda, are all attending the public schools. The 
family is connected with the Missionary Baptist church. 

H. R. WALKER. Endowed with a natural aptitude for business, keen 
and alert to take advantage of offered opportunities, H. R. Walker, 
secretary and treasurer of the Gaskins-Walker Lumber Company at 
Harrisburg, is numbered among the more energetic and prosperous 
of the younger generation of the city's leading men, and has already 
won for himself a fine reputation in both the industrial and social 
affairs of his adopted home. He was born November 30, 1887, at 
West End, Saline county, Illinois, a son of Pinckney J. and Savilla 
(Johnson) Walker. 

Acquiring a substantial education when young, Mr. Walker spent 
many of the earlier years of his life in Galatia, where he gained both 
knowledge and experience as regards the details of business, becom- 
ing familiar with the general mercantile and lumber trade. In 1911, 
forming a copartnership with Messrs. Gregg and Gaskins, he helped 
establish the Gaskins-Walker Lumber Company, which was incor- 
porated in that year with a paid-up capital of ten thousand dollars, 
T. Y. Gregg being made president of the concern, while Mr. Walker 
was made secretary and treasurer, and Edward Gaskins was elected 
general manager of the concern. This enterprising firm retails lum- 
ber and coal, having an extensive patronage in that line, and makes 
a specialty of supplying building material by contract. Mr. Walker 
married Bessie White, a daughter of G. W. White, of Eldorado, Illi- 
nois, a woman of culture and many social attractions. 

Edward Gaskins, general manager of the Gaskins-Walker Lum- 
ber Company, was born in Saline county, Illinois, three miles south 
of Harrisburg, May 16, 1879, a son of the late Wiley A. and Nettie 
Gaskins, neither of whom are now living, his father having died in 
1902 and his mother two years earlier, in 1900. Mr. Gaskins has 
been identified with the lumber interests of Saline county for many 
years, for five years previous to accepting his present positon, in 
1911, having been secretary and manager of the Dorris Lumber Com- 
pany, at Dorrisville, Saline county. In that capacity Mr. Gaskins 
became thoroughly conversant with the lumber business, and so fa- 
miliar with its requirements, both as regards its conduct and advance- 
ment, that he is eminently qualified for the important position he 
now holds in the concern in which he is so largely interested. 

Mr. Gaskins married Mattie Hallock, a daughter of A. C. and 
Ellen Hallock, of Harrisburg, and they have one child, Thomas El- 
wood Gaskins. 

PINCKNEY J. WALKER. One of the most successful and enterprising 
citizens of Saline county, Pinckney J. Walker, of Galatia, began life 
a poor boy, with no other assets than a courageous heart, willing 
hands, an active brain and an unlimited supply of energy and ambi- 
tion, and through his perseverance of purpose has accumulated a fair 
share of this world's goods and built up an enviable reputation for 
honesty and integrity. A son of Dr. James Walker, he was born Jan- 
uary 4. 1862, in Pope county, Illinois, of pioneer ancestry. 

His paternal grandfather, Rev. James Walker, was born and reared 
in Wilson county, Tennessee. Coming to Southern Illinois in 1845. 
he entered a tract of land in Pope county, and from it improved a 
good farm, which remained in possession of the family until sold a 
very short time ago. He was a minister of the Missionary Baptist 
persuasion and founded the first church of that denomination in Pope 



834 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

county. He died at the age of sixty-nine years, and, after the cus- 
tom of those days, was buried on his home farm. He was for seven- 
teen years pastor of the Mill Creek church, which was located sixteen 
miles from his home, and to reach which he had to ride on horseback 
through an almost pathless wilderness. In addition to preachng and 
farming he was also engaged in mercantile pursuits during the Civil 
war. He accumulated considerable property, and owned, aside from 
his home farm, many acres of land at Bay City, on the Ohio river. He 
reared four children, as follows : Newton, who died in early man- 
hood, leaving five children; James; Harriet, wife of Rev. Janies 
Weeks, a Baptist minister; and Malcolm, who went to the front dur- 
ing the Civil war as colonel of an Illinois regiment. He died while 
marching with his men, and was buried in the family lot in Pope 
county, Illinois. Rev. Mr. Walker also had a step-daughter, Martha, 
who is now living in Kentucky. 

