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Full text of "History of Story County, Iowa; a record of organization, progress and achievement"

HISTORY OF 



STORY COUNTY 



IOWA 



A RECORD OF SETTLEMENT, ORGANIZATION, 
PROGRESS AND ACHIEVEMENT 



By W. O. PAYNE 



Local history is the ultimate substance of national history— Wilson 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME H 



CHICAOQ; . 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO. 
1911 



-■r.- N^A- VCHK 

P'.lBiJC LIBRARY 



.810*1, ufcNOX *NB 

riLOEN F0UND»TI0NI. 

R 1»l2 L 



THE NEV/ YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN fOUNOAnON*. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL 



PETE E. SHUG-\RT. 

A country ha - - ... ^ is 

but one man at Uic .-^^. r^ z„^..^:. i:. _ _■...„_=. c-r„=: . of 

business is limitless and its (qqwrtmnties many. There £r ve- 

nues of activity and such demand for ^Bcient service i: i' ' --'=- 
may steadily work his way upward if he has enei^ ar. . ^ - - - 

counts honesty among his salient qoalides. Peie E. 5 ^ 

among those who have not feared to ver: - t-t f^ : 

has led the way. Proving his worth in tr. - ' " 

crowned his efforts, and he is today CHie : : : . . - ; - 

tractors of Iowa. He makes his brane in Xevaii as bom cm the 

east side of the Mississippi, his birth havir . - ■ - IDinois, 

January 8, 1865. His parents were Dr. C ; t rhnan) 

Shugart, natives of Pennsylvania and Xew Jersey. - ..ely. Their last 

days, however, were spent in Nevada. ..' f-t ' ' t ' - 1907. after 

devoring his life to the practice of ve zr.-ir _ 7 t f^riily came 

to this cirv in 1872 frcHn PrincetfMi, Illinois. 

Pete E. Shugart is the sixth in or ' - ' ' ' -- - 1 :i— ' :' r - ' ' 
dren, the record being as follows: Jc; r .. i r^ .-'r. :: ..— t: :;- 
the wife of John Prior, of Nevada; Philip, also living in Ames; Uh: t : t 
wife of Douglas Brunstm, of Des TT - Pete E. ; Cr ' 
killed on the railroad at the age of : :r _ .-.e years; Mel : ;i- 

the wife of Robert Cordlioas and died in Central City. Nebraska : ar ; 
William, of Sturgis. South Dakota. 

Pete E. Shugart was a lad of seven years st '-e - ^^ --- -^— :veI 
to Iowa, residing with his father upon a far— : of 

Ne\-ada until eighteen years of age, dun-_- _ - - 

education in the country schools. He ther. : ; -: -' . -.:- ' -'" 

seat and gave his attention to railroading ;-. : t ;----- — -: 1-: : 
teaming in the winter seastHis. He woriced as a :i 1 :- - - : - 
road at first but gradually won pmnotion and ever.rui; t 1- v 1 : 
contractor, to which business he has devoted his ererr;; : ' i -: t ; - 



6 HISTORY or STORY COUNTY 

years. Mis time has been principally given to railroad grading, yet he has 
done some bridge work and during the past five years he has been awarded 
many e.xtensive and important contracts. He built over two hundred and 
fifty miles of railroad in 1910 in the Dakotas and had railroad contracts 
throughout the middle west. His first contract was in grading for the 
motor line from Ames. He built eighty-five miles of the coast line of the 
Milwaukee railroail west of the Missouri river in the summer of 1907 and 
had over twelve hundred teams, of which he owned one hundred and 
twenty-five, while about fifteen hundred men were employed at that time. 
In the same summer he built forty miles of the South Dakota Central 
Railroad between Arlington and Watertown. Four years ago he con- 
structed an electric line between .Vines and Des Moines, and in 1909 and 
1910 he built over three hundred and fifty miles of railroad, while during 
the past four years he has built altogether si.x hundred miles. He is the 
largest team contractor in the state of Iowa. Team work is his specialty 
but he also does some shovel work. 

As he has prospered in his undertakings and has seen opportunity for 
judicious investments, Mr. Shugart has made extensive purchases of land 
until he is now the owner of three thousand, tw^o hundred and eighty acres 
in Story county, his holdings exceeding that of any other landed property 
in the county. He also has four hundred and fifty acres in Palo Alto 
county, Iowa, and is extensively engaged in feeding hogs and cattle and 
every winter ships about a thousand head of horses. He also feeds 
about five hundred head of cattle each winter and his sale of hogs in 1909 
amounted to over twenty thousand dollars. He is the largest cattle feeder 
in the county and upon his different farms he has erected a number of 
large barns especially built for feeding. He can feed one hundred and 
sixty-five head of horses in his two barns in Nevada. He also built the 
Savery livery in Des Moines. This is the largest livery barn in the state 
and was erected at a cost of over twenty thousand dollars. He owned it 
for a time, then sold it. He did all of the gra<lincf for the armory post at 
Des Moines and built all of the macadam roads there. He is one of the 
largest stockholders in the First National Bank of Nevada and although he 
started out empty-handed, with no special training for his work, he is 
today one of the most successful men of this part of the state and his 
lal>ors have been of a character that have contributed much to general 
progress and improvement as well as to individual success. At this writ- 
ing .Mr. Shugar is carrying on his contracting business as the senior part- 
ner of the firm of Shugart & Barnes Brothers, the partnership having been 
fiirmed in the summer of 1910. He is also associated with Bert B. W'cltv 
and Judge Lcc. of .Ames, Iowa, in platting a tract of land of thirty acres 
adjoining Nevada on the southeast. They purchased this and are now 
grading all of the streets. They have sold many of the lots and Mr. Shu- 
gart has recently erected ihin- four g I .mIi.-im ^ The district is known 

as Allen Park addition. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 7 

On tlic 4tli of July. 1889, Mr. Shugart was married to Miss Edith 
Banks, who was born in Rockford county, lUinois, January 9, 1870, and 
was brouglit to Story county in infancy by her parents, A. K. and Sarah 
(Rice) Banks. Her father was for twelve years sheriff of Story county 
and a prominent and influential citizen here but is now a resident of Des 
Moines. He was born September 21, 1845, and his wife was born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1851. Their marriage was celebrated December 31, 1868. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Shugart have been born three children: Eva L., born May 
9, 1890, is a student in the Northwestern University at Chicago, doing 
special work in elocution and physical culture. Charles A., born May 4, 
1893, died on the 7th of October of that year. Thelma Lois, born October 
12, 1S99, is at home. 

The Shugart residence is one of the finest homes in Nevada and was 
erected by Mr. Shugart in 1900. No record in this volume perhaps indi- 
cates more clearly the value and force of close application, unfaltering de- 
terminati(5n and uncjuestioned reliability. There have been no esoteric 
]ihases in his entire career. He has sought and won his success along the 
lines indicated and is respected and honored by all for what he has ac- 
complished. 



JAMES A. McKEE. 



James A. McKee, postmaster of Cambridge, to which position he was 
a|jpointC(I on the 22d of July, 1909, has since filled the position to the satis- 
faction of the general public. He is numbered among the worthy native 
sons of Story county, his birth having occurred in Union township on the 
13th of February, 1857, his parents being Hugh and Mary Ann (Harper) 
AIcKce, both of whom were natives of Ireland. In 1853, in early manhood 
and womanhood, they crossed the Atlantic to the United States, their mar- 
riage being celebrated in Ironton, Ohio, in 1854. A year later they came 
to Story county, Iowa, taking up their abode among the earliest settlers of 
this district. Mr. McKee entered a quarter section of land, built a log cabin 
and later erected a modern frame dwelling. He remained on this farm until 
within five or six years of his death, when he put aside the active work of 
the fields and removed to Cambridge, where his demise occurred in 1903. 
The period of his residence in this county covered almost a half century 
and he was well known and highly esteemed as one of its pioneer settlers and 
substantial agriculturists. His widow still survives and makes her home in 
Cambridge, where she has a host of warm friends. 

James A. McKee remained on the home farm until about twenty-two 
years of age, when he started out as an agriculturist on his own account, 
being thus busily engaged for a few years. Subsequently he came to Cam- 
bridge and cmliarked in the butchering business, being connected therewith 



8 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

for seven years. On the expiration of that period he began deaHng in Hve 
stock and for about thirteen years was one of the best known stockmen of 
the county. He was appointed postmaster of Cambridge on the 22d of July, 
1909. and, abandoning liis live stock interests, has since devoted his entire 
attention to the discharge of his official duties. 

On the nth of September, 1888, Mr. McKee was united in marriage to 
Miss Jennie Xellis, of Cambridge, Iowa. They have one son, Ray, bom 
October 22, 1893, who assists his father and holds the office of assistant 
postmaster. 

Mr. McKee gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
long wielded a powerful influence in its local ranks. For six years, from 
1903 until 1909, he served as mayor of Cambridge, his administration being 
characterized by many measures of reform and improvement. Fraternally 
he is identified witii the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to 
Cambridge Lodge, No. 486, while his religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the United Brethren church, to which his wife also belongs. 
Having spent his entire life in Story county, he has gained an extensive 
circle of warm friends who entertain for him the utmost regard and esteem 
because of his many excellent traits of character. 



CHARLES EDWIN OLINGER. 

Charles Edwin Olinger. a prominent resident of Maxwell, is now living 
practically retired, giving his attention only to the care and management of 
his properties. He was formerly identified with agricultural pursuits in 
Story county and also conducted a real-estate and insurance business for 
a number of years. He was born in Indian Creek township, this county, on 
the 2(1 of March, 1868, his birth occurring on the Olinger farm — a part of 
the present site of Maxwell. His father and mother, George \V. and Anna 
Eliza (John) Olinger, were both natives of Carroll county, Indiana, com- 
ing to Story county, Iowa, with their respective parents. The Olinger family 
made their way to Polk county, Iowa, in 1853, while the following year wit- 
nessed their arrival in Story county. Here the parents of our subject were 
married and established their home. George W. Olinger acquired half of 
the old homestead farm of two hundred acres, the other half belonging to 
his brother, James M. He devoted his time and energies to the work of 
the fields until calle<l to his final rest, passing away on the 6th of December, 
1886. in the faith of the Presbyterian church, to which his widow also be- 
longs. His political allegiance was given to the democracy and he held the 
office of township trustees and also served as a member of the school board 
for many years. His widow, who still survives and makes her home with 
our subject, is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community 
in which she has so long resided. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 9 

Charles Edwin Olinger was reared under the parental roof, attending 
the common schools in the acquirement of an education. When nineteen 
years of age he began teaching, following that profession for two years and 
abandoning it on the day that he attained his majority. During that period 
he also worked at farming, being closely identified with general agricultural 
pursuits until 1892, when he embarked in the real-estate and insurance busi- 
ness. In addition to his interests in this connection he also operated his 
farm until he disposed of it in 1899. In the spring of 1900 he opened an 
office in ]\Ia.\well and devoted his entire attention to real estate and insur- 
ance, being prominently and successfully identilied with this field of business 
activity until 1909, since which time he has given his supervision solely 
to the care and management of his properties. He is a director of the Peo- 
ple's State Bank and was one of the organizers of that institution as well as 
of the Farmers Grain Company of Maxwell. 

Mr. Olinger has been married twice. On the ist of October, 1889, he 
wedded Miss Elsie A. Ludlow, of Jasper county, Iowa, by whom he had 
four children, two of whom are yet living, namely: Byron K., who holds a 
clerkship in the First National Bank of Nevada, Iowa; and Mildred J., a 
high school student. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 
nth of September, 1905, and on the 12th of May, 1907, Mr. Olinger was 
again married, his second union being with Miss Jennie M. Comer, of 
Northville, South Dakota. They now have two children, Edwin Comer and 
George Donald. 

In politics Mr. Olinger is a republican. He takes an especial interest 
in educational matters, is president of the board of school directors, was a 
member of the board when the present handsome school building was 
erected and has done much to bring the Maxwell schools up to their present 
high state of efficiency. Fraternally he is identified with Herald Lodge, 
No. 455, A. F. & A. M., while both he and his wife belong to the Eastern 
Star. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian. His entire life has been spent 
in Story county and he enjoys an enviable reputation as one of its leading 
and representative citizens. 



KEITH R. FRAZIER. 



Keith R. Frazier, one of the leading business men of Story county, is at 
the head of the firm of K. R. Frazier & Company of Colo, dealers in lum- 
ber, grain, coal, etc. His birth occurred in Champaign county, Illinois, on 
the nth of December, 1878, his parents being Robert A. and Mary J. 
(Friesner) Frazier. The father, who was born in Muskingum county, 
Ohio, about 1848, removed when a young man to Champaign county, Illi- 
nois, where he was married and identified himself with the grain and lum- 
ber business, there conducting an enterprise of this character until 1892. 



10 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



In that year he came to Story county and established himself in the gram 
and coal business at Nevada, purchasing a mill and elevator combined, which 
he remodeled to make a commodious elevator building. He has thus been 
prominently identified with the business interests of Nevada continuously 
since and is widely recognized as a prosperous and influential resident of 
the town. In 1902 he assisted in the organization of the People's Savings 
Hank, was chosen its president and has served in that capacity to the pres- 
ent time. 

Keith R. I-Vazier was reared untler the parental roof and supplemented 
his preliminary education by a course of study in the Nevada high school, 
while later he attended the University of Iowa. He early became familiar 
with his father's business in principle and detail, ably assisting in its con- 
duct. On the ist of October, 1902, he and his brother. Pearl Frazier. be- 
came partners of their father under the firm style of R. A. Frazier & Sons. 
In 1907 our subject disposed of his interest in the concern and, in association 
with his father, purchased the business of Shaw & Binder in Colo, where he 
has since dealt extensively in lumber, grain and coal as the head of the firm 
of K. R. Frazier & Company. He is likewise a stockholder in the Story 
County Independent Telephone Company and enjoys an enviable reputation 
as a young man of excellent business ability, sound judgment and keen 
discrimination. 

In 1907 Mr. Frazier was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle McDole, of 
Eddyville. Iowa. Mrs. Frazier is a devoted and consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church, exemplifying its teachings in her daily life. Mr. Fra- 
zier is well known here and in all of his dealings with his fellowmen has 
demonstrated his right to their regard and confidence. 



EDGAR WILLIAMS STANTON. 

Ilvii) ijii/cii 1)1 Amo i^ justly proud of the Iowa State College and 
the i)osition to which it has attained among the educational institutions of 
the country. It is the visible evidence of the labors and devotion of a 
number of men to the profession to which they have consecrated their lives. 
It is a widely acknowledged fact that the most important work to which 
a man can direct his energies is that of teaching, whether it be from the 
pulpit, from the lecture platform or from the schoolroom. The founda- 
tion of character-building is laid in youth and the impressionable mind of 
the young readily receives the lessons that have important bearing upon 
his entire future life. The realization of this fact has made Professor 
Stanton hold to high ideals not only in methods of instruction in the par- 
ticular branches assigned to him in his college work but also in the personal 
conduct aiul the trend of thought and interests which constitute an ever 
present exani|)le for the student. 





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HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 13 

A native of Pennsylvania, Professor Stanton was born at Waymart, 
Wayne county. He is descended from Thomas Stanton, who landed in 
Virginia in January, 1635, from the merchantman Bonaventura, and who 
in the following year removed to Boston, Massachusetts, and thence, in 
1639, to Hartford, Connecticut. This ancestor was prominent in the Pe- 
quot and other Indian wars and in the early life of the colony. The line 
of descent is traced down from Thomas Stanton through John, John and 
David to Colonel Asa Stanton, who was a native of Connecticut and an 
active participant in the Revolutionary war. He served both in the army 
and infant navy of the colonies and, being captured, was confined for a 
considerable time on the prison ship Jersey. His son, Asa Stanton, born 
in Paupack, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1793, was the father of Fitz Henry 
Stanton, who was born at Waymart, Pennsylvania, May 7, 1823. Fitz 
Henry Stanton became successively a lumberman, railroad official and 
farmer, the farm on which he died, in 1906, having come into the posses- 
sion of his grandfather in 1793. He was married on the 30th of June, 
1844, to Alary Rounds, a daughter of Arba and Sarah Rounds. 

Professor Stanton, of Ames, son of Fitz Henry and Mary (Rounds) 
met the usual experiences of youth passed on a Pennsylvania farm in the 
'60s. His home training helped to establish habits of industry and a rec- 
ognition of the value and worth of time and money. He enjoyed farm life 
in its various phases but desired to get out into the great, busy world and 
gain a broader knowledge of life than could be obtained within the cir- 
cumscribed limits of the home farm. His inclination was toward mechan- 
ical and business pursuits yet into other channels his energies were directed 
and Iowa gained thereby one of her foremost educators. He was a pupil 
in the public schools of Waymart and in the normal school of that place 
prior to entering the Delaware Literary Institute of Franklin, Delaware 
county, New York. This is a preparatory school, then under the charge 
of Professor George W. Jones, afterward professor of mathematics at the 
Iowa State College at Ames and later professor of mathematics at Cornell 
University, at Ithaca, New York. On the completion of his preparatory 
work in the Delaware Literary Institute he sought the opportunity of pur- 
suing a college course where he could meet his expenses by working at the 
institution. Not finding any such opportunity in the east, he wrote to 
Professor Jones, of Ames, Iowa, having previously worked for him while 
attending school in Franklin. In reply he was told to come on at once 
and, making his way westward, he entered the sophomore class of the 
Iowa State College, living in the home of Professor Jones during the re- 
mainder of his student life, doing work about the house and also clerical 
work in the office of the college cashier. Such was his recognized ability 
and scholarship that on the day of his graduation, in November, 1872, he 
was elected instructor in mathematics in the college and throughout the 
intervening years to the present time has been continuously a teacher 
there, his labors constituting one of the strong and forceful elements in the 



14 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

development of the school and in the maintenance of the high standard that 
has placed the college among the foremost educational institutions of the 
middle west. Me was assistant professor of mathematics from the ist of 
March, 1874, until March i, 1878, when he was made professor of mathe- 
matics and political economy, so continuing until September i, 1906. Since 
the latter date his entire time and attention, owing to the growth of the 
school, have been given, in instructional lines, to mathematics. He has 
also had voice in the management of the institution for thirty-seven years, 
or since the i6th of November, 1874. when he was made secretary of the 
board of trustees. He acted in that capacity continuously until July i, 
1909. when he was elected secretary of the college. He was also acting 
president from November 13, 1890, until February 17, 1891, and again in 
1902-3 and since August 19, 1910. He has likewise been dean of the 
junior college from the nth of September, 1903, to the present time. 
Throughout the entire period of his connection with the school he has 
labored earnestly and zealously to extend its influence, to improve its 
methods and to make its course of instruction of practical value as a 
preparation for the duties and responsibilities of life. Reading and re- 
search have kejJt him in touch with the work that is being done by the 
most i)rominent educators of this and other lands, and sound judgment 
has enabled him to glean from their methods many ideas which, adapted 
to the work of Iowa College, have proven of inestimable value. More- 
over, his initiative spirit has enabled him to originate many plans of worth 
to the institution and methods of instruction whicli have worked out most 
satisfactorily in the schoolroom. 

In other connections Professor Stanton has displayed excellent business 
ability, being interested in both farming and banking. Through economy 
and fortunate investment in Iowa land and industrial enterprises of the 
state he has acquired a fair competence. While not without that laudable 
ambition for the attainment of success, which is the stimulus of all in- 
dustry, in an effort to provide the comforts of life for his family, he lias 
also been actuated by the higher motives of contriliuting to the world's 
intellectual progress which constitutes the basis of an advancing civiliza- 
tion. 

On the 22d of February, 1877. in Mount Pleasant. Iowa. Professor 
Stanton was united in marriage to Miss Margaret P. McDonald, who pur- 
sued her e<lucation in the Muskingum College of Ohio and the Mount 
Pleasant (Iowa) Ladies Seminary, being a graduate of the latter institu- 
tion. She was afterward jirofcssor of French and preceptress of the Iowa 
State College from 1870 until 1878. She passed away July 25, 1895, her 
death being <lceply rcgrcttccl by all who knew her. for her broad culture 
and splendid womanly qualities had endeared her to all with whom she had 
been brought in contact. The woman's building on the campus of Iowa 
College has been nainefl Margaret Hall in her honor, while her lui'^hand 
as a inciniirial to iu-r prcscnte<l to the college the Margaret Hall chimes, 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 15 

consisting of eleven bells manufactured by Taylor Brothers of England 
and now occupying the beautiful campanile on the campus. 

Professor and Mrs. Stanton became the parents of four children. Ed- 
win McDonald, bom July 31, 1879, was married February 26, 1908, to 
Miss ]Maude AIcDougall, of Brockville, Canada. He was graduated from 
the scientific course in Iowa State College in 1898, was for two years a 
student in Michigan University and was graduated from the medical de- 
partment of the Pennsylvania State University in 1903. For two years 
thereafter he was assistant in the Bender Research Laboratory of Albany, 
New York, and for two and a half years was with Dr. O.xner, of Chicago, 
He is now junior partner of the firm of McMullen & Stanton, practicing 
surgeons of Schenectady, New York. Roger Williams, the second son, 
born February 2, 1882, died on the 30th of May of the same year. Mar- 
garet Beaumont, born May 16, 1883, was graduated from the Iowa .State 
College in 1902 and spent the following year in post-graduate work at 
Bryn Mawr. She afterward devoted two years to post-graduate work in 
Wisconsin University, winning the Master of Arts degree in 1908. She 
was awarded a scholarship in the department of history for 1909 and is 
now instructor of history of the State Preparatory School at Bowlder, 
Colorado. Edgar Williams Stanton, Jr., the youngest son, born January 
19, 1887, was graduated at Ames College in 1907 with the Civil Engineer 
degree, did post-graduate work at the Wisconsin University in 1909-10 
in hydraulic engineering, and now is irrigation engineer at Gridley, Cali- 
fornia. 

Four years after the death of his first wife Professor Stanton was mar- 
ried, on the 2ist of December, 1899, to Miss Julia A. Wentch, of Traer, 
Iowa. She was graduated from the Iowa State College in 1888, was in- 
structor in mathematics in the Beatrice (Neb.) high school from 1889 
until 1903, and instructor in mathematics in Iowa State College from 1893 
until 1896 and again in 1898-9. In 1896-7 she was a post-graduate student 
in the Chicago University. She is very prominent in the club and social 
life of the college and city and has been president of the Ames library board 
from 1905 to the present time. The only child of this marriage is Barbara 
Stanton, born October 15, 1904. 

Professor Stanton has always given his political allegiance to the re- 
publican party but has never been an aspirant for office. He belongs to 
the Congregational church and labors earnestly to promote its growth and 
extend its influence. At this point it would be almost tautological to enter 
into any series of statements as showing him to be a man of broad intelli- 
gence and genuine public spirit, for these have been shadowed forth be- 
tween the lines of this review. Strong in his individuality, he never lacks 
the courage of his convictions but there are as dominating elements in his 
individuality a lively human sympathy and an abiding charity which, as 
taken in connection with the sterling integrity and honor of his character, 
have naturally gained for him the respect and confidence of men. The 



16 HISTORY OF STORY COL'XTY 

Iowa State College is in considerable measure a monument to his life work, 
but greater than even this is the monument that he has builded in the lives 
of those pupils who have been influenced by his instruction and stimulated 
and inspired by the example which every teacher consciously or uncon- 
sciously sets before his pupils. 



SEVERT J. SEVERSON. 

To few men are given the pleasure and gratification of looking back over 
half a century of their lives spent upon the place of their birth and reflecting 
that by their individual efforts they have contributed in no undue measure 
to the development and growth of the community in which they reside, and 
the history of Union township, Story county, would be incomplete without a 
record of the life work of Severt J. Severson, who was born March 15, 
1855, a son of John and Betsy (Aspoland) Severson, both of whom were 
natives of Norway. They came to this country while in their youth, locating 
in Illinois, where they were married and resided until 1855. In the spring 
of that year they removed to Story county. Iowa, and upon his arrival Mr. 
Severson entered five quarter sections of government land, two quarters of 
which were in Palestine township and three in Union township. On the lat- 
ter property he built a log cabin, located on the farm where his son now re- 
sides. Here he carried on the pursuit of agriculture until the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1877 in England while he was returning from a 
visit to Norway. The faithful wife and mother survived him for eight 
years and then she too passed away. 

Severt J. Severson was reared on the home farm, where he has spent 
his entire life, obtaining his early education in the district schools, which at 
that time were exceedingly limited in their facilities. Being naturally ambi- 
tious, however, he acquired enough book knowledge to enable him to adapt 
it to the pursuit of every day life. Possessed of the sterling qualities of 
thrift and industry which characterized his father, he, when but twenty 
years old, bought the home farm, of which he had been previously in charge. 
In conjunction with liis brother John J., he purchased three quarter sec- 
tions, and later bought forty acres, which he added this to his other property. 
Imiihi time to time he acquired additional land in North Dakota, his first 
purchase there having been made in 1903. in Cavalier county, his holdings 
in that state now amounting to eight hundred acres. At the present time he 
owns three hundred acres in Union township, this county, one hundred acres 
of which is located two miles east of the home farm. Mr. Severson has con- 
tributed to the welfare of his township, always having its interest at heart. 
Although at fir.st giving his attention to general agriculture, he subsequently 
made a specialty of raising hogs, and, having unusual knowledge in this 
branch of farming, he has met with unqualified success. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 17 

On November 2, 187O, Air. Severson was united in marriage to Miss 
Arabella Sheldahl, a daughter of Eric and Betsy (Ness) Sheldahl, both of 
whom were natives of Norway. The father emigrated to the United States 
in 1845, the mother arriving two years later and both locating in Kendall 
county, Illinois, where they were married. In 1856 they came to Story 
county, Iowa, and here Mr. Sheldahl entered one hundred and twenty acres 
of government land, to which he later added by purchasing forty acres of 
adjoining land. Owing to his splendid business ability and years of well 
directed labor he is now enabled to live in retirement, which he has done 
for the past ten years, making his home in Roland, Story county. He re- 
signed the management of the farm to his sons, who are conducting it in the 
same capable manner as did their father. To Mr. and Airs. Severson were 
born seven children, namely : Edwin, a lawyer in Stanley, North Dakota, 
is married and has one son, Edgar. Bertha is the wife of Jans Igland, a 
farmer residing in North Dakota, where he owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of land, and they have two daughters, Anna and Sylvia. Oscar, Mar- 
tin and Arthur own about eleven hundred acres of land in North Dakota, 
upon which they now reside. Bessie is the wife of Henry Scala, a carpen- 
ter of Story county, and they have two children, Wilfred and Arnold. El- 
mer is at home with his parents. 

In politics Mr. Severson has always given his support to the republican 
party and has devoted his spare time to the welfare of his township, having 
served as road supervisor and a member of the school board for several 
years. Not only has he reached a conspicuous position among the business 
men of Story county — he has shown what splendid success can be attained 
as the result of well directed efforts and determination and he stands today 
one of the most highly esteemed and honored citizens of Union township. 



CHARLES A. COOPER. 

Charles A. Cooper, one of the successful and enterprising agriculturists 
of Collins township is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land 
comprising the northwest quarter of section 5. His birth occurred in Lee 
county, Illinois, on the 12th of December, 1857, his parents being John and 
Charlotte (Black) Cooper, both of whom were natives of Ireland. Soon 
after their marriage they emigrated to the United States, locating in Lee 
county, Illinois, where the father passed away in June, 1870. The mother 
subsequently wedded Thurman Collins, likewise a native of the Emerald i.sle, 
whose demise occurred about ten years ago. Mrs. Collins still survives and 
yet makes her home in Lee county, Illinois. 

Charles A. Cooper was reared under the parental roof and attended the 
common schools in the acquirement of an education but his opportunities 
in this direction were somewhat limited, lie lost his father when little more 



18 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

than twelve years of age and, being the second oldest in a family of seven 
children, was obliged to assist in the support of his younger sisters and 
brothers. He remained with his mother until twenty-three years of age and 
in the spring of 1881 launched his ship on the sea of life, coming west to 
Iowa and arriving in Colo, Story county, with but five cents in his pocket. 
Immediately making preparations to follow an agricultural career, he began 
the operation of a rented farm in New Albany township the following sum- 
mer and was thus actively engaged in the work of the fields there for a 
period of fifteen years. In the spring of 1890 he bought eighty acres of his 
present farm and two years later purchased an adjoining tract of similar 
size, taking up his abode thereon in the spring of 1895. The farm embraces 
the northwest quarter of section 5, Collins township, and has remained his 
place of residence for the past sixteen years. The property was unimproved 
when it came into his possession and all of the buildings thereon stand as 
monuments to his enterprise and industry. Mr. Cooper makes a specialty 
of raising Duroc Jersey hogs and for several years past has been feeding at 
least one carload each of cattle and hogs. He is widely recognized as one 
of the substantial agriculturists of the community and his success is all the 
more creditable by reason of the fact that it is attributable entirely to his 
own efforts. 

On the 4tli of March. 1883. Mr. Cooper was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie Black, of Lee county. Illinois, her parents being James and Sarah 
(Wynn) Black, both natives of Ireland. Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born six children, four of whom are still living, as follows : Edith, the 
wife of Jesse Fry, who cultivates eighty acres of her father's farm; and 
Hattie, Fern and Leo, all at home. 

In politics Mr. Cooper is a republican, while fraternally he is identified 
with Crescent Camp, No. 2358, M. W. A. Both he and his wife belong to 
Sunbeam Lodge, No. 181, Mystic Workers of the World. During his resi- 
dence in Story county he has made an excellent record for upright manhood 
and honorable citizenship and may well be classed with the representative 
men of the communitv. 



CHARLES D. BARKER. 

Charles D. Barker, a prominent and wealthy agriculturist of Union town- 
ship, is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of Story county's most 
valuable land. His birth occurred in the state of New York on the "th of 
August, 1855, his father being Jesse Barker, a sketch of whom appears on 
another page of this work. He was reared at home and in the common 
schools acquired his education. When about twenty-three years of age he 
started out as an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating rented land 
for a short time. About 1880 he purchased eighty acres of his present home 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 19 

farm, paying but fifteen hundred dollars for the tract. He has since placed 
many substantial improvements on the property, including a modern and at- 
tractive residence and other necessary buildings. As his financial resources 
have increased he has added to his holdings until they now embrace three 
hundred and twenty acres of very valuable and productive land. His farm 
is well drained, for he recently laid fifteen thousand tile. Following pro- 
gressive and practical methods in the conduct of his agricultural interests, 
he has won a gratifying measure of success and is widely recognized as a 
prosperous and leading resident of the community. 

Mr. Barker has traveled a great deal, having made extended trips almost 
yearly and visiting nearly every state in the Union as well as Mexico, Can- 
ada, Cuba and British Columbia. In the winter of 1910-11 he visited the 
isthmus of Panama. Being a keen observer, he has greatly benefited by his 
sojourns in different parts of America and possesses that knowledge and cul- 
ture which only travel can bring. He is an expert with the camera and has 
many interesting views of the countries through which he has traveled. 
While away from home he has been a regular contributor to the local papers 
and his articles have attracted wide and favorable attention. 

On the 31st of August, 1878, Mr. Barker was united in marriage to Miss 
Emily Eastman, of Union township, Story county, a daughter of Thomas 
and Margaret Jane (Ball) Eastman. Her father was killed at New Orleans 
during the Civil war. Unto our subject and his wife have been born seven 
children, six of whom are yet living, as follows : Ada May, the wife of 
Frank Ray, of Indian Creek township, this county; Angle Ordell; Arthur 
Clinton; Leslie; Jesse; and Aha \'. G. 

Mr. Barker is a republican in politics but the honors and emoluments 
of office have no attraction for him. During a long residence in this county 
he has become widely known and is a man of many friends. His life history 
proves what may be accomplished by determined and honorable purpose. 
He has based his business principles and actions upon the rules which govern 
strict and unswerving integrity and industry and thus he has gained his pres- 
ent enviable position in the ranks of the leading citizens of Story county. 



WILLIAM W. POPE. 



William W. Pope, who opened a modern and well appointed drug store 
at Cambridge in 1907, has since built up an extensive and lucrative trade in 
this connection. His birth occurred in Knoxville, Marion county, Iowa, on 
the 2ist of ^lay, 1880, his parents being William W. and Laura (Jenkins) 
Pope, natives of Indiana. The father came to Iowa in early manhood, soon 
after the close of the Civil war. while the mother came to this state as a 
child with her parents in the "405. the family home being established in 
Marion county. William W. Pope, Sr., became one of Warren county's 



20 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

successful agriculturists and was also engaged in the grain business for sev- 
eral years. At the present time he is living retired in Indianola. 

William W. Pope was reared under the parental roof and supplemented 
his preliminary education by a course of study in Simpson College. Sub- 
sequently he spent a year in the State University of Oregon and after re- 
turning to Iowa took a course in ]3harmacy at Highland Park College, being 
graduated from that institution with the class of 1905. He was then em- 
ployed as a pharmacist at Des ^loines for two years and in 1907 embarked 
in business on his own account, opening a drug store in Cambiidge. Dur- 
ing the past four years he has maintained a well equipped establishment of 
this character, his stock being tastefully arranged, while his honorable busi- 
ness methods and earnest desire to please his patrons have brought to him 
a gratifying trade. 

On the 5th of August, 1908, Mr. I'ope was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha Schneider, of Fennimore, Wisconsin, by whom he has one child, 
John William. Mr. Pope gives his political allegiance to the republican 
parly, believing that its principles are most conducive to good government. 
Fraternally he is identified witji the Knights of Pythias, belonging to Cam- 
bridge Lodge Xo. 319, in which he is filling the chair of chancellor com- 
mander. His wife is a devoted and consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Pope has attained a creditable measure of pros- 
perity for one of his years, occupying a position among the representative 
and enterprising business men of Story county. 



D.WH) W. l',R(JWX. 



In the list of Story county's honored dead is to be found the name of 
David W. Brown, a highly successful farmer, wlio passed his entire lite in 
this county and was intimately identified with its development. I'.orn on 
the home farm July 16, 1866, he was the son of Levi and Louisa ( Fancher ) 
Brown, the former of whom was born at Hannibal, Oswego county. New 
York, and the latter in Tomjjkins county, Xew York. The father when 
seven years of age removed with his parents to Union county. Ohio, and in 
1844 came to Lee county, Iowa, subsequently taking up his residence in 
Fulton county, Illinois. In 1863 he returned to Iowa and located in Storv 
county, where lie engaged with marked success in farming until his death, 
which took place September 6, 1892. He was an energetic man of practical 
business judgment and became the owner of three hundred and cightv .-icres 
of good land in this couiuy. 

David W. i'.rown received his education in the district schools and as he 
grew up devoted his attention to various duties about the house and farm 
with an interest which gave bright promise as to his future. At the age 
of seventeen years he took charge of the home place, which he cultivated on 




Jp %, m 



y-i-^l/i^^y"^ 



THE NL .\ , ,J\K 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TII.DEN fOUNCx.riONt. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 23 

his own account, and also purchased one hundred and twenty acres a mile 
south of the home farm, which he owned for tifteen years and then sold, 
acquiring one hundred and twenty acres immediately adjoining the home- 
stead. Upon the death of his father he received his share of the estate — 
the old home and eighty acres of land, making his entire farm holdings 
amount to two hundred acres. 

On the 31st of January, 1890, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to 
Miss Elva G. Evans, a daughter of Thomas P. and Emma M. (Day) Evans, 
both natives of Indiana. The father removed from Indiana to Illinois with 
his parents in early childhood. He grew up in that state and at the time of 
the Civil war served in the One Hundred and Forty-eighth Illinois Infantry, 
continuing through the entire rebellion. In 1866 he located in Story county, 
Iowa, and on December 18, 1870, was married to Miss Emma M. Day, who 
passed away June 7, 1890. Mr. Evans continued to make his home upon 
his farm until the last year of his life, when he took up his residence with 
his daughter, Mrs. Brown, being called away October 12, iQog. He was 
one of the highly successful farmers of Collins township and was a man of 
unblemished character, very highly respected by the entire community. Po- 
litically he adhered to the democratic party and socially was identified with 
Amity Lodge No. 361, I. O. O. F. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown, three of whom are now living, William Ray, Emma Blanche and 
Cloyd Myrl, all of whom are students in the public schools. 

Mr. Brown from the time of arriving at voting age gave his support to 
the democratic party. He was not connected with any religious denomina- 
tion, but Mrs. Brown is a valued member of the United Brethren church. 
He was for many years a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and had many warm friends in that organization. Straightforward in busi- 
ness affairs and genial in manner, he readily made acquaintances, awakening 
in a remarkable degree the good-will of those with whom he came into con- 
tact. In all of the relations of life he was broad-minded and his aim was 
to be entirely just. He departed this life September 27, 1908. Mrs. Brown 
survives her husband and is living on the family homestead, devoting her 
time and energy to the interests of her children. 



CHARLES A. ROBISON. 

Charles A. Robison. who devotes his time and energies to general agri- 
cultural pursuits, is the owner of a valuable and well improved farm of 
two hundred and seventy acres in Indian Creek township. His birth oc- 
curred in that township on the 7th of October, 1864, his father being Robert 
A. Robison. More extended mention of the family is made in connection 
with the sketch of E. R. Robison, a brother of C. A. Robison, which may 
be found on another page of this volume. 



24 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Charles A. Robison was reared under the parental roof, acquiring his 
education in the public schools. In the summer of 1888 he started out as 
an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating a portion of the home farm. 
The following fall he was married and established a home of his own, 
locating on one of his father's farms in Indian Creek township and residing 
thereon for six years. On the expiration of that period he took up his 
abode on the ])lace where he has made his home continuously since and 
which he has developed into one of the highly improved farms of Indian 
Creek township. He built a modern, substantial residence and in fact his 
property is lacking in none of the equipments and accessories of a model 
farm of the twentieth century. It comprises two hundred and seventy acres 
of valuable and productive land and the well tilled fields annually yield 
golden harvests in return for the care and labor which is bestowed upon 
them. 

On the 19th of October, 1888, Mr. Robison was united in marriage to 
Miss Fannie Emery, of Iowa Center, Story county. Her father, Dr. John 
Allen Emery, who was a native of Pennsylvania, came to this county in 
1855. A few months later his parents also came to Story county and at the 
end of two years removed to Elkhart, Iowa. Dr. Emery served in the 
armv during the period of hostilities between the north and the south, was 
wounded by an exploding shell and experienced many of the hardships, 
rigors and dangers of war. He was captured in the siege of Vicksburg 
and was confined in Andersonville jjrison for eight months, and while with 
Sherman on his march to the sea he saw much arduous service. After re- 
turning home, liis wound incapacitating him for manual labor, he took up 
the study of medicine and was graduated froin the Keokuk Medical Col- 
lege with the class of 1873. Locating for practice in Elkhart, Iowa, he there 
remained until 1881. when he went to Roonc and was made practicing 
physician for the miners at that place, having an average of three or four 
hundred men under his care. He was an able representative of Iiis calling, 
being remarkably successful in solving the intricate problems which con- 
tinually confront the physician. 

After removing to Boone he purchased a fann in New Albany town- 
ship. Story county, on which he located his family and to which he was 
prcjiaring to retire when the accident occurred that resulted in his death 
on the 30th of November, 1884. His demise was occasioned by a runaway 
accident one day wIhti he was out driving in company witli tlie owners of 
the mine. 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Miss Dorothy Venneman, was 
a daughter of Lemuel \'enneman, of whom more extended mention is made 
in the sketch of his son, L. J. Venneman, which appears on another page 
of this w^ork. Mrs. Emery was an artist of no mean note, having jnirsued 
a three years' course in art at the Highland Park College. For some years 
following she gave private lessons in Des Moines, having a large class. 
Many of her paintings on china and canvas now adorn the home of our 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 25 

subject. She was called to her final rest on the 6th of October, 1910. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robison have one child, Hazel Dorothy, who is a graduate of 
the Nevada high school and also pursued the full musical course at Simp- 
son College near Des Moines. 

Mr. Robison is a republican in politics and has served as a member of 
the school board for several years. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to lodge No. 104 at Nevada, 
while his wife and daughter are faithful members of the United Evangeli- 
cal church. He has remained in Story county from his birth to the present 
time and that his has been an honorable and upright life is indicated by the 
fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have known him 
from his boyhood. 



CLAUDE G. DICKEY, M. D. 

Dr. Claude G. Dickey, a well known and successful physician and sur- 
geon of Cambridge, has enjoyed a steadily growing and most lucrative prac- 
tice during the five years of his residence here. His birth occurred in 
Corning, Adams county, Iowa, on the 6th of September, 1876, his parents 
being Charles H. and Mercy (Sherman) Dickey, who are natives of west- 
ern New York and Cleveland, Ohio, respectively. Charles H. Dickey was 
brought to this state by his parents when a boy, the family home being es- 
tablished in Delaware county, where he grew to manhood. He was a 
student in Lennox University at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war 
and in 1S63 enlisted for service in the Union army. When his term of 
enlistment had expired he returned to Iowa and eventually located in Adams 
county, where he became identified with general agricultural pursuits. In 
the fall of 1883 he took up his abode at Maxwell, Story county, and was 
there successfully engaged in merchandising for a number of years. For 
the past four years he has lived retired, making his home with his wife 
and son Claude in Cambridge. His fraternal relations are with the Masons 
and he is a worthy exemplar of the craft. The period of his residence in 
this county covers more than a quarter of a century and he enjoys a wide 
and favorable acquaintance within its borders. 

Claude G. Dickey was reared under the parental roof, pursuing his 
studies in the Alaxwell high school and later at Iowa College of Grinnell, 
Iowa, which institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy in 1900. In the fall of that year he took up the study of medicine, 
entering Rush Medical College of Chicago, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1903. Because of his scientific course at Grinnell he had been 
enabled to complete four years' work in three years and three months. Lo- 
cating at Garden City, Hardin county, Iowa, he there followed his profes- 
sion for two years and then came to Cambridge to take the practice of Dr. 



26 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

M. C. Keith, who removed to Casper. Wyoming. In the intervening five 
years he has buih up an extensive and remunerative patronage, having dem- 
onstrated his skill and ability in coping with the intricate problems which 
continually confront the physician in his efforts to restore health and pro- 
long life. 

In politics Dr. Dickey is a rc])ublican, while his religious faith is indi- 
cated l)y his membership in the .Methodist Episcopal church. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Yeomen, the Modern Woodmen of America and 
Tabernacle Lodge No. 452, A. F. & A. M., of Cambridge. He maintains 
the strictest conformity to the highest professional ethics and enjoys in 
full measure the confidence and respect of his professional brethren as well 
as of the general public. 



FREDERICK WALDEMAR LARSON. 

Frederick Waldemar Larson, cashier of the Citizens State Bank of Cam- 
bridge and one of the valued citizens of the community, was born in Boone 
county. Illinois. April 7. 1865. and is the son of Jonas T. and Sina (Xessen) 
Larson. The parents were both natives of Norway and came to America on 
the same boat in 1861. their destination being Chicago. They were mar- 
ried in the Illinois metropolis and subseciuently removed to Boone county, 
where they lived for two years, and then in 1866 came with an emigrant 
train to Story county, Iowa. The father purchased land two miles west of 
Cambridge in Union township and became one of the substantial farmers 
of that section. The mother was called aww' in 1881, and Mr. Larson was 
again married, the lady of his choice being Miss Carrie Burreson. also a 
native of Norway. He had six children by his first marriage and seven by 
the second, and was summoned from earthly scenes in October, 1908. at the 
age of seventy-seven years. His second wife is still living. He was a stanch 
republican politically but being of a modest and retiring nature never sought 
public oftk-c. Religiously he adhered to the Lutheran church. 

Frederick Walilemar Larson received his early education in the district 
schools and, having shown a decided inclination for study, was sent to Augs- 
burg Seminary at Minneapolis. Minnesota, his parents intending to prepare 
him for the ministry of the Lutheran church, .\fter two terms in the semi- 
nary, however, he left that institution and entered the Western Normal 
College at Shenandoah, Iowa, taking the normal and business courses, from 
which he was graduated in 1888. He taught school for several terms and 
was for a time in Chicago. Finally, being attracted to the mercantile busi- 
ness he came to Cambridge and continued in business with good success for 
about ten years. In 1901 he disposed of his store and soon afterward ac- 
cepted the position of cashier of the Citizens State Bank, which he has ever 
since filled, being also a stockholder and a member of the board of directors 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 27 

of the institution. He is regarded as one of the able financiers of the county, 
and by his close attention to a calling for which he seems eminently adapted 
he has greatly added to the resources and prestige of the bank. He is also 
interested with Johnson Brothers in farming, now having charge of more 
than five hundred acres in this part of the state. 

On the i6th of November, 1892, at Des Moines, Air. Larson was united 
in marriage to Miss Gustie Xutson, a native of Illinois but of Norwegian 
parentage, and by this union four children have been born : Florence G. 
and Jessie, both of whom are attending the high school; Charlotte N., now 
in the primary school ; and Edna O. 

Mr. Larson now gives his support to the prohibitionist party but was for 
many years a prominent factor in republican councils. He holds member- 
ship in the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and he and his wife are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he has served as steward and trustee and also 
as Sunday school superintendent. For nineteen years he has been a mem- 
ber of the school board and for thirteen years past has filled the chair of 
president of that body. He takes great interest in educational and church 
work, devoting a large part of his time in those interests and also contrib- 
uting very liberally to all worthy demands. He ranks as a leader in Story 
county, both as a business man and as a self-sacrificing citizen, whose constant 
aim is to add to the comfort and happiness of others. While he is a banker 
he is also a great lover of nature and the call of the farm has for him a 
charm that he often finds hard to resist. He has a host of friends who have 
been attracted by his spirit of helpfulness, which is one of the most desirable 
traits that can be possessed by any human being. 



JACOB W. McCORD. 



Jacob W. McCord, an enterprising and progressive agriculturist, is the 
owner of one hundred and si.xty acres of land in Collins township, where he 
is extensively engaged in the raising of shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey 
hogs. His birth occurred in Des Moines county, Iowa, on the 25th of 
October, 185 1, his parents being Conmiodore P. and Sarah E. (Smith) 
McCord. The father, who was born in Clermont county, Ohio, on the loth 
of October, 1826, was reared in the Buckeye state and in 1850 journeyed 
westward to Iowa, locating in Des Moines county. Two years later, in 
the fall of 1852. he came to Story county, where the remainder of his life 
was spent. Entering a tract of government land in Collins township, he 
erected thereon a log cabin and began farming. On the 14th of August, 
1862, he enlisted for service in the Civil war, joining Company K, Twenty- 
third Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. On the 17th of May, 1863, at the battle 
of Black River Bridge, Mississippi, he was so severely wounded in the 



28 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

left leg that amputation was necessary and on the 13th of August, 1863, 
he was discharged because of disability, subsequently returning to his home 
in this county. In 1869 he was elected the first auditor of Story county, 
ably serving in that capacity for one term. He next purchased and located 
on the farm which is now in possession of his son, A. S. McCord, residing 
thereon for a number of years. In 1883 he was stricken with paralysis and 
soon afterw-ard took up his abode in Nevada, where he passed away on the 
2d of (October, 1886, when almost sixty years of age. He had met with 
success in his undertakings as an agriculturist and accumulated about four 
hundred and twenty acres of Story county's most valuable farm land. His 
fraternal relations were with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
he was buried with the honors of the Maxwell and Nevada lodges. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican party and he was widely 
recognized as one of the representative and most highlj- esteemed citizens 
of the community. On the 12th of January, 1851, in Des Moines county, 
Iowa, he wedded Miss Sarah E. Smith, who was born near Springfield. 
Illinois. Their children were nine in number, namely : Jacob W., of this 
review; Mary, the deceased wife of John Ray; Nancy, the wife of James 
T. White, of Ames, Iowa; Abraham S., living in Collins township. Story 
county; Alice, at home; Rachel E., the wife of Clifford Funk, of Des 
Moines, Iowa; Sherman G., who is a resident of Nevada, Iowa; Elias S., 
a practicing physician and surgeon of Delmar, Iowa; and Charles P., of 
Nevada, Iowa. 

Jacob W. McCord was reared under the parental roof and in the ac- 
quirement of an education first attended the district schools, while later he 
continued his studies in the Nevada city schools. He was married when 
about twenty-eight years of age and continued farming as a renter for the 
next five or six years. His present farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Collins township has been his place of abode for the past twenty-six 
years and he has lived in his present residence since the spring of 1892. 
In connection with the tilling of the soil he raises shorthorn cattle and Duroc 
Jersey hogs, keeping only the best blooded stock. This proves a profitable 
source of income to him and as the years go by he is meeting with the 
measure of success which always crowns persistent, well directed labor. 

On the 4th of February, 1879, Mr. McCord was united in marriage to 
Miss Martha Dunahoo, a daughter of John Dunahoo. of whom more ex- 
tended mention is made in the sketch of M. R. Dunahoo. a brother of Mrs. 
McCord. Mr. McCord gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and has served as a member of the board of township trustees for about 
sixteen years. The cause of education has always fouml in him a stanch 
champion and he served for many years as a member of the school board. 
He belongs to Fervent Lodge No. 519, A. F. & A. M., and Crescent Camp. 
No. 2358, M. W. A., while both he and his wife are members of the 
Eastern Star at Collins and Sunbeam Lodge No. 181, Mystic Workers of 
America. They likewise belong to the United Brethren church, of which 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 29 

Mr. IMcCord is one of the trustees and in which he served for several 
years as steward. A review of his hfe shows that in business he has been 
diligent as well as reliable, that in citizenship he has been loyal to the best 
interests of the community and that his social acquaintances know him as 
a tried and trusted friend. Brought to Story county when still in his first 
year, he has since remained within its borders and is widely and favorably 
known. 



LARS F. SESKE. 



Success in farming, as in every other branch of business endeavor, only 
comes to him who has the intelligence and capacity for industry to apply to 
his chosen vocation in life, as is exemplified by the career of Lars F. Seske, 
who, at the age of twenty-two years, started out in life for himself and 
is today one of the successful and progressive agriculturists of Union town- 
ship. There he was born April i8, 1864, a son of Jolin and Helga (Staat- 
feit) Seske, both of whom were natives of Norway. The father was born 
March i, 1826, his parents being Frederick and Eugene (Frederick) Seske, 
who died in Norway. John Seske obtained such education as was avail- 
able in the schools of his locality and later was apprenticed to the trade 
of a shoemaker. Desiring to better his condition in life, for as a youth 
he was very ambitious, he decided to come to America and made the ocean 
voyage in 1857. Locating in New York city, he continued to follow his 
early vocation for a period of three months, after which time he removed 
to Racine, Wisconsin, where he secured employment in a shoe factory. 
From here he went to Franklin county, Kansas, and in i860 came to Story 
county, where he saw the agricultural advantages and purchased forty acres 
of land. Here he continued to till the soil and by thrift and industry he 
was able to add to his property, until his personal holdings amount to three 
hundred and ninety-six acres in Union township, at the present time being 
one of the largest landowners in Story county. 

In 1858 John Seske was married to Miss Helga Staatfeit, and by this 
union six children were born, namely : John ; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Oster- 
man, living in Polk county, Iowa ; Nels H. ; Lars F. ; Carl L. ; Jacob S. 
Mr. Seske has the unusual distinction of being the grandfather of thirty- 
eight children. Mrs. Seske departed this life July 29, 1904. In politics Mr. 
Seske has allied himself with the republican party and has served his town- 
ship with faithfulness and unaltering loyalty in various public offices. In 
his religious belief he is a consistent adherent of the Lutheran church. 

The independent spirit manifested itself in Lars F. Seske when, shortly 
after reaching his majority he rented and operated a farm on his own 
account for two years, during which time he acquired invaluable knowledge 
regarding the science of agriculture, profiting by this to such an extent that 



30 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

he was able in 1888 to purchase the farm on which he now resides and 
which consists of eighty acres. He is one of the progressive and well-to- 
do men of the community and by virtue of his individual industry is now 
reaping the benefits of his early efforts. 

In 1891 Mr. Seske was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Johnson, 
of Polk county, Iowa, whose father was John Johnson who came to this 
country from Norway at an early day. To Mr. and Mrs. Seske were born 
the following children: Mattie, Martin, Henry, Ella, Joseph, Frances, Eldon 
and .Anna. 

In politics Mr. Seske casts his vote with the republican jiarty. and in 
religion he and his family are faithful members of the Lutheran church. 
He is interested in everything that stands for the betterment of the com- 
munity in which he resides and is always willing to give his support to 
those projects which are working for the public good. He has the respect 
and esteem of his ni.iny friends as a public-spirited citizen of Union town- 
ship. 



VVILL1.\M PIERCE PAYNE. 

William Pierce Payne, the senior editor of the Nevada Representative, 
will celebrate his eightieth birthday on December 22, 191 1, and Mrs. .Ada- 
line Maria Payne, his wife, will celebrate her seventy-seventh birthday on 
November 12. 191 1. They celebrated together their golden wedding at 
Nevada on January 16, 1909. When their years are considered they are a 
very exceptionally active couple, still giving daily attention to business and 
current affairs and being ni the full enjoyment of most excellent health. 
They have been identified with Nevada and Story county since 1875 and 
this identification still continues, not merely as a courtesy but as a conse- 
quence of present relation to people and events. 

Mr. Payne was the second son of Samuel Pierce and Juliaeltc iBall) 
Payne, and he was born in the south part of the town of Rutland. Jeffer- 
son county. New York, on December 22, 1831. He grew up in the neigh- 
borhood where he was born, much of his youth being si)ent with his uncle, 
Henry M. I'.all. on an adjoining farm. He attended the district and vil- 
lage school and about the time he was getting through his teens began 
teaching in the ilistrict schools of the neighborhood. .After a few winters 
of teaching he went to the New York State Normal School at Albany, 
where he spent one year and was graduated in Fcbruarv, 1854. Subse- 
quently he taught for two or three years at Sacketts 1 larbor on the eastern 
shore of Lake Ontario, while in 1857 he went to Tufts College near Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, which he attended for two years. .At the end of this 
period, in 1859. he completed his education and was ordained in the min- 
istry of the Universalist church. His first pastorate was at Lynn, Massa- 




w . !■ r \> \K 




MRS. W. P. PAYNE 



. HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 35 

chusetts, and during the first year thereof he was married at South Rut- 
land, New York, on January i6, 1859, to Adahne M. Brown. He took his 
bride to Lynn, where their only son, William O., was bom May 7, i860. 
The pastorate at Lynn closed in 1862 and after a year at Cambridgeport, 
attending lectures at Harvard, he removed with his family to Clinton, 
New York, where he became pastor of the Universalist parish and also 
taught in the Clinton Liberal Institute, which was then a flourishing school 
of the Universalist denomination. He remained for nine years at Clinton 
and in 1872 removed to Nyack-on-the-Hudson, where he lived for two years. 
In 1874 the removal west was made, the destination being Mitchellville in 
Polk county, Iowa. At that place he had charge as principal of Mitchell 
Seminary, which had been established as the school for the Universalist de- 
nomination in this state and the main building of which has since become 
the nucleus of the State Industrial School for Girls. After a year at Mitch- 
ellville the family removed about thirty miles northward to Nevada. 

The arrival at Nevada was in the fall of 1875. Mr. Payne had in the 
previous spring been elected principal of the public schools at this place 
and Mrs. Payne became an assistant in the high school. The time was 
when the more enterprising towns of this class in Iowa were beginning to 
organize regular high schools, and Nevada was just completing a fine new 
brick school builcHng, suitable to its new and higher educational aspirations. 
Indeed the completion was so delayed that school did not open until the 
first \Veek in November; but in time the building was completed and the 
school opened with much enthusiasm. Then for the first time was there in 
the school here a definite course of study at the completion of which 
diplomas of graduation would be given. The conditions were highly fa- 
vorable for good work by teachers and pupils, and at the end of the second 
year, in June, 1877, the first class was graduated, numbering nine. Five 
years were spent by Mr. and Mrs. Payne in this work and in this time were 
established relations with young people who have here and elsewhere made 
their impress on aiTairs — relations which in a local sense have grown closer 
and closer with all the passing years. 

In 1880 the Paynes retired from the school here and Mr. Payne went to 
Boone, where he gained his first initiation into newspaper work on the staff 
of the Boone Republican. This initiation lasted for two years and at the 
end of that time, in the summer of 1882, he returned to Nevada and bought 
the Nevada Representative, the original newspaper in Story county and 
one that has always been identified with the county. 

Thus after only a brief intermission the residence of the Paynes in Ne- 
vada was resumed. Mrs. Payne at once joined with her husband in his 
newspaper work and a year later the only son returned from college and 
became connecterl with the work also. With the increased force the work 
gradually dift'erentiated, and the senior Payne gave his attention chiefly to 
the business and to the outside interests of the paper. In this work he be- 
came widely acquainted over the county. For nearly thirty years this work 



36 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

has now continued ; the county has thickened ; the town has grown ; the in- 
terests of all have progressed ; and in whatever has been for the general 
advancement there has always been ready editorial and personal cooperation. 
In respect to cooperation of this order for the general good, the rela- 
tion of Mr. Payne to the Nevada public library deserves first mention. 
Back in the time of his teaching days here the town had voted to establish 
a public library and Mr. Payne had been on the first committee to select 
books; also in the early 'cjos a local organization had been formed unoffi- 
cially for the general purpose of boosting the library, and of this organiza- 
tion Mr. Payne was the first and only president; so, when in 1894 a law 
was enacted for the creation of a board of library trustees to have charge 
of the library, he was named by William Gates, then as now mayor of Ne- 
vada, as the first upon the new board. He was at once elected president of 
the board and this position he has held continuously since. To the uplift- 
ing work thus put in his charge he has given very much of time and 
strength (not to mention other contributions) and in the development of the 
library, in the housing of it in a splendid building (which was built wholly 
from local resources) and in the finishing and furnishing of that building 
he has always been a moving spirit. At the same time Mrs. Payne, as a 
worker in the women's organizations and iiresident for several years of the 
city federation of women's clubs, was assisting, while the need continued, 
in raising money for the library and in making it what it is. In due time, 
through the especial appreciation of Mri. Dillin, one of the library trus- 
tees, and by action of the trustees, their portraits were conspicuously hung 
in the library. From such antecedents it may be seen that when the time 
came for the golden wedding of Mr. and .Mrs. Payne the event was cele- 
brated in the ample parlors of the library and was an occasion memorable 
among occasions of that kind. It was the occasion, significant above any 
other, of the part they have borne in Nevada and of the local appreciation 
of that part. 



MRS. .\D.\LTXF M.\RI.\ P.XYNE. 

Mrs. Adaline Maria Payne, wife of William P. Payne, was born Ada- 
line M. Brown. She was the eldest daughter of Orville and Lovisa 
( Phelps) lirown and was born at South Champion, Jeft'erson county. New 
York, November 12, 1834. The place was just over the line from the town 
of Rutland, in which her husband was born, and to that town her parents 
removed while she was but a small child. Mer father's homestead was es- 
tablished just outside of the village of Tylerville, which is officially known 
as .South Rutland, and there she spent the years of her girlliood and youth. 
She attended the local school and in the summer when she was fourteen 
she taught her first term of district school. After that experience she 



THE NSW YORK I 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8TOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOL-NOAnONS. 





x^l-^L^ei^ 





y. 



THE N'^'.''' VOKK 

PUBLIC LISKARY 

A8T0R. LENO* »HB 



• HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 41 

taught regularly during the term of the summer schools and after a time 
taught the winter schools also. In 1853-4 she also attended the State Nor- 
mal School at Albany, being graduated therefrom in July, 1854. Later she 
taught for a few years, much of the time in the city of Watertown, and on 
January 16, 1859, she was married, as above stated, to William P. Payne. 
She taught no more after the regular fashion for many years ; but her son 
was home educated up to the high school, and after the family came west 
she was matron of the seminary at Mitchellville during the year of their 
residence there. As before stated, she also taught in the high school at 
Nevada for five years, and during the residence at Boone she taught there 
for one year. Beyond this, she taught in teachers' institutes four years in 
New York in early womanhood and afterward taught in institutes for ten 
or more years in Story, Boone and other counties in Iowa. 

Returning to Nevada , she took part at first in the general work of the 
newspaper, the Nevada Representative, but after a number of years she 
came to give especial attention — along with the other work — to a depart- 
ment for "Busy Women," which has now for many years been a recog- 
nized feature of the paper. When the movement for the formation of 
women's clubs reached Nevada she was one of the very first to become in- 
terested and she was a charter member of the Nevada Woman's Club, 
which was the first of the modern clubs to be organized in this city. With 
the movement for federation of such clubs she attended as a delegate the 
first state convention of the federation and was one of the first state officers. 
Since then she has been many times a delegate to such conventions, and 
later she was active in federating the different clubs in the city and was 
long president of the city federation. Her interest in all such matters con- 
tinues with slight, if any, abatement. She has been hardly less active than 
her husband in behalf of the public library, as the highest concrete local ex- 
pression of general educational progress ; and at her golden wedding in the 
library parlors she wore the dress, necessarily remodeled, in which she had 
been married fifty years before. 



WILLIAM ORSON PAYNE. 

William Orson Payne, editoi" of the Nevada Representative and com- 
piler of the first volume of this history, is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William P. Payne and was born at Lynn, Massachusetts, May 7, i860. His 
babyhood was spent at Lynn and at Cambridgeport, where the family lived 
for only a short time, and his earlier boyhood was spent at Clinton, New 
York, where he had some associations never to be forgotten. After two 
more years of boyhood on the Hudson at Nyack his parents brought him 
west to grow up with the country. There was a year at Mitchellville and 
then the high school at Nevada. Two years in the high school and he grad- 



42 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

uated as one of its first class of nine, of whom six remain in Story county 
and five in or very near to Nevada. In the next year he clerked a few 
monllis in a justice's office and completed his preparation for college. In 
the fall of 1878 he entered the State University of Iowa at Iowa City, 
where be it recorded that he was an active member of the Zetagathian Lit- 
erary Society. Four years were spent in college in due course and he 
graduated in the class of 1882. Returning to the university for another 
year, he took his degree in law in 1883 and was admitted to the bar but 
never entered the active practice. Instead he returned to Nevada and be- 
came associated with his father anil mother in tlie publication of the Ne- 
vada Representative. Always interested in public affairs, he has been a 
quite voluminous writer of political editorials, many of which have been 
more or less extensively quoted. He has held the local offices of justice 
of the peace and member of the city council, has attended very many po- 
litical conventions and has gained a considerable acquaintance in the state. 
He was a delegate in 1900 to the republican national convention at Phila- 
delphia which nominated McKinley and Roosevelt and has been frequently 
mentioned in connection with the republican nomination for congress in the 
seventh district of Iowa. He was assistant clerk of the general assembly 
in 1888 and two years later was clerk of the committee on coinage, weights 
and measures of the house of representatives through the famous fifty-first 
congress. He has been for nearly thirty years on the Nevada Representa- 
tive, is now fifty years of age and hopes that his best work is yet before 
him. 

He was married in Madison county. Iowa. December 15. 1886, to Miss 
Jessie Dickens. They have one daughter, Jessie Bancroft Payne, who 
graduated from the Nevada high school in 1905 and from the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa in 1910. 



JESSIE DICKENS PAYNE. 

Jessie Dickens Payne, wife of William O. Payne, was the daughter of 
William and Maria Ellen Dickens and was born at Linwood, Minnesota. 
June 22, 1861. Her mother died while she was small and her father re- 
moved from his farm to the neighboring town of .Xnoka. In 1869 the 
family removed to Aurora, Illinois, and in 1875 tg Winterset, Iowa. After 
two years at Winterset, the father's business having been burned out, the 
family removed to Kansas ; but she and her older sister, Ella, remained in 
Iowa and made their home with an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Downing of 'Boone. She attended tiie Boone high school and also spent n 
year at Mt. Carroll Seminary at Mt. Carroll. Illinois. She taught country 
schools in Story, Polk and Madison counties, her first school being the poor 
farm school in this county. Later she accompanied the Downings to St. Jos- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 43 

eph and Kansas City, Missouri, and in 1885 returned to Madison county, 
Iowa, where her sister Ella, then Mrs. C. C. Bancroft, resided. It was at 
this sister's home that she was married, on December 15, 1886, to W. O. 
Payne. Their home has since been in Nevada, though one year was spent in 
Washington city. She also was a charter member of the Woman's Club and 
she was the first president of the local chapter of the P. E. O. sisterhood. 
She was for many years active in the affairs of the Ladies Nevada Ceme- 
tery Society and it was during her presidency thereof that the society pur- 
chased and conveyed to the city what is now the west half of the cemetery. 



WILBUR F. SHAW. 



\\'ilbur F. Shaw, a prominent and representative resident of Colo, was 
appointed postmaster of the town on the nth of October, 1906, and has 
ably served in that capacity to the present time. His birth occurred in 
Columbus, Kansas, on the 17th of June, 1869, his parents being James W. 
and Margaret (Zook) Shaw, who were natives of New Jersey and Indiana, 
respectively. The father was a lad of six years when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Indiana, in which state he grew to manhood. 
Removing to Livingston county, Illinois, he was married in Fairbury, that 
state, and there made his home during the following five years. He next 
spent about ten years in Cherokee county, Kansas, and then returned to 
Livingston county, Illinois, where he remained for some two years. On 
the expiration of that period he took up his abode in Champaign county, 
Illinois, residing there until 1892, when he came to Colo, Iowa, where he 
has made his home continuously since. He was successfully engaged in 
general agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career, but since 
coming to Colo has lived retired. His wife was called to her final rest on 
the 19th of August, 1 90 1, passing away in the faith of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. James W. Shaw was reared in the Quaker faith and still 
adheres thereto but worships in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Wilbur F. Shaw was reared under the parental roof and attended the 
common schools in the acquirement of an education. In 1891 he made a trip 
to Iowa, having a brother, Frank E., who was at that time a resident of 
Hubbard and in partnership with whom he purchased the grain elevator in 
Colo. In January, 1892, his brother having assumed control of their eleva- 
tor in Colo, Wilbur F. Shaw removed to this town and for five years the 
two young men were prominently identified with the grain and lumber busi- 
ness here. In 1897 Frank E. .Shaw withdrew from the business, selling his 
interest to his brother-in-law, E. A. Binder, and the firm style of Shaw & 
Binder was adopted. This relation was maintained until the ist of July, 
1907, when the concern sold out to K. R. Frazier & Company, who are the 
present proprietors of the enterprise. On the iith of October, 1906, Mr. 



44 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Shaw was appointed postmaster of Colo, assuming the duties of that posi- 
tion on the 1st of November following. He has served in that capacity 
continuously since and is widely recognized as one of the efficient and popu- 
lar public officials of Story county. A man of excellent business ability and 
sound judgment, his efforts have also been a factor in the successful control 
of the interests of the Colo Cement Block & Tiling Company, of which he 
is a stockholder and acts as secretary and treasurer. He is likewise the 
manager of the Colo Lighting Company. 

On the 4th of October, 1896. Mr. Shaw was united in marriage to Miss 
Myrtle E. Ilouser, of Colo. Her father, William Houser, who was for 
many years a well known hotel proprietor of Colo, is now living retired in 
Lyons, Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw now have si.x children, namely: Zola 
M., .Aaron J., Virginia C, Norma L., Kenneth E. and Keith H. 

Mr. Shaw gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
served as a member of the town council for several terms. He is a member 
of the present school board, having been connected therewith for several 
years past. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Co- 
lumbia Lodge No. 292. He is also a member of the Mystic Workers of the 
World and for several years has been secretary of Logan Camp Xo. 1591, 
M. W. A. Both he and his wife are consistent and devoted members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Shaw now acting as trustee and treas- 
urer thereof and having served on the church board of trustees for several 
years past. Whatever he undertakes he accomplishes, for he possesses reso- 
lution, perseverance and reliability and these qualities have caused liim to 
be enrolled among the l>est citizens of the county. 



ABRAM S. McCORD. 



Abram S. McCord, one of the leading and successful residents of Col- 
lins township, is the owner of two hundred and forty acres of Story county's 
most valuable land and in addition to his farming interests devotes con- 
siderable attention to the feeding of stock. His birth occurred in Collins 
township, this county, on the 5th of March, 1857. his parents being Com- 
modore Perry and Sarah E. (Smith) McCord, who were natives of Ohio 
and Illinois respectively. The father, who came west to Iowa in early 
manhood, took up his abode among the earliest settlers of Collins township. 
Story county. .-\ review of his life is given in the sketch of Jacob W. 
McCord, a brother of our subject, which appears on another page of this 
volume. 

Abram S. McCord was reared at home and acquired liis education in the 
common schools. In 1879, when twenty-two years of age, he started out 
as an agriculturist on his own account, operating the home farm as a renter 
until his father's death in 1886, when the estate was settled. .'Subsequently 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 45 

he purchased a tract of one hundred acres across the road from the home- 
stead, residing thereon for about six years. On the expiration of that period 
he traded the property for the old home farm, which had been acquired 
by two of his younger brothers and on which he has hved continuously 
since. The place comprises two hundred and forty acres and is one of the 
most valuable farms in the county. Mr. AlcCord has recently erected a 
very fine country residence and the other buildings afford ample shelter for 
grain and stock. He is extensively engaged in the feeding of stock and in 
the conduct of his agricultural interests has met with a gratifying measure 
of prosperity by reason of his well directed energy and capable business 
management. 

On the 8th of February, 1882, Mr. McCord was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah E. Bowman, a daughter of William and Anna (Bare) Bow- 
man, who came to Iowa in 1858, settling in Linn county. Later removing 
to Woodford county, Illinois, they resided there for some years and then 
returned to Iowa, locating in Marshall county. They next went to Polk 
county and then came to Story county, here spending the remainder of their 
lives. William Bowman passed away in January, 1905. while his wife was 
called to her final rest in March, 1884. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McCord were 
born five children, two of whom are yet living, as follows : Earl A., who 
is employed in a drug store at Collins ; and Ralph D., at home. 

Mr. McCord is a republican in politics and has held the office of town- 
ship assessor for ten years. He is a member of the present board of town- 
ship trustees, now serving his fourth term. Fraternally he is identified 
with Fervent Lodge A. F. & A. M. ; Crescent Camp No. 2358, M. W. A. ; 
and Fern Camp No. 2823, Royal Neighbors of America. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the United Brethren church, to which 
his wife also belongs. He has resided in this county from his birth to the 
present time and the circle of his friends is almost coextensive with the 
circle of his acquaintances. 



ALBERT H. LANDE. 



Success in any branch of industry depends entirely upon the energy 
and determination of him who seeks it. To these qualities Albert H. Lande 
owes his present position as one of the substantial farmers and stock-raisers 
of Union township. Born in Polk county, Iowa, October 8, 1868, he is a 
son of George H. and Anna Lande, both natives of Norway. They emi- 
grated to America while still in their youth and located in Kendall county, 
Illinois, where they were married and continued to reside until the spring 
of 1866, when they came to Iowa, and bought eighty acres of land in Elk- 
hart township, Polk county. Subsequently Mr. Lande added to his posses- 
sions until he had acquired two hundred and forty acres. Here he resided 



46 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

up to tile time of his death, which occurred August 7, 1900. when he was 
in his seventy- fourth year. His wife survives him and is still living on the 
home farm. 

Albert II. Lande passed his early youth at home, attending the public 
school. Upon reaching his majority he, in company with his brother Henry, 
assumed charge of the home farm, which they continued to operate until 
the spring of 1903, when Albert removed to his present home in Union 
township. Story county, which he and his brother Henry had purchased the 
previous fall. Aside from general farming. Mr. Lande has given special 
attention to the raising of hogs and cattle for the market and in this line 
of business he has met with unqualified success. 

On December 19. 1902, Mr. Lande was united in marriage to Miss 
Josephine Lawson, who was born in Rock county, Wisconsin. In his politi- 
cal preferment he gives his support to the republican party and takes an 
active interest in the affairs of his community, being a member of the school 
board. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lande are members of the Lutheran church. 



ALBERT K. Ili:i.\"IG. 



In tlic list of Story county's successful native sons must be placed the 
name of Alliert K. Helvig, who w'as born in Howard township on the 
23d of l-'cbruary, 1864. He is of Norwegian parentage, his father having 
come to the United States from the Norseland in 1S60. He had been a 
citizen of the United States for three years before he came to Story county 
but in 1863 he located on a farm in Howard township and continued to re- 
side there until he died in 1905, at the advanced age of seventy-seven years. 
He was a .successful farmer and had acquired at the tiine of his death one 
hundred and twenty acres of land. He married Isabelle Mucklcbush and 
they became the i^arents of ten children, all but four of whom have now 
passed away, Albert K. Helvig being the fourth in order of birth. The 
father was a member of the Lutheran church and voted the roi)ul)lican 
ticket. I le was a very public-spirited citizen and was well regarded in the 
community where he had resided for so many years. 

Albert K. Helvig's early years were sjjcnt in an unvaried routine of 
study, work and play, which characterizes the boyhood and youth of most 
young people who are reared in the country. .Xt the usual age he laid 
aside his text-books to assume the weightier duties of life and, having 
chosen farming as his occui)ation, assisted his father about the home place 
until he had reached the age of twenty-two years, when he began to work 
for himself. He had succeeded in accumulating sufficient means in 1890 
to invest in land of his own and he bought one hundred and sixty acres in 
Warren township, where he has since continued to live. His is one of the 
valuable farms of the townshi]). He raises a good grade of stock, keeps 




Ai.i;i:i;i' k. iiki.vk; 




MRS. ALBERT K. HKIAKi 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 51 

his property in good condition and from his fields reaps an abundant har- 
vest, which yields him profitable returns. He is regarded as one of the 
substantial men of the community as in addition to his realty holdings he 
is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company of McCallsburg and the 
Roland Creamery. 

In 1891 Mr. Helvig completed his arrangements for a home in his mar- 
riage to Miss Mina Hanson, who was a daughter of Charlie Hanson, a 
pioneer of Illinois, in which state Mrs. Helvig was born. They became 
the parents of four children, three of whom are still living: Clarence, 
Esther and Alina, all of whom are at home. The wife and mother passed 
away in 1899. 

The family always attended the Lutheran church, of which the parents 
were members, Mr. Helvig still being identified with that denomination. 
Ever since attaining his majority he has stanchly adhered to the principles 
of the republican party. He has always taken an active interest in local 
politics and has served in many of the township offices, the duties of which 
he discharged to the satisfaction of his constituency. He is highly regarded 
in the community where he has spent his entire life and retains the friend- 
ship of many of his boyhood comrades, which is a tribute to his fine prin- 
ciples of life. 



HARRY PAUL iJANSON, M. D. 

Prominent among the professional men of Story county is Dr. Harry 
Paul Hanson, physician and surgeon, who for ten years past has been 
located at Cambridge. He comes of good Norwegian parentage and was 
born at Christiania, Norway, January 14, 1870, a son of Bernhardt and 
Sophia Hanson. The mother passed away shortly after his birth and the 
father remained in Norway until 1887, when he came to America and 
located in Cleveland, Ohio. He was in the optical business in his native 
country but was engaged in the mercantile pursuits at Cleveland for about 
twenty years and is now living retired in that city. 

Harry Paul Hanson remained at home until fifteen years of age, re- 
ceiving his education up to that time in the common schools of the country 
and at Christiania University. Being an ambitious lad, he decided to come 
to the United 'States, and on August 5, 1885, he landed from a vessel in 
New York city, being then only fifteen years of age, a stranger in a strange 
land and with no knowledge of the English language. He felt the impor- 
tance of larger educational training and, saving his money, he later became 
a student in the Case School of Applied Sciences at Cleveland, one of the 
most noted institutions of the kind in America, and took a course in civil 
engineering. During the summer vacations he was employed as a nurse of 
the Hon. James Hoyt, a Cleveland millionaire, and for five years he was 



52 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

the personal attendant and companion of that gentleman, much of this time 
being spent in traveling. 

After the death of Mr. Hoyt our subject was persuaded by Dr. C. B. 
Parker, professor of surgery at the Cleveland General Hospital, to take up 
the study of medicine and while pursuing the regular medical course he 
acted as assistant to Dr. Parker. Having been graduated with the title of 
M. D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1897, he spent two 
years in the Cleveland General Hospital acquiring a practical knowledge, 
which has been of very great benefit to him in the years that have since 
passed. lie began practice in 1899 at Glenville, Ohio, but in 1900 removed 
to Cambridge, where he has since continued, soon gaining recognition as 
one of the ablest physicians and surgeons in this section of the state. He 
is at the head of a private hospital in Cambridge, where surgical cases are 
treated according to the most modern methods, and is also surgeon for the 
Milwaukee, Newton and Northwestern Railways. 

On the 5th of October, 1900, Dr. Hanson was united in marriage to 
Florence M. Lane, and their home has been brightened by the arrival of 
four children, namely : Harry A., born October 9, 1901 ; Lester T.. born 
July 30, 1904; Eugene W., born September 15, 1905; and Sidney L., born 
November 15, 1907. 

Fraternally Dr. Hanson is identified with the Knights of the Maccabees 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his wife are both con- 
nected with the United lircthrcn church. Politically he is a radical repre- 
sentative of the republican party and has served one term as coroner of 
Story county. Both as a professional man and as a citizen Dr. Hanson 
occupies an enviable position in the estimation of the entire community. 
P>cginning as a poor boy, he has overcome great obstacles and in doing so 
gained habits of perseverance and a strength of character that are of in- 
estimable value. His career is a remarkable illustration of the power of a 
well defined purpose and in tiie opinion of his friends the future holds for 
him nothing but the most brilliant promise of usefulness and honor. 



ED^VIX R. SII.I.IMAX. 



Edwin R. Silliman, an ex-banker of Colo, is now successfully engaged 
in the real-estate and insurance business and enjoys an enviable reputation 
as one of the leading and respected residents of the town. For the past ten 
years he has likewise been one of the best known breeders of registered 
shortlinrn cattle in the state of Iowa. His birth occurred in Whiteside 
county, Illinois, on the 4th of June, 1871, his parents being Rothmer J. and 
Lucy N. (Newman) Silliman. His paternal grandfather, Ira Silliman, was 
a stone-mason by trade. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 53 

Rothmer J. Silliman, the father of our subject, was born in the town of 
Como, Whiteside county, Illinois, where he was reared to manhood. He 
followed the profession of teaching for a time but later turned his attention 
to general agricultural pursuits. About 1874 he went west to Nebraska 
and engaged in the lumber business but, because of the grasshopper scourge, 
left that state in the spring of 1877. Coming to Nevada, Story county, Iowa, 
he purchased the lumber business of Judge Kellogg, the yard standing on the 
present site of the Letts Hotel. Two or three years later he bought a half 
interest in the West grain elevator and, renting the remaining half, em- 
barked in the grain business, also removing his lumber yard to the site of 
the elevator. He was prominently identified with the lumber and grain 
business at Nevada until 1894, in which year he disposed of his 
interests there. He was one of the organizers of the First National 
Bank of Nevada, was elected its second president and served as 
the chief executive officer of that institution for several years. His 
principal object in coming to Nevada was to secure the advantages 
of the schools at that place for his children. About a year after his 
arrival in the town he was made a member of the school board and dur- 
ing the remainder of his life labored untiringly and effectively in the inter- 
ests of the public schools of Nevada. The public library building at Nevada 
will also be a matter of much pride to future generations of the Silliman 
family, for it was erected as a Silliman memorial building in honor of 
Rothmer J. Silliman, showing the esteem in which he was uniformly held. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he served at 
various times as a member of the town council. Fraternally he was identi- 
fied with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his religious faith 
was indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. His 
demise, which occurred on the 3d of February, 1896, was the occasion of 
deep and widespread regret and a serious loss to the community. His 
widow still survives and makes her home at Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Edwin R. Silliman was reared under the parental roof and supplemented 
his preliminary education, obtained in the Nevada schools, by a course of 
study in Simpson College at Indianola, Iowa. On leaving that institution 
he returned to Nevada and for a time assisted in the conduct of his father's 
business. Rothmer J. Silliman and his oldest son. Homer N., were operat- 
ing a bank in Cambridge, this county, at the time of the panic of 1893, 
when every financial institution in Cedar Falls failed with the exception 
of one. Seizing the opportunity, they removed to that city and established 
llie State Bank of Cedar Falls, Mr. Silliman of this review being sent to 
Cambridge to look after the interests of the bank there. A year and a 
half later our subject purchased the bank in association with Edgar John, 
conducting it successfully until 1896. In that year he sold his interest to 
his partner and came to Colo, here taking over the banking business of 
P. W. Hopkins and establishing the Citizens Bank, which he conducted until 
1002. In 1900 he purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in 



54 HISTURV OF STORY COUNTY 

New Albany township, six miles southeast of Colo, stocked it with cattle 
and hired a man to take care of it. In 1900 he was elected to the board 
of county supervisors and served for two terms. In ilic fall of 1902 he 
located on his farm and continued to reside thereon until the spring of 
1907, when he took up his abode in Colo, employing a capable man to su- 
pervise the operation of his farm. In ujoy. in association with Leo Arnf- 
strong of Ames, Mr. Silliman was awarded the contract to build the county 
bridges of Story county. In recent years he has been successfully engaged 
in the insurance business and also deals in farm lands to some extent. For 
the past ten years he has been one of the best known breeders of registered 
shorthorn cattle in the state and has been a successful exhibitor at the 
county fairs, the Iowa state fair and also at the International Stock Show 
in Chicago. He has made it a point to exhibit only stock which he per- 
sonally has bred and in his exhibits at the state fair and at the International 
Show in Chicago he has never failed to win a premium. He has gained an 
enviable reputation throughout the nation as a breeder of thoroughbred 
cattle, and as a judge of cattle his services are in demand even as far dis- 
tant as San Antonio, Texas. The American Shorthorn I'.reeders' As.socia- 
tion numbers him among its valued members. 

In 1894 Mr. Silliman was united in marriage to Miss Eva Erb, of Cam- 
bridge, Story county. He is a republican in politics and has been called to 
serve on the town council of Colo. He is identified with various fraterni- 
ties, belonging to Columbia Lodge. A. F. & A. M.. of Colo; Three Times 
Three Chapter, R. A. M. ; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows: the 
Knights of Pythias ; the Modern Woodmen of .America ; and the Red Men. 
He is also the oldest Elk in Story county, belonging to the lodge at Des 
Moines. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, in which he acts as steward and to which his wife 
also belongs. They have the warm esteem and friendship of many with 
whom they have come in contact and the hospitality of the best homes of 
the locality is cordially extended them. 



ARTHUR CER.\LU GI.AXX, M. D. 

Dr. Arthur Gerald Glann, a practicing physician and surgeon of Colo, 
Iowa, well deserves mention among the most able representatives of the 
medical profession in this county. His birth occurred in Hinckley. De Kalb 
county, Illinois, on the 8th of Sejjtcmber, 1875, his ])arents being James 1-". 
and Phoebe (Ward) Glann. He comes of Scotch ancestry. The founder 
of the Glann family in this country was part owner of a vessel which was 
wrecked in a terrific storm while preparing to leave Turk island with a 
cargo of salt bound for the Liverpool market. He was also possessed of 
a title as lord of Vincent island but lost it when he was swept away by a 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 55 

storm and never returned to claim the island. His vessel, being dismasted, 
drifted around for weeks but he tinally landed at New York with a 
single groat in his pocket. Finding immediate employment a necessity, he 
went to work for a Dutch farmer of Kings Bridge, New York, one of 
whose daughters he later married. Both of his sons, John and James, en- 
listed in the Revolutionary army, serving under Generals Green and Wash- 
ington. They participated in the battle of Long Island, where John lost 
his life. James survived the conflict and took up a soldier's right on the 
line between Sussex county. New Jersey, and Orange county. New York. 
It was in the house which he built thereon that James F. Glann, the 
father of our subject, was born and reared. Journeying westward to Ue 
Kalb county, Illinois, the latter was there married and engaged in farming. 
He became a man of influence in the community and for a number of years 
acted as president of the board of county supervisors of De Kalb county. 
In 1880 he came west to Iowa, locating in Plymouth county, where he made 
his home for twelve or fifteen years. On the expiration of that period he 
removed to Sioux City, Iowa, there living retired until called to his final 
rest in igoo. He was a well informed man and an able public speaker. For 
a time he was identified with the political movement of the greenback party 
and afterward with the populist party. His funeral oration was delivered 
by George W. Argo, the well known criminal attorney of Sioux City, who 
was his close friend and spoke of him as one of God's great noblemen. He 
read much, thought deeply and reasoned profoundly. Though not identi- 
fied with any church or chained to any set form of worship, he was a true 
Christian, the Sermon on the Mount being his creed and the meek and lowly 
Nazarene his model and his guide. 

Arthur G. Glann was reared under the parental roof, supplementing his 
preliminary education by a course of study in the Le Mars (Iowa) Normal 
College. He followed the profession of teaching for three terms and then, 
having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, entered the 
office of Dr. C. F. Kueny of Le Mars, under whose tlirection he read for 
one year. Subsequently he entered the Sioux City College of Medicine, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1898, having the honor of be- 
ing chosen valedictorian of his class. He served an interneship of several 
months in the Samaritan Hospital at Sioux City and then located in South 
Dakota, where he remained for nine years, building up a large and lucrative 
practice. In May, 1907, he came to Colo, Iowa, which town has since re- 
mained the scene of his professional activities. He is continually promoting 
his efficiency by study and research and keeps in touch with the most ad- 
vanced methods of the profession through his membership in the Story 
County Medical Society and the Iowa State Medical Society. 

On the 7th of September, i8g8. Dr. Glann was united in marriage to 
Miss Catharine B. Niland, a daughter of Michael Niland, one of Story 
county's pioneers. The Doctor and his wife now have three daughters, 
namely : Frances, Helen and Pauline. 



56 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Dr. Glann is a republican in politics and was elected coroner of Stor>' 
county in November, 1910. In religious faith he is a Catholic, while fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Knights of Columbus, the Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Mystic Workers of the World. In his chosen life 
work he is making continued advancement, his patronage steadily growing 
as he gives proof of his ability to cope with the complex problems that 
continually confront the physician. 



FRANK THOMPSON, M. D. 

Dr. Frank Thompson, a prominent resident of Cambridge, was long and 
successfully identified with the medical profession in Story county but dur- 
ing the past four years has lived practically retired. Financial interests 
have also claimed his attention and he is now the vice president of the 
Citizens State r5ank. His birth occurred in Iowa Center, this county, on 
the 14th of July, 1858, his parents being James and Harriet (Haines) 
Thompson, Ixjth of whom were natives of Ohio. The father was born 
in Perry county, while the mother's birth occurred in Licking county. They 
were married at Granville, Ohio, in December, 1856, and the following 
spring came west to Story county, Iowa, where Mr. Thompson had entered 
land in 1855. He was a boiler-maker by trade as well as a stationary engi- 
neer and was employed as engineer in a mill at Iowa Center when he 
entered land in 1855. After removing to this county in the spring of 1857 
he continued working in the mill for three years, on the expiration of which 
period he took up his abode on his farm. To the further cultivation and 
improvement of that property he devoted his time and energies until called 
to his final rest November 4, 1896, winning a gratifying measure of suc- 
cess in the careful conduct of his agricultural interests. His widow, who 
still survives, now makes her home with our subject. 

Frank Thompson was reared under the ])arental roof and obtained his 
early education in the common schools. Subsequently he spent about two 
years in the Central L'niversity at Pella, Iowa, and next took up the study 
of medicine, reading fur two years under the preceptorshiii of Dr. P. W. 
I'arrar, then of Iowa Center and later of Nevada, this county, .\ftcrward 
he entered the medical <le|iartment fif the University of Iowa. comi)leting 
the i)rescribed course in that institution with the class of 1882. Locating 
for practice at Iowa Center, he there remained for nine years and in 1891 
removed to Cambridge, where he lias resided continuously since. His prac- 
tice continually grew in volume anrl im])ortance as he rlemonstrated his 
skill and ability anfl he gained recognition .imong the most able and suc- 
cessful physicians and surgeons of the county. I'our years ago. however, 
he largely abatuloned the work of the profession and has since assisted only 
in operations or acted in consultation with other physicians. He owns one 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 57 

hundred acres of land which Hes ahnost wholly within the corporate limits 
of Cambridge. He is also a prominent factor in financial circles as the vice 
president of the Citizens State Bank and has long enjoyed an enviable 
reputation as a leading and respected citizen of his native county. 

In 1882 Dr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Ida B. Davis, a 
daughter of John and Sarah (Grititith) Davis, who were natives of Ten- 
nessee and Ohio respectively. They were married in Illinois and came to 
Story county. Iowa, in 1868. Mr. Davis, who was a cooper by trade, con- 
ducted a cooperage shop at Iowa Center until he passed away in 1874. His 
wife, who still survives, afterward wedded \V. K. Wood, who is the oldest 
living resident of Story county, now making his home in Iowa Center. 
Dr. and Mrs. Thompson have three children, namely : Winifred, who is now 
the wife of Lieutenant F. E. Overholser, of Plattsburg, New York; Mil- 
dred, a teacher in the Cambridge public schools ; and James, who is in the 
primary grades. 

Politically Dr. Thompson is a stanch democrat, believing firmly in the 
principles of that party. He has served for a number of years as a member ' 
of the school board and also acted as justice of the peace. A loyal and 
public-spirited citizen, no matter which has for its object the substantial 
upbuilding and progress of the community is refused his endorsement and 
cooperation. He has attained high rank in Masonry, belonging to Taber- 
nacle Lodge No. 452, A. F. & A. M. ; Joshua Chapter No. 127, R. A. M., 
at Ames ; Excalibur Commandery No. 13, K. T., of Boone, Iowa ; Gebal 
Council No. 5, R. & S. M., of Ames; and Des Moines Consistory No. 3, 
A. & A. S. R. Both the Doctor and his wife are consistent Christians, wor- 
shiping in the United Brethren church. It is safe to say that he has as 
many friends as any man in the county and all who know him are glad 
to be numbered as such. 



JOHN J. SEVERSON. 



John J. Severson was born near Lisbon, Illinois, September 8, 1853, 
a son of John and Betsy (Aspoland) Severson, of whom extended mention 
is made in the sketch of Severt J. Severson on another page of this volume. 
When our subject was two years old his parents removed to Story county, 
Iowa, where he grew to manhood, his education being obtained in the public 
school. When twenty-two years old Mr. Severson. in partnership with his 
brother, Severt, rented and operated the home farm for seven years. Dur- 
ing this time the brothers earned enough to buy the property, which con- 
sisted of two hundred and forty acres, and a year after the marriage of 
John J., a division of the land and stock was made, he acquiring one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, upon which he began farming independently. Some 
years later he disposed of his farm and purchased the place in Union town- 



58 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ship wliicli has since been his home, comprising one hundred and sixty 
acres. He bought four hundred and eighty acres of land in Cavalier county, 
South Dakota, but sold two quarter sections, retaining one hundred and 
sixty acres. 

On November 6, 1875, Mr. Severson was united in marriage to Miss 
Lena Stenberg, a daughter of Hans Stenberg, who came to Iowa from 
Norway some time in tlie '60s. To Mr. and Mrs. Severson the following 
nine children have been born : Joseph, who is a farmer living at home ; 
Henry, also a farmer located in Cloverly, Canada; George J. M. D., a prac- 
ticing pliysician in Blairsburg, Iowa, and a graduate of Drake University; 
Osmond, a farmer in Saskatchewan ; Severt B., at home ; Albert C, who 
lives in Saskatchewan; Levi J., at home; Carrie B. and Milford C, both 
at home. The three sons who arc in Canada own a section of land each, 
besides which the three elder boys possess farms in North Dakota. 

Politically Mr. Severson is a republican with strong inclinations toward 
the prohibition party, as he is a firm believer in total abstinence. He is 
public-spirited, takes an active interest in the affairs of his township and 
has served as president of the school board for several years. In religion 
he and his family are members of the Lutheran church. 



ROTHEUS II.WWARD MITCHELL. 

Among the honored citizens of Story county who have passed to their 
reward and whose history is well worthy of a place in a permanent record 
the name of Rotheus H. Mitchell deserves a prominent position. For many 
years county surveyor and also filling other important public offices, he was 
a man whose influence was clearly in behalf of the best interests of the 
county and state, and the beneficial effects of his life are .still felt in the 
region where he lived and worked for more than a third of a century. 

He was born in Lyme, Grafton county. New Hampshire, January 4, 
1823, a son of Horatio G. and Mary (.Ames) IMitchell. The father was 
born at Bridgewater, Massachusetts, December 17. 1787, and the mother 
at Groton, New Hampshire, October 6, 1794. They were married at Lyme, 
December 11, 1817, ^^r. Mitchell havinj,' moved to that place with his father 
about 1791. They lived in New Hampshire until 1836, then taking up 
their residence at Parishville, St. Lawrence county. New York, where the 
father died on the 3(1 of .\pril, 18^.7. the mother passing away on tlie 10th 
of May following. 

Rotheus Mitchell, the grandfather of our subject, was born in I'.ridge- 
water, Massachusetts, in 1755 and was married there in 1783 to Hciihzihah 
Hayward. They moved to New Hampshire about 1791, where he died 
October 28, 1816, his wife departing this life June 9, 1848. He served in 
the continental army, enlisting on the 19th of .April. 1775. and rore to the 




I!. II. MIK IIKLI. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 61 

rank of lieutenant, remaining in the service until late in the spring of 
1781. He was the eighth son of Seth Mitchell, who was born in Plymouth 
county, Massachusetts, in 171 5. and was married in 1738 to Ann Latham, 
a descendant of Robert Latham, who married Susannah Winslow, a daugh- 
ter of John and Alary (Chilton) Winslow. Seth Mitchell died in 1802. 
He was the fifth son of Thomas Mitchell, who married Elizabeth King- 
man in January, 1696. She was born in 1673 and was a descendant of 
Henry Kingman, who came from Wales in 1632. Thomas Mitchell de- 
parted this life in 1727. He was the second son of Jacob Mitchell, who 
married Susanna Pope, November 7, 1666, and according to the records 
settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, but afterward moved to Dartmouth, 
where he and his wife were both killed by Indians in July, 1675, at the 
commencement of King Philip's war. The lives of their three children 
were saved, as the children had been sent to the garrison the previous 
evening. They were taken to Bridgewater and brought up by an uncle. 
Jacob Mitchell's father, Experience Mitchell, came from Holland with the 
Pilgrim fathers in the third ship, the Ann, in 1623. and settled at Ply- 
mouth. In 163 1 he moved with Miles Standish to Duxbury and later to 
Bridgewater. He had a share iji the first division of lots at Plymouth in 
1623, he and George Morton together receiving eight acres. He also had 
a share in the division of live stock among the colonists in 1627. He was 
one of the proprietors of Bridgewater, also one of the company that pur- 
chased the rights of the original proprietors of Dartmouth, Massachusetts. 
His wife before her marriage was, Jane Cook, a daughter of Francis Cook, 
and their family consisted of four sons and four daughters. One daughter 
married James Shaw, another married George, Hay woods and a third be- 
came the wife of John Washburn, one of the ancestors of the noted Wash- 
burn family of the present day. Mr. Mitchell died in 1689. Many of his 
descendants are now to be found in Maine, Massachusetts and also in 
various other parts of the United States. 

Rotheus H. Mitchell, the subject of this review, received his preliminary 
education in the public schools and also became a student in St. Lawrence 
Academy at Potsdam, New York. He learned the millwright's trade, 
which he followed a number of years in the summer months, teaching in 
the winter. However, he came to the conclusion that the west offered 
special inducements to young men and in 1856 he entered the stream of 
emigration that was then pouring across the Mississippi river and arrived 
in Story county, Iowa, where he decided to establish his home. His abili- 
ties soon met with recognition and he was appointed deputy county sur- 
veyor, filling the position so acceptably that at the next election he was 
elected county surveyor, which office he held four terms. In 1865 he was 
elected county judge and in 1874 was again selected as county surveyor, 
which position he held for many years. He passed away May 15, 1891, 
having then attained the age of sixty-eight years and having for more than 
thirty years been prominently connected with the county. 



62 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

On the 27th of May, 1854, Mr. Mitchell was united in marriage to 
Miss Herintha R. Mott, who was born at Keene, Essex county, New York, 
in 1827, and was a daughter of Rev. Ebenezer and Berintha (Knapp) 
Mott. Mrs. Mitchell having departed this life October 19, 1864. our sub- 
ject was married in 1866 to Miss Hannah C. Bixby, who was born in Ogle 
county, Illinois, April 15, 1848, and is a daughter of Benjamin and Mary 
(Daniels) Bixby. Two children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Mitch- 
ell: Mary Pjerintha, who was born July 11, 1867. and died March 29, 
1875; and Clara Maria, who was born January 24, 1870, and passed away 
October 15 of the same year. 

Mr. Mitchell was an adherent of the republican party from the time of 
its organization as a national body in 1856 and an earnest worker in its 
behalf. He was a man of high principles, unsw-erving in any cause that 
he considered right. He was an outspoken advocate of temperance and a 
stanch friend of public schools, believing the schools to be the bulwark of 
the nation. His honesty and probity were unquestioned. He was gener- 
ous almost to a fault and from him no needy or suffering fellow being was 
ever turned away unassisted. In his wife he found a truly worthy and 
able companion. She is now living at Nevada in the enjoyment of good 
health and the acquaintanceship of a host of friends, to whom she has en- 
deared herself hv inanv acts of courtesv and kindliness. 



O. II. IlEGGER. 



O. H. Hegger. a retired agriculturist residing in Cambridge, is now 
serving as road supervisor of Union township. His birth occurred in Nor- 
way on the Sth of April, 1857, his parents being Hans and Randa Hegger, 
who crossed the .Atlantic to the United States in 1870. locating in Polk 
county, Iowa. The father, who was a painter by trade, worked at that oc- 
cupation during his active business career, passing away some six years 
after his emigration to the new world. 

O. H. Hegger, who was a youth of thirteen when he came to America 
with his parents, attended the public schools of IxitJi this country and Nor- 
way. When still very young he began work on a farm, thus early becom- 
ing familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agricul- 
turist. Going to Des Moines wlien a youth of sixteen, he was there em- 
ployed on a dairy farm for nine years. On the expiration of that period 
he was married and, coming to Story county, here started out as an agri- 
culturist on his own account. In the spring of 1883 he remo%'ed to Ballard 
Grove, this county, operating a rented farm for five years, at the end of 
which time he ]>urchase<l the property. Nine years later he disposed of tiie 
place and took u]) his abode in Cambridge, cultivating land in the vicinity 
of that town for four years, while during the next five years he resided on 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 63 

a rented farm in Polk county. In 1906 he again came to Cambridge, where 
he has since Hved retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil in well 
earned ease. 

In March, 1882, Mr. Hegger was united in marriage to Miss Bertie 
Xutson, by whom he had four children, three of whom still survive, namely: 
Cora R. and William Howard, both at home ; and George J., who acts as 
clerk in the office of the board of control at Des Moines. 

i\Ir. Hegger is a republican in politics and is now ably discharging the 
duties devolving upon him in the capacity of road supervisor of Union 
township. Both he and his wife belong to the Lutheran church and take 
an active and helpful interest in its work. The period of his residence in 
this part of the state covers more than four decades and he has long en- 
joyed an enviable reputation as a substantial and representative citizen of 
the community. 



JASPER COOK. 



One of the stable and representative men of Union township, Story 
county, and one who has done much to develop the welfare of his com- 
munity is Jasper Cook, who has spent all his life on the farm which he 
now owns, being born here February 6, 1869. His parents were John and 
Lucy (Sears) Cook, the former a native of New York state and the latter 
of Ohio, she coming to Story county with her parents in her youth. The 
father, who was born in Lewis county. New York, August 15, 1835, arrived 
in this county when he was twenty years old and purchased a farm in 
Union township, the same one now owned by the subject of this sketch, 
and here he spent the remainder of his life. He was most successful in 
following the vocation of farming, and from time to time added to his 
possessions until he had acquired some five hundred and twenty acres of 
land. When he arrived in Cambridge, in October, 1855, the town consisted 
of one shanty and an old sawmill. Mr. Cook was one of the first men to 
use tile for draining and was also the first farmer to make use of a binder. 
He was one of a party to raise the first liberty pole in Cambridge, which 
act created such intense feeling that those who participated in it were 
threatened with death. This excitement, however, caused by local feeling, 
soon died away, and Mr. Cook was not molested. As an example of his 
energy and thrift it may be stated that the land he owned was fenced with 
rails split entirely by himself. In politics he was a republican but refused 
to run for office, although urged to do so by his many friends. However, 
having the interest of the community at heart he consented to serve as 
school director, a position he filled with honor to himself and to the entire 
satisfaction of the township. His death occurred December 29, 1893. 

Jasper Cook, the subject of this sketch, attended the public schools of 
Union township and upon attaining his majority worked in cooperation 



64 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

with his father in managing the farm until his parent's death. Later he 
added one hundred and ten acres to the estate, which now consists of three 
hundred and twenty acres, besides which he owns town property in Cam- 
briilge. 

On November 14, 1894. Mr. Cook was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
Harrison, a daughter of Henry J. and Mary J. (Graves) Harrison, who 
came to Story county. Iowa, from Wisconsin about 1869. settHng in Union 
township. Here her father died in 1894. but her mother is still living and 
resides on the home farm. To Mr. and Mrs. Cook have been born six chil- 
dren, as follows: Ava I.. Opal E.. Hazel F., Irma M.. Carmen R. and 
Lester L. 

In politics Mr. Cook gives his support to the republican party and has 
served for several years as secretary and treasurer of the school board. 
Socially he is a member of Cambridge Lodge No. 486, I. O. O. F. Mrs. 
Cook is a consistent meniljcr of the Methodist Episcopal churcli. 



ALBERT W. SOUTIiWICK. 

Albert W. Southwick. who was successfully identified with general agri- 
cultural pursuits during many years of his active business career, is still 
the owner of almost two hundred acres of valuable land in Union township. 
He is now living retired in Cambridge and is widely rccognize<l as one of 
the leading citizens of the town. His birth occurred in Chautauqua county, 
New York, on the 3d of .April. 1856. his parents being George D. and Char- 
lotte E. (Robinson) Southwick. who were natives of New York and \'er- 
mont, respectively. Their marriage was celebrated in the Empire state, 
where the mother had gone with her ])arcnts. Early in the '60s Mr. and 
Mrs. George Southwick removed to Winnebago county. Illinois, where they 
resided for four years. On the expiration of that period they came to 
Iowa, arriving in Story county on the 15th of November, 1867. Mr. South- 
wick here purchased a farm but did not locate thereon, taking up his abode 
instead at Cambridge. 1 le was a carpenter and wagon maker by trade and 
conducted a shop of that character for a number of years. In 1879 lie was 
appointed to the position of postmaster, ably serving in that capacity until 
called to his final rest in 1883. 

Albert W. Southwick was reared under the i)arental roof and obtained 
his education in the common schools. He was a lad of eleven years when 
he came w'ith his parents to Story county and has remained within its bor- 
ders continuously since. When a youth of fourteen he began providing for 
his own livelihood, hiring out to a farmer at a wage of ten dollars per 
month. He worked for one man for a period of seven years and then 
learned the barber's trade, following that occupation for about six years. 
On the 24th of August, 1882. he was joincil in wedlock to Miss Irena M. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 65 

Spar, of Ada, Ohio. For some years prior to his marriage he had dis- 
charged the duties of deputy postmaster in connection with his barbering 
business, and in September, 1883, he was appointed postmaster to succeed 
his father, who had passed away. He filled the office acceptably until 1886 
and in that year purchased a farm of one hundred and thirty acres in 
Union township, two and a half miles west of Cambridge. The further cul- 
tivation and improvement of that property claimed his time and energies 
until 1909, when he put aside the active work of the fields and took up his 
abode in Cambridge. While residing on the farm he extended its boun- 
daries by additional purchase until it embraced one hundred and ninety- 
seven and three-fourths acres. The property is still in his possession and 
is now being operated by his son-in-law, Lewis B. Erickson. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Southwick are the parents of seven children, as follows: 
Clarence W., who is a resident of Artesian, South Dakota ; Edith F., who 
lives on her father's farm, which is being operated by her husband, Lewis 
B. Erickson; Minnie C, a trained nurse in Mercy Hospital of Des Moines; 
Pearl F., who is a teacher in the public schools of Story county; Ilo G., a 
high school student ; George Leslie, who is in the primary grades ; and For- 
est A. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Southwick has 
supported the republican party, believing that its principles are most con- 
ducive to good government. He has held the office of township assessor 
for the past six years and was a candidate for reelection in the fall of 1910. 
The cause of education has ever found in him a warm friend and for about 
twenty-one years he furthered its interests as a member of the school board 
in his district. His wife is a devoted and consistent member of the United 
Brethren church. He has an extensive circle of friends throughout the 
community, for his life has ever been upright and honorable and the mo- 
tives which have guided his actions have been such as will bear the closest 
investigation and scrutiny. 



FREDERICK COOK. 



The subject of this sketch is one of the enterprising and progressive 
farmers of Union township, where he was born December 7, 1867, a son 
of John and Lucy (Sears) Cook, of whom extended mention is made in 
the sketch of Jasper Cook on another page of this volume. He remained 
at home, assisting his father on the farm and obtaining his elementary edu- 
cation in the district schools. After reaching his majority he continued 1 
give his time and attention to agricultural pursuits in conjunction with his 
father and at the latter's death acquired the homestead, which consisted of 
eighty acres of improved land. To this Mr. Cook has from time to time 
made additions, as his needs and facilities increased, and at the present time 



o 



66 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

is the possessor of two hundred and seventy-five acres in addition to a 
small tract which he owns in partnership with his brother. He has never 
married. He is a public-spirited citizen and is ever willing to give his 
assistance to anything that will conduce to the welfare of the community. 
In politics he is a stanch republican. 



T. F. TJNGENFELTER. 



J. F. Lingenfelter, a prominent resident of Collins, is a member of the 
firm of Lingenfelter Brothers, one of the leading and best known mercan- 
tile concerns of Story county, conducting stores at Collins and Maxwell, 
Iowa, and one at Thayer, Kansas. His birth occurred in Warren county, 
Iowa, on the 4th of April, 1857, his parents being George W. and Sarah 
E. (Oilman) Ligenfelter, natives of Kentucky and Pennsylvania respect- 
ively. Their marriage was celebrated in Indiana, where Michael Oilman, 
the maternal grandfatlier of our subject, conducted a woolen mill, George 
W. Lingenfelter entering his service as a commercial salesman. In 1855 
Mr. Gilman established woolen mills at Palmyra, Warren county, Iowa, 
w^here Mr. Lingenfelter was associated with him until about 1868. At that 
time Mr. Gilman sold his business atPalmyra and removed to Summerset, 
Iowa, where he erected flouring and w'oolen mills. On severing his business 
relations with his father-in-law Mr. Lingenfelter took up farming in War- 
ren county, also spending some time as clerk in the Palmyra stores. In 
1880 he embarked in merchandising at Palmyra in association with his son, 
J. F., the partnershi]) being maintained for about three years, when George 
W. Lingenfelter retired, J. F. Lingenfelter continuing the business for some 
three years longer. 

