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Full text of "The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations"

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THE HISTORY 



OF THE STATE OF 



RHODE ISLAND 



AND 



PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




NEW YORK 
THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETV, INC. 

1920 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JAMES LISTER, one of the founders and late 
president of the Ccnterdale Worsted Mills, and one of 
the most prominent citizens of Providence, R. I., was 
a native of England, born in the town of Bradford, 
Yorkshire, February 19, 1851. Mr. Lister was a son 
of William and Hannah (Brown) Lister, old and highly 
respected residents of that place. 

The first fourteen years of Mr. Lister's life was 
spent in his native region, but in 1865 he came with 
his parents to the United States, their first home in 
this country being in Philadelphia, where they resided 
until 1869. In the latter year they removed to Jasper 
county, Iowa, where his parents spent the remainder 
of their life. Mr. Lister's father was in the wool manu- 
facturing business in Philadelphia, but after going to 
Iowa spent the remainder of his life on a farm. The 
education of James Lister was begun in the schools of 
Yorkshire, which he attended until he reached the age 
of fourteen years. After coming to America he attended 
the night schools of Philadelphia, and during the day 
was employed in several different positions. Upon going 
to Iowa with his parents in 1869, he assisted his father 
with the work on his farm, but only remained in that 
Western State for about six or eight months, and in 
the summer of 1870 returned to Philadelphia. He had 
already some experience in the work of manufacturing 
wool, and upon returning to the Eastern city was given 
a position in charge of a wool room as overseer. Later 
be was advanced to the position of wool buyer for the 
Nalor Worsted Company and acted in that capacity for 
j-bout one year. He was then appointed to a similar 
position with Charles Spencer & Company, of German- 
town, Pa., where he remained for two years. In the 
meantime Mr. Lister, who had been very ambitious to 
be engaged in business on his own account, had had his 
attention drawn to the wool brokerage business, and at 
the end of the two years' period with the last-named 
concern, returned to Philadelphia and entered this line 
for himself. He remained thus occupied in Philadel- 
phia until 1885, when at the instance of Charles Fletcher 
he came to Providence and accepted the position of wool 
buyer and general manager of the wool department in 
the great establishment of the National and Providence 
Worsted Mills, situated at Olneyville. He remained 
with this company until 1890, and in the meantime in- 
vested his savings in the stock thereof, thus becoming 
a partial owner of the enterprise. In 1890 he sold his 
interest in the mill and formed an association with Wil- 
liam A. Mackie and William Dracup, and the three men 
established the Centcrdale Worsted Mills. This com- 
pany took over the old Centcrdale Cotton Mills, which 
had been operated by the firm of Baldwin & Greene and 
added largely to the structure. They then imported 
machinerv- for the manufacture of worsted yarns and 
began their successful operations. The concern was 
constituted with William Mackie as president, Mr. Lis- 
ter as treasurer and William Dracup as secretary. In 



the year 1914 William Mackie retired from the business, 
and Mr. Lister became president, an office which he 
held to the time of his death. During his entire con- 
nection with this firm Mr. Lister devoted his best ener- 
gies and practically all his time to the upbuilding and 
development of the great enterprise which he hea<led, 
and for more than a quarter of a century was the active 
factor in the growth of the mill. They gradually ex- 
tended their interest to embrace other towns and at the 
present day the concern owns mills located at Stillwater, 
Centcrdale, Olneyville and Allendale, the present officers 
being: William H. Lister, president; James J. Lister, 
treasurer, and Robert W. Lister, secretary. In addi- 
tion to his great business activities Mr. Lister was a 
conspicuous figure in the general life of the community 
and was a member of What Cheer Lodge, N'o. 21, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, with which he became 
affiliated in the year 1892. He was also a member of 
the Wool Men's Association of Boston. In his religious 
belief Mr. Lister was an Episcopalian and was a mem- 
ber of Grace Church of that denomination, at Provi- 
dence. 

James Lister was twice married. He is survived by 
his second wife, Elizabeth H. Lister, of Providence. 

The Centcrdale Worsted Mills— "Xht first mill built at 
Centcrdale is said to have been built along about 1820, 
but not until 1891 was the company formed which is 
now the Centcrdale Worsted Mills, incorporated. The 
company is capitalized at $100,000, and maintains four 
mills, one located at Olneyville, washing the wool and 
carding and combing. The other three are located at 
Centcrdale, Allendale and Stillwater, where the wool 
is spun into worsted yarns. About six hundred opera- 
tives are employed in the different mills, about one hun- 
dred acres of land surrounding them, upon which com- 
fortable houses have been built, which are occupied by 
the mill operatives. The original mill at Ccnterdale, 
which constituted the original plant, is still in opera- 
tion, and the main offices of the company are also 
located at Centcrdale. The officers of the company are : 
William H. Lister, president; James J. Lister, treas- 
urer; Robert W. Lister, secretary; they constituting the 
board of directors with the addition of Joseph B. Lis- 
ter, Benjamin Lister and William H. Thornley. The 
Lister family have been the controlling owners and 
managers of the Ccnterdale Worsted Mills; James Lis- 
ter, now deceased, was one of the founders and princi- 
pal owner at the time of incorporation. William H. 
and James J. Lister are the sons of Joseph Brown 
Lister. Robert W. Lister is the son of Samuel Lister, 
associated with the Centcrdale Worsted Mills. 



JOSEPH BROWN LISTER— In Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, Joseph B. Lister first saw the light, April 30, 1855, 
and is now a resident of Stillwater, R. 1., superintend- 
ent of the Stillwater Mill of the Ccnterdale Worsted 
Mills, of which he is a director. In 1865 his parents. 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



William and Hannah (Brown) Lister, now both de- 
ceased, came to the United States, and Joseph B., who 
had already been a mill worker for one year, accom- 
panied them. 

William Lister, a wool sorter and buyer, located in 
Philadelphia, Pa., and there Joseph B. attended the pub- 
lic school until twelve years of age. He then became a 
worsted mill worker, but .continued his education in 
night schools. In 1869, after five years spent in Phila- 
delphia, the family moved to the State of Iowa, settling 
on a farm. Joseph B. Lister assisted his father in the 
cultivation of the farm, and rerhained in the West six 
years, then returned to Philadelphia to take an over- 
seer's position in the worsted mill, of which his brother 
was superintendent. He did not long continue in that 
position, but entered the employ of a worsted mill in 
the Kensington district of Philadelphia, there being a 
sorter for one year. The path of duty then led west- 
ward, and he returned to Iowa, there remaining sev- 
eral years, associated with his father, they engaging in 
butchering and marketing. A few years later he moved 
to the State of Missouri, and there for seven years culti- 
vated a farm owned by his father. He then again re- 
turned to Iowa, and established a grocery, meat market 
and bakery, which he successfully conducted until 1899, 
which year closed his Western experiences, and he 
again came East, joining his brother, James Lister, in 
Ctnterdale, R. I., and forming the connection with the 
Centerdale Worsted Mills, which yet exists. He be- 
came a stockholder \n the company, which his brother 
had founded, and was at first placed in charge of the 
wool sorting department. The town of Smithfield 
secured an injunction against the company, claiming the 
washing of wool polluted the stream, the company then 
moving that department further down the river to 
Olneyville. In the autumn of 1917 Joseph B. Lister be- 
came superintendent of the Stillwater Mill, owned by 
the Centerdale Worsted Mills Corporation, and in that 
village he resides. That his years as an agriculturist 
left their impress is evidenced by the fact that the small 
garden attached to his home^Js his favored place of 
recreation, most of his spare time being there spent in 
the proper season. . . 

Mr. Lister married, in.Iowa,"December, 1878, Sarah 
Lowrey, and they are the parents'of twro sons and two 
daughters: James Jay, treasurer of the Centerdale 
Worsted Mills; William H., president of the Centerdale 
Worsted Mills : Harriett, wife of Frank Hunt, of Prov- 
idence; and Charlotte, married Arthur Miller, of Provi- 
dence. 



JAMES JAY LISTER,— The ORcration of the mills 
belonging to the corporation, and the management of 
the various departments into which the business of the 
Centerdale Worsted Mills is divided, has always been 
in the hands of the Listers, the present officials being 
of the second generation, James Lister, the f.iunder and 
principal stockholder, now deceased, being represented 
in the management by his nephew, Robert W. Lister, 
while Joseph Brown Lister, brother of the founder, 
and a stockholder from its earliest day, is yet the 
superintendent of the Stillwater Mill, he. the father of 
James Jay Lister, treasurer, and William H. Lister, 
president of the company founded by their uncle and 



father, and developed by the sons of both to its large 
proportions. 

James Jay Lister, eldest son of Joseph Brown and 
Sarah (Lowrey) Lister, was born in Newton, Iowa, 
September 20, 1879, and there was educated in the pub- 
lic schools, finishing with high school. He began his 
business career as an assistant in the meat market 
owned and conducted by his father, and later was a 
night clerk at Grinnell. Iowa. In iSgg he came East 
with his father, and with him became associated with 
James Lister, in the operation of the mill owned by the 
newly incorporated Centerdale Worsted Mills, at Cen- 
terdale, R. I. The young man rapidly acquired valuable 
experience, and under the able direction of father and 
uncle passed from post to post through merited promo- 
tion. When James Lister went with his wool-washing 
department to Olneyville, to comply with the law which 
forbade them longer to wash their wool in the town of 
Smithfield, James Jay Lister was placed' in charge at 
Stillwater, later going to Olneyville in charge of the 
wool sorting department there. His ne.xt promotion 
was the general superintendency of the plant, and in 
1914 was made general superintendent of all plants, 
and later was elected treasurer of the corporation and 
its general manager. 

James Jay Lister resides in Providence. R. I., and 
there belongs to the various Masonic bodies of the 
York and Scottish Rites, holding the thirty-second de- 
gree, and is also a noble of Palestine Tttnpie, Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of ;the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. In politics he ig a Republican 
and has served as councilman in SiiHthfield. 

Mr. Lister married, in Providence, -November 3. 1904. 
Emma Agnes Harris, daughter of Ira Harris, of North 
Providence, now deceased. ?ilr. and Mrs. Lister are the 
parents of a daughter, Mildred Edna, and of a son, 
Joseph I. 



WILLIAM H. LISTER— As head of the corpor- 
ation which has existed under its present name 
since 1899, W^illiam H. Lister occupies a position 
to which he came through years of preparation as 
a mill worker, wool buyer, and director. His entire 
business life has been passed in ■ the various de- 
partments of the business which he now directs as 
executive, the Centerdale Worsted Mills, with main 
•offices at Centerdale, and mills at Centerdale. Olney- 
'.ville. Stillwater, and Allendale. He is the second son 
of Joseph Brown and Sarah (Lowrey) Lister. The 
Centerdale Worsted Mills is a corporation owned and 
managed in the Lister family, the entire directorate and 
officials bearing the name Lister. The record of the 
company is an honorable one, and in the hands of the 
second generation the development of the business con- 
tinues along the best modern lines. 

William H. Lister, born in Newton. Jasper county, 
Iowa, April 7, 1882. was there educated in the grade and 
high schools. At the age of seventeen years he came 
East with his parents, making settlement with them at 
Centerdale. R. I., where father and sons joined James 
Lister in developing the newly incorporated Centerdale 
Worsted Mills. William H. Lister began at the bottom 
and passed in succession through the worl, combing and 





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^ -<^-/^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



carding departments of the mill, as it then existed, con- 
tinuing as a mill worker until the age of twenty-three 
years. He then became a wool buyer for the company, 
going out into the open markets and buying in com- 
petition with men from other corporations, many of 
whom had very much greater experience than he. He 
developed strong quality as a purchasing agent, and 
although now president of the corporation, he is still the 
buyer of wool for his own mills, and spends a great 
deal of time on the road attending wool sales and buy- 
ing and selling the surplus he secures direct to other 
mills. He has long been a member of the board of 
directors, and in 191 7 was elected president, an office he 
ably fills. He is also a member of the Boston Wool 
Traders' Association, and the Providence Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Mr. Lister married, in February, 1908, in Providence, 
R. I., Edna Swan, daughter of John Swan, a farmer, 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lister are the parents of 
a son, William H. (2), and of a daughter, June Leigh- 
ton. The family home is at No. 216 Ohio avenue. 
Providence, R. L 



ROBERT WILLIAM LISTER, secretary of the 

Centerdale Worstcil Mills, was b^rn in Newton, Jasper 
county, Iowa, October 22, 1881, the son of Samuel and 
Eliza (Snook) Lister. He attended the public schools 
and a commercial college at Newton. In 1901, at the 
age of twenty years, he came to Rhode Island, locating 
in Centerdale, where he accepted a position in the Cen- 
terdale Worsted Mills in the recording department, and 
so continued until 1912, when he was elected secretary 
of the company. Later he was given the additional 
title, assistant treasurer, and in this dual capacity is 
now serving (1919). He is a member of the Providence 
Chamber of Commerce, and holds all the degrees of the 
York and Scottish Rites of Masonry, up to and includ- 
ing the thirty-second. He is also a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a member of the Second United Pres- 
byterian Church of Providence. R. I. 

Robert W. Lister married, September ig, 1906, \'iolet 
Etta MacRae, daughter of Farquhar MacRae, "The 
Florist," now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lister are the 
parents of a daughter, Ruth M., and of a son, Robert 
W. (2). The family residence is in the Fruit Hill 
section of North Providence. R. I. 



ALFRED E. LAMOUREUX— Since the year 1905 
a pharmacist of .Anthony, R. I., Mr. Lamoureux. in the 
period since elapsed, has won his way to honorable posi- 
tion among the business men of the State to which he 
was brought by his parents when a boy. He is a grad- 
uate in pharmacy, and in both drug and prescription 
departments of his store has built up a good business. 
His success in business and his rise in public life is 
founded upon professional skill and ability, public 
spirit, and patriotism, he having had none of the aid 
influential friends can give when first he made his 
claim for recognition. Merit alone has been his 
strength, and in the town so long his home he is held 
in high esteem as professional man, merchant, and 
citizen. 

Alfred E. Lamotireux was born in the Province of 



Quebec, Canada, in November, 1871, but when a boy 
was brought by his parents to the town of Coventry, 
R. I., where the lad attended public school, and obtained 
his English education. He was employed in various 
capacities during his youth, but finally, deciding upon 
a profession, entered GrofF College of Pharmacy, 
whence he was graduated in 1898. He aided in clerical 
capacity for other pharmacists until 1905, when he 
opened a drug store in Anthony, R. I., and established 
the prosperous business of which he is still the manag- 
ing owner. 

Senator Lamoureux is a Republican in politics, and 
in Town Council and in both Houses of the Legislature 
has rendered his town and his State unselfish, public- 
spirited service. In 1912 he was elected a member of 
Anthony Town Council, remaining in that office two 
years. During this period Mr. Lamoureux addressed 
himself especially to the task of providing plans for 
freeing the town from its load of debt, and to the 
improvement of its sadly deteriorated highways. ' He 
succeeded in both undertakings, and when at the end 
of two years' service in Council he was sent to the 
State Legislature the roads were in good condition and 
the debt greatly reduced. Senator Lamoureux was 
elected to represent the town of Coventry, in the Gen- 
eral .Assembly of Rhode Island, in 1914, and was a 
member of the Lower House during the years. 1915 and 
1916, serving on committees on State property and 
labor legislation. At the November elections in 1916, he 
was elected a member of the State Senate from Cov- 
entry, and from the time of having his seat in that body, 
January i, 1917, he has served his State with high, 
patriotic purpose. He is chairman of the Senate com- 
mittee on State property, and in a public-spirited, pro- 
gressive way has sought the best for his State. While 
deeply interested in every department, he has been 
especially active and helpful in the improvement of the 
public highways, bringing to his work in that direction 
the results of much study and research. Deeply earnest 
in his desire to serve, and being well informed, he acts 
with intelligent purpose, has accomplished a great deal, 
and Rhode Island has no citizen more desirous of aid- 
ing the cause of the public good than this adopted son, 
Senator .Alfred E. Lamoureux. 

In fraternal relation he is afliliated with those sterling 
orders, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
Knights of Pythias, holding high office in both. He is a 
post noble grand of .Anthony Lodge, No. 21, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, serving also for two years 
as district deputy grand master of the Grand Lodge of 
Rhode Island. He is senior warden of Sagamore En- 
campment, No. 6. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of .Anthony, and a past chancellor commander of Narra- 
gansett Lodge, No. 8, Knights of Pythias, of Phenix, 
R. I. 

Senator Lamoureux married. December 31. 1903. 
Lillias MacMillan Apes, a graduate of State Normal 
School, class of 1898, and for two years thereafter a 
teacher in Crompton, R. I., town of West Warwick. 
.An invalid mother then requiring her care. Miss .Apes 
resigned her position, and until her marriage remained 
at home. She is a daughter of Captain Leonard Apes, 
born in Norwich, Conn., December 23, 1829, died in 
Quidnick, R. I., February 23, 1896. He ran away from 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



his Connecticut home when a boy of fourteen and went 
to sea, shipping at New London, and for thirty years 
he sailed deep water in New London and New Bed- 
ford ships bound "a whaling," becoming master of his 
own ship. He retired from the sea at the age of 
forty-five, after a seafaring life of great activity, dur- 
ing which he sailed many seas, visited many strange 
lands, and in his home had a collection of rare and 
curious souvenirs af his adventurous life. Upon retir- 
ing from a mariner's life he made his home at Quid- 
nick, R. I., where his after life was passed. He was 
a member of the Masonic order, belonging to a Con- 
necticut lodge, and was highly recommended in his 
community. Captain Apes married (first) June ii, 
1854, Mary Frances Bailey, who bore him two sons : 
Henry B. Apes, born Jan. 8, 1858, and Leonard F. Apes, 
born July 31, 1863, died Jan. 11, 1877. Captain Apes 
married (second) at Quidnick, R. L, in June. 1875, 
Margaret MacMillan. born in Glasgow, Scotland, May 
23, 1844, died Aug. 3, 1903, whose parents came to the 
United States in 1847. and settled in East Greenwich, 
later in River Point, and Quidnick, R. L Captain and 
Mrs. Apes were the parents of: Lillias M. Apes, wife 
of Senator Alfred E. Lamoureux, and they are the 
parents of two daughters: Hope, bom April 22, 1910, 
and Claire, born March i, 1915. 



his old employer, P. O. O'Connor, with whom he re- 
mained eight years, until 1906, in which year he opened 
and established the present plumbing business located at 
No. 261 Smith street, and has continued successfully. 

A Republican in his political faith, Mr. Hay was 
chosen a member of the North Providence Town Coun- 
cil for five terms ; was elected representative to the 
State Legislature in 1915 and 1916. and in 1917 was 
elected to his present office. State Senator. His resi- 
dence is at Fruit Hill, where he is a member of the 
Fruit Hill Volunteer Fire Company. He is a member 
of Roger Williams Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of North Providence, Scituate Chapter, Royal .\rch 
Masons; Providence Council, Royal and Select Masters; 
St. John's Commandery, Knights Templar; and Pales- 
tine Temple Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. He is also a member of North Providence 
Improvement Association. 

Senator Hay married, in North Providence, R. L, 
October 10, 1902, Minnie M. Angell, daughter of Oren 
T. and Mary (Gould) Angell, of North Providence. 
They are the parents of a daughter, Antoinette, bom 
April 16, 1907, now attending Fruit Hill grammar 
school. 



ROBERT WATSON HAY— In 1914 Mr. Hay was 
elected to represent North Providence in the Rhode 
Island Legislature, his office being State Senator. This 
prominence in political life is the outcome of a life of 
public-spirited interest in community public affairs and 
his willingness to bear his share of civic burdens. He 
brings to the performance of his duties strong, intelli- 
gent purpose, and is one of the members of the Legis- 
lature who can be relied upon to perform their duties 
to the limit. He is of Scotch parentage, his parents, 
John and Janet (Gibbs) Hay, both born in Glasgow, 
Scotland. They met in the United States, married and 
settled in Providence, R. I., where John Hay, a ma- 
chinist and blacksmith, died at the age of fifty-three, 
his widow surviving him until the age of seventy-two. 
Three of the nine children of John and Janet Hay are 
living: Robert Watson, to whom this review is in- 
scribed; William S., and Jotin K.. all residents of Provi- 
dence. 

Robert Watson Hay was born in Providence, R. I., 
January 8, 1870. and there completed primary and 
grammar school courses of study in the public school. 
He began a wage-earning life in the finishing depart- 
ment of the Wanskuck Mills and there continued five 
years, leaving to begin an apprenticeship with the J. S. 
Fuller Company at the plumber's trade. Five years were 
spent in acquiring expert knowledge of this trade with 
the Fuller Company, followed by two years service as 
a journeyman plumber at Marlboro, Mass., in the em- 
ploy of William H. Hill and the Bradley Plumbing 
Company. He then returned to Providence, spending 
two years with the Thomas Phillips Plumbing Com- 
pany, eighteen months with the F. G. Lees Company, 
and two years with P. O. O'Connor. He then formed 
a partnership and as a member of the firm of Doyle & 
Hay conducted a plumbing business in Providence for 
two years. He then again became a journeyman with 



THE HON. JOSEPH E. SMITH, one of the most 
prominent citizens of North Kingston, R. I., where 
for many years he was a successful farmer and repre- 
sented that town in the Rliode Island State Senate, is 
a member of a family which has been for a number of 
generations identified with this region, the members of 
which have always occupied a high position in the 
esteem and regard of their fellow citizens. His grand- 
father was Benjamin Smith, who resided in North 
Kingston during the Revolutionary period. He was 
a tailor by trade and also engaged in farming in this 
neighborhood. He had not yet attained his majority 
at the time of the Revolutionary War, but although 
under age, enlisted in the patriot forces and served dur- 
ing a considerable portion of that momentous struggle. 
He married Mary Austin, and among their children 
was Harris Smith, the father of the Hon. Joseph E. 
Smith, of further mention. 

Harris Smith, like his father before him, was en- 
gaged in the occupation of farming at North Kings- 
ton. He was also an expert surveyor and followed the 
latter calling to a considerable extent, doing much of 
the work of surveying in this community. In politics 
he was a Whig, and took an exceedingly active part in 
local affairs, serving on the town council and repre- 
senting North Kingston in the State Legislature. He 
married Hannah Spink, a daughter of John Spink, a 
member of one of the oldest of the North Kingston 
families. They were the parents of the following child- 
ren : Juan F., died in i860; John Spink; Benjamin F., 
died in 1865 ; Harriett S. ; Joseph E., with whose career 
we are here especially concerned; William M., deceased; 
Mary C, deceased; Amy S., who became the wife of 
John Coulters, of Arlington, R. I. ; Avis A., who be- 
came the widow of George M. Weeden of Cranston, 
R- I.; George H., on the old homestead; and Hannah 
A., deceased. 

Joseph E. Smith, son of Harris and Hannah (Spink) 
Smith, was born at North Kingston, January n, 




^Oi^L^/<h- Q) D^^^^i^y^-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



1837, and has made his residence here during his entire 
hie. As a child he attended the local school, then known 
as the Stony Lane School of North Kingston, where 
he studied until he had reached the age 01" sixteen 
years. He attended also the Rhode Island Institute 
and later the Lapham Institute. During this time, as 
was customary with the lads of that period, he assisted 
his father on the latter's farm, giving to this work not 
only his vacation but the spare hours during the school 
session. After he had completed his studies, however, 
he began to work for the neighboring farmers for a 
meager remuneration, and in 1865 purchased his present 
farm at North Kingston and moved his residence 
there. He was exceedingly successful in his agricul- 
tural operation, carrying on general farming and dairy- 
ing, and in later years he was able to retire to a well 
earned leisure. He still makes his home on his old 
farm, but although Mr. Smith was well known as a 
farmer in this community, his fame is still wider on 
account of the part which he has played in political and 
local affairs. Since his childhood he has been keenly 
interested in this department in the life of the com- 
munity and as a young man identified himself actively 
with the local organization of the Republican party, 
the principles and policies of which he has always 
staunchly supported. His first presidential vote was 
cast for .-Vbraham Lincoln as President of the L'nited 
States. Mr. Smith was elected a member of the town 
council of North Kingston and for many years served 
on that body, and in 1903 became the representative of 
this town in the State Senate. He proved himself a 
most capable and efficient legislator and a disinterested 
public servant, and was a member of the Senate com- 
mittees on fisheries, agriculture and real estate. He 
served from 1903 to 1912, inclusive, as Senator; this 
was a high compliment to Mr. Smith. Mr. Smith is a 
member of Washington Lodge, No. 5, Free and .Accepted 
Masons. 

Joseph E. Smith was united in marriage on May 14, 
1862, at Newport, R. 1., with Mary Sullivan, a native 
of Casteltown. Ireland, a daughter of John and Cath- 
arine (McCarthy) Sullivan, of that place. Mrs. Smith 
died in 1909. ^I^. and Mrs. Smith were p.irents of the 
following children ; William A., who died Nov. 22, 
1900, and married Grace H. Spink; Hannah A., who 
became the wife of Henry I. Reynolds, of Wickford; 
Joseph E., Jr., of Wickford, who married Eva Rath- 
bun, by whom he had one child, Lasker E. ; Benjamin 
F., of Wickford, who for many years was captain of 
Mr. Fleishmann's famous yacht "The Hiawatha," and 
married Frances E. Mowry, by whom he had one son, 
Charles John ; Mary E., who became the wife of 
Stephen H. Emery, of Providence, R. I., to whom she 
has borne six children : Ernest H., Stanley Smith, 
Waldo E., William A., Bessie E., Mary Ellen ; John H., 
of Wickford, who was captain of John D. Archibald's 
yacht "The \'ixen," and married Ellen Montague; 
Wesson G., who was killed October, 1908, had married 
Marian X. Crandall, a daughter of David Crandall, of 
Peacedale, R. I., by whom he had one daughter, Mary 
G. ; Thomas L., who died in infancy; Walter J., of 
Wickford, who married Annie L. Kilroy, by whom he 
has had two children: Arthur W., and Louise; and 
Bessie E., who died at the age of eight years. 



OLIVER HAZARD JACKSON PERRY— Oliver 

Hazard Jackson I'erp,-, one of llie most prominent 
citizens of Lincoln township, where he is intimately 
identified with the life and affairs of the community, 
is a member of the old Perry family of the Narragan- 
sett country, the members of which have for so many 
years been prominent in this community, 

(I) The Perrys of the Narragansett country are be- 
lieved to have been the descendants exclusively of 
Samuel and Benjamin Perry, the sons of Edward and 
Mary (Freeman) Perry, of Sandwich, Mass., where 
the latter was a prominent member and speaker in the 
Society of Friends, and an earnest defender of its doc- 
trines. As early as 1658 and from that date until the 
persecution of the Quakers ceased, Edward Perry was 
repeatedly fined and otherwise punished for his religious 
belief, the Puritans of Massachusetts being quite un- 
willing to grant to others the liberty of religious belief 
which they themselves had come to the New World 
to secure. 

(II) Samuel Perry, son of Edward Perry, was born 
in 1664 at Sandwich, Mass., and died in July, 1716. He 
probably resided at that place until 1695, as his name 
appears upon certain records of the town of that year. 
It must have been about this time that he came to 
Kings Town, R. 1., the probability being in favor of 
.August, 1696, and he was made a freeman of the colony 
there. May 6, 1701. His homestead and mill were in 
that part of Kings Town now known as Perryville. 
South Kingston. He was a large landowner and a 
partner in the Shannock and Maxon purchases, located 
in what are now the towns of Richmond and Hopkin- 
ton, and he also purchased extensive tracts at Pas- 
quesett in Westerly, near the northeast corner of the 
present town of Charlestown. Samuel Perry married. 
May 9, 1690, Mary Tucker, daughter of Henry and 
Martha Tucker, of Dartmouth, Mass., who was born 
August 16, i568. They were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : James, Edward, Samuel, Simeon, 
Benjamin. Robert. 

(ID Benjamin Perry, son of Edward Perry, was born 
probably in 1677. and died in 1648-49. He and his 
brother Samuel came probably prior to 1700 to Rhode 
Island and settled in the town of Kings Town in the 
Narragansett country, where he bought land as early 
as 1702. He was a prominent member of the com- 
munity, and was made a freeman there May I, 1 716. 
His house and property were in that part of the town 
now known as South Kingston. Benjamin Perry was 
twice married, but the name of his first wife is un- 
known and according to tradition there were no child- 
em born of this marriage. He married (second) Oc- 
tober II, 1727, Susannah Barber, daughter of Moses 
and Susannah (Waite) Barber. They were the parents 
of the following children : Benjamin, Edward, Free- 
man. Mary, and Susannah, of whom Freeman was the 
father of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. 

(III) Squire Robert Perry, son of Samuel Perry 
and father of Oliver H. J. Perry, Sr., was born near 
Perryville at South Kingston, and there grew to man- 
hood. As a child he attended the local school where 
he acquired an excellent education, and later became a 
teacher and engaged in that calling in his native town 
until 1835. He was personally acquainted wi'.h his 



8 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



cousin, the famous Commodore Oliver H. Perry, hero 
of Lake Erie, who used to visit the school taught by 
Robert Perry at South Kingston. In 1835 the latter 
removed to the town of Coventry and there taught 
school for a number of years in different districts of 
the town. He was a man of acute mind and from his 
youth had a strong taste for the law, pursuing con- 
sistently the study of that subject until he became an 
authority on legal matters generally. He was elected 
a justice of the peace and served in that capacity both 
at South Kingston and Coventry. His work in this 
capacity finally became so heavy that he was obliged 
to give up his teaching in order to devote his entire 
attention thereto. His skill in drawing up legal papers 
was recognized throughout the community, and it is 
probable that had he cared to enter the legal profession 
he would have become an eminent member of the bar. 
For a time he resided with his son, Oliver H. J. Perry, 
Sr., but afterwards removed to Centerville and resided 
with his daughter, Mrs. Arnold, until the time of his 
death. Squire Perry was married at South Kingston 
to Mary Davis, born in 1797. a daughter of Preserved 
Davis, and she died September 16, i839- They were 
the parents of the following children : i. Robert An- 
thony, born May 7, 1822; went to California during the 
agitation following the discovery of gold in that State 
in 1849; later he went to Oregon, where his death oc- 
curred in 1850. 2. John B., born July 14, 18^4; accom- 
panied his brother to California, but in 1850 returned to 
Rhode Island where for a number of years he worked 
at his trade of moulder ; later he became engaged in the 
fish business on Westminster street; he married Geor- 
gianna McDonald, and they were the parents of three 
children. 3. Martha N., born March 7, 1825 ; became the 
second wife of Burrill Arnold, and after his death 
married George Hail, a prominent manufacturer; she 
died at Warren. 4. Oliver Hazard Jackson, mentioned 
below. 5. Mary L., born June 9, 1830, died April 24, 
1836. 6. James S., born March 24, 1832; as a young 
man he removed from Rhode Island to California, 
where he followed the trade of carpenter; he married 
in the West and was the father of five children. 7. 
William L., born Sept. 21, 1835; engaged in farming at 
Foxboro, Mass., where his death occurred in 1905; 
he married (first) Sarah Tefft, and (second) Sophora 
Morse; he had three children by his first wife. 8. 
Mary L,., born Dec. 26, 1838; became the wife of Row- 
land H. Fry, of Pawtucket; they resided at that place 
and there her death occurred in July, 1907; they were 
the parents of one son. 

(IV) Oliver Hazard Jackson Perry, fourth child of 
Squire Robert and Mary (Davis) Perry, was born at 
South Kingston, April 24, 1828. The first seven years 
of his life were spent at his native place, but in 1835 
he removed with his parents to Coventry and shortly 
afterwards secured work in a cotton mill at .Anthony. 
He continued to work in that and similar establish- 
ments at Anthony until he had completed his eigh- 
teenth year, and then, in 1847, was apprenticed for 
three years to Rice & Dawley, prominent contractors 
and builders of Providence at that time. With this 
concern lie learned the trade of carpenter and was 
paid during the first year of his apprenticeship one 
dollar a week besides his board, a day's labor in 



those times consisting of ten hours. The young man 
proved himself a very industrious and apt pupil, and 
in eighteen months he had risen to the position of 
foreman, although still an apprentice, while there were 
several men under him who had been journeymen for 
a number of years. He continued to work as a car- 
penter in Providence until 1853, when he removed 
to Central Falls and there continued to follow his 
trade for a time. Unfortunately, however, he devel- 
oped about this time poor health, and he was obliged 
to give up his work on that account. His next occu- 
pation was that of the retail meat business, in which 
he was employed for about two years before being 
appointed manager of the meat market of E. F. Rich- 
ardson at Central Falls. In this position he dis- 
played the remarkable business abilities possessed by 
him, and the market under his management was recog- 
nized as the largest and best of its kind in the entire 
State., He remained in this position for about twelve 
years, having gained in that time the complete confi- 
dence and warm friendship of his employers. In the 
year 1867, however, he withdrew from this employ, 
and in accordance with an ambition which he had 
long felt embarked on an enterprise of his own. He 
purchased the business which he had so ably managed 
for his old employers and continued it on a very 
large scale for about eight years. Once more, how- 
ever, in 1875, his poor health forced him to give up 
active work for a time and accordingly he sold his 
business and purchased a farm, situated on the Louis- 
quisset pike in the town of Lincoln, about five miles 
from Providence. This property, which had belonged 
to Albert W. Holbrook before his purchase, he began 
to operate actively, the work in the open air proving 
most beneficial to his health. Eventually, however, 
age made it necessary for him to give the manage- 
ment of his farm to his son, Oliver H. J. Perry, Jr., 
and from that time until his death he resided there 
in a well-earned leisure. During the winter, however, 
Mr. Perry made his home in Providence and was a 
well-known figure in the life of that community. 

Mr. Perry was a Democrat in politics during his 
early life, but upon the formation of the Republican 
party became a member and continued to support its 
principles and policies during the remainder of his 
life. He was a member of Jenks Lodge, No. 24, 
Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, of Central Falls. 
A Baptist in his religious belief, he joined, in 1844, 
the Phenix Baptist Church, but later transferred his 
membership to the First Baptist Church of Central 
Falls. He was a man who was held in the highest 
esteem by the entire community, and his life was a 
prominent factor in its upbuilding and development. 
Oliver Hazard Jackson Perry was united in mar- 
riage. May 20, 1852, at Central Falls, with Emeline E. 
Thurber. a native of Connecticut, born May 17, 1S32, 
a daughter of Loring W. and Elmira (Gardner) 
Thurber. As a child Mrs. Perry had come with her 
parents from Connecticut lo Central Falls, and was 
a member of the First Baptist Church of that place 
for sixty years. Her death occurred in Providence, 
August 19, 1906. To Mr. and Mrs. Perry the follow- 
ing children were born: I. Theodore Oliver Hazard 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Lincoln, born May I, 1853, died April 15. 1856. 2. Clara 
Emma, born Feb. 13, 1858; became the wife of 
Eugene F. Bowen, of Providence. 3. Oliver Hazard 
Jackson, with whose career we are here especially 
concerned. 

(V) Oliver Hazard Jackson (2) Perry, son of 
Oliver Hazard Jackson (i) and Emcline E. (Thur- 
ber) Perry, was born October 22, 1862, at Central 
Falls, R. I. As a child he resided on his father's farm, 
and attended the local public school. Later he became 
a pupil at the Mowry & GofT English and Classical 
School of Providence, and proved himself an apt and 
intelligent student. Upon completing his studies at 
the latter institution, he returned to his father's farm 
and there, under the tuition of the elder man, learned 
farming and agricultural methods generally. He 
assisted his father with the work of the place and 
eventually became more and more responsible for 
the management thereof. At the time of his father's 
retirement he finally took over the entire manage- 
ment of the place, and has continued to operate it 
witli very marked success ever since. His father had 
already done much to improve the old farm, and this 
work has been carried on and perfected to a remark- 
able degree by its present owner. Mr. Perry has 
engaged there in general farming and has brought the 
state of cultivation of the place up to a high degree 
of perfection. Later he took up the growth of small 
fruit and has been eminently successful in this line, 
finding a large market for his produce in the neigh- 
boring city of Providence. He has been e.xceedingly 
successful in all his operations, and is now regarded 
as one of the most substantial citizens of the place 
and an authority on all agricultural matters. In poli- 
tics Mr. Perry, like his father before him, is a staunch 
Republican, and although he has been keenly inter- 
ested in local affairs, and has always performed to the 
full his duties as a good citizen, he has been quite 
unambitious of political preferment and has consist- 
ently avoided public office. 

Oliver Hazard Jackson Perry was united in mar- 
riage, November 19, 1884, with Ida Orlena Miner, a 
native of North Providence, born December 13, 1859, 
a daughter of Lucius and Julia A. (Randall) Miner. 
Mrs. Perry is a member of the distinguished Miner 
family, which is mentioned at length in this sketch. 
She was educated in the local schools of Lincoln and 
at the private school of Dr. Stockbridge. Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry are the parents of one child. Harold Thurber, 
who was born on his father's farm. May 16, 1888. He 
attended the Pawtucket Grammar School and the 
Technical High School of Providence, and was a 
member of the class of 1908 of the latter institution. 
He married Mary E. Jordan, a daughter of John and 
Sarah (Slocum) Jordan, of Lincoln township. 

(The Miner Line). 

The Miner family, of which Mrs. Perry is a mem- 
ber, is an old and distinguished one in New England, 
and was founded in Rhode Island by her father, who 
was a native of Vermont. Lucius Miner was a son 
of Simeon Miner, and a grandson of Isaac Miner. 
Simeon Miner was a resident of West Burke, Vt., 



from which town he removed to Barnston, Canada, 
and from there to Libbytown in the same country, 
where his death occurred December 19, 1865. Simeon 
Miner married Mary (or Polly) Orcutt, of Sutton, 
Vt., who was born July 6. 1798, and died October 
16, 1866. She was a daughter of Ephraim and Chris- 
tiana (.Willey) Orcutt, the former a native of Wales, 
who came to this country as a young man, and was 
one of the pioneers at Sutton, Vt. He was prominent 
in the life of that place, where he was engaged in busi- 
ness as a blacksmith and was the first town clerk 
there. Later, however, he removed to Boston, where 
he was employed at the .Arsenal. He was a soldier in 
the Revolution, enlisting at Windham, Conn., in .Au- 
gust, 1777, and became a fifer in Captain Wales' com- 
pany and the regiment of Colonel Jonathan Latimer. 
He was a member of the detachment sent to rein- 
force General Gates at Saratoga. John Willey, father 
of Christiana (Willey) Orcutt, was also a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, enlisting as a private from North- 
wood, July II, 1780, when nineteen years of age. He 
was mustered in at Kingston by Josiah Bartlett, and 
was discharged December 4, 1780. The children of 
Simeon and Polly Miner were thirteen in number, the 
eldest son and second child being Lucius, the father of 
Mrs. Perry. 

Lucius Miner was born February 24, 1820, at West 
Burke, Vt., and was quite a child when his parents 
removed from there to Barnston, Canada. His youth 
was spent at that place upon his father's farm, 
and he attended the local district school. He 
resided with his parents until he attained his 
majority, wl'.en he came to Rhode Island, and 
was employed as a hand on the farm on Louis- 
quisset pike in what is now Lincoln. He was also 
employed in the same capacity by Whipple Randall 
and here met the lady who afterwards became his 
wife. After his marriage he lived for a time at Provi- 
dence, where he worked in the logwood mill of Snow 
& Lewis, makers of dye stuffs. Still later he removed 
to the Edward Randall farm in North Providence, 
where he resided for a number of years, and then 
purchased the Whipple Randall farm, upon which he 
had been formerly employed, and there passed the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring May 11, 
1877. This farm is now the property of W. E. Nichols, 
of Lincoln. Mr. Miner was a successful farmer and 
carried on his operations on an extensive scale, at one 
time owning and working two other farms besides 
the one on which he resided. He operated a large 
dairy and ran the milk route in Providence which was 
conducted by his family for forty years. He was also 
a dealer in live-stock and became very well-to-do as 
the result of his various activities. In politics Mr. 
Miner was a Republican, and although not ambitious 
for public office, served his fellow-citizens as a mem- 
ber of the town school board and as highway sur- 
veyor. He married Julia .Mbina Randall, a native of 
North Providence, born February 12. 1818. a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan and Nancy Brayton (Smith) Randall. 
Her death occurred .-Xpril 11. 1893. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miner were the parents of the following children: 
Annie W., born March 31, 1848, died July 12, 1894, at 



10 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Providence, unmarried: Mary R., born Oct. lo, 1849, 
died Jan. 24. 1872; Lewis A., born Sept. 18, 1851, died 
Sept. 15, 1918; Amey Estance, born May 28, 1855, 
died Dec. 27, 1907; and Ida Orlena, born December 
13. 1859, who is mentioned above as the wife of 
Oliver Hazard Jackson Perry, Jr. 

(The Randall Line). 

The Randall family, from which Mrs. Perry is 
descended on the maternal side, came originally from 
France, and was founded in this country in the pre- 
Revolutionary period. 

(I) Joseph Randall was born in 1684, and came 
from Brest, France, to the New England colonies, 
settling in Providence, where he followed the calling 
of caulker. It is probable that his parents went from 
England to France, as the name suggests a British 
derivation. Joseph Randall lived at North Providence 
until his death, March 30, 1760. in his seventy-sixth 
year. He married, July 26, 1716. .\mey Estance (the 
name now spelled Esten), whose death occurred Feb- 
ruary 8, 1764, in her seventy-ninth year. They were 
the parents of the following children: Amey, born 
May 27, 1717, died Jan. 19, 1766: Joseph, born Aug. 
25, 1718, died at sea, unmarried: Henry, born March 
2, 1720, married Dorothy Billings, and died June 6, 
1789: Peter, mentioned below. 

(II) Peter Randall, youngest child of Joseph and 
Amey (Estance) Randall, was born June 12, 1723, 
and died March 9, 1808. He was a successful farmer 
of North Providence for a time and later at Johns- 
ton, and died at the latter place and was buried on his 
farm. He married (first), August 20, 1746, Freelove 
De.xter, a daughter of Captain Stephen Dexter, and 
she died October i, 1775, in her fifty-sixth year. 
They were the parents of the following children: 
Joseph, born Oct. 30, 1747, died March 5, 1840: Free- 
love, born June 19, 1749, and became the second wife 
of Enoch Angell, of North Providence, and died Aug. 
7, 1788; Amey, born Feb. 9, 1751, married Enoch 
Angell, and died Dec. 17. 1767, in her seventeenth 
year; William, mentioned below; Waite, born Dec. 
2, 1755. died February 11, 1840. married (first) Heze- 
kiah Smith, of North Providence, and (second) 
Thomas Harris: John, born June 23, 1758, died Aug. 
27, 1836, married Mercy Mowry, and resided in North 
Providence; Stephen, born Aug. I, 1762, was a phy- 
sician at Providence, where he married Lucina Win- 
sor, and died March 15, 1843. Peter Randall married 
(second) January 18, 1 781, Anna Collins, and they 
were the parents of the following children: Hezekiah, 
born Jan. 19, 1782, died Oct. 2, iSio, married Dinah 
Thornton, and resided in Johnston: Nancy, born 
May II, 1783. married George Brayton, and died Dec. 
25, 1850; Daniel, born Nov. 4, 1785, married (first) 
Lydia Harris, and (second) Sally Leonard, and 
resided at Thompson, Conn.; Marcy, born Dec. 29, 
1787, became the wife of John Waterman, of Johns- 
ton, and died July 18, 1867: Susan, born May 17, 
1789, married Joseph Waterman, and removed to Mil- 
waukee, W'is. 

(Ill) William Randall, fourth child of Peter and 
Freelove (Dexter) Randall, was born July 20, 1753. 



He became a farmer and resided at North Providence, 
near the North Burying Ground. Since his death his 
farm has been entirely absorbed by the city of Provi- 
dence for burial purposes. His death occurred Feb- 
ruary 15, 1828. William Randall married. May 20, 
1779, Vashti Whipple, born November 18, 1756. died 
March 29, 1837, the daughter of Jonathan Whipple. 
They were the parents of the following children: 
Amey, born April iS, 1780, died May 24. 1845; Wil- 
liam, born May 29. 1782, died Jan. 7, 1858; Jonathan, 
mentioned below; Jeremiah, born Feb. 20, 1786, died 
July 31, 1827; Mary, born April 18, 1788, died Oct. 
6, i860; Edward, born Jan. 26, 1792, died Nov. 10, 
1848; Whipple, born Feb. 2T, 1795, died Sept. 25, 1848. 
(IV) Jonathan Randall, third child of William and 
Vashti (Whipple) Randall, was born April 8, 1784, 
and died April 5, 1853. Like his father he became a 
well-to-do and successful farmer, and made his home 
at North Providence. He married, November 2, 1815, 
Nancy Brayton Smith, born January i. 1795, and died 
December 2, 1833, a daughter of Nedebiah Smith. 
Jonathan Randall and his wife were the parents of 
the following children: Daniel, born Dec. 15, 1816, 
died Dec. 18, 1816; Julia A., born Feb. 12, 1818, men- 
tioned above as the wife of Lucius Miner, and the 
mother of Mrs. Oliver Hazard Jackson Perry of this 
sketch: Blakely B.. born March 12, 1819. died June 
19. 1838: Alice S., born May 14, 1820, married Edward 
P. Knowles, and died in Providence, Jan. 17, 1871; 
Daniel B., born March 14, 1826, went West in early 
life, and is believed to have been killed by Indians in 
Idaho: Vashti Whipple, born May i, 1828, became 
the wife of William P. Angell. 



CHARLES SLOCUM GODFREY— Among the 

prominent farmers of Apponaug, town of Warwick, 
R. I., Charles Slocum Godfrey deserves especial men- 
tion, his place on the Cowesset road being one of 
the most successful and highly cultivated in this 
region. Mr. Godfrey is a member of an old and dis- 
tinguished New England family, and is the great- 
grandson of Joshua Godfrey, while on his maternal 
side he is descended in the seventh generation from 
Roger Williams. 

Joshua Godfrey came as a young man to East 
Greenwich, R. I., and resided at that place before the 
outbreak of the Revolution. He was drafted for the 
Continental army, but succeeded in securing a sub- 
stitute. Joshua Godfrey married Mary Cooper, by 
whom he had six children, one of which was Slocum, 
mentioned below. 

Slocum Godfrey was born in his father's home at 
East Greenwich, and spent most of his life at that 
place. He was, like most of his descendants, a farmer, 
and was well-known in the community. He married 
Sarah Reynolds, daughter of John and Mary (Hall) 
Reynolds, of Warwick. R. I., her mother being one of 
an old and distinguished Warwick family. They were 
the parents of the following children: Mary H., who 
became the wife of Daniel Briggs; Ruth, who mar- 
ried John Place; Abby; John R., mentioned below; 
Catherine, who became the wife of .A.lbert Greene; 





c^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



TI 



Joshua S. ; Sarah; Elizabeth, who became the wife 
of John H. Madison. 

John R. Godfrey, son of Slocuni and Sarah (Rey- 
nolds) Godfrey, was horn March 7, 1821. on the old 
family homestead at East Greenwich. When four 
years old his parents removed into the town of that 
name, where he attended school for a number of 
years. Later he went with his father to the old farm 
and there assisted him with the agricultural work on 
the place until he had reached the age of twenty-six 
years. In 1848 he went to Warwick, where there was 
situated a farm belonging to his father, which he 
worked for some time and eventually inherited. This 
is the farm upon which his son, Charles Slocum God- 
frey, now resides. John R. Godfrey was a Democrat 
in politics, but although keenly interested in local 
affairs avoided rather than sought political prefer- 
ment or office of any kind. He was a Quaker in his 
belief and worshipped with the Friends of East 
Greenwich, while his wife was a member of the Bap- 
tist church at Apponaug. He married. February 8, 
1847, Eliza G. Williams, a daughter of Daniel Wil- 
liams, of Coventry, R. I., and they were the parents 
of four children, as follows: Anna C, who became 
the wife of George Stowers; Charles Slocum, men- 
tioned below; William H., whose sketch follows; and 
George W., who married Ida Briggs, of East Green- 
wich. R. I. 

Charles Slocum Godfrey was born January 5, 1857, 
on the old homestead where he now lives. He 
attended the Central District School, where he re- 
mained until he had reached the age of sixteen years, 
but for a number of years before reaching this age he 
had spent his summers on the farm with his father, 
learning all the details of farm work. He was an 
ambitious lad and desirous of acquiring the best pos- 
sible education, and with this end in view entered the 
Apponaug school, but was unfortunately obliged to 
give up his studies a little later on account of ill 
health. On the death of his father, Mr. Godfrey pur- 
chased from the other heirs the farm at Warwick, a 
tract of one hundred and ninety acres, and has there 
been engaged in general farming and dairying ever 
since. In this occupation he has met with marked 
success, and since buying the property has built a 
new house with all the modern conveniences, includ- 
ing running water from a tank which is filled by a 
wmdmill. He also has erected new machine sheds 
and a silo. His place is now regarded as one of the 
handsomest in the region. .Although a prominent 
man in the community, and one whose integrity and 
ability possesses the entire confidence of his fellow- 
citizens, he has consistently refused all offers of politi- 
cal office from them, nor has he identified himself with 
any political party, preferring to remain an independ- 
ent voter. He is a member of Central Grange. Patrons 
of Husbandry. 

Charles Slocum Godfrey was united in marriage, 
June 24, 1887, with Izora Nunetta Locke, daughter of 
Mosher W. and Waity (Brown) Locke, old and highly- 
respected residents of Apponaug, R. I. They are the 
parents of the following children: i. Joshua S.. who 
resides with his parents on the farm where he was 



born ; he married Catherine Berncdctte Wilson, a daugh- 
ter of John William and Catherine Louise (Corney) 
Wilson, of Jewett City, Conn. ; their marriage was 
celebrated October 23, 1912, and they are the parents of 
one son, Joshua S., Jr., born Nov. 15. 1914. 2. Sarah 
R., born Sept. 26. 1896, attended the .Apponaug school 
and afterwards the Warwick High School, and now lives 
at home with her parents. 



WILLIAM HALL GODFREY, one of the best 
known and most successful farmers in the region of 
.Apponaug, R. I., and a man of social prominence here, 
is a member of a well-known New England family, the 
history of which appears in preceding sketch. 

Born September 24, 1868, on his father's farm on the 
Cowesset road, in Warwick, William Hall Godfrey 
attended the old Centra! School at .Apponaug. Like 
his father before him. his early training was in the 
healthful environment of farm life, and while not at 
his lessons he assisted his father with his various agri- 
cultural duties. .About the year 1881 he left the farm 
to work for the Oriental Print Works as a pattern card 
maker, and with this company remained approximately 
three years. In i8S.-?. however, he purchased what was 
known as the Emanuel Rice farm, located on Central 
avenue and River Point road near .Apponaug. This tract 
of land consisted at the time of about sixty acres and 
has. with the exception of a short period of years, been 
Mr. Godfrey's home ever since. His first stav there 
lasted only a few years, however, and he then rented it 
for a time. Then for three years he was emnloyed by 
Brown & Sharpc. of Providence, as a machinist. He 
then returned to the operation of his farm and has 
there entraeed in general farming and the dairy business 
with a high degree of success ever since. He has 
added about thirty-three acres to the original property, 
and now owns a model farm of some ninetv-three acres, 
which he keeps under the highest state of cultivation. 
Mr. Godfrey is an Independent in politics, a fact which 
has nrobably prevented him from taking that part in 
public afl^airs for which his obvioiis talents fit him. He 
is. however, very public-spirited, and his idea in the 
part that he plays in politics, is concerned with the wel- 
fare of the communitv-at-large, rather than with any 
political ambitions. He has served as overseer of the 
poor from the year 1913 to the present time, being re- 
elected in November. 1918, with the highest number of 
votes of any candidate on either ticket, and he showed 
himself an efficient and disinterested public servant 
Mr. Godfrey is a member of Central Grange, which he 
helped to organize. Another service which he has per- 
formed for the community was in connection with the 
establishment of a new modern central district school 
and the new Grange Hall, both of which he was largely 
instrumental in procuring for the community. The 
latter building is a large and spacious one. which 
through his endeavors is proving a splendid investment. 
In his religious belief Mr. Godfrey was reared in the 
Baptist church, and although not a formal member is 
still an active and liberal supporter thereof. 

Mr. Godfrey married Cfirst). on March 20. 1881. 
Carrie Esther Williams, a daughter of George H. and 
Mary (Spink) Williams, and like her husband, a de- 
scendant in the seventh generation from Roger Wil- 



12 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



liams. They were the parents of one son, William 
Harold Godfrey, born April 30, 1894, and now in the 
United States Navy, in which he enlisted as a car- 
penter's mate in April, 1918. After the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Godfrey married (second), April 12, 1910, 
Bertha Money (Mumford) Waterman, widow of Walter 
Waterman, and daughter of Isaac Newton and Sarah 
Jane (Money) Mumford, of Phenix, R. I. They were 
the parents of one son, Wallace, who resides with his 
mother, and is now a student. He is a bright and 
alert young man and is active in helping in the work 
on the farm. Isaac N. Mumford, the father of Mrs. 
Godfrey, was a son of Paul A. and Mary (Hopkins) 
Mumford, and his wife, Sarah Jane (Money) Mum- 
ford, is a daughter of George Brown and Mary Jane 
(Freeman) Money, and a descendant of Lafayette 
Freeman, who came to this country on the "Maj-flower." 
Isaac Newton Mumford learned the machinists' trade 
as a boy, and was later the depot agent at Phenix and 
Harris, R. I. He was the owner of considerable prop- 
erty at Phenix. In the latter years of his life he pur- 
chased a farm, and there spent his remaining days. He 
and his wife were the parents of the following children: 
Thomas Paul, Freeman Lafayette, John Henry, George 
Brown, and Sadie May, who became Mrs. George 
Emond. Mrs. Godfrey is, like her husband, a member 
of the Central Grange. She is a woman of wide culti- 
vation, and intensely interested in historical and gen- 
ealogical subjects. She has in her possession at the 
present time a very interesting volume composed of old 
newspapers, principally "The Guardian of Liberty," 
which was printed in Newport under the date of 
October 10, 1800. In these papers are many articles 
concerning the ancestry of the Mumford families. 



HORACE MILLER— In the early history of mer- 
cantile life in the city of Pawtucket, R. I., the name of 
Horace Miller is placed with those of the leading 
merchants of the time. He stands out prominently 
among those founders of early enterprise, to whose 
progressive industry and pride in the growth and dev- 
elopment of early Pawtucket the present industrial 
leadership of the city in the State of Rhode Island is in 
a large measure due. 

Horace Miller, son of Josiah Whipple and Mary 
(Slack) Miller, was born in 1801, in what was then a 
part of the town of North Providence, R. I. He was a 
descendant of several well known families of Colonial 
origin. He was educated in the public schools of 
North Providence, and at an early age quitted his 
studies to enter business life. After a short period 
spent in the employ of Pawtucket merchants, he estab- 
lished himself in the dry goods business, among the 
first in Pawtucket to engage in this field. The business 
proved highly successful, and he conducted it in part- 
nership with his brother Daniel for many years. Horace 
Miller rose gradually to a place of prominence in the 
business world of Pawtucket, and became connected 
largely with its financial and civic life. He was a 
member of the original board of directors of the Paw- 
tucket Fire Insurance Company, which was chartered 
at the May session of the Rhode Island General As- 
sembly in 1848, organized June 19, 1848, and began 
business on February 10 of the following year. Through 



his connection with many of the large enterprises of 
the city in either an advisory or executive capacity he 
came to be universally respected for the sagacity of his 
judgment and his keen business foresight, and his 
counsel was sought by many business men. Horace 
Miller was a member of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, active in its work for many decades, and was 
superintendent of the Sunday school for a long period 
of years. He was highly respected for the integrity of 
his business dealings, and the uprightness of his life, 
and at his death was deeply and sincerely mourned. 
Earlier in life he had been keenly interested in military 
affairs, and was one of the forty citizens of North 
Providence who on May 2, 1824, organized a military 
company, and at the May session of the General Assem- 
bly of the same year secured a charter as the "Fayette 
Rifle Corps, in the Second Regiment of Militia." The 
company was named in honor of General Lafayette. 

Horace Miller married in Bristol, R. I., Bishop Gris- 
wold officiating, on November 30, 1829, Elizabeth Burden 
Monroe, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Burden) 
Monroe, of Bristol. She was baptized at Bristol, June 
9, 181 1, and died on March 4, 1907. She was a devoted 
member of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church of 
Pawtucket, and like her husband took an active part 
in its charitable and philanthropic efforts. Their child- 
ren were: I. Horace George, mentioned below. 2. 
Ephraim Monroe Nelson, who resides at Waverly, 
Mass. 3. Mary. 4. Annie. The Misses Miller reside 
at No. 75 Park place, Pawtucket, whither they removed 
about 1894 from the old Horace Miller homestead on 
Main street, near Park place, where they were bom 
and which was built by their father before his marriage. 
They are members of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
of St. Paul, and take much interest in many depart- 
ments of the work of the parish. They are also mem- 
bers of the Pawtucket Chapter, Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 

Horace Miller died in Pawtucket, in 1851, and was 
buried in Mineral Springs Cemetery, his body later 
being removed to Riverside Cemetery, where also his 
widow was interred in 1907. 



HORACE GEORGE MILLER, M. D.— The late 
Horace George Miller, M. D., for many years one of 
the foremost members of the medical profession in 
Pawtucket, R. I., was bom April 6, 1840, in that city, 
the son of Horace and Elizabeth Burden (Monroe) 
Miller. His early schooling was obtained in the well- 
known "Jones school hoyse," and was later continued 
under the guidance of his uncle. Nathaniel Bowen 
Cooke, the well known educator of Bristol, R. I., at the 
latter's boarding school at Webster, Mass. He also 
attended the Church Hill School of Pawtucket, and the 
Lyon & Frieze School of Providence. He studied 
Latin under Rev. George Taft, D. D., then the rector 
of St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Pawtucket. Enter- 
ing Brown University, he received the de.oree of Master 
of Arts in i860, following which he entered Harvard 
Medical School, enrolled as a pupil of the late Dr. Lloyd 
Morton, of Pawtucket, and the late Dr. Sulvanus Clapp, 
of Pawtucket, and was graduated in 1865 with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. During the Civil War Dr. 
Miller enlisted in the volunteer service and was with the 




<^^ ^y^^i.44^*i^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



13 



army engaged in guarding Washington, D. C, serving 
as a commissary sergeant. Soon after this he became 
assistant surgeon of the United States Marine Hospital 
at Chelsea, Mass., and was assistant to the surgeons at 
the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
in Boston. Following this he went to Europe, where he 
made a special study of eye and car diseases, and in 
January, 1868, began the practice of his profession in 
Providence as a specialist in eye and ear troubles. 
Here he continued in active practice until his death, 
which occurred May 29, 1908, while on a vacation trip. 
His body was brought to Providence and deposited in 
Swan Point Cemetery. He became one of the leading 
physicians and specialists in eye and ear infirmities in 
the State of Rhode Island, and when the Rhode Island 
Hospital was opened in 1868 he was appointed opthal- 
mic and aural surgeon, which connection continued 
during the remainder of his life. At the time of his 
death he was senior member of the staff, and was 
president of the staff association. Dr. Miller was a 
member of the Rhode Island Medical Society, of which 
he was president from 1886 to 1888; a member of the 
Providence Medical Society, president in 1S76 and 
1877; member of the American Medical Association; 
fellow of the American Academy of Medicine; mem- 
ber of the American Opthalmological Society; vice- 
president of the American Otological Society, and a 
meniher of the New England Opthalmological Society, 
of which he was president two years. 

Dr. Miller married, July 4, 1871, Helen Woods, 
daughter of John Woods, of Boston, Mass., who died 
in February, igog, in Providence, K. I. Dr. Miller died 
at Camden, Me., on May 29, 1908. 



THOMAS I. HUDSON— As a fitting climax to a 
long and honorable career of usefulness, which began 
and has been confined to the city of Providence, R. L, 
Mr. Hudson is now (igiS) serving his city as a mem- 
ber of the General Assembly of his native State. He is 
a son of Thomas E. Hudson, born in Newport, 1815, 
died in Providence, R. I., in 1868, a contractor and 
builder of Providence for twenty-five years. He mar- 
ried Lydia Ann Smith, of Newport, born in 1820. died 
in 1892. 

Thomas I. Hudson was born in Providence, Septem- 
ber 20, 1845, and obtained a good public school educa- 
tion, finishing with high school. He began active busi- 
ness life with Thomas Phillips & Company, the oldest 
plumbing house in Providence, serving three years with 
that house, beginning May 14, 1862, and thoroughly 
mastering the plumber's trade. At the age of twenty- 
four he left the Phillips Company and entered the em- 
ploy of David Cady & Company of Providence, as fore- 
man of their plumbing department, remaining with that 
company four years. He was then twenty-eight years 
of age and had an expert knowledge of his trade and 
about ten years experience as apprentice, journeyman 
and foreman. Having in addition to his experience and 
skill the control of sufficient capital, Mr. Hudson de- 
cided, in 1873, to start a plumbing business under his 
own name. This he did with headquarters at No. 6 
Cranston street, a location he occupied for seventeen 
years. He prospered in business, new customers came 
to him in such abundance that in 1S90 he moved to 



more commodious quarters, Nos. 13-15 Cranston street. 
There he kept about twenty men constantly employed, 
but was compelled to enlarge his present location, Ko. 
231 Cranston street, being first occupied October I, 
1915. He is still at the head of the business he founded 
forty-five years ago, although he has delegated the 
heavier burdens to younger shoulders. During the 
years in business he has executed many important con- 
tracts with the city of Providence and with many of the 
large corporations of the city. He has won success as 
a business man through energetic, upright prosecution 
of the duty in hand, by keeping his word sacred and 
his contracted obligations inviolate. No man in the 
business world bettor deserved the success which he 
has attained and no man has warmer, truer friends. 
He is a Republican in politics and has long been one 
of the party war horses, ever ready for party service. 
He has sat in many party conventions as delegate, but 
never sought office, the nomination for assemblyman 
which he received in igi6 coming unsolicited. He was 
elected at the November polls, and during the session 
of the Rhode Island Legislation served on committees 
on elections. State institutions and governor's com- 
munications. He is a member of the Masonic order and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; his clubs the 
West Side, Central and Ponham ; his religious faith 
Episcopalian. 

Mr. Hudson married, in Providence, in 1868, EUa 
Devereaux, of Pawtucket, R. I., daughter of Elisha 
Devereaux, superintendent of the Eagle Screw Com- 
pany. They were the parents of two daughters and 
two sons: Maude E., born in 1870, died i8go; Harry 
K., born 1874; Thomas I., Jr., born 1874, died 1897; 
E. Gertrude, born 1883, married Benjamin Bayliss, of 
New York. Mrs. Hudson died December 18, 1893. 



THOMAS W. LIND, deceased, one of the best- 
known riguros in the manufacturing jewelers' trade in 
Rhode Island in the last quarter century, was born in 
Montrose, Scotland, on March 2, 1845, the descendant 
of a family which has occupied a prominent place in 
Scottish history for five hundred years. Numerous 
branches of the family are of the landed gentry and 
entitled to bear arms; the surname is picturesque in its 
derivation, and signifies literally "at the linden-tree." 
Thomas W. Lind was the great-great-grandson of the 
famous Marshal George Keith (1693-1778) who served 
under Marlborough, and like his brother, Francis, 
Marshal George Keith was a zealous Jacobite, taking 
part in the rising of 1715. after which he escaped to 
the continent. In the following year he was attainted. 
He lived in Spain for many years, where he concerned 
himself with Jacobite intrigues, but took no part in 
the rebellion of 1745, proceeding about that year to 
Prussia, where he became, like his brother, intimate 
with Frederick the Great. Frederick employed him in 
several diplomatic posts, and he is said to have con- 
veyed valuable information to the earl of Chatham, as 
a reward for which he received a pardon from George 
II., and returned to Scotland in 1759. The barony of 
Keith in East Lothian is said to have been granted by 
Malcolm II., King of Scotland, to a member of the 
house for services against the Danes. The office of 
great marischal of Scotland, hereditary in the Keith 



14 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



family, was confirmed to Sir Robert Keith by a charter 
of King Robert Bruce. From Marshal George Keith 
the line descends through Alexander Keith, grandfather 
of Thomas W. Lind, who married Elizabeth Scott; 
their daughter, Helen Storich Keith, became the wife 
of Thomas Wilson Lind, of Montrose, Scotland, and 
mother of the late Thomas W. and Peter Lind, 

In 1852 Thomas W. Lind, Sr., came to America with 
his famMy, settling in North Troy, Vt., where his sons 
were educated. Thomas W. Lind, on completing his 
schooling, came to Providence, where he entered upon 
a business course in the old Schofield Commercial Col- 
lege. Realizing from the outset that the great manu- 
facturing industries of Providence offered a fertile 
field for future business efforts, Mr. Lind entered the 
employ of the Providence Tool Company, which was 
then under contract with the Turkish Government, man- 
ufacturing rifles, as an inspector of forgings. 

Mr. Lind resigned his position with the Providence 
Tool Company to accept the management of the busi- 
ness of his brother, Alexander Lind. This enterprise, 
from which has grown the present concern of the T. 
W. Lind Company, was launched in Providence, in 
1865, by Alexander K. Lind, for the manufacture of 
jewelers' findings, and was the pioneer industry of its 
kind in the city. It was begun on a small scale in a 
part of the shop of E. W, Holden, with a diminutive 
capital The demand for the production was great, 
however, and within a short period Alexander K. Lind 
removed to No. 36 Potter street (now Garnet street). 
Soon afterward the business was quartered in No. 33 
Potter street, where Thomas W. Lind assumed its 
management. The output of those early years, while it 
satisfied a steadily increasing demand and met the needs 
of the period, was primitive in comparison with the 
productions of the company to-day. Having decided to 
make the development of this business his life-work, 
Thomas W. Lind henceforward strained every talent 
to bring it to the highest standard of etificiency. The 
death of his brother in 1880 left him free to carry 
out a policy of expansion long contemplated. He began 
gradually to introduce the finest of modern machinery 
and new methods of manufacture. Possessing con- 
siderable mechanical genius, he gave much time to the 
perfecting of inventions for the making of jewelers' 
findings. He was a business man of keen perceptions, 
alive to every changing phase of the trade in which 
he engaged, thoroughly conversant with every detail 
of his business from the least important detail of manu- 
facture to the larger problems of finance. He was an 
able executive and organizer. Mr. Lind made several 
trips to Europe for the purposing of studying condi- 
tions in the jewelry trade on the continent; these trips 
were fruitful of several valuable ideas which he later 
applied to his own business. His aim was to raise not 
only the standard of production in his own enterprise 
but to advance the ideals of the entire trade. In 1890 
the business was removed to its present location, at No. 
67 Friendship street. In 191 1 the firm purchased the 
building. In 1902 Peter Lind became a member of the 
firm ; in the same year the business was incorporated as 
the T. W. Lind Company. Mr. Lind remained the 
active head of the firm, dictating all its policies until 
his retirement, in January, 1909. His latter years were 



spent on his farm at Greenwood, R. I. Few men were 
better-known and more eminently respected in the man- 
ufacturing jewelers' trade in New England than Thomas 
W. Lind, and there were few of his contemporaries 
who exerted as great an influence on the trade as he 
did. The high artistic standard of the productions of 
the T. W. Lind Company perforce brought rivals to a 
higher standard of excellence in order that they might 
compete with it. 

Thomas W. Lind was essentially the man-of-affairs, 
at his best when engaged in creative work. He had no 
patience with the idler. Easily approachable, he was 
the friend and confidant of hundreds. Equity, fairness 
and justice characterized his entire career in the busi- 
ness world. He fulfilled not only the letter of the con- 
tract, but its spirit. Fraternally he was a member of 
Redwood Lodge, No. 35, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. He was prominent in trade organizations, and 
was a member of the New England Manufacturing 
Jewelers' and Silversmiths' Association. Thomas W. 
Lind died at his home in Greenwood, R. I.. October 14, 
1917. He is survived by his widow, Annie M. Lind, who 
makes her home in Greenwood. 



PETER LIND, late treasurer and general manager 
of the T. W. Lind Company, and like his brother a 
prominent figure for many years in the manufacturing 
jewelry trade in Rhode Island, was born in Montrose, 
Scotland, June 19, 1849, son of Thomas Wilson and 
Helen Storich (Keith) Lind. He removed with his 
parents to America in 1854, and received his early edu- 
cation in the schools of North Troy, Vt. On finishing 
his schooling he went to Taunton, Mass., where he 
learned the trade of machinist. Mr. Lind came to Prov- 
idence and entered the employ of the Rhode Island 
Locomotive Works, where he remained for several 
years. He then became connected with the John Hope 
& Sons Engraving and Manufacturing Company, makers 
of pantograph machines for textile printing. 

In 1882 Peter Lind resigned his position with John 
Hope & Sons to enter his brother's establishment as 
superintendent of the factory. He held this position 
for fourteen years, his brother's chief advisor and con- 
fidant, and at the end of this time retired to enter busi- 
ness independently. In 1896, in partnership with the 
late Charles J. Heimberger Mr. Lind established the 
firm of Heimberger & Lind and began the manufacture 
of jewelers' findings, in Providence. The business was 
highly successful from the outset, and Mr. Lind contin- 
ued active in its affairs until 1902, when at the request 
of his brother he returned to the T. W. Lind Company 
as a member of the firm. The business, in which he 
subsequently bought a controlling interest, was incor- 
porated in igo2 as the T. W. Lind Company, with T. 
W. Lind as president, Peter Lind, treasurer and general 
manager, and William T. Lind, secretary. Peter Lind 
was not only a mechanical genius of the highest order, 
but was also a most able business man. His far-sighted 
financial policies were in a large measure responsible 
for the rapid growth of the firm. 

Peter Lind was a well-known figure in fraternal and 
social circles in Providence. He was active in Masonry, 
and was a member of Redwood Lodge, No. 35, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Providence Chapter, No. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



IS 



I, Royal Arch Masons; St. John's Commandery. Knights 
Templar; and Palestine Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was also a member 
of Clan Fraser, No. ii. Order of Scottish Clans, of 
Pawtucket. He was a man of magnetic personality, firm 
in his friendships, sincere in purpose. His charities 
and benefactions were many, but did not come to light 
until after his death. He was eminently respected in 
business circles in Providence, and his death on March 
31, 1915, was the cause of widespread and sincere grief. 
Peter Lind married, in 1880, Margaret \V. Crombie, 
of Edinburgh, Scotland. They were the parents of 
two children: William G. Lind, mentioned elsewhere in 
this work, and Ethel I., who married Waldo Whit- 
marsh, of Providence. 



WILLIAM G. LIND, general manager and acting 
treasurer of the T. W. Lind Company, of Providence, 
the successor of his father, Peter Lind, and uncle, 
Thomas W. Lind. in the business which was founded 
in Rhode Island, in r865, was born in Providence, Nov- 
ember 25, 1881, son of Peter and Margaret W. (Crombie) 
Lind. He attended the public schools of the city, and 
on completing a course of study in the Manual Train- 
ing High School, in looo, entered the employ of his 
uncle, Thomas W. Lind. He continued as an em- 
ployee for six years, during which period he made an 
exhaustive study of every department of the business. 
In 1906 Mr. Lind became secretary of the corporation. 
After the retirement of his uncle in 1909 he was made 
assistant manager. The steadily failing health of his 
father, the late Peter Lind, brought practically the entire 
responsibility of the business upon him, and he was 
virtually its head for several years prior to his father's 
death, in 191 5. He then succeeded to the office of gen- 
eral manager of the company, and is at present (1918) 
acting treasurer. Mr. Lind ranks prominently among 
the progressive business men of the day in Providence. 
He is a member of the New England Jewelers' & Sil- 
versmiths' .Association. Mr. Lind is active in Masonic 
and club circles in Providence. He is a member of St. 
John's Lodge, No. i. Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; St. John's Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Providence Chapter, Royal .\rch Masons ; Providence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; Palestine Temple, 
Ancient .Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; 
and of Rhode Island Consistory. He is also a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of 
the Edgewood Yacht Club. 

On November 21, 1910, William G. Lind married 
Velna Bangs, daughter of the late Henry C. Bangs, of 
Providence. Mr. and Mrs. Lind are the parents of a 
son, William G. Lind, Jr., born June 28, 1918. 



CHARLES EUGENE SALISBURY— The appear- 
ance of the above name in a work of this character 
calls for neither introduction nor explanation by reason 
of the fact that Mr. Salisbury has been for more than 
th'irty years a representative of the Providence bar of 
which he is now one of the acknowledged leaders. He 
is also numbered among those citizens who are always 
ready to do their part in the work of progress and 
reform. 

Garner Abel Salisbury, father of Charles Eugene 



Salisbury, was a farmer. He married Mary Maria 
Patterson. Mr. Salisbury died when his son Charles 
E. was but eight years old, and Mrs. Salisbury passed 
away in i8<)4. 

Charles Eugene Salisbury, son of Garner Abel and 
Mary Maria (Patterson) Salisbury, was born Decem- 
ber 9. 1858, at Scituatc, R. I., and as a boy attended 
school during the winter months, his summers being 
spent in assisting on the farm. Later he attended Lap- 
ham Institute, at North Scituate. and then Fort F'.dward 
Collegiate Institute at Fort Edward, N. Y., graduating 
from the latter institution in 1884. He then entered 
the law office of Hon. Benjamin N. Lapham, of Prov- 
idence, and there for three years pursued his profess- 
sional studies. In October, 1887, he was admitted to the 
t)ar. He was also admitted to the bar of the United 
States Circuit Court in 1892. Mr. Salisbury practised 
continuously in association with Mr. Lapham until i8yo, 
when in May of that year the elder man passed away. 
Mr. Salisbury retained the old offices at No. 75 West- 
minster street and still occupies them, conducting an 
extensive general practice and at the same time spec- 
ializing in real estate law, wills and the settlement of 
estates. The principles advocated by the Republican 
party have always received Mr. Salisbury's political 
allegiance, and for years he has served on the Repub- 
lican State central committee, an office which he still 
retains. He affiliates with the Masonic fraternity, hav- 
ing taken the Blue Lodge, Chapter, and Council de- 
grees. He is a member of Roger Williams Baptist 
Church of Providence. 

Mr. Salisbury married, November 20, 1894, Mary C. 
Remington, and they are the parents of one daughter, 
Marion, born September 27, 1897, and now in her 
sophomore year at Brown University. The family spend 
their winters in Providence and their summers at North 
Scituate. Mr. and Mrs. Salisbury are both devoted to 
the ties of family and friendship, and find their chief 
happiness in the life of the household. 

His professional career has been one of quiet, force- 
ful attainment, of an assured standing at the bar, and 
as a citizen, while never holding any office with the 
exception of the one mentioned above, he has always 
been one of the men who counted, his influence being 
invariably exerted in behalf of good government and 
everything that makes for true advancement. This is 
a worthy record, richly deserving the emulation of 
younger men now coming into prominence. 



FRANCIS D. MORSE— The death of the late 
Francis U. Morse, in the city of Pawtucket, R. I., on 
June 22, 1913, removed not only from business circles 
in which he had been an honored member a ligure of 
prominence, but removed from the religious life of the 
city a leader whose honesty of purpose and Christian 
integrity of life had made him loved and respected 
throughout his long and useful career. Descendant of 
a long line of rugged Puritan ancestors, embodying in 
his personality the virtues of the early founders of the 
nation, tempered by the breadth of view and tolerance 
of a later age, he represented the best type of Christ- 
ian gentleman. Kind, earnest, just and charitable in 
all his acts, he wielded a quiet yet determining influence 
on the lives of the religious body of which he was a 



i6 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



member through the potent medium of a fine example 
In business life he applied the same pnnciples to all 
his dealings, with the result that he was universally 
known as a man whose word was as good as his bond. 
The Morse coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms— Argent a battle-axe In pale gules between 
^''cres'i— A lion rampant supporting a plumb-rule. 

(I) Richard Morse, the first of the direct line of 
whom he have authoritative information, was born in 
the historic town of Dedham, England, and married 
there, February l^, 1586, Margaret Symson. Among 
their children was Samuel Morse, who became the 
founder of the .American family of the name, of which 
Francis Dwight Morse was a descendant. 

(II) Samuel Morse, son of Richard and Margaret 
(Symson) Morse, was born in Dedham, England, 
where he resided up to the time of his emigration to 
New England. He sailed for the New World m the 
ship "Increase," April 15, 1635, and settled in Dodham, 
Mass., which was named by emigrants from the town 
in Old England in remembrance of their old home. He 
was admitted a freeman there, October 8. 1640, and later 
removed to the adjoining town of Medfield, where many 
of his descendants have lived. Samuel Morse was a 
prominent member of the early commimities in which 
he resided, and was a town officer of Dedham, as well 
as one of its proprietors. He died April 5. 1654, and 
his will was proved January 30. 1654-55- He married, 
in England, Elizabeth, who died June 20, 1655. She was 
fortv-eight years old at the time when she emigrated. 
Their children were; I. John, born in 1611. 2. Daniel, 
born in 1613. 3. Joseph, mentioned below. 4- Abigail, 
married Daniel Fisher, of Dedham. 5. Mary, married 
Samuel BuUen. 6. Jeremiah. 

(III) Joseph Morse, son of Samuel Morse, was born 
in England, in 1615, and settled first in Watertown, 
but in 1637 removed to Dedham, Mass. He mar- 
ried, in 1638, Hannah Phillips. While he was clearing 
land at Medfield, and preparing the house for his family 
who were living at Dorchester, he died, leaving the new 
home unfinished, and the growing corn and unfinished 
log house were left to the care of his children. The 
widow married, in 1658, Thomas Boyden. who died in 
Boston, in 1767, at the home of her eldest daughter. 
The children of Joseph and Hannah (Phillips) Morse 
were: l. Samuel, born in 1639. 2. Hannah, born in 
1640. 3. Sarah, born in 1643. 4. Dorcas, born in 1645. 
5. Elizabeth, born in 1647. 6. Joseph, mentioned below. 
7. Jeremiah, born in 1651. 8. Child, died young. 

(IV) Captain Joseph (2) Morse, son of Joseph (l) 
and Hannah (Phillips) Morse, was born September 26, 
1649. He lived in Sherborn, where he built the first 
mill in company with Captain Ware. He was a promi- 
nent man in the community, and was a deputy to the 
General Court. The first public worship was held at 
his house. He married (first) October 17, 1671, Mehit- 
able Wood, daughter of Nicholas and Mary (Wilkes) 
Wood. She was born July 22, 1655, died November 12, 
1681. He married (second) April 11, 1683, Hannah, 
daughter of Robert and Joanna Badcock, who was born 
in Milton, Mass., February 8, 1664, and died in Sherborn, 
November 9, 1711. He married (third) Mrs. Hannah 
Baxter Dyer, on May 17, 1713. She was the widow of 
Captain Joseph Dyer of Braintree, Mass., (or Wey- 



mouth), who was born in 1661, and died September 4, 
1727. He died in Sherborn, February 19, 1717. Chil- 
dren: I. Mehitable, born .A.pril 25, 1673, died young. 
2. Joseph, mentioned below. 3. Mehitable, born Nov. 
2, 1681. 4. James, born July i, 1686. 5. Hannah, born 
April 5, 1689. 6. Sarah, born on April 12, 1692. 7. 
Captain David, born Dec. 31, 1694. 8. Isaac, born Sept. 
14, 1697. 9. Keziah, born June 30, 1700. 10. Asa, born 
Aug. 24. 1703. . , , X 

(V) Joseph (3) Morse, son of Captain Joseph (2) 
Morse, was born in Sherborn, Mass.. March 25, 1679. 
died there, April 18, 1734; he married, April 14, 1/02, 
Prudence Adams, daughter of Henry and Prudence 
(Frairy) Adams. She was born April 10, 1683, and died 
in 1772. Their children were: I. Henry, born June 14, 
1703. 2. Joseph, mentioned below. 3. Seth, born 
Sept. 12, 1708. 4. Elisha, born April 13, 1715. 5. 
Jacob, born Sept. 21, I7I7- 6. Judith, born Oct. 13, 
1720. 7. John, born Dec. 31. 1725. died young. 

(VI) Joseph (4) Morse, son of Joseph (3) and Pru- 
dence (.Adams) Morse, was bom in Sherborn, Mass., 
November 15, 1705. He settled in Soutlibridge, where 
he bought a farm, which has passed by inheritance 
through seven generations to its present owner. He 
married on May 17. 1735. Experience Morse, who was_a 
descendant of Samuel Morse, the emigrant ancestor in 
the fifth generation, Noah (4). Daniel (3), Daniel (2), 
Samuel (i). Mr. and Mrs. Morse were the parents of 
several children, among them Jason Morse, mentioned 
below. 

(VII) Jason Morse, son of Joseph (4) and Experi- 
ence (Morse) Morse, was born in Southbridge, Mass., 
May 12. 1740, and died March 26, 1806. He married, 
March 16, 1759, Phebe Stacy, of Southbridge, Mass., 
bom March 8. 1740. He settled and established the 
family in Southbridge. He was a prosperous farmer, 
and well known citizen, and was prominent in the life 
of the community in his time. 

(\'III) Jason (2) Morse, son of Jason (i) and Phebe 
(Stacy) Morse, was born in Southbridge, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 28, 1769, and died there in 1844. He also fol- 
lowed farming, and was a leading man in the town. 
He married, April 4. 1793, Catherine Plimpton, of 
Southbridge, born August 14, 1769, died January 9, 
1810, and they w^ere the parents of James Morse, men- 
tioned below. 

(IX) James Morse, son of Jason (2) and Catherine 
(Plimpton) Morse, was born in Southbridge. Mass., 
January I, 1798, and died in Genoa Bluff. Iowa, in 
1866. He married Elvila Marsh, of a prominent South- 
bridge, Mass., family. They were the parents of Fran- 
cis Dwight Morse, mentioned below. 

(X) Francis Dwight Morse, son of James and Elvila 
(Marsh) Morse, was born in the town of Soiithbridg:e, 
Mass., May 23, 1830. He was a lineal descendant in 
the ninth American generation of Samuel M.>rse, 
founder of the line in New England, who was one of 
the pioneers of Dedham. The Morse family in subse- 
quent generations became allied with many notable 
Colonial families, among them namely: Frairy, An- 
thony, Fisher, Barbour and Wood, all of whom became 
freemen before 1640. Inheriting the finest traditions 
of a long line of upright ancestors, he verified in his 
life the value of an honorable heredity. He attended 
the public schools of Southbridge, Mass., until he 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



17 



reached the apre of seventeen years, when he entered the 
academy at Monson, Mass., from which he was grad- 
uated about 1841). After completinR his studies he 
learned the trade of bookbindingf, which he pursued for 
a time, but in 1858 ho removed to the town of Genoa 
Bluff. Iowa, and there purchased a large farm. For a 
period of six years he conducted this farm during the 
summer months, and during the winter months taught 
in the local district schools. In 1864 Mr. Morse re- 
turned to the East, and immediately secured employ- 
ment. For twelve years following he accumulated all 
his available resources, and in 1876 established himself 
in the bookbinding and blankbook business, in partner- 
ship with his son, Walter F. Morse, under the firm name 
of F. D. Morse & Son. This business proved highly 
successful. In 1878, the death of Walter F. Morse left 
a vacancy in the firm, and another son, Frederic A. 
Morse, was admitted by his father two years later. 
From this time forward until the death of Mr. Morse, 
Sr.. the business developed rapidly, and becan.e one of 
the leading enterprises of its kind in the city. Mr. 
Morse was a business man of fine ability, talented in 
organizing and directing the channels of his business. 
He was thoroughly versed in every department of the 
trade of bookbinding, and through close application to 
his affairs advanced his fortunes considerably. He 
was honored and respected as an employer. 

His deep interest in religious affairs dated from early 
youth. At the age of thirteen years he joined the Con- 
gregational church of the town of Southbridge, Mass., 
and very early became a teacher in its Sunday school. 
Throughout his entire life he was a prominent figure in 
the Congregational bodies of the cities in which he 
resided. On settling in Pawtucket, R. I., he became a 
member of the First Church, and immediately became 
identified with many departments of its work On the 
organization of the Park Place Congregational Church 
in 1882, he became one of its charter members and was 
chosen deacon, an office which he held until the time of 
his death. He was one of the leading members of the 
congregation, and until advancing years made active 
effort impossible, an active and valuable wurker in the 
interests of the church, supporting its charities and 
philanthropies liberally. A venerable patriarch in his 
closing years, he was loved and honored by the entire 
congregation. Mr. Morse was a Republican in political 
affiliation, but in no sense of the word an office seeker. 
He took a large interest in the affairs of the city of 
Pawtucket, and was for many years identified with all 
movements of importance for the advancement of civic 
welfare. He never aspired to public office, however. 

In 1855. Francis D. Morse married Sarah F. Raw- 
son, daughter of George B. and Sarah (Cook) Rawson. 
Mrs. Morse died in 1887. She was a descendant in the 
seventh generation of Secretary Edward Rawson, and 
Rev. Thomas Hooker, who in 1636 removed from New- 
town (Cambridge) with his entire congregation to 
Hartford, and founded that colony, also of the cele- 
brated Rev. John Wilsim, first pastor of Boston. Mr. 
and Mrs. Morse were the parents of three children : 
I. Walter F., partner in the firm of F. D. Morse & 
Son. from 1876 until his death in 1878. 2. Frederic A., 
present head of the firm of F. D. Morse & Son. 3. Eliz- 
abeth C, who became the wife of George E. Miller, of 
R 1-2-2 



Pawtucket, where she now resides. His grandchildren 
are: Elizabeth B., Eleanor W. and Frederic R. Morse. 
Francis Dwight Morse died at his home in Pawtucket, 
R. I., June 22, 1913, at the venerable age of eighty-three 
years. 



REV. JEREMIAH FRANCIS O'MEARA— Father 
O'Meara was installed permanent rector of St. Mary's 
Roman Catholic Church, Providence, February 6, 1918, 
succeeding Rev. Thomas P. Grace. He is a native of 
Rhode Island, and since i8f)6, has been engaged in min- 
isterial work, the divine calling having been his boyhood 
choice. He is a son of Daniel O'Mcara. who was born 
in County Kerry, Ireland, in June, 1S36, and came to 
the United States as a young man, settled in Cranston, 
R. I., and there died in March, 1911. He married in 
February, 1868, Mary Nihill, born in County Clare, Ire- 
land, in 1840. She died .\ugust 7, 1873, leaving two chil- 
dren : Jcrcm.iah Francis, of further mention ; and Mary, 
now Sister Mary Loretto, a Sister of Mercy, educated 
at St. Francis Xavier's Academy, Providence, now con- 
nected with the St. .Moysus Orphan .Asylum, Provi- 
dence. 

Jeremiah Francis O'Meara was born in Cranston, R. 
I., June 29, 1869, and there began his education in the 
public schools. He continued his studies at La Salle 
.•\cadtmy. Providence, then for three years was in the 
employ of the Cranston Print Works as bookkeeper and 
paymaster. The following three years were spent at 
St. Laurent College, Montreal, Canada, followed by 
courses at St. John's Seminary, Brighton. Mass., 
whence he was graduated Ph. B. and ordained a priest 
of the Roman Catholic church, September 24, 1896. He 
pursued post-graduate study at the Catholic University, 
Washington, D. C, receiving the degree S. T. L. His 
first appointment was as assistant to the pastor of 
Sacred Heart Church, Pawtucket, R. I., where he re- 
mained fourteen years, June, 1898- 191 2, his pastorate 
at St. James Church, Arctic, R. I., beginning in 1912, 
and until 1918, he served that church and St. Mary's at 
Crompton. On February 6, 1918, he was installed rector 
of St. Mary's Church of Providence. He is a member 
.)f the board of e.xaminers of La Salle Academy, and 
ludge of the Matrimonial Court (Diocese of Provi- 
dence) St. Mary's Church consists of nearly eight thou- 
iand souls, with all departments well organized. St. 
Mary's ParcKhial School provides educational facilities 
for 960 pupils in grammar school grades, with a two 
years' commercial course for boys and girls, and a four 
years' classical course for girls, the sexes kept apart in 
all grades. Music and art are taught, the twenty-two 
teachers employed in the school all being Sisters of the 
Order of Notre Dame, their Mother house at Ville 
Marie, Montreal. The elder boys are under the care of 
four Christian Brothers. The church edifice was 
erected by Rev. John Quinn, the first pastor, who was 
followed by Rev. Robert Sullivan, and he by Rev. 
Thomas P. Grace, who was succeeded by the present 
pastor. Rev. Jeremiah F. O'Meara. 



FRANK G. BURNETT, M. D.— For twenty years 
prior to his death in 1912, the late Dr. Frank G. Burnett 
was one of the foremost figures in the medical profes- 
sion in the city of Pawtucket, R. I. His practice, a large 



i8 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



one. had been built up with tireless energy and unswerv- 
ing devotion to the best ideals of the profession, and 
through it all ran the ideal of service. To those who 
could not pay he gave as freely of his time and skill 
as to those of wealth. In the twenty years of his con- 
nection with the medical profession of Pawtucket. he 
made for himself scores of friends among medical men, 
and a host of staunch admirers and friends in all walks 
of life in the city. He was most sincerely and deeply 
mourned at his death, which occurred March 3, 1912. 

Burnett Arms — Per saltire gules and vert, a sword 
erect, in pale proper .surmounted by a tiuglehorn 
stringed or, on a chief embattled, ermine three holly 
leaves of the second. 

Crest — On a mount, a vine, out of clouds, to the sin- 
ister, a man's hand issuant, grasping a knife, in the 
act of pruning, all proper, the whole on a mural cor- 
onet or. 

Dr. Frank G. Burnett was born in the town of Dud- 
ley, Mass., May 30, 1861, the son of Austin C. and 
Emma (Perry) Burnett, and a member of a family 
long established and prominent in the vicinity of Dud- 
ley. He received his early education in the public 
schools of the town, and at a later date entered the 
Dudley Academy, where he prepared for college. He 
matriculated at the Burlington (Vermont) Medical Col- 
lege, where he gained the preliminary portion of his 
medical education. Dr. Burnett completed his studies 
for the medical profession in the New York Medical 
College, where he obtained the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. He entered immediately into practice, choos- 
ing the town of Windsor, Conn., where he established a 
flourishing practice, and remained for four years. At 
the end of that time, in 1882, he removed to Pawtucket, 
R. I. Here he entered at once into a general medical 
practice. In a very short time he had built up what was 
one of the largest practices of its kind in the city, and 
attained a place in professional life, which he held until 
his death. Dr. Burnett also took an active interest in 
the life and development of Pawtucket, and lent his 
name and support to all movements directed toward the 
improvement of civic conditions. He was examining 
physician for several leading insurance companies, a 
member of the Pawtucket Medical Association, and the 
Rhode Island Medical Society. He was a member of 
the Windsor, Conn., Lodge, Ancient Free and .\ccepted 
Masons. He was a Republican in political faith, but 
remained strictly outside politics. For many years he 
was well known and popular in club life, and was a 
member of the To Kalon Club of Pawtucket. 

In 1895, Dr. Burnett married Isabella Bertha De Wire, 
daughter of Thomas Hudson and Ellen (Saul) De 
Wire, of New York. Mrs. Burnett, who survives her 
husband and resides at the Burnett home in Pawtucket, 
is a descendant of several prominent families of New 
York State. She is active and well known in social 
life in the city of Pawtucket. 



CLAUDE CUTHBERT BALL— Through difficul- 
ties which would have daunted a less determined spirit. 
Claude C. Ball, now a member of the law firm of 
Curtis & Ball, is reaping the reward of his persevering 
energy and ability. He is a son of Charles Ball, a man- 
ufacturing jeweler of Birmingham, England, and Provi- 
dence, R. I., and a grandson of Charles I. Ball, also a 
manufacturer of jewelry in Birmingham, England. 



Charles Ball was born in Birmingham in May, 1842, 
came to the United States in 1891, and in Providence 
resumed the business he had learned with his father. 
He married in England, Clara E. Smith, born in Birm- 
ingham. May 6, 1848, who survived her husband and 
passed away in Providence, R. I., in 1916. Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Ball were the parents of: George Edward 
Ball, a designer and official of the Whiting Manufac- 
turing Company of Bridgeport, Conn., and a member 
and secretary of the Rhode Island State Commis- 
sion to Louisianna Purchase Exposition in 1904; 
Percy B. Ball, designer and manager of the F. M. 
\\'hiting & Company, Attleboro, Mass.: Claude C, 
of further mention; Leo R. Ball, a master mariner 
and pilot, captain of the steamship "China," of the 
China Steamship Company, now taken over by the 
government as a transport, the only passenger steam- 
ship sailing from San Francisco flying the Ameri- 
can flag at the time of the transfer; Ethel G. Ball, 
married George F. Parker of the Towle Company, 
Newburyport, Mass.; Ella Beatrice Ball, a violinist of 
note, married James E. Battey, of S. Tourlellot & Co., 
of Providence, R. I. 

Claude C. Ball was born in Birmingham, England, 
March 19, 1881, and there attended school until 1891, 
when he was brought to the United States, by his par- 
ents, the family locating in Providence. Claude C. com- 
pleted the courses of the Peace Street Grammar School, 
then secured a position as office boy with the Silver 
Spring Bleachery, now the United States Finishing 
Company. He attended evening high school, and later 
completed a special course at Brown L^niversity, fitting 
himself for a better position and at the same time be- 
coming shipping clerk. He decided to study law, and 
finally resigned his position and placed himself under 
the preceptorship of Judge Harry C. Curtis and Senator 
Edwin C. Pierce, continuing study with them until he 
was admitted to the Rhode Island bar in 1906. He 
then became a partner with his former preceptor, Mr. 
Curtis, who is the senior member of the firm, and 
Judge of Probate for the city of Warwick. Mr. Ball, 
the junior member of Curtis & Ball, is Judge of Probate 
for the city of Cranston, and governor's appeal agent 
in draft procedure. He is an able lawyer, and is highly 
esteemed by his clientele. He is a Progressive in poli- 
tics, and was the congressional candidate of that party 
in 1914 and 1916. He is a member of Harmony Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Edgewood Yacht Club. 
Provident fraternity; St. Andrew's Chapter of All 
Saints' Church; Craftsman of America; and Calvary 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Ball married in Providence, June I, 1916, Elsbeth 

B. O'Brien, of Providence, a granddaughter of Leander 

C. Belcher, of the Belcher and Loomis Hardware Co., 
of Providence. Mr. and Mrs. Ball are the parents of 
a son. Edward Edmonds, born June 20, 191 7. 



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON PHILLIPS— 

To the men who fought in 1861 that the Union might 
endure, the Nation has ever paid honor. Once again in 
the throes of a mighty war, called upon to send our sons 
into battle, we feel again the need for sacrifice and we 
appreciate as never before the high and mighty valor, 
the patriotism and steadfastness to ideals which made 



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BIOGRAPPIICAL 



19 



men in 1861 leave their homes for the battlefront. They 
are fast dying out, those patriots. The old order pass- 
eth, and in their place, emulating the example of brave 
forebears, go the men of to-day. But they have graven 
their names deeply on the rolls of honor of the Nation, 
and as in life they were honored among men, their 
memory is preserved in death and they are placed 
among the ranks of the Nation's heroes. The late Wil- 
liam Henry Harrison Phillips, whose death occurred in 
Pawtucket, R. I., February 2, 1899, served throughout 
the entire period of the Civil War. On his return to 
the North after the declaration of peace, he resumed 
the ordinary affairs of life, and subsequently became 
a prominent figure in the manufacturing interests of 
I'awtucket. The strenuous life of the army, exposure 
on the field of battle to untold hardships, had under- 
mined his health, however, and in 1888, after a short 
but active career, he was forced to retire from business 
life. His death was genuinely and deeply mourned, for 
he was loved and honored by a circle of friends whose 
name was legion. Broad and tolerant in his views of 
life, impeccable in every detail of his life, brave, yet 
retiring and eschewing ostentation in any form, he had 
made for himself a place in the life of the city which 
was not filled after his death. 

William Henry Harrison Phillips was born in Hop- 
kinton. Mass., April 6, 1840, the son of Jerome and 
Mary Phillips, and descendant of an honored and long 
established family of that region. The coat-of-arms of 
the Phillips family is as follows : 

Arms — .\ziire a chevron argent between three falcons 
proper, duoally gorpeil. beaked and membered or. 

Orest — Out of a ducal coronet or, an arm embowed 
in armour, the hand proper holding a brolten spear of 
the last, powdered with fleur.s-de-lis or. 

William H. H. Phillips passed the greater part of his 
life in Pawtucket. however, removing thence with his 
parents when in his third year. The death of his father 
occurred in 1846. Young Phillips was educated in the 
public schools of Pawtucket, which he attended until he 
reached the age of sixteen years, when, ambitious to 
enter business life, he apprenticed himself to a manu- 
facturing jeweler of the city and learned the trade. He 
was engaged in this at the outbreak of the Civil War. 
Fired with enthusiasm for the cause of the Union, he 
left everything, and enlisted among the first, in Com- 
pany E, First Rhode Island Regiment, State Militia, 
then known as the "Pawtucket Light Guards." Serving 
out the period of his enlistment with this body on the 
fields of the South, he received an honorable discharge, 
and immediately reenlisted in Company H, Third Rhode 
Island Heavy .Xrtillery, with the rank of sergeant. He 
served in that capacity in some of the most stirring en- 
gagements of the entire conflict until the close of the 
war. On his return to the North he entered immedi- 
ately upon business pursuits, and with a capital of three 
hundred dollars established himself in the jewelry man- 
ufacturing business. Prior to the war he had become 
thoroughly familiar with the conditions of manufac- 
ing in large plants in Pawtucket, and possessing business 
and executive ability in a large degree, he was highly 
successful in his venture. Mr. Phillips became a well 
known figure in the manufacturing circles of the city, 
and when in 1888 he was forced to retire by ill health 
he occupied a place of prominence in the executive 



boards of many large enterprises. .Mthough doing his 
duty as a citizen to the fullest extent he refused public 
oflice. He was nevertheless identified with many move- 
ments for the advancement of the city's welfare, and 
was universally recognized as a public spirited citizen. 
For many years Mr. Phillips was captain of Company 
No. I, N'olunteer Fire Department, of Rhode Island. He 
was well known in fraternal life in the city, and was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, be- 
longing to Enterprise Lodge. He was also a member of 
Blackstone Encampment, Grand .Vrmy of the Republic. 
In December, 1862, Mr. Phillips married, in Paw- 
tucket, Emma Briggs, daughter of Hiram A. and 
-Almira (Harris) Briggs. Hiram .V. Briggs, father of 
Mrs. Phillips, was a prominent cotton waste broker in 
the early days of the industry in Rhode Island, and was 
a descendant of a well known Rhode Island family. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Phillips were: i. Frederick E., 
married Ella Snow. 2. William A., married Jennie 
Crumb, of Westerly, R. I. 3. Emma, deceased. Mrs. 
Phillips survives her husband and resides at the Phil- 
lips home in Pawtucket, R. I. She is well known in the 
more conservative social circles of the city. William 
H. H. Phillips died at Pawtucket R. I., February 2, 
1899, in his fifty-ninth year. 



GEORGE THOMAS BATCHELDER— .\ general 
mercliant of Centcrdale, R. I., for many years, but now 
retired in favor of his sons, Mr. Batcheldcr, who is 
also a veteran of the Civil War, is enjoying a serene old 
age and can review with satisfaction the events and suc- 
cesses of a life now in its eighty-third year, he having 
entered the ranks of the octogenarians in 1916. Public 
honors have fallen to his lot, and in the halls of the 
Legislature of his native State he has sat as both rep- 
resentative and senator. He is a son of Parley Batch- 
elder, son of Nathaniel, son of Lieutenant Joseph, son 
of Captain Nathaniel, son of Thomas, son of Nathaniel, 
son of Nathaniel, son of Rev. Stephen Bachiler, the 
founder of the Bachelder and Batcheldcr family in this 
country. Nearly three centuries have elapsed since this 
learned divine came from England and founded a family 
of strong men and women, whom through intermarriage 
has mingled their own strong characteristics with those 
of many other eminent families of New England. 

Rev. Stephen Bachiler was born in England in 1561, 
and after his graduation from St. John's College, B. A., 
1586, he took holy orders and in 1587 was instituted 
Vicar of Wherwell, in Hants, his patron Lord de la 
Wan. He came to New England in 1632, in the ship 
"William and Frances," being then seventy-one years of 
age. He was the founder of a church at Lynn, Mass., 
was in Newbury and later, in 1638, joined in the settle- 
ment of Hampton, N. H. He is credited with having 
selected a name for that town, and served the church 
there as its first pastor. He later lived in Portsmouth, 
N. H., and about 1647 returned to England. His second 
wife, Helen, accompanied him to New England in 1632, 
and died in 1642; neither the name of his first nor third 
wife has been preserved. The line of descent is through 
Nathaniel Bachelor, son of Rev. Stephen Bachiler, who 
was born in England in 1630, came to New England, 
was a resident of Hampton, N. H., constable, selectman 
and high in the church. He married (first) Deborah 



20 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Smith, of Martha's Vineyard, (second), October 31, 
i6;6, Mrs. Mary (Carter) Wyman, daughter of Rev. 
Thomas Carter, of Woburn, (third), October 2.5. 1689, 
Elizabeth B.. widow of John Knill. 

Thomas Batchelder, as the name had finally become 
after many changes, was of the fourth American gen- 
eration, son of Nathaniel and his second wife, Mary 
(Carter) (Wyman) Bachelor. He was born in Hamp- 
ton, N. H., in 16S5. and resided there on the first "old 
homestead" of the family in Hampton. He served with 
Captain Shadrach Walton's company in the expedition 
against Port Royal in 1710, and sixty-four years later 
died at his home in Hampton, February to, 1774. aged 
eighty-five. His first wife, Mary (Moulton) Batchelder, 
died May 22, 1716, and he married (second) Sarah 
Tuck, born April 30, 1689, daughter of Deacon John 
Tuck. 

Captain Nathaniel Batchelder, head of the fifth gen- 
eration, was a son of Thomas and his second wife, 
Sarah (Tuck) Batchelder. He was born in Hampton, 
N. H., May 10. 1722, died October n, 1784. He bore 
the title of "Captain," and resided in Hampton until 
about 1756, when he moved to Sandown in the same 
State. Captain Batchelder married, November 25, 1743, 
Hannah Butler, of Hampton Falls, N. H. 

Lieutenant Joseph Batchelder, son of Captain Nathan- 
iel and Hannah (Butler) Batchelder, was born in 
Hampton, N. H., December 28, 1750, died at his farm 
in Plainfield, Washington county, \'ermont, March 27, 
1827. He served in the \^'ar of the Revolution from 
New Hampshire, ranking as lieutenant, and continued 
his residence in that State until 1792, when with his 
brotliers, Moulton and Nathaniel, he migrated to Wash- 
ington county, Vermont, the brothers settling upon a 
section of the best farming land in Washington county 
and they became the first settlers of Plainfield, Vt. The 
land upon which they settled in 1792 has always re- 
mained in the family name. Lieutenant Batchelder was 
one of the founders of the Congregational church in 
his locality, in fact, it was at his house that the meeting 
was held, at which the church organization was effected. 
He married Sarah Ferrin, and reared a large family 
including seven sons. 

Nathaniel Batchelder, son of Lieutenant Joseph and 
Sarah (Ferrin) Batchelder was born in New Hamp- 
shire, January 10, 1772, died at Seneca Falls, N. Y., in 
1843. He moved with his parents to Vermont, settling 
at what was known as Batchelder's Pitch, near the four 
corners in Plainfield, the Batchelders being the first 
settlers there. Later he moved to Spruce Flats, East 
Montpelier, Vt., finally moving to Seneca Falls, N. Y., 
where he ended his days. He married, in Plain- 
field, Vt., Martha Dunlee, born in 1769, who lived to the 
great age of ninety-four, dying at the hoine of her son 
Mark. Nathaniel and Martha Batchelder were the par- 
ents of Parley, of further mention, father of George T. 
Batchelder; Nathaniel C, born July 11, 1797; Saraih, 
Nov. 14, 1799; John D., Aug. 5, 1802; Mark, June 28, 
1805; Philina, .'\ug. 21, 1807; Rhoda, died in child- 
hood. 

Parley Batchelder, son of Nathaniel and Martha 
(Dunlee) Batchelder, was born in Amherst, N. H., 
September 4, 1795. died in Johnston, R. L, May 10. 1878. 
His early years were spent in the State of Vermont, and 



at the age of eighteen he joined a company of volun- 
teers from Plainfield. marching in 1813 to the defense of 
the town of Plattsburg, N. Y., then threatened by 
British forces. About the year 1825 he moved to Provi- 
dence county, R. L. and was identified with that section 
until his death, half a century later. After his marriage 
he settled in the city of Providence and resided in that 
vicinity. He was an iron worker by trade, but was en- 
gaged in several occupations during his long life of 
eighty-six years. He took an active part in promoting 
the cause of temperance, was strongly in favor of the 
legal prohibition of the liquor traffic, and was always 
rated with the highly-moral men of his community. He 
married, in North Providence, R. L, January 13, 1831, 
.•Mzada Barnes, born June 4, 1806, in Gloucester, R. I., 
died in Johnston, R. L, May 10, 1878. Their children 
were: William W., born March 19, 1832, contractor and 
builder, man of affairs, married Sarah Arnold Turner; 
John P., born Dec. 19, 1834, a carpenter, married 
Elsie Smith; George Thomas, of further mention; 
James O., born March 22, 1837, died in 1859; .\lbert J., 
a salesman, died in Providence, July 7, 1901, married 
Emily Bosworth ; Mary C, a resident of Central Falls ; 
Martha T., married (first) Albert L. Austin, (second) 
Otis Andrew ; Carlista A., married Simon S. Page, 
whom she survives; Caroline A., born Jan. 22, 1846, 
died May 18, 1868. 

George Thomas Batchelder, of the ninth .\merican 
generation of the family, founded by Rev. Stephen 
Bachiler, is the third son of Parley and Alzada (Barnes) 
Batchelder. He was born at the family home, Fruit 
Hill avenue. North Providence. R. L, January 10. 1836, 
and is now (1918') living a retired life in Centerdale, 
R. L He attended public schools until attaining wage- 
earning years, then secured a boy's place as a mill 
worker. At the age of seventeen he began as a general 
store clerk, so continuing in the store of Luther Car- 
penter at Centerdale, R. L, until 1862. In that year he 
answered President Lincoln's call for men, enlisting in 
Cotnpany C, Seventh Regiment, Rhode Island Volun- 
teer Infantry, commanded by Colonel Bliss. He served 
until the war closed, was honorably discharged, and in 
July, 186;, was mustered out of the service. He saw 
active service with the Army of the Potomac and with 
his regiment was engaged in many of the leading bat- 
tles of the war, including Sulphur Springs, Fredericks- 
burg, Vicksburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg 
and City of Jackson. He was twice wounded, once at 
the battle of Fredericksburg, a scalp wound, and again 
at Spottsylvania, a wound in the left shoulder. His 
record was an honorable one in both camp and field, 
these three years in military service of his country be- 
ing bright periods in his life's history. 

After the war closed, Mr. Batchelder returned to 
Centerdale and was given his old position in the Luther 
Carpenter General Store. He remained in Mr. Car- 
penter's employ in increasingly confidential and respon- 
sible relation until the latter's death in 1886. He then 
succeeded to the business, which he successfully con- 
ducted until 1915, when he retired, the business then 
passing under the control of his three sons, whom he 
had trained to succeed him, when he could properly lay 
aside the cares of business. His continuous connection 
with the business in Centerdale, as clerk and proprietor, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



21 



covered a period of half a century and during that time 
he also carried civic responsibilities, serving in the 
State Legislature as representative from the town of 
Johnston in 1884; from North Providence in 1895 and 
1912; was senator in 1914; postmaster of Centerdale 
18S6-93; was a member of North Providence Town 
Council for eight years and president five years, and 
active in the councils of the Republican party for many 
years. He was a member of Temple Lodge, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, since 1868, also member of 
G. H. Browne Post, Grand Army of the Republic. He 
filled the stations to which he was chosen with ability 
and zeal, his civic service being rendered in the same 
spirit of patriotic devotion which inspired him in 1862 
to offer himself for military service. 

Mr. Batchelder married (first) Lydia A. Fenncr, and 
(second), in North Providence, April 13, 1802, Julia 
Theresa Hunt, daughter of Horace A. Hunt, of North 
Kingston, R. L, born 1824, and his wife, Julia (Smith) 
Hunt, born in 1841 at Johnston. Mr. and Mrs. Batch- 
elder are the parents of three sons : George Thomas 
(2), born Feb. 19, 1893; John Parley, June 30, 1895, 
now in United States Army; Earl Hunt, July 28, 1898. 
Mrs. Batchelder, who before her marriage was a teacher, 
took charge of the education of her sons, and from her 
teaching they passed to the father for business educa- 
tion, and now under the firm name, Batchelder Brothers, 
own and operate the general store business at Center- 
dale, with which each has been connected from youth. 



FREDERICK J. BERTH— Lawyer, city council- 
lor, man of affairs, Frederick J. Berth is a conspicuous 
figure in the public life of Providence, R. L, where he 
has resided since the age of ten years. Mr. Berth is a 
son of Thomas Berth, a native of Millville. Mass., 
where he was born in the year 1847, and of Theresa 
(Maroney) Berth, his wife, who was born in April, 
1847, at Providence, R. L The elder Mr. Berth was a 
wool dyer by trade and worked for many years at 
Greenville, R. L He lived also at Millbury, Mass., for 
eleven years, at Alton, R. L, for ten years and finally 
removed to Providence, where his death occurred 
March, 1912. He is survived by his wife, who still 
resides here. To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Berth the fol- 
lowing children were born : Ellen ; William, a graduate 
of the Baltimore Medical College, was a practicing phy- 
sician at Providence, where he married Miss May 
Revens of this city, and died here, October, 1907; Mary; 
Frederick J., of whom further; and Lawrence, who died 
in infancy. 

Born 'September 28, 1880, at Millbury, Mass., Fred- 
erick J. Berth was taken to Alton, R. L, by his parents 
while still an infant of less than a year old. His early 
childhood was spent at the latter place and he began 
his education by attending the local district schools. At 
the age of ten years, however, his parents once again 
moved and this time he was brought to Providence, R. 
L, where he has resided ever since. He continued his 
schooling here attending both the grammar grades and 
the high school and at the latter place was prepared for 
college. He then matriculated at Brown University, 
where he took the usual classical course and graduated 
with the class of 1899, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. Mr. Berth had in the meantime determined to 



adopt the profession of law as his career in life, and 
with this end in view entered the law department of the 
Boston University. From this institution he graduated 
in 1905, winning his degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 
October of the same year he was admitted to practice 
in the courts of Rhode Island. He entered the law firm 
of Barney & Lee, with whom he remained during a 
period of two years, and gained much valuable experi- 
ence in the practical aspect of his profession. .At the 
end of that time he severed his connection with this 
concern and opened his own law office, the orisjinal loca- 
tion of which was in the Tribune Building. His success 
began almost at once and he soon was recognized as a 
most able attorney and a man of the highest principles 
and standards. It was in December 1917. that he re- 
moved into his present location at No. 316 Turk's Head 
Building, Providence, where he has continued his suc- 
cessful career. Mr. Berth, since he came to the age of 
full citizenship, has always interested himself in the 
public affairs of the community, and has played an 
active part therein. He is staunch in his support of the 
Democratic party, and has associated himself conspic- 
uously with the local organization thereof. He became 
the Democratic candidate of the Tenth Ward of Provi- 
dence for the City Council in 1908, and served as a 
member of that body for six consecutive years. He was 
then (1914) elected alderman and has held that office 
ever since. In his religious belief Mr. Berth is a Cath- 
olic. He is affiliated with several Catholic organiza- 
tions, among which are the Knights of Columbus, and 
the Catholic Club. He is a member also of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and the Providence Lodge, No. 
14, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



JOHN JOSEPH HOEY, M. D.— Dr. John Joseph 
Hoey, well known physician of Providence, R. I., in 
which city he has been engaged in active practice for the 
past nine years, meeting with well merited success, is a 
native of Seneca Falls, N. Y., born November 5, 1878, 
son of John Joseph and Sarah (Hughes) Hoey, the 
former named a resident of Providence, R. I., engaged 
in the manufacture of textile machinery, and the latter 
named passed away January II, 1907. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoey were the parents of four other children, namely: 
Arthur A., William L., William H., and Margaret M., 
all of whom reside in Providence. 

When John Joseph Hoey was seven years of age his 
family took up their residence in Providence. His edu- 
cation was acquired in the grammar and high schools 
and was continued by attendance at night school for a 
period of six years, in this manner gaining a thorough 
elementary education. In 1905 he was ready for the 
technical side of his professional studies and matric- 
ulated in the Baltimore Medical College, remaining a 
student there for one year. He then attended George 
Washington Medical University, in Washington, D. C, 
and was graduated in 1909 with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. This was followed by an interneship of 
a year in the Sibley Hospital, Washington, D. C, and 
in 1910 he entered upon the active practice of his chosen 
profession in Providence, and during the intervening 
years has built up an excellent clientele, and has also 
gained the esteem of his professional brethren. In addi- 
tion to his private practice, Dr. Hoey is serving in the 



22 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



capacitj' of visiting surgeon for the out-patient depart- 
ment of St. Joseph's Hospital. Dr. Hoey is a member 
of the Church of the Assumption (Roman Catholic'), 
and in his political convictions is an Independent. He 
holds membership in the Knights of Columbus ; Catholic 
Club; 01ne\-\'ille Nest. Order of Owls, for which he is 
medical e.xaminer; and the Sunset Club. 

There is something intrinsically admirable in the 
profession of medicine that illumines by reflected light 
all those who practice it. There is something that is 
concerned with its prime object, the alleviation of 
human suffering, something about the self-sacrifice that 
it must necessarily involve, that makes us regard, and 
rightly so, all those who choose to follow its difficult 
way and devote themselves to its great aims with a cer- 
tain amount of respect and reverence, and among the 
men of this type is Dr. John J. Hoey, of Providence, in 
the interests of which city he takes an active part. 



BENJAMIN HOWARD JACKSON— The devel- 
opment of various sections of Providence. R. I., by Ben- 
jamin Howard Jackson has been the means of opening 
up large residential districts to the home seeker and 
investor. These developments were pushed to success- 
ful issue by Benjamin Howard Jackson, one of the sub- 
stantial, energetic, progressive young business men of 
the City of Providence, R. I., the city of his birth and 
life long residence. Mr. Jackson received his training 
in realty development in the offices of Samuel A. Night- 
ingale, going thence into his own business which he has 
conducted successfully since igio. Energetic and pub- 
lic-spirited, he has added largely to the material wealth 
of his city, causing non-producing property to become 
valuable and productive real estate. 

Benjamin Howard Jackson, son of William Albert 
and Elizabeth Jane Jackson, was born in Providence, 
R. I., December 30, 18S6. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Providence and after completing high 
school work, pursued a course in architectural study at 
the Rhode Island School of Design. Later he entered 
the real estate offices of Samuel A. Nightingale & Com- 
pany, where he obtained an exceptionally wide experi- 
ence in real estate development, becoming intimately 
associated with the Nightingale business. There Mr. 
Jackson continued until 1910, withdrawing then, and 
establishing in business February 24, 1910, under the 
firm name of Benjamin H. Jackson. He at once adopted 
modern plans of real estate development; purchased 
tracts of land in good locations near the best residential 
districts ; carefully studied contours and grades, graded, 
sewered, and macadamized streets; formed a building 
organization, and began the erection of homes. The 
result of his first year in business may be given as an 
indication of his energy and performance in each suc- 
ceeding year. In that first year the volume of business 
transacted stamped him one of the largest operators in 
Providence. During the second year a still larger 
amount of business was carried on, and unproductive 
property was improved and successfully developed into 
a healthy, profitable growth. The same wise and suc- 
cessful management has characterized the years which 
have since intervened. Mr. Jackson ranks high among 
the energetic, public-spirited business men in whose 
hands the continued development of their city rests. 



