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Full text of "A history of Sullivan County, Indiana, closing of the first century's history of the county, and showing the growth of its people, institutions, industries and wealth"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08181 



\ 



A HISTORY 



OF 



Sullivan County 
Indiana 



CLOSING OF THE FIRST CENTURY'S HISTORY 
OF THE COUNTY, AND SHOWING THE 
GROWTH OF ITS PEOPLE, INSTI- 
TUTIONS, INDUSTRIES 
AND WEALTH 



THOMAS J. WOLFE 

EDITOR 



VOLUME II HibW Y^,'" 



.1 



>»l 5 



ILLUSTRATED 



> ) > 3 * J 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 

1909 



THE NEW YORK 

FOBUC UBRARY 

536365 

TILOEN FOUNDAnONS. 



''i •;':'')'■:■ ^^ A y. W ^iZ .» 



• • * ^ £ ■# 



iTHE NEW YORK 

PU-BLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILOEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 



John T. and Will. H. Hays. — The law firm of John T. & Will. H. 
Hays, of Sullivan, is composed of John T. Hays, who has been a leading 
attorney and citizen of this locality for some thirty years, and Will. H. 
Hays his son, who has been associated with his father since 1900. The 
firm are attorneys for the various railroads, coal companies, and other 
important corporations which are so much concerned in the development 
of Sullivan county, among them being the Evansville & Terre Haute Rail- 
road Company; the Indianapolis Southern Railroad Company; the Terre 
Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern Traction Company ; the Dering Coal 
Company ; Consolidated Indiana Coal Company ; Jackson Hill Coal & 
Coke Company ; Carlisle Coal & Clay Company ; Bellevue Coal Company ; 
Sullivan County Coal Company ; the West Jackson Hill Coal Mining & 
Transport Company ; the London Liability and Guaranty Company ; the 
Illinois Coal Operators' Mutual Employers' Liability Insurance Company ; 
the Central Union Telephone Company ; the Sullivan Lighting Company, 
and the People's State Bank of Sullivan. 

John Tennyson Hays, senior member of the firm, is a native of 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, born on the nth day of November, 1845. 
His parents and grandparents were all native-born Americans. He lived 
on a farm with his father until he was sixteen years of age, attending the 
short winter terms of the common schools in his native county during that 
time. In 1864 he was graduated from the Iron City Commercial College 
at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, then attended the high school at Lisbon, Ohio, 
and in 1866 entered Mount Union College. He was graduated from that 
institution in June. 1869, receiving the highest honors of his class in 
natural science and mathematics. For a year after his graduation he 
was principal of schools at Calcutta, Ohio, and in August, 1870, moved 
to Farmersburg, Sullivan county. He taught in the Ascension Seminary 
there, and later in Sullivan, until 1874, with the exception of one year, 
during which he was principal of the schools at Oaktown, Knox county. 

In 1874 Mr. Hays became a law student in the office of Sewell Coun- 
sel, but at his admission to the bar on Marcli i, 187s. purchased the inter- 

1 



2 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

est of Nathaniel G. Buff, in the firm of Buff' & Buff, of Sullivan, continu- 
ing in partnership with Judge Buff until 1878. In the fall of that year 
the partnership was dissolved, as he had been elected prosecuting attornev 
of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit for a term of two years. In 1879 he 
associated himself in practice with his brother, H. J. Hays, and that part- 
nership was unbroken until 1892. From that year until 1900, when he 
received his son. Will. H. Hays into partnership, he conducted an inde- 
pendent practice. Although his law business is of immense proportions, 
his early life on the farm still draws him to the soil, and he now takes 
great delight in managing his farm, as well as a tract of several thousand 
acres owned by the West Jackson Hill Coal Mining & Transport Com- 
pany, of which he is president. He is also a director in the People's State 
Bank. 

Mr. liays has always been a Republican, but never was a candidate 
for any office except that of prosecuting attorney. He has always been 
a member of the Presbyterian church, of which he is an elder and in 
which he has taught for years in connection with the Sunday school. 
Socially, he is a member of the Columbia Club, Indianapolis, and has a 
close connection with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias. 
He is a member of Sullivan Commandery, No. 54, Knights Templar ; 
Jerusalem Chapter, No. 81, Royal Arch Masons; Sullivan Lodge, No. 
263, Free and Accepted Masons ; Sullivan Council, No. 73, R. & S. M. ; 
and Sullivan Chapter, No. 188, Order of the Eastern Star. He served 
eight years as high priest of this chapter and three years as master of his 
lodge. He is identified with the Knights of Pythias as a member of 
Sullivan Lodge, No. 85. 

He has been twice married; first in 1869, from which union his two 
daughters, Martha A. Hays and Bertha Hays Drake, were born.. In 
December, 1876, he was married to Mary Cain, of Sullivan, Indiana, and 
of their marriage two children have been born, William Harrison Hays 
and Hinkle Cain Hays. The career of John T. Hays, most noteworthy 
and honorable, needs no commendation. 

Will. H. Hays, junior member of the firm was born in Sullivan 
November 5, 1879. He was graduated from the Sullivan high school in 
the class of 1896, entering Wabash College in the fall of that year. After 
pursuing a four years' course in that institution he obtained his degree 
of B. A. in 1900. He had been interested in the law ever since he was a 
young boy, spending much of his spare time in his father's office. At his 
graduation he naturally formed a partnership with him, which has since 
continued. In 1904 Mr. Hays received the degree of M. A. from his 
alma mater, the subject of the special thesis upon which it was conferred 
being "The Negro Problem." In college he won the highest oratorical 
honors and ever since his graduation has given much time to public 
speaking. 

A Republican in politics, in 1902 he was nominated for prosecuting 
attorney, and was defeated by fifty-three votes. From 1904 to 1908 (two 
terms) he served as chairman of the Republican county committee; was 
a member of the State Advisory committee from the Second district from 




^^il^l^^^l^l^ 




HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 3 

1906 to 1908, and during the campaigns of 1906 and 1908 was chairman 
of the Speakers' Bureau of the Republican state committee. In his reHg- 
ious faith Mr. Hays is a Presbyterian, and teaches a class of boys in its 
Sunday school. In Masonry he is a member of Sullivan Lodge, No. 263, 
F. & A. M. ; Jerusalem Chapter, No. 81, R. A. M. ; Sullivan Council, 
No. JT^, R. & S. M. : Sullivan Commandery, No. 54, Knights Templar, 
and Sullivan Chapter, No. 188, Order of the Eastern Star. He is also a 
member of the Indianapolis Consistory, Scottish Rite Masons, and of 
Murat Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of both 
the Columbia and Marion Clubs, of Indianapolis, and is a life member 
of Sullivan Lodge, No. 911, B. P. O. E. He is a member of Phi Delta 
Theta Fraternity and for six years has been state president of the order. 
Mr. Hays was married on November 18, 1902, to Miss Helen Louise 
Thomas, of Crawfordsville, Indiana, a daughter of Judge Albert Duy 
Thomas, who resides in that place. 



Orion Boyd Harris, who was tile circuit-judge of Sullivan and 
Greene counties, Indiana, from 1900 to "1906) is'a'nai^ye'of Knox county, 
Ohio, born April 15, 1859, son of Amos M. and Jane (Hill) Harris. The 
father was also born in Knox county, Ohio, the date being March 2, 1833 ; 
he died in 1900. The mother, also a native of Knox county, Ohio, was 
born in 1834 and died in 1905. They were united in 'marriage in their 
native county in November, 1857, and moved to Greene county, Indiana, 
in 1866, and lived there until 1873, when they removed to Knox county, 
Ohio. In Ohio, the father was a farmer, and also a general merchant doing 
business at one time at Newark, Greene county, Indiana. Retiring from 
mercantile life, he lived his latter years on his farm. The grandfathers on 
both paternal and maternal sides came from southeastern A'irginia and 
effected a settlement in Ohio in 1808, remaining there until death. Grand- 
father Harris raised a family of ten children and they all lived to rear 
families of their own. Amos M. Harris, father of Judge Harris, was a 
stanch adherent to Democratic party principles. Both he and his wife 
were of Scotch-Irish descent. They were members of the Christian 
church. To them were born six children, as follows : Judge Orion B., 
of this memoir : Clarence W., residing in Syracuse, Kansas ; Victor L., 
residing in same place ; India A., wife of Harry A. Simmons, residing 
in Lakin, Kansas: Samuel C, died in infancy; Myrtle, wife of Charles 
P. Worden, residing in Syracuse, Kansas. 

Judge Harris was reared on his father's farm and received his 
primary education in the district schools. He then attended the Normal 
School at Utica, Ohio, graduating in the class of 1878. Later he was 
graduated from Kenyon College, Columbia, Ohio, with the class of 1885. 
He taught school two years in Ohio, and one year in Greene county, 
Indiana. Having settled upon the profession of law as the one he wished 
to pursue, he read law while yet a teacher in both Ohio and Indiana. In 
1887 he read with William C. Hultz, of Sullivan. Indiana, remaining 



4 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

until 1890. He acted as deputy prosecuting attorney, under Mr. Hultz, 
until 1892. From 1890 to 1893 he practiced law alone at Sullivan, 
Indiana, and at that date formed a partnership with William T. Douthitt, 
remaining with him until 1896. He then practiced law and managed the 
Sullivan Times, a Democratic local paper, until 1900. During the last 
named year he was elected judge of the Sullivan and Greene county cir- 
cuit courts, taking his office in November, 1900, and serving until 1906, 
since which time he has practiced alone. His office is now located in the 
Citizens' Trust Building. In 1902 a Negro v\'as lynched in his count)r, 
and the governor of the state undertook to dispossess the sheriff of his 
office. The judge gave his opinion and the sherifif was not molested. 
Judge Harris is a Democrat, and in fraternal connections is a member 
of the blue lodge and chapter of the Masonic order. He is also a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Sullivan. Besides his legal 
business. Judge Harris is the president of the La Gloria Copper Alining 
Company, of Terre Haute. 

He was married May 8, 1890, to Rachel, daughter of Seburn and 
Mary Elizabeth (McCrae) Kirkham. Mrs. Harris was born in Sullivan 
county, Indiana, and attended the common and high schools and also the 
state Normal. She subsequently taught for about three years in her 
native county. Mr. and Mrs. Harris are the parents of the following four 
children: Norval K., Naomi, Amos Myron, and Phillip Hill. Both the 
judge and his estimable wife are members of the Christian church. 



Robert P. White, of Sullivan, one of the editors of the 
Sullivan Union, was born September 23. 1876, in Terre Haute, Indiana, 
son of Samuel A. and Rebecca M. (Pearce) White. (For history of the 
White fainily see sketch of Samuel A. White). Robert P. White is a 
graduate of the Sullivan high school of the class of 1896. He was then 
employed by his father in his drug store at Sullivan and in 1898, began 
working on the Sullivan Democrat, continuing on that journal until 
1902, during which period he was city editor. In August, 1902, he was 
made assistant editor of the Sullivan Union, acting in such capacity until 
February, 1904, at which time, he with his present partner, Dirrelle 
Chaney, purchased the Sullivan Times, which they sold in March, 1904. 
Their paper, the Sullivan Weekly Union, has the largest circulation of 
any paper published within the county. 

In his political views, Mr. White is a Republican ; has served as 
secretary of the Republican county committee and was re-elected in 1908. 
Since the campaign days of 1896 he has been an active party worker. 
He served as precinct committeeman up to 1906. While engaged on 
the Sullivan Democrat, he also corresponded for the Terre Haute. In- 
dianapolis and Cincinnati dailies. Being a thorough, up-to-date man. 
Mr. White is interested in fraternal society matters and is numbered 
among the members of the Odd Fellows order, being advanced to the 
Encampment degree. He is also a member of the Benevolent Protective 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 5 

Order of Elks. The Masonic fraternity lias also attractecl him to its 
fold, and he is now a member of the Blue lodge. Royal Arch Chapter, 
and the Royal and Select Masters ; also belongs to the Eastern Star of 
the same fraternity, all being lodges at Sullivan. 

Mr. White was married June 16, 1906, to Bertha B. Briggs, who 
was born in 1874, in Sullivan county, Indiana, and is a graduate of the 
high school with the class of 1893. She was appointed money order 
clerk at the Sullivan postoffice and held the position for about five years. 
Mrs. White is the daughter of Dr. Charles and Josephine (Hinkle) 
Briggs. Her father died in 1903: he w-as a practicing physician in 
Sullivan, and counted among the leaders of his profession. 



DiRRELLE Cii.'VNEY, who is One of the owners and proprie- 
tors of the Sullivan Union, a weekly newspaper published at Sullivan, 
Indiana, is a native of Sullivan, born October 2, 1877, son of Hon. John 
Crawford and Ella (Saucerman) Chaney. 

Dirrelle Chaney attended the high school at Washington, District of 
Columbia, and the Wabash College, of Indiana, in which institution he 
took a literary course. In 1893 he was commissioner of the United 
States court of claims, serving two years. After his term had expired, 
he engaged in the newspaper business, first on the Terre Haute Express. 
In 1900 he was engaged on papers in London and Paris. In 1901-02 
was with the Chicago American, in Chicago. In P'ebruary, 1904, he in 
company with Robert P. White, purchased the Sullivan Times, and in 
March of that year purchased the Sullivan Uuio)i, having at the same 
date sold the Times. Mr. Chaney takes much interest in civic society 
affairs and is a member of the Eagles, Elks and Masons, and the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. He took the thirty-second degree in Masonry at 
Indianapolis and is also a Shriner, and a Knight Templar. 



Arthur A. Holmes. — The present efficient postmaster at Sullivan, 
Indiana, Arthur A. Holmes, was born September 11, 1856, at Annapolis, 
Crawford county, Illinois, son of John H. and Nancy E. (Rains) Holmes. 
The father was a native of Licking county, Ohio, born March 28, 1828, 
and died C)ctober 31, 1863, in Effingham county, Illinois. The mother 
was born in Crawford county, Illinois, August 31, 183 1, and passed from 
earthly scenes in Sullivan county, Indiana, February 10, 1890. John H. 
Holmes was a farmer by occupation and went to Illinois from Ohio in 
1848, remaining there until his death. Politically, he affiliated with the 
Democratic party, but was a W'ar Democrat. After the death of John H. 
Holmes, his widow married John L. Kaufman, of Gill township, Sulli\an 
county. Indiana. 

Arthur A. Holmes was reared to farm labor and received his educa- 
tion at the district schools, and at the College at Alerom, Indiana, which 



6 HISTORY OF SULLA'AX COUNTY 

educational institution he entered in 1874, and from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1877. He had also taken private instructions before entering 
college. He then taught three years, one term in Illinois and the balance 
of the time in Marshall and Sullivan counties, Indiana. Having decided 
to engage in the legal profession, he studied law with Buflf & Patten 
of Sullivan. After remaining with them for two years he was admitted 
to the bar in 1880 and entered into partnership with W. S. Maple of 
Sullivan, continuing until the spring of 1883, when he formed a partner- 
ship with I. H. Kalley, which relation existed until August i, 1887. At 
the last named date he entered into the service of the government as 
special pension examiner, remaining until April, 1893, at which time he 
resigned. In 1891 he had purchased the Sullivan Union and after his 
resignation from office he was actively engaged on the newspaper, of 
which he was owner and editor from March, 1891, to July 24, 1902, when 
he again entered the employ of the government and continued until 
Januar}' 21, 1907, in the pension department. He was appointed post- 
master at Sullivan, Indiana, Februar}' i, 1898, by President ]\IcKinIey 
and re-appointed by President Roosevelt, serving from February 8, 1898, 
to July 31. 1902, inclusive. He was again made postmaster in January, 
1907, and his term will expire January 18, 191 1. Mr. Holmes has always 
voted the Republican ticket and has been an aggressive party worker. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pvthias order in Sullivan. 



Major Willi.\m T. Crawford, who having now reached the age of 
three score and ten years, has been identified with the educa- 
tional and patriotic history for forty-eight years, and is one of the 
most honored and popular citizens in this section of the state. He was 
bom on a farm in Jay county, Indiana, January 25, 1838, but when three 
months old his parents sold the homestead and removed to Columbiana 
countv, Ohio, where his early years were spent. The major is the son 
of Samuel and Gracy (George) Crawford — the former being a native 
of Columbiana county, Ohio, where he died aged seventy-nine years. 
The paternal grandfather, John Crawford, was a native of Irelancl (his 
wife of Scotland) and lived to the remarkable age of one hundred and 
two years. William George, the maternal grandfather, was a native 
of Ireland, while his wife (Linea Hull) was born in England. The 
ancestors on both sides of the family came to the United States about 
1800 and located in Columbiana county, Ohio, where they became sub- 
stantial members of the agricultural community and continued their firm 
adherence to Presbyterianism. Grandfather George was a justice of the 
peace in that county for twent3'-four successive years, and although a 
practical and successful farmer was a deep lover of music, and expert 
viohnist and a man of cultivated tastes. 

Samuel Crawford, the father, was also an agriculturist and stock 
raiser. In stature, he was a very large man, being fully six feet in 
height : in his manners, he was mild and kind to those with whom he 





'l4^Cl^/.^M^t><tc/ , 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILOEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SULLI\-AN COUNTY 7 

mingled and labored, and as an illustration <.if these traits it is related 
that he never had a quarrel or a law suit. His ambition to be well 
educated was thwarted when young, but after his marriage, by persistent 
reading and self-training he became a man of wide general information. 
Another commendable trait in his character was his unfailing kindness 
to old people, and morally, he was ever found on the side of justice and 
right. The children born to Samuel and Gracy (George) Crawford were 
ten in number and in the order of their birth are as follows : Nancy, 
widow- of James Chaney and mother of Congressman John C. Chaney, 
who now resides at her farm home ten miles south of Fort Wavn'e, 
Indiana: Ruth, deceased; John, residing at Roanoke, Indiana; George, 
deceased; Elizabeth, a resident of Idaho and wife of Thomas Crawford; 
Jane, deceased ; William T., of this review ; Noah, deceased ; Linea E., 
wife of Alexander McCammont, who resides at Rogers, Ohio ; and Mary 
M., wife of Sant Hewett, of Florida. All but Jane lived to years of 
maturity. 

Alajor \\'illiam T. Crawford was diligently employed on his father's 
farm and attended the district schools of his home neighborhood and the 
high school of New Lisbon, Ohio. He began teaching in the same county 
and after being thus engaged four years, in 1866, came to Sullivan 
county, Indiana, and built the Ascension Seminary afFarmersburg. Be- 
fore its completion, however, in August, '1862, he raised a company and 
was made captain of what was known as Company H, Eighty-fifth 
Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, serving as a gallant officer and brave soldier, 
from August, 1862, to June 12, 1865. He saw much actual campaign 
service, participating in fifteen battles of the Civil war and being hon- 
orably discharged as brevet major. His regiment was first encamped at 
Locust Grove, opposite Cincinnati, for a few weeks, and then moved to 
Falmouth, Kentucky. There Captain Crawford was detailed by Gen- 
eral A. J. Smith, to act as provost marshall of the place, which he did 
for two and a half months. The regiment then moved to Lexington 
and on to Danville. Kentuck\-, later being sent to Louisville, where it was 
transported down the Ohio river and thence up the Cumberland to Nash- 
ville, Tennessee ; and thence was transferred to Brentwood and Frank- 
lin, Tennessee. Before reaching Franklin, Captain Crawford was attacked 
by typhoid fever and pneumonia, and five physicians gave his case up as 
a fatal one, telling him if he had any word to send to his family they 
would be glad to communicate it. The captain said, "Dr. Hobbs, please 
tell my wife that I have been sick, but am going to get well and live to 
see this rebellion put down." Dr. Hobbs then turned to Drs. Wiles and 
McPheters and said : "His will power may yet pull him through." He 
began to recover, but wdiile still in bed the rebels made an attack on the 
town of Franklin. He started for his command at Fort Granger, but was 
so weak that he was compelled to rest on the door steps along the streets. 
As he neared the river, five Confederates rode up and demanded his 
sword. The captain had not realized that they were rebels until after they 
had surrounded him. The leader at once demanded the captain's sword 
and when he asked him, "Ry what authority?" the rebel replied, "Bv the 



8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Confederate authorit}'. What authority did you think?" He then ordered 
him to get up on the horse behind him. whereupon the captain refused. 
The officer then drew his revolver on him and said, "Then I will leave 
you here." The captain replied, "You have the drop on me." Again 
the Confederate officer said, "Hand up your sword at once," and when 
the captain refused, the rebel demanded that he mount his horse behind 
him. For answer Captain Crawford knocked the revolver out of the 
enemy's hand with a hickory cane, which he fortunately carried. At 
that instant about one thousand shots were fired from the L'nion lines, 
one ball striking the leader in the mouth and cutting his tongue partly 
off. The blood shot out over Captain Crawford and fell upon his sword, 
which remained unwashed for many years after the close of the war. 
Another of the Confederates brought his carbine down upon the cap- 
tain's head, but a ball pierced the rebel's hand. Still another of the Con- 
federate squad was shot through the side, as he was taking aim at the 
captain's head. Another's horse was shot from under him as he ex- 
claimed. "Throw up your hands or we will shoot out of you." At 

this critical moment Captain Bails crossed the river and assisted Captain 
Crawford into the Union lines. 

A few weeks later two spies from General Bragg's army (Colonel 
Williams and Lieutenant Peter entered the Union lines, reporting that 
they were sent by General Garfield to inspect the camp, presenting as 
their authority a forged letter from the commander. Representing, also, 
that they had been surprised and robbed by rebels, they borrowed fifty 
dollars from Colonel Baird and obtained from him a pass to go to Nash- 
ville. Colonel Watkins, of the Sixth Kentucky Regiment (a graduate of 
West Point) recognized one of the spies as being a classmate of his and 
they had no sooner left camp than that officer remarked to Colonel Baird : 
"Those men are spies." As quick as thought, Baird said, "Overtake them 
and bring them back," which command was accomplished as the Con- 
federates were nearing the outer picket lines. Blandly telling them that 
the rebels were between them and Nashville and that Colonel Baird 
wished to send them a guard. Colonel Watkins led them to the regimental 
headquarters. One of the spies — a distant relative of Washington, an- 
swered "We have no fears." But Colonel Watkins persisted and they 
were brought back. Each wore a white visor on his cap ; when they 
returned a strong guard was placed around the tent. Colonel Baird 
stepped up to Colonel Williams and raised the white visor from his cap 
and saw on the band "C. S. A." (meaning Confederate States of Amer- 
ica.) The same conclusive evidence was found on their swords, when 
thev were drawn from their sheaths. Captain Crawford was made judge 
advocate at the trial, which was short and conclusive as to their guilt. 
Colonel Baird tried to escape the painful duty of hanging them, but, in 
reply to his telegram. General Garfield telegraphed. "If guilty, hang them 
at once," and they were accordingly executed — hanged to a wild cherry 
tree near Fort Granger— June 9, "1863. It is said that the Confederate, 
Colonel Williams, was a relative of General Lee. 

After the war Major Crawford refitted the Ascension Seminary, and 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 9 

ill Scpteiiilicr. 1865, opened a normal sclidol which he conducted until 
1872. In that year he moved to Sullivan and consolidated it with the 
local high school, conducting the higher department as a Normal Insti- 
tute until 1876, and out of the number who have been educated under him, 
two thousand two hundred and eighty-three have followed teaching as a 
profession. After 1876 the major engaged in the pension business in 
which he is still engaged and during this period of thirty-two years he 
has obtained between six and seven thousand pensions and increases, the 
beneficiaries being residents of twent\-three states. 



John S. B.ws. — The late John S. Bays, of Sullivan, was widelv 
known and deeply honored by the court and bar of both Sullivan and 
Vigo counties, his prominence as a corporation lawyer bringing him very 
fre(|uently to the courts of Terre Haute and other points in southern 
Indiana. Commencing in Sullivan county as a general practitioner, 
nearly a quarter of a century ago, his strong mind became more and 
more interested in the development of the great business and industrial 
development of the section of the state which he had made his home, and 
those forces themselves began to call upon him with ever increasing 
insistence for his careful, wise and practical legal guidance. The most 
important development of southern Indiana centered in its coal interests, 
and prior to their consolidation Mr. Bays had become the legal counsel 
for most of the large companies. By thus specializing he achieved a 
standing which placed him among the best informed and most successful 
lawyers in the country devoted to the management and exploitation of 
these vast properties. About two years before his death he effected a 
consolidation of the coal mines of southern Indiana, and this master 
stroke extended his reputation as a corporation lawyer throughout the 
central states. The vast business that resulted from this combination 
passed through his hands, and he did the work quickly because many 
years of application had made him thoroughly familiar with the details. 
He had always been a tremendous worker, all his habits were temperate, 
his constitution was vital with magnetism and based upon an abundance 
of physical strength, and yet it is doubtless true that the incessant and 
concentrated labors which finally gave birth to this last and greatest 
success of his professional life had much to do with the undermining of 
his health and his inability to resist the inroads of the disease which, 
with such comparative suddenness, snatched him from his business 
associates, his professional co-workers, and his loving kindred and friends. 
He spent the winter preceding his death in California, but, upon his 
return to Sullivan in the spring it was found that the change had been 
unavailing, and after several months of heroic struggling and the final 
resignation of a calm and resigned Christian, he died in the midst of his 
family on the 13th of August, igo6. On the day of his funeral the whole 
citv practically suspended business, and the memorial resolutions of the 
bar associations of Sullivan, Greene, Mgo and Knox counties indicated 



io HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

how general was the feehng of deep loss which pervaded the ranks of his 
professional associates. In the procession which accompanied his re- 
mains from the church to the grave were representatives of these organi- 
zations, as well as from the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in which he had long been active. 
"Coupled with his commanding ability as a lawyer," says one of the 
tributes, "was a high character as a citizen and a lovable disposition as 
a man and a friend. Ever kind and courteous in his bearing toward his 
associates at the bar and litigants, fair and honorable in his professional 
conduct, respectful and considerate of the judge on the bench, and faith- 
ful above all to those who were so fortunate as to become his clients, 
he has left among us a name to be cherished and an example to be emu- 
lated with profit." 

John S. Bays was a native of Point Commerce, Greene county, 
Indiana, where he was born on the 27th of January, 1850. His father, 
William S. Bays, was born in Virginia, and after his marriage to a 
Kentucky lady came to Indiana, where he prosecuted his dual calling 
of hardware merchant and farmer. The parents both died on the old 
Bays homestead near Worthington, Greene county. John S. obtained 
his preliminary education in the common schools of his native place, and 
in 1867, at the age of seventeen, entered the Indiana University at 
Bloomington. Because of the illness of his father he was obliged to leave 
the university, after completing a three years' course there. In 1871 
he entered the law department of the universit}', from which he was 
graduated. Shortly afterward, in 1875, he began practice at Worthing- 
ton, where he remained for five years, being also the publisher of the 
Times during a portion of that period. In 1880 he removed to Bloom- 
field and formed a law partnership with Hon. Lucien Shaw, the firm 
practicing in Los Angeles, California, in 1883-4. (Judge Shaw is now a 
member of the supreme court of California.) In the latter year Mr. 
Bays returned to Indiana, and located at Sullivan, his home thereafter 
until his death. His talents and strength were all devoted to the practice 
of his profession and he ever preferred the career of an attorney, as he 
repeatedly declined to be a candidate for judge of the fourteenth judicial 
district. In politics he was a Democrat, but was never a candidate for any 
political office ; but during the administration of Governor Durbin he was 
appointed as the Democratic member of the board of directors of the 
Southern Hospital for the Insane, which position he held at the time of 
his death. The deceased was a member of the Methodist church, the 
Sullivan lodge of Odd Fellows, and a charter member of Sullivan Lodge 
No. 911, B. P. O. E. He was instrumental in securing many public 
improvements for Sullivan, among others the founding of the Carnegie 
library, of which he was one of the first trustees. 

In 1876 Mr. Bays was united in marriage with Miss Hettie Fenton, 
of Indianapolis, but a native of Canada. She is a daughter of John 
Fenton, who was born in Dublin, Ireland, and married in Clifton, Eng- 
land. He came to Canada in the fifties with his wife and when they 
migrated to the United States located in Ohio. ]\Ir. Fenton served in 



HISTORY OF SULLRAX COUNTY ii 

the ranks of the Union army throughout the Civil war, ancf afterward 
located in Indianapolis, where hoth he and his wife spent their last years 
and where Mrs. John S. Bays was educated. The widow still resides 
at Sullivan, the mother of the following: Lee, born January 30, 1878; 
Harold, born January 26, 1880; and Fred P., whose biography is else- 
where given. 

Lee received a thorough literary training at DcPauw University and 
graduated in law at the University of Wisconsin. He married Miss 
Zoe E. Chancy, daughter of Congressman John C. Chaney. Harold, the 
second son, graduated from the Sullivan High School, and served four 
years in the army, his experience covering campaigns both in Cuba and 
the Philippines. He then graduated from Culver Academy, and while a 
student there held the western academic record in the hammer throw 
for 1902-3. He married Miss Glenn Lucas, daughter of Captain \V. H. 
Lucas, a sketch of whose life is given in other pages of this work. 
Harold C. Rays is now head of the artillery department of the Culver 
Military Academy and instructor in English and mathematics. He has 
two sons. Lee and Fred Fenton Bays are now associated in the practice 
of the law, the former having previously been connected with his father. 



Fred Fenton Bays, of the law firm of Bays & Bays, of Sullivan, 
is one of the able, eloquent and broad-minded young men of this section 
of Indiana, who in his professional, political and public capacities has 
already achieved much and given promise of a brilliant and substantial 
future' career. He was born in Bloomfield, Indiana, on the 12th day of 
July, 1882, a son of the late John S. and Hattie (Fenton) Bays. His 
"father was for nearly a quarter of a century one of the leading lawyers of 
southern Indiana, and, had he so desired, might have ascended the bench 
of the higher courts. But all his abilities were wrapped in the practice 
of the law, and at his death he was considered one of the leading, cor- 
poration lawyers of the Ohio valley and had no superior as an authority 
on the law relating to coal interests. As a man he was pure, high-minded 
and lovable, and the record of his life is given elsewhere in detail. 

Fred F. Bavs received the foundation of his mental training at Culver 
Academy, from which he graduated in 1904, after which he pursued his 
professional courses in the University of Indianapolis Law School and the 
University of Indiana Law School at Bloomington, Indiana. Soon after 
graduating from the latter he entered into practice with his brother Lee, 
who had been associated with his father. The two brothers, under the 
style of Bays & Bays, have continued the large business established by 
their. father, and are handling it with energy and fine judgment. Although 
general practitioners, they make a specialty of corporate law as relates to 
the coal interests, representing both the Southern Indiana railroad and 
the Southern Indiana Coal Company. They are also attorneys for the 
Standard Oil Company for that section of the state. Their well-appointed 



12 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

and busy offices are located on the north side of the pubhc square on 
Washington street. 

Fred F. Bays is a strong Democrat, and early commenced to partici- 
pate in the deliberations of the party. At the age of twenty-two he was 
elected chairman of the county committee, and ably performed its duties 
for two years. Governor Hanly selected him as a trustee of the Indiana 
Southern Hospital for the Insane to fill out his father's unexpired term 
of one and a half years, and at the expiration of that period he was 
appointed for a new term of four years, which will not expire until 1912. 
He is a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine at 
Indianapolis, and is also active in the fraternal work of the Elks, being 
exalted ruler of Lodge No. gii. He maintains his fraternal associations 
with his alma mater through the Beta Theta Pi of the Indiana University, 
and has cause to remember his college career with pride as well as fond- 
ness. While at Culver he won the first medal for oratory and a medal 
for debate; was editor-in-chief of the J'idefte, and was a member of 
the football and track teams, as well as being interested in boxing and 
athletics in general. He was a true university man, and has carried the 
broad, active and versatile life of his college days into the realities of pro- 
fessional and social life. From college halls he has continued his interest 
in oratory, and takes time from his busy professional life to promote the 
art, and in giving a gold medal to the winner of the annual oratorical 
contest in the Sullivan high school he pays a beautiful tribute to his late 
father's memory and at the same time furnishes an inspiration to young 
men and women to cultivate this ancient and time-honored art. The 
annual event is known as the "John S. Bays Gold Medal Oratorical 
Contest." 



Silver Chaney. — A lawyer, real estate dealer and loan agent, who is 
doing an extensive business at Sullivan, Indiana, is Silver Chaney, who 
was born September 14, 1858, in Allen county, Indiana, near Fort Wayne. 
He is the son of James and Nancy (Crawford) Chaney, the former being 
a native of Columbiana county, Ohio, born August 9, 1823. He was of 
Scotch-Irish descent. By trade he was a carpenter and contractor, 
working at the same in the vicinity of Fort Wavne. In his politics, he 
was a supporter of Republican party principles. He died in 190 1, on a 
farm in Allen county. The mother was a native of Columbiana county, 
also ; the date of her birth was 1828, and she still survives and is residing 
in Allen county. Both she and her husband were Presbyterians in their 
church faith and membership. Twelve children were born to them, 
seven being now deceased and the living are : John C, present member 
of Congress from the Second District of Indiana ; Silver, of this 
biographical notice ; Mary E. ; Belle, wife of George Lopshire, a resi- 
dent of Allen county : Matilda, wife of Joseph Weaver, residing in Wells 
county. 

Silver Chaney spent the early part of his life on the farm and 
attended the public schools, after which he took an eight months course 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 13 

in the schools of Farmersburg, and received a license to teach and taught 
two years at Cloverland, Clay county, Indiana. He next attended the 
Wabash College one year and entered Washington and Jefferson College, 
in I'ennsylvania, where he took a literary course, graduating with the 
class of 1879. He returned to his native state and taught school in Wells 
and Allen counties two years, as principal of the Zanesville schools. In 
1883, he went to Sullivan and engaged in the abstract business, handling 
real estate at the same time, and continuing in such work until 1887, 
when he entered the University of Michigan, graduating from the law 
department of that most thorough and modern school, with the class of 
1889. He then returned to Sullivan county, and commenced the practice 
of law with C. D. Hunt, of Sullivan. After two years thus associated, he 
practiced independently for a time, and then formed a partnership with 
A. G. McNabb, with whom he remained a partner for four years. Since 
that date he has been alone or with his brother, Hon. John C. Besides 
carrying on in a successful manner his legal business, he is extensively 
engaged in loans and real estate transactions. He is a director of the 
Citizens Trust Company of Sullivan and also director in the American- 
German Trust Company of Terre Haute ; director and auditor of the 
Great Western Life Insurance Co. of Terre Haute. 

Air. Chaney and his brother, Hon. John C. Chancy, organized the 
Alum Cave Coal and Coke company, which was the first movement in 
the direction of developing the coal fields of the neighborhood of Sullivan 
county. 

Mr. Chaney is interested in fraternities, being a member of the Odd 
Fellows order and has been district deputy grand master and grand 
patriarch for about fourteen years in Lodge No. 146. He is also a 
member of the Masonic blue lodge, chapter and council. He was married 
August 12, 1889, to Mhmie M. McEneney, born in Sullivan county, 
August 12, 1864; she was educated in Sullivan county and at St. Mary 
of the Woods class. Her parents were, Patrick and Julia A. McEneney, 
both now residents of Sullivan, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Chaney have 
four children : Julia Verne. Silver Dean, John Francis, and Harold R. 
Mrs. Chaney is a member of the Christian church and he of the Presby- 
terian. 



William H. Crowdee, Jr., prominent as the cashier of the 
Sullivan State Bank, comes of a well-known and highly respected family 
of Sullivan county, Indiana. He was born November 23, 1868, in Sulli- 
van, son of William H. Crowder, Sr. and wife, whose family history 
will be found in another sketch within this work. William H. Crowder 
of this notice, obtained his education in the most excellent public schools 
of Sullivan and began his business career at the age of sixteen years 
in his father's banking house. He became the bookeeper, which position 
he held until he was twenty-two years of age. At that time he entered 
into partnership with J. M. Long in the clothing business, remaining four 
vears, when the partnership was dissolved, after which Air. Crowder went 



14 ' HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

to Linton, Indiana, and there conducted a clothing and shoestore for 
about four years. He then entered the State Bank at SulHvan, in October, 
1900, as the teller of that institution ; and also served as assistant cashier. 
In September, 1906, he was elected cashier of the bank, which responsible 
position he still holds. He is a stockholder and director in the Sullivan 
State Bank and accounted a first class business man. 

Politically, he is a Democrat and has held the office of city counsel 
four years, and his term of office as such will expire Januar}' I, 1910. 
He is connected with the Odd Fellows order at Sullivan. He was married 
in June, 1891, to Earlene Moore, born in Sullivan, October, 1872, and 
educated in her native town. She is the daughter of Robert A. and 
Susan (Robertson) Moore. The mother is deceased and her father re- 
sides at Sullivan. He is a native of Ohio, and both were among the early 
settlers of Sullivan. Mr. and Mrs. Crowder are the parents of seven 
children: William H. Jr., born August -17, 1892, now attending high 
school; Daniel M., born April 25, 1894; Doris, born May i, 1898; De- 
borah, bom April 5, 1900 ; June, born May 12, 1902 ; Elizabeth, born 
April 30, 1904; Ben Allen, born February 26, 1906. 



Benjamin Cox Crowdek, .who is_, Jp^v the county auditor 
of Sullivan county, was born December 20, 1876, in Sullivan, Indiana, 
son of William H., Sr., and Sarah (Stewart) Crowder. (For an account 
of his ancestors see sketch of William H. Crowder, Sr., in this work.) 
Mr. Crowder received his primary education at Sullivan in the public 
schools, and in the autumn of 1894 entered DePauw University. When 
twenty years old he returned to Sullivan and commenced working in the 
Sullivan Covmty Bank, of which his father was president. He worked 
as a bookkeeper until this institution and the Farmers' State Bank con- 
solidated into what is now known as the Sullivan State Bank. He re- 
mained there until the organization of the National Bank of Sullivan, 
when he accepted a position in the new bank, he being assistant cashier 
for the first six months of this institution's history. He then went to 
Indianapolis and was engaged as bookkeeper in the Crowder-Mason Shoe 
Company, his cousin, C. H. Crowder being president of that company. 
He remained thereabout five months and in the autumn of 1 901, he was 
chosen deputy auditor, under J. M. Lang and worked until his term 
expired and then worked at bookkeeping in the Sullivan State Bank 
about one year, when he was chosen by E. E. Russell, then county auditor, 
as his deputy, which position he held until elected to the office of auditor 
on the Democratic ticket, in November, 1906. He is a member of the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; also belongs to the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity, at DePauw University. Mr. Crowder is president of the 
Citizens Driving Club. 

September 16, 1905, Mr. Crowder was married to Emily H. McCrory, 
born in Sullivan, Indiana, December 3, 1876. She graduated from the 
high school with the class of 1896. In March, 1900, she acted as assistant 
in the county auditor's office, remaining there until her marriage. She 



THE NEW YORK 

PU'BLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX ANO 

TILr>f:N FOUNDATIONS. 




rSf.'^ 





HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 15 

is tlie dau,t;litcr of William and Raclicl Ann ( Lcacli ) IMcCrory, Ijdtli de- 
ceased. Mr. and Mrs. Crowder are the parents of one daughter, Rachel 
Louise, born August u, igo6. Mrs. Crowder is a faithful member of the 
Christian chin-ch. 



Dr. Joseph R. Wh.\len, one of the most successful practitioners of 
Carlisle, is also a large land owner in Sullivan and Knox counties, has 
important banking and real estate interests in his home city, and, aside 
from his high professional standing, is a citizen of most substantial ability 
and character. Born near Bruceville, Knox county, Indiana, on the 30th 
of March, 1861, he is a son of Dr. Richard M. and Frances J. (Jenks) 
Whalen. He comes of distinguished ancestry on both sides of the family, 
the paternal branch originating in Ireland, where his great-great-grand- 
father was born. The heads of the three succeeding generations, with 
which the doctor is directly connected, arc buried in Bethlehem cemetery, 
four miles southeast of Carlisle. On the other han<l, his maternal grand- 
mother, Jane Arnold, was the daughter of Major Arnold, of Culpe]X'r 
county, Virginia, who fought with Washington at Yorktown, and now 
lies buried at Napoleon, Ripley county, Indiana. 

John W'halen, the great-grandfather, was among the first school 
teachers in Sullivan county, and the grandfather, Richard J., was a farmer 
who took up government land in the county. The title to the property has 
never been changed, and Dr. Joseph R. is now the owner of forty acres 
of the original tract. Richard J. Whalen was born in Tennessee and died 
in Haddon township, this county. His son. Dr. Richard M. (father of 
Dr. Joseph R.) Whalen, was born in the township named, November 4, 
1832, was reared on a farm, and was graduated in medicine from a Chi- 
cago college, being long engaged in honorable practice, chiefly in his 
native locality. He resided in Kansas in 1866 and 1867, and then moved 
to Haddon township, this county, practicing near Carlisle until his death, 
July 8, 1899. The deceased was an influential Democrat and a fine citi- 
zen, serving for two terms as trustee of Haddon township. He was also 
a Mason in high standing, having been master of the local lodge for a 
number of times and holding membership in Blue Lodge No. 3, at Car- 
lisle. Both he and his wife (who died February 26, 1902) were faithful 
adherents to Methodism. Mrs. Richard M. Whalen was born at Napo- 
leon, Ripley county, Indiana, on the 12th of February, 1839, daughter of 
Dr. Joseph Jenks. Her father was born in England ; when eleven years 
of age came to America as one of five brothers ; was educated in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio : practiced his profession in Indiana, Illinois and Kansas, 
and died in California about 1890. In Kansas occurred the marriage of 
his daughter to Dr. Richard M. WHialen, on the 12th of May, 1859, and 
to that union were born the following children : Lewis T., who died in 
infancy ; Joseph R. ; Mary Annette, wife of D. J. Mathers, who is con- 
nected with the National I5ank at Carlisle ; Hattie F., deceased ; Fannie 
S.. now the wife of J. B. Latshaw, of Carlisle ; Marion R. and Charles, 
deceased ; and Nellie, who married ^^^ J. Cole, of Sidlivan. 

Vol. II— 2 



i6 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Dr. Joseph R. Whalen, of this biography, obtained his early educa- 
tion at Carhsle, Indiana, and after pursuing the higher hterary branches 
at Union College, Merom, taught for a year in Haddon township. He 
then was associated with his father in the drug business for four years, 
when he sold his interest and engaged in the buying and feeding of stock 
until 1891. In that year he was matriculated at the Louisville Medical 
College, from which he graduated in 1894 with unusual honors, receiving 
a gold medal as the leader in general scholarship of a class of one hun- 
dred and ninety-one students. After his graduation he served as demon- 
strator of anatomy in his alma mater for a year, spending the following 
three years in practice at Oakton, Indiana, and the four succeeding years 
at Bicknell, that state. Since that time he has been an active and suc- 
cessful member of the profession and a public-spirited citizen of Carlisle, 
following the example of other progressive physicians and surgeons of the 
country by taking post-graduate studies. In 1893 the doctor pursued such 
a course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago, specializing 
in anatomy. 

Aside from his extensive medical practice, Dr. Whalen has large 
property interests, which include 810 acres of land in Sullivan and Knox 
counties and residence property in Carlisle. He was also one of the 
organizers of the People's Bank of that city, in which he is still a direc- 
tor. In politics, he is a Democrat, and his fraternal relations are with 
Masonry — more especially with Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, F. and A. M. ; 
Vincennes Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M., and Vincennes Commandery, No. 20. 
He has served as master of the blue lodge in Carlisle, Oaktown and 
Bicknell, Indiana. 

On January I, 1883, Dr. Whalen married Miss Isabelle Gobin, who 
was born in Haddon township, November 3, 1864, and received her edu- 
cation at Evansville, Indiana, where the ceremony occurred. She was the 
daughter of John and Margaret (Hall) Gobin, natives of Carlisle, her 
great-grandmother, Dianna Melburne (Forrester) Hall, being an adopted 
daughter of Lord Melburne, prime minister of England, and was pre- 
sented to the court of St. James. The Gobins were early settlers of Sul- 
livan county. Mrs. Isabelle Whalen died June 14, 1907, leaving three 
daughters: Melburne, born October 7, 1883, now the wife of Manson 
G. Couch, the mother of two children, and a resident of Lawrenceville, 
Illinois; Marguerite, born March 5, 1885, and Gladys, born June 27, 
1891, both unmarried and living at home. The first Mrs. Whalen was a 
devoted member of the IMethodist Episcopal church, as are her daugh- 
ters. On November 4, 1908, the doctor wedded, as his second wife, Mrs. 
Ida Irene (Smith) Starner. 



Thomas E. Ward, the present treasurer of Sullivan county, 
Indiana, was born January 4, '1863, in Sullivan, son of Anderson and 
Elizabeth Jane (Roll) Ward. The father, who was a native of Tennessee, 
of Irish ancestry, was born March 21, 1818, and died September 22, 1884, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY ■ 17 

in Sullivan count}-, Indiana. The mother was born in Vigo county, In- 
diana, in 1836, and died ^larch 2, 1882, in Sullivan count)-. They were 
united in marriage in \ igo county in 1854, and resided for a time — 
probably about four years — in Fayette township, Vigo county, and then 
moved to a farm six miles from Sullivan, in an eastern direction. After 
living there one or two seasons, they moved into the town of Sullivan. 
They then moved back and forth to the farm from Sullivan at different 
times, but were living on the farm at the date of their death. Anderson 
Ward came to Indiana when ten years of age with his parents. When 
he was old enough, he taught school and became a physician, and w-as also 
a minister in the Church of Christ, being in the ministry at the time of 
his death. Politically, he was a Democrat. He was at one time a member 
of the Masonic order. He and his wife were the parents of the following 
children : Sarah, deceased ; Polly, deceased ; Nancy M., residing at Terre 
Haute ; Bettie, of Vigo county ; Thomas E. ; Katie, now of Vigo county ; 
Jennie, of Vigo county; John B., residing in Sullivan county; Mattie, 
Hving in Chicago ; Lou H., residing in Sullivan ; Maggie, residing in 
Sullivan county. The living children are all married and settled in homes 
of their own. 

Thomas E. Ward, the fifth child in his parents' family, received his 
early education in his native place and labored on the farm until he was 
twenty-three years of age. He then started out in life on his own account 
following farming until the autumn of 1907, when he purchased a resi- 
dence in Sullivan. During the winter months for fifteen years he worked 
in the coal mines. In November, 1906, he was elected county treasurer of 
Sullivan county, taking his office January i, 1908. He was elected on the 
Democratic ticket, which party he has always supported. He is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is advanced in that order 
to the Encampment. He also holds a membership with the Alodern 
Woodmen of America, at Sullivan. 

October 16, 1886, he was married to Katie Waggoner, who was born 
in Sullivan county, Indiana, January 14, 1867, daughter of William H. 
and Mary (Snow) Waggoner. Her mother is residing in Oklahoma. 
Five children were born to Thomas E. Ward and wife : Lillie E., born 
July 15, 1889, a graduate of Lyons Business College, of Sullivan, Indiana, 
with the class of 1907, and now assisting her father in his official duties 
as treasurer; Ivy Fern, July 27, 1891, attending school at the State Normal 
at Terre Haute; Tressie May, May 3, 1893, attending high school; Ver- 
nice Kcitha, March 5, 1900; and Roy Anderson, October 17, 1905. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ward and family are members of the Church of Christ ; he is 
an elder and trustee of this church, at Palmer Prairie, Sullivan county. 



Arthur Elmeir DeBaun, the efficient clerk of the Sullivan 
circuit court, Indiana, was born in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, 
March 2, 1870, son of Jarnes P. and Rebecca J. (Dilley) DeBaun. His 
father, who was also a native of the same township, was born ^larch 14, 



i8 ■ HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

1839, and died February 10, 1899. Abraham DeBaun, the grandfather, 
was born in Mercer county, Kentucky, November 27, 1813, and came to 
SuUivan county, Indiana, in 1831 with his father and mother, Samuel 
and Mary (Devine) DeBaun. Samuel DeBaun was a native of Virginia, 
born in 1776, and his father was a soldier in the Revolutionary cause. His 
powderhorn is now highly prized by Arthur E., of this sketch. Samuel, 
the great-grandfather, died in Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1833, ^"d the 
grandfather, Abraham DeBaun, died April 3, 1900. The wife of Abra- 
ham, Elizabeth Pogue, was born in Fort Knox, near Vincennes, Indiana, 
July 28, 1816, and died July 17, 1884. She was five months old when her 
parents, James Pogue and wife, in the fall of 1816, with two other 
families, settled in Fairbanks township. These three original settlers and 
their families consisted of James Pogue, Joseph Thomas, and Leduwick 
Ernest. The mother of Arthur E. DeBaun, also a native of Fairbanks 
township, was born in 1845, and died February i, 1871. She was the 
daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Johnson) Dilley. Her father was born 
in Ohio in 1806 and died in 1872; he came from Lawrence county to 
Sullivan county, and was among the pioneer settlers of that region. 
Nancy Johnson was born in 1813 in Ohio and died in 1887 ; she came with 
her parents to Sullivan county about 1820. The above named were 
farmers by occupation and helped to start the first enterprises in this part 
of the state. James P. DeBaun was married twice, his second wife being 
Sarah Ann Lee, who was born in Illinois, May 2'3, 1853, and died August 
23, 1901. The three children born of the first union were: Iverson W., 
born 1866, died in infancy; Walter Scott, born January 22, 1868, resides 
in Fairbanks township ; Arthur Elmer, of this memoir. There was no 
issue by the second marriage. James P. DeBaun was a Democrat of the 
stanch and uncompromising type and always followed farming. He and 
his wife were members of the Christian church. 

Arthur Elmer DeBaun, who was reared on his father's farm was 
permitted to attend the public schools, and later entered DePauw Uni- 
versity, at Greencastle, where he spent six years, graduating in the Liberal 
Arts course in the class of 1897. He then followed teaching school for 
two terms in Fairbanks township. Desiring to follow the legal profession, 
he took a law course in the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis and was 
graduated in 1901. In the spring of 1902, he went to Sullivan, becoming 
deputy county clerk, which position he held until he was seated as clerk, 
March 28, 1908, being elected to the office in 1906. He is a Democrat, 
and was elected on that ticket. Mr. DeBaun is a member of the Christian 
church. 



Richard Levy Bailey, county surveyor of Sullivan county, 
is a native of Hamilton township, this county, born December 14, 1866, 
son of Marshal and Caroline (Bivins) Bailey. Bedford, Lawrence 
county, Indiana, was the birthplace of the father, who was born Jan- 
uary 3, 1836. Mr. Bailey's mother was also a native of the same place 
and has been dead a number of vears. The father married a second time, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 19 

a Mrs. Scott, who is also deceased. For his third wife, he married Mrs. 
Sarah Sutton, and they are now residents of Hamilton township, where 
the father has resided for forty-four years. Marshal Bailey and Caro- 
line Bivins were united in marriage in Lawrence county and came to 
Sullivan county, locating in Hamilton township, in the early autumn of 
1863, settling on the place on which he still resides. His ancestors were 
of German and Scotch-Irish lineage. At one time the father owned 
about three hundred acres of land, but his present tract contains only 
one hundred acres. Politically he is a Democrat. Both he and his first 
wife were members of the Christian church. Their children were eleven 
in number. Six are deceased, and the surviving are : Richard L. ; Dr. 
W. A., residing at Sullivan; Lola, wife of William Bolinger, of Sulli- 
van; Tressie Eaton, residing in Gill township, Sullivan county; Inez, 
wife of Ward Hawkins, residing in Sullivan. There was no issue by 
i\Iarshal Bailey's second and third marriages. 

Richard L. Bailey attended the district schools of his home town- 
ship and later the Southern Indiana Normal school at Mitchell, graduat- 
ing from the scientific course in the class of 1884. He then attended the 
State University at Bloomington for one year. The next three years of 
his life he spent in farming and teaching school, after which he entered 
the law office of George G. Reily, at Vincennes, Indiana, remained there 
eighteen months and was admitted to the bar in 1889. He then asso- 
ciated himself with Charles G. McCord, of Vincennes, in the abstract 
business for three years. He next went to Texas, and assisted in organ- 
izing Armstrong county of that state. There he was chosen deputy county 
clerk and served about two years. In the meantime, he had entered a 
section of land, which he finally sold, and after traveling through the 
West a short time, he returned to Vincennes, where he was made county 
surveyor of Knox county, which office he held for one term. He next 
became a contractor in building levees along the Ohio and Mississippi 
rivers, in which work he continued until 1900, when he returned to Sul- 
livan county, Indiana, and established himself in the profession of a civil 
engineer. He was appointed county surveyor in August, 1900, and was 
elected to that office in the month of November, 1900, taking his office 
December, 1901. He served, however, under the ex-county surveyor 
from August, 1900, until his regular term commenced, and which will 
expire January i, 1909. He was elected to this office on the Democratic 
ticket, of which party he is a firm supporter. Mr. Bailey has taken nine 
degrees in Masonry ; he now holds membership at Sullivan. He was a 
charter member of the Elks order at Sullivan ; he belongs to the Tribe of 
Ben Hur, having joined that order in Knox county, but now belongs to 
the lodge at Sullivan. 

He was married December 28, 1893, to Gertrude Benefield, born in 
Hamilton township, a daughter of John and Sarah (McGrew) Benefield. 
Her father is deceased and the mother is residing in Sullivan. She was 
born in Hamilton township, while her husband was a native of Lawrence 
county, Indiana. They were farmers and he came to this county when 
a boy! Mrs. Bailey attended the Sullivan high schools and Indiana State 



20 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Normal, at Terre Haute. She then taught school in the district schools of 
Sullivan county for nine years. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey are the parents of 
one daughter: Juanita, born September 14, 1894. 



John William Lindley, a representative of the legal fraternity at 
Sullivan, is a native of Crawford county, Illinois, born December 19, 
1867, a son of Samuel and Harriet (Hollenbeck) Lindley. The father 
was also a native of Crawford county, Illinois, born in April, 1833, and 
is still living in that county, on a farm. The mother was born in Clarke 
county, Illinois, September, 1842, and still survives. The grandfather, 
William A. Lindley, was a native of North Carolina, and came to Illi- 
nois a single man, settling in Crawford county, about 1800, where he 
resided until about fifty-six years of age. He v\'as a farmer, of English 
descent, and reared a family of seven children. Grandfather Hollenbeck 
came from Dutch ancestry of New York. 

Samuel Lindley, the father, always kept the farm on which he was 
born and reared and the title has never been changed. Politically, he 
is a Democrat of uncompromising terms. Among the local positions he 
has held may be mentioned that of supervisor. Both he and his wife are 
exemplary members of the Baptist church. Originally, the Lindley fam- 
ily were of the Quaker religious faith. The children born to Samuel and 
Harriet (Hollenbeck) Lindley are: Emma, wife of E. H. Boyd; Charles 
E., a resident of Crawford county; Mollie, deceased; John William, of 
this sketch; Ollie J. (twin sister of John W.), now wife of Qiarles H. 
Voorheis, of Crawford county ; Ola, wife of J. H. Neff, residing in Sul- 
livan county ; Samuel E., of Sullivan, a dentist. 

John William Lindley was reared midst the scenes and labors inci- 
dent to farm life and attended the common schools, after which he 
attended the Southern Illinois Normal University, graduating with the 
class of 1892. He then taught school one year in the city schools of 
Robinson, Illinois, and read law in the same city, at the same time, with 
Bradburv & McHatton. He remained with this firm for two years and 
passed the examination before the appellate court, August 3, 1894, and 
was admitted to the bar at Robinson. December 19, 1894, he began 
practice in Sullivan, Indiana, in partnership with John C. Briggs, with 
whom he remained until August i, 1899, since which he has practiced 
independently. He has been connected with nearly every criminal case 
tried within Sullivan county in the last four or five years, thus proving 
his ability as a rising attorney. He was prosecuting attorney for the 
Fourteenth judicial district for 1903-04. 

Mr. Lindley is a member of the Sullivan County Bar Association. 
Politically, he affiliates with the Democratic party and in his fraternal 
relations is connected with the Knights of Pythias, Elks and Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

He was happily married, in September, 1901, to Zona Lacey, who was 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 21. 

born in Sullivan, Indiana. September, 1877. She received her education 
in the count)' of her birth. Her parents are Edward P. and Margaret 
Lacey, both of whom still reside in Sullivan, her father being a teacher 
in the public schools. Two children have blessed the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lindley: Price, born in 1903, and Lois M., born in 1904. The par- 
ents are members of the I'aptist church. 



Fr.xnk M. DouTiiiTT, who is engaged in the clothing business at 
Sullivan, was born April 14, 1871, in Jefferson township, Sullivan county, 
Indiana, a son of Thomas M. and Lydia M. (Wells) Douthitt. The 
father was a native of the same township and county, born on the old 
original Douthitt homestead, eight miles east of Carlisle, which place was 
settled by the grandfather. Thomas M., the father, was born April 23, 
1845, and still lives on the old farm, with his wife, who was also born 
within the same township, in 1848. He has always followed farming, and 
was also quite a noted stock raiser. He is still able to attend to his finely 
improved hundred-acre farm. In his politics he is decidedly a Democrat. 
He has taken much interest in the welfare of his county, having served 
one term as county commissioner, and was a justice of the peace one 
term, etc. r>oth he and his wife are members of the Baptist church, 
known as Indian Prairie church. They are the parents of five children, 
born in the following order: William T., an attorne\- ; George E., resid- 
ing in Carlisle: Frank M., of this notice: Louretta, died February 22, 
1905 ; John E., residing on a farm adjoining the old homestead. 

Being reared on his father's farm, Frank M. Douthitt had the advan- 
tages of the public schools of his native county. He taught school one term 
in" Jefferson township. He then went to Sullivan and began clerking for 
McCammon & Wolfe, beginning April 27, 1892. This was in a clothing 
store, in which he remained until December I, 1900, at which time he 
opened a store on Jackson street, and put in a good stock of clothing 
and gentlemen's furnishings, which line of business he still carries on in 
a successful manner. His store is the largest of its line within the town 
of Sullivan. 

In his political views Mr. Douthitt supports the Democratic party, 
believing, as he does, that this best represents the general interests of 
the country. He is one of the directors in the Sullivan Building and 
Loan Association, and has other business interests within the county. 

Mr. Douthitt was married, November 24, 1896, to Miss Anna Boat- 
right, a native of Sullivan, born October i, 1871, and educated in Sulli- 
van, having graduated from the high school. She was engaged in the 
millinery business with a sister at the time of her marriage. She is the 
daughter of William and Ellen (Pearson) Boatright, both of whom are 
now* residing in Sullivan. The children born to Mr. Douthitt and wife 
are as follows: Paul Schuyler, born August 23, 1897: Thomas Edward, 
born I\Iav 3, 1900; Joseph Boatright. born August 30, 1903. 



22 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Ira Glidden, one of the business factors of Sullivan, doing a mer- 
cantile business, was born August 30, 1866, at Lewisville, Indiana, a son 
of Frederick Eugene and Julia (Martin) Glidden. Both of the parents 
were natives of Rush county, Indiana ; the father was born in 1834 and 
died in 1900, at Lewisville, Indiana, while the mother was born in 1841 
and is now residing at Lewisville. The father was a jeweler, and was 
engaged in a jewelry business at Greenfield, Indiana, for a number of 
years. In 1884 he went to Sullivan, where he conducted a jewelry and 
shoe business until 1888, then returned to Greenfield and retired from 
active business life. 

Being eight years old at the time his parents moved to Greenfield, 
Ira Glidden was there educated in the public schools. He remained with 
his father until twenty-one years of age, then engaged in the clothing 
trade, with W. E. Woods, of Sullivan, Indiana, serving as a clerk for 
twelve years, and gaining a thorough knowledge of the business. His next 
experience was as a commercial traveler out of Indianapolis for three 
and a half years. He was with Henderickson & Lefler, hatters. After 
quitting the road, he returned to Sullivan, where he was again emploved 
by W. E. Woods for a short time, and in 1904 engaged in business for 
himself, conducting a tailor shop. The following year he, with John F. 
Douthitt, bought the clothing business belonging to J. W. Wolfe & Son,, 
and they have conducted the store to the present time in a most satisfac- 
tory and profitable manner. Their store is the most thoroughly up-to- 
date one in Sullivan. He is identified with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the U. C. T. of Indianapolis. 

Mr. Glidden was united in marriage, August 29, 1888. to Lola Moore, 
born in Sullivan in 1862, where she was educated. Her parents were 
Robert A. and Susan (Robison) Moore, the father living with his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Glidden, and the mother being deceased. Mr. Moore is one of 
the pioneers of the dry goods trade in Sullivan. He retired from a long 
and prosperous mercantile career, in the latter part of the eighties. Mr. 
and Mrs. Glidden have two daughters : Nellie and Susan. 



James R. Browx, lawyer and abstracter, practicing at Sullivan, is 
a native of Wabash county, Illinois, born September 14, 1872, son of John 
and Eliza (Cisel) Brown. The father was born in 1832 and died in 
November, 1872. The grandfather, James Brown, a native of England, 
born about 1795, came to the United States in 1820, locating in Virginia. 
He removed to Illinois and there spent the remainder of his days. Grand- 
father Thomas Cisel was born in Ohio in 1807, and went to Illinois on 
a raft, run down the Wabash river, in 1814. The family settled at a 
point within Wabash county. He was of English descent, and always 
followed farming for his livelihood. The Cisels were all radical Demo- 
crats, while the Browns were Republican in their political views. 

John Brown, the father of James R., was also a sturdy farmer who, 
at the date of his death, owned about two hundred and fifty acres of 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 23- 

clioice land. He took a deep interest in church work, belonging to the 
Methodist Episcopal denomination, and was a trustee in that church 
nearly all of his life. The five children born to Mr. and Mrs. John 
Brown were named as follows, in the order of their birth : JNIary, Aura, 
and Leander, deceased ; Laura M., wife of H. A. Price, of Allendale, 
Illinois, where he is engaged in the mercantile business ; James R., of 
this memoir. After the death of the father, the mother married, in 1882, 
J. V. B. Wright. She died in April, 1899. There were no children by 
this marriage, and Mr. Wright now resides on a farm in Knox county, 
Indiana. 

James R. Brown was reared in Allendale, Illinois, to which place his 
mother moved four months after the death of the husband and father. 
The .son, having finished his course at the public schools of Allendale, 
entered and graduated from the scientific course with the class of 1895, 
at the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana. He then entered 
the State University, at Bloomington, Indiana, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1896. He was admitted to the bar of the supreme 
court of Indiana in the same year. He then began the practice of law 
at Martinsville, Indiana, forming a partnership with ^^■. H. Pigg. This 
law firm removed to Sullivan in 1897, and continued in the practice until 
1900, since which date Mr. Brown has been in independent practice. He 
also conducts an abstract business, with Joseph S. Schroeder. who in^ this 
branch of the business is a partner. This is the only abstract office within 
Sullivan county, and they do a large business and carry it on along 
approved and correct lines. Mr. Brown is secretary of the Sullivan 
County Loan Association; also president of the Sunday School Asso- 
ciation, as well as being treasurer of the Tri-State Oil Company, all of 
which causes him to be a very busy man. In fraternal society matters he is 
connected with the Masonic, Ben Hur, Modern Woodmen and Royal 
Neighbors societies. In Masonry, he belongs to the blue lodge and Eastern 
Star degrees. 

August 28, 1896, JMr. Brown was married to Sadie Holsen, a native 
of Wabash county, Illinois, born January 25, 1875. She was educated in 
her native county. Her parents were Frederic and Nancy (Kneippe) 
Holsen, the former born in Germany and now living in Wabash county, 
and the latter a native of Wabash county, where she died in 1892. The 
father is a grain dealer and miller, living at Allendale, Illinois. Five 
sons were born to ;\Ir. and Mrs. Brown: John Stanley, Rolland, Thomas 
Cisel, Barrel and Marcell. The parents are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which ]Mr. Brown is financial secretary, and he has 
been a class leader for the last six years. 



Adam Vincent Minich, farmer and stock raiser of Sullivan countv, 
residing in Sullivan, was born May 9, 1857, in Haddon township. He is 
a son of Pleasant Alexander and Sarah (Corbin) ]\Iinich, both parents 
being natives of this county. The father was born June 6, 1822, and still 



24 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

lives on the old ]\Iinich homestead in Haddon township, south of Car- 
lisle. The mother, born January 25. 1832, also survives. The grand- 
father, Adam Minich, was born in Virginia and his father and mother 
came from Germany. The grandfather settled in Tennessee and moved 
from that state to Sullivan county, Indiana, where he died November 16, 
1826. He, with a brother, came to Sullivan county, and entered tracts 
of government land. Adam Minich was a saddlemaker by trade and 
employed a small wooden mallet with which to pound the impressions in 
the leather he used for making the saddle skirts with. This implement 
is now possessed by Adam V., of this notice, and highly prized as a 
family relic. 

Pleasant Alexander, the father, has always followed farming for 
his livelihood and has made a success of tilling the soil. He now owns 
two hundred and fifty acres of valuable land. The first house, which he 
erected in 1856, is still standing on his farm, in the rear of the substantial 
brick structure erected in 1878. In his political views. Pleasant A. Minich 
is a Democrat, and in church faith a Methodist. He and his wife were 
the parents of three children, as follows ; Adam V., of this sketch : Will- 
iam Franklin, born August 22, 1859, married and resides at home with 
his father ; Charles Theodore, died in infancy. 

Adam V. i\Iinich obtained his early education at the public schools 
and was reared to farm labor, and taught habits of frugality and industry. 
He lingel'ed beneath the parental roof until twenty-four years of age, at 
which time he began to farm independently in Haddon township, remain- 
ing there until the autumn of 1903, when he moved to Sullivan. He still 
owns his farm, which is a part of the old homestead. In Sullivan, he 
has erected a commodious and modern styled residence, at the corner of 
Section and Johnson streets. While residing in the town, he still oper- 
ates his farm, in which he takes much interest. Politically, he is a firm 
believer in Democratic policies and platforms. He was elected on this 
ticket in the fall of 1902 as treasurer of Sullivan county, taking his seat 
January i, 1904, and serving four years. He has never been a candidate 
for any other public office. He is numbered with the Masonic fraternity, 
being connected with Carlisle Blue Lodge, No. 3, F. and A. M. ; Jeru- 
salem Chapter, No. 81, of Sullivan, and the Council of the same place. 
He is also counted among the brotherhood of the ]\Iodern Woodmen of 
America, at Carlisle, Lodge No. 3332. 

November 17, 1881, he was united in marriage to Ollie M. Collins, 
a native of Haddon township, born July 8, 1857, daughter of J. O. and 
Sarah Watson Collins, the former born in Kentucky and coming to 
Indiana in his youth, with his father. He died in Haddon township in 
the latter part of the nineties and Mrs. Collins still lives in that township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Minich have no children of their own, but adopted a girl 
named Mabel and raised her to womanhood. She is still with her foster 
parents and unmarried. She taught school several terms in Haddon 
township as well as in the graded schools at Farmersburg and Carlisle. 
Mrs. Minich is one of a family of nine children, six of whom still live. 
They are as follows: Finley O., residing in Haddon township; Mrs. 



HISTORY OF SULIJNAX COUNTY 25 

jMinich ; Robert, residing on a farm in Tennessee ; Dudley Odcll. of 
Haddon township: Eugene L., of Winchester. Tennessee, a hardware 
merchant; Ora L., unmarried and at home with her mother. 



Eso.M Rur.EN Leach, head of the firm of E. R. Leach & Co., of 
Sullivan, was born March 16, 1855, in Cjrant county, Indiana, a son of 
Edward and Emily (Brewer) Leach, both of whom died in Sullivan 
county. The father came to this state from the East with his father and 
mother, and he was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Grant and Sullivan 
counties, moving to the last named county in 1864. In 1887 he went to 
Nebraska and returned about 1890. When he first came to Sullivan 
county, he settled in Cass township and raised one crop, and then moved 
to Sullivan, where he engaged in business. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the old style Liaptist church and exemplary Christians. Their 
children were as follows : William Jasper, residing in Sheridan, Ne- 
braska ; Rachael Ann, deceased ; Charles Milton, residing in Grant 
county ; George W., resides at Sullivan ; James S. ; Esom R., of this 
review: Lucinda L., wife of William Lucas; Richard E., of Sullivan: 
Mary, deceased ; John W.. deceased. The mother of these children died 
in 1865. For his second wife. Mr. Leach married Mrs. Sallie Martin. The 
children born of the second marriage were as follows : Levy. Emil}-, 
Jesse. John, Bessie, Oliver, Daisy, and Marten. 

E. R. Leach, of this biography, was only nine years of age w'hen he 
came to Sullivan county. Here he obtained his common-school education 
and clerked for his father while yet in his teens. When he had reached 
his twenty-first year, with two brothers, J. S. and G. W., he engaged in 
the livery business in Sullivan, continuing about two years. He then 
returned to the farm, which he conducted about three years. His next 
business was that of the grain, stock and implement business, wdiich he 
carried on under the firm name of E. & E. R. Leach, operating this until 
1886, when he went west, remaining in Nebraska until 1896 and being 
engaged in farming in that state. Upon his return to the east, he was 
employed as a clerk for G. W. Borders, being appointed, in the fall of 
1897. superintendent of the county asylum, which position he resigned 
after four years' faithful service. He was then appointed superintendent 
of the Orphans' Home, at Greencastle. He remained there four years, 
when he resigned and moved back to Sullivan. In April. 1907, he pur- 
chased the business of the firm of Whitman & Asdel, who operated in 
grain and feed. This business was run by Mr. Leach and his nephew, 
Clell Leach, until September, 1907, when G. F. Botts bought an interest 
in the business. 

Mr. Leach was married March 12. 1889. to Mary J. Turman. who 
was born in Turman township. Sullivan county, a daughter of Charles 
and Nancy E. (Johnson) Turman, both of whom were natives of Sulli- 
van county. Charles Turman is dead, but his wife resides at Graysville, 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Leach are the parents of two children : Glenn 



26 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Emma, born January 21, 1890, single, and a graduate of the Sullivan 
High School with the class of 1908 ; Ruth Hazel, born November 28, 
1893. Mrs. Leach is a consistent member of the Christian church. Polit- 
ically, Mr. Leach affiliates with the Democratic party. 



Walter F. Wood, the present prosecuting attorney for Sullivan 
county, was born June 27, 1878, at Pleasantville, Indiana, son of Jesse A. 
and Elizabeth (Jones) Wood. The father was born in Greene county, 
Indiana, January 8, 1845, and now resides in Sullivan. The mother was 
born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, October 20, 185 1, and is still living. 
Mr. Wood's paternal grandfather. Lacy Wood, was a native of Tennes- 
see, and was born in 1808, dying in 1875, at Pleasantville, Indiana. About 
1835, he came to Indiana, settling in Greene county, but moved to near 
Pleasantville in 1846. He was of English and Irish extraction. Grand- 
father Jones was of Dutch lineage, but born in Pennsylvania, going to 
Louisiana in the forties. He was killed while serving in the Confederate 
army. 

Jesse A. Wood (father) has always followed agricultural pursuits, 
in which he has been materially prospered. Politically he is a stanch 
defender of Republican ideas. He served in the Civil war, from 1864 to 
1865 — from April to April inclusive — as a private soldier. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Baptist church. 

Walter F. Wood was reared in the free and independent atmosphere 
of the farm, and attended the district schools, remaining at home until 
about nineteen years of age. He had the desire to become a lawyer, 
and read law at home a year, and then entered the office of Chaney & 
McNabb, with whom he read more completely. Subsequently he was a 
student in the offices of Buff & Stratton, and also with C. D. Hunt. 
When twenty-one years of age, he was admitted to the bar, and when 
twenty-three opened at office for the practice of his profession, which he 
is still occupying, having practiced alone, with the exception of one year, 
when he was associated with W'lliam B. Edmonds. Politically, he is a 
progressive Republican, and was elected by this party, in November, 
1906, as prosecuting attorney, receiving a majority of 362 votes, and 
taking the office January i, 190?, for the term of two years. 

Mr. Wood is a member of the Odd Fellows Order and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. January 26, 1905, he was married to Miss Agnes 
McGuire, daughter of Rev. U. M. McGuire, who is now pastor of the 
Baptist church at Washington, Indiana. Mrs. Wood was born January 8, 
1882, and graduated from the high school with the class of 1902. By 
this union two daughters were born to bless the home : Elizabeth and 
Margaret. 



Paul Lyon Reid, the enterprising grocer and breeder of fine blooded 
Shetland ponies, residing at Sullivan, Indiana, was born Januar_y 28, 1873, 
in Sullivan county, Indiana, and is the son of James Thomas and Susan 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 2/- 

(Lyon) Reid. The father was born in this county, and thed aljout 1900, 
while the mother was a native of Owen county, Indiana, and now resides 
at SulHvan. The father was a miller and merchant, operating the Sulli- 
van Roller Mills for a number of years, and he was also a grocer. He 
served in the Eighty-fifth Indiana regiment during the Civil war period 
for the term of three years. Politically, he was a firm defender of Repub- 
lican principles in party politics. He belonged to the Masonic order, being 
a member of the blue lodge, F. & A. M. He and his wife were members 
of the JMethodist Episcopal church. Five children were born to them, as 
follows: William, deceased; Maude, wife of H. K. Ross, of Sullivan; 
Paul Lyon, of this memoir; Lola, widow of C. D. Taylor, residing in 
Sullivan ; Ruth, deceased. 

Paul L. Reid attended DePauw University, at Greencastle, liuliana, 
for two vears, after which he returned home and was employed by the 
Electric Light Company (of which his father was at that time super- 
intendent) for five years. He was associated with his father in the mill- 
ing and grocery business up to 1900, when he engaged in the grocery trade 
on his own account, continuing until the present time. He carries a full 
line of staple and fancy groceries and has an excellent trade, Ixith within 
and without the city. Politically, like his father, he is a Republican. He 
is a Mason, being a member of both the blue lodge and chapter at Sulli- 
van ; he is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 

June 29, 1894, he was united in marriage to Josephine Ensminger, 
born in Sullivan county, Indiana, October 12, 1874, daughter of Joseph 
and Jennie (Benefield) Ensminger. Mrs. Reid was educated at the public 
schools of her native county. The following chiklren were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Reid: Mildred, born February 21, 1896; James T., born May 
8, 1897; Ruth, born September 5, 1899. 

Besides the busy cares of his grocery business, Mr. Reid conducts 
another industry — a Shetland pony farm. He carries in stock all the 
time from thirty to forty head of fine Shetland ponies. His pony farm 
contains one hundred and thirty-four acres and is known as the "Walnut 
Grove Shetland Farm." He owns one exceptionally beautiful as well as 
valuable sire of a spotted color. The animals from this farm are shipped 
to every part of the country. This unique and profitable business has been 
carried on bv I\Ir. Reid for six years and more. 



WiNFiELD Scott Wolfe, who is numliercd among the enterprising 
retail merchants of Sullivan, and the proprietor of one of the hardware 
stores of the citv, was born February 6, 1880, in Sullivan county, Indiana, 
on a farm, and is the son of John W. and Mary O. (Sproatt) Wolfe. 
The father is also a native of Sullivan county, born there January 16, 
1848. The mother, a native of Knox county, together with her husband, 
is now leading a quiet and somewhat retired life at Sullivan. The father 
was a farmer in Sullivan county up to i88t, when he went to the town 
of Sullivan and there engaged in the clothing trade, continuing until 



28 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Ma)', 1906, when he sold to Glidden & Douthitt, the style of the firm 
at that time being J. W. Wolfe & Son. Since then, he has led a retired 
life. Politically, he is a Democrat. In his religious faith, both he and 
his wife are of the Christian church. He belongs to the Odd Fellows 
order and is ever alive to the best interests of his community. 

The son, Winfield S., of this notice, was reared in Sullivan. He was 
graduated from the Sullivan high school with the class of 1900, and then 
entered into business with his father, having put in his spare hours at 
the store before this time. He continued with the business until his 
father sold in 1906, when Winfield S., with Charles Riggs. purchased a 
hardware stock, which they dealt in until 1907, when he bought out his 
partner, and now conducts the store alone. He carries a full and com- 
plete line of shelf and heavy hardware, with stoves and buggies, together 
with a few farm implements. 

In his political views he is a Democrat and holds that the doctrine of 
that party iDest suits the masses of American citizens. He is connected 
with the Odd Fellows and Elks orders. ]Mr. W'olfe was married, in 1901, 
to Roxa Willard, who was born in Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
and died March 17, 1907. She was educated in this county and was the 
daughter of Rufus O. and Mary (Owens) Willard. Her parents are now 
residing in Gill township. She left one son and one daughter: Willard 
W. and Mildred Louise. Mr. Wolfe is a member of the Christian church, 
as was his wife in her lifetime. 

Mr. Wolfe's sisters are Teresa, born August 9, 1883, is unmarried, 
and at home; she was graduated with the class of 1902, and attended the 
Conservatory of Music, taking both the vocal and instrumental courses ; 
Edna, born August 3, 1886, is a graduate of the high school of Sullivan, 
with the class of 1905 ; is unmarried and at home. 



Walter Gibson Scott, hardware dealer of Sullivan, a son of Thomas 
Leeman and Nancy M. (Cotterell) Scott, was born May 30, 1868, at 
New Hope, Ohio. The father was a native of Cincinnati and of Scotch 
descent. The mother was also born in Ohio, and they came to Indiana 
in the early seventies, locating at a point in Morgan county, where the 
father died. Thomas Leeman Scott, was a practicing physician and sur- 
geon. He graduated at Cincinnati, Ohio, at one of the medical colleges. 
Politically, Dr. Scott was an uncompromising Republican, and served in 
the Civil war as a lieutenant. He belonged to the order of Knights of 
Honor. He had three children: Walter G., of this memoir; John Thomas, 
residing in Indianapolis, where he is practicing medicine ; Albert David, 
residing in Sullivan county. 

Mr. Scott received his education in Indiana and at the age of twelve 
years set out in the conflict of life for himself by working on a farm. 
When eighteen years of age he commenced to farm for himself, continu- 
ing two seasons in Ohio, and then came to Elnora, Indiana, where he 
learned the art, or profession, of telegraphy, operating for the Evansville 



HISTORY Ol' SULLRAX COUXTY 29. 

& Terre Hauto Railroad Company for ihe next nine years. He then 
returned to farm life fur two years, coming to Sullivan in 1904. Here 
he embarked in the hardware business, coupline:--with it house furnishing 
goods, wagons, buggies and pipe-fittings. He is in company with his 
brother, A. D. Scott. They also conduct a sale stable, catering to the 
local trade and the coal mines. Mr. Scott is president of the Business 
Men's Association of Sullivan ; he belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
order, and has advanced in Masonry to the thirty-second degree. In 
politics, he is a Republican. He was united in marriage, in 1905, to Nettie 
Bond, born in Worden, Illinois. One child has come to bless and brighten 
their home — Myrle Wyatt Scott, born April 12, 1906. The parents are 
niemliers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



James M. Sinclair, one of the proprietors of the popular ''Index 
Store" of Sullivan, is a native of Sullivan county, Indiana, born Decem- 
ber 31, 1 87 1, in Hamilton township. He is the son of Samuel and Sarah 
(Willis) Sinclair, the former born in Indiaija, and the latter in Kentucky, 
February 29, 1832. The mother is still living with her son, James M. 
The father died about 1881. Politically, he was a stanch Democrat, and 
both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Eight children blessed their marriage union, as follows : William M., 
residing at Coffeeville, Kansas ; Mary A., wife of Andy Mason, of Sulli- 
van ; Thomas H., of Sullivan ; Elizabeth, wife of Malon Gustin, of Sulli- 
van ; Edward, residing in Hamilton township ; Eliza, wife of Reason 
Lovelace, residing at Duggar ; Flora ; James M., of this notice. 

Reared midst the scenes and labors coincident to the farmer's life, 
James M. Sinclair remained at home until about twenty years, when he 
went to Sullivan and commenced clerking for a Mr. Boyd, who conducted 
the first Racket store established in the place. After working there two 
years, he was employed at other places up to 1898, at which date he estab- 
lished a business for himself. At. first, he began with a stock of goods in 
what was known as the Racket store, having an endless variety of small, 
cheap articles. In the course of time, as his trade demanded it, he added 
more goods, until he now heads the firm of Sinclair & Co., which firm 
deals in a wholesale and retail way in furniture, stoves, tinware, queens- 
ware, glassware and five and ten cent counter articles — the latter being 
their specialty. This store is situated in the Odd Fellows building at 
Sullivan. By strict attention to duty, a large and prosperous business 
has grown up and the trade which at first was on a small scale has become 
one of goodlv proportions. In his political views, Mr. Sinclair is a Demo- 
crat. In 1898 he served as clerk and treasurer of the town of Sullivan. 
He is identified with the Odd Fellows order, including the Encampment 
degree. Himself and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which body he is one of the trustees. 

January 8, 1896, ]\Ir. Sinclair was married to Fannie E. Orndorff, 
born in Knox county, Indiana, .April 10, 1879, daughter of Wallace and 



30 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Laura (Knotts) Orndorff. The father died in Knox county when i\Irs. 
Sinclair was in her infancy. Her mother later married her first husband's 
brother, Andrew J. Sinclair, and they now reside south of Sullivan, in 
Hamilton township. Mrs. Sinclair received her education in Sullivan 
county. The children born of her marriage to Mr. Sinclair are : Frances 
L., born August lo, 1897, and Zola I., born April 14, igoo. 



James Fraxk Alumbaugh. — The vice president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Carlisle, Indiana, and a man prominent in the business 
circles of his town and county, is James F. Alumbaugh, who was born 
September 10, 1857, in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, a 
son of Tilford and Paulina J. (Gobin) Alumbaugh. The father, who 
was of German descent, always followed farming in Haddon township, 
until about 1890, when he retired to Carlisle. He was a highly success- 
ful farmer and stock-raiser, at one time owning three hundred acres of 
most excellent Indiana land. Tilford Alumbaugh was born April i, 
1834, in Gill township, Sullivan county, and died March 22, 1900, aged 
sixty-five years, eleven months and twenty-one days. He was one of 
seven brothers, two perhaps being younger than he, but he was the last 
to pass away. The death of both parents within a short time of each 
other left him an orphan about the age of five years. He lived with his 
uncle, Morris Roberts, until eleven years old and was then bound out to 
Milner E. Nash, who died in February, shortly before young Alumbaugh 
was twenty-one. He remained with the widow during the following sum- 
mer. In the autumn of 1855 Mr. Alumbaugh went to James M. Gobin's 
place. This was a turning point in his life, for about one year afterward, 
on September 11, 1856, he was married to Paulina J. Gobin, daughter of 
James M. To this union were born three children : Libbie G., James F. 
and William H., the last named dying in infancy. This left only a brother 
and a sister. The daughter was the late sister Cauble, of precious mem- 
ory. The son, James F., one of the leading business men of Carlisle, is 
the only one now surviving. Uncle "Tip," as Tilford Alumbaugh was 
called, commenced life with nothing, but b}' industry and integrity, by 
economy and good management, he long since secured a competency for 
himself and his family. He loved his family and served them by self- 
sacrifice. He obeyed the gospel and became a member of the Providence 
Christian church in the early sixties. He and his wife were baptized at 
the same time by Uncle Joe Wolfe, who had also issued their marriage 
license and solemnized their marriage. Tilford Alumbaugh was a char- 
ter member of the Carlisle Christian church, which met first in the old 
Seminary, then in a rented hall, and finally in the house now occupied by 
the church. In the building of this house, in 1866, he took a leading part, 
being a member of the building committee, and contributing largely both 
of time and money. For many years he served the congregation as elder. 
In church work, as in everything, he was candid, energetic and decisive. 
In his death the family lost an exemplary father and husband, the church 



THE Nil ./ YORK 

PUfiUC LIISRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN' FOUHDATIONS, 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 31 

one of its most valuetl ineml)ers. and the community a benefactor. 
"Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord, from henceforth ; yea, saith 
the Spirit, that they ma\- rest from their labors, and their works "do follow 
them." A large audience attended the funeral, which took place in the 
Christian church, Sunday, March 25, at 10:00 A. M., interment being at 
Engle cemetery. The services were conducted b\- the pastor, Rev 
T. A. Cox. 

The mother of James F. Alumbaugh was also a native of Fladdon 
township, born near Carlisle, Indiana, January 5, 1826, the daughter of 
James 1\1. and Levicy (Booker) (.K)bin. James M. Gobin was born in 
Kentucky and his wife in Indiana, and both died in Haddon township, 
Sullivan county. Fie was a farmer and also a stock-raiser. In the early 
sixties Mrs. Alumbaugh became a Christian, uniting with the Providence 
Christian church, near Paxton, and with her husband she was a charter 
member of the Christian church at Carlisle. Through all the early strug- 
gles and successes of this church, she helped to carry the burdens and 
rejoice in the victories, and in her last moments the church was her chief 
source of care. No excuse for absence from the services of the church 
was satisfactory to her except sickness. She was ready to give of her 
means as well as her time and personal services toward the support of 
the teaching of the gospel. Her home was the home of the preacher 
as long as she was physically able to take care of the house. For months 
she had not been in vigorous health and for some weeks was quite feeble, 
but would not give her consent to leave her own home until stricken 
with paralysis, January 13, when she was removed to the home of her 
son, James Frank, where she died January 30, 1903. Retiring and mod- 
est almost to timidity, she was not a talking Christian but a working 
Christian. The early years of her married life, when she began with 
little, as well as in the later years of financial success, she was a true 
helpmate to her husband, by whose side she stood for more than forty- 
three years, was a true mother, a good neighbor, a faithful friend and an 
earnest though quiet Christian. 

James F. Alumbaugh was reared to farm labor, receiving his educa- 
tion in the district schools. He engaged in the livery business when 
twenty-three years old, locating at Carlisle for one year, where he oper- 
ated the business until he sold it, to engage in the hardware trade, in 
company with J. N. Roberts, under the firm name of Roberts & Alum- 
baugh. They also conducted a lumber and grain business at the depot 
and carried a large stock of farm implements and vehicles. This co-part- 
nership existed until January i, 1905, when it was dissolved bv mutual 
consent. The hardware business is now conducted by Mr. Alumbaugh's 
son, under the name of J. F. Alumbaugh & Co. Since January i, 1905, 
when Mr. Alumbaugh retired from the hardware business, he has super- 
intended his farm in Haddon township, a two hundred acre tract known 
as the old Alumbaugh homestead. He is also president of the Carlisle 
Construction Company, formed for the purpose of constructing gravel 
and stone walks and roads, and is vice president and one of the original 
organizers of the First National Bank of Carlisle, a solid financial insti- 
voi. 11— 3 



32 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

tution. Like his fatlier, James F. Alumbaugh affiliates with the Demo- 
cratic party. He is a meinber of the county council and served two terms 
on the town council. He takes much interest in educational matters, hav- 
ing served nine years on the Carlisle school board with much credit to 
himself and to the entire satisfaction of the district. He belongs to 
Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, F. & A. M., standing high in the Alasonic fra- 
ternity. 

Mr. Alumbaugh was married June 11, 1884, to Nora May IMarkee, 
who was born in Carlisle June 11, 1866, daughter of Isaac Newton and 
Mary Ann (Ferree) Markee. (See sketch of the Ferree family, else- 
where in this work, with sketch of Edley W. Rogers.) Isaac Newton 
Markee was born in Tippecanoe, Harrison county, Ohio, February 7, 
1832. He was married May 29, 1856, to Mary Ann Ferree Pirtle, of 
Carlisle, Indiana, by Capt. Wilbur Van Fossen. To this union were born 
iive children : William Allen, Sarah 'Ellen, Nora D., Maud Winifred and 
1 daughter who died in infancy. Mr. Markee was a shoemaker by trade 
and a man of good business tact and had the confidence of all who knew 
him. His father, James Markee, was born in 1795 and is buried in the 
town cemetery of Robinson, Illinois. The mother, Rhoda Johnson Nevitt, 
was born in Ohio in Januar}', 1801. Isaac Newton Markee died in Car- 
lisle, Indiana, September 6, 1883, of paralysis of the bowels, having been 
an invalid for many years. Mrs. Alumbaugh was educated at Carlisle, 
Indiana, and taught school for a season. One son was born to j\lr. 
Alumbaugh and wife, Harry Tilford, born March 21, 1885. He was 
educated at Carlisle and at the naval academy at Culver. Indiana, and the 
Illinois University, after which he returned home. He married Abbie 
Ross Harris, a native of Richmond, Indiana, where she was reared and 
educated, and they have two sons : James Winston and Harris Tilford. 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Alumbaugh are members of the Christian church. 
Mrs. Alumbaugh is especially interested in church work, having served 
eight years as president of the C. W. B. M., three years as junior super- 
intendent of the C. E., a teacher in the Sunday school for twenty-five 
years, and has always taken an active part in all public charities. At 
present she is vice president of the National Benevolent Association for 
Homeless Children, and has done much good for that cause. She is 
much beloved by children and appreciates greatly the friendship of a 
child. 

The following obituary is taken from the Carlisle (Indiana) Nczus 
of February 28, 1907: 

IN MEMORI.-XM. 

Mary Ann (Ferree) Markee was the daughter of Philip Copeland 
Ferree and Margaret (Trimble) Ferree. She was born near Paxton, 
Indiana, at the home of her grandparents, Joel Ferree and Mary (Leeth) 
Ferree, who were pioneer settlers of this township. The Ferrees are of 
French Huguenot ancestry, and she bore the name of her great-great- 
great-grandmother, Madame Mary Ferree, who, with her children, fled 



HISTORY OF SUIJJA'AN COUNTY 33 

from France after the edict of Nantes, came to America with William 
Penn and founded the first Huguenot colony in Pennsylvania in 1708. 

The greater part of Mrs. Markee's life was spent in this community. 
She received such education as the times afforded, which was meager. 
At the age of seven she was motherless, and e'er she was sixteen she 
was bereft of stepmother, father and grandparents. As the eldest of 
the little flock she bravely took the mother's place until she was incapaci- 
tated by illness, when the care of the little brothers was assumed by an 
uncle and she and her only sister, Sarah Fllen, found homes with maternal 
relatives. 

At the age of twenty she was married to William Linder Pirtle, son 
of Jacob and Lydia Pirtle, a young man of sterling qualities. He was a 
tanner, in partnership with Isaac Shannon, the home and tanyard occupy- 
ing a block on Harrison street. In 1852, she united with the Methodist 
church. She and her husband were immersed in Busseron creek, near 
Leclgerwood's Mill, by Rev. J. W. Julian. Her marriage was a happy 
one, but the young husband contracted quick consumption from over- 
work and exposure, and in August, 1853, she was left a widow with a 
young child, Margaret Oily (Mrs. Walstine Rogers), who survives her, 
the other daughter, Laura Jane, having died in infancy. 

The widow was married. May 29, 1856, to Isaac Newton Markee, 
son of James M. and Rhoda Markee, of Palestine, Illinois. The cere- 
mony was performed at her home by Squire Van Fossen, and the fiftieth 
anniversary of the event was quietly celebrated in Chicago last May. 
Of this union five children were born, four of whom survive her : Will- 
iam Allen Markee, of Chicago; Sarah Ellen (Mrs. Frank Buckley), of 
Monett, Missouri: Nora May (Mrs. Frank Alumbaugh), of Carlisle, 
Indiana; Maud Winifred (Mrs. George R. Miles), of Chicago. The 
second child, a daughter, died in infancy. 

Mr. Markee's health failed, and while the children were yet young 
she bravelv became the bread-winner of the family and performed both 
father and mother's part in caring for and educating her children. She 
faithfully ministered to her invalid husband until his death, September 6, 
1883. At this time all her children were married and well launched in 
the world, except the youngest, and to better her condition she decided to 
leave her native state. The inherited pioneer spirit of her ancestors 
asserted itself and she turned her face westward to what seemed to her 
the Land of Promise — Antelope Valley, in northwest Nebraska. A colony 
under the leadership of Rev. J. A. Scamahorn, of Sullivan, was organ- 
ized in 1884. About sixty or seventy-five families from Sullivan and 
Carlisle made up the party. Those from Carlisle were Mrs. Markee and- 
daughter, Maud, Dr. W. A. Lisman, Samuel and Albert Helms, Jacob 
Milam, Alonzo, John, Joseph and Oscar Estabrook and Charles Speake. 
Thev went a hundred miles beyond Valentine, the terminus of the rail- 
road, and settled on government land in the valley of the Antelope, in 
what is now Sheridan county, Nebraska. Airs. Markee was then past 
fifty-four years of age and was companioned only by her young daughter. 
For thirteen vears she lived there, enduring all the hardships incident to 



34 HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 

pioneer life. Everytliing was in the experimental stage, failure after 
failure rewarding their efforts. The severe winter, lack of rainfall and 
failure of crops all tended to discourage the little band of settlers. Strong 
men faltered, weak ones turned back, but Mrs. Markee bravely plodded 
on, firm in her confidence in the final success of the venture. 

The years sped apace ; success seemed within her grasp — the years 
of toil were bearing fruit — when suddenl)' the realization came that old 
age was upon her. She turned over the management of her affairs to 
her 3-oungest daughter and finally yielded to the desires of her elder 
children to leave the scene of her struggles and returned to the land of 
her birth to spend the evening of her life with her children and grand- 
children. Her industry, her public spirit, her high ideals, have made a 
lasting impression on the community which she helped to found. Her 
name is a synonym of courage, and there are many friends there who 
will mourn the passing of her brave spirit. Her life here since her return 
has been very happy. She has divided her time between her four daugh- 
ters and has watched the development of her grandchildren and great- 
grandchildren with satisfaction. 

To look back over seventy-six years of useful life, to realize that no 
duty has been left undone, to sleep every night with a clear conscience, 
to feel that in all the walks of life she has acquitted herself nobly and 
well, to see her children grow up and fill honorable places in the world, 
to bear with patience the affliction which came upon her when paralysis 
robbed her of her activity, to be tenderly ministered unto during the year 
of her helplessness by her devoted children and grandchildren and great- 
grandchildren, to enjoy at intervals the relatives and friends who came 
with words of cheer, to have a heart full of gratitude and thankfulness 
and to preserve an abiding faith in an All Wise Creator — this has been 
her portion ; this has constituted the glow which pervaded her sick- 
room. Her life went out like the passing of a perfect day. in a glorious 
sunset. 

"Her children rise up and call her blessed," and in all this world of 
shadows they see no shadow of a final parting from her. Three of her 
daughters were at her bedside when the end came. The simple funeral 
service was conducted at her home Wednesday afternoon by Brother and 
Sister Edwards, the details having been arranged in accordance with her 
wishes. The body was borne to its last resting place in the Carlisle 
cemetery by members of her own famih\ 



Charles Francis Batey, of the firm of Reed & Batey, druggists, 
and one of the well-known and enterprising merchants doing business at 
Sullivan, is a native of Kansas, born September 24, 1874, in Marshall 
county of that state. He is the son of William Henry and Alice (Francis) 
Batev. The senior Batey was a native of Ohio, "born February, 1850, 
and died in 1900, in Sullivan county, Indiana. The mother of Charles F. 
was born in Kansas, and died in 1876, after which sad event the father 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 35 • 

married Mary E. Stuckcy, a native of Illinois, and who now resides at 
Tcrre Haute. One child was born to each union — Charles F., by the first, 
and Thomas Lloyd, by the second. Thomas Lloyd was born in iSSS, in 
Crawford county, Illinois, and now resides with his mother at Terre 
Haute. 

Charles Francis Batey was reared by his father and continued to 
remain at home until he was eighteen years of age, after which time he 
was variously engaged in the western part of Sullivan county for about 
two years. When about twenty years old, he went to Sullivan. This 
was in 1894 and then he commenced clerking for Joseph S. Reed in the 
drug business. He remained with him until 1898, then went to Terre 
Haute with the Burton Drug Company, for whom he traveled about one 
year in southern Indiana. But not thinking the position on the road to 
his liking, he opened a drug store for Mr. Coffman, in Sullivan, but after 
a short time left that enterprise and went back with J. S. Reed and 
remained with him until September, 1902. when he bought a half interest 
of the Reed stock, since which time the firm has been known as Reed & 
Batey. They handle large quantities of drugs, wall paper, paints, all 
kinds of musical instruments, sewing machines and general supplies. 

Mr. Batey is a half owner of the Globe Theatre at Sullivan, which 
he opened himself in May, 1907, but in the following August took Francis 
H. Abell in as his partner, the latter being the manager of it. In his 
political choice, Mr. Batey is a Republican. Fraternally, he is associated 
with the Odd Fellows, Elks and Modern Woodmen of America orders, 
having reached the Encampment degree of the first named lodge, while 
he is a trustee of the last two. 

In the month of August, 1898, he was married to Louise Burton, 
daughter of Thomas and Emily (Brewer) Burton. Mrs. Batey's mother 
is still living, and both were natives of Sullivan county, Indiana. Mrs. 
Batey was born April, 1874, and graduated from the high school of Sulli- 
van." To Mr. and Mrs. Batey one daughter has been born: Emily Pau- 
line, born in May, 1899. The parents are both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



Laf.wette a. Stewart, D. D. S., dental surgeon, practicing in Sulli- 
van, Indiana, is a native of Sullivan county, born June 12, 1864, son of 
Lafayette and Emily (Peters) Stewart. The father was born in Indiana 
and died in Sullivan county in 1884. He was descended from that most 
sturdy and excellent people, the Scotch-Irish. The mother was born in 
Sullivan county and died in 1888. Lafayette Stewart was a general mer- 
chant doing business at Grayville and .Sullivan, Indiana, up to within 
twenty years of his death, when he engaged in the insurance and real 
estate' business in Sullivan. In politics, he was a supporter of the chief 
principles of the Democratic part\' ; was trustee of Hamilton township, 
and took nuich interest in public matters. He was a member of the pio- 
neer Masonic lodge at Sullivan, being a charter member, and its first 
master. Lie was also advanced to membership in the chapter of that 



36 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

fraternity. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church, of which he served as an elder for a number of years. Eight 
children blessed this imion : Isaac P., deceased ; Joseph L., residing in 
New York City; two who died in infancj-; Charles M., deceased; Flor- 
ence B., wife of R. C. Barnes, residing at Long Beach, California ; Lafay- 
ette A. ; Ralph W., residing at Danville, Illinois, a practicing dentist. 

Lafayette A. Stewart was graduated from the high school of Sulli- 
van with the class of 1883, after which he entered the Indiana Dental 
College, at Indianapolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1888. 
In the meantime, he worked with his brother Charles in the insurance 
business. After his graduation, he commenced the practice of dentistry 
in Sullivan, where he is still located, and enjoying a lucrative practice. 

In his political views. Dr. Stewart is a defender of pure Democracy 
and votes the Democratic ticket. In his fraternal relations, he is num- 
bered among the brothers of the blue lodge, chapter and council of the 
Masonic order ; he also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
— subordinate and encampment degrees. 

The doctor was united in marriage, August 14, 1890, to Mattie Crow- 
der, born in Sullivan, November 6, 1866, a daughter of Dr. R. H. Crow- 
der. Mrs. Stewart was educated in the Sullivan schools. Both the doctor 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and he has 
served as a trustee of the church for several years. Two children were 
born to Dr. Stewart and wife; Lois, born November 3, 1892; she is now 
attending high school; Lafayette, born ]\Iarch 27, 1903. 



Frank J. Nicholas, an enterprising and skillful contractor and 
builder of Sullivan, is a native of Morgan county, Indiana, born March 3, 
1878, a son of James F. and Rhoda (Long) Nicholas, who were born in 
Morgan county, Indiana. The father is a brick mason and contractor, 



who went to Sullivan in 1890, and has resided there ever since. He is a 
Republican in his political views, and was a soldier in the Civil war, being 
a member of the fife and drum corps. He is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 

When Frank J. was about three years old, his parents moved to 
Brazil, Indiana, where he attended school. At the age of fifteen years 
he commenced to work for himself, learning the bricklayer's trade and 
working at it in Brazil for five years, during which time he studied at 
home. He had taken up the study of architecture and when he had 
reached twenty years of age, began contracting on his own account. His 
first building contract was the Davis, Carpenter & Hoskins building, a 
business block and business college structure, of which Mr. Nicholas was 
the contractor on the mason work. He remained there until 1900, then 
went to Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he superintended the erection 
of three large veneered brick residences, he doing the architectural work 
on the same. In the autumn of 1900, he came to Sullivan, where he has 
resided ever since and been engaged in the architecture and building 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AN C"OUNTY 37- 

business, doing contract work. Among; the structures planned by him 
may be named in this connection the Citizen's Trust & Loan Company's 
building, the largest luiilding in Sullivan county. It is located on the 
corner of Jackson and Main streets and is seventy-five by one hundred 
and thirty feet on the ground and fifty-five feet high — three stories. He 
also built the Carnegie Library, which was erected in 1904, at a cost of 
$10,000. Mr. Nicholas' father had the contract for doing the mason 
work on the Davis Hotel and superintended the building of the Methodist 
Episcopal churcii at Sullivan. Besides the buildings named, Frank J. 
Nicholas had the coiUract for building the Jackson Street High School 
building, in Sullivan, and also the Leach block, on West Washington 
street. Among the late and beautiful residences within the town, he has 
had the majority of the building contracts, including the preparation of 
the plans and specifications. In the Giles Addition to Sullivan, he planned 
and contracted for all of the buildings except one, and built the Bay's 
block on North Court street. At this writing, he drew the plans for the 
new Presbyterian church, erected in 1908. He is one of the stockholders 
of the new opera house being erected, and made the plans for the build- 
ing, which is known as the "Colonnade." Politically, Mr. Nicholas is a 
firm supporter of the principles laid down by the Republican party. He 
is identified with the Masons and Elks. 

He was united in marriage, first in 1897, to Mary Underbill, who was 
born at Pleasantville, Sullivan county, Indiana, December 10, 1877, and 
who died April 22, 1906, leaving two children to mourn her death. The 
issue by this union was : Lois, deceased, William ; Agnes : Mary Ger- 
trude, deceased. For his second wife, Mr. Nicholas married, in Novem- 
ber, 1907, Gertrude Underbill, a sister of his first wife, and who Vv'as 
born in the same locality in 1879. The first wife spent the last two years 
of her life in Colorado Springs. Both wives were members of the Bap- 
tist church, and members of the Rebekah lodge of the Odd Fellows order. 

Beginning at the lower round of the ladder of life, Mr. Nicholas has 
steadily made his way upward, though at times against many difficulties. 
He has accumulated a handsome property, including two fine residences in 
Sullivan. 



GicoRGE R.\ND.\Li, Stiver.s, proprietor of the Interurban Restaurant 
of Sullivan, Indiana, was born in Meigs county, Ohio, July 19, 1856, a 
son of George and Elizabeth (Rice) Stivers. The mother was born in 
Alabama, in 182 1, and died in 1883. The father was born in Oswego 
countv. New York, in 1819, and was killed at the battle of Stone River, 
Januarv 2. 1862. during the Civil war. He was a captain in the Eigh- 
teenth Ohio \'olunteers. He owned a steamboat, was captain of the same, 
and plied the rivers from Pittsburg to Kentucky. He had this boat built 
at ]\Iadison, Indiana, and it was called "Leslie Combs." It was built for 
George R. Stivers by the Robinson Brothers. His maternal grandparents 
were'residents of New Orleans, and at one time were Cjuite wealthy. The 
paternal grandfather, George Randall Stivers, was born in Germany and 



38 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

his wife, Mary Uriaiia, was born in the same country, and there they 
were united in marriage, coming to this country at a very earlv day. They 
were the parents of the following children : William, deceased ; George, 
deceased; Uriana, a resident of Des Moines, Iowa; Catherine, of the 
same city, and both are unmarried; Charles, a resident of Frankfort, 
Kentucky. George Stivers, the father of George Randall, was a Repub- 
lican in politics and belonged to the Masonic fraternity. In church rela- 
tions he was a member of the Baptist church, as was also his wife, until 
after his death, when she united with the Methodist Episcopal church. 
There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. George Stivers : Harriet, 
deceased; Oliver Rice, resides in Columbus, Ohio, and is a commercial 
salesman; Serena, deceased; Mary Uriana, deceased; George Randall, 
of this memoir. 

Reared in Kentucky and Indiana, George Randall Stivers received 
the most of his schooling in Vevay, Indiana, and learned the printer's 
trade at that place. He was employed for three years on the Vevay 
Reveille, after which he worked for a time in Cincinnati, on the Enquirer. 
Leaving this trade, he commenced the butchering business at Edinburg, 
Indiana, where he continued for ten years. He then moved to Sullivan, 
Indiana, where he followed the same business for seventeen years. He 
sold this business and engaged in the restaurant business, moving to his 
present place in December, 1906. His place of business is at the corner 
of North Court and Beech streets, Sullivan. In addition to the regular 
restaurant trade, he carries a full line of tobacco, cigars, candies, etc. 

In his political views, Mr. Stivers is a believer in the principles of 
the Republican party. For two years he was marshal of the town of 
Edinburg and served on the town board of Sullivan two years. He is 
interested in fraternal societies, belonging to the Odd Fellows, Elks, 
Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. He was united 
in marriage, December 28, 1886, to Nanie Bowers, who was born in 
Parksville, Kentucky, August 30, 1856, and died February 16, 1905. She 
was educated at the high school of Edinburg, Johnson county, Indiana. 
There was no issue by this marriage. For his second wife, Mr. Stivers 
married, August 5, 1907, Nora Shepherd, who was born in Sullivan 
county, Indiana, May 12, 1880. The present wife is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, while the first wife was connected with the Christian 
denomination. 



John Ersinger, a civil engineer of Sullivan, Indiana, was born Sep- 
tember 3, i860, in Canton Schaft'hausen, Switzerland, a son of Michael 
and Anna (Myers) Ersinger, both natives also of that place, and both 
now deceased. They were farmers in Switzerland, and of an excellent 
family. The children born to Michael and Anna (Myers) Ersinger were 
as follows : Barbara ; Michael ; Christian ; Leonard ; George ; Alexan- 
der ; John : Anna, deceased. This family all live in Switzerland except 
John and his brother Leonard, who resides in northern Indiana. 

Educated in Switzerland in a literary and civil engineering course. 



TITSTORY OF SULLU'AN COUNTY 39 

John Ersin,Q;c'r, in 1880. came to the United States and located at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged at his profession for about 
four months, then went to Indiana and settled at Goodland, where his 
brother now resides, and here engaged in the railway service, being in 
the civil engineering department of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad 
Company. His first work was surveying the road from Brazil to Evans- 
ville. His next employment was in Minnesota, on an extension of the 
Duluth & Iron Range, from Tower to Ely. After one year's service 
there, he returned to Brazil, Indiana, from which place he surveyed a line 
to Evansville, for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois System. He then quit 
railroading and returned to Brazil and operated a coal mine for about 
three years, after which he engaged as an engineer in the construction 
of the gravel roads in Clay county, Indiana, at which he worked for about 
four years, and during which time he constructed most of the gravel roads 
in that county. May i, 1898, he went to Sullivan, when the gravel roads 
were first started in that section of the state, and was there employed at 
such work for about two years. At the termination of this undertaking, 
he, with R. L. Bailey, surveyed for several interurban roads which have 
not as yet been constructed. In 1904, he entered into a contract to con- 
struct macadamized roads in Sullivan county, of which he has up to this 
time made nine miles of most excellent roads. He is still thus engaged 
and his skill is acknowledged to be superior to others employed in such 
contract work. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and fully alive to all of that party's 
interests. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, being a member 
of blue lodge, chapter, council, commandery and Eastern Star. He is 
also a member of the lienevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a stock- 
holder in the Hamilton Gas and Oil Company, of which he is also a 
director. 



WiLLi.AM H. Luc.\s, of the Sullivan Transfer Company, is a native 
of Turman township, Sullivan county, Indiana, born December 11, 1858, 
son of Barton R. and Sarah Elizalaeth (Weir) Lucas. His father was 
born in Floyd county, Indiana, October, 1833, of Scotch-Irish descent. 
The mother was born in Turman township, in 1836, and died in 1872 ; she 
was of Irish extraction. The grandfather of William H. Lucas, James 
W'eir, was a native of Ireland, and his wife, Margaret McKee, was born 
in the United States. James Weir always followed farming for his live- 
lihood, and was among the pioneer settlers of Turman township. Barton 
R. Lucas, the paternal grandfather, was born in Scotland and came to 
this country, where he served in the war of 1812 against Great Britain. 
He also followed agricultural pursuits all of his life. 

Barton R. Lucas, the father of William H., was a soldier in the Civil 
war, and after his return from that conflict engaged in farming, continu- 
ing until about 1S70, when he retired to Sullivan, where he lived until 
1902, and then removed to Bedford, Indiana, his present home. He was 
twice married, first to Sarah Elizabeth Weir, by whom the following chil- 



40 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

dren were born : James B., deceased ; ^^''ilIiam H., of this notice : John 
A., of SulHvan; Charles E., deceased; Sarah E., deceased; Estella, 
deceased. For his second wife, Mr. Lucas married Catherine Deckard, 
by whom he had one daughter — Cora, who is living at Bedford, Indiana. 

WilHam H. Lucas was practically reared in Sullivan county, as his 
father moved to this county when he was a mere boy. Here he was edu- 
cated in the common schools in Sullivan. When but seventeen years of 
age, he enlisted, September 12, 1876, in the Seventh LInited States Cav- 
alry, serving until September 12, 1881. He was stationed with the regi- 
ment in Dakota. Alontana, W)'"oming, L^tah and the northwest. He was 
both a private and an orderly sergeant. After the termination of his 
army service, he turned his attention toward railroading, entering the 
employ of the Evansville & Terra Haute Railroad, commencing as a 
brakeman in the passenger service. He was in this position about one 
year, when he was promoted to conductor on the same road. He ran 
from Evansville to Terre Haute, following the same until 1887, when 
he abandoned the road and engaged in the livery business, coupled with 
a transfer line, which is now styled the Sullivan Transfer Company. At 
present, his partner is James E. Russell. They have the largest barn in 
the town of Sullivan. They cater to the hotel service and also to passenger 
and mail interests. 

In his political affiliations, Mr. Lucas is a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party ; he has served two years on the town council and in 
January, igo8, was elected as chairman of the Republican county central 
committee. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias 
fraternities and also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He is now serving as the president of the Sullivan County Trotting 
Association. 

An important event in the career of Mr. Lucas was his marriage, 
October i. 1882, to Lucinda C. Leach, who was born in Grant county, 
Indiana, April 23, 1857, a daughter of Edmond and Emily (Brewer) 
Leach, both natives of Indiana, and both now deceased. Mr. and I\Irs. 
Lucas are the parents of one daughter — Glen, who was born July 26, 
1883. She was educated at the high schools of Sullivan and then attended 
the Indianapolis Conservatory of Music for two years, taking both vocal 
and instrumental instructions. She was married, July 24. 1903, to Harold 
C. Bays, and they reside at Culver, Indiana. Mrs. Lucas is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church and much interested in the work of that 
denomination. 



M.ANNiNG E. Drake, of the Sullivan Monument Company, workers 
m marble and stone for monumental purposes, was born October 19, 
1854, in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, Indiana, a son of Manning 
and Margaret (Armstrong) Drake. The father was born in Butler 
county. Ohio, June 17, 1813, and the mother was a native of Kentucky; 
she died October 24, i860. Manning Drake, Sr., was of English descent, 



HISTORY OF SUrJJX'AN COUNTY 41 

while liis wife descended from the Scotch lines of Great Britain. The 
grandfather, James Drake, came to Sullivan county in 1817, locating in 
Fairbanks township, where he followed farm life until his death. He 
claimed a large tract of land and was highly respected and prosperous. 
I'olitically, he was an avowed Democrat. 

Manning Drake, the father of Manning E., lived in Fairbanks town- 
ship from the age of four years. He possessed a remarkable memory and 
his mind was clear and active up to the time of his death, which occurred 
June 6, 1908. At one time he owned about twelve hundred acres of land 
in Fairbanks township. Fie became forehanded and loaned much money 
out to those about him. In his political views he was a Democrat. Both 
he and his good wife were members of the Baptist church. - To them were 
born twelve children : Elizabeth, deceased ; Mary J. ; Amanda : Malinda ; 
James; Benjamin, deceased ; Sarah, deceased ; Ira; Manning E. ; Mar- 
garet ; William ; and one who died in infancy. 

Manning E. Drake was reared on the farm and obtained a good 
common-school education in the district schools of his ncightorho(u:l. 
VMien he became twenty-one years of age, he commenced to farm inde- 
pendently, in Curry township, Sullivan county. He continued there until 
April 12, 1898. when he removed to Sullivan and engaged in the livery 
business and in the shipment of horses of all kinds. In 1900, he sold out 
this business and embarked in the marble and monument business, under 
the firm name of Cummins & Drake. This co-partnership continued until 
1906, when W. F. Wagner bought Mr. Cummins out, and the firm was 
changed to Drake & Wagner. This enterprising and thoroughly reliable 
firm sell the product of their works in Sullivan, Vigo, Parke, Greene, 
Clav, and other territory within Indiana and also in Illinois. It is among 
the most extensive works for fitting up monuments within this portion of 
the state of Indiana. Either one member or the other of this firm remains 
on the road selling, while the other superintends the work at home. 