Dr. James Walker was reared to agricultural pursuits, and after 
his marriage took up a tract of wild land and was engaged in farm- 
ing until the death of his wife. He then began reading medicine 
under old Doctor Crosby, a neighbor, and when proficient in his 
studies began the practice of his profession. Locating at Dixon 
Springs, Illinois, he leased a large property, which he conducted as 
a health resort in additon to his practice as a regular physician, and 
also engaged in business as a general merchant. He continued thus 
actively employed until his death, when but fifty-four years of age. 
in 1887, he, Dr. Hodge, Dr. Agnew, and Dr. Frizzell, of Glendale, 
having been the leading physicians of that section of the state. 

Dr. Walker married first Mary Ann Glass, a sister of Colonel W. 
D. Glass, who commanded an Illinois regiment in the Civil war. 
She was one of a family of twenty-nine children, of whom Henry 
Glass, the eldest child, still lives in Golconda, Illinois, while Dr. M. 
M. Glass, of East Saint Louis, is the youngest child. She and two of 
her children, one a child of seven years and an infant, died within a 
few months of each other, and she left three living children, as fol- 
lows: Hon. A. W. Walker; Sarah E. : and Pinckney J., the subject 
of this sketch. Sarah E., wife of Henry Lewis, an attorney at New 
Liberty, Illinois, is herself the postmistress at that place and proprie- 
tor of a store. 

Hon. A. W. Walker was reared to habits of industry, and as a 
boy began to work out, receiving fifty cents a day in the summer 
season, and in the winter time clerking for his board and clothes in 
the store of Billy King at Rosebud, Illinois, and attending school. At 
the end of three years he entered the employ of McCoy & Son, at 
Golconda, and was afterwards a traveling salesman for a time. He 
subsequently clerked twelve years for J. C. Baker, and then, after 
being in partnership with Mr. Baker for a year, bought him out and 
was successfully employed in the hardware and agricultural imple- 
ment business at Golconda for several years, being one of the leading 
dealers in that line of goods. He met with severe losses when his 
warehouses, store and stock were destroyed by fire. He subsequently 
served as county treasurer of Pope county, after which he was elected 
sheriff of the county, and still later represented his district in the 
State Legislature. He made wise investments in real estate, buying 
large tracts of new land, which he opened up and sold at top prices. 
He died July 15, 1909, in Golconda. and was buried with honors by 
the Modern Woodmen of America, a fraternity of which he was a 
valued member, and which erected a fine monument to bis" memory 
in September, 1911. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 835 

Living at home until eighteen years old, Pinckney J. Walker re- 
ceived limited educational advantages, and subsequently began the 
battle of life on his own account as clerk in a general store and post 
office, his wages to be one hundred dollars a year, but at the end of 
six months the post office was abolished, and he was variously em- 
ployed the next few months, writing fire insurance a part of the time 
and clerking in Golconda for McCoy & Son, his brother's former em- 
ployers, while with that firm obtaining a good experience in handling 
farming implements and machinery. He married in the fall of 1884, 
and on January 1, 1885, began farming in Galatia, Illinois, on his 
father-in-law's farm and raised a fine crop of tobacco on the three 
acres that he planted to that shrub. Mr. Walker was so encouraged 
by his success as a crop-grower that in the following year he bought 
a tract of land on credit, and he still owns that very farm, which he 
paid for long ago. Fortune smiled on his every effort, and he has 
since bought many other pieces of property, having at one time title 
to one thousand acres, a part of which he has sold, although he now 
owns three valuable farming estates in the vicinity of Galatia. For 
four years Mr. Walker resided in Harrisburg, where he bought houses 
and land, and having laid out Walker's addition to that city made 
thousands of dollars in a few months in the rise of property. On 
returning to his old home in Galatia, Mr. Walker at first operated 
extensively in real estate for Weber Brothers, later having charge of 
the yards of the Galatia Lumber Company, which he subsequently 
bought. Selling his lumber interests, he again became a dealer in 
real estate and purchased all the land included in a block and erected 
a large building, including the Galatia Opera House. 