The offices of Benjamin H. Jackson are at No. 317 
Grosvenor Building, where a real estate development 
business is conducted in connection with nre insurance 
and mortgage investment. His patronage is liberal and 
influential. He is entrusted with the management of 
estates and is much sought after for consultation on 
real estate investment, ranking as a reliable authority 
on property values. 

Mr. Jackson is treasurer of the Amergold Company 
(Incorporated), member and an ex-director of the 
Providence Real Estate Exchange, member of the 
National Association Real Estate Brokers, member of 
the Insurance .Association of Providence, of the Meta- 
comet Golf, Catholic, and West Side clubs of Provi- 
dence, and the City Club of Boston. He belongs, also, 
to tlie General A. E. Burnside Camp, No. S, Sons of 
Veterans. United States America. Mr. Jackson is inde- 
pendent in political action, and is a member of St. Sebas- 
tian's Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Jackson enlisted 
July 17. 1918, in the United States Naval Forces for the 
duration of the war. 

Mr. Jackson married in Providence, R. I., October 17, 
1917, Ruth Louise Doran, daughter of James Curran 
and Annie Frances Doran, of Providence. A daughter, 
Mary Ruth, was bom to them September 15, 1918. 



FERDINAND BRAY— For more than two hun- 
dred and fifty years the Bray family has ranked among 
the foremost of Colonial families of Massachusetts. In 
the early days of the colony, members of the family 
were leaders in the towns which were founded in the 
central part of the present State, more particularly in 
the ancient towns of Topsfield, Boxford and Haverhill, 
in the neighborhood of Salem, which shared with the 
latter town part of the violence of the witchcraft delu- 
sion. Since the time of its founding the family has 
remained a small one, centering in the above mentioned 
localities, but despite its size it has not relaxed any of 
its early prestige. The early Brays were large land- 
owners, and to the present day continue to hold exten- 
sive landed properties. The Bray coat-of-arms is as 
follows : 

Arms — Quarterly. fir.st and fourth, argrent a chevron 
between three eagle.s' legs, sable, erased a la cuisee. 
their talons gules; second and third, vairfi. argent and 
azure, three bends gules. 

Crest — A flaxbreaker, or. 

The late Ferdinand Bray, former member of the firm 
of A. F. and F. Braj'. of Pawtucket. and for many 
decades one of the leading figures in the hardware in- 
dustry in Rhode Island, was a member of the Bray 
family of Massachusetts. He was born in the town of 
Yarmouth, Mass.. April 21, 1859, the son of Reuben and 
Elizabeth (Homer) Bray. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Yarmouth, which he at- 
tended until he reached his thirteenth year. On the 
death of his father, in iStig, his elder brother, .Allen F. 
Bray, had gone to Central Falls, R. I. Three years later, 
in 1872, he followed with his mother and sisters. Until 
1875 Ferdinand Bray attended the schools of Central 
Falls, at the end of that time quitting his studies to 
enter business life. He secured his first employment in 
the capacity of salesman with the firm of Belcher Broth- 
ers, of Providence, on July 19. 1S74. During the five 
years which he spent in the house of Belcher Brothers.. 





/U^-^-^^^/^. 



7 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



23 



Mr. Bray devoted all his spare time to the study of busi- 
ness methods, the conditions affecting the hardware 
trade in Rhode Island, and thoroughly familiarized him- 
self with all of its phases. As a consequence, when in 
1879 he entered into partnership with his brother, Allen 
F. Bray, in the firm of A. F. and F. Bray, he was quali- 
fied to manage the business affairs of the concern. In 
a short period, the firm became one of the foremost of 
its kind, not only in Pawtucket, where it ranked among 
the leading business houses of the city, but in Rhode 
Island. Mr. Bray was a business man of fine ability, 
an able organizer and executive, and a kind employer 
who received the confidence of his clerks. He was a 
keen judge of values, possessed excellent business fore- 
sight, and for this reason his opinion and advice were 
sought constantly by business men. Although an eager 
champion of all measures directed toward the advance- 
ment of civic welfare, Mr. Bray kept strictly aloof from 
politics. He was, however, deeply interested in military 
affairs, and in 1881 joined Company F, Second Battalion, 
Infantry, Rhode Island Militia. In 1883 he became first 
lieutenant of this body, and later was made commissary 
of the First Battalion Cavalry, which post he held until 
a few years before his death. He was an associate 
member of Tower Post, No. 17, Grand Army of the Re- 
public. Mr. Bray was well known in social and frater- 
nal life in the city of Pawtucket. He was a member of 
Union Lodge, Xo. 10, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Pawtucket Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
Pawtucket Council, Xo. 2, Royal and Select Masters ; 
Holy Sepulchre Commandery. Knights Templar; Pales- 
tine Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, of Providence; Rhode Island Consistory. 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Providence, and 
Queen Esther Chapter, No. 2, Pawtucket, Order of the 
Eastern Star. His religious affiliation was with the 
Congregational church of Central Falls, which he at- 
tended regularly, and he was a liberal donor to its 
charitable undertakings. Of a broad, tolerant, sympa- 
thetic nature, he had many friends. He was honored 
and respected throughout the city of Pawtucket, and his 
death was sincerely mourned. 

On September 20, 1887, Mr. Bray married Mary T. 
Cottrell, daughter of John T. and Emeline (Taylor) 
Cottrell, of Pawtucket, R. I. Mrs. Bray, who survives 
her husband and resides at the Bray homestead in Paw- 
tucket, is a descendant of many of the prominent old 
families of South Kingston, R. I., and the surrounding 
country. She is well known and active in the more 
conservative of the social circles of Pawtucket. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bray were the parents of the following children : 
I. Gertrude Cottrell, born Sept. 22, 1888. 2. Florence 
Allen, born April 3, 1892. 3. Reuben Thurston, born 
Nov. 11, 1893, died May i, 1895. 4- Ferdinand, Jr., born 
May II, 1896. 5. Mildred Taylor, bom Feb. 2, 1899. 6. 
Russell Stanton, born March 16, 1903. Ferdinand Bray 
died at his home in Pawtucket, R. I., May 4, 1912. 



study, finishing in 1898, then entered Brown Univer- 
sity, and was graduated in the class of 1902 with the 
degree of A. B. Deciding upon the profession of 
law, he entered the law department of the University 
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, there continuing for 
two years. He was admitted to the bar of Rhode 
Island, in 1904, and became associated with the law 
firm of Bassett, Raymond & Richmond. This associa- 
tion continued until 1914, when he became a member 
of the firm of Raymond & Richmond, and in 191S he 
became the senior partner in the law firm of Rich- 
mond, Patterson & Cordery, a well-known law firm of 
Providence. He is a member of the bar associations 
of Rhode Island, and practices in all State and Fed- 
eral courts of the district. His offices are at No. 806 
Union Trust building. Ever independent in his political 
opinions, Mr. Richmond joined heartily in the Pro- 
gressive movement of 1912, and was the candidate of 
that party for Attorney General of Rhode Island. He 
is coroner of East Providence, and in 191S was made 
permanent member of the Legal Advisory Board for 
East Providence. He is an attendant of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church; a member of St. Andrew's 
Lodge, No. 39, Free and Accepted Masons; and 
Temple Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. 

Mr. Richmond married, September 19, igoS, Grace 
Pierce, of East Providence. They are the parents of: 
Cory Pierce, born March 25, 1910: Parsons Pierce, 
born June 27, 191 1 ; and Barbara, born March 29, 
1915, died Sept. 16, 1917. 



RUSSELL WILLIAM RICHMOND, a member 
of the firm of Richmond, Patterson & Cordery, was 
born in Providence, December 22, 1878, a son of Wil- 
liam H. and Harriet (Parsons) Richmond. 

He passed the graded and high school courses of 



JUDGE NATHAN BARBER LEWIS— The Lewis 
family of which Jud,i<e Natiian Barber Lewis is a mem- 
ber, is one of the early settlement, and Judge Lewis is, 
himself, of the seventh generation. They have been 
in this part of Rhode Island for over two hundred 
forty years, one of the name being said to be the first 
settler in what is now Hopkinton. Several of the 
earlier generations were manufacturers, and among 
the first to engage in that line in their locality. Some 
were active in religious lines and were deacons and 
earnest workers in the First Seventh Day Baptist 
Church of Hopkinton. Among the highly respected 
people they have formed alliances with are such ancient 
and well-known families as Maxson, Babcock, Barber, 
Kenyon, Xoyes, Sisson, Richmond, Lillibridge and 
Chester. John Lewis is credited with having been 
the immigrant ancestor. He, with his four brothers, 
located in what is now Westerly, R. I., and according 
to tradition they were the first settlers in that locality. 
John Lewis is of record at Westerly as early as 1661, 
and was made a freeman of the town in 1668. He died in 
1690, and the line from him to Judge Nathan B. Lewis 
was as follows: James, James (2), James (3), Nathan 
Barber, James (4), the father of Judge Lewis. 

Judge Nathan B. Lewis is a son of Deacon James 
(4) and Mary (Sisson) Lewis, and was born February 
26, 1842, at the homestead in Exeter, R. I. Deacon 
James (4) Lewis, the father of Judge Lewis, with 
habits of ceaseless industry firmly anchored in his 
nature, bent all the forces at his command to the 
acquisition of wealth, and thus his boys, as long as 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



they remained at the farm, were safely shielded from 
forming idle habits, and a brief interval in winter 
was the natural limit of their school advantages. 
Upon the intellectual development of Judge Lewis, 
the private- school and the seminary at East Greenwich 
exerted positive and permanent influences, and when 
seventeen years old, he taught his first term at Gris- 
wold. Conn., where his father's brother, N. B. Lewis, 
a prominent and wealthy farmer resided. On August 
15, 1862, Judge Lewis enlisted as a private in Company 
F, Seventh Rhode Island Infantry, and without a 
day's absence for any reason he shared the fortunes 
of the Seventh until mustered out with the regiment, 
June 9, 1865. At the battle of Cold Harbor, where 
ten thousand men were cut down in twenty minutes, 
Sergeant Lewis was one of only seven men in Company 
F who came out of the fight unhurt. During the war 
he participated in all the campaigns of the regiment, 
and acted for the greater part of the time as the 
company clerk and regimental postmaster, and served 
also in the color guard. 

.^fter the war Mr. Lewis completed a mathemati- 
cal and commercial course at East Greenwich, and was 
variously engaged until the spring of l86g, when he 
began three years of farm life near his birthplace, 
in Exeter. That spring he was elected to the Legis- 
lature, and held the seat three successive terms. In 
May, 1872, he purchased a farm at Pine Hill, near 
the center of Exeter, where he resided until the sum- 
mer of 1888. In these sixteen years, the course of 
public affairs in the town was modified and moulded 
very largely by the acts and influence of this young 
man who held many of the town otitices during that 
period, and it is safe to record here, that at the end 
of his sixteenth year as town clerk of Exeter, that 
town had not another man as popular as he. His 
services as superintendent of schools, assessor of 
taxes, postmaster, coroner and trial justice, at various 
times, made him intimately acquainted with the peo- 
ple, and he has very often been named in wills and 
otherwise in the settlement of private estates. 

In May, 1886, on the establishment of the district 
court, he was elected by the General Assembly to 
preside over the second judicial district of the State, 
which embraces the towns of Exeter, North Kings- 
ton, South Kingston and Narragansett. Owing to 
the distance of his farm from railroads, he sold the 
farm on Pine Hill, Exeter, and removed to Wickford 
in June, 1888, where he resided until 1894. He then 
removed to West Kingston, where he that year com- 
pleted his home. He has served continuously on the 
bench of the second district by reelection, since his 
first election in 1886 by the Grand Committee of the 
General Assembly. In July, 1890, Judge Lewis opened 
a law ofifice in Westerly, R. I., where in the fashion of 
a country squire he enjoys a large practice, and has 
been engaged in settling a large number of estates. 
He was a member of the commission appointed to 
build the new county court house of Washington 
county, and was chairman of tliat commission. In 
1895 he was appointed by the Supreme Court, a stand- 
ing Master in Chancery for Washington county. 

The following are the local offices held by Judge 



Lewis: He was postmaster at Pine Hill, R. 1., from 
July I, 1872, to .April, 1876, when he resigned to 
accept a seat in the General Assembly, and was re- 
iippointed in 1879, holding the office until 1SS8. He 
was a member of the school committee of Exeter from 
June, iS6<J, to June, 1887, and superintendent of 
schools for the greater part of that time. He was 
assessor of taxes from June, 1S75, to June, 1888; was 
trial justice of Exeter previous to the establishment 
of the District Court: was coroner of the town of 
Exeter from July. 1873, to June, 1886: and was mod- 
erator of North Kingston from 1889 to 1892; auditor 
of town accounts from 1890 to 1S94. He was formerly 
secretary of the Westerly Railway & Lighting Com- 
pany: of the Mystic Electric & Gas Light Company; 
of the South Shore Gas & Electric Company: of the 
Westerly & Hopkinton Railway Company; and of 
the Pawcatuck Valley Street Railway Company prior 
to their absorption by the other corporations. 

Judge Lewis has cultivated his social tastes throi.igh 
membership in various societies and orders. He is a 
member of Charles C. Baker Post, No. 15, Grand 
.\rmy of the Republic, of which he is past com- 
mander; and was Judge Advocate of the Department 
of Rhode Island, 1890-93. He has served as president 
of the Seventh Rhode Island Veterans' Association 
continuously since 1S93. He is a member of Exeter 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
been through all the chairs, and is a member of the 
Grand Lodge; is a past chief patriarch of L'ncas En- 
campment, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Wickford; a member of Orilla Lodge, Daughters of 
Rebekah, Peacedale, R. I.; of E.xeter Grange, Patrons 
of Husbandry, and Washington county Pomona 
Grange: of Charity Lodge, No. 23, Free and Accepted 
Masons, Hope Valley; of Franklin Chapter. Royal 
Arch Masons, Hope Valley; and of Narragansett 
Commandery, Knights Templar, of Westerly. Mrs. 
Lewis is also a member of E.xeter Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry, and of Washington county Pomona 
Grange, taking a prominent part in these organiza- 
tions. Mrs. Lewis is also a member and regent of 
Narragansett Chapter of the Daughters of the .A.mer- 
ican Revolution, and has been secretary and historian 
of her chapter, and treasurer and State historian of 
the State organization. Mr. Lewis's political affilia- 
tions have been with the Republican party. In religion 
he is a L^nitarian. He is Supreme Herald of the 
Loyal Lewis Legion. 

Judge Lewis married (first) March 7. 1869, Rowcna 
K. Lillibridge, who died July 8, 1879, and he married 
(second) August 15, 1880, Nettie Chester, born May 
31, 1850, daughter of Oliver B. and Fanny E. (Sisson) 
Chester. Four children were born to the first mar- 
riage: Aubrey C, a graduate of Dartmouth College, 
and afterwards a law student, later associated with the 
General Electric Company at Schenectady, N. Y., and 
now associated with the Draper Corporation of Hope- 
dale, Mass., cotton machinery manufacturers; he mar- 
ried Lillian Gandy of Darlington, S. C, and they have 
one daughter, Frances Margaret; Agnes Mabel, How- 
ard, and Nathan Richmond, the latter three dying in 
infancy. 




v^ 



^y^a^u<^ 



y.2(J,j2.di^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



25 



WILLIAM HUGHES, founder and president of 
the William Hughes C"mpany, Incorporated, well- 
known in the business and manufacturing circle? of 
Rhode Island, was born in Lancashire, England, May 
28, 1863, a son of James and Alice (Fish) Hughes, 
who came to America in 1882. The father died De- 
cember 25, 1870, and the mother died November 2, 
1904, leaving four children: William, oi further men- 
tion; James E., of Esmond, R. I.; Sarah J., wife of 
John T. Singleton; and Mary Elizabeth, wife of 
John T. Baron, of Providence. 

William Hughes attended the public schools until 
eight years of age, and under the English law was 
allowed to work in the print mills one-half of each day, 
the other half being spent in school. This plan con- 
tinued until he was in his twelfth year, when he was put 
to work the entire day. 

In 1882 Mr. Hughes came to the United States, 
finding a home in Olneyville, R. I., and a position in 
the Watennan Cotton Mill, now the Providence 
Combing Mills. He there remained fourteen months, 
going thence to the Atlantic Mills, there continuing 
twelve years, 18S3-95, rising to the position of overseer 
of the yarn winding department. After a few months 
spent in the insurance business he opened a bicycle 
and sporting goods store in 1896, having in connection 
therewith a small inachine shop. In this machine 
shop there was built the first vehicle in this State 
to use gas as motive power, the car making its first 
appearance in 1899. He built fourteen in all, 1898- 
1902, the first three selling for $1,000 each, the price 
then being reduced to $850. In 1905 Mr. Hughes 
accepted the agency for the Reo car, and built up a 
business at the corner of Bough and Dike streets. 
Providence, and there continued in successful business 
operation until 1916. when he removed the old build- 
ings and erected his present building, which is fire- 
proof and modern in every detail, well-adopted to 
its purposes. Here he located his business office, 
sales rooms, service station and machine shop, his 
business a very extensive one, all centered in the one 
building. The machine shop is an important feature 
of the business, supplying one hundred and eighty-nine 
mills and factories in New York State and the city of 
Philadelphia with a special vibrating gear. Other lines 
are also manufactured of general use, while the auto 
repair and general garage business is very large. Mr. 
Hughes began business with one employee ; now the 
force numbers fourteen men, who are kept continually 
employed. In 1905 the W'illiam Hughes Company was 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Rhode 
Island, the president and treasurer was William Hughes; 
vice-president, James W. Mills; secretary, John T. 
Singleton. Mr. Hughes has taken a deep interest in 
public affairs, and is now serving his second term as 
councilman, representing the Eighth Ward. He was one 
of the organizers of the Rhode Island Automobile Asso- 
ciation, and is a director of the same. He is president 
of the Olneyville Business Men's Association, a member 
of the Sunset Club, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and Providence Lodge, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Hughes married, in Providence, November 28, 
1888, Elizabeth King, of Providence, daughter of John 



and Isabelle (McNabb) King. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes 
are the parents of three daughters: i. Edith .Mice, born 
Nov. 5, 1899; educated in music in Providence and 
Boston, specializing on the violin, and director of an 
orchestra of si.\teen pieces. 2. Bertha Isabelle, born 
July 26, 1900; a graduate of high school, now a student 
at Kingston College. 3. Dorothy Elizabeth, born March 
2, 1904; now a student in high school. Mr. Hughes 
can honestly claim the title of a self-made man who, 
without aid or counsel, has built and developed a busi- 
ness which is a credit to any successful man. 



FRANK HARLOW WILDES— Many years of 
successful practice :it the Providence bar has rendered 
Mr. Wildes independent of introduction to his fellow- 
citizens. He is a resident of Cranston, R. I,, and has 
for several years held the office of city solicitor of that 
place. 

The Wildes family is of English origin. John Wild, 
iminigrant ancestor, was born in England in 1618, and 
came to .America with his brother William on the ship 
"Elizabeth."' In 1639 he served in the Pequot War. 
About 1645 he married Priscilla Gould, and settled in 
Ipswich, Mass. In 1680 his branch of the family mi- 
grated to Maine. A famous seacoast road now bears 
the name of the Wildes family. 

George W. Wildes, father of Frank Harlow Wildes, 
was a farmer, as his ancestors had been. He married 
Mary C. Schuman, a member of a family which settled 
in Massachusetts about 1675, removing to Maine early 
in the eighteenth century. The Schumans, like the 
Wildes family, were an agricultural race. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Wildes are now deceased. 

Frank Harlow Wildes, son of George W. and Mary 
C. (Schuman) Wildes, was born December 2, 1866, in 
Providence, and received his education in the primary, 
grammar and classical high schools of his city, grad- 
uating from the last named in 1885. The next step in 
his progress was to enter Brown University, and in 
1SS9 that institution conferred upon him the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. The education thus acijuired was, 
in one sense, self-education, for it was obtained by the 
strenuous and unceasing efforts of the student him- 
self. From 1882 to 1893 Mr. Wildes was employed on 
the "Providence Journal and Bulletin," and his evenings 
from 1885 to 1893 were passed as an instructor in 
schools. During the latter portion of this period he was 
employed by different papers as supreme court reporter. 
During his last years at Brown L'niversity Mr. Wildes 
studied law in the office of David S. Baker, and on 
February 20, 1892, he was admitted to the bar. He has 
ever since resided in Providence and Cranston, where 
he has been and still is actively and successfully en- 
gaged in the general practice of his chosen profession. 
Politically, Mr. Wildes is a Republican, and in Crans- 
ton, where he resides, has always taken an active in- 
terest in public affairs. On January 16, 1914, he was 
elected city solicitor of that place and has ever since 
been continuously reelected, his present term expiring 
on January 16, 1919. He is a member of the Baptist 
church. 

Mr. Wildes married, February 12, 1893, in New York 
City, Marie Caulfield, of Boston, Mass., and they are 
the parents of two children : Adele Madeline, born 



26 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Feb. 10, 1894. and Frank Harlow, born Feb. 20, 1905. 
Miss Wildes is a graduate of the grammar school, the 
classical high school, and "Brown University, class of 
1916, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts; received 
in 1917 the degree of Master of Arts. She won the 
coveted Arnold Archaeologist Fellowship for students 
who excel in languages, is now (1918) teaching in the 
Cranston schools, and will enter Columbia College for 
1918-10 term. Mr. and Mrs. Wildes both enjoy a high 
degree of social popularity, and their home is one of 
the most attractive and hospitable in the city in which 
they reside. 

Frank H. Wildes may truly be termed the architect 
of his own fortune, and while he has accomplished much 
it must be remembered that he is in the prime of life, 
and that with a man of his calibre progress is both a 
law and a "foregone conclusion." 



JOHN A. BATES — Bates is an old family name in 
West Greenwich, R. I., and through marriage to a 
Tillinghast, another ancient family, was joined to their 
fortunes. In Pardon Tillinghast Bates, father of John 
.A. Bates, postmaster at West Greenwich Center, both 
family names were preserved. West Greenwich Center, 
as it is known, has long been the family seat, both 
Pardon Tillinghast Bates and his son, John A. Bates, 
having been born at the homestead owned by John 
Bates, his great-grandfather. The many virtues and 
lovable qualities of these ancestors have been per- 
petuated in this twentieth century representative, and 
he holds a warm place in the hearts of the community, 
which has been his home since 1844, his present resi- 
dence also being his birthplace. 

Pardon Tillinghast Bates, son of John G. and Abigail 
(Tillinghast) Bates, was born at the same homestead 
farm in West Greenwich Center. April i, 1818, and died 
in 1890. His father having died when he was a youth, 
he was reared under the loving care of his grand- 
parents, residing at the homestead and becoming post- 
master of the village in 1863, serving in that capacity 
until his death in 1890. He was a member of West 
Greenwich Baptist Church, very active and known for 
many years as "Deacon Bates." He was also overseer 
of the poor, and always abounded in good works, his 
heart readily touched, and his sympathy easily awak- 
ened by suffering or need. He was a man of sub- 
stance, and generously aided those less fortunate. He 
married, in 1838, Olive Peck, of Coventry, R. I., and 
together they spent many long and happy years. She 
died April 30, 1898. Mr. and Mrs. Bates were the 
parents of five children: A son, born in 1840, died in 
infancy; Helen Marr, born in 1842, died in 1844; John 
Ale.xander, of further mention; Penelope, born Nov. 
4, 1846, died Dec. 15, 1917, acting postmaster, 1890-93, 
married Charles S. Brown, of West Greenwich ; and 
Pardon Tillinghast, Jr., born in 1851, died March 2, 
1869. 

John Alexander Bates was born at the West Green- 
wich Center homestead. May 9, 1844, and resides there 
still. He was educated in the little red schoolhouse, 
which was nearby, but also studied at home after leaving 
school in his eighteenth year, his attendance prior to 
that having been in winter only, with the e.xception of 
one summer term. He obtained a good education 



through self-study, and at the age of twenty, he taught 
a winter term in the Escoheag district school, working 
as heretofore on the farm during the summer months. 
His next school was at Voluntown, Conn., where he 
taught during the winter, returning to the farm for the 
summer work. He then taught the Warwick Plains 
school for one winter term, and in the spring of 1867 
took the Apponaug school and there taught until Jan- 
uary, 1872. The following year and a half he taught 
the Fruit Hill school, in North Providence, finishing 
there in June, 1873. He then went to New York, and 
for si.xteen months was engaged in the grain business 
in the employ of a cousin, then for two years. 1875-77, 
was assistant to the town clerk of the town of War- 
wick, returning to the old home in 1877, and until 1905 
taught in Coventry and West Greenwich schools, retir- 
ing in the fall of 1905, after an experience as a peda- 
gogue covering the winters of over forty years of his 
life, 1864-1905. There are grandfathers in these dis- 
tricts who sat under his instruction, and many hun- 
dreds of men and women testify to the good results of 
the time spent in the schools he taught. He was both 
respected and loved by his pupils, many of whom are 
his warm friends of to-day. 

Mr. Bates was a member of the school committee for 
many years; member of Town Council in 1879; member 
and president of that body in 1880-81-82-83-85-86. He 
was again elected member and president of Town 
Council in 1891-92-93. His public services also include 
several years as town auditor, two years as town clerk, 
1903-04, and notary public. Since 1875 he has been a 
justice of the peace, and since 1893 postmaster of West 
Greenwich Center, an office held by his father from 
1863 until 1S90, by his sister from 1890 to 1893. and 
since by John A. Bates, the office having been held in 
the family for fifty-five years. .\1I these honors have 
come to Mr. Bates unsolicited, but as he never sought 
an office neither has he ever shirked a duty, and no 
man has rendered a greater public-spirited service to 
his town. He is a member of the West Greenwich 
Baptist Church, and for many years its clerk, and his 
political faith is Republican. 

Mr. Bates married, .April 5, 1883, Emma Eliza James, 
of Providence, daughter of Feleg Allen and Patience 
Sophia (Page) James, granddaughter of .\lfred and 
Amy (.Rounds) James, also a granddaughter of Wil- 
liam and Mary (Steere) Page. Emma Eliza James 
attended Rhode Island Normal School, whence she was 
graduated January 26, 1878. Her first school was the 
new schoolhouse at West Greenwich Center, where she 
taught one year, going thence to Knightsville schools 
for one term, and from there to a Providence evening 
school. In succession thereafter she taught in Rock- 
land, Scituate, two years, and at North Kingston, one 
year. Her marriage to John A. Bates, in 1883, ended 
her career as a public school teacher. She has been 
president of the local Women's Christian Temperance 
Union since 1S87, and has been very active in that or- 
ganization. Mr. and Mrs. Bates are the parents of a 
son, .\Iexander Peck, of whom further. 

Alexander Peck Bates was born September 15, 1889. 
He began his education in West Greenwich Center 
schools, taught the Howard Hill school one year, en- 
tered Monson Academy, Monson, Mass., whence he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



graduated class of 1913, then spent two years, IQ13-15, 
at Brown University. The following winter he was 
employed in the Oxford Linotype Company's printing 
office, going thence to the office of the Brown, Sharpe 
Manufacturing Company, remaining one year, then 
until 1917 being with the Equitable Life Insurance Com- 
pany. In that year he returned to assist his father in 
the operation of the homestead farm. He is now hold- 
ing a good position with the Robert L. Walker Com- 
pany of Providence, real estate and investments. He 
married, June 14, 1916, Emily May Bucklin, daughter 
of David and Mary Louisa (Wilbur) Bucklin, and they 
are the parents of a son, Alexander Peck Rates, Jr., 
born July i, 1917- 



JUSTIN DAVID CROSBY, president of the J. D. 
Crosby Company, a concern engaged in the manufac- 
ture of flat cold-rolled steel on a large scale, and one 
of the prominent citizens of Pawtucket, R. L, is a 
native of Worcester Mass.. having been born there 
October 12, 1862. He is a member of the old Crosby 
family, which emigrated from Scotland to the New 
England colonics during the seventeenth century and 
settled on Cape Cod. Mr. Crosby's parents were David 
and Eliza A. (Eldridgc) Crosby, the former being a 
native of Brewster, Mass., and one of the pioneers in 
the manufacture of wire and wire goods here. He was a 
member of the Washburn Moen Wire Company which 
specialized in fine wire works, and continued actively 
connected with that concern up to the time of his 
death in 1913. His wife was born in Worcester in 
1830 and died there in 1873. 

As a lad, Justin David Crosby attended the public 
schools of his native city. He passed through the gram- 
mar grades and was graduated from the high school, 
having been prepared for college there. He then en- 
tered Foster's Business College where he took a com- 
mercial course in order to fit himself for the career 
which he had planned. Upon completing his studies at 
the last named institution, Mr. Crosby secured a posi- 
tion with the Washburn Moen Wire Manufacturing Com- 
pany, with which his father, was associated, and began his 
career as a clerk. He was transferred very much to his 
own liking, from department to department, so that he 
leamed very thoroughly all the details of the business 
and was at last advanced to the position of assistant 
superintendent. He remained with this concern for a 
period of twenty-three years and in that time became 
thoroughly master of this industry. He then with- 
drew and engaged in business on his own account at 
Worcester, but remained there only for some six 
months, when he went to Pennsylvania and once more 
worked in the steel and wire business for four years. 
It was in the year 1910 that he finally came to Paw- 
tucket, R. I., where in association with others, he 
founded the J. D. Crosby Company, incorporated under 
the Xew York laws, of which concern Mr. Crosby be- 
came president and treasurer. He is also a director of 
this company and has remained ever since its organiza- 
tion as active head and presiding genius. Knowing 
thoroughly the wire situation, Mr. Crosby was admir- 
ably fitted to develop the great business of which he is 
now at the head, and the success that he has met in this 
line has been truly remarkable. In association with 



him are, at the present time, Mr. Gordon of New York, 
who has the rank of secretary and assistant treasurer; 
George F. Trott ; and H. E. Wray, superintendent. The 
Newman Wire Company of New York City is the sole 
selling agent of Mr. Crosby's great plant and handles 
this side of the business in many different parts of the 
country. In addition to his activity in this line. Mr. 
Crosby is a prominent figure in the general life of 
Pawtucket and is a member of many different organ- 
izations of that city. He is a member and the vice- 
president of the Chamber of Commerce, of Pawtucket, 
and has done much in this capacity to assist in the busi- 
ness and industrial development of the city, and is 
interested also in other manufacturing concerns. He 
is a member of the local lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; the Pawtucket Golf Club ; and 
the T. K. Club. He finds one of his greatest pleasures 
in out-door pastimes of various sorts and in this way 
also preserves his health from the wear and tear of 
his hard work in connection with his business. Mr. 
Crosby is in the best sense of the word a self-made man, 
having be.gun his business in a small way — his first 
office employed but six men and an office girl — but from 
that humble beginning he had worked up to his present 
important position with the industrial world. His shop 
at present measures about si.xty thousand square feet, 
and he now employs about one hundred twenty-five 
men in his factory, and eight clerks in the office. 

Justin David Crosby married, October, 1885, at Wor- 
cester, Mass., Cora E. Holland, a daughter of Henry 
and Hannah (Russell) Holland, both now deceased. 
Mr. Holland was a skilled mechanic and was employed 
for many years by the L. W. Paul Company, of Wor- 
cester. 'To Mr. and Mrs. Crosby the following children 
were born : Edna F., born 1887 ; W'arren Russell, born 
August 25, 1894, at Worcester, worked in the factory 
with his father for six months when he enlisted and is 
now stationed at Jacksonville, Fla., where he does val- 
uable work for the government as an expert on gas 
engines and automobile service. Mr. and Mrs. Crosby 
reside at their home at No. 43 Cherry street, Paw- 
tucket, R. L 



WILLIAM S. LANE— The surname Lane is of 
ancient English origin, and is of local classification, 
tracing beyond the English orthography to the Latin 
Land, which means lane. The baptismal nairle, modified 
by the designation "In the Lane," "By the Laiie," "In 
land," "Ad Lanam," is found with great ireqiiency in 
medieval documents, as well as the .Saxon "atte Lane," 
and the Norman French "de la Lane." Nurnerous en- 
tries are found in the Hundred Rolls, 1273. The family 
has been one of great influence and importance through- 
out the United Kingdom for several ceriturf^s. The 
Lane family of Kings Bromley claims aii aiicicht Nor- 
man origin, tracing to Sir Reginald de Lane, a knight 
in the train of William the Conqueror, who attended that 
monarch to England in, 1066 and wds rewarded with 
extensive grants of land in return 'for his" Services. 
Distinguished families of the name have been seated 
in Ireland for several centuries. The coat-of-arms of 
the family is as follows : 

Arm.'* — Or, a chevron ermines between three mullets 
pierced azure. 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Crest — A dexter arm vested ermines, turned up and 
indented argent, holding in the hand proper a mullet 
azure. 

Motto — Celeritate. 

The American families of the name descend from 
several unrelated progenitors. They have been active 
in New England life and affairs for two hundred and 
fifty years, and the family ranks to-day among the 
foremost of American families of Colonial origin. The 
late William S. Lane, for nearly thirty years a mer- 
chant of the city of Pawtucket, R. I., and a prominent 
figure in its business life, was a mLmbcr of a Massa- 
chusetts family of long standing. 

William S. Lane was born in Danvers, Mass., Decem- 
ber 21, 1862, the son of John and Margaret (Brady) 
Lane, of that city. His early childhood was spent in 
his native place, but at the age of six years he removed 
with his parents to Providence, R. L Here he received 
his education in the elementary and high schools, and 
on completing his studies entered immediately upon 
mercantile pursuits. He was employed in various 
capacities for a short period at Valley Falls, but 
in 1880 abandoned temporarily his plans for a busi- 
ness career to become a member of the Valley Falls 
police department. In i8?S, after eight years of service 
of the most disinterested type, Mr. Lane resigned his 
post in the police department, and with his brother, 
John Lane, engaged in business in Pawtucket, R. L, 
with which city he was identified thereafter until his 
death. Mr. Lane was widely known in business circles 
in Pawtucket, and was eminently respected for the 
integrity of his business dealings and for the justice of 
his business principles. Brought more or less into 
contact with the public, he was given an opportunity for 
the making of lasting . friendships, and in the twenty- 
eight years of his business career he endeared himself 
to hundreds of men in all walks of life. He was of a 
genial disposition, with a talent for friendship, and 
w-as the center of a circle which included some of the 
foremost men of his day in Pawtucket. Mr. Lane was 
active in social and fraternal organizations, and was 
a member of the Foresters, of Palestine Lodge, Red- 
men, Knights of Pythias, and of Central Falls Aerie of 
Eagles, of which he was at one time president. He 
was a Roman Catholic in religious belief, and a member 
of the Sacred Heart Cathedral congregation of Paw- 
tucket. He was a generous donor to charitable and 
philanthropic causes. He was a man of deep sym- 
pathies, but nevertheless was a keen student of human 
nature, seeing quickly through deception and misrep- 
resentation ; he was quick to answer an appeal for aid, 
financial or personal, and the extent of his gifts to un- 
fortunate applicants for his charity never became known. 
His death came as a blow to hundreds of friends and 
associates throughout the city of Pawtucket, and was 
deepl}' mourned. 

On June 20, 1893, Mr. Lane married Lucy Roche, 
daughter of Redmond and Mary (Fairington) Roche, 
both of whom were born in Ireland, married in Ware, 
Mass., settling in Webster, Mass., whence they re- 
moved to Pawtucket, R. I. Redmond Roche enlisted in 
the Union Army at the outbreak of the Civil War, 
and served gallantly throughout the conflict as a mem- 
ber of the Fifty-seventh Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
luiteer Infantry. Mr. and Mrs. Lane were the parents 



of the following children: i. John Raymond; died aged 
nineteen ; was a student at Kingston College. 2. Wil- 
liam S., died aged twelve. 3. Lucy Rita, a graduate of 
the Academy of Notre Dame, Roxbury, Mass. 4. and 
5. Edward and Ruth, who died in infancy. Mrs. Lane, 
who survives her husband, resides at No. 49 Olive 
street, Pawtucket; she has been active for many years 
in social circles in the city, and has been identified with 
several notable charitable etTorts. William S. Lane 
died at his home in Pawtucket, R. I., September 20, 
1 01 6. 



BYRON MATHEWSON— This branch of the 
Mathewson family has f(jr four generations resided in 
the town of Johnston, R. I., Byron Mathewson, great- 
grandson of Philip Mathewson, being the subject of this 
record. 

The Rhode Island record of this family begins with 
James Mathewson, brrn about 1624, who was an in- 
habitant of Providence in 1658, purchasing land from 
Thomas Angell in that year. He married Hannah Field, 
and had sons : James, John, Thomas, Zachariah and 
Daniel. From these sons sprang the different branches 
of the family, this branch being known as the Johnston 
branch, and in this review is traced to Philip Mathew- 
son, great-grandfather of Byron Mathewson. of Green- 
ville avenue, town of Johnston, R. I. He is a son of 
Stephen Olney Mathewson, son of Paris Mathewson, 
son of Philip Mathewson. 

Philip Mathewson was born in the town of Johnston, 
R. I., in the year 1772, and there died January 9, 1853. 
In early life he learned the trade of cooper, and on his 
farm he built a shop near his house. There he worked 
at his trade and also cultivated his farm, adding to his 
activities in later years a small store which he opened 
in one end of his cooper shop. There he continued 
action in the management of his affairs until his death 
at the age of eighty-one years. He married Mary 
Winsor, who died May 27, 1845, aged seventy-three 
years, daughter of Isaac Winsor, representative of a 
family founded in New England by Joshua Winsor, 
ancestor of those bearing the name in Rhode Island. 
Joshua Winsor came from England, settled in Rhode 
Island, and in 1638 was one of the thirteen signers in 
Providence to a compact "for the public good." Philip 
and Mary (Winsor) Mathewson were the parents of 
several children including a son Paris. 

Paris Mathewson was born on the home farm at 
Johnston, R. I., and there spent the years preceding his 
marriage as his father's farm assistant. After his mar- 
riage he removed to a farm nearby and there resided 
until the death of his father, in 1853, when he returned 
to the homestead and resided until his death, June 15. 
1875, aged seventy-one years. He was a farmer and 
teamster in earlier years, then became a contractor, 
building houses, barns, mills, railroads, and had a con- 
tract for a portion of the work necessary to construct 
the first telegraph line into the city of Providence. He 
conducted a store at Burrillville for a time, made many 
journeys to Canada to purchase horses, bringing into 
Johnston many carloads which he disposed of to 
Rhode Island farmers. He settled many estates, was 
president of the Johnston Town Council several years, 
and for years represented the town in the General 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



29 



Assembly. His life was one of great activity, and in 
all his relations with his fellow-men he was honorable 
and upright, highly esteemed as an able business man 
and a good citizen. 

Paris Mathewson married Phoebe T. Olney, born in 
Johnston, February 10, 1804, died October 22, 1885. 
daughter of "Deacon" James and Olive f Belknap) Ol- 
ney. She was a descendant of Thomas Olncy, born in 
England, who came to New England in the ship 
"Planter" in 1635, and later settled in Providence, R. I., 
accompanying Roger Williams to the new settlement 
and becoming one of the thirteen original proprietors 
of Providence who purchased their rights from the 
Indians. He became one of the most prominent men 
of the colony, was its first treasurer and filled many 
positions of honor and trust. He was one of the 
founders of the First Baptist Church and at one time 
was its active pastor. He was a man of means, and was 
buried in the yard in the rear of his homestead, on 
North Main street. Providence, dying in 1682 at the 
age of eighty-two years. In 1631 he married Marie 
Small, the line of descent in the branch being through 
their son. Epenctus Olney, born in England in 1634, 
who became an active member of the colony, taking 
part in its administration affairs as member of the 
Colonial Assembly and in Town Council. He married 
Mary Whipple, and was succeeded by his son. Kpen- 
etus (2) Olney, who married Mary Williams, a grand- 
daughter of Roger Williams, and lived on a large tract 
of land known as Gloucester and Burrillville. Their 
eldest son. James Olney, born November Q, 1670, mar- 
ried Hannah Winsor, and they w-ere the parents of 
Emor Olney, who married Mary Hopkins, the parents 
of Deacon James Olney, father of Phoebe T. Olney, 
wife of Paris Mathewson. 

Paris and Phoebe T. Mathewson were the parents of 
a large family, nine sons, eight of whom attained adult 
age, and three daughters, one of whom died young : 

1. William Henry, born Jan. I, 1823, died in 1887; mar- 
ried Mary Westcott, and left a son, William H. (2). 

2. James Olney, of further mention. 3. Patience Olney, 
born .Aug. 26, 1825. married William Sweet, whom she 
survives with two children, Walter and Lottie. 4. Paris 
Winsor. born Feb. 13, 1827, died in 1914; married Eliza 
.Mdrich, who died in 1900, and left a son, Frederick 
L. 5. Andrew Jcncks, born Sept. 28, 1828. married 
Ester Mowry, and had two daughters and one son : 
Emma, married Frederick Chadburn ; Josephine, mar- 
ried Thomas Walsh ; Henry Augustus, deceased. 6. 
Edward F., born Jan. 10, 1830, became a California 
rancher and mine owner, there married and died. 7. 
Elisha Belknap, born July 2, 1831, died in 1834. 8. 
Phoebe .A.nn, born Feb. i, 1834, died in 1885; married 
John Thurston, of Johnston, R. I., who died .\ug. 24, 
1906. 9. Isaac B., born Jan. II, 1836, a contractor, died 
at Grand Rapids, Mich.; married Rebecca Foster. 10. 
Martin Van Buren, born Oct. 4, 1837, died in 1873 in 
New York; he married Eliza Foster, a sister of the wife 
of his brother Isaac B. 11. Charlotte .'\melia, bom Aug. 
30, 1839, died in 1842. 12. Thomas Wilson, born Jan. 
4, 1842, died April 22, 1915; married Helen Sherman, 
and made Providence his home. 

James Olney Mathewson, father of Byron Mathew- 
son, was born in the town of Johnston, R. I.. May 7, 



i8-'4. and died September 12, 1894. He was educated in 
the public schools there and at Latham Academy, Sci- 
tuate, and with the exception of five years he spent his 
life in his native town. In the early si.xties he went to 
California and was employed in the mines for five years, 
then returned to Johnston. .After his marriage he 
settled on the Benjamin street farm and until his death 
was a successful agriculturist. He was a man of in- 
tense public spirit and gave a great deal of time to 
the public service. He was one of the leaders in advo- 
cating a street car line for Greenville avenue, was 
deeply interested in the public schools, and for years 
was a member of the town school board. He repre- 
sented Johnston in the Rhode Island General Assembly, 
as (lid his father before him, and w-as a man of honor 
and uprightness, highly-esteemed by all who knew him. 
His love of justice was a marked attribute of oharacter, 
industry, gentleness, and geniality also being leading 
characteristics. He married Ruth .\. Sweet, a daughter 
of William A. and Ann Eliza (Irons) Sweet, her 
father a longtime resident of Johnston. Children: i. 
.■\nn Eliza, married Jonathan \'. Barnes, of Johnston. 
2. Byron, of further mention. 3. Phoebe Olney, born 
Oct. 21, i860, married, in Boston, Mass., March 4, 
1879, Elisha Arnold Stcere, who died !\Iay 12, 1890; 
Mrs. Steere survives her husband, a resident of Green- 
ville; her children; Elisha .Arnold (3), died in in- 
fancy; Mary Mathewson, Ruth Emma, and Charles 
.Arnold Steere. 

Byron Mathewson, only son of James Olney and 
Ruth .A. (Sweet) Mathewson, was born in the town of 
Johnston, R. I., July 15, 1853, and has spent his entire 
life at the homestead farm on Greenville avenue, his 
birthplace. He attended the public schools of the town 
and a private school in Providence, early became his 
father's farm assistant, and finally his successor in own- 
ership. He specialized in dairy farming and for many 
years operated a retail milk route in Providence. His 
farm has been his chief business interest all his life and 
well has he improved its forty-five acres of tillable land. 
In addition to the acres cultivated he has twenty acres 
of wood lot. A Republican in politics, earnest and 
public-spirited. Mr. Mathewson has never sought nor 
held political office, although fully active and respon- 
sive to every demand of citizenship. He has lived a 
quiet life, and has made many friends. 

Mr. Mathewson married .Ashia Anna Angell. daughter 
of Philip and Drusilla (Thornton) .Angell, and grand- 
daughter of Olney .Angell. Her maternal grandparents 
were Jencks and Emarancy (Hopkins) Thornton, he 
a blacksmith and wheelwright, his wife a tailoress and a 
most remarkable woman. Philip Angell, father of Mrs. 
Mathewson, was a farmer and stone cutter. His father, 
Olney .Angell, was a farmer and at one time owner of 
the cotton mills at Greystone, R. L ; this family sprang 
from Thomas .Angell, born in 1618, who came to New 
England at about the same time as Roger Williams, 
with whom he retained intimate relations in Provi- 
dence. Byron and Ashia Anna (Angell) Mathewson 
arc the parents of two children: i. Byron (2). bom 
at the homestead in Johnston, March 14, 1877; he is a 
graduate of Brown University and a graduate in phar- 
macy, now being superintendent of the Hope Drug 
Company, Bristol, R. I.; he married Carrie Davidson, 



30 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



of Providence, and they have a son, Elmer Belcher, 
bom Aug. i6, 1903, also a daughter. Norma Gertrude, 
born Feb. 7, 1906. 2. Mary S.. born .April 2, 1878; is 
a graduate of State Normal School, taught school for 
several years, but is now residing at the homestead. 



IRVING WILLIAM SLACK, M. D., one of the 

prominent physicians of East Providence, R. I., with 
offices at No. 2540 Pawtucket avenue, is a native of 
North Turnbridge, \t., where he was born, November 
18. 1866. He is a son of Origen F. and Thirza (Moody) 
Slack, old and highly respected residents of that town, 
where his father was engaged in farming for many 
years. Mr. Slack, Sr., is a native of Washington, Vt, 
and is now living retired at New Durham, N. H., at 
the age of eighty-three years, his wife having reached 
the same venerable age. They are the parents of the 
following children: Irving William, of whom further; 
Flora, now deceased ; Elwin : and Mary. 

Dr. Slack received the elementary portion of his edu- 
cation at the public schools of North Turnbridge, Vt, 
and then became a pupil at the Lyndon Institute, Lyn- 
don Center, Vt., from which he was graduated with the 
class of 18S9. He had early in life developed a great 
interest in the subject of chemistry, especially in con- 
nection with the making and effect of drugs, and ac- 
cordingly entered the College of Pharmacy at Boston, 
Mass., where he took a three years' course in this sub- 
ject. It was not at first his intention to become a 
physician, and after graduating from that institution, 
he established himself in the drug business at West 
Ro.xbury, Mass., and later associated with Morgan & 
Company, Wellesley, in the same State. However, after 
a period of successful business, he decided to pursue his 
studies still further, with the intention of becoming a 
physician, and accordingly sold out his establishment 
and entered the medical school of the University of 
Vermont. He graduated from this institution with the 
class of 191 1, taking his medical degree and then, after 
registering in Vermont and Rhode Island, worked for 
a year as interne in the Massachusetts Homoeopathic 
Hospital at Boston, where he gained the necessary 
practical experience. In 1912 he came to East Provi- 
dence, where he located at No. 2540 Pawtucket avenue, 
and has made his home here ever since. In the year 
191 6, he also opened offices at No. 146 Westminster 
street. In the six years that he has practiced here. Dr. 
Slack has made for himself an enviable reputation as 
a capable physician and as one who adheres to the 
highest standards of the medical profession of which he 
is an ornament. He has developed a large and success- 
ful practice and takes his place properly among the 
leading physicians in this community. Dr. Slack is a 
member of the Rhode Island Homoeopathic .Society, a 
member of the Massachusetts Surgical and Gynaecolog- 
ical Society, and serves on the dispensary stafT of the 
Homoeopathic Hospital of Providence. He belongs also 
to the Howard Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and is a 
prominent figure in social and fraternal circles here. 

Dr. Slack married, July 2, 1902, at East Providence, 
.■\nnie Roberts, of Providence, R. I., a daughter of 
Sewell T. and .'\nn Eliza (Beacham) Roberts, old and 
highly respected residents of Alton, N. H., where the 
former was a prosperous farmer until his death which 



occurred in May, 1894, at the age of seventy-two years. 
Mrs. Slack is a woman of culture and unusually fine 
education, having graduated from the high school at 
Somersworth, N. H., and Bates College with the 
class of 1899, where she received her degree of A. B. 
She then taught school for about five years, after which 
she entered Kirksville College at Kirksville, Mo., where 
she took a course in osteopathy, and received her degree 
in that subject. She is now in active practice in asso- 
ciation with her husband, her offices also being at No. 
146 Westminster street. Providence. 

The success of Dr. Slack in his chosen profession, 
may be accredited to the possession by him of a com- 
bination of virtues and talents which are greatly in 
demand in this world. At the basis of his character, 
as they are at the basis of all character really worthy, 
are to be found the fundamental virtues of sincerity 
and courage, a sincerity which renders him incapable 
of taking advantage of another, and a courage that has 
kept him cheerful and determined in the face of all 
obstacles. To these he adds a practical grasp of 
affairs. These qualities, it is hardly necessary to em- 
phasize, are most valuable in the medical profession, 
and indeed his work as a physician has amply proved 
him the possession of this happy union. In all the 
relations of life, in all his association with his fellows, 
these characteristics have stood out in a marked man- 
ner and gained for him the esteem and affection of all 
who come in contact with him. In his family life his 
conduct is of the highest type, and he finds his chief 
happiness in the intimate life of his own home and 
hearthstone. 



EMERSON LELAND ADAMS, A. M.— For many 
years an educator, Mr. Adams brought to his present 
position, assistant commissioner of public schools for 
the State of Rhode Island, an intimate knowledge of 
the needs of the public schools system and its great 
possibilities for good, coupled with an intense devotion 
to education's cause and desirous of having the State 
schools brought to the highest possible state of effi- 
ciency. He is a son of Jonas G. and Rena S. (Hal!) 
Adams, of Wilton, Me.; his father, a farmer, and a vet- 
eran of the Civil War. They were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Emerson Leland, of further men- 
tion ; Lizzie, married Arthur L. Fletcher, of Wilton, 
manager of a department of G. H. Bass & Company, 
shoe manufacturers ; Warren W., married May E. 
Rushton, and engaged in farming in Wilton, Me. ; 
Minnie E., married Edmund Kenney, of Wilton, Me. 

Emerson Leland .Adams was born in Wilton, Me., 
February 6, 1866, and after completing the public school 
courses there finished college preparation at Wilton 
Academy in 1885. He then entered Bowdoin College 
whence he was graduated -A.. M., class of 1889. He 
immediately began his career as an educator, teaching 
at Mclndoe Falls, then advancing in rank, became a 
teacher in Hopkinton High School, going thence to 
Phillips Andover Academy as a teacher of Latin, 
mathematics, English and botany. He retired from 
educational work after one year at Andover, and en- 
tered the insurance business at Lewiston, Me., acting 
as special agent for the Provident Life & Trust Com- 
pany. After spending one year in the insurance busi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



31 



ness he accepted the position of principal of the high 
school at New Salem, Mass.. and remained there for 
ten years, then, for one year, was district superintend- 
ent of four towns, z-i:. : Dana, New Salem, Prescott 
and Greenwich. Following that year of service he was 
for two years principal of Fryeburg .Academy and 
superintendent of schools. For six and a half years he 
was superintendent of public schools of the town of 
Lincoln, R. I. The following five years he occupied 
a similar position at Central Falls, R. I. In 1917 he was 
appointed assistant commissioner of public schools, a 
position he is most thoroughly fitted to fill by virtue 
of education, training experience and inclination. In 
1913 he was president of the Rhode Island Institute of 
Instruction, and president of the Barnard Club of 
Rhode Island in 1917-18. During his residence in New 
Salem. Mass., he served for five years as town auditor. 
Since 1910 he has been a director of the Pawtucket 
Young Men's Christian Association, and chairman of 
the membership committee; president of the Men's 
Forum of Central Falls Congregational Church; was a 
director and vice-president of the conference of Rhode 
Island Congregational Church, and is a member of 
Pythagoras Lodge, No. 14, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Fryeburg, Me. 

Mr. .\dams married at Wilton, Me., December 2, 
1892, Effie C. Dascombe of Wilton, a graduate of 
Colby College, A. B., 1891, and a teacher of Latin and 
modem languages at Grafton High School. Grafton, 
Mass., until her marriage. She is a daughter of Henry 
G. and Cynthia (Perry) Dascombe. her father deceased 
for many years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adams are the parents of three child- 
ren: I. Ethel Margaret, born in New Salem. May 10, 
1896. a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design ; 
married Frederick F. Franklin, Jr., now a second lieu- 
tenant in the Quartermaster's Department of the United 
States Army, stationed at Fort Adams, R. I. She is 
now (1918) supervisor of drawing in Warwick. R. I. 
2. Ruth Dascombe, born in New Salem, March 15. 1898, 
graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design ; mar- 
ried Lincoln S. Fifield, now a second lieutenant in the 
Ordnance Department of the United States .Army. 
Prior to her marriage she was supervisor of drawing at 
Pawtucket. R. I., and in the fall of 1918 accepted the 
position of instructor in drawing at Rhode Island State 
Normal School. 3. .\rlo Gordon, born in New Salem, 
June 16, igoo, a graduate of Pawtucket High School, 
now coxswain in the United States Navy, stationed at 
the Torpedo Station at Newport, R. I. 



EDWARD CARRINGTON BUCKLIN— A native 
son of New York, son of a famous merchant whose 
house flag was carried by fast .American clippers 
throughout the period when our merchant marine was 
at its height, Edward C. Bucklin began his business 
life far from home scenes, and it was not until 1876 
that he became identified with manufacturing in Rhode 
Island. When different interests with which he was 
officially connected consolidated, Mr. Bucklin was 
chosen vice-president and treasurer of the Interlaken 
Mills. Later he was elected secretary of the corpora- 
tion, with offices at No. iioi Turk's Head building. 
Providence. His energy and business ability have car- 



ried him into numerous corporate enterprises, and he 
is to-day one of the leading figures in manufacturing 
circles in Rhode Island. 

Edward C. Bucklin was born in Brooklyn, X. Y., 
.August 7, 1850, son of Thomas Peck Bucklin, a native 
of Seekonk, R. 1.. an importer and vessel owner, and 
one of the wealthiest men of his day. Thomas Peck 
Bucklin flourished in the days of the fast .American 
clippers, and founded the important New York tea 
importing firm of Bucklin & Crane. Their house flag 
was known all over the world and was carried by their 
clipper ships "Comet," "Celestial," "Black Hawk," "In- 
trepid," and others, into every port of note. The old 
homestead at Seekonk dates from the days of Queen 
.\nne. Rehoboth. Mass., was the original home of the 
family. Joseph Bucklin and Deborah .\llen were mar- 
ried there, November 5, 1659. The early Bucklins were 
farmers, and owned and operated grist mills on the 
Seekonk river, owned lands at Pawtucket Falls, and 
in the struggle for liberty did their part. In the busi- 
ness world the name is an honored one. and in each 
generation has been worthily borne. Some members of 
the Rhode Island branch of the Bucklins in recent gen- 
erations arc recalled: The late James C. Bucklin. archi- 
tect and designer of the firm of Tallnian & Bucklin, 
builders and lumber merchants of Providence; Thomas 
Peck Bucklin. father of our subject; Samuel S. and 
William Bucklin of Providence, well and favorably 
known business men of the city; Colonel J. P. Bucklin, 
a Civil War veteran, whose gallantry placed him in 
command of his regiment, and who was for many years 
harbor master of the Port of Providence. 

Edward C. Bucklin is of the seventh .American gen- 
eration, his descent from Joseph and Deborah (.Allen) 
Bucklin of Rehoboth being through their eldest son, 
Joseph (2). The name is found in early records as 
Bucklin, Buckline, and Buckland. 

Joseph (2) Bucklin. born February 16, 1663, married 
Mehitabel Sabin, and they were the parents of eleven 
sons and daughters. The line follows through John 
Bucklin. born March 30, 1701, the fifth child, who mar- 
ried Freelove Smith, of Rehoboth. Their fourth child 
and second son was Captain John Bucklin, of Rehoboth, 
born February 12. 1732, who served in the Revolutionary 
War. Captain Bucklin married Jemima Peck, and they 
were the parents of George Bucklin. born December 6, 
1766, who settled in Seekonk, R. I., and died there Feb- 
ruary 14, 1850. He married Hannah Bennett, of Cum- 
berland, R. I., and their fourth son, Thomas Peck Buck- 
lin, was the famous tea merchant and vessel owner of 
New York City, and father of Edward Carrington Buck- 
lin, prominent in the business life of Providence. 

"Thomas Peck Bucklin was born at Seekonk. R. I., 
September 25, 1804, and died at the new home he erected 
on the homestead. He began business life under the 
direction of Edward Carrington, going to New York 
City, where as head of Bucklin & Crane he founded 
a great business. He was the architect of his own 
fortunes, and rose to eminence in business through his 
own strong character and ability. His clippers were 
famous in the day when .American sailing ships were 
unequalled for speed and design, and he transacted a 
heavy business, and about i860 retired, but as a silent 
partner continued his interest in the firm of Bucklin & 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Crane for some years. He mnrried Eliza Comstock, 
and they were the parents of a large family. 

Edward Carrington Bucklin. youngest son of Thomas 
Peck and Eliza (Comstock) Cucklin, was educated at 
Lyons Grammar School, Providence, at a boarding school 
in X'ermont, and at Mowry and Goff's English and 
Classical School, Providence. After completing his 
studies, he went West and spent ten years in Colorado, 
and was located in Denver, in 1871, where he served as 
a member of the governor's mission house there, and 
also gained practical business training in the office of 
a cotton mill. 

Mr. Bucklin began his official business connections 
with Providence on October 14. 1876, when he was 
elected treasurer of the Arkwright Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and the following year was chosen treasurer of 
the Harris Manufacturing Company, and in 18S2, treas- 
urer of the Interlaken Mills. Later these companies 
were brought under one management, the Interlaken 
Mills continuing the corporate name of the combined 
industries, and Mr. Bucklin becoming vice-president and 
treasurer. He has other important interests, including 
the vice-presidency of the Providence Land & Wharf 
Company; the Providence Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany ; Mercantile Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and 
others. He is a member of the New England Cotton 
Manufacturers' Association, and eminent in his par- 
ticular field of business operation. He holds member- 
ship in the Providence Art Club, in Providence Athan- 
aeum, and is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Bucklin married, February 4, 1874, at Providence, 
Jessie H. Howard, daughter of Henry Howard, gover- 
nor of Rhode Island in 1S73, and a maternal grand- 
daughter of Governor Elisha Harris, who died in 
1861. Mr. and Mrs. Bucklin are the parents of: i. 
Henry Howard, died aged four years. 2. Edward Car- 
rington (2), died aged seven years. 3. Henry Howard, 
born May 21, 1879. and is now secretary and assistant 
treasurer of the Interlaken Mills. 4. Thomas Peck (2), 
born July 23, 1881, and died July 13, 1917. 5. Janet, 
married F. H. Guild, of Edgartown, Mass. 6. Dor- 
othy, married R. G. Ostby, of Providence. 



NELSON HAMLIN WALCOTT— As president 
and treasurer of the L. H. Gage Lumber Company, 
Mr. Walcott is, perhaps, best known to his fellow-cit- 
izens of Providence, R. I., but he is a man of very 
extensive interests, being widely and influentially con- 
nected with the lumber industry. Mr. Walcott is also 
well known in the fraternal and social circles of his 
native city. 

Horatio N. Walcott. father of Nelson Hamlin Wal- 
cott, was a son of James De.xter and Lydia (Tilling- 
hast) Walcott. the former a mill owner of Pawtucket, 
R. I., and the latter a native of East Greenwich. 
Horatio N. Walcott was born in Charleston, South 
Carolina, and was educated in the schools of that city 
and in those of Smithfield, R. I. He was a carriage 
manufacturer at Greenville, R. I., and a trustee of the 
Smithfield Savings Bank, also a deacon of the church, 
and withal a very prominent man in the community. 
Mr. Walcott married Mary Louise Thornton, of War- 
wick, R. I., and their children were: Nelson Hamlin, 
mentioned below ; Chester Eugene, vice-president of 



National Exchange Bank, and carriage builder of 
Greenville ; Martha Louise, married Dr. J. E. Mowry, 
of Smithfield, and is now deceased; Evelyn May, wife 
of Senator Frank Colwell; Florence Ethel, wife of 
William E. Chandler, of Providence ; Bertha Winne- 
fred. wife of Frank Carr of Providence, and now de- 
ceased; Ralph Horatio, deceased; and Harold C, sales- 
man of the Carpenter Lumber Company, of Providence, 
and now first lieutenant in the One Hundred and Third 
Engineers. Mr. Walcott, the father, was born in 1840 
and died in 1897. His widow is still living and resides 
during the winters in Providence, spending the sum- 
mers in Greenville. R. I. 

Nelson Hamlin Walcott, son of Horatio N. and Mary 
Louise (Thornton) Walcott, was born .\ugust 14, 1864, in 
Providence, and received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native city, afterward studying at the 
Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. On 
completing the course he returned to Providence and 
associated himself with Henry M. Angell and Com- 
pany, lumber dealers, at Fox Point. This was in June, 
1881, and he remained with the firm one year, con- 
necting himself in 1882 with Burrows and Kenyon for 
the purpose of learning the lumber business. To this 
he applied himself during the next four years, acquir- 
ing a thorough knowledge of every detail. 

In 1886 Mr. \\'alcott went to Indianapolis and then 
travelled through the South as lumber buyer and sales- 
man for the Slocum and Gage Lumber Company. This 
position he retained until ib'qj when, on Mr. .Slocum's 
retirement, the L. H. Gage Company was organized and 
Mr. Walcott became president and treasurer. He is 
president and treasurer of the Crittenden Lumber 
Company which has mills in Arkansas and Louisiana. 
He is also treasurer of the Charles C. Gardiner Lumber 
Company of Providence, and a director of the Morse 
and Buff'um Company, of Providence, and the Panama- 
.•\merican Timber Corporation, with offices at Emporium, 
Pa. This concern is a manufacturer of mahogany lum- 
ber in Panama. Mr. Walcott is past president of the 
Natural Wholesale Lumber Dealers' .Association of the 
United States, and a director of the .■Mluvial Land 
Association, Memphis, Tennessee, composed of land 
owners in the Mississippi Delta. 

While faithfully adhering to the Republican party, 
Mr. Walcott has never cared to associate himself ac- 
tively with the work of the organization, preferring to 
devote his entire time and attention to his business 
responsibilities. He affiliates with What Cheer Lodge, 
No. 21, Free and .\ccepted Masons, of Providence; 
Royal Arch Chapter, Cavalry Commandery ; and the 
Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Walcott married, April 20, 1888. in Providence, 
R. I., Nellie Lincoln, daughter of Alexander and ."Mmeda 
(Blivan) McCrossan, of that city. Mr. McCrossan, 
who was a native of Scotland, was by trade a machinist. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walcott are the parents of the following 
children: i. Chester Lincoln, born Feb. 3, 1S89; edu- 
cated in Providence public schools, Wilbraham .'\cad- 
emy, Wilbraham, Mass., and Dartmouth College, class 
of 1915, Bachelor of Arts; now assistant manager of 
the Crittenden Lumber Company, .Arkansas. 2. Howard 
Nelson, born Jan. 13, 1894; educated in the Providence 
public schools, Wilbraham Academy and Bryant and 




ff^i-L^ 




X!^i/Loi 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



33 



Stratton's Business College; now assistant manager 
of the Hovey Lumber Company of Providence. 3. 
Alice Louise, born June 16, 1S96; educated in public 
schools and Miss Wheeler's finishing school, Providence. 
4. Ralph A., born Jan. 16, 1902; now attending Bryant 
and Stratton's Business College. The summer home 
of the family is at East Beach, Quonochontaug, R. 1. 



REV. LOUIS JOHN DEADY— In the triangle 
formed by Fountain, Park, and Carnation streets, with 
its apex on Laurel street, is the visible evidence of the 
existence of Sacred Heart parish, Pawtucket, R. 1., a 
parish Father Deady has served as pastor since July i, 
1905. In the apex of the triangle is the church edifice 
which he has rebuilt since his coming, in which he has 
installed new alters with beautiful furnishings, includ- 
ing statuary from Italy, and a wonderful pipe organ 
which was dedicated December 25, 1915. In the rear 
of the church fronting on Lcpine street is the new 
rectory, a beautiful brick structure erected by Father 
Deady, and at the corner of Park and Carnation streets, 
the school building which he has thoroughly renovated 
as regards plumbing and heating, a school at which 
six hundred and fifty pupils receive instructions includ- 
ing music and art. In that same block stands the con- 
vent, where nineteen Sisters of St. Joseph, from the 
mother chapter Louise, at Springfield, Mass., are sta- 
tioned to carry forward their holy work. Across Park 
street, opposite the rectory, stands the new high school 
building which he erected from the old rectory, and 
there forty students may be accommodated while taking 
the four years' course, either classical or commercial, 
the school fitting boys for college or LaSalle Seminary. 

As Sacred Heart has prospered materially, so has the 
spiritual welfare of the parish kept pace, and every 
department of its life. Father Deady has had the loyal 
support of his parish, and in return he has given them 
loving service which has endeared him to his parish- 
ioners. Father Deady is a specialist as are all really 
successful men in every profession, and very dear to 
his heart is the cause of education and the erection of 
buildings suitable for the purpose the church intends. 
Sacred Heart is a large parish, and in his pastoral 
work he is assisted by Joseph N. Welsh, Rev. Edward 
J. Gately, and Rev. Robert C. Cassidy. 

Louis John Deady was born in the County of Kil- 
kenny, parish of Thomston, Ireland, April 7, 1851, son 
of John and Margaret (Walsh) Deady, who came to 
the United States in 1851. John Deady died in Prov- 
idence, R. I., at the age of eighty-four, his wife at the 
age of seventy-two. They were the parents of: Mary, 
now deceased; Katherine, who resides at the rectory 
at Pawtucket with her brother; Louis John, of whom 
this review deals ; Margaret, married John F. Mahoney 
of Providence; and Julia, who resides in the old home 
in Providence. Louis John Deady was brought to the 
United States by his parents the year of his birth, and 
began his education in the Lime street school in Prov- 
idence. He was educated for the priesthood of the 
Roman Catholic church, and in succession passed the 
courses of study at St. Thomas College, Bardstown, 
Ky. ; St. Mary's College, Montreal, Canada, A. B. 1876; 
Grand Seminary, Montreal, where he completed his 
studies in divinity and was ordained December 22, 
K 1-2—3 



1877. by Archbishop Fabre. His first assignment was as 
assistant to the rector of the Church of the Immaculate 
Conception, Providence, where he remained two and a 
half years. He then became assistant rector and was 
at St. Mary's parish. Fall River, Mass., where ho re- 
mained eleven >ears. In addition to his pastoral work, 
he also founded the new parish of St. Lewis in Fall 
River, a parish of two thousand three hundred souls, 
with a church edifice on Bradford avenue. From St. 
Lewis', Father Deady was transferred to St. Joseph's 
at Newport, R.i I., and for ten years he served that 
parish most acceptably. While there he erected new 
St. Anthony's Church, at Portsmouth, R. I., and on him 
fell the entire responsibility of its successful comple- 
tion. In Newport he paved the way for a handsome 
new church, bought the site, caused the plans to be 
prepared, the basement walls built, and the-cornerstone 
laid, then turned it all over to his successor, and began 
the upbuilding of Sacred Heart parish, in Pawtucket, 
where he is still stationed. He has spent forty-one 
years in the priesthood, and from the foregoing it will 
be seen that he is a builder of churches and schools. 
Yet, as a pastor, he has won the hearts of his people 
wherever stationed, and spiritual blessing has bounti- 
fully attended his pastorate. 



FRED D. HOXSIE, the well-known scientist who 
has specialized in the culture of brook trout, and is a 
prominent citizen of Carolina, R. I., where he is super- 
intendent of the American Fish Culture Company, and 
is well known in his line throughout the United States, 
is a meml)er of an old and distinguished New England 
family, being a descendant in the eighth generation, 
from Lodowick Hawksie, who founded the family in 
this country. 

(I) Lodowick Hawksie, was a native of Scotland 
and came from that country to the New England col- 
onies, shortly after 1650. The first record that we 
have of him is of his having served with one John Dex- 
ter, to whom he was apprenticed to learn the trade of 
hatter at Sandwich, Mass. Upon completing his ap- 
prenticeship, he engaged in this business on his own 
account at Springhill, Mass., and was well known as 
a resident of Sandwich, taking an active part in the 
public affairs of the colony and holding a number of 
important local offices. He is recorded to have helped 
distribute powder to the militia and was one of the 
musketeers who went to Yarmouth to the general muster 
in July, 1660. He was admitted a townsman by vote 
of the town, February 3, 1675, and took the oath of 
fidelity July I, 1678. In 1691 he, and two others, were 
chosen to lay out custom lands. Lodowick Hawksie 
was married in October, l66:), to Mary Prc-sbury, a 
daughter of John Presbury, and they made their home 
on the south side of Spring Hill. They were the 
parents of a large family of children, one of whom 
was John Hoxsie, mentioned below. 

(II) John Hoxsie, fourth son and fifth child of 
Lodowick and Mary (Presbury) Hawksie, was born in 
March, 1677, and died in 1767, at the age of ninety 
years. He came from Sandwich, Mass., to Rhode 
Island, and settled at Westerly, being the founder of a 
family in this State. He married (first) Mary Hull, 
the daughter of Joseph and Experience (Harper) Hull, 



34 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



and (second) Ann Richmond, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth Richmond. By the first marriage the fol- 
lowing children were born: John, April II, 1704; 
Joseph, Feb. 25, 170S; Solomon, Dec. II, 171 1 ; Stephen, 
who is mentioned below; and Benjamin, born April 14, 
1716. One child was born of the second marriage, 
Edward, born April 20, 1736. 

(III) Stephen Hoxsie, son of John and Mary (Hull) 
Hoxsie, was born November 28, 1713, and made his 
home in what is now the town of Charlestown, where 
his death occurred October 24, 1793. He married 
February 27, 1734-35, Elizabeth Kenyon, daughter of 
John Kenyon, and they were the parents of a large 
family of children, of whom the eldest was Barnabas, 
mentioned below. 

(IV) Barnabas Hoxsie, eldest son of Stephen and 
Elizabeth (Kenyon) Hoxsie, was born September I, 1735. 
He married Elizabeth Wilbur, who was born December 
10, 1747, and they were the parents of the following 
children : Edith, born July 31, 1764; Stephen, mentioned 
below; Enoch, born July 27, 1769; Elizabeth, born .April 
I, 1772; Esther, born May 21, 1774, and died .\pril 10, 
1778; Joshua, born April 8, 1776; Esther (2), born Jan. 
7, 1782; Lydia, born June 22, 1788. 

(V) Stephen Hoxsie, son of Barnabas and Elizabeth 
(Wilbur) Hoxsie, was born January 8, 1768, and made 
his home at Hopkinton and Richmond, his death occur- 
ring October 28, 1823. He married Anna Kenyon. and 
they were the parents of the following children : Eliz- 
abeth ; Thomas W., who is mentioned below ; William 
B., who married (first) Elizabeth Wilbur, and (second) 
Susan Barber; Stephen, who married (first) Amanda 
Tinkham, and (second) Betsey Cook; Ann, George, 
Martha and Edith, none of whom married; Edward, who 
married Ann Wilcox ; Solomon K., who married 
Eunice G. Pierce, and John W., who died in early 
youth. 

(VI) Thomas W. Hoxsie, son of Stephen and Anna 
(Kenyon) Hoxsie, and grandfather of Fred D. Hox- 
sie, was born September 8, 1793. The greater portion of 
his life was spent in the town of Richmond, where he 
was engaged in business as a blacksmith, and enjoyed 
the high regard of his fellow townsmen as a man of 
integrity, intelligence and industry. He was a Quaker 
in his religous belief and may be said to have lived up 
to the high but difficult ideals of that faith. His death 
occurred November 7, 1878. Thomas W. Hoxsie mar- 
ried (first) February i, 1818, Lydia Taylor, who was 
born in August, 1799. and died March 15, 1820. There 
was but one child of this union, Thomas T., born March 
4, 1819, and died March 19, 1820. After the death of his 
first wife, Thomas W. Hoxsie married (second) Nov- 
ember 14, 1822, Tabitha Tucker, born April 9, 1802, 
and died March 25. 1827. They were the parents of 
the following children : Lydia T., born June 10, 1824, 
and died Jan. 29, 1S97; Mary N., born May ig, 1826, 
and married Charles Collins ; John W., born Feb. 16, 
1828, and died May 16, 1903; Jonathan T., born May 
24, 1829, died June 6, 1854; Stephen, born June 6, 1831, 
and died Oct. 16, 1833; Martha Ann, born Sept. 6, 1833, 
died Dec. 29, 1897, and married John Boss ; Thomas 
C., born June 8, 1836. and removed to Boone, Iowa, and 
is now deceased; Charles A., mentioned at length be- 
low; a daughter, born May 4, 1840, and died May 



18 following; a son, born March 30, 1841, and died 
April 19, of the same year ; Welcome S., born May 20, 

1842, and died Feb. 22, 1843; a daughter, born Dec. 9, 

1843, and died the same day; George T., born Jan. 18, 
1845, and died in 1904; a son, born Aug. 28, 1847, and 
died Sept. 22, of that year. 

(VII) Charles A. Hoxsie, son of Thomas W. and 
Tabitha (Tucker) Hoxsie, was born May 20, 1838, on 
the old Hoxsie homestead in Richmond township, near 
the village of Carolina. His childhood was spent on 
the old place and for his education he attended the 
school established for the convenience of the chil- 
dren of both Richmond and Charlestown. At an 
early age he was apprenticed to his father and under 
him learned the blacksmith's trade. He afterwards 
followed this line of business in association with his 
brother Thomas at Janesville, Wis., for a short 
time. He then returned to the East, and for a time 
engaged in farming, but later secured the position of 
fireman on the steamboats of the Stonington line. Be- 
ing a young man of wide ambition, he also ran a 
stationary engine at Stonington and afterwards en- 
gaged in railroading on the Shore Line of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, taking the 
position of fireman. He continued in this line for 
a number of years and was given a position as engi- 
neer on the New York and Erie Railroad, and also 
worked on the Illinois Central for a time. From this 
road he went to the New York Central and during 
his employment with this concern, made his home at 
Albany, N. Y. He then returned to the Shore Line to 
experiment on a patent spark arrester. It was about 
1878 when Mr. Hoxsie first turned his attention to the 
business of trout culture, taking up this unusual line 
on the old homestead, and he soon made himself a 
prominent figure in the fish industry. At the time that 
Mr. Hoxsie began, there were not more than two or 
three plants of the kind in the country, where artificial 
propagation of fish was carried on. These other con- 
cerns had met with little success in their business but 
Mr. Hoxsie became a student of his subject and was 
soon recognized as an authority throughout the coun- 
try. His skill and knowledge, together with an un- 
usual inventive genius, rapidly brought success to his 
enterprise and in the end a large business was developed. 
He engaged in numberless experiments in the matter of 
artifically propagating trout and it may be judged how 
slowly full results materialized from the fact that a 
whole year must elapse before the success or failure 
of any experiment had been demonstrated. For a time 
the average number of fish raised was only about five 
per cent, of those hatched, and at this rate the process 
was unprofitable. The United States Government had 
its experts, who were trying to eliminate what was 
known as the dark point in fish culture, and had sent 
men to study European methods, but without being able 
to detect the trouble. It was left to Mr. Hoxsie to per- 
fect means for overcoming this great difficulty, and in 
time he produced conditions so favorable to the growth 
and development of the fish, that the reverse of the 
original condition existed and not more than five per 
cent, of the fish hatched were lost. Mr. Hoxsie labored 
indefatigably at a subject which he had grown to be 
intensely interested in, and the result of his labors 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



35 



was his best reward. In the year 1892 the business was 
incorporated under the laws of Maine, as the Amer- 
ican Fish Culture Company, with Mr. Hoxsie as its 
first superintendent. He continued in this capacity until 
1902, when the enterprise was reorganized and enlarged, 
and he became its secretary, a position that he held 
until the time of his death, October 9, 1904. Mr. Hox- 
sie enjoyed the respect and esteem of all those who 
came in contact with him and who recognized in his 
work the achievement of a man of the most admirable 
persistency and determination, and of one who was 
willing to give up his ease and comfort and even his 
security to carry out the purpose he had set himself. 
His integrity was unimpeachable, and with all his pre- 
occupation in his subject, he never forgot or trampled 
on the rights or interests of others. Mr. Hoxsie was 
united in marriage April 20, 1861, at Groton, Conn., 
with Mary A. Davis, a native of Westerly, R. I., where 
she was bom May 23, 1842, a daughter of William H. 
and Mary (Kenyon) Davis. To Mr. and Mrs. Hox- 
sie the following children were born : Willie, born 
June 3, 1863, and died June 22, 1891 ; Ida, born June 
4, 1866, and married June 29, 1890, William P. Nichols; 
Fred Dean, with whose career we are here especially 
concerned ; Annette, born Nov. 14, 1873, and married 
July 25, i<X)3, Henry M. Drury, of Cranston, R. I. 

(VIII) Fred Dean Hoxsie, son of Charles A. and 
Mary A. (Davis) Hoxsie, was born October 10, 1871, at 
Albany, N. Y., but at an early age came to Rhode 
Island, and passed his childhood at the home of his 
parents in Richmond township. As a child, he attended 
the public school of the joint district of Richmond and 
Charlestown and here gained his education. His father 
was at this time making a beginning in his business of 
fish culture and the lad took a keen interest in the mat- 
ter, and from an early age gained a knowledge of the 
subject from the elder man. As he grew older he took 
an active part in the business and was closely identified 
with the building up and development of the .American 
Fish Culture Company. Naturally energetic and indus- 
trious, he displayed a remarkable precocity, not only in 
matters of business, but in the scientific aspect of the 
enterprise, and seemed to inherit his father's talents, 
his versatility and determination. Indeed the growth 
of the business was due to his efforts in a degree only 
second to that of his father, and upon the death of the 
latter he took over the general management of the con- 
cern and is now conducting it with the highest success. 
With the incorporation of the company in 1892 as the 
American Fish Culture Company, he was elected its 
first secretary and treasurer, a position that he con- 
tinued to hold until 1902. when the business was reor- 
ganized and he was elected to succeed his father as 
superintendent. This post is still occupied by Mr. 
Hoxsie and the management of the concern is tlnis 
practically in his control. In October, 1904, upon the 
death of his father, he also became secretary and held 
that oflSce until the election of his successor in 1905. 
In the latter year poultry was added to the business 
and the company to-day requires the services of several 
men to operate the various branches of the work. The 
service rendered by Mr. Hoxsie to the concern is 
scarcely to be overestimated and, since the death of his 
father, it has been his skill and scientific knowledge that 



have kept abreast of the latest advances in the science 
of the subject and maintained for the company its 
reputation as the foremost concern of the kind in the 
country. He has given the closest kind of study to 
trout culture in all its aspects and has originated many 
new and highly important modifications in the care and 
treatment of the fish which have universally been ac- 
cepted as standards. 

The constant demands upon his time and attention 
made by his business have not given him much oppor- 
tunity to take part in local affairs, but he is quite un- 
ambitious in the matter of political preferment, con- 
tenting himself with performing conscientiously his 
duties as a citizen and aiding to the best of his powers 
ever>- movement of importance undertaken for the ad- 
vancement of the community's welfare. He is an In- 
dependent in politics, giving adherence to no party, but 
supporting whatever issue or candidate he believes the 
best for the town or county. He enjoys a well deserved 
reputation for public spirit and is justly regarded as one 
of the best types of self-made men. He is a man of 
artistic tastes and accomplishments, especially in the 
realm of music, and was one of the organizers of the 
Carolina Cornet Band, and for a number of years was 
one of its leading members. In his religious belief he 
is a Baptist and attends the Free Will Baptist Church 
at Carolina. 

Fred Dean Hoxsie was united in marriage on Nov- 
ember 26, 1896, at Richmond, with Florence Gertrude 
Goodhue, a native of Niantic, where she was bom 
October 28, 1878, a daughter of George P. and Harriett 
M. (Brown) Goodhue, old and highly respected resi- 
dents there. To Mr. and Mrs. Hoxsie one child has 
been lx)rn, Hilda Florence, December 15, 1902. 



ERNEST M. SPENCER, one of the most prosper- 
ous and best known merchants of North Scituate, R. I., 
where for many years he has successfully operated a 
store, is a native of this place, his birth having occurred 
here July 2, 1875. Mr. Spencer is a member of an old 
and distinguished Rhode Island family, which was 
founded in this country in the early Colonial period, 
and the members of which have for many generations 
been identified with various parts of this State. 

The earliest ancestor of whom w'e have definite record 
in this State was John Spencer, who resided first at 
Newport and afterwards made his home at East Green- 
wich, R. I. We find him recorded as of that place as 
early as 1661, and he was made a freeman in if)()8. John 
Spencer was one of the first purchasers of the lands 
comprising East Greenwich in 1677, and was town clerk 
there from that year until 1683, while in 1678 he was 
conservator of the peace and deputy in 1680. He mar- 
ried Susannah , and they were the parents of 

nine children, all born between 1666 and 1683, as fol- 
lows : John, Michael, Benjamin, William, Robert, Ab- 
ner, Thomas, Susannah and Pcleg. From his eight sons 
are descended many families of prominence in this and 
other parts of New England. 

Ernest M. Spencer is the great-grandson of William 
Spencer, a member of the East Greenwich branch of 
the family, where his ancestors have resided for sev- 
eral generations. His grandfather was Eben Spencer, 
who also resided in that town, and married there Mary 



36 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Shippey, of Warwick, R. I. One of their children was 
Frank Spencer, the father of the Mr. Spencer of this 
sketch, who was a farmer and carpenter by trade. He 
purchased a farm property about three miles from North 
Scituate, and resided there until his death, which oc- 
curred January 3, 1916. He married Frankie Graves, 
of Natick, a daughter of William H. Graves, who came 
from that place to North Scituate, where he purchased 
a farm and made his home. 

The elementary education of Ernest M. Spencer was 
gained at the public schools of his native region, where 
he remained until he had reached the age of seventeen 
years, when he began his business career by accepting a 
clerical position in the establishment of Albert H. Leach, 
who operated a general store at North Scituate. Two 
years later, when nineteen years of age, Mr. Spencer 
formed a partnership with Henry H. Potter and pur- 
chased the old Leach store, which they operated under 
the name of Potter & Spencer for about two years. At 
the end of that period Mr. Spencer purchased his 
partner's interest, and with the exception of one year 
has been the sole proprietor of the establishment ever 
since. For a number of years he continued to operate 
it as a general store, but in igio specialized in the 
grocery business and also opened a market here. It is 
in these lines that he is at present engaged, and his 
establishment is one of the largest and most successful 
in the community. He has always been the active head 
of the business and has shown himself a most capable 
and eflScient manager, having developed from a com- 
paratively small beginning his present important enter- 
prise. He now does a very prosperous business, and is 
regarded as one of the most substantial citiEens of the 
community. Mr, Spencer has been so much engaged 
with the development of his large business that he has 
never had much time to devote to politics, although al- 
ways public-spirited and keenly interested in the general 
welfare of the community. In the year 1900, however, 
he was appointed postmaster at North Scituate. where 
he gave so efficient an administration of the department 
that he has been retained in this capacity ever since. He 
is one of a large family of children born to his parents, 
who were as follows: Irving G., Ernest M., William 
E., Walter B., deceased; Florence E. J., who became the 
wife of E. A. Hopkins ; Marion A., who became the 
wife of John Anthony; and Lillian D., who became the 
wife of Walter Beckwith. Mr. Spencer is a member 
of the Advent Christian Church, which he joined as a 
boy, and is very active in the work of his parish here. 

Ernest M. Spencer was united in marriage, Septem- 
ber 11, 1895, at North Scituate, with Jennie I. Lyman, 
daughter of Robert and Caroline (Leach) Lyman, old 
and highly respected residents of this place. Mrs. 
Spencer died October 6, 1918. To Mr. and Mrs. Spencer 
were born the following children: i. Robert F.. grad- 
uate of Bryant & Stratton Business College, at age of 
seventeen ; now with the .American Expeditionary Force 
in France. 2. Lester N., who is asscKiated with his 
father in the running of the latter's establishment at 
North Scituate; he is also a talented violinist, although 
eighteen years of age. 3. Carrie, who assists her father 
in the post-office department here. 4. Ernest M., Jr. 
5. Mihon K. 6. Ruth T. 7. Edith H. E. 8. Grace E. 



JUDGE AMBROSE CHOQUET— Inheriting one 
of the old and honorable names of the Rouen district 
of Normandy, France, Judge Choquet has won profes- 
sional honor in his .\merican home, and since October, 
1899, has held the judicial office, judge of the District 
Court of the Eleventh Judicial District. He is a son of 
Jean Baptiste and Adeline (Provost) Choquet, of 
\'erennes, Canada, and a descendant of Jean B. Cho- 
quet, who with his brother, Nicolas, settled at Cape St. 
Ignace, Quebec, Canada, about the year 1662. Jean 
Baptiste and Adeline Choquet were the parents of eight 
children, Ambrose being the third son. The family 
occupation in Canada was agriculture, but in choosing 
a life career Ambrose Choquet selected the law, and for 
over half a century he has engaged in active practice, 
his professional career in the United States beginning 
in 1883, and in Rhode Island in 1890. He has advanced 
in judicial strength and wisdom with the years, and is 
one of the strong men of an honored profession, his 
successive reelections to the bench testifying to the 
confidence reposed in him by the Legislature. In a like 
degree he has gained the respect of his brethren of the 
bench and bar, their unvarying friendship lightening the 
burdens of a life now nearing its eightieth year. 

Ambrose Choquet was born at Verennes, Canada, 
September 26, 1840, and there attended the parochial 
schools, being fitted to enter college at the age of 
fifteen years. He then entered St. Lawrence College, 
near Montreal, completing his course and making his 
decision between the three professions open to him, 
law, medicine, or divinity. His choice of the law later 
aided his brother, Francis Xavier Choquet, to decide 
upon that profession, and later he became judge of the 
Court of Quarterly Sessions for the District of Mont- 
real, and commissioner of extradition for Canada. In 
September, 1862, the young man, Ambrose Choquet, 
entered the office of Rover Roy, city solicitor of Mont- 
real, and studied under his preceptorship for three 
years, following at the same time the law course of 
McGill University, acquitting himself favorably, and in 
1865 receiving from McKill his degree, B. C. L., at grad- 
uation, his thesis on insurance law receiving honorable 
mention. 

Mr. Choquet was admitted to the bar of Lower Can- 
ada, November 7, 1865, and located for practice in the 
city of Montreal, and there continued until 1882, becom- 
ing well established. He was frequently called upon to 
draft important bills requiring carefully considered legal 
phraseology, many measures passed by the Quebec 
Legislature and the Canadian Parliament emannting 
from his pen. In 1882 he abandoned his Montreal prac- 
tice and prospects, settling in the city of Rochester, 
N. Y., where he was admitted to the Monroe county 
bar, and in association with Alfred Ely, of the Rochester 
bar, practiced for three years, 1882-85. The following 
three years were spent in journalistic work in editorial 
connection with newspapers in Plattsburg, N. Y., and 
Worcester, Mass., the law being temporarily abandoned. 
In 1888, with Grover Cleveland, a candidate for reelec- 
tion to the Presidency of the United States, the Wor- 
cester paper, with which Mr. Choquet was connected, 
decided to editorially support President Cleveland 
against Benjamin Harrison. This was exceedingly dis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Z7 



tasteful to Mr. Choquet, who had allied himself with 
the Republican party, and sooner than write in contra- 
diction to his private opinions, resigned his position, a 
happy circumstance, which returned him to his profes- 
sion. 

.After resigning his newspaper post, he applied for 
admission to the Massachusetts bar, and in November, 
1888, was admitted, opening a law office in Worcester, 
and also one in Pawtucket, R. I. He continued in 
Worcester until November, 1890, then was admitted to 
the Rhode Island bar and moved to Central Falls, which 
has ever since been his home. He practiced privately 
until 1893. then was elected judge of probate of the 
town of Lincoln, in which town Central Falls is located. 
He continued judge of probate for the town until 
Central Falls became a chartered city in 1895, then was 
elected to the same office by the City Council, continu- 
ing until February. 1900. On February 0, 1899, Judge 
Choquet was admitted to the bar of the United States 
Circuit Court, and in October, 1899, was appointed 
judge of the District Court, of the Eleventh Judicial 
District, Governor Elisha Dyer appointing him to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Frederick 
N. Gofl. The January session of the General .Assembly 
of 1900 confirmed the Governor's appointment, and by 
successive reiilections he has continued on the bench of 
this court until the present, 1918, a just, impartial, 
learned judge. He is a member of the local and State 
bar associations, holds fraternal relations with West- 
minster Lodge, No. 27, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; is a charter member of Lafayette Lodge, Knights 
of Pythias ; and interested in many of the organizations 
of his city, professional, philanthropic and social. 

Judge Choquet married, in Montreal, Canada. May 
27, 1867, Alexandria LeNoir, of that city. Among their 
children were: Joseph P., connected with the Provi- 
dence Printing Company; .Ambrose H., deceased, who 
was with the Providence "News," a Democrat; J. B. 
Arthur, with the Pawtucket "Gazette and Chronicle;" 
all practical compositors and printers; Alphonse R., a 
commercial traveler; and Mary Louise, who resides at 
home. 



ALLEN A. PRESBREY— The manufacture of 
wooden bo.xcs in the city of Providence, R. I., was the 
business of Allen A. Presbrey, as early as 1870. He 
came to that city from his native Taunton, Mass., and 
the business he then founded took form as Presbrey & 
Stone, a firm name that prevailed for a number of years. 
This was the forerunner of the present corporation, 
.A. .A. Presbrey Son & Co.. manufacturers of packing 
bo.xcs and general woodwork, of which company .Allen 
A. Presbrey is president; his son, Walter .A. Presbrey, 
secretary ; Howard .A. Presbrey. another son, assistant 
secretary. The factory and planing mill, operated by the 
company, have long stood at the corner of Summer and 
Meadow streets. Providence, and for more than half a 
century has been in the Presbrey name. The father and 
founder has now surrendered the heavier burdens of 
management, while the additional responsibilities have 
been on the shoulders of his sons, who have long been 
his business associates. 

.Allen A. Presbrey was born in Taunton, Mass., in 
1845, was there educated, and spent his youth. From 



Taunton and Fall River, he came to Providence, R. I., 
and as a member of the firm, Presbrey & Stone, began 
the manufacture of wooden bo.xcs, a business with which 
he has ever since been connected. The present business 
is operated as the .\. A. Presbrey Son & Co.. of which 
.Allen A. Presbrey is the president and treasurer. 

Mr. Presbrey lias been active in public life, serving 
his city as a member of Common Council, in 1897 and 
1898, and Commissioner of North Burial Ground. He 
is a member of the Church of the Meditator, of which 
he was treasurer for many years, and in his political 
faith he is a Republican. 

Mr. Presbrey married Ellen H. Peckham. They are 
the parents of two sons: i. Walter A., born in Provi- 
dence, R. I., in 1867; a civil engineer by profession, 
city engineer for a number of years, but has since been 
associated with his father in business, and is now secre- 
tary of .A. A. Presbrey Son & Co., an ex-councilman, 
and now a police commissioner of the city of Provi- 
dence. He married Ada Moore. 2. Howard A., born 
in 1876, now assistant secretary of A. A. Presbrey, Son 
& Co. The Presbrey family home is at No. 131 Broad- 
way. 



JULIUS CLARK GALLUP, D.D.S., for many years 
one of the leading dentists of Bristol, R. I., and the 
surrounding region, is a member of one of the oldest 
and most distinguished families of New England, 
which has spread to all parts of that district and is now 
widely represented. The Gallup family had its origin 
in Dorsetshire, England, where the early ancestors of 
Dr. Gallup resided in the Parish of Mosterne. 

(I) The founder of most of the branches of the 
family in this country was one John Gallup, a son of 
John Gallup, who came from the family home and sailed 
on the ship "Mary and John" from Plymouth, Eng- 
land, March 20, 1630. He arrived at Nantasket, now 
Hull, on the thirtieth of May following, and first went 
to Dorchester, but shortly afterwards made his home 
at Boston, to which place he was followed by his family 
in 1633. He was admitted to the first church of Boston, 
January 6, 1634. and in the same year was made a 
freeman. He was the owner of Gallup's Island, where 
he had a farm, and also a town house at Boston. He 
was well-known as a mariner, and after the settlement 
of the Rhode Island and Connecticut colonies his ves- 
sels were about the only means of communication be- 
tween them and the original Massachusetts Bay settle- 
ments. It was he who in September, 1633, succeeded in 
piloting the ship "Griffin" of three hundred tons, 
through a newly found channel, having on board a 
number of distinguished citizens of New England, 
including the Rev. John Cotton, the Rev. John Hooker, 
founder of Hartford, and the Rev. Mr. Stone, together 
with some two hundred other passengers. His death 
occurred January II, 1650, at Boston. John Gallup 
married Christobel , who died at Boston. Sep- 
tember 27, 1655. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: John, mentioned below; Joan, Samuel, 
and Nathaniel, all of whom were born in England. 

(II) Capt. John (2) Gallup, son of John (i) and 
Christobel Gallup, was a native of England, and came 
with his mother to .America in 1633 to join his father 
who had already settled here. He distinguished him- 



38 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



self as a gallant warrior in the Indian wars, and par- 
ticularly in the Pequot War, where he bore himself with 
such distinction that he was rewarded by the General 
Court of Connecticut, in 1651, with a grant of one 
hundred acres of land at New London. He repre- 
sented that town in the General Court of Connecticut 
in 1665 and 1667. At the time of the outbreak of King 
Philip's War, although he was then over sixty years of 
age, he took command of the warriors from the friendly 
Indian tribe of the Mohegans, and joined forces with 
Captain John Mason in command of the colonists. 
This little army took part in the sanguinary "Swamp 
Fight' at Narragansett, December 19, 1675, and Cap- 
tain Gallup was one of those who fell while leading his 
men to the storming of the fort. His death was felt 
as a great blow by the colonists. Captain Gallup mar- 
ried, in 1644, Hannah Lake, a daughter of John and 
Margaret Lake, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Hannah, born at Boston, Sept. 14, 
1644, married June 18, 1672, Stephen Gifford, of Nor- 
wich, Conn. ; Esther, born at New London, Conn., March 
24, 1653, and became the wife of Henry Hodges, of 
Taunton, Mass.; Benadan, mentioned below; William, 
born in 1658; Samuel; Christobel, who became the wife 
of Peter Carey, of Groton ; Elizabeth, who married 
Henry Stevens, of Stonington; Mary, who married 
John Cole; Margaret, who became the wife of Joseph 
Culver, of Groton. 

(III) Benadan Gallup, son of Captain John (2) and 
Hannah (Lake) Gallup, was born at Stonington, in the 
year 1655, and died August 2, 1727. He made his home 
at Stonington during Iiis entire life, and he and his wife 
were members of the church there. He married Esther 
Prentice, born July 20, 1660, a daughter of John and 
Esther Prentice, of New London. The death of Mrs. 
Gallup occurred May 18, 1751. They were the parents 
of the following children: Hannah, bom in 1683; 
Esther, bom in 1685; Mercy, born in 1689; Benadan, 
mentioned below ; Joseph, born in 1695 ; Margaret, bom 
in 1698; and Lucy, born in 1701. 

(IV) Lieutenant Benadan (2) Gallup, son of Ben- 
adan (i) and Esther (Prentice) Gallup, was born at 
Groton, Conn., in the year 1693, and died September 
30. '755- He married, January 11, 1716, Eunice Cobb, 
whose death occurred February i, 1759, at the age of 
sixty-three. They were the parents of the following 
children : Benadan, mentioned below ; Esther, born 
Feb. 24, 1718; Eunice and Lois (twins), born March 
29, 1721; William, born July 4, 1723; Henry, born Oct. 
5, 1725; Nathan, born in the year 1727; Ebenezer; 
Thomas P., baptized July 28, 1734; Hannah, and Sarah. 

(V) Colonel Benadan (3) Gallup, son of Lieuten- 
ant Benadan (2) and Eunice (Cobb) Gallup, was born 
October 26, 1716, at Groton, Conn. He was an officer 
in the Revolutionary War and distinguished himself in 
that historic struggle. He was with the second battal- 
ion of Wadsworth's militia brigade raised in June, 
1776, and was at the Brooklyn front, battle of Long 
Island, August 27, 1766; in the retreat to New York, 
August 27-30; in the retreat from New York City, 
September 15, and with the main army at White Plains. 
His death occurred at Groton, May 19, 1800. Colonel 
Gallup married, August 11, 1740, Hannah Avery, of 
Groton, who died July 28, 1799. They were the parents 



of the following children: Benadan, born July 29, 
1741 ; Isaac, mentioned below; Hannah, born Nov. 4, 
1744; Esther, born Dec. 9, 1746; James, born May i, 
1749; Jesse, born Feb. 2, 1751; John, born Jan, 13, 1753; 
Prudence, born Jan. 30, 1755; Susan, born in 1756; 
Josiah, born in 1760; and Abigail, born in 1762. 

(VI) Captain Isaac Gallup, son of Colonel Benadan 
(3) and Hannah (Avery) Gallup, was born December 
22, 1742, at Groton, and died at Ledyard, August 3, 
1814. Like his father he served in the Revolutionary 
War and attained the rank of captain. He married 
Anna Smith, a daughter of Nehemiah and Abigail 
(Avery) Smith, born December 8, 1765. They were the 
parents of the following children: Anna, born Sept. 3, 
1787; Isaac, bom Jan. 21, 1789; Russell, born April 11, 
1791 ; Sarah, born Nov. 9, 1792; Jabesh, bom Aug. 23, 
1794; ."^very, born April 6, 1796; Elias, born April 14, 
1798; Erastus, born July 31, 1800; Shubael, born March 
6, 1802; and Elihu, mentioned below. 

(VII) Elihu Gallup, youngest child of Captain Isaac 
and Anna (Smith) Gallup, and father of Dr. Julius C. 
Gallup, was born at Ledyard, Conn., Dec. 12, 1806. He 
removed to Norwich, Conn., where he continued to 
reside until his death, which occurred August 25, 1858. 
He married Emily Clark, and among their children was 
Dr. Julius C. Gallup, with whose career we are here 
especially concerned. 

(VIII) Dr. Julius C. Gallup, son of Elihu and Emily 
(Clark) Gallup, was born January 19, 1840, at Norwich, 
Conn., and spent his childhood there. It was there that 
he received the preparatory portion of his education, 
attending for that purpose the local public schools, and 
his father also provided him with private tutors. He 
was a very precocious child, and at the age of fifteen 
went to Oberlin, Ohio, and was a student at the public 
schools there. Shortly afterwards he returned to Nor- 
wich and it was in the high school there that he was 
prepared for college. Dr. Gallup had determined upon 
dentistry as a profession at an early age, and upon 
completing his studies at the Norwich High School he 
entered the office of Dr. S. L. Geer, of that place, whom 
he assisted, and thus learned the practice of his calling. 
It was in 1862, the days of his apprenticeship being 
over, that Dr. Gallup first entered the practice of his 
profession on his own account, and the scene of his 
first venture was Mystic, Conn. Two years later he 
removed to Bristol, where he has continued ever since, 
and is now a leading member of his profession in the 
community, enjoying the confidence of the entire com- 
munity and his colleagues in particular. Dr. Gallup 
owes the high place that he occupies to-day entirely to 
his own efforts. He is undoubtedly naturally qualified 
for success in his chosen calling and his skill and dex- 
terity is in part the gift of inheritance, but in far 
greater measure it comes from his own constant study 
and indefatigable practice over a period of about half 
a century. Dr. Gallup has devoted himself to his pro- 
fessional tasks and duties with the most single-minded 
devotion, and although keenly interested in public 
affairs and issues, and a staunch Republican in politics, 
has never found time nor opportunity to take part in 
local affairs. In his religious belief he is a Congrega- 
tionalitt and has for many years attended the church of 
that denomination at Bristol. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



39 



Dr. Gallup was united in marriage, October 25. 1864, 
with Mary E. Harvey, and they became the parents of 
the following children: Mary Esther, born Sept. 3, 
1866, graduated from the Boston Dental College. June 
21, 1893, and became the wife of A. W. Harlan, D. D. 
S.,' of New York; Dr. Jennie H., born Oct. 14, 1867, 
graduated from the Boston Dental (now Tufts) Col- 
lege, with the degree of D. D. S., and was granted the 
post-graduate degree of D. M. D., in IQ06, and is now 
associated with her father in his practice here; Annie 
C, born Nov. 22, 1868, and became the wife of J. F. 
Roach, of Dorchester, Mass.; Julius Clark, Jr., born 
March 5, 1871, a graduate of the dental department of 
Tufts College, and now a practicing dentist; Edward 
Clark, born Oct. 28. 1874. a graduate of Tufts College, 
dental department. 



EUGENE PHILLIPS PLATT— From early life 
Mr. Piatt has been in occupations which have brought 
him before the public, his earliest experiences being as 
a page in the Rhode Island Legislature and later a 
page in the National Congress at Washington. As 
founder and manager of the Inlaid Company, of Prov- 
idence, manufacturing French Ivory Novelties, he has 
established himself firmly in the business world, that 
corporation, established under the laws of the State of 
Rhode Island, being a prosperous and profitable enter- 
prise. Eugene P. Piatt, is a son of John A. and Emma 
(Bowne) Piatt, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

John A. Piatt, born in 1839, came to Providence in 
m.mhood and engaged in the drug business, becoming 
a member of the firm of Corliss, Metcalf & Piatt, 
Blanding & Blanding now occupj-ing the site used by the 
first named firm. Mr. Piatt withdrew from the drug 
business to enter the jewelry business as a member of 
Corliss, Metcalf, Piatt & Company, later, Walter While 
& Company, then Foster & Bailey. John A. Piatt died 
February i, 1902; his wife died in the year 19OO. aged 
fifty-nine. They were the parents of eleven children, 
five sons and a daughter now living; F. B., president of 
the Inlaid Company, of Providence; Charles E. B., a 
salesman with F. W. Foster Brothers; William H., 
stock manager with the Foster Brothers; Eugene P., 
of further mention ; Chester, an undertaker with J. W. 
Carpenter & Sons ; the daughter is a resident of South 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Eugene P. Piatt was born in Providence, R. I., Sep- 
tember 4, 1869, and was there educated in the public 
schools; Murray's .\cademy, and Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College. He secured appointment as page in 
the Rhode Island Legislature, and later occupied a 
similar position in Newport, R. I. He began business 
life with the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, remaining eighteen months, then for nine months 
was in the employ of Foster & Bailey, silversmiths and 
jewelers. His next business venture was undertaken on 
his own account, manufacturing Albertype pictures with 
a plant on High street. A year later he began the 
manufacture of French Ivory Novelties on Eddy street. 
Providence, his force consisting of six people. He re- 
mained on Eddy street for two years, then moved to 
Cyr street, where fifty hands were employed, and three 
years later moved to his present location. No. 1058 
Broad street. Providence, where two hundred hands 



are necessary to meet the demands of the trade. The 
president of the company is F. B. Piatt, a brother of 
Eugene P. Piatt, who is treasurer and general man- 
ager. The products of the Inlaid Company, incorpor- 
ated under the laws of the State of Rhode Island, with 
a capital of $25,000, are sold all over the United States 
by travelling salesmen of the company, and agencies 
established in Australia, New Zealand and Spain. The 
company is the largest of its kind in Rhcde island and 
one of the largest in the United States. 

Mr. Piatt married, in Providence, December 10, 1900, 
Maud H. Ricketts, daughter of Samuel and Nancy 
Ricketts. 



JOHN PRESCOTT FARNSWORTH— Capable, 
energetic and progressive, Mr. Farn.swortli has won his 
way through all the intermediate positions to the ex- 
ecutive control of one of Rhode Island's oldest busi- 
ness corporations, the Providence Dyeing, Bleaching and 
Calendering Company. For thirty-three years he has 
been connected with that company, beginning as agent, 
and in his special line his word is a recognized author- 
ity. Courteous and considerate, upright and honorable. 
he has won highest personal standing, and numbers his 
warm friends both within and without his business 
world. 

He is the son of Claudius Buchanan Farnsworth, 
grandson of Luke Farnsworth, of Groton. Mass., and 
great-grandson of Major Amos Farnsworth, a brave 
officer of the Revolution. Major Amos Farnsworth was 
a son of Amos Farnsworth, a man of striking appear- 
ance, six feet and four inches in height, who, when 
lands in Canada were opened for settlement, obtained 
grants for settlement of land which he secured and 
improved, but he was unable to hold title, and in 1774 
returned to Groton. Mass. On December 5, 1775, he 
was drowned with his youngest son, Benjamin, while 
attempting to cross the Nashua river in a small boat. 
This Amos Farnsworth was a son of Benjainin Farns- 
worth, a landowner of Groton, and a grandson of 
Matthias Farnsworth, the founder of the family in New 
England. Matthias Farnsworth is first of record at 
Lynn. Mass., in 1657, but later moved to Groton, Mass., 
where he died January 21, 1689, aged about seventy- 
seven. Groton was long the family seat, but Claudius 
Buchanan Farnsworth. of the sixth generation, aban- 
doned the family acres, and after embracing the law 
located at Pawtucket, R. I., and there his son, John 
Prescott Farnsworth, of Providence, was born. 

Claudius Buchanan Farnsworth was born January 8, 
181 5, and died May 19, 1897. He was a grailuate of 
Harvard University, A. B., 1841, and prepared for the 
practice of law at Harvard Law School and under the 
preceptorship of Timothy G. Coffin, a member of the 
Bristol county bar, located at New Bedford. He was 
admitted to the same bar in 1844, at Taunton, but at 
once located at Pawtucket, then in Massachusetts, but 
since 1862, a city of Rhode Island. He practiced his 
profession there until 1859, then was chosen treasurer 
of the Dunnell Manufacturing Company, a post he 
filled until 1881, then resigned and resumed the practice 
of law. His second son, Claude J,, later became his 
father's law partner, and as Farnsworth & Farnsworth 
they conducted a large and lucrative law practice in 



40 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Pawtucket until the death of the senior partner in 1897. 
In addition to his law work, Claudius B. Farnsworth 
prepared and published in i8qi a "Monograph of Mat- 
thias Farnsworth and His Descendants," which later 
formed a basis for a more pretentious work by another. 

Claudius B. Farnsworth married. February 27, 1851, 
Marianna Mclntire, who died in Pawtucket. August 10, 
1904, daughter of Joseph and Ann (Mayberry) Mc- 
lntire. They were the parents of two sons and a 
daughter : John Prescott, of further mention ; Claude 
J., born Dec. 15, 1862. his father's law partner and 
successor; Abby Mclntire, born Nov. 11, 1864. 

John Prescott Farnsworth. of the seventh .American 
generation of his family, was bom at Pawtucket. R. I., 
February 19, 1S60. He attended public schools of Prov- 
idence, R. I., also a private school taught by Rev. 
Charles H. Wheeler under whom he completed college 
preparation. In 1877 he entered Harvard University, 
whence he was graduated A. B., class of 1881. With 
this fine mental equipment he entered business life as 
a clerk, and from that entrance has gone steadily up- 
ward to his present post. He began with the Lonsdale 
Company, manufacturers of cotton goods at Lonsdale, 
R. I., where he remained as clerk until January, 1885, 
when he was sent to Great Falls, N. H., to superintend 
the construction of the bleacheries being erected by 
the Great Falls Manufacturing Company, continuing 
there until their completion the following July. He 
then returned to Rhode Island, locating at Providence 
in July, 1885, then and there beginning his long and im- 
portant connection with the Providence Dyeing, Bleach- 
ing and Calendering Company. His first position was 
as agent of the company, an office to which that of 
treasurer was added in 1889. He continued as agent 
and treasurer until 1903, when he was elected president 
of the old and substantial corporation, one which his 
genius for financial and executive management has so 
wonderfully developed and enlarged. He has confined 
himself largely to his own special field of business 
effort and has few outside interests. In politics a 
Repul)lican, he has served his city as councilman from 
the Ninth Ward; and in religious faith an Episcopalian, 
serving St. James parish, Providence, as vestryman and 
clerk. He is a master Mason, and past master of 
Orpheus Lodge, No. 36, Free and Accepted Masons; 
a companion of Providence Chapter, No. i, Royal Arch 
Masons ; and a sir knight of Calvary Commandery, No. 
13, Knights Templar; all Providence Masonic bodies. 
His clubs are the Hope. Squantum, Turk's Head, and 
University, of Providence, and the .Arkwright and 
Harvard, of New York City. 

Mr. Farnsworth married Margaret Cochran Bar- 
boni, November 25, 1885. Children: John P., Jr.. born 
Feb. 8, 1888; William B., Sept. 7, i8gi ; Claudius R., 
March 25, 1895. 



WHARTON WHITAKER— As vice-president and 
general manager of the William H. Haskell Company 
of Pawtucket, R. I., manufacturers of bolts and nuts, 
Mr. Whitaker has compiled a record of efficiency in 
management which can only be expressed in figures as 
an increase in business one thousand per cent, greater 
than when he became general manager in 1915. The 
business of William H. Haskell Company was started 



in 184s by William H. Haskell, upon an old machine 
shop business established early in the nineteentli cen- 
tury by Colonel Stephen Jenks. William H. Haskell, 
the founder, was born in Cumberland, R. I.. Septem- 
ber I, 1821, and there began learning the machinist's 
trade. He labored in Cumberland and other places 
until 1845, became an expert in his line, and in 1845 
established in Pawtucket in the old Colonel Stephen 
Jenks' machine shop on Mill street with Nathaniel S. 
Collyer as partner. There they built up a good busi- 
ness, employing from twenty to thirty men in their 
little plant. The partners remained in business four 
years as machinists, then in 1850, William Haskell in 
company with Curtiss Collyer and Lewis T. Haskell 
bought an interest in the bolt and screw manufacturing 
plant owned by Pinkham & Jenks, the business ort;aniz- 
ing as Pinkham, Haskell & Company. In 1857 William 
Haskell bought out his partners, and until 1861 was 
sole owner and manager. In 1861 Robert Sherman was 
admitted as a special partner, but seven years later Mr. 
Haskell bought his interest and continued sole owner 
until the incorporation of the business. The business 
grew rapidly under Mr. Haskell's management and ex- 
pansion rapidly followed. In 1861 the large plant on 
Main street was placed in operation, its size 100 x 40 
feet, two stories in height, then being considered enor- 
mous. A few years later, however, an addition 350 x 
50 feet was necessary, and one hundred fifty men were 
employed. Bolts, nuts, washers and coach screws are 
the special articles of manufacture, and the business has 
been a uniformly successful one. 

Wharton Whitaker, the present vice-president and 
general manager of the William H. Haskell Manufac- 
turing Company, was born in Waverly, Md., September 
21, 1S80, son of Alexander M. and Emma L. (.\mes- 
bury) Whitaker. Alexander M. Whitaker was engaged 
as a flour commission merchant in Waverly, but in 
1885 came to Rhode Island, forming a partnership with 
C. Earl, and starting business as the Briggs Printing 
Company of Providence, Thomas Lawson the first 
manager of the shop. Wharton Whitaker was educated 
in the Providence public schools, and in 1898 enlisted 
in Battery B, Rhode Island Volunteer .Artillery, for 
service in the war with Spain, but saw only camp duty. 
After returning to Providence he entered the employ 
of the Fourth National Bank as collection clerk and 
outside man, a position he held four and one-half years. 
He then became assistant teller with the Rhode Island 
Trust Company, continuing three and one-half years, 
resigning to become salesman for the Rhode Island 
Tool Company. A few years later he was promoted to 
the position of sales agent, a post he ably filled for five 
years. In 1914 Mr. Whitaker was elected vice-president 
of the William H. Haskell Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of bolts and nuts. He held that oflSce 
until January I, 191.^, then was made general manager 
of the business in addition to his former duties. Dur- 
ing the three years which have since intervened the 
increase of business has been wonderfully large, exten- 
sive additions have been necessary to care for it. and 
in all, the record is one most remarkable. Mr. Whit- 
aker is a member of the Masonic order of his city, 
and is rated one of the energetic, progressive, success- 
ful men of his business. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



41 



He married Ltia Otis, daughter of Orrin M. and 
Alice (Neal) Otis, of Providence, R. I. They are the 
parents of three sons and a daughter: Wharton Otis, 
Dorothv, Robert A. and Edward A. 



CHARLES EDWARD SCOTT, M. D.— Among 
the prominent physicians of Warren, R. I., Dr. Charles 
Edward Scott is a distinguished figure, having estab- 
lished here a large and high class practice, with offices 
on Childs street. Dr. Scott is a native of North Brook- 
field, Mass., where he was born May 14, 1872. He is a 
son of Alexis and Malvina (Langevin) Scott, who for 
many years were residents of the province of Quebec, 
in Canada. Ale-xis Scott was himself a native of the 
town of Chambly, in that province, where he was born 
in 1842. He afterwards removed to Marlborough, 
Mass., where his death finally occurred in April, 1914. 
He was engaged in the grocery and bakery business in 
Marlborough, and retired about eight years before his 
death. He was a Republican in politics, and became 
prominent in town affairs, holding the position of over- 
seer of the poor for many years. His v.ife, who was 
Miss Malvina Langevin, was born at St. Ourso, in the 
province of Quebec, and still resides at Marlborough, 
Mass., at the age of seventy-nine years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott, Sr., were the parents of ten children, four of 
whom died in infancy, the remainder being as follows: 
Emelain, who died in 1915; Alvares, who makes his 
home at Haverhill, Mass. ; Phileas, who resides at 
North Brighton, Conn. ; Charles Edward, with whom 
we are here especially concerned ; Mary Jane, who re- 
sides with her mother at Marlborough, Mass ; and 
Cyril, of Holyoke, Mass. 

Dr. Charles E. Scott was born during the short 
residence of his parents at Brookfield, Mass., and while 
still an infant was taken by them to Marlborough, in 
that State where the elementary portion of his education 
was received at the local public schools. He attended 
the grammar grades and the high school there, being 
prepared at the latter for college. He then became a 
pupil at St. Mary's College, Mao'sville, province of Que- 
bec, Canada, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1806, receiving his bachelor's degree. In the mean- 
time the young man had determined to adopt the pro- 
fession of medicine for his career in life, and with this 
end in view, entered the medical school connected with 
Laval University, Quebec. Here he continued his 
excellent reputation as a student and was graduated in 
the year 1900 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
On March 14, 1901, within a year of his graduation, he 
came to Warren, R. L, and since that time has been in 
successful practice here, having established for himself 
a reputation as one of the leading physicians of this 
region, and gaining the confidence both of his pro- 
fessional colleagues, and of the community at large. 

