(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A history of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota"

■■MMiaiiiMMiB«iiiniiaii»liiiiii I liii 
NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08180186 6 



•JrKW>f>-^Vf W-J^'Y* >'n- 





■:;"-; 










.."iJSgSsS 
























































































Sttam 



A HISTORY OF 

The Swedish-Americans 

OF 

MINNESOTA 



A Concise Record of the Struggles and Achievements of the Early i 
Settlers, together with a narrative of what is now being ' 

done by the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota in the 

development of their Adopted Country. ' 



ILLUSTRATED 



WITH THE VALUABLE COLLABORATION OF 
NUMEROUS AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY 

A. E. STRAND 



VOL. Ill 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
CHICAGO 

1910 



- \ 



THE Nh-'W . 

^"^ JC LIBRARY 

aSTOH, LrlNOX AND 
riLDEN FOl!'.D-»T;ON8. 

R 13;0 L 






*STOfi, LENOX A^.f, 




CARL R. HOLMEN 



Carl Robert Holmen, 412 Nicollet avenue, Minneapolis, is consid- 
ered one of the best jewelers in the city. He has charge of the store and 
part of the manufacturing plant of Cohen Bros., whose establishment is 
one of the finest on the avenue. Mr. Holmen was born in Gothenburg, 
Sweden, August 19, 1870. His boyhood days were passed in attending 
school in his native city. In 1882, at the age of twelve years, he came with 
his mother and other members of the family to America, his father having 
sailed for this country a short time previouslv in order to have a home for 
them when they arrived. They settled at Red Wing, Minnesota, where 
young Holmen soon hired out to a farmer of Wisconsin, for whom he 
worked two years. Growing tired of farm work, he returned to Red 
Wing, where for some time he worked for a painter, and later was 
employed for nearly a pear in a pottery. About this time an opportunity 
offered for him to learn the jewelry business with Thomas Gaskell of 
St. Paul, with whom he spent four years, from 1886 to 1890, and during 
that time mastered the trade of watchmaker and jeweler. The next five 
years he was with W. B. Smith, of the Endicott Arcade, St. Paul, after 
which he engaged in business for himself at Cannon Falls, Minnesota. At 
the end of two vears there he sold out to one of his employes and returned 
to his former employer, Mr. Smith. For six months Ur. Holmen was 
manager for Mr. Smith while the latter made a trip South for the benefit 
of his health. Next we find Mr. Holmen at Farmington, Minnesota, 
where he opened a jewelry store, wdiich he conducted for a year and a 
half. This he sold out and came to MinneapoUs, where he has since been 
identified with that line in a most creditable way. 

Of ^Ir. Holmen's familv we record that his father, O. A. Peterson, 
was born in Uddevalla, Sweden, in 1832, and since 1881 has been a resi- 
dent of America. For more than twentv years he has been an employe of 
the Union Railway Depot in St. Paul. John A. Holmen, only brother of 
Mr. Holmen, was born August 28, 1872, in Gothenburg, and is at this 
writing receiving teller in the St. Paul Savings Bank. 

June 6, 1905, Mr. Holmen married Miss Sarah Alida Ljung, who 
came to this countrv from Kristinehamn, Sweden. They have two sons : 
Robert Winston Li'nne, born May 3, 1906, and John Donald, June 19, 
1908. Thev reside at 3106 Eleventh avenue, South, Minneapolis. 

Mr. Holman is an enthusiastic musician, being an organizer of both 
the Orpheus Singing Societies and a member of the Arpi chorus, m 
which he sings second tenor. 

767 



768 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Carl Ekman. — The able and popular manager of Sz'cnska Folkets 
Tidning, Carl Ekman, is one of the stalwart Swedish-Americans of ]\Iinne- 
sota whose strong influence has been felt in the advancement of the busi- 
ness, good politics and high-toned journalism of the state. Until some 
eighteen years ago his manly life may be said to have been a series of hard 
struggles in the currents of business, with his head sometimes above, and 
sometimes below, the waves. He was born in Vexio, Sweden, on the 25th 
of October, 1851, the second child in a family of eight sons and one daugh- 
ter. The size of the family and the limited income of the parents made 
a thorough education for any of the children an impossibility. Young 
Carl therefore shared the good fortune of his other brothers in being 
thrown upon his own resources at an early age. After obtaining a good 
elementary education he secured a position in a dry goods store of his 
native town, and was already well advanced in business practice and theory 
when the Franco-Prussian war ended and Germany's great industrial 
revival seemed at hand. 

Carl Ekman, who shared in the popular belief and expectation, set out 
for Hamburg, the center of so large a portion of German commerce and 
trade, and soon secured a position as bookkeeper and Swedish correspond- 
ent with a leading wholesale firm of that city. After quickly and thor- 
oughly mastering all the details of the business he was appointed traveling 
representative for northern Germany, Denmark and Sweden ; but 
although the young man worked night and day, he was not favored with 
the assistance of the anticipated revival in the general world of business 
and commerce, and, becoming all but prostrate from overwork, without 
adequate results, he decided to take the advice of a friend and emigrate to 
America. In 1879 Mr. Ekman put his determination into efifect, arriving 
in St. Paul the day before Thanksgiving, where he at once' secured 
employment as bookkeeper and later as salesman in a dry goods establish- 
ment. Within two years he entered business of his owm together with one 
of his brothers, Henry Ekman. and the dry goods store conducted by them 
became one of the prominent Swedish business houses in St. Paul. Owning 
to ill health ]vlr. Ekman withdrew from the firm in 1884 and moved to 
Lindstrom, Chisago county, where he established a general merchandise 
store. By ceaseless labor and economy success again crowned his efforts 
to obtain financial independence until the day before Christmas eve, 1888, 
he saw the fruits of his nine years of work and self-denial go up in smoke 
and flame. 

Soon after his apparent disaster ^Ir. Ekman received an appoint- 
ment in connection with the ^Minnesota legislature, and in 1891 became 
chief clerk to the secretary of state. Colonel Hans Mattson. Two years 
later he became identified in a responsible position with the Minnesota 
Stats Tidning, St. Paul, and since July i, 1899, has been general man- 
ager of Sz'cnska Folkets Tidning, Minneapolis. The decade during 
which he has controlled the business policy of the latter publication has 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 769 

been notable for its progress in all departments Mr. Ekman was 
appointed director of the Board of State Normal Schools by Governor 

Johnson in 1908. 00 i. iv/r- „ 

^Ir Ekman has been twice married— first, June 20, 1883, to Miss 
Amanda Wallmark, who died July 20, 1900. On August 27 1902, he 
wedded Aliss Anna Charlotta Peters, and of the twelve children borne 
bv his two wives ten are living to do him honor. His children are: 
Irene (Mrs F. A. Smith), born March 30, 1884; Carl N. P., surveyor 
Great Northern Railroad, August 2, 1885; Claes T. S., civil engineer, 
February 22, 1887; Sidney R., clerk, January i, 1889; Lincoln G bank 
clerk, December 16, 1890; Ruth M., December 31, 1892; Roy H. K A., 
October 24, 1894; Emma E. S. and Edith E. A., twins, April 7, 1898; 
and Robert W. C.', January 30, 1907. 

August Ekman.— Few of the Swedish-Americans of the Twin Cities 
have enjoved a more varied and creditable experience in business and 
finances than August Ekman, of Minneapolis, founder and managing sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Pacific Coast and Norway Packmg Company. 
He is also engaged in other business enterprises, and he is a citizen whose 
successes in private enterprises have always been accompanied by contribu- 
tions of his means and abilities to the advancement of public chanties. 
Among these mav be mentioned the Swedish Hospital and Nurses insti- 
tute of which he 'has been treasurer for many years. 

\u^ust Ekman was born at Vexio, Smaland, September 3, 1866, and 
is a son^of Nils and Brita Katarina Ekman. The father was a prominent 
musician of the Kronoberg Regimental Band, in which, by long and faith- 
ful service, he attained the rank of "musik-fanjunkare" (musical standard 
bearer). He died at St. Paul, September 15, 1888, at the age of seventy 
years and his widow passed away on an Atlantic steamer, August 8, 1899, 
seventy-one years of age. With her sons, August and Knut, she was re- 
turning from a visit to her Swedish home when she was overtaken by 
death ^her bodv being reverently borne to St. Paul and interred m the 
Union cemetery beside that of her husband. Mr. and Mrs. Nils Ekman 
raised a fine family of eight sons and one daughter, of whom five sons 
and the daughter are stiiralive. The biography of Carl, the oldest living 
son. also appears in this history. Next of the survivors comes Henrik, 
who was born August 2, 1856, and is now a bank clerk m Minneapolis ; 
Edward, born November 10, 1859, is connected with the office ot the 
Board of Directors of Charities in Minneapolis ; Emma, born March i5, 
1862, is married to Gustaf Nilsson, a cigar manufacturer' of St. Paul; and 
August and Knut are both subjects of biography in this history. 

On May 24. 1887, August Ekman graduated from the Collegiate 
High School of Vexio with the degree of B. A., and in the following 
October emigrated with his parents and youngest brother to St. Paul, the 
sister and other brothers having already located there. He first secured 



49 



7/0 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



employment as bookkeeper and teller in the Scandinavian-American Bank 
of that city, and two years of strenuous labor, with fine results, brought 
him to the ofifice of A. E. Johnson & Company, the private bankers, with 
a most enviable reputation. Mr. Ekman remained in their St. Paul office 
until July, 1890, when he was placed in full charge of their Minneapolis 
branch. In 1891, when the latter was consolidated with the Washington 
Bank, he became teller and assistant cashier of the new institution, remain- 
ing thus until the failure of the bank in 1896. Wlien the financial crash 
®f the local institutions occurred in that year he was engaged to assist in 
clearing up the business of the Washington Bank and was employed in 
that work for about a year. In the spring of 1898 he formed a partnership 
Avith O. E. Brecke in the steamship passenger business, under the style of 
Brecke & Ekman. Although the firm was dissolved in 1902, Mr. Brecke 
continued the business and Mr. Ekman became a dealer in lands and 
general real estate. In the previous year the Pacific Coast and Norway 
Packing. Company had been organized, and in 1903 he assumed active 
charge of it as its secretary and treasurer. As stated, he is now giving 
his chief attention to its promotion and development. In 1900 Mr. Ekman 
married Mrs. Christine (Aim) Elsberg, a native of Vermland, Sweden, 
who was the mother of three children by a former marriage — Emma, 
William and Ellen. The family resides at 1617 Elliot avenue. A neces- 
sary addition to Mr. Ekman's personal record is that he is a Mason in 
good standing and an active member of the Odin Club. 

Knut Ekman, cashier of the new Scandinavian-American Na- 
tional Bank of Minneapolis, of which he was one of the founders, has a 
remarkably substantial standing in the banking circles of the Northwest, 
particularly in those upon which depend the financial security of his 
countrymen. A native of Vexio, Smaland, Sweden, he is a son of Nils 
and Brita Katarina Ekman and was born October 23, 1870. His father, 
who was a prominent musician connected with the military service of 
Sweden, died at St. Paul September 15, 1888, and on Aug-ust 8, 1899, 
nearly eleven years afterward, his widowed mother passed away while 
crossing the ocean on the return from a visit in Sweden, being accom- 
panied by himself and his brother August. Both are interred in the 
Union cemetery at St. Paul. 

As a youth Knut Ekman passed through the first five standards of 
the Collegiate High School at Vexio, and then deviated from the plan 
mapped out for him by spending several years in the study of piano and 
organ music. In 1887 he accompanied his parents to St. Paul, but after 
a short stay there went to Lindstrom, Chisago county, Minnesota, where 
for a year he was employed in the general store of his brother, Carl. Then 
returning to St. Paul, he secured the position of bookkeeper with the old 
Scandinavian-American Bank, remaining in that capacity for three vears. 
In December, 1891, he came to Minneapolis to accept a place with the 
Swedish-American National Bank, where he worked as collector, head 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 771 



bookkeeper and discount clerk until he went to Texas to assume charge 
of an 18,000-acre rice plantation operated by the Northern Irrigation 
Company. Ill health compelled him to relinquish this undertaking after 
three months, and he then returned to the Swedish-American National 
Bank as paying teller ; in 1908 was promoted to be assistant cashier and 
was holding that position when the consolidation was effected with the 
Northwestern National Bank. 

As the Swedish-American had sturdily weathered the storms which 
had laid low so many of the other Minneapolis banks, this consolidation, 
or rather absorption, aroused both the indignation and the national spirit 
of the Swedes of Minneapolis, and the proposition to organize a new 
Scandinavian-American National Bank was received so enthusiastically 
that within a few months two hundred and fifty thousand dollars was 
subscribed for that purpose. In the early steps leading to its establish- 
ment Knut Ekman was so prominent that he was elected cashier of the 
new organization, its president being Mr. Werner, who headed the old 
Swedish-American National Bank. The new bank started under the 
brightest of auspices, not only with an experienced and substantial man- 
agement, but with the advantage of its former location, in the heart of the 
business district on Fourth street, opposite the buildings occupied by the 
Minneapolis Tribune and the Minneapolis Journal. The result of such a 
favorable combination of circumstances has been a steady increase in the 
deposits and financial influence of the Scandinavian-American National 
Bank from the opening of its doors to the present. Its energetic and cour- 
teous cashier has been always recognized as a large factor in this progress, 
as he is both an able financier and a very popular man. In musical circles 
he is widely known, having a fine tenor-baritone voice and enjoyed active 
membership in various singing societies since 1891. He isa leader in 
perhaps the most prominent of these organizations, the Arpi Singing Club. 
Mr. Ekman is also a fourteenth degree Mason, identified with Khurum 
Lodge, and belongs to the Odin Club. He was married at Los Angeles, 
California, February 19, 1910, to Miss Frances Stowe, of ]^^;inneapolis. 

Swan M. Klarquist. — Prominent among the larger contractors for 
general mason work in Minneapolis is Swan M. Klarquist, whose office 
is located at No. 10 South Third street. He is a fine representative of 
the intelligent and thrifty Swedes who have contributed so largely towards 
the advancement of the industrial and financial prosperity of the city, 
and is in every respect deserving of the esteem in which he is held as a 
capable business man and a valued citizen. A native of Sweden, he was 
born, April 23, 1854, in Langaryd, Smaland, on the home farm. His 
parents, Stephanus and Jennie (Johannesson) Klarquist, had four sons 
and three daughters, of whom the following named are living: Inga 
Maria ; Christina, wife of Peter Johnson, a farmer in Kandiyohi county ; 
Swan M., of this sketch ; John, of Minneapolis, foreman for his brother 
Swan, married Sara Olson, of this city. 



^^2 SWEDISH-AAIERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



After leaving the public schools of his native town, Swan M. Klar- 
quist was confirmed and then began w^ork for himself, going first to 
Halmstad, where he was employed as a mason in summer and as a stone 
cutter in the winter for two years. From 1872 until 1874 he was 
engaged in railroad work in Denmark, working on bridges for the North- 
western Seeland Railroad Company, the follow^ing year working for the 
same contractor on a railway in Fyen, for his excellent and faithful 
services being rewarded by his employer with a handsome bonus and a 
fine letter of recommendation. In 1876 the American fever, which had 
been troubling him for some time, was brought to a crisis, and INIr. 
Klarquist sailed for the United States, landing in New York City one 
bright day. Continuing his itinerary to Illinois, he located in Princeton, 
where he had friends, and was there employed as a mason for two years. 
In 1878 he came to Minneapolis, which has since been his home. The 
first year that he lived there he worked as a journeyman mason, but in 
1879 began taking contracts on his own account, and has met with emi- 
nent success in this line of industry. In his labors Mr. Klarquist has 
devoted his attention mostly to public buildings in the state and its cities, 
and has also done work outside of the state, among others having erected 
the city hall at Marquette, IMichigan. During the past fifteen years Mn 
Klarquist has put up seven buildings for the University of Minnesota, 
and has erected several church buildings, including the Swedish taber- 
nacle, the First Congregational church, the Wesley Methodist church 
and others, while in 1908 he erected five public school buildings, and the 
West Side high school building for the city of Minneapolis. 