While Mr. Drake was yet on- the farm, he made a reputation as a 
specialist in raising Poland-China swine, all registered. He shipped about 
one hundred and fifty head annually to all parts of the United States. He 
also handled registered Holstein cattle, though not on so extensive a scale 
as he did the hogs mentioned. He still owns land of much value — eighty 
acres within Curry township and two hundred and twenty acres one mile 
west of Sullivan.' Politically, Mr. Drake affiliates with the Democrats. 
Fie is a member of the Odd Fellows order at Sullivan. 

One of the important events of Mr. Drake's life was his marriage. 
May 4, 1878. to Elma Gaskins, who was born in Curry township, and died 
April 4, 1882. Two children were the result of this union: Perry, born 
March 14, 1879, married and resides on a farm; Olive, born August 3, 
1 881, is unmarried and at home. Both attended the schools in Sullivan. 
For his second wife, Mr. Drake married, March i, 1883, Julia Denney, 
born in Currv township, Sullivan county, a daughter of William Denney, 
now of Sullivan. The date of her birth was July 29, 1863. Her mother 
died when the daughter was but a mere child. By I\Ir. Drake's second 
marriage, four children were born: LeRoy, born May 14, 1885, a grad- 



42 HISTORY OF SULLIA'AN COUNTY 

uate of the Bennett Medical College in Chicago, with the class of 1906; 
he also attended one of the medical colleges at Indianapolis, and then 
began practicing medicine at Aliddletown, Vigo county, Indiana, but 
removed to Palatine, Illinois, in January, 1908; Goldie, born November 
30, 1887, unmarried, a graduate of the high school in 1905; she is now 
attending Franklin College, from wliich she expects to graduate in 1909; 
Claudie, born in September, 1891, attending high school; Lola, born 
August 22, 1894, also in the high school. Mr. Drake and his family are 
members of the Baptist church. 



James Douglas Smith. — One of the owners of the Arc Amusement 
Company of Sullivan, Indiana, and the tonsorial artist whose finely 
equipped parlor is at the Davis House, is James D. Smith, who was born 
June 24, 1864, in Vigo county, Indiana, in Fayette township, son of 
James and Nancy (Posey) Smith. The father, a native of Sullivan 
county, was born in Jefferson township in 1832, in the month of Novem- 
ber, and died in Oklahoma in May, 1906. The mother was born in the 
same township as her husband, and they were united in marriage in Sul- 
livan county. The grandfather of James D. Smith was among the early 
settlers of Sullivan county, who took government land and resided there 
the remainder of his life. 

James Smith, the father, made agriculture his occupation. He farmed 
in Vigo county one or two seasons, then moved back to Farmer's Prairie 
in Hamilton township, Sullivan county, where he purchased sixty acres 
of land. After residing there for nineteen j'ears he sold out and moved 
to Shelburn, Indiana, where he lived a retired life for two years. He 
then moved to his farm in Curry township, where his wife died. He 
married Mrs. Thomas Chambers, of Cass township, Sullivan county, but 
subsequently they separated and he moved to Dugger, where he was 
engaged at various business enterprises for a time, but about 1902 he went 
to Oklahoma, bought a farm there and remained there until his death. 
Politically, he was a Democrat. Both he and his first wife were members 
of the Christian church. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Homer, deceased; Marshal B., a barber of Hymera ; Emma A., 
of Oklahoma; Charles, of Sullivan; James D., of this notice; William, 
of Washington, North Dakota ; and two who died in their infancy. 

James D. Smith was reared on the farm and obtained a common- 
school education. Fie remained at home with his father until twenty 
years of age, when he engaged in the barber business, learning his trade 
at Dugger, Indiana, after which he conducted a shop there himself for 
about ten years, and then went to Sullivan, and later to Linton, where he 
remained a year and a half, then returned to Sullivan, where he has since 
been engaged in the barber business. In September, 1898, he opened his 
shop in the New Davis hotel, where he makes use of four barber chairs 
and conducts a first-class shop. He is also a half owner in the Arc Amuse- 



HISTORY OF SULLIN AX COUXTY 43 

ment Company, which is located on North Court street, opposite the 
Davis Hotel. 

Jn his political views, Mr. Smith is in accord with the Democratic 
party. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias 
orders at Sullivan. He was married May 18, 1889, to Lavina Camjibell, 
born in Hamilton township, Sullivan county, Indiana, October 22, 1872, 
a daughter of Thomas M. and Jane (Spence) Campbell. She received 
her education in her native township at the public schools. One daughter 
has been born of this union : Dorothy, born May 10, 1900. Mr. Smith is 
a member of the Christian church, while his wife is connected with the 
Presbyterian. Mr. Smith's paternal grandfather was twice married and 
was the father of twentv-one children. 



^^"ILLIAM F. Wagner, one of the proprietors of the Sullivan Monu- 
ment Company, was born August 4, 1864, in Terre Haute, Indiana, a 
son of Williani and Catherine (Emerick) VVagner. William Wagner was 
a native of Wittenburg. Germany, born August 13, 1826, and died May 
29, 1900, at Clinton, Indiana, his home, however, being in Terre Haute. 
The mother was born in Trenton, New Jersey, in 1837, on the twentieth 
day of November, and she died March 20, 1906, in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. Her husband located in Terre Haute in October, 1852, when yet 
a single man, and they were married there in January, 1863. He had 
learned the stone-cutter's trade in Germany, and also worked some at 
the stone monument industry. After going to Terre Haute, he built the 
State Normal College buildings at that place, as well as the Marble Block 
on Wabash avenue" the Old Opera house, the Episcopal church and the 
Presbyterian church. The stone used in the construction of the two last 
named buildings was quarried at Pottsville, Indiana, and floated dovvn 
on rafts. He also built a great many store buildings at Paris, Illinois, 
and Brazil anil Vincennes. Indiana. He engaged in the monument busi- 
ness at Terre Haute in 1854, on Third street, under the firm name of 
Wagner, Crossley & Webber, which firm continued for about ten years. 
Mr. Wagner then engaged in the building stone business, in which he 
remained until 1875, when he formed a partnership with F. B. Palmer, 
under the firm name of Palmer & Wagner, which business relation 
existed for seven years, when the name of the firm was changed to 
Wagner & Ripley.' They continued as a firm for five years, when the 
business was conducted as Wagner & Son, and so operated until the 
father's death. 

Politically, Mr. Wagner was a supporter of the Democratic party. 
He belonged to the Odd Fellows and Ancient Order of United Workmen 
lodges. His wife was a member of the Roman Catholic church and was 
of German descent. Eleven children were born of this union, four of 
whom died in infancv, and the others were : William F. and George W. 
(twins), George W. being now deceased ; Lewis F., residing at Newman, 



44 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Illinois ; Edward, deceased ; Catherine, deceased ; Josephine, residing 
at Los Angeles, California; ]\Iamie B., of Los Angeles, wife of Arthur 
W. Harris, has three daughters. 

William F. Wagner was reared in the city of Terre Haute, receiving 
his education at the public schools and being graduated from the Old 
Garvin Commercial College in i882'. Believing that every man was more 
independent by having perfect knowledge of some one of the trades, he 
mastered that of stone-cutter, under his father's directions, working with 
him until his death, in 1900, since which time Mr. Wagner was engaged 
at Clav City, Clay county, Indiana, up to 1905 and in Sullivan since 
then. During 1905 he entered into a partnership with AI. E. Drake, under 
the firm name of Drake & Wagner, but now styled the Sullivan iMonument 
Company, which concern is doing an extensive and profitable business in 
the artistic production of substantial monuments and kindred marble and 
stone work. 

In his political views, Mr. Wagner is a firm believer in the general 
principles laid down in the platforms of the Democratic party. In his 
fraternal affiliations, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, IModern Wood- 
men of America and the Tribe of Ben Hur of Sullivan. He was united 
in marriage, March 6, 1884, to Nora E. Bressler, a native of Clay county, 
Indiana. She was reared on a farni. and received her education at the 
common schools, remaining at home with her people until the date of 
her marriage. She is the daughter of Daniel H. and JNIatilda (Zenor) 
Bressler. The father was born in Pennsylvania, and his father conducted 
one of the old-time stage route hotels or taverns in that state. Mrs. Wag- 
ner's mother was born in Clay county, Indiana, and both parents are now 
deceased. Mr. and Airs. Wagner are the parents of one daughter — Jessie 
May, born December 19, 1886. In their religious convictions, both Mr. 
and Mrs. Wagner are members of the Alethodist Episcopal church. 



Leander R. Botts, a retired farmer of Sullivan county, was born 
June 30, 1837, in Coshocton county, Ohio, son of John and Xancy (Alor- 
ris) Botts. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1796 and died in 
1847, '" Hocking county, Ohio. The mother was born in Maryland in 
1798 and died July i, 1859, in SuUivan county. She was of French 
extraction and the father of German,. He was a farmer and they were 
married in Ohio. Leander R. Botts received a limited education in Hock- 
ing county, Ohio, and started out in life for himself at the age of eighteen 
years, working as a farm hand, and when twenty-two years old he began 
farming for himself. ' He also taught school, continuing in this calling 
until thirtv years of age, farming summers and teaching in the winter 
months. In 1859 he came to Hamilton township, Sullivan county, Indiana. 
He followed teaching in Hamilton, Jackson, Fairbanks and Curry town- 
ships. He next took up the business of stock dealer, in conjunction with 
his farming operations, following the same ten years. He once owned 



THE NEW YORK 

PU'BLIC LIBRARY 



A8T0R, LENOX AND 
TILOEN roUNOATIONS. 





^.^H^ . f^^^ia^-^-^^rTi^ 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 45 

a hundred and fifty acres in Hamilton township. He remained on the 
farm until 1904, when he retired to Sullivan, where he purchased a city 
residence property. He still owns eighteen acres in his home township. 
Politically, J\lr. Botts votes the Democratic ticket. He is a memher of 
blue Iod!L;e of the Masonic fraternity at Sullivan. 

;March 1, i860, he was married to Elizabeth Rusher, born in Sullivan 
county, Indiana, February 10, 1836, daughter of Minor and Mary (Mar- 
low) Rusher, both natives of Kentucky. The father was born in 1806 
and died in Sullivan county, Indiana, April 30, 1867, and the mother 
born August 31, 181 1, died February 22, 1888. They were of (Ger- 
man descent and emigrated to Sullivan county in 1828, being num- 
bered among the very early settlers of the county. The five children born 
of this union are as follows: Hettie, born June i, 1861, wife of Joseph 
Wyman, and residing in Hamilton township: George F., September 10, 
1864, now resides on Jackson street, Sullivan, Indiana; William H., 
October 10, 1866; Maggie, born May 29, 1870, died in February, 1876; 
Flora C, born February 8, 1876, died May 5, 1896. Mrs. Botts has been 
a consistent member of the Christian church for many years. 

For his years, Mr. Botts has a remarkable memory, as is illustrated 
by the list of his old school teachers, beginning with the first, and which 
list he desires to keep as a record for the future: Miss Stratton, in Lick- 
ing county, Ohio: Mr. Kelsey, James G. McBroom, Nathan England, 
Henry Lincoln, Rosie O'Neil, Ephraini Woodard, Phebe Sudlow, Jesse 
Griggsby, all of Hocking county, Ohio: Samuel Edginton and Robert 
Wolfenbarger, of Coshocton county, Ohio. When Mr. Botts first came 
to this township the land was all timbered heavily, and this was removed 
by log rollings, which lasted about two weeks, each spring. He relates 
how the school teachers of the "fifties" were paid a dollar a day. Also 
how in his boyhood days they all lived on their own resources, making 
their own clothing, sugar, molasses, etc. He notes the great transforma- 
tion since those pioneer days in the Buckeye and Hoosier states, and is 
glad to have been a participant in changing the wilderness to a fertile, 
prosperous and highly enlightened section. 



John McNabb Branson. — No philosopher ever made a truer state- 
ment than the one who proclaimed that the greatest man in the world can 
do no more than to do well the thing which lies nearest to him ; and it 
may be added that greatness has usually been achieved through the 
faculty and determination to accomplish with faithfulness and forethought 
the afTairs of family and home community before going afield for other 
honors. Pleasured by this approved standard, John McNabb Branson, 
well known primarily as a substantial farmer and a stock raiser, has 
made his useful and honorable life one unvarying success, and his manly 
and intelligent efforts have never ceased to assist in the agricultural, 
educational and religious development of Curry township and Sullivan 



46 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

county. He comes of an old Virginia family, his father migrating from 
the C3ld Dominion (through Tennessee and Georgia) to this Indiana 
region, where he became one of its foremost pioneers. The son was born 
in Cocke county, Tennessee, on the 25th of April, 1836, being a son of 
Michael, Jr., and Sarah (McNabb) Branson. The father was a native 
of Pittsylvania county, Virginia, where he was born in September, 1805, 
and died in Curry township, Sullivan county, March 22, 1888. The 
mother was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, and died on the farm ad- 
joining the homestead now occupied by John M., in 1890. The paternal 
grandfather, a native of Virginia, spent his life within its limits as a 
farmer, stock raiser and a distiller. By his wife he became the father 
of ten children, and the sons are as follows: James, was a resident of 
Missouri, and was a farmer; George, was a renowned Baptist minister, 
itinerant, district, and preached in four or five counties in Indiana; he 
died in the state of Iowa ; Asa, was a farmer and stock dealer ; he pur- 
chased lands in Jackson township, and there died ; Michael was the father 
of John McNabb Branson; Luke L., was a Baptist minister in North 
Carolina, also an agriculturist; Joseph was an agricurturist, resided in 
Missouri, and there died. There is no records given of the daughters. 
Michael Branson, Jr., received an unusually broad education for one of 
those days, and during his lifetime practiced three professions, as well 
as became remarkably successful in agricultural enterprises. He was 
first a school teacher, practiced medicine, preached from the pulpit of the 
Baptist church, and during the last twenty years of his life not only 
returned to his labors as a physician but profitably engaged in farming. 
From Virginia he first removed to Cocke county, Tennessee, and in 1844 
transferred his homestead to Hamilton county, that state, later going to 
Cass county, Georgia, and finally in 1849 locating with his family in 
Curry township. Here he entered the last quarter section of canal land 
and resided until his death, occupied as a farmer, a physician and a man 
of public affairs. For many years he served as a justice of the peace, 
and as early as 1857 represented the county in the state legislature for one 
term. In politics he was a stanch Democrat, never turning from the 
straight path as laid down by the fathers of the party. The four children 
born to this strong and good man were as follows : Samuel, for a time 
a school teacher prior to his death, at the age of twenty years ; Nancy 
Branson Curry, who died after rearing three children ; John M. Branson, 
of this review ; and Felix, who married M. J. Curry and died some dozen 
years ago, leaving four children. The children of this family were all 
well educated, and honored their parents, themselves and the communities 
of their residence. 

John M. Branson spent the first twenty-five years of his life on the 
home farm, securing an education and faithfully assisting his parents. 
He then mastered the cooper's trade, and after being employed in that 
line for some time opened a shop at Shelburn, which he operated for 
several years before his marriage. Subsequently, he purchased land in 
Curry township and commenced to farm on a tract of forty acres. His 
holdings have since been increased to one hundred and eighty acres, and 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 47 

he now owns not only one of the most vahiable farms in this locality, but 
one of the finest residences in Farmersburg. Mr. Branson was a resident 
of the town for seven years while his children were attending school 
there, but now lives on his fine farm, engaged in the raising of standard 
crops and live stock and making a specialty of the breeding of horses. In 
politics he is a Populist Democrat, has been somewhat active in the local 
fieltl, and has served for one term as assessor. He is a member of the 
Missionary Baptist church, and for many years has been prominently con- 
nected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The Farmersburg 
lodge was established in 1885, and he has filled all the chairs in it, is a 
member of the Encampment, and has served as a delegate to the grand 
lodge. 

On May 10, 1866, John M. Branson married, as his first wife, 
Martlia A. Zink, who was born in Jackson township, Sullivan county. In- 
diana, in November, 1848, and died June 20, 1885, being buried in 
Littlellock cemetery, Shelburn. The children of this union were as fol- 
lows : (i) Stella, born February 14, 1876, who is teaching music in the 
girls' department of the State School at Redwing, Minnesota, having been 
educated at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, and also taught 
music in Chicago; (2) George Austin Branson, was born May 14, 1878, 
in Curry township, and is now engaged in the implement business in 
Hindsburg, Illinois. He married Golden Knight, having been educated 
at Dan\illc. Indiana; (3) Flossie, who was born November 4, 1882, 
married Robert C. Brownlee, and resides in St. Louis. She is a graduate 
of the Farmersburg high school, attended the State Normal, taught two 
years, is also a graduate of the Protestant Association Hospital of St. 
Louis, and is a lady of thorough culture and earnestness of purpose ; (4) 
Clarence Michael Branson was born on the 13th of June, 1885, and is 
pursuing a law course at Bloomington, Indiana. He attended the normal 
school at Danville two years and taught for a like period, having now 
three displomas to his credit. He is married to Martha Inez Sparks. 

As his second wife, John AI. Branson married, on July 11, 1887, Miss 
Margaret McMillan, born in Philadelphia, March 18, 1852, daughter of 
Daniel and Margaret (Geddes) AIcMillan. Mrs. Branson's father was 
born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1820, and died at Little Rock, Arkansas, in 
March, 1859. The mother, born in the Scotch city named in 1822, died at 
Galveston, Texas, in 1858, being at the time a temporary resident seeking 
health in the south. Mrs. Branson's father came to the United States 
in 1838 and first located in Woodville. Mississippi, where as a tailor he 
associated himself with his uncle. Fie followed that trade throughout 
life, and at the time of his death owned a flourishing establishment in 
Little Rock. Margaret McMillan was graduated from a scientific course 
at the female college in Oxford, Ohio ; afterward removed to Natchez, 
Mississippi, where she remained two years ; and in 1870 located in Park 
county, Indiana, where for the seventeen years prior to her marriage to 
Mr. Branson she taught the literary and musical branches. She is a 
Presbvtcrian. while the children of the family arc members of the Metho- 
dist church. 
Vol. II— 4 



48 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Arthur Denny Cutler, representing the legal profession in an 
able manner at Carlisle, Indiana, is a native of the state of Illinois, and 
was born at Dallas, Hancock county, of that state, November 15, 1875. 
He is a son of Rev. William Alonzo and Mary Ann (Denny) Cutler. 
William Alonzo Cutler was born at Alton, Illinois, November 28, 1843, 
and he was the son of Alonzo Cutler, born in Massachusetts, October 16, 
1804, at Warren, and who died August 26, 1896, at Brooklyn, New York. 
He was a manufacturer and real estate dealer and resided in Chicago 
and St. Louis for some years. He married Elizabeth Upham, who was 
born November 2, 1804, in Enfield, Massachusetts, and who died in 
Chicago, December 25, 1863. They were the parents of the following 
named children : Marshal, deceased ; Julia, deceased ; Harriet ; Mary ; 
William Alonzo. 

Rev. William Alonzo Cutler was reared and received a common 
school education at Alton and was graduated from Jacksonville College, 
in Illinois, where he took the literary course. In the days of the Civil 
war he was a soldier from Illinois, enlisting in April, 1864, for one hun- 
dred days, and mustered into Company "C," One Hundred and Forty- 
fifth Illinois Regiment Volunteer Infantry, at Camp Butler, Springfield, 
Illinois. He served about six months in southwestern Missouri, near 
Rolla, under General Rosecrans, and was mustered out in the fall of 
1864, at Camp Butler. He then chose the ministry and followed that 
profession in the Presbyterian church all his life. Among the places in 
which he was pastor may be named : Fairmount, Minnesota ; Broadhead, 
Wisconsin; Clear Lake, Iowa; Kansas, Illinois; Charlestown, Knights- 
town, Sullivan and Carlisle, Indiana ; Rankin, Illinois, and Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, the last named place being where he is now preaching. His 
wife, the mother of Arthur Denny, was born in England, in Stafiford- 
shire, Julv 31, 1852, a daughter of John and Ellen (Samuels) Denny. 
Her parents came to America in the sixties and settled in Morrison 
county, Minnesota, where they remained until overtaken by death. They 
were the parents of si.x children. 

The children of Rev. William Alonzo Cutler and wife were as fol- 
lows: Everett Alonzo, born June 3, 1873, now pastor of the Westminster 
church at Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; he is a graduate of Hanover College 
and McCormick Theological Seminary, of Chicago ; Arthur Denny, of 
this notice, of whom further mention is made ; William Murray, born 
December 20, 1877, now a cashier in the bank at Rankin, Illinois; he 
graduated from the Sullivan high school ; Grace Hattie, born December 
:8, 1 881, resides with her parents at Milwaukee. 

Arthur Denny Cutler was educated in various towns in Illinois and 
Indiana, after which he entered Earlham College, at Richmond, Indiana, 
for one year and one term, then entered Hanover College, remaining four 
years and two terms, graduating with the class of 1894. Having chosen 
the law for his life's profession, he began the study of that science with 
John T. Hays, of Sullivan, Indiana, in 1894, remained under his precep- 
"torship one year and then located in Carlisle in 1896, since which time 
he has carried on an independent law practice. He is the only attorney 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 49 

of liu' i)l;icc. He was admitted to tlie Iku" Xoveniljer 14, iSyf), and was 
admitted to practice in the supreme and a])peilate courts in upo. He 
was owner of the CarHsle Xcz^'S from September, 1899, to April, 1907. 
He is a director and one of tlie organizers of the First National Bank of 
Carlisle. In his political afifiliations, Mr. Cutler is a supporter of the 
Republican party. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
is fully up with the advanced age in which he lives. He was united in 
marriage, November 7, 1900, to Tillic H. Sallee, born in Carlisle, Novem- 
ber 23, 1875, daughter of William H. and Rebecca (Ford) Sallee, both 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Cutler are the parents of three children : 
George, Charles Nelson, and Mary Rebecca. Mrs. Cutler is an exem- 
plary member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Cutler has a 
library of over five hundred volumes, professional and otherwise, and liis 
neat and well arranged office is commendable. 



Edley W. Rogers, editor of the Carlisle (Indiana) Xczvs, is a man 
of good southern stock, with a substantial strain of French Huguenot 
blood, and ancestral influences, with a strong individuality and a thorough 
practical training, have combined to make him a forcible and pithy jour- 
nalist and a substantial all-around newspaper man. A native of Loo- 
gootee, Indiana, he was born on the 28th of August, 1885, and is a son 
of W. O. and Margaret Oily (Pirtle) Rogers. The father was born in 
Adamsville, Tennessee, September 11, 1847, '^nf' the mother in Carlisle, 
Indiana, February 21, 1853, the latter being a daughter of William and 
i\Iary Ann (Ferree) Pirtle. The founder of the Ferree family in the 
United States was Madam Mary Ferree, who was a French Huguenot 
and fled from France with her children, one of her fellow voyagers being 
William Penn. It was in the colony of the great Quaker leader that 
Madame Ferree settled with her family, in 1708, and laid the foundation 
of the first Huguenot community in this section of the country. Later 
generations of the family located in Indiana and made their home near 
Paxton. Among the pioneers to this locality were Joel and Mary 
( Leeth ) Ferree. Their son, Philip Cojieland, married ^largaret Trim- 
ble, and Mary Ann Ferree, a daughter by this union, became the mater- 
nal grandmother of Edley W. Rogers. The latter was born near Paxton, 
Indiana, September 8, 1830, and died February 25, 1907, as the wife of 
Isaac Newton Markee and the mother of Mrs. W. Q. Rogers. 

Mary Ann Ferree was married twice, the first husband being Will- 
iam Linder Pirtle, to whom she was married when she was twenty years 
of age. Her husband, wdio was a son of Jacob and Lydia Pirtle, was a 
tanner, associated for a time with Isaac Shannon, and was a man of 
industrious and sterling character. He died in August, 1853, leaving 
Mary Ann and Margaret Oily, the latter being the mother of Edley W. 
I'togers, and still living. Another daughter of this family, Clara Jane, 
died in infancy. The second marriage occurred May 26, 1856, when 
Mary .Ann Ferree became the wife of Isaac Newton Markee. 

Mr. and Mrs. \\'. O. Rogers were married at A'incennes, Indiana, 



50 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

but never resided there, going at once to Loogootee, where they still 
reside, and where the husband is engaged in the real estate business. 
The elder Mr. Rogers is a Republican, belonging to the Masons and Odd 
Fellows fraternities, and both he and his wife are active members of the 
Christian church. The second of their six children, Alba, died at the age 
of tliree }'ears, the other members of their family being still alive are : 
William L., a grocer of Carlisle; Aimee Nora, living at home; Charles 
O., a resident of Seymour, Indiana, where he is employed as a freight 
conductor on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad ; Edley W., of this sketch ; 
and Halstead P. Rogers, a student of the Loogootee high school. 

Edley W. Rogers received his education at Loogootee, his birthplace, 
graduating from its high school in 1902. He then completed the mastery 
of the printer's trade, which he had commenced two years before, and 
continued this as his steady employment until he removed to Carlisle. 
He was first employed on the Martin County Tribune and the Shoals 
Republican, and during 1905-6 was in partnership with his brother, Will- 
iam L. Rogers, at Beaumont, Kansas, where he was engaged in general 
merchandising. In November, 1906, Mr. Rogers went to Sullivan to 
assume a position on the Democrat and Times, and remained in that capac- 
ity until his purchase of a half interest in the Carlisle Nezvs, during 
April, 1907. His associate in the enterprise was H. T. Ahimbaugh, who 
remained with him until April 6, 1908, when j\Ir. Rogers became the 
sole proprietor. His publication is a non-partisan, independent weekly 
newspaper, having a circulation of eight hundred copies. It is a clean, 
newsy, well edited journal, and reflects decided professional credit upon 
its able and popular proprietor. Its editor is a firm Republican in poli- 
tics and, fraternally, is a member of Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, F. & A. M.. 
at Carlisle, Indiana; Jerusalem Chapter, No. 81, R. A. M., at Sullivan; 
Sullivan Council, No. y2>- R- S. M., at Sullivan ; also of Carlisle Chapter, 
No. 185, Order of the Eastern Star, at Carlisle. 



William J. Curtner, proprietor of the well equipped drug store at 
Carlisle, was born January 14, 1854, in Carlisle, Indiana, son of James A. 
and Symira (Ledgerwood) Curtner. The father was born in Kentucky 
and came to Carlisle, Indiana, when a young man, remaining there until 
his death, which occurred January 31, 1864. He served in the army 
during the Mexican war. He was of Scotch and German descent. By 
trade he was a harness and saddle maker, and conducted his business on 
the spot where his son's drug store now stands. He is said to have been 
an exceptional workman at his trade, and his workmanship was known 
far and near for both its beauty and quality. He voted the Republican 
ticket and was a charter member of Carlisle Lodge, No. 50, of the Odd 
Fellows order, at Carlisle. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

The mother of William J. was born one mile southwest of Carlisle, 
on the old Ledgerwood homestead, which was the first place settled upon 
anywhere north of A^ncennes. The great-grandfather, James Ledger- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 51 

wood, was a native of South Carolina and located in Kentucky when a 
young man and came to Indiana in the sjjring of 1793, and in the fall of 
that year returned to Kentucky, intending to move his family the follow- 
ing year, hut on the banks of the Ohio river he was captured by the 
Indians, who took him to a point near Detroit, Michigan, and there held 
him a prisoner for seven years. He then returned to Kentucky and got 
his family, coming to Carlisle in 1803. Here he built him a cabin of logs, 
a mile southwest of the town. He was granted some land west of Car- 
lisle by the government on which to build a mill, which he operated until 
his death. This grist-mill was willed to his .son William, who operated 
the same until his death, giving it to three of his sons, Thomas, Joseph 
and William, Jr. William and Joseph died soon after their father's 
death, when the jiroijerty fell to Thomas, who operated it until his death, 
when the old pioneer landmark was .sold to Benjamin Watson, and he in 
turn sold to a Mr. Abbey, who moved it to near Dugger, where it now 
stands, although abandoned for milling purposes. A wonderful story 
of early days could be told had this old mill but the power of speech. 
James Ledgerwood and wife reared a family of five children and one of 
their sons, Samuel, united with the Christian church of Sullivan county 
at about the date of its organization. 

Mr. Curtner's grandfather, William Ledgerwood, was born in Ken- 
tucky, coming with the family to Sullivan county when a mere lad. Here 
he grew to man's estate and married and reared a family of twelve chil- 
dren. He married Catherine Jenkins, born at Chester District, South 
Carolina, November. 1792. She moved to Sullivan county, Indiana, 
when yet a girl. She started with her father and mother about 1804, 
and after being on the journey about two weeks, her father, Thomas 
Jenkins, died. The children of this family were : Sarah, Eliza, Catherine, 
William, Thaddins, Martha. John and Richard. The last named was 
killed by the Mexicans while in the army. The great-grandmother of 
William J. Curtner had a brother named William Gill, who came to Sulli- 
van county before she arrived. Gill township was named in honor of 
him, as was "Gill Prairie." Mr. Curtner's grandmother, Catherine Jen- 
kins, and her sisters and brothers located four miles southwest of Car- 
lisle. The mother joined the Shakers and took her daughters with her. 
Subsequently, William Ledgerwood married Catherine and took her from 
the Shaker society, which community bore an interesting part in the early 
day historv of this section of Indiana. Grandmother Jenkins and her 
daughters, Sarah and Eliza, were among the division of the Shakers who 
went to Kentucky, locating at Shakerstown, which place is still in exist- 
ence. There Grandmother Jenkins died before the Civil war and Sarah 
became head eldress of the Shakers at Shakerstown, holding the position 
until incapacitated by old age, dying when about ninety-four years. 

William Ledgerwood and wife reared twelve children — eight sons 
and four daughters ; only one of the sons, Wesley Ledgerwood, bore chil- 
dren. He died in Iowa, leaving a large family. The daughters all mar- 
ried and bore children : Martha married John Curry ; Elizabeth mar- 
ried Col. \\'. D. Blacklntrn, who was killed in Louisiana during the Civil 



52 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

war ; Nancy married W. G. Culberson ; S3'mira married James A. Curt- 
ner and they were the parents of five children, as follows: two died in 
infancy ; John M., residing at Wabash, Indiana, was born June 20, 
1851; he is a banker; William J., of this notice: Flora, born August 
II, 1857, died about 1880; she married Dr. R. L. Jenkins, now deceased, 
and their child was Amy, who now resides in California. 

William J. Curtner was reared and educated at Carlisle and attended 
business college at the old Garvin & Heinley College in Terre Haute, 
Indiana. When nineteen years of age he entered the drug business, at 
first clerking in Carlisle, and later purchased an interest in the business, 
and has been thus engaged ever since. The business is now operated 
under the firm name of W. J. Curtner & Sons. They carry a full line of 
pure drugs, paints and wall paper. Mr. Curtner owns a part of the old 
Ledgerwood homestead — eighty-three acres — of which the deed has never 
been changed from the family. He also is interested in the Building and 
Loan Association, of which he is president. Politically, he is a Repub- 
lican and in fraternal societies he is a worthy member of both the Masonic 
and Odd Fellows orders at Carlisle. 

He was united in marriage, September 14, 1876, to Emma A. Grifiin, 
born in Sullivan county, January 6, 1859, a daughter of James L. Grififin, 
ex-county recorder, and a minister in the Christian church. The chil- 
dren born of this union are: James F., born July 6, 1878, married Ada 
M. Shepherd, born in Sullivan county ; they have one son — William 
Ledgerwood: Ada M., born December 22. 1880, married William B. 
Akin, former editor of the Times, at Sullivan, but now of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and they have one son, Edgar W., born April 2, 1886, 
unmarried and in business with his father; Flo, born January 4, 1892, 
unmarried and at home, and will be graduated from the high school in 
1909. The eldest child of the family died in infancy. Mr. Curtner is a 
member of the Methodist church and his wife of the Christian church. 



Edgar W. Akin, Jr., cashier and one of the directors of the Peo- 
ple's Bank of Carlisle, Indiana, was born June 28, 1883, in Carlisle, 
Indiana, son of Edgar W. Akin, Sr., and Susan M. (Wiggs) Akin. The 
father was born in Bloomington, July 17, 1853, and the mother was a 
native of Kentucky, born May 20, 1852. Both parents of Mr. Akin are 
residing in Carlisle. (See sketch of C. T. Akin, in this work.) 

Edgar W. Akin, Sr., was engaged in business with Charles T. Akin 
at Carlisle until about 1892. During that year he, with Josiah T. and 
Charles T. Akin, organized the People's Bank of Carlisle, with a capital 
stock of $25,000, and Edgar W. Akin, Sr., has been its president ever 
since. In 1902 the institution was reorganized and the stock increased 
to $35,000, and again in 1907 increased to $50,000. Politically, Edgar 
W. Akin. Sr., is a Democrat, and in fraternal connection is a worthy 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Carlisle. His wife 
is the daughter of Lorenzo D. Wiggs and wife, who were natives of 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 53 

Kentuck\-, eniigratiiig to Carlisle in the fifties and conducted a hotel and 
a store there. The)- both died at Carlisle. They reared three children : 
H. K. W'ig'gs, residing at Carlisle; Susan Al. (Mrs. Akin); Lillian, 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Akin are members of the Christian church, ot 
which he has been a trustee for a number of years. 

The three children of this couple are; Elouise, born Mav 20, 1876, 
now wife of James McConnell, residing at Carlisle ; she was educated 
in Oxford College, Oxford, Ohio, and also attended a private college 
(Cotes) at Terre Haute, Indiana, and she took a literary course in both 
schools named ; the second child died in infancx-, and Edgar W.. Jr., is 
the youngest. He was reared in Carlisle and attended the common 
schools, after which he entered the Culver Military Academy, in 1898. 
In iijoo he entered Lake Forest Academy, at Lake Forest, Illinois, and 
graduated with the class of 1902. He passed from the last named educa- 
tional institution into Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 
where he spent one year, and then returned to Carlisle and began clerk- 
ing in the People's Bank. This was in 1903, and he continued as a clerk 
until 1903. when lie became cashier, which position of trust he still holds. 

Edgar W. ,\kin, Jr., was married September 14, 1904, to Elizabeth 
Irma dalt, born in Sterling, Illinois, a daughter of John M. and Eliza- 
beth (McPherran) Gait, both natives of Illinois. The father is deceased 
and the mother lives in Sterling, Illinois. The father was engaged in 
the banking business. Airs. Akin was educated in the public schools of 
Sterling and later graduated from Ferry Hall Seminary, at Lake Forest. 
Illinois, with the class of 1902. She then went to Smith College, at 
Northampton, Massachusetts, where she spent two years ; she is a member 
of the Presb\terian church. 



Di^ Ik\ix J. Keys, representing the dental profession in a thor- 
oughly up-to-date manner at Carlisle, Indiana, was born July 7, 1872, 
at Verona, Kentucky, son of William and Elizabeth (McCauley) Keys. 
The mother was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1826. and died Sep- 
tember, 1907, at Lancaster, Indiana. The father was born at Piqua, 
Ohio, Februarv 29, 1824, and died March 23, 1899, at Lancaster, Indiana. 
They were united in marriage in Ohio. Dr. Keys' paternal grandmother 
was a native of Ireland and the maternal grand]iarcnts were natives of 
Pennsvlvania. Dr. Keys' father went to Cincinnati. Ohio, when aged 
about thirteen years, and grew to manhood in that citv. He then went 
to Kentucky about i860, remaining in that state until 1874, when the 
familv moved to Lancaster, Indiana, where he and his wife both died. 
He was a machinist and followed this trade all of his active years. At 
Marysville, Kentucky, he owned and operated a foundry and employed 
about two hundred workmen. Upon moving to Lancaster, Indiana, he 
lived a retired life. Politically, he was an ardent supporter of the Repub- 
lican party, and he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. Seven children blessed their union, as follows ; Charles, now 



54 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

a resident of Bedford, Indiana ; William T., residing at Commiskey. a 
machinist ; Mary, deceased ; Elizabeth, wife of Charles A. Fewell, re'sid- 
ing near Lancaster, Indiana ; Robert R., residing at Linton, Indiana, and 
practicing dentistry ; Carrie Gertrude, wife of Nicholas Clashman, resid- 
ing near Lancaster ; Irvin J., of this review. 

Dr. Keys received his education at the public schools and high schools 
at Lancaster, graduating with the' class of 1889. He then attended the 
Normal at Danville, Indiana, and also one at Mitchell, after which prep- 
aration he attended the dental department of the Hospital College of 
Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, one year and was graduated from the 
Kansas City Dental College with the class of 1897. After graduating, he 
practiced his profession in Kansas City a short time, and in 1899 located 
at Carlisle, Indiana, where he is the only dentist of the place and enjoys 
a large practice. Dr. Keys was superintendent of the schools at Dupont, 
Indiana, for two years, first in 1891, and was recalled in 1893 to the same 
position. 

He is affiliated with the Masonic order, being a member of Carlisle 
Lodge, No. 3, A. F. and A. M. In addition to being a member of the 
Masonic order and Modern Woodmen of America, he is a member of 
the Supreme Tribe of Ben Hur and of the Order of the Easter Star 
Chapter of Carlisle, No. 185, of which order he is now worthy patron, 
being elected to this office the second time. He united with the Presby- 
terian church at Carlisle, January 30, 1908, and a short time after was 
elected to serve on the Board of Elders, of which body he is now clerk. 
Politically, the doctor is a Republican. He was married in 1902 to Car- 
rie Alberta Land, who was born in Carlisle, Indiana, and educated there. 
She also received musical instruction at the Conservatory of Music, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. She is the daughter of Jacob Land and w-ife. Her 
father, now deceased, was a member of the Sullivan county bar and 
served as a justice of the peace at Carlisle for a number of years. 



William E. Cowle, the present justice of the peace at Carlisle, 
Indiana, is a native of Vanderburg county, Indiana, where he was born 
on his parents' farm, November 30, 1837, a son of William and Julia A. 
(Ewing) Cowle. The father was born in England and came to America 
with his mother and a brother and sister when two years old. The grand- 
mother was a sister of Squire John Ingle, whose son, John Ingle, Jr., 
built the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad through Carlisle. William 
E. Cowle's father and mother located in A^anderburg county. Scott town- 
ship, where the father died in 1838 and was buried in that township, in 
what is now an unknown cemetery. Mr. Cowle's paternal grandmother 
married Marcus Wheeler, who was also a native of England, and died 
in Vanderburg county, Indiana. William Cowle, the father of William 
E., of this notice, was a thoroughgoing farmer throughout his entire life. 
Politically, he was an old line Whig. After his death, his widow mar- 
ried Joseph Harrison, who was of English birth, and who came to this 



lilSTORY OF SULLI\'AN COUNTY 55 

country about the same time that her first husband came, and Mr. Har- 
rison was also buried in the township as was Mr. Cowle. By the first mar- 
riage two children were born : Sarah, now deceased, and William E. 
By the second marriage, Mr. Cowle's mother was the mother of the 
following chiUlren by Joseph Harrison : John ; Thomas, deceased ; Rich- 
ard, deceased; Henry; James, deceased; and Martha. 

William E. Cowle was reared on a farm until fifteen years of age, 
when his mother died, and he went out to make his own way in life. For 
two years he worked at Memphis and Batesville, Arkansas, where he 
also attended school for a short time. In July, 1855, he went to Evans- 
ville, Indiana, and learned both land and marine engineering. He was 
finally licensed by the government as a river engineer and ran boats 
between Evansville, Indiana, and Cairo, Illinois, and also to Paducah, 
Kentucky. At one time he was interested in towing boats with Captain 
Henry L. Mitchell, continuing in this line of work until the autumn of 
1870, when he went to Freelandsville, Indiana. In ]\Iarch, 1873, he 
located in Carlisle, where he erected a mill for sawing lumber, on the 
Thomas Davis place, one mile east of the town. He continued to operate 
this sawmill until about 1893. when he engaged in the windmill, pump 
and engineers' supply business, which he still carries on. July 19, 1902, 
he was appointed justice of the peace. He also is largely interested in 
the collection of accounts, having been elected collector by the Mer- 
chants' Association of Carlisle. He is very successful in the collection of 
such accounts as are turned over to him by the business men who com- 
pose this association. In his politics, Mr. Cowle is a Republican. He 
has served as town clerk and treasurer two terms. He is one of the 
active and honored members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
being a member of the Carlisle Encampment. 

For a time he was engineer in the United States Navy and held the 
rank of master, by reason of which he now draws a pension from the 
government. During the three and one-half years' service with the 
Federal army, his duties lay with the United States Navy. He was 
aboard the steamer General Thomas, belonging to the Eighth District, 
Mississippi Squadron, on the Tennessee river. While General Sherman 
was on his famous march to the sea, Generals Beauregard and Hood 
returned to Alabama along the Tennessee river, and at Gunterville, Ala- 
bama, there was a severe action, and the steamer General Thomas, whose 
captain was Gilbert Morton, under Commodore Forrest, was in this 
affray. Mr. Cowle received his honorable discharge at Evansville, 
Indiana, August 24, 1865, and returned to his home, once more as a 
civilian. 

j\[r. Cnwle has been thrice married, first to America L. Guilkey, 
who was born in Indiana, and died leaving three children : Charles, who 
died at the age of seventeen months ; the second and the third children 
both died in infancy. For his second wife, Mr. Cowle married Angeline 
Hopkins, born in England. By this union six children were bom: Sarah, 
who now resides with her father : Julia, wife of Frank Sproatt, residing 
in Carlisle; Luella, at home, the wife of W. F. Risinger, and they have 
five children ; Anna, deceased ; married Professor Gifford ; W'illiam E. 



56 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

(twin brother of Anna), also deceased: an infant, deceased. For his 
third wife, Air. Cowle married Susan Childs, born in Vanderburg county, 
Indiana, of English descent. There is no issue by this union. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cowle are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Among 
other business interests, Mr. Cowle is a stockholder in the telephone 
company and also in the P""irst National Bank of Carlisle. 



James Nelson Roberts, who is well known in the community in 
which Carlisle is situated, having for many years been a dealer in hard- 
ware, lumber and grain at that point, and now retired from active busi- 
ness pursuits, is a native of the Old Dominion state, born in Frederick 
county, Virginia, October 28, 1849, son of Andrew and Sarah (Nelson) 
Roberts. The father was born in Ireland in 1816 and the mother in 
Frederick county, Virginia, in 1826. She died in Hancock county, Ohio, 
in 1859. Andrew Roberts came to this country alone, when about eight- 
een years of age, and lived in New York two years, then went to Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, in which city he resided two years, going 
from there to Frederick county, Virginia, where he was united in mar- 
riage. In 185 1 he removed to Hancock county, Ohio, and in 1868 to Car- 
lisle, Indiana, where he lived until his death in 1898. He was a farmer 
by occupation. He had been educated for a priest in Dublin, Ireland, 
and New York City, but finally abandoned the idea of priesthood. While 
living in Virginia, he had the sub-contract of constructing the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad grade. He possessed great energy and considerable 
skill. His mother's parents were both natives of Ireland, and died in 
Ohio, where they were farmers. Andrew and Sarah (Nelson) Roberts 
were the parents' of seven children, as follows: Margaret, wife of Clark 
Hill, residing in Clinton, Illinois ; the next child died in infancy ; James 
Nelson; Marv Virginia, a widow, now residing at Columbus, Ohio; 
Jennie, wife of C. E. Henshaw, residing in Wisconsin; Ella, deceased; 
and Marion, a resident of Sullivan, Indiana. For his second wife, Andrew 
Roberts married the widow of Joseph Wolfe, who was reared in Car- 
lisle, Indiana. Politically, Mr. Roberts was a stanch defender of Demo- 
cratic principles. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, he having united with this church at Carlisle. 

James N. Roberts, of this sketch, obtained a common school educa- 
tion in Ohio and began to work for himself when he reached his majority. 
He continued to do farm labor until 1879, when he went to Cherokee, 
Iowa, and there engaged in the grain and milling business with his 
brother-in-law, C. E." Henshaw. After two years he sold his interest and 
went back to Carlisle, Indiana, and embarked in the hardware business, 
with L Frank Alumbaugh, operating under the firm name of Roberts & 
Alumbaugh. Their business comprised hardware, tinware, harnessmak- 
ing, lumber and grain. This continued until the fall of 1905, when the 
firm was dissolved. Mr. Roberts taking over the lumber and elevator 
business, which in the spring of 1906 he sold to James McConnell. Smce 



HISTORY OF SULLI\-AX COUNTY 57 

that date Air. KuIjctIs has been lookinsj after the interests of his farin. 
He is one of the owners of the old Roberts homestead, and is the treas- 
urer of the Carhsle Building and Loan Association. He is also one of the 
directors of the People's State Bank of Carlisle, Indiana. Politically, Mr. 
Roberts is a supporter of the Democratic party. 

He was married. February 7, 1888, to Carrie Long, who was born- 
in Evansville, Indiana, and there educated. She is the daughter of Lewis 
and Mary Ann (Gantner) Long. Both of Mrs. Roberts' parents were 
natives of Germany, and were united in marriage in \'anderburg county, 
Indiana. Both are now deceased. They were well-to-do farmers. Mr. 
and Mrs. Roberts are the parents of three children : Raymond Andrew, 
born April i, 1889, was graduated with the class of 1908 from the Car- 
lisle high school, and is now a student of Notre Dame (commercial 
course), at South Bend, Indiana; Louis Long, born April 26, 1891, grad- 
uated with the class of 1908, and is now a student in Wabash College, 
at Crawfordsville, Indiana; and Chafles Elliott, born March 4, 1894, is 
now in the sophomore class. Mrs. Roberts is a member of the Roman 
Catholic church, and attends St. Mary's church at Sullivan, Indiana, of 
which Rev. Father James Bolin is the pastor. 



Claude A. Ellis, of the firm of Risinger & Ellis, patentee of 
Hygiene Cabinets, and secretary of the Carlisle Business Men's Asso- 
ciation, was born November 17, 1868, in Haddon township, near Car- 
lisle, Indiana, son of Thomas Orlando and Eliza (Sproatt) Ellis. The 
father was born in Carlisle, December 19, 1835, and is of English descent. 
The paternal grandfather, John W. Ellis, was born in Virginia, and mar- 
ried Elizabeth Veecli, who was also a native of Virginia. They were 
married there and soon afterward came to Carlisle. Indiana. He farmed 
several years, after wdiich he took up the carpenter's trade and painting. 
In his latter days he was an undertaker. He was the first to carry on 
such business at Carlisle, and many times preached the funeral sermons 
for the deceased wdiose funeral he was hired to conduct. He was an 
old-fashioned Democrat and served as trustee of his town'ship many 
years. Both he and his estimable wife were members of the Christian 
church, in which he was very active. He was married three times, and 
was the father of eighteen children by the three marriage unions. Eleven 
of his children still survive. His father (Claude A.'s great-grandfather 
Ellis), named Louis, was a native of England, who on coming to America 
settled in Virginia. 

Thomas (jrlando Ellis was reared and educated at Carlisle, Indiana. 
He learned the brickmason's trade, with his uncle, in Mobile, Alabama. 
After remaining there about seven years, Mr. Ellis came back to Carlisle 
and purchased a farm which he worked. l)eing also employed at his trade. 
He still lives on his farm, about three-fourths of a mile from Carlisle. 
He owns two farms of about four hundred acres. He is a supporter of 
the principles of pure Democracy, and is a member of Lodge No. 3, 



58 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

A. F. & A. M., at Carlisle. He married Eliza Sproatt, who was born 
within a quarter of a mile of where she now lives, on September 4, 1838. 
She was educated in the place of her nativity. Her parents were John 
and Eliza (A'linich) Sproatt; her father was born on Shaker Prairie, 
Knox county, Indiana, March i, 1810, and died November 17, 1884. He 
was always engaged in fanning in Sullivan county. Eliza (Minich) 
Sproatt was born in Haddon township, July 26, 1819, and near this place 
she spent her entire life, dying February 8, 1906. Her father was of 
English descent, and her mother of Dutch ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Orlando Ellis were the parents of two children : Claude A., born 
November 17, 1868, and Mirtie, born May 23, 1876. Mirtie was educated 
in Carlisle and married William A. Deiss. They now reside on a farm 
near Carlisle, Indiana. 

Claude A. Ellis, was reared on his father's farm and attended the 
district schools about Carlisle. When sixteen years old, he went to 
Florida and there began firing on the J., T. & K. W. Railroad. He con- 
tinued there several months and then returned to Carlisle and began 
running a stationary engine, which work he followed for about five years. 
His next business was conducting a livery barn, with Rush M. Cammeron, 
under the firm name of Cammeron & Ellis, which partnership existed one 
year. Mr. Ellis then formed a partnership with T. S. Risinger, under the 
'firm name of Risinger & Ellis, which firm conducted a hardware, furni- 
ture and undertaking business. This is the only firm doing such business 
in Carlisle. Politically, Mr. Ellis is a Democrat and for some time has 
served as president of the Carlisle school board. He is affiliated with the 
jMasonic order, being a member of Carlisle Lodge No. 3, F. & A. M., 
Chapter No. 81, Council and Commandery No. 54, at Sullivan. He is also 
a member of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 50, belongs to the Encampment 
No. 139 of Carlisle, and has been through the chairs and to the grand 
lodge. He is also an honored member of Ben Hur Court, and Modern 
Woodmen of America, Camp No. 3332, both of Carlisle. The firm to 
which Mr. Ellis belongs, has placed on the market their celebrated cabinet 
case, above mentioned and during the last year has gained a wide reputa- 
tion for this excellent invention, the patents of which they own. 

Mr. Ellis was united in marriage August 6, 1890, to Lillian A. Wiggs, 
born in Carlisle, Indiana, on the lot where now stands the People's Bank 
of Carlisle. She died September 22, 1904, leaving three children, as 
follows : Eloise, now attending the high school and will graduate with 
the class of 1909 ; Orlando, attending high school, will probably graduate 
in 1910; Stanley, in school. The mother of these children, was a devout 
Christian and a member of the Christian church. 



David Frederick Shake, D. V. S. — ^Doctor Shake, the skillful 
veterinary' surgeon of Carlisle, Indiana^, is a native of Warren county, 
Iowa, born August 18, 1863, and he came to Indiana in April. 1868. He 
is the son of Christopher Columbus and Lucy J. (Bowen) Shake. The 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 59' 

father was born in llaclihin township, Sullivan county, Indiana, May 16, 
1836, and died February 16, 1889, in Jetterson townshii), Sullivan county, 
where he had resided only a few months. All but eight years of his life 
when he resided in Iowa were spent in Sullivan county, Indiana. He was 
of Irish and German descent. His father, Christopher Columbus Shake, 
Sr., was born about 1800 in Kentucky, where his wife was also born 
about 1801. In 1820 he came to Sullivan county, Indiana, and raised one 
crop in Haddon township, during which season he bached it in a log 
cabin, built by himself. After this crop was harvested he returned to 
Kentucky and was married and soon returned to the place where he had 
farmed one season, and there spent the remainder of his days. He 
entered about five hundred acres of land and tliere reared a family of five 
sons and four daughters. He and his wife were among the charter 
members of the Prairie Baptist church. In politics he was a Democrat. 
Grandfather William Bowen and wife Mary (Spencer) Bowen, were born 
near Lexington, Kentucky, where they were united in marriage. In 
1820 they effected settlement in Sullivan county, Indiana, near the Knox 
county line. He was a farmer throughout his life and politically he was 
a Democrat. He had seven children, and in their church connection, 
both he and his wife were members of the Baptist cluu-ch alrave re- 
ferred to. 

Dr. Shake's father always followed farming and stock raising. He 
was a Democrat and a member of the Grange lodge. He and his wife 
were the parents of ten children : William C, residing in Clearmont, Illi- 
nois, whose general occupation is that of a farmer, but has been deputy 
sheriff for four years in Richland county, Illinois ; Charles A., a resident 
and farmer of Jefferson township, Sullivan county, Indiana : Spencer J., 
residing in Fort Branch, Indiana, now the pastor of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church of that place ; John L., residing at Pleasantville, Indiana, a 
farmer and thresher : Dr. David F., of this biographical notice : LHysses 
Grant, a resident of Clearmont, Illinois, a farmer; Mary, deceased wufe of 
W, M. Howard; Elijah, who died in childhood: Cora, died aged nineteen 
years ; Claude T., residing at Sullivan, Indiana, a carpenter by trade, 
and the mother lives with him. 

Dr. Shake was reared in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
his father removing there when the son was about four years. In 
1900 the doctor .sold out his farm interests and entered the Indiana 
Veterinary College, at Indianapolis, graduating from that institution in 
April, 1902, when he immediately opened an office for the practice of 
his profession in Carlisle, Indiana. He is still practicing and with highly 
satisfactory results. He holds consultations along the line of the E. & 
T. H. Railroad, in his locality. Politically, he is a supporter of the Demo- 
cratic party and has been a member of the town council four years, and 
has still two years more to serve. He is president of the town board, 
having been such since January I, 1906. He is a member of Carlisle 
Lodge No. 3, A. F. & A." M.. and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He was united in marriage November 30, 1887, to Eliza 
Hooper, who was born in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 



6o HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

November 23, 1868. She is the daughter of Pinckney and Nancy 
(Corbin) Hooper and received her education in the district schools of her 
native township. Her father was born in Knox county, Indiana, and her 
mother in SulHvan county, and both are now deceased. Her father was 
a life-long farmer. Dr. Shake and wife are the parents of four children, 
as follows: Lillie Belle, born April 10, 1890, unmarried and at home; 
Pinckney C, born November 7, 1897: Pleasant Harold, born May 28, 
1902; Charles Maxwell, born July 7, 1905. The doctor and his wife, are 
members of the Indian Prairie Baptist church. 



Thomas S. Risixger, who is a member of the enterprising firni 
of Risinger & Ellis, merchants and manufacturers in Carlisle, Indiana, is 
a native of Wvnder township, Knox county, Indiana, born November 
19. 1858, son of Charles W. and iVIartha B. (Snapp) Risinger. The 
father was born in Jeffersonville, Kentucky, January 13, 1822, and died 
January 8, 1873, "'' Knox county, Indiana. The Risingers are of German 
extraction. Daniel Risinger, the grandfather, also a native of Kentucky, 
born at the same place as was his son, married Sarah Miers. a native of 
Kentucky. They were united in marriage in that state and very early in 
life took up a quarter section of land. He was a farmer and operated a 
water-power sawmill and tread-wheel. Daniel and wife reared seven 
daughters and one son. In their religious profession they were Metho- 
dists. 

Charles W. Risinger remained a resident of Wynder township after 
his father moved to Knox county, Indiana, and was a farmer and en- 
gaged in the sawmill business with his father. When they first moved 
to Knox county, they operated a pottery and made crocks and jugs, as 
well as other vessels made from clay. Charles W. Risinger was a soldier 
in the war with Mexico, and politically affiliated with the Democratic 
party. His wife, Martha (Snapp) Risinger, was born in Sullivan county, 
Indiana, March 14. 1836. in Haddon township. She grew to womanhood 
in her native township, and was there educated, teaching school a year. 
Her parents were Abraham and Martha (Baird) Snapp. Her father, 
born in Kentucky in 1793, was of English descent, while her mother was 
of Irish extraction. They were married in Knox county, Indiana. 
Abraham Snapp was a miller by trade and ran a gristmill and sawmill 
combined, at Scottville, Haddon township. He served as colonel in the 
war of 1812. He was thrice married, and reared a family of eleven 
children. He died in Haddon township in 1847, h's wife dying many 
years previous. 

The children born to Charles W. Risinger and wife were: Aurelia, 
wife of Herman Vaughn, a bookkeeper for Risinger & Ellis ; Thomas S. ; 
John, deceased ; Catherine, wife of Frank Minich, residing in the township 
in which Carlisle is situated ; Leonard, deceased ; Frank, residing in 
Evansville, Indiana. 

Thomas S. Risinger was reared to farm life and educated in the 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AX COUNTY 6i 

])ublic schools. After his marriage, he purchased a sixty-one acre farm 
in Haddon townsliip, just over the Knox county Hue, and there resided 
until he in<ivcd to Carlisle to engage in business. In March, 1892, he 
sold out and went to Carlisle, uniting with his brother I^'rank, under the 
firm name of Kisinger lirothers, undertakers and dealers in hardware and 
furniture. Thomas S. learnefl the art of emijalming antl the undertaker's 
business of Tutwiler & Sons, Indianapolis, Indiana, and is now a licensed 
embalmer. He is a member of the Funeral Directors' Association of In- 
diana, and is now the only undertaker in Carlisle. After a partnership of 
one year, the Risinger Brothers dissolved, Thomas S. buying his brother 
out, and continuing for one year alone. In the month of February, 
1894, C. A. Ellis (see his sketch in this work ), was taken in as a partner, 
since which time the firm lias gone under the title of Risinger & Ellis. 
This firm is extensively engaged in the manufacture of the patented 
Hygienic Cabinet, which article is having such a large sale at this date. 
Politically, Mr. Risinger is a supporter of the Democratic party and has 
been a member of the town board. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 50, belonging to the Encampment 
degree of that fraternity. No. 139. He has filled all cliairs in this lodge, 
and been to the grand lodge of the state. He is also connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, at Carlisle. Besides his many otiier 
business cares, Mr. Risinger is one of the directors of the Carlisle Ijuilding 
and Loan Association. 

Mr. Risinger was united in marriage October 14, 1S84, to Miss Judah 
Belle Hooper, born in Haddon township and educated in the district 
schools of the same. She is the daughter of Pinckney C. and Nancy 
(Corbin) Hooper. (See sketch of Dr. D. F. Shake). ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
Risinger are the parents of two children: Edna, born July 8, 1886, un- 
married and at home and Aurelia, born January i, i8yo, unmarried and 
will graduate with the class of 1909, from the Carlisle high school. . Mr. 
Risinger and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and Air. Risinger is a trustee of the parsonage. He has served as trustee 
of the church at Bethlehem for several years, but has recently given it 
up to others. 



Abr.miam G. Cox, D. V. S. — A skillful representative of the vet- 
erinary profession, who enjoys a large practice at Carlisle and surrounding- 
territory, is Dr. Abraham G. Cox, wdio was born August 10, 1858, in 
Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, east from the town of 
Carlisle. He is the son of Jacob and Mary (Hamilton) Cox. His father 
was born in Madison county, Indiana, and died in Jasper county, Illinois, 
aged about thirty-five. The mother was born and died in Jasper county, 
Illinois. Grandfather John Cox was a native of England and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer. The maternal grandfather was a native of Scotland, 
and his wife was Elizabeth Schmidt, born in Germany. They were also 
farmers. 



62 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

The parents of Dr. Cox moved to Jasper county, Illinois, in i860, 
and there he lived until fourteen years of age, when he came back to 
Haddon township and worked on a farm. In 1881, he was employed 
in a drug store at Houston, Missouri, after which he began the study 
of medicine, entering the College at Charleston, Illinois, in 1886. He 
remained in that school two years, going then to Toronto, Canada, where 
he took a one year's course. He began practice, April 13, 1890, at Car- 
lisle, Indiana, continuing until the autumn of 1897, when he entered the 
Indiana Veterinary College, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1898 and at once returned to Carlisle, and has been practicing here ever 
since. In igo6 Dr. Cox erected a modern veterinary hospital and formu- 
lated what is so widely known as "Dr. Cox's Barb-wire Liniment," and 
"Painless Blister," the same being made by P. L. Hoover & Bros. The 
doctor is a member of the Indiana Veterinary Association and is an up-to- 
date and highly skillful veterinary. He belongs to Carlisle Lodge No. 
3, F. & A. M., and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a stock- 
holder in the First National Bank of Carlisle. 

Dr. Cox was married July 6, 1891, to Mary Trimble, born in Haddon 
township, Sullivan county, Indiana, February 19, 1869, and educated in 
the same locality. She is the daughter of William and Jane Trimble. 
Her father was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, and her mother in 
Ohio, and both are still living in Haddon township. He is among the most 
extensive farmers within the towrisfhip. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Cox have had two 
children: Earl, who died in infanc}^ amd Corda, born November 11, 1895. 
Mrs. Cox is a member of the Church of Christ. 



:r::3 

J.\MES McCoNNELL, who is a well known grain and lumber dealer 
of Carlisle, Indiana, was born July 17, 1871. in Haddon township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana, son of Baily and Jennie (AIcDowell) IMcConnell. Baily 
McConnell was born in Haddon township, and his wife in Ohio, in 
Columbiana county, at Mooretown, April 29, 1852. She was a daughter 
of Dr. James McDowell, who came to Carlisle when she was a young 
girl. He began the practice of medicine at Pleasantville, Jefferson town- 
ship. Andrew JMcConnell, the father of Baily McConnell, also came to 
the county at a very early day. 

James McConnell, of this notice, was reared on the farm and edu- 
cated in the public schools, after which he attended DePauw College at 
Greencastle, Indiana, for four years. He then turned his attention to 
agriculture and still owns his well-tilled farm, although he has never lived 
on the place, having resided in town ever since his marriage. He owns 
a creamery and a herd of seventy-five registered Jersey cattle, and oper- 
ates a strictly sanitary milk business. In the spring of 1905 he purchased 
the lumber and grain business of J. N. Roberts, and now has the only 
lumber yard of tlie place. He also carries a full line of clay products. 
In connection with his extensive lumber trade, he runs a planing mill. 



«isr 






Z'^-^-'^ou.or"" 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AN COUNTY 63 

Both his lumber and creamery interests are models of uniformity and 
correctness. He keeps an exact account of every pound of butter pro- 
duced from each cow lie owns. It is said that his system is not equaled 
within Indiana. 

Politically, jNIr. McConncll afTfiliates with the RepuhHcan party. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Carlisle Lodge No. 3, 
F. & A. jM. ; Council, Chapter, and Royal Arch Masons of Sullivan; also 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America at Carlisle. He was married 
in 1896, to Eloise Akin, by whom three children were born : Bernice, 
Bailey, and Wall. The reader is referred to the sketch of Edgar W. 
Akin for the ancestry of Eloise (Akin) McConnell. 



Cl.\rence F. Burton-. — The business career of Clarence F. Burton, 
which has been attended by a large and well merited degree of success, 
was begun when he was but sixteen years of age as a clerk in a store at 
Silverwood, Indiana. After ten months spent in that capacity he became 
a student in the normal at Covington, Indiana, and after a six months' 
course there returned to the store in Silverwood and clerked there for two 
and a half years. During the year and a half following this period lie 
was the proprietor of a restaurant at Covington, and then returning again 
to his home town of Silverwood was for three years associated with D. P. 
Williams in the grocery business and was the postmaster of that town. 
Selling his interests there, he went to Clinton and spent a short time in 
the dry goods store of Randolph Brothers, and in July of 1904 he came 
to Shelburn and became a partner of I. C. Dalrymple in a mercantile store. 
In 1908 he purchased Mr. Dalrymple's interest and has since been alone 
in the business. He is one of the leading merchants of the city and enjovs 
a large and lucrative trade. 

Mr. Burton was born at Silverwood, in Fountain county, Indiana, 
December 11, 1871, a son of William E. and Sarah J. (Lunger) Burton. 
The father died when his son Clarence was but three years of age, and 
the mother, who was born near Linden, Indiana, about 1840, afterward 
married Peter Reynolds and is living on the home farm in Fountain 
county. There were three children by the first marriage : Thomas, who 
is a miner at Clinton, Indiana, and Flora Williams, of Silverwood. 

Clarence F. Burton, one of the three, attended the public schools of 
Silverwood until he was sixteen years of age, and then, as above stated, 
entered upon his successful mercantile career. On the 6th of March, 
1901, he was married to Margaret Randolph, who was born in Silver- 
wood in 1880, a daughter of Henry C. and Clara Randolph, who are 
farming people residing near Silverwood. The two children of this union 
are Carroll F. and Lucile. born respectively on the 27th of July, 1902, 
and on the 24th of September, 1904. Mr. Burton is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias order, Lodge No. 98, at Silverwood, and he gives a 
stanch support to Republican principles. 

Vol. II— 5 



64 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Solomon Deeble. — Superintendent and general manager of the Car- 
lisle (Ind.) Coal and Clay Company, Solomon Deeble is a native of 
Monmouthshire, Wales, where he was born June 14, 1854, son of James 
and Margaret (Ashton) Deeble. The father was born in Cornwall, 
England, and the mother in the north of Wales. They came to America 
in 1864, locating in Dover, New Jersey, where they remained one year, 
then went to Pittston, Pennsylvania. In 1869 their son Solomon, of this 
sketch, came to this country and joined his parents in Pittston. Here the 
father died. He was a miner and usually followed that business for a 
livelihood. 

Solomon Deeble lived in Pittston, Pennsylvania, for thirty-six vears. 
being a mine superintendent for several years at that place. He began 
the occupation of a coal miner in Wales, when but seven years of age, 
acting as a trapper, which part of the mining work he performed for 
three years and then started in as a driver boy, continuing in such role m 
the mines of his native land, until he was fifteen years old. He then came 
to Pittston, Pennsylvania, where he commenced as a driver-boy. Two 
years were spent at that branch of the work, after which he started in as 
a real laborer and mined one year, when he had mastered the situatioi. 
in the coal mining business sufficiently to enable him to work as a regulai 
miner, which he did for twelve years. His next position was that 01 
driver boss, at which he worked two years, then as fire boss one year, 
when he commenced as pit boss. This was in 1891 and he continued ir. 
that service for ten years, being employed by the Avoca Coal Company 
at Avoca, Pennsylvania. Resigning he was made superintendent of the 
Traders Coal Company (although still holding his residence at Avoca ^ 
and held this position for five years. In 1897 he was appointed post 
master of Avoca, Pennsylvania, and served in that capacity until 1904, 
being superintendent of the mines at the same time. In 1904 he resigned 
the postmastership, as well as his positions in the mines, and in March, 
1905, went to Carlisle, Indiana. There he established the Carlisle Coal 
and Clay Company. He began the sinking of a shaft in the month of 
April and has been superintendent and manager of the company ever 
since. The shaft was sunk to the depth of two hundred and forty feet, 
and work begun on vein number six, March 19, 1906. After having 
worked the mines to a daily output of two hundred and fifty tons, they 
observed the roof was weak and the mine was abandoned. They then 
went down to a distance of three hundred and fourteen feet, and began 
working number five in October, 1907. This vein of coal is five feet in 
thickness, and of an extra good grade: the roofing is said to be of an 
excellent qualitv, too. The daily output of this mine is two hundred and 
fifty tons and the coal produced is sold throughout Indiana and also in 
Chicago. This mine is provided with an escape shaft down to number 
four vein, at a depth of four hundred and ninety-five feet, it being the 
deepest shaft within the entire state of Indiana, while the vein of pure 
coal is five feet in thickness. The president of this mine is John William- 
son, of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania ; J. C. Wiegand, of the same place, is 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 65 

secretary And treasurer; Solomon Deeble, manager, and Thomas J. 
Deeble, is salesman. 

Solomon Deeble was united in marriage to Ruth Davis Alay 22, 1874. 
She was born in Wales, in the same locality as her husband. This union 
has been blessed by seven children : Thomas, died in infancy ; Anna, wife 
of Joseph McPherson of Carlisle, Indiana ; Thomas J., married Fannie 
jMae Pearce, of Carlisle, in 1904 and now has two children — Emma Ruth 
and Jessie Lois ; Birdella, wife of William L. Evans, residing in Carlisle ; 
Mola, wife of William T. Pratt, and has two children — Ruth Deeble and 
William Thomas, Jr., residing in St. Albans, Vermont ; William F., 
married Grace Wilson and has one daughter — Viola Dean ; Roy Edgar, 
married Miss Geneva Hammond and is still at home. 

Politically, Solomon Deeble affiliates with the Republican party and 
in fraternal societies, he is connected with the following : Masons, Blue 
lodge, chapter, commandery and Shriners ; Odd Fellows ; Ancient 
Order of United Workmen ; Foresters ; and Knights of Pythias. He was 
a member of the school board at Avoca, Pennsylvania, for nine years. 
Mr. Deeble received no schooling in his youth but is a self-educated man 
and he and his wife both being self-educated appreciate a good practical 
education and gave their children a high school and college course. Four 
residences on the Sullivan road between Carlisle and the mines were 
erected bv Mr. Deeble. 



George W. Pirtle, M. D. — Dr. George W. Pirtle, a practicing 
physician at Carlisle, Indiana, is a native of Haddon township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana, and was born two miles north of Carlisle, November 17, 
1868, son of James W. and Mary A. (Cron) Pirtle. The father was also 
born in Haddon township in August, 1837, and died December 31, 1904. 
The mother was born in Knox county, Indiana, and died in Carlisle in the 
spring of 1906. The Pirtles are of an English family who came from 
England in 1635. two brothers settling in Virginia and from them this 
branch of the family have all descended. The grandfather, Alfred Pirtle, 
was born in Sullivan county, and his father, George Pirtle, the doctor's 
great-grandfather, was born in Kentucky, coming to Sullivan county 
among the pioneer settlers of this part of Indiana. James W. Pirtle, 
father of George W., was a farmer and also operated a saw-mill. 
Politically, he was a Democrat. His children were as follows: Dr. 
George W. ; Charles, a resident of Hamilton township, Sullivan county ; 
Jacob, who resides on the old Pirtle homestead and Edward, a resident 
of Paxton, Indiana. The doctor's mother was twice married, first to 
James Stipe, who died in the Civil war, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

Dr. Pirtle was educated in the common schools of his native country 
and then entered the Lake Forest University. Lake Forest. Illinois. 
Subsequently, he graduated from that most excellent educational institu- 
tion, Rush Medical College of Chicago, with the class of 1890. In the 
spring of that year he began active practice of medicine at Carlisle, 
Indiana, where he has not missed a day's practice since he first opened 



66 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

an office, eighteen years ago, aside from the time spent at the medical 
societies. He is a member of the Medical Society of Sulhvan County ; 
the Indiana State Medical Society and American Medical Association, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, D. 
C, becoming a member of the last named in 1895. He takes much interest 
in fraternal matters, and belongs to Carlisle Lodge No. 3, F. & A. M., 
the chapter and council at Sullivan, and also belongs to the IModern 
Woodmen of America. 

He was united in marriage October 18, 1891, to Belle Julian, born 
in Indiana, December 23.' 1867, daughter of Rev. B. F. Julian, now 
retired at Hymera, Indiana. Mrs. Pirtle is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They are the parents of one son, J. Julian Pirtle, born 
July 12, 1896. 



Herbert A. Brown, who is the general manager of the 
Carlisle Mill and Elevator Company, was born in Rockport, Spencer 
county, Indiana, December 9, i860, son of Thomas H. and Martha 
(Jones) Brown. Thomas Brown was born in Russellville, Ohio, February 
4. 1809, and died in Princeton, Indiana, April 2, 1900. He was of Penn- 
s}-lvania German descent. He was a drover and stock dealer, and also 
handled real estate. He came to Spencer county, Indiana, in 1818, with 
his parents, Conrad Brown and wife. They located on the bluffs and built 
a log cabin at a point where is now located the county seat of Spencer 
county. Conrad was a farmer. Thomas H. Brown lived in Spencer 
county until 1888, at which time he went to Princeton, Indiana, where he 
lived until his death. He was supporter of the Republican party and 
served three terms (six years) as sheriff. He was a member of the 
Masonic lodge and took much interest in Masonry. His wife was born in 
Spencer county, Indiana, .September 7, 1830, and died April 21, 1900. 
She was of English descent and was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. They were united in marriage in Spencer county, Indiana, 
in 1852, and were the parents of six children, as follows: John Y., 
residing in Princeton, Indiana, where he is engaged in the livery business ; 
Adalie A., wife of Prelot Rounds, an electrical engineer, residing, in 
Providence, Rhode Island; Herbert A. of this sketch; Harry T., residing 
in Los Angeles, California, and engaged as a contractor and builder ; 
Nora, wife of Charles Morris, residing in Troy, Ohio ; he is a tobacco 
dealer ; Mary, wife of R. L. Tichenor, residing in Princeton, Indiana, 
where he is engaged in the livery business. 

Reared in Rockport, Indiana, and educated in the same place, Herbert 
A. Brown was sixteen years of age when he began to learn the miller's 
trade in his native town. He continued there three years, then went to 
Eureka, Spencer county, where he remained about six months. He next 
went to Hazelton, Gibson county, Indiana, where he remained two years, 
working as a miller. He then went to Carmi, Illinois, but remained there 
only a short time, when he moved to Sumner, that state, and lived there 
two years. The next six years he spent in Vincennes, Indiana, with 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 67 

J. & S. Emison. He then went back to Hazelton and engaged in the 
milling business on his own account, remaining between four and five 
years. Thinking to better his condition, he moved to \\'ebster, Missouri, 
remaining a few months and then went to Lawrenccville, Illinois, where 
he remained two years, going from there to Birds, Illinois, and engaging 
in milling for himself. Two years later, he went to Princeton. Indiana, 
and engaged with the Zenith Alilling Company for three months. In the 
month of June, 1903, he went to Carlisle, Indiana, and operated the mill 
for Wiley Brenton for about two and a quarter years, since which date 
he has been operating the mill for the Carlisle ]\Iill and Elevator Com- 
pany ; he is the head miller and general manager of the mill. This is a 
high grade flour-producing plant and the product is shipped to all parts 
of the country. They also buy and ship all kinds of grain. The "Golden 
Eagle" brand of their flour is a trade-winner and has given Mr. Brown a 
wide reputation as a flour maker. 

Mr. Brown is a Republican in his political views, and is a member of 
the Royal Arcanum lodge at Vincennes, Indiana ; the Court of Honor 
in Carlisle ; No. 66 Tribe of Ben Hur at Carlisle, and the Mutual Pro- 
tective League Council No. 226, at Litchfield, Illinois, as well as holding 
membership with the T. P. A. at \'incennes. He was married August 
27, 1 88 1, to Laura Briscoe, torn in Warrick, county, Indiana, May 17, 
i860. She is the daughter of With and Adeline (Brown) Briscoe, both 
natives of Warrick county, and both now deceased. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Brown are the parents of three children, only one of 
whom is living : Agnes, born in Sumner, Illinois, November 13, 1882. 
She is still at home and is a graduate of the J. Smith Business College, 
at Vincennes, Indiana. For two years she was employed with Bay & 
Company's wholesale house in \'incennes, resigning on account of her 
mother's failing health. The other two children died in their infancy. 
Mr. Brown's wife and daughter are acceptable members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



Philip L. Hoover. — Enterprising, energetic, and possessing rare 
business ability and tact, Philip L. Hoover, of Carlisle, Sullivan county, 
is widely known as head of the firm of P. L. Hoover & Bros., which has 
exclusive control of the manufacture and sale of Dr. Cox's Barbed Wire 
Liniment, one of the best and most wonderful articles of the kind in 
existence. A native of Sullivan county, he was born, July 22, 1869, in 
Haddon township, which was, likewise, the birthplace of his parents, 
John M. and Ann T. (Cartwright) Hoover. He comes of pioneer stock, 
his grandfather, Philip L. Hoover, first, for whom he was named, having 
been one of the early settlers of this township. 

Coming from Pennsylvania, his native state, to Sullivan county, the 
grandfather, Philip L. Hoover, took up land, entering about si.x hundred 
acres. He was a tailor by trade, and worked at it some in connection 
with farming. He served as a soldier in the ]\Iexican war, and after his 
return from the army devoted his attention almost entirely to agriculture. 



68 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

becoming one of the leading farmers of this part of the county, his home- 
stead property being near Carhsle. 

Born on the home farm in 1845, Jol^ri M. Hoover succeeded to the 
occupation in which he was reared, and as a general farmer and stock- 
raiser was successful. As a man and a citizen, he was held in high re- 
spect, and his death, which occurred May 5, 1889, was a loss to the 
community in which he had spent the greater part of his life. He 
married Ann T. Cartwright, who was born June 27, 1835, and is now 
living, making her home in Carlisle, Indiana. Her father, William C. 
Cartwright, was born in Virginia, from there coming to Sullivan county 
soon after the arrival of the first family of Hoovers. He subsequently 
married Sarah Ledgewood, who was born in this county in 1804, being 
the first white child born within its precincts. In politics, John M. 
Hoover was a steadfast Republican, and in religion his wife was, and is, 
a consistent Methodist. Five children were born of their union, namely : 
Nolan C, of Carlisle, a member of the firm of Hoover Brothers, and its 
traveling agent, married Sadie Vance, a native of Haddon township, and 
they have two children; May, born April 5, 1866, died in childhood; 
Philip L., of this sketch; Elmer G., born June 19, 1872, is also traveling 
for the firm, his home, however, being in Carlisle ; and Hester A., born 
May 9, 1874, is a member of the firm of P. L. Hoover & Brothers. All 
of these children were reared on the farm. Elmer and Hester both at- 
tended the Indiana University, at Bloomington. Hester also took a 
course of study at the State Normal school, and for two years was a 
teacher in the graded schools of Carlisle. 

Remaining on the home farm rmtil twenty years old, Philip L. 
Hoover then accepted a position as clerk in the drug store of W. J. 
Curtner. Subsequently going to Terre Haute, he was for a time similarly 
employed in Jasper D. Denison's drug store, where he formed a familiar 
acquaintance with the details of the business. Forming a partnership, 
then, with A. M. Morris, he embarked in business in Carlisle, becoming 
junior member of the firm of Morris & Hoover. While thus engaged 
this firm formed a separate business in company with Dr. Cox, of Car- 
lisle, placing before the public the Barbed Wire Liniment formulated and 
manufactured by the doctor. Two years later, Mr. Hoover bought out 
Mr. Morris, and for four years managed the drug business alone. In 
1895, he admitted his brother Elmer to partnership, and later the re- 
maining members of the family were admitted to the firm, his mother, 
his sister Hester, and his brother Nolan all becoming equal partners in 
the business, the name of the firm being P. L. Hoover & Brothers. In 
1900, this enterprising firm sold out its drug business, and also the tele- 
phone exchange, which Mr. Hoover had for some years managed in 
partnership with Charles Griffin. In 1897, Mr. Hoover bought out Dr. 
Cox, and since 1900 the firm has manufactured Dr. Cox's famous Barbed 
Wire Liniment, and in placing it on the market has been very successful. 
By extensive advertising its merits are widely known, and it is now sold 
in large quantities throughout the West and South, being found in all 
of the" leading drug and general stores of Kansas, Oklahoma, Florida, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 69 

Washington, Iowa, Nebraska, Michigan, ]\Iinnesota, Georgia, Alabama, 
California, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentncky, Missouri, Ohio, 
Tennessee and Texas. The use of this liniment in this vast territory of 
states is a sure proof of its medicinal virtue, and bespeaks the energy and 
enterprise of the firm that handles it, and the great advertising aijility 
and knowledge of its members. 

In 1892, Mr. Hoover married Xenia Anderson, who was born in 
Cass township, a daughter of Joseph Anderson, now a resident of Sulli- 
van. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover have two children, Glenn and Helen. Politi- 
cally Mr. Hotjver supports the principles of the Republican party. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to Carlisle Lodge No. 3, F. & A. M., to which his 
brothers also belong : to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a 
member of both lodge and encamiMnent : and to the T. P. A. 



M.\RK Lester. — A man of undoubted enterprise, industry and ability, 
Mark Lester, of Carlisle, is actively associated with the industrial progress 
of this part of Sullivan county, and as the owner of a sawmill is carrying 
on a substantial business. He was born, October 20, 1854, in London. 
England, which was also the birthplace of his father, Henry Lester. His 
grandfather, Mark Lester, who was for many years a captain in the 
Royal Navy, married a Scotch lassie, Isabella Keeling. 

In his earlier years, Henry Lester was engaged in the drug business 
in London. He was a man of talent, a genius in his way, and invented 
and patented the waterproof match. He then began the manufacture of 
matches in London, being a pioneer in that industry. Being burned out 
in 1855, he transferred his residence and business from London to Not- 
tingham, where he erected a match factory, wdiich he managed until his 
death. He married Hepzibah Gimbert, who was born in Cambridgeshire, 
England, a daughter of Thomas Gimbert, a velvet weaver, and she, too, 
spent her last years in Nottingham. They were both active in religious 
work, and were prominent members of the Church of England. Eight 
children were born of their union, namely : Thomas, deceased ; Harry died 
in Sullivan, Indiana ; George is engaged in mining in Nottingham, Eng- 
land ; Ruth, deceased ; Mark, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned ; 
Alice, wife of Joseph Hopkins, of Nottingham, England ; William, a lace 
maker, resides in Nottingham ; Jane died in infancy. 

Receiving a limited education in the Nottingham schools, Mark 
Lester remained at home until eighteen years of age, when he enlisted in 
the British army, in which he served three years, and one hundred and 
ninety-five davs, as a private. Returning home, he worked in the mines 
until' 1879, when he emigrated to this country, locating October i, of 
that vearl in Shelburn. Sullivan county, Indiana, where for three years 
he was profitably emjjloyed in mining pursuits. Going back then to Eng- 
land for a vacation, he staid there awhile, and then returned to Indiana, 
and during the summer of 1884 mined for coal in Sullivan. On April 17, 
i88s, ]Mr. Lester, in the employ of the Carlisle Coal Company, began 



70 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

sinking a shaft about a mile north of Carhsle, and superintended its man- 
agement for nine years, after which he operated it on his own account 
for three years, from 1892 until 1895. In 1893, Mr. Lester, in company 
with Walter Bugher, embarked in the threshing business, and continued 
in it seven years, when his partner sold out to Mr. Lester. In 1896 these 
gentlemen established themselves in the milling business, carrying it on 
in connection with their threshing operations until 1900, when j\Ir. Lester 
bought the sawmill, and thresher, and has since conducted it most suc- 
cessfully. He does considerable custom work, and is an extensive shipper 
of lumber, having a prosperous trade, and in addition to his mill in 
Carlisle also has one in Knox county, which he has operated since 1906. 
He formerly owned a farm of twenty-four acres, but was burned out in 
August, 1894, and has since lived in Carlisle. 

On September 9, 1878, Mr. Lester married Sarah Jane Rigley, 
who was born December 6, 1862, in Derbyshire, England, a daughter 
of William and Charlotte Elizabeth (Hardy) Rigley, life-long residents 
of England. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Lester, eleven children have 
been born, namely: Ernest M., deceased; Horace H., born in England, 
December 30, 1883, received his early academical education at Vincennes 
College, afterwards being graduated from the University of Minnesota 
with the class of 1905, was principal of the Anacortes high school in 
Washington, and is now Professor of Botany in Bellingham high school, 
Washington; Ivan Jefferson, born February 22, 1885, was graduated from 
the Carlisle high school in 1905, and is now in partnership with his 
father — he is a Mason, from Blue Lodge to Council, the same as his 
father ; Grover died in infancy ; Bertram died in early childhood ; Paulina 
C, born January 17, 1890, was graduated from the Carlisle high school 
with the class of 1908, is now a successful teacher in Haddon township; 
Albert Carroll, born March 14, 1893 : Thomas William, born December 
5, 1895; Raymond Kelling, born September 24, 1898; Elizabeth Eloise, 
born September 23, 1901 ; and Jennie Gretcham, born March 21, 1904. 
Politically Mr. Lester affiliates with the Democratic party. Fraternally 
he is a member of Carlisle Lodge No. 3, F. & A. M., of Sullivan Council ; 
and of Sullivan Chapter, R. A. M. Religiously, his wife, daughter and 
two sons are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Lester is 
a member of the Eastern Star at Carlisle. 



William B. Shepherd. — Among the well-known residents of Had- 
don township is WiUiam B. Shepherd, who, as a liveryman, is carrying 
on a substantial business in Carlisle, having an extensive patronage. A 
son of the late William B. Shepherd, Sr., he was born in this township. 
May 24, 1863, and was here brought up and educated. 

William B. Shepherd, Sr., was born in Sullivan, Indiana, in 1836, 
and died on his home farm, in Haddon township, in 1886. In the early 
'50s, following the trail of the gold seekers, he went to California, and 
for awhile was emploved in mining, but without meeting with the antici- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 71 

pated success. Somewhat ilisappointcil in the result <.if his vcuture, lie 
returned to Sullivan county, and for awhile lived at Shaker Prairie. 
Subsequently, in company with Josiah Wolfe, he embarked in business as 
a general merchant and a grain dealer, being first located at Griswold, 
Knox county, and afterwards in Carlisle. Subsequently buying land in 
Haddon township, he was engaged in agricultural labors until his death. 
He was a Democrat in politics, a member of the local Grange, and be- 
longed to the Christian church, of which his widow is still a member. He 
married Elizabeth Summers, who was born in Sullivan, in 1842, and is 
now living on the old Sheplierd homestead. Their union was blessed 
by the birth of seven children, namely: Thomas G., residing with his 
widowed mother on the home farm, in Haddon township ; Solomon G., 
of Gill township ; William B., of this brief sketch ; Estella May, wife of 
Alonzo Pifer, of Gill township; John, deceased; Effie, wife of F. M. 
Bland, of Gill township; and Carrie J., wife of William Willis, of Hamil- 
ton township. 

Educated in tlie district schools, and reared to agricultural pursuits, 
\\'illiam B. She])herd assumed the management of the home estate upon 
the death of his father, carrying it on for four years. Locating then in 
Carlisle, he embarked in the livery business, and a year later admitted 
to partnership Rush McCammon, with whom he was associated for two 
vears as junior member of the firm of McCammon & Shepherd. Selling 
out his interest then to Frank Risinger, he was for twelve years engaged 
in the retail liquor business in Carlisle, closing out April 3, igo8. Two 
weeks later, on April 15, 1908, Mr. Shepherd and Mr. JMcCammon again 
entered into partnership, and are now carrying on a good business as 
proprietors of a livery and feed stable. Politically, Mr. Shepherd is 
identified with the Democratic party, and fraternally he belongs to Eagle 
Lodge No. 996, at Sullivan, Indiana. 

"On February 18, 1883, Mr. Shepherd married Elizabeth Wagner, 
who was born in Ohio, in 1864, a daughter of John Wagner, who came 
to Indiana about 1870, and located first in Gill township, later settling 
in Sullivan, where he .spent his last years. Of the six children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd, two are dead, the second child having died in 
infancy, and John, the third child, having also passed to the life beyond. 
Four are living, namely ; Howard Floyd, born October 6, 1884, is engaged 
in the livery business with his father ; Paul, born September 24, 1888, was 
graduated "from the Carlisle high school in 1907, and is now in the employ 
of P. L. Hoover & Brothers, in Carlisle; Flazel, torn February 28, 1892, 
attends the Carlisle high school, belonging to the class of 1909 ; and Helen, 
born Februarv 3, 1900. Airs. Shepherd is a member of the Christian 
church. 



James D. How.\rd. — An honored representative of the brave, daring 
and energetic pioneers who came to this section of the country when it 
was in its primitive wilderness, and by heroic work actively assisted in 
developing it into a fertile and productive region, James D. Howard, of 



72 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Carlisle, is eminently worthy of especial mention in this biographical 
work. A son of Cornelius Howard, he was born September 4, 1844, in 
Jefferson ■ township, Sullivan county, on the home farm. His grand- 
parents, Joseph and Sarah Howard, were born, reared, and married in 
North Carolina. They afterwards lived for awhile in Kentucky, and their 
first child was born in Daniel Boone's fort. Coming from there to 
Sullivan county in 1820, he took up land, and was there employed in 
tilling the soil until his death, in the fall of 1838. He was buried in the 
Indian Prairie Cemetery, in that township, his body being the first there 
interred. 

Cornelius Howard was born. June 13, 1805, in Oldham county, 
Kentucky, and died October 28, 1896, in Jefferson township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana. He was a farmer from choice, being engaged to a con- 
siderable extent in stock raising and dealing, and at one time was owner 
of four hundred acres of land. He married first, Nancy Jarrel, who 
lived but a short time after their marriage. He married second, Naomi 
Mayfield, who was born in Jefl^erson township. Sullivan county, June 
20, 1819, and died in the same township, May 9, 1894. Her father, James 
Mayfield, who served in the war of 1812, married Amelia Hinkle, in 
Kentucky, their native state, and was subsequently one of the original 
settlers of Jefferson township. Of the marriage of Cornelius and Naomi 
(Mayfield) Howard, eleven children were born, as follows: Joseph T., 
of Jeiferson township : Naomi Elizabeth : James D.. of this sketch : W. W., 
residing on the old Howard homestead ; R. J\I., deceased ; Franklin P., 
deceased : John S., engaged in the fruit business in Florida ; Sarah E.,. 
wife of Edward C. Shake, of Haddon township : Wilton M., also of Had- 
don township; Jasper, deceased; and Daniel V., engaged in farming in 
Fairland, Indiana. 

Brought up on the home farm, James D. Howard was given excel- 
lent educational advantages, attending first the district schools, afterwards 
continuing his studies at what is now the DePauw University, in Green- 
castle. He subsequently taught school three terms in Jefferson township, 
and was then in the drug business in Carlisle until 1870. when, in com- 
pany with James L. Berry, he embarked in the drug business in Carlisle, 
being junior member of the firm of Berry & Howard. In January, 1874, 
he returned to Jefferson township, and resumed work on his farm of one 
hundred acres, residing there until September, 1888. Locating in that 
year in Franklin, Mr. Howard was there employed in the grocery busi- 
ness for three years, when he traded one hundred and sixty acres in 
Jefferson township for a farm in Haddon township, an estate of two 
hundred acres, subsequently selling his store and property in Franklin, 
Indiana. Immediately assuming possession of his property, he engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in Haddon township from 1891 until 1905. as a 
general farmer and stock raiser, meeting with genuine success. Since 
that time. Mr. Howard has been a resident of Carlisle, where he is livmg 
retired from active pursuits, although he still supervises the manage- 
ment of his farm. He is highly esteemed as a man and a citizen, and is 
an influential member of the Democratic party, and belongs to the Inde- 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AN COUNTY yz 

pendent Order of Odd Fellows, into which he was initiated January 8, 
1872. lie has filled all of the offices of his lodge and encampment, and 
has been a delegate to the grand lodge. 

On February 28, 1867, Mr. Howard married Nancy Jane Kobbins, 
wh.o was born in Knox county, Indiana, January 10, 1846. Her parents, 
John and Lucy (Bowen) Robbins, came from Kentucky, their native 
state, to Indiana, and were among the very first settlers of the northern 
end of Knox county. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812. He 
had a family of seven children, as follows : James, deceased ; Julia, wife of 
William A. Perry, of Freelandsville, Indiana; Mary, deceased; Thomas, 
residing on a part of the Robbins homestead, in Knox county ; Nancy 
Jane, wife of I\Ir. Howard; Isabella, deceased; and Alexander M., living 
on a portion of the old homestead. Five children have been born to Mr. 
and Airs. Howard, namely: a child that died in infancy; Edward C, 
deceased; Carrie B., deceased; Flora E., born October 3, 1874, is the wife 
of Thomas A. Grizzle, of Carlisle; and Icie Nora, born April 11, 1877, 
married Frank Corbin, of Carlisle, and has one child, James V. Corbin. 
Forty-one years ago Mr. Howard united with the Missionary Baptist 
church, to wdiich his parents belonged, and of which his wife is a member, 
and he has filled all of the offices connected with the church. 



Mrs. H.\nn.\h F. (Alsop) Jer.\uld. — A woman of culture and 
refinement, possessing excellent judgment and much executive ability, 
Mrs. Jerauld bravely assumed the duties devolving upon her when, many- 
years ago, she was left a widow, and has ever been mindful of the interest 
of her household. She resides in Carlisle, Sullivan county, where her 
birth occurred, March zy. 1846, and is descended from an old English 
family, being the daughter of Joshua and Margaret (Calvert) Alsop. 

Hon. Joshua Alsop, her father, was born in the town of Wall 
Hexem, in Northumberlandshire, England, on the fifth of September, 
1807. In the year 1818, on the i8th of May. in company with his 
father, mother, two brothers and sister, he emigrated from the old world 
to the new. landing in Canada. Thence they moved to the state of New 
York, residing at Halls Corner for one year, and then starting for the 
west, via Pittsburg, sailing down the Ohio river to the mouth of the 
Wabash and up that river to York, Illinois. .-Xfter a short stay at that 
place the family located at Carlisle, Indiana, in the fall of 1820, where 
Mr. Alsop remained until his death. 

In the thirtieth year of his age, Mr. Alsop was married to Miss 
Margaret Calvert and shortly afterward commenced his career of busi- 
ness, which he conducted on the old-fashioned theory that the word of a 
mercantile man must be as good as his bond. So strong did he adhere 
to this principle that his name became a synonym of business integrity 
throughout the Wabash valley. Mr. Alsop early became satisfied that 
the facilities the river afiforded for the transportation of produce and 
mcrchandi--e were inadequate to the development of Sullivan countv. 



74 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Upon the suggestion of railroad connection between Terre Haute and 
Evansville he became enhsted in the enterprise, and was elected one of 
the directors, which position he held until his death. He made all his 
sacrifice for the road with a desire that it should run through Carlisle. 
His plans were for a time frustrated by the machinations of certain men, 
who were anxious that the road should be located out of the town. Then 
Mr. Alsop displayed that trait of character which he possessed in a re- 
markable degree (tenacity of purpose), made a herculean effort and 
enlisted fifteen associates in the cause. The road was finally located in 
Carlisle, at a loss to Mr. Alsop and his friends of $32,000. Those who 
are enjoying the benefits conferred cannot appreciate the sacrifice thus 
made in their behalf. 

From the inauguration of the free school system Mr. Alsop gave it 
his financial aid and his unwavering support, looking forward to the time 
when education should become compulsory. One of his peculiar traits of 
character was his habit of coming to the rescue of a failing or an em- 
barrassed public enterprise, and by the timely advancement of money 
placing it on the highway to success. In 1870, much against his will, he 
was elected a member of the State Senate and served during the regular 
session of 1870-72, but no consideration whatever would induce him to 
accept a re-election. Though taking an interest in political affairs, he was 
averse to holding office. He was a sincere friend to the honest poor man, 
never refusing him either aid or sympathy. Enterprising and progres- 
sive he took an especial interest in the welfare of his adopted town, but 
whether his project was private or public always remembered his honor 
as a man. His death in 1876 was a sad loss to his family and a heavy 
loss to the community. 

Mr. Alsop's- marriage to Margaret Calvert occurred at Carlisle, 
Indiana. February 14, 1837, and seven children were born to them, as 
foUovi's : William and Mary, who died young ; Nancy and David, also de- 
ceased ; Hannah, of this sketch ; Isadora, wife of Charles P. Gwin, who 
resides in Georgia ; and Anna C., widow of the late Frank Parvin. Mr. 
Parvin was born in Evansville, Indiana, and was there educated, begin- 
ning his business career as a dry goods merchant in association with his 
father. He afterward embarked in the drug business in that city, and 
carried it on successfully until failing health forced him to retire from 
active pursuits. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. Parvin was educated at 
DePauw College, where she received an excellent intellectual training. 

Hannah F. Alsop received her elementary education in the public 
schools of Carlisle, afterward attending a female college in Terre Haute. 
On December 8, 1870, she married Thomas H. Jerauld, who was born in 
Patoka, Indiana, February 22, 1837, and died in that city, February 9, 
1883. He received his collegiate education in Bloomington, Indiana, and 
was actively and successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits at Patoka 
until his death, being an honored and respected member of the community 
and a man of sterling integrity and worth. In politics, he was a stanch 
Republican. In April, 1884, Mrs. Jerauld returned to Carlisle, her girl- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 75 

hood home, and has since resided there. She is an able business woman, 
and has, among other property, a farm of one hundred and seventy acres 
in Haddon township, from the rental of which she realizes a good income. 
The Bellevue Coal Company of Pennsylvania has recently sunk a coal 
shaft on Mrs. Jerauld's farm, and is now working vein No. 5. Mrs. 
Jerauld and her husband became the parents of four children, namely : 
Heber, who lives at home ; Anna, who died in infancy ; ^Margaret, who 
lived but sixteen months; and Charles G., who also resides with his 
mother. Religiously, Mrs. Jerauld is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. She has seen many changes in Carlisle since her girlhood days, 
and remembers driving with her father to Vincennes to take the train 
to Evansville before the railroad was completed as far north as Carlisle. 
It is hard for the younger people of this generation to realize the wonder- 
ful changes made' in the every-day life of this day by the establishment 
of railways, telephones, telegraphs, and the rural free delivery service 
throughout the country. 



George W. Funk, a retired farmer and one of the early promoters 
of the Wabash levee, as well as the present gravel road system, whose 
excellent farm lies in the famous Wabash valley, but who now resides 
in Carlisle, Sullivan county, is a native of Russellville, Lawrence 
county, Illinois, born March 24, 1851, a son of Henry H. and 
Martha (Petitt) Funk. The father was born in Virginia and the mother 
in North Carolina. They both had accompanied their parents to Lawrence 
countv, Illinois, at an early day, being among the pioneer settlers in that 
region. The grandparents, Peter and Nancy Funk, both live in Lawr- 
ence county until their death, and both reached the advanced age of 
ninetv years. Peter Funk was a miller and mill-wright, and operated 
the first mill ever run at Russellville, Illinois. He sold out, and later 
followed farming pursuits. While in the milling business he and his son, 
Henry M., attached a carding mill and a distillery to the mill proper. 
The son Henry W. also farmed in the latter years of his life and died when 
aged about sixty years, his wife dying when George W. was but three 
weeks old. 

George W. Funk grew to man's estate surrounded by the scenes of 
country life, receiving his education at the common district school, begin- 
ning to work for himself at the age of nineteen years, by farming on a 
modest scale, with one horse in Gill township. He came to Sullivan 
county when he was about sixteen years old. He continued to farm in 
Gill township until the autumn of 1904, and had come to be an extensive 
farmer at this time (1908), owning eight hundred acres, all in Gill town- 
ship. This man's career only shows what may be accomplished by per- 
sistent labor and good management, in a free country where every man 
may become the architect of his own fortune. Besides his extensive farm, 
he owns considerable property in Carlisle and in Riverside. California; 
also has about $25,000 in money loaned out in California. He is also a 



76 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

stockholder in the People's State Bank, at Carlisle. He began the founda- 
tion of this handsome financial success, by working on a farm by the 
month. He has ever been progressive and alive to all public enterprises, 
and was the first petitioner to secure gravel roads, as highways, in Sulli- 
van county, starting on Gill Prairie. About 1871, he in company with 
Samuel Hammell, made an effort to put in a levee in Gill township, along 
the Wabash river, but were defeated by three votes. He also took active 
part in the promotion of the levee which was constructed some years 
since. Politically, Mr. Funk is a firm believer in, and supporter of the 
cardinal principles of the Democratic party. He is an honored member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Carlisle, belonging to the 
subordinate lodge. 

February 11, 1869, marked an important epoch in his life. On that 
day he married Mary C. Blackburn, a native of Lawrence county, Illinois, 
who died at the age of thirty-five years, the mother of seven children, 
born in the following order: Estella, deceased; Lavada, died in infancy; 
the third and fourth children also died in infancy ; Arabelle, married G. 
W.. Allen, and died at the age of twenty- four j^ears, leaving daughters — 
Hattie and Erma, who are being cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Funk ; Nellie, 
deceased ; and George, deceased. 

For his second wife, Mr. Funk married ]\Iarch 23, 1883, Harriet 
Cochran, born in Lawrence county, October 18. 1854. She was educated 
in the county in which she was born. The children of this union all died 
in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Funk are members of the Christian church of 
which he served as an elder at Carlisle about twelve years. The last few 
winters, Mr. Funk has spent six months with his family, at Riverside, that, 
most beautiful winter resort in California. In August, 1890, he removed 
to Carlisle, where he now has a fine home residence. 



James W. Calvert^ one of the thoroughgoing agriculturists of 
Gill township, Sullivan county. Indiana, was born on Shaker Prairie, 
Knox county, Indiana, December 21, 1855. He is the son of 
Robert and Sarah (Snapp) Calvert. The father was a native of 
Kentucky and the mother of Indiana. The latter's parents were natives 
of Virginia. Robert Calvert, the father, was an early settler of Knox 
county, coming with his parents, both of whom died there. He con- 
tinued to live in Knox county and served from there in the Mexican 
war from 1846 to 1848, receiving a gunshot wound which caused his 
death in 1856, when his son of this notice was but one year old. The 
widow, later married and died in the autumn of i860. The children of 
Robert and Sarah (Snapp) Calvert were as follows: Mary, wife of Peter 
Price, of Carlisle; John, deceased: Ellen, widow Blann, of Oaktown, 
Knox county ; James W. of this notice. 

Left fatherless when but a babe of about a year old, James W. 
Calvert has never known the aid, and watch-care of a father's love and 
manly strength, to guide him. through the uncertain shoals of boyhood 



HISTORY OF SULLI\-AN COUNTY j-j 

and youth. His educational opportunities were limited. He attended the 
schools of his district and Carlisle a few terms. 

He made his home with an uncle in Carlisle, Indiana, until thirteen 
years of age, when he hired out to work for a farmer at twenty dollars 
the first year, and was defrauded out of this amount, including five dol- 
lars given him by his uncle as a present. However, the same unscrupulous 
man's father, out of shame and sympathy, bought young Calvert a suit of 
clothes. After this sad beginning, he found employment with another 
farmer at fifteen dollars a month and continued working there until 
twenty-seven years of age, when he purchased a team and the necessary 
implements and commenced farming in Knox county, remaining there 
about ten years. He kept "bachelor's hall" about three years, really a hard 
way in which to farm, but at all times he was cool and self-possessed. His 
next experience was in the purchase of a small farm in Gill township, 
which he soon sold and Ixiught twenty-two acres. Two years later, he 
bought forty acres in Haddon township, to which he added, in 1907, forty 
acres more, making altogether a farm of 102 acres at the present time. On 
this fine place, he carries on general and stock farming, paying especial 
attention to swine and horses. In his political views, he is in accord with 
those of the Democratic party, while in church faith, he adheres to that of 
the Christian denomination. At one time, he was connected with the Odd 
Fellows order, but at this date has no lodge affiliations. 

Mr. Calvert was happily united in marriage, February 12, 1885, to 
Miss Amanda O'Haver, daughter of Henry and Mary S. (Jewell) 
O'Haver, early settlers in Knox county, but who later removed to Sullivan 
county and the father still lives in Gill township, the mother having 
died several years ago. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Cal- 
vert : Arthur, deceased, and Urban B., unmarried, and employed in a 
wholesale meat house of Chicago. 



William Z. Payne has spent his entire life on the valuable home- 
stead on which he now resides, and which has been in the Payne 
family for three generations. He was born in Vigo county, Indiana, 
November 5, 1858, a son of Isaac T. and Emeline (Anderson) 
Payne and a grandson of Shadrach and Mary Payne, both of whom were 
born in Virginia. They were farming people there until their removal 
to Kentucky^ from whence they came to Sullivan county. Indiana, in 1835, 
and entered the one hundred and sixty acre farm which is now the home 
of their grandson William. They spent the remainder of their lives 
in this count V, and were the parents of seven children, of whom the fol- 
lowing two are now living: Bennett, at Oblong. Illinois, and Melvina 
Blackburn, a resident of Bedford. Indiana. 

Isaac T. Pavne. one of the sons of that family, was born during the 
residence of his 'parents in Kentucky, September 5, 1830. He too, was 
an agriculturist throughout his entire business life, and lived on his farm 
of eightv acres here "all his life, with the exception of ten years spent 



78 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

in Vigo county, his death occurring here in 1904. His wife died in 
1900. She was born in Fairbanks township, Suhivan county, i\Iay 18, 
1830, the same year as her husband, and their family numbered but two 
children, William Z. and his sister, ]\Iary Williams, whose home is in 
Vigo county. 

William Z. Payne, the younger, remained with his parents until their 
death, and on the 4th of September, 1879, he was married to Mary E. 
Martin, who was born in Middletown, Vigo county, Indiana, February 
4, 1858, a daughter of William and Violet Martin, the mother surviving 
her husband and residing in Sullivan. The four children of this union 
are : Walter F., who married Ida Harlan, and is one of the well known 
physicians of Middletown ; Bertha Marts, whose home is in Hamilton 
township ; James W., who married Lilly Thomson, and is a mail carrier 
of Shelburn ; and Claucie, at home. 

Mr. Payne began life for himself on his father's farm, which he 
purchased before the latter's death, and his estate now numbers eighty 
acres, and he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. His poli- 
tics are Democratic, and he is a member of both the Odd Fellows lodge, 
No. 420, at Shelburn, and of the Christian church, Mrs. Payne being also 
a member of that denomination. They are people of the highest worth 
of character, and Curry township -i-s- proud to claim them among her 
residents. ' . ' ■' ■ ' •' 



William L. Laxirent, who has attained prominence in the real 
estate circles of Sullivan countyj was born in Leopold, Perry 
county, Indiana, September 22, i'S75, a son of August and Catherine 
(Allard) Laurent, both of whom were of French descent, and 
the father was born in that country in 1846, while the mother was born 
in Perry county, Indiana, in 1852. August Laurent came with his 
parents to the United States when but seven years of age, the family 
locating in Leopold, Indiana, where they were farming people, but they 
died shortly after their emigration to this country. After the death of 
his parents August learned" the mason and marble cutters' trade, and 
followed those occupations until within a short time of his death, which 
occurred in 1901. He was a Republican politically, a Mason fraternally, 
and both he and his wife were members of the Catholic church. She is 
now living with her son William in Shelburn. Her parents, Francis and 
Mary (Belva) Allard, came from their native land of France to the 
United States about 1831, locating first in Kentucky, from whence they 
removed to Leopold, Indiana, and remained there during the rest of their 
lives. Mr. Allard was a merchant of that city until the breaking out of 
the Civil war, also a notarv, and after the close of the conflict he gar- 
dened and took care of his 'notary work, dying about 1888, at the age of 
eighty-seven years. His wife was seventy-five years of age at the tmie of 
her death in '1905. She was a member of a prominent and well known 
family in France. Nine children were born to August and Catherine 
Allard Laurent, namely: Joseph, who died when young; John, whose 



THE NEW YORK j 

PU-BLIC LIBRARY 

A5T0R, LENOX AND j 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. I 




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HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 79 

home is in Stoy, Illinois ; Edward, of Greenville, Indiana ; William L., who 
is mentioned later; Frank, whose home is in WilHsville, Illinois; August 
R., of Evansville, Indiana; Mamie, who is residing with her brother 
\\'illiam ; and Joseph and Henry, who died in infancy. 

After completing his education in the common schools William L. 
Laurent worked in a general mercantile store for two and a half years, 
having charge of the postoffice at the same time, and during the ten 
years following this period he worked in the mines. Coming to Shelburn, 
Indiana, in March of 1903, he opened a real estate and insurance office 
here, and is now the proprietor of a real estate, loan, insurance, collection 
and rental office, enjoying a large and lucrative patronage. In politics he 
is a stanch Republican, and takes an active part in the local councils of 
his party, while at the present time he is serving as the committeenian of 
his precinct, tie believes in the .social organizations for the protection of 
the laboring men, and while at the mines he was an active member of 
the mine organizations. His fraternal relations connect him with the 
Red Men, Utah Tribe No. 213, at Shelburn, with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, lodge No. 603 at Hymera, and with the auxiliaries of 
both orders ; with the^K. of C. council No. 541, Terre Haute, Indiana, and 
with the Modern Woodmen of America, camp 13563, Shelburn, Indiana. 

The marriage of Mr. Laurent-' w^a peletjlired September 26, 1906, 
at St. Mary's church at Sulliyaui Jti;(iiana,w1ieii, Sadie M. Stadley became 
his wife. She was born in Greensbufg, 'In'dlana.'a daughter of Edward 
and Julia Stadley, the latter deceased, but the father is now living in 
Shelburn. He farmed until he GanT,e"Jie¥e-'i#9^05.: 

John Ridgewav. deceased, who in his lifetime lived in Fairbanks 
township and was numbered among the most thrifty and successful 
farmers of Sullivan county, was born in Gill township, four miles west 
of Sullivan. January 13, 1851. He was the son of Otho and Nancy E. 
( Pinkston ) Ridgeway, natives of Kentucky. The parents came to Sulli- 
van county, Indiana, as children, and when old enough were married. 
Thev ovvued a farm in Turman township until the death of the father 
in 1863. His wife, now eighty-one years old, lives with her children. 

There were four sons and four daughters in this family and the 
third born of the four sons was John Ridgeway of this memoir. He 
attended the district schools until twelve years of age, at which time 
his father died, and afterward he, with his older brother Albert, con- 
ducted the home farm until Albert married and then John carried on 
the place until after his own marriage, July 30, 1871, to Violet Kelley. 
She was born in Fairbanks township, a daughter of Perry and Martha 
(Whitlock) Kelley, both natives of Kentucky. A few years later Mr. 
Ridgeway purchased a farm of his own in Fairbanks township, upon 
which he erected a large two-story house in 1882, having previously 
buUt the barns. The old one-story house on the place is still in use as a 
cellar and smokehouse. This farm contains one hundred and seventy-one 
Vol. n— 6 



8o HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

acres, fifty acres being in timber land, which 'Xlr. Ridgeway cleared off 
and placed under good cultivation. The farmhouse is in fine view of 
the famous and picturesque Wabash valley, and the house is surrounded 
by beautiful shade and ornamental trees. Besides this homestead ]\Ir. 
Ridgeway secured for himself three hundred and sixty acres on the 
river bottoms, six hundred and forty acres in Kiowa county, Kansas, 
and one hundred and six acres in Clark county, Illinois, and several 
other places within the state of Indiana. He always followed farming 
for his occupation, and in it achieved merited success. He made a 
specialty of stock raising in conjunction with his agricultural operations. 

Mr. Ridgeway was twice married, first to Violet Kelley on July 
30, 1871. By her he had the following children: Otho C, born December 
30, 1874, died September 5, 1875; Carsa E., April 5, 1877, now Airs. 
George Adams, of Vigo county, Indiana; Harold G., born May 6, 1883, 
died May 25, 1883. Mrs. Ridgeway died June 8, 1883. For his second 
wife Mr. Ridgeway married, December 24, 1884, Jerusha A. Rose, born 
in Tunnan township January 24, 1866. a daughter of John T. and 
Rebecca (Drake) Rose. The father was born in North Carolina and the 
mother in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, Indiana. The grand- 
parents were Thomas and Jerusha Rose. By his last marriage the 
children born to Mr. Ridgeway were: Lora A., born April 26, 1887, a 
student in Georgetown College, entering in 1904, is now Mrs. Thomas 
M. Durham, of Turman township, and Hervey J., born August 7, 1896, 
entered Notre Dame College January 2, 1909, for collegiate training. 

Mr. Ridgeway died February 3, 1905. He was a Republican in 
politics and was a member of the Odd Fellows' order at Graysville. In 
church . connections he was a Methodist, a member of the Kingsley 
chapel in Fairbanks township, as is also his wife. 



John H. Allen, the well known furniture dealer and under- 
taker of Farmersburg, has been engaged in business in this city 
since 1904, when he sold his farm and bought the furniture and 
undertaking business where he is now established. He studied under- 
taking under efficient directions, and also has a diploma from the Barnes 
School of Anatomy and Sanitary Science of Embalming. 

Mr. Allen was born in Linton township of Vigo county, Indiana, 
April 24, 1863, a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Williams) Allen, and a 
grandson of Josiah and Rebecca Allen, both of whom were born in Ire- 
land. They came to America before their marriage, living for a time in 
Virginia, removing some time after their marriage to Kentucky, where 
Mr. Allen followed his professions of surveying, and school teaching, 
having been an efficient teacher for sixty years. He also owned a farm 
there. There were eleven children in their family, but none are now 
living, and among the number was Robert, who was born in Spencer 
countv, Kentucky" March 28, 1814, and when sixteen years of age he 



HISTORY OF SULLI\AX COUNTY 8i 

graduated from Uacon CoUcsje in Kentucky. During the remainder of 
his Hfe he taught school and farmed, coming to \'igo county soon after 
his marriage, and he resided there during the remainder of his life, dying 
on the 23d of December, 1891. His wife, Elizabeth Williams, was born 
in Bullitt county, Kentucky, October g, 1820, and died on the 27th of 
June, 1892. She was his third wife, and they had six children: Robert C, 
who was born on the old homestead farm in Linton township, July 14, 
1866, married Gertrude Risinger, and yet resides on the homestead ; 
Sarah A. Allen, born August 29, 1861. married Charles P. Miller and 
lives in Terre Haute; John H., the subject of this review; and Hannah 
E., born December 29, 1867. became the wife of Thomas L. Davis and 
lives in Linton township, Vigo county. 