On the expiration of that period our subject disposed of his mercantile 
interests and began buying and selling horses in association with his brother, 
W. E., being thus engaged until 1890. In January, 1891, the brothers came 
to Collins and bought the mercantile establishment of Hidy Brothers, be- 
ginning operations under the firm style of Lingenfelter Brothers. They 
continued dealing in horses, however, J. F. Lingenfelter managing the mer- 
cantile business and his brother the live stock interests. In IQ04 tliey pur- 
chased the mercantile establishment of Miller & Miller in Maxwell, Mr. 
Lingenfelter of this review assuming the management of both the Collins 
and Maxwell stores. In 1905 they opened another branch store in Cam- 
bridge, of which W. E. Lingenfelter took charge. Three years later, how- 
ever, they disposed of thi.s store, trading it for Kossuth county land. In 
the fall of 1910 W. E. lingenfelter opened a branch store at Thayer, Kan- 
sas, and has since conducted the same. George W. Lingenfelter, the father 
of our subject, came to Collins in 1 891 and was actively engaged in the 
conduct of the business of Lingenfelter Brothers for fen years, in 1901 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 67 

the Collins store was destroyed by fire, but J. F. Lingenfelter had previously 
erected his present brick store building and, with the salvage that had es- 
caped the flames, established the firm of Cooper, Halterman & Company, 
his partners being two young men who had heretofore been in his employ. 
It was Mr. Lingenfeher's intention to retire from active business here, but 
Mr. Cooper died a year after the organization of the firm and for a year 
and a half the business was conducted under the style of Lingenfelter & 
Halterman. The senior partner then bought out his .associate and the con- 
cern has since been known as Lingenfelter Brothers. In business affairs 
Mr. Lingenfelter has always displayed keen judgment and excellent execu- 
tive ability, and the success that he now enjoys is well merited. 

In 1888 Mr. Lingenfelter was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Jami- 
son, of Palmyra, Iowa, by whom he has two children, namely: George F., 
a graduate of the Capital City Business College at Des Moines ; and Harold 
A., a high school student. 

Mr. Lingenfelter exercises his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the democracy but has had neither time nor inclination for 
office holding, having served only as a member of the first town council of 
Collins. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Fer- 
vent Lodge No. 513, A. F. & A. M. He is also a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Yeomen of America. His life has been 
most honorable and upright in its varied relations and his fellow citizens 
instinctively pay deference to him because of what he has accomplished and 
the principles which have governed his conduct. 



NELS ERICKSON. 



Nels Erickson, the proprietor of a livery barn at Cambridge, is- num- 
bered among the representative and enterprising business men of the town. 
His birth occurred in Lincoln township, Polk county, Iowa, on the 6th of 
July, 1875, his parents being Barney and Bolette (Gabrielson) Erickson, na- 
tives of Norway. His father was bom May 14, 1837, on a farm named 
Stolb. at Etne, Norway, and there grew to manhood, being married October 
28, 1862, to Miss Bolette Gabrielson. Coming to America in 1866, they 
made their home for a short time in Nevada, Iowa, and next lived in Roland 
for a couple of years. The following two years were spent in Story City 
and from there they came to Cambridge which was their home for three 
years at that time. . While living here Mr. Erickson purchased a farm south- 
west of the town, in Polk county, where he lived for thirty-seven years, 
returning to Cambridge in 1906. After his return he was in poor health 
and passed away on the 4th of January, 191 1, honored and respected by all 
who knew him. He was an earnest Christian man and a faithful member 
of the First Norwegian church at Cambridge. To him and his wife were 



68 HISTURV UF STORY COUNTY 

born seven children, hut Mahnde, Gerhanl. Anna, Eric and Carrie are now 
deceased, those still living being Lewis and Xels. 

Nels Erickson was reared under the parental roof, attending the com- 
mon schools in the acquirement of an education. On attaining his majority 
he started out as an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating rented land 
in Polk county for live years. On the expiration of that period he took a 
milk route, hauling cream to the creamery for eighteen months. At the 
end of that time he came to Cambridge, being here engaged in the imple- 
ment business for two years. In 1905, in association with his brother Lewis, 
he purchased the livery barn in Cambridge, the two young men operating 
together for four years or until 1909. In that year our subject purchased 
his brother's interest and has since remained the sole proprietor of the busi- 
ness, enjoying an extensive ])atronage because of his straightforward deal- 
ings and earnest efforts to please his patrons. 

In politics Mr. Erickson is a republican, while his religious faith is in- 
dicated by his membership in the Lutheran church. Upright and honor- 
able, he commands the respect and confidence of those with whom he is 
brought in contact, either in business or social relations, and he well merits 
the esteem in which lie is uiiiiormlv held. 



SAM 11. TWEUT. 



Sam IT. Twedt, one of the prominent citizens of \\'arren township. 
Story county, and vice president of the McCallsburg State Dank, was born 
in Howard township on the ist of August, 1867, being therefore a native 
of Story county. He is the son of Hans J. and Julia (Erslandl Twedt, 
both of whom were natives of Norway, but they were married in this 
county in i860. The father caine to the United States in 1854 but did. not 
locate in Story county until two years later, at which time he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, cultivating it up to the time of his 
death in 1901. He was an energetic man and a good manager, and was a 
religious man, being very instrumental in organizing the Lutheran church 
at Roland, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans J. Twedt were tiic jKirents of eleven children, seven 
of whom are still living: Abel, a resident of Warren township; Jane, who 
married Lars Amdall ; Joe H., of Story county; Sam II.; .-\ndrew IL, who 
lives in Hamilton county; Henry, also residing in Hamilton county; and 
Julia, the wife of Olaus Osheim. The father passed a-way in 1901 at the 
venerable age of seventy-.sevcn years, but the mother is still living and con- 
tinues to reside on the old hotnestead. Mr. Twedt always gave his support 
to the republican party but was never an office seeker. He was highly re- 
garded in the townshij) where he lived, his industry and upright life com- 
manding the respect of all who knew him. 




mi;. AM) \ii;s. s \\i II, I w i;i)i' 




.MK8. AIJ( E TWKin 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 73 

Sam H. Twedt spent the first twenty years of his Hfe on the home- 
stead in Howard township, in the district schools of which township he 
acquired his education. When he had completed his school course he as- 
sisted his father with the work of the farm and this arrangement continued 
until 1887, when the young man decided to begin working for himself. He 
first engaged in farming as a renter in Emmet county, where he remained 
for two years but at the end of that time he returned to Story county and 
rented a farm which he cultivated for five years. Untiring energy, perse- 
verance and economy won the usual reward and at the expiration of that 
period he was able to become a property owner and invested his accumu- 
lated savings in one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 4. Warren 
township. Careful supervision and close application resulted in his adding 
another eighty acres in 1900 and eight years later he annexed by purchase 
a similar amount, so that he now possesses one-half section of some of 
Story county's most fertile and valuable land. In addition to his extensive 
real-estate interests Mr. Twedt is a stockholder and official of the McCalls- 
burg State Bank, a director of the Farmers Creamery Company of the 
same place and a stockholder of the Farmers Savings Bank of Roland, 
Iowa. 

Mr. Twedt has been married twice, his first wife being Miss Alice 
Christian, the daughter of John Christian, and unto them were born three 
children: Herman J., Cecilia and Helen, all at home. The wife and mother 
passed away in 1901 and the father holds in trust for his children two 
hundred and forty acres of land, the mother's portion of her father's es- 
tate. His present wife was Miss Hattie Krohn, who was born in Story 
county in 1881, a daughter of Hans and Annie (Sadvig) Krohn, both of 
whom were natives of Norway. They emigrated to the United States in 
1870 and came directly to Story county, where they still reside. They 
were the parents of five children, Mrs. Twedt being the second in order 
of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Twedt have one little son, their only child, Allis. 

Mr. Twedt votes the republican ticket and has been honored by being 
elected township trustee, which office he has held for two years. He is 
one of the older residents of Story county and is in every way worthy of 
the regard in which he is held in the community where he lives. 



RALPH E. MARSH. 



Ralph E. Marsh, one of the leading merchants of Story county, conducts 
an extensive business at Collins as a dealer in furniture and carpets and 
also handles agricultural implements. In addition to his interests in this 
connection he is likewise the proprietor of an undertaking establishment. 
His birth occurred near Oskaloosa, Iowa, on the 8th of December, 1866. 
his parents being Lewis W. and Laura A. (Hartpence) Marsh, the former 



74 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

a native of England and the latter of Indiana. Lewis W. Alarsh emigrated 
to the United States with his parents when a youth in his teens, the family 
home being established in Stephenson county, Illinois. Becoming a carpen- 
ter's apprentice, he thoroughly familiarized himself with the trade and fol- 
lowed it until the outbreak of the Civil war. Offering his services to the 
Union, he served the country for a short time as a carpenter. Soon after his 
return from the war he journeyeil westward to Marshall county, Iowa, and 
there wedded Miss Laura Ilartpence, who had accompanied her parents 
on their removal from Indiana to this state. Following his marriage he 
took up his abode on a farm near Oskaloosa, residing thereon for about two 
years. He next followed farming in Marshall county for a similar period 
and then came to Story county, purchasing three hundred and five acres of 
land one mile east of Collins and ojierating the place until he put aside the 
active work of the fields about 1897. l"or a period of five years he lived 
in Collins and in 1902 removed to Pasadena, California, where both he and 
his wife have since made their home, enjoying the fruits of their former 
toil in well earned ease. Mr. Marsh still retains two hundred and sixty- 
five acres of his land in Collins township, which is generally known as the 
garden spot of Story county. Tie and his wife are consistent and devoted 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, exemplifying its teachings in 
their daily lives. 

Ralph E. Marsh was reared under the parental roof, attending the pub- 
lic schools in the ac(|uiremcnt of an education. On attaining his majority 
he started out in life for himself as an agriculturist, renting and operating 
the home farm for three years. On the expiration of that period he pur- 
chased and located on a tract of one hundred and twenty acres on section 2, 
Collins township, there carrying on agricultural pursuits for about ten years. 
In 1901 he left the farm and took up his abode in Collins, where a year 
later he established the business which he now conducts and which has since 
assumed extensive and profitable proportions. In connection with his in- 
terests as a dealer in furniture and agricultural implements he also conducts 
an undertaking business, for which he is well (jualified, being a 1909 grad- 
uate of the Hohenschuhe Carpenter School of Embalming of Des Moines, 
Iowa. He is careful in formulating plans, is determined in their execution 
and displays keen foresight in managing his varied interests. 

In 1891 Mr. Marsh was unitctl in marriage to Miss Edith Black, a 
daughter of James Black, a ])rominent farmer of Lee county. Illinois. Unto 
our subject and his wife were born five children, four of whom still sur- 
vive, namely: Hazel M.. Harold. Kenneth T. and Glenn B. 

.Since age conferred upon iiim the right of franchise Mr. Marsh has 
supported the men and measures of the republican ])arty. He is a member 
of the present town council of Collins, having been identified therewith for 
seven consecutive years. In fraternal circles he is well known, belonging to 
Fervent Lodge No. 513, A. F. & A. M. ; Amity Lodge No. 361. I. O. O. F. ; 
Crescent Camp No. 2358, M. W. A.; and Collins Homestead No. 365, Yeo- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUiNTY 75 

men of America. Both he and his wife are connected with the Eastern 
Star and the Rebekahs. They are well known in Collins and have an ex- 
tensive circle of warm friends, who esteem them highly for their many 
excellefit traits of character. Mr. Alarsh has made steady progress in his 
business career and, placing his dependence upon the safe, substantial quali- 
ties of diligence and perseverance, has gained a goodly measure of success 
and moreover has won a most honored name. 



HENRY YEAGER. 



Henry Yeager, a prominent and well known resident of Colo, is the 
cashier and business manager of the Colo Savings Bank, having served in 
that capacity since November, 1909. His birth occurred in Switzerland on 
the 3d of December, i860, his parents being Florian and Maria (Haus- 
wirth ) Yeager, who were likewise natives of that country. The father was 
a silk worker, being employed in the silk mills in the town of Chur, Switz- 
erland, and later in Paris, France, where he spent some years. Later he 
returned to his native country and there passed away. In 1865 Mrs. Yeager 
emigrated to the United States in company with her only child, Henry, 
locating in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, where her demise occurred four 
years afterward. 

Henry Yeager, who was but a lad of eight when his mother died, was 
reared by an uncle, Josias Florin, remaining with that gentleman until he 
had attained the age of nineteen years. At that time he took up the study 
of telegraphy and was employed by the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany for three years, on the expiration of which period he entered the serv- 
ice of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company. After a temporary 
location of more than a year in Bertram and Lowden, Iowa, he was made 
agent at Colo, holding that position for twenty-five and a half years. This 
fact in itself speaks volumes for his capability and fidelity in the discharge 
of the duties devolving upon him. In November, 1909, he was appointed 
cashier of the Colo Savings Bank and tendered his resignation to the North- 
w'estern Railroad Company. It is one of the conservative and substantial 
moneyed institutions of this part of the state and its success is attributable 
in large measure to the efforts, the executive ability and the enterprise of 
Mr. Yeager, and his son, who has been assistant cashier for the past six or 
seven years, and also Mr. D. F. Bartlett, who was Mr. Yeager's prede- 
cessor. 

In July, 1884, Mr. Yeager was united in marriage to Miss Anna Weber, 
of Waumandee, Wisconsin, by whom he has two children : Charles W., as- 
sistant cashier of the Colo Savings Bank ; and Florian J., who is attending 
the Colo high school. 



76 iilSTUKV Ul' STURV CUUXTV 

In politics Mr. Ycager is a republican and liis fellow townsmen, recog- 
nizing his worth and ability, have called him to several positions of public 
trust. He has served as mayor of Colo for six years and acted as a mem- 
ber of the town council for a similar period. For the past fifteen years he 
has been a member of the Colo school board and is now serving as its 
president. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Co- 
lumbia Lodge. Xo. 292. A. F. & A. M., and Three Times Three Chapter. 
No. 92. R. A. M. He likewi.se belongs to Colo Camp. Xo. 1591. M. W. A., 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membershi]) in ilie Christian 
church, with which his wife is also affiliated. Mr. Veagcr is faithful in all 
his duties as a citizen and wields a forceful influence in his community, in 
all parts of which he is highly respected. 



S. S. HAXSOX. 



S. S. Hanson, one of the best knnwn and most prosperous residents of 
Story county, is the ])roprictor of the Meadow Lawn Stock Farm, embrac- 
ing five hundred and fifty-seven acres of land in Collins township, lie is 
likewise a prominent factor in financial circles, having served as president 
of the Exchange State Bank at Collins since its organization. In public life, 
too, his intUicncc has been felt and he is now ably discharging the duties 
devolving upon him as county supervisor. His birth occurred in Jasper 
county, Iowa, on the 25th of September, 1864, his parents being Hans and 
Mary (Ashton) Hanson, the former a native of Xorway and the latter of 
Muskingum county, Ohio. When still but a boy Hans Hanson accomi)anie(l 
his parents on their emigration to the United States, the family home being 
established in Illinois. He grew to manhood in that state and in 1849 
joined the "fortune hunters" who were flocking to California in search of 
gold. Crossing the plains with an o.x team, he remained in California for 
about four years but met with only average success. Being next attracted 
to the .'Xustralia gold fields, he also spent about four years in that country 
with excellent results. It was with the intention of investing his money in 
Illinois farm lands that he returned to that state, but believing the price too 
high for profitable investment, he came to Iowa, purchasing and locating on 
a quarter section of land in Clear Creek townshi]), Jasper county. In that 
township he made his home throughout the remainder of his active business 
career, being successfully engaged in general agricultural pursuits. On put- 
ting aside the active work of the fields he took up his abode in Collins, 
where his demise occurred late in the ''m^s. His wife was called to her 
final rest about two weeks later. 

S. S. Hanson remained with his parents until about twenty-four years 
of age, when his father removed to Collins, leaving him in charge of the 
home farm. In partnership with his brother George he operated the place 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 77 

as a renter for three years and then purchased the farm, continuing to re- 
side thereon during the next six or seven )'ears, at the end of which time 
he sold it to his brother, who had just been married. On leaving the home 
farm Mr. Hanson of this review purchased and located upon what was 
known as the Bricker estate of two hundred and forty acres, which lies 
within the corporate limits of the town of Collins. From time to time he 
has extended the boundaries of this place by additional purchase until it 
now embraces five hundred and fifty-seven acres of land, all of which is 
under a high state of cultivation. The buildings which he has erected 
thereon are the finest in Story county and the farm is one of the best im- 
proved within its borders. Mr. Hanson was for a number of years an ex- 
tensive buyer and shipper of stock, but more recently has given his attention 
largely to his farming and stock feeding interests. He personally super- 
vises the operation of his entire farm, hiring three married men as assist- 
ants throughout the year. He was one of the prime movers in the organ- 
ization of the Exchange State Uank of Collins, was chosen president of the 
institution and has served in that capacity continuously since. 

On the i/th of June, 1894, Air. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie P. Mead, a daughter of Charles Mead, now deceased, who was one 
of the most widely known and successful farmers and stockmen of Story 
county. Unto our subject and his wife have been born six children, 
namely : Mabel, Charles, Lester, Dorothy, Mary and Margaret. 

In politics Mr. Hanson is a republican and his fellow townsmen, recog- 
nizing his worth and ability, have called him to positions of public trust. 
For several years he has served as a member of the school board and town 
council. He was elected to the board of county supervisors in November, 
1910, and has already proven himself an able incumbent. Always a resi- 
dent of this part of the state, he is widely and favorably known and the 
fact that many of his stanchest friends have been his acquaintances from 
boyhood indicates that his has been an upright and honorable career. 



JOHN W. JOHN. 



John W. John, a retired agriculturist residing in Maxwell, was for 
many years actively and successfully identified with farming interests in 
Story county, thus winning the competence which now enables him to spend 
his declining years in well earned ease. His birth occurred in Carroll 
county, Indiana, on the 14th of September, 1837, his parents being Bowen 
W. and Cynthia Ann ( Todd ) John, who were natives of Pennsylvania and 
Kentucky respectively. They came to Iowa in 1853, settling near Ottumwa, 
Wapello county, where they remained for one year. On the expiration of 
that period they took up their abode in Allamakee county, while the year 
1857 witnessed their arrival in Story county. In the fall of 1859 Bowen 



78 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

W. John removed to Kansas, his son John having previously made his way 
to the Sunflower state. Because of the disastrous drought in the summer 
of i860 he returned to Iowa, locating at Iowa Center, Story county. His 
wife died during the following summer and he tlien took up his abode in. 
Indiana, remaining in the Hoosier state for a year. At the end of that time 
he once more came to Story county, here continuing to reside until called to 
his final rest in 1878, wdien he had attained the age of eighty-one years. 

John W. John was reared under the parental roof, attending the com- 
mon schools in the acquirement of an education. His opportunities in this 
direction were but limited, for he was able to attend school for only two or 
three months each winter. The little "temple of learning" was a log struc- 
ture, with slab benches, puncheon floor, etc. Despite his early disad- 
vantages, however, Mr. John has become a well informed man. constantly 
augmenting his knowledge by reading, experience and observation. When 
not busy with his text-books he assisted his father in the work of the home 
farm, thus early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to 
the lot of the agriculturist. At' the age of twenty-two years he was married 
and started out as an agriculturist on his own account. He began farming 
in Indian Creek township. Story county, cultivating some land which be- 
longed to his wife. Subsequently he purchased a tract of fifty-three acres 
and as his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and 
capable management, he added to his holdings from time to time until they 
embraced five hundred acres of rich and productive land. He recently dis- 
posed of a quarter section but still owns the home farm of three hundred 
and forty acres ; a tract of eighty acres in Polk county, five miles south of 
Cambridge ; and two hundred and seventy-eight acres in Oklahoma. In the 
spring of 1891 he put aside the active work of the fields and removed to 
IMaxwell, there residing for four years. On the expiration of that period 
he took up his abode in Camliridge, where he made his home for fifteen 
years. In September, 1910, he returned to Maxwell, where he is now living 
in honoral)lc retirement, enjoying all of the comforts and many of the lux- 
uries of life. He owns a handsome home in Maxwell and also has a resi- 
dence in Cambridge. His labors as an agriculturist were attended with a 
gratifying measure of success and he has long been numbered among the 
substantial and respected citizens of the county. 

In March, i860. Mr. John was united in marriage to Miss Sarah I. Hell, 
a daughter of John J. and Sarah (Kelly) Bell, of Nevada. To them were 
Iwm eight children, as follows: Marion Edgar, who is a resident of Mus- 
kogee, Oklahoma; Charles C, living in Council Hill. Oklahoma; Carrie 
Blanche, the wife of A. L. r..utlett. of l.eola. South Dakota; Ida M., who 
is the wife of C. M. Webb an.l resides on her father's home farm; John 
Willard, of Muskogee. Oklahoma; Anna R., who is the wife of John Bowen 
.111(1 likewi.se resides on her father's farm; Fred M., living in Muskogee, 
Oklahoma; and Esther 1'.., wlio is with her parents. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 79 

In politics Mr. John is a stanch prohibitionist, having done all in his 
power to promote the strength of that party and kill the liquor traffic, 
which he believes is the worst evil with which our country has to contend. 
There were but four or five prohibitionists in Maxwell when he came here 
and now there are twenty-eight. He and his wife are of the Evangelical 
faith but as there is no congregation of that denomination here, they wor- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. John was class-leader for 
twenty-five years. He enjoys a wide acquaintance in the county where he 
has so long resided and, as all who know him entertain for him high re- 
gard, his friends are legion. His thoughts are not retrospective but are 
concerned with the afifairs of the day, and to him are applicable the words 
of Victor Hugo that while "the frost of winter is on his head, the flowers 
of spring are in his heart." 



GEORGE HARDENBROOK. 

George Hardenbrook, who was appointed postmaster of Maxwell in 
May, 1897, and has served continuously since, was born in Wawaka, Noble 
county, Indiana, on the 2d of August, 1843, his parents being Freeman and 
Sarah (Gibson) Hardenbrook, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 
of Virginia. They were married in Noble county, Indiana, where they had 
gone as children with their respective parents, both the Hardenbrook and 
Gibson families being among the early pioneer settlers of that county. 
Freeman Hardenbrook followed farming in Noble county, where the de- 
mise of his wife occurred. In 1869 he came to Iowa, purchasing and lo- 
cating on a small farm in Jasper county, where he made his home until 
called to his final rest in March, 1882, when sixty-three years of age. 

George Hardenbrook was reared at home, acquiring his education in 
one of the primitive log schoolhouses characteristic of those early times. 
On the i2th of October, 1863, he became a member of Company B, Twelfth 
Indiana Cavalry, serving with that command until the cessation of hostili- 
ties between the north and the south. He did detail duty as dispatch 
bearer during almost the entire period and was mustered out on the 19th 
of June, 1865. After returning from the war he worked on the home 
farm in Noble county for two years and then came to Iowa, arriving in 
this state on the 5th of May, 1867. For a year or more he was employed 
in a store at Peoria, Polk county, and at the end of that time went to Iowa 
Center. There he remained for twenty-three years in the service of the 
firm of Baldwin & Maxwell, one of the largest mercantile concerns in that 
section of the state. In i8gi he came to Maxwell, Story county, and was 
here employed in the mercantile establishment of C. H. Dickey for a num- 
ber of years. In May, 1897, he was appointed postmaster of Maxwell, in 
which capacity he has served continuously since, discharging the duties 



80 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

devolving upon him in this connection in a most prompt and efficient man- 
ner. 

On the lOth of December, 1869, Mr. Hardenbrook was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Addie Wells, a daughter of Charles and Sarah (Park) Wells, 
who were born, reared and married in Xew Jersey. Subsequently they 
removed to Bureau county, Illinois, where they remained for some years, 
coming thence to Story county, Iowa, and taking up their abode among the 
early settlers here. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hardenbrook were born eight 
children, five of whom are yet living, as follows: Frank J., a resident of 
Chicago, who is a baggagemaster on the Milwaukee Railroad running be- 
tween Chicago and Omaha; Jennie, the wife of L. G. Merrill, of Xeola, 
Iowa; Harry F. ; Joseph II., a telegraph operator at Little Falls, Minne- 
sota; and Clyde G., assistant postmaster at Maxwell, Iowa. 

In politics Mr. Hardenbrook is a stanch republican, believing that the 
principles of that party are most conducive to good government. He still 
maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his mem- 
bership in James II. Ewing Post, No. 305, G. A. R. His wife is a de- 
voted and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Hardenbrook has been a resident of Maxwell for two decades and enjoys 
a wide and favoraI)le acquaintance here. 



iM.\K)R El'llKAl.M HIX. 

On the roll of Story county's honored dead appears the name of Major 
Ephraim liix, who for many years was closely associated with the farming 
interests and later with the real-estate and abstract business of this part of 
the state. Energj- and determination ever characterized him in his business 
career and he worked his way steadily upward to success, enjoying at the 
same time the honor, confidence and respect of his fellowmen. 

He was a native of Alabama Center. Genesee county. Xew York, his 
birth])lace being near the Erie canal and the celebrated roadway from Lewis- 
ton to Lock])ort. Xew York. He was born October 28, 1839, and was the 
eighth in order of birth in a family of nine children, eight of whom reached 
adult age. He came of most creditable ancestry, the line being traced back 
on the paternal side to one who was a member of Lord lialtimcire's colonv in 
Maryland, while in the maternal liiK' be is descended from the Pilgrims who 
first settled Xew England. In ilie year 1848 he removed westward with his 
parents to De Kalb county. Illinois, ijcing then a lad of nine years. He 
pursued his education in the public schools and afterward in Mount ^forris 
.Academy, largely meeting the expenses of his college course bv leaching or 
other kinds of labor during vacations. He subsequently attended Wheaton 
College. Eventually he engaged in business on his own account in -Syca- 
more. Illinois, and he also made several trips to California in the in'ercst of 




MAJOR E. HIX 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 83 

commercial enterprises engineered by his brother Seymour or himself. He 
made his first trip across the plains in 1861 — a trip involving much hardship 
for that day. He was absent for about a year and then returned by way of 
the isthmus of Panama and by steamer to New York. 

Major Hix was married at Sycamore, Illinois, December 7, 1864, to Miss 
Susan Ancelia Ring, who for more than forty years was a faithful and help- 
ful companion to him. sharing with him in all of the joys and sorrows, the 
adversity and prosperity which came to him. 

In 1869, influenced largely by health considerations, he disposed of his 
De Kalb county interests and came to Iowa, settling on a farm in Richland 
township. Story county. That place remained the family home until 1883, 
when it became evident that Mr. Hi.x could no longer endure the hardship 
and exposure of farm life and he took up his abode in Nevada. Here he 
became a partner of M. C. Allen in the real-estate and abstract business. 
This relation was in force without intermission or disagreements to the time 
of his death, or for a period of nearly twenty-two years. He enjoyed to the 
fullest extent the high regard and confidence of his fellow townsmen, who 
recognized his worth and frequently honored him with local offices. He was 
a member of the city council in 1895 and 1S96, and in 1897 and 1898 filled 
the office of mayor, giving to the city the benefit of his broad business ex- 
perience and public spirit. In both positions he discharged his duties to the 
satisfaction of the public. 

As previously stated. Major Hix was married in 1864 to Miss Susan 
Ancelia Ring. She was born in Huntington, Chittenden county, Vermont, 
June 30, 1840, and was but seven years of age when she accompanied her 
parents to Wheaton, Illinois, where she resided up to the time of her mar- 
riage. She pursued a course in the Wheaton College and afterward engaged 
in teaching school for nine years. Her people were among the pioneer 
settlers of Wheaton but her parents, Greenleaf and Betsey (Bunker) Ring, 
where natives of New Hampshire. Their last days were spent in California, 
to which state they removed in 1869. Their family numbered six children, 
three sons and three daughters. Her brother. Professor Orvis Ring, grad- 
uated in the first class from Wheaton College fifty years ago and his whole 
life has been devoted to teaching, while his means have largely been given 
to the education of poor boys. He was superintendent of the public schools 
of Reno, Nevada, for seventeen years, was county superintendent of schools 
for a number of years and state superintendent for twelve years, filling the 
last named position at the time of his death, which occurred September 19, 
1910. Mrs. Hix has long lived in this part of the state. She was residing 
at Wheaton when the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad was completed and 
she saw the first train which passed through that place. As the years have 
come and gone she has witnessed many changes in Illinois and Iowa as 
these comparatively unimproved and undeveloped states have been trans- 
formed into extremely productive regions, taking leadership among the agri- 
cultural states of the Union. 



84 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

The death of .Major Hix occurred May 13. 1905, when he had reached 
the age of sixty-five years, six months and fifteen days. One of the local 
papers said of him: "As a man, Mr. Hix bore an unblemished name. He 
inherited good mental powers which were well disciplined in the schools and 
enriched by reading, travel and observation. He was well informed on the 
questions of his time and able to give a reason for the views he held. He 
was a man of positive convictions and though firm in their maintenance was 
mild and gentlemanly in doing so. The condition of his health for many 
years involved throat and lung trouble with increasing tendency to con- 
sumption ; and this condition not only required his frequent sojourn in win- 
ters in milder climates and made necessary the watchful care of himself at 
all times but also circumscribed his business and social activities from what 
they would have been had he been blessed with robust health. But he pos- 
sessed in good degree the cooperative, social, fraternal and companionable 
spirit as those who in one way and another came into intimate relations with 
him freely testify; and he formed deep and lasting friendships, as was evi- 
denced by the many old friends present at his obsequies. He held those 
moral and religious convictions that lead to uprightness of life. In a word 
Mr. Hix was a man of sterling character, a good husband, a kindly neigh- 
bor and a worthy citizen; and the home and the city out of which he has 
passed have sustained a greatly regretted loss." A man of sterling purpose 
and of high ]>rinciples. Major Ilix ranked for many years as one of the 
most valued citizens of Nevada and his splendid qualities gaincil for him 
the higliest regard of all who knew him. His record is in many respects 
an example well worthy of emulation anil no history of Story county would 
be complete without mention of him because of his close and honorable 
association with many interests that pertained to the general welfare. 



ARTHUR RAV JOILXSOX. 

Arthur Ray Johnson, the junior partner of the firm of the Nelson & 
Johnson Investment Company, was born in Garden City, Iowa, on the 3d 
of January, 1883, and is a son of Svend .M. and Lola (Sink) Johnson. The 
father was a native of Norway but emigrated to the United .'^tates in 1872, 
going directly to Tama county, Iowa, where lie resided for six years. In 
1878 he removed to Hardin county, Iowa, and engaged in farming up to 
the time of his death in January, 1907, at the age of fifty-one years. He 
was a most successful farmer and liad acquired one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Ilardin county at the lime of his demise. He married 
Miss Lola Sink and to them were born two children : CIco, who lives at 
home, and Artluir Ray. The family attended the United Evangelical 
church, of which the parents were members, Mrs. Johnson still being iden- 
lilicil with that denomination. Mr. Johnson always voted the republican 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 85 

ticket and, taking an active interest in politics, he filled the office of town- 
ship assessor for twelve years. 

Arthur Ray Johnson received his early education in the common schools 
of Hardin county and later he attended Highland Park College at Des 
Moines, Iowa, for a while. In 1904 he came to RIcCallsburg, where he 
was employed in the bank for two years, and at the end of that time he 
formed a partnership with N. H. Nelson and they are engaged in the land, 
loan and insurance business under the firm name of the Nelson & Johnson 
Investment Company. Both members of the firm are popular in McCalls- 
burg, where their ability and high principles have won for them recogni- 
tion as men who are building up a clientage on a policy of fair dealing and 
strict integrity. 

Mr. Johnson was united in marriage on the ist of Januar}-, 1909, to 
Miss Ethyl Babcock, a daughter of F. D. Babcock of McCallsburg. They 
attend the Presbyterian church in which Mr. Johnson holds membership. 
Ever since age conferred upon him the right of suffrage he has cast his 
ballot for the candidates of the prohibition party, and although he has never 
taken a particularly active interest in local politics he is always at the polls 
on election day to fulfill his duty as a citizen. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON MILLER. 

Thomas Jefferson Miller resides at No. 211 South Kellogg street in 
Ames, where he has made his home since 1896. He has lived retired dur- 
ing the past three years but previously was engaged in agricultural and com- 
mercial pursuits and also served in public office. He was born in McLean 
county, Illinois, November 21, 1841, a son of John and Blanche (Taylor) 
Miller, natives of Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. The father was 
born July 29, 1801, and the mother on the 20th of March, 1809. In child- 
hood they went with their respective parents to Champaign county, Ohio, 
where they were reared and married, and in 1826 they removed to Mc- 
Lean county, Illinois, where they resided for two decades. The year 1856 
witnessed their arrival in Story county, Iowa, and, settling upon a farm in 
Franklin township, they there spent their remaining days, the father passing 
away January 15, 1886, while his wife survived until October 24, 1889. In 
addition to farming he operated a sawmill for a number of years after his 
arrival. He entered several tracts of land in the western part of the state 
but did not reside thereon, although at one time he owned a thousand acres.' 
In business affairs he displayed sound judgment, keen discrimination and 
unfaltering energy and upon those qualities he builded his success, which 
made him one of the substantial residents of the county. His political al- 
legiance was given to the whig party until its dissolution, when he joined 
the ranks of the new republican party, which he supported until his death. 



86 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

During the greater part of his residence in Story county he filled the office 
of justice of the peace and his decisions were strictly fair and impartial. 
His entire life was in harmony with his professions as a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which he took an active part. 

Unto him and his wife were born eight children: James H., now de- 
ceased; John F., a resident of Clinton, Illinois; Ichabod Taylor, deceased, 
who was a Methodist Episcopal preacher and who served for several years 
in the Civil war, a part of the time as private and later as chaplain of the 
Xinety-fourth Illinois Infantry; William O., who has resided in California 
since 1859; Kohama J., who died in infancy; Charles P., who was killed 
in the charge at Black River Bridge in the Civil war; Samuel II.. who died 
in Texas ; antl Thomas J. 

The last named remained upon the home farm in Illinois until twelve 
years of age. wlicii, with his parents, he removed to Bloomington, that state, 
there residing for two years. In 1856 the family came to Story county, 
Iowa, settling in Bloomington, I-^-anklin township, and there Thomas J. Mil- 
ler remained until after the inauguration of the Civil war, when he re- 
sponded to the country's call for troops, enlisting on the 9th of .August. 
1862, as a member of Company A, Twenty-third Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. 
He took part in the battles of Port Gibson, Champion's Hill and Black 
River Bridge. He was taken ill soon afterward and subsequently did camp 
duty. He was in the convalescent hospital during the siege of N'icksburg 
and was di.scharged at Vicksburg on the nth of .August, 1863. 

After his return home Mr. Miller engaged in farming with his father 
for a short time but later entered the nursery business at Bloomington, in 
connection with Captain R. S. Osborne, carrying on business under the firm 
style of Osborne & Miller for about nine years. On the expiration of that 
period Mr. Miller began farming on his own account and devoted his ener- 
gies untiringly to general agricultural pursuits until 1S91. when he was 
elected county treasurer, entering upon the duties of the office on the ist of 
January, 1892. He served for two terms, or four years, his reelection com- 
ing to him as an indication of the confidence and tru^l reposed in him. On 
his retirement from office he engaged in the grocery business at .\mes for 
nine years, first as a member of the firm of .Miller & Korsen, and later under 
the firm style of Miller & Son. .\t the time of the second opening of ter- 
ritory in Oklahoma, in February, 1900, he went to that state and took up a 
homestead near Frederick, si)cnding about nineteen months there. At 
length he sold out, trading his store for Kansas lan<l, which he has since 
.sold. During the past three years he has lived retired, enjoying the fruits 
of his former toil in a well earned rest, his home being at .\'o. 2\\ South 
Kellogg .street in .Ames, where he has resided since 1896, save for a brief 
interval of absence. 

Mr. Miller has been twice married On the 28th of Xovcmbcr, iSho. lie 
wedded Lizzie McCIain, who was born August 28, 1848, and died Marcli 
2, 1868, leaving a son. William Howard, who died at the age of two years. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 87 

In 1873 Mr. :\Iiller was united in marriage to Miss Belle j\I. Bisbee, who 
was born in Chenango, New York, June 9, 1855, and there resided until 
1867, when she came to Story county, Iowa, with her parents, Bolivar and 
iMartha r^lalina ( Herrick) Bisbee, both of whom were natives of New York, 
the former born September 5, 1826, and the latter about 1828. The mother 
died when her daughter Mrs. Miller was but seven years of age and the 
father afterward married again. On coming with his family to Iowa he 
settled in Bloomington, Franklin township, and his remaining days were 
spent in this county, his death occurring in December, 1895. He had four 
children by his first wife and three by his second wife. Unto Thomas J. 
and Belle Miller there have been born five children: Delia Marian, the wife 
of F. M. Dawson, of Story City ; George Atherton, living in Ames ; Lena 
Belle and Harry Claude, who died in infancy ; and Lizzie Azalia, who died 
at the age of five years. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Miller has given his political support to 
the republican party and has served in some local ofifices, acting as township 
trustee of Franklin tow^nship, also as a member of the school board. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with Ellsworth Post, No. 30, G. A. R., and with 
Ames Lodge, I. O. O. F. He likewise belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
church and in these relations are found the guiding principles of his life, 
making him a man whom to know is to esteem and honor. He has ever 
been loyal to the trust reposed in him, faithful in his obligations of citizen- 
ship and straightforward in all business dealings, and because of these quali- 
ties the years have brought him the warm regard of those with whom busi- 
ness or social relations have brought him in contact. 



THOMAS P. CHILDS. 



One of the extensive landowners of Grant township is Thomas P. 
Childs. He is a native of tlie Empire state, having been born in Philadel- 
phia, Jefiferson county, New York, on the 7th of December, 1840. He is 
of Quaker extraction and is the son of Aaron and Mary (Hicks) Childs. 
The father was a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of New York. 
They were the parents of nine children, all but two of whom have now- 
passed away, those living being: Henry, a resident of Clinton, Iowa, and 
Thomas P., our subject. 

It was in the district and common schools of Jefiferson county, New 
York, that Thomas P. Childs acquired his early education. He remained a 
member of his father's household until he had attained the age of twenty- 
three years, having occupied the greater part of that time in the acquire- 
ment of an education and fitting himself for his life's work, which he early 
decided would be along agricultural lines. In 1863 he turned his face west- 
ward, feeling that better opportunities were afforded a young man of lim- 



88 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ited capital in a new country, and he located in Iowa. In 1868 he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Story county but did not take up his 
residence there until 1870, at which time he removed to this county with 
his wife and one child. He later sold this place and bought the three hun- 
dred acres where he now resides. His is one of the valuable farms of the 
count)'. It contains modern improvements, which are kept in repair, he 
raises a good grade of stock and his carefully cultivated fields produce 
abundant harvests. 

Mr. Childs married Miss Catherine Grohe, and they have become the 
parents of three children, who are as follows : Oliver, who was graduated 
at the Iowa State University with the degree of C. E. and is now a bridge 
engineer in St. Louis, Missouri; L. B., a farmer in Grant township; and 
Winnie, the wife of John Fay of Cambridge. 

Fver since he acquired the right of full citizenship Mr. Childs has been 
casting his ballot for the candidates of the republican party. He has taken. 
an active part in local politics and is highh' esteemed by his constituency as 
is indicated by his position on the school board. He is one of the older resi- 
dents of this county and during his period of citizenship has shown him- 
self to be a man well worthy of the esteem which is generally accorded 
him. He has met with success in his pursuits but it has never been 
achieved at the expense of honor and at no time has his integrity been as- 
sailed or in any way questioned. 



PETER A. SOLEM. 



Roland is indebted to Norway for many of its estimable citizens and 
among these is Peter A. Solem. lie was born in the Xorseland in 1857 and 
had sailed the seas and lived in various climes before he became a mem- 
ber of Uncle Sam's family. He acquired his education in his native land 
and then followed the sea, sailing for one and one-half years on a Nor- 
wegian ship. .After that he emigrated to South .\frica and worked for a 
time as a cabinet-maker. He then went to Australia, Init only remained in 
that country for six months. He was next employed as a sailor on an 
English vessel but finally decided to become a resident of the United States. 
His first permanent location in this country was in Story county, Iowa, 
of which he is still a citizen. When he arrived here he engaged in carpen- 
try but after following that trade for two years he decided to go into the 
furniture business and opened a .store in Roland in 1887. which he continues 
to conduct, being the pioneer furniture dealer of the town. 

Since his residence here Mr. Solem has been married to Miss .\nnie 
Hclland, who was also a native of Norway. They have become the parents 
of three children, two of whom are still living: Adelaide and Oswald, both 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 89 

of whom are attending school. They lost one little daughter, Selma, at the 
age of two years. 

The family attend the Lutheran church in which the parents are com- 
municants. Ever since he has acquired the full rights of citizenship through 
naturalization Mr. Solem has cast his ballot for the candidates of the re- 
publican party, as he feels that the basic principles of that political body are 
best adapted to subserve the interests of the general public. He has always 
been a very active wide-awake citizen, taking a warm interest in all muni- 
cipal affairs and for three years served as a member of the Roland council 
and is now acting as a member of the board of school directors. 

He is a progressive man, possessing very broad views. His extensive 
travel and residence in so many different countries, as well as the fact of 
his having followed various occupations, has given him a comprehensive 
understanding and grasp of many subjects which never come within the 
scope of the average individual who only acquires his knowledge from 
books or at second hand. He has always proven himself to be a capable 
man, well worthy of the regard which is generally granted him by his fel- 
low townsmen. 



LOGAN OLINGER. 



One of the noticeable factors of recent years in business circles is the 
presence of young men in positions of large responsibility. Possessing 
advantages of early training of which former generations had only a dim 
conception, they are prepared to advance rapidly and the result is that 
many of the important enterprises of the country are directed by young 
men. Logan Olinger, in the real-estate business at Maxwell, belongs to 
the class briefly outlined above. He is a native of Maxwell, born Feb- 
ruary 23, 1880, a son of George W. Olinger, a record of whom appears in 
the sketch of Charles E. Olinger, to be found elsewhere in this work. 

Logan Olinger received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of his native town and also attended the high school. At the age of nine- 
teen years he became connected with the real-estate business of his brother, 
Charles E. Olinger, and in March, 1900, was made a member of the firm 
of Olinger Brothers and was placed in charge of the insurance depart- 
ment, the firm doing the largest fire insurance business of any in this sec- 
tion of the state. As time passed the personal affairs of the senior mem- 
ber of the concern demanded more and more of his attention until, on 
December i, 1909, he retired and the subject of this review is now sole 
proprietor. The firm has been prominent in handling local real estate but 
its main operations have been in Iowa and Dakota farm lands, while the 
insurance business controlled by them under active and able management 
has grown to remarkable proportions. 



90 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

On the 2ci of May. 1906, Mr. Olinger was united in marriage to Miss 
Bessie Shemian, a daughter of Silas and Mary E. (Gamble) Sherman. 
The father is now deceased but Mrs. Sherman is still living and makes her 
home in Maxwell. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Olinger. but 
only one. Paul J]., is now living. 

Mr. Olinger gives his support to the democratic party but does not 
devote much attention to politics, as his time is largely taken up with his 
business affairs, lie is a member of the Brotherhood of American Yeo- 
men and is connected with tlic Commercial Club of Maxwell, being presi- 
dent of this organization. He and his wife are valued members of the 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Olinger is remarkably active, clear-sighted and 
efficient in the line to which he has devoted his talents ever since he began 
the battle with the world, and he has gained a very high standing among 
the successful promoters of land enterprises as well as in the lield of in- 
surance. Through persistent purpose he has won his way to general recog- 
nition, presenting one of the most striking examples of the effect of well 
applied energy that may be met with in the state of Iowa. 



FR.WK T. OL.SAN. 



I'rank J. Olsan. a well known agriculturist of Story county, was born 
on the 17th of February, 1859. in Moravia, in which country his ancestors 
have been engaged in the occupation of horticulture in the same i)lace for 
a period of four hundred and eighty years. He came to the United States 
in 1887, first locating in Iowa City. Iowa, but the following year removed 
to Nebraska. In i8()i, however, he returned to the Hawkeye state and 
settled in Story county, where he has since continued to reside. He is en- 
gaged in the seed, nursery and llorist business, in which line he has shown 
himself to have few equals. .\t the present time he has six hothouses con- 
taining fifteen thousand feet of glass, the space which he is utilizing being 
equal to thirty acres of land. That he is thoroughly conversant with every 
detail of his work is indicated by the abundance and perfection of his 
products. Since his residence here he has acquired a nnich more than lo- 
cal reputation being known as one of the most capable and competent rep- 
resentatives of the science of horticulture in the country. He was the first 
editor of the horticultural department of the Hospodar of Omaha, Ne- 
braska, the largest Bohemian i)ubIication in the worM interested in this sub- 
ject. He is now associate editor of the same iJublication. the growing de- 
mands of his business precluding the possibility of his devoting as much 
time as formerly to his editorial work. 

Mr. Olsan was united in marriage to Mis> Mary Danek. also a native 
of Moravia, and unto them have been born nine children, eight of whom 




!•■. .1. u|>\\ 




\"II-:\V OK or.SAXVILLE 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 95 

are still living as follows: Lidia, Miles, Ladic, Charles, Lumer, George, 
William and Erma. 

Mr. Olsan is fraternally identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Homesteaders and Yeomen of America. Ever since he ac- 
quired the right of suffrage through naturalization he has cast his ballot 
for the republican party, feeling tliat the policy of that organization best 
subserves the interests of the majority by its principle of protection. Dur- 
ing his period of residence in Story county his life has met all the require- 
ments of good citizenship, and he is well worthy of the regard awarded 
him in the communitv. 



ELMER F. BIDDLE. 



Elmer F. Biddle, one of the well known stockmen of Story county, who 
is now serving as clerk of Grant township, was born in McLean county, 
Illinois, on the 30th of May, 1869, a son of Dorrel F. and Rebecca (Lam- 
bert) Biddle. His parents were both natives of the Buckeye state. His 
father was born in 1836 and after he had acquired an education decided to 
become a farmer. He was very successful in his work, and particularly in 
his specialty, which was the raising and feeding of stock, accumulating a 
nice competency and considerable valuable property. He was always iden- 
tified with the republican party arid was very. active in politics, holding 
many of the ininor offices in his locality. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Biddle were the parents of si.x children: Melissa, 
who married William Merna, of Bloomington, Illinois; Maywood, who is 
also married and is living in South Dakota; Edna, the widow of D. C. 
Fletcher; Elmer F., our subject; Pearl J., who "is married and is living in 
Bloomington, Illinois ; and Wilmer O., also a resident of Bloomington. The 
mother passed away November 3, 1901, and the father survived until the 
2 1 St of December, 1906. 

Elmer F. Biddle received his preliminary education in the common 
schools of McLean county, Illinois, and later went to Danville for one 
year for a more advanced course. His early years were quite similar to 
those of the majority of youths reared in the country. When he had 
reached the age when it was time for him to lay aside his text-books and 
assume the more practical duties of life he assisted his father up to the 
age of twenty-two years. At that time he bought one hundred and thirty- 
six acres of land in partnership with his brother Maywood and followed 
cooperative farming for a time. Later he sold his interest to his brother 
and cultivated rented land for a time. He then bought eighty acres, upon 
which he lived until he came to Story county in 1898. The first year after 
his removal here he rented land but very soon after his arrival bought one 
hundred ami sixty acres. He has since added one hundred and sixty acres 



96 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

to his farm and now owns three hundred and twenty acres of good land. 
Like his father he has always made a specialty of the breeding and raising 
of stock. He has some good thoroughbred animals on his farm, taking 
particular pride in his Duroc hogs and Polled Angus cattle, in the breed- 
ing and raising of which he has been quite successful. He also raises and 
breeds pure bred Percheron horses, in which he has been equally success- 
ful, having very much improved the standard of pacing horses in this sec- 
tion. He has the distinction of having bred a pacer — E. F. B. — who made 
a 2:20 record after a fifteen days' tryout. 

On the 6th of January, 1891, Mr. Biddle was united in wedlock to 
Miss Sarah Maroney, a native of Woodford county, Illinois, and of this 
union eight children have been born, seven of whom are living, tlie order 
of their birth being as follows: Dorrel, now attending high school; David, 
who died at the age of nine months; Ethel, Elmer Charles, Jr., Edna and 
Maud, all of whom are in school ; and Wayne and Ralph, who are at home. 

Ever since he attained his majority Mr. Biddle has cast his vote with 
the republican party and has been very active in politics. At present he 
is filling the office of township clerk. His fraternal relations are entirely 
confined to membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, his local 
affiliation being with the Nevada camp. During his residence in Story 
county Mr. Biddle has proven himself to be a capable and competent busi- 
ness man and is regarded as one of the successful and prosperous farmers 
of the community. He is favorably regarded by those with whom he has 
had business and social relations and is well liked in the district wlicre he 
resides. 



ALFRED J. FAWCETT. 

Alfred J. Fawcett, a prominent representative of financial interests in 
Story county, is the cashier of the People's State Bank at Maxwell, which 
institution he organized. His birth occurred in New .-Mbany township, 
this county, on the 23d of October. 1869. He was reared on the home 
farm and supplemented his preliminary education, obtained in the com- 
mon schools, by a course of study in the Collins high school. Subse- 
ruicntlv he entered what is now known as the Leandcr Clark College at 
Toledo, Iowa, i)ursuing the commercial course and being graduated with 
the class of 1890. 

Desiring to learn telegraphy, he entered the telegraph office at Collins 
but alx)ut two and a halt months later was offered and accepted a position 
in a lumberyard, lie took the position, however, with the intention of 
returning to the telcgrai>h office, for the click of the key possessed a fasci- 
nation for him. But it seemed that he was destined for some other field 
of activity. He remained in the lumberj-ard for about two years and then 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 97 

entered the service of the Exchange Bank of ColHns, a private institution, 
acting as bookkeeper and assistant cashier for about ten years. On the 
expiration of that period the owner died and Mr. Fawcett was made ad- 
ministrator, continuing to conduct the business of the bank for the estate for 
about six months. In July, 1902, he reorganized the institution, which be- 
came known as the Exchange State Bank and of which he was made 
cashier and manager, serving in the dual capacity for two and a half years, 
when he sold his interest with the intention of going to California, in which 
state his parents were residing. Instead, however, he returned to the 
farm to look after some improvements and remained thereon for two years, 
abandoning his California trij). He next entered the county treasurer's 
office at Nevada as deputy and on leaving the office, in April, 1908, organ- 
ized the People's State Bank of Alaxwell, being placed in charge of the in- 
stitution. A man of excellent executive ability and keen discrimination, 
he has since contributed in large measure to the success and growth of 
the bank. In addition to his financial interests he owns a farm in Indian 
Creek township, this county, and another in South Dakota. 

In 1892 j\Ir. Fawcett was united in marriage to Miss Huldah Hanson, 
a native of Jasper county, Iowa, by whom he has four children : Genevieve 
M., Geraldine M., Helene M. and Alfred H. Mr. Fawcett gives his po- 
litical allegiance to the republican party, while fraternally he is identified 
with Herald Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and Sylvan Camp, No. 2417, M. W. A. 
His business record is one which any man might be proud to possess. 
Starting at the bottom round of the ladder, he has advanced steadily step 
by step until he is now occupying a position of prominence and trust. 
Through his entire business career he has been looked upon as a model 
of integrity and honor, never making an engagement that he has not filled 
nor incurring obligations that he has not met. He stands today an example 
of what determination and force, combined with the highest degree of 
business integrity, can accomplish for a man of natural ability and strength 
of character. 



DANIEL McCarthy. 



Daniel McCarthy, to whose enterprising spirit Ames is largely indebted 
for its educational and commercial development, was born in Leeds county, 
Ontario, Canada, on the nth of January, 1833. He is the son of Florence 
McCarthy, a native of County Cork, Ireland, who was educated in the city 
of Cork. The father was a profound student and deep thinker as well as 
an ardent advocate of the education of the masses and was one of the first 
propagators of the free school system in Canada. He taught school for 
thirty-two years, teaching twelve months in succession. After he became a 



98 HISTUKV UF STUKV CUUXTV 

resident of Canada lie received the a])i)(>intincnt of justice of jieace from 
the crown. Mr. McCarthy was united in marriage to Miss Mary Eliza- 
beth Moore and by this union seven childrn were born, three of whom still 
survive, the son Daniel being the second in order of birtli. 

Daniel McCarthy acquired his fundamental education in the district 
schools of Canada and after laying aside his te.xt-books he apprenticed him- 
self to the cari)enter's trade. When lie attained bis majority he left the 
land of his nativity and located in Jefferson county, New \'ork, but after 
a brief residence there he decided to follow the sea for a wliile, believing 
the opportunities so afforded of studying the customs and habits of other 
nations at first hand would prove a liberal education. He shipped out of 
Sackets Harbor, New York, as a sailor, but two months of this life was 
sufficient and he migrated to Chicago and then removed to the central part 
of Illinois and obtainexl a position as lireman on the Illinois Central Rail- 
road for a few months. In the winter of 1854 he came west to Iowa and 
located in Marshall coimty. where he worked at the carpenter's trade. He 
remained there until the ist of April, 1856, when he removed to Fair- 
view — now Story City, it taking four days to make the journey. After 
his arrival in Story county he installed a steam plant in a sawmill owned by 
Mr. House. This was the first steam plant operated in this county, and 
after completing the work he returned to Marshall county but shortly 
afterward was employed by XeLson House to remove the sawmill to what 
was at that time called New Philadelphia but is now Ontario. He con- 
tinued in the service of Mr. House in the sawmill for a time and then 
bought the mill, which he operated for about two years and then sold it. 
He again engaged in carpenter work for seven years, being dependent upon 
it for his livehhood, while spending all of his leisure time in the study of 
law. He made what progress he could, being entirely without assistance 
during the whole period of his study. However, he was ambitious and 
determined to win and although it took twelve years to master the prin- 
ciples of jurisprudence his perseverance won and he was admitted to the 
bar in 1870, remaining in active practice for nearly forty years, only re- 
cently retiring. He first engaged in practice with John L. Stevens, under 
the firm name of McCarthy & Stevens, later G. A. Underwood was ad- 
mitted as junior partner. .After the dissolution of that partnershiji he be- 
came a member of the firm of .McCarthy & Conley and later practiced with 
Mr. Lee, now Judge Lee. More recently he has been identified with Mr. 
Luke, under the name of McCarthy & Luke, and while this last relation- 
ship still continues Mr. McCarthy is only a consulting jiartner, taking no 
active part in the business of the firm. 

NN'Ikmi be first located in Story county Mr. .McCarthy bought one bun- 
drctl and sixty acres of land in Washington township, upon which he 
erected the first frame house built in the township, and since that he has 
at divers times added to his holdings until he now owns four hundred 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 99 

acres of valuable farm land. In 1875 he began importing horses and 
crossed the ocean eighteen times for this purpose. He was at one time 
manager and director of the Central Iowa Importing Company but they 
discontinued the business in 1893. He also served as a director of the 
Union National Bank for thirty years but recently resigned from this. 

I\Ir. McCarthy has always been an ardent supporter of the cause of 
education and it is largely due to his personal eflorts that the Iowa State 
College, then known as the State Agricultural College, was located at 
Ames, as with other public-spirited citizens he donated money for that 
purpose. He drove the first stake, and leveled and staked oflf the ground 
for the first two buildings of this college, which is now recognized as one 
of the foremost institutions of learning of its kind in the United States. 
His championship of the college was recognized and honored by his being 
appointed to have entire supervision of the arrangements for the semi- 
centennial anniversary, which was held on the 4th of July, 1909. It is also 
very largely due to his efforts that the Northwestern Railroad passed 
through Ames, as he contributed money toward defraying the expenses of 
the preliminary survey and did his utmost to convince the more conserva- 
tive citizens of the advantages which it would be to the communitv. 

On the 25th of April, 1858, Mr. McCarthy was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary A. Ross, a daughter of James and Mary Ross, natives of Vir- 
ginia and Ohio respectively. Her father was a salt manufacturer in his 
early days but gave this up later in life and became a farmer. In the 
family were eight children, Mrs. McCarthy being the seventh in order of 
birth, three of whom are still living. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McCarthy have 
been born nine children, eight of whom are living, as follows: WiUiam 
F., a machinist, residing in Ames ; Andrew, who died at the age of two and 
one-half years; Marie, the wife of H. L. Carrol, a member of the Polk 
county bar, living in Des Moines ; Emma, who married C. G. Lee, of Ames ; 
Robert H., engaged in the real-estate business in Ames; Elizabeth, the wife 
of George S. Foster, a civil engineer of Madison, Wisconsin; Harriet, 
who married Dr. Thomas L. Rice, of Ames; Mary R., who is the wife of 
Frank W. Linebaugh, superintendent of the electric light and water plant 
of Ames; and Justin D., who is engaged in farming. 

Mr. McCarthy has always been a stanch adherent of the republican 
party, is a very public-spirited man and has at all times taken an active 
interest in municipal politics and has served in various local offices. He 
was a member of the board of supervisors for many years and recently re- 
signed because of the arduous duties it involved and has held no public 
office since that time. He v/as also a member of the first city council in 
Ames. 

Mr. McCarthy can most truly be termed a self-made man. The son of a 
poor man. he started out in life determined to make a place for himself 
and to this end he saw that every step was an advance. When a less de- 



100 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

termined man would have become discouraged and have given up. he stuck 
to his Blackstone and in time was the victor. He is one of the substantial 
citizens of Ames and is well worthy of the regard and esteem which his 
fellow townsmen accord him. 



ADELBERT J. BROWN. 

Adelbert J. Brow-n, one of the most prominent representatives of mer- 
cantile interests in Story county, acts as business manager of the depart- 
ment store of the Lingenfelter lirotliers at Maxwell. His birth occurred 
in Iowa Center, this county, on the 13th of September, 1869, his parents 
being Peter and Catherine (Shoop) Brown, who are natives of Ohio and 
Pennsylvania respectively. They came to Iowa as children with their re- 
spective parents, both the Brown and Shoop families settling in Story 
county some time in the '40s and forming the vanguard of emigration 
westward. Both families entered land from the government and built 
homes. The parents of our subject were married in Story county and 
have resided within its borders continuously since. Peter Brown was suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming in Union township until 1892, when he put 
aside the active work of the fields, having since lived retired in Maxwell. 
He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Herald 
Lxxlge, No. 455. Both he and his wife belong to the Presbyterian church 
and are well known and highly esteemed throughout the community as 
people of genuine personal worth. 

Adelbert J. Brown spent his youthful days under the parental roof amid 
the environment of the average farm boy and was educated in the district 
schools. When alx)Ut nineteen years of age he left the home farm to em- 
bark upon his business career, first going to Cambridge with the intention 
of learning the drug business. At the end of a year, however, because of 
the fact that his father had met with an accident, he returned home and 
for twelve months operated the farm. Coming to Maxwell on the expira- 
tion of that period, he was engaged in draying for a short time and then 
entered a general store. Willi the exception of one year devoted to the 
restaurant business at Collins he has since been continuously identified 
with mercantile interests. In 1905 the Lingenfelter Brothers purchased the 
general stock of Miller & Miller in Maxwell, and Mr. Brown was placed 
in charge of the store. At that time the business was conducted in a small 
corner room and there was alxjut nine thousand dollars' worth of stock. 
Two years later the trade had grown to such an extent that the need arose 
for more commodious quarters and the stock was removed to the present 
place of business, where there are two large storerooms and also basement 
rooms of the same size, affording altogether ten thousand square feet of 
floor space. In the short period of five years, under the able management 
of Mr. Brown, the trade has grown to an extent almost unequaled in a town 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 101 

the size of Maxwell. From a humble and obscure position he has worked 
his way steadily upward to one of large responsibility and prominence, be- 
ing now widely recognized as a leading business man and influential resi- 
dent of his native county. 

In 1892 Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Cynthia John, of 
Ma.xwell, her father being Daniel W. John, a retired agriculturist of 
Maxwell. Unto our subject and his wife has been born one chi-ld, Ava 
Gladys. 

Mr. Brown is a republican in politics, while his religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Presbyterian church, to which his wife also 
belongs. Fraternally he is identified witli Herald Lodge, No. 455, A. F. 
& A. M. ; Social Lodge, No. 463, I. O. O. F. ; the Knights of Pythias ; and 
Sylvan Camp, No. 2417, M. W. A., acting as clerk of the last named. He 
has always resided in Story county and his life has been such that the circle 
of his friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



JOHN W. LUTZ. 



John W. Lutz, who vras successfully identified with general agricultural 
pursuits throughout his entire business career, passed away on his farm in 
Sherman township on the 31st of October, 1906. His birth occurred in La 
Salle county, Illinois, on the 31st of October, 1862, his parents being V. G. 
and Elizabeth (Renz) Lutz, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
Emigrating to the United States, they were married in the state of Michi- 
gan more than fifty years ago. V. G. Lutz, who was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, died in Illinois in December, 1896. His widow still survives, how- 
ever, and now makes her home with a daughter in Nebraska. 

John W. Lutz attended the common schools in the acquirement of an 
education and after putting aside his text-books worked on a farm, thus 
early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. He lived on a farm near Omaha, Nebraska, before com- 
ing to this county in the spring of 1899, at which time he took up his 
abode in Sherman township. In addition to the cultivation of cereals he 
devoted considerable attention to the breeding of Hereford or white-faced 
cattle, which branch of his business added materially to his income. He 
also acted as vice president of the creamery at Zearing and was widely 
recognized as a substantial and esteemed citizen of the community. His 
farm of two hundred and sixty-two acres on section 5, Sherman township, 
is now in possession of his widow and is known as the Fairview Stock 
Farm. 

On the 23d of January, 1889, in La Salle county, Illinois, Mr. Lutz was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Cehm, who was born in that county on 
the 15th of May, 1863, her parents being Nicholas and Margaret (Young) 
Gehm, who were married in Germany. They crossed the Atlantic to the 



102 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

United States in the early '50s, locating on a farm in La Salle county, Illi- 
nois, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. Gehm passed away 
in March, 1901, while Mrs. Gehm was called to her final rest in February, 
1902. Mrs. Lutz, who attended the grammar and high schools as a girl, is 
now the mother of five children, the record of whom is as follows. Caro- 
line A., whose birth occurred in Nebraska on the i8th of December, 1889, 
and who is still at home with her mother, is a graduate of the Central Busi- 
ness College at Marshalltown. George J., who was born in Nebraska on the 
4th of March, 1891, lives with his mother in Sherman township and attends 
the Zearing high school. Nettie E., whose birth occurred in Nebraska on 
the 13th of December, 1892, is pursuing her studies in the common schools. 
Louis E., who was born in Nebraska on the loth of May, 1897, likewise at- 
tends the common schools. Lydia M.. whose birth occurred in Sherman 
township. Story county, on the 9th of March, 1904, is also pursuing her edu- 
cation in the common schools. 

Mr. Lutz gave his political allegiance to the republican party, while his 
religious faith was indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church. 
His life, in all of its various relations, was of such character as to com- 
mand the respect and esteem of those with whom he was associated. Mrs. 
Lutz. who still resides on the farm in .'^herman township, is a lady of many 
excellent traits of heart and niiml and has won a host of warm friends 
here. 



JACOB R. FETTERHOFF. 

\\'hen death came to Jacob R. Fetterhoff there was closed a record of 
a life of great usefulness, fraught with good deeds and of marked influence 
as an element for good in the lives of those with whom he came in con- 
tact. While the greater part of his attention was given to agricultural pur- 
suits he was always actuated by a spirit of Christian faith and belief and 
for alx)ut four years prior to his death engaged in evangelistic work. He 
was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1840, his parents 
being Jacob and Catherine (Forney) Fetterhoff, both of whom were na- 
tives of the Keystone state. The father died when his son Jacob was but 
eight years of age. The mother afterward married again and spent her 
last days in Maryland. 

Jacob R. Fcttcrlioff was the second in a family of three sons but his 
brothers, Hiram and .Mbert H., are both deceased. He resided at the 
place of his nativity with his widowed mother until after the outbreak of 
the Civil war when, in September. 1862, he oft"ered his services to the gov- 
ernment, becoming a i)rivatc of Company H, Si.xtccnth Pennsylvania Cav- 
alry. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant and served for thirty-two 
months, being honorably discharged at the close of the war. He was 
wounded and while at the front suffered from typhoid malaria. Twice he 
was obliged to go to the hospital but as soon as possible rejoined his regi- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 105 

ment. In February, 1863, he was granted a furlougli and for a short time 
was at home. He took part in over thirty engagements with the Army of 
the Potomac and made a most creditable mihtary record by his iidebty to 
duty on all occasions. He did not hesitate to take his place on the lonely 
picket line nor stand upon the firing line where the battle raged the thickest. 

Following the close of the war Mr. Fetterhoff was married at Franklin 
Grove, Illinois, in October, 1865, to Aliss jNIelvina Catherine Cook, who was 
born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, November 4, 1843. In the spring 
of 1865 she went to Illinois with a sister and was married there. Her 
parents were Samuel and ]\Iary Ann (Beaver) Cook, both of whom were 
natives of Pennsylvania, where their entire lives were passed. They had 
a family of five children: Airs. Isabelle Alonn, of Pennsylvania. Henry 
A., who served in the Civil war ; JNIrs. Anna R. Southerland, who resides 
three miles south of Nevada; Mrs. Fetterhoff; and Mrs. Jennie Eiker, of 
Pennsylvania. 

In 1866, the year following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Fetterhoff 
came to Nevada and he remained a resident of Story county until his death, 
which occurred February 26, 1885. Soon after his arrival here he pur- 
chased a farm four miles south of the town and his remaining days were 
largely devoted to the work of the fields and the improvements of the 
place. He was the owner of one hundred and eighty-three acres and had 
become a well-to-do citizen at the time of his death. He placed many im- 
provements upon his farm, added to it all modern accessories and equip- 
ments and as the years passed by made his place a productive and valuable 
property. Soon after coming to Story county he was converted and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal church and his life from that time was guided by 
the teachings of the church and his efforts were an element in the moral 
progress of the community. He became an evangelist and engaged in 
preaching for about four years prior to his death, being in the midst of a 
meeting when called to his final home. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Fetterhoff was blessed with five chil- 
dren: Anna May, at home; Harvey Grant, who removed to Spokane, 
Washington, where he died at the age of thirty- four years ; Cleo Pearl, at 
home ; Benola Alvin, of Salem, South Dakota, who is married and has 
three children, Sylva Pearl, Alvin and Ira ; and Etta, the wife of Peter 
Mattison, who resides on the Fetterhoff' farm. Mr. and Mrs. Mattison 
have seven children living: Lola, Ona, Harry, Merle, Clyde, Ivan and 
Glen. Their eldest son, Orval Guy Mattison, was born January 25, 1894, 
and died August 7, 1907. All of the children of the Fetterhoff family 
were born upon the farm in Story county. Eighteen years after the death 
of her husband Mrs. Fetterhoff removed to Nevada, where she now makes 
her home but still retains the ownership of the farm. 

In his political views Mr. Fetterhoff' was a republican and never lightly 
regarded the duties of citizenship yet did not seek nor desire any public 
office. He preferred to labor for the upbuilding and welfare of the com- 



106 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

munity in other ways and his life became a jxatent force in the moral prog- 
ress of the community. He left to his family not only a comfortable com- 
petence, but also the priceless heritage of an untarnished name and a 
memory that remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew him. 



JAMES H. CLE\'ERLEY. 

That the life history of James H. Cleverley is a record of success is 
due to the persistent effort and intelligently directed industry which he has 
displayed through the years of his connection with agricultural interests 
of Story county. Born in .Allamakee county. Iowa, on the 13th of July, 
1 87 1, he is a representative of one of the well known and highly honored 
families of central Iowa, his parents being Jonathan and Elizabeth J. 
(Owen) Cleverley, the former a native of London and the latter of Cov- 
entry, England. Jonathan Cleverley, whose birth occurreil in the wiirld's 
metropolis on the 12th of .April, 1836, is a son of William and .\nn (Lov- 
ett) Cleverley. The mother passed away in England and later the father 
brought his family of four children, a son and three daughters, to the 
United .'states. He arrived here in 1847 and took up his abode in Herki- 
mer county. New York, where he made his home until i860, in which year 
he came to Iowa and remained with his sun until his death in 187S at the 
age of seventy-five years. 

Jonathan Cleverley, the only son of -Mr. and .Mrs. William Cleverley, 
was eleven years of age when brought to the United States and the j'ear 
follnwinq: his arrival he began working in a lumberyard. Later he was 
engaged in a mill for a while and then began lumbering in the woods, al- 
together being connected with the lumber business for seven years. In 
1854 he came west to Iowa, locating in .Allamakee county, and was there 
variously occupied for some time, giving his attention principally, how- 
ever, to farming. In 1859 he purchased a farm of eighty acres, upon 
which he made his home until 1876. in which year he removed to Jasper 
county, there investing in one hundred and si.xty acres, which tract is still 
in his possession. This remained his home until 1906, when he withdrew 
from active work and became a resident of Collins, where he is now living 
in well earned retirement. That he was ambitious, industrious and per- 
severing and possessed good business ability is indicated by the fact that 
when he first came to this country he began working for one dollar ])er 
week, while his father received seventy-live cents per day, the combined 
sum going for the support of the family. Today he is numbered among 
the mo.st substantial and well-to-do men of Collins, having acquired a 
competency which makes it possible for him to enjoy all of the comforts 
and many of the lu.xuries of life. He is one of the prominent and influen- 
tial men of the community in which he lives and gives stalwart support to 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 107 

the republican party although he has never sought nor desired public office. 
He has, however, been a leader in Masonic circles in Maxwell, being con- 
sidered the best posted Mason in this section of the state. He is also one 
of the oldest, having joined the order in Winneshiek county forty-three 
years ago. He assisted in organizing and was a nieniber of Herald Lodge, 
No. 455, A. F. & A. M., at Maxwell. He is likewise a charter member of 
Fervent Lodge, No. 513, A. F. & A. M., at Collins, and was its first mas- 
ter, serving in that office for five years. He and his wife both hold mem- 
bership in the Order of the Eastern Star. Jonathan Cleverley was married 
on the 27th of July, 1862, to Miss Jane Elizabeth Owen, who was born 
in Coventry, England, and came with an uncle to the United States when 
nineteen years of age. settlement being made in Allamakee county, Iowa. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cleverley were born eight children but only four now 
survive, namely : Mary, the wife of William Kimberly, a farmer of Jasper 
county, Iowa; Maria, who wedded William Clapper, of Oklahoma; James 
H. ; and Frank E., operating the old home farm. 

James H. Cleverley whose name introduces this review, was reared in 
his parents' home, no event of special importance coming to vary the rou- 
tine of life for him during the period of his boyhood and youth. In the 
public schools he acquired a good education, passing throughout consecu- 
tive grades to his graduation from the Collins high school in due course of 
time. He remained under the parental roof until attaining his majority, 
when he laid the foundation for a happy home of his own by his mar- 
riage, on the 4th of November, 1894, to Miss Orlena A. Crabb, of Collins. 
She is a daughter of \"incent and Hester (Wells) Crabb, who came to 
Story county from Indiana in 1877. The father was a veteran of the 
Civil war and passed away in 1879 as a result of disease contracted during 
his term of service. The mother still survives and makes her home in 
Collins. 

After his marriage James H. Cleverley started out independently in 
the business world, engaging in farming in Jasper county as a renter for 
three years. At the end of that period he purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres on section 24, Indian Creek township, known as the 
old Strickler farm. That remained the scene of his business activity for 
four years, when he purchased the Andrew J. Marshall place, upon which 
he now makes his home. When it came into his possession it consisted of 
one hundred and sixty acres constituting the northwest quarter of section 

23, Indian Creek township. He did not dispose of his property on section, 

24, however, until three years later. In 1906 he became the owner of 
eighty acres adjoining his place, so that his farm now consists of two hun- 
dred and forty acres. Under his direction it has been greatly developed 
and improved, for he has made a careful study of agriculture, employs the 
most modern and progressive methods and, moreover, has a capacity for 
wise management and sound business ability. He receives a good annual 



108 HISTORY OI' STORY COUNTY 

revenue from his farm and is recognized as one of the substantial agri- 
culturists of Indian Creek township. 

With the passing of the years the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cleverley has 
been blessed with seven children: Ruth L., Flossie M., Willard J., Opal 
B., Wayne H., .Alice and Mildred, the family circle remaining untouched 
by the hand of death. 

Since age conferred ujjon him the right of franchise Mr. Cleverley has 
been a loyal supporter of republican principles and has been an influential 
and effective worker in the ranks of that party. He served for four years 
as assessor of Indian Creek township and is now serving as a member of 
the township board of trustees. Progressive and public-spirited in his 
citizenship, he strongly advocates those measures and matters wiiich have 
for their object the improvement and upbuilding of the community, and 
his devotion to the general good has ever remained an unquestioned fact. 
Whether in the discharge of public duties or in the management of private 
business atiairs he has ever been actuated by those qualities which speak 
for good citizenship and he is held in high regard and esteem by all who 
have come in contact with him. 



W 1LLI.\M J. \ K.\"liM.\N. 

W illiam J. Veneman, who is now living retired on a small tract of land 
of twenty-three acres adjoining the town of ^laxwell, was long and success- 
fully identified with general agricultural pursuits in Story county and for 
more than thirty years has been a prominent factor in local politics. His 
birth occurred in Kosciusko county, Indiana, on the 5th of June, 1844, his 
parents being Lemuel and Matilda (Cory) Veneman, both of whom were 
natives of Ohio. The father went to Kosciusko county, Indiana, in early 
manhood, while the mother was taken there by her parents. They were 
married in that county and six years later, in 1849, journeyed westward to 
Polk county, Iowa, Lemuel \'eneman entering three hundred acres of gov- 
ernment land in Elkhart townshi]). He erected a log house on his farm and 
made his home thereon until he passed away in 1868. His wife was called 
to her final rest in 1897. Mr. \'eneman gave his political allegiance to the 
republican j)arty and served in various township offices, including those of 
township trustee, assessor and school director. Both he and his wife were 
devoted and faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William J. X'cncman was reared under the parental roof, receiving such 
educational advantages as the log schoolhouses of those early days afforded. 
On the nth of August, 1862, he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a 
member of Company P., Thirty-ninth Iowa \'oIunteer Infantry, remaining 
with that command until the cessation of hostilities. He was honorably dis- 
charged on the 5th nf Juno. 1865, — his twenty-first birthday — and mustered 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 109 

out at Clinton, Iowa, about the ist of July. He had been captured at Al- 
toona Pass on the 5th of October, 1864, and was first incarcerated in the 
Macon (Ga.) prison, while later he was transferred to Milan prison, being 
confined for fifty-two days. At the end of that time he was paroled and 
four months later was exchanged. After returning home he attended 
school for a year and a half longer, recognizing the value of a good educa- 
tion in the battle of life. 

On the 30th of August, 1867, he wedded Miss Margaret Kirby, of Des 
Moines, a daughter of Jacob and Harriet (Ferguson) Kirby. The follow- 
ing winter he became identified with educational interests as teacher of the 
Hall school, a log schoolhouse in Indian Creek township. Story county. 
During that season his wife taught the Donohue school in the same town- 
ship. In the spring Mr. Veneman took up general agricultural pursuits, 
renting his father's farm in Polk county and operating it for four or five 
years. During that time he had come into possession of a little more than 
one hundred acres thereof and continued to reside on that tract until 1873, 
when he disposed of the property and purchased one hundred acres on sec- 
tion 14, Indian Creek township. There he successfully carried on his farm- 
ing interests until 1902, when he put aside the active work of the fields, 
having lived in honorable retirement for the past nine years. He owns a 
tract of twenty-three acres adjoining the town of Maxwell and makes his 
home in a pleasant and commodious residence which he built thereon. His 
property holdings include one hundred and sixty acres on section 24 and 
twenty acres on section 14, Indian Creek township, all of which is culti- 
vated by his son Lemuel. Early realizing that earnest, unremitting labor is 
the basis of all success, he worked on diligently year by year to provide for 
his family and to obtain a comfortable competence for old age. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Veneman have been born six children. Roy, the 
eldest, passed away in 1906 in the thirty-ninth year of his age. He was edu- 
cated at Ames and followed the profession of teaching at Colo, Story City 
and Madrid, Iowa. Becoming noted as an educator, he was elected superin- 
tendent of schools of Boone county and served in that position for four 
years. Lemuel J., the second son, is an agriculturist by occupation and 
operates the home farm in Indian Creek township. Nelson J., is engaged 
in the produce business at Scranton, Iowa. Harriet, who gave her hand in 
marriage to John Black, makes her home in Scranton, Iowa. Alberta, the 
wife of Elmer Cole, lives in Winterset. Iowa. Ward \V., a stationary en- 
gineer, makes his home in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Mr. \'eneman is a republican in politics and has long been an influential 
worker in the local ranks of his party. For more than thirty years he has 
remained continuously in public ofiice, serving as township trustee or in 
one of the other township positions. He represented his district in the 
twenty-seventh and twenty-eighth general assemblies of the state legislature 
and has repeatedly served as delegate to the state conventions, being one of 
Story county's most widely known and highly esteemed citizens. Frater- 



no HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

nally he is identified with Herald Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; Social Lodge, L O. 
O. F. ; and James H. Ewing Post, No. 305, G. A. R. For four or more 
years he served as commander of the post. He acts as steward and Sun- 
day school superintendent of the Methodist Episcopal church, which num- 
bers himself and his wife among its valued members. Mr. Veneman has 
resided in this part of the state for more than six decades and stands fore- 
most in his community as one of its leading and influential citizens. 



S. B. STEVENS. 



The owner of a productive farm of one hundred and twenty acres on 
sections 33 and 34, New Albany township, S. B. Stevens may justly be re- 
garded as one of the prosperous citizens of Story county. He was born in 
Van Buren county, low^a, December 7, 1847, a son of Henry Adam and 
Matilda Janes (Smith) Stevens, the latter of whom was born July 3. 1817. 
The father was a native of Perth. Canada, and was born July 31, 1813. He 
was of American parentage, the family living temporarily in Canada at the 
time of his birth. The ancestrj- on the paternal side has been traced to 
John Adams, second president of the United States, the father being a 
nephew^ of Mr. Adams. On the maternal side the genealogical line has been 
traced to the Bradfords of Puritan times. Ilcnry Smith, one of the ances- 
tors, was a prominent man in Canada and .served as governor of the prov- 
ince of Ontario. Our subject's Grandfather Stevens was appointed to a 
government position by President .-Xdams. with whom he stood in high 
favor, having served as one of the original Green Mountain Boys under 
Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga. He spent several years in Canada while in 
the employ of the government. An uncle of our subject was a classmate 
of U. S. Grant at West Point and lost his life while crossing the Rio Grande 
river on his way to Mexico w iili the invading army in 1847. 

Henry Adams Stevens, the father, received unusual advantages of edu- 
cation in his times and was a graduate of Harvard University, entering 
the ministry froin that celebrated institution. He officiated at Springfield, 
Illinois, and at Montrose, Iowa, then locating in \'an Buren county, where 
he spent many years. He attained a wide reputation as a speaker and elo- 
quent advocate of the Christian life, and in 1893, at the World's Fair in 
Chicago, delivered an address upon "When Timothy was made an .Xpostle." 
He was married to Matilda Janes Smith in 1836 and encountered consid- 
erable difficulty in conducting his bride from Canada to the United States 
on account of trouble over the Oregon boundarj' line, which at that time 
created ill feeling between the two countries. He passed away near Cam- 
eron, Missouri, in i8g8, his beloved companion having been called from 
earthly scenes in 1882. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY HI 

S. B. Stevens was one of a family of three children. He received a 
common-school education and although only fifteen years of age at the time 
of the breaking out of the great rebellion, his services were accepted and 
for four years and two months he valiantly defended the cause of the 
Union, participating in many of the most important engagements and move- 
ments of the war. He marched under General Sherman to the sea and was 
present at the surrender of Fort McAllister. After being mustered out 
when then only nineteen years of age, he worked during the winter months 
in a packing house at Farmington, Iowa, and in summer was foreman of a 
bridge gang on the Des Moines Valley Railroad. Subsequently he entered 
the employ of James Tuttle as foreman of his farm in Polk county, seven 
miles from Des Moines. In 1870 he began farming on his own account in 
\'alley township, Polk county, but two years later sold out and moved to 
Elkhart township, taking up his residence four years later in Union town- 
ship, Storj' county. In 1891 he removed to Sherman township and ten 
years later, having acquired a competence, took up his residence at New 
Albany. He has been very active and energetic as a farmer and business 
man and has gained an enviable reputation as a breeder of fine cattle and 
Chester White hogs. He is now serving as president of the Johnson Grove, 
Colo & New Albany Telephone Company. 

On the 26th of March, 1869, Mr. Stevens was united in marriage to 
Miss Dorcas Bullington, of Polk county, who was born at Blakesburg, 
Wapello county, January 29, 1S50. They became the parents of six 
children, namely: Arthur, who was born December 20, 1870, and is now 
engaged in the general merchandise business at McCallsburg; A. T- and 
Alice May, twins, born January 13, 1872, the former of whom is farming 
in Richland township and the latter the wife of Phil Buffiington ; C. W., 
now a prosperous farmer of Warren township, who was born March 28, 
1875, and married Miss Alinnie Webb; Hattie, born March 20, 1877, who 
married W. W. Carver and is now living in Lincoln township ; and Dorcas, 
born August 20, 1879, who married Charles Webb and is living in Sherman 
township. The mother of these children departed this life September 18, 
1879, and Mr. Stevens was married, April 24, 1882, to Miss Emily A. 
Hanks, a daughter of Jay and Jane Songers Hanks. Eleven children 
blessed this union, namely: Bradford, born September 11, 1883, who was 
graduated from the Cedar Falls Normal School and married Edith Sherer ; 
S. W., born July 3, 1884, who married Adelia Klein; John Quincy, born 
July 15, 1885, who is a professional auctioneer; Edith Belle who was born 
July 17, 1889, and is one of the popular school teachers of the county; Janet 
Blanche, born February 14, 1891 ; William J., born December 17, 1895; 
Ethel born August 7 1898; Iver born April 26, 1900; Winifred, born May 
7, 1903; Velma, born July 23, 1907; and Thelma, born September 6, 1909. 
Of these children the nine last named are at home. 

Mr. Stevens has ever since reaching manhood given his earnest support 
to the democratic party. He has been active in its local councils and served 



112 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

as justice of the peace for a number of years in Polk county, also tilling 
the office of township assessor and for twenty-seven years performed his 
duty to the cause of education as a member of the school board. He is a 
stanch believer in the Bible, and he and his wife are valued members of the 
United Brethren church. lie has raised a remarkable family, all of whom 
are performing their share in the duties of life. He has been industrious, 
economical and persevering and, therefore, successful in his work, at the 
same time gaining the respect of his neighbors and of the entire community. 
By honorable methods in business and by an ujiright character he has main- 
tained an untarnished name, which to his children is a legacy much more 
precious than gold or silver. 



OLE NIEHLSEN. 



Ole Niehlsen, one of the esteemed and successful farmers of Story 
county, was born in Denmark on the 17th of May, 1841, a son of John 
and Marie Niehlsen. The parents were both natives of Denmark in which 
country they spent their entire lives. The mother passed away in i860 and 
the father eight years later. 

The early years of Mr. Niehlsen's life were spent in his native land, 
but the many stories he heard of the advantages offered men of limited 
means in America at last proved irresistible and in 1876 he crossed the At- 
lantic, landing at Boston. He straightway made his way across the coun- 
try to Marshall county, Iowa, where his brother had located three years 
previously. F"or six years be worked on the railroad at Marshalltown, 
carefully laying aside a portion of his wages each month, until in 1882 he 
had acquired sufficient capital to enable him to buy eighty acres of land in 
Warren township. Story county. For twenty-five years he made this his 
home and then in 1907 he bought another eighty acres in Richland town- 
shij), where he continues to reside. Everything about his farm has an air 
of prosperity; the stock is well housed, the fences kept in repair and the 
residence has an air of comfort, while the carefully cultivatcfl fields yield 
])rofitablc returns. 

Mr. Niehlsen married Pauline, the daughter of Nelson and Christine 
Nelson. She is also a Dane and has becoiue the mother of seven children : 
Cliristine; Inga Marie; Anna Dorothy, who became the wife of Luke 
O'Donnel, of Sherman townshjp; Carrie; Annie Christina; Jens; and Peter 
Nelson. 

The family atltiiil the Lutheran church in which the parents liold mem- 
ber.ship. Before coming to the United States Mr. Niehlsen had served 
seventeen months in the Danish army and hac! seen some active service, 
going to the front with his regiment in the war with Germany in 1864. He 
is a loyal subject of the United States and has never regretted his deci- 



Li 




HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 115 

sion to become a citizen, feeling that the success he has met with here would 
have been practically impossible in the more thickly settled and conserva- 
tive country in which he spent the first thirty-five years of his life. His 
present position can be entirely attributed to his own efforts and the capable 
assistance at all times rendered him by Mrs. Niehlsen. He is highly re- 
garded in the community where he resides, his integrity and industry — • 
which are the fundamental principles of good citizenship, winning him the 
respect of all who have known him in either a business or social wav. 



ARCHIBALD RAY. 



Archibald Ray, whose efforts during an active and useful life were de- 
voted to agricultural pursuits, in which he won substantial prosperity and 
a place among the most successful and well known farmers of his locality, 
was one of Indiana's native sons, his birth occurring in Marion county on 
the 25th of November, 1844. His father, Judiah Ray, one of the early and 
prominent settlers of Story county, was born in Ohio on the 1st of October, 
1823, and was a son of Samuel and Maria Ray. During the period of his 
early boyhood he was accorded such advantages as could be obtained in 
pioneer days but at the age of twelve years was compelled to take upon him- 
self the duties of manhood, the death of his father at that time placing him 
practically in charge of the family, and during her remaining days he con- 
tinued the main support of his widowed mother. He entered the business 
world in the employ of an uncle, driving an ox team in the construction of 
the Ohio canal. Although during that time he worked earnestly and dili- 
gently, he was, however, unable to save any money, his earnings going to the 
support of the family. Thus it was that upon attaining his majority he 
found himself without capital and when he was united in marriage 
to Miss Ann Belcher, his financial possessions amounted to one dollar. This 
was paid to the justice who performed the marriage ceremony and by him 
was given to the bride as a token of good luck, and with a capital of one 
dollar they began their domestic life. Good luck, however, did follow and 
when, in 1851, they brought their family to Iowa they had been able to 
save seven hundred dollars. The winter of that year was spent at Pella 
and in the spring of 1852 they arrived in Story county, Mr. Ray entering 
land at Iowa Center. Success continued to attend his efforts and as he pros- 
pered from time to time he was able to purchase more land until, in the 
spring of 1884, he retired from active life, his holdings making him one of 
the extensive landowners of his section of the county. Upon leaving the 
farm he removed to Nevada and there his remaining years were spent. He 
became a director of the First National Bank of Nevada and was thus con- 
nected with financial interests as long as his health permitted. He was iden- 
tified with various other enterprises and his many interests eventually made 



Ill) HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

liini one of the well-to-do and influential men of Story county. Soon after 
his arrival in Iowa he was followed by his mother and sister, who assisted 
him when opportunity permitted. A man of great industrj' and persever- 
ance, he also possessed those characteristics which make it possible for a 
man, taking up his abode in a new and undeveloped country, to bravely meet 
the conditions and successfully overcome the hardships and privations 
which he is forced to endure on the frontier. He did his full share in the 
work of development and improvement and is numbered among the build- 
ers of Story county. He i)ossessed sound business jmiginent and, more- 
over, was a man of well known probity, his honorable, upright life com- 
manding the esteem and respect of all who knew him. He was reared in 
the Evangelical faith but after taking up his residence in Nevada united 
with the Alethodist Episcopal church, in the faith of which he passed away 
on the 2d of July, 1907, having for several years survived his wife, her 
death occurring on the 31st of March, 1895. 

Archibald Ray was about eight years of age when he came with his 
parents to Iowa and thus practically his entire life was spent within the 
boundaries of Story county. As a lad he acquired his education in the 
primitive log schoolhouse of pioneer days and with the other members of 
the family suffered much of the discomforts of pioneer life. He remained 
at home, assisting his father in the cultivation of the farm, until he at- 
tained man's estate, when he entered the business world on his own ac- 
count. Wisely choosing as a life work the occupation to which he had been 
reared, he rented land from his father and was thus engaged at the time of 
his marriage in 1869. He continued as a renter for about four or five years 
thereafter and then purchased a tract of forty acres from John Funk, which 
became the nucleus of his later e.xtensive possessions. To this he added 
from time to time as he prospered in his undertakings, and something of the 
success which attended his efforts is seen in the fact that at the time of his 
death he was the owner of four hundred and twenty acres of highly cul- 
tivated land. He possessed much of the spirit of industry and energy which 
characterized his father, his ambition prom])ting him to make a thorough 
study of agriculture. He cultivated the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate, practiced rotation of crops and in addition to tilling the soil raised 
good stock. Keen business discernment and a capacity for wise manage- 
ment were also his, and as the years passed the results of his labors were 
seen in the acquirement of a competence which ranked him among the 
wealthiest and most sul)stantial agriculturists of Indian Creek townsiiip. 
In the spring of 1901 he withdrew from active pursuits and removed to 
Maxwell, where he lived in quiet retirement until his demise. 

It was on the 3d of February, 1869. that Mr. Ray was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Hilda Johnson, a daughter of Henry and Helen (House) 
Johnson, natives of England and New York respectively. Her father came 
to the United States in infancy, his parents settling near Ogdensbiirg in 
St. Lawrence county. New York. There Henry Johnson w^as reared and 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 117 

married, and in 1867 he sought a home in the middle west, residing in Cook 
county, IlHnois, for one year, after which he took up his permanent abode in 
Polk county, Iowa, where his wife died soon after their arrival. Later Mr. 
Johnson married Mrs. Catherine Strong and was actively engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits for a number of years, making his home on a farm south 
of Collins. Upon his retirement late in life he removed to Collins and there 
his death occurred on the loth of July, 1905. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ray were 
born five children, of whom four survive: Andrew, at home; Ida, the wife 
of Samuel Coughenour, of Indiana Creek township ; Charles, operating the 
old homestead farm ; and Artie, also at home. 

In early life Archibald Ray became identified with the Evangelical church, 
of which he remained a member until the organization of the Christian 
church in Maxwell in 1890, when he associated himself with that congrega- 
tion and remained a devoted and conscientious member thereof until his 
demise. In politics he was a stanch democrat but the honors and emoluments 
of office held no attraction for him, preferring to concentrate his time and 
attention on his personal interests. Preeminently a home man, he never 
affiliated with any fraternal orders, finding congenial companionship in his 
own home circle, where he was loved and revered as a devoted husband 
and father. Inheriting the elements of sterling integrity and moral sound- 
ness, like his father he commanded the highest regard and respect of his 
fellowmen, his life record ever remaining in harmony with an untarnished 
and honored name. His wife, who still makes her home in Maxwell, is also 
a member of the Christian church, in the work of which she takes an active 
and helpful part. She is a lady of many excellent traits of heart and mind 
and is the center of a large circle of warm friends. 



FRANK SUTTER. 



Frank Sutter is now interested in the hardware and implement business 
in Kelley, where he is conducting an enterprise of substantial proportions 
that indicates his careful management, sound judgment and enterprising 
spirit. He was born in Lee county, Illinois, November i, 1867, and is a son 
of John and Alargaret (Thomas) Sutter, both of whom were natives of 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania. The mother came with her parents to the 
middle west in 1850, driving across the country to Lee count}-. Illinois. She 
was a daughter of James and Mary Thomas, who in the year 1875 continued 
their westward journey to Iowa, settling in Story county. In the year 1896 
James Thomas went to California, where his death occurred at the age of 
eighty-five years. He had for about fourteen years survived his wife, who 
passed away in Story county in 1882. They were well known residents 
here during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. 



118 HISTORT OF STORY COfXTV 

John Sutter went as a youug man to Franklin. Illinois, about 1S55. 
He lost his mother early in life and had no home until he made one for him- 
self. His father, however, reached the venerable age of ninety-three years, 
passing away in Lee county, Illinois. In that county John Sutter married 
Margaret Thomas. In the year 1875 they became residents of Story county. 
Iowa, settling in Washington township, two and a half miles south of the 
Iowa State College, where they resided until 1895. when they sold that farm 
and removed to Ma.xwell. IJoth died, however, in Lincoln Nebraska, the 
mother on the 6th of December, 1908, when seventy-two years of age. and 
the father on the 4th of April. icpQ, at the age of eighty years. He had fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming throughout his entire life and thus pro- 
vided fur the supijort of his fifteen children, ten of whom reached mature 
years, while nine are now living. 

Frank Sutter was only eight years of age when the family left Illinois 
and came to Story county. He remained upon the home farm with his 
parents until 18S9 and then went to Lincoln. Nebraska, where he remained 
for two years. He devoted two years to general farming and afterward 
worked in railroad shops for a year. He then returned to Iowa, settling in 
Kelley in 1892. He was employed in the tile factory for about a year and 
in 1893 took charge of the home farm, which he cultivated and improved 
then again took up his abode in Kelley and for five years worked at the car- 
penter's trade during the summer months, while in the winter seasons he 
aided his father-in-law. II. A. Cook, in the management of the elevator and 
grain trade. In the .spring of 1901. he went to Guthrie, Oklahoma, where 
he remained from the i6th of April until the 24th of December engaged in 
carpentering, threshing and elevator work. In the spring of 1902, however, 
he returned to Iowa, settling in Pocahontas county, where he followed car- 
pentering uiilil August, after which he engaged in liuying grain for two 
years. On the ist of .\pril. 1904. he went to Idaho I'"alls. Idaho, where he 
followed farming and carjicntering during the summer and in .August of 
that year returned to Kelley taking charge of the elevator for the H. A. 
Lockwood Grain Company. He remained in that connection for si.x years 
and eight months but on the i6th of March. 191 1. he became interested in 
the hardware and implement business. He is also interested to some extent 
in real estate, owning dwellings, business property and vacant lots in the 
town. 

On the 2ist of I'-ebruary, 1889. Mr. Sutter was united in marriage t.. 
Miss Belle Cook, who was bom in Story county, August 20, 1870. and is a 
daughter of H. ,\. and Jennie Cook, natives of Quincy, Pennsylvania, where 
they were married. In 1864 the father enlisted for service in the Civil war 
and after the close of hostilities came to Iowa in 1866 taking up his ahofle 
in Story county. The last two years of his life, however, were spent in 
Polo, Illinois, where he died January 23. 1901). in his seventieth vear. He 
tlevoted many years to farming, following that pursuit until 1882, when he 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 119 

removed to Kelley and for seventeen years worked for the Lockwood 
Grain Company in connection with the operation of the elevator at this point. 
His wife died in Kelley in 189S, at the age of fifty-six years. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Sutter have been born three children: Effie, now the wife of R. C. 
Lowman, of Kelley; Irene and Edith, at home. 

While Mr. Sutter has at times been absent from the county, he has prac- 
tically regarded Story county as his place of residence since 1875. What- 
ever success he has achieved is due entirely to his own efforts. He has 
worked his way steadily upward and his industry and energy have been the 
salient features in winning him a substantial place in business circles. 



WILLIAM M. YOUNG. 



The strength of the American nation lies in its self-made men — those 
who through unremitting toil, indomitable courage and temperate habits have 
attained the heights to which they aspired and in so doing have ever retained 
the respect and esteem of their fellowmen. Of such as these is William M. 
Young. He was born in Polk county, Iowa, on the 19th of January, 1862, 
being the son of Benjamin and Rachael (Woods) Young, both natives of 
Darke county, Ohio, where they were reared and married. Benjamin Young 
came to Iowa in 1858, buying one-half section of land in Polk county, near 
Ankeny, on which he lived until 1864 or 1865, when he returned to Ohio, 
spending two years in Darke county. At the end of that time he came to 
Iowa again, settling in Jasper county on Wolf creek, five miles south of 
Collins. He bought one hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he 
lived for a number of years, and on selling this he purchased a small farm 
near Mingo, continuing to make his home there until the death of his wife, 
when he removed to Mitchellville to reside with his daughter, with whom 
he is still living at the venerable age of eighty-three years. 

The early years of William Young's life were unusually void of those 
joys and pleasures we consider to be the rightful heritage of every child. 
He was reared to manhood on the Jasper county farm and upon him de- 
volved much of the farm work, his schooling being confined to the brief 
sessions of the district school, which he attended at such times as his ser- 
vices were not required at home. At the age of fourteen years he laid 
aside his text-books and became self-supporting, hiring out as a farm 
hand, for which service he received ten dollars per month. His first work- 
was the binding of grain behind an old Buckeye reaper on a farm where 
tlie town of Collins now stands. His earnings, up to the age of nineteen 
years, were given to his father, after that, however, he began working for 
himself, continuing as a farm hand for four more years and then renting 
the place where he harl been employed. Always thrifty, by careful man- 
agement and indefatigable energy he was able in 1881 to buy his first 



120 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

piece of real estate, which consisted of forty acres of farm land, to which 
he added another forty acres in 1884 and acquiring a similar amount in 
1886 brought the aggregate up to one hundred and twenty acres. During 
this time he continued to cultivate rented land but in 1888 he moved to his 
own farm, which was located two miles across the line in Polk county 
and upon which he had erected a new house and farm buildings. After 
living there one year he sold the place and bought the T. H. Strickler 
farm, containing one hundred and forty acres, which was located in Jas- 
per county south of Collins. After he had built a new house and barns 
and added other modern improvements to the latter place he took up his 
residence there and continued to make it his home until 1896. On the 
nth of November, 1895, Mr. Young bought two hundred and forty acres 
of land in Collins township, Story county, for which he paid thirty-five 
dollar per acre. This property was unimproved when he bought it but 
being a progressive man he never hesitates at any e.xpense which will add 
to the value of his land. He has always been a strong advocate of til- 
ing, in fact was one of the first men in this section to use tile on his farm, 
and after he had tiled and fenced his present place he built a fine modern 
residence — one of his first considerations always having been the comfort 
of his family. He also erected commodious barns and added other mod- 
em improvements, which have made his homestead one of the most val- 
uable properties in Story county. In 1902 he bought the Pearson farm, 
comprising one hundred and twenty acres, which adjoined his on the west, 
and five years later he bought one hundred and twenty acres of the Parker 
farm, lying within the corporate limits of Collins, making his present realty 
holdings amount to four hundred and eight\' acres. 

Much of .Mr. Young's success may be ascribed to his e.xtensive and 
successful stock-dealing, which has at all times proven to be most re- 
munerative. He has probal)ly fed and shipped more carloads of stock in 
the past twenty-five years than any other man in Stor)' county, and he 
now has on his farm three Inuidred and sixty hogs and one hundred and 
sixty-five head of cattle, all of which he is feeding for the market. 

Mr. Young established a home of his own by his marriage in 1883, at 
the age of twenty-one years, to Miss Lauretha Gibson, the youngest daugh- 
ter of David Gibson, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Jasper county, 
coming to Iowa from Indiana in tlio early days. Four children have 
been born of this union: .Mta. a teacher in the district schools; Fred, 
I'lanche and Jose|)h. all of whom are at home. 

The family always worship with the Methodist Protestant denomina- 
tion, in which church the parents hold membership and of which Mr. 
Young has been one of the trustees for several years. He is identified 
with the Masonic fraternity through memberslii]) in the I-"crvcnt Lodge, 
No. 513, A. F. & A. M. 

He is a zealous advocate of the jirinciples of the republican ])arty and, 
altiiough he has always been too busily occupied with the direction of his 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 121 

private affairs to eitlier seek or accept the responsibility of public office, 
he is always to be found at the polls on election day, casting his ballot for 
the candidates of the party of his choice. 

The study of Air. Young's life but shows what it is possible to achieve 
by means of energy, application and perseverance. Thrown upon his own 
resources when only a boy, with the equipment of but the rudiments of an 
education, and not only maintaining himself but contributing toward the 
subsistence of the family, he nevertheless before reaching middle age had 
acquired what many never achieve. He is known as one of the most suc- 
cessful and substantial farmers and stockmen of this section of the state, 
all of which is due to his ability to handle capably and successfully any- 
thing which he elects to undertake on a very large scale. The farm which 
he bought fifteen years ago for thirty-five dollars per acre is now valued 
at one hundred and seventy-seven and one-half dollars per acre, in fact he 
has for years had a standing offer at that price. His success at the same 
time has not been achieved at the price of another's loss, his great asset 
in life ever being his incorruptible integrity, and he today is highly re- 
spected and esteemed by all who have ever had occasion to do business 
with him as well as by those who have known him socially. 



JACOB A. GROSECLOSE. 

After acquiring a comfortable competence in the line of agricultural 
pursuits Jacob A. Groseclose is now enjoying the fruits of his early en- 
deavors and is one of the leading citizens of Union township. He is a son 
of Thomas Jefferson and Elizabeth (Wharton) Groseclose, and was born 
February 5, 1857. His parents were both natives of Johnson county, In- 
diana, where they were married in 1852. In the fall of 1854 they came to 
Story county, Iowa, locating on the present homestead. Mr. Groseclose 
purchased eighty acres of land entirely uncultivated, from Thomas Lawe, 
and there built a log cabin. He at once began to improve this land and 
later preempted more land adjoining until he had acquired three hundred 
and sixty acres. This he accomplished before he was thirty-one years old, 
at which time his death occurred. He was survived by his wife and three 
children : Jacob A., the subject of this sketch ; Mary Elmira, the wife of 
John Griffith, residing in Indian Creek township ; and Sarah E., who mar- 
ried A. J. Hainline and died in 1884, leaving a family of six children. Mrs. 
Groseclose is still living and resides with her son. 

Jacob A. Groseclose spent his childhood on the home farm, acquiring 
his education in the district schools. He was but two years old when his 
father died. Apparently he inherited his father's energetic nature for at 
the early age of twelve years he was following the plow and studying the 
science of agriculture. At the age of sixteen years he took entire charge of 



122 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

the farm and from that time devoted his attention to this industry until he 
had become the possessor of four hundred and eighty acres of valuable 
land in Union townshi]). For many years he turned his attention to cattle 
feeding but has done little recently along that line. For the past ten years 
Mr. Groseclose has not been actively engaged in farming, as he has rented 
most of his land. He is a director in the Citizen's State Bank of Cam- 
bridge, Iowa, and is regarded as one of the influential men of his com- 
munity. 

In his political views Mr. Groseclose is a republican but has never 
sought any public favors from his party, preferring to cast his lot with 
the rank and file. 



XORM.W \V. KXFl'I'ER. M. D. 

There is no doubt tiiat the talents of the parents are often inherited by 
their children. This fact has been illustrated in numberless instances and 
the success of Dr. Xorman W. Kne[)per. of Collins, is additional evidence 
in its favor. The father of Dr. Knejiper was a highly successful physician 
and the son has demonstrated during an experience of more than twenty 
years at Collins that he possesses rare ability in the practice of the healing 
art. lie is a native of Berlin, Pennsylvania, born July 17, 1853, a son of 
I'^rederick and Elizabeth (Lint) Kncpper, both of whom were natives of 
Uerlin. The father was a graduate of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, of Philadelphia, and practiced at llerlin, gaining acknowledged prom- 
inence in his profession. He passed away in 1S74 in the prime of his life, 
being only forty-four years of age. The mother is still living at P.erlin 
and has now reached her seventy-ninth year. 

Norman W. Knepper received his preliminary education in the public 
schools and at sixteen years of age took up tlic study of dentistry, attending 
the Philadelphia College of Dental Surgery. He practiced at Berlin until 
1877, when he came to Clyde. Iowa, and began reading medicine under 
Dr. Ritchey. In the fall of 1878 he entered the medical dci)artment of the 
Iowa State University and in 1880 became connected with the Long Island 
College Hospital at New York city, continuing in his studies there for two 
years, during the last eight months of which time he was on the staff of 
hospital surgeons. He was graduated with the title of M. D. in 1882. and 
immediately afterward came to Collins, although there was at that time only 
four or five houses in the town. The zeal he has devoted to his profession 
and the interest he has taken in his patients have led to a marked degree 
of success and he ranks today as one of the most prominent jiliysicians in 
this part of the state. 

On the 4th of July. 1879. Dr. Knejipcr was united in marriage to Miss 
Effie Hunt. of Nevada, a daughter of Moses and Catherine (McLainl Itniit. 




DR. X. W. KNEPPER 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 125 

The parents came from Rhode Island to Story county in 1874 and took up 
their residence at Nevada. Two children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Knep- 
per: Fred, deceased; and Sayre. The mother of these children departed 
this life in April, 1894, and the Doctor was married March 17, 1909, to Miss 
Maud Pence, a daughter of William J. Pence, a carpenter, now living at 
Cedar Rapids but formerly a resident of Collins township. 

Professionally Dr. Isjiepper is a valued member of the Iowa State Med- 
ical Society and the Story County Medical Society and fraternally he is 
identified with Fervent Lodge No. 513, A. F. & A. M.; Amity Lodge No. 
361, I. O. O. F. ; and Crescent Camp No. 2358, M. W. A. He gives his 
earnest support to the republican party but has never sought political honors, 
as his time and attention are almost wholly given to the duties of his pro- 
fession. He was the pioneer physician of Collins and has witnessed the 
great transformation from a struggling hamlet to a beautiful modern town 
supplied with all the comforts and conveniences of an up-to-date city. Dur- 
ing this time he has made a host of friends by his kindly ministrations and 
public spirit and he ranks today as one of the most honored citizens of a 
section noted for the intelligence and progressiveness of its people. 



SEYMOUR W. HIX. 



The life record of Seymour W. Hi.x spanned the years from the 20th 
of August, 1830, to the 7th of October, 1907. He was born at Medina, 
Orleans county. New York, his parents being Ephraim and Laura (Will- 
iams) Hix, natives of Michigan and Connecticut respectively. The father 
was a shoemaker by trade but after his removal to Jllinois took up the oc- 
cupation of farming, which he followed until his death. Both he antl his 
wife died in Illinois. 