An active worker in the Republican ranks, Mr. Walker was elected 
justice of the peace in a Democratic stronghold, and filled the office 
with credit to himself and to the honor of his constituents. In 1S98 
he was elected county treasurer of Saline county, on the Republican 
ticket, the election being won by a close margin, and for four years 
resided in Harrisburg, as previously mentioned. 

Mr. Walker married, September 25, 1884, Savilla Johnson, who 
was born and reared in Saline county, being the only child of W. A. 
and Caroline (Cleveland) Johnson. Her father was born seventy-six 
years ago near his present home in Galatia. Mr. and Mrs. Walker 
have two children, namely : H. R. Walker, of Harrisburg, of whom a 
brief sketch may be found elsewhere in this volume ; and Maude, a 
graduate of Ewing College, and now a music teacher, lives with her 
parents. Fraternally Mr. Walker is a member of the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Order of Masons, belonging to the Blue Lodge, at 
Harrisburg, and to the Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, at Harrisburg ; 
and he also belongs to the lodge of Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks at Harrisburg. Religiously he is a member of the Missionary 
Baptist church. 

GEORGE W. FILLERS. In the great political upheaval that has swept 
the country from end to end a man may confess with pride that he is 
mayor of his town, or it may be that he is mayor to his shame, for 
during the last few years the forces that have been pitted one against 
the other have been those of "Good Government" and of the ma- 
chine. Therefore it is with pride that the citizens of Pinckneyville 
point to their executive head, George W. Fillers, for he was the leader 
of this modern progressive movement, and the triumph of his party 
came only after a hard fight. George W. Fillers is not a politician, 
he is a plain business man who has no patience with the wiles and 



836 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

tricks by which the professional politician wins his way into the con- 
fidence of the people. He stands for honesty and openness, and be- 
lieves in the practicality of that doctrine that is supposed to have 
died a natural death years ago from disuse, that is, a government of 
the people, by the people, and for the people. 

George W. Fillers was born on the llth of September, 1876, four 
miles south of Sparta, Illinois. He is a descendant of one of the 
earliest settlers of Randolph county, where his father and his father's 
father were born and lived. His grandfather was Peter W. Fillers, 
the son of James M., the founder of the Fillers family in Illinois. 
This old pioneer was from Kentucky and settled near old Kaskaskia 
about 1873. Here he passed the remainder of his life, as a farmer, 
and he now lies buried not far from the scene of his labors. His son 
Peter W. followed in his father's steps and devoted his life to farm- 
ing and the raising of stock in a small way. His death occurred in 
April, 1890, near Sparta. Peter W. Fillers was married to Jane M. 
Wilson, a daughter of another pioneer of Randolph county. She is 
still living, and resides with her children in Sparta, Illinois. The 
children of this couple were James M. ; Henry C., of Sparta, who, fol- 
lowing inherited instincts, is a farmer and stock-raiser; Charles E., of 
Denver, Colorado ; Ada and Albert, both living in Sparta ; Scenic, 
the wife of William Graham, of St. Louis ; and Aldo, a teacher in the 
Sparta public schools. 

James M. Fillers, the eldest of these children, is the father of 
George W. He was born on the 2nd of March, 1854, in Randolph 
county, and passed his youth near Sparta. His education was re- 
ceived mainly at the schools of Sparta, and he graduated from the 
high school of that city. He showed his independence by starting 
out as a merchant in Steeleville, soon after the completion of his 
school life. He also was in the hotel business there, but the greater 
part of his life has been spent in planting and harvesting his crops 
and in breeding the fine horses and cattle for which his farm is well 
known. He is actively identified with the community about Steele- 
ville, and is one of the leading men of his section. 