John H. Allen remained at home until his marriage, in the meantime 
studying surveying and civil engineering under his father, and after his 
marriage he located on a farm in Linton township, Vigo countv, owning 
one himdred and twenty acres, and during his residence on the farm he 
served for five years and three months as a trustee. In February of 1904 
he sold his farm, and after traveling for a year came to Farmersburg and 
purchased the furniture and undertaking business where he is now located. 
His politics are Democratic, and he is a member of the town board and 
the president of the financial board. He is also a member of the Grange, 
in Linton township, Vigo county, Indiana. 

On the 1st of November. i8g6, Mr. Allen was married to Manna 
Russell, who was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, March 23, 1872, a 
daughter of Spencer and Elizabeth ( Gaskins ) Russell. The mother was 
also born in Sullivan county, April 15, 1838, and she died in March of 
1891, while the father was born January 11, 1826, in Spencer county, 
Kentucky, and died in Vigo county, Indiana, May 9, 1905. He was a 
farmer all his life. Mrs. Allen has been a member of the Church of 
Christ since she was thirteen vears of age. 



A]M.\ND.\ ( De Baun) SHERii.\x. — Mrs. Sherman has spent many 
years of her life in Sullivan county, and is loved and honored for her 
many sterling characteristics, for her Christian character and for her life 
of usefulness and helpfulness. She was born near Middletown, in Vigo 
county, Indiana, August 13, 1840. a daughter of Samuel and Phvlinda 
(Shattuck) De Baun. The father was born on the 14th of January, 
1820, in Mercer county, Kentucky, and is now living with his daughter 
in Farmersburg, but the mother, born April 2, 1817, in the state of New 
York, died on the 14th of February, 1866. 

Samuel De Baun is a son of Samuel, Sr., a native of Kentucky, and 
he in turn was a son of Joseph De Baun, who was of French descent and 
was a stone mason throughout his life. His son Samuel embraced the 
occupation of agriculture. He came to Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1831 
and died here in 1833, of cholera. His wife, two of his own children and 



82 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

a son-in-law were also stricken with the dread disease and died. There 
were nine children in the family of Samuel De Baun, but all are now 
deceased with the exception of the son Samuel. 

Samuel De Baun, Jr., was only thirteen years of age when his father 
died, and he was yet in his teens when he engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, but after his marriage he turned his attention to farming in Vigo 
county and became the owner of sevent3r-two acres of land. He left the 
farm after the death of his wife in 1866, and three years afterward, in 
1869, he married Susan Earnest, and in the same year went to Shelby- 
ville, Illinois, where he was engaged in the coal business until the death 
of his second wife in 1886. Coming then to Sullivan county, Indiana, he 
was engaged in buying and selling live stock until his retirement in 
1904. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. De Baun, five are 
now living, namely : Amanda, who is mentioned later ; William S., who 
was born December 13, 1841, and resides in El Reno, Oklahoma; Mar- 
garet A., born February 26, 1843, resides in Farmersburg; Alonzo, born 
April II, 1845, 'I'sd in infancy; Phylinda and Hilinda, twins, born 
December 23, 1846, died in infancy; Emily R., born November 9, 1848, 
resides in Farmersburg; and Isabelle A., born July 18, 1851, is also a 
resident of Farmersburg. 

Mrs. Sherman was left motherless when she was quite young, and for 
over twenty years in her early life she taught school in Sullivan county. 
On the 22d of September, 1895, she gave her hand in marriage to Thomas 
K. Sherman, who was born seven miles west of Sullivan, on the 26th 
day of September, 1829, and died on the 30th of September, 1903. During 
the latter part of his life he was engaged in the mercantile business, and 
was very highly respected by all who knew him. He was an earnest 
Christian worker, and was an elder in his church, at one time the only 
one holding the office in the church. One of the most cherished posses- 
sions in the home of Mrs. Sherman is an old family Bible which has been 
handed down from generation to generation in the De Baun family and 
is now in the possession of Samuel De Baun. At his death it descends to 
the next oldest living relative. The Bible is a Holland edition, for its 
first possessor lived in that country, and it is supposed to be several hun- 
dred years old, by some said to be six hundred years old, and it has been 
in America for over three hundred years. Mrs. Sherman is a member of 
the Christian church, and is an earnest and efficient worker in the cause 
of Christianity. 



S.AMUEL C. Smock, who is farming in Curry township, traces his 
descent to his great-grandfather on the paternal side, Barnett Smock, 
whose son, Henry Smock, Sr., and his wife, Anna De Baun, were born 
in Kentucky and there followed agricultural pursuits. Among their chil- 
dren was Henry Smock. Jr., who was born in Kentucky, June 5, 1806. 
and before his marriage he came to Sullivan county, Indiana, with his 
parents, and located in Curry township, where they entered land from the 
government. He continued as a farmer throughout his entire life and 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 83 

owned at tlie time of his death one huiich-cd and ten acres of land. From 
the Whigs he transferred his pohtical allegiance to the Republican party 
at the time of the organization of that division, and was a faithful and 
earnest member of the Christian church. In his early life he married 
Elizabeth Carruthers, who was born in Kentucky, August 18, 1807, and 
(lied on the 4th of February, 1888, in Sullivan county, surviving her hus- 
band but three years, for his death occurred oh the 30th of April, 1885. 
He was of Holland descent. In their family were nine children, namely : 
Nancy J. Nelson, who was born June 11, 1832, and died January 31, 1887 ; 
Francis M., born February i, 1835, died May 22, 1872; William II.. 
born July 27, 1837, went out during the Civil war as a recruit, but did 
not reach his regiment, and his death occurred on the loth of April, 1865 ; 
Sarah A. I'ittman, born November i, 1841, died June 15. 1891 ; James B. 
and J(_ihn A., twins, born October 29, 1840, died in infancy ; Mary A., 
born December i, 1839, died in infancy; Samuel C, whose name intro- 
duces this review; and Abraham, born August 26, 1846, died I-'ebruary 
26, 1905. 

On the nth of August, 1862, Samuel C. Smock enlisted with Com- 
panv H, Eighty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served as a private 
until the 12th of June, 1865, in the meantime participating in many of 
the hard fought battles of the war, including those of Resaca, New Hope 
Church, Thomson Station, Culp's Farm and Peach Tree Creek. After 
the war had ended he returned to his home, and after his marriage he 
rented his father's farm, thus continuing until the death of his father, 
when he rented fifty-three acres and now owns an estate of ninety-one 
acres three-quarters of a mile southwest of Farmersburg. 

Mr. Smock married, February i, 1871, Elizabeth Collins, who was 
born in Hancock county, Indiana, May 28, 1852, a daughter of William 
and Elizabeth (Snyder) Collins, both now deceased. The six children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Smock are: Ida E. Heck, born November 20, 1871, 
resides in Jackson township, Sullivan county ; Maggy and Mary, twins, 
born October 5, 1874, but the former died in infancy and the latter is the 
wife of Ben Gaskins, of Farmersburg; Clella, born July 19, 1878, is the 
wife of William V. Allen, and is living in Terre Haute; Dora Criss, 
born June 13, 1881, resides in Farmersburg; and Roy, born December 19, 
1885, is teaching school. Mr. Smock votes with the Republican party, 
and fraternallv is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
Lodge No. 622, at Farmersburg, in which he has filled all the offices and 
has represented the order as a delegate to the Grand Lodge. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Christian church. 



Francis R. W.\llace has for many years been prominently identified 
with the agricultural life of Sullivan county, owning a valuable and well 
improved farm in Curry township, but he was born in Washington county, 
Pennsvlvania, January 28, 1826, a son of William and ]\Iary (Reeder) 
\\'allace. The" mother was born in England, and coming to the United 



84 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

States with her parents. WilHam and Mary Reeder, they located in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, but the father only lived about a year after coming 
to this country. His life occupation was farming. William Wallace was 
born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, and died in Jackson township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana. He was a millwright as well as farmer, and 
coming to Hamilton township of this county in 1840, he entered land here 
at that time and assisted in building the first jail in Sullivan and also the 
first horse mill in Sullivan county. This mill was located just east of the 
town of Sullivan, and he also built several other mills here, thus assisting 
materially in the early development of this community. Nine children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wallace, namely: Harriette and Maria, who 
are deceased ; Louisa, who has never married and resides in Curryville ; 
Sarah M. and Henry, who have also passed away ; Francis R., who is 
mentioned later ; and Edwin, Charles and Mary Jane, deceased. 

After the death of his father, Francis R. Wallace entered eighty acres 
of land and also rented an additional twenty-five acres and continued 
actively identified with the agricultural interests of Curry township until 
his retirement a few years ago, his children now conducting his farm of 
two hundred acres. 

The marriage of Mr. Wallace was celebrated on the 28th of April, 
1864, when Anna Grant became his wife. She is a daughter of Peter 
Grant, formerly from Scotland. Peter Grant was an educated man and 
taught in Logan, Ohio, and in Sullivan, Indiana, in both high and com- 
mon schools. He was educated at Edinburgh, Scotland, and he came to 
the United States when a young man. having spent a number of weeks 
in crossing the Atlantic ocean. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace have five living 
children and all are at home, namel}' : William H., Anna M.. Francis 
Marion, Caroline and Ada. The family are members of the Presbyterian 
church, and the children are especially active in the work of that denomi- 
nation. 



Luther P.vtten, who is numbered among the prominent farmers of 
Curry township, was born in Fairbanks township of Sullivan county, 
Octoijer 28, 1866, a son of Milton and a grandson of jMiles and Elizabeth 
(Bundy) Patten, who were prominent early residents of Fairbanks town- 
ship. Miles Patten was a life-long tiller of the soil, and he came from 
Ohio to this section of Indiana in an early day in its history. 

Milton Patten, their son, was born in Fairbanks township, January 
15, 1843, and after attaining to years of maturity on his father's farm 
and receiving a common school education in the schools of the neighbor- 
hood he, in the spring of 1866, bought twenty acres of land and farmed 
it for three years. Selling the land then he bought forty acres near by, 
but after ten years on that place sold the land and bought the one hundred 
and sixty acres in Curry township which he yet owns and lives upon. 
He married Anna Dilley, but she died in March of 1880, leaving four 
children : Luther, who is mentioned later : Delia Taylor, a resident of 
Curry township; Ora E., who married Hud Hill and lives in Shelburn; 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 85 

and Annie Drake, of Fairbanks township. The father was a second time 
married, wedding Mrs. Lucy (Clark) Hopewell, a daughter of Hamilton 
and Nancy (All) Clark, who were burn in Kentucky. By her first mar- 
riage to Sedlcy M. Hopewell, Mrs. fatten had two children, Sedley M, 
and Arthur, the latter residing in Farmersburg. Mr, Hopewell was a 
native son of Sullivan county and one of its life-long farmers, his death 
occurring here in May of 1880, Mrs. Patten was born September 16, 
1848, and both she and' her husband are members of the Christian church, 
and he is a Democrat in politics. 

Luther Patten remained at home until his marriage, February 19, 
1888, to his step-sister, Nancy Hopewell, who was born November 5, 
1869, to Sedley and Lucy Hopewell, and during the first year following 
their marriage the young couple lived at home. During the two subse- 
quent years they farmed on rented land in Curry township, and Mr, 
Patten then built on forty acres which belonged to his wife, and that was 
their home for twelve years. In 1904 they sold their forty-acre tract and 
bought their present homestead of one hundred acres, located three miles 
southwest of Farmersburg, and the estate now contains one hundred and 
twenty-six acres. Mr. Patten carries on both general farming and stock 
raising. 

The three children born of this union are: Ira M., born May 27, 
1890, is attending the high school at Farmersburg; Ruth, born February 
9, 1897, is a pupil in the public schools; and Esther, born March 14, 1903. 
Mr. Patten is a Democrat in his political views, and the family are mem- 
bers of the Church of Christ, in which he is serving as a trustee. 



Tames S. F)OLixger, the owner of one of the finest estates in Curry 
township, has been identified with the agricultural interests of Sullivan 
county throughout his entire business career, and is one of its most promi- 
nent farmers and stock raisers. He was born in Mason county, Ken- 
tuckv, July 9, 1854, a son of William H, and Victoria (Close) Bolinger, 
and a grandson of William H., Sr., and Susan Bolinger. The senior Mr. 
Bolinger was the projirietor of one of the first glass factories of Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, liotli he and his wife were born in Germany, coming 
to this country after their marriage, and after disposing of his glass fac- 
tory he became the owner of a cigar factory, but disposing of this also, he 
moved to a farm in Mason county and lived there until his death,, both 
he and his wife spending the later years of their lives in the home of 
their son William. 

William H. Bolinger, Jr., was born in Mason county, Kentucky. July 
24, 1821, and died April 13, 1906. He remained with his parents until his 
marriage and then began farming in Mason county, operating the old 
familv homestead, and after the death of his parents he bought the iarm 
of one hundred and thirty acres. In Alarch of 1865 he moved to Hamil- 
ton township, Sullivan county, Indiana, purchasing what was then known 



86 HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 

as the William McGrew farm of one hundred and seventj'-two acres. In 
1903 he left this place, and thereafter lived a retired life among his chil- 
dren until his death, dying on the 13th of April, 1906, on the farm on 
which his son James now resides. He was a member of both the Odd 
Fellows and Masonic orders, and was a Republican in his political affilia- 
tions. He helped to organize the Shelburn Baptist church and became one 
of its most active and helpful members, serving the congregation in the 
capacities of deacon and trustee until his good and useful life was ended 
in death. His wife was also a member of that church. She was born 
in PVance, in 1825, and when eight years of age came with her father, 
Charles Close, and his family to the United States, locating in Maysville, 
Kentucky, where he became the keeper of the toll gate. The daughter, 
Mrs. Bolinger, died on the 24th of October, 1889, after becoming the 
mother of eight children: Carrie, who was born March 20, 1845, niar- 
ried William O. White, and, after his death, Samuel Carruthers, and she 
died October 6, 1900; John H., born May 31, 1847, married Elizabeth 
Siner, and lives in Curry township ; Charles B., born September 8, 1849, 
married, first, Barbara Sparks, and, after her death, Mary A. Dix. and 
his home is in Shelburn ; William T., born March 14, 1852, married Arpy 
Curry and lives in Hamilton township ; James S., the subject of this 
review; Annety, bom September 30, 1856, married Grace All and lives 
in Terre Haute ; Frederick J., born January 14, 1859, married Anna 
Osborn and lives in Curry township ; and Edward S., born February 8, 
1866. died August 3, 1883. 

The early youth of James S. Bolinger was spent on the farm and in 
school, and after his marriage he lived on a rented farm in Curry town- 
ship for one year, and then, in 1882, moved to his present homestead, 
which he rented during the first four years and then purchased. The 
homestead contains one hundred and sixty acres of rich and fertile land, 
well improved and cultivated, and he devotes much of his attention to 
the raising of stock, breeding principally the registered O. I. C. hogs. 

The marriage of Mr. Bolinger occurred on the 3d of February, 1881, 
to Marv A. Chesnut, born in Curry township. October 16, 1858. a daugh- 
ter of James E. and Lidia A. (Douglas) Chesnut, the father born in 
Kentucky, April 7, 1833, and the mother in Curry township, April 28, 
1833, and both are now living on a farm in Wilson county, Kansas. 
James E. Chesnut is a son of James E., Sr., and Nancy (Burton) Chesnut, 
North Carolinians by birth, and they were farming people. The four 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bolinger are : William D.. born November 
30, 1881, married Clennie Jennings and lives in Farmersburg; James E., 
born December 12, 1886, married Emma Able and resides on his father's 
farm; Herman, born October 2"]. 1889. is attending school; and Hazel, 
born May 8, 1897, is also in school. The Republican party receives J\Ir. 
Bolinger's stanch support and co-operation, and he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 420, at Shelburn, in which 
lie has filled all the offices and served as a delegate to the Grand Lodge, 
and also belongs to the Encampment. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bolinger and 
one son are members of the Baptist church at Shelburn. 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AN COUNTY 87 

Andrew Thomson. — The Thomson family is one of the oldest in 
SulHvan coiuity, and was founded here by the grandparents of Andrew, 
Enoch and Lucy (Clark) Thomson, in 1816, the former a native of the 
state of New York. On arriving in Sullivan county they located in Fair- 
banks township and entered land there. This was about the time of the 
admission of the state to the Union, and Enoch Thomson became promi- 
nent in the public life of his community, following farming throughout 
his entire life for a livelihood, and for those early days he was also quite 
extensively engaged in the raising of stock. 

Reuben Thomson, his son, also became ]5roniinently identified with 
the stock interests of Sullivan county, and owned about four hundred 
acres of land in Fairbanks township. That township was his birthplace, 
on the 5th of September, 1827, and the scene of his death, on the 24th of 
December, 1907. His politics were Democratic, and he was very promi- 
nent in the public life of his community, and he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. She bore the maiden name of Emily McKin- 
ney, and was born in Fairbanks township in 1827, and is now living there 
with a daughter, aged eighty-three years. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomson was blessed by the birth of nine children, of whom six are now 
living: John, who married Jane Frakes and resides in Curry township; 
Rachael Trueblood, whose home is in Fairbanks township ; Ezra, who 
married Nancy Lloyd, and their home is in Jackson township ; Amanda 
Able, residing in Turman township; Price, of Fairbanks township; and 
Andrew. 

The last named, Andrew Thomson, was born in Fairbanks township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana, October 14, 1865, and he remained at home and 
worked on the farm until his marriage, which occurred on the 24th of 
July, 1886, to Myra Pittman, who was born on the 9th of March, 1866, 
also in Fairbanks township, a daughter of David and Sarah Pittman, 
both now deceased. The young couple spent the first four years of their 
married life on her father's farm, but in 1890 Mr. Thomson bought the 
farm where he now lives, three and a half miles west of Farmersburg, in 
Curry township. The homestead contains two hundred and thirty acres 
of rich and fertile land, and in addition he also owns property in Farmers- 
burg. During the past two years he has lived retired from an active busi- 
ness life, and in 1905 he and his wife went to Arizona in search of renewed 
health, returning in 1907, and he has been here ever since, but on the 
17th of January, 1908, the wife died, leaving her husband and three small 
children, namely: Audie, born April 9, 1893; Clare, born December 29, 
1896; and Velsie, born December 10, 1902. She was buried at the Drake 
cemetery at Fairbanks. She was a prominent and worthy member of the 
Baptist church, as is also Mr. Thomson, who is prominent in the public, 
social and business life of his township and is a Democrat politically. 



Albert ]M. Lane. — Curry township numbers among its prominent 
farmers and stock raisers Albert AI. Lane, who was born in Washington 
county. Indiana, November 5. 1854, a son of Charles and Christena (Lee) 



88 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Lane, born respective!}- in Kentucky, in February, 1817, and in Barringer 
county, North Carolina, in 1812. Charles Lane was a son of Joel Lane, 
who was born in Kentucky, but moved with his parents to Washington 
county, Indiana, when twelve years of age, and in 1865 he came to Curry 
township, and, purchasing eighty acres of land, spent the remainder of 
his life here. Christena Lane was a daughter of James Lee. who was of 
English birth, and came from North Carolina to Washington county. 
Indiana, in 1815, and spent the remainder of his life there. He was a 
slave owner in North Carolina, but sold his negroes before coming to 
Indiana, where he was the owner of estate of four hundred acres at the 
time of his death. Charles Lane was a farmer throughout his lifetime, 
owning an estate of forty acres in Curry township at the time of his death, 
which occurred in July of 1892, his wife surviving him until March 
of 1902. 

Albert M. Lane was their only child, and he remained at home with 
his parents until his marriage, when he bought eighty acres in Gill town- 
ship. After six years there he sold that land and bought his present home- 
stead farm of sixty acres, and he also owns twenty acres two miles east 
of Shelburn, where he has conducted a saw mill since 1902. 

Mr. Lane married, November 13, 1881, Jennie Curtis, who was 
born in Hamilton township of Sullivan county, February 15, 1864, a 
daughter of James R. and Olive J. Curtis, who are living in Gill township, 
and she is a granddaughter of Gideon and Elizabeth Curtis, natives 
respectively of Maryland and North Carolina, and of William and Lucy 
Mooney. who are living in Lafayette, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Lane have 
two children, Leola, born October 8, 1886, and Elma, born November 5, 
1892. The wife and mother is a member of the Christian church. Mr. 
Lane gives his political support to the Republican party. 



J.\MES H. Conner, one of Curry township's farmers and stock raisers, 
was born in Hamilton township, Sullivan county, Indiana, April 21, 1873, 
a son of Isaac and Mahala (Severns) Conner. Immediately after their 
marriage they came from Ohio to Sullivan county, Indiana, locating one 
mile northwest of the town of Sullivan, where the husband and father 
entered eighty acres of land in the dense woods. After a time he traded 
that farm for the place where his widow now resides, owning two hundred 
and seventy-eight acres in that. farm and two hundred and eighty acres 
in another tract, all in Hamilton township. He was one of the most pros- 
perous agriculturists of the community, and his was one of the best stock 
farms in the county. He was well known and honored in the community 
in which he so long made his home, a stanch Democrat and an active 
poKtical worker, and he died at his home in Hamilton township June 25, 
1902, being laid to rest in Wall's cemetery. He was born in Holmes 
county, Ohio, in 1833. and his wife was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, 
and. as above stated, is now living at her home northwest of Sullivan. 
She is an earnest and faithful member of the Christian church, as was 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 89 

also her husband, and he assisted in the erection of many of the houses of 
worship in this community. They raised a large family of ten children, 
as follows ; I'rank, who married Martha Barnes and resides in Sullivan ; 
Eva and Emma, twins, but the latter died at the age of thirty years, while 
the former married John Wilson and is living in Turman township ; 
Samuel, who married .Stella Marts and is living in Hamilton township; 
Flora, the wife of John Woodward, of Hamilton township ; Stewart, who 
is with his mother; Lou, wife of Frank Wible, of Sullivan; James H., 
who is mentioned later; Gertrude, the wife of J. H. Parks, of Sulli- 
van; and Myrtle, who became the wife of Ben Mattix and is living in 
Hamilton township. 

James H. Conner remained at home and worked with his father until 
his marriage, and after that event he continued to farm the old homestead 
for four years, when he went to Terre Haute and for two years was 
employed on public works there. Returning at the close of that period to 
his mother's farm, he lived there for one year and then located on a farm 
four miles northwest of Sullivan, and from there in 1907 he came to his 
present homestead one and a half miles northeast of Shelburn, which he 
purchased at that time. The farm contains eighty-two acres of excellent 
and well improved land, and Mr. Conner is engaged in both grain and 
stock farming. 

On the 1st of November, i8g6, he was married to Maud Dailey, a 
native of Paxton, Indiana, born January 9, 1880, a daughter of John and 
Martha (Arnett) Dailey, and a granddaughter of John Dailey and E. W. 
and Martha (Purcell) Arnett. Mrs. Conner's great-grandmother, Nellie 
Purcell, was born and reared in Sullivan county, and is now the oldest 
living representative of five generations of her family, and her home is 
in Paxton. E. W. Arnett survives his wife and is living on a farm north 
of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Conner have two children, Isaac Leland and 
Leo D., born respectively March 25, 1898, and June 26, 1901, and both 
are attending school. Mr. and Mrs. Conner hold to the religion of the 
Christian church, and he is a stanch supporter of Democratic principles. 



Eli C. Bolks, an agriculturist of Curry township, Sullivan county, 
was born in Hamilton township of this county December 16, 1845, and is 
a member of one of the county's oldest families. His paternal grandfather, 
Edmond Boles, Sr., was a native of Virginia, but soon after his marriage 
he came to Sullivan county and became enrolled among its earliest pio- 
neers. He was a farmer throughout his entire business career, and died 
on the land which he entered here. 

Edmond Boles, Jr., his son and namesake, was born in Gill town- 
ship, Sullivan county, Indiana, about 1832, and was reared to the life of 
an agriculturist here. After his marriage he rented land for about a year 
and then bought a farm of forty acres in Turman township, but selling 
that tract he became the owner of another farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in the same township. In August of 1862 he enlisted with the 



90 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Seventy-first Indiana Regiment, Company I, as a private, for service in 
the Civil war, and he continued as a brave and loyal soldier until his 
honorable discharge in June of 1865, in the meantime having been cap- 
tured at Muldraugh Hill, Kentucky. Among the battles in which he par- 
ticipated were those of Atlanta and Nashville, and following the close of 
his war period he returned to his farm in Sullivan county and continued 
to reside there until his death in 1899. He was a stanch Republican 
politically and an earnest member of the Christian church. His wife, nee 
Jemima Bundy, was born in North Carolina, but came to Indiana with 
her parents when she was a child. In their family were seven children : 
Eli C, who is mentioned later : William R., a resident of Cass township, 
Sullivan county; Myra F., the wife of a Mr. Swift, and they reside 
on the home farm in Turman township ; Caleb, whose home is in Texas ; 
Commodore, also of Turman township ; Lew. W., who resides in Sullivan; 
and Jennie Whitman, also of Sullivan. 

Eli C. Boles, remained on the home farm with his parents until his 
marriage, and then establishing a home of his own he rented for two 
years, or until he bought eighty acres of land in Turman township, which 
was his home for twelve years. He then became the owner of one hundred 
and twenty acres on the county line, but after two years he traded the land 
for one hundred and twenty acres where he now lives, two and a half 
miles northeast of Shelburn, in Curry township. He is a stanch supporter 
of the Republican party, and is active in both the business and public life 
of his community. 

On the 24th of December, 1879, Mr. Boles was married to Josephine 
Brown, a daughter of Perry and Caroline Brown, who are now living in 
Turman township. Five children have been born of this union, namely : 
Arthur, who married Minnie Rook, by whom he has one child, Aurilla 
Josephine, and the family reside in Harrisburg; Edgar and Ernest, at 
home ; Oscar, who is attending school ; and Maud, a stenographer in 
Indianapolis, Indiana. I\Ir. and Mrs. Boles are members of the Christian 
church. 



Elias G. Denney, who is farming one of the valuable homestead 
farms of Curry township, is a son of John W. S. and Sarah (Gaskins) 
Denney, and was born in Curry township June 14, 1853. John W. S. 
Denney was born December 9. 1809, in Kentucky, and in his early man- 
hood he went from that state to Monroe county, Indiana, with his father, 
William Denney, who lived the remainder of his life in that county. The 
son W'as there married, and about 1850, with his young wife, he came to 
Curry township and entered eighty acres of land two miles west of 
Farmersburg, but, selling that tract, went to Vigo county, this state, in 
1867, and bought eighty acres, which he sold in 1881, and returning to 
Curry township, bought the old Spencer farm of one hundred and thirty- 
four acres, two and a half miles northwest of Shelburn. After disposing 
of that farm he retired from an active business life and lived among his 
children until his death in January of 1889. He was a Republican, and 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AN COUNTY 91 

both he anil his wife were members of the Methodist ciuirch. She was 
born in W ashington county, Indiana, April 6, 1816, and died on the 3d 
of March, 1896, in Fairbanks township. There were eleven children in 
their family, namely : William, who is residing in Sullivan ; Mary Cowen, 
deceased ; Margaret Mitchell, of Middletown : Elizabeth Pogue, also of 
Middletovvn; John, whose home is in Farmersburg; America B. Mitchell, 
deceased; Rose Dilley, of Fairbanks; Elias G., wdio is mentioned later; 
Emeline Watson, deceased ; Samuel, of Chicago, Illinois ; and E. Clay, 
a resident of Springfield, Illinois. 

Passing from the common schools t(i the seminary at Farmersburg, 
Elias G. Denney received a good educational training and for five years 
was a school teacher. After his marriage he bought eighty-five acres of 
the farm where he now lives, two and a half miles north of Shelburn, 
and later added thirty-five acres to his original purchase, thus increasing 
the boundaries of his farm to one hundred and twenty acres, one of the 
best improved estates in the township, and he is engaged in both grain 
and stock farming. 

On the 9th of February, 1878, Mr. Denney was married to Mary 
Dilley, who was born in Fairbanks township of Sullivan county October 
31, 1856, a daughter of Jonathan R. and Adeline (Henry) Dilley, both 
of whom were born in Kentucky, and both are now deceased. The father 
was a life-long farmer, and during the Civil war he served for three years 
in Company I, Seventy-first Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
serving under Grant. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Denney, namely: Grace, who was born in Curry township. May 26, 1879, 
married William Bennett; James G., born March 21, 1881, is the cashier 
at the interurban station in Terre Haute: Baxter, born August 29, 1883, 
is teaching school: Wade, born March 4, 1889, is at home; Gertrude, 
born Jamiarv 15, 1894, is attending school; and one, the fourth born, 
died in infancy. Mr. Denney votes with the Republican party. He is an 
earnest and faithful member of the Church of Christ, as is also his wife, 
and he has preached the gospel during the past twenty years. His path 
has been ever upward through life, and he is numbered among the truest 
and best citizens of Curry township. 



Cora A. C.\se is a native daughter of Sullivan county, born on the 
14th of October, 1868. and she is a member of one of its best known and 
most honored families. She is a daughter of William F. and Jane C. 
( Boone) Case and a granddaughter of James and Elizabeth Case, both of 
wdiom were born in Kentucky. Coming to Sullivan county, Indiana, they 
located in Curry township about the year 1820, and entered land from 
the government, becoming in time prominent farming people of the county. 
There were ten children in their family who grew to years of maturity, 
seven sons and three daughters, namely : Hiram, Daniel, John, George, 
Fannie A.. James, Sarah, Alfred, Cynthia J. and William, all now 
deceased. The father and all of his sons with the exception of John 



92 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

served in the Civil war, and James, Sr., George and Hiram were members 
of the Eighty-fifth Regiment. 

.William Case served with the Thirty-first Regiment of Yolunteer 
Infantry, and was wounded once during his army career. After the war 
he came to Sullivan and worked at the saddlery trade until about 1870, 
when he bought a farm of seventy-seven acres in Jackson township, and 
lived there until his retirement and removal to Terre Haute in 1900, which 
was his home until his death in 1902, on the 20th of June. He was born 
on the 19th of December, 1834, in Hamilton township, and his life of use- 
fulness and honor covered many years in Sullivan county. Mrs. Case 
was born in Gill township on the 26th of July, 1835, and their union was 
blessed by the birth of the following children : ' Henry, who was born 
May 17, 1858, and is living in Wellington, Kansas; Lana B., born 
December 3, 1859, resides in Jackson township; Mary, born November 
8. 1861, died December 4, 1864; William M., born October 28, 1864, 
resides in Jackson township; Sarah J., born October 26, 1866, is a resi- 
dent of Terre Haute ; Cora A., who is mentioned below ; Mar}' M., born 
July 30, 1871, died September 17, 1872; Daniel, born February 3, 1873, 
resides in Terre Haute; and Fred, born November i, 1875, is a resident 
of Vigo county, Indiana. 

Cora A. Case passed from the district schools and those of Sullivan 
to the state normal at Terre Haute, and after completing her studies there 
she taught for fifteen years. In 1892 she bought forty acres 'of land in 
this county, to which she later added a tract of thirty-seven acres, but in 
1903 she sold that farm and bought the place where she now resides, three 
miles west of Shelburn in Curry townsliip. Her farm contains one hun- 
dred and sixteen acres of rich and fertile land, and she oversees the work 
of the entire tract and raises a great deal of stock. She is a lady whom 
to know is to honor and respect. 



James H. Stuck, a prominent farmer in Curry township, was born 
in this township May 23, 1858, and on the paternal side is a descendant 
of an old southern family from Kentucky and a grandson of William and 
Pollv (Smock) Stuck. The grandfather came from his native state of 
Kentucky to Sullivan county, Indiana, during an early epoch in its 
history, and he was a millwright and farmer. 

Henrv Stuck, a son of William and Polly Stuck, was born after the 
removal of his parents to Sullivan county, and when the Civil war was 
inaugurated he became a member of the Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, but his death occurred shortly after his enlistment. In his 
early manhood he had married Sarah E. Vest, a daughter of John and 
Polly (Johns) Vest. John Vest, who followed both carpentering and 
house moving, lived for a time in Boone county, Indiana, from whence 
he later came to Sullivan county and finally became a resident of Terre 
Haute. From there he went to Kansas, to the home of one of his daugh- 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AN COUNTY 93 

ters, and died there at the age of ninety-five years. Mrs. Stuck still 
.survives her husband and is living in Terre Haute. 

James H. Stuck, the only one living of the four children born to 
Henry and Sarah Stuck, supplemented his common school training by a 
com-se in the seminary at Farmersburg, and when the time came to select 
a life's occupation he chose that of farming. After his marriage he pur- 
chased and moved to a farm in Jackson township of sixty acres, but in 
1894 he sold that tract and bought forty-eight acres .in Curry township. 
There he lived and farmed untif after the death of Mrs. Stuck's mother, 
and from that time until 1905 he lived on the Hill farm. In that year he 
purchased fifteen acres of his present homestead, but he has since added 
to this little farm from time to time until he now owns eighty-three acres, 
located one mile west of Shelburn. 

He married, July 22, 1880, Mallie 1 lill, who was born in Curry town- 
ship November ij. i860, a daughter of Paschal and Lettie Hill. They 
have two children, Effie E. and Zula M., born respectively June 10, 1887, 
and April 10, 1897. The younger daughter is now attending the public 
schools. Mr. Stuck is a stanch Republican politically, and fraternally he 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Shelburn Lodge, 
No. 420, and the Encampment, and of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
Camp No. 3744, at Farmersburg. He is a member of the Baptist church. 



Perley M. H.wworth, a farmer and stockraiscr in Curry township, 
Sullivan county, is a native of Vigo county, Indiana, born October 22, 
1863, a son ofAlbert and Julia (Rowe) Hayworth, both of whom were 
natives of Vigo county. Albert was the son of Sanford and Elizabeth 
(Smith) Havworth, and they were natives of South Carolina. Sanford 
Havw^orth was a Methodist' minister and also followed farm life. He 
came to Vigo county immediately after his marriage, in about 1838, enter- 
ing a tract of government land, and started to till the soil. Later he 
entered the ministry. Albert was the only son who remained at home 
with his father until his marriage, after which event he went onto one 
of his father's farms in \'igo county and lived there until his death, in 
August, 1887. He was a very extensive stock raiser and highly successful 
as a farmer, owning two hundred and fifty acres of choice land, all within 
Vigo county. Perley M. is one of the two children born to his parents, 
who are now living! His sister, Mary L., was born .August 28, 1873, 
and now resides in Terre Haute, the wife of W. J. Smith. 

Perlev M. Hayw-orth obtained a common school education by attend- 
ing school winters and farming summers. He was united in marriage 
December 4, 1884, to Media Hess, born October 16, 1861, in Vigo county, 
the daughter of Washington and Malinda (Killian") Hess, no%v deceased. 
Mr. Hayworth stayed at his father's home after his marriage until the 
death of his father. He then purchased thirty-five acres near his father's, 
and there began housekeeping in a log house, in which he lived until 1899, 
then moved to Terre Haute and resided there until 1900. At the last 



94 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

named time he purchased one liundred and twenty acres of land in Curry 
township, SuUivan county. Here he erected in 1905 a fine modern farm- 
house, with all needful outbuildings, making the entire premises one of 
the most up-to-date within the township. Besides his general farming 
he raises and sells much stock, especially hogs. In addition to the revenue 
derived from his farm, Mr. Hayworth is a stockholder in the Citizens' 
State Bank at Farmersburg. 

In stature Mr. Hayworth is the largest man within Sullivan countv, 
his weight being three hundred and sixty-five pounds, while his height is 
six feet and two inches, yet he is an active, energetic man. possessed of 
a robust constitution. In his political views he is a Republican. He was 
elected trustee of Curry township in 1904, being the first man in this 
political party to be elected to office within the township on a strict party 
vote. He is a member of the Alodern Woodmen of America, belonging 
at Farmersburg, and also belongs to the Elks and Eagles at Sullivan. 
Of the strict secret societies he is a member of the Masonic and Knights 
of Pythias orders. In church relations he is in sympathy with, though 
not a member of, the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is 
a member in full connection. 

Mr. Hayworth was married, as above referred to, in 1884, and their 
children are : Dudley B., born February 8, 1891 ; Albert W., born July 8, 
1892; Audrey G., born February 26, 1899, all born in Vigo county, 
Indiana, and all at home at this time. 



Sampson Walters. — Prominent among the thriving and progressive 
agriculturists of Sullivan county is Sampson Walters, who displays much 
judgment and skill in his calling, his farm being one of the most valuable 
and attractive of any in Haddon township, everything about the premises 
■ indicating the care and supervision of an excellent manager, and a 
thorough-going farmer. A son of Sampson Walter. Sr., he was born 
Februarv 21, 1862, in Cass township. His grandfather, Frank Walters, 
came from his Kentucky home to Indiana in 1837, and spent the remainder 
of his life in Sullivan county. 

A native of Kentucky, Sampson Walters, Sr., was born January 22, 
1827, near Lexington, where he lived until ten years old. Coming with 
his parents to Sullivan county, Indiana, he assisted his father in clearing 
and improving a homestead from the forest. Becoming then a farmer 
from choice, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 
Cass township, March 28, 1890. He married Elizabeth Simpson, who 
was born January 20, 1825, in Sullivan county. Indiana, of English 
ancestry. She survived him, and is now residing in Greene count}-. She 
is a member of the Church of Christ, to which her husband also belonged. 
Six children were born of their union, namely : Courtney, deceased ; 
John, a resident of Sullivan county ; Elizabeth, wife of James Decard, of 
Greene county : Francis E.. deceased : Mary Ann, wife of Louis Saucer- 
man, of Sullivan county ; and Sampson, of this sketch. • 



HISTORY (3F SUI.LTNAX COUNTY 95 

Growing to manhood on the home farm, Sampson Walters was 
educated in the district schools, and until twenty-two years of age 
assisted his father, under whose instruction he became well drilled in 
the various branches of agriculture. Beginning the battle of life, then, 
on his own account, Mr. \\'alters purchased the farm on which he now 
lives, in Iladdon township, and in its management has had excellent 
success, having now in his possession five hundred acres of choice land, 
admirabl\' adapted to general farming and stock raising. He deals quite 
extensivelv in stock, making a specialty of hogs, cattle and sheep, an 
industr}- which he finds profitable. He has in his possession one of the 
t:>ldest deeds in Sullivan county. It is dated June 6, 1827, and was 
executed by President John Ouincy Adams. Mr. Walters is a man of 
good business capacity, alive to the interests of the rural community, 
and is one of the stockholders in the Carlisle Telephone Company, which 
he helped to organize. 1 'oliticall)- he affiliates with the Democratic party. 

]\Ir. Walters married April 14, 1886, Permelia A. Land, who was 
born in Haddon township, Sullivan county, February 22. 1864, a daughter 
of James K. and Sarah A. ( McKinley ) Land, neither of whom are now 
living. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Walters, namely : 
Edward E., born February 3, 1887, was graduated from the Carlisle 
high school in 1906, and is now attending the Indiana University at 
Bloomington ; Jesse N., born May 17, 1888, is a student in the Carlisle 
high school, being a member of the class of 1909; and Maude, born June 
6, 1892, attends the Carlisle high school, belonging to the class of 191 1 ; 
she has received both a vocal and instrumental musical education. Mr. 
and Mrs. Walters are highly respected throughout the community in 
which they reside, and are worthy and valued members of the Church 
of Christ, of Paxton, Indiana. 



U. Ellerv H.wden. — Sullivan county was the birthplace of U. Ellery 
Havden, on the ist of Ma\-, 1863, in Turman township, and it has been 
the scene of his subsequent business career. He is a son of Daniel J. 
and Sarah (Gray) Hayden, the former of whom was born in Mercer 
county, Kentucky, and the latter where the east portion of Sullivan has 
since been built. Daniel J. Hayden came to Indiana before the inaugura- 
tion of the Civil war, and he worked at the blacksmith's trade in Sullivan 
and finallv, about 185 1, he began farming in connection with his trade, 
continuing both occupations there until alDOUt 1862, when he moved to 
Turman township and continued his residence there until his death in 
about 1892. The wife and mother is still living and resides with her son 
William, north of Sullivan, having reached the age of seventy-five years. 
In the Havden family were seven children, namely : Mary E.. deceased ; 
John T-, who resides on the old home farm in Turman township ; William 
T., wiio has never married, and lives with his mother at the old home- 
stead : U. Ellery, the subject of this review: Julia E. Patton, whose 
home is in Turman township : L'ral. near the old home farm in Turman 
township: and one who died in infancy. 

Vol. II— 7 



96 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

U. Ellery Hayden- continued to reside with his parents until he had 
attained his twenty -ninth year; and he then married and started in life 
for himself by renting a farm, but after one year as a renter in Turman 
township he bought the farm where he now lives in Curry township. 
Although he carries on general farming pursuits, he makes a specialty 
of the raishig of Chester White hogs and has been very successful in this 
line of business. His land is divided, his homestead consisting of seventy- 
five acres in Curry township, and he also owns seventy-seven acres in 
Turman township, forty acres in Hamilton township, and forty acres in 
Jackson township, but he farms all his land himself, and is a prominent 
and progressive agriculturist. 

On the 1st of March, 1891, Mr. Hayden was united in marriage to 
Lillian B. Dodd, who was born in Illinois, July 28, 1868, and her father 
became one of the early settlers of Sullivan county. The children born 
of this union are Forest A. and Fannie O., the elder born December 22, 
1892, and is at home, but the younger, born April 17, 1895, died April 7, 
1896. The wife and mother is also deceased, dying September 7, 1896, 
and on the 29th of December, 1897, Mr. Hayden wedded Josie Shepherd, 
who was born in Jackson township, and her people were of Irish descent 
and among the oldest residents of that township. Her mother still lives 
on the old homestead near Hymera, but the father is deceased. The 
second union has been without issue. Mr. Hayden is a member of the 
Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 584, at Graysville, and he has served 
in all the offices of that lodge and has twice served as a delegate to the 
Grand Lodge. He was a delegate to the famous convention at Chicago 
which secured four hundred and fifty dollars of prize money. He is a 
member of the Baptist church and is a stanch and active Prohibitionist. 



William A. Nelson. — The name of William A. Nelson has been 
long and prominently associated with the agricultural interests of .Sullivan 
county. He was born in Honey Creek township, Vigo county, Indiana, 
April 7, 1833, a son of John J. and Emilia (Cruse) Nelson, both of whom 
were born in Kentucky. Coming to Vigo county in 1823, they lived there 
until their removal to Curry township in Sullivan county in 1838, enroll- 
ing their names among the county's earliest pioneers. Mr. Nelson became 
prominently known as a farmer and hunter, farming the tract of one 
hundred and twenty acres which he entered from the government and 
the subsequent additions of eighty and forty acres each, thus making him 
the owner of two hundred and forty acres. Six children were born to 
John J. and Emilia Nelson, as follows: Mary A., James and Susan, 
deceased; William A., the subject of this review ; Eliza J., deceased : and 
Margaret E. Williams, whose home is in Kansas. 

After his marriage William A. Nelson was given forty acres of land 
by his father, and he farmed that little tract for two years, in that time 
also conducting a huckster wagon. In the spring of 1864 he laid aside his 
business duties to become a soldier in the Civil war. enlisting on the loth 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 97 

of October, in Compain- C. First Indiana i Icavy Artillery, and he was 
discharged on the loth of October, 1865, after participating- in the one 
battle of Fort Spanish. Returning after the close of the conflict to his 
little farm in StiUivaii county, he again began running his huckster wagon 
and finally purchased a tlireshing machine and continued its operation 
until his retirement in 1891. He is now the owner uf a farm of forty-seven 
acres of rich and fertile land. 

On the 30th of October, 1856, Mr. Nelson was married to Armilda 
A. Shoemaker, who was born on the farm on which she now resides, 
November 27, 1842, and to their union has been born five children: 
John T., deceased ; Hattie Frakes, of Shelburn ; William A., Jr., who 
married Alice Harris and resides in Curry township; Lucetta Frakes, of 
Fairbanks township ; and Ozro, at home with his parents. Mr. Nelson 
is a member of Gaskin Post, G. A. R., at Farmersburg, and in compensa- 
tion for his army services he now receives a pension from the government 
of twenty dollars a month. He is a stanch Republican in his political 
afiiliations, and botli he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. 



Earl Patten, one of the best known and most prominent of the 
younger residents of Shelburn, was born in the city where he now resides, 
April II, 1870, a son of Isaac and Jane (Pugh) Patten. The father was 
born in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, in 1829, and is now living 
near Gravsville, in tliis state, while the mother was born in Fairbanks 
township in 1833 and died in Shelburn on the 31st of August, 1884. She 
now lies buried in the Littleflock cemetery. Her parents, John and 
Mahala (Harris) Pugh, came to this county from Kentucky and located 
on the farm which they entered from the government in Fairbanks town- 
ship. The father was a flatboatman as well as farmer, sailing down the 
Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, his death occurring 
at Evansville, Indiana, on one of his return trips, and he was buried there. 
Of the eleven children born to Isaac and Jane ( Pugh ) Patten, five are 
now living: Isaac, Jr., whose home is in Shelburn; John \V. and Ira, 
who are also residing in Shelburn ; William G., of Missouri ; and Earl. 

Earl Patten started out to battle for himself when but eleven years of 
age, working for a brother in the grocery business, and for two years 
following this was in the employ of Robert Linn, a general merchant. 
Returning then to the store of his brother John, he worked for him until 
his enlistment in the LJnited States army as a musician of the Fifteenth 
Infantry, in 1892. He served two years and was honorably discharged on 
the 4th of June, 1894, and during his service in the army he was qualified 
as a sharpshooter, in 1893. After the close of his military career he again 
entered the employ of his brother John and continued with him until he 
embarked in the clothing business with Harry Banister in 1904, the firm 
of Patten & Banister continuing for a year, wdien Mr. Patten sold his 
interest to his partner, and during the following years was in the grocery 
and meat market business. On the 25th of July, 1905. he entered the 



98 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

employ of the Kettle Creek Mining Company in the capacity of a book- 
keeper, and served in that capacity until October, 1908, when he was 
promoted to superintendent of the mines. Mr. Patten was obliged to 
leave school when a little lad of eleven years, but despite this disadvan- 
tage he continued his studies and never missed a day of school while in 
the army. He has thus been the architect of his own fortunes from early 
youth, and is rapidly winning for himself a name and place in the front 
ranks of the business men of Sullivan county. His politics are Demo- 
cratic, a stanch supporter of the principles, and as the representative of 
this party he was made the clerk and treasurer of Shelburn, taking charge 
of those offices on the ist of January, 1900, and his term of office will 
continue until the 1st of January, 1910. 

On the 1st of January, 1900, Mr. Patten was married to JNIayme 
Banister, born January 22, 1877, to George and Mary (Dix) Banister, 
and the one child of this union is Georgia Carmen, born on the 13th of 
October, 1901. Mr. Patten has fraternal relations with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Prairie Lodge, No. 420, at Shelburn, and he is 
identified with all its branches and twice served as a delegate to the 
Grand Lodge. Mrs. Patten also served as a delegate to its auxiliary, 
the Rebekahs, in 1901. Mr. Patten is a member of the Utah Tribe of 
Red Men at Sherman. Religiously, they are attendants of the Christian 
church, and Mrs. Patten is a member of that denomination. 



Ch.\rles E. Brewer has been for many years prominent in the pub- 
lic and business life of Sullivan county, and is now one of the leading 
undertakers of Shelburn, as well as the coroner of the county, having 
been elected to that office over a year ago. He entered upon his success- 
ful business career when a boy of thirteen years, as an apprentice in a 
carriage and wagon shop, working in the shop nights and mornings and 
during vacations, while during the remainder of the time he was in 
school. He continued thus engaged until he was twenty-two, when he 
went to Monument, Colorado, and engaged in the furniture and under- 
taking business with his brother-in-law. During his residence there he 
learned the undertaking business in all its departments, and returning 
home after an absence of six years he went to Indianapolis and opened 
and conducted a carriage shop of his own for four years. Returning 
thence to Hymera in this county, he was the proprietor of a carriage and 
repair shop here for eight years, and at the close of that period, in 1902, 
he came to Shelburn and opened a furniture and undertaking business, 
but at the present time gives attention exclusively to the latter department. 

Mr. Brewer was born in Johnson county, Indiana, May 18, 1861, a 
son of John C. and Anna (Cummingoer) Brewer, and a grandson of 
Abram Brewer, who was born in 1790 and died on the 12th of March, 
1873. On coming to Indiana he entered land in Johnson county, and 
became the proprietor of a hotel on the Madison and Indianapolis road, 
spending the remainder of his life there. Flis son, John C, born in 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AX COUNTY 



99 



Mercer count}', Kentucky. January 8, 1820, (ipened a Imtel in Greenwood 
in 1869, and continued the hotel in connection with his farm until his 
death, January 2^, 1874, passing away in the faith of the Presbyterian 
church. Mrs, Brewer was born in Mercer county, Kentucky, March 29, 
1825, and she died in 1896. In their family were eight children, namely: 
Arena, deceased, born March 26, 1846: Lizzie, born August 29, 1849, 
resides in Colorado; Laura J., deceased, was born February 3, 185 1 ; 
Marcella, born January 17. 1854, resides in Greenwood, Indiana; Eldora, 
born January it, 1856, is deceased; Laura M., born December 29, 1857. 
resides in Indianapolis ; Charles E., the subject of this review ; and 
Edward, born July 3, 1864, resides near Greenwood. 

On the 8th of March, 1882, Mr. Brewer was united in marriage to 
Lillian Miller, who was born December 18, 1864, a daughter of Dr. 
.\bram Miller, of Whiteland, Indiana. She died on the 17th of Alarch, 
1891, at Hymera, leaving four children, as follows; Ruby P., the wife 
of W. B. Bonham, of Hymera; F"reeda, born in October, 1885, is now 
traveling for the J. C. Curtis & Company undertaking supply house; 
John C, born June 9. 1887, is at home and is working for his father; 
and Anna May, born December 22, 1895, is a student in the St. Joseph 
Academy at Terre Haute. On the 17th of April, 1904, Mr. Brewer 
wedded Luna L. Conover, who was born in February of 1858. Mr. 
Brewer is an active political worker, voting with the Democracy, and he 
is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 603, at Hymera ; 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 911, at Sulli- 
van ; and the Knights and Ladies of Security, in Terre Haute. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and he is serving 
as one of the <lirectors of his church. 



Wii-i-iAAt A. FoRDYCE, the present postmaster of Shelburn, has been 
identified with the interests of Sullivan county throughout his entire life, 
for he was born within its borders, in Fairbanks township, and here he 
has since lived and labored. After completing his education in the dis- 
trict schools and in those of Shelburn, he began the study of telegraphy 
in this citv and continued in that occupation until 1892. During the fol-- 
lowing four years he was at home on account of ill health, and at the 
close of that period he was appointed the postmaster of Shelburn, and 
has ever since continued in that official capacity. He is a stanch Repub- 
lican politically. 

Mr. Ford\ce is a representative of a family who have long resided 
in Sullivan county, and it was founded here by his paternal grandparents, 
Lewis and Elizabeth (Case) Fordyce. Lewis Fordyce was a farmer, 
and after coming to Sullivan county he was elected a justice of the peace 
and became prominent in the public life of his community. His pohtical 
affiliations were with the Democracy. Lewis Fordyce was born in Wash- 
ington county, Indiana, May 17, 1816, was married in that county, to 
Elizabeth Case, Mav 20, 1838, and after living for some years in Orange 



53G365 



loo HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

county, where he held minor offices, he moved to Fairbanks, this county, 
and in 1869 took up his residence at the county seat. He died February 
28, 1874, after a long illness. 

Among the children of Lewis and Elizabeth Fordyce was William 
A., Sr., who was born in Lawrence county, Indiana, but came to Fair- 
banks township in Sullivan county about i860 and spent the remainder of 
his life here, dying in 1865, when his son and namesake was but a year 
old. He was a farmer and cabinetmaker, and was working at his trade 
at the time of his death. In his early manhood he had married Francis 
J. Griffin, who was born about 1844. in Honey Creek township, Vigo 
county, Indiana, a daughter of William and Amelia (Hanna) Griffin. 
William H. Griffin owned and operated a tanyard near the old B'udd 
place in Honey Creek township for many years, but later on moved to 
Fairbanks township in Sullivan county, and opened and conducted a 
harness shop. In 1866 he was elected the treasurer of Sullivan county 
and moved to the city of Sullivan, continuing in that office for two 
terms, but he maintained his residence in Sullivan until his life's labors 
were ended in death. During a number of years previous to his death he 
was engaged in the poultry and produce business in Princeton, Indiana. 

After the death of Mr. Fordyce his widow married Dr. James A. 
Harper, and her death occurred on the ist of September, 1900. Dr. 
Harper is now living in Shelburn, and his home is also the home of 
William A. Fordyce, who is the younger of his mother's two children bv 
her first marriage, but his brother Elmer died when seven years of age. 
Three children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Harper, namely : Gertrude 
Froment and Georgia Bardsley, both living in Shelburn, and Grace, who 
is at home with her father. 

Mr. Fordyce has membership relations with the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics, Council No. 69, in the lodge at Shelburn, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 911, of Sulli- 
van, Indiana; with Entaw Tribe, I. O. R. M., No. 213, at Shelburn, and 
also the Junior Order at Sullivan. He holds to the' belief of the Church 
of Christ. He holds high rank in the political and business circles of 
Sullivan county, and is one of the property owners of Shelburn, where 
he owns about six and a half acres in lots. 



Richard B. Douglas, M. D.. is a member of one of the first families 
to establish their home in Sullivan county, and from the early daj's until 
the present the name of Douglas has been inseparably associated with its 
history. His father, Samuel Douglas, was born in Curry township, and 
the scene of his birth has been the field of his subsequent operations and 
his present residence, three miles west of Shelburn. Samuel is a son of 
Benson and Eliza (Dawson) Douglas, natives respectively of Curry 
township and of Vigo county, Indiana. Benson was a son of Samuel, 
who was also a native son of Curry township, and he served through the 
Civil war as a private. The earlier generations of the family followed 
agricultural pursuits for a livelihood. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY loi 

Samuel Douglas, Jr., is now living retired from an active business 
life, owning a fine estate of one hundred acres. His wife, Nancv M. 
(Smith) Douglas, was born in Sullivan county, and died in May of 1905, 
after becoming the mother of two children, both of whom have embraced 
a professional life, and the younger. Perry, is practicing law in Terre 
Haute. He married Sarah \A'olf. Samuel Douglas, the father, is a stanch 
Democrat in his political affiliations, and is a member of the ]\Iasonic 
lodge at Shelburn, No. 369, and of the Methodist church. 

Richard B. Douglas was born in Curry township, Sullivan county, 
Indiana, February 17, 1876, and after receiving a common school educa- 
tion taught school for five years. In 1898 he became a student in the 
Eclectic Medical College, where he studied for three years, and during 
one year was a student in the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Indianapolis. Returning to Shelburn after the completion of his 
medical training, he opened an office here and has ever since been engaged 
in practice, enjoying a large and representative clientele. His politics 
are Democratic, and he was nominated and elected by the party for the 
office of trustee, while from 1900 for four years he served as the assessor 
of Curry township. He is the medical examiner for the Modern Amer- 
ican Lodge, and is a member of the Indiana Eclectic Medical Association, 
the Sullivan and Vigo Counties Medical Association, and is an honorary 
member of the Illinois Eclectic ]\Iedical Association. His fraternal rela- 
tions are with the Alasonic order. Lodge No. 369, at Shelburn : with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 420, also of this city, and 
with the Eagles, at Sullivan. His religious views are in harmony with 
the teachings of the Christian church. 

Dr. Douglas is married and has two children: Harry, born April 
25, 1899, now attending school, and Blanche, born June 22, 1903. 



Philip T. Lloyd, the proprietor of the Shelburn Lumber Company, 
was born in Curry township, Sullivan county, Indiana, December 12, 
1854, a son of John G. and Elizabeth (Chowning) Lloyd. John G. 
Lloyd was born in Kentucky in 1832, and was a farmer throughout his 
entire business career, but is now living retired. He was but three years 
of age when he came with his parents, Philip and Anna Lloyd, from 
Kentucky to Indiana, and since, then he has been living principally on a 
farm in Curry township. He served twelve months in the Civil war 
with the Twenty-first Indiana Heavy Artillery, and participated in the 
memorable siege of Mobile for ten days and nights, and in compensation 
for his services in the war he now draws a pension of eighteen dollars a 
month. His wife bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Chowning, a native 
of Kentucky, and she died in February, 1893, in Curry township. 

Philip T. Lloyd, their son, started out on his business career as a 
farm hand, thus continuing until his marriage on the 3d of February, 
1881, to Alice Shields, who was born in Hamilton township of Sullivan 
county. May 6, 1859, a daughter of Henry and Mary A. Shields. She 



102 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 



(ir 



ed on the 3d of j\Iay, 1892, leaving her husband and three children : 
Clew H., born July 28, 1882, who resides in Shelburn with his father; 
Anna O., bom October 12, 1883,. married Harry E. Allen, who is in the 
employ of his father-in-law and lives in Shelburn, and they have one 
child, Mary Lucile, born December 5, 1907; and Albert C, born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1885, is attending school at a Bible Reading in Peace Creek. 
Kansas, near Sylvia. He is a member of the Church of Christ. On the 
19th of March, 1893, Mr. Lloyd wedded Mary E. McKenzie, born in 
Curry township in 1859, a daughter of Edward AIcKenzie. There are no 
living children by this union. 

After his first marriage Mr. Lloyd rented and moved to a farm of 
eighty acres, and here he has lived for twentj'-four years, the property 
being now in West Shelburn. In 1903 he opened a lumber yard in Shel- 
burn, and two years later, in 1905, bought the property of one of his 
competitors, A. T. Hill, while in 1907 he became the owner of the Shel- 
burn Lumber Company, one of the well-known business institutions of 
Sullivan county. He is also the president of the Central Mutual Tele- 
phone Company, and his political aflSliations are with the Republican 
party. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd and his children are members of the Church 
of Christ, and he is one of the elders of old Liberty Congregation. 



John C. Annis is a representative of two of the most prominent of 
the early families of Sullivan county, and he has won for himself a 
place among the leading business men of Shelburn. He entered upon 
his business career as an engineer, but later became a bookkeeper for 
his father, this being in 1876, when the elder Mr. Annis first came to 
Shelburn, and at the time of his removal to Terre Haute the son 
accompanied him and they were in business together for one year. 
Returning thence to Shelburn he was. in the employ of Stephen Brace- 
well, a general merchant, until 1886, from that time until i8go was 
connected with the coal industry, and in the latter year took charge of 
the Curryville store and conducted it until the latter part of 1892. .\t 
the expiration of that period he began work as top foreman for the 
Curryville mine, in 1900 became connected with the Star City mine m 
the capacity of a carpenter, and during the years of 1902, 1903 and 1904 
he was the bookkeeper for the Keystone Coal Company at Shelburn. 
Since 1904 Mr. Annis has been the proprietor of a feed store in this 
city, buying in that year the business of N. O. Robbins, and in connection 
with this he also does a large transfer business. A stanch Democrat 
politically, he has served for five or six terms as a member of the town 
board and during eight years was the clerk and treasurer of Shelburn. 

Mr. Annis was born in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, April 
27, 1854, a son of Abraham and Armilda (Hopewell) Annis, both of 
whom were born in Kentucky, the father in 1832, and his death occurred 
in 1884, while the mother was born in 1830 and died in 1896, both 
passing away in Terre Haute. Thev were but two years of age when 



IIISTOKV ()!• Sn.LlN'AN COL'XTY 103 

they came inirlh with their parents, and the ])arcnts of Al^raham, John 
and ]\Iary ( Potts) Annis, located in l*"airbanks township in 1834. Arniilda 
Hopewell Annis was a daughter of Henry and Alary (All) Hopewell, 
who came to Fairbanks township at about the same lime as the Annis 
family, and they located near together on land which they entered from 
the government, the land being at that time wild and unimproved. Henry 
Hopewell died in 1871. Both he and John Aimis became successful 
farmers, the former being also a cooper. 

Abraham Annis, a son of John Annis, followed farming until 1875, 
when he came to Shelburn and purchased a warehouse, in which he 
installed a custom mill, and continued as a miller until 1882, while 
from that time until his death in 1884 he was a resident of Terre Haute, 
engaged in the grocery business. During his residence in Shelburn he 
served as a member of the town board. Seven children were born to 
Abraham and Armilda Annis, namely : Earl and Samuel M., deceased, 
while the third born died in infancy; John C, the subject of this review; 
Mary L. Stalker, of Terre Haute; Isabelle Snider, also of that city, and 
Julia, who has never married and resides in Terre Haute. 

Four children have been born to John C. Annis, namely : Louren, 
who died in infancy ; Ethel R., born March 4, 1886, is the wife of Roy 
Hair, of Shelburn ; Orval, who died at the age of two years ; and Hosie 
SutclilTe, who was born February 14, 1897, and is attending school. Mr. 
Annis is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge 
No. 420, at Shelburn, in which he has filled all of the offices, and is 
also a charter member of the United Workmen, which lodge was 
abandoned in 1880, and a member of the International (Jrder of the Team 
Owners" Union. 



James P. Siner. — The name of James P. Siner was for many years 
associated with the business life of Shelburn, where he conducted a 
general mercantile establishment until his retirement in 1905. In the 
early years of his life he was a cooper, having learned that trade when 
only seventeen years of age in Carlisle, Indiana, and he worked at that 
occupation for six years. In 1859 he joined the westward emigration 
across the plains, making the journey with ox teams, and leaving here 
on the 13th of April, 1859, he reached Placerville, California, on the 
12th of September, following. During the following six and a. half 
years he sojourned over California, Oregon and Idaho, and then returning 
to Shelburn w-as one of the leading general merchants of the city until his 
retirement in i()05. 

Mr. Siner was born in Hamilton township of Sullivan county, 
February i, 1837, a son of Nelson and Dessie (Shelburn) Siner. Xelson 
Siner was a son of P>enjamin, a native of Virginia, and he was a grandson 
of Benjamin, Sr., who served as a colonel in the Revolutionary war. 
Nelson Siner was born in Breckenridge county, Kentucky, in 1810, but 
came from that state to Sullivan county, Indiana, with his mother, in 
1821, where in his vounger days he worked at the wagon maker's trade. 



I04 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

but finally abandoned that occupation for farming, and later, in 1859, 
opened a general mercantile store in Shelburn and was also the postmaster 
of the town from i860 to 1866. He was a stanch Republican and in 
the earlier days a Whig, and his death occurred in 1869, in Shelburn. 
His wife survived him but a few years, dying in 1872. She was born 
about 1809 in Kentucky. Of their eight children five are now living: 
John L., of Shelburn ; Mary Nesbit, a widow residing in Hamilton town- 
ship, and Parthena McClanahan and Lorena Singer, twins, both widows 
residing in Farmersburg. 

James P. Siner, the youngest of the living children, married, on 
the 13th of April, 1866, Martha A. Hodges, who was born in Vigo county, 
Indiana, in 1845, ^ daughter of Harden and Phoebe (Lovelace) Hodges. 
This union has been blessed by the birth of seven children, but only the 
following four are living at the present time : Julia Harden, of Shelburn ; 
Fred, who married Emma Buckley, and is the proprietor of a shoe store 
in Shelburn : Walter and Clarence, who are at home with their parents. 
Mr. Siner follows in the political footsteps of his father and gives a stanch 
support to the Republican party. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, 
No. 369, in Shelburn, in which he has filled all the offices, occupying the 
master's chair for twelve years, and at the present time he is serving in 
the capacity of treasurer. He has the distinction of being the oldest 
Mason in Shelburn. Both he and his wife are earnest and efficient 
members of the Baptist church. 



Leander Wence. — During a number of years Leander Wence was 
numbered among the best agriculturists and business men of Sullivan 
county, but he is now living quietly retired at his pleasant home in 
Farmersburg. He was born on the 3d of November, 186 1, in Jackson 
township, Sullivan county, a son of Abraham and Mary E. (Zink ) Wence. 
The father was born in Ohio, but when but four years of age he was 
brought by his parents to Jackson township. He is a son of Abraham, 
Sr., and Sarah Jane Wence, who were farming people and entered land 
from the government in Jackson township north of Hymera, which con- 
tinued as their home during the remainder of their lives. Mr. Wence 
was a squire and constable here for many years. 

Abraham Wence, Jr., spent the early years of his life on his parents' 
farm, and during five years of his business career he was engaged in 
the mercantile business in Terre Haute and Lyons. From 1861 until 
1865 he was a Civil war soldier, but twelve months of that time was 
spent in Andersonville prison, where he endured all the hardships and 
privations of that noted prison pen. He is now the owner of a fine 
estate of one hundred and twenty acres five miles southeast of Hymera, 
where he and his wife are spending the remainder of their lives. He is 
a stanch Democrat politically, a member of the Odd Fellows' order at 
Lyons, and of the Methodist church. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wence were four children, of whom Leander is the eldest ; Elizabeth 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 105 

Jenny died at tlie age of nineteen years: James E. resides in Curry 
township; and Charles E. is a resident of Evansvillo. 

Just after his marriage Leander Wence began farming fnr himself, 
renting a farm in Curry township, and he continued as a renter until 
purchasing twenty acres in 1886. From time to time he added to his 
original purchase until he became the owner of one hundred and forty- 
three acres in his homestead farm, and also eighty acres in another tract, 
but he has since sold his land and invested his money in notes and town 
property. He continued his agricultural labors until in March of 1907, 
when he sold his farm and is now living retired in Farmersburg. 

On the 8th of October, 1882, Mr. Wence was united in marriage 
to Susana Everly, who was born in Owen county, Indiana, September 9, 
i860, and died June 4, 1896, after becoming the mother of five children: 
Nora A., born November 16, 1885, died November 25, 1904; Hershal E., 
born October 30, 1887, married Sadie Crow August 24, 1907, and resides 
in Shelburn ; Otto W., born November 18, 1889, has been in the regular 
army for two years ; the fourth child died in infancy : and Ona M., born 
January 7, 1896, is attending school and lives with her grandparents. 
On the 8th of November, 1899, Mr. Wence married Sophia F. Wells, 
who was born in Grant county, Indiana, April i, 1869, and died January 
II, 1905, after becoming the mother of two children. Noma C.. born 
]\Iarch 13, 1903, and a son, the younger, who died in infanc}-. On the 
24th of April, 1907, Mr. Wence wedded Daisy Beck, who was born 
January 3, 1882, in Jefferson township, Sullivan county, a daughter of 
"josiah F. and Rosanna (Hume) Beck, both of whom were also born 
in this county, and they are now living in Carlisle. Mr. Wence has one 
child by his last wife, a daughter, Dortha Lee. He has membership 
relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Shelburn, Lodge 
No. 420. He is the only one of the Wence name to affiliate with the 
Republican partv. He is a member of the Methodist church, but Mrs. 
Wence is of the Baptist faith. 



Elz.x W. Jennincs, who is among the successful and enterprising 
business factors of Curry township, Sullivan county, and besides other 
business interests, is engaged in the hardware and implement trade, is 
a native of this township, born January 15, 1868, a son of Abel J. and 
Fannie M. (Willsey) Jennings, the former born March 28, 1812, in 
Massachusetts, at some point within Hrnnden county, and died January 
10, 1877, in Sullivan county. Indiana. The latter was born October 19, 
1824, in Albany county. New York, and died June 28, 1890, in Curry 
township, Sullivan county, Indiana. Abel was the son of Aceph and 
Mary (Abbv) lennings, the former born in Massachusetts and the latter 
in Scotland. Aceph was born in 1782. and died in 1844. He was a 
gunsmith, and worked eight years in the Springfield Armory W'orks, 
but abandoned his trade there upon his marriage and went to farming, 
which occupation he continued to follow the rt'mainder of his life. Abel, 



io6 HISTORY OF SLXLIA'AX COUNTY 

at the age of twenty years, started as a sailor on Lake Erie, and within 
fourteen months was made second mate, soon afterward first mate and 
then captain of the boat. This position he filled for five years and up 
to the date of his marriage. He purchased a farm in Ashtabula count\-. 
Ohio, where he farmed two years, and in 1842 went to Missouri, in 
which new state he purchased a farm. In 1844 he removed to Marion 
county, Indiana. Upon a trip back to Ohio he was taken ill upon reaching 
Marion county, and there remained until 1867, when he went to Currv 
township, this county, about three miles west of Farmersburg, where 
the subject of this narrative was born. He owned a hundred-acre farm, 
upon which he resided until his death. 

The father was twice married, first to a Miss Benjamin, by whom 
seven children were born, but only two lived to reach mature years. For 
his second wife he married Fannie M. Willsey, by whom were born 
sixteen children, as follows: Emaline, born in 1841, died young; jNIarshall, 
born March 22, 1843, resides at Farmersburg; Harriet, born in Sep- 
tember, 1844, resides in Weldon, Illinois : Julia, deceased ; Mary J., 
resides in Oklahoma ; Millie, also living in Oklahoma ; Lydia, deceased ; 
Sylvester, residing in Curry township, this county : Oswell, deceased ; 
Emory and Emma (twins), both living in Curry township; Rufus, living 
in Kingfisher county, Oklahoma ; Mattie, living in Vigo county, Indiana ; 
Katie, living in Curry township : Walker, living in Currv township, and 
Elza W., of this notice. 

Mr. Jennings remained at home with his parents until their death, 
and on November iS. iBgo, soon after their death, he married Mary A. 
Harris, born March 2, 1870, in Shelby county, Illinois, a daughter of 
John Harris. Mr. Jennings began operating a saw mill and thresher at 
the age of seventeen years, continuing until 1902. In 1899, however, 
he purchased a one-fourth interest in Jennings Brothers and Lloyd's 
hardware store, and in 1902 bought a two-thirds interest in Jennings & 
Taylor's hardware and implement house. Since then he has paid special 
attention to this business. The firm with which he is associated owns 
some real estate in town. 

Politically Mr. Jennings is a Democrat. He was elected president 
of the Farmersburg Town Board in 1906, his term expiring in 1910. 
He is president of the Merchants' Association, president of the Torry 
Electric Light plant and is a stockholder and director of the Citizens 
State Bank. He is a member of the Blue Lodge, No. 494, A. F. & A. 
]\I., at Farmersburo-. 



AViLLiAM Benefield, formerly extensively engaged in Turman 
township, this count}-, as a general farmer and stock raiser, is now a 
resident agriculturist of the Panhandle country of Texas. He is a 
native of Hamilton township, Sullivan county, a son of George Wash- 
ington and Elizabeth (McGrew) Benefield. The father was a native of 
Lawrence county, Indiana, and, in 1904. died at Terre Haute. Indiana, 
the mother beins; still a resident of that citv. George W. Benefield 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUXTY 107 

always followed the life of a fanner, with the exception of a few years 
which he spent in California, durint;- the early days of the gold excite- 
ment. Starting from Snllivan with an ox team, March 4, 1852, he 
crossed the Wabash river at Merom, on the old ferry boat, and reached 
San Francisco in Aiignst. He remained on the coast until 1856, returning 
by steamer, via Cape Horn, and stopping in Cuba for a few days. Thence 
he resuined his voyage to New York City, and from that city reached 
his tiome by rail. His trip was successful, financially, and like most of 
the California pioneers, the experiences of both his overland and sea 
trips were always considered the most interesting chapter of his life. 
After his return from California Mr. Renefield farmed in Hamilton 
township until i8i;3, when he and his faithful wife moved to Terre Haute. 
Politically the elder Mr. Benefield was a Democrat, and in church rela- 
tions his' wife was a Baptist. They were the parents of the following 
children : Chauncy, now residing at Dallas, Texas ; Leona, wife of Ezra 
Coble, of Terre Haute, Indiana ; Felix G., also of that city ; George, who 
is an insurance man of Dallas ; William, of this sketch ; Robert, also in 
the insurance business at Dallas; and Anna, wife of Herbert Osborn, 
of that city. 

William lienefield was reared on a farm in Hamilton township, 
received his education in the district schools, and worked at home until 
he was twentv-one years of age. He then went to Mound, Louisiana, 
where he worked a year, after" which he returned to the farm where he 
now resides. Remaining there a year and a half, he next located at 
Hymera and lived there" three years, during this period being engaged 
in the meat business as well as in mining. In 1893 he returned to Turman 
township and resumed farm life, his place tinally consisting of one 
hundred and three acres of fine land bordering on the plat of Graysville. 
At that location he conducted grain and stock farming. Among other 
enterprises with which he was afso connected was that of the Big Springs 
Threshing Machine Company in which he was a stockholder. In Sep- 
tember, 1908, Air. Benefield sold his farm and removed to Texas, having 
visited various sections of that state and purchased a fine tract of land 
in the Panhandle country. There he has erected a substantial set of 
buildings and is engaged in general farming and stockraising. 

Politicallv Mr. Benefield is a Democrat. In his fraternal connec- 
tions, while residing m Sullivan county, he was a member of the Alodern 
Woodmen of America and the Masonic order, and with his wife, _he 
belonged to the Eastern Star lodge at Graysville. Mr. Benefield was 
married January 26, 1889, to Mary Brewer, who was born November 
2, 1866, on the farm which became the family homestead. She is the 
daughter of William and Mary (Hawkins) Brewer. Her. father, a 
native of Ohio of Scotch-Irish descent, was born March 20, 1824, and 
died in Turman township, October 24, 1899. When a child he was 
brought to this country by his parents, John and Mary Ami (Cook) 
Brewer, who located at Graysville. John Brewer, the maternal grand- 
father, operated a general store at Graysville for a number of years. 
\\'illiam Brewer, the father, reached manhood in Turman township and 



io8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

there followed agricultural pursuits, finally purchasing three hundred and 
eight acres of land, which he handled in a most successful manner. Upon 
this homestead his wife died in 1868, the deceased being born in 1832, 
a daughter of Major and Sallie (Earnest) Hawkins. In 1871 William 
Brewer married Amelia Miles, a native of Gill township, and the family 
moved to Sullivan, where William Brewer formed a partnership with 
Thomas Burton, under the name of Brewer and Burton, which firm 
continued in trade several years. Then disposing of his business, he lived 
a retired life. Mr. Brewer's second wife died August 16, 1893, and in 
1895 he married Mrs. Rebecca Thornberry. In the following year he 
moved to her farm in Turman township, where he died. The widow 
novir resides with her daughter in Turman township. Mr. Brewer was 
a member of the Masonic fraternity at Merom ; also connected with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics a Republican. By his first 
marriage Mr. Brewer had si.x children ; by the second and third unions 
there was no issue. By the first wife these children were born : John 
and Solon, deceased ; Sarah E., wife of Robert Watson, of Rockford, 
California ; Emily A., deceased, who married John Kirkham ; Leanna, 
who married Rolland Hanchett, and now resides at Harlan, Nebraska ; 
and Mary, Mrs. William Benefield. Mrs. Benefield was educated in 
Sullivan, Indiana, attending its high schools and remaining at home until 
a year before her marriage in Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Benefield have children as follows : Herbert 
Milton, born October 2, I'Sgo, living at home ; June Elizabeth, born 
November 17, 1894; and William Brewer, born May 4, 1899. Mrs. 
Benefield and daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and connected with the Eastern Star lodee. 



George Townsley Wilson, who lives on and owns the original 
Wilson homestead in Haddon township, was born April 17, 1849, upon 
the three hundred acre farm where he now resides. This valuable farm 
home is situated two miles northeast of Paxton. He is a son of Martin 
and Mary P. (Lamb) Wilson. The father was bom July 15, 1810, in 
Greene county, Ohio, and the mother was born September 21. 1822, in 
Sullivan county, Indiana. This worthy couple were married January 
4, 1844. Martin Wilson came to Haddon township in 1822 and began 
working on a farm and later entered government land to the amount of 
two hundred and seventeen acres, to which he added until his landed 
estate amounted to four hundred acres. This land was all one vast 
forest when he came to the country and he, through a long series of 
years and great toil, succeeded in subduing it and making a beautiful 
and productive farm of what he found a wilderness. Politically he was 
a Democrat. His wife was a devout member of the Christian church. 
He died June 15, 1890, on his farm, and his wife laid down the burden 
of life January 9, 1857, many 3'ears prior to his death. The following 
children were born of their union: Mary Jane, born October 17, 1844, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 109 

married William Carl Usrey, of Sullivan, whose history appears else- 
where in this work; William Lowery, born October 12, 1846, died Feb- 
ruary 6, 1888, in Greene county, Indiana; George Townsley, of this 
notice; Joseph, born January 7, 1852, died August 7, 1888, at Golden, 
Colorado, where he was farming ; Sarah Ann, born September 25, 1855, 
married John T. Whitmire. 

George T. Wilson of this biographical notice remained on the home 
farm until both parents were dead. He attended the public schools and 
worked dutifully, and early learned the necessity of saving and wisely 
investing his earnings. The old homestead is now his property, the same 
comprising three hundred acres, upon which he methodically farms and 
raises stock for the market. Politically Mr. Wilson is a believer in the 
principles of the Democratic party. He is unmarried and for the last 
few winter seasons has visited various states of the Union, chiefly in 
the south. 



John E. M. Purcell, who is the owner of one of the superior grain 
and stock farms found within the limits of Haddon township, was born 
on the land he now owns and cultivates, the same being situated a mile 
and a half in an easterly direction from the enterprising village of Paxton, 
Sullivan county, Indiana. The date of his birth was November 14, 1867. 
He is the son' of William W. and Rachel L. (Creager) Purcell. The 
mother was born March 17, 1848, in Hamilton township, a daughter of 
Thomas J. and Barbara (Canary) Creager, both born in Kentucky, and 
who came with their respective parents to this country about the time 
Indiana was admitted into the Union. 

William W. I\ircell, the father, was born in Haddon township, Sul- 
livan county, April 23, 1842, and died June 7, 1894. His widow now 
resides at Paxton. The grandfather, John Williamson Purcell, was born 
in Kentucky and became one of the early pioneers in Sullivan county. 
At the time of the Civil war William W. Purcell served as a member of 
Company D, Indiana Heavy Artillery, enlisting in 1861, and serving 
until the close of the rebellion. He entered as a private, and was promoted 
to orderly sergeant. He was in the famous seige of Vicksburg and at 
the battle of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. On January 23, 1867, he began 
farming, which occupation he followed the remainder of his life. He 
began on the same farm where now lives his son, John E. M. Purcell. 
A successful farmer, at one time William W. Purcell owned about three 
hundred acres of land, all in one tract. He raised grain and fed con- 
siderable stock, and also was a breeder of fine grades of stock, including 
horses. He owned draft and English coach horses and a valuable Spanish 
jack, which animals he exhibited at the several county fairs in this section 
of the country, capturing many of the premiums offered on such stock. 
He also raised Shorthorn Durham cattle, which were also registered in 
the American Stock Book, and exhibited. Politically Mr. Purcell was 
a stanch Republican and at the hands of his fellow-party workers received 
numerous nominations. He was president of the Paxton Canning Com- 



no HISTORY OF SULLIVAX COUNTY 

pan)-, from the date of its organization in 1888, until his death, but this 
factor}' is not in operation at the present. In lodge connections he was 
an honored member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. Of his church faith, it may be said 
that he was of the Methodist Episcopal denomination, of which his 
widow is also a faithful adherent. For a number of years he served 
as one of the stewards in the church of his choice. The children born 
to William W. and Rachel L. (Creager) Purcell were: John E. M., 
of this notice, and Stella J-, now the wife of Edgar E. Nash, whose 
family history will be found within this work. 

John E. M. Purcell remained with his father, worked the farm and 
attended to the stock business with him. until the latter's death, since 
which date the son has conducted the place himself. He now owns two 
hundred and ^hirty-five acres, this being a portion of the old homestead. 
Having been trained in the science of agriculture and stockraising from 
his boyhood up by his association with his father, he naturally continued 
to pursue the same line of industry after his father's demise. Mr. Purcell 
now raises the Black Poll-Angus cattle and about two carloads annuallv 
of hogs of the Poland China breed. Besides his extensive farming 
operations, Mr. Purcell is a stockholder in the People's First National 
Bank, of Carlisle, and the People's State Bank, of Sullivan. He is the 
secretary of the old Paxton Canning Company. In his political views 
Mr. Purcell is a firm defender of the general principles of the Republican 
part}'. In the matter of fraternal societies, he is connected with the Odd 
Fellows Lodge, No. 50, and the Modern \'\"oodmen of America, Camp 
No. 3332, these lodges being at Carlisle. 

He was married December 23, 1897, to Miss Bessie B. Barclay, who 
was born in Jennings county, Indiana, September 21, 1879, daughter of 
James W. and Lydia (Ewing) Barclay. The father was born in Mason 
county, Kentucky, April 15, 1834, and now resides in Bloomington, 
Indiana. The mother was born in Decatur county, Indiana, May i, 1841, 
and died September 19, 1907, in Louisville, Kentucky, her home, however, 
being at Bloomington, Indiana. John W. Barclay has always followed 
the independent life of a farmer. Mrs. Purcell received her education 
at the public schools of Jennings county, Indiana, and graduated from 
the Carlisle high school with the class of 1896. Her parents came to 
Sullivan county from Jennings county in 1893, and the parents and one 
brother moved to Bloomington, Indiana, in 1903. Mrs. Purcell is one 
of a family of eight children, four of which are now living: Luella B., 
now a widow : Alice C, widow of A. D. Giboney, residing at Carlisle : 
Mrs. Purcell : Joseph Knox, of Bloomington, Indiana, now practicing law ; 
he is an athlete and at one time held the long distance run of the state 
of Indiana, being one of the Hoosier state's best athletes. From 1902 
to 1905 he was captain of the track team at Bloomington and football 
manager in 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Purcell have two children: William 
W., born November 16, 1898, and Paul Barclay, born October 31, 1902. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Purcell are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Paxton, of which he was a steward. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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HISTORY OF SULLI\^\X COUNTY iii 

William ¥. Huki;. — Prominent among- tlu- more prosperous and 
extensive agriculturists of Sullivan county is William F. Hoke, a wcll- 
kngwn farmer and stock raiser of Haddon township. A man of good 
business qualifications, thoroughly acquainted with the work in which he 
is so busily engaged, he is meeting with unquestioned success, and is an 
important factor in advancing the farming interests of this section of 
Indiana. He was born, August 8, 1844, on the old Hoke homestead, about 
three miles south of Carlisle, a son of Jacob Hoke. 

•Born, in 1807, in Jefferson county, Kentucky, he was there reared 
and educated. Coming to Sullivan county, Indiana, soon after his mar- 
riage, he sought a favorable location, and after looking about for a time 
took up government land in Haddon township, and by dint of industry 
and perseverance cleared and improved the valuable homestead, on which 
he resided until his death, in 1873. He carried on general farming on 
an extensive scale, and was quite a heavy stock feeder. He made much 
money in his operations, and having invested it wisely, owned at the time 
of his death about one thousand acres of choice land. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics, and served one term as county commissioner. He mar- 
ried Rosamia Brentlinger, who was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, 
about 1807, and died in Haddon township, Indiana, in 1874. Ten children 
were born to them, as follows : The two oldest, twins, died in infancy ; 
Susan, deceased ; George, engaged in farming in Knox county ; Sarah, 
deceased; Jacob, presidentof the Sullivan State Bank, at Sullivan; John, 
residing on the old homestead ; William F., of this sketch ; Charles, 
deceased ; and Richard, deceased. 

Acquiring an excellent knowledge of the various branches of agri- 
culture while young, WiUiam F. Hoke selected farming as his life occu- 
pation, and until twenty-seven years of age assisted in the management of 
the home farm. In 1872, his father having at that time purchased the 
old Hinkle farm, he assumed its possession, and has since resided here. 
Succeeding in his efforts from the first, he now owns three hundred and 
thirty acres of the best land in southern Indiana, and on it has made 
improvements of an excellent character. In the fall of 1906, he erected 
his present fine home, which stands upon a natural rise of ground, and is 
of modern construction, its building having been necessitated by the 
burning of his former home about three years ago. Mr. Hoke makes a 
specialty of raising and feeding stock, having now, in 1908, over a carload 
of choice hogs that he is raising for market. He is now turning his atten- 
tion to the breeding of black Poll-Angus cattle, having recently purchased 
a thoroughbred sire of that grade. 

On December 18, 1873, Mr. Hoke married Virginia Belle Turner, 
svho was born November 16, 1851, in Virginia, where her parents, Thomas 
K. and Lucv (Gilson) Turner, settled when coming to Sullivan county 
from Pennsylvania, where they had gone from their native state, Mrginia, 
and where they spent their remaining years. The union of Mr. and j\Irs. 
Hoke has been blessed by the birth of eleven children, namely; Myrtle, 
deceased; Bessie, unmarried; Ella, wife of ]\Iarvel Nash, a telegraph 
operator in Greene county, has two children, James and Dorothy ; Allie, 

Vol. II— 8 



112 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

a twin sister of Ella, has passed to the higher life ; Jacob, living on the 
home farm ; Thomas and Lue, twins ; Thomas is deceased, and Lue, 
single, lives at home ; Anna, living at home ; William, single ; Lillie, 
single: and a child that died in infancy. Politically, Mr. Hoke supports 
the principles of the Democratic party by voice and vote. 



John Thom.'VS Whitmire^ numbered among the progressive farmers 
of Haddon township, whose pretty farm home is situated two and a half 
miles east from the thriving village of Paxton, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
is a native of Missouri, born in Randolph county, that state, September 
3, 1851. He is the son of David Marion and Caroline (Snider) Whitmire, 
both of whom were natives of the historic county of Jessamine, Kentucky. 
The father was born June 8, 1826, and died in Randolph county, Mis- 
souri, in 1865, and the mother, born August 27, 1825, died early in the 
nineties in the same county. David M. Whitmire was of Pennsylvania 
Dutch descent, and his wife of Dutch descent with some Irish blood in 
her veins. John Whitmire, the grandfather, and his family, went to 
Missouri when David M. was a small boy. The maternal grandfather, 
John Snider, and his family, settled in Haddon township, Sullivan county, 
Indiana, locating one mile to the north of Carlisle, where he and his wife 
resided until their death. 

As has often been the case in human experience, the meeting and 
final companionship of Mr. Whitmire's father and mother was destined 
by unforeseen acts, which have not infrequently determined the future of 
men and women. The mother, Caroline Snider, went to Missouri from 
Carlisle, Indiana, to visit a married sister in Randolph county, and while 
there chanced to meet Mr. Whitmire, to whom she was subsequently 
united in marriage. They at once commenced farming in that county 
and ever after remained in that locality. David M. Whitmire, the father, 
served in the Civil war in the army. Politically he was a supporter of 
the Democratic party, while both he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Their children were as follows : One who 
died in fancy; John T., of this memoir: Charles W., born December 30, 
1853, deceased : George W., born April 13, 1856, resides on the old home- 
stead in jNIissouri : Mary B., born February 21, 1858, wife of William 
Wainwright, residing in -Missouri; William T., born April 5, i860, also 
living in Missouri ; Eliza, born September 6, 1862, now wife of Frederick 
Robb, of Randolph county, Missouri ; ]^Iontgomery, born J\lay 27. 1865, 
deceased. 

John Thomas Whitmire was reared on a farm and had the advan- 
tages of the Missouri district schools. He remained at home until Feb- 
ruary 26, 1874, on which day he went to Paxton, Indiana, and began 
farming as a hired hand. Three years later, however, believing that 
he was capable of conducting a farm for himself, he began to do so. 
About 1886 he purchased his present farm of one hundred_ and thirty- 
eio'ht acres of valuable farming land, located two and a half miles from 



HISTORY OF SULLIN A\ COUNTY 113 

Paxton, ill an easterly direction. Here lie lias l)een highly successfnl 
in the cuUivatic)ii of tlie land which has hrouj^lit him good returns, and 
placed himself and family in independent circumstances. Politically Mr. 
W'hitmire affiliates with the Democratic party. 

He was united in marriage November 2, 1876, to Sarah Ann Wilson, 
born in Haddon township, September 25, 1855, a daughter of Martin 
and Mary P. (Lamb) Wilson. Her father came to Sullivan county from 
Ohio in 1820, and her mother was native to Kentucky ; both are now 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. W'hitmire have one daughter: Gertrude, born 
November 8, 1878, unmarried, and living at home. She attended the 
district schools of her native township and the high schools of Sullivan, 
graduating in music at the Conservatory of the DePauw University, 
Greencastle, Indiana, both in vocal and instrumental music. She is now 
giving instructions in music in her home neighborhood. Mr. Whitmire 
and family have had the pleasure of spending the past two winters in 
California's delightful climate, amid the flowers and sunshine of the 
coast state. In their church connections the parents and daughter are 
acceptalile members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



Fr.\xklix M. Anderson, one of the representative farmers who 
have aided in building up the present prosperity found within the borders 
of Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, was born February 7, 
1864, in Marion county, Indiana, on the farm of his father, Abner B. 
Anderson. The father was born in Highland county, December, 1818, 
and died in 1884. He was of Scotch descent and went to Marion county, 
Indiana, alone, at the age of sixteen years. He subsequently married 
in that county and there began farming for himself. In the autumn 
of 1S69 the family moved to Haddon townsliip, Sullivan county, and 
in 1870 was erected the farm house which Franklin M. now owns and 
in which he lived until the spring of 1908, when he completed a new 
house on his farm. The father and mother both resided on this farm 
until their death. Abner F>. Anderson was a successful farmer and was 
a Democrat in politics. He was a member of the Baptist church, while 
his good wife was of the Methodist religious faith. Before her marriage 
she was Ruth Elmore, a native of Kentucky, and was born near Crab 
Orchard, March 5, 1819, dying in 1896. She was of Irish lineage. The 
children born to Abner B. Anderson and wife were as follows: William, 
Candice A., John, Loretta, Mariah Jane, Franklin M. and three who 
died in infancy. 

Franklin M. Anderson was reared on a farm and attended the 
country schools. When he reached his twentieth year he commenced 
to farm on his own account, and now owns the original homestead, con- 
sisting of forty-five acres, to which he has added, now possessing one 
hundred and forty-three acres, upon which he carries on general farming 
operations. In his political views Mr. Anderson favors the Republican 
partv, and casts his vote with that organization. He has wisely taken 



114 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

a membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, Camp No. 3332, 
at CarHsle. 

He was united in marriage January 5, 1888, to PermeHa A. Wahers, 
born in Haddon township, in 1865, and who died in i8g6 in the month 
of September. She was educated in her native county. Her parents 
were Joel O. and Nancy (Land) Walters, both of whom are now dead. 
Five children were born to Mr. Anderson and wife: Lola M., deceased; 
William L., deceased; Elva, born November, 1892; Ruth Marie, born 
June, 1894; John W., deceased. For his second wife Mr. Anderson mar- 
ried Sarah E. (Woodward) Pool, born in Jefferson township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana, March 27, 1871. They were united in marriage in 1896 
and are the parents of two children : Albert L. and Dais}^ Gladys. Before 
her second marriage Mrs. Anderson was the widow of Harrv Pool, 
who lived in JetTerson township, and who died in the nineties, leaving 
a daughter, Ethel, born in February, 1896, and who now resides with 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson. In church connections Mrs. Anderson is a 
member of the Christian church.. 

The Andersons are all large men in stature, Franklin M. being six 
feet and four inches in height, weighing one hundred and ninety-five 
pounds, while his father was the tallest man in Sullivan county, he 
measuring six feet and seven inches, and weighing two hundred and 
twenty-five pounds. 



John Marion Whitlock, who is the owner of one of the many fertile 
farms of Haddon township, Sullivan county, i's a native of Kentucky, 
born April 29, 1858, son of Nathan and Mary E. (Williams) Whitlock, 
both natives of Kentucky. In 1863 the family came to Marion county. 
Indiana, remained one year, then settled in Haddon township, Sullivan 
county, near Paxton, where both the father and mother died, he on 
August 10, 1878, and she later. They were both of English descent. 
The father always followed agriculture for his livelihood. Politically 
he supported the Democratic part)^ Their children were as follows : 
John Marion, Mary Jane, wife of John O. McCammon, residing in 
Haddon township ; Robert, of Haddon township ; Josephine, deceased ; 
George, of Haddon township ; Nancy, wife of David S. Wilson, of Jef- 
ferson township. 

John Marion Whitlock commenced the real activities of his career 
when but twelve years old, by doing farm work b_\' the month. \Vhen 
nineteen years of age he began farming on his own account and has 
continued in the same calling ever since. He removed to his present 
farm in 1888. The property, which belongs to him and his wife, consists 
of one hundred and twenty-five acres. In his political views Mr. Whit- 
lock is a believer in the platform of the Democratic party. 

He has been twice married, first, November 2, 1878, to Pamelia 
Shake, born in Haddon township, daughter of John Shake, who was 
a farmer of Haddon township. jNIr. Whitlock died about 1884, leaving 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 115 

two children: Lou Effie, born January 27, 1882, now the wife of Edward 
Padgett, of Lladdon township ; and WilHani W'aUers, born Jaiuiary 24, 
1884, unmarried and at home, attended the Carhsle high sciiool and was 
graduated from the Normal College at Danville, Indiana. Since leaving 
school he has taught three years in Haddon township. For his second 
wife Mr. Whitlock married, March 18, 1888, Mary E. Deveors, who 
was born January 28, 1858, in Haddon township, on the farm which 
she now owns. She is the daughter of James and Eliza (Carrico) 
Deveors, both now deceased. l!y this marriage the issue is: Ethel, born 
October 18, 1891. 



Edgar- E. Nash is a son of Armpsted ]\I. and Nancy E. (Purcell) 
Nash. In the sketch of Armpsted M. Nash, on another page of this 
work, with biography of William L. Nash, will be found ancestry, so 
far as it is now known. Edgar E. Nash was born February 7, 1868, in 
Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana. He was reared on his 
father's farm, receiving his education at the district schools and he 
remained at home until he reached the age of twenty-one years, when 
he embarked in farming on his own account, on the old Nash homestead. 
Subsequently, he removed into the same old farm house which his father 
had remodeled. Edgar E. Nash has come to be an enterprising agricul- 
turist, who is alive to all new and modern farming methods, both as a 
grain and stock grower, in which calling he is highly successful. He 
usually feeds two carloads of hogs and cattle each year and handles 
the Poll-Angus and Shorthorn cattle. He owns two farms, one of two 
hundred and forty-six acres, and one of seventy-six acres. 

Like all true Aiuerican citizens, Mr. Nash is somewhat interested 
in politics, but not as an office seeker, for his time and attention is 
thoroughlv wrapped up in his agriculture and stockraising. He votes 
with the Democratic party. As a protection to his family, in case of his 
death, he holds membership with that most thoroughly reliable beneficiary 
society, the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to Camp No. 3332 
at Carlisle. 

He was married October 30. 1889, to Stella J. Purcell, born in 
Haddon township, October 2, 1871, daughter of W. W. and Rachel L. 
(Creager) Purcell, both of whom were natives of Sullivan county, 
Indiana. The father died June 7, 1894, and the mother still lives at 
Paxton. Their two children were: J. E. M. Purcell, who lives in 
Fladdon township, and Mrs. Nash. Mr. and ]\Irs. Nash are the parents 
of six children, born in the following order: Dona Maude, born Sep- 
tember 27, 1890, expects to graduate from the high school at Carlisle 
with the class of 1909; William Carlton, born October 4, 1892: Lillie 
Alabel, June 26, 1894; Rachel Naomi, December 15, 1896; Harold Eugene, 
Tulv 24, 1901 ; Helen Louise, September 16, 1905. Mrs. Nash and her 
daughters, Dona Maude and Lillie ]\Iabel and the son William are 
members of the IMethodist Episcopal church in Paxton, Indiana. 



ii6 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

John W. Walters, one of Sullivan county's progressive farmers, 
whose farm home is situated' in Haddon township, is a native of this 
part of Sullivan county, born April 12, 1856, a son of Joel O. and Nancy 
(Land) Walters. The father was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, 
January 18, 1824, one of seven children born to Luke and Evaril'la 
(Lambj Walters, who were natives of Virginia, but who settled in Ken- 
tucky and removed from that state to Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1830. 
They resided in Haddon township the remainder of their days. The 
mother of John W. Walters was born in Haddon township, September 
8, 1823, and died in 1895, her husband dying two years previous to her 
death. Nancy Land was a daughter of James R. and Jane (Willis) 
Land, who was twice married, Nancy being a daughter by the first 
marriage. Joel O. and Nancy (Land) Walters were united in marriage 
March 28, 1848, and to their union ten children were born, of whom the 
following are living: ]\Iahala, widow of James H. Willis; John W., 
of this biography ; and Permellia. The remainder of the family are all 
deceased. 

Joel O. Walters was a very successful farmer, and at one time owned 
three hundred acres of land. Politically he was a firm supporter of the 
Democratic party, while both he and his faithful wife were members of 
the Christian church. The great-grandfatliers on both sides were in the 
Revolutionary war, and two great uncles were in the war of 1812; two 
second cousins also served in -the Mexican .^war, and three uncles were 
in the Civil war. Non^ of this number who went forth to defend their 
country ever received a iivound. '■ 

John W. Walters, Son 'o.f Joel O.; was, reared on his father's farm 
and remained at home until twenty-five years of age, then began farming 
for himself in Haddon township, continuing until the present time. In 
the spring of 1882 he purchased a farm of eighty acres in the northeast 
part of the township. This he sold in the autumn of 1882 and bought 
sixty-six acres where he now lives. To this he has added until he now 
has one hundred and eighty-six acres, situated a half mile west of Paxton. 
Here he carries on in a most successful manner both grain and stock 
farming. He handles considerable stock, and ships from one to two 
carloads each year. Besides his extensive farm operations, he is one of 
the stockholders in the Carlisle Telephone Company. In his political 
belief he is a Prghibitionist, believing as he does, that the liquor business 
in all of its evil forms, will never be controlled or totally suppressed by 
either of the old political parties. 

April I, 1881, Mr. Walters was married to Anna Nash, born near 
Paxton, Sullivan county, Indiana, October 31, i860, and educated in her 
native county. She is a daughter of James L. and Sarah (Ross) Nash, 
both being natives of Haddon township, Sullivan county. James L. 
Nash was born March 16, 1829, and was one of the nine children born 
to Marvel W. and Leah (Love) Nash, who were counted among the 
pioneers of Sullivan comity, and came in from the state of Kentucky. 
September 16, 1854, James L. Nash married Sarah J. Ross, born in 
Sullivan county, July 9, 1835. To this union four children were born: 



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HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 117 

Robert D., of Slielburn : John ?\I., of I'aris, California, where he is a 
professor in the high schools; Leah Ann, Mrs. Walters; Marvel, residing 
in \igo county, Indiana, now telegraph operator and also owns a farm 
in Haddon township. Sarah J. (Ross) Nash died December 25, 1873. 
James L. Nash then married Eliza J. (Summers) Curr)-. Mr. Nash 
owned at one time about four hundred and twent\-five acres of land, and 
represented his county in the state legislature in the session of 1875. He 
was instrumental in securing the passage of the "Fees and Salaries" 
bill, as well as one for reducing taxes in the state. He was a county 
commissioner for four years, and in church connection was an elder in 
the Christian church. He died November 10. 1896, and his widow now 
resides on the old homestead. 

To ]Mr. and Mrs. Walters were born nine children, as follows: 
Lorena, born December 29, 1881, attended the University at \'incennes 
and also the Union Christian College at Meroni, Indiana, is now the wife 
of Carl Gobin, residing in Haddon township ; James Nash, born March 
7, 1884, unmarried, took a course in the Correspondence School of Scran- 
ton, Pennsylvania, after which he went to Buffalo and engaged with the 
Bell Telephone Company, and is now superintendent of maintainance of 
the cable at Rochester, New York; Bessie,' born September 20. 1885, 
unmarried, educated in the common schools and now at home ; Joel E., 
born September 2-]. 1887, died May 11, 1888: William L., born June 17, 
1889, unmarried and at home; Melvin E., born March 7. 1891. unmarried 
and attending the Carlisle high school; Jenni?; born March 10, 1895; 
Marvil W., born November 12,, ^.897 ; R. Ros.s', born July 25, 1899. Mr. 
and Mrs. Walters, together with, tlieir family, are members of the 
Christian church, of which he has been a elder eleven years, as well as 
chairman of the official board. 



S.\L.\THiEL Boone. — Holding a position of prominence among the 
foremost agriculturists of Sullivan county is Salathiel Boone, of Haddon 
township, an extensive landholder, a leading stock raiser and feeder, and 
a keen, wideawake business man. A native of Sullivan county, his birth 
occurred August 9. 1853. in Fairbanks township. When he was a year 
old he was brought by his parents to Haddon township, where he lived 
until six years of age. The following eight years he lived near Sullivan, 
and in the public schools of Hamilton township received his early 
education. 

Coming, when a lad of fourteen years to Haddon township, Salathiel 
Boone lived with James J. Snyder, one mile north of Carlisle, for eleven 
years, during the last four years of the time working the Snyder farm 
on shares. In the fall of 1878, about six months after his marriage. Mr. 
Boone bought ninetv-four acres of land lying east of Carlisle, and 
remained here until the fall of 1880. Selling then at an advantage, he 
purchased the Crantz farm, lying two miles east of Carlisle, and has here 
resided since. Succeeding well in his undertakings, Mr. Boone subse- 



ii8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

quently bought fifty-five acres of the ElHs farm, which adjoins his, and 
eighty-five acres of the McConnell farm, having now in his home farm 
two hundred and fifty-five acres of rich and productive land. In addition 
to his home estate he also owns three other farms, having title in all to 
five hundred and fifteen acres. For many years Mr. Boone has made a 
specialty of raising fine blooded horses, and has now two registered 
French draft mares, and is part owner of the French draft stallion 
"Model." He is an extensive feeder of stock, feeding from two to six 
carloads of cattle every year, and he also raises and sells from one hundred 
to three hundred head of hogs per annum. His estate, which is one of 
the finest in the vicinity, is, with its valuable improvements and equip- 
ments, a visible evidence of his industry, energy and good judgment. 

On April 24, 1878, Mr. Boone married Sue Blything, who was born 
in Sullivan county June 25, 1853, and was here brought up and educated. 
Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Boone, namely: James, 
born December 26, 1880; Jesse, born August 5, 1883; Jennie, born 
December 18, 1886; and Robert, born August 2, i8go. James, now living 
with his parents on the farm, completed his education at Purdue Univer- 
sity, and was associated with Dr. J. R. Whalen and J. F. Alumbaugh in 
the construction of the gravel and rock roads of the county. He is a 
Mason, belonging, to Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, A. F. & A. M. Jennie is the 
wife of Bert Lisman, of Haddon township. 

Mr. Boone is actively identified with many of the more important 
interests of this locality. He was one of the organizers of the First 
National Bank of Carlisle, of which he is a stockholder and a director ; 
he was also one of the organizers of the Carlisle Telephone Company, in 
which he is still a large stockholder, and of which he was for a number 
of years the president ; he also assisted in organizing both the Carlisle 
Canning Company, which was operated three years, and the Carlisle 
Creamery, which existed about ten years, and of which he was president 
for sometime, and one of the directorate the greater part of the time. 

Politically Mr. Boone is a stanch Democrat, and since January i. 
1905, has served as county commissioner. Fraternally he is a member, 
and worshipful- master, of Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, A. F. & A. 'SI., of the 
Eastern Star, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. When seventeen years old he united 
with the Christian church and is a trustee and a deacon of the church in 
Carlisle, to which his wife and children also belong. 



Richard T. Willis. — The substantial and well-to-do citizens of 
Haddon township, Sullivan county, have no better representative than 
Richard T. Willis, who holds high rank among the systematic, progressive 
and business-like farmers that are so ably conducting the extensive 
agricultural interests of this part of Sullivan county. He is surely a 
native and to the manor birth, his birth having occurred on the farm 
where he now resides, July 17, 1854. He is a son of the late Edward 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 119 

Willis, and grandson of Richard Willis, who emigrated from Kentucky 
to Indiana in 1832, took up land in lladdon township, and here spent 
his remaining years. He was a life-long farmer, and was, also, very, 
fond of hunting, being an expert marksman. 

Born at Crab Orchard, Kentucky, January 10, 182^, Edward Willis 
was but a child when he came with his parents to Haddon township. 
Finding farming congenial to his tastes, he was successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits during his entire life, at the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1903, being owner of about nine hundred acres of 
good land in Haddon township. He was a man of influence in public 
afifairs, in his earlier life belonging to the Democratic party, but in later 
years supporting the principles of the Republican party. He was a 
member of the Ancient Free and Accepted jMasons. and at one time 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Religiously he was 
identified by membership with the Christian church. The maiden name 
of his wife was Pamelia Shake. She was born in Kentucky, June 10, 
1826, a daughter of David Shake, who came to Haddon township about 
the same time that Richard Willis did. She is now living in Carlisle, 
Indiana. To her and her husband twelve children were born, as follows : 
John W., of Carlisle; James, deceased; David, of Carlisle; Richard T., 
"of this sketch ; L. H., of Hamilton township ; W. D., deceased ; Louisa, 
deceased ; Fannie, wife of Rush McCammon, of Carlisle ; Anna, deceased ; 
Minnie, deceased ; Ardimeca, of Carlisle ; and George B., of Haddon 
township. 

Growing to manhood on the home farm, Richard T. Willis obtained 
his elementary education in the district schools and remained a member 
of the parental household until twenty-six years old. He then began 
farming for himself in Haddon township, in the fall of 1888 returning to 
the old homestead, where he has since resided. He has dealt quite 
extensively in real estate, especially in farming property, and is now 
owner of four hundred and six acres of land in the township. He carries 
on general farming, raising both grain and stock, and has been a heavy 
cattle feeder and hog raiser, owning now one hundred and seventy hogs, 
and two carloads of'cattle. He takes great interest in the welfare of his 
native town and county, and is always ready to lend his assistance- in 
the establishment of beneficial enterprises. He was one of the organizers, 
and is a director, of the First National Bank of Carlisle, and is a stock- 
holder in the Carlisle Telephone Company. In his political affiliations 
he has been identified with the Democratic party. 

On March 14, 1882, Mr. Willis married Emma F. Plummer, who 
was born in ^Marion county, Indiana, ]\Iarch 17', 1857, a daughter of 
Samuel and IMelinda (Boatman) Plummer, the former of whom was 
born in Ohio, and the latter in Kentucky. In 1868 :\rr. and :\Irs. Plummer 
located in Sullivan county, and here spent the remainder of their lives. 
Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Willis, namely : Josephine, 
living at home; Grover, deceased; Scott, now living at home, married 
Zelnm Near, who died in April, 1908, leaving one child, Harold Edward ; 
Clara, \'eacher, Denver, Okie, Clem and Celia. ^Mr. and Mrs. R. T. 



120 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Willis have in their possession two of the old parchment deeds executed 
under the hand and seal of President Van Buren, and dated respectively 
August 5, 1837, and September 5, 1838. These deeds are valuable 
souvenirs in Sullivan county. 



Bailey McConnell. — Occupying a position of prominence among 
the native-born citizens of Haddon township, noteworthy for their abilitv, 
integrity and enterprise is Bailey McConnell, a practical and progressive 
agriculturist, actively and successfully employed in general farming. A 
son of Andrew McConnell, he was born April g, 1840, in Haddon town- 
ship, of thrifty Scotch ancestry. His grandfather, McConnell, emigrated 
from Scotland, the land of his birth, to America in 1805, bringing with 
him his family. In 1806 he located in Haddon township, becoming one 
of the original householders of this part of Sullivan county, and on the 
farm which he improved, lying about two miles east of Carlisle, Bailey 
McConnell, of this sketch, was born. 

Born in Scotland in 1798, Andrew McConnell was but eight years 
old when he came to Indiana. As soon as old enough to wield an axe or 
a hoe, he began to assist in the pioneer labor of clearing and improving 
a homestead, and during his entire life was engaged in tilling the soil, 
meeting with good success in his efforts. He was a man of strong con- 
victions, earnest in the support of principles which he believed to be 
right, and while identified with the Democratic party before the Civil 
war, was a Republican after its close. Andrew McConnell married Nancy 
Johnson, whose father was an early settler of Haddon township, and the 
land, situated about three miles south of Carlisle, that Mr. Johnson took 
up from the government and improved, is the farm upon which Bailey 
McConnell has. lived during the past quarter of a century. Of the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McConnell, nine children were born, as 
follows: Elizabeth, widow of William Harper, resides in Haddon town- 
ship; John, of Sullivan: Virginia, deceased; Turner, deceased; Bailey, of 
this sketch ; Margaret, deceased ; Sarah Barthenia, deceased ; Laura, wife 
of Ellis Greenfield, of Carlisle ; and Mary, deceased. 

Reared to agricultural pursuits, Bailey McConnell was educated in 
the district schools. On July 13, 1862. inspired by true patriotic spirit, 
he enlisted in Company K, Eightieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a 
private, but was afterwards promoted to second lieutenant, then to first 
lieutenant, finally being commissioned captain of his company, a rank 
that he held until the close of the war. He saw hard service while in 
the army, his company, which numbered one hundred sound men at the 
time of enlistment, being reduced to twenty-four when mustered out of 
service in 1865, on June 28. Mr. McConnell took part in many of the 
important engagements of the conflict, among them being those at Perry- 
ville, Resaca, Knoxville, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and at Fort Ander- 
son, North Carolina. Returning home after receiving his discharge, June 
24, 1865, Mr. McConnell resumed farming, and in the pursuit of his 



HISTORY OF SULT.]\'AX COUNTY 121 

indepciKk'iit calling luis bccMi exceedingly prosperous, now owning 
between four hundred and six hundred acres of rich and fertile land. 
Since 1873 he has resided on his present homestead, which was bought 
from the" government by his Grandfather Johnson. Many valuable 
improvenieuts have been made on the place by Air. McConnell. including 
the erection of his handsome residence, a brick structure, which stands 
back a few rods from the street, on one of the finest building spots 
imaginable. He carries on general farming, and buys and feeds con- 
siderable stock each year, finding stockraising a profitable industry. He 
owns stock in the Peoples State Bank of Carlisle, a prosperous institution. 
In politics he is a Republican, and in social circles is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, Geo. Rotranund Post, No. 445, at Carlisle. 

On September 29, 1870, Mr. McConnell married Jennie O. McDowell, 
who was born April 29, 1852, in Columbiana county, Ohio, a daughter of 
Dr. Tames McDowell. Dr. McDowell was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, June 19, 1820, a son of James and Catherine (McCarthy) 
McDowell, and" there began the study of medicine with Dr. James Martin. 
Fitted for a professional career, he located as a physician at Moore's 
Salt Works, on Big Yellow creek, in Jefferson county, Ohio, where he 
remained from 1842 until 1854. The following seven years he was 
engaged in the practice of medicine in Columbiana county, Ohio, after 
which he returned to Moore's Salt Works, and was there a few years. 
Coming from there to Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1865, Dr. McDowell 
located" in Teft'erson township, and was successfully engaged in his pro- 
fessional calling at Pleasantville until his death, October 6, 1892. He 
married Carolina Erwin, and they became the parents of five children, 
namely: Hon. M. M. McDowell,' M. D., a practicing physician at Vin- 
cennes, Indiana, now serving as state senator: James McDowell, M. D., 
of Bruceville: L. C. McDowell, M. D., of Freelandsville ; Jennie O., wife 
of Mr. McConnell; and Catherine, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. McConnell 
have one child, James McConnell, a lumber and grain dealer in Carlisle, 
of whom a brief sketch may be found on another page of this work. Mrs. 
McConnell is a woman of culture and talent, having received her educa- 
tion at Farmersburg College under the instruction of Professor Craw- 
ford. Both Mr. and Mrs. McConnell are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and are among its most faithful and active workers. 



George W.\shington Watson. — Trained to habits of industry and 
honesty, and familiar with farming pursuits from boyhood, George W. 
Watson, of Haddon township, is numbered among the substantial and 
prosperous agriculturists of this part of Sullivan county, being the owner 
of one of the best improved and best managed farms in this vicinity. A 
native of Indiana, he was bom, September 4, 1842, in Alartin county, a 
son of Singleton Wilson Watson. 

A lifelong resident of Indiana, Singleton W. Watson was born August 
II, 1809, and'died August 22, 1876, in Knox county. Choosing agricul- 



122 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

ture as his means of making a livelihood, he began his career as a farmer 
and stock raiser in Martin county, from whence he came to Sullivan 
county during the fifties, settling in Haddon township,' where he was 
employed in tilling the soil until his retirement from active labor, his 
last years being spent with his children. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Hannah Albright, was born in Indiana, June 29, 1813, and died in 
Sullivan county, March 4, 1864. Her father, John Henry Albright, a life- 
long farmer, was born in Pennsylvania, and died in j\Iartin county, Indi- 
ana. Thirteen children were born of the union of S. W. and Hannah 
(Albright) Watson, as follovv's: John H., deceased, was born July 13, 
1833; Sarah Ann, deceased, was born July 12, 1834; Elizabeth, born 
October 13, 1837, died March 13, 1883; Joseph R., born February 7, 
1840, resides in Knox county; George W., of this sketch; James R., 
residing in Knox county, was born November 19, 1844 ; Thomas R., born 
November 19, 1846, is a resident of Oaktown, Indiana; Weston R., born 
November 22, 1848, died June 26, 1873; Benjamin F., born February 27, 
1851, died April 6, 1879; Singleton W., of Huntington count}^ Indiana, 
was born February 28, 1853 ; Mary H., born April 19, 1855, died January 
4, 1879; Willis \Y.. born October 11, 1857, resides in Huntington county, 
Indiana ; and a child that died in infancy. 