Seymour W. Hix was the third in order of birth in a family of seven 
sons and three daughters and resided at the place of his nativity until nine- 
teen years of age, when he accompanied his parents on their removal west- 
ward to Sycamore, De Kalb county, Illinois. In early life he had learned 
and followed the shoemaker's trade and after becoming a resident of Illi- 
nois he engaged in the produce business, shipping butter, eggs and poultry 
both during and after the war. He remained a resident of Sycamore until 
1873, when he removed westward to Story county, Iowa, settling in Sher- 
man township, where he purchased and improved a section of land. Later 
he bought six quarter sections. He had five hundred and twenty acres in 
his home place and resided thereon for sixteen years, during which periofl 
three children were added to the family, while six children had been born ere 
the removal to Iowa. Upon the home farm Mr. Hix built the largest farm 
hoiuie in the county. It was three stories with basement in height and there 
were nine rooms on the first floor. There were two rooms, twenty feet 



126 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

square, and a hall the whole length of the house on the second floor. This 
was used as a ballrom and young people from all over the county were en- 
tertained there at many delightful social affairs. On one night there were a 
hundred couples attending a dance there and Mrs. Hix cooked supper for 
all. Mr. and Mrs. Hix followed a progressive and liberal policy with their 
children. They recognized the fact that young people demand and must 
have amusement and they did not place the ban upon many sources of en- 
tertainment which were largely condemned at an earlier day. They al- 
lowed their children to play cards and dance at home, knowing that such 
amusements in themselves are innocent and that it is only environment 
which can bring harm. That their policy was wise is indicated in the fact 
that their eight grown children are now good and substantial citizens — a 
credit to the comnuinitics in which they live. 

Mr. Hi.x carried on farming on a very extensive scale for a number of 
years but at length sold out and erected the residence which his widow 
now occupies, making his home in Nevada from 1886 until the time of his 
death. 

It was on the 24th of February, 1S53. at Mayfield, Illinois, that Mr. Hix 
was married to Miss Laura Mumford, who was born in Nova Scotia, July 
17, 1833, and w1k-ii eight years of age went to Mayfield, Illinois, with her 
parents, Thomas and Sarali (Sillibeer) Mumford. who were natives of Eng- 
land and on crossing the .Atlantic to .Vmerica settled in Nova Scotia. Later 
they became residents of Illinois, where their last days were spent. They 
had a family of five daughters and one son. Mr. and Mrs. Hix lived to 
celebrate their fiftieth weilding anniversary. They had nine children: Will- 
iam, now living in Deadwood, South Dakota ; \\'alter W., a resident of 
Rhodes, Iowa ; Amy, who is the wife of -Asa Mead and resides two miles 
south of Nevada ; .\lbcrt D., living in Zearing, Story county ; Charles E., a 
resident of Mitchell, South Dakota; Harry J., of Portland, Oregon; Susan, 
the wife of Frank Eddy, of Sherman township; Major E., who died at the 
age of six months; and Sarah, the wife of Arthur Saunders, of Montana. 

In politics Mr. Hix was a stanch democrat and held a number of local 
offices, yet never sought nor desired political iireferment. The Hix liome 
was known far and wide for its generous and lavish hospitality. Neither 
Mr. nor Mrs. Hix ever refused any one a meal or a niglit's lodging. They, 
indeed, kept open house and always had extra plates on the table to be ready 
for any guests that might come in. In addition a large force of workmen 
were employed on the farm in the operation of the hay presses and at times 
they were kept busy all winter. The threshers, too, were employed for a 
long period, for Mr. llix carried on farming extensively. 

In religious faith Mr. Hix was a Universalist and his wife still belongs 
to the same church. He was a man of very generous and kindly spirit, 
who gave liberally to the poor and needy and was ever ready to extend a 
helping hand to those who needed assistance. His warm heart reached out 
in sympathy to all and was evidenced in tangible and ready aid. Some one 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 127 

has said: "Xot the good that comes to us but the good that comes to the 
world through us is the measure of our success," and judged in this way 
as well as in the more material things of the business life Mr. Hix was a 
most successful man. 

Mrs. Hix still survives her husband and spends much of her time in 
visiting among her children. She is extremely active for one of her age 
and travels alone, three times having visited Portland, Oregon. She has 
twenty-three grandchildren living and five great-grandchildren. Her hus- 
band left her in very comfortable financial circumstances and she is now 
the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in Sherman 
township. No history of Story county would be complete without mention 
of Mr. and Mrs. Hix, for no home has been more hospitable and none have 
been more free in according to friend and stranger a warm welcome than 
this worthy and honored couple. 



RICHARD WILLIAMS. 

The life of any man who has forged his way to a position of responsi- 
bility through his own exertions is worthy of record. It teaches the im- 
portance of industry and self-reliance, as without these characteristics 
very little can be accomplished in the modern world. Richard Williams 
has from his boyhood been industrious and self-reliant, hence he over- 
came many obstacles and is today well established as one of the success- 
ful farmers of Story county. Born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 23, 
1849, he is the son of Robert K. and Martha (Brannum) Williams, the 
former a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Fair- 
field county, Ohio. The parents removed to Hancock county, Ohio, in 
1851, when the subject of this review was two years old and there the 
father died in i860. Subsequently the mother took up her residence with 
her children and passed away at Fort Wayne, Indiana, October 6, 1907. 

Richard Williams was educated in the common schools of the Buckeye 
state and continued at home until he arrived at maturity. In 1872, after 
having married, he came west by wagon, bringing his household eft'ects 
with him, and located in Collins township. Story county, Iowa. He began 
farming upon rented land and in 1874 had acquired sufficient capital to 
purchase forty acres, which is now a part of his present farm. He has 
since made several purchases of adjoining land and at the present time is 
the owner of a beautiful farm of two hundred and forty-three acres, which 
he has developed from its original state of virgin prairie until it is one of 
the most valuable farms in the township. He is equally successful both 
as an agriculturist and stock-raiser and as he keeps thoroughly informed 
concerning the most advanced methods and the best available markets, his 
opinion is much sought by those who desire to keep fully abreast of the 
times in all matters pertaming to agricultural interests. 



128 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

On the 28th of September, 1871, I\Ir. Williams was united in marriage 
in Hancock county, Ohio, to Miss Mary Downing, a daughter of George 
Downing, a record of whom is presented in the sketch of Ellsworth Down- 
ing in this work. By this union six children have been born, three of 
whom are now living: Cora E., the wife of J. H. LafFerty, of New Al- 
bany township; Jesse M., at home; and Ihittie, now the wife of J. C. Mc- 
Cord, also of Xew Albany township. 

Mr. Williams has never devoted much time to [iolities. Imi he S'^'c^ his 
adherence to the republican party as the one best qualified to advance the 
welfare of the nation. Alert and progressive, he is thoroughly alive as to 
the possibilities of the county and state of his adoption. A man of hope- 
ful disposition, good judgment and well established character, he fully 
deserves the recognition he receives as a patriotic and energetic citizen 
who never seeks to advance his personal interest to the injury of another. 



HENRY THOMPSON. 



On the old Thompson homestead in iloward township stands the house 
wliicli has the distinction of having been the home of four generations of 
that family and the birthplace of three. The present resident, Henry 
Tiiompson, was born there on the 9th of June, i860, and is therefore not 
only a native son of Story county, but of Howard township, where he still 
continues to make his home. He is the son of Paul and Enger ( Helga- 
son ) Thompson, both natives of Norway, the father having been born in 
1829 and the mother in 1825. Paul Thompson came to the United States 
in 1847 ^"fl located in Kendall county, Illinois, where he remained for 
seven years, at the end of which period he came to Story county, Iowa, 
and worked as a farm hand until 185(1, when he bought one hundred and 
si.xty acres of land from the government, llis entire quarter section was 
unbroken and unimproved prairie when he dbtained it. but close ap|ilica- 
tion and hard work soon transformed it into well tilled fields, whose har- 
vests yielded him the means to add to his acreage so that at the time of 
his retirement in 1902 he owned three hundred and sixty acres of thor- 
oughly cultivated and well iminnved land. .Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were 
married in 1851 and so have long since i)asscd their fiftieth wedding an- 
niversary. Three children were born of their union: Thomas Henry, our 
subject; Edward, deceased; and one wlm ilied in infancy. The family 
always attend the services of the Lutheran church, of which the jiarcnts 
are communicants and Mr. Thompson one of the organizers. .After ac- 
quiring the full rights of citizenship he affiliated with the reiniblican jiarty. 
He was always a public-spirited man and took a warm interest in |)olitics. 
serving many years as townshi]> trustee and also as one of the school di- 
rectors in his district. In addition to his landed interests, he is a stock- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 129 

holder in the Roland Savings Bank and the Roland Creamery. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thompson now live in Roland, enjoying the comfort and leisure pro- 
cured by the diligence and economy of their early years. They have many 
friends by whom they are highly regarded. 

Henry Thompson spent his early years in the unvaried routine which 
characterizes country life. He obtained his education in the district schools 
of Howard township and remained a member of his father's household. 
At twenty-two years of age he undertook the supervision of the home 
farm, which he continues to operate. In addition to the three hundred and 
sixty acres belonging to his father he has bought one hundred and sixty 
of his own, so that he now cultivates five hundred and twenty acres. He 
devotes a great deal of attention to the breeding and raising of shorthorns 
as well as to the breeding and feeding of hogs. 

Mr. Thompson has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Lizzie 
Erickson, by w'hom he had two children. Amanda is now the wife of 
A. J. Severson, Story City, and the mother of two children, Paul and 
Lillian Josephine. Emma married L. E. Quam and has four children : 
Lucille, Tessie, Hazel and Leverne. Mrs. Thompson passed away in 1885. 
For his second helpmate Mr. Thompson chose Sarah Ann Watney and 
they have become the parents of five children : Paul, a graduate of the 
Iowa State University ; Elliot ; Cyrus ; Milton ; and Ervin. 

The family attend the Lutheran church. Ever since he attained his 
majority Mr. Thompson has cast his ballot for the candidates of the re- 
publican party, and he has been honored by election to the office of town- 
ship trustee. He has met with success in his agricultural pursuits and in 
addition to his real-estate holdings is a stockholder in the Farmers Sav- 
ings Bank and the Roland Creamery. 



COMMODORE PERRY McQUISTON. 

It has been forty-five years since Commodore Perry McQuiston took 
up his residence on the farm in Collins township on which he now lives. 
Today he sees beautiful homes and fertile fields yielding abundant har- 
vests where formerly roamed the wolf, the deer or other wild animals of 
the forest or prairie. "Mr. McQuiston has been instrumental in bringing 
about this wonderful transformation. He was born in Tuscarawas county, 
Ohio, March i, 1829, a son of John and Nancy (Bowers) McQuiston, 
both natives of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. About 1843 the 
father removed with his family to La Grange county, Indiana, where he 
died ten years later. 

The subject of this review continued in charge of the home farm until 
it was sold and in 1855, having previously married, he started with his 
wife, mother, brothers and sisters and three other families in search of 



130 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

more favorable opportunities in the great west. The party came to Jasper 
county, Iowa, travehng by wagon and camping out at night en route. The 
mother purchased forty acres of land, which one of her sons-in-law cul- 
tivated, and she made her home in his family. Subsequently she lived 
around among her children, being called away November i, 1887, in her 
eighty-ninth year, while stopping with the subject of this review. 

Commodore Perry McQuiston devoted his attention during the first 
two years after arriving in Jasper county principally to making shingles 
and ax handles. At the end of that time he and his brother Silas pur- 
chased seventy acres of land which they divided between them, their farms 
being located in Jasper county on the Story county line. Here Mr. Mc- 
Quiston continued for ten or twelve years, when he traded his place for 
si.xty acres in Collins township. Story county, and subsequently bought 
forty acres adjoining, making an attractive farm of one hundred acres, 
upon which he has since lived continuously. He is a man of acknowledged 
ability, upright character and moral worth. 

On the 9th of May, 1850, Mr. McQuiston was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine Henning, a daughter of Jacob Henning. a farmer of La 
Grange county, Indiana. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McQuiston twelve children 
have been born, seven of whom are now living, namely: Eli, of Jasper 
county; John Q., who now has charge of his father's place; Charles L. 
and George W., both farmers of Collins township; Dora M., who is the 
widow of Thomas Holmes and is now living with her father ; Commodore 
Perry, of Aitkin county, Minnesota; and Sarah E., the wife of George 
Vasey, of Jasper county. 

Mr. McQuiston is an earnest supporter of the republican party, and 
although his attention has been taken up mainly with his own affairs, he 
has served with great acceptance as road supervisor and member of the 
school board. He and his wife are thoroughly respected by their neigh- 
bors and friends on account of their genial, hospitable characteristics, no 
needy stranger ever being turned from their door empty-handed. He has 
from his boyhood been active, industrious and efficient ajul now has the 
satisfaction of knowing that through his well applied energy he and his 
estimable wife arc amply provided for during the remainder of their lives. 



ISAAC II. .ATKINSON. 

The name of .Atkinson has for more tlian fifty years been familiar to 
the inhabitants of Story county. The family having come here in pioneer 
days. Isaac H. .Atkinson, the son of Eli and Jestine (Moore) Atkinson, 
was born in Knox county. Illinois, on the 4th of October. 183''). His father 
was a native of Clark county. Ohio, and his mother of Tazewell county. 
West V^irg^nia. They removed to Knox county, Illinois, with their re- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 131 

spective parents when children and there were reared and married. In 
1847 they came to Story county, where they lived for one year and then 
went to Missouri for a year, at the end of which time they returned to 
Knox county, Ilhnois, where they resided for twelve years. In 1862 they 
again came to Story county, locating in Palestine township, but in the 
spring of 1870 they went to Jasper county and for twelve years were resi- 
dents of the latter place. They migrated to Gutherie county, Nebraska, 
in 1886 and later went to Washington and Montana. Our subject's mother 
has passed away and since October, 1908, the father has made his home 
with his son Isaac. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, the Rev. Isaac Atkinson, was 
a Methodist minister and came to Story county with his son Eli when the 
latter first migrated from Illinois and made his home here during the re- 
mainder of his life. Not having any means of conveyance, he traveled all 
over Story county on foot in order to carry the gospel to the people. The 
story of Christ was told in the log cabin, the primitive schoolhouse, and 
sometimes in a clearing in the forest — God's first temple. Mr. Atkinson 
was widely known and highly esteemed throughout the district in which he 
so long resided. It was said of him that he had conducted more funeral 
services during the many years he ministered to the spiritual needs of the 
people than any other divine in the state. During the last thirty-five or 
forty years of his life he was afflicted with total blindness but no mere 
physical infirmity could vanquish a spirit such as his and despite the diffi- 
culties he encountered in going from place to place he continued to preach 
the word of God. In 1884 he passed away. He was living in Jasper 
county at the time, where he had removed late in life from the old home- 
stead in Palestine township, this county. 

Isaac H. Atkinson, who represents the third generation bearing this 
name in Story county, was reared at home. His boyhood and youth were 
very similar to those of all pioneer farmer boys attending the district 
school, which was conducted in a log schoolhouse very unlike the modern 
school buildings seen on the Iowa prairies. He assisted in the work of 
the farm and enjoyed such recreations as fell to the lot of the young people 
of his day. 

On the -th of August, 1881, Mr. Atkinson married Miss Mary Boitnott, 
and immediately after this event he began farming on his own account as 
a renter, but at the end of four years they went to Nebraska and preempted 
one hundred and sixty acres in Frontier county, where they continued to 
live for nine years. In 1894 they returned to Story county and remained 
here for two years, at the end of which time they again removed to Ne- 
braska, residing there until 1900, when they sold their preemption. Re- 
turning to this county they rented the farm in Indian Creek township 
where they still live and which they now own, having bought it in 1904. 
It is one of the fine farms of the locality, containing one hundred and 
forty-eight acres of well improved and valuable land. 



132 HISTORY OF STORY COU^'T^' 

Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson are the parents of nine children: Gertie, the 
wife of Fred Lakin. living in Kansas; Lee, of Colo, this county; Sidne)', 
who lives in Indian Creek township ; Guy, of McCallsburg, also of this 
county ; Archie, George and Devere at home, George being a student in 
the high school ; and Lois and Gerald. The family attend the services of 
the Christian church, of which the parents are members. Mr. Atkinson 
is a republican in his political views, feeling that party's policy of protec- 
tion best subserves the interests of the agriculturist, and while he fulfills 
his duty as a citizen by casting a vote at each election, he has never sought 
any reward for party fealty in the way of political honors. His fraternal 
relations are confined to membership in Sylvan Camp, AL W. A. He is 
one of those unobtrusive, reliable and substantial citizens highly esteemed 
anil respected throughout the community in which he lives because he can 
at all times be depended upon to fulfill his duly as he sees it to his coun- 
try and fellowmen. 



JOHN THOMPSON. 

John Thompson, of Collins, who is well known in financial and business 
circles in Story and adjacent counties, has achieved a gratifying measure 
of success and is today numbered among the prosperous and progressive 
men whose work has redounded to his credit and to that of the community, 
liorii in Wayne county, Ohio, November 14, 1S41, he is a son m1 William 
and Margaret (Moorehead) Thompson, both natives of X'enango county, 
Pennsylvania. They were reared in X'enango county and subseciuently 
came to Red Rock, Iowa, but later returned to Ohio and lived fur various 
periods in Wayne. Stark and Hancock counties. In 1851 the father crossed 
the plains to the California gold fields and s])ent twenty-six years on the 
Pacific coast, at the end of which time he came to Des Moines, and finally 
settled in Jasper county, Iowa, where he jiassed away at the age of eighty- 
seven years. The mother was called to her reward at the age of seventy- 
five years. 

John Thompson continued at home until he arrived at manhood. In 
1861 he came to Jasper county, Iowa, and a year later went to Ohio, re- 
turning with his mother. The Civil war was then in progress and three of 
his brothers were at the front serving in the cause of the Union, but the 
subject of this review decided to remain at home to take care of his 
mother. His financial resources were extremely limited and he began 
farming as a renter, cultivating the land to such good advantage that after 
four years he purchased forty acres in Clear Creek township, which he im- 
proved and sold, buying another tract of forty acres in the same county. 
In about 187."? he purchased eighty acres on section 32, Collins township. 
Story county, later adding forty acri's also on section ;i2, and making ad- 




ill!. AND .\llis. JOHN lIKiMI'SdX 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 135 

ditional purchases until he became the owner of a beautiful farm of two 
hundred acres, which he improved and cultivated with highly gratifying 
results. In October, 1898, he removed to Collins, where he has since re- 
sided. For the past sixteen years he has been engaged in the banking busi- 
ness and has gained an acknowledged standing in financial circles on ac- 
count of the ability he has displayed in this line. 

On the 1st day of January, 1866, ]\Ir. Thompson was united in mar- 
riage to Aliss Ann Elizabeth Angelo, a daughter of Samuel W. and Rhoda 
{ Burwell) Angelo, a record of whom appears in the sketch of J. B. Angelo, 
which is presented elsewhere in this work. Two children have blessed the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Thompson: Walter H., and Rhoda E., fhe wife of 
Edward Jones of Collins. Mr. Thompson belongs to the liberal branch of 
the democratic party and reserves the right to vote for a candidate irrespec- 
tive of political lines. He served for a number of years as member of the 
school board. He is identified with Fervent Lodge, No. 513, A. F. & A. M., 
and also with the Odd Fellows. He and his wife are stanch members of 
the Christian church, of which he is trustee and elder. 

The career of Air. Thompson is a striking example of the ef¥ect of well 
directed energy and persistent purpose and should be an inspiration to any 
young man who is obliged to face the world and has nothing to depend 
upon but his own strong constitution and an unalterable determination to 
win. The silent influence of a_ noble life no mortal can tell and it is with 
unfeigned pleasure that the sketch of one of Story county's most honored 
citizens is herewith presented. 



BERT B. WELTY. 



Bert B. Welty, for twelve years past in the active practice of law in 
Nevada and also prominent as a business mian, was born at Oregon, Ogle 
count}-, Illinois, May 31, 1871. He comes of Teutonic ancestry and is a 
son of Christian C. and Susan (Poffenberger) Welty, both of whom were 
natives of Washington county, Maryland. The father was a farmer, and 
at the time of the Civil war, on account of his sympathy with the Union 
cause and also because of depredations by soldiers of both armies, who 
took his live stock, he lost the accumulations of years. In 1870 he re- 
moved to Ogle county, Illinois, living there until 1881, when he took up 
his residence in State Center, Marshall county, Iowa. In 1882, however, 
he located at Johnson's Grove in Richland township. Story county, Iowa, 
where he was actively engaged in farming until 1899, when he retired to 
Colo. Iowa, continuing there until 1907. when he passed away at the age 
of eighty years. He was a man of rugged physique and many sterling 
qualities that greatly endeared him to those with whom he was associated. 



136 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

The mother of our subject departed this life in January-, 1906, at the age 
of seventy years. She was a consistent member of the Lutheran church. 

There were seven children in their family, namely: Daniel D., who is 
now living on the farm of his brother; Harvey A., of Spirit Lake, Iowa, 
who engaged in teaching for a number of years and is also actively identi- 
fied with agricultural interests; Ira C, of Nevada, who has been county 
superintendent of schools and is now devoting his attention to his land 
interests; Dora May, deceased; Bert B., the subject of this review; David 
Guy. of Nevada, who has also taught school and is a stock-buyer and 
landowner; and Gertrude \'., the wife of A. B. Alderman, of Marion, 
Iowa, who for some years past has served as county superintendent of 
schools. 

Bert B. Welty was reared on his father's farm and thoroughly in- 
structed by him in all details pertaining to agriculture and stock-raising. 
He attended the district .schools and taught for several terms. He was 
a student in the Iowa State Normal School, at Cedar Falls, from which 
he was graduated in 1896. Having decided to devote his attention to the 
legal profession, he matriculated at the Iowa State University in the fall 
of 1896, graduating with a degree of LL. B. in June, 1898. He at once 
began practice at Nevada and possessing natural adaptability for law and 
also having made thorough preparation in one of the most noted schools 
in the west, he has met with gratifying success from the very start. He 
is the owner of a farm east of Nevada of two hundred and forty-five 
acres, where he maintains a noted herd of Shetland ponies, to which he 
has devoted a great deal of attention, having made two trips to the Shet- 
land Islands, Scotland, for the purpose of selecting and importing pedi- 
greed stock. He has arranged for a trip to the islands with his family in 
i9ri. He also owns eighty acres in Sherman township and an interest 
in the Highland Park addition to Nevada, being associated in the latter 
enterprise with Judge C. G. Lee and P. E. Shugart. He has other busi- 
ness connections and has shown a judgment and discrimination in finan- 
cial aflfairs which give great promise for his success along those lines in 
the future. 

In June, 1900. Mr. Welty was united in marriage to Miss Alice M. 
Shoemaker, a native of Indiana and daughter of Daniel and Mattie (Baer) 
Shoemaker, who came to Iowa in 1880. Four children have come to 
brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Welty : Esther M., born September 2. 
1901 ; Paul B., February 28, 1904; Mildred A.. July 13. 1906; and Joseph 
P., who was born Januarj' 9, 1910. and died July i, 1910. 

Mr. Welty is a member of the Story County Bar Association and po- 
litically gives his earnest support to the republican party. His religious 
belief is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church. Frater- 
nally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and he is a strong ad%'ocatc of the beneficent i)rinciples 
of those organizations. He has attained a high jinsition in professional 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 137 

ami business circles, and, being a man of unusual energj' and determina- 
tion, his friends prophesy for him a brilliant future. Thoroughly honor- 
able and straightforward, he is always loyal to his convictions, never swerv- 
ing from what he believes to be just and right. It is men of his class, 
possessing virility, intelligence and progressiveness that add to the pros- 
perity of the county, state and union. 



CHARLES J. PORTER. 

In Scott county, Iowa, on the 27th of September, 1855, was born 
Charles J. Porter, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Sykes) Porter. The 
father was an Irishman by birth but the mother was a native of England, 
both coming to this country after reaching maturity. The mother was a 
widow when she married Mr. Porter, her first husband being a Mr. Todd, 
with whom she had lived in New York city for several years, but after 
his death she removed to Iowa and here she met and married Mr. Porter. 
In 1867 they removed to Story county, locating on eighty acres of land 
which they bought in Indian Creek township, adding to their holdings 
from time to time until they had acquired two hundred acres. The father 
died on this farm in 1882, but the mother is still living at the advanced 
age of eighty-five years and makes her home in Des Moines. 

The early years of Charles J. Porter's Hfe were spent under the pa- 
ternal roof and were occupied in acquiring an education and in assisting 
in the work of the farm. His leisure hours were employed very similarly 
to the majority of young people. He laid aside his text-books when he 
felt that he had acquired such knowledge as he deemed essential for the 
vocation he elected to pursue and then assumed the heavier responsibili- 
ties of life. At the age of twenty-one years he left home and the first 
two years of his independent life were spent as a farm hand but at the 
end of that time he rented land and thereafter worked for himself. Dili- 
gence, good management and application enabled him to acquire sufficient 
capital to buy a place, so he purchased a farm just one mile north of his 
homestead and lived there for four years. At the expiration of that period 
he rented his present farm, which at that time was the property of his 
father-in-law, N. P. Hall, for seven years and then bought it in 1898. 
This is one of the best farms in Indian Creek township, containing one 
hundred and thirty acres of well tilled land, with good improvements which 
are in excellent repair. Mr. Porter also owns sixty-five acres on section 
34 of the same township, which he purchased in 1805. the aggregate of 
his realty holdings thus being one hundred and ninety-five acres. For the 
past twenty-five years he has made a specialty of feeding stock for the 
market, making it a practice to consume all of his crops in this manner, 
and he has been most successful in his undertakings. 



138 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

Mr. Porter established a home of his own by his marriage on the 9th 
of September, 1886, to Miss Ellen Hall, the daughter of Noble P. and 
-Margaret (Felkner) Hall, early settlers of Story county. They are the 
parents of two children: Rose Ethel, the wife of John 1. Fleming, of 
Omaha, Nebraska; and Curt C. who lives at home. 

The family have always attended the Presbyterian church, of which the 
parents are members. The republican party has at all times had the strong 
support of Mr. Porter, as he considers its basic principles best adapted to 
the protection of home interests and industries. He has never been ah 
active participant in politics to the e.xtent of seeking office or desiring pub- 
lic honors, but fulfills his duty as a citizen by casting his ballot for the can- 
didates of his party. He is regarded as one of the successful and sub- 
stantial citizens of his township, whose business methods and high prin- 
ciples as well as upright life compel the respect of all. 



CHRISTOPHER HARRINGTON. 

Among the self-made men of Story county probably none are more 
worthy of the success they have attained than Christopher Harrington, the 
owner of one of the most productive farms in the county, which he ac- 
quired entirely through his own industry and good business judgment. He 
was born in St. Lawrence county, New York, July 21, 1855, a son of 
Christopher and Julia A. (Rouse) Harrington, the former a native of \'cr- 
mont and the latter of Canada. The father was twice married, the mother 
of the subject of this review being his second wife. After his second mar- 
riage he took up his residence on a farm in St. Lawrence county. New 
York, where he lived for twenty-five or thirty years, passing away in 
1876. The mother departed this life in 1891. 

Christopher Harrington was reared under the kindly influences of a 
genial home and received his education in the common schools. He con- 
tinued with his parents uiuil twenty-one years of age and then, like many 
young men of the east, he decided to cast his fortunes in the Mississippi 
valley. Accordingly he went to De Kalb county. Illinois, where he worked 
upon a farm for two years, and then in 1879 removed to Story county. 
Iowa, and continued in farm work for another period of two years. In 
1881 he began renting land and after about twelve years, having acquired 
sufficient cajiital, he bought eit;hty acres on section i. Collins townshij). 
but he has never lived upon this ])lace. as one year later he ])urchascd the 
farm which he had been renting. He is now the owner of two hundred 
and forty acres in one body and has made many improvements, converting 
this into one of the most valuable jiroperties of its size in the county. 

In t88o Mr. Harrington was united in marriage to Miss Dora .\. 
Crouch, a daughter of Jacob Crouch, who came from West N'irginia to 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



139 



Jasper county, Iowa, in 1852 and shortly afterward took up his residence 
in Story county. Five children have blessefl the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrington: Charles A., now a farmer of Collins township; Tesse I., a 
farmer of Grant township; William J., who is engaged in farming in New 
Albany township; and Christopher C. and George N., both of whom are 
at home. 

Mr. Harrington gives his support to the republican party and although 
he has never sought public office, he has served as a member of the school 
board and for many years as road supervisor, being largely instrumental 
in the construction of the present good roads in the township. At the 
present time he is a member of the board of township trustees. Fraternally 
he is identified with Crescent Camp. No. 2358, M. W. A. He ranks as 
one of the substantial and progressive farmers of the county. In the 
early part of his career he overcame many difficulties, keeping in view a 
position of independence which he has now gained. He justly stands very 
high in the estimation of the community in which he lives, being- regarded 
as one of its most valued members. 



JONAS A. CHRISTIAN. 

One of the best improved farms in Story county is the property of 
Jonas A. Christian, the vice president of the Roland Savings Bank, who 
was born in Harvard township in 1867. His father, John Christian, was 
born in Norway but came to the United States with his parents when he 
was twelve years of age. The family located in Kendall county, Illinois, 
in the district schools of which John Christian acquired his education. 
He remained a member of his father's household until he had reached the 
age of twenty-three years, when he removed to Story county. Iowa, to 
engage in farming. By purchase he had already acquired the right to one 
hundred and twenty acres, upon which he located when he arrived and 
made all improvements thereon. He was one of those men who make in- 
dustry spell success and by application and economy he became one of 
the most extensive landowners in this section of the state, having acquired 
title to fourteen hundred acres at the time of his death. He married Miss 
Cecelia Pierson and they became the parents of nine children three of 
whom are still living: Jonas A.; Otis H., a resident of Aberdeen, South 
Dakota ; and Edward. The parents were both members of the Lutheran 
church, to which Mr. Christian gave liberal support, being one of the 
organizers of the church in Roland. He was a stanch advocate of the 
policy of the republican party, for whose candidates he always cast his 
liallot. Mrs. Christian is still living at the age of sixty-seven and makes 
her home on the farm where they first settled, but her husband passed 
away in 1908 at the age of seventy-five years. His only asset when he 



140 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

began his business career was an inexliaustible fund of courage, winch 
was ever supported by a worthy ambition and strength of purpose, by 
means of which he achieved his success. 

The early years of Jonas A. Christian's hfe were spent in procuring 
an education, performing his share of the farm work and enjoying such 
pastimes as the average youth. Me remained at home until he had reached 
his majority, when he commenced working for himself. Since that time 
he has acquired three hundred and seventy acres of land, all of which he 
is cultivating. He makes a specialty of feeding cattle and hogs, and in 
this he has met with success. His homestead is well improved, the resi- 
dence being one of the handsomest in Story county and containing all of 
the modern improvements and many beautiful appointments. 

Mr. Christian has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Bessie 
Johnson, a daughter of Knute Johnson, by whom he had three children, as 
follows: Cora, Maime and Silvia. The wife and mother passed away in 
1905. Mr. Christian's ]iresent wife, who was Miss Deona Logan, is the 
daughter of Christian Logan. Two children have been born of this union, 
twin boys. Julius Cecil and John Logan. Mr. and Mrs. Giristian attend 
the Lutheran church, of which denomination they are members. The can- 
didates of the republican party always receive his ballot and have ever 
since he received the right of citizenship. He is very active in local poli- 
tics and is at present serving as trustee in Harvard township. He has 
been successful in his various undertakings and in addition to his real 
estate is one of the stockholders and officials of the Roland Savings Bank. 
He is considered one of the most progressive citizens and foremost busi- 
ness men in his community, and Ijoth he and his wife have many friends 
who enjoy the gracious Iiospitality of their beautiful home. 



C. E. LOXGXFXKER. 



C. E. Longnecker, the proprietor of the Calamus Run Stock Farm, w.i- 
born in Polk county, Iowa, on the 23d of March, 1865. His father was a 
native of Indiana and was but ten years of age when his parents removed 
to Iowa, locating in Polk county near Des Moines, where the son grew 
to manhood and married Miss Mary Davis, the mother of our subject. 
After his marriage Mr. Longnecker settled on a farm in Polk county, 
which at that time was a piece of unbroken and unimproved prairie, an<l 
there the ])arcnts spent their entire lives, Mrs. Longnecker passing away 
in 1875 and her husband twenty-iive years later. 

The early years of C. E. Longnecker's life were uneventful, the routine 
of the days being varied only by trivial incidenls which hardlv served to 
break the monotony. He attended the flistrict school, aided his parents 
about tile house and farm, and fur recreation depended upon such diver- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 141 

sions as are made possible for young people living in an unsettled com- 
munity. His father ran a sawmill and threshing machine and from his 
tenth year Mr. Longnecker served as his assistant, as his strength in- 
creased with the passing years more of the work and greater responsi- 
bility devolving upon him. This cooperative plan of work remained in 
effect until the son became twenty-tive years of age. 

On the 30th of March, 1890, Mr. Longnecker was united in marriage 
to Miss Allie Cole, a daughter of Henry Cole, of Ma.xwell, and subsequent 
to this event he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres two miles 
south of Collins. It was upon this place the young people began their 
life together and were soon able to add another forty-six acres to their 
holdings. They resided upon this farm for twelve years and then in 1902 
they sold and bought their present homestead in Indian Creek township. 
Mr. Longnecker now owns two hundred and forty acres of as fine and well 
improved farming land as can be found in the vicinity. During his occu- 
pancy he has rebuilt the house, erected a new barn, tiled his land and added 
various other improvements, all of which have served to increase the value 
of his property. He has become quite prominently known as a stockman 
through the breeding of thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey 
hogs, in both of which he has been most successful. 

Mr. and Mrs. Longnecker have become the parents of two sons and 
two daughters: Roscoe H., lona B., Ruth and Ralph D., all of whom reside 
at home. The family attend the Presbyterian church, of which the parents 
are active members, the father having served as a deacon for some years. 
Mr. Longnecker is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and being a strong advocate of prohibition he always casts his vote for the 
candidates of that party. In addition to his realty holdings and stock 
interests he is a stockholder in the Farmers' Elevator Company of Max- 
well. He is known as one of the progressive and intelligent agriculturists 
and stockmen of his district and is highly esteemed by all who have had 
either business or social relations with him. 



JOHN H. GAMBLE. 



For thirty years John H. Gamble applied himself industriously to 
farming in Story county and then he retired to Maxwell, where he is now 
enjoying the fruits of his labors. He was born in Carroll county, Indiana, 
December 22, 1854, son of J. D. Gamble, a record of whom is presented in 
the sketch of William H. Gamble which appears elsewhere in this work. 
John H. Gamble received his education in the common schools and con- 
tinued upon the home farm, assisting his father until after reaching man- 
hood. In 1876 he began farming on his own account and a year later 
purchased eighty acres adjoining the family homestead. Having married, 



142 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

he and his bride began housekeeping upon the farm, where he continued 
for six years, at tlic same time renting a portion of the homestead. In 
1883 he sold his place and purchased one hundred and sixty acres on sec- 
tion 22, Indian Creek township, to which he removed. For more than 
twenty years he devoted his attention closely and with marked success to 
agriculture and stock-raising, and then in 1905 he removed to Maxwell, 
where he has since resided. In 1907 he sold his farm and purchased eighty 
acres on section 26, wliich he still owns and which is in charge of one of 
his sons. 

On the 7th of March, 1878, Mr. Gamble was united in marriage to 
Miss Clara Maxwell, daughter of Thomas and Nancy Maxwell. Her 
father came to Story county about 1852 and is now living in Iowa Center, 
being in his eighty-seventh year. Four children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gamble, three of whom are now living, namely: \"era, the wife of 
Fred Ray, of Rendrick. Iowa; \'an D., now in charge of his father's 
farm ; and George M.. of Maxwell. The mother of these children, having 
departed this life July 21, 1900, Mr. Gamble was married June 26, 1902, 
to Miss Phoebe Moore, a daughter of Lott and Mary (Glenn) Moore. 
Her father was a well known farmer of Indian Creek township. 

Mr. Gamble has never taken any active part in political or religious 
affairs, preferring to devote his energies to his own private interests. He 
became a thorough and systematic farmer and by his example of patient 
application leading to a gratifying measure of success he influenced many 
others to renewed ambition. He reared his children to lives of industry 
and accomplished his part in the great work which has transformed the 
wild prairie and woodland into the beautiful farms to be .seen in all parts 
of the state today. 



S. E. COOPER. 



The business interests of Story county find a worthy representative in 
S. E. Cooper, who has throughout the existence of Maxwell been promi- 
nently identified with its u])liuilding and advancement. He is today one of 
tJK' leading business men of the city, conducting an u])-to-date furniture 
and undertaking establishment, and is president of the Peoples State Bank. 
which is one of the reliable financial institutions of this section of the 
state. He is a man of good business and executive ability and usually 
carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

A native of Illinois, Mr. Cooper was born in Mercer county, on the 
7th of March, 1853. and is the son of John and Rebecca .\nn (Stark) 
Ccx>per. His father was a native of Devonshire, England, but was only 
three years of age when brought to this country by his parents, who settled 
near .Mljany in .\ew York state. Later the family removed to Michigan 




lift 



BU.SIXE'^S BLOCK OF 8. E. COOPER 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 145 

and from there to Mercer county, Illinois, where John Cooper was united 
in marriage to ]\Iiss Rebecca Ann Stark, a native of Inthana. Upon a 
farm in that county they made their home until i860, when thev removed 
to \\'arren county. Iowa, and in 1864 came to Story county, locating in the 
village of low'a Center. There the father carried on agricultural pursuits 
and was also interested in other business until the spring of 1871. when he 
went to Kansas, living in that state for several years. Finally he returned 
to Story county and made his home in Maxwell until called to his final rest. 

S. E. Cooper was reared on the home farm and acquired his education 
in the public schools of Illinois and Iowa. His father being a wagonmaker 
by trade, he took up that occupation during his boyhood and continued to 
work with him for some years. In 1879 he opened a shop of his own in 
Iowa Center, where he carried on business as a wagonmaker for five years. 
In 1882 he came to Maxwell, through which village the railroad had been 
built the previous winter, and here he erected a building on the corner now 
occupied by the Peoples State Bank, it being the second structure built 
there. In it he opened a stock of furniture, becoming identified in busi- 
ness with the firm of Baldwin & Maxwell, general merchants, under the 
name of S. E. Cooper & Company. In 1893 Mr. Cooper bought out his 
partners and continued in the furniture business alone. He carries a large 
and well selected stock, necessary to meet the demands of his customers 
but has not confined his attention alone to the furniture trade for he also 
does all of the undertaking business in his locality. On the organization 
of the Peoples State Bank, he became its president and has since served in 
that capacity. In the spring of 1909 he purchased the Aliller block, which 
was built in 1900 at a cost of fourteen thousand dollars but at the present 
time would probably cost twenty-five thousand dollars, owing to the rise in 
building material. It is the finest business block in a town of its size to 
be found anywhere, and Maxw'ell has every reason to be proud of the 
institution. 

Mr. Cooper was married in 1877 to Miss Nellie Squires of Iowa Cen- 
ter, a daughter of Henry and Josephine Squires, and to them were born 
seven children, of whom five still survive, namely : Rae, the wife of C. B. 
Wells, of Maxwell ; Hugh J., who is engaged in the real-estate business 
in Weatherford. Oklahoma; Guy, who is a partner in his father's business; 
Hazel, the wife of Sidney Sherman, of Maxwell ; and Nellie, a teacher in 
the public schools of this county. The mother of these children died in 
1892. and the following year Mr. Cooper was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Mattie J. (Moore) Wood of Iowa Center, by whom he has one son, Forest 
F., now sixteen years of age. 

Fraternally, Mr. Cooper is a member of Social Lodge, No. 463, I. O. 
O. F., and three times has represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of the 
state. He is one of the leading members of the organization and wears the 
veterans jewel for twenty-five years in good standing. He is also con- 
nected with the Yeomen anrl with the Mvstic Workers of the World. In 



146 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

his political affiliations he is a republican and has been honored with the 
office of mayor of Maxwell, wliich position he acceptably filled for one 
term. He has also been a member of the town council and of the school 
board continuously since the town was organized. He is today one of the 
most prominent business men and leading citizens of Maxwell, and the 
honorable position which he has attained is due entirely to his own well 
directed efforts, good management and sound judgment, for in starting out 
in life for himself he was without capital and had to make his way in the 
world unaided by financial support. 



JAMES McCOY. 



James McCoy, the senior member of the real-estate and insurance firm 
of James McCoy & Son, which he organized in August, 1907, is one of 
the leading and successful citizens of Colo. His birth occurred in West 
Virginia on the 28th of June, 1855. his parents being Rodger and Bridget 
(Manahan) McCoy, both of whom were natives of Ireland. They crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States in early manhood and womanhoofl, lo- 
cating in West \'irginia, where their marriage was celebrated and where 
they continued to reside until 1861. That year witnessed their removal 
westward to Clinton county, Iowa, where they made their home for two 
years, on the ex])iration of which period they went to Sabula, Jackson 
county, Iowa. They came to Story county in 1868 and on the 28th of 
May of that year Mr. McCoy purchased and located on a farm of eighty 
acres situated a mile and a half west of Colo in New Albany township. 
Subsequently he extended the boundaries of this farm at two different 
times, making the homestead one of two hundred acres. The further cul- 
tivation and improvement of the property claimed his time and energies 
until 1894, when he put aside the active work of the fields and took u]) his 
abode in Colo, where his demise occurred on the 22d of September, 1897. 
Tlic i)oriod of his residence in Story county covered almost three decades 
and he gained a wide and favorable acquaintance within its lx>rders. Both 
he and his wife passed away in the faith of the Catholic church, the latter 
being called to her final rest on the 8th of March, 1898. 

James McCoy was reared under tlie parental roof and acquired his 
education in the public schools of Colo. When a youth of eighteen he 
began learning the blacksmith's trade and after completing his apprentice- 
ship opened a shop in Colo, being engaged in blacksmithing for about 
thirty-five years. While still operating his shop he embarked in the im- 
plement business, becoming the proprietor of an establishment of this char- 
acter about 1880. Some years later he abandoned blacksmithing and turned 
his entire attention to the conduct of his agricultural ini])lenicnt business, 
in which he was successfully engaged until the ist of June, 1909, when he 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 147 

sold out. For some years prior to that time he had been deahng in real 
estate and in August, 1907, established the firm of James McCoy & Son 
for the conduct of a real-estate and insurance business. He has secured 
a good clientage in this connection and has negotiated a number of im- 
portant realty transfers, being thoroughly familiar with the value of prop- 
erty and the opportunity for sale or purchase. 

On the 24th of November, 1881, Mr. McCoy was united in marriage 
to ]\Iiss Sarah O'Donnell, a native of England. Her father, Martin O'Don- 
nell, who was born in Ireland, is now a resident of Colo, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mr«. ]\IcCoy have two children, namely: Martin R., who is a partner of 
his father in the firm of James McCoy & Son; and Mary A., the wife of 
H. R. Wilson, of Hope, Kansas. 

Mr. McCoy is a democrat in politics and for many years served as a 
member of the school board. He is a faithful communicant of the Cath- 
olic church and also belongs to the Knights of Columbus and Logan Camp, 
No. 1591, M. W. A. His interests are thoroughly identified with those of 
Colo and at all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any 
movement intended to benefit this section of the country or promote the 
welfare and upbuilding of his adopted county. 



CHARLES CARMODY. 

As a breeder of Norman and Percheron horses Charles Carmody has 
demonstrated an ability v^diich receives recognition from many who are 
interested in the improvement of horses and other farm animals. He is 
also a successful farmer and has a beautiful place, which includes three 
hundred and twenty acres in Sherman township, as a visible evidence of 
the deep interest he takes in the work with which he has been connected 
since his earliest recollection. 

Born in Jersey county, Pennsylvania, April i, 1865, he is the son of 
Patrick and Mary (Moroney) Carmody, both natives of Ireland. They 
came to America in 1862 and after spending a few years in Pennsylvania 
removed to Illinois, settling in Sherman township. Story county, Iowa, in 
April, 1882, where Mr. Carmody engaged with a goodly measure of suc- 
cess in farming. In 1900 the parents took up their residence in the town 
of Nevada and nine years later made their home with a daughter in Ne- 
vada township. The father was called away November i, 1909, and the 
mother January 4, 1910. 

Charles Carmody received his education in the public schools of Illi- 
nois and Iowa, coming to this state with his parents at seventeen years of 
age. Even as a boy he showed special adaptability to the pursuits of agri- 
culture and stock-raising and after reaching manhood he applied himself 
with such diligence that he became the owner of one of the most valuable 



148 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

farms of Sherman township. For a number of years he has paid special 
attention to the breeding of horses, and as he uses sound judgment and 
has a thorough understanding of market conditions, he generally succeeds 
in receiving a fair price for animals raised upon his farm. Since coming 
into possession of his place he has made many improvements, erecting new 
buildings and fences, tiling the land and adding many modern accessories 
anil equipments, so that his farm is now one of the attractive features of 
the landscape in Sherman township. 

On the 1 2th of February, 1890, Mr. Carmody was united in marriage 
at Colo to Miss Margaret Moroney, a daughter of John and Mary 
(Moloney) Moroney both of whom were natives of Ireland. Mrs. Car- 
mody was born in luigland, March 25, 1862, and was brought by her 
parents to America in 1863. The family lived for a number of years in 
Illinois and the father became connected with the railroad business but 
later engaged in farming. He moved to Iowa in 1887 and settled in Ne- 
vada township. Story county. Four children have blessed the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Carmody: John P., who was born October 23. 1891, and is 
now attending business college at Des Moines; Patrick Joseph, who was 
born February i. 1893, and is now living on the old homestead in Story 
county; Delia, who was born June 16, 1895. ^nd died June 3. 1896; and 
Mary Kathryn. born September 16, 1896, now a pupil in the public schools. 

Mr. Carmody is a public-spirited and patriotic citizen, ever ready to 
extend his assistance to any wortliy cause that aims to develop his part of 
the county or to increase the neighborly feeling of the people. He be- 
longs to the liberal clement of the democratic party and in local affairs 
often votes irrespective of party lines. He is now serving as townsliip 
trustee, a position for which he is well qualified, bcin?; thoroughly ac- 
c|uninted with the needs of llie townsliii), and for four years he has been 
a member of the school board. In religious belief he follows the faith of 
liis ancestors and gives his sincere adherence to the Catholic church. 



M.\TTH1-:\V C. RE.\G.\N. 

Among the retired farmers who are now engaged in business in Max- 
well is .Matthew C. Reagan, a native of the Keystone state, having been 
born in Fayette couiUy nn tlie ijlh of I'diruary, 1847. ^ son of James and 
Rachel (Shaffer) Reagan, who were also both natives of Pennsylvania, 
where they were reared and married. The parents migrated to Iowa in 
1856, locating on a farm of eighty acres in Jasper county, which the 
father had acquired through a land warrant as a soldier in the war of 
1812. The winter of 1856-7 was a very severe one and in the spring he 
was forced to trade his farm for a forty acre piece and a team of horses, 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 149 

as he had lost everything he had. A few months after locating on his 
new place, on the 7th of June, 1867, his wife passed away, her death be- 
ing caused by fright at the sight of a runaway team in charge of her son, 
whom she supposed had been killed. Shortly after her demise the father 
went to live with his daughter, with whom he made his home until his 
death, which occurred seven years later and on the same day of the month 
as that of his wife. 

The early years of Matthew C. Reagan were spent under the paternal 
roof, and at such times as his services were not required in the work of 
the farm he attended the district schools, where he acquired his education. 
The most of his schooling was obtained in the old Center school in Clay 
Creek township, Jasper county. At the age of twenty-three years he 
started to work for himself, hiring out as a farm hand, but after a short 
time he became ill and was compelled to return home, where he remained 
until the following spring, when he began farming as a renter on eighty 
acres of land in Jasper county, which belonged to his father-in-law, re- 
maining there for five years. At the end of that period he leased a place 
in Collins township. Story county, which he cultivated for three years, and 
then returned to Jasper county and after remaining there for one year 
again removed to Story county, settling upon eighty acres of raw prairie, 
which he had bought in Collins township. This he improved and culti- 
vated for two years and then sold it, purchasing another eighty acres of 
unimproved land in the same township, which he also disposed of at the 
end of three years. Following this he bought eighty acres of improved 
land, also in Collins township, and after living there for four years he 
sold it and removed to Marshall county. After two years' residence in 
the latter place he again returned to Story county for a few years and 
subsequently bought a hotel in Rolfe, Pocahontas county, but soon disposed 
of this, buying a farm in the same county, where he resided for a time 
and then moved to Union county, where he lived for four years. At the 
end of that time he returned to Story county, where he has since resided. 
He gave up farming in 1906 and removed to Nevada, Iowa, and then in 
October, 1910, he purchased the livery stable in Maxwell with wliich he 
is still identified. 

On the 7th of February, 1870, Mr. Reagan was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary L. Plumb, of Jasper county, but a native of Licking county, 
Ohio. Eight children were born of this union, five of whom survive : 
Rachel, who is the wife of John Hardin, proprietor of the electric light 
plant at State Center; Belle, the wife of W. T. Norris, of Nevada; An- 
drew George, a farmer of Shipley, Iowa; John H., a resident of Clyde, 
North Dakota; and Grover C, farmer. Grant township, this county. The 
mother passed away on the 6th of October 1908, and after her death Mr. 
Reagan made his home with his son at Shi[)ley until he located in Ma.x- 
well. 



150 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Although he has never taken an active interest in politics to the extent 
of aspiring to public office, Mr. Reagan always votes for the candidates of 
the democratic party. He is a member of the Christian church and is one 
of the esteemed citizens and highly regarded business men of Maxwell. 



THEROX \\'. BLACKMAN. 

Among the prosperous business men of Nevada, Blackman Brothers, 
vegetable gardeners, are recognized as leaders in their line, their business 
each year showing a handsome increase, and the reputation of the firm 
now extends over a wide territory in central Iowa. This enviable pros- 
perity they have attained through their own exertions and the exercise of 
sound business princi])!cs and strictly honorable methods. 

Theron W. Blackman, senior member of the firm, was born in Roch- 
ester, New York, in 1858. His father, James Blackman, was born in Eng- 
land and came to the United States with his parents, the grandfather being 
also named James. The family settled on a farm near Rochester, New 
York, in 1827. There the father grew to manhood and became identified 
with farming interests. He came to Iowa in 1864, locating in Benton 
county, where he remained for eight years, at the end of which time he 
removed to Nevada and his death occurred there in March, 1907. He gave 
his adherence to the republican party except during the last few years of 
his life, when he was identified with the cause of prohibition. He was a 
stanch believer in the Bible and held membership in the Methodist church. 
Our subject's mother, who bore the maiden name of Belinda Ann Allen, 
was born near Rochester, New York, in 1836. She was of German and 
English descent and, like her husband, was a faithful member of the Meth- 
odist church. She departed this life in February, 1907. Two children were 
born to them: Theron \V., our subject; and Allen L., who was born in 
Benton county, Iowa, in 1864 and is now identified with his brother in 
business. 

Theron \V. Blackman was reared as a farmer boy and early acquired 
a love of nature, which has been one of the prevailing characteristics of 
his life. He gained his preliminary education in the country schools and 
later became a student in the Nevada high school, where he gained the 
foundation of a good education. As he advanced in years he showed evi- 
dences of possessing a practical mind and as soon as opportunity pre- 
sented he purchased a tract of land just west of Nevada, where he estab- 
lished a truck farm, the nucleus of one hundred and ten acres which the 
firm now owns. The demand for the products of the farm has grown 
steadily and in 1898 the firm erected a greenhouse twenty-two by one hun- 
dred feet in size for the propagation of plants to be used on the farm or 
disposed of to patrons. A ready market is found for all the produce that 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 151 

is raised and there is every indication that the demand will continue to 
increase as the years pass. The success of Blackman Brothers is due to 
their industry, perseverance and good judgment. The brothers are identi- 
fied with the Methodist church and both are active prohibitionists, believ- 
ing that the saloon is the greatest enemy of society. 



ADELBERT B. MAXWELL, M. D. 

Dr. Adelbert B. Maxwell, a member of the medical profession in Ames 
and president of the Story County Medical Society, was born in DuPage 
county, Illinois, on the loth of February, 1863. He is the son of David N. 
and Altha (Bartholomew) Maxwell, the father also being a native of 
DuPage county, where he always lived until the family removed to Story 
county, Iowa, in 1867. He is no longer engaged in active business. Of 
the three children of the family only one is now living, Adelbert B. 

Dr. Adelbert B. Maxwell was only four years of age when his parents 
located in Story county, so that almost his entire life, with the exception 
of the years he was away studying for his profession, have been spent in 
this immediate locality. His boyhood and youth were very similar to those 
of the majority of men. He attended the district schools, performed such 
tasks as were assigned by parental authority and occupied his leisure hours 
in the diversions which appeal to every boy who lives in the rural districts. 
After he had completed the work of the common schools he entered the 
Iowa State College, where he studied for two years. Later he went to 
Iowa City and matriculated in the medical department of the Iowa State 
University, remaining there for a similar period, but finished his medical 
course in the Chicago Plomeopathic Medical College of Chicago, Illinois, 
being identified with that institution until his graduation, at which time he 
received the degree of M. D. He was a very ambitious young man, how- 
ever, having always been a diligent student, and unlike most young physi- 
cians, felt that instead of having completed the study of medicine he had 
just begun it and so entered Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, 
Chicago, in order to continue his research in the healing art. 

After the completion of his post-graduate course Dr. Maxwell returned 
to Ames and began the practice of medicine and surgery, in both of which 
lines he has proven himself to be most capable and skillful. Later he took 
up the special practice of eye and ear. One of his strongest assets in all 
probability has been his personality which never fails to soothe and cheer 
the patient, while at the same time it inspires confidence in the efficacy of 
his art. He also possesses that most essential of all powers to the medical 
man acuteness in the diagnosis of disease, as well as the gentle touch and 
positive hand of the competent surgeon. He always makes friends in the 
sick room as is attested by his large and growing practice. 



i:,2 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Dr. ^laxwell has never permitted his professional duties to absorb him 
to the extent of releasing him from all of his responsibilities as a public 
citizen. He has always voted the republican ticket and takes a keen in- 
terest in all municipal affairs, and that his constituency and the general com- 
munity regard him favorably is indicated by the fact that he has been city 
clerk since 1889; no man ever held an office, however insignificant it might 
be, continuously for twenty years unless he held the respect and confidence 
of the community. 

Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, his local affiliation 
being with Arcadia Lodge, No. 249, A. F. & A. ]\I., he is also a member of 
the Order of the Eastern Star and the Modern Woodmen of America, 
Ames Camp, No. 458, the basic principles of which organizations serve to 
guide his life. 



JACOB D. SCOTT. 



One of the best known stockmen in this section of the state was the 
late Jacob D. Scott, who for twenty-eight years was a resident of Indian 
Creek township. Story county. The son of Robert M. and Mary (Drake) 
Scott, he was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, on the 15th of 
March, 1854, his parents also being natives of the Keystone state. In 
1867 they came west, settling on a farm near Keokuk, Iowa, where they 
remained, however, but for one year, at the end of that time removing to 
Jasper county. They were residents of the latter county for ten years and 
in 1874 they bought a farm one-half mile north of Elwell in Indian Creek 
township, this county, which is now owned by O. N. Jory, and here they 
continued to live until Mr. Scott retired in 1S90, when they removed to 
Maxwell. Mrs. Scott passed away on the 13th of March, 1904, and since 
that time he has made his home with his children. He is now living with 
his youngest son in Greene county, Missouri. 

The boyhood and youth of Jacob D. Scott were very similar to those of 
most boys who are reared in the country. He attended the district school 
when not occupied in performing his share of the farm work, and indulged 
during his leisure in .^uch sports as are usually enjoyed by young people. 
At the usual age lie laid aside his text-books and assumed the responsibili- 
ties and duties of manhood. Deciding to follow the vocation of farming. 
he rented land in the vicinity of his home, where lie cimtinucd to live until 
he was thirty years of age. 

On the 2ist of .Xugust, 1884, Mr. Scott w-as joined in marriage to Miss 
Cynthia Elizabeth Olinger. a daughter of James M. an<l ]\ebecca J. (John) 
Olinger. Her father came to Story county from Indiana in 1854 and con- 
tinued to live in this state until he passed away on the 8th of .April, 1907. 

.\fter his marriage Mr. Scott rented land in Polk county, which he 
farmed for two years. Having purchased, in the meantime, eighty acres 




MK. AND MRS. J. D. SCdTT 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 155 

near where he was renting he removed thereon and continued to reside 
there until 1900, at which time he bought one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Story county, upon which he lived until called to his final rest on 
the 6th of August, 1910. His death was very sudden and a great shock 
to his family and friends. 

Eleven children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Scott, all of whom are 
living at home with their mother, with the exception of Lisle G., who is 
married and living on a farm near Elwell in this county, the others being 
Cecil E., Glen M., Forrest A., J. Burness, Anna Laura, Marion and Marie, 
twins, Alice L., Dale John and Arnold R. The family all attend the Chris- 
tian church, of which Mr. and Mrs. Scott were members. 

Mr. Scott was a stanch republican, feeling that party's policy of pro- 
tection was essential to the best interest of home industries. Although he 
always cast his ballot at each election he never sought political honors or 
public office. His active interest in educational matters caused him to serve 
as school director in this district for several years. He was a liberal, 
broad-minded, public-spirited man, at all times doing his utmost to pro- 
mote every movement for the betterment of the community in which he 
lived. Thoughtful and kind to the friendless, aiding the needy, always 
striving to bring into the lives of the unfortunate a little cheer, he,, was- 
ever highly esteemed and respected. 

Mrs. Scott, who was a teacher before her marriage, is a woman of un- 
usual culture and refinement, and her home has always been one which 
stood for the highest and best, the family occupying an influential position 
in the social life of the community. 



ADELBERT LEE KENNEDY. 

In the list of useful and lucrative occupations of Story county agricul- 
ture and stock-raising occupy the premier place. It is to these pursuits 
that the county owes its high standing in the state, and few sections of 
Iowa can boast of more carefully cultivated fields or of better grades of 
live stock. Among the well kept farms is that of Adelbert Lee Kennedy, 
who was born near Laporte, Marshall county, Indiana, February 3, 1854, 
a son of Emerson and Louisa (Bixby) Kennedy, the former a native of 
Ashtabula county, Ohio, and the latter of Steuben county, New York. 
They were married in Ohio, to which state the mother had removed as a 
child with her parents, and after their marriage went to Marshall county, 
Indiana, coming to Iowa in 1857. After spending eleven years in Black 
Hawk county, Iowa. Mr. Kennedy purchased a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 10, Collins township. Story county, upon which he 
settled. In 1894 he retired from active life and took up his home with a 
daughter in Pocahontas county, Iowa, subsequently removing to Oklahoma, 



156 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

where he resided with another daughter. He passed away in 1902, and 
the mother of our subject departed this life in 1887. 

Adelbert Lee Kennedy came to Iowa with his parents and after re- 
ceiving his education in the district schools continued upon the home farm 
until twenty years of age, when he began life upon his own account. At 
the age of twent\'-seven years, having married, he established his home 
upon eighty acres of land which he purchased in Collins township and to 
which he has added as his resources pennitu-d until he now owns a beau- 
tiful farm of one hundred and sixty acres which yields a handsome re\t- 
nue. He was for a number of years prominently identitied with the breed- 
ing of thoroughbred Aberdeen Angus cattle, but during recent years has 
devoted his attention to cattle feeding, in which he has been highly suc- 
cessful. 

On the 2ist of September, 1881. Mr. Kennedy was united in marriage 
to Miss Caroline Dawes, of Decatur county. Iowa, a daughter of John and 
Alary (\'an Dorn) Dawes, the former of whom was born at Thomaston, 
Lincoln county, Maine, and the latter at \'ans \'alley, Delaware county, 
Ohio. Mr. Dawes in his early manhood removed to Delaware county and 
after his marriage was engaged in the mercantile business at Alexandria, 
Licldng county, Ohio, for twenty years. Subsequently he took up his 
residence on the old \'an Dorn hoinestead at \'ans \'alley, where he was 
engaged in farming for twenty years. He passed away in 1876, and in 
1877 Mrs. Dawes came with her children to Decatur county, Iowa, but 
later removed to Bonhomme county, l^oiuh Dakota, where she died in 
1896. Mrs. Kennedy's grandfather, William Dawes, was one of three 
brothers who came to America from England. James locating in Pennsyl- 
vania. Edward in Virginia and Williaiu at Thomaston, Maine. The last 
named became United States revenue collector for the port of Thomaston 
and was known as one of the leading citizens of the place. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy six children have been born, five of whom 
are now living: Mary L., now the wife of F. M. Hanson, state secretary 
of the Young Men's Christian Association at Des Moines, Iowa ; Magda- 
lene, the wife of R. F. Ralthis. a member of the United States government 
forest service, now located at Alamogordo, New Mexico; Maud O.. the 
wife of I. O. Schaub, head of the department of agronomy of the State 
Agricultural College at Raleigh, North Carolina; Laura D.. who is now 
attending the conservatory of music of the Northwestern University, at 
Evanston, Illinois; and Bert L., a farmer of Collins township. Mr. Han- 
son and Mr. Ralthis are both graduates of the Iowa State .Agricultural 
College at Ames, and Professor Schaub is a graduate of a college in Ten- 
nessee. 

Mr. Kennedy g^ves his adherence to the reiiulilican party and has served 
for a number of years in various township offices. He is a true friend of 
education and was for fifteen years a member of the school board, being 
treasurer of the board for twelve years. Mrs. Kennedy is also greatly 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 157 

interested in education. She is a lady of unusual intellectual qualifications 
and received her training at the Granville (Ohio) Female College. Mr. 
Kennedy is a member of Crescent Camp, No. 1358, M. W. A.; Fervent 
Lodge, Xo. 513, A. F. & A. M. ; and of the Order of the Eastern Star, 
his wife being also a member of the latter organization. He is not identi- 
fied with anv religious denomination, but Mrs. Kennedy is a faithful mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. They have many friends in Story county 
and possess in an unusual degree the confidence and respect of all with 
whom they come in contact. 



LON G. HARDIN. 



Lon G. Hardin, editor of the Ames Times and well known as a repre- 
sentative of progressive journalism in Iowa, was born in Fairfield, Jeffer- 
son county, this state, on the 5th of December, 1861, his parents being 
Anderson G. and Sarah Jane (McConnell) Hardin, the former a native 
of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. They came to Iowa in childhood 
days with their respective parents, were married in this state and now re- 
side in Spencer, Clay county, where the father follows merchandising. 
Their family numbers four daughters and two sons. 

Lon G. Hardin, the third in order of birth, resided at the place of his 
nativity until 1870, when the family removed to Spencer where he re- 
mained until 1884. He acquired his education in the public schools of the 
two towns and in 1880 began learning the printer's trade which he followed 
in Spencer until 1884, when he went to Plankinton, South Dakota, where 
he was employed at his trade for a year. He afterward engaged in the 
printing business in Webster City, Iowa, until 1892, when in the month of 
May he came to Ames and here established the Ames Times, which he has 
since published, being sole owner and manager of the paper which he has 
made one of the leading country journals of the state. Its editorials are 
interesting and indicate wide knowledge of the subject under discussion. 
Much attention is paid to the appearance of the paper, and its tasteful ar- 
rangement indicates a thorough understanding of the mechanical side of 
the art preservative. He well merits the liberal subscription and adver- 
tising patronage which is accorded him and which indicates the popularity 
of the paper in Ames and throughout the surrounding country. 

On the 28th of June, 1885, Mr. Hardin was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella R. Eckley, a native of Keokuk county, Iowa, where she resided 
until her marriage. They now have one son. Max E., who was born De- 
cember 22, 1889, and is now a junior in the Iowa State Agricultural Col- 
lege, pursuing a scientific course. 

In his political views Mr. Hardin is a stalwart republican and advocate 
of the principles of the party through the columns of his paper. He 



158 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

served as postmaster of the town under appointment of President Mc- 
Kinley and President Roosevelt, filling the office for nine years, or until 
tlie 13th of Januar}', 1907. He is well known in Masonic circles as a 
member of the lodge and chapter at Ames, belongs also to Ames Lodge, 
Xo. 150, K. P., and to Boone Lodge, No. 563, B. P. O. E. A social, genial 
nature renders him popular, and it is well known that he is an ardent ad- 
vocate of progress and improvement in public affairs, stanchly and ag- 
gressively advocating measures which he deems factors of general growth 
and development. 



MICHEL HEGLAXD. 



The student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the 
records of Story county without learning that the Hegland family has been 
prominently connected with the work of upbuilding and improvement here. 
For fifty-four years Michel Hegland of this review has resided where he 
now makes his home and he has witnessed the growth and development 
of the entire countryside and at all times has borne his part in the work 
of general improvement. 

His birth occurred near Bergen, Norway, on the 13th of January, 1845, 
and he was therefore a lad of but twelve years when in 1857 he came to 
the United States with his parents, Ole and Betsy (Tungsvig) Hegland. 
The father was born in Norway in November, 1802, and the mother on 
the 5th of May, 1805. In early life he learned the shoemaker's trade and 
followed it in his native country, but throughout the period of his residence 
in America his time and energies were devoted to agricultural pursuits. 
Two older brothers of Michel Hegland were the first of the family to come 
to the new world, having crossed the Atlantic in 1854, at which time they 
took up their abode in Illinois. Later they became familiar with condi- 
tions in Story county, Iowa, made their way to this district, secured the 
lumber and built a good frame house, which the family occupied on their 
arrival. It was in 1857 that the parents and the other cliildren of the 
household made the long voyage across the briny deep and then overland 
to Iowa. The first settlers had come here only the suinnur licfme and the 
country was very new. Iowa City was the nearest town. They liad no 
market and in fact they had nothing to sell and practically notliing with 
which to buy. The fratiie house wiiich llic two sons had erected was one 
of the best houses in the county at that time. In fact it was the largest 
building in Howard townshij) in pioneer limes and the only frame struc- 
ture for a number of years. It was therefore used for church purposes, 
Mr. and ^'r*;. Hegland opening their home to the Lutheran congregation, 
which was soon organized among the early settlers. No improvements 
had been made upon the land when the family took possession but with 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 159 

characteristic energy father and sons broke the prairie and planted crops. 
At first they raised only enough to supply the family needs. Everything 
used was made by hand upon the farm and the fare was principally cracked 
corn and pork. Within the boundaries of the farm were embraced one 
hundred and sixty acres of land and the soil, naturally rich and productive, 
responded readily to the efforts of the owners. The father continued to 
engage in general agricultural pursuits until his later years. He reached 
the very advanced age of ninety-one and a half years, passing away in 
May, 1893, ^"d his wife was also about ninety years of age at the time of 
lier demise, which occurred in February, 1895. 

Their family numbered seven children. Thor, the eldest, enlisted from 
Story county as a soldier of the Civil war and died in the service in Mis- 
souri. He and two others were the first Norwegians to enlist from this 
county. Lars is a retired farmer living in Roland. Inga is the wife of 
John Ritland, of Howard township, living about two and a half miles 
north of Roland. Ole O., who served in the Union army as a member of 
an Illinois regiment, is now a retired farmer living in Roland. Samuel O., 
who enlisted from Illinois with his brother, is likewise a resident of Roland. 
Ole, the second of the name, is a retired farmer of Roland. 

The youngest member of the family is Michel Hegland, whose name 
introduces this review. He was a lad of twelve years when the family 
sailed for the new world and since that time he has continuously lived at 
the present place of his residence, which is now within the corporation 
limits. There was no town, however, at the time the family took up their 
abode here. Michel Hegland was formerly the owner of a farm of one 
hundred and si.xty acres, a part of which has now been platted. He also 
added forty acres to his original holdings, becoming the owner of two 
hundred acres, but sold the farm to his son-in-law, T. C. Erickson. He 
retained about two acres and has erected thereon a fine residence, built 
in modern style of architecture and supplied with all comforts and con- 
veniences. As a farmer he was enterprising, diligent and progressive, de- 
voting many years of his life to general agricultural pursuits and stock- 
raising. He did not confine his attention entirely to that business, however, 
for he became interested in commercial pursuits in Roland, being associated 
with his son Lewis in the hardware and implement business for a number 
of years. He ever displayed sound judgment in business affairs and keen 
discrimination, and the success which he has enjoyed has come to him as 
the merited reward of earnest labor. 

On the 20th of August, 1870, Mr. Hegland was married to Miss Caro- 
line Larson, who was born in Kendall county, Illinois, November 27, 1853, 
and was brought to Story county in 1856 by her parents, Rasmus and 
Margaret (Sheldahl) Larson, both of whom were natives of Norway, the 
former born in November, 1802, and the latter on the 20th of August, 181 1. 
They came to the United States in 1845. settling first in Illinois, and on 
removing to Story county the father purchased a farm of two hundred 



160 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

acres on the present site of Story City. There he and his wife continued 
to Hve until called to their final rest, Mr. Larson passing away in Novem- 
ber, 1873, and his wife in January, 1901. While he owned a farm he did 
not personally engage in agricultural pursuits. He was a mechanic and 
while in Norway engaged in watch-making. After coming to the new 
world he followed carpentering, shoemaking. and the tinsmith's trade, and 
in fact could do anything in mechanical lines. He was a man of unswerv- 
ing integrity and possessed sound judgment. People came for miles 
around to ask his advice, especially in matters concerning building or buy- 
ing. Unto him and his wife were born seven children: Lars, now deceased; 
Erick, who was a soldier of the Thirty-second Iowa \olunteer Infantrj' 
in the Civil war and is now living at Island, Minnesota ; Randi, the widow 
of Ilolver R. Larson and a resident of Story City ; Inger, who is the 
widow of Samuel Larson, a brother of her sister's husband and a resident 
of Los Angeles, California; Margaret, who is the widow of Jacob Jergen- 
son and lives in Story City; Betsy, the deceased wife of the Rev. O. G. 
Jukam; and Mrs. Hegland. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hegland have been born twelve children: Betsy, 
now the deceased wife of T. C. Jacobson; Martin, who died in infancy; 
Margaret, the wife of T. S. Erickson, who is mentioned elsewhere in this 
volume; R. L., who was educated at Sioux Falls and is a graduate of a 
business college, his home being now in Sharon, North Dakota ; Mary, the 
wife of M. O. Anderson ; Henrj' T., who was educated at Sioux Falls and 
is now following farming a mile west of Roland; Martin N., who. after 
graduating from the high school at Roland and the Lutheran grammar 
school at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, spent three years in school at De- 
corah, Iowa, as a teacher but is now in Twin \'alley. Minnesota; Clara, a 
nurse in the general hospital at Des Moines; L. Roy, at home; and three 
who died in infancy. 

In his political views Mr. Hegland has always been a stalwart rejiub- 
lican since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He has held 
some minor offices but lias never cared much for political preferment. He 
belongs to the Bergen Lutheran church and his life is an exemplification 
of his Christian faith and belief. His history is in many respects a most 
interesting one, for few residents of Roland and this part of the county 
have been more closely associated with the pioneer development and sub- 
sequent prosperity of tlie district. People today can scarcely realize the 
hardships and privations which were borne by the early settlers. Mr. 
Hegland was twenty-three years of age before he possessed an overcoat, 
and many comforts which the present generation regard as necessities were 
at that (late unknown, ll was with difficulty, too, that the farm work was 
carried on, for the machinery was very crucle as compared to that in use 
at the present time. Much of the work of the fields was done by hand and 
the farmer worked from daybreak until dark. Mr. Hegland is still the 
owner of one hundred and sixty-three acres of land a mile west <>f Roland, 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 161 

which he operated in connection with the cuhivation of his two-hundred- 
acre farm that he sold to his son-in-law. At one time he was the owner 
of land in Minnesota, Missouri, and North Dakota, in addition to his Iowa 
property, but has disposed of his holdings to his children and is now living 
retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. He has a beautiful home in 
Roland, where he is surrounded by the comforts and many of the luxuries 
of life, and because of his upright course in business affairs and his un- 
faltering energy his fellow townsmen rejoice in what he has accomplished 
and feel that his prosperity has been most worthily won. 



EDGAR A. FAWCETT. 



Edgar A. Fawcett, who through the greater part of his business life 
has been identified with banking and is now cashier of the First National 
Bank of Nevada, was born on a farm about four and a half miles south 
of Colo, December 26. 1871. His parents were Sylvanus S. and Hannah 
S. (Gifford) Fawcett, natives of Ohio and Maine, respectively. In his 
childhood days the father accompanied his parents on their removal west- 
ward to Wisconsin, where he was reared. He went to California during 
the first gold excitement in that state, spending six or eight years upon 
the Pacific coast, after which he returned by way of the Panama route and 
New York city. He continued a resident of Wisconsin until about 1866, 
when he drove across the country to Story county, Iowa, settling in New 
Albany township, where he resided until 1892, when he retired from busi- 
ness life and took up his abode in California. There his remaining days 
were passed, his death occurring in May, 1908. He had devoted his entire 
life to farming with the exception of the period spent in mining in the 
far west, and was the owner of a valuable property of two hundred and 
eighty acres. His widow still survives and is now a resident of Los Angeles, 
California. In their family were three children : Alfred J., a resident of 
Maxwell, Iowa; Edgar A.; and Jennie E., who is living with her mother. 

Edgar A. Fawcett was born on the old farm homestead and there re- 
sided until his father left the farm. He supplemented his public-school 
education by a business course in Western College at Toledo, Iowa, after 
which he joined his parents in California and was there engaged in raising 
oranges and lemons for six years. On the expiration of that period he 
returned to Iowa, settling at Collins, where he entered the Exchange State 
Bank in the capacity of bookkeeper, the institution being then known as 
Hanson's Private Bank. On the ist of January, 1900, Mr. Fawcett was 
appointed deputy county treasurer, which position he filled for four years, 
covering two terms. He was twice elected county treasurer, filling the 
office for five years. He became connected with the First National Bank 
of Nevada on the ist of January, 1909, as assistant cashier and was elected 



162 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

cashier on the ist of August, the same year, so that he is tilhng that posi- 
tion at the present time. He has had liberal experience in connection with 
financial interests and is well qualified for the onerous and responsible du- 
ties which devolve upon him. 

On the 19th of December, 1900, Mr. Fawcett was unitetl in marriage 
to Naomi Thorne. a native of Kansas and a daughter of William B. and 
Josephine Thorne who are residents of California. Mr. and Mrs. Fawcett 
have become the parents of four children: Naomi L., Harold T., Ruth and 
Josephine. 

The parents arc members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take 
an active part in its work, Mr. Fawcett serving for some time as Sunday 
school superintendent. He is also a valued member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, being affiliated with the lodge and chapter at Nevada, and he also 
belongs to the Modern Woodman camp. His political allegiance is given 
to the republican party and his cooperation is a supporting element in every 
measure and movement which tends to promote the public good. As a 
business man he is enterprising and energetic, and his close application and 
progressive spirit promise well for his success in the future and also are 
factors in the present success of the bank. 



\\"ILI.1.\M I.OCKRIDGE. 

In an enumeration of the men whose records have been a credit and 
honor to the city of Nevada it is imperative that mention be made of 
William Lockridge, who for many years was actively associated with the 
business interests of the city and county and also with municipal affairs 
as a public official. Perseverance and industry at length brought him suc- 
cess that enabled him to spend the evening of life in quiet retirement. As 
the day with its morning of hope and promise, its noontide of activity, its 
evening of completed and successful cft'ort. ending in the grateful rest of 
night, so was the life of William Lockridge. He was born in .Augusta 
county, X'irginia. June 23, 1832, a son of John and Eliza (Irvin) Lock- 
ridge. who spent their entire lives upon a farm in the Old Dominion. 
They had a family of four sons and three daughters but only one is now liv- 
ing. Dr. John E. Locki-i(li,'0. who is engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Indianapolis. Indiana. 

William Lockridge spent his boyhood and youth in his native state and 
was in his twenty-fourth year when, in the spring of 1856, he came to Story 
county, Iowa. Here he located a laiK] warrant that bis father had given 
him. the father having received the same for his services in the war of 
1812. Our subject secured employment in the old courthouse which then 
.stood upon the site of the present home of Mrs. Lockridge. For several 
years he filled the position of deputy recorder, after which he was elected 




WILLIAM L(>( KIMDCK 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 165 

to the position of recorder and treasurer, the two offices being combined at 
that time. He was a supporter of the democratic party and upon its ticket 
he was chosen to office. About 1863 he removed to his farm which he had 
secured through his father's land warrant and which was located a mile 
south of the courthouse. The tract comprised one hundred and sixty acres, 
to the development and cultivation of which he devoted his energies for 
nine years, working a marked transformation in its appearance. By rea- 
son of the improvements he placed upon it he sold to good advantage and 
then purchased a lumberyard in Nevada, which he conducted for twenty- 
six years. Throughout that period he ranked as one of the leading busi- 
ness men of the city, his progressive spirit and his enterprise enabling him 
to build up a business of satisfactory proportions that returned to him 
gratifying annual income and eventually enabled him to live retired. After 
conducting his lumberyard for more than a quarter of a century he sold out 
and put aside all business cares save the supervision of his investments. 
He was considered one of the most substantial business men of the town 
and built the first tile factory there. His progressiveness was tempered by 
a safe conservatism and his judgment was sound and reliable so that his 
advice was frequently sought by others concerning the advisability of busi- 
ness propositions. From time to time he made purchases of land and be- 
came the owner of about three hundred acres of valuable farm property 
near the fair grounds. He had another farm south of Nevada and six 
hundred and forty acres in Kossuth county, Iowa. He became known as 
a prominent representative of financial interests here, being president of 
the First National Bank for a number of years but resigning in his later 
life. 

On the 19th of January, i860, Mr. Lockridge was united in marriage to 
Miss Lydia A. Letson, who was born in Hardin county, Ohio, January 15, 
1 841, and there resided to the age of seventeen years when she came to Ne- 
vada with her parents, Christian Bemper and Jane (Huston) Letson, the 
former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Ohio. Both died, how- 
ever, in Nevada. Iowa, the former at the age of fifty-eight years and the 
latter at the advanced age of eighty-three. Mr. Letson prospered in his 
undertakings and became the owner of three farms in Story county. Unto 
him and his wife were born six children: Delia, the wife of John Waldron, 
of Nevada; Mrs. Lockridge; Warren, who is living in Council Bluffs, 
Iowa; Helen, the wife of S. F. Balliett. of Des Moines; Rachel, the wife 
of Clarence Miller, of Cedar Rapids; and Levina, the wife of W. P. Zwill- 
ing, of Nevada. 

The marriage of Mr. and ^Irs. Lockridge was blessed with eight 
children: Elfa, who is the wife of T. P. Worsley and lives with her wid- 
owed mother; Jennie, who became the wife of Frank Warrick and died 
in 1903; Etta, the wife of L. A. Will, of Salina, Kansas; Frank, who 
died at the age of twenty-one years; Levina, the wife of J. E. Drybread, 
of Nevada; ^Maggie, who died at the age of two years; Clarence, who died 



166 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

at the age of sixteen years; and Anna Fay. the wife of Emmitt Arm- 
strong, of Nevada. 

While Mr. Lockridge conducted important business interests and dis- 
played an aptitude for successful management in their control, he did not 
selfishly concentrate his energies upon business affairs to the exclusion of 
all other interests in life. He was a public-spirited citizen and his coopera- 
tion could be counted upon to further many measures and movements for 
the general good. He served both as a member of the city coimcil and as 
mayor of Nevada and exercised his official prerogatives in support of all 
projects which he deemed of benefit to the city at large. As chief execu- 
tive his administration was businesslike and resulted in the adoption of 
various measures of reform and progress. .At one time he was a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and he always exemplified in his life the benefi- 
cent spirit of the craft, being ever ready to extend a helping hand where 
assistance was needed. He died July 2^. 1903. at the advanced age of 
seventy-one years. Nevada had long claimed him as one of her prominent 
citizens and the basic principles of his life were such as won him the 
regard, confidence and honor of all with whom he came in contact. 



SOREN V. KALSEM. 



In the list of Columbia's adopted children who put on the blue and 
fought for the stars and stripes in the south during those momentous days 
of the early '60s must be placed the name of Soren \'. Kalsem. He was 
born in Norway on the 14th of August, 1836. in which country his boyhood 
and youth were passed. He acquired his preliminary education in the 
schools of his village and after completing the course of study he entered 
a more advanced school and remained there until he felt competent to ap- 
prentice himself to a trade. He chose cabinet-making for his life work 
and has continued to follow that trade during his residence in the United 
States. In 1858 be o])ened the first cabinet-maker's shop in Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. 

He was one of the first to respond to the call for volunteers and in 
1861 enlisted in Company C, Seventh Iowa \*olunteer Infantry. He spent 
about three years in the army, much of which time he was actively en- 
gaged at the front. He took part in manj- of the notable battles of the 
war, being at Shiloh and Fort Donelson and the closely contested engage- 
ment at Ijelmont. He was wounded three times and yet bears the scars 
of some of those strifes. He now keeps in touch with his old comrades 
through his nKinbcrship in Ellsworth Post, No. 30, of the G. A. R. 

Mr. Kalsem was united in marriage to Miss Sarena Strom, and they 
have become the parents of the following children: Sarah, the wife of 
Irvcn Wettland ; Goodm.ui. wlio resides in Marshalltown, Iowa; I'ulion ; 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 167 

Berth, who married Rinert Pierson and lives in Union township ; Phillip, 
at home; Silas, a railroad man living at Woodbine, Iowa; and Albert and 
Cora, both at home. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, in which the parents 
hold membership. Ever since acquiring the full rights of citizenship Mr. 
Kalsem has cast his vote with the republican party, its principles best con- 
forming to his conception of the highest form of government. He has 
never aspired to political honors or public office but meets the require- 
ments of good citizenship by casting his ballot on election day. He is one 
of the pioneer citizens of Story county and has watched the growth and 
development of the country from the days when Ames contained but a 
few frame dwellings and the country was largely wild prairie. He tells 
many entertaining reminiscences of the hardships and privations of the 
early days which can hardly be credited by the present generation. He 
was for some years the president of the Grange and Farmers Alliance, 
Mr, Kalsem owns his own home, which is located on one of the older 
streets of the town, and is highly regarded in the community. 



WALTER HENRY THOMPSON. 

The career of Walter Henry Thompson, cashier and manager of the 
Bank of Collins, is a record of worthy ambition under direction of sound 
and intelligent judgment. The responsible place he holds is the result of 
executive force and clear discrimination and it also calls for successful 
management and business talents of a high order, with all of which quali- 
ties he is fortunately endowed. He was born in Jasper county, Iowa, 
November 3, 1866, son of John and Ann E. (Angelo) Thompson, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this volume, 

Mr, Thompson received his early education in the district schools and 
not being especially attracted to agricultural pursuits, became associated 
with his father at nineteen years of age in the grocery business at Col- 
lins, having the management of the business. Four years later a stock 
of dry goods was added, making the concern one of the important mer- 
cantile establishments of that part of the county. It was conducted under 
the title of Thompson & Son until 1891, when the junior partner came 
into possession of the entire business and the title was changed to W, H, 
Thompson, so continuing until 1896, when the business was disposed of. 
In 1895 Mr. Thompson and his father organized the Bank of Collins, of 
which they were sole owners, the subject of this review being cashier and 
manager. He has devoted his entire attention to the banking business since 
1896 with most gratifying results, the institution being now recognized as 
one of the flourishing financial concerns of the county. 



168 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

In 1887 Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Luna Crabb, 
a daughter of X'incent and Hester (Wells) Crabb. who came to Story 
county from Indiana about 1880. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Thompson 
has been brightened by the birth of two children: Forest G., now the wife 
of Hugh Graef, of Riceville, Iowa; and John B., now attending the Col- 
lins high school. 

Mr. Thompson gives his support to the democratic party, and although 
his attention has been mainly devoted to his business alTairs, he has served 
most acceptably for two terms as mayor of Collins and also for a number 
of years as town treasurer. He is connected with Fervent Lodge. Xo. 513, 
A. F. & A. M.; Amity Lodge, No. 361, I. O. O. F. ; and Crescent Camp, 
No. 2358, M. W. A. He and his estimable wife are also members of Col- 
lins Chapter, No. 134, O. E. S. 

Owing to habits of industry and able business judgment. Mr. Thomp- 
son has been successful financially and has acquired a comfortable com- 
petence. Possessing natural ability and discernment, and having had ex- 
tensive practical experience with men and affairs, he is well qualified for 
the position of responsibility which he occupies and has attained a well 
established position as one of the thoroughly capable and progressive men 
of Iowa. 



ANNA C. RINGGENBERG. 

Anna C. Ringgenberg is a native of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and a 
daughter of Gerhardt and Minnie (Carstans) Bierhaus, both natives of 
Germany, who came to the United States with their parents when they 
were children. The father was a contractor by trade and followed that 
business during the greater part of his life. During his last years, how- 
ever, he lived retired on a farm. He was a member of the Reformed 
church, being identified with that denomination up to the time of his de- 
mise in 1897. Mrs. Bierhaus is still living and makes her home in Camp- 
bell county, Nebraska. Ten children were born to them, eight of whom 
survived, Mrs. Ringgenberg being the oldest of those living. Mr. Bier- 
haus was an estimable citizen, his high standards of life and loyalty to the 
principles of his adopted country making him a credit to any community 
where he lived. 

In 1883 Miss Anna C. Bierhaus gave her hand in marriage to Henry 
.■\dnlph Ringgenberg, a native of Switzerland and a son of Peter and Anna 
KingiL;cnbcrg. By this union there were born three children, as follows: 
l-'ranklin, who died at the age of five years; and Calvin and Carl, at home. 
Mr. Ringgenberg was a native of the Buckeye state, born in Holmes county, 
where he lived until he had reached the age of nine years, at which time 
he migrated with his parents to Polk county, Iowa. He resided in the latter 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 169 

place until 1900, when he removed to Jamaica, Iowa, but after residing 
there for three years he decided to become a resident of Story county and 
so located in Ames in 1903, where he continued to live up to the time of 
his death in 1909, at the age of fifty-one years. He left a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Boone county and one hundred and fifty-five 
acres in Story county. 

Mr. Ringgenberg united with the Methodist Episcopal church nine years 
before his death and continued to hold membership in that denomination 
at the time of his demise. He was an ever ready and stanch defender of 
the principles of temperance and therefore always cast his vote for the 
candidates of the prohibition party, feeling that its policy is best adapted to 
improve and strengthen the moral status of the nation. He was a man 
of sound principles, high standards of citizenship and incorruptible integ- 
rity and upon these he founded his life as well as his business. He was 
born and reared on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until his re- 
tirement from active labor nine years before his death. He was a suc- 
cessful man and left his family a competence which assures Mrs. Ringgen- 
berg of always having sufficient to provide her with all of the necessities 
and some of the luxuries of life. 



WINFIELD SCOTT SMITH. 

The Buckeye state has contributed many stahvart sons who have assisted 
in the upbuilding of Iowa and among them may be named Winfield S. 
Smith, well known in Story county as one of its most energetic and pro- 
gressive citizens. He was born at Mount Vernon, Knox county, Ohio, 
October 26, 1850, a son of Aaron and Sarah (Paddock) Smith. The 
father was born in Franklin county, Ohio, and came of Dutch ancestry, 
the early members of the family in America arriving during the colonial 
period. The great-grandfather on the paternal side served in the Revolu- 
tionary war from New Jersey. The Smiths came to Ohio about 1810 and 
entered land in Franklin county, having the opportunity at that time, had 
they so desired, to take up the tract now occupied by the capitol building. 
Aaron Smith began his business career as a farmer but later learned the 
iron molder's trade and subsequently maintained a foundry at ditiferent 
times at Mount Vernon, Westerville and Marion, Ohio, also manufacturing 
plows, corn shellers and iron for railroad uses at the last named place. 
While at Westerville he enlisted in the Civil war in the spring of 1864 as 
a member of Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, serving until the close of the conflict. He was one of a family 
of eight brothers, all of whom were valiant soldiers for the cause of the 
Union. Two of the brothers were wounded in battle and one of them 
was taken prisoner at the battle of Shiloh. Seven of the brothers returned 



170 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

home, one having given up his hfe on the field of battle. In the fall of 
1868 Aaron Smith came to Story county, Iowa, and purchased one him- 
dred and sixty acres in Milford township, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. He died in 1885 at the age of sixty-seven years, having been 
born on the 8th of March, 1818. While in Ohio he was an active member 
of the United Brethren church. He was identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and also with the Grand Army of the 
Republic. Originally he was an old line whig but after the organization 
of the republican party he gave to it his earnest support. The mother of 
our subject was born in Xew Jersey on the 13th of September, 1823, and 
traced her ancestry to Holland. Her grandfather Paddock served in a 
New Jersey regiment at the time of the Revolutionary war. He and his 
brother were taken prisoners by the British but they made their escape 
after a short confinement and reached the Continental army in safety. 
Mrs. Smith was a woman of many excellent qualities and a consistent 
member of the United Brethren church. She was the mother of five chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom died in infancy. The other members of the 
family were: Levi H., now living at Central Point, Oregon; Winfiekl 
Scott, our subject : Eugene, a successful fruit and vegetable grower of 
Franklin township, Story county ; and Daniel P., now engaged in fruit 
growing in the Hood river district of Oregon. 

Winfield S. Smith removed with his parents to Lee county, Illinois, 
and in 1868 to Story county, Iowa. As he grew up he assisted his father 
upon the home farm and attended the district school in winter. In the 
spring of 1876 he went to Kansas and preempted a timber claim upon which 
he located, expecting to make it his ]iernianeni home. The first two seasons 
were prosperous, but during the next two years a drought prevailed over 
that portion of the state and in 1880 .Mr. Smith returned to Milford town- 
ship. Story countv. fully convinced that conditions were much more favor- 
able here than in certain parts nf the Sunflower state. He purchased 
land, which he cultivated diligently and with very satisfactory results until 
1890, when he took up his residence in Nevada. He has since devoted his 
attention largely to the general oversight of his farm and to the real-estate 
and insurance business. 

On March 3, 1878, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
H. Iluckel, who was born in Black Hawk county, Iowa, June 23, i860, 
and is a daughter of Joseph and Lizzie (Roberts) Huckel. The parents 
came to Iowa from Pennsylvania about 1850 and located in Black Hawk 
county. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith five children have been born: .\aron 
L., now a railroad engineer of Sioux City, Iowa ; Harry W., who is con- 
nected with the railroad business at Kansas City, Missouri ; Lulu L., wlio 
married John Shirk, an expert creamery man, of San Luis Obispo, Cali- 
fornia, and is the mother of two children : Edna R., a teacher in the 
public schools of Nevada ; and Laura \'., now acting as bookkeeper in the 
lournal office at Nevada. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 171 

Mr. Smith is not a member of any religious denomination but his wife 
and daughters are connected with the Lutheran church. He is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a supporter of the 
republican party. He served for a number of years as a member of the 
city council and in 1906 was elected justice of the peace and is now enter- 
ing upon his third term in that office. In the discharge of his various 
duties, both public and private, he has displayed a fairness and ability that 
have met the approval of the entire community and today no man stands 
higher in the respect of the people of Nevada than the gentleman whose 
name introduces this review. 



J. A. CAMPBELL. 



In the enterprising city of Ames J. A. Campbell occupies a leading 
position in business circles, being proprietor of a coal and feed yard. What- 
ever success he has achieved in life is attributable entirely to his own 
efforts and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. He 
was born in Milford township, July 25, 1858, a son of James and Anna 
(Eccles) Campbell, both of whom were natives of northern Ireland. The 
father, who was born February 23, 1808, came alone to America when 
eighteen years of age, landing at New York, where he resided until his 
removal to the middle west in August, 1855, at which time he took up his 
abode in Milford township, Story county, Iowa. This was then largely an 
unimproved and unsettled district and he entered eighty acres from the 
government on the southeast quarter of section 27. There he spent his 
remaining days, having the usual experiences of frontier life and meeting 
with the usual difficulties in transforming wild prairie into productive fields. 
The journey westward had been made by railroad to Iowa City, which was 
then the terminus of the line, and from that point by team. He continued 
a worthy and valued resident of the county until his death, which occurred 
February 3, 1881. His wife, who was born in northern Ireland, June 13, 
1825. sailed for New York with her brother and was married in that city. 
She died at the home of her daughter in Marshalltown, Iowa, at the age 
of seventy-three years. The father had been previously married. After 
first coming to the L^nited States he returned to his native land, was there 
married and brought his bride to the new world, but her death occurred 
in New York city, where he afterward wedded Anna Eccles. There were 
two children by his first marriage : Robert J., of Hollenberg, Kansas ; 
and Mrs. Alartha Cressler, living at Berkeley, California. The children 
of the second marriage are : William J., who died near Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana; Bell, who is the wife of W. W. Gossard and resides at Colorado 
Springs, Colorado ; Charles E., who is living upon the old home place which 
his father entered from the government: and Sadie, the wife of M. W. 
Gossard, of Marshalltow^n, Iowa. 



172 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

The other child of the father's second marriage is J. A. Campbell of 
this review, who resided upon the old home place with his parents until 
he had attained his majority, pursuing his education in the common schools. 
At eighteen years of age he began teaching in the district schools and 
followed that profession for three years. He began farming on his own 
account in Milford township, where he resided until about fourteen years 
ago, when he came to Ames. Here he turned his attention to the real- 
estate business, which he followed until the spring of 1910, when he sold 
out and formed a partnership with C. R. Holdredge under the firm style 
of Holdredge & Campbell for the conduct of a coal and feed business. 
This partnership continued until January, 191 1, since which time Mr. 
Campbell has conducted the business alone. In this he has met with suc- 
cess and he now has an extenisve patronage, which he well merits because 
his business methods are at all times honorable and reliable. 

On the 9th of September, 1880, Mr. Campbell was united in marriage 
to Miss Ada Hall, who was born in Lafayette township, Story county, 
February 16, 1856, and is a daughter of Alba O. and Mary (Spaulding) 
Hall, the father a native of Maine and the mother of \'ermont. They 
became pioneer residents of Story county and spent their remaining days 
within its borders, both passing away in Ames. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Camp- 
bell have been born four children : Fae ; Claud V., who is editor and 
publisher of the Jewell Record of Jewell, Iowa; Mabel V., who is head of 
the domestic science department of the Illinois Wesleyan University; and 
Floy B., who is in the First National Bank at Canon City, Colorado, and 
was formerly assistant cashier of the Ames Savings Bank. The youngest 
child is a graduate of the high school of Ames and Claud and Mabel are 
graduates of the Iowa State College. Mr. Campbell owns a good resi- 
dence at Xo. 916 Dayton avenue. 

He holds membership with the Masonic fraternity anil the Independeiu 
Order of Odd Fellows and also belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His life has been an active, busy and useful one and he has made a credit- 
able record, which has gained for him the respect, confidence and good 
will of his fellowmen. 



NOBLE PORTF.R HAL!.. 

Noble Porter Hall, one of the well known retired farmers of Story 
couiUy, was born in Ross county, Ohio, on the 25th of Dcccml)er, 1831. 
He is the son of Thomas and Eliza (, Rosenbarger ) Mall, both natives of 
Virginia, who removed to Ross county as children with their respective 
parents and there they were reared and married. In 1S36 they located in 
Kosciusko county. Indiana, remaining there until the fall of 1854, when 
they again started westward, this time locating in Story county, Iowa. The 




Nilltl.K !■ IIAl.l, 




MRS. XORLK I'. HAI.I. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 177 

journey across the prairies to Iowa was made in company with the family 
of Jacob Greider. Four wagons with two teams of liorses and two yoke of 
oxen were required to transport the various members of the party and their 
household effects. The journey was made in comparative ease and with- 
out incident of any moment until they had reached Iowa City but very 
shortly thereafter cholera broke ctut among the party and one of their 
members died and was laid to rest nine miles this side of Marengo. Thev 
continued their journey, however, until within two miles of Grinnell, when 
they were compelled to go into camp for about three weeks and when they 
resumed their march they left behind tliem in the little cemeterv Amos 
Hall, brother of our subject, and Mary Greider. During this time the care 
of the horses and stock devolved upon ]Mr. Hall and Thomas Edgars, a boy 
of the party, and they were indeed busy as well as sad days. Arriving in 
Story county they located in Indian Creek township, one mile northeast of 
Maxwell, where Thomas Hall bought two hundred acres of unimproved 
land, which he immediately began to cultivate. Here on the 22d of Feb- 
ruary. 1879, he passed away at the age of sixty-nine years, having been 
born on the 29th of May, 1810. Mrs. Hall survived him for four years 
and on the 27th day of January, 1883, she died, having passed the seventy- 
second milestone in the cycle of life, being born on the nth of January, 
181 1. They were the parents of eight children, six of whom survive, four 
of them being over seventy years of age. The surviving children are as 
follows : iMary Jane, the widow of Augustus Berlin, of Ottawa, Kansas ; 
John R., of Maxwell, Iowa; James H., of Maxwell; William C, of Golden 
Prairie, Wyoming; Thomas, of Bagley, Iowa; and our subject. 

Mr. Hall was reared at home and living in the country in pioneer days 
his educational advantages were very limited ; his schooling being confined 
to the brief sessions of the district school, which were held in a log build- 
ing with puncheon floor and slab benches. 

He left the parental roof at the age of nineteen years in order to estab- 
lish a home for himself, having been united in marriage on the 29th of No- 
vember, 1855, to Aliss Margaret Felkner, of Kosciusko county, Indiana. 
For fifteen years he farmed as a renter but in 1862 he removed to Indiana, 
locating on the farm of his uncle in Kosciusko county, where he remained 
until the fall of 1868. He then returned to Story county and purchased 
eighty acres of land on section 23, Indian Creek township, on which he 
located in 1871. Later he added to his holdings, forty acres at one time 
and ten at another, until his farm contained one hundred and thirty acres. 
The land was unimproved when he bought it but in 1871 he erected a house 
on it and added other improvements until at the time of his retirement, 
twenty years later, it was one of the best farms in that section. In 1891 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall removed to Maxwell, where they still reside, and the 
following year they sold the farm to their son-in-law, Charles Porter. 

Five children were born to them. Nancy E. is the wife of Charles Por- 
ter, of Indian Creek township, Rosetta is the wife of Samuel Miller, of 



178 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Maxwell. Amy C. is the wife of II. J. Garlock. a banker of Maxwell. Mrs. 
Garlock is a graduate of the Maxwell high school and also took a normal 
course at Nevada, Iowa. Lulu is the wife of Charles Woods, of Waterloo, 
low-a. who was educated at a young ladies seminary at Lebanon, Tennessee. 
Mildred, the wife of George H. Hay, a farmer in Polk county, Iowa, was 
educated at the Cumberland Presbyterian College at Lincoln, Illinois. All 
of their daughters were teachers in the public school prior to their mar- 
riage Both Mr. and Mrs. Hall are members of the Presbyterian church. 
Mr. Hall is a veteran of the Civil war. having enlisted on the 17th of 
February, 1865, in Company B, One Hundred and I'ifty-second Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. He was assigned to both garrison and detached duty 
during his service, which was terminated by discharge granted on the 
30th of August. 1865. He holds membership in the James Ewing Post, 
G. A. R. He votes the democratic ticket, feeling that the basic principle^ 
of that party are best adapted to subserve the interests of the majority. 
He is one of he highly esteemed and respected men of this district, where 
more than forty years residence has proven him well worthv of such 
regard. 



ELIAS W. SHEARER. 



The Civil war was a great school out of which came many of the 
noblest characters the republic has know-n. Thousands of young men 
gained their first lessons in the realities of life in the tremendous conflict 
and lived to put into practical aijplicatioii the principles of courage, self- 
denial and persistence learned while faithfully serving in the army. Of 
this number is Elias W. Shearer, now postmaster of Collins. 

He was born in Marion county, Indiana, January 3, 1844, a son of 
Michael and Catherine (McCord) Shearer, the former of whom was a 
native of Maryland and the latter probably of Ohio. The father was first 
married in Pennsylvania and subsequently removed to Indiana, where his 
wife died. He subsequently married Miss Catherine McCord. In 1847 
he removed to Wapello county. Iowa, locating near Ottumwa, where he 
entered government land, which he was industriously developing when he 
met his death in an accident while trying to corral a cow. The animal 
jumped on a pole which was resting on one of his shoulders and he was 
crushed under the weight, leaving a widow with six children, all of whom 
were sons. Mrs. Shearer bravely assumed the responsibility and reared 
the sons to manhood. Later she married Andrew Shearer, a brother of 
her first husband. This faithful wife and mother passed away in Iiinc. 
1876. 

Elias W. Shearer was reared as a boy upon the home farm and at the 
early age of fourteen years began to work for wages among the farmers ni 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 179 

the neighborhood. On the lOth of March, 1862, being then eighteen years 
of age, he enlisted in Company E, Seventeenth Iowa Infantry, and was 
soon sent to the front, participating in many of the great battles and cam- 
paigns of the war. He was present at the battles of luka and Corinth, the 
siege of Vicksburg and the battles in the neighborhood of that city, being 
sent after the surrender of Vicksburg to east Tennessee, where he par- 
ticipated in the battle of Missionary Ridge. The regiment was then or- 
dered to assist in the relief of Knoxville and later took part in the Atlanta 
campaign. Mr. Shearer was never in camp from March i, 1863, until 
January i, 1864, being almost constantly upon the move. At eleven o'clock 
at night in October, 1864, the regiment was sent to guard a bridge at Til- 
ton, Hood's army being then in motion in that immediate vicinity. About 
daybreak the pickets began firing and part of the regiment was thrown 
forward to guard the picket post, the subject of this review being one of 
the number. By nine o'clock they were completely surrounded but con- 
tinued to fight until their ammunition was exhausted and at four o'clock 
in the afternoon surrendered to General Stewart, commanding one of the 
corps of Hood's army. After being deprived of their arms the men were 
marched to Cahaba, Alabama, and after a short stop were sent to An- 
dersonville prison, in which the subject of this review was incarcerated for 
six and one-half months. On the day of his capture he had nothing to 
eat and for three days afterward the only rations received by the men of 
the regiment was one ear of raw corn. In Andersonville he underwent 
great suffering but he survived the awful ordeal and after the surrender of 
General Lee was paroled April 28, 1865, at Lake City, Florida. He and 
his companions marched to Jacksonville, that state, and from that place 
returned home, being discharged at Davenport, June i, 1865. 

Mr. Shearer spent the remainder of the summer recuperating with his 
mother in Wapello county. As his education had been interfered with 
by the war, he attended school for three winters, working at various occu- 
pations during the summer months, and in 1868 came to Story county, 
locating soon afterward upon eighty acres in Collins township for which 
he had traded. Subsequently he purchased forty acres adjoining, upon 
which there was a farm residence, and here he lived until his removal to 
Collins in 1906. He became the owner of three hundred and sixty acres, 
forty acres of which he sold. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres 
in Kossuth county, Iowa. Since October 15, 1908, he has filled the office 
of postmaster at Collins. 

In 1869 Mr. Shearer was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Shenkle, of 
Collins township, a daughter of Benjamin Shenkle, who located in that 
township in 1854 and was one of its most valued citizens. The following 
children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Shearer, namely: Anna Alice, 
now deceased, who married E. B. Weese and became the mother of one 
child, Florence, who was reared by Mr. and Mrs. Shearer and is now as- 
sistant postmaster of Collins; Jennie, the wife of Elmer Bence. of Collins 



150 IIISTURY Oi- STORY COUNTY 

township; Charles P., of Cumberland, Iowa; George N., of Tama, this 
stale; John L., of Kanawha. Iowa; and Edith May, now the wife of Brad- 
ford Stevens, who is in charge of the old homestead of Mr. and Mrs. 
Shearer. 

Mr. Shearer has ever since arriving at voting age given his support to 
the republican party and has served in a number of township offices, in- 
cluding those of trustee, assessor and township clerk. He has discharged 
the duties of postmaster in a way that meets with the general approval of 
the people. Being of a genial disposition, his friends may truly be said 
to include every man, woman and child of the community. He is a mem- 
ber of James Ewing Post, G. A. R., of Ma.xwell, and he and his wife are 
supporters of the United Brethren church, by their example demonstrating 
the sincerity of their faith as followers of tlie great Master. 



WILLIA.M MARION GAMBLE. 

The Gamble homestead is one of the best known places in Story county. 
It originally comprised a large portion of section 28, Indian Creek town- 
ship, but it has recently been divided into two farms. It was here on the 
25th of February, 1875, that William Marion Gamble, the son of John D. 
and Elizabeth (Mullen) Gamble, was born. The father was from Ten- 
nessee, in which state he was born on the 7th of May, 1830, but when he 
was seven years of age his parents removed to Indiana, and it was there 
he met and married Elizabeth Mullen, who was born in Indiana on the 
8th of June, 1835. They migrated to Iowa in 1856, locating in Story 
county, where they procured, direct from the government, a portion of 
the present home farm. Mr. Gamble was the type of man who makes 
perseverance spell success. By his own energy, unflinching purpose and 
firm determination he became one of the men of affluence in this section 
of the state. He broke the prairie, cleared away the forest and brought to 
a high state of cultivation every acre of his farm. His was. no easy task, 
for farming implements of those days were crude indeed compared to 
those of the present ; then, too, much of the work performed by machines 
now at that time was done by hand and days were consumed in the per- 
formance of a task which now requires hours. Nevertheless, he steadily 
persevered until he had actjuired six hundred acres of as good farming 
land as can be procured in the state. Mr. Gamble never retired but con- 
tinued to cultivate his farm up to the time of his deatJi on the 27th of 
June, 1893. 

His political allegiance was given to the democratic party and his party 
fealty rewarded by his fellow citizens bestowing upon him various town- 
ship offices, in each and all of which he most faithfully discharged his 
duties to the universal satisfaction of the communitv. Mrs. Gamble sur- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 181 

vived her husband for thirteen years and on the 6th of January, 1906, she, 
too, passed away. Both were members of the Presbyterian church. 

The boyhood and youth of WiUiam Marion Gamble was very similar 
to that of the average young man reared on the farm. His education was 
obtained in the common schools. The task of the schoolroom and the work 
of the farm were relieved by the healthy sports and diversions enjoyed by 
young people. He wa.s only eighteen years of age when his father died 
and thus the duties and responsibilities of manhood early devolved upon 
him, as he and his brother, Charles S. Gamble, operated the farm together. 
This cooperative plan of work was followed for nine years, then in June, 
1902, Charles was married and the November following the brothers de- 
cided to divide the farm and work independently. William remained upon 
the home place and Charles removed to the farm where he now resides, 
which was a portion of the homestead. Our subject's farm contains two 
hundred and fifty acres of well tilled land, improved by modern buildings, 
which are at all times kept in excellent repair. 

On the 19th of November, 1902, Mr. Gamble was united in marriage 
to Rosa Ray, a daughter of John and Mary (McCord) Ray, of Maxwell. 
They are both members of the Presbyterian church. Ever since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of suffrage Mr. Gamble has cast his ballot for 
the democratic candidates, and although he has never sought political favor 
he nevertheless takes a keen interest in all political issues. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Yeomen of America. He is one of the well known 
and highly esteemed young men of Indian Creek township, and both he 
and his wife are very popular in both church and social circles in the com- 
munity where they live. 