On December 6, 1879, Mr. Klarquist married Christine Edquist, who 
was born in Vermland, Sweden, and came to this country with her 
parents when ten years of age. Six children have blessed their union, 
namely: Sadrak M., born August 21, 1880, is in business with his 
father; Rachel A., born June 25, 1882; Reuben E., born March 30, 1886, 
is in the commission business; Effie, born February 15, 1890; Clarice 
Swanhild, born October 6, 1898; and Dorothy Victoria Abigail, bom 
October 12, 1901. Religiously Mr. Klarquist and his family are valued 
members of the Swedish Covenant church (the Swedish tabernacle), of 
which Rev. Mr. Skogsbergh is the pastor. The home of the family, at 
No. 3732 Nicollet avenue, is pleasant and attractive, and its doors are 
ever open to many friends and acquaintances. 

Elias L. Anderson, secretary of the Crown Iron Works, of ]\Iin- 
neapolis, was born at Dassel, IMinnesota, July i, 1869, and is the son of 
Peter and Carrie Anderson, both from the vicinity of Christianstad; 
Sweden, whence they came to the United States in 1865. They spent 
a vear in Minneapolis and then removed to Dassel, where they purchased 
a farm, which they carried on thirteen years and then removed to Lake 
Elizabeth, Kandiyohi county, where they spent seven years and then 
removed to Minneapolis. Peter Anderson died in 1897, and his widow 




ELIAS L. ANDERSON 



\the 



NEW 



''^^B^^^, 



r-Ki:";,^.''?'<«o 



( F«u 



"■■'.'O/'-i I 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 775 



resides at Spokane, Washington, with a daughter. They were the parents 
of eight children, five of whom are hving. 

EHas L. Anderson received his education in the public and high 
schools of Minneapolis, after which he took a course at Archibald Busi- 
ness College. His first position was as bookkeeper with the Crown Iron 
Works, in which capacity he worked ten years ; in the meantime he had 
purchased the interest in the business held by Mr. Hernlund, and was 
elected to the post of secretary and treasurer of the concern. He is a 
thoroughly enterprising and up-to-date business man, and has mastered 
the details of the business in which he is engaged. Mr. Anderson is a 
member of St. Anthony Commercial Club, is one of the Board of Bethel 
Academy and College Association, of which he has been treasurer since 
1906. 

Mr. Anderson married, in 1901, Rose Hawkinson, of Minneapolis; 
her father is a pioneer nurseryman of the state and lives at Lake Minne- 
tonka. Mr, and Mrs. Anderson have two children, Margaret C, born 
May 10, 1902, and Clififord, born May 11, 1904. They reside at 527 
Sixth street, Southeast, and are members of the First Swedish Baptist 
.-hurch, of which Mr. Anderson is trustee. 

Claus Otto Peterson, ex-alderman of Minneapolis, present street 
commissioner and one of the most widely known and honored residents of 
the southern part of the city, is especially strong with the home working 
classes, of which he has been an active member and a large employer for 
many vears. He has been a citizen of Minneapolis since 1880, v/hen he 
came from Sweden as a young man of twenty-four, who had patriotically 
fulfilled his military duty to his fatherland and was otherwise prepared to 
take an unimpeded hand in the advancement of his private interests and 
those of the community which should benefit him. Born in Aker parish, 
Smaland, on the 2nd of February, 1856, he is a son of Peter Jonsson and 
Kajsa (Johansson) Peterson. His father was a well known farmer of 
the parish, who died in 1874, at the age of sixty-eight, while his mother, 
who was born in Oderstuga parish, Smaland, in 1813, passed away in 
1902. 

Claus O., the youngest of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter J. Peterson, attended the public schools in his native parish until he 
was fifteen, when he made his home with his oldest sister, who had niar- 
ried and was residing in Byarums parish, Smaland. There he remained 
during his military service and until he came to Minneapolis in 1880. His 
first six months were spent as a "lumber shover," but in 1881 he obtained 
employment in the Minneapolis Harvester Works and commenced _ to 
advance. He was soon promoted to be shipping clerk and after holding 
that position for two years decided to learn a trade. Mr. Brunsell. under 
whom he commenced to learn the trade of plastering in 1883, is still living 
in Minneapolis. The mastery of this trade occupied Mr. Peterson three 
years and then he bought his employer's business. He is still actively 



776 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

engaged in that line, employing about ten men in the earning out of his 
contracts, and he is therefore one of the Minneapolis veterans in his field. 

Since his arrival in Minneapolis Air. Peterson has been a resident of 
the Eleventh ward ; two months afterward he got out his "first papers," 
and has ever since been a Republican voter and worker. He was soon 
being sent as a delegate to city and county conventions and for many 
years has been an attendant at all the important gatherings of his party 
in Minneapolis, having also served as a delegate on all the important com- 
mittees. In 1898 he was elected alderman from his home ward, serving 
his full term of four years and then being defeated for reelection by only 
nine votes. In 1906 he was appointed to his present office of street com- 
missioner, in which his long experience as a handler of men and his 
thorough business qualifications are only two of the many strong quaUfi- 
cations which he possesses for the able discharge of his official duties. 
In regard to his religion, Mr. Peterson has been a member of the Mission 
Friends' church for the past thirty years ; his children are all baptized in 
that faith also, and the entire family are regular attendants at the Mission 
tabernacle. 

In a final review of Mr. Peterson's immediate family it should be 
added that his oldest sister, Brita Stina, was married to Anders Johan 
Sveningson, quite a wealthy farmer of Byarums parish, Sweden, where 
she now resides as his widow. Anders Johan Peterson, the oldest brother, 
was a farmer, who died in Sweden in 1908, leaving a family. Stina 
Kajsa, who was born in 1841, married Swan Johnson, a building con- 
tractor of Red Wing, Minnesota, and Johanna, another sister, became 
Mrs. August Johansson and the mother of several children, the family 
living in Akers parish, Sweden. Johannes Vilhelm Peterson, who is mar- 
ried "and the father of a family, was educated in an agricultural school 
of his native country and is now the manager for a large industn.- at 
Langsele, Sweden. 

Claus Otto Peterson was married, October 8, 1887, to Miss Ida 
Josefina Anderson, daughter of Johan Peter Anderson, a farmer of Grenna 
parish, Smaland, where she was born March 25, 1858. One of her 
brothers lives in Sweden ; the other, in the United States. The children 
born to Mr. and I\Irs. Claus O. Peterson were: Ellen Katherine, born 
August 2, 1888, who is a stenographer in Minneapolis and resides at home; 
Clarence Cvrus, born October"23, 1890, who is a student at the state uni- 
versity; Harriet Irene, born April 29, 1893, attending the :\Iinneapolis 
high school: and William Richard, a public school pupil. The family 
residence is at 2708 East Twenty-second street, this fine honne being 
erected by Mr. Peterson in 1890. 

Johannes Otto Peterson, well-known pharmacist, Minneapolis, 
born at Edh Woxtorp. Smaland, Sweden, August 29, 1864, is a son of 
Peter and Martha (Johannesson) Anderson. They lived on a farm and 
were the parents of eight children, the oldest of whom was Gustafva. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA -j-jy 



Gustafva Peterson married (first) John Danielson, and they had four 
children, two daughters and two sons ; two sons and one daughter became 
pharmacists and the remaining daughter married a hotelkeeper of North 
Dakota. After the death of her husband Mrs. Danielson married J. C. 
Dahl, a merchant of Spring Lake, Minnesota. Johan Gustaf, the second 
child of Peter and ]\Iartha Anderson, has taken the old homestead in 
Sweden ; Anna, the third child, married John Dahl, a farmer of Chisago 
county, ^Minnesota; the next, Mathilda, married S. G. Johnson, also a 
farmer of Chisago county; Anders Peter is a farmer in Isanti county, 
^Minnesota ; Johannes Otto is the sixth child ; Elis, the seventh child, 
married John P. Leaf, of Pine River, Minnesota ; and the youngest, 
Frank William, is proprietor of the drug store in the Andrus Building, 
Minneapolis. 

J. O. Peterson received his early education in the public schools of 
his native land, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. In 1880, when 
he was fifteen years of age, he emigrated to the United States and located 
at Prophetstown, Illinois, where for about six months he worked at 
various things as he found an opening. He secured employment in the 
drug store of Dr. R. E. Barnes, who subsequently removed to Orion, Illi- 
nois, Mr. Peterson going with him. He worked for Dr. Barnes a few 
years, meanwhile attending the public and high school of that town as 
opportunity offered. In the spring of 1884 Dr. Barnes sold his interest 
and Mr. Peterson then removed to Minneapolis, where four years later 
he graduated from the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy. Soon after he 
opened a drug store on his own account, at Seven Corners ; beginning 
on a small scale, he has increased his business as time went on, and at 
present is proprietor of one of the largest stores in this line kept by a 
Scandinavian in the state. His integrity and probity are well known, and 
he has a large circle of friends. He has taken thirty-two degrees in 
Masonry, being a Shriner, and is also affiliated with several other societies. 
He and his family attend St. John's Lutheran church. In 1900 Mr. Peter- 
son sent for his parents and purchased for them a hcime at Spring Lake, 
Minnesota, where his mother still resides ; his father died in 1904. 

]\Ir. Peterson married, in 1889, Mary Anderson, who was born at 
Wislanda, Sweden, November 11, 1865. and came to Minneapolis in 
childhood. They are parents of nine children, namely: Hugo, born 
Januarv 15, 1890, expects to become an analytical chemist, has passed 
examination for assistant pharmacist, and is now studying this branch 
at the University of Minnesota; Rudolph Washington, born July 4, 1892; 
Vemer, born June 3, 1894, and Helen, Edna, James Otis, Paul, Irene and 
Kenneth. Mr. Peterson's drug store is located at 1 501-3 Washington ave- 
nue, South, on very valuable property, owned by him, and his residence 
is 1 92 1 Elliott avenue. 

Charles A. Peterson, of the firm of Peterson & Larson, grocers, 
was born January i, 1866, in Sweden, and is a son of Peter Johnson. 



778 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Peter Johnson was a farmer in early life, and having met with financial 
reverses, devoted the latter part of his life to the making and repairing 
of shoes; he died about 1889. 

His son, Charles A. Peterson, received his education in the public 
schools of Sweden, after which he worked on a farm until 1889, at which 
time he emigrated to the United States. He first located at Minneapolis, 
working at various things as opportunity offered, for about seven years. 
In 1897 Mr. Peterson engaged in the creamery and grocery business at 
926 East Twenty-fourth street, and conducted same successfully for five 
years and then sold out. For about a year he was out of business, and 
then engaged in the creamery business at 813 East Twenty-eighth street, 
and for seven years successfully did business at this stand. He then 
located at 2845 Chicago avenue, in partnership with John Larson, in the 
grocery business, and under the firm name of Peterson & Larson they 
met with a very fair degree of success. Their store has modern equip- 
ments, and their shelves are well stocked with an attractive line of goods. 
They have an increasing patronage, and an established reputation for fair 
dealing. Mr. Peterson is a member of the Free Mission church. He is 
an enterprising and valuable citizen, and takes a keen interest in the 
progress and well-being of the city. 

Mr. Peterson married, July 25, 1891, Clara M. Carlson, who was born 
and educated in Sweden, and to them have been born seven children, 
namely: Treckler L., Esther M., Carl A., Arthur N., Alvira M., William 
Theodore P., and Margaret, who died at the age of eighteen months. 

Charles August Anderson. — A larger proportion, doubtless, of 
the enterprising and progressive business men of foreign ^ birth in 
Minneapolis have come from Sweden than from any other Euro- 
pean country, and noteworthy among this number is Charles Au- 
gust Anderson, the well-known house mover, who has been con- 
tinuously employed in this business, which requires ability and good 
judgment, for the past twenty-six years. He was born, Novem- 
ber 7, 1852, in Hafby, Vestergotland, a son of Anders and Kata- 
rina (Johanson) Carlson, who reared six children, namely: Ida Maria, 
died in 1889; Charles August, the special subject of this brief biographical 
review ; Lars Johan, a carpenter in Minneapolis ; Christina Ingeborg, liv- 
ing in Sweden ; Anna Sigrid, wife of Mr. Landquist, who has charge of 
the old homestead, in Sweden ; and Frank Noah, who has been employed 
in the Minneapolis Fire Department. 

Having completed his early education in the public schools, Charles 
August Anderson, complying with the laws of his country, was confirmed 
in the Lutheran church, after which he was well trained in the many 
branches of agriculture on the home farm. On becoming of age he 
served two terms in the Swedish army, and then, in 1882, bade good- 
bye to his friends and country, and came to Sibley county, Minnesota, 
where he worked for a while, either on a railroad or a farm, finally going 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 781 



to the Dalrymple farm in North Dakota, on which he worked through 
one harvesting season. Coming to Minneapolis in the fall of 1882, he has 
since made this city his home, and in the management of his business as a 
house mover, which he has carried on since 1883, he has met with genuine 
success. His services have been in such wide and constant demand that 
it would be impossible for him to enumerate the numbers of buildings 
which he has moved, but at the present writing, in the summer of 1909, 
he is filling a large contract as house mover in Rochester, Minnesota. 

Thrifty and industrious, Mr. Anderson has accumulated considerable 
wealth, and is the owner of two valuable residential properties at num- 
bers 1606 and 1608 Eighth street. South. He is not married. 

Olof Julius Veline, M. D. — One of the foremost specialists in dis- 
eases of the stomach and nervous diseases. Dr. Olof J. Veline, of Alinne- 
apolis, has achieved a high standing in the medical profession of the 
Northwest. Neither has such substantial success been reached by mere 
intellectual efforts, however strenuous and wisely directed, but his progress 
has involved physical exertions and hardships of the most trying and 
forbidding nature — difficulties which to surmount have required real 
bravery and manly stamina. 

The doctor was born in Kylen, Wisseltofta parish, Skane, Sweden, 
in the year 1868, receiving his earlier education in the common schools 
of that locality and through the instruction of Rev. Tretow, pastor of the 
parish. Realizing that his parents could not aff'ord to give him the edu- 
cation which he craved and which would satisfy his ambition, in 1881, when 
only thirteen years of age, the manly boy emigrated to Germany, deter- 
mined to earn the money which should allow him to master the branches 
of higher learning. At first he worked on a dairy farm; then obtained 
employment in a Mecklenburg hotel and still later became connected with 
a mercantile house in the city of Bremen. Here it was that young Veline 
worked, studied and developed into energetic, earnest and studious man- 
hood. The last named trait attracted the attention of the old and eccentric 
professor and scholar. Dr. Steinhoff, who volunteered to give him instruc- 
tion in English during the early morning hours. At this stage of his 
strenuous preparatory period his daily routine was as follows: Before 
6 o'clock a. m., sweeping out of the store ; 6-7 a. m., instruction in English 
at Professor Steinhoff's house ; 7 a, m.-8 p. m., clerical duties ; and from 
8 o'clock to 10 p. m. night school, with an additional course of private 
study in his little attic room. Thus, at the age of eighteen he had not 
only acquired a good elementary education in English and German, but in 
Latin and French. In 1886, during his stay in Bremen, Germany, Dr. 
Veline at the risk of his own life swam out in the river Weser and saved 
a young boy from drowning. For this deed Dr. Veline was accorded the 
German gold medal for life saving. 