Dr. Scott is almost as equally well known in the com- 
munity in connection with his active participation in 
public affairs, as he is as a physician, and indeed his 
reputation has extended even to wider limits. He is a 
Republican in politics, like his father before him, and 
has become one of the leading figures in the organiza- 
tion of that party in this part of the State, and he has 
held many public offices. In the years 1908 and 1909 
he represented Warren in the State Senate, and estab- 



lished for himself an enviable record as a very intelli- 
gent and progressive legislator, and at the same time a 
disinterested public servant. For five years he has 
served as a member of the Republican town committee, 
and has just been elected a representative on the State 
convention of his party (1918). He also held the post 
of health officer here for i\\e years, besides many other 
professional posts in connection with the local govern- 
ment. He is at the present time medical examiner of 
the John Hancock Life Insurance Company and has 
served as surgeon on the artillery company at Warren 
for nine years. In 1910 Dr. Scott opened a drug store 
in this place, and is at the present time doing a large 
and growing business in this line. Dr. Scott is a mem- 
ber of the Franco-.\mcrican Medical .Association, the 
Royal Order of Moose, the Calumet Club of Fall River, 
the Catholic Order of Foresters, and a number of 
F'rench societies. In his religious faith Dr. Scott is a 
Roman Catholic and attends the French church of this 
denomination at Warren. He is a man of strong 
religious convictions, and is active in the support of 
the work of his parish. 

Dr. Scott married January ig, 1905, at Chambly Basin, 
Eugenie Scott, a native of that place and a daughter 
of Amelien and Doniithid (Lambert) Scott, old and 
highly respected rosi<!ents of that region in Canada. 
Her father was for a number of years engaged in 
business as a blacksmith at Chambly Basin, and after- 
wards became superintendent of construction on the 
Richeleau Canal. He was a member of the town coun- 
cil at Chambly Basin for thirty-five years, was a Lib- 
eral in politics, and was well known among his fellow 
citizens as an honest and intelligent man. His death 
occurred in August, i(X>3. at the age of seventy years. 
Mrs. Scott's mother was born at Chambly Basin, and 
died there .'\ugust 26, 1906, at the age of seventy-six 
years. To Dr. and Mrs. Scott two children have been 
born, as follows: Charles Emile, born F"eb. 3, 1905, and 
Anita Lillian, born July 15, 1907, and died Aug. 19, 1917. 



LOUIS WARD DUNN— Since 1916 a justice of 
the Eighth Rhode Island District Court, and an ex- 
judge of the Probate Court of Johnston, Judge Dunn 
has gone far in his profession during the ten years of 
his practice at the Rhode Island bar. This endorse- 
ment of his ability and fitness for responsibility is most 
gratifying to the young man, and in return he gives of 
his best. In addition to his professional duties, he has, 
since the outbreak of hostilities between the United 
States and Germany, served as a volunteer on many 
Federal and State boards and commissions to aid in the 
bringing of victory to .•\mcrican and Allied arms. He 
is a son of John Francis and Mary (O'Donnell) Dunn, 
his parents residing in Johnston, R. I., his father retired. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunn are the parents of three other sons 
and a daughter: Robert D., now of Washington, D. 
C. ; John Francis (2), of Greenville, general agent of 
the Namquit Worsted Company ; Reuben S., of Green- 
ville, superintendent of the Namquit Worsted Com- 
pany ; and May, married James E. Dooley, of Johnston. 

Louis Ward Dunn was born in Philadelphia. Pa., 
March 25, 1889. In 1895 the family moved to Rhode 
Island, locating in North Providence, and later in 
Johnston. He was educated in the public schools of 



42 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Johnston and Providence. After leaving high school 
he entered X'alparaiso University, Valparaiso, Ind., com- 
pleting the courses of law department, receiving his 
degree LL. B., at graduation, class of 1908. The two 
following years were devoted to gaining law office ex- 
perience with the firm of Vincent, Boss and Barnetield, 
and in 1910 he applied for and gained admission to the 
Rhode Island bar. He began practice in Providence, 
and has since been very successful, his hold upon public 
confidence and esteem becoming stronger the better 
he is known. He was elected judge of the Probate 
Court in 191 1 and 1912, having served as coroner in 
1910, and in 1915 was elected to represent the town of 
Johnston in the General Assembly of Rhode Island. 
There he served on house committees, rules, education, 
and on the joint committees, accounts and claims In 
1916 he was elected to his present office, judge of the 
Eighth District Court. 

Judge Dunn is a member of St. Thomas Roman 
Catholic Church; is the advocate of Providence Coun- 
cil, Knights of Columbus; member of St. Thomas 
Catholic Club; the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks of Providence, and of other social organizations, 
and in politics is a Republican. He is one of the young 
men of the Rhode Island bar for whom the future 
seems bright with promise, and he carries with him the 
best wishes of many friends. 



ADIN WALTER TAFT, D. D. S.— This branch of 
the Taft family springs from Robert Taft, of Mendon, 
Mass., whose farm later was part of the town of Ux- 
bridge, and who settled at Burrillville, R. I., where Dr. 
Adin W. Taft was born. The Taft families of Amer- 
ica descend from Robert Taft and a relative, Mathew 
Taft, who settled later near Robert's home in Mendon. 
They were both of Irish birth, Protestant in religion. 
The name does not appear in Scotland, and only in 
England apparently among the descendants of the Irish 
family. For some centuries the name was spelled 
Taaffe, the families of Tifft and Tafft in England 
possibly coming from the same stock, there still being a 
contention as to whether the family is English or Irish. 
The family is associated with the Scotch-Irish, just 
as many English families were, so nothing can be proved 
from that fact. Sir Robert Taaffe or Taft, a Protestant 
Knight, was among the grantees at the time of the 
Scotch emigration and settlement in the Province of 
Ulster, Ireland, by order of King James. In 1610 he 
received a grant of one thousand acres of land in the 
parish of Castle Rahen in County Cavan. On this 
Taft land there was "an old castle newly mended, and 
all the land was inhabited by Irish." This seems to be 
the family with whom Robert and Mathew Taft were 
connected. County Louth, the Irish home of the Tafts, 
is on the northern coast bounded by Armagh and Ulster, 
on the east by the English Channel, and on the south 
by the Boyne. 

Robert Taft, the American ancestor, was bom in 
Ireland, about 1640, and died in Mendon, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 8, 1725. He and his sons built the first bridge 
across the river Mendon, and he was one of the pur- 
chasers of the tract from which the town of Sutton 
was founded. By his wife Sarah he had five sons, all of 
whom married and had large families. The family is 



large and influential, one of the famed men of the race 
being William H. Taft, president of the United States, 
1908-12. 

.•\din Walter Taft was born in Burrillville, R. I., 
March 20, 1871, son of Bazaleel Paine and Ellen 
(Payne) Taft, his father deceased, his mother now 
residing in Providence. Adin W. Taft attended the 
grammar and high schools, but did not graduate from 
high school, circumstances compelling him to leave 
school and obtain employment. For ten years he was a 
bookkeeper, but that was temporary, his ambition being 
to become a professional man. He considered his re- 
sources, and when he felt that he had saved enough 
he entered the dental department of the University of 
Maryland, at Baltimore, and in 1901 was graduated D. 
D. S. In 1902 he began practice in Providence, R. I., 
and so continues well established in public regard and 
prosperous, his office at No. 334 Westminster street. He 
is a member of the professional societies, the Congre- 
gational church, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and the Free and Accepted Masons. In poli- 
tics he is an Independent. 

Dr. Taft married in Pawtucket, R. I., .\pril 6, 1894, 
Emma F. Haines, they the parents of a son Earl, bom 
March 20, 1895, who enlisted in the United States 
Navy, and served his country in her period of trial 
and stress. They also have two daughters : Ellen M. 
and Muriel M. 



ALBERT HARRIS WHITMAN, of Pawtucket, 
R. I., a retired business man, and the owner of valuable 
properties in this city, is a native of Scituate, R. I., 
born October 18, 1848. He is a son of Harris O. and 
Louisa (YoungJ Whitman, and a member of a very 
old Rhode Island family, which has lived in this region 
for a number of generations, his grandfather. Garner 
Whitman, having been born in the town of Scituate. 
Mr. Whitman's parents removed to Connecticut, when 
he was a lad of six years of age and remained there 
until he was fifteen, during which time he attended the 
local public schools and worked during his vacations 
assisting his father. When fifteen years of age he 
went to Washington, R. I., where he attended the schools 
during two terms and then gave up his studies to en- 
gage in business. His first position was a humble one, 
that of driving a meat wagon for his father, and at 
the same time he also learned the butcher's trade. Not 
long afterwards he secured a position with S. T. Ald- 
ridge & Company in their butcher's establishment at 
Slatersville. He remained with this concern for a 
period of eight years and during that time displayed an 
unusual industry and thrift for a young man of his 
years. He carefully saved a large proportion of his 
earnings, and at the end of that time found himself in 
a position to engage in business on his own account. 
His first business venture was in the shoe business in 
Olneyville square, occupying a building now a part of 
the J. O. San Souci Company. He remained here 
about one year and then sold out and returned to 
Slaterville, where he purchased the old established busi- 
ness of Day & Armstrong, livery, expressing and stag- 
ing. Mr. Whitman continued these lines and operated 
the stages between Pascoag, Millville and Woonsocket, 
and the carrying the mails prior to the building of the 




^a^^^c^.^j^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



43 



railroad. For over twenty years he represented the 
various express companies in Slaterville. Later he 
added implements and carriages to his business, and 
also engaged in undertaking, teaming and coal business. 
He continued in active business until 1903, when he 
sold his business enterprises and removed to Paw- 
tucket to devote his time to his real estate interests. 
He is a self-made man in the best sense of the word, 
having raised himself by his own efforts from a position 
of the most humble kind to his present important place 
in the community. He never inherited any money, but 
with the aid of his wife is now the owner of many 
tenements and stores in the city of Pawtuckct. Mr. 
Whitman is a staunch Republican in politics, having 
voted this ticket ever since he cast his first ballot, which 
he did in support of the Democratic party. A number 
of years ago he held the position of road surveyor in 
the township of N'orth Smithfield, and built the first 
stretch of macadam road in North Smithfield. He has 
never had an ambition for political office, although often 
urged to become his party's nominee on account of his 
prominence and popularity. He has, however, con- 
sistently refused, but has nevertheless always taken 
time to discharge adequately his duties as a citizen. He 
is a member of the Ancient Order of the United Work- 
men and the Degree of Honor. 

.\lbert Harris Whitman was united in marriage. May 
4, 1884, with Ida E. Durrans, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Partington) Durrans, old and highly re- 
spected residents of North Smithfield. Mr.-;. Whit- 
man was born in Woonsocket, R. I., and educated in 
the public schools of North Stnithfield. She finished her 
education in Rhode Island State Normal School, and 
taught school in the State until her marriage in 1884, 
when she became active in the development of Mr. 
WTiitman's real estate interests. Mrs. Whitman was a 
charter member of the first lodge of "Degree of Honor" 
in Rhode Island, organized at Slatcrsville, and passed 
through all the local chairs and Grand Lodge, and is at 
present grand receiver of the Grand Lodge in the 
New England States, having served in that capacity for 
the past eighteen years. They are the parents of one 
child, Bertha Louisa Hall, who became the wife of 
George Hall, whose death occurred in .'\pril, igiS. She 
is the mother of two children : Ida E. Hall and Georgia 
Louisa Hall. Mr. Hall was prominent in the jewelry 
business at Pawtucket, being an expert jewelry tool 
maker. 



WALTER LOUIS FROST— Now an attorney-at- 

law, and master in chancery, practicing his profession 
in the city of his birth, Mr. Frost is the second cf his 
family identified with the professional and business 
life of Providence, his father being a successful pub- 
lisher in that city. Walter Louis Frost was born in 
Providence, R. I., November 18, 1877, son of Walter 
Bliss and Alice .Almira (Barber) Frost, they natives of 
Rehoboth. Mass., and Windsor, Conn., and descendants 
of early New England families. 

Walter L. Frost began his education in the primary 
grade and passed through the graded and high schools, 
completing the courses with graduation, in 1897. From 
high school he passed to Brown University, and after 
a four years' course there was graduated A. B., class of 



1901. Deciding upon the profession of law as his life 
work, he entered Harvard Law School, whence he was 
graduated LL. B., in 1904, and on October 31 of that 
year was admitted to the Rhode Island bar. Previous 
to his admission to the Rhode Island bar, he had studied 
in the law office of W. B. Tanner, and there he con- 
tinued until 1905, when he opened his present law office 
at No. 42 Weybosset street. Through well-directed 
energy and effort, he has built up a general practice, is 
a Standing Master in Chancery of the Superior Court, 
and since 1913 be has been clerk of the Senate Judiciary 
Committee, having previously, in 1013, been ckrk of 
the Senate Committee on Education. He has served 
on several commissions and was chairman of the com- 
mittee in charge of the widening of Elniwood avenue. 

Outside his professional work, Mr. Frost has other 
interests, two in particular having more than a passing 
attraction for him. In college days he was an editor 
upon the boards of all the college publications, contrib- 
uting freely from his own pen, besides contributing 
numerous illustrations. He was also editor of the 
"Sea Side Times" at Southampton, L. 1., for some time. 
Another close interest is his devotion to out-of-door 
sports, especially yachting. He has been for many years 
a member of the Washington Park, Kdgewood and 
Rhode Island Yacht clubs, and for ten years has been 
secretary of the Narragansett Bay Yacht Racing Asso- 
ciation. .To him is largely due the consolidating of 
the various yacht clubs in that organization, the result 
having l)een beneficial to the sport of yacht racing under 
the control of a central body representing all local 
clubs. He was commodore of the Washington Park 
Yacht Club in 1906. Mr. Frost is a member of the 
Rhode Island Bar .Association; Harmony Lodge, No. 
9, .Xncicnt Free and .\ccepted Masons, of Pawtaxet, 
R. I.; his college fraternity. Phi Delta Thcta. He is 
president of the Washington Park Improvement Asso- 
ciation. 

Dr. Frost was married, at Pawtucket, Jime i, 1910, to 
Ruth Dring Jenks, daughter of William Henry and 
Ruth Augusta (.Mexander) Jenks, of Pawtucket, and 
a descendant of prominent Rhode Island families. They 
are the parents of two daughters: Deborah Richmond 
and Sarah Elizabeth Frost. 



ARCHIBALD GRANT DELANEY, who has 

reached man's allotted years, "three score and ten," 
recalls hi? arrival in Providence, in 1865, a lad of 
nineteen years, his visible capital a lonely five dollar 
bill. He harks back also to that first year as a carpen- 
ter's apprentice, when his wages were $6 weekly, and 
his board and room called for $5 out of the $6. But 
times were better the second year, his wages having 
been raised to $7 and the third year they were increased 
to $8 weekly. But those years passed, and at their 
end he was none the worse for having lived economic- 
ally, and he had in the meantime learned a good trade. 
He is now one of the well-known contractors of Prov- 
idence, a man highly regarded for his true worth as a 
business man and a citizen. For twenty years he was 
superintendent of buildings at Brown University, and 
can speak knowingly of the student life of that institu- 
tion, the bright and the sad side of college life being fully 
revealed to him. He is now again a contractor, keep- 



44 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



ing many men fully employed. He is of Nova Scotian 
birth, his parentage, Scotch-Irish. His grandfather, 
Timothy Delaney, an Enghsh tar, was ten years in the 
British Navy, and for two and a half years served 
under Lord Nelson on the .'Admiral's flagship, and was 
with him on that glorious day at Trafalgar Bay, when 
his beloved Admiral won immortal fame and met a 
hero's death. Peter Delaney, son of Timothy Delaney, 
was a ship carpenter by trade, and settled finally in 
Pictou county. Nova Scotia, Canada. He married Mary 
Ann Grant, and they were the parents of sons : Arch- 
ibald Grant, of further mention; and James Grant, the 
inventor of the present system of coaling vessels at 
sea, an invention sold to the English, Japanese and 
French governments, and was first used by the United 
State government during the Spanish-.\merican War. 
Archibald Grant Delaney was born in Nova Scotia, 
at the home farm in Pictou county, September 28, 1848, 
son of Peter and Mary Ann (Grant) Delaney. He 
was educated in Nova Scotian schools, and until seven- 
teen years of age was his father's farm assistant. He 
then came to the United States, locating in Providence, 
R. I., where he learned the carpenter's trade, serving a 
three years' apprenticeship under James Hutchinson, 
whose shop was on E.xchange place. After completing 
his years of apprenticeship he was employed by Car- 
penter & Childs, building contractors, on Benefit street, 
remaining with that firm four years. His next em- 
ployer was Peabody & Wilbur, of Hope street, with 
whom he remained three years. These firms were all 
prominent contractors, and while with them Mr. De- 
laney was employed on the best work, and became an 
expert on fine woodwork. For seventeen months he 
was employed on the old Ben .'\dams residence, now 
the Merrimac House, located at the corner of Cook and 
Benevolent streets, which at that time was considered 
a very large, fine residence. After leaving Peabody & 
Wilbur he secured the position of superintendent of 
buildings at Brown University, and in that position 
remained twenty years, erecting, altering, repairing and 
overseeing the many buildings forming the University 
group. These were the best twenty years of his life 
from a physical standpoint and around that period of 
his life cluster many pleasant memories. At their ex- 
piration he began contracting and mill working, making 
a specialty of fine cabinet work and store fixtures, and 
from 1904 until the present, 1918, has conducted a very 
prosperous contracting business. He employs at times 
twenty skilled workmen and will accept orders for the 
finest woodwork. He stands as a fine representative of 
the self-made man, having come up from an appren- 
tice to contractor through his own quality, and in the 
upbuilding of a business he has also built up a fine 
character for trustworthiness and integrity. His most 
recent government work has been in connection with 
the new and old post office interiors. He is a member 
of the Broadway Presbyterian Church, a member of 
the Knights of Maccabees, and the Providence Chamber 
of Commerce, and in politics is a Republican. 

Mr. Delaney married Mary Jane Forbes, in Prov- 
idence, June 17, 1884, she also of Nova Scotia birth. 
Mr. and Mrs. Delaney are the parents of two daughters: 
Mary Ida and Elizabeth Jeannette, both graduates of 
ProviJence High School and Brown University; the 



younger served several years as teacher at Sockanosset 
School for Boys, and now (1918) holds the position of 
clerk. 



WILLIAM BUCHANAN COLWELL is undoubt- 
edly one of the most prominent figures in the life of 
the town of Johnston, R. I., where for many years he 
has been well-known as a successful and progressive 
farmer and a public-spirited man. He is a member of 
an old and distinguished New England family which 
for many generations has been represented in this State 
by members who have earned and won the esteem and 
regard of the communities where they have made their 
home and have become prominent in many different 
callings. He is a representative in the eighth generation 
of the line which was founded by Robert Colwell, who 
founded the family in America and who came to this 
country from England in the early Colonial period. The 
line of descent is from Robert Colwell, through Robert, 
Robert, Joseph, Stephen, Uriah, and Harlev, to Wil- 
liam B. Colwell. 

Uriah Colwell, grandfather of William B. Colwell, 
was a man noted for his industry and diversified activ- 
ities. He made his home at Gloucester, R. I., and mar- 
ried Deborah Bowen, by whom he had the following 
children: Harley, mentioned below; Uriah R., who mar- 
ried, January i, 1849, Zelote A. Winsor, daughter of 
Samuel Winsor, of Johnston ; Joshua, born in 1832, 
married (first) Fannie Gallup, (second) Julia E. 01- 
ney; Ashel ; William, a resident of Providence; Sel- 
vina, who married James Brown, of Providence; Lillis, 
who became the wife of Jeremiah Tourtelotte ; George; 
Earned, who married (first) Melissa Harris, (second) 
Ruth Aldrich ; and two other children who died in in- 
fancy. 

Harley Colwell, son of Uriah and Deborah (Bowen) 
Colwell, was born May iS, 1818, at Gloucester, R. I., 
where his boyhood was passed. He was the eldest son 
of his parents, and at an early age it developed upon 
him to assist his father in his various enterprises, the 
principal one of which was his dealing in stock. His 
educational advantages were very meagre, but he was 
one of those young men who learn readily from obser- 
vation and experience, and he soon became very well 
capable of caring for himself and his interests in life. 
.\s a youth he learned the trade of stone mason, but 
never followed that craft. He was for a time engaged 
in the retail meat business, but abandoning this he left 
his native home and though his sole capital was his 
own strong optimism, common sense and determina- 
tion, he soon began to make his way in the world. He 
settled finally on a farm at Johnston, in the year 1855, 
the tract being at that time quite undeveloped and cov- 
ered with a natural growth of timber and underbrush. 
He went to work, however, with the utmost energy, 
and soon cleared away a sufficient portion to lay the 
foundation of what is now one of the best properties 
in this region. In addition to his energy, he was a 
man of great intelligence, and able promptly to seize 
such opportunities as came his way, so that he soon rose 
to a position of prominence in the community where he 
had settled, and won the respect of his fellow-citizens. 
He was greatly interested in the educational system of 
the town, and for sixteen years served as a member of 




Q{^ , y6. ^-^^-^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



45 



the Johnston school committee, besides holding several 
other offices of responsibility and trust, in all of which 
he won an enviable reputation for ability and disinter- 
estedness. He died September 5, 1901, and was buried 
in Pocasset Cemetery. Harley Colwel! married (first), 
November 8, 1838, Eliza Brown, a daughter of Moses 
Brown, and a direct descendant of Chad Brown, one of 
the early settlers of Rhode Island, and one of the im- 
portant figures of his day. He married (second) 
Catherine H. Rickford, of Maine, whose death occurred 
March 24, i8q8. Of the second marriage but i>ne child 
was born, Leon, who is now a resident of Johnston. 
Ten children were born of the first marriage, as fol- 
lows: George Bowen, born Aug. 10, 1839, married 
Maria Cheney, daughter of Elder Cheney, founder of 
the Free Will Baptist church at Johnston, and they are 
now residents of Anthony, R. 1.; James Brown, born 
Aug. 18, 1841, married Sarah Carpenter, both now de- 
ceased; Mary Eliza Brown, born Oct. 23, 1843, died in 
early youth; a child who died in infancy; Maria Harris, 
born July 28, 1846, became the wife of Henry Gleason, 
and died leaving one son, Harry N. Gleason ; Harley 
Francis, born Aug. 12, 1848, married Carrie Seaman, 
by whom he has had one child, Willis D., and resides 
in Cumberland, R. I.; Maurice Gilbert, born Dec. 13, 
1850; Ella Elizabeth, born Feb. 14, 1855, became the wife 
of John H. Coffin, son of Captain Coffin, and they reside 
at Providence ; William Buchanan, with whose career 
we are here especially concerned ; Pardon Moses, born 
Oct. 26, 1858, married Almeda Mowry, and died leaving 
a son, Harry A., who makes his home at Woonsocket. 
William Buchanan Colwell, son of Harley and Eliza 
(Brown) Colwell, was born January 4, 1857, in the old 
homestead, at Johnston, R. I. As a lad Mr. Colwell 
attended the district schools of his native place and 
afterwards became a student at the Mount Pleasant 
Academy (popularly known as the Jencks-Mowry 
School), from which he graduated. For five years 
thereafter he followed the profession of teaching in the 
schools at Johnston, but after his marriage abandoned 
this line of work and settled upon the old family home- 
stead, assisting his father with the work on the farm. 
Here he gained a wide knowledge of agricultural meth- 
ods, which he has continued to increase ever since, until 
now he is regarded very justly as an authority upon 
this subject. In 1882 he purchased the Burrill farm 
which adjoined his father's property, and proceeded at 
once to clear a portion of this farm which had been 
uncultivated and bring a large number of acres of till- 
able land into use and to a high degree of productive- 
ness. Here he engaged on an extensive scale in the 
dairy business for some years. Upon the death of his 
father, he purchased from the other heirs the home- 
stead farm, which in addition to his own property he 
now operates, making his home in the old family dwell- 
ing, which is situated on Hartford avenue, just beyond 
the city line of Providence. Of recent years Mr. Col- 
well has added a large poultry plant to the other activ- 
ities of his farm, upon which he has made many im- 
portant improvements. 

Mr. Colwell is very well-known in public affairs 
here, and some estimation of his popularity and the trust 
reposed in him by his neighbors can be gained from the 
fact that although a staunch Democrat in a strongly 



Republican community, he has held many offices of trust 
and responsibility and has been sent by the community 
to represent it in the State Legislature for a number 
of years. He was but twenty-six years of age when he 
was elected to the Town Council, and served at that 
time for three years on that body. Later he was re- 
elected to the Council and was president of that body 
for two years. He has served as town moderator for 
six years and as coroner for half that period. It was 
in 1892 that Mr. Colwell was elected to the State Legis- 
lature, serving in that and the following year, during 
which time he was a member of the important com- 
mittees on agriculture and education, and winning for 
himself a high reputation as a public-spirited and capa- 
ble public servant. In 1892 he was also secretary of 
the State Central Committee, serving four years, and 
for fifteen years was a member of tlie same conmiittee. 
In 1912 he was appointed probate judge, and at the 
present time is still serving in that capacity here. Mr. 
Colwell has taken a great interest in the good-roads 
movement, and his influence has been a potent factor 
in securing the present splendid system of highways 
enjoyed by the community. Mr. (Colwell is not partic- 
ularly active in fraternal nor club life here, but at one 
time was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and is now affiliated with the Narragansett 
Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 

William Buchanan Colwell was united in marriage, 
February 20, 1879. with Betsy A. Bliss, daughter of 
Captain George Williams Bliss, of Rehoboth, Mass., 
where he was a captain of militia. TTiree children have 
been born of this union, as follows: I. Elmer Warren, 
born Oct. 24, 1882, at Johnston, R. I., and educated at 
the Classical High School of Providence, from which 
he graduated with the class of 1900; he then became a 
clerk in the drafting room of the Rhode Island Loco- 
motive Works, where he remained a year, after which 
he accepted a position with the Equitable Fire & Marine 
Insurance Company of Providence; he is now a prom- 
inent real estate and insurance man in that city. 2. 
Ernest Ethelbert, born April 20, 1884, died June 10, 
1885. 3. Raymond Carpenter, born Sept. 8, 1891, edu- 
cated at the grammar and high schools of Providence, 
later being a pupil at Brown University, from which he 
graduated with the class of 1913, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts; the following year, after taking a 
post-graduate course, the degree of Master of Arts was 
conferred upon him by his alma maler ; he married, 
Aug. 20, 1918, Mattie Holmes Barrow, of Providence, 
a graduate of Boston Art School, and School of Design, 
of Providence, and at present (1918) operates a studio 
on Westminster street, and is also teacher of drawing 
in Providence High Schools. Raymond Carpenter Col- 
well is now first lieutenant in the Sanitary Corps, with 
the United States Expeditionary Force, at a base hos- 
pital somewhere in France. 



JOHN EDWARD DONLEY, JR., M. D.— A 

native of Providence, Dr. Donley has gained high pro- 
fessional standing in the city of his birth, and is rated 
one of the skilled and honorable members of the med- 
ical profession. He is a son of John Edward and Eliz- 
abeth (Nevin) Donley, his father a manufacturer of 
jewelry, founder and head of Donley & Company, estab- 



46 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



lished in 1 89 1, located at No. 144 Pine street. Provi- 
dence. Elizabeth (Nevin) Donley died April 17, IQ18. 

John Edward Donley, Jr., was born in Providence, 
R. I., January I. 1870, completing in the city schools full 
grammar school courses and attending high school for 
three years. He then entered Seton Hall College, South 
Orange, New Jersey, whence he was graduated A. B., 
class of 1897. He returned to Seton Hall for a post- 
graduate course, receiving his A. M. in 1899. Choosing 
the profession of medicine, he entered the medical de- 
partment of the University of Pennsylvania, and was 
graduated M. D., class of 1902. He located in Provi- 
dence and has built up both reputation and practice as 
a specialist in nervous and mental diseases. Both father 
and son have been very successful, each in their own 
separate sphere of action, the father retiring from busi- 
ness the current year, igiS. Dr. Donley is consulting 
physician to St. Joseph's Hospital, Providence City 
Hospital, and Pawtucket Memorial Hospital ; associate 
editor of the Rhode Island Medical Journal; formerly 
assistant editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychol- 
ogy, of Boston; is a member of the American Psycho- 
Pathological Society, American Medical Association, 
Rhode Island Medical Society, Rhode Island Medico- 
Legal Society, Providence Medical Society, and ex- 
president of the Mills Neurological Society, is a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic church and the Catholic 
Club. In political action he is an Independent. 

Dr. Donley married, January 30, 1906, Esther Mad- 
eline Biery, of Lawrence, Mass. Dr. Donley's offices 
and residence are at No. 222 Broadway. 



FRED LUTHER OWEN— Admitted to the Rhode 
Island bar in 1901, Mr. Owen has since practiced his 
profession in Providence, giving especial attention to 
commercial law and collections. He is a son of Wil- 
liam Kimball and Mary (Potter) Owen, and a descend- 
ant of Samuel Owen, born in Wales in 1651, who with 
his wife, Priscilla (Belcher) Owen, and their son Josiah 
came to the New England Colonies in 1685. Samuel 
Owen settled first in Massachusetts, but the Puritans 
drew the line so tightly on matters of religion and 
conscience that he left that colony, settling in that part 
of Providence known as North Providence, the Rhode 
Island authorities then being the most independent and 
liberal in matter of religious opinions. Fred Luther 
Owen is of the eighth generation of the family in Rhode 
Island, his father residing with him in Providence. 

Fred Luther Owen was born at Charlestown, R. I., 
August IS, 1877, and there finished public study with 
high school graduation, class of 1898. The next two 
years were spent in study at Rhode Island Law School, 
whence he was graduated in 1900. He spent a period of 
one year in probationary practice and study in a Provi- 
dence law ofticc, was admitted to the bar in 1901 and 
has since practiced his profession continuously in Prov- 
idence with offices at No. 86 Weybosset street. He 
represents the American Adjustment Company of 
Rhode Island; secretary and Rhode Island representa- 
tive of the Creditors' National Clearing House Asso- 
ciation, is manager of the Harris Mercantile Company, 
practices in all State and Federal courts of the district, 
but specializes in commercial law and collections. He 
is a member of the Rhode Island Bar Association. A 



Republican in politics, he served on the school com- 
mittee of Charlestown and represented the eleventh 
district of Providence in the Rhode Island General 
Assembly. In the Assembly he served on the commit- 
tee and on the floor, worthily representing his dis- 
trict. He is the present appeal agent for Division 
Eight, Providence, United States selective draft. 

Mr. Owen married, January 21, 1907, in Providence, 
Lillie A. Maher, of Providence; their children: Lenora 
Mary, Elizabeth Alice, and Frances Erina, all born in 
Providence. 



GEORGE HENRY COMSTOCK, one of the most 
successful and progressive farmers of Lincoln, where 
he owns a farm which is regarded as one of the models 
of Lincoln township, is a member of an old and dis- 
tinguished Rhode Island family. He is descended from 
one Samuel Comstock, w-ho was the first of the name 
of whom there is definite record, and who resided at 
Providence as early as the year 1654. We have a record 
on March i, 1634, that he purchased property at Prov- 
idence, and according to the historian and genealogist, 
.Austin, he was the son of William Comstock, of 
Weathersfield, Conn., who came from England with his 
wife, Elizabeth, and later made his home at New 
London. 

(I) If it be true that William Comstock is the founder 
of the Rhode Island family, it is established that this 
branch is related to many other lines bearing the same 
name in different parts of New England. William and 
Elizabeth Comstock were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: William, Jr.; Daniel, who died at New 
London in 1683, when about fifty-three years of age; 
Samuel, mentioned below ; and apparently Christopher, 
of Fairfield, Conn. 

(II) Samuel Comstock, son of William and Eliza- 
beth Comstock, was born in 1654, and resided during 
practically his entire life at Providence. He was a 
prominent man in his community, and was a deputy to 
the General Court in 1699, 1702, 1707, 1708 and 1711. 
He also served on several important committees, and 
in his will and other records of that time is referred 
to as captain. His death occurred May 27, 1727. Samuel 
Comstock married, November 22, 1677, Elizabeth Ar- 
nold, a daughter of Thomas and Phebe (Parkhurst) 
Arnold, whose death occurred October 20, 1727. They 
were the parents of the following children : Samuel, 
born April 16, 1679; Hazadiah, bom April 16, 1682; 
Thomas, born Nov. 7, 1684; Daniel, born July ig, 
1686; Elizabeth, born Dec. 18, 1690; John, mentioned 
below; Ichabod, bom June 9, 1696; and possibly Job, 
born April 4, 1699. 

(III) John Comstock, son of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Arnold) Comstock, was born March 26, 1693. He was 
a blacksmith by trade, and a prominent man in the com- 
munity, where for a time he served as assistant (1746). 
His death occurred at his home in Providence, January 
12, 1750, and he was buried in the old North Burying 
Ground there. He married (first) Esther Jencks, and 
(second) Sarah De.xter, the latter born June 27, 1698, 
and died July 8, 1773. She was a daughter of John and 
.'Mice (Smith) Dexter, and a member of a well-known 
and prominent family in these parts. Of these two 
unions the following children were born to John Com- 





^ 





/ 



c-y-r^AjLe^^\; 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



47 



stock: Samuel, born in 1715; Joseph; Jeremiah; John; 
Jonathan; James, born in 1733-34; Ichabod, mentioned 
below; Nathan, born December 6, 1735; and it is pos- 
sible a daughter Esther. 

(IV) Ichabod Comstock, vounKest son of John and 
Sarah (Dexter) Comstock, was born in the year 1734 
at Providence, and passed his life in that city and at 
Smithtield, R. I. He was a man who was noted for 
oricinality of speech and was greatly beloved by the 
community. He died at Smithfield, December 19, 1800, 
at the age of sixty-six years. He married, April 11. 
1760, Sarah Jenckes, daughter of Dr. John Jenckes, of 
Smithfield, who was born in 1741, and died November 
19, 1815. They were the parents of the following child- 
ren: Ephraim, born in 1761 ; Lydia, 1766; Isaac, Decem- 
ber II, 1769; Susan, 1772; Patience, 1775; and George 
Washington, mentioned below. 

(%■) George Washington Comstock, youngest child 
of Ichabod and Sarah (Jenckes) Comstock, was bom 
February 5, 1789, at Smitlifield, and spent most of his 
life in his native place, though for a number of years 
he resided at Providence, where he was engaged in 
business in the old market. In his latter years, how- 
ever, he returned to his farm at Smithfield, where his 
death occurred November 16, 1858, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. He was a man noted for his integrity and 
industry, and during the two years of 1816 and 1817 was 
ensign of the First Smithfield Company. He married 
(first) Comfort Joslin, daughter of Benjamin Joslin, of 
Thompson, Conn., where she was born March 24, 1791. 
Her death occurred April 3, 1834, and he married (sec- 
ond) Sarah Jenckes, born October 24, 1796, and died 
February 22, 1882, at Lincoln, R. I. Mr. Conistock's 
children were all born of his first marriage, and were 
as follows: Benjamin, mentioned below; a son born 
Aug. 10, 1820, and died Sept. 19, 1820; Nancy, born 
Oct. 24, 1821, and became the wife of Benjamin S. 
Olney, of Providence, where she died June 6, 1889; 
Sarah, born July 29, 1827, and made her home in Prov- 
idence; a son born March 10, 1831, and died eight days 
later; Jane, born June 23, 1833, and died Sept. 19, 1833. 

(VI) Benjamin Comstock, eldest son of George 
Washington and Comfort (Joslin) Comstock, was bom 
at Smithfield, May 3, 1818, and for many years was one 
of the most prominent citizens of this region. His 
education was received at the local public school, and 
during his spare time he worked on his father's farm, 
where all his childhood and early youth were spent. 
In the year 1850, however, he left the parental home and 
removed to Louisquisset Pike, where he rented the old 
Asa Arnold farm for ten years. At the end of that 
period he purchased this property, which consisted of 
a tract of two hundred acres of tine farming land, and 
from that time until his death he made his home there. 
Here he engaged in general farming and dairying, and 
met with a high degree of success in his enterprise, so 
that in 1884 he was enabled to retire from active work. 
He was always keenly interested in public affairs, and 
in politics was a staunch Republican. He served in a 
number of public offices in this region, was for two 
years a member of the General Assembly, and also 
served on the Town Council. He was a man exceed- 
ingly enterprising and progressive, and the success 
which he achieved was the result of his own efforts 



and the splendid reputation which he made for himself 
for integrity and square dealing in the community. His 
death occurred March 18, 1906. Benjamin Comstock 
married (first), October 19, 1847, Mary Randall, born 
October 14, 1823, daughter of John Randall, of Nor- 
way, N. Y. She died November 29, 1887, and was buried 
in the old North Burying ground of Providence. She 
was a devout Christian woman, and a member of the 
Episcopal church. Mr. Comstock married (second), 
.Vpril 22, 1889, Mrs. .Amanda (Gorham) Harris. She 
was born DecemlK-r II, 1818, and died March 17. 1897. 
.-Ml of Benjamin Comstock's children were born by his 
first marriage at Smithfield, and were as follows: Wil- 
liam H., mentioned below ; George W., born .\pril 9, 
1850, and died Nov. 8, 1871 ; Mary Anna, born Feb. 24, 
iSsA. and became the wife of Jabez G. Harris, of Prov- 
idence; Benjamin W., born Feb. 3, 1856, and made his 
home in Providence, where he married Efiie J. Wil- 
liams; Frank Smith, born March 26, 1858, a carpenter 
of Boston; and Nettie Maria, born Feb. 28, i860, be- 
came the wife of George H. Loomis, of Pawtucket, and 
died there May 30, 1898. 

(VII) William H. Comstock, eldest son of Benja- 
min and Mary (Randall) Comstock, was born August 
5, 1848, in Lincoln township. He was the father of 
George Henry Comstock, of this sketch, and for many 
years was one of the most prominent men of this com- 
munity. He received his early education at the local 
public schools, and afterwards attended the famous 
I'Viends' School of Providence. Like his father before 
him, his childhood was spent on the farm, and there he 
gained an early knowledge of agriculture and farming 
methods. He worked for a long time for his father 
and then, following in his footsteps, began farming on 
his own account on a rented farm, the farm in this case 
being leased from Daniel Jencks in this community. 
Here he engaged in the dairy business for nine years, 
and in 1886 returned to the old homestead and continued 
his activities there. These consisted of general farming 
and dairying, and the produce of his place he marketed 
in Providence, selling it at retail to his customers, many 
of whom were the same family to whom his father sold 
milk and other produce a half a century before. His 
milk route was the oldest in the city. Mr. Comstock 
made many improvements on his farm, erecting modern 
buildings and equipping them with the best devices 
known in his day for carrying out dairy work. He was 
a strong Republican in politics, and very active in local 
affairs, holding a number of public offices. In l8g6 he 
was elected a member of the General Assembly of the 
State, upon which body he served in all four years, 
devoting his every energy to the enacting of reform 
legislation and serving on the committees on special 
legislation and education. He also served for many 
years on the Town Council, and was president of that 
body for a considerable period. He was a member of 
Union Lodge, No. 10, Ancient Free and Accepted 

Masons; Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 

Council, Royal and Select Masters ; Holy Sepulchre 
Commandery, Knights Templar, of Pawtucket ; Pales- 
tine Temple, Ancient .Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine ; Rhode Island Consistory, Sublime 
Princes of the Royal Secret; and gained the thirty- 
second degree of Free Masonry in the Scottish Rite 



48 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



body. He was also a member of Lime Rock Grange, 
No. 22, and past master of same. 

William H. Comstock married, December 21, 1874, 
Nettie Frances Kendall, of Fitchburg. Mass., where she 
was bom July 4, 1853, a daughter of George A. Ken- 
dal!. She died .\ugust 29, 1900, and was laid to rest in 
the Old North Burying ground. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam H. Comstock were the parents of five children, as 
follows: I. Mabel Frances, born Jan. 23. 1876, who 
became the wife of .\rthur N. Dodge, of Providence, 
to whom she has borne two children, Newton Comstock 
and William Everett. 2. Mary K., born .\ug. 25, 1878, 
and died Oct. 30, igoo. 3. Fannie Louise, born Nov. 6, 
1879, and resides at the old home. 4. Florence Antoin- 
ette, born April 4. 1882, and became the wife of Richard 
B. Howard, of Providence. 5. George Henry, with 
whose career we are here especially concerned. Wil- 
liam H. Comstock died Oct. 12, 1912, and his wife 
passed away, Aug. 29. 1900. 

(Vni) George Henry Comstock was born on the old 
family homestead near Saylesville. Lincoln township, 
March 10. 1887, the youngest child of William Henry 
and Nettie Frances (Kendall) Comstock. The child- 
hood of Mr. Comstock was spent on this same old 
farm, which was operated by his grandfather and father 
before him and is now operated by himself. Follow- 
ing in the footsteps of his distinguished ancestors, Mr. 
Comstock did much work on the farm as a lad, using 
such spare hours as were left him from his school 
work. His early education was received at the public 
schools of this neighborhood, and he afterwards took 
a classical course at the University School of Provi- 
dence. Since completing his studies, Mr. Comstock has 
spent his life on his farm, which he inherited from his 
father at the time of the latter's death. For several 
years he was associated with his father in the active 
management of the farm, gradually assuming the respon- 
sibility for its operation, as the elder man rela.xed his 
efforts toward the close of his life. He has now been 
engaged in operating it alone for seven years, and is 
making a notable success of his enterprise. The farm 
possesses splendid buildings and all the necessary equip- 
ment for carrying on general farming and dairy work 
and, as mentioned above, includes some two hundred 
acres of good land which Mr. Comstock keeps ever in 
the highest state of cultivation. He has at present some 
forty milch cows, from which he supplies his dairy, the 
products of which and of the general farming he supplies 
to Providence in auto trucks. His milk route is an ex- 
ceedingly old one, having been established by his grand- 
father nearly three-quarters of a century ago. 

George Henry Comstock was united in marriage, 
October 22, 1913, at Providence, with Anna Blanche 
McGreevy, of that city, a daughter of Thomas C. and 
Anna (Donahue) McGreevy, old and highly respected 
residents there. Two children have been born of this 
union, as follows : George Henrj', Jr., born Dec. 9, 
1914, and William Kendall, Aug. 16, 1916. 



JAMES MONROE BAKER— The life record of 
James M. Baker, of Providence, R. L, is one of deep 
interest, and in many respects unequalled. Although a 
man nearly eligible to nonagenarian honors he continues 



head of the business he founded half a century ago, and 
is as earnest, enthusiastic, and capable as men of half 
his years usually are. His life has been one of unceas- 
ing activity, his gospel of life being summed up in one 
word, work. Liquor, tobacco, and vacations are un- 
known to him, and even yet, an occasional visit to the 
theatre and a week's end trip each year to his boyhood 
home in Tolland county. Conn., constitute his recrea- 
tions. Baseball even never tempted him to an "after- 
noon off," and he has never witnessed a professional 
game, nor a horse race, save at the agricultural fairs. 
But he is a good, strong .American citizen, and during 
a term of service in the Providence Fire Department, 
volunteer and paid, covering a period of forty-five years, 
he gave ample evidence of his courage and resourceful- 
ness in the hour of danger. .\s inventor of valuable 
devices, now in use by fire fighters the world over, and 
as a manufacturer, he has proven the strong quality of 
his practical business sense and general character. In 
fact, success may be written large over all departments 
of his life, but it is the success which follows industry, 
energy, and self-denial. 

Mr. Baker comes from an ancient Connecticut family 
long settled in Tolland county, that State. There his 
parents, .Anson and Sarah (Logan) Baker, resided on a 
farm, and in that county, at Ellington, on November I, 
1830, James Monroe Baker was born. He attended a 
country school amid the Tolland county hills, but as 
soon as he grew large enough to be of service on the 
farm, his school months were reduced to four, and 
these, the winter period of the year when farm work 
was at a standstill. He remained on the farm until 
fourteen years of age, then left home, arriving in Prov- 
idence, R. L, in 184-I, having come over forty miles of 
the way on foot. He did not, however, remain, and it 
was not until 1850 that he made Providence his perma- 
nent home and place of business. His first work in the 
city was learning the carpenter's trade, and in 1S54 he 
became a contractor, continuing as such until an attack 
of sickness sent him back to the old Connecticut home 
in Tolland county. He soon brought himself back to 
health, and from that time has never had illness of any 
consequence. In 1861 he returned to Providence, fully 
recovered, and in the Hope Iron Works resumed labor, 
becoming a foreman of the pattern shop after six 
months. In 1868 he again started business under his 
own name as a maker of furniture and of patterns used 
in foundry and mill. He began that business with a 
partner, Henry M. Howe, operating as Baker & Howe, 
this association continuing for si.x years, when Mr. 
Baker purchased his partner's interest, and since 1876 he 
has conducted the business under the firm name, James 
M. Baker, pattern and model maker. No. 114 West 
Exchange street. Providence. When he became sole 
owner of the business, forty-two years ago, Mr. Baker 
dropped the furniture line and confined himself entirely 
to pattern and model making. Although at times his 
force is quite large, and on an average eighteen men 
are constantly employed, he has never had a strike 
among his workmen, nor any serious misunderstanding. 
He began business with a force of four men, which 
grew as the reputation of his shop grew for patterns, 
absolutely perfect in every detail. In time he shipped 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



49 



patterns and models to firms. North, East, South, and 
West, but the principal trade he enjoys conies from the 
states of Maryland, rennsylvania. \ew York. Massa- 
chusetts and Rhode Island. Another interesting fact 
about this business is that it was started absolutely 
without cash capital, Mr. Baker's reputation as a pattern 
maker and as a man of sober, industrious habits gain- 
ing him sufficient credit to carry on his business suc- 
cessfully from its very beginning. This it may be sur- 
mised called for the closest economy and self-denial, 
but these traits were strongly developed in the founder, 
and during these forty-two years the name of James 
M. Baker has been held high as a syno:;ym for integ- 
rity, industry, and quality. He is still the active head of 
the business he founded and developed from its modest 
beginning, in iS6S, as Baker & Howe, to the present 
well-established business which, since 1876, has been 
under his own name. 

Beginning in 1850, there was for nearly half a cen- 
tury another interest in Mr. Baker's life which equalled 
his business interest in his affections, in fact, was a 
business in itself. This interest was the Providence 
Fire Department, which he joined as a volunteer in 
1850. running with Engine No. 9, until 1854, without 
pay but solely from love of the excitement and enjoy- 
ment of a fireman's duties and pleasures. In 1854 he 
was regularly appointed a salaried member of the 
department, and assigned to Engine No. 4. receiving 
for his services S75 yearly, the department having the 
right to call upon him at any time. From that time 
until his retirement in 1896, he was connected with the 
force, filled every office in the volunteer department, 
and at the time of his retirement was first district chief. 
For twenty-three years he served continuously upon 
the Board of Engineers, and his first command was the 
captaincy of Hook and Ladder Company, No. 3. He 
was a good fireman, could both command and obey, 
and when, at the age of sixty-five, he retired from the 
department, he was presented by the fire commissioner 
with a beautiful badge, commemorating his forty-five 
years of honorable service. 

It was his connection with the Fire Department of 
Providence that taught him the need of special appar- 
atus, and first set his active brain at work to solve 
some of the problems of the department. One of these 
needs was apparatus for fighting basement fires. This 
need he solved by an invention called the "cellar pipe," 
which is yet the best in existence, and in use by the 
fire departments of London, England, and in all Amer- 
ican cities. He also invented wagon pipes which are in 
use everywhere, one order for fifty recently going to 
the Baltimore department. Another of Mr. Baker's 
inventions is an adjustable nozzle which will throw 
streams of three different sizes and kinds. This phase 
of Mr. Baker's life is most remarkable, as it ran side 
by side with his business life for so many years, neither 
apparently affected by the dual interest save to stimula- 
tion and improvement. 

In political faith Mr. Baker is an Independent Dem- 
ocrat, but has never had even a slight desire for 
political office, he valuing his citizenship highly and 
failing in no duty. He is not a member of any club, 
society, fraternity, nor church, but orders his lite by 
the Golden Rule, wrongs no man, and always "lends a 

R 1-2-4 



hand" wherever he can. His one organization member- 
ship is with the Providence Veteran Firemen's .Vsso- 
ciation, that membership being highly valued. 

Mr. Baker married, .^pril 2, 1853, Julia Sheppard, of 
Pawtuckct, R. I., who died in 1910. He has no children. 



FRED LEE SMITH, D. D. S.— Son of one of the 
eminent surgeons of the Civil War, Dr. Norman Smith, 
whose service began with the famous Sixth Massachu- 
setts Regiment in its memorable passage through Balti- 
more in 1861, Dr. Fred Lee Smith in selecting his life 
work chose a profession closely akin, and since 1899 
has practiced dentistry in Providence, R. I., his offices 
at No. 51 Broad street. Dr. Norman Smith, a graduate 
physician and surgeon of Groton, Mass., enlisted in 
the earliest period of the Civil War, and went to the 
front with the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment as sur- 
geon. He was with the regiment when attacked by the 
mob in Baltimore, who were determined to prevent 
the regiments from passing through to Washington, and 
then saw two years of hard service in Virginia. Mary- 
land, and West Virginia. He was remarkably success- 
ful in his treatment of wounded and sick soldiers, and 
until his term expired remained in the field in close 
attendance upon all duties devolving upon him After 
the war he returned to private practice and was one of 
the eminent men of his profession. He was prominent 
in Grand .\rmy of the Republic activities, a Free Mason 
of high degree, also was a leading member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. Dr. Norman Smith 
married Mary J. King, they both deceased. 

Fred Lee Smith, son of Dr. Norman and Mary J. 
(King) Smith, was born in Groton, Mass., February 
26, 1871. After public school courses he entered Law- 
rence (Mass.) Academy, whence he was graduated in 
1891, going thence to Harvard School of Dentistry, but 
his father's death caused his course at Harvard to end 
with his second year there. After leaving dental col- 
lege he spent two years under the famed dental sur- 
geon, Dr. Justus Osgood, of Boston, then for five years 
was associated with the eminent Dr. Stewart, of New 
York City. With this preparation. Dr. Smith came to 
Rhode Island in 1899, locating in Providence, having 
occupied his present office. No. 51 Broad street, since 
1905. He is registered in both Rhode Island and New 
York, has a large private practice, and for si.x years 
was dental surgeon to the Providence Emergency Hos- 
pital. He is a member of the City and State Dental 
societies, and of the Congregational church. He is de- 
voted to his profession, and when freed from its cares 
can always be found at his home, he having no lodge 
nor club affiliation. 

Dr. Smith married, February II, l8')2, Sadie Carney, 
of Boston, they the parents of three sons: I. Fred Lee, 
Jr., born July 18. 1893; a graduate of Brown Univer- 
sity; now serving as lieutenant in the Aviation Corps, 
United States Army. 2. Howard Carlton, born Aug. 2, 
1896; a graduate of Providence High School, now a 
student at Tufts Dental College, Boston; he has volun- 
teered for service in the Naval Hospital Reserve Com- 
pany, but on account of his youth will most likely be 
allowed to complete his dental course before being called 
to the colors. 3. Norman Carney, born March 5, 191 1. 



50 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



EVERETT LEWIS WALLING— As one of the 

leading members of the Providence bar, and widely 
known as a specialist in corporation law. Mr. Walling 
requires no introduction to his fellow-citizens. For a 
number of years he has taken a prominent part in local 
and State politics. 

Martin Van Walling, father of Everett Lewis Walling, 
was a woolen manufacturer of Millbury, Mass. He 
married Carrie Metcalf, a member of one of the most 
ancient and distinguished families of New England. 
Michael Metcalf, founder of the American branch, was 
born in 1586, in the County of Norfolk, England, and 
in 1637, accompanied by his wife and children, emi- 
grated to the province of Massachusetts, settling at 
Dedham. Early in the eighteenth century a branch of 
the family was transplanted to Fihode Island, where 
the name has ever since been continuously represented. 
The descendants of Michael Metcalf, wherever found, 
have been useful citizens, of good social standing, and 
in not a few instances earning distinction in various 
walks of life. Martin \'an Walling and his wife are 
now both deceased. Mr. Walling was a business man 
of irreproachable character, and both were held in the 
highest esteem by a large circle of friends. 

Everett Lewis Walling, son of Martin Van and Carrie 
(Metcalf) Walling, was born April 25, 1875, in Prov- 
idence, R. I., and attended the public schools of Woon- 
socket, and the English and Classical School in Provi- 
dence, graduating in 1892 from the latter. The same 
year he entered Brown University, and in 1896 received 
from that institution the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
His professional training came next and was obtained 
at the Harvard Law School which conferred upon him, 
in 1899, the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Within ten 
days from his last graduation Mr. Walling entered the 
law office of the late Charles P. Robinson, where he 
remained two years, being admitted to the bar in 
January, 1900. In 1901 Mr. Walling entered upon the 
independent practice of his profession in which, during 
the years that have since elapsed, he has been actively 
and continuously engaged. Over and above his large 
general practice he makes a specialty of corporation 
law, and at the present time holds the position of attor- 
ney for many corporations of considerable magnitude. 
After practising alone for a number of years he received 
into partnership his nephew, Lester S. Walling, the 
style of the firm being Walling & Walling, and the 
connection being maintained to the present time. 

As a staunch adherent of the Republican party Mr. 
Walling has, for a considerable period, been an active 
participant in public affairs, always, however, giving 
precedence to his professional obligations. He has 
served for several years as town solicitor of North 
Smithfield, R. I., and is now a member of the Repub- 
lican State Central Committee, also holding the office 
of commissioner of birds for Rhode Island. The vari- 
ous organizations in which Mr. Walling is enrolled are 
numerous and indicative of his predominant tastes and 
characteristics. He affiliates with the following Masonic 
orders: Blue Chapter, Council. Commandery and 
Shrine; also belonging to the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics, and the Phi Beta Kappa and 
Delta Phi fraternities. These show him to be a man of 
social nature and companionable disposition, but his 



supreme preference is for life in the open and he is 
entitled to the distinction of having been the first presi- 
dent of the Rhode Island Fish and Game Protective 
Association. He is ex-president of the New England 
Fair Club and the Ironston Country Club. He is a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 

Mr. Walling married, October I, 1902, Annie Wood 
Marshall, of Millville, Mass., and they are the parents 
of one child, Metcalf, born December 22, 1908. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Walling is one of the most at- 
tractive in North Smithfield, and is a center of gracious 
hospitality dispensed by a host and hostess who delight 
to gather their friends around their fireside. 

Everett Lewis Walling is in the eighteenth year of 
his practice at the bar, and his record indicates that, 
being now in the prime of life, he has before him a 
quarter of a century filled with activities even more 
fruitful than those of the past. 



WILLIAM HOWARD SPAULDING. one of the 

successful business men of Saylesville, where he is the 
proprietor of a large steam heating and plumbing estab- 
lishment, is a native of Central Falls in this State, his 
birth occurring June 2, 1882. Mr. Spaulding is a son 
of William Whipple and Martha (Jollie) Spaulding, 
both of whom are deceased. 

William Howard Spaulding was but eleven years of 
age when his father died. His education was received 
at the local public schools, and he attended the grammar 
grades, and for a short time the Central Falls High 
School. The circumstances of his family were such, 
however, that it became necessary for him while still 
little more than a lad to engage in some remunerative 
occupation, and accordingly he entered a plumbing estab- 
lishment in Pawtucket, where he learned that trade. He 
remained with that concern for some years and com- 
pleted his apprenticeship, after which he worked for 
five different large plumbing firms in Pawtucket during 
a number of years. He was of an exceedingly ambi- 
tious disposition and was exceedingly anxious to engage 
in business on his own account, so that with com- 
mendable economy he saved a large portion of his 
earnings, and in 1908 opened his present establishment 
in the town of Saylesville. Here he has a large and 
commodious shop, to which is attached a garage with 
accommodation for two cars and trucks. Mr. Spauld- 
ing has prospered highly in his enterprise, and during 
the ten years in which he has been engaged in business 
here has done many of the largest plumbing jobs in the 
town. Among these should be mentioned the Manville 
schools, the Saylesville schools, the Lonsdale schools, 
the Baptist church of Lonsdale, and many of the fine 
residences in Lincoln township, where Saylesville is 
situated. He has also filled most of the large contracts 
for the Sayles Finishing Plants, a very large concern 
which employs nearly three thousand hands. At the 
time that he started in business, Mr. Spaulding de- 
pended upon his own work to complete his job, together 
with that of a single helper, but he now employs on an 
average of twelve men and his business is still in 
process of development. He is a man of progressive 
ideas and has been prompt to seize every opportunity 
which has offered itself to him. His beautiful house 
is situated adjacent to his plant, on a large plot of 




C>^,.^^^,sjUUC <^ .\\Jo^SJL.^^^ 



3- 





4 /U a^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



51 



ground owned by him. in one of the most attractive 
locations in the town. While Mr. Spaulding is not a 
formal member of any church, he attends the Sayles 
Memorial Episcopal Chapel, and is active and liberal 
in his support thereof. He is also prominent in fraternal 
and social circles here, and is a member of Unity Lodge, 
No. 34, .Ancient Free and .Accepted Masons ; Pawtucket 
Chapter, Royal .Arch Masons ; Pawtucket Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; Holy Sepulchre Conimand- 
ery, Knights Templar; and Palestine Temple, No. 2, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
Besides these Masonic bodies he is also affiliated with 
the National Master Plumbers Association, and with the 
local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Spaulding 
has not identified himself with any political party in 
the community, but is an independent voter, depending 
entirely upon his own judgment in his selection of can- 
didates and quite uninfluenced by partisan consider- 
ation. 

William Howard Spaulding was united in marriage, 
October 28, 1908, at Providence, with Marion E. .Mien, 
of Providence, a daughter of Edward and Susan 
(Southwick) Allen, old and highly respected residents 
of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding are the parents 
of three children, as follows : Barbara Southwick, now 
a pupil in the Saylesville grammar school ; William 
Howard, Jr., and Richard Morton. 



WILLIAM SYLVANUS HINCKS, M. D.— When 
Dr. Hincks decided to embrace the profession of medi- 
cine he but followed in the footsteps of his honored 
father. Dr. Ezekiel Franklin Hincks, a graduate of New 
York College of Homoeopathy, whose professional life 
was mainly passed in Marlborough, Mass. Both he and 
his wife, Martha J. (.Armstrong) Hincks, are deceased. 

William S. Hincks was born in Foxboro, Mass., 
December 14, 1861. He was educated in Marlborough 
public schools and Wilburhaven .Academy, going thence 
to the medical department of Boston University, but 
prior to graduation he decided to change his school of 
medicine. He then entered the New York College of 
HotTKropathy, and in 1884 was graduated, the second 
Dr. Hincks to be graduated from that institution, 
father and son. For sixteen years he practiced in 
Massachusetts as a general practitioner, and in 1900 
located in Providence, where he is well-established in 
lucrative practice. He is a member of Old South 
Universalist Church, Worcester, Mass., is a member of 
the Masonic order, and an Independent voter. 

Dr. Hincks married, July 29, 1884, Elizabeth Nellie 
Robinson, of Templeton, Mass. They are the parents 
of six children: Ruth; Willis, married Pearl Picard; 
Edwin, married Ailine Schomachcr; Beatrice, married 
Roy Stimpson, of Providence, and has a daughter, 
Muriel Ruth Stimpson ; Harvey ; and Muriel. The 
family home is at No. 37 Maple street, Riverside. 



EDWARD J. YALE — When a young man in his 
nineteenth year, Mr. Vale came to Providence, R. I., 
from his native Canada, without any knowledge of the 
business in which he has been so successful, in fact he 
could not speak the English language. But he possessed 
the inborn skill of a mechanic, and when his talent was 



diverted to its proper channel his progress was rapid. 
He has risen to a leading position among jewelry manu- 
facturers, as president of the Yale Jewelry Manufactur- 
ing Company, and the inventor of machines and devices 
which are used in jewelry making, many such being in 
use in the plant he has developed as a part of his 
business. 

From ancient Wales came the ancestors of this fam- 
ily, the original form of the name lal or Yal, the first 
records being found in Commate Hundred or the Dis- 
trict of Yale in Powys. Fadog, Wales. The original an- 
cestor was Osborn Fitz Gerald (Osbyn Wyddell) of 
the County of Meriweth, Wales. One of his descend- 
ants, Ellis ap Griffith, married Margaret, the heiress of 
Plas yn Yale, of the lordship of Bromfield and Yale, 
the marriage joining the estates of Plass and Yale. 
Descendants of this marriage later adopted Yale as the 
family surname, the name and estates following the 
paternal side. Dr. Thomas Yale, who died in 1577, 
was chancellor under Matthew Burke. .Archbishop of 
Canterbury, and a grandson of Ellis ap Griffith, and his 
wife. Margaret. Chancellor Yale was one of the first 
to definitely assume the surname "Yale," and his 
nephews, Thomas and Dr. David Yale, were the an- 
cestors of the Yales of Plas yn Yale and of Plas 
Gromo. But back beyond this Welsh history there is 
Italian, Norman and English blood, the family being one 
of great antiquity, the Yale genealogy going in direct 
male line to Dominus Otho, the Florentine Noble, who 
came to England in 1057, nine years before the Norman 
Conquest. On the paternal side descent is traced to 
Cuenda, the first ruler of the Cymric Nation, who 
flourished about the year 415, A. D. The arms of the 
Yale family are almost as ancient as heraldry itself, and 
are as follows : 

Arms — Ermine a saltlre gule.s. 

Crest — A mount vert thereon, a boar azure, within a 
net or, in the mouth an acorn slipped proper. 

In New England the family traces to Thomas Yale, 
who came to .America in 1637, settled in New Haven, 
filled many public positions of trust, and became one of 
the principal men of the colony. This Thomas was 
the son of Thomas Yale, the eldest son of David Yale, 
D. C. L., Chancellor of Chester, England, who lived 
at Chester and Plas Gromo, the Yale estate near Wrex- 
ham, Wales. 

David Yale, who was also a son of Thomas Yale, 
and grandson of Chancellor Yale, was born at Plas 
Gromo, Wales, and came to Connecticut with his 
mother, and stepfather, Theophilus Eaton, and in 1638 
settled in New Haven. This David Yale married, one 
of his children being Elihu Yale, born May 16. 1640, a 
generous friend of the Collegiate School at New 
Haven. He went to India about 1670, to seek his for- 
tune, entered the service of the East India Company, 
and rose rapidly tlierein, and was governor of the main 
British settlement at Madras, 1687-1692. He married 
a native lady, who bore him three daughters, and in 
1699 he returned to England with a "prodigious estate" 
and a vast quantity of native fabrics. Having no son, 
he sent to Connecticut for a relative, to make his heir. 
Jeremiah Drummer then tried to interest him in the 
school at Saybrook, and in 1715 he, with others, sent 



52 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



books. In January, i;i8, Cotton Mather wrote him 
from Boston in behalf of a "college without a colleg- 
ian's way of living." and in his letter made this sugges- 
tion : "If what is forming at New Haven might wear 
the name of Yale College, it would be better than a 
name of sons and daughters." In response to this letter 
a valuable shipment of presents "for the benefit of the 
Collegiate School at New Haven" arrived in August, 
1718. These presents from Elihu Yale consisted of 
rare books, a portrait of George I., and a quantity of 
goods from the East Indies, which sold in Boston for 
£562. This amount went toward the expense of the 
building erected in 1717-18, at New Haven, which forth- 
with was called "Yale College," a name officially con- 
ferred in 1745. Two or three years later he sent a small 
sum which covered one-fifth the costs of the rector's 
house, finished in 1722. He was a fellow of the Royal 
Society, and governor of the East India Company. His 
tomb in Wrexham, Denbigshire, Wales, bears these 
lines: "Born in America, in Europe bred, in Africa 
traveled, and in Asia wed." While he could have re- 
tained no recollection of the land of his birth, his mem- 
ory is associated with one of its finest institutions of 
learning. He purchased the honor cheaply it would 
seem now, but his gifts were of real value in that day 
of small beginnings, and aided to settle the vexed ques- 
tion of location. A copy of his portrait, presented by 
his past descendant in 1789, is preserved by the college. 
He died in England, July 8, 1721. 

The line of descent from Thomas Yale, the founder 
of this branch, who came in 1637, 'S through his son, 
Captain Thomas Yale, of New Haven, one of the agi- 
tators for a settlement at Wallingford, Conn., and later 
one of the little band of settlers who founded that 
town. Captain Yale resided in Wallingford until his 
death, January 26, 1736. His son, Captain Theophilus 
Yale, of Wallingford, Conn., was a magistrate of the 
town from 1724 until his death, September 13, 1760, and 
also filled other important trusts conferred upon him 
by his fellow-townsmen. The line of descent from 
Captain Theophilus Yale is through his son, Theophilus 

(2) Yale, of Wallingford. Conn.; his son, Theophilus 

(3) Yale, of St. Andrew's, New Brunswick, Canada; his 
son, Miles Yale, of Vercheres, Quebec, Canada; his son, 
Sylvester Yale; his son, Edward J. Yale, president of the 
Yale Jewelry Manufacturing Company, Providence, R. I. 

Sylvester Yale was born at Berthierville, a banking 
river port of the province of Quebec, the chief town 
of Berthier county, on the north shore of the St. 
Lawrence river, forty-five miles from Montreal, died 
July 6, 1880, a farmer. He married, in May, 1851, 
Emilie Gagnon, of Montreal, they the parents of : James, 
of Montreal; William, deceased, March, 1917; Melina, 
the wife of Edouard Rinquite, of Mont Laurier, Can- 
ada ; Philomene, married Raoul Geneveux, now resid- 
ing in Alberta, Canada; Edward J., of further mention; 
Emile, formerly of Pawtucket, R. I., died in Montreal, 
April, 1913; and Mary, the wife of Emile Bourassa, of 
Montreal, Canada. 

Edward J. Yale was born November 15, 1868, in 
Montreal, Canada, and there spent the first nineteen 
years of his life. He was doubly orphaned when a child, 
but obtained a common school education, and was well 
cared for. In 1887 he came to Providence, and upon his 



arrival found work with a house-mover, who paid him 
$1.10 per day for a time. He then secured employment 
at the .\tlantic Mil! doing general work, later going 
with the Langelier Machinery Company, there contin- 
uing ten years, learning the jewelry manufacturing 
business from every angle, and becoming an expert 
workman. He advanced to a good position with the 
Langelier Company, but at the end of ten years' service 
left that employ to become head tool-maker for the 
T. I. Smith Jewelry Company. There he designed and 
further developed jewelry machinery, one of his original 
inventions being a machine for making collar buttons. 
In 1908 he incorporated the Yale Jewelry Manufactur- 
ing Company, Edward J. Yale, president; F. A. Ballou, 
treasurer; E. C. Lakey, secretary. The business of the 
Yale Company is the manufacture of jeweln' for men, 
and in their particular field have been very successful. 
Mr. Yale is a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and a member of St. Joseph's Roman Cath- 
olic Church. 

Mr. Yale married, October 27, 1893, Octavia Duffiney, 
also born in Canada, but brought in childhood to Prov- 
idence. They are the parents of two children: Armand 
E., a graduate of Pawtucket High School, class of 1913, 
and of Worcester Institute of Technology, having com- 
pleted a full course in electrical engineering, now an 
employee of the American Telegraph & Telephone Com- 
pany, at Philadelphia; Loretta, a graduate of Paw- 
tucket High School, class of 1913, and of Rhode Island 
School of Design, class of 1917, and now (1918) taking 
a post-graduate course at the last-named institution. 



PHILIP CHARLES JOSLIN— In 1908 the law 
firm of Hahn & Joslin was organized in Providence, the 
junior member, Philip C. Joslin, a recently created 
LL. B., of Georgetown University Law School. Ten 
years have since intervened, the firm now being well- 
established among the able and reliable law firms of the 
city. Mr. Joslin is a son of Joseph and Jennie (Di- 
mond) Joslin, of New York City, but since 1890, resi- 
dents of Providence. 

Philip Charles Joslin was born in New York City, 
March 8, 1886, his parents moving to Providence. R. I., 
in 1890. He passed all the grades, attended until 1904 
Hope Street High School, spent a year in special study, 
and in 1905 entered the law department of George- 
town University, Washington, D. C. Three years later, 
in the class of igo8, he was graduated LL. B., and the 
same year was admitted to the Rhode Island bar. He 
at once formed the partnership of Hahn & Joslin, which 
yet exists, that firm being counsel for several large 
corporations, and serving an influential private clien- 
tele. Mr. Joslin is a member of the Rhode Island Bar 
-Association, and a lawyer of learning, ability, and skill. 

A Republican in party faith, he has long been an 
active party worker and official, serving on the Provi- 
dence School Committee in 1912-14, and representative 
to the State Legislature from the fourth district, 1915- 
16, reelected and serving 1917-18. During his first 
term he was appointed to the committee on militia, and 
during his second term served on the corporations and 
rules and order committees. He is greatly interested 
in the various charitable and educational Hebrew asso- 
ciations, and active in their management. He is a direc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



53 



tor of the Jewish Orphanage of Providence; director 
of the Zionist Association of Rhode Island; president 
of the Hebrew Educational Institute; president of 
Georgetown University Alumni Association of Rhode 
Island; past grand chancellor of the Grand Lodge of 
Rhode Island, Knights of Pythias; member of Red- 
wood Lodge, No. 35. Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Providence Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
What Cheer Lodge, No. 24, Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Joslin married at Worcester, Mass.. March 18, 
1913, Dorothy .\isenberg, of Worcester. They are the 
parents of two sons, Alfred Hahn, born January 29, 
1914; and Berrick Lloyd, born April 20, iyi8. 



FRANK HOWARD ARNOLD, one of the promi- 
nent citizens of Warwick, K. I., where he is proprietor 
of the Warwick Coal Company, and a man of large 
influence in the community, was born at East Green- 
wich, in this State, January 22, 1848. Mr. .Arnold is 
a member of an old and distinguished family of New 
England, which was founded here in the early Colonial 
period. 

(I) Thomas Arnold, the first ancestor of this family 
to whom we can directly trace, was a native of Dorset- 
shire, England, where he was born in the year 1599, at 
Cheselbourne. He married (second) Phebe Parkhurst, 
daughter of George and Susannah Parkhurst, and they 
were the parents of the following children: Thomas, 
Nicholas, Susannah, Ichabod, Richard, Thomas, John, 
Eleazcr, who is mentioned below ; and Elizabeth. 

(II) Elcazer Arnold, son of Thomas and Phebe 
(Parkhurst) Arnold, was born June 17, 1651, and re- 
sided at Providence during his entire life. He was a 
member of the Town Council there in 1 684-85, was 
deputy in 1686, 1700-03-06-07-11-15, and justice of the 
peace in 1705. He was a very prominent member of 
the community, and died there, August 29, 1722. He 
married Eleanor Smith, daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth Smith, and they were the parents of the following 
children: Phebe, Elizabeth, Eleazer, Jr., Joseph, who is 
mentioned below; John, Jeremiah, Eleanor, Mary, Abi- 
gail, and Deborah. 

(III) Joseph Arnold, son of Eleazer and Eleanor 
(Smith) Arnold, was born September 21, 1694, at Prov- 
idence. He lived in that city during the major portion 
of his life, but afterwards removed to Smithfield, R. I., 
where his death occurred November 4, 1746. He mar- 
ried Mercy Statford, born September 21, 1694, a daugh- 
ter of Amos and Mary (Burlingame) StatTord, and they 
were the parents of the following children : Eleazer, 
Joseph, Benjamin, Amos, Elizabeth, Caleb, Deborah, 
Joshua, Nathan, Stukeley, Mercy, and Samuel, who is 
mentioned below. 

(IV) Samuel .Arnold, son of Joseph and Mercy 
(Stafford) Arnold, was bom July 12, 1736, at Provi- 
dence, R. I., and married, November 10, 1757, Elizabeth 
Arnold, by whom he had the following children : Ben- 
jamin, who is mentioned below; John, Abigail, Anna, 
Richard, Samuel, Elizabeth, Mercy, and Jonathan. 

(V) Benjamin Arnold, son of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Arnold) Arnold, was born March 4, 1758, and married 
(first) April 5, 1785, Isabel Greene, born June 18. 
1764, a daughter of Paul Greene, cousin of General 



Nathaniel Greene, of Potowomut, R. I., and his wife 
Sarah (Hall) Greene, a native of East Greenwich, in 
this place. Mrs. Arnold was a descendant of Surgeon 
John Greene, of Salisbury, England, who became one 
of the prominent settlers of Providence Plantations. 
Her death occurred April 8, 1790, and Mr. Arnold mar- 
ried (second) June 5, 1793. Rachel Harris, a daughter 
of David Harris. Mr. .Arnold's children by his first 
wife were as follows: Hannah Greene, born June 22, 
1786, and Aza, who is mentioned below. His children by 
his second marriage were: Thomas, Rachel. Isabella, 
and Eliza. Benjamin .Arnold, during the latter part of 
his life, became a resident of Stamford, N. Y. 

(VI) .Aza Arnold, son of Benjamin and Isabel 
(Greene) Arnold, was born November 4, 1788, in the 
vicinity of Pawtucket, in the town of Smithfield, R. I. 
.As a young man he became associated with the Messrs. 
Slaters, in the mill business, and manufactured cotton 
and woolen machinery. He afterwards built and oper- 
ated a mill at Great Falls, N. H., and was engaged in 
numerous industrial enterprises. He established at 
East Greenwich, R. I., a machine shop, where he and 
his sons engaged in the manufacture of cotton machin- 
ery. Mr. Arnold was an inventor of much ability, and 
did much to perfect the designs of the machinery which 
he manufactured and which was used extensively 
throughout this part of the world in the manufacture 
of cotton and woolen goods. Among other devices he 
invented and perfected a compound motion for speed- 
ers, and also a machine for the manufacture of files. 
Later in life he removed to Philadelphia, Pa., and there 
became connected with a concern engaged in the manu- 
facture of print goods. Finally, upon his retirement, 
he went to Washington, D. C, where he made his 
home, and where his death occurred in 1865, at the age 
of seventy-seven years. In his religious belief Mr. 
Arnold was a Friend, and was buried in the Old 
Friends' Cemetery, at Washington. He was honored 
highly on account of his integrity, and enjoyed a repu- 
tation second to none in the community for honest and 
square dealing. Mr. Arnold married, at Portsmouth, 
R. I., Abigail Dennis, a native of that town, and a 
member of one of the oldest Quaker families in the 
State. Mrs. Arnold survived her husband and continued 
to make her home at Washington after his death She 
died at East Orange, N. J., while on a visit to one of 
her children, and was buried at East Greenwich, R. I. 
.Aza Arnold and his wife were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: 1. Mary, who died unmarried. 2. 
Harriett, who became the wife of Asa Shove, of East 
Orange, N. J., where she died. 3. William Dennis, who 
went to Florida, where his death occurred. 4. Benja- 
min, who is mentioned below. 5. James Greene, who 
died at Worcester, Mass. 6. Samuel Aza, who died in 
Worcester. 7. Elizabeth, who died at Washington. 
D. C, in 1861. 8. Sarah Greene, who became the wife 
of Charles Houghton, of New York, and died in 1880. 
9. Edward Greene, a civil engineer, who married Rosa 
Redding, and died at Hoboken, N. J. 

(VII) Benjamin Arnold, son of Aza and .Abigail 
(Dennis) Arnold, was born at Pawtucket, R. I., Octo- 
ber 4, 1822. He was only a small child when his 
parents removed from that place to Potowomut, War- 
wick. He enjoyed very little schooling, and as a lad 



54 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



entered his father's machine shop, where he learned the 
machinist's trade and worked at this craft as a young 
man. He afterwards became engaged in the manu- 
facture of cotton machinery at East Greenwich, in 
partnership with his father, and was very successful in 
this line of business. He inherited from his father the 
latter's remarkable inventive ability and among the 
devices originated by him was a machine for the manu- 
facture of seines and fish nets. He also perfected a 
compound gear-pulley, for which he received a medal 
at the Franklin Exposition, held at Philadelphia. He 
was keenly interested in the subject of patent rights, 
and during the latter part of his life devoted himself 
exclusively to that business. He established, at Provi- 
dence, an office to deal with his business in this line, 
and in course of time became one of the leading patent 
attorneys of the State. Mr. Arnold died at his home in 
East Greenwich, in 1902, when eighty years of age, and 
was buried in the East Greenwich Cemetery. He 
erected a fine brick dwelling at East Greenwich (or 
Cowesett) as it was then called, and imported the brick 
for this structure all the way from Philadelphia. His 
home was the only one constructed of this material in 
that part of the State. Benjamin Arnold was a man of 
broad mind and wide culture, and during his entire life 
was a great reader, it being one of his greatest pleasures 
to read scientific works, chiefly those on botany and 
chemistry. He also kept himself well abreast of the 
leading questions of the day, and took much interest in 
public affairs. He was a great lover of nature, espec- 
ially the woods and flowers, and spent as much of his 
spare time as possible out of doors. He was a birth- 
right member of the Society of Friends and, in poli- 
tics, a Republican. He was not, however, interested 
especially in politics in the usual acceptation of that 
term, and was consistent in his refusal to run for public 
oflice of any kind. While living at Warwick he was 
married to Sarah Congdon, a daughter of Gideon and 
Eliza (Reynolds) Congdon. Mrs. Arnold died at 
Mount Vernon, N. Y., in 1883, and was buried in the 
East Greenwich Cemetery. Benjamin Arnold and his 
wife were the parents of the following children : James 
Edmond, born in 1846, a resident of East Greenwich; 
Frank Howard, of whom further; Phebe Elizabeth, 
born in 1851, married (first) Nicholas S. Arnold, and 
(second) Thaddeus S. Kidd. and resides in New York 
City; Abby Harriett, born in 1854, the widow of 
Charles Houghton, of New York City, and resides in 
East Greenwich; Benjamin and William (twins), born 
in 1857, and both died in early youth; Richard Dennis, 
born in i860 and died in 1866; Annie Congdon, born in 
1863 and died when but two years of age. 

(VHI) Frank Howard Arnold, son of Benjamin and 
Sarah (Congdon) Arnold, was born January 22, 1848, 
at East Greenwich, R. I. As a child Mr. Arnold at- 
tended the local public schools and the East Green- 
wich Academy of this place. He was later sent as a 
student to the famous Friends' School at Providence, 
and acquired an excellent education. Upon completing 
his studies he entered his father's machine shop, al- 
though still a lad, and there learned the machinist's 
trade. His brother-in-law, Charles C. Houghton, con- 
ducted a business in New York City, selling fancy wood 
veneering, and young Mr. Arnold went to that city and 



became associated with him there. About five years 
were occupied by Mr. Arnold in this occupation, and 
he then entered the Putnam Manufacturing Company, 
at Putnam, Conn., as an accountant, where he remained 
eight years, and then, in 1893, became interested in the 
Warwick Coal Company, with which he has continued 
associated ever since. He devoted his whole attention 
to the development of this concern, and eventually was 
able to purchase it from its former owners and became 
its president and sole proprietor. This successful busi- 
ness is a monument to Mr. Arnold's sound judgment 
and business skill, and its development has been due 
entirely to his own industry and foresight. The old 
family homestead, built in 1687 by Eleazer Arnold, is 
still standing and is in the possession of Preserved 
Arnold, not a relative of F. H. Arnold. It is a pic- 
turesque dwelling which stands on the old North road, 
now Lonsdale avenue, about half a mile from the 
Butterfly factory, and about a mile west of the town 
of Lonsdale, occupying an eminence not far from the 
bank of the Mushasuck river. Mr. Arnold is a staunch 
Republican in his political faith, but has never identified 
himself with the local organization of his party, al- 
though he performs consistently his duties as a citizen. 
Frank Howard Arnold was united in marriage, in 
1877, with Carro L. Champlain, a native of Greenville, 
R. L, and a daughter of Daniel J. and Matilda (Fisher) 
Champlain, and granddaughter of Samuel and Mary 
(Arnold) Champlain. Mrs. Arnold takes an active 
interest in historical and genealogical subjects, and is a 
prominent figure in the social world here. She is a 
member of the Rhode Island Society, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, being affiliated with the General 
Nathaniel Greene Chapter of East Greenwich, in which 
she has filled the office of treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Arnold are the parents of two children as follows: 
I. Benjamin H., born in New York City, in 1884, a 
graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
with the class of 1907, and later connected with the 
General Electric Company at Lynn, Mass. ; now a 
captain in the United States Engineers, stationed at 
Washington, D. C. 2. Daniel Ray, born in Putnam, 
Conn., in 1887, attended East Greenwich public schools. 
East Greenwich Academy, Friends' Academy, Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island State College, at Kingston, R. I.; 
associated with his father until he entered the service 
of the United States, being a corporal with the 310th 
Infantry, and at this time (1Q18) is in service in France. 



MARDEN HENRY PLATT, M. D., one of the 

most progressive and successful of the younger physic- 
ians of Riverside, R. I., is a native of Winoaski, Vt., 
where he was born February 23, 18S6, and a son of 
James C. and Emma (Allen) Piatt, old and highly 
respected residents of that place, where Mr. Piatt was 
engaged in business as the proprietor of a store. Dr. 
Piatt, as a lad, attended the Grammar School in his 
native town, and afterwards was sent to Burlington, 
\'t., and was a student in the high school there, where 
he was prepared for college and was graduated with the 
class of 1906. He had determined, while little more 
than a lad, to follow the profession of medicine as his 
career in life and with this end in view, entered the 
University of Vermont, studying in the medical depart- 




"^^^^^a.^fc.j.i^ '^?^^-^'<^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



55 



ment of the same and making a record for himself for 
good scholarship. In the year 1910 he was graduated 
from this institution, taking his medical degree, and 
immediately thereafter came to Riverside to begin prac- 
tice. He was governed in his choice of Riverside as 
the scene for his activities, by the fact that an elder 
brother, Dr. Arthur E. Piatt, was already established 
in practice here, and had become prominent in his pri> 
fession. He joined the elder Dr. Piatt in his work at 
Riverside, and built up an independent practice of his 
own. Upon the death of Dr. Arthur E. Piatt, our sub- 
ject fell heir to his brother's large practice, which he 
added to his own. so that he is now the possessor of 
one of the largest clienteles in this region and has 
established a reputation for himself as one of the most 
capable physicians here. Dr. Piatt, in addition to his 
medical activity, is a well-known figure in the general 
life of the community and especially in fraternal 
circles, being a member of a number of organizations 
of this character. He is affiliated with the Lodge and 
Encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, while as 
a college student he joined the Delta Mu and Cap and 
Skull fraternities. He is particularly prominent how- 
ever, as a Mason, and is affiliated with Corinthian 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Providence 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Calvary Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Ancient .\rabic Order Xobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, and Rhode Island Consistory, and has 
attained the thirty-second degree in Masonry. Dr. Piatt 
is a Republican in politics and at the present time is 
serving as medical examiner of schools at Riverside. 
In his religious belief he is a Congregationalist and 
attends the church of that denomination here. He is 
a member of the Rhode Island Medical Society, and the 
Providence Medical Society. 

Dr. Marden Henry Piatt was united in marriage on 
June II, 1912, at Burlington, Vt., with Dorothea Von 
Fliet Pope, daughter of George and Nellie Pope, of that 
city. 



ROBERT GODDARD McMEEHAN— Early in 
his business career Mr. McMeehan determined to master 
cotton mill operation, and that ambition was fairly 
realized, he having been in charge of large cotton manu- 
facturing plants as superintendent. Many years were 
spent in reaching the fruition of his hopes, then he 
turned to other lines, and is now both merchant and 
manufacturer, owning dry goods stores and success- 
fully operating them ; is treasurer of the General Ma- 
chinery Company, a prosperous concern, and head of 
McMeehan Engineering Staff, a designing and develop- 
ing company. He is a son of Robert and Margaret 
Knox (Mcintosh) McMeehan, the former of Provi- 
dence, and the latter of Fall River, Mass. Both parents 
have passed away. 

Robert Goddard McMeehan was born in Providence, 
R. I., January 14, 1865, and obtained a good public 
school education, completed with high school graduation, 
class of 1883. He began business life in 1883 as a 
bookkeeper with Dodge & Canfield, Exchange Place, 
Providence, continuing in the same lines with the Lons- 
dale Manufacturing Company at Lonsdale, R. I. In the 
immense plant of the latter company he really found 



himself, and formed the resolution to master the secrets 
of cotton manufacturing. There being no opening that 
met his plans, he left Lonsdale and in i88q went with the 
Columbian Manufacturing Company of Greenville, N. 
H., his object being to learn the business. He developed 
wonderfully during the years which followed, and at 
New Bedford, Mass., in 1892, became an assistant fore- 
man in the Grinnell Mill. In 1893 he returned to the 
Lonsdale Mill as assistant foreman, that being the 
plant he had left as a bookkeeper. His next important 
post was as superintendent of the Hamlet Textile Com- 
pany of Woodsocket, which position he accepted in 
1898. remaining until 1901, going thence to LIncasville, 
Conn., as superintendent of a cotton mill, and while 
there, added the labor of superintendent of another mill 
in the town owned by the same company. From Uncas- 
ville, in 1907, he went to Utica, N. Y., as general super- 
intendent of the New York Cotton Mills, employing 
eighteen hundred hands, holding that position until his 
retirement from the cotton mill field, one in which he 
was a conspicuous success. In 1909 Mr. McMeehan 
bought out a dry goods store on Watchemoket square. 
East Providence, and in 1910 opened a second store at 
Broadway Six Corners, both of which he successfully 
operates. In 1916 he formed the McMeehan Engineer- 
ing Staff, and in 1917 became treasurer of the General 
Machinery Company. 

After locating his home in East Providence, in 1909, 
Mr. McMeehan began taking part in public affairs, and 
in 1914 was elected to represent his district in the Town 
Council. Later he was chosen president of the Council, 
and is yet the capable head of that legislative body. He 
is a past master of Unity Lodge, No. 34, Free and 
Accepted Masons, Lonsdale, R. I., elected in 1896; mem- 
ber of Providence Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Prov- 
idence Council, Royal and Select Masters; St. John's 
Commandery, Knights Templar; member of the Masonic 
Veterans' Association; Reliance Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of East Providence; vice-presi- 
dent of East Providence Business Men's Association ; 
member of Metropolitan Park Commission ; is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and a member of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church. 

Mr. McMeehan married. November 19, 1891, Alice 
May Hardy, of Clinton, Mass., they the parents of 
Alice Inez, Iva Louise, and Robert Milton, who enlisted 
in the United States Regular Army in the Cavalry as 
soon as his age permitted. 



JOHN LEO CURRAN— Numbered among the able 
young men of the Providence bar. Mr. Curran brings 
to his work the learning of college and university, the 
enthusiasm of youth and a strong determination to 
succeed. His classical education. Brown, A. B., 1907, 
and his professional, Georgetown, LL. B., 1910, came 
through hard and persistent effort both in school terms 
and between, during school hours and after. He is a 
native son of Providence, R. I., as is his father, the 
Currans coming from Ireland about 1830. John L. 
Curran is a son of John Thomas Curran, born in Prov- 
idence, now in the furniture business. He married 
Margaret Kiernan, born in and now living in Provi- 
dence. 

John Leo Curran was born in Providence, R. I., July 



56 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



9, 1883. He completed his preparatory education with 
graduation from Providence Classical High School. 
class of 1903. then entered Brown University, pursuing 
a four years' classical course, ending with graduation, 
A. B., 1907. Choosing the profession of law he entered 
the law department of Georgetown University at Wash- 
ington, D. C, and was graduated LL. B., class of 1910. 
After graduation he returned to Providence and began 
practice, being associated for five years with Frank W. 
Tillinghast. He is at present (1918) associated with 
O'Shaunessy, Gainer & Carr, in general practice of 
law at No. 602 Grosvenor building. He is a member of 
the Rhode Island Bar Association, and has a most 
satisfactory practice. 

Hunting and fishing have been favored sports with 
him since youth, particularly fishing. He has long since 
lent his time and influence to the societies devoted to 
the preservation of our fish and game, and has just 
been appointed by the governor of Rhode Island for a 
second term as a member of the State Commission of 
Inland Fisheries. He is a member of the National 
Association of Game and Fish Commissioners ; mem- 
ber of the Rhode Island Game and F'ish Protective 
Association ; member of the American Fisheries Society, 
and the Pen and Pencil Club. His vacation periods are 
spent with rifle and rod, and he ranks as an expert in 
their use. He is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, serving as advisory counsel for 
three years ; belongs to St. Michael's Roman Catholic 
Church, and is president of St. Michael's Catholic Club. 
He is a Republican in politics, and is one of the active 
workers for party success, his gift of oratory being 
freely drawn upon by party managers for campaign 
speaking. Mr. Curran is unmarried. 



CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON ASTLE, M. D.— 

For ten years, 190S-18, Dr. Astle has practiced his 
healing art in Providence, R. I., specializing in diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He made ample 
preparation for the profession he honors, and claims 
two great universities, Brown and Columbia as alma 
tnatcr. He is a son of Solon R. and Julia (Hoyt) 
Astle; the latter died February i, 1914; his father a 
traveling salesman, now residing at Lakewood, R. I. 

Christopher Johnson Astle was born in Providence, 
R. I., August 23, 1879, there completing high school 
study with graduation, class of 1898. He pursued a 
classical course at Brown University, finishing and 
receiving his A. B., class of 1902. Deciding upon the 
medical profession he entered Columbia University, 
College of Medicine, and was graduated M. D., class 
of 1906. Two years were then spent as first assistant 
at New York City Hospital; first assistant at Vander- 
bilt Clinic, eye department. New York City; clinical 
assistant at St. Bartholomew Clinic, New York City, 
and as interne at Rhode Island Hospital, Providence. 
In October, 1910, he began private practice in Provi- 
dence as a specialist, and is medical examiner of 
schools for the town of Warwick, R. I., but confines 
his examinations to eye, car, nose and throat, his spec- 
ialties in practice. He is medical examiner for the eye, 
towns of Barrington and Warren, R. I., both appoint- 
ments dating from 1917, and applying only to the public 
schools. He is a member of the Rhode Island Medical 



Society, Providence Medical Society, secretary of Rhode 
Island Opthalmological and Otological Society. He is 
also one of the founders and secretary of the Warwick 
Health League. He takes a deep interest in these 
societies, and is firmly established in public esteem. 
He is a member of Red Cross Chapter, No. 25, Knights 
of Pythias, and is a past chancellor commander of 
same; Shawmut Lodge, Loyal Order of Moose; Knight 
of Kharassan ; the Republic Club, and attends the Epis- 
copal church. 

Dr. Astle was twice married, the second time, June 
10, 1915, to Albertina Page, daughter of Thomas and 
Georgiana Page, of French ancestry. His children: 
Phyllis H., born Nov. 29, 1908; and Christopher Albert, 
born Aug. 30, 1916. 



JOHN A. HAMILTON, a prominent and public- 
spirited citizen of Cranston, R. I., and for many years 
a faithful public servant in a number of different capac- 
ities, is a native of Manchester, England, and a son of 
James and Agnes (Dagleish) Hamilton, who were also 
born in that great manufacturing center. James Ham- 
ilton was born in Manchester, on September 30, 1842, 
and his wife in the year 1844. The former was for 
many years employed as a clerk on the Midland Rail- 
way Company of England, but in 1873 came to the 
United States and settled at Cranston, R. I., where he 
worked for the Providence Water Works for twenty- 
seven years. He then secured a position as store- 
keeper in the Quartermaster's Department for the State 
of Rhode Island in the State Armory at Providence. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton, Sr., celebrated their golden 
wedding November 30, 1913, and Mrs. Hamilton's death 
occurred April 28, 191 7. They were the parents of 
thirteen children of whom five are now living as fol- 
lows : Annie, widow of William Peterson, resides at 
Cranston, R. I.; John A., of whom further; Ellen E., 
wife of John McCann, of Providence; Jeanette. who 
resides at No. 11 Camp street, Providence; and James, 
born at Cranston, January 2/, 1883. The latter grad- 
uated from Brown University in 1906 with the degree 
of A. B., and from Yale Medical School with the class 
of 1910. He then took a two years' course in path- 
ology and served as an interne in the Rhode Island 
Hospital. After this valuable experience he was placed 
in charge of the laboratory at St. Joseph's Hospital for 
one year, and from there, in 1917, entered the military 
service of his country. He was commissioned as a 
lieutenant and was shortly afterwards raised to the 
rank of captain and is now a major. Dr. Hamilton 
is government expert on paralysis, meningitis, and 
pneumonia. In this capacity he was sent to all canton- 
ments and military camps in the United States and 
is now senior major of Unit No. 193, serving in France. 

Born at Mancester, England, March 23, 1871. John 
A. Hamilton was but two and a half years old when he 
came to America with his mother, brothers, and sisters, 
there to join his father who had preceded them. The 
father had already made a home for them at Cranston, 
R. I., and here the family located, the children, includ- 
ing John A. Hamilton, attending the public schools 
there. Later he was sent to La Salle Academy and grad- 
uated there with the class of 1888. Upon completing 
his studies in this institution, he secured employment 





crPvni ^. 




CV^^l^l 



lSh^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



57 



as a pattern maker in the plant of the George H. Cor- 
liss Steam Engine Company on Charles street. Provi- 
dence, R. I. He remained with this concern for three 
years, and then worked for ten years at the same trade 
with the Fuller Iron Works. From this line of work 
Mr. Hamilton entered the insurance business in July, 
1902, as the representative of the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company in this region, and after one year 
was made assistant superintendent, a position which he 
held for eight years. On January i, 1913, he resigned 
from this office and since that time has been engaged in 
the real estate business on his own account, and has 
served the community in a number of public oflfices. 
Mr. Hamilton has been very active in the political situa- 
tion here and is a staunch Republican. On April 2. 1909, 
he qualified as overseer of the poor to fill the unex- 
pired term of John Bigbee, and when Cranston became 
a city in .\pril, 1910, he was elected to the same office 
and reelected each succeeding two years to date. In 
1914 Mr. Hamilton was elected to represent the Third 
Assembly District in the State Legislature of Cranston, 
and was reelected in 1916-18. In 191 5 the office of 
juvenile probation officer was added to that which he 
already held, and he has served in both positions ever 
since. He is a member of a number of organizations, 
including Cranston Council, No. 1738, Knights of 
Columbus; the .Arlington \'oluntecr Firemen; the Rhode 
Island State Firemen's League, of which he is past 
president; and the .Associated Overseers of the Poor of 
Rhode Island, of which he is now president. 

Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage, June 21, 1892, 
with Faith Bigbee, of Cranston, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Hodson) liigbee, old residents of this place. 
Her father, born at Crompton, R. I., February 2, 1846, 
died in Cranston, December n, 1908. For twenty-eight 
years he was town sergeant and chief of police, being 
the first chief of police of the city of Cranston. He 
was also overseer of the poor from June 8, 11^85. to the 
time of his death, in 1908. Mrs. Bigbee also was born 
here May 18, 1846, and her death occurred August iS, 
1893. The family is Catholic in its religious belief, and 
attends St. .Ann's Church here. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 
were the parents of thirteen children : Richard, bom 
June 16, 1893, died in infancy; John, horn Jan. 5, 1896, 
died also in infancy; Harold, born .March g, 1897, en- 
listed, July I, 1918, in the United States Reserve Forces, 
stationed at Newport. R. I., and later transferred to 
Boston, Mass.; Charity, born June 15, 1898; Ralph, born 
Feb. 25, 1901, died at the early age of two and one-half 
years; Clifton, born Jan. 24, 1903; Hope, born July 17, 
1904; John, born May 27, IQ06; Agnes, Elizabeth and 
Faith, triplets, born Jan. 21, 1908, the first two of whom 
died in infancy; James, born July 7. 1910; and Patience, 
born .Aug. 15, 1911. Mr. Hamilton resides at No. 1230 
Cranston street. He finds his chief recreation in out- 
door sports and pastimes, in which he indulges to the 
extent of his spare time. 



EDWARD A. HEWITSON— The Stillman White 
Foundry was established in Providence by Stillman 
White in 1856, and in a very small way brass and bronze 
casting was begun at No. i Bark street For forty-six 
years he continued his business of producing all kinds 
of bronze and brass castings, also manufacturing his 



own invention, the S. White Lining Metal, a very 
superior lining. He won high reputation for the 
products of his foundry and found a ready market 
awaiting them as fast as they could be turned out. He 
continued sole head of the business imtil 1002, when 
Theodore P. Hall bought a half interest, and together 
they operated the foundry until the death of Stillman 
White, April 3, 1903. Mr. Hall conducted the business 
alone until .April, 1<X>4. when Wendell P. Mcintosh pur- 
chased a half interest. Theodore P. Hall died in .April, 
1907. Edward A. Hewitson having previously ])urchascd 
Mr. Hall's interest. Mr. Hewitson and Mr. Mcintosh 
now own and operate the foundry, but still retain the 
name, Stillman White. The high ideals which the 
founder maintained during his forty-six years of sole 
ownership are maintained by the present owners, the 
original site has also been retained at No. I Bark street, 
and the same metals are principally cast to meet the 
present-day requirements, the greatest change being the 
greatly enlarged size of the plant. Brass and bronze are 
cold, inanimate things ; a foundry is not a place with 
which one would council the word artistic, but the lives 
of the four men who have been responsible for putting 
life and art beauty into this thing men know as the Still- 
man White F'oundry have accomplished a wonderful 
work, and their lives are of interest. 

Stillman White, the founder, was a descendant of 
Peregrine White, the first white child born in the 
Plymouth Colony. His father, James White, a mill 
owner of Canton, Mass., married .Aiirclia Howard, Still- 
man being the only one of their ten children to settle 
in Providence, R. I. Stillman White was born in Can- 
ton, February 5, 1832, died in Providence, R. I., .April 
3, 1903, and was buried in Swan Point Cemetery. He 
was a brass molder by trade, coming to Providence at 
the age of sixteen to begin his apprenticeship. .\t the 
age of twenty-four he began business for himself, and 
at No. I Bark street laid the foundation for the busi- 
ness which still flourishes as the Stillman White 
Foundry. Nearly half a century passed ere he laid 
down the reins of management and passed to a good 
man's reward. 

Mr. White was prominent as a citizen, held offices as 
councilman, alderman, assemblyman, fire commissioner 
and volunteer fireman ; was first worshipful master of 
.Adelphi Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; and grand 
master of Rhode Island Free and Accepted Masons, in 
1892; was a companion of the Royal Arch Masons; a 
sir knight of St. John's Commandery, Knights Templar; 
and in Scottish Rite Masonry held the thirty-third and 
highest degree. Stillman White married Lydia Mosley, 
they the parents of a daughter, Abby Howard White, 
who married George H. Holmes, of Providence. 

Theodore P. Hall, the second of the quartet who have 
been identified with the business of the Stillman W hite 
Foundry, was born at Roxbury. Mass., but early in life 
moved to Taunton, Mass., where he remained about 
forty years. He was a confidential clerk in the employ 
of Reed & Barton, and became very capable. In 1902 
Mr. White sold to Mr. Hall a one-half interest in the 
foundry business. Mr. White died the following April 
3, 1903, Mr. Hall then continuing the business alone 
until April, 1904, when he sold a one-half interest to 
Edward A. Hewitson. they operating as a firm until 
Mr. Hall's death in 1907. 



5« 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Theodore P. Hall married (first) Martha Plummer, 
of Taunton, Mass. Their children were: Theodore P. 
(2); Joseph H. ; and Sylvia R. He married (second) 
Ida Radden, who survives him, a resident of Melrose, 
Mass. 

Wendell P. Mcintosh, one of the present partners of 
the Stillman White Foundry, is a nephew of Theodore 
P. Hall, the second owner, and is the only one of the 
four men herein named, who did not come into the 
business a trained mechanic, his training having been 
of a business character in Boston. He was born at 
Needham, Mass., November ~, 1879, and there completed 
grade and high school courses of public school study. 
After the completion of high school study he pursued a 
course of special business training in a commercial col- 
lege at Boston. Shortly after graduation he came to 
Providence, where his uncle. Theodore P. Hall, was 
interested in the Stillman White Foundry as half owner. 
In 1903 Mr. Hall became sole owner, and being then 
advanced in years, was willing to shift the burden, Mr. 
Mcintosh becoming a partner and one-half owner. In 
1904 Edward A. Hewitson purchased a half interest 
from Mr. Hall, and from that year Hewitson & Mcin- 
tosh have been the owners of the long established busi- 
ness, Stillman White Foundry, brass and bronze cast- 
ings of all kinds, and the manufacture of the S. White 
Lining Metal, a business which for sixty-two years, 
has been centered at No. i Bark street. Providence, R. 1. 

Mr. Mcintosh is a member of the Providence Central 
and Turk's Head clubs, belongs to the Masonic order, 
and is a Republican in politics, but is first of all the 
able business man. He married. November 5, 1903, 
Helen A. Mosley, of Needham, Mass. They are the 
parents of a daughter, Helen. 

Edward A. Hewitson, of the firm, Hewitson & Mcin- 
tosh, owners of Stillman White Foundry, is the last of 
the four owners, which the foundry has had, to become 
associated with the business. Like Mr. White and Mr. 
Hall, he was an experienced workman, and unlike them, 
had previously conducted business for himself as a 
manufacturer. He was born in Taunton, Mass., June 
8, l?72, and after completing the grades in the public 
schools spent three years as a student in the Taunton 
High School. He then entered the employ of Reed & 
Barton, manufacturing silversmiths, and for seven years 
was with that well-known and reliable firm, being con- 
nected with the department of design. Finally severing 
his connection with Reed & Barton, he began the manu- 
facture of silver novelties and trimmings at Northamp- 
ton, Mass., conducting business under the firm name, 
Edward .\. Hewitson & Company. 

Mr. Hewitson continued in business in Northampton 
until 1905, then moved to Providence, R. I., where his 
father-in-law. Theodore P. Hall, and Wendell P. Mcin- 
tosh were operating the Stillman White Foundry. Mr. 
Hall being willing to sell, Mr. Hewitson acquired his 
one-half interest, and since 1904 Hewitson & Mcintosh 
have conducted this always successful plant. Under 
them quality and prestige have been maintained, old 
friendships cemented in stronger bond, and new ones 
formed. .A new building, forty by sixty feet, two stories 
in height, has been added to the foundry equipment, 
with modern offices and shipping room. The output is 
now confined to bronze castings for machine parts. Mr. 



Hewitson is an able, energetic business man with no 
interests which conflict with the prompt performance of 
his duties at the foundry. He is a member of Northamp- 
ton Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Northampton, 
and of Providence Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Providence. 

He married, in 1900, Sylvia R. Hall, daughter of Theo- 
dore P. Hall and his first wife, Martha Plummer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hewitson are the parents of three children: 
Edward H., Sylvia E. and Martha F. Hewitson. 



ALGERNON STERRY GALLUP, the eminent 
teacher and influential citizen of Centerville, R. I., is a 
member of a very distinguished New England family, 
which was founded in the early Colonial period by John 
Gallup, or Galloup, who came to Boston and settled 
there in 1630. He owned Nixes Mate and Galloup 
Island, in Boston Harbor, the latter taking its name 
from the family, and was the first to take up land in 
those localities. He is the ancestor of many branches 
of the family; those of his descendants still residing in 
Boston spell the name Galloup. His son, John Gallup, 
was living at Salem, Conn., and took part in the Indian 
wars of that region, and in the famous Swamp Fight 
with the Indians at Kingstown, R. I. The old family 
homestead of the Gallup family in Connecticut includes 
one hundred acres of land, and is located at X'oluntown, 
in that State, which was received as an allotment by the 
family, after the Indian wars, and is still in the posses- 
sion of the family. Mr. Gallup is the grandson of Ben- 
jamin Gallup, Sr., who was a very active man in the 
political affairs of Voluntown, Conn., which he repre- 
sented in the State Legislature, and where he held a 
number of town offices. Some of his descendants are 
prominent citizens of that place at the present time. Mr. 
Gallup, on the maternal side of his house, is descended 
from Captain Samuel Robbins, a veteran of the Revolu- 
tion, who was his great-grandfather. He is a son of 
Benjamin Sterry and Helena (Gallup) Gallup, his 
mother having been a daughter of Kinney and Har- 
riett (Robbins) Gallup. 

Algernon Sterry Gallup was born in the town of Gris- 
wold. Conn., February 6, 1S62. As a child he attended 
the country school in that region, and afterwards was 
a pupil of the school at Hanover, Conn., to which place 
his parents moved. Still later he studied at the Natchang 
High School, at Willimantic, and the Williston Semi- 
nary of East Hampton, Mass., and was prepared for 
college at the last-named institution. .After leaving the 
grammar school at Hanover, Conn., young Mr. Gallup 
began alternately teaching and attending school, and 
continued thus occupied until he was finally graduated 
from college. He entered Amherst College at .Amherst, 
Mass., where he took the usual classical course and 
was graduated with the class of 1S92. Even as a youth 
he had a strong taste for teaching and decided to follow 
that profession through life, and before his graduation 
from .Amherst had already established a considerable 
reputation as a teacher. During his last year in college 
he also occupied the position of principal of the gram- 
mar school at Baltic, Conn. Upon completing his course 
at Amherst, Mr. Gallup accepted a position as acting 
principal at the Upson Seminary at New Preston, Conn., 
where he remained for a time. He then became princi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



59 



pal of the grammar schools at Moosup and Central Vil- 
lage, in Plaintield, Conn., where he remained for two 
years. In 1896 he came to Centerville, as principal of 
the grammar school here. He continued to serve in this 
capacity until February, 1918, and during his adminis- 
tration did much to improve the standard of the local 
schools, and develop the educational system of the com- 
munity. In February, 1918, he was offered the position 
of teacher in mathematics and general science at West 
Warwick High School, which he accepted, and is now 
engaged in that capacity there. Mr. Gallup has thus 
carried out his early intention to become a teacher, and 
has now established a splendid reputation for himself 
in his chosen calling, being recognized as one of the 
most capable instructors in this region. Mr. Gallup is a 
man peculiarly fitted for the calling which he has 
adopted, possessing that innate ability to impart knowl- 
edge which is quite a separate thing from the mere 
possession of it, and which alone enables a man to 
reach a high position in the profession of teaching. 
He seems to have an intuitive understanding of the 
personality of the young people in his charge, and can 
bring out and develop such native abilities as they pos- 
sess in the classroom. He is also a most capable scholar 
and possesses a very wide and extensive knowledge, 
not only of the subjects which he teaches, but of many 
of the branches of human thought, and is thus the pos- 
sessor of a wide culture which is the ideal atmosphere 
for a school which is to develop the characters of young 
men and women. Mr. Gallup is also active in the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Centerville, where he is 
a member of the official board and quarterly conference 
of the church, resident of the Men's Rrolhcrhood, and 
the teacher and leader of the Men's Brotherhood class. 
He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and financial secretary of the local body. 

Mr. Gallup was united in marriage, .\ugust 9, 1899, 
with Lorena B. Tyler, a daughter of .Mbert and Helen 
M. (Jenks) Tyler, old and highly respected residents of 
Foster, R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Gallup are the parents of 
two sons, as follows: Benjamin Tyler, the sixth to 
bear that name on the Gallup side, born June i. 1902, 
and now a member of the junior class in the West War- 
wick High School ; Royal Kinney, who was named for 
his grandfather, Kinney Gallup, born June i, 1907. 



JAMES FRANCIS CLARK, D. D. S., one of the 

most popular dentists of Pawtucket, K. I., is a native 
of this city and traces his descent from Irish ancestors. 
He is a son of Patrick and Katherine (Cosgrove) Clark. 
His father was a baker in Pawtucket, where he eventu- 
ally died. Mrs. Clark survives her husband and is now 
living at her home in Pawtucket. 

James Francis Clark was born July 31, 18S0. He spent 
his childhood in his native city and received the ele- 
mentary portion of his education here. He graduated 
from the Broadway Grammar School and from the 
Pawtucket High School. Having decided upon den- 
tistry as his life profession, he entered the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery and graduated in 1903, with 
the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He returned 
to Pawtucket and began practice here, opening an office 
at 228 Main street and later at 161 Main street. He has 
continued his practice here and has met with gratifynng 



success. In 1906 he interrupted his practice long enough 
to take a course in post-graduate work in demal sur- 
gery at the Jenkins Post-Graduate Porcelain School of 
New Haven. Conn. He is now rei-arded as one cf the 
leading members of his profession and enjoys a wide 
popularity. Dr. Clark has been identified with every- 
thing that has been undertaken for the advancement of 
his profession and is a member of a number of organiza- 
tions existing for that purpose. Of these should be 
mentioned the National Dental Association and the 
Rhode Island Dental .Xssociation. In 1918 he served 
the Rhode Island Dental .Xssociation as vice-president, 
and January 29, 1919, he was elected president of that 
body. 

There is scarcely a part of the life of the community 
in which he does not take an active part, and his public 
spirit is generally recognized. He is vice-president of 
the Pawtucket Board of Trade, a member of the Paw- 
tucket Business Men's .Association, of the local Young 
-Men's Christian .Association, a charter member of the 
Knights of Columbus, the Blackstone Club, the Psi Phi 
fraternity, and is vice-president of the executive council 
of the Rhode Island Society of the Alumni of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery. He is prominently 
identified with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
-Elks, of which he is a charter member. In 1914 he be- 
came a life member, and served as exalted ruler in 
1918-19. He was one of the men who. in 1907, organized 
the local body of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick of 
Pawtucket and Blackstone N'alley, and served as treas- 
urer and financial secretary from 1907 to 191 1. He was 
then chosen president and served in that office until the 
close of 1913. Dr. Clark is a member of the Sacred 
Heart Roman Catholic Church. 

In St. Mary's Church, Pawtucket, August 14, 1911, 
James Francis Clark married Mary Elizabeth Hayes, a 
daughter of William Hayes, an old and highly respected 
resident of Providence. Dr. and Mrs. Clark are the 
parents of two children: Rita Frances, born July s, 
1916; and James Francis, Jr., born Oct. 6, 1918. Since 
1909 Dr. Clark has served as national delegate from 
Rhode Island to the national convocation of the Atlantic 
Deeper Waterway .Association in 1917, 1918, 1919. He 
was, also, dental examiner for the draft board of the 
Central Falls district in 1918. 



SAMUEL GILBERT BLOUNT, M. D.— With the 

completion of his high school courses and a year of 
university study, Dr. Blount began preparation for the 
profession he had chosen as his lifework, and when 
awarded his M. D. degree in 191 1, he returned to his 
native city. Providence, and has since practiced his pro- 
fession with satisfactory results. He is a son of Samuel 
and Sarah Jane (Gilbert) Blount, his father a foreman 
in jewelry manufacture. 

Samuel G. Blount was born in Providence, R. I.. 
January 28, 1887, and there completed public school 
courses with graduation from classical high school, class 
of 1906. The following year was spent in study at 
Brown University (preparatory course), but deciding 
upon the profession of medicine he entered Tufts 
^Iedical College, whence he was graduated M. D., class 
of 1911. He continued medical study and preparation 
at St. Luke's Hospital for six months, then was for 



6o 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



one year on the orthopedic staff of the Carney Hospital 
of Boston, Mass., so continuing until December 15, 1912, 
when he began private practice as a general practitioner, 
giving special attention to orthopedics. He has built up 
a good practice, and is well established in public favor. 
He is a member of the Rhode Island Medical and the 
Providence Medical societies, and holds the respect of 
his brethren of the profession. Dr. Blount is a mem- 
ber of lodge, chapter, council, commandery and shrine, 
and in Scottish Rite Masonry has attained the thirty- 
second degree, affiliated with the Providence bodies of 
the order. In politics he is an Independent. 

Dr. Blount married, in St. John's Episcopal Church, 
December 23, 1914, Hazel Hayden Martin, of Provi- 
dence. They are the parents of one son, Samuel Gilbert, 
Jr., born May 19, 1916. 



JOHN ALLEN BATTEY, JR., second of the name 
to add to the activity and importance of the Pawtuxet 
valley, is a resident of Fiskeville, R. I., and a most 
worthy twentieth century representative of an honored 
family, founded in Rhode Island by Samson Battey, 
who is of record in Jamestown as early as 1677. Both 
John A. Battey, senior and junior, represented their 
district in the Rhode Island House of Assemblv, and 
there is no name better known or more highly honored 
in the section they long made their home. The present 
is the seventh generation in Rhode Island, dating from 
Samson Battey. 

Samson Battey was one of the forty-eight men who, 
on October 31, 1677, were granted 5,000 acres of land, 
"to be called East Greenwich." He served as lieutenant 
in 1695. as deputy in 1706 and 1716, and was prominent 
otherwise. He and his wife, Dinah, were the parents of 
a large family, descent being traced through their son, 
John Battey, born September 7, 1688, who was located 
in the town of Warwick, where he died in 1767. He 
married Margaret Carr, born October 22, 1684, daughter 
of Nicholas and Rebecca (Nicholson) Carr. They 
were the parents of: John (2) Battey, born in the 
town of Warwick, R. I., March 13, 1720, married Nov. 
26, 1741, Priscilla Westcott, of Providence, and settled 
in the town of Scituate. 

William B. Battey, bom Oct. 2, 1759, son of John 
(2) and Priscilla (Westcott) Battey, married, Oct 
13, 1782, Betsey Sheldon, daughter of James Sheldon, 
of Cranston, R. I. 

Allen Battey, son of William B. and Betsey (Shel- 
don) Battey, was born in Scituate, R. I., May 27, 1791, 
died August 18, 1861, a farmer and teamster all his adult 
years. He was highly respected, a man of determina- 
tion and character. He married, July 29, 1813, Fanny 
Fenner, born April 29, 1797, died May 29, 1872. They 
were the parents of John Allen Battey, father of John 
Allen (2) Battey, of Fiskeville, R. I. ' 

John Allen Battey was born in Scituate, R. I., June 
2, 1838. He attended the public schools in his native 
town, and was variously engaged, until finally he became 
a manufacturer of soap used in the cleaning of wool. 
He began in that business as an employee, but later 
became proprietor of the business which he conducted 
quite successfully for several years, his customers being 
the numerous mills of the Pawtuxet valley. After sell- 
ing his soap manufacturing business he engaged in stock 



dealing, operated a livery and sales stable, and ran a 
hack and a teaming business. He built up an excellent 
trade and was held in honorable regard by all with 
whom he did business. He was an excellent judge of 
horses, and on his buying trips in the West and Canada 
he selected his stock with such rare judgment that his 
Eastern sales stables could always be relied upon to 
furnish the best stock for the needed purpose. The 
business he built up and so successfully conducted he 
has retired from in his later years, his successor being 
his son, John Allen (2) Battey. Mr. Battey is a Dem- 
ocrat in politics, and so highly esteemed in his district 
that he was frequently elected to office from a district 
politically opposed to him. This tribute to his ability 
and popularity was expressed more than once in his 
section for the offices of tax assessor and Town Council, 
and still more forcibly in his election as representative 
to the General Assembly, he being one of the nine 
Democrats elected from the entire State to serve in the 
House that year. He still takes an interest in local 
affairs, aids in all movements tending to advance the 
common good, and is always ready to lend a hand to 
those in need of assistance, and is, moreover, a most 
public spirited, loyal citizen. His ability in political 
affairs was always respected during his active con- 
nection with politics, as his word was his bond. Mr. 
Battey is a charter member of Phenix Covenant Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Ashland, R. I., 
charter member Narragansett Lodge, No. 8, Knights 
of Pythias, Phenix, R. I. 

Mr. Battey married, in August, i860, Nancy Holden 
Matteson, daughter of Russell M. Matteson, of Cran- 
ston, R. I. Mrs. Battey died in May, 1909. Mr. and 
Mrs. Battey were the parents of a daughter, Mabel F., 
deceased, and of two sons: John .■\Ilen (2), and Wil- 
liam R. Battey, the latter a boot and shoe merchant of 
Hartford. Conn. 

John Allen (2) Battey, son of John Allen and Nancy 
Holden (Matteson) Battey, was born in Scituate, R. I., 
June 9, 1869. Like his honored father, he has taken an 
active interest in the public affairs of the town of 
Scituate, and has served the public as assessor of 
taxes, collector of taxes, 1908-09-1011, member of 
Town Council, president of that body several years, 
twice the elected Senator to represent Scituate, and as 
a representative to the General Assembly. Politically 
he is a Democrat, and attends the Baptist church. Has 
been chairman for many years of the Democratic Town 
Committee of Scituate. Mr. Battey is a member of 
Narragansett Lodge, No. 8, Knights of Pythias ; Phenix 
Covenant Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Ashland, R. I., and a charter member of Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, No. 1313, of .A.rctic. 