HERMAN KNAPP. 



Herman Knapp, treasurer and registrar of the Iowa State College at 
Ames, was born at Poultney, Rutland county, Vermont, December 28, 
1863. He is the son of the late Dr. Seaman A. Knapp and Maria Hotch- 
kiss Knapp, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The 
Knapps trace to the family of Josiah Knapp, who came as a colonist to 
Massachusetts in 1644. 

The subject of this sketch came with his parents to Vinton, Iowa, in 
1866, where his father lived for a time on a farm and later served as 
principal of the Iowa College for the Blind. In 1879 his father having been 
elected to the professorship of agriculture in the Iowa State College, he 
entered upon his college course, graduating with honors in 1883. He be- 
came at once deputy treasurer of the college and the following year was 
elected assistant professor of agriculture. He had full charge of the de- 
partment during 1886. In 1887, upon the death of General James L. 



182 HISTORY Ol" STORY COUNTY 

Geddes, he became treasurer and registrar of the college, which position 
he now occupies. 

The mere enumeration of the duties which have fallen upon his shoulders 
during these years shows how intimately he has been identified with the 
college in its every interest. Outside of college circles he is recognized 
as a leading citizen, having been honored by many positions of trust in 
city affairs, at present as a member of the library board. He is adjutant 
general of the First Brigade of the Iowa National Guard with the rank of 
major. He has also been honored with the state presidency of the Iowa 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

In 1885 Professor Knapp was married to Miss .Mary W. McDonald, 
of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, who was also a graduate of the State College 
in the class of 1883. They have a beautiful home upon the campus of the 
college and have a happy family of four children, namely : Seaman A., of 
the class of 1909, now connected with the Valley National Bank of Des 
Moines, Iowa; Marian Hermine, Jeanette Margaret and Byron McDonald, 
the last three being students of the college or the Ames schools. 

The "Bomb" of 1907 was dedicated to Professor Knapp in the follow- 
ing appropriate w-ords: "To Herman Knapp, a common, big-hearted, lov- 
able man. who disregarding fame and fortune, and ])lace and power, has 
given the richest years of his unselfish life in loving labor to the upbuilding 
and advancing of our alma mater, we as a token of our esteem and admira- 
tion dedicate this volume." The Class of 1907. 



JOSEPH C. SAWTELL. 

-Mthough seventy-four years of age Joseph C. Sawtcll. a well known 
and prosperous farmer of New Albany township, still continues to take an 
active interest in Im^iness affairs. He has been a resilient of the ti'vwnship 
for more than forty years and is honored as one of its most valued citizens. 
Born in Lapeer county, Michigan, A])ril 14. 1837. he is the son of Levi 
and Mary Ann (Canfield) Sawtell, the former born near the Kennebec 
river in Maine, January 21, 1810, and the latter in the same state in 1815. 
The mother was of German descent and removed to Michigan in 1836. 
The father, who was a carpenter and builder by trade, removed from 
Michigan to La Ilarjie, a small town near Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1844. The 
troubles with the Mormons soon created intense excitement throughout 
that part of the state. Joseph Smith, the Mormon leader, was killed June 
27, 1844, while attempting to escape from jail, and soon afterward on ac- 
count of the disturbed condition of the community Mr. Sawtell returned 
to Lapeer county, Michigan, where he resumed work at his trade. He 
passed away in 1887. He was twice married, his second \sife being 
Airianda M. Tripp, a daughter of S. Tripp, of Lapeer county. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 183 

Joseph C. Sawtell received his education in the common schools of 
Michigan and continued with his father until 1857. At twenty years of 
age he left his native state, removing to Warren county, Illinois, where 
he worked upon a farm and became thoroughly acquainted with the busi- 
ness to which he has devoted many years of his life. In 1862, in response 
to the call of his country for soldiers, he enlisted for three years in Com- 
pany F, Eighty-third Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, the regiment being as- 
signed to the Army of the Cumberland. He served under General Thomas, 
participating on the 3d of February, 1863, in the second battle of Fort 
Donelson, and later he did scout duty. He was a good soldier and was 
many times exposed to great danger but came through the conflict un- 
scathed. He received his honorable discharge in the fall of 1865, after 
serving for three years and two months. Upon being mustered out he 
returned to Warren county, Illinois, where he continued for three years, 
and then removed to New Albany township. Story county, Iowa, where 
he permanently located. As the years passed he became one of the suc- 
cessful farmers of the locality, acquiring a valuable place, upon which he 
is now living retired, devoting his attention to the Story County Farmers 
Insurance Company, of which he was one of the organizers. He is also 
agent for several other companies. 

On the I2th of April, 1866, in Warren county, Illinois, Mr. Sawtell 
was united in marriage to Mrs. Louisa (McMillian) Edgington, a daughter 
of John and Harriett (Glaze) McMillian. Four children came to bless this 
union. Florence V., who was born July 12, 1867, was educated in the 
common schools and at the Chautauqua School of Nursing at Jamestown, 
New York, being a graduate of the latter institution. She is now keepijig 
house for her father. William A., born September 20, 1869, was married 
June 3, 1897, to Catherine Gallantine, of Milburn, Iowa, and is now en- 
gaged in the real-estate business at that place, being also postmaster of the 
town. Charles H., born November 11, 1872, was married November 11, 
1893, on the birthday of himself and wife, to Miss Mary Morgan, of 
Colo, a daughter of William and Mary (Fox) Morgan. He is now in 
charge of the family homestead. Joseph A., born April 11, 1875, married 
Hazel Ritter, of Denver, Colorado, and is now a successful commission 
man of Denver. The mother of these children was called from earthly 
scenes April 12, 1875, her death being the greatest sorrow Mr. Sawtell has 
ever known. 

Mr. Sawtell supports the republican party but he is liberal in his political 
views, often voting for a candidate at local elections irrespective of party 
affiliations. He has not sought the emoluments of office but has served 
with recognized ability as justice of the peace of his township and also as 
a member of the school board. He is a valued member of the United 
Brethren church of Dalton Corners and is also identified with Lodge No. 
238, G. A. R., of Colo. As an old soldier Mr. Sawtell deserves the grati- 
tude of a generation now enjoying the fruits of a war which cost a vast 



184 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

outlay of money and human life. In the great Rebellion he learned the 
lessons of self-denial and perseverance which he has applied in every day 
affairs, attracting many friends who recognized in him those attributes 
which make the true gentleman and loyal citizen. 



IRWI.X CLAYTON \VlilTXl£Y. 

Irwin Clayton Whitney had been a resident of Stor)- county but two years 
at the time of his demise but the period was sufficiently long for him to 
prove himself to be a man of high principles and sterling worth. He was 
a native of the Buckeye state, having been born in Lorain county on the 
17th of June, 1865. his parents being Eli M. and Mary E. (Hale) Whitney. 
He was but five years of age when his people migrated to Iowa, settling in 
Jasper county, where they lived for a time, and then went to Humboldt 
county and after remaining there for a short time they returned to Jasper 
county and settled on a farm near Mingo. The latter place continued to be 
their home until 18S9. when they removed to Saybrook, Illinois, where Mr. 
Whitney passed away on the 20th of May, 1891, and very soon thereafter 
the widow with her family located in Maxwell, this county. On the 13th 
of February. 1894. Mrs. Whitney was married to R. R. Thompson, whose 
death occurred on the 24th of the following June. When a girl of fourteen 
years Mrs. Thompson was converted and united with the Baptist church, 
but as there was no church of that denomination in Maxwell she joined the 
Methodist Episcopal church. She was always an ardent Christian anil an 
active worker in the churcli. Her death occurred on the 14th oi December, 
1909. 

Irwin Clayton Whitney's boyhood and youth were not unlike that of 
most boys who live in the country. He remained at home imtil he had 
acquired such education as the common schools afTordcd. but being an am- 
bitious youth, he laid away his text-books and early began his business ca- 
reer. He was married on the 30th of June, 1885, shortly after the twen- 
tieth anniversary of his birth, to Miss Mary Dickey, a daughter of Solomon 
and Rebecca (Barker) Dickey. Her father was a native of .\thens county. 
Ohio, born on the 30th of March, 1828. He c.imc to Iowa in 1834, locating 
in Jasper county, and there he was married on the 12th of Sc]neml)cr of 
the same year to Rebecca Jane Barker. He acquired some land, ever}' acre 
of which was unbroken prairie, and upon this the young people began their 
life together, but unremitting toil and careful cultivation in time trans- 
formed it into a valuable farm, which remained their home until 1897, when 
they removed to Mingo. Mr. Dickey passed away in 1905. He had been 
a life-long member of the Methodist Episcopal church and always led an 
upright, consistent Christian life, his high principle^ and incorruptible in- 
tegrity gaining him the resjiect and esteem of all with whom he came in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 187 

contact. For many years of her life Mrs. Dickey was practically an in- 
valid, owing to injuries which she received in the X'aleria cyclone and from 
which she never recovered. Although she suffered greatly at times she never 
complained, being sustained at all times by her strong faith in the ever- 
lasting arms. She passed away on the 26th of May, 1902, at the age of 
sixty-two years, having been born in La Grange county, Indiana, on the 
25th of December, 1839. 

After his marriage Mr. Whitney located on a farm which he rented near 
Mingo and after living there for a year he removed to another farm in 
Jasper county, where he also remained but one year and then rented a farm 
near the one where he had first lived. He remained on the latter place about 
eighteen months and then went to Saybrook, Illinois, and after living there 
about the same length of time he bought one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Hardin county, Iowa, where he continued to live for eight years. 
In 1899 he sold his farm and bought eighty acres in Story county, upon 
which he was living at the time of his death and where his widow continues 
to reside. 

Air. and Airs. Whitney were the parents of si.x children, who are as 
follows : Berton Leroy, a farmer of Carroll township, this county ; Carl 
Jason, at home ; Jennie Alay, the wife of Roy Bell of Indian Creek town- 
ship, this county; Ethel Pearl, the wife of Glen Bell, of Jasper county; and 
Clarence Irwin and Elsie Mary, both at home. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mrs. Whit- 
ney holds membership. Mr. Whitney was a stanch supporter of the repub- 
lican party, feeling its principles were best adapted to protect the rights of 
the majority. He never was an office seeker nor did he at any time aspire 
to political honors, preferring to devote his energies to the development of 
his private interests. He was ever a most loyal and devoted husband, gen- 
erous and affectionate father and charitable neighbor, the loss of whom was 
most keenly felt not only in the family circle but in the community where 
he had lived. 



CLARENCE E. MARKLAND. 

Clarence E. Markland, one of the most extensive stock-shippers of 
this section of Iowa, the owner of valuable farm property in Story county 
and the director of the First National Bank of Nevada, was born in Mc- 
Lean county, Illinois, October 20, 1869. His parents, Daniel F. and Hannah 
(Miller) Markland, were natives of Ohio, born near Hamilton. They were 
reared and married in the Buckeye state and soon afterward removed west- 
ward to Illinois, being now located in Pontiac, Illinois. In their family were 
seven children of whom Clarence was the third in order of birth. The 
record is as follows: Laura, now the wife of W. E. New, of Richland 



188 HISTORY OF STORY COL'XTY 

township: John, who died in infancy; Clarence E. ; Effie May, who died 
at the age of eighteen years; Muzetta, the wife of Maurice Pearl, of Okla- 
homa; Liician. of Illinois; and Walter, of North Dakota. 

C. E. Markland spent the period of his minority in his native state, and 
during much of the time was upon his father's farm working in the fields 
through the summer months and acquiring his education in the country 
schools in the winter season. He came alone to Nevada in February. 1802. 
when in his twenty-third year, and here established a grocery store which 
he conducted for about a year and then sold out. On the expiration of 
that period he rented land and for eight years engaged in the cultivation of 
the soil, during which time he bought and sold a number of tracts of land, 
realizing a good profit on most of them. Thus he gradually worked his way 
upward financially and in 1901 removed to Nevada, where for four years 
he engaged in real estate business, handling much valuable property and 
negotiating many important realty transfers. On the expiration of that 
period he turned his attention to the live stock business in which he has 
since engaged. He buys, feeds and ships stock to Chicago and is the most 
extensive shipjjer in Nevada, making his shipments not only from there 
but also from other points. He sends about two hundred carloads of 
horses, cattle and hogs annually to the state markets. Being an excellent 
judge of stock he shows wisdom in his purchases and in his sales which 
result jirofitably. Moreover, he has made judicious investments in real 
estate and is the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of valuable land 
in this county, being divided in three different tracts and located in Grant 
and Richland. He is likewise interested in Dakota lands and owns town 
properly in Nevada and in Ames and a business block in McCallsburg. 
He is a stockholder of the Story County Mutual Telephone Company and 
is a director of the I'irst National Bank. He is notably prompt, energetic 
and reliable and in the conduct of his business affairs allows no obstacle 
or difficulty to brook his path if it can be overcome by earnest and honorable 
effort. 

In March, 1893, Mr. Markland was married to Miss Hattie M. Daw- 
son, who was born in McLean county. Illinois. February 16, 1870, and 
in 1890 came to Story county with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Dawson. Her mother is now deceased and her father resides with his 
daughter. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Markland have been born two children, 
Hazel and Irene. In 1909 Mr. Markland purchased his present home, a 
fine brick residence wdiich is richly and tastefully furnished. 

In politics he is a republican who takes only a citizen's interest in 
political affairs, never seeking nor desiring office for himself. He belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and his wife holds membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal church. They are well known socially and their 
home is most attractive by reason of its w-arm-hearted and cordial hospi- 
tality. Mr. Markland came to Story county empty-handed, nor had he 
enjoyed any special advantages in his youth. In the intervening years he 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 189 

has made continuous progress in business lines and is now one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of the community. W^ith a genius for devising and execut- 
ing the right thing at the right time, joined to everyday common sense, he 
has worked his way upward, utilizing all the advantages that have come to 
him and proving at the same time that success and an honored name may 
be won simultaneously. 



JOHN TWEDT. 



John Twedt is now living retired in Roland, where he erected his pres- 
ent residence in 1910. He is still connected with the agricultural interests 
of the county, however, as the owner of two valuable farms in Howard 
township, each comprising one hundred and sixty acres. Both are well 
improved and from the property he derives a substantial income. He has 
lived in Storey county continuously for about forty-five years, having ar- 
rived here in 1866. He was at that time a young man of tweniy-one years, 
his birth having occurred at the old family homestead of Twedt, on the 
west coast of Norway, March 10, 1845. His parents were John J. and 
Carrie (Oldsdatter) Twedt. The mother died in Norway when the son 
was twenty years of age and the father afterward came to America with 
the subject of this review, spending his last days in Story county. He was 
eighty-si.x years of age when he passed away at the home of his son Ole A. 
Twedt, who at that time was a resident of Warren township. The family 
numbered five sons and two daughters who came to the United States, of 
whom three sons and one daughter, Mrs. A. Helvig are still living. 

John Twedt made his home at the place of his nativity until he sailed 
for the new world. As a boy he worked on a farm with his father and 
later spent four years as a sailor. In 1866 he made the voyage across the 
Atlantic to the United States and for a brief period lived in Chicago, being 
occupied as a sailor on the lakes, and on the 24th of July of that year ar- 
rived in Story county, where he has since made his home. He had no 
capital at that time and, being dependent upon his own resources for a 
living, he secured work as a farm hand, receiving one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars for a year's labor. He was ambitious, however, to engage in 
farming on his own account, and as soon as possible he rented land on the 
present site of Roland. This was in 1868 and he cultivated the tract for 
five years. In 1873 he purchased a farm in Howard township comprising 
one hundred and sixty acres and resided thereon until 1910, when he re- 
tired from business and erected his present home which is one of the com- 
fortable and attractive dwellings of Roland. In the meantime he had 
added to his landed possessions, having become the owner of three hundred 
and twenty acres of rich and valuable farm property in Howard town- 
ship, divided into two farms, both of which were well improved. Year 



190 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

after year he worked diligently and persistently until his labors had brought 
him a measure of success that enabled him to put aside active business 
cares and live retired in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. 

In 1868 Mr. Twedt was married to Miss Anna X. Erickson, who was 
born in Norway in 1848 and came to the United States with her parents 
when a year and a half old. The family settled first in Illinois but in 1856 
came to Story county where the father took up land from the government 
where the town of Roland now stands. Mrs. Twedt was a daughter of 
Jacob and Ellen (Michaelson) Erickson, both of whom died in Roland. 
Unto our subject and wife have been born eight children: Joseph, who is 
now proprietor of a hardware store in Roland; Jacob, living in Milford 
township ; Albert, who is engaged in clerking for his brother Joseph in Ro- 
land; Ellen, the wife of Thomas Sampson, of Milford township; Carrie, 
the wife of P. J. Peterson, of Milford township; Hannah, the wife of Ed- 
ward Grove, of Howard township; Lizzie, the wife of J. A. Rutherford, of 
California; and Clara, the wife of Elmer Highland, of Howard townshi]). 

Since becoming an American citizen Mr. Twedt has given his political 
support to the republican party which finds in him an earnest and stalwart 
advocate of its principles. He has been called to serve in several local offices 
including that of county supervisor, and reelection continued him upon the 
board for six years. He also served as school director for about ten years 
and (lid much to further the interests of public education. He likewise be- 
longs to the Bergen Lutheran church and in its teachings he finds the prin- 
ciples which have governed his conduct in all of his relations with the pub- 
lic and with his fellowmen. He deserves much credit for what he has ac- 
complished in tiie business world, for when he left the land of the midnight 
sun his only capital was his determination and his indefatigable industry. 
Upon those qualities he has builded his success and never has he taken ad- 
vantage of the necessities of his fellowmen in the conduct of his business 
dealings. 



SAMUEL SWINBANK. 

Among the honored citizens of Story county who have passeil away 
after having bravely performed their duty in life, should be named Samuel 
Swinbank, who was a resident of this county for seventeen years and died 
April 12. 1894, in the height of his u.scfulness, at the age of fifty-one years. 
He was born in Westmoreland. England, October 2, 1843, ^ son of Joseph 
and Jennie (Taylor) ."^winhank. both of whom spent their entire lives in 
England, the father devoting his attention to farming. 

Samuel Swinbank received his education in the common schools of his 
native land and after arriving at a suitable age was apprenticed to the ma- 
chinist's trade, in which he became highly proficient. .At twenty-six years 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 191 

of age, believing that more favorable conditions existed in America than 
were to be found in a thickly settled country of the old world, he emi- 
grated to the United States, going direct to Kane county, Illinois, where he 
purchased a farm of forty acres and began to carve his way to fortune. He 
cultivated the land for eight years and then, seeking still wider opportuni- 
ties, removed to Story county in 1877, acquiring land on section 25, New 
Albany township, upon which he established the family home. He was of 
industrious habits and by his unremitting diligence he transformed his 
farm into one of the valuable properties of the township. 

On the i6th of February, 1869, in Westmoreland, England, Mr. Swin- 
bank was united in marriage to Miss Martha Martindale, a daughter of 
William and Martha (Hastwell) Martindale. She was one of a family of 
fourteen children and was born January 24, 1844, coming to America with 
her husband shortly after their marriage. Five children blessed the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Swinbank, namely : Joseph William, now living on a farm 
in Story county, who was born in Kane county, Illinois, February 12, 1871, 
and married Miss Emma Walters, of Story county ; .'\da O., who was born 
in Kane county, July 26, 1877, and married Charles Graves, of Oregon; 
John S., now living on the family homestead, who was born in Story county, 
September i, 1879, and married Miss Agnes M. Bullock; Jennie T., who 
was born September 5, 1883, and is now living on the old homestead; and 
George M., who was born December 29, i886, and is also living at home. 

Mr. Swinbank was a consistent member of the United Brethren church 
of Dalton's Corners. Politically he gave his support to the republican party, 
being an earnest advocate of its principles. He served most acceptably as 
a member of the school board and also for many years as roadmaster of his 
township. In England he was a member of the Amalgamation of Engin- 
eers. Mrs. Swinbank is now living with several of her children on the 
home farm of one hundred and twenty acres. She is greatly respected by 
her neighbors and friends in the community where she lives, all of whom 
have a good word to say of her. 



BENJAMIN BROTHERS. 

No history of Nevada would be complete without mention of Oscar 
John and George .^lonzo FJenjamin, founders of the Nevada Journal, now 
edited by them under the name of the Nevada Evening Journal. The 
brothers had received comprehensive experience along journalistic lines in 
connection with other papers prior to the establishment of the Nevada Jour- 
nal, and this thorough knowledge of the art preservative, combined with 
keen business sagacity, wise management and progressive and up-to-date 
methods have insured the success of their present venture, their paper be- 



lUii HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ing recognized as one of the important and intlucntial factors of com- 
munity life in Nevada. 

The family of which they are representatives is of German and Irish 
lineage. The father, Jcdediah H. Benjamin, was born in New York and 
in early boyhood removed with his parents to Peoria county, Illinois, where 
his father engaged in agriculture. He remained on the farm until attaining 
man's estate, when he entered the mercantile business in Peoria, Illinois, 
but after a few years thus spent returned to farming, being thus identified 
until 1S90, when he withdrew from active business, the substantial success 
which he had attained in agricultural and mercantile lines making it possible 
for him to live retired throughout his remaining years. He took up his resi- 
dence in Winlield, Kansas, and there passed away in 1909 at the age of 
seventy-eight years. A democrat in politics, he held several minor offices, 
including that of township supervisor, and was a prominent citizen of the 
communities in which he made his home. His wife, who in her maiden- 
hood was Julia Maria Tyrel, is also of German and Irish descent. Her 
birth occurred in the Empire state and when a young lady she accompanied 
her parents to Illinois and was married in Peoria. She still survives, at the 
age of seventy years and is a faithful and consistent member of the Presby- 
terian church. By her union with Mr. Benjamin she became the mother 
of four children, as follows : Oscar John and George Alonzo, who are men- 
tioned below; Leitha, who was born near Princeville in 1880 and is now the 
wife of John D. Funk, a real-estate dealer of Winlield. Kansas; and Edna, 
deceased. By a former marriage Jedediah H. Benjamin had three daugh- 
ters, Emma, who wedded J. K. Laycock and now makes her home on a 
farm in Story county; Hattie, deceased; and Ida, the wife of H. M. Blanch- 
ard, a resident of California. 

Oscar John Benjamin, whose birth occurred on the 28th of July. 1869. 
at Peoria, Illinois, acquired his preliminary education in the district schools 
of Peoria county and later graduated from the Princeville high school. 
Later he was given the opportunity of studying in the Princeville Academy 
and after putting aside his text-books he entered the office of the Princeville 
Telephone to learn the printing business. After an apprenticeship of about 
two years he left that office and was employed by various daily newspapers 
in several cities in the middle west, where he gained comprehensive knowl- 
edge of his chosen line of work. Later he took up independent journalistic 
ventures, being associated with three fiitTerciit partners in the management 
of as many different papers. The year 1895 witnessed his arrival in Nevada 
and here, in connection with his brother, he founded the Nevada Journal. 
The wide and varied experience which he had previously acquired in the 
newspaper field made his eflorts in the management of this last enterprise 
potent elements in what has become one of the successful and prominent 
papers of Nevada. 

Mr. Benjamin laid tlic foundation for a happy home life of his own in 
his marriage, in December. 1900. to Miss Carrie Elliot, who was born in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 193 

St. Charles, Illinois, in 1869, and is the daughter of Abner and Elizabeth 
Elliot. He gives his political support to the republican party, while in fra- 
ternal circles he is identified with the Knights of Pythias. He belongs to 
the International Typographical Union and is one of the prominent and in- 
fluential members of the Nevada Commercial Club. Aside from his con- 
nection with newspaper interests he is well known in financial and business 
circles, being a director of the Peoples Savings Bank and a stockholder of 
the Story County Mutual Telephone Company. Thus his excellent business 
ability has not only been a factor in the acquirement of an individual suc- 
cess which makes him one of the substantial and representative citizens of 
Nevada, but also a potent element in the management of various interests 
which bear strongly upon the permanent upbuilding and development of the 
community. 

George Alonzo Benjamin is also one of Illinois' native sons, his birth 
occurring near Princeville on the 24th of October, 1871. Like his brother 
he received his education in the district schools and Princeville Academy 
and also acquired his knowledge of the art preservative in the office of the 
Princeville Telephone, which paper was at that time under the management 
of an uncle. He remained in that office for several years and was then con- 
nected with his brother in various other ventures throughout the middle 
west until their arrival in Nevada in 1895, since which time they have been 
associated in' the management and publication of the Nevada Journal, now 
known as the Nevada Evening Journal. His knowledge of the newspaper 
business is also broad and comprehensive and his efforts in behalf of the 
Journal are important and resultant forces in the success of the paper. 

George A. Benjamin was married on the 15th of January, 1896, to Miss 
Grace Johnson, a native of Illinois, who was born on the i8th of Novem- 
ber, 1875, a daughter of Rev. J. and Frances Johnson. The father, a min- 
ister of the Methodist church, is now in charge of a church in Luray, Kan- 
sas. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin are members of the Presbyterian church, 
while in politics he supports the principles and candidates of the republican 
party. He has also extended his interests outside of journalistic fields and 
is a stockholder in the Story County Mutual Telephone Company. 

The Nevada Evening Journal, which was originally established as a 
weekly paper, was later converted into a bi-weekly edition and has had a 
continuous and gradual growth under the supervision of the Benjamm 
brothers, who brought to its inception not only the practical knowledge ac- 
quired by many years of experience but also an inherited aptitude for wise 
management and good business ability — elements which have proved potent 
forces in the upbuilding of the paper. The Journal attracts many readers 
by reason of its entertaining discussion of public questions and also as a dis- 
tributor of news of general interest. Moreover, the paper is accorded an 
extensive advertising patronage, which is well merited for the partners have 
ever been quick to adopt new methods, are progressive and up-to-date in 
their ideas and their capable conduct of the paper has won the confidence 



194 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

of a large circle of patrons. The high personal worth of the brothers has 
been widely recognized among their fellownien, who hold them in unquali- 
fied respect and esteem, and the honorable and manly principles which have 
governed their private as well as their business life make them desirable 
and honored citizens of the community. 



f. T. HANDSAKER. 



Among the large landowners of Sherman township should be named 
J. T. ilandsaker, who has spent his entire life in tliis county, attaining 
marked success both in agriculture and stock-raising. Upon his farm is 
to be seen the only steam plow in Story county and in other respects he 
is fully abreast of the times, making use of the best modern facilities and 
a])])lying up-to-date methods, thus producing tlie most satisfactory results. 
He was born in Richland township, December i8. 1859, a son of William 
and Emily (Wyatt) Handsaker. the former born in Staffordshire, Eng- 
land, A])ril 6, 1828. and the latter in Indiana. August 7, 1838. The father 
emigrated to America in 1854, landing at the port of New York, and soon 
afterward he came west to Illinois. Not satisfied, however, with the con- 
ditions as he found them east of the Mississippi river, he started in 1855 
for Story county, Iowa, walking from the river with George Hyden, who 
took up his residence in Richland township. Mr. Handsaker engaged in 
farming in this county until 1893, when he retired and removed to Nevada. 
He passed away March 31, 1907, but his wife is still living and has ar- 
rived at the age of seventy-two years. There were eight children in their 
family, namely: J. T.. the subject of this review; Sabina, now Mrs. Day; 
and Nona, now Mrs. Ilyncs, both living five miles south of Nevada; W. IL, 
of Grant township; H. G., now living on the old homestead; J. H., a 
farmer of Richland township; D. P., who died in 1894 at the age of 
twenty-eight years, leaving a wife and two children; and Mary Ellen, who 
died in infancy. 

J. T. Handsaker received his early education in the common schools 
and became so proficient in the text-books that he taught school very suc- 
cessfully for eight terms. He learned the carpenter's trade and while in 
the employ of D. B. Paddleford assisted in the erection of the Lutheran 
church at Johnson's Grove in 1880. This building has since been re- 
moved to Femald. Subsequently he engaged in the tiling business. In 
1883 he settled upon his present farm in Sherman township and for many 
years devoted his attention closely to various branches of farming, be- 
coming recognized as one of the most successful agriculturists in the county. 
Recently he retired from active labors, leaving the work of the farm to 
his sons. Father and sons have gained a wide reputation as breeders of 
red polled cattle and Poland China hogs. They have also engaged quite 




.1. I . II \M)^ AKKl; 




MBS. J. T. HAXDSAKER 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 199 

extensively in the dairy business and are now regularly shipping one hun- 
dred and twenty pounds of high grade butter per week to New York and 
Brooklyn. 

On the nth of March, 1882, Mr. Handsaker was united in marriage 
in Richland township to Margaret Lawman, who was born in Canada, April 
17, 1864, a daughter of John and Violet (Elliott) Lawman. Her parents 
came to America in 1858 and were married in New York state. After 
several removals they settled in Richland township, Story county, where 
they have lived for the last thirty-seven years. Four children came to 
brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Handsaker, namely: Ethel M.. born 
Februar}- 9, 1885, was educated in the common schools and in the School 
of Music at Ames, and is now living at home. E. Ralph, also on the home 
farm, was born November 30, 1886, and was educated in the common 
schools, also taking a course in engineering at Charles City, Iowa. John 
W., born October 25, 1887, is now living on the old homestead. Thomas 
L., born November 25, 1892, is also living at home. 

Mr. Handsaker, ever since reaching his majority has given his support 
to the republican party. He has not sought the emoluments of office but 
has served with great acceptance as township clerk and secretary of the 
school board for si.xteen years and as township trustee for eight years. He 
is a man of unusual intelligence and keeps fully informed on the progress 
of everything pertaining to his calling, to which he has applied with great 
success the best efforts of his life. He has witnessed many changes in 
Story county. Land when his father came to this county was being sold 
by the government at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. As late 
as 1880 Mr. Handsaker of this review bought one hundred and sixty acres 
in this county for seventeen hundred dollars, being a little over ten dollars 
and fifty cents per acre. The same land now commands one hundred and 
fifty dollars per acre, and the tendency in price is still upward. A worthy 
representative of a family which has performed an important part in the 
development of the county, Mr. Handsaker now enjoys in comfort and 
ease the results of his wisely directed efforts and at the same time is ac- 
corded the confidence and respect of the entire community. 



DR. SEAMAN A. KNAPP. 

Dr. Seaman A. Knapp, who passed away at Washington, D. C, on the 
1st of April, 191 1, was the second president of the Iowa State College at 
Ames. He was born at Schroon, Essex county, New York, December 16, 
1833, and was graduated from Union College in 1856, Phi Beta Kappa. He 
was granted six honorary degrees by the Iowa State College and other col- 
leges and universities, was vice president of Fort Edward Collegiate 
Institute from 1856 until 1863, and associate manager of Ripley Female 



200 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

College in 1S64 and 1S65. Failing health caused him to move to Benton 
county, Iowa, in 1866. where he served as principal of the Iowa College for 
the Blind from 1869 to 1875, when he opened a large fine stock farm at Vin- 
ton and became editor of the Western Farm Journal published at Cedar 
Rapids. From 1879 until 1886 he was professor of agriculture in the Iowa 
State College, while during the years 1883 and 1884 he served as president 
of the college. For three years, from 1873 until 1876. he was president of 
the Iowa Fine Stock Breeder's Association. 

Dr. Knapp left Iowa in 1886 to assume the supervision of a tract of land 
in southwestern Louisiana, as large as the state of Connecticut. He in- 
troduced to the rice field of the southwest, the wheat machinery of the 
northwest. By his great work for rice he became president of the Rice 
Growers Association of America, which position he held until his removal 
to Washington three years ago. 

In 1898, at the request of the secretary of agriculture, he visited the 
Philippines, Jai)an and China to report on their agricultural resources. In 
1900 he went to Porto Rico on a similar mission. In 1901 and 1902 he 
went to Ceylon and India and again to China and Japan, bringing from the 
latter a seed rice of great value, which is used today in the southwest. 
During this last trip he performed private missions for the secretary of 
war in the Philipi)ines and for President Roosevelt in Honolulu. 

The crowning work of his life was begun when the secretary of agri- 
culture sent him to Texas in 1903 to light the Mexican boll weevil. By 
his efforts he turned what seemed the utter destruction of the cotton crop 
of the south into a blessing and opened the way for the establishment of 
the "Farmer's Cooperative Demonstration Work of the South" of which he 
was the originator and the inspiration during the last seven years of his life. 

At seventy-seven years of age he had an office force of thirty men, five 
hundred field agents, seventy-five thousand adult and forty-six thousand 
boy demonstrators, all under the Farmer's Cooperative Demonstration 
Work of the United States department of agriculture, the general education 
board of New York and the patrons of southern states. By his work the 
south has been able to grow two blades of grass, two bales of cotton, and 
two bushels of corn where one grew before. His work was to reach the 
humblest of southern homes and help them to see the light. Himself the 
pro<luct of the classical school, he became the apostle of and gave his life to 
the exemplification of modern industrial education. 

Dr. Knapp married Maria Hotchkiss, of Washington county, *New York, 
in 1856, and left five children to mourn his loss. They are: Mrs. Maria 
Knapp Mayo, the wife of A. M. Mayo, of Lake Charles, Louisiana; Her- 
man Knapp, treasurer and registrar of Iowa State College. Ames. Iowa ; 
Bradford Knapp. connected with the farmer's demonstration work of the 
south, of Washington, D. C. ; Seaman Arthur Knapp, cashier of Calcasieu 
National Bank. Lake Charles, Louisiana; and Mrs. Helen Knapn Fay. the 
wife of Dr. Oliver J. Fay, of Des Moines. Iowa. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 201 

Dr. Knapp's remains were brought to Ames for burial in the College 
cemetery. He was an educator and philosopher, a gentleman of learning 
and culture. Of superior ability, he yet recognized individual obligation 
and the truth of the universal brotherhood of mankind. 



JOHN Y. LUKE. 



The present incumbent of the office of city attorney in Ames is John 
Y. Luke, who was born in Galena, Illinois, on the 12th of April, 1870, a 
son of John W. and Sarah A. Luke. The father, a native of the Empire 
state, was born in Albany county on the 31st of March, 1840, and after 
completing his academic education he studied law, being most successfully 
identified with that profession during his entire life. In 1882 the family 
located in Hampton, Franklin county, Iowa, and there the father died in 
January, 1896, but the mother is still living and makes her home in 
Hampton. 

John Y. Luke, who is the second in a family of nine children, was only 
twelve years of age when the family removed to Iowa and therefore has 
spent the greater part of his life in this state. After completing the gram- 
mar school course he graduated from the high school at Hampton and then 
taught in the country. Later he entered the Iowa State College at Ames 
and after three years' study in that institution he accepted a position as 
principal of the schools in Roland, Iowa. While a student in the high 
school he studied law in his father's ofifice and completed his law course and 
was admitted to the bar during his two years' residence in Roland. At the 
close of his school he opened an office in that place and began practicing. 
He only remained there during the summer, however, and in the fall of 
1895 he went to Nevada, Iowa, where he formed a partnership with J. F. 
Martin under the firm name of Martin & Luke. On the ist of January, 
1896, this partnership was dissolved because of the death of Mr. Luke's 
father necessitating his return to Hampton to look after the latter's large 
practice and business interests. He remained in Hampton for ten years, 
and during that period built up a large practice, ])roving through his capable 
discharge and execution of the business of his father's clients that he was a 
man of unusual mental attainment. His powers of deduction, keen dis- 
crimination in grasping the points at issue and his elucidation of the abstruse 
problems in a legal entanglement were quickly recognized and accepted at 
their full value. In 1907 Mr. Luke came to Ames and entered into partner- 
ship with Mr. McCarthy, taking the position in the firm previously held by 
Mr. Lee, who was retiring from private practice to accept a position on the 
bench. The partnership however, is but a nominal one, Mr. McCarthy hav- 
ing retired from active practice. 



202 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

In 1S99 at Hampton, Iowa, Mr. Luke was united in marriage to Miss 
Lol H. Hoxie, a daughter of W. H. Hoxie and a native of Hampton. One 
child has been born of this union, Gilbert M. The family attend the Con- 
gregational church and Mr. Luke is fraternally identified with the Knights 
of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. Ever since attainmg 
his majority he has taken a keen interest in all political issues and has ac- 
quired more than a local reputation as a campaign orator, having stumped 
the district quite thoroughly in 1896. He ahvay.-; votes the republican ticket 
and his party fealty has been rewarded by his constituency electing him to 
the office of county attorney while a resident of Franklin county and in ad- 
dition he served two terms as city attorney in Hampton, while since re- 
moving to Ames his ability has been recognized by his election to the posi- 
tion of city attorney. He belongs to that body of young politicians who are 
striving to bring up the political standard of the country and makes no 
promises or assurances to bis supporters which he does not honestly in- 
tend to maintain. 



FRANCIS E. GUNDER. 

The spirit of enterprise which has always been the dominant factor in 
the upbuilding of the middle west finds expression in the life of Francis 
E. Gunder, a progressive and rei^resentative farmer of Franklin township, 
living on section 35. He was born in Colfax township, P.oone county, Iowa. 
December 31, 1869, a son of Casper and Elizabeth (Savits) Gunder. The 
father was born in Germany on the ist of January-, 1812. and was but four 
years of age when brought to America by his parents, who settled in Penn- 
sylvania. He was reared to farm life in that state and was married in 
Cumberland county, after which he removed westward to Illinois, where 
he spent two or three years. In 1865 he arrived in Roone county. Iowa, 
and later took up his abode upon the farm on section 35. Franklin town- 
ship, Story county, which is now the home of his son Francis. It was upon 
this place that his remaining days were passed, covering a period of a quar- 
ter of a century, and his death occurred September 6, 1890. He owned 
here sixty-five acres of land, to which the son Francis has since added. 
The father was a shoemaker and followed that trade before he came to the 
west but always gave his attention in Iowa to farming. His widow still 
survives him. She was bom in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, October 
I, 1828, and now resides with her son Francis, who is the youngest of a 
family of twelve children, eight sons and four daughters, of whom six sons 
and two daughters are now living, although they are widely scattered. 

When a lad of eleven years Francis E. Gunder accompanied his parents 
on their removal to .Ames, and in 1883 the family took up their abode on 
section 35, Franklin townshiji. where he has since lived. Adding to his 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 203 

father's original purchase of sixty-five acres, lie is today the owner of an 
excellent farm of one hundred and ninety acres pleasantly located a half 
mile north of Ames and known as the Oak Grove Farm. He conducts a 
dairy business, milking about thirty cows and selling the milk to the whole- 
sale trade. He has been engaged in dairying for about five years and finds 
this a profitable source of income. At the same time he carefully develops 
his fields and gathers therefrom abundant harvests. His home is a modern 
nine-room brick building, which was erected in 1907, in attractive style of 
architecture and equipped with all modern comforts and conveniences. 
There are also good outbuildings upon the place, which he erected, and a 
house which is occupied by a tenant. 

Mr. Gunder has been married twice. In 1891 he wedded Dora Novvn- 
ing, a native of Story county, and a daughter of James and Abbie Nowning. 
Mrs. Gunder died in April, 1903, leaving two children, Virgil and Byron. 
In June, 1904, Mr. Gunder wedded Katherine Cooney, a native of Dallas 
county, Iowa, although reared in Illinois. Her parents were William and 
Mary Cooney. Two children have been born of the second marriage, 
Dwight F. and Lolita E. The family are most pleasantly located in one of 
the beautiful country homes of Story county. Mr. Gunder has his own 
electric light plant which lights both the house and barns. He also has a 
water system, supplying the house and barns, and a gasoline power engine 
for grinding feed, as well as generating electricity and pumping water. 
Both he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church at Ames 
and their many sterling qualities have gained them an extensive circle of 
friends. In matters of citizenship Mr. Gunder is progressive and gives his 
hearty cooperation to many movements for the general good. In business 
affairs he is thoroughly reliable and has followed pi'ogressive methods which 
may well serve as an example for others who are connected with the agri- 
cultural interests of the county. 



THOiMAS W. RAVVSON. 

A bright example of success in a responsible vocation is shown in the 
career of Thomas W. Rawson, cashier of the Farmers Savings Bank of 
Slater. Starting upon his business career with a laudable ambition and im- 
bued with high ideals, he attained a position of trust, which he fills to the 
entire satisfaction of the directors and stockholders of the bank. He was 
born in Dallas county. Iowa, September 15. 1878, a son of Edmund A. and 
Catherine (Huston) Rawson, the former a native of New Hampshire and 
the latter of Pennsylvania. The father came to Iowa in his early manhood 
and served as principal of the schools of Panora, Dallas county, Iowa, later 
engaging in farming in the same county. His first wife having died he 
went to Oneida, Illinois, where he was married to Catherine Huston. Re- 



204 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

turning to Dallas county, he taught school and farmed and also took up the 
study of medicine, subsequently entering the medical department of the 
State University at Iowa City, from which he was graduated with the de- 
gree of M. D. in 1884. He practiced in Sheldahl until the town of Slater 
was organized, when he took up his residence in this place. Here he con- 
tinued in successful practice until his retirement, in July, 1910. He is now 
making his home in Boise City, Idaho. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his wife are both identified with the 
English Lutheran church, but were originally members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Thomas \V. Rawson was reared at home, where he early gained a true 
knowledge of the importance and value of labor. He received his prelim- 
inary education in the common schools and also attended Iowa College 
Academy, at Grinnell, from which he was graduated in the class of 1901. 
Immediately after leaving school he entered the Farmers Savings Bank of 
Slater as assistant cashier and continued in that position until July, 1910, 
when upon tlic death of M. S. lielland, casliicr of the bank, he was selected 
to fill the vacancy. In the discharge of his duties he has shown an interest 
and ability which are highly pleasing to the officers and stockholders of the 
institution. 

On the 3d of September, 1902, Mr. Rawson was united in marriage at 
Slater to Miss Belle Nelson, a daughter of Hon. Oley Nelson, a record of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. One child. Homer Arnold, has come 
to bless this union. 

Mr. Rawson has possessed every desirable advantage of education and 
training for the banking business that could be desired and, having made 
good use of his opportunities, he has enjoyed the favors of fortune and has 
also been accorded the confidence and esteem of the entire community. 
Politically he gives his support to the republican party and as a citizen he 
extends a willing hand to every worthy movement seeking to promote the 
permanent interests of this section. 



GEORGE A. KLO\E. 



There is in the atmosphere of the west something that calls forth en- 
ergy, determination and ambition on the part of the citizens of this sec- 
tion of the country. Imbued with this spirit, George A. Klove has made 
substantial progress in his business career, and is now occupying the posi- 
tion of assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Nevada. He was 
born in Decorah, Winneshiek county, Iowa, on the i6th of January, 1867, 
and is a son of Edwin and Christina (Howard) Idove, both of whom were 
natives of Norway, whence they came to America in their childhood days 
with their respective parents and settled near Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 205 

father was born at Voss, Norway, on the 19th of October, 1836, and was 
a son of Andrew and Gundvor (Ringheim) Klove, who were also natives 
of \'oss. In the year 1843, they sailed for the new world with Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, as their destination, and soon afterward located on a farm 
about twenty miles southwest of that city, where they remained for a long 
period. About 1864, however, they removed westward to Winneshiek 
county, Iowa, where the father's death occurred in 1865. The mother sur- 
vived him for several years and passed away in 1870. Both were sixty- 
nine years of age when called to their final home. Andrew Klove had fol- 
lowed farming throughout his entire life and was known as a worthy and 
representative citizen of the community in which his last days were passed. 
His family numbered thirteen children, all of whom were born in Norway 
with the exception of two. 

Edwin Klove was only six years of age when the family crossed the 
Atlantic, and with his parents he resided until i860, when he went to De- 
corah, Iowa, making the trip alone. There he established a general mer- 
cantile business in connection with I. A. Ringheim, a cousin. This associa- 
tion was maintained for two years, when they disposed of their stock and 
Edwin Klove accepted the position of deputy in the office of county treas- 
urer. Later he was elected county treasurer and filled the position in a 
most acceptable and creditable manner for eight years, proving a most 
faithful custodian of the public funds. He was then out of business for 
a short time. In 1883, he removed to Nevada, where he has since made 
his home, and for ten years acted as clerk in the store of I. A. Ringheim. 
following the death of Mr. Ringheim Mr. Klove retired and has since 
spent his days in the enjoyment of well earned rest. In the year 1864, he 
married Christina Howard, who was born in Voss, Norway, October 31, 
1841, and came to this country with her parents about 1844. She was a 
daughter of Joseph and Christina Howard, both of whom died in Wiscon- 
sin. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Klove were born seven children: George 
A., of this review; Janette, the wife of U. S. Alderman of Nevada; Henry, 
of Sac City, Iowa ; Edmond Joseph, of Ames, Iowa ; Frederick Howard, 
who is located in Livingston, Montana ; Anna Louise, a resident of Minn- 
eapolis ; and Mrs. Alice McCall, deceased. 

In taking up the personal history of George A. Klove, we present to 
our readers the life record of one who is widely and favorably known in 
Story county, where he has made his home for more than twenty-seven 
years. The first sixteen years of his life were spent in Decorah, Iowa, and 
in September, 1883, he came to Nevada, where he has since resided. He 
pursued a high school course in Decorah, but after coming to Story county 
turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, serving as a clerk until 1896. 
In that year he was appointed deputy county treasurer, in which capacity 
he served for four years, at the end of which time he was chosen county 
treasurer, and by reelection was continued in the office for two terms. He 
has been prominent in the public life of the community, and it is well known 



206 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

that his aid and influence are ever to be found on the side of progress and 
improvement. He was mayor of Nevada for one term, 1903-1904, and 
gave to the city a businessHke administration, wherein tlie interests of the 
city were greatly promoted. He became connected with the First National 
Bank as assistant cashier, and still continues in that position. 

In 1895 j\Ir. Klove was united in marriage to Miss Sylvia Thompson, 
a native of Nevada, and a daughter of F. D. Thompson. They now have 
two children : Herman Thompson and Sumner Edwin. 

In Iiis i)olitical life J\lr. Klove has been a lifelong republican, unfalter- 
ing in his allegiance to the principles of the party. He has served as a 
member of the city council and also as secretary of the school board, filling 
the former position from April, 1906 until April, 1909, while in the latter 
office he served for four years. He holds membership in the Lutheran 
church and for many years has served on its council. He also belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias fraternity, the Masonic lodge and the Modern 
Woodmen camp. The greater part of his life has been passed in Story 
county, and that his record has ever been a most honorable one is indi- 
cated in the fact that his stanchest friends are those who have known him 
from his boyhood to the present time. Few men are more prominent or 
more widely known in the enterprising city of Nevada, and he is recog- 
nized by all as a man of unbending integrity, unabating energj- and in- 
clustrv that never flags. 



HON. JOSEPH A. FITCHPATRICK. 

No history of Nevada and Story county would be complete without ex- 
tended reference to Hon. Joseph A. Fitchpatrick, who is distinctively a 
man of affairs and one who has wielded a wide influence. He is now closely 
associated with the public life of the community as a member of the bar. 
as president of the First National Bank of Nevada and as representative 
of his district in the state senate. He belongs to one of the old families of 
this part of Iowa and is a native son of Washington county, \'irginia. born 
October 17, 1840. His parents were William H. and Sarah \'. (Hagy) 
Fitchpatrick, who were al-so natives of W'ashington county, born in 1814 
and 181 5, respectively. A removal to the west was made in 1842. at which 
time the family home was established in Clinton county. Indiana, where 
they resided until 1854. In that \ear they became residents of Boone. 
Iowa, and in 1857 the family came to .Story county, where they made their 
home for many years. The parents spent their last days in .Ames, where 
the mother died in 1895 and the father in 1897. In their f.unijy were eight 
children of whom five arc yet living. 

Hon. J. A. I-'itchpatrick, the eldest, devoted his lime between the work 
of the farm and the acquirement of an education in the public schoo' 




J. A. FITCH I'AIKKK 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 209 

through the period of his youth, and in early manhood he took up the pro- 
fession of teaching, which he followed through the winter seasons. The 
welfare and preservation of his country became a paramount interest in his 
life at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war and in response to Presi- 
dent Lincoln's first call for troops he offered his services to the government, 
enlisting in May, 1861, under command of Captain (afterward Colonel) 
Scott, of Company E, Third Regiment of Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He 
continued with this, command until after the battle of Atlanta, having in 
the meantime reenlisted, and then the Third Iowa Regiment was consoli- 
dated with the Second Regiment and his command became Company A of 
that organization. He remained with his regiment until the close of the 
war and was on active duty from the start. During the summer, fall and 
winter of 1861 he was largely engaged in skirmish duty throughout Mis- 
souri. He participated in the battle of Shiloh on the 6th and 7th of April, 
1862, his regiment doing volunteer service there, holding its line all day and 
repelling every attack of the enemy. Because of a flank movement on the 
part of the Confederates the Third Iowa was compelled to fall back and in 
so doing about six o'clock in the evening Mr. Fitchpatrick, with a few 
others of the regiment including Major Stone, the commanding officer, fell 
in with the Iowa Brigade which a few moments afterward surrendered. 
Through the succeeding ten weeks Mr. Fitchpatrick was held as a prisoner 
of war at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, after which all of the prisoners were pa- 
roled but were not allowed to join their commands until exchanged several 
months later, being stationed during the intervening period in St. Louis, 
Missouri. As soon as possible, however, Air. Fitchpatrick rejoined his regi- 
ment at Moscow, Tennessee, in January, 1863. and afterward participated 
in the siege of Mcksburg. The troops then proceeded to Jackson, Missis- 
sippi, and he took part in the unfortunate and ill-timed assault on the 
enemy's works at that place on the 12th of July, 1863, on which occasion 
more than half of those engaged were either killed or wounded. He also 
participated in the Meridian campaign under Sherman in February, 1864, 
and in the Atlanta campaign, including the battles of Atlanta on the 21st 
and 22d of July, 1864. On the second day of the engagement, after five 
hours of stubborn fighting, Mr. Fitchpatrick and several of his comrades 
were surrounded and captured, while the only commissioned officer in the 
regiment at that time was killed. This was on the first day of the battle. 
On the second day the regiment drew up in I^attle line without a single 
officer to command and did some of the most effective fighting of its whole 
term of service, almost literally fighting itself out of existence on that occa- • 
sion. Mr. Fitchpatrick with the others who had been made prisoners of 
war were taken to Andersonville, where they suffered greatly, their treat- 
ment being of the most inhuman character. Three months were spent in 
that loathsome prison pen, after which Mr. Fitchpatrick was transferred 
to Florence. South Carolina, where the treatment was no better. On the 
1st of -March following, however, he was exchanged at \\'ilmington. North 



■2\o HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Carolina, and his sulierings were indicated by the tact that he had lost 
greatly in weight, having been reduced almost to a skeleton ere his release. 
He was sent to Annapolis. Maryland, and was granted a furlough which he 
spent at home. On the expiration of his leave of absence he rejoined his 
regiment in Washington, D. C, in May, 1865, and with his command went 
soon afterward to Louisville. Kentucky, where he was mustered out of 
service in July. He had been with the Union army for four years and two 
months, during which time he was never ill or absent from duty with the 
exception of the period of his prison experience and his furlough home. 
He stood frequently upon the tiring line and again upon the lonely picket 
line, but no matter what the duty entrusted to him it was faithfully i)cr- 
formed. 

In July, 1865, Mr. l-"ilchpalrick reached his old home in Story county 
and throughout all the intervening years to the present he has figured prom- 
inentlv in the public life of the community and in the advancement of its 
business interests. Soon after his return from the war he was elected clerk 
of the district court, capably filling the office for a period of eleven years, 
or until January i, 1877. He then turned his attention to the loan and ab- 
stract business, in which he has since engaged. He was the first one to 
make a complete set of abstract books in the county. In 1877 he was ad- 
mitted to practice before the Story county court and almost immediately 
thereafter formed a law partnership with George W. Dyer. In 1878 he 
was licensed to practice before the Iowa supreme court. His partnership 
with Mr. Dyer was terminated in 1885 and he afterward remained alone 
in practice for a considerable period. In 1898 he entered into partnershi|) 
with Edward M. McCall, which relationship still maintains under the firm 
.style of Fitchpatrick & McCall. They have a large clientage connecting 
them with much of the important litigation held in the courts of the district. 
Mr. Fitchpatrick has also invested heavily in real estate and is the owner 
of much valuable property in Nevada and Story county. Becoming con- 
nected with the First National Bank, he was for a considerable period its 
vice president and in 1904 was elected to the presidency, serving as its chief 
executive officer throughout the ensuing decade. 

On the i6th of August, 1866, Mr. Fitchpatrick was married tu .Mi>> 
Hattie V. Pierce, who was born in Onondaga county, New York, in 1843. 
a daughter of Lyman and Phoebe (Dean) Pierce. She dieil in September. 
1906. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fitchpatrick were born three children: William 
P., of Nevada, who married Ada. J. Ringheim ; Mrs. \'iola E. Everhart. of 
Chicago; and Genevieve L.. the wife of Edward M. McCall. who is now 
her father's law partner. 

Mr. I'itchpatrick and daughters arc members of the Presbyterian church 
and the family has long occupied a prominent position in social circles. 
Mr. Fitchpatrick holds membership in Lodge No. 99, .A. F. S: A. M., of 
Nevada; the chajHcr and Excalibur Commandery, No. i_^. K. T.. at Boone. 
Iowa. He likewise belongs to Sani])S(in Lodge. No. jy. K. I'., of which 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 211 

he is a charter member, and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and while he is not 
a politician in the usually accepted sense of the term, he has yet been 
honored with public office and has proven himself capable in the discharge 
of his duties. In i8gg he was elected state senator from the district com- 
prised of Boone and Story coimties and served until 1904. In 1908 he was 
reelected, so that he is the present incumbent in the office. He gives 
careful consideration to each question which comes up for settlement and 
his spirit of opposition to any measure is the expression of his honest 
conviction and of a conscientious effort to do that which is best for the 
community. Progress and patriotism might well be termed the keynote to 
his character, for those qualities have characterized him in every relation 
of life. His enterprising spirit is manifest as well in his official service 
as in the conduct of his private business interests, and sound judgment and 
keen discrimination have ever been elements in the continuous advancement 
which has brought him to his present enviable position. 



CHARLES A. WENTWORTH. 

While practically living retired, Charles A. VVentworth was for many 
years identified with general agricultural pursuits and is still the owner of 
a good farm property west of Ames, although he now makes his home in 
the city. He was bom in Monson, Piscataquis county, Maine, on the 24th 
of February, 1845, ^nd spent the greater part of his youth there. His pa- 
rents were Oliver and Janette (Thomas) Wentworth, who always remained 
residents of the Pine Tree state and were farming people. Their son 
Charles was the second in a family of nine children, eight of whom are now 
living and all were together in the summer of 1910 on the old home place 
in Maine. A daughter of the family died in infancy. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life 
for Charles A. Wentworth in his boyhood and youth. The public schools 
afforded him his education and he worked in the fields for his father and 
also to some extent for neighboring farmers until seventeen years of age, 
when, aroused by the attempt of the south to overthrow the Union, he en- 
listed for active duty with the northern army. He was discharged August 
I, 1865, after eighteen months' service with Company M of the First Maine 
Cavalry, which was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, and was on duty 
in the vicinity of Petersburg most of the time. He took part in the en- 
gagements at Green Station, Cathaly Run, the Bellfield raid and was on the 
skirmish line most of the time. When the war was over and victory 
crowned the Union arms, he returned home and continued a resident of 
Maine throughout the ensuing year. He then went to Pennsylvania, where 
he spent a year and then again returned home, remaining for a few months. 



212 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Later he spent a year and a half in Pennsylvania, and on the expiration of 
that period went to Alpena, Michigan, where he resided for three years. 
In Pennsylvania and in Michigan he was employed in the lumber woods 
during the winter months, after which he returned to Maine, where he 
again lived for a year. 

The fall of 1876 witnessed the arrival of Mr. W'cntworth in Iowa, at 
which time he took up his abode in Jones county, living there until the 
spring of 1878, when he went to Boone county. In February, 1895, he came 
to his present home near the corporation limits of Ames, his farm lying 
west of the city. In addition to the home where he now resides, he has one 
hunched and twenty-one acres of rich farm land and from the place derives 
a substantial income. He is practically living retired, however, leaving the 
active work of the farm to others. 

On the 2d of March, 1877, in Clinton, Iowa, Mr. VVentworth was mar- 
ried to Miss Emma C. Chapin, who was born in Monson, Maine, on the 12th 
of October, 1845, and there resided until the spring of 1877. when she came 
to Clinton, Iowa. Her parents were Aretus and Mary (Whiting) Chapin, 
natives of Monson, Maine, and reared in that state, where they spent their 
entire lives. Mr. and Mrs. Wentworth had but one child, Atlee O., who 
died at the age of three months. 

Mr. Wentworth belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and is as 
true and loyal in matters of citizenship today as he was when he followed 
the old flag in defending the Union cause on the battlefields of the south. 
His life has been quietly passed, yet at all times his career has been marked 
by usefulness and activity in his business aflfairs. Moreover, he has ever 
been reliable in his business transactions and his many substantial quali- 
ties have won for him recognition as a worthy and representative citizen of 
his adopted county. 



lOHX OSP.ORX. 



Among the residents of Story county who have now passed away, there 
were none more highly esteemed and respected than John Osborn, who 
was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, on the 2Sth of December, 1846. His 
life up to the age of eighteen years was like that of the majority of the 
boys of fifty years ago who were reared on the farm. He attended school 
when his services were not required at home and enjoyed such diversions 
as fell to the lot of the young people oi that period. 

,'\t eighteen years of age he cnlistcf! in the Union army and spent eleven 
months of his early manhood in the service of his country on the battlefields 
of the south. There, as elsewhere throughout his life, he discharged everv 
duty assignee! him to the best of his ability. That he was faithful in service, 
brave in the face of danger and reliable at all times is fully attested by the 
honorable discharge accorded him at the end of his period of enlistment. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 213 

In 1865 Mr. Osborn removed with his parents to Shelby county, IIH- 
nois. Four years later on the i8th of November, 1869, he was united in 
marriag'c to Miss Sarah A. Shell, a native of Shelby county. The lirst year 
of their married life the young people continued to make their home in that 
county, but at the end of that period they removed to a farm near Green 
Castle in Jasper county, this state, and here, with the exception of one year, 
when they lived in Madison county, they resided for thirteen years. They 
went to Polk county in 1884, where they lived for a time, but later removed 
to Mr. Osborn's farm near jNIaxwell. this county. They lived on this place 
until ]\Ir. Osborn retired in 1907, after which time they made their home 
in Maxwell and there on the 24th of July, 1909, Mr. Osborn passed away. 

Three children were born to ]Mr. and Mrs. Osborn, two of whom sur- 
vive: Eva L., wife of William Hartung, a farmer in Indian Creek town- 
ship ; and Orlando, who owns and lives on the home farm near Maxwell. 

Mr. Osborn was always a stanch adherent of the republican party, be- 
lieving that its basic principles were best adapted to protect the interests 
of the general public and while he never sought political preferment he 
served as township trustee and most capably discharged the duties of other 
local offices while a resident of Polk county. Mr. Osborn was a Chris- 
tian and a communicant of the Methodist Protestant church, in which Mrs. 
Osborn also holds membership. He was not a man who sought publicity 
or reward for service but he was always ready to respond to the call of his 
country or fellowman in time of need, and he will long be remembered in 
the community where he lived, for he was held in high esteem by all 
who knew him. 



WALTER L. MORRIS. 



\\'alter L. Morris, living on section 34, Franklin township, has been 
a resident of Story county since the fall of 1875, arriving here when a youth 
of eleven years. He was born in ]\Iorrison, Illinois, on the 23d of May, 
1864, his parents being Willard and Adaline (Leonard) Morris. He was 
the eldest son and fourth child in a family of seven children and spent 
the first eleven years of his life in the place of his nativity, after which 
he came with his parents to Story in the fall of 1875. They took up their 
abode in Washington township, two and a half miles west of Ames, and 
there lived for two years, after which they removed to Franklin town- 
ship, where W'alter L. Morris has since made his home. 

He continued with his parents until his marriage and in the public 
schools of Illinois and of Iowa he pursued his education, while his train- 
ing in farm work was received under the direction of his father. There 
were few leisure hours in his boyhood and yet at times he had opportunity 
to enjoy the sports which engaged the attention of all healthy youths. 



214 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

In early manhood he engaged in farming on rented land with his father, 
who with his three sons rented and cultivated eight hundred acres of land 
for a number of years. The father owned and rented farm property. In 
1889 Walter L. Morris purchased a part of his present farm and became 
owner of the remainder in 1902. Me now has two hundred and forty 
acres of land lying on sections 27 and 34. his home standing on the latter 
section. The farm has been well improved by Mr. Morris and in its midst 
stands a comfortable modern residence, while other commodious and sub- 
stantial buildings shelter grain, stock and farm machinery. The place is 
known as the Fairview farm and its name is well deserved. Everything 
about the place is kept in excellent condition and indicates the careful su- 
pervision and practical methods of a progressive owner, lie raises the 
cereals best adapted to soil anil climate and has also met with success in 
the breeding and raising of shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, having 
upon his place twenty head of registered shorthorns at the present time, 
while all of his hogs have been eligible to registry for the past fifteen years. 
He has been engaged in the breeding of shorthorns since 1898 and in addi- 
tion to his herd he feeds from sixty to ninety head of cattle. In addition to 
his home property he owns a house and lot in Boone and his wife is the 
owner of residence property in Ames. He is likewise a stockholder in 
the Story County Fair Association and he is a charter member of the 
Breeders Association of Story county, of wliicli he served as treasurer for 
a number of years. 

On the 28th of November, 1895, Mr. -Morris was united in marriage to 
Miss Gertrude Rutheford. who was born in Ontario. Canada. June 26, 
1863, and was brought to Story county in 1868 by her parents. Edward and 
Maria (Eckels) Rutheford, the former a native of New York and the latter 
of Ireland. Both were residents of Story county at the time of death, the 
father passing away April 4, 1875. when forty-six years of age. while the 
mother died January 27, 1896. at the age of sixty-seven years. He was a 
carpenter contractor and architect and practiced the profession of archi- 
tecture in Xew York city for about ten years. Their family numbered si;: 
children, including Mrs. Morris, who by her marriage has become the 
mother of one .son. Edward Leonard, born September 24. i89ri. Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris are also rearing an adopted daughter. Eleanor Morris, born 
February 22. 1900. Their son at the age of twelve years was graduated 
from the rural schools with the first class that was graduated. He alway.; 
displayed special aptitude in his studies and he is now successfully en- 
gaged in the breeding of Shetland ponies although but fourteen years of 
age. 

Mr. Morris has always been a warm frienil of the cause of education 
and was president of the township school board and one of the school di- 
rectors of his district for a number of years. He also filled the office nf 
assessor of Franklin township for twelve years and discharged his duties 
with promptness and ability during the entire period of his incumbency 



HISTORY OP STORY COUNTY 215 

in office. For ten years he has filled the office of justice of the peace, in 
which connection his decisions are strictly fair and impartial. He has like- 
wise served as township trustee for a number of years and is ever loyal 
and faithful to the confidence and trust reposed in him. His political alle- 
giance has always been given to the republican party and fraternally he 
is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America, while his religious faith is 
indicated in his membership in the Congregational church of Ames. Dur- 
ing thirty-si.x years' residence in Story county he has formed a wide ac- 
quaintance among the citizens of this part of the state and he is held in 
high esteem by those who have long known him as well as by his later 
acquaintances. In manner he is genial and social and wherever he goes 
wins the high regard of those with whom he is brought in contact. 



PETER S. GRIFFITH. 



Among the successful farmers and extensive landowners of Union 
township is Peter S. Griffith, who was born in McDonough county, Illinois, 
on the 9th of March, 1856, his parents being John M. and Biddy (Rice) 
Griffith. The father was a native of Virginia and the mother of Ireland, 
having come to America as a child with her parents, who settled in High- 
land county, Ohio. After he had reached manhood John M. Griffith, in 
company w'ith his brother, w'ent to Highland county and there he met and 
married the mother of our subject. The first ten years of their married life 
the young people spent in Ohio and then removed to McDonough county, 
Illinois, where they continued to live until 1867, when they again set their 
faces westward, Iowa being their destination. They first settled in Polk 
county, where they remained but a few months and then bought a farm in 
Story county, which adjoins their son's homestead on the east and which he 
now owns, there spending the remainder of their lives. The father passed 
away on the 19th of November, 1890, but the mother survived until the 
24th of December, 1904. Mr. Griffith was a very successful man and owned 
between six and seven hundred acres of land at the time of his demise. 
They were both life-long members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which they were always active workers. 

Peter Griffith's early years differed but in detail from those of many 
farmer lads. He lived at home and attended the district school, assisted 
in the work of the farm and iiidulged in such recreations as appeal to young 
people. When old enough to lay aside his text-books, he cooperated with 
his father in the culitvation of the farm, and at length purchased eighty 
acres of his own land, upon which in 1892 he took up his residence and has 
since continued to live. After his father's death he bought the old home- 
stead, containing one hundred and sixtv acres, and he also owns one bun- 



216 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

dred and twenty acres on section 27, inside of the corporate limits of Cam- 
bridge, making the aggregate of his real-estate holdings amount to three 
hundred and sixty acres. His home farm is one of the best in the town- 
ship, the (ields are well tilled, the improvements modern and kept in re- 
pair and the stock of a good breed and well cared for. In fact everything 
about the place bespeaks thrift, capable management and careful attention 
to details. 

In 1882 Mr. Griffith established a home of his own by his marriage to 
Miss Carrie C. Chamberlain, a native of Union township and a daughter of 
Oliver Chamberlain, who came to Story county from Ohio about 1856, be- 
ing one of the pioneers of Union township. He is now deceased. Three 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Griffith: Genevieve, Carrie B. and 
John M. 

Mr. Griffith is identified with the Masonic fraternity, holding member- 
ship in Tabernacle Lodge, Xo. 452, A. F. & A. M., while he and his wife 
belong to the Order of the Eastern Star. While he has never actively par- 
ticipated in politics he casts a vote at all elections for the republican can- 
didates, as he considers the fundamental principles of that party are best 
a(la])ted to serve the majority. He has been very successful as a farmer, 
which can undoubtedly be largely attributed to his careful management, dis- 
cretion and progressive ideas and is considered to be one of the substantial 
citizens of Union township, where during his long residence he has made 
many friends, whose respect and esteem he has retained. 



STEPHEN PARKER O'BRIEN. 

The name of Stephen Parker O'Brien deserves to be placed high on 
the roll of Story county's honored citizens inasmuch as he is a veteran of 
the Mexican war and of the Civil war and has ever been a loyal and pro- 
gressive resident of Iowa, cooperating in all measures and movements cal- 
culated to benefit his home commimity or the state. In official ser\-ice and 
in ])rivate life his course has ever commended him to the confidence and 
respect of his fellowmen as he is totlay one of the most honored as well 
as one of the most venerable citizens of Story county. 

Mr. O'Brien was born in Union townshi]). Brown county, Ohio, De- 
cember 24, 1825, a son of Enoch and Naomi ( Parker) 0'P>rien. The 
father was probably born in Adams county, Ohio, in 1800, and the mother's 
birth occurred in \'irginia. October 22, 1798. In the winter sea.sons Enoch 
O'Brien followed the profession of scliool teaching and in the summer 
months worked at the stone-cutter's trade. He was married in the Buck- 
eye state to Naomi Parker, who had removed with her parents from \'ir- 
ginia. In October, 1831. Enoch and Naomi (Parker) O'Brien tcxjk their 
family to Hancock county, Indiana, where his remaining days were passed. 





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MR. AND MRS. S. P. O'BRIEN' 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 219 

his death there occurring in 1835. His widow long survived him, passing 
away in Indiana at tlie age of seventy-eiglit years. He was of Scotch-Irish 
hneage, while the Parkers were of one of the old families of Virginia. 
Five children were born to Enoch and Naomi O'Brien : George W., who 
was born February 24, 1823, and now resides at Corwith, Hancock county, 
Iowa; Stephen P., of this review; Nancy, the deceased wife of Benjamin 
Deal; Sarah, the deceased wife of Elmoth Jeffery ; and Salina, the wife 
of Eli Deal, a brother of Benjamin. 

Following the death of his father Stephen P. O'Brien, when sixteen 
years of age, removed with his mother to Clay county, Indiana, and there 
resided until after his marriage, when he came to Iowa. He reached the 
present site of the town of Ames on the 27th of October, 1852, and secured 
a squatter's claim on the southeast quarter of section 35, Franklin town- 
ship. He was in Indiana for eight years after the Civil war but always 
regarded this place as his home. In his early manhood he was busily em- 
ployed at the work of the farm on his mother's behalf until his patriotic 
spirit was aroused by the outbreak of the Mexican war and he enlisted 
for active service on the 15th of June, 1846, as. a member of Company C, 
Second Indiana Infantry, under Captain John Osborne. He was on active 
duty under General Taylor in the battle of Buena Vista and served for 
one year, after which he was honorably discharged at New Orleans and 
arrived home on the 4th of July, 1847. He afterward engaged in teaching 
school for nearly two years. 

Mr. O'Brien made arrangements for having a home of his own by his 
marriage on the 19th of July, 1849, to Sarah E. Hiestand, who was born 
in Harrison county, Indiana, June 24, 1831. They were married in Clay 
county, that state, after which Mr. O'Brien engaged in farming and teach- 
ing school in Indiana until his removal to Iowa in 1852. Here he again 
gave his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits until the tocsin 
of war again called him to the scene of battle. When differences over the 
slavery question brought on hostilities between the north and the south he 
enlisted at Ames as a member of Company A, Twenty-third Iowa Volun- 
teer Infantry, under Captain L. R. Houston, on the 4th of August, 1862. 
He was elected first sergeant of the company, afterward promoted to sec- 
ond lieutenant and later became first lieutenant of the same company, with 
which rank he was honorably discharged at Matagorda island, Texas, on 
the nth of April, 1864. He was with the Army of the Mississippi and 
participated in the battles of Fort Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Black River 
and the siege of Vicksburg. At Black River on the 17th of May, 1863, he 
was wounded through the left arm and also sustained a slight scalp wound, 
together with a slight wound in the stomach. He took part in the charge 
at Milliken's Bend on the 7th of June, 1863, and during the balance of 
the time was in the ditches in the rear of Vicksburg, where he contracted 
'rheumatism that, growing worse with the passing years, now renders his 
lower limbs wholly helpless. His mind, however, is as clear and bright as 



220 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

a man in the prime of life and, going about in a wlieel cliair. lie meets with 
his old friends and discusses the questions and issues of the day, keeping 
in closer touch with the tilings of the present than many of much younger 
age. 

Mr. O'Brien has always been deeply, actively and helpfully interested 
in public aftairs and questions relative to the progress and improvement of 
his community. He was present at the organization and first election of 
Story county but lacked a few days of being old enough to vote. He was 
appointed by County Judge E. C. Evans as the first assessor of Story 
county and filled the position for a year. .At the ne.xt election he was 
chosen school fund commissioner of the county and also served as con- 
stable for two terms, while for eight terms, or sixteen years, he filled the 
office of justice of the peace of Ames. His decisions were strictly fair 
and impartial, being based upon comprehensive knowledge of the law and 
the correct application of its principles. In Alay, 1864, he was admitteil 
to the bar under District Judge J. C. McFarland, but has practiced only 
in the justice courts. His political support was originally given to the whig 
party until the organization of the republican party, when he supported 
John C. Fremont for the presidency and has since been a stalwart advo- 
cate of that party's principles. His first presidential vote was given Zach- 
arj' Taylor, on which occasion he walked forty miles in order to exercise 
his right of franchise. That was a proud day in his life as it is to most 
young men casting their first vote. Mr. O'Brien not only served as jus- 
tice of the peace but has also been notary public and pension attorney at 
.Vines for many years, in which connection he has secured more than one 
hundred pensions for old soldiers. He has likewise conducted a real-estate 
and insurance office and has led a busy and useful life. 

In 1864 Mr. O'Brien was called upon to mourn the loss of his first 
wife, who died on the 24th of May of that year. They were the parents 
of si.x children; Mary Ellen, now the wife of W. J. Zenor, of Ames; 
Samuel Webster, of JefTerson, Iowa ; Mrs. Naomi Ann Phillips, who is 
living in Lewiston, Montana; Nancy Alice, the wife of J, P. Jackson, of 
Sullivan county, Indiana; George \\'., of .Ames; and \'iola L.. who became 
the wife of Charles H. Giilden and after his death married Fred Thomas, 
of Des Moines. 

Twenty years after the death of his first wife Mr. O'l'.ricn was mar- 
ried on the 24th of December, 1884, to Mrs. Sarah K. Iliestand, the 
widow of H. J. Hiestand and a daughter of Judge E. C. Evans. Mr. 
riiestand was a brother of Mr. O'Brien's first wife and was one of the 
recruits that served under Mr. O'Brien in Company A, Twenty-third Iowa 
Infantry, during the Civil war. He died in the service of wounds re- 
ceived at Port Gibson. Mrs. O'Brien was born in Blcnimington, McLean 
county, Illinois. January 23, 1837, and with her parents came to Story 
county in October, 1852, since which time she has lived in this county. 
Her parents were Ju<Igc Evan C. and Elizabeth D. ( Blankenship^ Evans. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 221 

The mother was a native of \'irginia and was reared in Ohio. Her father 
was bom near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and there resided until twenty- 
three years of age. Both went to Blooming-ton, Illinois, with their re- 
spective parents and were married soon after becoming acquainted there. 
They resided in Story county from 1852 until 1883 and then went to South 
Dakota to live with a daughter. Judge Evans owned a homestead in thati 
state. He died, however, in Story county but his wife passed away in 
South Dakota. He was for nine years county judge of Story county and 
made an excellent record on the bench as a fair and impartial jurist and 
one thoroughly conversant with the law. In the early days of his resi- 
dence in Iowa he entered land here and at different times bought and sold 
several farms. His family numbered nine children of whom Mrs. O'Brien 
is the eldest. Her brother, William C. Evans, who enlisted in August, 
1863, in the Ninth Iowa Cavalry, was killed in service. By her first mar- 
riage ]\Irs. O'Brien had three children: Samuel E. ; Alonzo B.; and Leo- 
nora, now the widow of Albert Park. 

Mr. O'Brien belongs to the First Church of Christ of Ames, of which 
he is a charter member. He is also a charter member of Ames Lodge 
No. 309, I. O. O. F., and of Ellsworth Post, G. A. R. He is the only 
Mexican war veteran in this county and so far as is known is the only one 
living in Iowa. His life indeed covers a notable period in the history of 
the country. He has witnessed the introduction of telegraph and telephone. 
There was scarcely a railroad in the country at the time of his arrival here 
but he has lived to see this wide domain crossed and recrossed by lines 
that connect the Atlantic with the Pacific. He came to Story coimty when 
it was largely wild and unsettled, when its prairies were covered with their 
native grasses and its streams were unbridged. Here he has lived for 
fifty-nine years watching a notable transformation and at all times bearing 
his part in the work of general progress. 



HERBERT PEASE, M. D. 

Less than seven years ago Dr. Herbert Pease began practice at Slater 
and he has applied himself with such capability and diligence that today his 
name is well known throughout this section of the state. He was born 
near Sandwich. Illinois, November 10, 1871, son of George W., and Adri- 
anna (Stockholm) Pease. The father was born in Kendall county, Illinois, 
[uly 23, 1841, and the mother in the village of Fishkill, Dutchess county, 
New York, November 16, 1841. For some years after his marriage the 
father lived on a farm in La Salle county, Illinois, coming in 1881 to Col- 
lins township, Story county, Iowa, where he purchased eighty acres of land 
and established himself as one of the prosperous farmers of the county. 
He has lived retired at Collins since 1909. 



222 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Herbert Pease came with liis parents to Story county when ten years 
of age and acquired his preliminary education in the public schools, later 
attending the Collins high school. Drake University and the State Normal 
College at Cedar Falls, Iowa. In 1890 he began teaching and continued 
in that vocation for ten years, during the last three years of which he 
served as principal of the Collins schools. He gained a reputation as one 
of the most accomplished teachers in the county. Having decided to devote 
his attention to medicine he matriculated in the medical department of the 
State University in the fall of 1900, and while taking the regular course of 
instruction spent his vacations reading under Dr. N. W. Knepper, of Col- 
lins. In 1904 he was graduated from the university with the degree of 
M. D. and has since practiced at Slater, being from the start unusually 
successful. He keeps thoroughly in touch w-ith the latest discoveries and 
advances in medicine, as is indicated by his large and well selected library 
and also by post-graduate work at the Chicago Polyclinic in 1907 and the 
Philadelphia Polyclinic in 1909. He is a valued member of the Story 
County Medical Society and of the Iowa State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. 

On the i"th of January, 1906, Dr. Pease was united in marriage to Miss 
Lois Felshaw, a daughter of John S. Felshaw, a well known attorney of 
Collins, and to this union two children have been born: Adrianna and 
Evelyn. Dr. Pease fraternally is identified with Slater Camp, No. 7971. 
M. VV. A., and socially is one of the leaders in the community. He early 
acquired habits of close study and careful observation, which he has applied 
in his professional career, being on this account more than ordinarily suc- 
cessful. A man of good judgment, high ideals, force and determination 
of character, he is held in great esteem by his fellowmen and meets in his 
chosen calling with the rewards which arc due to wisely directed effort. 



CIIAKI.FS S. GAMliLI-:. 

One of the best known men in agricultural circles in Story coimty is 
Charles S. Gamble, of Indian Creek townshiji. wlio was born in this county 
on the 26th of September, 1872, a son of John D. anfl Elizabeth (Mullen) 
Gamble. His parents came to Iowa from Indiana in 1856, locating on the 
farm where they continued to reside until their death?. The fatiier was 
born in Tennessee on tlic 7th of May, 1830. but when he was seven years 
of age his family removed to Indiana, where he met and married Elizabeth 
Mullen, who was a native of Indiana, Ixirn in that state on the 8th of June. 
1835. In 1856 they came to Iowa and settled in Story county, whore Mr. 
Gamble entered from the government a portion of the farm now occu])ied 
bv his son. William Marion G.Tmblc. U])on this worthy couple devolved 
all the hardships and privations of pioneer life. The ])rairic hai! to be 



HISTORY OF 'STORY COUNTY 223 

broken, tlie forests clearetl and roads made. Modern conveniences and 
machinery wliich are available to the residents of the country today were 
then unknown, the work of the farmer and his wife at that time being lit- 
tle more than drudgery. But despite the backsets and discouragements, 
drouths and wet seasons, John Gamble never faltered and at the time of his 
death was accounted one of the men of affluence in the community where 
he lived. He had added to his holdings piece by piece until at that time 
he was the owner of si.x hundred acres of well tilled and valuable farm 
land, every acre of which he had acquired by thrift, an unflinching pur- 
pose and indomitable energy. That he was ever highly esteemed and re- 
spected in the community where he lived for nearly forty years is indicated 
by his large circle of friends. He was a stanch democrat and the esteem 
in which he was held by his party is attested by his election to various 
township offices, in all of which he served to the general satisfaction of the 
community. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Gamble passed away on the 27th of June, 1893, ^^ the age 
of sixty-three years, but Mrs. Gamble lived until the 6th of January, 1906. 

Charles S. Gamble was reared at home, acquiring his education in the 
common schools and assisting his father on the farm. ITis time waS pretty 
equally divided between the tasks of the school- room, work of the farm and 
such sports and amusements as are usually indulged in by young people. 
His life has never been remarkable in any way, in fact it has been very 
similar to those of other energetic, ambitious young men who have made 
the best of every opportunity afforded them of becoming good, substan- 
tial citizens. After his father's death Mr. Gamble cooperated with his 
brother 'William in the management of the farm. This partnership con- 
tinued until November, 1902, when they divided the property, William re- 
maining on the old home farm and Charles S. taking up his residence on 
his present farm, where he has ever since lived. His farm embraces two 
hundred and fifty-five acres of well tilled and valuable land and is con- 
sidered to be one of the best farms in Story county. 

Mr. Gamble makes a specialty of feeding cattle, preparing from six to 
eight carloads for the market each year. He is now feeding one hundred 
and twenty head. He also feeds six or seven carloads of hogs every year. 

On the 4th of June, 1902, Mr. Gamble was married to Miss Maud 
Sutherland, a daughter of James W. and Adelaide (Bailey) Sutherland, 
residents of Baraboo, Wisconsin. Mrs. Gamble completed her education 
in the high school of Baraboo and after graduation taught for two terms 
prior to her marriage. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gamble, Ruth G., Elizabeth L., and James Derrett. 

Mr. Gamble is a democrat and although he does not take an active part 
in politics, each election sees him discharge his responsibility as a citizen 
by the casting of a ballot in support ot the candidates of his party. He is 
a member of Social Lodge, No. 463, I. O. O. F., and also of the Yeomen 
of America. The family attend the Presbyterian church, of which the pa- 



221 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

rents are members. Mr. Gamble is accounted one of the substantial and 
enterprising citizens of which his township has cause to be proud. Both 
he and his wife have hosts of friends and their home is one of the social 
centers of the community. 



O. M. GROVE. 



O. M. Grove is numbered among the native sons of Story county, his 
birth having occurred on the I2th of October, 1871, about a mile south of 
Roland. He is now living in lliat town, with the mercantile interests of 
whicli he was formerly closely associated, while at the present writing he is 
serving as cashier of the Farmers Savings Bank. He is a son of M. C. 
and Anna (Sheldahl) Grove. The father, who was born in Voss, Nor- 
wav, in 1830, died May 22, 1903, in Roland, and the mother, a native of 
Etne. Norway, is still living in Roland. She came to the United States 
with licr parents, Rasmus and Ingebord Sheldahl. both natives of Norway, 
when a little maiden of five years, the family living in Illinois until 1856, 
when a removal w^as made to Story county, where Mrs. Grove has since re- 
sided, having now for fifty-five years made her home in central Iowa. 
She is therefore familiar with its development and progress and has been 
an interested witness of what has been accomplished as the years have 
passed by. Her husband came direct to Story county in 185S and spent 
his remaining days here, successfully following the occupation of farming 
until 1896, when he retired and took up his abode in Roland. Unto this 
worthy and highly respected couple were born six children: ]\Iartin X.. 
who is living in Roland; Lorenda, living at home with her mother; O.scar 
M., of this review; Edward R.. who occuijies the old homestead south of 
the town; Mary, the wife of K. P. Teig, of Howard township, living 
about three miles southeast of Roland; and Emma, who for the ])ast three 
years has engaged in teaching school at Collins. 

Oscar M, Grove has been a lifelong resident of this county and in his 
youthful days devoted his time to the work of the schoolroom, the jileas- 
ures of the playground and the duties assigned to him by parental author- 
ity. In 1889, when a young man of about eighteen years, he left the farm 
and turned his attention to commercial pursuits, securing a clerkship in a 
hardware store in Roland. He was thus employed for eight years, during 
which time he thoroughly mastered the business and on the expiration of 
that period he purchased an interest in the store, becoming a partner in 
1897. The enterprise was then conducted under the firm style of Grove 
Brothers, his ])artncr lieing Martin N. Grove. For seven years the busi- 
ness was continued, and in the spring of 1904 they sold their hardware 
stock and have continued to deal in agricultural implements since that 
time under the same name, the store being managed by Martin N. Grove. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 225 

On the 1st of December, 1905, O. IM. Grove entered the Farmers Savings 
Bank of Roland and a month later was elected cashier, which position he 
has since tilled, his business ability and enterprising spirit contributing 
much to the success of the institution. He has also been one of the bank 
directors since 1902 and has been the owner of real estate interests in this 
county and also in northern Iowa, near Forest City. 

On the 7th of July, 1905, Mr. Grove was married to Miss Malinda 
Eggland, who was born in Milford township in August, 1865, and is a 
daughter of Ingebrit and Julia Eggland, both of whom were born in the 
land of the midnight sun. They were married, however, in the United 
States and are now residents of Roland. 

}tlr. and Mrs. Grove are well known in Roland, occupying a prominent 
position in the social circles of the city, and the hospitality of the best homes 
is cordially extended them. Mr. Grove belongs to Kohinoor Lodge, No. 
576, A. F. & A. M., of Story City, and has been a member of Trinity 
Lutheran church of Roland since its organization. In business he is re- 
sourceful and enterprising, readily recognizes opportunity and utilizes it. 
His success has been won through earnest, persistent effort, intelligently 
directed, and he stands today among the successful and progressive resi- 
dents of Roland, his labors, contributing to public progress as well as to 
individual prosperity. 



J. CLIFFORD ROSS, M. D. 

Starting in his profession under highly favorable circumstances, Dr. 
J. Clifford Ross, now of Ogden, Iowa, has entered upon a career that gives 
promise of a brilliant future. He is a native of Iowa, born March 4, 1885, 
and is a son of Frank A. and Ella (Johnson) Ross. His grandfather Ross 
was probably a native of Indiana, and came to Story county, Iowa, about 
1855, locating in Ontario. There Frank A. Ross was reared and educated. 
Upon reaching manhood he entered the insurance business, with which he 
has ever since been identified, his territory being principally in northwestern 
Iowa. He is known as one of the prominent insurance men of the state 
and has made his home in Des Moines for the past fifteen years. His wii'e 
is a valued member of the Methodist church and is a lady of many excel- 
lent qualities of mind and heart. 

J. Clifford Ross received his preliminary education in the public schools 
and continued his studies in the East Des Moines high school and the 
Drake University. In 1904 he matriculated in the medical department of 
Drake University, where he continued for two years, and then entered the 
St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which he was grad- 
uated with a degree of M. D. On account of his high standing in his 
class he was given opportunity of interneship in Jefferson Hospital, St. 



2-2C) HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Louis, and was connected with that institution for one year. In July, 1910, 
he began practice at Slater, where he siiowed an ability as a physician and 
surgeon which attracted a steadily growing patronage. Recently, however, 
he removed to Ogden, Boone county, Iowa. 

On the 2ist of September, 1910, Dr. Ross was united in marriage to 
Miss Edna Hendry, a daughter of J. G. Hendry, a well known banker of 
Bridgewater, Iowa. In addition to his professional societies Dr. Ross is 
prominently identified with the Masonic order, holding membership in 
Home Lodge, No. 370, A. F. & A. M.; Des Moines Consistory, No. 3, 
A. A. S. R. ; and Za-ga-zig Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., all of Des Moines. 
He is also identified with Des Moines Lodge, No. 98, B. P. O. E. He is 
not affiliated with any religious denomination, but his wife holds member- 
ship in the Methodist church. Politically he gives his support to individ- 
uals rather than to party and therefore belongs to that growing class of 
citizens recognized as independent. Having made thorough preparation 
for the practice of his profession. Dr. Ross has met with marked success 
from the very start and he now enjoys the confidence of all who know him. 
Being gifted with a pleasing address he readily makes friends and is recog- 
nized as a valuable citizen not only on account of his ability in the healing 
art but also on account of the interest which he takes in the general wel- 
fare of the community. 



WILLIAM K. WOOD. 



One of tlie first pioneers of Story county, now living, was William K. 
Wood, who has resided in this ccninty continuously for fifty-nine years. 
He was born in Logan county, Ohio, on the 19th of .\pril, 1823. and is a 
son of John G. and Anna (Kennison^l Wood. The father was a native of 
Kentucky and the mother of Virginia. Inn they were both living in Ohio 
at the time of their marriage and continued to live there for some vears 
after. During the boyhood of our subject, however, they removed to 
Kosciusko county, Indiana, where Mrs. Wood died in 1844. About ten 
years thereafter John G. Wood went to Iowa, locating in Story countv, 
where he was living at the time of his demise on the 27th of January, 
1870, having arrived at the venerable age of seventy-eight years. At the 
age of twenty he entered the service of his country being stationed on the 
northern frontier during our second war with Great Britain in 1812. He 
was a very religious man and for many years was a communicant of the 
Baptist church. The paternal grandfather of William K. Wood was a 
native of England. 

Mr. Wood was reared at home, obtaining his education in the brief se.s- 
sions of the district school which was held in a log schoolhousc, which, in 
common with those of the day, was but inadequately lighted by means of 




Wll.LIA-M K. Will ID 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 229 

the tiny panes in the small wiiulows and the ventilation ami heating were 
equality poor, the scholars sitting near the fireplace suffering from the in- 
tense heat and those near the windows shivering with the cold. 

On the 17th of October. 1847, Air. Wood was united in marriage to 
Aliss Melinda Corey and two years later he came west, settling in Corey 
Grove, Polk county, Iowa, on the 22d of June, 1849. They continued to 
live there for eighteen months and in the spring of 1851 removed to Story 
county, locating on the farm where Air. Wood still lives. It is situated on 
the northeast quarter of section 16, Indian Creek township, and was orig- 
inally school land. When he first settled here all grain had to be hauled 
to Oskaloosa, that being the nearest milling point, and it required two 
weeks to make the trip, owing to the distance and the poor roads, which 
in many instances were little more than wagon tracks across the prairie. 
Such conditions as these could not exist long, however, in a community 
where such enterprising men as Mr. Wood resided, and very shortly he 
and his cousin, Christopher Wood, together with Nathan Webb erected 
a steam mill, adapted to both grist and saw mill purposes, just north of 
Iowa Center. This was the first steam mill built in Story county and all 
of the lumber and machinery had to be hauled in wagons from Keokuk. 
It was of great assistance to the settlers, however, and did much to simplify 
living conditions being in operation for many years. Mr. Wood has ever 
been a progressive man, always ready to aid every movement which would 
in any way tend to better conditions in the community and such men always 
succeed, and he has not been the exception. At one time he owned thir- 
teen hundred acres of land, which he has now divided among his children, 
every acre of which was acquired through his thrift, tireless energy and 
firm determination to win. Work was very scarce in Iowa in the early 
days and wages very poor. He arrived here with a sick wife and five 
dollars in money, but undaunted by conditions and ever hopeful he cheer- 
fully walked eight miles to obtain two days' work and at another time he 
went nine miles for three days' work, for which he received eight bushels 
of wheat, which provided them with their bread that year. 

Mrs. Wood died on the 29th of March, 1862. There were three chil- 
dren by this marriage but Cory died in 1863. Those living are Curtis A. 
and James H., two of the most prominent and successful live-stock com- 
mission merchants in Chicago. Mr. Wood was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Louisa Ingersoll, a native of Pennsylvania and a 
daughter of David Ingersoll. One child was born of this union, Carrie, 
the wife of Edwin Pizer, of St. James, Minnesota. Mrs. Wood passed 
away on the 3d of February, 1870, and on the 8th of the following Decem- 
ber Mr. Wood married Mrs. Julia (Addis) liull, a native of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. They had one daughter, Oueen, who is now the wife of E. P. Sum- 
mers, of Oregon City, Oregon. On the 8th of May, 1874, Mrs. Wood died 
and later Mr. Wood married his fourth and present wife, formerly Mrs. 
Sarah Davis, a daughter of John M. Griffith, who came to Story county 



230 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

from McDonougli county, Illinois, in 1868. Mrs. Wood was born and 
reared in liigiiland county. Ohio, and by her first marriage had one child. 
Ida B., the wife of Dr. Frank Thompson, of Cambridge, this county. 

Mr. Wood's ix)litical allegiance has always been given to the republican 
party. He voted at the first election held in Story county, the ])olling place 
being McDaniel's shanty, which stood on the east side of Indian creek. In 
the fall of 1868 he was elected to rejjresent his district in the legislature 
and was reelected in 1870. He served on several of the most important 
committees, discharging his duties with great credit to himself and the 
constituency to whom he was indebted for his office. He has always taken 
an active part in local politics, serving for many years in the various town- 
ship offices. He is identified with the Masonic fraternity through member- 
ship in the Nevada Lodge. Both Mr. and Mrs. ^^■ood are members of the 
church, he of the Baptist and she of the Methodist Episcopal, but they 
worship in ihe Evangelical church in Iowa Center. 

Owing to his long residence in the county and his great service in the 
upbuilding of the community as well as his faithful and at all times capable 
discharge of ])ul)lic duties he is one of tlie best known and most highly es- 
teemed and resjjccted citizens in this district. 



W. J. FREED. 



In the eightieth year of his age, W. J. Freed makes his home in Ame- 
and for more than fifty-si.x years he has been a resident of Story county, 
so that he is today numbered among its honored pioneers. He was long as- 
sociated with agricultural interests but some years ago put aside business 
cares and is now living retired in the enjoyment of well earned rest. He 
was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, September 19, 1831. His 
parents, Samuel and Nancy (Jones) Freed, were both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, where the mother spent her entire life, while the father always lived 
in that state with the exception of his last two years, which were passed in 
Michigan. He was a blacksmith by trade and an excellent mechanic. He 
served a seven years' apprenticeship and then followed the trade through- 
out his entire life. His family numbered eleven sons and two daughters, all 
of whom reached mature years with the exception of three, while four of 
the sons and one daughter are yet living. After losing his first wife the 
father married again and had two daughters by that union. 

W. J. Freed remained with his parents until eighteen years of age and 
during his youthful days worked in his father's blacksmith shop and also at 
farm labor for others. In 1849 he left the Keystone state and went to Por- 
ter county, Indiana, where he joined his older brother, Paul, residing there 
until 1834. He was married in 1852 and then began farming on his own 
account, but after two years removed to Story county, Iowa, where he has 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 231 

since lived, becoming one of tlie pioneer settlers here. He remained upon 
the farm until September, 1892, when he removed to Ames and retired to 
private life but sold his farm only five years ago. He was the owner of two 
hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land, adjoining the corpora- 
tion limits of Ontario, a town four miles west of Ames. On coming to this 
county he entered a quarter section from the government but after culti- 
vating it for a time sold that propery and purchased the two hundred and 
forty acre tract, which was in a better location and had timber upon it. 
There he carried on general farming and stock-raising and he also bought 
and shipped stock to Chicago for twenty years, that constituting an im- 
portant branch of his business. When he began shipping State Center was 
the nearest railroad point and he had to drive his stock to that place in order 
to make shipments. He was the first stock buyer in the county and in his 
business aftairs he always displayed sound judgment, keen discrimination 
and unfaltering enterprise. 

While Mr. Freed successfully conducted business affairs for many years 
he did not concentrate his energies upon individual interests to the exclu- 
sion of all else. He has ever been mindful of his duties of citizenship and 
in many ways has promoted public progress. On one occasion he spent two 
days and one night in soliciting subscriptions in Story and Boone counties 
for the location of the Iowa State Agricultural College. Five counties were 
working very hard to secure the school, but the untiring efforts of Mr. Freed 
and others resulted in having the college located at Ames. One man gave 
thirty acres of a stone quarry and Mr. Freed opened this up and quarried 
the rock for the foundation for the first buildings of the college erected 
here. He also raised and dressed a pig which his wife roasted for the free 
dinner which was held on the 4th of July, 1859, to celebrate the establish- 
ment of the college, the entire countryside being invited to attend the feast. 

In his political views Mr. Freed has always been a republican and an 
earnest worker in the party ranks. He served for fourteen years as justice 
of the peace and for two terms as county supervisor. While filling that 
position the county board located the county farm and built the first house 
thereon. When Mr. Freed came to Iowa the city of Ames had not been 
founded and there was no railroad in the locality. Goods were hauled from 
Keokuk and after the railroad was built to Iowa City Mr. Freed hauled 
goods from that point to Boonesboro, about two hundred miles, with ox 
teams. When he was living in Indiana he helped get out timber for the 
construction of the Michigan Southern, the first railroad into Chicago. He 
has always been on the side of progress and improvement, and his influence 
has been a progressive element in the general development of the com- 
munity. 

On the I2th of September, 1852, Mr. Freed was united in marriage to 
Miss Catharine D. \Miite, who was born in Wayne county, Ohio, June 5, 
1833. and went to Indiana with her parents, James and Marjorie (Dough- 
erty) White. Mr. and Mrs. Freed were married in Indiana and unto them 



232 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

were born eight children: X'aleria A., the wife of Clate Foster, of South 
Dakota; Mary Jane, the wife of Harvey Boughnian, of Ames; Alice G., 
the wife of Mark Prine, of Nebraska; Arthur D., a farmer of Kelley, 
Iowa; Anna, the wife of William Prine. of Clinton, Iowa; Nancy Elizabeth, 
the wife of Joseph Goldberger, of Mapleton, Iowa; Flora C, the wife of 
Charles Antes, of South Dakota ; and Kittie B., who is a graduate of the 
Iowa State College and is now librarian of the public library of Ames. 
The daughter Alice was for three years a student in the Iowa State 
College. Four of the daughters have been school-teachers and all of the 
children are members of the Christian church. 

For forty years Mr. and Mrs. Freed have held membership in the Chris- 
tian church of Ames and for thirty-seven years he has been one of its 
elders. He has ever taken active and helpful part in the church work, doing 
all in his power to promote its growth and extend its intluence. His politi- 
cal allegiance has been given to the republican party since 1856, when he 
supported John C. Fremont. The family residence is at No. 514 Fifth 
street and in addition to this Mr. I-"reed owns four other dwellings in .Vmes. 
He has always enjoyed good health and has been an active man. He and 
his family were one of a party of live families that came here together, but 
Mr. and Mrs. Freed are now the only representatives of the older genera- 
tion now living. They have always enjoyed the warm regard, good will 
and confidence of those who know them and they are today among the most 
esteemed and venerable citizens of the county. They have witnessed many 
changes here, for at the time of their arrival Story county was largely an 
unimproved and unsettled district. They have seen towns and villages 
s])ring up, farms entered and improved and the work of general progress 
carried steadily forward. 



CART. A. ROSENFFJ.D. 

Carl A. Rosenfeld, a representative and prominent agriculturist of 
Story county was born December 10, 1875, upon his present farm on sec- 
tion 33, Washington towiishii). about a mile north of Kelley. and has always 
resided here, his time and energies being now given to the cultivation 
of a place of one hundred and ninety acres on section 33. and also to a 
portion of a tract of three hundred and seventy acres which belongs to 
him, his mother and sister. It is known as the Rosengift farm and is de- 
voted to stock-raising. 

His parents were George and Louise ( I'ritch ) Rosenfeld. the former a 
native of Baden and the latter of Saxony, Germany. The father was born 
June 4, 1824, and in early manhood served for three years in the German 
army. He was a schoolmate of General .Siegel, the distinguished German 
citizen, and because of his active participation in the revolution of 1848 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 233 

sought a home and hberty in America and won distinction here by his ser- 
vice in the Civil war. George Rosenfeld learned the mason's trade in his 
native land where he remained until 1855, when he crossed the Atlantic 
to Xew York. The same year he was married there to Louise Fritch and 
soon afterward they removed to Morrison, Illinois, where he worked at 
his trade until 1873, when he came with his family to Story county and 
settled upon the farm which is now the family homestead and upon which 
he resided until his death, which occurred on the 6th of March, 1902. He 
was a very successful agriculturist, capably managing his business alifairs 
and making other investments in property until he was the owner of five 
hundred and twenty-five acres of valuable land in this county at the time 
of his death, including the tract which is now cultivated by his son Carl. 
The father devoted his time to general farming and stock feeding. His 
wife, who still survives him, was born in Sa.xony, Germany, January 3, 
1855. She is now a resident of Ames. By her marriage she became the 
mother of four children : Lester G., who is living a mile south of the Rosen- 
gift farm and half a mile east of Kelley on a part of the old home place; 
Clara, the wife of R. W. Crane, of Trenton, Missouri ; Carl A. ; and Minnie, 
the wife of C. L. Severly, of Ames. 

Carl A. Rosenfeld spent his youthful days on the old homestead, and 
his experiences were those which usually fall to the farm lad. He pur- 
sued his education in the public schools and when not busy with his text- 
books worked in the fields under the direction of his father, so that his 
training well qualified him to take charge of a farm of his own when he 
•started out in life independently. He is now extensively and successfrlly 
engaged in the breeding of Aberdeen Angus cattle and in 1909 sold an 
Angus bull calf, Prince Pride, which was the first Aberdeen Angus to be 
shipped from the LTnited States to the Argentine RepubHc. being sold direct 
by Mr. Rosenfeld to South American parties. He has made exhibitions of 
stock at the international stock shows at Chicago for the past four years. He 
has been engaged in stock-breeding since 1902 and' keeps from thirty to one 
hundred head of Aberdeen Angus cattle upon his place. He is also engaged 
in breeding Poland China hogs, Belgium horses and Plymouth Rock chick- 
ens. All lines of his stock are registered and all are thoroughbreds except 
some stock which he feeds for general market. His whole time is devoted 
to the stock business, and he has sold some very fine cattle, horses and hogs. 
The calf which he shipped to South America brought six hundred :ind 
twenty-five dollars. 

On the 20th of March, 1901, Mr. Rosenfeld was married to Miss Anna 
E. Johnston, who was born in Ogden, Iowa, September 4. 1882, and is a 
daughter of Louis and Marie Hermanson, natives of Denmark. Mrs. 
Rosenfeld lost her mother while an infant and was reared by John John- 
ston, taking his name. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rosenfeld have been born three 
children, George Albert, Louise Marie and Clyde Lester. 



234 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

rile family is prominent in the community and ]\Ir. Rosenfeld occin-ies 
a leading position among the stock-raisers of this part of the state, conduct- 
ing a business of extensive proportions and regarded throughout Iowa as 
an authority upon Aberdeen Angus cattle. He is a most energetic man, 
and his well formulated plans indicate sound judgment and keen discrimi- 
nation. 



DAXIELGUV .MILLS, M. D. 

Dr. Daniel Guy Mills, who for fifteen years has engaged in the general 
practice of medicine at McCallsburg, progressing continuously by reason of 
his broadening experience and wide reading and study, was born in Ot- 
tawa, La Salle county. Illinois, July 7, ilSdi. but from the age of five 
years has been a resident of Story county. 

It was in 1866 that his parents, Edward Clark and Levantia D. (Guy) 
Mills, came to Iowa. They were natives of New York, the former born 
at Cohoes and the latter at Guilford. Mr. Mills was of English lineage, his 
parents having reached Cohoes only a short period before his birth. He 
was a son of Daniel and Sarah Mills, who after living for some time in 
the Empire state removed westward to Ottawa. Illinois, when Edward C. 
Mills was a youth of seventeen years. After arriving at years of maturity 
he wedded Levantia D. Guy. who when fifteen years of age went to East 
Paw])aw. Illinois, with her parents, George and Rebecca (Keith) Guy. 
Her mother was horn in Ireland of Scotch parentage. After living in 
Illinois until i8(if) Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Mills came to Story county. 
Iowa, settling near Iowa Center, in Indian Creek township. The father 
died there when but forty-two years of age, and the mother, long surviving 
him, passed away in this county in 1907, at the age of seventy. Mr. Mills 
had followed farming as a life work and was the owner of one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Indian Creek township. The family num- 
bered eight children: Daniel G. ; William E., who is living in Maxwell. 
Iowa; Ida, who died at the age of eighteen months; Lela A., the wife of 
L. E. Byers, who resides at Sante ¥c on the Isle of Pines, in the West 
Indies; Frank W.. a practicing physician at Otlumwa. Iowa; Charles C. 
who is located in Oklahoma; Rose A., the wife of John E. Douglas, of 
Polk county; and Levantia D.. also residing at the Isle of Pines, in the 
West Indies. 

Reared upon the old homestead farm in Indian Creek township. Dr. 
Mills had the usual experiences of farm boys, working in the fields when 
not occupied with the duties of the schoolroom and learning many lessons 
from close contact with nature. Desirous of securing a broader education 
than had hitherto been aflfordcfl him, he entered the Iowa State University 
of Iowa City in 1892 and, electing to pursue the medical course, was grad- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 235 

uated il. D. from that institution in the spring of 1896. He then began 
practice in McCallsburg, where he has since been located, and throughout 
the intervening years has enjoyed a large and growing practice, indicative 
of the confidence reposed in his skill and ability by his fellow townsmen. 
He is conscientious in the performance of all professional duties, carefully 
diagnoses his cases and his judgment is rarely, if ever, at fault. He keeps 
in close touch with the advancement of the profession through his member- 
ship in the Story County Medical Society and the Iowa State Medical So- 
ciety. 

In 1882 Dr. Mills was married to Miss Sarah L. Morrison, who was 
born in Cedar county, Iowa, April 15, 1862, a daughter of John A. and 
Fannie J. (Wilson) Morrison, who came to this county when Mrs. Mills 
was about fifteen years of age, settling in Collins township. The father is 
now deceased, while the mother resides in Rhodes, Iowa. Dr. and Mrs. 
Mills have become the parents of four children. Guy Wilson, the eldest, 
now editor of the Zearing Advocate, married Leila E. Peck and has two 
children, Carrol B. and Lawrence G. John Clark, editor of the McCalls- 
burg Tribune, wedded Myrtle R. Marsh and had two children : Everard C, 
now deceased; and Linn Edward. Altha May is the wife of C. T. Knut- 
son, of McCallsburg, and has one son, Chester Andrew. Edward Wil- 
liam, the youngest of the family, is at home. 

Dr. Mills holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Royal Neighbors. His political allegiance is stanchly given to the 
republican party and he is an active and helpful worker in its ranks. He 
served for four years as county coroner but otherwise has not sought ofiice, 
for his professional duties make constant demand upon his time and at- 
tention. He is widely recognized as an able physician and in his practice 
conforms at all times to a high standard of professional ethics. 



PHILIP ALLEN. 



Philip Allen, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on 
section 22, Milford township, was born in Randolph county, Indiana, April 
24, 1854. his parents being Philip and Louisa Allen. His father died of 
cholera during the infancy of his son and namesake, and the boy was left 
an orphan when but a year old, at the mother's death. He was the youngest 
of four children, the others being: George W.. a farmer living at Macki- 
naw, Illinois; Mary, a resident of Winchester, Indiana, who is the widow 
of Moses Conyers, a Civil war veteran ; and Ella, the wife of William 
Denton, also of Winchester, Indiana. 

After the death of his parents, Philip Allen was reared by other people 
until about fifteen years of age, when he started out in life on his own 
account. From that time on he practically had no home until he made one 



236 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

of his own. Indeed, he earned his Hving from the age of ten years, work- 
ing at farm labor by the month in Indiana and Illinois until 1896, when 
he came to Iowa. During the period of his residence in Illinois, he lived 
in Tazewell county, until four years prior to his removal to Iowa, which 
period he spent in Iroquois county. In 1896 he purchased his present farm 
coniprising one hundred and sixty acres on section 22, Milford township, 
and in the intervening period of fifteen years he has carried on general 
agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. The past year he has rented his 
land, but during nearly tlie entire period of his residence in Iowa he has 
personally cultivated the tields, which he has brought under a high state 
of improvement, adding all of the accessories and equipments of the model 
farm of the twentieth century. 