In 1887 the future physician located at Stillwater, Minnesota, attend- 
ing the city high school, teaching classes in German and working at a 



782 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

hotel; and this incessant combination of hard work and earnest mental 
application he continued throughout his college days, when he took up 
the study of medicine at the University of Minnesota. Notwithstanding 
his constitution was such that he was noteworthy for his physical strength 
and was therefore made sergeant-at-arms of his class, while on the 
strength of his pen he was elected chief editor of the medical department 
of the college monthly, The Oracle. After graduating with honors from 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, in 1897, Dr. Veline located at 
Kerkhoven, Minnesota, where he established a fine general practice, and 
in 1898 was appointed surgeon to the Great Northern Railway. At the 
convention of the Supreme Lodge of the Swedish United Sons of America, 
held at Calumet, Michigan, in 1904, he was elected head physician of the 
order, and has since been reelected four times. He is also medical 
examiner for the Modern Brotherhood of America, Independent Scandi- 
navian Workmen. German Lutheran Aid Association, the Svithiod, Vasa 
Orden, and M. \N . A. The years 1900 and 1901 Dr. Veline spent in 
post-graduate studies in Europe, specializing in diseases of the stomach 
and nervous diseases, and has since achieved marked success in the treat- 
ment of these great American maladies. In 1908 the doctor married 
Miss Hazel Lorene Niedercorn, the talented daughter of M. W. Nieder- 
corn, former mayor of Farmington. 

Axel R. Brostrom, an expert accountant of ]\Iinneapolis, is of a 
fine Swedish family, whose representatives, both maternal and paternal, 
have rendered the "fatherland faithful military service. He was born in 
Jonkoping. Smaland, on the 17th of June, 1871, his father, who died 
in 1889, being long stationed there as colonel of the Vestgota-Dal regi- 
ment of infantry. His mother, who died in March, 1908, was the daugh- 
ter of Captain Richter, of Vendes Artillery. 

Axel, the only child of the family, received his earliest education 
in the public schools of his native city, and was later sent to the Univer- 
sity of the citv of Lund, from whose collegiate department he graduated 
in '1889. Soon afterward, he emigrated td America, arriving in Boston dur- 
ing 1890. The year of his residence at the Hub was not altogether con- 
genial, as it was' spent working as a factory hand, and he also longed for 
more extended association with his countrymen than he could enjoy m 
the eastern city. Minneapolis appealed to him in every point, and he 
therefore settled there in 189 1. It has since been a home to him in the 
full sense of the word, and through the clerical positions which he has 
held in various banks and mercantile establishments he has become an 
accountant of recognized expertness. At present he is employed as book- 
keeper in the Minneapolis branch of the Jung Brewing Company, of 
Milwaukee. 

In 1898 Mr. Brostrom married, in Minneapolis, Miss Ida Borglin, 
who is a native of Lund, Sweden, where the husband received his univer- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 783 



sity education. The children of this union are Violet, born in 1899, and 
Marjory, born in 1901. 

Charles Fjfxlman, for nearlv three decades a resident of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, dates his birth in Fargelanda parish, Dalsland, Sweden, 
in December, 1861. He is one of the eight children born to Peter and 
Eva Fjellman, and one of the three of that number now Uving-. One 
brother, Edward, is a resident of Connecticut, and the other brother, John, 
lives in Minneapolis. 

Charles received his education in the public schools of his native 
land, and was confirmed there in the Lutheran church, and when a youth 
in his teens found employment as clerk in general merchandise stores, 
being thus occupied until 1880, when he emigrated to America. After 
stopping for a brief time in Connecticut, he came west to Michigan, and 
in the fatter part of that same year took up his abode in Minneapolis. 
Here he worked at various occupations, including railroading, until 1883, 
when he engaged in business for himself. 

In 1898, Mr. Fjellman entered into a partnership with Mr. Alfred 
Olson, which continued until the death of Mr. Olson, October 23, 1908, 
when Mr. Fjellman, according to an earlier agreement, became sole pro- 
prietor of the whole business, at a fixed figure. 

July 13, 1887, Mr. Fjellman married Miss Minnie Peterson, who was 
born in'lvallestad, Smaland, October 12, 1863. They have had four chil- 
dren, of whom three are living, namely : Philip Carl, born October 26, 
1890; Reuben Columbus, June 11, 1893; and Ruth Verney, February 24, 
1896. The eldest is a graduate of the Minneapolis High School and at 
this writing is a student in the University of Minnesota. The family 
reside at 2020 Chicago avenue, and are members of St. John's English 
Lutheran church. Fraternally, Mr. Fjellman is identified with the Swe- 
dish Brothers and the Knights of Pythias. 

David Ekberg. — Numbered among the thriving and prosperous mem- 
bers of the Swedish-Americans of Minneapolis is David Ekberg, who 
is actively identified with the industrial interests of the city as one of its 
most skilful and busy blacksmiths. He was born, April 27, 1870, in 
Karlskoga parish, Vermland, Sweden, being one of the seven children 
born to Lars Johan and Maria Katarina Ekberg, life-long residents of that 
countrv. Six of the children of the parental household are still living, 
as follows : Josephine, wife of Carl Bjorndahl, of Karlskoga ; Carl Johan, 
a blacksmith in the State Railway shops at Orebro, Sweden; Dorothea, 
wife of Abraham W. Sjoman, a machinist at Bofors, Vermland ; Elias. a 
machinist in Carlsborg, Sweden; David, the special subject of this sketch; 
and Isak Andreas, a blacksmith, living on the parental homestead. 

Having completed the course of study in the public schools, and been 
confirmed in the Lutheran church, David Ekberg learned the blacksmith's 
trade' in his father's shop, and continued working there until 1891. Enter- 



784 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



prising and ambitious, he then bade farewell to his family and friends, 
and emigrated to this country, locating immediately in Minneapolis. For 
a number of years thereafter, he worked at his trade for various firms, 
displaying much skill and ability. In 1902 Mr. Ekberg, in company with' 
one of his countrymen, Mr. Anquist, bought out Mr. Joseph Guy, and has 
since carried on a large and lucrative business, the firm being among the 
leading blacksmiths of Minneapolis. Mr. Ekberg has been prosperous 
financially, and several years ago visited his old home in Sweden. 

Mr. Ekberg married, in 1892, Ida Sophia Josephson, who was born, 
April 10, 1870, in Karlskoga, Sweden, on a farm, and came to this coun- 
try in 1889. Her parents are still living in their native land. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ekberg has been brightened by the birth of five children, 
namely: Lillie Sophia, born May 15, 1893; David Einar, born November 
4, 1894; Burt Elias, born November 23, 1896; Gustaf Antonio, born 
August 25, 1898; and Harold, born May 6, 1900. The family are all 
members of the Swedish Mission church at Camden place, and reside at 
No. 4027 Girard avenue. North. Mr. Ekberg is a gifted musician, and, 
notwithstanding that he has labored as a smithy so many years, his hands 
are sufficiently soft and pliable to draw sweetest music from the piano 
and organ, his touch being delicate and strong, and he is also a fine 
singer, having a rich baritone voice, which it is a delight to hear. 
He has for a long time been a trustee of the church, and for five or more 
years was organist and choir leader. 

Peter Paulson, a well-known railroad contractor of Minneapolis, 
was born in Barseback, Malmahus Ian, Sweden, May 28, 1859, his parents 
being Paul and Inga (Anderson) Olson. They were the parents of seven 
children, of whom five are still living, namely: Paul, Nils and Andrew, 
each owning a farm in Sweden ; and Harry (Hans) and Peter in America. 

Mr. Paulson received his education in the public schools of his native 
parish and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. Since attaining the 
age of sixteen years he has done the work of a man, for some time work- 
ing hard on his father's farm, which he had to manage, as his father died 
when he was a small boy. In 1880 he decided to find a broader field and 
wider opportunities for his activities, and emigrated to the United States, 
reaching Minneapolis during the first week of November. 

The first work undertaken in Minneapolis by Mr. Paulson was that 
of a laborer on a railroad, and with the exception of six weeks spent 
on a farm, he has since that time been constantly connected with rail- 
road work. About the time he had been two or three years in this coun- 
trv, being of an energetic and ambitious nature, ]\Ir. Paulson began 
taking small contracts in railroad work, gradually gaining experience, as 
well as reputation in this line, and becoming able to take constantly in- 
creasing jobs. As his business grew larger than he could handle alone 
to advantage, he took as partner P. Lindquist, and the firm name became 
Paulson & Lindquist; in 1890 Mr. Lindquist withdrew from the firm 






^'C:-^^c, 






SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 787 

and Mr. Paulson then took John Larson into the business as partner. 
In 1906 they took into partnership with them John A. Johnson, then 
taking the firm name of Paulson, Larson & Company. They do a large 
business in general railroad contracting work, mostly in the past for 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company during the last sixteen 
years, although they have received large contracts for other companies; 
their last contract in 1908 was for building an extension of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad in the vicinity of Gleason, Wisconsin. 
The enterprise has been very successful, as all members of the firm are 
well informed along the line of their endeavors, and take keen interest 
in the faithful fulfillment of the work undertaken by them. 

During the winter of 1888-9 Mr. Paulson visited his native country. 
His father having died when he was but eight years old, he early had to 
look out for his own interests, and as he has himself remarked, he has 
"worked hard all his lifetime in order to get his present home," which 
he may well be proud of, as it is modern, comfortable and attractive in 
every respect ; it is located at 1622 Park street. South. The family attends 
the St. John's Lutheran church, where they are members. 

Mr. Paulson married Desiree Evrard, of French parentage, born in 
Waukesha, Wisconsin, and to them have been born two daughters, Clo- 
thilde Ethel, born January i, 1891, and Amy Eulalia, born February 19, 
1894; both attending the Central High School and studying music. 

Carl August Swenson, D. D. S., 2628 East Twenty-fifth street, 
Minneapolis, is of Swedish birth, but has been a resident of this country 
since he was a year and a half old. Dr. Swenson was born in Langasj5, 
Smaland, December 26, 1869, son of Carl Johan Swenson and his wife, 
Johanna, daughter of Israel Peterson. The grandfather on the paternal 
side was Sven Jonasson, and the grandmother on the same side was 
Gustafva Nojd. Dr. Swenson's maternal grandmother was Ingrid 
Jonasdotter, she being a representative of a family that figured among 
the first Swedish separatists, the founders of a sect called Akianer, and 
its teachings Akianism. In those days the State church of Sweden, 
which is Lutheran, was very intolerant and persecuted people of different 
faith living within the boundaries of that country. Dr. Swenson's parents 
came with their family to America in 1871, settling first at Scandia, 
Minnesota, where they remained one year, and from whence the father 
went to Apple River, Wisconsin, and took a homestead. Both he and 
his good wife are still living, now being residents of Polk county, Wis- 
consin. Seven of their eight children are living, namely : Ida, widow 
of John Swenson ; John Adolph, a farmer of Amery, Wisconsin ; Hilda 
Gustafva. wife of Gustof Johnson, a farmer of Wood Lake, Wisconsin ; 
Elias Edward, who died at the age of fourteen years ; Carl August, 
whose name introduces this sketch ; Stany Seraphia, wife of Andrew M. 
Johnson, a farmer at Hines, Douglas county, Wisconsin; Peter Hjalmar, 
a farmer at Amery, Wisconsin ; and Emilia Sophia, wife of Carl P. 



788 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Johnson, who Hves on the old homestead, a distance of eight miles from 
Amery. 

As already mentioned, Carl A, Swenson landed in this country at 
the age of one^ and one-half years. He attended the district school near 
his father's home, and from his sixteenth year has worked his own way 
in the world. At an early age he had acquired sufficient education to 
receive an appointment as school teacher, and he taught school in winter 
and worked on a farm in summer until he attained his twenty-second 
year. In the fall of 1891 he entered Gustavus Adolphus College at 
St. Peter, where he pursued the classical course, and graduated in 1897 
with the degree of A. B. The next four years he taught school in 
Minnesota. In the fall of 1901 he matriculated in the Dental Depart- 
ment of the State University of Minnesota, from which he graduated in 
the spring of 1904. That same year he opened a dental office at 2628 
East Twentv-fifth street, his present location, where he has established 
a successful practice. In 1907 he paid a visit to the land of his nativity, 
on this trip also visiting England, Denmark, Germany, Belgium and 
France. 

Fraternally, Dr. Swenson is identified with the Scandinavian Dental 
Society and the State Dental Society, and in his religious belief he har- 
monizes with the church from which his ancestors separated. He is a 
member of the Swedish Lutheran Ebenezer church. 

John August Larson. — A prominent railroad contractor of Minne- 
apolis, was born in Paarp, Vestra Karup, Skane, Sweden, May 12, 1857, 
and is a son of Lars and Petronella (Svenson) Anderson. They were 
the parents of eight children, of whom seven survive, namely: John 
August, the eldest; Paulus, living on the old homestead; Emma,' married 
Janne Paulson, a farmer; Amanda, married Alfred Olson, generally 
known in Minneapolis as "Stockholm Olson." who died October 23, 1908; 
Anton lives in California; Ida, married John Olson, a farmer in Santa 
Clara Vallev. California : and Patrik, a plumber in Minneapolis. _ 

Mr. La'rson received his education in the public schools of his native 
parish, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. He came to the 
United States in 1872, settling in Chicago, where he worked as teamster 
and street-car driver, and then went to work on the railroad, with which 
business he has ever since been connected. He removed to Minneapolis 
in 1878, and there worked on railroads; in 1883 he began taking small 
contracts on his own account, building roads in Canada, which he con- 
tinued four vears. Returning to Minneapolis in 1890, he took Peter Paul- 
son as partner, and thev continued in the contracting business. The part- 
nership is still in efit'ect, and they have worked mostly for the Chicago 
& Northwestern road and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul. Mr. Lar- 
son has attained a verv fair degree of success in the enterprise he has 
undertaken, and by his 'industry and reliability has secured a good reputa- 
tion among those with whom he has been associated. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 789 



June 9, 1897, Mr. Larson married Emma Augusta Hellman, daugh- 
ter of August Hellman ; she was born in Elghult, Smaland, Sweden, and 
died May i, 1903. They had one son, Lars Reuben, born August 27), 
1899, who is a boy of great promise, now attending school. With his 
son Mr. Larson resides at 1819 Tenth avenue, South, and they attend 
St. John's English Lutheran church. 

Andrew L. Lindstrom is a contractor for interior decorating and 
paper hanging, and he is one of the best known members of that vocation 
in Minneapolis. He learned his trade at Karlstad, Sweden, and after- 
ward, from 1882 until 1887, he worked for different firms in Stockholm. 
On emigrating to the United States in 1887 he located in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, and has since resided in this city, a well known and influential 
business man. 

Mr. Lindstrom was born on September 16, 1866, in Bog, Fagerbacks 
parish, Sweden, a son of Lars and Christina (Nilson) Anderson. The 
father, born on the 31st of July, 1831, died on the 15th of April, 1879, and 
the mother, born December i, 1842, is yet living. Their family numbered 
five children: Andrew; Catarina, born in 1868; David, born in 1875; 
Gustaf, born in 1877; and Maria, born in 1878. 