Leaving home at the age of fifteen years, George W. Watson worked 
by the month on the farm of Samuel Johnson, afterwards being similarly 
employed for a year in Knox county. On July 6, 186 1, responding to the 
call for troops, he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-first Indiana Lleavy 
Artillerjr, and served as a private until honorably discharged, at New 
Orleans, July 31, 1864. He took part in many engagements, including 
those at Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, St. Charles, Bisland, and at Port 
Hudson, where the siege lasted forty-five days, and during the entire 
period of his enlistment, although often under fire, was fortunate enough 
to escape without a wound. He now receives a pension for his services to 
his country in her time of need. On returning to his home, Mr. Watson 
began farming on his own accoimt in Haddon township, and in his free 
and independent vocation has met with well merited success. He has 
accumulated a good property, and in addition to the home estate owns a 
fai^m of forty acres in lefferson township, and supervises its management. 
He is a stanch Republican in politics, influential in local aft'airs, and for 
several years has been a member of the Republican precinct committee. 
Socially, he belongs to Carlisle Post, No. 445, G. A. R. 

On June 26, 1S70, Mr. Watson married Helen C. Berry, who was 
born in Knox county, Indiana, July 19, 1850. Her father, William A. 
Berry, was born, October 5, 1800, in Shenandoah county, Virginia, and 
died in Knox county, Indiana, October 18, 1861. When about fourteen 
years of age, he went to Kentucky, where he followed his trades of a 
blacksmith and carpenter for a numlDer of years. Coming to Knox county, 
Indiana, in 1840, he improved a farm, and also worked at his trades, con- 
tinuing residence there until his death. He married Lucinda Million, who 
was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, April 11, 1805, and died January 
28, 1867, in Indiana. Both were members of the Baptist church. Twelve 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 123 

children were born of their union, nanieh-: L\'(Iia K., born March 17, 
1828, died July 23, 1885 ; Daniel T., born July 27, 1829, died April 8, 
1908; John M., born November 8, 1830, resides in Greene county, Indiana; 
William A., of Knox county, Indiana, was born August 19, 1832; Amanda 
E., born July 14, 1834, resides in Knox county; Susan A., residiu"; in 
Jefferson township, born April 16, 1836, is the wife of Alexander Rob- 
bins : James L., born October 30, 1837, is a resident of Indianapolis ; 
Angeline, widow of the late John Miller, of Carlisle, was born November 
I, 1839; Sarah E., born January 21, 1848, died September 12, 1901 ; 
Helen C, wife of Mr. Watson ; and two children that died in infancy. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Watson, namely : Nora 
Ollie, born September 24, 1871, died April 4, 1879: Jennie AL, born Jan- 
uary 29, 1875, was educated in the Carlisle schools and at the State Normal 
College in Terre Haute, and taught school three terms in Haddon town- 
ship and one term in Pearson township ; Otto Dare, born October 4, 1877, 
died March 17, 1879; and Carl A., born January 12, 1880, now a photog- 
rapher in Terre Haute, married Nora Shake, and they have one son, 
Dwight C, and one daughter, Mildred Florence, who died when two 
months old. Religiously, Mr. Watson belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
ciiurch, while his wife and daughters are members of the Baptist church. 



J.\MEs H. Padgett. — Prosperously engaged in the calling upon which 
our nation's wealth and strength so largely depends, James H. Padgett, 
of Haddon township, holds an assured position among the systematic 
and skilful agriculturists of Sullivan county. The descendant of a pio- 
neer family of prominence, he was born, January 3, 1848, in this town- 
ship, a son of the late Theophilus Padgett. His grandfather Padgett 
was one of the earliest ^ettlers of Haddon township, coming here in the 
very early period of its settlement, at the time of his arrival there being 
but two houses between Carlisle and Pleasantville. 

Born in Kentucky, Theophilus Padgett was but six years old when 
he came with his parents to Sullivan county. Brought up on a farm, he 
continued in the occupation to which he was reared, and on reaching 
man's estate entered government land in Haddon township, and at once 
began the pioneer work of clearing and improving a homestead. During 
the fall and winter seasons, he kept four horses busily employed by doing 
nearly all of the teaming for the Carlisle merchants, taking produce for 
them to Evansville, and bringing back large loads of general merchandise. 
As a farmer, he was very successful, at one time being owner of about 
three hundred and seventy acres of rich and valuable land. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and a member, with his wife, of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He was twice married. His first wife, whose maiden name 
was Susie Hinkle, died in early womanhood, leaving two children, namely: 
William, of Pleasantville, and Sareldia, deceased. He married for his 
second wife Permelia Bodwell, who was born in Jefferson township, 
Indiana, and died in Haddon township. Slie bore him four children, as 



124 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

follows: Martha Elizabeth, wife of William Lisman, of Haddon town- 
ship ; Sarah Jane, wife of James Spencer, of Jefferson township ; James 
H. ; and Cassius G., of Haddon township. ■ 

A farmer by birth, breeding and inheritance, James H. Padgett is 
now living on a part of the land which his father took up from the gov- 
ernment, and in the raising of grain and stock has been exceptionally 
fortunate, his labors as an agriculturist meeting with substantial rewards. 

Mr. Padgett married, in 1861, Martha Yates, who was born in Jeffer- 
son county, Kentucky, December 25, 1848, a daughter of William and 

(Shake) Yates, who were lifelong residents of Kentucky. After 

the death of her parents, she came with her uncle, James Shake, to Had- 
don township, being then sixteen years of age. Five children have been 
born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Padgett, namely : Mary and William 
died in infancy ; Theodosia : Everett E. ; and Delia Grace. Theodosla, 
born in December, 1878, has been twice married. She married, first, Don 
Pane, who died a short time later, leaving one child, Floy, who lives with 
her mother and grandparents ; and, second, Rev. A. L. Tidric, a Baptist 
minister, now located at Oolitic, Indiana, and they have one son, Lawrence. 
Everett E., born in November, ,1880, was graduated from the State Normal 
school at Terre Haute, after which he took a course of study at the North- 
western University, in Chicago, later being graduated with the degree of 
M. D. from the Rush Medical College, in Chicago. Since 1905, Dr. E. E. 
Padgett has been located in Indianapolis, wdiere he has built up a fine 
practice as a physician and surgeon. He married Theresa Bow, of 
Pleasantville. Delia Grace, born in 1882, married Lee Douthitt, of Wag- 
ner township, Knox county, and has one child, Catherine, living, and has 
lost one child. Mrs. Tidric, Mr. Padgett's oldest daughter, began teaching 
school when but sixteen years old, and for seven )'ears was a most success- 
ful and popular teacher in the common schools of Sullivan county. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Padgett is a strong Prohibitionist ; fraternally, he belongs to 
Ben Hur Lodge, of Carlisle, and religiously, both he and his wife are 
members of the Baptist church. 



James Whipps. — A practical and skilful farmer, James Whipps, of 
Haddon township, is an able representative of the horticultural and agri- 
cultural interests of Sullivan county. His highly improved farm, lying 
south of Carlisle, contains the site of old Fort Haddon, the fort itself 
having been located very near the house in which Mr. Whipps lives. A 
son of Reuben Whipps, he was born, October 9, 1853, "'' Perry county, 
Ohio, of Irish ancestry. His grandfather Whipps emigrated from Ireland 
to this country, bringing with him his wife and children, locating in Perry 
county, Ohio, where he was engaged in tilling the soil until his death. 

Born in Ireland, in September, 1812, Reuben Whipps came with the 
family to the LTnited States, assisted his father in establishing a home in 
Perry county, Ohio, and there resided during the earlier years of his life. 
Comino- from there to Sullivan countv, Indiana, he located in Haddon 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 125 

township on Ajiril 7. 1857. lluying land just east of Carlisle, he improved 
a good honiL^tcad, and as a tiller of the soil met with signal success, at 
the time of his death, which occurred Fehruary 6, 1886, being owner of 
three hundred and twenty-seven acres of valuable land. He was a Jack- 
sonian Democrat in politics, and an earnest supporter of the principles of 
his part}-. The maiden name of his wife was Elizabeth Welch. She was 
born in Ireland, January 10, 1822, a daughter of George Welch, who came 
to this country with his family, and settled in Ohio, living first in Harrison 
county, but spending the later years of his life in Perry county. Six chil- 
dren were born of their union, namely : William and George residing in 
California ; John, a farmer ; Thomas, deceased ; James, of this sketch ; 
and Alary Ann, wife of Dudley Willis, of California. 

Brought up on the home farm, James \Miipps received his early edu- 
cation in the district schools, which he attended in the long winter terms, 
laboring on the farm during seed time and harvest. He remained beneath 
the parental roof until thirty years of age, when he moved to the farm 
which he now owns and occupies, but which was then owned by his father. 
Continuing the improvements already begun on the place, Mr. Whipps has 
now a valuable farm of ninety-two acres, its land being highly cultivated, 
and one of the most productive in the vicinity. Here he is raising both 
grain and stock, and for the past eight years has made a specialty of rais- 
ing potatoes and strawberries for the home market, doing an extensive 
and lucrative business in this branch of industry. He raises fine varieties 
of strawberries, having the Warfield, Haviland, Sample, Excelsior, and 
Senator Dunlap, all of which are especially fine, being pleasing to the eye 
and of particularly rich flavor. 

On October 9. 1883, Mr. Whipps married Margaret McClure, who 
was born in Knox county, Indiana, August 6, 1858, and was there edu- 
cated. After completing a course at the Bruceville Normal School, she 
taught four years in Knox county, being a teacher in the public schools 
of baktown' for a year. Her parents, Hiram and Rosella (Wilson) 
McClure, spent their' lives in Knox county, being farmers. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Whipps, namely : Chellis O., born Jan- 
uary 19, 1885. was graduated from the Carlisle high school with the class 
of 1905, and is now assisting his father on the home farm ; and Clara E., 
born March 17, 1888, was graduated from the Carlisle high school with 
the class of 1906. True to the political faith in which he was reared, Mr. 
Whipps is an uncompromising Democrat. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
belonging to the Carlisle lodges of both organizations. He and his wife 
and their son and daughter are valued members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



John A. Hoke. — Numbered among the practical and progressive 
agriculturists of Sullivan county is John A. Hoke, who is successfully 
employed in his chosen occupation on the old Hoke homestead, which 
lies three miles south of Carlisle. He was born on the homestead where 



126 HISTORY OF SULLIVAX COUNTY 

he has spent his entire hfe, May 6, 1842, being a son of Jacob and Rosanna 
(Brenthnger) Hoke, and a brother of Wilham F. Hoke, in whose sketch, 
on another page of this work, further parental histor}' may be found. 

Assisting in the clearing and improving of the home farm, Mr. Hoke 
remained with his parents as long as they lived, and subsequently suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of the original tract of land that his father took 
up from the government, and the title to which has never been changed. 
He has now one hundred and eighty-three acres of rich and arable land, 
and also one hundred and twenty acres in the same township, which is 
well improved and judiciously cultivated, constituting one of the model 
farms of the vicinity. He carries on general farming and stock raising, 
making a specialty of the black Poll-Angus cattle. He feeds each year 
about a half carload of cattle, from one to two carloads of Poland China 
hogs, and raises Shropshire sheep. He is a stockholder in the First 
National Bank of Carlisle, and is a Democrat in his political affiliations. 

Mr. Hoke married, January 3, 1875, Elizabeth Brentlinger, who was 
born, March 12, 1849, in Clark county, Indiana. Her parents, Joseph and 
Camellia (Wells) Brentlinger, were born and reared in Kentucky, but 
shortly after their marriage settled in Clark county, Indiana, where they 
improved a farm, on which they spent their remaining years. Five chil- 
dren have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hoke, namely: Estella, 
born in July, 1878, married Austin Wortnian, who lives on a part of Mr. 
Hoke's farm, and they have one child, Helen : Evelyn, born December 
24, 1880, married Ivan Lisman, and they live just across the street from 
Mr. Hoke ; Albert and Allie, twins, born in December, 1882, are unmar- 
ried, and live with their parents; and Camellia, born in July, 1887, lives 
at home. Mr. Hoke's daughters are members of the Methodist church. 



Mrs. Mary Louise (Collins) Brentlinger. — A highly esteemed 
woman of Haddon township, Mrs. Mary L. Brentlinger has spent her 
entire life in Sullivan county. She was born two and one-half miles south 
of Carlisle, October 6, 1839, ^ daughter of William S. Collins. Coming 
from Scotch descent on the paternal side, and from English stock on his 
mother's side, William S. Collins, was born. May 30, 1798, in Sumner 
countv, Maryland. At the age of nineteen years, being of an active and 
enterprising disposition, and possessing a resolute will and an honorable 
ambition to better his material condition, he left home, determining in a 
newer country to seek a living. Going, therefore, to Gallatin county, 
Kentucky, he lived there a short time, and then located, in 1818, in Louis- 
ville, where he resided until after his marriage. Coming with his bride 
to Sullivan county in 1837, he located in Haddon township, and was here 
a resident until his death, July 6, 1886. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Hoke, was born, in 1797, in Jefferson county, Kentucky, and 
died, in Sullivan county, Indiana, at the age of sixty-eight years. Nine 
children were born to them, as follows : Sarah, deceased ; James O., of 
Haddon township ; the next two children died in infancy ; Julia Gather- 



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HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 127 

ine, living with her brother Edward ; Mercer D., deceased ; Edward, 
residing in JeiTerson township ; Alfred B., deceased ; and Mary Louise, 
of this brief sketch. 

On January 28, 1863, Mary L. Collins became the wife of Andrew 
J. Lirentlinger, who was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, October 27, 
1827, and died in Haddon township, Sullivan count)-, Indiana, February 6, 
1905. His father, Jacob Brentlinger, was born, July 4, 1793, in Jefiferson 
county, Kentucky, and there spent the earlier portion of his life. In 1836 
he followed the trail of the emigrant to Indiana, locating in Clark county, 
where he passed his remaining years, dying February 19, 1874. On Jan- 
uary 5, 1826, he married Sarah Hoke, who was born, March 12, 1804, in 
Jefferson county, Kentucky, and died, in Clark county, Indiana, July 12, 
1884. Of their union, thirteen children were born, namely: Robert H., 
deceased; Andrew J., deceased ; Susan C, deceased ; Charles M. : Mary 
F., widow of the late William McMillan, residing in Clark county, Indi- 
ana ; Rosanna, widow of the late Mr. Barrickman, lives in Charlestown. 
Indiana; Matilda, deceased; Sarah A., deceased; Amanda, widow of 
the late James Beggs, resides in Areola, Illinois ; George W., deceased ; 
Jacob A., living in Kentucky ; Eva Elizabeth, deceased ; and John W., 
living in Kansas. 

Brought up on a farm in Jefferson county, Kentucky, where his birth 
occurred, Andrew J. Brentlinger received a conunon school education, and 
early in life became well acquainted with the various branches of agricul- 
ture. With his parents he came to Clark county, Indiana, in 1836, and was 
there a resident for a number of years. In M'arch, i860, he bought two 
hundred acres of land in Haddori township, and with characteristic indus- 
try and ability, began its improvement. He succeeded in his efforts, and 
for many years was one of the leading agriculturists of this part of the 
county. He raised grain to quite an extent, but was especially interested 
in stock farming, each year feeding and raising on an average a carload 
of hogs, chiefly Poland-Chinas, which were his favorite breed. Just a 
short time previous to his death, Mr. Brentlinger sold one-half of his 
farm, his widow and heirs now owning the remainder of the estate. He 
was a straightforward Democrat in politics ; fraternally, he belonged to 
Carlisle Lodge of the I. O. O. F. In early life Mr. Brentlinger united with 
' the Methodist Episcopal church, in Charlestown, Indiana, but after coming 
to Haddon township became a member of the Carlisle Presbyterian church, 
to which Mrs. Brentlinger belongs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brentlinger became the parents of six children, namely : 
Agnes A., born November 11, 1863, died October 15, 1869; Emmett P., 
born January 20, 1865, lives in Carlisle; Kate C, born November 20, 
1866, died April 30, 1902; William J., born June 30, 1869, resides in 
Carlisle; Charles T., born September 19, 1873, died April 25, 1874; and 
Rush E., born January 7, 1878, lives with his mother on the old home- 
stead, which he is managing most successfully. On March 8, 1899, Rush 
E. Brentlinger married Sallie D. Vigus, who was born in Knox county, 
Indiana, March 22, 1877, a daughter of Henry C. and Barbara (Norton) 
Vigus. Mr. \'igus was born in ^fartin county, Indiana, and Mrs. Vigus 
Vol. II— 11 



128 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

in Sullivan county. They are now living in Alerom, Sullivan county. On 
September 4, 1907, Mrs. Rush E. Brentlinger died, leaving one' child, 
Hubert V., born September 15, 1900. 



Pleasant Alexander Minich. — Of honored pioneer descent, and 
for many years a leading agriculturist of Sullivan county, Pleasant A. 
Minich has the distinction of being one of the very oldest native-born citi- 
zens of Haddon township, his birth having occurred here, about three miles 
south of Carlisle, June 6, 1822, on the farm which his father, Adam 
Minich, entered from the government. Of German descent, Adam Minich 
was born, in 1791, in Virginia. During a part of his early life he resided 
in Tennessee, living there until after his marriage. Coming to Sullivan 
county, Indiana, in 1819, he located in Haddon township, buying a tract 
of wild land from the government. He began the clearing of a farm, and 
also worked at his trade of a saddlemaker, living here until his death, in 
1826, while yet in the prime of life. He was a Jacksonian Democrat, and 
was a soldier in the war of 1812. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Sarah O'Haver, was born in Tennessee, May 16, 1799. She bore him 
five children, as follows : Two who died in infancy ; Pleasant Alexander, 
of this sketch ; Mary, deceased ; and Sarah, deceased. His widow subse- 
quently married for her second husband Richard Whalen, grandfather of 
Dr. Joseph Whalen, of Carlisle, of whom a brief sketch is given elsewhere 
in this work, and they reared several children. 

Succeeding to the free and independent occupation to which he was 
reared, P. A. Minich has resided on his present homestead since June, 
1856, and during the fifty and more years that have since passed has con- 
tributed his full share towards advancing the agricultural and industrial 
interests of the community. As a farmer, he has had excellent success, 
his two hundred and eighty acres of land being in a fine condition. Since 
1 88 1 he has not performed any of the actual labor devolving upon an agri- 
culturist, having relegated the management of his farm to his son Will- 
iam, but has lived in ease and comfort, enjoying the reward of his earlier 
years of persistent toil. True to the political faith in which he was brought 
up, he is a straightforward Democrat. 

On April 24, 1856, Mr. Minich married Sarah Corbin, who was 
born, January 25, 1832, in Haddon township, on the same farm that he 
was. Her father, \'incent Corbin, was born in Virginia, in 1799, and 
died in Haddon township, on the farm which he bought from the govern- 
ment in 1829, his death occurring February 20. 1871. He married, in 
Kentucky, Julia Spencer, who was born in that state, in 1805. and died 
in Haddon township, Indiana, in January, 1891. Three children were 
born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Minich, namely: A. V., of Sullivan, 
of whom a sketch may be found in this biographical work : William 
Franklin, born August' 22, 1859; and Charles Theodore, born October 
21, i860, who died July 14, 1861. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 129 

William Franklin Minicii has spent his entire life on the parental 
homestead, at first carrying it on with his father. The past t\vent_v-five 
or thirty years, however, he has had entire control of the estate, and has 
carried on general farming and stock raising with great success. He finds 
hog raising and feeding especially profitable, raising from one to five car- 
loads each year. He is now paying considerable attention to the breeding 
of cattle, formerly the black Poll-Angus. Politically, Mr. Minich is a 
Democrat, and fraternally, he belongs to Carlisle Lx)dge, No. 3, F. & 
A. M. ; to the Modern Woodmen of America ; and to the Ben Hur Lodge 
of Carlisle. 

On May 6, 1891, Mr. Minich married Sarah C. Risinger, who was 
born in Knox county, Indiana, September 21, 1862, a daughter of Charles 
and Martha (Snapp) Risinger, of whom further history is given in con- 
nection wdth the sketch of Thomas S. Risinger. Airs. William F. Minich 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Dethlehem. They have 
no children. 



IviN Sylvester Lisman. — Conspicuous among the wide-awake, pro- 
gressive business men of Haddon township is Ivin S. Lisman, who is 
actively identified with many of the more substantial enterprises of this 
part of Sullivan county, and holds an assured position among the thriving 
agriculturists of his community. A son of William F. and Martha Eliza- 
beth (Padgett) Lisman, he was born in Haddon township, November 22, 
1874, and was here bred and educated. 

Acquiring under his father's tuition a practical knowledge of the 
many branches of agriculture, Mr. Lisman remained on the parental home- 
stead until twentv-eight years old, in the meantime earning and saving 
money. Beginning farming on his own account in 1902, he bought one 
hundred and thirty-one and one-half acres of land, three miles south of 
Carlisle, and in the fall of that year took possession of it. Here he has 
since devoted his energies and time to grain and stock farming, each year 
raising from one and one-half to two carloads of hogs, mostly Poland 
Chinas, for which he finds a ready market at top prices. In his agricul- 
tural labors, Mr. Lisman has been almost invariably fortunate, meeting 
witli far more success than discouragement. He possesses recognized 
financial ability, and is secretary and treasurer of the Carlisle Coach Horse 
Company ; a stockholder in the coach horse "Ozar," which is kept in 
Carlisle ; and owns stock in the People's State Bank of Carlisle. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, and fraternally, he is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, Camp No. 3332, and also of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

On November 26, 1902, Mr. Lisman married Mary Evelyn Hoke, 
who was born December 24, 1879, a daughter of John A. and Elizabeth 
(Brentlinger) Hoke, of whom a brief sketch may be found on another 
page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Lisman have no children. They are 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Bethlehem, in Haddon 
township. Mrs. Lisman is a member of the Rcbekah Lodge at Carlisle. 



I30 HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 

Michael Unger. — A man of enterprise and ability, Michael Unger 
is intimately identified with the agricultural interests of Sullivan county, 
his farm being pleasantly located in Haddon township, near Bethlehem. A 
son of Michael Unger, Sr., he was born, October 5, 1834, in Canada, not 
far from Buffalo, New York. Michael Unger, Sr., a native of Alsace, 
France, spent a number of years in Canada, but in 1837 returned with 
his family to his native country, and subsequently lived in Alsace until 
his death. His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Raches, was 
born in France, lived in Canada, and went back to France with her hus- 
band, living there a number of years after his death, then returning to 
America and spending her last days in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

But three years old when he accompanied his parents to France, 
Michael Unger was there bred and educated, attending school in France 
for fourteen years, being a pupil in both French and German schools, 
and being now able to converse fluently in the French, German and Eng- 
lish languages, an accomplishment of decided value to a business man. 
Returning to America in 185 1, Mr. Unger was for five years employed in 
a whalebone factory in New Jersey. The following five years he resided 
in Walworth county, Wisconsin, near Racine, and there had his first 
experience as an agriculturist. Going then to Topeka, Kansas, he worked 
for a year at the stone mason's trade, after which he spent another year 
in Walworth county, Wisconsin. Going then to Indianapolis to meet his 
mother, who had just returned from France, he was there employed as 
a firing engineer in the railroad shops for ten years. Desiring a change 
of occupation, Mr. Unger farmed for a year in Knox county, Indiana, 
and then worked for another eighteen months in the Indianapolis car 
shops. Taking up his residence in Sullivan county in 1878, Mr. Unger 
bought his present farm of eighty-two and one-half acres, in Haddon 
township, and has since been here industriously and prosperously em- 
ployed in agricultural pursuits, his farm lying about four miles south of 
Carlisle. He carries on general farming, including both stock and grain 
raising, and is meeting with deserved success, his well tilled fields yielding 
abundant harvests each year. 

On December 17, 1861, Mr. Unger married Carrie Deiss, who was 
born, November 12. 1843, i" Germany, a daughter of John Frederick 
and Wilhelmina (Heifner) Deiss. Mr. and Mrs. Deiss came to the 
United States with their family in 1 85 1, and for a number of years 
lived in Ohio, being in Georgetown until 1853, and in Salem from that 
time until 1859. Coming then to Indiana, they resided in Noble county, 
near Kendallville, for fifteen years, after which they spent a year in 
Indianapolis. They then came to Haddon township, where they bought 
a farm, on which both spent their remaining years. Eleven children 
have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Unger. namely: William, 
who died in infancy; Elizabeth, born August I, 1864, married William 
Pruesner, of Haddon township, and died November 27, 1904. leaving one 
child, Wilhelmina; Minnie, born October 17, 1866, married Rollie Col- 
lins, and died November 12, 1900; George Henry, born January 28, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 131 

1869, resides on a farm adjoining his father's; Edgar. l)orn December i, 
1871, married Flora Roacli, and Hves in Knox county; Emma, born 
January 9, 1875, married, August 23, 1908, Mordecai Cox, a teacher in 
Vincennes ; Delia, deceased : Carrie, born July 14, 1878, lives with her 
parents; Nellie, deceased; Lillian, born September 7, 1882; and Harry, 
who was born October 31, 1886, died in 1891. Politically, Mr. Unger is 
identified with the Republican party, and religiously, he and his family 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Bethlehem, which is 
near their home. 



George Henry LInger. — Holding an excellent position among the 
practical and thriving agriculturists of Sullivan county is George Henry 
Unger, a son of Michael and Caroline (Deiss) Unger, of whom a brief 
personal history is given on another page of this volume. Born, January 
2, 1869, on a farm lying in the southeast corner of Haddon township, 
George H. Unger was about a year old when 'his parents removed to 
Indianapolis, where he acquired the rudiments of his education. Return- 
ing with the family to this part of Sullivan county in 1878, he here com- 
pleted his early education in the district schools, and until attaining his 
majority remained with his parents. Going then to Knox county, he 
worked by the month for two years, after which he assisted his father on 
the home farm for four years. Beginning then his career as an agri- 
culturist on his own account, Mr. Unger bought the old Walston farm 
of ninety-six acres in Knox county, where he was actively engaged in 
his chosen occupation for seven years. Deciding to make a change, he 
then sold out, and for a year resided in Indianapolis. Returning to the 
scenes of his childhood, he subsequently purchased the George McCor- 
mick homestead, which adjoins his father's farm, buying it in March, 
1903, and assuming its possession in September of that year. It contains 
sixty-six and two-thirds acres, a large part of which is under a high 
state of cultivation, and here he is carrying on general farming and stock 
raising with most satisfactory results. 

On September 10, 1896, Mr. Unger married Cora Keith, who was 
born, November 14, 1873, on the south line of Sullivan county, a daugh- 
ter of Marion and Elizabeth (Curry) Keith, the father born in Knox 
county, and the mother in Dubois county, Indiana, and they died in Sulli- 
van county. Mrs. Unger was educated in the Bicknell high school, and 
subsequently remained at home until her marriage, receiving from her 
mother a good training in the domestic arts. Mr. and Mrs. Unger have 
no children of their own, but in 1907 they adopted a daughter, Doris 
Unger, who is now four years of age, and is a bright and interesting 
child. Both Mr. and Mrs.' Unger are valued members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of Bethlehem. Mr. Unger is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, Camp No. 3332, at Carlisle, Indiana. 



132 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Richard William Hoke. — A worthy representative of the agricul- 
turists of Suhivan county, and a respected' and highly esteemed citizen of 
Haddon township, is Richard William Hoke, of this brief personal his- 
tory, in which are recorded a few of the more important events of his 
life. A son of George H. Hoke, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
work, he was born in Widner township, Knox county, Indiana, April 4, 
1862, of pioneer ancestry. His father was three times married. By his 
first wife, whose maiden name was Mary H. Pearce, he had three chil- 
dren, of whom Richard W., is the only survivor. George H. Hoke mar- 
ried, second, Mary Polk, who bore him three children. By his marriage 
with his present wife, Alice Scanling, he has one child. 

Brought up in Widner township, Richard W. Hoke obtained his 
early education in the district schools, and until twenty-six years of age 
assisted in the care of the home farm, in the meantime acquiring a prac- 
tical knowledge of the science and art of agriculture. Buying then the 
old Pearce homestead, on which his grandfather, Richard William Pearce, 
settled in the very early part of the past century, while the Indians were 
still numerous, and while 

"The forests in their grandeur all proud and noble stood, 
Ere the woodman's blows rang echoing in the deep and darksome 
wood." 
Continuing the improvements previously begun, Mr. Hoke has added 
greatly to the value of his property, his buildings being now in excellent 
repair, and his house occupying a beautiful site on a natural elevation. 
As a general farmer, he has met with richly deserved success, both as a 
grain raiser and as a stock breeder and feeder, raising each year from 
two to four carloads of hogs, an industry which brings him much money, 
as do his two. carloads of cattle which he ships each year. Mr. Hoke has 
also other interests of value, being a stockholder in the People's State 
Bank of Carlisle. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the 
Democratic party, and a member of Carlisle Lodge, No. 3, F. & A. M. 

On March 5, 1889, Mr. Hoke married Mary Osborn, who was born 
in Widner township, Knox county, Indiana, September 17, 1865, a daugh- 
ter of Wines and America (Colton) Osborn. Her father was born in 
Greene county, Indiana, December 20, 1839, and her mother was born 
November 3, 1842, in Haddon township, Sullivan county. They were 
married in 1864, in Haddon township, and after living for a year in Greene 
county, settled in Widner township, Knox county, where they resided 
until 1900, when they retired from farming, and have since made their 
home in Oaktown. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Osborn, 
as follows : Mary, wife of Mr. Hoke ; Emma, deceased ; Anna, wife 
of Lee Bond, of Oaktown ; and Theodore W., of Oaktown. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoke have one child, George Osborn Hoke, born June 5, 1897, now 
attending school in Carlisle. Religiousl_v, Mrs. Hoke is a faithful member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In December, 1906, Mr. Hoke, his wife and little son Osborn made 
a pleasure trip to Monterey, Mexico, and spent some two months in the 
land of the Montezumas. Mr. Hoke is known amongst the citizens of 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 133 

Carlisle as an intre]5i(l Ininter and dead shot, and passionately fond of the 
chase. Whilst in the mountain wilds of Mexico, he killed foiuleen deer, 
one Alexican tiger, one haviline or wild hog and a mountain wolf and 
hundreds of ducks. He had the skins of the animals tanned by a Mex- 
ican and they adorn his country residence. He killed the Mexican tiger 
with a No. 303 "Savage" rifle, sixty yards distance, whilst the animal was 
feeding upon the carcass of a deer which Mr. Hoke had slain. He 
expects to again spend some of the hunting seasons in that country. His 
father, Ceorge Hoke, and wife also spent a vacation at Monterey and 
Tampico, on the Gulf of Mexico. Richard Hoke and his brother Charles, 
who is a resident of Montere}-, witnessed four Ijull fights, which is the 
national sport in Mexico. 



John L. Hinkle. — An industrious and thriving farmer of Had- 
don township, John L. Hinkle comes of substantial pioneer stock, and 
is an excellent representative of the native-born citizens of this part of 
Sullivan county, his birth having occurred, March 23, 1863, on what 
was then known as the old Walker farm, near the Knox county line. 

James S. Hinkle, father of John L., was born in Kentucky, but when 
eight years of age came to Sullivan county with his parents, who entered 
government land in Haddon township, and on the farm which they 
improved spent the remaining years of their lives. During the days of 
his youth and early manhood he assisted his father in the strenuous labor 
of reclaiming a farm from the forest. When ready to settle in life he 
chose farming as the occupation most congenial to his tastes, and has 
always been employed in agricultural pursuits, his home being now one 
and one-half miles northeast of Carlisle. Until recently he was an ardent 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and for four years 
rendered excellent service as justice of the peace. He is a man of emi- 
nent piety, and a consistent member of the Baptist church, to which his 
wife also belonged. He married Eliza Walker, who was born in Haddon 
township, on the farm adjoining the one owned by her son John, and 
died, in this township, about 1880. She bore her husband six children, 
as follows: Elzora Jane, deceased: John L., of this sketch: Carrie I., 
deceased : Cora May, deceased : Hammet D., who was graduated from 
the State Normal school, at Terre Haute, and afterwards taught school 
for four years in Knox and Sullivan counties, has been practicing law 
the past five years in Vincennes : and Charles H., who is married, and 
resides with his father. 

Brought up on a farm, and receiving a common school education, 
John L. Hinkle remained at home until attaining his majority. Following 
in the footsteps of his ancestors, he turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits at that time, and for four years farmed for himself in Widner 
township. Knox county. The ensuing three years he was similarly 
employed in Gill township, after which he spent two more years in Knox 
county. Coming then to Haddon township, Sullivan county, Mr. Hinkle 
purchased the farm where he now resides, and has since carried on gen- 



134 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

eral farming, including grain and stock raising, with signal success, 
cultivating, in addition to his own farm, other land. He takes especial 
interest in breeding and raising fine horses, and is a stockholder in the 
Carlisle Coach Horse Company. In his political affiliations, he is a stanch 
Republican. 

Mr. Hinkle married, November 12, 1905, Anna Jones, who was born 
in Busseron township. Knox county, Indiana, March 28, 1876, a daughter 
of Thomas and Nancy Ellen (Ridgeway) Jones. Her parents, natives 
of Knox county, are now living, retired from farming pursuits, in Oak- 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Hinkle have one child, Elzora Jane. Religiously, 
Mr. Hinkle was reared in the Baptist faith, and Mrs. Hinkle is a valued 
member of the Church of Christ, of Oaktown, Indiana. 



James Kautzman Wilson. — A prominent member of the farming 
community of Sullivan county, and a man of sterling integrity and worth, 
James K. Wilson, of Haddon township, has been an important factor in 
the development of this part of the state, and in the advancement of its 
welfare. He is a son of the late John L. Wilson, and grandson of Peter 
Wilson, who, with three of his brothers, John, Adam and George, came 
to Sullivan county, Indiana, and were among the original settlers of 
Haddon township. Mr. Wilson's great-grandfather, John Wilson, was 
born, June 16, 1761, in what is now Hardin county, West Virginia, and 
as a young man served in the Revolutionary war. He married Susan 
A. Kautzman, who was of German descent, and who lived to the age of 
ninety-four years, dying July 17, 1857. Great-grandfather Wilson died 
in Greene county, Tennessee, April 13, 1809. 

Born in Greene county, Tennessee, May 15, 1792, Peter Wilson died, 
January 29, 1849, in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana. Inher- 
iting the patriotism that inspired his ancestors, he served in the war of 
1812. Coming with his family to Haddon township in 1828, he entered 
forty acres of land in section 18, having a deed written on sheepskin and 
signed by President Andrew Jackson. It is one of the first deeds exe- 
cuted in Sullivan county, being dated October 23, 1835. This is a valu- 
able souvenir. Being very successful, Peter Wilson from time to time 
bought other land, having at his death one hundred and sixty acres. He 
married Judith Welty, who was born in Germany and died in Haddon 
township, November 15, 1854. They reared but one child, John L. 
Wilson. 

John L. Wilson was born in Greenville, Greene county, Tennessee, 
May 5, 1817. and died, June 17, 1897, in Haddon township, on the farm 
now occupied by his son James. Engaged in agricultural pursuits during 
his entire life, he was eminently successful, and acquired a good prop- 
erty, at one time holding title to three hundred and eighty-nine acres of 
valuable land. He was active in local aiifairs, and until Lincoln's time 
was identified with the Democratic party. He married Elizabeth Ste- 
phens, who was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, January 12, 1821, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 135 

and died, September 4, 1865, in Haddon to\vnshi|). into tlieir Jiouselioid 
ten sons were born, namely: Peter, who died in liolivar, Missouri, in 
1888, leaving a widow and two sons, who still reside there; Will- 
iam Stephens, of Ripley county, Missouri, and his twin brother, Harvey, 
who died at the age of one month and twenty days ; James Kautzman, 
of this sketch; John Martin, living in Edgar county, Illinois; Courtney 
M., of Seattle, Washington ; Uriah, of Jefferson township ; Jasper, 
deceased ; Ashpel P., deceased ; and Morton, deceased. Both parents 
were lifelong members of the Presbyterian church. 

At the age of nineteen years, James K. Wilson, who had received a 
good common school education, enlisted in Company D, Twenty-first 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which his brother William served from 
July, 1861, until January, 1866. James K. was mustered out of service, 
at Indianapolis, in January, 1866, having been doing garrison duty during 
the entire period of his enlistment. He was a member of the state militia 
also in 1863 and his captain was Samuel McCormick. After returning 
home, Mr. Wilson began farming on a piece of land given him by his 
father. He afterwards sold that land, and purchased another farm. In 
1874, he bought the farm where he now resides, and has since carried 
on general farming with great success. He has a good residence and 
comfortable farm buiklings, everything about the premises indicating the 
care and supervision of an able manager. Mr. Wilson's entire farm is 
underlaid with a four to five foot vein of coal, and a gas well is about 
one-half mile from his residence. 

On April 8, 1869, Mr. Wilson married Laura Jane Johnson, who 
was born, November 16, 1845, '" Haddon township, which was likewise 
the birthplace of her father, Samuel Johnson, while her mother, whose 
maiden name was Amanda Elizabeth Reid, was a native of Jefferson 
township. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson four children have been born, 
namely: one who died in infancy; Amanda E., born December 12, 1870, 
is the wife of Charles L. Pirtle, of Hamilton township, of whom a brief 
sketch may be found in this volume; Jasper Nevil, born July 15, 1873, 
married lona Bensinger, and lives in Jefferson township ; and James A., 
born November 4, 1875. James A. served in the Spanish-American war, 
being under command of General Lawton in the Philippines. He is now 
a member of the Coast Artillery Company, and was stationed at Fort 
Miley, at the Golden Gate, and is now at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, 
Sixty-fourth Company of United States Coast Artillery. He is unmar- 
ried. Mr. and Airs. Wilson have seven grandchildren, six grandsons, and 
one granddaughter. They and their children arc members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church of Bethlehem. 



Captain Nevel Blackmer Boone, a veteran of the Civil war and 
a large land owner in Sullivan county, Indiana, comes of the Boone stock 
of which "Old Daniel Boone, the Hunter of Kentucky," was a member. 
Captain Boone, of this narrative, was born in Boone township, Harrison 



136 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

county, Indiana, June 12, 1835, a son of Craven Boone, and grandson of 
George Boone, who was a cousin of Squire Boone, the latter being a 
brother of the old pioneer Daniel Boone, and an early settler in Harrison 
county. Captain Boone's mother was Sarah Newman, daughter of Ben- 
jamin Newman, a native of Virginia, who moved to Tennessee and from 
there to Indiana. The captain is one of a family of eleven children born 
to his parents, Craven and Sarah (Newman) Boone. He was reared and 
educated in the common schools of Harrison county, Indiana, as well 
as the higher schools of Corydon, Indiana. Elected recorder of Harrison 
county in 1858, he resigned after three years and organized Company E, 
of the Eighty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was mus- 
tered in August 29, 1862, and served faithfully and well until his dis- 
charge in October, 1863. He took active part in the battles of Stone 
River and Chickamauga, after which he resigned and returned home. 
He was engaged in the dry goods business at Laconia in 1864 and then 
moved to New Albany, and from there to several other places, returning 
then to Harrison county and locating at Corydon. Here he remained 
for a time, then removed to Mauckport, where he sold goods a year and 
a half, and purchased a store-boat on which he made two trips — one to 
Cottonwood Point, Missouri, and one to Memphis. Captain Boone was 
in the mercantile business from 1864 to 1874, since which year he has 
been devoting his time to agriculture. He remained on his farm until 
May, 1906, when he moved his family to Carlisle, where he has lived 
since. He still owns his farm in Harrison county, the same consisting 
of two hundred and fifteen acres, and it is now carried on by his son. 
Rush H. Boone. 

Politically, Captain Boone is a firm believer in the principles of pure 
Democracy. He was united in marriage to Anna R. Helms, October 8, 
1867. She was born August i, 1846, daughter of Dr. H. N. Helms 
by his wife. Mary, the latter being a daughter of Rev. John Davis, 
a Methodist preacher, and a sister of Hon. John W. Davis, of Sullivan 
county, who was a member of Congress. Captain and Mrs. Boone have 
had nine children, as follows : Rush H., residing in Harrison county, 
where he is engaged in farming on the father's place ; Mary M. ; Ida, 
wife of Theodore Elbert, residing in Louisville, Kentucky; Lola V., wife 
of Oliver Neely, of Anderson, Indiana, a retired merchant ; Fay N., now 
attending the state normal, at Terre Haute, and will graduate with the 
class of 1909; Bonnie, unmarried and at home; Hamet N. and Anna C, 
twins, died in infancy ; Daniel E., deceased. Mrs. Boone and the family 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

It should be subjoined, in this connection, that Mrs. Boone is the 
daughter of Dr. Helms, one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of 
Carlisle, who died at his home, September 16, 1902. He was born near 
Geneva, New York, October 3. 1814, and came with his father to Car- 
lisle, Indiana, in 1817. His education was begun in the old log school 
house, and he studied medicine with Dr. John W. Davis, afterward study- 
ing at Lexington, Kentucky. Dr. Helms commenced medical practice at 
Edwardsport, where he remained one year. He also practiced at Carlisle 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AX COUNTY 137 

with Dr. Dax'is and Dr. Alurpliy, and later with Dr. John Al. llinkle 
and Dr. W. R. Miller. About 1873, he abandoned the practice of medi- 
cine and turned his attention to farminsj. Politically, he was a stanch 
defender of Democratic principles, and in church connection was of the 
Methodist denomination. He was twice married, first to Mary Ann 
Davis, by whom three children were born : Dr. Rush Helms, who died in 
1887 ; Margaret, of Haddon township ; and Anna R., wife of Mr. Boone, 
of this biography. For his second wife, Dr. Helms married Amanda 
Sallee, who survived the doctor, dying in 1905. Three sons were the 
issue by this union : Samuel Dixon, deceased ; Albert Gray, also deceased ; 
Daniel \'., who resides on a farm in Haddon township. 



John Uni;ek, who is known as one of the heavy farmers of Sullivan 
county, carrying on as he does both grain and stock farming in an upto- 
date manner, as well as being an extensive grower of watermelons, natu- 
rally finds a place in the family history of the representative men of 
Sullivan county. Mr. Unger comes from a family well and favorably 
known in the south of Europe. He was born, October 6, 1843, in France, 
a son of Michael and Malissa (Gregor) Unger. (For a sketch of Michael 
Unger, the reader is referred to his personal sketch in this work. ) In 
1875, John Unger came to America and located in Ohi(5, within Ashland 
county, where he worked on a farm by the month. In 1876. he went 
to Haddon township. Sullivan county, Indiana, where he rented a farm 
to the south of Bethlehem church, where his brother Michael now lives. 
After a two-year stay there he moved up to within about one mile of 
Carlisle, where he also remained two years. Thinking to better his con- 
dition, he removed to a place east of Bethlehem church, remaining one 
year, and then located in Widner township, Knox county, where he lived 
two years, going back then to Haddon township, near Ermin Station. 
Upon leaving that farm, Mr. Unger went to the John A. Hoke place 
and continued there five years, purchasing then the one hundred and two 
acres of land upon which he now resides, the same being situated four 
miles west of Carlisle, bordering on the Gill and Haddon township lines. 
Here, in addition to his general grain and stock farming operations, he 
raises about thirty-five acres of watermelons annually of late vears. His 
present farm consists of about three hundred acres. He moved to this 
place in March 1889. 

Mr. Unger was united in marriage, January 20, 1876, to Catherine 
Lake, born in Jefferson township, Sullivan county, April 5, 1844, a daugh- 
ter of Abraham and Ursula (Roberts) Lake. The father was born Sep- 
tember 3, 1802, in Tennessee, and the mother in old Virginia. This 
worthy couple were married in Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1830. Abra- 
ham Lake came to Indiana Ijefore it had been admitted into the union. 
He came along with the Minichs and followed farming and stock raising. 
His children were as follows: Elizabeth, Morris, Mary Ann, John, 
Martha, Jane, Thomas, Catherine, Eliza, all of whom are now dead, 
excepting Mrs. Unger. She was educated in Jefferson township. 



138 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX- COL'XTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Unger are the parents of the following children : 
George W., born November 23, 1876; Morris, born July 31, 1878, edu- 
cated in the district schools and a civil engineering school, and is now a 
car framer at the American Car Shops, Terre Haute ; Thomas, born 
March 8, 1880, died in 1893 : William, born August 16, 1882, educated 
in the district schools, is unmarried and on the farm with his father ; 
Frank, born December 6, 1884, also educated in the district schools, 
unmarried, and assists on the home farm; Charles, born December 16, 
1887, educated in the common schools, being graduated from the Carlisle 
high school with the class of 1906, and now attending lavi^ college at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, and will graduate with the class of 1909. Politically, 
John Unger believes in the general principles laid down by the Republican 
party. Both he and his wife are exemplary members of the ^lethodist 
Episcopal church. 



James William Adams, one of the thoroughgoing agriculturists of 
Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, is a native of the township 
in which he now resides, and was born November 17, 1864, a son of Isaac 
and Barbara (Summers) Adams. The father was born in Virginia and 
the mother in Haddon township. Grandfather Adams and family were 
among the early settlers. Isaac Adams was one of five children, as fol- 
lows : Mary, deceased ; Benjamin, deceased : James, deceased ; Isaac ; 
and one who died in infancy. Isaac was always a farmer and stock raiser. 
Politicallv, he was a Democrat. He and his wife were faithful members 
of the Christian church. The mother died in 1876, aged forty-three 
years, and the father in the spring of 1898, aged seventy-two years. The 
children of Isaac Adams and wife were: Thomas, deceased; the next 
two both died in infancy: Hannah, wife of Richard Hackett, residing 
in Haddon township : Rebecca, wife of William Clark, also residing in 
Haddon township ; Belle, deceased ; James W., of this notice ; Jesse, a 
resident of Knox county, Indiana : Stonewall Jackson, residing in Oak- 
town, Indiana ; Isaac, residing on the Adams homestead, on Shaker 
Prairie. 

James William Adams remained at home on the father's farm until 
about fifteen years of age, when he began working by the month for 
various farmers until he was twenty-two years of age, commencing then 
to farm on his own account, on a farm which he purchased and where 
he lived one year. He then lived on and farmed the Samuel A. White 
farm for eight years, after which he bought the fifty-seven acres where 
he now resides, in the spring of 1898. Besides cultivating his own land 
he rents a large acreage from other farmers. He carries on general 
grain and stock farming, besides being an extensive grower of water- 
melons, planting out from thirty to forty acres annually. In his political 
choice, he is a stanch Democrat. Believing in the theory that every man 
should make some provision in the way of life insurance for the benefit 
of his family, he carries a membership policy in the Modern W^oodmen of 
America, belonging to Camp No. 3332, at Carlisle. 



HISTORY OF SULLI\-AX COUNTY 139 

Air. Adams was married, September 27, 1891, to Isabelle Wolfe, 
born November 4, 1870, on the old Wolfe homestead on Shaker Prairie, 
in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana. She was educated in the 
district schools. Her parents were William B. and Flora (Fry) Wolfe. 
Mr. and Mrs. Adams are members of the Christian church. Eight chil- 
dren have been born of this union: Orville E., born July 8, 1892, died 
November 28, 1897; Flora B., ]\lay 3. 1894, died August 14, 1906; Roy 
J., November 22, 1895; Mervin W., May 8, i8y8: Joseph C, April 6, 
1900; Edith C, May 23, 1903; Gracie G., born March 11, 1905; William 
B., born January 16, 1907. 



WiLLiAiu E. Tucker, who owned one of the ]iroductive farms sit- 
uated within Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, was a native of 
Franklin county. North Carolina, born April 26, 1838, son of James 
Madison and Betsey Ann (Stone) Tucker. The father was born in Nash 
county and the mother in Franklin county. North Carolina, where they 
were united in marriage, and both died in that county. The son William 
E., was reared on a farm and had the advantages of a common school 
education. When the Civil war broke out and in 1862, when it was 
known that a fierce conflict was to be waged between the North and 
South, he enlisted in Company B, Forty-seventh Regiment of North 
Carolina, as a private soldier, and served until 1866. He took part in the 
engagements at Second Bull Run, Cold Harbor, the Wilderness, being 
captured at the last named place. He also fought at the battle of Gettys- 
burg. He was made a prisoner of war at Petersburg, Virginia, in April, 
1866, and Released a few days later in April. 

In the same month he located in Haddon township, Sullivan county, 
where he attended the public schools and later the Ascension Seminary, 
at Farmersburg, Indiana, where he also worked for Capt. William T. 
Crawford, who founded the school last mentioned and was a professor 
in the same. After attending this most excellent educational institution 
for twelve months, Mr. Tucker began teaching in Haddon township, and 
taught twelve consecutive winters, while he farmed during the summer 
months. He taught three terms in Knox county and one in Greene 
countv, but the balance of his teaching was all in Haddon township. 
After he quit teaching, he followed farming ]iursuits exclusively. Some- 
time during the eighties he purchased one hundred and six acres of land, 
to which he added at a later date twenty more. This place is situated 
four miles west of Carlisle, and borders on the Gill and Haddon township 
lines. Here he carried on a general farming and stock business and also 
raised several acres of watermelons each season. The peach orchard 
contains seven acres, while the apple orchard has the same acreage. 
Politicallv, Mr. Tucker was a Democrat, formerly, but of late leaned 
strongly towards the Socialist party. He died October 25, 1908, and was 
interred in Shaker Prairie Cemeter)-. 

He was united in marriage, in 1872, to Mary Jane McKinley, who 



I40 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

was born in Knox county, a daughter of Steward and ]\Iary (Wolfe) 
McKinley. Mary Wolfe was the sister of Thomas J. Wolfe, so well 
known in Sullivan county. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Tucker: Aquilla P., born in 1873, residing at Carlisle, a mail carrier; 
Ira P., residing on his father's farm; Mary J. and Nancy J. (twins); 
the latter died in infancy and Mary Jane married John Hallett and resides 
in Gill township ; Leacie E. is the wife of Isaac Cox, and they reside on 
the farm with the parents. Aquilla P. has four children : Gilbert, Ber- 
nice, Bertha and Phena. Ira P. has two children : Orvil and Opal. 
Mary Jane has one daughter — Geneva. Leacie E. has two children : Dora 
Marie and Gladys May. 



Charles E. Knotts, perhaps one of the most extensive, as well as 
successful, melon raisers wathin the limits of Sullivan county, Indiana, 
whose farm is situated in Haddon township, is a native of the township 
in which he now resides, born May 10, 1868, a son of George and Sarah 
J. (Parrette) Knotts. The father was born in Pennsylvania, December 
25, 1816, and died December 12, 1898, in Haddon township. The mother 
was born in Fayette county, Ohio, November 13, 1830, and died February 
3, 1898. This worthy couple were united in marriage in Fayette county, 
Ohio, and came to Haddon township. Sullivan county, in the latter part 
of the sixties, locating a half mile west of Carlisle, on a farm containing 
two hundred and ten acres which they bought of William Akin. George 
and Sarah Knotts remained in Haddon township until their death. The 
father was a firm defender of Democratic party principles and in his 
fraternal affiliations was a Mason. His wife was a member of the Chris- 
tian church. Their children were : George C, died December 30, 1893, 
aged thirty-one years; Lucy B., born March 25, 1864, died April 22, 
1888: Charles E., of this notice. 

Charles E. Knotts was reared on a farm and educated in the public 
schools, remaining at home until he reached his majority, when he began 
farming for himself in Haddon township. In 189 1 he moved onto the 
farm he now occupies and owais. inheriting a part and purchasing the 
interests of the remaining heirs, thus making his present farm one hun- 
dred and twelve acres, all within Haddon township. Here he carries 
on an exclusive melon culture farm. For seven years he produced water- 
melons alone, but for the last seven years has grown muskmelons. which 
product finds ready sale within the state, including the large cities and 
smaller towns, within shipping distance. In his political views Mr. 
Knotts is in perfect accord with the Democratic party, but prefers that 
others hold the local offices, while he attends strictly to his own business, 
trusting in his fellow citizens to administer the laws w'ithin his county 
and state. 

He was married March 25, 1887, to Rachel T. Carmichael, born 
in Greene county, Indiana, April 26, 1869, and she received a good 
education within the county of her birth. Her parents were George W. 
and Nancv Carmichael. Her father was born in Greene countv. Indiana, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 141 

and is now residing in Terre Haute. Tiic motlicr was born in Ohio 
and died when Mrs. Knotts was but eleven years of age. Mr. and 
Mrs. Knotts are the parents of seven children, as follows: Bessie M., 
born November 15, 1888, unmarried, a graduate from Brown's Business 
College at Terre Haute; Jesse M., born March 14, 1890; Carl R., born 
January 9, 1892; George R., born March 13, 1894; Charles \'., born 
February 26, 1896; John A., born April 22. 1898; Henry Herbert, born 
March 24, 1900. 



James H. Wilson, one of the enterprising agriculturists whose 
attractive farm home is situated within the bounds of Haddon town- 
ship, Sullivan county, Indiana, was born November 28, 1851, in Han- 
cock county, Indiana, on his father's farm. He is the son of Jacob and 
Hannah (Emmons) Wilson. The father was a native of Kentucky and 
the mother of Pennsylvania. They came to Indiana with their respective 
parents and located in Hancock county. In that county the parents of 
James H. were united in marriage and there the father followed farming 
until 1863, when the family went to Knox county, locating in Widner 
township, where he bought eighty acres of land, upon which he and 
his wife lived the balance of their lives. He died in November, 1880, 
and the mother in January, 1875. Eight children blessed their marriage 
union: Samuel, deceased: Robert, residing in Carlisle: Lewis, also of 
Carlisle; James H., of this biographical narrative: Silas, of Pleasantville, 
Indiana ; William, of Los Angeles, California ; Paul, a twin to Silas, 
died at the age of eight years ; and one who died in infancy. 

James H. Wilson, of this sketch, was reared on a farm and early 
taught the need of frugality and industry. He obtained his education 
after moving to Knox county. When he was but fifteen years of age 
he commenced to farm for others by the month, continuing until about 
twentv-three years of age and then began farming for himself. He 
continued to till the soil of Knox county for three seasons, coming 
then to Haddon township, in which sub-division of Sullivan county he 
has farmed ever since. He now owns a seventy-seven acre farm, which 
is in two tracts. He lives, however, on leased lands and farms about 
three hundred acres, including his own place and the rented grounds. 
Politically, he is a supporter of the Democratic party and is a firm 
believer in the principles of pure Jacksonian Democracy. In his fraternal 
connections he is a member of the Ben Hur lodge at Carlisle. 

He was married September 28, 1873, to Alice Phillippe, born in 
Knox county, near Bruceville, Indiana, June 4, 1855, a daughter of 
William Johnson and Sarah (Minich) Phillip]3c. Her father was born 
in Virginia, and her mother in Haddon township, Sullivan county. She 
is a sister of Pleasant A. Minich, whose family history will be found 
in the sketch of W. F. jMinich, within this work. William Johnson 
Phillippe came Vi'ith his parents when a small boy to Knox county and 
the family located north of \'incennes. William Johnson Phillippe and 
wife moved to Haddon township when Mrs. Wilson was a small girl 



142 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

and here they resided until their death. They had a famil)' of six 
children, as follows : Alice, Mrs. Wilson ; Flora, widow of James M. 
Harber, residing in Knox county ; William A., of Haddon township ; 
Franklin M., of Bruceville, Knox county; Martin J., of Oklahoma, now 
the editor of the Register, a local paper of Oklahoma ; John M., of Los 
Angeles. California. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were born the following children : Elvin, 
born August 12, 1875, married Eva McClure, and they reside in Haddon 
township and are the parents of four children ; Denver, born December 
28, 1876, married Lydia Kennedy, and they reside in Haddon township, 
and have one daughter; Earle, born January 19, 1879, is unmarried and 
at home; Vernie, born April 29, 1881, wife of John D. Prose, residing 
in Carlisle, and they are the parents of two children ; Flora, born May 
28, 1884, married Miles Curry, residing in Terre Haute, and they have 
one son. Mr. Wilson's children were all educated at Carlisle. Elvin 
graduated from the high school and the Vincennes College, after which 
he returned to the farm, which has been his vocation ever since. James 
H. Wilson is quite an extensive hog raiser, and markets about one carload 
annually. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
the parents are exemplary members. 



David E. Everhart.- — Prominent among the most prosperous, 
energetic and sagacious agriculturists of Sullivan county is David E. 
Everhart, who owns and occupies a large and well improved farm in 
Cass township. He ranks high among the progressive farmers and sub- 
stantial business men of his community, and is everywhere respected 
as a man of honor and worth. A son of John Everhart, he was born 
March 5, 1855, in Lancaster, Owen county, Indiana, coming from Ger- 
man ancestry, his great-grandfather on the paternal side having emi- 
grated from Germany to Pennsylvania when young, and there married a 
Scotch-Irish lassie. (The original spelling of the name was Eberhardt. ) 
David Everhart, grandfather of David E., was born and bred in Penn- 
sylvania. Emigrating to Ohio in early manhood, he became a pioneer 
settler of Tuscarawas county. Purchasing a tract of wild land, he began 
its improvement, and was there employed in tilling the soil until his 
death, when but thirty-five years of age. He married a Miss Hicks, who 
survived him many years. 

A native of Ohio, John Everhart was born in Tuscarawas county 
in 1820. Learning the carpenter's trade when young, he followed it as 
a journeyman for a few years. In 1850, in company with a few neigh- 
boring families, he came across the country with teams to Indiana, and 
for a year lived in Wabash county. Returning then to Tuscarawas 
county, he located with his family on land given them by his father and 
was there a tiller of the soil for three years. Selling out in 1854, he 
again came with his family to Indiana, settling in Owen county. He 
purchased a tract of timber land, and in the log cabin which then stood 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8T0R, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATION*. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 143 

upon the place, his son David E. was born. This section of Indiana 
was then ahnost a wilderness. Settlers were few and far between, and 
the forests were filled with an abundance of game of all kinds. He began 
the improvement of a homestead, clearing a large tract of the land, and 
erected a frame house and a double log stable. In 1867 he sold that 
property, came to Sullivan county, purchased a quarter of a section of 
land in Jackson township, and was there successfully employed in farm- 
ing and stockraising until his death, in 1885. He married Martha Hoffer, 
who was born in Canton Berne, Switzerland, in 1825, and died in Jackson 
township in 1887. Her father, Alexander Hoffer, emigrated from Switz- 
erland to America in 1835, being accompanied by his wife and their two 
daughters. Locating in Coshocton county, Ohio, he bought forty acres 
of land, and there carried on general farming the remainder of his life. 
Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. John Everhart, namely: 
Lavina. Adaline, Louisa. Sarah, Alexander, David E., Lucy A., Dan, 
John ^^^, Ella and Ezra A. 

Trudging three long, weary miles over the hills, David E. Everhart 
obtained his rudimentary knowledge in the district schools of Owen 
countv. He subsequently attended the rural schools of Jackson town- 
ship, afterwards completing his early studies in the graded schools of 
Sullivan. Beginning then a professional career, Mr. Everhart taught 
school for twenty-six years, all but three years of the time being so 
located that he was enabled to board at home. As a teacher he was 
successful and popular, gaining an excellent reputation as an educator 
and as a disciplinarian. Always interested in agriculture, he has of late 
years turned his attention almost entirely' to agricultural pursuits. Resid- 
ing in Cass township, he has in h'is..hame.farm five hundred and thirty- 
five acres of rich and fertile land, the greater part of which is under 
fine cultivation, and is well equipped with substantial buildings, and all 
of the appliances for doing the; nep.essary' farm labor after the most 
approved modern methods. 

On June 7, 1883, Mr. Everhart married Laura E. Patton, who was 
born in Jackson township April 16, i860, a daughter of William Nelson 
Patton, Esq. Mr. Patton was born in Carlisle, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
but was reared in Jackson township. As a young man he was extensively 
engaged in farming, owning upwards of five hundred acres of land. 
Subsequently removing to Sullivan he, in company with his son, embarked 
in mercantile pursuits, and is now one of the leading merchants of that 
place. Mr. Patton married Harriet Rebecca Magill, who was born in 
Cass township. Sullivan county, in 1837, a daughter of Thomas and 
Mary (Hall) Magill, and they reared five children, namely: Laura E., 
wife of Mr. Everliart : Clara, Cora E., Oscar M., in business with his 
father, and Bertha L. Mr. Patton is quite active in public affairs, and 
for twelve years served as justice of the peace. A history of the Magill 
family, to which Mrs. Everhart belongs, has been written by Robert 
Magill, of Maryville, Tennessee. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Everhart are 
members of the Presbyterian church. The pretty country seat of Mr. 
and Mrs. David Everhart in Cass township is known as "Eorest Home." 
Vol. n— 10 



144 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Moses H. Gregg, well known in farming circles of Haddon town- 
ship, Sullivan county, is a native of^ this township, where he was bom 
September 20, 1839, three miles south of Carlisle, Indiana, a son of 
Elijah and Nancy (Pell) Gregg. The father was born in North Carolina 
in 1800, and died in 1876. The mother was born in Virginia and 
married in that state. They drove overland to Wayne county, Indiana, 
where they located for a while, but later removed to Sullivan county, 
locating south of Carlisle, where they remained until their death. Elijah 
Gregg was a Republican and a public-spirited citizen, who always tilled 
the soil for his livelihood. He owned one hundred and eight acres at 
the time of his death. The children born to him were as follows : 
Eveline, deceased; William, residing in jVIontana; Henry, of Haddon 
township; Lott B., deceased; Galvin, of Montana; Oliver P., of Mon- 
tana; Moses H., of this notice; Elijah, of Montana; Milton, residing 
in the west. 

Moses H., the seventh child in the family of Elijah and Nancy 
(Pell) Gregg, farmed with his father until thirty-five years of age, and 
then began to farm independently, continuing until the present time. 
He has chosen to live the life of a bachelor and farms his forty-acre 
farm. Politically, he is a believer in the principles of the Republican 
party. He is thoroughgoing and methodical in all he undertakes, as 
can be observed by an inspection of his well cultivated fields. 



Frank B. Ridgway. farmer and stock raiser, whose excellent farm 
property is situated in Haddon township, Sullivan county, is a native 
of Widner, township, Knox county, Indiana, where he was born Feb- 
ruary 12, 1862. He is the son of John H. and Rachel (Watson) Ridg- 
wav. The father was born in Kentucky and the mother in Sullivan 
county, Indiana, where they were united in marriage. They resided in 
Knox for a long term of years, then removed to a section south of 
Carlisle, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father 
was a successful farmer. Politically, he favored the Democratic party, 
and he held the office of county assessor for one year. The children 
born to John H. Ridgway and wife were as follows : Frank B., Hester, 
Benjamin (deceased), William and Minnie (twins) ; William is deceased 
and Minnie is the wife of Harry Shaver, of Kansas, Illinois ; Bert 
(deceased), and two who died in infancy. 

Frank B. Ridgway was reared on his father's farm and began 
working for himself at the age of twenty-one years at farm labor and 
has been engaged in such work ever since. His farming operations 
have always been carried on within Haddon township, where he now 
owns a well improved farm of one hundred and twenty acres, upon 
which he lives. This place is situated four miles to the south of Carlisle. 
Both grain and stock raising are methodically carried on here by Mr. 
Ridgway, and he raises and feeds from four to six carloads of stock 
per annum. His farm gives evidence in every part of being one con- 



HISTORY OF SfLLlXAX COUNTY 145 

ducted by a man who thoroughly understands his I)usiness. PoHtically 
he atifihates with the Democratic party. 

February 22, 1883, Mr. Ridgway was luarried to Anna (W'ortman) 
Pearce, who was born in Haddon township, a daughter of Philip G. 
Wortman, a farmer of this section. Mrs. Ridgway 's father was born 
in Wayne county, Indiana, and his wife, Nancy Gregg, was born in 
Patrick county, Virginia, September 16, 1822. She came with her 
parents to Hendricks county, Indiana, when young. Philip Wortman 
came to Haddon township with his mother, his father being dead at 
that time. Philip always followed farming pursuits, in which he was 
very successful. He served as a private soldier at the time of the Civil 
war, in Company D, Twenty-first Indiana Regiment. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Ridgway, 
as follows: Mabel, born December, 1883, wife of Henry Hale, of 
Haddon township ; Rush W., unmarried and at home ; one who died 
in infancy; Rachel, deceased; and Ivin. Rush was graduated from 
Carlisle high .school with the class of 1906, after which he returned to 
the farm, being thoroughly equipped for a better understanding of 
agriculture or any other vocation he may later select. 



D.wiD C. WoRTM.\N, one of Haddon township's worthy and enter- 
prising citizens, follows farming, and is also connected with the saw- 
milling business, as well as threshing. He was born February 20, 1845, 
in Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, a son of John C. and Alvira 
(Gregg) Wortman. The father was a native of Ohio, born July i, 
1813, and died January 16, 1899, in Haddon township. The mother 
was a native of \'irginia. This worthy couple were numbered among 
the pioneers of Sullivan county. Their children were as follows : John 
P., deceased ; Mary C, deceased ; Nancy, wife of James O'Haver, resid- 
ing in Haddon township ; David C. of this sketch ; Julia A., wife of 
Alonzo Colton, of Haddon township ; William C, deceased ; James Mar- 
tin, residing with his brother, David C. ; Emeline, deceased ; Elizabeth, 
of Oaktown, Knox county, Indiana. 

Reared on the farm and receiving his primarv education at the 
district schools, David C. Wortman continued to reside at home until 
he reached manhood. He then started out in life for himself as a 
farm hand, which occupation he pursued until 1881, when he saw a 
more independent way of gaining his livelihood, by tilling the soil on 
his own account. He purchased forty acres of land, in 1876, where 
his farm buildings now stand, but did not remove to the place until 1881. 
He now owns a splendid farm, consisting of an even one hundred acres 
of choice land. Late in the nineties he retired from the activities of his 
farm life, but still resides there. In 1888 Mr. Wortman was engaged 
in the livery business at Oaktown, but at the same time he conducted 
his farm. In 1892 lie engaged in the saw-mill an<l grain-threshing 



146 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

business, he superintending the operation of this combined business. 
The saw-mill was sold in 1905, at the same time that his threshing 
machine was sold. Mr. Wortman has always led the life of a bachelor, 
his brother James and family having lived with him for the last twenty- 
seven years. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party. 



John A. Lisman, who is well known as the farmer of Haddon 
township who pa3's especial attention to raising horses, is a native of 
Scottsville, Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana. He was born 
January 28, 1864, a son of John Wesley and Margaret (Lovelace) 
Lisman. The mother was a native of Kentucky and came to Sullivan 
county when young. The father was born near Carlisle, Indiana, in 
September, 1814, and died in 1871, in Scottsville, near Carlisle. The 
grandfather, Andrew Lisman, was born in Germany and came to this 
country when but a child. He Jocated near Carlisle and was a well-to-do 
farmer and reared a large family. John Wesley Lisman, the father 
of John A., of this notice, was a carpenter, but worked at farming in 
his later years. He performed much work at his trade in New Orleans 
and Natchez and other southern cities. He was noted for his integrity 
and strict honesty of purpose. Politically he affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party and had the honor of voting for Abraham Lincoln in his 
first presidential campaign, in i860. John W. Lisman's father and 
three of his brothers, were at the battle of Tippecanoe. The children 
of John Wesley and Margaret (Lovelace) Lisman were eight in num- 
ber. The mother was of the Campbellite religious faith. 

John A. Lisman was born and reared on a farm and had the advan- 
tages of a common school education. His parents died when he was 
quite young, and he was reared by Simeon Yocum, near Carlisle, with 
whom he remained from the time he was ten years of age until he was 
thirty-one. After reaching his majority Mr. Lisman farmed for Mr. 
Yocum and subsequently farmed on his brother's place — Dr. Lisman's. 
He engaged in the horse business, and was the owner of "Old Frank," 
'"Hambletonian," which valuable animal died. He now owns "George," 
a grandson of "Sun Rise Prince." 

Mr. Lisman's sister, Maggie, kept house for him on his brother's 
farm for about five years, after which he returned to the old Lisman 
homestead, where he has since lived. In 1905 he replaced the old house 
with a new and more comfortable cottage and he now owns seventy- 
seven acres and makes a specialty of raising horses. Politically Mr. 
Lisman afiiliates with the Republican party. He was united in marriage 
November 6, 1899, to Lillie E. Edwards, born in Illinois, and reared in 
Lawrence county, Indiana. The date of her birth was March 13, 1875, 
and her parents were William H. and Rachel (Johnson) Edwards, both 
of whom are now deceased, dying when she was a small girl. Mrs. 
Lisman is a member of the Christian church in Georgetown, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 147 

TiLMAN B. Wolfe, of Haddoii township, who was born and reared 
to agricultural pursuits, is a native of this township, born February 10, 
1881, a son of George F. and Margaret (Pifer) Wolfe. Both of Mr. 
Wolfe's parents were natives of the same township in which the son 
was born. The father was born May 17, 1856, and is engaged in the 
hardware business at Oaktown, Knox county, Indiana, and the mother 
was born in 1859, in the same township as her husband. The grand- 
father, Uriah Wolfe, was among the early pioneer band who first 
effected a settlement in Sullivan county. George F., the father, always 
followed farming for a living, until February, 1899, when he engaged 
in the hardware trade at Oaktown, the firm being known as Snapp, 
Latshaw & Co. In his political views Mr. Wolfe is a Democrat. He 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and Maccabees order. 
Both he and his wife are consistent members of the Christian church. 
The three children born to diem are: Charles M., residing in Haddon 
township; Tilman B., of this biographical review; Delia B., wife of 
Melvin Sproatt, residing in Knox county, Indiana. George F. Wolfe 
was married a second time to OUie Heddon, a native of Illinois, who 
died a few years after their marriage. Four children were born of this 
union, and all are deceased except Paul, who is now with his father at 
Oaktown. For his third wife Mr. Wolfe married Amanda Owens, a 
native of Turman township, Sullivan county, who is now his companion 
at Oaktown. 

Tilman B. Wolfe, son of George F. Wolfe by his first marriage, 
was reared on his father's farm and attended the district schools of 
Haddon township. He continued to reside at home until about twenty- 
one years of age, when he began farming for himself and has continued 
to the present time. He inherited one hundred acres of land where 
he lives now, about five years ago, in 1903. Here he carries on an 
extensive farm and stockraising business. Like every true American, 
Mr. Wolfe has his decided opinions concerning political parties and 
their platforms. He supports the Democratic party. 

He was married February 17, igoi, to Maude Kite, born in Honey 
Creek township, Vigo county, Indiana, August 27, 1880, a daughter 
of Edwin and Rettie (Pickens) Kite; the latter is deceased. They moved 
to Sullivan county about 1895, locating in Haddon township. The chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Wolfe are : Hershel, Robertine and Russell. 



George Washington Hale. — One of the industrious agriculturists 
of Fladdon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, is George W. Hale, who 
was born Julv 29. 1843, in Jefferson township, a son of Stephen C. and 
Ann (Howard) Hale. The father w^as born in Virginia in 1810, dying 
in Teff'erson township, this county, in 1885, and the mother was iDorn 
in Kentucky and died in Jeft'erson township May 2, 1862. Both paternal 
and maternal grandparents were numbered among the first settlers of 
lefferson township. The father and mother of George W. were united 
"in marriage in Jefferson township. The father always followed farm 



148 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

pursuits and owned one hundred and ninety acres of land at the time 
of his death. He was pohtically a Democrat. Both he and his good 
wife were members of the Metliodist Episcopal church. Fourteen chil- 
dren were born of this union, nine of whom are still living, as follows : 
Mary Ann, widow of Robert Crawford, a resident of Sullivan ; George 
W., of this biography; Rebecca, widow of Michael Goodwin, of Greene 
county ; Martin, of Pleasantville, a merchant ; William, residing in 
Nebraska; Mildred, widow of Simeon Yocum, residing in Carlisle; 
Amanda, wife of Louis Wilson, of Carlisle ; Eliza, wife of Frank Wells, 
of Jefferson township ; S. M., of the same township. 

George W. Hale, of this notice, was reared to farm labor and 
attended the district schools in common with other boys of his day. At 
the age of nineteen years, in the month of August, 1862, he enlisted in 
Company I, of the Ninety-seventh Indiana Infantry, as a private soldier, 
serving until June, 1865, when he was honorably discharged at Indianap- 
olis. He was engaged at the retaking of Jackson, Mississippi, and other, 
battles in the never-to-be-forgotten Civil war. He was in General Sher- 
man's command and followed him through the Georgia campaign, and 
back to Washington, District of Columbia, thence home. Mr. Hale saw 
much hardship and exposure, but was fortunate in never receiving a 
wound. For his term in the Union army, in common with his com- 
rades-at-arnis, he is receiving a small pension from the government. 
He is honored with a membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. 
After the war had ended he returned to pursue the peaceful vocation 
of a farmer in Jefferson township, where he continued one year, remov- 
ing then to Cass township, Sullivan county, where he remained until 
1890, at which time he sold his farm, consisting of one hundred and 
ninety-six acres, and purchased a quarter section of land, upon which 
he now resides, in Haddon township. Here he carries on farming and 
stockraising. In his political views Mr. Hale is a supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party. 

He has been married three times, first on March 2"], 1867, to Jane 
Parks, born in Cass township, Sullivan county, in 1846, and died in 
1869. One daughter was born of this union. Flora, now the wife of 
W. W. Young, residing in Michigan. For his second marriage, he chose, 
about 1870, Sarah Clayton, born in Cass township, Sullivan county, who 
also died there. Four children were born of this union ; John T., of 
Gill township ; Charles, of Haddon township ; Anna, wife of Frank Shep- 
herd, residing in Jefterspn township ; Hattie, wife of George Unger. 
After the death of his second wife Mr. Hale married, in February, 1883, 
Cassie Ann (Evans) Parks, who was born in Grant countv, Indiana. 
One son is the issue by the last union, Henry, born March 6, 1886, 
married Mabel Ridgway, and lives with his parents. He was educated 
at the district schools, after which he was a fireman one year on the 
Vandalia Railroad and then went to California for a six months' stay. 
He and his father operate the home place together. Henry Hale is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge, No. 3, which is the third oldest IMasonic 
lodge in Indiana. 



HISTORY t)F SULLINAX COUNTY 149 

( )\VEN Jackson Ridgway, whose fine farm liome is situated near 
the thriving town of Carhsle, in Sullivan county, Indiana, was born 
Februarv 20, 1868. in Haddon township, on Shaker I'rairie, a son of 
Benjamin Wiginton and Mar_v H. (Hoghland) Ridgwa\-. The father 
was born in Kentucky and the mother in the vicinity of Indianapolis. 
The grandfather, Jacob Hoghland, and wife, were both born in Ohio. 
The grandfather of Mr. Ridgway, Wiginton Ridgway, was born in Ken- 
tucky, and became one of the early settlers of Shaker Prairie. Benja- 
min Wiginton, the father, was always a farmer. In politics he voted 
the Democratic ticket. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Christian church. Their two children were: Owen Jackson, of this 
notice, and James T., residing in Haddon township, on Shaker Prairie. 
Mr. Ridgway's mother married twice, her second husband being Samuel 
Lillic, a native of Gill township, and they are both now deceased. To 
this union three children were born : John W., living in Te.xas, where 
he is engaged in farming, and is b\- trade a blacksmith; Charles, residing 
in Gill township ; Jacob W., now attending college at Purdue. 

His father dying when he was but four years of age, Owen J. Ridg- 
wa^• lived with his mother and stepfather until about twenty years old, 
when he began farming in Haddon township. He rotated back and 
forth between Gill and Haddon townships until September, 1891, when 
he moved onto the place he now occupies, a mile and a quarter north 
of Carlisle. Here he carries on general farming and stockraising. Mr. 
Ridgway is the owner of "Duke of Scotland, No. 1140," a registered 
Clydesdale stallion, and a fine Spanish jack, called "Teddy." He feeds 
from one to two carloads of hogs annually, mostly of the Poland China 
breed, and also owns some Black Poll-Angus cattle. In his political 
afiiliations he votes with the Democratic party. He carries a member- 
ship in the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to the Carlisle 
Camp, No. 3332, of this order. 

Mr. Ridgway was married September 4, 1887, to Alfretta King, born 
in Illinois, and reared in Haddon township. She is a member of the 
Christian church and an exemplary Christian. Six children have come 
to bless this home circle : Mary Elizabeth, wife of Charles Seever, has 
two little daughters, Geneva Lucille and Lois ; Fred W., in the seventh 
grade of Carlisle public school : Lillie Alay, also in the seventh grade ; 
Mildred Marie, in the fourth grade : and .Mjjha, the youngest, in the 
second grade. 



William Warren Bailkv. the owner of more than a half section 
of fertile farming land within Haddon township, all in one bodv, is an 
extensive stock raiser and farmer. He is a native of Sullivan countv, 
Indiana, born near Carlisle, February 2, 1850, a son of Salathiel Jackson 
and Mary (Gobin) Bailey. The father was born in Georgetown, Ken- 
tucky, about 1818, and died in Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indi- 
ana, in 1863. The mother was born near Carlisle. The maternal grand- 
father, William Gobin, was a native of Kentucky, and among the early 



I50 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

settlers of Haddon township, this county. He always followed farming 
and also operated a tan-yard at Carlisle. He was a very successful busi- 
ness man and highly respected in his community, and had a family, 
including two sons. Politically he was a Democrat of the old type. 
Salathiel Bailey, the father of M'illiam W., of this notice, came to 
Haddon township when fifteen years of age, and later married and began 
farming". He owned a farm of eighty acres at the date of his death. He, 
too, was a supporter of the Democratic party, and in church connection, 
both he and his wife were members of the Christian church. Their 
children were as follows : Frances, deceased ; Finle}^, deceased ; Ardillia, 
deceased ; Margaret, wife of John Nesbit, of Haddon township, Sullivan 
county ; William Warren, of this biography ; Hammett, deceased. 

William W. Bailey was reared on a farm and began to work for 
himself independently at the age of seventeen years. He began by work- 
ing for others by the month, but when twenty years of age he farmed 
for himself in Haddon township upon a ten-acre tract, to wdiich he had 
fallen heir. He has continued in agricultural pursuits to the present 
time. In 1894 he purchased his present farm, consisting of three hun- 
dred and forty acres of choice land, upon which he carries on both grain 
and stock farming. He raises about two carloads of hogs annually, 
besides some cattle. He has been a stock drover for over thirty years, 
and has shipped from all along the line, including Oaktown, in Knox 
county, and Carlisle, Sullivan, Dugger, Riverton, etc., buying and ship- 
ping, both hogs and cattle. He is a large stockholder in the Peoples 
State Bank of Sullivan and is a thoroughly up-to-date agriculturist and 
competent business man. 

Mr. Bailey has been married thrice, first in 1871, to Elizabeth 
Snyder, born in Sullivan county, Cass township, and who died in 1877. 
The issue by this union was : Frenchie Eugene, deceased ; one who died 
in infancy ; and Grace, wife of Harry Mason, residing in Gill township. 
For his second wife Mr. Bailey married Jennie Creager, also a native 
of Sullivan county, who died a few years subsequent to her marriage to 
Mr. Bailey, leaving two children: Oma, who was born June, 1889, a 
graduate of Carlisle high school with the class of 1908; Dessie E., born 
July 3, 1891, now in the high school. For his third wife Mr. Bailey 
married Emma Walker, a native of Haddon township, Sullivan county. 
The issue by this marriage is one daughter, Helen Pauline. Mr. Bailey's 
daughters are members of the Christian church and his present wife 
belongs to the Baptist church. 



Ernest M. Deputy, M. D. — A man of high mental attainments, 
cultured and talented, Ernest M. Deputy, M. D., of Dugger, Cass town- 
ship, is successfully engaged in the practice of his profession as a physi- 
cian and surgeon of skill, being widely known and having a fine patron- 
age. A native of Indiana, he was born August 5, 1877, in Paris, Jen- 
nings county. His father, Sylvester Deput}', was born January 3, 1834, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 151 

in Woods county, Virginia, wliicli was likewise the birthplace of his 
father, Andrew Deputy. A well-established tradition says that the first 
known ancestor of the' Deputy family was a babe left at the door of a 
deputy sheriff in France. The deputy sheriff' and his wife being child- 
less, gladlv welcomed the foundling, took it in, and as it was found on 
the door sill christened it Sylvester, and gave it the surname of Deputy. 

The Doctor's great-grandfather and two of his brothers came from 
Virginia to Indiana via the Ohio river, landing at the present site of 
Madison. One of the brothers subsequently settled in Illinois, but the 
Doctor's progenitor bought a tract of government land in Jeff'erson 
countv, and was there engaged in tilling the soil the remainder of his life. 

Andrew Deputy, the Doctor's grandfather, came with his parents 
to Sullivan county,' and subsequently entered government land on the 
bank of the Musc'atucket river, where he cleared and improved a farm. 
He afterwards sold that property and removed to Jeniiings county, set- 
tling in Montgomery township, where he resided until his death. 

But a child when he was brought by his parents to Jefferson county, 
Sylvester Deputy was here reared to agricultural pursuits. He was very 
energetic, enterprising and ambitious, and soon after attaining his major- 
ity bought a tract of timbered land in Montgomery township, Jennings 
countv, where he built up an extensive business. In addition to clearing 
the land and carrying on farming, he operated a shingle mill and maiui- 
factured molasses from sorghum which he raised, making a large quan- 
tity each fall. Improving a valuable farm, he erected a substantial set 
of' buildings and was there prosperously engaged in his chosen labors 
until his death in 1895. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Hud- 
son, was born in Jennings county, Indiana, in .\ugust, 1836, and is now 
living near the old homestead. Her father, Boyd Hudson, was born, 
it is diought, in New York state, and was a pioneer of Jennings county. 
He was a tanner by trade, and established a tannery in Jennings county, 
it being one of the first in the state, and in it carried on an extensive, 
business. He bought large tracts of timber land, taking especial pains 
to get that containing mostly oak trees, as he needed oak bark for use 
in his tannery. He employed a large force of men in his work, and the 
locality in which he lived was known as Boydtown. He cleared large 
tracts of land, and in addition to operating his tannery was prosperously 
engaged in general farming until his death. His wife, whose maiden 
name" was Frances Shepherd, survived him and married for her second 
husband William Johnson. 

Sylvester and Sarah (Hudson) Deputy reared five children, as fol- 
lows: ' Velmore, Alban S., Emerson J., Frank (deceased), Ernest M. 
Educated in the public schools of Montgomery township, and at Lan- 
caster, Velmore Deputy began his career as a teacher at the age of 
eighteen years, being first employed in the public schools of Kansas. 
Returning to Indiana he was principal of the high school at \'ernon 
until his "death, at the age of twenty-two years. Alban S. Deputy took 
a normal course at the Blinn Academy, and in addition to teaching and 
farming, was superintendent of a canning factory. He died August 20, 



152 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

1909, and was interred in the Jennings county family cemetery. Emerson 
J. Deputy is a contractor for tlie building of public highways. 

After his graduation from the high school Ernest M. Deput}' studied 
for a year at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana, after which he 
taught school for four years, in the meantime reading medicine. Entering 
then the medical department of Kentucky University he took a course 
of four years, and was graduated from that institution in July, 1903, 
receiving the degree of M. D. Locating in Dugger, Sullivan county, in 
the following month, Dr. Deputy has since built up an extensive and 
lucrative practice, obtaining an assured position among the leading physi- 
cians of this part of the county. Deepl)- interested in his professional 
work, he makes a close study of all newer methods employed in detecting 
and treating diseases, keeping abreast of the times in regard to medicine 
and surgery. He is a member of the Sullivan County Medical Society 
and is president for 1909, and is also a member of the Indiana State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Elks Lodge, No. 866, at Linton. Indiana, and exam- 
ining physician for the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On December 11. 1904. Dr. Deputy married Fletie Staples. She was 
born in Jennings county, Indiana, in Marion township, a daughter of 
Thomas Jefferson and Belle (Rogers) Staples. The Doctor and Mrs. 
Deputy have two children, Sherrill S. and Mary C. 



Samuel O. Carty. — Among the. many intelligent and enterprising 
men who are devoting their time and attention to the tilling of the soil is 
Samuel O. Carty. of Cass township, who is meeting with as much success 
in using agricultural implements as he formerly did with his mining 
tools. A native of Virginia, he was born January 14, 1857, in Russell 
county, which was likewise the birthplace of his father, James L. Carty. 
His paternal grandparents were, as far as known, life-long residents of 
the Old Dominion state. 

Reared on a farm, James L. Carty continued a resident of Virginia 
until 1848. In search then of a more favorable location for securing a 
living for himself and family, he moved to Kentucky, purchased a farm 
in Carter county, and was there a resident for ten years. In 1868, push- 
ing still nearer to the frontier line, he came to Sullivan county, Indiana, 
settling in Hamilton township, where he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his death, in 1906. He married Rachel Dickerson. who 
was born in the same county of Virginia that he was, a daughter of 
Organ and Nancy Dickerson. She died in 1872, leaving five children, 
namely : Robert. Samuel O.. Thomas, Mary and Lucy. 

But eleven years old when he came with his parents to Indiana. 
Samuel O. Carty completed his early education in the schools of Ham- 
ilton township, Sullivan county, and obtained a license to teach school. 
Deciding, however, not to adopt teaching as a profession, he began life 
for himself as a miner, and for a number of years followed that vocation. 



HISTORY OF SL'LLR'AX' COUNTY 153 

In the meantime, having accumulated some money, Mr. Cart)- wisely 
invested in land, purchasing the farm where he now resides, and on 
which he has been successfully employed in general farming since 1894. 
Showing excellent judgment and much skill in his operations, he is meet- 
ing with good success as a tiller of the soil, reaping satisfactory harvests 
each season. 

In 1876 J\lr. Carty married Airs. Lucy (Blevins) Timmons, who 
was born in Kentucky, a daughter of James Blevins. She married 
first Harvey Timmons, who died in early life, leaving her with one child, 
William Timmons. Mr. and Mrs. Carty have reared four children, 
namely : Bertha, George, James and Harry. Bertha, wife of Marion 
F. Walters, has children : Marie, Marion, Mabel, Margaret and Evelyn 
Verle Walters. George married Nellie Smith, and they have three cliil- 
dren, Cecil, Earl and Bertha L. James married Emma Goodman, and 
they are the parents of three children. Ruby, William and Rupert. Harry 
married Chloe Shipman, and they have two children, Geneva and Pauline. 
Politically Mr. Carty is identified with the Republican party, and relig- 
iously both he and his wife are members of the Baptist church. 



Joseph A. Cr.\\\ford. — Among the enterprising and successful 
agriculturists of Cass township, Sullivan county, may be named Joseph 
A. Crawford, whose skill and energy in the direction and prosecution 
of his chosen industry have given to his work a value and significance 
of which few have deemed it capable. A son of the late Hugh Crawford, 
he was born in this township, and has here spent his entire life, his birth 
having occurred March 24, 1862. 

Born in 1808, in Ohio, Hugh Crawford was there reared and mar- 
ried. With his young wife he came to Indiana in search of a home, and 
for a while lived in Grant county. Coming from there to Sullivan county, 
he resided first in Cass township and then moved to Hamilton township, 
where he bought two hundred acres of land. A commodious hewed log 
house and a few acres cleared constituted the improvements on the place 
at the time of his purchase. By dint of energy and persistent toil he 
cleared the greater part of the land, placing it under cultivation, and was 
there actively engaged in farming until his death, August 11, 1873. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Alarion McCormick, was born in Ohio, 
a daughter of William McCormick, and died in Sullivan county, Indiana,- 
August 19, 1892. She reared eight children, namely: John W., Robert. 
David O., Lewis L., George W., Thomas W., Susanna and Joseph A. 

Beginning when young to assist on the farm Joseph A. Crawford 
received his education in the usual manner, gleaning his early knowledge 
of books in the district schools. Leaving his mother's home after his 
marriage, he began life for himself on rented land, and continued thus 
to make his living until 1892, when he bought the farm which he now 
owns and occupies. This is pleasantly located in Cass township, about 
four miles from the village of Sullivan, and contains one hundred and 



154 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

thirty acres of rich and productive land. Here Mr. Crawford is profitably 
engaged in general farming and stockraising, in both branches of his 
work meeting with satisfactory results. 

On April 17, 1884, Mr. Crawford married Lydia E. Brodie. She 
was born March 20, 1862, in Cass township, Sullivan county, Indiana, a 
daughter of William A. and Mary J. (Maxwell) Brodie. Of the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Crawford six children have been born, namely: Maude, 
Mary Ann, Clio, Hugh (deceased), Lester and Russell Homer. Politic- 
ally Mr. Crawford is a stanch Republican. 



Captain Josiah Standley. — In the annals of Sullivan county we 
find no name more worthy of recording in a work of this character than 
that of Captain Josiah Standley, who has the distinction not only of 
being a pioneer settler and a hero of two wars, but of being descended 
from a Revolutionary soldier, of being the son of a soldier of the war 
of 1812, and of representing two honored pioneer families of Indiana. 
He is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred November 18, 1827, 
in Washington county, near Pekin, making him one of the oldest native- 
born citizens of this state. His father, Joseph Standley, was born in 
Guilford county. North Carolina, a son of Thomas Standley. Thomas 
Standley was born, it is thought, in England, and on coming to this 
country lived for a number of years in North Carolina, from there com- 
ing to Washington county, Indiana, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. 

Reared and married in his native state, Joseph Standley kept pace 
with the moving tide of emigration, and in his early life journeved by 
teams to Ohio, where he lived a few years. Then, still pushing his way 
westward, he came across the country to Indiana, locating at first in 
Martin county. He subsequently lived for a time in Washington county, 
from there going to Putnam county, and afterward settling near Bowling 
Green, Clay county, being one of the earlier pioneers of that locality. 
Subsequently taking up his residence in Sullivan county, he pre-empted 
a tract of government land in. section nine, Cass township, and lived on 
it without securing a title to it until his death. He was a man of patriotic 
spirit, and served for a 3'ear in the war of 1812. He married Mary Bar- 
ham, who was born in Guilford county. North Carolina, a daughter of 
Hartwell Barham. Mr. Barham was born and bred in England, from 
there coming to America in colonial days, and taking an active part in 
the great struggle for independence, serving in the Revolutionary army 
for seven years. He spent the winter of 1777-78 at Valley Forge with 
Washington, and he handed down to his descendants the pass word there 
used, it being "Suffer Liberty or Death." Returning to Guilford county. 
North Carolina, after the war, he subsequently spent the remainder of 
his life in that place. Mrs. Joseph Standley survived her husband a 
number of years. Of the children born to her twelve grew to vears of 
maturity. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 155 

About eight years old when his parents moved to Clay covmty, Josiah 
Standley spent all of his early life on the frontier, his parents moving 
from time to time to a newer country, taking advantage of every opening 
made. Inheriting in a marked degree the patriotism that characterized 
his ancestors, he enlisted at the breaking out of the Mexican war in 
Company H, Fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, went with his command 
to Mexico, and there fought until peace was declared. He then marched 
with his comrades from the interior to Vera Cruz, and from there sailing 
by wav of the gulf and rivers to Madison, Indiana, where he was honor- 
ably discharged from service. Returning home, Mr. Standley received 
a land warrant for his services, and with that secured the land that his 
father had previously pre-empted. There he was afterwards engaged in 
farming until the tocsin of war again rung through the land. Then, in 
1861, lie enlisted in Company E, Forty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
was appointed second lieutenant of his company, and went with his com- 
mand to Missouri, where he took part in the battle of New Madrid. 
Early in 1862 he was taken ill, and on March 29 of that year resigned 
and returned home to recuperate. Recovering his health, he enlisted 
during the same year in Company I, Ninety-seventh Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and was made second lieutenant of that company. He was 
afterwards promoted to first lieutenant, and later received his commis- 
sion as captain of his company. While in service Captain Standley par- 
ticipated in more than forty different engagements, including those at 
Jackson, Mississippi, where he was wounded; at Vicksburg, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Dalton, Resaca and the siege and capture of Atlanta, where 
for a time he commanded a regiment. The Captain was with his com- 
mand on the memorable march to the sea, thence through South Carolina 
to North Carolina. There, at Lynch Creek, while in command of a 
mounted squad in detached duty, he was captured and taken to Andcrson- 
ville. His experience there, however, was brief, as he was transferred to 
Libby prison, and there confined until the close of the war, when he 
joined his regiment at Alexandria, Virginia, where he was honorably 
discharged. Returning home, Captain Standley was for several years 
actively engaged in farming, and at one time had title to over four hun- 
dred acres of land. Much of this he has since deeded to his children, 
although he has now one hundred and twenty-five acres in his possession. 
Captain Standley has been three times married. He married first, 
at the age of twenty-two years, Margaret Hinkle, who was born in Illi- 
nois, a daughter of Samuel Hinkle. Her grandfather, Nathan Hinkle. 
came from Germany, his native land, to America in colonial times, and 
fought with the colonists in their struggle for liberty, serving as a soldier 
in the Continental army for seven years. Subsequently coming to Indiana, 
he was a pioneer settler of Sullivan county, and at his death his body was 
laid to rest in Hymera, where his friends have erected a monument to 
his memory. Mrs. Margaret Standley died about two years after her 
marriage, and a year later Captain Standley married her sister, Mahala 
Hinkle, also deceased. In 1905 Captain Standley married Mrs. Nancy 
J. Ooley. By his first marriage he had one son, Hartwell Barham Stand- 



iS6 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

ley, M. D., a successful physician and surgeon of California. By his 
second marriage he had the following children : Elihu E., James H., 
William H., Josiah S., Emma, Nettie, Asenath R., and Fannie. Fraternally 
the Captain was made a Mason at Sullivan. Indiana, when young, and 
he was formerly a member of Fletcher Freeman Post. G. A. R., located 
at Cass, Indiana. 



George A. Exline. — Especially worthy of more than mere mention 
in this biographical volume is George A. Exline, a venerable and 
respected resident of Cass township, a veteran agriculturist, and one 
who fought for his country during the Civil war. For more than half 
a century he has lived upon his home farm, and in the meantime has 
greatly enhanced the value of his propert}' by his many excellent improve- 
ments, rendering it one of the most attractive and desirable estates in 
this part of the county. A son of Adam Exline, he was born June 25, 
1829, in Coshocton county, Ohio, near Dresden. His grandfather. Ber- 
nard Exline. migrated from Pennsylvania to Ohio, becoming a pioneer 
of Muskingum count}', where he spent the remainder of his life. 

Born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, Adam Exline became one of 
the very early settlers of Coshocton county, Ohio, locating there in 1818. 
Purchasing a tract of wild land in Washington township, he erected a 
log house, which was the dwelling place for his family until 1844, his 
older children being born in the cabin. With his wife and six children 
he came in that year to Indiana, making the removal with teams, and 
bringing all of his worldly goods. Settling in Wright township, Greene 
county, he bought a tract of timbered land, and at once built a log house, 
splitting the boards to cover the roof, and making a split puncheon floor. 
There were then no railways in the state, and Terre Haute, thirtv-five 
miles away, was the nearest market and milling point. While he was 
busy clearing the land his wife, with true domestic thrift, was equally as 
busy carding, spinning and weaving the material with which she clothed 
her family. On the homestead which they improved both he and his wife 
spent their remaining years, his death occurring at the age of seventy- 
two years, and hers at the age of eighty-two years. Her maiden name 
was Jane Saucerman. She was born in Belmont county, Ohio, a daughter 
of George and Catherine Saucerman, the former of whom spent his last 
years in that county, while his widow, Mrs. Saucerman, came to Indiana 
after his death and died in Greene county. 

One of a family of nine children, George A. Exline was fifteen 
years old when he came with his parents to Greene county. Indiana. 
Beginning the battle of life for himself in 1851, he came to Sullivan 
county, and here found employment on a farm, working for two years 
for eight dollars a month, afterwards farming on shares until his mar- 
riage. Money came slowly, but surely, and as he was prudent in his 
savings and wise in his expenditures, he accumulated a sufficient sum 
within a few years to buy a strip of canal land, paying two dollars and 
fifty cents an acre, and later buying another tract at five dollars per acre. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 157 

Both tracts are now included in his home farm in Cass township. At 
the time of his marriage Mr. ExHne bnilt a three-room house, and then 
began tlie improvement of a farm. In August, 1862, responchug to his 
country's call, he enlisted in Company H, Eighty-fifth Indiana \'olunteer 
Infantry, and was with his regiment until the close of the war, being at 
the front until February, 1865, when he was disabled, and did not join 
his regiment until after the war was closed. He look an active part in 
many important engagements, including the battle of Thompsons Sta- 
tion, Dalton, Resaca, the siege and capture of Atlanta, where he witnessed 
the surrender of that city by the mayor, and the battle of Nashville, one 
of the most strenuous of the entire conflict. Being honorably discharged 
with his regiment in June, 1865, Mr. Exline returned home. During his 
absence his house had been burned. He immediately built another, and 
in 1883 erected the spacious brick dwelling now occupied by the family. 
He has been very successful in his agricultural labors, accumulating a 
competency, and now, although he has assisted his children to establish 
homes of their own, he has nearly two hundred acres of finely improved 
land in his valuable and attractive farm. 

On February 25. 1858. Air. Exline married Nancy J. Crager. She 
was born in Hamilton township, Sullivan county, Indiana, where her 
parents, Thomas J. and Barbara Crager, were pioneer settlers. Five 
children Iiave blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Exline, namely: Mar- 
shall, Samuel Winfield, Thomas C, Isabelle, John L., and Stella T. 
Marshall married Katie Bryant, and they have two children, Orval and 
Harold. Samuel W. married Dora McClellan, and they have six chil- 
dren, Russell, Lillie, Eunice, Edith, Mabel Clare and Lloyd L. Thomas 
C. married May Buck, and they have five children. Fay E., Fern, Cora, 
Hazel and Mary. Isabelle, wife of George French, has one child, George 
A. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. E.xline are consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Politically Mr. Exline has always sup- 
ported the principles of the Democratic party. Socially he was a member 
of Fletcher Freeman Post, G. A. R., which was located in Cass, Indiana. 



Wii.Li.AM Z.XAYER. — Numbered among the industrious and prosper- 
ous agriculturists of Sullivan county is William Zaayer, who is activelv 
engaged in his pleasant and independent calling in Cass township, having 
the management of the parental homestead, which is one of the best and 
most desirable pieces of property in the neighborhood. A native of Sul- 
livan county, he was born in Haddon township, where his father, Rufus 
Zaayer, was a pioneer settler. He is the descendant of a soldier of the 
Revolutionary war, and comes of German ancestry, his great-grandfather, 
Thomas Zaayer, having emigrated from Germany, his native land, to 
America in colonial days, afterwards serving under General Washington 
in the great struggle for American independence. He subsequently lived 
for a while in I'cnnsylvania, but from there moved to Ohio, where he 
spent the remainder of his eighty-one years of earthly life, residing in 



158 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

either Fairfield or Pickaway counties. He reared two sons and one 
daughter. The daughter married a J\Ir. Dumm ; his son Jacob never left 
Pennsylvania ; his son Joseph was the grandfather of William. 

A native of Berks count}', Pennsylvania, Joseph Zaayer migrated 
to Ohio when young, settling in Pickawa}' county. He had previously 
learned the tailor's trade, but after his marriage he located on a tract of 
timbered land given him by his father in Adams township, that county, 
and thereafter devoted his energies to clearing and improving a home- 
stead. In common with the other pioneers of the place, he raised flax, 
kept sheep, and labored with earnest toil to clear the land and cultivate 
the soil, while his good wife, skilled in the domestic arts, carded, spun 
and wove the homespun in which she clothed the family. He erected 
a comfortable set of log buildings, and was there a resident until his 
death, at the age of sixty-eight years. He married Maria Dunkle, a 
native of Berks county, Pennsylvania, whose father was born on the 
ocean while his parents were on their way from Germany to this country. 
She survived her husband, dying on the home farm in Adams township, 
Ohio, at the age of eighty-one years. She reared thirteen children, as 
follows : Levi, Colton, William, Leah, John, Seth, Samuel, Rufus, Ben- 
jamin. Joseph, Enos, Mary and Daniel. 

Rufus Zaayer was born April 15, 1830, in Adams township, Picka- 
way county, Ohio, and was there bred and educated, attending the prim- 
itive schools of his day, and assisting in the pioneer labor of clearing a 
homestead. At the age of seventeen years he went to live with Solomon 
Teagarden in Adams township, and for five }'ears assisted him in the 
care of the farm, receiving for his.labor a share of the crops. Ambitious 
then to become a land owner he came in the fall of 1854 to Indiana, 
making the removal with teams, and ■"entered a tract of canal land in 
Gill township, Sullivan county, and also bought a five-acre tract, upon 
which was a log house and an orchard. The land was partly timber and 
partly prairie, and he at once began its improvement, residing there four 
years. Exchanging it then for a farm in the same township, he remained 
there two years, and then traded that property for a farm in Hamilton 
township. Ten years later he sold out there and bought the farm which 
he now owns and occupies. It contains one hundred and twenty acres 
of rich land, and is advantageously located about three and one-half 
miles east of the village of Sullivan. The land is well cultivated and 
improved, and has a substantia.l set of buildings, well adapted for the 
use of an up-to-date farmer. 

On August 23, 1854, Rufus Zaayer married Mary Alspach, who 
was born January 5, 1837, in Bloom township, Fairfield county, Ohio, 
which was likewise the birthplace of her father, Daniel Alspach. Her 
grandfather, John Alspach, was born in Pennsvlvania, of German par- 
entage, and was a pioneer of Fairfield county. Ohio, where he spent his 
declining )'ears. A life-long resident of Ohio, Daniel Alspach there 
married Leah Hummel, who was born in Pennsylvania, of German 
ancestors, and they became the parents of nine children, namely: jNIary, 
Caroline, John, Julia, Ann, Eliza, Sophia, Nancy, Carol and Margaret. 



THE NEW YORK 

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HISTORY Ol' SL'LLINAX COUNTY 159 

Of the union of Rufus and Alary (Alspach) Zaayer, seven children 
have been born, five of whom h^ave passed to the higher hfe, Benjaniin 
having died at the age of seventeen years ; Leah ]\Iaria at the age of 
thirty years ; John at the age of fourteen years ; Daniel at the age of 
thirty-four years ; and Emma when but fourteen years old. Allen Zaayer, 
the youngest child, married Hallie Richie, and they have two children, 
Claude Mathers and Herbert. William Zaayer, the second son and third 
child in succession of birth, has been a life-long resident of Sullivan 
county and remains at home, the solace, comfort and mainstay of his 
parents. Having charge of the home farm, he is carrying on general 
farming and stock-raising after the most approved modern methods, and 
in his work is meeting with genuine success. 



Stephen R. Brown, one of the representative farmers of Jackson 
township, is numbered among its native sons, born May 9, 1862, a son 
of Stephen and Ann (Johnson) Brown and a grandson of Samuel and 
Nancy Brown. The grandparents were born in Ireland, where thev were 
farming people, and coming to America they located first in T'eimsvl- 
vania, from whence they later moved to Davis county, Indiana, and later 
to Sullivan county, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 

Stephen Brown, a son- of Samuel and Nancy Brown, was born in 
Pennsylvania, about 1819, and was but a child when he came with his 
parents to Davis county, and some time in the thirties he came with them 
to Sullivan county. He was married in Jackson township in 1856 to 
Ann Johnson, who was born near Jamestown, Ohio, March 11, 1832, a 
daughter of George and Epharatia Johnson, both now deceased, and they 
too were farming people. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown, and the first two, George W. and Samuel B., were twins, the 
former now living in Mandan, North Dakota, and the latter in Youngs- 
town, Ohio : William E. resides in Minneapolis. Minnesota ; Stephen is 
mentioned later ; Charles died in infancy ; Nancy A. died at the age of 
sixteen years ; and Mary E. Wilcox resides in Bricelyn, Minnesota. 
Stephen Brown, the father, was a lifelong agriculturist, and at one time 
owned an estate of three hundred and thirty-five acres, being both a 
grain and stock farmer. In politics he voted with both the Whigs and 
Republicans, and both he and his wife were earnest members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Stephen R. Brown assisted his father with the farm work until the 
summer before his marriage, when he began farming for himself. He 
wedded, November 29, 1885, Anna A. Wambaugh, who was born on 
the 20th of December. 1864, a daughter of Ebcnezer and Rosena Wam- 
baugh, the former of whom was born in 1830 and died April 20, 1896, 
while the latter was born in 1828 and died April 10, 1896. Both were 
natives of Germany, the father coming from Prussia and the mother 
from Baden before their marriage, and from Ohio they moved to Greens- 
burg, Indiana, and later, about 1873, came to Jackson township. Sullivan 
Vol. 11—11 



i6o HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

county, where they spent the remainder of their hves. The union of j\Ir. 
and Mrs. Brown was blessed by the birth of five children. The eldest, 
Herbert A., born July 5, 1887, received a common school education with 
one term in Brown's Business College, and he is now in the regular army 
and stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He enlisted on the i8th 
of March, 1908. William E., born February 13, 1888, completed the 
common school course and a one year's high school training, and is now 
working at the mine. Ernest R., born October 7, i88g, passed from the 
common schools to the high school, where he studied for two years, and 
was for one year a student at the normal college at Danville, Indiana. 
He is now teaching his first school. Leslie R., born August i, 1892, has 
completed the common school course and is now assisting his father on 
the farm. Mildred A., born May 6, 1897, is attending the common school. 
Just after his marriage Mr. Brown bought the forty acres of land 
on which his home is now located, and his farm contains one hundred 
and twenty-seven acres of land, while in addition to this he also farms 
the three hundred and thirty-five acres belonging to his mother. He 
raises both grain and stock, and has been very successful in his chosen 
field of endeavor. He is a stockholder in the Citizens' State Bank of 
Farmersburg, and is a Republican in his political affiliations. Both he 
and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. 



David M. Bedwell. — Distinguished not only for the honored pioneer 
ancestry from which he is sprung, but for his services as a volunteer 
soldier during the late Civil war, and as an excellent representative of 
the successful agriculturists of Cass township, David M. Bedwell is 
eminently deserving of special mention in this work. A native of Sulli- 
van county, Indiana, he was born February 24, 1845, a son of Robert 
Bedwell, and a grandson of Thomas Bedwell, both Indiana pioneers. 
Born, bred and married in Kentucky, Thomas Bedwell came from there 
to Indiana in early days, settling in Jefferson township, Sullivan county, 
where both he and his wife, whose maiden name was Polly Holston, 
spent their remaining years. 

One of a family of seven children, Robert Bedwell was born in 
Kentucky, and was a small child when he came with his parents across 
the country to Sullivan county, oftentimes finding the way by means of 
blazed trees. Growing to manhood, he entered government land in Jef- 
ferson township, and having cleared an opening in the dense timber built 
the log cabin in which his son David was born, riving by hand the 
boards that covered the roof. There were then neither railways nor 
canals, and Yincennes was the nearest market and milling point. For 
a number of years thereafter deer, wolves, panthers and other wild 
beasts roamed at will in this vicinity and the energetic women of the 
household were accustomed to card, spin and weave and make all the 
clothing worn by the members thereof. After clearing a portion of the 
land he sold out and removed to Cass township, purchasing the land now 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY i6i 

owned and occupied by his son David M. A few acres of the land had 
been cleared and a log cabin, with a frame addition, containing one room, 
had been erected. Continuing his agricultural labors, he resided here 
until his death, September 3, 1878, in his seventy-third year. He married 
Rebecca Pitts, who was born in Virginia, and came to Indiana with her 
parents, Macey and Barbara Pitts, pioneer settlers of Sullivan county. 
She survived her husband, passing away September 25, 1892, in the 
eighty-fourth year of her age. Of the fourteen children born of their 
union, thirteen grew to years of maturity, namely : Elizabeth, Sarah, 
James, Polly Ann, George, Thomas, Rebecca, Robert, David M., Stephen, 
Alexander, John W. and Eliza. 

Obtaining a practical education in the old log schoolhouse, with its 
home-made furniture, David M. Bedwell began as a boy to assist his 
father on the farm, continuing thus employed until ready to establish a 
home of his own. Beginning then to farm for himself, he rented land 
and was busily employed in its cultivation until the early part of 1864. 
In February of that year he enlisted in Company C, Fifty-ninth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and went south with his regiment, being with his 
comrades in Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. Being taken 
ill at Huntsville, Alabama, he was taken first to the hospital at Nashville, 
Tennessee, and after his discharge from that institution was granted a 
furlough of thirty days. Going then to Indianapolis to join his regiment, 
he was sent to New York city, thence by boat to Morehead City, North 
Carolina, and from there to Raleigh, North Carolina, where he joined 
his command. Marching then with the "boys" to Washington, he took 
part in the Grand Review, and was subsequently honorably discharged 
with his regiment. Returning home Mr. Bedwell resumed his agricul- 
tural labors, and on the death of his father succeeded to the ownership 
of the parental homestead, a part of which he had previously purchased. 
Here he has since carried on general farming with ability and success, 
and his added improvements have been of the best. 

Air. Bedwell married in October, 1863, Emma Shepherd, who was 
born in Sullivan county, Indiana, a daughter of Eli and Lucy Shepherd, 
pioneers of Hamilton township. Four children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Bedwell, namely : Carl, Burt, Ollie and Freddie. Carl married 
Alice Birch, and they have three children, Willie, Gladys and Jesse. Burt 
married Sarah Borders, and they are the parents of four children. Evert, 
Nora, Hazel and Theresa. Ollie, wife of Joseph Vaughn, has three 
children. Clarence, Alta and Harold. Politically Mr. Bedwell is a stanch 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and religiously both 
he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



M.\RTix M. Pope. — Recognized as one of the most intelligent men 
and thoroughgoing farmers of Sullivan county, Alartin M. Pope, of 
Cass township, is successfully engaged in tilling the soil on as com- 
fortable and well-kept a homestead as can be found in this part of the 



i62 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

state. During his long and busy life he has pursued the even tenor 
of his way as an honest man and a good citizen, being engaged in either 
mercantile or agricultural pursuits, and is now reaping the reward of his 
many years of persistent toil. A native of Indiana, he was born October 
9, 1838, in Morrill township, Shelby county, a son of Henry L. Pope. His 
grandfather, Samuel Pope, a native of Virginia, followed the march of 
civilization westward, settling first as a pioneer in Ohio, and a few 3'ears 
later coming from there to Indiana and locating near Indianapolis, where 
he passed his remaining years. 

Born in Ohio, Henry L. Pope came with his parents to Indiana. 
He lived for a number of years with, or near, his parents, but after his 
second marriage he located in Shelby county, where he lived until 1867. 
He subsequently spent a few years in Sullivan county, and then moved 
to Greene county, where he resided until his death, at the age of eighty- 
three years. The maiden name of his second wife, mother of Martin 
M., was Charity Martin. She was born, it is thought, in Shelby county, 
Indiana, where her father, George Martin, a native of North Carolina, 
was a pioneer settler. He was a basket maker and a farmer, and spent 
his last years in Edgar county, Illinois. He married a Miss Hoop. Of 
the union of Henry L. and Charity (Martin) Pope, eight children were 
born, namely: William, Martin M., Isabelle, Sarah, Mary, Aaron, Phebe 
and John. The mother of these children died at the age of fifty-six years. 

Brought up in pioneer days Martin M. Pope learned to read and 
write in the old log schoolhouse, sitting on a slab seat which had wooden 
pegs for legs, while a slab placed against one side of the cabin served 
the children for a writing desk. The room was lighted with just the 
amount of light that could push its way through a strip of greased paper 
in an opening where one log was left out, and was heated by a fire built 
of logs in the huge fireplace. He was about nine years old when he made 
his first visit to Indianapolis, going there with his father to take a load 
of poultry. It was then quite a flourishing town, with less than ten 
thousand inhabitants, and but two railroads. Beginning life for himself 
at the age of twentv-two years, Mr. Pope rented a farm in Shelby county, 
taking at first a lease for four years. Coming to Sullivan county in 1866. 
he rented land for a few years, after which he bought a farm in Cass 
township. Subsequently selling that property, Mr. Pope was for fourteen 
years engaged in mercantile business in the village of Cass, having a 
substantial trade in general merchandise. In 1887 he bought the farm 
which he now owns and occupies, it having formerly belonged to his 
father-in-law, Greene L. A'ernon, and has since been here profitably 
employed in agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Pope married in i860, Mary Matilda Vernon, who was born in 
Morrill township, Shelby county, Indiana, a daughter of Greene L. and 
Delitia (Vernon) Vernon. A native of North Carolina, Greene L. Ver- 
non came from there to Indiana with teams, bringing with him his wife 
and two children. Entering government land in Morrill township, he 
first erected a log cabin, and then began the improvement of a farm, 
subsequently residing there until 1867, when he bought a farm in Cass 



HISTORY OF SULLUAX COUXTY 163 

town.ship, ami here liveil until his death the following year, passing away 
in 1868. 