James M. Fillers married Emma M. Garven, who was a daughter 
of George Garven. The latter was a farmer near Sparta, and hailed 
from the land of the thistle. Perchance it is this Scotch strain in 
Mayor Fillers' blood that makes him so intolerant of oppression, and 
so insistent upon the rights that every man should possess for him- 
self. Mrs. Fillers died on the 1st of October, 1911, leaving two sons, 
George W., of Pinckneyville, and James M., Jr., a member of a drug 
firm in the same city, and one daughter Rose G., who also lives in 
Pinckneyville. 

George W. Fillers spent a childhood much like that of any other 
boy going reluctantly to school, doing chores on the farm, gazing 
with longing eyes after the circus wagons, when they left after their 
annual visits, and registering a vow that when he grew up he was 
going to be a clown. The ambition died, however, and by the time he 
was through school he was willing to become that much prosaic and 
perhaps more comfortable thing, a druggist. He entered Dr. Robin- 
son's drug store at Stillwell, Illinois, and remained here until 1898, by 
which time he had mastered the business and was fully prepared as 
a practical pharmacist. Returning to Pinckneyville, he became the 
moving spirit in the establishment of the drug business which bears 
the family name, father and sons being equally interested. The 
name of the firm is James M. Fillers and Sons, and they handle a 
large amount of business. 



HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 837 

The manifestly sincere and earnest citizenship of George "W. 
Fillers won the confidence of the Piiickneyville populace and he was 
obviously the man for whom they were looking to head the ticket of 
the "Good Government" party in 1909. He accepted the candidacy 
and was elected mayor in April of that year, as the successor of "W. 
W. Sims. Two years later he was re-elected and his administration 
is everything that the people of Pinckneyville had hoped for. He 
and all of his family are Republicans, but they have never been poli- 
ticians. He is eager to modernize the facilities of Pinckneyville and 
make of it an up-to-date town, as was evidenced by the enthusiasm 
with which he entered into the project of a local telephone company. 
He was not only one of the promoters of the Pinckneyville Telephone 
Company, but is at present its secretary and treasurer. 

On the 15th of November, 1905, Mr. Fillers celebrated his mar- 
riage with Carrie Gilster, a daughter of the late Louis H. Gilster, one 
of the most prominent business men of Chester. He was a pioneer 
merchant, and held large interests in various financial concerns, being 
a well known banker of Chester at the time of his death. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fillers have one child, Marion C. 

PLEASANT N. POPE has had an active career in the commercial and 
financial world of DuQuoin. He was in the banking business as one 
of its pioneers, as a member of the banking house of Horn and Pope, 
and when the organization of the First National Bank was under con- 
sideration he was one of the leading spirits, afterwards acting as its 
first president and holding this office for nineteen years. He has 
added much to the prosperity of the city, for he is ever on guard to 
protect her interests and to stimulate her growth in size and wealth. 

Pleasant N. Pope is a member of one of the pioneer families of 
Illinois, his father haying settled on Pope's Prairie about 1817, and 
here the son was born, at Pope's Prairie, Franklin county, on the 26th 
of September, 1838. His father was Dr. Benjamin "W. Pope, and the 
spot on which he settled afterwards became the site of the town of 
Zeigler. Dr. Pope was reared in the humble home of a farmer, and 
devoted his life to his profession, caring little or nothing about poli- 
tics. He married Miss Sarah L. Read, whose father was a settler in 
Illinois from Tennessee. He and his wife were members of the Chris- 
tian church, and his family were brought up in this faith. Dr. Pope 
was born in 1806 and died in 1882, having lost his wife when she was 
a young woman, in 1846. Pleasant N. Pope was the 'sixth child of his 
parents. 

As a boy he received a liberal education from the country schools 
and from the public schools of Benton, Illinois. He grew up on the 
farm, and as usual with boys reared in the country the life of the 
town and particularly of its merchant class attracted him. Therefore 
he came to DuQuoin and engaged in merchandising, becoming a pros- 
perous young merchant. He started in this business at the age of 
twenty and remained in it for a dozen years, then, until 1871, he was 
engaged in the grain business. At this time his mind was turned to- 
ward the fin