Andrew L. Lindstrom married Cedra Maria Carlson, born in Faller- 
um, Ostergotland, Sweden, in 1872, a daughter of Carl J. and Ingred 
Carlson, of the same place. Three children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Lindstrom: Carl David, born October 11, 1907; Ingred Astrid 
Viola, born October 5, 1908; and Ernest Willard, born January 21, 1909. 
Mr. Lindstrom is a member of several fraternal societies, in all of which 
he has held positions of trust and confidence. He has a home at beautiful 
Lake Amelia. 

JoHAN Axel Wallin, an organist and music teacher of Minneapolis, 
was born August 10, 1874, at Lennas parish, Nerike, Sweden. His father, 
Johan Fredrik Wallin, was born June 13, 1842, in Oja parish. Soderman- 
land ; he served as parish teacher and organist thirty-one and a half years, 
and twenty-three years as postmaster at Lennas, and then resigned, with 
a pension. In 1885 he took a position as book-keeper in Lennas Savings 
Bank, which he still holds. He was married, in 1868, to Anna Gustafva 
Engelina Rosenquist, and their children are: Anna, born in 1869, a 
music teacher in Philadelphia; Carl, born in 1870, living in Sweden; Elin, 
born in 1872, is a teacher in Gothenberg, Sweden; Johan Axel; Richard, 
born in 1876, succeeded his father as teacher and organist in Lennas ; 
Fred, born in 1878, is manager of the Koberg Estate, in Smaland ; Astrid, 
born in 1880, a teacher in Sweden ; Hjalmer, born in 1882, at home with 
his parents; and Signe, born in 1891, also living at home. 

Johan Axel Wallin attended the public schools and studied music with 
his father until 1891, when he emigrated to the United States. He re- 
mained three vears in Rockford, Illinois, earning a livelihood at different 



790 SWEDISH-A^IERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



kinds of employment and studying music. In 1894 he went to Knox Col- 
lege, at Galesburg, where for two and one-half years he took an academic 
and musical course. 

In 1896 \].T. Wallin came to Minneapolis, where he has since been 
successfully employed in teaching music and as church organist. The 
first vear he served as organist in the Swedish Mission church in North- 
east ^Minneapolis, and a year later was appointed organist in the large 
Swedish Lutheran Emanuel church, which post he still fills. He has 
earned an enviable reputation as organist, and has a fine patronage be- 
sides, having some sixty pupils in music. He is a member of the /Vncient 
Order of United Workmen, and of the Swedish Lutheran Emanuel 
church. He resides with his family at 1318 Madison street, Northeast, 
where he has purchased a comfortable home. 

Mr. Wallin was married, in 1899, to Charlotta Wahlquist, born in 
1879 in Sweden, and daughter of Claes Wahlquist, now a farmer in Nick- 
erson, Minnesota. To this union five children have been born, namely : 
George, born April 26, 1900; Genevieve, born July 8, 1902; Margaritte, 
November i, 1904; Stanley, October 27, 1906; and Quentin, July 2, 1908. 
Mr. Wallin is well known outside of his professional duties, and has a 
large circle of friends. He is considered a public-spirited, representative 
citizen of Minneapolis. 

GusTAF A. Blixt, with Smith & Wyman Manufacturing Company, 
of Minneapolis, was born June 29, 1853, in Gunnarskog, Vermland, Swe- 
den, and is a son of Anders and Maria (Bjorn) Blixt, both deceased. 
Anders Blixt was a sergeant with Vermland's infantry regiment, and died 
in 1865; his wife w^as a daughter of Anders Bjorn, of Gunnarskog, and 
died at the age of forty-nine years. Of their ten children four survive, 
namely: Andrew, born in 1842. a farmer at Dalbo, Isanti county, Min- 
nesota; Christine, born in 1841, housekeeper for the Spreckels family, of 
sugar fame, having been with them since 1888; Magnus, born in 1851, 
has charge of the packing department of Smith & Wyman Manufacturing 
Company ; and Gustaf A. 

Gustaf A. Blixt received his education in the public school and spent 
a short time in college at Arvika. In 1870 he emigrated to America, going 
directlv to St. Paul, where he was received by his two sisters, Christine 
and [Martha, the latter now deceased. He was first employed by Dr. Coe 
Glazing & Glass Cutting Company, for which firm he worked three sum- 
mers and learned the trade. He went to school winters, working for his 
board. In 1883 he took a position wath Johnson & Copeland Sash & Door 
Company, Third street and Third avenue. South, in iMinneapolis. In 1876, 
in order to improve his education, he began attending Professor Folsom's 
Business College, where he spent two terms, taking up book-keeping and 
arithmetic. [Meanwhile, in 1875, he had engaged in business on his own 
account, with a partner, known as North Star Glazing Works (Blixt & 
Fridlund), and conducted the same about three years, selling out in 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 793 



1878. He had acquired a goodly sum of money by this time, and owned 
some property, and engaged in business as a jobber in glass. However, 
through the failure of several large manufacturing concerns he lost nearly 
his entire capital and had to give up the jobbing business. In 1879 Mr. 
Blixt began working for Smith & Wyman Sash & Door Company, work- 
ing the first year by the day, but since 1880 has been foreman, buying all 
the material used in the glazing and painting department, and at the 
same time does the glazing and painting on contract and does outside con- 
tracting. He has had charge of the glazing in most of the large buildings 
recently erected in Minneapolis, among them: Guarantee Loan, New 
York Life, Masonic Temple, etc. 

Since 1885 Mr. Blixt has held the world's record as glazier, having 
glazed 4,320 panes of glass, 8x10, in 8 hours and 20 seconds ; this feat 
was accomplished by him as a result of using a hitherto unknown method, 
by which a man could do as much work in one hour as he would other- 
wise be able to accomplish in ten hours. Thus he has saved an enormous 
amount of money to both manufacturer and consumer. Mr. Blixt is well 
known throughout the city, and is universally respected. He is a member 
of several societies, among them the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Owls and the Norden Society. He resides with his children at 523 
Third avenue. Southeast. 

Mr. Blixt married, in 1882, Emma Louise Abrahamson, born in 1863, 
in Chisago county, Minnesota. She died January i, 1909, leaving four 
children, namely : Walder, born July 19, 1883, employed as glazier by the 
company with which his father is connected, and living at home; Isabel, 
born October 12, 1886, is a music teacher in Minneapolis ; Edwin Hershel, 
born in 1888, is married, and also a glazier employed by Smith & Wy- 
man ; and Hattie, born November 19, i8qi, lives at home, and is attending 
college. 

Claus a. Rollin, D. D. S. — A prominent and worthy representative 
of the Swedish population of Minnesota, Claus A. Rollin, D. D. S., is 
actively associated with one of the most important branches of dental 
surgery, the valuable discoveries and improvements made in recent years 
in dentistry having elevated it to the dignity of a distinct and separate 
science. By means of his acknowledged skill and close attention to his 
professional duties he has already established a large practice in Minne- 
apolis, and is fast winning his way to an assured position among the 
leading dentists of the city. A son of August Rollin, he was born, April 
16, 1877, at Smaland, Sweden, where his earlier years were spent. 

Coming to Minnesota in 1893, Dr. Rollin continued his studies in the 
public schools, subsequently further advancing his education by attend- 
ing the evening, schools of Minneapolis. In the meantime he was em- 
ployed at various occupations, and with a special desire to fit himself 
for' a professional career he saved his hard-earned dollars, and when he 
saw his wav clear entered Gustavus Adolphus College, where he com- 



794 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



pleted the course of study. Entering the University of ]\Iinnesota in 
1903, he was graduated from the Dental Department in 1906 with the 
degree of D. D. S., and has since been engaged in the practice of his 
profession in Minneapohs. June 27, 1909, Dr. RolHn visited his old 
home in Sweden and spent about three months there and in travel on the 
continent. He then returned to Minneapolis and resumed the practice 
of his profession. Dr. Rollin's office is at No. 1526 East Lake street, 
Minneapolis. 

Carl Ludvig Anderson, contractor and builder, ^Minneapolis, Alinne- 
sota, was born in Branningsidden. Hofva parish, \'estergotland, April 23, 
1862, son of Anders Peter and Anna Greta Anderson. The father was 
a forester by occupation. Both he and his wife are deceased. Besides 
this son, they had one daughter, Anna Mathilda, born in 1858, who is now 
keeping house for her brother in Minneapolis. 

After having finished his studies in the public schools, the subject 
of our sketch worked as a coachman at Gudhammar, remaining there until 
he was nineteen, when he went to Lusta parish to learn cabinet-making. 
From there he went to Stockholm and found employment in the Ekman 
Sash & Door Factory, which concern has manufactured thousands of 
frame villas and shipped them all over the world. After spending about 
three years in the factory, he turned his attention to house building, at 
which he worked in that city for four and a half years. Returning to 
Vestergotland, where his mother lived, his father having died in 1880, he 
married, and, in 1887, with his young wife and infant son, emigrated to 
America. 

Upon their arrival in this country, Air. Anderson and hi_s family 
went direct to Des ^Moines, Iowa, where lived a brother of his wife, and 
where they remained about three months. Then they settled in Marcus, 
Iowa, where he engaged in contracting and building. He had only twenty- 
five cents when he landed in this town, but he had what is sometimes bet- 
ter than money — credit, — his backer being John Gund, a banker, brother 
of the La Crosse, Wisconsin, brewer ; and, having credit with real estate 
and lumber dealers, he at once embarked in building houses, which he sold. 
He erected and sold two whole blocks of houses, making a good profit, 
and continued in business there for nearly nineteen years. Then he went 
to Edmonton, Alberta. Canada, on a prospecting tour, and was employed 
as foreman at his trade for six months, after which he returned to his 
family at oMarcus, and in 1907 they moved to ^Minneapolis, where he en- 
gaged in business under the firm name of Steinman & Anderson, con- 
tractors and builders. This firm was dissolved in 1908, and since them Mr. 
Anderson has been in partnership with his son, John B. x\nderson. They 
have erected a number of buildings for Fred Gering & H. Davis, Minneap- 
olis real estate men. 

In 1885, Mr. Anderson married Miss Christina Olson, who died in 
Marcus, Iowa, leaving him two sons and a daughter, viz. : John Bernhard, 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 795 



born October 8, 1886; Esther Christina, January 3, 1895, and Carl Ivar, 
December 21, 1897. 

Fraternally, i\Ir. Anderson is identified with the Modern Woodmen 
and the Independent Order of Svithiod, Lodge Oscar II, No. 31, of which 
he was a charter member, and its first treasurer, to which office he was 
re-elected for 1909. He and his family attend the Swedish Lutheran 
church. They reside at 3619 Garfield avenue, South. 

To Mr. Anderson belongs the distinction of having saved two human 
lives. During a blizzard, in 1888, in Marcus, Iowa, he saved the life of a 
grocer, Peter Anderson, who is still living there ; and the same winter he 
saved the life of a young girl by the name of Wilson, who was crossing 
a railroad bridge in the darkness. A train was coming behind them. 
Anderson caught the girl around her waist, and, holding her with one 
arm, with the other clung to the ties, their bodies in the ice cold water, 
and the water forty feet deep. After the train had passed over, he took 
her to her home, half a mile away. She is- still living. 

Jonas Carlson, of ^linneapolis, Minnesota, is a Smalander by birth, 
having been born in Wra parish, Sunnerbo, October 10, 1867, son of Carl 
and Ingrid Johannesson. In their family were seven children, of whom 
two daughters died when young. The five sons living are: Peter, a 
blacksmith and farmer in Holland ; Johannes, a farmer at the old home- 
stead ; Anton, a merchant tailor in Halmstad ; Jonas, the subject of this 
sketch, and Enoch, a book-keeper and office man in Minneapolis. 

In his youth Jonas Carlson attended the public schools and also 
studied under the instruction of private tutors, after which he entered 
the Seminary for Teachers in Vexio, where he was a student two terms. 
In 1883, he emigrated to America and came directly to Minneapolis, which 
city has since been his habitation, with the exception of one summer when 
he worked on a railroad and five months spent in Michigan as representa- 
tive for the Minneapolis Brewing Company. His first summer here he 
worked at the plasterer's trade, and from this he turned to the grocery 
business, entering the employ of John Moren, with whom he remained 
three and a half years. Afterward he worked for O. J. Lund and later 
for Ole Nelson, both grocers. For one year he was connected with the 
Vanstrom Clothing Co., after which he engaged in the clothing business 
with Dahl'Bros., under the firm name of Carlson & Dahl Brothers, at 321 
Twentieth avenue. North. This partnership continued for seven years, or 
until Carlson bought the interest of his associates, after which, he con- 
tinued the business in his own name for another seven years. Meeting 
with financial loss, he went out of business, and soon afterward accepted a 
position with the Palace Clothing Co., dividing his time between St. 
Paul and Minneapolis for about three years. Then he entered the employ 
of the Minneapolis Brewing Co., with which he was connected until 
January i, 1909. 

Mr. Carlson is a member of the I. O. F., Modern Woodmen of 



796 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



America, Improved Order of Red Men, Independent Order of Svithiod, 
and the Order of \'asa. 

In 1902, Mr. Carlson visited several countries in Europe, including 
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Belgium, Holland, France, Eng- 
land and Ireland, the voyage covering a period of three months. The 
chief object of this trip was to visit in Sweden his aged father, then in 
his eighty-fourth year, and who died two years later. His mother died 
in 1874, as the result of a surgical operation. 

Charles J. Carlson, who has a general merchandise store at 2700 
Bryant avenue, MinneapoHs, Minnesota, is a native of Sweden and dates 
his birth at Lilla Strom, Dannike parish, near Boras, Februar}' 8. 1870. 
Mr. Carlson's parents, Svante and Sophia Carlson, came to this country 
in 1902, and the father, who was born in 1834, is still living, making his 
home with his sons in Minneapolis ; the mother died in 1907. They had 
eight children, three of whom are deceased. Those living are : Gustaf 
Conrad Carlson, of Duluth, Minnesota ; Svante August Isidorus Carlson 
is in the far West; Mauritz Carlson, a wood turner by trade, resides in 
Minneapolis ; Maria Valborg is the wife of Harold W^eek, estimator with 
the Minneapolis Sash and Door Factory. 

Charles J. Carlson received a public school education in his native 
land, and after his confirmation spent about five years traveling with 
his father, the latter being a farmer and an itinerant merchant. In 1888, 
the young man came to America. For a short time he stopped in Minne- 
apolis, then he went to Gibbon, Minnesota, where, for two years, he 
worked on a farm, afterward securing a position as clerk in the general 
merchandise store of William Webster, where he remained for a period 
of eight years. 

Returning to Minneapolis in 1899, he opened a grocery and general 
merchandise store at 720-722 Twenty-sixth avenue. North, where he did 
an extensive and profitable business until he sold out in 1906. Since then 
he has bought and sold a number of stores and stocks of goods and has 
also dealt in real estate. He traded a tract of land for his present store, 
2700 Bryant avenue. 

Mr. Carlson resides with his family at 1028 Logan avenue. North. 
In 1894, at Gibbon, he married Miss Maude L. Searles, of Swan Lake, 
Nicollet county, her parents being among the early settlers of that county, 
where her father is still engaged in farming ; her mother died in 1904. 
To Charles J. Carlson and wife have been given four children, namely : 
Lyle Searles, born in 1895; Lola, in 1897; Gladys Marine, in 1899, and 
Warn Daw, in 1906. The family attend the English Presbyterian church, 
and Mr. Carlson is also identified with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. 