In 1874 Mr. .\llen was united in marriage to Miss Mary Rulon, who 
was born in Tazewell county. Illinois, May 9, 1855, a daughter of Caleb 
Rulon. Unto them have been born five children : Frank, who is living at 
Zeering, Warren township; Sadie, the wife of M. L. Sower, of Milford 
tow^nship ; Iva. who became the wife of Henry Hopper and died August 3, 
1910, leaving twin sons, Harold Allen and Harlan Eugene, who were born 
July 27, 1910; George, a law student of the Chicago Law University, who 
was graduated from the Liberal Arts College of the University of Illinois 
before entering upon his law course; and May, the wife of C. A. Chitty, a 
farmer of Milford township. 

Mr. Allen holds membership with the Presbyterian church of Nevada 
and is most loyal to its teachings and principles. There were many hard 
and trying experiences in his youth, but he learned the difficult lesson that 
integrity and character are worth more in the world than advancement and 
success. He therefore guided his life along the lines of straightforward, 
honorable manhood and has not only won a creditable name but also a 
goodly measure of prosperity, for his industry, reliability and perseverance 
brought to him the substantial rewards of labor, and he is now one of the 
well-to-do farmers of his communitv. 



WILLIAM K( )l',l-:Kr Ill-ATIl. 

Thirty-three years ago William Robert Heath, a descendant of go. i 1 
pioneer American stock, came to Story county, and as he and his wife now 
own a beautiful farm of two hundred and forty acres in Collins township, 
he sees no cause to regret taking up his home in Iowa. He was born in 
Hamilton county, Indiana, April 10, 1835, a .son of John .-\. and Sarah 
(Glass) Heath, the former of whom was a native of South Carolina anl 
the latter of Clark county, Indiana, where they were married, .\fter tiuir 
marriage the young couple were conveyed by the father-in-law to a portimi 
of Hamilton county. Indiana, which up to that time liad not been settle ' 



i 




MR. AXD MRS. \V. R. HEATH 



HISTORY OF, STORY COUNTY 239 

Their household goods were unloaded in the midst of the virgin forest 
and there JMr. Heath built a log cabin in which he and his bride took up 
their residence. He cleared away the timber and as the years passed be- 
came the owner of a valuable farm of two hundred and forty acres in 
Hamilton county, Indiana, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 
The father was born June i6, 1803. and departed this life September 20, 
1888. at the age of eighty-five years. The mother was born July 5, 1806, 
and passed away January 8. 1864, being about fifty-eight years of age. 
Mr. Heath was originally a whig and upon the organization of the republi- 
can party became one of its stanch supporters. Through his high character 
and unselfish interest in the welfare of others he made a lasting impression 
upon all who knew him. He and his wife were devout Christians and were 
active workers in the United Brethren church. 

William Robert Heath was educated in the little log schoolhouse of the 
neighborhood in which he was reared and after he had advanced as far as 
possible in his studies in the district school his father purchased a scholar- 
ship in the United Brethren College at Hartsville, which he urged his son 
to make use of. The latter, however, was determined to learn a trade and 
instead of securing a college education he was at eighteen years of age ap- 
prenticed to a cabinet-maker. He applied himself assiduously to the trade 
for fourteen years, also becoming an undertaker and making all the coffins 
himself which he disposed of during that time. In 1866 he turned his at- 
tention to farming and rented the old homestead which he cultivated for 
twelve years. The west presented inducements which Mr. Heath could 
not well resist and accordingly in 1878 he came to Collins township, Story 
county, and for three years engaged in farming on rented land. Having 
prospered in his work, he bought the old Benjamin Shenkle homestead, to 
which he removed in 1881, making it his permanent place of residence. He 
has carried on general farming, sparing no pains to secure the best results 
from his work. Being very thorough in everything he undertakes, he has 
brought the farm to a high state of cultivation and has one of the model 
places of the township. 

On the 9th of December. 1855, Mr. Heath was united in marriage to 
Miss Rachel Shenkle, a daughter of Benjamin Shenkle. of Story county, 
a record of whom is found in the sketch of his son, W. T. B. Shenkle, 
which appears elsewhere in this work. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Heath six 
children have been born, four of whom are now living, namely : Etta, the 
wife of Loren Fowler, of Baxter, Iowa; Belle, at home; John AI., of Meri- 
dian, Oklahoma; and Halleck F., also at home. 

Mr. Heath cast his first vote for John C. Fremont for president of the 
United States and he has never departed from his allegiance to the republi- 
can party, having firm faith that its principles are better adapted than those 
of any other political organization to advance the prosperity of the entire 
country. He has never aspired to public office, preferring the quiet chan- 
nels of private life to the turmoil of political affairs, and each day he has 



240 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

attempted to perform his duties as they arose according to the best of his 
abihty. Mrs. Heath has been a valued assistant to her husband and is 
prominently identified with the social interests of the community, being 
also an active member of the United Brethren church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Heath have many friends in Story county who greatly esteem ihem for 
their genial qualities. 



WILI.ARD MORRIS. 



Willard Morris is a remarkably well preserved man of eighty-five years, 
still active both in mind and body, giving his time and attention to the 
cultivation of a farm of fifty acres which is situated on section 27, Frank- 
lin township. He previously owned a much larger amount but has sold a 
portion of his land. He was born in Lebanon, Madison county. New 
York. June 21. 1825, his parents being William and Emma (Rice) Morris, 
who spent the greater part of their lives in the Empire state. They were 
probably natives of Massachusetts but both died in New York where the 
father had followed the shoemaker's trade for many years and also en- 
gaged to some extent in farming. Their children were William, Catharine, 
Mary Ann, John, Willard, Jonathan, Abigail. Cornelia and two who died 
in infancy. 

Willard Morris is the only one of the family now living. His boyhood 
and youth were spent in the east and he resided in Madison county, New 
York, until 1854. when he sought the opportunities of the growing west, 
making his way to Chatham. Sangamon county, Illinois. In that locality 
he worked on a farm by the month. He had made the journey across the 
country with a horse team from New York to Illinois and although he 
had no capital at the time he hoped, by earnest labor and unfaltering dili- 
gence, to become the possessor of a comfortable competence. He con- 
tinued to work at farm labor for three years in Sangamon count>- and in 
February, 1857, went to McLean county, Illinois, where he spent a year 
devoting his attention to agricultural pursuits, but the following year he 
became a resident of Whiteside county, Illinois, where he cultivated a 
rented farm. In 1875 he took up his abode in Story county. Iowa, where 
he has since resided, his time and energies being given to the cultivation 
and improvement of his present farm which now comprises fifty acres of 
rich and arable land. In former years he was much more extensively en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits but because of advanced age has 
sold one hundred and sixty acres of his property. His remarkable preser- 
vation of his powers, however, enables him to contiinic the work on the 
homestead although he is now eighty-five years of age. 

In 1856 in Lebanon, New York. Mr. Morris was united in marriage to 
Miss Adalinc Leonard, who was born .April 13. 1831. in New York, and 



HISTORY OE STORY COUNTY 241 

died in Story county, January 20. 1907. In their family were seven chil- 
dren : Addie. the wife of Chester Davis, of Franklin township ; Ella, the 
wife of L. G. Rosenfeld. who is living in Washington township; Josephine, 
who is the widow of William Kinnan and resides with her father ; Walter 
L. and Erank E., who are mentioned elsewhere in this volume ; Gertrude, 
a school teacher residing with her father; and L. R. Morris, who is pro- 
prietor of a livery stable at Ames. Mr. Morris is also rearing a boy, John 
Cocklin, who was born February 8, 1906. His father was killed by the 
cars when the child was but two weeks old, at which time he became a 
member of the Morris household. He is the pet of Mrs. Kinnan, who 
resides with her father. 

During the period of his residence here Mr. Morris has ever enjoyed 
and merited the confidence and high regard of his fellow citizens and 
today is one of the most honored as well as one of the venerable residents 
of the county. Few would realize, however, from his appearance that he 
has passed the eighty-fifth milestone on life's journey, for he possesses the 
vigor of many a man of younger years and in spirit and interests seems 
yet in his prime. 



CURTIS R. WICK. 



Having had extensive experience in various lines of business, Curtis 
R. Wick, cashier of the Exchange State Bank of Collins, was thoroughly 
prepared for the responsibility he assumed when in August, 1909, he en- 
tered upon his present duties. He is well acquainted with human nature 
and few men of his age have had a better opportunity of observing busi- 
ness methods or becoming familiar with the resources of the country, hence 
he has been highly successful in the conduct of financial affairs. 

Born in Monmouth, Illinois, February 27, 1861, he is a son of Cham- 
bers and Catherine (Foster) Wick, both of whom were natives of Arm- 
strong county, Pennsylvania. They were married in their native county 
and about 1858 removed to Warren county, Illinois, where the father en- 
gaged in farming. He departed this life about a year after his son was 
born, and the mother subsequently returned to her native state but five 
years later once more resumed her residence in Warren county, where she 
continued until her death in 1888. 

Curtis R. Wick received his preliminary education in the common 
schools and later attended the Northern Illinois Normal School and the 
Dixon Business College. .'\t the age of twenty-two years he became clerk 
in a store at Lafayette, Indiana, a position which he held for five years, 
when he went to Bartley, Nebraska, and engaged in general mercantile 
business for one year. His next employment was in the fresh meat ship- 
ping department of the Lincoln Packing & Provision Company at Lincoln, 



242 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Nebraska. He was in cliarge of this department for four years and then 
came to Manilla, Iowa, as bill clerk for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railroad and assistant agent of the United States Express Company. 
About three years later he removed to Collins as local manager of the 
Neola Elevator Company, and having become thoroughly acquainted witji 
this line of Tjusiness was made traveling auditor of the company, which 
position he held for five and one-half years. In August, 1909, he resigned 
to accept the position of cashier of the Exchange State Bank and has dis- 
charged his duties in such a way as to meet the hearty approval of officers 
and patrons of the institution. 

In 1884 Mr. Wick was united in marriage to Miss Helen Williams, of 
Lafayette, Indiana, and three children were born to this union, two of 
whom are now living: Beulah, the wife of O. H. Gearhart. of Collins 
township ; and \\'allace. who is now a student of Highland Park College at 
Des Moines. The mother of these children dying in October. 1898. Mr. 
Wick was married in June. 1910. to Mrs. Hattie Campbell, the widow of 
Charles E. Campbell and formerly Miss Hattie Carver. 

Mr. Wick ever since arriving at voting age has cast his ballot for the 
republican party. He is a member of Fervent Lodge, No. 513, A. F. & 
A. M.; Green Lodge, No. 315, I. O. O. F.. of JefTerson, Iowa; Jefferson 
Encampment, No. 103; and Crescent Camp, No. 2358, M. W. .\. He and 
his estimable wife are also connected with the Order of the l"-astern Star 
and the Royal Neighbors. He is an active worker in the Methodist church. 
of which he is a trustee, while Mrs. Wick holds membership in the Chris- 
tian church. He is a busy man but he always has time to extend a helping 
hand to one less fortunate than himself and is justly held in high regard 
wherever he is known, his success being the merited result of a wisely 
directed energy. 



THOMAS S. ERICKSON. 

Although the home of Thomas S. Erickson stands within the corpora- 
tion limits of Roland, it is situated upon a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres of which all but forty acres lies within the boundaries of the city. 
His holdings elsewhere make him one of the extensive landowners of this 
part of the county, and from his property he derives a substantial annual 
income, resulting largely from the care and labor which he bestows upon 
his place in keeping with the progressive spirit of the a^e. He is practical 
in all that he does and his plans are well formulated. System characterize^ 
all of his imdertakings, and his methods will at all times bear the closc-i 
investigation and scrutiny. 

Mr. Erickson was born in the neighboring state of Illinois, his birtli 
having there occurred in La Salle county on the ist of November, 1862. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 243 

His parents were Solomon and Anna (HougelandJ Erickson, who were 
natives of Imsland, Norway, where they were reared and married. In 
ihc spring of 1857 they arrived in Illinois, bringing with them their little 
daughter Anna. Establishing their home in La Salle county, they were 
residents of that locality until they came to Story county, Iowa, in the 
spring of 1868. Settling in .Milford township the father devoted his en- 
ergies to general agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred 
January 12, 1889, when he was fifty-three years of age. His widow re- 
mained upon the farm until 1900, when she removed to Roland where she 
now resides. Mr. Erickson was the owner of two hundred and fifty-three 
acres of land, all of which was cultivated and improved by him, his labors 
converting it into one of the fine farms of the district. He was an active 
and devoted member of the Lutheran church, and his upright, honorable 
life won him kindly regard. The family numbered six children: Anna, 
now the wife of O. C. Hoagland, of Alarshalltown, Iowa. Elizabeth, the 
wife of H. J. Amondson, of Howard township; Thomas S. ; Ole J., who 
IS living in Roland; Ira, a resident of Howard township; and Sarah, the 
wife of L. M. Olson, of Roland. 

Amid the usual conditions and environment of farm life Tliomas S. 
Erickson spent his youthful days. The public schools afforded him his 
educational privileges and he worked in the fields with his father up to the 
time of his marriage, when he removed to a farm adjoining the old home 
place, having in 1887 purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. A 
laudable ambition to attain success prompted him to bend every energy 
toward the development and improvement of his place which he continued 
to cultivate until 1894, when he sold that property and invested in two 
hundred and forty acres in Warren township. There he resided until the 
spring of 1903, when he removed to his present place within the corpora- 
tion limits of Roland. He has in this farm a quarter section of which one 
hundred and twenty acres lies within the corporation limits of the town. 
He also retains the two hundred and forty-acre tract in Warren township 
and is the owner of eighty acres of timber within the corporation limits 
of Story City, so that his possessions aggregate four hundred and eight 
acres. Both farms are well improved and indicate his careful supervision 
and progressive, practical methods. Moreover, he is a stockholder in the 
Farmers Savings Bank of Roland and his energy and determination have 
classed him with the representative business men of his part of the county. 

Pleasantly situated in his home life, Mr. Erickson was married May 
25, 1893, to Maggie Hegland, who was born in. Roland, March 19, 1875, a 
daughter of Michael and Carolina (Larson) Hegland, both of whom were 
natives of Norway but are now residents of Roland. The children of this 
marriage are: Stella, who was born August i, 1894; Maurice, born Oc- 
tober 12, 1896; Lester, who was born October 7, 1898, and died at the 
age of six months; Gladys, born December 12, 1900; Laurence, born Sep- 



244 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

tcmber 19, 1906; and Fern and Flora, twins, who were born July 3, 1909. 
The latter died when but a month old. 

The parents hold membership in the Lutheran church and are people 
of genuine personal worth, highly esteemed throughout the community. 
Both belong to old and honored pioneer families of which they are worthy 
representatives. Mr. Erickson votes with the republican party, and in 
matters of citizenship his influence is always found on the side of reform 
and im])rovcnient. while in every relation of life he stands for justice, 
truth and right. 



FRED C. McC.ALL. 



I'rominent among the enterprising business men of Nevada is Fred C. 
McCall, now filling the position of postmaster and long a well known and 
popular resident of this city. He was born on October 7, 186S, a son of 
Captain Thomas Clifton and Mary A. ( lioynton) McCall, and the grand- 
son of Samuel \V. and Ann (Clifti)n) McCall. Tiie great-grandfather, 
Thomas Clifton, served in the Revolutionary war for seven years, doing 
duty under General (ircen most of the time. He participated in the battle 
of Cowpens and in other important engagements. Samuel W. McCall was 
a soldier of the war of 1812 and was wounded in battle, a 
ball striking him in the arm. He was a son of another Samuel McCall 
who was a soldier in the American army in the war for independence. The 
family is of Scotch-Irish lineage and was founded in America by three 
brothers who were Scotchmen but came from the Xorth of Ireland to the 
new world. 

Captain Thomas Clifton McCall, the father of Fred McCall. was born 
in Ross county, Ohio, September 4, 1827, and in 1836, when a small boy, 
came to Iowa with his parents. The summer was passed at Burlington, 
after which they removed to Canton. Illinois, where they remained for 
ten years. In the fall of 1846 they became residents of Polk county. Iowa, 
where they spent about a decade. Thomas C. McCall accompanied his 
parents on their various removals and while living in Polk county was 
married, his first union being with Miss Garret. He then located at Des 
Moines and afterward at Sioux City and Council Bluffs, where he was en- 
gaged in the land business. In 1858 he came to Nevada, where he resided 
until his death, and through much of the period of his residence here he 
carried on a real-estate business. He was reared in the faith of the whig 
party and upon the organization of the republican party joined its ranks, 
giving to it earnest and stalwart support. He became a recognized leader 
in [lolitical circles in Story county and was a member of the ninth general 
assembly, also of the nineteenth and twentieth assemblies and was a mem- 
ber of the state senate, representing I'.oone and Story counties at the time 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 245 

of his death. The portrait of Captain Thomas CHfton McCall hangs in 
the gallery of Iowa's distinguished citizens in the state Historical building 
at Des Moines, Iowa. At one time he was a member of the state central 
committee and did everything in his power to further the interests of the 
republican party, believing lirmly in its principles as factors in good gov- 
ernment. He was for many years a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and for a long period was an elder in the Presbyterian 
church. His business affairs were most carefully conducted and by judi- 
cious investment he became an extensive landowner, having over three 
thousand acres at one time. By his first marriage he had one son, John 
A., now a practicing attorney at Des Moines. After losing his first wife 
he wedded Mary A. Boynton and unto them were born three children : 
Minnie Ellen, now the wife of A. E. Cronenwett, of Monrovia, Califor- 
nia ; Fred C, of this review ; and Edward M., an attorney of Nevada. For 
his third wife the father chose Clara Kennedy, of Carrollton, Ohio, and 
she is now a resident of Nevada. There was one son of this marriage who 
died at the age of five years. 

In the public schools of Nevada, Iowa, Fred C. McCall pursued his 
education until he had completed the course, except the last term, leaving 
the high school to enter the State Agricultural College at Ames, Iowa, in 
February, 1884. He afterward spent a summer in Colorado and about a 
year in California, and upon his return to Nevada engaged in the real 
estate business in connection with his father, the partnership continuing 
from 1889 until the father's death on the nth of August, 1892. Fred C. 
McCall then continued in the real estate business under his own name, 
operating quite extensively in property here until appointed postmaster of 
Nevada on the ist of February, 1902. He took charge of the office on the 
1st of March, 1902, and has filled the position to the present time, having 
been twice reappointed. He is, moreover, well known in financial circles 
of this city as a director of the First National Bank, to which office he was 
elected six years ago. His business enterprise makes him a valued factor 
of the community, and he has brought to his official duties the same pro- 
gressive spirit and close application which characterizes the conduct of his 
private business. 

On the 2d of September, 1890, Mr. McCall was married to Miss Alice 
Klove, a native of Iowa and a daughter of Edwin Klove, of Nevada, of 
whom mention is made elsewhere in this work. Her death occurred in 
February, 1891, and on the 7th of May, 1895, Mr. McCall was joined in 
wedlock to Edith V. Ferner, who was born in this city and is a daughter 
of James D. Ferner, who was postmaster here prior to Mr. McCall's ap- 
pointment to the office and is now deceased. His widow survives him and 
still makes her home in Nevada. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. 
McCall has been blessed with two children, Thomas Clifton and Elva 
Hazel. 



246 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Reared in the faith of the repubhcan party. Mr. McCall has seen no 
cause to change his allegiance since arriving at adult age, for mature judg- 
ment sanctions that course, and he therefore gives to it stalwart support. 
In 1896 he served as chairman of the county central committee. When but 
twenty-one years of age he was elected township clerk and filled the posi- 
tion for a term — his first political office. He has also been a member of the 
Nevada school board. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, hold- 
ing membership in E.xcalibur Commandery, K. T., at Boone, and is a 
charter member of Za-ga-zig Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Des Moines. 
His connections with the blue lodge and chapter are at Nevada and he also 
belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge in Nevada. He has a very wide ac- 
quaintance in the state which has always been his home, and his substantial 
qualities have won for him the high and enduring regard of many friends. 
He is recognized as, a man true to every trust reposed in him, and whether 
in office or out of it he displays the qualities of public-spirited citizenship 
in his loyalty to the general good. 



O. M. JOHNSON. 



No obstacles seem too great for some indomitable spirits to overcome 
and the life histories of many men in this work indicate that a young man 
may attain practically any position in the business world he may desire 
provided he thoroughly prepares him.'iclf and steadfastly perseveres. O. M. 
Johnson, whose name stands at the head of this sketch, came to .America 
from a foreign land a poor boy ; today he has attained a handsome com- 
petence and is one of the honored men of Story county, who represent the 
best citizenship. He was born in Norway. February 25. 1850, son of John 
and Rachel (Halverson) Johnson, both of whom passed their entire lives in 
Norway. 

O. M. Johnson acquired his early education in the schools of his native 
land and also had the advantage of one year's attendance at .Augsburg 
School at Minneapolis. Alinnesota. Being ambitious as a boy to attain an 
honorable place in life even though he should be obliged to take up his 
home among strangers, he came to America when sixteen years of age. 
After spending one year in La Salle county, Illinois, he was attracted to 
Story county, Iowa, where he worked for two or three years as a farm 
laborer, at the same time becoming acquainted with the language and cus- 
toms of the country. In 1S71 he .secured a position with Baldwin &• Max- 
well, merchants of Cambridge, and for about four years drove a team for 
that firm. However, he was on the lookout for a more promising position, 
which proved to lie a clerkship in the store of J. D. Brizley, of Cambridge, 
in which position he continued for about five years, then going to Shcldahl 
as clerk in the store of Nelson & Ersland for two years. Returning to 




O. M. .JOHNSON 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 249 

Cambridge, he began on his own account in the mercantile business under 
title of O. j\I. Johnson di Company, seUing out six years later in order to 
accept a position at Sheldahl under the employ of Oley Nelson, formerly 
senior member of the firm of Nelson & Ersland. In the summer of the 
same year Mr. Nelson removed his business to Slater and Mr. Johnson 
went with him, continuing until 1894, when he rented Mr. Nelson's elevator 
at Slater and became identified with the grain business, purchasing the ele- 
vator in 1903. In 1904 Mr. Johnson bought from John \'alland his eleva- 
tor and lumber yard at Huxley and since that time has been one of the 
leading men of business in the community. 

In 1879 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Alice Larson, a 
native of Norway, who located in Illinois in 1867 and came to Story county, 
Iowa, in 1875. Eight children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson, four of whom are now living, namely: Joseph, now superintendent 
of the city playgrounds of Dayton, Ohio; Rebecca, a teacher of music in 
the Jewell Lutheran College; Martin, cashier of the Farmers Savings Bank 
of Alleman, Iowa ; and Lennie, now attending the Jewell Lutheran College. 

Mr. Johnson is a man who fearlessly follows his convictions in political 
matters and having observed the evil etifects of the saloon he is a stanch ad- 
vocate of prohibition. That his neighbors have great confidence in his judg- 
ment is evinced by the fact that he is now serving his third term as mayor 
of Huxley and for six years past has been a valued member of the school 
board, having assisted very materially in the erection of the new school 
building. He and his wife are consistent members of the Lutheran church. 
He has from the beginning of his career been remarkably energetic and 
wide-awake, and whatever rewards he has achieved have come to him as 
the result of his own well directed efforts. 



WILLIAM GATES. 



Nevada has been signally favored in the class of men who have filled 
lier public offices, for on the whole they have been practical business men 
who have brought to the discharge of their official duties the same keen 
insight and spirit of enterprise which characterizes their conduct of private 
interests. In a history of those vvfhose records have been creditable and 
beneficial to the city mention should be made of William Gates, who is 
now Nevada's chief executive and one whose ability and fidelity are 
strongly manifest by the fact that he is now serving in the office for the 
fifth term. 

He was born in Ireland, on the 17th of March, 1842, and is a son of 
John and Katharine (Conigan) Gates, who were likewise native's of the 
Emerald isle but in 1845 sailed for Canada, establishing their home at 
Niagara-on-the-Lake. They brought with them their five children, but the 



■2-do history of story county 

mother died soon after their arrival. The father kept the children to- 
gether for a few years but they later separated, as one after another started 
out in business life. The father continued his residence in Canada until 
his death, which occurred in 1869. The five children of the family are: 
John, who died in Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; Margaret, who died in Los Angeles, 
Cahfornia; Jennie, the widow of Dr. E. H. Akin and a resident of Oak- 
land, California; William, of this review; and Maria, the widow of Wil- 
liam Taber, of Minneapolis. 

William Gates was only three years of age when brought by his parents 
to the new world. He resided at Niagara, Canada, until twelve years of 
age, when he took up his abode in the vicinity of Hamilton, where he re- 
sided until the spring of 1865. In that year he came direct to Nevada 
where he has resided continuously since. At twelve years of age he began 
learning the blacksmith trade which he followed until January i, icjcx), and 
has worked to some extent at the trade since that time in connection with 
his sons who succeeded him to the business here. In 1895 he built a brick 
shop forty by sixty feet and two stories in height. For many years he 
carried on a very extensive business because of his expert workmanship 
and his honorable dealing. He now owns two hundred and eighty acres of 
valuable land four miles southwest of Nevada, which he has improved and 
from which he derives a substantial annual income, his farm being the 
visible evidence of his life of well directed energy .-uid thrift. 

In 1864 Mr. Gates was married at Hamilton, Ontario, to Miss Agnes 
Malloy, a native of Scotland born November i. 1844. With her parents 
she went to Canada in her girlhood days. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gates there 
were born two children while residents of Canada while two others were 
added to the family after the removal to Iowa. The eldest, Janette, died 
at the age of one year and five months. W.R. is conducting the blacksmith 
shop at this place. Mabel J. is a school teacher at Longmont, Colorado, 
and Fred E. is a blacksmith of Beech, North Dakota. The two sons learned 
their trade with their father and Fred followed blacksmithing in Nevada 
until February, 1910, when he removed to his present place of residence. 

Mr. Gates is a stalwart advocate of republican principles, supporting 
the party since he became a naturalized citizen of the United States. He 
has served as township trustee of Nevada township for several terms and 
was .called to more important office in his election as mayor of the city. 
He is now serving for the fifth term in this capacity and has made a 
splendid record. Continued reelection is an indication of the confidence 
and trust reposed in an individual and of his fidelity to that trust. Abra- 
ham Lincoln said: "You may fool all of the people some of the time and 
some of the people all of the time, but you can't fool all of the people 
all of the time." The truth of this is nowhere so strongly manifest as in 
jiolitics. for untrustworthiness antl lack of ability will surely he found out 
and will awaken opposition. That Mr. Gates has been again .-ind again 
elected to the office of chief executive proves that he has given to the city 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 251 

a public-spirited and businesslike administration which receives the in- 
dorsement of the general public. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons, belonging to the blue lodge and chapter at Nevada. Excalibur 
Commandery, K. T., at Boone, Iowa ; and Za-ga-zig Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Des Moines. He is regarded as an exemplary representative of 
the craft, and no history of Nevada would be complete without the record 
of his life, so worthily has he borne himself as a factor in its public affairs 
and in the progress of the city. 



OBADIAH D. ALLEN. 



For more than three decades Obadiah D. Allen was numbered among 
the worthy citizens of Story county and those who knew him entertained 
for him warm regard, for he was always straightforward in business, liv- 
ing peaceably with his fellowmen and sought at all times the welfare and 
progress of the community. He was born in Fairview township, Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, on the 4th of September, 1836, his parents being 
Lorenzo D. and Jane (Culbertson) Allen, the former a native of Otsego 
county, New York, and the latter probably of Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
where both died. On leaving the Empire state the father walked to Penn- 
sylvania, driving before him an ox team. He followed farming, devoting 
his entire life to that pursuit. His family numbered seven children : Joshua, 
now deceased ; L. C, of Franklin township, who came to this county in 
1868; Obadiah E. ; Andrew, who served for three years in the Eighty-third 
Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry during the Civil war and is now de- 
ceased; Ebenezer, who was killed in the battle of Gettysburg; Mary, who 
died in childhood ; and Martha, the wife of Jay Frances, of Erie county, 
Pennsylvania. 

Obadiah D. Allen remained with his parents until twenty-one years of 
age and then removed westward to Wisconsin, but after a short time re- 
turned to Erie county and was there married in 1862. He afterward went 
to Branch county, Michigan, where he lived for six years, and in 1868 
came to Story county, Iowa, settling in Franklin township, where he re- 
sided until his death, which occurred February 23, 1899. He was a life- 
long farmer and was the owner of an excellent property of one hundreii 
and twenty acres about a mile north of College. 

In 1862 Mr. Allen was married to Miss Sarah S. Strickland, who was 
born at East Gainesville, Wyoming county. New York. May 27, 1840, and 
tliere resided until ten years of age, when she went to Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania, with her parents, William and Betsy (Wadsworth) Strickland. 
Her father, who was born in England, October 23, 1808, came to the 
United States when about twenty years of age and died at the age of 
seventy-one. He was a miller by trade. His wife was born near Rome, 



252 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Xew York, January 6, 1806, and died in Erie county, Pennsylvania, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1882. She was related to the well known Wadsworth family of 
Geneseo, New York, and her brother, Lee Wadsworth, is still living at the 
age of over ninety years and is one of the wealthy residents of Michigan. 
Mr. and Mrs. Strickland had five children: William W., who died March 
7, 1909; Sarah S. ; Harriet L., the wife of L. O. Eldridge, of Springfield, 
Erie county, Pennsylvania; J. F., who died in 1893; and Kittie O.. also 
of Springlield, Penn.sylvania. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Allen were born five 
children: Edgar S., of Rocky Ford, Colorado; Edwin F., the twin brother 
of Edgar S., and a resident of Cambria, Iowa ; Hattie M., the wife of 
W. R. Dodds, a farmer of this county ; William D., a railway engineer of 
Dubuque, Iowa ; and Hugh, a brick-mason of Ames. 

In his political views Mr. Allen was a Lincoln republican. He kept 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day and was a public- 
spirited citizen but never sought nor desired office save in connection with 
the schools. He belonged to the Grange and lived a quiet and uneventful 
but useful life, which gained him the kindly regard of his fellowmen. He 
was in the si.xty-third year of his age at the time of his death, February 
23, 1899, and was not only deeply mourned by bis family but Aha by his 
many friends. 



NEHEMIAH H. NELSON. 

Among the extensive landowners of Story county is Nehemiah H. Nel- 
son, who was born in Hardin county. Iowa, on the 12th of September. 
1880. His father, Henry Nelson, was born in Norway in 1854 but decided 
that the United States afforded far better prospects than the old country 
and therefore in 1875 he emigrated. He remained on the Atlantic coast 
a short time and then made his way to Hamilton county, Iowa, where he 
engaged in farming, and later lived for a time near what is now the village 
of Randall. In 1880 he removed to Hardin county, where he lived for ten 
years, and then located in RadclifFe but after five years' residence in the 
latter place he returned to Hamilton county, where he continues to live. 
In 1878 he was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Peterson and to them 
were born the following children: Nehemiah H.; Helen E., who married 
S. V. Van Winkle, of Eagle Grove, Iowa; and Tobie A., the wife of E. C. 
Houck. of Iowa Falls, Iowa. Mrs. Nelson passed away in 1886, and the 
father later married Miss Cecelia Onstean, his present wife, and they have 
become the parents of five children: Gertie, Lloyd, Lilas, Otis and Mamie. 

Nehemiah H. Nelson acquired his preliminary education in the district 
'ichools of Hardin county and later lie attended Jewell Lutheran College 
at Jewell, Iowa, where he took a commercial course. After his graduation 
in 1899 he came to McCallsburg, being employed in the bank for seven 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 253 

years, but at the end of that time he engaged in the real-estate, insurance 
and loan business. Mr. Nelson has been quite successful in all of his un- 
dertakings and has acquired three hundred and twenty acres of land in 
Warren township and several hundred acres in South Dakota. 

Mr. Nelson completed his plans for a home by his marriage to Miss 
Annie Guthrie, and to this union two children have been born : Lucille and 
Ilo. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of American and votes the 
republican ticket. He takes quite an active interest in local politics. 



THOMAS E. POSEGATE. 

The majority of travelers who reach Story county today come in Pull- 
man parlor cars, equipped with nearly all of the conveniences and luxuries 
which one may obtain at home. Thomas E. Posegate, however, drove 
across the country with team and wagon for no railroads had been built 
in this section at that time and the seeds of civilization had scarcely been 
planted within the borders of the county. Here and there a settlement had 
been made but much of the land was still in possession of the government, 
and there was little to indicate that the county would soon become a popu- 
lous and prosperous region. 

Mr. Posegate was born in Vermilion county, Illinois, on the 27th of 
August, 1833, his parents being Thomas and Charity (Hay worth) Pose- 
gate, both of whom were natives of Ohio, where they were reared and 
married. They afterward removed to Vermilion county, Illinois, where 
they spent their remaining days upon a farm. Their family numbered 
sixteen children, eight of whom lived to years of maturity. 

Thomas E. Posegate spent his youth in the usual manner of farm lads 
in Illinois during the pioneer period. His educational opportunities were 
limited to the advantages afforded in the public schools but his training at 
farm labor was not meager. As soon as old enough to handle the plow 
he took his place in the fields and worked from the time of early spring 
planting until crops were harvested in the late autumn. He resided at 
home until his marriage, which was celebrated in 1852, Miss Martha A. 
Seal becoming his wife. She was born in Vermilion county, Indiana, Oc- 
tober 10, 1836, and was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Trowser) Seal, 
who were natives of Ohio. Her father died in Illinois but her mother 
spent her last years in Story county. 

It was in the year 1854 that Mr. and Mrs. Posegate came to Iowa. 
They drove across the country from their old home in Illinois to Warren 
county, where they spent the winter, and in the spring of 1855 they con- 
tinued their journey to Story county, settling at Ballard Grove, Mr. Pose- 
gate entering one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land near the grove 
in Palestine township. He never resided upon that place, however, but 



254 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

had a small tract of land in the grove, for at that day people were afraid 
to get very far out on the prairie, believing it vk-ould be safer and better 
to live in the timber. The second winter was a very severe one and there 
was much suffering. The family occupied a log cabin for a number of 
years, and .Mr. Posegate tried strenuously to make a comfortable living 
for his family. Des Moines was at that time the nearest market and also 
the closest milling place and it took a long time to make the trip to the 
city in order to secure supplies. Mr. Posegate has resided continuously 
in that portion of Story county since 1855 and was actively engaged in 
farming until eight years ago, when he €old his place and removed to 
Kelley, where he has since lived. During most of the time he owned and 
cultivated one hundred and sixty acres of good land and lived the life of 
a quiet, industrious and energetic farmer, who realized that his success 
must come from persistent and determined effort. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Posegate were born six children: John, who died 
when but sixteen months old; Mary, who is the wife of W. Parriott, of 
Nebraska, and has eight children ; George, of Des Moines, who is married 
and has five children ; Eli. who is living in Boone county, west of .Ames, 
and has eight children; Ellen, who is the wife of Joseph Montgomery, of 
Nebraska, and has one child ; and Victoria, who became the wife of C. A. 
Crane and died in 1907 at the age of forty years, leaving three children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Posegate now have twenty-five grandchildren. 

In Story county this worthy and venerable couple are widely and 
favorably known. They are members of the Baptist church and their 
entire lives have been passed in harmony with its teachings. While they 
have never sought to figure prominently in public or social ways, they have 
so lived as to gain the esteem and good will of their fellowmen and all 
who know them entertain for them warm regard. 



GENER.M. J.VMES RUSH LINCOLN. 

General James Rusji Lincoln, brigadier general of the Iowa National 
Guard and military commandant of the Iowa State College at .Ames, was 
born in Frederick county, Maryland, February 3, 1845, a son of Thomas 
Blodget and Sophie Julia (Ash) Lincoln, both of whom were natives of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where they were reared and married. The 
father was one of the original directors of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
and also spent considerable time in Texas in the development of railroads 
in that state. He likewise owned a large stock ranch there. He inherited 
an extensive fortune, which gave him opportunity to live as and where he 
pleased, and in many ways his wealth was used for the advantage of the 
sections in which he resided. He lost his wife when their son James was 



HISTORY OF. STORY COUNTY 255 

but three months old, after which the father spent much of his time in 
travel, his death occurring in Cecil county, Maryland, in 1888. 

Thomas B. Lincoln was a son of Abel Fearing Lincoln, an officer in the 
United States navy, who died in New Orleans of yellow fever when thirty- 
tive years of age. Major General Benjamin Lincoln was a brother of the 
great-great-grandfather of General Lincoln of this review and received the 
surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. He was the eldest of the family, 
while Seth Lincoln, the great-great-grandfather of General Lincoln, was 
the youngest. Thomas Blodget Lincoln, the father, received his middle 
name because of connection with the old Blodget family of New England. 
His grandmother was the wife of Colonel Samuel Blodget, son of Governor 
Blodget of New Hampshire, and she was a daughter of Dr. William Smith, 
who with Benjamin Franklin founded the University of Pennsylvania and 
was the first provost of the university. The maternal grandfather of Gen- 
eral Lincoln was Michael W. Ash, a brigadier general of the war of 1812 
and of Irish birth. Genealogical records connect the family with the an- 
cestry of President Lincoln, the line in each case being traced back to three 
brothers who came from England and landed on American soil in 1637. 
They located at Hingham, Massachusetts. 

The family of Thomas B. and Sophie J. Lincoln numbered four chil- 
dren, namely : Matilda, Harriet, Sophie and James R. The three sisters 
are yet living but none are married. 

General Lincoln traveled with his father until nine years of age and 
had been all over the continent prior to that time. A private tutor accom- 
panied them and thus his education was not neglected. At the age of nine, 
however, he was placed in school and continued his studies until after the 
outbreak of the Civil war, attending the Loudon Military Academy of 
Maryland, the Virginia Military Institute and the Pennsylvania Military 
College. After the outbreak of hostilities the military spirit which he in- 
herited from his ancestors was aroused and, espousing the cause of the 
Confederacy, he joined J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry, which with Lee's army 
surrendered at Appomatto.x. He was serving on staff duty at the battle 
of Gettysburg and participated in a number of the hotly contested engage- 
ments of the Civil war. 

General Lincoln afterward spent two years in Virginia and then came 
to Iowa, settling in Boone in February, 1868. He remained a resident of 
Boone county until October, 1883, when he came to Ames and took charge 
of the military department and steward's department of the Iowa State 
College, remaining in charge of the military section continuously since but 
resigning the steward's department in 1892. He has also taught in the 
engineering department but is perhaps most widely known because of his 
prominence in military circles. He mobilized the Iowa troops for the 
Spanish-American war and sent them to the front. He was appointed 
brigadier general by President McKinley on the 27th of May, i8g8, and 
commanded a brigade in the Fourth Corps, later a brigade of the Second 



256 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Corps and subsequently the Second Division of the Second Corps. He was 
the last volunteer brigadier general to be mustered out after the close of 
hostilities with Spain, his military service in that war continuing until 
March i6, 1899. He then returned to Ames, where he has resided con- 
tinuously since. At the reorganization of the Iowa National Guard after 
the war, he took command of the Mfty-first Regiment and later of the 
Fifty-fifth Iowa Infantry. On the 5th of July, 1908, he was elected briga- 
dier general of the Iowa National Guard, which position he has since filled. 

In 1865 General Lincoln was married to Elizabeth Blake, of X'irginia, 
who died in 1866, leaving a son. who died in 1908 and left a widow and two 
children in Richmond, Virginia. In 1872 General Lincoln wedded Pris- 
cilla C. Hicks, a native of New York and a daughter of Alexander Ham- 
ilton Hicks, who removed from the Empire state to Three Rivers, Michi- 
gan, but is now deceased. The children of the second marriage are: W'il- 
liani B., government inspector in charge of packing houses in Nashville, 
Tennessee ; Charles S., who is a graduate of the Iowa State College and is 
now a captain of the Second Infantry of the regular army; Theressa, at 
home; Francis H., a captain in the coast artillery of the United States 
army, being artillery engineer officer of the district of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts ; Arthur J., an employe of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road ; Rush B., a lieutenant of the Second Infantry, U. S. A. ; and Lotie, 
who died in 1898 at the age of nine years. 

General Lincoln is a man of fine personal appearance, whose soldierly 
bearing is at once evidence of his military training and experience. He 
holds to a high standard in the military training of his department in col- 
lege and of the state troops as well and has every reason to be proutl of 
the record of the Iowa National Guard. 



ANDREW C. ANDERSON. 

Andrew C. .Anderson, who owns a well developed and highly productive 
farm in Palestine township, belongs to the class of men who win their way 
to the front regardless of circumstances. They possess the strength and 
energy so necessary in the acconi])lishment of an important undertaking, es- 
pecially in the attainment of financial success. In this class are to be found 
many men representing the best type of American citizenship. 

Mr. .Anderson was born in Clinton county, Iowa. October 28, 1871. a 
.son of Christoiiher and X'elder .Anderson, both natives of Norway. They 
lived for a short time in L"linton county, and tlun removed to Story county. 
Mr. .\nderson jnirchasing a farm about four miles nortiiwest of Huxley, in 
Palestine townslii|i. This place he cultivated to good advantage until 1898, 
when he removed to Huxiev. where he has since resided. He and his wife 



jf- 




HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 259 

are active members of the Lutheran church and on account of their many 
estimable traits of character are greatly esteemed by all who know them. 

Andrew C. Anderson was reared on the home farm, acquiring his educa- 
tion in the district schools and showing an application both as to work and 
study which gave favorable promise for a successful career. After arriving 
at twenty-one years of age he worked as a farm hand by the month for two 
years and then rented land on his own account, applying himself with such 
earnestness that in 1895 he had acquired sufficient capital to purchase the 
farm upon which he has since lived. It now consists of one hundred and 
fifty-four acres, the interurban railway cutting ofif six acres of the quarter 
section. He has improved his place with characteristic energ}', setting out 
a good orchard, shade and ornamental trees, building large barns and a 
thoroughly modern residence, which he erected in the spring of igio, sup- 
plying it with furnace heat and the most approved and up-to-date conven- 
iences. He ranks as one of the most thorough farmers of the township. 

In 1898 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Lessie Chelswick, 
of Palestine township, a daughter of Peter Chelswick, one of the settlers of 
this township. Four children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. An- 
derson : Clara V., Palmer O., Willard E. and Leroy A. 

Mr. Anderson and his estimable wife are firm believers in the authority 
and inspiration of the Bible and are stanch members of the Lutheran church. 
He votes for the candidates of the republican party and although not a poli- 
tician in the sense of being an office seeker, he keeps well informed as to 
questions arising from year to year and also on the general progress of 
events in America and the world. He is recognized as a man of good judg- 
ment and fine business capacity and his opinion on subjects pertaining to 
agriculture or stock-raising is generally worthy of respectful hearing. His 
neighbors and friends recognize that he possesses the elements of character 
most essential in the attainment of success, therefore he is greatly respected 
bv all who know him. 



JOSEPH LANCASTER BUDD. 

Ames has ever regarded Professor Joseph Lancaster Budd as one of 
the most prominent citizens that has ever lived within her borders. He 
was a man of international reputation because of his contribution to the 
world's work along horticultural lines. There is no one of prominence in 
horticultural circles that is not familiar with his name and what he ac- 
complished as educator, writer and experimenter in the field to which he 
devoted his labors. 

Professor Budd was born near Peekskill, on the Hudson river, in New 
York, July 3, 1835, and was one of the younger members in a family of 
eleven children, whose parents were Joseph and jMaria (Lancaster) Budd, 



260 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

the latter a daughter of David Lancaster, of Orange county. New York. 
He traced his ancestry back to John Budd, the man who purchased thirty 
thousand acres of Indian lands in 1660 and erected the first buildings in 
Westchester county, New York. His ancestral line includes John Budd, 
1600-1673; John Budd, Jr., 1620-1684; Captain Joseph Budd, who died in 
1722, and Sarah Underbill; Joseph Budd. 1702-1763; Joseph Budd III, 
who died in 1772, and Elizabeth Griffin; Griffin and Katherine (Sutton) 
Budd; and Joseph and Maria (Lancaster) Budd. Among his ancestors 
who served in the Revolutionary war were Andrew Sutton. John Griffin, 
David Lancaster and Joseph Budd. 

In early childhood Joseph L. Budd was taken by his parents to Monti- 
cello. Sullivan county. New York, where he was reared to young manhood, 
pursuing his education in Monlicello Academy. About 1855 he came to 
the middle west and accepted the professorship of a boys school at Gales- 
burg. Illinois. Subsequently he was engaged in business with H. Fuller, 
at W'heaton. Illinois, and about 1858 became a resident of Iowa, pur- 
chasing in the vicinity of Shellsburg a large farm, which the family still 
own. There he established the Benton County Nursery and successfully 
continued in that business until called to the faculty in the Iowa State 
College in 1877. He was elected professor of horticulture in the school 
at Ames, in November, 1876, and entered upon his new work on the ist 
of March of the following year, continuously filling the position for twenty- 
three years. He was called the "Columbus of American Horticulture" be- 
cause of what he did to classify and make the subject a permanent science. 
The success of his work may be shown in the fact that in the year 1900 
fully seventy-five per cent of the men filling similar positions in American 
colleges were cither his "boys" or men who had received their inspiration 
from this pioneer, and the department of agriculture at Washington was 
ever eager to obtain the services of men whom he had trained. He wa- 
a pioneer plant breeder and experimenter of this work, beginning his labors 
along those lines as early as 1870. The work of importation and experi- 
mentation with Russian and other European fruits was begim ai the bnva 
State College in 1878 and so continued until he resigned in 1900. During 
the summer of 1882 he was sent to Europe by the governments of the 
United States and Canada to study horticultural problems, especially the 
Russian fruits. Charles Downing, the pioneer pomologist of New York, 
willed his horticultural library of three hundred volumes and all his private 
papers of a technical nature to Professor Budd. with instructions that tlicy 
were to go to the college when Mr. Budd was througli with them. 

Professor Budd was a prolific writer who never lacked in material for 
an interesting article in the Iowa State Register and Leader, or in the 
various horticultural and scientific periodicals to which he was a frequeir 
contributor. He had a host of readers who always received, with interest, 
the reports of his investigations and experiments. He continuously con- 
tributed articles to the Iowa State Register from 1S72 until i<KX). then 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 261 

being scarcely a week in which something from his pen did not appear in 
that paper. During Father Clarkson's last illness he requested that Pro- 
fessor Budd be made an editor of the Iowa State Register, continuing the 
agricultural department. His authorship also included two volumes en- 
titled American Horticultural Manual, which he published in collaboration 
with Professor X. E. Hanson, one of his "boys." This was the culmina- 
tion of his work along technical lines and the manual is to be found in all 
colleges and large libraries in the country. On resigning his position in 
the Iowa State College in 1900, he was made professor emeritus, an hon- 
orary title. He continued to take an active interest in the college, however, 
up to the time of his death. He was a pioneer member of the Iowa State 
Horticultural Society and as its secretary edited all but four or five of the 
annual reports up to the year 1900. 

On the 7th of January, i860, at Iowa City, Professor Budd was united 
in marriage to Miss Sarah Breed, of Crown Point, New York, who was 
there born, reared and educated. She came to Iowa with a married sister 
and engaged in teaching school at Cedar Rapids, where she made the ac- 
quaintance of Mr. Budd. She was a member of the old Breed family of 
Lynn, Massachusetts, the ancestral record being as follows : Allen Breed, 

1601-1692; Allen Breed, 1626 ; Joseph Breed, 1658-1713; Allen Breed, 

who was born in 1707, and Huldah Newhall ; Eliphalet Breed, who was 
born in 1750, and wedded Mary Johnson; Allen Breed, 1778-1853, who 
married Judith Livingston; and Allen Breed, who was born in 1801, mar- 
ried Barbara Baldwin and died in 1877. Among Mrs. Budd's ancestors 
were two who served in the Revolution : Isaac Livingston, of New Hamp- 
shire, and Oliver Ladd, of Vermont. Unto Professor and Mrs. Budd were 
born a son and daughter. The former, Allen Joseph Budd, was born at 
Shellsburg, Iowa, and was educated in the Iowa State College at Ames. 
He then returned to his native town, where he is engaged in active busi- 
ness. He married Miss Nellie McBetH and has reared and educated a large 
family, his children being Joseph Arthur, Mrs. June E. Case, Leila, Vera, 
Sarah Jane, Myron and Alfred. Etta M. Budd, born in Shellsburg, Iowa, 
accompanied her parents to Ames and was graduated in the Iowa State 
College. Later she was successfully engaged in the study of art in Boston, 
New York and Chicago. After the death of her father she continued to 
live in the parental home and conducted much of the business of the estate. 
She is the genealogist of the Budd family. 

In early life while residing in Benton county. Professor Budd joined 
the Masonic fraternity. November 14, 1863, and continued his connection 
with the order until his death. He built and owned the home of Arcadia 
Lodge, No. 249, A. F. & A. M. in Ames. He took great delight in building 
operations and found extreme pleasure in erecting some large building, 
and thus contributing to the welfare and improvement of the city in which 
it was located. He found rest, recreation, interest and education in travel 
and visited nearly all of the European countries. Cuba and the various states 



262 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

of the Union. He possessed an observing eye and retentive memory and his 
mind was stored with many interesting reminiscences of his journeys. In 
character he was quiet and unassuming but always made friends wherever 
he went and had the happy faculty of retaining them. He did much good 
in the world, aside from his discoveries and experiments in the field of 
horticulture, by assisting students who came under his guidance and aiding 
them to gain a start in life. He was an ideal man in his home, devoted to 
the welfare of wife and children and he left his family well provided for. 
His death occurred at Phoenix, Arizona, December 20, 1904, and his re- 
mains were brought back to Ames for interment. Xot seeking honor but 
simply endeavoring to do his duty, honors were yet multiplietl to him and 
prosperity followed all his undertakings. 



H. C. DAMS. 



H. C. Davis, devoting his life to general agricultural pursuits, was born 
on the farm on section 36, Franklin township, on which he now resides, his 
natal day being December 6, 1871. He has always resided here and 
throughout his entire life has been connected more or less with the work of 
the fields, his time and attention being now given to the cultivation of one 
hundred and eighty-five acres of rich and productive land known as the 
Evergreen farm. 

His parents were John E. and Sarah A. (Benson) Davis, the former 
born in Canandaigua, New York, August 18, 1832, and the latter at Spen- 
cerport, New York, on the nth of November, 1835. They were reared in 
the Empire state and were married there on the i8th of January, 1859. 
For several years thereafter they resided in Ontario county, New York, 
but in 1868 removed westward to Story county, Iowa, settling on the farm 
which is now the home of their son H. C. Davis. Here their remaining 
days were passed, the father's death occurring April 16, 1891, while his 
wife survived until February 28, 1900. Both were members of the Con- 
gregational church and were people of sterling worth, who enjoyed tin 
good will and friendship of those who knew them. The father devoted hi> 
entire life to farming and was the owner of two hundred and thirty-five 
acres of land in this county, including one hundred and twenty acres of 
the farm upon which H. C. Davis now resides ; while the remainder lay 
across the road in Milford township. The family numbered three sons: 
Herbert M., who is now living in Greensburg, Kansas; George S., who was 
killed in a railroad wreck in northwestern Iowa on the 20th of December. 
1887; and H. C, of this review. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm 
life for H. C. Davis in his boyhood and youth. He pursued his education 
in the district schools and when not busv with his text-books worked in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 263 

the fields or did the chores, gradually becoming more and more familiar 
with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. At 
length he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of the old homestead 
and to this has added until his place now comprises two hundred and 
twenty-three acres. The land is rich and productive, and the Evergreen 
farm is known as one of the excellent properties of Franklin township. 
Upon the place is a ten-room brick residence which was erected by his 
father in 1880, and the barns and outbuildings are in good condition, fur- 
nishing ample shelter for grain and stock. ITe has made a specialty of 
breeding and raising Percheron horses and Shetland ponies and in this 
connection has become widely known. 

On the 28th of February, 1894, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to 
Miss Dora E. Lawson, who was born in Polk county, Iowa, June 11, 1871, 
and is a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Highland) Lawson. They now 
have four children: Hazel A., Ida S., Esther Elizabeth and Fredericka. 

In 1888 Dr. Davis with his mother attended a reunion of the Davis 
family at Canandaigua, New York, where he met over eighty relatives. 
These reunions are held annually. A member of the Congregational church 
of Ames, he has endeavored to guide his life by its teachings and his fellow 
townsmen recognize in him an honorable, upright man and a public-spirited 
citizen. 



SAMUEL M. McHOSE. 



Samuel AI. McHose, a well known tile and brick manufacturer of 
Nevada, was born in Geneseo, Illinois, August 17, 1856, and is a son of 
Samuel and Mary (Dillin) McHose, the former of whom was born in 
Pennsylvania and the latter at Jefferson, New York. The family comes 
of Scotch ancestry on the paternal side and also of good Revolutionary 
stock. Early in his career the father learned the brickmaker's trade but 
worked at the cooper's trade in winter. He removed to Henry county, 
Illinois, in 1850, and in 1854 established a brickyard at Geneseo, continu- 
ing there until 1876, wdien he became a resident of Grinnell, Iowa, and was 
identified for ten years with the brick and tile business at that place. He 
is now living retired at the age of eighty-seven years, one of his sons hav- 
ing succeeded him in the business. Being an energetic man of good judg- 
ment, he attained a fair measure of success, acquiring a competence, so 
that at the present time he is in the enjoyment of the results of many years 
of well applied energy. Politically he gave his allegiance to the republican 
party during the greater part of his life but now votes independently. The 
mother of our subject departed this life in 1863, being then about forty- 
six years of age. She was of Irish descent and was a sister of the late 
James Dillin, a record of whom appears elsewhere in this work. She was 



261 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

a tirm believer in llic J^ible and a valued member of the Methodist church. 
There were eight children in the family. 

Samuel M. McHose began his education in the public schools of 
Geneseo, and after coming to Nevada in 1876 attended school for two 
years. Ilis brothers, J. B. and W. E. McHose had established a brickyard 
at this place to make brick for the new courthouse, and when not in school 
worked for them, becoming a partner at the end of two years. In 1879 
he established himself in business at the Short Line bridge at the foot of 
Linn street, where he was located for eight years. He then sold out anti 
operated a yard west of the college at Ames for a year, after which he 
spent two years in St. Anthony, Marshall county. He ne.xt went to Pack- 
wood, Jeflferson county, where he engaged in the manufacture of brick and 
tile. However, he was again attracted to Nevada and in 1897 he opened 
his present plant on the Ames road, one mile from the business center of 
the city. This plant has a capacity of two carloads of tile per day and also 
possesses the facilities for the manufacture of a fine quality of building 
brick, the property including fifteen acres of fine clay. In 1905 the main 
building was destroyed by fire and has been replaced by a three-story brick 
structure si.xty by one hundred and seventy-five feet in foundation area. 
This building contains the machinery and drying rooms and is supplied 
with a complete outfit for the manufacture of brick and drain tile accord- 
ing to the most approved modern methods. There are .six kilns, each hav- 
ing a capacity of eighteen thousand four-inch tile. The plant gives em- 
ployment to eighteen men and is one of tlic best appointed establishments 
of the kind in this part of the country. ^Ir. McHose also owns a hand- 
some modern brick residence, which was erected in 1901, and is quite an 
extensive landowner, holding at the present time three quarter sections of 
land in Kossuth county and one thousand acres in the state of Minnesota. 

In 1887 Mr. McHose was united in marriage to Miss Sarah M. Sharon, 
who was born in Marshalltown. Iowa, in 1866. a daughter of Simon and 
Charlotte ( I'liillips) Sharon. Her father was a blacksmith by trade and 
also followed farming. Two children have blessed the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. McHose: Ray M., who was born at Packwood, Iowa, in 1888 and is 
now a student in tlie sophomore class of the Iowa State University, where 
he is taking a course in ceramic engineering; and Winifred M., also born 
at Packwood and now one of the successful school teachers of the county. 

As a wide-awake and progressive business man Mr. McHose is an 
active member of the Nevada Commercial Men's Association. He give- 
his allegiance to the republican party, believing that its principles of pr^ 
tection and centralization are conducive to the prosperity and development 
of the country. Although not a member of any religious denomination, he 
is friendly toward them all ,uid extends his support toward those causes 
which in his opinion will add to the permanent welfare of the community. 
Mrs. McHose is a valued member of the Christian church and has been 
to her husband a true and loving lieli)mate. His success in business has 



HISTORY OP STORY COUNTY 265 

been due to undaunted perseverance and sound judgment. Happy in his 
home associations and in the work to which he is devoting the best energies 
of his hfe. it may truly be said that the position which he has earned has 
been reached deservedlv. 



WILLIAM H. JOHNSON. 

WilHam H. Johnson has for forty-two years resided upon the farm on 
section 7. ^^'ashington township, which is now his home. He formerly 
owned one hundred and seventy acres but about ten years ago disposed of 
ninety acres of this. The remainder of his place is all improved, and upon 
it is a good set of farm buildings, including a pleasant home and bams 
and sheds which furnish ample shelter to grain and stock. Mr. Johnson 
was a young man of twenty-seven years when he located upon this place, 
his birth having occurred in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, near Smith- 
ville, on the 14th of April, 1842. 

On attaining his majority he went to Wisconsin, settling in 
Green county, where lie lived for five years. In the fall of 
1869 he came to Iowa and took up his abode upon the farm where 
he now makes his home — a well improved and highly cultivated tract of 
eighty acres. He has improved the place with good buildings and every- 
thing about the farm presents a neat and thrifty appearance, indicating the 
careful supervision and progressive methods of the owner. Mr. Johnson 
also became closely identified with educational interests here. He began 
teaching when nineteen years of age and taught in all for about thirty 
terms, but in the meantime three summer seasons were devoted to the cul- 
tivation of his fields. 

In 1867 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth J. Sin- 
clair, who was born in Monroe county, Ohio, on the 15th of May, 1845, 
and went to Wisconsin with her parents when about ten years of age. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson has been blessed with nine children: 
Charles W., now a resident of Des Moines; Alice, the wife of E. W. Jones, 
also of Des ^loines ; Cora, the wife of M. E. White, of the capital city , 
Ira B., who was superintendent of schools of Cass county and died at the 
age of twenty-nine years while serving his second term in that office; 
E. M., who is a graduate of the Iowa State College and is now a packing 
house inspector for the government at Chicago ; Western L., the govern- 
ment meat inspector of the packing houses of Topeka, Kansas; Daisy, liv- 
ing in Des Moines; Dora, who is a twin sister of Daisy and now the wife 
of F. S. Bone, of Grand River, Iowa ; and Olla, a teacher in the Humboldt 
College and a graduate of the Iowa State College of the class of 1906. 
All of the children have attended the Iowa State College and the sons have 
all graduated therefrom. The eldest is a professor at Still College in Des 
Moines and his brother Ira was doing excellent work in the educational 



266 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

field when called to his final rest. Following his demise his widow was 
elected his successor and has since filled the position. Mr. Johnson has a 
family of which he has every reason to be proud, and in their well spent 
lives they indicate the careful home training which they received. 

Mr. Johnson holds membership in the Christian church, and his has 
been an active, useful and well spent life, entitling him to the honor and 
high regard which are uniformly accorded him by all who know him. 
Starting out in life for himself empty-lianded when a youth in his teens, 
he has since made his own way in the world, and the success which has 
come to him is the merited reward of his earnest labor and honorable 
dealing. 



JAMES DILLIX. 



Among tile names of men prominent in Story county in years past that 
of James Dillin. who departed this life March 27, 1901, at the age of sixty- 
one years, occupies a leading place. A resident of the county for more than 
thirty years, he became one of its best known citizens and as a farmer and 
business man attained a position of influence and responsibility that has 
been gained by few in this part of the state. 

He was born in JelTerson, New York, and having lost his father at 
five years of age, he was taken to the home of a sister in Montana, where 
he lived until he reached maturity. There he became acquainted with 
ranch life and gained a love for nature and for agricultural pursuits which 
was one of his prominent characteristics during his later career. He was 
educated in the schools of Montana and received a good mental training 
which he further developed by reading and observation. He found time 
to learn the carpenter's trade, to which he devoted several years, but the 
outbreak of the Civil war interfered with his plans and he enlisted in 
Company M. I-'irst Regiment of Colorado Cavalry, in which he served as 
corporal for three years, being honorably discharged and mustered out at 
Denver. Colorado, October 31, 1864. .\fter the close of the war he came 
to Geneseo, Illinois, upon a visit to his mother, who was living at that 
place, and opened a store at Green River. Illinois, which he conducted for 
aljout a year. 

While on a visit to a sister at Letts, Louisa county. Iowa, he met the 
lady who became his wife and after his marriage he sold out his business 
in Illinois and spent the following winter at Muscatine. Iowa. Having de- 
cided to devote his attention to farming, he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Richland township. Story county, in itS68. Taking 
up his residence uy>on his newly acquired place, he set vigorously to work 
with such ability that he became the owner of one thousand acres in Storv 
county. .After moving to Nevada about 1886, he largely increased his 




Mi;. AM) MRS. .lAMKS UII.I.IX 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 269 

landed possessions until he became recognized as one of the most worthy 
and influential men in the county. He remodeled and improved the family 
residence on Locust street, making it one of the most attractive homes in 
the city, and he became identified with many business interests, in which 
he displayed a rare judgment and foresight, producing gratifying financial 
returns. 

On the 24th of December, 1867, Mr. Dillin was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah Furnas, a sister of Elwood Furnas, a record of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. Two children came to bless the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Dillin: EKvyn O., now a merchant of McCallsburg, Iowa, who mar- 
ried May Loomis and has two children ; and Viola M., the wife of Charles 
McCord, a real-estate dealer of Xevada and the mother of four children. 

Mr. Dillin from the time of arriving at voting age was an adherent of 
the republican party. He never desired or sought political honors, pre- 
ferring to devote his attention to his private affairs. He was a valued 
member of J. C. Ferguson Post, No. 31, Grand Army of the Republic, and 
served as post commander. He was essentially a man of business. Alert, 
enterprising, sagacious and clear-sighted, he made few mistakes in his 
judgment of men and accomplished many remarkable feats in business 
organization and management. He was very positive in his convictions 
and having once deliberately made up his mind on any subject, he was 
scarcely ever known to change his opinion. He possessed a strong and 
pleasing personality and a convincing manner which assisted him very 
materially in the advancement, of. his businessL and social relations. Mrs. 
Dillin still makes her home* in Nevada Snd is;held in high esteem by a wide 
circle of friends and acquaintances in Story county. 



JACOB E. ERICKSON. 



One of the well known native sons of Story county now engaged in 
business in Roland is Jacob E. Erickson. He was born on the 25th of 
December, 1870, and is the son of Michael Erickson, who was born in 
Norway in 1835. The father came to the United States at the age of four- 
teen years with his parents, Jacob and Elizabeth Erickson. The family 
located in Story county, Iowa, in 1856, where the father entered one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, on a portion of which the town of Roland 
now stands. He was first married in 1856 to Sarah Wooster, by whom he 
had two children : Lizzie, who married Henry Thompson and died about 
twenty-five years ago; and Ida A., who became Mrs. O. T. Flanson. For 
his second wife Mr. Erickson married Martha Wooster and they became 
the parents of four children of whom three still survive, as follows : Olaf, 
now a resident of New Mexico; Jacob E., our subject; and Annie May, 
who became the wife of J. H. Larson of Roland. The father was a mem- 



270 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ber of the Lutheran churcli and always cast his vote with the republican 
party. He was honored by his fellow citizens electing him to nearly all 
of the township offices, which he capably filled. He was one of the very 
successful agriculturists of his district, acquiring during his life four hun- 
dred acres of land adjoining the town of Roland and on forty acres of 
which the townsite was platted. He also had two hundred acres of land 
in South Dakota and was a stockholder in the Farmers Savings Bank. He 
was a very public-spirited man, high-principled and upright in all of his 
business transactions. He presented to the town of Roland fifty acres for 
a public park and this was but one of his many substantial evidences of 
allegiance to the village. He was regarded as a man of incorruptible in- 
tegrity, and the community lost a most estimable citizen when he passed 
away at the age of seventy-five years. 

Jacob E. Erickson is indebted to the district schools of Story county 
for his education and when he had acquired such knowledge as he felt 
fitted him to begin his business career he laid aside his text-books and as- 
sumed the more serious work of life. He remained a member of his 
father's household until after his twenty-first year, at which time he began 
working for himself. He managed his father's farm for seven years and 
then engaged in the grain business, with which he is still actively identified. 
He owns a sixty thousand bushel elevator and besides this is a stockholder 
and director of the Story County Telephone Company. He also owns one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Hamilton county, Iowa, and one-half 
section in Hamlin county. South Dakota. 

Ever since age conferred u]ion him tlie right of suffrage Mr. Erickson 
has cast his ballot with the republican party. He has always taken an 
active interest in municipal matters and is now acting as a member of the 
council of Roland. He is a member of the Lutheran church and is un- 
married. He is one of the popular and progressive young business men of 
Roland, who by means of his close application, unswerving purpose and 
industry has met with a more than average degree of success, which his 
fellow townsmen feel is justly his right. 



D.-\\TFT. AI. GROVE. 



Implement dealers of Iowa are well acquainted with the capable and 
enterprising gentleman whose name introduces this revievV. Since its or- 
ganization he has been secretary and manager of the Iowa Imjilement 
Dealers Mutual Insurance Association and has displayed an ability which 
meets the hearty api^roval of implement men in all parts of the state. He 
is a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, having been born May lO, 
1856. a son of John L. and Correlia (Giles) Grove. The ancestors of the 
family on the paternal side came from Holland in the colonial times and 
their descendants assisted the patriots under Washington in freeing this 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 271 

country from British domination. John L. Grove was a blacksmith and 
followed his trade for some years in the east, coming in 1868 to Carroll 
county, Iowa, where he bought land and became well established as a 
farmer. He departed this life at the age of seventy years. Politically he 
gave his support to the republican party and fraternally he was identified 
with the Odd Fellows. The mother of our subject was of Irish descent, 
both of her parents having been born on the Emerald isle. She died at 
forty-one years of age, when the subject of this review was a lad of eight 
years. She was a woman of tnany noble characteristics and a faithful mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

The fourth in order of birth in a family of six children, Daniel M. 
Grove reared under the parental roof and at twelve years of age came to 
Carroll county, Iowa. He attended a private school in the east, continuing 
his education in the district schools after arriving in Iowa. Having applied 
himself closely to his studies he was able to secure a certificate as a teacher 
at si.xteen years of age and taught school for si.xteen years, having charge 
of the Coon Rapids schools during the last four years of his experience 
as a school-master. However, he decided to seek other avenues for the 
exercise of his talents and in ^larch. 1888. he became connected with the 
implement business at Coon Rapids, in which he continued for two years. 

In 1890 Mr. Grove removed to Nevada, embarking in the same line of 
business, which he conducted with marked success for sixteen years. In 
1894 he was elected county auditor of Story county and reelected two years 
later, filling the position with general acceptance to the voters of the county 
for four years. He also served as state secretarj' of the Implement Dealers 
Association for several years until 1907. He gained a wide acquaintance 
among men in this line of business in the state and was among the origi- 
nators of the Iowa Implement Dealers Mutual Insurance Association, which 
was chartered by the state in 1903 as an organization by means of which 
the implement men might carry their own insurance. Mr. Grove has been 
from the start one of the most active workers in this movement and since 
1903 has served as secretary and manager of the association. The duties 
of his office increased to such an extent that he was obliged to give up his 
private business four years ago. He now devotes his entire time to the 
insurance association, which has grown remarkably and is one of the most 
flourishing organizations of the kind in the country. 

In 1877 Mr. Grove was united in marriage to Miss Orra Beadell, who 
was born in Lee county, Iowa, and is a daughter of Levi and Polly Beadell. 
The father was for many years identified with the agricultural interests of 
Linn county but later took up his residence in Lee county. Mr. Grove holds 
membership in the Knights of Pythias, and politically gives his allegiance to 
the republican party. He served for two terms as member of the city 
council but during recent years has not sought public office, as his time has 
been fully occupied with business affairs. His career should be highly 
encouraging to every young man who has ambition to make an honorable 



272 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

record for himself. To attain deserved success requires perseverance, self- 
reliance and habits of industry and when these characteristics, as in the 
career of Mr. Grove, are united with well established principles of per- 
sonal honor and fidelity to all obligations there can be no doubt as to the 
result. 



JOHN H. LARSON. 



It is an old saying that perseverance wins success and in countless cir- 
cumstances the truth of this statement has been fully demonstrated. An 
additional evidence is presented in the life of John H. Larson, ex-mayor of 
Slater and widely recognized as one of the substantial business men in 
Story county. As president of a flourishing bank, he has shown his ability 
in the field of finances and for years he has been at the head of one of the 
leading mercantile establishments of his part of the county. 

He was born in Norway, July 30, 1862, a son of Lars and Anna Ilausjen. 
The parents emigrated to the United States in 1866 and spent two or three 
years near Lisbon, Illinois, then removing to Polk county, Iowa, but in 
the fall of the same year took up their residence north of Ames in Story 
county. Two years later Mr. Larson rented a farm in the northeast part 
of the county and after cultivating this place for four years purchased a 
farm in Hardin county, upon which he lived until his retirement to Slater. 
After the death of his wife he look up his home with a daughter at Hux- 
ley, where he now lives. 

John H. Larson came to America with his parents when four vears of 
age and remained at home, securing such education as was available in the 
district schools until he arrived at the age of fifteen or sixteen years. Hav- 
ing a natural inclination for mercantile rather than agricultural life, he se- 
cured a position in a store at Sheldahl, continuing in that establishment for 
eleven years. He became well acquainted with mercantile affairs and ac- 
quired a solid foundation for a successful business career. Having decided 
to begin upon his own account, he came to Slater in 1889 and purchased a 
half-interest in the lumber business of A. K. Ersland. the firm assuming 
the title of Ersland & Larson. Later he acquired his partner's interest and 
the business has since been conducted under his own name, being now the 
leading mercantile concern in Slater. Mr. Larson was one of the organ- 
izers of the Farmers Savings Bank at Slater and was elected a member of 
the board of directors, the Hon. Oley Nelson being chosen as president. 
After several years Mr. Nelson resigned and Mr. Larson was selected as 
his successor, a position which he has filled with the highest credit to him- 
self and to the great satisfaction of the officers and stockholders of the 
institution. 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 273 

On the 28th of December, 1898, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella Walker, a daughter of Torkel Walker, a native of Norway, who 
came to America when a young man and passed thirty-three years of his 
life in Polk and Story counties. He is a carpenter by trade but has also 
successfully engaged in farming and is now living in Slater. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Larson three children have been born : Cecil Anselm, Leslie Tru- 
man and Miriam Lucile. 

Mr. Larson gives his adherence to the republican party and his voice 
is often heard in its councils in his part of the county. He has served many 
times as a member of the town council and also for eight or ten years as 
mayor of the town, being recognized as one of the most efficient executive 
officers the town has known. He is a valued member of Slater Lodge, 
No. 384, L O. O. F., and he and his wife are connected with the Rebekahs 
and the Lutheran church. He is a stanch friend of education and always 
lends his aid to the public schools. As a citizen he is patriotic, prompt and 
true to every obligation and as a man he is held in the highest honor and 
esteem by all classes. 



CAPTAIN THOMAS CLIFTON McCALL. 

For many years one of the most distinguished citizens of Story county. 
Captain Thomas Clifton McCall, now deceased, gained a reputation for 
enterprise, sound judgment and integrity which has been accorded few men 
in this part of the state. In both private and public affairs he was eminently 
successful, gaining a fortune and at the same time proving by his useful 
and honorable life a constant source of inspiration to those with whom he 
was associated. 

He was born in Ross county, Ohio, September 4, 1827, a son of Samuel 
W. and Ann (Clifton) McCall. The father was born in Kentucky in 
1792 and the mother in Ross county, Ohio, in 1795. In his early manhood 
Samuel W. McCall was a soldier in the war of 1812 and was wounded at 
the battle of Maguauga, which occurred about the time of Hull's sur- 
render. He came to Iowa and located in Polk county, where he died in 
1864, his wife having passed away in Ross county, Ohio, in 1833. He 
was a son of Samuel McCall, who was born about 1750 in Maryland and 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He was drowned in Licking river, 
Kentucky, in 1795. Our subject's maternal grandfather, Thomas Clifton, 
who was born in South Carolina about 1740, fought under General Na- 
thaniel Greene in the war for independence and later settled in Ross county. 
Ohio, where he died about 1830. 

In 1836 Thomas Clifton McCall came with his father to I'.urlington, 
Iowa, where they remained during the summer, removing in the fall to 
Fulton county, Illinois, where he lived on a farm for ten years. At the 



274 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

age of nineteen he began teaching, having charge of the first school that 
was opened east of the Des Moines river in Polk county. After a short 
experience as a schoolmaster he embarked in ihc mercantile business at 
Lafayette, Polk county, in parincrship with A. Y. Hull, continuing for 
three years, when he became the pioneer merchant of Rising Sun. in the 
same county. From the beginning he had shown a decided ability in busi- 
ness affairs and in 1855 he entered the real-estate business at Des Moines, 
coming to Nevada three years later, where he dealt quite extensively in land 
for many years, becoming the owner of about three thousand acres in 
Story county. He was a man of quick discernment and wide observation 
and as time passed he became remarkably proficient in knowledge concern- 
ing current events, especially those of public and political interest. In 
1861 he was chosen to represent Story county in the state legislature and 
served in the regular and special sessions of that year and also in 1862. 
this being a period of unusual importance on account of the Civil war. 

In October, 1862, Mr. McCall proflfered his services to the government 
and was sent to the front as quartermaster of the Thirty-second Iowa In- 
fantry with the commission of lieutenant and continued with his regiment 
in the field. He was appointed by President Lincoln assistant quarter- 
master of volunteers with the rank of captain, March 22, 1864, and served 
in that capacity until November 27, 1865, when he received his honorable 
discharge. He performed the arduous duties devolving upon him during 
these trying years of the war with absolute fidelity and his army record was 
a source of just pride to himself and is a splendid heritage for posterity. 
After resuming peaceful pursuits he was, in 1881, again sent to the legis- 
lature from Story county, being reelected in 1883, and was state senator, 
representing Boone and Story counties in 1892 at the time of his death. 
He was one of the most active and efficient representatives that this county 
has ever sent to the general assembly and by his efforts and personal in- 
fluence accomplished much work that has been of special benefit to the 
county and state. 

Captain McCall was three times married. By his first marriage he had 
one son, John A., who is now practicing law at Des Moines. His second 
wife was Mary A. Boynton and by this union three children were bom : 
Minnie Ellen, now Mrs. A. C. Cronenwctt, of Monrovia, California; Fred 
C, a record of whom appears elsewhere in this work ; and Fdward M., a 
practicing attorney of Nevada. The third wife of Captain McCall bore 
the maiden name of Clara Kennedy. She is now living in Nevada but the 
son bom of this union died at the age of five years. 

Captain McCall passed away .Xui^nist 11. 1892, being then sixty-five 
years of age and an acknowledged leader in the business and financial 
circles of Story county. He early realizes the value of industry and perse- 
verance and his life was a remarkable exemplification of those principle- 
carried to a legitimate conclusion. He was generous in iu's judgment and 
friendly toward every cause calculated to advance the public interest and in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 275 

numberless ways contributed to the welfare of his fellowmen. For almost 
fifty years he was a member of the Presbyterian church and was seldom 
absent from religious service when circumstances made it possible for him 
to attend. He became an Odd Fellow in 1853, joining the order at Des 
Moines and representing it a number of times in the Grand Lodge of the 
state. He was also a valued member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and was one of the best friends the old soldiers of Story county have 
known. The death of Mr. jMcCall deprived the community of one of its 
most loved and respected citizens, one who was eminently successful in his 
efl:'orts to make the world better and whose memory will long be revered 
bv those who knew him. 



CLARK CHAMBERS. 



Among the business men of Collins, Clark Chambers occupies an honor- 
able place, having won his way through many obstacles. Today he is recog- 
nized as one of the thoroughly substantial citizens of the community and has 
the satisfaction of knowing that he has gained his present position through 
his own unremitting diligence and sound judgment. He was born near De- 
catur, Illinois, November 15, 1873, a son of James A. and Mary (Clark) 
Chambers. The parents were both born in Ohio and were married in that 
state, subsequently removing to Illinois. The mother passed away in 1878 
and the father has since been twice married. His present wife was Miss 
Caroline Smith, whom he married in Guernsey county, Ohio, and they are 
now living upon a farm in Tuscarawas county, that state. 

At fifteen years of age Clark Chambers began his battle with the world. 
Going to Bloomington, Illinois, he worked as a farm laborer for a year and 
then returned to Ohio, where he was employed for two years in a sawmill. 
Once more starting westward, he reached Collins, Iowa, where for four 
years and four months he was employed by Charles Fish, an extensive stock 
feeder of this section. Not having seen enough of the world, Mr. Cham- 
bers decided to visit the great west and accordingly he took a trip through 
the Dakotas, Idaho, Utah and the Pacific northwest, working at various oc- 
cupations as opportunity presented. He was absent for two years and in 
Februa^\^ 1902, returned to Collins, with a mind richly supplied with ex- 
perience which has been to him of inestimable value. Soon after reaching 
Collins he became connected with the meat and provision business, with 
which he has ever since been identified, being now a member of the firm 
of George W. Baldwin & Company, general merchants, also handling meat 
and provisions upon a large scale. 

On the 20th of May, 1902, Mr. Chambers was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Wood, of Des Moines, and by this union five children have been 



276 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

born, four of whom are now living, namely: Irene, Laurence C, Gerald and 
Marjorie. 

Mr. Chambers started out in life entirely upon his own resources as a 
boy and difificulties served but to spur him to renewed effort, strengthening 
his will and developing a fearlessness and an indomitable spirit of self- 
reliance that are among his prominent characteristics. He has attained a 
position of comparative financial independence, although only thirty-eight 
years of age, and can still look forward to many years of activity and use- 
fulness. Fraternally he is a valued member of Fervent Lodge, No. 513, 
A. F. & A. M., and in political belief he adheres to the republican party. 



lAY A. KING. 



Jay A. King, of Nevada, now in the grain and lumber business and 
formerly county treasurer of Story county, is in the best sense of the wonl 
a self-made man. Coming to this county forty-two years ago, he forged 
his way through many obstacles to a position of financial ease, at the 
same time gaining the enduring respect and esteem of the people of the 
county. 

He was born at .\kron, Ohio, May 28, 1845, a son of Dr. John E. and 
Ann (Jackson) King, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of England. The father had meager opportunities for education in his 
early years, but this handicap was largely overcome by close application 
to home study after he grew to manhood. He began his business career 
in the mercantile pursuits at Akron, removing in 1855 to New Lisbon. 
Wisconsin, where he farmed and conducted a shoe store for several years. 
In 1861 he came west, taking up his home at Eldora, Hardin county, Iowa, 
and, having decided upon a professional career, he matriculated at Hahne- 
mann Medical College. Chicago, from which he was later graduated. He 
returned to Eldora, wlierc lie has ever since continued in the practice of 
his jjrofession. He was very successful from the start and as the years 
passed became recognized as one of the leading physicians of the county. 
He is still in practice, although eighty-five years of age, being almost as 
strong physically and mentally as ever in his life. He is a man of un- 
usual intelligence, generous and broad-minded, a constant student of books 
and current events, and a stanch friend of education. He is a good 
musician and for many years took a ]>roniinent jiart in musical affairs of 
the church and the coninnmity. Fraternally he is identified with the Ma- 
sonic order and politically has been a supporter of the republican partv 
ever sinre its organization. He is greatly esteemed by his professional 
brethren and for two years was president of the Iowa H(5meopathic Meil- 
ical Association, being now :\n hiinnrary member of that body. The mother 
of our subject came to this country from England with her parents, who 




JAY A. Krxr; 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 279 

settled at Akron, Ohio. She passed away in 1863, at the age of forty-five 
years. 

There were si.x children in the family of Dr. and Mrs. King: ]. A., 
the subject of this review; George H., in the fruit growing and jewelry 
business in Colorado ; Ina, deceased ; Elizabeth, who married George 
Brookins, a veteran of the Civil war, now living at St. Paul, Minnesota; 
Oliver ]., a farmer living retired at Zearing, Iowa; and John E., engaged 
in the publishing business at St. Paul. 

Jay A. King was educated in the public schools of Akron, Ohio, New 
Lisbon, Wisconsin, and Eldora, Iowa. He taught school for two years and 
at the age of eighteen, in the summer of 1863, enlisted at Eldora in Com- 
pany H, Ninth Iowa Cavalry. He attained the rank of quartermaster ser- 
geant and was engaged principally in scout duty with small detachments, 
his regiment being assigned to that branch of the service. Ha continued 
faithfully until February, 1866, when he was honorably discharged at Dav- 
enport, Iowa. After laying aside the accoutrements of war, appreciating 
the importance of further educational training, he took a course in a Chi- 
cago business college, after which he became a bookkeeper in the pipe 
department of the Crane Manufacturing Company of Chicago. 

After a year's experience in this line Mr. King returned to Iowa and 
worked for a few months on a farm, teaching school the following winter. 
In 1868 he came to Iowa Center and entered the employ of the general 
mercantile firm of Baldwin & Maxwell as bookkeeper. His ability being 
soon recognized, he was after the first year made credit man and busi- 
ness manager. The firm was one of the remarkable concerns of those 
times, controlling a business of three hundred and fifty thousand dollars 
a year, although the house was located in a town of four hundred inhabi- 
tants. Mr. King continued for seven- years at Iowa Center, becoming 
widely acquainted in the county which he had adopted as his permanent 
home. In 1875 h^ was elected county treasurer and continued in the office 
for three terms. Upon assuming the duties of the treasurership he removed 
to Nevada, where he has ever since lived. After retiring from public office 
he associated with Otis Briggs in the Farmers Bank, conducting its affairs 
for eight years with great success. After a vacation of a few years he 
entered the grain and lumber business in 1889 at Nevada with O. L. Dun- 
kelbarger under the title of Dunkelbarger & King and has so continued to 
the present time. He was for six years president of the Iowa Grain Deal- 
ers Association and is now president of the Western Grain Dealers Mutual 
Fire Insurance Association, a position which he has held for two years 
past. He has been eminently successful in his various business enterprises 
and has for years been known as one of the most prosperous and influen- 
tial men in this part of the state. 

In 1880 Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Lillic .A. Day, of 
Ohio, a daughter of E. G. Day, and to them one child was born, Day E., 
now superintendent of the light and heating plant at Park City, Utah, and 



280 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

the father of two children. The mother having departed this hfe in 1881, 
Mr. King was united in marriage in 1889 to Mrs. Elizabeth (Severns) 
Coggshall, the widow of M. Coggshall. Mrs. King was the mother of one 
son by her first husband, Fred M., now a theatrical manager. She is a 
member of the Presbyterian church and a leader in the social circles of 
the community. 

Mr. King is identified with the various Masonic bodies, including the 
Shrine, and also with the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of Jason 
D. Ferguson Post, G. A. R. and in politics gives his support to the repub- 
lican party, having cast his first ballot for Abraham Lincoln as president 
of the United States. He has served most acceptably as member of the 
city council several times, as member of the board of trustees of the pub- 
lic library and also as president of the board of education. As a public 
officer he has been conscientious, efficient and thoroughly reliable, setting 
an example in the discharge of his duties well worthy of emulation. He 
has never sought to advance himself at the expense of others and as a 
generous, liberal-minded and progressive citizen he has fairly earned the 
honorable jilacc he occupies in the community. 



OLE B. OLSOX. 



The stock-breeders have been of inestimable benefit to farmers and in- 
directly to the whole country, adding vastly to the value of domestic animals 
and making the business of the farmer, when properly conducted, highly 
profitable. Ole P). Olson of Story county should be named in the class that 
is accomplishing this good work, being a successful stock-breeder whose 
opinions are an authority on shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs. He 
was born in Union township. Story county. June 17, 1872, son of Brit and 
Sarah (Sandcno) Olson, both of whom were born in Norway. They were 
married in their native country and after their emigration to the United 
States became residents of Union township, Story county, Iowa, where the 
father engaged in farming. He departed this life in 1882. but the mother is 
now living with her daughter. Mrs. F. H. Sheldalil. i!i Storv countv. 

Ole H. Olson was the youngest member of the faniilv .-in<! was ten vcars 
of age when his father died. The mother, however, bravely kept her chil- 
dren together until they were grown up. The subject of tiiis review at- 
tended the district schools and assisted in the support of the faniilv until 
after arriving at twenty-one years of age. when he began fanning on his 
own account on rented land. At the age of twenty-four he purchased one 
hundred and thirty acres on section 2, Palestine township, which he culti- 
vated for seven years and then sold, buying his present farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 26 in 1902. He has made manv improvements, 
rebuilding the residence, setting out trees, etc.. so that he now lias one of 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 281 

the most beautiful farms in his section. He makes a specialty of breeding 
thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs and has succeeded in 
raising some of the choicest animals of the kinds named that have yet been 
bred in this county. 

On the 20th of February. 1895, ^^^'- Olson was united in marriage to 
Miss Martha S. Kalsem, a daughter of John \'. Kalscm. a record of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. Six children have been born to this union, 
tive of whom are now living, namely: Elmer J., who is now attending the 
Hu.xlev high school ; John F., also a student in the high school ; Mollie S. 
and Ollie M., twins ; and Alilford S. 

Mr. Olson and wife are members of the Lutheran church, of which he 
is secretary and one of its liberal supporters. Ever since arriving at voting 
age he has adhered to the republican party, believing that in so doing he is 
best advancing the interests of the entire country. A sincere friend of edu- 
cation, he is a member of the school board, upon which he has served for 
several years past. The life of Mr. Olson is one of great activity and the 
success he has attained is the result of his own unwavering and well directed 
industrv. 



WILLIAM DODDS. 



William Dodds, living on section 33, Franklin township, general farm- 
ing interests claiming his attention, was bom in Boone county. Iowa, De- 
cember 29, 1863, and was not yet two years of age w-hen his parents, James 
and Catharine (Kegley) Dodds, came with their family to Story county. 
The father was a native of Ohio and the mother of Pennsylvania. She 
came to Boone county, Iowa, with her parents in her girlhood days, while 
James Dodds arrived when a young man of about twenty-one years. They 
were married on the farm where the birth of their son William occurred, 
and they spent their last years in Colorado, where the death of Mr. Dodds 
occurred in 1905, when he was seventy-two years of age, while his wife 
passed away in 1906 at the age of seventy years. Throughout his active 
life he devoted his energies to farming and carpentering and was the owner 
of four hundred and forty acres of valuable Iowa land which he sold ere 
his removal to Colorado. His family numbered eight children : Martha M., 
the wife of Ed Gilbert, of Salina, Kansas; William; Guy, a resident of 
Washington township, this county ; Thomas, of Colorado ; James, also liv- 
ing in Washington township ; Belle, the wife of James Reynolds, of Gil- 
bert, Iowa; Fannie, of Lamar, Colorado; and Gertrude, the wife of Alfred 
Downer, also of Lamar. 

Brought by his parents to Story county when less than two years of age, 
William Dodds has since lived in Franklin township, where he was reared 
to the occupation of farming, remaining at home with his parents until 



282 HISTORY OF STORY COL'XTY 

his marriage, when he started out in hfe on his own account. He is today 
the owner of two hundred and eighty acres of rich and valuable land, sit- 
uated two and a half miles east of Gilbert on sections i and 12, Franklin 
township. He removed to that place immediately after his marriage and 
there resided until about fcrur years ago, when he came to his present home 
on section 23' Franklin township, having purchased the property in 1905. 
This is a tract of land of one hundred and twenty acres, and in addition he 
also owns the former place. Both farms have been well improved by Mr. 
Dodds who now rents his land on sections i and 12. His present farm is 
situated about a mile north of College, and is devoted to the cultivation of 
the crops best adapted to soil and climate. 

In 1894 Mr. Dodds was married to Miss Harriet Allen, who was born 
August 16, 1871, on the farm where she now lives, a daughter of O. D. 
.Alien, mentioned elsewliere in this volume. They have three children: 
Bernice, Mildred and Galen. 

Mr. Dodge is a republican and has held some road and school offices 
but cares little for political or official preferment. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and both he and his 
wife are nitmhcrs of tlic Rebckah lodge. He has a wide acquaintance in 
Story county where almost his entire life has been passed and where his 
many good qualities have gained him the warm regard of those with whom 
he has been associated. The able management of his business affairs con- 
stitutes the basis of his success which has classed him with the substantial 
agriculturists of Franklin township. 



ELWOOD FURNAS: 



Ehvood Furnas, deceased, who for more than thirty years was promi- 
nently identified with agricultural and business interests in Story county, 
will be remembered as one of the ablest and most public-spirited men the 
county has known. His death, which occurred December 31, T902, when he 
was sixty-two years of age, was regarded as one of the severest losses in 
the history of this region, and there is no reason for doubting that tli' 
beneficial effects of the work which he set in motion will be felt for many 
years to come. 

He was a native of Montgomery county, Ohio, born February 22. 1840. 
The family is of English ancestry, the first member of whom there is any 
record being John Furnas, who was born at Standing Rock, Cumberland- 
shire, England, in 1736. He was a peer of the realm, and a large land- 
owner. He married Mary Wilkinson in the Friend's Meeting House at 
Standing Stone, in February, 1763, and they came to America, landing at 
Charleston, South Carolina, where they spent the remainder of their days. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 283 

Among noted descendants of this worthy couple in America may be named 
ex-Governor Robert Furnas, of Nebraska; Sarah Furnas Wells, M. D., 
author of "Four Years Travel Around the World," and Rev. Newton Fur- 
nas, a distinguished clergj^man of Ohio. Benjamin Furnas, the father of 
our subject, was a lineal descendant of John and Mary (Wilkinson) Fur- 
nas. He was for many years identified with agricultural interests in Ohio 
and subsequently came to this state, where he continued until his death. 

Elwood Furnas was reared in the parental home and gained his pre- 
liminary education in the country schools of Ohio. He was sufficiently ad- 
vanced in his studies to become a teacher, but after teaching a part of a term 
for a brother teacher, he abandoned the ferrule for a more congenial occu- 
pation in the fields. He came with his father to Louisa county, Iowa, in 
1857, and after renting land of the latter for some years, he purchased a 
tract of land in Richland township. Story county,, upon which he established 
his home in 1870. He applied himself with unusual energy and ability, ac- 
cumulating more land until he became the owner of a beautiful farm of eight 
hundred acres and also one of the leading cattlemen in this part of the state. 
Fie made a close study of agriculture and was widely regarded as an author- 
ity on that subject, being one of the prime movers in various organizations 
that have assisted in a marked degree in the advancement of the permanent 
interests of all branches of farming. 

On the loth of February, 1859, Mr. Furnas was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Sunderland, who was born on a farm in Montgomery 
county, Ohio, February 20, 1842, a daughter of Richard and Eleanor Sun- 
derland. She is a descendant of Captain Richard Sunderland of Revolu- 
tionary fame. Her father was a prominent farmer of Montgomery county, 
and he and his wife have passed to their reward. No children were bom 
to Mr. and Mrs. Furnas, but they made a home for si.x children and par- 
tially reared them. 

Air. Furnas was reared in the faith of the Society of Friends. He was 
identified with the Masonic order, and politically adhered to the republican 
party from the time of reaching his majority. He was never a seeker for 
public office but he filled various positions in the township, always dis- 
charging his duties with a fidelity that met the unanimous approval of the 
taxpayers. He was an earnest advocate of temperance and was widely known 
throughout the country on account of his prominence in advancing the farm- 
ing interests. He was president of the National Farmers Alliance, the Story 
County Farmers Institute and the Farmers Progression Reading Circle ; 
vice president of the Farmers Fire and Lightning Association of Story 
county ; secretary of the State Farmers Mutual Protective Association and 
of the local alliance; and was one of the honorary members of the Commer- 
cial Travelers Fair, which was held in Madison Square Garden, New York 
city, December 16, 1896. A man of winning manner, generous in disposi- 
tion, he made a host of friends, and in the course of a life of unusual activ- 



284 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ity he assisted in advancing very materially the comfort and happiness of 
those with whom he associated. He was thoroughly progressive and always 
ready to assist a fellow traveler less fortunate than himself, his greatest 
happiness being found in service for others. 



OSMOND J. \ ILAND. 



Although he began as a school teacher and attained an enviable reputa- 
tion in that calling, Osmond J. \iland, of Slater, felt attracted to a business 
career and embarked in the furniture and undertaking business, in which 
he has been highly successful. He is a native of Story county, born Sep- 
tember 8, 1871, and is a son of Knute and Carrie (Fronsdahl) Viland, both 
natives of Norway. They were reared and married in that country and came 
to America in 1866, their destination being Story county, Iowa. The father 
purchased land in Palestine township, about one and one-half miles south 
of Huxley, and started upon what promised to be a highly prosperous ca- 
reer. In 1873, however, he passed away in the midst of a life of usefulness, 
leaving a widow and three children. The mother bravely took up the re- 
sponsibility of rearing her family and continued upon the farm until about 
a month before her death, when she removed to Slater. She died January 
20, igoo, leaving the memory of an unselfish character that will long be re- 
remembered by those who knew her. 

Osmond J. Viland was reared upon the home farm and assisted as he 
grew u]) in j)rovi(Iing for the wants of the family. He received his early 
education in the district schools and later attended the State Nonnal Col- 
lege at Cedar I-'alls, Iowa, also the United Church Seminary, at Minnea- 
polis, Minnesota. After thoroughly preparing himself he taught school 
for five or six years, gaining a reputation as one of the most promising 
teachers in the county, in iS^y) ho joined .Andrew Maland in the inircha-r 
of the furniture business at Halverson Brothers at Slater, the style of the 
new firm being Maland & X'iland. On March i, 1907. he acquired his part- 
ner's interest and has since conducted the business independently. He is a 
licensed embalmer and has acquired an extensive patronage both in the sale 
of furniture and as an undertaker. 

On the 22d of June, 1904, Mr. Viland was united in marriage to Mis^ 
Inger Askland. of Slater, a daughter of Colhen .Askland. who was born in 
Norway and emigrated to the United States in the same year as the X'iland 
family, stopping for some time in the state of Illinois. Finally he located 
in Story county and he is now one of tiie successful farmers of Palestine 
townshij). Unto -Mr. and Mrs. X'iland three children have been born: Clare 
Kenneth. Blanche Celestinc and Lillian Margaret. 

Mr. \'iland gives his support to the republican party and has served in 
official positions for eight years past to the general satisfaction of tlie pco- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 285 

pie of his town and township. He and his wife are faithful members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church. He is secretary of the church and also super- 
intendent of the Sunday school, showing an ability in church and Sunday 
school work that has greatly assisted in promoting the best interests of the 
community. He is a man of fine address and superior talents, moreover, 
possessing the laudable desire to advance the welfare and happiness of 
others, and he justly ranks as a leader in his locality. 



OSTEN T. MOLDE. 



The agricultural interests of Milford township find a worthy represen- 
tative in Osten T. Molde, who is now living on section 2},. His record is 
that of a self-made man for he not only started out in life empty-handed 
but also came to America without knowledge of the language or customs 
of the people. It was necessary that he familiarize himself with the speech 
of the American nation as well as to become acquainted with the methods 
of doing business here. Resolution and energy, however, have enabled him 
to work his way upward and he is now the owner of two hundred acres 
constituting one of the valuable and desirable farms of Milford township. 

Mr. Molde is a native of the land of the midnight sun, his birth having 
occurred at Saude Ryffilke, Norway, on the 28th of November, 1854. His 
parents were Thormod and Rayna Molde, the latter now living at Saude 
at the advanced age of ninety-four years, her birth having occurred April 
13, 1817. The father, who was born March 14, 1807, died in 1857. He 
was a farmer by occupation and thus provided for his family which num- 
bered four sons and three daughters. 

Osten T. Molde was the youngest, and the only son who came to the 
United States. He remained a resident of his native land until about 
twenty-seven years of age, when he sailed for the United States and made 
his way direct to Nevada, Iowa. He was not acquainted with a single per- 
son here and he could not speak the English language. He had only sixty- 
five dollars at the time of his arrival but he possessed what is better than 
capital — firm purpose, laudable ambition and unfaltering integrity. He has 
since resided in Story county and has spent most of the time in Milford 
township. He had previously learned the carpenter's trade in his native 
land and after coming to this county he worked for a time at his trade and 
also was employed at farm labor by the month. Following his marriage he 
began farming on his own account on rented land and so continued for five 
years, during which period he carefully saved his earnings until he was en- 
abled to purchase eighty acres of his present farm which is situated on sec- 
tion 23, Milford township. He has added to this a tract of one hundred 
and twenty acres and now has an excellent farm property of two hundred 
acres upon which he has made good improvements, adding to it all of the 



286 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

accessories and conveniences of a model farm of the twentieth century. His 
methods of tilling the soil are practical, and his work at all times is charac- 
terized by a progressiveness that protluces excellent results. 

On the 13th of December, 1883, Mr. Molde was united in marriage to 
Miss Gusta Jacobson, daughter of Johannes antl Barbara (.Teig) Jacobson. 
She was born in Norway. April 10. 1863, and with her parents came to the 
United Slates, settling first in Minnesota but removing a few months later 
to Story county, Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Molde have been born seven 
children: Julia, who is now enj,fage(l in dressmaking in Roland; Theodore; 
Emma ; Gertie ; Otis ; Mabel ; and Gladys. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church of Roland and are 
well known in their part of the county where they have gained many friends. 
Mr. Molde certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. 
He has never regarded obstacles or difficulties as something to cause failure 
but rather as an impetus for renewed effort. He has worked earnestly 
and untiringly and there have been few idle hours in his life. Gradually, 
therefore, he has advanced and is now one of the substantial agriculturists 
of his adopted country. 



J. 11. DUKKOUGHS. 



Realizing at the outset that advancement in business must depend upon 
close application, earnest purpose, unfaltering diligence and reliability, J. H. 
Burroughs has employed those qualities to reach the creditable place which 
he now occupies as one of the leading grocers of Nevada. He was born in 
Lake View, New Jersey, April 17, 1850, a son of George F. and Sarali 
(Major) Burroughs. The father was born in Cayuga county, New York, 
and became a foundryman, following that business until about fifty years of 
age. after which he turned his attention to farming. In 1868 he removed 
with his family to Cedar county, Iowa, and there carried on agricultural 
pursuits but retired in his later years. His last days were passed in Salem. 
South Dakota, where he died in 1907 in his ninetieth year. His wife, a na- 
tive of New Jersey, passed away in Tipton. Iowa, in 1898. at the age of 
seventy-seven years. 

I. H. Burroughs, the fifth in order of birth in their family of twelve 
children, resided in New Jersey until eighteen years of age. when he ac- 
companied his parents on their removal to Tipton, Cedar county, where he 
resided until i8g2. In that year he came to Nevada, where he has since inailc 
his home. For two years he worked in a foundry in New Jersey and Phila- 
delphia under tlie direction of his father and after going to Tipton was em 
ployed in connection with the timber business for four years. He afterward 
went ujion the farm and not only devoted his attention to the labors of the 
field but also engaged in teaching school U<r three terms. He likewise spent 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 287 

four years at the court house in the position of deputy auditor and at dif- 
ferent times engaged in clerking in stores in Tipton until 1890, when he 
entered into partnership with W. E. EHjah, with whom he was thus asso- 
ciated for two years. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Burroughs came to Nevada and 
purchased a grocery stock, conducting the store for two years, when he sold 
out. He spent the winter of 1895-6 at Eureka Springs, Arkansas, but in 
the spring returned to Nevada and purchased a furniture store, which he 
conducted for two and a half years. In 1898 he came to his present loca- 
tion, trading his furniture stock for a stock of groceries in the Ringheim 
block, where he carries a large and well selected line of goods, while his 
earnest desire to please his patrons and his honorable business methods are 
salient features in the success which is attending him. In addition to his 
grocery stock he owns three dwellings in Nevada and a farm near Crooks- 
ton, Minnesota, embracing a quarter section of land. 

In 1883 Mr. Burroughs was married to Miss Mary Ryder, a native of 
Tipton, and a daughter of Christian and Rachel Ryder. Mr. Burroughs 
belongs to the Masonic lodge, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the ^lethodist Episcopal church — associations which indicate much of the 
nature of his interests and the principles that govern his conduct. Per- 
sistent, earnest labor has brought him success, and tangible evidence of his 
active and well spent life is found in his business and real-estate interests 
in Nevada. 



J. H. RIDDLESBARGER. 

Prominent among the business men of Nevada is J. H. Riddlesbarger, 
for twenty-five years past connected with the poultry business and also ac- 
tively identified with other lines. He came to Nevada from Franklin Grove, 
Lee county, Illinois, in 1885, and was associated with A. F. Wingert, under 
title of Wingert & Riddlesbarger, the firm soon becoming widely known on 
account of its extensive operations in poultry. In 1900, the firm consolidated 
with Boardman Brothers and continued the business for three years, when 
Mr. Wingert and Boardman Brothers retired. Mr. Riddlesbarger and C. M. 
Morse then purchased the Boardman Brothers packing house, the name of 
the firm being changed to the Nevada Poultry Company. At the close of 
the year Mr. Morse withdrew and C. W. Harris was admitted as a partner, 
the title under which the business was conducted still remaining unchanged. 

The Nevada Poultry Company handles annually half a million pounds 
of dressed and packed poultry, which is shipped principally to eastern and 
European markets. The company has built up an enviable reputation on 
account of the excellence of its products and the reliable business principles 
upon which its affairs are conducted. Mr. Riddlesbarger has from the 



288 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



beginning been a leading factor in its management. During his residence 
in Nevada he has also been ])romincntly connected with the live stock 
market, purchasing extensively for packing houses at Chicago. In addition 
to the interests mentioned, he is engaged in farming and is the owner of a 
well improved place of two hundred and tifty-tive acres in Grant township. 
He is recognized as a progressive man of large enterprise and public spirit, 
and he has assisted very materially in enhancing the prosperity not only of 
Story county but of a much wider region in Iowa. 



JOHN M. CHRISM.VN. 



John M. Chrisman, a son of James A. and .Amanda J. (Fairbanks) 
Chrisman, was born in Bureau county, Illinois, on the i6th of February, 
1867. The father was a native of Ohio, being born in Highland county, 
and was a son of George Chrisman, who came to the United States from 
Germany with his parents when a small boy. The mother was born in 
Posey county, Indiana, a daughter of Alexander Fairbanks, a cabinet-maker 
by trade, who was born in Massachusetts and belonged to the F'airbanks 
family of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Chrisman were married in Bureau 
county, Illinois, and were the parents of four children, who are as follows : 
Emma, who became the wife of Joseph Burton of Lincoln, Nebraska; 
Catherine, the widow of Fred Conover, of Bradford, Illinois; John M., our 
subject; and William David, of Bradford, Illinois. The father always fol- 
lowed the vocation of farming, in which he was very successful. The pa- 
rents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which the father 
was a very active worker until his death in 1899. The mother is still liv- 
ing at an advanced age and makes her home in Bureau county, Illinois. 

Mr. Chrisman spent his younger years in a manner very similar to the 
majority of boys who are reared in the country. He attended the district 
schools to the age of fifteen years and for three years at Princeton. (Illi- 
nois) high school. He also took a course at the university in X'alparai.so, 
Indiana, where he spent three years. At the age of twenty-one years he 
assumed the entire responsibility and control of the home farm, serving in 
this capacity for three years. At the expiration of that period he became 
a landowner, jiurchasing eighty acres of land in I'.ureau county. wJiich he 
operated for nine years. In 1901 lie came to Iowa and houglit two hun- 
dred acres of land on section t^2. Richland township. Story county, where 
he continues to reside. Mr. Chrisman has always made a specialty of feed- 
ing and raising cattle and hogs and in this he has met with success and sub- 
stantial reward. He has very largely confined his efforts in this direction 
to shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. 

In 1892 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Chrisman and Miss Addie 
Reed, a daughter of Hudson and Saraji (I'lHtton) Reed, the former a native 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 289 

of Ohio and the latter of lUinois. They have become the parents of two 
children: Ruth and Gertrude, both of whom still reside at home. 

The parents both attend the Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mr. 
Chrisman is a very active worker. He has always been a ver>- public- 
spirited man and takes an active interest in politics, his support being given 
to the republican party. He is now and has been for the past six years 
one of the township trustees, is also a member of the school board, of which 
he was at one time treasurer, and in addition to these two offices he is serv- 
ing on the township central committee and is a director of the First National 
Bank of Nevada. 

Both the public and private life of Mr. Chrisman has at all times been 
such that he has won and held the esteem and respect of those with whom 
he comes in contact in either a business or social way. He has been success- 
ful in the vocation he chose to follow, but it has been a steady progression 
every step of which has been won and held by his business ability and close 
application to the course which he had marked out for himself. 



NICHOLAS SIMSER. 



Nicholas Simser, who for nearly thirty years past has been engaged in 
the blacksmith business at Nevada, Iowa, and at the present time serving 
as member of the city council, is a native of Canada. He was born on a 
farm, November 3, 1843, and is of good Teutonic ancestry on the paternal 
side, being the son of John and Martha (Woods) Simser. The father was 
a native of New York and the mother of Canada. His grandfather, John 
Simser, adhered to the British cause at the time of the Revolutionary war 
and fought in the army of the king, seeking safety in Canada after the 
close of the war, where he spent the remainder of his life. The father of 
our subject passed his entire life in Canada, where he engaged successfully 
in farming. He died at an advanced age when the subject of this review 
was a young man. The mother departed this life in 1876 at the age of 
eighty years. Her father also fled to Canada at the close of the Revolution, 
having been an ardent sympathizer of the British. Mr. and Mrs. Simser 
were both members of the Episcopal church. There were thirteen children 
in the family, the first two being girls and the ne.xt seven, boys, Nicholas be- 
ing the seventh of the latter in order of birth. 

He was reared on the home farm and gained his early education in the 
country schools, also being taught by his father the value of labor. After 
attaining manhood he learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1865, believing 
that more favorable opportunities were presented under the flag of the re- 
public, he came to the United States, his first employment being upon a 
bridge which was in course of erection at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. After com- 
pleting that work he worked for four years in a blacksmith shop and then 



290 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

opened a shop of his own at Stockbridge, Wisconsin, which he conducted 
for six years. In tlie spring of 1876 he was allured by the mines to Dead- 
wood, South Dakota, remaining in the Black Hills for four years, a large 
part of which time he spent eagerly searching for the yellow metal. He 
was moderately successful in his quest but not finding a fortune he returned 
to Wisconsin, where he was married, and in May, 1881, he came to Nevada, 
Iowa, and entered the employment of W'illiam Gates. Having decided to 
make this place his prominent home, he purchased a shop that stood on the 
corner now occupied by the Peoples Saving Bank, and, his work prosper- 
ing, he built the shop which he has since owned and which is located a few 
doors north of the spot of his original establisment. By close attention to 
his business he has secured a large patronage and now enjoys a pros- 
perity, which is the result of many years of applied energy. 