;\Ir. and Airs. Pope are the parents of seven children, namel)-: Sarah 
E., Janie, Cordelia, Aaron, John, Minnie and Etta. Sarah E., wife of 
P'rank Usery, has three chddren, Ferd, Eva P. and Ruth. Janie married 
William Miller, and died in 1892', leaving two children, Bert and Gertie. 
Cordelia, wife of W. Sanders Pigg, has six children, Herbert, Bessie, 
Raymond. Arval, Iva and Noal. Aaron married Florence Keene, and 
they have seven children, Bert, Zclla, Sylvia, Clarence, Roy, Tony and 
Cleo. Minnie, wife of Hosea Steele, has two children, \'ernie and 
Frances. Politically Mr. Pope is an active member of the Democratic 
party, and has filled' various offices of trust and responsibility with ability 
and fidelity. While living in Shelby county he was poor superintendent 
and has served as assessor in Cass township. He has been deputy 
assessor three terms, was justice of the peace for eleven years, and for 
three vears was a county commissioner. Religiously both Mr. and Mrs. 
Pope are worthy members of the Methodist Protestant church. 



John Lammev. — Many of the more prosperous and respected citi- 
zens of Sullivan county are of foreign birth, and in their native land 
acquired those habits of industry, thrift and frugality that have been 
such important factors in winning them wealth and good fortune in this 
country. Prominent among this number is John Lammey, who has 
retired from agricultural pursuits, and is now residing at his pleasant 
home in the village of Dugger, devoting his time to horticulture and 
agriculture, finding fully as much pleasure as profit in his congenial work. 
A son of John Lammey, Sr., he was born September 25, 1834, in county 
Tyrone, province of Ulster, Ireland, coming on the paternal side of 
French Huguenot ancestry. His grandparents, William and Ellen (Gal- 
lagher) Lammey, were life-long residents of the Emerald Isle. 

John Lammey, Sr., a farmer by occupation, came to America about 
the time of the Civil war, and for awhile lived in Philadelphia. Subse- 
quently purchasing a farm near Richmond, Virginia, he was there a 
resident until his death, at the venerable age of eight-nine years. He 
married Martha McNeil, who was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, of 
Scotch ancestors, being a daughter of John and Eliza McNeil, who spent 
their entire lives in Ireland. She died in Philadelphia. Of her children, 
five grew to maturity. Eliza went to Australia to live, and the <ithers 
came to America. Ann is living in Philadelphia ; Martha and William 
have passed to the life beyond; and John is the special subject of this 
sketch. 

Bred and educated in his native county, John Lammey began as a 
boy to learn something of the various branches of agriculture, remain- 
ing with his parents until his marriage. He afterwards lived on rented 
land until i860. In March of that year, hoping in this land of fair 
promise to better his financial condition, he came to the United States, 



i64 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

and for two years lived in Philadelphia, and then located in Coshocton 
county, Ohio. In August, 1863, Mr. Lammey, loyal to the land of his 
adoption, enlisted in Company F, Second Ohio Heavy Artillery, went 
south with his regiment, and remained with it in all of its hard marches, 
campaigns and battles, and with his comrades was honorably discharged 
from the service in August, 1865. Returning to Ohio, Mr. Lammey 
bought land near Mohawk village, and was there employed in tilling the 
soil until 1874. Coming then to Indiana, he settled in Sullivan county, 
for three years renting land. In the meantime, Mr. Lammey purchased 
a tract of wild, tmcultivated land lying in sections twenty-three and 
twenty-four, Cass township, and in the log house which he erected he and 
his family lived for many years, and it is still standing. Clearing and 
improving the land, he subsequently built a good frame barn, and was 
there successfully employed in agricultural pursuits until 1904. Rent- 
ing the farm at that time, he has since made his home in Dugger, pleas- 
antly passing his time in caring for his fruit trees, flowers and bees, mak- 
ing a special study of these, and finding enjoyment in their cultivation. 
Mr. Lammey married, October 3, 1854, Mary Graham, who was 
born in county Tyrone, Ireland, where her parents, Andrew and Jane 
(McjMains) Graham, both of Scotch ancestry, spent their lives. The 
union of J\Ir. and Mrs. Lammey has been blessed by the birth of eight 
children, namely : Jane, William, John, Martha, Robert A., Charles, 
Lewis C. and Margaret E. Jane, wife of Frank Shivers, has si.x; chil- 
dren, Wilmer, Minnie, James, Frank, Lizzie and John. William married 
Rachel McBride, and they have three children, John, Frank and Ruth. 
John married Susan Magill, and has four children, Myrtle, Mary, Earl 
and Ray. Martha, wife of William Exline, has six children, Jane, Jose- 
phine, Nora, John, Willie and Vinetta. Robert A. married Mary E. 
Lambright. Charles married Susan Doherty, and they have three chil- 
dren, Culmer, Opher and Cecil. Lewis C. married Clara Walters, and 
they have two children, Ethel and Hazel. Alargaret E., wife of William 
Fry, has two children, Leroy and Willie. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. 
Lammey are faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Polit- 
ically ]\Ir. Lammey is a strong Republican. While in the army he cast 
his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, and soon afterwards 
was granted his naturalization papers. 



Eli Clayton. — An enterprising and well-to-do agriculturist. Eli 
Clayton is prosperously engaged in his free and independent vocation on 
one of the pleasantest and most desirable homesteads in Cass township. 
It has a fine location in section sixteen, and with its fertile land and 
comfortable and convenient set of buildings invariably attracts the atten- 
tion of the passer-by. and indicates to what good purpose the proprietor 
has employed his time and means. Coming from pioneer stock, he was 
born August 31, 1866, in Cass township, a son of William Clayton. 

Francis Clayton, grandfather of Eli, was born in Bradford, York- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 165 

shire, England. Acqniring a practical education in the puhlic schools, 
he in company with his brother George subsequently embarked in the 
coal business, and for several years operated a number of mines. Visit- 
ing America in 1842, he looked about for a favorable business location, 
and spent a short time in Sullivan county. Going back to his native land 
in 1843, he remained there a year, and in 1844 returned to this country 
with his wife and five children, being eight weeks and three days in sail- 
ing across the ocean to New Orleans. From that city he came by steamer 
up the river to Evansville, Indiana, from there journc_\-ing with two four- 
horse teams to Greene county, bringing with him his household goods 
and provisions enough to last his family a year. At first he found shelter 
with friends, but ere long he bought a tract of land in Jefferson township. 
Several acres of the tract had been cleared, an orchard had been set out, 
and a two-roomed frame house and a log house had been erected. He 
soon built a mill, which he operated by horse power, and there ground 
both wheat and corn, the bolt being operated by hand. Selling that place 
in 185 1, he purchased land on Burrow creek, in the north part of Cass 
township, and having improved the water power, built a grist mill in 
the place now known as Caledonia. There he lived as a farmer and miller 
until his death in December, 1853. He was twice married. His first 
wife, the grandmother of Eli Clayton, was a lifelong resident of England, 
and at her death she left three children: William (father of Eli), Eli 
and Jeremiah. By his second marriage he had two children : Frances, 
now Mrs. Snow, and John. All of his children were born in England. 

Born in Bradford, Yorkshire, England, William Clayton attended 
school when young, and afterwards assisted his father in the mines. 
Soon after coming with the family to Indiana, he married Ann Lunn, 
who was born in England, and came to Greene county, Indiana, with her 
parents, Thomas and Christiana (Dolby) Lunn, who there improved a 
farm on which thev spent their remaining years. He then settled on land 
that is now included in the home property of his son Eli, who was born 
in the cabin made of round logs that he then built. Laboring with unceas- 
ing toil, he cleared a large part of the wild land, placed it under cultiva- 
tion, and later erected a set of frame buildings, and here resided until 
his death. To him and his wife eleven children were born, namely : 
Mary, Sarah, Christiana, Thomas, Francis, Rachel. Martha. Fanny, 
Emma, Eli and William. 

Reared on the home farm. Eli Clayton gleaned his early education 
during the short terms of the district school, and as soon as practicable 
was initiated into the mysteries of farming. At the time of his marriage 
he bought fortv acres of land in Jefferson township, but a few years later 
sold out and purchased the parental homestead, where he has since been 
busily employed in general farming, his labors being substantially 
rewarded by the abundant crops that he raises each season. 

]\Ir. Clayton married, April 23, 1890, Mabel Shepherd. She was 
born July 30. 1870, in Haddon township, Sullivan county, which was 
also the birthplace of her father, Francis M. Shepherd, and the place 
in which her grandfather, William Shepherd, settled as a pioneer. Receiv- 



i66 HISTORY OF SULLUAX COUNTY 

ing excellent educational advantages, Francis ]\L Shepherd taught school 
when a young man, and afterwards turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, for a number of years being one of the leading farmers of Jef- 
ferson township, where his death occurred November 14, 1889. The 
maiden name of his wife was Sarah Willis. She was born in Haddon 
township, a daughter of John A. Willis, who was born in 1800 in Vir- 
ginia, but was reared and married in Kentucky. Coming from there to 
Indiana about 1830, he entered one hundred and sixty acres of govern- 
ment land in Haddon township, and from the wilderness hewed out a 
farm. He built first a cabin of hickory logs, riving the boards to cover 
the roof, and putting in a stick and clay chimney. He had no stove for 
many years, his wife cooking by the open fireplace. He raised sheep and 
flax, and his wife, carded, spun and wove the cloth used in making gar- 
ments for the family. In 1859, having succeeded well in improving his 
land, Mr. Willis built a substantial house from oak logs, with a good 
brick chimney and a porch. He subsequently bought the brick school 
house which had been erected on his land, and converted it into a good 
dwelling house, in which he resided until his death, at the age of eighty- 
six years. He was twice married. His second wife, Mrs. Clayton's 
maternal grandmother, was Sarah Boatman. She was born in 1812, in 
Jessamine county, Kentucky, and died aged eighty-three years. By this 
marriage Mr. Willis reared ten children: Ann E., Mary, William, Sarah, 
Marion F., Tilghman H., Margaret, James A., Ruah L. and Laura. By 
his first marriage he had two children : John and Richard. He joined 
the Methodist church after coming to Indiana, and became a licensed 
exhorter, and his wife and all of his children belonged to the same church. 
Mrs. Sarah (Willis) Shepherd is still a resident of Jefferson township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clayton are the parents of three children, namely: Iva, 
Hazel and William Russell. Politically, Mr. Clayton is a loyal supporter 
of the principles of the Democratic party, and religiously both he and his 
wife are adherents of the Christian church, and the wife is a devout 
member of that denomination. 



Levi Gam dill. — Holding a good position among the successful 
farmers of Cass township, Sullivan county, is Levi Gambill, who is 
emphatically a self-made man, as he started in life with no other capital 
than brains, a willingness to labor and the necessary muscle, and by his 
industry and excellent judgment and management has acquired a fair 
share of this world's goods. A son of Morgan Gambill, he -was born in 
this township Januar}' 2, 1839, and is an excellent representative of the 
native-born citizens of this part of the state. His grandfather, Martin 
Gambill, came from Tennessee to Indiana at an early day, making the 
journey on horseback, and bringing with him his family and all of his 
household effects. On the farm which he improved in Wright township, 
Greene county, he spent his remaining days. 

Born in Tennessee, Morgan Gambill was but a child when he came 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 167 

with the family to Greene count}-, Indiana. An apt scholar in his youth- 
ful days, he was well educated for his times, and in early manhood began 
his career as a teacher, having charge of the first school established in 
Cass township. The round-log cabin in which he taught was rudely con- 
structed and equipped, having a stick and clay chimney, a roof made of 
boards rived and held in place by poles, while the seats were made of slabs 
and the floor of puncheon. A strip of greased paper covering the narrow 
opening made by leaving out a round log admitted light to the room, 
which was heated by a fire in the fireplace. This part of Indiana was then 
a wilderness, and the comparatively few inhabitants lived in a very primi- 
tive manner, the farmers raising flax and sheep, and their hard-working 
wives carding, spinning and weaving the cloth in which she dressed her 
entire family. During his boyhood all grain was cut with a sickle, and 
the plows were made with wooden moldboards, on which were narrow 
points of iron. The wagons were home-made, the wheels being sawed 
from a log, and no iron at all used in their construction. Wild game, 
deer, wolves and bears were plentiful, and oftentimes damaged the 
growing crops unless they were carefully watched and guarded. 

When a young man, Morgan Gambill entered government land in 
section one, Cass township, and having cleared a space erected from 
round logs the cabin in which his son Levi was born. With character- 
istic energy and enterprise he began the improvement of a homestead, 
and a few years later erected a commodious hewed log house, which was 
then considered a fine residence, and subsequently built on liis place the 
first frame barn erected in the township, a barn that is still in use. Clear- 
ing the greater part of his land, he resided there until his death in 1852, 
when but forty-one years old. He married Ellen McGrew, who was born 
near Salem, Daviess county-, Indiana, a daughter of John McGrew, a 
pioneer of Daviess and Greene counties, who improved a farm near 
I.inton. She survived him, n-iarrying subsequently for her second husband 
^\'ilIiam Cone, and now. a bright and hearty woman of ninety-five years, 
is living with one of her sons. By her first marriage she reared seven 
children: John, Hannah, Lucinda, Levi, Wiley, Morgan and Mary Ann. 
By her second marriage she had two children : Eleanor and William. 

Having received his early education in the district schools, Levi 
Gambill obtained on the home farm a practical experience in the art and 
science of agriculture, ren-iaining with his mother until eighteen vears 
old. Beginning life for himself then even with the world, he secured 
work on a neighboring farm, receiving nine dollars a month wages, which 
was then considered a good compensation. Prudent and economical, he 
accumulated enough money before many years to buy forty acres of the 
land that is now included in his present homestead. He built a hewed 
log house for his first hon-ie, and there began housekeeping with his bride. 
Enlisting in his country's defense in March, 1865, 'Sir. Gambill became 
a member of Company A, Fifty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, joined 
his regiment at Indianapolis, and with it w-ent by way of Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania and New Jersey to New York City, fron-i there going by steamer 
to Wilmington, North Carolina, and after a short stop at that port return- 



i68 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

ing by boat as far north as Alexandria, Virginia. A few weeks later he 
marched with his comrades to Washington, where he took part in the 
Grand Review. Going from there to Pennsylvania, and thence to Ken- 
tucky, he was there honorably discharged from the service in the fall of 
1865. Returning home, Mr. Gambill resumed the care of his land, and 
has since enlarged his farm by purchase of adjoining land, having now 
eighty-five acres in his homestead. He has placed his land in a fine state 
of cultivation, erected a substantial set of frame buildings, and set out 
fruit and shade trees, each year adding to the beauty and value of the 
property. 

On February 7, i860, Mr. Gambill married Elizabeth Moore. She 
was born in Cass township, a daughter of James Moore, and grand- 
daughter of Robert Moore. Her grandfather, an early settler of Sullivan 
county, improved a farm in the west half of the northeast c^uarter of sec- 
tion fourteen, Cass township, and in addition to being a successful farmer 
was one of the noted hunters of his day. James Moore cleared and 
improved a homestead in section fourteen, Cass township, and was there 
employed in tilling the soil until his death, at the age of forty-four years. 
His widow, whose maiden name was Sarah Graves, married for her 
second husband Joseph Linn, and died at the age of seventy-two years. 
She reared four children by her first marriage : William, Elias, Elizabeth 
(now Mrs. Gambill ) and John. Her father, Elias Graves, was also a pio- 
neer of Cass township, and from the wilderness redeemed in the south 
half of section one a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gambill have three children, namely: John S., Sarah 
E. and William M. John married Amanda Gabard, and they have five 
children : Homer, Cornie, Osal, Bessie and Kittle. Sarah E.* wife of 
John Marshall Buck, has six children : Chloe, Dessie, Alma, Dora, Pearl 
and Estie. William M. married Elizabeth Kelley, and they have two 
children : Nona and Everett. Chloe Buck married Otis Pitcher, and they 
have two children : Louis and Pans}'. Dessie Buck married Albert Boyd, 
and has one child, Theresa. Bessie Gambill, wife of Ira Sisk, has two 
children : Esther and Iva. Politically, Mr. Gambill votes for the best men 
and measures, regardless of party restrictions, and religiously, both Mr. 
and Mrs. Gambill are members of the Christian church. Fraternally, he 
is a Mason of Sullivan. 



Daniel H. H.\lberst.\dt was born on the 7th of January, 1850. 
about three-fourths of a mile north of where he now resides, and is a 
son of one of the most honored pioneer families of Sullivan county, 
Harrison and Elizabeth (Manwarring) Halberstadt. They were born 
in Franklin county, Indiana, and came to Jackson township in Sullivan 
county as early as 1837, and here they both spent the remainder of their 
lives and died. Mr. Halberstadt, the father, was quite a prominent stock- 
raiser, and owned over two hundred acres of good land. The Republican 
party received his stanch support and co-operation, and both he and his 
wife were earnest members of the Methoclist church. Thev reared five 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AN COUXTY 169 

children to years of maturity, namely: George ^i., whose home is in 
Jackson township ; Charlotte, deceased ; Thomas J. and Elijah T., who 
also reside in Jackson township : and Daniel H., who is mentioned more 
at length below. 

Daniel H. Halberstadt remained at home and assisted his father in 
clearing and improving his land until his marriage, which occurred on 
the 27tli of November, 1873, to Samantha Ridgeway, who was born in 
Jackson township, September 26, i852', a daughter of Jacob W. and 
Julia A. Ridgeway, both of whom were born in Kentucky, but they were 
married in Sullivan county, Indiana. Mr. Ridgeway was a lifelong tiller 
of the soil, and he owned an estate of four hundred and eighty acres. 
Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Halberstadt, three are deceased, 
two dying in infancy, and Bettie Lillian at the age of nineteen years. The 
two living are Nellie G. and Goldie May. The elder is the wife of John 
A. Harding, of Jackson township, and the younger is at home with her 
parents. 

After his marriage Mr. Halberstadt erected a pleasant home on his 
farm, and here the family have ever since lived, the homestead farm con- 
sisting of eighty acres. He is a carpenter as well as a farmer, and has 
been very successful in his business operations. His politics are Repub- 
lican, and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist church. 



Katiikrini-: (Grant) Wallace, a member of one of the most 
prominent families of Sullivan county, was born in Muskingum county, 
Ohio, September 14, 1836, a daughter of Peter and Anna (Neff) Grant. 
The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, but was only a boy of nine- 
teen when he came to this country, and he spent three months in crossing 
the ocean. He taught school both before and after coming to the United 
States, and was one of the highly educated men of his day, being able 
to speak five difterent languages, and his professional career covered the 
long period of fifty or sixty years. During that time he taught in Balti- 
more and in many of the higher educational institutions of learning, but 
finallv he came to Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1855, and spent the remain- 
der of his life here, his later years having been passed on his farm in 
Jackson township. From the Whigs he transferred his political allegiance 
to the Democracy, and both he and his wife were members of the Presby- 
terian church, in which he served as an elder for many years. Fight 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Grant, namely : Katherine Wallace ; 
Mary Forester, deceased ; Elizabeth Squire, also deceased : Anna Wal- 
lace, whose home is in Curry township ; William and Charles, who have 
both passed away ; Caroline Baker, whose husband is a minister at Lyons : 
and Morgan, who died in infancy. 

The daughter Katherine received her educational training in the 
public schools and under the able instructions of her father, and she also 
taught school during about four years before her marriage. This occurred 
on the 7th of August, 1859, when she wedded Henry R. ^^'allace. Sr., 



170 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

who was born February 7, 1824, in Pennsylvania, and was a lad of sixteen 
when he came with his parents to Indiana. Immediately following their 
marriage the young couple moved to the farm where the widow yet resides 
and which had been entered from the government by his father. Mr. 
Wallace cleared and improved this place, and made it his home until his 
death on the 7th of August, 1887, and he was buried in Littleflock ceme- 
tery, near Shelburn. At his death he left a valuable estate of four hun- 
dred acres, and during his lifetime he had been prominently engaged in 
the raising of grain and stock. His politics were Democratic, and he was 
prominently before the people for many years as a squire, as a trustee 
and as a county commissioner. He was at the same time an earnest 
Christian gentleman, a member of the Presbyterian denomination, and for 
many years he served his church as a deacon. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace was blessed by the birth of five 
children, namely : Elizabeth Giles, of Jackson township : Frank, who mar- 
ried Joanna Giles, by whom he has two children, Katharine and Henry, 
and the family home is in Curry township; Edward P.. at home with his 
mother; Harry S., who has been twice married, first to Leona Wagner, 
deceased, and secondly to Sarah Ross, and he is now practicing law in 
Terre Haute ; and Peter J., who died at the age of seven years. Mrs. 
Wallace and her son reside on her estate of eighty acres in Jackson 
township, and she is a prominent member and an earnest worker in the 
Presbyterian church. 



Jacob Cumson, whose home for many yeai^s has been on a farm in 
Jackson township, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, June 20, 1848, 
a son of James and Nancy (Early) Cumson, natives respectively of Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, and of Scotland. When twenty years of age, in 
1807, James Cumson went to Ohio and became a farmer and cabinet- 
maker there, and his life's labors were ended in death in about 1878, 
surviving his wife for about ten years, and they both lie buried in Ohio. 

Jacob Cumson attended school in Harrison county, Ohio, during his 
boyhood days, and he has practically cared for himself since the early 
age of sixteen years. At this time, about 1864, he obtained a government 
position in the quartermaster's department, where he remained for about 
eighteen months, and he then worked for others until 1867, after w'hich 
he farmed on rented land in Guernsey county for one year. At the close 
of that period he bought a little twenty acre farm in Ohio, and lived 
and labored there until he sold the land and came to Sullivan county, 
Indiana, in 1883, here buying forty acres, where he now lives. He has 
sold the coal which underlies this tract, and he also owns eighty acres of 
land about half a mile northeast and thirty-six acres in Cass township, 
renting about twenty-five acres of these tracts, while on the remainder 
he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. He is a Republican 
in politics, and is now serving as a justice of the peace, and to his honor 
it may be said that he was elected to this office without his knowledge. 

On the 13th of October. 18,68, i\Ir. Cumson married Sarah E. Lam- 



HISTORY OF SULLIN'AN COUNTY 171 

bright, who was born in Harrison county, Ohio, a daughter of Henry 
and jNlary Jane (Shivers) Lambright, natives respectively of Germany 
and of Ohio. They came to Sulhvan county in 1882 and bought a farm 
in Cass township, where the father died in 1904 and the mother about 
fourteen years previously. Mrs. Cumson has also passed away, dying on 
the 30th of April, 1907, after becoming the mother of three children, 
but only Mary Elizabeth, the youngest, is now living, the two others 
having died in infancy. Mr. Cumson is a member of the Methodist 
church. 



RoKEUT J. Denton, one of the thrifty agriculturists of Jackson 
township, Sullivan county, is a native of V'igo county, Indiana, born 
April 23, 1839, son of Joseph W. and Anna (Miller) Denton, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Tennessee. The father came to Terre 
Haute, Indiana, when it was yet a small place. He located on lands near 
Terre Haute, where he resided with his parents, and they both died near 
Lewis, Indiana. Mr. Denton remained at home until twenty-one years 
of age, when he married and moved to a farm in Honey Creek township, 
where he followed fann life until 1862. He then removed to Lancaster, 
Owen countv, where he stayed one year, then went to the old home place. 
During this term of years by frugal and industrious habits he had suc- 
ceeded in accumulating over one thousand acres of land in Vigo, Clay 
and Owen counties. At the time of his death he resided near Lewis, 
having sold the old place and purchased another fariu about three miles 
from the old one. He died about 1878, his father having survived until 
1880. Mr. Denton's mother died in i860, and his grandmother in 1877. 

Robert J. Denton remained under the paternal roof until twenty years 
of age, when his father gave him eighty acres of land. He then located on 
his own farm in Pierson township. On October 10, 1864, he enlisted in 
the Twentv-lirst Heavy Artillery, in which service he was faithful to 
every known duty for twelve months. He was a member of Company C. 
Upon his return home he engaged in farming on the place where he now 
lives, which land he had purchased prior to going into the army. At one 
time this place contained four hundred and forty acres, but has been sold 
off until he now has but seventy acres. He bought and sold stock for 
about twentv vears and carried on general farming in connection with 
his extensive stock business. Of late years he has lived more of a retired 
life and enjoys the fruits of his long and strenuous life. 

Mr. Denton is a member of the Masonic fraternity at Hymera. The 
fainily attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Denton is 
a member. Politically he is a believer in the principles of the Republican 
partv, and cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln for president. 

He was married. October 4, i860, to Martha Lovett, born in Ohio 
June 10, 1857, daughter of Jonas Lovett. Martha Lovett came to Sullivan 
county, Indiana, in 1839, her sister having resided here some years before. 
She taught school in Indiana from the time she was sixteen years of age 



172 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

until her marriage. To Mr. and ]Mrs. Denton have been born six children, 
as follows : Charles A., married and resides on a farm near his father ; 
Joseph Ellsworth, married and lives near the father ; Mary Etta, deceased ; 
Arthur, deceased ; William, married and lives in Oklahoma City ; and 
Rhoda, wife of Charles Liston. 



Caroline (A'Iahan) Branson. — Mrs. Caroline Mahan Branson was 
born in Kentucky January 13, 1832, a daughter of Jeremiah and Jemima 
(Browning) Mahan, both of whom were also born in Kentucky. Coming 
to Jackson township in Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1834, they entered 
land here at that early day, and the father was both a cooper and farmer, 
having operated a shop both before and after coming to this county. 
During the years of his residence in Sullivan county he also cleared his 
farm of two hundred acres and operated a saw and grist mill, becoming- 
one of the best known men throughout the entire county, loved and 
honored for his many sterling characteristics, and he was known as 
"Uncle Jerry" by his many friends and acquaintances. His politics were 
Democratic, and he held to the Methodist belief. His parents, John and 
Sarah Mahan, were both natives of Kentucky, but they also came to 
Indiana and entered land near Hymera, where they became prominent 
agriculturists. 

Mrs. Branson is one of the four children born to Jeremiah and Je- 
mima Mahan, namely : William, deceased : James, whose home is in Jack- 
son township ; Mrs. Branson ; and John J., deceased. The father was a 
second time married, wedding Nancy Cochran, and their ten children are 
Jane, George, Emma, Charles. Thomas J., Ann, Mary, Elizabeth, Jere- 
miah and an infant. 

On the 1st of July, 1852, Caroline Mahan gave her hand in marriage 
to Isaiah Branson, the only child of Asa and Nancy (Allen) Branson, 
who were born respectively September 17, 1798, and October 18, 1801, 
in Pittsylvania county, Virginia. Asa was a son of Michael and Mary 
Branson. Mr. and Mrs. Branson have resided on their present home- 
stead since their marriage, and their union has been blessed by the birth 
of eleven children, as follows: Nancy, deceased; Noten M., who mar- 
ried Sarah J. Miller and resides in Jackson township ; Josephine Will- 
iams, of Jackson township ; Lucy Flowers, whose home is in Oklahoma ; 
Isaiah J., who resides in Hymera ; John, of Jackson township ; Charles, 
who died at the age of five years ; Emma, also deceased : Stella Swift, 
of Clay county, Indiana, and two, the fourth and fifth born, who died in 
infancy. 



John Wambaugh, who is a well known grain and stock farmer re- 
siding on his one hundred and twenty acre farm in Jackson township, 
Sullivan countv, is a native of Decatur county, Indiana, born August 9, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 173 

1862, a son of Ebenezer and Rosena E. (Freedman) Wambaugh. His 
father was born in Berlin, Germany, in October, 1829. and came to this 
coimtry in 1858. He was married after arriving in America, and tirst 
located in Decatur county, Indiana, where he purchased the sixty acres 
of land upon which he lived until 1873, and in the following November 
bought the farm upon which John, his son, now resides. He bought 
one hundred and twenty acres at first, but later added to it, making in all 
three hundred and seventy-five acres. Here he became an extensive cattle 
and hog raiser. He w'as an enterprising man, and had the confidence and 
esteem of a large circle of friencls. Politically he voted the Democratic 
ticket, and in church faith was a Roman Catholic. His wife was born 
about 1824, in Berlin, Germany, along the river Rhine. She accompanied 
some of her brothers and sisters to America. The date of her death was 
April 10, 1896, and that of her husband was April 20, 1896. Their chil- 
dren were as follows : Lynia, Mrs. Rossfield, residing in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky ; Tressa, Mrs. Lansing, of Aurora, Indiana; Mary, ;\Irs. Miller, of 
Indianapolis ; John, of this notice ; Anna, Mrs. Brown, residing in Jackson 
township, Sullivan countv ; Rose, Mrs. Burton, of Jackson township, and 
Joseph, of Coalmont, Indiana. 

John Wambaugh received his education at the common schools and 
was reared to farm pursuits. After farming on his father's land a few 
seasons he bought thirty-five acres east of his present place, which he sub- 
sequently sold, as well as the other land that he owned. He next pur- 
chased the farm on which he now lives in Jackson township, consisting 
of one hundred and twenty acres, which has come to be a well improved 
place and which he devotes to both grain and stock raising. 

Politically Mr. Wambaugh is a supporter of the Democratic party, 
but prefers others to fill the local offices of his township and county. Both 
he and his wife are faithful members of the Presbyterian church. He 
was united in marriage November 23, 1886. to Ellen Forbes, born June 
12, 1866, in Linton township, Vigo county, Indiana, a daughter of Calvin 
and Harriet ( Fitzwater) Forbes. Her father is now living with his 
daughter in Sullivan, the mother being deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Wam- 
baugh are the parents of four children : Noble William, born November 
I, 1887; he has completed his common school studies and is now assisting 
his father on the farm; Almeda, born June 15, 1890, graduated from the 
common school and then entered the Normal school, but owing to her 
failing health she is now at home; Iva G., born November i, 1893, is 
attending school, and Irma May, born March 3, 1903, is also in school. 
Mr. Wambaugh is a member of the Ll'nited Mine Workers of America, 
District No. 11. 



Mrs. N.\ncy Ann (Taylor) R.\ilsb.\ck, widow of John S. Rails- 
back, w^ho was a prosperous farmer of Jackson township up to the time 
of his death, which occurred in this township August 22, 1906, was born 
March 16, 1834. in Monroe county. Indiana, the daughter of John C. and 



174 HISTORY OF SULLIX'AX COUNTY 

Mary E. (Bennett) Taj'lor. The father was born in 1832 in Davis count_v, 
Indiana, and died in 1871. He was buried in the Liberty cemeter}' north 
of Shelburn. Mrs. Railsback is the oldest of twelve children in her 
parents' family, born in the following order : Nancy Ann ; Samuel, resid- 
ing in Curry township ; Robert, residing in Sullivan ; Richard, living in 
Curry township: Sarah J. (Mrs. Wood), residing in Curry township; 
Molly (Mrs. Martin), resides in Sugar Creek township, Vigo county, 
Indiana, and Dora, residing with her mother in Curry township. The 
remaining five children of this family are now deceased. 

Nancy Ann Taylor was united in marriage to John S. Railsback Jan- 
uary 17, 1875. He was born November 8, 1849, i" Kentucky, and within 
Nelson county. He was the son of Lewis D. and Delithia J. (Reynolds) 
Railsback, both of whom were natives of Kentucky and both now de- 
ceased. They were energetic farmers throughout their active lives. John 
S. Railsback came to Sullivan county with his parents in 1853, and they 
located in Curry township. After the marriage of John S. to Miss Taylor 
they leased a farm in Curry township and continued as renters until 1880, 
when they purchased a farm containing forty acres, where Mrs, Railsback 
now resides, the same being three miles north of Hymera. Her sons now 
carry on the farming operations there for her. Her husband was a 
staunch Democrat in his political affiliations, and served his township as 
assessor one term and was deputy assessor several terms, and was super- 
visor of roads. The children born to i\Ir. and ]\Irs. Railsback were 
twelve in number, of whom nine are still living : Ira B., born in the 
autumn of 1875, died in January, 1903, leaving a wife but no issue: Ola 
Etta, born 1877, married Elvis EajrJ Maratta, residing in Jackson town- 
ship, and they are the parents of three children — Logan E., Chester A. 
and Wayne B. ; Dora, born December 23, 1880, wedded Otto Miller, a 
resident of Vigo county; Lottie V., born August 8, 1881, is unmarried 
and teaching school: Charles R., born December 14, 1882, married Miss 
Stella Ridgeway and has the farm and mines coal. He is the owner of 
seventy-one acres of land; John C, born May 14, 1884, is still at home 
and works the home farm; Claudia T., born August 24, 1885, is at home; 
Dolpha, born June 12, 1887, is at Terre Haute; Lessie A., born November 
20, 1888, is attending high school at Hymera ; Molly B., born November 
28, 1890, died in April, 1897; Lona F., born December 5, 1894, now 
attends the public school. One also died in infancy. ]Mrs. Railsback is 
a consistent member of the Christian church. 



S.^MUEL F. B.\DDERS. — Although long and prominently identified 
with the agricultural and business interests of Sullivan county, Samuel 
F. Badders, was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, January 5, 1827, a 
son of James and Christena (Frey) Badders, both of whom were born 
in York county, Pennsylvania. They went to Ohio just after the war of 
1812, but in 1829 returned to Pennsylvania, where they spent the re- 
mainder of their lives on a farm in Beaver county, the husband pre- 



; THE NEW YORK 

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HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 175 

ceding liis wife in death several years. Their estate in Beaver county 
consisted of three hundred and eighty-two acres of land. 

Samuel F. Badders secured his educational training in the district 
schools of Pennsylvania, and in 1845 he started out in life for himself in 
connection with a wholesale and retail grocery house in Wellsville, Ohio. 
After he had been there two years the house purchased a steamboat and 
Mr. Badders was given the choice of staying in the store or going on 
the boat. He had studied steamboat bookkeeping at Duff's Commercial 
College at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and choosing the latter, he was to 
receiv^e thirty-five dollars for the first year and fifty dollars for the second 
year, and he was just one dollar in debt at the close of his two years' 
service. For several years he was employed on different boats, and 
during the latter part of his service on the water he received as high as 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars a month. He continued boating 
until 1853, and after the death of his wife he resumed the occupation, 
and was in Florida and other points in the South for one year. In 1857 
he came to Sullivan county and bought four hundred acres of canal land, 
which was almost entirely covered with timber. He at once began the 
arduous task of clearing and preparing his land for cultivation, and he 
has resided on this farm ever since, it now containing four hundred and 
twenty acres of rich and highly improved land, richly underlaid with coal, 
but he has sold the coal from three hundred and five acres of the tract. 
He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, and aside from 
being one of the representative farmers of Jackson township he is perhaps 
the oldest living member of the bar. qi S«lliv;ai'i.^c©unty. The exact time 
of his admittance is not known, as'nb' records were kept by the clerk at 
that time, and in all the walks of life he is honored among the people 
with whom he has so long made his home.. 

On the 5th of January, i85,4; Mr. Badders was united in marriage 
to Miss Harriett Todd, a daughter of Joshua and Rachael (Wiley) Todd, 
both of whom died in Columbiana county, Ohio. Mr?. Badders has 
joined them in the home beyond, dying in 1856, and her two children, 
Emma Luella and Tascala Adella.'are also deceased. On the 8th of 
June, 1858, Mr. Badders wedded ;\Iiss Mary Snowden, wdio was born in 
Ireland to Orr and Nancy (Martin) Snowden, her natal day being the 
i6th of March, 1832, and in 1852 she came with her parents to the 
United States and to Sullivan county, Indiana, locating near the home of 
her future husband. The parents spent the remainder of their lives here. 
Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Badders, namely: Indiana, 
the wife of E. H. Irwin, of Cleburne county, Arkansas; Harry M., who is 
married and also resides in that county : Martin E., at home ; John Charles, 
who married, but his wife is deceased, and he lives near his father's farm ; 
Marietta, the wife of William M. Case ; Samuel Burton, deceased : Clinton 
S., at home; Lewti, the deceased wife of Charles Shivers; Nina, now 
Mrs. Gordon ; and William Webster, who married Leona Allen, deceased, 
and he resides in Hebron, Arkansas. Mr. Badders is a Socialist in pol- 
itics. He has been a ]\Iason since 1872. at Lewis, Indiana. 

Vol. n— 12 



176 HISTORY OF SULLA'AX COUNTY 

George M. Halberstadt, for many years identified with the agri- 
cultural interests of Sullivan county, was born in Franklin county, In- 
diana, January 26, 1837, a son of William Harrison and Elizabeth (Man- 
warring) Halberstadt. It was in 1837 that the father, William H. Halber- 
stadt, established his home in Jackson township, Sullivan county, where 
he entered land from the government and at one time was the owner of 
a fine estate of three hundred acres. He spent the remainder of his life 
on this homestead, and was engaged in farming throughout his entire 
business career. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
church, and he was a prominent and active worker in its cause. His 
life in Sullivan county covered the span of fifty-five years, and he became 
one of its best known and most honored residents. 

Mr. Halberstadt was first married in 1833 to Elizabeth Manwarring, 
who died in 1883, after becoming the mother of five children: Charlotte, 
deceased ; John T., whose home is in Jackson township ; George M., the 
subject of this review; and Elijah T. and Daniel H., both of whom reside 
in Jackson township. For his second wife Mr. Halberstadt wedded 
Elizabeth Register, who died in 1905, but there was no issue by the 
second union. 

During the period of the Civil war. in October. 1864, George AI. 
Halberstadt enlisted in Company G, Eighty-fifth Indiana Infantry, and 
seived until the close of the conflict, and he now receives a pension of 
fifteen dollars a month in compensation for his services. He remained 
at home with his parents until his marriage, and after that event he came 
to the farm where he now lives, a valuable homestead of one hundred 
and fifty-eight acres. He has been a successful farmer throughout the 
years of his business life, and his political affiliations are with the Re- 
publican party. 

On the 28th of November, 1877, he was united in marriage to ]\Iary 
E. Mahan, who died in April of 1908. They had three children: Ethel 
Romine. of Vigo county, Indiana ; George, who is married and living with 
his father ; and Stella Forbes, also of Jackson township. i\Ir. Halber- 
stadt has been three times married, first wedding Margaret J. Mahan, a 
sister of his present wife, and she died without issue. His second wife 
was Mary E. Phillips, who left three children at her death, namely : 
William H.. a minister at Robinson, Illinois : Louetta Bennett, of Farmers- 
burg ; and Maria Romine, of Jackson township. Mr. Halberstadt is a 
member of the Methodist church. 



William W. Barcus was born in the house in which he now resides 
on the 14th of December, 1869, and this place has ever since been his 
home and the scene of his operations. Thus far in life he has followed 
the tilling of the soil for a livelihood, and after his marriage he con- 
tinued to live with his parents and operate the farm, his present estate 
consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of rich and fertile land. 



HISTORY OF SULLU'AX COl'XTY 177 

where he follows both grain and stock farming. He is a member of the 
Farmersburg Mutual Telephone Company, is a stockholder in the Citi- 
zens' State Bank at Hymera and is quite prominent and active in the 
local councils of the Republican party. 

Mr. Barcus is a son of Thomas G. and Amanda S. (Goodwin) 
Barcus. The father was born on the 12th of June, 1830, and died on 
the 25th of March, 1902, and lies buried in Nye's Chapel cemetery. His 
life work was farming, becoming very successful in the vocation/and at 
one time he owned two hundred and forty acres of land. He was also a 
broom maker, working at that occupation in the winter months when 
not employed on the farm, and he also raised his own broom corn. In 
politics he was a stanch Republican, and was a member of the United 
Brethren church, as is also his wife. She was born on the 21st of April, 
1838, and is now living with her son William. Ten children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Barcus, namely : Sarah E., who was born on the 28th 
of May, 1857, a"d died on the 8th of July, 1876; Delphia, born August 
28, 1858, died October 2, 1859: George R., bom August 9, i860, died 
February 13. 1864; Samuel J., born November 10, 1861, resides in Al- 
berta, Canada; Rosa B., bom July 15, 1864, died June 7, 1894; Tilla J., 
born July 23, 1866, married Samuel Patton' and resides in Hymera; 
William W., whose name introduces this review; Anna M., born May 2, 
1871, is the wife of Harvey Patton, of Hymera; Luella, born November 

19, 1873, is deceased, and Thomas E., born May 11, 1876, died February 
I, 1877. 

On the i6tli of January, 1891, William W. Barcus was united in 
marriage to Louisa B. Harvey, who was bom in Jackson township 
November 16, 1872, a daughter of William and Matilda (McCammon) 
Harvey, bom respectively on the 4th of November, 1839, in Franklin 
county, Indiana, and on the 22d of March, 185 1, in Jackson township, 
Sullivan county. Their home is now one mile north of Hvmera on a 
farm of sixty acres. Mr. Harvey served four years in the Civil war as 
a member of Company B, Thirty-seventh Regiment of Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, as a private, and he has been engaged in farming ever since his 
return from the war. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Barcus, namely: Helen FI., born August 7, 1901 ; George W., October 

20, 1902; Hazel E., July 12, 1904; and Alice M., May 27, 1906. Mrs. 
Barcus is a member of the Methodist church. 



WiLLi.xir M. C.\,SE is numbered among the prominent farmers and 
stock raisers of Jackson township, where he owns a pleasant and attractive 
homestead farm. He was born one mile north of Sullivan October 28, 
1864, a son of William F. and Jane C. (Boone) Case. When he had 
reached the age of eighteen years he started out in life for himself, work- 
ing as a farm hand for one year, and then going to Sumner county, 
Kansas, he spent one year there, after which he returned to his home aiid 



178 HISTORY OF SULLH'AN COUNTY 

attended school during one winter and superintended his father's farm 
until he was twenty-two. He was married at that time and rented a 
farm in Greene county for one season, after which he returned to Sullivan 
county and farmed rented land until he purchased eighty acres where he 
now lives in 1895. He has since been engaged in general farming, and 
has also added to his original purchase until he now owns about one hun- 
dred and eighty-five acres of rich and fertile land, while in addition to 
this he has also become the owner of a dwelling house and a business 
building in Hymera and valuable residence property in Martinsville, Illi- 
nois. His stock is of a high grade, consisting of Shropshire sheep, of 
which he has about eighty-two head, and horses and cattle, usually raising 
from four to ten head of horses and about twenty head of cattle. Jackson 
township numbers him among her leading agriculturists. 

On the 28th of October, 1886, Mr. Case was united in marriage to 
Marietta, a daughter of Samuel F. and Mary (Snowden) Badders, and 
they have become the parents of four children, but the first born died 
in infancy, and Clarence, the second, is also deceased. Cecile and Floyd 
are both at home and attending school. Mr. Case is independent in his 
political affiliations. 



DoRCY C. G.\RD. — During many years Dorcy C. Card has been resid- 
ing in Sullivan county, and he has become prominent in its business life. 
He was born in Greenfield, Hancock county, Indiana, June g, i860, a son 
of George and Nancy (Smith) Gard. The mother was also born in 
Greenfield, and she died in J\Iay of 1903. There her son Dorcy attended 
school in his youth, but his educational advantages were limited, and he 
was with his maternal grandparents from the time he was six weeks old 
until the age of seventeen. He then began work in a brickyard in Indian- 
apolis, but after some years there he came to Sullivan county and worked 
as a farm hand until his marriage. Since that time he has been more 
or less identified with mining, but still continues the work of his farm 
when the mines are not in operation, being both a grain and stock raiser. 

On the 23d of May, 1886, Mr. Gard was married to Harriette Bell 
French, a daughter of William and Ruth (Mattingly) French, both of 
whom were born in Mason county, Kentucky, and they were there mar- 
ried in March, 1862. In September of the same year they came to Sul- 
livan county, Indiana. Mr. French's father had previously visited this 
communit}' and entered a homestead, and William French built a home on 
his father's land, and there he died when his daughter Harriette was but 
fifteen months old. The widow continued to reside on the farm with his 
father for about seventeen years, and he then deeded her sixty acres of the 
land. In 1893 she sold her farm to the Coal Company and bought eighty 
acres where Mr. and Mrs. Gard now reside. In 1903 they built one of the 
neat and modest country residences in the township, located three-quarters 
of a mile west of Hymera, and there they expect to spend the remainder of 
their lives. In the French family there were three children : Maggie, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 179 

born March 6, 1863, married George Browning, and died on the 4th of 
December, 1892, after becoming the mother of a child which died in 
infancy. Mr. Browning now resides in Starr City, Sulhvan county. Har- 
riette B. became the wife of Mr. Card. Mary Maria, born September 
II, 1867, became the wife of Frank Hess and died October 6, 1893. 
Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Card. The eldest, Alyrtle, 
born March 15, 1887, is the wife of Austin Shipley, a carpenter and miner 
in Hymera. and their two children are Lucile, who was born May 24, 
1906, and Dorcy, a little son; Hattie Ethel, born April 18, 1889, died Oc- 
tober 2, 1901 ; Ruth Ann, born May 24, 1894, is at home, as is also Stella 
Marie, born March 5, 1896; Fannie I., born May 31, 1901, died Decem- 
ber II, 1903. 

Mr. Card has membership relations with the Masonic order, the 
Home Defenders and the Eastern Star. He is a self-made man in the 
truest sense of the word, and deserves much praise for the success he 
has achieved in life. His politics are Democratic, and he is a member 
of the Methodist church. 



Lorenzo D. Sink, who is farming in Jackson township, was born 
in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, November 11, 1842, a son of John and Sarah 
(Klenk) Sink, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. Moving to Ohio 
in an early day Mr. Sink became a carpenter and cabinet maker, and fol- 
lowed those trades for many years or until he engaged in farming. He 
was twice married, and by his first wife he had eight children, while by 
his second union, of whom Lorenzo was the eighth born, he had thirteen 
children, of whom four are now living, namely : Lorenzo D. ; Zachary T., 
whose home is near his brother Lorenzo ; Eva Ann Williams, of Patricks- 
burg; and Eliza, the oldest of the living children, is now Mrs. Shoup and 
a resident of northern Indiana. 

Lorenzo D. Sink attended school first in Ohio, and then moving with 
his parents to Indiana he was a student in a school near Steubenville in 
Owen county, but his educational advantages in his early youth were 
limited, as his father was old and the care of the farm fell upon him. 
He was obliged to leave school at the age of eighteen years, and up to 
that time he had never seen a school book with the exception of an arith- 
metic, in which he had reached the division of fractions. But seven 
vears after leaving school at the earnest request of the citizens he was 
engaged as teacher in the school of his neighborhood. He at once pur- 
chased some books and spent some time studying at home and also studied 
under the instructions of a friend for twenty-three days. At the county 
examination he was obliged to make an average of sixty per cent and 
not fall below forty per cent in any one study, and iii^pite of adverse 
circumstances he obtained his license and taught a term of seven months 
on a si.x months' license, but before the expiration of this license he 
obtained the position of a teacher for the following term. He then 



i8o HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

obtained a two }'ears'' license and taught for four years without further 
examination. He taught in all about ten years, and seven years of that 
time were spent in the school which he had formerl}' attended as a scholar. 

Mr. Sink continued at home with his father until he was twenty-two 
years of age, and he then fanned the home place on shares for his mother 
for several years. Finally he and his brother bought the mother's interest 
in the homestead, and he continued to reside there until the spring of 
1880, when he sold his land, and coming to Jackson township purchased 
the eighty acres where he now lives. He makes a specialty of the raising 
of corn, and at the present time is the only man in the township who is 
able to sell that commodity. During the Civil war Mr. Sink served as a 
private in the Thirty-third Indiana Infantry for four months or until the 
war closed. He enlisted in the service in March of 1865. 

In February of 1865 he was united in marriage to Hannah A., a 
daughter of Harrison and Louisa (Bloss) Kelly, both of whom were born 
in Jackson county, Indiana, and both are now deceased. The union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sink has been blessed by the birth of the following children : 
Sarah, the wife of William Miller, a railroad man at Mattoon. Illinois ; 
Charles A., employed in the broom corn w-arehouse at Mattoon ; William 
Grant, a plumber in Fort Wayne, Indiana; Lillie, the wife of Henry 
Conrad, a heater in a rolling mill in St. Louis, Missouri ; Marietta, the 
wife of George Hankey, who resides near her father; Bessie G., wife of 
Cecil Scott, a miner in this township; Cora, at home; and Clarence, 
deceased. Mr. Sink is a Republican in politics, and he attends the services 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



JosiAH Worth. — Never can greater honor be paid than to those who 
aided in holding high the principles of liberty during the period of the 
Civil war, and among those who were called upon to lay down their lives 
on the altar of their country during that conflict is numbered Josiah 
Worth, one of the early agriculturists of Sullivan county. He was born 
in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, March 19, 1830, a son of James and Eliza- 
beth (Romig) Worth, who were also born in that county. Coming to 
Indiana about 1858, they located in Jackson township, Sullivan county, 
and after several years they moved to a farm near by the one on which 
thev had first located. But after five years they returned to the first 
homestead, and there they subsequently died, the mother in 1874 and 
the father in 1888. 

Shortly after coming with his parents to Sullivan county Josiah 
Worth married, but continued to live on his father's farm until he enlisted 
for the war, entering the Eighty-fifth Indiana Regiment in 1862, and 
his death occurred at Lexington from sickness contracted in the army. 
His widow continued on the senior Mr. Worth's farm for about two 
vears longer, and then bought twenty acres where she now lives, but has 
added to this little tract from time to time until she now owns sixtv-two 



HISTORY OF SL"LL1\'AN COUiXTY i8i 

acres, and here she expects to speml the remainder of her hfe. She bore 
the maiden name of JMary Tennis, and was born in Columbiana county, 
Ohio, October 9, 1835, a daughter of John and Xancy (Rose) Tennis, 
both of whom were also born in that county. In 1853 they came to Sulli- 
van county and located on the farm on which Mrs. Worth now resides, 
and at that time the farm was- densely covered with timber. The father 
at once began clearing and preparing his land for cultivation, and he 
died on the old homestead there in June of 1873, his widow surviving 
until the 6th of Xovember, 1888. Four children were born to the union 
of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Worth, namely: James, who married Martha Xicholson, 
a native of Sullivan county, and they reside on the old home farm with 
his mother. Their ten children are : Mollie, deceased ; Effie May, wife 
of Herton Griffith, of Jackson township ; Anna Elizabeth, wife of Earl 
Griffith, of Clay county ; Emma \'iola, with her parents ; Melissa Elvie, 
at home : James Harrison. Charles Joseph and Herbert Alfred, also at 
. home : and two who died in infancy. John, the second child of Mr. and 
Mrs. Worth, is deceased; Elizabeth is the wife of Joseph Gordon, of Clay 
county, and their four children are James Sylvester, Herbert Alfred, Ethel 
and Stella. Anna, deceased, was the wife of John B. Xicholson, of Jack- 
son township, and their two children are Mary Josephine and Charles 
Edward. 

James Worth, the eldest of the children, has always remained with 
his mother, looking after her estate as well as his own. In 1874 he 
bought eighteen acres of land in Jackson township, but he has since, 
added forty acres more to this tract, and is engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. He is a Republican politically, and a member of the 
Masonic order in Hymera and of the Christian church. The politics of 
Mr. Worth, the father, were also Republican, and he too was a valued 
and earnest church member. 



James W. Brown. — In an account of the events which fonu the 
history of Sullivan county the name of this family appears frequently on 
its pages. Samuel Brown, the paternal great-grandfather of James W.. 
was a native of Scotland, but during his early life he came to the United 
States and in time became a resident of Ohio, where with the assistance 
of his son Samuel he opened a farm. 

Samuel, the son, was also a native of Scotland, and coming with his 
father to America eventually became a resident of Washington county, 
Indiana, but after a residence there of about sixteen or eighteen years he 
came to Sullivan county and died here in 1859. He became very prom- 
inent in the public life of this community, and at one time represented 
Sullivan county in the legislature. His politics were Democratic until 
the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, when he joined the Republicans. 
Samuel Brown married XTancy DufT, of Irish descent, and they became 
the parents of five children : Stephen, John K., Mary, James and William, 
all now deceased. 



i82 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

John K. Brown was born in Washington county, Indiana, in 1819, 
and he was but a lad of eleven when he came with his parents to Sullivan 
county and was reared and educated here. He entered land here in 1854, 
and became the owner of an estate of three hundred acres, being a life- 
long and successful farmer. After the Civil war he joined the Republican 
party, and both he and his wife were members of the old-school Presby- 
terian church. He married Alary AlcClary, who was born in Tennessee, 
and came with her parents to Terre Haute, Indiana. Her father, John 
McClary, was a native of Virginia. Seven children were born to John K. 
and Mary Brown, as follows: Margaret E., deceased; Samuel U., of 
Farmersburg ; John C, of Jackson township ; Mary J. Burton, whose home 
is in Farmersburg ; Nancy E. Ford, also of that place : James W., the sub- 
ject of this review ; and William H., of Jackson township. Mr. Brown, the 
father, died in 1895, but his widow yet survives and is living with her 
son James. She was born on the i6th of April, 1829. 

James W. Brown remained at home with his parents until his mar- 
riage, and his father then gave him' one hundred and fifty-four acres, 
the nucleus of his present homestead, which lies four and a half miles 
east of Farmersburg and contains one hundred and sixty-six acres. Mr. 
Brown is both a grain and stock farmer, and in 1905 he erected a feed 
mill and threshing machine. He is also a director and the treasurer of 
the Delora C)il and Gas Company, and is a prominent factor in the business 
life of Sullivan county. 

On the 30th of October, 1894, he was married to Mary M. Caton, 
who was born in Owen county, Indiana, February 29, 1876, a daughter 
of Hugh B. and Toliver (Candace) Caton, both of whom were also born 
in Owen county. They subsequently came to Sullivan county and located 
at Hymera, where Mr. Caton followed the blacksmith's trade. His wife 
died in 1904, and in 1907 he went to Texas, where he now follows farming 
and blacksmithing. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Brown : 
John B., born January 25, 1896; Roy S., March 2, 1897: Nellie M., April 
16, 1899; and Daisy M., October 28, 1903. The three eldest children are 
attending school. Mr. Brown gives his political allegience to the Repub- 
lican party. As a member of the well known Bartlett Quartet he toured 
Indiana and Illinois for four years and won fame and prominence in 
musical circles. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 



H.A.RRISON B.A.RNH.VRT. — The business life of Sullivan county finds a 
worthy representative in Harrison Barnhart, who has been an agriculturist 
throughout his industrial career, and during the past four years he has also 
conducted a wholesale butcher business and enjoys a large and remuner- 
ative trade. During the past seven years he has also bought and shipped 
stock quite extensively. When he started out in life for himself after 
his marriage he owned a little tract of five acres where he now lives, and 
his present estate consists of eighty-seven acres of rich and fertile land. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 183 

Mr. Baniliart is a representative of one of the oldest families of Sul- 
livan county. His father, Chauncey C. Barnhart, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania January 29, 1824, came with his mother, his father having pre- 
viouslv died, to this county during his early manhood, and they bought 
forty acres of land in Jackson township, but in 1874 they sold that land 
and went to Champaign county, Illinois, where they farmed on rented 
land until Mr. Barnhart was loo old to carry on active work for himself. 
He then bought property in Tolono, where he yet resides. His mother, 
Lydia Barnhart, lived to the age of ninety-three years. Harrison Barn- 
hart is the only child by his father's second marriage, he having been four 
times married, and his second wife bore the maiden name of Cliarlotte 
Halberstadt. She was born in Jackson township about 1834, and died 
when her only son and child was a babe of fourteen months. She was a 
daughter of Harrison and Elizabeth (Manwarring) Halberstadt, who 
were farming people. 

After the death of his mother Harrison Barnhart lived with his 
maternal grandparents until he was twenty-three years of age, when he 
was married to Hamiah Peterson, who was born in Curry township, Sul- 
livan county, March 27, 1863, a daughter of John and Deliah Peterson, 
the former of whom is now deceased and the latter is living in Jackson 
township. Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart have become the parents of five chil- 
dren : Lillian, who was born July 10, 1882, is the wife of Lou McCrock- 
lin and lives in Curry township ; Flora, born October 29, 1883, has com- 
pleted the course in the public schools: Arthur, born May 20, 1884, is 
working with his father; Edna, born April 10, 1899, is in school; and 
Odetta, born October 29, 1904. Mr. Barnhart is a Republican in his 
political affiliations. Mrs. Barnhart is a member of the Methodist church. 



George Gordon, many years of whose life were spent in Sullivan 
countv and who has but lately passed to his final reward, was born 
in Pennsylvania July 26, 182 1, a son of James Gordon. George Gordon 
learned blacksmithing in his early life, and coming to Indiana about 
1857 he located in Clay county and followed his trade until feeble 
health caused him to abandon it and then he farmed in a small way until 
his busy and useful life was ended, dying on the 4th of August, 1906. 
His politics were Democratic, and he served his community many years 
as a constable. His religious affiliations were with the Methodist church. 

In October of 1875 Mr. Gordon was united in marriage to Miss 
Rebecca McCray. and this was his third marriage. The only child of 
his first union is deceased, and by the second marriage he had the follow- 
ing children : Joseph, whose home is in Clay county ; Jane Agnes, now 
Mrs. Joseph Copcland ; James A., of Clay county ; Wilfred, Frank and 
Charles, all deceased ; John A., whose home is in Clay county ; George 
Thomas, of Linton, Indiana; and William L.. a farmer near Hymera. 
Mrs. Gordon, his third wife, is a daughter of Daniel and Sarah (;\IcKay) 



i84 HISTORY OF SULLI\'AX COUNTY 

McCra_v, who were born in Ireland and emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1834, 
two years before the birth of their daughter Rebecca. The father farmed 
in Beaver county, that state, until his death in May, 1864, and some 
years afterward his family came to Greene county, Indiana, and bought 
the farm on which the widow spent the remainder of her life, dying about 
1873. Mrs. Gordon is now living in Sullivan county. 

William Gordon married, on the 13th of September, 1900, Nina 
Badders, who was born in Jackson township on the 12th of October, 1872, 
a daughter of Samuel F. and Mary (Snowden) Badders, natives respect- 
ively of Pennsylvania and of Ireland. They are now living in Jackson 
township, Sullivan county, where the father during his active business 
life conducted his farm of nearly four hundred acres. Mr. and R'Irs. 
Gordon have four children, — Ralph, Gladys, Walter and Claud. Mr. 
Gordon has fraternal relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He was formerly a miner, but during the past few years has car- 
ried on the work of the eighty acre farm on which the family now reside, 
although he expects soon to return to his former occupation of mining. 



Solomon Wym.\n, who is farming in Jackson township, was born 
in Owen county, this state, March 20, 1857, the fifth of the seven children 
born to Jacob and Sarah (Saddler) Wyman, natives respectively of Ger- 
many and of Tuscarawas county, Ohio. The mother is still living, her 
home being near Sullivan, and she has now reached the advanced age 
of eighty-four years, her birth occurring in 1824. Jacob Wyman, who 
was born in 1821, was twenty-one years of age when he came to the 
United States,- and after working in a carriage factory in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, for two or three years, he went to Ohio and followed the 
same trade there. He was married and lived there until about 1854, 
when he came to Owen county, and three years later to Sullivan county, 
where he bought a farm where Jackson Hill is now located. He built a 
shop on his farm and continued the manufacture of wagons and general 
repair work until 1873, when he sold his shop and went to Hamilton 
township, still following his trade until about five years before his death, 
which occurred on the 17th of September, 1905. He was a Lutheran in 
his religious views, and his wife was a Dunkard. 

In his boyhood days Solomon Wyman attended school in the old 
log houses then in use in Jackson and Hamilton townships, and he began 
farming for himself when twenty years of age, remaining on his father's 
farm for five years, after which he married and moved to another part of 
the home estate, until finally in 1884 he came to his present homestead, 
which has been the birthplace of all of his children. He owns eighty 
acres of land, where he expects to return in the near future, for he has 
been living for a short time at Jackson Hill. He is a miner as well as a 
farmer and stock raiser, mining during the winter months when not busy 
on his farm. He is a member of the United ]\Iine ^^^orkers of America, 



HISTORY OF SULLIN'AX COUNTY 185 

and i^ a Uciiiocrat politically. During four years he served as the assessor 
of Hamilton township, having been elected to the office in 1882. His 
religious views are in harmony with the teachings of the Missionary Bap- 
tist church, and his wife is a member of that denomination. 

On the 2ist of July, 1883, Mr. Wyman was married to Miss Mary 
L. Wright, who was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, April 16, 1862, a 
daughter of William and Mary (Gordon) Wright, who came from their 
native state of Ohio to Coles county, Illinois, and thence four years later 
in 1869 to Sullivan county, Indiana, and located on Farmers prairie in 
Hamilton township. After a residence there of twenty years they moved 
to Pose}- county in this state, where the father died two years later, and 
the mother now resides with a daughter in East St. Louis, Illinois, aged 
seventy-four _\ears. Mr. and Mrs. Wyman have had seven children, but 
the first born died in infancy ; Pearl is the wife of Oscar Keen, of Jackson 
township, and their three children are Paul, Harold and Lester ; and 
William R., Bertha, Clarence, Leota, Mary and Rul)\-. who are at home 
with their parents. 



John Tenms. — The life work of John Tennis was crowned with a 
well merited degree of success, and in Sullivan county, where he so long 
lived and labored, he endeared himself to many friends, and his memory 
is cherished by those w^ho knew him. Born in northern Pennsylvania on 
the 28th of April, 1842, he was a son of John J. and Nancy Ann (Rose) 
Tennis, who were also from that state and were married there. Coming 
to Sullivan county in their early life they located on a densely wooded 
farm in Jackson township, buying canal land, and here the father toiled 
early and late until his death about 1876 to bring his farm under cultiva- 
tion. After a few years the mother sold the farm, and thereafter made 
her home with her children until her death in 1893. 

John Tennis, their son, attended the Badder school in Jackson town- 
ship in his boyhood, and when he had attained the age of seventeen he 
began working as a farm hand in Jackson township, but after his mar- 
riage, at the age of twenty-one, he lived on his father-in-law's farm until 
his death, December 17, 1899. Some years before his demise her father 
had deeded this farm to Mrs. Tennis, and since her husband's death she 
has carried forward the work of the old homestead with the aid of her 
sons, and is one of the brave and honored pioneer women of the county. 

]\Irs. Tennis bore the maiden name of Diana Worth, and was mar- 
ried on the nth of October, 1863. Her parents, James and Elizabeth 
(Romig) Worth, were born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, but in 1858 they 
came to Sullivan county, Indiana, and located on a farm in Cass township, 
where their deatlis subsequently occurred. Nine children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Tennis, namely: James William, deceased; Charles Martin, 
who is a farmer in South Dakota ; ^Nlary Elizabeth, deceased ; Jacob 
Henrv. who resides with his mother and has charge of the home farm ; 
John Harrison, a farmer in Greene county; Martha Ann, wife of W. O. 



i86 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Mattox, a miner in Jackson township ; Ida Jane, wife of John J. Brewer, 
who is farming in northwestern Canada ; Alfred Alonzo, who is also with 
his mother ; and Roscoe Scott, who is with his sister, Mrs. Mattox. The 
oldest son of the family is a member of the fraternal order of Woodmen, 
while the youngest is a member of the Miners' Union. Mr. Tennis, the 
father, voted with the Democracy, and he was a true and earnest adherent 
of the Methodist church. 



Andrew Jackson Steele is a man who can lay many claims 
to prominence in Sullivan county. He is a member of one of its 
oldest and most prominent pioneer families, and to him and his brother- 
in-law, William A. Lambright, is given the credit of the discovery of coal 
in this vicinity, which has added much to the wealth of the county. In 
lieu of this discovery they were given the option on several hundred acres 
of land, but much time elapsed before a road could be built to the land. 

During many years Mr. Steele has been engaged in general farming 
and stock raising in Jackson township. When he reached the age of 
twenty-two he left his parents' home and rented land in Ohio until he 
came to Indiana, where during a couple of winters he was engaged in 
coal mining and also did contract work for a company engaged in bridge 
and road building. After coming to Sullivan county he bought twenty- 
five acres, the nucleus of his present estate, which contains one hundred 
and twenty acres, and in addition his wife also owns a small farm near 
by. He is a shareholder in the Hymera State Bank at Hymera. In 1896 
he was a candidate for the office of representative to the state legislature, 
and throughout the years of his maturity he has been prominent in public 
affairs, voting independently. He is a member of the L'nited Mine 
Workers, and was a Knight of Labor. 

The Steele family came originally from Scotland, which was the 
birthplace of James Steele, the great-grandfather of Andrew J., and he 
was a younger brother of Lord Steele of that country. During the colonial 
period he came to America and located in Virginia. His son Basil, the 
grandfather of Andrew, was born in North Carolina June 26, 1775, but 
from there moved to Virginia and later to Ohio, where he died on July 3, 
1857. His wife, nee Rachael Sparling, was born June 30, 1777, in Vir- 
ginia, and her death occurred in Ohio December 30, 1874, aged ninety- 
seven rears and six months. Among their children was David Steele, 
who was a farmer and stock raiser throughout his entire business career, 
and his death occurred in 1900, surviving his wife, Elizabeth \"ermilion, 
for some years. 

Andrew J. Steele, a son of David and Elizabeth (A^ermilion) Steele, 

was born in Harrison county, Ohio, September i, 1847. ^"d received his 

education in district school No. 4 of Washington township, that county. 

' On the 13th of November. 1869, he was united in marriage to Eliza Jane 

Lambright, a daughter of Henry and Mary Jane (Shivers) Lambright, 



HISTORY OF SULL1\"AN COUNTY 187 

both of whom were born in Ohio, near Urichvihe. The paternal family 
were early resident there, and the old home farm which belonged to her 
grandfather is still in the Lambright name and the heirs are endeavoring 
to hand the estate from one generation to another. Her parents came 
to Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1883, locating in Cass township, where 
both spent the remainder of their lives. Ten children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, namely : Ernest O., who is married and resides on 
a farm near Hymera ; Claudius Wilbert, at home; Nina Florence, thewife 
of Harry Badder, of Arkansas ; Mary Elizabeth, deceased : Joseph Victor, 
of Illinois : Henry David, deceased ; Oliver, at home ; Ella Frances, the 
wife of Porter Campbell, of Jasonville ; and Lutie May and Ona Eva, 
both at home. Mr. Steele is independent in his political affiliations. Mr. 
and Mrs. Steele have in their possession two of the old parchment deeds 
— one executed under the hand and seal of President John Tyler and 
bears the date of Aug. i, 1844, and the other by President Martin \'an 
Pjuren and dated Aug. i, 1839. These deeds are valuable souvenirs in 
old Sullivan county. 



N.\TH.\N J. Sills. — Among the business men of prominence in Jack- 
son township is numbered Nathan J. Sills, who follows both farming and 
raining. He is also numbered among the native sons of Jackson town- 
ship, born on the 26th of February, 1864, to David and Elizabeth ( Bo- 
gard) Sills, both of whom claimed Kentucky as the commonwealth of 
their nativity. They came with their parents in an early day to Indiana, 
the Bogards locating in Vigo county and the Sills in Jackson township, 
Sullivan county. After attaining to mature years David Sills began 
farming for himself, and continued in the occupation until stricken with 
paralysis in about 1874, his death occurring four years later in 1878. The 
last four years of his life were spent on the farm on which his son Nathan 
now lives. His widow is now residing near Lewis in this township, 
having reached the advanced age of eighty-six years. 

The educational training of Nathan J. Sills was received in school 
No. I of Jackson township, and when but fifteen years of age he was 
obliged to" begin the battle of life for himself, for his father was an 
invalid and much of the support of the family fell upon his young shoul- 
ders. He remained at home until he was twenty-one, after which he 
rented a farm in Clay county for one season, and then returning to the 
home farm worked in the mine as well as superintending the work of 
the farm. In 1892 he bought thirty-seven and a half acres of the old 
home place, to which he later added twenty acres adjoining, and hf- still 
continues to work in the mine and look after his farming interests. 

On the 26th of March, 1885, Mr. Sills was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella Willie, who was born in Owen county, Indiana, June 20, 1864, 
a daughter of John E. and Magdalena Everhart Willie, the father a 
native'of Germany and the mother of Switzerland, and both are now 
deceased. They came to Sullivan county. Indiana, about i8fi8, where the 



i88 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

father's death occurred in 1900 and the mother's many years previously, 
in 1887. Four children have been born to 'Sir. and ]\Irs. Sills, namely; 
Winnie Alyrtle, the wife of Frank Fulfard, a miner at Bicknell, Knox 
county, and they have two children, Alsie Lucile and Carl Francis ; George 
Francis, who is with his parents ; Flora Ethel, the wife of Harry Keenan, 
a miner and electrician at Jackson Hill ; and Ernest Burton, deceased. 
Oscar Willie, a son of Mrs. Sills by a former marriage, also resides in 
this home. Mr. Sills is a member of the LTnited ]\Iine Workers of America, 
and both he and his wife are members of the Baptist church. 



James B. G.^skill^ who is farming in Jackson township, was born 
in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, June i, 1841, a son of Andrew and Susanna 
(Lacey) Gaskill, natives respectively of England and of Carroll county, 
Ohio. The father came to America about 1836, first locating in New 
Comerstown, Ohio, where he taught school for several years, and was 
there married in 1839. After a residence there of fourteen years he sold 
his possessions intending to come to Indiana, having a public sale for his 
stock, etc., but on the evening of that day, which was a rainy one, he 
became suddenly ill and died nine days later. His widow remained on 
the place for one year longer, and then joining a party of emigrants bound 
for Indiana made the overland journey to this state, first stopping in 
Greene county. She was accompanied on the trip by her six children, of 
whom James B. was the eldest, and in Greene county she bought a farm 
for twelve hundred dollars and a team and wagon, w'hich left her a 
surplus in money of only one hundred dollars. But thirty days after the 
purchase she was informed that the place was mortgaged for five hun- 
dred dollars, and to add to the misfortune one of her horses and a cow 
died. She was compelled to leave the place in 1856, and coming to Sulli- 
van rented a house and worked for others in order to support her family. 
After one year she moved to the O. M. Patton place in Jackson township, 
which continued as her home until 1861. 

About this time James B. Gaskill went to work for Samuel Badders 
and took his mother with him, receiving twenty cents a day in wages, 
and he remained there for seven years. During the following year he 
farmed rented land in Cass township, and as he then married, his mother 
moved to the ]\Iiller place in the same township, but six years after Mr. 
Gaskill's marriage his wife died and his mother then returned and was 
with him for three years. For several years thereafter his home was at 
Jackson Hill, and there his mother died about 1888. 

Mr. Gaskill has been four times married, wedding first Pollv .-Vnn 
Hart, by whom he had three children : Alice, the deceased wife of Tom 
Murratta ; Etta, deceased, became the wife of James Johnson, of Jackson 
township ; and John, also deceased, was an engineer at the mines. He 
married secondly ^Margaret Stanley, who died eleven months later, leaving 
one son, Edward M., who is married and resides on a farm adjoining 



HISTORY OF SULLUAN COUNTY 189 

his. father's home. Alary Jane Xeal, a widow, became his tiiinl wife, and 
they had nine children, namely: William, of Jackson township; Sylvia, 
the wife of Galen Burritt, a carpenter at Gilmore; Elmer, deceased; Flora 
and Stella, both at home ; Delphia, Charley and Oscar, all deceased ; and 
Eva, at home. In 1899 j\Ir. Gaskill wedded Martha Setty. a widow, and 
their two children are Gladys and Madge, but the younger is deceased. 
Gladys resides with her mother at Gilmore. 

iMr. Gaskill owns a valuable estate of two hundred and sixty acres 
in Jackson township, where he is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising, making a specialty of the raising of Southdown and Shropshire 
sheep and of mules. His farm is richly underlaid with coal. He is a 
member of the order of Odd Fellows, lodge No. 603, at Hymera. 



Samuel R. Cole, one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of 
Jackson township, was born in Bloomfield, Indiana, August 27,. 1845, a 
son of John and Rachael ( Bradford ) Cole, natives respectively of Ken- 
tucky and Virginia. John Cole came with his parents to Indiana in the 
early twenties and located near Bloomington. and his mother died there, 
her husband surviving her until about 1858 and dying at the home of his 
son. In an early day John Cole located in Bloomfield, Indiana, and for 
many years he served as a deputy in the court house there. In 1858 he 
joined a party from Indiana bound for the gold fields of California, and 
spent about two years in that state and in the overland journeys there 
and back, and on his return to Bloomfield he engaged in farming. 

In November of 1861 John Cole and his son Samuel enlisted in Com- 
pany D, Fifty-ninth Regiment of Indiana Infantry, for service in the 
Civil war, and the father served about eight months, while the son con- 
tinued as a soldier for three years and seven months, both participating 
in the battles of Island No. 10, Benton and Corinth, while the son con- 
tinued on through the battles of \'icksburg, Chattanooga, and Atlanta, 
serving on the Mississippi most of the time until they moved on to 
Atlanta. The father was for a time confined in the general hospital at 
Corinth, and was discharged early in 1862. The son was mustered out at 
Indianapolis at the close of the war. 

After his return from the war John Cole continued farming until 
1868, and going then to Nebraska spent the following year in that state, 
while after his return to Indiana he embarked in the mercantile business 
at Lyons, remaining there until his death on the ist of May, 1870. Flis 
wife died in about 1879 in Jackson township. 

Samuel R. Cole was a young man of twenty when he returned from 
the war, and from that time until 1873 he farmed on rented land in 
Greene county. In that year he came to Sullivan county and rented a 
farm in Jackson township, and about 1879 he added thirty-four acres to 
the forty acres which belonged to his wife and where they now reside, 
but he has since sold a part of this tract until the farm now contains but 



IQO HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

sixty-nine acres. He follows general farming and stock raising, and has 
been very successful in his operations. 

In November of i860 Mr. Cole married J\Iary Harrah, who was 
also born in Bloomfield, a daughter of James and Kissie Harrah, both 
now deceased, as is also the daughter, who was born in 1845 S-^d died 
in February, 1873. On the 17th of June, 1875, Mr. Cole wedded Teresa 
Snowden, who was born in Ireland January 27, 1841, a daughter of Orr 
and Nancy (Martin) Snowden, who came to the United States in 1841 
and located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The father preceded the family 
to this country a short time and engaged in general work, and later he 
became a miner. In 1853 he came to Sullivan county, Indiana, and bought 
canal land in Jackson township, where he died in 1879, a week after the 
death of JNIr. Cole's mother. His wife died on the 26th of January, 1889. 
Mr. Cole gives his political support to the Republican party, and is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. Both he and his wife are members of the Presby- 
terian church at Jackson ITill, and he is one of its elders. 



Charles C. Schlichter, a general farmer, residing in Gill town- 
ship, Sullivan county, Indiana, is numbered among the citizens who are 
making good progress in the pursuit of agriculture within this section of 
the state. He is a native of Dresden, Muskingum county, Ohio, born 
December 25, 1839, a son of Jacob F. and Susan (Miller) Schlichter, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was born in 1807 
and came to America in 1826. He lived in New York a short time, being 
employed in a paint and soap factory, where he was seriously injured by 
falling into a paint vat. He was united in marriage in New York and 
moved to Dresden, Ohio, where he purchased a farm on the Muskingum 
river and there resided until 1841. He then bought a farm in Pike county, 
where he lived about twelve years, and then removed to Perry county, 
remaining but a short time, when he retraced his steps to Pike county, 
where he bought the farm on which he died about 1855, his wife having 
passed away in 1841. The grandfather of Charles G. was mayor of the 
city in which he lived in Germany for many years. At one time he sent 
his son, Jacob F., five thousand dollars in gold as a gift. From the fore- 
going and other information it appears that the Schlichter family were 
from among the better classes of the great German empire. 

Though he had only about three months' actual schooling, Charles 
C. Schlichter, who is now sixty-nine years of age, by persistent study, 
has become a well informed man. The greater part of his study was 
while serving in the army. When seventeen years of age he was bound 
to a farmer in Ohio and remained with him until about twenty years of 
age, when he went to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he was employed at a 
hundred and fifty dollars a year, working in a nursery most of the time. 
A part of his time he assisted his employer in a shoe store. Mr. Schlichter 
remained here until the Civil war broke out. when he enlisted as a member 



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HISTORY OF SL'1.L1\"A.\ CCJUXTY 191 

of Company C, Fifty-sixth ( )hin N'oluiUccr iiifantr_\', serviiiii" four \ears, 
five montlns and twenty-tive da^s. Flc enlisted November 16, 1861, and 
was discharged F"ebruar_\- i, 1864. He then re-enlisted in the same regi- 
ment, January 1, 1865, and was honorably discharged April 25, 1866. 
During his exceedingly long service in the army of his country, he partici- 
pated in ten battles and was wounded in his right hand and also in the 
right shin. He acted as commissary sergeant a year and a half, but was 
not promoted. He was engaged in the following battles: Pittsburg Land- 
ing, Tennessee, April 6 and 7, 1862; Siege of Corinth. Mississippi, May, 
1862: in 1863 at Port Gibson. May i. Champion Hills. May 16, Siege of 
Vicksburg, June and July, Jackson, July 12 to 15, all in Mississippi, and 
Carrion Crow Bayou, Louisiana, November 23; during 1864, at Sabine 
Cross Roads, April 8, Monett's Ferry, April 23, and Snaggs' Point, May 5, 
these three battles being in Louisiana. 

After his return from the war he went back to Portsmouth, ( )hio, 
and was employed in a rolling-mill about one year, after which he went 
to Des Moines. Iowa, and on to Dallas county of the same state, and 
there had charge of a farm belonging to a doctor, a resident of Des 
Moines. This place contained an even thousand acres of land, and here 
he remained for two years ; then returned to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he 
was employed with a large coal company for the next two years. The 
succeeding year he was in a rolling-mill, which business failed on account 
of a panic in money matters. Mr. Schlichter then purchased a dairy, 
which he operated live years, havirig' two hundred and seventv-two cus- 
tomers. His health failing, he bought a farm of one hundred and forty 
acres, situated seven miles distant, and there he remained for eleven 
years. He traded this place for four houses in Portsmouth, but later dis- 
posed of all his property in Ohio, and came to Gill township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana, his present home. His daughter had already come here 
two years before. He settled here at the time of the McKinlev flood. Mr. 
Schlichter purchased one hundred and ten acres of land, upon which he 
resided until recently, when he sold his place for $8,175 and now lives 
retired. When he came to this section he bought good corn at fifteen 
cents a bushel. He did general farming and raised some swine, his large 
experience peculiarly fitting him for intelligent work as an agriculturist 
of the up-to-date type. 

It is not the lot of all men. indeed of few, to escape through so long 
a term of \-ears without being duped or caused to part with a part of 
their hard earned money, and Mr. Schlichter did not escape. He engaged 
in the coal business in Ohio, in partnership with a man named Draper. 
They had $2,500 in the bank and about two months later his partner drew 
the same out and gambled it all away. Politically Mr. Schlichter is an 
avowed Republican. While a resident of Ohio, he served as trustee for 
eight years and was also on the school board in that state. At one time 
he held meniliership with the Odd Fellows order and held various official 
positions in his lodge, but has not been connected with the fraternity for 
several years. 

Vol. II— l.'i 



192 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

While on a furlough he was happily united in marriage, June 15, 
1864, to Mary Elizabeth Hauck, who was born in Meigs county, Ohio, 
March 25, 1840, a daughter of Charles J. and Mary A. (Holstetter) 
Hauck. The father was a native of Germany, as was the mother, who 
was born March 15, 1810; Charles Hauck was born about the same time 
as his wife and he came to America in 183 1, going to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he mastered the trade of shoemaking, serving three years. He 
married and remained there five years, and then moved to Chester, Ohio, 
where he followed his trade and purchased a small farm. There he 
made his home for many years, but later removed to a farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty acres, which he bought within a few miles of Pomeroy. 
Here he spent the balance of his days, dying in 1877, while his wife sur- 
vived twelve years longer. Mr. and Mrs. Schlichter are the parents of 
the following children : Mary Anna, wife of William D. Prose, residing 
near her parents and the mother of six children ; Valentine George, mar- 
ried Almira Andrea and they live on his father's farm and have six 
children; Caroline Susan, wife of Alexander Prose, who lives near the 
parents' farm, and they have three children. 



Leonard M-^rshall, an agriculturist of Jackson township, Sullivan 
county, was born in Washington county, Indiana, December 22, 1832, a 
son of Ambrose and Cynthia (Roby) Marshall, natives respectively of 
Kentucky and Washington county, Indiana. The father was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, and in an early day in its history he came to Indiana and 
took up his abode in Washington county, where he followed farming and 
to some extent coopering until his death, both he and his wife dying in 
that county. Their religious views were in harmony with the principles 
of the United Brethren church. 

When he reached the age of twenty-one years Leonard Marshall left 
his boyhood's home and moved to a farm which he purchased in Wash- 
ington county, residing there until about 1868. He had previously bought 
eighty acres of land where he now lives, buying it about i860, and in 1872 
he located thereon, but at that time the tract was covered with timber. 
He cleared the land and added to its boundaries until he now has about 
one hundred and forty acres, all in one body but lying in three townships, 
Cass, Hamilton and Jackson, and he also owns the coal which underlies 
this tract. 

Mr. Marshall married, April i, 1853, Lucy Jane Montgomery, who 
was bom in Virginia on the 25th of July, 1835, but when she was but 
eight years of age her parents moved from that state to Missouri, crossing 
the Mississippi river on foot on the ice. After a residence of eight months 
in Missouri, the father died, and the mother with her family then moved 
to Washington county, Indiana. Her family consisted of nine children, 
two sons then living in Washington county, and she resided with one of 
these sons a short time, but her residence in that county covered a period 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 193 

of ten years. She died at the home of Mr. Marshall in 1866. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, namely: William 
Franklin, a farmer near Chappel Church in Cass township ; Henry A., 
deceased ; John W., who has charge of the home farm and resides with 
his parents ; and George D., who resides in Cass township and is farming 
a part of his father's farm. Mr. Marshall is a Democrat in politics, and 
fraternally is a member of the Masonic order. 



Albert J. Zink, one of the leading business men and farmers of 
Hymera, was born and has spent his entire life in Sullivan, his birth 
occurring in Jackson township on the 27th of October, 1855, a son of 
Michael and Clarissa (Hubanks) Zink, natives respectively of Washing- 
ton county, Indiana, and of Maysville, Kentucky. The father, who was 
a life-long farmer, came to Jackson township with his father when only 
thirteen years old, and at the time of his death in 1888 he owned a beau- 
tiful estate of two hundred and eighty acres, the accumulation of his own 
personal efforts and industry. The mother died in the year of 1892. 

Albert J. Zink received his educational training in the district schools 
of Jackson township, and at the age of twenty he began his life work as 
a renter, renting of his father and also conducting his estate until the 
latter's death. His first purchase of land was a tract of forty acres in 
1882, and by adding to this from time to time he became the owner of 
one hundred and twenty acres, but in 1908 he sold this farm to the coal 
company and a short time afterward bought eighty acres which he now 
conducts. He also owns a fine business block in the town of Hymera, 
and is connected with the leading general store and meat market there, 
in which they carry a seven thousand dollar stock. Some years ago Mr. 
Zink made a specialty of the raising of wdieat, and is now also quite 
extensively engaged in small farming and hay growing, which he uses 
as feed for his horses. His interests are extensive and varied, and his 
efforts are being substantially rewarded. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Zink occurred in March of 1876, and 
she bore the maiden name of Mary B. Hughes and was born in Virginia, 
as also her parents, Henry M. and Harriett (Thayer) Hughes. They 
came to Sullivan county during the war and located near Shelbnrn. where 
he followed blacksmithing for many years, but later bought and operated 
a farm for a few years, and then selling his land here returned to Vir- 
ginia. But in a few years he came again to Sullivan county, where he 
died at Hymera in 1898 and the mother one year later. The daughter 
received her education in the schools of Shelburn. Seven children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Zink, namely : Clara, the wife of J. J. Branson, 
of Hymera; Blanch, deceased; Maud, the wife of J. L. Pipher, also of 
Hymera ; and Herbert, Herschel, Cora Castella and Gladys, at home. 
Mr. Zink is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Methodist 
cliurch. 



194 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Singleton Marshall has spent many years of his long and useful 
career in Sullivan county, prominently identified with its business interests. 
He was born in Washington county, Indiana, June i, 1828, a son of 
Ambrose and Cynthia (Robie) Marshall. The mother was reared from 
a mere child near Albany, Indiana, and she was of Scotch-Irish descent. 
Ambrose Marshall, a native of Kentucky, was of English descent, and 
came with his parents to Indiana when about ten years of age, the family 
locating in Wasliington county, where his father was a blacksmith and 
an exceptionally fine workman in his line. Ambrose Marshall followed 
farming all his life, and both he and his father died in Washington county. 

Singleton Marshall continued to reside with his parents until he was 
twenty-one, and during the following three years worked for his father. 
After his marriage he bought a farm in Washington county, but after 
six years sold the land and then rented land for three years. I'urchasing 
then one hundred and si.xty acres near where he now lives, he lived there 
until about 1890, when he went west in search of a better location, but 
finding nothing which surpassed the land of this section of Indiana he 
returned and lived on a rented farm for a short time. He then purchased 
a tract of land near Hymera, but afterward on account of ill health he 
went to Arkansas and bought two hundred and forty-seven acres in that 
state, two hundred acres of which he yet owns. He spent the winters 
there for several years, and he now makes his home with a daughter-in- 
law in Jackson township. 

In August, 1850, Mr. Marshall was united in marriage to Mary Ann 
Allen, whose parents were farming people in Washington county. Indiana, 
and both are now deceased, the mother, Christena (Lee) Allen, dying 
in 1883. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, namely: 
Robert Cornelius, deceased ; Martha Carolina, also deceased ; Alfred 
Franklin, a physician of Jasonville, Indiana; Mary Jane, the wife of 
William Lucas, of Denver, Colorado : Emma, wife of Douglas Marshall, of 
Jackson township ; Julian, a farmer of Hamilton township ; Laura, the 
wife of John Nead, of Hymera : Onie, wife of Charles Rusher, of Jackson 
township ; Oliver, who was killed by a train at Hymera in 1901 ; Eva, who 
died at the age of twenty years ; and Edward, also deceased. Mr. Mar- 
shall is independent in his political affiliations, and he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



Fr.-\ncis Marion Dorothy. — Among the early dav business men of 
Indiana was numbered Francis M. Dorothy, who during many years of 
his active life was identified with the mercantile business. He was born 
in A^igo county, this state, August 24, 1834, a son of Harrison and Lucinda 
(Sweeney) Dorothy, who were natives of Kentucky and of Irish descent. 
In his youth the son Francis located in the village of Old York in Clark 
county, Illinois, where he worked as a mechanic until 1852, and for some 
time afterward was a mercantile salesman there. In the fall of 1881 he 



HISTORY OF SULLIXAX COUXTY 195 

enlisted as a Civil war soldier, becoming a member of Company l', I*"ifth 
Illinois Cavalry, entering the ranks as a lieutenant. He took part in sev- 
eral hard-fought skirmishes, and on one occasion was wounded in the 
left knee, the ball remaining imbedded in the wound until his death. 
Returning home after his discharge from the army he was engaged in 
business in Roliison for four years, from tliat time until the summer of 
i87(j was identified with the business interests of Bellair, Illinois, and 
moving thence to Clay City, Indiana, he was a prominent and successful 
merchant there until his death on the 12th of December, 1888. He was 
a member of the time honored order of Masons, and an earnest and active 
Republican. 

On the i8tli of December, 1871. Mr. Dorothy was united in marriage 
to Miss Notolean Peters, who was born in Queen Ann county, Maryland, 
December 30, 1841, a daughter of John Wesley and Martha (Wallace) 
Peters, of English descent and natives respectively of Maryland and Dela- 
ware. They were farming people, and both are now deceased. When 
their daughter Notolean w^as fourteen years of age she came to Park 
county, Illinois, to live with an uncle, who was a miller, and she was a 
member of his home from 1856 until her marriage. After the death of 
her husband she continued the business and remained in Clay City until 
1896, when she sold the store and came to Hymera to engage in the mer- 
cantile business here. She was the proprietor of one of the town's leading 
mercantile establishments, carrying a stock valued at three thousand dol- 
lars, and met with the success she so well merited. Mrs. Dorothy is the 
mother of four children: Francis Otto, the first born, married Ethel 
lieckett, by whom he had one child, Hester, and he died on the 30th of 
September, 1901. Charles is a miner and resides at home, as does also 
the vounger son, Dick, who had charge of the store. May is the wife of 
Charles Zenor and resides in Hymera. They have two children, Donald 
and Dorothv. 



Ch.^rles B.arnh.art. — From the age of twenty-four years to the 
present time Charles Barnhart has been prominently identified with the 
btisiness interests of Sullivan county. At that age he started to work for 
himself, but for some years following this he conducted his father's farm, 
and then buying out the heirs to the home estate resided thereon until 
the year of 1887. Selling the land then he bought another farm of ninety- 
two acres where the village of Hymera now stands, but he has since sold 
this entire tract in town lots with the exception of one and a half acres. 
During about six years of this time he was engaged in the furniture busi- 
ness, was also in the livery business for about four years, and during the 
past twentv-one years he has been the proprietor of a well known and 
popular hotel. He has thus contributed much to the public life and interests 
of Hvmera and vicinity, and the community numbers him among her 
foremost business men and citizens. 

Mr. Barnhart was born in Owen coimty, Indiana. February 28, 1851, 



196 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

and is of German parentage. His father, Henry Barnhart, came to 
America when about twenty-two years of age and located in Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio, where he was employed on public works for some years 
and then bought a farm in that county. After a residence there of several 
years, however, he sold the land and moved to Owen county, Indiana, 
where he bought a farm and resided there until selling the land in 1885 
he came to Jackson township, Sullivan county, buying a farm a half a mile 
south of Hymera. He resided on this homestead until his death in the 
year of 1877, when he had reached the age of sixt3^-eight years. His wife, 
Margaret, was born near his old home in Germany, and coming to 
America about the same time they were married in Ohio. The wife died 
about ten years after the death of her husband, aged seventy-seven }-ears. 
The two children of Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart are Bert, a pharmacist, and 
engaged in the drug business in Indianapolis, and Ralph, who is with his 
parents and attending school. Mr. Barnhart is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and of the M-ethodist church, and in poli- 
tics he upholds the principles of the Democratic party. The original 
spelling of this name was Earnhardt, but it has since been changed to its 
present form. 



John A. Spe.ar. — The life's labors of John A. Spear were ended on 
the 17th of August, 1899, when death took from Sullivan county one of 
its truest and best citizens. He was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, 
April 9, 1835, and starting in life for himself at about the age of eighteen 
he continued to work for his father for one year, and after his marriage 
his father deeded him forty acres of land in Owen county, in the Spear 
settlement. During the period of the Civil war he served as a private 
in Company A, Fifty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry for three and a 
half vears, and he was in service for six months before being mustered 
in. During the most of the time of his army service he was a teamster 
on an amnumition wagon. Previous to entering the army Mr. Spear 
had sold the land which his father had given him and on which he had 
farmed for six years ; and after returning from the war he bought a 
tract of eighty acres near Hymera, and there he lived and labored until 
his busy and useful life was ended. 

Mr. Spear was a son of David Spear, who was a native of Virginia, 
as was also his wife, Jane Vance, and very early in its history he moved 
to Ohio and enrolled his name among its pioneers. He continued to 
farm in that state until his removal to Owen county, Indiana, in about 
1850, where he bought a farm and resided until his death in about 1890. 
His wife survived him for eight years, dying in 1898. He was a Repub- 
lican politically, but never desired the honors of office. 

On the 14th of September, 1856, Mr. Spear married Lydia A. Criss. 
who was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, near New Lisbon, November 
6, 1835, a daughter of Isaac D. and Susana (France) Criss, both of 
whom were also born in Ohio, the mother in Old Philadelphia and the 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 197 

lather in Carl cuunt_\. He was a farmer, and coming to Owen coimty, 
Iiuliana, near Spencer, about 1843, he entered a homestead there and 
continued his residence thereon until his death in 1878. The mother 
survived until 1890. They were members of the Baptist church, and 
were highly respected in the community in which they so long resided. 
Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Spear, namely: James Isaac, 
who died at the age of eight \ears and four months ; Sulesta, the wife 
of O. H. Gagan of Hymera ; Louisa, who married Perry Bear and resides 
in Knox county, Indiana; David \'.. a miner and farmer in Hymera; 
Oliver M., a prospector and miner in Colorao ; Anna, the widow of Perry 
Botts and who resides with her mother; Jennie F., the wife of I. N. 
Botts. of Hymera ; William H., who died at the age of thirty-three years, 
in 1906 ; and Levi Hale, who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Spear continued to reside on the homestead farm until about 
two years after the death of her husband, when at the request of her 
son she moved to the village of Hymera and now resides in one of its 
most spacious homes. She yet owns the old farm property. Since the 
age of fourteen years she has been an earnest and consistent member of 
the Christian church, and her husband was also affiliated with that 
denomination. 



Fkancis M. Nead, a member of one of the most prominent of Sulli- 
van county's early families, was born in Jackson township on the i6th 
of October, 1858, a son of John and Nancy A. (Tipton) Nead and a 
grandson of George Nead, who died on the 6th of February, 1856, aged 
about sixtv-seven years. His grandparents were natives of Switzerland, 
but emigrated when young to Pennsylvania and thence to Carroll county, 
Ohio, where they spent the remainder of their lives and were there buried. 
George Nead was both a farmer and cooper, and in early life he married 
Sarah ]\Iizer, who was born in Carroll county, Ohio, and died June 13, 
1888, aged more than eighty-eight years. 

John Nead also claimed Carroll county as the place of his nativity, 
born November 4, 1830, but three years later his parents moved to 
Coshocton county, that state, where the senior Mr. Nead became a 
prominent farmer. In 1854 the son came to Sullivan county, Indiana, 
and bought eighty acres of land in Jackson township, where he followed 
general farming until his enlistment, on the 26th of August, 1862, as a 
private in the Ninety-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Company I, 
in which he served a little over a year and died on the 31st of August, 
1863, from sickness contracted in the army. He was buried with military 
honors at Camp Sherman, Mississippi, on the Big Black river, but with 
those of other soldiers his remains were afterward taken to the burial 
ground of the National Cemetery at Vicksburg, and his grave was marked 
by a stone bearing the initials of J. N. Mrs. Nead, his wife, was born 
March 5, 1831, in Coshocton county, Ohio, a daughter of William and 
Patience S. (Pugh') Tipton, the former of whom was born in \'irginia 



198 HISTORY OF SULLIVAX COUNTY 

August 20, 1798, and the latter in Berkeley county, West Virginia, No- 
vember 18, 1794. Moving to Ohio when a boy William Tipton spent his 
early youth on the Manmee river, where he was married in 1818, and 
many years afterward, in 1847, they came to Owen county, Indiana, and 
farmed there until the death of the husband and father. May 29, 1854. 
The mother had moved with her parents to Ohio when a young girl, 
and after the death of her husband, in 1854, she came to Jackson town- 
ship in Sullivan county, and resided here until her death, March i, 1868. 

Francis M. was the eldest of the three children born to John and 
Nancy A. Nead, and he was but a little lad of five years at the time of 
the death of his father. His mother kept him in school until he was 
about eighteen, attending the graded schools of Hymera, Sullivan and 
Farmersburg, and for fifteen years after the completion of his education, 
beginning in 1879, he was engaged in teaching. During that time he 
had become the owner of the parental homestead, and at about the close 
of his professional career he was elected the assessor of Jackson town- 
ship and continued to reside on the farm until October of 1907. Previous 
to this time he had bought the site for the splendidly equipped home 
W'hich he built at that time, and he still owns the old farm and about 
fifteen acres adjoining. 

On the 22d of August. 1883, Mr. Nead was married to Adaline 
Payne, who was born in Jackson township August 22, 1858. a daughter 
of Rosea and Sarah A. (Asbury) Payne, the father a native of North 
Carolina, born on the 25th of December, 1815, and his wife was some 
years his junior. He came with his parents to Lawrence county, this 
state, about 1830, and from there to Sullivan county, where he bought a 
farm in Jackson township, married, and continued to reside here until 
his death in 1900. His wife died four years later, in 1904. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nead have four children: Conza C, born October 6, 1884, married 
in 1904 Evan G. Moreland and resides on the old homestead in Jackson 
township; Garland H., born October 30, 1887, taught school some years 
and is now with her parents ; Wendell Holmes, born December 27, 1894, 
is in school, as is also Mary Esther, born September 13, 1901. Mr. 
Nead's politics are Democratic, and for five years, from 1895 to 1900, he 
served as an assessor, and he is now serving his fourth year as a trustee, 
having been re-elected as the trustee of the township of Jackson Novem- 
ber 3, 1908. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Hymera Lodge No. 603, in which he has filled all of the offices and is 
one of the present trustees, and has also represented the order in the 
Grand Lodge. THis lodge was instituted here on the 6th of October, 
1883. He is a prominent and worthy member of the Methodist church. 



Robert G. Jackson, who is numbered among the business men of 
Jackson township and Hymera, was born in Pleasantville, Jefferson town- 
ship, Sullivan county, March 4. 1869, a son of J. H. and Nancy C. 
( INIcClung) Jackson, the former a native of Kentuckv and the latter of 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 199 

Indiana. J. 11. Jackson came with his parents to Indiana when ten years 
of age, in 1842, the family locating on a farm in Jefferson township, Sulli- 
van county, where the parents spent the remainder of their lives. The 
son has continued his residence on a farm near by the one selected by 
his parents. During the Civil war he served as a soldier in an Indiana 
regiment, but in a short time after enlisting he was wounded and crippled 
in a railroad wreck and was discharged from the service. ]Mrs. Jackson, 
his wife, was born in 1848. 

Robert (_;. Jackson remained on the home farm with his father until 
the age of twenty-one, when he puchased land in Jeft'erson township, 
but after one year there he sold that land and bought another farm. 
There he resided for ten years, and then selling that farm he bought 
another in Jackson township, which he yet owns in connection with a 
tract of fortv acres four miles north of Hymera. He also has valuable 
propertv interests in Hymera, and during the past seven years he has 
been engaged in jjlastering there. 

On the 4th of December, 1891, Air. Jackson was united in marriage 
to Minnie \'. Steele, a daughter of Samuel and Anna J. (MurdockJ 
Steele, the mother a native of Ireland and the father of Dearborn county, 
Indiana. During many years he was a blacksmith in Sullivan, and he 
died in the vear of 1874. His widow was a resident of Youngstown, 
this state, and died on March 11, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have 
four children, — Lomie L., \'annessa L., Vida B. and Lowell G. Mr. 
Jackson is a member of the Masonic order at Hymera, is a Republican 
politically, and both his and his wife's religious affiliations are with the 
Methodist church. 



Thom.as W. H,-\milton. — During a period of twenty years Thomas 
W. Hamilton has resided on his present estate in Jackson township, 
prominently identified with its agricultural and stock raising interests. 
His farm contains sixtv acres of rich and fertile land, and he is exten- 
sively engaged in the Isreeding of Hereford cattle, and some years ago 
he sold an animal which was the pride of the stockmen of the vicinity, 
it weighing twenty-four hundred and eighty-seven pounds. During two 
years Mr. Hamilton served as the assessor of the township, elected by 
the Republican party, and he proved an efficient officer. 

Mr. Hamilton is one of a large family of children born to William 
Hamilton, his natal day being the nth of June, 1845, and his father was 
a native of Kentucky, but came to Indiana during an early epoch in its 
history, and both he and his wife have long since passed away. Their 
children were: Mary Jane, the deceased wife of Benjamin Maratta, of 
Sullivan ; Elizabeth, the deceased wife of M. H. Plew, also of Sullivan ; 
Nancy Jane, who has been blind from infancy, and she resides with a 
brother James in Jackson township ; James, also of this township ; and 
William, who has not been heard from for ten years, and he was then 
in New Mexico. 



200 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

In 1875 Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage to Sarah E. Gillmore, 
and they have four children, — Orin, Bert, Leland and Caroline, aged 
respectively twenty-nine, twenty-seven, twenty-one and seventeen years. 
Mr. Hamilton is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



Kenneth W. Self^ who has been an industrious tiller of the soil 
of Sullivan county since 1869, is a native of Montgomery county, Ken- 
tucky, born December 21, 1823, a son of Presley and Helen (Wilson) 
Self. The father was born July 7, 1787, and died in August, 1864, in 
Coles county, Illinois, and was buried at Greensburg, Indiana. He was 
a native of Culpeper county, Virginia. Kenneth W. Self"s mother was 
born in Greensborough county. West Virginia, August 11, 1787, and 
died in Greensburg. 

Presley Self was the son of John and Milly (Harden) Self, both 
natives of Virginia. They emigrated from there to Kentucky and were 
among the pioneer settlers of that region. Helen (Wilson) S^lf was 
the daughter of Newton Wilson, a native of Scotland who came to this 
country after his marriage and served in the Revolution in the cause 
of American independence. By trade he was a weaver, and first located 
in Virginia, but later moved to Kentucky, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. The subject's grandfather Self was a soldier in the war 
of 1812, and was captured at Dudley's defeat, and was never afterward 
heard of. Presley, the father Kenneth W. Self, was married about 1809 
in Kentucky, and resided there until 1824, and then moved to Decatur 
county, Indiana. He retained his land, however, in Kentucky until about 
1855, when he sold and retired from farming, which had been his calling 
and in wdiich he was very successful. Up to 1840 he was a Jacksonian 
Democrat, but after that date voted with the Whig party, later espousing 
the cause advocated by the Republicans, and his last vote was cast for 
President Lincoln. He was a member of the Christian church, a devoted 
Christian in word and deed. He was the father of six children : John, 
born in 1810, was killed by a horse in 1836, in Indianapolis; Joseph, born 
about 1811, died in 1844; Ruth, born about 1813, died in 1844; Harden, 
born in 1817, died in 1892; Randolph, born in 1819, died in 1862; and 
Kenneth W. 

Kenneth W. was educated at the old fashioned subscription schools 
and at a select school for a short time. When seventeen years of age he 
taught school fifteen months, after which he attended college at what is 
now the State Lhiiversity. He then resumed teaching school and followed 
that profession until 1850. During that year he was married in Decatur 
countv, Indiana, and taught school and farmed there until 1863, then 
moved to Coles county, Illinois, where he continued teaching and farming 
until 1869, when he went to Jackson township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
where he now resides. After coming to this county he also taught school 
up to 1885. When he first settled in Sullivan county he purchased 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 201 

eighty acres of land, and added thcrclo until he owned a finely improved 
farm of one hundred acres, but sold a portion of the tract he had at one 
time to his son, this leaving him sixty acres. Mr. Self was married 
July 19, 1850, to a Miss Wood, who was born in 1825, in Mason City, 
Kentucky, and she died in igoo, on December 28th. She was the daugh- 
ter of Genoa and Comfort Wood, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. 
By this union were born seven children as follows: Viola (Stock), born 
1852 and now residing in Lewis, Indiana; Samuel O.. born June 11, 1855, 
resides in Sullivan; Laura (Brown), born June 22, 1858, resides in 
Youngstown, Ohio; Joseph L., born December 19, i860, resides in Farm- 
ersburg; Presley M., born February 27, 1863, resides in Farmersburg; 
William L., born September 17, 1865, is now at home on the old home- 
stead, and Claborn c5., born September 15, 1871, resides in Terre Haute. 
In his political choice ]\Ir. Self is a pronounced Republican, formerly 
being a member of the old-line Whig party, which was merged into the 
new party in 1856. He has served as a justice of the peace in Decatur 
countv for a period of four years. He is of the Presbyterian church 
faith and a member of that denomination. 



Simpson Edwards, a prominent farmer and stock raiser, 
whose methods have brought success to his efforts, is a tiller of the 
fertile soil of Gill township. He was born in Lawrence county, Indiana, 
June 30, 1852. son of Henderson and Cynthia (Co.x) Edwards. The 
father was born in the same county, as was the mother, the former in 
1820, and the latter in 1 83 1. Henderson Edwards was a farmer through- 
out his entire lifetime. When about twenty-one years of age he entered 
land in the Vincennes district, which he cleared up and used for agricul- 
tural purposes. Here he resided and labored until 1885, then sold out 
and purchased the farm where his son now lives, at first purchasing 
eighty acres. His wife died in 1901 and he now resides with his son 
Simpson. The children born to Henderson and Cynthia (Cox) Edwards 
were five in number, as follows : Simpson, of whom further mention is 
made; Geneal Edwards, deceased; Clementine, deceased; Jane, wife of 
William Cox, of Haddon township ; Margaret, wife of A. W. Engle of 
Gill township. 

Like many a youth of his times, Simpson Edwards had but a limited 
opportunity for gaining an education. He attended the common schools 
of Lawrence county, and one term at the high school of Mitchell. At 
the age of seventeen years, he commenced working for others, continuing 
four years. He then purchased a farm in Lawrence county, which he 
owned two years, but to which he never moved. After he sold this he 
continued to reside with his father, and managed his place for him. He 
next bought land in Sullivan county. This was an eighty acre tract, 
which was purchased in 1885. Subsequently, he added another "eighty," 
which with an acre piece more recently liought makes him the present 



202 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

owner of one hundred and sixty-one acres of land, where he carries on 
general farming and makes a specialty of stock-raising. Besides raising 
many hogs and cattle, he also deals in this variety of stock to quite an 
extent. His farm has been well improved by his systematic methods and 
today is one of much beauty and great value, as compared to the date 
which he purchased the several tracts composing the whole. 

Mr. Edwards, being of a progressive turn of mind, has identified 
himself with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to both blue lodge and 
Eastern Star degrees. In his church relations, he is a communicant of 
the Baptist church. Politically, Mr. Edwards believes in the general 
principles advocated by the Republican party. He has never sought 
public favor in way of local office, but has served as supervisor and held 
minor township offices. 

He was married in October, 1894, to Mary E. Price, born near 
Terre Haute, the daughter of John W. Price, a prominent farmer of 
Vigo county. Mrs. Edwards' parents are now both deceased. 



Walter P. Sparks, the efficient and truly obliging postmaster at 
Merom, Sullivan county, was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, 
March 29, 1842, son of Thomas and Jennie (Harwood) Sparks. Thomas 
Sparks was born in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, and his wife in 
Ohio. Thomas came to Sullivan county at a very early da}' and pur- 
chased a farm upon which he continued to reside until his death, his 
wife dying before he passed away. 

Walter P. Sparks was left an orphan at the tender age of seven 
years, tie attended the Montgomery county public schools, thus gaining 
a fair common school education. He worked here and there for various 
persons, up to the time he was sixteen years of age, when he commenced 
to learn the carpenter's trade in his native county, and followed this for 
his livelihood until about the date of the Harrison Presidential election, 
when he was appointed mail messenger from Merom to Merom Station, 
which position he filled until the end of a five year period. He was then 
appointed postmaster at Merom and is the present incumbent, having 
held the office continuously ever since, except four years during Cleve- 
land's administration. Mr. Sparks by prudence has been able to accu- 
mulate considerable property, including two dwellings in IMerom, as 
well as six choice town lots. 

He was among the men who braved the exposure and dangers of 
camp and field, during the Civil war period in this country. He enlisted 
in the month of September, 1861 — first year of the war — as a member 
of Company B, Tenth Indiana Regiment, under Colonel Manson, and 
served three years, being mustered out of service September 18, 1864, 
at Indianapolis. He was in the battles of Mills Springs (Kentucky), 
Shiloh, Chickamauga. Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain 
and Atlanta. His only wound was a bruise caused by a spent ball which 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AN COUNTY 203 

shattered the stock of his gun. He was also at I'erryville, in which 
engagement his company lost eight men. 

Politically, Mr. Sparks is a firm defender of Repuhlican principles. 
Aside from being postmaster, he has held the office of member of the 
school board and other minor positions. In church relations, he is of the 
Methodist Episcopal creed. He is an honored member of the Masonic 
fraternity and stands for all that is good and true in the county and 
state in which he resides. 

He was united in marriage, first in 1864. to Martha J. Lisman, born 
at ]\Ierom, Indiana, in 1847, daughter of David Lisman, an early settler 
who located near Carlisle, now deceased. To this union, two children 
were born: David L., born December 12, 1866, residing at Robinson, 
Illinois, a tailor by trade, and Thomas, born January 8, 1868, now living 
near ^lerom on a farm. Mrs. Sparks died in 1870. For his second wife, 
Mr. Sparks married Rebecca I. Curl, a native of Ohio, born March 13, 
1858, daughter of David Curl and wife. The father, a farmer, moved 
from Ohio to Illinois in 1865 and settled on a farm east from Palestine, 
where they resided many years, but subsequently removed to Texas, where 
a son was living. There the father died about 1898, the mother having 
died several years before. By Mr. Sparks' second marriage the issue is : 
Helen May, married Dr. Boone, and died in September, 1904, leaving an 
only child, Helen, aged three years; Clara, wife of Elmer Pinkston. a 
hotel keeper and farmer of Merom ; Guy. married Ora Ellis, and resides 
in Merom, where he is engaged in painting and paper-hanging: Lula, 
wife of \\'alter Mahan. a ])ainter antl paper-hanger, residing at Merom. 



John Emery Brewer, well known in Sullivan county both as a suc- 
cessful business man and farmer, was born at Graysville, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 12, 1854, a son of Samuel S. and Cynthia Ann (Dodd) Brewer. 
The father was also born near Graysville on a farm April 20, 1830. He 
was the son of John Brewer, Sr., a native of Mercer county, Kentucky, 
born in 1796. and who moved with his parents to Butler county. Ohio, 
when eleven years of age. When he was twenty-four years old, he walked 
from that county to Sullivan county, Indiana, carrying with him an ax, 
which was his only article of defense. He entered one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, the same now being owned by the Davis heirs, in Turman 
township. When cutting down his first tree, which was a very large one. 
he discovered a she bear and cubs. As the tree fell, the dogs entertained 
the bear, which animal would have killed the dogs, had he not rushed to 
their rescue and killed her. After having cleared up four acres, he erected 
a small cabin and remained there in the wild forest land about one year, 
then returned to Ohio and brought his wife and one child back to Sul- 
livan county. The child mentioned was James Brewer, who later settled 
in Fairbanks township, one mile north of Fairbanks, where he lived and 
died, having amassed a goodly fortune. 



204 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

John Brewer, Sr., reared a family of nineteen children, twelve of 
whom reached maturity, and all of them took up their abode within Sul- 
livan county and cleared up farms. He possessed about seventeen hun- 
dred acres himself, in Turman township, which he gave to his sons and 
daughters. After disposing of his large land holdings, he engaged in 
mercantile business with his son, Samuel S. They purchased a stock of 
goods belonging to Lafayette Stewart, at Graysville, he being the pioneer 
merchant of that place. This transaction was in 1853, on the first day 
of June, and the business was conducted until the junior member, Samuel 
S. Brewer, died, in the month of August, i860, and the following year 
the business of the firm was closed up. John, Sr., remained at Graysville 
for four years, after which he was associated with his son-in-law, Thomas 
Burton, in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Brewer & 
Burton, which relationship existed until 1876, when by mutual consent 
it was dissolved and William Brewer, a son of John Brewer, Sr., took 
the business and located at Sullivan and engaged in the hardware trade. 
John Brewer, Sr., died at Graysville in 1880 and was buried at the Mann 
cemetery. He was the first man to drive a team of horses with check 
lines within Sullivan county. His son, of this memoir, has in his pos- 
session the journal and ledger used by the old firm of Brewer & Son, 
which has the names of nearly all of the old pioneers of that township. 
Its pages show it to have been one of the most perfect and neatly kept 
set of books in the county, not excepting those of the present day busi- 
ness houses. 

Cynthia Ann (Dodd) Brewer, the mother of John Emery, was born 
in August, 1836, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Osborne) Dodd. The 
Dodd family originally lived in Kentucky, the father of John being com- 
monhr called Dickey Dodd, and he was the first sheriff of Sullivan county, 
Indiana. Elizabeth Osborne was the daughter of Isaiah Osborne, also 
a pioneer of Kentucky, who settled in Sullivan county, when all was yet 
a wilderness. 