GuSTAF Adolf Hallin, who is a prosperous young dairyman resid- 
ing at 3445 Hennepin avenue, Minneapolis, is of substantial Swedish 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 799 



stock which has been wedded to agriculture for many generations. He 
was born in Arestad, Bjorkeberg parish, Ostergotland, on the 12th of 
February, 1868, and is a son of Carl Johan and Christina Maria (Mons- 
dotter) Nilsson. The father, who was born in Bjorkeberg parish in the 
year 1829, continued to engage in agriculture until his death in 1893. 
The mother, born in the same year, is a daughter of Carl Magnus Mag- 
nusson, long a farmer of Kisa parish, and she is still living in Sweden. 
The six children of the family were as follows : Hulda Maria, who was 
born in 1851 and is now married to Johan Nilson, a farmer and auc- 
tioneer of Bjorkeberg; Carl Emil, born in 1852 and engaged in farming 
in the West; Nils Peter, born in 1854, who was a brewer of Tranas, 
Sweden, and died in 1905; Johan Alfred, who was born in i860 and is 
engaged in that industry at the same place ; Oscar William, who was born 
in 1865 and died in 1907, and Gustaf Adolf, of this sketch. 

Mr. Hallin spent his life until he was of age in acquiring an educa- 
tion and assisting his parents at home; but in 1889 he emigrated to the 
United States and located at Minneapolis. There he worked as a com- 
mon laborer for two years, and then held a position with the street rail- 
way company for ten years. But he was not satisfied with his position 
as an employe ; he longed to be independent and his inclinations naturally 
led him toward an agricultural opening. In 1903 he therefore purchased 
the dairy farm at his present location, where he conducts a substantial 
business and has a comfortable and pleasant home. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Hallin married Miss Anna Maria Hallgren, who was 
born in Asbo, Ostergotland, in 1869, and is a daughter of Claus Gustaf 
Hallgren, general overseer of the Stralsnas estate, of that province. They 
have one child, Agnes Elizabeth, who was born at Minneapolis in 1893 
and is now a student at the West High School. 

Frank Ephraim Bergstrom, the firmly established and artistic 
merchant tailor of Minneapolis, is a native of Stockholm and was born 
in the beautiful Swedish capital jNIarch 13, 1872. His parents were 
Clays Rudolph and Anna Julia Bergstrom, and at his birth his father 
was' a shoemaker at Stockholm, but later moved to Carlskrona, where he 
long monopolized the trade of the best families of that somewhat aristo- 
cratic community. The elder Mr. Bergstrom died in that place several 
years ago, but the widow is still living there. There were seven sons 
and two daughters in the family and, besides Frank E., the following 
sons reside m the United States: Adolphus Bergstrom, who is _ an 
artist, living in Boston, Massachusetts, and Israel Bergstrom, at one time 
chief clerk of the Minnesota house of representatives, but now identified 
with the Scandia Life Insurance Company, with headquarters in Duluth. 

After passing through the fourth "standard" of the high school at 
Carlskrona, Frank E. Bergstrom was apprenticed to learn the tailor's 
trade, and the conclusion of this period of his life was coincident wnth 
his coming to Boston in 1889. In that fastidious city he was accepted 



8oo SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

as a master of his trade and employed by several of the leading houses 
of the Hub, such as those of F. L. Dunn and John J. Mitchell. On the 
bench and as a cutter he thus spent thirteen years of profitable experi- 
ence, both from the standpoint of money and reputation, and, not satis- 
fied with this practical training, he pursued a scientific course in cutting 
with the Bell Tailoring Company, New York. In 1892 Mr. Bergstrom 
located in Minneapolis, being employed by Hodgdon & Zahn until 1906, 
when he purchased the tailoring business of D. H. Gallagher, which he 
has since continued with signal success under his own name. He has 
recently moved into more spacious quarters at No. 4 Fifth street, North, 
opposite the West Hotel. Mr. Bergstrom is a member of the First 
Swedish Baptist church and of the Odin Club. Mr. Bergstrom caters 
especially to his countrymen, from whom he draws a large business. 

Otto A. Nelson. — Long identified with the executive affairs of the 
lumber and railroad interests of his locality, Otto A. Nelson is now asso- 
ciated with the business of Gust Lundahl, a prominent railroad contractor 
of Minneapolis. Mr. Nelson is also one of the oldest and most active 
members of the Swedish society, Norden, of which he has served as 
librarian, secretary and president — in the last-named capacity for five 
years. At all the festivals and other important gatherings of the society, 
he has been conspicuous both as a speaker and a reciter of original poetry 
which has been received with such just favor. As to the more general 
fraternities, it may be added that he is an active member of the Knights 
of Pvthias. 

Otto A. Nelson was born December 24, 1866, on the ancestral estate 
which has been in the possession of the family for centuries, in Broby 
parish, Omarstorp, Skane. Sweden. He is a son of Nils Manson and 
Anna Maria (Persdotter) Nelson, the father being a farmer of that par- 
ish, who was born in 1829 and died on the family homestead m 1892, 
while the mother, who is still living there, was born in 1834, a daughter 
of Per Nilsson, a farmer of Sodra Vram. The six children of the Nelson 
household were: N. P., born in 1859, who is now custodian of the 
United States Government Building in ISIinneapolis ; Mathilda, born in 
1862, who is the wife of Gustaf Palsson, an extensive farmer located at 
Broby, Sweden; Amanda, born in 1864, who is also married and livmg m 
Broby' parish; Otto A., of this sketch; Axel Bonde Fredin, born in 1868, 
who occupies the old family homestead; and Hilma, who was born m 

1872. A A- 1 

Until 1883. when he was seventeen years of age, Otto A. .\eIson 
attended the public and private schools of his home neighborhood, and 
then, after remaining at home for two years, emigrated directly to Mm- 
neap'olis, where he secured a position in a sash and door factory and was 
thus emploved for three vears. Next he assumed a more responsible posi- 
tion with the Nelson-Tennev Lumber Company, and remained with that 
firm until 1905, or for a period of seventeen years. In the year named 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 8oi 



he returned to Sweden, but only for three months, when he re-located 
in Minneapolis, soon obtaining a position as clerk and time-keeper for the 
Great Northern Railway Company. He was first sent to British Columbia 
and afterward to the Dakotas, and was engaged in the same line of work 
for the Soo Railway. Since 1907 he has been employed as a book-keeper 
and clerk by Gust Lundahl, the well known railroad contractor. When 
in the city, he resides at 1400 Monroe street, Northeast, Minneapolis, and 
stands high both in Swedish-American circles and in the business world 
at large. 

Aksel Leonard Hammarstrand, a salesman identified with the 
Plymouth Clothing House of Minneapolis, is one of the Swedish-Ameri- 
cans of the Twin Cities whose lineage can be traced to old and noted fam- 
ilies of the mother country. On the maternal side its well authenticated 
records commence about the middle of the sixteenth century. The ma- 
ternal genealogy may be traced to the unfortunate Eric XIV, the King 
of Sweden, who made unsuccessful overtures of marriage to Queen 
Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots and who, after a tumultous reign of 
seventeen years, is believed to have been poisoned February 26, 1577. 

Mr. Hammarstrand is a native of Skara, Sweden, born October 21, 
1874, to Wilgot L. and Augusta Sophia (Palmgren) Hammarstrand, his 
father having been a leather manufacturer of that place, who was born 
April 17, 1833, and died March 15, 1906. His paternal grandfather, 
Anders, was also a manufacturer in that line, while his maternal grand- 
father, E. P. Palmgren, was owner of the paper mills at Katrinefors, 
Ostergotland. Mr. Hammarstrand has two brothers and three sisters 
living, all residing in Sweden except the oldest brother, who is in Copen- 
hagen. Aksel L. graduated from the College of Skara and then joined 
his father for several years in his leather factory. Such contracted em- 
ployment did not satisfy him, however, and in 1899 he left home for 
England, being then identified with the large mercantile firm of Lilley & 
Skinner, of London, for three years. Next, he spent some time in Ger- 
many ; passed another year at home, and then started for the United 
States, where at that time he had a brother. Mr. Hammarstrand reached 
Minneapolis July 6, 1903 ; then spent two years at Duluth and in prospect- 
ing through the West, with a final return to the city in which he first 
located. The period since has been passed in pushing the interests of the 
Plymouth Clothing House, with which he is now a salesman in the boys' 
department. 

Mr. Hammarstrand's wnfe, to whom he was married since his return 
to Minneapolis, was known by the maiden name of Olga Faller, and was 
at the time a graduate nurse from the Swedish Hospital. She was born 
in Montrose, South Dakota ; lost her mother when but an infant and for 
many years of his life cared for her invalid father, who was a victim of 
chronic rheumatism contracted while engaged in farming during the 

51 



8o2 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

pioneer times of South Dakota. Mr. Faller spent the last eighteen years 
of his Hfe as a bedridden sufferer, during nine years being a patient at 
Bethesda Hospital, where his sufferings were ended July ii, 1908. The 
deceased was a native of Sweden, of Finnish descent, and came to the 
Dakota country early in the seventies. 

Nels Erickson, a resident of Minneapolis since 1905, was born 
March 26, 1863, at Warmland, Sweden, son of Ericson and Christena 
(Jenson) Erickson, and is one of the three of their seven children who 
emigrated to this country. He landed here in 1880, a youth of seventeen, 
equipped with a public-school education obtained in his native land, to 
which he has since added a valuable knowledge gained in the broad school 
of experience. His first work in this country was on the railroad at 
Warren, Minnesota. He spent one year there, two years at Vinson, this 
state, and five years at Crookston, all this time working on the railroad. 
Then he accepted a position as salesman for the McCormick agricultural 
machinery and went to Grand Forks, North Dakota, where he remained 
several years, after which he was sent to South America, in the interest 
of the company, this trip covering a period of about one year. Upon his 
return, he went to Winnepeg, Canada, to introduce machinery for the 
manufacture of cement and concrete products, and has since been in- 
terested in this machinery, his work in the promotion of the industry 
taking him over various portions of the Northwest and gaining for him 
an acquaintance with the leading contractors and builders of this part of 
the country, by whom he is regarded as an expert in his line. He came 
to Minneapolis in 1905, and has since been identified with this city. 

In 1888, Mr. Erickson married Miss Randy Melby, who bore him one 
child, Harry, born in 1889. This wife and mother died in 1896. In 1905, 
he married Miss Etta Johnson, daughter of Nels Johnson, of 'Grafton, 
North Dakota. Fraternally, Mr. Erickson is identified with the orders, 
Woodmen of the World, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

John Johnson was born near Lund, in Sweden, December 2, 1865, 
but the greater part of his business career has been spent in the United 
States and he is now one of the leading liverymen in Minneapolis. His 
father, John Johnson, Sr., was for many years the foreman of a very 
large estate in Sweden. The son attended the public schools of his native 
land, and coming to the United States in 1891 he located first at Win- 
throp, Minnesota, and worked for several months on a farni near that 
city. For two years he was employed in the woods at lumbering and on 
the railroad, and then coming to Minneapolis he secured work in a livery 
stable here. Ambitious and resolute, he applied himself diligently to the 
business at hand and after nine months was able to rent the barn from his 
employer and thus entered upon his successful career as a liveryman. 
After eight years as a renter he bought the barn and now has one of the 
largest and best equipped livery stables in the entire Northwest, his barn 




-?^^?s-' 





^ //^^--tU-iyu^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 805 

being large and well arranged and his carriages and horses are of the 
best. ?Ie furnishes employment to from twelve to fifteen workmen. Mr. 
Johnson entered upon his business career without money or influential 
friends, and his success is due entirely to his own energy, persistent labor 
and close attention to the details of his business, and further than this 
he is honorable and upright in all his dealings, and commands the respect 
and confidence of a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 

He was married on Thanksgiving Day of 1895 to Christena Ander- 
son, a native daughter of his own country, where she was also reared and 
educated, and they have three children, Edward, Clarence and Howard. 
Mr. Johnson is a member of the Metropolitan Society and the Mystic 
Circle, and he is an active member in the Swedish Baptist church. 

John A. Nelson. — In the field of industrial or commercial activity 
opportunity is almost limitless, and along these lines John A. Nelson has 
been constantly advancing until he now occupies a splendid position in 
the business circles of Minneapolis. Coming from his native land of 
Sweden to the United States as a lad of eighteen in 1882, he made his 
way directly to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and without means he for two 
years worked at any honorable employment that he could find. He then 
secured work with A. G. Parkhurst, who had built up a splendid repu- 
tation in business in paving and concrete work, and during his nine 
years' connection with that gentleman Mr. Nelson became very proficient 
in the business, learning thoroughly its every detail. In the spring of 
1893 he purchased the interest of Mr. Parkhurst and started in for 
himself, forming a partnership with his brother, Neal J. Nelson. This 
firm, known under the name of the Nelson Brothers Sidewalk Companv, 
not only maintained the excellent reputation of its predecessor in busi- 
ness, but they at the same time greatly enlarged its scope, and in 1904 
they admitted into the firm Harvey B. Smith, since which time business 
has been carried on under the name of the Nelson Brothers Paving & 
Construction Company. Their main office is at 226 South Fourth street, 
Minneapolis, and their business, now one of the most prominent of its 
kind in the entire Northwest, has grown to enormous proportions and 
furnishes employment to from one hundred and twenty-five to one hundred 
and fifty workmen. Their trade is not confined to the Twin Cities, but 
extends through the northwestern states to and including that of Michi- 
gan, the middle West, including Indiana, and as far south as the state 
of Florida. Their work is excellently done, performed entirely by con- 
tract, and the rapid growth of their trade is an indication of their 
straightforward manner of dealing. 

John A. Nelson, the senior member of the Nelson Brothers Con- 
struction Company, was born at Halland, Sweden, March 7, 1864. His 
father, Nels Nelson, a farmer in that country, died in 1906. The son 
John A. obtained his education in the public schools of his native town, 
and as above stated came to the United States when eighteen years of 



8o6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



age. He married, in 1893. Aliss Emma Peterson, from Wilmar, Minne- 
sota, but she died in the spring following her marriage. On the 21st of 
October, 1896, he wedded Ella Johnson, and they have four children, 
Melville J., Eulalia E., Luciel A., and Douglas A. Mr. Nelson is a 
member of Albert Pike Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at Hopkins, Minnesota 
and of the Swedish Baptist church. 

Arvid Idoff Linden, who is identified with the business of the W.. 
K. Morrison Company, Minneapolis, is a native of Sweden, born in 
Strofvelstorp, Skane, on the 3rd of July, 1882. His parents are P. R. 
and Caroline (Lindblad) Linden, his father, who was born in 1857, being 
the present executive clerk in the paper mills at Stromsnas. The mother 
is a native of Fagerhult, Skane, daughter of a school teacher and a lady 
of refined and strong character. The seven children of the parental fam- 
ily were as follows: Arvid I., of this sketch; Hugo, who was born in 
1884 and is now a farmer in Alberta, Canada; Per, born in 1885 and an 
engineer in the Swedish navy; Emilia, born in 1886, who is living with 
her parents in Sweden and preparing herself for a high school teacher ; 
Oscar, who was born in 1889 and is working under his father in the 
office of the Stromsnas paper mill ; Otto, born in 1893 and still a pupil 
living at home; and Anna, born in 1895, who is also attending school and 
living with her parents. 

After completing his course in the public schools, Arvid spent two 
years in a business college and then entered the employ of Kristenson & 
Eliason, hardware merchants of Stromsnas, to which place his father had 
removed with his family after having conducted a business in Markryd 
for some thirteen years. In 1902 the young man came to America, locat- 
ing at Hancock, Minnesota, and working as a book-keeper in ^ lumber 
office for a year and a half. A desire for more independence induced him 
to establish himself in the commission business at that point and he con- 
tinued in that line until he located in ]Minneapolis in 1904. His first posi- 
tion there was as manager of the Columbia Restaurant, and after continu- 
ing thus for a year and a half he accepted the responsibilities of general 
order clerk with W. K. Morrison Company, having since discharged his 
duties with precision, promptness, fidelity and general ability. He resides 
at 821 Eighteenth avenue. North. 