Mr. Battey married in June, 1909, Georgia Melita 
Sherman, of Providence, R. I., daughter of George 
Sherman (deceased) and Ruth (Tucker) Sherman. 
The latter resides in Providence. 



HENRY HARRIS DEXTER— The Dexter family 
has figured in Rhode Island life and affairs for a period 
of two hundred seventy years to such an extent that it 
would be impossible to compile a history of the early 
colony and State omitting the name. Rev. Gregory 
Dexter, eminently fitted by great natural gifts and by 



I 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



'6t 



training for a position of leadership in public circles and 
in the intellectual life of the struggling colony of which 
he was a spiritual guide for a quarter century, trans- 
mitted to his descendants not only his line capability as 
a man of large affairs and a public official, but also 
the prestige and vital influence which had already at- 
tached to the name in Rhode Island afTairs. The family 
has never relinquished its power, and is to-day among 
the foremost in the State. Numerous members of the 
family have attained fame in the professions, and in 
business, commercial and manufacturing fields. Dexter 
Asylum, of Providence, a noble institution for the un- 
fortunate poor, and the De.xter Training Grounds, are 
monuments to the name and family. Notable among the 
De.xters who have achieved fame in the arts was the 
late Henry Dexter, whose statue of General Warren 
adorns the Bunker Hill Monument. The line of an- 
cestry herein under consideration is that of Colonel 
Edward De.xter, a well known figure in official life in 
the State of Rhode Island in the opening decades of 
the nineteenth century, and of his son, Henry Harris 
Dexter. 

(I) Gregory Dexter, the .-Xmerican ancestor, was 
born at Olney, Northamptonshire, England, in 1610. 
He went early to London, where he became a printer 
and stationer, in which occupation he was engaged in 
partnership with a gentleman named Coleman, in 1643. 
Rev. Gregory Dexter was connected with the Baptist 
ministry at London, and was the friend and transatlantic 
correspondent of Roger Williams. In 1638 he was at 
Providence, where he had a lot assigned him. On 
July 27, 1640, he and tliirty-eight others signed an 
agreement for a form of government. He subsequently 
returned to London. When, in 1643, Roger Williams 
went to England to procure the first charter for the 
infant colony, he took with him the manuscript of his 
dictionary of the Indian language, and on the voyage 
arranged it for printing; in 1643, ^fi"- Dexter printed 
the first edition of the dictionary at London, a reprint 
of which now constitutes the first volume of the publi- 
cations of the Rhode Island Historical Society. On the 
return of Roger Williams with the charter in 1644, Mr. 
Dexter sold out his establishment in London, and came 
with his friend, Williams, to try his fortunes in the 
New World. Upon coming to Providence he was re- 
ceived there into the First Baptist Church, of which 
he subsequently became pastor. In a few years after 
his arrival in Providence he became active in public 
affairs. In 1651-52-53-54 he held the oflice of commis- 
sioner. In 1653-54 he served as president of the towns 
of Providence and W'arwick, at the same time filling 
the office of town clerk in Providence. In the subse- 
quent history of the colony the name of Rev. Gregory 
Dexter appears with great frequency. On the death of 
Rev. William Wickenden, February 13, 1669, Mr. Dex- 
ter succeeded him in the pastorate of the Providence 
church. While in this position, amid his other duties, 
he won the name of an effective, able, and successful 
preacher. Mr. Dexter was the first accomplished printer 
to come to the Rhode Island Colony, and although he 
did not pursue the occupation here, occasionally went 
to Boston, whtre he rendered assistance and advice in 
this field. He printed with his own hands the first 
almanac for the meridian of Rhode Island. The Rev. 
Gregory Dexter occupies a well defined place in liter- 



ature relating to the early colonial period. Dr. Stiles, 
former president of Yale University, describes him as 
a man of excellent education, possessed of handsome 
talents, who "* * * left his native land, and joined 
Williams at Providence, where he became a distin- 
guished character in the Colony." Morgan Edwards 
says of him: "Mr. De.xter, by all accounts, was not 
only a well-bred man but remarkably pious. He was 
never observed to laugh, seldom to smile, yet he was 
always a very pleasant, friendly and agreeable man. So 
earnest was he in his ministry that he could hardly 
forbear preaching when he came into a house or met 
with a concourse of people out of doors." Mr. Dexter 
married Abigail Fullerton, and they were the parents of 
five children. 

(II) Major John Dexter, son of Rev. Gregory and 
.Abigail (Fullerton) Dexter, was Imrn in Providence, 
R. I., November 6, 1652. In 1677 he became a freeman, 
and subsequently settled on lands owned by his lather, 
on what later became the Pawtucket turnpike, a little 
north of Harrington's lane, where he had a large farm. 
He figured notably in official and military affairs in 
Providence for several decades, filling the oflice of 
deputy in i68o-84-S5-86-<X)-94-y6-97-98-i700-oi-02-03-O4- 
05. In 1688-99-1700-01 he was a meiuber of the town 
council. In 1690-91 he was assistant. In the years 
1 699- 1 700-01 -02-03-04-05 he held the important office of 
major for the main land. In 1704-05 he was speaker 
of the House of Deputies. Major John Dexter died 
.A.pril 23, 1706. On February 16, 1688, he married Alice 
Smith, who was l)om in 1665. daughter of John and 
Sarah (Whipple) Smith. His widow married (sec- 
ond) in 1727, Hon. Joseph Jenckes, Governor of Rhode 
Island; she died Feb. 19, 1736. 

(HI) Stephen Dexter, son of Major John and Alice 
(Smith) Dexter, was born in Providence, R. I., on 
.•\pril 15, 1689, He became a freeman in 1712. and in 
1727 was elected a member of the General .Assembly. 
In 1727-29-31-32-33-34-3.1-36 he was a member of the 
town council, but after 1736 retired to private life. He 
was a prosperous farmer, and resided on the homestead 
of his father, a little north of the old North Burying 
Ground, on the east side of what was the Pawtucket 
turnpike. Stephen Dexter married Susanna Whipple, 
who was born .Xpril 14, i6<>3, and died December 15, 
daughter of Joseph and Alice (Smith) Whipple. He 
died in Providence, R. I., December 27, 1758. On 
February 26, 1759, administration on his estate was 
granted his widow, Susanna. 

(IV) Edward Dexter, son of Stephen and Susanna 
(Whipple) Dexter, was born in Providence, R. I., in 
1732. He erected a house near the former toll gate of 
the Pawtucket turnpike where he lived. Edward Dex- 
ter was a master mariner and followed the sea during 
the greater part of his life. He perished at sea in Janu- 
ary, 1770. He married Marcy Arnold, daughter of Jon- 
athan Arnold, who was born in Smithfield, R. I., in 1739. 

(V) Colonel Edward (2) Dexter, son of Edward (l) 
and Marcy (Arnold) Dexter, was born in 1760 on his 
father's farm on the Pawtucket turnpike, and here 
passed his youth. During the period of the .Xmcrican 
Revolution, General Lafayette and other officers of the 
Continental forces were quartered at different times at 
the homestead. With the famous Frenchman he became 
particularly intimate. Nearly fifty years after, 1824, the 



62 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



general met and recognized him in a crowd at Dedham. 
At the age of sixteen years young Dexter entered the 
counting house of Welcome Arnold, a well known mer- 
chant of the day, as a clerk. In 1791, having served 
an apprenticeship in every branch of the business and 
laid the foundations for his subsequent successful career, 
he left the employ of Welcome Arnold and established 
himself independently in business. For fifteen years he 
followed the seas, a portion of the time as manager of 
his own cargoes. In 1806, after having visited nearly 
every portion of the civilized world in the interests of 
his business. Colonel Dexter retired from active busi- 
ness on the seas, and returned to his home. He was 
thereafter engaged in mercantile pursuits in Providence 
and the vicinity until shortly before his death. In 181 1, 
when William Jones was elected governor of Rhode 
Island, Mr. Dexter was called from a company of 
cavalry to the post of aide on the governor's staff, 
with the rank of colonel — a position which he held until 
1817. when Governor Knight came into office. Colonel 
Dexter figured prominently in official, business, and 
legal life in Rhode Island in the early half of the nine- 
teenth century. In conjunction with his mercantile busi- 
ness, he carried on an extensive business in real estate, 
and acted often in the capacity of guardian, trustee, 
referee, and commissioner for others. He was well 
known in social and fraternal circles and eminently 
respected. He was keeply interested in genealogical 
research and Americana, and many of his collections, 
transmitted through descendants, form the basis of 
subsequent publications on the De.xter family. Colonel 
Dexter married (first) Abby Smith, daughter of Job 
Smith, of Providence, R. I., who was born in 1773. He 
married (second) Sarah Mumford, who was born in 
Providence, in 1781, daughter of John Mumford. 

(V'l) Henry Harris Dexter, son of Colonel Edward 
(2) and Abby (Smith) Dexter, was born in Providence, 
R. I., in the year 1801. He succeeded to a large portion 
of his father's landed estate, becoming owner of the 
homestead at Seekonk, which he made his home until 
his death. Mr. Dexter followed agricultural pursuits 
all his life, on a large scale. He was widely known and 
eminently respected in the country around Seekonk, 
and figured prominently in local affairs. 

Henry Harris Dexter married, on November 12, 
1828. Eunice Walker, who was born in Seekonk, Mass., 
in 1806, daughter of Timothy Walker. The homestead 
in which Mrs. Dexter was born and grew to young 
womanhood, known throughout Rhode Island as the 
"Timothy Walker Homestead," is of great historic in- 
terest as the oldest in the State. Mr. and Mrs. Dexter 
were the parents of the following children : i. Samuel 
Frederick, born in Gloucester, R. I., in 1829. 2. Sally 
Smith, born in Gloucester, in 1831. 3. John Mumford, 
born in Seekonk, Mass., in 1833. 4. Joseph Davis, born 
in Seekonk, 1835. 5. Edward, born in Providence, in 
1837. (^- Timothy Walker, born in Providence, in 1839. 
7. .Abby Smith, born in Seekonk, in 1842; Miss Dexter 
resides in East Providence, R. I. 8. Charles Henry, 
born in Seekonk, in 1843. 

Henry Harris Dexter died at his home on April 2, 
1868. 



council here, is a native of England, having been bom 
in the city of Leeds, in that country, June 10, 1866. He 
is a son of Robert and Jane (Youney) Bragg, who came 
from their native land to the United States when John 
Israel Bragg was about two and a half years of age. 
They settled at Olneyville in this State where the elder 
Mr. Bragg started the present manufacturing business 
in 1870 or 1871. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 
The childhood of Mr. Bragg was passed in his adopted 
city of Providence, and it was here that he received 
his education, attending for this purpose the Jencks- 
Morin School on Academy street, as well as the public 
schools of the city. 

Upon completing his studies at these institutions, he 
secured employment at the Riverside Mills, in Rhode 
Island, and after working there for some years became 
associated, in 1886, with his father in the latter's manu- 
facturing enterprise. This business, which consists of 
the manufacure of machine wool combs, is a compar- 
atively rare one in the United States, there being only 
about one hundred men employed therein in the whole 
country. Since the death of the elder Mr. Bragg, the 
son has taken complete control of the enterprise and 
is now doing a large and substantial business here. 
During ordinary times the factory employs about seven 
hands, but during the war as many as ten were given 
employment The concern supplies over sixty of the 
large woolen mills with its product and the whole enter- 
prise is an exceedingly remunerative one. In addition 
to this business, Mr. Bragg has taken a very active 
part in local public affairs and is one of the leaders of 
the Republican party in this city. As a young man he 
served as supervisor of elections in the ward, and in the 
month of November, 1918, was elected to the Provi- 
dence city council. He is still serving on this body and 
has already proved himself an able and conscientious 
public servant. He is a member of the committees on 
accounts and comfort stations. Mr. Bragg is a prom- 
inent figure in fraternal and social circles in this city 
and is affiliated with Nestell Lodge, .Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and Providence Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons. He is also a member of the local lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has held prac- 
tically every office in the gift of this lodge, being at 
present past noble grand. 

John Israel Bragg was united in marriage November 
16, 1890, at Providence, with Elizabeth Alice Holden, 
daughter of William and Mary Holden, of this city. 
Mr. Bragg has three sisters living in Providence: Mrs. 
Jane Ann Knight, Mrs. Martha Elizabeth Congdon, 
and Mrs. Blanche Louise Anderson. 



JOHN ISRAEL BRAGG, the well known manu- 
facturer of Providence, R. I., and a member of the city 



CORNELIUS JANSEN HASBROUCK, one of 
the leading physicians of Bristol, R. I., and a prominent 
figure in the general life of the city, is a native of 
Alligerville, Ulster county, N. Y., where he was bom 
March 30, 1852. Dr. Hasbrouck is a son of Lewis B. 
and Rachel (Jansen) Hasbrouck, the former a native 
of High Falls. N. Y., where he was bom in 1809, and 
died in 1876, and the latter of Rochester, N. Y., where 
she was born in 181 5 and died in 1880. He is a member 
of an old New York State family, originally of French 
Huguenot ancestry. The childhood of Dr. Hasbrouck 
was spent in Ulster county, and it was there that he 
received the preliminary portion of his education, attend- 





'^^ZJ^^-,^^^ y^ r ></' 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



63 



ing the local grammar school and later the New Taltz 
Academy, wliere he was prepared for college. He then 
entered the medical department of Union College at 
Albany, N. Y., and was graduated from that institu- 
tion with the class of 1874, receiving his degree of 
Doctor of Medicine at the same time. He began the 
practice of his profession at Shokan, N. Y.. in the 
Catskill Mountains, and continued at that place for 
about live years. He then removed to Valitia. N. Y., 
and remained there for a similar period, after which he 
spent two years in practice in New York City, and took 
a post-graduate course at the Post Graduate School of 
New York City. In the year 1888, he came to Bristol 
where he established himself in practice and has been 
actively engaged therein ever since that time. He has 
made an enviable position for himself in the medical 
circles of the State and at the present time is tlie oldest 
practicing physician in Bristol and one of the oldest, if 
not the oldest in the State. He maintains his home and 
office at No. 117 State street, Bristol, R. I., and is well 
known throughout the community. Dr. Hasbrouck has 
been very active in local public affairs and has served 
as a member of the town council of Bristol for two 
years and for three years on the school committee. He 
is a member and past president of the Homeopathic 
Medical Society of Rhode Island, and during his college 
course was president of his graduating class. Dr. Has- 
brouck finds his principal recreation in medical re- 
search and is very much interested in the study of his 
chosen science. 

Dr. Hasbrouck married, October 14. 1874, at North 
Chatham. N. Y., Sarah Penoyar, daughter of George 
and Gertrude M. (Rowe) Penoyar, the former a native 
of Milan, Dutchess county, N. Y., where he was en- 
gaged in farming for many years, and later of North 
Chatham. To Dr. and Mrs. Hasbrouck one child has 
been born, Gertrude M., April 10, 1876, a graduate of 
Smith College with the class of 1899, where she received 
her degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



serves as secretary and treasurer. His early and long 
continued connection has been prolific of result, and to 
his inventive genius the Hope Pantograph group of 
machines owes several of its important numbers. In 
IQIS he was granted letters patent by the United States, 
England and France, for a universal pantograph ma- 
chine, which works at any diminution up to seven times 
and will enlarge up to twenty-five per cent. Later he 
patented a machine for engraving twelve foot rug rolls, 
tracing on the roll directly from the original design; 
these rolls weighing one and one-half ton. Four other 
patents are pending which will still further add to the 
laurels he has already won as inventor of useful ma- 
chinery. Mr. Hope has always given close attention to 
the business, but finds recreation in good books. He is 
a persistent worker, a legacy from his honored father, 
and like all else that emanated from John Hope, is given 
due importance by his sons who are proud of the name 
they bear, a name honored in both the United States 
and England by all textile printers. Father and son 
are examples of public spirit and all have won honor- 
able position as business men and citizens. 



WILLIAM H. HOPE— The engraving of copper 
rolls for printing calicos is a business handed down in 
the Hope family for more than a century, the sons 
becoming apprentices to their father, and in turn trans- 
mitting their art to their children. This was true under 
the old hand-engraving regime, and has prevailed since 
the invention of the Pantograph Roll-F-ngraving Ma- 
chine by John Hope, of Providence, he teaching the 
business to his sons in all its detail. The John Hope 
& Sons Engraving and Manufacturing Company, built 
upon the Hope inventive skill and genius, is now man- 
aged by his sons, Charles H. Hope, president, being of 
extended mention in this work, and William H. Hope, 
secretary and treasurer, the principal subject of this 
review. Both of these sons were born during the few 
years residence of their parents in England, 1860-1866. 

William H. Hope, son of John and Emma (Cordwell) 
Hope, was born in Manchester, England, May m, 1863, 
but in 1866 his parents returned to their Providence 
home, where William H. was educated in the public 
school, Mowry & Goff English and Classical Academy, 
and Schofield Business College. At the age of seven- 
teen he began his apprenticeship with his father, and in 
the plant mastered every detail of the business he now 



WILLIAM FRANCIS SULLIVAN, M. D.— When 
but seventeen years of age. Dr. Sullivan entered medical 
college, and upon arriving at legal age he was invested 
with his degree, and from that year has been engaged 
in professional work in the city of Providence, R. I. 
He is well known as one of the rising physicians of the 
city, young in years, but a veteran in practice and pro- 
fessional experience. He is a son of Thomas and .\nnie 
E. (McGovern) Sullivan, his father now deceased, a 
long time foreman in the employ of the United States 
Rubber Manufacturing Company. His widow, .\nnie 
E. Sullivan, is a resident of Millsville. Mass., the fam- 
ily home for many years, and there Thomas L. and 
.\nnie L., children of Thomas and Annie E. Sullivan, 
yet reside. 

William Francis Sullivan was born in Melville, 
Mass., November i, 1886, and there attended public 
schools, finishing the high school course with graduation, 
class of 1903. Choosing the medical profession, he en- 
tered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Balti- 
more, Md., there pursuing study until graduated M. D., 
class of igoQ. After graduation he located in Provi- 
dence, R. I., becoming an interne at St. Joseph's Hos- 
pital, a position he held for fourteen months when he 
resigned, and until iQio devoted himself to study and 
recreation. His years of preparation have been constant 
and laborious, and on the threshold of his private prac- 
tice he took his first real vacation since boyhood. In 
1910 he began practice in Providence and so continues, 
a general practitioner with offices at No. 752 North 
Main street. He has won honorable position in his 
profession, has a good practice, and a wide circle of 
friends. He is a member of the Rhode Island Medical 
and Providence Medical societies, the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and The Order of Antlers, acting as medical ex- 
aminer of the last named. He is a member of the 
Roman Catholic church. Cathedral Parish, and in pol- 
itico is a Democrat. 

Dr. Sullivan married. September 18, 1903, Alice Mc- 
Court, of Rumford, Mass., and they are the parents of 
three children: .Alice F., Walter T., and Robert G. 



64 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



BENJAMIN STANTON CARPENTER, one of 
the best known and most successful merchants of 
Belleville, R. I., and a very prominent and influential 
citizen here, is a member of an old and distinguished 
New England family. He is a son of Benjamin and 
Sarah (Hazard) Carpenter, and a grandson of Benja- 
min Carpenter. His mother was a daughter of Thomas 
and Sarah Hazard, who were also representatives of 
well known families in this region. Mr. Carpenter's 
father was a native of Matunuck. in South Kingstown, 
and attended the local district schools during his child- 
hood. He later became the keeper of a store in that 
region and was very successful. He had remarkable 
native abilities as a trader and dealt in many different 
kinds of commodities, including land and real estate, 
stock, and sheep, etc. He purchased a fine farm at 
South Kingstown, which he operated for a number of 
years, although he began work as a farmer at Point 
Judith Pond on Great Island. He made frequent busi- 
ness trips to the mainland, crossing the strip of water 
between the island and the State, by means of a skiff, 
afterwards riding on horseback to his destination. He 
was a selectman at South Kingstown for many years 
after coming to reside here and was very prominent 
in all the town affairs. He was a Democrat in politics 
and was well known in connection with the activities 
of his party. He became very prosperous in this region 
and later bought the old Hazard property at Perryville, 
in the township of South Kingstown, and there made his 
home during the remainder of his life. He married 
Sarah Hazard and they were the parents of nine child- 
ren as follows: Ellis M. ; Thomas, deceased; Wanton, 
who resides at Perryville and is the owner of the first 
hotel at Matunuck, which he erected on a part of the 
old homestead property; George, who resides at North 
Kingstown ; Benjamin, with whose career we are here 
especially concerned; Susan, deceased; Sarah, deceased; 
Elisha. who now resides at Westerly ; Kate, who became 
the wife of Mr. A. H. Bliss, a manufacturer of jewelry 
at North Attleboro. 

Benjamin Stanton Carpenter was born February i6. 
1843. at South Kingstown, on the farm which his father 
had purchased there some years prior to that event, and 
here his childhood was spent. He attended the district 
schools of South Kingstown and later studied for a 
short time at Hopkinton .Academy. During his vaca- 
tion and other spare hours from school, he assisted his 
father both on the farm and in the store which the elder 
man conducted in this region, and continued thus oc- 
cupied until he had attained his majority. The money 
for his schooling was saved up by Mr. Carpenter, him- 
self, from his earnings as a farmer's assistant in this 
region. Upon completing his studies and becoming of 
age, Mr. Carpenter rented a farm in the immediate 
neighborhood of his father's old place, but a year later 
left this property and went to the town of Hopkinton, 
where he hired a store in the village of Woodville, and 
operated it successfully for some two years. He then 
came to Belleville, and later to Providence, where he 
hired a building and operated a store for a number of 
years, situated on Potters avenue and Eddy street. He 
later returned, in 1875, to Belleville, where he pur- 
chased a valuable plot of land upon which he built a 
modern store, and also made his home there. Mr. 



Carpenter has since that time built up a large and suc- 
cessful general store business here and has greatly 
e.xpanded his original enterprise. He has purchased the 
old store property at his first location here and also 
developed that as a branch of his main establishment. 
Mr. Carpenter deals in provisions, fuel, grain, etc., and 
has a large market for his goods throughout the sur- 
rounding district Mr. Carpenter is a Democrat in 
politics and although he has never aspired to public 
office, he has nevertheless allowed himself to be per- 
suaded to become the candidate of his party for the 
position of assessor of taxes. He was successfully 
elected and held this most responsible and difficult posi- 
tion very efficiently for a number of years. Grover 
Cleveland, upon being elected President of the United 
States, appointed Mr. Carpenter postmaster of Belleville 
and during the four years that followed, he did much 
to develop and improve that important department here. 
Although Mr. Carpenter is a very quiet and retiring 
man, who finds his chief pleasure in his home life, he is 
well known and highly esteemed by his fellow citizens 
generally, and holds a prominent place in the business 
life and public affairs of the community. He is a man 
of keen insight, and his advice is often sought for by 
young men engaged in business enterprises here. He 
is a delightful companion and is ever ready with an 
appropriate story for every occasion and possesses a 
remarkably quick wit. His code of ethics is of the 
highest both in business and in every other relation of 
life, and his reputation for honesty and square dealing, 
is second to none in the community. 

Benjamin Stanton Carpenter was united in marriage 
on March 14, 1867, at Westerly, with Mary Anna Sher- 
man, daughter of John P. and Catherine (Holly) Sher- 
man. Mrs. Carpenter died in the year 



CHARLES HENRY KERNAN— Since 1909 Mr. 
Kernan has practiced at the Rhode Island bar. He is 
a son of Felix H. and Mary F. Kernan. He was born 
in Warwick, R. I., May 22, 1882, and was educated in 
public and private schools of Providence, finishing with 
a course at the Rhode Island Commercial School. He 
became a student of the law under the direction of his 
uncle, Patrick H. Quinn, and on November 6, 1909, 
was admitted to the Rhode Island bar. He is a member 
of the Rhode Island Bar Association. He is a Democrat 
in politics, was the first town solicitor of the town of 
West Warwick, and served on the school committee of 
the town of Warwick. Mr. Kernan married, July 12, 
191 1, Winifred M. McCusker, of Pheni.x, R. I. They 
have three children : Mary W., Edward F., and 
Louise C. 



WILLIAM JAMES ARNOLD— After a busy and 
successful business life William James Arnold has re- 
tired and interests himself in beautifying the old estate 
upon which he lives and which he has made one of the 
show places of the region. He was born June 26, 1842, 
in New York City, a son of William Utter Arnold, who 
was a native of Providence, having been born on 
Westminster and Union streets, now a busy business 
section. As a boy he used to play ball on Mathewson 
street. William Utter Arnold was apprenticed when a 
youth in the cotton mills, and afterwards worked his 





2^^^^^^^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



way up through a number of positions to that of man- 
ager. He developed a special ability in the takiui; over 
of old and deteriorated mills, reorganizini; and refitting 
them anil putting them finally on a paying basis. He 
later moved to \cw York, and invested in the leather 
manufacturing business, which he sold at a later period, 
and returned to the old .Arnold homestead at Lake- 
wood. R. I. The grandfather of William James .Arnold 
was a James Utler .Arnold, who married a Miss Car- 
penter, and he in his turn was the son of George and 
Ruth (Utter) Arnold, Ruth Utter having been descended 
from William Utter, the first of the family in Rhode 
Island. 

William James Arnold was brought by his parents 
from New York City, at the age of seven, to the old 
homestead of the Arnolds and here he spent his child- 
hood. He went to the local schools of Spring Creen, 
and to the Evans and Stevens private school, on Pine 
street. Providence, R. I. School work was interrupted 
for a time by an opportunity of a business character. 
Then he came back to school, attending the Lyons 
school on College street. It was while he was here at 
school that he enlisted in the First Light Infantry, was 
selected in the Second Company and went into military 
training. It was a tragic happening for the enthusiastic 
youth when he was stricken down with pneumonia, and 
by the desperate illness that followed and which pros- 
trated him for nine months he was prevented from 
going with his companions into service at the front. 
This has always been a matter of keen regret and a 
bitter disappointment which has left a lifelong scar. 

He bore his disappointment with true American pluck 
and took the work at hand and threw himself into it 
with a characteristic energy. The first chance he had 
was a position in a grocery store in Providence, and he 
kept this while his mind reached out to the time when 
he could learn the machinist's trade. He finally was 
apprenticed to the firm of Le Valley & Lamphier Com- 
pany of Phenix, R. I., and here he served out his full 
time and became an expert machinist. An opportunity 
came to him soon after this to work for the New York 
Steam Engine Company as a machinist, and he went 
to New York and remained with them for several years. 
There is often a strong pull for a man from the place 
in which he has spent his childhood and to which he 
feels that he belongs. Something like this brought Mr. 
Arnold back to Rhode Island, and he came to Provi- 
dence where he established a planing mill on Fountain 
street opposite the old Hoyle Tavern. This business he 
carried on until 1892 with excellent success, but having 
now reached the age of fifty he felt that he had earned 
the right to retire and indulge his inborn love of a 
country life. He had accumulated a substantial amount 
of Providence property, and feeling that the future was 
provided for he looked about for a site for a country 
home. He found an old abandoned farm with many 
possibilities on the Warwick road in Buttonwoods and 
located on the Tuscatucket river, at the point where the 
remains of an old Indian trail crossed the river. This 
beautiful stream runs through the farm, and it required 
only an artistic imagination and a little engineering to 
convert the stream into a lake dotted with wooded 
islands, and partially inclosing the house. Here, set on 
high grounds sloping to the water, the house stands 

R 1-2-5 



and watches its mirrored reflection. Although all the 
modern comforts were added to the house, a fine taste 
retained all the ancient beauties of the building, and the 
result has been a place which keeps all the old world 
charm of an ancestral home in a setting of wonderful 
loveliness. The old New England atmosphere is re- 
tained and the many out-buildings are painted white in 
Colonial fashion. .^ charming little bungalow studio 
is situated in a grove that borders on the lake which is 
the special sanctum of a daughter who is an artist. The 
whole forms a unique and arresting picture of tran- 
quil country beauty and domestic happiness, Mr. 
.\rnold is a member of Old Providence J. W. Tilling- 
liast Fire Department, No. 9, and for ten years has been 
first hoseman. He is a Republican in his political affi- 
liations. 

Mr. Arnold married, December 20, 1868, .\bby Frances 
Stone, daughter of Daniel J. and Harriet E. (Chase) 
Stone, both of them natives of Prudence Island. Daniel 
J. Stone is a descendant of Samuel (Norton and Abby 
Frances (Stone) Arnold, and is the seventh in descent 
from Samuel Gorton. Mr. .Arnold has one daughter, 
Hetty Frances, whose life is devoted to the practice of 
the art of painting. 



GEORGE P. CLARK, a successful and prominent 
manufacturer of Shannock, R. I., and a well known 
citizen there, is a member of an old and highly respected 
family which has been identified with affairs of this 
State since early Colonial times. Mr. Clark is a de- 
scendant in the twelfth generation from John Clark who 
founded this branch of the family in Rhode Island. 

(I) John Clark, a native of England, resided in that 
country during his entire life and was buried there in 
the year 1559. 

(II) John (2) Clark, son of John (i) Clark, was 
born in England in February, 1541, and was buried 
there .'Xpril 7, 1598. 

(III) Thomas Clark, son of John (2) Clark, was 
bom on All Staints' Day, November, 1570, and died 
July 27, 1627. He was the father of four sons: Dr. 
John; Thomas; Joseph; and Carew. 

(I\') Joseph Clark, son of Thomas Clark, was born 
in England, December 9, 1618, and died June I, 1694. 
His brother. Dr. John Clark, was the author of the 
Charter of 1663 from King Charles II., and was assisted 
in the framing of this document by Joseph Clark (1618- 
1694). 

(Y) Joseph (2) Clark, son of Joseph (i) Clark, was 
born in 1643, and removed to Westerly, R. I., where he 
died January 11, 1726. He was the father of five 
sons: William; Samuel; Thomas; Joseph; and John. 

(VI) William Clark, eldest son of Joseph (2) Clark, 
was one of the first settlers of Richmond township. He 
was born May ij, 1670, at Newport, R. I., and his 
death occurred at Richmond, February 28, 1767, at the 
advanced age of ninety-six. He was the father of the 
following children: William; Thomas; Jonathan; 
Caleb; Rebecca; and Elisha. 

(VII) William (2) Clark, son of William (i> Clark, 
\\as born in 1702 at Newport, and accompanied his 
parents to Richmond, where he resided during the re- 
mainder of his life, and died March 28, 1786. He was 
one of the most prominent men of his town, and was 



66 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



elected town clerk of Richmond, June 6, 17^9. He was 
elected as representative from Richmond in the General 
Assembly of the State in 175C. He was the father of 
six sons: James; William; Gideon; Joshua; Peter; 
and Weeden. 

(VIII) Joshua Clark, son of William (2) Clark, was 
bom at Richmond, and was the first of the name to 
come to Shannock, R. I., where the majority of his 
descendants still reside. In 1771, he purchased a tract 
of land with water privilege, at Shannock. This priv- 
ilege has been owned and utilized by his descendants 
ever since that time, and it is now operated by his 
great-grandson, George H. Clark, and his great-great- 
grandson, George P. Clark, of this sketch. Joshua 
Clark was married February 26. 1769, to Elizabeth 
Dodge. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Rouse, horn Dec. 7, 1769; Elizabeth, born Oct. 17, 
1771 ; William, born April 8, 1773; Joseph, twin of Wil- 
liam, married Joanna Tifft; Joshua, born Jan. 22, 1775, 
and died Sept. 19, 1787; Wells, born Feb. 15, 1777; 
Susannah, born Jan. 10, 1779; Perry, of whom fur- 
ther; Hazard, born May 20, 1783; Luke, born Aug. 

15. '785. and married Sarah Tifft; Mary, born July 10. 
1787; Joshua (2), born June 28, 1790. 

(IX) Perry Clark, son of Joshua Clark, was born 
November 21, 1780, at Richmond, R. I., and was a prom- 
inent man in Shannock for many years. It was he that 
built and operated for a number of years at this place 
the grist mill and the old saw mill, equipped with the 
old fashioned overshot water-wheel. It gives a picture 
of the old time to recall that once a week he took his 
products to market behind a team of horses, usually 
making his sales at Newport, and sometimes at Provi- 
dence. It was he who built, also, the first store at 
Shannock. He carried on a business large for those 
days, and was well known and highly esteemed in the 
community. He died July 24, 1835. He married, April 

16, 1815, Penelope Perry, who was born May 2, 1784, 
and died March 19, 1875, at the venerable age of one 
hundred one years. They were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Perry, born Feb. 17, 1816, married 
Penelope Dodge, Sept. 13, 1837; Charles, born Jan. 23, 
1818, died May 9, 1870, and married Mary Clarke; 
Simeon P., mentioned further in the te.xt; Mary, born 
Dec. 10, 1821 ; and Penelope Congdon, born Feb. 27, 
1825. 

(X) Simeon P. Clark, son of Perry and Penelope 
(Perry) Clark, was born at Clark's Mill, R. I., Feb- 
ruary 19, 1820. As a lad he attended Bacon Academy at 
Colchester, Conn., and when he was fifteen years old, 
he succeeded to his father's business in association with 
his brother, Charles. He took, also, the position of 
bookkeeper for R. G. Hazard, who operated the mills 
at Carolina at that time. In 1849, with this same 
brother, Charles, he erected a mill in this region, and 
m 1856 engaged in the manufacture of cotton yarn. 
This old mill is still standing and is to-day operated by 
his son and grandson. His partnership with his brother 
was finally dissolved by the death of the latter in 1870, 
after which Simeon P, Clark became the sole proprietor 
of the mill and continued in active management of the 
same until 1885, when he sold it to his son, George H. 
Clark. Simeon P. Clark was a prominent figure in the 
early development of the industrial interests of the 



community, and was a most active, capable, and enter- 
prising man. Mr. Clark, while possessing strong anti- 
slavery convictions, took no part in the violent contro- 
versy of that period and throughout his life he felt a 
strong dislike for politics. He was a man of phil- 
osophic mind, and his chief pleasures were those to be 
found in contemplation and reflection, especially in the 
realm of religious problems. For a time he was a 
member of the Baptist church, but later joined the 
Advent Christians and remained a member of that 
church until his death, December 4, 1S87. His business 
talents were of an exceptional character and he enjoyed 
a universal reputation for integrity throughout the com- 
munity where his operations were carried on. Novem- 
ber 8, 1843. he married Catherine Perry, a native of 
South Kingstown, born in 1819, and a daughter of 
Walter Perry of that place, and a direct descendant of 
the Oliver Hazard Perry family. She died February 
22, 1897. They were the parents of the following child- 
ren : George Herbert, of further mention; Catherine 
Perry, born Aug. 7, 1848, now deceased; Nellie Aug- 
usta, born March 25, 1850, wife of George Carmichael, 
of Shannock; Julia Wells, born in Shannock, Nov. 23, 
1854; and Harriet Sumner, born April 22, 1856, and died 
April II, 1874. 

(XI) George Herbert Clark, the eldest son of Sim- 
eon P. and Catherine ( Perry) Clark, was born .\ugust 
6, 1847, at Carolina, R. I. His childhood was spent 
at Shannock. He received his education at East Green- 
wich .\cademy and later at the Scholfield Commercial 
College at Providence. When he was eighteen vears of 
age, he associated himself with his father's business, 
and in 18S5 he purchased the old mill and engaged in 
the manufacture of cotton yarn. Mr. Clark was one of 
the organizers of the Columbia Narrow Fabrics Com- 
pany, January, 1901, manufacturers of silk elastic web- 
bing. This concern was incorporated with Mr. Clark as 
president, his son, George Perry Clark, as treasurer and 
general manager, and Henry G. Clark, secretary. This 
business was first carried on at Providence, but after a 
year was removed to Shannock, where it is still located. 
In addition to his extensive business interests, Mr. Clark 
participated actively in the public affairs of Shannock. 
For many years he served as assessor of the town of 
Richmond. He was a staunch Republican and was highly 
regarded by his townsmen as a public spirited member 
of the community. December 26, 1877, Mr. Clark, mar- 
ried Celia E. Carr, of Jamestown, a daughter of Pcleg C. 
and Catherine (Weeden) Carr. They were the parents 
of the following children : George Perry, with whose 
career we are especially concerned here ; Harriet Sum- 
ner, a graduate of Smith College; Henry Garfield, a 
graduate of the Westerly High School, and of Brown 
University, formerly chairman of the school committee 
of Richmond, being the youngest official who has served 
in that capacity at the time of his election, in this State; 
Florence, a graduate of Wellesley College with the 
class of 1907. 

(XII) George Perry Clark, the eldest son of George 
Herbert and Celia E. (Carr) Clark, was born January 
13. 1879. He attended the Westerly High School, an<l 
completed a commercial course at the East Greenwich 
.\cadcmy. East Greenwich, R. I. In January, 1901, he 
became the treasurer of the Columbia Narrow Fabrics 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



67 



Company, and at once devoted himself to mastering the 
manufacturing, marketing and financing of this business. 
So well did he succeed, that in 1903, one year after the 
removal of the plant to Shannock, he became general 
manager in addition to his duties as treasurer. Both of 
these positions he fills at the present lime. The business 
has developed rapidly for quality is the main reliance for 
a reputation which is very well established. Mr. Clark 
devotes his entire time to this business. In national 
politics, Mr. Clark is a Republican. He is a member 
of the Charity Lodge, Free and .Accepted Masons, Hope 
Valley, R. I.; and a member of the Colonial Club, 
Westerly. On April 26, 1911, George P. Clark married 
Anne Mary O'Neil, of Pawcatuck, Conn., daughter of 
Eugene and Sarah (Mahon) O'Ncil. 



ARCHIBALD W. HUGHES, M. D.— Among the 
rising young physicians of Rhode Island, Dr. Hughes 
takes leading rank, his practice and the home which he 
has built in the village of Esmond being worthy of a 
much older professional man. He is a son of James 
E. and .-\nnie Hughes, of England, the former a resi- 
dent of Esmond, and the mother deceased. 

Archibald W. Hughes was born in Lancashire, Eng- 
land, on Christmas Day, 1882, and there spent the 
first ten years of his life. He attended the public 
school in England until 1892, when he was brought to 
the United States by his parents. They located in the 
city of Providence, where the lad, Archibald, attended 
the public schools, completing the full course with 
graduation from the Technical High School. He then 
entered Tuft's Medical School, whence he was grad- 
uated M. D., class of 1906, going thence as interne to 
the State Sanitorium, at Rutland. Mass. One year 
later, he was placed in charge of Pine Ridge Camp for 
Consumptives at Scituate, R. I., there remaining one 
year with marked success. In the fall of 1908, he located 
in offices at Greenville, and there practiced his pro- 
fession for about one year. He then moved to Esmond 
where he won high reputation as a physician of skill 
and honor, his large practice reflecting the confidence 
and esteem in which he is held by his community. He 
is a member of the American Medical Association, the 
Rhode Island Medical Society, and the Providence Med- 
ical Society. 

Dr. Hughes married in Greenville, R. I., November 
30, 1914, Mary M. Steere, daughter of Elisha A. and 
Phoebe O. (Mathewson) Steere, her father a farmer of 
Greenville. 



FRANK D. ALMY — More than a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago the Almy Water Tube Boiler was patented by 
Darwin Almy and the corporation formed to manu- 
facture what was then an innovation in boilers. The 
corporation is known as the Almy Water Tube Boiler 
Company, of which Frank D. Almy, of Providence, is 
now the executive head. The two men, DarwMn and 
Frank D. Almy, were cousins, and both in the employ 
of the Herreshoflf Manufacturing Company, of Bristol, 
Darwin Almy being the superintendent and Frank D. 
Almy, a marine engineer. The Almy W'ater Tube 
Boiler Company was formed in 1889, Darwin Almy 
being president during the years 1889-1917, and when he 
died was succeeded by Frank D. Almy, who as super- 



intendent has been an active factor in building up the 
successful business of which he is now the capable 
head. 

Frank D. Almy is a son of Samuel Elam (2) and 
Cynthia ftllen (Delano) Almy, the former having been 
born July 27, 1838, and having been a farmer at Tiver- 
ton all his life, dying in that place, September 14, 1912. 
He was a son of Samuel Elam (i) Almy, who was born 
February 18, 1800. died August 18, 1889, and was a son 
of Cook Almy. Cook .Mmy was the son of John Almy, 
and was born September 27, 1765, and died February 25, 
1861. John Almy, the son of Job (2) and Bridget (San- 
ford) Almy, was born .-Xpril 18, 1720, and died .April 20, 
1808. Bridget (Sanford) Almy was a granddaughter on 
the maternal side of Governor William Coddington. Job 
(2) Almy was a son of Job (l) Almy, and was born 
March 3, 1681, and died January 28, 1767. Job (i) Almy, 
born in 1640, died in 1684, was a son of William Almy, 
born in 1601, and died in 1676, who came to Lynn, 
Mass., not later than 1631. He returned to England, 
but came again on the ship "Abigail" in 1635, with his 
wife, Audry (Almond) Almy, and their two children. 
He moved to Sandwich, Mass., in 1637, to Portsmouth, 
R. I., in 1641, and died there in 1676. 

Frank D. Almy, of the seventh American generation, 
was born at Tiverton, R. I., June 4, 1865, and until nine- 
teen years of age was his father's farm assistant. He 
attended the public schools, and continued to reside at 
the home farm until 1885, and then became an em- 
ployee of the boiler department of the Herreshoff Man- 
ufacturing Company, of Bristol, R. I., a cousin of 
Frank D. Almy, Darwin Almy, being the foreman of 
the department. While working in that department, 
the young man was sent to assist in installing boilers 
and engines on board vessels, and also accompanied 
vessels on trial trips. In this way he became deeply 
interested in the subject of boilers, and began to qualify 
for a position as a marine engineer. He obtained a 
government license as such in 1887 and did not take 
a position elsewhere, continuing with the HerrcshofT 
Manufacturing Company for two years, 1887-1889. He 
then joined with Darwin Almy in the organization of 
the Almy Water Tube Boiler Company to manufacture 
the invention of Darwin Almy. The corporation known 
as the Almy Water Tube Boiler Company began manu- 
facturing, September I, 1889, although the patent for 
the boiler was not granted until the spring of 1890. 

Water tube boilers met with a good deal of opposi- 
tion, and the .*\lmy plant had no easy task in establish- 
ing the soundness of the theory upon which their 
boilers were built, and after that was done to prove the 
superior quality of the Almy boiler. Darwin .Mmy, 
as president, and Frank D. Almy as superintendent 
bent their every energy to the upbuilding of a business 
based on quality of product, and into every boiler wove 
the Almy quality, which they rated above every other 
consideration. Their success was great and there is no 
manufacturing business in Rhode Island which rests 
upon a more secure foundation. In 1017 Darwin .Almy 
died, and was succeeded in the presidency by Frank 
D. Almy. Mr. Almy is a thoroughly practical manu- 
facturer and knows how markets are gained and are 
retained, and never loses sight of the fact that buyers 
are only held to a brand of manufactured goods by 



68 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



one consideration, self-interest. Hence, he expects to 
hold his markets by maintaining a quality no rival can 
surpass, and this plan of campaign he invariably carries 
out to the letter. He is a member of the Providence 
Engineering Society, of What Cheer Lodge, No. 21, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and in politics is a Repub- 
lican. 

Mr. Almy married. June l8, 1867, Julia May Luce, 
of Bristol, R. L. and two sons have been born to them: 

1. Samuel Elam, now lieutenant (J. G.) Reserve Force, 
United States Navy, engaged in overseas duty. He has 
been once the victim of the German submarine, but 
escaped with his life, although the ship was destroyed. 
He married Catherine Matheson, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2. Albert S.. who is a chemist, now employed in that 
capacity by the Industrial Engineering Company, of 
Salt Lake City, Utah. Mrs. Almy died January I, 1900. 



WILLIAM ROSCOE POTTER— One of the re- 
sults of the selection of a farmer legislator from Cov- 
entry to the Rhode Island General Assembly was the 
passage of an act relative to the licensing and bonding 
of persons engaged in the sale of milk in the State of 
Rhode Island. This act, introduced by William Roscoe 
Potter, and passed at the January session of the Gen- 
eral .'Vssembly in 1918, is of great value both to milk 
producers and users, modeled along the same lines as 
bills which are in force in the States of New York and 
New Hampshire. Dairy farming is Mr. Potter's pet 
occupation, business or hobby, if you please, and the 
product of his fine herd of Holsteins is his pride. The 
bill which bears his name is for the protection of the 
honorable producer and dealer, and if enforced will 
prevent adulteration and fraud practices which have en- 
dangered branches of farm industry into disrepute. Such 
has been Mr. Potter's public service as a State legislator 
since his election to the Assembly in 1916, but from 
youthful manhood he has been interested in public 
affairs and in town offices. He is now a resident of 
Greene, R. I., having purchased a farm there, but he 
was born at the old Potter homestead in Summit, and 
at Bowen's Hill taught school one year in the same 
school in which his mother taught prior to her mar- 
riage to James J. Potter. He is also the owner of 
the old Potter homestead farm in Coventry, near Hop- 
kins Hollow, near the Connecticut-Rhode Island State 
line, where James J. Potter resided for several years 
prior to his death, returning to the old home after 
nearly a lifetime spent in the State of Connecticut. 

Daniel D. Potter, grandfather of William R. Potter, 
first located upon the homestead which he purchased 
from the fruits of his trading trips with horse and 
wagon. He prospered and the old farm which he 
bought from the Westcott family, when he had scarcely 
a dollar and no property save the horse and wagon 
used in his business, was added to, until it consisted 
of 3300 acres at the time of his death. Daniel D. 
Potter married Phoebe Johnson, the Potters and John- 
sons, both old Rhode Island families. 

James J. Potter, son of Daniel D. and Phoebe (John- 
son) Potter, was born at the old Potter homestead near 
Hopkins Hollow, on the Connecticut State line, in 
Coventry, R. I., and there spent the greater part of his 



adult life, a farmer, but late in life returned to the 
homestead, and there died July 25, 1909. He was a man 
of industrious and upright life, a selectman in his Con- 
necticut home, a Democrat in politics, and highly es- 
teemed by his community. He married (first) Emma 
Capwell, who died, leaving a son, Irving L. Potter, now 
a resident of Oneco, Conn. He married (second) 
Josephine Potter, who died in 1895, daughter of Jason 
Potter, leaving a son, William Roscoe Potter, whose 
useful life is the inspiration of this review. He married 
(third) Elizabeth Wood, who survives him and resides 
in Providence. 

William Roscoe Potter, only child of James J. Potter 
and his second wife, Josephine Potter, was bom at the 
Potter Farm, which he now owns, at Summit, R. I., 
.•\pril I, 1879. He was educated in Coventry public 
schools, and at Moosup High School, his studies being 
terminated by a severe illness which prevented gradu- 
ation. He taught the Bowen's Hill public school for 
one year, and the next year he presided over the 
Cranberry Hill School, that position being his last as 
a pedagogue. He next entered mercantile life as clerk 
in a general store in Greene, R. I., and on June 17, 
1902, became telegraph operator and station agent at 
Greene for the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railway Company, a position he still retains, serving 
most satisfactorily. In June, 1916, he bought and 
removed to his present farm in Greene. There he main- 
tains and personally cares for his herd of Holstein 
cattle, his specialty, dairy farming. This herd is at once 
his recreation and his work, for his heart is in his 
business, and he has labored all his life to better con- 
ditions surrounding milk production and distribution. 
He has been successful in his business undertakings, and 
is one of the leading agriculturists of the S'ate who 
have labored not less for the good of all than for their 
own advancement. 

In public life Mr. Potter has held several town offices 
including the superintendency of schools, igoi-02; 
school committeeman, 1905-13; town councilman, 1913- 
16. In November, 1916, he was elected to represent 
Coventry in the Rhode Island House of Representa- 
tives, and in January, 1918, introduced the Potter bill, 
regulating the sale of milk, previously referred to. In 
the House he served on the committee on State char- 
ities and corrections. His career has been one of use- 
fulness and honor, and not yet in the prime of his 
physical or intellectual powers, the future holds promise 
of greater usefulness. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, affiliated with Ionic Lodge, No. 28, of Greene. 
He has for seventeen years been a member of .Anthony 
Lodge, No. 21, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is a member of James Pike Council, No. 86, Order 
of United American Mechanics. Since he was four- 
teen years of age he has been a member of Coventry 
Republican Club, and is now its honored president. In 
religious faith he is a member of Greene Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Potter married (first) .August i, 1901, Daisy 
Wilbur, who died leaving a son, Everett James, now 
residing at home, a graduate of grammar school and 
president of his class (1918). He married (second), 
December 16, 1915, Mrs. Dora E. Sherman, daughter 
of Byron M. Lewis. 




^^<^t^ 




Aat^ 




. ^CT^M^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



69 



FRANCIS BISHOP KEENEY— A young man, 
finely educated and well equipped for the practice of 
law, Mr. Keeney came to Providence, R. I., in 1908. 
He is a native son of the State of Michigan, his 
parents, Alanson and Mary Jane ( Dewey) Keeney, yet 
residing in that State at Morris. His mother is a cousin 
of Admiral George Dewey. 

Francis Bishop Keeney was born at Cambridge, 
Mich., a village located twelve miles from Adrian, 
November 12, 1881. Soon afterward his parents moved 
to Adrian and there he completed full courses of public 
school study, graduating from high school with the 
class of 1902. From high school he passed to the col- 
lege dipartment of Michigan State University, at Ann 
Arbor, receiving his A. B., class of 1906. Choosing law 
as his profession he entered the law department of 
Michigan University, completing the course and grad- 
uating LL. B., class of 1908. The same year he located 
in Providence, R. I., and began practice in the office of 
Edwards & Angell. In November, 1913. he was ad- 
mitted to partnership in that firm. On .Xpril I, IQ17, he 
withdrew from the firm of Edwards & Angell to become 
a member of the firm of Swan & Keeney, with offices 
at No. 716 Turk's Head building. He is a member of 
the Rhode Island Bar Club and the Rhode Island Bar 
Association. 

In politics Mr. Keeney is a Republican, and in churcli 
affiliation a member of the First Congregational Church. 
His clubs are the University, Turk's Head, and Unitar- 
ian, he being the present secretary of the last named. 
His college fraternities are: Phi Beta Kappa and Phi 
Alpha Delta. 

Mr. Keeney married. May 2S, 1910, at Southold, N. 
Y., Bernice Pearl Mitchell. They have one son. Francis 
Bishop (2), born January 23. 1914. 



mcnt as assistant surgeon in the maternity department, 
this service to St. Joseph's being increased in 1915 hy 
his being added to the staff, in 1914, as assistant surgeon 
in women's diseases. As the years have progressed he 
has made obstetrics and women's diseases his special 
branches of practice, his skill and knowledge being 
largely devoted to this class of patients. He is a mem- 
ber of the .American Medical Association, the Rhode 
Island Medical and Providence Medical societies, his 
standing among his professional brethren being most 
honorable. He is a member of St. .\gnes Roman Cath- 
olic Church, and of the Knights of Columbus. 

Dr. Kcnney married, January 10, 191 1, Margaret 
Elizabeth Walsh, of Whitinsville, Mass. 



JOHN JOSEPH KENNEY.M.D.— Since the year 
1908 Dr. Kenney has been engaged in mediail practice 
in the city of Providence, R. I., coming soon after his 
graduation from medical school. While his practice is 
general in character, he is a skilled surgeon, and gives 
preference to that branch of practice. He is well estab- 
lished in public regard and ministers to a large clien- 
tele. Dr. Kenney is a son of Thomas and Ellen (Gib- 
lin) Kenney, both residents of Franklin, Mass., where 
Thomas Kenney is a mill overseer. They are the 
parents of five sons and five daughters, all except Dr. 
Kenney being residents of Franklin, Mass.: John J., 
Thomas J., James F., William E., Frederick L., Mary 
E., Catherine, Elizabeth, Annie, Margaretia Veronica. 

John J. Kenney was born in Woonsocket. R. I., 
March 9. 1884, but when very young he was taken by 
his parents to Franklin, Mass., which has since been 
the family home. He attended the public schools of 
Franklin, completing high school study with graduation, 
class of 1903. He then became a student at Dean 
Academy, going thence to Dartmouth College Medical 
School, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 1908. 

-After receiving his degree Dr. Kenney returned to his 
native State and began his professional career as interne 
at St. Joseph's Hospital. Providence, serving as such 
for one year before beginning private practice. In addi- 
tion he was also assistant physician to the out-patients 
department of the hospital, and also received appoint- 



IRVING P. HUDSON, the well known editor and 
publisher of the Pawtu.xct Valley "Daily Times." of 
.Arctic, R. I., and a prominent citizen of Kent county, 
is a native of Warwick, R. I. He was born in the vil- 
lage of Phenix, .August 5, 1873, son of J. Ellery and 
Eliza (Pearce) Hudson. The former was born in 
Natick and the latter in Ironstone, Mass. Irving P. 
Hudson is the oldest of thirteen children, of whom 
eleven survive. His father was bom in September, 
1852, and ac(|uired an education through his own efforts. 
.\t the age of nine years he started to work in the mills 
of Natick and Harris, and stayed there until he entered 
Mowry & Goff's School, of Providence. He then went 
with the Pawtuxet Valley "Gleaner," at Phenix, as fore- 
man, and later became general business manager, being 
with this paper for over thirty years. He was in the 
Legislature two years. Governor Elisha Dyer appointed 
him factory inspector, and he later became chief factory 
inspector, which position he occupies to date. He is 
a Republican, and for many years chairman of the 
Town Committee of Coventry, and is a member of the 
State Central Committee from Coventry. He has al- 
ways been active in the councils of his party, and is one 
of the best known men in the State. He is a past grand 
master of Masons of Rhode Island. In 1872 he mar- 
ried Eliza Pearce, of Phenix, R. I. They were the 
parents of thirteen children: Irving P., of further men- 
tion; Charles J., Mary E., John B., Laura M, Ellery 
E., .\rchcr E., James, Marion L., Royal C, Albert S., 
Wilton P.. and Lloyd E. 

Irving P. Hudson received his education at the Harris 
Grammar School in Coventry, and afterwards took a 
commercial course at the Bryant & Stratton Business 
College of Providence, R. I. After finishing school he 
entered the employ of John H. Campbell, publisher of 
the Pawtuxet Valley "Gleaner." a well known weekly of 
that period. He was apprenticed to the printing trade, 
which he completed there and worked as a journeyman 
until 1905, when he entered the employ of the Provi- 
dence "Tribune" for two years. In July he purchased 
the Pawtuxet Valley "Daily Times," and since that 
time he has taken an exceedingly active part in local 
aflairs. He has made himself a power for the good 
and general enlightenment of the community, and has 
served his fellow-citizens not only as the editor of one 
of the most progressive journals of this region, but 
also as holder of a number of public offices. He is a 
staunch member of the Republican party, and has al- 
ways been prominently identified with the local Repub- 



70 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



IJcan organization. In 1908 he was elected auditor of 
the town of Coventry. In the year IQIO Mr. Hudson 
was elected to the Rhode Island House of Representa- 
tives, and served in that body for three years, when he 
was elected to the Rhode Island Senate. His record as 
a legislator has been one of distinction, and he has been 
closely identified with the reform legislation that has 
been enacted during this period. He was vice-president 
of the Rhode Island Press Club in 1913-14, and presi- 
dent in 1915-16. He is a member of the Pen and Pencil 
Club ; the Town Criers ; the Kent Club ; the Flat River 
Club, of which he is now secretary ; Warwick- Lodge, 
No. 16, Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is past 
master; Land Mark Chapter, No. 10, Royal Arch 
Masons; Providence Council, No. i, Royal and Select 
Masters ; St. John's Comanden.-, No. I, Knights Tem- 
plar; Palestine Temple, Mystic Shrine; Eastern Star, 
Ruth Chapter, No. 5, of which he is a past patron; 
Anthony Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
and the Sagamore Encampment, of which he is at 
present high priest. For the past twenty-eight years 
he has been a member of the Phenix Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He is a charter member of the West 
Warwick Typographical Union. He is at the present 
time president of the Coventry Town Council. 

February i, 1899, Irving P. Hudson married Thirza 
Hammond, daughter of John Hammond, of Riverpoint, 
formerly of Harbor Grace, New Foundland. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hudson have four daughters: Dorothy Isabelle, 
Lucy May, Marion Thirza. and Thirza Hammond. 



ALBERT F. SMILEY, one of the largest building 
contractors in the region of Pawtucket, R. I., and one 
whose reputation for integrity and capability is second 
to none, is a native of Canada, and a son of Samuel 
and Rebecca (Alexander) Smiley, old and much re- 
spected residents of the outlying regions about Mont- 
real. Mr. Smiley, the elder, was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and continually engaged in that line during prac- 
tically his entire life. He died in the year 1902. but is 
survived by his wife, who at the present time makes 
her home at Lenoxville, near Montreal, Canada. 

Born May 17, 1870, at Montreal, Canada, Albert F. 
Smiley spent the early years of his life on his father's 
farm and attended the public schools of his native 
region. .'Vs he grew older he was apprenticed to a car- 
penter and learned that trade, becoming very proficient 
in it while still a mere youth. Upon attaining his 
majority, he left his father's home and came to the 
United States locating in the city of Manchester, N. 
H., in 1890. He worked at this trade in the surround- 
ing region there until the year 1895, and then came to 
Rhode Island, and secured work on the Grosvenor 
building at Providence, which was at that time in 
process of construction. During this perio<l he took a 
night school course in architecture at the Rhode Island 
School of Design, and supplemented this with a course 
in the Correspondence School of Scranton. Pa. His 
skill and knowledge in the work soon led to his being 
put in positions in which he supervised his fellow labor- 
ers, and from 1895 to 1905 he acted as foreman or super- 
intendent on several large buildings in the neighbor- 
hood and elsewhere in the State. During the period 
between 1900-1905, Mr. Smiley acted as general super- 
intendent for Benjamin F. Smith, a contractor, build- 



ing in various cities of Massachusetts, some of the 
largest mills in the United States. In the latter years 
he determined to engage in business on his own ac- 
count, and in association with George Humes and Peter 
A. Cruise, he organized the Hume, Cruise & Smiley 
Construction Co., of Pawtucket. Success quickly at- 
tended their efforts and during this period the firm 
erected the following buildings: In Pawtucket, J. P. 
Coats' store house, Albert H. Humes' private residence, 
the Solway Dyeing and Bleaching Company, and Kirby's 
Five and Ten Cent Building; in Prnvidence, the Rhode 
Island Hospital power house, laundry, sleeping quarters 
and tunnel; the Rhode Island Tool Company, and the 
Slocomb Machine Shop; in Central Falls, the Sutcliff 
Bank and office building; in Whitinsville, Mass., the 
Ring and Traveler Mill ; in North Attleboro, Mass., the 
Badaracco Office Building; and at Valley Falls, the 
Standard Nut and Bolt Company. But the year follow- 
ing, Mr. Smiley and Mr. Cruise disposed of their in- 
terests to Mr. Humes and founded the Cruise & Smiley 
Construction Company. This association continued 
until IQ09 but in that year Mr. Smiley sold his interests 
to his partner and since then has conducted the business 
alone. While he was a member of the firm of Cruise 
& Smiley they erected the following buildings : In Paw- 
tucket. American Hall Building, Chester House, St. 
Mary's Rectory, the John Smith Building, and the con- 
crete bridge for Darlington Fertilizer; in Central Falls, 
the Hemphill Manufacturing Company; in Providence, 
Ridge Street School and Church, and the Veazie Street 
School ; and at Woonsocket, the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Smiley besides being a complete master 
of the science of construction is also a most capable 
business man and executive, and his enterprise has con- 
stantly grown under his able management. Among other 
large contracts carried out under him have been the 
following: In Pawtucket, Swift & Company, Slater 
Mill Manufacturing Company, the Weeden Land Com- 
pany, the Hamlet Textile Company, American Textile 
Company, and extensive additions and repairs on the 
Union Wadding Company, on the Memorial Hospital, 
and on the David Harley Company; in Mansfield, Mass., 
the S. W. Card Company ; in Waterville. Me., the 
Lockwood Company ; at Saylesville, R. I., the Glenlyon 
Dye Works, the Sayles Bleachery, the Lonsdale Bak- 
ery, the Crefield Waste & Batting Company, the Sayles- 
ville School and Post Office; at Phillipsdale. the Glen- 
lyon Dye Works, L. A. Lockwood, the River Spin- 
ning Company; at Central Falls, the Glenlyon Dye 
Works, the Samoset Mill, and the Haniley Textile Com- 
pany ; at Mechanicsville, Conn., the French River Tex- 
tile Company, and the Mechanicsville Mills; at Valley 
Falls, the Samoset Mill, the River Spinning Company 
and the Hansahoe Manufacturing Company; and at 
Woonsocket. the River Spinning Company; and at Prov- 
idence, R. I., the Buena Vista .'\partments. Besides 
these there was the construction of the Stump Hill 
Dam, and the Phillipsdale Dam on Ten Mile river, and 
many others of a similar type in the past year (1918). 
Mr. Smiley has made the construction of mills his 
specialty together with their remodeling and exten- 
sion, and there is probably no other man in this par- 
ticular region who has given so much study and 
thought to this particular problem in construction or is 
so complete a master of it in all its aspects. 






'U^c^tCC^ 



/^4^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



71 



Mr. Smiley is a member of the Master Builders' 
Association and has done not a little towards promot- 
ing the general development of the community by his 
activities. He is also a member of the Roger Williams 
Driving Club, and is a prominent figure in the social 
world of the city. 

Albert F. Smiley was united in marriage on June 17, 
1895, at Manclicsler, N. H., with Rose Goodrich, a 
daughter of Phillip and Susan (Richards) Goodrich, 
of Manchester, N. H. They are the parents of five 
children: Clifford Earl, now a corporal in the Sixty- 
Sixth Company, Rhode Island Coast Artillery, and at 
present serving with the .'\merican E.xpeditionary 
Forces in France: Emma: Albert: Doris, and Harriet, 
who reside with their parents. Mr. Smiley and his 
family make their home at No. 129 Chapel street, 
Saylesville. His business office is in the Oak Hall 
Building, Pawtucket. 



THOMAS L. CARTY, a popular and respected 
attorney of l';uvtuckct. R. I., and a native of that city, 
is a son of Edwin and Catherine (Marran) Carty, both 
of whom are natives of England. Edwin Carty and his 
wife came to this country in their early married life and 
settled at Pawtucket. where the former secured a posi- 
tion in one of the loc&I industrial plants. He is still 
thus employed, and they reside at the present time in this 
place, where they are well known and highly respected. 
Born at Pawtucket, R. I., November 21, 1881. Thomas 
L. Carty has always resided there and has made it the 
headquarters of his professional career. He began his 
education by attending the local schools and was pre- 
pared for college at these institutions. He next entered 
Brown University at Providence, and there remained 
for two years. In the meantime, however, he decided 
to follow law as a profession, and accordingly gave up 
his general studies to take up his chosen subject. With 
this purpose in view he entered the famous law school 
01 the University ot Michigan at Ann Harbor, Mich., in 
1906. He studied for three years at this institution and 
graduated with the class of 1909. receiving his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. Returning to Rhode Island, he 
passed his bar examination there, and at once began 
the practice of his profession, opening an office in the 
Reed Building at No. 188 Main street, Pawtucket, 
where he has remained up to the present time. During 
these years he has firmly established himself in the 
legal world of that city and has won a reputation for 
ability which is second to none. He has now a large 
practice and is respected most highly, not only by the 
general public, but by his professional colleagues 
throughout the city. Mr. Carty is a member of the 
Pawtucket Bar .\ssociation and has done much to 
further the aims of that valuable organization. In his 
religious belief he is a Roman Catholic. He is also an 
active member of the Knights of Columbus, Pawtucket 
Council. No. 412. 



lively, his lather having come to this country in young 
manhood. The early education of Dr. Hayman was 
received at the public schools of Taunton, and he 
graduated from the high school there with the class 
of 1901, having been prepared for college. The young 
man had already determined upon medicine as a pro- 
fession and, accordingly, matriculated at the Boston 
University School of Medicine, where he took a four 
year course in that study, according to the Homoeo- 
pathic theory. He graduated with the class of 1905, 
having taken his degree of M. D., and during the last 
year of his studies was resident physician at the Hull 
Street Medical Mission at Boston. He then became 
surgical interne at the Massachusetts Homoeopathic 
Hospital, where he remained until July. 1906. .-Xt that 
time he formed an association with Dr. Frederick 
Evelcth, and with him practiced at .Amesbury, Mass., 
until the close of 1907. It was then that Dr. Hayman 
came to Providence, where he engaged in the practice 
of his profession and has continued ever since. He 
has built up a large and successful practice, and is 
one of the best known general physicians of the city, 
having devoted himself to no particular specialty, 
excepting that he has won his chief reputation as a 
surgeon. Dr. Hayman is at the present time a mem- 
ber of the staff and a trustee of the Homoeopathic 
Hospital, located on Jackson street. Providence. He 
is a prominent figure in professional and fraternal 
circles in this region, and is affiliated with a large 
number of organizations of various kinds. He is a 
mcml)er of the American Institute of Homoeopathy, 
the Massachusetts Surgical and Gynecological Society, 
the Rhode Island Homoeopathic Medical Society, of 
which he served as president during the years 1917 
and 1918. He is a member of St. John's Lodge, .An- 
cient Free and .\cceptcd Masons, Providence Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons, St. John's Commandery. 
Knights Templar, Palestine Temple. .Xncicnt Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In his religious 
belief Dr. Hayman is a Congregationalist and attends 
Union Church of that denomination in Providence. 
He is also a member of the Congregational Club of 
this city. In politics he is a staunch Republican, but 
his professional activities have prevented him from 
taking an active part in public affairs. 

Dr. Ralph W. Hayman was united in marriage, Feb- 
ruary 26. 1916, with Hope .\ylesworth, a daughter of 
Ira Curtis W. and Emma (Cady) Aylesworth, promi- 
nent residents of Providence. 



RALPH W. HAYMAN, M. D., one of the popular 
and successful physicians of Providence, R. I., is a 
native of Taunton, Mass., where he was born, Sep- 
tember 27. 1883. a son of Fred W. and Laura M. 
(Wilbar) Hayman. His parents were natives of Shef- 
field, England, and South Middleboro, Mass., respec- 



WILLIAM A. BATCHELOR— Woonsocket, R. I., 
has been the family home 01 the Batchelors since 
1805, when George Batchelor. an English lad of fif- 
teen years, came to the city of St. John, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada. He grew to manhood in that city, 
became prominent in its business and public life, being 
succeeded as police commissioner by his youngest 
son, William A. Batchelor, who was appointed to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of his father. 

George Batchelor. son of Joseph and Elizabeth 
Batchelor, was born in London, England, October 12, 
1850. died in Woonsocket, R. I., December 27, 1913. 
When he was four years of age he was brought to St. 



^2 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



John, New Brunswick, that being the family home 
until 1865, when George Batchelor began his long 
and honorable career in Woonsocket. He was em- 
ployed in the mills for some time, then was a grocer's 
clerk until i&So, when he established himself in the 
grocery business under his own name in the Globe 
store on South Main street. There he continued a 
successful business until his retirement, several years 
prior to his death. In addition to the demands of his 
grocery store, Mr. Batchelor was called upon to fill 
ofiicial position in various corporations, being for 
years president of the Woonsocket Electric Machine 
Power Company, holding executive control of the com- 
pany until its merger into the Blackstone Valley & 
Electric Company. At the time of his death he was 
president of the Union Cemetery Corporation, a trus- 
tee of the Producers' Savings Bank, and a director of 
the Producers' National Bank. He was long a mem- 
ber of the Woonsocket Business Men's Association, 
and its president in 1907-1908. He was an able busi- 
ness man, quick of decision, sound in judgment, and 
the soul of honor. For nearly half a century he was 
a resident of Woonsocket, and he was known the city 
over as a man ever ready with counsel or substantial 
aid wherever needed. He was a man of kindly, sym- 
pathetic nature, numbering a host of friends, and re- 
spected by even those who differed with him. 

When a young man, Mr. Batchelor began his politi- 
cal career, being first appointed a member of the 
Republican Town Committee. Later he was chosen 
town sergeant, serving in that capacity for several 
years. He was then and for twenty-five years an 
active member of the Woonsocket Fire Department, 
the firemen during his term serving at a salary of one 
dollar monthly, Mr. Batchelor turning his pay into 
the company's treasury. For years he was foreman 
of Steamer No. i. and also served as assistant chief 
engineer. When Woonsocket became a city he was 
elected fire marshal, an office he held for one year. 
Later he served a year as license commissioner, and in 
1890-91-92 he was elected highway commissioner by the 
City Council. In 1892 he was elected alderman, serv- 
ing three terms, 1893-94-95, being president of the 
board one term. In 1894 he was elected Representa- 
tive to the State Legislature and reelected in 1895. 
He was chosen mayor of Woonsocket in 1897 and 
1898; was a member of the Republican State Central 
Committee from 1897 until the spring of 1909, serving 
a part of that time on the executive committee. On 
August 5, 1898, he was elected chairman of the Woon- 
socket Republican City Committee, and for nearly 
eleven years was the directing head of the party in 
his city. He resigned April 7, 1909, on account of ill 
health, his retirement being made the occasion of a 
banquet in his honor, signalized by the presence of 
prominent Republicans of city and State, and the pre- 
sentation of a handsome loving cup. He remained a 
private citizen but two years. Governor Pothier call- 
ing him from his retirement in 191 1 to serve upon the 
police commission, newly created hy the General As- 
sembly of the State. The Governor named Mr. Batch- 
elor as chairman, and with his colleagues, Amie J. 
Dulude and James M. McCarthy, placed the police 



department on a higher plane of efticiency and greatly 
improved the local licensing system. Mr. Batchelor 
filled the position bestowed upon him, unasked, until 
his death. His rise in politics was from the very 
bottom, and in his upward course touched many depart- 
ments of city life. He won recognition through his abil- 
ity to meet the demands of every position to which he 
was appointed or elected, the voters believing in him im- 
plicitly, and he never knew the sting of defeat at the 
polls. During his long and active political career, 
he made and maintained a reputation as being a fair 
fighter, and a loyal friend: a man highly interested 
in the welfare of his city, and despite the acrimonies 
of political contest his reputation was fair and un- 
sullied. When he succumbed to the last enemy after a 
five years' struggle, the city flag was placed at half 
mast, the police of the city ordered in mourning, and 
full police honors were paid the dead commissioner. 
The funeral was from Friends' Meeting House, the 
pall-bearers and ushers being men high in business 
and official life. Mr. Batchelor married, February i, 
1870, Mary .\. Miller, daughter of Thomas Miller, 
of Woonsocket. She survives her husband with two 
sons: William A., of further mention: and J. Fred 
Batchelor, of Dodgeville, Mass. Another son. Cap- 
tain G. Frank Batchelor, for years captain of Hose 
Company No. 4. died several years before his father. 
All the sons married, J. Fred Batchelor having a 
daughter Edna, and Captain Batchelor leaving a son. 
George (2) Batchelor, and a daughter Grace. 

William A. Batchelor was born in Woonsocket. 
May i,^, 1876, and there completed courses of public 
school study. This was later supplemented by a 
course at Bryant & Stratton's Business College, in 
Providence. He began business as a salesman for 
Swift & Company, wholesale meat dealers, and for 
twelve years, 1897-1909, was in their employ in New 
York City. In 1909 he returned to Woonsocket, pur- 
chased the bottling works of his brother, which he 
still owns and conducts with successful results. In 
1914 he was appointed police commissioner to fill out 
the unexpired term of three years. He is chairman 
of the City Republican Committee, and one of the 
leading men of his party. While in New York, Mr. 
Batchelor became a member of the Masonic order, 
belonging to lodge, chapter and commandery, and to 
Mecca Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic .Shrine. He is also a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order 
of Moose, and the Woonsocket Business Men's As- 
sociation. He is a worthy son of an honored father, 
and in his way is carrying forward the work begun 
by George Batchelor. 

William A. Batchelor married, in 1914. Emily 
Farrell. 



EDWARD F. CARROLL, M. D., one of the most 
successful and popular physicians of Providence, R. I., 
and at present occupying the office of postmaster of 
this city, is a native of Rumford, R. I., where he was 
born, September 13, 1S71, a son of Charles and Mary 
(Monahan) Carroll. Both of Mr. Carroll's parents 
were natives of Ireland, who came to this country 





l^lyH^-t^^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



73 



shortly after their marriage and settled at Rumfdrd, 
in 1866. It was at the public schools of East Provi- 
dence that Dr. Carrol! secured his education, and at 
the well-known Brothers' School at LaSalle Acad- 
emy, from which he graduated in 1889, having been 
prepared for college. He then entered the medical 
school in connection with Harvard University, from 
which he graduated with the class of 1894, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately upon 
completing his course in medicine. Dr. Carroll came 
to Providence, and here engaged in the practice of 
his profession. Since that time he has continued with 
a high degree of success in this city, and has now made 
a place for himself among the leaders of the medical 
profession in this part of the State, and is held high 
in the esteem of his colleagues. Dr. Carroll is a 
member of the Providence Medical Society. In 
March, 1917, at the time of his appointment as post- 
master of Providence, Dr. Carroll relinquished his 
practice in order to attend more cfificicntly to the 
arduous duties of this post. Under his capable man- 
agement the department has developed greatly in size 
and efficiency, and his work in this connection is 
appreciated by his fellow citizens of all political 
parties. Dr. Carroll is a Democrat in politics, and has 
been very active in the counsels of his party. He 
has served for three years on the school committee 
at Providence, and has also held various minor 
appointments. In his religious belief Dr. Carroll is 
a Roman Catholic and attends St. Mary's Church of 
this denomination here. He is a member of the local 
council. Knights of Columbus, the local lodge of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the 
Rotary, and Pen and Pencil clubs of Providence. He 
is also an active member of the Providence Chamber 
of Commerce, and has done much in this connection 
to advance the general interests of the community. 

Dr. Edward V. Carroll was united in marriage, in 
April, 1901, with Mary T. Dwyer, a daughter of Owen 
and Margaret Dwyer, residents of Pennsylvania. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Carroll four children have been born : I. 
John E., born in 1902. Young Mr. Carroll has the dis- 
tinction of being the youngest "four minute man" in 
America, for while too youthful to fight physically for 
his country, he has rendered valuable aid on the plat- 
form and stage in the form of stirring appeals addressed 
to his fellow citizens. 2. Thomas P.. born in 1904. 3. 
Catherine, bom in 1909. 4. Elizabeth, born in 1914. 



JAMES MULLEN, one of the leading merchants 
and e.x-mayor of Woonsocket, is a native of the town 
of Blackstone, Mass., a son of Michael and .Mice 
Mullen. His birth occurred January 19, 1855, and 
the years of his childhood were passed in Blackstone 
and vicinity, and in the pursuance of his education, 
which he obtained at the local public schools. His 
studies were completed in the high school of Black- 
stone and a course at Bryant and Stratton's Business 
College, at Providence. Mr. Mullen then apprenticed 
himself to a tinsmith in Providence, and applied his 
mind to learn that trade. For twelve years he re- 
mained in the city and then, in 1884, came to Woon- 
socket, where he has made his home ever since. 
Here he established himself in the furniture business 



in company with Daniel Denipsey, under the firm name 
of Mullen and Denipsey. They prospered highly, and 
later were obliged to remove to larger and more ade- 
quate quarters. Accordingly he purchased the old 
Harris Stone Mill on Main .street, and here began the 
development of what is now the largest furniture 
business in the city. In 1907 Mr. Denipsey died and 
Mr. Mullen continued the business as sole iiroprietor. 
Besides his principal line of furniture, Mr. Mullen 
also handles on a large scale rugs, carpets, linoleum, 
cooking ranges and kitchen furnishings. The trade that 
he has built up is due entirely to his own individual 
efforts, for he has never sought or had outside aid 
of any kind. He is a self-made man in the best 
sense of the term, and the position which he holds 
to-day in the regard of his fellow citizens he has 
made for himself. He is justly regarded by the com- 
munity at large as one of its most capable and trust- 
worthy citizens, and the influence that he wields is 
always exerted to the cause of good. 

Shortly after his residence in Woonsocket, Mr. 
Mullen was asked by his fellow citizens of the Third 
Ward to fill an unexpired term in the City Council, 
created by the death of Mr. Doran. He was pos- 
sessed, even as a young man, with an unusual grasp 
of affairs, and soon convinced his colleagues of his 
fitness for office, albeit without any definite inten- 
tion to do so. Later he became the candidate of the 
Democratic party for alderman of the Third Ward, 
and was successful in the campaign that followed. 
The proof of his ability was shown in the great sup- 
port he received from his opposite party, the Repub- 
licans. He had already served as councilman, and 
all men were convinced of his ability and disinterest- 
edness. His election was a tribute to his popularity, 
a popularity that he did much to confirm and increase 
in the years that followed. In the year 1909 he was 
elected mayor of W'oonsocket and held this, the 
highest office in the city's gift, in that year and in 
1910 and 19H. His administration was remarkable 
for its efficiency and the practical business lines upon 
which it was conducted. Besides much important 
reform, which he instituted during these years, he 
also deserves the honor of having been the only mayor 
of the city who ever actually reduced the municipal 
debt, .'\nother achievement of his was to stop public 
dancing on Saturday night in the city, a practice that 
had led to much that was undesirable, for which he 
enjoyed the thanks of the better classes in the com- 
munity. Mr. Mullen is at the present time a member 
of the executive committee of the Red Cross Society, 
and is very active in carrying on the great work now 
being done by this organization the world over. He 
is also a director of the National Globe Bank of 
Woonsocket. In his religious belief Mr. Mullen is a 
Catholic, and he has been secretary of the St. Vincent 
de Paul Home in this city since its foundation and 
incorporation in 1905: and also president of the 
"Particular Council of the St. Vincent dc Paul Society" 
of Woonsocket, an organization for the aid and relief 
of the poor. 

James Mullen was united in marriage. /Xugust 29, 
1889, with Catherine Glynn, a daughter of John and 
Mary Glynn, natives of Ireland. 



74 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



RHODE ISLAND TEXTILE COMPANY of 
Pawtucket, R. I., one of the most successful and rap- 
idly developing among the great industrial cstablisli- 
ments of this city, is a living monument to the genius 
of organization and mechanical skill of J. H. Conrad, 
its founder, treasurer and general manager. This con- 
cern has the distinction of operating and working 
every day and night since the plant was first opened, 
a truly remarkable record. The rapid growth of this 
concern is another example, of which New England 
offers so many, of the marvelous ability in practical 
affairs, and the industry of that region, and well de- 
serves that the salient points of its career be recorded. 
It was organized and incorporated by Mr. Conrad in 
association with A. L. Kelley, of Providence, R. I., 
in the year 1913. with Mr. Kelley as president, and Mr. 
Conrad, treasurer and general manager. Mr. Kelley 
took up the financial side of the business and has con- 
fined himself to that ever since, while Mr. Conrad 
directs the practical operation of the plant and all 
the other aspects of the work done. It was started 
in S'imewhat restricted quarters in the American Hall 
Building, with seventy-five braiding machines, but the 
quality of the product and the energtic initiative of 
the management soon gained for the concern a wide 
patronage, and it was necessary to keep the seventy- 
five machines running steadily, night and day. But 
even this constant activity soon became insufiicient 
to handle the mass of business that began to pour in, 
and larger quarters were sought. The plant was 
moved to the J. D. Crosby Building on Prairie ave- 
nue, Pawtucket, where more space could be had, but 
even this site proved inadequate and shortly after the 
management decided upon a factory of their own. 
Accordingly, a valuable property was purchased 
adjoining the Crosby Building, situated on the corner 
of Dean and Prairie avenues, and here a fine brick 
structure begun in March, 1916, was occupied in Au- 
gust of that year. When completed it afforded twenty- 
five thousand square feet of floor space, and in con- 
struction and equipment was one of the most com- 
plete and modern plants in Pawtucket, its workman- 
ship and finish throughout being of the finest. The 
Rhode Island Textile Company is engaged in the man- 
ufacture of fine braids, and specializes largely in cor- 
set laces and laces for "middy blouses," but their 
best known product is the well-Icnown "Jewel Lingerie 
Braid," which is a nationally known commodity of 
highest standard. In developing its present standard 
of quality, the greatest degree of skill and inventive 
genius have been required, but Mr. Conrad has proved 
himself equal to every demand put upon him. It had 
long been supposed that braids and lacings of very 
delicate colors, and especially of pure white were im- 
possible, owing to the difficulty of passing the material 
used in their manufacture through the braiding 
machines and preserving it perfectly clean. To the 
problem of overcoming this obstacle Mr. Conrad 
devoted himself and did so with such success that 
the factory now turns out great quantities of the most 
delicately tinted lacings and braids, as well as the 
pure white variety of a quality satisfying the most 
exacting taste. The Rhode Island Texlile Company 



has refined, stabilized and standardized the hereto- 
fore commonplace varieties of braids and now enjoys the 
distinction of being the first to specialize in the super- 
ior grades. The "Jewel" brand of most delicate and 
fancy braids and lacings has universally come to be 
regarded the best ori the market, and "Jewel" lirand 
individual packages are well deservedly popular. 

The career of Mr. Conrad has been a brilliant one 
and is entirely the result of his own efforts. He is a 
native of Danville, Va., where he was born August 17, 
1880, a son of Charles H. and Parker (Holland) Con- 
rad. His childhood was passed in his native town and 
it was there that he received his education in public 
and private schools. In the year 1905, he came to the 
north and settled in Providence, R. I., where he 
secured a position as a clerk in one of the local banks. 
He continued thus employed for about two years, and 
then, in 1907, entered the employ of a braid manufac- 
turing company, as a bookkeeper. It was here that 
he first gained his knowledge of the manufacture of 
braids and lacings, the actual processes employed in 
the factory interesting him more than the financial 
side of the business, although he also applied him- 
self to what was his own task with zeal and intelli- 
gence. He soon proved himself of so much value to 
his employers that he was advanced to more and 
more responsible posts, and had an opportunity to 
become acquainted with every aspect of the business. 
He became, indeed, a master of the trade in all its 
details and determined eventually to engage in a simi- 
lar business on his own account. With this end in 
view he associated himself with Mr. Kelley, and the 
year 1913 saw the organization of the Rhode Island 
Textile Company. In addition to his interest in the 
great company of his own founding, Mr. Conrad is 
half owner of the R. C. N. Fabric Company of Provi- 
dence, which is engaged in the manufacture, conver- 
sion, refining and finishing of shoe laces. During the 
war this concern was engaged in work on very large 
government contracts for shoe and legging laces for 
the army. 

J. H. Conrad married, December 2.?, 1909, Phoebe 
Angell, a daughter of Jesse H. and Robina (Holland) 
Angell. old and highly respected residents of Provi- 
dence, R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Conrad make their home 
at Pawtucket, R. I. He is a member of the Paw- 
tucket Business Men's Association, the Pawtucket 
Board of Trade, and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, of Danville, Va. 



THOMAS FRANCIS MOURNIGHAN. M. D., 

began practice in Providence, in 1910, coming to that 
city after three years of practical experience in pro- 
fessional work at the State institutions at Howard, 
R. I. He is a native of Rhode Island, his birthplace 
the village of Arctic, in the town of Warwick. His 
parents, Thomas and Fannie (Mulvihill) Mournighan, 
have gone to their reward, leaving two sons, John L., 
now an eminent lawyer of Oswego, \. Y., and Thomas 
P., whose career is herein reviewed. 

Thomas Francis Mournighan was horn August 22, 
1884, at Warwick, and there completed grammar 
school courses of study. He then entered LaSalle 




^^Cl=t^^ ^L 




L^^^i^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



/J 



Academy, Providence, also pursuing courses at Classi- 
cal High School. During the years thus spent, he 
had also learned the baker's trade, and was for a 
time engaged as a mill worker, thus financing his 
preparatory education, and accumulating a fund to be 
used later, when the cost of his professional educa- 
tion must be provided for. When ready to begin 
medical study, he entered Baltimore Medical College, 
and there completed a full course, receiving his 
degree, M. D., with the graduating class of 1907. 
With his newly acquired degree he returned to Rhode 
Island, and for three years was an interne at the State 
institutions, advancing later to the post of assistant 
surgeon under the chief surgeon. Dr. Henry .-V. Jones. 
With this knowledge gained through actual practice 
to add to his college training. Dr. Mournighan came 
to Providence, R. I., in 1910. and at No. 86 .Kborn 
street began the upbuilding of a private clientele. 
His success has been gratifying, and he has won not 
only a clientele, but a large circle of friends and a 
large degree of public confidence. He is a member 
of and medical examiner for the Modern Woodmen of 
America and Foresters of America, and physician 
and surgeon to the United States Shipping Board, 
serving the Lord Construction Branch engaged in 
outfitting vessels at Providence. His college fra- 
ternities are: Phi Kappa Delta and Phi Epsilon: his 
professional societies. The .\merican, Rhode Island, 
and Providence Medical; his social fraternity, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; his re- 
ligious affiliation with the Roman Catholic church. A 
man of genial, social nature, he enjoys life in a ra- 
tional way, is devoted to his profession, and holds the 
high regard of his medical brethren. 



CHARLES SAMUEL FOSTER— When Joseph 
Henry Foster, contracting macliinist in the spindle 
department of The Fales & Jenks Machine Company, 
was obliged to surrender his obligations by weight 
of years, after forty-six years' service, 1868-19x4, his 
son, Charles Samuel Foster, whom he had taught the 
trade and business, succeeded him. and thus continues 
a connection with that important Rhode Island com- 
pany which has existed from 1830 to 1918. Charles 
S. Foster is of the tenth generation of the family 
founded in New England by Sergeant Thomas Foster, 
who came in the ship "Hercules," in 1614. The line of 
descent is through the founder's son. Dr. Thomas (2) 
Foster; his son, Thomas (3) Foster; his son, Thomas 
(4) Foster, who bought land in Scituate, R. I., and 
there lived; his son, Stephen Foster, of Scituate and 
Foster, R. I.: his son, Lemuel Foster; his son, 
Thomas (5) Foster; his son, Samuel Foster, machin- 
ist of PawtucVct. R. I., a veteran of the Civil War; 
his son, Joseph Henry Foster: his son, Charles Sam- 
uel Foster, of Central Falls, a sterling twentieth cen- 
tury representative of the thrifty New England family. 

Joseph Henry Foster, of the ninth generation, son 
of Samuel and Angeline (Arnold) Foster, was born in 
Pawtucket, R. I., .August 29. 1846, and still resides 
there (1018). He attended the city public schools. 
learned the machinist's trade with William H. Haskell, 
and continued in his employ until 1868, becoming an 



expert worker in metals. In that year he entered the 
service of The Fales & Jenks Machine Company, of 
Pawtucket, as a toolmaker, but before a year had 
expired he changed his department, going into the 
spindle manufacturing shop as a contractor. For 
forty-six years he continued a contracting machinist 
with The Fales & Jenks Machine Company, from 
thirty to fifty skilled machinists being kept constantly 
emidoyed, and at times the number totaling nearly 
one hundred. In )888 he admitted his son, Charles 
S. Foster, to a partnership, father and son continuing 
the association until 1915. 

From 1S72 Mr. Foster has been a member of the 
Masonic order, being a past master of Jenks Lodge, 
Free and .Accepted Masons, of Central Falls, R. I.; 
later demiting to Union Lodge of Pawtucket; member 
of Pawtucket Chapter. Royal Arch Masons; Paw- 
tucket Council. Royal and Select Masters; Holy Sepul- 
chre Commandery, Knights Templar; and in the An- 
cient .Accepted Scottish Rite held the thirty-two 
degrees of Massachusetts Consistory. He is also a 
noble of Aleppo Temi)le, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
member of the Masonic Veterans Association, vice- 
president of the Masonic Temple Company of Paw- 
tucket, 1897-1900, is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, a member of Rhode Island 
Historical Society, a Republican in politics, and an 
attendant of the services of the Baptist church. 

Mr. Foster married (first), July 31, 1866, Ellen 
Smith Parker, born October 11, 1844, in Perth, Scot- 
land, who died July 2, 1889, in Pawtucket, R. I., 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Roy) Parker. Mr. 
Foster married (second), August 28, 1890, Mary 
Reardon, born in Enfield, Conn., daughter of John 
and Mary (Kelly) Reardon. Joseph H. and Ellen 
Smith (Parker) Foster were the parents of four sons 
and three daughters: Charles Samuel, of further 
mention: Cora Belle, died in childhood: Mary .Ange- 
line, married George O. Everett, of Pawtucket; James 
Wheaton, died young; Levi Arnold, a machinist, 
married Lydia V. P. Vose; Lester Parker, died 
young: and Ida Maude, married Ralph Smith Pot- 
ter, of Pawtucket. 

Charles Samuel Foster was born in Pawtucket, R. I., 
October 12, 1867, and has ever since been a resident 
of the city of his birth. He attended the public 
schools of Pawtucket, and the University Grammar 
School of Providence, leaving school at the age of 
eighteen years, and entering his father's employ at 
The Fales & Jenks Machine Company. He became 
associated with Joseph H. Foster in his machine con- 
tracting operations, in 1885, and from the latter year 
until 1888 he was a student in mechanical draughting 
at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. 
In 1S88 he arrived at legal age and was at once 
admitted to a partnership, father and son executing 
contracts with The Fales & Jenks Machine Company 
until 1915. Since that date Charles S. Foster has con- 
ducted the business alone, and as a contracting ma- 
chinist has won success and reputation. 

Like his honored father, Mr. Foster is prominent 
in Masonry, in both the York and Scottish rites. He 
is a past master and since 1900 has been treasurer of 



76 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Union Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; member 
and since 1898 treasurer of Pawtucket Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; member of Pawtucket Council, Royal 
and Select Masters: a sir knight and eminent com- 
mander of Holy Sepulchre Commandery, Knights 
Templar; a noble of Palestine Temple, Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. In the Scottish Rite he holds 
the thirty-second degree, Rhode Island Consistory. 
He is a member of the Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island Association of Knights Templar Commanders; 
member of the board of managers of the Masonic 
Temple Company, of Pawtucket, a post he has filled 
since 1901. In politics Mr. Foster is a Republican, 
and in 1903 and 1904 served his city in Council, being 
president of that body in the last-named year. In 
1905 he was elected a trustee of the Central Falls 
Public Library for a term of three years, and since 
1905 has served as a trustee of the Adams Library. 
He is also a member of the Rhode Island Historical 
Society, the To Kalon Club, the Royal Arcanum, and 
Central Falls Congregational Church. He takes more 
than passing interest in these varied activities of his 
city, and lends his help freely to all good causes. 

Mr. Foster married, June 5. 1890, in Marlboro, 
Mass., Mary Alice Curtis, daughter of Francis C. and 
Caroline A. W. (Brigham) Curtis, of the eighth gen- 
eration of the family founded in New England by 
Zacheus Curtis, who was of Gloucester, Mass., in 
1659, died in Boxford, in 16S2. Mr. and Mrs. Foster 
are the parents of a son, Chester Curtis, born at Cen- 
tral Falls. R. I., September 16, 1891, a graduate of 
Central Falls High School, class of 1910, and until 
May, 1917, associated with his father in business. He 
then enrolled at the OflScers' Training Camp at 
Plattsburg, N. Y., passed the vigorous tests there 
imposed, and on August 12, 1917, was commissioned 
second lieutenant in the United States Army, and 
ordered to report for duty at Camp Devons, Ayer, 
Mass.. September i, 1917. After forty-eight hours' 
duty there he was assigned to Company K, One Hun- 
dred and Fourth Regiment of Infantry, Fifty-second 
Brigade, Twenty-si.xth Division, the regiment sta- 
tioned at Westfield, Mass., being composed of 
Massachusetts National Guard troops. They sailed 
for the seat of war in October, 191 7, landed in Eng- 
land, went thence to France, where the regiment 
underwent additional training until February. 1918, 
and then entered the trenches. Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Foster are also the parents of two daughters: Ellen, 
born in Pawtucket, Dec. 24, 1S9.1, married, Oct. 7, 1916! 
Henry A. Street, of Pawtucket. and they are the par- 
ents of Mary, born Aug. i, 1917, and Caroline Brig- 
ham, born at Central Falls, Oct. 22, 1898. 



FRANK ELBERT NICHOLS, for many years 
connected with one of the leading industries of South 
county, is a resident of Hope Valley, in this State. 
and one of the most conspicuous figures in the life of 
the community. Mr. Nichols is a son of George H. 
and Susan C. (Gardner) Nichols, and a grandson of 
Alexander H. and Jemima (Perrin) Nichols, his fam- 
ily having been connected with the affairs of this 
State for several generations. 



.Mexander H. Nichols was a native of Kingstown, 
but as a lad went with his parents to Woodstock, 
Conn., and there spent his childhood and early youth. 
He returned, however, to Rhode Island, and learned 
the machinist's trade in Hope Valley. Afterwards he 
worked at this craft for many years at Woonsocket, 
but toward the end of his life returned to Connecti- 
cut and made his home at Greenville, where his death 
occurred in 1850. He was a lieutenant of militia in 
the town of Hopkinton. During his first residence in 
Connecticut he married Jemima Perrin, and they were 
the parents of the following children: George H., 
mentioned below; John T., deceased; Charles S., 
married Mary M. Matteson, served for three years in 
Company D, Second Regiment, Rhode Island Infan- 
try Volunteers, and was for a number of years secre- 
tary of the Nichols & Langworthy Machine Com- 
pany of Hope Valley, died in 1894; Lewis, died in 
early youth; Oliver, died in early youth; Caroline E., 
became the wife of George H. Lewis, of Providence. 

George H. Nichols, son of Alexander H. and Jemima 
(Perrin) Nichols, and father of the Frank Elbert 
Nichols, of this sketch, was born in Connecticut and at- 
tended school at Greenville in that State, and at Hope 
Valley. In his youth he was employed in a cotton mill at 
Voluntown, and later at Greenville, and in 1849 became 
overseer of the weave shop in the Tefft Mill at Wyom- 
ing. He also worked in several other concerns of a sim- 
ilar character, and in i860 came to Loocustville with VV. 
R. Greene & Company, whose plant was moved from 
Millville, R. I., to this place at that time. On September 
25, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Twelfth Regiment, 
Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry, and served until July 
29, 1863, when he received his honorable discharge. He 
was a member of Lincoln Post No. 22, Grand .Army of 
the Republic, at Hope Valley, and at one time served 
as its commander. After his return from the war he 
was given the position of superintendent for W. R. 
Greene & Company, and continued to hold that oflnce 
both for that concern and for its successors, the Nich- 
ols & Langvvorthy Machine Company, until 1904, when 
he retired from active business. 

Mr. Nichols was a Republican in politics ; served as 
trustee of his school district, and collector of town 
taxes; was a member of the town council for nine 
years; a member of the Rhode Island House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1902-1903; member of the Rhode Island 
State Senate, 1903-1904, serving on important commit- 
tees in both branches. In i860 he joined Mechanics 
Lodge No. 14, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
was a charter member of Niantic Encampment of that 
order at Hope Valley. He was a regular attendant of 
Hope \'alley Baptist Church. He died December 9, 
1907. 

Mr. Nichols married, September 3, 1854, at Sag 
Harbor, L. I., Susan Champlain Gardner, a daughter of 
Stephen C. and Dorcas W. (Gardner) Gardner, and they 
were the parents of the following children : Mary Es- 
telle, born April I, 1858, died .^ug. 10, 1S78; George 
Elbert, died in infancy; Charles Ray. born Aug. 29, 
1861, for many years a locomotive engineer, but now a 
resident of Warwick. R. I., married Alice Cemmel; 
Frank E., of this review; Cora D., born Aug. 25, 1868, 
a graduate of Emerson College, Boston, and for several 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



77 



years teacher of elocution and physical culture in the 
Woman's College at Whitby. Ontario, and at a similar 
institution at Jacksonville, III., and married Edward 
Barr Fessenden, of rrovidcncc. Mrs. Xichols, the 
mother of these children, died September 20, igog. 

Frank Elbert Xichols was born September 19, 1864, at 
Hope \'alley, and as a lad attended the local public 
school. When but eleven years of age he began to work 
in his vacations, finding employment in the W. R. 
Greene & Co. Mills under his father, after which he was 
apprenticed in the printing trade, serving four years. 
He then entered the Colgate .Xcademy, at Hamilton. 
N. Y., and continued to work during his vacation, secur- 
ing positions as clerk in various hotels at Narragansctt 
Pier, including the Massasoit and Rookhingham, and 
in this way secured the money to pay his expenses at the 
academy. 

Mr. Nichols took the usual classical course and was 
graduated with the class of 1888. Upon completing his 
studies at this institution he went to Chicago, to take a 
position as superintendent for the real estate company 
in charge of the old Phoenix building, now the West- 
ern Union building there. After four years of this 
work he returned to his native town of Hope Valley, 
and became associated with the Xichols & Langworthy 
Machine Company as bookkeeper. He was later placed 
in charge of the office of this concern, and still later 
appointed secretary, a position he held until 1905. In 
that year the corporation was sold to New York inter- 
ests, which continued to operate it until .'\pril 13. 1909, 
when it was badly damaged by fire. This disaster threw 
the corporation into the hands of a receiver, and it was 
later taken over by the bond holders, who placed Mr. 
Nichols in charge, and he successfully conducted it 
until 191S, when the property was sold to the Wood 
River Iron Works, Inc. The latter concern was ab- 
sorbed in May, 1918, by the National Marine Engine 
Works of Scranton, Pa. The Nichols & Langworthy 
plant, with which he has been so long associated, was 
originally built by Gardner Nichols, a brother of Alex- 
ander H. Nichols, the grandfather of Frank Elbert 
Nichols. The Gordon Job Printing Press was manu- 
factured here as well as the famous Babcock & Wilcox 
boilers, and the Xew York Safety Steam Power En- 
gines, and later the Worthington Water Tube Boiler. 
In addition to his connection with this manufacturing 
concern, Mr. Nichols has become associated with a large 
number of important institutions in this region, and in 
1917 was elected treasurer of the Wood River Branch 
Railroad Company, a position that he continues to hold 
to-day. He is treasurer of the Hope \'alley Machine 
Company, general machinists, and garage. This com- 
pany was organized in 1919. He is also treasurer of the 
Pine Grove Cemetery Corporation ; treasurer of the 
school district in 1902 and 1903, and also of the Old 
Home Day Association, a branch of the cemetery cor- 
poration, an organization designed to hold open house 
for the entertainment of "old folks" and for appro- 
priate celebration on Decoration Day. The cemetery, 
under Mr. Nichols' management, has been successful in 
every way, and now owns a large perpetual fund which 
has been well invested for future purposes. Mr. Nich- 
ols is a member of Charity Lodge, No. 23. Free and 
Accepted Masons; member of Franklin Chapter, No. 7, 



Royal Arch Masons of Hope Valley; and has held the 
positions of treasurer and master of his lodge, and high 
priest of the Chapter. In his religious lielief Mr. 
Nichols is a Baptist, and has attended the First Baptist 
Church of Hope \alley from 1878 to the present. He 
is also treasurer of the Church Society and is active 
in the work of the congregation. In politics he is a 
Republican, member of the Republican Town Commit- 
tee of Hopkinton. He is a director of the Langworthy 
Public Library Association, which was named for one of 
the partners of the old business with which Mr. Nichols 
had been so long connected. 

Frank Elbert Nichols married, February 18, 1892, 
Sarah Louise Ellis, daughter of Thomas H. and Louisa 
(Stillman) Ellis, old and highly respected residents of 
.'\lfred, N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are the parents of 
two daughters: Dorothy, born March 26, 1894, became 
the wife of Fred .\. Richmond, of Hope X'alley, now of 
Yonkcrs, N. Y., who is now employed by the New 
York Centra! Railway; Margaret Ellis, born Dec. 15, 
1900. is now a student. 



GEORGE C. CROSS— Among the most prominent 
citizens of Charlestoun, R. I., where for many years he 
was the popular and efficient town clerk and one of the 
most successful contractors, is George C. Cross, a mem- 
ber of one of the oldest and most distinguished families 
of the State, which was founded in the early Colonial 
period by two brothers, Ralph and John Cross, who 
came from Scotland and settled here. Among his an- 
cestors was Joseph Cross, who was one of the first men 
to settle in the town of Charlcstown and who was 
a prominent man in this community. 

Joseph Cross, great-great-grandfather of the George 
C. Cross, resided at Charlestown. and was active in the 
affairs of the community. His death occurred here in 
the year 1751. He was the father of a large family of 
children among whom was Gideon Cross, who is men- 
tioned below. 

Gideon Cross, was born in February, 1737, and died 
March 2^. 1816. He resided at Charlestown all his life 
and married Mary Wilbur, a native of this region, where 
her birth occurred March 25, 1746. They were the 
parents of the following children: Gideon J., born Aug. 
I. i77f>; William P., born Feb. 6, 1781, died Sept. 13, 
1817; Susan W., born Feb. 23, 1785, and became the wife 
of Peter Parks; Joseph, who is mentioned at length 
below; and Mercy, born Oct. 24, 1789, who became the 
wife of Joshua Collins and died April 27, 1830. She 
was the mother of James C. Collins, of Providence, 
formerly a member of the Shell Fish Commission and 
the grandmother of James Cross Collins. Jr., formerly 
the assistant attorney-general of Rhode Island, and now 
practicing law. 

Joseph Cross, son of Gideon and Mary (Wilbur) 
Cross, was born December 17, 1786, at Charlestown, 
and married, October 16, 1808, Martha Hurdick. His 
second wife was Polly Kcnyon. His death occurred 
May 17, 1861. He was the father of the following 
children: William P., born Jan. 7, 1810, died Dec. 10, 
1831 ; .\bby S., born Dec. 19, i8ri, and became the wife 
of John Nichols; Caroline, born Oct. 7, 1813, died 
Dec. 23, 1838: Charles, who is mentioned at length be- 
low; Mary W., born March 6, 1817, and became the 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



wife of Robert Crandall; Joseph H., born Nov. 29, 
1823, and died Sept. 29, 1824; Martha H., born Sept. 
2, 1830, married Charles Holden, and died Oct. 23, 1869. 

Charles Cross, son of Joseph and Martha (Biirdick) 
Cross, and father of George C. Cross of this sketch, was 
born January 2, 1815, at Charlestown, and there passed 
his childhood and early youth. As a lad he lived upon 
his father's farm and gained his education at the local 
public schools. He was a man of unusual ability and 
remarkable talent for public affairs and in 1852 became 
town clerk of Charlestown, an office in which he con- 
tinued to serve until 1881. From 1884 to 1897 he was 
town treasurer and he also served for several years as 
deputy sheriff. He was elected to the General Assembly 
of the State in 1875 and returned to that body in the 
year following. He was a staunch Republican in pol- 
itics and was closely identified with the local organiza- 
tion of his party. Charles Cross died December 23, 
1902. He married, September 25, 1842, Martha B. 
Hazard, a native of South Kingston, where her birth 
occurred April 26, 1812, and her death took place Janu- 
ary 24, 187S. She was a daughter of Brenton Ward and 
Nancy G. (Childs) Hazard, the former a descendant 
of the old Newport Hazards, and a son of George W. 
and grandson of George Hazard, one of the early 
mayors of that city. Charles and Martha B. (Hazard) 
Cross were the parents of the following children : 
James F., born Dec. 3, 1843. and married, Jan. i, 1874; 
Sally Tucker, and resides in Newcastle, Ind. ; Carrie E., 
born July 22, 1845, and is the widow of James S. Ken- 
yon, of Hopkinton ; Mary A., born Dec. 8, 1846, and 
died unmarried in Dec, 1877; Millard P., born Sept. 
10, 1850, married, June 29, 1873, Sarah F. Merriss, and 
died Feb. 6, 1876; Frank P., born .\pril 10, 1853, and 
died unmarried July 21, 1881 ; George C, with whose 
career we are here especially concerned. 

George C. Cross was bom June 27, 1S55, at Charles- 
town, and has made his home in this place ever since. 
As a lad he attended the local public schools and after 
completing his studies at these institutions, became ap- 
prenticed to a carpenter from whom he learned that 
trade. For a time thereafter he worked as a carpenter 
and then gradually went- into business for himself as 
a contractor, meeting with a high degree of success in 
his enterprise. He has established a large business here 
and has gained a well deserved reputation for probity 
and integrity and for the e.xcellent quality of work 
which he always puts into his jobs. It has been in the 
department of public affairs, however, that Mr. Cross 
has come to be best known in this community, for he 
has inherited his father's unusual ability in this line 
and for many years' has occupied an exceedingly influ- 
ential position in the political life of this region. Like 
his father, he has always been a staunch Republican and 
has gradually come to be recognized as one of the most 
influential members of his party in this region of the 
State. Recognizing that in him they possessed a strong 
and capable candidate who would increase the prestige 
of the party hereabouts, his colleagues nominated him 
for public office at an early age, and in 1878 he was 
elected a member of the school committee. Mr. Cross's 
record in this position has been an unusual one, for he 
has served continuously until the fall of 1914, and dur- 
ing this period of forty years has performed an in- 



valuable service to the community. In the year 1887 
he was elected a member of the General Assembly of the 
State, and was reelected to that body in 1888. In 1889 
he was elected State Senator and reelected in 1890, and 
in both the lower and upper house established a repu- 
tation as a most enlightened and disinterested legisla- 
tor, placing himself invariably on the side of progress 
and general improvement. For six years, between 1889 
and 1805, he served on the Shell Fish Commission of 
Rhode Island, and from 1880 to 1884 was trial justice at 
Charlestown. He also held the position of overseer of 
the poor at Charlestown for two years. In the year l88i 
Mr. Cross was elected to succeed his father as town 
clerk of Charlestown and this office he has held con- 
tinuously ever since. Indeed his father and himself oc- 
cupied it consecutively for more than half a century, so 
that the office came to be well nigh identified with the 
name of Cross here. In all the posts which he has filled, 
Mr. Cross has proved himself a most efficient public ser- 
vant and the community owes him a great debt of grati- 
tude for the various capacities in which he has served so 
well. He is a man of the most scrupulous integrity and 
honor, and enjoys the highest esteem and admiration of 
his fellow townsmen. Mr. Cross is a man of kindly and 
genial temperament and has made hosts of friends in this 
region, and, what is a far more difficult feat, has al- 
ways kept the friendship of those with whom he is 
associated. He is a man of strongly domestic instincts 
and his home has for many years been noted for the 
open-handed hospitality displayed there. Mr. Cross has 
been a member of the Executive Committee of Wash- 
ington County -Agricultural Society since 1897. Mr. 
Cross is a member of Charity Lodge, No. 23, Free and 
Accepted Masons, Hope Valley ; and Franklin Chap- 
ter, No. 7, Royal Arch Masons, of Hope Valley. 

George C. Cross was united in marriage, February 
28, 1883, with Mary E. Budlong, of Hopkinton, where 
her birth occurred October 19, 1856, a daughter of 
Charles R. and Mary E. ( Knight j Budlong. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Cross one child has been born, Bessie May, 
July 24, 1886. Mrs. Cross is a member of the Seventh 
Day Baptist Church of .'\shaway, and is an active 
worker therein. 



PETER A. CRUISE, president of the Cruise & 

Smiley Construction Company, Incorporated, of No. 
12 East avenue, Pawtucket, R. I., and one of the most 
successful men in that line of business in the com- 
munity, is a native of England, having been born at 
Stockport, Lancashire, on April 30, 1869. By blood he 
is an Irishman, both his parents having been born in 
Ireland and having come to England as children. His 
parents were John and Anna (Burns) Cruise and his 
father was a municipal and corporation contractor for 
many years in England, finally retiring from active 
business in 1889, when he and his wife came to this 
country and made their home at Pawtucket, R. I. They 
are now both deceased and are buried in St. Francis' 
Cemetery. The early life of Peter A. Cruise was spent 
in his native place where he attended the local public 
schools. After completing his studies and while still a 
mere lad, he worked for a brick manufacturing concern, 
making hand-made bricks. He was of an unusually 
ambitious character, however, and in the year 1885, 




."/le AjTterican h'tSlon^oi 5ei 




m^ Ot. 




I 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



79 



although he was then but sixteen years of age, he came 
to the United States all by himself and started in at 
the bottom of the ladder as a brick layer, with the 
intention, even at that age, of working into the con- 
tracting business and eventually making his fortune. 
His first work was on the construction of the Ann and 
Hope mills at Lonsdale, R. 1., and he was employed 
also on several other large jobs. From the outset he 
had made Pawtucket his home and headquarters, and 
this he has continued to do up to the present time. His 
skill as a brick mason rapidly increased for he was of 
the type of youth that readily picks up knowledge and 
learns quickly from experience. He soon became a 
master mason and mechanic and worked as a journey- 
man on the construction of the State Capitol Building, 
at Providence. It was in the year 1905 that he was 
finally able to engage in a business of his own and end 
the term of his employment by others. In that year he 
formed a partnership with two gentlemen, a Mr. Humes 
and a Mr. Smiley, of Pawtucket, and the firm of Humes, 
Cruise and Smiley was organized to engage in business 
as general contractors and builders. The offices of the 
new concern were at first situated on Custom House 
street. Providence, and in the first year of their business 
existence, one of their principal contracts was for the 
erection of the SutclifTe Building at Central Falls, and 
the concern rapidly increased in size and importance 
until it was recognized as one of the most successful of 
its kind in the region. In the year 1907 Mr. Cruise and 
his partner Mr. Smiley sold their interests to Mr. 
Humes and. immediately afterwards, the former went 
to Europe and visited his native place and the home of 
his ancestors in Ireland. Upon his return to this 
country in 1908, a now concern was formed and incor- 
porated under the name of the Cruise & Smiley Con- 
struction Company, a name that has continued up to 
the present in spite of the fact that in 1909, Mr. Cruise 
purchased the interest of Mr. Smiley and has since 
conducted the enterprise alone. He has steadily grown 
better and better known and more popular through an 
ever increasing section of the country, and it has been 
liis fortune to build some of the largest and most im- 
portant edifices in the State. Among these are some 
that are universally recognized among the most beautiful 
specimens of architecture. A list of the buildings of 
various kinds put up by Mr. Cruise would extend beyond 
the limits of a paper of this character, but among them 
should be mentioned the following : In 1908, the Vesey 
Street Grammar School, of Providence, and the rectory 
and St. Mary's Church at Pawtucket; in 1910, the last 
section of the Merchants' Freezing and Cold Storage 
Plant on Kinsley avenue, Providence, the J. and P. Coats 
Power Plant and the Garibaldi Playgrounds on West 
Exchange street. Providence; in 1912, he remodeled 
and built over the Blackstone Hotel, at Providence ; 
in 1913, the Hope Webbing Company Power Plant and 
Dye House, and the D. Goflf & Sons' Power Plant ; in 
1914. the D. Goff & Sons' Dye House; the complete 
plant of the Halliwell Dye and Bleaching Company ; the 
McCarty Dry Goods Block, at Woonsocket ; and the 
N'urses' Dormitory at the Memorial Hospital, at Paw- 
tucket; in 1915, the New Dormitory of the State Home 
and School ; in 1916, the complete plant of the Crown 
Manufacturing Company; and in 1917, the complete 



plant of the United Lace and Braid Company at Crans- 
ton, R. I., besides many others. 

Peter A. Cruise was married .August i~, iS<S8, to Miss 
Catherine Kelly, a native of Stockport, Cheshire county, 
England, and they became the parents of the following 
children : William F., who is now the general manager 
of his father's concern, enlisted in March, 1918, in the 
L'nited States Xaval Reserve forces, stationed at New- 
port, R. I., where he attained the rank of chief petty 
officer, stationed at the receiving barracks as master 
mechanic ; Gertrude /\., resides at home ; Estolla ; Lil- 
lian ; Rose; and a son Raymond who died January 18, 
1916, at the age of seventeen years from internal in- 
juries sustained in playing basketball. 

The present year ti9l8) was one of the busiest in 
all Mr. Cruise's career, when he built for the city of 
Providence the Fire .Marm and Telegraph Building. 
He has already completed the remodeling of the vulcan- 
izing building at tlie Revere Rubber Works; the Central 
Fire Alarm Building at Providence ; the storehouse, 
garages, oil storage and weave shed for D. GofF and 
Sons on Main, Elm and River streets, Pawtucket. 
This carries the distinction of being the largest ever 
let in Pawtucket. He built also, the large store house 
for the .American Silk Spinning Company, of Provi- 
dence ; and the Cruise (iarage, a building with housing 
space for fifty motor cars, which he built mainly for 
his own use and pleasure and is largely occupied with 
his business trucks. Some years ago he built the 
handsome tnansion at No. 165 Mineral Spring avenue, 
Pawtucket, where he and his family now resides. Mr. 
Cruise is not a politician in any sense of the word and 
he has no political ambitions, although in 1916 he was 
appointed by Governor Bcekman. special State Con- 
stable, a commission that he still holds. Mr. Cruise is 
a charter member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Pawtucket Lodge. No. 920. He is a 
member and president of the Builders' and Traders' 
Exchange, Pawtucket, and a member of the Builders' 
and Traders' E.xchangc of Providence. He belongs 
also to the ToKalon Club, the Business Men's Associa- 
tion of Pawtucket and Warwick Club. 



DANIEL JENCKES MANTON— The town of 
Lincoln is the scene of a very large industry in general 
farming and dairying, and numbers among its inhab- 
itants many successful farmers, whose activities are an 
important factor in the general prosperity and develop- 
ment of this region. None of these, however, has 
reached a higher place in the general esteem of the 
community, or has made himself a more substantial and 
influential citizen here, than Daniel Jenckes Manton, 
the well-known farmer and landowner of Lime Rock. 
Mr. Manton is a native of Lincoln township, born June 
9, 1856, on the old Captain John Jenckes homestead 
farm, which has been in the possession of the family 
for centuries. The Manton family is one of the oldest 
and most distinguished in Rhode Island and its an- 
cestors among the earliest settlers of the Providence 
plantations, having lived here at least as early as 1640. 

(I) The first ancestor of this family of whom we 
have authentic record was Edward Manton. a gentle- 
man of English origin, who was one of the thirty-nine 
signers in 1640 for a form of government in Provi- 



So 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



dence. In 1643 he was a resident of Seekonk, and in 
165s was made a freeman there. He was a prominent 
man in the community, and was a juryman in 1659. 
Edward Manton was the father of one child, Shad- 
rach, mentioned below. 

(II) Shadrach Manton, son of Edward Manton, was 
a resident of Providence, where he was engaged in busi- 
ness as a cooper. In the year 1658 he was granted by 
the township a house share adjacent to that of Epen- 
etus OIney, and in addition some meadow land above 
Wanskuck. In l6j8 he was made a freeman, and also 
served as a juryman, constable, town clerk, and dep- 
uty, filling the latter office for a number of years, and 
later was surveyor of highways and overseer of the 
poor. His death occurred at Providence, January 27, 
1714, after a long and useful life. Shadrach Manton 
married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of John and .-Mice 
Smith, of Providence, and they were the parents of the 
following children : Edward, mentioned below ; Ann, 
Elizabeth, Mary, and probably several other children 
who died in early youth. 

(III) Edward Manton, son of Shadrach and Eliza- 
beth (Smith) Manton. was born at Providence, Decem- 
ber II, 1658, and there spent his entire life, his death 
occurring August 14, 1723. He married, December 9, 
1680, Elizabeth Thornton, daughter of John and Sarah 
Thornton, and they were the parents of the following 
children: Shadrach, Edward. Jr., mentioned below; 
John. .\nn, Catherine, Mary, Elizabeth, and Sarah. 