John Emery Brewer attended the schools at Ascension Seminary, 
under the tutorship of Major Crawford, whose sketch appears elsewhere 
within this work. Mr. Brewer entered that excellent educational insti- 
tution without much preparation at the age of eighteen years. He was 
a well posted farmer, but knew little else of the great, teeming world, 
with its various activities, but had an ambition to learn. He attended this 
seminary also at Sullivan and the Commercial College at Terre Haute, 
from which he was graduated in 1875. It should be recalled that Mr. 
Brewer's father died when the son was but six years of age, at a time 
when a boy most needs the tender watch-care of a father. He was 
"hired out" by his mother to one Thomas Pogue, with whom he remained 
for five years, then was employed by various farmers, near Graysville, 
until he was eighteen years of age, at which time young Brewer decided 
to obtain a good education, which he did in the manner stated above, 
beginning with a three years' course under Professor Crawford, whose 
school was then at Farmersburg. After graduating from the Terre Haute 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 205 

Business College, he engaged with the firm of Sherman & Davis, as a 
clerk, at Graysville, Indiana, where he was soon made manager of the 
business there and continued two years, when the stock was removed to 
Sullivan. Subsequently, Mr. Brewer engaged in business at Graysville 
on his own account, continuing until 1881, when he sold to Robert Car- 
ruthers. Mr. Brewer then purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres, near the village of New Lebanon, where he has since resided. Here 
he carries on a general farming business and raises stock. He has made 
decided improvements upon the farm since buying it. This place is 
known, far and near, as the William Gill place, and the township was 
named in honor of its former owner. Mr. Brewer is the eldest of a 
family of three children born to his parents. One brother was Theodore 
Frelingheisen, born in 1856, and died at the age of twenty-one years ; he 
was also educated at Farmersburg under Major Crawford. This brother 
was a most thorough scholar and a faithful, hardw^orking student, whose 
career was suddenly cut short at the threshold of young manhood, wiien 
all looked fair for a successful life's voyage. As a musician, he ranked 
among the best of his years, and was among the attractive, bright stars 
which seemed destined to sink prematurely. Mr. Brewer's sister was 
Flora, born i860, at Graysville. She married William T. Ingersoll in 
1880 and died the year after her marriage, at Graysville. Mr. Brewer's 
mother remained a widow for eight years, then married J. W. Warner, 
and now resides with him, one mile north of Graysville. She is seventy- 
three years old. 

In religious faith, Mr. Brewer and also wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, he having, united with this denomination in 
1864, at Graysville. He has held the office of steward. Politically, he 
affiliates with the Republican party, and was postmaster at Graysville 
for six years, but aside from that has never aspired or held local positions 
of honor or trust. 

Concerning his domestic relations, it may be said that he was married 
September 11, 1877, to Jennie Cornelius, a native of Sullivan, born 
August 10, 1859, daughter of Rev. W. H. and Sarah Ann (Robbins) 
Cornelius. The father was born at IMaysville, Kentucky, April 4. 1810, 
and the mother was born October 22, 1819, at Elizabethtown, Pennsyl- 
vania. W. H. Cornelius was a ship-carpenter by trade, apprenticed when 
fourteen years of age, at Louisville, Kentucky. He moved to Cincinnati, 
where he was united in marriage, and where he engaged in ship-carpen- 
tering for a short time. He then went to Louisville, and there engaged 
at the same work until he entered the Indiana Methodist Conference in 
1841. He was a regular traveling minister until his death, Juh' 31. 1882, 
at Linton, Indiana, where he was buried. His wife, who died May 4, 
1863, was buried at Corydon, Harrison county, Indiana. 

In the Cornelius family there were ten children, seven of whom 
reached mature years. They are as follows : Mary Ann. wife of Marion 
Hise, both deceased ; Celestine, wife of G. W. Lane, of Danville, Illinois, 
and she is now deceased ; William F., of Linton, Indiana, engaged in the 



2o6 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

insurance and real estate business; Daniel B., of Linton, an architect; 
Margaret Elizabeth, wife of Capt. Edward Estes Laymon, an attorney 
of Santiago, California, and a man of much wealth, whose other home 
is at Des Moines. Iowa; Sarah Emily, wife of Ransom Bedwell, of 
Springfield, Missouri, a farmer by occupation : Jennie, wife of Mr. 
Brewer, of this memoir. 

John E. Brewer and wife are the parents of the following children : 
Walter Cornelius, born at Graysville, Indiana, September 6, 1878, unmar- 
ried and at home ; Samuel Scott, born at Graysville, December 5, 1880, 
unmarried, and is an attorney, practicing law at Indianapolis, a graduate 
of the Indianapolis Law School, being admitted to practice in all of the 
courts within the United States, the date of final admission being June 7, 
1907; Nellie, born at New Lebanon. Indiana, March 14, 1883. unmarried, 
a teacher at present and will graduate in the Indiana State Normal School 
in class of 1910; Mabel, born at New Lebanon. July 4, 1886. now at 
home: John Thaddeus. born at New Lebanon, August 26. 1888. also 
at home. 

It is said that of all the members of the Brewer family none have 
ever been brought before the law ; all are Republicans and members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and the same may be said of the Cor- 
nelius family in detail. Mr. and Mrs. Brewer have in their possession 
two of the old deeds, one executed August 9. 1823, the oldest found in 
Sullivan county so far and given-, urtder the hand of President James 
Monroe, and the other deed executed November 24, 1828, is by President 
John O. Adams. 



William H. Jones, Jr., who is numbered among the largest land- 
owners and large farmers within Sullivan county, is a native of Fayette 
county. Ohio, born October 21, 1855, a son of William H. and Olavi 
(Hidy) Jones. The mother was born in Fayette county, Ohio, and the 
father in Denbigh. Wales. He came to this country when about twenty- 
five years old. landing in New York City. He spent one year at Phila- 
delphia, going from there to New Orleans, where he remained one year, 
and from that city he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where for about five 
years he studied medicine and graduated in the same. He commenced 
the practice of medicine at Oak Hill, Ohio, in 1851, but after a short 
period there went to Jeffersonville, Ohio, and bought out the practice of 
another physician. He was married there and resided there almost four 
years, then moved onto the farm adjoining the town, which land his wife 
had inherited. He remained there the balance of his life, dying in 1894 
at about the age of seventy-eight years. His wife died two years later, 
being about seventy years old. Seven children were born to Dr. Jones 
and wife : Mary jane, wife of Luther M. Irwin, residing on the old 
homestead, near Jeffersonville, Ohio; William H., of this memoir; 
Humphrev. an attorney residing in Washington Court House, Ohio; 
Enmia O.. unmarried and practicing medicine at Columbus. Ohio; Cary, 



THE NEW YORK- 
' PUBLIC IIBRARV 



ASTCc 
Tltoe^ 




^^^^a^ 7^, o<^^^^.c^. 



THE NEW YORK 

PU^BUC LIBRARY 



AJTOR, LENOX AND 
t" eN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 207 

practicing- law at London, Ohio ; ]\iinnie, wife of Dallas Reading, of 
Detroit, Alichigan. Another child, the next to the youngest in the famil)-, 
died in infancy. 

William H. Jones, Jr., grew up as a farmer's son, performing what- 
ever work seemed best at the time, regardless of the kind. He attended 
the district schools while living in Ohio, and also the high school of Jeffer- 
sonville. At the age of nineteen years, he entered Buchtel College, at 
Akron, Ohio, and took a four year course, graduating in 1879. Later, 
he taught mathematics in the same college for a year, then attended 
Harvard Law School one year. 

After he had finished his schooling, he married and settled down on 
a farm, near Jefifersonville, Ohio, where he remained five years. While 
there, he also followed civil engineering and surveying in that and the 
adjoining counties. Subsequently, he moved to Washington Court House 
and engaged in the mortgage loan business, making loans on farm prop- 
erty mostly, and also conducted an abstract business, contimiing there 
until 1899. H^e then sold his farm in Ohio, adjoining the town, and 
came to Sullivan county, Indiana, locating in Gill township, in March, 
1899. He had bought his land here of the Rogers heirs, of Fayette 
county, with the understanding that they would help circulate a petition 
for the construction of a levee, so the deal for the land was not closed 
until this petition had been granted. The tract comprised 615 acres and 
the day on which the petition- was^rantetL he purchased 120 acres addi- 
tional from John D. and Fl. S^rirfgar.:: ;iCQ^^s"ihe has added, from time 
to time, until he now poss&ses.'.'8S'4:' acre's, besides being interested in 
380 acres held jointly by Himself and his brotliel- Humphrey, an attorney 
of Washington Court House, Q.ljip, who is the owner of more than three 
thousand acres of land. Mr. Jon«sTs sitpeftntending this large possession 
in Sullivan county, besides aT two -hundred acre tract belonging to his 
sister, and on which land he holds a ten year lease. He is an extensive 
and thoroughgoing agriculturist, raises grain and stock, and gets the 
greatest possible return by feeding up the product of the land he works, 
thus insuring the perpetual fertility of his soil. He raises from five hun- 
dred to one thousand head of hogs annually, and horses and cattle in 
proportion. 

j\Ir. Jones, by reason of his educational training and experience, is 
fully capable of doing almost any kind of business which he might embark 
in, but prefers the independence of a farmer's life, which to him is also 
one of much profit. Politically, he supports the Democratic party, seeing 
in its platforms and principles, that which he believes the best for the 
average American citizen. 

He was united in marriage, October 18, 1882, to i\Iiss Mary M. 
Loughead, born in Montezuma, Iowa, February 29, 1856, a daughter of 
C. B. and Elizabeth (Roup) Loughead. C. B. Loughead was a native 
of Pennsylvania, born November 11, 1822, while the mother was born in 
Ohio, January 15, 1831. The father went to Ohio in 1845 a'ld there 
engaged in carpentering and the work of a millwright. He married 
Vol. 11— 14 



2o8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

there and moved, after nine years, to Iowa and followed his trades there 
for about three years, then returned to Ohio, where he died in December, 
1S89. The mother died March 4, 1892. Mrs. Jones received her educa- 
tional training in the public schools in Meigs county, Ohio. She entered 
Buchtel College in 1877, and she was graduated in the class of 1882 in 
the classical department. While pursuing her scholastic course she was 
a teacher as assistant in Latin in Buchtel College, being such for three 
years. She is a member of the L^niversalist church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones are the parents of five children as follows : 
Cyrinthia, born July 11, 1884, single and attending Buchtel College at 
Akron, Ohio; Helen Olavi, born January 30, 1887, died March 3, 1890; 
William Hermon, born November 12, 1888, now in Buchtel College at 
Akron ; Lucy, born October 8, 1890, died February 22, 1892 ; Ruth 
Elizabeth, born January 14, 1893, ^t home with her parents, student at 
New Lebanon, Ind. 



Lewis C. Baughman, one of the substantial agriculturists residing 
in Gill township, Sullivan county, is a son of Christopher and Emeline 
(Davis) Baughman. Lewis C. was born August 24, 1854. His father 
was a native of Virginia, and his mother of Pennsylvania. The father 
came to Indiana and located in Jackson county about 1840. He was a 
blacksmith, and at first settled at Reddington, but soon after removed to 
Pea Ridge, bought a farm and erected a blacksmith's shop. He carried 
on his shop, and also operated his farm, for about three years, when he 
went to Missouri, locating in Monitor county, but subsequentl_y he moved 
to Benton county, where he operated a farm in connection with the 
blacksmith's trade. He remained there until his death in 1862. He was 
united in marriage in Jackson county, his wife's people being among the 
pioneer settlers there. The wife died in Jennings county, on a farm 
about 1883. Christopher and Emeline (Davis) Baughman were the 
parents of nine children, as follows: Christopher, deceased; Mary, de- 
ceased ; John, deceased ; Enoch, residing in California ; Martha, a resident 
of Jennings county; Ormal G., in Jennings county; Lewis; William, de- 
ceased ; Silas E., a resident of Jackson county. 

Lewis C. Baughman attended the district schools of both Barthol- 
omew and Jackson counties. Since eleven years of age, he has supported 
himself. He began work at eight dollars a month, one-half of which he 
gave to his mother. He continued so to work and divide his earnings 
until he was sixteen years of age. From that date until he was twenty- 
three years old, he worked for others and kept all of his earnings himself. 
He then married and rented a farm in Jackson county, remaining there 
for four years, after which he lived on and cultivated a farm belonging to 
his father-in-law for twenty' years, which farm became the property of 
Mrs. Baughman. They sold this farm and purchased the one hundred 
and forty-three acres where they now reside. This change was brought 
about in 1905. Here the family expect to make their permanent home. 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AX COUNTY 209 

and general farming and stock-raising is carried on after an orderly and 
modern plan, hog-raising being a special feature of the stock-farming. 

Mr. Baughman was married October ig, 1881, to Mary E. Gant, 
born in I'artholomew county, Indiana, in I'Y-bruary, 1858, a daughter of 
Kiley and Martha ( Wiggs ) Gant. The Wiggs family came from North 
Carolina, her parents being early settlers in that section of the state. The 
father, who followed farming pursuits, died about 1887; the mother still 
survives, and resides on the old homestead in Bartholomew county. In 
the (iant family there were five children, Mrs. Baughman being the oldest. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Baughman are as follows : Clarence, 
d'jceased ; one who died in infancy; Alice, who died at the age of five 
vears ; another who died in infancy ; Joseph L., Charles, Dewey and 
Estella Lenore, the last four being still at home. 

Air. Baughman is an honored member of the Knights of Pythias 
order, and has passed all the ofificial chairs of his lodge, as well as repre- 
senting his lodge at the grand lodge of Indiana. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and in his political party affiliations is a 
Democrat, but has not sought for, nor held political office. 



George D. Sch.\ffer, one of the substantial farmers living in Sul- 
livan county, v\'as born near Edwardsport, Knox county, Indiana, March 
22, i860. He is the son of William and Angeline (Neal) Schaffer. The 
father was a native of Germany, born July 2"], 1829, and the mother of 
Kno.x county, born about 1837. William Schaffer came to America in 
1844, with an older brother, and first located at Washington. Davis 
county, Indiana, near which place he was employed as a farm hand a few 
vears. His next employment was in the packing house of A. Simonson, 
Edwardsport, Indiana, where he remained a few years more and then 
went into a dry goods store as a clerk and later became a partner in the 
business, thus proving his ability to accomplish something in the busy 
world. He continued in trade for twenty years, at the end of wliich time 
he embarked in the real estate business. He also owned a large flat-boat, 
which he employed in transporting pork and corn to the far-away city of 
New Orleans. He only resided in Washington a short time, but lived 
at Edwardsport up to 1869, when he purchased a good farm in Jefferson 
townshi]), Sullivan county, Indiana, where he resided for twenty years 
and then removed to Carlisle. The later portion of his life he spent 
with his children, his death occurring December 29, 1906. His first wife 
passed away about 1870, and he married again, and. the last companion 
died May i, 1882. She was born in Delaware county, and this was also 
her second marriage, her former husband being a Mr. Hadden, who died 
several years prior to her second marriage. The children by the first 
union of William Schaft'er were as follows : Five are long since deceased 
and the surviving ones are: J. W., residing in Bicknell ; George D., of 
tliis memoir; W. E., of Dayton. Texas; Nora, wife of Anson Hildebrand, 
of Sandborn, Knox county, Indiana. 



210 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

■ George D. Schaffer attended the common schools of Jefferson town- 
ship, where he was compelled, in the absence of anything better, to sit 
upon split log benches, as the school building was of the most rude and 
primitive style. He was a dutiful son and remained under the parental 
roof until he reached his majority, when he bought eighty acres of land 
in Jefferson township and began to farm for himself. He did not move 
to this place, but continued to reside at the old homestead and helped care 
for the father until the other children were old enough to take care of the 
place. At this time the father moved to Carlisle, and George D. purchased 
the old home, disposing of his first farm. He remained on the old place 
until 1891, then sold it and moved to Bloomfield, Greene county, Indiana, 
where he engaged in the butcher business, but only for a short time. He 
then moved to Carlisle and remained until the death of his wife in 1892, 
when he broke up housekeeping and followed no special vocation until he 
came to his present place in the autumn of 1893. He has made many fine 
and attractive improvements upon his place, which contains ninety-eight 
acres. At the present time (1908) Mr. Schaffer has his land rented, but 
resides on the same. 

In his church connection Mr. Schaffer affiliates with the Baptist 
church, while in political choice he favors the Democratic party. He 
has never sought, or held public office. He was united in marriage, first. 
May 24, 1882, to Mary E. Corbin, born in Sullivan county, August 20. 
i860, a daughter of John and Angeline (Douthit) Corbin. Her people 
were substantial farmers and the parents were both natives of Sullivan 
county, Indiana, and both are now deceased. Mary E. (Corbin) Schaft'er 
died September 13, 1892. The issue by this union was three children: 
[ra D., now of Knox county, is the assistant cashier of a bank at Sanborn ; 
Charles W., who died at the age of twenty-one years ; and another child 
who died in infancy. For his second wife i\Ir. Schaffer married, February 
28, 1894, Miss Kate C. Brentlinger, born at Carlisle, November 20, 1866, 
daughter of A. J. and Mary L. (Collins) Brentlinger, who were residents 
of Carlisle and farmers by occupation. The father died and the mother 
still lives at Carlisle, on the old farm. To this union there were born 
the following children: Clyde E. Schaft'er, Ward E., Rush L., Wayne A., 
Fern M., all at home. The mother of this familv died April 30, 1902, 
and June 15, 1904, Mr. Schaft'er married for his third wife, Margaret E. 
Wampler, born near Bicknell. September 8, i860, a daughter of Daniel 
and Susan (Slinkard) Wampler, residents of Knox county. Her father 
was a farmer, but both he and his wife are now dead. There is no issue 
bv the last marriage of Mr. Schaffer. 



Daniel J. Vaughn is a true t^-pe of a self-made and thorough- 
going, farmer, whose industry and frugality have put him in possession 
of a most excellent farm home, which estate contains one hundred and 
sixty-five acres of choice land in Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana. 
He is a native of Sullivan county, born October 4, 1872, son of James W. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 211 

and Sarah E. (Hay den) \'aughn. The father and mother were also 
natives of Indiana, the mother being born in Orange county, and both 
still live on a farm in Gill township, Sullivan county. There were nine 
children in the family of James W. and Sarah E. X'aughn, as follows : 
Julia, wife of J. C. Alsop, of Cass township, Sullivan county ; Daniel J., 
of this sketch; Benjamin F., of Cass township: Joseph M.. of the same 
township; Mary and Sarah (twins), who died in infancy; Ruth AL, wife 
of Morris Unger, residing in Terre Haute ; Hayden, at home ; Paul, with 
his father. The father was a soldier in the Union cause at the time of 
the Civil war, serving in a Missouri regiment throughout the entire 
conflict. 

Daniel J. \'aughn remained at his parents' home until he attained 
his majorit)', when his father gave him a horse, after which he worked 
the land in ]iartnership with his father until 1903. Daniel J. then pur- 
chased one hundred and fifteen acres of land, upon which he now resides, 
and where he carries on a successful farming business on his own account. 
After he bought this farm, he "bached" one year, then rented the place a 
year, after which he married and moved to the farm. Subsequently he 
added fifty acres more to his place. Mr. Vaughan has accumulated this 
handsome property alone, and fully appreciates its cost as well as its value. 

In his political views Mr. Vaughn is a firm and uncompromising 
supporter of the fundamental principles of the Republican party. He 
has been too busy a man to seek office at the hands of the public, but was 
a deputy assessor until he was forced to abandon its duties on account 
of sickness. He was a deputy under Charles Farrell, assessor. Mr. 
Vaughn and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
are exemplary Christians. In his fraternal relations he is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and at one time belonged to the Odd 
Fellows' order, but is not connected at this time. 

Mr. Vaughn was united in marriage ]\larch ig, 1005, to I\Iiss Edith 
Jackson, born at Franklin, Johnson county, Indiana, October 30, 1882, a 
daughter of George W. and Yula ( Satterwhite) Jackson. The mother 
was born October 24. 1857, and the father April 4, 1845. The parents 
were both natives of Owen county, Kentucky, where they were married, 
coming to Indiana in 1878, first locating at Franklin. The father worked 
on the railroad for some years, then began farming, which vocation he 
still follows. In the Jackson family there were nine children, as follows : 
William C, of Gill township ; Emma A., wife of Frank Fisher, residing 
near Danville, Indiana ; Homer FL, with his father in Gill township ; 
Isaac, who died in infancy; Edith (Mrs. Vaughn); George F., with 
parents; Verna D., wife of Benjamin Hale, of Gill township; Walter and 
Robert Lee, at home. 



Ch.\rles L. Engle. who ranks among the best of the many excellent 
farmers tilling the fertile lands of Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
is a native of Jackson township, this county, born November 16, 1859, a 
son of Joseph B. and Letitia (Rusher) EngJe, both natives of Hamilton 



212 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

township, Sullivan county, Indiana. Joseph B. Engle was born May 15, 
1822, and was a farmer, as was his father, who was a native of Kentucky 
and served as a soldier in the war of 1812-14. He made his home in 
Hamilton township, Sullivan county, with his son, and there died. His 
wife had died previously. Joseph B. Engle served in the Mexican war 
one year, having enlisted in May, 1846. After his return from that war 
he engaged in farming and also became interested in lumbering and saw- 
milling. Subsequently he moved to Jackson township, remained there a 
few years, and then came back to his farm, where his son now resides. 
The father died there May 24, 1904, and his wife, who was born April 8, 
1832, still survives and lives with her son, Charles L. 

Charles L. Engle received the most of his schooling at the district 
schools of Hamilton township. In his father's family there were five chil- 
dren, of whom he is the youngest. He was a dutiful son assisting about the 
farm work, or whatever seemed best for the general interest of the famih', 
until twenty-four years of age. Then he bought his brother's interest in 
the homestead, consisting of eighty acres. Here he continued to farm, 
later adding forty acres more to his place and making substantial improve- 
ments on the premises, until now he possesses one of the finest farm homes 
within the county, including an almost palatial residence. He does a 
general farming business as well as raises much stock. In church con- 
nection he is of the Christian faith, as were his parents. In his political 
views he is a faithful supporter of the Republican party, but has never 
aspired to public office. He has long been a member of the Odd Fellows' 
order, having passed through all of the chairs of the society at Carlisle. 

Mr. Engle was united in marriage May 7, 1883, to Louise B. VVillard, 
a sketch of whose family will be found under the head of Rufus O. 
Willard, her father. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Willard: 
Nellie, wife of Frank Mickle, of Grape Creek, Illinois, where he is a tele- 
graph operator ; Abbie, in the high school of Carlisle, and residing with 
her parents ; Marie, at home, in high school also ; Joseph, at home ; Ger- 
trude, at home ; Rufus, at home ; Alice, at home ; William, the second in 
the familv, is deceased. 



George W. Unger, one of the well-to-do and highly progressive 
farmers of Sullivan county, residing on the fifth rural free deliverv route 
out from Carlisle, is a native of Haddon township, Sullivan county, born 
November 23, 1876, a son of John and Catherine (Lake) LTnger. The 
Unger family are French, the father having come from that country about 
1866. He worked for various persons at various employments for a 
number of years, then purchased a farm of one hundred acres in Haddon 
township, upon which he still resides. Possessed of all the manlv and 
intelligent qualities of the French people, he has woven about him a large 
circle of admirers and friends. 

Having only the advantages of the district schools of Gill and Had- 
don townships, George W. Unger improved this schooling, and with 



HISTORY OF SULIJXAX COUNTY 213 

careful rL-adint; as the years have gone Ijy he has become a weU-infornied 
man. When twenty-one years of age he rented his father's farm for aljout 
five years, then ini'rchase'd fort\- acres in Haddon township, but did not 
occupy it, selling it a year later. He next bought the two hundred acre 
farm on which he now lives, and where he carries on an up-to-date place, 
dealing quite largely in stock, including a registered Clydesdale stallion 
and a fine jack. Politically he favors the principles laid down by the plat- 
form of the Republican party. 

November 3, 1902, Mr. Unger was united in marriage to Miss Hattie 
Hale, born in Cass township, Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1880, a daughter 
of George W. and Sarah (Clayton) Hale. Her mother is deceased and 
the father resides in Haddon township, where he has lived many years. 
Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Unger; the first died in infancy, 
and Richard Paul and Frank Hale are at home. 



Aloxzo p. Pifer, one of the busy and enterprising farmers, who 
reaps bountifully where he sows, within the borders of that most excellent 
and fertile township known as Gill, in Sullivan county, is a native of 
Crawford county, Illinois, born December 11, 1861, a son of Oliver P. and 
Mary C. (Davis) Pifer. The mother was born in Licking county, Ohio, 
January 30, 1842, and the -father, December 24, 1840, at Merom, Gill 
township, Sullivan county, Indiana. The father was a lifelong farmer 
who in i860 owned a farm in Illinois. He was drafted into the U. S. 
service at the time of the Civil war, but hired a substitute to go in his 
place. He continued to farm in that state ten years, then removed to 
Haddon township, Sullivan county, Indiana, and purchased the farm upon 
which he still resides. He has now tilled the fields of this place for more 
than two score years. He was bereft of his good wife January 31, 1866. 

Alonzo P. Pifer attended the district schools at what is known as 
the Texas school, in Haddon township, and also at Carlisle. He was 
industrious and of great service to his father on the farm and continued 
to work with a right good will until one year past his majority, when he 
worked out for others for two years. He then married and became a 
farm renter in Haddon township, continuing about four years, when he 
removed to his present place, where he has made many substantial im- 
provements. He located here in 1892, His farm consists of fifty-five 
acres, which he works himself, besides attending to lands in the vicinity 
which he has leased. He pays much attention to stock, together witli 
grain-growing. Like every intelligent American citizen, Mr. Pifer has his 
own preferences in relation to parties and governmental affairs. He 
favors the jirinciiiles of the great Democratic party, but has never sought 
or held public oiiice, leaving that duty to those who see in it a pleasure 
and sometimes profit. He is of the Christian church faith and attends the 
church of that denomination. 

He was married December 24, 1885. to Miss Stella M. Shepherd, 
daughter of William P.. and Lizzie (Summers) Shepherd, both natives of 



214 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Sullivan county. The father followed farming until his death in April, 
1885. After his demise, the widow continued to conduct the farm, and 
later was married to William Alumbaugh, who died two years after their 
union. His widow still remains on the old farm, a part of which is 
situated in Haddon township. Mr. and Mrs. Pifer are the parents of 
four children: Charles M.. born October 21, 1886, married April 13, 1906, 
to Miss Floy Furnace, of Terre Haute, a native of Vigo county, Indiana ; 
Frank E., born May 12. 1888, single, with his parents ; Maudie ^lay, 
born July 17, 1892, unmarried, at home ; William O., born in 1896 and 
died October 2, 1900. 



Henry R. Mil.\m. — The oldest member of the Odd Fellows' lodge 
at Carlisle, and a farmer who has the respect and confidence of all within 
the radius of his wide acquaintance, is Henry R. Milam, of Gill township, a 
native of Stillivan county, Indiana, where he was born February 27, 1826; 
hence has passed his four-score-year mark. Many are the changes wrought 
within the section of Indiana in which he resides since the long ago day 
of his birth. He is the son of Ambrose and Sarah (Mason) Milam. The 
father was a native of Kentucky who came to Indiana at a very early day, 
and always followed farming pursuits for his livelihood, as did his parents. 
Sarah Mason, Mr. Milam's mother, was native to Sullivan county, Indiana. 

Henry R. Milam attended the district schools of Sullivan county, 
which at that early date were not models for educational institutions, but 
which gave the youth a fair knowledge of the elements of an education, 
to which he has added with the passing of the years. When he was six- 
teen years old he commenced to work for himself, being variously em- 
ployed for others until the time of his marriage. His first wife v\'as the 
owner of the farm upon which he still resides. To this tract of land he 
added from time to time until at one time he owned several hundred acres 
in the famous Wabash valley. He has sold ofif from this landed estate until 
his present holdings consist of one hundred and thirty acres. He carried 
on general farming, and earlier in his life dealt in cattle, hogs and other 
live stock quite extensively. Unfortunately, in the month of August, 
1906, Mr. Alilam suffered a severe sunstroke, while attending to his official 
duties as road supervisor. From this he has never fully recovered. He 
united with the Alethodist Episcopal church at the age of seventeen years, 
but subsequently withdrew, and is not now a member of any church body. 
Politically he is a supporter of the Democratic party, but of the independ- 
ent type, not feeling himself in duty bound to vote for party, but for men. 
Mr. Milam has been married three times. By the first marriage, to 
Armina Webb, there were two sons, but both are deceased. By his second 
union two sons were born — Josephus C, who is still a resident of Gill 
township ; and another, who is deceased. February 5, 1874, Mr. jMilam 
married his third wife. Miss Josephine Webb, born in Gill township, this 
county, August 2, 1 851, a daughter of Mathias A. and Caroline (Fair- 
child) Webb. The mother was born in Sullivan county, Indiana. Feb- 
ruary 10, 1825, her parents being natives of New York state. Mathias A. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 215 

Webb, was born in 1814 and came tn Sullivan county with his parents 
when a mere boy. The family settled in Gill township on a farm where 
they lived until his death, September i, 1892. The mother died Sep- 
tember 5, 1904. 

The children born to Henry R. and Josephine (Webb) Milam are as 
follows: Charles H., who is residing near his parents, on a part of the 
Milam homestead, was born November 7, 1874 ; Robert Massie, born 
October 20, 1876, died 'Slay 9, 1893; Carrie Elizabeth, born January 17, 
1874, now residing in Gill township, the widow of Samuel Brown ; \Vebb, 
born January 11, 1881, residing with his parents; an infant, born July 8, 
1885 ; Bonnie, born August 27, 1888, unmarried, now a student in Carlisle 
high school ; Hattie J., born April 4, 1891, died March 24, 1897. 



WILLIA^[ C. Hart, whose comfortable farm home is within Gill 
township, is a native of Clark county, Illinois, born March 20, 1855, son 
of John and Susan (Smith) Hart. Of his parentage it may be said that 
the father was born in Germany and the mother in Pennsylvania. The 
father came to America when a young man. and made his home in Free- 
port, Kentucky. From there he moved to Clark county, Illinois, and 
bought a piece of land, having previously learned the blacksmith's trade. 
He remained there until his death in 1852, at the age of fifty-one years, 
and which was before William C. was born. The widowed mother for 
about twelve years continued to reside on the farm left her by the hus- 
band, and then moved to Terre Haute, Indiana, residing with a daughter, 
and later coming to live with her son, William C, of this biographical 
notice. At his home she died April 21, 1905, aged ninety-five years and 
some few days. !Mr. and Mrs. John Hart were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, only two of whom are now living — Joseph, of Gill township, and 
William C., who was the youngest of the children. 

On account of the death of his father and the size of the familv which 
had to be provided for, William C. Hart's education, which he obtained at 
the district schools of Clark county, Illinois, was quite limited. He re- 
mained with his mother until he was fourteen years of age, after which he 
lived elsewhere until he was twenty-one years old. He then worked 
for various persons for four years, at the end of which period he married. 
He then became a land-renter in Illinois, and later in Indiana, having 
come to the last named state in 1884. For nine years he rented land, then 
purchased thirty-nine acres, upon which he still resides, carrying on 
general farming operations and paying some attention to the raising of 
stock. Upon this place he has made all of the many substantial improve- 
ments, and now enjoys the comforts of a well-equipped farm home. 

Mr. Hart was married January i, 1880, to RIargaret Koppler, born in 
Clark county, Illinois, daughter of John A. and Johannah ( Listenberger) 
Koppler. John A. Koppler was a native of Baden Baden, Germany, 
born in 1833, and his wife of Ohio, where she was born in 1834. In 
1848, Mr. Koppler came to America and settled on a farm in Ohio. He 



2i6 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

there married and resided until 1859, when he moved to Clark count}', 
Illinois, where he bought a farm upon which he resided until his death in 
1903. The mother still survives and occupies the old homestead, around 
which cling so many fond memories. In the Koppler family there were 
eight children, two of whom are deceased, and the living are : Christo- 
pher, of Clark county, Illinois ; Hannah, wife of Oliver Morgan, also of 
Clark county ; Margaret. Mrs. Hart ; Julia, wife of Frank Minekee, resid- 
ing in Missouri ; Katherine, wife of Curt Guard, of Terre Haute, Indiana ; 
Christina, wife of Lyman Thompson, a teacher and farmer of Clark 
county, Illinois. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hart are as follows : Alice May, 
born September 27, 1881, died January 17, 1882; John E., born Octo- 
ber 21, 1882, married Martha Prose, and they reside with her father; 
William Henry, born March 13, 1884, a farmer of Gill township, married 
Ada Dudley ; Katherine, born March 24, 1886, unmarried, at home ; 
Edward Franklin, born August 12, 1888, unmarried and at home. 

As a means of protection to his family, William C. Hart carries a 
membership with the Modern W'oodmen of x-\merica. Camp No. 5488, at 
New Lebanon. W'hile he is not connected with any church organization, 
he is in sympathy with the teachings of the Friends' Society. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 



Alex.\nder D. Prose, who is well and favorably known as a farmer 
and thresher in Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, is the son of 
Jacob A. and Martha F. (Tanner) Prose, whose family history will be 
found in the sketch of Jacob A. Prose, elsewhere in this work. Alexan- 
der D. was born October 9, 1869, in Gallia county, Ohio, the same county 
in which his parents were born, the father May 27, 1839, ^"d the mother 
November 14, 1846. Alexander D. remained at home until he was 
twenty-two years of age, and being naturally gifted with mechanical 
ingenuity, he commenced to operate a threshing machine at that age. 
and also a sawmill. When about twenty-seven years of age he bought 
twenty acres of land in Gill township, which he farmed, still running his 
thresher. Later he purchased forty acres more, but when there was any- 
thing in the threshing line he still held himself in readiness to do such 
work. At length he sold the land just mentioned, and purchased the 
fourteen acre tract on which he now resides. He is now the owner and 
operator of a first-class modern threshing outfit, as well as a good saw- 
mill and feed-mill. 

Mr. Prose was educated at the district schools of Scioto county, 
Ohio. He is a supporter of the Democratic party, and in church faith is 
of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. He was married April 14, 
1897, to I\Iiss Callie S. Schlichter, who was educated at the schools of 
Portsmouth, Ohio, and Sullivan county, Indiana. The history of her 
parents' families will be found under the head of C. C. Schlichter, else- 
where in this work. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Prose are as 
follows; Mabel L., born February 22, 1898; Lillian I., born September 



IIISTURY OF SUIJ.U'AK COUNTY 217 

II, 1899; Opal A., born August i, 1901. All are at home and attending 
the New Lebanon schools. As a means of protection in way of life bene- 
ficiary, Mr. Prose holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, 
of wliich society he is the present manager. 

The brothers and sisters of Mr. Prose are as follows: Laura A., who 
became the wife of Charles Dettwiller, now residing in Ohio ; Mary E., 
the wife of Thomas J. Holt, residing in CAW township, now a widow; 
William T., of Gill township; Charles N., of Ohio; Daniel E., of New 
Lebanon ; ( ). .\., deceased; John A., of Sullivan; Mattie J., wife of J. E. 
Hart, living on the old homestead. 



Cyrus B.vnther. — One of the veterans of the Civil war and a pros- 
perous farmer of Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana. Cyrus Banther 
is a native of Snyder county, Pennsylvania, born December 5, 1841, a 
.son of George and Ann (Hufilit) Banther. Both parents are natives of 
Pennsylvania, and the father lived there until 1846, when he moved to a 
farm near Mt. Carmel, Illinois, where he remained two years, and then 
located at Hudsonville, Illinois. After three years at that place he moved 
to Palestine, remaining here two years, and in 1856 bought a farm near 
Hudsonville, ujion which he lived one year. His wife died at that place, 
and in 1857, having again married, he moved to Darwin, where he 
died in 1863. The children born to George and Ann (Huffit) Banther 
were twelve in number, of whom. Cyrus was the fourth child. 

Cvrus Banther, on account of having to begin work when very young, 
never had educational advantages, three days covering all the schooling 
he received. When seventeen years of age, he left home, single-handed 
and alone, to try the world and all it had in store for him. The first 
three years he was employed as a farm hand. The great Civil war 
came on in April, 1861, and August 16 of that year he enlisted under 
Captain Markley, of" Company D, Thirtieth Illinois Regiment. Mr. Ban- 
ther served as a faithful soldier in his country's cause for three years, 
being mustered out August 16, 1864. He was in seven prominent battles, 
as follows : Fort Donelson, Briton's Lane, Champion Hills, Black River, 
siege of Vicksburg (where he was forty-two days), siege of Corinth, and 
Peach Tree Creek. He was never wounded or taken prisoner. After the 
war he came to Sullivan, Indiana, where he was engaged in business 
about six months. He then turned his attention toward agriculture and 
rented land up to 1889, when he bought a farm of one hundred and forty 
acres, making all the improvements himself, which task was no easy 
undertaking." His building site is one of the most charming within the 
county. Here he carries on a successful farm, having been assisted by 
none other than the good counsel of his faithful wife. 

Mr. Banther was married July 6, 1865, to Miss Nancy Daniel, born 
near New .Mbanv, Indiana, April 4, 1842, daughter of James and Syrena 
(Lucas) Daniel. The father was a native of \'irginia and the mother 
of Ohio. He was Imrn February 7, 1807, and the mcither January 24, 



2i8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

1813. When about seven vears old ^Ir. Daniel came with his parents 
to a point near New Albany, where the family settled. Later they re- 
moved to Greenville, where Mr. Daniel's parents died. In 1847 he sold 
his land and entered land in Sullivan county, Indiana, and resided there 
fifteen vears. After residing in the town of Sullivan for a time, he 
moved to Merom, Indiana, but spent part of his time in Kansas. He died 
in 1883 and his wife in Merom in 1862. In the Daniel family there were 
eleven children, the seventh being Mrs. Banther. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Banther are as follows : James H., 
born April 13, 1866, married Minnie McClure, and they reside on a farm 
in Gill township : William C., born March 29, 1868, married Eva Simms, 
and thev live in Haddon township ; Minnie A., born August 19, 1869, wife 
of Benjamin :\Iunroe, of Fairbanks township, where he farms. 

In fraternities, Mr. Banther is connected with the Grand Army of the 
Republic and the Modern Woodmen of America. In his church faith 
he is of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. Politically, he votes the 
Republican ticket, but has never cared to be an office-holder. 



Jacob A. Prose, general farmer and stock raiser, of Gill township, 
Sullivan countv, Indiana, is the eldest of nine children born to Daniel 
and Marv (Waddell) Prose. This son was born May 27, 1839, in Gallia 
county, Ohio. The father and mother were natives of the same county. 
The former was born in 1818, followed farming in Ohio, and in 1849 
started with a gold prospecting party headed for the far-away California 
gold fields, which had just awakened the interest of the whole of the 
American people. The precious metal had been discovered that year in 
paying, quantities, and many possessing hardy constitutions and a love for 
the excitement, with the romance of such an expedition, set forth for 
the setting sun and land of gold. The father of Jacob Alexander Prose 
was not fortunate enough to finish the trip, but, like many another, died 
en route and was buried at Independence, Missouri. The mother had 
remained in Ohio and later married David Wickline ; she died when about 
eighty-three vears old, in 1900. By her marriage with Daniel Prose she 
had three children: Jacob Alexander; Emeline, wife of Isaac Wickline, of 
Pike countv, Ohio ; and Charles, deceased. 

Remaining with his parents until he was twenty years of age, and 
his educational opportunities being limited to a few terms in the district 
schools, Jacob Alexander Prose tlien rented a farm of his father, con- 
tinuing on this for eight years, after which he went into the sawmill 
business, in which industry he was engaged for thirty-five years. He 
then bought land in Ohio and again resumed farming pursuits in connec- 
tion with the sawmill business. He followed this for eighteen years, at 
the end of which time he traded his property for a hundred and forty 
acre farm upon which he now resides. Here he carries on a general 
farming and stock-raising business. 

May 2, 1864, in the thickest of the rebellion, he enlisted m the One 



HISTORY OF SULLI\"AN COUNTY 219 

Iluiulred and Forty-first Ohio \'olunteer Regiment of National Canards. 
being in the infantry service as a private soldier. He was discharged 
September i, 1864. Mr. Prose is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, which guar- 
antees his family a protection in case of his death. 

He was united in marriage July 25, 1861, to Martha Tanner, who 
was born November 14, 1845, '" t'^e same county in Ohio in which he 
was. She was a daughter of William and Mary Jane (Tibbs) Tanner, 
who were natives of eastern Virginia, and farmers, and went to Ohio at 
at early day, spending the remainder of their lives in that state. In the 
Tanner family there were thirteen children, of whom eight reached the 
age of maturity and five are still living: Nathan, who resides in Gallia 
county, ( )hio ; Alexander, in the same county ; James, living in Oregon ; 
Penjamin, of Gallia county, Ohio; and Martha, wife of Mr. Prose. To 
Air. and Mrs. Prose the following children were born: Laura Annis, 
wife of Charles Dettwiller, now residing in Scioto county, Ohio ; Mary 
Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Holt, now a widow residing on her father's 
farm: William T.. a Gill township farmer; Charles, operating a sawmill 
in Ohio ; Alexander, whose sketch is on another page of this work ; 
Daniel E., a New Lebanon farmer ; Ochre, deceased ; John A., of Sulli- 
van light plant ; Martha J., wife of John Flart, residing with her parents. 



George Love, who is the possessor of a most excellent one hundred 
acre farm within Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, is a native of 
this county, born in Haddon township, April 5, 1847, son of Joseph and 
Hannah (Davis) Love. Joseph Love was a native of North Carolina, 
and his wife of West Virginia. When a single man, in 1820, Joseph 
Love came to Indiana and located in Haddon township, on a farm upon 
which he remained until his death in 1866, when aged about sixty-two 
years. The mother of George Love, of this sketch, accompanied her 
parents to Kno.x county at about the same time. Her mother died some 
years later, and the father made his home with Joseph Love until death. 
Mrs. Love died in the month of January, 1883. There were seven chil- 
dren born to Joseph Love and wife, and of this number but two are now 
living: Mary, unmarried, residing in California, and the youngest of the 
famih- ; George, the other surviving one, was the fourth in order of birth. 

George Love had the advantages of the district schools in Haddon 
township, and attended two terms at Carlisle. His father died when 
George was nineteen years of age, and the son then took charge of the 
farm, in connection with which he practiced the profession of a veteri- 
narv surgeon for about twenty years. After abandoning the practice of 
this profession, he continued to farm the place he then owned, consisting 
of one hundred and sixteen acres, which he sold in January, 1907. Pur- 
chasing then the farm on which he now resides, which contains one hun- 
dred acres, he carries on a general farming business in which he is highly 
successful, getting ample returns from the soil he cultivates so thor- 



220 ^ HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

oughly. In his political views Mr. Love is a believer in and supporter of 
the cardinal principles of the Republican party, though never seeks prefer- 
ment in the matter of local offices. In religious faith he is of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church creed and profession. 

November i8, 1883, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah F. 
Ballow, who was born August 11, 1868, a daughter of William D. and 
Susan F. (Myers) Ballow. Her father was born in Davis county, Indi- 
ana, and by trade was a saddler, coming to Sullivan county before the 
Civil war and engaging in business at Carlisle, where he continued until 
his death. The mother died in 1897. Two children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Love, as follows : Edna H., wife of Claud C. Collins, residing 
on the farm with the father (they have two children, Mary Pauline and 
George Winston) ; Hazel May, unmarried, resides with her parents. 



Solomon G. Shepherd, whose farm home is situated on the rural 
mail route running, from Carlisle, known as "Xo. i," in Gill township, 
Sullivan county, is a good representative of the thrifty agriculturists of 
this section of Indiana, where prosperity abounds by reason of fertile soil 
and a good class of farmers who cultivate the fields from year to year. 
Mr. Shepherd was born near Carlisle, December 8, i860, a son of William 
B. and Elizabeth (Summers) Shepherd. His parents are both natives 
of Sullivan county, and the father always followed farming for his liveli- 
hood. Solomon G. remained at home with his father until twenty-two 
years of age, then leased a farm on Shaker Prairie for one year. He 
rented land about four years in all, and inherited forty-seven acres of 
land from his father's estate, upon which he now lives. To this he has 
added by purchase eighteen acres more. When first he took possession 
of the place it had no improvements to mention, save an old log-house, 
but he soon set about making it a first-class farm. Here he carries on a 
general farming business together with stock-growing. Mr. Shepherd 
attended the public schools of Haddon township, thereby gaining a good 
common school education. In politics he is a supporter of Democratic 
principles. 

Concerning his brothers and sisters, it should be said in this narra- 
tive that there were seven in the family : Thomas, residing on the old 
home farm ; Solomon G., of this memoir ; William, of Carlisle, engaged 
in the livery business; Estella May, wife of Alonzo Pifer (see his biog- 
raphy in this work) ; Effie, wife of Marion F. Bland, a farmer of Gill 
township; John, who died young; Carrie, wife of William Willis, on a 
farm near Sullivan. 

Mr. Shepherd was married October 12, 1882, to Margaret J. Alum- 
baugh, daughter of William and Rebecca (Pool) Alumbaugh. The 
father was a native of this county, and his parents were also natives of 
the state of Indiana. The mother of Mrs. Shepherd came from Kentucky 
with her parents when she was but seven years of age. They lived in 
Owen county for several years, after which they came to Sullivan county. 



HISTORY Ul' SULLIX'AN COUNTY 221 

The parents are now both deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd were 
born the following children: Bertha May, born January 7, 1884, wife of 
George Weathers, of Haddon township : they have two children — Harry, 
born May 7. 1908, and Fred, born July 4, 1907; William B., born May 21, 
1885, unmarried and at home; Walter C, born October 17, 1887, at home, 
attending high school at Carlisle; Albert Roy, born August 21, 1890, 
attending high school. Mr. Shepherd has wisely thrown a safeguard 
around his family by becoming a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America, thus providing a first-class life beneficiary protection. 

In the Alumbaugh family, to which Mrs. Shepherd belongs, there 
were nine children : Martha, wife of H. A. Benefield, of Carlisle ; 
George W., of Elwood, Indiana, working in a tin factory, John, of Car- 
lisle; Epinitus, of the farming section, near Carlisle; Samuel, retired, at 
Carlisle; Margaret J. (Mrs. Shepherd) ; Mary, wife of Joseph Milam, of 
Sullivan county; William, deceased; Minnie, wife of John Meng, farmer, 
of Gill township. 



Dr. Orren Stoddard, an honored physician of Merom. Sullivan 
county, has a record of two decades of active and successful practice, 
having retired at a comparatively recent date as one of the leading citizens 
of the place, whether judged by his material advancements or his high 
character. He owns one of the handsomest residences in Merom ; has 
valuable and productive farming property, as well as property interests 
at Indianapolis ; and, as a splendid climax, has used his abundant means 
and strong personality in the promulgation of prohibition principles and 
the support of other moral movements which have appealed to his good 
judgment and fine conscience. 

Dr. Stoddard is a native of Montgomery county, Indiana, born near 
Linden, on the 12th of August, 1843, son of Mosley and Eva A. ( Kelli- 
son) Stoddard. His father was born near Connersville, Indiana, on the 
east fork of White river, November 27, 1821, and his mother near Craw- 
fordsville, on the 26th of August, 1823. The paternal grandfather was a 
native of Coniiecticut who married Mary Catherine Shonts, a Pennsyl- 
vania woman and a playmate of Fannie Siocum, the girl who was taken 
prisoner by the Miami Indians and held many years in captivity. The 
grandfather came to Indiana about 1818 and for some years resided on 
Wea prairie, Tippecanoe county, later removing to Montgomery county, 
where he resided on a farm until the time of his death. At his decease 
he was the proprietor of more than a section of land, and one of the 
most substantial men, both in worldly goods and solid character, in that 
county. His wife survived him, dying at the same place in her eighty- 
first year. The father, who was also a farmer, died July 26, 1852, at the 
age of thirtv-one vears, leaving his young widow as the support of four 
cliildren. The farm, which consisted of two hundred acres, was only 
partiallv cultivated, but the family continued to reside on it, and, as the 
children increased in years and capability, improvements were made and 
the property eventually became valuable. The faithful wife and mother 



222 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

died on the homestead in which had centered so large a part of her Hfe 
work and affections, on the 8th of Februar}', 1884. 

Orren Stoddard attended the first school erected in his home town 
of Linden, and lived to see four educational institutions erected near the 
same site — first, a log school house ; secondl)', a one-story frame building ; 
thirdl}-, a two-story frame structure ; and fourthly, a substantial modern 
brick edifice. After exhausting the educational facilities provided by the 
Linden schools, he attended college for a time at j\Ierom, and in August, 
1862, enlisted in the Seventy-second Regiment Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry for service in the Civil war. After serving for some time in 
the ranks of Company K of that regiment, which was attached to the 
Wilder brigade, he was discharged because of disability and returned to 
his old home. Having recuperated, in May, 1864, he re-enlisted in the 
One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Indiana Regiment, Companv D, in what 
was known as the hundred-day service. At the expiration of that time 
he was honorably discharged, having been promoted from the ranks to the 
position of first corporal, and among his most valued relics is the certifi- 
cate of his hundred days' service signed by Abraham Lincoln. 

In September, 1864, Dr. Stoddard returned from the front to teach 
school at his home in Linden, his first charge being the Horner school, 
three miles east of town. He later taught in Linden itself, and still later 
attended the Union Christian College at Merom. In the following year he 
went to Iowa and for a number of mortths engaged in the cattle business, 
but returned to Linden . to. ■ commeqce his medical studies under Dr. 
McMurry. 

After pursuing his studies for a year. under Dr. McMurry, Dr. Stod- 
dard was matriculated at Rush IMedical College, Chicago, spending the 
years 1868 and 1869 in that institution. In the latter year he associated 
himself in the grocery and drug business with his brother, John D., and 
also became interested in various other mercantile ventures. The period 
from 1882 to 1884 was devoted to farming, but in 1886, having graduated 
from the Indiana Medical College, he removed to Merom, after which for 
twenty years he gave his entire attention and abilities to the practice of 
medicine. The doctor has been an earnest member of the Christian 
church since he was sixteen years of age. A stanch Republican until 
1884, since that time, inspired by the teachings of his honored mother, he 
has been an uncompromising and influential prohibitionist. He has never 
sought office, having been quite content to do his utmost in forwarding 
the movement in which he so thoroughly believes, irrespective of personal 
considerations or prominence. 

Dr. Stoddard was married May 18, 1868, to Miss Arminta Mont- 
gomery, born at Linden, Montgomery county, Indiana, on the 6th of 
March, 1850, daughter of Harvey H. and ]\Ialinda (Fullen) IMontgomerv. 
Her father was a native of the same county, born on the 7th of April, 
1822, and her mother's birthplace was near Connersville, Indiana, on the 
south fork of the White river, February 20, 1820. It is supposed that 
the maternal grandfather was a native of Pennsylvania and the first set- 
tler of Indianapolis, Pogue's run, of that city, being named in his honor. 



THE Ntw yukk 
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TILOEN FOUNDATIONS. 




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QTlM J^^uXti.^ (S^ 



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HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 223 

He came to Indiana at a very early day, served under Harrison at the 
battle of Tippecanoe, and shortly afterward went to Montgomery county, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. The grandmother liad died 
many years prior to his decease. Harvey II. Montgomery, the father, 
was a farmer when he joined the American army bound for Mexico; he 
fought at Monterey, Buena \ ista and other critical battles, and at the 
conclusion of the war returned to the fields and his familiar life. The 
witlow continued on the farm for a short time ; then removed to Linden, 
and, while on a visit to Crawfordsville, Indiana, died suddenly on the 
15th of August, 1905. 

Four children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Stoddard : Bard Wells, 
Clay Halden, James McCann and Orren Deans Stoddard. Bard W. 
Stoddard was born December 10, 1869, and after teaching in various col- 
leges of the country he entered the manufacturing field and is now assist- 
ant superintendent of \'an Camp's canning establishment at Indianapolis. 
He married Miss lieatrice Musetta Osier, an artist of especial talent in 
the decoration of china and a native of Carson, Iowa. Clay Halden Stod- 
dard, unmarried, was born October 22, 1873, and is a composer and 
teacher of instrumental music at Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. James M. 
Stoddard, born May 6, 1878, is a practicing physician and surgeon of 
Anderson, Indiana, and married Miss Ruby Eunice Palmer, a native of 
that place. Orren D., born November i, 1888, is at present a student in 
the normal course of the Union Christian College, at Merom, all of the 
sons, with the exception.- of G.":H.,- be'ing graduates of the institution 
named, the one mentioned ijaving finished the regular course at the 
Palmer Christian College, of Iowa. James M., the physician, also took a 
three years' course at the Wabash College, and was graduated from the 
Indiana Medical College, of Indianapolis, and for a year thereafter served 
as an interne at the Deaconess" Hospital, of that city. 



WiLLi.\M H. Browx, who was one of the substantial agriculturists 
of Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, was a native of this state, born 
in Clark county, April 7, 1843. He was the son of Nathan and Sarah S. 
(Brenton) Brown. Sarah S. Brenton, born in Clark county, July 24, 
1809, was the granddaughter of the sister of Richard Stockton, one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence, and her father served in the 
Revolutionary war, as well as eight of his brothers. Two of these broth- 
ers were killed at the battle of Boonesborough, Kentucky — J^mej; and 
Robert. Their names were praised in a poem in the life of Washington, 
by Weems. The great-grandfather on the maternal side was killed at 
the battle of Brandywine, his name being William Wiley. Grandfather 
Brenton was a Revolutionary soldier when but twelve years old, and was 
stationed at Louisville, Kentucky, which was then on the frontier. He 
was a native of Jamestown, Mrginia. 

The father of W'illiam H., of this memoir, Nathan Brown, was born 
in Lebanon, Ohio, July 27, 1812, and died in December, 1875, and the 
mother passed away on JNIay 19 of the same year. In his early career. 

Vol. 11—13 



224 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Nathan Brown was a blacksmith, working at his trade in Clark county, 
Indiana, and later he became a farmer. He followed this from 1852 to 
1857, when he moved to Gill township, Sullivan county, where he farmed 
until his death. The children of Nathan and Sarah S. (Brenton) Brown 
were as follows : Francis M., residing at Graysville ; Harriet A., of Gill 
township ; William H., of this sketch ; James M., of Carlisle, a retired 
farmer ; John R., who died in 1877 ; Sarah E., died in December, 1858. 

William H. Brown was a student in the schools of Jefferson and 
Shelby and also later attended the schools of Gill township, Sullivan 
county. He remained on the farm with his parents until their death, then 
continued there with his sister, Harriet A., and brother, John R., until 
the latter's death in 1877. Then William H. and his sister remained alone 
on the old homestead, and when he married she remained with him on 
the old place where their parents had resided the greater portion of their 
lives. His farm consisted of one hundred and forty acres, and here he 
carried on general farming, but during the last years of his life rented 
his land and lived retired. His sister Harriet had ninety acres adjoining, 
which was also leased out. Mr. Brown was an energetic church worker, 
a kind and loving husband, and an indulgent father. He united with the 
Christian church in 1878. In politics he was a Democrat, but never cared 
for local offices. In his veins coursed the blood of patriots. 

In September, 1896, William H. Brown was married to Julia Criss, 
who was born in Crawford county, Illinois, July i, 1877, a daughter of 
Joseph and Adeline (Simons) Criss. Joseph Criss was a native of 
Indiana and went to Illinois with his parents when a small boy, remaining 
there until his death in April, 1881. The mother died September 21, 1884, 
both laying down life's burdens in Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown the 
following children were born : Robert R., born May 23, 1897 ; Zone Irene, 
November 18, 1898; Hattie A., May 4, 1902, died August 12, 1904; John 
Edward, born January 25, 1906. Alma Ruth Higgins is a daughter of 
Mrs. Brown by a former marriage. Mr. Brown died February 10, 1908. 
Mrs. Brown is a member of the Christian church at Oakland, Haddon 
township. 



James A. Miller is a thoroughgoing farmer and takes great interest 
in the raising and breeding of fine horses, and has a jack and jennet 
farm also. He is a resident of Jefferson township, Sullivan countv, 
Indiana, and a native of Knox county, where he was born July 23, i86'8, 
near Oaktown. He is the son of Samuel H. and Elizabeth M. (Harbin) 
Miller. The grandfather, Samuel Miller, Sr., was a native of Kentuckv 
who came to Indiana at an early day. He always followed farming, and 
died at Oaktown, Indiana. 

Samuel H. Miller, the father of James A., of this narrative, was born 
near Oaktown, Indiana, in 1831, and died in 1895 in Greene county. The 
mother, Elizabeth M. (Harbin) Miller, was born in 1833 in North Caro- 
lina, and accompanied her parents, James Harbin and wife, when a child 
to Jeft'erson township, Sullivan county, Indiana, where thev at first set- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 225 

tied, but subsequently went to (ireene county, wliere the father remained 
until his death. He was a farmer and had borne well his part in the set- 
tling of the county, under many difificidties. Mrs. Samuel Miller now 
resides with her youngest son, Samuel O., over the line in Greene county. 

Reared on a farm, Samuel H. Miller was united in marriage in 
1859, after which he rented land in Knox county, Indiana. In 1861 he 
enlisted in Company I of the Forty-first Regiment, Second Cavalry, 
serving in the LInion cause for three years and five months. He saw 
hard service, but was never wounded. He was, however, captured two 
months before his term of service had expired, and was held prisoner 
by the Confederates for seven months, such imprisonment being at three 
different rebel prisons — Andersonville prison, Florence, S. C, and one 
other. After the close of the Civil war Mr. Miller returned to his farm 
of forty acres, near Oaktown, where he remained until 1873. He then 
sold out and purchased an eighty acre farm in Greene county, upon 
which he remained until his death. He was an ardent Republican in his 
party affiliations. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
as was his wife, and he had held every office in the church of his choice, 
except that of pastor. The children of Samuel H. Miller and wife were 
as follows : Rosetta, who married Commodore Perry Miller, and resides 
in Greencastle, Indiana; Elva A. (Lyons), residing in Oregon; Emniett 
L., who resides in Linton, Indiana, and married Clara Wilson ; James A., 
of tliis sketch ; Samuel O., residing on the old homestead, married 
Martha J. Page. 

James A. Miller was educated at the public schools. He entered 
upon the duties of life for himself when twenty-one years old, bv renting 
a farm in Greene county, Indiana, for one season, and after the crop 
had been harvested he purchased eighty acres in that county and resided 
there another year, when he sold his farm and became a renter for an- 
other year. His next land purchase was thirty acres in Greene county, 
and there he farmed until 1903, when he sold that farm and bought fifty- 
two acres in the ridge of Pleasant ville, at which place he still resides. 
During, one season Mr. Miller was employed in a hardware store in 
Lyons, Indiana, but not finding indoor life agreeable, he soon gravitated 
back to rural work and freedom. He now conducts a horse farm and 
owns two registered horses — King of Iowa, No. 10699, a French draft 
animal weighing seventeen hundred pounds ; Ridgeville, No. 25468, a 
Percheron horse weighing two thousand pounds; and also a jack named 
Black Fred. Mr. Miller takes much pride in the management and 
general care of his horse farm. 

He is a Republican in his political party affiliations, and both he and 
his wife are members of the jvlethodist Episcopal church. In his fra- 
ternal society connections he is numbered among the worthy members of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 408, at Pleasantville. 
He is also a member of the Mutual Protective League. 

September 3, 1889, Mr. Miller was married to Mary M. Lester, born 
June 22, 1873, at Newberry, Indiana, daughter of Willis D. and Mar- 
garet (Loudon) Lester. Mrs. Miller's father is now living in Arkansas; 



226 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

the mother died in 1873. They were farmers by occupation. Mr. and 
Mr.s. Miller are the parents of four children: Lottie Fay. born August 24, 
1891, died April 3, 1892 ; Elva M., born July 17, 1894, now attending 
school; Eva Pearl, November 5, 1896; Rose Marie, November 14, 1901. 
Mrs. Miller is a member of the Rebekahs, Lodge No. 605, of Pleasant- 
ville, Indiana, of which she is vice grand. 



Frank E. Poston, farmer and stock-raiser, residing in one of the 
choice sections of Gill township. Sullivan county, is a native of the town- 
ship, born on the old Poston homestead, March 20, 1872, a son of J. H. 
and Amy R. (Rose) Poston. The father and mother were both born in 
1845, the mother a native of Illinois and the father of Gill township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana. His parents came from Virginia, and the 
mother's people were from Ohio. J. H. Poston resided with his parents 
until twenty-four years of age, when he and a brother bought land to- 
gether and farmed in partnership for several years, and then divided the 
property. J. IT. sold his share, which consisted of one hundred acres, and 
purchased one hundred and ninety-six acres where his son Frank E. now 
resides. On this land the father resided until his death, June i, 1900, 
and the mother died in September of the same year. They were the par- 
ents of four children : Corena, deceased ; Frank E., of this memoir ; 
Carlton, deceased; Sarah J., wife of Alexander Rogers, a farmer of Gill 
township. 

Frank E. Poston attended school at Rose Chapel school, in Merom, 
and a short time at Sullivan. He continued with his parents until twenty- 
four years of age, when he married, and then farmed with his father until 
the death of the latter. Continuing on the old place after the death of 
the father, he carries on general farming operations and stock-raising, 
making a specialty of raising corn. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Politically he is a Democrat, though he never has 
aspired to office-holding. At one time he belonged to the Odd Fellows' 
order and Woodmen of America, but does not hold membership with any 
society now. 

Mr. Poston was married in April, 1897, to Miss Alda Banther, a 
daughter of Cyrus Banther and wife, whose sketch, see elsewhere in this 
work. By this marriage two children were born : Hallie B. and Ruble C, 
both at home. For his second wife, Mr. Poston married, in November, 
1901, Mattie O. Cummins, born at Carlisle, Indiana, a daughter of S. B. 
and Margaret (Trimble) Cummins, both natives of Carlisle. The mother 
was born in September, 1863, and the father in March, 1854. They now 
reside in Terre Haute. He was engaged in the mercantile business at 
Carlisle until about 1899, then sold and moved to Terre Haute. He is an 
experienced bookkeeper and has been a traveling salesman. There is no 
issue by Mr. Boston's second marriage. 

Concerning the Cummins familw let it be stated that there were eight 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AX COUNTY 227 

children in the faniil_v of the parents of Mrs. Poston : Edna, deceased; 
Josiah, residing in Terre Haute, unmarried ; \Iattie, wife of Mr. Poston ; 
Winifred ; James : Augusta : Rilla ; I'rank, all living at Terre Haute, 
Indiana. 



Licwis ( )sc.\R TuKNiiULi.. a meml)er of the board of county commis- 
sioners of Sullivan county, was born at Retreat Corners, Franklin county, 
X'irginia, on the 23d of October, 1854. His father, Lewis Hubbard Turn- 
bull, was a native and a life-long, resident of the same county. He con- 
ducted a general store at Retreat Corners, where he carried in stock 
nearly everything in daily use in that section. He owned one hundred 
acres of land at Retreat Corners and a plantation of four hundred acres of 
land near b\-. His death occurred about 1885. He owned a large number 
of slaves, which were freed at the time of the Civil war, entailing a loss of 
manv thousands of dollars. The maiden name of his wife, the mother of 
our subject, was Elizabeth Booth, also a native and lifelong resident of 
Franklin county. In politics he was a Democrat, and was a county 
assessor two terms ; also a justice of the peace and postmaster about 
twenty-five years. He affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and was in 
his church connection a member of the Methodist church, while his wife 
was of the Baptist profession of religious faith. Twelve children were 
born to this worthy Virginian couple, as follows : Bia Ellen, deceased ; 
William, residing in Franklin county, \'irginia ; Sallie Ann, of Virginia; 
labis E., of X'irginia; Laura L., of X'irginia; Lewis O., our subject; 
Geno Stephen, of Sullivan county. Indiana; Mildred Hubbard, of X'ir- 
ginia ; Lula, deceased ; Cornelia Lee, of Kansas ; Odessa, of North Dakota ; 
and Mary E., deceased. 

Lewis Oscar Turnbull was born an his father's farm in X'irginia and 
had the advantages of the old fashioned "pav-school" system. The first 
school he attended was in a log house, with seats made of split poles 
and resting on legs of natural wood. He remained on the old farm 
until eighteen years of age, when he superintended a gang of men in a 
lumber camp at Salem, Virginia, six months. Then in company with four 
neighbor boys went to West Virginia and engaged in mining for seven 
sears, and then came to Indiana and was employed at farming in Parke 
countv one season. He then opened a coal mine east of Rockville in 
Parke county, and operated it six and one-half years, when his lease 
expired and he then came to Sullivan county and bought eighty acres of 
wild land in Gill township and at once set about to clear a farm. In 
due course of time he had the land all cleared and in a good state of 
cultivation. He erected a good set of frame buildings and dug. four good 
wells. After several years he added forty acres, making a one hundred 
and twentv acre farm. He conducted general farming and raised regis- 
tered Poland China swine and registered Durham cattle. In 1907 he 
rented his farm and moved to Sullivan and now devotes his time to his 
ofificial duties. 



228 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

He was married in Parke county, Indiana, May 23, 1870, to Cliristena 
Kinsey. She was born at Retreat Corners in Franklin county, Virginia, 
June 15, 1855, a daughter of George W. and Fanny (Akers) Kinsey. 
Her father died in 1861, leaving the mother with twelve children. In 
1863 she came to Indiana and lived in Montgomery county two years, 
then moved to Parke county, where she lived many years. She spent 
her last days in Sullivan, passing away at the age of seventy-seven years. 
]\Ir. and Mrs. Turnbull were playmates in their early youth, and attended 
the same school. Mrs. Turnbull was eight years old when the family 
moved to Indiana, and she had reached mature years ere she saw her 
future husband. 

At the age of sixteen years !Mr. Turnbull had a full beard, which in 
time grew to the remarkable length of forty-eight inches. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics. He was elected county commissioner in 1901, and at the 
expiration of his term was re-elected without opposition.. Mr. and Mrs. 
Turnbull are members of the Baptist church. 



RiCH.\RD T.'WLOR, a farmer and hardware merchant of Farmersburg, 
Sullivan county, was born August 26, 1861, in Curry township, Sullivan 
countv, where he still resides. He is the son of John C. and Mary E. 
(Bennett) Taylor. The father, now deceased, was the son of Robert 
Taylor, a native of Virginia, and came to Monroe county, Indiana, when 
a young man and entered land and was a farmer ^nd flat-boat builder. 
He usually made his annual trips to New Orleans, going each spring. 
He married Mar}' E. Bennett, now living two miles south of her son 
Richard, in this township. Six children were born to this union, four 
of whom reached maturity, John C. being the eldest. There is one now 
living besides him — D. N. Taylor, who was judge of Vigo county one 
term, but is now at the Oklahoma capital. 

John C. Taylor remained at home and worked the farm with his 
father until the date of his marriage. He always accompanied his father 
down the rivers to New Orleans. They also ran a shipping wagon 
between Louisville and Cincinnati. He continued with his father one 
3'ear after his marriage, then went to Curry township, Sullivan county, 
and there purchased land consisting, of an eighty acre tract. This was 
about 1857, and he farmed there until the Civil war broke out. In 
1864 he enlisted with Company C, Twenty-first Indiana volunteer infan- 
try, as a private soldier. He served one year, escaped unwounded, and 
came home to his farm, to which he attended as well as operated his 
threshing machine, which combined occupations he continued to follow 
until his death, at which time he owned two hundred and twenty-seven 
acres. 

Richard Taylor, of this notice, son of John C. and wife, is one of 
seven children in his parents' family, whose names and order of birth 
are here given: Nancy A., vv'ho resides in Jackson township, this county, 
married John Railsback ; Samuel, of Curry township, married Louisa 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 229 

Wvnian : Robert, of Sullivan, married Arena Russell ; Richard, of this 
sketch; Sarah J., of Curry township, married J. H. Wood; Mary E., of 
Illinois, married William Martin ; and Dora E., at home and unmarried. 

Mr. Ta\l(ir remained at home with his mother until his marriage 
October 16, '1887, to Delia J. Patton, born December 5, 1868, daughter 
of Milton and Anna (Dilley) Patton. He was educated at Sullivan and 
after his marriage taught school every winter season for fifteen years, 
doing farm work sumniers. In 1902, in company with Elza W. Jennings, 
he engaged in the vehicle, hardware and implement business. Their 
place of business is at Farmersburg, Indiana. He also conducts his farm 
of one hundred and seventy-eight acres. Mr. Taylor also has other 
financial interests, including his shares in the Citizens' State Bank of 
Farmersburg, Indiana. He raises a large amount of stock upon his farm, 
which is also another source of revenue. 

Politically he is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of 
the Christian church. In secret societies he is connected with the (3dd 
Fellows order, lodge No. 622, at Farmersburg, having filled all the chairs 
in this lodge. He also holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of 
America, camp No. 3473. The three children born to bless the home 
circle of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are as follows : Alva N., born September 
15, 1888, is doing first year college work at the Indiana University at 
Bloomington, Indiana; Herman R., born July 15, 1892, is in his second 
year in high school; and Alamie lona, born March i, 1898, is now in the 
common school. 



Aaron Holder, a native of lladdon township, Sullivan county, and 
one of the present prosperous farmers of his native county, was born 
November 16, 1839, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Dailey) Holder. 
The father was born in the same township and died in 1895. and the 
mother, born in Kentucky, died in 1893. They were married in Haddon 
township, and there reared a family of eleven children, only four of whom 
reached maturity: Aaron, of whom later; Mary, wife of Joseph 
Roxburv, residing in Carlisle ; Sarah, residing in Carlisle ; and Elizabeth, 
deceased. The grandparents, Thomas Holder and wife, were among the 
first settlers of Indiana, and some of their children were born in old 
Fort Knox. 

Aaron Holder was reared on his father's farm and began working 
out at the age of twentv-four years in his native township, continuing 
there until 1877, when he went to JeiTerson township, and there remained 
until 1903. At the last named date he went to Furman township and 
bought eighty acres of land, upon which he now resides and where he 
carries on a successful grain and stock raising business. Politically he 
is in hearty accord with the Democratic party. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Church of Christ. He was married October 27, 1864, 
to Sarah Lowdermilk, born in Daviess county, Indiana, April 9, 1840, 
a daughter of Solomon and Sarah ( Starns )' Lowdermilk, natives of 
North Carolina and who came to Indiana about 1838 and to Sullivan 



230 HISTORY OF SULLIX'AX COUNTY 

county about 1843. 0"^ daughter blessed this union who is now Hving 
and three who are deceased. The children were : Cordia May, wife 
of Levi Willis, residing in Sullivan, and those deceased were Flora M., 
Lizzie Pearl and Anna C. Mr. and Airs. Willis have four children, 
Thomas Roy, Floyd, Chloie and Helen May. 



William J. Thornberry, who has farmed Indiana soil ever since 
he was twenty-five years of age on his own account, and at this date 
(1909) is one of the successful agriculturists of Turman township, is a 
native of Morgan county, Indiana, born on a farm April 15, 1844, a son 
of Daniel A. and Fannie (Lee) Thornberry. His father was a native of 
Fauquier county, Virginia, while the mother was born in Winchester, 
that state. They were married in their native state and moved to 
Morgan county, Indiana, in 1837, where he purchased a farm. At first 
he bought a quarter section and then added thereto until at his death he 
possessed two hundred and forty acres. He lived to the ripe old age of 
eighty-two years. While he yet resided in the Old Dominion State he 
was an overseer of a plantation. He had the advantages of attending 
school until he was twenty-tv\'o years of age. He was one of five brothers 
in his father's family, and they were as follows : Elijah, John, William, 
James and Daniel, all long since deceased. Politically the subject's 
father was a firm believer in the principles of the Democratic party. He 
served as a message bearer in the war of 1812-14, and held a land war- 
rant for such service for his country. Daniel A. Thornberry and wife 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Nine children blessed 
their home circle, as follows : Alary, deceased ; John, deceased ; Milton 
A., deceased; Benjamin Franklin, deceased: Patrick Henry, residing in 
Morgan county, Indiana, retired ; Susan, widow of Cyrus Watson and 
residing in Morgan county; Thomas Benton, deceased; William J., of 
this notice ; and Daniel A., residing in Brooklyn, Indiana. 

W'illiam J. Thornberry was reared to farm labor and received his 
education at the district schools common in his county. He remained 
under the home roof-tree until nearly twenty-five years of age, when he 
engaged in farming for himself, having been well drilled in agricultural 
pursuits, at his father's place, in boyhood and }-oung manhood. He 
cultivated and harvested one crop for himself in Morgan countv, and 
in the spring of 1869 moved to Sullivan county, locating on the farm 
upon which he now resides in Turman township, three miles northeast 
of Graysville. Besides his grain and hay he aims to turn into market 
about eighty hogs each year. He also keeps Polled Angus and Polled 
Durham cattle to quite an extent. He is a stockholder in the Turman 
Township Mutual Telephone Company. 

Politically Mr. Thornberry is in sympathy with the principles found 
in true Democracy. He has held the office of township trustee m all 
about ten years. He is connected with Masonry, belonging to the Blue 
lodge at Graysville and to the chapter at Sullivan. He is also a worthy 



HISTORY (_)!• SL'LLIXAN COUNTY 231 

member of the liidepLiident Ortler of Udd Fellows at (irav.-villc, haviii,^- 
filled all the official chairs in this lodge. 

He was united in marriage, October 5, 1867, to Catherine Elizabeth 
Passmoore, born in Montgomery county, Kentucky. January 9. 1850, a 
daughter of Joseph and Lou Ann (Edmondson) Passmoore. natives of 
Kentucky, who came to Indiana in the autumn of 1850 and located in 
Morgan county, where both died. Mrs. Thornberry is a member of the 
Methodist Ejiiscopal church. The children born to Air. and Mrs. Thorn- 
berry were as follows : Orlando W., who is now a widower ; Louetta, 
wife of C. C. Phillips, of Turman township, and they have one daughter. 
Hazel ; Alice, wife of Charles E, Booles, of Turman township, and they 
have a son, William ; Charles O., who married Addie Murduck and resides 
in Sullivan, has a son. Webster ; Phoebe 'A., wife of Albert Atkinson, 
of Merom. has four children. Herman, Guy, Audrey and Margaret ; Dora, 
the first born, died in infancv. 



William A. Shields, whose fine farm home is situated hard by the 
sprightlv town of Graysville, Sullivan county, Indiana, and whose broad 
acres yield their annual harvest in obedience to his frugal and painstaking- 
management, is a native of Sullivan county, born October 22. 1847, one 
mile to the north of Graysville in Turman township. He is the son of 
Alexander and Mary M. (Johnson) Shields. The parents were both 
born in this township; and the father, born in 1818, died in i86g. The 
grandfather, William Shields, came from Kentucky and became owe of 
the pioneer settlers in Turman township. The maternal grandfather, 
William Johnson, came to Sullivan county from Tennessee, locating on 
the Wabash Blufifs in the western end of Turman township, and was 
equallv as earlv a settler as the Shields family, with w'hom he intermarried. 
The grandfather Shields served in the war of 1812-14. Both grand- 
parents were of the Democratic party and of Scotch-Irish descent. 

Alexander Shields, the father, was reared on a farm, and there spent 
the best years of his life. In every particular he was a useful man and 
good citizen. At one time he owned one thousand acres of land. In 
his political convictions he like his forefathers was a Democrat, and held 
the office of justice of the peace several terms. He was also assessor of 
his township. His wife was a devoted member of the Presbyterian 
church. Their children were a% follows: Mary J., deceased; Sarah 
Elizabeth, deceased: William A. and Nancy (twins), the latter dying 
aged two years ; John L., deceased ; James C, residing in Hamilton town- 
ship ; and Martha, deceased. 

William. A. Shields, of whom this memoir is especially written, was 
reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He continued 
at home until he reached the age of twenty-five years, taking charge of his 
father's farm after his death. At the age last indicated he began farming 
on another farm within the same township, which place he now occupies. 
Here he docs a careful and profitable agricultural business, raising grain 
and stock. He ships about two car loads of Poland China hogs annually. 



& 



232 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

His farm consists of two liundred and ninety-three acres of choice farm 
land, upon which he has a commodious, well planned farm house, the 
same being about one mile to the east of Graysville village. 

Like most true American citizens he takes an interest in the great 
political issues of the day and votes with the Democratic party. He is 
connected with the Masonic fraternity, being a member of the Blue lodge 
at Graysville. He has held all the chairs within his lodge, and is a 
member of the auxiliary — the Eastern Star lodge. Besides his farming 
interests he is a stockholder in the Turman Township Mutual Telephone 
Company. 

In domestic relations it may be said that Mr. Shields was united 
in marriage September 9, 1874. to Martha E. Cowen, born in Vigo 
county, Indiana, February 24, 1849, a daughter of James H. and Sarah 
M. (Wisener) Cowen, natives of Illinois and Indiana respectively, both 
of whom are now deceased. The father died when JNIrs. Shields was 
but three years of age, after which sad event the mother married Ben- 
jamin Harrison, who resided in Fairbanks township. Martha E. was 
educated in the district schools and attended the Ascension Seminary 
at Farmersburg, after which she graduated at the Sullivan High School 
with the first class which graduated after the consolidation of that school 
with the first named educational institution. She had taught some before 
graduation, and continued teaching until she married. The children 
born to Mr. Shields and wife are as follows : Clyde H., who married 
Maria Cushman, a daughter of T. K. Cushman,-and they reside with 
the parents and have three children — Alildred. Enid and Lois. Clyde 
H. Sliields helps his father operate the farm. Elsie is unmarried and at 
home. The third born child died in infancy. Clyde H. and Elsie both 
obtained their education at Graysville and attended the Union Christian 
College at Marom. The entire family are members of the Presbyterian 
church, of which he is one of the ruling elders, having been such for a 
number of vears. 



Guy a. Cushm.vn, who in recent years has been farming, in Turman 
township, is the son of Dr. Arbacus Cushman. He was born June 14, 
1882, in Graysville, Indiana. Dr. Cushman (deceased) was born on a 
farm in Turman township, a son of David Cushman, and he was reared 
to farm labor and attended the district schools. Later he attended the 
academy at Merom, and having chosen the science of medicine for a 
profession, he entered the Jefl^erson Medical College in Philadelphia and 
graduated with the class of 1869. He then returned to Graysville and 
began the practice of medicine. He came to be a well learned and skillful 
physician and continued to practice there until his death excepting the 
two years which he spent in Cloverland, Clay county, Indiana. He died 
in his home in Turman township April 8, 1908. He had made a financial 
as well as professional success in life's career. He was widely known 
throughout Sullivan county, and was a member of the County jNIedical 
Society and the Wabash Valley Medical Association. He was a Mason, 
belonging to the Blue lodge at Graysville, and he served as worshipful 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 233 

master of two }eai-s before his death. He was a member of tlic chapter 
at Sullivan, ami also belonged to the Odd Fellows order at Graysville, 
which he had served as noble grand. Politically the doctor was an un- 
compromising Republican, ever ready to further the cause of the party 
of his choice by time and means. He, together with his good wife, 
were members of the Presbyterian church. In 1862 he enlisted as a 
member of Company I, Second Indiana Cavalry. He was discharged 
as a lieutenant, and saw much actual service, being engaged in numerous 
battles. At the time of his death he owned a farm of one hundred and 
forty acres east of Graysville. The children born to Mr. Cushman and 
wife, Mary (Gray) Cushman, were five in number, as follows: Catherine, 
lorn in 1872, graduated from the Conservatory of Music at the Union 
Christian College of Merom. She taught about five years in different 
parts of the county, and was also an instructor in instrumental music. 
She is now the wife of Jacob Frederick Hoke, who is one of the firm 
of the American Bo.x Ball Company of Indianapolis. Joseph, born in 
1874, died in infancy. Ethel and Grace (twins) were born in 1877. 
The latter died in infancy and Ethel was educated at the Union Christian 
College, graduating from the Conservatory of Music, and then taught 
school in the county for four years, as well as giving instruction in 
instrumental music. .She is now the wife of Dr. W. R. Turman and 
they reside at Marshall, Illinois, where he is in the practice of his 
profession. 

Guy A. Cushman, the fifth born, was reared in the town of Graysville, 
Indiana, and attended the Union Christian College at Merom. He 
remained at home until twenty-one years of age, having been employed 
in a store up to that date a part of the time. When he was twenty-two 
years old he went to Indianapolis, where he was engaged with the 
American Box Ball Company for about six months, when he returned to 
Gravsville and connnenced to manage his father's farm and has been an 
agriculturist ever since. He handles considerable stock, including the 
breeding and feeding of many hogs. Politically ^Ir. Cushman is a loyal 
supporter of Republican party principles. He is associated with the 
Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities at Graysville. 

He was happily married, June 21, 1903, to Harriett Turman, born 
October 21, 1883, in Turman township, a daughter of Return J. Turman 
and wife, whose complete family history appears elsewhere in this work. 
Mrs. Cushman was educated in the common schools and attended the 
State Normal one year. Two children have been the result of this luiion : 
Paula ^1.. born September i, 1904, and .\rbacus Edward, born March 
6, 1908. 

Mr. Cushman has descended from Puritan stock, and is a member 
of the Sons of the Revolution and traces his ancestors back to the band 
who came to our shores in the Mayflower. Concerning his mother's 
people let it be said in this connection that she was born in Sullivan 
countv, Indiana, in 1846, a sister of Joseph Gray, whose family history 
will kc found in a sketch of him elsewhere in this compilation. The 
mother is now residing among her children. 



234 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

John Kelly, who owns about four hundred acres of excellent land 
within the borders of Turman township, and now resides in the thriving 
town of Merom, is an example of what a boy left fatherless at a very 
tender age may accomplish in this free republic, where every man is the 
builder of his own financial success. Mr. Kelly was born September lo, 
1858, in Turman township, a son of James and Malinda (Johnson) 
Kelly. The mother w&s born near Carlisle. For a history of the 
father the reader is referred to the sketch of James Kelly, found at 
another place in this work. John Kelly was reared upon the farm and 
had a very limited common school education. He was left fatherless 
when a mere boy, and remained at home until twenty-five years of age. 
He then went out into the untried world for himself, unaided by none 
other than his own inert energy and pluck. Previous to his marriage 
he had bought a piece of land, and to this he has added until his present 
place consists of three hundred and ninety-four acres in Turman town- 
ship and about six acres within Merom. In August, 1906, he moved to 
Merom to give his children a better opportunity to gain an education at 
the Union Christian College. He still superintends his farming opera- 
tions. Politically he is a Democrat. He is a stockholder in the Citizens 
Trust Company at Sullivan. He was united in marriage, February 10, 
1887, to Nancy J. Dickerson, born in Fairbanks township October 8, 
1864, a daughter of A. W. C. and Lucy (Park) Dickerson. The father 
was born in Orange county, Indiana, in 1835. and late in the forties he 
came to Sullivan county. His parents both died when he was young. 
A. W. C. Dickerson located first at Sullivan and worked in a saw-mill for 
several years, up to i860, when he bought a farm in Fairbanks township 
where he has resided since. Lucy Park was born near Sullivan, and 
died when her daughter, Mrs. Kelly, was but a child. After her death 
the father married Mary Lawson, about 1878. She is still living. The 
following children were born to A. W. C. Dickerson and his first wife : 
Oscar L.. of Springfield, Ohio; Mrs. Kelly; Emma, now the wife of 
William Gaston, of Fairbanks ; June, deceased ; and three who died 
in infancy. By the second marriage five children were born : Warren, 
residing in Fairbanks township; Mondella, wife of C. Moore, of Sullivan; 
Kate, wife of Claud Byers ; Guy, at home ; and Ada, deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are the parents of three children : Roy, born 
April 5, 1888, unmarried and attending the Union Christian College at 
Merom ; Linnie, born July 4, 1891, also attending the college just men- 
tioned and she graduated from the Conservatory of Music with the class of 
1908; and Lois, born March 10, 1896, now at the Union Christian Col- 
lege. Mr. Kelly and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he was for a number of vears a steward. 



Joel C. Barnes has always resided in the township of Turman, 
and his residence has ever been at the place where he now resides and 
where he is the owner of an excellent farm. He was born June 23. 1857, 



HISTORY OF SULLIXAX COUNTY 235 

a son of Nelson and Mercy (Taft) Barnes. The father was horn in 
New York state March 24, 1816, and died February 21. 1884, in Turman 
townsliip, Sullivan county. The mother was also a native of New Y'ork, 
born about March 27, 1822, and she died October 4, 1884. They were 
luiited in marriage in their native state October 21, 1839. and came to 
Sullivan county, Indiana, early in the forties. He first located in 
l-'airbanks township, where he purchased a forty acre tract of land. 
Subsequently he removed to Turman township, where both he and his 
wife laid down life's burdens. At the date of his death he owned five 
hundred and forty acres of land in the township in which he lived and 
labored so many years. He was always a farmer, and at an early day 
helped to build flat-boats, which he also ran upon the Wabash river. 
In his political views he was a Democrat, and in church matters both 
he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The 
following- children were born of this happy union : Tryphena Ann, 
now the widow of Jasper Mayfield, and she lives in Turman township ; 
Ploulina, widow of James Ransford, residing in Turman township ; 
Theodore E., a resident of Sullivan county ; Susie, deceased ; Abraham, 
residins; in Sullivan county ; Cyrus John, deceased : Joel C, of this 
biography; Lucy M., deceased: and Alartha Ellen. 

Joel C. Barnes was educated in the district schools, and remained 
under the parental roof until he was twenty-one years of age, when 
he began for himself and farmed in the bottoms for two years. He 
then came to the place which he now occupies. He farms in a successful 
manner his one hundred and sixty-three acre place, carrying on stock 
raising in connection with his grain and corn growing. 

Politicallv he is a Democrat. In fraternal relations he is a member 
of the Free and Accepted ^Masonic lodge No. 373 at Fairbanks, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Barnes and their daughter are members of the Eastern Star 
degree of Masonry at Fairbanks. He was united in marriage on Christ- 
mas day of 1876 to Josephine Connor, born in Sullivan county February 
10, 1854, a daughter of Solomon and Harriet (Crapo) Connor. Mrs. 
Barnes died in 1892. Five children were born of this union : Flora, 
born September 18, 1878, wife of Harlan Riggs, now residing in Fair- 
banks township, and they have two daughters and one son living ; Flava, 
born May 13. 1881, died July 22, 1882: Alma, born October 20, 1882, 
is unmarried and at home; William, born February 12, 1886, died 
November 4, 1886; and Orphic, born October 26, 1888, died July 21, 1889. 
For his second wife Mr. Barnes married, June 18, 1893, Marada Lister, 
born In Sullivan county February 28. 1S67. a daughter of Nimrod and 
Maiinda Lister, who are now deceased. The following children were 
born to the second union : Ray, born May 2, 1895 ; Ada, born March 
21, 1898. died December 19, 1899; Nelson, born April 14, 1901, died 
November 22, 1902; Essie, born March 15, 1903: and ]\Iabel, born April 
5, 1906. 

Marada Lister was the daughter of Nimrod and Maiinda (Evans) 
Lister, both natives of Ohio, who came to Sullivan county. They were 
married in ( 'liio, and came to this ccmnty in the autunni of 1859. The 



236 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

father worked in a woolen mill in his earl_y life, but after moving to this 
county followed farming. They are both now deceased. 



Russell E. Minter, who is counted among the large land-owners 
of Gill township, Sullivan county, was born March 25, 1848, in Turman 
township, a son of William and Melinda (Pinkston) Minter. Of his 
parentage it may be said that his father was born in Shelbyville, Ken- 
tucky, August 10. 1818, and died March. 17, 1882, in Gill township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana. He was of Irish descent. William IMinter 
came from Missouri in 1843. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 
1836, and was united in marriage in Gill township in 1845. He drove 
stage on the line from Vincennes to Terre Haute and from Terre Haute 
to Marshall, Illinois. He farmed one year in Missouri after his marriage, 
then returned to Indiana, .where he followed farming pursuits the re- 
mainder of his years. He was very successful and owned seven hundred 
acres of land, all in Gill township. Politically he favored the Democratic 
party. The mother of Russell E. Minter was also a native of Kentucky, 
born at Lexington June 26, 1825. and died in Gill township, at Merom. 
She came to Sullivan county in 1842. She was a member of the i\Ieth- 
odist Episcopal church. The four children born of this union were as 
follows : The first died in infancy ; Russell E.. of whom later : another 
who died in infancy ; and Hattie, widow of Dr. Harper, residing at 
Merom. 

Russell E. Minter was reared to farm labor and continued at home 
all of his life except the two years in which he was engaged in the 
hardware business at Martinville, Illinois, having for his partner Robert 
Carruthers, the firm name being Carruthers & Minter. Mr. Minter was 
educated at the Union Christian College at Merom. He is well equipped 
for carrying on the agricultural business, and is successful in the growth 
of grain, corn and stock. He raises many fine Poland-China hogs with 
the other kinds of stock he handles. His excellent farm contains almost 
four hundred acres, and is situated about one mile north of the thriving 
town of Merom, on the old state road. In his political views Mr: Minter 
is a supporter of the principles laid down in the several platforms formu- 
lated by the different parties, and votes an independent ticket, selecting 
from ail parties such men as he believes best represent his views. 

He was married, October 4. 1887, to Mary E. Halladay, born in Ohio 
in 1856, a daughter of William Halladay, who lived at both Terre Haute 
and in Greene county, from which locality he moved to Sullivan county. 
One daughter has blessed this union — Courtney Gretchin, born j\Iarch 19, 
1891 ; she is unmarried and at home attending the Union Christian College 
at Merom. 



JoTH.\M J. Bragdon, who is fortunate enough to be one of the land- 
owners of the goodly portion of Sullivan county known as Turman 
township, is a native of Clermont county, Ohio, born October 3. i860. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 237 

rie is the son of Jotham and Asenath (Fairfield) Bragdon. The father 
was born December 11, 1827, in Clermont county, Ohio, and the mother 
September 28, 1830, in the same county. The date of their marriage 
was October 20, 1853, and they lived in Ohio until the autumn of 1864, 
and then moved to Sullivan county, locating in Gill township, where he 
purchased a most excellent farm of three hundred and five acres, upon 
which he carried on a general farm business, including, stock raising, 
and here spent the remainder of his days. His death occurred September 
2, 1908. He was an avowed Democrat. Fraternally he w'as numbered 
among the members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with 
which society he united in July, 1850. By trade he was a carriage maker, 
which he followed in Ohio for six years. He was in the mercantile 
business two years in the same state, but after coming to Indiana devoted 
his time to agricultural pursuits. The Bragdons are of English, Irish 
and French extraction. The subject's mother is a consistent member of 
the Christian church. The issue of these worthy parents is as follows : 
Benjamin, deceased ; Emma, now wife of G. W. Finley, a physician and 
surgeon, at Brazil, Indiana; Sophia R., unmarried and at home; Jotham 
J., of this memoir ; Voorhees Y., a fanner of Gill township ; and Clara 
A., wife of Lee G. Corder, and lives at Merom Station. The children 
were educated in the public schools and attended the Union Christian 
College at Merom. 

Jotham J. Bragdon taught school thirteen years in Turman town- 
ship, farming during the summer months. He commenced to work for 
himself when aged twenty-one years. He first farmed in Gill township, 
but since his marriage has tilled the soil of Turman township. His farm, 
comprising two hundred acres of fine land, is situated three miles north 
of Graysville, Indiana, where he carries on an up-to-date farming enter- 
prise, including the raising of quite a quantity of sheep and cattle. He 
also owns sixty-four and one-third acres of the old homestead in Gill 
township. He is a stockholder and the vice president of the Turman 
Township Telephone Companv and also stockholder in the Gravsville 
Percheron Horse Company. In his political choice j\lr. Bragdon is a 
Democrat, and has held local offices, including that of township trustee 
for five years. He is a member of the Masonic order, belonging to the 
Blue lodge, at Graysville, and is master of the lodge. 

He was married, ]\Iarch 23, 1890. to Olive Wible, born in Turman 
township June 6, 1868, a daughter of William W. and Adeline (Davis) 
Wible. Her father now resides in Turman township, the mother having 
died November 14, 1873. William W. Wible was born in Turman town- 
ship April 24, 1844, and his wife, November 23, 1841, in the same town- 
ship. William W. was the son of John V. Wible. born in W^ashington 
county, Indiana, and came to Sullivan county, locating in Turman town- 
ship, in 1842. Adeline (Davis) Wible was the daughter of Parmenas 
Davis, who was born in South Carolina January 17, 1814. He was 
among the early settlers of Turman township. Mrs. Bragdon was edu- 
cated in Turman township, and remained at home until her marriage. 
The children born of this union are as follows : One who died "in 



238 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

infancy; Charles R., born November 17, 1891 ; William F., born Septem- 
ber 2, 1893 ; Bernice, born January 23, 1895 : Ross Jotham. born May 
17, 1903 ; and one, the fifth born, who died in infancy. Mrs. Bragdon is 
a member of the Christian church. 

Many are the changes wrought out in this section of Indiana since 
Mr. Bragdon's father first came to Sullivan county and dropped into 
the center of a one thousand acre tract which had been fenced off and 
secluded by the people in the neighborhood on account of a disease known 
then as "Milk Sickness." Hence his farm of over three hundred acres 
was literally hewed out from the great forests and much credit should 
be given this hardy pioneer who had seen much of the early-day hard- 
ship never again to be experienced by men in this section. 

Jotham J. Bragdon, of this sketch, spent the summer of 1885 in Kansas 
on a cattle ranch, and in 1888 made a trip through the south. At this 
date he is actively engaged in looking after the interests of his farm, 
which labor is not only profitable but pleasing to its owner. 



George H.vrrisqn Hoke. — One of the most prosperous farmers of 
Widner township, Knox county, is George H. Hoke, who is an extensive 
landholder, a skillful agriculturist, and a business man of ability. A 
native of Sullivan county, he was born December 14, 1833, on the old 
lioke homestead, about three miles south of Carlisle. He is a son of the 
late Jacob and Rosanna (Brentlinger) Hoke, and a brother of John A. 
Hoke and of William F. Hoke, whose sketches appear in this work, in 
which a more extended notice of their parents may be found. 

Receiving his limited education in the pioneer log school house of his 
day, George H. Hoke grew to manhood on the parental homestead. When 
ready to begin the battle of life for himself, he bought seventy acres of 
land adjoining a farm owned by his father in Widner township, Knox 
county, and has since made this his home. Laboring with unremitting 
industry, he placed his land under excellent tillage, each year adding to 
its improvements and value, and from time to time bought additional 
land, having now two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive 
land in his home estate, and owning, in addition, two farms, aggregating 
two hundred and forty acres, in Haddon township. As a general farmer 
and stock-raiser he carried on a substantial business until 1904, when he 
retired from the active management of his farm, although he still 
occupies it. 

Mr. Hoke has been three times married. He married first, March 
17, 1859, ]\Iary H. Pearce, who was born December 23, 1835, on the old 
Pearce homestead, situated on the Sullivan and Knox county line. She 
died in 1867, leaving three children, namely: Sarah Isabelle, deceased; 
Charles, deceased ; and Richard William, of whom a brief sketch may 
be found on another page of this volume. Mr. Hoke married, second. 
Marjr M. Polk, who spent her entire life in Widner township, her birth 
occurring March 19, 1841, and her death, August 17, 1882. Of their 



THE NEW YORK 

PU-SLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 239 

union three children were born, namely : Rosic, wife of French Willis, 
of Carlisle; Charles Edward, born May 30, 1880, was graduated at 
Purdue University, after which he did post-graduate work in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and is now an electrician in old Mexico; and Anna, de- 
ceased. Mr. Hoke married, third, December 2;^, 1883, Miss .\lice Scan- 
ling. She was born July 18, 1853. i" I'reble county, Ohio, a daughter of 
John and Emma (Roe) Scanling. Her father, Mr. Scanling, was born 
in 1818 in Ireland, came to this country when a young man, and lived 
for a few years in Ohio, where he married Miss Roe, who was born in 
that state in 1830. In the winter of 1853-54 he came with his family to 
Indiana, locating in Knox county, where he bought land, and was subse- 
quently engaged in farming and carpentering until his death in 1899. 
His wdfe died on the home farm in 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Hoke have one 
child, (jlenn Dora, who was born .-Vpril 13, 1887. She was graduated 
from the A'incennes high school with the class of 1906, after which she 
attended Rockford College, in Rockford, Illinois, taking both vocal and 
instrumental music at the conservatory of music connected with that 
college. Politically Mr. Hoke is a Democrat, and religiously both Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoke are members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. 



Jon.v Wesley Woner is known to tjie citizens of Turman township, 
Sullivan county, as a thrtfty fat^nTer ior/ the acreage which he attempts 
to till, and also as being', cpi^hected'jwith' the grain threshing and saw 
mill industry, which he follows during the season for such activities. 
Mr. Woner was born in Madison county, Indiana, August 2y. 1840, a 
son of David and Malinda W'. (Hay'den ) Woner. The father was born 
in Kentucky, as was his wife, who was a- native of Mercer countv, that 
state. They were married in Kentucky about 1830, and between then 
and 1840 they moved to Madison county, Indiana, but later went to 
Wabash county, and while there he had a contract for the construction 
of the Wabash and Indianapolis railroad. During his sojourn there and 
while thus actively engaged, he disappeared and was never again seen 
by his friends and family. The mother, with her family, then removed 
to Mercer county, Kentucky, and lived there until her son, he of whom 
this biography is written, w'as fifteen years of age, and then moved to 
Orange county, Indiana, where the family resided. 

Mr. Woner has one brother, Jacob, who resides in Orange countv, 
Indiana. For her second husband the subject's mother married Jesse 
Burton of Sullivan county. 

On July 4, 1861 — the first year of the Civil war — John W. Woner 
enlisted in the Twenty-fourth Indiana infantry, being a member of Com- 
pany G, under Captain Spicely, of Orleans, Indiana. He served until 
November 30, 1865, when he was mustered out of the L'nited States 
service at Galveston, Texas, and finally discharged at Indianapolis. He 
participated in the battles of Shiloh, \'icksburg, Jackson (Mississippi), 
Mobile (.Alabama) and lesser engagements. After the close of his niili- 
voi. 11—10 



240 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

tary life, he returned to Sullivan, where he joined his mother and brother, 
who had moved to this county during his absence in the army, and had 
located east of Merom. He soon began farming and also did black- 
smithing for about fifteen years, attending to his farming in the mean- 
time. His shop was at Graysville, and there his strength was expended 
at the forge and anvil, which was quite a source of revenue to him. His 
faithful wife owns ninety acres of choice farming land, which he has 
worked in connection with considerable stock raising. Beginning as 
early as 1874 Mr. Woner has operated a threshing machine and saw mill 
in their respective seasons. 

Politically he is a stanch supporter of the general principles of the 
Republican party. He naturally found a place among the comrades of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, being a member of Richard Burton 
Post. He was happily married April i, 1868, to Mrs. Cynthia A. ( Dodd) 
Brewer, born in Curry township, a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
(Asbourn) Dodd. The father formerly conducted a hotel at Sullivan. 
She first married Samuel Brewer, who died within a few years. To 
that union three children were born, one of whom now survives — John 
E. Brewer, living near New Lebanon. Mr. and Mrs. Woner have two 
living children and one deceased. They are : William E., deceased ; 
Hattie G., now the wife of William Strain, and they reside in Turman 
township ; James I. married Esther U. Moore and they reside with the 
subject. 



Thomas K. Cushm.^Nj a retired farmer, a veteran of the Civil war 
and the present postmaster of Graysville, Sullivan county, Indiana, is 
a native of Turman township, born November 19, 1837, a son of David 
and Catherine (Kennerley) Cushman. Of the father it may be said that 
he was born in Onondaga county. New York, in 1812, and died in 
Turman township in 1868. The mother was born in Kentucky in 1808 
and died in the same township as her husband in 1880. The father in 
1818 went to Sullivan county with his parents. Seth and Nancy (Rundel) 
Cushman, both natives of New York state, but of English descent. The 
Cushman family located two miles southwest of what is now Graysville, 
on a farm. He entered eighty acres of land and added thereto until at 
his death in 1824 he owned two hundred acres. His wife survived him 
four years. The children born to Seth Cushman and wife were four 
sons and four daughters, all of whom are now deceased. David Cushman 
was practically reared in Turman township and followed farming all of 
his life. He was a successful tiller of the soil and at one time owned 
four hundred acres of land. Originally he was a Whig in politics and 
later went into the Republican ranks as soon as that political party was 
formed. Among the local offices he held may be named that of township 
trustee, which position he filled two terms. In their religious faith David 
and Catherine Cushman were Universalists and Christians respectively. 
Their children were as follows : Thomas K., of this memoir ; Arbaces, 



HISTORY OF SL'LLIX'AX COUNTY 241 

deceased; John, deceased; Caroline, wife of N. M. Cochran, residing; in 
\\'al(h"on, Illinois; Maria, wife of G. W. Buff, of Sullivan; and Alarv, 
deceased. 

Thomas K. Cushnian obtained his early traininj;^ in the district schools 
and later Merom Academy, which was subsequently merged into the 
Union Christian College. He then taught school for four years in his 
native township, teaching winters and farming during the summer months. 
He continued to reside at home until July 26, 1862, when he enlisted in 
Company I, Sixth Regiment of Indiana cavalry, as a private soldier, 
serving in the Union cause until June 17, 1865, when he was honorably 
discharged with the rank of first lieutenant. He was discharged at 
Pulaski, Tennessee, and mustered out at Indianapolis. Among the more 
important battles in which he participated was Richmond, Kentucky. 
He was with (leneral Sherman on the march to Atlanta and participated 
in all the many engagements of that campaign, including the siege and 
capture of that city. After the fall of Atlanta he went west with General 
Thomas' command in pursuit of Hood's army and fought in the battles 
of Franklin and XashvUle. By reason of his military service he receives 
a pension. He is numbered among the members of the Grand Army 
Post known as "Joe Kerns," at Merom. He is also a member of Grays- 
ville lodge No. 627, F. and A. M., the Royal Arch Chapter No. 81 at 
Sullivan and the Commandery at the same place, as well as the Eastern 
Star No. 308, at Graysville. After the war Mr. Cushman returned to 
Turman township and engaged in farming, in which he continued until 
1904, when he moved to Graysville. On August 4, 1897, lie was ap- 
pointed postmaster under President McKinle_\''s administration, and is 
still serving. He owns a handsome residence at Graysville, and stands 
high in his community. 

He was united in marriage first, September 2", 1866, to Louisa Ann 
Cochran, born in Coshocton county, Ohio, in 1842, and she died August 
10, 1877. She came" to Sullivan county in 1856 with her parents, who 
located southwest of Graysville. The following children were born of 
this union: Cora, wife of Charles Eno ; Mary, wife of C. E. Medskcr ; 
Ambrose G., who married Anna Eno; Roy and Charles G., deceased. 
For his second wife he married Elizabeth D. Baker, born in New York 
state May 30, 1858. The date of their marriage was April i, 1881. 
She came to Indiana in i860 with her parents, who first located in Sul- 
livan county, on the farm now owned by C. E. Medsker. She was 
educated at the common schools. The children born of this union were 
as follows : Grace, wife of C. T. Whitlock, resides in Fairbanks town- 
ship, Sullivan county. David T. married Bertha Lisnian, and resides at 
Farmersburg, where he is engaged as a teacher. He received instruction 
at the Union Christian College at Merom and in the State Normal. 
Maria is the wife of Clyde Shields, of Turman township. Paul J. mar- 
ried Jessie Yeager and resides with the parents. He has served three 
■years in the regular army — doing duty in the coast artillery. Agnes is 
unmarried and at home. Mr. and Mrs. Cushman are members of the 
Presbvterian church. 



242 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

* 

William Adams, numbered among the foremost farmers of his 
community, is a native of Devonshire, England, born on the 9th of 
April, 1830, a son of William G. and Mar}^ Ann (Tucker) Adams, both 
also born in Devonshire and there married. He was a farmer in his 
native country, and in 1847 the family came to America and settled in 
Clark county, Illinois, where they lived about six years and then moved 
to Turman township, Sullivan county. Later William Adams purchased 
tvi'o hundred acres of land in the Wabash bottoms, and subsequently 
bought in all eighteen hundred acres in this county and in Clark countv, 
Illinois. Politically he was a Democrat, while both he and his wife were 
members of the Presbyterian church in England. The children born to 
William G. and Mary Ann (Tucker) Adams were twelve sons, as fol- 
lows: John, William, William (2). Thomas, Sham, George, Richard (a 
farmer of Turman township), Harry, and four who died in infancy. 
These sons are all deceased with the exception of Richard and William, 
and all were born in England excepting the last four named — Harry 
being the first born in America. 

William Adams remained at home until he was thirtv vears of age, 
and then began to farm for himself, selecting for his field of operation 
Turman township, where he has continued to reside ever since. He was 
about sixteen years of age when his parents emigrated from England. 
He now owns a quarter section of land in the famous and highly fertile 
Wabash valley, and is an extensive raiser of Poland-China swine and 
red Short-horn cattle. He also owns one hundred and twenty-six acres 
of land in Crawford county, Illinois. Politically he is a Democrat. He 
has been married twice, first in 1867 to Harriet Davis, born in Logans- 
port, Indiana. One daughter was born of this union — Mary Ann. now 
deceased. For his second vi'ife Mr. Adams was married to Anna Logan 
in 1875. She was born near Franklin, Indiana, and died in 1883. By 
this marriage two children were born : Charles, residing in East St. 
Louis, and Harry, born March 29, 188 1. The latter was educated m the 
district schools, and married Nora Harris, of Crawford county, Illinois, 
February 22, 1882. They have had four children, Ora (deceased), 
William Earnest, Clinton Clay and Mildred. Harry Adams and family 
reside on the farm, and he operates it for his father. He is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Graysville. 



James Kellv, who is the owner of a farm of more than five hundred 
acres of excellent land and a resident of Turman township, Sullivan 
county, is a native of Geauga county, Ohio, born March 9, 1838, a son 
of James and Mary Ann ( ^McFetridge) Kelly. The father was born 
in county Derry, Ireland, and came to the United States when twenty-six 
years of age, landing in New York city with but two dollars in his pos- 
session. His wife, Mary Ann McFetridge, came about the same time, 
and they were united in marriage two years later in the city of Phila- 
delphia, later coming to Ohio, where they remained until 1840, and 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 243 

thence on to Tnrman township, Sullivan county, Indiana. They located 
on the bluffs overlooking the Wal^ash river, the wife, who was the sub- 
ject's mother, dying about one year after their arrival, and the father 
died in September, 1859. In his political views James Kelly, Sr., was a 
Democrat. His occupation was that of a farmer, but prior to his coming 
here and while in Philadelphia he was a dyer of broadcloth goods, while 
in Ireland he followed the trade of a weaver of "Irish linen." At his 
death he owned a thousand acres of land. Both he and his good wife 
were grounded in the church faith of the Presbyterian denomination. 
Their children were : Sarah, deceased ; Margaret, widow of William 
Crow ; and James Kelly, Jr. 

James Kelly, our subject, was reared to farm life and labor, and 
attended the district schools of his home township. Remaining at home 
until twenty-one years of age he then began farming on his father's 
farm on the river bottoms. Here he has remained ever since, and has 
come to be known as one of the most extensive and prosperous agricul- 
turists and stock raisers within the limits of Sidlivan county. On his 
more than five hundred acres of land he carries on both grain and stock 
raising. He raises thoroughbred Herefords and Short-horn Durham 
cattle "and Poland-China swine, of which he usually sells about three car 
loads annually. Politically Mr. Kelly is a firm supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party. He was one of the original promoters 
of the building of the lev^e in his section of the state. This particular 
section is thirteen miles in length, and cost approximately one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

In his domestic relations Mr. Kelly, it should be said, was married 
in 1865 to Adelia Ann Drake, born in Turman township, on the Island, 
in 1844, a daughter of Preston G. and Susan (Bryan) Drake. The 
father died prior to his daughter's marriage to Mr. Kelly. Preston G. 
Drake was a native of Virginia, a son of Tarlton and a lineal descendant 
of Sir Francis Drake. Susan Bryan, his wife, was born in Kentucky, a 
daughter of William Bryan. Two children have blessed the union of 
]\Ir.' and Mrs. Kelly: Augustus, born in 1867, married Annie Mitchell, 
born in Derry, Ireland, and has one son — James A. C. Augustus Kelly 
is practicing law in Chicago, having graduated from De Pauw University 
and attended the State University at Bloomington, Indiana. The second 
son, Otis, born in 1869, married Lucy Martin, of Terre Haute, and resides 
in Turman township. He attended De Pauw University two years and 
was one year at the Terre Haute State Normal. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Kelly are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



Hox. Thom.^s Josiah M.\nn, deceased, who will form the subject 
of this memoir, was a native of Turman township. Sullivan county, 
Indiana, born March 12, 1848, on the old Mann homestead. He was a 
son of James B. and Fidelia f Turman) ^lann. The father was born in 
Mercer county, Kentucky, and he was a son of Josiah T. Mann, com- 



244 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

monly called Judge Mann. Judge Mann was born in Virginia and early 
in his life went to Mercer county, Kentucky. About 1819 he removed 
to Sullivan county, Indiana, settling near Merom, on a farm to the east 
of the town. Subsequently he engaged in the hotel business at Merom. 
While there James B. Mann and wife were married. Fidelia, the wife, 
was the daughter of Thomas Turman, one of the well known pioneers 
of the county and for whom Turman township was named. Later they 
resided in Merom, where Judge Mann died, after which they moved into 
the house with the widow Mann and assisted in conducting, the hotel 
for a time, but in 1847 moved to the farm now owned by Dr. Durham, 
and this is where Flon. Thomas J. Mann was born. 

Hon. Thomas J. Mann, of this notice proper, spent his boyhood 
days midst the scenes of his rural home and attended school like most 
of the boys of his time. He assisted with the farm work in the summer 
and went to district school in the winter months, attending the Big- 
Spring School. Among his teachers were Seth Cushman and Messrs. 
Hall and John T. Phillips. In 1865 he went to Vincennes and entered 
the university, where he did one year's work, and then returned home 
and taught school two terms. This was the first demonstration he had 
of the people's confidence in his native ability to accomplish whatever 
he undertook. After teaching he returned to farm work, and there put 
in his wonderful energy. In 1868 he formed a partnership with his 
father, and together they did an extensive work as agriculturists and 
stockmen. This relation continued until 1878, when Thomas J. was 
called by the people to serve as clerk of the circuit courts, which position 
he ably filled two terms. During his entire clerkship P. R. Jenkins 
served as his deputy. In 1882, at the close of his first term of ofiice, 
he formed a partnership with Dr. J. L. Durham, his brother-in-law (see 
his sketch), in the farming and stock raising business, which continued 
without change or friction until Mr. Mann's marriage, in 1897, when 
the real estate owned by the firm was divided. After Mr. i\Iann retired 
from the clerk's office he made his home with Dr. Durham, devoting his 
entire attention to his farming interests. The firm early saw the great 
wealth and richness of soil in the river bottom lands, and purchased all 
the acreage offered for sale. When the division was effected they owned 
seventeen hundred acres of land. Later they increasd their holdings, 
and at his death he owned one thousand acres. 

Mr. Mann was president of the Sullivan County Agricultural Society 
from 1889 to 1896. In political choice he was a Democrat. In 1885 
he was appointed by Governor I. P. Gray as a delegate to the Agricul- 
tural Congress held at New Orleans. In 1896 he was elected represen- 
tative from Sullivan county to the state legislature, serving during the 
session of 1897. He acted as chairman of the Democratic Central com- 
mittee in 1888. In 1899, after the county reform was passed, Mr. Mann 
was appointed as a member of the County Council by Judge Moffett, 
and when the council was organized he was chosen its chairman. He 
was an honored member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Blue 
lodge, and was a charter member of the lodge when it was instituted at 



HISTORY OF SULL1\'AN COUNTY 245 

Graysvillc. IK- was made a Ma-tcr .Masun and a iiicmlxT nf tbc Chapter 
at Sullivan. 

Concernins^ his domestic relations it should be stated that he was 
happily married March 9. 1897, to Miss Henrietta Ingersoll, born January 
4. 1861, a daughter of Henry and Mary Ingersoll, who came from Indian- 
apolis in 1 86 1, settling near Merom, but later moved to Turman town- 
ship, near Graysville." Mrs. Mann's father. Henry Ingersoll, was born 
in Cavuga county. New York, a son of Benjamin F. and Laura ( Rose ) 
Ingersoll. He learned the trade of cabinet maker and in 1836 he located 
at "Greenfield, Indiana, but afterward moved to Indianapolis, where he 
was engaged in the manufacture of furniture under the firm name of 
Sloan & Ingersoll till 1862. He then came to Sullivan county and bought 
a farm in Turman township, where he resided until his death in 1891. 
The maiden name of his wife was Mary Dickinson. She was born in 
Bullitt county, Kentucky, a daughter of Isaiah and Polly (Fraim) Dick- 
inson. Archibald Fraim, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Mann, was cap- 
tured by the Indians when seven years old and kept until twenty years 
old. After this he served in tlie Revolutionary war. He owned a farm in 
Bullitt county, Kentucky, upon which were located some of the famous 
salt springs. 