Anders Thorsten Hammarstrand, 4712 Xerxes avenue, South, 
Minneapolis, was born August 7, 1886, in Jonkoping, Sweden. On his 
paternal side, the family history can be followed back to the middle of the 
sixteenth century. His father, the late State Veterinary Surgeon, Axel 
Vilhelm Hammarstrand, was born September 21, 1836. and died October 
21, 1907. He was a son of Anders Hammarstrand, who conducted a tan- 
nery and leather business in Skara, Sweden. 

On his mother's side, Mr. Hammarstrand can trace his genealogy to 
the unfortunate King Eric XIV of Sweden, this descent being from 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 807 



Lavinia, the illegitimate daughter of the king, and a daughter of the mer- 
chant Per i Porten. Lavinia was educated by the Princess Cecilia Vasa 
and was richly endowed by the king. The mother of Mr. Hammarstrand, 
Emelie Charlotta (ncc Palmgren) was born in 1847 and is still living. 
Her father, E. P. Palmgren, owner of the paper mills at Katrinefors, Ves- 
tergotland, died in 185 1. Axel V. Hammarstrand and his wife had two 
other sons besides Anders T., and two daughters, of whom only one is 
living — Nils Verner Hammarstrand, who was born May 10, 1878, and is 
an architect and constructing engineer in Jonkoping, Sweden. He mar- 
ried Signa Salven, and has three children, two daughters and a son. 

After receiving his primary education in a private school, Anders T., 
at the age of ten years, entered the collegiate high school of Jonkoping, 
where he spent five years, at the end of that time being sent to college 
in Lund, the university of southern Sweden, where he graduated in 1906. 
He was then engaged by the Swedish Life Insurance Company Trygg, in 
which his brother-in-law, Adolf af Jochnick, is one of the directors, and 
general manager. In different capacities, the young man remained with 
this company until February, 1908. During the summer of that year 
he completed his compulsory military service with Svea Lifgarde, Stock- 
holm. In the meantime his brother-in-law, af Jochnick, had made inqui- 
ries with the view of ascertaining where the young man could secure the 
best education in life insurance, with the result that he came to America 
and became identified with the Prudential Life Insurance Company. Leav- 
ing Sweden in October, 1908, he landed at Newark, New Jersey, after a 
voyage of ten days, and was at once set to work. Desiring to learn the 
business and work his way up from the bottom, at his own request he 
was sent out "in the field," after having spent a week in the office at 
Newark. Going to Philadelphia, he started in as an agent, and remained 
there until April 28, 1909, when he was promoted to the position of assist- 
ant superintendent and transferred to Minneapolis, with ofifice in the 
Bank of Commerce Building. Mr. Hammarstrand is a member of the 
Swedish Society Par Briscoll. 

ViLHELM RuNDQuiST, head of the cutting department of the Rydell 
Clothing Company of Minneapolis, and one of the most expert and artis- 
tic tailors in the city, is also a fine type of the industrious, straightforward 
and progressive Swedish-American. He is a native of Fryksende parish, 
Vermland, Sweden, Avhere he was born June 8, 1873, ^"c^ where his 
father was a well known painter. He is a son of Magnus Anderson and 
Regina Rundquist, and both are residing in Stromnas, Engermanland, 
whither they moved with their family in 1887. The six children in the 
household, besides Vilhelm R., were: Hulda, who was born in 1885 and 
died in 1907; Victor, born in 1888, who is now employed in a sash and 
door factory in Hernosand, Sweden ; Verna, born in 1887, who is living 
with her parents in the motherland; Maria, born in 1890, who married 



8o8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in Stromnas, Sweden ; and Theresa, born in 1889, who is also Hving with 
her parents; as well as Jacob, born in 1891. 

\^ilhelm attended the public school of his native place until he was 
fourteen years of age, when he was apprenticed to a tailor in Stockholm, 
afterward following his trade as a journeyman until his emigration to the 
United States in 1892. In December of that year he arrived in Luding- 
ton, Michigan, where he was employed on high-grade work until 1896. 
He then located in Minneapolis, where his position in the trade was fur- 
ther advanced by his connection with the leading tailors doing business as 
the Rydell Clothing Company ; as stated, he has been advanced to the 
responsible position of superintendent of its cutting department, on whose 
expertness and taste virtually depend the attractiveness and general mer- 
chantability of the goods sent forth by the house. 

Mr. Rundquist wedded Miss Alma Bergstrom, born in the year 1875 
and a daughter of Charles Bergstrom. deceased. Another daughter mar- 
ried G. E. Rydell, head of the clothing company which bears his name 
and with which Mr. Rundquist is so prominently identified. In winter the 
families make their home together at 1627 Twenty-second avenue. North, 
but in summer Mr. Rundquist resides at Carmen's Bay, Spring Park 
Station, Lake Minnetonka. 

Otto Emil Anderson. — It may well be said of Otto Emil Ander- 
son, who is well known to the Swedish-American public through his 
able contributions to literature, both in English and in his native ver- 
nacular, that he is one who has "come within sight of the castle of his 
dreams" and has found pleasure and afforded pleasure through his 
many able productions in both prose and verse. To Swedish /\mericans 
throughout the Union he is better known under his nom-de-plumes of 
"Otto," "Viftaren," "Magdalena," and "Kalle Petterson." As podt, 
humorist and literary connoisseur he has entertained thousands of per- 
sons through his contributions to Swedish-American newspapers and 
periodicals. He has maintained his home in the city of Minneapolis 
for more than a quarter of a century and here is held in affectionate 
regard by the many worthy citizens who claim the same nationality or 
descent as does he himself. 

Otto E. Anderson was born at Norrkoping, Sweden, on the 17th 
of May. 1867, and by reason of having been the eighth in order of birth 
in the family of ten children he was baptized under the name of Otto 
(den attonde). He figures as the only representative of the imme- 
diate family in America. His father, johan August Andersson, was 
born in Ostergotland, Sweden, in 1831, and was for many years a fore- 
man in a woolen mill in Norrkoping, where he continued to reside until 
his death. His wife, Carolina (Westerberg) Andersson, was born at 
Ostra Eneby, Ostergotland, Sweden, and is still living, now venerable 
in vears. The religious faith of the family in Sweden is that of the 
Lutheran church. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 809 



As a boy Mr. Anderson was known as an apt pupil, showing ready 
power of absorption and assimilation, but that he was not lacking in 
the traits of the "real boy" is evident from the fact that he gained repu- 
tation as the mischievous youngster of his class, thus proving, no doubt, 
more or less a "thorn in the flesh'' of his patient instructors. Among 
his schoolmates he gained the title of "Brorse Lincjuist" (nick-name). 
Concerning his early career the following statements, previously pub- 
lished, are well worthy of reproduction in this connection, only slight 
paraphrase being made : 

"At the age of eight years Mr. Anderson surprised his parents one 
morning with his first composition, which he sung as he stood in bed 
dressing himself, and this one was followed in the evening by another, 
as a concomitant of the ceremony of undressing for slumber. Those 
verses are still treasured by other members of the family. At the age 
of twelve he was compelled to leave school and go to work. He first 
found employment in the large woolen mill in which his father was a 
foreman at the time. Imbued with ambition to learn a trade, Mr. 
Anderson soon left the mill and entered a wall paper factory, but he 
soon found, to his great sorrow, that he had jumped from the ashes 
into the fire. The foreman of the factory was a man of most bibulous 
habits, and young "Brorse," as he had been termed by his schoolmates, 
was, against his own will, used as a messenger to bear the desired 
intoxicants between the saloon and the factory. If he refused this 
service the foreman administered to him a severe chastisement. One 
day, bottle in hand, he ran right into the arms of the owner of the 
factory, was called into the office, refused to implicate his foreman, and 
left the place. He soon afterward secured a new place as clerk in the 
store of J. F. Sodergren, in whose employ he continued until the i6th 
of April, 1884, when he severed the ties that bound him to home and 
native land and set forth to seek his fortunes in America. His forti- 
fication for the trip to the United States was most meager in a financial 
way, and after landing in New York City he straightway set forth for 
Minneapolis, having only his ticket and fifty cents in money. In this 
city he has resided during the long intervening years, with the excep- 
tion of a few months spent in his native land, in the winter of 1892-3." 

^Nlany years ago Mr. Anderson wrote, in prose and verse, a record 
of his boyhood days, under the title of "The Adventures of Brorse 
Linquist," and the same was published in the Svcnska Amerikanska 
Postal, of Minneapolis. Under the same title, in 1909, he published 
a most interesting two-act comedy. As a dramatist Mr. Anderson has 
gained no insignificant reputation, and it may be noted that his illus- 
trated comic lecture, "The Adventures of the Johnson Family," has 
been presented on the stage from time to time in Minneapolis and else- 
where, as have also his Swedish-American "Magdalena" stories and 
verses. Mr. Anderson has published three books, "Pa Lediga Stun- 
der" (Idle Hours), in verse, 1896; "I Skumrasket" (At Sunset), in 



8io SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

prose and verse, 1902; and "Svenska Latar" (Swedish Ditties), giving 
much of the Swedish history in verse, in 1910. 

From the article to which recourse has already been made are 
taken the following pertinent statements: 

"During the first years of his residence in America Mr. Anderson 
was compelled to 'make a stab' at anything and everything th»t_ offered 
a means of livelihood, but he finally found a vocation to his liking, and 
for a score of years worked as traveling agent, collector and cor- 
respondent for Swedish newspapers. For more than a decade past he 
has been busily engaged in securing subscribers for Svenska Folkcts 
Tidning, published in ^linneapolis, and has been very successful in the 
work, in connection with which he has friends everywhere that 'Viftaren' 
is a familiar visitor. Now and then he has, in different papers, published 
his laughing letters from 'Magdalena to Chale Peterson,' and vice versa, 
and his' contributions signed under his pseudonyms of 'Viftaren,' 'Mag- 
dalena' or 'Otto', are sure winners. Time and again his verses and 
other contributions have been published in some of the leading news- 
papers in Sweden .and in other publications in America. Being an 
extensive traveler, Mr. Anderson has perhaps more personal acquaint- 
ances among the masses of the Scandinavians in this country than any 
other Swedish-American writer. He has contributed to nearly every 
Swedish-American paper, both in prose and verse, and for the last ten 
years has been a regular contributor practically every week to the 
paper of which he has been a representative and of which mention has 
just been made. He is often called upon to write verses in connection 
with various social functions, and his personal presence is ever grati- 
fying to his host of admiring friends." 

^In politics Mr. Anderson gives his allegiance to the Repubhcaii 
party and while he is not formally identified with any religious organi- 
zation his views are in harmonv with the tenets of the Unitarian church. 

In the city of Minneapolis, on the 25th of August, 1888, Mr. 
Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Hulda Josephina Johansson, 
who was born in Ulricehamn, Sweden, being a daughter of Karl Johan 
and Maria Christina (Andersson) Johansson. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
became the parents of eight children, all of whom were born in Minne- 
apolis, and of the number all are living except one. Their names, with 
respective dates of birth, are here entered : Carl Johan Emil, February 
13, 1889: Hulda CaroHna Maria. September 12, 1890 (died December 
28, 1890); Blenda Josephina Emelia. April 22, 1892; Alice Jenny 
Amanda, November 17, 1894; Ruth Ingeborg Maria, January 17, 1897; 
Hulda Linnea Carolina, July 24, 1899; Otto Lennart, May 8. 1902; 
and Ernest Martin, February 10, 1906. 

GusTAF WiLHELM Olson.— A man of versatile talents, energetic and 
enterprising, Gustaf Wilhelm Olson is a thorough master of the art 
preservative, having the reputation of being one of the most expert 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 813 



printers in the Northwest, and has occupied a noteworthy position as a 
director and the vice-president of the Hahn & Harmon Company, of 
MinneapoHs. A son of Sven and Sissa (Trulsdotter) Olson, he was 
born, April 7, 1876, in Harlunda parish, Smaland, on a farm. 

vSven Olson came to America with two of his sons, John M. and 
Gustaf W., in 1888, and for four years worked in Minneapolis. Return- 
ing then to his native land, he has since been a resident of Sweden. 
His wife died in 1903. They were the parents of eight sons, six of 
whom are now living, namely : John M., engaged in farming at Kelsey, 
Minnesota ; Gustaf W. ; Carl Henrik, a country merchant in Sweden ; 
August, a farmer at Meadowlands, Minnesota ; Emil, assisting his father 
in the management of the old homestead ; and Otto, who is employed in 
agricultural pursuits in Minnesota. 

Coming w'ith his father and oldest brother to Minnesota when 
twelve years old, Gustaf Wilhelm Olson spent a year and a half in Vasa, 
Goodhue county, where he attended the public schools two terms. Coming 
to Minneapolis in the fall of 1889, he served an apprenticeship at the 
printer's trade, in the meantime continuing his studies at the evening 
schools. He subsequently worked six months on the Szvcnska Ameri- 
kanska Postcii, then served three years in the ofifice of the Rornanhladet. 
When sixteen years old he was made foreman of the Missionhladet, for 
two years having charge of its mechanical department. In the fall of 
1894, in partnership with Albert Sjostrand, a fellow-compositor, under 
the firm name of Olson & Sjostrand, he started a job printing office, and 
succeeded so well that in 1898 he bought out his partner's interest and 
continued the business alone. In 1899 Mr. Olson unfortunately had a 
severe illness, during which the business ran down to such an extent 
that he had to sell out the stock, the greater part of which went to 
Svenska Folkets Tidning. 

Mr. Olson then entered the employ of Hahn & Harmon, printers, 
and remained as foreman of their jobbing office from 1899 until 1902, 
when he accepted a position as advertising manager with the Minnesota 
Stats Tidning. in St. Paul. He was very successful, but at the end of a 
year was offered a better position with Hahn & Harmon, with whom he 
was again associated, this time remaining from February, 1903, until 
January, 1904. At that time Mr. Olson started a business of his own 
as head of the firm of G. W. Olson & Company, and five months later, on 
May I, 1904, his company became consolidated with the firm of Hahn 
& Harmon, and was incorporated under its present name of "Hahn & 
Harmon Company," of which Mr. Olson was a member of the direc- 
torate and vice-president. This company erected a new and commodious 
building on Fifth avenue. South, and since March I, 1909, have occupied 
it, and are now carrying on one of the most extensive printing establish- 
ments in the state, their patronage being large and lucrative. In his 
capacity of superintendent of the printing office, Mr. Olson has won 
much praise and established an extended reputation for skilful and artistic 



8i4 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



work. In 1897 he was commissioned as correspondent for a leading 
printing trades journal at the Industrial Exposition at Stockholm and 
spent the summer in Europe, visiting his old home and the leading 
industrial centers. 

In 1899 Mr. Olson married Tillie Olson, who was born at Vasa, 
Minnesota, February 22, 1876, a daughter of John A. and Anna (Pers- 
dotter) Olson, who came to IMinnesota from Kiaby, Christianstad, 
Sweden. The mother died in 1907, but the father is still living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Olson have three children, namely : Vendela Svanhild Annette, 
born August 9, 1900; Goodwin Wendell, born November 25, 1901 ; and 
Carol Vernon, born September 28, 1903. Religiouslv Mr. Olson and his 
familv are members of St. Paul's Swedish Lutheran church, in which he 
was confirmed in 1890, and of which he has since been an active member, 
having served as deacon the past twelve years, and as superintendent of 
the Sunday School for a long time. Mr. Olson is also a member of the 
Swedish Hospital Association, now serving his second term on the 
board, which he has served as secretary since his election, and at present 
has full charge of the hospital. Fraternally he belongs to the Royal 
Arcanum. In 1905 Mr. Olson built a beautiful home for himself and 
family at No. 3344 Tenth avenue. South. 