(IV) Edward IManton, Jr., son of Edward and Eliz- 
abeth (Thornton) Manton. was born at Providence, 
R. I., and made his home at that place. He married 

Tabitha — , and among their children was Daniel, 

mentioned below. 

(V) Colonel Daniel Manton, son of Edward and 
Tabitha Manton, was born at Providence, R. I., in 
1743, and became a conspicuous hgure in the commu- 
nity, taking an active part in both civil and military 
affairs. He was captain of a troop of Rhode Island 
Light Horse during the Revolution, and several of his 
sons became men of distinction in this community. 
He appears to have removed from Providence to the 
town of Johnston, as his children are recorded among 
the birth records of that place. He married Patience 
Eddy, born in 1743, a daughter of Daniel and Lydia 
(Olney) Eddy, of Gloucester, R. I., and they were the 
parents of the following children : Edward, mentioned 
below; Jeremiah, born Jan. 13, 1763; Mchetabel. born 
July 21, 1766; Elisha, born April 21, 1769; Olney, born 
Feb. 27, 1772; Daniel. Jr., born Nov. 27, 1774; John, 
born May 23, 1777; William, born May 27, 1780; Esther, 
born Sept. 8, 1782; and Thomas, born April 7, 1785. 

(\'I) The Hon. Edward Manton, son of Colonel 
Daniel and Patience (Eddy) Manton, was born at 
Johnston, R. I.. May 26, 1759, and died September 20, 
1820. He resided at Johnston during his entire life 
and, like his father, was exceedingly prominent in local 
affairs. He married, April 30, 17S0, Catherine Alver- 
son, who was born in 1761, daughter of William Alver- 
son, and died December 18, 1842. Edward Manton and 
his wife were the parents of the following children, all 
of whom were born at Johnston : Lydia, born May 17, 
1781, and became the wife of Dr. Moses Mowry; 
Patience, born Dec. 14, 1783, and died Feb. 27, 1803, 



unmarried; Catherine, born Oct. 26, 1785, died June II, 
1811 ; Edward, Jr., born Nov. 13. 1787, died Dec. 29, 
following; William James, mentioned below; Marian, 
born July 29, 1791, became the wife of Dr. Stephen 
Harris; Henry, born July 2, 1793, married Ann C. 
Jencks, and died in Dec, 1841 ; Abigail, born Jan. 29, 
1796, died unmarried. June 12, 1853; and Edward Eddy, 
born Sept. 17. 1804, married Mary G. Nightingale. 

(VII) William James Manton, son of Edward 
and Catherine (Alverson) Manton, was born July (or 
January) i, 1789, in the town of Johnston, where he 
made his home during his entire life. As a lad he 
received his education there, and upon attaining man- 
hood engaged in the occupation of farming, which he 
followed during the remainder of his life. His death 
occurred June 30, 1828, when only thirty-nine years of 
age. He married, October 14, 1822, at Lime Rock in 
the town of Lincoln (then Smithfield), at the home of 
Captain John Jenckes. Freelove C. Jenckcs, who was 
born there in 1799. Her death occurred December 27, 
1831, at the age of thirty-two years. They were the 
parents of one child, Crawford Jenckes, mentioned 
below. After the death of Mr. Manton his widow re- 
moved to the home of her father, Captain John Jenckes, 
at Lime Rock, and there spent the remainder of her 
days. 

(VIII) Crawford Jenckes Manton, son of William 
James and Freelove C. (Jenckes) Manton, was born on 
his father's farm in the town of Johnston, and there 
grew to manhood. He subsequently inherited this place, 
which is now occupied by his son, Daniel J. Manton, 
and which at that time included a tract of two hundred 
and fifty acres of valuable woodland. He resided dur- 
ing his entire life on this farm, which he did much to 
improve and develop during the time that he was active. 
He was also the agent for the Harris Lime Rock Com- 
pany of Lime Rock for eighteen years, and proved him- 
self an exceedingly able business man. He made for 
himself a place of importance and influence in the com- 
munity and won the high regard of all his fellow-citi- 
zens. He died on his home farm, March 13, 1898, in his 
seventy-fourth year, and was buried in the old Jenckes 
Cemetery on the Lime Rock farm. During his youth 
Crawford Jenckes Manton was a Whig in politics, but 
later joined the Republican party at the time of its 
organization. He was not, however, bound by partisan 
consideration, and always claimed his right to vote in- 
dependently on all issues. Crawford Jenckes Manlon 
was married at Lime Rock to Esther Brown Wilbur, 
a native of that place and a daughter of David and 
Phoebe (Brown) Wilbur. Her grandfather, Christo- 
pher Wilbur, was a prominent man in this region during 
his life. Mrs. Manton was a woman of many virtues 
and wide cultivation and was beloved of all who knew 
her. Her death occurred September 24, 1888, when she 
was but fifty-five years of age. Crawford Jenckes 
Manton and his wife were the parents of the following 
children ; Freelove Jenckes, born Jan. 7, 1853. and be- 
came the wife of Frank Draper, son of Alpha A. 
Draper, of Lincoln ; William James, born June 7, 1855, 
a ranchman and cotton grower of Bellevue, Clay county, 
Tex., where he makes his home; Daniel Jenckes, with 
whose career we are here especially concerned ; Lydia 
Mowry, born Aug. 10, 1859, and became the wife of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



8i 



Luther Thomas Angell, of East Providence, where they 
reside; Edward, born Aug. 17, i860, died in early 
youth: Crawford Jcnckes, mentioned below; Edward 
Eddy, bom May 24, 1866, died Oct. 5. 1867; .Xnn Eve- 
lyn, born Oct. 27, 1867, died May i, 1893, unmarried; 
Thomas Holmes, mentioned below ; Esther Mabel, born 
Jan. 28, 1871, died June 13, 1885; Harry, born Sept. 3, 
1874, died Oct. i, of the same year. 

(IX) Daniel Jenckes Manton, second son of Craw- 
ford Jenckcs and Esther Brown (Wilbur) Manton, was 
born in the town of Lincoln, June 9, 1856. and has ever 
since made his home in this region. .Xs a child he 
attended the local schools and afterwards was a pupil 
at Scofiield's Commercial College at Providence, where 
he took a business course. Upon completing his stud- 
ies he returned to his home, and became a partner of his 
father in the latter's general farming and dairying 
business. He had a distinct taste for farming life and 
has ever since followed it with a high degree of suc- 
cess. After his father's death he continued to oper- 
ate the eld family homestead, consisting of two hundred 
and thirty acres of fine farm land. This was already 
highly-improved through the accumulated efforts of his 
ancestors, but Mr. Manton has still further developed 
it, until it is now one of the model farms of this neigh- 
borhood. His property has the further advantage of 
being crossed by the Providence & Burrillville Electric 
railroads, which brings it into easy communication with 
the surrounding community and makes the marketing 
of its produce a simple matter. Mr. Manton is a staunch 
Republican in politics, but is quite witliout political am- 
bition, having avoided rather than sought public office. 
His prominence in the community, however, has caused 
him to be sought frequently as the candidate of his 
party for office, and he has served one term on the 
Lincoln Town Council, proving himself a most capable 
and efficient public servant. He has been for many 
years prominently identified with the Grange move- 
ment in this community and was one of the charter 
members of Lime Rock Grange, No. 22, and its first 
master, a position which he held for two years. He is 
also a member of Pomona Grange, in which he has 
held the post of gate-keeper. In his religious belief he 
is a Baptist, and with his wife and family attends the 
Lime Rock Church of that denomination. He is very 
active in the work of the congregation and has served 
as treasurer, being succeeded in that position by Mrs. 
Manton, who continues to hold the office. 

Daniel J. Manton was united in marriage, October 2, 
1878, with Patience E. Wickes, born July 16, i860, 
daughter of Stephen and Ida (Angell) Wickes, and a 
descendant in the paternal line from the old Wickes 
line of Warwick. Mrs. Manton, on the maternal side 
of the house, is descended from Thomas Angell, one of 
the original settlers of Providence, to which place he 
came in the company of Roger Williams. Mr. and Mrs. 
Manton are the parents of two children, as follows : 
Harry A., born Dec. 18, 1882, now residing in East 
Templeton, Mass., and married, Sept. 26, 1906, Cath- 
leen L. Jencks, of Lime Rock, who has borne him one 
child. Mabel Manton ; Daniel Jenckes, Jr., born Sept. 
28, 1888, and married Grace Henderson, of Saylesville. 

(IX) Crawford Jenckes Manton, Jr., fourth son of 
Crawford Jenckes and Esther Brown (Wilbur) Man- 

R 1-2—8 



ton, was born on the old Manton homestead near Lime 
Rock. December 12, 1861. He received his education 
at the local public schools, and learned the trade of 
machinist in the shop of Fales & Jenks. Upon com- 
pleting his apprenticeship he went to the city of Boston, 
where he followed his trade for about two years, and 
then returned to Providence, where for fifteen years he 
was in the employ of the Rhode Island Tool Company. 
.•\fter the death of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Alpha A. 
Draper, of Lincoln, he removed to the Draper farm, 
and here he still resides with his family. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. Crawford Jenckes Manton, Jr., married Emma 
E. Draper, daughter of .Mpha A. and Lydia H. (Haw- 
kins) Draper, of this place, and they are the parents of 
one son, .Alpha D. Manton. 

(IX) Thomas Holmes Manton, youngest surviving 
son of Crawford Jenckes and Esther Brown (Wilbur) 
Manton, was bom at Lime Rock, on the old Captain 
John Jenckes farm, November 22, 1869. Mr. Manton 
received his preparatory education at the local school 
in this region and afterwards was a student for two 
years at the English and Classical Schocl of Provi- 
dence, R. 1. During his childhood he lived on his 
father's farm, where he assisted in his spare hours with 
the work about the place. He did not, however, finally 
take up agriculture as an occupation, but in 1888, when 
nineteen years of age, he accepted a clerkship in the 
Berkeley Mills at Berkeley, one of the plants owned by 
the Lonsdale Company, and continued in this position 
until 1901. He was then appointed paymaster of the 
concern and still holds this responsible position after 
seventeen years. Mr. Manton is a man of marked 
business ability, and his genial personality endears him 
to all those with whom he comes in contact. He is very 
well liked both by his employers and the men who 
work in the mill, and enjoys the respect and esteem of 
all his fellow-citizens. Like his father and the other 
members of the family, he is a Republican in politics, 
but while keenly interested in the affairs of the com- 
munity has never sought office of any kind. Thomas 
Holmes Manton was married in 1903 to Bertha M. 
Clark, of Boston. 



WILLIAM ROBE GILLESPIE— The business 
with which the S'n.s nf William Kt-bb Gillespie are con- 
nected was founded by their father who, with fine busi- 
ness instinct and broad vision, laid sure and deep the 
foundation upon which the substantial business edifice 
which men know as The Rhode Island Processing Com- 
pany has been erected. Like a true father, he built the 
future for his sons, and in them his hopes have been 
realized. He was master of his business, and when 
the time came to found a business, he knew how to 
plan, how to build, and how to weave into that com- 
mercial structure a wharf and woof which should en- 
dure. 

William Robb Gillespie was born in Scotland, May 20, 
1858, and died in Pawtucket. R. I., March 24, 1917. 
His schooling was meagre, but he gained valuable 
knowledge in the school of experience, then was blessed 
in his choice of a wife who was not only a helpmeet 
but an educated woman, who acted as her husband's 
tutor until both were on an intellectual level. He mar- 



82 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



ried Elizabeth Clark, in Scotland, and here resided 
until after the birth of their fifth child, when they 
came to the United States. 

In Scotland the father was a mill worker, and in the 
United States he followed the same occupation, going 
first to Westbrook, Me., the pay then being one 
dollar daily with which to support a wife and five 
children. But his careful, capable wife accomplished 
that feat, and step by step he rose to a better position 
until finally a superintendent's position was reached. 
Leaving Maine he came with his family to Easthamp- 
ton. Mass., there securing a position as assistant super- 
intendent with the Hampton Manufacturing Company 
in their bleaching and dyeing mill From Easthamp- 
ton he went to Utica, N. Y., in oflicial capacity, thence 
to Coventry, R. I., where he organized a company and 
absorbed the Cooper Mercerizing Company. This com- 
pany was greatly involved, but Mr. Gillespie reorganized, 
refitted and improved, until with better surroundings 
and modern equipment he instilled new life into the 
business, and with the new machinery, much of which he 
designed, went a new spirit and principle which in time 
raised the plant to a high plane of usefulness and effi- 
ciency. .\ new mill later was added, a large business 
conducted and The Rhode Island Processing Company 
firmly established as a productive, prosperous manu- 
facturing property. Letters from large dealers in New 
Vork, Philadelphia, and other cities, which have 
been preserved, vouch for the high esteem in which 
Mr. Gillespie was held in the business world. He was 
a man of genial disposition and hearty manner, making 
friends with all with whom he came in contact, whether 
of high or low degree. He held particularly sacred 
his word in financial matters, was prompt and punctual 
in all his business engagements and the soul of honor. 
He erected a beautiful home in Pawtucket, but one 
week after it was completed he passed away. 

Mr. Gillespie became a lover and a student of fine 
literature, and ranked especially high as mathema- 
tician. He had abrut completed arrangements by which 
his business cares would be assumed by his son, Andrew 
M., his intention being to retire and enjoy the fruits 
of his life of labor in his beautiful Pawtucket home. 
He took an interest in community affairs, served the 
Council of Coventry Center for two years, was a mem- 
ber of Barney Merry Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Pawtucket Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Coun- 
cil, Royal and Select Masters ; Holy Sepulchre Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar, all of Pawtucket; Pales- 
tine Temple, .•\ncient .\rabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, of Providence ; was an active member of 
Woodlawn Baptist Church of Pawtucket, and in Coven- 
try donated the land upon which the Episcopal church 
stands. 

Mr. Gillespie married Elizabeth Clark, born in Scot- 
land, and they were the parents of Barbara, now resid- 
ing with her widowed mother in Pawtucket ; John, 
associated with textile manufacturing in Holyoke, 
Mass.; William R., of Coventry, R. I.; Robert S.. died 
one month before his father; Andrew M., of Coventry; 
Elizabeth C, married William Bassett, of Coventry; 
Margaret, married \\'allace V. Thornley, of Pawtucket; 
Mae, married Edgar Wilkinson, of Pawtucket; Alfred 
C, of Coventry, R. I. 



Andrew Millar Gillespie was born in Paisley, Scot- 
land, November 2, 1885, and when a child was brought 
to the LTnited States by his parents, residing in the 
various places in Maine, Massachusetts, New York and 
Rhode Island, to which business called his honored 
father. He attended public school in these' places,- and 
when school years were over he learned the dyer's art 
and the bleaching of cotton goods under his father's 
direction and instruction. In time he advanced to close 
business association, became a trusted, confidential 
assistant, and diverted from his father's shoulders many 
business burdens. When the father laid down his 
burdens for all time, the son assumed the management 
on behalf of the estate and is now (1918) the efficient 
treasurer of the Cowen Braid Manufacturing Company, 
a director of that company, and treasurer of The 
Rhode Island Processing Company, both of Coventry, 
R. I. He is an able, capable business man, thoroughly 
familiar with the financial problems and needs of the 
corporation with which he has been connected for so 
long, and is held in high regard by his business asso- 
ciates and contemporaries. 

Mr. Gillespie married. June 17. 1914, Mae Eleanor 
Perry, of New Bedford, Mass., and they are the parents 
of Claire Eleanor and William Robb Gillespie. The 
family home is in Coventry Center, R. I. 



REV. JOSEPH H. BELAND— Ordained a priest 
of the Roman Catholic church in 1883. Father Beland 
reviews thirty-five years of pastoral work in his native 
Canada and in the United States, his present pastorate. 
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Pawtucket, R. I., cover- 
ing nearly a quarter £>f a century of that period, 1894- 
1918. He is a son of Toussaint Beland, a farmer of 
the Province of Quebec, Canada, born in September, 
1822, died November 17, 1909. His mother, Elizabeth 
Cartiers (Dupuis) Beland, died in November, 1901, 
aged seventy-seven years. They were the parents of 
thirteen children, seven of whom are living; six sons, 
one of whom, Victor Beland, is in charge of the Notre 
Dame Cemetery in Pawtucket, four brothers, business 
men of Three Rivers, Canada, the sixth. Rev. Joseph 
H. Beland, permanent rector of Our Lady of the Sacred 
Heart. Two of the daughters, Virginia and George- 
anna, the latter now deceased, took the vows of the 
Sisterhood known as the Grey Nuns, at Ottawa, Ont. 

Joseph H. Beland was born at Three Rivers, Prov- 
ince of Quebec, Canada, and there completed primary 
and grammar school courses, finishing secular study at 
St. Joseph's College, Three Rivers, and was there edu- 
cated in theology in preparation for consecration to the 
life of a priest of the Roman Catholic church. He was 
ordained December 23, 1883, by Bishop Lafleche, of 
Three Rivers, and began his work as a priest at Artha- 
basaville, Quebec, remaining there eighteen months. 
The next year and a half were spent in pastoral work 
at Duluth, Minn., his work there being brought to a 
close through a severe illness. He spent the year fol- 
lowing his recovery in Albany, N. Y., then for two and 
a half years was curate of Sacred Heart parish. New 
Bedford. Mass. After service at Flint College. Fall 
River, two and a half years pastor of St. James parish, 
in Manville, he came to his present parish in Central 
Falls, R. I., being installed pastor of Our Lady of the 






^1 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



83 



Sacred Heart parish in February, 1894. The parish 
which he has served so long, faithfully and well, is an 
important one, and its upbuilding has been the great 
work of the life of this devoted son of the church. 
Twelve hundred Catholic families, numbering 6,000 
souls, arc included within the limits of the parish which 
dates corporate existence from the year 1874. The 
first pastor. Father Dauray, is now a Monsignor in 
rank, his connection with the parish beginning in 
September, 1873, and ending in November, 1875. He 
was succeeded by Rev. A. L. Bouland, in Xovember, 
1875, and he by Rev. George T. Mahoney, in Septem- 
ber, 1880, Father Mahoney serving for nearly fourteen 
years until succeeded by Rev. Joseph H. Beland, in 
February, 1894. The visible fruits of the long con- 
nection which has existed between Father Beland and 
the parish are many ; schools are maintained where one 
thousand pupils receive instruction in the grammar 
school grades ; a Sacred Heart Brothers School is sup- 
ported where two hundred and forty pupils are prepar- 
ing for college; a convent with twenty-three sisters of 
the Order of St. Anne is part of the educational system 
of the parish ; thirteen Brothers from the Sacred Heart 
Provincial Home at St. Hyacinthe, Canada, comprising 
the faculty of the Christian Brothers School, previously 
referred to. The rectory was built by Father Beland, 
as was the large school building ; the convent building 
was purchased by him ; the Brothers school built, St. 
Joseph's gymnasium built and equipped, the Church of 
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart enlarged and Notre 
Dame Cemetery, on Daggett avenue, Pawtuckct, estab- 
lished. .'Ml social, fraternal and religious societies of 
the parish are well-maintained. Father Beland being a 
member of the school board of the diocese, a director 
of the Society of St. Jean de Baptiste, Jacques Cartier 
Circle Literary Society, St. Joseph's Gymnasium, all 
other interests of the church claiming his closest per- 
sonal support and guidance. He has three assistants 
in his work, Rev. A. P. Desrochers, Rev. Stephen 
Grenier, and Rev. N. J. Plasse. 



FREDERICK A. POTTER— To trace the con- 
:roie achie\ement of a career is a task of compara- 
tively few difficulties, for we have but to turn to his- 
tory or well preserved tradition for ample data. But 
to determine in an accurate or approximately adequate 
degree the extent of the sphere of influence of the life 
of an individual is a task of large proportions. The 
influence of the conduct and bearing as well as the 
business efficiency of a man in an executive office over 
the lives and minds of the men whose work he directs 
is very great. The greatest of the world's leaders 
have been in the beginning imitators of the greatness of 
the great men who went before them, tempering their 
imitation with individual effort, but still imitating. And 
this is true of the lowly as of the great. We look 
instinctively for a model that we may pattern after it. 
As other men have done so also we wish to do. The 
aspiration to do even greater things carries us only 
a step beyond. Imitation to the very letter and detail 
is niggardly and slavish and bears no true relation to 
greatness. But imitation in as far as it is the basin 
foundation of the ambition to do great things, forms a 
vital part of every man's life, and we find it every 



step along life's journey. The child imitates its father, 
the young man his employer, the man who stands upon 
the pinnacle of achievement turns to the pages of 
history for his example, and so through all the rela- 
tions of life. Therefore, too great emphasis cannot 
be placed on the physical, mental and moral fitness of 
executives for the offices they hold. For their example 
is emulated and those who come to take their places 
will be essentially what they themselves have been. 

.•\ study of conditions in the milling industries of the 
country reveals to even the most casual investigator 
the great field for either good or evil influence the large 
plants and mills offer. Young men and women, not yet 
out of their teens, form a large proportion of the 
hands of these establishments. Their minds are par- 
ticularly open to impression at this stage, and they 
imbibe and form into active life principles the ex- 
amples set by those in authority over them. Careless- 
ness, lack of interest, dishonesty and injustice in super- 
ior officers, works a harm which is as irreparable as is 
incalculable the effect of kindness, justice and equity, 
integrity and human understanding. 

Therefore when we say that a life of comparative 
retirement has wrought untold good through its influ- 
ence we do not stray from the truth. Such a life w'as 
that of the late Frederick A. Potter, for many years 
superintendent of the Fales & Jenks AJachine Company, 
of Pawtuckct, R. I. The nature of his position with 
this large and well-known firm brought him constantly 
into contact with its employees. Through the influ- 
ence of an exemplary Christian life, a broad and toler- 
ant understanding which allowed him to appreciate tjie 
weaknesses of his fellowmen, and a cheerful and up- 
lifting honesty and probity, Frederick A. Potter left 
the mark of his life and works on the hearts of count- 
less men with whom he came into contact in the affairs 
of every day life. His interest in the affairs of the 
men under his authority was fraternal, and had its root 
in fellowship, and was far removed to the paternal 
interest which partakes in most instances of a mild 
form of despotism, stifling individuality. He studied 
the talents of the men under his care, saw their special 
aptness for work, suggested, guided, and aided them 
along the paths for which they were most fitted. .'Knd 
in consequence he was loved, honored and emulated, 
and in his own sphere left his monument in the lives of 
the men who were his co-workers. 

Frederick A. Potter was born in the town of Man- 
ton, R. L, the descendant of an honored family of that 
vicinity. The coat-of-arms of the Potter family is as 
follows : 

Arms — -A-rgrent on a pale azure three wings con- 
joined of the fir.st. 

Crest — .\ star of twelve rays or, between a pair of 
wings argent. 

Frederick A. Potter was educated in the public 
schools of Pawtucket, R. I., whither his parents removed 
when he was very young. Tiring of his studies at an 
early age, and evincing a decided talent for things 
mechanical, he left school and entered the employ of the 
Fales & Jenks Machine Company, of Pawtucket. His 
first position with this firm was in a minor capacity. 
He rose rapidly, however, through perseverance and 
industry to a post of large importance. Later he be- 
came superintendent of the firm, and continued to fill 



84 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLANU 



the office until the time of his retirement from active 
business hfe. During the long period of his connection 
with Fales & Jenks Machine Company he was one of 
the best loved of its officers, and his retirement in 
March, 1907, was deeply regretted by the members of 
the firm and the employees alike. 

Although known throughout Pawtucket as a citizen of 
the finest type, thoroughly alive to the responsibilities 
of his citizenship, and a willing worker for the ad- 
vancement of the city, Mr. Potter took but liUle part 
in the public life of the city. His political affiliation 
was with the Republican party, but he was not bound 
by party principles against moral conviction in casting 
his vote. He supported every movement for the better- 
ing of civic conditions in Pawtucket. He was well 
known in fraternal life, and was a prominent member of 
the Masonic order. He was a member of Barney Berry 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of Paw- 
tucket, of the Royal Arch Masons, of Holy Sepulchre 
Commandery, Knights Templar, and of the Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Boston, 
Mass. 

On March 20. 1853, Mr. Potter married in Woon- 
socket, R. I., Mary E. Whipple, daughter of George 
A. and Marianne (Sheldon) Whipple. Mrs. Potter 
died April 23, 191 7. They were the parents of one 
daughter, Florence E., who resides at the family home- 
stead. No. 126 Pine street, Pawtucket, R. I. Fred- 
erick A. Potter died at his home in Pawtucket, January 
8, 1908. 



ROBERT SIMMONS PHILLIPS, M. D.— Seven- 
teen years of successful practice have made the name 
which stands at the head of this article thoroughly 
familiar to many of the citizens of Providence. Dr. 
Phillips is held in the highest esteem not only as a 
physician of repute, but also as a man ever ready to do 
his part toward serving the best interests of his com- 
munity. 

Henry Phillips, father of Robert Simmons Phillips, 
was in business in Philadelphia, but moved to New 
Bedford. Mass., where he became bookkeeper for a 
large mill, a position which he retained to the close of 
his life. Mr. Phillips married Harriet Simmons, who 
survives him and now resides with her son in Provi- 
dence. 

Robert Simmons Phillips, son of Henry and Har- 
riet (Simmons) Phillips, was born January 18, 1873, 
in Philadelphia, and was six years old when the family 
moved to New Bedford. It was in the public schools 
of that city that he received his elementary education, 
passing thence to the high school and graduating in 
1891. For a few months thereafter he was employed 
in the Mechanics' National Bank of New Bedford, and 
then took a post-graduate high school course of one 
year preparatory to entering Brown University, which 
he did in 1892. In 1896 he received from that institu- 
tion the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, and the same 
year matriculated in the New Nork Homoeopathic Med- 
ical College, graduating in 1900 with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. On competitive examination for 
entrance to the Flower Hospital, Dr. Phillips took an 
interne course in that institution, graduating in 1901. 
While at Brown University he was an honor student, 



being elected to Phi Beta Kappa. In 1901 Dr. Phillips 
began practice in Providence and has ever since re- 
sided continuously in that city, acquiring a large and 
high-class patronage and building up a reputation for 
professional skill and unwearied devotion to duty. He 
holds the position of attendant physician for the Home 
for Aged Women, for St. Elizabeth's Home for Con- 
firmed Invalids, and for the Toby Street Home for 
Children. Among the professional organizations in 
which he is enrolled are the Rhode Island Homceopathic 
Medical Association and the .\merican Institute of 
Homoeopathy. In politics Dr. Phillips is an independ- 
ent voter and has never mingled actively in public 
affairs. His friends are many, both within and without 
the pale of his profession. The only other social organ- 
ization to which he belongs is the Sigma Chi frater- 
nity, in the affairs of which he takes a prominent part, 
having served as its delegate to the San Francisco and 
St. Louis conventions. He is a member of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal church. 

Dr. Phillips has won for himself an undisputed 
standing in his chosen profession. The success which 
he has achieved is entirely of his own making and, 
resting as it does on a solid foundation of learning, 
skill and natural ability, bids fair to increase steadily 
and rapidly with the passing of the years. 



ARTHUR LIGOURI FANNING, one of the most 
successful and widely known of Providence physicians, 
is a native of this city, and a son of Bernard and Mary 
(Carroll) Fanning, old and highly respected residents. 
His grandfather, Michael Carroll, was a native of Ire- 
land, and came from that country to the United States 
early in life. He settled at Pawtuxet Valley, in the 
year 1828, and was extremely prominent in Providence 
and River Point during his life. The father of Arthur 
Ligouri Fanning was for many years a skilled machin- 
ist here and is now deceased, while his wife survives 
him and makes her home with her son. 

Born at Providence, R. I., February 24, 1876, Arthur 
Ligouri Fanning attended the parochial and public 
schools of the city. He studied for some time at the 
Providence High School, then entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Boston. His ambition to 
learn his profession was not easily gratified, as he was 
obliged to earn the money with which to pay his ex- 
penses in the medical school. In order to accomplish 
this, the young man engaged in various kinds of work, 
taught in school and tutored private pupils during the 
time that he was himself carrying on his studies. His 
earnestness and courage at length had its reward and 
he graduated from college with the class of 1907, taking 
his medical degree. He then became interne at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, at Providence, and remained sixteen 
months there, gaining the necessary practical experience 
for his career. In the year 1909 he established himself 
in practice in this city, and since that time has met with 
a great and uninterrupted success, which has made him 
a leader in his profession here. Since 1909 he has been 
visiting physician at St. Joseph's Hospital. Dr Fan- 
ning has been very active in politics for a number of 
years, and is a prominent member of the local Democ- 
racy here. He has not been personally ambitious, how- 
ever, and has held but one office, that of membership 




^v^akaaAanjCk 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



85 



on the city school board, to which he was elected from 
the Third Ward, and in which he served from IQOO to 
1902. In his religious belief he is a Roman Catholic, 
and a member of St. Michael's Church in this city. He 
is a member of several societies and organizations of 
various kinds, including the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Order of Owls, and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, and is medical examiner for the local 
chapters of the two latter. He is also afiiliated with ihc 
various professional societies including the Providence 
Medical Society, the Rhode Island Medical Society, and 
the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Fanning was united in marriage, October 12, 
1910, at Providence, with Teresa Mary Washek, of 
Providence, R. I., a daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Washek, of Austria. They were the parents of three 
children: Joseph Edward, Mary Louise and Arthur 
Ligouri. 

BERNARD McCABE — Prominent in business and 
manufacturing circles in the city of Pawtucket in the 
closing decades of the nineteenth century, and a well 
known though unofficial figure in public life, was the 
late Bernard McCabe, whose death occurred in Paw- 
tucket. on April 15, 1909. His career belongs to that 
period of development and progress which brought 
Pawtucket from a place of comparative unimportance 
into the foremost rank of Rhode Island cities. 

Bernard McCabe was born in Pawtucket, on March i, 
1848, the son of Hugh and Catherine (McEntee) Mc- 
Cabe. His father, a native of Ireland, emigrated to 
America in 1843, settling in Pawtucket, where he died. 
His son was educated in the schools of the city, but 
was forced by adverse circumstances to curtail his 
studies at the age of fifteen years. He entered the 
Pervear Bolt Works, where he remained only a short 
time, leaving this employment to learn the trade of 
blacksmith with Allen Green at Providence. On com- 
pleting his apprenticeship he went to Boston, where he 
was employed as a journeyman. In 1875 Mr. McCabe 
returned to Pawtucket and, in partnership with Michael 
Whalen. opened a general blacksmith and wheelwright 
shop. The business prospered from the outset, growing 
within a short period far beyond its original limits. In 
18S0 Mr. McCabe purchased the interests of his partner, 
and thenceforward until his death was sole owner and 
manager of the steadily increasing business. In 1887, 
forced by the volume of his business to seek larger 
quarters, he erected a wheelwright and blacksmith shop 
on the corner of Main and Bayley streets, in Paw- 
tucket. In the same year he opened the factory, which 
he controlled until his death, for the manufacture of 
carriages and wagons. The business which he founded 
and brought to such successful proportions is now 
conducted under the name of the Bernard McCabe 
Carriage Company. Mr. McCabe also established a 
store at No. 345 Main street, for the sale of bicycles 
and bicycle accessories. He was eminently respected 
in business circles, and throughout the period in which 
he engaged in the carriage and wagon manufacturing 
was a leader in the industry in Pawtucket. He was a 
business man of shrewd foresight, keenly alert to the 
possibilities of a bargain, yet fair and just in all his 
transactions. His success was all the more remarkable 



when considered in the light of his early handicaps. 
Indomitable courage, and a strong determination to use 
every opportunity of an honorable nature to aid him 
on his way to success, brought him eventually into a 
position of responsibility and influence in the business 
world. 

Keenly interested in every development of the times, 
a student of current events, and of National, State and 
civic issues, Mr. McCabe, although he remained strictly 
aloof from political office seeking, was widely known in 
political circles, and frequently consulted in matters of 
importance relative to civic issues. He was an Inde- 
pendent in local politics, but a Democrat in National 
issues. 

In July, 1891, Mr. McCabe married Ellen M. P.rady, 
daughter of Philip and Rose (Goodwin) Brady, of Attle- 
boro, Mass. Mrs. McCabe, who survives her husband, 
resides at No. 68 Sayles avenue, Pawtucket. She is 
well known in social circles in the city, and for many 
years has been identified with charitable and philan- 
thropic endeavors. Bernard McCabe died at his home 
in Pawtucket, R. I., on April 15, 1909. 



HARRY PECKHAM KENYON, one of the well- 
known figures in the financial and banking interests of 
Providence, is a member of an old and distinguished 
Rhode Island family which has been conspicuous in 
this region for many years. He is a great-grandson of 
Captain John and Kate (Vars) Kenyon, the latter a 
member of the old X'ars family of Niantic, R. I., a 
grandson of Isaac Kenyon, and a son of John Thomas 
Kenyon, for many years one of the best known men in 
the business and public life of Olneyville, in this State. 
Captain John Kenyon and his wife were the parents of 
the following children : Nancy, Sally, who married 
Jarcd Barber; Fanny, who married George Barber; 
Sophia, who married Mitchael Irving; Drusilla, who 
married Henry Lowe; Jesse, Burdick, Isaac, who is 
mentioned below; Charles, Edward, Godfrey, and 
George. 

Isaac Kenyon, son of Captain John and Kate (Vars) 
Kenyon, was born at Hopkinton, R. I., and as a lad 
attended the public schools of that place and Richmond. 
He was employed in the mill at Brand's Iron Works 
(now Wyoming), and lost his left hand in a planing 
machine at Locustville (now Hope Valley) during the 
war. He also ran a grist mill at Wyoming for some 
time, and there his death occurred at the age of si.\ty- 
nine years. He married Julia A. Sheldon, a daughter 
of Thomas and Rhoda (Edwards) Sheldon, a native 
of Voluntown, Conn., where she was born, June 28, 
1S12. They were the parents of the following child- 
ren : John Thomas, who is mentioned below ; Selina 
M., who became the wife of John M. Burdick; Laur- 
etta, who became the wife of David Segar. Isaac Ken- 
yon was at first a Whig in politics, but joined the 
Republican party at the time of its formation. He was 
a charter member of Mechanics Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Hope Valley. 

John Thomas Kenyon, son of Isaac and Julia A. 
(Sheldon) Kenyon, was born at Wyoming, R. I.. Nov- 
ember 24, 1839. He spent his childhood and early youth 
in his native place, and there attended the local public 
schools for his education. After leaving school there 



86 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



he worked for a number of years in the mill of A. & 
W. Fenner, of Wyoming, until he reached his majority. 
On October 4, 1861, he responded to the call of Abra- 
ham Lincoln for volunteers, and enlisted in Company 
D, First Regiment Rhode Island Cavalry, and was 
given the rank of corporal. He saw much active serv- 
ice, and took part in the great engagement at Cedar 
Mountain, the Second Battle of Bull Run, Grafton, 
Fredericksburg and Winchester. On October 4, 1S64, 
he was honorably discharged from service at Harris- 
burg, \'a., and shortly afterwards returned to his native 
town of Wyoming, in this State. For a short time he 
was employed in a shoe peg factory at this place, but in 
the spring of 1865 secured a position in the machine 
shop of Nichols & Langworthy, of Hope \alley. At 
the close of the summer, of that year, he secured a 
clerical position in the grocery store of Horatio N. 
Burdick, of Hope Valley, and still later took charge of 
the store of David Segar, at Valley Falls, remaining 
with the latter concern about eighteen months. He then 
became the traveling agent for John Thurston & Com- 
pany, prominent confectioners, with an office located in 
the City Hall building at Providence, and for three 
years was on the road, driving to practically every part 
if the State of Rhode Island in order to dispose of his 
^ares. and also operated in Easton, Conn. The three 
years following he served in the same capacity with 
M. B. Arnold & Company, confectioners of Central 
Falls, but in 1873 withdrew from that concern and en- 
gaged in business for himself as a jobber in confection- 
ery, among the trade in Providence and vicinity until 
1S90, when the management was assumed by his son, 
Harry P. Kenyon, who continued the same until 191 7. 
Mr. Kenyon was for many years a member of Slocum 
Post, No. 10, Grand Army of the Republic, and the 
local lodges. Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
and the Order of American Mechanics. From early 
youth Mr. Kenyon has taken a keen interest in political 
issues, both national and local, and soon rose to a posi- 
tion of leadership in the Republican party here. He 
was elected to represent Johnston in the State Legis- 
lature in 1891, and was returned to that body in 1892- 
94-95-96-97. In 1900 he was elected a member of the 
City Council of Providence, and in ick>2 again served 
as representative on the Legislature. In the year 1907 
Mr. Kenyon made a trip abroad, and visited parts of 
Europe, Egypt and the Holy Land. He had also widely 
traveled in the United States, and visited every State 
of the Union but two. 

John Thomas Kenyon was married, March 26, 1865, 
at Wyoming, to Susan Elizabeth Segar, daughter of 
Francis Brayton Segar, a well known merchant of that 
place. Mrs. Kenyon died June 28, 1906. Mr. Kenyon 
died October 29, 191 6. They were the parents of the 
following children: i. Frank Isaac, born Feb. 10, 1866, 
at Hopkinton, R. I. .'\s a young man he went to Jack- 
sonville, Fla., where he became prominent in the affairs 
of that city, and served for two years as its treasurer. 
His death occurred there in 1898; he married Nettie 
Hosmer, of that city. 2. Charles Segar, bom Oct. 30, 
1867, at Valley Falls. In his youth he went to Savan- 
nah, Ga,. where he became general manager and treas- 
urer of the Georgia Telegraph & Telephone Company. 



Later, however, he returned to Providence, and is now 
associated with the Industrial Trust Company of this 
city. He married (first) Nellie Campbell, now de- 
ceased, by whom he had two children : Susan H., and 
Frank C. ; he married (second) Pearl Carkuf, by whom 
he had one son, John T. (2). 3. Harry Peckham. of 
whom further. 

Harry Peckham Kenyon, third and youngest son of 
John Thomas and Susan Elizabeth (Segar) Kenyon, 
was born December 8, 1871, at Pawtucket, R. I. .As a 
child he attended the public schools of Johnston, and 
after graduating from the Johnston High School, en- 
tered the well known Bryant & Stratton Business Col- 
lege of Providence, where he took a commercial course. 
Upon completing his studies at the latter institution, 
Mr. Kenyon engaged in business with his father, and 
was associated with the confectionery line for a num- 
ber of years, or until the death of his father in 1916. 
Four months later he disposed of this business and since 
that time has been engaged in banking. At the present 
time he is a trustee of the Old Colony Co-operative 
Bank, of Providence, and the manager of its real estate 
department. He possesses a reputation throughout New 
England as a building estimator, 

!Mr. Kenyon is exceedingly prominent in the general 
life of the community, and is a staunch supporter of the 
principles and policies of the Republican party. He has 
frequently been asked by his fellow citizens to run for 
many offices, but has always refused the honor, for 
although he is keenly interested in the issues and prob- 
lems of the day, he is quite without ambition for poli- 
tical preferment. He nevertheless performs in every 
way the duties of citizenship, and is justly regarded as 
being possessed of a broad public spirit by his fellow 
citizens. In his religious belief Mr. Kenyon is a Bap- 
tist and attends the Plainfield Free Baptist Church. He 
is a member of Manufacturers' Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and is past noble grand of that 
body. He is also affiliated with Nestell Lodge, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and his clubs are the Sun- 
set, of which he was president and is now treasurer, and 
the Pomham. During the continuance of the war. Mr. 
Kenyon was an active member of the Rhode Island 
Food Administration, and performed an invaluable 
service for his community in this responsible post. He 
has always been actively interested in the general wel- 
fare of the community and is a member of the Olney- 
ville Business Men's .Association, and has done much 
to promote it. 

Harry Peckham Kenyon was united in marriage, 
December 12, 1893, at Providence, with Nancy L. Ball, 
of this city, a daughter of Nathaniel G. and Mercy, A. 
(Henry) Ball, and they are the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Alice May, Helen Ball, and Julia Shel- 
don. These children have all been educated in the 
Providence schools, and the youngest is now a student 
in the Technical High School of Providence. 



JAMES SPENCER MOORE, one of the most 
prominent physicians and surgeons of East Providence. 
R. I., where he has been in practice for over twenty 
years, is a native of South Royalton, Vt., his birth hav- 
ing occurred at that place, March 3, 1871. Dr. Moore is 
a son of David C. and Hannah A. (Estabrook) Moore 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



87 



and a member of an old New England family. David 
Comstock Moore was also a physician, and for many 
years practiced medicine at South Royalton, and was 
also interested in the drug business. During the Civil 
War he served as a surgeon in the Union army, and 
was located at one time at the famous Point Lookout, 
Md. In 1872 he removed with his family from South 
Royalton to Charlestown, N. H., where he engaged in 
the drug business for a time. He later returned to 
South Royalton, however, and it was there that his 
death occurred, October 9, i8;6. He and his wife were 
the parents of two sons : James Spencer, of whom 
further ; and Elmer E., who became a physician and 
practiced both in Rhode Island and Bristol county, 
Mass. 

James Spencer Moore was about five years of age 
when his father died, and immediately after that event 
accompanied his mother to Boston, where they made 
their home for a time. It was at Boston that he first 
began his schooling, attending the public institutions 
for this purpose, and proving himself an alert and in- 
dustrious scholar. In 1887 the family removed to East 
Providence, and here he continued his studies and at- 
tended the East Providence High School, where he was 
prepared for college. He then entered Brown Univer- 
sity, at Providence, where he took the usual classical 
course, and graduated in 1894 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. The young man by this time had 
determined to follow in the footsteps of his father and 
elder brother in the choice of a profession, and accord- 
ingly entered the medical school connected with Har- 
vard University. Here he studied to such good purpose 
that he was graduated with the class of 1898, and at the 
same time received his degree as Doctor of Medicine. 
Dr. Moore began the practice of his profession in his 
brother's office, but in 1900 came to East Providence, 
and there opened a small office at No. 6 Walnut street. 
It was not long before he was firmly established here, 
and rapidly increa.sed this practice until he has now one 
of the largest in the city, and is regarded as one of the 
leaders of his profession. From his original location 
Dr. Moore removed, in 1905, to No. 30 Walnut street, 
where he is situated at present. Dr. Moore is intimately 
identified with a number of important organizations, in- 
cluding the Providence Medical Society, the Rhode 
Island Medical Society, and the American Medical As- 
sociation, of which he is a fellow. He is also a member 
of the Harvard Medical Society, the Alumni Society of 
Brown University, the Theta Delta Chi fraternity, and 
the University Club. He has been exceedingly active in 
public affairs, and although an independent voter, and 
quite unaffiliated with any political party, has neverthe- 
less served in a number of important capacities here. 
He has been a member of the Town Council for one 
term, served on the school committee for an equal 
period, and has been health officer of this place for 
two terms. In his religious belief Dr. Moore is a Con- 
gregationalist, and attends the United Congregational 
Church of this city. 

Dr. James Spencer Moore was united in marriage, 
September 12, 1901, at Creston, Iowa, with .Mice G. 
Ide, a daughter of George A. and Ellen F. (Allen) Ide. 
One child has been born of this union, Dorothea Ide, 
bom October 8, 1908, and now a pupil at the Lincoln 
School. 



JOHN ALFRED SWANSON— That peculiarly 
.\merican title which is our National pride is one worth- 
ily worn by Mr. Swanson, and while it is often mis- 
applied there is no exaggeration or error made in styl- 
ing him, in the best sense of the word, a "self-made 
man." It is only in a Democracy that such are pro- 
duced, and it is greatly to his honor that coming to the 
United States a poor bc^y, unfamiliar with the language 
and without friends, he yet overcame this severe handi- 
cap and has won an honorable position in the manu- 
facturing and business world in which he moves. 

In i^>;2 Jonas and Amanda (Lundin) Swanson with 
their son. John Alfred, left their home in Sweden and 
came to the United Slates, locating in Pontiac, R. I. 
The lad, John Alfred, was then ten years of age and 
prior to the coming had attended school in his Swedish 
home. He completed his education in the Pontiac pub- 
lic schools, and there began mill work, his first position 
sweeping and cleaning, his present position superintend- 
ent. He has filled about every position in the spinning, 
weaving and designing departments of a textile mill. 
He knows every operation from raw material to finished 
product from actually having performed it, and to this 
complete and practical knowledge he adds a facility for 
managing men and administering executive authority. 
He is respected by every man under him for his spirit 
of comradeship and fair dealing which forbids injustice 
or favoritism on the part of the superintendent, and 
this is fully understood by the employees who appreciate 
the "square deal" which they invariably receive at Mr. 
Swanson's hands. 

John Alfred Swanson w-as born in Ulricehamn, 
Sweden, February 11, 1872, his birthplace being the an- 
cient village named in the sixteenth century in honor 
of Queen Ulrika. In 1882 he was brought to Pontiac, 
R. I., by his parents and there, after completing school 
studies, he began his wage-earning career as sweeper 
and cleaner in the spinning room of a cotton mill in 
Pontiac owned by the great textile firm of B. B. & R. 
Knight, his wages being two dollars weekly. While 
working there he attended night school, keeping up his 
studies in that manner for two years. He soon began 
learning the art of spinning the cotton into yarns, be- 
came an adept in that branch, then mastered the carding 
machines, and then became a weaver. He continued in 
Pontiac until the autumn of 1887; then located in 
Crompton, R. I., beginning work at the Crompton Mills 
as a weaver. In Crompton he made the acquaintance of 
the principal of the Crompton grammar schools, an 
Episcopal clergyman, the Rev. Mr. Auburn, and under 
his direction night studies were resumed. He con- 
tinued in the weaving room until 1904, then spent a year 
in the cloth room, becoming designer for the mill in 
1905. He was in charge of the cloth room and designer 
during 1906, and during 1907 was in charge of the 
examining and shipping departments of the finishing 
room. He continued in that capacity until 1911, when 
he was advanced to the position of assistant to the then 
superintendent, Mr. C. D. Robinson. Mr. Swanson 
continued as assistant to Mr. Robinson until 1016, then 
succeeded him as superintendent of the Crompton Mills, 
his present position. 

Mr. Swanson is a Republican in politics, and has for 
several years taken an active part in town aflfairs He 
was a member of the Republican town committee for 



88 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



the old town of Warwick; served the village of Cromp- 
ton as assessor of taxes for several years; was inod- 
erator for two years ; moderator of the school district 
one year; and is the present chairman of the fire board. 
He is a member of Providence Lodge, No. 14, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks; and in religious 
connection he is identified with the Swedish Congrega- 
tional Church of Crompton, which was incorporated in 

1893. 

Mr. Swanson married. May 12. 1894, Selma Pauline 
Johnson, of Chicago, III., and they are the parents of 
two daughters, Edith Charlotte and Elsie Pauline, 
and of a son, John Harold. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON AVERY, prominent 
business man of Hope Valley, R. I., where he conducts 
a large establishment as undertaker and dealer in fur- 
niture, and a prominent figure in the public affairs of 
this community, is a native of Groton, Conn., where his 
birth occurred, February 18, 1847. He is a son of 
George W. and Frances (Davis) Avery, old and highly 
respected residents of that place, and here his child- 
hood was passed. 

George W. Avery attended in early life the public 
schools of his native region, and later the Mystic Acad- 
emy, from which he was graduated about 1856, having 
taken the English course. After completing his studies 
at this institution, Mr. Avery secured a position with 
the Cattrel & Mallory Company of Mystic, where he 
learned the machinist's trade, and remained with that 
concern for about three years, working on marine 
engines. During that time he assisted in placing the 
engine on the old wooden gunboat "Verona," which 
was one of the active Civil War vessels, and was even- 
tually sunk by the Confederates. Upon leaving the 
Cattrel & Mallory Company, Mr. Avery went with the 
Nichols & Langworthy Machine Company, of Hope 
Valley, in their shop, and remained in their employ for 
about nine months. His next position was with the 
Standard Machine Company, of Mystic, where he was 
employed in the construction of book-binding machines, 
and here he worked for some four years. At the end 
of that period Mr. Avery returned to Hope Valley, 
this time entering the employ of Babcock & Wilcox, 
where he was engaged in work on electrical engines 
until 1872. His ne.\t move was to Taunton, Mass., 
where he was employed for two years by William Alason 
& Coinpany, in the production of the Campbell presses, 
after which he again returned to Hope Valley, and to 
the establishment of his old employers, Babcock & 
Wilcox, where the New York safety steam power en- 
gines were being built. During this entire period he 
had retained his residence in Hope Valley, and has con- 
tinued to make this place his home ever since. About 
the year 1902, in association wMth his son, Samuel R. 
Avery, he purchased the business of Samuel Richmond, 
at this place, who was a prominent furniture dealer and 
undertaker here, who had been established since before 
the Civil War. This business he completely reorgan- 
ized, and renamed S. R. Avery & Company. Mr. 
Avery studied embalming at the H. S. Eckles School 
of Embalming at Philadelphia, and under his man- 
agement his business has grown and prospered to a 
remarkable degree. He has now a complete morgue in 



connection with his establishment, and a full equip- 
ment for the carrying on of his business, including auto 
cars for the most up-to-date kind of service, and a 
mortuary chapel completes this establishment. In addi- 
tion to his business Mr. Avery at present operates a 
small farm for the use of his family, and takes great 
pleasure in his work thereon. 

Mr. Avery has been exceedingly active in public af- 
fairs here, and has held a number of offices in the gift 
of the community, including that of tax assessor, which 
he held for four years, and a ten years' term as truant 
officer. In politics he is a staunch Republican, but has 
never been ambitious for political preferment. He is a 
conspicuous figure in social and fraternal circles here, 
and is a member of many organizations. He is affiliated 
with Mechanics Lodge, No. 14. Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is past noble grand of that body, and 
has also served it as financial secretary for several 
years; a member of Niantic Encampment, No. 7, and 
Rhode Rebecca Lodge, No. 23. He is also a member 
of Charity Lodge, No. 23, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of which he is past master; Franklin Chapter, No. 7, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Hope Chapter, No. 4. Eastern 
Star, of which he is past patron, and is past grand patron 
of Grand Chapter, Rhode Island Eastern Star. In his 
religious belief Mr. .^very is a Baptist, and for many 
years has been an active member of the First Church of 
that denomination at Hope Valley, and has sung in the 
choir there. From early childhood Mr. Avery has dis- 
played a remarkable musical talent, and has been for 
many years first cornetist of Killson's Comet Band, and 
became its leader at the death of Mr. Killson. continu- 
ing in this capacity until 1902. Since that year he has 
taken great pleasure in teaching cornet playing and 
band music. He was also a leader of the Taunton Mas- 
sachusetts Band, while living at that place. Mr. Avery 
had a splendid military record during the Civil War, 
and enlisted from Mystic, Conn., in Company A. Third 
Regiment, Connecticut National Guard, in 1861. He 
served, in all, five years during the war, and during the 
second year of service received his commission as 
second lieutenant. He resigned in 1866. 

George Washington Avery was united in marriage, 
February 23, 1S71, with Marcia Elizabeth Richmond, 
daughter of Samuel N. and Rachel Richmond, and they 
became the parents of four children, as follows: i. 
Carrie Marcia, who became the wife L. L. Barber, of 
Apponaug. 2. Samuel Richmond, who is engaged with 
his father in business. He was a student at the public 
schools of Hope Valley, and afterwards attended the 
Clark Embalming School of Providence, and was 
licensed to practice embalming in Connecticut and Rhode 
Island. He is a member of the same fraternal lodges 
as his father, and is recording secretary of Mechanics 
Lodge, a position which he has held for a number of 
years. Like his father, he also plays the cornet and. in- 
deed, all of Mr. Avery's family are musical, including 
the grandchildren, so that the family is enabled to pass 
many pleasant hours in this manner. Samuel R. Avery 
married Ethel B. True, who has borne him two children : 
Elwot T. and Kleber R. 3. William Henry, who is now 
associated with the Maine Cream Company, manufac- 
turers of ice-cream. He was educated at the Bryant & 
Stratton Business College at Providence, and married 



.#■ 



.< 





BIOGRAPHICAL 



89 



Lillian Brown, a daughter of Charles H. Brown, the 
present postmaster of Hope \'alley. He and his wife 
are the parents of two children : Laura Frances, and 
Helen Brown, both students in the Providence High 
School. 4. Laura Frances, who died at the age of thir- 
teen. 



FRANK AUGUSTUS McKENNA, M. D.— .After 

graduation from medical colleue in 1S04. Dr. McKenna 
soon returned to Pawtucket, and has since practiced his 
profession continuously and successfully in his native 
city. He is one of the best known physicians of the 
city, and is firmly established in public esteem, and has 
a very large practice. He is a son of Frank and Mary 
.\. McKenna, both born in Ireland, but brought in child- 
hood to the United States. Frank McKenna settled in 
Pawtucket, and became a belt-maker. Both he and his 
wife are now deceased. 

Frank .Augustus McKenna was born in Pawtucket, 
R. L, September 8, 1866. and there obtained his early 
and preparatory education. He wms variously engaged 
for some years after completing his school years, but 
later decided to take up a professional career, and re- 
sumed his studies. After reading medicine under a pre- 
ceptor, he entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of New York, continuing there for one year, 
then transferred to the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Baltimore. Md., there continuing until graduated 
Doctor of Medicine, class of '94. He spent one year as 
interne at Baltimore City Hospital, then located for pro- 
fessional practice in Pawtucket, and there has won his 
way to recognized jiosition as a physician of skill and 
honor. The offices he opened in the Ellis block in Paw-- 
tucket, he yet occupies, tlie practice of that now far 
away day very small, but always enough to furnish in- 
spiration and encouragement, until finally success came 
in abundance. He is a member of the Pawtucket Medi- 
cal Society, and the Rhode Island Medical Society. He 
keeps in close touch with all advancement in theory or 
practice, and is held in high regard by his brethren of 
the profession. He is a communicant of St. Mary's 
Roman Catholic Church, and interested in all that per- 
tains to the welfare of the community in which he re- 
sides. 

Dr. McKenna married, in Pawtucket, Fannie McGurn, 
daughter of Bernard and Katherinc (Feron) McGum, 
both born in Ireland, and now deceased. They are the 
parents of a daughter, Frances; and sons: Charles A. 
and Lewis G. McKenna. 



RAYMON RESOLVED RICHARD RHODES 
WHIPPLE — Prominent among the successful citi- 
zens of Natick, R. I., where he has been engaged in 
business as a contractor and builder and as a real estate 
and insurance agent for many years, is Raymon Re- 
solved Richard Rhodes Whipple, a member of one of 
the oldest families in the State, which has made its home 
here since 1635. He is a son of Job Rhodes and Sarah 
Bennett (King) Whipple, old and highly respected resi- 
dents of the town of Warwick, where the former was 
engaged in the occupation of farming during the greater 
part of his life. It was at Warwick that Mr. Whipple, 
of this sketch, was born, May 28, 1851, and there that 
his childhood and early youth was spent. There, too, 



he gained the elementary portion of his education, at- 
tending for this purpose the local public schools, where 
he proved himself an apt and industrious pupil. He 
later entered the East Greenwich Academy at East 
Greonwich, and there completed his schooling, .\fter 
graduation from the latter institution, Mr Whipple left 
the parental home and built a house on part of the 
homestead in the section known as Whipple's Corner, 
and has since made his home there. Here he engaged 
in the contracting and building business, and met with 
the most gratifying success. His absolutely trustworthi- 
ness, his close application to business, and his knowledge 
of his subject, all were elements in winning the confi- 
dence and respect of the community and in building up 
his notable business success. He also added real estate 
and insurance to his other activities, and in this, also, 
he was highly successful, until to-day he does one of 
the largest businesses of its kind in this neighborhood. 
Mr. Whipple has also been extremely active in local pub- 
lic alTairs, and is a staunch Republican in politics, having 
supported his party consistently for a long period. For 
a quarter of a century Mr. Whipple has held the office 
of justice of the peace and notary public at this place, 
and has gained an enviable reputation for the justice 
and wisdom of his decisions, and his impartiality in all 
disputes. In his religious belief Mr. Whipple is a Bap- 
tist, and he attends Apponaug Free Baptist Church of 
that denomination. 

Mr. Wliipplc was united in marriage, June 13, 1878, 
at riieni.x, R. I., with Lucy Emma Luella Card, daugh- 
ter of Stephen and Esther (Edwards) Card, well known 
residents of that place. To Mr. and Mrs. Whipple three 
children have been born, as follows : Lulie Evelyn, born 
March 30, 1879, and became the wife of Matte- 
son, of Whipple's Corner; Leon Eldridge, born May 
20, 1881, and now of Whipple's Corner; Lillian Esther 
Parker, born Jan. 11, 1886, and became the wife of 
I'rank Bowen, of Whipple's Corner. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK SEARS is not a native 
of Rhode Island, he hails from the Cape Cod country, 
where his family is connected with the civil, social and 
business interests of that locality. Born at Brewster, 
Mass.. June 19, 1862, he is the son of Joseph E. Sears, 
who was engaged in shoe manufacturing at East Dennis, 
Mass., and died in South Harwich, in 1874, at the age 
of sixty-three. His mother's maiden name was Eunice 
Howard Nickerson, of Harwich, Mass.; her death 
occurred in 1890. The children of Joseph E. and F^unice 
Howard (Nickerson) Scars are: i. Loring, born Jan. 
ifi, 1845, owner of a Boston fur company, of that city. 
2. Elisha B., born July 7, 1846, a member of the firm of 
Otto Pheler Company, of Boston, Mass. 3. Joseph E. 
(2), born April 4, 1848, a farmer at Dighton, Mass. 4. 
Mary Elizabeth, born April 23, 1852, widow of Henry B. 
Nickerson, of Harwich. 5. Alice, born Aug. 2, 1854, 
v\-idow of Captain Ernest Anderson, who was connected 
with the line of steamers between Baltimore and Bos- 
ton ; she resides at Bronxville, N. Y. 6. Benjamin 
Franklin, born April 16, 1858, who is proprietor of the 
Sears Department Store at Cotuit, Mass. 7. William F., 
of this review. 

The education of William F. Sears was interrupted 
at the age of twelve by the death of his father. He was 



90 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



compelled at this early age to seek employment, and 
found work in a general store, which also handled ship 
chandlery. At the age of eighteen years we find him 
in business for himself, as a proprietor of a general 
store in South Harwich, Mass. Under his skillful man- 
agement this business grew into one of the finest on 
Cape Cod. The village of South Harwich, in Septem- 
ber, 1899, was devastated by a forest fire, and Mr. Sears 
decided to remove to Providence, R. I., where he 
cstablislied the Rhode Island Biscuit Company, which 
he managed successfully until 1910, when he became 
connected with the well known department store of The 
Shepard Company. His first position with his new em- 
ployers was that of floor man, but he was finally pro- 
moted to credit manager, which position he now fills. 

Mr. Sears commenced his political career while a resi- 
dent of Cape Cod. He was a member of the Republican 
Town Committee of Harwich, a delegate to political 
conventions, a member of the school committee and 
town auditor. In his adopted residential city he was for 
twelve years a member of the City Council, representing 
the Si.xth Ward. He was elected in November, 1918, a 
member of the Rhode Island General Assembly. In 
politics, though he has always affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party, he is noted for his independence, and has 
his own way of making up his mind on a matter and 
sticking to it when he knows he is right. He was 
appointed a member of the committee from Rhode 
Island to welcome home the Rhode Island boys in the 
Twenty-sixth Division, who landed April 10, and 
marched in review April 25, 1919. 

Mr. Sears has been as successful in his social career 
as he has been in business. He is a prominent lodge 
man ; his first start in fraternal organizations was when 
he was made the first noble grand of Exchange Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Harwich, Mass. 
He is president of the Retail Credit Men's Association 
of Providence; a member of the Providence Chamber of 
Commerce; of the Washington Park Improvement Soci- 
ety; of the St. Paul's Men's Club, and has been for the 
last eighteen years treasurer of the St. Paul's Church 
of South Providence, R. I. 

Mr. Sears married, November 25, 1888, Minnie R. 
Harward, of Dennis, Mass., and they have two daugh- 
ters: Bernice Estelle, born Sept. 18, 1889, is a teacher at 
a private high school at Harvard, Mass.; Maude Eunice, 
born Jan. 20, 1892, is a teacher at the Providence Classi- 
cal High School, also manager and conductor of Maude 
Eunice Sears Ladies' Orchestra ; both have graduated 
with honors from Brown University. 



HERBERT ENOCH ROUSE, M. D., a physician 
of Shannock, R. I., where he has been engaged in active 
practice for the past twenty years and has earned a 
splendid reputation for ability and for the maintenance 
of the highest standards of his profession, is a native of 
Stonington, Conn., his birth having occurred there June 
14, 1870. Dr. Rouse is a son of George W. and Har- 
riet S. (Maynard) Rouse, and a grandson on the mater- 
nal side of Antoine and Mary (Lavalle) Maynard, or 
Menard, as the name was originally spelled. The Men- 
ard family is of French Huguenot descent, their ances- 
tors being among those who were forced to leave the 



country after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 
Dr. Rouse was four years of age when his parents re- 
moved from Stonington, Conn., to the town of Nor- 
wich, and it was there that his childhood was passed 
and there that he attended the local public schools for 
his education. Later he removed to Hartford with his 
parents, and there entered the Hartford High School, 
from which institution he was prepared for college and 
graduated in 1891. In 1892 he entered the University of 
Vermont, where for one year he followed the study of 
medicine and then went to the Baltimore College of 
Physicians and Surgeons to complete his course. .\t the 
latter institution, he was graduated with the class of 
J896 and received his medical degree. Upon complet- 
ing his studies Dr. Rouse secured a position as surgeon 
for the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, and 
after two years of this employment passed the examina- 
tions for physician in the United States Navy. A com- 
mission was offered him but at the last moment he was 
persuaded by his friends not lo accept, but to remain in 
private practice. In the year 1898 he came to Shannock, 
where he has remained ever since and has now devel- 
oped a large and remunerative practice here, which is 
still rapidly growing. He has gained the trust and 
confidence of the community to a large degree besides 
the esteem and respect of his professional colleagues 
throughout the region. Dr. Rouse has been exceedingly 
active in public affairs, and at the present time occupies 
the position of medical examiner for the towns of Rich- 
mond and Charleston. In politics he is a staunch Re- 
publican, but his medical duties render it impossible for 
him to take as active a part in the affairs of his party 
as his inclinations would otherwise urge him to, or his 
abilities fit him for. Dr. Rouse is a member of the 
Rhode Island Medical Society and the .American .Medi- 
cal Association : Outside of these professional societies, 
he is also afliliated with a number of orders and similar 
organizations in this community and is a member of 
Mount Vernon Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Norwich, Conn., and of the local lodges of the United 
Order of American Mechanics and the Order of Red 
Men. While not a formal member of any church, nor 
active in religious work here, Dr. Rouse nevertheless 
liberally supports the various churches in the commu- 
nity. 

Dr. Rouse was united in marriage on September 29, 
1902, with Hortense James, daughter of Edward K. and 
Mary (Chappell) James, of Richmond township. Mrs. 
Rouse died January 4, 1904. Dr. Rouse married (second) 
November 10. 1906, Marion Lewis, daughter of John 
F. Lewis, of East Providence. Clifford Rouse, brother 
of Dr. Rouse, attended the public schools of Westerly 
and the high school there, and then entered Kingston 
College, where he took a course in engineering, and 
graduated with the class of 1909. He then entered the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technologv' at Boston to 
continue his engineering studies and while a student in 
that institution, enlisted in the Tank Corps of the 
United States Army. He is now serving with the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Force in Europe, having gone to 
France in March, 1918. He received a promotion to 
the rank of corporal under Captain D. D. Eisenhower, 
of Company B, Three Hundred and Fourth Battalion 
of the Tank Corps, July I, 1918. 




<;^^^\^V4.iJLiyi^^t^cC 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



91 



MICHAEL F. COSTELLO— A native of Paw- 
tucket, K. I., Mr. Costello returned to that city after his 
graduation from law school in 1908, since which time 
he has there practiced his profession. He was born in 
Pawtuckct, R. I., October 17, 1879, son of Michael and 
Jane (Mangan) Costello, both deceased. He completed 
the grade and high school courses of Pawtucket public 
schools, then entered Brown University, whence he was 
graduated Bachelor of Philosophy, class of lyoj. Choos- 
ing the law as his profession, he entered Georgetown 
University Law School, at Washington, D. C, there 
continuing until graduated Bachelor of Laws in 1908. 
He began practice in Pawtuckct, the same year, and is 
there well established in general practice. He is a mem- 
ber of the law associations of the State and district; 
Delaney Council, Knights of Columbus, and a charter 
member of Pawtucket Lodge, No. 920, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

.Mr. Costello married, January 24, 1916, Kathryn H. 
Hoar, daughter of William and Ellen McCarty Hoar, 
of .Amherst, Mass., and they are the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Helen Costello. 



SILAS RUSSELL RICHMOND, one of the most 
prominent citizens of Hope X'aliey, formerly known as 
Locustville, where he has been identified with banking 
and financial interests for a nuinbcr of years, is a native 
of this place. 

The Kichmonds of Southwestern Rhode Island, of the 
towns of E.xeter, Hopkinton and Westerly, are all de- 
scended from (i) John Richmond, born in 1594, who 
came to America from Ashton Keyner, Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, as early as 1637, that year being one of the pur- 
chasers of Taunton. He owned six acres in the original 
purchase there, and was one of the older men in the 
settlement, but he seems to have spent much time away 
from there. Before 1640 he took the oath of fidelity in 
Taunton. He was in Rhode Island in 1655, and the next 
year was one of the commissioners of the Court of 
Commissioners held at Portsmouth. The family were 
large landholders in the eastern part of Taunton, and 
gave to a village in that section the name of Richmond- 
town, which it still bears. Mr. Richmond died at Taun- 
ton, March 20, 1664, aged seventy. His children were: 
John, of further mention ; Edward, Sarah and Mary. 

(II) John (2) Richmond, son of John Richmond, 
was born about 1627, before his father's emigration. He 
was constable and member of the Town Council, com- 
missioner and surveyor. His residence was not far 
from the Green or Taunton Center, and both he and his 
wife are buried there. He died October 7, 1715, aged 
eighty-eight. He married Abigail, born in 1641, daugh- 
ter of John Rogers, of Duxbury; she died .August 1, 
1727, aged eighty-six. It is probable, says the family 
genealogist, that Mr. Richmond had a previous wife, 
who died in 1662, and that he married Abigail Rogers 
early in 1663. His children were: Mary, born June 2, 
:654, in Bridgewater, Mass.; John, born June 6, 1656, in 
Bridgewater; Thomas, born Feb. 2, 1659, in Newport, 
R. I.; Susanna, born Nov. 4, 1661, in Bridgewater; 
Joseph, born Dec. 8, 1663; Edward, born Feb. 8, 1665; 
Samuel, mentioned below; Sarah, born Feb. 26, 1671 ; 
John, born Dec. 5, 1673 (all in Taunton) ; Ebenezer, 
born May 12, 1676; and Abigail, born Feb. 26, 1679 
(both in Newport). 



(III) Samuel Richmond, son of John (2) and. Abi- 
gail (Rogers) Richmond, born September 23, 1668, in 
Taunton, Mass., married (lirst) December 20, 1694, 
Mehetabel .Andrews, daughter of Henry and .Mary An- 
drews, and (second) Elizabeth (King) Hall, widow of 
John Hall, and daughter of Philip and Judith (Whit- 
man) King. He died in 1736, and she in 1757. His 
children, the first two born in Taunton, and the others 
in Middleboro, Mass., were : Samuel, born Oct. 16, 
1696; Oliver, mentioned below; Thomas, born Sept. 10, 
1700; Hannah, born .Aug. 29, 1702; Lydia, born May 17, 
1704; Silas, and Mehitable. 

(IV) Oliver Richmond, son of Samuel Richmond, 
married and resided in the eastern part of Taunton. In 
1753 'i>i sold his homestead to Edward Paddleford, and 
removed to Killingly, Conn., where his children were 
married. His wife's name was Ruth. His children 
were: Philip, born Feb. 11, 1735; Michael, Oliver, of 
further mention ; Sybil, and Dorcas. 

(\') Oliver (2) Richmond, son of Oliver and Ruth 
Richmond, born in Taunton, Mass., was a farmer and a 
man of unblemished reputation, and was highly respect- 
ed. In 1798 he removed to Chenango county. New York. 
He was a patriot of the Revolution, serving from its 
beginning to its close. He married Mary Bateman, of 
Killingly, Conn., and their children, all born there, were: 
Thomas, born Nov. 15, 1770; Ruth, born in 1773; Oliver, 
born Nov. 17, 1776; Mary, born about 1778; Freeman, 
born about 1780; Robert, born about 1782; Priscilla, 
born about 17S4; Lucinda, born June 20, 1785; and Silas, 
mentioned below. 

(VI) Silas Richmond, son of Oliver and Mary (Bate- 
man) Richmond, was born June 6, 1788, in Killingly, 
Conn. He resided at various times in Richmond, Hop- 
kinton and Charlestown, K. I., and in Pmman, Conn. 
He was a member of the firm of Olney & Richmond, in 
the town of Richmond, R. I., and later kept the books 
in the cotton mill at Hope Valley, R. I. The last year of 
his life was devoted to farming in the town of Killingly,' 
Conn., between Putnam and Dayville, and there he died. 
He attended the Congregational church in Thompson, 
Conn. He married (first) November 25, 1813, Marcia 
Leavens, born March 9, 1791, in Killingly, daughter of 
Roland Leavens, of that town. He married (second) 
June 18, 1S43, Laura Leavens, sister of his first wife. 
His children were: William, born Nov. 6, 1814, in 
Pomfret, Conn.; George W., born .April 7, 1817, in 
Providence, R. I.; Mary B., born Dec. 16, 1818, in Fal- 
mouth, Mass.; Nancy B., born May 22, 1820, in Fal- 
mouth; Angeline P., born June 16, 1822, in Seekonk, 
Mass.; Henry H., born Nov. 22, 1823, in Seekonk; 
Samuel Newell, mentioned below; Hannah W., born 
Nov. 24, 1827, in North Providence, R. I.. ; and Silas R., 
born Sept. i, 1829, in North Providence. 

(VII) Hon. Samuel Newell Richmond, son of Silas 
and Marcia (Leavens) Richmond, was born May I, 
1825, in North Providence, and spent his early school 
days in Pawtucket and Hope Valley, R. I. He learned 
the wagon-making trade with T. T. and E. Barber at 
Barberville, R. I., and followed that trade for a short 
time, soon, however, engaging in the furniture and 
undertaking business at Locustville, a part of the village 
of Hope Valley. He first located in what is now known 
as the Joseph Crandall house, which structure he built, 
but later sold it. In 1858 he built a store on Main street, 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



and a little later a residence west of it. For some years 
he also carried on the manufacture of brick at Hope 
Valley, and for three years was in the same line at Put- 
nam, Conn. Public affairs always interested him, and 
he devoted much time to the careful study of current 
events. For many years he was a member of the Town 
Council of Hopkinton, and also a member of the school 
board. He served in both branches of the State Legisla- 
ture, being a member of the Senate in 1859 and i860. 
At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted from Hope 
Valley, in the Twelfth Rhode Island Regiment Volun- 
teer Infantry, and was given the rank of sergeant. He 
was, indeed, offered a commission as lieutenant at that 
time, but refused, serving throughout the war in the 
non-commissioned rank. He was very active and saw 
much of the most important service during that momen- 
tous struggle, taking part in the Battle of Fredericks- 
burg, and was one of those to bring in his lieutenant, 
when the latter was killed in action. He, himself, was 
never wounded. 

He was a member and liberal supporter of the First 
Baptist Church at Hope Valley, and a regular attendant 
at its services. His fraternal relations were with Me- 
chanics Lodge (of which he was a charter member), 
and Niantic Encampment of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, at Hope Valley, and he was a staunch 
supporter of a local temperance organization. He died 
in 1897. He married, July 5, 1846, Rachel Thayer, of 
Hopkinton, who died in 1892. She was a daughter of 
Russell Thayer, who was for many years a partner of 
Gardiner Nichols, in the machine shops of Nichols & 
Thayer, at Hope Valley, and who was also in the busi- 
ness of carding wool and finishing cloth at Hopkinton, 
which he carried on until 1844. He died about 1851. 
There is still in possession of the family an interesting 
piece of negro cloth, made on the old loom of his mill. 
Hon. Samuel Newell and Rachel (Thayer) Richmond 
were the parents of : Marcia E., born April 29, 1849, 
married George \V. Avery, of Hope \"aney, mentioned 
elsewhere in this work; Silas R., mentioned below; and 
Charles N., born June 22, 1861, now of Yonkers, N. Y., 
where he is engaged in the plumbing business. 

(VIII) Silas Russell Richmond, son of Samuel New- 
ell and Rachel (Thayer) Richmond, was born Septem- 
ber I, 1851, in Hope Valley. His childhood was passed 
in his native town, and it was at the public schools of 
that place that he began his education. Later he studied 
at the Suffield Literary Institution, at Suffield, Conn., 
but during his spare time from liis studies he was em- 
ployed in the undertaking establishment of his father. 
Upon completing his studies, Mr. Richmond decided to 
engage in the banking business, and with this end in 
view secured, on April i, 1871, a position with the First 
National Bank of Hopkinton. and it was at that institu- 
tion that he learned the details of the business, becom- 
ing cashier in October, 1885. He was also connected 
with the Hopkinton Savings Bank, in which institution 
he held the office of treasurer, being elected to that re- 
sponsible post on October 20, 1885. In 1896 the Hopkin- 
ton Savings Bank was liquidated, and the First National 
Bank of Hopkinton was purchased by the Washington 
Trust Company of Westerly, and on May 25, 1914, Mr. 
Richmond became manager of its branch in Hope Val- 
ley, continuing to hold this post at the present time. In 



these various capacities Mr. Richmond has become inti- 
mately identified with the financial situation in this 
region, and is now regarded as one of the leading figures 
therein. His judgment and advice are sought and fol- 
lowed by many of his associates, who have the highest 
respect for his business foresight. In addition to his 
banking activities, Mr. Richmond has been exceedingly 
prominent in public affairs in this region for a number 
of years, and is a well known figure in the Republican 
party, with the local organization, of which he has for 
long been associated. He was elected on the ticket of 
that party to the House of Representatives of this State, 
and served in that body during the years 1908 to 191 1, 
being a member of the finance committee thereof. In 
1912 he was elected to the Rhode Island State Senate, 
served on that body in 1913 and 1914, and was a mem- 
ber of the Senate Committee on Finance. Mr. Rich- 
mond has served the town of Hopkinton as town treas- 
urer since 1883 continuously, which is a most remark- 
able record. In these various capacities Mr. Richmond 
proved himself to be a most capable and distinguished 
legislator, and his service in promoting reform legisla- 
tion, particularly in connection with the banking and 
business interests of the community, has been an invalu- 
able one. He has been treasurer of the Langworthy 
Public Library since its organization in 1888. Mr. Rich- 
mond is a member of Mechanics Lodge, No. 14, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and he has held a num- 
ber of offices in the gift of that body, including that of 
treasurer, which he has filled since 1880, and that of 
noble grand, which he has twice held. In his religious 
belief Mr. Richmond is a Baptist, and has for many 
years been a member of the First Baptist Society of 
Hope Valley. He has taken a very active part in the 
work of this society, and at the present time holds the 
office of president, as well as that of deacon, in the 
church. 

Mr. Richmond married, June 13, 1S75, at Hope Valley, 
Marietta Anna Allen, a daughter of Ray Greene and 
Asia Malinea (.-Mien) Allen, old and highly respected 
residents of this place. Children: Lucius Russell, born 
in 1877, died in 1908; Fred Allen, mentioned below. 

(IX) Fred Allen Richmond, son of Silas Russell and 
Marietta .A.nna (.-Mien) Richmond, was born Novem- 
ber 24, 1890, at Hope Valley. His education was re- 
ceived in the local schools of Hope V'alley, where he 
was prepared for college, and at Kingston College, 
v.-here he took a course in electrical engineering. Mr. 
Richmond graduated from Kingston College with the 
class of 1912, and immediately thereafter secured a posi- 
tion with the General Electric Company, of New York. 
He remained with this great concern for a short time, 
and then went with the New York Central Railroad, in 
charge of electrical work in the office of the electrical 
department of that concern. Fred .'\llen Richmond 
married, in November, 191 5, Dorothy Nichols, a daugh- 
ter of Frank E. and Louise (Ellis) Nichols, the former 
being mentioned elsewhere in this work. Two diildren 
were born of this union, as follows : Virginia Louise 
and Marion Allen. 



WALTER BERTRAM KINGSLEY, the popular 
postmaster of Allentoii, R. I., and a successful merchant 
of this place, is a native of North Kingston, now 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



93 



Allenton, where his birth occurred November 13. 1877. 
Mr. Kingsley is a son of Emanuel D. and Almira Ma- 
tilda (Gardiner) Kingsley and a member of a good old 
New England family. His father, Emanuel D. Kings- 
ley, was for many years associated with the shipping 
department of the Hamilton Mills in this region and 
was born on the old Kingsley homestead here on July 4, 
i?44, and died February 10, 1915. He was a son of 
Thomas C, Sr., and Abby F. Kingsley, the former born 
in :8i4. died July 10. 1873. His wife died March 6, 1866. 
His wife on the maternal side was a granddaughter of 
Fenjamin \V. and (Wells') Bicknell, and a de- 
scendant of the original Bicknell family of Rhode 
Island. Her parents were Robert and Almira (Rick- 
nein Gardiner, old and highly respected residents here. 
She was born January 24, 1851, and died March 26, 
1903. Walter Bertram Kingsley was the only child and 
is now deceased. 

The early life of Walter Bertram Kingsley was 
passed in his native region, where as a child he 
attended the village schools. .After completing his 
studies at these institutions, he entered the Rhode Island 
State College at Kingston in 1894, and was pursuing his 
course there at the time when the college buildings were 
burned. While at college he followed a commercial 
course and also a course in English, and in i8q6, having 
completed his studies, he began his business career in a 
humble position in the grocery store of John H. Rem- 
ington, of Wick ford. He continued thus employed for 
a period of eight years and then secured a position in 
the office of the Aldrich-Eldrich Company, of Provi- 
dence, and also worked for this concern as a salesman, 
remaining in its employ about four years. It was in 
1909 that Mr. Kingsley came to Allenton, where he en- 
gaged in the grocery business on his own account in 
association with Mr. A. A. Wilbur, who had conducted 
a mercantile enterprise here for a number of years. This 
concern is still operated by Mr. Kingsley with a high 
degree of success. Mr. Kingsley was appointed post- 
master of Allenton on .'\pril 3, 1915. by President Wil- 
son, and has continued to fill this office most efficiently 
ever since. In politics he is an Independent and has 
never been bound by partisan consideration. He is quite 
without political ambition, and with the exception of his 
postmastership has never accepted public office of any 
kind. He is, however, a man of wide public spirit and 
has participated actively in local affairs and done much 
to subser\-e the public interest. 

Walter Bertram Kingsley was united in marriage, 
October 17, 1908, at Providence, with Lorena Ruth Wil- 
bur, daughter of A. A. and Harriett M. (Pratt) Wilbur. 
Mr. Kingsley is a member of Washington Lodge, No. 5, 
Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mrs. Kingsley was a daughter of .-Mbertus .A. Wilbur 
and a granddaughter of Thomas E. and Ruth Ann 
(Sweet) Wilbur, old residents of Providence, R. I., 
where Albertus A. Wilbur was born June 8, J849. He 
attended the Grove Street Grammar School in Paw- 
tucket, where Judge Tillinghast was the princi|)al, and 
also the Riverpoint schools under Mr. Kent. After the 
death of his mother, when he was but 14 years of age, 
he accompanied an uncle to Massachusetts, and made 
his home for a time in Southbridge. He enlisted from 
Worcester in the Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Heavy 



.■\rtillcry, in the autumn of 1863, and served with that 
organization in the Civil War as a private for eighteen 
months, or until the close of hostilities. After return- 
ing from the war, he learned the trade of machinist at 
the Attawagan and Quinncbog Mills under his uncle 
Mr. Charles J. Sweet, at that time master mechanic of 
those and other mills. He later secured a position as 
assistant master mechanic at the Quinncbog Mills, at 
Donaldson, and continued engaged in the cotton indus- 
try for a number of years. He later worked in the mills 
of Christopher Lippett as superintendent, remaining 
with that concern until 1886. Mr. Wilbur had intended 
to follow the cotton manufacturing business perma- 
nently, but was persuaded by a Mr. Frissell to engage 
with him in the grocery business, and he later bought 
his partner's interest and continued in that line most 
successfully by himself. He came to Allenton in the 
month of January. 1885, where he was associated for a 
time wilh F. R. Frissell in operating the general store 
here, and he was appointed postmaster of this place. In 
the year 1873 he married Harriett M. Pratt, daughter of 
Calvin Shcpard and .'Xshia Ann (Hunter) Pratt. One 
child was born of this marriage, Lorena R., who is 
mentioned above as the wife of Walter Bertram Kings- 
ley. Mr. Wilbur is a member of Washington Lodge, 
No. 5, Free and Accepted Masons, and Washington 
Chapter, Royal -Arch Masons, of East Greenwich. 



CHARLES FREDERICK SWEET, M. D., one 

of the prominent physicians of Pawtuckct, K. I., is a 
native of the town of Cumberland in this State, where 
he was bom .\pril 11, 1869. a son of George A. and 
Abbie A. (Fisk) Sweet, old and highly respected resi- 
dents of that place. As a lad. Dr. Sweet attended Cole's 
private school in Pawtucket, where he was prepared for 
college, and then entered the Medical College at Har- 
vard University, having determined to adopt medicine 
as his profession. He graduated from that university 
with the class of 1894, and received his medical degree. 
Coming immediately to Pawtuckct, he then established 
himself in practice here and has met with well merited 
success. His father, who for many years conducted an 
art store in Providence, R. I., now has retired from 
active life and resides with the doctor. 

Dr. Sweet has been closely identified with important 
medical institutions of Pawtucket, and has held many 
posts of responsibility and trust. For five years he was 
chief surgeon of the Rhode Island National Guard, 
from which he is now retired with the rank of lieuten- 
ant-colonel. He was a member of the guard for ten 
years, and was at one time a member of the Associa- 
tion of Military Surgeons of the United States. Dr. 
Sweet has also been identified in the work of conserving 
the public health and for a number of years was super- 
intendent of health, and city physician of Central Falls, 
R. I. In addition to his private practice, he is at the 
present time senior visiting physician of the staff of the 
Pawtuckct Memorial Hospital, and is a member of the 
American Medical Association, the Rhode Island Medi- 
cal Society, the Pawtucket and Providence Medical 
associations, and the Rhode Island Medico-Legal Soci- 
ety. He is a Free Mason and is a member of the Ma- 
sonic bodies in the region of Pawtuckct. 

Dr. Sweet has been twice married. His first wife was 



94 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Janet Maude, a daughter of Joseph and Janet (Mc- 
Dowell) Makin, of Pawtucket. Her death occurred 
September la 1013. They were the parents of two chil- 
dren : George Albert, born Dec. 21, igoo; and Charles 
Frederick, Jr., born Aug. 31, 1905. Dr. Sweet married 
(second) April 18, 1917, Mabel Hilton DeWitt, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas and .-Xnnie Allen (Belyca) DeWitt, of 
Frederickton, New Brunswick. One son, Thomas De- 
Witt Sweet, was born to them May 19, 1918. 



JEREMIAH EDWARD O'CONNELL— A grad- 
uate of hiith college and law departments of Boston 
University. Mr. O'Connell came to Providence soon 
after acquiring his Bachelor of Laws and Master of 
Laws degrees, and since 1908 has practiced his profes- 
sion in that city in all State and Federal courts of the 
Providence district. A member of the eminent law 
firm of Cunningham & O'Connell, he has no spare hours, 
yet in this crisis in his country's history, he is devoting 
a portion of his time to service on different boards and 
committees of importance. He is a son of Jeremiah and 
Margaret R. O'Connell, who at the time of the birth of 
their son were residents of Wakefield, Mass. 

Jeremiah E. O'Connell was born in Wakefield, Mass., 
July 8, 1883, and there completed his preparatory study 
with graduation from high school with the class of 
1902. The following fall he entered the college depart- 
ment of Boston University, where he was graduated 
Bachelor of Arts, class of 1906. He entered the law 
department of the University, was graduated Bachelor 
of Laws, cum laude, 1908, and Master of Laws, the 
same year. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar 
in 1907, to the Rhode Island bar in igo8, and for ten 
>ears has practiced at the bar of the last-named State, 
and in the Federal courts in association with Joseph J. 
Cunningham as Cunningham & O'Connell, offices Nos. 
301-302 Grosvenor building. Providence. He is a mem- 
ber of the local State and National Bar associations, 
and in addition to his legal practice is secretary and 
treasurer of the Narragansett Motors Company, of 
Providence. Mr. O'Connell is a Democrat in politics, 
and since 1912 has been a member of Providence City 
Council. He is chairman of the legal advisory commit- 
tee to Draft Board, No. 3, Providence; chairman of the 
Red Cross committee on information to soldiers, sailors 
and their families; member of the Civilian Relief Com- 
mittee, the American Red Cross, past district deputy of 
Knights of Columbus, member of the Catholic Club or 
Providence, and the college fraternities of Beta Theta 
Pi and Phi Delta Phi. 

Mr. O'Connell married, in Wakefield, Mass., June 
6, 1910, Esther Garraty, daughter of James and Annie 
Garraty. The family home is at No. 59 Hilltop avenue. 



CORNELIUS JAMES MAHONEY, M. D.— 

There is something intrinsically admirable in the pro- 
fession of medicine that illumines by reflected light all 
those who practice it. Something that is concerned with 
its prime object, the alleviaiion of human suffering, 
something about the self-sacrifice that it must neces- 
sarily involve that makes us regard, and rightly so, all 
those who choose to follow its difficult way and devote 
themselves to its great aims with a certain amount of 
respect and reverence. A man of this type is Dr. Cor- 



nelius J. Mahoney, of Providence, whose work in that 
city has been of benefit to many. 

Dr. Cornelius James Mahoney, a well-known physi- 
cian of Providence, R. L, was born in East Providence, 
January 30, 1875, a son of Cornelius and Catherine 
.White) Mahoney, both deceased. They were the par- 
ents of four other sons and five daughters, namely: 
Rev. George T. Mahoney, John Francis, Dr. Michael P. 
Mahoney, of Providence ; Timothy J. Mahoney, a 
greatly beloved priest of the Roman Catholic church, 
now deceased ; Hannah, Catherine, Mary, Theresa and 
Agnes. 

Cornelius J. Mahoney was educated in the public 
schools of Providence, at La Salle Academy, and St. 
Michael's College, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated, class of 1894. He decided upon medicine as his 
profession, and entered Harvard Medical School, there 
pursuing courses, and was graduated Doctor of Medi- 
cine with the class of 1S98. From there he passed to 
hospital practice as interne at St. Joseph's Hospital in 
Providence, but after seven months' service his health 
gave way, and he was compelled to resign his position. 
As a means of recuperation, he went to the State of 
Colorado, was admitted to practice in that State, and 
during his four months' residence there was engaged in 
active practice. In December, 1899, he returned to 
Providence and be.gan the practice of his profession, 
with offices at No. 81 Governor street. Dr. Mahoney is 
a member of the American Medical Association, the 
Rhode Island Medical Society. Providence Medical Soci- 
ety, St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, the Catholic 
Club, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
In National elections he is strongly Democratic, but in 
local affairs is non-partisan and extremely independ- 
ent in political action. 

Dr. Mahoney married, January 15, 1902, Mary Clogher, 
of Boston, Mass., and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren : George T. and Cecelia C. Mahoney. 



WILLIAM ALPHONUS McGROARTY — As 

executive head and manager of the Warwick Lumber 
Company, of Apponaug, R. I., Mr. McGroarty is suc- 
cessfully continuing this, a business established about 
1835. His career has been an active one, and in its 
making he has developed a strong, self-reliant character, 
sound business judgment, and a broad-minded, public 
spirit, all tending to produce a capable and valuable busi- 
ness man and citizen. He is a son of Joseph and Mary 
(Leddy) McGroarty, his father, born in Donegal, Ire- 
land, coming to Providence about 1880. Joseph Mc- 
Groarty was a city employee in the street department 
for a number of years, then became a watchman, later 
entering the service of the city of Providence, as a 
policeman, continuing in that branch of the city govern- 
ment for fifteen years. He then spent two years in St. 
Louis, Mo., as a member of the Jefferson Guards, the 
police body at the Exposition of 1904, commemorating 
the Louisianna Purchase. He returned to New Eng- 
land in 1906, located in Lawrence, Mass., where he 
secured the government position he now holds. Joseph 
McGroarty married, June 12, 1884. in Providence (the 
late Bishop Stang performing the ceremony in St. Jo- 
seph's Church) Mary Leddy, born in County Cavan, 
Ireland, but from her eighteenth year a resident of 





/v7<si-:^l.-^-^-v M: 




J 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



95 



Providonce. They are the parents of: William A., of 
further mention ; Joseph, residing in New York ; John, 
now serving in the United States Navy, under a second 
enlistment ; James, died at the age of four years ; 
Charles, now serving in the United States Navy; Flor- 
ence, married Paul Meister, of Providence ; Aloysius, 
also serving in the Unfted States Navy. 

William .-\. McGroarty was bom in Providence. R. I., 
July i6, 1885, and educated in the parochial schools, 
later entering LaSalle Academy, where he was gradu- 
ated, class of 1003. He began business life with the 
Rhode Island Company, being engaged as starter and 
inspector until 1907. He then passed the required tests, 
and on October 10, 1006, was appointed to the Provi- 
dence police force as a night patrolman. In time he 
was promoted to the day service, and was stationed at 
Dorrance & Westminster streets as traffic officer, the 
first man ever regularly assigned for traffic duty there. 
He resigned from the force in 1912, then spent three 
years with his father-in-law, Jeremiah F. Driscoll. in 
the lumber business, mastering that business in all its 
detail. In 1915 he bought the Apponaug Lumber Com- 
pany, located at .\pponaug, reorganized the business as 
the Warwick Lumber Company, and, as president and 
treasurer, is its successful managing head. He is a 
member and trustee of St. Catherine's Roman Catholic 
Church, of Apponaug; is past district deputy of the 
Knights of Columbus for the State of Rhode Island ; 
member of Providence Council, No. 195, the Catholic 
Club of Providence, the Holy Name Society, and be- 
longs to the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Rhode 
Island Lumber Dealers' Association. 

Mr. McGroarty married, June 12, 1912, Anna Louise 
Driscoll, daughter of Jeremiah F. Driscoll, formerly 
general manager of the Rhode Island Cofiperative Coal 
Company, and connected with the Providence Teaming 
Company. He was an official of the Rhode Island Lum- 
ber Dealers' .-Xssociation ; member of the Roger Wil- 
liams Driving Club, and was an active, useful member 
of St. Vincent De Paul Society and of the Holy Name 
Society until his death in the fall of 1912. Mr. and 
Mrs. McGroarty are the parents of two children : Wil- 
liam, born Sept. 6, 1914; and Catherine Anita, bom July 
26, 191 7. 



DR. FRANK HARRY ACKRILL, one of the 

most popular and successful dentists of Pascoag, R. I., 
and the surrounding region where he has been in prac- 
tice for a number of years, is a native of New Haven, 
Conn., having been born in that city November 3. 1885. 
Dr. .\ckrill is the son of Thomas R. and Edith Marion 
( Benton 1 .\ckrill, old and highly respected residents, 
of New Haven. Thomas R. Ackrill was a native of 
Lancashire. England, where his birth occurred in i860, 
but he came as an infant to the United States with his 
parents and his childhood was spent at Westhaven, 
Conn. He afterwards resided at New Haven, in that 
State, and there his death occurred in 191 5. His father 
was Thomas .Ackrill, also a native of Lancashire, Eng- 
land, where he was a wood turner by trade, and he 
afterwards came to this country with his wife, Sarah 
Ackrill. Thomas R. .Xckrill married Edith Marion Ben- 
ton, a native of New Haven, who is still living at Provi- 
dence, R. I. They were the parents of two children : 



Frank Harry, of whom further; and Edith, who became 
the wife of .Arlington Garfield Post, of Pawtuckct. R. I., 
where he is engaged in business as vice-president and 
general manager of the National Coated Paper Com- 
pany of that city. 

Frank Harry Ackrill was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of New Haven and as soon as he had 
completed his studies in these institutions, he began his 
business career as a boss dyer in the National Coated 
Paper Company, of Pawtucket, R. I. For four years he 
remained thus employed and while there studied at night 
in the office of Dr. B. Cecil Burgess, a well-known den- 
tist, of that place. Having decided to adopt dentistry 
as his profession, his next step was to enter the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, where he took a course in his 
chosen subject and was graduated with the class of 1014. 
taking the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Dr. 
.Ackrill then came north to Rhode Island, and estab- 
lished himself in the practice of his profession at No. 4 
Westminster street. Providence, where he remained 
until .April. 1918. At that time Dr. .Ackrill, who had 
alrea'dy gained a wide reputation among the general 
public and his professional colleagues, came to his 
present location at Pascoag, and here established him- 
self. Although he has not been very long in practice 
here. Dr. .Ackrill has already made a name for himself 
in this locality and has developed a large and successful 
practice. In addition to his professional activities, Dr. 
.Ackrill is well known in fraternal and social circles at 
Pascoag, and is especially conspicuous in the Masonic 
order, in which he takes a keen interest. He is a mem- 
ber of Barney Merry Lodge, No. 29, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Pawtucket ; Pawtucket Chapter, 
No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; and Pawtucket Council, 
Royal and Select Masters No. 2. Dr. .Ackrill is also an 
active member of the Universalist Glee Club, of Provi- 
dence, R. I. His residence is situated on South Main 
street, Pascoag. Dr. .Ackrill is exceedingly fond of out- 
door sports and pastimes, and is a staunch advocate of 
these wholesome occupations for the young people of 
the community, and engages in them himself to a large 
extent. 

Dr. Ackrill married, December 21, 1916, at Meriden, 
Conn.. Rachel Curtis, of that place, a daughter of Le- 
Roy Hommans and Nellie May (Clark") Curtis, old and 
highly respected residents there. Mr. Curtis was born 
January 24, 1870, and is now engaged in business as a 
wholesale fruit and produce dealer. His wife, Nellie 
May Clark Curtis, is a native of .Ashtabula, Ohio, where 
she was born July 7, 1868. 



THEODORE HOWLAND BLISS— In the town 

of South Kingston, R. I.. Theodore H. Bliss was bom, 
his father, James H. Bliss, there owning and cultivating 
a farm upon which the lad spent his youth. But the 
farm failed to hold him, and after a season or two 
spent with the coast fishermen, he found his true sphere 
in the mercantile world, beginning as a clerk at the age 
of nineteen years. Nearly forty years since intervened, 
in which time he was actively engaged in business with 
the same firm, having filled all positions from errand boy 
to the responsible post of general manager, from which 
position he retired on February 26, 1910. In public life 
he is now serving as the able Senator from Narragan- 



q6 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



sett, having been elected for the term 1919-20. The fam- 
ily has long been identified with New England histon% 
and has furnished many men eminent in the public and 
private life of the nation. 

Theodore H. Bliss was born in South Kingston, R. I., 
April 5, 1S60, son of James H. and Laura (Whaley) 
Bliss. James H. Bliss, born in Newport, R. I., died 
aged sixty-nine years, a farmer of South Kingston. 
His widow Laura Whaley Bliss, born in South Kings- 
ton, yet survives him (1919), aged seventy-nine years. 
They were the parents of the following children : Theo- 
dore H., of further mention; .A.nnie, married William R. 
Browning, of South Kingston ; Charles R., a farmer of 
South Kingston; and Mary, married Russell Chase, of 
Newport. Theodore H. attended the South Kingston 
schools, completing grammar school courses, was his 
father's farm assistant, a fisherman in the early spring 
and winter fishing seasons, and for two seasons was 
in the hotel business at Narragansett Pier. He began 
merchantile life on June 25, 1879, as a junior clerk in 
the grocery and market owned and operated by J. C. 
Tucker, at Narragansett Pier. He became general man- 
ager of the same business, and one of the substantial 
business men of his community. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Bliss, during the years, 
1911, 1912, 1916 and 1917, served as a member of the 
town council, and on January I, 1917, took his seat in 
'he State Legislature as representative from Narragan- 
sett, and in November, 1918, was elected a member 
of the Rhode Island State Senate from Narragansett. 
He was a member of the house committee on Labor 
Legislation, and on the joint standing committee, Sales 
of Real Estate, and is now a member of the Senate 
Educational Committee and a member of the joint coin- 
mittee on Printing. He is a member of Hope Lodge, 
No. 25, Free and Accepted Masons ; and of Wakefield 
Chapter, Royal .Arch Masons ; and a member of Nestell 
Chapter, No. 6, Order of Eastern Star. In religious 
connection he is affiliated with the First Baptist Church 
of Narragansett Pier. 

Mr. Bliss married at Narragansett Pier, R. I., Novem- 
ber 28, 1888, Nellie Knowles, daughter of Horatio and 
Carrie (Anthony) Knowles, of Point Judith, R, I. The 
family home is at Narragansett Pier. 



THOMAS FRANCIS COONEY— Providence has 
been the scene of the professional struggles and tri- 
umphs of Thomas F. Cooney, and there, since igoi, he 
has been a member of the law firm of Cooney & Cahill, 
his practice large and his reputation high as a lawyer of 
ability and integrity. Thomas Francis Cooney was born 
in Cranston, R. I., October 21, 1873, son of James and 
Bridget (Sheil) Cooney, his father deceased, his mother 
residing with her son in Cranston. He attended the 
public schools in Cranston, and LaSalle -Academy in 
Providence, but while yet a boy became a wage-earner, 
earning the means to pay for his education. Three years 
were spent as a student in Boston University Law 
School, financing the entire course from his own funds. 
He was graduated Bachelor of Laws, cum laude, June 
6, 1900, and was also honored by election as president of 
his class. Mr. Cooney at once began practice in Provi- 
dence, continuing alone for about a year, when the 
present firm, Cooney & Cahill, was formed, his partner, 



James A. Cahill. The firm continues one of the leading 
law firms of the Providence bar, with offices at No. 40 
Grosvenor building. Mr. Cooney was in charge of the 
Michael Hand will case, one of the most noted in the 
State. This case was on trial for three months, and is 
a record one in point of time consumed in its hearing. 
A Democrat in politics, Mr. Cooney has twice been the 
candidate of his party in the congressional district in 
which he lives. Both in 1908 and 1910 he ran ahead 
of his ticket, but the Republican party has a large 
normal majority in the district which he could not over- 
come. He is a member of St. Ann's Roman Catholic 
Church, Cranston ; is president of the Catholic Club, 
Providence ; is a fourth degree member of the Knights 
of Columbus; a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks ; and a lover of all sports of the 
great out-of-doors. 

Mr. Cooney married (first), June 30, 1904, Elizabeth 
A. Reilly, of Providence, who died July 19, 1912. Chil- 
dren : Thomas S., born May 4, 1905 ; Elizabeth, Nov. 
5, 1906; Theresa, June 9, 1910. He married (second), 
November 5, 1913, Elizabeth W. Hayden, of Pascoag, 
Burrillvillc. 



HENRY de WOLF ALLEN, one of the rising 
young business men of Bristol. R. I., where his birth 
occurred in 1886, is a son of Henry Crocker .Alien and 
Marguerite (de Wolf) Allen, old and highly respected 
residents of this place. Mr. Allen is descended on the 
maternal side of the house from a very old New Eng- 
land family, which was founded in this country by Bal- 
thasar de Wolf, of Lyme, Conn., and the members of 
which have ever since maintained a high place in the 
esteem of the various communities in which they have 
made their homes. In the fourth generation from Bal- 
thasar de Wolf, was Charles de Wolf, a native of Lyine, 
where he was born in 1695. He married at Guadaloupe, 
March 31, 1677, Margaret Potter, and one of their chil- 
dren was Mark Anthony de Wolf, who served in King 
George's War in 1774, under the command of his 
brother-in-law. Captain Simeon Potter. He married, 
Augxist 25, 1774, .Abigail Potter. One of the sons of 
Mark Anthony de Wolf was the Hon. William de Wolf, 
who was born at Bristol, R. I., December 19, 1772. He 
was a very prominent man in his day and was a member 
of the Federalist party of 1811-12, and fought in the 
political battles of that period. After the dissolution of 
that party which boasted of such men as .Alexander 
Hamilton and Fisher .Ames, Mr. de Wolf retired from 
public life. He had filled with credit the office of Sena- 
tor in the palmiest days of the Commonwealth, but 
jfter his retirement made his home at his quiet farm 
situated at Popposquash, and there passed the remainder 
of his days. His death occurred .April 19, 1829. The 
Hon. William de Wolf married Finney, daugh- 
ter of Josiah Finney, a leading citizen of Bristol at that 
time. One of their children was the Hon. James de 
Wolf, who, as a mere lad, served in the Revolutionary 
War and took an active part in that historic struggle. 
He married, January 7, 1798, Nancy Bradford, and died 
January 2, 1838. The father of Mr. .Allen, Henry 
Crocker .Allen, was born at Providence. R. I., and died 
in the year 1888. He married Margaret de Wolf, daugh- 
ter of Francis LeBaron de Wolf, who was bom Octo- 





rvn CL^ (, L^^-tih^^JL, 






■T^- old 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



97 



jer 12, 1826, and Caroline (Dexter) de Wolf. Henry 
Crocker de Wolf was a farmer by occupation and was 
very active in the affairs of the community. He and 
his wife were tlie parents of one son, Henry de Wolf 
Allen, of this sketch. 

Henry de Wolf .Mien received his early education at 
the pub'ic schools of Bristol, and was afterwards sent 
to a b./arding school at Newport, where he completed 
bis studies. During his early life he assisted with the 
work on his mother's farm, and has always rnade his 
home on the old homestead. He is now the possessor 
of a handsome farm of thirty-live acres upon which is 
situated his beautiful home, and here besides general 
farming he raises chickens, making a specialty in this 
line. In 1918 Mr. .Mien became farm manager of the 
S. B. Colt farm, a magnificent estate of five hundred 
acres, which is undoubtedly one of the most perfectly 
equipped farms in the State of Rhode Island, and he is 
now engaged in managing the same. 

Henry de Wolf Allen was united in marriage on Oc- 
tober 14, 1914, at Bristol, with Catherine Reynolds, a 
daughter of John Post and Fannie (Greenwood) Rey- 
nolds. Mr. Reynolds engaged for many years in the ice 
business at Bristol, where he was also superintendent 
of schools, and a very active man. Mr. Reynolds died 
in 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are members of St. 
Michael's Church of Bristol. 



ROBERT M. BANNON, D. D. S.— .A.fter gradu- 
ation from dental college, Dr. Bannon located in Paw»- 
tucket, R. I., and for the past eight years has been in 
the practice of his profession in the city of his birth. 
He is a son of Matthew J. and Margaret M. (Early) 
Bannon, both of Rhode Island birth and both now de- 
ceased. Robert M. Bannon was born in Pawtuckct, R. 
I.. November 27, 1885, and was educated in the city 
schools. Deciding upon a professional career, he en- 
tered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in Balti- 
more, Md., pursued a full course there, and in 1910 he 
opened offices in the Brownell Building in Pawtucket 
and began the practice of dentistry, remaining there 
until 1 91 7, when he moved to his presc-it well-equipped 
offices in the Smith Building. He is building up a loyal 
clientele and is well established in professional standing. 

He is a member of the Rhode Island Dental Society, 
the Young Men's Christian Association, the Knights of 
Columbus, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and the .\lumni Association of Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, and is now secretary of the latter asso- 
ciation. 



MARTIN J. SINNOTT— From the secure heights 
of business success, Martin J. Sinnott, of Arctic, R. I., 
reviews a career as merchant and business man, which 
from a modest beginning has continued to grow in im- 
portance and usefulness until the present day. He is 
"self made" in the best sense of the term, and when 
frst battling for a foothold in the mercantile world he 
knew neither day nor night so long as there was work 
to be done in his little store, and meal hours were but 
hasty lunches at any time obtainable. But success came 
abundantly, and he is one of the solid, substantial men 
of his town, associated with the leading men of his com- 
munity in the town's progress. His rise has been 



through his own efforts, and success has been won not 
through the downfall of others or by special privilege, 
but by a life of earnest, high-principled endeavor, which 
has benefited, not harmed others. 

Martin J. Sinnott was born in Providence, R. I., Au- 
gust 12, 1862, son of John F. and Bridget (Mackey) 
Sinnott, his father for many years superintendent of the 
John D. Lewis Dyeing and Bleaching Company of 
Providence. Martin J. Sinnott attended La Salle Acad- 
emy, in Providence, until the age of seventeen, then 
became a clerk in the dry goods store of Jacob Schatten- 
berg, in Phenix, R. I., his salary seven dollars weekly. 
He continued a clerk until 1885, then began business 
under his own name in a small store, eighteen by thirty- 
tight, located in Arctic, where he was well-known as a 
young man of industrious habits and pleasing manner. 
He worked hard to make his little business a success- 
ful one and .saw his hopes realized. Just across the 
street from the little store in which he began business 
in 1885 stands his present department store, three stories 
in height, well stocked, modernly conducted, where a 
very large business is transacted, the reputation of the 
store and its management being most enviable. 

.^s a merchant Mr. Sinnott's career may be justly 
termed a success, but to his mercantile activity he adds 
largo mill interests and other investment lines. He is 
one of the largest stockholders and a director of the 
Warwick Mills at Centerville, R. I.; is interested in the 
Warwick and Phenix Lace Mills, the Pawtucket Valley 
Street Railway Mills in Olneyville, Central Falls, and 
Pawtucket, R. I.; New Bedford, Mass., and in the State 
of Connecticut. He is also a director of the Union 
Trust Company of Providence, a stockholder of the 
National Exchange Bank of Providence, and the Cen- 
terville National Bank of .Arctic. He is doing "his bit" 
as an investor in liberty bonds and war saving stamps, 
being the heaviest individual buyer in the town of West 
Warwick, and a leader in selling bonds and stamps to 
others. 

Mr. Sinnott married Sarah Elizabeth Gough, daughter 
of James Gough, postmaster of River Point, R. I., for 
many years, and they are the parents of three sons: 
Richard Andrew, general manager of the Sinnott de- 
partment store at Arctic, now serving in the United 
States Navy; Martin and James William, second and 
third sons, respectively, all educated at La Salle Acad- 
emy, Providence. The family home is at Centerville, 
R. I. Mr. Sinnott is essentially a business man, but 
of quiet, domestic tastes, his home claiming his leisure 
hours. He has persistently refused all offers of political 
office, but is deeply interested in the welfare of his town, 
and as a member of the committee on town debt served 
with commendable zeal. He has many friends and is 
highly esteemed as a man of sterling and upright char- 
acter. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS DUFFY, M. D., of Bris- 
tol, R. I., is undoubtedly one of the leading physicians 
of this place, but he is more than that, he is a person- 
ality, a figure possessing an individuality which makes 
him inevitably an influence of moment in the commu- 
nity. Dr. Duffy is a native of Bristol, his birth having 
occurred here, December 28, 1871, but by descent he is 
of Irish blood, and inherits the notable talents of this 



R 1-2-7 



98 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



race. His paternal grandfather, James B. Duffy, was 
? native of Glasgow, Scotland, from which city he went, 
as a young man, to Manchester, England, and eventu- 
ally, in 1848, came to the United States and settled at 
Bristol, where his death occurred in 1886. He married 
Margaret Lowry, born in 1817, at Kildare. Ireland, and 
died at Bristol, in 1904. One of their children was 
Thomas Duf?y, father of Dr. Duffy, of this sketch, who 
was born Xoveniber 11, 1844, at Manchester, England, 
and came, as a child of four, with his parents to the 
United States in 1848. Upon reaching manhood he 
became associated with the rubber industry at Bristol, 
tnd eventually became a foreman for the India Rubber 
Company of this place. During his early youth he 
served his adopted country in the Union army in the 
Civil War, and was for many years a member of Bab- 
bitt Post, Grand Army of the Republic. His death 
occurred July 22, igoj. Thomas Duffy married Helena 
Nerone, born at Tipperary, Ireland, June 21, 1851, and 
now residing at Bristol. They were the parents 01 the 
following children: James, who died in infancy; Wil- 
liam Francis, of further mention; Augustus, who makes 
his home at Bristol ; Thomas, who resides at Boston, 
Mass; Mary, deceased; Margaret; Catherine, de- 
ceased; John, deceased; James, deceased; Joseph, 
now serving with the .American Expeditionary Forces 
in France, in the 301st Regiment, Engineers; and 
Carrie. 

The childhood and early youth of William F. Duffy 
were passed in his native town, and it was at the public 
schools here that he received his preparatory education. 
He passed through the grammar grades and then the 
lour years of the high school, after which he attended 
the University of Chicago, and there took a course in 
pharmacy. He was registered as a pharmacist in Illi- 
nois, in May, 1893, and followed that calling in Chicago 
for about two years. He became intensely interested 
in the subject of medicine during that time, and finally 
determined to take it up in a more complete manner 
and become a physician. Accordingly he returned to 
the East and entered the medical department of the 
University of New York, from which, after taking the 
full course, he was graduated with the class of 1898, 
and with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He followed 
up his studies with some practical experience as an in- 
terne at St. Catherine's Hospital, Brooklyn, remaining 
there for the two years between 1898 and 1900. Com- 
pleting this work, he came directly to Bristol and here 
established himself in practice, which has steadily 
grown, until it is now one of the important ones of 
the region. Dr. Duffy is a man who puts a premium 
upon all the wholesome aspects of life and enjoys its 
normal pleasures. He is particularly fond of travel, 
however, and has indulged this taste very extensively, 
having visited almost every part of Europe and .\mer- 
ica, and traveled around the world. He is also keenly 
aHve to the great issues of the day, as well as to those 
of a local character, and conscientiously discharges the 
duties of citizenship. He is a Democrat in politics, but 
takes no active part, as his time and attention is too 
much taken up with professional tasks and duties. In 
religious belief Dr. Duffy is a devout Catholic, and 
f.ttends the church of St. Mary of this denomination at 
Bristol. He is a member of the local lodge of the 



Knights of Columbus, and the Providence Medical 
Society, and the Rhode Island and American Medical 
associations. 

Dr. Duffy was united in marriage at Washington, D. 
C, on January 23, 1901, with Rose Nolan, of that city, 
a daughter of James and Blanche (Whalen) Nolan, old 
and highly respected residents there. James Nolan was 
born in Ireland, June 9, 1839, and there carried on a 
successful business as building contractor until his 
death. March 12, 1899. His wife was also a native of 
Ireland, where she was born, January 20, 1839, and died 
April ii, 1888. Dr. and Mrs. Duffy are the parents of 
one child: William Francis, Jr., born March i, 1914. 
Their residence is situated at No. 79 Constitution street, 
Bristol. 



EDWARD ARNOLD JOHNSON, one of the suc- 
cessful contractors and business men of Washington, 
R. I., who now resides at this place, retired from active 
labor, is a member of an old and distinguished New 
England family which was founded in this country 
about the close of the seventeenth century by 
Elkanah Johnson and his brother, Elisha Johnson. 
These brothers settled in Rhode Island at the early date 
above mentioned, the former at Warwick and the latter 
at East Greenwich. After the division of the towns in 
1741 they were respectively of Coventry and West 
Greenwich. 

It was from Elkanah Johnson that the Johnson family 
with which we are concerned was descended, and 
through his eldest son, John, who was born in the year 
1699. and died May 16, 1782. John Johnson married 
Sarah Phillips, of Jamestown, October 13. 1721, who 
was born in 1703, and died May 14, 1790. They were 
the parents of a number of children. 

Jonathan Johnson, fourth son of John and Sarah 
(Phillips) Johnson, was born June 21, 1738, and died 
in 181 5. He married Elizabeth Yeates, December 14, 
1759, a daughter of Jonathan and Deborah (Johnson) 
Yeates, and a granddaughter of Elisha Johnson, the 
brother of Elkanah Johnson, mentioned above. She 
was born May 20, 1740. and died sometime prior to her 
husband's death. 

Their youngest son, Elisha Johnson, was born March 
15, 1774, and died in 1819. He married Elizabeth Ellis, 
daughter of Gideon and (Helme) Ellis, of North Kings- 
ton, R. I., who was born April 27, 1774, and died in 
1862. She was a sister of Lieutenant William Helme, 
in the Revolutionary navy. 

The youngest child of Elisha and Elizabeth (Ellis) 
Johnson was Jenkins Jones Johnson, who was born July 
21, 1814, and died January 25, 1905. Mr. Johnson mar- 
ried, October 2, 1836. Cynthia A. .Arnold, a daughter of 
Welcome and Cynthia (Knight) Arnold. Mrs. Johnson 
was born November 28, 1817, and died April 25, 1887. 
Among their children was Edward Arnold Johnson, who 
is mentioned below. 

Edward Arnold Johnson, second son of Jenkins Jones 
and Cynthia A. (Arnold) Johnson, was born January 
7, 1849. at Coventry, R. I. He attended there, as a child, 
the local public schools. It was his father's intention, 
as well as his own, when he grew to the age of judg- 
ment, that he should have the advantages of a complete 
education, and at the age of twenty-one he began to 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



99 



study under the direction of E. Benjamin Andrews, at 
Southfield, Conn., and continued until compelled to 
desist on account of ill healtli. Mr. Johnson, Sr., 
was a carpenter by trade, and his son, when he was no 
more than si.xteen years of age, had entered his father's 
shop and learned the detail of that craft. Later he 
secured a position as watchman on the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, a position which he re- 
tained for several years, after which he was transferred 
to Nipmuck, where he became station-master. In the 
year 1870, however, he retired from his railroad work 
and again took up carpentry, being employed as a car- 
penter in the various local mills for a period of from 
eight to nine years. Mr. Johnson was a man of very 
thrifty habits, which were stimulated and encouraged 
by a desire on his part to be engaged in business on his 
own account. As the result of this economy and his 
industrious behavior, he finally found himself in a posi- 
tion to invest his savings in local real estate, and pur- 
chased much valuable property in and about Washing- 
ton, R. I. He also removed to this place and built his 
present fine mansion here, and also established a general 
store on the site now occupied by Knight & Andrews. 
After conducting this business for some four years, Mr. 
Johnson sold it and returned to the carpenter business, 
which he followed until the year i<yo8, when he finally 
retired. In the meantime Mr. Johnson had acquired 
some valuable tenement property which he has devel- 
oped to a high point. Mr. Johnson has been very active 
for a number of years in local affairs at Washington, 
and has held a number of public offices here. He was 
chairman of the board of assessors for a considerable 
period, and in that responsible position performed a 
valuable sen-ice to the community. He is a Republican 
in politics, and a staunch supporter of the principles 
and policies of that party. He is a man of very domes- 
tic instincts, and finds his recreation and happiness in 
his own home. He is vice-president of the Coventry 
Center Six Principle Church Corporation, and was 
treasurer of the Six Principle Baptist Conference until 
that body joined the Warren Association, of which he 
is now a member. Mr. Johnson is much interested in 
history, especially in that branch of it which deals with 
genealogy, and has in his possession the complete rec- 
ords of many of the prominent Rhode Island families. 
Edward Arnold Johnson was united in marriage, 
January 5, 1879, with Sarah A. Tillinghast, daughter 
of Clarke and Sarah B. (Brown) Tillinghast of Exe- 
ter, R. I. Mrs. Johnson was born October 10, 1858. 
They are the parents of one daughter, .A.nnie M. 
Johnson, born July 21, 1881, and died January 7, 1905. 
She married William W. .\nthony, October 28, 1903, 
the son of Frederick and Gertrude (Briggs) Anthony. 
Sarah .•\. Tillinghast Johnson is a direct descendant of 
Elder Pardon Tillinghast, a well-known figure in the 
Colonial history of this place, and also of Theopholis 
Whaley. 



held in highest esteem among his many friends and 
acquaintances. He is a son of Philip and Margaret 
Duffy, of Clyde, R. I. Philip Duffy is retired from 
active life, is a Democrat in politics, and has the dis- 
tinction of having been the first elected town treas- 
urer of West Warwick. Philip and Margaret Duffy- 
are the parents of eleven children: Mary C, married 
M. J. McPartland, of East Greenwich, R. I.; Frank 
P., of further mention; J. Edward, a physician of 
New York; Ellen G., married Henry F. Miller, of 
River Point, R. I.; Margaret, residing with her 
parents at Clyde; J. Veronica, married Robert M. 
Easdon, of River Point; Annie L., residing with her 
parents; Agnes L., a teacher in the Phenix school; 
Philip A., a graduate in dentistry, was associated with 
his brother, Dr. Frank P. Duffy, until his enlistment 
in the United States Army, now commissioned first 
lieutenant, on duty at Camp Devens; Beatrice E. and 
Mildred, residing with their parents. 