In 1881 Mr. Simser was united in marriage to Miss Etta B. Miller, 
who was born near Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, May 14, 1861. Two children 
have blessed this union : Jay Adam, who was born March 8, 1888, and is 
now telephone manager at Roland, Iowa ; and Erma B., who was born 
May 3, 1895, and is attending school. 

Mr. Simser is identified with the Masonic order and the Knights of 
Pythias, having been a charter member of Samson Lodge, No. "/"j, Nevada, 
of the latter organization. Politically he gives his support to the republi- 
can party and is an ardent advocate of its principles. As a patriotic citi- 
zen he attempts to perform his duty to the community and is now serving 
most acceptably as member of the city council. He is essentially a self- 
made man. Starting as a poor boy he has climbed from the bottom of the 
ladder financially and has now attained a position of independence. Recog- 
nizing the difficulties that lie in the way of young men who have the de- 
sire to advance, he is always ready to extend a helping hand to every worthy 
aspirant, and it is safe to say that no man in this region has a greater 
number of true friends than the subject of this review. 



HENRY F. WOODRUFF. 

Henry F. Woodruflf is one of the extensive landowners of Story county, 
although for the past two years he has made his home in Ames, from which 
point he has superintended his agricultural interests. In the management 
of his affairs lie displays keen judgment, strum,'- jiurpose and laudable am- 
bition, carrying forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 
He was born in Seneca county. New York. March 8, 1849, his parents be- 
ing I'.enjamin and Ruth ( I'uller ) WoodrulT, both of whom were also na- 
tives of the Empire state. The mother died when her son was but six 
weeks old, and in 1853 the father removed to Lenawee countv, Michigan, 
where he resided for ten years, when he went to Ann Arbor, Michigan. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 291 

He spent his last days in Ames, in Story county, at the home of his son 
Henry F., passing away here in 1898, at the age of eighty-two years. His 
father. John Woodruff, was a soldier of the Mexican war, who was 
wounded in battle and died a few years later. Henry F. Woodruff has a 
sister, Emma ]., who is now the wife of Austin Burbank, of Ypsilanti, 
Michigan. He also has a half-sister, Mrs. Ruth McClay, who is living in 
Rockford, Illinois. 

Henry F. Woodruff' was but four years old when the father removed to 
Michigan and was a youth of fourteen when the family home was estab- 
lished in Ann Arbor, where he attended the high school. In 1868 he came 
to Story county and purchased a farm in Washington township on the 
Boone county line. There he actively engaged in general agricultural pur- 
suits until about two years ago, when he erected his present beautiful resi- 
dence at No. 121 5 Lincoln avenue in Ames and took up his abode in the city. 
He retains the ownership of the home farm and has other property, making 
him one of the large landholders of this part of the state. He owns a farm 
on section 24, Colfax township, Boone county, the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 18, Washington township, this county, and also land on section 19, 
Washington township, his total possessions aggregating eight hundred and 
seventy-four acres, divided into four farms and improved with four sets 
of buildings. The land, however, is all in one body and constitutes a very 
valuable and productive property, from which Mr. Woodruff' derives a 
substantial annual income. For thirty years he engaged extensively in 
feeding cattle and also bought and sold cattle, his live stock interests con- 
stituting an important branch of his business. His success has come through 
judicious investment and the wise management of his affairs and is weU 
merited. 

In 1872 Mr. Woodruff was united in marriage to Miss Libby Lambert, 
who was born in Jackson county, Michigan, and died in Story county, Iowa, 
March 15, 1891, at the age of forty-two years. Their children were: Laura 
Elizabeth, who became the wife of John Perry and died in 1907, leaving 
five children; Minnie, who died in 1894; Effie, who died in the same year of 
typhoid fever, as did her sister; Benjamin, a resident of British Columbia; 
and Theressa W., the wife of Hiram H. Powers, a professor at the experi- 
mental station at Crookston, Minnesota. In the fall of 1892, in Michigan, 
Mr. Woodruff married Theressa Lambert, a sister of his first wife. 

In his religious faith Mr. Woodruff is a Methodist. He manifests a 
citizen's interest in public affairs, giving his aid and support to many meas- 
ures and projects for the general good. He finds great delight in travel 
and has visited all of the world's fairs held in this country. On the lOth 
of February, 1910, he left San Francisco for a tour around the world, reach- 
ing Ames on the 20th of July after a six months' absence. It was a most 
enjoyable trip and his mind is today stored with many interesting memories 
of the lands and people that he visited. His is the notable record of a 
successful business man, who owes his progress to his recognition and utili- 



292 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

zation of opportunit)-. J!y untiring industry antl wise investment he has 
worked his way steadily u[nvar(l and his success has been so worthily won 
that the inost envious could not begrudge him his prosperity. He has never 
been known to take advantage of the necessities of another in business 
transactions but has placed his dependence upon the substantial qualities of 
industry, determination and close application. 



L. G. KUSEXFHLD. 



The history of agricultural and stock-raising interests in Story county 
would be incomplete and unsatisfactory were there failure to make ref- 
erence to the Rosenfeld family, for through many years representatives 
of the name have closely been associated with business of this character 
and in fact have been leaders in farming and kindred activities. 

lie whose name introduces this review was born in Morrison. Illinois, 
on the 9tli of July, 1864, and was brought to Story county by his parents 
in the spring of 1873. He is a .son of George and Louisa (Fritch) Rosen- 
feld. The father was born in liaden. Germany, June 4, 1824, took part in 
the Baden rebellion and was captured by the Prussian army, being one of 
the fifteen hundred prisoners who were locked up in a church. From that 
number the enemy each morning took out six officers and shot them. Mr. 
Rosenfeld in company with General Sigel managed to escape, forty-four 
of the number forcing their way out of prison. He made his way to the 
United States as soon as possible. In 1853 he secured a I'rench passport 
and in the year 1855 he arrived in Xtw ^■()rk. The same year he was mar- 
ried and soon afterward removed westward to Morri.son, Illinois, where 
he worked at the mason's trade, which he had i)reviously learned ni his 
native country. In 1873 he removed to Story county, Iowa, and was here 
killed by the cars while driving a team across the railroad, on the 6th of 
March, 1902. He had devoted his life to farming in this state and had 
prospered in lii^ undertakings, becoming the owner of five hundred and 
twenty-five acres of valuable land, lie had purchased two hundred and 
forty acres of the home place here in iHnj but did not take up his abode 
thereon until 1873. 

L. G. Rosenfeld was at that time a lad of nine years. The family 
home was situated a mile north of Kellogg, on section 33, Washington 
township, and he has resided upon this farm continuously since. He re- 
mained with his i)arents until his marriage, when he located on another 
part of the farm about a half mile ea.st of Kelley but still on section t,^. 
He owns one hundred and ten acres of the old home place, and his propertv 
constitutes one of the valuable and desirable farms of the neighborhood. 
Here he is engaged in breeding French draft horses, to which business he 
has devoted his attention untiringly and successfully since 1902. He owns 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 293 

an imported stallion called Courageous, also another named Gotch, and 
has five thoroughbred mares. His horses are all eligible to registry in 
both French draft and Percheron classes. Mr. Rosenfeld was a breeder 
of Hereford cattle for a number of years but does not give any attention to 
that business at the present time. He also breeds Berkshire hogs and his 
stock-raising interests are to him a profitable source of income. 

In 1891 occurred the marriage of Mr. Rosenfeld and Miss Ella M. 
Morris, who was born in Morrison, Illinois, IMay 22, 1866, and is a daugh- 
ter of Willard and Addie Morris. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rosenfeld have been 
born two daughters. Mabel and Blanch, who are now high-school students 
in Ames. 

The family are prominent socially in the county and have an extensive 
circle of warm friends. Mr. Rosenfeld has made for himself a creditable 
position in business circles, being regarded today as one of the leading 
representatives of stock-breeding interests in Story county. He has thor- 
oughly informed himself regarding everything that promotes the success 
of stock-breeders, especially in raising Percheron draft horses and Berk- 
shire hogs. He works untiringly, is strictly honorable in all of his deal- 
ings, and success has come to him as the merited reward of his labor. 



JAMES H. KIRK. 



James H. Kirk, a well known farmer of Union township, was born 
in Lebanon. Kentucky, on the 3d of August, 1832, and is the son of Tra- 
vis and Melinda (Purdy) Kirk, also natives of the Blue Grass state, whence 
they removed to McDonough county, Illinois, in 1841, making their home 
there until they passed away. There our subject grew to manhood, re- 
ceiving a practical education in the common schools. In 1853, he came to 
Iowa, and located in Polk county, where he worked as a farm hand for 
three years. The following year was spent in Mills county, and at the end 
of that time he returned to McDonough county, where he remained until 
he entered the service of his country, enlisting in 1862, in Company D, 
One Hundred Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry. He was discharged the fol- 
lowing November, and the next April returned to Iowa, spending one more 
year in Polk county. 

In the spring of 1864, we again find Mr. Kirk in Iowa, and this time he 
took up his abode in Story county, following farming for himself as a 
renter for some years. In 1896 he purchased eighty acres of land in 
Union township, on which he lived until September, 1871, when he sold 
the place and removed to Kansas. He made his home in that state for 
three and one half years, but has since been a resident of this county, and 
now owns and operates a good farm of eighty acres in Union township. 



294 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

In 1869 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kirk and Miss Elizabeth 
C. Warren of Story county, a daughter of Jolin and Ellen (Groseclose) 
Warren, both natives of Johnson county. Indiana. It was in tlie fall of 
1853 that the Warren family came to Storj' county, Iowa, and the father 
purchased the farm now owned by our subject, where he and his wife 
continued to reside until called to their final rest. To Mr. and Mrs. Kirk 
were born nine children, seven of whom are still living, namely: Charles 
W.. who is now principal of the Collins schools; James Burtis, a fanner 
of Polk county, Iowa; Edward A., a resident of Greeley. Colorado; Frank 
B., who is now operating his father's farm; Addie E.. the w-ife of Harley 
Elliott of Union township ; Lulu, the wife of Ingral Hendrickson of Cam- 
bridge; and Carl H.. of Des Moines. 

The republican party finds in Mr. Kirk a stanch supporter of its prin- 
ciples, and he has taken quite an active part in local affairs, serving as 
constable for five years, assessor for eight years, and as a member of the 
school board for over twenty years. Fraternally he is connected with 
Ersland Post No. 234, G. A. R., of Cambridge, and lx)th he and his wife 
are earnest and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
During his long residence in this county he has become widely and fa- 
vorably known, and is a man honored and esteemed by all with wdiom he 
has been brought in contact. 



CHARLES F. STUART. 

Charles F. Stuart is an honored veteran of the Civil war but was no 
more loyal to his country at that time than he is in days of peace, for he 
is ever ready to aid in promoting projects and movements teniling to ad- 
vance the welfare of county, state or nation. Much of his life has been 
spent in Iowa and he is now living on section 24, Franklin township, where 
he owns and cultivates fifty-three and a half acres of land. 

lie was liorn at Uridgcport, Belmont county. Ohio. May 13, 1843, =1'"' 
is a son of Joseph and Diana (Richardson) Stuart, the latter a native of 
Maine, as was probably the father. They lived for a number of years in 
Belmont county, Ohio, and in 1858 became residents of Jones county. Iowa, 
settling about three miles northwest of Olin. Their remaining days were 
passed in that county, where the mother died in 1868, at the age of fifty- 
seven years, while the father passed away in 1876, at the age of sixty-, 
seven. He was a millwright and followed that trade while in Ohio, but 
after coming to Iowa turned his attention to farming. Unto him and his 
wife were born four snns and five daughters: George .\.. wlio enlisted at 
Reynold.sburg and served for three years in the Civil war. after which he 
died in Illinois; Charles, who passed away at the age of seven years; Mrs. 
Elmira Jane Robinett. now deceased; Mr-. Mary .\nn Forquer Norman. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 297 

of Ashland, Oregon; Mrs. Emeline Norton, of Laramie, Wyoming; Charles 
F. ; John Albert, who enlisted in February, 1S64, and served until the close 
of the Civil war. his home being now in Jones county, Iowa; Mrs. \'ir- 
ginia Bickford, of Washington, Iowa; and Diana, who died at the age of 
sixteen years. 

When a youth of fifteen years Charles F. Stuart, in 1858, accompanied 
his parents to Jones county, Iowa, and was living upon the home farm, 
about three miles northwest of Olin, when his patriotic spirit was aroused 
and he joined the Union army, enhsting on the loth of August, 1861, as 
a member of Company B, Ninth Iowa Infantry, under Captain D. x\. Car- 
penter, The command was assigned to the army of the southwest and 
was on duty in Missouri and Arkansas, participating in its first engage- 
ment at Pea Ridge, Arkansas. Mr. Stuart also took part in the battle of 
Chickasaw Bayou and was afterward taken ill, being poisoned with the 
water at Yazoo river. Later he participated in the battle of Jackson, 
Mississippi, and in the siege of Vicksburg, in which he was twice wounded, 
on the 22d of May, 1863. These were only flesh wounds, however, and he 
was ofif duty but for ten days. He took part in the second engagement at 
Jackson, then went back to Black river and afterward to luka, Tennessee, 
where he became ill and was left in the hospital for a few days. He was 
then again on duty at the battle of Brandon, after which the troops went 
into winter quarters. In December, 1863, he reenlisted in the same com- 
pany and regiment and was granted a thirty days' veteran furlough. At 
the battle at Dallas, Georgia, he was taken prisoner and sent to Anderson- 
ville, where he remained from the 27th of May, 1864, until the loth of 
September. He was then removed to Florence, South Carolina, where he 
continued until the 5th of February, 1865, when he made his escape. He 
was three months in getting to the lines and his companion who escaped 
with him was taken sick, Mr. Stuart remaining with him for five weeks, 
during which time they were cared for by an old negro. They then re- 
joined Sherman's forces at Charleston and reached their regiment at Alex- 
andria, \'irginia, on the igtii of May, 1865. After participating in the 
grand review at Washington, D. C, they were sent to Louisville, Kcn- 
tuckv, where they were discharged and mustered out on the 19th of July, 
1865. 

Mr. Stuart at once returned to his home in Jones county, Iowa, and 
resumed farming. There he resided until 1874. when he came to Story 
county. Here he operated a ditching machine for two years, after which 
he engaged in farming for two or three years. He then followed rail- 
roading until 1892, acting as bridge foreman, and since that date he has 
given his attention to general agricultural pursuits, owning and cultivating 
fifty-three and a half acres of land on section 24, Franklin township. The 
farm is well tilled and developed and brings to him a good annual income. 

Mr. Stuart was married in Jones county, September 14, 1865, to Miss 
Minerva Overball, who was born in Ohio, May 13. 1845. and died at Ana- 



298 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

mosa, Iowa, February 19, 1874. They liad three children : Joseph Michael, 
who died in infancy; Charles Wilber, who died at Ames when twenty-four 
years of age; and Mrs. Arlinna May Everett, who died leaving one daugh- 
ter, Bessie. 

On the 27th of June, 1875. Mr. Stuart was again niarried. his second 
union being with Ellen Elliott, who was born in Story county, Iowa, De- 
cember 25, 1854, a daughter of Clark and Mary Elliott, natives of Ohio 
and Indiana, respectively. They came to Story county in August, 1854. 
and the father died at Ames, but the mother is now living- in Des Moines. 
Four children have been born to the second marriage of Mr. Stuart: Ger- 
trude, now the wife of Roy Taylor, of Franklin township; Maude, the 
wife of Fay Taylor; Clark; and Bessie, the wife of S. B. Allen. All are 
residents of Franklin township. 

Mr. Stuart is a member of the United Brethren church at Ames and 
also belongs to Ellsworth Post, G. -\. R.. of which he became a charter 
member. He has always been true to the banners under which he has 
marched and to the cause which he has espoused. Loyalty is one of his 
strong characteristics and the county today numbers him among its public- 
spirited citizens. 



DWIGllT \V. BOYDSTOX. 

For twelve years past engaged in the jewelry business at Nevada, 
Dwight W. Boydston has attained recognition as an enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizen whose example and influence have contributed materially 
to the permanent welfare of the city. He is a native of Knoxville, Iowa, 
born July 4, 1876, and is a son of George L. and Josephine C. (W'aus) 
Boydston. The father was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, and is of 
German parentage. He learned the tinner's trade and in his ear^j' manhood 
came to Iowa, subsequently locating at Knoxville, where he has been en- 
gaged in the grocery business for the past twenty-seven years. He is also 
the owner of a fine farm in Marion county. He was a soldier in the Civil 
war and gives his allegiance to the republican party, with which he has been 
identified ever since he arrived at voting age. He has been an active 
worker politically and served for five years as treasurer of Marion county. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellow^, 
the Kjiights of Pythias and the Grand .Army of the Republic. His re 
ligious views are indicated by membership in the Methodist church, it 
which he is a trustee and a stanch supporter. The mother of our suljject 
is a native of Delaware county. Ohio, and is also an earnest member of 
the Methodist church. She is now fifty-five years of age, while her hn 
band is ten years her senior. There were two children in their family : 
Dwight W., our subject; and Marion, who is now engaged in the general 
merchandise business at Fairmount. Nebraska. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 299 

Dwight W. Boydston received his preliminary education in the pubUc 
schools, graduating from the Knoxville high school, after which he at- 
tended the Bradley Polytechnic School at Peoria, Illinois, from which he 
was graduated in 1898. Having laid the foundation for a successful career 
by a thorough education and being attracted to mercantile pursuits, he came 
to Nevada in the spring of 1899 and entered the jewelry business in the 
First National Bank building, where he has since continued, being now 
accounted one of the substantial business men of the city. 

On October 12, 1904, JMr. Boydston was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora A. Thompson, a daughter of F. D. and Abigail Thompson, a record 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Two children have blessed the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Boydston: George L., who was bom July 26, 
1907; and Josephine, born July 20, 1909. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boydston are both members of the Presbyterian church, 
in whose behalf they are active workers. He is a valued member of the 
Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias and politically gives his support 
to the republican party. He has shown capability in his business affairs 
and a promptness and efficiency in the discharge of every duty, which have 
won him the honor and esteem of all classes of people. He has now se- 
cured a handsome competence and is numbered among the representative 
citizens of Nevada. 



HIRAM E. EMERY. 



Hiram E. Emery, a contractor and builder of Ames whose ability and 
business integrity constitute the foundation upon which he has raised the 
superstructure of his success, was born about a half mile northeast of Ne- 
vada on the 24th of August, 1858, his parents being John and Amanda 
(Stull) Emery. The father's birth occurred in Wheeling, West \'irginia, 
November 28, 1832, while the mother was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
September 3, 1835. 

The paternal grandfather, Tiiomas Emery, came to Story county, Iowa, 
with his family in 1857 and his death here occurred in 1868. His wife, 
Mrs. Barbara Emery, died in Grant township in 1890. They had four 
children, William. Marv', John and Sarah J. The eldest is now living in 
London, Ohio, at the age of more than eighty-five years. Mary is the wife 
of Rev. Samuel Gossard, who was one of the first Methodist Episcopal 
preachers of Story county. Sarah became the wife of Thomas Gossard, the 
nephew of Rev. Samuel Gossard. He was a soldier of the Civil war prior 
to his marriage and died in 1889. His widow is now a resident of Onawa, 
Iowa. The third member of the family was John Emery, who married 
Amanda Stull and they became parents of Hiram E. Emery. Both be- 
came residents of Madison county, Ohio, in childhood days and were there 



300 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

reared and married. They arrived in Story county, Iowa, in the spring of 
1857, traveling by boat to Keokuk and reaching- their destination on the ist 
of March. They located on the place where the birth of Hiram E. Emery 
occurred and five years later the father entered land in Grant township but 
never resided upon that farm. Subsequently he purchased a farm on sec- 
tion 32, Grant township, whereon he lived until 1882, when he took up his 
abode in Ames. In 1885 he removed to O'Urien county, Iowa, where he re- 
sided until 1895, when he went to live with his son Hiram in Poweshiek 
county. Eater Hiram E. Emery returned to Ames, accompanied by his 
father, who passed away here on the 2Sth of December. 1908. Since the 
death of her husband the mother has resided with the daughter in O'Brien 
county. In their family were nine children: Mary, who died in Ohio in in- 
fancy; Hiram E. ; Nettie B., the wife of Homer Morgan of Cherokee 
county; Charles F., also of Cherokee county; E. Grant, of ^lontana; I'"rank, 
a resident of Fort Dodge, Iowa; William, of Sanborn, Iowa; John, who 
died in infancy; and Florence, the wife of Fred Marunda, of I'rimghar, 
O'Brien county. 

Hiram E. Emery was reared to farm life, remaining witii his parents 
until twenty-two years of age, during which jieriod he became familiar with 
all the labors of held and meadow. He then began working at the car- 
penter's trade in Ames and was employed by O. P. Stuckslager for three 
years. Subsequently he was employed at bridge work and building for the 
Chicago & Northw'estern Railroad Company for five years, and subsequently 
spent two years in similar service with the Milwaukee Railway Company. 
Since that time he has engaged in contracting and building on his own ac- 
count and now has a liberal patronage. He has done much work in Ames 
and throughout the surrounding country, confining his attention largely to 
the building of houses. He has made judicious investments in property and 
is the owner of a good farm in O'Brien county and another in Minnesota, 
while in Ames he has three good residences and other business interests. 
His life has indeed been a busy and useful one, and the success which has 
come to him is the merited reward of earnest labor. 

On Christmas Day of 1889 Mr. Emery w-as united in marriage to Mi- 
Arminda J. Brown, who was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, December 27, 
1862, but when 9 years of age went to Poweshiek county, Iowa, with her 
father's family. She was the daughter of Samuel and \'ictoria Brown. 
The mother died when her daughter was but five years of age, and the father 
afterward married again. Mr. and Mrs. Emery became the parents of two 
children but the younger, J. V., died in infancy. The elder, Samuel Orvillc, 
is now attending the high school. 

Mr. Emery belongs to the Masonic fraternity in which he has taken the 
degrees of the lodge, chajner and council, lie also holds membership re- 
lations will) the .M(»kin Woodmen of America and with the Homesteaders. 
His has been a well s[)cnt life, devoted to the duty close at hand. There 
nothing hesitating or vacillating in his nature. When he sees that ihcrt- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 301 

something that should be done, he does it, and his promptness and ability in 
the discharge of his work have been strong elements in his success. Grad- 
ually he has advanced in his business life and now occupies a creditable posi- 
tion among the contractors and builders of Story county. 



CYRUS SIMMOiNS. 



Cyrus Simmons was nimibered among the pioneer settlers of Story 
county and for many years was identified with its agricultural interests. 
Those who yet remember him — and his friends were many — speak of him 
in terms of high regard and attest the fact that his labors were an element 
in the substantial improvement and upbuilding of this section. He was 
born November 3, 1823, in Ohio, a son of Lorenzo and Anna (Taylor) 
Simmons, whose family included Henry, Amos, Rachel, John, Warren, and 
Cyrus, who was the third child. 

Cyrus Simmons spent his youthful days in Ohio, acquiring his educa- 
tion in such schools as the home neighborhood afforded. When about 
twenty years of age he accompanied his parents on their westward re- 
moval to Adamsville, Michigan, and there he was married in 1853 to Miss 
Rosetta Corwin, who was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, February 13, 1836, 
a daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Hewlitt) Corwin, who removed from New 
York to Michigan and there spent their remaining days. In their family 
were eleven children of whom Mrs. Simmons and Stillman Corwin, of 
Ypsilanti, Michigan, are the only ones now living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simmons began their domestic life in the Wolverine 
state where they resided until 1855, and then came to Story county, Iowa, 
making the trip in a wagon. Here Mr. Simmons purchased a farm of two 
hundred and forty acres which he secured at the nominal price of four 
dollars per acre. It was wild and unimproved land, hut with characteristic 
energs' he began to turn the sod and prepare the fields for cultivation. In 
time planting was done and crops were ultimately gathered. Year by year 
the work of the farm was carried on until the place was converted into 
a rich and productive tract of land from which large harvests were an- 
nually garnered. After some years Mr. Simmons sold two eighty-acre 
tracts of his place, leaving to his widow eighty acres which is situated on 
section 14, Washington township. He also had some timber land. He 
made substantial improvements upon his farm, including the erection of 
good buildings, and remained there until his death, which occurred in 
June, 1878. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Simmons there were born three children but two 
of the number died in infancy. The surviving daughter, Alice, is the wife 
of Albert Kelly and they reside upon the old Simmons homestead. Mr. 



302 lliSTURV UF STURV COUNTY 

Kelly operating the farm. They liave tliiee children. Rutli, Ralph and 
Floyd. 

A thiril of a century lias passed away since Mr. Simmons was called 
to his final rest, but he is yet remembered by many of the old settlers 
and citizens of this country as a man of genuine worth, active and indus- 
trious, and loyal to' the best interests of the community. Mrs. Simmons is 
today the eldest resident in this neighborhood, having lived here for more 
than fifty-five years, during which period she has witnessed a marvelous 
transformation. When she came there were no railroads, much of the 
land was unclaimed and uncultivated and the work of civilization and im- 
provement seemed scarcely begim. She has seen crossroads villages trans- 
formed into thriving cities and towns and as the years have gone by has 
also witnessed substantial growth in educational and moral i)rogress as well 
as along material lines. She can relate many interesting incidents of the 
early days when the homes were small and luxuries few but when hn-- 
pitalitv reigned supreme and a spirit of general helpfulness existed among 
neighbors. 



JAMES H. LARSON. 



One of the highly esteemed business men of Roland is James li. Lar- 
son, who is also serving his second term as mayor of the village. He i- 
the son of Lars and Joanna Haugen, both natives of Norway. The father 
was born in Norway in 1827 and came to the United States in 1867, lo- 
cating in Kendall county, Illinois. During his first five years of resi- 
dence in the United States he worked by the day and then rented a place 
in Howard township, Story county, Iowa, which he cultivated until 1879. 
By thrift, careful management and untiring application he acquired the 
means which enabled him to become a property owner and in 1879 he 
bought eighty acres of land on which he lived until 1896, when he added 
to his holdings another one hundred and sixty acres. Shortly after this 
he withdrew from active farming and is now living retired in Iluxlev. 
Iowa, enjoying the fruit of his early labors, his realty yielding him a 
sufficient income to provide him with the necessities of life and .some oi 
the luxuries. Mr. and Mrs. Haugen were the parents of nine children, 
of whom seven are living: James II.. our subject; John, residing in Salem, 
Oregon; Louis, living at I.akefield, Minnesota; I'clle, a resident of Col- 
orado Springs; Cornelius, of Devil's Lake. North Dakota; Eddie, resid- 
ing in Seattle, Washington; and Louise, who is the wife of Elmer 
Thompson. 

Mr. Larson spent his boyhood and youth im a farm, performing such 
work as paternal authority dictated. His education was mainly acquired in 
night school and he enjoyed the sports and games usually favored by 



i 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 303 

young people. He remained at home assisting his father until he was 
eighteen years of age, when he began business for himself by drilling 
wells. He continued in that business for thirteen years, doing some farm- 
ing at inter\-als. but in 1900 he embarked into the grain business. After 
he had engaged in that for seven years he sold out and went into the 
lumber business, which he is now following. In addition to his lumber 
interests Mr. Larson is a stockholder in the Farmers Savings Bank and the 
Story Independent Telephone Company. 

Mr. Larson established a home for himself by his marriage to Miss 
May Erickson, a daughter of Michael Erickson. Unto them have been 
born five children : Leonard, Severt, Malcolm and Mildred, all of whom 
are at school ; and Avis, who is at home. The family always worship with 
the Lutheran denomination in which church the parents hold membership 
and are ardent workers. Air. Larson is one of the public-spirited and 
progressive citizens of his community, who well deserves the esteem which 
his fellow citizens entertain for him. 



HENRY CLAY LOWREY. 

Henry Clay Lowrey is one of the extensive landowners of Storey 
county and one of the most prominent importers and breeders of Percheron 
horses. His business interests have been so wisely and ably conducted 
that success in large measure has come to him and by all is acknowledged 
to be the merited reward of his effort. 

Mr. Lowrey was born in McLean county, Illinois. March 28, 1858, his 
parents being Joseph and Josephine (Jenkins) Lowrey. The father, a na- 
tive of Scotland, came to the United States in 1830, settling in Pennsyl- 
vania, where he lived for a short time when with two companions he 
started on horseback for Illinois, which at that time was largely a frontier 
region. Land could be obtained at a very low figure on the western fron- 
tier and ]Mr. Lowrey traded a horse for one hundred and sixty acres. 
He then turned his attention to farming and with characteristic energy 
converted his place into highly cultivated and productive fields. As he 
prospered in his undertakings he made other investments in property until 
his holdings aggregated several thousand acres, and he w-as numbered 
among the wealthy farmers of McLean county at the time of his death. 
He left a widow and four children to mourn his loss. 

H. C. Lowrey, the third in order of birth, spent his boyhood and youth 
upon the old home farm in McLean county and in the district schools ac- 
quired his early education, which was afterward supplemented by study 
in the Kentucky University at Lexington for a year. He was then com- 
pelled to return home to assist in the management of the farm and re- 
mained in McLean county until 1894, when he removed to Story county, 



304 lUSTUUY UF STURV COUNTY 

Iowa, where he has since been engaged in farming and stock-breeding, 
making a specialty of importing Percheron horses from France. He is one 
of the largest importers of the state and has made forty trips abroad 
for that purpose. He has a splendidly improved farm, equipped with all 
modern accessories and conveniences and has upon the place every facility 
for the care of his stock. Energy, economy, thrift and diligence have 
enabled him to win a place among the prosperous agriculturists of his 
adopted county, within the borders of which he now owns eight hundred 
acres of valuable land, while in liig Stone county, Minnesota, he owns 
four hundred acres. 

Mr. Lowrey was married, November 5. 1S90. to Aliss Elizabeth Otto, 
of McLean county, Illinois, and to them have been born three children: 
Joseph and Lawrence, who aid in carrying on the home farm ; and Leona, 
at school. 

Mr. Lowrey gives his political support to the republican party but the 
honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him as he prefers 
to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. He is honest almost 
to a fault. His word is as good as his bond, and he has never been one to 
take advantage of the necessities of another in any business transaction. He 
would far rather suffer loss him.self than inflict it upon anyone else. He 
has pro.spered by reason of his close application, his intelligently directed 
effort and his sound judgment, and his record should serve to encourage 
and inspire others. 



LOVETTE OLIVER. 



Lovette Oliver, a capitalist of Gilbert, who has been both the archi- 
tect and builder of his own fortunes, was for many years identified with 
commercial pursuits and at the present time is vice president of the Gil- 
bert Savings Hank, although not in active control of the institution. Large 
investments in lands, as well as in bank stock, indicate the success which 
has come to iiim as the reward of ])ersistcnt ami intelligently directc<l labor. 

He was born in Livingston county. New 'i'ork, October 13, iS^b, a 
son of John and Mary (Rosenberg! Oliver. The father was born in Lin- 
colnshire, England, in 1816, and when about twenty years of age crossed 
the Atlantic, becoming a resident of New York, where he married Miss 
Mary Rosenberg, who was liorn in the Empire state in 1820. .\bout i«*^50 
he removed with his family i<. Indiana, wlicre he lived for three years, and 
then became a resident of Kenosha county, Wisconsin, where he remained 
until 1869. He then came to Ames, Iowa, but spent his last days in 
Neosho, Missouri, where he passed away in 1871. His widow long sur- 
vived him and died in Missouri on the nth of October, 1910. The father 
was a cabinet-maker by trade, serving a seven years' apprenticeshi]) in 




LDNKTTK iiLIXKi; 



HISTORY OF Story county 307 

England and afterward following his trade in the United States until his 
removal to Wisconsin, when he turned his attention to farming. Unto him 
and his wife were born nine children: Mrs. Mary Dowse, now deceased; 
James, of Montana; Lovette, of this review; Mrs. Eliza Walker, of 
Neosho, Missouri; John, a resident of Cummins, Iowa; Mrs. Libby Mott, 
deceased; William, of Neosho, Missouri; Charles, a resident of Ames; 
and one who dietl in infancy. 

Lovette Oliver was only six years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to Indiana and a youth of nine years when they went to Kenosha 
county. Wisconsin. There he resided until 1869, when, at the age of 
twenty-three years, he made his way to Ames, since which time he has 
lived in Story county. He was reared to farm life from the age of nine 
and was continuously connected with agricultural pursuits until the time 
of his enlistment for service in the Civil war. He offered his aid to the 
government in Lake county. Illinois, in February, 1865, and was assigned 
to duty with Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-third Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he continued until the close of hostilities, doing guard 
duty most of the time with the Army of the Cumberland. He then re- 
turned home, after which he engaged in teaching school in the winter 
months and in the summer seasons studied photography. After his re- 
moval to Ames he opened a photographic gallery, which he conducted for 
three years and then removed to a farm a mile and a half southeast of 
the present site of Gilbert. Bending his energies to the cultivation and 
improvement of his land he transformed his farm into a valuable place and 
remained active in its improvement and control until 1880. When the 
town of Gilbert was founded he opened a lumberyard there and was en- 
gaged in the lumber and implement business for twenty-eight years. When 
he retired he was the oldest dealer in those lines in either Story or Boone 
counties. Throughout the entire period he had enjoyed an extensive pat- 
ronage, for he had closely applied himself to business and at all times 
met the demands of his patrons with courteous service and honorable deal- 
ing. He was therefore accorded an extensive patronage and his business 
brought him substantial returns. As he prospered in his undertakings he 
invested more and more largely in real estate. He sold his farm property 
in Story county but is the owner of good farming land in Palo Alto county, 
together with eight hundred acres in South Dakota. He and his brother 
John owned and conducted a lumberyard at Cummins for several years 
but at length sold it. Lovette Oliver has invested in bank stock and has 
been vice president of the Gilbert Savings Bank since its organization in 
1906. His attention, however, is merely given to the supervision of his 
invested interests and he is enjoying a rest which he lias truly earned and 
richly deserves. 

In November, 1868. Mr. Oliver was united in marriage in Lake county, 
Illinois, to Miss Lavina Ruth, who was l)orn in that county. October 11, 
1846. and is a daughter of Erwin and Leah (Brown) Ruth. Air. and 



308 lUSTURV UK STURV CUUXTV 

Mrs. Oliver have two children: Irene, now the wife of Oscar Johnson, 
living two miles west of Gilbert; and Dr. ClitTord I. Oliver, who is a grad- 
uate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago and now a 
practicing physician of Graceville, Minnesota. 

Mr. Oliver has been a lifelong republican, active in support of the 
party and its principles. He served as township clerk of Franklin town- 
ship for fifteen years, has done effective work as a progressive member of 
the city council of Gilbert and in the spring of 1910 was elected mayor, 
since which time he has given to the city a businesslike and public-spirited 
administration, resulting beneficially to Gilbert in many ways. He is like- 
wise a valued representative of fraternal organizations. He is a charter 
member of I'rank Bentley Post No. 79. G. A. R., and also of the Odd 
Fellows lodge of Gilbert, and he joined the Congregational church of the 
town on its organization and has since been one of its active and helpful 
members. With the exception of two years he has served continuously as 
clerk of the church and for twenty-five years has been superintendent of 
the Sunday school, doing excellent work in making the methods of the 
school of interest to the young and thus inculcating in tlieir minds lessons 
which are factors in character building. While he has met with sjilendid 
success, business has been to him but one phase of existence and not the 
end and aim .of life. He has at all times recognized his duties and obliga- 
tions in other relations and stands as a high type of .American manhood 
and chivalry. 



SAMUEL S. S'lWTLER. 

Samuel S. Statler, now living retired at Nevada, was for many years 
actively identified with its business interests. He has now passed the 
eightieth milestone on life's journey and, having throughout life been gov- 
erned by strict principles of honor and fidelity to every trust, he enjoys the 
good-will of all who know him. He was born in Stoyestown. Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1830, and is a son of Jonathan Stat- 
ler, also a native of Pennsylvania. The family on the paternal side is of 
German origin and good Revolutionary stock, the early progenitors hav- 
ing arrived in .America during colonial days. Jonathan .Statler was a mer- 
chant and also owner of a tannery, being known as a man of good busi- 
ness judgment and reliable ciiaracter. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian church and politically was identified with the democratic party. 
He was called away at the age of fifty-six years, in i860. The mother of 
our subject, who bore the maiden name of Maria Snell, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, May 14, 181 1. She was of Scotch descent and possessed many 
admirable traits inherited from worthy ancestry. She was a firm believer 



HISTORY OF' STORY COUNTY 309 

ill the Bible and for many years an active worker in the Methodist church. 
She departed this Hfe September 24, 1887. 

Samuel S. Statler is one of a family of four children and received his 
education in private schools, the public-school system not being then es- 
tablished. He remained with his parents until after reaching manhood 
but in 1855, being then twenty-five years of age, he started out for him- 
self. Coming west to Nevada, Iowa, he was connected for a year or more 
with the land business. He soon gained many friends in Story county 
and was appointed deputy county treasurer and recorder under William 
Lockridge, serving for three years. In 1873 he was elected county treas- 
urer and filled that office for one term, while previously he had served 
as member of the board of supervisors from Nevada township. After 
retiring from the treasureship he entered the grocery business, in which 
he continued about fifteen years. During this time he also acted as agent 
of the American Express Company, continuing in that capacity after re- 
tiring from the grocery business and serving altogether twenty-five years 
as representative of the express company in Nevada. Since giving up this 
position he has taken no part in business affairs. 

On March 22, i860, Mr. Statler was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Stephens, who was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, Septem- 
ber 16, 1831, and is a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Lytle) Stephens. 
The parents came to Nevada in the spring of 1858 and here took up their 
permanent abode. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Statler: 
Samuel \'., James F. and Sidna, all of whom are deceased ; one who died 
in infancy; Edgar, further mention of whom is made below; Carrie Ellen, 
who married Frank A. Flach, of Amboy, Illinois, and is the mother of 
four children ; Margaret, at home ; and Ferdinand, a fruit grower of El- 
berta, Utah. The mother of these children was called from earthly scenes 
December 23, 1908. She was a woman of many noble qualities of mind 
and heart, who thought no sacrifice too great provided it added to the 
comfort and happiness of those with whom she was associated. 

Edgar Statler was born in Nevada, Iowa, in 1865. He was educated in 
the public schools and engaged in various occupations until arriving at the 
age of twenty-five years, when he entered his father's grocery, continuing 
there for three years. Subsequently he engaged in other lines but since 
1903 has again been identified with the grocery business and has met with 
a goodly measure of success. He gives his allegiance to the democratic 
party and fraternally is identified with the Knights of the Maccabees. He 
holds membership in the Presbyterian church, of which he is a liberal 
supporter. In 1889 he was married to Miss Cora M. Slifer, who was born 
in Grundy Center, Iowa, in 1871. There are five children in their family. 

Samuel S. Statler is a nlember in high standing of the different bodies 
of the Masonic order and is connected with the Order of the Eastern 
Star. He has for many years been affiliated with the Odd Fellows and is 
the oldest member of the order in Story county and the only charter mem- 



yiO HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ber living. Politically he is in sympathy with the democratic party. Al- 
ways straightforward, sincere and generous in judging others, he was early 
recognized as the possessor of those estimable qualities that are most es- 
sential in the formation of manly character. That he has ably performed 
his part is the unanimous opinion of those who know him best. 



FRANK JOHNSTON ECKELS. 

One of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Story 
county is Frank Johnston Eckels, who was born in Mercer county, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 20th of September, 1855. His father, James Starr Eck- 
els was also from the Keystone state, having been born in Cumberland 
county on the 7th of December, 1827. The latter was a graduate of 
the Washington and Jefferson University and after having completed his 
academic course studied law. IJefore he began practicing, however, he 
filled the cliair of Latin and Greek in a school at Greenville, Pennsylvania. 
He married Margaret Herron, a daughter of James and Isabelle (John- 
ston) Herron. Her father was a native of Pittsburg, the descendant of 
the Pennsylvania branch of the family, and the mother of New ^"ork, her 
family being originally from Kentucky, however. 

James Starr Kckcis left Pennsylvania in 1S57 and located with his 
familj- in Princclon, Illinois, where he ])racticed law up to the time of his 
death. He was a member of the democratic party and was always very 
active in politics. He was several times the candidate of his party for 
congress in a republican district and he was also a delegate to all of the 
democratic national conventions while in politics. He passed away in 
Princeton, Illinois, in 1907. In his family were four children. Frank 
Johnston of this review is the eldest. James Herron, who was a lawyer, 
received the appointment as comptroller of currency during the Cleveland 
administration and after his retirement from office was elected to the 
presidency of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago. His death oc- 
curred in Chicago in April, 1897. George Morris is at present acting as 
legal counselor of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago. And fane 
Lsobelle is the widow of the late Dr. C. A. Palmer, of Princeton, Illinois. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject was a brother of the paternal 
grandfather of Mrs. William Taft. the wife of the president of the United 
States, thus Mrs. Taft and the children of James Starr Eckels are cousins. 

Frank Johnston Eckels acquired his preliminary education in the pub- 
lic schools of Princeton and after graduation from the high school he 
went to Albany, New York, to attend law school, having chosen the profes- 
sion of his father as his vocation. He received his degree in 1S75 ami, rc- 
turninqf to Princeton, entered the office of his father, with whom he con- 
tinued to practice until 1882, when he decided to give up law for agriciil- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 311 

tural pursuits and with this purpose in view located in Wellington, Ohio. 
After eighteen years residence in the Buckeye state he removed to Iowa, 
locating on two hundred and twenty acres of land in Story county, where 
he still resides. His farming has always been conducted along thoroughly 
scientific and businesslike methods. His stock is well sheltered and cared 
for, all sheds, pens and barns being kept in a thoroughly sanitary condi- 
tion, while the latest models in machinery and most up-to-date processes 
in drainage and fertilization are employed in the cultivation of the fields. 
He has given as much study to agriculture and as careful regard in its 
pursuit as he would have bestowed upon the details of any profession or 
industry, all of which is indicated by the general air of prosperity which 
surrounds his homestead. 

Mr. Eckels was married to Miss Jennie Wadsworth, a daughter of 
Benjamin Wadsworth, of Wellington, Ohio, one of the extensive land- 
owners and prominent farmers of that section of the state. Mrs. Eckels is 
a well educated and highly cultured woman, an alumna of the Oxford 
University of Oxford, Ohio, one of the oldest and best educational institu- 
tions in the state. She is a descendant of Captain Wadsworth of Massa- 
chusetts, who hid the charter of the state in the old Charter Oak, and the 
poet Longfellow was connected with the same family on his mother's side. 
Mrs. Eckels also has the distinction of being a descendant of General 
Putnam of Revolutionary fame. Both she and her husband belong to good 
old American families who have been connected with the history of the 
country since colonial days and are eligible to various societies whose 
membership depends on Revolutionary lineage. 

They are the parents of eight children, who are as follows : Elmer 
Palmer is living in Illinois. Jennie Wadsworth became the wife of George 
G. Hutchinson, cashier of the First National Bank at Lake City, Iowa. She 
was a student of Overland College, while Mr. Hutchinson is a graduate of 
the Iowa State University. Herron Ames married Bertha Chapman, of 
Wellington, Ohio, who was a teacher in the Cleveland high school. Frank 
Johnston is a graduate of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, that 
state, and is now practicing law at Fort Smith, Arkansas. He attended 
the Iowa State College at Ames for two years and the University of Michi- 
gan for three. Maria was a student at Ferry Hall and later at Oxford 
College at Oxford, Ohio. She married Raymond Hutchinson, a gradu- 
ate of the Iowa State University, who is now the cashier of a bank at Rock- 
well City, Iowa. James Starr is deceased. Benjamin Wadsworth and 
Margaret Davidson are attending school in Nevada. 

The family always attend the services of the Presbyterian church, of 
which the parents are members. They are a family of unusual refinement 
and education and hold a prominent social position in the community where 
they reside, their home being noted for its hospitality and the gracious cor- 
diality accorded all guests. Mr. Eckels has been a resident of Story county 
for only nine years, yet that time has sufficed for him to impress his per- 



312 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

s 

sonality upon those who have formed his acquaintance, and he is generally 
recognized as a man of unusual attainments. He has a gentleman's sense 
of honor and this coupled with his high ideals and manly dignity has won 
him the esteem and respect of the entire community. 



ROBERT ALEXANDER ROBISON. 

During a residence of fifty years in Story county Robert A. Robison 
left an indelible impress here by reason of the fact that he exemplified in 
his life the sterling traits of good citizenship and of activity and honor in 
business. Through careful management and judicious investment he be- 
came one of the extensive landowners of the county, owning at the time 
of his death nearly twelve hundred acres of valuable farm land. He had 
devoted many years to general agricultural pursuits and stock-raising near 
Iowa Center, having arrived in this state in the fall of 1856. 

He was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. May 15. 1822. His 
father, John Robison. was a native of the same locality, was reared to 
manhood there and after arriving at years of maturity wedded Miss Mary 
Anderson, also a native of Pennsylvania. They took up their abode upon 
a farm in MifiBin county and resided there until called to their final rest, 
the father passing away in 1853 and the mother a number of years later. 
Their family numbered eight children, seven sons and a daughter. 

Robert A. Robison, who was the sixth in order of birth, remained under 
the parental roof through the period of his boyhood and assisted his father 
until eighteen years of age, when he began learning the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed for a number of years, eventually becoming a contractor 
and builder. In 1855 he heard and heeded the call of the west. Bidding 
adieu to the Keystone state, he removed to Lafayette, Indiana, where he 
worked at his trade for about eighteen months, and in the fall of 1856 came 
to Iowa, settling in Story county, at Iowa Center. There he established 
himself in business as a contractor and builder, but after four years de- 
voted to that pursuit took up his abode upon a farm in 1859 and con- 
centrated his energies upon the work of tilling the soil. He first bought 
eighty acres of land and added to the farm from time to time as his re- 
sources increased, until in his home place he had over four hundred and 
twenty acres. Elsewhere he bought other property until he became the 
owner of nearly twelve hundred acres. He brought his fields under a high 
state of cultivation and added modern equipments to his different farm 
properties. Upon the home place he erected a fine residence, together with 
two large barns and other outbuildings necessary for the shelter of grain, 
stock and farm machinery. 

His success came to him largely after his removal to Iowa and was the 
direct result of untiring industry and good management. He worked his 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 313 

way steadily upward until he was recognized as one of the self-made men 
of his township. In addition to tilling the soil he raised and fed cattle and 
hogs and found that a profitable source of income. Year by year his farm- 
ing and stock-raising interests were carried on carefully, systematically and 
profitably until 1893, when he left the farm work to others and removed 
to the city of Nevada, where he resided until his death. During the first 
seven years of his residence in Nevada his home was upon a farm lying 
partially within the corporation limits. About 1900 he removed to Linn 
street, occupying an attractive residence, in which his widow now makes 
her home. 

Mr. Robison was married in Pennsylvania, in February, 1852, to Miss 
Nancy Greer, a native of that state. She, too, was born in Mifflin county 
and was a daughter of Adam and Mary Greer. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Robi- 
son were born eight children: George G., who is married and resides in 
Nevada ; Ida, who became the wife of A. G. Moore and died near Nevada, 
December 28, 1909, leaving three daughters: Emma, the wife of Warren 
Maxwell, of this county ; Roland, who is married and is an extensive cattle 
feeder living four miles west of the town of Maxwell; Charles, who is 
married and resides on a farm six miles south of Nevada; Fannie, who is 
the wife of Ephraim Proctor, living about four miles from Cambridge; 
Edward, a resident of Maxwell, Iowa ; and Bert, who follows farming near 
Nevada. All of the children are now married and have homes of their 
own. 

When Mr. and Mrs. Robison came to Story county in September, 1856, 
their cash capital consisted of but ten dollars. The following winter was 
a most severe one and they suffered much with the cold. They had startetl 
from Lafayette with ox teams but one of the oxen became crippled and 
Mr. Robison traded the other for a horse and bought another horse, driv- 
ing the rest of the way with the newly acquired team. At that time the 
county contained a population of little more than two hundred and the 
town of Nevada was not founded for five years more. There was scarcely 
any money in circulation and Mr. Robison worked at his trade and in com- 
pensation therefore took what he could of the necessaries of life. Des 
Moines, thirty miles away, was the nearest trading point. Food supplies 
were scarce and prices were very high at first. The family met all of the 
hardships, privations and trials of pioneer life, but with the passing years 
all this changed, and as the result of his energy, diligence and wisely di- 
rected effort Mr. Robison became one of the wealthiest men of the county. 

After his retirement he spent two winters in California in company with 
his wife. In all matters of citizenship he stood for progress and reform, 
seeking the adoption of methods and measures for the benefit of the com- 
munity at large. He instructed his children in habits of industry and 
economy and reared a family who are a credit to his name. He continued 
his residence in Nevada until his death, which occurred January 23, igo6. 
In the meantime he had been an interested witness of the growth and de- 



314 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

velopinent of the county, which had been transformed from a largely un- 
inhabited district into one of the populous and prosperous sections of the 
state. His labors were an element in its substantial growth, and no man 
rejoiced more heartily in what was accomjilished along the lines of im- 
provement and upbuilding. He possessed a genial nature that attracted 
warm friendship and, while to him was allotted a long life of about eighty- 
four years, it was with deep regret that his fellow townsmen learned that 
he had been called to his final home. Mrs. Robison still resides in Nevada 
and is one of the oldest among the pioneer women of this part of the state. 



JESSE BARKER. 



The name of Barker is well known in Story county and is recognized 
as a synonym for integrity of character and also for success in business 
affairs. Jesse Barker, the founder of the family in this county, is now 
more than four score years of age and for forty-five years has been identi- 
fied with the agricultural interests of Iowa. He was born at Windham, 
Greene county, New York, October 12, 1828, a son of Ezra and Mary 
(Conley) Barker. The parents were New Englanders, locating in Greene 
county after their marriage. Subsequently they lived in various places 
in the Empire state, the father passing away in Steuben county. New 
York. The mother came to Iowa with her son Azel, who located in 
Kossuth county, where she continued until her death. 

Jesse Barker was reared in New York state and as he grew to manhood 
was given the advantages of a common-school education. He engaged in 
farming in Steuben county until May, 1866, when he sold his farm, being 
attracted westward on account of superior advantages offered in the Mis- 
sissippi valley. He came to Story county and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of unimproved land in I'nion township, to which he later adikl 
eighty acres. He lived with his family for a time in a rude board liou-c. 
later erecting a comfortable residence wdiich is now the family home. By 
close application to a business, for which he was well adapted by natural 
ability and training, he became one of the prosperous farmers of the 
township, cultivating his land so as to produce highly gratifying results. 
He engaged in general farming but during recent years has lived retired, 
having sold all but one hundred acres of his place. 

On the 20th of January, 1850, in Steuben county. New "S'ork. Mr. 
Barker was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Mary Brown, a daughter 
of Abijah and roily (McClary) Brown, natives of New York, but at an 
early day the fatlier brought his family to Iowa. Of the nine children 
born to our subject only three are now living, namely : Cliarlcy (or C. D.) ; 
Eugene; and Delphine, the wife of W. C. Bennett, of Greene county, Iowa. 
The son Eugene is a well known farmer of Union township. He married 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 317 

Miss Jennie Chashe, a daughter of David and Emma (Lampman) Chashe, 
and they became the parents of five children : Cora, now the wife of \V. 
Huff; Jessie, the wife of Chnton Warfield, by whom she has one child, 
Selma Louise; Glenn Irvin; David Earl; and Effie Winnefred. 

Mr. Barker is a self-made man, whose prosperity has been gained 
through his own well directed efforts. Possessing at the outset of his 
career good business talent, he took advantage of opportunities as they 
were presented and gained a position of respect and responsibility. He 
has displayed many traits of character which are recognized as belonging 
to the best citizenship and he assisted to the extent of his ability in the 
development of Story county. Today he is enjoying the results of many 
years of labor, in the course of which he assisted many others less fortunate 
than himself. Politically Air. Barker gives his adherence to the republican 
party. He is not connected with any religious denomination but is friendly 
toward them all. 



LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL. 

Louis Hermann Pammel, occupying the chair of botany in the Iowa 
State College, is numbered among those whose work has been most effec- 
tive and resultant in giving to the college its high standing among such 
institutions of learning in the country. He is also widely and favorably 
known because of his contributions to scientific literature. In Dr. J. Mc- 
Keen Cattell's American Men of Science Dr. L. H. Pammel's name ap- 
pears among the American men of science as one who has won distinction 
as an investigator. It is also a recognition of the work done in Iowa State 
College as he is the only inan so selected from the college whose name is 
starred. 

He was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, April 19, 1862, his birthplace 
being one of the first brick houses erected in that city. His father, Louis 
Pammel, was a native of Hoxter, Germany, and in 1853 came to America, 
settling first in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He afterward returned to Ger- 
many for his bride, who in her maidenhood was Sophie Freise, a native 
of Stade, Germany. Following his return to the United States he took up 
his abode in what w-as then the small city of La Crosse, where he en- 
gaged in the meat business until 1867, when he removed to a farm three 
miles from the city on the state road between Madison and the Missis- 
sippi river. Three sons and three daughters were born unto Louis and 
Sophie Pammel, namely : Louis ; Hermann ; Gustaf ; Mathilda ; Dora ; and 
Emma, who became the wife of Professor N. E. Hansen, but is now 
deceased. 

Louis H. Pammel attended the country schools and afterward pursued 
a year's course in a La Crosse business college. Private instruction later 



318 IllSTURY OF STORY COUNTY 

prepared him for entrance to tlie University of Wisconsin, in which he was 
enrolled as a student in September, 1881. Previous to this time he had 
worked at ordinary routine farm labor, doing the chores about the home 
place, plowing and cultivating the ground and caring for the harvests. 
The summer vacations while in college were also spent in farm work. 
In the university he pursued the agricultural course and was graduated 
in 1885, the only agricultural student graduating in that class. Previous 
to that time the university had graduatetl but a single student in that 
course. In addition to the prescribed work he pursued special work in 
German literature under Professor W. H. Rosenstengcl, and also made a 
study of botany, which he pursued under the efficient and able educator, 
Dr. William Trelease, who later became director of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden at St. Louis. Because of his special work he took special honors 
in botany, preparing a thesis on the Anatomy of the Seeds of Some 
Leguminosae. This paper was later published in the Bulletin of the Torrey 
Botanical Club. This was the first of many of Professor Pammel's papers 
that have been accorded publication, although his introduction to the sci- 
entific world was through a paper by Dr. Trelease on Some Phenological 
Observations and the List of Parasitic Fungi of Wisconsin. 

After leaving the university, Professor Pammel was associated from 
December, 1885, until the following July with Dr. W. G. Farlow, of Har- 
vard University, as private assistant and later was proffered the position 
of assistant in the Shaw School of Botany of Washington University, St. 
Louis, under his old teacher. Dr. Trelease. While there he published two 
of his papers, one on Mildews, and a second on Root Rot of Cotton, the 
latter containing the results of his investigations of a serious disease of 
cotton in Texas, which he investigated for the Te.xas .Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station during the summer of 1888. 

In February, 1889, Professor Pammel received and accepted a call to 
ilie chair of botany from the Iowa Agricultural College, as it was then 
known. He has been in continuous service of the Iowa State College since, 
except for occasional summer work done for the Bureau of Forestry, 
Bureau of Plant Industry of the United States department of agriculture. 
When he was called to the chair of botany in 1889 the department had the 
upper floor of Xoriii Hall, now an annex to Margaret Ilall. He had to 
give all of the instruction in the class room and laboratory. Tiie depart 
mcnt was well equipped for the time. He had been preceded by two mo.-t 
efficient and poindar instructors, — Dr. C. E. Pessey, who became the pro- 
fessor of botany of the University of Nebraska, and Dr. Byron D. Hal- 
sted, professor of botany, Rutgar's College, New Jersey. He carried out 
the same general policies and has endeavored to see the department well 
equipped in every way. During this time the department was sent from 
pillar to post, having had (|uartcrs in the .Xgricidtural building, built in the 
'90s, then in the old Main building, from which the department was driven 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 319 

by two disastrous fires, then in the dining room of Margaret Hall, and 
finally in the modern and well equipped Central building, where it oc- 
cupies splendid quarters on the top floor, in one of the best buildings of its 
kind in the country. Though much was lost by the two fires, he has started 
a splendid herbarium, containing the large and extensive herbarium made 
by Dr. C. C. Parry, formerly a citizen of Davenport. This collection con- 
tains many types from the Rockies and the Pacific coast, as Dr. Parry 
was an early Rocky Mountain explorer. 

In 1889 Professor Pammel was honored with the degree of Master 
of Science from his alma mater and in 1899 Washington University of 
St. Louis conferred on him the Doctor of Philosophy degree, on which oc- 
casion his thesis was Anatomical Characters of the Seed of Legimiinosre 
Chiefly Genera of Gray's ^lanual. His contributions of papers along 
scientific and economical lines are regarded as of marked value and worth 
in the scientific world. Among his more important contributions are: 
Grasses of Iowa (two volumes) ; Ecology (one volume) ; Pet Bog Flora 
of Northern Iowa ; The Anatomy of the Caryopsis of Some Grasses ; Fun- 
gus Diseases of Grasses ; Manual of Poisonous Plants, a large volume of 
over one thousand pages ; and Common Weeds of the Farm and Garden. 
These indicate something of the line and scope of his activities and their 
favorable reception by the scientific world indicates his standing in the 
profession. 

He is a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science and the Iowa Academy of Science. He is a member of the Botani- 
cal Society of America and Deutsch. Bot. Gesellsch, St. Louis Academy, 
Society for the Promotion of Agricultural Science, Society of American 
Bacteriologists, American Breeders' Association, American Forestry As- 
sociation and a corresponding member of the Davenport Academy of Sci- 
ence. He has been president of the Iowa Academy of Science and Iowa 
Park and Forestry Association. He was formerly a member of the Iowa 
Geological Board. At the present time he holds membership with the 
Delta Theta Sigma, an honorary agricultural fraternity, and is a director 
of the Cosmopolitan Club, in which he takes great interest. Aside from 
his interest in general college affairs. Professor Pammel has ever mani- 
fested a most helpful spirit toward his students. He has the faculty, 
without which the educator never attains the highest success, of regarding 
each student from the standpoint of the individual and in his instruction 
and personal relations of meeting scientific needs. A number of the men 
of his training now occupy important positions in college and govern- 
mental work, including F. C. Stewart, botanist of the Geneva (New York) 
Agricultural Experimental Station, C. R. Ball, C. W. Warburton, J. I. 
Schulte, Miss Emma Sirrine, P. H. Rolfs, F. Rolfs, A. J. Norman, F. W. 
Faurot, R. E. Buchanan, E. R. Hodson, A. L. Bakke, J. R. Campbell, E. 
Sherman. G. W. Carv'er and Dr. L. Lewis. 



320 HISTORY OI' STORY COL'XTY 

Professor Pammel was married June 29, 1887, to Miss Augusta Emmel, 
of Chicago, and unto them have been born six children, Edna, Harriet, 
Doris, Lois, Violet and Harold. They are all faithful communicants of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, in the work of which they take active part. 
Theirs is an attractive home opposite the campus and is the scene of many 
delightful social functions. 



D.WID VANCE THRIFT. 

David \'ance Thrift, proprietor of a restaurant in Xevada, was born in 
Utica, Licking county, Ohio, August 18, 1845, and is a son of \\'illiam and 
Margaret (Newell) Thrift, whose family numbered five sons and three 
daughters, of whom David \'. is the youngest and the only one now living, 
lie was only three years of age at the time his mother died and but six 
years of age when his father passed away. His uncle, Joseph Thrift, was 
a commissioner sent out by the government and located the county seat of 
Story county, which he named Nevada after the Sierra Nevada Mountains, 
for he was an old Californian. His residence was at Boonesboro, Iowa. 
He went to Fort Des Moines with the soldiers as a tailor and engaged in 
making the clothing worn liy the trDnjis. He was the fatlier of the first 
white child born there, and his eldest son. William Hamilton Thrift, served 
as adjutant general of Iowa under Governor Cummins. The life of Joseph 
Thrift was in many respects an eventful and unusual one, owing to the 
varied exi)criences that came to him. He was a native of V^irginia and 
spent his last days in California. 

Early in life David \'ance Thrift started out to earn his own living. 
He was reared in Bellefontaine, Ohio, to the age of thirteen years and then 
went to Findlay, Ohio. In that district he worked for farmers for his 
board and clothing and also was employed as porter in hotels. In fact lie 
scorned no emplcjyment that would yield him an honest living, doing what- 
ever he could until si.\tcen years of age, when on a certain afternoon he 
walked sixteen miles to Carey and there boarded the train for Bellefon- 
taine, Ohio. This was in the year 1861 and he enlisted, under his nick- 
name, "Leroy" Thrift, as a member of Company E, Eighty-second Ohio 
\'olunteer Infantry, which command was organized at Kenton, Hardin 
county, Ohio. He served for two years with the army as an independent 
sharpshooter and was then honorably discharged on account of disability. 

In 1863 he went to Warsaw, Indiana, where he learned the tinner's 
trade, at which he worked for six years. On the expiration of that period 
he came to Iowa, settling in Kellogg, where he established a hardware store 
which he conducted for a year. He then sold out and went to Monroe, 
Jasper county, where he again became proprietor of a hardware store but 
again sold after a year. In 1874 he arrived in Nevada and opened the first 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 321 

bakery shop and restaurant in the city. He continued the business for two 
or three years, when he sold out and for five years thereafter he was em- 
ployed by T. E. Alderman & Sons, working at the bench in their hardware 
store. He then opened a hardware store of his own, which he sold five 
years later, going to California, where he spent six months, after which he 
returned and opened a restaurant, which he has since conducted. He has 
made this popular with the public and is accorded a good patronage. While 
there have been no sensational chapters in his business career, he has 
worked his way steadily upward and is now the owner of two good busi- 
ness blocks in the city in addition to his restaurant. 

On the 27th of December, 1865, Mr. Thrift was married to Miss Emily 
A. King, a native of Ohio, and they have an extensive circle of warm 
friends in this city. Mr. Thrift belongs to the Grand Army of the Re- 
public and to the Knights of Pythias. In matters of citizenship he is as 
true and loyal to his country today as when he followed the old flag upon 
southern battlefields. He deserves all the praise implied in the term, a 
self-made man, for he has worked his way steadily upward, depending 
entirely upon his own resources from the age of thirteen years. Whatever 
success he has achieved is attributable entirely to his earnest labor and ca- 
pable management. 



WILLIAM N. CANADY. 

Within the borders of Story county there still reside many of the vet- 
erans of the Civil war who in early manhood, with the vigor and courage 
of youth, fought for the defense of the Union and have since remained 
loyal citizens of the country, stanchly supporting measures which they be- 
lieve to be for the best interests of the state and nation. Among this num- 
ber is William N. Canaday, who was born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, 
on Saturday, December 31, 1842, in the last hour of the year. His parents, 
John and Jane (West) Canady, also natives of Kentucky, were residents of 
that state until 1850, when they came with their family to Iowa, settling in 
Clinton county near Dewitt. The mother died in Woodbury county. Iowa, 
but the father spent his last days in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Their family 
numbered twelve children, five sons and seven daughters, of whom Robert 
Canady served for three years as a soldier of Company H, Twenty-sixth 
Iowa Infantry, during the struggle to preserve the Union. 

William X. Canady was but eight years of age when his parents left 
Kentucky and went to Clinton county, Iowa, where his youthful days were 
spent upon a farm. The public schools afl^orded him his educational privi- 
leges and when not busy with his text-books he worked in the fields. His 
time was given to the farm work until his enlistment for service in the 
Union army on the 12th of August, 1861, as a member of Company A, 



'S-2-2 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Eighth Iowa Infantry The regiment was assigned to the Army of the 
Tennessee, and with his command Mr. Canady participated in the battles of 
Shiloh, Corinth, the Siege of \'icksburg, Champion Hill, Grand Gulf and 
Memphis, being in Memphis in 1864 when General Forest made his raid. 
The Eighth Iowa saved the city on that occasion. Afterward Mr. Canady 
took part in the battle of Spanish Fort and was in all in sixteen important 
engagements. He received an honorable discharge on the 20th of April, 
1865, and then returned home. 

During the period of the war he had attained his majority and on the 
6th of February, 1866, Mr. Canady was married to Miss Loretta Tamer, 
who was born in Dewitt, Clinton county, Iowa, October 14, 1847, and is a 
daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Shinn) Tamer, the father a native of New 
Brunswick and the mother of Illinois. Her death occurred in her native 
state while Mr. Tamer passed away at Wall Lake, Iowa. Following his 
marriage Mr. Canady engaged in farming in Clinton county for a brief 
period but in December, 1866, came to Story county and located near the 
present site of the Iowa State College. He aided in building the first cen- 
tral building of that institution. He also went to Zenorsville, Boone county, 
where he worked in the coal mines for twenty years, and in 1902 he came 
to CJilbcrt, where he followed carpentering. The past five years, however, 
have been spent in the conduct of a wagon shop. He learned the trade of 
carpentering in 1872 and followed it in Des Moines, Boone and other 
cities. He possesses natural mechanical ability w-hich training and ex- 
perience have augmented and he is now numbered among the capable arti- 
sans of Gilbert, where he has won a liberal patronage in the conduct of his 
wagon shop during the past five years. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Canady have been born ten children : Carter N., 
now living in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; Eddie M., who died in infancy ; 
Etta M., the deceased wife of Clifford Zenor ; Murt. living in Greene county, 
Iowa; Sadie J., the wife of George Black, of Dawson, Iowa; Leonard J., 
at home; Lilly, the wife of Frank Reynolds, of Boone; Arthur, of Pitts- 
burg; and Thomas E. and Ethel, both at home. Two of the sons. Carter 
and Arthur, are graduates of the civil engineering department of the Iowa 
State College, the former having completed his course in 1888 and the 
latter in 1908. Carter Canady now has charge of the highway department 
for the American Bridge Company at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and .\rtl)iir 
is working there for him. lie has also spent eight inonths at work on thei 
Panama canal. 

In his political views Mr. Canady has long been a republican, believing 
that the princi|)le> nf that party contain the Ijest elements of good govern-^ 
ment. While living in Boone county he served as justice of the peace forj 
ten years and his decisions were based upon a comprehensive knowledge of 
the law as well as of the equity of the case. He has also been justice of the 
peace of Gilbert for two years and was the second mayor of this city. He 
takes an active part in the public life of the community and his worth is 



HISTORY OF STORY COUxNTY 323 

recognized by his fellovvmen who have honored him with office. He be- 
longs to Frank Bentley Post, No. 89, G. A. R., of Gilbert, also to the Odd 
Fellows lodge here and is likewise a member of the Congregational church. 
A review of his life shows that he has closely followed a course which has 
made of him a valued citizen and an upright man. He has many good 
qualities, is social and genial by nature and at all times approachable. Good 
words are spoken of him by his fellow townsmen, and he is justly ac- 
counted one of the worthy citizens of Gilbert. 



ISAAC H. CRAIG. 



Isaac H. Craig is regarded as one of the prominent citizens of western 
Iowa, and, while a resident of Boone county, is widely known in Story 
county, his home being just across the line. His friends in this part of the 
state are many, and his life history therefore cannot fail to prove of in- 
terest to a large majority of the readers of this volume. 

His birth occurred in Harrison county, Indiana, August 25, 1832, and 
he was reared in Clay county of that state. His parents were Presley R. 
and Elizabeth (Hiestand) Craig, the former a native of West Virginia and 
the latter of Ohio. When their son Isaac was about fourteen years of age 
they were baptized by the Mormon missionaries and joined that religious 
sect and when they were driven out of Nauvoo, Illinois, the father decided 
to go with them across the plains. Isaac H. Craig accompanied his parents 
as far as Council Bluffs and there the father and children were taken ill. 
This was his first experience in Iowa. The following spring the family 
returned to Indiana and remained residents of Clay county until March, 
1853, when they came to Story county, the family home being established 
three miles north of the present site of Ames. The father entered land 
from the government, began the development of a farm and continued to 
engage in agricultural pursuits in this county throughout his remaining 
days. His wife also passed away in Story county. They were the parents 
of six children : Isaac H. ; Elisha B., who enlisted with the first squad from 
Story county as a member of Company E, Third Iowa Infantry, and died 
in the service; Benjamin F., who joined Company D, of the Tenth Iowa 
Infantry, and also died while serving in the Union army; Samuel Clay, 
who died at the home of his brother Isaac about twenty years ago ; Mrs. 
Nancy E. Horine, also deceased; and Sarah A., who is the wife of Alex- 
ander H. Buck, a veteran of the Civil war now living in Ames. 

After coming to Iowa Isaac H. Craig remained at home with his parents 
until after the outbreak of hostilities between the north and the south, 
when, prompted by a spirit of patriotism, he joined Company A of the 
Twenty-third Iowa \'olunteer Infantry in July, 1862. He was on active 
duty among the bushwhackers in Missouri until honorably discharged on 



324 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

account of disability in March, 1863. He then returned home and was en- 
gaged in farming in Story county until he sold his farm of seventy-nine 
acres and purchased his present farm just across the boundary line in 
Jackson township, Boone county. Upon this he took up his abode in 
^Tarch, 1909. He has sixty acres of rich and valuable land, a mile and a 
quarter west of Ontario and a quarter of a mile west of the Story county 
line. His entire life has been devoted 10 agricultural pursuits, and in his 
work his practical methods and unfaltering spirit of industry have consti- 
tuted the source of a substantial success. What he undertakes he accom- 
plishes. There is about him no hesitancy, and his carefully formulated 
plans are well executed and have brought him prosperity. 

Mr. Craig has been married twice. On the 27th of December, 1856, he 
wedded Miss Mary Briley, a native of Indiana, wlio came to Iowa with her 
mother in 1852 and died here in February, 1896. There were seven chil- 
dren born of that union: Laura E., who is -now in Ames; Eldora, who died 
in childhood ; Mary, who died at the age of fourteen years ; Arthur Sher- 
man, who passed away at the age of eleven years; Minerva, the wife of 
Ralph Bell, of Idaho ; Charles, living in Ontario, Iowa ; and Xanny, the 
wife of George Cowdrey, of Washington townshij). Story county. In -Feb- 
ruary, 1898, Mr. Craig was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Rebecca Breezley, the widow of J. D. Breezley. 

Mr. Craig has now been a resident of this section of the state for fifty- 
eight years and has therefore witnessed the greater part of its growth and 
development as its wild lands have been transformed into attractive farms, 
as cross-roads villages have grown into cities and as the work of improve- 
ment has been carried on along all the lines which indicate an advanced 
civilization. He has participated in or witnessed many of the events which 
are now matters of history. He cast his first vote in 1853 at the first elec- 
tion held in Story county at the organization of the county, his ballot sup- 
porting candidates who were running for county offices. In 1856 he voted 
for John C. Fremont, the first presidential nominee of the republican party 
and has never failed to support its presidential candidates since that time. 
He has never held any office higher than that of township trustee, for his 
ambition is not along political lines. He has sought to do his duty quietly 
as a private citizen but has preferred to leave office-holding to others. He 
maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his mem- 
bership in Ellsworth Post, No. 30, G. A. R. of Ames. 

He relates many interesting incidents of the early days and of the ex- 
periences which constituted features of pioneer life. He was an expert 
rifle shot w-hen a young man and has killed many deer on the present site 
of Ames, for they were to be found in plentiful numbers during the first 
three years of his residence in Iowa. Wild turkeys were also very nu- 
merous, as were prairie chickens and other game. In 1854 Mr. Craig 
wished to go 1)ack to Indiana to see some of his old neiglibors, for he was 
homesick and longed for the companionship of old friends. He walked. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 325 

from Story county to Iowa City and on to Rock Island, Illinois, which was 
the nearest railroad town, covering the distance of one hundred and ninety 
miles in four days. At night he would seek shelter in some pioneer cabin, 
for in those days the homes of the early settlers were always open to the 
traveler. He did not need money or introduction to secure accommoda- 
tions. It was a time in which hospitality reigned supreme and a cordial 
welcome was extended to all. While Mr. Craig misses some of the old- 
time pleasures and customs, he is yet a believer in the world's progress and 
knows that substantial advancement has been made over the old methods of 
living when the farm work was done with crude machinery and when the 
homes were small, large families being crowded into two or three rooms. 
Today comforts and conveniences are to be had by all who will labor per- 
sistently and earnestly for them, and Mr. Craig is numbered with those 
to whom prosperity has come as the reward of earnest and persistent toil. 



LEWIS APPELGATE. 



Lewis Appelgate, who was numbered among the early settlers of Story 
county and who took active and helpful part in developing and improving 
this section of the state, was born in Indiana on the 25th of February, 
1819, a son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Smith) Appelgate, the former a 
native of Virginia, while the latter was probably born in Indiana. They 
had seven sons and four daughters, including Lewis Appelgate. 

In his childhood days our subject accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval to Bureau county, Illinois, the family home being established mid- 
way between De Pue and Princeton. There he was reared to manhood 
amid the pleasant conditions of country life and having arrived at years of 
maturity he was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Tichenor, who was 
born in Indiana, February 7, 1821. Her father was Moses Tichenor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Appelgate began their domestic life in Illinois, and six 
children were born unto them there before their removal to Iowa in 1855, 
at which time they took up their abode in Story county, settling on section 
18, Nevada township, two miles south of Nevada. There the father spent 
his remaining days, devoting his time and energies to the development and 
improvement of a farm of one hundred and forty-two acres of land which 
was naturally rich and productive and responded to the care and labor 
which was bestowed upon it. He was ever an upright, honorable man, and 
held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. His political alleg- 
iance was given to the democratic party, and he filled some minor offices 
but never cared for political preferment. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Appelgate were born nine children. Joseph, the 
eldest, is now deceased. James M. enlisted from Story county for active 
service at the front during the Civil war and died in the army. Sarah A. 



326 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

is the wife of E. T. Rainier, who was born in this county in November, 
1868, and has always resided within its borders. In May, 1905, he wedded 
Sarah Appclgate who since 1855 has resided upon a farm where they now 
made their home on section 18, Nevada township. She came to this county 
with her parents when ten years of age. Lorenzo D., the ne.xt of the 
family, is a resident of Nevada. Franklin M. wedded Miss Mary Lewis 
in 1876. She was born in Connecticut in February, 1856, and when four 
years of age went to Illinois with her parents. Her mother died when she 
was six years of age and her father afterward married again, coming with 
his family to this county when Mrs. Appelgate was nine years of age. 
Unto F. M. Appelgate and his wife have been born three children: Her- 
bert; Bernice, the wife of Lewis Appelgate, of Richmond township; and 
Verne, the wife of Guy Atkinson, living near McCallsburg. Mar)', the 
sixth member of the family of Lewis Appelgate, Sr., is the wife of John 
Densmore, of Nevada. Olive is the wife of Albert Hemstead, of Clinton, 
Iowa. Mrs. Viola Gooden is deceased; McClellan, the youngest of the 
family is living in Grant township. 

The name of Appelgate has been associated with the history of this 
county for more than fifty-five years, and the members of the family have 
taken active and helpful part in the work of general improvement and 
progress, so that they deserve prominent mention upon the pages of this 
volume. 



JAY G. BUTTON. 



Jay G. Button, president of the Farmers Bank of Nevada, throughout 
the last period of his residence in this city, covering thirteen years, has 
long been accorded a prominent position in business and financial circles. 
His record is another proof of the fact that success is not the result of 
genius as held by some, but is rather the outcome of clear judgment, ex- 
perience and close application. 

He was bom in Benton county, Iowa, August 31, 1866, and in 1870 
was brought to Nevada by his parents, O. B. and Elizabeth A. (Beavers) 
Button, the former a native of New York and the latter of New Jersey. 
The father became a resident of Chicago in 1835, before the incorpora- 
tion of the city, and was closely identified with its early development. The 
year 1855 witnessed his arrival in Iowa and in Belaware county, this state, 
he was married to Miss Elizabeth A. Beavers. Subsequently he removed 
to Norway, Benton county, and in 1870 came to Nevada. In that year 
Mr. Button established the first bank of Story county and conducted busi- 
ness under the firm style of O. B. Button S: Son. bankers, the junior part- 
ner being O. E. Button, now living in Los Ani^cles. California. For eleven 
years he continued in tlie banking business hut in 1881 sold out and re- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 327 

moved to Missouri Valley, where he established the First National Bank 
of that place. He was connected with financial interests there for about 
nine years but disposed of his interest in the bank in 1890 and returned to 
Nevada. In early life before entering banking circles he had engaged in 
merchandising and from time to time as opportunity offered he made ex- 
tensive and judicious investment in real estate, becoming the owner of nine 
hundred and sixty acres of rich and valuable land adjoining the corpora- 
tion limits of Nevada on the west. To the development and improvement 
of the property he gave his personal supervision. He was a very success- 
ful man, his business judgment being sound, his sagacity keen and his en- 
terprise unfaltering. His labors, too, were of a character that contributed 
largely to the improvement and progress of the section in which he lived, 
and his commercial integrity was such as to win for him the unqualified 
confidence of all. The death of Air. Button occurred in Nevada in 1891, 
when he was si.xty-five years of age. He had for several years survived 
his wife, who passed away in Missouri Valley, in April, 1888, at the age 
of fifty-three years. Their children were six in number: Martha, the wife 
of David Leonard, a resident of Lake City, Iowa ; O. E., living in Los 
Angeles, California; O. J., a banker of Grand Junction, Iowa; Jay G., of 
this review; Jeannette, the wife of Dr. F. H. Conner, of Nevada; and 
Omer B., who died at the age of sixteen years. 

Jay G. Dutton was only four years of age when his parents came to 
Nevada and in the public schools of this city he began his education, which 
was continued after the removal of the family to Missouri Valley. In the 
latter place he made his initial step in business, becoming the first cashier 
of the First National Bank of Missouri Valley, which position he occupied 
for seven years, or until his removal from that place to Perry, Iowa. His 
attention was then given to the lumber and grain trades and to the banking 
business for seven years, when he disposed of his interests there. He 
then returned to Nevada, where since 1897 he has continuously made his 
home. He came here with the intention of entering the banking business 
and purchased an interest in the Farmers Bank, of which he has since 
been the president. He is thoroughly familiar with every phase of banking 
and is conducting a business that safeguards the interests of depositors an<l 
also promotes the success of the institution. He is also the owner of ex- 
tensive landed interests in this county and elsewhere, much of his capital 
having been placed in the safest of all investments — real estate. 

In 1891 Mr. Dutton was united in marriage to Miss Lida Briggs, a 
native of Nevada and a daughter of Otis and Jennie Briggs. The father 
is now deceased, and the mother resides in Los Angeles, California. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Dutton have been born two children: Dorothy and Orson B. 

The family are prominent in Nevada, the hospitality of the best homes 
being cordially extended them. As a citizen Mr. Dutton advocates and 
supports all those measures and movements which are of practical value 
in the upbuilding of the city along material, intellectual, social and moral 



328 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

lines. I lis entire life has been actuated by a spirit of enterprise that is 
manifest in his public relations as well as in his private business affairs. 
He is resolute and determined, accomplishing what he undertakes and his 
success is the logical sequence of his industry, close application and busi- 
ness integrity. 



FRANK E. MORRIS. 



Frank E. Morris, who" has engaged continuously in the livery business 
in Ames since 1893 and is also identified with agricultural interests in Story 
county, was born in Whiteside county, Illinois, about two miles east of 
Morrison, on the 30th of July, 1868. His parents, W'illard and Adaline 
(Leonard) Morris, were botii natives of Schenectady, New York, the for- 
mer born June 22, 1825, and the latter in 1830. They were married in the 
Empire state and on coming to the middle west settled in Illinois, where 
they remained for about eighteen years, after which they arrived in Story 
county, Iowa. The mother's death occurred in January, 1901, but the 
father .still survives and makes his home upon a farm north of Ames. In 
their family were seven children : Addie, the wife of Chet F. Davis, living 
three miles east of Gilbert, Iowa; Ella, the wife of Lester Rosenfeld, whose 
home is a half mile east of Kelley ; Joie. the wife of William Kannan, re- 
siding on the home farm with her father ; Walter, a resident of Franklin 
township; Frank E., of this review; Gertie, at home; and Lynn, who is 
conducting a liver}- .stable in Ames. 

Frank E. Morris resided upon the old home farm in Illinois, upon which 
his birth occurred, until he came to Iowa in October, 1875, in company 
with his parents, who luade their way direct to .Ames. The family home 
was established upon a farm near that city, and there he continued to aid 
in the cultivation and development of the fields until 1893, when he took 
up his abode in the city and established a liverj- barn. In the spring of 
1909 he erected his present livery stable, which is the largest building in 
Ames. It is three stories and basement, with gable roof, is fifty-one by 
one hundred feet and fifty-one feet in height. It is built of glazed brick 
and is used exclusively for the livery business. Its location is at the corner 
of Main and Bamette avenue, and Mr. Morris has about twenty-five head 
of horses, together with vehicles of all kinds, and three hearses and a num- 
ber of closed carriages for funeral use. His livery barn is accorded a liberal 
patronage, and the business has grown along substantial and gratifying 
lines. In addition to this Mr. Morris owns eighty acres of valuable farm 
land in Franklin township, three miles north of the city, and one hundred 
and sixty acres in Milford township. 

In 1894 occurred the marriage of Mr. Morris and Miss Ella Dodds. 
who was born in Franklin township, in 1872. and is a daughter of Robert 
Dodds. They liave three children : Glenn, Clair and Ralph. 



HISTORY OF 'STORY COUNTY 329 

Mr. Morris votes with the repubHcan party and was a member of the 
city council for six years, capably discharging the duties of the office in the 
interest of municipal progress and upbuilding. He belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and has many substantial qualities that 
make him a valued citizen as well as an enterprising and successful business 
man. 



M. O. ANDERSON. 



M. O. Anderson, imbued with a progressive spirit, has made steady 
advancement in his business life, winning substantial success as a farmer, 
while he is now conducting profitable operations in real estate, making his 
home in Roland. His birth occurred about three and a half miles south- 
west of this city in Howard township, on the 3d of November, 1872, his 
parents being Ove and Aggie (Orton) Anderson, both of whom were na- 
tives of Norway, where they were reared and married. On crossing the 
Atlantic to the new world in 1S70, they made their way direct to Story 
county where they spent their remaining days, the father devoting his time 
and energies to general agricultural pursuits. As the years passed he pros- 
pered and was the owner of a half section of land at the time of his de- 
mise, which occurred in 1894 when he was sixty-three years of age. His 
wife survived him for a decade and died in Roland in 1904. His life his- 
tory illustrates clearly what may be accomplished by determined purpose 
and unfaltering industry, and his reliable business methods gained him the 
confidence and good will of all. Mr. Anderson was the father of twelve 
children, eight sons and four daughters. The first five were natives of 
Norway and the others were born in Story county. O. B., a resident of 
Richland township, and A. B., of Fernald, were children of the father's 
first marriage. The other members of the family are: T. O., living in 
Sioux Rapids, Iowa; Barbara, the wife of O. M. Ryerson, of Roland; 
O. O., who is located near Roland; J. O., of Hamilton county, Iowa; 
]\I. O. ; Martha and J. T., who are residents of Roland ; Axel, who died 
at the age of fourteen years ; and Nellie O. and Allen O., twins, who are 
residents of ]\Iinneapolis, Minnesota. 

The youthful days of M. O. Anderson were spent in the usual manner 
of farm lads. He worked in the fields during the summer months and at- 
tended school during the winter seasons. He continued to give his father 
the benefit of his services until 1897, when at the age of twenty-five years 
he removed to Roland and for two and a half years thereafter conducted a 
livery stable. He then worked again for a year upon the home place, at 
the end of which time he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
adjoining the corporation limits of Roland on the south. This property he 
still owns and to its cultivation and development he devoted his energies 



330 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

with good success until 1909. when he purchased his present home in 
Roland, lie has also engaged in the live stock business and during the 
past year has operated in the real-estate field. In addition to his farm prop- 
erty in this county he also owns one hundred and sixty acres in Pembina 
county. North Dakota. 

In 1899 Mr. .Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hegland, 
who was born in Roland in December, 1881, and is a daughter of M. Heg- 
land. This union has been blessed with five children. Orvil. the eldest, died 
in infancy, and Amos, the second, died at the age of five years. The others 
are Orphie, Bel ford and Melvern. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. Anderson 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party which he has sup- 
ported continuously since attaining his majority. He does not seek recog- 
nition along political lines, however, but gives his time and energies to 
business affairs, and liis unfaltering perseverance, his watchfulness of all 
details and his improvement of oj^portunities have been the salient features 
in a desirable and gratifying success. 



M. L. TESDALL. 



M. L. Tesdall, filling the position of county recorder, is numbered among 
the native sons of Story county, his birth having occurred in Palestine 
township, on the 6th of January, iSfx). He has always lived in this county 
and was reared as a farm boy, spending his youthful days in the home of 
his parents, Ole and Betsy (Sheldahl) Tesdall, both of whom were natives 
of Norway, the former born on the 3d of September, 1836, and the latter 
on the I2th of January, 1843. They left the land of the midnight sun in 
early life, however, and in 1855 became residents of Story county, where 
they were married. They settled upon a farm in Palestine township, where 
they still make their home, being well known and worthy representatives 
of the agricultural interests of this part of the state. 

M. L. Tesdall, the third in order of birth in a family of nine children, 
spent his youthful days in the usual manner of farm lads, working in the 
fields through the summer months and attending the district schools in the 
winter seasons. Tic also continued his education in Capital City Commer- 
cial College at Dcs Moines. He became connected with official interests 
in the court house as deputy county recorder in January, 1903, filling that 
position until elected county recorder in 1906. He is now serving the third 
term in that office. On the occasion of each election he received large ma- 
jorities, which indicate his popularity and the confidence reposed in him 
by his fellow townsmen. He is prompt, systematic and faithful in the dis- 
charge of his official duties, and his record has received the commendation 
and indorsement of the general i)ublic. He was elected on the republican 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 331 

ticket, having been a lifelong supporter of the party. He has also served 
in other offices, filling the position of township clerk in Palestine township 
for four years. 

In June, 1907, ]\Ir. Tesdall was married to Miss Mabel R. Sherk, and 
they are well known in Nevada and throughout this portion of the state. 
Mrs. Tesdall received a college education in South Dakota and taught school 
for a number of years. Afterward she became a clerk in a store in Ne- 
vada, being thus employed for about ten years. 

The Tesdall home is a hospitable one, always open for the reception of 
their many friends. Mr. Tesdall belongs to the Modern Woodman camp 
and also to the Lutheran church and is ever loyal to the principles and 
causes which he espouses. 



J. W. LANNING. 



J. W. Lanning needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for 
he has been engaged in the milling business in Ames for thirty years and 
is one of the best known among the representatives of industrial activity 
here. In citizenship as well as in business he has made for himself a cred- 
itable record and the circle of his friends includes almost all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. 

He was born in Jackson county, Indiana, September 10, 1841, a son of 
Louis and Laney (Wilson) Lanning, natives of Kentucky and North Caro- 
lina, respectively. They were married, however, in Indiana, where they re- 
sided until 1843, when they came with their family to Iowa, settling in 
Iowa county. The father devoted his entire life to farming, following that 
pursuit until his death, which occurred in 1870, when he was sixty-four 
years of age. The mother long survived him and spent the last fourteen 
years of her life in Ames with her son J. W. Lanning, passing away in 
1894, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. They were both people 
of the highest respectability and enjoyed the warm regard and good will 
of all who knew them. Their family numbered twelve children, six sons 
and six daughters, of whom J. W. Lanning was the sixth in order of birth. 

He was not quite three years of age at the time of the removal to Iowa, 
so that within the borders of this state practically his entire life has been 
passed. He continued a resident of Iowa county until twenty years of 
age, after which he spent three years in Tama county and then returned 
to Iowa county, where he made his home until his removal to Ames, his 
time and energies being devoted to general mercantile pursuits. Thirty 
years ago, or in 1880. he came to Ames and throughout the ensuing period 
has been engaged in the milling business, conducting a flour and feed mill 
for twelve years, since which time he has confined his attention entirely 
to the conduct of a feed mill. He owns his mill and home property here 



332 lilSTOKY UF STURY COUXTY 

and is one of the worlliy and substantial citizens of Ames, reliable in busi- 
ness, trustworthy at all times and faithful to the ties, duties and obligations 
of citizenship. 

On the 13th of February, 1862, Mr. Lanning was united in marriage to 
Miss Eliza Marcellus, who was born in Xew York, December ^1, 1843, 
and there resided until twelve years of age. when she accompanied her 
parents. John and Hannah O. (Richardson) IMarcellus, to Iowa county, 
Iowa. Her father was a native of Xew York, and her mother of Maine. 
Following their removal to the middle west they continued residents of 
Iowa county until their life's labors were ended in death. Mrs. Marcellus 
passing away at the age of thirty-eight years, while the death of Mr. Mar- 
cellus occurred in April, 1903, when he was more than eighty-seven years 
of age. In their family were ten children, of whom six reached years of 
maturity. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Lanning has been blessed with five 
children : Myrtle, who has been successfully engaged in teaching in the 
high school of Ames for the past twenty years; Mellie, the wife of Wil- 
liam Taylor, of Ames; Julia, the wife of Mont Gossard, of Onawa, Iowa; 
John, living in Ames; and Sadie, the wife of C. C. Morrison, of Chicago. 

In his political views Mr. Lanning has always been a stalwart repub- 
lican and for si.xteen years has served on the city council. He was also 
a townshi]) trustee in Iowa county for a number of years and in the dis- 
charge of his official duties has ever been found promiit, reliable and ener- 
getic. As a member of the city council he has exercised his official preroga- 
tives in support of many public measures contributing to the general wel- 
fare and upbuilding of this part of the state. He belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in 
their teachings and principles are found the rules which govern his life, 
making him a man whom to know is to esteem and respect. 



JOIIX QUIXCY MOORE. 

The passing years are rapidly thinning the ranks of the brave men who 
responded to their country's call for aid on the battlefields of the south and 
the few remaining arc always conspicuous figures in the communities where 
they live, .\mong those in Story county none are better known than John 
Quincy Moore, who is a son of Lott and Mary E. (Glenn ) Moi>re and was 
born in Clermont county, Ohio, on the "th of .Vpril, 1844. His ])arents were 
bnth natives of the Buckeye state, his father being a descendant of an old 
N'irginia family, while his maternal grandparents came from Ireland,^! 
About 1852 the i)arents moved to Hardin county, Ohio, where the mother^H 
died in i860. Three years later the father and family came to Iowa, locating 
on section 9, Intlian Creek townshi|). this county. From that time until 
his death in 1885 he made this state his iiome. 




.lUHN (). .MdORE 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 335 

John Ouincy Moore's life until he had reached manhood was not unlike, 
save in detail, that of the majority of boys of that period. He attended the 
sessions of the district school held in the little log schoolhouse, which was in 
every respect similar to those which served as the educational centers of 
the various communities of that day. At the usual age he laid aside his 
text-books, feeling he had acquired sufficient education to enable him to 
assume the responsibilities of life, and apprenticed himself to the black- 
smith's trade, but at the end of his first year he enlisted in Company B, Forty- 
fifth Ohio \'olunteers Infantry. Twelve months' service at the front, 
together with the long wearisome marches and hardship and privation inci- 
dent to war undermined his constitution to such an extent that he was dis- 
charged on account of disability. 

Returning home Mr. Moore found his father preparing to go west and 
the son joined him, feeling that better opportunities were afforded him for 
the pursuance of his trade in a younger community. After reaching Story 
county he worked at blacksmithing, and for some years followed that trade, 
running a shop in Iowa Center. He homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Sioux county, where he lived in 1870 and 1871, but in the 
latter year they were visited by the grasshopper scourge and Mr. Moore 
returned to Story county and after a few more years' work at the forge he 
again engaged in farming. In 1908 he left the farm and again became a 
resident of Iowa Center, engaging in the mercantile business. 

In 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Martha A. Webb, of Iowa 
Center, and two sons were born of this union: George M., now a farmer of 
Indian Creek township ; and Ward H., w ho lives in Iowa Center. Mrs. 
Moore passed away in 1894. 

Mr. Moore keeps in touch with his army comrades through membership 
in the James Ewing Post, G, A. R. He is one of the well known men of 
his district, having made this his Tiorne the greater part of the time for the 
past forty-five years. He owns twO' farms of .eighty acres each and is 
accounted among the well-to-do citizens of the community. 



DAVID K. BUNCE. 



David K. Bunce, now living retired in Gilbert, was formerly closely 
identified with agricultural interests in western Iowa. Persistent eiTort and 
well directed energy-, however, brought him increasing success year by 
year, and at length with a comfortable competence as the reward of his 
labors he retired and now has leisure for the enjoyment of those things 
which are of most interest to him. 

He is a native son of the neighboring state of Illinois, his birth having 
occurred in Carroll county, on the 27th of April, 1845. His parents were 
James A. and Esther (Lewis) Bunce, natives of New York and Michigan, 



336 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

respectively. They were married in llie latter state and their last days were 
spent in Whiteside county, Illinois, where the father died March 28, i860, 
at the age of sixty-four years, while the mother's death occurred October 
31, 1876, when she had reached the age of seventy years and five months. 
James A. Bunce was a blacksmith and followed that trade until si.xty years 
of age but owned a farm at the time of his death. The family numbered 
thirteen children, eight sons and five daughters, of whom eleven reached 
years of maturity, while two died in infancy. Only four of the numner, 
however, are now living. One son, L. D. Bunce, served in the Mexican 
war, while C. D., D. W. and D. K. Bunce were soldiers of the Civil war. 
Another brother, Dr. D. J. Bunce, was a practitioner of veterinary surgery 
and a holiness preacher. The eldest brother, Deloss Bunce, was a prac- 
ticing physician; and a second brother, Delaney Bunce, devoted his life to 
merchandising and died in Minnesota. C. D. Bunce was a blacksmith by 
trade and died at Ottumwa, Iowa. While in the Civil war he was capturcil 
at Crab Orchard, Tennessee, and taken to Andersonville. where he re- 
mained for fourteen months. D. W. Bunce is now a resident of St. An- 
thony, Idaho. 

When a young lad, David K. Bunce accompanied his parents on their 
removal from Carroll county to Whiteside county. Illinois, and was then 
living when, at the age of seventeen years, he enlisted on the i8th of Sep- 
tember, 1862, as a member of Company H, Seventy-fifth Illinois Voluntcci 
Infantry. He served until wounded on the 8th of October of that year ;it 
the battle of Perry ville. Kentucky, a bullet piercing his left forearm. 11 r 
was then discharged and sent home on the 19th of Januar\-. 1863. .\ftcr 
remaining at home for fourteen months he reenlisted for one hundred day>' 
service with the One Hundred and Fortieth Illinois Infantry, remaining 
with that command until the close of the war. During his second term 01 
enlistment he participated in the engagement with various troops at Mem- 
phis, Tennessee. He sustained his wound only eight days after the regi- 
ment had been given its arms. When the war was over he returned home 
and engaged in farming in Illinois until his removal to Boone county, Iowa, 
on the i-th of Xovember, 1867. He remained a resident of that couniv 
for five years and has since lived in Story county, where he continuously 
followed farming until ig02. when he retired from liusiness life and took 
up his abode in Cilbcrt. He sold his property in this countv but is still 
interested in Soinh Dakota lands, on which he has ]iut his four sons, eacji 
having charge of a quarter section. 

It was on the 15th of November, 1867. in Morrison, Illinois, that Mr. 
Bunce was married to Miss Flizabcth I.inerode. who was born in Stark 
county, Ohio, in 1S48, and with her parents, I. D. and N. J. Linerode, went 
to Illinois in her girlhood days. The children of this marriage are as fol- 
lows: W. A., who married Ilattie Seaner and is living in South Dakot.i 
Fffie, the wife of Peter Marsden. of Boone county; Frank H.. who weddi 
I.ydia Jones, of Boone county and resides in South Dakota; Bertha I., tin 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 337 

wife of Oliver Bonneau, of South Dakota; Grace, the wife of Joseph 
Watts, of Osceola county, Iowa; C. M., who married Sadie Gondy, and 
is living in South Dakota; and Arthur, who married Gretta Hess and makes 
his home in South Dakota. All of the children were born in the same 
house in Lafayette township. Story county, and there has never been a 
death in the family although the youngest son is twenty-four years of age. 
Mr. Bunce has been a lifelong republican, supporting the party since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He has ever be^ loyal to 
the best interests of the community and is as faithful to the interests of 
his country today as when he followed the stars and stripes upon southern 
battlefields. Friends and neighbors have found him a reliable, trustworthy 
and progressive man and citizen, and all speak of him in terms of high 
regard and good will. 



J. D. SIMS. 



For almost three decades J. D. Sims has lived in Story county, arriving 
within its borders in March, 1882. He is today the owner of extensive and 
valuable landed interests and is numbered among the leading and progres- 
sive farmers of Franklin township, his home being on section 36. He was 
born in McArthur, Vinton county, Ohio, March 11, 1864, a son of Simon 
and Ann H. (Cramblit) Sims, who were also natives of the Buckeye state. 
The father was for one hundred days a soldier of the Civil war with Com- 
pany E, of the One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment, and died when 
his son J. D. Sims was but thirteen years of age. The mother long sur- 
vived him and passed away in Story county in 1902, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. Their family numbered seven children : A. B., living in Ralph, 
Iowa; Matilda A., the wife of H. Dunkle, of Franklin township; Sophia 
L., who became the wife of W. A. Miller and died in June, 1910; M. F., 
of Washington township ; Lavina E., who died in Ohio at the age of 
eighteen years; J. D. ; and Mary E., the wife of Charles Cunningham, of 
Winterset, Iowa. 

J. D. Sims spent the first eighteen years of his life in his native state, 
working on the farm and attending school. In March, 1882, he left Ohio 
and came direct to -Story county, Iowa, with his mother, brothers and sis- 
ters. They took up their abode in Franklin township, where he has since 
resided with the exception of one year spent in Boone county. He has 
always followed farming and is now the owner of thirty-eight and a half 
acres of land on section 36, Franklin township, where he makes his home. 
He has also purchased two hundred acres in Warren township, a mile east 
of McCallsburg, and will take possession of this in the spring of 191 1, 
after which he expects to sell the smaller farm. He has been engaged ex- 
tensively and successfully in stock-raising and is the owner of two Perch- 



338 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

eron stallions : Gaylord, an imported animal ; and Keote, which was raised 
in Iowa. 11 is live stock interests are an important branch of his business, 
adding much to his success. 

On the 22d of February, 1891, Mr. Sims was married to Miss Ida M. 
Pohl, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1872, and came to Iowa 
with her parents when about two years of age. She died September 20, 
1906. There were seven children by that marriage : George W. ; Elva A. ; 
John H.; Raymond M., who died at the age of nine months; Ethel E. ; 
Willis W. ; and Edith M. On the 9th of April, 1907, Mr. Sims was again 
married, his second union being with Mrs. Lura Donahue, a widow who 
by her former marriage had one child, Hugh M. Donahue. Mrs. Sims is 
a native of Minnesota. By her second marriage she had two children, 
twins, but one died in infancy. The other is Ida M. Sims. Mr. Sims' four 
oldest children are in school in Ames, and the younger members of the 
household are attending the district schools. 

A member of the Christian church, Mr. Sims endeavors to closely fol- 
low its teachings and in all of life's relations to display the characteristics 
of true and upright manhood and citizenship. He has worked earnestly 
and persistently in his efifort to attain success and as the years have passed 
by has prospered in his undertakings so that he is now the owner of a 
good farm property in Story county. 



ELI R. CRAM BUT. D. \\ S. 

Dr. Eli B. Craniblit. who was formerly successfully engaged in the 
practice of veterinary surgery, and is now breeding fine chickens, was born 
in Guernsey county, Ohio, December 18, 1840, a son of Daniel and Eliza- 
beth (Lukins) Cramblit, natives of Baltimore, Maryland. They were mar- 
ried, however, in Dcersville, Ohio, and resided in that state until 1882, 
when they came to Ames, where their remaining days were passed, the 
father departing this life at the age of eighty-seven years, and the mother 
when seventy-four years of age. Throughout the years of his connection 
with business, Daniel Cramblit followed farming and milling. lie served 
as a captain in the Ohio Militia at an early day and participated in one or 
two skirmishes with the Indians. Later, at the time of the Civil war. he 
aided in the capture of General Morgan, being one of the "squirrel hunt- 
ers" of Ohio. The family numbered five sons and four daughters: Julin 
.\nn, who is the widow of James Alban and is living in Hocking county. 
Ohio, at the age of eighty years; Thomas, who died in Boone, Iowa; John, 
who went to California in 1861 and now resides in Oregon; Mary Jane, 
the wife of Jacob Nicholson, a resident of Hartford, Ohio; Eli B. ; Naomi, 
the wife of W. F. Noggle, of Chillicothe, Ohio; Nancy .Ann, the wife of 



I 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 339 

\V. A. Perkins, of Ames; Elizabeth, who is the widow of William Cam- 
eron and makes her home in Ames; and W. A., also of this city. 

Dr. Cramblit remained on the home farm in Guernsey coimty. Ohio, 
with his parents until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when, on the 
14th of November, 1861, he enlisted as a member of Company A, Seventy- 
eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Leggett. The regiment was 
assigned to duty with the Army of the Tennessee, and after serving for 
three years he enlisted for three years more, or for the remainder of the 
war. This was at Yicksburg. He took part in all of the engagements of 
his regiment, including thirty-three battles and many skirmishes and he 
was engaged in scouting for six months after the guerilla band. He was 
made captain of twenty select men, who, splendidly mounted, would cross 
the dead line at dark and hunt our guerillas and desperadoes who were 
causing such trouble among the northern troops by their disregard of all 
the rules of war. In this connection Dr. Cramblit served on independent 
detailed service. He was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, and hon- 
orably discharged July 18, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. 

When the war was over. Dr. Cramblit returned to his father's home in 
Ross county, to which place his parents had removed during the period of 
the war. There he resided for some time and engaged in buying stock, 
which he shipped to the east until 1867. He then came to Ames, bringing 
stock with him, purchasing four horses in Ohio at a cost of eleven hun- 
dred and fifty-four dollars. He also had two hundred and forty of as fine 
blooded sheep as could be found in the United States, these winning first 
prize at the National Stock Show at Circleville, Ohio. The last work Dr. 
Cramblit did in Ohio was to drive sheep from Ross county to New Jersey, 
riding a horse all the way, and later he shipped the horse and saddle to 
Ames, where he has resided continuously since 1867. Here he began 
farming and in the spring of 1868 took up the practice of veterinary sur- 
gery, which he followed until about four years ago, in the meantime pur- 
suing a three years' course in the veterinary department of the Iowa State 
College. Prior to that time he had pursued a correspondence course of 
lectures on veterinary surgery and had traveled with an old doctor for five 
years, treating chronic diseases of men and animals in various states. His 
practice covered a radius of fifty miles in early days, and few men are 
more widely or more favorably known in this part of the state than Dr. 
Cramblit. Largely retired from the practice of veterinary surgery, he is 
engaged in the breeding of chickens, making a specialty of fine Rhode 
Island Reds since 1906. He has also been engaged in the manufacture of 
medicines for thirty-five years and was the originator of King of Pain, 
which, together with his other medicinal products, have been sent all over 
the United States. 

In March, 1868, Dr. Cramblit was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Jane Nichols, who was born in New York in 1844, and with two brothers 
came to Ames, where she was married. Her parents had died during her 



340 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

early girlhood. Unto this marriage were born two daughters and a son: 
Rose Elizabeth, now the wife of \V. G. StocUwell, of Davenport, Iowa ; 
Florence Belle, the wife of Dr. W. B. Lincoln, of Nashville, Tennessee; 
and Albert D., who is a musician, giving his whole time to band and or- 
chestra work. The sisters are also possessed of superior musical talent. 

Dr. Cramblit has resided at his present home at No. 915 Kellogg avenue 
for the past twenty-three years. He is a charter member of Ellsworth 
Post, No. 30, G. A. R., and he relates many interesting incidents of iii> 
army experience. He participated in the grand review at Washington. 
D. C., in 1865, when over broad Pennsylvania avenue there was suspended 
a banner bearing the words, "The only debt which the country owes that 
she cannot pay is the debt which she owes to her soldiers." He was among 
the number who volunteered to run the blockade at Vicksburg and helped 
fortify the fleet which made the run. The last bullet that was fired at 
.Sherman's army was aimed at Dr. Cramblit, who was on the skirmish line 
just before darkness set in and after the Confederate troops had surren- 
dered. He was at that time caring for a wounded comrade by an oak 
stump and the next day twelve bullets were found in that stump that had 
been fired at him. Dr. Cramblit, however, carried his comrade, Milton M. 
Turner, to Cambridge, Ohio, a distance of two miles, for the latter had 
lost much blood from Iiaving an arm shot away. In his fighting against 
the guerillas the Doctor had many narrow escapes, for the service was 
found a most difficult and dangerous one. He never faltered, however, in 
the performance of his duty and the same spirit of loyalty in citizenship 
has characterized his entire life, making him an honored resident of Story 
county. 



C. A. BATMAN. 



On the roster of county officials in Story county appears the name of 
C. A. Batman, county auditor of Story county. With the exception of a 
period of four years spent upon a farm near Nevada, he has been a life- 
long resident of this city, his birth having here occurred on the 15th of 
August, 1875. His parents were J. E. and Avanda (Purkheiser) Batman. 
The father was born in Kentucky. December 13, 1832, and the mother was! 
a native of Indiana. They came to Iowa following their marriage and both I 
died in Nevada, the mother passing away on the loth of August, i897,J 
while tlie father survived until December 25, 1909. In their family werd 
four children : A. A., of this city ; Anna C, who is a school teacher i^ 
California; F. A., a farmer of Washington township; and C. A., of thil 
review. 

The youthful days of C. A. I'atman were devoted to the duties of th^ 
schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and such tasks as were as 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 341 

signed to him by parental authority. He passed through consecutive grades 
in the pubHc schools until graduated from the high school of Nevada in 
March, 1895. He also pursued a commercial course in Capital City Busi- 
ness College at Des Moines. During his school days he learned the painter's 
trade, which he followed at intervals until 1903. He also spent four years 
in farming on his own account near Nevada and then entered the county 
auditor's office as deputy. In the fall of 1910 he was elected by the re- 
publican party for the position of county auditor. He has proven capable 
and methodical in the discharge of his duties and is ever loyal to the trust 
reposed in him. 