Mr. Olson has always taken a great interest in church music and 
was instrumental in introducing "Kyrkosangen," a quarterly music 
journal, for the Augustana Synod of America. He was also influential 
in securing a fine pipe organ for St. Paul's church, getting a contribution 
of $1,500 from Andrew Carnegie for the purpose. In 1908 he was a 
candidate for the Republican nomination for alderman from the Seventh 
ward, and at the primaries received a handsome majority of- the votes 
cast, but was defeated at the polls by the small majority of fifteen votes, 
largely through the trickery and libel of his political opponents. 

Fredrik M. Nelson. — Bringing to this country the habits of indus- 
try and thrift characteristic of his Swedish ancestors, Fredrik M. Nelson 
has made practical use of the lessons learned in his youth, and through 
his own efforts has attained a position of note among the successful 
business men of the enterprising city of INIinneapolis, being now man- 
ager and secretary of the National Cut Glass Company, a compara- 
tively new organization, giving rich promise of a prosperous future. 
A son of Nels Olson, he was born, December 3, 1870, in ^layneskog, 
Vermland, Sweden. 

Nels Olson is still living in the land of his birth, being actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in the parish of Brunskog, Tofdal. 
He has been "twice married. He married first Kajsa Erickson, who 
died in 1900. Four sons were born to them, namely: Andres, deceased; 
Fredrik M.. the subject of this sketch; Enoch F.. engaged in farming 
in North Dakota ; and Gustaf Olof, who, on account of ill health, is 
living in Monrovia, California. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 815 



Fredrik M. Nelson was educated in his native parish, and was 
there confirmed in the Lutheran church. After confirmation he remained 
at home for two years, but being of a venturesome spirit, and anxious 
to avail himself of every opportunity to improve his material prospects, 
he emigrated to America before he was seventeen years of age, arriving 
in Alexandria, Minnesota, on June 13, 1887. Remaining there five 
years, he found employment on a farm during the first three years, the 
next two years serving as a clerk in the establishment of Kortsch, 
Hardy & Hiebel. Wishing then to broaden his field of action, he came 
to Minneapolis, found employment in the department store of the Chi- 
cago Store Company, of which Mr. Holtzermann was the manager, 
remaining with him two years. Being then stricken with typhoid fever, 
he had a long and serious illness, for nearly a year being confined in a 
hospital. The following twelve months Mr. Nelson was general sales- 
man for the S. E. Olson Company. Desiring then to try his luck at 
mining, he started for Alaska in 1898, going first to Edmonton, and 
from there north by various rivers to Fort Simpson, thence southwest 
to the McDame district, the oldest gold-mining region in the Northwest 
Territory. After prospecting perseveringly for seventeen months he 
became somewhat discouraged and returned to Seattle. Washington, 
where for seven months he was connected with the department store 
of O. W. Peterson & Brothers. In the spring of 1900 Mr. Nelson 
again took up his residence in Minneapolis, and at once entered the 
employment of the New England Furniture and Carpet Company, having 
charge of their linen and bedding department. Five months later he 
was promoted to the position of manager and buyer, and served faith- 
fully and ably as such for eight years. Leaving that concern, Mr. 
Nelson embarked in the business of manufacturing cut glass, becoming 
secretary and manager of the National Cut Glass Company. On July 
2, 1909, he sold his interest in the National Cut Glass Company to Mr. 
J. C. Elzy, of St. Paul. On the first of September following Mr. Nelson 
bought the Invincible Renovator Sales Company, together with the Elec- 
tric Carpet and Rug Company, of which he is treasurer. The offices are 
at 67 South Tenth street, Minneapolis. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1895, Anna Olson, who was born, November 
20, 1871, in Brunskog, Vermland, Sweden, and came to this country in 
1886. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have two children, namely : Myrtle Hazel, 
born November 2y, 1897; and Frances Lorraine, born January 15, 
1901. Taking an active part in political affairs, Mr. Nelson was the 
leading spirit in organizing the Swedish-American League, which he 
served as president for two years, when he resigned. It was during 
his tenure of office, and chiefly through his efiforts, that the large hall 
known as the Twelfth Ward Republican Hall was erected, at a cost 
of $4,700. He has never, however, been an aspirant for political favors. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Order of Vasa, of the Modern Wood- 



8i6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



men of America, and of the Odin Club. Religiously he and his family 
are members of the Swedish Evangelical Bethany church. 

John W. Lindstrom. — It is indeed a "far cry" from the position 
of a farmer lad in one of the staunch little parishes of the fair Norseland 
to that of one of the able and representative members of the architectural 
profession in the great city of Minneapolis, and yet this transformation 
essentially stands indicatory of what has been accomplished by him 
whose name initiates this review and who is recognized as one of the 
skilled and successful architects of the state of Minnesota, in which con- 
nection he is senior member of the firm of Lindstrom & Almars. Mr. 
Lindstrom has been in a significant sense the artificer of his own fortunes 
and has won success and prestige through worthy and well directed 
efforts. In the land of his adoption he has honored the land of his 
nativity, and he is well entitled to consideration in this history touching 
the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota. 

Mr. Lindstrom was born in Edsvara parish, Vestergotland, Sweden, 
on the 9th of April, 1874, and is the fourth in order of birth of the eight 
children born to Svante and Christina (Abrahamson) Johanson, both of 
whom still reside on their old homestead farm in Sweden. Of the eight 
children five are living and of the number the only representative in 
America is he whose name initiates this article. John W. Lindstrom 
was reared under the sturdy discipline of the home farm and is indebted 
to the public schools of his native parish for his early educational advan- 
tages. He continued to be associated in the work and management of 
the parental farmstead until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, 
when his ambition led him to sever the gracious home ties and. set forth 
to make for himself a place of independence as a citizen of the great 
American republic. Accordingly, in 1891, the sturdy, alert and cleter- 
mined voung man came to America, landing in New York City in the 
month of June. He had courage and manifested marked facility in the 
directing of ways and means toward the accomplishment of desired ends. 
Though industrious and willing to work assiduously, Mr. Lindstrom was 
not one to become a mere plodder, for he formulated definite plans and 
directed his energies in such a way as to make definite progress toward 
the desired goal. He remained in the state of New York until 1900, in 
the meanwhile finding occupation as a cabinetmaker during the daytime. 
His evenings and other leisure moments he devoted to the study of Eng- 
lish and other subjects, among the most important of which was archi-, 
tecture, for which "he had a natural taste and predilection and to which 
ancient scientific art he had finally determined to turn his attention as a. 
vocation. In 1900 Mr. Lindstrom left the old Empire state and made his 
' way westward, finally settling in Rockford, Illinois, where he followed 
the cabinetmaker's trade in furniture factories until 1902, in March of 
which year he came to Minnesota and took up his residence in Minne- 
apolis. In the meanwhile he had continued hi? study of architecture 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 817 



with all of earnestness and appreciation, and had gained distinctive tech- 
nical skill and scientific ability in the connection. Upon his arrival in 
Minneapolis he readily secured employment as an architectural drafts- 
man, and he changed from firm to firm, for the sake of broadening his 
experience and professional facility, until 1904, when he found himself 
admirably fortified for independent work as an architect. He therefore 
engaged in the work of his chosen profession, and he continued his 
business in an individual way until 1906, when he admitted to partner- 
ship in the same Ora W. Williams, who came to Minneapolis from 
Cleveland, Ohio. Under these conditions the firm name of Lindstrom & 
Williams was adopted, and this alliance continued until the spring of 
1907, when the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Lindstrom then became 
associated in a professional alliance with Joseph Almars, under the present 
title of Lindstrom & Almars. Through recognized ability and careful 
and reliable business methods this firm has built up a large and pros- 
perous enterprise, and the same is constantly expanding in scope and 
importance. The business of the firm is largely in connection with 
designing and supervising the erection of private residences and apart- 
ment houses of the best modern type, and the best evidence of the skill 
of the Messrs. Lindstrom and Almars is that offered in the many fine 
buildings erected under the direction and according to plans and speci- 
fications drawn by them. Mr. Lindstrom has achieved a worthy success 
and is an enthusiast in his profession, to which he gives his undivided 
attention. His advancement is the more interesting to contemplate from 
the fact that it represents the direct results of his own powers and efforts, 
and his career since coming to America as a youth, dependent upon his 
own resources, offers both lesson and incentive to other aspiring young 
men. His loyalty to the land of his adoption is of the most insistent 
and appreciative tvpe and as a citizen he is liberal, progressive and public- 
spirited, the while he has gained and retained uniform confidence and 
esteem in the city in which he has elected to establish his home. 

In politics Mr. Lindstrom is found aligned as a stanch supporter of 
the cause of the Republican party. He is a valued member of the North 
Star Society, the Odin Club and the Minneapolis Architectural Club ; 
and both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church, in which 
he was confirmed in his native land. 

On the 3rd of April. 1907, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Lindstrom to Miss Nellie C. Johnson, who was born in Faratorp Norre- 
gard, Annerstad parish, province of Smaland, Sweden, on the 24tli of 
June, 1881, and who is a daughter of Johan and Catharina Peterson, 
who still reside in Sweden. Of the eleven children seven are living and 
three of the number represent the family in America. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lindstrom have one child, Gina Catherine Marie, who was born on the 
27th of January, 1908. They own and occupy an attractive residence at 
1932 Kenwood parkway, and the same is a center of generous hospitality. 

52 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



The Allen Family. — One of the stanch and essentially representa- 
tive Swedish-American families of the state of Minnesota is that to 
which this brief sketch is dedicated. Its members have been zealous and 
productive workers in various lines of enterprise and in professional life, 
and the name stands exemplar of leal and loyal citizenship and sterling 
integrity of purpose. Four brothers of the name have lent honor to the 
same in Minnesota, and each has attained to success of worthy order. 
Earnest application, industry, ambition and alert mentality have in each 
instance combined to make of success not an accident but a logical result, 
and such is the status of those who now represent the family in this state 
that there is all of consistency in here making perpetual record concerning 
their lives and labors. Each of the children who has taken up his abode 
in Minnesota was born at the old family homestead farm named Guder- 
smala, in Algutsboda parish, Smaland, Sweden, where the father was a 
prosperous farmer and manufacturer of wall paper — a man of promi- 
nence and influence, honored by all who knew him. The old homestead 
of the family in Varend, a section of the province of Smaland that has 
sent many sterling representatives to the great state of Minnesota, in 
whose civic and industrial development those of Swedish birth and lineage 
have played an important part. Carl Johan Jonason and Erika (nee 
Gustafson), parents of the four Allen brothers who have so worthily 
represented the family in Minnesota, were scions of stanch lineage in the 
province of Smaland, where the father continued to be identified with the 
great basic industry of agriculture until his death ; his cherished and 
devoted wife, who is now venerable in years, was born on the i8th of 
June, 1839, and now makes her home with her children in Minneapolis. 
Of the five sons and five daughters three of the sons and three daughters 
are living. 

Frank Oscar Allen, the eldest son, was born on the old homestead, 
on the 13th of October, 1861, and was reared and educated in his native 
province. He came to America in 1880 and for a number of years there- 
after he maintained his home in Minnesota, whence he removed to Seattle, 
Washington, where he and his wife now reside. On the 21st of Sep- 
tember, 1896, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Josephine Johanson, 
of Algutsboda, Sweden. 

John Gottfrid Allen, the second son, became one of the successful 
and popular real estate and insurance men of Minneapolis, and his death 
occurred on the 26th of January, 1910. He succumbed to an attack of 
heart failure, having been sojourning at West Palm Beach, Florida, at 
the time of his death. He was born on the old homestead, on the 23d 
of August, 1863, and was educated in the public schools of his native 
parish. After leaving school he continued to be associated with the 
work of the home farm and also that of the wall paper factory conducted 
by his father until 1880, in which year he came to America. He arrived 
in Minnesota in May of that year and soon afterward secured work on a 
farm. In 1885 he took up his residence in the city of St. Paul, where he 



^'^^^0 



.."^rr 



^"^r/ 






'^\, 




^Avlf'^ii 



•*'^JS^/ 




' "<::'^^o. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 821 

engaged in the hotel business, in which he continued, as the proprietor of 
a modest estabhshment, until 1890, when he formed a partnership with 
Gus Broberg, of Chicago, and established a general land, steamship and 
immigration agency in St. Paul. Five years later he purchased his part- 
ner's interest in the enterprise, which he thereafter continued in an indi- 
vidual way for the ensuing five years, at the expiration of which, in 1901, 
he removed to Minneapolis, where he established himself in the real 
estate and insurance business, in which he continued successfully until 
the time of his death. He handled a large amount of farm land and city 
property during his identification with this line of business and gained 
precedence as one of the substantial and reliable business men of the city 
and state, the while he ever commanded the unqualified confidence and 
esteem of all who knew him. He was a man of sterling attributes of 
character, generous and whole-souled, and he gained a wide circle of 
valued and loyal friends in the "Twin Cities" and throughout the North- 
west. His devotion to his family was of the deepest order, and in the 
sacred precincts of the home his death came as an irreparable loss and 
a source of deepest bereavement. He was an appreciative member of 
the Masonic fraternity, in which he received the Master Mason and 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite degrees, and was also affiliated 
with the Zurah Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He was also a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Order of Vasa and the Odin Club. He was reared 
in the faith of the Lutheran church, but after taking up his residence in 
Minneapolis he became a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal 
church, both he and his wife identifying themselves with the parish of 
J. V. Alfvegren church, of this denomination. 

On the 3d of September, 1900, John G. Allen was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Cemelia Anderson, daughter of Frank Anderson, a repre- 
sentative citizen of Cumberland, Wisconsin. Mrs. Allen survives her 
husband, as do also their three children — John G., who was born on the 
28th of September, 1901 ; Frances Adeline Erika, who was born on the 
1st of August, 1903; and Florence Catherine, who was born on Christ- 
mas day of the year 1909. 

Johan Ernest Allen, the third of the sons to establish a home in 
America, was born on the old homestead in Sweden, on the 23d of 
October, 1865. After duly availing himself of the advantages of the 
public schools of his native parish and after his confirmation in the 
Lutheran church, he went to Carlskrona, where he served an appren- 
ticeship at the trade of a baker. At the expiration of his apprentice- 
ship he went to the city of Copenhagen, Denmark, where he received 
his diploma as a journeyman at his trade, at which he was there employed 
for some time. In 1887 he came to America and joined his two older 
brothers, of whom mention has just been made in this context. Soon 
after his arrival in the city of St. Paul he secured employment in the 
restaurant conducted by A. Dahlquist, and later he was for two vears an 



822 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



employe in the Washington hotel, in said city. He then removed to 
Tacoma, Washington, where he opened a restaurant and where he con- 
tinued to be thus engaged in business until 1899, when he returned to 
Minnesota and opened a restaurant on Cedar avenue, in the city of 
Minneapolis. Six months later he closed this place and opened a cafe 
at 305 Second avenue. South, where he entered into partnership with his 
younger brother, Gustavus W. On the ist of April, 1901, they engaged 
in the hotel business, in connection with their cafe. In the conducting 
of this hotel they are still associated, and the business is on a substantial 
and profitable basis. Johan E. Allen is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Order of Vasa and the Odin Club, and enjoys unqualified 
popularity in both business and social relations. He is a bachelor and 
resides with his mother and two sisters. 