Frank P. Duffy was born at River Point, R. I., 
March 26, 1878. He obtained his grammar school 
education in the schools of Phenix, going thence to 
Providence High School, from which he graduated, 
class of 1896. The following six years were passed 
in the employ of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, as telegraph operator, station master, 
and general office accountant. He decided upon the 
profession of dentistry, chose Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery as his professional alma mater, there 
receiving his degree, D. D. S., as valedictorian of the 
class, 1906. Dr. Duffy is a member of Alpha Chapter, 
Psi Omega, a dental fraternity of Baltimore Den- 
tal College ; also a member of the advisory board, 
and during 1915 was president of the Rhode Island 
Dental .•\ssociation; member of the National Dental 
Association; the Northeastern Dental Society; the 
Preparedness League of .'Vmcrican Dentists; the State 
Board of Registration in Dentistry, appointed in Jan- 
uary, 1918, for a term of three years by the Governor. 
He introduced dental inspection into the schools of 
Warwick, and for three years held the position of 
inspector. He is a member of St. James' Roman 
Catholic Church, is a member of James P. Gibson 
Council, No. 181, Knights of Columbus, and for five 
years served as a member of the State Council of the 
order. 

Dr. Duffy married, September 23, 1907, Alice A. 
Bradley, daughter of Thomas H. and Ellen Bradley, 
of Cranston, R. I. They are the parents of two sons: 
.■\ustin and Richard Philip, and of a daughter, Fran- 
ces Rita. 



FRANK P. DUFFY. D. D. S.— Upon receiving 
his degree at Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dr. Duffy returned to his native town. River Point, 
R. I., and has been in continuous dental practice there 
for twelve years. He is well known throughout his 
section of the State as a skillful practitioner, being 



WARREN MANFORD GREENE— In the same 
house on Harking Hill, Coventry, R. I., in which his 
father was born, Warren M. Greene first saw the 
light, September 28, 1861, he the son of James Har- 
ris Greene, a descendant of Quidnesset John Greene. 
Of the Kingstown or Quidnesset Greenes Mr. Henry 
Rousmaniere w-rote to General George S. Greene, 
December 12, 1867: "I recollect a conversation I 
had five or six years ago w-ith Isaac Greene of Exe- 
ter, in which he told me that his early ancestors were 
not named Greene but had, a century and a half ago. 



lOO 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



adopted that cognomen. Isaac Greene was a Sena- 
tor for several years, possessed a strong intellect and 
tenacious memory, and would not be likely to be mis- 
taken in his information of his family history. Gen- 
eral Greene endorsed the tradition that this family 
bore, at an early date, the name Clark, as he always 
alluded to them as 'The Clark-Greenes.' " 

Warren Manford Greene is a son of James Harris 
Greene, a direct descendant of Quidnesset John 
Greene, through his son, Lieutenant John Greene, 
through his son, James Greene, his son, Isaac Greene, 
his son, James Greene, his son, Reuben Greene, and 
his son, James Harris Greene. Reuben Greene mar- 
ried Esther Whaley, a descendant of Judge Edward 
and Theophilus Whaley. James Harris Greene was a 
farmer and a minister of the Baptist church, a man of 
piety and high character. He married Lydia Ann 
Briggs, daughter of Warren and Desire Briggs. He 
died February 23, igo6; she died February 8, 1905. 

Warren Manford Greene, son of James Harris 
and Lydia Ann (Briggs) Greene, was born at Harkney 
Hill, town of Coventry, Kent county, R. I., September 
28, 1861. He was educated in the public schools, and at 
the age of seventeen years began teaching in the Coven- 
try schools, later in Washington and River Point. He 
then pursued courses in the Rhode Island State Nor- 
mal School, after which he taught in the schools of 
Coventry for about nine years, spending his summers 
on the farm. During this period he served as post- 
master of Coventry Center, from 1S85 to 1S89. He 
also served as State sealer of weights and measures. 
He next entered the employ of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad in the office of freight 
agent in Providence, continuing until a serious illness 
decided him to abandon railroading. After leaving 
the railroad, Mr. Greene became a tenant farmer, 
continuing for a few years, then bought a farm in the 
town of Coventry, one mile from Washington, upon 
which he operated for eight years very successfully, 
then sold, the health of his wife demanding a change. 
While living on the farm, in 1905. Mr. Greene was 
elected overseer of the poor. The town endowment 
for the poor had been mismanaged, and a poor busi- 
ness system had resulted in confusion and debt. He 
introduced correct business methods, and as school 
committeeman and town treasurer he has wrought a 
wondrous change in town finance and school efficiency. 
He accepted the office of town treasurer to fill a 
vacancy in 1909, and has since been in the office con- 
tinuously, the debt of the town, then $128,000, now 
being reduced to $20,000, and every fund of the town 
being in similarly good condition. The standard of 
school efficiency has been greatly raised, their scope 
enlarged and in many ways the result of Mr. Greene's 
public services has been of the greatest benefit to 
the community. He is an agent for the Waterman 
Fund, the town endowment for the benefit of the 
poor; is superintendent of cemeteries, and is giving 
his time freely to the public service. He has refused 
political office and has no liking for public office fur- 
ther than to prove useful to his fellow-men. 

Mr. Greene is a member of Anthony Lodge, No. 
21, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is 



a past grand, and when the burned lodge building 
was rebuilt he was chairman of the building commit- 
tee. He is chief patriarch of Sagamore Encampment 
of Anthony; member of the Grand Lodge, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, State of Rhode Island; 
member of the Odd Fellows Veteran Association, 
and of the Daughters of Rebekah. From the Re- 
bekahs he received a handsome jewel in appreciation 
of his services to the lodge during his thirty years of 
membership, and is the recipient of a beautiful past 
grand regalia from his brethren of Anthony Lodge, 
No. 21, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is 
also a member of Anthony Grange, No. 51, Patrons 
of Husbandry, and of the Rhode Island State Asso- 
ciation of Overseers of the Poor, and for two years 
was president of that organization. 

Warren M. Greene married (first), April 19, 1885, 
Anna P. Tillinghast, who died in 1888, daughter of 
Clark and Sarah Tillinghast, and a descendant of 
Pardon Tillinghast, the founder of the family in New 
England. They were the parents of a daughter, 
Leonora A. Greene, residing at home. Mr. Greene 
married (second), September II, 1890, Lizzie S. 
(Bromley) Branche, who died August 13, 1913. 



MICHEL NAPOLEON CARTIER, for many 
years president and treasurer of the large concern 
of M. N. Cartier & Son's Company, manufacturers 
of lexonite plastic asbestos roofing compound and 
various waterproof paints and compounds, and one of 
the most successful figures in the industrial world of 
Providence, is a native of Sutton, Mass., where he was 
born January 9, 1854, the son of Michel and Julia 
(Renault) Cartier, now deceased, formerly natives 
of Canada and France, respectively. The Cartiers 
have resided in this country for a considerable period, 
although the date of their immigration here is uncer- 
tain. Mr. Cartier is a member of a family of dis- 
tinguished French origin, a descendant of the famous 
French explorer, Jacques Cartier, discoverer of the 
St. Lawrence river. Jacques Cartier, a native of St. 
Malo, in Brittany, set sail on November 20, 1534, in 
search of a new passage to tlie East, a quest which 
had agitated all Europe from the time of Columbus. 
He reached Newfoundland on May 10, and after 
exploring the coast returned to France. On May 16, 
1536, he again set sail for America with three ships, 
and this time, passing through the strait of Belle 
Isle, anchored on August 9, in Pillage bay, which on 
the following day he named the bay of St. Lawrence. 
The name in course of time spread to the gulf and to 
the river. Cartier later explored parts of Canada 
bordering on the bay, in search of a mythical land of 
great riches called by the Indians, Saguenay. He 
later returned to France, and subsequently made two 
more voyages to the New World. He died at St. 
Malo, September i, 1557. Mr. Cartier numbers among 
his forebears the noted Canadian statesman, Sir 
Georges Etienne Cartier (1814-1873), in 1S57 attorney- 
general of Lower Canada, and from 1858 to 1S62 
prime minister of Canada with Sir John MacDonald. 
He favored the construction of railways and to his 
energy and fearless optimism are largely due the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



lOI 



eventual success of the Grand Trunk Railway, and 
the resolve to construct the Canadian Pacific. Sir 
George E. Carticr was instrumental in effecting the 
confederation of Upper and Lower Canada, and in 
bringing about harmonious relations between the 
British and French. 

Michel Cartier, Sr., was engaged in business at 
Sutton as a shoemaker up to the time of his death, 
and was well known in that community. The child- 
hood of Michel Napoleon Cartier was spent in his 
native place and as a lad he attended the local public 
schools and later those of Millbury, Massachusetts. 
His educational opportunities, however, were of the 
slightest, and when but nine years of age, he went 
to work to assist his father in the making of shoes. 
He remained thus employed until he had completed 
his fourteenth year, when he secured a position in a 
grocery and meat establishment at Millbury, Mass. 
He remained with this concern until he was eighteen 
years of age, after which he went to Putman, Conn., 
and became assistant manager of the Morse Mills 
store for six years. He then spent about five years 
in travel as a salesman for a Boston company selling 
groceries and liquor, w^holesale. At the age of thirty- 
four, Mr. Cartier engaged in the general store busi- 
ness for two years at Willi«msvillc, Conn., after 
which he removed to Putnam, in the same State, 
where he spent two years in the dry goods business. 
He then once more became a traveling salesman for a 
concern which manufactured roofing materials and 
here learned the fundamentals of the business in 
which he has since been engaged. In the year iiS94, 
when forty years of age, possessing at that time a 
capital of but $16.00, he opened his first roofing and 
building material store at No. 45 Smith street. Provi- 
dence, in partnership with his eldest son and another 
helper. He was very successful from the outset, but 
after a time removed to his present location. His 
establishment was then a comparatively small one, 
but it has grown rapidly to its present great propor- 
tions, until the firm of Mr. Cartier & Sons became 
the largest dealers in roofing materials (not including 
manufacturers) in the United States. Some idea of 
the magnitude of his operations may be gained from 
the fact that his business for igi8, which owing to 
war conditions was a poor year, amounted to some- 
thing in excess of $400,000. The business was incor- 
porated in the year 1904 with Mr. Cartier himself as 
president and treasurer, his son George E. Cartier, 
as secretary and assistant treasurer, another son, 
Louis N. Cartier, as vice-president, another son, Jo- 
seph A. Cartier, as second vice-president, and a fifth 
son, Charles A. Cartier. as assistant secretary. At 
the present time (1919) Mr. Cartier employs fifty 
hands to carry on his work. The business is located 
at 291 Canal street, and has occupied this location for 
the past tw-enty-four years. In addition to this mer- 
cantile enterprise the company is engaged in the 
manufacture of the famous "lexonite" plastic asbestos 
roofing compound, and several types of waterproof 
paints and compounds. They manufacture also vari- 
ous tools used by roofers, such as heating kettles, 
roofer's mops, roofing buckets, gravel roof scoopers, 



gravel spreaders, tinner's firepots, kettle dippers, pour- 
ing dippers, concrete tampers and so forth. For these 
various articles they have an exceedingly wide market 
and there is no State in the Union in wliich their goods 
are not sold. 

Mr. Cartier is well known in fraternal and social 
circles in Providence, and is a member of Palestine 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and past treasurer of the 
grand lodge of this order in the State, having served 
six years upon his resignation, February 12, 1919. 
He is also a member of the National Association of 
Roofers, past .president of the Travelers' Protective 
Association, Rhode Island division, and a member of 
other bodies. In politics Mr. Cartier does not 
acknowledge any partisan afiiliations, but is entirely 
independent in his judgment on public issues and 
questions generally. Upon his 65th birthday, Mr. Car- 
tier retired from active business life. 

Michel Napoleon Cartier was united in marriage on 
April 9, 1875, with Ozilda Tetreault, a daughter of 

and Alixis (Josette) Tetreault, and seven 

children have been born of this union, as follows: 
Henry N., George E., Louis N., Joseph A., Charles 
A., ail of whom are engaged in business with their 
father: Ozilda, and Felix D., both deceased. During 
the whole course of his career Mr. Cartier has been 
closely identified with the industrial and financial 
growth of Providence, and has been one of the most 
active participants therein, whose efforts are pri- 
marily directed towards the advancement of the 
community of which he is a member. He is pos- 
sessed of unyielding will and purpose, and has brought 
these strong traits to bear upon the enterprise in 
which he is engaged with the inevitable result of its 
great prosperity. His unimpeachable integrity and 
rare sense of justice have won for him an enviable 
reputation, both as a business man and as one whose 
conduct in the more personal relations of life is 
above reproach. The successes achieved by Mr. Car- 
tier have been very remarkable in degree, and indubit- 
ably the result of uncommon powers of will and intel- 
ligence. It often seems in the case of such men that, 
with their restless activity and the quickness with 
which they accomplish their results, that their lives 
are in eflect longer than that of the average man. 
Certainly this is true, if time is to be measured by 
events, rather than in figures on a dial. Not a moment 
of Mr. Cartier's life has been lost or wasted, and he 
has realized that ideal in Longfellow's poem, becom- 
ing one of those who "While their companions slept 
are toiling upwards in the night." 



LE GRAND BLAKE. M. D.— One of the leading 
physicians of Riverside, R. I., and the surrounding 
region, is Dr. LeGrand Blake, who has one of the 
most important practices in the community. Dr. 
Blake is a son of Elias and Mary Ann (.Adams) 
Blake, the former having been a prosperous carpen- 
ter of Franklin, Mass., where the family resided for 
many years. 

Dr. Blake was born at Franklin, November 11, 1854, 
and there received the elementary portion of his edu- 
cation. It had not been intended that he should receive 



I02 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



a college course, but the youth was exceedingly ambi- 
tious and determined to gain one for himself. With 
this end in view he began work as a hatter, which 
trade he learned and continued in this occupation until 
the year 1890, when he had earned a sufficient sum to 
pay his way through college. He then matriculated 
at the medical department of Tufts College, having 
determined upon medicine as a profession, and there 
made an excellent record for himself for industry and 
general good scholarship. He was graduated with the 
class of 1894, receiving his medical degree, and at 
once began tlie practice of his profession in Milford, 
Mass. He remained for about eight years there, 
meeting with a high degree of success, and then came 
in 1902 to Riverside, where he has been in active prac- 
tice ever since. He has established an enviable repu- 
tation for himself for his ability and his adherence to 
the highest ethics of his profession, and is now one 
of the most prominent figures in the life of this place. 
He does not belong to a church, but his family attend 
the Episcopal church at Riverside. Dr. Blake is a 
prominent man in the social and fraternal circles here, 
and is a member of the Blue Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Warren Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; the Order of the Eastern Star; and is also 
affiliated with the Betsey Ross Chapter. Daughters 
of Liberty Grange, and is a fourth, fifth and sixth 
degree member. For sixteen years he has held the 
position of local medical examiner for the Metropol- 
itan Life Insurance Company, and has also served in 
this capacity for the Hartford Life Insurance Com- 
pany, the North Western Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and the Connecticut General Life Insurance 
Company. 

Dr. Blake married (first), January i, 1877, Ellen 
Burns. He married (second), Marcli 5, 1906, in Prov- 
idence, Nancy E. Parker, a daughter of Roswell P. and 
Helen Parker. The Parkers were old and highly 
respected residents of West Medway, Mass. 



CHARLIE HARRISON ARNOLD, now a mer- 
chant of tlie town of Greene, reviews an active busi- 
ness life as mill worker, mercantile clerk and pro- 
prietor, his activity beginning at an early age. He is 
a descendant of the ancient and honorable Arnold 
family of Rhode Island, a family that has been prom- 
inent in Rhode Island since the coming of William 
Arnold to Providence in the spring of 1636. This 
branch of the family moved to the State of Illinois, 
where William Henry Arnold was born and spent his 
early life, but later he came to the Hope Valley of 
Rhode Island. He studied for the ministry of the 
First Day Adventist church, conducting farming oper- 
ations at the same time but in a small way. He mar- 
ried Almira N. Greene, daughter of Randall and Nancy 
(Richmond) Greene. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold are liv- 
ing at the home of their son Charlie H., the father 
now aged seventy-nine years. 

Charlie Harrison Arnold, son of William Henry 
and Almira N. (Greene) Arnold, was born in the vil- 
lage of Barberville, town of Hopkinton, R. I., Febru- 
ary 27, 1875. He spent his youth in the village of his 
birth, and secured his education in the public schools 
there and at Wyoming, another village of the Hope 



Valley. His first employment was in the cotton mill 
owned by A. T. Crandall in Barberville, that position 
being followed by a term in the Arcadia Mill as a 
weaver. This completed his experience as a mill 
worker, his next employment being as a grocer's 
clerk in Arcadia. From Arcadia he went to Arling- 
ton, R. I., where he engaged in the same business for 
five years. The following seven years were spent in 
Providence, R. I., with the mercantile firm of Bed- 
ford & Browning. He began business for himself in 
F.scoheag, about 1910, buying out an established groc- 
ery business. He was appointed postmaster of the 
village the same year, and there continued in suc- 
cessful business until 1913, when he sold out and 
moved to Greene in the town of Coventry. There in 
1915 he bought the store business wliich had been 
founded fifty years earlier. Mr. Arnold has developed 
a successful business at the old stand, and is one of 
the substantial men of his village. He has repeatedly 
declined political office, but is an ardent believer in 
Prohibition and interested in the success of the party 
which makes it their chief plank. He is an active, 
useful member of Greene Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He is a good business man, very attentive to all his 
interests, upright and honorable in his dealings and 
highly esteemed. 

He married Alberta H. Barber, daughter of Albert 
T. and Emma (Wright) Barber, of Escoheag, R. I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold are the parents of three children: 
Mildred P., Lester W. and Albert B. 



GRAYDON BROWN SMITH, M. D.— From the 
earliest settlement of Rhode Island, Smiths have been 
associated with its history. John Smith coming with 
Roger Williams, and through his occupation gaining 
the distinctive name. John Smith "The Miller." A 
descendant, Jefferson Smith, married Ellen, a daughter 
ol Chad Brown, and their son. Rev. Brown E. Smith, 
a Baptist minister, served Rhode Island churches for 
many years. He was a member of the Roger Wil- 
liams Society, tracing descent from the founder of 
Providence, in the eleventh generation. Rev. Brown 
F. Smith married Harriet Wright Haskins, and they 
are the parents of : Graydon Brown Smith, M. D., of 
Quidnick, R. I., and Pearl G. Smith, who resides with 
her mother. Rev. Brown E. Smith died October 9, IQ16; 
Mrs. Smith now resides in Providence. 

Graydon Brown Smith was born in Providence, R. 
I., August 4, 1891. He was educated in the public 
schools, necessarily in different towns, as his father 
accepted calls from churches needing him, and while 
at Wickford, R. I., Dr. Smith completed his high 
school education, graduating with the class of 191 1. 
The next four years were spent as a student at Hahne- 
mann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., whence he 
was graduated M. D., class of 1915. He served as 
interne at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, one 
year, then began the private practice of medicine in 
Providence, R. I., opening offices at No. 422 Cranston 
street, ■ there remaining eighteen months. In April, 
1917, he located at Quidnick, R. I., where he has 
established a growing clientele. He is a member of 
the Kent County Medical Society, the Rhode Island 
Homoeopathic Medical Society, the Rhode Island 




i^arolD H. £0aDi6on 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ici 



State Medical Society, and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Dr. Smith married. June 28, 1916, Myrtle L. Um- 
phrey, daughter of .\rthur E. and Betty Umphrey, of 
Washburn, Me. 



HAROLD LESTER MADISON— Madisons have 
figured pruminently in American affairs since the close 
ot the seventeenth century. New England has been 
the home of several distinguished branches of the 
family for two and a half centuries. The Rliode Island 
Madisons, represented in the present generation by 
several men prominent in business, professional and 
public life, have long ranked among the foremost 
families of the State. Harold Lester Madison, curator 
of Roger Williams Park Museum, and editor and 
authority on natural and allied sciences, is a member 
of the old Rhode Island Madison family, and the 
descendant on both paternal and maternal sides of 
several of the oldest of New England families. 

Mr. Madison was born in Warwick, R. I., Septem- 
ber 22, 1878, son of George Warren and Fannie Louise 
(Spink) Madison. George Warren Madison, son of 
Joseph Warren Madison, has been active in public 
life in the State, and is at present a member of the 
Upper House of the Rhode Island Legislature; he is 
also an expert agriculturist and for many years has 
supervised large estates. He married Fannie Louise 
Spink, of an old Rhode Island family, a descendant 
of Robert Spink, founder of the family in .'\merica, 
who was born in England in 1615, and sailed from 
London in 1635. He was a resident of Newport and 
Portsmouth, and in 1665 settled in Kingstown, where 
his descendants have since resided. A review of the 
family appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Harold Lester Madison was educated in the best 
scientific schools of the country, receiving the first rud- 
iments in the democratic surroimdings of the district 
schools of Warwick. He ne.xt attended the East 
Greenwich Academy, where he took the scientific 
course. Graduating in 1897, he matriculated at Brown 
University, where he began his studies for a Ph. B. 
degree, which he received in 1901. After graduation 
he continued his studies in biology at the university 
for the A. M. degree, which he received in igo2. His 
work as a student and instructor (appointed January, 
1905) at Brown University lasted until June, 1905, and 
ht financed in a large measure his expenses as a 
student. 

This e.xperience as an instructor opened up to him 
an interesting and absorbing career, and revealed 
the work for which he was best fitted by nature and 
acquirements. In 1905, Mr. Madison accepted the 
chair of biologj' at the Southwestern Baptist Univer- 
sity, now Union University, at Jackson, Tenn., and for 
three years was a member of the staff of the college. 
On June 15, 1908, he was appointed curator of the 
museum at Roger W'illiams Park, in Providence. His 
work here has been constructive and most valuable. 
He has enlarged the scope of usefulness of the insti- 
tution, and with his democratic outlook has it serve 
the masses of the community as well as the students of 
science. To this end he publishes six times a year 
the "Park Museum Bulletin," which is full of very 



interesting and vital material. In 1916, Mr. Madison 
was elected councilor of the American Association of 
Museums, and in 1917 became editor of the "Museum 
News Letter" for this association. In January, 1918, 
he was appointed to fill the unexpired term of the 
secretary of the association, who had resigned. In 
May, 1918, he was elected secretary of the association 
and editor of a new publication museum work, includ- 
ing the proceedings of the American .Association of 
Museums. The publication of the '"Museum News Let- 
ter" was discontinued. From 1914 to 1917 he was 
president of the Rhode Island Fields Naturalist Club. 
Since 191 1 he has been secretary and treasurer of the 
Audubon Society of Rhode Island. He is a member 
of the -American' Association for the Advancement of 
Science, of the American Ornithological Union, the 
National Geographical Society, the Cooper Ornitho- 
logical Club, and of the Rhode Island Horticultural 
Society, of the latter of which he was treasurer for 
five years. He was "director of exhibits" of the 
United States Food Administration for Rhode Island 
in 1918. Mr. Madison is a member of King Solomon 
Lodge, No. II, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
and in politics is an Independent Republican. He is 
a member of the People's Baptist Church of .\uburn, 
R. I., and was president in 1918. He has been superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school since 1909, was at one 
time a member of the board of trustees, and is now a 
deacon. 

On August 20, 1905, Mr. Madison married, at Block 
Island, Florence .Mberta Ball. Their children are: 
Mary Frances, born .Aug. 23, 1907; Harold Lester, Jr., 
born May 4, 1908: Hope Brown, born May 26. 191 1. 



ARTHUR ABBOT THOMAS, one of the leading 
attorneys of Providence, and a member of the City 
Council, is a native of this city, where his birth oc- 
curred June 13, 1878. He is a son of Charles Lloyd 
and Sarah Sophia (Barstow) Thomas, both of whom 
are now deceased. Charles Lloyd Thomas was born 
in Galena. 111., having been educated there in his early 
childhood, and then at Hopkins Grammar School, New 
Haven, graduating from Yale in the famous class of 
1853. After three years of teaching in Louisiana, he 
studied law in Chicago, becoming a partner in the 
firm of Smith, Farwell & Thomas. He came East in 
1861, and became a partner in the firm of Taylor, 
Symonds & Company, with which firm he was asso- 
ciated until his death. Sarah Sophia (Barstow) 
Thomas was a daughter of Amos Chafee and Emel- 
ine Eames Barstow. Her father, Mr. Barstow, served 
the city as mayor in 1853-54. 

.Arthur Abbot Thomas was educated in the English 
and Classical School, with two years in the Classical 
High School, and three years in Phillip's .Academy, 
Andover, Mass., where he was prepared for college, 
and from which he was graduated in 1897. He then 
matriculated at Yale University, where he took the 
usual academic course and was graduated with the 
class of 1901, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He had already determined to follow law as his pro- 
fession, and with this end in view entered the law 
school of Harvard University, taking the usual three 
years' course, and being graduated in 1904 with the 



I04 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



degree of LL. B. He was admitted to the Rhode 
Island bar January 5, 1905, and since that time has 
been actively engaged in general practice here. After 
six months as a student in the office of Edwards & 
Angell, he became associated with the firm of Tilling- 
hast & Tillinghast, with which he was identified until 
an illness necessitated his absence from the city, and 
took him out of active practice for fourteen months. 
On his return he became associated with Charles E. 
Salisbury and Percy W. Gardner. In 1912 he became 
associated with Cyrus M. Van Slyck, and after the 
death of the latter, continued with those in the office, 
at present being associated with Frederick A. Jones, 
though there is no partnership. Recently he became 
identified with city politics, having been elected in 
November, 1918, to the city council from the Second 
Ward, and besides serving on that body, is a member 
of its committees on pensions and ordinances. 

In his religious belief Mr. Thomas is an Episcopal- 
ian, and is very active in the parish of St. John's, hav- 
ing attended that church for a number of years. He 
h also vestryman of St. John's Church and secretary 
of the same. He is secretary of St. Andrew's Indus- 
trial School, an important charitable institution of the 
State; also a member of the board of directors oi 
Providence Lying-in Hospital; Providence Boys' Club; 
Society of Organizing Charities; Young Men's Christ- 
ian Association and board of trustees of the Young 
Women's Christian .\ssociation. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Yale Association of Rhode Island and holds 
the post of secretary-treasurer thereof; a member of 
the Hope and Agawam clubs of this city; and a direc- 
tor of several business corporations. During the war 
he was government appeal agent of Ward Two, and a 
member of the commercial economy board under the 
State Council of National Defense. 

Arthur Abbot Thomas was married, June i, 1910, 
to Pauline de W'eale Bartlett, of Easton, Md., a daugh- 
ter of John C. Bartlett and Matilda Jane Bartlett, old 
and highly respected residents of that city. Two 
children have been born of this union: Jane Bartlett, 
and Barbara Ann. 



HARRY ALEXANDER MANCHESTER, M. D., 

one of the most popular and successful physicians of 
Saylesville, is a native of the town of Portsmouth, this 
State, born June 20, 1877, He is a son of Oscar Con- 
stant and Ruth (Manchester) Manchester, highly 
respected residents of that place, where they still re- 
side. Oscar Constant Manchester has been for many 
years engaged in a mercantile business at Portsmouth, 
where he operates a prosperous store. His marriage 
to Ruth Manchester, who was no relative of his, oc- 
curred February 22, 1876. 

The childhood of Dr. Manchester was passed in 
his native town of Portsmouth, where he attended the 
local public schools and thus obtained the elementary 
portion of his education. Upon completing his studies 
at these institutions, he was given a position in his 
father's store, and worked there for a time. While 
thus occupied, however, a physician came to the place 
and rapidly gained a large practice there. Seeing the 
success of this man, young Mr. Manchester decided to 
enter this profession and to this end took private tui- 



tion under Everett Durphy, of Fall River, Mass. Dr. 
Manchester afterwards went to New York City, where 
he entered the New York Preparatory School on 
Forty-Second street, from which he graduated in 1895. 
He then entered the Long Island Hospital Medical 
School, where he took the regular course in medicine 
and graduated with the degree of M. D. in i8og. He 
then returned to Rhode Island and in 1900 began the 
general practice of his profession at Saylesville, where 
he has remained ever since. He now enjoys a large 
practice here. Dr. Manchester is a Congregationalist 
in his religious belief and attends the Sayles Memor- 
ial Church at this place, although not a member of the 
congregation. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, 
No. 22, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of Lime 
Rock Grange, the Pawtucket Medical Society, the 
Rhode Island State Medical Association, and the 
American Medical Association. He has been keenly 
interested in the fire department of this town, and is 
a member of the Saylesville Firemens' .Association. 

Dr. Manchester married, March 7, 1900, at Ports- 
mouth. Idella Harney, an old schoolmate of his. They 
have one child, Fannie Katherine, born September 26, 
1902. She is now a student at the Pawtucket High 
School. Dr. Manchester is the only surviving mem- 
ber of the three children born to his parents, two 
brothers having died in early youth. His father was 
for many years postmaster of Portsmouth and still 
resides there, as does his wife; his aged mother, who 
had reached the advanced age of eighty-seven years 
when she died, November 8, 1918, was also a resident 
of Portsmouth. 



HENRY F. WOODMANSEE, a retired business 
man of Wyoming, R. I., and a prominent figure in 
the general life of this community, is a native of 
Wyoming, and was born on the old family homestead 
here, August 2. 1844. He is a son of Abner M. and 
Eliza (Boss) Woodmansee, the former a tailor by 
trade who carried on his business in this village until 
his retirement from active life, when he made his 
home with his son, Henry F. Woodmansee. The elder 
Mr. Woodmansee conducted his business in Wyoming, 
R. I. He was born May 28, 1812, and died March 29, 
1881. Mrs. Woodmansee died June 4, 1852. Mr. and 
Mrs. Abner M. Woodmansee were the parents of the 
following children: Abner L., born April 21, 1842, 
died Sept. 21, 1843; Henry F., of whom further; Lafay- 
ette Greene, born July 17, 1847, a resident of Provi- 
dence, an employee of Brown & Sharpe; Lemira 
Frances, born Dec, 1849, of California. 

The childhood of Henry F. Woodmansee was spent 
in his father's home and he worked at an early age in 
a local cotton mill, where he remained until his seven- 
teenth year. It was at that time that the Civil War 
broke out and the young man responded to the call of 
Lincoln and enlisted in Battery A, Third Rhode Island 
Heavy .Artillery in the L^nion Army. This battery 
was ordered to South Carolina and became a part of 
the Third Regiment, Rhode Island Heavy .Artillery. 
As a member of that battery, he participated in many 
of the great engagements of the war, including the 
battles of James Island, Secessionville, Morris Island, 
Charleston and Savannah Railroad, and Honey Hill, 




CX^-Ai..^ o^ ^^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



loq 



and the siege of Charleston and Fort Suinpter. In 
the battle of Honey Hill, while acting as a mounted 
orderly, Mr. Woodmansce had his horse killed under 
him, but was himself unwounded. At the close of 
hostilities, Mr. Woodmansee received his honorable 
discharge, on his twenty-first birthday, August 2, 1865. 
Returning to the North, he resumed his interrupted 
career, and made his home on the old family home- 
stead, where he continues to reside at the present 
time. Politically, he is a Republican. 

Mr. Woodmansee has been very prominent in the 
life of this place and has been a member of many 
public and fraternal organizations here, and served in 
numerous public offices in the town of Richmond. He 
was chosen moderator as many as twenty-six times, 
and served for twenty-five times on the town council 
and was president of that body for eighteen years. In 
the year igo6 he was elected to represent his com- 
munity in the General Assembly of the State and con- 
tinued to do so until 1909. In Xovember, 1918. he 
was again elected to represent the town of Richmond 
in the General .'\ssembly. He is at the present time 
a member of the Board of Tax Assessors of Richmond. 
He was a charter member of the Lincoln Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is now a member of Burn- 
side Post, Grand .\rmy of the Republic, of Shannock, 
R. I. In the year 1877 Mr. Woodmansee became a 
member of Mechanics Lodge, No. 14. Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and has been past noble grand 
of that body since 1880. In the year 1896 he was 
appointed postmaster of Wyoming, but in 1906, upon 
his election to the assembly, resigned from that post, 
being succeeded therein by his wife, who continued to 
hold it until 191 5. Mr. Woodmansee was employed in 
the machine shop of the Nichols & Langworthy Ma- 
chine Company, but several years ago retired from 
active business. 

Henry F. W'oodmansee was united in marriage on 
February 10, 1867, with Lovina J. James, of Exeter, 
a daughter of Simeon and Elizabeth (James) James, 
of that place. Of this union one child has been born, 
Bernis L. Woodmansee, on April 15, 1868. Mr. 
Woodmansee, Jr., attended the village schools of 
Wyoming, and later the Eastman Business College, of 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. After completing his studies 
he was employed in the Carolina Mills store for a time 
and about 1895 went to Providence, where he estab- 
lished a market on Cranston street. He remained in 
this business for about eighteen months, when he sold 
out and became associated with the Providence branch 
of the Nelson Morris Provision Company. After 
three years with this company he went with the Indus- 
trial Trust Company and has been connected there- 
with for the past eighteen years. Bernis L. Wood- 
mansee married, in 1890, Clara J. Burdick, a daughter 
of Henry J. Burdick, and they are the parents of three 
children as follows: Sadie Bernadcta, died at age of 
six; Clarence Henry, a graduate of Brown Univer- 
sity, served as a second-lieutenant with the Two Hun- 
dred and Thirteenth Regiment of Engineers; Hazel 
Marie, a student in the Classical High School, of Prov- 
idence. 



There is no citizen of Wyoming more highly re- 
spected and esteemed than Mr. Woodmansce, who 
enjoys a reputation for integrity and square dealing, 
second to none. Not long ago he and his wife cele- 
brated their golden wedding, many of their friends in 
this and the surrounding communities coming to the 
Woodmansee home to offer their congratulations. 
Among these was a delegation from Mechanics Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which presented 
Mr. Woodmansee with a veteran Odd Fellows jewel, 
on which were engraved the figures "40," he having 
been a member of the order for forty years. 



IRA LLOYD LETTS— .'\mong the well known 
attorneys of Prnvidcnci-. R. I., should be numbered Ira 
Lloyd Letts, who has practised in this city but a com- 
paratively short time, and has already made a place for 
himself in the profession of the law and won the con- 
fidence of his professional colleagues. Mr. Letts is a 
native of Cortland, X. Y., where he was born May 
29, 1889, a son of George J. and Emma (Slater) Letts. 
The elder Mr. Letts was a farmer for many years and 
still continues to attend to some of his farming inter- 
ests, although he now lives in semi-retirement with his 
wife at Moravia. N. Y. Mrs. Letts, Sr.. is a member 
of an old Connecticut family. While still very young, 
Mr. Letts' parents removed to Moravia, and it was at 
that place that his childhood was principally spent and 
there that he attended the local public schools He 
was graduated from the Moravia High School in 1906, 
and in the fall of 1907 entered the State Normal 
School at Cortland, N. Y., graduating from that in- 
stitution two years later. He then entered Brown 
University, at Providence, and graduated in the year 
1913 with the degree of Ph. B. The following year, 
he gained the degree of M. .'\. from the same univer- 
sity, and then entered the law school in connection 
with Columbia University, of New York City. From 
this institution he graduated with the class of 1916, 
receiving the degree of LL. B. Coming to Rhode 
Island early in the year 1917, he passed the Rhode 
Island bar examinations and at once opened his office 
in the Industrial Trust building, where he is now 
situated. During his college career he was very prom- 
inent in the life of the various institutions which he 
attended, and was a member of the Theta Nu Epsilon, 
the Delta Kappa Epsilon. and the Delta Sigma Rho 
fraternities. He was chairman of the national conven- 
tion of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity in 1912. He 
was president of the senior class of Brown University 
in 1013, president of the debating club of that college, 
chairman of the athletic association, and president of 
the Sphinx Club there. While in the Columbia Law 
School, he was on the board of editors of the Colum- 
bia Law Review, and has served as treasurer of the 
Brown University Club of New York City. His 
scholarship was of a remarkable order and he won 
many honors, taking at Brown the Hicks prize, for 
three consecutive years, the Hicks interclass prize 
during his junior year and the Carpenter prize in that 
same year. At the present time he serves on the ex- 
ecutive board of the Brown Club. He is also a mem- 



io6 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



ber of the East Side Tennis Club, the Noon-Dny Club, 
and a number of art clubs in Providence. In his 
religious belief Mr. Letts is a Congregationalist. 

Ira Lloyd Letts was united in marriage on December 
20, 191 7, at Providence, with Madeleine H. Greene, a 
native of Central Falls, and a daughter of Edward A. 
and Annie H. Greene. One child was born of this 
union, Barbara Slater Letts, on Christmas Day, 1918. 



ALVAH HENRY BARNES, M. D.— .\t his fine 
summer home on the Bay, Dr. Barnes lays aside pro- 
fessional cares and enjoys the domestic side of life to 
the full. He is a man of quiet tastes and life, one of 
whom home is the great joy of life, but alas, is eminent 
in a profession which acknowledges no devotees with 
a divided interest, hence home joys are denied those 
who have won public confidence as physicians of skill 
and honor. This class includes Dr. Barnes who, since 
the year 1900, has been a practitioner of Providence, 
where he has a large and important clientele. He is a 
son of Frederick John and Mary J. (Higgins) Barnes, 
the former for many years a master mechanic of 
woolen mills, now deceased, the latter yet a resident 
of Providence, an honored guest at the home of her 
son. Dr. Alvah H. Barnes, of No. 449 Plainfield street. 
Alvah Henry Barnes was born in Worcester, Mass., 
May 27, 1873, and there attended public school until 
completing the high school course. After leaving school 
he was employed as a clerk in a hardware store, but as 
soon as able financially, he completed his English edu- 
cation. Medicine was a favored profession in the 
Barnes family, seven of the ancestors of Alvah H. hav- 
ing been physicians. This fact, perhaps, influenced the 
young man. and as soon as possible he arranged for 
the financing of a medical education. He finally entered 
the Medico-Chirugical Medical College, in Philadelphia, 
Pa., and at the age of twenty-seven, in the year igoo, he 
was graduated M. D. He at once located in Providence. 
R. I., and began the task of building up a practice. 
The years have bro\!ght him the honors and reward of 
his profession, and he ministers to a large clientele. He 
is a member of the American Medical .Association, 
Rhode Island State and Providence Medical societies, 
and is highly esteemed by his brethren of the profes- 
sion. Dr. Barnes is a member of the Masonic Order, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, past chancellor 
commander of the Knights of Pythias, member of the 
Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias, and a member of 
the Rhode Island Grand Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 
He is a trustee of the Plainfield Street Free Baptist 
Church, is a Republican in politics, but wholly devoted 
to his profession to the exclusion of all desire for 
political office. 

Dr. Barnes married, in Providence, June 12, 1000, 
.'Mice E. Curtis, of Worcester, Mass. They are the 
parents of two daughters and a son : Dorothy Ger- 
trude, born Aug. 12, 1902; Marjorie Paine, Dec. 10, 
1907; and Alvah Henry (2), Aug. 23, igog. 



He gained his education in both public and private 
schools of Harrisville, going later to the preparatory 
school for Boston College. He was also for three years 
at the preparatory school of the Holy Cross. He then 
went for two years to St. Joseph's College, from which 
he was graduated in 1909 with tiie degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He had decided by the time he left college 
that he would choose a legal career, and therefore began 
his preparation for the profession in the law office of a 
practising attorney, where most of the work was of an 
extremely practical character. He also spent one year in 
the New York Law School. In 1914. having passed 
his examinations, he was admitted to the bar of Rhode 
Island and has been engaged in professional work ever 
since that time. Mr. Smith is a Democrat in his political 
views, and has served as moderator of Harrisville for 
a term of two years, but does not take a very active 
part in party politics. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church. He has one brother, Thomas F. 
Smith, who lives also in Providence, and two sisters, 
Ellen M., and Rosemary L., also of Providence, R. I. 



JAMES E. LAWRENCE SMITH— Among the 

young practising lawyers of Providence is James E. 
Lawrence Smith, who was bom at Harrisville. R. I., in 
December, 1886, the son of Terence J. and Ellen 
(Leoby) Smith. 



WILLIAM RANA FORTIN, one of the success- 
ful merchants of Pawtucket, R. I,, where he is engaged 
in the drug business on a large scale, and closely iden- 
tified with the general life of this community, is a 
native of Vergennes. Vt., where he was born August 
26, 1880. Mr. Fortin is a son of Rana and Alzine 
(^lonast) Fortin, old and highly respected residents of 
that place. Mr. Fortin's early life was spent at Central 
Falls, R. I., to which place his parents removed when 
he was a small child, and it was here that he gained 
his early education, attending for that purpose the local 
public schools. L^pon completing his studies at these 
institutions, Mr. Fortin entered the employ of a local 
pharmacist, and there learned the drug business. He 
was registered as a drug clerk in 1890, and in October, 
of that year, engaged in business on his own account, 
starting a small drug store at his present location. No. 
640 Broadway, Pawtucket. His business has grown 
rapidly, and at the present time he owns one of the 
largest and most up-to-date establishments of its kind 
in the city. The success that he has met with has been 
due entirely to his own efforts, and he may be regarded 
as a self-made man in the best sense of the term. Afr. 
Fortin's residence is at No. 6 Webster street, in this 
city, and here makes his home. In addition to his busi- 
ness success, Mr. Fortin has also taken a leading part 
in public affairs here, and has also been active in social 
and club life. He is intensely fond of the sports and 
pastimes connected with open air life. Mr. Fortin is a 
member of the board of directors of the Rhode Island 
College of Pharmacy, and has taken a great deal of 
interest in developing and making more useful this 
highly important institution. From 1006 to 191 1 he acted 
as milk inspector for the city of Pawtucket. In 1911 
Mr. Fortin was elected to represent District No. i, city 
of Pawtucket, in the State Legislature, and has con- 
tinued to serve as a member of that body ever since. 
He is chairman of the House Committee on Judiciary, 
and also is the Republican floor leader. He is a mem- 
ber of Montcalm Council. No. 46, Society of St. Jean 
de Baptiste, Pawtucket. He is a member of Pawtucket 
Lodge, No. 920, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and Ossemequin Lodge, Independent Order of 




\jm\j 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



107 



Red Men. In his religious belief Mr. Fortin is a Roman 
Catholic, and attends the church of Our Lady of Con- 
solation at this place. 

William Rana Fortin was united in marriage, .April 
i^. 1903, at Pawtucket, with Delia Masse, of this city, 
a daughter of Joseph and Sophia (Breault") Masse, old 
and highly respected residents here. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Fortin the following children have been born : Rhea, 
born March 2, 1904, and now a pupil at the local high 
school; William E., born Dec. 29, 1912; .\nita, born 
Tan. 10. ](}\-. 



WILLIAM BURT SHEPARD, B. S., D. O., one 

of the most successful and prominent osteopaths of 
Providence and Wickford, R. I., is a native of Hills- 
dale, Mich., where his birth occurred April 20, 1884. 
Dr. Shepard is a son of William Pcnn and Lydia 
(Brown) Shepard, the former deceased and the latter 
still a resident of Michigan. William Penn Shepard 
was for many years a manufacturer of leather goods 
in the State of Michigan, and came from old English 
stock of New York State, and is a descendant of John 
Shepard, who was commissioned magistrate for the 
Colony of New York, by King George III. 

Dr. Shepard passed his childhood in his native tow-n 
of Hillsdale, and there attended the grammar and high 
school, graduating from the latter in 1902, after being 
prepared for college. He then entered Hillsdale Col- 
lege in 1902, where he started to take a classical course, 
attending three years. He then entered Valparaiso 
University, at Valparaiso, Ind., in 1905, from which he 
graduated with the class of 1906, taking the Bachelor 
of Science degree. After graduation he taught school 
at Mt. Carroll, 111., as assistant principal and teacher 
of sciences. In 1907 he entered the Still College of 
Osteopathy at Des Moines, Iowa, from which he grad- 
uated in 1910 with the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy. 
Upon completing his studies Dr. Shepard came to the 
East, and began the practice of his profession in Provi- 
dence, in June, 1910. He opened an office at No. 146 
Westminster street, which has remained his headquar- 
ters up to the present time. Dr. Shepard has been 
extraordinarily successful, and has won for himself a 
most envial)le reputation in this section of the country, 
and become a leader among his professional colleagues 
here. He has gained a large followin.g. who testify 
unreservedly to his skill and capability. Not long after 
coming to this place. Dr. Shepard purchased the old 
estate known as "Oaklands," of the late Governor Greg- 
ory, and here established, in 101.3. the Shepard School 
for Boys. The building was destroyed by fire in 191 7> 
but arrangeincnts were at once made to rebuild on a 
larger scale. Dr. Shepard has been equally successful 
with his school, as with his profession, and has already 
achieved a work of remarkable significance and import- 
ance. The Shepard School was founded for the partic- 
ular purpose of offering a carefully graduated system 
of studies for boys physically handicapped, together 
with the care w^hich only a physician can give. Its pur- 
pose is well expressed in a quotation which appears in 
the front of the school's prospectus, as follows : 

What the world needs Is that balance of body, soul, 
and mind, which spells etBciency. But body Is basic. 
It Is now many years since psycholog^lsts began to 
Investigate the operation of the brain. In search for 



laws of growth. Thought processes have carefully- 
been studied, yet. In our consideration of child and 
adult, we must not lose sight of the fact that unless 
a brain Is phvsloloelcallv normal. It cannot, in fairness 
to the individual, be measured by a standard of normal 
brain operation. To expect the hlKhest return.s, while 
Igrnorinp the fact of body machinery, l.s to build a 
house upon the sands. 

It was with the idea of aiding boys who started in 
life with this handicap, of d weak physical constitution, 
to regain what is a necessary base to their normal 
mental development, and, while so doing, to scientifically 
.grade their studies so as to correspond with their sub- 
normal but growing abilities that Dr. Shepard's work 
was undertaken. To quote once more from his pros- 
pectus : 

The Shepard School is the outBrowth of careful 
study of boys and vounK men on the part of a company 
of physicians and educators, who have Riven a large 
part of their lives to this work. After visiting and 
Investigating many .schools, both public and private, 
as well as Institutions, the directors came to the con- 
clusion that there was need of a private school adapted 
to the care of boys physically liaiullcapped. The 
Shepard School was established to provide a home and 
school of high standard, where the best physical 
treatment could he combined with tlie most efOclent 
teaching. The school Is Ideally located, being situated 
in the small sea.slde village of Wickford, on Narra- 
gansett bav. and here the lads enter a climate and en- 
vironment "parllcuIaFlv well adapted to the growth of 
physical health and well-being. The school is essen- 
tially a home school, and every boy who is enrolled 
enters a real home, where his comfort and welfare are 
Intimately looked after. 

Dr. Shepard has taken an active part in the general 
life of the community of Wickford, in addition to his 
duties in connection with the school. He is an Epis- 
copalian in his religious belief, and is a member and 
vestryman of St. Paul's Church of that denomination 
at W'ickford. He is also associated with a number of 
societies and other organizations here, professional and 
otherwise. He is ex-president of the Rhode Island 
Osteopathic Society, having served in that office in 1911 
and 1912, and since that time has been secretary and 
treasurer thereof. In 1914 he was elected trustee of 
Still College of Osteopathy for six years. He is also 
a member of the New England Osteopathic Association, 
and served as treasurer in 191.S-16, and the .-\merican 
Osteopathic Association. Dr. Shepard is prominently 
connected with the Masonic order, and is a member of 
Washington Lodge, No. K, .Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of W'ickford, R. I., and of Providence Chapter, 
No. I, Royal .\rch Masons, of Providence. He is also 
a member of the Providence Lodge. Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Iota Tau Sigma frater- 
nity, and was national president of this society, and a 
member of the Rotary Club of Providence, the Chur- 
mans Club, the Noonday Club, and the Edgewood Yacht 
Club. While in college Dr. Shepard served three years 
in the Michigan National Guard, with the rank of 
sergeant. In 1917 he assisted in the organization of the 
North Kingston Home Guards, and became first-lieu- 
tenant in same. Dr. Shepard was very active during 
the war and served with many organizations in various 
capacities in Providence and Wickford. 

Dr. Shepard was united in marriage, January i, 
1907, at Savannah, III., with Leta Cora Hibbard. of that 
place, a daughter of Rockwell N. and Cora (Woodruff) 
Hibbard. Mrs. Shepard is a member of the Daughters 
of the .American Revolution and the Eastern Star. 
Four children have been born of this union, as follows : 



io8 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



William Northrope, born Feb. 12, 191 1; Lcta Louise, 
born Jan. 8, 1913, and died in infancy; John Othur, 
born Feb. 13, 1914, and Alice Virginia, born Feb. 9, 
1917. 



REV. WILLIAM J. KEEFE— In May, 1906. Father 
Keefe came to the parish of St. James, at Arctic, R. I., 
as curate, his previous experience having been with the 
Church of the Sacred Heart, in East Providence, which 
he served for five years, from the ordination to the 
priesthood by Cardinal Gibbons. From curate to pastor 
was an easy transition, and St. James has known the 
Rev. Father as a religious consoler, as pastor, citizen, 
and neighbor, for so long a period that he is known 
and liked by all, regardless of creed, and by his own 
people who so intimately knew his great heart and 
gentle spirit he is greatly beloved. 

William J. Keefe is a native son of Rhode Island, 
born in South Providence, his parents, William and 
Catherine (Howard) Keefe, both deceased. After com- 
pleting public and high school courses, he studied in 
other advanced schools, and at Grand Seminary, Mont- 
real, Canada, he spent two years in philosophy and one 
year in theological studies, and completed his course 
at St. Mary's Seminary. Baltimore, Md., and received 
the rites of ordination at the hands of his Eminence, 
Cardinal Gibbons, on December 21, 1901. His first 
assignment was as assistant to the pastor of the Church 
of the Sacred Heart, at East Providence, there remain- 
ing from January, 1902, until his transfer to St. James 
Church, at Arctic in May, 1906. He continued a curate 
until February, 1918, then was installed pastor, and has 
since been the devoted leader of that congregation. 
St. James is a large parish with schools, societies and 
auxiliary departments of Christian work, fully organ- 
ized and equipped. Father Keefe has won the regard 
of the community for his public spirit and the advanced 
ground he has taken in public affairs. He is a man of 
genial, generous nature, deeply concerned for the wel- 
fare of his people and the advancement of their inter- 
ests, spiritual and material. 



GEORGE FREDERICK FROST, one of the at- 
torneys of Providence, R. I., where he has been in 
active practice for several years and at present holds 
the post of attorney for the Rhode Island Company of 
this city, is a native of Chelsea, Mass., where his birth 
occurred June 18, 1872. Mr. Frost is a son of George 
Washington and Fannie (Davenport) Frost, both de- 
ceased, the former for many years an inspector in a 
large manufacturing plant at Boston. 

George Frederick Frost was still little more than 
an infant when his parents removed from Chelsea to 
Hyde Park, Mass., and it was at the latter place 
that he gained the elementary portion of his edu- 
cation, attending the public schools there for that pur- 
pose. He graduated from the Hyde Park High School 
in 1892, and after being prepared for college, immed- 
iately matriculated at Brown University, removing to 
this city at the same time. Mr. Frost graduated from 
Brown University with the class of 1896, taking the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and one year later took 
the degree of Master of Arts as a reward for special 
post-graduate work. .A.fter completing his studies at 



this institution Mr. Frost, who had not at that time 
made up his mind to follow the law as a profession, was 
employed for several years as a teacher in the English 
and Classical high schools at Providence. He then 
received the appointment of assistant clerk of court at 
the Providence County Court House, and while serving 
in that capacity studied the subject of the law. This 
he did to such good purpose that in the year 1905 he 
took and passed the bar examination and was admitted 
to the practice of the law in Rhode Island. Two years 
later he began his practice as an attorney for the Rhode 
Island Company. He then became associated with the 
New Haven Railroad as attorney, a post that he held 
until 1915. and in the month of August, in that year, 
was appointed attorney for the Rhode Island Company. 
.As mentioned above he now holds the post of attorney 
for that company and handles much very important 
litigation on its account, and has established a most 
enviable reputation for integrity and ability in his pro- 
fession. Mr. Frost has always taken a keen interest in 
public affairs, and is a staunch supporter of the policies 
and principles of the Republican party. He has held a 
number of local positions in the public life of the com- 
munity, and was at one time a member of the East 
Providence School Committee, in which capacity he has 
performed an invaluable service to the schools of that 
place. He was for a time judge of the Probate Court 
in East Providence, and formerly a member of the 
East Providence Republican Town Committee. Mr. 
Frost attends the Newman Congregational Church at 
East Providence, and is a trustee of the same. He is 
a prominent figure in the social and club life here- 
abouts, and is a member of the University Club of 
Providence; the Providence Bar Club: the Rhode 
Island Bar Association and the American Bar Asso- 
ciation. 



HENRY CHARLES GAGNON, who is engaged 

in the auto garage business at Warren, is a native of 
the town of Harrington, where his birth occurred, 
November 19, 1884. He is a son of Pierre and Marie 
R. (Boissomeau) Gagnon, the former a native of the 
Province of Quebec, Canada, born in Yamachiche, June 
4, 1838. The elder Mr. Gagnon came to the United 
State Senator, and at the present time a member of the 
son was bom, but later moved to Warren. He was for 
many years a stationarj- engineer by trade, but retired 
from active life in 1914. He married. November 26, 
1871, Marie R. Boissomeau, like himself a native of the 
Province of Quebec, where she was born October 22, 
1851. She came to Barrington, R. I., alone, when but 
eighteen years of age, and here met and married the 
elder Mr. Gagnon. Her death occurred March 7, 1917. 
They were the parents of the following children: 
Henry Charles, of further mention ; Annie, who became 
the wife of Dionis E. \'incent, of Warren, a prominent 
citizen of this community, who has served in many 
public offices including that of State Representative, 
State Senator, and at the present time a member of the 
Town Committee ; Wilfred J., who now resides at 
Providence ; Matilda, who became the wife of Arthur 
Bissoimette, of Central Falls; Rose, who became the 
wife of Telesphore Lessard, of Warren; Ida, born April 
16, 1881, and died April 22, 1906; Emma, born April 28, 







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BIOGRAPHICAL 



109 



18S3. (lied Jan. iS, l8S^ ; Silvina, born April 3, 1888, 
died April iS, 1S88; Edwilda, bom July 27. i88q, died 
March 30, 1893; MeKina, born Feb. 16, iSgi ; George 
J., born Feb. 2, i8t)5, and now with the .American Ex- 
peditionary Forces in France. 

Henry Charles Gagnon was a very yoimg child when 
he came with his parents to Warren, and it was here 
that he gained his education, attending for this purpose 
the local grammar school. Upon completing his studies 
at this institution, he learned the trade of machinist, 
which he followed for some thirteen years, and was at 
one time master mechanic at the Warren Manufacturing 
Company. He then engaged in the garage bu.iincss on 
his own account, opening an establishment on Childs 
street, here, where he remained for four years. Mr. 
Gagnon then moved to a larger place near the center 
of the town, on Market street, and is still located at 
this place. He conducts a very successful business, and 
is well and favorably known throughout the commu- 
nity. Mr. Gagnon has also been active in the general 
life of Warren, and for one year has served on the 
Town Council. He has also been a memlier of the 
State Legislature, being elected to that body in 1917, 
and reelected for 1919 and 1920. He is a member of 
the Providence Lodge, No. 14, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and is prominent in social circles 
here. In his religious belief Mr. Gagnon is a Roman 
Catholic, and attends St. John Baptist Church of this 
denomination at Warren. 

Henry Charles Gagnon was united in marriage, March 
3, 1908, with F'lora L. \'achon, of Woonsocket, a daugh- 
ter of Elzeor and Mary (Rancourt) Vachon, old and 
highly respected residents of that place. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Gagnon the following children have been born: 
Henry E., born Feb. 20, 1909, died Feb. 22, of the same 
year; .\ndrew P., born -\ug. 21, 1911; Henry Charles, 
Jr., bom April 9, 1913; and Florence M., born Aug. 
28, IQ17. 



EMORY DAVID FORROW— Figuring promi- 
nently in business life in Centerville, R. L, for several 
decades, the late Emory David Forrow belongs in the 
foremost rank of those men of affairs whose history is 
inseparably interwoven with that of the town in the 
closing decades of the nineteenth century. 

Emory David Forrow, son of George and Laura 
Forrow, was born in Hillsdale, Columbia county, N Y., 
on August 31, 1844, descendant of a pioneer family 
prominent in the history of the county. At the age of 
eight years, on the death of his mother, he went to 
Dryden, N. Y., to the home of his sister, where he 
remained until 1S64. During this period he obtained 
two years of schooling gained at a sacrifice, since he 
was forced at an early age to earn his own living. He 
apprenticed himself to learn the tinsmith's trade, and 
in 1864. already a skilled workman, he went to New 
York City, and for a short time was employed in the 
making of canteens for the Union army. Having 
amassed a small capital he removed to Providence, R. 
L, where he launched an independent venture, estab- 
lishing himself on a small scale in a general tinsmith 
and hardware business. He had met with a large 
degree of success, and was planning to extend his 



business when his shop was destroyed by fire. Mr. 
Forrow then removed to Centerville, R. I., with which 
town he was connected until bis death. Here for a 
short time he was employed by the late Samuel Kings- 
bury, whom he left to enter again business for himself. 

His first shop in Centerville consisted of a one room 
building, which stood on the site of the present office 
of the Kent Manufacturing Company. He was suc- 
cessful from the very outset, and succeeded early in 
establishing a reputation for unexcelled workmanship 
and quality, which brought him large contracts for tin 
work from the Laphani Mills and other large milling 
companies of the Pawtuxet Valley. His business, begun 
on a small retail scale, he extended to include whole- 
sale, and forced by the demands of his steadily grow- 
ing trade to increase his quarters, he built a small 
frame building two stories in height near the Center- 
ville station. This building later proved inadequate for 
his business, and he remodeled it into a tenement, 
erecting a new store three stories in hei(.'ht and of 
spacious dimensions. In this new building he con- 
ducted a large and lucrative business until forced by 
ill health to retire from every form of business activ- 
ity. A talented organizer, keen and farsighted in his 
judgment, he had developed from the smallest begin- 
nings and against the greatest odds, a business which 
entitled him to the respect and admiration of his asso- 
ciates in the business world. Perseverance, tireless 
energy, and an unfailing adherence to the principles of 
honesty and fair play, formed the foundation of his 
success. He attained a place of well recognized leader- 
ship in the field in which he engaged, and was widely 
known as a man of shrewd foresight, keenly alive to 
the changing times, progressive in all things, and above 
all unimpeachably honest and just, .\lthough actively 
identified with many movements for public welfare in 
Centerville, Mr. Forrow remained aloof from political 
circles. He was a continuous attendant of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and a generous supporter of its 
charities. A man of simple, sincere personality, strong 
in his friendships, he had made scores of friends to 
whom his death came as a deep grief. 

In 1877, Mr. Forrow married (first) Mary A. Gold- 
smith, who died in 1900. He married (second) Jennie 
E. Dewel, who was born on March 23, 1865, daughter 
of Michael H. and Laura (Pyke) Dewel, of New 
York State. Mr. and Mrs. Forrow were the parents of 
the following children; i. Laura Verda, born Sept. 
29. 1901, died at the age of eight months. 2. Oscar A., 
born .\pril 23, 1903, a sophomore in the West Warwick 
High School ; member of Troop I, Pawtucket Valley 
Boy Scouts; young Mr. Forrow is an able assistant to 
his mother in the management of the estate. 3. Charles 
Emory, born Oct. 20, 1905; a student in the West War- 
wick grammar school ; a member of Troop I. Paw- 
tuxet Valley Boy Scouts. Mrs. Forrow, who survives 
her husband, resides in the Forrow home on Main 
street, Centerville, a handsome estate purchased by 
Mr. Forrow in 1900. She is wxll known in social circles 
in the town, and has been actively identified with many 
notable charities. 

Emory David Forrow died at his home in Centerville, 
R. I., October 7, 1910. 



no 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



HENRY ALFRED LANGE, M. D.— Among the 
heroes who have been developed by the unusual condi- 
tions of the past four years of international welfare 
are those men and women who gave up position, home, 
and prospects, and under the banner of the Red Cross 
w-ent forth to seek out and save the suffering and the 
needy. His native country was at war when Dr. 
Lange went abroad in the service of the Red Cross in 
1915. but he had been brought to the United States by 
his Belgian parents when a boy of eight years, and 
it was as an American that he entered stricken Bel- 
gium and gave to that heroic people all that the skill 
of a physician and the love of a sympathetic heart could 
accomplish. "Greater love hath no man than this, than 
that he should give up his life for his friend." Dr. 
Lange did not give up his life, but only the skill of 
other surgeons saved it, two major operations being 
performed upon him ere the condition brought about 
through his self-sacrificing professional labor in Eng- 
land and Belgium was removed. 

Henry Alfred Lange was born in Verviers, Belgium, 
September 30, 18S4, son of Alfred and Barbara (Ren- 
som) Lange. In 1S93 the family came to the United 
States, settling in Woonsocket, R. L, where the lad, 
Henry A., began his American education in a parochial 
school. He passed in succession from parochial schools 
to Bryant & Stratton's Commercial School, his ulti- 
mate object being a professional education. To this 
end he carefully conserved his earning, and finally 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Balti- 
more, Md. He could not entirely finance the course 
from his previous earnings, and all through his med- 
ical course he was employed in some revenue-producing 
labor. The year 1909 saw the fruition of his hopes, and 
with the graduating class of that year there was no 
young man whose M. D. had been attained through more 
worthy effort. Another year of preparatory work was 
accomplished as interne at St. Agnes Hospital, Balti- 
more, and a term in Providence Hospital in similar 
service, then, in 191 1, he began private practice in the 
city of Providence. He made surgery a special study 
in college and hospital, and in his practice has also 
specialized in that branch of the medical profession. 
He quickly won public favor as a physician and sur- 
geon of skill, and in four years had acquired a satis- 
factory clientele. 

In 1914 came the great upheaval and the birth of the 
modern Hun, who, breathing out fire and slaughterings, 
made this earth the abode of devils, not men. Over 
fair Belgium they marched, and to his subjects in all 
lands went up the cry from a noble monarch being 
crucified, because he held his sword sacred and his 
honor dear. The world will never forget what King 
Albert of Belgium did during those fateful two weeks 
of 1914, when, with an army of fiends at his throat, he 
fought with a valor and desperation which saved the 
world from the grip of that arch devil, the Kaiser. 
Then came the call of the International Red Cross for 
physicians and surgeons, for nurses, supplies, and 
money, so generously answered from every civilized 
quarter of the globe. Dr. Lange, in 1915, arranged his 
affairs in Providence, and sailed as a Red Cross sur- 
geon, and until his breakdown he was in constant and 
exhausting service in England and Belgium, when 



nature at last gave way, and only the skill of the 
surgeon availed, after two operations to save his life. 
When convalescent, he returned to the United States, 
and when able, resumed practice in Providence. He is 
interested in the ownership of the Providence Surgical 
Hospital and is consulting surgeon to that institution. 
He is a member of the American Medical Association ; 
Providence Medical Society ; St. Mary's Roman Cath- 
olic Church ; and in politics an Independent. 

Dr. Lange married in Washington, D. C. June S, 
1912, Bernadette Donohoe. They are the parents of: 
Henry Alfred (2), born March 14, 1913; Daniel Jen- 
kins and Barbara Denise (twins), born Dec. 12, 1915; 
and Bernadette. born Oct. 27. 1917. 



ALFRED HUGH OLIVER BOUDREAU, one 

of the most capable and successful of the younger at- 
torneys of Providence, R. I., where he is now engaged 
in the active practice of the law, is a native of Can- 
ada, his birth having occurred in the city of Montreal, 
January 14, 1891. His parents, Oliver and Katherine 
(McCoy) Boudreau, removed to Providence in 1893. 
Oliver Boudreau is at present interested in, and the 
manager of, a large department store in this city. 

The childhood and early life of Alfred H. O. Boud- 
reau was passed in Providence, and it was here that he 
secured his education at the local public schools, and 
graduated from the Providence High School in the 
year 1910. Having been prepared for college at that 
institution, he then entered Brown University, where he 
remained for two years and then went to Yale Univer- 
sity, where he studied the usual classical subjects, and 
was graduated with the class of 1914, taking the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Boudreau had in the mean- 
time determined to adopt the law as his career in life, 
and with this end in view, entered the Harvard Law- 
School, where he pursued his studies to such good pur- 
pose that in 1 91 7 he was graduated therefrom with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. In the same year he took 
and passed the bar e.xamination, and was admitted to 
the Rhode Island bar. After his admission to the bar, 
Mr. Boudreau became associated with the law firm of 
Green, Hinckley and Allen, one of the prominent law 
firms of this city, and continued thus occupied until 
the month of December, 1918. At that time he withdrew 
from this position and established his own office at No. 
76 Dorrance street, where he has remained ever since. 
Mr. Boudreau has met with notable success in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Providence, and has already 
won for himself the respect and confidence, not only 
of his own clientele, but of his professional colleagues 
generally, and the community at large. In his practice 
he makes a long and careful study of each case that is 
entrusted to him, so that he is never caught lacking 
in any of the essential details of the case, with the 
result that he has been unusually successful, and at 
the present time handles a great deal of important liti- 
gation hereabouts. Mr. Boudreau is a Republican in 
politics, but his professional matters have prevented 
him up to the present time from taking that part in pub- 
lic life for which his abilities and talents so admirably 
qualify him and he has always maintained a keen in- 
terest in local and general affairs. In his religious 
belief Mr. Boudreau is a Roman Catholic, and attends 




/ 




/^i^i^/ /^TP-Z// 




-7^?^/- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



III 



the church of St. Charles of this denomination at Prov- 
idence. He is also a member of the local council of the 
Knights of Columbus. 

Alfred Hugh Oliver Boudreau was united in mar- 
riage. December 12, 1916, at Fall River, Mass., with 
Maude Barrett Price, of Pawtuckct, in this State, a 
daughter of John and Alberta (Pass) Price, old and 
highly respected citizens there. To Mr. and Mrs. Boud- 
reau one child has been born, as follows: Alfred Hugh 
Oliver. Jr., March 30, 1918. 



THOMAS FRANCIS RYAN, an enterprising citi- 
zen of Providence, R. I., and the assistant baggage 
master at the Union Station, in this city, for the New 
York, Xew Haven & Hartford Railroad, is a native of 
New York City, where his birth occurred December 14, 
1871. He is a son of John T. and Winifred Mary 
(Barrett) Ryan, both his parents having been natives of 
Ireland, the former born in 1838, in County Tipperary, 
and the latter in 1846, in County Mayo. The elder Mr. 
Ryan served for twelve years in the British army, his 
father having been an old army man, and then at the 
age of twenty years came to the United States and 
located in Xew York City. He was a tailor by trade, 
and carried on his business for a number of years in 
that city, linally coming to Lonsdale, R. I., where he 
made his home until the time of his death, in 1S80. He 
married Winifred Mary Barrett, at Blackburn, England, 
in St. Alban's Roman Catholic Church. He brought 
his wife to this country, and she eventually died at 
Lonsdale, March 21, 1904. They were the parents of 
three children, as follows : Thomas Francis, of further 
mention: John J., born May I, 1873, in New York 
City, and died in 1900; William E., bom May 11, 1876, 
and died in lyi i. 

The early life of Thomas Francis Ryan was passed 
at Lonsdale, R. I., whither his parents had removed 
while he was still a small child. His education was 
attained at the parochial and public schools of that 
place, where he continued to study until he secured a 
position in a cotton mill at Lonsdale. He was si.xteen 
years of age at the time, and displayed an unusual 
degree of ambition and application to his work for that 
age, with the result that he was rapidly promoted, until 
he had reached the position of weaver, during which 
time he had learned thoroughly the details of the cotton 
industry. Mr. Ryan then withdrew from the mill, and 
for a number of years followed the occupation of farm- 
ing and various other enterprises until, in 1897, he 
secured a position as helper in the baggage room of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Here 
he remained uninterruptedly up to the present time, 
being advanced from rank to rank until he now holds 
that of assistant baggage master. In this position Mr. 
Ryan has made himself of great value to the company 
which he serves, as well as to the general traveling 
public, and his efficiency has done much to improve and 
develop the methods of handling baggage in this part 
of the State. Mr. Ryan is one of those men who de- 
vote their best energies to the performance of their 
duties, and he has made a substantial success for him- 
self as well as performed a valuable service for the 
railroad. Mr. Ryan is also a prominent figure in the 
public life of this city, and has held a number of 
offices in the gift of the community. He is a staunch 



supporter of the principles and policies of the Demo- 
cratic party, and was elected on the Democratic ticket 
to the City Council from the Tenth Ward, serving on 
that body in the years 1915 and 1916. In his religious 
belief Mr. Ryan is a Roman Catholic, and attends the 
church of the Blessed Sacrament of this denomination 
at Providence. He is also a member of the local coun- 
cil of the Knights of Columbus, and of the various rail- 
road organizations here. 

Thomas Francis Ryan was united in marriage, at 
Providence, August 19, 1896, to Delia Talman, daughter 
of Edward and Bridget (Mc.Alvey) Talman, old and 
highly respected residents of this city. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Ryan the following children were born: Thomas 
Norman, born July 2, 1^7, graduated from LaSalle 
Academy, served in Battery A, on the Mexican border, 
during our trouble with that country, when he was 
promoted to the rank of first sergeant, and then with 
the commission as second lieutenant in Battery F, of 
the 103rd Field Artillery, and now undergoing inspec- 
tion at Camp Funston, with the Twentieth Field Artil- 
lery; Richard E., born December 11, 1904, and now a 
student at the LaSalle Academy. Mr. Ryan and his 
family make their home at No. 5 Winthrop avenue, 
Providence, R. I. 



BRAYTON ALLEN ROUND— As commissioner 
of shell lishcrios for the State of Rhode Island, Mr. 
Round became intimately associated with the work 
which is being done by the States to conserve this great 
national resource and to add to its value. As president 
of the National Association of Fisheries Commission- 
ers, he has become prominent in the public eye as one 
of the men who earnestly approach this problem and are 
attempting its solution intelligently. He has given the 
last thirteen years of his life to this work, having been 
clerk of Rhode Island commission ever since the expir- 
ation of his term as commissioner. The National As- 
sociation of Fisheries Commissioners has during its 
entire history conferred the office of president twice 
in succession upon but two men, the founder and first 
president of the association, and upon Brayton .Allen 
Round, he having been reelected at the tenth annual 
convention of the association held at Richmond, Va., 
May 14, 15, 1918. 

Mr. Round is a native of Rhode Island, a son of Wil- 
liam N. and Mary Edna (Cole) Round, of Foster, R. I., 
and a grandson of William and Roby (Blackinan) 
Round. His maternal grandparents were Brayton H. 
Cole and Eliza (Phillips) Cole, the former, a farmer 
and merchant of Foster, R. I., bom in 1837, died in 
18S9. William N. Round, who resided in the town of 
Scituate, R. I., where his son was born, was a member 
of Covenant Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of Scituate, a man highly regarded in his com- 
munity. His wife, Mary Edna Cole, of Foster, born in 
1840, died in 1866. 

Brayton -Allen Round was born in Scituate, February 
4, 1866, losing his youthful mother the same year. 
After courses in the public grammar and English high 
schools, Providence, he attended Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College, soon afterward entering Bowdoin 
■ College, Medical Department, where he continued dur- 
ing 1892, 1893 and 1894, until compelled to leave in 
1894 on account of sickness. Later he took special 



112 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



courses at Brown University in chemistry, botany and 
pharmacy, becoming a registered pharmacist under the 
State law of Rhode Island, passing the examination of 
the State Board in June, 189S. This course of educational 
and professional preparation for life duties had been 
financed by the young man's own earnings as a school 
teacher and had been frequently interrupted through the 
necessity of earning more funds to continue his studies. 
He taught in Scituate, Foster, and in other towns, this 
being his only way of securing funds. He was super- 
intendent of schools in Foster in i8g6, 1897 and 1898. 

When finally he became a registered pharmacist, he 
engaged in business at River Point, conducting a drug 
store there for three years before selling out to accept 
a position as manager of the Crawford Pharmacy at 
Central Falls, R. I. 

In 1905 Mr. Round was elected to represent Foster 
in the Rhode Island Legislature and there made so 
favorable an impression that in 1907 he was elected a 
member of the Shell Fisheries Commission, a post he 
filled most satisfactorily until the expiration of his 
term in 1910. He was elected in 1907 as clerk of the 
committee of special legislation for House of Repre- 
sentatives, serving until 1910. During his term as 
commissioner, he had acted as secretary or clerk of the 
board and after going out of office as commissioner, 
remained as clerk, an office he yet fills. In politics he 
is a Republican. 

He was chairman of the board of tax assessors in 
1912 and the same year was elected treasurer of the 
National Association of Fisheries Commissioners, an 
office he held four consecutive years, 1912-1916, the 
office of secretary being added in 1916. He served as 
vice-president of the association for one year, 1916-17, 
was then elected president, and on May 15, 1918, was 
elected a second time. 

When the Rhode Island College of Pharmacy was 
established in Providence, in 1902, Mr. Round was one 
of the interested men who went out and solicited funds 
for the support of the infant institution, acting very 
materially in bridging the current of needs during those 
early years. In return he received the honor of being 
made a life member of the corporation and an honor- 
ary member of the Alumni Association. He is a member 
of Hamilton Lodge, No. 15, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of Scituate, R. I.; Scituate Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; Lafayette Lodge, No. 42, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; and Queen of Sheba Chapter, No. 18, 
Order of the Eastern Star. His club is the Rhode 
Island Republican. His favorite out-of-doors recrea- 
tion is landscape gardening, his indoor occupation most 
enjoyed is writing. He has compiled valuable records 
concerning the Shell Fisheries of Rhode Island, for this 
department of his work is a source of great pleasure to 
him. In religious faith he is affiliated with Foster 
Centre Christian Church and is president of the Clay- 
ville Christian Church Association. 

Mr. Round married in Foster, R. I., August 4, 1894, 
Eda M. Round, daughter of John A. and Roena Frances 
(Yeau) Round, of Scituate, R. I., the latter now de- 
ceased. After special courses in chemistry and botany 
at Brown University, Mrs. Round entered Rhode Island 
College of Pharmacy, whence she was graduated with 
the class of 1904 Ph. G., the first woman to graduate 



from the institution. She passed her examinations so 
creditably that she was awarded all the prizes of the 
year, and was graduated with all the honors the insti- 
tution could bestow. She tlicn pursued special courses 
in pharmacy, toxicology and physiology, but the last 
illness of her mother caused the abandonment of these 
courses of advanced study. The family home is No. 
137 Warren avenue. East Providence, R. I. 



LESTER ANGELL ROUND, a scientist of note 
and an authority on bacteriology and kindred subjects, 
is a native of Foster, R. I., where he was born Novem- 
ber 5, 1888. Dr. Round is a son of John Angell and 
Roena Frances (Yeau) Round, the former the owner 
of a mercantile establishment at Clayville, where he 
was engaged in business for many years. The early 
life of Dr. Round was passed at his native place, and 
he attended the local public school there. Later his 
parents moved to Scituate, R. I., and he continued his 
studies there, finally graduating from the North Sci- 
tuate .-Xcademy in the year 1902. He was prepared for 
college at the Classical High School of Providence, 
from which he graduated in 1906. and immediately after- 
wards entered Brown University where he pursued 
various academic and scientific courses. He graduated 
with tlie class of 1910 and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, but not content with this, took 
various post-graduate studies, which brought him the 
degree of Master of .\rts in 1911, and that of Doctor 
of Philosophy in 1914. He also attended the School for 
Health Officers at Harvard University during the years, 
1913 and 1914. During his post-graduate work at 
Brown University, from 1910 to 1914, Dr. Round acted 
as assistant bacteriologist to the Providence Health 
Department, and in the same capacitv' served the Rhode 
Island Commissioners of Shell Fisheries. 

Upon completing his preparatory work in 1914, Dr. 
Round was appointed bacteriologist to the United States 
Bureau of Chemistry, Department of Agriculture at 
Washington, D. C, and was engaged in research work 
for the government until 1918, in the matter of food 
bacteriology. On September 15, of that year, he took 
his present position as pathologist in charge of the 
Laboratory of Pathology and Bacteriology for the State 
Board of Health of Rhode Island. Dr. Round has 
earned the right to be regarded as an authority on 
bacteriology and pathology and has written and pub- 
lished numerous articles on the former subject. The 
work that he is doing at the present time in these de- 
partments of science, is of an exceedingly valuable 
character, and his service to his State is a most praise- 
worthy one. Dr. Round is not active in club or social 
life, but during his college career, joined the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity, and in 1912 was elected a member of 
Sigma Psi, an honorary scientific society occupying the 
same field in scientific achievement as Phi Beta Kappa 
fraternity holds in the academic world. In his religious 
belief he is a Presbyterian and attended the Church of 
the Covenant of that denomination at Washington, D. 
C, during his residence in that city. He is a member 
of the American Public Health .Association, the Amer- 
ican Society for the Advancement of Science, and the 
Society of American Bacteriologists. 

Lester Angell Round married, February 18, 1915, at 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



i'3 



Brooklyn, N. V., Mildred Martha Gay, daughter of 
Charles E. and Nellie (Mansfield) Gay, old and highly 
respected residents of that city. They are the parents 
of one son, Charles Rrayton, boni Jan. 13, 1916. 



PATRICK EDWARD DILLON, one of the suc- 
cessful attorneys of Central Falls, R. I., where he has 
an office at Xo. 295 Broad street, is a native of the 
town of Cumberland in this State, having been born 
there December 24, 1884. He is a son of John and 
Mary (Dowlinp;) Dillon, old and highly respected resi- 
dents of that place. 

The childhood and early youth of Patrick E. Dillon 
were spent in his native place. There also he attended 
school and passed through both the grammar grades and 
the high school, graduating from the latter institution 
with the class of i'j04. He then entered Brown Univer- 
sity at Providence, R. L, where he remained two years, 
and then left that college and entered Holy Cross 
University. At both Brown and Holy Cross he took 
the usual academic course, and after completing that 
entered Cornell University for special work. He did 
not complete this course, however, for in the mean- 
time he had decided to adopt the law as a profession, 
and accordingly matriculated at the Law School of the 
Boston University to take up the study of that subject. 
He was graduated from that institution in the year 
igio, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and on 
October 24, in the same year, was admitted to practice 
at the Rhode Island bar. Since that time Mr. Dillon 
has been in active practice at Providence and Blackstone 
Valley, and is now recognized as one of the leaders of 
the bar in this region. Mr. Dillon is an active figure in 
the general life of the community and has taken a lead- 
ing part in many important movements here. For a 
number of years he was a Democrat in politics, and 
during that time was elected from the town of Cum- 
berland to the Rhode Island General Assembly, in 
November, 1912, and served in 1913 and 1914. During 
that time he served as a member of the Legislative 
Committee on Engrossed Acts. Of recent years Mr. 
Dillon has joined the Republican party and is now- 
prominent in the councils of the local organization. In 
his religious belief Mr. Dillon is a Catholic and is a 
member of St. Patrick's Church of this denomination at 
Valley Falls, R. I. He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus, and of the Phi Kappa fraternity of Brown 
University. 

Patrick Edward Dillon was united in marriage, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1918, at Norwich, Conn., with Cathryne C. 
Donovan, of that place, a daughter of Timothy and 
Mary (Shea) Donovan. 



JOHN EDWARD BABCOCK, one of the most 
prominent business men, bankers and men of affairs of 
Wakefield, R. I., with the life of which place he has 
been intimately identified for many years, is a member 
of one of the old Rhode Island families, which has been 
resident in this State for more than two hundred years. 
The Babcock family has given many prominent men to 
this State during the Colonial period and subsequently, 
among whom should be mentioned the Hon. Joshua 
Babcock, a major-general of militia in the War of the 
Revolution, and chief justice of the Supreme Court of 
R 1-2-8 



Rhode Island: Colonel Henry Babcock, famous in the 
old French War and the Revolution, and the Rev. 
Stephen Babcock, who was one of the most celebrated 
divines of that period. There have been several 
branches of the Babcock family in this State, and John 
E. Babcock is descended from that line which made 
its home at South Kingston, and which came originally 
from the old Westerly, R. I., family. 

(I) James Babcock. who was the progenitor of the 
family in this country, was a native of England, where 
he was born in the year 1612. He came to this country 
sometime prior to 1642, and the first record that we have 
of him in America, is as a resident of Portsmouth, in 
that year. He was prominent in the affairs of Ports- 
mouth, and was commissioner there in 1656-1659. 
Shortly after 1664 he brought his family to Westerly, 
where he continued to reside during the remainder of 
his life. He was twice married, but beyond the fact that 
the Christian name of his first wife w-as Sarah, and 
that of his second, Elizabeth, we know comparatively 
little about them. It is from the first wife that the 
line with which we are here concerned is descended, 
and the children of this marriage were as follows : 
James, John, who is mentioned below; Job, and Mary. 

(II) John Babcock, son of James and Sarah Bab- 
cock, was born in the year 1644, at Portsmouth, and 
came with his parents to Westerly, where the remainder 
of his life was spent, his death occurring in 1685. He 
was a freeman of Westerly in 1669, conservator of the 
peace in 1678, and deputy in 1682-84. He married Mary 
Lawton, daughter of George and Fllizabeth (Hazard) 
Lawton, and they were the parents of the following 
children : .Ann, Mary, John, Job, George, who 
is mentioned below; Elihu, Robert, Joseph and Oliver. 

(III) George Babcock, son of John and Mary (Law- 
ton) Babcock, was born in 1673, at Westerly, and died 
there May i, 1756. He married, November 28, 1(194, 
Elizabeth Hall, and they were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Mary, born Sept. 20, 1695; George, 
born April 9, 1699; David, born Dec. 22, 1700; Jona- 
than, born March 22, 1702-03; Elizabeth, born March 
16, 1704-05; Abigail, born Feb. 6, 1706-07; Ruth, born 
March I, 1709; Eunice, born Jan. 13, 1712-13; Heze- 
kiah, who is mentioned below; and Elisha, born May 
18, 1718, 

(IV) Hezekiah Babcock, son of George and Eliza- 
beth (Hall) Babcock, was born March 26, 1715, at 
Westerly, and died in 1798. He married, January 3, 
1739-40, Mary Peckham, of Newport, R. I., whose death 
occurred in 1796. Among their children was Caleb 
Babcock, who is mentioned below. 

(V) Caleb Babcock, son of Hezekiah and Mary 
(Peckham) Babcock, was born June 10, 1741, and died 
November 18, 1826. He married, October 3, 1782, Wait 
Peckham, who died .April 12, 1836, and among their chil- 
dren was Hezekiah Babcock, who is mentioned below. 

(VI) Hezekiah (2) Babcock, son of Caleb and Wait 
(Peckham) Babcock, was born January 3, 1784. and 
died March 4, 1880. Both he and his wife were prom- 
inent members of the Society of Friends, and Mr. 
Babcock was a staunch advocate of the temperance 
cause. As a young man he learned the trade of tanner 
at the establishment of William Peckham. his father- 
in-law, and continued to engage in that business during 



114 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



the remainder of his life, eventually becoming the 
superintendent of the tannery in which he served his 
apprenticeship. He was also very prominent in the 
financial affairs of the community, and was one of the 
incorporators of the Wakefield Institution for Savings, 
which began business in 1850. Mr. Babcock was a 
director of that concern and also of the old State bank, 
and for some years was treasurer of the town of 
South Kingston, where he made his home. Hezekiah 
Babcock married, January 28, 1813, Dorcas Peckham, 
born February 7, 1787, died October 22, 1859, a daughter 
of William and Mercy (Perry) Peckham. They were 
the parents of the following children: Dorcas Gardner, 
born Feb. 23, 1816, died July 7, 1903; WiUiam P., born 
April 28, 1818, died Aug. 3, 1861 ; Hezekiah, born Oct. 
31, 1820, died Oct. 10, 1864; Adam, born Dec. 14. 1822, 
died Oct. 26. 1872; and John, who is mentioned below. 

(VH) John Babcock, son of Hezekiah and Dorcas 
(Peckham) Babcock, was born May 2^, 1831, at South 
Kingston. R. I. As a child he attended the old country 
school, which was situated on the Babcock farm, and 
as he grew of an appropriate age, assisted his father 
in the latter's tannery business. He continued to reside 
at the old family home for many years, but engaged in 
farming for most of that period, in which line he was 
exceedingly successful. During his young manhood 
he supported a number of his maiden aunts, one of 
whom was Elizabeth Peckham. a noted Quaker preacher 
of those days. Like his parents, he was a staunch 
member of the Society of Friends, and was a strongly 
religious man througl'.out his whole life, and highly 
respected by the community. He was a man of marked 
business talents, and in 1854, though but twenty-three 
j'ears of age at the time, was elected a director of the 
Wakefield State Bank, and later served in the same 
capacity with the Wakefield Trust Company. In 1870 
he was appointed president of the Wakefield Institute 
for Savings, holding that position to the present time 
(1919), and from 1867 to 1870 served in the same 
capacity with the Wakefield National Bank. John Bab- 
cock. during his active life, was exceedingly prominent 
in public affairs, and held a number of oflices of trust 
and responsibility in the gift of the town. He was for 
many years a member of the Town Council and for 
more than a quarter of a century was assessor of taxes 
in this community. Another of his enterprises was the 
operation of the Massasoit Hotel, one of the large hos- 
telries situated at Narragansett Pier, and which was 
owned by the Wakefield Institution for Savings. He 
also represented South Kingston in the State Legis- 
lature, and was one of the leaders of the Republican 
party in the State, of Rhode Island, having joined that 
party at the time of its organization. Mr. Babcock's 
first presidential vote was cast for John C. Fremont, 
and from that time until the close of his life he was a 
staunch supporter of the principles and policies for 
which the Republican party has stood. In the year 
1889 Mr. Babcock removed to Wakefield, where he had 
built a splendid home and where he is now passing the 
remainder of his days. He married, September 23, 1856, 
Mary Perry, who died October 26, 1916, a daughter of 
William S. and Lois (Davis) Perry, and they were the 
parents of the following children: Lois F.lma, born 
Sept. 6, 1857, and became the wife of Thomas \. Tripp, 



of New Bedford, Mass., vice-president of the Pairpoint 

Corporation ; John Edward, who is mentioned below ; 
and William H.. who is at home. 

(VIII) John Edward Babcock, son of John and Mary 
(Perry) Babcock, was born at Matunuck. South Kings- 
ton, R. I., October 7, 1858. As a lad he attended the 
local public schools until he had reached the age of 
fourteen, when his father sent him to the famous 
Friends School at Providence. Here he took the usual 
classical course, and graduated with the class of 1877. 
For a time, after completing his studies, Mr. Babcock 
followed the profession of teaching, and was so em- 
ployed in District School No. 10, for a number of years. 
He then became a clerk in the Narragansett Pier post 
office, and held similar positions with the Wakefield 
Institute for Savings, and with the Pairpoint Corpora- 
tion, of New Bedford, Mass. He displayed in all of 
these positions a marked business talent, and became 
well known on account of his exalted knowledge of 
banking and financial methods generally. In the year 
1880 he accepted a position as clerk in the Wakefield 
National and Wakefield Savings Bank, and was rapidly 
advanced until in January, 1887. he was appointed sec- 
retary and treasurer thereof. In addition to this Mr. 
Babcock also became secretary and treasurer of the 
Wakefield Trust Company, a banking concern which 
was incorporated in July, 1890, and this position he 
holds to the present time. He is also a director, secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Wakefield Institution for 
Savings. For three years he was treasurer of the 
Narragansett Pier Electric Light & Power Company, 
and also served on the directorate of this concern. Mr. 
Babcock also engaged in the fire insurance business 
and has made a notable success in this line. In-so-far 
as the exacting demands made upon him by his various 
financial and business activities would permit, Mr. Bab- 
cock has been active in local affairs, although he has 
been unable to accept a number of public oflices which 
his fellow citizens offered him. He did, however, serve 
for a year as member of the school committee of 
South Kingston, and performed a valuable service to 
the community in this capacity. He is a conspicuous 
figure in the social and fraternal circles of South 
Kingston, and is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and the local lodge of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. His career has been one which 
has combined personal achievement for himself with a 
very large and valuable scrvii?e to his fellow citizens, 
and he is at the present time one of the most respected 
figures in this progressive community. 

John Edward Babcock was united in marriage, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1890, at Peace Dale, with Margie Hunter 
Rodman, a daughter of George and Kate (Hunter) 
Rodman, old and highly respected residents of this 
place. Mrs. Babcock's father was a veteran of the 
Civil War. To Mr. and Mrs Babcock two children 
have been born: Edith Rodman, born May 17, iSq8; 
John E., Jr., born Dec. 18, 1912. 



HOWARD DEXTER WILCOX, special repre- 
sentative for the Phcenix Mutual Life Insurance 
Company in Rhode Island and Bristol countv. Mass., 
was born in Providence, June 21, 1883, son of Jon- 
athan Brenton Shaw and Fannie Esther (Irons) Wil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



115 



cox. natives of Rhode Island and Connecticut, respec- 
tively, and a descendant of early Colonial families in 
New England. The public schools of his native city, 
and the English High School and the Manual Training 
High School, from which he graduated in i8f)7, were 
the means by which he received a practical education 
which prepared him for the activities of life. Shortly 
after leaving school he became associated with the 
American Telephone & Telegraph Company, now known 
as the American Bell System. For many years he was 
manager of the Westerly and Narragansett Pier offices 
of the Providence Telephone Company, and later be- 
came chief clerk to the general manager and store 
manager of the Western Electric Company, in which 
capacity he served faithfully and efficiently until 1917, 
in which year he entered the insurance field in Provi- 
dence and became special representative for the Phcenix 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, so continuing to the 
present time (1919) his services being of such a char- 
acter as to command recognition. In his political affi- 
liation he is a Republican, and since 1012 has served as 
treasurer of the Republican Club in Rhode Island. He 
is a member of the Central Congregational Church, in 
the activities of which he takes an active interest. He 
is also active in Masonry, holding membership in Frank- 
lin Lodge, No. 20, Free and /Xccepted Masons, of 
Westerly ; Palmer Chapter, Xo. 28, Royal Arch Masons, 
of Westerly; Providence Council, No. I, Royal and 
Select Masters; Calvary Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar, of Providence; Rhode Island Consistory, Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite; and Palestine Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; the Council of the Providence Engineering So- 
ciety; the Wasmamoisett Country Club, and Vesper 
Country Club of Lowell, Mass. 

Mr. Wilcox married, June 30, 1913, Edith Glines, 
daughter of Charles H. and Florence (Bryant) Glines, 
natives of Quincy, Mass., and a lineal descendant on the 
maternal side of Governor Bradford, of Massachusetts. 
They are the parents of one child, Dorothy Bradford, 
born Xov. 7. 1914. 



TERENCE MICHAEL O'REILLY— From the 

flagpole surmounting a beautiful seaside home at Ma- 
tunuck, R. I., two flags are kept flying whenever the 
owner is at home, the Stars and Stripes and the flag of 
the old Irish clan from which he sprang, the O'Reilly. 
From this ancient family, the Princes of East Brefney, 
comes Terence M. O'Reilly, of Providence. R. I., lawyer 
and construction expert. He combines in himself the 
mechanic and the professional man, and in building his 
Rhode Island home drew the plans, superintended con- 
struction, and personally saw that all matters legal were 
perfectly sure, safe and sound. Coming from ancient 
lineage, he also bears the name of the most ancient of 
Rhode Island schoolmasters, Terence O'Reilly being the 
first teacher of record in the Providence Plantations, and 
the same records show that the Plantations owed him 
money when he disappeared. Terence M. O'Reilly is a 
son of Patrick and Bridget (Moran) O'Reilly, both of 
Irish birth. Patrick O'Reilly came from Ireland in 1844, 
and located in Providence, R. I. 
Terence M. O'Reilly was bom in Providence, April 12, 



1864, and began his education in the public schools. 
Later he became a student at LaSalle .-Academy, whence 
he was graduated in 1879, after which he began learning 
the carpenter's trade, becoming a finished workman. 
He was engaged in building construction as a contractor, 
and in that business accumulated the funds necessary to 
carry out a long-formed ambition — the study of law. 
He entered Boston University Law School, registering 
at the same time as a law student in the office of W. B. 
N'incent of the Providence bar, was graduated from law 
school, Bachelor of Laws, class of 1898, and on October 
3, 189S, was admitted to the Rhode Island bar. During 
the twenty years which have since intervened he has 
closely devoted himself to his profession, specializing 
in the law of contracts and building construction. He 
practices in all State and Federal courts of the district, 
and has a large clientele, his offices at No. 728 Gros- 
venor building. His knowledge of the builder's trade 
and business peculiarly fits him for the practice of the 
special branches of the law he follows, and that practical 
knowledge has been a factor in his success at the bar. 
Learned in the law and skillful in its application, he is 
thoroughly equipped for professional work and to these 
he adds energy and integrity. 

A Republican, and deeply interested in party success, 
business and professional engagements have prevented 
extended party service. He has presided as chairman of 
party city conventions several times, and renders such 
campaign aid as is possible. He is also a volunteer 
member of the advisory draft board and also register 
of the draft. He has been a member of the Knights of 
Pythias for thirty years, is a past high chief ranger of 
the High Court of Rhode Island, Independent Order of 
Foresters, for many years was a trustee of St. Mat- 
thew's Roman Catholic Church, and is a member of the 
West Side Club. He is a man of culture and attractive 
personality, a lover of good literature, particularly his- 
torical, and proud of the ancient race from which he 
springs. His summer home is one of the show places 
of the section, and its two flags can be seen from far 
oflf at sea. His city home is on the site of the old Betsey 
Williams farm at Providence. 

Mr. O'Reilly married, in Cumberland, R. I., February 
8, 1893, Catherine T. Black. They are the parents of a 
daughter, Maria Carmelita, now serving as a private in 
the Rhode Island Red Cross Motor Corps. 



ISAAC NELSON EDD'y, president of the Paw- 
tucket Ice Company, of No. 126 North Maine street, 
Pawtucket, R. I., and one of the most influential citizens 
of this place, is a native of Olneyville, where his birth 
occurred May 19, 1848, and a son of Darius and Esther 
A. (Irons) Eddy, old and highly respected residents of 
this region. The elder Mr. Eddy was a native of Provi- 
cience, where he was born in the year 1813, and as a lad 
began work in one of the local mills. He afterwards 
became a moulder, and also worked in a provision mar- 
ket. He then started the operation of a meat wagon on 
his own account, in which he went from place to place, 
and continued in this line from 1865 until 1883. He was 
so successful in his business that he was able to retire 
therefrom in the latter year, about thirteen years prior 
to his death in 1896. He was prominent in the affairs of 
Olneyville, and served on the Olneyville Town Council 



ii6 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



for a term. His wife, who was Esther A. Irons, born 
in 1810, survived him, her death occurring in 1906. 

The education of Isaac Nelson Eddy was begun at the 
grammar scliools of his native place and was completed 
at the well-known school of Jenks Mowry, of Provi- 
dence. After completing his studies at the latter insti- 
tution Mr. Eddy, who was very musically inclined, 
joined the famous American Band on May 30, 1870, 
which organization was known throughout the whole 
country by that name, and led at that time by the famous 
D. W. Reeves. He has continued his membership in 
this organization ever since, and is now the oldest active 
member. With the American Band, Mr. Eddy has trav- 
eled at different times to practically every part of this 
country. Mr. Eddy was also employed, while still a 
youth, by his father in the latter's meat business, con- 
tinuing for fifteen years in this occupation, and in 1895 
purchased an interest in the ice business of Dcspeau, 
Russell & Company, of Pawtucket. He had saved up 
the major part of his earnings during the time that he 
worked for his father, and was in this manner able to 
become independent. He gradually rose in position in 
this concern and in iSqo, when the firm was incorporated 
under the name of the Pawtucket Ice Company, he was 
elected president, a position that he has served in ever 
since. Under his most capable and energetic manage- 
ment the Pawtucket Ice Company has developed to large 
proportions, and now transacts a large business, and is 
one of the most important establishment of its kind in 
this region. Mr. Eddy has always been keenly inter- 
ested in public affairs, both local and general, but the 
great demands made upon his time and attention by his 
large business interests have prevented him from taking 
an active part in politics. He is, however, a staunch 
supporter of Republican principles and policies, and 
exerts as a private citizen a considerable influence upon 
affairs. 

Isaac Nelson Eddy was united in marriage, August 4, 
1873, with Martha Perry Gardiner, of North Provi- 
dence, a daughter of William H. and Charlotte E. 
(Read) Gardiner. Mr. Gardiner, of South Kingston, 
R. I., died at New Bedford, Mass. He was for many 
years a prominent farmer at North Providence. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Eddy one child has been born ; William D. 
Eddy, born November 18, 1875, and now in the United 
States Government Service at Newport, R. I. He mar- 
ried Isabelle Kendrick, of Philadelphia, and they have 
one child. Nelson A. Eddy, born June 28, 1901. 



IRVING S. COOK— In 1886 Dr. Cook, with his 
diploma newly acquired, came to the village of George- 
ville, R. I., and succeeded Dr. Nutting in practice at that 
point. Dr. Cook is a son of William W. Cook, of 
Wrentham, Mass., and Woonsocket, R. I., who came to 
Woonsocket shortly after the birth of his son, Irving S., 
and there conducted a successful grocery business until 
his retirement several years prior to his death in 1907 
at the age of seventy-nine years. He was a man of 
strong character and upright life. An ardent, apostle 
of the temperance cause, and for several years an official 
of the Universalist church. He married Rhoby Sher- 
burne, of Wrentham, Mass. 

Irving S. Cook was born in Wrentham, Mass., in 



1858, and in 1864 was brought by his parents to Woon- 
socket, R. I., where he completed the public school 
course of study with graduation from high school. 
He continued his education at Tufts College and later 
entered Howard Medical College, whence he was gradu- 
ated, Doctor of Medicine, class of 1886. He at once 
located in Georgeville, R. I., and still continues there. 
He has been health officer of the village and medical 
inspector in the schools in the town of Smithfield. He 
is a member of the Rhode Island and Providence Medi- 
cal societies. 

An Independent in his political action, Dr. Cook has 
never sought a political office, but has been very active 
in the work of school board of the town of Smithfield 
and in the management of the town schools since 1906. 
He has been chairman of the school committee, and was 
superintendent of schools for nine years. He is a mem- 
ber of Roger Williams Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, of North Providence, and is interested in all that is 
of benefit to his village. 

Dr. Cook married, in Woonsocket, Georgia E. Paul, 
daughter of Seth D. Paul, of Woonsocket, the inventor 
of the Paul loom and mule used very extensively in 
woolen manufacture. Dr. and Mrs. Cook are the par- 
ents of three children: Alice F.. a graduate of Pem- 
broke College of Brown University and Simmon's Col- 
lege of Boston ; Paul W., educated at Providence Tech- 
nical High School and Kingston College, now enlisted in 
the naval service, and in training at Newport, R. I. He 
married Florence Anderson, of Georgiaville, and has 
a daughter, Estelle Alice; and a son. Freeman W., now 
with the Ambulance Corps with the American Expedi- 
tionary Forces in France. 



HARRY T. BODWELL— Harry T. Bodwell, the 
president and treasurer of the Bodwell Land Company, 
is a native of Castine, Me., where he was born Janu- 
ary 9, 1882. He received his education in the public 
schools of the city of Providence and upon reaching his 
majority was appointed assistant clerk of the Appellate 
Division of our Supreme Court and served in that capac- 
ity for two and one-half years. Previous to and during 
this time he pursued the study of law. He was later 
elected by the General Assembly, clerk of the District 
Court of the Eighth Judicial District and served in that 
capacity for three years. He was also moderator of the 
town of Cranston and in 1914 was elected to the State 
Legislature from the Fourth District, Cranston, being 
reelected in 1016 and again in igi8, serving during these 
legislative terms as a member of the House Committee 
on Finance. 

Mr. Bodwell is a Free Mason being a member of the 
Harmony Lodge, No. 9, Free and Accepted Masons of 
Pawtuxet, R. I., of which he is a past master; Provi- 
dence Chapter, No. i. Royal Arch Masons ; Providence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; Calvary Command- 
ery, Knights Templar; Palestine Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a mem- 
ber of Pomham Club, and secretary of the Rhode Island 
Fruit Growers' Association. In politics, he is a Repub- 
lican, and is a member of the State Central Committee 
from Cranston, and also a member of the executive 
committee of that body. 




-^l^.JcUl^ 



BIOGIL'\PHICAL 



117 



EUGENE LOUIS JALBERT— One of the most 
successful and enterprising among the younger lawyers 
of Woonsocket, where he has won for himself an ex- 
cellent reputation for ability and integrity, is Eugene 
Louis Jalbcrt, a native of Arctic Center, in this State, 
where he was born April 20, 1885, a son of Joseph and 
Julie (Danis) Jalbert. Nfr. Jalbert's parents were both 
natives of Canada and came from that country to the 
United States about forty-five years ago. Joseph Jal- 
bert was engaged in the grocery business, which for a 
time he carried on at Arctic Center and later in Provi- 
dence, coming to Woonsocket in the year 1889. 

Eugene Louis Jalbert was but four years of age when 
he came to live at Woonsocket with his parents, and it 
was at the latter place that practically all of his child- 
hood associations were formed. It was at Woonsocket 
also that he gained the elementary portion of his edu- 
cation, attending for this purpose the local public and 
parochial schools. The young man went to Canada, 
where he entered Nfontrcal College, Montreal, and later 
the Jolictte College, and there took the usual classical 
course, provin.g himself a most apt and intelligent stu- 
dent. Mr. Jalbcrt graduated from the Jesuit College 
with the class of 1906, the possessor of an e.xcellent 
general education. He had in the meantime, however, 
decided to adopt the legal profession as a career in life, 
and with this end in view, entered the law school con- 
nected with the Boston University. From the outset he 
showed a marked ability along his chosen line, and his 
eminent qualifications in this direction early made them- 
selves manifest. At the Boston University Mr. Jalt>ert 
pursued his studies with such good purpose that he was 
graduated therefrom with the class of 1910, and took 
at the same time the degree of J. B.. maijna cum hiudc. 
Mr. Jalbert had not waited, however, until his gradua- 
tion before beginning the practice of his profession, but, 
in September, 1909, took the bar examination and was 
admitted to practice on November 5, 1909, and opened 
an office at Woonsocket, where he be.gan the practice 
of law. From that time on to the present Mr. Jalbert 
has remained constantly in practice, and in the mean- 
time has developed a verv- large and high-class clientele. 
His office is situated at Rooms 8 and 9. Longley build- 
ing, Woonsocket, and much important litigation is now 
handled there by him. Not only has he proven himself 
perfectly qualified to take a leading position before the 
Rhode Island bar, but his personality and democratic 
attitude towards his fellows have rendered him very 
popular and he at the present time enjoys a host of 
faithful friends and associates. Mr. Jalbert is a Re- 
publican in politics, but the demands made upon his 
time and attention by his professional activities have 
up to the present time rendered it impossible for him 
to take an active part in public aflfairs, although his 
views on the practical side of life and his quickness in 
adapting himself to new conditions and circumstances 
amply fit him for such activities. Mr. Jalbert is a con- 
spicuous figure in the fraternal and social circles of 
Woonsocket, and he is a member of a number of impor- 
tant organizations here, among which should be num- 
bered Woonsocket Lodge, No. 850, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; Conseil No. 2, of L'Union St. 
Jean Baptiste d'Amerique; the Forestiers Franco- Amer- 
icains Cour Napoleon, A. C. A.; the Phi Delta Phi fra- 



ternity; the .Mumni .Association of the Boston Univer- 
sity, and the Cercle National Dramatique. In addition 
to these organizations Mr. Jalbcrt is a member of the 
Rhode Island Bar Association and the Woonsocket 
Chamber of Commerce and. particularly in the latter 
capacity, has done much to promote the material inter- 
ests of the community of which he is a member. In 
his religious belief Mr. Jalbert is a Roman Catholic and 
attends the Notre Dame des V'ictoires Church of this 
denomination at Woonsocket. 

Kugene Louis Jalbert was united in marriage, No- 
vember 28, 1912, with Nathalie H. Moreau, of Man- 
chester, N. H., a dau.ghter of J. J. and Marie Heloise 
(Houde) Moreau. Mr. Moreau is one of the most 
prominent business men and particularly influential in 
the business life of Manchester, where he is without 
doubt one of the most influential citizens of the com- 
munity. To Mr. and Mrs. Jalbert three children have 
been born, as follows : Heloise. Louis M.. and Julienne. 

EVERETT BURNSIDE DEXTER— Beyond doubt 
one of the most enterprising and energetic citizens of 
Scituate, R. I., is Everett Burnside De.xter, who is 
engaged in this community in large farming operations 
and as a successful manufacturer. Mr. Dexter is a 
native of Providence, R. I., where his birth occurred 
October 15. 1838, and a son of William and Sahra 
(Narton) Dexter, both of whom are deceased. The 
elder Mr. Dexter was for many years engaged in a 
peddling business in Boston, New Haven and Provi- 
dence. The early life of Everett Burnside Dexter was 
spent at Providence, where he attended for a short 
time the local public schools. His parents, however, 
moved to Scituate, R. I., when he was seven years of 
age and here he continued his schooling for a time. 
The circumstances of his family were such, however, 
that it became necessary for him to engage in some 
lucrative employment and while still a mere lad he 
secured a position in a wheelwright shop, where he 
remained for a time. He then took up farming and 
for a number of years was employed by local farmers 
in work upon their places. In the year 1882. having 
by dint of great industry and a most commendable 
thrift laid by a considerable capital. Mr. De.xter pur- 
chased his present farm, which at that time consisted 
of some forty acres, to which he has since added sixty 
acres more. The energy and ambition of the lad which 
manifested itself while he was still employed by others, 
continued to be displayed by him when he became the 
owner of his own place. At the time of his purchase, 
the property was practically without improvement, a 
fact which enabled him at that early age to pay for it, 
but since that time he has made it through hard work 
and careful management, one of the most prosperous 
and highly cultivated farms in this region. Upon it he 
has built every building which now stands here, in- 
cluding his own house and a number of dwellings and 
tenements in what is now known as the Dexter settle- 
ment. In addition to these activities, Mr. Dexter has 
branched out into quite other departments and in 1902 
erected a large cider mill for the manufacture of 
vinegar. This plant he has conducted with the utmost 
success and it now turns out in the neighborhood of 
one thousand barrels per year. Perceiving that he could 



ii8 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



save greatly if he provided his own mill with the bar- 
rels necessary to care for the shipment of its product, 
Mr. Dexter built in 1913 a large cooper shop, where he 
now manufactures barrels for himself. He employs 
about twelve men in the plant. In spite of these large 
industrial enterprises, Mr. Dexter has not given up 
his farming and is extensively engaged in fruit grow- 
ing, having an extensive orchard of many acres, and 
raised in 1918 ever 5.000 bushels of apples. The great 
success achieved by him has been due entirely to his 
unaided efforts, for he did not inherit any money at all, 
and it has been entirely owing to his industry and 
thrift that he amassed the capital necessary to starting 
in his various ventures. Mr. Dexter has earned a 
well-merited reputation for public spirit in this com- 
munity and has never failed to interest himself actively 
in local affairs. He is now, however, ambitious on his 
own account for political preferment, and although a 
staunch member of the Republican party and an 
ardent supporter of its principles and policies, has never 
sought office from it. He has, nevertheless, for many 
years occupied the position of forest warden, and is 
also a member of North Scituate Grange No. 39. Mr. 
Dexter has served as master of North Scituate Grange 
for the years of 1917-18. 

Everett Burnside De.xter was united in marriage on 
April 26, 1892, with Theodora Augusta Gurney, of 
Boston, Mass., a daughter of James Theodore and 
Harriet Augusta (Haradcn) Gurney, old and highly 
respected citizens of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Dexter 
are the parents of five children, as follows : Theodore 
and Irving, twins; Horace; Henry and Cora, twins. 
All of these children have received excellent educations 
in the schools of their native town. Theodore, now 
serving with the First Division of the United States 
Army in Coblenz, Germany ; Irving, now serving 
with the United States Army in Siberia; Horace served 
six months in the Engineering Corps of the United 
States Army and was honorably discharged December 
I, 1918; Henry is assisting his father at home. 



ERLE D. FORREST, M. D., a prominent physi- 
cian of Edgewood Station, R. I., is a native of Utica, 
111., where his birth occurred June 18, 1888. He is a 
son of John and Isabel E. (Anfield) Forrest, old and 
highly respected residents of Franklin, Mass., where 
the elder Mr. Forrest is pastor of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. The early life of Dr. Forrest was spent 
in a number of different parts of the country, owing to 
the fact that his father's profession took him from 
place to place as he was given charge of various par- 
ishes. His education was consequently gained at a 
number of different public schools but he was grad- 
uated from the high school at Melrose, Mass., in 1903. 
He then entered the Ogdcnsburg Academy, at Ogdens- 
burg, N. Y., where he took a full English course and 
was graduated in 1905, after being prepared for col- 
lege. Dr. Forrest then entered Tufts College, study- 
ing in the medical department thereof and graduating 
with the class of 1912. He served in the Mt. Sinai 
Hospital of Boston, as obstetrical house officer there. 
After a time spent in this hospital he became an in- 
terne in the Rhode Island Hospital at Providence, 
where he remained for two years and was then interne 



in the Providence City Hospital until 1915. In that year 
Dr. Forrest offered his services to the Red Cross 
Society, and was sent to Serbia, where he was engaged 
in war work for a time. While in Serbia, Dr. Forrest 
was transferred to the famous hospital corps of Lady 
Paget, and during this time was captured by Bulgarian 
troops, during an action at Uskub, while they were 
overrunning Serbia. His capture was occasioned by 
the fact that the corps remained courageously on duty 
at the various hospitals where they were placed, rather 
than abandon their wounded charges. In 1916, however, 
he was released from his captivity and shortly after his 
return to America, travelled to South America and 
was there placed in charge of the sanitary condition of 
properties of a large industrial company in British 
Guiana. Later, however. Dr. Forrest returned to the 
United States, and opened an office at No. 1880 Broad 
street, Edgewood. where he is at present in active prac- 
tice. Since December, 1916, w'hen he first established 
himself at this place. Dr. Forrest has rapidly grown in 
popularity here and is now regarded as one of the most 
successful among the younger physicians of the place. 
He has taken a keen interest in the public affairs of 
the city but has not affiliated himself with any of the 
political parties, preferring to remain entirely inde- 
pendent in his judgment on local issues. In his relig- 
ious belief. Dr. Forrest is a Methodist and is a mem- 
ber of the Temple Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Boston, Mass. He is also a member of Harmony 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and of the 
Rhode Island Hospital Club. 

Dr. Forrest was united in marriage on April 24, 1917, 
with Miriam R. Bliss, of Providence. To them one 
child has been born, Richard A. Forrest, Jan. 25, 1918. 



ANDREW BROWN WALLS, JR., agent of the 
Manton Mill, of Manton, R. I., and a man of influence 
in the community, is a native of Chatham, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada, where his birth occurred August 7, 1884, 
and a son of Andrew Brown, Sr., and Mary C. (Green- 
ough) Walls, old and highly respected residents of 
that place. Mr. Walls, Sr., like his son, was a native of 
Chatham, New Brunswick, and was engaged in the 
tanning business at that place for many years. From 
there, however, he removed to Chelsea, Mass., where 
he became a carpenter, and now lives retired, on ac- 
count of ill health, at Revere, Mass. He married Mary 
C. Greenough, a native of West Petpeswick Harbor, 
Nova Scotia, whose death occurred February 3, 1916. 
They were the parents of the following children : Albert 
G., now of Revere, Mass., where he is engaged in busi- 
ness as overseer for the Penn Metal Works ; Maude, 
who makes her home at Revere, Mass.; George E., 
who resides at Maiden, Mass., where he is cashier of 
the Joyce Brothers' Company ; Walter B., of Winthrop, 
Mass., where he is assistant treasurer of the Woolen 
Worsted Company; Mark G., of Medford, Mass., where 
he is manager of the "Insurance Press," of Boston, and 
Andrew Brown, Jr.. of further mention. 

Andrew Brown Walls, Jr., received his education at 
the public schools of Chelsea, Mass., to which place 
his family removed when he was a small child, but after 
completing the grammar grades, it became necessary 
for him to secure some remunerative employment, and 





T 



C«4<c 




r-.^S> 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



119 



accordingly he found work with the American Woolen 
Mill, being placed in the Boston office of that concern 
in the capacity of messenger boy. He remained there 
for four years, during which time he had worked up 
to a responsible clerical position in the office of the 
general agent. N'ot long afterwards Mr. Walls was 
given a position with the Riverside Mill, at Providence, 
and worked with that concern from 1903 to November 
I, 1909. His first position there was that of secretary 
to the superintendent, and at the time he left he held 
the post of assistant to the agent. Mr. Walls then 
went with the Wood Worsted Mill, at Lawrence, Mass., 
the largest concern of its kind in the world, as assistant 
agent there, and after spending eight years in its em- 
ploy was offered the position of agent with the Manton 
Mill, of Manton, R. I. Accordingly, he came to this 
place to take up his new duties, and has continued thus 
occupied up to the present time. In politics Mr. Walls 
is a Republican, and although the great demands made 
upon his time and activities by his responsible post 
render it impossible for him to take so active a part in 
public affairs as he otherwise might, he nevertheless 
continues keenly interested in local and general issues, 
and performs his duties as citizen conscientiously. Mr. 
Walls is a conspicuous member of the Masonic order 
in this place, and is affiliated with Phoenician Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Mount Sinai 
Chapter, Royal .-Xrch Masons, Lawrence Council. Royal 
and Select Masters, and Bethany Commandery, Knights 
Templar. Mr. Walls possesses the well-earned reputa- 
tion as a hard worker and capable business man, and 
stands high in the esteem of the various mill owners 
and operators in this region. His chief recreation is 
automobiling and fishing, but he enjoys almost any of 
the wholesome pastimes which are associated with out- 
door life. He makes his home at No. 90 Arnold avenue, 
Edgewood. 

Andrew Brown Walls, Jr., was united in marriage, 
October 15, 1907, at Everett, Mass., with Ethel Cary 
Bruzzell, a daughter of Frank A. and .A.da L. (Cary) 
Bruzzell, old and highly respected residents there. 
Mr. Bruzzell was a native of Maine, but came 
to Everett, Mass., as a young man, and was there 
engaged in the retail grocery business up to the time of 
his death, June, 1908. Mrs. Bruzzell survives him, and 
continues to reside at Chelsea. To Mr. and Mrs. Walls, 
Jr., three children have been born, as follows: .\lden 
Roberts, born May 23, 1910, and now a student at the 
Cranston Primary School; Gordon Edward, born July 
10, 1914; Donald Irving, born March 30, 1919. 