On the 2 1 St of November, 1900, Mr. Batman was united in marriage 
to Miss Alta Morse, who was born in Wisconsin, August 28, 1877, and 
came to Story county with her parents, C. M. and Lena Morse, who are 
now living in Nevada. Mrs. Batman died March 5, 1909. leaving a little 
daughter, Deborah Mary. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Batman is a Knight of Pythias and a 
member of the Modern Woodmen camp. He has been a lifelong repub- 
lican, having been reared in the party to which he has given his support 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He has a wide ac- 
quaintance, and his genial manner, cordial disposition and genuine worth 
have gained for him an extensive circle of warm friends. 



REV. FRANCIS C. RENIER. 

Rev. Francis C. Renier, pastor of St. Cecelia's Catholic church of 
Ames, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, December 9, 1877, a son of Philip J. 
and Mary E. (Strueber) Renier. The father was born in Belgium in 
1858 and the mother in Dubuque in 1854. When a lad of five years Philip 
Renier accompanied his parents to the new world, and one year later the 
family home was established in Dubuque where he has resided continuously 
since, being now superintendent of the Milwaukee shops of that place. He 
has devoted his entire life to car-building, in which line of work he has 
made steady advancement through his ability and close application. His 
wife was a daughter of Christ and Pauline (Yunge) Strueber, botji of 
whom were natives of Germany and on coming to America settled in 
Dubuque where Mr. Strueber passed away but his widow still makes her 
home there. 

The Rev. Francis C. Renier is the eldest of seven children. He at- 
tended the parochial schools of Dubuque and later entered St. Joseph's 
College of that city, completing a six years' course in 1895. He devoted 
three years to the study of theology in Grand Seminary in Montreal, after 
which he was ordained to the priesthood. Later he spent two years in 
study in the Catholic University at Washington, D. C. and received his 



342 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

present appointment in 1902. In addition to the regular work of the church 
he has organized llie Newman Club for young men. mostly college boys, 
and in this connection an excellent work is being done. He also has charge 
of Sts. Peter and Paul's church five and a half miles northwest of Gilbert 
in this county, doing mission work there throughout the eight years of his 
pastorate at St. Cecelia's church in Ames. Under his guidance the present 
cluircli was erected as was also the parish house, and the work of tlie church 
has been fully organized in all of its departments, proving a strong force 
for Catholic conversion and churcli work in this locality. 



ALFRED P. EDDY. 



Alfred P. Eddy, a prosperous and well known agriculturist of Story 
county, has lived on his present farm in Sherman township for the past 
thirty-six years but for forty-six years he has been a resident of this county. 
His birth occurred in Ohio in August, 1839, his parents being Allen and 
Sophia (Beardsley) Eddy, who were natives of New York and New 
Hampshire respectively. The maternal grandfather of our subject partici- 
pated in the Revolutionary war, serving throughout the entire conflict. 
.Allen Eddy, the father of Alfred P. Eddy, removed to Illinois in 1853. .set- 
tling on a farm in Ivane county, where he made his home until called to his 
final rest in 1875. The demise of his wife occurred in Ohio. 

Alfred P. Eddy accompanied his father to Illinois, where he obtained 
his education in the district schools. He remained a resident of the Prairie 
state until 1865, which year witnessed his arrival in Story county, Iowa. 
He spent ten years in Richland township but for thirty-six years has re- 
sidetl in Sherman township, his farm being located on section 6. For his 
first tract of land, comprising eighty acres, he paid but twelve dollars an 
acre. Later he extended the boundaries of the place by an additional pur- 
chase of eighty acres, so that his farm now embraces a quarter section of 
rich and productive land. In connection w-ith the tilling of the soil he has 
also devoted considerable attention to the raising of cattle and hogs for the 
market, meeting with success in both branches of his business. He has 
long been numbered among the representative and leading citizens of the 
community and acts as president of the Zearing & Johnson Grove Tele- 
phone Company. He can relate many interesting incidents of pioneer days 
when the district was but sparsely settled and largely undeveloped. During 
the period of his early residence here the railroad went only as far as Ne- 
vada and between his abode and State Center, a distance of fourteen miles, 
there was but one house. On the road to Zearing there was also only one 
house — that belonging K) Thomas Thatcher. Mr. Eddy recalls the fact that 
on the 5th of July. 1872, he washed with snow and can rememb-^r the time 
when the snow was six feet deep. He herded cattle throughout Iowa for a 




.\li;. AND MKS. A. I'. KDin 



I 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 345 

great many years and at one time drove twenty-three hundred head through 
the northern part of the state. 

In 1863, in Kane county, Illinois, Mr. Etldy was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah A. Alark, her parents being Aaron and Eliza Mark, the former 
a native of New York and the latter of Vermont. Mrs. Mark, whose birth 
occurred in January, 1828, came to this county with her daughter and son- 
in-law in 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Eddy are the parents of four children, the 
record of whom is as follows. Frank Sherman, who was born in Kane 
county, Illinois, on the 27th of April, 1864, wedded Miss Susan Hicks, of 
Sherman township, and is cultivating a tract of land just east of his fa- 
ther's farm. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and also a 
worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the lodge at 
Zearing. Orlando M., whose birth occurred on the 4th of March, 1869, 
married Miss Belle Fisher and lives on a farm northwest of the old home- 
stead. He intends to take up his abode in Howard county, Iowa, in the 
near future. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Dwight Wilson, whose natal day was Sep- 
tember 26, 1879, wedded Miss \'iola Thomas and is now successfully en- 
gaged in farming. William Cooper, who was born on the 19th of Septem- 
ber, 1881, resides on his father's farm and also has land of his own in 
Sherman township. 

Mr. Eddy gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is 
now serving as chairman of the township board. The cause of education 
has ever found in him a warm friend and as a school director he has done 
much to further its interests. He is a valued member of Pacific Lodge, 
No. 469, A. F. & A. M., of Zearing, and attends the services of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He has lived his life to good purpose, recogniz- 
ing and utilizing each opportunity as it has come to him, while the methods 
which he has ever pursued have been such as inspired- the trust, confidence 
and good will of all with whom he has been associated. 



CHARLES F. RUTH. 



An excellent farm of one hundred and ninety acres on sections 11 and 
14, Franklin township, is the property of Charles F. Ruth, and indicates in 
its well kept appearance the careful supervision which he gives to the place 
and the modern methods which he follows in its cultivation. He was born 
in Lake county, Illinois, October 7, 1856, and is a son of Irwin and Leah 
(Brown) Ruth, both of whom were natives of Berks county, Pennsylvania. 
When eighteen years of age the father made his way to Freeport, Illinois, 
and thence walked to Lake county, that state, a distance of one hundred 
miles. He secured sixty acres of land which is now included within the 
corporation limits of Chicago, after which he walked back to Freeport, 



346 HISTURV OF STORY COUNTY 

completing the journey in two days. Me was then married and took his 
bride to his sixty-acre farm, to which he afterward added by additional 
purchase. He became the owner of two farms, aggregating one hundred 
and ninety acres of land, and in the summer of 1870 he sold this property 
at sixty dollars per acre. In the spring of 1S71 he arrived in Ames, ac- 
companied by his family, and soon after settled on a farm about a mile 
from the place, upon wliicli Charles F. Ruth now resides. The father, how- 
ever, was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, for he passed away 
in 187s at the age of fifty-five years. The mother died in 1881 at the age 
of sixty-one years. Their family numbered seven children : Hannah, who 
is the widow of Michael Grctlen and resides in Gilbert; Lavina, the wife 
of L. Oliver, also of Gilbert; Carrie, the wife of Floyd Sibley, of Los 
Angeles, California; William, who married Rachel Bingham and lives in 
Salem, Oregon; Linus, who was a judge in one of the Chicago courts and 
died in 1908; Charles F., of this review; and Alma, the wife of Frank 
Palmer, of Arapahoe, Nebraska. 

Charles F. Ruth spent the first fifteen years of his life in his native 
county and during that period became familiar with the duties and labors 
of the home farm. He then accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Story county in 1871 and has since resided in Franklin township. The 
occupation to which he was reared he has made his life work and in 1880 
he located upon his present farm which was then a tract of raw prairie 
land. The fact that it is today a well improved property is due to his 
energy, determination and unfaltering industry. The place comprises one 
hundred and ninety acres of rich and arable .soil on sections 1 1 and 14, 
Franklin township, and in addition to the cultivation of the fields he is 
engaged extensively and successfully in the breeding of Chester White hogs 
and Jersey cattle. Besides his farming interests Mr. Ruth has other busi- 
ness connections. He had the management and was secretary of the Gilbert 
Creamery Company for five years and he was one of the organizers and 
the first secretary of the West Milford Telephone Company. He has been 
a hunter from the age of eight years and finds his chief recreation as a 
follower of Nimrod. He killed eight wild carrier pigeons in Plymouth 
county in 1878, these being the last seen in Iowa. He has killed all the 
game native to this state and in New Brunswick, in September, icpS, he 
killed a moose weighing eleven hundred pounds, the head of which he had 
mounted, and it now adorns his home. On the same hunt be succeeded in 
getting two Ijlack bears, the hides of which he has in his home. lie spent 
three weeks on that hunting trip and felt well repaid. 

On the 2d of November, 1880, Mr, Ruth was united in marriage to 
Miss Minerva B. Kooser, who was born in Milford township. Story county, 
September 19, 1861, and is a daughter of George 15. and Margaret 
(Boucher) Kooser, both of whoin were natives of Pennsylvania and were 
there married. On coming to Iowa in 185(1, the father entered land from 
the government. He devoted many years to farming and passed away on 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 347 

the 26th of Xovember, 1S96. His widow still survives and is now a resi- 
dent of Ames. They were the parents of seven sons and four daughters. 
Unto -Mr. and Mrs. Ruth have been born two sons: Chelsea I., who man- 
ages the farm; and Clifton L.. at home. The elder son is married and has 
one child, Constance Alene, who was born Alarch 7, 1910. 

;\Ir. Ruth is entitled to membership with the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, for one of his great-grandfathers in the maternal line was John 
Clontz, a native of Germany, who was with Washington's army at Valley 
Forge. In his political views Mr. Ruth was formerly a republican but in 
later years has supported the prohibition party. He has served as township 
clerk and for sixteen years has been secretary of the school board of 
Franklin township. He holds membership in the Cumberland. Presbyterian 
church at Gilbert and also belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge there. In 
these associations are found the principles and rules which govern his con- 
duct and which have made him an upright, honorable man, respected by 
all who know him. In business, too, he has displayed such sterling quali- 
ties as have gained for him warm regard and the confidence of all with 
whom he has had dealings. 



EDWARD M. McCALL. 



With the exception of six years spent away at school, Edward M. Mc- 
Call has resided continuously in Story county from the time of his birth, 
which occurred in Nevada, on the 30th of August, 1873, and in a profes- 
sion where advancement depends entirely upon broad learning and merit 
he has worked his way steadily upward, being recognized as one of the 
strong members of the Story county bar. His parents were the Hon. T. C. 
and Mary A. (Boynton) McCall, who to prepare their son for the practical 
and responsible duties of life gave him excellent educational advantages. 

He pursued his studies through consecutive grades in the public schools 
of Nevada but left the high school before his graduation and went to 
Cornell College at Mount Vernon, where he spent a year in special work in 
the preparatory department. He afterward entered the Ames Agricultural 
College in the fall of 1891 and for three years was a student there, com- 
pleting one-half of the work of the junior year. He next took up the study 
of law, entering the law school at Iowa City, from which he was graduated 
in 1896. He at once located for practice in Nevada, where he has since 
followed his profession, and in 1900 he formed a partnership with J. A. 
Fitchpatrick under the firm style of Fitchpatrick (S; McCall. He has 
never specialized in any particular branch of the profession but has con- 
tinued in the general practice of law and a large and distinctively repre- 
sentative clientage has been accorded him. For two years, from 1900 until 
1902, he was city attorney and for four years, from 1905 until 1909, he was 
county attorney. His ability is manifest in his strong and logical argu- 



348 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ments which follow the careful preparation of his cases and in the many 
verdicts which he has won favorable to his clients' interests. 

In 1896 Mr. McCall was united in marriage to Miss Genevieve Louise 
Fitchjjatrick, a native of Nevada and a daughter of the Hon. J. A. Fitch- 
patrick, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. This marriage has 
been blessed with two interesting little daughters: Mary, five years of age; 
and Harriet Louise, three years of age. 

The parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church and are promi- 
nent in the social circles of the city. Mr. AlcCall also belongs to the Twen- 
tieth Century Club of Nevada. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican jjarty. which he has stanchly advocated since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. He is interested in everything that pertains to 
the general w-elfare. and his cooperation can be counted upon to further 
every movement for the jniblic good. For the past si.x years he has served 
as a member of the board of trustees of the public library. He has at- 
tained high rank in Masonry, belonging to Nevada Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & 
A. M.; Nevada Chapter, No. 92, R. A. M.; and Excalibur Cominandery. 
No. 13, K. T., of Boone, Iowa. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In strictly profes- 
sional lines he is connected with the .Story County P)ar .Association and he 
believes in upholding the highest standards of the profession. It is the 
theorj' of the law that the counsel is to aid the court in securing justice, 
and no member of the profession in Nevada is more careful to conform his 
practice to a high standard of professional ethics than Mr. McCall. He 
gives to the client the service of his legal talent and of unwearied industry 
and broad learning, yet he never forgets that there are certain things due 
to tlie court, to his own self-respect and. above all, to justice and a righteous 
administration of the law, which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the 
pleasure of success permits him to disregard. 



FRANK RAY. 



The Ray family needs no introduction to the citizens of Story county, 
as for three generations it has been represented by men who have proven 
most worthy of the esteem in which they have at all times been held. 
Frank Ray, a son of Samuel and Martha (Kurtz) Ray, was born in Indian 
Creek township on the 27th of March, 1881. Both of his parents are also 
natives of this county, being the children of early pioneers, and were reared 
and married in the county, where they have spent their lives. 

Frank Ray's early years were spent as are those of the average boy in 
the rural districts. He attended the common schools, perfonned such 
duties about the farm as were assigned him by parental authority and spent 
his leisure hours in the manner of the majority of young people. At the 
usual age he laid aside his text-books, feeling he had ac<]uircd sufficient 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 349 

education to enable him to assume the responsibilities of manhood, and 
began his career. He decided to follow the vocation of his father and 
grandfather, which was that of farming, and at the age of eighteen years 
left the parental roof to work as a farm hand in the vicinity of his home. 

He had not yet cast his first vote when he established a home for him- 
self by his marriage on the 25th of December, 1901, to Miss Ada May 
Barker, a daughter of Charles D. and Emma (Eastman) Barker, also 
pioneers of Story county. After marriage the young people began life 
on the farm of Mrs. Ray's father, located in Union township. They re- 
mained there for five years and then removed to the Monahan farm in 
Indian Creek township and after residing on the latter place for two years 
they located upon the farm of Mr. Ray's father, which is situated on sec- 
tion 16, Indian Creek township, where they have since continued to live. 
This farm contains one hundred and thirty-two and one-half acres of well 
improved land. Here Mr. Ray is engaged in the raising of shorthorn 
cattle and Poland China and Duroc Jersey hogs. He has been most suc- 
cessful in his specialty and is one of the best known young cattlemen in 
this section of the country. 

Two children have come to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray : 
Hazel Pearl and Ethel Levon. Ever since he has acquired the right of 
suffrage Mr. Ray has cast his vote for the candidates of the republican 
party. He has never taken an active part in politics to the extent of aspiring 
to public office or seeking political honors, preferring to give his entire 
time and attention to the demands of his private interests. He has just 
reached the age when most men are acquiring a foothold in the business 
world but he is quite firmly established. While attaining this position he 
has ever won and retained the good-will and esteem of all with whom he 
has come in contact. He is regarded as one of the promising young citi- 
zens of the community" where he lives, and both he and Mrs. Ray are 
highly esteemed. 



OLE L. FROWICK. 



It is doubtful whether any element of American citizenship has con- 
tributed in proportion to its numbers more valuable service to the up- 
building of the country than the Norwegian. Possessing the characteristics 
of energy, perseverance and thrift, the Norwegian-Americans have ac- 
quitted themselves with the highest credit and through their indomitable 
industry have established comfortable homes wherever they have settled. 
Ole L. Frowick, of Palestine township, comes of stanch Norwegian paren- 
tage on both sides of the house and, judging by what lie has accomplished, 
is a worthy representative of conscientious and hard-working ancestry. 

He was born in Palestine township. Story county, December 11, 1S69, 
a son of Lars E. and Sarah (Cleveland) Frowick, both natives of Norway. 
The parents were reared in the mother country and then came to America. 



350 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Mr. Frowick purchasing a farm south of Huxley, in Palestine township, 
Story county, Iowa, upon which he resided until 1872. He then sold his 
place and bought land in another locality in the same township, which 
became tlie family homestead. Here he continued until his death, which 
occurred in 1901. The mother was called away in 1907. They were both 
faithful members of the Lutheran church and had many friends in Palestine 
township. 

Ole L. Frowick was the only son of his parents and was reared under 
highly favorable conditions for a useful life. He attended the public 
schools and when not occupied with his books assisted in the work of the 
fields. After reaching manhood he still continued upon the home farm, 
which he purchased in 1898. It is situated on sections 21, 28 and 29, Pales- 
tine township, comprising originally two hundred and eighty acres, to 
which he has added by purchase, so that the farm now includes three 
hundred and fourteen acres and is a highly pleasing feature of the land- 
scape. It is under thorough cultivation and yields excellent harvests each 
year. 

Mr. Frowick gives his support to the republican party but official honors 
have never had any attraction for him as his interest is centered in his 
business, to which he devotes his best energies. His religious faith is ex- 
pressed by membership in the Lutheran church, to which he is a liberal 
contributor. A representative farmer of the county, he has attained a 
goodly measure of prosperity, and it requires no prophet to foretell for 
him a successful future. 



FRAXK NICKERSON FO\VLER. 

Frank Nickerson Fowler, county treasurer of Story county, is one of 
the be.'^t known men of central Iowa. He has been for twenty-five years a 
resident of the state and in business, political and social affairs has achieved 
a distinct success. He was born at Searsport, Maine. June 11. 1858, a son 
of Major James N. and Mary Ellen (Wentworth) Fowler. He comes of 
good Scotch and English ancestry, members of the family on botli sidc'^ 
of the house having served most creditably in the patriot army during the 
Revolutionary war. The founders of the Fowler family in America crossed 
the ocean with tlie Pilgrim Fatiiers and the mother of our subject clainieil 
the Carvers among her ancestors and was also a descendant of the Curia! 
family of Scotlan<l. 

James N. Fowler was educated in the common schools of the Pine 
Tree state and began his business career as an apprentice to a merchant 
tailor, also learning the haberdashery business. The male members of the 
family were largely sea captains and John Fowler, the father of James N.. 
after retiring from the sea, opened a haberdashery store at Searsport, with 



I 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 351 

which his son became connected, the latter succeeding the father in busi- 
ness. About fourteen years ago he retired and althougli now quite ad- 
vanced in age is strong and hearty physically and mentally his powers are 
unimpaired, although he has now reached the age of seventy-six years. 
He was successful in his business and acquired a competence which he 
now enjoys. He attends the Congregational church, of which his father 
was a deacon. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order and is 
a Knight Templar in that organization. He has been allied with the 
democratic party ever since casting his first vote and has been an active 
worker in its support, although never an aspirant for political honors. In 
response to the first call of President Lincoln for troops he offered his 
services to the Union, enlisting for three months in a Maine regiment. 
Later he reenlisted, becoming a member of Company K, Twenty-sixth 
Alaine \'olunteer Infantry, and rose to the rank of major. 

The mother of our subject was born in September, 1834, and passed 
away June 20, 1883. She was a daughter of James Wentvvorth, who was 
a ship carpenter and married Eliza Curial, whose family settled in Penn- 
sylvania at an early day. Three children blessed the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fowler: Frank X., the subject of this review; James X., Jr., who 
became a merchant tailor and died at Ames, Iowa, in 1907; and Ellen M., 
of Dorchester, Massachusetts, the wife of Albert Cleveland, a traveling 
salesman for a Boston house. 

Frank X. Fowler received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of Camden, Maine, and worked his way through the academic course, being 
ambitious to take up the profession of law. After graduating from the 
academy, however, he and his companions were seized with the sea fever 
and shipped on board a merchantman, leaving friends and country far 
behind in a long voyage to foreign ports. The young seaman spent about 
ten years on the ocean, visiting the principal ports of the world and gaining 
a knowledge of human nature that has since proved of great value. In 
Xovember, 1886, Air. Fowler came west and after stopping for a few 
months in Des Moines, Iowa, settled at Ames, where he continued for 
t^venty-two years as manager of the B. A. Lock wood Grain Company of 
Des Moines. In 190S he was elected treasurer of Story county and re- 
moved to Xevada, being reelected to the same office in 1910. He has dis- 
charged his duties with rare fidelity and with special regard for the in- 
terests of the people, hence his administration has met the hearty approval 
of the citizens of the county irrespective of their party affiliation. 

In 1883 Mr. Fowler was united in marriage to Miss Lottie L. Treat, 
who was born at Searsport, Maine, September 3, 1861. She was the 
daughter of James B. and Alary Ann (Pendleton) Treat and came of 
Revolutionary stock. Three children were born of this union : Albert, 
who is now chief of the final result division of the census department at 
Washington, D. C. ; Mona L., now a student in the Xevada high school ; 
and Donald Wentworth, also attending school. The mother of these chil- 



352 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

dren having passed away in 1903, Mr. Fowler was married in 1906 to 
Miss Hattie D. Brouhard, who was born at Colo, Iowa, March 5, 1877, 
and is a daughter of Bainie and Mary Brouliard. The father, who was a 
well known farmer of Xew Albany township, passed away in 1908. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Fowler has been brightened by the birth of one 
child, Dorothy Lucile, who was born May 30, 1910. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fowler are both members of the Universalist church. 
He gives his adherence to the republican party, of which he has been a 
stanch supporter for many years. He served for nine years as a member 
of the Ames school board and was also one of the organizers of the Ames 
Commercial Club, filling the ix>sition of secretary-treasurer for eleven 
years. He is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Knights of Pythias and has passed through all of the chairs in the 
latter organization. As a Mason he has become well known in Iowa, 
fdling nearly all of the subordinate offices in the several bodies, and also 
presiding over the lodge, chapter and council. He became a member of 
Arcadia Lodge, No. 249, of Ames, in 1894, and of Three-Times-Three 
Chapter, No. 92, R. A. M., of Nevada, in 1896, receiving the degrees of 
Royal and Select Master in Joshua Chapter, No. 127, in 1898. He was a 
charter member of Gebal Council, No. 5, R. & S. M., of Ames, in 1900, 
being given the commandery degrees in Excalibur Commandery, No. 13. 
of Boone, in 1898. He received the distinguished honor of the Order of 
High Priesthood September 4, 1901. He has been a regular attendant 
upon the assemblies of the Grand Council almost since its inception and 
was given merited recognition in 1906 by being elected illustrious grand 
principal conductor of the work. In the following year he was elected right 
illustrious deputy grand master and at the annual assembly held in Water- 
loo in October, 1908, was made most illustrious grand master of the Grand 
Council of Royal and Select Masters of the state of Iowa. Genial, courteous 
and agreeable in manner, he has made a host of friends and is undoubtedly 
one of the most popular citizens in Story county. Happy in his family 
relations and successful in business and public life, he has just reason to 
congratulate himself upon the selection of Iowa as his home. 



CHARLES E. TAYLOR. 

Charles E. Taylor, who for twenty years has been identified with build-J 
ing operations in .Ames, where a liberal patronage is accorded him. waa 
born in Le Raysville, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, .\ugiist 2, 1844, an^ 
is a son of Nelson and Martha (Fletcher) Taylor, who were also native 
of Le Raysville. The ancestry of the family is traced back to John Taylot 
who came from Sussex county. England, in 1^)30. and settled at Lynn 
Massachusetts. He had two sons, John and Thomas. The former's wifd 




('. K. lAM.OU 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 355 

Mrs. Rhoda Taylor, was a widow when she married John Taylor. They 
settled at Windsor, Connecticut, in 1639. and had five children but three 
died, leaving John and Thomas as the surviving members of the family. 
In 1646 their father sailed for England, leaving the family at Windsor, 
but the vessel was lost at sea. The legend concerning this lost ship was 
afterward put in poetic form by Henry W. Longfellow under the title The 
Phantom Ship. The widow and her two sons, John and Thomas, aged six 
and four years at the time of the father's death, continued in Windsor for 
some time, but in 1655 Mrs. Taylor became the wife of Mr. Hoyt and re- 
moved to Norwalk, Connecticut. When Thomas Taylor was fourteen 
years of age the town of Norwalk granted him land as ''one of the children 
of the town." He was married February 14, 1668, to Rebecca, a daughter 
of Edward Ketchum, of Stratford, and on the 14th of October, 1669, 
his name was presented as one who desired to be made a "freeman." In 
the same year he was made a member of the general court from Norwalk. 
In 1685 he became one of the first eight settlers of Danbury, Connecticut, 
and was chosen ensign of the military company. He was also the first 
representative to the general court from Danbury, serving in 1697, 1701 
and 1706. He died January 17, 1735, aged ninety-two years. 

His fifth son, Nathan Taylor, was born at Norwalk, February 7, 1682, 
and in 1706 married Hannah, a daughter of Lieutenant Daniel and Mary 
Benedict. He enlisted in Colonel Waterbury's regiment and served in the 
Revolutionary war as sergeant from May until October, 1775. He died 
in 1 781, at the age of ninety-nine years, leaving four sons. He had acted 
as color bearer in the Revolutionary war at the remarkable age of eighty- 
nine years and nine months, while his grandson John Taylor, who was 
born at Danbury, Connecticut, June 12, 1754, marched by his side carry- 
ing a musket. Nathan Taylor received an honorable discharge at the ex- 
piration of his term of enlistment. He preached his farewell sermon as 
a minister of the Congregational church when ninety-six years of age and 
died in Connecticut at the notable old age of ninety-nine years. The 
family is noted for longevity. In 1755 Thomas Taylor, the great-great- 
grandfather of Charles Taylor of this review, was killed at Lake George, 
New York, while fighting for the British in the French antl Indian war. 
Various ancestprs of Charles E. Taylor bore arms in the difYerent wars 
in which the country has been engaged. His grandfather, Abraham Taylor, 
served in the Revolution under command of Captain Camp and Colonel 
Canfield. The great-grandfather. Lieutenant Perrin Ross, was one of the 
heroes in the war for independence and was killed in the Wyoming mas- 
sacre. Another great-grandfather. Brigadier General Samuel Fletcher, of 
Vermont, was in the Revolution and still another, Elinas Brister. who 
served as a private. In another ancestral line is found the record of Ithel 
Stone, of Hartford, Connecticut, who was a great-great-grandfather of 
Charles E. Taylor and served as a colonel in the Revolutionary war. 
Vol. n— 18 



356 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Nelson Taylor, the father, born in Lc Raysville, I'ennsylvania, in iSuk 
died at Ames, Story county, Iowa, at the venerable age of ninety-twc 
after residing here for twenty-five years. He had been a pioneer of the 
middle west of 1855, at which time he settled in Illinois. He had followed 
the tanners trade in early life but after his removal to the west carried on 
agricultural pursuits and was actively connected with farming up to the 
time of his death, being ill only four days. His wife, who was born in 
Le Raysville, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1820, died in Illinois, in 1868. In 
their family were six sons and two daughters, of whom four sons and a 
daughter are yet living. The oldest brother, Byron F. Taylor, served for 
three years as a soldier in the Civil war. After losing his first wife lii^ 
father married again. 

Charles E. Taylor was a youth of eleven years when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal from Pennsylvania to Illinois. He remained 
with them uiion the farm in the latter state until twentj' years of age and 
then started west. He traveled over the Union Pacific Railroad when its 
terminal was at Cheyenne. He then returned to Nebraska and from there 
retraced his steps into Iowa. Between the ages of twenty and thirty-one 
years he largely devoted his time to teaching in the common schools through 
the winter months and a portion of the summer seasons were .spent in Illi- 
nois. In 1868 he came to Ames but the following year his mother's death 
recalled him to Illinois, where he again taught school for one term. In 
March, 1870, he made his way to the Pacific coast and conducted a meat 
market in Amador county, California, hm in .\ugust, 1871, returned to 
Illinois, where he again followed the profession of teaching for two terms. 
After that ])criod he came again to Iowa and has since been a resident of 
Ames with the exception of three years, which were spent in Del Rio, 
Texas. He was engaged in clerking in .\mes for fourteen years and for 
the past twenty years has been engaged in carpenter work. As time has 
passed on he has met with success in this undertaking and is now in com- 
fortable circumstances. 

On the 1st of December, 1874, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to 
Miss Nancy M. Wilder, of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and unto them 
have been born four children: F.dna M.. the wife of Silas Kalsen, of Wood- 
bine. Iowa ; Phila Etta, at home ; Harry N.. who is employed by the North- 
western Railroad Company and resides at Boone, Iowa; and Charles E., 
who is a conductor with the Chicago & Northwestern at Des Moines. There 
are also two grandsons and three granddaughters and Mr. Taylor also has 
two half-brothers and a half-sister living in Story county. 

Mr. Taylor is a well informed man, keejiing in toudi with the general 
interests of the day. 1 le is also greatly interested in the geological forma- 
tion of the county and has written some articles upon that subject. He 
belongs to Iowa Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
since twenty-one years of age has been a member of the Masonic frater- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 357 

nity. He was initiated into the order in Illinois and is now secretary of 
Ames Lodge. His many sterling traits of character have gained him warm 
regard. His periods of residence in different parts of the country have 
given him intimate knowledge of America and her opportunities and 
conditions and he is thoroughly content to make his home in Iowa, for he 
believes that no state has been more richly endowed by nature. 



JOHN B. ANGELO. 



John B. Angelo, one of the well known retired farmers of Story county, 
who is now serving as mayor in the town of Maxwell, was born in Morgan 
county, Illinois, on the 26th of June, 1846, a son of Samuel W. and Rhoda 
(Burwell) Angelo. His parents were both natives of Pennsylvania, his 
father removing to Illinois when a child with his parents, but the mother 
remained in the Keystone state until she had reached womanhood when she, 
too, came west and settled in Illinois. Some years after their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Angelo decided to remove to Iowa and in 1853 they located in 
Polk county near Rising Sun, where, two years later the father died. In 
1857 Mrs. Angelo with her family of six children went to Jasper county 
to reside upon a farm which the father had entered prior to his death and 
there she continued to live up to the time of her death in 1894. 

The childhood and youth of Mr. Angelo was somewhat harder than 
that of many boys. Being the son of a widow and one of the older chil- 
dren in the family he was required to perform a large portion of the work 
about the farm. His education was acquired in the district schools, the 
sessions of which were brief and the standard of scholarship at that period 
not of the best. When yet not much more than a lad his oldest brother 
left home and located in Nebraska and the next older entered the army, 
going to the front for the Union as a volunteer during that momentous 
period in the early '60s, thus leaving our subject the entire responsibility 
and care of the home farm. He managed the old homestead first for his 
mother and later as a renter until 1902, when he retired from active work 
and removed to Maxwell, where he has since continued to reside. 

Ever since attaining the age which conferred upon him the full rights 
of citizenship Mr. Angelo has been a strong partisan of republicanism. 
feeling that party's policy of the centralization of power and protection 
best subserved the interests of the majority. He has always taken a more 
or less active interest in politics, having served for several years as town- 
ship trustee when a resident of Jasper county, and twice being the choice 
of his fellow citizens for the office of justice of the peace, and in both 
capacities he proved himself well worthy of their confidence. His excellent 
guardianship of the public interests and his strong advocacy of every 
movement which promised the betterment of conditions essential to the 



358 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

community proved him to be a man of progressive ideas and one well able 
to direct and fill any local office. As justice of the peace he proved him- 
self fully as competent, his decisions in all cases meeting with the approval 
of the general public. Since his retirement and residence in Ma.xwell he 
has served si.x years in the town council, and in the spring of 1909 he was 
elected mayor and is still the incumbent of that office. 

Mr. Angelo was united in marriage on the 9th of January, 1876, to 
Miss Ada R. Kimberly, a daughter of Isaiah and Mary Ann (Cleverly) 
Kimberly, of Jasper county, where they continue to reside, he at the vener- 
able age of eighty-five years and she having passed her seventy-ninth 
anniversary. One cliild was born to this couple, W'yatt B., who is practic- 
ing law in Plainfield, Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo are both members of the Christian church, of 
which he has been a trustee for years. He is also identified with the 
Masonic fraternity, being a member of Herald Lodge, Xo. 455, A. F. & 
A. M. Me is one of the proy^ressive men of his community, who has 
always been held in high regard, both he and Mrs. Angelo being popular 
in both church and social circles of Maxwell. 



HORACE GREELEY HAXDSAKER. 

Among the native sons of this county whose close application and in- 
dustry have been rewarded by a comfortable competence is Horace Greeley 
Handsaker. He is the son of William and Emily Ilandsaker and was born 
on section 22, Richland township, on the 3d of January, 1870. The mother 
was born in Indiana and was reared in Illinois but the father was an 
Englishman by birth and came to the United States when he was a young 
man,, settling in Richland township, this county, where he met and married 
Emily Wyatt. Of the eight children born of this union six are living. 

The boyhood and youth of H. G. Handsaker differed but in detail 
from that of the majority of boys who are reared in the rural districts. 
It was the usual routine of school, work about the farm and such sport- 
as are usually enjoyed by strong and energetic lads. His education wa.- 
acquired in the district schools of the township in wliich he was born and 
reared. On laying aside his text-books he assisted his fatlier in the work 
of the home farm until he had reached the age of twenty years, when he 
began life for himself. For two years he served in the capacity of a farm 
hand, but at ihc (.nd of that period he was able to become somewhat more 
indci)endcnt and rented a farm from his father, which he continued to 
culli\atc tor five years. I lis thrift, good management and hard work were 
rewanUd during that period to the extent that he was able to become a 
property owner and he bought two hundred and forty acres on section 22, 
Richland town.ship, where he still resitles. Later he investeil in one hun- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



359 



dred and sixty acres of land in Worth county and he has more recently 
acquired three hiuidred and twenty acres in the Panhandle of Texas. 
Thus the aggregate of his realty holdings is seven hundred and ninety 
acres, all of which is valuable land. His home farm is well stocked, its 
fertile fields yield abundant harvests and it contains a comfortable resi- 
dence and commodious barns. 

Air. Handsaker was united in marriage to Miss Emma Cook, a daughter 
of tlie late ■Michael Cook and Rose Cook. To this couple have been born 
four children, three daughters and one son, as follows: Eva, w^ho died in 
infancy; Lulu, who is attending school; Bertha and Harold. 

Ever since he attained his majority Mr. Handsaker has given his 
political allegiance to the republican party. He has never been particularly 
active in politics, not aspiring to public office, but always discharges his 
duties as a citizen by casting a vote at each election for the candidates of 
die party of his choice. He has always been an active, progressive, ener- 
getic man, who has met with more than average success in his life work 
and at the same time has won and held the esteem and good-will of those 
who have known him from childhood. 



s 



W. S. HEMPING. 



W. S. Hemping, a general farmer and stock-raiser of New Albany 
township. Story county, is winning success in his chosen life work owing 
to the fact that his efforts in that direction have ever been characterized by 
unfaltering industry and intelligently applied labor. He was born in Ogle 
county, Illinois, on the 3d of June, 1S61, and represents a family which 
was founded in the United States in the early part of the nineteenth century. 
In the year 1803 his paternal grandfather came from Germany to the new 
world, locating at Halifa.x, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, where the re- 
mainder of his life was spent. He was a minister of the Lutheran church 
and his entire time was devoted to preaching the doctrines of that faith. 

His son, J. N. Hemping, the father of our subject, was born on the 
17th of October, 1818, in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. He was afforded 
the advantage of a college education, and it was his father's wish that he 
devote himself to the ministry. This occupation, however, did not appeal 
to J. N. Hemping who, taking up farming as a life work, was identified 
with that enterprise throughout his active life. In 1856 he came west, 
taking up his abode in Ogle county, Illinois, and in May, 1866, arrived in 
Story county, where he resided until his demise. In April, 1840, he w-as 
united in marriage in St. John's Lutheran church near Elizabethville, 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, to Miss Eva Brosius, who was also a 
native of the Keystone state, her birth occurring in Dauphin county, July 
28, 1824. Mr. Hemping passed away on the 6th of March, 1896, on the 



360 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

old homestead in New Albany township, Story county, but his wife still 
survives and makes her home with a son in South Dakota. By her mar- 
riage she became the mother of the following children : Dan, a veteran of 
the Civil w^ar, who was born January i8, 1842, and passed away January 
9, 1895; Elizabeth, who was born November 26, 1843. ^""^^ d'^<J '" May, 
1898; Peter and Moses, both of whom passed away in infancy; Mary, who 
was born in May, 1846, her death occurring August 5. 1906; Kathryn. 
who was born October 16, 1851, and was killed in a railroad accident in 
Colo on the 15th of July, 1900; Susan, who was born November 14, 1853, 
and resides in Lincoln, Nebraska; John N., born March 31, 1856, and 
living in Ford county, Kansas; and Aaron I., wdio was born October 28, 
1865, and now makes his home in South Dakota. 

Coming with his parents to Story county when a lad of five years, 
W. S. Hemping therefore acquired his education in the schools of New 
Albany township, while he received thorough practical training in the 
work of the home farm. The wholesome atmosphere of rural life was 
conducive to a healthy, normal growth both mentally and physically, and 
with the passing of the years he learned much concerning the value of 
industry, integrity and perseverence. He remained w-ith his parents until 
thirty years of age, when he removed to the farm adjoining the old home- 
stead, the property of his wife, upon which he yet makes his home. Here 
he is successfully engaged in general farming and also devotes considerable 
time to stock-raising, making a specialty of breeding high grade Percheron 
horses. He is meeting with success in his enterprise, owing to the fact that 
he employs modern and progressive methods in the conduct of his interests 
and gives careful personal supervision to both Ijranches of his business. 

On the lOth of March, 1892, W. S. Hemi)ing was united in marriage 
to Rachel Isabel Trites, whose birth occurred in New Albany township on 
the 22d of Januarj', 1862. Her father, Henry Trites, a native of Germany, 
made the trip across the Atlantic in 1853 as a passenger on the William 
Tell, landing at New York. In 1858 he arrived in Story county and in 
the following year started for Pikes Peak. He returned to Story county, 
however, in i860, in which year he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
McCamy. Agriculture was the occupation to which he devoted his tinu- 
and attention, and he spent his entire life upon the farm. Iowa was yet 
a frontier district when he arrived within its borders. Mrs. Hcmping's 
mother and her family came west with ox teams and it took nine week- 
to make the trip from Randolph county, Indiana, to Story county. Mr. 
Trites cast in his lot with the early settlers and bore an important part 
at the time of the Spirit Lake Indian uprising. He undertook the task 
of notifying the troops at Fort P.ri<lgely, South Dakota, of the uprisini,'. 
as many people had already been killed. The task was a difficult one, a- 
the distance to Fort Bridgcly was one hundred miles and the journey 
had to be made on foot, witli four to six feet of snow on the ground. 
He was a Mason, holding membership in Columbia Lodge. No. 292, A. F. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 361 

& A. M., at Colo. He passed away on the 8th of August, 1892, and 
his funeral services, held at the Methodist Episcopal church, at Colo, 
were conducted by Rev. Ellenberger, with the Masonic order assisting. 
He is survived by his widow, who now makes her home at Colo, whence 
she removed in 1894, and two daughters, Mrs. Hemping and Louise 
Hemping. 

Unto Mr. ad Mrs. Hemping have been born two sons : Henry, born 
on the lOth of December, 1893, who lives at home and attends high 
school; and William Silas, born on the 31st of December, 1898, who is 
also with his parents and is attending school. 

Mr. Hemping is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and has held all of the offices in the order. In politics he is a 
stanch republican, strongly supporting the progressive branch of that 
party, but he is without ambition for public office. He has, however, 
served as a member of the school board for four years, the cause of edu- 
cation and intellectual development finding in him a stalwart champion. 
Indeed his ideas are progressive along other lines, as well, and every 
measure or project which has for its object the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of the community finds in him hearty cooperation. He has passed 
practically his entire life within the borders of Story county and his 
genuine worth has gained him many warm friends during that period, 
his excellent traits of citizenship gaining him the respect and good-will 
of his fellowmen. 



BURTON L. ]\IEAD. 

Burton L. Mead, whose farm of one hundred and sixty acres lies 
within the corporate limits of Collins, may be designated as one of the 
fortunate citizens of Story county. His home is one of the most attrac- 
tive in the township, and as a farmer, although a young man, he enjoys a 
reputation for success seldom accorded a man of his years. Born on the 
farm where he now resides, January 14, 1882, he is the son of Charles 
and Phoebe V. (Fish) Mead. The father became one of the wealthy 
men of this section and died in 1894. The mother is now living in Collins. 

Burton L. Mead was reared upon the home farm under highly favor- 
able conditions for acquiring a good physical constitution and also a thor- 
ough knowledge of all the details of agriculture and stock-raising. He 
received his preliminary education in the public schools and subsequently 
attended the Capital City Business College at Des Moines, where he 
acquitted himself most creditably and gained the basis of a thorough 
business education. At the age of eighteen years he was made assistant 
cashier of the Exchange State Bank of Collins, serving most acceptably 
for three and one-half vears, when he resigned and located upon the 



362 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

home farm, which reverted to him on the settlement of the family estate 
in 1903. This place comprises one hundred and sixty acres and is one 
of the highly improved farms of Story county. It is provided with sub- 
tantial buildings and all conveniences of a first class, up-to-date establish- 
ment. Mr. Mead makes a specialty of stock- feeding, using not only all 
the grain and hay that he raises but he also buys extensively from others. 
He is a good judge of stock and being well acquainted with the markets 
is generally able to secure the very best prices available. 

On the nth of November, 1903, Mr. Mead was united in marriage to 
Miss Hattie E. Middleton, of Modale, Iowa, a daughter of William and 
Catherine (Mintun) Middleton, the former a native of Ohio and the > 
latter of Iowa. Mr. Middleton came to Iowa about 1846 and engaged in 
farming in Harrison county. He also served as foreman on the construc- 
tion of the Union Pacific Railway when it was built through .\ebraska. 
but is now living retired at Modale at the age of eighty-three years. There- 
were eighteen children in his family. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Alead two children have been born: Leroy William, 
and Elena Kathryn. Politically Mr. Mead gives his support to the repub- 
lican party and fraternally is identified with Fervent Lodge, No. 513. .\. 
F. & A. M., of Collins, lie is a kind and considerate husband and father, 
an enterprising citizen and a faithful friend, who is willing to make any 
reasonable sacrifice to advance the comfort and happiness of those with 
whom he associates. By an industrious and straightforward life he ha< 
gained an enviable reputation for efficiency and integrity, and his per- 
sonal worth is fully demonstrated in the high esteem in which he is held 
by people of Collins and vicinity. 



MATHEW ELLIS McMICHAEL. 

Mathew Ellis Mc.Michael occupies an attractive home at No. 1007 
Douglas avenue and is now partially living retired but for many year 
was closely associated with agricultural interests and draying. He w:i 
born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1839. His parents, Robci i 
and Jane (Cairns) .McMichael, were both natives of Ireland, where they 
were reared and married. The year 1819 witnessed their arrival in 
Pennsvlvania. at which time they took up their abode near Philadelphia, 
and later removed to Pittsburg. After a year in the latter city they went 
to Lisbon, Columbiana county, Ohio, where Mathew E. .McMichael 
remained until his enlistment for service in the Union army in May, 1862. 
Both of his parents spent their last days in Lisbon, the mother passing 
away March 19, 1855. while the father's death occurred on the 19th of 
February, 18^16. He was a weaver and followed that trade throughout 
his life. He was also an expert at sowing grain and stacking it and did 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY ♦ 363 

considerable work of that kind but aside from that did not engage in 
farming. He had developed a knack at that work while a boy and he also 
became quite efficient in weaving. 

Mathew E. McMichael is the youngest and the only survivor in a family 
of eleven children, nine of whom reached adult age. His brother John, in 
response to the last call, served for three months with the One Hundred 
and Forty-third Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war. The members 
of the family are: James, who was a farmer, thresher and teamster and 
died at Alliance, Ohio; Eliza Jane, who became the wife of David Kimball 
and died in Ohio; William, who was a carpenter and died in Ames; 
Margaret May, who died in infancy; Robert Hayes, who was a builder 
and contractor and passed away in Ohio; Isabella, who became the wife 
of Wesley Kimball and died in the Buckeye state ; John, who was a laborer 
and died in Ohio; David, who was proprietor of a livery stable at Lisbon, 
Ohio, for many years and there passed away ; Margaret, who married 
Robert Morrow and died in Ohio; Anna, who died in infancy; and Mathew 
Ellis. 

Alathew E. McMichael devoted his youth to the acquirement of an 
education and assisted his father in different lines of work. He was 
about twenty-three years of age when in May, 1862, he offered his services 
to the government and joined Company F, of the Eighty-seventh Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for five months, after which 
he was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry in the fall of 1862. Being 
paroled, he returned home, where he suffered an attack of typhoid fever. 
He enlisted a second time, in 1864, as a member of Company F, One 
Hundred and Forty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served 
for three months. He participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry and 
many minor engagements and assisted in the capture of Morgan when 
the Confederate general made his raid into Ohio. After the war Mr. 
McMichael worked as a farm laborer and later as a teaiuster until he 
came to Iowa in 1868. Making his way to Story county, he settled in 
Franklin township about five miles north of Ames and there rented land 
until July, 1870, when he took charge of the county poor farm. He was 
the first superintendent of the Story county farm and filled the position 
for twenty-two months. He then came to .Ames, where he engaged in the 
draying business for a number of years, after which he resumed farming 
on a place a mile south of Ames. He rented and cultivated that land for 
six years, when he returned to Ames and was again engaged in teaming 
for a number of years. Later he went to Grundy county, where he engaged 
in farming in the vicinity of Conrad for si.x years, after which he returned 
to Ames and has since partially lived retired. In 1909 he built his present 
fine home at No. 1007 Douglas avenue. 

Mr. McMichael has been married three times. In 1863 he wedded 
Miss Elizabeth Orr, a native of Elkton, Ohio, who died in 1866. In Janu- 
ary, 1868, he married Samantha Evans, who was born in Illinois and died 



■Ml • HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

in 1874. They had three children. Jennie, the eldest, is the wife of John 
McKay, of Saskatchewan, Canada. Charles Edgar, who served for three 
years in the regular army with the rank of sergeant, was born in Story 
county, October 28, 1872, and at the time of the Spanish-American war 
enlisted for service in the volunteer army and died in Cuba in 1898. 
Myrtle Belle, of Portland, Oregon, lost her mother when but two years 
of age and was adopted by Edward Lockwood, whose name she now 
bears. On the 29th of January, 1S80, Mr. McMichael was again married, 
his third union being with Sarah Long, who was born in Stark county. 
Ohio, in 1847. They have one child. Kate, who is now the wife of L. J. 
Cole, and resides with her father. 

In his political views Mr. McMichael has always been a stalwart demo- 
crat but has never sought or desired office. He belongs to the Grand 
Army of the Republic and thus keeps in touch with those who were his 
comrades when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields. He 
has now passed the seventy-second milestone on life's journey and though 
still engaged in business to some extent is also living partially retired, 
enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly merits. 



GEORGE C. COUGHEXOUR. 

Ill tlie list of the younger generation of well known and successful 
farmers of Story county must be placed the name of George C. Coughe- 
nour, who is also a native son, having been born in Indian Creek township 
on the 5th of September, 1877. The parents, Solomon and Margaret 
(Dunahoo) Coughenour. came to Iowa with their respective jiarents. he 
from Pennsylvania and she from Virginia, when they were children and 
are included among the first settlers of this county. After their marriage 
they settled in Indian Creek township, where the father engaged in farm- 
ing until about 1901, at which time he retired and they moved to Nevada, 
where they have since continued to live. 

George C. Coughenour spent his boyhood and youth under the parental 
roof, acquiring his education in the common schools, assisting in tiie work 
of the farm and enjoying such pastimes as do the majority of young people 
living in the rural districts. When he had acquired sufficient education to 
enable him to undertake the duties and responsibilities of life he laid aside 
his text-books and turned his attention to farming, having decided to fol- 
low that occupation as it was the one to which he had been reared and 
which he considered was best adapted to his powers. At the age of 
twenty years he relieved his father by taking over the entire charge and 
management of the home farm, which he still continues to cultivate. It 
consists of one hundred antl si.\ty acres of land on section i. Indian 
Creek township, and is considered one of the valuable properties of Story 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 365 

county. He has made a specialty of cattle feeding for several years and 
has been very successful in this as well as in his farming. He is one of 
the progressive, wide-awake, alert young agriculturists, who keeps in close 
touch with every advanced movement along the lines in which he is inter- 
ested, always ready to try any new methods which appeal to him as being 
practical and the efficacy of which has been demonstrated by trial. 

He established a home of his own by his marriage on the nth of 
October, igoo, to J\liss Nellie Ray, a daughter of Jacob Ray, now a resi- 
dent of Nevada but for many years one of the well known pioneer farmers 
of Indian Creek township. Three children have been born of this union: 
Ray, Ralph and Rollin. 

Mr. Coughenour's fraternal relations have been confined to member- 
ship in the Mystic Workers of the World. Ever since age conferred upon 
him the right of suffrage his political affiliation has been with the demo- 
cratic party, as he feels its policy is best adapted to protect tlie interest 
of the agriculturist. He has never been an office seeker nor aspired to 
political honors of any kind, but each election day finds him at the polls, 
where he casts his ballot for the candidates of the party of his choice. He 
is highly respected and esteemed in this, the county of his birth, and higher 
tribute could not be paid to his worth as a man and citizen. 



SEA'EREN O. WALD. 



Among the active members of the Story county bar none occupies a 
more honorable place than the gentleman whose name introduces this 
review. He has been in the thick of the fray for fifteen years and has 
carried off a fair share of laurels, being known as one of the brightest 
lawyers in this section of the state — an attorney who never acknowledges 
defeat as long as he feels he is in the right and who in a remarkable num- 
ber of difficult cases has convinced the court or jury of the righteousness 
of his contention. 

He was born in Polk county, Iowa, December lo, 1865, a son of Ole 
J. and Bertha U. (Gaard) Wald, both natives of Norway. They came 
to the United States before their marriage, in the early '50s, and located 
near Ottawa, Illinois. Mr. Wald purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of prairie land in Elkhart township, Polk county, Iowa, from a man for 
whom he was working in Illinois, and in the spring of 1865 he and his 
family removed to this place. He built a log cabin and later improved his 
farm with modern structures, developing it into one of the valuable 
properties of the township. He also acquired land in Humboldt county, 
Iowa, taking up his residence there about 1890. Mrs. Wald passed away 
in 1899, her husband departing this life eight years later. They were both 
faithful members of the Lutheran church and active workers in behalf of 



366 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

every cause seeking to advance the permanent interests of the community. 
Mr. W'ald possessed good business judgment and on account of his acknowl- 
edged reputation for integrity was a man of large influence whenever he 
was know-n. 

Severen O. W'ald was reared under favorable circumstances for a use- 
ful career. He acquired his education in the district schools and then took 
a course in the Iowa Business College of Des Moines. Subsequently he 
matriculated in the law department of Drake University, graduating with 
the degree of LL.B. in 1896. He was admitted to the bar January 22, of 
the same year, several months before his graduation from the university. 
Opening offices in Slater, he at once entered upon an active practice and has 
handled successfully some of the most important civil and land cases that 
have been tried in this section. Recently he won a land case at Clarion 
which involved twenty-five thousand dollars or more that had been unsuc- 
cessfully tried by some of the ablest lawyers in this part of the state. His 
clients are among the leading business men of the community and his 
opinions upon questions of law command respect as coming from one who 
has carefully considered the subject from all points of view. 

In June, uSgg, Mr. Wald w-as united in marriage to Miss Minnie John- 
son, of Des Moines, and of this union si.x children were born, five of whom 
are now living, namely: Curtis M., Lowell M., Roscoe E., Bonnie \'. and 
an infant daughter. 

Mr. W'ald gives his support to the re|)ublican party and has been fre- 
quently requested to allow his name to be proposed for the state legislature, 
but his extensive and growing practice has prevented his acceptance of 
this honor. He has served as a member of the town council and fraternally 
is connected with Slater Lodge, No. 384, I. O. O. F., and the local camp of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are valued members of 
the Methodist church. Both as a pleader and counselor he has attained high 
standing in his profession, and as he is a man of studious habits who thor- 
oughly prepares for every case in which lie is interested, he apparently has 
before him many years of increasing responsibility and usefulness. 



JOHX \'. K.\LSEM. 



John \'. Kalsem, who has been living retired at Huxley for nine years 
past, and attained a competence through years of wisely applied labor, w'as 
born in Norway, May 26, 1839, He is a son of Valentine and Sarah Kalsem. 
both of whom were natives of Norway and continued in that country dur- 
ing their entire lives. Mr. Kalsem of this review was reared under the 
parental roof and acquired his education in the jiublic schools of Norway, 
subsequently attending the schools of Mahaska county. Iowa, for a short 
time. In the spring of 1859, being then twentv years of age, he Arrived in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 367 

the United States, having decided to make for himself a home and a for- 
tune under the sheltering protection of the republic. He stopped for a short 
time in Henry county. Iowa, where he worked on a farm for five dollars a 
month and board, but he soon removed to Mahaska county, where he spent 
two or three years. In 1862, having in the meantime selected a life com- 
panion, he brought his bride to Story county and took up his home on eighty 
acres of land in Palestine township, where he began farming on his own 
account. He worked industriously and with good judgment and as he pros- 
pered from year to year he purchased more land until at one time he was 
the owner of five hundred acres in Story county. About 1902 he retired 
from active labor and removed to Huxley, where he is now living in the 
enjoyment of comfort and ease. He has divided his land among his children 
but is sure of a liberal income during the remainder of his life, being also a 
stockholder in the Fanners Savings bank. 

On the 17th of ]May, 1862, at Oskaloosa, Iowa, Mr. Kalsem was united 
in marriage to Miss Martha Cleveland, a native of Norway, a daughter of 
Ole and Martha Knutzen, and of this union nine children were born, five of 
whom are now living, namely : Severt J., a farmer of Palestine township ; 
Ole, also a farmer of Palestine township ; Martha, the wife of Ole B. Olson, 
of the same township; Mary A., now Mrs. Knute Nelson, of Polk county; 
and John F., who is living at home. 

Mr. Kalsem is essentially a self-made man, having acquired a fortune 
almost entirely through his own efforts. His total cash capital upon arriving 
in America was ten dollars, and although he was among strangers and in a 
strange land, he bravely set to work to win a responsible position among his 
fellowmen. This he accomplished and no name is more highly respected in 
Huxley and vicinity than that of John \^ Kalsem. He has been for many 
years an active worker in the republican party and has served most accept- 
ably as township trustee and member of the school board. He and his estim- 
able wife are connected with the Lutheran church and are earnest workers in 
its behalf. 



AMOS C. HANSON. 



Amos C. Hanson, one of the well known business men of McCalls- 
burg, who has been a resident of Story county for over thirty years, was 
born in La Salle county. Illinois, on the 3d of September, 1870. his par- 
ents being Peter C. and Martha (Anderson) Hanson. The father was 
born in Norway on the 9th of September, 1844, but at the age of eighteen 
years he decided that the United States offered better advantages to 
young men of limited means and he emigrated. He went to Chicago in 
186 1, remaining there but a short time, however, as he was engaged by 
the government to build barracks for two years. At the end of that period 



368 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

he returned to Chicago and continued to reside there until 1877 and in 
the fall of that year he came to Story county, Iowa, and engaged in farm- 
ing. He followed this for nine years and in 1886 he removed to Washing- 
ton territory, but at the end of one and one-half years residence in the 
latter place once more located in Story county and resumed farming. In 
1896 he emliarked in the grain and lumber business in McCallsburg, in 
which line he continued up to the time of his death in July, 1909. His 
wife was a native of La Salle county, Illinois, and a daughter of Erner 
Anderson, who was a native of Norway and emigrated to New York state 
when a young man. After living there for a time he went to Chicago, 
Illinois, making the journey on foot, and from Chicago he went to La Salle 
county, Illinois, where he entered a tract of government land, upon which 
he was living at the time of his death in 1900, at the age of eighty-one 
years. He married Miss Margaret Gunderson, also a native of Norway, 
and they became the parents of ten children, Mrs. Hanson being the sec- 
ond in order of birth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Hanson were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Amos C. ; Milton C. ; David, deceased; Carrie, deceased; Carrie, 
who married Howard Billings; David; Minnie; and Frank. The father 
held membership in the Masonic fraternity and voted the republican ticket. 
He was a very public-spirited man and was held in high esteem in the 
community where he lived, being elected to many of the minor offices in 
Warren township and during his residence in McCallsburg being a mem- 
ber of the city council. He was a most capable and successful business 
man and succeeded in acquiring five hundred and twenty acres of land, 
as well as other property, at the time of his death. 

Amos C. Hanson spent his early years in the unvaried routine of study, 
work and play, and only at rare intervals did anything occur of sufficient 
interest to relieve the monotony. When he had completed the course in 
the district schools of Story county he matriculated at Ellsworth Col- 
lege, Iowa Falls, Iowa, where he pursued a more advanced course, thus 
obtaining a better education than is acquired by the average young man 
living in the country. On reaching his majority he followed farming for 
one year but on the 2d of January, 1892, he went to McCallsburg to work 
for his father, who was at that time engaged in the grain and lumber 
business. At the end of four years he was admitted to partnership, the 
firm thereafter being P. C. Hanson & Son, and upon the death of his 
father three years later he became senior member of the company, the 
business continuing under the same name, however. 

Mr. Hanson establi.'jhed a home for himself by his marriage to Miss 
Louisa Lura, a daughter of K. O. Lura. of Hardin county. Iowa, and 
they have become the parents of the following children : Mabel, Clarence, 
Peter Lloyd, Beatrice M. and Albert Lawrence. 

Mr. Hanson's fraternal relations are confined to membership in the 
Modern Woodmen of America and he is at present acting as clerk of the 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 369 

IMcCallsburg Camp, Xo. 2999. Ever since he was granted the riglit of 
suffrage ^h. Hanson has cast his ballot for the republican party, tie 
has always taken an actiye interest in local politics, having been a mem- 
ber of the JMcCallsburg council from the time the town was incorporated 
.in 1902 until 1908, and he is now serving on the school board. 



DAVID HANSON. 



David Hanson, the junior member of the firm of P. C. Hanson & Son, 
was born in Warren township. Story county, Iowa, on the 24th of March, 
1885, being a son of Peter C. and }»Iartha (Anderson) Hanson, the father 
a native of Norway and the mother of Illinois. He has spent his entire 
life in the county of his nativity, and after completing the work in the 
district schools of Warren township, he entered the high school at JMc- 
Callsburg, Iowa. When he left school he worked for his father until 
the latter's death in July, 1909, when he became the junior member of the 
firm, of which his brother Amos C. is the head but which continues under 
the original name of P. C. Hanson & Son. 

Mr. Hanson is a member of the jNIodern Woodmen of America, his 
local affiliation being with McCallsburg Camp, No. 2999. Ever since he 
attained his majority he has voted for the candidates of the republican 
party and although he has never taken an active interest in local politics 
he is always at the polls on election day. He is one of the highly esteemed 
young business men of AlcCallsburg, wdiere the name of Hanson is well 
known and has always been accorded the greatest respect. 



SEVERT J. KALSEM. 



The second generation of the Kalsem family in Story county is ably 
represented by Severt J. Kalsem, whose name is synonymous with integrity 
and honor. He lives upon a well improved farm in Palestine township, 
whose appearance indicates that its owner is wide-awake and fully capable 
of keeping abreast of the times. He was born in the school district in which 
he now lives, October 4, 1866, a son of John Y. Kalsem, a record of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. 

Severt J. Kalsem was reared at home and acquired his preliminary edu- 
cation in the district schools, later attending the Iowa State Business College 
at Des Moines, where he gained a practical knowledge that has been of 
special benefit to him as a man of affairs. He continued with his father 
and assisted in cultivating the farm until twenty-three years of age, when 
he began farming on his own account, locating upon land which he had ])re- 



370 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

viously purchased from his father. He now owns one hundred and ninety 
acres on section 22, Palestine township, and has one of tlie desirable places 
of the county, having made many improvements adding greatly to its original 
value. He is a stockholder of the Farmers Savings bank and also of the 
Farmers Elevator company and the Farmers Cooperative Creamery Com- . 
pany, all of Huxley, and as a business man and citizen stands very high in 
the estimation of the people. 

On the 14th of February, 1895, Mr. Kalsem was united in marriage to 
Miss Carrie R. Nelson, a daughter of Andrew Nelson, a wealthy farmer of 
Polk county. Four children blessed this union : Mabel \'.. Martha C. Joseph 
N. and Agnes M. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kalsem are active members of the Lutheran church, in which 
he serves most creditably as trustee. Politically he gives his su])port to the 
republican ])arty and is a stanch advocate of its i)rinci])les. In 1910 he was a 
candidate for the office of county supervisor but failed at that time of nomi- 
nation. He has been identified with this section ever since his earliest recol- 
lection anil on account of his many excellencies of character is greatly 
esteemed by a large circle of friends and ac(|uaintances in his part of the 
countv. 



GEORGE W. KELLEY. 

On the pages of pioneer history of Story county appears the name of 
George W. Kelley. who arrived here when Nevada contained but one house 
and when the greater part of the county was still an unclaimed and un- 
settled region. He was among those who secured the wild land for the 
purpose of civilization and converted the prairie into productive fields. 
He relates many interesting incidents of the early days and is authority 
upon many events which find a place in history. 

He was born in \ igo county, Indiana, on the 15th of January, 1835, 
his parents being Ainos and Elizabeth (Jackson) Kelley. natives of Ken- 
tucky and North Carolina respectively. They were married in the former 
state and became pioneer settlers of Indiana, where the father died when 
his son George was but three years of age. The mother spent her last 
days in Story county in the home of her son George and there passed away 
in 1884. She ever remained true to the memory of her husband, never 
marrying again. Mr. Kelley had devoted his life to farming and was a 
very bu.sy and active man imtil death terminated his labors. 

(jeorge W. Kelley was the ninth in a family of seven sons and three 
daughters: Sallie Ann, now the deceased wife of George P. Yocum; Ma- 
linda, the deceased wife of William Stafford ; Amos, who has also passed 
away; Rebecca, the deceased wife of Isaac Jones; Samuel, who .served for 
three years in the Tenth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry and then reenlisted, after 




(iEDIJCK W. KKLI.KV 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 373 

whicli he was granted a furlough and started home but died while on his 
way to Davenport, Iowa; William, deceased; John, who enlisted from 
Story county and served for a year and a half in the Civil war, his death 
occurring since his discharge, which was occasioned by disability; Abram, 
of Bloomington, Illinois ; George W. ; and Hezekiah, who died in Kansas. 
Of the above sons William and John were twins. 

George W. Kelley with his mother and younger brother, Hezekiah, 
went to McLean county, Illinois, in the fall of 1850 and in the fall of 1853 
they came to Story county, Iowa. It was on the 22d of September of that 
year that George \V. Kelley started from Illinois, accompanied by his 
mother and brother and by Samuel and Isaac Jones and their families, 
for Iowa. The Kelleys had two covered wagons drawn by horses. They 
crossed the Mississippi at Muscatine, traveled from there to Iowa City 
and thence to Marietta, which at that time was the county seat of Marshall 
county. Later they proceeded to Story county, which was then largely a 
wild, unsettled and undeveloped region. There was only one house upon 
the present site of Nevada and it is still standing — one of the old land- 
marks of the early days — occupied by T. E. Alderman. The Kelley family 
traveled on to what is now the eastern part of Boone county, where they 
arrived in October, remaining there until the 12th of December, at which 
time George W. Kelley took up his abode on section i, Palestine town- 
ship. Story county. At that time there resided in Palestine township R. 
Balldock. Washington Thomas. George Thomas, Robert and William 
Hawk and E. McKinzie. There was not a house between Grove and 
Madrid, a distance of fifteen miles. Mr. Kelley entered one hundred and 
forty acres of land from the government. In the fall of 1852 he had en- 
tered eighty acres in Marshall county but never resided thereon. He has 
made his home continuously in Story county since 1853 and after locating 
in Palestine township he at once began the task of developing and improv- 
ing his land. In the fall of 1854 it became necessary for him to go to mill, 
and the nearest place where he could get grist ground was at Oskaloosa, 
about seventy-five miles away. He had to journey with an ox team and 
it took a week to make the round trip. Because of this he had to carrv 
provisions with him and camp on the prairie at night. The same fall he 
took a load of dressed pork to Des Moines and received a dollar and a half 
per hundred weight therefor. On the return trip he brought home a bar- 
rel of salt, for which he paid twelve dollars and ten cents. At that time 
there was only one dry-goods store and two grocery stores in Des Moines 
and the state capital was at Iowa City. Deer and elk were seen in Story 
county in large numbers and wild turkeys were very plentiful, so that it 
was not difficult to supply the pioneer table with meat. The first school- 
house in Palestine township was built on section i in the spring of 1854, 
was made of rounrl logs and had a dirt floor. .A. young man Ijy the name 
of G. Brown was the first teacher. Mr. Kelley aided in building the school- 
house and has always been a friend of education and progress. He also 
Vol. 11— 19 



374 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

assisted in building tlie first church in Palestine township about 1856. it 
being a house of worship for the United Brethren congregation, Rev. 
Marks acting as the first pastor. The church was started with the idea of 
making it a United Brethren school but sufficient aid was not received and 
they converted the building into a church, Mr. Kclley giving twenty-five 
dollars and his labor toward the work. In 1854 he also helped to lay out 
the first road from Palestine township to Nevada. It was practically only 
a trail made by sticking poles in the ground to guide the wagons over the 
prairie through the tall grasses. 

As the years passed on Mr. Kelley devoted his time and energies closely 
to llie development of the farm, consisting of one hundretl and twenty 
acres, which he converted into a rich and productive property, annually 
gathering good harvests therefrom. He made his home upon that place 
until Novemljcr 27, 1906, when he retired, taking up his abode at his 
present residence at No. 1302 Kellogg avenue in Ames. He sold the farm 
aliout two years ago and since removing to this cit)' has lived retired, en- 
joying well earned rest, which is the merited reward of his labor. 

Mr. Kelley was living in this county at the time of the Civil war and 
enlisted in August, 1861, as a member of Company A. Tenth Iowa X'olun- 
leer Infantry, under Captain McCauley. The command was assigned to 
the Army of the West and after serving for three and a half years he was 
honorably discharged in the fall of 1864. He was in the hospital at Camp 
Dennison, Ohio, for two months, yet took ])art in all of the engagements 
with liis regiment, including the battles of Island No. 10. luka. Corinth. 
Jackson, Cliami)ion's Hill, the siege of \'icksburg. Lookout Mountain, the 
Atlanta camijaign and was also with Sherman on the march to the sea and 
on the campaign through the Carolinas. lie was mustered out at Kingston. 
Georgia, and returne<l home with a most creditable military record, for he 
had manifested unfaltering loyalty on the field of battle, lie not only hatl 
narrow escapes while upon the firing line but again seemed to escape with 
his life in almost miraculous manner during the cyclone of September. 
1882, for on that occasion his buildings, stock and crops were all destroyed, 
leaving him nothing save the land. Undiscouraged by this condition, how- 
ever, he resolutely set to work to retrieve his losses and in the course of 
years gained a substantial competence, now enabling him to live retired. 

On the 22d of December. 1870. Mr. Kclley was united in marriage to 
Miss Henrietta Selby, who was born in La Grange county. Indiana, Sep- 
tember 5, 1841. and in 1868 came to Iowa with her parents, Ralph and 
Catharine Selby, who were natives of Ohio and spent their last days near 
Des Moines. Their family numbered four children and unto Mr. and Mr<. 
Kelley four children have been born, namely: Annetta, the wife of I-'rank 
Smith, of Dayton, Iowa ; Clinton, who died at the age of twenty-one year< : 
Harry, living in .'\mes ; and Frank, of Boone county, Iowa. 

Mr. Kelley is a member of the (irand .\rmy of the Re])ublic and tlui 
keeps in close touch with his old army comrades. He has always been 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 375 

loyal and progressive in citizenship, displaying no greater faithfulness to 
his country and its welfare in times of war than he does in days of peace. 
He has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey and his 
has been an honorable and creditable record, his life history showing what 
may be accomi)lished by determined purpose, close application and unfal- 
tering energy. He started out empty-handed and is today the possessor of 
a cohifortable competence, supplying him with all of the necessities and 
manv of the comforts of life. 



FRANK FREDERICK MENZEL. 

Among the well known and prosperous farmers of Warren township, 
Story county, is Frank Frederick Menzel, who was born in Stephenson 
county, Illinois, in 1863, and is a son of Carl and Amelia (Richter) Men- 
zel. The father was born in Prussia, Germany, on the 4th of July, 1832, 
a son of Frederick and Teresa Menzel, both natives of Prussia, where 
they spent their entire lives. Frederick Menzel was a farmer and was 
highly respected in the community where he lived. Of the six children 
in his family his son Carl was the only one to come to the United States. 
Mrs. Amelia Menzel was a daughter of John Fred and Rosa Richter, the 
fourth child in a family of eleven. Her parents spent their entire lives 
in the fatherland. 

Carl Menzel, our subject's father, came to America in i860, landing 
in New York on the Sth of July and going to Freeport, Illinois, where he 
remained until 1871, when he migrated to Warren township. Story county, 
Iowa, and has since continued to make this his home. He was actively 
engaged in farming until igoo, at which time he retired and removed 
to McCallsburg, where he now resides. He was successful in his under- 
takings and is now able to live comfortably on the revenue derived from 
his various properties. He owns his residence in McCallsburg and is a 
stockholder in the McCallsburg State bank. Five children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Menzel, as follows: Albertina M., the wife of J. A. M. 
Irvine; Charles H., a resident of Warren township; Frank F., our subject; 
Amelia, who married A. L. Dayton; and Emma, the wife of Lars H. 
Bakka. The mother is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Ever since his naturalization the father has identified himself with the 
republican party. Both of these worthy people are highly respected and 
esteemed in their locality, where they have many friends. 

Frank F. Menzel was only eight years of age when his parents located 
in Warren township. He started to school in Illinois but the greater por- 
tion of his education was acquired in the district schools of Story county. 
He remained under the paternal roof until he had reached the age of 
twenty-two years, when he felt he should become independent of his 



376 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

father's supervision and start out in life for himself. He engaged in 
farming as a renter for about six years, during that time acquiring suf- 
ficient capital to enable him to purchase land, which he did in 1891. He 
settled on his farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 35, Warren 
township, where he continues to reside, his property being one of the 
best in the vicinity. In addition to his country real estate Mr. Menzel 
owns a business block in McCallsburg, is a stockholder in the Farmers 
bank of that town and a director of the Farmers Elevator Company of 
McCallsburg. 

Mr. Menzel was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Johnson, who was 
born in Denmark, in 1867, coming to the United States with her parents 
in 1868. Six children have been born of this union: Pearl, Ray, Grace, 
Ruth, Lela and Fred, all of whom are living at home. The wife and 
mother passed away in 1902 at the age of thirty-tivc years. She was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Ever since he has been granted the full rights of citizensliip Mr. Men- 
zel has cast his ballot with the republican party, and his party fealty has 
been rewarded by his election to the office of township trustee and presi- 
dency of the local school board. He served in the latter capacity for 
twelve years, lie is a man of exceptionally high [)rinciples, broad in his 
views, charitable in his criticisms and just in his opinions. He has been 
quite successful in Iiis pursuits, acquiring a comfortable competency, but 
it is the fruit of honest endeavor and close application. His every deed has 
been above suspicion and as a result he is highly esteemed and honored 
in the community where the greater part of his life has been passed. 



SQUIRE McCOXXELL. 

Men of industrious habits and of fidelity to principle are worthy of the 
sincere respect of their associates. Their life from day to day is a valuable 
incentive to others and it would be imjiossible to estimate the good that is 
done in the world tiirougli the simple force of example. Squire McConnell, 
whose name introduces this sketch, should be classed with those here indi- 
cated. Born in Indian Creek township, this county, Xovember 17, 185S, he 
is a son of Alexander and Caroline (Raimer) McConnell, the former of 
whom was a native of Hancock county, Ohio, and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
The parents were married in Hancock county, where the mother was livini,' 
at that time with her parents. About 1855 they came to Story county, Mr 
McConnell entering government land in Indian Creek township. He was 
one of the jnoneer settlers of the township and continued upon his fann until 
late in life, when he removed to Maxwell, being called away in i8g6, at the 
age of sixty-eight years. He was quite successful in his vocation, becoming 
the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he made 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 377 

many improvements. Politically he gave his support to the democratic party 
and fraternally he was connected with the Masonic order. Mrs. McConnell 
was a stanch believer in the authority and inspiration of the Bible and a 
woman of many beautiful traits of character. She departed this life in 
April, 1882. 

Squire McConnell in his early years attended school in a pioneer log 
schoolhouse and there acquired the rudiments of an education which has 
been greatly broadened by reading, observation and experience. At the 
age of twenty-one years he began cultivating rented land on his own account 
and kept bachelor's hall until his marriage, when he brought his wife to the 
farm which has since been their home. He is the owner of one hundred and 
twenty acres of good land on section 18, Collins township, and, being thrifty 
and energetic, he has acquired a handsome competence and is now well forti- 
fied against material want. 

On the 4th of August, 1884, Mr. McConnell was united in marriage to 
Miss Rebecca J. John, a daughter of William Tipton John and a grand- 
daughter of Bowen W. John, one of the early settlers of Story county, 
mention of whom is made in the sketch of John W. John. To Mr. and Mrs. 
McConnell two children have been born : Mabel Belle, deceased ; and Hester 
A. 

Mr. McConnell has been a useful citizen, performing his duties to the 
best of his ability, and he is ever ready to extend a helping hand to a deserv- 
ing fellowman. He plainly is entitled to an honorable place among the sub- 
stantial citizens of Story county. Since arriving at man's estate he has been 
affiliated with the democratic party but he has never sought public office, pre- 
fering to devote his attention to his private affairs. Mrs. McConnell has 
been a most valued assistant to her husband and is an earnest meinber of 
the Presbyterian church. 



GEORGE W. BALDWIN. 

Reared under highly favorable conditions for a successful business career 
and with practical experience, without which the best training could scarcely 
avail, George W. Baldwin is now recognized as one of the successful mer- 
chants of Story county. Energy and firm purpose have constituted the salient 
elements in his career. He was born in Iowa Center, Story county, April 22, 
1874, a son of Frank M. and Mary (Maxwell) Baldwin. The father, who 
was one of the best known business men in central Iowa, was born in Onon- 
daga county. New York, November 10, 1829, a son of Wallace and Mary 
(Burnett) Baldwin, natives respectively of Connecticut and Vermont. The 
grandfather was a well known salt manufacturer. Frank M. Baldwin was 
reared in his native state and received his education in the public schools. In 
1849 lie came west to Chicago, arriving in that city about the same time that 



378 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

Marshall Field, Alexander Revell and others whose names have since become 
famous in the business world came. Mr. Baldwin, however, remained in Chi- 
cago only about three years, during which time he was clerk in a dry-goods 
store. He then came to Story county, Iowa, and entered government land in 
Indian Creek township, but after one season returned to Cook county, Illi- 
nois and engaged in the mercantile business at a place then known as Dundee 
Station. In 1855 he returned to Story county and was associated for nine 
years in business with Young Brothers. In 1864 he became senior member 
of the mercantile firm of Baldwin & Maxwell, whose business gradually in- 
creased until its trade extended throughout a large portion of central Iowa. 
The firm did a wholesale business, supplying many smaller tradesmen, and 
the name of Baldwin & Maxwell became a synonym for fair dealing wher- 
ever the name was known. At the time the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway was built through Story county the firm established a branch house 
at Maxwell, of which Mr. Ma.xwell assumed charge, while the senior member 
continued at Iowa Center. 

Frank M. Baldwin was married in 1859 to Miss Mary Maxwell, a sister 
of !iis business partner, and by this union five children were born: Millie 
A., now deceased; Jennie. Charles G., George \\'., and Jessie. The father is 
still living at Alaxweil anil is one of the most capable business men in Iowa. 

George VV. Baldwin was reared at Iowa Center and educated in the jniblic 
schools until he arrived at the age of twelve years, when the exigency of 
business required that he should assist in his father's store. Having once 
started in the mercantile line he has never found time to continue his school 
education, but he has greatly broadened his knowledge by reading, observa- 
tion and contact with the world. He continued at Iowa Center until hi- 
father removed to Maxwell in 1892 and then entered the Maxwell store, 
with which he was connected until it was disposed of in 1898. .After work- 
ing for others for a short time he visited California and upon returning to 
Maxwell was employed for one year by R. J. Belt. In 1903 he removed to 
Collins and for a year was connected with the general mercantile establish- 
ment of Fred Graef. Retiring from this position he went to Los Animos, 
Colorado, but his wife was dissatisfied with their surroundings, and, after 
receiving several letters from Mr. Graef, asking him to return, Mr. Baldwin 
again came to Collins and assisted Mr. Graef until the latter sold the busi- 
ness to W. A. Severs, of the Colfax (Iowa) Mercantile Company. Mr. Bald- 
win was placed in charge of the store and closed out most of the stock, tin 
remainder being removed to Colfax. Having purchased fixtures, Mr. Bald- 
win then organizeil the firm of G. W. Baldwin & Company with Clark Cham- 
bers as partner, and the stock of Mr. Severs being removed from the build- 
ing January i, 1907, on January 5th, four days later, the new firm opened 
for business, selling forty-three dollars worth of goods the first day. I-'rom 
this time onward the business has steadily increased, and the firm of G. 
W. Baldwin & Company is now one of the substantial and flourishing con- 
cerns of this section. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 379 

On the 20th of July. 1904, Mr. Baldwin was united in marriage to Miss 
Olga E. Serbein. of Maxwell, and one child, John William, born January 11, 
1909, has blessed this union. Mr. Baldwin is a valued member of Fervent 
Lodge, Xo. 513, A. F. & A. M.. of Collins ; Social Lodge, No. 436, L O. O. F., 
and Jewell Encampment, Xo. 143, both of Maxwell. Politically, he is iden- 
tified with the republican party and is a firm believer in its ability to con- 
duct the affairs of the nation through any troubles that may arise. He 
takes the interest of a patriotic citizen in public aft'airs and is now serving 
his second term as member of the town council. He is thoroughly prac- 
tical and systematic in anything he undertakes and has fairly earned the 
success which is the result of patient and wisely applied labor. 



\V. J. HARTUNG. 



W. J. Hartung. proprietor of the Oak Park Farm, is too well known 
among farmers and stockmen not only of Story county but of this section of 
the state for it to be necessary to make any explanation as to why his name 
should appear in the annals of Indian Creek township. He is of German 
descent, as his name would imply, his parents emigrating to the United 
States when they were quite young and settling in Polk county, Iowa, where 
they were later married. William and Mary (Koppf) Hartung were living 
on a farm in Polk county when their son, W. J. Hartung, was born on the 
4th of June, 1874. The father came to this country in company with his 
brother August, with whom he fanned in partnership as a renter for a time, 
but being a thrifty man and possessing unusual executive ability he was soon 
able to purchase the farm which he had been renting and continued to add 
to his holdings until he possessed three hundred and forty acres. In 1892 he 
retired and moved to Colfax, being known as one of the wealthy farmers of 
that vicinity, but in 1899 he and Airs. Hartung located in Des Moines, where 
they have ever since resided. They attend the Methodist Protestant church, 
to which the mother belongs. 

W. J. Hartung remained a member of his father's household until he was 
eighteen years of age and up to that time his life had been spent very sim- 
ilarly to that of other young people. He obtained his education in the com- 
mon schools and when not occupied with his text-books assisted his father 
upon the farm, so that when he had attained manhood he was quite a com- 
petent young farmer and stockman. In 1892 he decided that he was old 
enough to assume the heavier responsibilities of life and began farming for 
himself, renting for this purpose a portion of his father's land. He con- 
tinued to follow this course for eight years and then in 1901 he came to 
Story county and bought his present home farm of ninety-two acres located 
on section 15, Indian Creek township, where he has ever since resided. 



380 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

In 1897 he began making a specialty of the breeding and raising of thor- 
ough bred Diiroc Jersey hogs. He has made a particularly careful study of 
breeds and is one of the best, if not the best, informed man along this line 
in this section of the state. He has bred some of the best stock in this part 
of the country, at the same time raising the standard among stockmen gen- 
erally, many of the heavy breeders obtaining their strain from him. He has 
probably done more than any other stockman in his immediate vicinity to 
improve the breed of hogs, and his reputation in this line has spread as he 
ships stockmen all over the country. He has been exhibiting his stock for 
years past at the county fairs and for three years has been an exhibitor at 
the state fair and has never yet failed to win a ribbon. 

Mr. ilartung was united in marriage to Miss Eva L. Osborne, on the 
lOlh of -March. 1897. She is a daughter of the late John Oslxirne and Mrs. 
Sarah Osborne, of Maxwell, both of whom were among the ])ioneers of 
Story county. 

In his political views Mr. Hartung has always been guided by the policy 
of the republican party for whose candidates he casts his ballot. Although 
he has never sought political favor he has, without any solicitation on his 
part, been twice elected to the office of township assessor and is the present 
incumbent of that office. He is well known and highly esteemed throughout 
the community and is ranked as one of the very successful and substantial 
farmers and stockmen in .'^tory county. 



ER.XESl" KDW.VKD WlllTK. M. D. 

Through conscientious application to his profession and by a personal 
interest in the advancement of the town which he adopted as his home 
seven years ago, Dr. Ernest Edward White has attained an honored place 
in the estimation of the people of Huxley, Iowa, and the surrounding re- 
gion. He was born in Saunders county, Nebraska, September 12. 1872, a 
son of Edward T. and Rose (Stocking) White, the former a native of 
Wahoo, Nebraska, and the latter of Hope, Indiana. They were married in 
Nebraska, to which state Mrs. White had previously moved with her 
parents. Her father was the Hon. Moses Stocking, a member of the Ne- 
braska state legislature and one of the first men to introduce blooded cattle 
into Saunders county. He was county commissioner, a life member of the 
state board of agriculture, a director of the State Horticultural Society, 
president of the Wool and Sheep Growers Association, and vice president 
of the Fine Stock Breeders Association, being also a charter member of 
the State Historical Society and a member of the committee on awards on 
wool at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876. He also re- 
ceived an award from this exposition on wotil raised from his own farm. 
He was a fluent writer and a frequent contributor to periodical literature. 



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DR. E. E. WHITE 



HISTORY Ot" STORY COUXTY 383 

Politically he gave his support to the republican party and although not a 
seeker for office, he came very nearly being nominated for g"overnor by 
his party at the state convention held in Lincoln September 23, 1875. He 
was an interesting and forciljle public speaker and for many years a leader 
in the state. In the early days of the gold excitement in Colorado he vis- 
ited the Rocky ^lountains and while waiting for spring to appear at the 
mouth of Cherry creek assisted in founding the city of Denver. Mr. 
Stocking was indeed a true type of the frontiersmen who paved the way 
for the settlement of the western country. Our subject's paternal grand- 
father, Thomas White, was also a man of unusual sagacity. He was a 
partner of John Deere in the manufacture of plows but severed his con- 
nection with Mr. Deere and removed to ^luscatine, Iowa. 

Edward T. White, the father of our subject, enlisted at Aluscatine in 
1862 in Company G, Thirty-fifth Iowa \'olunteers, and was one of the 
valiant soldiers of the Civil war. He was severely wounded at the battle 
of jMiddleton. Tennessee, and in January, 1864, was taken prisoner by the 
Confederates and confined in the Cahaba (Ala.) and Andersonville mili- 
tary prisons. He received his honorable discharge from service August 19, 
1865, and went to Saunders county, Nebraska, where he taught school for 
several years. .Subsequently he located upon government land in Butler 
county, Nebraska, being one of the old settlers in that section. In 1880 
he removed to Portland, Oregon, where he has since resided. His wife 
died in Portland in 1908. 

Ernest Edward White acquired his preliminary education in the com- 
mon schools of Nebraska and also attended' the Plainview Normal school 
at Plainview, Nebraska, and Elliott's Commercial College of Burlington, 
Iowa. After leaving school he accepted a position in a bank at Plainview, 
serving for four years when he took up the study of medicine. He began 
under Dr. F. H. Nye, of Plainview, and in 1893 entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa. He transferred his allegiance 
in the fall of 1894 to Drake University, graduating from the medical de- 
partment of that institution in 1896 with the degree of M. D. Immediately 
after leaving college he began practice at Alarysville, Marion county, Iowa, 
where he continued for three years, and then in 1899 removed to Pleasant 
Plain, Jefferson county, Iowa, where he gained a liberal patronage. In 
1904 he located at Huxley and has since built up a practice which extends 
over a wide territory in this part of the state. Professionally he is identi- 
fied with the Story County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical So- 
ciety and the American Medical Association. He is in high favor with his 
brother practitioners as well as with all who have had reason to make use 
of his professional services. 

On the 14th of October, 1896, Dr. White was united in marriage at 
Plainview, Nebraska, to Miss Minnie Stafford, and one child, Gertrude S., 
has blessed this union. Politically the Doctor is allied with the republican 
party and although he has not sought [jublic office, he has served most ac- 



384 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

ceptably as a member of the school board, being one of the active factors 
in the erection of the new school building. In every relation of life he has 
attempted to perform his duty, and as he is a man of genial manner and 
generous disposition, he has gained many friends who have the most im- 
plicit confidence in his integrity and ability. 



GEORGE CLINTON WHITE. 

George C. White, recently established in the practice of law at Nevada, 
Iowa, is a native of Illinois, born in McLean county, December 6, 1865. He 
comes of English lineage on the paternal side, the progenitors of the family 
in America having arrived on the western shores of the Atlantic during the 
colonial jjcriod. His great grandfather, Nathaniel White, served in the Revo- 
lutionary war from New York. The father of our subject, William H. 
White, was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, in 1835 and rcniiivcd with 
his parents to Illinois in 1850. He was one of the successful farmers of 
that state, where he died in 1905, at the age of seventy years. Politically 
he gave his support to the republican party. The mother of our subject, 
who was Martha Ann Donovan before her marriage, was born in Springfield, 
Ohio, in 1840, and survived her husband live years, passing away in July, 
1910. She removed with her parents to Washington county, Iowa, in 1849. 
Our subject has one sister, Anna, who was born in McLean county, Illinois, 
in 18C9, and is now the wife of E. W. Sutherland, a lawyer of lUoomington, 
Illinois. 

George C. White was reared under the favoring influences of a peace- 
able home, and as he grew up he assisted his father to the extent of his 
strength and ability in the work of the fields. He received his preliminary 
education in the district schools, advancing sufficiently to secure a certificate 
as a school teacher. He taught for two years and for a time was a student 
at the nomial school at Normal, Illinois, but agricultural pursuits held out 
greater inducements than the schoolroom, and accordingly, in 1893. he began 
farming on land of his own in Story county, continuing for twelve years. 
In 1905 he took charge of the l""armers Elevator at Nevada, which he con- 
ducted most successfully for one year. Having decided to ado])! a profes- 
sional career, he matriculated at Drake University in 1907 and was gradu- 
ated from the law department with a degree of LL.B. in 1909. Desiring to 
proceed still further with his studies, he entered the law department of Yale 
University and was graduated from that celebrated institution with a degree 
of LL.M., in 1910. Soon after leaving the university he began practice 
in Nevada and as he has many friends in Story county and his ability in 
practical lines of business has been thoroughly demonstrated, there is little 
doubt as to his success in his chosen profession. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 385 

On the i8th of June, 1890, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida ]\Iay Chalfant, who was born in McLean coimty, Illinois, May 2, 1865. 
She is the daughter of William and Margaret (Duff) Chalfant, the father 
being a well known farmer of the county. Mr. White is a member of the 
Story County Bar Association, and also of Lodge Xo. 99, A. F. & A. M., 
the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. Ever since 
arriving at manhod he has given his support to the republican party, believ- 
ing that its principles are best adapted to promote the interests of the coun- 
try. He has been an earnest supporter of the party in Story county and 
served in the thirty-second and thirty-third general assemblies of Iowa, 
showing an ability which greatly pleased his constituents. He is now fairly 
started on his professional career, and it requires no prophet to foretell that 
his efforts will be exercised in behalf of the political, intellectual and moral 
advancement of the region with which he has for many years been intimately 
identified. 



STEPHEN L. LOUGHRAN. 

Stephen L. Loughran is one of the well known business men of Ames, 
being proprietor of the Loughran Machine company, and an old resident of 
Story county. He was born in Des Moines, Iowa, on the 27th of August, 
1866, a son of Edmund and Sarah A. (Bryer) Loughran, also residents of 
Ames. The father was born in Armagh, County Armagh, Ireland, on the 
30th of June, 1832, and was educated in the schools of Armagh, where he 
lived until he had reached his fifteenth year, when he emigrated to the 
L^nited States. Upon his arrival here he went to Hampshire county, West 
Mrginia, but after remaining there for a few months he removed to Wheel- 
ing, that state, and engaged in the machinery business there until 1855, at 
which time he went to New York city and after a year's residence in the 
metropolis he accepted a position in the employ of Cox, Richardson & Boyn- 
ton, stove and furnace manufacturers, in Westchester county. New York. 
He did not long retain that position but in 1857 started westward. Des 
Moines. Iowa, being his destination, and there he engaged in the manufactur- 
ing business. On the 2d of January, 1864, he responded to the call of the 
nation's chief and enlisted in the First Iowa Battery. The most important 
battle in which he participated was that of Atlanta on the 22d of July, 1864, 
and he was also on the field at Resaca, Georgia. On the 5th of July, 1865, 
he was mustered out at Davenport, Iowa, and returned to Des Moines, where 
he engaged in business until 1874. In the latter year he bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Jasper county, Iowa, upon which he settled, and 
for ten years followed the occupation of farming. At the end of that period 
he came to Ames and bought out the business of Shields & Cook, who handled 
farm implements, continuing in this for eighteen years. In 1902 he with- 
drew from active business and is now living retired in Ames. 



386 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

On the 6tli of February, 1854, Edimiiul Loiigliran was united in marriage 
to Miss Sarah A. Bryer, and they became the parents of nine children, who 
are as follows: John B., a resident of Scott, Kansas; Sarah, who became the 
wife of W. H. Wintersteen and lives in Hartford, South, Dakota ; Edmund 
James, living in Madison county, Iowa; one who died in infancy; Stephen 
L., our subject; Thomas J., residing in Ames; Jennie E.. the wife of F. M. 
Coulter, also living in Ames ; William B.. who died at the age of thirty-six 
years; and Mary B.. who lives in Los Angeles, California. The family 
always attended the services of the United Presbyterian church and the par- 
ents hold membership in the First church of that denomination in Des Moines. 
.Mr. Loughran votes the republican ticket and for a period of four years 
filled the office of justice of peace. He is a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, being locally identified with Ellsworth Post. Xo. 30, of Ames. 
He stands liigli in the regard of the people of the community where he has 
resided for nearly a quarter of a century. 

Stephen L. Loughran acquired his preliminary education in the public 
schools of Des Moines and in 1884 entered the Iowa State College, where he 
remained until 1887, at wliich time he entered into business with his father 
under tlic firm name of the Loughran Machine comjiany. This is the pioneer 
machine business of the county having been in existence for twenty-six years, 
and they now have a branch establishment at Gilbert, Iowa. They handle a 
full and complete line of buggies, wagons and farming im])lonicnts, and also 
deal in coal. 

Mr. Loughran completed arrangements for a home of his own by his 
marriage to Miss Lillie Brown, a daughter of Captain K. W. and Lydia 
(Gates) Brown. .'>ix chiklren have been born of this union, as follows: 
Faith Lillian; Sarah, who died in infancy; Stephen L.. Jr.; Kendric W. ; 
Dorothy Gates, and Edmund. The family attend the Congregational church 
of which the parents and three older children are members. Ever since he 
acquired the full rights of citizenship Mr. Loughran has cast his ballot for 
the candidates of the republican party. He has never taken an active jiart 
in politics, not aspiring to public office, but fulfills his duties as a citizen In- 
being at the polls on election day. 



J. J. COOX. 

J. J. Coon is one of the venerable citizens of Story county, having passed 
the eighty-first milestone on life's journey. He was born in Saratoga 
county. New York, December 23, 1829, and has, therefore, lived through 
the period of America's greatest and most marvelous development. His 
parents were Samuel and Elizabeth (Jaco) Coon, both of whom were na- 
times of Saratoga county. New ^'ork. The mother died in the Empire 
state, but the father passed away in Branch county, Michigan. They were 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 387 

the parents of six children : Rensselaer, Elizabeth, J. J., Sarah Jane, Sam- 
uel and Louisa, but only the subject of this review is now living. 

When six or eight years of age J. J. Coon accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Rochester, New York, and remained a resident of Monroe 
county until twenty-four years of age. He was with his parents until 
about seventeen years of age, when he learned the carpenter's trade and 
started out in business for himself. He then went to Michigan, where he 
spent one year working at his trade, and in 1856 he came to Story county, 
Iowa, casting in his lot with the early settlers who were seeking to re- 
claim a wild and unimproved region for the purposes of civilization. He 
built the first sawmill of the county and the dam for T. R. Hughes on 
Skunk river and afterward worked at the carpenter's trade in the employ 
of others for tw^o years. He then returned to Michigan and was married, 
after which he brought his wife to Story county. They were fourteen days 
in making the trip from Iowa City with three ox teams, for the mud was 
so deep that they could make but little progress. Mr. Coon secured one 
hundred and ninety-six acres of land, a mile and a half northeast of Gil- 
bert, and in exchange gave one hundred and ninety-six days' work at his 
trade to T. R. Hughes, its former owner. The land was on the prairie about 
three miles from any other habitation, so Mr. Hughes felt that he could not 
live there. Mr. Coon, therefore, made the exchange and also paid one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars for his present eighty-acre farm on which he has 
resided continuously since i860. He afterward purchased an additional 
tract of twenty acres and now has a valuable property of one hundred acres 
on section 23, Franklin township. He has lived continuously in this county 
since 1856 and is one of its best known and most honored pioneers. At the 
time of his arrival only one house stood on the present site of Ames. He 
attended the celebration held by the college when they were plastering the 
first of its main buildings. The occasion was made a most festive one for 
all countryside, and Mr. Coon speaks with pleasure of his enjoyment on 
that day. He has seen the building of the towns of College and Ames and 
witnessed all of the changes which have occurred. In the early days Iowa 
City was the nearest railroad point and that was one hundred and forty 
miles away. The common subject of conversation in pioneer times was in- 
troduced with the question, "How did you cross the slough and which way 
is the best to take ?" Nevada was the postoffice and trading point until the 
railroad was built to Ames. Mr. Coon managed to get his mail once a 
week by taking turns with the neighbors in going to the postoffice. There 
were many hardships and trials to be borne in the early period of develop- 
ment in Story county, yet there were many pleasures to be enjoyed, for flie 
pioneers were hospitable people, whose homes were ever open for the re- 
ception of friends and neighbors. 

On the 2ist of January, 1858, Mr. Coon completed his arrangements for 
having a home of his own by his marriage to Miss Mary J. Hinchey, who 
was born in Rochester, New York. June 4, 1838, and when sixteen years 



388 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

of age went to Ypsilanti, Michigan, with her parents, there residing until 
her marriage. She is a daughter of William S. and Lucy G. (Davis) 
Hinchey, who were natives of Saratoga county, New York, and spent their 
last days in Ypsilanti. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Coon were born five children: 
Louise A., who is the widow of Lemuel Walters and resides in South Da- 
kota; Elizabeth, the wife of Alvin Van Campen, of Rochester, Minnesota; 
Mary E., the wife of John Hoover, of Ames; Jennie C, the wife of Seward 
Mabie, also of Ames; and William P., who is living in Franklin township. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Coon yet enjoy good health and are remarkably 
active for people of their age. Mr. Coon seems to possess the vigor of a 
man twenty years younger and still works about the farm although he has 
passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey. His wife, too, is splen- 
didly preserved and does her own housework. They are numbered among 
the worthy pioneer settlers of the county and all who know them are glad 
to call them friend. Mr. Coon is familiar with the pioneer history of this 
part of the state and shared in all of the experiences of frontier life. .After 
locating here he killed three wolves, two fo.xes and one deer within the 
county and on one morning he caught fifty-six prairie chickens in a trap. 
In 1877 he caught a pike that weighed twenty-two pounds in a dip net in 
Skunk river near his home, this being the largest ever caught in this sec- 
tion of the state. It was four and a half feet long and might well be a 
matter of pride to any fisherman. In his farming operations Mr. Coon dis- 
played an enterprising, progressive spirit and as the years have passed by 
he has enjoyed substantial success, supplying him with the comforts of 
life. 



W. P. COON. 



W. P. Coon, the youngest of the five children of J. J. and Mar\- Coon, 
was born in Franklin township. Story county, April 22, 1867. Through- 
out his entire life he has lived in iliis township and since attaining his ma- 
jority has given his attention to general farming. He is today busily en- 
gaged in the cultivation of a tract of land of one hundred and thirty-one 
acres on section 22, whereon he has resided for fifteen years. It is known 
as the Riverside farm and is a fine property, well improved, lie makes a 
specialty of raising seed corn and is also extensively engaged in the raising 
of pigeons, selling about two thousand annually to the Des Moines market. 
He finds tliis a profitable industry aixl takes excellent care of the birds, so 
that good results are obtained. 

In 1892 W. 1'. Coon was married to Miss Nannie Miller, a native of 
this county and a daughter of R. J. Miller. Tiiey had two children : Ernest 
and Theodore. In 1907 Mr. Coon was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. Grace UnderJiill, a native of Michigan and a daughter of 



HISTORY OF STORY COL'XTY 



389 



D. G. Stone. There is one child by this marriage, Edwin, and they also 
have an adopted daughter, Florence. Like his father, Mr. Coon has led a 
busy and useful life and is held in high regard throughout the community 
wliere he has always made his home. 



SEGAR NELSON. 



Iowa is indebted to Denmark for many of her ' progressive and enter- 
prising citizens and among these must be included Segar Nelson of Rich- 
land township, Story county. He was born in Denmark on the 21st of 
December, 1846, and is a son of John and Marie Nelson, who spent their 
entire lives in the land of the Danes. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, of whom four became citizens of the United States, namely : John Nel- 
son, a resident of Iowa; Ole Nelson, Richland township; Hans Nelson, 
Marshall, Iowa; and our subject. 

Mr. Nelson of this review came to America in 1873, feeling after 
twenty-seven years spent in the old country that his opportunities^ for 
acquiring a competence that would enable him to become independent in 
the latter years of his life, would be far greater here than there. He had 
already served eighteen months in the army of his country and had received 
an honorable discharge. On arriving in New Ytork he made his way west- 
ward and located in Marshall county, Iowa. He remained there for seven 
years and in 1880 he bought one hundred and thirteen acres of land on 
section i. Richland township. Story county, where he continues to reside. 
He later acquired one hundred and fifty-two acres on another section of the 
same township but he has disposed of this. His homestead is one of the 
finest farms in this section of the county. It is well stocked with good 
iDreeds of cattle and hogs and contains modern improvements, all of which 
have been added since he purchased it, the property is kept in excellent 
repair and the well tilled fields yield an abundant harvest each year. Every- 
thing about the place suggests thrift, good management and careful super- 
vision of details. Time was when it was thought that any one could be a 
farmer, but it is now universally conceded that it requires just as much 
skill, foresight and executive ability to cultivate the soil so that it will 
yield profitable returns as to manage any business or industry. That he 
was by nature qualified to do the work he chose as his life's vocation Mr. 
Nelson has clearly demonstrated, as the arduous work of his early years 
enabled him to retire from active farming some time ago. 

Mr. Nelson chose for his helpmate Miss Christina Rasmussen and by 
this union were born two children: Mary, deceased; and Rasmus A., who 
lives at home and manages the farm. Ever since his naturalization con- 
ferred upon him the right of sufifrage Mr. Nelson has cast his ballot with 
the republican party. He has always taken an active interest in politics and 



390 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

was for several years road supervisor and is now a member of the school 
board. Both Mr. and Mrs. Nelson hold membership in the Lutheran 
church. He is one of the leading men of his community, his industry and 
progressive spirit making him one of the honored citizens of Richland 
township, whose success and substantial position is regarded as the right- 
ful heritage of his many years of close application and unremitting activity. 



IIIR.AM F. FERGUSON. 

The name of Ferguson is well known in Story county. It has figured 
in tlie agricultural development of this portion of the state for many years 
and Hiram F. Ferguson is recognized as one whom lovers of the Union 
delight to honor. He was a brave soldier when the dissolution of the re- 
public was threatened and during his active life was one of the most pro- 
gressive citizens of the county, but is now living retired at Nevada. 

He was born in Oswego county. New York, April 14. 1843, a son of 
Hiram and Ethelinda D. (Dewey) Ferguson. The father was a native of 
Oswego county. New York. His grandfather was born in Scotland, com- 
ing to this country and settling in New York state, where he was living at 
the time of the Revolutionary war. Hiram Ferguson, who was a mill- 
wright by trade, came to Iowa in 1854 and readily found employment in 
building a sawmill on the Iowa river, near Union in Hardin county. After 
comiileting this work he built a mill for John Miller on Skunk river, in 
Franklin township, and also for Darius Chandler, at Cambridge. He was 
of an inventive turn of mind and originated a water wheel principally for 
up and down sawmills, which was used quite extensively throughout the 
country for many years. After spending two years in Iowa he went east 
for his family and upon returning he lived for a time at Steamboat Rock, 
Hardin county, where he had overhauled a mill and put in one of his 
wheels, lie built a gristmill and in the fall of 1858 moved his family to 
Nevada in order thai the children might have the advantages of school 
during the winter. In the spring of 1839. having entered a tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Howard township, he took up his resi- 
dence there, the mother of the family passing away the following year. 
In 1862 Mr. Ferguson located at demons Grove, Marshall county, and 
he died while living at that place. July 14. 1863, at the age of fifty-five 
years. I le was an active member of the Methodist church and while in 
the east was connected with the Sons of Temperance. Politically he was 
identified with the old line whig party and its succes.sor, the republican 
party. Mrs. I'-erguson was a native of Connecticut and was also a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. She died May 27. \8Cio. at the age of fifty- 
three vears. There were six children in the family. William D., now liv- 
ing retired in Oswego county. New Yurk. is a machinist by tra'de and 




Mi:. AND MRS. H. K. I'Klil H'SOX 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 393 

served with distinction in the Civil war, becoming major of the one Hun- 
dred and Eighty- fourth New York \ohmteer Infantry. EHjah prepared 
for the ministry but died in Tennessee prior to the Civil war. Harvey 
H. passed away in 1863. Jason D. gave up his life for his country in the 
battle of Shiloh, April 7, 1862. being then twenty-two years of age. He 
enlisted for three months in the First Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, while at- 
tending school at Mount \'ernon. and after the expiration of that period 
reenlisted in the Twelfth Iowa Infantry, at Cedar Rapids, and was made 
first lieutenant of Company D. The Grand Army Post at Nevada is named 
in his honor. He was the first man from Story county to be killed in bat- 
tle. Hiram F. is the subject of this review. Delia N. married John 
Stough. a farmer, and after his death became the wife of George Monlux, 
who is also deceased. She is now living at Beaman, Grundy county. 

Hiram F. Ferguson received his education in the public schools up to 
sixteen years of age and after laying his books aside in the spring of 1859 
assisted his father upon the farm for two years. In August, 1861, he en- 
listed at Nevada in Company B. Second Iowa Cavalry, and served in the 
Civil war until September 19, 1865, at which date he was mustered out at 
Selma, Alabama, as sergeant of his company. He took part in many im- 
portant battles, sieges and movements, including the siege of Corinth, dur- 
ing which a charge was made by his regiment, which stands out promi- 
nently in the history of the Army of the West. He was also in the battle 
of Booneville, Mississippi, where Sheridan won his spurs as brigadier gen- 
eral ; the battle of luka and again at Corinth ; Tupelo ; Nashville ; and in 
many skirmishes. His regiment during Hood's advance and retreat was 
for sixty-four days almost continuously under fire. After the war Mr. 
Ferguson engaged in farming on the old homestead and on other places in 
Howard township for many years, finally removing to Story City, where 
he lived retired for seven years. Since 1910 he has made his home at 
Nevada. 

On March 15, 1866, Mr. Ferguson was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha J. Ballard, who was born in Will county, Illinois, December 31, 
1845. and is a daughter of Moses R. and Eliza (Beecher) Ballard. Moses 
Ballard, the American progenitor of the family, was born in England and 
came to the United States when he was about eighteen years of age. He 
served in a Massachusetts regiment of Minute Men througiiout the entire 
Revolutionary war and was in camp at \'alley Forge with \\'ashington. 
His son, Moses R. Ballard, removed from Massachusetts to New York 
state after marrying Eliza Beecher, the second cousin of Henry Ward 
Beecher. He was a blacksmith and worked at his trade until crippled, when 
he took up the study of medicine, beginning practice in Monroe county, 
New York. He moved to Ohio in 1841 and a year later to Will county, 
Illinois, where he practiced his profession and his sons cultivated the farm. 
In 1857 he came to Story county and purchased land in Howard town- 
ship, where he farmed and practiced medicine until his death, which oc- 



394 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

curred in 1878, when he was in his seventy-seventh year. His wile died in 
1880, at the age of seventy-one years. Politically he gave his support to 
the republican party. There were eleven children in the Ballard family : 
Russell W., deceased; Hudson L., now living in Missouri at the age of 
eighty -two years; Amos B., who enlisted from Minnesota as a soldier of 
the Civil war and is now deceased; Devillo P., who served as captain of 
Company A, Twenty-third Iowa Infantry, and is now living in Wisconsin; 
Mary C, who married George Smith and is now deceased ; Samuel A. and 
Volney P., both of whom are deceased; Henry D., who sened in Com- 
pany A, Twenty-third Iowa Infantry, in the Civil war and is now living at 
Lincoln, Nebraska; Sarah E., who married H. H. Boyes, a farmer of 
Homer township; Martha J., now Mrs. Hiram F. Ferguson; and Ruth S., 
who is the wife of O. M. Robbins, a farmer of Kansas. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson: Jason D., now 
living upon a land claim in South Dakota, who married Angie Elder and 
has four children; Addie R., now the wife of E. W. Kimball, a farmer of 
Milford township and the mother of three children; and Mabel C, who 
married D. L. Sowers, also a farmer of Milford township, and is the 
mother of five children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson are valued members of the Methodist church. 
He is a member of Ferguson Post No. 31, G. A. R., of Nevada, and ever 
since he arrived at manhood has voted the republican ticket. He has not 
aspired to political honors but has held a number of township offices, dis- 
charging his duties in such a way as to merit the approval of all concerned. 
In the course of a long and active life he has performed his part in the 
development of the west and in establishing society on the substantial basis 
upon which it exists today. In the evening of his career he enjoys the con- 
fidence of a host of friends and a comfort and repose which he has fully 
earned. 