Mrs. "Mann had been a teacher in the public schools of Indianapolis 
for fourteen years and was very popular and efficient in her work as an 
instructor, having a reputation throughout the state. Three children 
blessed this marriage union, including twins, one of whom still survives — 
Thomas Henry, born January 27, 1898. Mary Fidelia, the other living 
child, was born August 10! 1899. Mrs. Mann is a member of the 
Plymouth Congregational church of Indianapolis. The family reside on 
the farm two miles to the west of Graysville, the same being kr.own as 
the "Maple Corner Farm." Since the death of Hon. Thomas J. Mann, 
July 30, 1001, Mrs. Mann has added one hundred and forty-two acres 
to the original place. She is a stockholder in the Graysville Telephone 
Company and the National Bank at Sullivan. In 1900 Mr. Mann went 
to Asheville, North Carolina, for his health, and spent the last of his 
life there. 



Return Jon.\til\x Turm.vn, who comes from the old pioneer fam- 
ily whose nanie is attached to Turman township, is an enterprising farmer 
of that section of Sullivan county, born near his present residence Jul\- 
6, 1837, a son of Thomas and Lavina (White) Turman. The father was 
a native of Virginia and of English descent, while the grandfather. 
Benjamin Turman, was among the first to eflfect a settlement in Turman 
township, which, as well as the creek, was honored with his name. .\t 
one time he possessed twenty-five hundred acres of choice land within 
the township. Politically he was a Democrat. He married and reared 
several children, including Thomas. Thomas Turman, the father, built 



246 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

the first flour mill in the neighborhood, located near Big Springs, the 
machinery of which was propelled by the swift falling waters of Turman 
creek. He followed both milling and farming, and was prominent both 
in business and public matters. He was a member of the state legis- 
lature and in that capacity was instrumental in the passage of the free 
school bill. In his political views he was thoroughly Democratic. That 
he w'as a man of patriotism it is only necessary to add that he was a 
soldier in both the Black Hawk and Mexican wars, the land warrant 
granted him in recognition of his services having the name of Jefferson 
Davis affixed thereto. Thomas Turman was also a Mason of some 
prominence and stood for all that was good, progressive and true. He 
married Lavina White, who was born in Tennessee, of Scotch extraction, 
and the daughter of William White. The grandparents on both sides 
of the family migrated to Ohio and later to Sullivan and Fountain coun- 
ties, Indiana, the Whites settling in the last named county, where they 
died. The children born to Thomas and Lavina (White) Turman were 
as follows : Ang.eline and William, deceased : Fidelia, who married 
James B. Mann, and now resides with her son-in-law ; Lycurgus, Charles 
R. and Thomas, all deceased ; Return Jonathan, of this sketch ; Martha, 
widow of Thomas Collier and a resident of Turman township ; Mary, 
deceased ; John Higbee ; and two or three other children who died 
in their infancy. 

Return Jonathan Turman lived the life of a farmer boy and attended 
the district schools at Big Springs. He assisted his father until the lat- 
ter's death, then continued with his mother until he was twenty-seven 
vears of age, after which he commenced farming independently on the 
place he still occupies, which contains one hundred and twenty acres 
of the original Turman homestead, the title having always been in the 
Turman family name. Politically jNIr. Turman is a Democrat and in his 
religious relations is a member of the Christian church. 

On April 3, 1864, Mr. Turman was united in marriage to Paulena 
Wible, born in Turman township, in 1846, and she was a sister of 
William W. Wible, mentioned elsewhere in this work. She died in 1889. 
The children born of this union were : John Edward, of Sullivan ; 
William F., a teacher in the State Normal at Terre Haute; Ira L., a 
practicing ohysician of Cynthiana, Indiana ; Walter R., practicing den- 
tistry in Marshall, Illinois ; Flora, wife of Rev. William Harney, a Ken- 
tucky clergvman ; Dove M., wife of William Riggs, of Sullivan ; Avarilla, 
wife of Leonard Bostwick ; Hattie A., Mrs. Guy Cushman ; Ross J., a 
farmer ; and Hallie, who is keeping house for her father. 



Dr. Clarence T. Howard, D. V. S., a veterinary surgeon of Sulli- 
van, Indiana, was born May 26, 1878, on a farm in Jefferson township, 
a son of William W. and Rose (Shake) Howard, both born in Jeff'erson 
township, where they still reside on the old homestead. (See sketch of 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 247 

James D. Howard.) The father has always followed farming for his 
livelihood. He was elected on the Democratic ticket and served as 
county treasurer of Sullivan county from 1900 to 1902. He has also 
been a trustee of Jefterson township. In his religious belief he is of 
the Baptist faith. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. William Howard 
are as follows : Elmer, who resides in Florida ; Ora, deceased ; Dr. 
Clarence T., of this notice ; Iludson, at home ; Grover, at home ; and 
Claude, at home. 

Dr. Clarence T. Howard received his education at the district schools 
and in the high schools at Sullivan. In the fall of 1904 he entered the 
Indiana Veterinary College, graduating with the class of 1907, and 
immediately commenced the practice of his profession at Sullivan, where 
he has been ever since, and now enjoys a lucrative business. His office 
at this date is at Knott & Park's livery barn. 

Like most true American citizens the Doctor takes an interest in 
the political welfare of his country, and his party choice is that of the 
Democratic party. In his fraternal affiliations he is connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, including the Encampment degree. 
In his religious faith he is a believer in that taught by the creed of the 
Baptist church. 



. Otho Thomas Collieu. — A widely known teacher as well as a 
farmer and man of affairs', is Otho T. Collier, of Turman township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana, who was born April 20, 1869, in this township, 
his father being Thomas H. Collier, a native of Rochester, New York. 
He was born April 4, 1836, and his parents, Thomas and Sophia (Cauble) 
Collier, were, so far as is now known, life-long residents of the Empire 
state. About 1855 Thomas H. Collier removed to C)hio, where he lived 
until i860, when he came to Turman township, Sullivan county, to set 
up a sawmill for an Ohio firm. On April 8, 1862, he enlisted as a 
private in Company I, Seventy-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
went south with his regiment. The following September he was captured 
by Morgan's raiders, but was soon paroled and then exchanged. In 
February, 1863, he was transferred to the Eighteenth Regiment, U. S. 
Infantry, and one year later was assigned to Company B, Second Bat- 
talion, U. S. Infantry. He was quartermaster sergeant of this regiment 
and was promoted to sergeant of Company B, being also acting quarter- 
master sergeant of the brigade. He was with General Sherman in the 
Atlanta campaign until the battle of Jonesboro. In October, 1865, Mr. 
Collier was detailed as clerk at General Palmer's headquarters, Jefferson 
barracks, St. Louis, and served with such until honorably discharged in 
February, 1866. 

Mr. Collier then returned to Turman township and for some time 
was engaged in the manufacture of lumber and shingles. Turning his 
attention then to farming and stockraising, he continued in this until his 
death in 1903. He married Martha M. Turman, who was born in Turman 



248 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

township, a daughter of Thomas and Susanna Lavuia (White) Turman, 
and a granddaughter of Benjamin Turman, the first settler of the town- 
ship. Mrs. Collier still occupies the old homestead which is pleasantly 
situated on an elevation overlooking the Wabash valley. She is a member 
of the Christian church, as was her husband. He was a Democrat and 
served as township trustee for four years. Three children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Collier: Otho Thomas, of this sketch: Theron 
L., residing in Indianapolis ; and a child who died in infancy. 

Otho T. Collier obtained his education at the Big Springs district 
schools and also attended the Union Christian College at Merom. Having 
thus properly fitted himself for the duties of a teacher he began teaching, 
and continued thus for fourteen years. He generally taught during the 
winter months and put in the summers at farm work. He now owns 
an excellent farm consisting of a quarter section of land in one of the 
choice portions of Turman township, Sullivan county. This place he 
superintends and has it devoted to grain and stockraising. 

Mr. Collier has been very prominent in public afifairs. He was one 
of the members of the Island Levee Association and was elected. clerk of 
this organization, serving continuously since. He is also a member of 
the board of directors. He was associated with Dr. J. L. Durham and 
William A. Pound in organizing the Turman Township Telephone Com- 
pan}', and was secretary of the same. Mr. Collier has served several 
years as trustee of Turman township. At the time he was elected the 
district system prevailed. During the time he was trustee the present 
admirable system of graded schools was inaugurated. There was a com- 
modious building erected at Graysville, where eight schools are united 
under one roof, the scholars being carried to and from their homes, and 
Mr. Collier caused to be placed in the Graysville school the department 
of domestic science and manual training. The transportation is paid for 
by the township, and the schools of Turman township now vie with the 
best in the state. 

Politically Mr. Collier is a supporter of the Democratic party and 
was elected township trustee of Turman township in 1904, taking his 
seat January i, 1905. He is connected with the Masonic, Odd Fellows 
and Modern Woodmen of America fraternities, all of Graysville, Indiana. 
He belongs to the Blue lodge of the A. F. and A. M., at Graysville, of 
which he was a charter member ; the subordinate lodge of Odd Fellows 
and Fncampment at Sullivan, having filled all the chairs in the subordi- 
nate lodge and been a delegate to the grand lodge. In the Woodmen 
he is a charter member of the Graysville camp. 

Mr. Collier was married September 30, 1896, to Estella Phillips, 
born in Turman township November 28, 1873, and educated in her native 
township. She is a daughter of Leander and Louisa (Herndon) Phillips. 
The father was born in Ohio and the mother in Indiana, and both now 
reside at Big Springs, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Collier are the parents 
of one son, Ralph T., born April i, 1898. i\Irs. Collier is an exemplary 
member of the Christian church. 



IIISTURV OF SULL1\ A.\ L'ULWTY 249 

Joseph Gray, who with his wife is joint owner of a fine three 
hundred and forty acre farm in Turman township, this county, is one 
of the successful agricuUurists who has hel]5ed to develop this section of 
the state, and by marriage is connected with a family which not only 
was among the pioneers of the territory of Indiana, but gave its name to 
the township in which he now resides. Mr. Gray is a native of Sullivan, 
born ( )ctober 19, 1852, and is a son of Joseph Gray (born in Frankfort, 
Kentucky, in 1803) and a grandson of Thomas Gray, who was an early 
settler of Kentucky and a pioneer of Turman township, where he settled 
in 1818. For several years the grandfather operated a saw and grist mill 
on Turman creek, two and one-half miles northwest of the present town 
of Graysville, and in that locality he spent the last years of his life. In 
his earlier years the father of our subject assisted in the conduct of this 
enterprise, but later engaged in various other industrial and agricul- 
tural occupations at various points in Sullivan county. At one time he 
was a manufacturer of woolen goods at Sullivan and later engaged in 
farming in Curry township, where at one time he owned a full section 
of lan(i. I le was also a contractor in the building of the Evansville and 
Terre Haute railroad and achieved such a decided success in this capacity 
that the company awarded him the prize offered for the contractor who 
completed his section first, Mr. Gray thereby securing a quarter section 
of land in Sullivan, which he platted into lots. Joseph Gray, Sr., platted 
the town of Graysville, which was named in his honor, and then estab- 
lished the woolen mill which he operated for a time, and then returned 
to Turman creek, where he conducted a similar establishment for a 
number of years, after which he lived in retirement until his death, 
August 4, 1875. He was a strong Democrat and an influential man of 
public affairs, serving one term as county treasurer. The wife of the 
deceased was formerly Miss Nancy Sherman, a native of Virginia. She 
died in January, 1877, the mother of the following children: Simon, 
William, Benjamin, Martha, Leanah, James, Mary (widow of Dr. A. 
Cushman), Tliomas and Joseph. Leanah, Mary and Joseph are the 
only ones now living. 

Joseph Gray, of this sketch, received his earlier education in the dis- 
trict schools of his home locality and pursued advanced courses at the 
Union Christian College at Merom. He lived with his parents until he 
was twentv-two years of age, after which for several years he was em- 
ployed bv neighboring farmers and then associated himself in a mer- 
cantile venture with his brother-in-law, Frank Turman. This association 
continued for some time, after which Mr. Gray conducted the business 
independently for about two years, when he resumed farming and stock 
raising. Mr. Gray has always been an active Democrat and deeply con- 
cerned in the public affairs of the county. For five years he served as 
assessor of Turman township, and has since been a member of the 
advisory board. 

In September, 1874, Mr. Gray wedded Miss Cornelia M. Turman, 
a native of the township which is honored with her family name, born 
January i. 1857. Her father, William Harvey Turman, was born in 



250 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

that township Ma}' 4, 1819. The maternal grandfather, Hon. Thomas 
Turman, was a native of Virginia, born in Bedford county, August 18, 
1796. Benjamin Turman, the great-grandfather, was also a son of the 
Old Dominion, where the American branch of the famil}' was first estab- 
lished. Great-grandfather Turman migrated from his \''irginia home to 
Champaign county, Ohio, and after living in that localit}' a short time 
went to Kentucky. In 1810 he made another move westward, this time 
locating in the territory of Indiana and becoming the first settler of what 
is now Turman township. He there secured a tract of government land 
in section 25, and the log cabin which he there built often became the 
refuge of the early settlers from Indian attacks. It was here that both 
he and his wife, Sarah Flowers, resided and passed the last years of 
their lives. The son of this sturdy pioneer couple was the Hon. Thomas 
Turman, the grandfather of Mrs. Gray, who not only assisted his father 
in farming but became an enterprising, transportation agent of these early 
times, owning and operating flat boats by which he conveyed hogs, lumber 
and other products of the country down the Wabash, Ohio and Missis- 
sippi rivers to New Orleans. He also built and operated the first flour 
mill in the neighborhood, and in addition to these many enterprises he 
was an extensive raiser of live stock, at his death being quite wealthy 
and the owner of a large estate. Like other men of mark he served in 
both the Black Hawk and Mexican wars, and his standing was such 
in every way that he was sent to the state legislature as a representative 
of his district, where among other important affairs that he championed 
was that providing for the establishment of free schools in the state of 
Indiana. In politics he was a Democrat and fraternally a Mason. He 
died in his sixty-sixth year universally respected for his stalwart character 
and broad and useful works. 

The wife of Thomas Turman, Susannah Lavinia White, was born 
in North Carolina November i, 1801, daughter of William White, a 
native of Washington county, Virginia, born March 27, 1776, while the 
great-great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Gra}', William White, was an Eng- 
lishman born in London, who came to America during the colonial times 
and settled in Virginia, where he spent the remainder of his days. His 
son, William White, great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Gray, married Miss 
Mary Johnson, resided for a time near Abingdon, southwest Virginia, and 
during the Revolutionary war period migrated to Tennessee and settled 
in Greene county. William White, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Gray, 
was but an infant when his parents moved to Tennessee. After his 
marriage he settled in Rowan county. North Carolina, where he remained 
until 1815, which marks the year of his coming to Turman township, 
Sullivan county. In 1823 he made another change in location, settling 
in Fountain county, and several years thereafter permanently located in 
Vermilion county, where he died at the advanced age of ninety-six years 
and eleven months. The deceased was married three times, the maiden 
name of his first wife, great-grandmother of Mrs. Gray, being Ann Wilkes 
Balch. She was a native of Greenville, Tennessee, bom February 17; 
1776, so that both 'Sir. WHiite and his wife were born in the year of 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AX COUXTY 251 

American indtpcndcnce. Airs. White was tlie daughter of Rev. liezckiah 
Balch, son of James and Ann (Bloomer) Balch, natives respectively of 
England and Wales, who came to America in the colonial period, residing 
for a time in \'irginia, whence they removed to Tennessee and became 
pioneer settlers of that state. The above genealogv is from a work com- 
piled by Rev. A. F. White, LL. D. 

Continuing the sketch of William Harvey Turman, the father of 
Mrs. Gray, it may be added that throughout life he was an industrious 
and successful farmer, and at the time of his death. May 3, 1900, owned 
one thousand acres of land, the greater portion of which was highly 
improved. The deceased was a firm and active Democrat, and served 
as trustee of his township. He was twice married, first to Sally Ann 
Tavlor, and secondly to Nancv Ann Bridwell, mother of Mrs. Gray. 
She died in May, 1880. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gray are as follows: 
Nanc}-, now deceased; William H., born in 1878, who married Bertha 
Moore of Turman township and is the father of two children — Joseph 
and Marjorie ; Frank, who is now a traveling salesman for Havens and 
Geltin, an Indianapolis house ; Arbaces, a merchant of New Lebanon ; 
and Nellie, who is living at home with her parents. Mrs. Gray and her 
daughter are active members of the Christian church at Big Springs. 



John L. Durham, M. D., was well known as a practitioner in this 
section of the state until 1887, when he also engaged in the business of 
farming and stock raising, since which time he has not onl\- continued 
his medical practice but become well known throughout a wide extent 
of country by reason of his well-bred stock, which is raised and fed upon 
the farm of which he has the superintendence. Doctor Durham is a 
native of Boyle county, Kentucky, born October 26, 1844, and is a son 
of Jesse Y. and Martha (Tarkington) Durham. Concerning his ancestry, 
it should be stated that his grandfather, John Durham, was born in 
Virginia, coming to Kentucky with his parents when a boy. In that 
state he married Celia Bugg, a Kentucky woman, and passed the re- 
mainder of his life in farming. The grandfather mentioned participated 
in the famous Clark expedition up the Wabash river at a very early date 
in the countr\-'s history. There were seven children in his family. 

Jesse Y. Durham, the father, was born in November, 1820, in 
Mercer (now Boyle) county, Kentucky, was a farmer and in the spring, 
of 1850 moved to Montgomery county, Indiana, remaining on his farm 
therein until his death, August 26, 1907. Politically he was an old-time 
Democrat and was elected to the Indiana legislature in 1873, serving 
one session. In the Masonic fraternity he belonged to the Blue lodge. 
In August, 1843. he was married, in Kentucky, to Martha Tarkington, 
born in Giles county, Tennessee, April 29, 1820. His wife, who was a 
faithful Methodist, died January 2, 1892. The children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Jesse Y. Durham were as follows: John L., of this sketch; George, 



252 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

who resides on a farm in Montgomery county, Indiana : Crittenden. Jiving 
in the state of Washington : Julia, deceased ; Laura, widow of William 
Rue, who passed his life in Danville, Kentucky, Mrs. Rue now residing 
in Indianapolis ; Joseph P., a resident of Indianapolis, identified as book- 
keeper with the Stewart Drug Company ; Joshua B., wdio forms the sub- 
ject of another sketch on other pages of this work; William Y., living in 
Waveland, Montgomery county, and with his brother, Dr. Durham, 
owning the old homestead : and Cornelius, who died in infancy. 

Dr. John L. Durham was reared on the Indiana farm and obtained 
his earlier education at the district schools of Montgomery county and 
then attended for a short time the Waveland Academy, of that county. 
He began the study of medicilie with Dr. A. T. Steele, at Waveland, and 
continued it four years under his instruction. In the autumn of 1877 
he entered the medical department of the Louisville (Kentucky) Univer- 
sity, graduating from the same in 1880, and then practicing at Waveland 
for ashort time. In 1879 he went to Merom, practiced there for a short 
time, attended lectures at Louisville, and in January, 1881, located at 
Graysville. There he continued in active professional work until the fall 
of 1887, when he moved to the James B. Mann homestead, about two 
miles west of Graysville, which he successfully operates as a stock farm 
and also maintains a large professional practice in his neighborhood. 
Originally the Doctor owned about thirteen hundred acres of land, but 
after giving some to his children and selling other tracts, he now owns 
about "one thousand acres. He superintends this extensive place, which 
is devoted to grain and stock-raising purposes, his specialty in live stock 
being the breeding of high-grade Polled Durham cattle and thoroughbred 
Berkshire swine, selling of" the latter about one hundred and fifty head 
a vear. He also raises mules on an extensive scale. Early in the eighties 
Dr. Durham entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Thomas J. 
Mann (who lived with the Doctor before his marriage), and they carried 
on farming and stock and poultry raising, the latter including wild geese 
and Pekin ducks. At one time he owned over twenty-three hundred acres 
of land. 

Dr. Durham was the president of the ]\lerom Bluff Chautauqua Asso- 
ciation for three years, and is a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, Indiana Medical Society, County Medical Society, and the iEscula- 
pian Association. In his religious relations the Doctor and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church. Politically he is a Democrat, and 
during the administration of the late President Cleveland served on the 
L'nited States pension board. On February 18, 1908, he was nominated 
for representative on the Democratic ticket and was elected representative 
of Sullivan county, November 3, 1908. In his fraternal relations he is 
associated with the A. F. and A. M. 

Dr. Durham was united in marriage October 5, 1881, to Mrs. \lary 
(Mann) Davis, who was born in Turman township, this county. October 
20, 1850, on the farm upon which she now resides. She is the daughter 
of James B. and Fidelia (Turman) Mann, sketches of whom appear in 
other pages. Three children have been born to Dr. Durham and his wife : 



HISTORY OF SL'LLIN'AX COUNTY 253 

Thomas Alann, the eldest, was born Scptenilier 29, 1884, and attended 
the Union Christian College, at Merom, and I'urdue University, at which 
institution he took the agricultural course. He married Lora Ridgeway, 
bcjrn in h'airbanks township, and they reside with the Doctor. James 
Jesse, the second child, was born April 10, 18S6, pursued a course at the 
Union Christian College, and is now in his third year at the Wabash 
College, where he is taking a scientific course, a member of the class of 
1910. Martha Fidelia, the only daughter, who was born March 25, 1888, 
attended college at Merom, and is now a student at the Western College, 
of O.xford, Ohio. 

Concerning Mrs. Durham's great-grandfather, Benjamin Turman, it 
may be stated that early in the nineteenth century he built a fort on his 
land which was known as Fort Turman. The first white man to be buried 
in the cemetery on the knoll opposite Dr. Durham's residence was shot in 
that locality while going for a pail of water to the creek which still runs 
past the family home. 



J.\Mi-:s MiLLiG.\N MooRE, of Tumian township, who is one of the en- 
terprising farmers of Sullivan county and one of the veterans of the Civil 
war, is a native of Jay county, Indiana, born April 9, 1845, a son of 
William and Caroline (Vail) Moore. His father was bom in Perry 
county, Ohio, June 27, 1819, and died in Jay county, January 16, 1892, 
being of Irish descent and a lifelong and successful farmer. The mother, 
of Welsh extraction, was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1823, and died 
in Jay county in 1855. This worthy couple were united in marriage in 
Jay county, where they both passed the remainder of their lives. In his 
political belief William Moore was a firm Republican, and both he and 
liis wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
was a class leader. They were the parents of the following six children : 
Isaac Marshall, deceased ; Lydia Ann, now the wife of Zadock Lanham 
and a resident of Christian county, Illinois ; James M., of this memoir ; 
Rebecca and Emma, deceased : and Alwilda, wife of Ira Oborn, who lives 
in California. 

James M. Moore was reared on the farm, attended the district schools 
and two terms at Liber (Indiana) College. On September 19, 1863, he 
enlisted as a member of Company B, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry Regiment, 
and served in the war of the rebellion until September 19, 1865, when he 
was mustered out of the service at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, being 
honorably discharged at Indianapolis, Indiana. Among, others he partici- 
pated in the battles of Springhill, Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee, and 
was fortunate in that he never received a wound in tlie two years of his 
service. In common with other comrades-at-arms, he is now receiving a 
pension for his military services. 

For two years following the war Mr. Moore farmed in Jay county, 
Indiana ; then went to Sullivan count)-, first locating at Merom, and soon 
afterward in Turman township, there engaging in agricultural pursuits. 
These have occupied his busy and useful life ever since, with the e.xcep- 



254 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

tion of three years (1878-1881) which he spent in Ja}' count)'. Mr. 
Moore's farm comprises ninety acres of excellent land, all within Turman 
township, and besides his agricultural interests he is a stockholder in the 
Terre Haute & Merom Traction Railway Company and the Turman 
Township Telephone Company. Politically he believes in the cardinal 
principles of the Republican party, and naturally and fittingly enjoys 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic, belonging to the Sulli- 
van Post. 

Referring to Mr. Moore's domestic life, it may be said that he was 
married on March 15, 1871, to Sarah Jane Burton, who is a native of 
the township in which she now resides, born March i, 1850, and a daugh- 
ter of Sherrod and Eletha (Burks) Burton. Her parents were both 
natives of Kentucky, and in the thirties, when young, were brought by 
their parents to Sullivan county, Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Moore were 
born three children: Amy Theressa, born January 10, 1872, who attended 
the Union Christian College (Merom), and is still living at home; 
William Sherrod, born October 18, 1875, who married Dora Phillips 
(also born in Turman township) and is the father of Mina, Earl and 
James; and Grace Gertrude, born March 23, 1881, who was also educated 
at Union Christian College, is unmarried and engaged in the milliner)' 
business at Farmersburg, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Moore and their family 
are all members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



George Washington Nowlin, who is a large land-owner and 
agriculturist of the famous Wabash Valley bottoms in Sullivan county, 
was born February 7, 1853, o" ^ farm in Fayette county, Illinois. He is 
the son of Bryant and Mary M. (Stokes) Nowlin; and the father, also 
being a native of Fayette county, was born September 13, 1828, and died 
on his farm near Decatur, Macon county, Illinois, August 26, 1903. Mary 
M. Stokes, the mother, was also a native of that county, born February 5, 
1830, and died in July, 1907. They were united in marriage about 1852 
in Fayette county. After he reached manhood Bryant Nowlin always 
followed farming for his livelihood. Prior to that time he had been 
employed as a clerk on one of the merchant boats plying the Mississippi 
river between St. Louis and Alton, and also drove a stage coach between 
these points. Until the late fifties he farmed in Fayette county, Illinois, 
and then moved to Macon county, that state, where he followed the same 
calling until his death, he and his faithful wife both dying on the same 
farm. At his death he owned two hundred and eighty acres of valuable 
farming land. Both he and his wife were consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and the parents of the following children ; 
George W., of this memoir; Francis M., who is single and lives on the 
old homestead in Macon county, Illinois ; Charlotte, unmarried, lives with 
Francis ; Douglass, married, and is a resident of Macon county, and five 
others v\'ho died in infancy. The Nowlins are English, while the Stokes 
are of Scotch-Irish descent. 

George W. Nowlin, of this review, received Ws early education in 



HISTORY OF SL'LIJXAX COUNTY 255 

the district schot'ls of Alacun county and later attended the high school 
at Decatur, lUinois, after which for one year he attended the Indiana 
State Normal at Terre Haute, having previously taught school for one 
term. After leaving that institution he taught in Sullivan county for 
nine years, and during, this period read law in Sullivan with Sewel Coul- 
son. He was admitted to the bar of Sullivan, Indiana, about 1882, and 
served as deputy prosecuting attorney under Perry H. Blue. After aban- 
doning teaching, Mr. Nowlin was drawn toward the farm again, and 
began the cultivation of the soil on the Wabash bottoms in the western 
part of Turman township, where he has continued ever since. In 1902 he 
purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres adjoining the town of 
Gravsville, upon which he moved the year of his purchase. He also owns 
a quarter section on the river bottoms proper, conducting both a general 
farming and stock business, the latter comprising the raising of hogs, 
cattle and horses, liesides the farming operations of Mr. Nowlin he is a 
director and president of the br;ard of directors of the Island Levee Asso- 
ciation, which was duly organized under the state laws and incorporated 
in September, 1902. This dike, or levee, is between thirteen antl fourteen 
miles in length. He is also interested in Chautauqua work, being a 
director and assistant secretary of the Merom Bluff Association. A 
Democrat in politics, a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
active in all commendable works of reform and charity, he is a citizen 
of practical ability and decided usefulness. 

Mr. Nowlin was married in August, 1881, to Delia Turman, born in 
Turman township, Sullivan county, February 9, i860, in the house on 
Turman Creek in which she was reared and in which she died in October, 
1894. Mrs. Delia Nowlin was a daughter of William H. Turman, grand- 
daughter of Thomas Turman and great-granddaughter of Benjamin Tur- 
man, the first settler of Turman township. The children born of this 
union were as follows : William B., born August 26, 1882, who married 
Ruth Burton, and is now a widower residing on the home place ; Roy 
Douglas, born April 7, 1886, unmarried, and living, at home; Pearl, born 
February 5. 1888, residing with Mr. Nowlin's sister in Macon county, 
Illinois; and Emmet, born April 17, 1891, unmarried, and also at home. 

For his second wife Mr. Nowlin married, April 26, 1896, Lillie 
Cooper, born in Clark county, Illinois, September 22, 1874, a daughter of 
Lewis Cass and Jane (Dix) Cooper, both natives of the county named. 
The latter died September 16, 1894, and the father is now residing in 
Missouri, near Willow Springs. The grandfather of Mrs. Nowlin, David 
Cooper, was a native of Virginia and a pioneer of Clark county, Illinois. 
He was a cooper by trade, w'hich business he conducted at his home near 
West York. The maternal grandfather, Kelly Dix, was also a pioneer 
of Clark county and a wheelwright and wagonmaker. He operated a 
shop at his home in Clark county. Mr. and Mrs. Nowlin have been 
blessed by the following children: Edward, born May 12, 1897; Mabel, 
born September 26, 1899; and Archie, born July 2, 1902. The mother was 
educated in Clark county and there prior to her marriage taught four 
terms of school. 

Vol. 11—17 



256 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Joshua Bell Durham, a farmer and stock-raiser of Turman town- 
ship, who is also interested in various other business affairs, is a native of 
Montgomery count_y, Indiana, born May 19, i860, a son of Jesse Youce 
and Martha (Tarkington) Durham (see sketch of Dr. Durham). Joshua 
B. was born and reared on a farm. His education was such as is afforded 
at the pubHc schools. He remained under the parental roof-tree until 
he was twenty-three years of age, when he went to Graysville and com- 
menced farming, which he followed there three years, and then went to 
Danville, Kentucky, where he engaged in the horse business in company 
with his brother-in-law, W. M. Rue. They conducted a feed and training 
stable and also sold horses for about a year and a half. He then went to 
Rossville, Illinois, and there engaged in farming and buying and selling- 
horses for two years, after which he removed to Terre Haute, where he 
was made the manager of the Edgewood Stock Farm, owned by W. E. 
McKeen, Sr., of Terre Haute. He managed this place for seven years, 
and then went to Turman township, Sullivan county, where he has since 
been located and operating a farm as well as raising stock. He also has 
come to be an extensive dealer in mules and jennets, besides buying and 
selling large quantities of horses. His cattle are of the Poll Angus and 
Durham breeds. The farm where he carries on these successful opera- 
tions consists of one hundred and thirty acres in Gill township, but he 
dives on the Thomas Mann ranch of eleven hundred acres, which affords 
him an abundant range for his stock. 

Politically he is a supporter of the Democratic party, and in his lodge 
affiliations is connected with the Knights of Pythias of Montgomery 
county. He is a stockholder and the president of the Graysville Horse 
Company ; also a stockholder and a director of the Turman Township 
Threshing Machine Company, and is a shareholder in the Terre Haute & 
Merom Traction Company. 

Mr. Durham was first married, late in the eighties and while yet 
residing, in Illinois, to Sittie Ellis, born in Montgomery county, Indiana. 
She died after about seven years of married life. One child was born of 
this union, but died in infancy. Mr. Durham was married the second 
time, October 5, 1898. to Miss Nellie Planning, born in Terre Haute in 
1872. She was reared in Terre Haute and at the age of sixteen years 
accompanied her parents, W. B. and Lizzie (Mann) [Manning, to their 
farm. The father is now deceased and the mother resides in Turman 
township. By Mr. Durham's second marriage three children were born : 
Laura Elizabeth, Marion Youse and Lelia Belle. 

While not belonging to any church organization, Mr. Durham was 
reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



William Benjamin Manning, who was a painter and deco- 
rator early in life, and later a farmer in Turman township, Sullivan 
county, was born April 13, 1834, in Terre Haute, Indiana, a son of 
Horatio Nelson Manning, who was born in New Jersey and of English 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 257 

descent. He married Pauline Hodge, born in Germany. They were 
married in Tcrre Haute in 1830. Horatio Manning "run the river," a 
term ap])Hed to the persons who followed a boatman's life along the 
great water cour.ses of the country. He operated boats from Terre Haute 
to New Orleans. The last even heard of him was when he was en route 
to New Orleans with a flatboat loaded with corn. His widow died in 
Terre Haute, on South Fourth street, in March, 1885. Two children 
blessed this union, }^lary, who died in infancy, and William Benjamin, of 
this memoir. 

William B. Manning received his education in the common schools 
of Terre Haute and at the age of fifteen years began to master the paint- 
er's trade in all of its manifold branches. He soon became an adept in his 
trade as a ])ainter, grainer, decorator and papcrhanger, and was also a 
beautiful sign-writer. As a side-line to his regular profession he did 
some excellent handiwork in landscape oil painting. Among such pieces 
his widow now possesses a fine sample of his work as an artist in way of 
a picture of the house and grounds where she was born on her grand- 
father's estate, the Thomas Turman farm. Mr. Manning was employed 
at his trade in Terre Haute until 1887, during which year he with his 
family moved to the farm where he died, January 9, 1907. After moving 
there he continued to work at his trade. He purchased the eighty acres 
of land upon which the widow now resides. Politically Mr. Manning 
was a Republican, and in fraternal connections he affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows lodge and also belonged to the Knights 
Templars and the lower degrees of Masonry, both connections being at 
Terre Haute. 

He was united in marriage September i, 1867, to Elizabeth Mann, 
born January 19, 1845, in Turman township, a daughter of James B. 
and Fidelia (Turman) Mann. The father was born October 5, 1816, in 
Kentucky, and came to Sullivan county, Indiana, about 1819, with his 
parents, Josiah and Elizabeth (Schooling) Mann; they located on a farm 
east of Merom. He died in Merom and the widow died in Sullivan. 
James B. Mann and wife were married on March 4, 1844, and began 
housekeeping and farming on the farm now occupied by Dr. Durham, he 
being a brother-in-law of Mrs. Manning, and her mother still resides on 
the old homestead with Dr. Durham. Among the successful farmers, 
James B. Mann was among the best. In his political views he was a 
Democrat. He died in the month of April, 1887. His wife, Fidelia 
Turman, was born in January, 1825, in Turman township, a daughter of 
Thomas and Lavinia (White) Turman. They were married and located 
in the township named for Thomas Turman. Six children were born of 
this union: Elizabeth, widow of William B. Manning; Lavinia, wife of 
John Royse, of Honey Creek township, Vigo county ; Thomas Josiah, 
deceased ; Mary, wife of Dr. J. L. Durham ; James, who died in childhood ; 
and Arthur, who also died in childhood. 

The issue of the union of William W. ^Manning and wife is as follows: 
William, born June 8, 1868, married !\Iinnie Coole, a native of Ohio, and 
they reside in Aleridianville, Alabama, on a farm. James Mann, born 



258 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

December i8, 1869, is now a widower. He married Delmer Hamilton, 
who died a short time after their marriage, and he now lives in Wyne, Ar- 
kansas, where he works at his trade, that of painting. Nellie, born Au- 
gust 3, 1871, is the wife of J. B. Durham, whose sketch will appear else- 
where in this work. JMary-, born May 27, 1880, is unmarried and with her 
mother, Mrs. Manning is a consistent member of the Presbyterian church. 



Dr. Frank L. Robbins, a practicing physician of Carlisle, Indiana, 
was born May 29, 1881, at Freelandville, Knox county, Indiana, a son of 
Thomas, Sr., and Maranda (Howard) Robbins. Dr. Robbins' paternal 
grandparents were born at Lexington, Kentucky, about 1775. His Chris- 
tian name was John. They were married at Lexington and emigrated to 
Freelandville, Knox county, Indiana, in 1813. He entered about one 
thousand acres of land and remained there until his death. He reared a 
very large family, and was a soldier in the Mexican war. Thomas, Sr., 
and brother, Alexander M. Robbins, now own about four hundred acres 
of this old homestead. 

Dr. Robbins' father was born near Freelandville, October 18, 1843, 
and his wife was born in August, 1848, and she died May 3, 1902. She 
was a native of Jefferson township, Sullivan county, Indiana. The Rob- 
bins are of Scotch and English descent, and the Howards were originally 
from Ireland. Thomas Robbins followed farm pursuits until within a few 
years, since which time he has been living a retired life, enjoving the 
fruits of his many years of toil as an agriculturist. His home is near 
Freelandville. He has paid much attention to stock-raising, and still 
handles horses, and he has ever taken a delight in those animals. Thomas 
Robbins and wife were the parents of the following children : John, now 
residing in San Francisco, having been in the west about twentv years ; 
Ruel, living on a farm near Freelandville ; Lillie, now the wife of O. C. 
Buck, of Bicknell ; lona, unmarried and at home ; i\Iary, wife of Elvin 
Bowen, of Freelandville; Dr. Frank L. ; and Earle, residing at home, a 
student in the Indiana University at Bloomington, Indiana, where he is 
taking a course in civil engineering. 

Dr. Robbins, who is unmarried, was reared on his father's farm and 
obtained his education at Freelandville, graduating from the high school 
with the class of 1900. He then attended the Vincennes University, 
1900-1901, and taught school during the winter months of those years in 
Knox county. In 1902 he entered the Louisville, Kentucky, Medical College 
and was graduated from that most excellent institution with the class of 
1906. He then located at Carlisle, Indiana, where he has built up a good 
medical practice. He is numbered among the members of the Sullivan 
County Aledical Association, the Indiana State Medical Association, and 
the American Medical Association. The doctor is a Democrat in his political 
choice, but is not an office-seeker in the present-day meaning of this term. 
He is an acceptable member of the Baptist church, and holds membership 
in the Masonic, Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen of America frater- 



HISTORY UF SL"LLi\ AX COUNTY 259 

iiities. In the JNIasoiiic order he belongs to Carlisle Lodge No. 3, A. F. 
and A. M., Jerusalem Chapter No. 81, and Council No. 73, all of Sulli- 
van. In the Odd Fellows order he is a member of Encampment No. 50, 
at Carlisle ; also of the Eastern Star and the Woodmen, of the same place. 



WiLLi.vM L. Nash, who is well known as one of the extensive farm- 
ers and stock-raisers within Sullivan county, was born in Haddon town- 
ship, where lie now resides, September 3, 1865, a son of Armstead M. 
and Nancy (Purcell) Nash, both of whom were natives of Sullivan 
countv. The father, a native of Haddon township, is now deceased, and 
the mother is still a resident of the township. The grandfather of William 
L. Nash, Marvel W. Nash, was a native of Kentucky, and was among 
the first persons to blaze the way to and eiifect a settlement in Haddon 
township. He entered government land and lived there until he was 
eightv-six years of age. He was always a farmer, in which occupation 
he was unusually successful. He reared quite a large family ; and was a 
Democrat in his political views, always casting, a vote for that political 
organization. 

Armstead M. Nash, the father, was reared on a farm and followed 
that occupation throughout his life, at one time owning about four hun- 
dred acres of choice land in Haddon township. Sullivan county. He was 
both a grain and stock grower. He raised registered Shorthorn Durham 
cattle, some of which he exhibited at stock fairs. In his political con- 
victions he was in accord with the Democratic party. He was a consistent 
member of the Christian cliurch, as is also his widow. They were the 
parents of the following children : Indiana Ann, deceased ; William L., 
of this memoir; Edgar E., of Haddon township; Clara B., now wife of 
Charles Siner, of Vigo county, Indiana ; Alary, wife of Edgar Chambers, 
residing in Sullivan ; and Lilly Jane, deceased. 

William L. Nash was reared to farm labor and attended the common 
schools and the high school at Carlisle, beginning life for himself at the 
age of twentv-two years, by farming, in Haddon township, where he has 
continued ever since. His present farm contains about three hundred 
and fifty acres, where he pays special attention to the raising of cereals 
and stock. He usually feeds two carloads of hogs for the markets each 
vear. He also follows the occupation of a stock drover, shipping stock 
up and down the line, including the towns of Carlisle, Paxton, Sullivan, 
New Lebanon, etc. His partner in the stock business is Washington Sin- 
clair. Mr. Nash is a stockholder in the new national bank at Carlisle and 
also a stockholder in the People's State Bank of Sullivan. Politically he 
affiliates with the Democratic party. He is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, thus giving his family life insurance protection. 
In secret societies he is an honored member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to the lodge at Carlisle. 

Mr. Nash was united in marriage in 1888 to Deborah Shake, born in 
Haddon township, a daughter of Benjamin S. and Elizabeth (Arnett) 



26o HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 

Shake, both being natives of Hacldon township. He is deceased and she 
resides in the township. Mrs. Nash's grandfather, David Shake, was a 
native of Kentucky and was among the pioneer settlers here. The fol- 
lowing children have been born to Mr. Nash and wife: Nellie S. ; 
.Martha J. ; Walter L. ; Kate : Claud Ed ; Harold A., deceased ; Roland R. ; 
Lois W., and Arthur J. The parents and eldest three children are mem- 
bers of the Christian church at Providence, near Paxton. 



aIelvin Ellis, — Having, materiall_v assisted in establishing the repu- 
tation of Sullivan county as a superior agricultural and stock-raisnig 
region. JNIelvin Ellis is now living retired from active pursuits in Carlisle, 
having, through his judicious efforts as a farmer in Haddon township, 
accumulated a competency. A son of John W. Ellis, he was born April 
i6, 1848, on the Ellis homestead, one and one-half miles east of Carlisle. 

Coming from English and German stock, John W. Ellis was born 
in October, 1800, in Prince William county, Virginia. Learning the trade 
of a carpenter when young, he followed it for some time in his native 
state. Some time before 1830 he came to Indiana and for a number of 
years worked as a carpenter and contractor, building many of the earlier 
houses of Carlisle. Investing his money in land, he became the owner of a 
good farm, on which he carried on farming successfully until readv to 
retire from active labor, and moved to Carlisle, where he spent the remain- 
der of his life. He was three times married, marrying first Alargaret 
Wardell, a native of Georgia, by whom he had one child, Howard Wesly, 
who is now dead. He married, second, Sarah E. Ching, who was born 
in Lancastershire, England, in 1800, being married near Washington, 
D. C. Thirteen children were born of this union, as follows : Amanda, 
deceased ; Oscar A., a farmer living near Greencastle, Indiana ; Salina, 
deceased ; Mary, wife of F. A. Jean, of Los Angeles, California ; T. O., 
of Haddon township ; William L., deceased, was killed during the Civil 
war at the battle of Seven Pines, Virginia, June 2, 1862, having, been a 
member of the Second Alabama Volunteer Infantry ; Ann M., wife of 
George Riggs ; Virginia, widow of the late Matthew McCormick, lives in 
Chicago : E. R., a farmer in Coatsville, Ind. ; Josiah W., deceased ; Robert, 
of Los Angeles, California ; Melvin, with whom this sketch is chiefly con- 
cerned ; and Olivia, wife of John W. Warner, of Carlisle. By his union 
with Mar}^ Bishop, his third wife, John W. Ellis had four children, 
namely : Ella G., wife of John Wilbanks, of Springfield, Illinois ; George 
W., deceased: George, a farmer in Petersburg, Illinois: and John Bishop, 
deceased. 

Between the age of ten years and thirteen years ^lelvin Ellis 
attended the public schools of Carlisle, where his parents then lived. 
Going back, then, to the farm with the family, he assisted his father in 
his agricultural work until September, 1867, when he again entered the 
Carlisle schools, which he attended the following, three years. During the 
next six vears Mr. Ellis was engaged in farming during the summer 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 261 



seasons, but taught school during the winter terms. In ^larch, 1876, he 
bought a farm of eighty acres in Haddon township and for a number of 
years was busily and ]5rofitably employed in tilling the soil, carrying on a 
good business as a raiser of both grain and stock. This farm Mr. ElUs 
still owns and supervises, although since April, 1892, he has resided in 
Carlisle. He is a Democrat in politics, much interested in local affairs, 
and is one of the stockholders of the People's State Bank of Carlisle. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a 
member of the lodge and the encampment, and is a member of Ben Hur 
lodge of Carlisle. 

" On September 28, 1872, Mr. Ellis married Susan V. Tapp, who was 
born in Kansas City, Missouri, Xovember 10, 1850, but was bred and 
educated in Carlisle.' Her father, William Tapp, was born in Kentucky, 
and died when ^Irs. Ellis was but a child. His wife, whose maiden name 
wa: Zerelda Stansberry, was born August 18, 1813, in Kentucky, and died 
October 8. 1895, in Carlisle, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are the parents 
of three children, namely: Daisy, born July 24, 1873, was educated in 
Carlisle, taught school in Haddon township five years, after which she 
married Roscoe C. O'Haver and now has two children, Elene and Hubert 
j\laurice; Bessie O., born October 4, 1876. is the wife of Richard Chra- 
nicki, a rural free delivery mail carrier in Terre Haute, and has one child 
living, Alildred: and Floyd Elmo, born October 17, 1883. Mr. and 
Mrs. Roscoe C. O'Haver reside in Los Angeles, California, where he is 
engaged in the real estate business. Floyd Elmo Ellis, the youngest child, 
was graduated from the Carlisle high school in his thirteenth year, after 
which he studied for eighteen months in the Terre Haute high school 
and for two and one-half years in the State University at Bloomington. 
Then after teaching school for a year he was for two years engaged with 
the Title Trust Company at Los Angeles. Going from there to Washing- 
ton, he spent a }ear in Seattle, and in the fall of 1906 entered the law 
de])artment of Columbia LTniversity, from which he will graduate with 
the class of 1909. Religiously, Mr. Ellis and his family are members of 
the Christian church, of which he has been an elder and the treasurer for 
thirtv vears, and for the past ten years has also been superintendent of its 
Sundav-school. 



Rev. Daniki. Rv.\n, the merited and highly popular Methodist 
clergvman so well known in the various conferences of this country, espe- 
ciallv within the state of Indiana, very naturally finds a place in a work 
of this character. He was born in the city of Troy, New York, July 4, 
1846, a son of William and Catherine (Ryan) Ryan. The father was 
born in Ireland, as was the mother, though in no way related by ties of 
kinship. This worthy couple were united in marriage in their native 
country and emigrated to America about 1840, locating at Troy, New 
York, where he was engaged as a' mechanic. It was he who designed 
and made the first cook stove in Troy, which city is now so world-wide 
famous for the annual output of its stoves of all descriptions. He and his 



262 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

wife resided in Tro}- until death overtook them. He was a Democrat in 
his political views, and he and his wife were members of the Catholic 
church. They were the parents of six children, the subject being the 
fourth in order of birth, and is the only one now living. He went to Cin- 
ciimati, Ohio, in 1852, with an aunt Mary, who was a sister of his mother. 
In 1856, Mr. Ryan removed to Wayne county, Indiana, and lived on a 
farm, receiving his education at the district schools of that county. In 
April, 1862, he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and enlisted as a teamster and 
drove army wagons in the Shenandoah valley until July, when he returned 
to Cincinnati and enlisted in Company C, Thirteenth United States In- 
fantry, the date being July 10, 1862. He was discharged July 10, 1865, 
at Nashville, Tennessee. Sherman was the colonel of his regiment, which 
was the first command to plant the flag at Vicksburg. Mr. Ryan partici- 
pated in the following engagements : Chickasaw Bayou on December 29, 
Arkansas Post, Hains Bluff, Jackson (Mississippi), Raymond, Champion 
Hills, Vicksburg, the retaking of Jackson and Collinsville (Mississippi), 
October 11, 1863. They were en route to Corinth when the last named 
battle took place. They followed on to Missionary Ridge, and followed 
General Bragg to Georgia and back to Chattanooga, Nashville, etc. ]\Ir. 
Ryan was in fortunate circumstances when the war closed, for in all of 
his exposure to the enemy in so many hard fought battles he was never 
once injured by. wounds. 

He returned to Waj'-ne, cpli!>^tv,'atid followed blacksmithing at Boston, 
Indiana, until i8j2. He-tben. ukit^'djwith the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Boston and the following year \«aS licensed to preach. He took work 
as a supply in 1876 and joined the conference of southeastern Indiana in 
1881. His first work >vas 'af^EiVownville, where he remained four years, 
and afterward was. at, ■Mpimt''Canijel, Indiana, where he labored three 
years, and was ordained by Bishop Cyrus D. Foss at Columbus, Indiana, 
in September, 1883. He was ordained an elder by Bishop G. Andrews 
in September, 1886. His third appointment was at Columbus, Indiana, 
where he remained three years, and was then at Irvington for two years, 
Milroy one year, Hartsville three years, Utica four years, Flatrock two 
years, Rockport two years, New Lebanon two years, and three years at 
Carlisle. During the above period he remodeled and paid off the debt of 
thirty-three churches and three parsonages. He has presided at almost 
seven hundred funerals and has united in marriage five hundred couples. 
He has added to the various branches of the church about three thousand 
persons. He was elected department commander in 1898 and 1899 of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. After the war he was grand chaplain 
of the Grand Army of the Republic of Indiana, and was appointed on the 
commission for the return of the "Texas Rangers' '" flag at Dallas in 
October, 1899. He has attended conventions all over the country, and 
made the address of his life when the above flag, was returned to Dallas, 
where he received a great ovation. He loves historic trophies and has a 
fine collection of badges which he has had exquisitely framed and care- 
fully preserved. Mr. Ryan is a member of the Odd Fellows' order, 
having joined that society in 1868, and served two terms as grand chap- 



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HISTORY OF SLLLIXAX COUNTY 263 

lain of the order, and has filled all of its chairs and been a representative 
to the Grand Lodge two terms. He is also advanced in ^lasonry, and 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Dumont Post Xo. 18, at 
Shelbvville, Indiana. Politically he is a stanch defender of Republican 
principles, and has delivered addresses in the principal larger cities of 
this country. 

Of his" domestic relations it should here be said that he was married 
Alarch 5, 1867, to Nancy Jane Rife, born in Wayne county, Indiana, a 
daughter of Daniel and Cynthia (Stanley) Rife. They were also natives 
of Indiana. Her father died before her birth, and she obtained her educa- 
tion in her native county. Five children have been born to Air. and Airs. 
Ryan, as follows, in the order of their birth : Anna, wife of Nollis 
Beard, residing in Liberty, Indiana, and they have one daughter, Teressa ; 
William, residing in Cleveland, Ohio, was assistant superintendent of the 
reformatory school of Jeiifersonville about four years; Teressa, wife of 
John T. Conover, a graduate of the Columbia University, and they now 
reside in New York city, where he is an important factor in the Fiske 
firm of bankers and brokers. His wife was the leading woman in the 
"Earl of Pawtucket" of New York city for six months. She played 
Miranda in "The Tempest," and traveled with Ward and James, going 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans on her tours and made five conti- 
nental trips and played in all the leading cities in the United States and 
Canada. Walter died in infancy; Adolph F. is unmarried. 



AIr.s. Flora A. (McClure) Haddon. — An accomplished and enter- 
prising business woman, Mrs. Flora A. Haddon, widow of the late Cap- 
tain Jesse Haddon, of Haddon township, Sullivan county, is devoting 
her energies to the care of her estate, which is among, the best in the 
neighborhood. A daughter of Hiram McClure, she was born March 16, 
1 86 1, on Shaker prairie, Knox county, Indiana. Her grandparents, 
Samuel and Sarah (Curry) McClure, natives of Union county, Ken- 
tuckv, were among the pioneer settlers of Knox county and for many 
years were leading farmers of Shaker prairie. 

A lifelong resident of Shaker prairie, Hiram AlcClure was born 
there September 6, 1824, and died November 20, 1876. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and both he and his father used to market their hogs and 
grain in Vincennes and Evansville, sending it down the river on flatboats. 
He married Rosella Seaney, and into their home nine children were born, 
as follows: Sarah, wife of Cook Chapman, of Deming, New Mexico; 
Mary, deceased ; S. B., deceased ; Albert B., of Bruceville, Indiana ; Hen- 
rietta, wife of Henry Frederick, a retired farmer residing in Bruceville ; 
Maggie, wife of James Whipps, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
book; Flora A., of this sketch; Edgar M.. living near Oaktown, in the 
vicinitv of the old McClure homestead ; and Jasper F., living, in the same 
neighborhood near Oaktown. 

" After her graduation from the Oaktown high school. Flora A. 
McClure taught for ten terms in Knox county, during her last term being 



264 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

a teacher in the graded schools of Oaktown. On February i, 1901. she 
married Captain Jesse Haddon, an esteemed resident of Haddon township. 
A son of David Haddon. Captain Haddon was born July 24, 1837, on 
the farm where he spent his entire life, his death occurring November 26, 
1906. He came of honored pioneer stock, his grandfather, John Haddon, 
a native of Virginia, having settled in that part of Sullivan county now 
known as Haddon township, in 1804, where he entered a tract of twenty- 
three hundred acres. His home, known as Fort Haddon, was a place of 
refuge for the early families that settled in this vicinity, all seeking pro- 
tection within the fort whenever the Indians became hostile. 

Captain Haddon boasted of his life as a soldier and none could 
dispute him. Very soon after the breaking out of the Civil war he offered 
his services to his country, enlisting in 1861 as a private in the Twenty- 
first Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was a private until July 4, 1861 : 
then corporal until February 16. 1862 ; sergeant until June i, 1862 : second 
lieutenant until July 30, 1863; first lieutenant until October 8, 1864; then 
for gallantry and meritorious conduct was promoted to the rank of captain 
in Company D, Twenty-first Indiana Heavy Artillery. He took part in 
many important engagements of the war, among them the battle of Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana, in 1862, and the siege of Port Hudson, where, while 
in the top of a tree, watching with a fieldglass the movements of the 
enemy, he received a gunshot wound in the right arm that came near 
proving fatal, and did maim him for life. His regiment was converted 
into heavy artillery. He was mustered out of service January 10. 1866. 
receiving his honorable and final discharge after four and a half years 
of service for his country. Captain Haddon was a man who did not 
know fear and was ever ready to perform his part as a faithful soldier, 
and his record as a soldier was most worthy of commendation. 

Returning to Haddon township at the close of the conflict. Captain 
Haddon resumed his former occupation and on the old Haddon home- 
stead was for many years profitably employed in general farming and 
stock-raising, meeting with noteworthy success in his undertakings. The 
captain was noted as a breeder and raiser of exceptionally fine horses, and 
among some of those sold at public sale after his death having been five 
Norman Percheron mares which brought $1,598, others being sold at 
$400, $305, and $230 each. Four fat hogs were sold for $121, and four 
deer brought a good price. The captain was a lover of animals of all 
kinds, being especially fond of horses, dogs and birds. He was a man of 
strong individuality, peculiar perhaps in some ways, always wearing, his 
hair in long locks over his shoulders, and wearing a hat made expressly 
for him, of the finest beaver and after his own design, being of the som- 
brero order, with a brim fifteen inches in width, and he always carried a 
Colt's revolver in a holster attached to his belt. He was a stanch Repub- 
lican in politics, an active worker in the party, and belonged to the 
Republican county organization, and at one time was Republican nominee 
for state senator. Fraternally he was a member of Carlisle Lodge No. 50, 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was owner and pro- 
prietor of the Carlisle opera house and donated the use of this institution 



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HISTORY OF SL"l.r.l\'A\ COUXTY 265 

for the Woman's Relief Corps ehaptcr. Ily his request this corjjs accepted 
his offer. They still meet at the opera house, for after his-death his widow- 
extended to the corps the same privilege, knowing the earnest desire of 
the captain to perpetuate the loyalty of the rising generation in this com- 
munity. She is using every effort to carry forth his plans of promoting 
the loyalty which was so firmly instilled in his own bosom. Me had a 
fiagstatf erected upon the opera house, and as long as he lived he kept 
"Old tilory" afloat, to remind the youths that he was earnest in the affairs 
of his country. 

Cajitain Haddon wedded Miss Flora .-\. McLlure. l-'ebruary 1, 1901. 
Mrs. Haddnn has out- child, Jessie Helen, whose birth occurred January 2, 
1902, and they reside on the old homestead. She is a bright little child 
and in the first grade of the Carlisle public school.. Mrs. Haddon, like 
the captain, is a lover of animals, and is the owner of a full-blooded 
Xorman Percheron mare, which is registered, and she is a shareholder in 
the National French Draft Iforse Association, of I'airfield, low a, of which 
the Captain was a member and stockholder. Mrs. Haddon takes a leading 
part in the Carlisle Chapter No. 255, Woman's Relief Corps. She is press 
correspondent of this society, which is in a very flourishing condition. 
CJn Tuesday, January 8, 1909. the following officers were duly elected : 
Miss Dercie Kivett, president ; Mrs. Sarah Hoover, senior vice president ; 
Mrs. Mildred Yocuni, junior vice ])resident ; Mrs. Martha Risinger, 
chaplain: Mrs. Arvilla Johnson, treasurer.:' Mrs. I'rances Hutchinson, 
secretary; Mrs. Ida Whalen, conductor; Mrs. Flora Haddon, guard. 
This society has for its mission charit)- and a friendly hand to all. Car- 
lisle Chapter No. 255 donated and assisted with proper ceremony in the 
erection of the beautiful flag on the public school building of Carlisle. 
Its very color speaks to one — Red for valor : White, purity ; and Blue, 
justice and friendship. L'nder its folds is the motto : Fraternity, Charit\- 
and Lovaltv. 



Ch.nri.f.s L. Piuti.i:, one of the uji-to-datc farmers of Sullivan county 
soil, is a native of Haddon township, Sullivan county, born November 11. 
1871, a son of James W. and iVIary A. ( Cron ) Pi'rtle. Of Mr. Pirtle's 
parentage, let it be said in this connection that his father was born August 
8, 1837, in Haddon township, and died December 31, 1904, in the same 
subdivision of Sullivan county, Indiana. The mother was born July 11. 
1842. in Bloomington. Indiana, and died March 16, 1907. Both the father 
and mother were buried within the Odd Fellow^s' cemetery at Carlisle, 
Indiana. James W., the father, was a son of Alfred and Elizabeth Pirtle, 
the former a native of Kentucky who came to Sullivan county wdien but 
six years of age with his parents, Jacob Pirtle and wife, farmers. They 
came here in 1816, and were counted amojTg. the early pioneer band in 
this section of the state of Indiana. They located near the old blockhouse 
at Carlisle. The Pirtles were all farmers by occui^ation. They were very 
active and influential in subduing and perfecting the county, aiding in 
transforming a wilderness into a fertile and prciductixe garden spot. 



266 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

James W. Pirtle, the father, remained at home until the date of his 
marriage; when he commenced work in a sawmill, continuing one year, 
and then purchased a farm of sixty-six acres. He was industrious and 
frugal, so that from time to time he added more land to his place, until he 
owned a tract of one hundred and fifty-six acres of excellent farm land, 
all in Haddon township, and where he spent the remnant of his days. His 
wife, subject's mother, Mary (Cron) Pirtle, was the daughter of Jacob 
and Louise Cron. The father was a shoemaker and leather tanner. He 
served an apprenticeship beside Andrew Johnson. Mr. Cron and a part- 
ner laid out San Antonio, Texas, prior to the Mexican war. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Pirtle were as follows : Dr. George, 
born November 17, 1868, and residing in Carlisle, Indiana, married Belle 
Julian; Charles L., of this narrative; Jacob A., born March 7, 1824, and 
now residing on the old homestead, is unmarried ; and Edward, born 
August II, 1881, married Clara Fiddler and resides in Paxton. Indiana. 

Charles L. Pirtle remained at home until his marriage, March 27, 
1895, to Lizzie Wilson, born December 12. 1870, in Haddon township, 
this county, a daughter of James K. and Laura Wilson, both of whom are 
living east of Carlisle. Mr. Pirtle purchased fifty-five acres the year 
before his marriage and moved to the same, which forms a part of his 
present farm in Hamilton township. He now ovi'ns eighty acres, and all 
is well improved and cared for through his untiring industry and good 
management. He has but recently completed one of the most thoroughly 
modern farmhouses within Sullivan county. He operates a combined 
grain-producing and stock-raising farm, and is thoroughly interested in 
his work, which he performs with much intelligence, thus meeting with 
the success which always follows such labor as an agriculturist, as well 
as in any other calling. 

In his political understanding Mr. Pirtle advocates and votes the 
principles of the Democratic party. Believing in protection for his family 
through the medium of mutual life insurance, he has wisely become a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to Camp No. 
3967, at Sullivan. Both he and his wife are consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Four children have blessed this happy home 
circle: Paul, born December 19. 1895; Lee, born September 14, 1899; 
Harold, born August 4, 1903; and James Hinkle, born August 11, 1908. 
The two older children are now (1908) attending the public schools. 



J.AJiES E. BiTTLE. — James E. Bittle, an extensive land owner and one 
of the practical farmers of Gill township, Sullivan county, was born 
December 21. 1865, in Champaign county, Illinois. He is the son of Silas 
and Fannie (DeVere) Bittle, the former born in October, 1842, in Put- 
nam county, Indiana, and now residing in Tippecanoe county. The sub- 
ject's mother was born in February, 1847, in Fountain county, Indiana, 
and died October 11, 1908. Silas Bittle was the son of William and 
Landis Bittle, the former a native of Virginia who went to Indiana about 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COL'XTY 267 

1830. locating in Putnam county, where he entered government land and 
remained a few years, and then disposed of his land and moved to Alont- 
gomery county, where he purchased other lands. Later, thinking to hetter 
his circumstances, he sold this tract of land and went to Fountain county. 
In 1868 he sold out there and went to Anderson county, Texas, and there 
retired. He took about sixty thousand dollars with him when he went 
south. He was a wonderful worker and a shrewd trader and made many 
large deals in stock. He died about 1878 in Palestine, Texas, and was 
buried in that city. 

Silas Bittle, our subject's father, remained at home and assisted his 
father until he reached his majority, when he married and removed to 
Champaign county, Illinois, where he worked two years and then returned 
to Fountain county, Indiana, where he bought an eighty acre farm, to 
which later he added sixty-six acres. He remained on that place for 
thirteen years, then sold his farm of one hundred and forty-six acres. 
He then moved to Montgomery county and purchased two hundred acres, 
and lived there seven years, after which he sold, and bought the two 
hundred and forty acre farm on which he now resides, the same being 
situated in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. This farm is said by good and 
unbiased judges to be one of the finest within the entire state. Mr. Bittle 
is an extensive swine raiser, running mostly to Poland-China stock. The 
children born to Silas Bittle and wife are as follows : James E. ; Frances, 
born March 12, 1867, married Charles McCorkle and lives in Tippe- 
canoe count}', Indiana ; Alonzo, born December 14, 1869, resides in Chi- 
cago and is a traveling salesman for a drug firm, married Hattie Phillips ; 
Luther, born September I, 1877, resides in Tippecanoe count}', married 
\'era Buxton. 

Leaving the common schools, James E. Bittle entered DePauw Col- 
lege at Greencastle, Indiana, where he took a one year's course, after 
which he went to Purdue college, and there took a course in mechanics, 
being at the last named school for two years. He then taught for three 
winters, working on the farm during the summer months. He worked 
at farming until twenty-eight years of age, when he purchased a quarter 
section of land in Fountain county, Indiana, which in 1902 he sold and 
came to Sullivan county, purchasing two hundred and fifteen acres, but 
he traded this in May, 1908, for two hundred and eighty acres in Gill 
township, where he now resides, and in addition to general farming he is 
extensively engaged in raising many hogs. Politically Mr. Bittle is a 
believer in the principles of the Socialist party, but so far has voted the 
Democratic ticket. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
while his wife is connected with the Christian denomination. He has been 
an extensive traveler, liaving been in more than half of the states within 
the L'^nion. At one time he and his brother owned a line of elevators on 
the Clover Leaf railroad system, but he sold out in 1906. 

He was united in marriage, June 29, 1904, to Cora E. Curtis, born 
June 29, 1883, in Sullivan county, Indiana, a daughter of J. R. and Olive 
(Alooney) Curtis, the former born March 4, 1840, in Sullivan countv, 
and the latter October 20, 1842, in Floyd county, Indiana, both of whom 



268 HISTORY OF SULLI\^\N COUNTY 

are still living within Sullivan county. Two children were born to ^Ir. 
and Mrs. Bittle : Burton Keith, born April i6, 1905, and Frances Jaunetta, 
born October 9, 1907. 



Clarence Edward Coffmax, widely known as a breeder and trainer 
of fast horses, whose farm and stables are located in Hamilton township, 
Sullivan county, was born on the 8th of JNIarch, 1876, and is a son of the 
late Dr. Stuart S. Cofifman, one of the leading pioneers, practicing physi- 
cians and public men of the county. The father was a citizen of such 
unusual activity and broad usefulness, a factor so closely identified with 
the higher progress of Sullivan county, that a full account of his services 
and a delineation of his noble character will be found in other pages of 
this work. Clarence E. Coffman, of this biography, is the fifth and young- 
est child born to Dr. and Philena (Rodman) Coffman. The mother, who 
is a native of Washington county, Indiana, was born September 12, 1832, 
and still resides in Sullivan, a devoted member of the Baptist church and 
an honored pioneer mother of the county. 

;\Ir. Cofifman was educated in the public schools of Sullivan, graduat- 
ing from its high school with the class of 1895. He then became asso- 
ciated with his father in the breeding and sale of standard and fast horses, 
and from 1899 to 1902 also conducted a drug business. Following his 
inclinations and obvious talents, however, he abandoned his drug store 
and resumed the sole raising and handling of horses, in which specialty 
he has attained such high standing. In 1903 Mr. Cofifman centered his 
business on a fine stock farm of two hundred and seventy-seven acres, 
where he owns twenty-five head of registered trotting stock and operates 
a first-class boarding and training stable. Among this fine array of 
animals mav be named : "Wyoming," a trotting sire with a record of 
2:2914; "Joe W.," 2:16^; "Gerfrude," 2:26; "Alleene W.," 2:25; 
"Molly Wilkes," 2 :22}4 ; "Philena Coffman," 2:21^; and "Bill I jams," 
2:23^4 — all these figures being trotting records. Since 1904 Mr. Coff- 
man has also been operating a public stable on his farm, which has met 
with marked success and which has enabled him to give records to other 
animals than his own, including the following: "Maxie C," 2:16^2. 
trotting; "Fortune," 2:i7>4, trotting; "Nightingale," 2:36, pacing; and 
"Red Hooker," 2:45, trotting. "Philena Coffman," before mentioned, is 
the first two-year-old to reach a record of 2:30 in Sullivan county, and 
"Gertrude" is the only horse in the county, that ever won a purse over a 
Grand Circuit track. He has raised colts from such noted sires as 
"Axtell," "Margrave," "Baron Review," "Boreal," "The Captain." 
"Redette" and "Axcyone." He is also a well-known breeder of Jersey 
and Hereford cattle and fancy Berkshire swine. Mr. Coft'man is a thor- 
ough believer in Democracy, both in the conduct of party and the general 
affairs of the world. He has made an eminent success of his business, 
but has never advanced at the expense of his good name or the deep 
respect of his home community. 

Married April 19, 1899, to Miss Alice McDonald, Air. Coft'man's 



HISTORY OF SULLINAX COUNTY 269 

wife is a native of Roscoe. Ohio, born January 27, 1878, and a daughter 
of James W. and ^Margaret (Graves) McDonald. Mrs. Coffnian removed 
to Sullivan with her parents in her early childhood, was reared and edu- 
cated in the county, attended the State Normal, and was engaged in 
teaching for four years preceding her marriage. The children of this 
union are Dorothy and Mary Catherine Coffman, and the mother is an 
earnest member of the Christian churcli. 



Stu.\kt S. Coffm.w, 'SI. D. (deceased) — One of the broadest 
minded and most useful citizens of Sullivan, and an able and deeply 
beloved physician of many years' standing, the late Dr. Stuart S. Coti'man 
was born near Zanesville, Ohio, on the 12th of March, 1828, and died at 
his beautiful hotel and home in the city named, on the 15th of November, 
11)03. -^^ 'I'' early age he came with his parents to Greenville, Floyd 
county, Indiana, and resided on a farm near that place until he reached 
his majority. During his boyhood he attended Greenville Seminary, and 
in 1851 was matriculated at the Kentucky School of Medicine, in Alarch 
of the latter year entering the medical department of the Transylvania 
University, Lexington, Kentucky, from which he graduated in 1852, with 
his degree of M. D. He then located for practice at Orleans, Iniliana, 
where he continued until i85(), when he became a resident of Sullivan, 
residing there for' the remainder of his life as an active practitioner, an 
he mured citizen and a public man of strong and high influence. 

Dr. Coffman was engaged in the active practice of his profession 
from 1851) to 1881, and during that period he was perhaps as widely 
known and as deeply revered as any citizen of the county. This was also 
the time of his most prominent public service. Always a firm and earnest 
Democrat, he served as chairman of the county central committee for 
ten vears ; was a member of the town board and the school board, and in 
i872-() represented Sullivan county in the legislature. In connection with 
his practice. Dr. Coti'man engaged in the drug business, but when lie 
retired from both, in 1881, removed to his farm near Sullivan, where for 
seven years he devoted his time to the raising of fine cattle and fast horses. 
In 1888 he returned to town, where he was an extensive real estate owner 
and the proprietor of a fine hotel until his death in 1903. 

P'rom the days of his early manhood Dr. Cof¥man was an active 
Mason, and at the time of his death had filled all the local offices, having 
been past master of his lodge for many years. Sullivan Lodge No. 263, 
of which he was so long a member, noted his death with the profoundest 
evidences of regret and high appreciation of his services and character. 
Its touching resolutions of respect and condolence referred to him as 
"eniinentlv successful in his profession'' ; as one who "took an active part 
m all public affairs in connection with the history of the county in tlie 
earlier part of his life" : and "was respected and honored by the commu- 
nitv in which he lived and died, and venerated by his neighbors and 
friends." After noting that "r.rotlicr Coffman was made a I\Iason prior 



270 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

to his coming to Sullivan in 1859" ; that he had lived to see the roster of 
the local lodge completely changed, the resolutions concluded as follows : 
"Brother Coffman lived a consistent Mason and kept his mind and con- 
science divested of all the vices and superfluities of life, thereby filling his 
body as a living statue for that spiritual building — that house not made 
with hands — eternal in the heavens. 

"Therefore, be it resolved. That in the death of Brother Cofifman 
his widow has lost a devoted companion, his children a loving and kind 
father, Sullivan Lodge, A. F. and A. M., No. 263, a true and faithful 
member, and the community an honored and respected citizen. 

"Next, a copy of these resolutions be furnished the family of the 
deceased, and published in each of the county papers and spread on the 
records of the lodge." 

The funeral of the deceased, which was largely attended, was con- 
ducted by Sullivan Lodge, and the remains were interred at Center Ridge 
Cemetery. The Doctor was also an Odd Fellow in good standing. 

In 1852 Dr. Coffman was united in marriage to Aliss Philena S. Rod- 
man, and the following children were born of this union : William, who 
died in infancy ; Ida ; Mamie, wife of George T. Johnson ; Ella, now Mrs. 
T. P. Townes and superintendent of the business interests of the Cofifman 
estate in Sullivan : and Clarence Edward, of this sketch. The surviving 
widow resides in Sullivan as a revered pioneer of the county and a 
devoted member of the Baptist church, her birth having occurred in 
Washington county, Indiana, on the 12th of September, i832._ 



Richard Adams, one of the enterprising agriculturists of Turman 
township, Sullivan county, was born March 31, 1845, i'T Devonshire, 
England, a son of William G. and Mary Ann (Tucker) Adams, both 
born in England. Six children were born to these parents in England 
and one in Illinois, namely : John, now deceased ; William, residing in 
Turman township ; Thomas, deceased : Richard, subject ; Samuel, de- 
ceased ; George, deceased ; Henry, born in this country and now deceased. 
The parents came to America when Richard was yet a small boy. The 
family located in Clark county, Illinois, and remained there about five 
years, when they moved to Turman township. Sullivan county, Indiana, 
where the father and mother both died. The father was always a farmer, 
and in his political views a Democrat. Both he and the good wife were 
members of the Baptist church. 

Richard Adams, of this memoir, had but little opportunity to obtain 
an education. He attended school taught in a log. building, the floor and 
seats of which were made of puncheon, the latter resting on natural sticks 
for legs. There were no desks in front of the seats, but a board against 
the wall served for the scholars to write on. There being no windows, 
the light was admitted through greased paper covering an aperture in 
the wall. He remained at home until he was of age. He enlisted in the 
Seventy-first Indiana A'olunteer Regiment, being a member of Company 






■?» 




MctLi^ cArtUo^^ 



THE MEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILOEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SL'LLIVAN COUNTY 271 

I, the date of his enhstment being August, 1863. He was wounded in 
the left arm at Richmond, Kentucky, and was honorably discharged on 
account of disabilit}-. After the close of the rebellion he resumed farming 
with his father and continued until the latter's death, when he inherited a 
part of the old homestead. He now owns a farm of five hundred and one 
acres, upon which he resides and carries on a general farming business in 
which he is highly successful, and he has a nice set of buildings, recently 
erected. Politically he is a supporter of Democratic principles. He is a 
member of the Blue lodge of the Masonic order at Graysville. 

Mr. Adams has been married five times. His first wife was Mary 
^Vells, born in Ohio. One daughter was the fruit of this union, Martha, 
now deceased. His second wife was Rebecca J. Chandler, born in Casey, 
Illinois ; now deceased. One daughter was born of this marriage, I^ula, 
who died aged six years. For the third wife Mr. Adams married Louisa 
Ash. born in Greene coimty, Indiana, and she is also deceased. Two 
children were born of this union — Rebecca, deceased ; and Minnie, wife 
of John Osborn, residing in Turman township, and have two children, 
]\Iabel C. and Hazel. For the fourth companion Mr. Adams married 
Martha Burnett Adams, a widow of the subject's brother Thomas. She 
is also deceased, and three of her children were reared — Aladge, unmar- 
ried and at home : Gertrude, wife of William Lottery and mother of two 
children, Harold and Martha E. ; and Bertha, who married George Burton 
antl has two sons. Forest A. and Hubbard. His present wife's maiden 
name was Lulu Rogers, who with her husband are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 



\achel D. Cummins, a retired farmer and one of the veterans of 
the civil war, residing at Sullivan, Indiana, was born May 30, 1842, at 
Terre Haute, a son of John A. and Mary (Crist) Cummins, the former a 
jiative of Kentucky, born in 1813, and the latter of Clark county, Indiana. 
The father came to Indiana in 1819 with his parents. The grandfather, 
named Robert Cummins, located in Curry township and remained until 
his death. The great-grandfather was born in Scotland, and with his four 
brothers emigrated to the United States and settled in Pennsylvania. Our 
subject's father and mother were married in Clay county, living for a 
time on a farm there on land now included within the city of Terre Haute. 
Subsequently they removed to Lewis, Vigo county, and still later to Curry 
township, Sullivan county, where Vachel D. was reared and where the 
parents spent the remainder of their days. The mother died in the six- 
ties and the father in the eighties. He followed farming for a livelihood, 
and by trade was a carpenter. They were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The children born to this worthy couple were as fol- 
lows: David, deceased; Sareptia, deceased; Vachel D. ; Joseph; Eliza 
Jane; Nancy, deceased; and John A., Jr. 

\'achel D. Cummins was educated in Curry township and remained 
at home until twenty years of age, and then engaging in farm pursuits on 
his own account, continued until the autumn of 1891. when he removed to 

Vol. 11—18 



272 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Sullivan. He was elected to the office of county recorder in the fall of 
1890, on the Democratic ticket, taking the office in the fall of that vear, 
and served until 1898, holding two terms. In 1900 he engaged in the 
marble business with M. E. Drake, continuing, until 1906. He served eight 
years as township trustee of Jackson township. That Mr. Cummins 
was patriotic is shown by the fact that at the time of the Civil war he 
served from October 13, 1864, to October 13, 1865, as a member of Com- 
pany B, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry. He participated in the battles of 
Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee, and at Spring Hill and other engage- 
ments. 

He was united in marriage, March 10, 1863, to Minerva Watts, born 
in Anderson county, Kentucky, December 31, 1842, a daughter of Wood- 
ford and Lacy (Steele) Watts. They came to Indiana in the fifties, locat- 
ing near Fairbanks, in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, but later 
removed to Jackson township, where they lived until their death. They 
were farmers and reared a family of ten children, five of whom are still 
living. The children born to Mr. and 'Sirs. Cummins are as follows : 
Francis Verdie, residing in Jackson township, married Lucinda Price 
and has four children, named Gladys, William D., Francis R. and Esther. 
Vachel Dean resides at Hymera, Indiana, engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness. He married Maude Asbury and has three children, named Floyd, 
Ralph and Ruth. Lura Etna, now deceased, married Daniel Berline and 
left three children, named Lola, Arval and Etna. Wint resides at 
Hymera, Indiana, engaged in the drug trade. He married Margaret 
Boston and has two children. Max and Bernice. John died in infancy. 
Charles lives at Terre Haute, where he works at the harness trade. He 
married Zona Luzador, who died leaving two children, Hazel and Ruel. 
Mary resides in South Dakota, the wife of Dr. James Gregg. Kerthbert 
died in infancy. William M. resides in Chicago, unmarried, and is a 
druggist. Delbert M. resides at Hymera, Indiana, and is a clothier. 
He married Lottie Cummins, and has one child, Mildred. James, un- 
married, is in California, a stone mason by trade. Jesse, unmarried, 
resides with his brother in California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cummins are members of the LTnited Brethren church, 
'and he is connected with the Odd Fellows order and the Grand Army 
of the Republic post at Sullivan, Indiana. The father, John A. Cummins, 
was a prominent character in Sullivan county during his lifetime. In 
politics he was a firm believer in the fundamental principles of the 
Democratic party and served nine years as a county commissioner. 
Our subject's maternal grandfather, Nicholas Crist, was a pioneer in 
Clark county and later in Lewis township of Clay county, where he spent 
his last vears. 



Peter B. M.\y, one of the representatives of the legal profession 
in Sullivan, Indiana, and for many years a preacher in the Church of 
Christ, is a native of Orange county, Indiana, born May I, 1864, a son 
of John Wesley and Susan Carr May. The father was born in Monroe 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 273 

county, Indiana, December 25, 1824, and died at I'.edford. Indiana, in 
November, 1904. He was of German descent and bad always followed 
agricultural jnirsuits, botb in ^Monroe and Orange counties. Politically 
be was a Democrat, and in bis lodge connections was a Mason. He 
retired at Bedford, Indiana. Peter P). May's motber was born in Orange 
county June 7, 1840, and now resides with ber son Peter B. Botb sbe 
and her busband were members of the Christian church. Their children 
were as follows: Mary C, now the wife of \\'inepark Fields, residing 
at Cale, Indiana; Peter B., of this sketch; and lielle M., now the wife 
of Thomas Roach, of Cale, Indiana. 

I'etcr B. May was reared on a farm and nlitained his early educa- 
tion at the district school and later attended the Normal College at 
Mitchell, Indiana. After completing his course at that institution, be 
attended the Elliottsville Training School, where be took a literary course, 
He then entered the Bible College at Lexington, Kentucky. Having a 
taste for the study of law, he pursued the study of this science at the 
Indianapolis Law College, but was admitted to the bar before be left 
the Law College, which was in 1901. L^pon leaving Law College be 
was admitted to both the Federal and Supreme court bars of Indiana. 
He commenced the practice of law at IScdford in 1902 and practiced there 
until 1906, and then moved to Sullivan, where he has practiced since. 
He was state's attorney for Indiana in the case of Indiana against Ulysses 
G. Sutberlan for the murder of his wife at New Albany, Indiana, in the 
spring of 1906. This trial lasted for one month lacking three days. 

Politically Mr. May is a firm supporter of the Democratic party, 
and in 1908 he was a candidate for prosecuting attorney. He is a 
thoroughly self-made man, having to push his own way through the earlier 
years of his manhood unaided by influential friends. He followed the 
ministry for seventeen years, preaching at points in Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois, Indian Territory and Texas, but he claimed Bedford as bis home. 
He also preached much in Sullivan county, Indiana, and does yet when 
occasion seems to demand it. The church of his choice is that of the 
Church of Christ. He is a member of the Tribe of Ben Hur at Sullivan, 
being a "beneficial" member of this organization. 

]\Ir. May was married, December 30, 1896, to Estella Gertrude Xeal, 
born at Bicknell, Knox county, Indiana, December fi, 1875. She was 
educated in her native county and was reared on a farm and taught to 
perform well the duties of such an independent life, which has ever been 
of excellent practical service to her. By this union two children have 
been born : Jov De.xter and ]\Iarv Belle. 



Ir.\ .Augustus Nesbit. proprietor of the flouring mills at Sullivan, 
is a native of Hamilton township, Sullivan county, Indiana, born Sep- 
tember 24, 1855, a son of William O. and Nancy Jane (Eaton) Nesbit. 
The father was born in Kentucky December 26. 1825, and died lune 22, 
i8g6, in Nebraska. The Nesbits are of Welsh descent. }klr. Nesbit's 



274 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

mother was a life-long resident of Hamilton township, and she died in 
1876. After the death of his first wife William O. Nesbit married 
Louise A. McKinlev. a native of Sullivan county, who now resides in 
Fairbury, Nebraska. He followed farming for his occupation, coming 
to Sullivan county when but six years of age with his parents, Thomas 
and Betsey (Morgan) Nesbit, who entered some of the first land from 
the government taken up in this section of the state. They both died in 
Sullivan county. William O. Nesbit served in the Eighty-fifth Indiana 
infantry regiment, being a member of Company H, under Captain W'. T. 
Crawford, for three years during the Civil war period. Politically he 
was an advocate of the principles of the Republican party. In the latter 
part of the seventies he moved to Fairbury, Nebraska, and there in a 
new but fertile section purchased a farm of eighty acres, upon which 
he died. Both he and his wife were members of the Christian church, 
in which body he served as an elder for a number of years. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. William O. Nesbit are as follows : John, of 
Sullivan county ; Euphratus H.. of Hamilton township ; Ira A., of this 
memoir; Sarah E., wife of Albert K. Bo3'Ie, of Sullivan county: William 
R., of Sullivan, whose sketch will appear in this work ; and Anna 
Elizabeth, wife of Hardy Reins, residing in Hamilton township. 

Ira A. Nesbit was reared on the farm, surrounded by the scenes of 
genuine rural life, and he remained at home imtil about twenty years 
of age, when he commenced to farm on his own account, continuing for 
a quarter of a century. He then sold his place and moved to Sullivan in 
1898. Here he purchased a grist mill which belonged to J. T. Reid, 
which he has since been successfully operating as a custom mill, also 
buying and selling grain. In his political choice he favors the platforms 
of the Republican party. He has prudently become a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, which provides him with a safe life insur- 
ance, as well as giving him other fraternal benefits throughout his life. 
Mr. Nesbit and family are exemplary members of the Christian church. 

One of the important events in this man's career was his marriage, 
in 1883, to Mvrtle J. Johnson, born in Turman township March 31, 
1865. She was educated in the schools of her native township. Her 
parents, who were natives of Sullivan county, Indiana, and both now 
deceased, were Cyrus and Catherine (McClanahan) Johnson. Two chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Nesbit to cheer and brighten their 
home circle: Glennalda, born December 7, 1884, is now attending De 
Pauw University at Greencastle, Indiana. She has already taught three 
terms of school in the country districts in Sullivan county. Grace Lois, 
born August 16, 1886, now teaching in Sullivan county. 



Abraham Thomas Hazelrigg, known by the people of Sullivan 
county by reason of his fifteen years' service as a school teacher, as 
well as having been the deputy county treasurer a number of years, will 
form the subject of this memoir. He was born September 17, 1867, 



HISTORY OF SULLI\'AN COUNTY 275 

in Ciirrv township, Sullivan county, Indiana, a son of William and Alary 
(Dous,das) Hazclrigg. William 'Hazelrigg was the son of John W. 
Hazelrigg, who was a native of Kentucky, born 1817, and died at Farm- 
ersburg, Indiana, in 1884. The grandmother ot Abraham T. Hazelrigg 
was Elizabeth Llo>d, born in Kentucky in 181 7, and died in 1887, at 
Farmersburg, Indiana. This worthy couple were of Scotch-Irish descent. 
Samuel Douglas, the maternal grandfather, was a native of Virginia, 
born in 1802^ and died in Curry township, Sullivan county, Indiana, in 
1875. Sarah, his wife, was born in Kentucky in 1807, and died in 1891, 
in Curry township, this county, and they were of Irish lineage. The 
great-grandfather, William Hazelrigg, was born in 1794, and his wife 
Elizabeth, in 1795. The grandfather, John W. Hazelrigg, came to 
Sullivan county and entered what was known as canal land in Fairbanks 
township. He' finally retired from the toils and cares of his farm and 
died at Farmersburg, Indiana. The maternal grandfather, Samuel Dong- 
as, of Virginia, came to Indiana at about the same time as did the 
Hazelriggs. He married Sarah Jewell, a native of Kentucky. Mr. 
Douglas took up land in Curry township and died there in 1875. 

Our subject's father and mother were married in Curry township in 
the earlv sixties. Both the father and grandfather always followed farm 
life. Ill his political choice the father was a Democrat and he belonged 
to the C)dd Fellows order and the Christian church, as did also his wife 
in her lifetime. Mrs. Mary (Douglas) Hazelrigg, the mother of Abra- 
ham T., was born in 1840 and died in 1875. After her death Mr. 
Hazelrigg married for a second wife Rebecca Peak, born in Sullivan 
county, Indiana, and she still survives. To the first union there were 
born seven children, as follows : Lethia, wife of George A. McCord ; 
Oliver, deceased ; John S., of Curry township ; Abraham T. ; Albert E., 
of Sullivan: Rebecca A., wife of D. C. McKinney; and one who died in 
infancv. By the second marriage there is no issue. William Hazelrigg 
was for many years a successful agriculturist and paid much attention 
to stock raising. He was public spirited and ever took an active part 
in the work of the church of his choice — the Christian. He died March 
17, 1908. 

Abraham T. Hazelrigg, a son of William and Mary (Douglas) 
Hazelrigg., lived on the old homestead with his father and attended the 
district "schools of his neighborhood and later the Sullivan Normal for 
several terms. Having acquired a good education, he taught school for 
fifteen vears in Sullivan county. Before teaching, however, he had 
attended the State Normal at Terre Haute, and subsequently the National 
Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, graduating in the teachers' course 
with the class of 1894. From January i, 1902, to January i, 1908, 
he served as deputy county treasurer of Sullivan county having been 
elected on the Democratic ticket. He is a stockholder in the First 
National Bank at Shelburn, and helped to organize the bank in 1905. 
He IS a member of the Odd Fellows order, including the Encampment 
and Rebekah degrees. He is a member of the Christian church at 
Sullivan, Indiana. 



276 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Mr. Hazelrigg was married on June 29, 1898. to Genevra Dix. born 
in Curry township, Sullivan county, February 13, 1879. She was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and remained at home until her marriage. 
She is the daughter of William T. and Parintha B. (Pierson) Dix. both 
residing in Hamilton township and both born and reared in Indiana, he 
in Sullivan and she in \'igo county. He is a farmer and stock raiser. 



William M. Dr-'VPEr, who is numbered among the important busi- 
ness factors of the enterprising inland city of Sullivan, Indiana, and 
who is engaged in the bottling industr}', is a native of Sullivan county. 
Indiana, born February 8, 1861, in Curry township, a son of Solomon 
and Amy Ann (Oakes) Draper. Of his parentage it maj- be said that 
the father was a native of Ohio, born near Baden on the 8th of April, 
1831, and he died in Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1904. The mother. 
Amy Ann (Oakes) Draper, w^as born in Indiana and is still living. They 
were united in marriage in Sullivan county, and the father of William 
M. was an industrious agriculturist in Curry township and followed that 
for his livelihood until the son was about seven years of age, when the 
family moved to Sullivan, where the father worked at the blacksmith's 
trade until he retired from actual hard service. Politically he was a 
staunch Democrat, and in church relations was connected with the 
Christian denomination, the wife being of the same faith. The four 
children born to Solomon Draper and wife were as follows : Isaac S., a 
resident of Bloomington, Indiana ; Theodosia, deceased ; Laura, wife of 
William Timmons, residing in Sullivan ; and William M., of this sketch, 
who has two half-sisters — Caroline and Elizabeth, unmarried. 

William M. Draper was reared and educated within Sullivan count)'. 
Indiana, and at the age of fifteen }'ears began as a messenger boy for the 
Western Lliion Telegraph Company under F. E. Easier at Sullivan, with 
whom he worked five years — the first year as messenger boy and the 
remaining four years at handling freight and baggage. He was then 
on the Evansville & Terre Haute Railway, at various points along their 
system as agent, for six months, after which he took the agency of the 
road at Summerville, Indiana, which position he filled two years, and 
then served at Hazelton, Indiana, two years. He next moved back to 
Sullivan, and was agent for the Adams Express Company nine years. 
He relinquished this position in February, 1896, and engaged in the bot- 
tling, business at Sullivan. He now possesses a fine, modern planned 
plant. The building is made of cement blocks and is located near the 
Evansville & Terre Haute railway depot. Besides bottling all sorts of 
soft drinks he acts as the local agent for the Terre Haute Brewing 
Company. 

In his political understanding he agrees with the principles of the 
Democratic party. Among the local offices he has held may be men- 
tioned that of member of the town board. He is associated with the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity, and is also a member of the Eagles order. 



HISTORY OF SULLIX'AN COUNTY 277 

CuiiccrniiiL;- his clDiiicstic relatiDiis let it he said that in 1880 he was 
married to isahelle i'hmkett. hurn in Suihvan eounty, Indiana, .March 
2, 1S61, and died August 30, lyoi. One sun was horn of this union, 
Alexander E., born August 8, 1881. and is now a married man and 
associated with his father in the bottling business, the firm name being 
stvled The Sullivan Steam Bottling Works and City Artificial Ice De- 
livery. This concern is the only one in Sullivan handling ice. I'or his 
second wife Mr. Draper married \'iola R. Sligar. born in Sullivan county 
in 1880. Iloth wives were members of the Christian church. 



Willi \m W'illts, of Sullivan antl well known throughout the count\-, 
was horn on a farm in Lamott township. Crawford county, Illinois, on 
the t4th of August, 1851. His father. Richard Willis, was formerly from 
Kentuckv, and was a farmer by occupation. He died in 1857. The 
maiden name of the mother of our subject was Tempy Ann Webb. She 
died 1855, leaving three small children : luneline, the oldest, married 
Amos Miseinhelder, of Palestine, Illinois, and is now deceajSed. Isahelle. 
the youngest, married Joseph B. Pearson, of Sullivan, and is also de- 
ceased. Upon the death of their parents the children found homes among 
strangers. 

Our subject lived with a farmer in Crawford county until eleven 
years of age, and then ran away and spent a winter with an uncle in the 
same county. He then went to live with Seymour Siler, and remained 
with him until fifteen years old, and then with an uncle who had returned 
from California visited his sisters, from whom he had been separated 
since their father's death. He then found a home with George W. 
French ,a farmer living south of Merom. During this time he had 
attended school but little, but after becoming a member of Mr. French's 
family he attended school more regularl\', and a part of each year during 
five years attended Merom College. In the fall of 1873 he commenced 
teaching at Merom Station. He taught a part of each year for three 
vears and was employed at farming during the summer seasons. In 
18S0 he was elected township trustee of Gill township, and served for four 
vears. and in the fall of 1886 was elected county auditor and served two 
terms of four years each. He then engaged in the real estate, loan and 
insurance business in .Sullivan, and has continued in that business until 
the present time. 

He first married Sarah L,. Ward on the 23d of July, 1875. She 
was the daughter .if Samuel and Sarah. Ward, and was a graduate of 
Alerom College and became a teacher. She died in 1877. His second 
marriage, on the Qth of April, 1879, was to Mary E. Sibley. She was 
born in Hamilton township, a daughter of William T. and Cecelia Siblev. 
The follo'.ving children have blessed this union : Carl M,. Flossie, 
Cecelia. William E.. Ralph R.. and Burchard. Carl M. was educated in 
the ]5uhlic schools of Sullivan and assisted his father until his death, 
which occurred December 12. IQ02. aged twenty-two years. Flossie C. 
married Herbert C. Steele, of Robinson. Illinois. X\'illiam E. married 



278 , HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Rhoda Bo_vle and had one child, Alary Louise. Mr. and Mrs. WilHs are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and have reared their family 
in that faith. Mr. Willis cast his tirst vote for Horace Greeley and has 
been a supporter of the principles of the Democratic party since. He is 
a member of Sullivan lodge, F. & A. M., Sullivan chapter, the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows of Sullivan, and the orders of the Eastern 
Star and the Rebekahs. and Sullivan lodge, K. of P. 



John B. Mullane, a dealer in hardware, implements and buggies 
at Sullivan, will form the subject of this biography. Mr. Mullane is a 
native of New York City, born November 29, 1854, a son of James and 
Julia (Sullivan) Mullane. The father was a native of Ireland and died 
in Libby Prison, Virginia, where he was held a prisoner of war during 
the rebellion. The mother was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and died in 
New York City in 1861. By trade the father was a cooper, having 
learned the same in Cincinnati, to which city he went when a boy, and 
where he was married. Politically he was a staunch Democrat, and 
both he and his wife were devoted members of the Roman Catholic 
church. They were parents to the following five children: Catherine, 
deceased ; Daniel, residing in Boston, Massachusetts, where he is a trav- 
eling salesman: John B., of this notice; Dr. Joseph, deceased; and Ella, 
deceased. 

John B. Mullane attended the public schools until eighteen years 
of age, after which he went to college at Bedford, Indiana. He was 
reared in Lawrence county, and came to Indiana when aged eight vears. 
He made his home with Charles Trueblood, with whom he remained ten 
years. He farmed and worked for his board winters, going to school, 
thus showing that he appreciated a good education. Later he taught 
school two terms in Lawrence county, and then began clerking in a 
general merchandise store. Coming to Sullivan in 1879 he was employed 
by the firm of Llostetler & Williams, general dealers, with whom he con- 
tinued for two years. After leaving this store he, having become ac- 
quainted with such work, found emplo}'ment with other business houses 
there until about 1895, when he embarked in the real estate business and 
also farmed. In 1900 he opened his present store, consisting of hardware, 
implements and vehicles. He operated independently for three vears, 
when he induced his father-in-law, George Price, to become his partner, 
and then added furniture to his stock of goods. The firm name is now 
J. B. Mullane & Company. Besides his mercantile interests he is a stock- 
holder and director of the Citizens" Trust Company of Sullivan. On 
the 3d of February of the present year his store with its contents burned 
and entailed a loss of twenty-five thousand dollars, with but fortv-five 
per cent insurance. 

In his political views Mr. Mullane is a pronounced Republican. He 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Odd Fellows 
order. 

In the month of March, 1884, he was united in marriage to Teresa 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 279 

Price, born in Sullivan July 4, 1862, and educated in the public schools 
and at Eminence College, Kentucky. She is the daughter of George and 
MoUie (Wolf) Price. They have three children living and one deceased: 
Beulah (deceased), Joseph W., Daniel P. and Price. Joseph graduated 
in the class of 1908 at the high school. Mr. and Mrs. Mullane are mem- 
bers of the Christian churcli, he having been identified with this body 
since 1872 and has been an officer since about 1885. He has been Sunday 
School superintendent and is now one of the trustees. 



John F. Douthitt, one of the enterprising dealers in clothing and 
gentlemen's furnishings at Sullivan, was born in Jefferson township, 
Sullivan county, Indiana, March 28, 1865. a son of John M. and Mary A. 
(Howard) Douthitt. The father was born and reared on the same farm 
on which the son was born. The date of his birth was March 17, 1836, 
and that of his death May 2, 1904. The mother was also a native of the 
same township, born September 19, 1841, and she still survives and is 
residing on the old farmstead. The grandfather, Ira Douthitt, was a 
native of North Carolina, and was one of the pioneer settlers of Sullivan 
county, Indiana. They were of Swedish descent. The grandmother 
Howard was born in Ireland. 

John M. Douthitt, the father, followed agricultural pursuits, owning 
at the time of his death one hundred and eighty-five acres of land, all 
finely improved. He was in politics a Democrat. During the Civil war 
he served his country six months in the Union army. He was, and his 
widow is, a member of the First Baptist church at Indian Prairie. This 
worthy couple were the parents of the following children: Victoria, wife 
of George Lucas, residing in Knox county. Indiana ; James E., of Sulli- 
van ; John F., of this sketch: Grace, wife of William P. Medley, of Sulli- 
van : William R., unmarried and living on the old homestead with his 
mother; ;\Iary, wife of George Robins, of Knox county, Indiana: Estella, 
wife of Frank Robins, fruit grower near Pa.xton, Indiana ; Lee. residing 
on a farm in Knox county, Indiana, and is married ; Lucy Edith, wife of 
Alonzo C. Owens, of Sullivan ; Glenn, now teaching at Pleasantville, 
Indiana ; and Nellie, who died in infancy. 

John F. Douthitt, of this narrative, spent his youthful da\s on his 
father's farm and attended the public schools, remaining, under the pater- 
nal roof until he was twenty-three years of age, when he commenced to 
farm on his own account in Haddon township. After three years he sold 
out and moved to Pleasantville, engaging in the general mercantile busi- 
ness, which he prosecuted about five years, with much energ)'. He next 
embarked in the milling business at Pleasantville, and made flour for four 
years, after which he returned to the store and there remained until the 
autumn of 1899, when he was chosen deputy treasurer of Sullivan county. 
He served for fourteen months and then was employed by J. W. Wolfe 
& Son in the clothing business, remaining initil Ma}', 1906. At the date 
last named he with Ira Glidden formed a partnership under the firm name 
of Glidden & Douthitt, and they engaged in the clothing and gentle- 



28o HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

men's furnishing goods business at Sullivan. This business is carried on 
by them at this time in a most successful manner. 

In his political choice ]\Ir. Douthitt is a Democrat. In fraternal 
society relations he is a member of the Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen 
of America, and Ben Hur societies. He was united in marriage. March 
15, 1888, to Dora E. Shake, born in Haddon township, Sullivan county, 
Indiana, August 9, 1870, a daughter of David and Eliza (Corbin ) Shake, 
natives of Sullivan county. The father is still living, but the mother died 
January 20, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Douthitt are the parents of four chil- 
dren : Efifie, who graduated with the class of 1908 from the Sullivan high 
school ; Zadie ; Ella : and Raymond. The family are all members of the 
Baptist church, and Mr. Douthitt is its treasurer and deacon. 



Edgar Stewart Crowder, now operating an automobile garage in 
Sullivan, is a native of Sullivan, Indiana, born May 12, 1864, a son of 
William H. and Rebecca C. (Stewart) Crowder. (See sketch of William 
H. Crowder, Sr.) Edgar Stewart was educated in Sullivan and at Purdue 
University, graduating with the class of 1887 in the mechanical engineer- 
ing course of that institution. After leaving the university he engaged 
in the milling business at Shelbvu'n, Indiana, operating a flour mill some 
three years, after which time he went to Payne, Alabama, and was 
engaged in the grain and feed business for two years. He then returned 
to Sullivan, Indiana, in 1891, since which date he has resided there. He 
was engaged in the milling industry there and in the mills of the county, 
the main offices of the company being at Sullivan, 'while branches were 
maintained at Marion and New Lebanon. In July, 1907, Mr, Crowder 
sold out the milling interests he held and operated a general store at New 
Lebanon, beginning December, 1906. In the month of August, 1907, he 
opened an automobile garage in Sullivan, and still carries on the same 
with much success. He handles the Alitchell, Rambler and Maxwell cars, 
and also does all kinds of repair work, having a fully equipped and 
thoroughly up-to-date garage. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Crowder is affiliated with the Blue 
lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons, and with the Odd Fellows to the 
Encampment degree, having filled all the chairs in the last named order 
and been its representative at the Grand Lodge of Indiana. He also 
holds a membership with the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, all of 
Sullivan. Politically he is a staunch Democrat, and has served on the 
town council, and takes much interest in public affairs in the community 
in which he resides. In the years 1893 and 1894 he was the county sur- 
veyor of Sullivan county. 

On October 22, 1888, he married Amelia Frank, born in Ouincy, 
Illinois, December 10, 1868. She was educated primarily at Fort Worth. 
Texas, and also attended the Sullivan schools in Indiana. She is the 
daughter of William and Amelia Frank. The former is deceased, and the 
latter resides at Fort Pavne, Alabama. The children born to Mr. and 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 281 



Mrs. Crowder arc as follows: ]\Iax Frank, born November 22, 1889, now 
reading law in Chicago with Castle, Williams & Castle. He graduated 
from the Sullivan higli schools with the class of 1906 and attended the 
university at llloomington. Indiana, one year. Mary, born August 17. 
i8gi, now in the Sullivan high school; Helen, born June 11, 1896; and 
Edgar S.. Jr., born June 22, 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Crowder are both mem- 
bers of the Mcthii(list Episcopal church. 



WiLi.i.Mi II. 11ku>wi^ll. — The efficient comity attorney of Sullivan 
county, Indiana, William 11. liridwell, was born October 14, 1872, in 
CJwensburg, Indiana, son of Lafayette and Katherine (Keenan) Brid- 
well. The father was a native of Springville, Indiana, and was born in 
1850, dying in 1901. He was of French and English ancestry. Grand- 
father Noah Rridwell was a pioneer in Lawrence county, Indiana, and 
died near Springville before the birth of William H. The mother was 
born in New York City, April 30, 1852, and now resides with her son 
William H. Her mother was a Kern and a native of Ireland, and she 
died in the earl\- nineties. Mr. Bridwell's grandfather Keenan died dur- 
ing the Civil war. Lafayette Bridwell was a physician and surgeon who 
practiced at Owensburg, Indiana, being graduated from some one of the 
medical colleges of Cincinnati, Ohio. In politics he was a stanch Demo- 
crat and was postmaster at Owensburg under President Cleveland's 
administration. He was a member of the lUue lodge of the Masonic 
order, and also belonged to the Independent Order of Red Men. Having 
served in the Union army during the Civil war as a member of the Forty- 
fifth Indiana Regiment, he naturally found a place in the Grand Armv of 
the Republic. The children born to Lafayette Bridwell and wife w^re as 
follows: Minnie, deceased; Frank, of Bedford, Indiana; John, deceased; 
William H., of this notice ; Samuel, residing in Sullivan. Indiana ; Nina, 
unmarried and lives with William H.; and Curtis, attending the law- 
department of the Indiana LTniversity. The mother of these children was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William H. liridwell received his early education at the public schools 
of Owensburg, and taught school from the time he was si.xteen until he 
was twenty-one years of age, in Greene county. He then matriculated 
in the Indiana State University, being in the law department of that insti- 
tution. He was gradtiated with the class of 1898, having been admitted 
to the bar three years prior to his graduation. He was in partnership with 
C. D. Hunt, of Sullivan, from October, 1895, until 1897, during this time 
acting as deputy prosecuting attorney. He re-entered the universitv in 
February, 1898, being graduated the same year. Upon his return to 
Sullivan in February, 1899, he opened his present law office on the corner 
of Court and Jackson streets. He was reappointed deputy prosecuting 
attorney in October, 1899, and served two years under E. W. Mcintosh. 
In June, 1900. he was elected county attorney by the county commis- 
sioners and has served continuouslv ever since. 



282 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Mr. Bridwell is a member of the Odd Fellows order ; he is in the 
Encampment and has held the office of noble grand and is past chief patri- 
arch of the Encampment; he belongs to the Rebekahs and the Canton. 
In Masonrv he is advanced, being a member of the Blue lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Eastern Star. He is also counted among the worthy members 
of the orders of Elks and Eagles at Sullivan. Politically he is an active 
Democrat and has served as secretary and treasurer of the central com- 
mittee, and IS now its chairman. He was honored by being, the president 
of the Sullivan County Bar Association from Thanksgiving, 1906, to 
Thanksgiving, 1907. 



Samuel A. Witite. — Formerly a merchant, but now a capitalist and 
operator in various financial institutions, Samuel A. White is widely 
known in Sullivan county. He was born in Prairieton, Vigo county, 
Indiana, Februarv 12, 1850, a son of George E. and Naomi (Gunn) 
White. The father, who was born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, died 
when Samuel A. was but two years of age. Samuel White, the grand- 
father, was born in Germany. The mother was born in Kentucky in 1829, 
and died in 1904. She was twice married. 

Samuel A. White left home at the age of ten years and worked on a 
farm in Otter Creek township, \'igo county, Indiana, for Warren Genung, 
with whom he remained one year. The following summer he was employed 
in the same neighborhood. When he became thirteen years of age he 
went to Terre Haute, living with his uncle, William Pattock, and entered 
the public schools, first attending the White Rose school. When four- 
teen years old he commenced as a newsboy on the Indiana & St. Louis 
Railroad, but soon abandoned that project. He next entered a confec- 
tionery store at Terre Haute, with a Air. Sage, with whom he remained 
between five and si.x years. He then went to Fort Scott, Kansas, where 
he established a confectionery store, which after three months he sold. 
He returned to Terre Haute' and found employment in a grocery store 
on the corner of Fourth and Walnut streets, where he made candy at 
night for another dealer. After a short time there, in February, 1872, he 
went to Sullivan and purchased a candy store, which he operated for four 
vears. selling it in 1876 and going back to Terre Haute and entering 
into partnership with his cousin, Aloses C. Carr, in the grocery trade. 
After one year there he sold his interest and went to Carlisle, Indiana, 
opening a new grocery store in November, 1878, which was burned in 
the following February ; but within one week he was in business again 
across the street. 

The Masonic order of Carlisle, jointly with him, erected a two-story 
brick building in which he opened a store, handling general merchandise. 
Besides this store building he also erected a residence. Although having 
built up a good trade, in four and a half years he sold out and went into 
the drug business at Petersburg, Pike county, Indiana, where he remained 
two years. He then sold his stock and went to Clay City, Clay county, 
and ijought the only drug store of that place. After six months he sold 



HISTORY OF SULLRAX COUXTV 283 

this and went to Sullivan and there engaged in the drug trade, con- 
ducting it for five or six years, when he again sold out, after which he 
directed his attention to his farm for nearly five years. In 1895 he bought 
the drug business of Paul S. Ried, which stock he sold in 1898. Since the 
late date he has been busily engaged in looking after his sundry financial 
interests. When the National Bank of Sullivan was organized in June, 
1900, he was one of the charter members, and is now a director and 
stockholder. He is also a charter member and director of the Sullivan 
County Loan & Trust Company. Mr. White is also interested as stock- 
holder and is secretary and treasurer of the Hamilton Gas & Oil Com- 
pany, and is the owner of an excellent farm within .Sullivan county. 

Politically Mr. White supports the Republican party, locally and 
nationally. He is connected with the Odd Fellows order, having ad- 
vanced to the Encampment degree. He is alive to every interest of his 
home town and county. In 1875 he was married to Rebecca M. Pearce, 
a native of Haddon township, Sullivan county. Two children bless this 
union : Robert P., editor of the Sulliz'aii Union, and who married Bertha 
B. Briggs; Gertrude A., wife of W. E. Parrott, a solicitor for the Van- 
dalia Railroad Company, residing in Kansas City, Missouri. Both of Mr. 
White's children received good educations at the public schools of Sulli- 
van county. Mrs. White is a member of the Presbyterian church. Her 
mother, Mrginia Pearce, now ninety-three years of age and living at 
Carlisle, was there during the Indian raids, and Haddon township was 
named in honor of her father. 



Elijah E. Ru.ssell. deputy county auditor of Sullivan county. 
Indiana, born April 8, 1867, is a native of Curry township, Sullivan 
county. He is the son of Spencer and Elizabeth (Gaskins) Russell. The 
Russells are of Irish ancestry. In the various generations there are many 
farmers, including the father of Elijah E. Spencer Russell was born in 
Kentucky and came to Indiana with his parents when a mere lad. Politi- 
cally he was a Democrat, and in church relations both he and his wife 
were members of the Christian church. She died late in the nineties, and 
he in 1906. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: Mar- 
garet, deceased ; Mary Ann, wife of James H. Reed, a resident of Curry 
township ; Serena, wife of Robert Taylor, residing in Sullivan ; James 
Milburne, deceased; Elijah Edward, of this sketch; Manna, wife of 
John H. Allen, residing at Farmersburg, Indiana; and Joseph W., resid- 
ing in Sullivan. 

Being reared on a farm, Elijah E. Russell attended the county dis- 
trict schools. He remained on the home place and was its manager for 
eight years, from the time he was twenty-one up to his twenty-ninth year. 
He also during this period learned and worked at the carpenter's trade. 
About 1897 he purchased an eighty acre farm in Curry township, upon 
wdiich he lived until 1904, when he took his seat as county auditor of 
Sullivan countv, to which office he was elected on the Democratic ticket 



284 HISTORY OF SULLR^AN COUNTY 

in 1902. Besides his farm in Curry township he owns his residence in 
Sulhvan. He is a director of the Verdegris River Land & Oil Company 
of Oklahoma; also director of the Tri-State Oil Company of Illinois. 
While Mr. Russell was on the farm he did much carpentering and con- 
tracting in partnership with J. H. Collins, working for nineteen consecu- 
tive years and taking contracts for school buildings, etc. When he came 
to Sullivan to take the auditorship they had contracts amounting to 
twenty thousand dollars on hand. He was defeated for the office of 
township trustee, and at one time was secretary of the township advisory 
board. Mr. Russell is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and has held the office of noble grand in his lodge. 

Fie was married in December, 1894, to Mary E. Jones, born in Indi- 
ana, and who came to A'igo county when an infant with her parents, 
Daniel H. and Mary (Adair) Jones, who are still residing in Linton 
township, Vigo county. Mr. and INIrs. Russell are the parents of two 
children: Hazel, born November 23, 1896, and Ma.x, born April 18, 1898. 



TiLGHM.\N Ogle, present county clerk of Sullivan county, Indiana, 
is a native of this county, born March 26, 1861, the son of William B. 
and Anna Eliza (Anderson) Ogle. The father died in 1868. Grand- 
father Ogle came to Indiana from Ohio at a very early day and settled 
at Prairieton, Vigo county, where he lived for a short time, and then went 
back to Ohio to afford his daughters a better opportunity to finish their 
education. Later he again came to Vigo county, Indiana, where he owned 
fifteen hundred acres of land. William B. Ogle, father of Tilghman 
Ogle, was a merchant in Vigo county for a time, and also carried on. 
merchandising in Sullivan county. He was elected as treasurer on the 
Democratic ticket, serving two terms. The mother was born in January, 
1823, and still resides in Sullivan. Her mother died in Sullivan at the 
extreme old age of ninety-four years. Mr. and IMrs. William B. Ogle 
were the parents of eight children : Belle ; Jacob, now residing in j\Iem- 
phis ; Charles, Katie and Frank, deceased ; William Baty, Jr., a resident 
of Ohio ; Tilghman, of this memoir ; and Elizabeth. 

Tilghman Ogle attended the public schools of Sullivan and began 
clerking in a grocery store in 1874, when but thirteen years old. Two 
vears later he went to Terre Haute and there engaged with Car & White, 
grocers, remaining there until February, 1878. Subsequently he accom- 
panied Mr. White to Carlisle, Indiana, where he was connected with the 
same line of business. For the next twenty years he was employed as a 
clerk in the general store of R. W. Akin, at the end of which long period 
of service he was elected county clerk of Sullivan county. He was elected 
on the Democratic ticket, being nominated in the convention against two 
opponents, and he took his seat in office in 1904. Air. Ogle is a member 
of the Odd Fellows order at Carlisle, Lodge No. 50, and has been the 
noble grand ; and also of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at 
.Sullivan. 



HISTORY OF SULLRAX LUUXTY 285 

He was united in marriag.e. June 2, 1886, to Mary Ella Speak, who 
was born at Carlisle, Indiana. June 26, 1869. daughter of James E. and 
Eliza Speak. The latter was a native of Sullivan county, and both she 
and her husband are still living at Carlisle. :\lrs. Ogle was educated at 
the public schools of her native place. To Mr. and Mrs. Ogle were born 
two children. Cornelia, attending high school, and Fred. Mr. Ogle belongs 
to the Christian church, while his wife is connected with the Methodist 
Episcopal. 



WiLLiA.M K. Xesiut, an attorney practicing at Sullivan, Indiana, is 
a native of Hamilton township, Sullivan county. Indiana, born Septem- 
ber 2, 1861, a son of William O. and Nancy J. (Eaton) Nesbit. The 
father was born in Sullivan county and died in 1895. The_ grandfather 
on the paternal side was born in Kentucky. William O. Xesbit always 
followed agricultural pursuits. He was a stanch Republican, and served 
three years in the Union army during the Civil war under Captain Craw- 
ford, who now lives at Sullivan, Indiana. The mother of William R. 
was also a native of Sullivan county. She was born in 183 1 and died 
in 1876. Her parents were among tiie early pioneer band who settled in 
Sullivan county. William O. Xesbit and wife were united in marriage in 
Sullivan county and were the parents of six children: John, residing 
near Paxton. Indiana ; Euphrates H., living near the old homestead ; 
Ira A., residing in Sullivan; Sara E., wife of Albert K. Boyl, of Sulli- 
van ; William R., of this sketch ; Armina E., wife of Hardy Raines, resid- 
ing in Hamilton township, Sullivan county. William O. Xesbit was 
married the second time, the last wife being Lucy A. McKinley, now 
residing at Fairbury, Xebraska. Two children were born of this union : 
Oran, of Omaha, Xebraska, andOra, with her mother in Xebraska. 