PATRICK FRANCIS BARRY— Among the best 
known young lawyers of Riverpoint, R. I., Patrick F. 
Barry occupies a high position in the esteem of the 
community. He is a native of the place, having been 
born here, March 20, 1884, the son of William H. and 
Susan A. (Carville) Barry. William H. Barry was 
born in Cranston. R. I., and for thirty-seven years has 
been connected with The L. Brayton Foundry Company, 
of Riverpoint, R. I., a connection which has given him 
so much satisfaction that he has repeatedly refused to 
consider more advantageous offers. Susan A. Barry 
is a native of County Monahan, Ireland, and besides 
Patrick F. Barry, who is the eldest of the family, there 



were four other children : William H., Jr., who died 
in service in the United States .Army at Camp Upton, 
L. I., October 18, 1918; Elizabeth; Esther Lilian, and 
Clara May, the latter two of whom are teachers in 
private schools in Riverpoint. 

Patrick F. Barry was educated in the grammar school 
at Riverpoint, and later finished the course at the town 
high school. His ambition had been set on the legal 
profession from an early period in his life, and from 
high school he went to the law school of Boston 
University, matriculating in 1908 and receiving his 
degree in 1911. In September of this year he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of the State of Rhode Island, and 
opened an office in Riverpoint, where he had a large 
circle of friends, and a still larger connection of those 
who had known and respected, his father. The young 
lawyer began to make his mark from the first, and in 
1912 he was made the ta.x collector for the old town of 
Warwick. In 1915 and 1916 he held the position of 
probate judge of West Warwick, and in 1917-18 he was 
town solicitor of West Warwick. Business enterprises 
also interested his alert and ready mind, and one of the 
projects into which he threw his energies in 1917 was 
the building of a fine brick block for residence and 
business purposes. In that same year he bought the 
Purity Ice Cream Manufacturing Company which had 
been established in 1914, and refitting the plant with a 
complete equipment of the most modern machinery, he 
has built up a most successful and prosperous business. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of St. 
Peter's and St. Paul's Total Abstinence Society, and of 
the Fraternal Sons of St. Patrick, of Pawtuxet Valley, 
and was president of the last named in 1917-18. In his 
political principles Mr. Barry is a Democrat, though he 
has the friendship and respect of many Republicans, 
and has enjoyed their support in public affairs. 

Mr. Barry married, in 1910, Rose M. Andrews, 
daughter of John C. and Mary A. (Carroll) Andrews, 
and they have two children : Francis H., born Oct. 15, 
1912; and Richard J., born May 4, 1914. 



REV EUGENE LESSARD, rector of St. James 
Roman Catholic Cliurcli at Manville, R. I., and one of 
the best known and most loved figures in this com- 
munity, is a native of Canada, having been born 
Elizabeth, Province of Quebec, in that country. He is 
a son of Edward and Margaret (Lachance) Lessard, 
both of whom are natives of France, the former having 
been engaged in the mercantile business in Canada for 
thirty years. Mr. and Mrs. Lessard are the parents of 
eight sons and three daughters, as follows: Eugene, 
with whose career we are especially concerned; Joseph, 
who resides in Boston ; Edward, who also lives in that 
city; Romulus, of Ontario, Canada; Avila, also a resi- 
dent there; Adelard, of Pawtucket, R. I.; .\ugust. of 
Canada; Emma, who makes her home in Woonsocket; 
Benoni and Delima; Zelima and Couronna, who are 
deceased. 

Father Lessard received the elementary portion of 
his education at the public schools of his native Prov- 
ince in Canada, and also attended classical courses at 
Joliette Seminary, where he gained a degree in letters. 
While yet a youth he realized that he was called to 
the priesthood, and began the study of theology at 



120 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Montreal Seminary. He was ordained. February 28, 
1884. by Mgr. Fabre, archbishop of Montreal, and was 
appointed assistant in the Roman Catholic Church of 
Saint Cunegonde, Montreal. In 1889 he was appointed 
assistant pastor at Precious Blood Church at Woon- 
socket. He remained at this post until the year 1896, 
when he was called to the Church of St. James at 
Manville, R. I., which is the central point of the large 
French colony here. He has remained faithful to his 
charge ever since and has been responsible in a large 
measure for the growth in size and importance of this 
flourishing parish. When he first came to Manville. 
the Parish of St. James numbered some fifteen hundred 
souls, and the church property was worth in the neigh- 
borhood of seventy-five thousand dollars. He has now 
under his pastoral care twenty-seven hundred souls and 
his church property is valued at more than one hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars. He has been an active 
builder and it was he who constructed the handsome 
and modern Sisters' residence. In 1903 Father I.essard 
built the present beautiful rectory costing over $15,000. 
The modern school which was built by Father Beland, 
contains twelve large classrooms, and is under the 
charge of twelve teaching sisters, who superintend the 
eight grades here. He has also instituted post-:_i:raduate 
courses in business and commercial subjects, the en- 
tire institution playing a most valuable part in the 
educational system of the community. Father Lessard 
has also vastly improved and expanded the other 
church property and has modernized it in every way. 
He also installed a fine modem pipe organ in the 
church, 1910. He has one assistant in the parish, the 
Rev. Alphonse Ernest Olivier. 

It is a mistaken corollary from the great and true 
proposition that the world is growing more virtuous, to 
suppose that therefore, of any two epochs, the latter 
must be the better. It is true that we are moving, 
however slowlj', towards what we believe shall prove 
to be the millennium, but we move as do the waves of 
the sea and trough must follow crest as well as the 
contrary. It would probably be a difiicult matter, how- 
ever, to persuade anyone that the present time occupies 
any such ignominious position as that of trough be- 
tween two crests of development, and doubtless most 
men would point indignantly to the marvelous mechan- 
ical achievements of to-day and ask when the world 
has approached them in the past. But there are other and 
surer ways of judging of the worth of a period than by 
its mechanical inventions, notably by the amount of reli- 
gious enthusiasm existing, and it is a fact that to call a 
period in historj' at once the "Dark Ages" and the 
"Ages of Faith" is a contradiction in terms. That 
to-day there is less of religious belief than in the 
times that have preceded it is hardly susceptible of 
denial, and this, according to the above criterion, marks 
it as in some degree a retrogression. To carry us 
through such times of disbelief, however, there are 
several great factors to which men of more faithful 
instincts may turn for support and refuge. One of the 
greatest of these is undeniably the Roman Catholic 
church, in the shelter of whose institutions so many 
find security. It is among the priests and more devoted 
members of the church that we shall still find some- 
thing that approximates the simple faith of those old 



times, a faith which approached the moving of moun- 
tains. Typical of those who thus seem to perpetuate in 
their own persons the splendid tradition of the past 
is Rev. Father Eugene Lessard, he himself having been 
instrumental in building up the parish to its present size 
and importance and made it the factor that it is in 
the religious life of the community. 



EDWIN GILPIN THOMPSON, one of the lead- 
ing physicians of 01ne}'^Mlle, R. I., where he has been in 
practice since the year 1897, is a native of Halifax, 
Canada, where his birth occurred April 16, 1865, and a 
son of Joseph and Mary (Devine) Thompson. The 
elder Mr. Thompson is now deceased but was for many 
years successfully engaged in business as a manu- 
facturer at Halifax. His wife, now resides with her 
son. Dr. Thompson, at this place. The childhood and 
early life of Dr. Thompson were spent in his native 
city of Halifax, and it was there that he attended the 
local public schools and gained his elementary education. 
After two years at the high school, however, he was 
obliged to seek some remunerative employment in 
order to gain funds to finish his education. He en- 
tered in business as grocer and general trader in 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia, remaining two years. In the 
meantime he saved up with commendable thrift enough 
money to enable him to continue his studies, and ac- 
cordingly came to this country and entered the Phila- 
delphia Dental College of Philadelphia. Pa., from which 
institution he was graduated with the class of 1889-90, 
and received his degree as doctor of dental surgery. 
He had, however, determined to take up the study of 
medicine, but it was necessary for him to gain enough 
money for this purpose, and accordingly he began the 
practice of dentistry at Woodstock, New Brunswick, 
Canada. At the same time, however, he entered the 
Medico-Chirurgical College at Philadelphia, confining 
his practice to the months of his vacation each year. 
In the year 1893 he graduated from the Philadelphia 
institution with the degree of doctor of medicine, and 
then entered as interne the hospital connected with the 
Medico-Chirurgical College. He remained for two 
years, gaining much valuable practical experience, and 
then established himself in general practice in Phila- 
delphia. This was in the year 1895, and for two years 
following he remained in that city. At the same time 
he was given a position as extern at Wills Hospital 
and was also made chief of the gyncecological clinic 
of the Medico-Chirurgical Hospital and held these two 
responsible posts during the time of his practice in 
Philadelphia. In 1897 Dr. Thompson went to the \\'est 
and began practice at Springfield, Mo., but later in the 
same year returned to the East and opened an office at 
No. 68 Pocasset avenue, Olneyville, R. I. Here he has 
remained in general practice for about twenty-one 
years and has now a large and high class clientele here. 
Dr. Thompson was won the confidence of the entire 
comtnunity, including his fellow physicians, and is justly 
regarded as among the leaders of his profession in this 
city. He is a member of the Providence Medical 
Society, the Rhode Island Medical Association, and the 
American Medical Association. In addition to his 
private practice, he now holds the post of medical 
examiner for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



121 



the Prudential Life Insurance Company, and the Life 
Extension Association, in this city. He is surgeon- 
major of the United Train of Artillery, one of the old- 
est military organizations in the United States, a char- 
tered command which originated in 1776, first lieuten- 
ant and assistant-surgeon, Rhode Island State Guard. 
In politics Dr. Thompson is a Republican and for six 
years was a member of the school committee from the 
Eighth Ward. In his religious belief Dr. Thompson is 
an Episcopalian and attends the church of that denom- 
ination here. 

Dr. Thompson was united in marriage on March 6, 
1901, with Harriett .\. Wells, of Providence, a daughter 
of Albert Wells, old and highly respected resident of 
this city. Four children have been born of this union, 
as follows : Ernest Devine, now a pupil of the Classical 
High School here; Mildred Wells, a pupil at the gram- 
mar school, of Providence ; Helen, also a pupil of 
the grammar school, of Providence; and Louise, who 
died at the age of three weeks. 



ARTHUR WALLACE STEERE, a prosperous 
farnu-r and successful business man of Greenville, R. I., 
and one of the largest land-owners in this rcirion, is a 
member of one of the oldest and most prominent fam- 
ilies of the State, which was founded here in early 
colonial times. He is a member of the seventh genera- 
tion from the immigrant ancestor and the following is 
a record of his descent. 

(I) John Steerc, the founder of the family in this 
State, was born in England in the year 1634. He came 
to the New England colonies prior to 1660, and we have 
a record of him on May 9, of that year, as having 
received a grant of land at Providence. He was ac- 
cepted as townsman February 18, 1661, was town ser- 
geant in 1663, and made a freeman in 1672. His death 
occurred August 27, 1724, in the community where he 
had made his home. It was in 1660 that we first have a 
record of him, when he married Hannah Wickenden, a 
daughter of the Rev. \\'illiam Wickenden. and they 
were the parents of the following children : John, Sarah, 
Dinah. Thomas, James, Ruth, William, .Anne, and Sam- 
uel, who is mentioned at length below. 

(in Samuel Steere, youngest son of John and Han- 
nah (Wickenden) Steere, was born about 1673 3t Prov- 
idence, and removed from that place to Bridgewater, 
Mass., but later returned and made his home both at 
Smithtield and Gloucester. His death occurred October 
18, 1745, when about seventy years of age. He married 
Hannah Field, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Ever- 
den) Field, and a granddaughter of John Field, the 
immigrant settler. They w-ere the parents of the fol- 
lowing children ; Urania; a son that died in early youth; 
Anthony, born Dec. 14, 1716; Jonah, who is mentioned 
at length below; Jeremiah, born Feb. 22, 1722; John, 
born about 1729; and Samuel, born Nov. 12, 1731. 

(Ill) Jonah Steere, son of Samuel and Hannah 
(Field) Steere, was born in January. 1720, at Gloucester, 
and made his home there during his entire life. He 
was the owner of about seventy acres of land on the 
road from Greenville to Harmony, which property was 
deeded to him by his brother, Anthony, in 1746. He 
was admitted a freeman of the colony in that year and 
was a prominent man there, having served as a justice 



of the peace and on the town council for a number of 
years. He was appointed to the General Assembly in 
1780 from the town of Gloucester to receive recruits, 
and his death occurred April 14, 1798. Jonah Steere 
married, December 10, 1741, Lydia Whipple, who was 
born in 1725, a daughter of Job and Lydia (Harding) 
Whipple, and they were the parents of the following 
children: Hannah, born April 15, 1743; Samuel, born 
Jan. 13, 1744-45; Simeon, born Feb. 26, 1746-47; Job, 
born March 21, 1749; Lydia, born Feb. 14, 1751 ; .Anne, 
born Jan. 21, 1753; Drusilla, born Oct. 10, 1754; Asa, 
who is inentioned below; Abigail, born Oct. 27, 1759; 
Nicholas, born Jan. 27, 1763, and Nehemiah, born April 
17. 1765- 

(IV) Deacon Asa Steere, son of Jonah and Lydia 
(Whipple) Steere, was born September 28. 1757, and 
made his home on a place situated about three miles 
from Harmony, in the town of Gloucester. He was a 
man of strong religious instincts and beliefs, and a 
member of the Free Will Baptist Church at Chep- 
achet, of which he became deacon, holding that office 
for many years. His death occurred January 31, 1835, 
in his seventy-eighth year. Deacon .Asa Steere married 
Mary Irons, born October 25, 1762, a daughter of Sam- 
uel and Hannah (Waterman) Irons, and they were the 
parents of the following children : Riley, who is men- 
tioned at length below; Abigail, born .April 15, 1785; 
Lucina. born Dec. 22, 1786; Jonah, born Dec. 14, 1788; 
Lydia, born March 25, 1790; Hannah W., born July 20, 
1792; Samuel, born Jan. 29, 1795; Whipple, born Oct. 
16, 1796; and Job, born Nov. 16, 1799. 

(V) Riley Steerc, son of Deacon Asa and Mary 
(Irons) Steere, was born at Gloucester and made his 
home at Harmony, where he carried on the business 
of wheelwright until his death, which occurred Novem- 
ber 17, 1863. He was a member of the Congregational 
church at Scituate. Riley Steere married (first) Nancy 
Hunt, who was born in February, 1790, and died Janu- 
ary 21. 1826. He married (second) January i, 1832, 
Lovina Goldthwaite, who died February 29, 1864. He 
was tlie father of four children, all by the first mar- 
riage, as follows: Charles H., born .Aug. 8, 1810, who 
was a carpenter and farmer at Gloucester and married 
Mehetible A. Tourtellot; Mary Ann Evans, born Nov. 
5. 1812, and died Nov. 7, 1823; Nelson, born .Aug. 23, 
1815, and removed to Illinois, where his death occurred 
June 22, 1862; Seth Hunt, who is mentioned at length 
below. 

(VI) Seth Hunt Steere, youngest son of Riley and 
Nancy (Hunt) Steere, was born December 19, 1825, at 
Harmony, and from his childhood w-as trained in farm 
work. As a young man he learned the trade of painter 
and followed in that capacity for a few years, but after 
his marriage he located on the farm which is now 
occupied by his son, Seth H. Steere, on Snakehill road, 
where he resided until his death, October 14, 1SS4. 
Mr. Steere, in addition to his farming, was engaged also 
in business as a dealer in firewood and timber, and was 
very successful in this line. He owned a large and 
productive farm at Scituate and was prominent in the 
affairs of the community. Seth Hunt Steere married, 
February 23. 1851, Lucy L. Smith, who was born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1831, at Gloucester, a daughter of Gideon and 
Lucy (Bowen) Smith, and they were the parents of 



122 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



the following children : Lucy Emma, born April 23. 
1852, and married, Jan. 2S, 1872. James B. Coman, of 
Gloucester ; Hannah, deceased ; Warren Hunt, born Oct. 
9, 1855, and married in 1883 Adelaide S. Phillips; Seth 
Herbert, born Nov. 21, 1857, and married Lillie King; 
Lucius B., of Harmony; .\rthur Wallace, with whose 
career we are here especially concerned ; Patience Smith, 
born Feb. 11, 1868, and now engaged in the practice of 
osteopathy at Springfield, Mass. ; Asa Gideon, born 
Sept. 7, 1871, a stone cutter of Greenville, married 
Lena Smith. 

(VII) Arthur Wallace Steere, son of Seth Hunt and 
Lucy L. (Smith) Steere, was born September 3, 1865, 
on the old family homestead at Gloucester. As a child 
he assisted his father with the work of the farm and 
attended the district schools. As a youth he went tem- 
porarily to North Scituate, where he was engaged in 
teaming for three years. After his marriage, Mr. 
Steere purchased his present farm from the heirs of 
his father-in-law, David Brayton. He eventually be- 
came the owner of a very large property, which at one 
time amounted to as much as one thousand acres, one 
hundred of which, however, he has since disposed of 
to the city of Providence. Mr. Steere engaged in gen- 
eral farming on a large scale and also operated a 
modern dairy, where at one time he disposed of the 
milk and other products of one hundred cows. He also 
became interested in the lumber business, and made a 
specialty of providing ties and telegraph poles for the 
railroads of the region, in which process he operated 
two portable saw mills. He was engaged also in team- 
ing for a number of years, and operated as many as 
twenty-five horses in this work on the average, the 
number at sometimes being increased to as many as 
one hundred and fifty. His property lies in the towns 
of Foster, Burrillville, Scituate, Gloucester, Johnston, 
and Smithfield. Of recent years Mr. Steere has with- 
drawn somewhat both from his lumber business and 
from his dairy operations and now devotes most of his 
attention to the raising of fruit in which he has been 
very successful, especially in the case of apples, and 
possesses a large orchard of these trees. He is a mod- 
em and progressive farmer in every way and is justly 
regarded as one of the most enterprising and substan- 
tial citizens of the community. In politics Mr. Steere 
is a Republican, and has been very active in pubhc 
affairs, having represented Greenville in the Rhode 
Island General Assembly for four years. He is a mem- 
ber of Temple Lodge, No. 18, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Greenville; and Scituate Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of North Scituate. In his religious 
belief Mr. Steere is a Free Will Baptist and attends 
the church of that denomination at Greenville. 

Arthur Wallace Steere was united in marriage (first) 
at Scituate with Sarah J. Brayton, who was born at 
Foster, August 13, 1867, a daughter of David and 
Phoebe Brayton. Mrs. Steere died September 4, 1892. 
Mr. Steere was married (second) January 24, 1894, 
to Mamie E. Farrar, of Smithfield, a daughter of Miles 
and Annie E. (Allen) Farrar, and they are the parents 
of four children, as follows : Seth Hunt, born Jan. 24, 
1895; Arthur Wallace, Jr., born May 7, 1905; Nettie 
E., born Feb. 15, 1911 ; and Henry J., born Sept. 8, 
1913. 



CLIFFORD BOWEN COLWELL, M. D.— In 

1907 Dr. Colwell returned to the city of Providence, 
R. I., after a long absence during which he had com- 
pleted medical study, interne service in Baltimore and 
Washington hospitals. With this equipment to com- 
mend him, and the good wishes of his friends of a 
lifetime, he is now (1918) head of a well-established 
practice. He is the son of James Brown and Sarah 
(Carpenter) Colwell, both deceased, his father a one 
time extensive wholesale and retail dealer in wood. 

Clififord B. Colwell was born in Providence. R. I., 
September 12, 1881, and there completed all grades of 
the public schools, finishing grammar school in 1895, 
high school in i8g8. Three years were then spent in 
secular employment before beginning medical study, 
which was taken up in 1901. He chose the medical 
department of the University of Maryland as his ahiia 
mater, and there pursued courses until graduated M. D., 
class of 1905. He spent a year as interne at Maryland 
General Hospital in Baltimore, another year in similar 
station at Sibley Hospital, Washington. D. C, then re- 
turned to Providence, and began private general prac- 
tice. The eleven years which have since intervened 
have dealt generously with him, and he has reaped the 
reward of a profession proverbially generous to her 
devotees. He is a member of the American Medical 
Association, Rhode Island Society, is a member of the 
Baptist church, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, Modern Woodmen of America, and is affiliated 
politically with the Republican party. Dr. Colwell mar- 
ried Elsie Reichmann, of Washington, D. C. 



THOMAS O'BRIEN— The parents of Thomas 
O'Brien, a leading real estate and insurance broker of 
Pawtucket, R. I., were Timothy and Norah (Troy) 
O'Brien, of County Tipperary, Ireland, and there Tim- 
othy O'Brien died. They were the parents of si.xteen 
sons and daughters, four of whom died in infancy, 
twelve growing up and becoming citizens of the United 
States. These twelve were : John, who enlisted in the 
Union army during the Civil War, and died from 
sickness contracted in the army; James, also a Union 
veteran of the Civil War, he dying in Pawtucket, R. 
I., a few years after the war closed; Martin, who 
resided until his death in Pawtucket, R. L; Mary, mar- 
ried John Donnelly, of Pawtucket, she too deceased ; 
David, now residing in Pawtucket; Thomas of further 
mention ; Timothy, deceased, for a long time a resi- 
dent of Pawtucket; Honora, married John Hill, of 
Woonsocket; Daniel F., now living in Riverside, R. I.; 
Winifred, married Alfred Kennedy, of New Bedford, 
Mass.; Joanna, married Peter Donohue, of Pawtucket; 
Margaret, widow of John Nolan, of Pawtucket. The 
mother of these children later joined them in Paw- 
tucket, R. I., and there died. 

Thomas O'Brien, sixth of these children, was born in 
County Tipperary, Ireland, February 27, 1857, and there 
lived until he became fourteen years of age. He at- 
tended the national schools until 1871, then he came to 
the United States and joined his elder brothers and 
sisters who had settled in Pawtucket, R. I. He began 
business life as a bookkeeper for his brother-in-law, 
John Donnelly, who operated a bakery in Pawtucket, 
and for fourteen years he remained in that employ. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



123 



He next spent eiK'iteen months in the insurance depart- 
ment of the State Auditor's office, as bookkeeper, the 
next seven years thereafter being passed with the 
Pawtucket "Tribune." After leaving the "Tribune" 
he was manager of a branch office for the Isaac L. Goflf 
Insurance Company, holding that position until the 
year 1900. In that year (1900) he established in busi- 
ness for himself in Pawtucket, and is one of the sub- 
stantial real estate brokers of the city. He is, also, a 
well known auctioneer whose services are in demand 
far and near at important sales. 

\\'ith the adaptability of his race and tlicir genius 
for public affairs, Mr. O'Brien has taken a leading part 
in city affairs, representing his ward in the common 
council for four years, and a member of the board of 
aldermen for four years, also in iSgg and 1902, repre- 
senting Pawtucket in the Rhode Island House of Rep- 
resentatives. He belongs to the Pawtucket Business 
Men's Association, the Chamber of Commerce, ."Xncient 
Order of Hibernians, Knights of Columbus, and Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. O'Brien married, October 4, 1883, Mary .■\. Mar- 
rin, daughter of Patrick and Mary Marriii, of Paw- 
tucket, R. I. They are the parents of the following 
children: Thomas A., a journalist of Hartford, Conn.; 
Kathleen C, a teacher of music. Providence, R. I. ; 
Marian F., and Rosalcen, both teachers in Pawtucket 
schools; and Francis Emmctt, died aged eight years. 



HENRY FRANCIS BALDWIN, the well known 
and successful real estate dealer of Providence, is a 
native of Cranston, where his birth occurred .August 
31, 1874. Mr. Baldwin is a son of Theodore Augustus 
and Nancy Jennings (Stearns) Baldwin, both of whom 
are deceased, the former having been a successful 
wholesale dealer in provisions at Providence. Henry- 
Francis Baldwin was but one year of age when he came 
to this city with his parents, and it was here that his 
childhood was spent and here that he received his educa- 
tion, attending and graduating from the Candace Street 
Grammar School in 1889. Some time later he engaged 
in business on his own account in the same line as his 
father, and became the owner of a successful estab- 
lishment in this city, where he dealt in the wholesale 
and retail provision trade. For nineteen years he was 
actively concerned in the establishment and operation 
of this business, but in 1914 sold his interest and re- 
tired. In igio Mr. Baldwin had become interested in 
the real estate field, and upon selling his stores in 
1914, devoted his entire attention to the latter line. He 
established in that year the Hope Realty Company, 
which has prospered greatly since and of this company 
he is the sole owner. He has added to his real estate 
dealings in recent years a large brokerage business, 
and now deals in many commodities, including machin- 
ery, odd lots of merchandise, etc. He has opened 
branch establishments in Providence and elsewhere in 
the State and is now justly regarded as one of the 
most successful and substantial men in the community. 
Another of his activities connected with his real estate 
operations has been the building of many important 
structures, including residences, large and small, in this 
region. 



Mr. Baldwin has not confined himself, however, to 
his business activities, although these are very great, 
but is equally well known in the department of public 
affairs here, and has served as representative of the city 
in the General .Assembly of the State, in 1911, 1913 
and 1914. In this capacity he had shown himself to be 
a very capable and disinterested legislator and served 
on many important committees. Mr. Baldwin was a 
member of the special commission on the Bristol and 
Kelly bridges, and was appointed commissioner thereof 
by former Governor Pothicr. Mo was also appointed 
a parole commissioner by Governor Beeckman. in 1915, 
and still holds that office, having been appointed for a 
six year term. January 7, 1919, he was made lieutenant- 
colonel and was appointed aide-de-camp by Governor 
Beeckman on his staff. He takes great interest in this 
work and has performed an invaluable service to the 
community in connection with it. He was also a 
member of the Put-in-Bay Celebration committee. 
Mr. Baldwin is a conspicuous figure in the Masonic 
order here, having taken his thirty-second degree in 
Free Masonry, and is a member and a past master 
of Redwood Lodge, No. 35, Free and .Accepted 
Masons ; a member of Providence Chapter, Royal .A.rch 
Masons; a member of Providence Council, Royal and 
Select Masters; a meinbcr and past coinmander of Cal- 
vary Commandery. No. 13, Knights Templar; and a 
member of Palestine Temple, .'Vncient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and of Rhode Island Con- 
sistory, Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret. Al- 
though not a member, Mr. Baldw-in has attended the 
.•\sbury Methodist Episcopal Church of Providence, and 
for many years sang in the choir there and was musical 
director for the same. 

Henry Francis Baldwin was united in marriage on 
July 3, 1916, with Lilla M. Taudvin, of Providence, a 
daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Goss) Taudvin, old and 
highly respected residents of this city. 

Mr. Baldwin is a self made man in the best meaning 
of that term. He started life with little or no advan- 
tages and never inherited any money. In spite of this 
fact, he has, by dint of his own efforts, worked himself 
up to a position of promise and influence in the com- 
munity and enjoys a reputation second to none for 
honor and integrity hereabouts. Mr. Baldwin is the 
possessor of that fortunate union of qualities that so 
often spells success, of the most stable and permanent 
character. He is a conservative business man and yet 
is in no wise hidebound to the old methods, but always 
willing to adopt whatever he approves of in modern 
ways and means. He is progressive in the best sense, 
and ever on the outlook for new and improved meth- 
ods, which upon trial he is only too willing to adopt. 
Personally he is one who at once commands attention 
and respect, and his associates instinctively feel that 
they can trust him, both in his intentions and capabil- 
ities. He is a charitable and public spirited man who 
shares his success with his fellows in a large degree and 
is ever ready to assist any movement for the public 
good that his reason can approve. He is indeed a 
typical example of the best class of New England busi- 
ness man and his career may well serve as a model to 
the youth of this community. 



I2J 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



HENRY MANCHESTER BOSS, of the law firm 
of Boss & Barnefield, of Providence, R. I., was bom 
in Providence, September 13, 1875, the son of Henry 
Manchester and Emma (Wilbur) Boss. His parents 
are now living in Providence, where his father is a 
retired merchant. 

Mr. Boss was educated in the grammar and the high 
schools of Providence, from the latter of which he was 
graduated in 1893. He then took a special course in 
Brown University. This was followed by a course in 
the law school of Yale University, from which he was 
graduated in 1899 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
For a time after this he gained practical knowledge of 
the law in the office of W. B. Vincent, of Providence, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1900. In 1904 a part- 
nership with R. T. Barnefield and W. B. Vincent was 
formed, which continued until Mr. Vincent was elected 
judge of the Supreme Court in 1912, in which year the 
present partnership was formed. The firm has a large 
general practice, though it makes a specialty of the 
defense of negligence cases. On Xovember i, 1918, Mr. 
Boss became a member of the firm of Lee, Boss & Mc- 
Canna, with offices in the Hospital Trust building. 
Mr. Boss is a member of the American Bar Associa- 
tion, of the Rhode Island Bar Association, of the Prov- 
idence Bar Club, of the Vale Association of Rhode 
Island, of the Turk's Head Club, of the Zeta Psi fra- 
ternity, and of the East Side Tennis Club, In his 
political views Mr. Boss is a Republican. 

Mr. Boss married, October 20, 1906, Louise J. Gif- 
ford, of Swansea, Mass., and they have one child, Bet- 
sey, born July I, 1909. 



WILLIAM JAMES TOBIN, D. D. S., one of the 

prominent dentists of Bristol, R. I., is a native of this 
town, where his birth occurred August 2, 1891. He is a 
son of James and Mary (Rogers) Tobin. Mr. Tobin, 
Sr., was born in Ireland in 1840, and at the age of ten 
years came with his parents to the L'nited States. The 
family settled at Bristol, R. I., and Mr. Tobin secured 
a somewhat meagre education at the public schools of 
this place, which he attended for a year or two. He was 
unable to continue his studies, however, on account of 
the death of his father and mother, so that he was 
obliged to seek remunerative employment in order to 
support himself. Accordingly, he went to work in a 
local mill and after remaining there a short time, en- 
gaged in the blacksmith business on his own account. 
Still later he worked on a farm and eventually engaged 
in the livery business. In this latter line Mr. Tobin was 
exceedingly successful and remained therein some 
thirty years. At the close of this period he sold out 
his livery business and engaged in that of hardware, 
crockery and gentlemen's furnishings. Later he also 
added an undertaking establishment and was success- 
ful in them all. His three establishments were entirely 
separate and they are each of them, the leaders in their 
lines in Bristol at the present time. About six years 
ago Mr. Tobin retired from active business life and 
now resides on his farm at Fernclifife. He is a Roman 
Catholic in religious belief and is a member of a num- 
ber of church societies and the local lodge of the Royal 
Arcanum here. He never entered into politics but was 
nevertheless a prominent and much respected figure in 



this place. He married Mary Rogers, born in Ohio, in 
1850, and died February, 1907. Besides Dr. William 
James Tobin, they were the parents of the following 
children: Alice, deceased; Helen, wife of Dennis D. 
Sullivan, of Bristol; Charles Augustus, now engaged in 
the contracting business here; .•'innie Marie, principal 
of the Taft School of Bristol ; Emily Frances, now a 
school teacher at Warren, R. I. 

Dr. William James Tobin was born August 2, 1891, 
and his education was received in the local public 
schools. He completed the grade and the high schools, 
and prepared himself there for college. Upon complet- 
ing his studies at these institutions he entered Brown 
University, but after remaining one year there was trans- 
ferred to the Holy Cross College at Worcester, Mass. 
In the meantime, however, Dr. Tobin had decided to 
take up dentistry as his profession, and accordingly, 
after a year at the latter institution, entered Tufts 
Dental College. After studying two and a half years 
there, he went to the Cincinnati College of Dental Sur- 
gery, where he was graduated with the class of 1916, 
receiving his degree of D. D. S. Since that time he 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession in 
Bristol, R. I., and is now regarded as one of the most 
successful of the younger dentists here. Dr. Tobin 
makes his home with his father. Like the elder man 
he is a Roman Catholic in his religious belief, and is a 
member of the Knights of Columbus. He attends divine 
service at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church and is 
very active in the support of the work of the parish. 
While at Brown University he was a member of the 
Phi Kappa fraternity. Dr. Tobin is immarried. 



LEONIDAS POULIOT. JR.— Since coming to the 
Rhode Island bar, in 1907, Mr. Pouliot has gained sub- 
stantial recognition, and is now serving as judge of 
probate, an office to which he was first elected in 1908. 
He is a son of Leonidas and Marie (LeFrancois) Pou- 
liot, both now residents of Fall River, Mass., where 
their son, Leonidas Pouliot, was born March 30, 1882. 
This son was prepared for college in the B. M. C. 
Durfee High School, Fall River, his primary and gram- 
mar school training also being obtained in the public 
schools of that city. After completing high school 
study he entered Brown University, where he spent 
two years, a member of the class of 1905, the two fol- 
lowing years being spent as a student at Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, where he was awarded the degree 
LL. B., class of 1907. 

He was admitted to the Rhode Island and Massachu- 
setts bar the same year, located in Pawtucket, and 
from that year until 1910, he was on the legal stafif of 
the Rhode Island Company. In 1909 he was admitted 
to practice in the United States Courts. In 1910, he 
resigned and began private practice. In 1908, he was 
elected Judge of Probate, an office he held for three 
years, 1908- 1909- 1 9 10, in connection with his legal busi- 
ness. He then conducted practice privately until 1913, 
when he was again elected Judge of Probate, an office 
he yet holds (I9I9)- 

Mr. Pouliot is chairman of the Legal .Advisory Board 
for Division No. 7, State of Rhode Island ; vice-presi- 
dent of the Pawtucket Bar Association; and is highly 
regarded as a lawyer of learning and skill. He is now 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



I2q 



supreme president of the Society of Chevaliers Jacques 
Carticr; member of Pawtucket Lodge, No. 020, Bene- 
volent and Protective Order of Elks ; Dclaney Council, 
\o. 54, Knights of Columbus; Union St. Jean Baptiste; 
Catholic Order of Foresters; director of the Cercle 
Franco- .-American ; and a member of the Lincoln Repub- 
lican Club. He is also president of the Franco-.\mcr- 
ican .\u.xiliary of the American Red Cross; chairman 
of Central Falls and Cumberland District of "Four- 
Minute Men ;" chairman District No. 2, Central Falls 
Council of National Defense; and chairman of Speakers' 
and Publicity Committee of Liberty Loan Committee of 
Central Falls. 

He married, July 10, iQii, Edna \'. Schiller, daughter 
of Alphonse and Antonia (Baron de Lafranicre) Schil- 
ler, of Central Falls, R. L Mr. and Mrs. Pouliot are 
the parents of Dorothy Edna, and Albert, born Nov. 11, 
191?. 



CAPTAIN HENRY K. POTTER— For many 
years toward the close of his life, the late Captain 
Henry K. Potter held the distinction of being one of 
the oldest soldiers in the United States, if not in the 
world, on active duty with his original regiment. He 
had been a member of the First Light Infantry Regi- 
ment of Rhode Island for sixty-si.x years, and had 
become one of the best loved figures in military circles 
in the State. His death on July 5, 191 7, came as a 
deep bereavement to military men in Rhode Island. 

Captain Henry K. Potter was born in Providence on 
January 2, 1831, the son of Roger Williams Potter and 
Sarah (Langlcy) Potter, and the descendant of a long 
line of men distinguished in the service of their coun- 
try, and famous in public life in the early colony and 
State. He was a descendant in the seventh generation 
of Roger Williams and among his ancestors who fought 
in the various wars were Major Benjamin Potter, a 
fighter in the French and Indian wars, and Holliman 
Potter, a lieutenant in a Massachusetts regiment during 
the -American Revolution. His father, Roger Williams 
Potter, and his three brothers were members of the 
First Light Infantry. Young Potter was educated in 
public and private schools in Providence, and on com- 
pleting his schooling went to work in the city. In i?5l 
he enlisted in the First Light Infantry Regiment. Gen- 
eral .Ambrose E. Burnside was a private in the organ- 
ization at that time, as were many other men who later 
took prominent parts in the Civil War. 

At the outbreak of the Rebellion in 1861, came the 
first call of President Lincoln for troops, and Captain 
Potter was one of the two hundred men furnished by 
the First Light Infantry in the First Rhode Island In- 
fantry. He entered the service with the rank of cor- 
poral, and when the regiment was mustered out had 
been advanced to the rank of sergeant. He reenlisted 
in the Eleventh Rhode Island, and was with this regi- 
ment at the front when the war came to an end. He 
had served through some of the most stirring engage- 
ments of the entire conflict, and had been in many of 
the great battle areas of the South. Returning to the 
North at the close of the war, he still retained his deep 
interest in things military, and again became active in 
the First Light Infantrj-. When the veteran company 
was organized, he became a member of it, and until 



the time of his death was one of its leaders and guid- 
ing spirits. He rose through intermediate ranks to the 
post of captain, and toward the close of his connection 
with the regiment his service bars numbered, in all, 
twenty. Captain Potter was a member of Slocum Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic. He was also a member 
of the fire department for a time, and was a member 
of the Providence Veteran Firemen's .Association. A 
man of force and determination he was a vital figure 
in the circles in which he moved. .\ venerable patri- 
arch at the time of his death, he was one of the last 
of the fast dying out race of Civil War veterans. 

Captain Potter married .Amelia Seldcn, daughter of 
Elijah and Frances L. Selden, of Providence, R. I. 
They were the parents of the following children: i. 
Harriet Amelia, who became the wife of Edward H. 
Greene. 2. Henry W., of Providence. 3. Edwin C, 
of Providence. 4. Laura Maria, deceased. 

Captain Potter died at his home in Providence, July 
5, 191 7. 



RAYNOR WOODHEAD, M. D., one of the 

prominent physicians of Valley Falls, is a native of 
Lancashire, England, born January 24. 1876. He is a 
son of John and .Ann (Howarth) \\'oodhead, both of 
whom are deceased, John Woodhead having been a 
merchant in England for a number of years, and after- 
wards a well known insurance agent of Pawtucket, com- 
ing to the United States in the year 1894. 

Raynor Woodhead attended school at Manchester, 
England, being a pupil in the grammar grades there. 
He was a youth of eighteen years of age when he 
accompanied his parents to this country, and at that 
time had already decided to make medicine his career 
in life. .Accordingly he began the study of his chosen 
subject in the office of Dr. Harrington at Pawtucket, 
and after remaining with that well-known physician for 
a time, entered the Medical Department of Tufts Col- 
lege, from which he graduated in the year 189S with 
the degree of M. I). Instead of beginning his practice 
immediately, however, he entered the University of 
Buffalo, N. v.. where he took a post-graduate course. 
He was then appointed medical examiner for the 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York, 
at \'alley Falls, R. I., and has held this position since 
1899, besides engaging in general practice here with an 
office at No. 382 Broad street. Dr. Woodhead has 
made a well-deserved reputation for himself for his 
ability and his adherence to the highest standards of 
professional ethics. He has already received a valuable 
medal from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 
and next year will receive another, in honor of the 
twenty years of service which he has rendered that in- 
stitution, which will be completed at that time. Dr. 
Woodhead is not a member of any church but attends 
the Presbyterian church of Valley Falls. He is a prom- 
inent member of the Masonic order and is past master 
of Unity Lodge, No. 34, Ancient Free and .Accepted 
Masons, and a member of the Chapter, Council, and a 
Knights Templar. He is also a member of the Paw- 
tucket Medical Society and the Rhode Island State 
Medical Society. In politics he is a Republican, and has 
been very active in local affairs, having identified him- 
self closely with the local organization of his party. 



126 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



For two years he has been chairman of the Republican 
town committee, and has held a number of pubHc 
offices here, including an eight-year term, as health 
officer of the town of Cumberland. He was also elected 
to the Town Council in the year 1905 and was president 
of that body for one year. 

Dr. Woodhead was united in marriage, March 6, 
1901, at Boston, Mass., with Catherine Munroe. a native 
of Nova Scotia, a daughter of Angus and Jessie (Mac- 
Lennan) Munroe, old and highly respected residents of 
that region. 



THOMAS C. HART— The story of the life of 
Thomas C. Hart is the story of a man who by sheer 
force of character and the thing called "plain grit" has 
achieved success and made for himself a position of 
respect and esteem among his fellow townsmen and 
built up at the same time a competency. Though he 
calls himself a farmer, he has been interested in various 
other types of business enterprise, and has shown in 
all these a practical common sense and a mental acumen 
that shows he would have been a success in almost any 
other line he might have chosen to follow. He was 
born in Pawtuxet Neck, in Cranston, R. I., April 16, 
1863, the son of Noah W. and Margaret (Salisbury) 
Hart. His grandfather was Abner Alden, who had 
married Sallie Rice Chase, all of these being of old 
.American stock which had lived in Warwick since 
Colonial times. 

Thomas C. Hart had few school advantages, though 
he had the great advantage of country surroundings 
and the discipline in outdoor work with its calls on 
every side of the boy's nature. A rugged hardihood of 
character, although partly a matter of inheritance, is 
also largely fostered by the varied lessons of farm life, 
and the later developments in the career of Mr. Hart 
show the value of this early training in the Spartan 
virtues. He was only eleven years old when the short 
school days in the "little red school house" of the 
neighborhood came to an end, and he started out to 
make his own way. First he worked on a farm known 
as Babbitts, in North Kingston, and then went to the 
Harris farm, where he remained for three years. He 
had now gained both mental and physical stature, and 
the change to the employ of the New England Oyster 
Company was a distinct promotion. He had always 
been thrifty, and saved his money for the projects which 
from an early period were simmering in his brain. 
Later he became the station master at Shawomet, R. I., 
and that position he has continued to hold till the pres- 
ent time. While providing a good livelihood, this posi- 
tion did not occupy all the energies of the ambitious 
young man. He had early determined to own a home 
of his own, an ambition which at the time seemed rather 
chimerical. He set to work, however, and when the 
opportunity came to gain possession of the lot opposite 
to the station, he acquired it, though the payment had 
to be a matter of arrangement. Then he bought a 
horse and wagon, and began trading. In this way he 
paid for his lots in one year. The land having been 
gained it was now necessary to build a house. For this 
he had no money, but he set to work with his usual 
vigor and confidence in his ability to accomplish his 
aim, and accomplish it he did. He drew his own plans. 



and dug his cellar. He bought materials at Riverpoint 
and Providence, and with his own hands did the con- 
struction work, and when it was nearly finished bor- 
rowed the money to pay for the material. This is the 
tj'pe of achievement possible only to the country-bred 
man who comes of the old American pioneer breed. 
This house, which is the work of his own hands, is a 
matter of worthy pride to Mr, Hart. Since its com- 
pletion it has not been changed, though additional 
buildings have been erected and more land has been 
acquired. A good barn and other outbuildings have 
been added. Mr. Hart now owns other farms and 
some summer places in the vicinity, from which he 
makes a good profit. He established the store at Shaw- 
omet, which he later sold to advantage. 

A man who has helped himself to a well-earned suc- 
cess is usually helpful to others, and Mr. Hart is no 
exception to the rule. He is the master of Warwick 
Grange, and is active in promoting the welfare of New 
England farmers. He is also a member of Moose 
Lodge, and has been active in other organizations until 
recently. He is also the chief of the Commicut Fire 
Department. 

Mr. Hart married Nellie E. Gardiner, daughter of 
Hutchinson C. Gardiner, who was born in Exeter, and 
with her parents moved to Shawomet, where the old 
homestead still stands. Her father was the son of 
Russell and Mary ( Sherman t Gardiner. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Hart the following children have been bom: 
Noah Webster, Clarence T., and Maude E., all at pres- 
ent living at home. 



SAMUEL NEWELL SMITH, JR., M. D.— Since 
190S, Dr. Smith has practiced his profession privately, 
that year witnessing the close of long years of college 
and hospital study research and practical preparation 
for the profession he had chosen to follow. He spec- 
ializes in surgery and obstetrics and is well established 
in the confidence of a large clientele, with offices at 
No. I South Angell street, on Wayland Square. He is 
a son of Samuel Newell and Emma R. (Greene) Smith, 
his mother now deceased, a descendant of General 
Nathaniel Greene, so conspicuous in the history of 
Rhode Island, as colony and state. Samuel Newell 
Smith is now retired from all business activity, a resi- 
dent of Providence, his a Pawtucket family originally. 

Samuel Newell Smith, Jr., was born in Providence, 
March 19, 18S1, and completed the public school course 
with graduation from English and Classical High 
School in 1899. Two years were then spent as a student 
at Brown University, before beginning medical study in 
New York City; he then entered the medical department 
of Cornell University, whence he was graduated M. D., 
class of 1905. Returning to Providence, Dr. Smith 
formed a connection with the medical staff of Rhode 
Island Hospital, serving two years as interne, then 
going to Providence Lying-in Hospital, remaining there 
until October i, 1908. He then began his private prac- 
tice, and has won distinction among the surgeons and 
obstetricians of the city. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, Rhode Island Medical Society, 
Providence Medical Society, Providence Chamber of 
Commerce, and member of the Committee of One 
Hundred. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



12: 



Dr. Smith is an independent voter, supporting the 
Repubhcan ticket in national issues, but in local affairs 
entirely non-partisan. He is a member of Central 
Congregational Church, Economic Club, Brown Univer- 
sity .AUimni Association, and Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He married in Providence, June i, iix)3, Celia S. 
Peckham. and they are the parents of Francis Peckham, 
and Ruth Greene Smith. 



WILLIAM R. SHERMAN— The Sherman family 
has been proniinciit and intiiifntial in the life and atTairs 
of Massachusetts and Rhode Island since the middle 
of the seventeenth century. Descendants of the founder, 
the Hon. Philip Sherman, have figured notably in offi- 
cial, industrial, business and financial life in the above 
commonwealths throughout this period. The early 
Rhode Island Shermans settled in and about Newport. 
Portsmouth, and Tiverton. Philip Sherman, founder of 
the Rhode Island family of the name, of which the late 
William R. Sherman, of Tiverton, was a member, was 
born on February 5, 1610, in Dcdham, England, scion 
of a family long established in Essex county. He came 
to New England in 1634 and settled in Ro.xbury, Mass. 
Espousing the popular side in the Anne Hutchinson 
agitation in Boston, he was forced with others to leave 
the colony and migrate to Rhode Island. In Provi- 
dence the refugees met Roger Williams who advised 
the purchase of the Island of Aquidncck from the In- 
dians. The purchase was completed on March 24, 1638, 
and on July I, 1639, a regular government with Wil- 
liam Coddington as governor and Philip Sherman as 
secretary was established. After this he often held 
office in the colony and in most critical periods. He 
was 3 man of intelligence, wealth and influence, and 
was frequently consulted by those in authority. The 
early records prepared by him still remain in Ports- 
mouth, and show him to have been a skilled penman. 
After coming to Rhode Island he left the Congregational 
church and became a member of the Society of Friends. 
He died in Portsmouth, R. I,, in 1687. Philip Sherman 
married Sarah Odding. daughter of Mrs. John Porter, 
who was a widow Odding at the time of her marriage 
to John Porter. Their descendants have spread 
throughout all parts of Rhode Island. William R. 
Sherman, the subject of this memorial, was a member 
of the Tiverton branch of the family. 

William R. Sherman, son of Isaac and Elizabeth 
(Lake) Sherman, was bom in Tiverton, R. I., in 1831. 
He attended the schools of his native town until he 
reached the age of nine years, when he came to Provi- 
dence, and continued his studies in the schools of the 
city. After leaving school, he entered the employ of 
his brother, who was engaged in the teaming business 
in Providence. He subsequently rose to an important 
place in the business, and purchased the interest of his 
brother, becoming sole owner of an enterprise which 
he later developed into one of the leading undertakings 
of its kind in the city. Mr. Sherman remained at the 
head of this steadily growing business until his death. 
He was widely known in business circles in Providence, 
and eminently respected for the honesty of his prin- 
ciples. .Although he remained strictly outside political 
affairs in Providence, he was deeply interested in civic 
welfare, and was identified with many movements for 
(he betterment of civic conditions. In early life he was 



a member of the volunteer firemen, and until his death 
was president of the Survivors of N'cteran Firemen. 
He was a Republican in political affiliation. Mr. Sher- 
man was a well known ligure in Masonic circles. He 
was a member of Rising Sun Lodge, No. 30, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Providence Chapter, No. I, 
Royal Arch Masons; Providence Council, Royal and 
Select Masters ; Calvary Commandery, Knights Templar, 
No. 13; Palestine Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; 
and had attained to the thirty-second degree in Mason- 
ry. He was a member and past patron of Providence 
Chapter, No. i. Order of the Eastern Star. He was 
also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

In 1 886, Mr. Sherman married in Providence, Mary 
W. Legg, daughter of Willis Cleveland Legg, who was 
manager of the extensive furniture business of the 
Clevelands. and his wife, Amy Clarke, daughter of 
Samuel Clarke of Cumberland, R. L Mrs. Sherman, 
who survives her husband, resides at No, 6 Hawthorne 
street. Providence. 

William R. Sherman died at his home in Providence, 
December i, 1909. 



EMERY PAGE LITTLEFIELD— The surname 
Littlefield is of early English origin, and of local deri- 
vation, signifying literally "the little field." It is taken 
directly from Littlefield, one of the hundreds of Kent 
county, England, although of course there were local- 
ities of the name throughout England at the time when 
surnames were coming into use among all classes of the 
English. The family in America dates from the early 
decades of the Colonial period, and has been prominent 
in New England life and affairs for two hundred and 
fifty years. The name appears on the records of our 
wars, and has been particularly distinguished in pro- 
fessional fields. The late Emery Page Littlefield, gen- 
tleman farmer and for many years a well known resi- 
dent of Providence, R. I., was a member of the Maine 
branch of the family. The Littlefield coat-of-arms is 
as follows : 

Arms — Vert on a chevron ardent between three garbs 
or, as many boys' heads couped proper. 

Crest — On a Karb or, a bird argent. In the beak an 
ear of wheat vert. 

Emery Page Littlefield was born in Bnmswick, 
Maine, March 8, 1822, and was educated in the schools 
of his native town, .At the age of about si.xteen years, 
impatient of the restrictions of school and ambitious 
to get started on a business career, he left home and 
made his way to Providence, R. L, with which city he 
was identified until the time of his death. His first 
employment was with the late Harrison Gray, to whom 
he apprenticed himself to learn the blacksmith trade, 
and for whom he worked for a short period of years. 
Completing his training, and familiar with the business, 
Mr. Littlefield established himself in business, and for 
a number of years conducted a blacksmith shop in 
OIneyville. He was successful in this venture, but on 
receiving an offer from the Union Railroad Company, 
disposed of his interests to accept the post of head 
blacksmith of their shops. Mr. Littlefield held this 
position for a number of years, but resigned because of 
the introduction of methods in horseshoeing which he 
did not think practical. He retired from active business 
life at this time, and thenceforward until his death, 



128 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



followed agricultural pursuits on his farm on Hartford 
avenue, in Providence. 

On November 26, 1848, Mr. Littlefield married (first) 
Mary B. Waterman, who died on November 14, 1863. 
He purchased from her brother the four acres on Hart- 
ford avenue, which was his home throughout his life. 
Mr. Littlefield married (second) Mrs. Caroline E. 
Lapham, widow of William B. Lapham, of Millbury, 
Mass., and daughter of Cyrus and Eleanor (Smith) 
Stone, of OIneyville. R. I. Cyrus Stone, for many years 
overseer of the Old Union Mills, at OIneyville. R. I., 
was the son of Edward Stone, a farmer of Manton, 
R. I., an extensive land owner. Edward Stone owned 
the property where the Cranston Institution now stands. 
He was active in public affairs, and for many years 
prominent in the life of Manton and the vicinity. The 
Stone coat-of-arms is as follows : 

Arms — Per pale or and gules an eagle displa>-ed with 
two necks counter-changed. 

Crest — A spaniel courant gules. 
Motto — Nil desperandum. 

The children of Emery Page and Mary B. (Water- 
man) Littlefield were: l. A child who died in infancy. 
2. Enieretta, deceased. 3. Henry deceased. 4. Freder- 
ick, who married Emma White; they had one daughter, 
Mrs. Percy Patterson, of Edgewood, R. 1. 

A conservative man of strong convictions, yet with a 
mind fair and unbiased, Mr. Littlefield in early life 
allied himself with the Democratic party, but subse- 
quently became a member of the Republican party. He 
was a public spirited citizen of the finest type, fulfilling 
the duties of citizenship, yet in no sense of the word 
seeking political preferment. The strictest integrity 
characterized his every transaction, and he was widely 
known as a just and honorable man. 

Emery Page Littlefield died at his home on Hartford 
avenue. May I, 1891. Mrs. Littlefield, who survives 
her husband, has resided at the Hartford avenue home 
for more than half a centurv. 



LOUIS J. A. LEGRIS, M. D.— In 1914 Dr. Legris 
opened offices for the practice of medicine in Pheni.x, 
R. I., and established himself well in the public favor 
there. The name, Legris, is well known in the town of 
Warwick and in Kent county, R. I. For thirty-eight 
years Dr. M. J. E. Legris lived in the town, and has for 
some time been in active practice there, his offices and 
home being at Arctic, R. L Both father and son observe 
closely the highest ideals of their profession, and are 
highly esteemed, the son guarding carefully the reputa- 
tion established by his father. The family is of 
French ancestry and traces to Joseph Legris, a farmer 
of Louisville, in the province of Quebec, Canada. He 
was the father of Antoine Legris, also a farmer of 
Louisville, who reared a family of eleven children : 
Mathilde, deceased; Ovid E., a manufacturer in Mont- 
real; Adele, the wife of M. Lanois, of the vicinity of 
Louisville, Quebec; Agapit, deceased, formerly a priest 
of the Roman Catholic church; Charles, a physician in 
Canada ; Hormidas, who farms the old homestead, and 
is a member of the Senate of Canada; Marie Louise, 
of Arctic, R. L; Annie, deceased; Zotique, an attorney, 
now deceased; and Marie J. E., of further mention. 



Marie Joseph Ernest Legris was born in Louisville, 
province of Quebec, Canada, May 8, 1859. He obtained 
his preparatory education in his native town. He then 
spent si.x years in Nicolet College, near Three Rivers, 
Canada, and after graduating, began the study of medi- 
cine under the preceptorship of his brother. Dr. Charles 
Legris. He completed his professional study at Vic- 
toria Medical College, Montreal, Canada, and grad- 
uated, a doctor of medicine, in 1879. He at once began 
practice at Natick, R. I., and continued there until 
iSSo, when he located in the town of Warwick, Kent 
county, R. I., at Centerville. The years have brought 
him well-deserved success and he is one of the physi- 
cians of this section whom men delight to honor. In 
addition to the cares of a large practice, he has taken 
an active part in business, and has served w'ell the 
church of which he is a member. His residence is at 
Arctic. R. I. Dr. M. J. E. Legris was a director of 
Centerville Xational Bank; vice-president of the War- 
wick and Coventry Water Works ; a member and trustee 
of St. Jean Baptiste Church in Centerville; an honor- 
ary president of the Society of St. Jean Baptiste; a 
member of the American Medical Association, and the 
French Medical Society of New York and New Eng- 
land; a member of the Rhode Island Medical Society; 
and a member of the Kent County Medical Society. 
He is a Republican in politics, and at one time a mem- 
ber of Warwick Town Council, and member of the 
General Assembly. 

October 24. 18S1, he married Leopoldine H. Des 
Rosiers, daughter of Louis Des Rosiers, a notary of 
Montreal, Canada. Dr. and Mrs. Legris are the 
parents of nine children : Marie Blanche, born May 8, 
1883, wife of Alfred Demers, of Montreal; Dr. Louis 
J. A., of further mention; Charles Ernest, a graduate 
of McGill L'niversity, now a practising civil engineer; 
Jean M., a graduate of Brown University, also a civil 
engineer, serving as second lieutenant in the Quarter- 
masters Corps, United States Army, in the great war; 
Florctte, at home; Edith, at home; and Leopold A., 
Nina, and Therese, students. 

Dr. Louis J. A. Legris, eldest son of Dr. M. J. E. 
Legris. was born in Arctic, Kent county. R. I., Novem- 
ber 13, 1884. He received his early education in paro- 
chial schools and in the Arctic Grammar School. He 
then entered St. Mary's College, Montreal, Canada. 
From this college he went to the University of Illinois, 
at Chicago, and in 1914 became a Doctor of Medicine. 
He passed the examining boards of the states of Illi- 
nois, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, and was thereby 
licensed to practice in each of those states. He chose 
Rhode Island, his native State, and in 1914 he opened 
an office in Phenix, in the town of West Warwick. For 
two years he served as town physician, and is now 
winning his way to a good practice. He is a member 
of the Kent County Medical Society, the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, a member of Notre Dame du Bon Con- 
seil Church, and the Canado-American Association. 
Dr. Legris is unmarried. He enlisted in the medical 
corps of the United States Army, receiving his com- 
mission as first lieutenant, October 22, igi8, and was 
sent immediately to Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, 
Ga. He was honorably discharged December 20, 1918. 






a-^-t-c^ 





BIOGRAPHICAL 



129 



GEORGE M. KITTREDGE— In New England 
history thero is perhaps no single surname having a 
greater number of its representatives in the profession 
of medicine and surgery than that of Kittredi;e, and 
not infrequently has it been remarked that the name has 
been synonymous with doctor. Few families in this 
country can lay claim to equal distinction. In other 
branches of human endeavor the descendants of Dr. 
John Kittrcdge who "sat down in the old town of 
Billerica. Mass., about the year 1650," have been equally 
distinguished. The family, from the beginning, seems 
to have possessed a strong moral fiber which has given 
its members character and substance wherever they 
were located. 

Numerous traditions attach to the immigration of 
Dr. John Kittredge. One narrates that he came from 
England with his mother when a young man, while the 
earliest mention of him in any record extant speaks 
of him as "one on whom the healing art had descended 
and come down through many generations." Another 
contemporary writer says there is a tradition that the 
ancestor of the Kittredge family in this country was 
the master of an English ship and a bearer of dispatches 
between the medical faculty of England and a foreign 
country, and that he settled in Kittery, Me. The "His- 
tory of Billerica," in speaking of the early settlers of 
the town, says "a few came from England direct to 
Billerica, Mass.," and among them mentions John Kitt- 
redge "whose descendants have been many and honor- 
able." Dr. John Kittredge was an inhabitant of Biller- 
ica and "lived and died southeast of Bear Hill." His 
"house lot was ten acres of land ;" he received "five 
acres grant September 25, 1660," and in 1C63 the town 
granted more to him that "instead of ten poles of land 
which he should have had upon ye township (by willm 
patten's houselot) to sett a shop upon" "that now he 
shall have it added to his house lot upon the south of 
it." His first grant of land contained sixty-four acres 
and lay in that part of Billerica which afterwards be- 
came Tewksbury, Mass. In 1665 a committee was ap- 
pointed to make a gratuity division of land in the 
town, and in pursuance of that appointment John Kitt- 
redge was granted "one third part of five acres adjoin- 
ing the south side of his house lot & he is content." 
That part of Billerica where his descendants located 
was incorporated into the tow'n of Tewksbury, Mass., 
December 23, 1734. Among the forty-six families from 
Billerica taken in to the new town were eleven by the 
name of Kittredge. The progeny of Dr. Kittredge has 
spread throughout New England. The family to-day 
ranks among the foremost of New England families of 
colonial date. 

The late George M. Kittredge, whose death occurred 
in Providence, R. I., on June 18, 1915. was born in 
Worcester, Mass., descendant of a family long estab- 
lished and prominent in Worcester and the vicinity. 
He was identified with Providence from early man- 
hood and for a quarter of a century was a prominent 
figure in retail jewelry circles in the city. Mr. Kitt- 
redge w'as educated in the public schools of Worcester, 
and on completing his studies entered immediately on 
his business career, spending four years in the employ 
of T. M. Lamb, a jeweler of Worcester, Mass., where 
be learned the watch-making trade. He then came to 



Providence where he secured employment in the retail 
jewelry store of Joshua Gray, where he continued the 
trade of w-atch making in which he became an expert. 
While in the employ of Joshua Gray he familiarized 
himself thoroughly with every phase of the jewelry 
business, and within a short period established himself 
independently in the retail jewelry trade. He was 
highly successful in this venture and for forty years 
continued actively engaged in business in Providence 
where he was widely known and eminently respected. 
Fraternally he was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Heptasophs, and of the Knights 
of Honor. He attended Grace Church, in Providence. 
On November 28, 1878, Mr. Kittredge married in 
Providence. R. I., Goldina C. Bibby, daughter of the 
late William Fischer Bibby, a native of Taunton, Mass. 
William Fischer Bibby married Charlotte Brown Ar- 
nold, member of the famous Arnold family of Rhode 
Island, and daughter of Israel Arnold, of Smithfield. 
(See Arnold). Mr. and Mrs. Kittredge were the par- 
ents of two children: i. Maude H., now at the National 
Service Camp of the Society of Daughters of the 
.\merican Revolution. 2. William B., of Providence. 
Mrs. Kittredge, who survives her husband, resides at 
No. 19 Westfield avenue. Providence. She is a mem- 
ber of the Daughters of the American Revolution, by 
virtue of descent from Israel Arnold, who served with 
the Continental forces during the Revolution. Mrs. 
Kittredge has been actively engaged in charitable and 
patriotic enterprises for many years. 

(The Arnold Line). 

The family of Arnold is of great antiquity, tracing 
its origin to the ancient princes of Wales. According to 
a pedigree recorded in the College of .Arms they trace 
from Ynir, King of Gwentland, who flourished about 
the middle of the twelfth century, and who was pater- 
nally descended from Vnir, the second son of Cad- 
walader. King of the Britons; which Cadwaladcr built 
.■\bergavenny, in the county of Monmouth, and its 
castle, which was afterward rebuilt by Hamlet ap 
Hamlet, ap Sir Druce of Balladon, in France and por- 
tions of the walls still reinain. 

The first of the family to adopt a surname was 
Roger Arnold, a descendant in the twelfth generation 
from Ynir, King of Gwentland. Roger was of Llan- 
thony, in Monmouthshire, and married Joan, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Gamage, Knight, Lord of Coytcy. 

From the foregoing source descended the two Ar- 
nold brothers, who came to America and were the pro- 
genitors of the numerous and distinguished Arnold 
family of Rhode Island. Their lineage from Roger 
Arnold is through Thomas, Richard, Richard (2), 
Thomas (2). The latter lived for a tiine at Melcombe 
Horsey, from which place he removed to Chesel- 
bourne, settling himself on an estate previously belong- 
ing to his father. He was twice married; (first) to 
Alice, daughter of John Gulley, of North Over, she 
being the mother of William Arnold; to his second 
marriage was born Thomas Arnold, who also came to 
New England. Thomas Arnold settled at Watertown, 
Mass., as early as 1640, and removed to Providence not 
far from 1661. Here he was several times deputy and 
a member of the town council. William .Arnold, the 



R 1—2—8 



no 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



other immigrant sailed from Dartmouth, England, with 
his family on May i, 1635. He was for a time at 
Hingham, Mass., but removed to Providence, in the 
spring of 1636. Several of the sons of Thomas became 
conspicuous public men in Providence, Richard being 
many times deputy and assistant, speaker of the House 
of Deputies, etc. ; Thomas and Eleazer were often 
deputies and members of the town council. Likewise 
several of the sons of William Arnold were prominent 
figures in official life. Benedict, who removed to New- 
port, was many times commissioner and assistant, presi- 
dent of the four towns then established, and governor 
for some ten years. Stephen Arnold was many times 
deputy and assistant. The prestige and power of these 
early Arnolds have never been relinquished, and the 
family to-day is one of the foremost of New England 
families. 

Charlotte Brown Arnold, who became the wife of 
William Fischer Bibby. and mother of Mrs. George M. 
Kittredge, was born in Smithfield, R. I;, the daughter 
of Israel Arnold, a prominent resident of that town, 
and a lineal descendant of Israel Arnold, who served 
with the Rhode Island troops in the War for Independ- 
ence. She married William Fischer Bibby, and they 
were the parents of the following children: i. Goldina 
Camilla, who became the wife of the late George M. 
Kittredge. 2. William Richard, who died at the age 
of two years. 3. Maud I., who married S. D. Lewis, 
of Newport, N. H., and is the mother of one daughter, 
Goldina DeWolf Lewis, an operatic singer of great 
talent. William F. Bibby was engaged for many years 
in the jewelry business in the employ of Flint & Blood, 
of Providence. 



Dr. Dunphy married, May 16, 1916, Jennie Edith 
Krum, born in Providence. Dr. and Mrs. Dunphy are 
the parents of a daughter, Ethel May. 



GEORGE AMBROSE DUNPHY, D. D. S.— 

Through his own untiring energy and strong deter- 
mination to secure professional education. Dr. Dunphy 
owes his position as one of the successful members of 
the dental profession in Providence. He not only 
furnished the intellectual ability and the ambition which 
impelled him but provided the means through his own 
labor for financing his college course. The year 1914 
saw the fruition of his hopes, and with his newly- 
acquired degree he returned to Providence, w-here he is 
well established as a dentist, skilled in his profession 
and thoroughly reliable. 

George .Ambrose Dunphy was born in Providence, 
R. I., September 25, 1894, son of Patrick and Mary 
(Donley) Dunphy. He attended St. Mary's Parochial 
School and LaSalle Academy, completing courses at 
the last named institution with graduation, class of 
I9T2. During those years of study he had been em- 
ployed in various ways in out of school hours, and after 
entering the dental department of Maryland, in Balti- 
more, he continued an earner, financing his course in 
that manner. He was graduated D. D. S. in 1914. He 
at once returned to Providence and began the suc- 
cessful professional career which he now continues. 
His offices are in the Post OflFice building at Olneyville, 
his residence. No. 93 Messer street. Dr. Dunphy is a 
member of St. Mary's Roman CathoHc Church, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Order 
of Owls, Fraternal Order of Eagles, Phi Kappa fra- 
ternity, and in politics is an Independent. 



TOBIAS BURKE— The late Tobias Burke, one of 
the foremost figures in racing circles in Rhode Island, 
a breeder of notable race horses which have made 
remarkable records on American courses, was for many 
years a prominent business man of Providence, and head 
of the firm of Burke Brothers. He was born in County 
Tipperary, Ireland, March 6, 1852, and in early youth 
emigrated to America, settling in Providence, R. I., 
with which city he was identified until his death. In 
18S0, Mr. Burke entered the employ of the James 
Hanley Brewing Company, and for five years remained 
in their employ as a travelling salesman. In 1885, in 
partnership with his brother, Richard Burke, he estab- 
lished the firm of Burke Brothers, on Eddy street, in 
Providence, on the site of the building now known as 
the Burke Brothers building. He was highly success- 
ful in this venture, which he conducted with his brother, 
until the latter's death in 1906. He then became sole 
owner of the business, remaining at its head until his 
death. 

To horse racing and the breeding of thoroughbred 
horses, he gave all the time he could spare from the 
duties and demands of his business career. In these 
he found not only rest and recreation from business 
careers, but an avocation which amounted almost to a 
career, and which placed him prominently before the 
eyes of the sporting world of New England for many 
years. The love of horse-flesh is deeply implanted in 
the Anglo-Saxon race. Horse racing, if not introduced 
into England by the Romans, at least was encouraged 
by them and flourished under Roman rule. It has since 
ranked foremost among the national sports of Britain, 
and in English literature of every age has been called 
"the sport of kings." Racing in the American colonies 
dates from the middle of the seventeenth century, when 
it was indulged in to a limited extent in Maryland and 
\'irginia, particularly in the latter colony. Most of the 
early settlers of Virginia were immigrants from Great 
Britain, many of them members of the upper classes, 
who inherited and brought with them an age old love of 
racing. After the Declaration of Independence, the 
importation of thoroughbred horses from England be- 
came quite common, and selections were made from 
the best stock of the L^nited Kingdom. The sport and 
the breeding of thoroughbreds flourished until the Civil 
War, when it was broken up by the commandeering 
of horses for cavalry. With the era of prosperity of 
1870, however, progress began again and has been con- 
tinuous almost to the present time. The stock farm of 
the late Mr. Burke was among the best known in New 
England. It was located on Chalkstone avenue, and 
was called the "Pleasant \'alley Stock Farm." The 
breeding of fast thoroughbreds was his hobby, and 
among other noted animals, he was the owner of Don 
Carr, whose record was am. 6^4s. ; Winola, 2m. 9s.; 
Busy Boy, Sarah Ann Patch, 2m. 5s., and Gratton Boy, 
Jr., 2m. 13s. Mr. Burke headed the movement which 
resulted in the building of the Roger Williams Park 
Speedway. He was a member and vice-president of 
the Roger Williams Driving Club, and a director of 




^Ac 





BIOGRAPHICAL 



131 



the organization until his retirement from office in 

1913. 

For many years prior to his death, Mr. lUirke was 
active in public affairs in Providence. He was promi- 
nently identified with many movements for the im- 
provement of civic conditions, and was active in pro- 
moting Davis Park. He was also a prime mover in 
securing the Chalkstone avenue street car service, and 
electric lights. He was engaged to a large extent in 
real estate operations, and erected many fine houses 
and offices in Providence. He was a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the 
John Mitchell .-Xssociation. Mr. P.urke remained active 
in business and public life in Providence until shortly 
before his death. 

On July 6, 1879, Mr. Burke married Maria Patter- 
son, daughter of Richard and Mary (McKeon) Patter- 
son. Richard Patterson was a native of Ireland, and 
came to .A.merica at the age of twenty-two years. He 
served for four years during the Civil War as a mem- 
ber of the Third Regiment, Rhode Island Volunteer 
Infantry, and after being honorably discharged returned 
to Providence, where he engaged in business until his 
death. Mr. and Mrs. Burke were the parents of two 
children. I. Thomas F., who became his father's partner 
in business, and still continues the same. 2. Charles 
J., head of the Rhode Island Real Estate Company; 
married Elizabeth O'Keefe, daughter of Thomas J. 
O'Keefe, of Providence; Mr. and Mrs. Burke have 
adopied a daughter, Mary Lillian Burke. Mrs. Burke, 
who survives her husband, resides at No. 721 Chalk- 
stone avenue. Providence. Mr. Burke in his life time 
was a member of St. Patrick's Church. 

His status in the business world, as head of the firm 
of Burke Brothers, and president of the Consumer's 
Brewery, was assured and important, and his death 
came as a shock to his numerous friends and asso- 
ciates. Tobias Burke died at his home, in Providence, 
R. I., on July 12, 1913. 



REV. JOHN F. SULLIVAN— Nearly a quarter of 
a century ago, Father Sullivan was ordained a priest 
of the Roman Catholic church, in the cathedral at Balti- 
more, being one of a class of twelve young men, who 
were ordained, June 11, 1894, by Cardinal Gibbons. 
Wholly consecrated to his work, he entered upon the 
ministry with a devoted enthusiasm which has been 
succeeded by that calm unswerving devotion to duty, 
which is the heritage of the faithful devoted minister 
of the Gospel, and which onlj' the years of service can 
give. His years as an assistant to the pastor in sev- 
eral parishes were followed by appointment to his 
first pastorate, the parish of St. Matthews, in Auburn, 
R. I., in 1909. As a pastor, he is not more earnest and 
devoted than he was as an assistant, but he has grown 
with his responsibilities and while of reserved coun- 
tenance, he is one of those happy, cheerful spirits who 
scatter kindness and sunshine wherever they go. He is 
a true son of the church to which he has devoted his 
life and his talents. 

Rev. Sullivan is a son of John Dennis and Norah 
(Sullivan) Sullivan, of the parish of South Kelcaskan, 
County of Cork, Ireland, and a grandson of Dennis 
Sullivan and Norah (Sullivan) Sullivan. His maternal 



grandparents were Timothy and Mary (Murphy) Sul- 
livan, he dying in Ireland in 1846, she coming to the 
United States, where she died in 1882, aged seventy-four 
years. Dennis Sullivan was born in County Cork, 
Ireland, five generations of his family having been born 
in the same parish. He was a farmer of South Kil- 
caskan. County Cork, and there died in 1872, aged 
seventy-two years. He married Norah Sullivan of the 
same parish, who died in April, 1910. at the venerable 
age of ninety-four years. John Dennis Sullivan, son of 
Dennis and Norah Sullivan, was born in South Kil- 
caskan, County Cork, Ireland, December 26, 1832, and 
died in Newport, R. I., April 11, 191 1. He was a farmer 
in Ireland. He married Norah Sullivan, born in the 
same parish, December 24, 1840, died at the family 
home. No. 15 Carey street, Newport, R. I., October 
7, 1888, daughter of Timothy and Mary (Murphy) Sul- 
livan. John D. and Norah (Sullivan) Sullivan were the 
parents of two sons, one of whom died in infancy, and 
John F., whose life and services are the inspiration of 
this review. They also were the parents of five fine 
daughters: .Amanda and Johanna, who reside with their 
brother. Father John F. Sullivan, in the parsonage at 
.•\uburn ; Mrs. Ellen Kelleher, a widow since August I, 
1894: Mrs. Mary O'Brien, a widow since March, iQio; 
and Mrs. William Kennealley, residing at Auburn, R. I. 

John F. Sullivan was born in the village of Upper 
Drcen, in the parish of South Kilcaskan, commonly 
called "Clan Lawrence Parish," Bcarhaven, County 
Cork, Ireland, Saturday, September 28, 1867. He was 
baptized the following October 16, by the pastor of 
the parish, Father John O'Reilly, and on July 17. 1877, 
he was confirmed by the Rt. Rev. David Moriarty, 
Bishop of Kerry. -At a suitable age, he began his 
studies in the National School practically completing 
the grammar school course, sailing for the United 
States only one month prior to finishing the course. 
The school he attended was kept by Matthew Crowley 
at .\drigole, less than two miles from his home in 
Bcarhaven. 

The family arrived from Ireland in 1881 and located 
in Newport, R. I., on June 21, of that year. There 
John F. attended the parochial school sustained by St. 
Mary's parish, until January, i886, most of that period 
being devoted to the study of Latin, Green, French and 
higher mathematics under the instruction of Monsignor 
Doran, \'icar General and Rev. T. P. Grace. During 
the period July, 1881, to September, 1885, he was official 
scorer for the Newport Casino Tennis Club. Destined 
for the church, he entered Mt. St. Mary's College, 
Emmettsburg, Md., in February, 1886, and was one of 
a class of twelve who graduated from that institution, 
June 26, 1889. The period September 27, 1889, until 
June, 1892, was spent as a student in St. John's Semi- 
nary, Brighton, Mass. In September, 1893, he entered 
St. Mary's Seminary, at Baltimore, Md., spending three 
years in the study of philosophy and four years in the 
study of theology, being invested with holy orders by 
Cardinal Gibbons, June 21, 1894. .\fter ordination, he 
was appointed by his bishop to ministerial labor, as as- 
sistant to the pastor of St. Joseph's parish, Pawtucket, 
R. I., continuing there from July 7, 1894, until Septem- 
ber 3, 1898. He was then assigned to New Bedford, 
Mass., as assistant to the pastor of St. Lawrence, re- 



1 3-' 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



niaining there from September's, 1898, until December 
25, 1902, when he was appointed to the Church of the 
Assumption in Providence, as assistant to Father Kelley 
of the church, who had met with an accident. In May, 
1904, he succeeded Rev. John E. Brady, as assistant to 
Father Clark, at Teresa's in Providence, and when the 
latter was appointed pastor of Holy Name parish. 
Providence, Father Sullivan was assigned to the same 
parish as his assistant, Jklarch 30, 1906. There he re- 
mained until April 28, 1909, when by order of Kt. Rev. 
Matthews Harkins, Bishop of Providence, Father Sul- 
livan was appointed pastor of St. Matthew's parish. 
Auburn, R. I., to succeed Rev. J. J. Schuren, who was 
sent to Sacred Heart Church in East Providence. 
Father Sullivan, after being relieved of his duties as 
curate of the Church of the Holy Name, assumed his 
responsibilities as pastor of St. Matthew's in Auburn, 
on April 28, 1909, and in that, his first pastorate he yet 
serves, loved by his people and esteemed by those of all 
faiths who have met him or know of the great work 
he has accomplished for the cause he loves so well. 



TIMOTHY J. MYERS, late founder and head of 
the Elmwood Bakery, and for many years a prominent 
figure in public and political circles in Providence, R. I., 
was born in the city of Providence, July 28, 1852. He 
was the son of John and Catherine (McCarthy) Myers, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland. John Myers 
came to America early in life, settling in Providence, 
where he established himself in the coal business, even- 
tually becoming one of the largest coal merchants in 
the city. 

His son, Timothy J. Myers, was given excellent edu- 
cational advantages, attending first the old Lime street 
school. He later entered La Salle Academy from which 
he was graduated. Finding business rather than pro- 
fessional life more to his liking, he entered the employ 
of the firm of Rice & Haj-ward, of Providence, with 
whom he learned the baking trade which he followed all 
his life. After leaving the employ of Rice & Hay ward 
he established himself independently in business, open- 
ing the Elmwood Bakery at No. 751 Potter avenue. 
This venture, started on a comparatively small scale, 
proved highly successful and grew to large proportions. 
Mr. Myers was ail able business man, keenly alert to 
every changing phase in his business. His plant was 
always kept at a high standard of efficiency, and con- 
tained the most modern devices for safeguarding the 
lives and health of his employees. 

Mr. Myers entered public life early, allying himself 
with the forces of the Independent Democrats from the 
very outset of his public career. For several years he 
was prominent in the councils of his party, and was 
actively identified with many notable movements for 
the bettering of civic conditions. He had already ac- 
quired a reputation for steadfast honesty and tireless 
devotion to the interests of the people, when in 1904 
he was elected to represent the Seventh Ward of 
Providence, in the Rhode Island General Assembly. 
He discharged the duties of his office with fine ability 
and with the utmost integrity, bringing all of his influ- 
ence to bear on the side of right. In 1907, Mr. Myers 
was returned to the Legislature, and during his second 
term served as a member of the judiciary committee, 



rendering valuable service in this capacity. Of his pub- 
lic service as a member of the Legislature, a tribute paid 
to his memory, states : 

For two years he was a member of the House of 
Representatives. He was ever vigilant to safeguard 
the interests of his constituents. He was endowed with 
an urbanity of manner and kindliness of spirit that 
made him no enemies. Tiiose, whom he was obliged 
to oppose in following his principles, felt the influence 
of his sense of justice and his absolute integrity. He 
was never domineering but always willing to cooperate 
for the best results. 

Mr. Myers was well know and justly popular in fra- 
ternal and social circles in Providence throughout his 
life. He was a member of .\lcazaba Caravan, No. 2, 
of the Order of Mystic Nobles of Granada, and prom- 
inent in that organization for many years. For a long 
period he was treasurer for Providence county, of the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, and also had been past 
grand master and treasurer of Newman Council, No. 
23. He was a Roman Catholic in religious faith, and 
was a member of the Church of the Assumption in 
Providence. 

On June 12, 1889, Mr. Myers married, in Providence, 
R. I., Julia O'Connor, daughter of Timothy and Henora 
(Teahan) O'Connor. Mrs. Myers was born in Ireland, 
where she was educated. Coming to America after 
completing her studies, she entered upon the profession 
of teacher, which she followed until the time of her 
marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Myers were the parents of the 
following children: i. John A., assistant city editor, 
and at present assistant sporting editor of the "Detroit 
Free Press." 2. Charles, attended Georgetown Acad- 
emy for a year, at the end of which time he enlisted in 
the Thirtieth Regiinent, Coast Artillery, is now a cor- 
poral. 3. Catherine, a school teacher, of Providence. 
4. William, a cigar maker in Providence. 5. Eleanor, 
student at the Rhode Island Normal School. 6. Vincent, 
attending LaSalle University. 7. Julia. 8. Mary. Mrs. 
Myers survives her husband and resides at the Myers 
home at No. 745 Potter avenue. Providence. 

Timothy J. Myers died at his home in Providence, 
March 22, 1915, aged sixty-three years. His death was 
sudden and unexpected, coming as a deep blow to his 
many friends in public and private life. Tributes to 
his memory were numerous. The following memorial 
presents vividly his admirable character and his worth 
as a man : 

Sir Noble Myers was a Just man. His justice, how- 
ever, was tempered "with mercy of the finest quality. 
He did not seek worldly gains at the expense of his 
fellow man. He was loyal to friend, steadfast to prin- 
ciple and sincere in purpose. He died when apparently 
about to enjoy the fruits of his labors here below. 

His death was deeply and sincerely mourned. 
The coat-of-arms of the Myers family is as follows: 

Arms — Argent on the sea proper an ancient ship at 
anchor with three mast.s, on each a single yard across, 
the sails furled sable colors flying gules, on a canton 
of the last a baton or and a sword, also proper, pom- 
mel and hilt gold, in saltire, encircled by a mural 
crown argent. 

Crest — On a wreath of the colors a mermaid proper, 
her waist also encircled by a mural crown or. 

Motto — Non dormiat qui custodit. 



FRANK ANTHONY CUMMINGS, M. D.— Fr.ink 
Anthony Cummings, son of John and Bridget (Slat- 
tery) Cummings, was born in Providence, R. I., 
September 7, 1S83. After passing through the graded 





^tA^-^' 



^, J^ 



/X^^i 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



133 



schools and completing the shorter high school course 
he entered La Salle Academy, whence he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1907. He then spent two years 
at Brown University, after which he entered Tufts 
Medical College, receiving his M. D., class of 1912. 
He then devoted sixteen months as interne in Boston 
City Hospital, also receiving a diploma from that 
institution. In 1913 he returned to Providence and 
lias since continued in successful practice. He is 
devoted to his profession and has no outside inter- 
ests, being unmarried and without club or fraternal 
affiliations. He is a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, Rhode Island Medical Society, Prov- 
idence Medical Society, St. Luke's Roman Catholic 
Church, and politically is an Independent. 



JOHN DWYER. ESQ.— The late John Dwyer, for 
many years engaged in the teaming and expressing 
business in Providence, R. I., well known in the busi- 
ness life of the city in the closing decades of the 
nineteenth century, was born in Tipperary, Ireland. 
He came to the United States in 1848, and settled 
in Providence, R. I., where shortly afterward he 
established himself in the teaming and expressing 
business, in which he was highly successful. He was 
widely known in business circles until the time of his 
retirement. Through strict application to his busi- 
ness he developed it from comparatively insignificant 
beginnings into one of the largest of its kind in Prov- 
idence. He was a man of great strength of purpose 
and of tireless energy, and to these two elements in 
his character his success in the business world was 
largely due. 

John Dwyer married in Providence. R. I., on July 
8, 1850, Honore Collins, who was born in Ireland, and 
died in Providence, R. I., in 1893, in her sixty-sixth 
year. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. William, who died at the age of twelve 
years. 2. Tliomas J., a well-known figure in mer- 
cantile and real estate circles in Providence until his 
death in 1916; he married and had the following 
children: i. Joseph, who died in infancy; ii. Louis, 
died at the age of twenty-two years: iii. Henry J., 
born in 1894; now in the government service in 
Washington, D. C; iv. Elizabeth, makes her home in 
Providence. 3. John F., who until his death was en- 
gaged in the dry goods business in Providence. 4. 
Jeremiah, died in in childhood. 5. James, deceased: 
an expert box-maker. 6. Mary A. (Mrs. Maines), of 
Providence. 8. William (2), died in childhood. 7- 
Michael, founder, at the age of eighteen years, of 
the enterprise in which his brother later attained such 
signal success: now deceased. During the lifetime of 
Mr. Dwyer the entire family were members of the 
Cathedral parish. 

John Dwyer died at his home in Providence, R. I., 
in 1874. aged forty-six years. 

At the age of eighteen years, the late Michael 
Dwyer, son of John Dwyer, founded the drj- goods 
business which his brothers, the late Thomas J. and 
John F. Dwyer, conducted for fifteen years in Provi- 
dence, and developed into one of the largest estab- 
lishments of its kind in the city. Graduating from 



La Salle Academy, he went immediately into business, 
securing a position in the "Boston Store," in Provi- 
dence, where he learned the general merchandising 
business through strict application to its every phase. 
With a tenacity of purpose and determination out of 
proportion to his years he prepared himself to con- 
duct an enterprise of his own. Shortly afterwards he 
opened his first store on Atwells avenue, taking into 
partnership with him his brotlier, John F. Dwyer. 
The venture met with almost immediate success, and 
offered such evidence of future development, that a 
year later Mr. Dwyer was forced by the demands of 
his growing trade, to enlarge his quarters. In the 
following year he established a similar store on West- 
minster street, in Providence. He had barely placed 
these two enterprises on sound financial foundations, 
when he died. The late Thomas J. Dwyer succeeded 
to his brother's place in the firm, and remained at 
the head of the business for a period of fifteen years, 
during which time he was widely known and emi- 
nently respected in mercantile circles in Providence. 
In 1905, on the death of John F. Dwyer, Mr. 
Dwyer became sole proprietor, and conducted the 
business for a short time. He later disposed of his 
interests, and for the remainder of his life engaged in 
the real estate business, gaining considerable promi- 
nence in this field. Business genius of a high order 
distinguished these three brothers. The death of 
Michael Dwyer at the age of twenty-one years ter- 
minated abruptly a career which gave great promise 
of future achievement in the business world. John 
F. Dwyer, until his death in 1905, was well known in 
business life in the city of Providence. Thomas J. 
Dwyer died in Providence, in 1916. 



OLIVER D. DREW— Of the men in Rhode Island 
who may be justified in feeling a pride in their suc- 
cesses is Oliver D. Drew, the superintendent of the 
Interlaken Mills, Phenix. R. I. He has made his 
way to the top of the mill business from the lowest 
rung of the ladder, and what he has learned by dint 
of persistent effort he has always put into efficient 
practice. There are men who gain through experi- 
ence and immediately forget the lesson, but it has 
been otherwise with Oliver D. Drew, for he, having 
put into immediate use all he has learned, has 
achieved successes of which he himself is too modest 
to boast, but which are readily recognized by his 
many friends. Endowed with a vigorous mentality, an 
astonishing stock of energy, and tremendous will- 
power, his aim has always been to give the best that 
is in him. He has had a passion for perfection, and 
possibly that in itself sums up the man and his achieve- 
ments. 

Mr. Drew was a country boy, with poor school ad- 
vantages, bom in Saco, Me., June 26, 1848. When 
only fourteen years of age he began to take care of 
himself, obtaining a position in the cotton mills of 
the Peperil Manufacturing Company at Riddcford, 
Me. Although working fourteen long hours each 
day, and receiving the meagre sum of twenty-five 
cents for this work, he was not the boy to be dis- 
couraged by hardships, so by mastering every detail 



134 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



of the cotton manufacturing business he became, in a 
few short years, overseer of the Great Falls Manu- 
facturing Company at Great Falls, N. H. He left 
this position to go to Fall River, Mass., to work in 
the first mill of Richard Borden, where he remained 
for nine years as overseer. Later he was superin- 
tendent of the Stafford & Mason Mill at Barrows- 
ville, and was also connected with the Elmwood Mills 
at Providence, R. I., for a short time. This was fol- 
lowed by a period of nine years at the Danielson 
Mills at Danielson, Conn. He then worked for the 
Dwight Manufacturing Company at Chicopee, Mass., 
for eight years, and while there he rebuilt and en- 
tirely refitted the mill along new and modern lines. 
During all this time Mr. Drew was making the clos- 
est and most painstaking studies in the means and 
methods to produce the greatest efficiency. He is 
to-day an unexcelled production manager, classed as 
one of the greatest of acknowledged experts in that 
line. 

On coming to the Interlaken Mills at Phenix, R. I., 
in 1908, he brought to this concern vast experience 
in all the details of management, and a judgment of 
men and affairs which is seldom found. He has 
occupied the position of superintendent during all 
this time, and has done much in the way of improving 
the plant — having added one new mill and refitted 
the old mill with new machinery, doubling the capac- 
ity, a tliorough reorganization of the force having 
accompanied these outer changes. He has introduced 
all the modern ideas for the safety and comfort of 
the employees, such as supervision of the many cot- 
tages of two villages, and the running of a large farm 
for the benefit of the employees. During the heat- 
less days of the past winter (1918) when the work 
of the mills was shut ofif by order of the fuel admin- 
istrator, the married men were given work on the 
farm. All the families of the employees are furnished 
coal at cost, and are so well looked after in every 
detail that there is always a long waiting list for 
steady positions. The workmen are all Americans, 
a policy which keeps the type of help employed up to 
the highest standard. Mr. Drew believes that it is 
good business, as well as good religion, to treat the 
workers with fairness and generosity, and has organ- 
ized a committee of public works for both villages. 
A notice of the mills and a biographical sketch of 
Edward C. Bucklin, the president, are to be found 
elsewhere in this work. 

In the midst of a busy life Mr. Drew finds time 
tc belong to Moriah Lodge, No. 15, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Danielson, Conn.; to the Friendly 
Union Lodge, No. 164, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Fall River; and to the American Me- 
chanics' Association, having held all offices in this 
latter organization. One of the secrets of his success 
is never being content with what he has accomplished, 
but always seeking for further knowledge; a progres- 
sive in the truest sense. His career has been ever 
marked by a strict adherence to the best of business 
standards, being a man thoroughly genuine. In view 
of the fact of his marked career, these words are 
strikingly impressive: "To achieve success, attend to 



business and possess the important quality of in- 
tegrity." 

Mr. Drew married (first) in 1868, Emma Knight, 
of Saco, Me., who died in 1878, leaving three sons and 
three daughters: Willis, who fills the position of 
manager of the Interlaken Mills; Harry, who died 
July 27, 1917, was superintendent of the Knight Mill 
and also of the Union Mill at Buffalo; Arthur, who 
died April 12, 1916, was superintendent of the Halifa.x 
Mill; Mary, who married George H. Chapman, of 
Providence; Ada, who married Clinton Rising, a 
draftsman with the Taft-Pierce Manufacturing Com- 
pany at Woonsocket, R. I.; and Caroline F., who 
lives at home. Mr. Drew married (second). May 19, 
1886, Helen F. Bond, of Waterbury, Me. There is 
one son by this marriage, Harris, superintendent of 
the Wilkinson Mill of Wilkinsonville, Mass. It is 
a matter of satisfaction bordering on pride to Mr. 
Drew that his sons have followed in his footsteps, for 
they have certainly made a worthy record in the 
manufacturing industries. 



EDWARD EUSTACE FITZ— When in 1881, Ed- 
ward E. Fitz entered the employ of the Nicholson 
File Company, he had little idea that his entire busi- 
ness life would be spent with that corporation, but 
so it has proved. Thirty-seven years have since (1918) 
intervened, and the stock room clerk of 1881 is the 
general superintendent of 1918, and that responsible 
post he has held since 1896. He is a son of Rev. 
William Fitz, a gifted minister of the Gospel, and 
a great-grandson of Jeremiah Fitz. The line of 
descent is from "Robert Fitt, Planter," who settled 
in Ipswich, in 1635. Jeremiah Fitz had a son, Jere- 
miah (2), who died in Burri-llville, R. I., November 
26, 1868. He married Hannah Eaton; they tlie par- 
ents of seven sons. 

William Fitz, son of Jeremiah (2) and Hannah 
(Eaton) Fitz, was bom in Haverhill, Mass., August 
5, 1828, died at Burrillville, R. I., January 8, 1895, 
and was laid in a private burial ground on the Dr. 
Levi Eddy farm, north of Harrisville. He literally 
"worked his way" through the public schools in Bos- 
ton, Worcester Academy, Worcester, Mass., and 
Brown University, ill health alone preventing his 
receiving a degree from Brown. He completed his 
junior year there, but severe illness caused him to 
abandon his course. He financed himself with money 
earned during vacation periods and during the school 
term. Choosing the holy calling of a minister, he 
pursued studies in divinity at Newton Theological 
Seminary, was duly ordained a clergyman of the 
Baptist church, and in August, 1857, was installed 
pastor of the First Baptist Church of Westerly, R. I. 

This was the beginning of many years' service in 
his Master's cau.se, and during the two years of his 
pastorate at Westerly, there was a noticeable increase 
m both church membership and spirituality. He re- 
tired from the First Church in 1859, and spent the 
next two years as pastor of South Baptist Church, 
Hartford, Conn. In i86i, his health broke, but later 
in the year he accepted a call to the First Church of 
Westerly, filling that pulpit most acceptably until 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



135 



1866. In that year he became pastor of the First 
Baptist Church at Haverhill, Mass., having at the 
same time calls from North Berwick, Me., and W'al- 
tham, Mass. From 1866 until 1869, he served the 
Haverhill pulpit, then spent a rest period of about 
one year at Burrillville. In 1870, he again entered 
the active ministry, accepting a call from the First 
Baptist Church of Montpelier, Vt., and declining a 
call from Marquette, Mich. He remained in Mont- 
pelier two years, then went to North Attleboro, 
Mass., where he continued until his health again 
forced him into retirement. After recovering his 
strength he supplied the Free Baptist Church at 
Pascoag, for nearly a year and a half, living at Bur- 
rillville. During this period he declined an invitation 
from the First Church of Colorado Springs. Colo. 
He later organized the Burien Baptist Church at 
Harrisville, which he served for several years, and 
left in a prosperous condition when he severed his 
relations with the congregation to accept the pastor- 
ate of the Second Baptist Church of East Providence. 
Six years were most profitably passed with the Sec- 
ond Churcli. then he accepted a call from the First 
Church at Kumney, N. H. He removed to Rumney 
from East Providence in 1887, but in i8go, he again 
w^as obliged to yield to his physical condition, and his 
resignation followed. This was his last stated charge, 
although he moved to Providence and supplied the 
Fourth Baptist and other churches nearby as they 
had need and as his strength permitted until 1894. 
He then moved to Burrillville, where he died the 
following January 8, 1895. He was a man of force- 
ful character, eloquent in the pulpit, faithful as a 
pastor to his people, and highly rated among the 
successful men of his profession. He bore his handi- 
cap of physical weakness manfully and although it 
prevented his career from attaining anywhere near 
its full fruition, he never complained but gave his 
best as long as he could. He was a cultured, studious 
man, fond of his library, and a frequent contributor 
to church literature. He was a strong friend of the 
public schools, often served on school boards in the 
town in which his lot was cast, and in 1876. was 
superintendent of Burrillville schools. During that 
period he wrote a history of the schools of the town 
and did very much for their improvement. His years, 
numbering si.xty-seven, were well spent, and he was 
lovingly remembered by the charges he served as 
each in turn gave way to a new pastorate, who felt 
they needed him more than did the one he was leaving. 
Rev. William Fitz married, August 26, 1856. Ellen 
L. Salisbury, born in Providence, April 16, 1836, and 
there yet resides at the age of eighty-two, with her 
daughters, Nellie F. and Emmeline E. She is a 
daughter of Daniel M. and Emmeline (Eddy) Salis- 
bury. Salisburys were prominent in the French and 
Indian Wars, were Revolutionary soldiers, early man- 
ufacturers and men of influence in church and State. 
Emmeline Eddy, wife of Daniel M. Salisbury, was a 
daughter of Dr. Levi and Prussia (.Mdrich) Eddy, her 
father an eminent physician of Northwestern Rhode 
Island, and a charter member of the Rhode Island 
Medical Society. 



Rev. William and Ellen L. (Salisbury) Fitz were 
the parents of four sons, all of whom came to honor- 
able position in the business world, and of two 
daughters, who occupy leading places as educators: 
I. William Ernest, of Pawtucket, married Viola Sher- 
man, and their children were: Ernest S. and Har- 
old S. Fitz. 2. Arthur Salisbury, journalist and busi- 
ness man, died Feb. 26, 191 1. He married Delia M. 
Richardson, and their children were: Arthur E., 
Robert R., Mollie E., and Josephine S. 3- Edward 
Eustace, of further mention. 4. Howard Whittier, 
vice-president of the Slater Trust Company, of Paw- 
tucket, R. I., married Emily Vial Aplin and has a son, 
Richard Arnold Fitz. 5. Nellie Faith, at home. 6. 
Emmeline Eddy, a graduate of Brown University, 
now an instructor in French in the high school at 
Pawtucket. 

Edward Eustace Fitz, third son of Rev. William 
and Ellen L. (Salisbury) Fitz, was born at Westerly, 
R. 1., August 23, 1862. Until the age of sixteen 
years, he attended the schools of the different places 
in which his father was stationed, then began his 
business career as a clerk with D. C. and C. S. Rem- 
ington, retail merchants of Harrisville, R. I., remain- 
ing there a few months before going to Providence, 
still as a merchantile clerk. From 1878 until 1881 
he was so engaged, but in 1881, transferred to the 
manufacturing field as store room clerk with the 
Nicholson File Company. He did not long remain 
at the bottom but soon began his upward climb, be- 
coming in turn superintendent's clerk and purchas- 
ing agent. He continued with the company in Provi- 
dence for nine years, then in 1890, went with the 
American File Company as superintendent of their 
plant at Central Falls. He held that post for only a 
few months, then in November, 1890, the Nicholson 
File Company bought the plant of the American File 
Company at Central Falls, and with it acquired their 
former purchasing agent, Mr. Fitz, whom they re- 
tained as superintendent of the plant until the spring 
of 1896. 

He spent in all, six years at the Central Falls 
plant, and during that time increased the daily out- 
put from three hundred dozen to eleven hundred 
dozen, and fully demonstrated managerial capacity. 
He was then advanced to the superintendcncy of the 
home plant of the company at Providence, a posi- 
tion he has capably filled for the past twenty-two 
years, 1896-1918. He was interested with his brother, 
Arthur S., in the Realty Company of America, as 
vice-president, but has confined himself to his own 
field, and in his specialty is second to none. He has 
been the builder of his own fortunes and has won 
his way to honorable position without the aid of influ- 
ence or favor, but through personal merit. He is a 
Republican in politics, but never has sought or desired 
public office. His home and his business fill his 
measure of life to the full, and he holds a few club 
and no fraternal relations. His clubs are the Turk's 
Head, Commercial and Economic. 

Mr. Fitz married. May 26, 1886. Minnie L. Whelden. 
of East Providence, daughter of Samuel and grand- 
daughter of Samuel Whelden. They were the parents 



1.^6 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



of two children: Helen E., educated in music, mar- 
ried Dr. Lamcrt Oulton, Providence; and Erie, 
born Feb. I, 1891, an employee of the Graton & 
Knight Manufacturing Company of Worcester, Mass. 
Mr. Fitz married (second), August, 1905, Lillian 
Metzgcr. of Providence. R. I. 



ABRAHAM GREAVES— From childhood until the 
present, Abraham Greaves has been a mill worker 
or official, beginning so young as to come under the 
operation of the English law which decrees that a 
child shall have at least one-half of each day in 
school. This continued until the age of twelve 
brought him to the end of school privilege, save night 
school, and in that way his education was won. This 
plan of development produced a strong, well-balanced 
operator, who soon advanced to better position, and 
when in 1881 he came to Canada, thence to the United 
States, it was as superintendent and an experienced 
worsted manufacturer. 

Abraham Greaves was born in Bradford, England, 
July 16, 1S61, son of William and Elizabeth (Lang- 
ford) Greaves. His father was born in 1838, and died 
in 1913. He was a mill manager. Abraham Greaves 
early began work in a worsted mill, his first job being 
as a bobbin boy. He attended school one-half day 
sessions until the age of twelve, then became a full- 
time worker, and became a skilled worker, reaching 
an overseer's position at the age of twenty, being 
then employed by Samuel Whitely & Sons, at Brad- 
ford. In 1881 he came to Canada, remaining five 
years as overseer of the Rosamond Woolen Com- 
pany, of Almonte, Ontario. From Canada he came 
to Providence, R. L, in 1886. taking a position as 
superintendent of the French department of the 
Providence Worsted Mills, his department making 
yarns. In 1889 he went to Palmer, Mass., as super- 
intendent of the Massasoit Carpet Company, a branch 
of the Palmer Company, manufacturers of carpet 
yarns, remaining there until 1890. From that posi- 
tion he went to StatTord Springs, Conn., as superin- 
tendent of the Warren Woolen Company, yarn 
manufacturers; returned in 1891 to the Riverside Mill, 
now a part of the American Woolen Company, at 
Providence, where for thirteen years he was in charge 
of the yarn department. He next became superin- 
tendent with the Cranston Worsted Mills, at Bristol, 
R. I. In 1905, with John Reid. he started a co- 
partnership known as Greaves & Reid, operating a 
plant for twisting and spooling yarn, which firm con- 
tinued until absorbed by the Snowdon Worsted Mill, 
in 1906. Mr. Greaves then became superintendent of 
the Crown Worsted Company, and secretary and 
superintendent of the Snowdon Worsted Mills of 
Providence, his present ofBcial position. He is a Re- 
publican in politics, and highly regarded wherever 
known. 

Mr. Greaves married, February 17, 1897, Julia S. 
Sanderson, of Boston, Mass. 



the medical fraternity of Rhode Island. He is of 
an old Rhode Island family, dating to the coming of 
Thomas Harris with Roger Williams. He is a son 
of Walter Douglas and Ida M. (Clcmence) Harris, 
the father for thirteen years being postmaster of 
Olneyville, R. I. His widow, Ida M. Harris, survives 
him, residing at No. 112 Francis street. Providence, 
also the home of her son, Dr. Herbert E. Harris. 

Herbert E. Harris was born in Johnston, R. I., 
September 10, 1885, and there attended public school. 
Later he entered the Providence High School, fin- 
ishing with graduation in 1903, and following that 
with a four years' course in Brown University, 
whence he was graduated A. B., in the class of 1907. 
From Brown he passed to Harvard Medical School, 
his course there interrupted by a year spent as an 
interne at the Long Island Hospital, Boston. This 
lengthened his time at the Harvard Medical School 
to five years, he receiving his degree of M. D. with 
the class of 1912. Both the classical course at Brown 
and his professional course at Harvard had been 
financed by himself, his vacations being spent as a 
purser on steamboats and in other avocations. After 
graduation in 1912, Dr. Harris was connected with 
the Children's Hospital in Boston, and he began his 
private practice in Providence, R. I., May i, 1913. 
He is well established in general practice with an 
oflice at No. 112 Francis street; is on the orthopedic 
staff of the Rhode Island Hospital, and is acting sur- 
geon in chief of the Orthopedic Department of the 
Memorial Hospital at Pawtucket since the departure 
of Dr. Roland Hammond, his chief, who is now 
abroad with the Rhode Island Hospital Base Unit. 
He is also medical school inspector at Johnston, R. I. 
He is a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, the Rhode Island Medical Society, and the 
Masonic order, and in politics is a Republican. The 
family are attendants of the Episcopal church. 

Dr. Harris married, in Providence. April 16. 1913, 
Lilian Arthur Winsor, of an old and prominent Rhode 
Island family. They are the parents of a son, Wal- 
ter Douglas. 



HERBERT ELISHA HARRIS, M. D., acting chief 
surgeon of the Orthopedic Department of the 
Memorial Hospital, of Pawtucket, is well known to 



REV. THOMAS J. FITZPATRICK, A. B., S. T. 

B., P. R. — When less than a year old Thomas J. Fitz- 
patrick was brought to the ignited States by his par- 
ents, his birthplace being Lancashire. England. The 
family landed in New York City, but soon came to 
Rhode Island, locating at Georgiaville, in the town 
of Smithfield. Later they moved to Ashton, in the 
town of Cumberland, the lad attending public school 
in both towns. Later he was a student at La Salle 
Academy, Providence, there continuing until 1877. In 
that year he entered the University of Ottawa, Ot- 
tawa, Canada, remaining a student there until gradu- 
ated in 1883. In the fall of 1883, he began theological 
study at Grand Seminary, Montreal, there receiving 
the degree. Bachelor of Theology. He was ordained 
a priest of the Roman Catholic church, December 18, 
1886, and as his first assignment was sent to St. 
Patrick's Church, Providence. R. I., as assistant pas- 
tor. There he remained twelve years until June, 
1899. He was then installed pastor of the East 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



'0/ 



Greenwich parish succeeding Rev. Owen F. Clarke. 
That parish then included St. Bernard's Church, 
Wick ford, also St. Catherine's Church, Apponaug, 
Father Fitzpatrick serving both parishes until 1904, 
when St. Bernard's was set off as a separate parish. 
In December, 1904, Father Fitzpatrick was installed 
pastor of St. Mar>'s Church at Bristol, where he 
remained until March 13, 1908, when he became irre- 
movable rector of St. Patrick's parish at Valley 
Falls, where he is also treasurer of the corporation. 
Durin.c; these changes he has accomplished great good, 
and each church was left in a better state both spirit- 
nally and financially. St. Patrick's is a parish of 
four thousand souls, with a primary and grammar 
school, and also the various societies connected with 
parish work. One of the most imposing buildings in 
the town of Cumberland is the Young Men's Catholic 
Institute Association building which belongs to St. 
Patrick's parish. The rectory is at No. 285 Broad 
street, \'alley Falls. Father Fitzpatrick is chaplain of 
St. Thomas's Council, and takes an active part in all 
the social activities of the order. He is highly 
esteemed both within and without his own parish, 
and in a progressive, public-spirited way aids in the 
betterment of town conditions. 

F'ather Fitzpatrick is a son of James Fitzpatrick, 
born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1831, died July 10, 1912. 
When about twenty years of age he went to Black- 
burn, England, and there married Matilda Hayes, 
of the Count}' of Queens, Ireland, born June 10, 1829, 
died January 12, 1910. In September, 1859, they came 
to the United States, going to Holyoke, Mass., thence 
to Georgiaville, R. I., thence to Valley Falls, in 1S88, 
where the father lived a retired life until death. 
Children: Thomas J., of whom the foregoing is 
written: Elizabeth, married David M. McLaughlin, 
manager of the Haywood Rubber Company, of Paw- 
tucket, R. I.; Mary, married John F. Fxyan, of Lons- 
dale, R. I., died August 14, 1912: Catherine, residing 
with her brother at \'alley Falls: and Anna Maria, 
died at the age of seven years. 



JAMES HEYWORTH is remembered by the 
older residents 01 the city of Pawtucket, R. I., by 
those who knew the city in the middle of the nine- 
teenth century, as a quiet, courtly gentleman, hon- 
ored and respected in the community, retiring in his 
tastes, but one of a circle of men of worth. 

James Heyworth was born in Accrington, Lan- 
cashire, England, March 4, 1811, and received his 
education in his n.itive England, and as a youth came 
to America, settling in Taunton, Mass. Here he 
practised the trade of designer and block cutter, which 
trade he learned in England. He became a skilled 
artisan, and an expert. He married in Taunton, and 
after his marriage removed to Pawtucket, where he 
engaged in the same line of endeavor until the time of 
his death. He was an able business man, entrusted 
throughout the length of his business career with 
heavy responsibilities. Mr. Heyworth was well known 
in Pawtucket social and fraternal circles, but was 
essentially a home-loving man, and found his greatest 
enjoyment in his own home. 



James Heyworth married, in i8,^6-,3", .-\nn Livesey, 
who was born in England, in 1816, and died in Paw- 
tucket, R. I., in 1890. They were the parents of a 
daughter, Annie E. Heyworth, who resides at the 
eld Heyworth homestea<i at Xo. 177 Walcott street, 
in Pawtucket. Miss Heyworth is the oldest resident 
of Walcott street, and in her lifetime has seen much 
of interest in the growth and development of Paw- 
tucket. James Heyworth died at his ho:ne in Paw- 
tucket, January 4, 1886. 



JOHN BERNARD McKENNA, one of the promi- 
nent figures in the medical worUl of East Proviilence, 
R. I., a man of great cultivation and wide education, 
whose position in the community is the result of his 
own character and efforts, is a native of New York 
City, where he was born August 31, 1863. Dr. Mc- 
Kenna is a son of John and Catherine (Loughran) 
McKenna, both of whom are natives of Ireland. The 
father, John McKenna, was born in County Mona- 
han, in the year 1828, and came to the United States 
when seventeen years old. Here he located in the 
city of Providence, R. I., remaining there for some 
three years, and then went to Boston to learn the 
trade 01 machinist. After completing his apprentice- 
ship he went to New York City and assisted in open- 
ing a factory for the Locke Print Works, where he 
remained until 1868. In that year he returned to 
Providence, and established himself in a grocery busi- 
ness, with a store on Atwell avenue and Piedmont 
street. He remained in active business until 1882 
and then retired, his death occurring three years later, 
in 1885. His wife, who was Miss Catherine Loughran 
before her marriage, also was born in County Mona- 
han, Ireland, in the year 1836. She came, as a child, 
to Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, with her 
parents, and later to the United States, where she met 
and married Mr. McKenna in Boston. Dr. McKenna 
is the only child of his parents and early in his youth 
showed a marked taste for the various arts, and is 
now an accomplished musician and possesses a wide 
familiarity with the best literature of the world. 

The early education of Dr. McKenna was obtained 
&t the La Salle Academy at Providence, and he later 
entered Manhattan College, New York, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1884, taking the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Later he received from 
his alma mater, the honorary degree of Master of 
Arts, in appreciation of his many accomplishments, 
an honor of which he is justly proud. The young 
man had already determined to take up the profes- 
sion of medicine as a career in life, and with this end 
in view entered the medical school in connection with 
Columbia L'niversity. He graduated from this insti- 
tution with the class of 1888 and received his medical 
degree. Immediately after completing his studies he 
located at East Providence, and has been here ever 
since. He was connected with the Rhode Island Hos- 
pital for ten years and in addition has built up a 
large private practice. He is now regarded as one 
of the leading physicians of this region, and his 
reputation has extended far beyond the limits of his 
own community. He is now visiting surgeon at St. 



I3S 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



Joseph's Hospital, Providence, and medical inspector 
of the schools of East Providence. Dr. McKenna 
entered the Rhode Island Militia as a young man and 
was promoted to the rank of major, being surgeon of 
the Second Rhode Island Regiment for nine years 
prior to the Spanish-American War, and a member 
of Colonel Koran's staff. Dr. McKenna is a Roman 
Catholic in his religious belief and attends the church 
of that denomination in this city. His offices are at 
\o. 47 Taunton avenue. East Providence. Dr. Mc- 
Kenna is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Rhode 
Island Medical Association, the American Medical 
Association, and the Catholic Club of East Provi- 
dence, and was elected a fellow of the American 
College of Surgery, in 1918. Dr. McKenna, in addi- 
tion to his professional activities, has also been very 
prominent in the public affairs of this community. 
He is a staunch Democrat in politics and has repre- 
sented this community in the Rhode Island State 
Legislature, serving that body in the years 1912 and 
1913. As already mentioned, he is keenly interested 
in the arts, and is a notable scholar. He has deliv- 
ered many lectures on various scientific and literary 
subjects and is widely recognized as an authority in 
these subjects. His residence is situated at No. 12 
Summit street. East Providence, R. I. 

Dr. McKenna married (first) Frances Gerhard, 
whose death occurred in the year 1898. One child 
was born of this union, Ambrose B. McKenna, bcTn 
Aug. 18, 1893. He is a graduate of St. Mary's Pri- 
vate School, La Salle Academy, and the Bradford 
Durfee Textile School at Fall River, Mass. He 
graduated from the latter institution in the year 1904, 
and is now a chemist with the General Electric Com- 
pany in New Jersey. Dr. McKenna married (sec- 
ond) Aug. 28, 1901, in East Providence, Mary E. 
Lewis, a daughter oi Joseph and Mary (Oliver) 
Lewis, old and highly respected residents of this 
place. They are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Madeline, born July 21, 1902, now a pupil at 
St. Mary's Seminary: John B., born Aug. 27, 1903, 
now attending La Salle Academy, Providence; Fran- 
cis, born Oct. 17, 1905, a pupil at St. Mary's Semin- 
ary: and Mary, born Jan. 12, 1911, also a pupil at 
St. Mary's Seminary. 



CHARLES METCALF SMITH— The large ice- 
cream business conducted by Charles M. and Ralph 
H. Smith from their splendid "Oak Knoll Farm" has 
given the brothers State-wide acquaintance and popu- 
larity. They are sons of Walter Metcalf Smith, who 
owned and operated "Oak Knoll Farm," located 
near Woonsocket, R. I. Walter Metcalf Smith mar- 
ried Ellen Frances Windsor, who survives him and 
yet occupies the old homestead. Walter M. Smith 
died in 1906. "Oak Knoll" is a fine farm, well im- 
proved and equipped, including a modern ice-cream 
plant. Several residences, many barns, stables, and 
special buildings, with large ice-houses, complete the 
equipment. The brothers harvest large quantities of 
ire, for the manufacture of ice-cream is an important 
business at "Oak Knoll." Woonsocket is the prin- 



cipal market for their product, which is shipped to 
all nearby towns and villages in Rhode Island and 
Massachusetts. Deliveries are made by their own 
auto trucks, and fifteen men are employed in the 
management of the business and the cultivation of 
the farm. 

Charles Metcalf Smith, eldest son of Walter Met- 
calf and Ellen Frances (Windsor) Smith, was born 
at the present homestead, "Oak Knoll Farm," July 
20, 1881. He was educated in the district schools of 
North Smithtield, in Woonsocket public schools, and 
for one year attended a Providence high school. From 
birth, until recently, the old homestead has been his 
home, and since leaving school he has been con- 
cerned in its cultivation, and with his brother now 
operates the ice-cream manufacturing business pre- 
viously mentioned. In politics Mr. Smith is a Repub- 
lican, served in the Town Council in 1914-1915, and 
in igi8 was again elected to that office. He is a 
member of the Woonsocket Universalist Church, and 
the Junior Order of American Mechanics. 

Mr. Smith married (first) Nellie Drowne Paine, 
who bore him a daughter, Barbara Paine Smith; 
mother and daughter now both deceased. He mar- 
ried (second), December 28, 1917, Caroline Davis 
Flagg, of Providence, R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are 
the parents of a daughter, Nancy Windsor Smith. 
The familv home is located in Union Village. 



RALPH HERMON SMITH, youngest son of 
Walter Metcalf and Ellen F'rances (Windsor) Smith 
was born at the homestead, now "Oak Knoll Farm," 
near Woonsocket, R. I., March 20, 1883. He was 
educated in the district public school and in Woon- 
socket public schools, his life, like that of his brother, 
having been spent at the homestead. He was his 
father's assistant for several years, and since the 
latter's death has been a co-partner with his brother 
Charles in the management of the farm and ice- 
cream business previously referred to. He is a Re- 
publican in politics, a member of the Woonsocket 
L'niversalist Church, and of the Junior Order of 
American Mechanics. 

Mr. Smith married, April 12, 1911, Grace Brown, 
oi Woonsocket, R. I., and they are the parents of 
four children: Sylvia Bartlett, Windsor Ballou, Ralph 
Hermon (2), Harriet Susan. The family house is a 
beautiful residence situated upon the old homestead 
at "Oak Knoll." 

In addition to the two sons named in the fore- 
going review, Walter Metcalf and Ellen Frances 
(Windsor) Smith were the parents of three daugh- 
ters: Eleanor Amanda, married Henry Payson, and 
resides at "Oak Knoll Farm:" Ruth Abigail, mar- 
ried Samuel Farron, and resides in Union Village; 
Pauline Windsor, residing with her mother on the old 
homestead. 



DR. CHARLES ANTHONY SYLVIA, of Provi- 
dence, has won high standing as a general practi- 
tioner in medicine and surgery, and a specialist in 
diseases of children. He is a son of Michael Leal 
Sylvia, of New Bedford, Mass., and a native of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



139 



Azores, that country the long-time seat of the Sylvia 
family which already numbers in this country men 
of eminence in the profession and in business. 
Michael Leal Sylvia was an accountant in \ew Bed- 
ford for many years, but in his later years retired 
from business. His wife, Marian (Picanso) Sylvia, 
survives him, and is yet a resident of New Bedford. 