ALEXANDER HENDERSON. 

As mayor of Story City Alexander Henderson has proved one of the 
most eflficient officials the municipality has ever known. He has attained an 
enviable reputation in this locality, being identified with one of the most 
prosperous concerns in the town. He was born in Hamilton county, Iowa, 
February 6, 1872, a son of Lars Henryson, whose twin brother, Torkel, is 
now living on a farm adjacent to Story City and has reached the venerable 
age of eighty-nine years. Lars Henryson, a native of Norway, was a car- 
penter and farmer by occupation, lie emigrated to .America in 1855 and 
spent ten years in Illinois, removing to a farm near Randall, Hamilton 
county, Iowa, in 18O5. He kei)t a jiostoffice on his fami for over twenty 
years and was one of the leading men of the county, serving as county 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY ,-595 

supervisor and justice of the peace. He was considered a good scholar 
and was a surveyor of estabhshed reputation, often performing work of that 
kind for his neighbors. As a carpenter he assisted in erecting many of the 
early buildings and when living in Illinois was often called upon to make 
coffins for the early settlers. He passed his declining years in the town of 
Randall in honorable retirement, passing away in 1896, at the age of seventy- 
six years. Mr. Henryson was twice married and had eight children by his 
first union, three of whom died in infancy. His second wife wjts Sarah 
Michaelsdatter, who survives her husband and is now living at Randall, 
Iowa. She is the mother of seven children, namely: M. L., of Randall; 
M., superintendent of the electric light and water-works of Story City; A. 
M., at present postmaster at Story City; Alexander, the subject of this 
review; :\Irs. Annie Williams, of Randall; O. J., a successful practicing 
attorney, of Webster City, Iowa; and Mrs. Maggie Sowers, of Story county. 
Ale.xander Henderson received his early education in the district schools 
and later attended the Story City Business College and the Highland Park 
College at Des Moines, Iowa. He was early taught the importance and 
value of labor and received upon the home farm a good training in agri- 
culture and stock-raising, becoming thoroughly acquainted with all the 
details along those lines. In the fall of 1895 he came to Story City and for 
two years served as bookkeeper. In 1897 he entered the furniture and 
embalming business, the name of the firm for the last twelve years being 
Jondall & Henderson. It is the only concern of the kind in Story City and 
has a floor space of four thousand eight hundred square feet, two floors 
being well packed with a carefully selected stock. Mr. Henderson is thor- 
oughly qualified as an embalmer, receiving a diploma in 1899, and was the 
first person in Story City who w-as thoroughly prepared to apply strictly 
modern methods of embalming. He is also president of the Northwestern 
Land Company, which controls large interests in Minnesota, town property 
in Story City, etc. He is a stockholder of the First National bank, 
has also been a director of the Story City Telephone Company and for 
twelve years secretary of the Story City Farmers Creamery company. 

On the 28th of September, 1897, Mr. Henderson was united in marriage 
to Miss Mabel Tendeland, who was born at Marshalltown, Iowa, and reared 
in Story City. Three children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henderson, Lester, Grace and Beatrice. 

Mr. Henderson is an active worker in the republican party and has 
twice been a delegate to the republican county convention. He served for 
six years as alderman, being chairman of the water-works committee and 
also active in other important capacities. In 1908 he was elected mayor of 
Story City and has since occupied that office. He has paid special attention 
to the promotion of good government, being a firm advocate of a business 
administration in municipal affairs, and as overseer of the poor has done 
much to relieve the unfortunate. He has been prominent in the promotion 
of good roads and the excellent condition of the roads in the vicinity of 



396 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Story City is largely due to his efforts. Fraternally he is identitied with 
the Knights of Pythias, was for six years keeper of the records and seal 
and has passed through all the chairs of the lodge, being now past chancelor 
commander. Me is also a valued member of the Modem Woodmen of 
America and he and his family affiliate with St. Peter's Norwegian Lutheran 
church. He is a man of many genial characteristics and at the same time 
is a thorough business man of systematic and methodical habits, who has 
the ability to advance his own interests and also to add largely to the com- 
fort and happiness of others. He is an uncompromising advocate of tem- 
perance and has successfully led in many a conflict with the forces of the 
opposition. Much of his success is due to his knowledge of human nature 
and the ability lie possesses of reading aright the motives of those with 
whom he has come into contact. Today he clearly occupies a position as a 
leader in this section. 



TilOM.AS 11 EM STOCK. 

Among tlic well known and enterprising agriculturists of Story county 
is Thomas Hemstock, wluj owns one of the finest and best equipped farms 
in Union township. He is of Fnglish parentage and was born on the Isle 
of Man on the 1st of June, 1832, being a son of Thomas Hemstock. He 
was but si.K weeks old when the family sailed for America. Landing at 
New York, they soon removed to the interior of the Empire state, where 
they lived for one year, and then went to Lorain county, Ohio, but at the 
end'of a year again moved, locating this time in Winnebago county, Illinois. 
Three years later Mrs. Hemstock died, when her son was only five years 
of age, too young to have any recollection of his mother whatever. Later 
the father married Miss Martha Taylor and continued to make Illinois his 
home until 1870, when he migrated to Iowa, settling in Union township, 
Story county, where he lived until his death at the age of si.\ty-five years. 

Mr. Hemstock made his home on the farm with his father and ste])- 
mother and, being the eldest of the family, he obtained but meager educa- 
tion. The work of the farm was heavy and only at such times as he could 
be spared was he permitted to attend the brief sessions of the district school. 
On the 23d of March, 1852, he left home and with an ox team took the over- 
land route to California. It was a long, hard trip but life on the frontier 
had inured him to hardships and privations and, nothing daunted, with light 
heart and bright dreams of what the west held in store for him he started. 
On the 3d day of the following .August he drove into Placertown. l^ldorado 
county. California, and for fourteen years he followed mining in California, 
Montana and Idaho, ever hoping, despite discouragements and misfortune-, 
to make a "find." In SqUenibcr, i8r/), he returned to the old hjmc in Illi- 
nois and after remaining there for a time came to Story county, Iowa, to 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 397 

visit a brother. While here he bought his present home farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty-six acres, for which he paid ten dollars per acre, all of which 
was unbroken prairie with the exception of fifty acres. 

Returning to his old home in Illinois for a time Mr. Hemstock was 
united in marriage on the 7th of January, 1867, to Miss Louise C. Randall 
who was a daughter of Ira Randall, a veteran of the Civil war, living in 
Wisconsin. Later Mr. Randall removed to Nebraska, where he died. Im- 
mediately after marriage the young couple returned to Iowa and located on 
the farm which Mr. Hemstock had purchased in the fall. They arrived in 
Story county on the loth of January, 1867, and have lived here continuously 
ever since. Mr. Hemstock has been most successful, despite the many hard- 
ships and discouragements endured during the early days, and now owns 
three hundred and fifty acres of as valuable farm land as can be found in 
this section of the country. Thrift, tireless energy and absolute confidence 
in the ultimate victory has ])laced him among the substantial and aftluent 
farmers in this community. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hemstock, three of whom sur- 
vive : Willard P., who is a farmer of Union township, this county ; Arthur 
\ ., a farmer of Grant township ; and Bernie B., who at present is managing 
the home farm. The family always attend the Methodist Episcopal church, 
in which Mrs. Hemstock holds membership. She is very active in all church 
work, particularly that of the Jefi'erson Aid Society. Mr. Hemstock always 
votes for the candidates of the democratic party and that he is highly 
esteemed by his fellow citizens is demonstrated by the fact that for many 
years he served as supervisor, township trustee, director of the school board 
and in other township offices. That he proved to be efficient in all instances 
is borne out by his repeated reelection. He is and has been during his 
forty-four years residence here one of the well known men of the com- 
munity. His influence and support could always be counted upon in any 
measure that bid fair to benefit or improve conditions in his community. 

When a very young man in Idaho territory Mr. Hemstock joined the 
Masonic fraternity and has ever continued a loyal member of that body, 
letting its basic principles mold and direct his life. At present he is iden- 
tified with Nevada Lodge, No. 99, A. F. & A. M. 



ANDREW^ MALAND. 



As an educator and molder of public opinion, Andrew Maland, pro- 
prietor and editor of the Slater News, is accorded general recognition in 
Story county. His personal worth and his valuable services as a leader in 
politics received recognition by President Roosevelt, who appointed him 
postmaster of .Slater, a position he still occupies. Thrown upon his own 
resources at an early age, he overcame every obstacle and through un- 



398 lllSTURV UF STORY COUNTY 

daunted perseverance won his way to the responsible position he now 
occupies. 

He was born in Palestine township, January 19, 1874, a son of lohn 
and I'.ngeljor .Maland. The parents were both born in Norway and were 
married in their native country, coming to the United Stales in i860. They 
spent one year at Morris, Illinois, and then located in Story county, Iowa. 
The father purchased eighty acres of land on section 36, Palestine township, 
on which he resided until his death in 1895. The mother is still living, 
having arrived at the age of seventy-five years, and makes her home in 
Slater. 

.Andrew Maland was reared under conditions that early acquainted him 
with hard work. He possessed limited advantages of education in the dis- 
trict schools but was ambitious to study the higher branches, believing that if 
he had a good mental training, he could better perform his part in the 
world. When sixteen years of age he was in attendance at the State Nor- 
mad School at Cedar Falls, working for his board and in various ways 
earning money to pay his expenses. That he succeeded is shown by the 
fact of his coming hoine after the first term with fifteen dollars in his pocket. 
He also attended Highland Park College and at nineteen years of age began 
teaching at Renwick, where he continued for two years, then going to Hum- 
be Idt, where he taught for one year and from that place to Hu.xley, teach- 
ing for three years in that vicinity. He completed his training at the State 
Normal School in 1899. but, having come to the conclusion that the remu- 
neration for educational work was too .small, he gave up teaching. Going 
to Slater, he formed a partnership with O. J. \'iland and purchased the 
furniture business of Halverson Brothers, the new firm being known as 
-Maland & X'iland. In 1902 they purchased the Slater News, a weekly 
newspaper, and Mr. Maland continued its publication under the same title, 
also remaining in the furniture business. In 1906 he was appointed post- 
master of Slater, and the printing plant and postoffice demanding his en- 
tire time, he and Mr. \'iland mutually agreed to sever their business rela- 
tions, Mr. \ilan(l taking the furniture store and Mr. Maland the printing 
plant, of which he has since had entire charge. He has also been success- 
fully identified with other business enterprises, being secretary and manager 
of the Farmers' Cooperative Creamery Company for five years, carrying the 
concern through its early struggles and jilacing it on a substantial basis. 

On the loth of October, 1900, Mr. Maland was united in marriage to 
Miss Bessie Wald. a sister of S. O. Wald, an attorney of Slater, and previ- 
ous to her marriage a popular teacher of that vicinity. Two children 
bles.sed this union. Ella B. and Obert J. Mrs. Maland was called from 
earthly scenes on the lOth of January, 1909. She was a woman of man\ 
e.stimable qualities and her death wa< the .severest loss Mr. Maland ha~ 
ever known. 

Politically he has from the lime of casting his first ballot been in thor- 
ough sympathy with the rei^ublican party. Since the age of fifteen \ear< 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 399 

he has been connectetl with public office, having served as township com- 
mitteeman, member of the school board, member of the town council and 
in other capacities. He has been a prominent factor in local politics and in 
1910 was campaign manager, succeeding in nominating M. S. Helland as 
a member of the legislature. He is a leader in every movement pertaining 
to die welfare of Slater and vicinity, going to the extent of guaranteeing 
payment for good public entertainments for the town. Fraternally he is 
identified with Slater Lodge, No. 384, I. O. O. F., and in religious affairs 
he gives his allegiance to the Lutheran church, for four years serving as 
superintendent of the Sunday school and leader in the choir. He was the 
organizer of the Central Luther League and its secretary for several 
years, from which was developed the Luther League of Iowa, one of the 
most important movements in the Lutheran church in this part of the coun- 
try during recent years. 



CHARLES H. HALL. 



Among the young men engaged in the active practice of law in Story 
coimty is Charles H. Hall, of Nevada, who is now fairly launched in the 
second year of his professional career. He was born in Peoria, Iowa, 
October 25, 18S0, a son of James ]\I. and Alary Jane (Bell) Hall. The 
father was born in Indiana and has been identified with the mercantile 
business ever since reaching manhood. He is now living at Collins, Iowa, 
and is fifty-six years of age. Aside from his business his attention for 
many years has been given to the church and Sunday school. He is a 
stanch worker in the Methodist denomination and has been superintendent 
of a Sunday school for twenty years past. Politically he is identified with 
the republican party and fraternally with the Masonic order. He is a man 
of good business qualifications, unsullied character and the possessor of 
those attributes which are most essential in progressive citizenship. The 
mother of our subject was born at Valparaiso, Indiana, and is also an active 
member of the Methodist church. There were five children in the family 
of Air. and Airs. Hall, namely : Clara, who married H. C. Denniston, a 
farmer, now living near Collins ; Charles H., our subject ; Grace, now Mrs. 
O. G. Smith, of Nevada ; Milo, a shoe salesman of Des Moines, Iowa ; and 
Jennie, at home. 

Charles H. Hall was reared in a peaceful home and even as a boy gave 
indications of a studious and thoughtful disposition which pointed to a pro- 
fessional career. He attended the public schools of Collins, graduating from 
the high school in the class of 1899, being then nineteen years of age. In 
1902 he entered mercantile business at Colo, Story county, in which he con- 
tinued for four years, at the end of which time he matriculated in the law 
department of Drake University, graduating therefrom with the degree 



400 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

of LL.B. in June, 1909. In July following he began practice at Nevada, 
where he has since remained, meeting with a success that has been highly 
gratifying. 

On January i, 1902, Mr. Hall was united in marriage to Miss Addie 
May Triplett, who w^as born in Elkins, West \irginia. in June. 1880, a 
daughter of Hickman and Martha (Chenoweth) Triplett. Mr. Triplett is 
one of the prominent farmers of his state. One child, Oscar Lelantl, born 
July 31, 1910, has blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hall. 

Mr. Hall has won the position of responsibility and respect which he 
holds in the community by earnest, conscientious and well directed effort 
and as he possesses the requisites of education and natural ability, there is 
no doubt in the minds of his friends that he will be able to meet their ex- 
pectations in the years to come. He has gained a fair share of patronage 
and as time progresses it is steadily increasing, his patrons being among 
the best class of citizens in the city and county. He and his wife are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist church and liberal contributors tow-ard its 
support. He is a member of the Story County Bar Association and has 
many friends in that well established organization. He is also identified 
with Columbia Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at Colo, and with the Modern Wood- 
men of America. Since arriving at voting age he has cast his ballot in be- 
half of the republican party and although he has not sought public office his 
efforts have been freely expended in support of candidates and princi|]les 
that lie believes to be essential to the permanent prosperity of the state and 
tiation. 



W. T. B. SHENKLE. 



Some men have several talents and appear to be almost equally at home 
in whatever they undertake. To this class belongs W. T. B. Shenkle, who 
for ten years past has been engaged in the real-estate business at Collins. 
Reared as a farmer, he devoted a number of years to agriculture and then 
engaged in mercantile business, finally selectng his present occujiation as 
the one that most appealed to his judgment. He deals largely in farm land^ 
and has met with a goodly measure of success. 

He was born in Collins township, July 7, 1858, son of Benjamin and 
Edith (Day) Shenkle. They were both natives of Brown county, Ohio, 
and removed with their respective parents to Marion county. Indiana, where 
they grew to maturity and were married. In 1856 the Shenkle family, with 
that of William Fertig. started westward, their destination being Fort Scott. 
Kansas. They journeyed by water down the Ohio river, then u\i the Mi~ 
sissippi to the mouth of the Missouri, thence to Kansas City. On reachinj,' 
the latter point they heard much talk of troubles in Kansas on arcount of 
the slavery question and they decided to seek a more peaceable region. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



401 



Being very favorably impressed with what they had heard concerning this 
section of Iowa, J\lr. Shenkle outfitted with a team of horses and a wagon 
and his friend purchased an ox team and wagon as their means of trans- 
portation to their new home. On the 2cl day of May they arrived at Eden- 
ville, now Rhodes, Alarshall county, Iowa, where they remained for a time. 
Mr. Shenkle visited Story county and being very much pleased with the ap- 
pearance of the countrv", purchased a tract of raw prairie land which he 
broke, also erecting a log cabin to which he removed his family in the fall 
of 1856. His farm consisted of two hundred acres, of which eighty acres 
was timber and was considered a clioice piece of land on account of the 
timber, but the price which he paid — five dollars an acre — was thought by 
settlers to be highly exorbitant. The same land would now readily bring 
one hundred and fifty dollars per acre. The first election for the organiza- 
tion of the township was held at Mr. Shenkle's home, and as the country 
was quite thinly inhabited, there were only five votes cast at this time. The 
township was named Collins in honor of a township in New York state, 
from which one of the nearest neighbors of Mr. Shenkle came. Mr. 
Shenkle was active in the councils of the democratic party and was first clerk 
of the tow^nship, holding that position until his death, which occurred in 
1865. Mrs. Shenkle continued on the home farm until after her children 
were grown up, and then she made her home with the subject of this review, 
being called to her reward May 3, 1898, at the age of eighty-three years. 

W. T. B. Shenkle was reared under the healthful conditions of a coun- 
try home and acquired his early education in the common schools. At 
twelve years of age he was placed in charge of the home farm, his older 
brothers having gone out into the world, and when he reached his eighteenth 
year he began operating rented land on his own account. After his mar- 
riage he removed to a farm of eighty acres, which he had purchased a year 
previously, located two and one-half miles east of Collins. He continued 
upon that place for ten years and then removed to Collins, where in 1898 he 
was placed in charge of a hardware business, which he managed success- 
fully for one year. In 1899 he went to Churdan, Greene county, Iowa, and 
was identified with the hardware business there, in partnership with a 
brother-in-law, the title of the firm being Tipton & Shenkle. After eighteen 
months' experience they closed out the business and Mr. Shenkle returned 
to Collins and opened a real-estate office. He has since been interested in 
farm lands and has found the business so congenial to his taste that it is 
probable he will so continue for a number of years to come. 

In 1887 Mr. Shenkle was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Tipton, 
of Collins township, a daughter of Leonard and Isadora (Eatherton) Tip- 
ton, natives of Ohio. They came to Cedar county, Iowa, in 1851, and lo- 
cated in Story county in 1877. The mother passed away February 4, 1904, 
and the father is now making his home with his daughter at Collins. One 
child, Eva, who dierl in infancy, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Shenkle. 



402 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Mr. Shenkle has spent over fifty years in the part of the state where he 
now lives and few men are better acquainted with its resources. He early 
became thoroughly familiar with agricultural pursuits and as a business 
man has shown a discrimination and sound judgment that have added 
greatly to his reputation, so that today he is one of the best known real- 
estate men in this section. He is a member of Fervent Lodge, No. 513, A. 
F. & A. M.; Amity Lodge, Xo. 361, L O. O. F. ; and the Mystic Workers 
of the World, and he and his wife are connected with the Order of the 
Eastern Star and the United Brethren church. Politically he is an earnest 
supporter of the republican party, and although he has never sought po- 
litical office he has been active in assisting many of his friends who have 
done so. 



GEORGE HYDEX. 



One of the successful agriculturists and extensive landowners of Story 
county was George Hyden of Richland township, who passed away Febru- 
ary 23, 191 1, honored and respected by all who knew him. He was born 
in Staffordshire, England, on the 12th of May, 1828, and was a son of 
Robert and Elizabeth (Xokes) Hydcn, both of whom spent their entire 
lives in that country, the father living to the advanced age of one hundred 
and two and one-half years. Four children constituted the family, all of 
whom have now passed away. 

Mr. Hyden spent the first twenty-three years of liis life in the mother 
country and then in 1851 decided to become a citizen of the United States, 
believing that this country afforded better opportunities for ambitious 
young men. Crossing the Atlantic he landed at Xew York city and made 
his way to Fredonia, New York, where he hired out by the year for tJiree 
and one-half years and then again started westward, settling at Rock Island, 
Illinois. He remained there only about si.x months, however, and in the 
spring of 1835 arrived in Story county. .After working out for eleven 
months he entered one hundred and si.xty acres of land on section 22, Rich- 
land township, which was unbroken and unimproved prairie. He began 
to cultivate the soil, adding such improvements as he could from time to 
time and in 1857 he erected the house in which he continued to live through- 
out life. Mr. Hyden was successful in his vocation, his good management 
and tireless energy being rewarded by the means which enabled him to 
later add two hundred acres to his realty holdings, but this he subsequently 
sold to his son-in-law. He then owned, in addition to his homestead, eighl\ 
acres on section 27, Richland township, and one-half section in Texas. 

Mr. Hydcn was wedded to Miss Louisa Pool, a daughter of John and 
Ann Pool. She died in 1891. Of this union there were seven children 
born, two of whom are still living: Gorilla is the wife of Clark Apple and 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 403 

the mother of five children. Rose is the wife of J. C. Hilburn, who was 
born in Spencer. Owen county. Indiana, and is a son of J. C. and Bridget 
Hilburn. His parents were both dead ere he left home, and before coming 
to Iowa he spent some time in Kansas and Nebraska. He has been a resi- 
dent of Story county about twenty years. He purchased land in Richland 
township, which he subsequently sold and then bought the farm which he 
now occupies from his father-in-law. He is recognized as one of the lead- 
ing citizens of the community and is held in high regard wherever known. 
To .Mr. and Mrs. Hilburn have been born the following children: Willis, 
George Howard, Blanch, Beulah, Clarence and Walter. 

After he acquired the rights of full citizenship through naturalization 
Mr. Hyden cast his vote with the republican party. The esteem in which 
he was held was indicated by his election to many of the township offices, 
the duties of which he discharged to the satisfaction of the community. 
He was one of the most respected and substantial farmers of his section 
and during his residence here won many friends, whose esteem and good- 
will he alwavs retained. 



FRED HOLTBY. 



That the United States affords the possibilities which warrant the am- 
bitious young man or woman in aspiring to almost any goal with full 
confidence of attaining it is universally conceded and to such men as Fred 
Holtby it has ever proven not only the land of promise but of fulfillment. 
Mr. Holtby was born in Yorkshire. England, on the loth of March, 1865, 
a son of Stephen and Ana (Holtby) Holtby, also natives of Yorkshire, 
where they lived and died. The father was a farmer by occupation. 

Our subject was reared on the home farm, acquiring his preliminary 
education in the village school and later being sent to a boarding school for 
a more advanced course, as is the custom in that country. On attaining 
his majority he decided that conditions in the United States offered better 
opportunities to ambitious young men than those of conservative England. 
He, therefore, set sail for America, landing in New York with twelve dol- 
lars in his pocket. Undaunted, however, he made his way west and located 
in Morgan county, Illinois, where he worked as a farm hand. He remained 
there for six years, carefully laying aside a portion of his meager wage 
each month in order that he, too, might become a landowner. In June, 
1892, he again set his face toward the west, Iowa being his destination this 
time. He stopped in Story county for a short time and then rented a farm 
just over the line in Jasper county, about five miles south of Collins, where 
he began farming for himself. After six years of economy, good manage- 
ment and unremitting toil he had secured sufficient means to enable him to 
make a start for himself, so he purchased a small farm in Jasper county. 



404 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Three years more of thrift, hard work and good judgment in the manage- 
ment of his affairs enabled him to buy a farm of one hundred and lifty-three 
acres in Story county, three miles east of Collins ; here he resided for nine 
years, and then, in the spring of 1909, he sold his place and bought his 
present home farm of one hundred and ten acres in Indian Creek township. 
For the past twelve years Mr. Holtby has made a specialty of breeding and 
raising registered Shire horses. He has been most successful in this, being 
known throughout this section of the state not only for the excellent breeds 
he carries but for his ability in judging the good points of a horse. He 
began exhibiting his slock at the local fairs in 1896 and since then has taken 
many first premiums. 

On the i6th of February, 1892, Mr. Holtby was united in marriage to 
Miss Ada M. Thursby. a native of Morgan county, Illinois, and a daughter 
of Charles and Ann ( Smith ) Thursby, both natives of England. They 
came to the United States in 1855, first locating in Stark county. Illinois. 
but later removing to Morgan county. Three children have been born of 
this union: Orlando O., now attending the Capital City Commercial Col- 
lege in Des Moines ; Hazel and Ana. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of which the parents 
are members. Mr. Holtby 's fraternal relations are confined to membershii) 
in the Modern Woodmen of America. After he had become a naturalized 
citizen of the United States he decided that the policy of the re|niblican 
party best conformed to his ideas and has therefore always cast his vote 
for the candidates of that party. That he has ever proved a capable and 
loyal citizen is confirmed by the fact that for several years he has been 
elected to various township offices. He is known throughout the community 
where he makes his home as one of the thoroughly reliable and capable 
men of the county and is highly regarded by all. 



WII.I.IAM 1',UR\"1-:Y. 



Of the many agencies thai have conlriliulcd lo tlie remarkable growth 
of Iowa, none have been more important than the country press. Its 
editors are in many instances men of liberal education and gooil business 
cai)acily. and no class of men has been more faithful in the di.scharge of 
responsibilities or more loyal to the people it represents. William r.urncy, 
editor and proprietor of the Collins Gazette, clearly belongs to the highly 
capable newsi)aper men of Iowa. He was born in the north of Ireland, 
July 14. 1S50. near the city of Portadown, a son of James and Ann (Od- 
gcrs) I'.urncy. also natives of County Armagh. The father was reared on 
a farm but after reaching maturity learned the boilermaker's trade and in 
later years was employed in shiiibuilding on the west coast of Scotland, to 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 405 

which section he removed with his family before his son WiUiam was one 
year old. 

\\ illiam Burney received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of Partick and later attended the Mechanics Institute and the Athenaeum 
of Glasgow, showing a mental capacity that gave bright promise as to his 
future. When a young man he made musical theory and research a special 
study and was granted membership in and was given an advanced certificate 
from the Tonic-Sol-Fa College of London. England. He was also attracted 
to mercantile pursuits and engaged as a commercial salesman, traveling 
considerably in Great Britain. During these years he was correspondent 
for various publications. In 1885 he came to central Iowa to visit relatives 
living near Xewton and very soon after arriving in this state was invited 
by Perry Engle. owner of the Newton Herald, to become identified with 
that paper. I\Ir. Engle was soon after this a candidate for state senator 
and after his election to that position Mr. Burney became part owner of 
the paper and its managing editor, soon gaining a prominent position in 
the political affairs of that section. After an experience of ten years with 
the Herald he for one year had charge of the Newton Times, whose owner, 
Mr. Sherman, was then serving as postmaster under President Cleveland. 
In May, 1896, Mr. Burney came to Collins and purchased the Collins Clipper, 
which he published under the same title until after acquiring in September, 
1905, The Liberator, also issued at Collins. He consolidated the two papers, 
changing the name to the Collins Gazette, now one of the leading local 
publications in this part of the state. 

In August, 1876, Mr. Burney was united in marriage to Miss ]\Iargaret 
Hamilton Gibson, of Glasgow, Scotland, who passed away, and on October 
7, 1884, he was married to Miss Jane Elizabeth Finch, the ceremony taking 
place at Drumbanagher Episcopal church, County Armagh, Ireland. Of 
this union five children have been born, namely: Mary Florence, now the 
wife of L. H. Ozias, superintendent of schools at Dysart, Iowa; Anne 
Lena, the wife of Arthur A. Vasey. a lumberman of Collins; Alice Widell, 
a primary teacher at Des Moines, Iowa ; Elizabeth Finch, a teacher of voice 
at the Teachers College of Cedar Falls, Iowa ; and William James, now 
a student in the Teachers College at Cedar Falls. 

Politically Mr. Burney gives his support to the republican party, be- 
lieving that its principles are best adapted to secure the prosperity of the 
nation. He is a member of Sunbeam Lodge, No. 181, Mystic Workers of 
the World, and has served as secretary of this organization since 1898, 
also being a demitted member of St. Barchan Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Renfrewshire, Scotland. He and his wife are affiliated with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he serves as trustee. He is a clear and inter- 
esting writer and his paper has a high standing in a state that abounds in 
good newspapers, its editors ranking among the most intelligent men of 
Iowa. The Collins Gazette has a large circle of readers, its influence in a 
great degree being due to the conscientious position which the paper takes 



406 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

in matters of vital interest to the locality. Mr. Burney, judging by what 
he has accomplished, made no mistake in selecting Iowa as his adopted 
state, and it is doubtful whether a more patriotic citizen is to be found 
within its borders than the gentleman whose sketch is here given. 



B. C. DUELAXD. 



I"cw men deserve the credit that belongs to B. C. Dueland, now in the 
milling business at Slater, who from a water boy on a railroad has become 
one of the substantial business men of Story county. His career is a 
practical demonstration of what may be accomplished by one who is actuated 
by right principles antl who bravely faces every difficulty, being fully 
determined that it must give way. He is a native of Norway, born August 
25, 1866, and is a son of Qirist C. and Mary Dueland. The family left 
that country for America in 1882, coming direct to Iowa and locating in 
Sheldahl. The father is by trade a painter but for sometime after arriving 
in this country he worked on the railroad or at any honorable labor he 
could find to do. Finally he secured employment at his trade. He is still 
living and makes his home with the subject of this review. 

B. C. Dueland was educated in his native country, receiving advantage 
of only two or three months attendance in American schools after arriving 
in Iowa. It was necessary for him to assist in the maintenance of the 
family and at sixteen years of age he was employed as a fann hand by 
T. T. Ryan, of Palestine township. The following summer he secured a 
position as water boy for a railway construction gang and for four years 
followed this work and also engaged as a farm hand. In 1888, having 
decided to learn a trade, he became an apprentice in the grist-mill at 
Sheldahl, in which he spent three and one-half years, becoming thoroughly 
acquainted with the trade. In 1891 he formed a partnership with John 
Nielson and rented the mill from his former employer, operating it under 
the firm name of Nielson & Dueland. In the fall of 1894 they purchased a 
two-thirds interest in the mill at Slater and seven months later acquired 
the remaining interest, becoming sole owners. The mill up to this time 
had produced nothing but feed, and desiring to meet the (lenian<]s of a 
growing community, the partners enlarged the building and \iu{ in a modern 
roller process, thus making the mill one of the leading Inisincss enter|)rises 
of that section. However, in April, 1910, the town was visited by a con- 
flagration, which destroyed the mill, the depot and two freight houses. 
Messrs. Nielson and Dueland were not to be easily discouraged, and they 
immediately purchased the elevator building of Oley Nelson, in which they 
made many alterations, fitting the structure with mill machinery and enter- 
ing upon a new era of |5rosperily. In connection with their milling busi- 
ness they deal extensively in coal and feed and are now enjoying the largest 
patronage they have ever known. 



HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 407 

On the 13th of November, 1896, .Mr. Dueland was united in marriage 
to :\Iiss .Alary Sydnes, of Huxley township, a daughter of R. T. Sydnes, a 
prominent farmer now Hving retired at Huxley. Five children have blessed 
this union : Lillian, Raymond, Myrtle, Glendora and Carl. 

Politically Mr. Dueland gives his support to the prohibitionist party. 
He is a valued member of the school board of Slater and for several years 
has served as judge of election. He and his wife are identified with the 
Lincoln Lutheran church and for eleven years he has been a member of the 
board of trustees of that organization. Having worked his way through 
many obstacles, Mr. Dueland, as shown in this brief sketch, is not an 
mdividual that becomes easily cast down. He has been successful in busi- 
ness, gaining the confidence of the community by his, straightforward deal- 
ings and a spirit of helpfulness to others, which is one of his prominent 
characteristics. His friends are many and under all conditions it is recog- 
nized that his word is as good as his bond. 



MAURITS MALMIN. 



Among the children of Scandinavia who have become subjects of Uncle 
Sam and citizens of Story county must be included Maurits Malmin, who 
was born in Norway on the 15th of September, 1846. He acquired his 
education in his native land and when he had reached the required age 
entered the Norwegian army, spending five years of his early manhood in 
the service of his country. He became an expert shot and two of his most 
prized possessions now are medals he won because of his ability in this 
direction. 

Air. Malmin became a resident of Story county in 1881, engaging in 
farm work by the month for the first two years and then by the day for a 
year thereafter. At the end of that period he had acquired sufficient capital 
to enable him to begin the cultivation of land as a renter. After following 
this for eight years, by means of close application, unceasing energy and 
careful management he had accumulated the requisite savings to permit 
him to become a property owner and bought the first one hundred and 
sixty acres of his present homestead. He established his residence here 
in 1893 and has added to his holdings from time to time until he now has 
the title to three hundred and twenty acres, owning one of the most valu- 
able farms in the township. It is well stocked, the improvements are good 
and always in repair, while its carefully cultivated fields yield abundant and 
profitable harvests. His specialty is the feeding and raising of cattle and 
hogs, and he is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company as well as 
the creamery. 

Mr. Malmin completed his arrangements for a home of his own by his 
marriage to Miss Karen Hoverson Lura, a daughter of Hover Lura. Nine 



408 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

children have been born of this union, they are as follows: Carrie, who 
became the wife of Ole lioiigen; Harry; Bertha, deceased; Gerhard; 
Adolph; Martin; Bertha, now the wife of Ole V. Oleson; Clara, at home; 
and Laura Matilda, the wife of Thomas Grimslay. 

The family attend the Lutheran church, in which the parents hold 
membership. Ever since he has acquired tlie right of suffrage through 
naturalization, Mr. .Mahiiin has cast his vote for the republican party, feel- 
ing that its policy is best adapted to serve the interests of the majority. 
His fellow citizens have honored him by election to the office of road 
supervisor, in which capacity he is now serving his eighth year. He is one 
of the esteemed citizens of Warren township and is highly regarded by 
the communitv in wliich he resides. 



1"R.V.\K S. SMlllI. M. D. 

Dr. Frank S. Smith, practicing in Nevada, is recognized as one of the 
most capable and successful members of the medical profession in Story 
county. He was burn in X'enango county, Pennsylvania. July 31. 1853. 
His father, William Smith, was born in Chautauqua, New York, January 
18, 1826, and was a son of the Rev. Salmcron Smith, of Massachusetts. 
The latter nKirrieil a Miss .\very. who was a descendant of Governor Dud- 
ley of Massachusetts, .\fter arriving at years of maturity William Smith 
was united in marriage to Cynthia Smith, who was born near Lachine 
Rapids on the St. Lawrence in Canada on the 20th of May, 1829. and 
though of the same name was not a relative of her husband. Her father, 
Francis Smith, was born and reared in Ireland. The marriage of William 
and Cynthia Smith was celebrated in \cnango county, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 28, 1848, and while living in the Keystone state tlie father was 
owner of a tract of land near Oil Creek, Pennsylvania. A few years after 
he sold that property and came west, petroleum was found there, and it is 
said that more millions of dollars were taken from that farm through the 
development of the oil wells than from any other piece of land in the 
world. Two cousins of Di'. .'^iiiilh arc imw pumping oil from the well- 
there, as their father did before thei'i. and wells and derricks cover the 
ground until it looks like a harbor with the masts of many sailing vessels 
placed as close together as possible. It was in tlie year 1855 that William 
Smith left Pennsylvania with his family, lie lived for brief periods in 
Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin and in i860 became a resident of .\ndalu- 
sia. Rock Island county, Illinois, making his way down the Mississii)iii 
river on a lumber raft. William .Smith was engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness continuously from his seventeenth year until his death at the .age of 
sixty-eight with the exception of about three years spent on the farm on 
which his son Dr. Smith was born, and even during that time he eng.aged 




DK. KKAXK S. SMIIII 



c 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 411 

in the lumber business for a part of the year on the Allegheny river. He 
conducted a large retail lumberyard at Andalusia, Illinois, from i860 until 
1S83, when he removed to Toledo, Iowa, where he continued in the same 
line until the time when death claimed him on the 30th of May, 1894. He 
was a member of the United Brethren church and was a stalwart republi- 
an throughout his entire life. A strong, rugged man both mentally and 
physically, he proved himself an important factor in the public life and the 
affairs of the communities in which he lived. His wife, a woman of strong 
personality, had but meager educational advantages in her girlhood but was 
determined that all of her children should be well educated and bent every 
energy toward accomplishing this purpose, so that all are now college grad- 
uates. They owe much to their mother for what she did for them and they 
sacredly cherish her memory. She survived her husband for a few years 
and passed away October 21, 1900. 

In their family were six children. The eldest. Dr. E. R. Smith, now of 
Toledo, Iowa, was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1851. 
Dr. Smith, of this review, is the second of the family. Lucy, the third 
child, died in infancy. Walter C. was born in Jackson county. Wisconsin, 
April 5. 1857, and is now residing in Toledo, Iowa. Nellie May, born at 
Pine Hill. Wisconsin, April 13, 1865, is the wife of O. O. Rimkle, of Tififin, 
Ohio. William Avery, born in Andalusia, Illinois, November 19, 1870, is 
a lawyer practicing at Nashua, Iowa. 

Dr. Smith, of Nevada, acquired his early education in the public schools 
of Andalusia, a beautiful little town twelve miles below Rock Island on 
the Mississippi river. He afterward had two years of college work at 
Westfield College in Westheld, Illinois, from 1870 until 1872, and spent the 
school year of 1874-5 in the State University of Iowa but completed his 
course in the Western College of Iowa, now the Leander Clark College, 
from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree in 1876. 
In the meantime he had taught several terms of school in Rock Island 
county and following his graduation he became principal of the South Mo- 
line public schools, remaining in that position for nearly four years. Dur- 
ing that period he devoted his leisure hours to studying medicine at home 
under the direction of his brother. Dr. E. R. Smith. In the fall of 1880 
he matriculated in Rush Medical College of Chicago, where he pursued a 
thorough course, with an extra course in the summer of 1881. and was 
graduated with the professional degree on the 21st of February, 1882. 

In the meantime Dr. Smith had been married and lost his first wife. On 
Christmas day of 1878 he wedded Miss Etta Dilling, who had been his class- - 
mate in Western College and was an Iowa girl. They resided in Moline 
until the death of Mrs. Smith on the i6th of March, 1880. An infant 
daughter survived, Etta Maude, who was born February 22, 1880, and was 
reared by Dr. Smith's parents. 

Following his graduation from medical college Dr. Smith located in 
Tama county, Iowa, where he spent the summer of 1882 in practice with 



412 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

his brother, Dr. E. R. Smith, of Toledo. In the fall of that year he opened 
an office in Elberon, Tama coimty. and soon won gratifying professional 
recognition. On the 30th of September of that year he was married in 
Rock Island, Illinois, to Miss Ella Wells, a childhood playmate, and there 
their son. Roy Wells Smith, was born December 13. 1883. They resided 
at Elberon until March 4, 1885, when they removed to Nevada, where Dr. 
Smith has continuously engaged in practice to the present time with the 
exception of eleven months spent in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In 1889 
he was called upon to mourn the loss of his second wife, who died in Ne- 
vada on the 20th of February of that year, leaving three small children. 
Roy W'., Aha and Olga. On the ist of July, 1890. he married Mrs. 
Amanda S. Philp, of Rock Island, Illinois, a sister of his second wife, and 
they have two children, Ella and Donald W. The Doctor's eldest daughter. 
Etta Maude, wlio was born in Moline. Illinois. February 22, 1880. is now 
Mrs. J. .K. Weaver, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Roy Wells, born in Elberon. 
Iowa, December 13, 1883, is a graduate of the Nevada public schools. He 
is now married and at the present writing is studying medicine in Drake 
University at Des Moines. Alta, born in Nevada. July 13, 1885, is at home. 
Olga, born in Nevada, February 3, 1888, is engaged in teaching school. 
Both she and her sister Alta are graduates of the high school and pursued 
a four years' course in Leander Clark College of Toledo, Iowa, being grad- 
uated therefrom in June, 19a). with the Bachelor of Science degree. Both 
now have state certificates. Ella Smith, the youngest daughter, born in 
Nevada, November 14, 1891, was graduated from the high school in 191 1. 
Donald W., born in Nevada, May 2-/. 1899. is attending the home school. 

Throughout tlie period of his residence in Nevada Dr. Smith has con- 
tinuously engaged in practice and his ability has won him wide recognition. 
That his work has gained him more than local distinction is indicated bv 
the fact that his alma mater in 1908 conferred upon him the Master of 
Arts degree. For many years a liberal practice has been accorded him and 
he is today the loved family physician in many Nevada households, where 
his cheery presence inspires confidence. He has done post-graduate work 
in the Chicago Post Graduate Medical School and Hospital and in the Chi- 
cago Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital, and at all times he kecjis in 
close touch with the advancement of the profession through wide reading 
and research. Moreover, he is known in business circles as one of the or- 
ganizers and stockholders of the People's Savings Bank of Nevada, of 
which he is now vice president, and he likewise aided in organizing the 
Nevada Gas Company and the Story County Inrlcpcnflcnt Telciihone Com- 
pany, in each of which he is a director. 

Dr. Smith holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and 
also with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. In 
his political views he is a republican but has never .sought nor desired public 
office and has no ambition in that direction. He has served, however. ,1 
school director and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend, lie 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 413 

belongs to the Iowa Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
in strictly professional lines is connected with the Story County Medical 
Society, the District Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. He thus keeps in touch with the ad- 
vanced thought of the profession and is continuously promoting his knowl- 
edge through reading and investigation. Anything that tends to bring to 
man the key to the complex mystery which we call life is of interest to him 
and he performs all professional service with a sense of conscientious 
obligation and with close conformity to a high standard of professional 
ethics so that he enjoys in large measure the confidence and high regard of 
his brethren of the medical fraternitv. 



AMI JEFFERSON PEDDICORD. 

One of the prosperous farmers and extensive land owners of Story 
county is Ami Jefferson Peddicord, who was born in La Salle county, 
Illinois, on the 27th of January, i860. He is a son of Edward Smith 
Peddicord, a native of \'irginia, who at the age of four and one-half years 
walked from that state to Licking county, Ohio. He remained there until 
a young man and then went to La Salle county, Illinois, where he lived up 
to the time of his death. He was a successful man, accumulating, by means 
of his thrift and discretion, one thousand acres of land. He was a man of 
fine principles and strict integrity, his word being as good as his bond. He 
married Elizabeth Johnson, a native of Licking county, Ohio, whose parents 
were Virginians and pioneers of Ohio. Nine children were born of this 
union, eight of whom lived to maturity and four of these still survive, our 
subject being the eighth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Peddicord were 
members of the Baptist church and he always voted the democratic ticket. 

A. J. Peddicord's early years were spent very similarly to those of the 
majority of boys who are reared in the rural districts. He acquired his 
early education in the district schools of La Salle county, Illinois, and at 
the usual age put aside his text-books and assisted his father in the culti- 
vation of the farm. After reaching the age of twenty-two years he hired 
out by the month for three years, at the end of which time he was married. 
Subsequent to his marriage he located upon a farm belonging to his wife, 
and the next year he bought forty acres but after farming this for a time 
he moved south of Pontiac, Illinois. Subsequently he sold his place there 
and engaged in the tile business, which vocation he followed for two years. 
He then returned to the place of his birth in La Salle county and conducted 
the home farm. Later he removed to Story county, Iowa, locating on 
section 14, Richland township. He still continues to reside there and now 
owns one-half of the section. His is one of the valuable farms of the 
district. It is well stocked, contains a good farm house and other improve- 



414 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

inciils, all of which are kcj)! in the best of repair, and the well tilled liekls 
each year yield abundant harvests. In addition to his homestead Mr. Peddi- 
cord owns one hundred and sixty acres in McCook county, South Dakota. 
and one-half section in Texas, making the aggregate of his realty holdings 
eight hundred acres. 

i\Ir. I'cddicord was united in marriage to Miss Maggie Mc^^Iichael, a 
daughter of James McMichael, a Scotchman and pioneer of Illinois. Four 
children were born of this marriage, who are as follows: James A., who 
died at the age of four years; Roy; Margaret; and Isabelle. 

Ever since age conferred upon him the right of sulirage Mr. Peddicord 
has cast his vote for the democratic party. He has never been particularly 
active in politics, however, not aspiring to i)ublic honors, but has, owing 
to his warm interest in educational matters, served on the school board. 
He is known as one of the substantial citizens of the county, his early en- 
deavors and industry having been rewarded by a gratifying success, the 
achievement of which has never caused any one to question his methods or 
integrity. 



THOMAS J. LOUGHRAN. 

By natural talents ami education Thomas J. Loughran, of .\mes. was 
adapted for a mercantile career and he early became identified with the 
drug business, in which he has attained a gratifying measure of success. 
He was bom at Des Moines, Iowa, April 30, 1869, and removed in 1885 
to Ames with his parents, Edmund and Sarah A. Loughran, both of whom 
are now residents of that city. The father was born in County Armagh, 
Ireland. June 30. 1832, and came to the United States when fifteen years 
of age. After sjjending a few months in Hampshire county, Virginia, now 
West X'irginia. he went to Wheeling and engaged in the machinery busi- 
ness until 1855. He then went to New York city and accepted a position 
with Cox, Richardson & Boynton, stove manufacturers of Westchester 
county, New York. In 1857 he came to Des Moines, Iowa, where he en- 
gaged in the manufacturing business. On the 2d of January. 1864. in re- 
sponse to a call for troops to assist in bringing the rebellion to an end, he 
enlisted in the First Iowa Battery and partici])ated in the battles of .At- 
lanta and Resaca and in other important engagements. On the 5th of July, 
1865. he was honorably discharged and mustered out at Davenport, Iowa, 
after wliicli he reentered the manufacturing business. In 1874 he pur- 
chased one Innidred and sixty acres of land in Jasj^er cnimty, Iowa, which 
he cultivated for ten years, and then came to .\mes. buying the farm im- 
])Iement business of Shields & Cook, of which he was at the bead for 
eighteen years, lie has lived retired since 1902. 

On the Cith of February. 1854. Edmund Loughran was marrie-I to Miss 
Sarah A. Brver, and nine children were born of this union, namely: John 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 415 

B., now living at Scott, Kansas; Sarah, who married \V. H. Wintersteen 
and Hves at Hartford, South Dakota; Edmund James, of Madison county, 
Iowa; one who died in infancy; Stephen L., a record of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work; Thomas J., the subject of this review; Jennie E., 
the wife of F. M. Coulter, of Ames; William B., who died at the age of 
thirty-six years; and Alary B., now living at Los Angeles, California. Air. 
Loughran and his wife are members of the First United Presbyterian 
church of Des Moines, while politically he gives his support to the repub- 
lican party. He is a member of Ellsworth Post. No. 30, G. A. R., of 
Ames, and is one of the highly honored citizens of this city. 

Thomas J. Loughran received his education in the public schools of 
Ames and Des Moines and pursued the pharmaceutical course at Highland 
Park College of Des Moines. He has been connected with the drug busi- 
ness in Ames since 1886 and is now a member of the firm of Loughran & 
Bauer, one of the leading drug iirnis in the city. By close and conscien- 
tious attention to his vocation he has built up an enviable reputation as 
one of the substantial and representative men of the community. 

On the 2d of February, 1895, Mr. Loughran was united in marriage at 
Shannon, Illinois, to Aliss Kathryn Sherwood, and two children have 
blessed this union, Ella Georganna and Harold Sherwood. 

Politically Air. Loughran supports the candidates and principles of the 
republican party, and his religious views are indicated by membership in 
the United Presbyterian church. He became a member of the First church 
at Des Aloines in 1892 while attending college. A gentleman of pleasing 
address and attractive personality, he possesses business energy and judg- 
ment that have materially assisted him in the accomplishment of a nol)le 
ambition. He and his wife have a wide acquaintance and are held in high 
regard by a large circle of friends wherever they are known. 



JAMES E. HULL. 



The name of James E. Hull is well known to cattlemen and farmers in 
this section of the state as he has been exhibiting his stock at the local fairs 
for more than ten years. He is the son of James E. and Julia L. (Addis) 
Hull and was born in tlie capital city of this state on the 20th of December, 
1865. His father was a native of the Empire state and his mother of Indi- 
ana, but they were married in Des Aloines, Iowa, on the 15th of Alay, i860, 
his mother having come to Iowa with her parents, who were among the 
early settlers of Des Aloines. Air. Hull, who was a lawyer and a civil 
engineer, went there with a government surveying party and later opened 
an office and began the practice of law. He served one term as city clerk, 
having been elected on the democratic ticket, and later ran for mayor on 
the same ticket but the election was carried by a large republican plurality. 



41G HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

He was an able counselor and his skill in tlie handling of intricate legal 
])robleins, together with his fine personal qualities, brought him to the fore 
and at the time of his death in 1870, at the age of forty-three years, he was 
considered one of the prominent citizens of Des Moines. He held mem- 
bership in the Masonic fraternity. After her husband's death Mrs. Hull 
became the wife of the Hon. W. K. Wood, then a member of the state 
legislature, with whom she lived until she too passed away. 

At the time of his father's death James E. Hull was only a child and was 
reared to manhood by his maternal grandmother. Mrs. Abraham Boys, 
which was her name by her second marriage. He was educated in the 
public schools of Des Moines, graduating from the high school with the 
class of 1882, being sixteen years of age and having the distinction of being 
the youngest student, at that time, ever to have graduated from that school. 
He decided that the printer's trade had more attractions for him than any 
other and after serving the usual apprenticeship he followed that vocation 
for twelve years, during which time he worked in almost every state in the 
Union. Being temperate in his habits he was able to save sufficient out of 
his salary to enable him, after working for a few weeks or months, to go 
elsewhere, and while such a metliod is not advisable if one wishes to accu- 
mulate wealth, he lias found that the knowledge thus gleaned is such as can- 
not be obtained in any educational institution, while the experience has 
proven of inestimable value. He worked for almost a year at one time on 
the Nevada democratic jjajjcr. The Watchnian, which has since gone out of 
existence. While in Livingstone, Montana, he formed a partnership with a 
banker by the name of Stebbins, who later became a state senator, in the 
conduct of a local paper. Mr. Stebbins. not wishing his name to be in any 
wav connected with the venture, was always a silent partner. Mr. Hull 
having the entire charge and management and being supposedly the owner 
of the paper. He placed the business on a solid foundation and was making 
money when he developed lead poison and was forced to give up the trade 
entirely. 

Returning to Iowa Mr. Hull located in Story county where he engaged 
in farming as a renter, and after two years he began the breeding of Poland 
China hogs, which venture proving most lucrative he bought one hundred 
and twenty acres of land on section 21, Indian Creek township, where he 
continues to reside. He had been breeding registered hogs for live years 
when he moved to his present location but it was not until the following 
year that he began raising thoroughbred registered shorthorn cattle. He 
has been most successful in both of these lines and has achieved quite a 
reputation as a stockman in this section of the state as he has been ex- 
hibiting at the various county fairs for years and has taken more fir.st 
premiums than any other one exhibitor. 

Mr. Hull was united in marriage in 1893 to Miss Mary M. Boster. a 
daughter of Stei)hen T. and Sarah (Ingraham) Boster. of Nevada, who 
came to Story county from Wapello county, Iowa, in 1878. They are both 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 417 

natives of tJiis state, the father having been born in Lee county and the 
mother in Wapello county. Air. Boster has now passed away but his wife 
is still living and makes her home in Indian Creek township with one of 
her daughters. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hull; 
Alarie, I\Iarion and Leslie. 

They attend the Methodist Episcopal church, where the parents hold 
membership and of which Air. Hull is one of the trustees. Although he 
has never taken an active interest in politics he goes to the polls on election 
day and casts his vote for the republican candidates, for he feels that the 
basic principles of that party are best adapted to the requirements of the 
people. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hull are highly esteemed and popular in the 
community where they live and he is one of the substantial farmers and 
cattlemen of the locality. 



ELLSWORTH DOWXIXG. 

Ellsworth Downing, who is the owner of a well conducted farm of 
two hundred acres in Collins township and is recognized as one of the 
substantial citizens of Story county, was born in Hancock county, Ohio, 
October 8, 1864. He is a son of George and Lavina (Van Buskirk) 
Downing, the former of whom was born in Pike county, Ohio. February 
II, 1819. Airs. Downing was also a native of the Buckeye state and was 
born January i, 1831. The father successfully engaged in farming in Ohio, 
but believing that more favorable opportunities were to be found in the 
w^est, he made a trip of inspection to Story county, Iowa, and traded his 
Ohio farm for a place of two hundred acres in Collins township. Return- 
ing to Ohio, he came west with his family in 1872, driving across the 
country with two covered wagons. He resided on a farm in Collins town- 
ship until his children were all grown and married, subsequently taking 
up his home with the subject of this review, with whom he continued to 
live for ten years. He passed away September 6, 1904, in the eighty-sixth 
year of his age. His wife died in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1870. Mr. Downing 
was a stanch advocate of the republican party and was quite prominent as 
a political speaker in Story county, also filling various public offices in his 
township. He served as justice of the peace in Ohio and also in Iowa and 
was a man of considerable influence wherever he was known. He was not 
identified with any religious body but was a valued member of the Ma- 
sonic order. 

At eight years of age Ellsworth Downing came to Story county with 
his father, growing up under the influences of the home that prepared him 
well for the struggle of life. He was educated in the district schools and 
at the age of eighteen years, while assisting his father upon the home farm, 
also engaged modestly, as opportunity permitted, in farming on his own 



418 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

account. At twenty-six years of age he was married and located upon the 
farm where he now lives. This place comprises forty acres but he also 
owns one hundred and sixty acres of the old homestead, thus being the 
possessor of some of the most desirable properties in the township. He 
makes a specialty of cattle feeding, in which he has been very successful. 

On the 25th of March. 1890, Mr. Downing was united in marriage to 
jMiss Laura Brown, a daughter of Levi Brown, who came to Story county 
from Fulton county, Illinois, about 1864 and settled in Collins township. 
He passed away in 1903 after a long and honorable career. Five children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Downing: Crescy E., a graduate of the 
Collins high school and now a popular district school teacher; Ethel G., 
who is attending high school ; lea G.. also a student in the high school ; 
George L., who is attending the district school ; and Esther B., at home. 

Air. Downing is a strong friend of education and as an active, progres- 
sive member of the community is always ready to assist in any worthy 
movement aiming to promote the general welfare. He has from his boy- 
hood been industrious and enterprising and now enjoys the results of his 
self-denial in earlier years. He gives his allegiance to the republican party 
and the confidence of his neighbors in his judgment is indicated by the 
fact that for ten 3'ears past he has served as township assessor. Frater- 
nally he is identified with Crescent Camp No. 2358, M. W. A. Mrs. Down- 
ing and her daughters are valued members of the L'nited Brethren church. 
They are well known socially and have the warm regard of a large circle 
of friends. 



D.WIKL B. LEWIS. 



Two years ago Daniel B. Lewis was made cashier and business man- 
ager of the Farmers Savings Bank of Huxley. It was his first practical 
experience in the field of business but he was well prepared for the re- 
sponsibility and lias performed his duties in such a way as to meet the 
hearty approval of directors and officers of the institution. He was born 
in Union township, Story county, December 22, 1884, son of Erasmus and 
Ane (Bryne) Lewis, both natives of Norway. They came to the United 
States after reaching manhood and womanhood and were married in Wis- 
consin, locating in Union township, Story county, Iowa, in 1864. Mr. 
Lewis became highly successful as a farmer and acquired extensive land 
holdings but has disposed of all of his property except the old home farm 
of two hundred acres and is now living retired. Politically he has been con- 
nected with the republican party and although his attention was mainly 
given to his private aflfairs, he served for a number of years as township 
trustee and also in other offices. Me and his wife are consistent members 
of the Lutheran chiucli. 




DAMKL I!. LEWIS 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 421 

Daniel B. Lewis was reared in a peaceful home and acciuired his early 
education in the district schools, later attending the Cambridge high school, 
from which he was graduated in 1905. After teaching school for several 
terms he took a course in the Capital City Commercial College at Des 
Moines, graduating with the class of 1908 and showing a proficiency in his 
examinations that gave bright promise as to his future. Immediately after 
leaving the commercial college he was appointed cashier of the Farmers 
Savings Bank of Huxley, and has since served with great acceptance in 
that position. He is a member of the Lutheran church of Cambridge and 
is quite prominently identified with social circles in this region. From 
the beginning of his active career he has shown an adaptability to his 
chosen calling, which is a brilliant prophecy of a life of usefulness and 
honor that cannot fail to reflect credit upon himself and those with whom 
he is associated. 



ANDREW A. OLSON. 



Andrew A. Olson, a member of one of the well known families of 
Roland, was born in Howard township, Story county, on the i6th of Sep- 
tember, 1863, a son of Abel and Jorena Olson. The father was born in 
Norway and on coming to the United States located in Chicago, where he 
followed the life of a sailor on Lake Michigan, serving for seven years 
as first mate of a vessel. In 1854 he came to Story county, Iowa, and, 
buying forty acres of land, engaged in farming. He later sold that tract 
and bought eighty acres, which he soon disposed of, and then purchased 
another eighty on section 16, Howard township, where he continued to 
live up to the time of his death. He was a persevering and industrious 
man and had accumulated six hundred and eighty acres of land in Story 
county at the time of his demise. He was for many years identified with 
the business interests of Roland, being one of the first men to engage in 
general merchandising there. In connection with Jona Duey, Paul Thomp- 
son and John Evenson, he conducted what was called the Granger store, 
but later withdrew and embarked in the general merchandise business on 
his own account, with which he was connected at the time of his death. 
He was a member of the republican party and always took an active in- 
terest in all local political issues. He was justice of the peace for twenty 
years, which fact alone is assurance of his capable as well as faithful 
discharge of the duties of the office. He was also one of the first assessors 
of Howard township and was for many years regarded as the political 
leader in that township. He was one of the organizers of the Lutheran 
church of Roland, contributing liberally toward the founding and main- 
tenance of the same. He married Jorena Olson, and unto them were born 
four children, all of whom are still living: Ole, who resides in Minnesota; 



422 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

George, living in Howard township, Story county; Carl, a resident of Cali- 
fornia; and Andrew A. The father passed away in 1898, having resided 
for forty-four years in Story county, upon which he left tiie impress of 
his strong personality and worthy character. The mother still lives in 
Roland. 

.Andrew .A. Olson attended the district schools of Story county and on 
laying aside his school books he worked for his father until he was twenty 
years of age. at which time he started out in life for himself. lie liad de- 
cided to follow agriculture, feeling that it offered better and more certain 
opportunities than almost any other line. In addition to his farming he 
has been a feeder of stock, in which he has met with reasonable success. 

Mr. Olson has been married twice, his first wife being Miss Berth 
Barka, and they became the parents of five children : Ella, who married 
I. M. Cole; Josie; .Abel; Orville ; and .\rthur. The mother of these chil- 
dren passed away in 1901. For his second wife Mr. Olson chose Miss 
Julia Johnson and unto them has been born one child. \'iola. 

The family worslii]) in the Lntlicran church, with which denomination 
the parents are identified by niembcrshi]). Since reaching his majorit}' 
Mr. Olson has voted the republican ticket and he takes an active interest 
in politics. 



lOH.X A. SCOTT. 



Near the top in the list of progressive and enterprising farmers of 
Story county stands the name of John A. Scott, who since 1894 has been 
a resident of Indian Creek township. He was born in Jones county, this 
state, on the 17th of December. 1869, being the son of Prior and Jane 
(Ferguson) Scott. His father was a native of Indiana but came to Iowa 
with his parents when a child, the grandfather. Prior Scott, Sr.. being 
among the first settlers in Cedar county. Our subject's mother was from 
Pennsylvania and came to Iowa with her brother, Claude Ferguson, also 
locating in Cedar county, where she met and married Prior Scott. Im- 
mediately after their marriage the young couple removed to Jones county, 
locating on one hundred and si.xty acres of land which had been given them 
by Mr. Scott's father. This continued to be their home up to the time of 
Mr. Scott's death in 1871. Later Mrs. Scott married -Asa Lindsey and re- 
turned to Cedar county, where she still resides. 

John .A. Scott made his home with his mother and stepfather until he 
was fourteen years of age, when he left the parental roof and went to 
the western part of the state, thus starting out in life for himself when 
still but a boy. For nine years he worked as a farm hand until, by means 
of hard work and thrift, he had acquired a small capital. 

In 1892 he married Miss Kate Smith, of Story county, a daugiitcr of 
William \'. Smitii, of Maxwell. Shortly after marriage they removed to 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 423 

Jones county, where they settled on a farm, a portion of which had come 
to Mr. Scott in the settlement of his father's estate. They lived there for 
two years, then sold out and bought their present homestead in Indian 
Creek township. Story county. The present farm contains ninety-seven 
acres of well tilled and valuable land and is one of the best equipped and 
best kept farms in the township. Air. Scott has always been a strong ad- 
vocate of diversified farming. He keeps a good grade of cattle and hogs, 
and by means of study and the pursuit of scientific methods and care and 
discretion in the breeding and raising of stock has been one of the most 
successful men of the community. 

Two daughters and one son have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Scott, all 
of whom are still at home: Sylvia Pearl, Emmett Raymond and Lulu 
Belle. The two former are attending the high school at Maxwell. The 
family attend the Evangelical church, of which the parents are members, 
Mr. Scott also serving as a trustee of the church. 

The policy of the democratic party has always appealed to Mr. Scott 
as being the one best adapted to protect the interests of the general public 
and he therefore casts his ballot for its candidates. He has never taken a 
prominent or active part in politics, but at the same time he is now and 
has been for some time a member of the school board. He is secretary 
and treasurer of the Iowa Center Telephone Company and is also a di- 
rector of the Fai-mers Grain Company of Maxwell. He has ever since his 
residence here been prominent in all public matters pertaining to the in- 
terest of the agricultural community and is known as one of the pros- 
perous men of the township where he lives, being highly esteemed and 
respected by all who know him. 



JUDGE CHAUCER G. LEE. 

In a history relating to the substantial and progressive citizens of Story 
county adequate mention should be made of members of the bar, prominent 
among whom are the gentlemen who occupy the judicial positions. For 
four years past Chaucer G. Lee has filled the office of district judge and 
in that time has greatly enhanced the reputation he had previously acquired 
as a practicing attorney. 

Born on a farm in Kellogg township, Jasper county, Iowa, August 7, 
i86q, he is the son of James and Sarah (Whitcomb) Lee, the former of 
whom was born in Massachusetts and the latter in Indiana. At an early 
day the father settled in Jasper county, Iowa, and became one of its suc- 
cessful farmers. 

Chaucer G. Lee received his early education in the district schools, 
later attending Hazel Dell Academy at Newton, Iowa, from which he was 
graduated in 1891. Matriculating in the Iowa State College at Ames he 



424 HISTORY OF STORY COl'XTY 

pursued his studies further and was graduated in 1894 with a degree of 
B. S. He next entered the law department of Drake University at Des 
Moines, and in 1895. having completed the regular law course, received the 
degree of LL. B. While acquiring his education he taught at various times 
in the country schools, showing an ability that gave bright promise as to 
his future. On February 2, 1895. he located at Ames and at once entered 
upon his life vocation, attracting almost from the very start a lucrative 
clientage. He served for eight years as city attorney at Ames and [jrnved 
a strong advocate before a jury and a speaker who readily gained the ear 
of the court, winning many cases in which he was pitted against some of 
the ablest lawyers in this ])art of the state. Since the ist of January. 1907. 
he has occupied the bench of the district court, displaying a fairness and 
impartiality which invites even the most humble to look with confidence 
for unbiased justice. 

On the 23d of Sei)tember, 1896. Mr. Lee was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma McCarthy, a daughter of Daniel and Mary McCarthy, of 
Ames. One daughter. Norma, has blessed this union. Judge Lee gives his 
adherence to the republican party, with which he has been identified ever 
since reaching manhood. Socially he and his estimable wife are prominent 
in the community. He is regarded as a man of the strictest integrity and 
of unfiinching devotion to what he believes to be his dutv. A deep student, 
he is seldom at a loss in determining as regards any difficult point of law. 
Throughout his entire career he has demonstrated that he possesses a well 
balanced mind, and he is eminently worthy of the respect and confidence 
in which he is held by all who know him. Just entering upon the most 
important period of life, being now forty-two years of age and possessing 
every requisite for a long and useful career, there is everj' reason to predict 
for him still greater successes in years to come than any he has yet known. 



OLI\'ER HILL. 



To the industrious farmer who adds intelligence to his chosen vocation 
success is assured. Oliver Hill was born in Norway, September 29, 184S. 
a son of Toris and .Mariha (Berhaw) llill, who emigrated to the United 
States in 1849, landing at New York on July 2d of that year. They came 
west, locating in Kendall county, Illinois, where they resided until 187^1, 
;it which time they came to Story county and took up their residence with 
their son, the subject of this .sketch. Here they both died, the father fm 
December 7, 1887, and the mother March 18. 1902. 

Oliver Hill spent his childhood at home, acquiring his education in the 
public schools in his district. School facilities were at that time very 
limited, however, and he secured his book knowledge at intervals between 
working on the farm. Notwithstanding this fact, being a very industriou- 



HISTORY Of STORY COUNTY 425 

youth and ambitious as well, he managed to overcome all difficulties and 
when twenty years old began teaching school, which line of work he fol- 
lowed for ten years in connection with farming. During this time he taught 
for nineteen terms. In the spring of 1875 he came to Story county, Iowa, 
making his residence with Ole Berhaw, whom he had known when living in 
Kendall county, Illinois. This was the farm on which he now resides and 
which he later purchased. In the meantime he went to Polk county and 
spent the winter there, returning the following spring to the Berhaw farm, 
where he has since resided. 

]\Ir. Hill was married to Mrs. Clara Thorson. nee Seymour, of Kendall 
county, Illinois. Her parents were Sebert and Isabella (Thompson) Sey- 
mour, who came to America from Norway. To Mr. and Mrs. Hill four 
children have been born, as follows: Albert T., residing at Cambridge; 
Martha H., who is attending Drake University at Des Moines; John, who 
is a student in the State Agricultural College at Ames; and one child, 
deceased. Mr. Hill is a prohibitionist in politics and both he and his wife 
are faithful members of the Lutheran church. 



JAMES W. DUNAHOO. 

One of the well known farms of Story county is the Dunahoo home- 
stead, which is located on sections 2 and 3, Indian Creek township, and 
upon which the third generation of this family is now living. James W. 
Dunahoo, the present head of the family, was born in Marion county, 
Indiana, on the 3d of April, 1841. His parents, William M. and Sarah 
(Sheets) Dunahoo, were both natives of Virginia, where they were reared 
and married. A few years later they migrated to Ohio and the next year 
they removed to Marion county, Indiana, where they made their home for 
several years. In August, 1854, they came west, locating in Story county, 
Iowa, on the farm which is now owned by their grandson, our subject's 
son. William Dunahoo entered one hundred and sixty acres of land from 
the government, upon which he continued to make his home imtil the time 
of his death in 1874. His wife survived him for thirty years and passed 
away in 1904. 

James W. Dunahoo remained a member of his father's household until 
he had attained manhood, attending the district school, assisting with the 
work of the farm and enjoying such diversions as fell to the lot of the 
young people of that day. He acquired the rudiments of his education in 
an old log schoolhouse with puncheon floors and slab benches and lighted 
and ventilated by means of pieces cut out of the logs which formed the 
walls. In those early days he drove oxen to market to Des Moines and Iowa 
City and sold wheat in Cedar Rapids for forty cents per bushel. 



426 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

At the age of twenty-two years Mr. Dunahoo began farming on his 
own account on land which he rented, but at the end of two years by un- 
remitting toil, tireless energy and thrift he was able to buy twenty-four 
acres of the present home farm and thus become a landowner. He kept 
adding to his holdings from time to time until he had acquired two hundred 
and twenty-five acres of Story county's most valuable land. Mr. Dunahoo 
did not remove to this place until 1868 but since that time he has lived here 
continuously. 

In 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ellen Webb. Her 
parents were \'irginians by birth but came to Iowa from Indiana, settling 
first in Polk county, where they lived for two years, and then locating in 
Story county. Two children were born of this marriage: Elmer Clayton, 
who is a farmer of Indian Creek township, and Major R., who is also a 
farmer and lives on the old Dunahoo homestead, which he now owns. The 
family circle was broken when Mrs. Dunahoo passed away in 1901. 

They always attend the Methodist church, of which the parents were 
members and of which Mr. Dunahoo is still a communicant. Although 
he has never taken a [Particularly active part in politics, never aspiring to 
|)ublic office or political honors of any kind, he is at the polls at every 
election and casts his vote for the republican candidates. The name of 
Dunahoo has always been highly respected in .Story county, each representa- 
tive of that family being well worthy of the esteem of his fellow citizens, 
which has always been freely accorded. 



JOSEni TI. TWEDT. 

One of the successful agriculturists in Howard township, Story county, 
is Josepli H. Twedt, who was born in the locality where he now resides. 
He is a son of Hans J. and Julia (.island ) Twedt, both natives of Nor- 
way, who emigrated to the United States in 1855 and coming directly to 
Iowa located in Story county, where they remained the rest of their lives. 
The father, who possessed all the unwearied perseverance and tireless 
energy which characterizes the Norse races, by his close application and 
careful expenditures accumulated considerable property before his demise 
at an advanced age. Unto him and his wife were born twelve children, 
eight of whom sur\'ive and are as follows: Abel H., Joseph H., Samuel 
H., Andrew IT., Hcnrj-. Jane, Hattie and Julia. 

The early years of Joseph H. Twedt were as unvaried in their routine 
of school, work and play as are those of the majority of young people 
who are reared in the more sparsely settled districts. .At the usual age lie 
laid aside his school books to assume the heavier responsibilities of life. 
choosing for his life work farming, the vocation for which he had been 
trained from childhood and fell he was best adapted. He remained at 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 427 

home until he had attained his majority, when he began working for him- 
self. He was first employed as a farm hand by the month but later en- 
gaged in farming on the shares. Economy and industry brought him the 
usual reward and in 1890 he had acquired sufficient capital to enable him 
to buy one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 14, Howard town- 
ship. Through diligence and capable management he has added to his 
holdings at various times until the present aggregate of his real estate is 
two hundred and forty acres. His farm contains good improvements, a 
nice grade of stock and the fields are given the careful supervision which 
results in abundant harvests. In addition to his realty holdings Mr. Twedt 
is a stockholder and director of the Farmers Savings Bank of Roland. 

He established a home of his own when he married Miss Bertha Pier- 
son, and they have become the parents of si.x children, five of whom are 
living: Rose, Howard. Otis, Joseph, Ruth and Mamie, deceased. Ever 
since age conferred upon him the full rights of citizenship Mr. Twedt has 
cast his ballot for the candidates of the republican party, believing that its 
policy of protection is essential to the best development of the country. 
He is now occupying the office of trustee in Howard township. Almost 
his entire life has been spent in that township, where he was born, and 
greater tribute can be paid to the character of no man than that the com- 
rades of his boyhood are the friends of his manhood. 



E. ROLAND ROBISON. 

One of the most successful farmers and cattle-raisers of Story county 
is E. Roland Robison, who is one of the substantial and enterprising citi- 
zens of Indian Creek township. Born in that township, July 9, 1862, he is 
the son of Alexander and Nancy ( Greer ) Robison, both of whom were 
natives of western Pennsylvania. The father was born in Mifllin county, 
Pennsylvania, May 15, 1822, and died at Nevada, Iowa, January 23, 1907, 
at the age of eighty-four years. He was a representative of one of the 
early families of this country, his great-grandfather having settled in or 
near Wilmington, Delaware. His youth was spent in Pennsylvania and 
he was married in Mercer county, that state, in March, 1856, to Miss 
Nancy Greer, who survives him. 

E. Roland Robison spent his youth at home, attending the public school 
when not working on the farm. There he remained until attaining his ma- 
jority, when he married and purchased eighty acres of his present farm, 
on wliich he took up his residence. During the succeeding twenty-two 
years he added to his property from time to time until at present he owns 
four hundred and thirteen acres of the most valuable land in Story county. 
When he was married he had two or three hundred dollars with which to 
make payment on his first eighty acres, and this was unimjirovcd lancl. 



428 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

Now he has one of the best farms in this section of the county, containing 
all of the most modern improvements. He has made a specialty of cattle 
feeding, in which he has met with unusual success. 

The marriage of Mr. Robison took place April 4, 1888, when he was 
united to Miss .Mattie W'hitakcr, a daughter of Samuel and Harriett (Mil- 
ler) Whitaker, of Indian Creek township. Her mother was a native of 
Indiana, while her father was horn in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 
The latter came to Story county in 1855 and is now a resident of Maxwell. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Robison have been born four children, two of whom 
survive, namely: Edith, and Clay A. The daughter is now a teacher in 
the district schools. She is a graduate of the Maxwell high school and at- 
tended the Iowa State Normal school at Cedar Falls. 

In politics Mr. Robison is a republican and he has served for several 
years as a member of the school hoard. He is affiliated with Maxwell 
Lodge, No. 465, I. O. O. F. Mrs. Robison, prior to her marriage, was a 
teacher in the public schools and is a highly accomplished woman. She 
is a member of the United Evangelical church. 



OLEY NELSON. 



Among the well established citizens of Story county there is none who 
deserves more honorable mention than Oley Nelson, who is now living re- 
tired at Slater. He is a native of Rock county, Wisconsin, born August 
II. 1845, and son of Nels and Aase (Chrestensdotter) Olson Evensrue, 
both of whom were natives of Rollag, Numedal, Norway. They were mar- 
ried in Norway and came to America in 1843, locating at Jefferson Prairie 
in Rock county, Wisconsin. The father entered forty acres of govern- 
ment land and in 1845 declared his intention of becoming a citizen of the 
United States. In the spring of 1848 he removed to Primrose, Dane 
county, Wisconsin, and entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, which 
he proceeded to improve. On August 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company 
H, known as the Sugar River Rifles, of the Eighth Wisconsin \'olunteer 
Infantry, the regiment gaining a wide reputation as the Live Eagle Regi- 
ment. The regiment left Camp Randall at Madison, Wisconsin, about 
October i, 1861, and went to St. Louis, from there going to Iron Moun- 
tain, Missouri, where they drove out the rebels and secured the ore for the 
use of the government. They then went to Raleigh and from that place 
to St. Louis and thence down the Mississippi river, assisting in the capture 
of Island No. 10. The regiment was then ordered to Corinth and after 
the capture of that city to N'icksburg. On the way from Corinth to X'icks- 
burg the father of our subject received a sixty day furlough to enable him 
to vi.sit his home as his health had been seriously impaired. lie went 
aboard a boat at Memphis and came as far north as Keokuk, Iowa, when 




(11. KV XKI.SdX 



jt 



HISTORY Of STORY COUXTY 43I 

he was taken off the boat in an unconscious conchtion and conveyed to the 
hospital, where he died August 4, 1862. 

After the father's death the mother continued to live on tlic farm and 
the son took charge of the work. However, in the spring of 1864, desir- 
ing to take the place of his father in defense of the Union, he enlisted in 
Company D, Fortieth Wisconsin Infantry, and was present at the last cap- 
ture of Memphis later in the same year. The regiment was sent to Holly 
Springs and Jackson. :Mississippi. and at the latter place Mr. Nelson was 
taken sick with fever and jaundice and in the fall of the year was sent 
home on a furlough. He was in a very serious condition on his arrival at 
Madison and was practically incapacitated for any service for several 
months. He received his honorable discharge from the army in December 
1864. 

Mr. Xelson continued with his mother in Wisconsin until 1867. In the 
winter of 1864-5 tlie home farm was sold under foreclosure on account of 
a security debt, and they then moved to eighty acres in which the mother 
had an equity. In the spring of 1867 she disposed of this equity, receiv- 
ing two hundred and twenty-five dollars. They also possessed a span of 
colts and three head of young heifers, and having secured a prairie schooner 
started westward, having decided to cast their lot in Iowa. Upon reaching 
Skunk river opposite Cambridge, Story county, Iowa, they found the river 
bottom flooded, making it extremely dangerous to attempt to cross with a 
wagon. Accordingly :\Ir. Nelson left his mother upon the bank and hired 
a pilot for five dollars to assist him in crossing with the wagon and animals. 
After reaching the opposite shore he waded back, the water reaching above 
his waist, and took his mother on his shoulders, she being a small woman 
weighing only about ninety pounds, and carried her across in safety. The 
effort practically exhausted him, but after resting a while they resumed 
their journey and crossed the county line to Polk county, subsequently lo- 
cating on eighty acres of raw prairie. As their resources were extremely 
limited Mr. Nelson found it necessary to sell the horses and wagon and pur- 
chase a yoke of oxen, this transaction replenishing the treasury by about 
one hundred dollars. He hauled lumber and brick from Polk City to build 
a house and they lived comfortably during the following winter. In the 
fall of 1867 the grasshoppers ate up everything green in that section and 
it was indeed a gloomy outlook, especially as payments were due on the 
farm and other obligations had been incurred. 

In the spring of 1869 Mr. Nelson sold the oxen and wagon and went to 
Des Moines, where he secured a position the first day of S. A. Robertson 
to haul brick from his yard at a salary of thirty dollars per month and 
board. In the fall of the same year he received his first introduction to 
the mercantile business in the house of Luce & Mahanna, his salary being 
fifteen dollars per month, twelve dollars of which he was obliged to pay for 
board. Subsequently he conducted a farmers boarding house and in 1874 
removed to Sheldahl, where he erected the first store building in the town, 



432 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

continuing as a merchant and grain buyer until he retired on account of 
the encroacliments of age. He was organizer of the Farmers Savings Bank 
at Slater and was its first president, being at the present time a member of 
the board of directors. 

In December. i86g, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie 
Ersland, of Cambridge, and by this union ten children were born, namely : 
George E., Elsie C, Carrie H.. Anna G., Bell O., Mattie A., Elemer O., 
and Beatrice D., and Kuttie A, and Anios K,. who died in infancy. The 
first five are now married. 

Politically Mr. Nelson has ever since arriving at the age of manhood 
given his support to the republican party and has served in a number of 
responsible positions. He was postmaster at Sheldahl from 1874 to 1880 
and school treasurer from 1874 to 1885. He was elected to the twenty-first 
and twenty-second general assembly, serving in 1882 and 1884 with dis- 
tinguished ability, being especially active in behalf of better drainage laws, 
better school laws and free text-books. He was a delegate to the national 
republican convention which nominated James G. Blaine for president and 
has been employed many times by the state republican committee as a cam- 
paign speaker, having appeared in more than fifteen counties in Iowa and 
in four counties in Minnesota. Religiously, he is identified with the United 
Lutheran church, in which he has for many years been a prominent worker. 
In 1904 he was elected president of the board of directors of St. Olof Col- 
lege and since 1890 has been a member of the board of the United Nor- 
wegian church of America, being now vice president of that body. 

Mr. Nelson possessed limited opportunities of school education in his 
early life. His mother, however, was a woman of fine education and was 
his principal teacher until he came into contact with the world. His tastes 
were originally for mechanical pursuits but conditions led him into mercan- 
tile life, in which he attained deserved success. As a public speaker he has 
been highly efficient and his services have been in urgent demand. Today 
he is recognized as a leader among Norwegians of Iowa, due to his high 
character and marked business ability, and he is greatly esteemed wherever 
he is known. 



DICK R. SPIEKER. 



Dick R. Spieker, cashier of the Peoples Savings Bank of Nevada and 
recognized as one of the most progressive young business men of the city, 
was born in Grundy county, Iowa, September 17. 1880. He is a son of 
John and Hattie (Ilusinga) Spieker, both natives of Germany. The father 
came to this country with his parents in infancy, the family locating in 
Hardin county, Iowa, in 1852. Our subject's Grandfather Spieker did not 
possess a liberal amount of this world's goods when he established his 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 433 

home in the country of his adoption, but he was industrious, frugal and 
persevering and succeeded even beyond his expectations. As an indication 
of his character it may be stated that he walked from his farm, a distance 
o! one hundred miles, to Des Moines to file his land entry papers. The 
father of our subject was reared on the home farm and has devoted his 
entire life to agriculture and stock-raising. He is the owner of five hundred 
acres of land, which he acquired through his industry and good manage- 
ment, and is recognized as one of the substantial and influential citizens 
of the state. He is a member of the board of directors of the Farmers 
Savings Bank of Aplington, Butler county, Iowa. Politically he gives his 
support to the republican party but has never sought public office, his at- 
tention being mainly devoted to his private interests. The mother of our 
subject was born in Germany in 1850 and came to the United States with 
her parents about 1865. 

There were eight children in the family of Mr. and Airs. John Spieker, 
namely: Matilda, now the wife of Charles Wilke, a contractor and cement 
block and tile manufacturer of Aplington; one who died in infancy: Dick 
R., our subject: Claude, further mention of whom is made below; and 
Tena, Anna, Lena and John, all at home. Claude Spieker, who was born 
in Grundy county, Iowa, in 1882, received his education in the district 
schools, after which he attended the State Normal School, the Capital City 
Commercial College and Drake University, taking the commercial law 
course in the latter. Since leaving the university he has been engaged in 
the banking business at Des Moines, Aplington and Nevada, now being 
associated with his brother as assistant cashier of the Peoples Savings Bank. 

Dick R. Spieker grew to manhood upon the home farm and early gave 
indications that his tastes lay in other directions than those of agricultural 
pursuits. He became a student of the State Normal School at seventeen 
years of age and after teaching for two years took a course in the Capital 
City Commercial College, graduating in 1903. Seeking practical experience 
in a well established banking institution, he became connected with 
the Des Moines National Bank, where he continued for three years. 
In 1905 he assisted in organizing the Farmers Savings Bank at Aplington 
and became its cashier, holding that position for three years and building 
up the business until the institution became recognized as one of the reliable 
concerns of the county. In May, 1909, he came to Nevada as cashier of 
the Peoples Savings Bank, which office he now holds. He and his brother 
are large stockholders in this bank and it has shown a remarkable growth 
under their management. 

In March, 1909, Mr. .Spieker was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle A. 
Graham, who was born in Des Moines, in 18S4, a daughter of David and 
Augusta (Sinn) Graham, the father being a well known contractor. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Spieker one child, Roy, was born Ajjril 5, 1910. 

Mr. Spieker is an active member of the American Bankers Association 
and also of the Iowa Bankers Association and keeps thoroughly informed 



434 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

on all imijortant movements in fniancial affairs. He gives his support to 
the republican party and his religious belief is indicated by membership in 
the Baptist church. Mrs. Spieker is a member of the Christian churcii. 
Since taking up his residence in Xevada Mr. Spieker has erected a beau- 
tiful modern residence, which is a credit to his taste and an ornament to 
the city. Although living here comparatively a short time, he has made 
many friends and has shown a capability as a business man and financier 
wliii-h gives brilliant promise for his future. 



FRED E. IIAXSEX. 



It is doubtful if a more promising advocate at the bar is to be found in 
Story county than l-"red E. Hansen, whose name introduces this review. 
lie was born at Chicago, Xovember 14, 1873, and comes of Danish and 
Norwegian ancestry. The father, Thomas P. Hansen, was born in Denmark 
and after reaching manhood became a seaman. He established his home 
in the L'nited States and for a number of years was identified with inland 
water traffic, being at the time of his death, in 1894, captain of the W. O. 
Goodman, a merchantman plying on the Great Lakes. He was energetic 
and thoroughly competent in his calling and attained a high reputation a- 
a conscientious and trustworthy officer. He was a member of the Masonic- 
order and jjolitically gave his adherence to the rejjublican party. He mar- 
ried Xathalia Werfel, who was a native of Chicago and departed this life 
some years before the death of her husband. Her mother was a Xorwegian 
and her father a Dane. Ilcr religion was that of the Baptist church. She 
was the mother of five children, all of whom are deceased except the sub- 
ject of this review. The father was again married after the death of hi- 
first wife, but there were no children by that union. 

Fred E. Hansen came to Iowa at eleven years of age and took uj) hi- 
home with Henry Thomiison, a friend of the family, living near Roland. 
Ikre he grew to manhood and continued for si.xteen years. He received 
his preliminary education in the jMiblic schools graduating from the Roland 
high school in 1893. After spending two years as a student in the State 
.Agricultural College at Ames, he began teaching in which he cnntinncil for 
five years, serving for two years of that time as principal of the Roland 
high school. His ability as a teacher received general recognition in the 
county and in 1900 he was elected county superintendent of schools, beinu 
reelected in 1902. I'pnn retiring from this position he went upon the ro.id 
as a traveling salesman, in the meantime preparing for admission to the 
bar by taking the prescribed course of the Sprague Correspondence School 
of Eaw. He also studied law in the office of Fitchpatrick & McCall, <if 
Nevada, and in the fall of 1906 was duly admitted to the bar. He has been 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 435 

in active practice at Nevada since January, 1907, meeting with success due 
to thorough preparation and conscientious effort. 

On the 6th of June, igoo, Air. Hansen was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna R. Hegland, who was horn at Roland, Iowa, July 19, 1883, a daughter 
of O. O. and Engehorg (Johnson) Hegland. The father is one of the old 
and influential farmers of the county and is now living retired. Two chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hansen: Floyd, who died at the age 
of six years; and Alargaret, who was bom January 2, 1910. 

Mr. Hansen has made a favorable .start in a profession that calls for the 
best energy and talent, and there is no doubt that he will attain an enviable 
position at the bar. He is a constant student and fluent speaker and the 
possessor of well tested business capacity which cannot fail to assist him 
very materially in his career. He is a member of the Story County Bar 
Association and politically is identified with the republican party. He has 
not sought official responsibility but is now serving most acceptably as a 
member of the board of trustees of the public library. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Knights of Pythias and has attained in the latter organization the 
title of chancellor commander. He and his wife are active workers in the 
Memorial Lutheran church, of which Mr. Hansen is a deacon. Having 
made the right start in life, he is winning success and has many warm per- 
sonal friends in central Iowa. 



JESSE R. WOOD. 



Few citizens of Indian Creek township have exercised a stronger force 
or more potent influence on the life of the community than did Jesse R. 
Wood during the period of his residence in this locality. Ohio claimed 
him as a native son, his birth occurring in Allen county, that state, on the 
igth of August, 1832. His parents, John G. and Anna (Kennison) Wood, 
were both natives of A'irg-jnia, wdience they removed to Ohio in early life. 
In the '30s they took up their abode in Indiana and there the mother passed 
away. Later the father was again married, after which he removed to 
Story county, Iowa, locating on a farm near Iowa Center, which remained 
his home throughout his remaining days. 

Leaving his native state in early childhood, Jesse R. Wood accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Indiana, and there he was reared to man- 
hood. As a pupil in the common schools he received his elementary train- 
ing and later matriculated in the Central University at Pella, Iowa, 
prompted by a desire for a thorough education. It was decreed, however, 
that he should not complete his university course, for at the outbreak of 
the Civil war he put aside all personal interests, actuated by a strong spirit 
of patriotism, and. offering his aid in defense of the Union cause, en- 



430 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

listed, on tlic lytli of ^lay, 1861, as a private in Company E, Tliird Iowa 
Infantry, under Captain John Scott. The regiment, commanded by Colonel 
N. G. Williams, was assigned to the First Brigade, Fourth Division, Sev- 
enteenth Corps of the Army of the Tennessee, as a member of which Mr. 
Wood participated in several important engagements, including the battles 
of Blue Mills, Missouri, and Shiloh or Pittsburg Landing. He was on 
detached service for a time, and in .\pril, i8(>2. at Shiloh, while en route 
to Corinth, he was honorably discharged because of disability, at which 
time he was mustered out. He suffered greatly from e.xposure during his 
term of service, being little more than a skeleton when he reached home, 
and it required several months to recuperate. 

As soon as his returning strength would jjermit Mr. Wood took up 
teaching as a means of support, and for many years his time was thus 
occupied during the winter months, while in the summer seasons he was 
engaged in farming, becoming successful in both branches. His identifi- 
cation with the educational interests of his part of the state was a source 
of benefit to the communities in which he labored, for he proved himself 
a most competent and able instructor, imparting clearly and readily to 
others the knowledge that he had acquired. After withdrawing from the 
profession of teaching he served for many years as member of the school 
board, the cause of education ever finding in him a stalwart champion. He 
became interested in various other phases of community life and was one 
of the best known and most public-spirited citizens of his part of Story 
county. Possessing those qualities which always win respect and confi- 
dence, he was chosen as executor of many estates and his aid was in- 
variably sought in matters requiring business ability and integrity. In- 
deed there were few residents of Indian Creek township whose counsel 
and advice were more largely .sought than that of Jesse R. Wood, and no 
trust reposed in him was ever abused. That he was endowed with keen 
business ability is indicated by the fact that he was numbered among the 
substantial and prosperous fanners of his district, being the owner at the 
time of his death of a valuable farm of two hundred acres besides si.xtecn 
acres of good timber land. The farm is yet in the possession of Mrs. 
Wood, although she has since disposed of the timber tract. About five 
years prior to his death Mr. Wood turned the work of his farm over to 
others and retired from active life, taking up his abode in Des Moines. 
About two years later, however, he came lo Maxwell and was here re- 
siding at the time of his death. 

On November 20, 1862, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss 
Juliet Wilson, of Grant town.ship, a daughter of Alfred and .Anna (Adams) 
Wilson, formerly of Licking county. Ohio, and by this marriage were born 
six children, as follows: Georgiana, the widow of W. II. King, who re- 
sides in Des Moines; Ida II., who wedded Rev. Wilson .Mills, a Baptist 
minister of Omaha, Nebraska; Harvey A., engaged in farming in Okla- 
homa; Edith, the wife of L. W. Stone, of Nevada. Iowa; Jessie E., who 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 437 

married Professor C. W. Kirk, of Collins, Iowa ; and Ada L., the widow 
of Roy W. Brokaw, of Des Moines. 

Like his wife Air. Wood was ever a faithful and devoted church mem- 
ber, his actions at all times being in harmony with his professions. At 
an early day he joined the Baptist church and remained an earnest worker 
therein until the disbanding of the congregation at Iowa Center, when he 
united with the Christian church in Maxwell. For twelve years prior to 
his demise he served as elder in the latter church, and Mrs. Wood con- 
tinues an active and helpful factor in its work. Death came very unex- 
pectedly to Mr. Wood on the 6th of March, 1905. He was standing on 
the railroad platform in Cambridge preparing to board a train for Des 
Moines when he suddenly dropped dead. Deep regret was felt at his 
death, the news of which brought a sense of personal loss into the heart 
of almost everyone who had known him, for with his passing Story county 
lost one of her most valued and influential citizens, the measure of whose 
success in life was taken not so much by the material gain which was his 
as by the honor, confidence and good-will extended him by his fellowmen. 



GEORGE SEVERT NELSON. 

Although he has been a resident of Story county but eleven years, 
George Severt Nelson is recognized as one of its leading agriculturists and 
business men. He was born in Norway in 1859 and is a son of Severt 
and Julia (Anderson) Nelson. After the death of the father, which oc- 
curred in Norway, the mother married O. O. Oleson. The family came to 
the United States in Alay, 1866, and located at Grinnell, Iowa, where they 
remained for only three months, and then came to Story county. The 
first five years of their residence in this county they lived on a rented 
farm but during that period were able to accumulate sufficient capital to 
enable them to buy eighty acres of land north of Slater in 1871. Owing to 
their thrifty habits and industry they were later able to add another forty 
to this. Mr. Oleson has now retired from active farming and is living- in 
Roland, enjoying in the evening of his life the ease and comfort denied 
him during the hard working days of his early manhood. 

George Severt Nelson was only a lad of seven years when the family 
located in Story county, therefore his boyhood and youth were passed here 
and in the district schools he acquired his education. He remained a resi- 
dent of Iowa until 1883, when he went to South Dakota and entered one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. Two years later he filed on a tree claim 
and in 1898 he bought another quarter section, making the aggregate of 
his realty holdings in that state four hundred and eighty acres. He sold 
his property in 1900 and the following year returned to Stor>' county and 
louo-ht two hundred and twenty-one acres. He has since added to his 



438 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

property and now has two hundred and ninety-four. In addition to his 
landed interests Mr. Nelson is a stockholder in the canning factory at 
Cambridge and the Charles Publishing Company, of Chicago, Illinois. 

Mr. Nelson wedded Miss Carrie Tesdall and they have become the 
parents of seventeen children, eight sons and nine daughters, fourteen of 
whom are living. They are as follows: Gertie; Leslie Morris; Maltie; 
Sivrie; Orville; Clarence; Chester, deceased; one who died in infancy; 
Jessie and Bessie, twins; Benjamin; Florence; Alvin; X'erna ; Laura; Lil- 
lian ; and Beulah. 

Mr. Nelson is a member of the socialist party and has always taken 
an active interest in jjolitics. In 1899, while a resident of South Dakota, 
he represented the si.xteenth district in the state legislature and was re- 
nominated ])\- the populist party for another term but was defeated. He 
was also elected to the office of county assessor in Buffalo county. South 
Dakota, and served as clerk of his township for ten years and two as 
treasurer. During his residence in Iowa he has been the candidate of the 
socialist party for the office of railway commissioner of the state, but was 
defeated because of the minority of his jKirty. Wherever he has lived 
Mr. Nelson has slmwii himself to be a ])ublic-spirite(l. progressive and 
enterprising citizen. 



JOHN NIELSEN. 



Denmark has contributed thousands of her progressive sons and dauijh- 
ters to America and in this country many of them have found home, 
friends and fortune, now being numbered among the most honored mem- 
bers of their respective communities. In this class is John Nielsen, a well 
known miller and grain dealer of Slater. He was born in Denmark, June 
26, 1857, a son of Niels and Margaret Madsen, both of whom spent their 
entire lives in Denmark. 

John Nielsen was reared under the parental roof and acquired his 
early education in the common schools of his native land. At the age of 
fourteen years, according to the custom of the country, he was appren- 
ticed to a trade and learned the milling business, becoming verj' adept in 
an industry which can be usefully applied in almost any country of the 
world. In 1880, being then twenty-three years of age and ambitious to 
advance as rapidly as possible in life, he emigrated to .America, coming 
to Sheldahl, Iowa, where he readily found employment at his trade. About 
1884 he and a i)artncr rented the mill, which they operated for a short 
time. He then went to Grinnell and made an effort to rent the mill at 
that place but was not able to accomplish his purpose and after spending 
a few months at Sheldahl, became associated with his brother in a clothing 
store at Fargo. North Dakota. Two years' experience in the dothincf busi- 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 



439 



ness convinced him that the trade to which he had been reared offered 
more favorable inducements, and accordingly, in 1891, he once more re- 
turned to Sheldahl and in company with B. C. Dueland rented the mill at 
that place, which they operated for three years under the firm name of 
Nielsen & Dueland. In 1894 he and his partner purchased a two-thirds 
interest in the mill at Slater and began its operation, acquiring the remain- 
ing interest seven months later. This mill was at the time only a feed 
mill and in order to meet the growing demand of an increasing population 
the firm enlarged the building and put in modern machinery, including a 
complete roller-process plant, making the mill one of the leading industries 
of the locality. In April, 1910, the building was destroyed by fire, the 
depot and freight houses also being swept away at the same time. The 
firm of Nielsen & Dueland was composed, however, of men of determina- 
tion and they immediately purchased the elevator building of Oley Nelson 
and fitted it out with milling machinery, so that they have since conducted 
an elevator and a mill, being also extensive dealers in coal and feed. They 
are now enjoying a large and increasing patronage. 

In 1879 ^Ir. Nielsen, before coming to America, was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sina M. Peterson, a native of Denmark, and two children 
blessed this union: Nels IM., now of Slater; and Catherine, the wife of 
Fred Nelson of Missoula, Alontana. 

The life record of Mr. Nielsen is a remarkable illustration of the possi- 
bilities in America for men who have learned a useful trade and are pos- 
sessed of business ability to make practical application of their knowledge. 
He has no reason to regret making Iowa his home, as he has secured a 
competency and is assured of a liberal annual income. Politically he is 
allied with the prohibition party. He has not sought public office but has 
ably served as member of the town council. He and his wife are con- 
nected with the Methodist church, Mr. Nielsen being one of the stewards 
of the local organization. 



OLIVER G. TICHENOR. 

Many of the successful agriculturists of Story county are native .sons, 
men whose parents came here in pioneer days and broke the prairie, felled 
the trees for their lojj cabins, built the roads and in .short endured all of 
the hardships and privations incident to life in an unsettled district and 
among these may be mentioned Oliver G. Tichenor. He was born in 
Nevada township on the 7th of October. 1869, a son of Joseph and Martha 
J. (McCullough) Tichenor. The father was a native of Delaware, born 
on the 9th of March, 1813, and was a son of Aloses Tichenor. He went 
to Indiana as a child with his parents and there he spent his boyhood and 
youth, acquiring his education in the district schools. He remained in his 



440 HISTORY OF STORY COUXTY 

father's household until old enough to work for himself, at which time lie 
left and began farming. Some time after his marriage he removed to 
Bureau county, Illinois, but after one year's residence there he again started 
west and in 1855 he located in Story county, Iowa. He bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land on section 28, Nevada township, at one dollar 
and twenty-five cents per acre and there he spent the remainder of his life. 
Joseph Tichenor married Miss Sarah Applegate in Indiana and they 
became the parents of the following children : Nathaniel, who enlisted from 
Story county and was killed in battle during the Civil war: May Elizabetli, 
the widow of J. P. Robinson, of Ness City, Kansas ; Malvina, deceased, 
who married J. S. Middleton ; Louisa, the widow of J. Tanner, of Stewart, 
Iowa; Emma, who died in childhood. Mrs. Tichenor died before they left 
Indiana and in 1855, while living in Illinois, he married Miss Martha J. 
McCullough. who was born in South Carolina on the loth of March. 1830, 
and unto them were born seven children : George L.. who is living on the 
old homestead; Isabelle. the wife of J. W. Hayne. living in Nevada town- 
ship, Story county; Eva. who died at the age of thirteen years; Carlton 
W., who died at the age of twenty-six, leaving a widow and one son, 
Joseph, who was the twin brother of Carlton W. and died at three years ; 
Edward M.. also living on the old home farm; and Oliver G. The father 
passed away on the i6th of June. 1876. He had always voted the re- 
[Hiblican ticket and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
The mother had passed the seventy-ninth milestone of life before she died 
on the 2ist of February. 1909. All of the Tichenor children of the second 
marriage were born on the old homestead and tliere tlie brothers George 
and Edward, the former born on the 4th of February. 1856, and the 
latter on the loth of November. 1865. have always resided. Edward 
Tichenor is single but George is now a widower. He was married in 1889 
to Nettie Wireman, but she died five years later, in 1894. They have three 
hundred and eight acres of well improved and highly cultivated land and 
engage in general farming and stock raising and feeding, in all of which 
they have met with more than moderate success and are considered to be 
among the most successful and substantial farmers in Nevada township. 
They have always been stanch supporters of the republican party and take 
an active interest in all local political issues. Edward Tichenor has held 
the position of township clerk and township assessor and is the present in- 
cumbent of the latter office. He is a member of the United Evangelical 
church. 

Oliver G. Tichenor, the youngest member of his family, was educated 
in the district schools of Story county and after he laid aside his text- 
books assisted on the home farm until his marriage, when he began farm- 
ing for himself. He rented land for one year but at the end of that time 
bought a small farm of forty acres, which he cultivated for two years, and 
then rented a larger place, which he operated for four years. At the en'' 
of that tituc he had acquired sufficient capital to enable him to invest in 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 441 

eighty acres in Richmond township, upon which he hved for ten years. 
In January, 1909, he bought his present place, which consists of two hun- 
dred acres on sections 12, 13 and 14, Nevada township, and engages in 
general farming. He owns one of the valuable farms in that township and 
keeps a good grade of stock. The improvements upon his farm are kept 
in repair and the lields reward his careful supervision by an abundant har- 
vest, which always commands good prices. 

Mr. Tichenor was married on the 17th of March, 1891 to Miss Hattie 
Whittaker, who was born in Nevada township in 1867, a daughter of 
Thomas Whittaker. They hold membership in the United Evangelical As- 
sociation. Ever since attaining his majority Mr. Tichenor has been identi- 
fied with the republican party. He always takes an active interest in local 
politics and during his residence in Richmond township served for four 
years as township assessor, while he is at present filling the office of town- 
ship clerk in Nevada township. He is highly regarded in the community 
where he lives, is a public-spirited man and always gives his support to 
every measure that will prove of public benefit. Both he and his wife 
have many friends, to whom they extend the hospitality of their pleasant 
home. 



CHARLES G. VASEY. 



Charles G. Vasey, of the firm of \'asey Brothers, dealers in lumber, 
coal and agricultural implements at Collins, by his active and honorable 
business life is well entitled to representation in this volume. He was born 
in Peoria, Polk county, Iowa, September 17, 1873, a son of William and 
Anna (Oxley) Vasey, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Vasey acquired his early education in the district schools and 
later attended the Collins high school, graduating in the first class that com- 
pleted the course in that institution. He then entered the Capital City 
Commercial College, from which he was graduated in 1896, securing a 
practical business education, which has been of great benefit to him in his 
contact with the world. He began his business career in the bank at Max- 
well and later was connected with both banks at Collins. For two terms 
he made a test of his talents as a school teacher but found the work un- 
congenial, and being attracted to mercantile pursuits in February, 189S, 
he purchased from S. A, Rush the Collins lumberyard, two years later 
taking into partnership a younger brother, Arthur A. The business is 
conducted under the title of Vasey Brothers, and they have secured an 
extensive patronage, the concern being recognized as one of the most 
successful in Story county. 

In June, 1902, Mr. \'asey was tmited in marriage to Miss Grace King, 
a daughter of William King, of Collins, and by this union one child, Harold 



442 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

B., lias been born. Mr. X'asey is independent politically, and thus is free 
from partiality in casting his ballot and is able to take a broad view of 
political questions. He is actively interested in public affairs and served 
three terms as town clerk, two terms as mayor of Collins, and at the 
present time is a member of the school board. He previously tilled the 
office of secretary of that body for several years and was a member of the 
board when the handsome new school building was erected, being largely 
instrumental in the inception and accomplishment of that important work. 
He is identilied with Amity Lodge, No. 361, I. O. O. F., and also with 
Sunbeam Lodge, No. 181. Mystic Workers of the World. He ranks as 
one of the leading business men of Collins, and as he has always dealt 
fairly with others, never seeking to advance his personal interest to the 
injury of his fellowmen, he possesses in an eminent degree the respect and 
esteem of the entire community. 



JOHN R. H.\LL. 



The name of John R. Hall holds a prominent place in tlic list <if the 
pioneers of Story county, where he has lived for more than fifty years. 
He was born in Ross county, Ohio, on the 2d of December, 1S35, his 
parents being Thomas and Eliza (Rosenbarger) Hall, both natives of \'ir- 
ginia, who removed to Ohio with their parents in the early days and were 
there reared and married. In 1836 they went to Kosciusko county, Indiana, 
where they lived until the fall of 1854, when they again started westward, 
their destination being Story county, Iowa. When they were nearing the 
end of their journey, which was made in wagons across the prairie, cholera 
broke out in their party, and one member succumbed to the dread disease 
and was buried nine miles this side of Marengo, while two more were laid 
to rest in the little cemetery at Grinnell. one of them being Amos Hall, 
a brother of our subject. Upon their arrival in Story county they located 
on two hundred acres of land which Thomas Hall had purchased in Indian 
Creek township and where they continued to live until both parents passed 
away, the father at the age of sixty-nine years and the mother just after 
passing the seventy-second anniversary of her birth. They were the parent^ 
of eight children and of the six surviving four have passed their seventieth 
year, namclv : Noble Porter Hall, a resident of Maxwell. Iowa; Mary 
Jane, the widow of Augustus P>erlin. of Ottawa, Kansas; John R., our sub- 
ject; lames IL, also of Maxwell; William C. of Golden Prairie. Wyoming; 
Thomas, of P.agley. Iowa. 

The boyhood and youth of John R. Hall was very similar to that of 
other farmer lads in ])ionecr days. The educational facilities afforded by 
the district school jiroviiled him with the fundamental jirinciple;- of the 
three "R's." an introduction to which was acquired in a log school, with 



HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 443 

puncheon floor and slab benches, where the rod formed a very important 
feature of the curriculum. At the usual age he laid aside his text-books 
to assume the heavier responsibilities of manhood. He remained at home 
until he was twenty-three years of age, when he rented land anil began 
farming for himself, but by thrift, hard work and self-denial he was able 
to acquire sufficient capital to purchase eighty acres on section 13, Indian 
Creek township, in 1867. The laml was unimproved and after erecting 
a house he located thereon and from then until 1888 this continued to be his 
home. In the latter year he removed to ^laxwell, where he has ever since 
lived retired, which is the reward of tireless energy and indomitable courage 
in the face of the hardships and misfortunes incident to life in a new 
country. 

Mr. Hall responded to his country's call and went to the front during 
the Civil war with Company I of the Thirteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
in which he had enlisted on the 27th of October, 1864. He took part in 
various skirmishes and battles, among the most important being the battle 
of Xashville. Receiving his discharge on the 28th of July, 1805, he then 
returned home. 

On the 17th of October, 1861, Mr. Hall and Miss Sarah Dunahoo 
were united in marriage. Mrs. Hall is a daughter of William Dunahoo, 
one of the pioneer settlers of Story county, who came here in 1854 and 
located on a farm in Indian Creek township. 

Mr. and ilrs. Hall are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He has always been a stanch supporter of the republican party, although 
he has never sought any reward for party fealty in the form of political 
honors or public office. He is known as one of the substantial citizens of 
Maxwell and has always been held in high regard in the communities where 
he resided because of his fine sterling qualities. 



MADISON R. DUNAHOO. 

Among the well known and highly successful native sons of Story 
county is Madison R. Dunahoo, who was born in Indian Creek township 
on the 19th of May, 1857. He is a son of John and Rachel (Ray) Duna- 
hoo, the father being a \'irginian by birth and the mother a native of 
Indiana. They came to Iowa in 1854, locating on the farm where their 
son ;\Iadison R. was born and now lives. Eighty acres of this land was 
acquired from the government and later Mr. Dunahoo bought forty more 
adjoining. It was here that they reared their children and continued to 
make their home during the remainder of their lives. On the 28th of 
March, 1880, Mrs. Dunahoo passed away and was survived by her hus- 
band for twenty-four years, his death occurring on the I2tli of November. 
1904. He was an ardent advocate of the principles of the republican 



444 HISTORY OF STORY COUNTY 

pam- and always voted for its candidates, his fidelity- being rewarded by 
' ■ to the \ • vvnship offices, all of which he most capably filled. 

. lison R. was reared "ron the farm where he now lives 

and which he continu