William R. Xesbit was reared on his father's farm and received the 
common school education which most Indiana boys of his time did. He 
attended the State Normal School at Terre Haute, graduating with the 
class of 1885. He returned to his native county and began teaching 
school in the sixth grade in the autumn of the year of his graduation. 
In Alarch, 1886, he was promoted to superintendency of the Sullivan 
public schools, serving until 1891, when he tendered his resignation. He 
had also taught during his term at the Normal, one year at Burnetts 
Creek, White county, "and one year in the city schools of Logansport. 
After his resignation from the superintendency of the Sullivan schools 
he entered the law office of W. C. Hultz, of Sullivan, with whom he read 
law about one year. In October, 1891, he was admitted to the bar and 
soon after formed a partnership with W. C. Hultz. his tutor. He re- 
mained in this partnership until 1893, and then formed a partnership with 
Iudg(> George W. Bufif, of Sullivan, which partnership existed until 1899, 
after which he practiced independentls- until July, 1902, when he becan.ie 
the partner of A. G. McXabb. In August, 1902, he received the apjjoint- 
ment of postmaster and served as such until February i. 1907, since which 
date he has practiced law in Sullivan. Mr. Nesbit owned and edited the 



286 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Sitlliz'aii Union in 1902-3. He is a supporter of Republican party prin- 
ciples and in his society connections is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, having passed all the chairs in that lodge. He 
was married July 12, 1888, to Effie I. Coulson, daughter of Uriah and 
Jane A. Coulson. Her father was a native of Pennsylvania and her 
mother of Brown county, Indiana. Her father served as postmaster at 
Sullivan on two occasions, and is now leading a retired life in Sullivan. 
Mrs. Nesbit graduated at the Sullivan high school, and was a teacher in 
the Sullivan public schools for about three years. She was born July 12, 
1868, and died April 6, 1907. She was a prominent woman in the society 
of Sullivan, being president of the Woman's Club. She made the address 
at the dedication of the Carnegie Public Library. She was not unfre- 
cjuently called upon to deliver public addresses, in which she never dis- 
appointed the people. She was enthusiastic and public-spirited, ever seek- 
ing to bring about progress and higher thought and action in her county 
and state. She left two children to mourn her death : Maurice, born 
August ID. 1889, a graduate of the high school with the class of 1907, 
unmarried and at home ; Mildred, born November 30, 1893, also in the 
high school. Mr. Nesbit is a member of the Christian church, while his 
wife was connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. 



William T. Douthitt, senior member of the law firm of Douthitt 
& Haddon, of Sullivan, has long been a leader of the county bar, both in 
official and private practice. He was born in Jefferson township, Sullivan 
county, on the i8th of December, 1868, and is a son of Thomas M. and 
Lydia (Wells) Douthitt. His parents are also natives of the township 
nam.ed, were married therein during the fall of 1867, and are still resi- 
dents of that section of Sullivan county. Both the Douthitt and Wells 
families have been identified with the progress of agriculture and the 
general advancement of this region since the early pioneer period. The 
paternal grandfather, James Madison Douthitt, was a native of Virginia, 
married a Miss Good, and entered government land as among the first 
settlers of Jefferson township. His old-world descent was English. John 
Wells, the grandfather on the maternal side, also of English ancestry, is 
believed to have been born in Pennsylvania. It is known that he was one 
of the Jefiferson township pioneers, and that he died therein during the 
eighties. The members of these families were all farmers, and most of 
them members of the Baptist church, as were the parents of William T. 
Douthitt. The children born to Mr. and ]\Irs. Thomas M. Douthitt were 
as follows : William T., of this sketch ; George E., who resides in Car- 
lisle ; Frank M.. a resident of Sullivan county, whose biography is else- 
where published; Luretta, who died February 22, 1906; and Elliott, who 
is married and lives on the paternal homestead. 

After receiving a district school education Mr. Douthitt taught for 
four years in Sullivan county, in 1887 entered the Valparaiso normal 
school for a year, taught for several years, and was then chosen deputy 
county clerk under William M. Dennev. He held the office named for 



HISTORY OF SL'LLR'AX COUNTY 287 

about a year, in 1892-3, and as he had been stud\ino- law for a number of 
years during the time he could snatch from his educational and official 
duties, he had been admitted to the Indiana bar in June, 1890. In 1893, 
after resigning his position of deputy county clerk. Mr. Douthitt Ijegan 
the continuous practice of his profession in partnership with Judge O. I>. 
Harris (mentioned biographically in this work), and the firm of Harris & 
Douthitt continued until 1896. The junior member then practiced alone 
until 1905. when he associated himself witli Milton A. Haddon. under the 
present finn name of Douthitt & Haddon. His practice of fifteen years in 
Sullivan county had brought Mr. Douthitt in connection with nearly all 
the important cases of that period, either in his private capacity as a lead- 
ing attorney or as county attorney, city attorney and deputv prosecuting 
attorney. He ably discharged the duties of the last named office for two 
years. Besides carrying a large general practice, Mr. Douthitt is the 
attorney for the National Bank and the Sullivan County Loan & Trust 
Company, and has long been classed as among the strong corporation 
lawyers of his section of Indiana. He owns a fine residence on the corner 
of North Court and Beach streets, and has been recognized for so many 
years as one of the steadfast forces operating for the advancement of the 
city and county that his contemplated removal to Terre Haute is con- 
sidered a most serious loss to the entire communitv. He has already 
purchased property and made office arrangements in that city, and plans to 
remove his residence thither in September, 1908. There the field of his 
activities will be larger, and his many friends and admirers therefore 
anticipate for him even a broader and brighter career than he has enjoyed 
in the past. 

Mr. Douthitt has always been a firm Democrat, but has had no politi- 
cal ambitions. He is a Mason of long, and high standing, having filled 
all the offices of the Blue lodge of Sullivan, No. 263, A. F. and A. j\I., and 
served as high priest of the Jerusalem Chapter, No. 81, R. A. M., of 
Sullivan. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, and is also an active 
member of the order of Elks. Both Mr. and Mrs. Douthitt are identi- 
fied with the Masonic auxiliary. Order of the Eastern Star. In November. 
1890, Mr. Douthitt was united in marriage with Miss Ella Mayfield, who 
was born in Jefiferson township, Sullivan county, in April, 1871, a daugh- 
ter of William C. and a Miss (Bowen) Mayfield. The mother died when 
Mrs. Douthitt was a young girl, and her father, wdio served in the Civil 
war, passed aw'ay in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Douthitt have two sons — Arista 
B., born November 11, 1891, and Earl, born April 9, 1897 — both of whom 
are pupils in the Sullivan high school. The parents are earnest members 
of the Baptist church, Mr. Douthitt having been on its board of trustees 
since the erection of the house of worship in Sullivan. 



S. P.\UL PoYNTER, a well-known figure in the newspaper field of 
Sullivan for more than a decade, was born at Eminence, Morgan countv, 
Indiana, on the 29th of ]\Iarch, 1875, a son of Jesse A. and Martha Lutitia 

Vol. 11—19 



288 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Poynter. The father was a blacksmith and wagonmaker b}- trade, and 
for several 3'ears prior to the age of fifteen the son was employed in these 
lines. At that period of his life he added carriage-painting to his other 
liandicrafts, and was thus enabled to earn enough money to complete his 
education. Lie was first educated in the gj-aded schools at Cloverdale, and 
afterward took a course at DePauw LTniversity, Greencastle, Indiana, 
from which he graduated in 1897 with the degree of Ph. B. 

In July of the above year, soon after his graduation, Mr. Poynter 
entered newspaper work in Sullivan, and has been in the business con- 
tinuously since that time. He bought the Democrat when the business 
was at a low ebb, and developed it to a profitable establishment. In 1904 
he absorbed the Times, his Democratic competitor, and in the following 
year started the Dally Times, through these agencies being one of the 
most influential Democrats in the county. Outside of his newspaper 
business he is most interested in real estate. He is vice president of the 
State Democratic Editorial Association, and is also a Methodist, having 
been a member of the official board of the church -since 1900. He is 
identified with three branches of the Masonic order — Free and Accepted 
Masons, Ro\al Arch Masons, and Order of the Eastern Star — and also 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen and the Elks. 

Mr. Po\nter was married. April 11, 1900, to Miss Alice lima Wilkey, 
daughter of the late Nelson Wilkey and Ann B. Wilkey, and the two chil- 
dren born to them are Eleanor Allen, February 24, 1901, and Nelson Paul 
Poynter, December 15, 1903. Both of Mr. Poynter's parents are living. 
His father was a soldier in the Civil war, his service covering more than 
three years. He was a musician, serving with Company C, One Hundred 
and Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with Company B, Thirty- 
first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and participated, among other great 
engagements, in the battle of Shiloh. 



Charles William, Welman. — Prominent among the citizens of 
Sullivan, Indiana, is Charles William Welman, an attorncy-at-law and 
real estate dealer.^ He is a native of Crawford county, Indiana, where 
he was born September 18, 1858, his parents being John and iNIartha J. 
(Chamberlain) Welman. John Welman was born in Orange county, 
Indiana, January 19, 1826, and now resides in the town of Fort Branch, 
Gibson county. The paternal grandfather was born in Kentucky in 1801, 
and the paternal great-grandfather, Samuel Welman, was born about 
1760 in Maryland, and went to Kentucky about 1790. In 1819 he and his 
family moved to Harrison county, Indiana. He resided in Harrison, 
Crawford and Orange counties until his death, which occurred about 
1850. The grandfather, Samuel Cignor Welman, moved to Gibson county, 
Indiana, in 1863, and died there in 1870. The Welmans were all farmers. 
John Welman, the father of Charles W., now lives retired at Fort Branch, 
Indiana. He is a Democrat and a regular Baptist. Martha J. ( Chamber- 




CHARLES W. WELMAN 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN POUNOATIONS. 



HISTORY OF SULLI\AX COUNTY 289 

lain) Weliiiaii, the mother, was boni in Louisville, Kentucky, November 
24, 1830, and died December 7, 1905. Her mother died of the cholera in 
1837, at about the same time that her father was drowned in the waters 
of the Mississippi river as he was on his way with a shipload of pork. 
Mrs. Welman then crossed the Ohio river and was reared by her p;rand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elias Hedden, of southern Indiana, with whom 
she lived until her marriage, at the age of eighteen years. Although she 
had few educational opportunities, yet she became a well-posted and 
cultured woman. Uy her marriage to Mr. Welman ten children were 
born, five of whom died in infancy, and the others were as follows: 
Samuel 15., residing in Evansvillc, was born in 1850 and has been a rail- 
way contractor many years ; Mary E., widow of Charles Ripley, formerly 
of Chicago; Susan, who died in 1895, married Thomas W. Redman; 
(."liarles W., of this memoir; and Joel H., wdio died in 1875. 

Charles W. Welman was born on his father's farm in Crawford 
county. The father moved to Fort Branch, Gibson county, when the 
son was about five years of age. The son's early education was received 
at the public schools, and later, in 1879-80. he attended the college at Val- 
paraiso. He was a teacher in the public schools of Gibson and \'ander- 
burg counties a number of \ears. In 1888, Mr. Welman went to Sulli- 
van and was editor and manager of the Sullivan Times until 1896. In 
1891 he was elected county superintendent of schools of Sullivan county, 
serving four years and three months. He was adipitted to the bar in 1897 
and has been an expert accountant in Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota and 
Indiana at various times and in various counties. In the meantime he 
practices law and deals in realty. In 1905, Mr. Welman platted forty- 
eight acres of land, the same being recorded and now known as "Wel- 
man's First Addition to Sullivan." It lies atljoining the corporation of 
Sullivan on the north. On this addition Mr. Welman has erected a beauti- 
ful and modern residence. He also ])latted fifty acres to the north of the 
first addition, and this is known as "Highland Park." 

Politically Mr. Welman is a Democrat of no uncertain tvpe. He 
was nominated on this ticket in 1894 for clerk of the supreme court of 
Indiana, but was defeated. Again, he was defeated for county treasurer 
in a field of five candidates by only thirty-nine votes. In 1902, 1906 
and 1908 he was a candidate for Congress, but was not nominated in 
either campaign. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having 
been identified with that order since 1889, and belongs to the Blue 
lodge and chapter. He is also a member of the Elks, Eagles and Knights 
of P)'thias, all of Sullivan. 

Mr. Welman was united in marriage in 1884 to Frances R. McC'learv, 
a native of Gibson county, Indiana, who was born in 1868. This union 
resulted in the birth of one son, \'ictor A., born in December, 1884. He 
was graduated in the scientific, classic and law courses at A'alparaiso, and 
is located in Seattle, Washington. For his second wife Air. Welman 
married in 1903 Miss Nelle Farley, a native of Sullivan, Indiana, and by 
this union two children were born, Agnes, born March 20, 1905, 
and Charles Warren, born January 27, 1907. 



290 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

William H. Crowder, Sr., a retired banker residing- at Sullivan. 
Indiana, was born November i8, 1838, in Putnam county, Indiana, a son 
of William Milton and Hannah C. (Cox) Crowder. His father was born 
in North Carolina in 1816 and died in July, 1851, at Sullivan, Indiana. 
He was an only son and was a practicing physician who graduated at 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, in 1850. The mother was born in Day- 
ton, Ohio, in 1819, and died in Sullivan, August 23, 1903. They were 
married in Putnam county, Indiana, in 1837, and eight children were 
born to them, as follows : William H., of this notice ; Robert H. ; James 
H., deceased ; Oscar H., residing in Sullivan ; John H., residing at Gor- 
don, Nebraska; Milton H., a resident of Sullivan; and two who died in 
infancy. 

William H., of this sketch, was born and was reared on a farm until 
1847, since which date he has lived at Sullivan. When but fifteen years 
of age he opened a general store in Sullivan and was connected with this 
business until 1885. On July 4, 1 861, he enlisted in the Twenty-first 
Indiana Regiment, serving in the Union cause until the spring of 1863. 
All of his brothers except Milton served in the army, and none were ever 
wounded and none ever claimed a pension until the act allowing pension 
for age was granted. In 1875, Mr. Crowder became president of the bank 
at Sullivan, and retained such office until July, 1900, when he of choice 
retired from active business pursuits. He is still a director of the Sulli- 
van State Bank and vice president of the Citizens' Trust Company and 
one of its directors. Politically he is an ardent supporter of the Prohi- 
bition party. He belongs to the Odd Fellows order and is also numbered 
among the members of the Grand Army of the Republic. The famih' are 
connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Crowder was married in August, 1863, to Sarah R. Stewart, a 
native of Sullivan county, Indiana, born May 23, 1842, and who died 
May 31, 1902. Ten children blessed this union, and they are as follows: 
Edgar S.. resides in Sullivan ; Mary, deceased ; William H., Jr., also resid- 
ing at Sullivan ; Hired, a resident of Indianapolis ; Katherine ; Benjamin 
C. ; James Hanry ; Jessie ; Dorothy : and Isaac Milton. The last six are 
all residents of Sullivan. All this family received good educations within 
Sullivan. Mary attended school at New Albany and at DePauw Lfniver- 
sity ; Katherine. at DePauw ; Milton and Benjamin also attended De- 
Pauw ; Dorothy was graduated at St. Mary of the Woods ; Edgar and 
Harvey attended school at Purdue ; and Jessie at Oxford. 



John Sisson, a farmer residing in Jefferson township, Sullivan 
county, was born March 10, 1846, in Jefferson township, a son of Ben- 
jamin W. and Miranda (Davidson) Sisson. The father was born March 
15. 1815, in Jessamine county, Kentucky, and died Februarv 10, 1897: 
he was laid to rest in the cemetery at Pleasantville. The mother was born 
February 3, 1814, and died August 18, 1882. Benjamin W. came from 
Kentucky to Sullivan countv before his marriage, and was united in 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAX COUNTY 291 

marriage in tliis county. He entered one hundred and twenty acres of 
land in Jefferson township and followed farm pursuits all of his life. 
Politically he voted the Democratic ticket, and was a member of the 
Methodist church, as was his wife. Eight children were born to this 
worthy couple, two of whom died in their infancy. The others arc as 
follows : Judea, unmarried and residing, on the old home farm in Sulli- 
van county ; Mary, on the home place, the widow of Austin Graham ; 
Paulina, who married James Anderson and resides in Pleasantville ; 
^liranda, who resides in Jefferson township, the wife of James Wells ; 
Daniel W., who married Lizzie Maddox and resides in Oklahoma ; and 
John, of this sketch. 

John Sisson, subject, received his education at the common school, 
but spent most of his youthful days on the farm, assisting his father to 
clear and improve his land. He continued to reside at home until in 1874, 
when he purchased a farm containing one hundred and twenty-five acres, 
where he now resides, the same being situated one mile west of Pleasant- 
ville. After buying this place, which was mostly in a wild and unim- 
proved state, he set about to clear it and fit it for cultivation, which task 
he accomplished almost without help. He farmed at home until his 
marriage, and was engaged in buying and shipping stock for about fifteen 
vears. His present farm contains one hundred and eighty-nine acres of 
choice, well improved land. Mr. Sisson is now quite extensively engaged 
in sheep-raising. He rents out a portion of his farm and looks after the 
remainder himself. He is very fond of hunting, and was at one time con- 
sidered a good marksman, and still enjoys the chase. 

Politically Mr. Sisson is a Democrat, believing this party best serves 
the interest of the masses of American citizens. He belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, as does his wife, and is a trustee in this church. 
He is also affiliated with the Odd Fellows order. Lodge No. 408 at Pleas- 
antville, and also with Black Creek Encampment Xo. 177 at Sanborn, 
Kno.x countv, Illinois. Mr. Sisson was initiated in Pleasantville Lodge 
No. 408, located at Pleasantville, Indiana, on the 2gth of April, 1873, and 
received the pink degree April 29, 1873 ; the second, or blue degree, April 
I, 1874, and the third, or scarlet degree, April i, 1874. He was made 
vice grand July i, 1875: noble grand, January i, 1876; and was made a 
member of the Grand Lodge in October, 1876. 

He was married, November 17, 1887, to Ella J. Shake, born Sep- 
tember I, 1865, in Haddon township, this county. She is the daughter 
of David and Eliza (Corbin) Shake, the former still living in Haddon 
township, but the latter is deceased. The following paragraphs appeared 
in a local newspaper commemorating the death of Mrs. Shake : 

"Mrs. David Shake died Sunday morning about four o'clock at her 
home three and a half miles east of Carlisle, after a long illness. Funeral 
services were held at eleven o'clock Monday morning at the Indian Prairie 
Baptist church, the pastor. Rev. C. L. Merriman, ofticiating. Interment 
in the Indian Prairie cemetery. 

"Eliza Corbin Shake was born in Sullivan county, Jaiuiary 8, 1836. 
She was united in marriage to David Shake, September 25, 1859, and to 



292 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

this union have been born four children — Charles E. : Vincent, who died 
in 1877; Ella J.. Mrs. John Sisson ; and Dora E., Mrs. J. F. Douthitt. 
Mrs. Shake became a member of Indian Prairie Baptist church. Septem- 
ber 16, 1871, and since that time has tried to live a faithful Christian life. 
She has been an invalid for thirty years, thirteen and one-half of which 
she was confined to her bed. The 8th of last September she fell and broke 
her arm, since which time she has been a constant sufferer. She was 
promoted to the heavenly life January 22, 1905, aged sixty-nine years and 
fourteen days. She leaves a husband, three children, a sister and many 
friends to mourn her departure. She was a true and affectionate com- 
panion, a loving and devoted mother, a good neighbor, and worthy citi- 
zen, bearing all of her afflictions patiently." 

;\Ir. Shake always followed farm life for his livelihood. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sisson are the parents of one child, Alary D., born January 3, 1889, 
and now the wife of Charles Yates, a resident of Linton, Indiana, and a 
teacher. Mrs. Sisson is a member of the Rebekahs at Pleasantville, 
Indiana, Lodge No. 605, and she has passed all the chairs in her order. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sisson have one of the old parchment deeds executed 
August I. 1843, and signed by President John Tyler, a valuable heirloom 
in the county. 



James H. Near, who has been a farmer of Sullivan county, Indiana, 
since 1870, is a native of Clark county, Ohio, where he was born February 
18, 1849, a son of H. J. Near and Elizabeth, his wife, whose maiden name 
was Applegate. The parents were both born in Clark county, Ohio. The 
mother died in 1853, in her native county, and the father died about 1879, 
in Clark countv, Illinois. The father was married three times. For his 
second wife he married Mrs. Ann (Lockhart) Chance, a native of Clark 
county. Ohio, who died m Knox county, Indiana. For his third wife he 
married Mrs. Mariah (Coffee) Munk, who now resides in Jasper county, 
Illinois. 

By H. J. Near"s first marriage the children born were: a daughter, 
who died in infancy ; William A., deceased ; James LL, of this review ; 
and Joseph M., a resident of Union county, C5hio. To the second mar- 
riage there were born five children : Azilla Jane, wife of Jacob Laferty, of 
Champaign county, Ohio ; Charles, deceased ; Frank, residing near Casey. 
Illinois : Clara, deceased ; and Lizzie, deceased. The issue by the last 
marriage was: James, George and Eliza, all residing in Illinois. William 
A. Near, the eldest son of H. J. Near by his first marriage, was a member 
of Company K, One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio Infantry. He served 
three years during the Civil war and received a wound in the shoulder- 
blade. He died in the seventies. Politically the father was a Democrat, 
and he and his first wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

lames H. Near was reared midst the scenes of rural life, and early 
began working out on a farm, for which services he received but twenty- 
five cents a day. In 187 1 he commenced to farm for himself, and has fol- 
lowed this occupation ever since. In 1867 he went to Greene county. 



HISTORY OF SL'LLRAN COUXTY 293 

Indiana, and in March of the same year came to lladdon to\vn>hii). Sulh- 
van county, first locating a half mile from where he now resides. He 
carries on a seventy acre" farm, which he owns, raising cereals and paying 
much attention to 'stock-raising. In the late seventies and early eighties 
Mr. Near operated a wheat separator and did threshing with a horse- 
power engine. 1 Ic has alwavs been a very busy man, and has prospered 
through his industrious habits. Politically he votes with the Democratic 
parl\-. 

'He was married Februar\- 28, 1870, to Elizabeth Deveors. born on 
the opposite side of the highway from where she now resides, April 15, 
1855, a daughter of James" and Eliza (Carrico) Deveors, both of whom 
are now deceased. The mother was born in Sullivan county, a daughter 
of Reason and Elizabeth (Trimble) Carrico. They were among the 
earliest settlers in Haddon township. Father Deveors was born in Marion 
countv, Indiana. Mrs. Near is a member of the Christian church at 
Bethany, Jeft'erson township. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Near 
are as follows : Florence, born October 26, 1871, is now the wife of 
O. Padgett, of Terre Haute ; Eliza, deceased, was the wife of John Roox- 
berv, and they had an infant child, deceased ; William A., residing in 
Teff'erson township; Charles L., also residing in Jefferson township, mar- 
Vied Nellie McCammon, and they have one son and one daughter, Ralph 
and Lela ; Zelma, deceased, married Scott Willis and left one son, Harold 
E. Willis, who is also now deceased: Iva, unmarried, at home: and Nora, 
who died in infancy. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. O. Padgett, of 
Terre Haute, are : Flossie, Lourice R., Elwon A., Doris, Tressa L. and 
two infants, deceased. Paul Y. Near, a son of William A., is living with 
his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Near. They have had twelve grand- 
children, and eight are living, two boys and two girls being deceased. 



J.VMEs M.\H.\N, who is farming, in Jackson township, was born in 
Mason county, Kentucky, December 20, 1830, a son of Jerry and Jemima 
(Browning) Mahan, both of whom were also born in the Blue Grass 
state and were of Scotch-Irish descent. They came to Sullivan county 
during the early boyhood of their son James and purchased a farm in 
Jackson township, but the mother only lived a short time after coming 
north, and the father died in the early seventies. 

When James Mahan attained the age of twenty-two years he left the 
parental home and bought seventy-eight acres of land in Hamilton town- 
shi]). He at once began the arduous and difficult work of clearing his 
land and preparing it for purposes of cultivation, and that farm was his 
home from 1853 until 1896, since which time he has lived retired at 
Hvmera. He sold his farm in 1904. but he owns four lots in this city, on 
which his pleasant and comfortable home is located. His political views 
are in harmony with the principles of the Democratic party. 

On the 4th of June, 1865, Mr. Mahan married Caroline M. Zink, a 
sister of Albert Zink. who is represented elsewhere in this history. She 



294 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

is his second wife, and their union has been blessed by the birth of two 
children. Mr/Mahan has six children, namely: James Monroe, a grain 
and coal dealer in Mansfield, Illinois; Evelyn, iiow Mrs. Brecount, a 
widow residing in Indianapolis; John P., who is farming in Michigan; 
Walter, a telegraph operator at Bethany, Illinois ; Manson M., a miner 
in Hjanera ; and Clara, who became the wife of Mr. Railsback, a traveling 
salesman whose home is in Hymera, and she is deceased. Mr, Mahan has 
made many friends throughout the years of his .residence here, and is 
honored and revered for his many sterling characteristics. Mrs. j\Iahan 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Hymera. 



Dr. J.AjMes H. Xeff, of Sullivan, is of true German descent. Three 
brothers left Virginia, where they had settled, and one of the number 
went to Pennsylvania, one to Ohio, and the other to Kentucky. The 
paternal grandparents came from Kentucky and settled in Hendricks 
county, Indiana, where they located on a farm. Years later they sold and 
went to Alontgomery county, Indiana, where the grandfather purchased 
more land and there passed the remainder of his life. The maternal 
grandfather (McGrew) was an early settler in Sullivan county, and he 
died when the subject's mother was a small girl. The Doctor's parents 
were Willis G. and Mary A. (McGrew) Nefif. The father was born in 
Boyle county, Kentucky, and the mother in Sullivan, Indiana. The 
paternal grandparents were John and Elizabeth (Kenton) Neff, he of 
Virginia and she of Kentucky, and the maternal grandparents were Burr 
and Elizabeth (Maxwell) McGrew, natives of Indiana. Simon Kenton, 
an uncle of the subject's mother, was associated with Daniel Boone. It 
may be related in this connection that the grandfather McGrew was an 
early settler in Sullivan, and was very highly esteemed among the pioneer 
band. The Doctor's father was county recorder of Sullivan county, and 
also its prosecuting attorney at one time. He moved to Greencastle in 
1866, and was postmaster there under President Grover Cleveland. He 
also represented Putnam county in the state legislature four terms, and 
continued to live at Greencastle until overtaken bv death. His wife now 
resides at Terre Haute. There were six children in the family of Willis 
G. Nefif and wife: Elizabeth, who died aged six years; Catherine, who 
died aged four years ; Frank, who died in infancy ; Dr. James H., of this 
memoir ; Jessie, Mrs. George G. Morris, of Terre Haute ; and W. Duff, 
of Terre Haute. 

Dr. Neft was born in Sullivan, Indiana, October 18. 1863, and was 
educated at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, at the Belleview 
Hospital, New York City, and attended DePauw University four veavs. 
Having chosen medicine for his life's profession, he commenced hisprac- 
tice at Hudsonville, Illinois, where he continued in practice four and a 
half years. He then moved to Fairbanks, Indiana, September 14, 1894, 
and there resumed his medical practice, in which he was highly successful. 
He continued there until January i, 1909, when he removed to Sullivan 
to give his children the benefit of the schools. 



HISTORY UF SULLIXAX CUL'XTY 295 

Dr. Xeff is identified with the following orders : The ^lasonic Lodge, 
'^"'-'- Z7^ '• Odd Fellows order, Lodge No. 763 ; and the Modern Wood- 
men, Camp No. 11256, all three lodges heing located at Fairbanks. Ik- 
is secretary of the connty board of health, and is a member of the Sulli- 
van County Medical Society, the Indiana State ]\Icdical Society, and the 
jF.sculapian Society of Illinois. 

He was united in marriage, November 25, 1894, to Mola L. Lindley, 
born in Crawford county, Indiana, Alarch 28, 1870, a daughter of Samuel 
and Harriet (Hollenback) Lindley. The father was born in Crawford 
county, Illinois, and the mother in Clarke county, Illinois. The children 
of this union were : Frances L., born August 2y, 1895 ; James S., born 
November i, 1900; and John D., born August 22, 1905. 



Eli Willi.xm Lemon Dix, of Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, 
was born in the township in which he now resides, September i, 1848, 
a son of Eli and Mariam (Bundy) Dix. The father was a native of 
Guilford county. North Carolina, born in 1813, and the mother was born 
in Randolph county. North Carolina, in 181 3. The grandparents were 
Joshua and Ann (Jessup) Dix, of North Carolina, and Moses Bundy 
and Elizabeth Pittman, widow of Mr. Bundy. The grandfather Dix went 
to Fairbanks township and entered land, consisting of a timber tract, in 
1819. The grandfather Bundy went to Washington township, locating 
in Salem in 1824. He was a large land owner in that section of the 
county, but not long after his settlement he died. 

Eli and Mariam Dix married and settled in Fairbanks township in 
1832, in section 36. He lived in a log-house until i860, and in this 
rude habitation was born the subject of this memoir. This house 
gave way for the first brick residence in the township, and was of such 
a character that it is still among the best within the township. The father 
died August 19, 1877, and the mother, March 10. 1884. This worthy 
couple were the parents of eight children who reached maturity, Eli W. L. 
being the fifth in order of their birth. Fle remained at home until a few 
months before he was married, which date was October 5, 1873, to Jose- 
phine Osborn, born in Hamilton township, a daughter of William and 
Martha (Hill) Osborn, natives of Kentucky. The paternal grandparents 
were John (3sborn and wife, of Kentucky. .After his marriage Air. Dix 
remained with his father until the following January and then removed to 
a fortv acre farm given him by his father. There they resided in a log- 
house until 1878, when they erected a two-room frame building, to which 
they built an addition in 1890, making a nine-room residence of the whole. 
Subsequently Mr. Dix added forty acres of land to his original farm. 
He now owms seventy-eight and a fraction acres, all in Turman township, 
and eighty acres in Fairbanks township. He has always resided in sec- 
tions 35 and 36, and his present home is in section 36. Mr. Di.x has a 
finelv improved place, is surroiuided with all the comforts of life, and is 
indeed an inde|)endent agriculturist. He has never followed other than 



296 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUXTY 

agricultural pursuits, and in this with his stock-raising he has materially 
succeeded. He had but limited common school privileges, only attending 
R. Garvin's Commercial College for eight weeks, yet with his primary 
education and what he has added to his store of knowledge by careful 
reading and observation he has come to be a well-posted farmer. In 
church relations it may be said that he and Mrs. Di.K are consistent mem- 
bers of the Christian church, of which organization he was a trustee three 
years. Politically he affiliates with the Democratic party, and served four 
years as notary public under Governor Durbin. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dix are as follows : Lowell A., 
born May 27, 1875, now of Shelburn, Indiana : Bethuel A., born August 
2;^, 1876, of Hymera, Indiana ; James E., born November 17, 1877, of 
Shelburn, Indiana; Melissa J., born April 17, 1879, "Ow Mrs. George 
Liston, of Hamilton township; iMartha A., born C^ctober 18, 1880, now 
Mrs. Noah Parr, of Turman township ; Eli Harper, born November 5, 
1881, of Curry township; Porter J., born November 25, 1884, at home; 
and Lura Bell, born March 28, 1887, at home. Lowell A. married Vernie 
Harbaugh and has two children, Esther and Kennett W. Bethuel married 
Emily Graves ; James E. married Fanny Fisher and has two children, 
Eli J. and Arthur. He also has a son by a former marriage, named Ray 
Eugene, who now lives with his grandparents. Melissa married George 
Liston, and Martha A. married Noah Parr. Eli married Martha Bushell 
and has two children, Eli M. and Bryan. Besides their own children, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dix reared M. G. Boles from the age of twelve years to twenty- 
one, and also Homer Bush, an orphan, from the age of eleven years. 



J.VMES J. PiRTLE, who has been industriously engaged in operating 
an extensive truck garden in Gill township, Sullivan county, Indiana, 
since 1903, was born on the farm upon which he now resides, July 19, 
1833. He is the son of Abel and Mary (Ferree) Pirtle, both of whom 
were natives of Kentucky. The father, born April 4, 1800, came to 
Indiana at an early age and entered land in Sullivan county, the tract 
being the same where the son now lives. The mother was born January 
17, 1807. This worthy couple were united in marriage in Sullivan county 
and lived on the farm mentioned until the father's death, January 25, 
1862, the mother surviving until March 20, 1874. Of the eight children 
born to Abel and Mary (Ferree) Pirtle, only four are now living: James 
J. ; Ferree, living at Lyons, Greene county, Indiana, who was a soldier in 
an Indiana regiment at the time of the Civil war; Ann, wife of Hugh 
Dufif}-. of Sullivan county, who was a native of Ireland and is now de- 
ceased'; and Nancy J., wife of James W. Monroe, a native of Ohio, and 
they are now living on a portion of the tract entered by Abel Pirtle. 

James J. Pirtle had but a very limited opportunity for gaining an 
education. He attended a little log school house, in which the onlv 
windows were openings made by sawing otit sections of the logs, and the 
seats upon which the pupils sat were made of puncheon, as was the floor. 



HISTORY OF SLLLIX'AN COL'XTY 297 

A huge fireplace furnished tlie heat, and many times the smoke also. It 
was perha]3s not unlike the one pictured by Eggleston in his "Hoosier 
Schoolmaster." James J. Pirtle continued to reside at home until he 
was twenty-four years of age, and did his share toward cultivating, and 
improving' the old homestead. About the cnmmencement of the war of 
the rebeliion he bought forty acres of land, which was a part of the old 
homestead. To this he added another "forty," but subsequently disposed 
of it. Since 1903 he has been engaged in conducting a modern truck farm, 
for the various products of which he finds a ready sale in the markets of 
Sullivan and Carlisle. Mr. Pirtle has been an industrious worker and 
is known for his integrity and kindness. He may justly be said to be a 
self-made man, having gained what he possesses by the dint of his own 
industry and frugal management. He has been somewhat unfortunate, in 
that his family has been afflicted by much illness, which has caused a large 
e.Kpense and the loss of his wife, she being an invalid twenty years, and 
almost totally helpless for fourteen years. This trouble somewhat thwarted 
his i^lans. At the time of the Civil war Mr. Pirtle united with the Chris- 
tian church, but at this time is not identified with any religious body. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and is an honored member of the Independent 
( )rder of Odd Fellows. 

( )n .August 27, 1857. Mr. Pirtle was united in marriage to Elizabeth 
IJoatman, who was a native of Sullivan county, born in 1840, and who 
died April 24, 1906. She was the daughter of Jefiferson and Margaret, 
known as "Peggy," Boatman, who came from Kentucky the same time 
as the I'irtles. The Pirtles made their way up the Ohio river on an old- 
fashioned push-boat to the mouth of the Wabash, then up that stream to 
liusseron creek, and up the creek to a point known as Shakertown. Mr. 
Pirtle now has in his possession an old kettle used on this boat by the 
family as they slowly wended their way upstream from Kentucky. The\ 
located in the eastern part of Sullivan county, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. Both parents of Mrs. Pirtle have been dead 
many years, her mother dying four years to the day (March 20) later 
than her husband's mother. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. James J. 
Pirtle are as follows: a son, who died in infancy; William Jefi'erson. 
deceased ; A. Marley, residing at Terre Haute, a carpenter iDy trade : 
Margaret, wife of j. A. McCammon, residing in Hamilton township, 
Sullivan county ; R. F., a prominent farmer ; b'riend L., a carpenter and 
farmer living in Cass township; MoUie, wife of John A. McCammon, a 
farmer of Gill township, Sullivan county, living near her father's place ; 
Lora M., unmarried, residing with her father; and James N., with his 
father (in the home farm. 



Edw.\rd W. Brv.xn, who owned an excellent farm, well improved 
by his own hands, even to the making of fences, in (lill township. Sullivan 
countv. was born November 17, 1873. near Burlingame. Osage count w 
Kansas, a son of Josiah and Mary E. Bryan, whose family sketch appears 
elsewhere in this work. The father went to Kansas from Ohiii in 1869 



298 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

and followed farming for five years, he having purchased school land 
there to the amount of eighty acres. Subsequently he disposed of the 
Kansas land and returned to Ohio, remained in Fayette county until 
he moved to Indiana and located in Sullivan county, where he died in 
the autumn of 1 90 1. 

Edward W. Bryan attended the public schools of Stanton, Ohio, and 
took a commercial course at Valparaiso. He remained with his parents 
until eighteen years of age, and then commenced the activities of life for 
himself. He prepared for teaching by attending school at Lebanon, Ohio. 
At the age of twenty years he commenced teaching school near Stanton, 
Ohio. He taught two winters near that city, and the next two, near 
Sabina. Ohio. He then attended the schools of A^alparaiso for about four 
months, graduating there, and then went to Chicago and secured a posi- 
tion with William Wrigley, Jr.'s, chewing gum house as their bookkeeper. 
There he continued for two years, and then returned to his parents' home 
in the autumn. The next spring he went to Indiana with his parents and 
remained with them until his marriage. He then moved to his farm in 
Gill township, where he was a general farmer and stockman. He owned 
seventy acres of land, all of which he improved himself. Flis farm home 
was one which made him one of the independent agriculturists of Sulli- 
van county. But on account of ill health he sold his farm and property 
in Sullivan county and with his family moved to Denver, Colorado, in 
August, 1908. where he is now engaged in the real estate business. He 
is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which denomi- 
nation he served as trustee for three years. He was also president of the 
Epworth League two years while residing in Ohio. In his political views, 
Mr. Bryan, like his forefather, is a Republican. 

He was happily married January 22, 1902, to Eva L. Hyer, a native 
of Ohio, born April 7, 1880, a daughter of John and Phoebe (Isgrig) 
Hyer. Her father was a native of Ohio, and the mother of Missouri. 
They are still living near \^'ashington Court House, that state. The 
father is a carpenter and contractor. The date of the mother's birth was 
March, 1850, and of the father's, January, 1845. The children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Bryan are: A'iola, born January 15, 1903, and Arthur L., 
born March 13, 1904. 

Of Mrs. Bryan's parents' children it may be said that there were 
two in the family : Jesse, a resident of Washington Court House, Ohio, a 
school teacher and also a contractor and carpenter. He has taught school 
since twenty-one years of age. The other child is Eva L., the wife of 
Mr. Brvan. 



Edward J. Collins represents a family who have been honored resi- 
dents of Sullivan county since 1837. The present representative of the 
name is an extensive farmer and stock-raiser of Jefferson township, and, 
both on account of his own worthy career and because of the excellent 
record of his family, commands the esteem of all who know him. 
Although he has spent the greater part of his life in this county, he was 



lilSTURV OF SULLINAX CUUXTY 299 

born in Louisville, Kentucky, November 6, 1835. He is a son of William 
Collins, who was born May 30, 1799. in Somerset county. Maryland, and 
died Tulv 6, 1886. in Haddon township, this county. 

The earlv life of William Collins was marked by some uiuisual and 
interesting experiences. From his home in Maryland at the age of nine- 
teen he set out for the west, down the Ohio valley to Gallatin county, 
Kentucky. He began working for a tobacco-raiser, but because he 
insisted on crushing the tobacco worms with his foot instead of killing 
them with his hands, his employer discharged him, and he found himself 
penniless and without opportimity. Procuring an old skifT, he set off 
down the Ohio. The kindness of an old black slave in giving him a hand- 
kerchief and a dime to help him on his journey was afterwards remem- 
bered when Mr. Collins, in more prosperous circumstances, met his bene- 
factor and repaid him with five dollars to help the old darkey purchase his 
freedom. The skift" became unseaworth)- after a short distance had been 
covered, and two men rescued young Collins from the current of the river 
and landed him in Louisville. From the only acquaintance he had in this 
citv he obtained employment as a hod carrier, and then became an appren- 
tice at the brick-layer's trade. As a brick-layer he became so skillful 
that it was declared he could lay brick as fast as a hen could pick up 
corn. When he settled in Sullivan county in 1837 he entered fifty acres 
of government land near Carlisle and continued to follow his vocation 
for a number of years. In addition to the entered land he had bought two 
hundred acres, and lived on this farm until his death. 

The ascertained history of the Collins family on the father^s side 
goes back to the parents of William Collins, who were James O. and 
Sarah E. (McGraw) Collins, the former a native of England and the 
latter of Scotland. James O. Collins was a sailor and lost his life by being 
drowned in Chesapeake bay while William was only a boy. The wife 
of William Collins was Mary Ann (Hoke) Collins. Her grandfather. 
Andrew Hoke, was born in Germany in 1740, and died in Kentucky in 
1800. while his wife, Barbara Hoke, was born in Germany in 1734 and 
died in Kentucky, March 19. 1814. Adam Hoke, their son, was born in 
Germany in 1760, and died August 7, 1832, and his wife Catherine (Hof- 
feils) Hoke, was born in Germany in 1764, and died November 30, 1818. 
Both these maternal grandparents of Edward J. Collins died in Kentucky. 

William Collins and his wife were loyal Presbyterians, he being an 
elder in the church, and he was also known for his pronounced advocacy 
of the Democratic party. They were both well remembered by the older 
residents of Haddon township. They had a large family, nine children. 
as follows: Sarah E., born February 26, 1825, died January, 1888; James 
O.. born February 21. 1826, died June, 1898; William H., born November 
15, 1827, died December 28, 1833; Columbus W., born November 3, 1833, 
died Tulv 10. 1835; Julia C. born October 7. 1829, now living with her 
brother Edward J.: Mercer D.. born March 5, 1832, died March 17. 1880: 
Edward ].: Alfred B.. born September ii, 1837. died December 18, 1855: 
Marv L.i born October 6. 1839, a resident of Haddon township and the 
wife of A. J. Brentlinger. The mother of this family died May 2^. 1865. 



300 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN- COUNTY 

Edward J. Collins, during his young manhood and after he had 
attended the public schools, learned his father's trade as brick-layer and 
was regularly engaged in that occupation four years. From 1866 to 
1870 he and his father farmed together, and from the latter year until 
1891 he engaged in farming on the homestead, part of the time as lessee. 
In 1891 he traded his old place of two hundred acres for the one hundred 
and sixty acres four miles southwest of Pleasantville which are his present 
homestead. Being a man whom years have not aged, ^Ir. Collins still 
gives active superintendence to his farm, and with stock-raising and 
grain-growing is known as one of the leading farmers of the township. 
He has filled all the official chairs of the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 50 at 
Carlisle, and has been a delegate to the grand lodge. He is a Democrat, 
and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church, in which 
he has served as an elder. 

By his marriage on January 5, 1864. to Mary Jenkins, Air. Collins 
united with one of the old and well known families of Sullivan county. 
Mrs. Collins, who died April 4, 1905, was born at Carlisle April 9, 1840, 
and was a daughter of John and Mary Jenkins. The Jenkins family are 
elsewhere mentioned in this history. The six children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Collins are named as follows: Roland A., who married November 15, 
1893, Miss Minnie Lingerer, and she died November 12, 1899; William 
J., mentioned below ; John G., born February 26, 1868, who is one of the 
successful teachers of Sullivan county : Cora B., born March 17, 1870, 
who lives at home ; Mercer D., born May 8, 1882, who helps conduct the 
home farm ; and Charles T., who died at the age of three months. 

The late Dr. William J. Collins, who was second *in age of the above 
children, was a rising young physician and a popular citizen of Geneva, 
Indiana, at the time he was accidentally killed by a train, December 3. 
1905. He was born July 15, 1866. Fie was a graduate of the Terre 
Haute Normal School with the class of 1900 and was engaged in teacnmg 
imtil he took up the study of medicine. After his graduation from the 
Illinois Medical College in 1904 he began practice at Geneva. He was 
an honored member of the Masonic lodge at Carlisle and a member of 
the Presbyterian church at that place. 



WiLLi.\M T. Spenc-er. Jr., who is counted among the worthv and 
enterprising citizens of Pleasantville. Indiana, is a native of Greene 
county, born in Stafford township, September 29, 1864, a son of James 
and Sarah (Padgett) Spencer. His father was a native of \lrginia, 
born October 22, 1841. The mother was born in Haddon township, 
.Sullivan county, November 15, 1844. James Spencer came to Indiana 
with his parents when yet a sniall boy. The family located near the vil- 
lage, on a farm which at that time was government land and all thickly 
covered with timber. The log house which he built stood until about 
1906. The grandfather continued to live on that place until his death, 
which occurred in 1895. at the age of ninety-five years. During the 
latter part of his life he was greatly crippled in his lower limbs by reason 



HISTORY UF SL'LLIN AX QJUXTY 301 

of rheumatism. Mis wife died man_\- years licfnrc licr liusband ami he 
hved with Mrs. Howard, who occupied a part nf (lie uld place. 

James Spencer, the father, left home when about eighteen years of 
age. working as a farm hand until after his inarriage. when he bought 
the farm in Sullivan county on which he now lives, having been a constant 
resident for over fort_\- years. He also owns ten acres in the village of 
Pleasantville, but prefers to remain on the old homestead, which has been 
so dear to him for two score and more years. His farm is among the 
choicest in this part of the state. It consists of two hundred and twenty- 
five acres, seventy-five of which are situated within Greene county and 
the remainder in Sullivan, lioth he and his good wife still enjoy excellent 
health for persons of their age. 

William T. Spencer received his educalion at the Jackson school 
liouse in Cireenc county, lie remained faithful to every known trust 
about the old homestead of his father's until he was twenty-three \ears 
of age, when his father deeded him twenty-eight acres of land and to 
this he soon added as much more, which last tract he purchased himself. 
Here he began general farm operations and worked energetically for 
eighteen \ears, then bought a five-acre tract in the village and also five 
town lots, building- him the fine five-room house m which he now resides. 
He owned and made improvements on other town lots which he sold in 
the spring of 1907. His farm is handled by a trusty tenant, while he 
himself is engaged as a hardware salesman for Mr. Bough. He con- 
ducted the operations of a coal mine on his own farm for seven years, 
supplving the local trade. Later he sold the coal rights on his land to 
the Little Giant Coal Company. He also took up the option on si.xteen 
hundred acres of coal land for the same company, and for this he was 
liberally paid. 

]Mr. Spencer was married September 28, 1887, to Miss .\nna McCart, 
a daughter of James and .Amanda (Warner) McCart. She was born in 
this township ( )ctober <;, 1862. Her parents were natives of Greene 
countv. anil her father died when she was nine years of age, and her 
mother two years earlier. She was cared for by her grandmother a 
few years, and then lived with an uncle in Haddon tovv'nship until her 
marriage. Bv this union one child was born: Everett, on July 12, 
i88g, and he is yet at home. Mr. Spencer is connected with the Knights 
of P\thias order. Castle Hall Lodge No. 358, and his wife with the 
Rathbone Sisters. In his political choice he favors the platforms of 
the Republican party, but has never had a liking for local positions, 
hence is not an <iffice holder. Mr. and Mrs. William Spencer have one 
of the old parcliment deeds executed by President .\ndrew Jackson, 
which is one of the valuable relics in their liome. 



Wn.i.i.xM Mii.r,i;u. a successful farmer of Jefferson township. .^ulli\an 
cnuntv, and a veteran of the Civil war, was born March 30, 1842, in 
Lawrence county, Indiana, a son of Martin and Edith ( Packwood) Miller. 
The paternal grandparents were Jacob Miller and wife Mary, whose name 



302 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

before marriage was Borders. Jacob Miller was a native of Tennessee, 
and in 1828 went to Kentuck)' and resided there until 1822. He then 
moved to Clark county, Indiana. In 1834, thinking to better his circum- 
stances, he removed to Lawrence count}-, and in 1841 to Sullivan county. 
He located in Hamilton township, where he was among the hardy 
pioneers. His land comprised the tract where the old fair ground was 
later situated, and there he lived and labored until his death. Among 
his children was a .son named Martin, who became the father of William, 
and who was born in 1 816 in eastern Tennessee, and died in Lawrence 
county, Indiana, in 1906. He continued at home with his parents until 
they moved to Lawrence county and he lived in that county during the 
remainder of his life. At one time he owned nine hundred acres of land 
and was an extensive farmer and stock raiser. Formerly he was an 
old-line Whig, but when the Republican party was organized he supported 
the principles for v.'hich that party was formed. Both he and his wife 
were devoted and consistent members of the Christian church. His wife 
was born in 181 3, in Virginia, and died about 1888. Their children were 
as follows : William, of this narrative ; Michael, residing in Lawrence 
county, Indiana, who married Sarah J. Smith; Adam, who died in his 
youth; Mary Ellen, deceased; Aaron, a resident of Lawrence county, 
who married Mary Ann Lee, now deceased ; Sarah A., deceased ; 
Elizabeth, residing in Lawrence count}-, married William G. Todd ; and 
a child that died in infancy. 

William Miller, who was the eldest of his parents' children, obtained 
a good common school education in, Lawrence county. He continued to 
reside under the paternal roof .tnitil he .caugTitlljeNspirit of true patriotism 
and in the month of July, i86i,'-.enrist'ed iji Company A, Twenty-fourth 
Indiana A-'olunteer Infantry Regiment, in vvKich .command he served one 
year. He returned and after •ope year re-enlisted, in July, 1863, as a 
member of Company H of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana 
Infantry, with which regiment ' he- re-maj,ne'd six months. He participated 
in the famous battle of Shiloh during his "first" enlistment, and during his 
last enlistment was in the battle of Bean Station. After his honorable 
discharge from the United States service he returned to Lawrence county, 
Indiana, and commenced operations for himself, by clearing and improv- 
ing an eighty-acre tract within the forest country. This place in 1876 
he sold and purchased fifty-two acres where he still resides, the same 
being a well improved farm within the limits of Jefferson township, where 
he carries on farming with much thrift and a corresponding success. 
Mr. Miller is an enthusiastic supporter of the Republican party, and has 
served efficiently as township trustee and was elected assessor of his 
township in 1904, his term of office expiring January i, 1909. He is an 
honored member of JMcClung Grand Army Post at Pleasantville. Indiana. 

Mr. Miller has been thrice married, first, January 10, 1863, to Sarah 
Edwards, born in 1845, in Lawrence county, Indiana, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Young Edwards. She died in 1887, the mother of the follow- 
ing children : Oliver, who died aged eight months ; Dora, residing in 
Greene cotnity, Indiana, wife of Marion Story, and they are the parents 






l£NOH 



AND 



^rr-^-Ji 




MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM RIGGS 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 303 

of four children — Jennie, Olive, Eunice and Odell ; Henry, residing in 
Jefferson township, Sullivan county, married Emma Swady ; Easter, who 
rlied aged one year ; Frank, residing in Jefferson township, married 
Fannie Moore, whose five children are Edith, Dorothy, Garrett, William 
and Guy ; Margaret, residing in Greene county, Indiana, is the wife of 
Timothy Pool and their children are Arthur and Paul ; Maude, residing 
in Cass township, Sullivan county, married Frank Chambers, whose four 
children are Nora, Paul, Bert and Marion ; and a child who died in 
infancy. For his second wiis Mr. Miller married, in February, 1888, 
Elizabeth Craig, who was born about 1840 and died July i, 1899. There 
was no issue by this marriage. For the third wife he married, September 
30, 1904, Sarah Shepherd, a w^idow, born in 1841 in Haddon township, 
Sullivan county, and daughter of Jack Willis. There was no issue by the 
last marriage. 



William Riggs. — One of the most extensive farmers, land owners 
and coal mine promoters living in Fairbanks township, Sullivan county, 
is William Riggs, who resides along the Shelburn rural free delivery 
route No. i. He is a native of this township and was born September 30, 
i860, a son of Byron and Elizabeth (Osborn) Riggs. The father was 
also born in Fairbanks township and the mother in Hamilton township. 
The paternal grandparents were Hezekiah and Lydia (Engle) Riggs, the 
grandfather being a native of Mrginia. and the grandmother of Kentucky. 
Grandfather Riggs was among the first settlers in Fairbanks township. 
He entered land in the heavy timber and kept passengers and changed 
horses on the stage routes from Terre Haute to Vincennes. He owned a 
large amount of land, the most of which had to be cleared and put in 
shape for farming purposes. He attained the ag.e of eighty-two years, his 
wife dying when about eighty years of age. The maternal grandparents 
were William and Martha (Hill) Osborn, the former born in Kentucky 
and the latter in Sullivan county, Indiana. 

Byron Riggs, the father, was born March 18, 1838. and after his 
marriage settled near his father's place and bought several hundred acres, 
which constituted one of the finest farms, and he was one of the best agri- 
culturists in this section of the state. He kept registered cattle and pure- 
blooded hogs. He died February 4. 1901, and his wife survived till Octo- 
ber 13, 1907. William Riggs was the eldest of the four sons and four 
daughters born to Byron Riggs and wife. Of this family five are now 
living, namely: Sanbury, of Fairbanks township ; Delia, widow of Edward 
Stone, now residing on her father's place ; Florence, residing with her 
sister, Mrs. Stone; Charles, of Fairbanks township; and William, of this 
memoir. 

William Riggs spent his boyhood days on the old home farm and 
attended the district schools. He was married September 30, 1884, to 
Rosa L. Johnson, born in Fairbanks. January 11, 1867, a daughter of 
Oliver B. and Mary (^"an Gilder) Johnson, natives of West \'irginia. 
The grandparents were Barnabas and Elizabeth Johnson, of West \'ir- 

VoL 11—20 



304 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

gmia, and William and Mary Van Gilder, of the same state. ]\Irs. Riggs' 
father died July 26, 1900, and the mother, October 4, 1873. After the 
marriage of Mr. Riggs he moved to the one hundred and sixty acre farm 
which he farmed until 1893. His father gave him eighty acres and he 
bought the remainder of the farm from him, in section 27, which was 
partly improved, but which he has now finely cultivated. His land within 
Fairbanks township amounts to four hundred acres, and he also has forty- 
one acres in Turman township and one hundred and eleven in Curry 
township. His wife owns in her own right one hundred and thirty- 
five acres. 

Besides his large realty holdings, Mr. Riggs owns ten shares of stock 
in the Scott City Coal Mine Company, of which he is secretary, and he 
also has a fotir thousand dollar interest in the mine besides his stock. He 
owns twenty acres of good coal land. Not alone does his propertv inter- 
ests rest in Sullivan county, but he also owns five thousand dollars' worth 
of stock in coal lands in Illinois and has about eight hundred acres of 
land in Vig;o county, Indiana, nearly all of which is bottom land. His 
present commodious buildings were erected in 1901. Although his finan- 
cial interests are large, he superintends his own business affairs. He is 
one of the largest dealers in cattle and hogs and one of the most extensive 
feeders in his township. 

Politically Mr. Riggs is a Democrat. He is connected with Masonrv, 
belonging to Fairbanks Lodge No. 373 ; also with the Odd Fellows order, 
Fairbanks Lodge No. 763. Mr. and Mrs. Riggs are the parents of the 
following children: Elva C, born April 21, 1886; Myrtle Olive, October 
22, 1888; Goldie Glenn, June 9, 1891 ; Oral Byron, July 21, 1896; and 
?ilayra Elizabeth, October 17, 1902. 



James Spencer. — The late James Spencer, during many years one 
of the progressive and substantial farmers and stock raisers of Jefferson 
township, Sullivan county, was a native of Greene county, Indiana, born 
in the month of December, 1840, a son of Charles and Mary Spencer. 
Charles Spencer was born in A'irginia and was among the pioneer settlers 
in Sullivan county, Indiana. He entered government land when he first 
located here, and continued to reside in the county until his death. He 
was a farmer and helped to lay the foundation of the present prosperity 
of this goodly section of Indiana. Eig;ht children were born to this 
worthy couple : Moses, who died a soldier in the Civil war, after having 
been out abotit two years ; John, who died in the service of his country 
in the same conflict, after being out one year ; James, of this memoir ; 
Thomas, a resident of Jefferson township, who also participated in the 
war ; Armon, residing in Jeft'erson township ; Mary, deceased ; and JManda, 
residing at Sullivan, the widow of Joshua Anderson. Charles Spencer, 
the father, was formerly a Whig in politics and afterward a firm defender 
of the principles of the Republican party. That the family was ever 
loval to the country of their nativity it only needs to be recalled that 



HISTORY OF SULU\-AX COUNTY 305 

several of its members wore the loyal blue from 1861 to 1865. Both 
Charles Spencer and wife were strict members of the Baptist church. 

James Spencer, son uf Charles and Mary Spencer, obtained a com- 
mon school education, but like a dutiful son spent much of the time in 
his youth in assisting his father in clearing; up and improving their farm. 
When James first started out in life he worked his brother's land, but 
in 1861 purchased seventy-two acres in Jeiiferson township, Sullivan 
county, to which he removed the same year, and lived there until his 
death. He possessed one hundred and forty acres, after having given 
all oi his cliildrcn a comfortable start in life.' In politics he was a" firm 
believer in the chief principles laid down by the Republican party. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal' church, as is also his wife. 

As to Mr. Spencer's domestic relations it may be said that he was 
liappily married December i, 1866, to Sarah J. Padgett, born in Haddon 
township, Sullivan county, December 20, 1845. The issue bv this mar- 
riage was as follows: \\'illiam T.. a resident of Pleasantville ; Minnie, 
Mrs. Bedwell, residing in Greene county, Indiana; Rosa, Mrs. Pool, 
living near Linton. Indiana: Effie. Mrs. Pool, residing at Pleasantville; 
Mattie. deceased ; Frank, residing in Jefferson township. Sullivan countv ; 
and Charles, at home with his father. Mr. Spencer departed this life 
November 10, iyo8, and his remains are interred in the Pleasantville, 
Indiana, cemeterv. 



J.XMES Fr.\xk Spencer, who owns antl operates one of the most 
productive farms for its size within Jefferson township, Sullivan county, 
is a native of this township, born June 2y. 1879, one mile north of 
Pleasantville. He is the son of James and Sarah J. (Padgett) Spencer, 
both of whom are now residing half a mile north of Pleasantville, where 
they conduct a farm of one hundred and twenty acres. James Spencer 
was born in Jefferson township and is the son of Charles Spencer, who 
was one of the first settlers in Sullivan county. He lived to the advanced 
age of ninety-three years, and was a farmer all of his life. James 
Spencer was first a Whig and later a Republican. In his church con- 
nections he is a Methodist, as is his wife, and in his church work he 
is very active and holds the ofifice of church steward. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. James Spencer are as follows; William T., a 
resident of Pleasantville, who married Anna AlcCart. and thev have one 
child, Everet: Minnie, Mrs. Bedwell, a resident of Greene countv, 
Indiana: Frank J., of this notice; Mattie. deceased; Rose. Mrs. Pool, of 
Greene county, Indiana: Effie, Mrs. Pool, residing in Pleasantville; 
Charles, who married Garnett Herndon and resides with his father. 

Frank J. Spencer was educated at the common schools of Greene 
county, Indiana. I'^or five years after his marriage he farmed on rented 
land in Jefferson township, the same belonging to his father. He was 
then deeded fiftv acres by his father, and this he cleared and finely im- 
proved, and has added thereto seventy acres more, which makes one of 
the numerous valuable farm tracts within the township. This work of 



3o6 . HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

clearing and improving has all been accomplished by Mr. Spencer, un- 
aided by others. He has owned and operated a saw mill and threshing 
machine for about seven years. He and his brother, William T., owned 
and operated a coal mine on his brother's farm from 1897 to about 1901, 
when they sold the property of the mines. Mr. Spencer is a staunch 
Republican and was the first man of this political party to be elected to 
any office within Jefferson township, he being made a township trustee 
in 1904, his term of office expiring in 1909. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the 
Odd Fellows order, lodge No. 408, at Pleasantville, and also of the 
Knights of Pythias order, lodge No. 358, at the same place. Being a 
believer in fraternal life insurance, he wisely holds a membership in the 
Modern Woodmen of America, camp No. 4929, at Pleasantville, and is 
one of the trustees of this lodge. He is an honored member of the 
Rebekahs and Pythian Sisters lodges at Pleasantville, the auxiliaries of 
the orders just named. Mrs. Spencer is a member of the Rebekahs, the 
Pythian Sisters and the Royal Neighbors, and is oracle in the last named 
order. 

Mr. Spencer was united in marriage April 7, 1888, to Rebecca 
Purcell, born near Paxton, February 9, 1866, a daughter of. Daniel and 
Malissa (Pirtle) Purcell. The latter is deceased, but the former resides 
in Sullivan and is retired. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Spencer: Archie, born October 24, 1889, and now assisting his father 
on the farm; Delmar, born October 2, 1892, at home; and Ralph Calvert, 
who was born September 14, 1894, and died March 6, 1896. 



Mrs. Sarah E. (Burton) Holdson, who is the daughter of one 
of the highly respected families of Gill township, Sullivan county, was 
born August 28, 1849, in the township just named. She is the daughter 
of Hardon and Nancy (Pinkston) Burton, both natives of Sullivan 
county, Indiana. The father was born February 5, 1816, and died in 
Gill township in 1854. The mother was born in Jefferson township and 
died in 1857; she was the daughter of Bazzel and Anna (Dwiggins) 
Burton. Hardon Burton is by occupation a farmer, who owned eighty 
acres of land. The children born to Hardon and Nancy Burton were as 
follows: Bazzel, Jr., deceased; Harrison, deceased; Floyd, a resident 
of Graysville, Indiana, who is a horseman, and who served two years in 
the Civil war and was wounded in the foot; Nancy E., deceased; Fidelia, 
deceased ; Lucy A., deceased ; Sarah E., of this notice ; Josephine, residing 
in Graysville, Indiana, with her brother. 

Sarah E. (Burton) Holdson received her education in the public 
school in Jefferson township. After her father's death her mother mar- 
ried Andrew Wallace, by whom there was no issue. Mrs. Holdson lived 
with her step-father until thirteen years of age, after which she sup- 
ported herself until the date of her marriage, which occurred February 
14, 1867, Vi'hen she was united to Anderson Pinkston, by whom two chil- 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 307 

dren were born; AUie. residing at lionie with her niotlier, and Fannie, 
<\h(i married John Bedwcll, and they reside at Linton, Indiana. For 
lier second husband Mrs. Holdson married Captain James Holdson, born 
December 20, 1820, in Kentucky, and died December 24, 1894. He 
came to Sullivan county in 1824 with his parents, and remained here the 
remainder of his life. 'When the Civil war broke out in 1861 he raised 
a company of which he was made captain and served until the war closed. 
He was wounded five times and carried two of the enemy's bullets with 
him to his grave. He had also been a soldier in the Mexican war in 
1846-47. After the Civil war ended he returned to his farm, which 
consisted of five hundred acres, and which he operated until his death. 
He possessed a character so replete with good traits that all were his 
friends and admirers. Politically he was a staunch and uncompromising 
Republican who ever worked for the good of that jiolitical organization 
and for the general good of the community in which he lived. When- 
ever any public improvement was sought to be made, he was foremost in 
giving it his influence, assisting both by money and time. By the mar- 
riage of Mrs. Pinkston to Mr. Holdson there were two children born, 
but Cynthia Ann, born February 6, 1876, died October 5, 1900. The other 
was James Arthur, born September 28, 1870, in Jefiferson township, Sulli- 
van county, and he follows mining for his occupation. He married Eliza 
Bedwell. 

Mrs. Holdson receives a pension from the government, amounting to 
twenty dollars a month, on account of her second husl)and's army service. 
She looks after her thirty-five acre farm, upon which she raises both grain 
and stock. She is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
as was her husband in his lifetime. 



George C. Youngman, a man of large experience in various avoca- 
tions, and who has now passed his three score and ten years, will form 
the subject of this memoir, which very fittingly finds place in this con- 
nection, it being the story of one of the pioneer characters who has forged 
his way to the "front in the developing of Sullivan county as well as other 
section's of the middle west. Mr. Youngman was born at the thriving city 
of Greencastle, Putnam county, Indiana, August 13, 1837, a son from out 
the family of fourteen children born to Stacy R. and Laurena B. (Mark) 
Y'oungman. The parents were both born in Kentucky, which state has 
furnished so many acceptable "first settlers" in many of the counties of 
Indiana. The father was born August 24, 1813, and the mother in 1816. 
They came to Indiana in 1831, locating near Greencastle, on a farm 
owned bv his father. Stacy R. Y'oungman was a practicing physician of 
considerable note. He lived at Greencastle until about 1846, when he 
moved to Cloverdale, in the same county, and there practiced medicine 
until i8si, when he moved to Owen county, settling in Williamson, where 
he resided until 1853. He then moved to Greencastle again, and con- 
tinued his medical practice until 1855 at that place. In 1861 he moved 



3o8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

to West Liberty, Illinois, and followed his profession until his death, 
September i, 1904. His good wife died about 1898. They were the 
parents of fourteen children, seven of whom are still living, as follows : 
Eliza J., wife of Dr. Stevens, who is now deceased, and his widow resides 
with the subject of this sketch ; Josephine C, wife of James Barrack, 
deceased ; James T., of Kansas ; Mary, wife of Milton Adams, of West 
Liberty, Illinois ; Nancy E., wife of William Tippet, of Dundas, Illinois ; 
Elmer H., residing in New York City, connected with the National 
Bankers' Magazine; and George C, of this notice. 

George C. Youngman obtained his education under many a difficulty 
unknown to the youth of the twentieth century. He attended the district 
schools north of Greencastle, Indiana, where there was not a single window 
light in the entire building, and had other trials which only the stout- 
hearted can endure and develop under. He was thrown upon his own 
resources at an early age, his father having a large family to support 
from a limited means. He went to live with an uncle when aged about 
eight years, and continued to live with him as long as he worked for 
others. These good people, Richard J. and Rebecca Tolin, were people 
who commanded the esteem of all for their sterling traits of character. 
During the years of 1850 and 1852 he was on a mail route, the first year 
between Bloomington and Crawfordsville, Indiana. He traveled on 
horseback a distance of seventy miles, and on the entire route there were 
but three bridges ; but he practically never missed a trip on account of 
liad roads or high water. His salary was the princely sum of seven dol- 
lars a month. On his first trip to Bloomington in 1850 he was served 
with a cup of coffee, which was the first and last cup he ever tasted. In 
i860 he rented a farm in this county, and also began threshing wheat with 
his uncle as early as 1855, and has continued practically ever since that 
time to be near the busy hum of a threshing machine in its annual season. 
In 1866 he purchased a house in New Lebanon, which after a few months 
he sold at a handsome profit. He also engaged in operating a sawmill 
for a time, but sold and bought his farm, consisting of seventy-four acres, 
and moved to the premises in the month of March, 1869. Here he has 
added many valuable and attractive improvements and carried on general 
farming operations. He purchased forty acres more land not far distant 
from his home farm, and this he sold in 1908. 

It will be observed, as stated in the commencement, that Mr. Young- 
man has seen many of life's changing scenes, but not near all of his his- 
tory has been told. For five years he traveled for the Robinson ^Machine 
Company, of Richmond, Indiana, as their salesman. Again, he had a 
touch of Civil war military life, which should not be omitted from this 
narrative. In January, 1865, the last year of the rebellion, he enlisted as 
a member of Company G, of the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana 
Regiment. He entered as a private soldier and was promoted to the rank 
of sergeant and mustered out of the U. S. service September 27, 1865. 

In his politics Mr. Youngman is a staunch Republican, and takes 
high ground on the subject of temperance; and in his religious connec- 
tion he was reared a Methodist, but he is not a member of anv church 



IIISTURV UF SL"Ll.i\AX OJLW'TV 309 

organization. He was married March 2, 1862, to Margaret E. (Jill, a 
daughter of (jeorge N. and — (Graham) (iill. The grandfather was 
born in North Carolina and the grandmother in Tennessee. It is be- 
lieved that her parents were born in Sullivan county. Indiana. Her father 
was a farmer and also followed the trade of millwright. He removed to 
Wisconsin, settled near IJoscobel. remained a few years, and then went to 
Arkansas, and finally returned to Sullivan cnunty, ln<liana. and remained 
on his farm until his death in 1867. Jhe nioiher of Mrs. Youngman 
died several years before the death of the father. 

Mr. and Mrs, Youngman are tlie parents of three cliildren. biU the 
eldest, born .March 3, 18(13. died in infanc}'. .\lbion D., born June 3, 
18(14, died in 11J04. He was first married to Aliss Kmma Sherman, born in 
this count}-, aiid tlie_\' had two children — P'rnest, born March 7, 
1888, now with the subject, and Ivan, born May 21. 1889. He marrieil, 
>econdly. Miss Jennie Xevvsom, a native of Illinois, liorn near Olney, and 
tlic\- had two children — Margaret, born September 4, 1898, and Albion 
Uuane, born h'ebruary 2, 1900, and died August 11, 1908. These chil- 
dren, with the mother, are with Mr. and Mrs. Youngman. 

Mr. Youngman was a candidate for trustee of the townshi]) and 
was defeated b\- only ten votes. He was also a candidate for sheriff, 
auditor, county commission.er. and count)- treasurer, and in a count\- of 
eighteen hundred Democratic n-iajority he was defeated by only three hun- 
dred and eighty-one majority votes. He is also a member of Silver's 
firand Army of the Republic Post No. 435, and filled all the offices, at 
New Lebanon, Indiana, and has attended grand encampments at different 
tin-ies. 



Geokc;i£ W. hUn'i-:\vi-:Li.. who was a soldier in the L'nion cause at the 
time of the Civil war in this country, and who now resides in Gill town- 
ship, Sullivan county, on land entered by his father at an earlv dav, was 
born on the farm where he now resides Alarch 9, 1843. His parents were 
John and Katherine (Lisman) Hopewell, both <if whom were natives of 
Kentucky. The father came to Sullivan count\ and took advantage of 
cheap government land, the warrant for which was signed bv President 
Jan-ies Monroe. He continued to reside on this land until his death, in 
about i84(). His wife died there about 1872. He served his country as 
a soldier during the entire period of the war with Mexico. Their children 
were eleven in number, and are all deceased but George W. of this notice 
and one sister. Katherine, the wife of Amos Fiske, residing in Carlisle, 
where he is now retired, having spent the active years of his life as a 
mechanical engineer. 

George W. Hopewell attended the pul^lic schools of New Leliauon. 
and ren-iained on the old place with his mother until her death, when the 
farm came into his hands. He soon afterward married and continued to 
operate the hon-iestead, to which he has from time to time n-iade valuable 
additions and substantial improvements. Here he still carries on general 
farming and stock raising. He owns one hundred and ten acres, fort\- 



310 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

acres of which are about a mile and a half west of the homestead. Mr. 
Hopewell served at the time of the Civil war as a member of Company G, 
One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana Regiment of Infantry, under Cap- 
tain Parvin. He enlisted at New Lebanon, served about eleven months 
and was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, having been mustered out 
at Nashville, Tennessee. His service was mostly doing picket duty. He 
is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church and in politics 
votes an independent ticket, choosing such candidates as seem in his own 
judgment best calculated to serve the interests of the people. 

He was married, April 21, 1880, to Miss Melissa Owens, a native of 
Missouri, and a daughter of Elias and Sally Ann (Johnson) Owens. Her 
parents came to Indiana during the Civil war period, locating, in Sullivan 
county on a farm, where they died. The death of the father occurred in 
1888, and the mother ten years later. The father was a blacksmith, which 
trade he followed together with farming until his death. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hopewell was born one son: Thomas E. Hopewell, born April 17, 1882, 
and now residing in New Lebanon and assisting his father on his farm. 
He married Mabel Oldham, born near Palestine, Crawford county, 
Illinois, and whose parents now live in New Lebanon, Indiana. The 
father conducts a general merchandise store. 

Mr. Hopewell has one of the old deeds signed by President James 
Monroe, which is one of the oldest deeds found in the county, and this 
land was never out of the hands of the Hopewell family. 



Dr. Henry Francis Harper, deceased, who up to Februarv, 1898. 
was one of the leading practicing physicians and surgeons within Sullivan 
county, Indiana, was born March 5, 1845, near Carlisle, Haddon town- 
ship, a son of Dr. John Baxter and Isabella (Benefield) Harper. The 
Doctor's father was a native of Virginia and the mother of Ohio. Their 
respective parents were early settlers of Haddon township. Dr. lohn 
Baxter Harper practiced in and around Carlisle. His wife died when 
the son Dr. Henry F. was but fourteen months of age, he being the only 
child born to them. Dr. John B. Harper moved to I\Ierom and began 
the practice of medicine, and continued until 1886, when he moved to 
San Diego, California, where he died in 1894. For his second wife he 
married a widow named Shepherd, of Carlisle. Politically Dr. Harper, 
the senior, was a Republican. 

Dr. Henry F. Harper, of this biography, received his primarv educa- 
tion at the common schools at Merom, at which place he also attended 
the Union Christian College. After being properly fitted he matriculated 
at Bellview College, in Philadelphia, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1868. He then went to Indianapolis, in which citv he took up 
the insurance business, later taking a post-graduate course at Rush 
Medical College, Chicago. After being thus highlv qualified for the 
medical fraternity he began its practice'with his father at Merom, and 
continued with him until the father moved to California. After that 




)>4/ / ' vb^^^^;;;^£^<2/^ 



[the NEW YORK , 

■ vmilC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX ANC 
TltOEN FOUNOSTIGfi:, 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 311 

Dr. Henry F. practiced alone at the same place until his death, February 
10, 1898. He was admitted to be the best physician in the county. He 
accumulated much property, including several tracts of valuable land, 
besides much real estate in California. He owned and occupied the line 
residence on ■\Ierom BluiT where his widow now lives. Politically Dr. 
Harper was a Republican. He served as a corporal in the C)ne Hundred 
and Thirty-seventh Indiana volunteer regiment of infantry. The date 
of his discharge was December 15, 1864. He was president of the 
Sullivan County Medical Association, a member of the American Medical 
Association, and took much interest in the science of his profession, in 
which he ever sought to excel. He was high in Masonry, belonging to 
the lodge at Merom and to the Chapter at Sullivan. In his religious 
faith he was of the Methodist Episcopal denomination, in which body 
he was a trustee for some years. 

He w^s united in marriage, November 8, 1877, to Harriett Minter, 
who was a native of Gill township, Sullivan county, born about one mile 
north of ]\Ierom April 28, 1857, a daughter of William and Malinda 
(Pinkston) Minter. Her father was born in Missouri, near Liberty, 
August 10, 1820, and died on the old Minter homestead north of Merom. 
Mrs. Minter was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, June 10, 1829, and died 
August 17, 1905, in Merom, Indiana, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Harper. 

Mrs. Harper was educated in Sullivan county and attended the Union 
Christian College at Merom. One daughter was born to Dr. Harper 
and wife — Bernice Isabella, born Cktober 24, 1886. She graduated at 
the Merom schools in 1904 and at Oberlin College, Ohio, in 1907. The 
mother and daughter are both consistent members of the Alethodist 
Episcojjal church. 



Chris Kahre, who is associated with his brother Fred, is a thorough- 
going farmer of Gill township, Sullivan county, where he has made a 
success as an agriculturist. He was born in Germany, near Bremen, in 
1850, a son of Henry and Mary Kahre, both natives of Germany. The 
father died in his native land wlien his boys were both small, and soon 
after his death the mother and family came to America and settled in 
Knox county, Indiana, where they all worked out for others. The mother 
died within a few years after her arrival in this country. The sons had 
but little opportunity to attend schools, as they v^'ere compelled to work 
for their maintenance. From the time he was sixteen years of age during 
the next fifteen years Chris Kahre worked out for others, and then pur- 
chased fifty two and a half acres of land, to which later he added twenty- 
two acres more. This constitutes his present farm of eighty and a half 
acres, upon which he has made all the improvements. Here he does 
a general farming and stock raising business. The twenty dollars which 
had been loaned him in Germany by an uncle who came with the family 
had to be paid from out the first money he earned after coming to 
America. This was the cost of his transportation from his native land. 



312 HISTORY OF SULLIVAX COUNTY 

]\Ir. Kahre was united in marriage, April 24, 1892, to Sarah Jane Engle, 
born in Sullivan county, Indiana, a daughter of Alexander and Patsy 
Engle. natives of \ irginia and early settlers here, but both are now 
deceased. By this union one child was born — Frank, on May 26, 1893, 
and now living with his father. Mrs. Kahre died in 1895. In his church 
faith Mr. Kahre is of the Christian denomination, and politicallv is a 
supporter of the Democratic party. 

Fred Kahre, who is the brother associated with Chris Kahre, men- 
tioned above, was born in Germany in 1847. a son of Henrv and ]\Iarv 
Kahre. The father died in Germany and the family on emigrating to 
this country located in Knox county, Indiana. The sons had to shift 
as best they could for themselves, but have always aided one another 
in their life's conflict. When eighteen years old Fred Kahre, having 
worked for others for two years, then bought sixty-one and a half acres 
of land, upon which he lived until February 5, 1906, but now^makes his 
home with his brother Chris. While on his own farm he carried on 
general farming and stock farming, but has now disposed of all of his 
property, for he was bereft of his wife by death Alarch 5. 1901. 

Mr. Kahre was married in September, 1881, to Hannah Skidmore, 
a native of Sullivan county and a daughter of Abe Skidmore and wife, 
who came from Kentucky, and both are now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Kahre were born twins, but both died in infancy. The sad affliction has 
cast a gloom over the otherwise bright pathway of Mr. Kahre, and at 
this time his plans for the future are unsettled. 



J.VMEs A. Sh.aw, deceased, was in his lifetime one of the energetic, 
moving factors in Sullivan county, as well as a well known merchant in 
different sections of the country. He was born April 4, 1850, near 
Bowling Green, Clay county, Indiana, a son of Thomas Shaw and wife. 
The mother died when he was but five years of age. The father was 
a native of Rhode Island, and became one of the earlv settlers of Clav 
county, Indiana, where he was known for years as an extensive farmer. 
He was twice married and died in Clay county. He was the father of 
three children, all now deceased. 

James A. Shaw had but a limited common-school education, having 
been bereft of his parents when quite young. After the death of his 
parents he worked for others as a farm hand in Illinois until when about 
seventeen years old. He then began canvassing for a picture firm in 
Chicago, and later went to that city and remained there until five years 
before his marriage. He then moved to Indianapolis, where he continued 
to reside for some time. He engaged in the carpet and stove business, 
and was among the first men to start an installment house in that city. 
He furnished houses from kitchen to the parlor and drawing-room, and 
continued there until December 10, 1887, and established another store 
on the same plan in the following; spring. In the following vear he 
shipped his goods to Tevre Haute and continued there one }ear. and 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUXTY 313 

then sold and went to Alcrom, Indiana, near which place he condncted 
a farm which he had ])reviously purchased and which was situated imme- 
diately across the river in Illinois. The family resided at the leading 
hotel almost one year, then moved to the farm, remained two years, and 
the}- then rented the land and located in Indianapolis. There Mr. Shaw 
again engaged in the installment btisiness, continuing four years, after 
which he moved to another farm which he had owned for some time in 
Owen county. He resided there four years, and then sold and moved 
to Alerom, where the family was settled in a rented house for four years 
while j\lr. Shaw conducted the farm. He also manufactured brooms 
for about three years. The date of his death was November 5, 1905. 

Since the death of Mr. Shaw, his widow still conducts the farm, 
which consists of almost two hundred acres. She, together with her 
family, resides in one of the most modern and spacious residences in 
Merom, which house she purchased in February, 1907. Her husband 
was a man of great native ability and wonderful energy and determina- 
tion. He possessed the natural gift of a salesman and was oflfered man\- 
tempting positions as such, but always believed he was entitled to all the 
profits that might accrue from such abilitx". He had no other assistant 
in his business affairs save his good wife, who always did her share, and 
to whom he frequently looked for council along important business lines. 
Mr. Shaw was an active member of both the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
fraternities. While not a member, he was in sympathy with the teachings 
of the Christian church. Politically he was formerly a Republican, but 
later became a supporter of the Democratic party. 

He was united in marriage. May 12, 1884, to Miss Martha Ijaldwin. 
who was born in Ohio, near Lebanon, a daughter of Jesse and Susan 
(Wood) Baldwin, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father was born 
May 30, 1817, and the mother September (), 1821. They went to Ohio 
at a very early day with their parents. .At that time many Indians 
roamed throughout that section of the country. They were married in 
that state, and the father became a shoemaker, which at that time was 
a paying trade, it being before the shoemaking machinery had been 
invented. The niDther died March 30, 1873, ^"'1 the father April 5, 1877. 
After the death of her parents Mrs. Shaw resided with an aunt until her 
marriage. By this union four children were born : James A., born Ma\- 
17, 1885, was principal of the public schools at Merom four years. He 
married Lara lloskins, of Trimble, Illinois, December 29. 1907. Mabel 
is unmarried and attending school at LTnion Christian College at Merom, 
Indiana. She was born July 27, 1888. Harrison, born April 19, 1891, 
is at home and in the college above mentioned. Marv Elizabeth was 
born November 19, 1897, and is at home. 

Concerning the Baldwin family it may here be stated that in Mrs. 
Shaw's parents' family there were nine chilih-en, all now living e.xcepting 
three. They are as follows: Jacob Marion, who died in the service of 
his country in Tennessee, at the time of the Civil war, he being a member 
of Company A in the Seventy-ninth Ohio Regiment : Samuel died 
November 14, 1908, resided at Lincoln. Illinois, and was also a veteran 



314 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

who served in the regiment named above ; Emily, who died at the age 
of seventeen years ; Thomas, living in I-Iamilton, Ohio, a shoe merchant ; 
David, of Dayton, Ohio ; Lewis, residing in Springfield, Illinois, a retired 
farmer ; Freemont, of the last named place ; Susan, wife of Elmer Smith, 
residing at Lebanon, Ohio, a merchant and also chief of police for six 
years ; and Martha, who married Mr. Shaw, of this memoir. 



Franklin Kimeerlin, who is numbered among the heavy land 
owners and tax-payers of Sullivan county, and now living retired in the 
suburbs of New Lebanon, is a native of Greene county, Indiana, born 
October 15, 1844, a son of Joseph and Susan (Bechtal) Kimberlin. The 
father was a native of old Virginia and the mother of Greene county, 
Indiana. They were married in Bloomfield, Indiana. He came with 
his father from Virginia, and the former entered government land 
near Bloomington, and there the family resided many years, but 
finally removed to Greene county. The grandparents both died there ; 
their deaths occurring but twenty-four hours apart, both dying at 
night time. Joseph Kimberlin, the father of him for whom this 
sketch is written, remained in Monroe county until too aged to continue 
to farm, and then went to Sullivan county and made his home with his 
son Franklin until his death, about 1882. The mother had died about 
1875. They were the parents of fourteen children and four are living: 
John, a farmer in Richwood, Illinois ; Franklin, of this review ; Polly, 
wife of James Haggard, and resident of Alorgantown, Indiana ; and 
Jacob, resident of Mitchell, this state. 

Franklin Kimberlin had the advantages of the public schools of 
Monroe county, and also attended the same while living in Greene county. 
On the theory that "Antagonism is the law of development" Mr. Kimber- 
lin has forged his own way to the front rank, beginning to strive for 
himself and his own support at the age of ten years. His parents being 
unable to assist him he was forced to stem the tide by the force of his 
own will power, which, however, proved successful in the conflict, but 
the race for several years was indeed fierce. At the age of seventeen 
years (then probably called eighteen) he enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany K, Fourteenth Indiana Regiment, under Captain Kelly, of Bloom- 
ington. The date of his enlistment was in 1862, and he served as a brave 
and loyal soldier for two years and ten months, participating in the battles 
of Fredericksburg (Virginia), Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, 
Spottsylvania, Bull Run, The Wilderness, Smoky Charge and Peters- 
burg, Was on a raid in pursuit of General Lee until his final surrender. 
He was wounded three times — first in his first battle; secondly at Cold 
Harbor, and the third day before the surrender he was wounded the 
third time. He was mustered out of U. S. service at Alexandria, 
Virginia, in the month of June, 1865, and after a short stay in 
Bloomington upon his return from the army he went to Greene county, 
Indiana, where he rented a farm for one vear. He then lived a short 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 315 

time in Marshall, and then went to Crawford county. Illinois, where 
he purchased a farm containing forty-four acres. After two years' 
sojourn there and in 1870 he sold and bought a farm in Gill township, 
Sullivan county. Indiana, containing eighty acres, to which subsequently 
he added from'time to time until he possessed seven hundred acres. This 
land he finally sold and purchased four hundred and eight acres, all 
within Cill township, and this most excellent farm is at this date ( 1908) 
being operated by his son and son-in-law. In 1902 Mr. Kimberlin 
purchased a tract of sixteen acres in New Lebanon, which he now has 
finely improved, and here he expects to make his home and spend the 
remainder of his days. While he has met with misfortunes and given 
away as much or more than he now possesses he may well count life 
a success, having served his country in time of peril, reared a family 
which is an honor to his name, and .still possesses a goodly heritage of 
this world's goods. At one time and another in his life, he belonged 
to various lodges and societies, but at the present is not connected with 
anv of the orders. He is an acceptable member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and lives an upright, true citizenship before his fellow men. 
Mr. Kimberlin was married first, in the month of February, 1870, 
to Louisa Hite. born in Greene county, Indiana, a daughter of William 
and Dianah (Woodall) Hite, natives of Mrginia and both now deceased. 
To this union were born three children : Joseph Edward, married and 
residing on his father's farm ; Elvira Jane, wife of Jet? House, a resident 
of Cass township, Sullivan county, and a farmer ; and Amanda, widow 
of Lisle M. Pirtle and now residing in Gill township on her farm. For 
his second wife Mr. Kimberlin married, in .Ypril, 1896, Mrs. Jennie 
Stedman, born in Pike county, Ohio, a daughter of James and Rebecca 
(Potts) Dunham, she having been previously married. Her parents 
were natives of Jackson county, Ohio, and the father farmed until his 
wife died about 1875, while he passed away in 1893. There was no 
issue bv the second marriage. Mrs. Kimberlin had one son by her 
former husband — William Allan Stedman, a telegraph operator at New 
Lebanon, and who married Lelia Morris, of the village. 



Davu) H. Hancock, of Gill township, comes of a family some of 
whose members have been residents of Sullivan county for many years. 
His grandfather was sheriff of the county in the forties. He whose 
name heads this sketch was born hi Gill township July 10, 1857, a son 
of Marion and Johannah (Nash) Hancock. The parents were both 
natives of Sullivan county, the mother born in 1825, and the father two 
years earlier. The father enlisted in an Indiana regiment, served but 
a short time and died in the service at Nashville. Tennessee. The 
mother died in 1889. David H. received his education at the common 
schools of his native township, and remained with his mother until he 
was twenty-one years of age, when he commenced farming on twenty 
acres of land, left him by his mother. To this he added forty acres 



3i6 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

more, giving him his present excellent place of sixty acres of choice 
land, a portion of which he has lived upon ever since he was four years 
of age. Here he conducts general farming and stock raising. He is 
a member of the IMethodist Episcopal church and votes the Democratic 
ticket. 

He was united in marriage, September 21, 1887, to Nannie Elliott, 
born at New Albany, Indiana, November 7, 1856, a daughter of William 
and Maggie (Ford) Elliott, who were :natives of Indiana and of 
English descent. Mrs. Hancock's father was an engineer by occupation, 
and later, about 1867, went to Sullivan, where he ran the engine in a 
flouring mill, continuing there until 1869, when he died. The widow 
married again and moved to Gill township, where she died May 10, 
1906. To Mr. and Mrs. Hancock were born four children : Rellie Otis, 
residing, at home : Josephine, deceased ; Lucian, at home : and the fourth 
child died in infancy. Mr. Hancock is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at New Lebanon, Indiana. He is a progressive 
farmer and an excellent citizen in whom all have implicit confidence. 



Francis M. Blann, a prosperous agriculturist of Gill township, 
Sullivan county, is a native of Knox county, Indiana, born on Shaker 
Prairie September 17, 1867, a son of S. G. and Sarah S. (Sprott) Blann. 
The father, S. G. Blann, was born on Indian Prairie, Sullivan county, 
and the mother at Carlisle. Indiana, the date of the former's birth being 
March 31, 1833, and of the latter's January 26, 1835. S. G. Blann's 
parents came from Virginia, and the grandfather spent part of his life 
in Kentucky, residing in Breckinridge county, but later in life moved to 
Sullivan county. Indiana. After a few years there he removed to 
Shaker Prairie, Knox county, and still later made his home in Sullivan 
county, but finally returned to Shaker Prairie, where he died. 

S. G. Blann worked as a hired hand early in his life, receiving six 
dollars a month, but later purchased land with his scanty earnings and 
commenced farming for his livelihood. He was a progressive and 
industrious man who accumulated rapidly, and at one time possessed 
eleven hundred acres of land, a portion of which was situated in Sullivan, 
and the remainder in Knox county. He spent the last years of his life 
in retirement at Oaktown, Knox county, to w'hich place he removed in 
about 1899. He died July 4, 1907, and his widow still resides at Oaktown. 
They were the parents of seven children, six of whom are still living: 
Edward P., a merchant of Monroe City, Knox county : John A., deceased ; 
Francis M., of this review : Mary O., wife of John G. Ford, residing in 
Knox county, a farmer by occupation ; William W., a farmer of South 
Dakota ; Dr. Herbert E., a physician of Fairbanks, Indiana : and Charles 
Everett, of Oaktown, a farmer. 

Francis M. Blann obtained his limited education at the schools of 
Shaker Prairie and at Oaktown. He remained at home until twentv-two 
vears of age, and purchased a tract of land containing one hundred and 



HISTORY UF SULLI\'AX COUNTY 317 

twenty acres situated in Knox connty, north of N'incennes. lie was 
unmarried at tliat time, and onl\- kejit this land about one year, wlien 
lie disposed of it and bought one huntlred and ninety acres in Sullivan 
county, near Carlisle, Here he resided for five years, during, which time 
he was married and purchased two hundred acres more land from his 
father, the same being near Oaktown, to wdiich place he removed and 
engaged in the grocerv business in partnershi]') with an uncle. This he 
only followed for about a vear. after which he jiurchased a hundred-acre 
farm two miles to the north of Carlisle, having already sold both of his 
other farms. The last place he kept a year and then sold and bought 
one hundred and fifty acres where he now lives, and upon which he has 
made extensive and valuable improvements. As it now presents itself it is 
among the best equipped places in the vicinity, and here he expects to 
remain and carry on his farming and stock raising operations, making 
thoroughbred short-horn cattle a specialty. Possessed of great determina- 
tion and natural abilitv, only success seems jirobable to follow and crown 
his untiring efforts. 

Mr. Blann is in his jxilitical views a pronounced advocate of pure 
Democracy. In his religious faith he adheres to that of the Christian 
denomination. He was united in marriage, October 21, 1894, to Aliss 
Efifie J. Shepherd, a family sketch of whose familv will appear in th.is 
work. To Air. and Mrs. Blann the following children were born : 
Edward Row born September 12, 1805; l^cstcr Ray, born August Ji, 
1897; Robert Lowell, born in November, 181)9; and Harrv Sliepherd, 
born November i, 1906. The fourth born child died in infancy. 

Mr. Blann is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, Camp 
No. 5488. as a protection to his family. The camp of Woodmen is located 
at New Lebanon, Indiana. 



Augustus L. Thrasher, who is numbered among the agriculturists 
that are developing and bringing forth the products of the soil in the 
territory embraced within Gill township, Sullivan county, was born in this 
township February 27, 1871, a son of Martin M. and Angeline ( Pinkston ) 
Thrasher. The parents were both born within Gill township, the father 
F^ebruary 16, 1847, and the mother December 23, 1849. Martin M. was 
a son of Elanthon A. and Rachel (Mary) Thrasher. His mother was a 
native of \'ermont and the fathei- of New York state. She was born in 
1812 and he in 1817. Elanthon came to Sullivan county at a very early 
day, locating in what is now Gill township. He was a farmer, and was 
married here. For a few years they resided in Terre Haute, but retraced 
their steps to this township, and still later moved to Illinois, but came back 
to their old farm again and died in this township, the mother September 
2, 1870, and the father in 1891. Martin AI. Tlirasher resided with his 
parents until about 1867, when he leased a farm and cultivated it three 
seasons. He has continued to rent within the township ever since. The 
subject's mother died November 16, 1875. 

Augustus L. Thrasher, of this biographical review, was educated 



3i8 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

within his native township, at the "Blue School House" and at the Rose 
district schools. He remained at home until he had reached his majorit}', 
when he rented land in partnership with his brother for one year and the 
following- year with another man of the neighborhood. In the autumn 
of 1897 he was married, after which he rented another farm in the same 
part of the county, on which he lived three years. His next experience 
was in renting land of John Mason for almost five years, at the end of 
which time he purchased eighty acres of land where he now resides. 
There were no improvements on this place at the time he bought it, and 
he has cleared it and built a comfortable house and barns, with the neces- 
sary out-buildings. It is now under fair cultivation and all well fenced. 
He expects to make this his permanent home, although on account of ill 
health since about 1904 he has been unfitted for heavy manual labor, but 
superintends the work of the place. In politics Mr. Thrasher is an avowed 
Republican. He has held the office of supervisor and been deputy assessor 
two years. 

He was united in marriage to Elizabeth X. Clark, who was born in 
Gill township April 12, 1873, a daughter of John S. and Anna (Butler) 
Clark. Her parents were natives of Nova Scotia, and came to this 
country with their parents at a very early date. They were married prior 
to the Civil war. He served in Company C, Fifty-ninth Indiana Regiment, 
being a private soldier. Upon his return from the service of his country 
he engaged in farming, which was of the truck-garden type on a three- 
acre plot where he still lives. Mr. and Mrs. Thrasher are the parents of 
the following children : Roy Otto, born August 18, 1894 ; Charles 
Edward, born January 30, 1896, died January 12, 1897; Lucy Viola, born 
February 3, 1898; Leila Rachel, born February 16, 1900; Eva Pink, born 
December 24, 1901 ; Bernice Pearl, born December 31, 1903, and John 
Martin, born August 8, 1907. 



James H. Banther, a farmer and stockman of Gill township, Sulli- 
van county, is a native of this township, born April 13, 1866, a son of 
Cyrus and Nancy Banther, whose sketch will appear elsewhere in this 
work. He was educated in the district schools of his native county and in 
Turman and Gill townships especially. He remained at home with his 
parents until twenty-one years of age, and the following season worked 
as a farm hand for others. Being seized with the western fever he went 
to Coles county, Illinois, where he found employment on the railroad for 
three years, and in 1872 returned to Terre Haute, Indiana, where he 
worked in the car shops for about three years, and also followed carpenter- 
ing. In 1895 he returned home and was employed by his father for 
seven years, which was up to the spring of 1902, at which date he pur- 
chased forty acres of land where he now resides, and upon which he has 
placed all of the improvements, including house, barns, fences, etc. Here 
he carries on general farming', and pays special attention to hog raising. 
Mr. Banther is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 



HISTORY OF SULLR'AN COUNTY 319 

and carries a two thousand dollar beneficiary ])olicv with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Politically he is a believer in Republican prin- 
ciples and platforms, but has never aspired to public ofifice. 

In relation to his domestic life let it be stated that Air. Banther mar- 
ried, February 21, 1889, Miss Minnie McClure, born in Hamilton town- 
ship, Sullivan county, Indiana, May 11, 1872, a daughter of Dr. Griswold 
Barton and Alary (Mason) McClure, both natives of Sullivan countv. 
The mother was born May 6, 1837, and the father January 15, 1836. 
They resided on a truck farm after 1891, and before that date had farnied 
in Gill township. After the father's death the mother sold the place and 
made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Dora Hart, in Sullivan until her 
death in 1904. In the AlcClure family there were seven children, all now 
deceased except Mrs. Banther and her sister Dora, wife of Philip Hart. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Banther are as follows : William 
Harry, born September 2, 1889: one who died in infancy, born May 13, 
1891 ; an infant born Februars 14. 1896, and died early; George Dewey, 
born May 8, 1898; James Garry, born April 24, 1902; one who was born 
September 7, 1904, and died early, and Cyrus Henry, born November 18. 
1906. 



Edw.\rd Axueksox. one of the extensive land owners and successful 
farmers who is a tiller of Gill township soil, Sullivan county, is a native 
of that far away and picturesque country of northern Europe — Swcdi-n. 
He was born May 3, 1861, near Starby. He is a son of Swan and Mar\- 
(Benson) Anderson. The father was born about 1816 and died about 
1868, in the country of his birth. The mother was born April 14, 182 1, 
in Sweden and died December 20, 1908, in her native land. At the age 
of fifteen, having attended the schools of Starby, Sweden, Edward 
Anderson commenced to learn the blacksmith's trade. After working 
at the forge for twelve years he emigrated to America, where he 
worked in New York City one year and then went to Rantoul, Illinois, 
and after two years' service for wages there he went to Paxton, Illinois, 
and purchased a machine and blacksmith shop. There Mr. Anderson 
worked vigorously during all the years up to 1905, when he had accumu- 
lated a sufficient amount to enable him to buy land, which he did, leasing 
his shops. He selected the lands on which he now resides in Gill town- 
ship. This land he purchased in 1903, and his first tract consisted of 
three hundred and sixty-eight acres, to which he has added until he now 
owns five hundred less two acres. Of this he ojierates through careful 
tillage about three hundred acres, and the remainder he has leased to 
others. He raised corn, wheat and stock. Being a thorough man in 
whatever he undertakes he has succeeded well in the role of an American 
farmer, as well as one who wielded the sledge so many years. Having 
in mind the protection of his home circle he wisely became a member of 
both the Modern Woodmen of America camp at Merom, Indiana, and 
the Royal Neighbors fraternal .societies, both afi"nrding a beneficiary in 
case of sickness or death. 
Vol. n— 21 



2,20 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson and children are members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church at Paxton, Ilhnois, and in politics he is a Republican. 
He has never aspired to public office in his adopted country, but seeks the 
best men to fill the local and state positions. He was united in marriage, 
April 20. 1895, to Anna jNIarie Peterson, born in Sweden, Alay 24, 1872, 
a daughter of P. M. Aberhanson, whose wife's maiden name was 
Charlotte Helen Johnson. The father is deceased, and the mother resides 
in Sweden. Mrs. Anderson accompanied her brother to this country in 
1888, and they located in Rantoul, Illinois, going from there to Chicago, 
where she was emploj-ed as a domestic until the date of her marriage in 
1895. Six children were born of this union: Swan Walford, born June 
2, 1897, died aged two years and seven months ; Oscar Edward, born 
May 6, 1898 ; Helen Marie, born September 6, 1900 ; Ebba Marie, born 
January 18, 1902: Albert, who was born July 21, 1906, and died in 
infancy; Carl Raymond, born December 25, 1907. 

Mrs. Anderson is a member of Royal Neighbors and also of the 
Circle of Honor and she carries protection in both. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Anderson have policies in the Prudential Insurance Company also, and 
both are well insured for their families. 



Wiley G.\iiniLL. one of the representative agriculturists of Llamilton 
township, Sullivan count_v, was born April- 3, 1843, in Cass township, 
this count}-. He is the son of Morgan and Eleanor (McGrew) Gambill. 
The father was a native of Kentucky, who went to Indiana when a single 
man and settled in Wright township, Greene county, where he remained 
until he was married. He then came to Cass township, Sullivan county, 
and entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he resided 
until his death, at which time he owned a half section of land, and was 
an extensive stock raiser. He had become well versed in the science 
of medicine, as understood and practiced at that time by the herbal doctors 
of this countr)-. He practiced throughout the section in which he lived 
with much success, using exclusivel}' roots, barks and herbs in the treat- 
ment of disease. The grandfather, Morgan Gambill. was a soldier in 
the Mexican war. He was a farmer and was of Irish descent. The 
mother of Wiley Gambill was born in Tennessee in October, 1808, and 
is still living and makes her home with her son Wiley. She came to 
Salem, Indiana, with her parents, and later moved to Greene county, 
south from Linton, where she remained until her marriage to Mr. Gambill. 
By this union eight children were born, as follows: John, deceased; 
Hannah, deceased ; Lucinda, wife of William Walters, a resident of Cass 
township ; Levi, of Cass townsliip ; Eliza, deceased ; Wiley, of this sketch ; 
Morgan, who occupies the old Gambill homestead, which has never gone 
out of the family's hands; and Mary Ann, deceased. After the death 
of Morgan Gambill, the father, the mother married William Combs, who 
is now deceased and by whom she had three children : Eleanor, wife 
of John Mason, residing in Cass township ; William, deceased ; and 
William H., deceased. 



i PU-BLIC LIBRARY \ 

ASTOR, LENOX AN'C 
TILOEN TOUNOATlONt^ 



HISTORY OF SULLRAX COUXTY 321 

Wiley (^ainbill's father died when the son was about six years of 
age, and he remained at home until he was twenty years of age, then 
began farming on his own account on a forty-acre farm, to which he 
added until he had three hundred and sixty acres, all in Cass township. 
In 1904 he divided this tract of valuable land between his children, and 
in March of that year moved to Sullivan, adjoining which town he pur- 
chased forty acres, and bought a small house, to which he built an addi- 
liiiii. Me was engaged in raising registered Durham cattle and Pohunl- 
Lhnia hogs, also fine wool sheep, the Cheviots, which were imported and 
the only ones of the kind in the county. When a boy Mr. Gambill saw 
many hardships and lived in the old style and in most primitive manner. 
It was his father's custom to go each autumn time to New Albany to 
procure leather for the children's shoes and boots. Their clothes were 
all hand-made, and many of the garments from tlax which they grew. 
Deer skins being ver\- plentiful at that time they were used for making 
many articles of wearing apparel. Fresh and cured venison formed the 
chief article of meat diet the year around, and their flouring mill was 
many miles distant. His father cleared up all of his land from out the 
heavy forest-lands, which was no small task. His house was of the 
hewed log type, not beautiful but very conrfortable, and from such have 
come forth some of America's greatest public men and women. Mr. 
Ciambill, of this notice, did not have the early educational advantages 
alTorilcd most boys of to-day, but had to gain what knowledge he received 
by studying evenings, after his marriage, and attending night schools, 
in which he captured all the prizes offered for good scholarship. Politi- 
cally he is a Democrat, and he served as county commissioner for six 
consecutive years in the third district. 

He was married first, April 20, 1863, to Nancy Moss, born in (Ireene 
county, Indiana, August 24, 1842, and died August 23. 1882. Thev were 
the parents of twelve children, as follows: Stephen Morgan, residing in 
Sullivan, the principal of the high school of that town ; Albert, a resident 
of Cass township ; Laura, wife of Jesse lUirge, and the\- reside in (ireene 
county; Sidney, residing in (jibson Cit\-, Illinois, where he owns a clothing 
store ; Walsey, deceased ; William, deceased : John, residing, in Sullivan ; 
Eleanor, wife of Ed. Llewellyn, of Cass township ; Elza, of Cass town- 
ship ; Osa, of Cass township; Hezza H., of Cass township, on his father's 
old farm ; and Floyd, deceased. 

For his second wife Mr. ( !ambill married Elizabeth J. (Smith) 
Baldwin, born in Ohio. She is still living. There was no issue by this 
marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Gambill are members of the Christian church, 
as was his former wife and all of her father's family. He has been a 
trustee of this churcli for the ]iast twenty-five years, thus showing his 
zeal in church work and the business attairs of the same. 



George B. Thompson, one of the progressive representatives of the 
most excellent farming section embraced in Gill township, will form the 
subject of this narrative, sJiowing something of his parentage and his 



322 HISTORY OF SULLR'AX COUNTY 

own success in life's activities. He was born in Highland count_v, Ohio, 
April 12, 1842, a son of John and Elizabeth (Burton) Thompson. His 
mother was born in Ohio, while the father was a native of Virginia, who 
went to Ohio when a small boy, and resided there with his parents until 
their death. He was a carpenter and contractor, which occupation he 
followed throughout life, leaving the management of his farm to his sons. 
He died about 1900, and the mother soon thereafter. 

George B. Thompson obtained his education at the public schools 
of Highland county, Ohio. He made his home with his parents until 
about 1859, when he began working, out for others by the day ana monin. 
During the first year of the Civil war — 1861 — he enlisted as a member 
of Company A, Sixtieth Ohio Regiment, under Colonel Trimbel. He 
served nine months and was sent home on a "sick furlough," and was 
never able to return to his regiment, and never received any kind of a 
discharge. \\'hen so far recovered that he could get out he went to 
Madison county, Indiana, in which section he worked by the month for 
two years, and then married and worked in company with his father-in- 
law for five years. At the end of that time he went to Sullivan county, 
Indiana. The father-in-law first purchased one hundred and twenty 
acres, to which he subsequently added until at his death he owned two 
hundred and five acres of choice land. Mr. Thompson has within his 
farm ninet}--three acres, all well improved and devoted to general farming 
purposes. 

He was married in the month of ]\Iarch, 1863, to Miss Rebecca 
Obriant, born in Madison county, Indiana, March 2, 1850, a daughter 
of Daniel and Caroline (Richardson) Obriant, both born in Ohio and 
came to Indiana very early. They accompanied their parents and grew 
maturity in this state. They were united in marriage in Madison 
county, and a few years later settled in Sullivan county, on the land upon 
which Mr. Thompson now resides, where they died several years ago. 
The children born to ]Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are as follows : John, a 
blacksmith at Sullivan, Indiana, married Bertha Poston, and they have 
two children, Hadie and Essie. David, residing near the father, married 
Ellen McKinney, and they have three children — George, Beatrice and 
Myrtle, and three who died in infancy, William, residing wath the 
parents, married Jessie Langford, and they have two children — Gladys 
Eulalia and Rebecca, In his church faith Mr. Thompson is in harmonv 
with the Methodist Episcopal denomination, though not a member of 
that church, and politically is a firm believer in the principles of the 
Democratic party. 



Aloysius M.\thi.\s, who is the owner of one of the fine grain and 
stock farms within Gill township, is a native of Ohio, born November 
22, i860, at Chillicothe, Ross county. He is the son of John and Mar- 
garet (Schanase) Mathias. The father was born in the same place as 
was the son Aloysius, while the wife and mother was a native of Germany. 



HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 323 

The date of the father's birth was February 24, 1840, and \vliile the 
exact date of the mother's birth is not now known, it is certain that she 
was several years his senior. The father was a plasterer by trade, but 
worked in a large packing; house much of his time, especially during the 
winter months. He accumulated considerable property in Chillicothe, 
where he died about 1905. The mother died about 1873. They were 
the parents of eight children, five of whom were living in 1908, and they 
are as follows: "john, of North Dakota; Joseph, of Chillicothe, Ohio: 
Lizzie, wife of Mr. Michaels, residing in Athens, Ohio; Minnie, wife of 
Charles Baley, of Ohio ; and Aloysius, who was the eldest of the children. 

Up to the time Mr. Mathias was thirteen years of age he had the 
comforts of a home, but at that early time in his life he went to work 
as a farm hand ;n Ross and Fayette counties, Ohio, and remained in that 
locality until 1888, wdien he purchased a team and rented land in (nil 
township, Sullivan county, Indiana, to which section he came in 1885. 
The first two years he rented, then worked for others for five years, and 
then bought a second team and again rented land two years longer. He 
then purchased forty acres of land upon which he now resides. This 
purchase was made in 1901, and later he added sixty-three acres more 
and also made many needed improvements and now carries on general 
farming and pays especial attention to the raising of hogs for the market, 
in which he has been very successful. 

Mr. Mathias attended the parochial schools in Chillicothe, Ohio, and 
was reared in the religious faith of the Roman Catholic church. Politic- 
ally he is an independent voter, choosing the best man for public posi- 
tions regardless of party lines. He is a member of the Odd Fellows order 
at Merom, Indiana, and is progressive in all that affects public policy. 
As to his domestic relations let it be stated in this connection that he 
was married to Miss Mary Schwint, born in Gill township, Sullivan 
county, Indiana, August 24, 1875, a daughter of Frank and Louisa Jane 
(Collier) Sclnvint. Her father was a farmer who came from Kentucky 
about 1863. The mother was a native of Kentucky, and there they were 
married. They removed to Sullivan county, Indiana, and located south 
of Carlisle, where they remained about five years and then moved to 
Gill township, where they continued to reside until his death in 1882. 
The mother died in March, 1895. Before coming to this country from 
Germany Mrs. Mathias' father was a sailor. To Mr. and Mrs. Alathias 
the following children were born; Claud L., born January 5, 1899; 
Chloe May, born September 5, igoi ; Lela Opal, born September i, 1904; 
David Orval, born June 25, 1906 ; and Kenneth Eugene, born September 
5. 1907- 



James W. Jackson, one of the industrious farmers living two miles 
west of Pleasantville, Indiana, is a native of IMarion county, Kentucky, 
born October 13, 1836. His parents were John T. and Mary L. (Pirtle) 
Jackson. The father was born Jidy 7, 1810, in Kentucky, and died July 



324 HISTORY OF SULLIVAN COUNTY 

5, 1887. The mother, also a native of Kentucky, born in 1813, died in 
Suhivan county, Indiana, in 1905. The paternal grandfather was John 
Jackson, and his father, also named John, came to this country as a 
British soldier, but deserted and joined the Continental army, as did two 
of his brothers. John T. Jackson went to Indiana in 1837, remained 
one year, and then returned to his native state for a year and then came 
back to Sullivan county, Indiana. Here he entered forty acres of land, 
which he later sold and entered a quarter of a section in sections two 
and eleven, where he spent the remainder of his days at farming. He 
was a Democrat, and in church relation a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The children born to John T. Jackson and wife were 
as follows: John H., of JelTerson township, Sullivan county; William 
A., deceased ; James W., of this notice ; Jeiiferson G., of JetTerson town- 
ship, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work : Harriette R., deceased ; 
Mary E., deceased ; and Susanna, deceased. 

James W. Jackson received a limited common-school education, 
having to spend much of his time in youthhood in assisting his father 
to clear their forest farm and make for themselves a comfortable home. 
He remained at home until twenty-four years of age, when he married 
and settled on his father's farm, which he worked until 1869, when he 
purchased forty acres where he still resides, now owning sixtv-seven 
acres, which land his son now farms for him. He has been a successful 
farmer, tilling what land he possessed in a most thorough and painstaking 
manner. In his political views Mr. Jackson is a staunch defender of 
Democratic principles, believing as he does that this party best serves 
the interests of the masses of American citizens. Both he and his wife 
are acceptable members of the Methodist church. 

He was united in marriage, February 28, 1861, to Zilpha .A.. Wallace, 
born November 12, 1837, in the township in which she now resides. She 
is the daughter of Andrew K. and Betsey (Halston) Wallace. Her 
father was born in Virginia and followed coopering and farming for his 
livelihood. j\Ir. and Mrs. Jackson are the parents of three children : 
Hattie A., born February 17, 1862, and residing near Fairland in Shelbv 
county, Indiana, married D. V. Howard ; William M., born February 3, 
1864, married Evaline Bedwell and they reside in Jefiferson township: 
and Charles I., born April 28, 1872, is at home with his parents and 
unmarried, Mr. Jackson has one of the old deeds executed October i, 
1850, and signed by President Millard Fillmore, and this deed is one of 
the valuable souvenirs of Sullivan county. This land never changed 
hands until the death of the mother. 



WiLLiAii Thom.\s Spencer, a generally known and highly respected 
farmer of the thoroughgoing type residing in Jefferson township, Sulli- 
van county, was born January 19, 1842, in Stafford township, Greene 
county, Indiana, a son of Charles and Sally (Snyder) Spencer. The 
former was a nati-ve of A'irginia, born about 1807, and died in 1898, and 



HISTORY OF SULLIXAX CuUNTY 325 

the mother was born in Kentucky and passed from earthlx- scenes in 1846. 
(/harles Spencer emigrated from Mrginia to Kentucky with his parents. 
Aloses Spencer and wife, who were farmers. Charles was married in 
Kentuck\-, after wliich he moved to Greene count\-. Indiana, some time 
about the middle of the "thirties." He lived in (Ireene county until about 
1875, 3nd then went to Jefferson township. Sullivan county, and settled 
on the farm uwncil b\- James Howard, and there spent the remainder of 
his davs. At one time he owned four hundred acres of land. He was 
twice married. B}- his first wife, Sally Snyder, the following children 
were born: Aloses. who died in the army; Manda. who married first 
Thomas Stafford, who died in the army, and secondly. Joshua Anderson, 
also now deceased, and she resides at Sanborn ; John, who also lost his 
life in the War of the Rebellion : Mary, deceased ; James, residing in 
Teft'erson township, thi