Ciiarlcs Anthony Sylvia, son of Michael Leal and 
Marian (Picanso) Sylvia, was born in New Bedford, 
Mass., April 16, 1878, and there completed a full 
course of public school study, finishing with high 
school graduation, class of 1898. .After leaving high 
school he decided upon the medical profession and 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Co- 
lumbia University, New 'iork City. He pursued a 
full course of study, then finishing with graduation 
with the class of 1902, being then awarded the degree 
M. D. During the period of educational prepara- 
tion as boy and young man, he had confined himself 
to study, and in all spare time engaged in helpful 
labor. For one year he served as interne in St. 
Francis Hospital, New York City. This applica- 
tion resulted in the deterioration of his health, and for 
several months he devoted himself to recreation and 
rest. In September, 1901. he was authorized by the 
board of examiners to practice in the State of Mas- 
sachusetts, but did not locate in that .State, and in 
1903 he came to Rhode Island. locating in the city 
of Providence, where he began practice in the month 
of December. Si.xteen years have since intervened, 
years in which he has grown in professional strength 
and reputation and has gained confidence to an un- 
usual degree. He is a member of the .Vmerican 
Medical Association, the Rhode Island Medical So- 
ciety, the Providence Medical Society, and is held in 
high regard by the brethren of his profession. 

Through his intimate knowledge of Portugal and 
the Portuguese language. Dr. Sylvia was appointed 
in July, 1909, vice-consul at the city of Providence, by 
the Portuguese government, he being the first man 
to hold that office at that port. He is an accom- 
plished linguist and is yet the official Federal inter- 
preter in Portuguese. He also speaks Italian, Span- 
ish and French. He is a director and vice-president 
of the Columbus E.xchange Bank; president of the 
Rosary Club; is ex-supreme vice-president of the 
Portuguese Fraternity of the United States. He is 
an independent voter, and in religious faith a Roman 
Catholic. 

Dr. Sylvia married, September 11. 1904, Palmyra 
S Lemos, of Xew Bedford, Mass., and they are the 
parents of Edmund and Regina. deceased ; and of 
six living children: Mary .\urora, .Anthony Leal, 
Catherine .Angelica. Helen .Augusta, Dorothy Agnes, 
and Marian .Alice. 



of James and Mary (Farley) Maher, who came to the 
United States with their son in 1875, settling in Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

James Joseph Maher was born in Dublin, Ireland, 
March 21, 1868. He was brought to Providence when 
seven years of age and here completed full courses of 
grammar school study, finishing in 1880, then entering 
La Salle Academy, Providence, whence he was gradu- 
ated, class of 1883. His first work was in a grocery store 
as errand boy, but not long afterward he began learning 
the printers' trade with the book and job printing tirm 
of J. A. & R. A. Rcid. He continued with that firm 
for three years, becoming a good compositor. He then 
spent three years more working as a printer in various 
places, but in 1888 he entered into a partnership with 
his father and established a livery and sale stable, which 
they jointly conducted for several years. After the 
death of his father, James J. Maher continued the busi- 
ness alone until 1916, when he sold out ::nd retired, hav- 
ing been a successful livery man for twenty-eight years. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Maher took no active 
part in politics during his business life, but in 1917 he 
was chosen representative from Providence, and in 1918 
was reelected. He has seivcd on committees of fish- 
eries, and State property. On May 15, 1918, he was 
appointed superintendent of armory for mounted com- 
mands. He is a member of Cathedral Roman Catholic 
Church I the Knights of Columbus, Tyler Council, of 
which he was one time recording secretary and was also 
secretary of the fourth degree of that council. He is a 
member of Providence Lodge. Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, and the Catholic Club. 

Mr. Maher married, June 13, 1893, .Alice M. Gannon, 
daughter of Patrick and Celia (McCarten) Gannon, and 
they were the parents of three children: Madeline C, 
educated in public schools, graduate of State Normal, 
1916, now a teacher in Providence public schools ; Mary 
E.. a graduate of grammar and Providence Technical 
High School; .Alice M., died at the age of three years 
and eight months. 



JAMES JOSEPH MAHER— After a lite of busi- 
ness activity, including twenty-eight years in the livery 
and sale stable business in Providence, Mr. Maher sold 
cut and retired. He is a man well liked wherever 
known, and during his many years of business life in 
Providence men learned that James J. Maher kept his 
promises and always made his work good. He is a son 



JOHN JOSEPH HOEY— Through the ownership 
of several valuable patents and by the aid of the most 
modern and highly specialized machinery, the Hoey 
Manufacturing Company is enabled to produce a large 
output with a coinparatively small number of employees. 
The company was founded by John Joseph Hoey, after 
many years of intimate experience with the machinery 
trade as machinist, traveling salesman and general man- 
ager. Mr. Hoey is practically the sole Owner of the 
Hoey Manufacturing Company, Inc., and is its treasurer 
and active managing head. The business of the com- 
pany is the manufacture of special machinery. Mr. 
Hoey is of English birth and parentage, son of John 
Joseph (i) and Mary (Taylor) Hoey. His father, a 
machine blacksmith, came to New York in 1862. his son, 
John Joseph, then being four years of age. 

John Joseph (2) Hoey was born in Bradford, Eng- 
land, March 24, 1S58. and there passed his first four 
years, then being brought to New York City by his par- 
ents. He was educated in the public schools of New 
York City and at an academy, his school years then 
ending. .After leaving school he became a machinist's 
apprentice in Auburn, N. Y. He was an ambitious 



140 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



young man and in course of time became very proficient 
as a worker in metal, continuing for many years in 
Auburn, N. V., and later learned the manufacture 
of card clothing, and was employed by Rufus Sargent 
until the mill was sold and the machinery removed to 
Lester, Mass., where he continued until 1886. He then 
located in Providence, R. I., being one of the officials 
of the Steadman & Fuller Manufacturing Company, 
which removed from Lawrence, Mass. He served as 
traveling salesman, and superintendent, finally becoming 
general manager. He continued in the last named posi- 
tion until 1912, when the business was sold out. He then 
organized the Hocy Manufacturing Company, Inc., and 
establislied his present business, the manufacture of 
special machinery. He has won high standing among 
manufacturers and keeps his plant constantly employed 
on special and profitable work. He is an independent 
voter, and a member of the Church of the Assumption, 
Roman Catholic. 

Mr. Hoey married, October 12, 1889, Margaret 
Hughes, who died June 18, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Hoey 
were the parents of five children: John Joseph (3), a 
physician of Providence ; Arthur, a foreman in a textile 
plant; Margaret, a bookkeeper; William, a soldier of 
the United States army, serving in the paymaster's 
department; Walter, a priest of the Roman Catholic 
church and assistant rector of a parish in Maine; 
Charles, died aged five years ; George, died aged eighteen 
years. 



WILFRED JOSEPH MATHIEU, one of the suc- 
cessful business men of Woonsocket, is a native of 
Sorel, in the Province of Quebec, Canada, his birth 
having occurred there. October 28, 1S79. Mr. Mathieu 
was a son of Joseph B. and Christine (Dumas) 
Mathieu, old and highly respected residents of that 
place, where the former was engaged for many years 
in business as a painter. 

The childhood of Wilfred Joseph Mathieu was 
passed in his native land, and he began his educa- 
tion at the local public schools of Sorel. He after- 
wards attended the St. Hyacinthe College at St. Hya- 
cinthe, Canada, and graduated from the latter, taking 
the classical course, with the degree of Batchelor of 
Arts. Upon completing his studies at the last named 
institution Mr. Mathieu came to the United States 
and settled for a time at South Framington, Mass. 
There he was employed for si.x years in a drug store 
and there learned the drug business, but after remaining 
a w^hile with that concern, he went to Boston and was 
similarly employed about eighteen months. L'nlortu- 
natcly for Mr. Mathieu at that time, his health failed, 
and he sought and found a position with a news- 
paper, believing that that occupation would be less 
confining and take him more into the open air. How- 
ever, Mr. Mathieu rapidly rose in position with the 
"News" of Marlborough, Mass., and eventually rose 
to the position of city editor there. In 1908 he sev- 
ered his connection with that publication and came 
to Woonsocket, where he was given a similar position 
with the "Daily Tribune." As city editor of this 
paper, Mr. Mathieu did some valuable work in con- 
nection with the journalistic life of the city, and re- 
mained associated therewith for about five years. At 



the end of that time, however, he became interested 
in the real estate situation in this city, and accord- 
ingly resigned from his position and established him- 
self in the real estate and insurance business here. 
The enterprise was successful from the outset. From 
the time of his first coming to Woonsocket, Mr. 
Mathieu had been exceedingly active in public affairs 
of this region, and has held a number of offices of 
trust and responsibility in the gift of the community. 
He is a staunch supporter of the principles and poli- 
cies of the Republican party, in the sense of which he 
has often wielded his very effective pen, and he still 
takes part in the affairs of that party, and is recog- 
nized as one of its leaders hereabouts. Mr. Mathieu 
has served on the school committee, and was chair- 
man thereof at the time the new high school building 
was erected, an achievement which was due in no small 
measure to his energies and ardent support of the 
project. He has also served as a member of the 
City Council, and proven himself a capable and dis- 
interested public servant. He is at the present time 
secretary of the City Republican Committee, and rep- 
resents the First Ward on that body. He has also 
been secretary of the committees of the State Legis- 
lature for six years, and is exceedingly active in the 
public affairs of the community. In his religious 
belief Mr. Mathieu is a Roman Catholic, and attends 
the Church of the Holy Family of this denomination 
at Woonsocket. He is also a member of the local 
lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; the order of the Franco-American Foresters, 
in which he has been and is now the supreme financial 
secretary; the Franco-American Catholic Federation 
of the United States, of which he is also the supreme 
secretary; I'Union St. Jean Baptiste, and the Woon- 
socket Chamber of Commerce. 

Wilfred Joseph Mathieu has been twice married, 
his first wife having been Irene May Lambert, of 
South Framington, Mass., a daughter of J. B. Lam- 
bert, of that State. Seven children were born to this 
union, as follows: Wilfred Joseph, Jr., born March 

1, 1905; George Emile, born Feb. 3, 1907; Beatrice, 
born in 1909: Roland, born in 1913: Alice, born June 

2, 191S; Eugene, born in 1916; Germaine, born Feb. 
4, 1917. All of these children who are old enough are 
now attending the public schools or the Sacred Heart 
College of Woonsocket. The first Mrs. Mathieu died 
Oct. 18, 1918, and Mr. Mathieu married (second) 
Bertha Cadoret, a daughter of Frank C. Cadoret, of 
Woonsocket. 



LOUIS JOSEPH GARIBALDI CELLA, M. D., 

earned his title, M. D., not through the favor of par- 
ents willing to finance the educational courses neces- 
sary, nor by the benevolent favor of patron or insti- 
tution, but by his own efforts the means were pro- 
vided, and the "midnight oil" was often burned after 
a day of toil. His father died when the boy was 
very young, and even his public school education was 
obtained in the intervals of work periods, for he 
sold papers, shined shoes, and missed no chance to 
add to the family purse. Came the time when the 
future must be considered, and with the courage 





ilOiM^ /% . ^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



141 



handed down to him from his maternal ancestor, the 
great Italian patriot, Garibaldi, he boldly adventured, 
and through the same course of work and study he 
advanced step by step, earning the necessary money 
to pay his bills by waiting on table in fraternity and 
boarding house, and by teaching in night schools. In 
this way the battle was fought and the victory won. 
Two professional schools certified to his merits and 
attainment by the conferring of the degrees. Ph. G. 
and M. D., the ownership of these degrees being 
badges of highest distinction for they represent toil, 
privation, and self-sacrifice, in addition to scholarship 
and professional learning. There is an American 
expression introduced into the language as slang, but 
now almost a classic, which, better than eulogy or 
description, sums up Dr. Cella's career, he "made 
good" as a boy, as a student, as a physician, as a citi- 
zen, and now, at the age of thirty, is well established 
in the favor of a large clientele, and is politically in- 
fluential in his ward. 

Louis J. G. Cella was born in Providence, R. I., 
August 28, 1888, son of Antonio and Angela (Gari- 
baldi) Cella, his father a small farmer of Italy, his 
mother a descendant in the fourth generation from the 
immortal Garibaldi. After coniin.c; to the United 
States, Antonio Cella supported his family by organ 
grinding until his death, his widow, Angela, still sur- 
viving him, residing with her son, Dr. Cella, in Provi- 
dence. The boy, Louis J. G., attended the public 
schools of Providence, completing his grammar 
school courses and a partial high school course. He 
then entered Rhode Island Pharmaceutical College, 
whence he was graduated Ph. G., class of 1909. This 
was not, however, the goal of his ambition, and as 
soon as practicable he entered the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Vermont, and in 1914 com- 
pleted his long years of educational preparation and 
was awarded his M. D. with the graduating class of 
that year. .'\t medical school he won special diploma, 
special honor in scholarship, represented by the de- 
gree, M. D. The manner in which the foregoing edu- 
cational courses were financed has been related, but 
no description can do justice to the courage, ambition, 
self-sacrifice and determination of the young man, 
now the well known and highly esteemed Dr. Louis 
J. G. Cella. Following graduation in 1914, Dr. Cella 
spent a year as interne in Lynn City Hospital, begin- 
ning private practice in 1915 in Providence, R. I., 
opening offices at Xo. 514 Broadway. His practice is 
confined largely to diseases of children, and during 
the three years that he has practiced his profession he 
has been very successful. His practice is large, he has 
won the respect of his professional brethren, and ranks 
among the rising young men of his profession. 

Dr. Cella has taken an active interest in public 
affairs ever since becoming a voter, and is chairman 
of the school committee from Ward Nine, and a can- 
didate for the Board of .-Mdermen. He is very popu- 
lar in his ward and has many friends who are always 
ready to do all in their power to advance his inter- 
ests. He is a progressive citizen, and although denied 
the leadership he craved clings to the principle in- 
volved and waits for its ultimate triumph. He is a 



member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, and 
of many lodges and clubs, namely: Modern Wood- 
men of America, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, Sons of Italy, Teanese M. B. Society, Incoronata 
Del Bosco Di Panni, La Basilicata, Laziale Society, 
Young Federal .\tliletic Club, Dante Club, Working 
Men's Political Club. Imperial Club, Phildo Dramatic 
Club of Rhode Island, Italia-Amcrican Club, Ninth 
Ward Progressive Club, Ricci Geovanni B. Gilentani. 
St. Eraclio Di Petro Variano M. S., .Vmcrican Medi- 
cal Association, and Providence Medical Association. 
Dr. Cella married, in Providence, Jime 30, IQ15, 
Laura Tirocchi. 



PETER HARDEN— The small wage, fifty cents 
weekly, which Peter Barden received for sweeping 
out the office, and being otherwise useful around the 
factory in Dodgeville, was not then the little insigni- 
ficant sum it now appears, but seemed entirely ade- 
quate, and implanted within him a spirit of independ- 
ence and self-reliance which made that half dollar 
the foundation of his fortune. From that beginning 
he went forward to greater earnings as a mill hand, 
learned the stone cutter's trade, and finally, about 
1888, bought out the marble and granite monumental 
work of which he has since been owner and manager. 
During these thirty years he has erected monuments 
practically everywhere in Rhode Island and South- 
eastern Massachusetts, there being perhaps not a sin- 
gle cemetery in the sections named in which Peter 
Barden has not erected at least one monument. The 
marble and granite monumental works which he owns 
was established in 1851, and is the oldest business 
of its kind in the State of Rhode Island, former owners 
being: S. Brooks & Company and C. H. Brown. 
The name. Peter Barden, has been on the sign for 
thirty years, and he has won the reputation which he 
enjoys by rigidly observing the strictest rules of fair- 
ness in all his dealings, and by superior work, ma- 
terial and design. He is a native son of Ireland, but 
at the age of five years was brought to the United 
States, Dodgeville, R. I., being the first home of the 
family after arriving in this country. 

Peter Barden spent his youth in Dodgeville, first 
being employed at fifty cents weekly, as told hereto- 
fore, then passing into the cotton mill and becoming a 
spinner. .-Xbout i860 he came to Providence and 
learned stone cutting with S. Brooks & Company, be- 
coming an expert in monumental carving and cutting. 
S. Brooks & Company established their business in 
1851, but in later years sold out to C. H. Brown, 
Peter Barden remaining in Mr. Brown's employ as a 
marble and granite cutter. He continued with Mr. 
Brown until 1888. then bought him out, and has from 
that date conducted the business under the firm name, 
Peter Barden. The works are located at No. 348 
Cranston street, and there for over half a century 
Peter Barden has labored as apprentice, journeyman 
and proprietor. He can review that half century with 
great satisfaction for he began with nothing but cour- 
age, will power, and a strong constitution, and has hon- 
orably won business standing, fortune, and the respect 
of the community in which he has lived so long. He 



142 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



has not lived selfishly, but has with a generous hand 
aided in civic improvements and in church affairs. 
He is a supporter of the Democratic party in National 
politics, but in local affairs is extremely independent 
in his political action. In religious faith he is a 
Roman Catholic. 

Mr. Harden married (first) at Crompton, R. I., 
Mary Ann McGrain; their only child, John Frank, 
was being educated for the priesthood, but died in 
1915, prior to his ordination. Mr. Barden married 
(second) Bridget Kelley. 



JOSEPH SPELMAN— Now retired from active 
business life, Mr. Spelman reviews a life of length 
and usefulness, now in his seventy-eighth year. He 
is a descendant of Richard Spelman, born in Essex, 
England, in 1665, died in Middletown, Conn., 1750. 
Richard Spelman resided in Danbury. England, where 
in 1695 he married Mary Baker, of Tillingham, who 
died in 1700. The same year Richard Spelman came 
to New England, meeting on shipboard Alcey French, 
an English girl. Upon arriving in this country they 
were married, and soon afterward located in Middle- 
town, Conn., where their six children were born. 

The line of descent is through their son, Thomas 
Spelman, born April 26, 1712, and there followed his 
trade, stone cutter. He married Mary Hickox. They 
were the parents of Daniel Spelman, born July 12, 
1738, a soldier of the Colonies during the French and 
Indian War and in the Revolution. He married Mary 
Carpenter, of Providence, a descendant of William 
Carpenter, who settled in Providence, R. I., in 1637. 
They were the parents of Captain Joseph Spelman, 
born September 13, 1788. He became a Hudson river 
packet boat owner, and operated a line running to 
Albany. He married Roxanna Whiting, of Provi- 
dence, R. I. They were the parents of Captain James 
Esdell Spelman, born March 13, 1813, and became 
a master of ships, following the sea for thirty-five 
years. He married (first) in Massachusetts, in the 
year 1836, Hulda Pond, born in Franklin, Mass., May 
10, 1S18. He married (second) in Providence, October 
12, 1857, Sarah J. Luther, who died April 25, 1895. 

Joseph Spelman, son of Captain James Esdell and 
Hulda (Pond) Spelman, was born in Providence, R. I., 
October 16, 1840, and there is yet living in honored 
retirement. He attended the city public schools, and 
for one year was a student at the Samuel Austin 
Union School. He began his business career with 
Stephen D. Andrews, continuing with him for four 
years, then going to sea for two years with his father. 
In 1859 he reentered Mr. .Andrew's employ, and so 
continued until 1888, when he became manager of the 
Reliance Mill Company, on Dyer street. Providence, 
remaining in that position for eight years. In 1896 he 
established in business under the firm name, Andrews 
& Spelman, jobbers and wholesalers of salt, hay and 
grain, locating at No. 173 Dorrance street. Providence. 
He there continued a successful business until 1916, 
when he withdrew and turned the management over 
to his capable son. He erected the building in which 
his business is conducted on Dorrance street, and at 



one period was a member of the Boston Chamber of 
Commerce. In politics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Spelman married, January 30, i860, Isabel 
Glover, of Providence, daughter of James and Mary 
(Hugh) Glover, her parents both from Prince Edward 
Island, Canada, but residents of Providence from 
1853 until death, her father a carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Spelman are the parents of three children: i. Abby 
G., married Frank Burrows, and they are the parents 
of three children : i. Mrs. David Spink, of Auburn, 
R. I.; ii. Frank Spelman Burrows, who married 
Helen Speck, he now a lieutenant in the United States 
Army, being transport quartermaster, and they have 
one son, Frank Spelman Burrows, Jr.; iii. Louise 
Burrows. 2. Mary W., who lives at home with her 
parents. 3. Joseph G.. married Jennie R. Greene, 
daughter of Ezra Greene, of East Greenwich, R. I.; 
they are the parents of three children: i. Joseph Ray, 
married Carrie Ryan, of Providence, and has two 
children, Everil Ray and Evelyn May ; ii. Ruth 
Eleanor, married Leo Ostiguy, and has two sons, 
George C. and Esdell Spelman Ostiguy; iii. George, 
married .\nna Hargraves, and they have one son, 
Milton Glover Spelman. 



PATRICK J. MANNING— The name Manning is 
one of the most ancient of English and Irish surnames, 
and is traced beyond the surname epoch into a period 
of most remote antiquity. Mr. Ferguson, eminent 
authority in the study of patronymics, derives the 
name from the Old Norse "Manningi," which, trans- 
lated literally means a valiant man. Entries of the 
surname are found in the Domesday Book, under the 
form Mannig. Manning appears in the Hundred 
Rolls, and from the close of the thirteenth century is 
continuous under its present form in England and 
Ireland. Irish families of the name have risen to con- 
siderable prominence and influence in several coun- 
ties of Ireland, and the name is honorably written 
in Irish history. County Cork has been the seat of a 
notable branch of the family for several centuries. It 
was here that the late Patrick J. Manning, for many 
years a prominent figure in business circles in the city 
of Pawtucket, R. I., was born. He was the son of 
Bartholomew and Mary (McCarthy) Manning, and at 
an early age accompanied his parents to the United 
States, settling in South Providence, R. I. He was 
educated in the public schools here, and on completing 
his studies learned the trade of carriage-maker in 
Pawtucket. Mr. Manning followed this occupation 
for several years, despite the fact that his heart was 
not in the work, during which period he accumulated 
a competence which enabled him eventually to estab- 
lish himself in business independently. Mr. Manning 
founded the undertaking business in Pawtucket in 
which he engaged actively until his death. He rose 
to a leading place in the profession in Pawtucket, 
both through the reliability and unimpeachable integ- 
rity of his business principles, and his undoubted 
sincerity, understanding and kindliness. He was 
widely known and eminently respected in the city, and 
for many years was a prominent figure in business 





V d^J^.^.^^i'^---^^' 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



143 



circles. Beyond his activities in business and pro- 
fessional lines, he took no active part in Pawtucket 
affairs. He was essentially a home lover, but of a 
genial and hospitable nature, and his home was the 
center of a large circle of friends. Patrick J. Man- 
ning was a business man of the type which we are apt 
to term distinctly American. His success was in every 
respect the result of his own efTorts. He began life 
under the handicap of insufficient education, and was 
thrust at an early age into an occupation for which 
he had no inclination. Despite these odds he rose 
through indomitable perseverance and energy to a 
position of prominence in the business world, winning 
the respect of men, not only because of his ultimate 
achievement, but because he had fought the coml)at 
single-handed. His death was widely and sincerely 
mourned. 

Mr. Manning married IJridget McGowen. daughter 
of the late Michael and Bridget (McGloam) Mc- 
Gowen, both of whom were natives of Ireland, who 
later became residents of Pawtucket, R. I. Mr. and 
Mrs. Manning were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Joseph John, deceased. 2. Daniel Edward, 
v.dio succeeded to the management of his father's 
business on the latter's death. 3. Mary Katherine, de- 
ceased. 4. Mary Elizabeth, wife of Dr. Heflfern, post- 
master of Pawtucket. Mrs. Manning, who survives 
her husband, resides at No. 33 School street, Paw- 
tucket. Patrick J. Manning died at his home in Paw- 
tucket, R. I., on January 12, 1908. 



REV. HENRI ARCHAMBAULT, pastor of the 
Roman Catholic Church 01 the Presentation at Marie- 
ville, R. I., has been connected with this parish but a 
comparatively short time, but has already made him- 
self a recognized influence for good in the community 
and has gained the staunch loyalty and devotion of his 
parishioners. He is a native of Harrisvillc, R. I., 
where he was born March 30, 1868, a son of Francis 
and Henrietta (Poiricr) Archambault, who were for 
many years residents of Canada. His father, Francis 
Archambault, was born at the town of St. Hyacinth, 
Province of Quebec, in that country, but in 1827 came 
to the United States and settled in Rhode Island, 
where he engaged in the farming business and met 
with a notable success. During the later years of his 
life he removed to Woonsocket, R. I., and there his 
death occurred in 1914. His wife, who was before her 
marriage Henrietta Pairier, was a native of St. Jean 
the Baptist, Providence of Quebec. Canada, and died 
at Woonsocket, R. I., at the age of eighty years. Mr. 
and Mrs. .Archambault were the parents of a very 
large family, seven of whom are still living as fol- 
lows: Mizael A.; John B.; Henri, with whose career 
we are here especially concerned; Dinah; Henrietta; 
Louise: Celie; and Amelia. 

The early education of Father Archambault was 
received at the Marieville Seminary, near Montreal, 
Canada, after which he entered the Grand Seminary 
in that city, where he conducted his philosophical and 
theological studies to fit him tor the Roman Catholic 
priesthood, which career he had at an early age de- 
termined to pursue. He was ordained to the priest- 



hood at the Cathedral at Montreal, in December, 
1901, by Archbishop Bruchesi. Father Archambault 
was then assigned to St. Charles Church at Provi- 
dence, R. I., and coming to this country, entered into 
his priestly duties there, continuing in the same for 
twelve years. He was next sent to the church of St. 
John the Baptist at Warren, R. I., where he remained 
for four years and then received his present appoint- 
ment as pastor of the Church of the Presentation at 
Marieville, R. I., December 11, 1917. This church 
was built in the year 1913 by the Rev. Henri DeFoy. 
The parish at present numbers one hundred and 
twenty-five families and six hundred souls. Father 
.Archambault has been very active in the work of his 
parish since coming here and has done much to assist 
it both from a spiritual and from a material point of 
view. He is greatly beloved and respected on account 
of his pious lite and the many good works he assidu- 
ously practices among the people of his flock, and also 
on account of his profound learning and wisdom. He 
resides in the rectory of the church, which is situated 
on Mineral Springs avenue, Marieville, R. I. 



CHARLES B. BAMFORTH, secretary of the 
Davol Rubber Company, of Providence, and a promi- 
nent citizen of this city, is a native of Mt. Vernon, 
Iowa, where his birth occurred, Xovcmber 5, 1876. 
Mr. Bamiorth is a son of Bentley and Ann (Wood) 
Bamforth, both of whom were natives of Yorkshire, 
England, where the father was a worker in a woolen 
mill for a number of years. He later came to the 
United States and located in Massachusetts, about 
1868, where he was employed in various woolen mills 
of that State. In 1876, however, he decided to try 
agricultural pursuits, and with his wife went to Mt. 
Vernon, Iowa, where their son, Charles B. Bamiorth, 
was born. The elder Mr. Bamforth did not, however, 
locate there permanently, but returned to Massachu- 
setts when Charles B. was still a small child. Here 
Bentley Bamforth continued in the woolen industry, 
and during the last twenty years of his life was super- 
intendent of several large mills in various parts of 
the State, continuing active until his death, which 
occurred in 1905. He is survived by his wife, who 
makes her home in Providence. Bentley Bamforth 
and his wife were the parents of three children as 
follows: Charles B., with whose career we are here 
especially concerned: Walter I., who died in infancy. 
End Mary Ethel, who resides with her mother at 
Providence and is now an employee of the Davol 
Rubber Company, of which her elder brother is the 
secretary. 

The childhood of Charles B. Bamforth was spent in 
a number of Massachusetts towns and cities, the first 
few years after coming to the East, at Uxbridge, 
where he attended the local public school. He then 
attended a business college at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
finished his course when only a little more than six- 
teen years of age. After graduating he immediately 
applied for a position as typist through a typewriting 
machine agency, and by chance was given an oppor- 
tunity to work as stenographer and typist for the 
Davol Rubber Company, of Providence, with which 



144 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



concern he has remained ever since. He was the 
first person ever emploj'ed in that capacity by the 
Davol Company, and took up his duties in the year 
189J, this work being of a kind which had not assumed 
the general importance to which it has since attained. 
From the start he proved himself of value to his em- 
ployers, and was soon promoted by them to a more 
responsible position. Indeed, he continued to advance 
rapidly until May, 1900, when he was placed in charge 
of the ledger "accounts receivable." He continued 
in the bookkeeping department until August, 1917, 
when he was elected a member of the board of direc- 
tors, secretary of the company, and its acting treas- 
urer. In these capacities Mr. Bamforth has continued 
to serve this concern most efficiently ever since, and 
has now made for himself an enviable reputation as a 
successful business man throughout the community. 
Mr. Bamforth is a man of quiet and retiring tastes 
and habits, and during the quarter of a century that 
he has been connected with the Davol Rubber Com- 
pany has devoted himself with unusual singleness of 
purpose to its interests, the years of experience com- 
bined with strong native ability having produced in 
him an official of rare capacity and worth. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Bamforth is a member of St. John's 
Lodge, No. I, Free and Accepted Masons, and is 
also a member of the Seventeenth Company of Crans- 
ton Blues, Rhode Island State Militia. 

Charles B. Bamforth was united in marriage, Sep- 
tember 28, 1898, at Providence, R. I., with Ida C. 
Lind, and they are now the parents of one son, Stanley 
R. Bamforth. 



JOSEPH PERKINS— Through the obstinacy of a 
^"ermont official. Joseph Faquin on coming from his 
native Canada to that State, was registered as Per- 
kins, and to that form of his name the emigrant was 
henceforth bound. He became Joseph Perkins, and 
his son was Joseph Perkins, and his grandson is Jo- 
seph Perkins, of Arctic, R. I., whose career fur- 
nishes the motive for this review. 

Joseph (l) Perkins (Paquin) was born at Three 
Rivers, Canada, about 1805, died at the age of ninety- 
three at Centerville, R. I. At the age of sixteen he 
came to Highgate, Vt., where the blunder with his 
name occurred, and for several years he was back and 
forth between the two locations, coming to Vermont 
in certain seasons when work was plentiful and 
wages good. About 1832 he married in Canada, and 
later located in St. Albans, Vt., but a few years later 
removed to Pascoag, R. I., then returned to Vermont, 
settling finally at Centerville, where he died a nona- 
genarian. His wife died at Centerville, aged eighty- 
six. He was a gardener and farmer, a man of indus- 
try and very fond of his work. 

Joseph (2) Perkins was born in Canada, but at the 
age of three years was brought to the United States 
by his parents, who made their home first in Vermont, 
next in Rhode Island. He became a mill worker; 
was assistant superintendent of the Enos Laphara 
Mill for twenty years, the Stone Mill at Centerville 
his chief field of operations. There he later pur- 
chased a house and continued his residence until his 



death in 1908. Joseph (2) Perkins married Natalie 
Laneaux, and they were the parents of nine chil- 
dren: Joseph (3), of further mention; Henry, of 
Arctic, R. I.; Mary Jane, married Wallace Gendron, 
of Arctic; Julia, died in infancy; two sons died in in- 
fancy; Elizabeth, of Centerville; Matilda, married 
Julius Maynard; John Amedie, of Arctic. 

Joseph (3) Perkins, son of Joseph (2) and Natalie 
(Laneaux) Perkins, was born at Centerville, R. I., 
July 8, 1857. He attended public school until nine 
years of age, then began in a boy's position in the 
Enos Lapham Mill at Centerville, his salary two dol- 
lars weekly. After six months in the mill he attended 
school for another year, then returned to the mill, con- 
tinuing until twenty-one years of age, becoming an 
expert spinner. After leaving the mill he was for six 
years in the employ of B. B. & R. Knight as a clerk 
in their stores at White Rock and River Point. He 
continued in this employment in these stores until 
about 1898, when he became manager of the general 
merchandise store of Duke & Wood at Centerville, 
remaining for two years. In 1900, with George I. 
Parker, he established a general insurance business, 
which was conducted as a partnership until 1914, when 
it was dissolved, Mr. Perkins continuing the business 
alone with much success, his office in Arctic, R. I. 

Always interested in public affairs, Mr. Perkins has 
given a large share of his time to the public service. 
He has been interested in the town fire district ever 
since its organization, in varied capacity; was school 
census enumerator in Warwick and West Warwick 
for a number of years; has been police constable since 
June 9, 1879, for the town of Warwick; and in 1902 
was commissioned a notary public under Charles Dean 
Kendall, a distinctive privilege he yet holds. In 1915 
he was chosen police commissioner, and is still serv- 
ing, in 1917 being appointed an agent of the United 
States Government for Division K of the State Food 
Administration of Rhode Island. He is furthermore 
a gifted auctioneer, and for thirty years has cried 
sales in his section of the State. His political faith is 
Republican; he is a member of St. John's Roman 
Catholic Church. He is one of the best known men 
of his section of the State, having been in the public 
service for nearly forty years. He has a host of close 
friends, and to all he is the kind, courteous and sym- 
pathetic adviser and confidant. 

Mr. Perkins married Celina Lafereniere, of Quid- 
nick, R. I., who died June 17, 1918, the mother of six 
children: Celina, married Leonard Theroux, of Arc- 
tic, R. I., and they are the parents of three children: 
Corine, Louis, Lourett; Henry, born Sept. 10, 1878, 
died June 18, 191 1; James L., born Dec. 28, 1879, a 
pharmacist of Centerville; Ada, born May 24, 1881, 
married Hector Cloutier, of Phenix, R. I., proprietor 
of a bakery, they have one son, Albert Hector Clou- 
tier; Fred X., born Jan. 5, 1894, clerk for Dr. J. D. 
McGuire; Charles E., born May 16, 1895, died Oct. 
I, 1916. 



PETER BINGHAM MacMANUS— One of the 
leading business men of Pawtucket, R. I., late presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Home Bleach and Dye 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



145 



Works, Incorporated, was a native of Glasgow, Scot- 
land, born March 24, 1837, son of Daniel MacManus. 

Daniel MacManus was born in Glasgow and spent 
his entire life there, engaged in carpentering. He 
died in his native city, aged sixty-three years, leaving 
a widow, who had been Margaret Bingham, of Olden, 
England, and five children as follows: Daniel, a boot 
and shoemaker, who died in Glasgow: Margaret, 
Katherine and Ellen, who died in Scotland; and 
Peter B. 

Peter Bingham MacManus attended the schools of 
his native city until he was eight years of age, and 
then entered the bleaching and dyeing establishment 
of John Gettis & Son, Glasgow, to learn the business, 
recei\-ing three cents a day — thirty-six cents a week — 
salary, with which he clothed himself and purchased 
food. Mr. MacManus continued with this firm for 
about eleven years, being advanced on various occa- 
sions, and attended night school during this period 
when he could manage to do so. After becoming a 
proficient workman, he was employed in Paisley, 
Scotland, for the J. & P. Coats Company, Limited, 
and various others in the dyeing of silk and cotton 
goods for six or seven years, and then returned to 
Glasgow, becoming overseer for the .-\nderson Man- 
ufacturing Company. Mr. MacManus then went to 
Perth, being employed by Garvey & Davis for two 
years, and at this place had charge of the works. He 
then was employed by John Thompson at Belfast, 
Ireland. Returning to Scotland, Mr. MacManus re- 
mained there for a short time, and then sailed for 
America on the old ship "St. Patrick," which had been 
built about eighteen years before. He landed at 
Quebec, whence, in 1870, he came to the United 
States. He worked one year for the Lewiston Manu- 
facturing Company at Lewiston, Me., and then spent 
three months in the Everett Mills at Lawrence, Mass., 
after which he removed to Walpole, Mass., being 
overseer for Smith Gray & Company's mills for ten 
years. In 1881 Mr. MacManus located at I'awtucket, 
R. I., on his arrival here becoming mana.ger of the 
Union Wadding Company's bleachery, a position 
which he continued to hold for three years. At the 
end of that time he took over the business, leasing the 
plant, which he conducted under the name of the 
Home Bleach and Dye Works. On April 15, 1905, he 
purchased the business, which he ever after continued 
with great success up to the time of his death, his pro- 
duct finding a ready market all over the country. In 
1889 Mr. MacManus leased the Valley Falls Dyeing 
and Bleaching Works, but in February, 1892, the 
buildings of the plant were destroyed by fire, his loss 
being about twenty thousand dollars. One year later 
his Pawtucket plant burned and this also caused him 
a considerable loss. At this time he leased a portion 
of the Cranston Print Works in Cranston, and at a 
heavy expense converted the property for his own use, 
but after one year he returned to Pawtucket and at 
once rebuilt there, transferring the Valley Falls 
business to this place. The plant is now one of the 
largest and best equipped in Xew England. Under 
Mr. MacManus' able and capable management the 
business steadily and rapidly grew from a small be- 



ginning, when only a few hands were necessary, to the 
proportions that it had assumed in 1908 at the time of 
its death, when one hundred and twenty-five hands 
were employed, and with a capacity of twenty-five 
thousand pounds a day. In 1904 the business was 
incorporated with a capital stock of one hundred 
thousand dollars, as the Home Bleach and Dye Works, 
and Mr. MacManus was elected president and treas- 
urer, which offices he held until his death. About 
two years before his demise Mr. MacManus was 
taken ill and from that time devoted very little time 
to the conduct of his business. He passed away on 
the morning of February 29, igaS, at his home, Xo. 
870 North Main street, Pawtucket, after serious ill- 
ness of several weeks. In his long connection with the 
dyeing and bleaching business, Mr. MacManus was 
widely known throughout the State. 

Mr. MacManus was connected with the Masonic 
organization, holding membership in Union Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Pawtucket 
Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; Pawtucket Coun- 
cil, No. 2, Royal and Select Masters; Holy Sepulchre 
Conimandery, No. 8, Knights Templar; and Palestine 
Temple, Ancient .-Xrabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, of Providence. He was an honorary member 
of Tower Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Paw- 
tucket, was connected with the Veteran Firemen's 
Association, the Business Men's Association of Paw- 
tucket, and for several years was a member of the 
Chess Club of Pawtucket. He was independent on 
public questions and never sought office, the only 
public office he ever held being as member of the 
Grade Crossing Commission, to which he was ap- 
pointed when the commission was organized. He 
was a man of wide sympathies and many charities, but 
his gifts of such nature were made very quietly. 

In August, 1S59, Mr. MacManus was married to 
Mary Hunter, of Glasgow, Scotland, daughter of John 
Hunter. She died April 2, 1902, at Pawtucket. To 
this union were born: i. Hugh, who met his death at 
Lewiston, Me., where he was drowned at the age of 
ten years. 2. Peter B., Jr., mentioned at length 
below. 3. Mary, born July 1, 1873, at Walpole, Mass., 
married William F. Roberts, D. D. S., who is engaged 
in the practice of dentistry at Pawtucket, and they 
have three children, Charles Franklin, enlisted in the 
United States Navy, Mary Hunter and Hilton Davis. 
Mrs. Roberts is a director of the Home Bleach and 
Dye Works. 4. John, born May 29, 1876, at Walpole, 
Mass., married Adelaide Davis, by whom he had three 
children, Mary Elizabeth, who resides at Utica, N. Y.; 
Louise Bingham, deceased, and John, Jr. John Mac- 
Manus learned the business of bleaching at the Lons- 
dale Mills, where he spent three years, going from 
there to the Utica Willowvale Bleaching Company of 
Chadwicks, N. Y., of which he became the superin- 
tendent. He was a graduate of Brown University. 
Eventually he became connected with his father's 
business, and upon the death of the elder man became 
vice-president of the concern. His untimely death, 
which occurred June 24, 1916, ended a brilliant career. 
He is survived by his wife. 
Peter B. MacManus, Jr., second child of Peter B. 



R 1-2-10 



146 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



MacManus, was born January i, 1872, at Lewiston, 
Me. His parents did not remain in Lewiston long 
enough for him to begin his education in the schools 
ot that city, but while he was yet a small boy removed 
to Walpole, Mass., where he attended the graded 
schools. Still later they removed to Pawtucket, R. I., 
and here he completed his general education, though 
he supplemented this with a special commercial course 
at the business college of Bryant and Stratton in the 
neighboring city of Providence. After his graduation 
from this institution, he at once entered the employ of 
his father and worked in the establishment of the 
Home Bleach and Dye Company as a clerk. It was 
his purpose to master the complete operation of the 
business in all its details, by working at first in the 
humblest positions and gradually taking positions of 
greater trust and responsibility. This he accom- 
plished so successfully that upon his father's death, in 
igoS, he was able to step into the latter's place and 
was accordingly elected to the double office of presi- 
dent and treasurer. These posts he still holds, and 
under his most capable guidance the business has 
thriven and prospered as never before and is now 
one of the largest of its kind in this region. Mr. Mac- 
Manus has also been exceedingly active in many other 
of the departments of the community's life and has 
been a leader in many movements undertaken for the 
common welfare. He is a director of the Providence 
County Savings Bank, vice-president of the Paw- 
tucket Boys' Club, one of the incorporators of the 
Memorial Hospital of Pawtucket, and was for a 
number of years vice-president of the Young Men's 
Christian .Association here. In his religious belief he 
is an Episcopalian and attends the Church of the Good 
Shepherd of that denomination. He is a very promi- 
nent Free Mason, and is affiliated with the Lodge, 
Chapter, Council, Commandery and Temple. 

Mr. MacManus was united in marriage, December 
2, 1903, at Pawtucket, with Carrie Powers, a daughter 
of .'\lmon and Alice A. (Jenkes) Powers, and a native 
of Pawtucket. Her parents were born at Montpelier, 
Vt., and at .Ashton, R. I., respectively. Mr. Powers 
was for many years a contractor of Pawtucket, and 
he and his wife were the parents of a number of chil- 
dren. To Mr. and Mrs. MacManus five children have 
been born, as follows: Donald Hunter, .\lmon Bing- 
ham, Peter B., Robert Gordon, and Alice Louise. 
The two nephews of Mrs. MacManus, sons of Charles 
P. Powers, brother of Mrs. MacManus, of Chicago, 
are Leland Stanford Powers and Almon Philips Pow- 
ers, both now in France, enlisted in the Signal Corps. 



ROBERT PIERCE BAILEY, a prominent under- 
taker of Providence, R. I., and one of the most active 
and successful of the younger business men of this 
city, is a native of Victory Mills, N. Y., where his 
birth occurred December 12, 1881. He is a son of 
Robert J. and Ella M. (Pierce) Bailey, the former a 
native of Richmond, Me., where he was born in 
March, 1S47, and formerly engaged in the milling busi- 
ness at Berkeley, R. I., the latter a native of Rhode 
Island, where she was born m 1861, and died in the 
year 1906. Robert J. Bailey and his wife were the 



parents of the following children: Josephine, now the 
wife of George F. Drake, of Winsted. Conn.; Rob- 
ert Pierce, of further mention; Hattie Pierce, who 
is now the wife of Frank H. Webb, of Lawrence, 
Mass. 

The education of Robert Pierce Bailey was begun 
in the schools of .Augusta, Ga., and lie later became 
a pupil in the grammar schools of East Greenwich, 
and the East Greenwich Academy, where he com- 
pleted his studies. Having determined upon the un- 
dertaking business as a career, Mr. Bailey learned 
that business with J. H. Williams, of East Provi- 
dence, R. I., remaining in the employ of that gentle- 
man for about si.x years. In the year 1910 he opened 
an establishment of his own at No. 61 Plainfield 
street, Providence, and has continued at this location 
ever since. He has worked up a large and success- 
ful business, which is still enjoying a period of rapid 
growth, and he is regarded as among the most suc- 
cessful and substantial citizens of the city. He is 
well known in the social life of Providence, and pos- 
sesses a host of devoted friends here. Mr. Bailey 
has taken a very active part in the public life of 
Providence, and is regarded as one of the leaders of 
the Republican party here. In the year 1919 he was 
elected as a representative of this city in the State 
Legislature for a term which will expire at the end 
of 1920. He is a member of Ivanhoe Lodge, No. 19, 
Knights of Pythias, in which he has held the position 
of past chancellor; and Manufacturers' Lodge, No. 
15, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His clubs 
are the Rotary, the Sunset, and the Olneyville Busi- 
ness Men's xAssociation. 

Robert Pierce Bailey was united in marriage, Sep- 
tember 29, 1915. at Providence, with Maud Tupper, 
of this city, a daughter of Albert R. and Alveretta 
(Waterman) Tupper, natives of Massachusetts and 
Providence, respectively, the former born in 1844, and 
died in 1908, and the latter born December 26, 1847, 
and died December 26, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey 
are the parents of one child, Alveretta Waterman, 
born January 14, 1917. 



DEXTER STEVENS— The value of the two great 
schools of Massachusetts, one at Lowell, the other 
at New Bedford, has been demonstrated over and 
over again by the young men they have sent forth to 
important positions in the textile mills, well equipped 
with technical knowledge and practical manufacturing 
experience. From the Lowell Textile School came 
Dexter Stevens, now manager of the plant of the 
Esmond Mills, a Massachusetts corporation, manu- 
facturers of cotton blankets and bath robes, with a 
plant at Esmond, R. I. 

Dexter Stevens was born in Maiden, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 16, 1885, and there completed courses of grade 
and high school study. After leaving high school he 
entered Lowell Textile School, there pursuing a three 
years' course in cotton manufacturing. With his cre- 
dentials from the Textile School, he early secured 
remunerative positions, and several years were spent 
in different localities, and in varying capacity, but 
in all, gaining strong mechanical and professional 




(Ly!?/tcr(P. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



147 



experience. Finally lie became a designer at the 
Parkhill Manufacturing Company, of Fitchburg, Mass., 
remaining one year, thence going to the Lancaster 
Mills, at Clinton, Mass., as superintendent which posi- 
tion he held for seven years. He then went South, 
and at Cumberland, X. C, was for some time man- 
ager of the Xecronsett Mills. His next change was 
to the Esmond Mills, at Esmond. R. I., in 1914, com- 
ing as superintendent, later being promoted to gen- 
eral manager of the plant which employs about eight 
hundred and fifty hands. He is thorough in his knowl- 
edge of cotton mill management, and has won high 
standing among his contemporaries. 

Mr. Stevens is a member of the Textile Club of 
Boston, the Southern New England Textile Club, and 
the National Association of Cotton Manufacturers. 
He married in Maiden, Mass., Margaret Robinson, 
and they are the parents of two sons: Dexter (2) ; and 
Robinson. 



THE ESMOND MILLS, located at Esmond, R. L, 
a typical New England mill village, is a great cor- 
poration engaged in the manufacture of fancy cotton 
blankets and bath robes, a corporation with an author- 
ized capital of $2,000,000, of which $1,405,000. has 
been issued. The present officials of the company 
are: President, Clarence Whitman, head of Clar- 
ence Whitman & Son, Incorporated, of \cw Vr)rk 
City; treasurer, Harold C. Whitman, of New York 
City; vice-president, Henry P. Binney, of Boston: 
secretary, John A. Pearson; and Dexter Stevens, 
manager. The directors in addition to the above 
are: Clift Rogers Clapp, of Boston, and F. Gilbert 
Hinsdale, of New York City. The company was in- 
corporated in 1906, under the laws of the State of New 
Jersey, and in 1910, under the laws of the State of 
Massachusetts. The old mill at Esmond was torn 
dow-n after its purchase from William J. Dunn, of 
Fall River, and in 1906 the present large mill was 
built. The mill employs eight hundred and fifty 
hands. 



NILES BROWN — .Among the successful physicians 
of Providence, R. I., should be mentioned Niles 
Brown, a native of Carlyle, N. Y., where he was 
horn March 23, 1877, a son of Abraham and Mary 
E. (Louck) Brown, old and highly respected residents 
of that place. Mr. Abraham Brown is now deceased, 
but is survived by his wife who is a descendant from 
an old French Huguenot family, the name having 
originally been spelled Laux. Her ancestor first 
came to the United States during the religious perse- 
cutions of the Huguenots, following the Revocation of 
the Edict of Nantes about two hundred and fifty years 
ago. Dr. Brown's paternal ancestry was of German 
Huguenot, or Lutheran stock, and came to the United 
States during the terrible Thirty Years' War in Cen- 
tral Europe. The childhood of Dr. Brown was spent 
at his native place and he there attended the local 
public school and spent two years in the Cobleskill 
High School. The circumstances of his family were 
such that it was necessary for him to work during the 
entire period of his schooling, but he was intensely 



ambitious and overcame every obstacle in his way. 
After the two years spent at high school, Dr. Brown 
attended for a similar period the New York State 
Normal School at Cortland, all the time continuing 
his work outside. He had determined to become a 
physician, and being greatly interested in the new 
theories of the osteopathic system of therapeutics, 
attended the Osteopathic College at Kirksville, Mo. 
He did not graduate from that institution, however, 
but entered the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, 
where he completed his studies and graduated in 
1910 with the degree of D. O. Upon completing these 
studies Dr. Brown went to- Quebec, Canada, where 
he engaged in practice for a short time, but in the 
same year returned to the United States and settled 
in the city of Providence where he established himself 
permanently in his profession. He has built up a 
very large practice in the eight years that he has 
resided here, and is now regarded as one of the lead- 
ing osteopathic physicians in this section of the State. 
Dr. Brown has always taken an active part in the 
general life of Providence, and is a meml)er of a 
number of the local organizations, fraternal and other- 
wise. H(e is particularly well known in Masonic 
orders. He is affiliated with the Mount Vernon 
Lodge, .Ancient Free and Accepted Masons: the Prov- 
idence Chapter, Royal .Arch Masons; the Providence 
Council, Royal and Select Masters; St. John's Com- 

mandery, Knights Templar of this city; and 

Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine of Providence. He is also a member of the 
.American Osteopathic .Association, the Providence Oste- 
opathic .Association, and the Rhode Isbmd Osteopathic 
Society, and was president of the last named for some 
time. He belongs also to the Rotary Club. Dr. 
Brown is an Independent Republican in politics, and 
though a staunch supporter of the principles and poli- 
cies of that party, in all national issues, reserves to 
his own judgment his decision on local matters and 
the election of candidates. 

Dr. Brown married, January 28. 1901, at Chicago, 
111.. Emma Brassard, of New York City, a daughter 
of Peter and Matilda Brassard, and a member of an 
old French Huguenot family. 



JESSE WANTON SHIPPEE LILLIBRIDGE— 
This is one of the old Rhode Island families, and 
through intermarriage connected with the Sherman, 
Greene, Shippee and Knight families, thus tracing 
to early days in Rhode Island, the paternal line begins 
with Thomas Lillibridge, the founder of the Lilli- 
bridge family in this country, born in England, 1662. 
His earliest known record in New England is as signer 
of a petition dated Newport, September 26, 1699, to 
the Earl of Bellomont. then in Newport, R. I., to use 
his influence with his Majesty. William III., for the 
establishment of a Church of England, at Newport. 
This is the original Trinity Church in which Thomas 
Lillibridge was a warden in 1709, 1713, and where 
he owned pew 8 until 1719. He was admitted a free- 
man at Newport. May 6, 1701, and was vestryman, 
1718, 1722-1724, in St. Paul's (Narragansett) Church, 
built in 1707, moved to Wickford in 1800, said to be 



148 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



the oldest Episcopal churcli building north of the 
Potomac river. He settled in Old Westerly, in 1715, 
in that part set off as Richmond, where he died Au- 
gust 29, 1724. He left by will lands, personal property, 
and two slaves, Ming and Ring. He married (first) 
Mary Hobson, (second) Sarah Lewis. Children by 
his first wife: Elizabeth, married Richard Easton; 
and Catherine, married Robert Wilson. Children 
by second wife: Thomas (2), died Feb. 8, 1757, aged 
fifty-four years; Sarah, married George Fitch; Rob- 
ert, admitted a freeman. May 4, 1731; Mary, married 
Jonathan Clark; Esther, married (first) James Mar- 
tin, (second) William Peckham; Benjamin, of fur- 
ther mention; John, married Marcy Enos; Edward, 
married Esther Hill; Patience, born in 1716, married 
Paul Tew. 

(II) Benjamin Lillibridge, son of Thomas Lilli- 
bridge, and his second wife, Sarah (Lewis) Lilli- 
bridge, was born July 11, 1712, and died August ii, 
1806. He married Annie Sherman, daughter of Jona- 
than Sherman, a descendant of Henry Sherman, of 
Dedham, England, he also the ancestor of General 
William T. Sherman, of Civil War fame. The line 
is traced from Henry Sherman, of Dedham, England, 
through his son, Samuel, his son, Philip, the first 
treasurer of the Colony of Rhode Island, his son, 
Benjamin, his son, Jonathan, his daughter, Annie, 
wife of Benjamin Sherman. They were the parents 
of eight children: David, born September 18, 1744, 
died January 19, 1831 : Mary, married William Rey- 
nolds, and settled at Hoosick, N. Y.; Josiah, born 
Aug. 12, 1749, died Aug. 13, 1827; Jonathan, of fur- 
ther mention; Gideon, a Revolutionary pensioner, 
list of 1840: Benjamin, born Aug. 14, 1756, died May 
II, 1828; Gardiner, a Revolutionary pensioner, list 
of 1835; Annie, married Christopher Harrington. 

(III) Jonathan Lillibridge, son of Benjamin and 
Annie (Sherman) Lillibridge, was born August 28, 
1751, and died October 13, 1836. He was a man of 
large physical proportions, a substantial farmer of 
Exeter, owning three hundred acres of farm land. 
He served as ensign of the Third Exeter Company, 
G. Wilcox, captain. Ensign Jonathan Lillibridge 
married Mary, daughter of Henry and Mehitable 
(Waite) Reynolds. Children: Anna (Nanny), mar- 
ried Willett Rathbone; Clark, of further mention; 
Reynolds, born Nov. 14, 1782, died June 8, 1868, at 
Exeter; Hannah, married James Dye, and settled in 
Lebanon, N. Y.; a child, died in infancy; Mary, 
married at the age of fourteen George Hazard, of 
South Kingston, R. I. 

(IV) Clark Lillibridge, son of Jonathan and Mary 
(Reynolds) Lillibridge, was born in Exeter. R. I., 
August 4, 1779, died July 21, 1864, and is buried with 
his second wife at Patchaug, Griswold, Conn. He 
married (first), Feb. 14, 1799, Lydia Lewis, born Oct. 
19, 1780, died June 26, 1818, daughter of David and 
Molly (Sweet) Lewis. He married (second), Aug. 
15, 1819, Phoebe Bales, born Feb. 27, 1794, died Aug. 
4, 1862. daughter of Mowry and Hannah (Lewis) 
Bates. Children of first wife: Abbe, married Bene- 
dict Kenyon, of Richmond; Clark (2), married Eliza 
Tefft; Mary, married William Esmond; Jonathan, of 



further mention; Benjamin, born May 21, 1810, died 
March 18, 1886; Daniel, born May 12, 181 1, died Feb., 
1879; a child who died unnamed; David, born Sept. 
I, 1814, drowned at Troy, N. Y., Aug. ii, 1835; Lewis, 
died in infancy. Children by second wife: Nathan 
Bates, born June 21, 1820, died July i, 1887; Henry 
Reynolds, born March 9, 1822, died Oct. 9, 1875; Har- 
riet, born July 9, 1824, married Nelson Eno; William 
Smith, married Matilda Corey; Lydia, married Henry 
F. Douglas. 

(V) Jonathan (2) Lillibridge, son of Clark Lilli- 
bridge and his first wife, Lydia (Lewis) Lillibridge, 
was born May 31, 1809, and died November 16, i860. 
He married Elizabeth E. .\rnold, who died in 1893, 
aged ninety-three years. Children: Jesse Reynolds, 
of further mention; Lydia Lewis, born in 1S36, died 
unmarried, April 22, 1900; Phoebe, died young. 

(VI) Jesse Reynolds Lillibridge, son of Jonathan 
(2) and Elizabeth E. (.\rnold) Lillibridge, was born 
June 7, 1829, and is still living and resides in East 
Greenwich. He married, March 21, 1852, Mary C. 
Greene, born Dec. 13, 1831, died June 27, 1899. Chil- 
dren: Herbert M., born Nov. 19, 1852, and resides in 
Cliftondale, Mass.; Seth Edwin, of further mention; 
Nellie E., died in infancy; Byron Jesse, born Oct. 
3. i860, a graduate in medicine, Jefferson College, 
Philadelphia, Pa., a practicing physician of Provi- 
dence, R. I., married Gertrude Vinal, of Scituate, R. I.; 
Mary B., born Sept. 28, 1S66, died June 5, 1906. 

(VII) Seth Edwin Lillibridge, son of Jesse Rey- 
nolds and Mary C. (Greene) Lillibridge, was born 
June 4, 1856, and died April 25, igio. He gained a 
practical education by attending public schools and 
East Greenwich Academy, and after completing his 
studies he assisted his father, who for about twenty 
years was farm superintendent for Mrs. William God- 
dard, and upon the death of Mrs. Goddard the estate 
passed to her son, M. B. I. Goddard. At that time 
Seth E. Lillibridge became farm superintendent and 
continued as such for about thirty years, until the 
death of the owner. Mr. Lillibridge was a quiet, un- 
assuming man, of strong character, honest, staunch 
and loyal, very highly respected, and very faithful to 
the interests of his employers. He was a member of 
Quidnessett Baptist Church, and of King Solomon's 
Lodge, No. II. Mr. Lillibridge married, March 14, 
1877, Zilpha Knight Shippee, daughter of Wanton 
and Zilpha B. (Knight) Shippee, and their children 
were: i. Jesse Wanton, born Nov. 4, 1877, died .^ug. 
5, 1878. 2. Jesse Wanton Shippee, of further men- 
tion. 3. Maude Evelyn, born Aug. 23, 1882; married. 
May II, 1910, George A. Whitworth, of East Green- 
wich, R. I., one daughter, Marion. 4. Elizabeth Hope, 
born Nov. 28, 1884; married. Aug. 2, 1905. Lucius 
Gilbert Eldredge, of East Greenwich, R. I.; chil- 
dren: Lucius Gilbert, Jr., and Amie Gilbert. 5. Har- 
riett Frances, born Aug. 9, 1887, died Feb. 21, 1888. 6. 
Edna Raea, born .'\ug. 2. 1889; married, Nov. 26, 
1906, Fritz V. Algren, of East Greenwich, R. I.; 
three children: A. E. Leroy, Beatrice M., Norman F. 
7. Helen Zilpha, born June 5, 1891; married Jan. i, 
1915, Thomas Earl Laughlin, of Alden, Pa., one son, 
Thomas Earl, Jr. ' 8. Edwin, born Nov. 15, 1895, 




-'^s.^-ttn^-^'ijYi^/^j-r^-i, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



149 



died Nov. 17, 1895. g. Unnamed son, born and died 
Sept. 23, 1899. Mrs. Lillibridge was a descendant of 
David Shippee, who on -Vugust 15, 1664, married, in 
Warwick, R. I., Margaret Scranton. The line of 
descent was through their son, Samuel Shippee, his 
son, Thomas Shippee, his son, Caleb Shippee, his son, 
Lodowick Shippee, a resident of Shippectown, R. I., 
his son. Wanton Shippee, born July 27, 1827, father 
of Mrs. Lillibridge. On the maternal side, Mrs. Lilli- 
bridge was a granddaughter of Bucklin and Harriott 
Knight, and a great-granddaughter of Dr. Nathan 
Knight. 

(VIII) Jesse Wanton Shippee Lillibridge, son of 
Seth Edwin and Zilpha Knight (Shippee) Lillibridge, 
was born at the old homestead in East Greenwich, 
R. I., November 12, 1879. After attending the 
public schools he became a student at East Green- 
wich .\cademy, continuing until graduation in 1900. 
He then entered Brown University, class of 1904, 
but left in his junior year to become director of the 
commercial department of the Southwestern Louisiana 
Industrial Institute at Lafayette, La., a position he 
filled for four years. He then returned to the old 
homestead, and has since confined his activities to 
general farming and dairying, and official relation 
with the East Greenwich Farmers' Cooperative .As- 
sociation, of which he is vice-president, the East 
Greenwich Savings Fund and Loan .Association, of 
which he was the first secretary and treasurer, and is 
now a member of its board of directors. He is a 
member of Quidnessett Baptist Church, Quidnessett 
Grange, King Solomon's Lodge, No. 11, Ancient Free 
and -Accepted Masons; Narragansett Chapter, No. 
11, Royal Arch Masons; St. John's Commandery, No. 
I, Knights Templar. An unusual coincidence was 
noted in King Solomon's Lodge of East Greenwich 
at meetings occasionally, viz., the presence of three 
generations of this family in the lodge room at the 
same time, namely: Jesse R. Lillibridge, grandfather; 
Seth E. Lillibridge, father, and Jesse W. S. Lilli- 
bridge. 



FRANCIS JOSEPH McCABE, the popular and 
efficient postmaster of .Apponaug, R. I., and a man 
who almost more than any other is identified with the 
public aft'airs of this place, is a son of Edward and 
Catherine (McConnell) McCabc. The elder Mr. Mc- 
Cabe is a native of Ireland, having come to this coun- 
try in the year 1888 and settled at the town of Ap- 
ponaug, April 2, in that year. He built his home 
at .Apponaug and has resided in this place ever since. 
Mr. McCabe is associated with the .Apponaug Com- 
pany in an office of responsibility and trust, and is a 
well known man in the community. His wife, who 
was Catherine McConnell before her marriage to 
him, was also a native of Ireland, and died at 
Phenix, March 12, 1893. 

Born March 26, 1890, at Phenix. R. I., Francis Jo- 
seph McCabc received his early education at the pub- 
lic schools of Warwick, and afterwards attended eve- 
ning school there. He was but twelve years of age 
when he secured a position with the company of S. H. 
Greene & Son at a salary of two dollars per week. 



and worked for two years there in the bleachcry. 
When fourteen years of age, he became an office boy 
for the building and contracting firm of S. H. Watson, 
the concern that constructed the .Apponaug grammar 
school. His next position was in the office of the 
.Apponaug Company, with which his father was asso- 
ciated, where he worked as a lot tracer, until January 
15, 1914. It was on that date that Mr. McCabe was 
appointed by President Wilson postmaster of .Appo- 
naug, R. I., being at the time the youngest postmaster 
in New England. The Apponaug post office was then 
of the third class, but has since been advanced in 
grade, its gross receipts and salaries having risen to 
a considerable degree. On September 13, 1918, Mr. 
McCabe was reappointed postmaster of .Apponaug 
by executive order of the President, until death, resig- 
nation or removal. He has been an exceedingly active 
and capable officer in this important post and has 
done much to develop the department here, having ex- 
tended the rural delivery to several localities in this 
region, while the post-office boxes have increased 
in number from one hundred and eighty to two hun- 
dred and thirty-four. He has also had the rural free 
delivery extended so as to benefit the shore resorts 
adjacent and thereby benefiting over five hundred 
people. In June, 1915, the post office was removed 
from its old location to the new building on Main 
street, near the center of the business district. Mr. 
McCabe has thrown himself with enthusiasm into the 
war work of the community, and near the close of the 
War Saving Stamp campaign, had made the record of 
selling fourteen thousand dollars' worth of the stamps 
to the twelve hundred people of the community. He 
has also served as register in the draft board, and is 
a member of the Local Council of National Defense 
and its executive secretary. He has not limited his 
activities, however, to his official capacity, but has 
given general assistance to the draft board in various 
ways, and especially in locating the drafted men. He 
has been for a number of years a prominent factor 
in the local organization of the Democratic party, 
and served as a member of its town committee before 
his appointment as postmaster. Mr. McCabe has been 
very active in the real estate and fire insurance busi- 
ness which he established at Apponaug, in April, 
1916, and is an agent for the Home Fire Insurance 
Company and other great .American companies. Mr. 
McCabe was largely instrumental in securing the 
plant of the Narragansett Cotton Mills Corporation 
to locate in Apponaug. having sold tlie site for the 
location of the plant. He is a member of the Warwick 
Central Grange. Mr. McCabe was keenly interested 
in the part that this country played in the great war 
in Europe, and has done much to assist the young 
men of this region from the time of their enlistment 
until their departure. He possesses a unique collec- 
tion of photographs of all the boys who have enlisted 
from this neighborhood, many of which have been 
sent to him from the front in France. He was ex- 
ceedingly active in the Liberty Loan drives, and 
these pictures, together with relics sent to him from 
France, have been used by him in his activities in 
this direction. In his conduct of the post-office Mr. 



150 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



McCabc is assisted by the following staff: Miss 
Elinor R. Kirhy, assistant postmistress; George W. 
Briggs, a Civil War veteran, now mail messenger; 
Frederick F. Howard, rural mail carrier, and Francis 
B. Winter, substitute carrier. 



ERNEST AMABLE CHARON, M. D., one of the 

leading pliysici?.ns oi Manville, and a very prominent 
citizen of this place, is a native of Chambly, Quebec, 
Canada, where his birth occurred March 26, 1S68. 
He is a son of Amable and Elmira (Dauray) Charon, 
old and highly respected residents of that place, of 
whom the former is deceased, and the latter now 
makes her home at Providence, R. I. Mr. Charon, 
Sr., was a wheelwright by trade, the early part of his 
life being spent at Montreal and the latter at Provi- 
dence in this State. 

The family removed from Canada to the United 
States when Dr. Charon was twelve years of age, and 
here he gained the elementary portion of his educa- 
tion by attending La Salle Academy. He was a very 
ambitious youth, and determined to follow the medical 
profession as his career in life, with which end in view 
he matriculated at Laval University, Montreal, Can- 
ada, where he established an excellent record as a 
brilliant student, his work gaining the favorable atten- 
tion of the faculty of that great institution. He gradu- 
ated with the class of 1894, having taken his medical 
degree, and then became an interne at St. Joseph's 
Hospital at Providence, where he remained one year, 
gaining the necessary practical experience as a sup- 
plement to his theoretical knowledge. In 1896 he 
established himself in the practice of his profession at 
Providence, remaining in that city for about nine 
years, and in 1905 came to Manville, R. L, where 
he has been active ever since. He was governed in 
his purpose of coming to this place by the presence 
here of a large French settlement, and it is among 
these primarily, although by no means solely, that Dr. 
Charon has gained the large practice that he now 
enjoys. In the thirteen years that he has been prac- 
ticing here he has established an enviable reputation 
for skill and for adherence to the highest ethics of 
his profession, and is now universally recognized as 
one of the leading physicians in this region. In his 
religious belief Dr. Charon is a staunch Roman 
Catholic and is at the present time a member of the 
parish of St. James Roman Catholic Church at Man- 
ville. He is very active in the work of the church and 
a liberal supporter, particularly of its philanthropic 
and benevolent undertakings. He is a member of 
the local lodge of the Knights of Columbus, and 
those of the Order of Maccabees, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, the National Order of St. John the Baptist. 
Order of Artisans and the Canada-.\merican Associa- 
tion. With the exception of the Order of the Macca- 
bees, he is the medical examiner of all these bodies. 
In his politics Dr. Charon is a Democrat, and has 
been actively associated with the local organization of 
this party for a number of years. He was a member 
of the school committee of the town of Lincoln in 
1912-13-14, and at one time ran on the Democratic 
ticket as candidate for the State Senate, but was 



defeated at the election. Recently, Dr. Charon has 
found it necessary to withdraw from his political 
activities on account of the onerous demands made 
upon his time and energy by his professional work, to 
which he devotes himself with unreserved enthusiasm 
and zeal. 

Dr. Charon was united in marriage, October 26, 
l8g6, at Montreal, Canada, with Augustine LaBelle, 
of that city, a daughter of P. E. and Euphemia La- 
Belle. They are the parents of twelve children, as 
follows: Edward, John, Leo, Ann, Ernest, Charles 
Dauray, Gerard, Robert, Madeline, George, Eu- 
genia, Joseph, all of whom but the last three named 
are now at school. In addition to these Dr. and 
Mrs. Charon had two children, now deceased, Charles 
Edward and Ernest. 



FREDERICK TILLINGHAST ANDREWS — 

Among the influential citizens of Oak Lawn, R. I., 
should be mentioned Frederick Tillinghast Andrews, 
who has for many years been engaged successfully in 
the occupation of farming, and who has attained a high 
position in the esteem of his fellow townsmen. Mr. 
Andrews is a member of an old and distinguished 
New England family which came originally from 
Scotland, and was founded in this country by one 
John Andrews, at an early period in our Colonial 
history. 

(I) John McAndrews, or Andrews, first of Kings 
Town, came from Scotland to the New Eng- 
land colonies and lived for a time at Boston and 
Cape Cod, Mass. He is known to have lived 
in Kings Town before May 20, 1671, and his death 
occurred at that place before August 22, 1693, for at 
that date his eldest son, John .\ndrews, settled in the 
State. He was twice married, the name of his first 
wife being unknown, but by this union he had two 
children. John and William, the latter mentioned at 
length below. He married (second) Mary Ridgley, 
who died in 1716, the mother of five children, as fol- 
lows: Charles, James, Thomas, Edward (or Ed- 
mund), and Benoni. 

(II) William .Andrews, son of John Andrews^ was 
born August 23, 1679, at East Greenwich, R. I., and 
married, September 25, 1700, .''innie Searle, by whom 
he had four children, as follows: John, who is men- 
tioned below; Charles. Mary, and William, Jr. Wil- 
liam, Sr., died in 1762, and his administration was 
granted to his eldest son, John Andrews, in Cov- 
entry. 

(III) John Andrews, son of William and Annie 
(Searle) .Andrews, was born March 23, 1702, at East 
Greenwich. He later removed to Coventry, where 
his death occurred May 18, 1795. He married Hannah 
Greene, daughter of John and Abigail D. Greene, and 
granddaughter of John Greene, of London, England, 
the traditional regicide judge clerk, who, like others, 
fled when Charles II. came to the throne of England, 
less they should be executed for condemning his 
father. John Andrews came from Frenchtown, East 
Greenwich, and settled on Maple Root plains, in 
Coventry. He and his wife were members of the 
Maple Root Six Principle Baptist Church. They were 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



151 



the parents of lour children, as follows: Annie, who 
married, Jan. 4, 17S1, Robert Weaver, of Coventry; 
Hannah, who died unmarried, at an advanced age; 
Elnathan, who is mentioned at length below: and 
William, who married Rebecca Greene, of Coventry, a 
daughter of Ebenezer Greene. 

(IV) Elnathan Andrews, son of John and Hannah 
(Greene) Andrews, was born February 22. 1732 (the 
same day that the birth of George Washington oc- 
curred), and probably married, June 22, 1757, Jane 
Greene, of Coventry, daughter of Ebenezer Greene, 
granddaughter of John and Abigail Greene, and 
great-granddaughter of John Greene, of London. Mr. 
Andrews died June 21, 1824, at the age of ninety-two 
years. He married (first) Waitey , and (sec- 
ond) Elizabeth, the widow of Ezekiel Johnson. By 
his first wile he had the following children: Waitey, 
Bethana, Timothy, who is mentioned below: John, 
and Rebecca. 

(V) Timothy .\ndrews, son of Elnathan and Waitey 
Andrews, was born November 27, 1762, at Coventry, 
and died at West Greenwich, September 5. 1843. He 
married Russelle Mattison. of West Greenwich, daugh- 
ter of William and Sarah (Lee) Mattison. the former a 
son of Joseph and Martha (Greene) Mattison. and the 
latter a daughter of Peter and Rachel (Russelle) Lee. 
Mrs. Andrews was born in 1757, and died February 
J. 1847. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: I. Bethana, born in Coventry, Jan, 2, 1785, died 
at West Greenwich, Jan. 29, 1865; married, July 28, 
1807, Caleb Sweet, of that place. 2. Freelove, born in 
Coventry, July 13, 1786, died in West Greenwich. Dec. 
29, 1871: in 1805 she married (first) Benjamin Vick- 
ery, of Dighton, Mass., by whom she had seven chil- 
vJren: she married (second) Aug. 30, 1835. .Amos 
^L^ttison, of West Greenwich. 3. Peleg. born at Cov- 
entry, April 29, 1790, died March 6, 1855: married 
Marcey James, born April 23, 1790, died April 11, 1855, 
by whom he had four children. 4. Jane, born at Cov- 
entry, April 10. 1792, died there, Jan. 2;^, 1881; mar- 
ried, in 1809, Perry Greene James, of West Green- 
wich, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Greene) James. 
5. Charles, born at Coventry, in i793. died when 
about twelve years of age. 6. Sally, born at Cov- 
entry, in 1794, died Nov. 27, 1842, at West Green- 
wich; married, in 1817, William Sweet, of West 
Greenwich, son of Barton and Rachel Sweet, to whom 
she bore nine children. 7. George, born at Coventry, 
Aug. 7, 1797, died at Noank, (Tonn., April 7, 1872; 
married, Dec. 11, 1829, Mary Esther Barnes, of Led- 
yard, Conn., daughter of Amos and Mary Barnes. 8. 
Mattison, born at Coventry, in 1799, died at Xatick, 
R. L, Jan. 27, 1852; married, in the autumn of 1819, 
Lucy Sweet, of South Kingstown, by whom he had 
nine children. 9. Jonathan, born at Coventry, Oct. 
5, 1801, died in Minnesota, Jan. 24. 1868: married, 
Aug. 30, 1825, Ruby Sweet, of West Greenwich, 
daughter of Burton and Rachel Sweet, she born Nov. 
2, 1802, at Crossville, Tenn., died Aug. 10, 1869, the 
mother of seven children. 10. Joanna, born at Cov- 
entry, in 1804, died there, .\ug. 14, 1879; in 1824-25 
she married Seneca Williams, of North Stonington, 
Conn., son of Uriah and Johanna Williams, to whom 



she bore four children. 11. John, who is mentioned at 
length below. 12. Nelson, born at Coventry, Oct. 
30, 1808, died there, .\ug. 28, 1882; married, Jan. 2, 
1833, Merebah Whitman Harrington, of West Green- 
wich, daughter of Ebenezer and Huldah (.Johnson) 
Harrington, by whom he had nine children. 

(VI) John Andrews, eleventh child of Timothy and 
Russelle (Mattison) Andrews, and father of Frederick 
Tillinghast Andrews, of this sketch, was born July 
4, 1806, at Coventry, and died at Cranston, R. I., Oct. 
3, 1896. He married (first) Aug. 25, 1827, Antha 
Sweet, of West Greenwich, daughter of William and 
Elsie Sweet, she born Sept. 7, 1809, and died Oct. 10, 
1859, at West Greenwich. He married (second) Mary 
(Battey) Mattison, of West Greenwich, daughter of 
James and Maplet Battey, and widow of Thomas Mat- 
tison. By his first wife John .Andrews had thirteen 
children, as follows: I. Timothy, born Nov. 30, 1828, 
married, Dec. 18, 1847, Eunice Mattison. of West 
Greenwich, daughter of Asa and Merebah (Potter) 
Mattison. 2. William, born Sept. i, 1830, at West 
Greenwich, married (first) May 18, 1849. .\bbie Wood- 
mansee. daughter oi Samuel and Mehala Woodman- 
see, and (second) in 1862, .Ann Mystilla Tarbox, of 
East Greenwich. 3. Elsie, born in West Greenwich, 
April 15, 1832, married, Dec. 12, 1847, John Mattison, 
of West Greenwich, son of Asa and Merebah (Pot- 
ter) Mattison, to whom she bore nine children. 4. 
Mary Ann, born at West Greenwich, May 7, 1834, died 
April 20, 1861: married, Sept. 11, 1852, Samuel Hoxie 
Barber, of Exeter, R. I., to whom she bore four children. 
5. Jonah Titus, born at West Greenwich, July 31, 1836, 
married. Sept. 10, 1857, Mary Ann Sweet, daughter of 
Amos and Ruth C. (Browm) Sweet. 6. Phebe, born 
at West Greenwich, May 13, 1839, died Sept. 8, 1843. 
7. .Abel, born at West Greenwich, April 17, 1841, died 
Sept. 5, 1843. 8. Abbie Frances, born at West Green- 
wich, March 31, 1843, died there, in June. 1875; mar- 
ried, July 7, i860, Job Whitman Harrington, born July 
23, 1842, at West Greenwich. 9. John Francis, born 
at West Greenwich, May 2, 1845, died Nov. 11, 1878; 
married, December 25, 1866, Mary Elizabeth Howard, 
by whom he had two children. 10. Lois A., born at 
West Greenwich, .April 15, 1847, married, June 30, 
1864, Lucius E. Cahoon, born Oct. 12, 1840. 11. Nel- 
son, born at West Greenwich, April 5, 1849, married, 
June II, 1871, Phebe E. Spencer, of East Greenwich, 
by whom he had one child. 12. Frederick Tillinghast, 
who is mentioned at length below. 13. Jane, born at 
West Greenwich. May 10, 1853, married, Oct. 12, 1876, 
Halscy James Briggs, of West Greenwich, to whom 
she bore three children. 

(VII) Frederick Tillinghast Andrews, twelfth child 
ofjohn and Antha (Sweet) Andrews, was born March 
23, 1851, at West Greenwich, R. I. As a child he 
attended the local district school, where he established 
an excellent reputation for scholarship. While still a 
lad, he assisted his father with the work on the lat- 
ter's farm and has always continued in this occupa- 
tion up to the present time. He became the owner 
of his present farm at Oak Lawn, Cranston township, 
in 1900, and since that time has developed and im- 
proved his place highly. This property consists of 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



one hundred and ninety-two acres of excellent farm 
land and here Mr. Andrews has built a modern and 
up-to-date dairy. He carries on general farming and 
dairy operations and is the owner of a fine herd of 
fifty-five milch cows, the product of which he sells in 
the surrounding region. He also owns a number of 
fine horses, oxen, etc., to carry on the work of his 
farm. He is at the present time regarded as one of 
the most substantial and successful farmers of the 
region and his business is a large one. Mr. .\ndrews 
has also been exceedingly active in the public life of 
the community and has identified himself with a num- 
ber of important organizations here. In his religious 
belief he is a Baptist and attends the Maplewood 
Church of that denomination at Cranston. Fie is a 
Republican in politics and is one of the leaders of the 
party in this region, which he has represented in the 
House of Representatives of the State, serving on 
that body from 1908 to 1910 inclusive. At that time 
he also served on the legislative committees on the 
military and labor. He has also held other offices in 
this region and was for sixteen years a member of the 
county board. 

Frederick Tillinghast Andrews was united in mar- 
riage, .August 31, 1876, with Clara J. Vaughn, daugh- 
ter of George B. and Mary A. Vaughn, and a native 
of West Greenwich, where she was born September 
29- 1855- 



CALIXTE J. COUTU— Prominent in Franco- 
American circles in the Pawtuxet Valley, a business 
leader and well known contractor for several decades, 
a notable figure in club and fraternal life, the late 
Calixte J. Coutu, of Arctic, R. I., was a vital factor in 
many departments of the life of the valley, and a man 
whose place, vacated by death, will never be ade- 
quately filled. Calixte J. Coutu was born in the town 
of St. Feli.x de Valois, Province of Quebec, Canada, 
son of Pierre and Angele (Charpagne) Coutu, on .^pril 
22, 1874, member of a French-Canadian family of 
considerable antiquity and prominence. He was edu- 
cated in the schools of his native village, and at the 
age of sixteen years came to the United States, set- 
tling with relatives in the Pawtuxet Valley. Here 
he continued his education under the tutelage of Pro- 
fessor Deering, attending also the evening schools to 
perfect a knowledge of English. In early manhood 
he apprenticed himself to the carpenter's trade, and 
after a short training as apprentice and journeyman, 
established himself in business independently on a 
small scale in the town of Arctic. He rose rapidly to 
the fore in this field, and within a short period attained 
a widespread reputation in the Pawtuxet Valley for 
ability as a contractor and builder. Mr. Coutu was 
for nearly two decades one of the foremost contrac- 
tors in the valley, as is attested by the fact that he 
was awarded contracts for numerous public and semi- 
public buildings. Among the buildings of note which 
he erected in Kent county are: The St. Onge block, 
and the Archambault block in Arctic; the addition to 
St. Joseph's Church, Natick; the addition to the Baker 
Street School, Natick; the addition to the Centreville 



school, and the Buttonwoods school; and the Odeon 
building, the finest building in Arctic (French Thea- 
tre). He was also constantly engaged in the building 
of fine private residences. He was the proprietor of 
the well known Arctic Cabinet Works and Lumber, a 
business which is a monument to his genius as an 
organizer and executive. At the time of his death 
he was engaged in building the new club of the .An- 
thony Athletic Association. 

Through prominence in business circles he was 
brouglit naturally into the field of public afltairs, and 
although deterred by business responsibilities from 
continued participation in public affairs, in 1915 he 
accepted the nomination for office as tax assessor. 
He was reelected in 1916, and again in 1917, and on 
the completion of his third term refused renomination. 
He was actively identified with all movements which 
had for their end the advancement of public welfare. 
An ardent Democrat in political affiliation, he was for 
many years influential in the councils of the party. 

A prominent figure and recognized leader in club 
and fraternal circles, Mr. Coutu was a member of 
Court George Etienne Cartier, Canado-.\mericains, 
of which he was president: James P. Gibson Coun- 
cil, No. 181, Knights of Columbus: Warwick Aerie, 
No. 1313, Fraternal Order of Eagles; Warwick 
Lodge. No. 996, Loyal Order of Moose; Court Mer- 
cier, Franco-.-\merican Foresters, and Union St. Jean 
Baptiste Societe. He was highly esteemed in all 
these organizations, and his sudden death at the height 
of a successful career which gave promise of still 
further attainments, came as a decided blow and deep 
grief to hundreds of his friends and acquaintances. A 
man of strong and virile personality, sincere in his 
friendships, courteous and kindly, rich in sympathy 
and understanding, he drew to him magnetically men 
of all walks of life, who remained his steadfast friends 
throughout life. As a business man of more than 
ordinary ability, indomitable of purpose, and of unim- 
peachable integrity, a keen competitor, though fair, he 
gained the respect and admiration of the business 
world of Kent county. Men who knew him and saw 
his feet firmly planted on the ladder of success, ex- 
pected still greater success for him. 

On June 5, 1893, Mr. Coutu married (first) Malvina 
Laplume. They were the parents of three children: I. 
Albert, born May 4, 1S95. 2. Alice, born .\ug. 6, 1896. 
3. Anatole, born July 24, 1898. Mr. Coutu married 
(second) Feb. i, 1904, Mary Jeanne Forcier, daughter 
of Nazarre Forcier and Helene (.\uclair) Forcier, of 
Canada. Mrs. Coutu, who survives her husband, and 
resides in .Arctic, R. I., manages the extensive Coutu 
business interests with the aid of her step-sons. She 
is also active in war work, and since the outbreak of 
the European W'ar has made her home the head- 
quarters for the collection and repairing of garments 
for the stricken people of Belgium and northern 
France. Mrs. Coutu has long been a leader in social 
circles in the valley. 

Calixte J. Coutu died suddenly at his home in 
Arctic, R. I., on December 11, 1917, aged forty-three 
years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



153 



CHARLES HENRY CASEY, D. D. S.— The 

years, twenty-nine, comprising the span of life thus 
far accomphshcd by Dr. Casey have been spent in 
Providence, R. I., barring only the years spent in den- 
tal college in Baltimore, Md. He is a true native son, 
and is one of those whom the city takes pride in 
acknowledging. He is a son of Patrick Francis and 
Mary (Reilly) Casey, they the parents of three sons 
and two daughters, all living. The parents reside in 
Riverside, R. I., the father holding responsible posi- 
tion in a department store in Providence. Dr. Casey 
has practiced his profession in Providence since 1913, 
and has succeeded in establishing a good practice, but 
at his country's call he volunteered his services in 
1917, and is a member of the United States Dental 
Ofticers' Reserve Corps, ranking as first lieutenant, 
entered regularly upon his duties in June, 191S. 

Charles Henry Casey was born in Providence, R. I., 
June 29, 1889, and obtained his early education in the 
public schools and also in La Salle .Academy, and 
while there formed the resolution to become a den- 
tist. \\'hile still a school boy he was employed in the 
office of Dr. Burgess, a prominent dentist, evenings, 
Saturdays and vacation periods, the money thus earned 
being placed in a fund to finance his own professional 
education. He was in Dr. Burgess' office three years, 
then in lOlo, entered the dental department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Baltimore, whence he was grad- 
uated D. D. S., class of 1913. The same year he 
returned to Providence, began practice, and so con- 
tinues, his call to the colors in June, 1918, being the 
first break in his practice. His way was not made 
easy for him, either in acquiring his education or in 
building up a practice, as he financed his own educa- 
tion and has bent every energy to making the educa- 
tion he strove so hard for, yield its proper harvest. He 
is a member of St. Brendon's Roman Catholic Church, 
the Knights of Columbus, Psi Omega Delta fraternity, 
and in politics is an Independent. Dr. Casey is un- 
married. 

Dr. Casey has two brothers. .Austin Paul Casey, in 
the medical department, United States army, stationed 
at Spartansburg, S. C, going to France; Calvert Ed- 
mond, a student in Brown University. He also has 
two sisters, Alice Claire and Madeline Estelle, both 
residing at home. 



JAMES RICHARDS LAWRY— Since 1914 Mr. 
Lawry has been engaged in business operations in 
Providence as head of the firm of J. R. Lawry & Son, 
conducting a monumental works as the successor of 
John O'Brien, whose location and business interests 
he purchased. Mr. Lawry is a son of John T. and 
Elizabeth (Richards) Lawry, and was educated in the 
schools of the various places in Maine and Massachu- 
setts to which his father's business, stone cutting, 
carried the family. As a young man he learned the 
stone cutter's art and to the present time he has fol- 
lowed that calling. .\ few years after making his 
home in Providence he became the owner of the busi- 
ness he now conducts, his son associated with him 
until his death. Mr. Lawry is himself an expert 
worker in stone and a designer of taste and ability, 



specimens of his work in the largest cemeteries of the 
State bearing eloquent testimony to the high order of 
his firm's workmanship. J. R. Lawry & Son have 
e.xecuted commissions for monuments that have been 
placed in burial grounds in other States, and the repu- 
tation of the firm is of the best. Mr. Lawry is a 
member of the Episcopal church, and fraternizes with 
the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Lawry married, July 3, 1914, Sarah M. (Green- 
ougli) Lynn, widow of John Lynn, born in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, died February 7, 1918. By her former 
marriage Mrs. Lawry was the mother of two children: 
Ellis, who died May 7, 1917, was adopted by Mr. 
Lawry and given his name, his associate in business; 
and Lulu. 



WILLIAM JAMES SWORD, proprietor of the 
large and popular tlorist establishment in Valley Falls, 
is a native of this place, his birth having occurred 
here on February 28, 1884. He is a son of Walter 
Scott Sword, whose death occurred August 12, 1918, 
and who was the founder of the large florist business 
of which his son is now the head. The elder Mr. 
Sword was born at Marblchead, Mass., in the year 
1857, and there received his education at the local 
public school. At the age of twenty years he went 
to Bristol, R. I., where for a time he worked in the 
large industrial plant. His next move was to Paw- 
tuckot, where he secured a position with James Nes- 
bit, who owned a florist business there, and here he 
gained a wide knowledge and a strong taste for this 
kind of work. After his marriage in 1881, he came to 
Valley Falls, and here established the present business 
of which he remained the head until the time of his 
death. He was a member of the Valley Falls Baptist 
Church, and was a man of strong religious instincts 
and an upright Christian life. He was affiliated with 
a large number of fraternal associations here, and was 
a member of Good Samaritan Lodge, No. 8, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, which he joined April 
4, 1885; of Manchester Encampment, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; of Conorchet Lodge, No. ID, 
Improved Order of Red Men, and was past sachem 
of the same. For a number of years Mr. Sword 
w^as chief of the Valley Falls fire department, and 
he was a member of the Rhode Island Florist As- 
sociation, and an associate member of the Pawtucket 
Post, Grand .Army of the Republic. He married Mary 
Nickle, and they were the parents of four children, as 
follows : William James, with whose career we are 
here especially concerned ; David, who now resides at 
Pawtucket, R. I.; Charles, who makes his home at 
South .\ttleboro, Mass. ; and Jennie, who became the 
wife of George B. Campbell, of Valley Falls, R. I. 

William James Sword attended the grammar and high 
school grades at the public schools of Valley Falls, and 
after three years at the latter institution, worked with 
his father in the florist business which he had estab- 
lished here in 1881. He learned quickly and l>ecame a 
thorough master of all the details of this business, and 
for two years before his father's death, in 1918, was 
practically the manager of the concern. Since that 
event he has become its owner and his long experience 



154 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



has eminently fitted him to carry on successfully his 
father's work. Although not formally a member of any 
church, Mr. Sword attends Christ's Episcopal Church of 
Lonsdale, and is an active supporter of the work of 
the church. Like his father he is a member of Good 
Samaritan Lodge, No. S, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; Manchester Encampment, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; Conorchet Lodge, No. 10, Improved 
Order of Red "Men. and is prominent in social circles 
here. He is now collector for the Improved Order of 
Red Men. and is also a member of the United Order 
of .American Mechanics. In politics he is independent 
of any party, and at the present time is tree warden of 
\'alley Falls. 

William James Sword was united in marriage, Novem- 
ber i6, 1909, with Emma Gertrude McCauley, of this 
town, a daughter of the late State Senator J. P. and 
Mary (Parker) McCauley, of Lonsdale. 



JAMES EDWARD CUFF, well and favorably 
known chief of police of Cranston, R. I., is a prom- 
inent figure in the life of the community in which he 
lives. He was born December 28, 1876, in East Green- 
wich, R. I., son of Patrick F. and Mary A. (McCabe) 
Cuff, both of whom are now living in Cranston. 

Patrick F. Cuff was born in Ireland, and at the age 
of ten years he came with his parents to America, 
locating in Cranston, R. I. It was here that Patrick 
F. Cuff began life in his new country as an employee 
of the Cranston Print Works. Alert and industrious, 
he rapidly worked his way up until he became the fore- 
man of the plant. He then removed to East Green- 
wich. R. I., and after a short stay returned to Cranston, 
assuming again his position as bleacher foreman and 
continuing in that capacity until his retirement. Mr. 
and Mrs. Patrick F. Cuff were the parents of six 
children, viz. : James Edward, of whom further ; Mary 
A., deceased ; Eva Irene, deceased ; Walter Leo, bom 
1885, now manager of the J. E. Cuff plumbing estab- 
lishment; Ella M., the wife of Richard T. Healey of 
Chicago, III.; and Etta, who is at home with her 
parents. 

James Edward Cuff was born at East Greenwich, 
during the short residence of his parents in that vil- 
lage, and was brought by them to Cranston when he 
was three years of age. He received his education in 
the public schools of Cranston, after which he entered 
business life as an apprentice to the plumbing trade. 
In 1903 he engaged in that business on his own account, 
opening an establishment at No. 587 Broad street, 
Providence, R. I. This concern is to-day at the same 
location, and is managed by his brother. Walter L. Cuff. 
In 1910, when Cranston was incorporated as a city, 
James Edward Cuff was appointed to the position of 
the first chief of police. In the new office he instituted 
many reforms, and through his ingenuity made the 
organization a modern and efficient department. He 
inaugurated a system of supervision and discipline of 
members, and installed and equipped the department 
and its personnel with every modern accoutrement, and 
the efficiency resulting reflects very great credit upon 
the city and its executive head. Some idea of the ex- 
acting duties required may be seen in knowledge of the 
fact that the department polices an area of over thirty 
square miles. Mr. Cuff's first term of appointment as 



chief of police expired in 1912, and in 1915 he was 
re-appointed to that office, and continues in that capacity 
at the present time (1919). 

James Edward Cuff, as his successful career in the 
department of police shows, is a most public-spirited 
man, and has taken an active part in many different 
aspects of the life of this place. He serves his city of 
Cranston also as a member of the Fire Department. He 
is a prominent and respected member of St. Anne's 
Roman Catholic Church and belongs to the Cranston 
Council of the Knights of Columbus. He is aftiliated 
with the Edgewood Yacht Club, and the Rhode Island 
Yacht Clul). Mr. Cuff is not married. 



WILLIAM RAYMOND BURKE, D. D. S., well 
know-n dental practitioner, was born in Stonington, 
Conn., November 13, 1883. He is a son of Edward and 
Mary (Sullivan) Burke, his father a retired con- 
tractor of Stonington, Conn., his mother deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Burke had four daughters, Catherine, .Annie, 
Frances and Helen, all now residing in Providence, 
and two other sons, Edward, a student in Tufts Medi- 
cal College, class of 1918, and John, a resident of Prov- 
idence. 

William Raymond Burke completed the public school 
courses at Stonington with graduation from high school 
in igo2. He was variously employed for a year or 
two, then decided upon a profession, and entered Bal- 
timore College of Dentistry, and in 1907 was graduated 
D. D. S. The same year he located in Providence. R. I., 
opening office at No. 411 Howard building, there min- 
istering to the dental needs of a large clientele. Dr. 
Burke is a member of St. Joseph's Church, Knights of 
Columbus. Catholic Club, Columbus Club, St. Michael's 
Catholic Club. Metacomet Golf Club, Providence Lodge, 
No. 14. Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Phi 
Psi Phi fraternity, Rhode Island Dental Society, and 
member of the executive committee. His favorite re- 
creations are golf and fishing, his politics, independent. 

Dr. Burke married, September 9, 1914. in St. Joseph's 
Church, Providence, R. I., .A.gnes Cecelia Conlonche. 
They are the parents of a daughter, Barbara, born in 
Providence, January 16, 1918. 



JAMES GERALD HINES— On October i, 18S3, 
the business now incorporated as the Thurston Manu- 
facturing Company, of Providence, R. I., was estab- 
lished by Horace Thurston for the manufacture of 
machinery and fine tools used by the jewelry trade. 
The company has ever been a prosperous one, their 
product being sold all over the United States and in 
foreign countries. Since 1903 Mr. Hines has been con- 
nected with the company, and since July, 1913, has been 
treasurer and a member of the board of directors. 

James G. Hines was born in Oak Lawn, town of 
Cranston. R. I., December 22, 1879, son of James and 
Mary (Cuddy) Hines, his father deceased, his mother 
a resident of Oak Lawn. He finished public school 
courses with graduation from Cranston High School 
in 1900, following this study by eighteen months at 
LaSalle Academy, Providence. He was a student in 
Canada for eighteen months after leaving LaSalle, then 
took a course at Bryant & Stratton Business College, 
Providence. He began business life as a clerk with 
the Thurston Manufacturing Company, of Providence, 





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BIOGRAPHICAL 



155 



and for the past fifteen years, 1903-18, he has been 
associated with the company, now being treasurer and 
director. Mr. Hines is a member of St Michael's 
Roman Catholic Church, treasurer of the local order. 
Knights of Columbus; member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; and in politics is an In- 
dependent. 

Mr. Hines married, November 22, 1917, Ellen Mary 
Stone, of Auburn, R. I., and they are the parents of a 
son, Jnmes Gerald, Jr. 



RALPH COLLINGWOOD WATROUS— Since 

1804 the real estate business has closely held the interest 
of Ralph C. Watrous, and so vigorously has he pur- 
sued the business that since August, 1908, it has been 
conducted by a corporation known as the Ralph C. 
Watrous Company, of which he is president and a direc- 
tor. The offices of the company are at \o. 436 Indus- 
trial Trust building. Providence, and there a very large 
business is conducted through the varied departments 
of real estate operation and development into which 
the company is divided. Mr. Watrous is one of the 
leading operators of the city, and during the quarter of 
a century that he has operated in Providence he has 
been concerned in many of the most important move- 
ments in Providence real estate, both city and sub- 
urban. He is an expert on valuation and investment, 
his opinion on property values having the weight of 
linal authority. He has been very successful in his 
undertakings, and is one of the substantial, highly 
regarded men of his business. He is a son of Leonard 
and Mary .\. (Nichols) Watrous, of Mystic, Conn. 

Ralph Collingwood Watrous was born in Mystic, 
Conn., July 19, 1866, and there obtained his early edu- 
cation in- the public schools. He continued his studies 
in the public schools of Hope Valley, R. I., and was 
variously engaged until 1894, when he located in the 
city of Providence. R. I., which city has since been his 
home. After coming to the city he opened a real 
estate office, and soon became well known as a j'oung 
man of great energy and unusual ability. His opera- 
tions increased in importance as the years passed, until 
finally his business grew bej'ond his ability to handle 
•t properly and to distribute the work, and the Ralph 
C. Watrous Company was incorporated, Ralph C. \\'at- 
rous, president. This office he still holds, the company 
a large and prosperous realty corporation. In the pur- 
suit of his career Mr. ^^'atrous has acquired other in- 
terests of importance, and holds official relation with 
, them. He is a director of the Rhode Island Safe 
Deposit Company; director of the Title Guarantee Com- 
j pany of Rhode Island, and a member of the executive 
I committee; is president of the Wood River Branch 
Railroad Company; and has other interests. 
In 1907 and 1908. Mr. Watrous was lieutenant-gov- 
! emor of Rhode Island, elected on the Republican ticket, 
' his record as presiding officer of the Senate and in the 
performance of the other duties of his office being 
highly creditable. He is a member of the Providence 
Chamber of Commerce, the Radio Institute of New 
York, Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery of the 
York Rite of Masonry, a thirty-second .degree member 
of the Ancient .\ccepted Scottish Rite, a member of 
Central Congregational Church, and of the Providence 
clubs, Chomouwauke Lodge, Squantum Association, 



.\rt and Turk's Head. He is a man of strong social 
instincts, and extremely fond of out-of-door sports, is 
an expert amateur photographer, and an adv.Tnced ex- 
perimenter in wireless telegraphy. His summer home 
at Warwick Neck is an abode of hospitality and good 
cheer. 

Mr. Watrous married, June 23, 1892, Susan A. Al- 
drich, of Providence, R. I. The family home is at 
No. 20 Deman place. 



FREDERIC S. NOCK— The career of Frederic S. 
Niick is an excellent example of the i)ossibilities that 
await an ambitious and well educated young man who 
comes here to make his home and his fortune. There 
is always an element of the picturesque and interesting 
in the story of the foreigner who makes his way to 
the top of the ladder of success and wins the prize 
despite every handicap, and this is true in the case of 
the life history of Frederic S. Nock. It is no less 
noteworthy because he came trained for the work he 
was to undertake, for many as well equipped as he have 
never acquired the necessary momentum to enable 
them to leave the ranks and attain a competency and 
success. 

Frederic S. Nock is a designer and builder of yachts 
and other small craft at East Greenwich, R. I., and in 
this village conducts a large and flourishing business at 
the foot of Division street. He is a native of Eng- 
land, having been born in Birmingham, November 20, 
1.H71. He is a son of Stephen Leith and Emma (Marsh) 
Nock, of that city, his father having been a noted 
worker in art metal, and was an authority in the 
ecclesiastical branch c^f this art. He was also a skilled 
construction engineer. Stephen L. Nock died in 1906, 
his wife still being alive and now makes her home 
with her son in East Greenwich. 

Frederic S. Nock was educated under private tutors 
in Birmingham up to the time of the removal of the 
family to London, after which he entered Hand's 
School, where he did college preparatory work. He 
then went to the school of the British and Foreign 
Schools Society in London, and was graduated from 
its technical course. He was then apprenticed under 
the direction of his father to the trade of pattern- 
making in wood and metal. He was an energetic and 
ambitious young man, and foreseeing the larger oppor- 
tunities awaiting effort on the other side of the Atlantic, 
came over early in life to try his fortune in America. 
In the j'ear 1894 he founded the Narragansett Yacht 
Agency, a highly successful enterprise in Providence, 
and in 1900 became connected with- the Holmes Ship- 
building Company of Mystic, Conn., in which, on acr 
count of his wide knowledge of ship construction, he 
was employed as naval architect and superintendent. 
In the year 1902 he acquired the possession of the boat- 
shops and marine railway situated at the foot of 
Division street. East Greenwich, and here a large and 
prosperous business is at present conducted under his 
personal management. The establishment is large and 
splendidly equipped with every modern device in use 
for the building of vessels of all types, and there is 
every preparation for doing high-class building and repair 
work. His docks contain twelve feet of water at low 
tide, making them adequate for the receiving of vessels 
of large size. There is a large basin for storage pur- 



•156 



HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



poses, with twenty feet of water and with every facility 
for the hauling out of vessels and their storage during 
winter months. 

Mr. Nock's skill as a designer and builder of vessels 
has brought him into wide prominence in yachting 
circles throughout the entire country, and has brought 
him patronage from far and near. His ability has been 
amply proven through many years of activity, and 
many of the finest sailing yachts and power boats have 
come from his stocks. He was the designer and builder 
of the launch "Circe," which in its time was the finest 
gasoline launch of its size in the country. Perhaps his 
most famous work was the "Ethelea," a gasoline yacht 
seventy feet in length, with a speed of twenty-three 
knots, which is the finest and fastest of her kind yet 
built. This boat is a radical departure from all the 
accepted standards, but her performance has been 
such as to vindicate in every particular the theories of 
her builder, and is still in active service. Mr. Nock is 
universally regarded as one of the most capable and 
masterly builders of vessels who has ever operated in 
this region, and takes a high place among the whole 
fraternity of builders and designers in the United 
States. He keeps in touch with all the advances made 
in the science of ship-building, and he never allows any 
detail on the technical or business side of the enterprise 
to escape his vigilance. Mr. Nock is an active and in- 
terested member of the Society of Naval Architects and 
Marine Engineers, and of the New England Engine 
and Boat Association. He also holds membership in 
the Varnum Continentals, a military organization of 
East Greenwich ; in the Rhode Island Yacht Club ; in 
the Edgewood (R. I.) Vacht Club; in the East Green- 
wich (R. I.) Yacht Club; in the Harrington (R. I.) 
Yacht Club, and in the Boston (Mass.) Yacht Club. 
In political beliefs Mr. Nock is a Republican. 

Mr. Nock married, January 30, 1897, Florence E. 
Adams, daughter of S. F. Adams, of Providence, R. I. 



JOSEPH B. O'NEILL, A. B., M. D., a native and 
life-long resident of Pawtucket, R. I., where he now 
enjoys a wide reputation as a capable and successful 
physician, was born March 7, 1871, a son of Daniel 
and Ellen (McCanna) O'Neill. His parents were both 
born in Ireland and came to the United States in early 
youth and settled in Massachusetts where they were 
married and shortly afterwards removed to Pawtucket. 
Mr. O'Neill here became one of the pioneer undertakers 
of the city and died in the year 1905. His wife had 
already died in the year iSgo. 

Joseph B. O'Neill, their son, attended the public 
schools at Pawtucket, where he was prepared for col- 
lege, and then attended Brown University from which 
institution he graduated with the class of 1894, receiv- 
ing the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He had already 
determined upon medicine as a profession, and accord- 
ingly entered the Medical School of the University of 
Maryland where he gained his medical degree in 1900. 
Dr. O'Neill then took a post-graduate course at the 
Post Graduate Hospital at New York City, and after 
remaining there for two years, returned in 1902 to 
Pawtucket and began active practice there. He met 
with substantial success from the outset and eventually 
opened an office at No. 180 liast avenue, and still makes 
that his headquarters. 



Dr. O'Neill married. November 23, 1910, at Paw- 
tucket. Miss Margaret F. Montague, a daughter of 
Michael and Sarah (Mc."\levy) Montague, old and high- 
ly respected residents of that city. Mr. Montague, who 
was for many years an employee of the Union Wadding 
Company, is now deceased, but Mrs. Montague sur- 
vives him and resides still at Pawtucket. Dr. and Mrs. 
O'Neill are the parents of one child, Margaret M. 

Dr. O'Neill enlisted and was commissioned first- 
lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the United States 
Army, October, 1918, and was stationed at Camp Green- 
leaf (Chicamaugua Park), Ga., and was mustered out 
December 20, 1918. 

Dr. O'Neill is a prominent figure in the social and 
club life of Pawtucket and is associated with a number 
of important organizations there. Besides the Provi- 
dence Medical Association, of which he is a very 
active member, he is affiliated with the Pawtucket 
Council, Knights of Columbus; the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, the Modern Woodmen of America; and 
the Irish National Foresters. He has always been in- 
terested in the welfare of the city and has given many 
proofs of his public spirit. 



GEORGE WILLIAM SMITH— As agent of the 

National & Providence Worsted Mills, Mr. Smith is 
at the head of an important branch of the American 
Woolen Company. The history of these mills is very 
interesting, and dates from 1876, when Charles Fletcher 
established them under the name of the Providence 
Worsted Mills, which became the corporate name in 
1883 under Rhode Island State laws. On the premises 
there was an old stone mill which burned several years 
ago, and in that building the company began the spin- 
ning of yarn. Upon that business has grown up the 
largest individual fancy worsted mill in the country. 
In 18S6, a weaving department was added, the firm 
incorporating as the National Worsted Mills. These 
two corporations pursued business separately until 1893, 
when they merged and became the National & Provi- 
dence Worsted Mills, chartered under Rhode Island 
laws and capitalized at $2,000,000. This mill together 
with the Saranack Mills, of Blackstone, Mass., was 
absorbed by the American Woolen Company, at the 
time of its formation in 1899. 

George W. is a son of Richard P. Smith, born in 
Leominster, Mass., June 20, 1848, died October, 1912, 
a master mechanic of woolen and worsted mills. He 
married Margaret H. Monahan, born in January, 1837, 
who survives him, now a resident of Providence. They 
were the parents of; George W., of further mention; 
Mary C, widow of Thomas McGctrick, of East Green- 
wich and Providence; Eleanor B., a teacher, married 
Fred Ritchie, of Dorchester, Mass., now with a medical 
unit. American Expeditionary Forces in France; Helen 
S., married James W. McNamara, assistant principal 
of the Fitchburg, Mass., High School. 

George William Smith was born in Leominster, 
Mass., February 22, 1871, and educated in the public 
schools of that city and Fitchburg. finishing in high 
school. During his school years he was employed at 
times in the James Phillips Mills, and after finishing 
high school he spent five years in the office employ of 
the same mills becoming assistant paymaster. From the 
Phillips Mills, Mr. Smith went to New York City, where 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



157 



he spent six months in the clerical employ of the New 
York "Press," of New York City, resigning to return 
to New England. There he became a bookkeeper in 
the Star Worsted Mills at Fitchburg, Mass., later re- 
ceiving appointment to the post of assistant superin- 
tendent. He remained at the Star Mills five years, 
then, in 1894. came to Rhode Island, locating in Prov- 
idence, where, in 1507 he became assistant superinten- 
dent, and later agent of the Valley Mills, continuing 
in this capacity until 191 1. The Valley Mills were 
owned by the .\merican Woolen Company, and in 191 1 
were closed, the company transferring Mr. Smith to 
their plant, the National & Providence Worsted Mills, 
as manager of the yam department. He was manager 
of the yarn mill from 191 1 to 1916. then he was appointed 
agent for The National & Providence Worsted Mills, 
a position which he now fills. 

In political faith a Republican. Mr. Smith for seven 
years represented his ward, the Ninth, in the Provi- 
dence Common Council. He is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, the Catholic Club, the Wannamoisett 
Country Club, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and is a communicant of St. Michael's Roman 
Catholic Church. He married in Providence, October 
20, 1900, Catherine T. Carroll, of Providence, daughter 
of .\ndrew and Helen (Flynn) Carroll. Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith are the parents of a son, Richard Carroll, born 
February zj, 1902, now a Classical High School stud- 
ent, class of 1919. 



DR. LAMERT OULTON, one 01 the leading phy- 
sicians and surgeons of Providence. R. I., and a well 
known figure in the general life of the community, is a 
native of Shemoguc. New Brunswick, Canada, where 
his birth occurred July 4, 1882. a son of George and 
Mary Bell (Phelan) Oulton, old and highly respected 
residents of that place, who are now both deceased. 
On the paternal side. Dr. Oulton is a descendant of 
Zachary Taylor, twelfth president of the United States, 
and a son of Colonel Richard Taylor, a veteran of the 
Revolutionary War. Zachary Taylor served with dis- 
tinction as captain during the War of 181 2, and sup- 
pressed the Indian uprisings in Florida, and in 1845 
marched his troops into Texas and played a veo' im- 
portant part in the Mexican War. He was breveted 
major-general during the Mexican War. He died July 
9. 1850. 

The childhood of Dr. Oulton was passed in his 
native region, and as a lad he attended the local public 
schools and graduated from the high school there with 
the class of 1901. He then attended for a year the 
Canadian Commercial College at Fredericton. N. B., 
and on completing his studies at that institution in 
1902, came to the United States. Dr. Oulton had con- 
ceived a great interest in medicine, and entered the 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy from which he 
graduated in 1905 with the degree of Ph. B. He then 
entered- the medical department of Tufts College and 
graduated with the class of 191 1, receiving the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. In that year he came to Prov- 
idence, where he immediately entered the Pawtucket 
Memorial Hospital and remained as an interne in that 
institution until 1913. He was then appointed to the 
staff of the same hospital, and at the same time began 



a general practice in this city. It was not long before 
Dr. Oulton made a position of importance for himself 
in the medical profession of Providence, and he is 
widely known as a successful specialist in general 
surgery. He is now an assisting visiting surgeon of 
the Pawtucket Memorial Hospital. Dr. Oulton is well 
known in the fraternal and social circles of Provi- 
dence, and is a member of the American Hospital 
.Association, the Providence Medical Society, and Rhode 
Island Medical Society, the Clinical Congress of North 
American Surgeons, and is a fellow of the American 
Medical Society. He is also affiliated with Putnam 
Lodge, .Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In politics 
Dr. Oulton is a Republican, and he attends the Central 
Congregational Church. Dr. Oulton enlisted in the 
navy upon the entrance of the United States into the 
European War, and holds the commission of a surgeon 
in "The Navy at Large" and is still on call. 

Dr. Oulton was united in marria.trc. July 20. 1914, at 
Pawtucket, with Helen Eddy Fitz. a daughter of Ed- 
ward E. and Minnie L. (Whelden) Fitz, and a great- 
granddaughter of Raymond P. Eddy, a very distin- 
guished physician in his time and the first president of 
the Rhode Island Medical Society. Dr. and Mrs. Oul- 
ton are the parents of one child, Ruth Oulton. born 
December 16. 1917. 



WILLMARTH - MacKILLOP. Incorporated —As 

general contractor.>; anil builders and lumlier dealers, 
Willmarth-MacKillop, Incorporated, have won a repu- 
tation which extends far Iieyond local limits. The 
business was started in a small way by John W. Will- 
marth and R. K. MacKillop in 1879. and existed as a 
partnership until 1910 under the firm name, Willmarth 
& MacKillop. They began business modestly, but ex- 
pansion soon be,gan, and each year more and larger 
building contracts were executed, and more men em- 
ployed. In 1910. the business was incorporated as 
Willmarth-MacKillop, Incorporated. John W. Will- 
marth, president; Willard .\. Lenz, vice-president; R. 
K. MacKillop. treasurer; and W. N. Brown, secretary 
and assistant-treasurer. 

Among the buildings erected by the firm the most 
prominent are : The Masonic Hall in Providence, since 
destroyed by fire ; the Soldiers Home at Bristol ; the 
Slater Trust Company building, and remodeled banking 
room; Public Library at Brockton, Mass.; the City 
Hospital in Providence; and several school buildings. 
During the past twenty years mills and manufacturing 
plants have been the principal buildings erected, these 
including the greater part of the plant of the Phillips 
Wire Company, and that of the Royal Weaving Com- 
pany, in Pawtucket. Prior to 1900. the firm's offices and 
yards were located on Dexter street, on land now oc- 
cupied by the Union Wadding Company for their of- 
fices. In 1900 they erected their present building on 
Freeman street, between Central avenue and Cottage 
street. 



JOHN W. WILLMARTH— One of the founders 
of the well established and highly reputable contract- 
ing and lumber dealing companies. Willmarth-Mac- 
Killop. Incorporated, was John W. Willmarth, the 
present executive head of the corporation. He is the 






HISTORY OF RHODE ISLAND 



fourth son of Pascal Ellery Willmarth. and his second 
wife. Mary E. (Webster) Willmarth, of Freetown, 
Mass. Pascal Ellery Wilimartli was a son of John 
Willmarth. son of Nathaniel Willmarth, son of John 
Wiomot or Willmarth, who was of Rehoboth, Mass., 
February 6, 167!. Pascal Ellery Willmarth, of the sixth 
generation, died in Seekonk, March 26, 1864, and his 
widow. Mary E. (Webster) Willmarth, survived him 
thirty years, until August 7, 1S94, aged sixtv-seven 
years. 

John W. Willmarth was born in Seekonk, R. I., 
December 8, 1851, and there attended the district 
schools until he was twelve years of age. He assisted 
in the farm work until his seventeenth year, then began 
learning the carpenter's trade with Bliss & Carpenter, 
continuing with that building firm for eight years. He 
became a skilled workman, and after completing his 
term of apprenticeship was employed as a journevman. 
In 1876 he entered into partnership with Mr. Carpenter, 
his old employer, and as Carpenter & Willmarth they 
conducted a building business for two years. In 1878 
Robert K. MacKillop purchased Mr. Carpenters inter- 
est, and the firm of Willmarth & MacKillop was 
launched. Forty years have since intervened and both 
men are yet closely identified with the business which 
has become one of the stable institutions of Pawtucket, 
now housed in its own building, with a wood working 
plant unsurpassed in its equipment and scope. Since 
1910 Mr. Willmarth has been president of the company. 
For many years Mr. Willmarth was connected with 
the Pawtucket fire department, and on March i, i8g6, 
succeeded John Brierly, a chief, being the second man 
to hold the office since Pawtucket became a chartered 
city. He is a member of all bodies of the Masonic 
order, and holds the highly coveted thirty-third degree. 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and is highly regarded 
by his brethren of the Rite. 

Mr. \\'illmarth married, in 1907, Ida Cross, of South- 
bridge. Mass., and resides in the handsome home he 
purchased at the corner of Orchard and Central avenues 



passed have not broken either the business association 
nor the friendship, and together the two men have built 
up the contracting and lumber business which they in- 
corporated in 1910, Mr. MacKillop being treasurer. 

Mr. MacKillop married, in iSSo, Adela Josephine 
Phillips, of Providence. Thev are the parents of two 
daughters : Margery and Mild'red Adela. 



ROBERT K. MacKILLOP, now treasurer of Will- 
marth-MacKilIop, Incorporated, of which he was a 
founder, came to Rhode Island in 1871, and with that 
firm he began his long and successful career as a 
builder and business man of Pawtucket. He is a son of 
James and Catherine (Kelso) MacKillop, both natives 
of Scotland. In 1829 they came to the Province of 
Quebec. Canada, County of IMegantic. settling in the 
town of Inverness, where their third child, Robert K 
was born. ' 

Robert K. MacKillop was born in Inverness. Canada, 
November 2S. 1S47. and after attending school in his 
youth, learned the carpenter's trade. In 1871 he located 
in_ Providence. R. I., and a year later in Pawtucket, 
being in charge of the work on the interior finishing of 
the Pawtucket Town Hall. After completing his work 
on the Town Hall, he was next emploved by Kenvon, 
Drown & Company, of Pawtucket, and in the mean- 
time made the acquaintance of John W. Willmarth. 
The young men were mutuallv attracted, with the 
result that in 1878 the new firm, Willmarth & Mac- 
Killop, was formed. The forty years which have since 



HERBERT LESLIE CARPENTER— Among the 
successful attorneys and influential citizens of Woon- 
socket, R. I., the name of Herbert Leslie Carpenter is 
prominently identified with many dififerent departments 
of the community's affairs, and in all of them is a 
leader. Mr. Carpenter is a native of Menden, Mass., 
where his birth occurred September 2, 1878. He is a 
son of Leslie and Clara (Wilson) Carpenter, the former 
now deceased. The first five years of Mr. Carpenter's 
life were spent in the town of Menden, but in the year 
1S83, his parents removed to the town of North Smith- 
field, R. I. 

It was at North Smithfield that Herbert Leslie Car- 
penter first attended school, and it was at the public 
institut