Gustavus Wilhelm Allen, the youngest of the four brothers, was 
born on the 23d of May, 1872, and received his early education in his 
native land, where also he was confirmed in the church of his fathers. 
In 1888, when sixteen years of age, he joined his three elder brothers 
in St. Paul, Minnesota, where his first employment was that of clerk in 
a general merchandise store. Later he became clerk and general 
assistant in a local hotel, and after retaining this incumbency for one 
and one-half years he entered a business college, in which he was a 
student for the ensuing six months, within which he gained an excellent 
knowledge of business methods and American commercial systems. 
After leaving this institution, in 1891, he became clerk and bookkeeper 
in the St. Paul office of the firm of Gus Broberg & Company, where he 
remained four years, after which he had charge of the firm's Minne- 
apolis office about one year. He then returned to St. Paul, where for 
two years he held the position of chief clerk in the real -estate and 
insurance office of his brother, John G. Allen. He then went to Chicago, 
where he assumed the position of traveling passenger agent for the 
"Beaver Line'' (now known as Canadian Pacific) Steamship Company, 
in connection with which he later became manager of the land and 
colonization department incidentally conducted by the general agent of 
said company. At the expiration of two years Mr. Allen returned to 
Minneapolis, where he associated himself with his brother, Johan E., in 
the cafe business, as has already been noted, and they are now asso- 
ciated in the conducting of the Hotel Allen, which is well known to 
the people of the Northwest and which caters to a large and appreciative 
patronage. 

In 1903 Gustavus W. Allen entered the college of law of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, where he continued his technical studies for four 
years, being graduated as a member of the class of 1906 and duly 
receiving his well earned degree of Bachelor of Laws. In the following 
year he secured from his Alma Mater the degree of Master of Laws. 
Since his graduation he has been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in Minneapolis, where he has built up an excellent business and 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 823 



where he has gained prestige as an able lawyer and well fortified 
counselor. His clientage includes large representation among those of 
his own nationality, and by them he is held in inviolable confidence and 
respect, as is he, indeed, by all who know him in a business, professional 
or social way. Mr. Allen is a life member of the Alumni association of 
his Alma Mater, the University of Minnesota ; he is prominent in 
Masonic circles, having passed the degrees from an Entered Apprentice 
to that of a Super Excellent Master, inclusive ; he also holds membership 
in the adjunct organization, the Order of the Eastern Star, and he is a 
charter member and the first and present district treasurer of the Order 
of Vasa for the state of Minnesota, besides which he is actively identi- 
fied with the West Side Commercial Club, an organization of high civic 
ideals and much productive activity. He holds membership in the 
Lutheran church. 

On the 29th of April, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Gustavus 
W. Allen to Miss Anna S. Owen, a daughter of Willis H. and Josephine 
Owen, of Chicago. Her father (deceased) was an American, and her 
mother, residing in Chicago, was born in Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
have one son, Willis Gustavus, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 
1 6th of July, 1897. 

Of the three living sisters in the Allen family it should be stated that 
Johanna Maria is the wife of Charles Engberg, who is engaged in the 
livery business at Clayton, Wisconsin, and that Mathilda Christina and 
Emma Charlotte reside with their widowed mother in Minneapolis. Of 
the latter it might be said that nature having generously endowed her 
with a sweet, mellow voice, which she is now cultivating under instruc- 
tions of the best vocal teachers in the Northwest, she might in the near 
future surprise her friends by coming out as a fine singer, if not a full- 
fledged prima donna. In any event she has the good wishes of all who 
know her and who admire her perseverance and studiousness displayed 
in the admirable art of music. 

E. Hugo Erickson. — When any absorbing work in a man's life is 
the natural and inevitable result of some keen personal experience, with 
ability and brave determination to keep it in motion and development, so 
charged with vitality is such a project that it is bound to make its endur- 
ing mark in the world. No blow can be so crushing to the energetic, 
conscientious and ambitious man as a misfortune which threatens to 
throw him upon the community as one of its useless and cumbersome 
members ; and brave indeed is the man who rallies from the impending 
blow and from his threatened misfortune wrestles a decisive victory.. 
Although these words are general, up to this point, they have an indi- 
vidual application to the life and business career of E. Hugo Erickson, 
of Minneapolis, who has a most personal reason for the tireless enthu- 
siasm with which he has been perfecting his artificial limb for the past 
sixteen years and building around its manufacture one of the leading: 



824 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



industries of Minneapolis and the greatest establishment of the kind in 
the United States. 

In 1 89 1 Mr. Erickson was an intelligent, sturdy young Swedish 
mechanic of twenty-two, living at St. Paul and employed by the Northern 
Pacific Railroad as an inspector of Pullman sleeping cars. While so 
engaged he was run over and his right leg so badly crushed that an imme- 
diate amputation was found necessary. At the time, to use a stock 
phrase, he felt himself "down and out," and as he lay in bed wondered 
seriously whether the world would ever again have any use for him — a 
man with only one leg. Soon he commenced to have calls from agents 
of artificial limb companies, and gathered from their confident talk that 
he would soon be around as lively as ever — if he used a special make of 
leg. Four months after his accident he commenced to wear an artificial 
leg, but as his stump was short and very sensitive the chafing caused him 
intense agony. After trying six kinds he gave up the last in despair and, 
falling back on his own mechanical ingenuity and sustained determination 
to become again a working, useful member of the community, he labored 
incessantly for nearly two years and evolved the "Slip Socket" artificial 
leg, which he first patented in 1893. Demands for this invention in- 
creased so rapidly that he soon organized the E. H. Erickson Artificial 
Limb Company, and from the initial patent of 1893 until April, 1908, he 
has taken out seven patents for various special features and improvements. 
His large and finely equipped factory gives abundant evidence of the 
ingenuity, lightness, strength, flexibility and general finish of the article 
to whose manufacture it is solely devoted. The most complete facilities 
are also at hand for the scientific fitting of limbs, patients coming from 
all over the United States, Canada and Europe to take advantage of such 
convenience and to consult the enthusiastic and sympathetic "proprietor 
personally. The manufactory is located at No. 12 Washington avenue. 
North, Minneapolis. This extensive business has been established and 
developed without solicitors, through the medium of a handsome cata- 
logue, illustrated in four colors, and a series of cheerful, encouraging 
"printed talks" — all the product of Mr. Erickson's ingenuity, earnestness 
and tactful talents. The value of his invention has not only been recog- 
nized by the remarkable growth of his business, but has been marked by 
the highest awards from three American expositions. The Pan-Ameri- 
can, at Buffalo, awarded it the only gold medal given an artificial leg- 
exclusively, pronouncing his invention the best artificial limb exhibited; 
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition rendered the same unqualified ver- 
dict and awarded him the only grand prize offered on artificial legs and 
sockets, while the Lewis and Clark Exposition also honored his invention 
with the highest award for artificial legs. 

Mr. Erickson is a native of Odeshog, Stora Aby, Ostergdtland, 
Sweden, born on the 9th of September, 1869, his parents being John and 
Christina Ericsson. His father, who died in 1886, was a contractor and 
mill builder, while his mother is living with her son in Minneapolis. In 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 825 



1886, at the age of seventeen years, Mr. Erickson located at St. Paul and 
there he worked for a few months and later was employed by the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, in whose service he received the injury which made him 
a successful manufacturer and, in many respects, a public benefactor as 
well. On May 3, 1890, Mr. Erickson married Miss Mary Lundin, a 
native of Fageras, Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Erickson are proud of their 
two children — Elvira, who is now a young lady eighteen years old, and 
Walter, fifteen years, all at home in their comfortable family residence at 
No. 2600 Third avenue, South, Minneapolis. 

Anders Mandeen was born on a farm in the parish of Bratteborg 
Byarum, near the city of Jonkoping, Sweden, June 26, 1859, and when 
he was but two years of age his parents, Anders Johan and Johanna 
Christina Mandeen, moved to Jonkoping. During twenty-five years the 
father was a policeman there, and the parents yet reside in that cit}\ 
There were seven children in their family, but two daughters, Agda 
Helena and Anna Judith, died many years ago in Sweden, at the ages of 
three and ten years, respectively. Ebba Christina, another daughter died 
in Minneapolis three years ago, the wife of Andrew Dyberg, a grocery- 
man there. Ellen Lovisa and Esther Maria are both married and living 
in Superior, Wisconsin, and a son, Johan William Mandeen, is in Seattle, 
Washington. 

Anders Mandeen grew to mature years in Jonkoping, attending mean- 
while the best schools of that city, and much against his father's wishes 
he finally left school and began work in a wholesale and retail house in 
that city. In 1882 he went to Stockholm and secured a position in the 
office of the Stockholm Stads Bransle. In the spring of 1883 he sailed 
for America, and arriving at New Richland in Waseca county, Minnesota, 
on the 7th of May, 1883, he spent the following three years on his uncle's 
farm. Leaving there, he secured a position in a general mercantile store 
in the city of Waseca, but was obliged to return to the farm on account 
of the death of his uncle and he remained some time as its manager. 
Again leaving the farm, he went to Minneapolis and became a coachman 
for General Netleton, and later served in the same capacity for W^ S. 
Tenney, of the Nelson R. Tenney Company lumber firm. 

In November of 1891 Mr. Mandeen was married to Miss Ebba Al- 
thea Sponberg, born September 17, 1871, in Otisco, Waseca county, Min- 
nesota. Her parents both came from Jokoping, Sweden, in 1869, and 
located in Waseca county, where her mother yet owns the homestead 
farm, and it is conducted by her oldest son. The husband and father died 
twenty-five years ago. Four daughters and a son have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Mandeen, namely : Doris Christina, eighteen years of age ; 
Ruth Tyra Linea, sixteen ; Anders Hilding Bernhard, ten years, and the 
twins, Esther Maria and Ebba IMargaret, were born June 16, 1909. The 
family are members of the Bethlehem Sw^edish Lutheran church, located 
at Fourteenth and Lyndale avenues. Mr. Mandeen also belongs to the 



826 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Norden Lodge Vega, to the Wasa Lodge Runeberg, being a charter mem- 
ber of the latter, and is a member of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. 

Following his marriage Mr. Mandeen became a street car conductor 
and later became associated with the land and immigration business, and 
in the latter capacity he has traveled extensively over this continent. 
He has traveled from Canada to the Gulf many times, and in his wander- 
ings he has met many noted personages and has had many interesting 
experiences. In coming north from Atlanta, Georgia, in 1897, he reached 
Washington, D. C, when that city was making ready for President Mc- 
Kinley's inauguration. Seeking the Minnesota senator, Knute Nelson, 
the latter took Mr. Mandeen to the office of ex-President Cleveland, also- 
to Vice-President Stevenson and Loren Fletcher, the latter a member 
of the House of Representatives. Following these interesting interviews 
Mr. Mandeen went to the home of Washington at Mount Vernon, also 
made a business trip to New York and Philadelphia, stopping at Wil- 
mington, Delaware, to view the First Swedish church there, and returned 
to Washington on the morning of the inauguration and witnessed the- 
grand parade. On the following day and in company with Dr. Carl Swen- 
son, from Lindsborg, Kansas, he called upon Mark Hanna, and also had 
the honor of interviewing President McKinley at the White House as a 
delegate, he thus having the distinction of being a member of the first 
Swedish delegation that waited on that president. Through the influence 
of Dr. Swenson he also witnessed the inaugural ball of President Mc- 
Kinley. Two months after this Mr. Mandeen was with Dr. Swenson in 
Stockholm. Sweden, where, together with the Swedish-American singers, 
he celebrated the Fourth of July on Hasselbacken, where Old Glory waved 
in state. While in that city he also saw many royal personages,' including 
the King of Siam and King Leopold, and was on one occasion in com- 
pany with Christina Nelson. On his return to this country he stopped at 
London, England, four days, and had the pleasure while there of seeing 
her majesty, Queen Victoria. On arriving in America he joined his 
wife, who had remained on the farm with her mother during his absence, 
and he subsequently visited the exposition at Nashville, Tennessee. In 
1900 ]Mr. ]\Iandeen established his office in the Phoenix building in 
Minneapolis, but during the past four years he has been operating in 
western Nebraska, where he is at the head of a splendid settlement of his 
fellow countrymen. His home during the past twelve years has been at 
1 120 Dupont avenue, North, Minneapolis. 

Dr. Oscar Burg, the dentist, with offices now for nearly a dozen 
years at 812 Andrus Building, ]\linneapolis, may well be classed among 
the most popular, progressive and successful of his profession in this 
city. 

Dr. Burg was born, March 15, 1868, at Abbestorp, Ryssby, Kalmar 
Ian, Sweden, son of Borje and Sophia (Olson) Borjeson. Receiving his 





.^<d^^^^^^ (/ S^^chA^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 829 



public school education in his native land, he came to America at the age 
of twenty years. Here he secured for himself an English schooling, and 
then began his studies and experience in his chosen profession at Ash- 
land, Wisconsin. Soon thereafter we find him in Chicago, matriculated 
in the Dental College of Northwestern University, where he obtained his 
professional education. 

Coming to Minnesota in 1898, Dr. Burg took the examination 
required by the State Board of Dental Examiners, and shortly thereafter 
began what quickly grew to be a large and lucrative practice. In 1895 
he married Miss Christine Olson, Malung, Dalecarlia, Sweden, and has 
been blessed with two children: Amy, born in 1897, and Robert, in 
1899. Believing in preserving the health of his interesting family beyond 
peradventure. Dr. Burg owns a summer cottage, which he has improved 
with lavish hand until it is one of the real beauty spots on the breezy 
shores of Lake Minnetonka. The end of each strenuous day in his 
well-appointed city offices find him hurrying towards his country home, 
where he can enjoy the delightful scenery and fresh air, as well as keep 
open house to the special delight of the more intimate friends of this 
hospitable family. 

Frank W. Peterson. — Among the representative business men of 
Swedish nativity who have attained to marked success and gained a se- 
cure place in popular esteem in the city of Minneapolis is he whose name 
heads this sketch, and who owns and conducts a thoroughly metropolitan 
retail drug establishment in the Andrus building. Frank W. Peterson 
was born in Woxtorp, Smaland, on the 17th of June, 1871, and is a son 
of Peter and Martha Anderson, the former of whom passed his entire 
hfe in Sweden, where he died when the subject of this sketch was a 
child. The devoted mother is still living and now resides with a son on 
his well-improved farm near Stacy, Chisago county, Minnesota. Of the 
eleven children eight are living. 

Mr. Peterson is indebted to the excellent public schools of his native 
parish for his early educational discipline and he was confirmed in the 
Lutheran church, of which the family have long been devoted members. 
In 1886, when only sixteen years of age, he immigrated to America and 
forthwith made his way from the national metropolis to Minnesota, 
where he joined relatives in Isanti county. He there remained about one 
and one-half years and during the major portion of this period he attended 
the public schools, realizing the expediency of gaining a definite knowl- 
edge of the English language. Upon leaving that county, he joined his 
elder brother, J. O. Peterson, in Minneapolis, where the latter is now 
successfully engaged in the drug business. Here he continued his studies 
in the public schools for a time and then entered IMinneapolis Academy, 
now known as Minnesota College, in which well-ordered institution he 
was a student for two years. It will thus be seen that his ambition for 
the acquiring of a higher education was one of definite action, but he 



830 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

showed a desire to qualify himself still more thoroughly for the active 
responsibilities of business life in the land of his adoption. With this end 
in view, he was matriculated in the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy, 
where he continued his technical studies for two years, being graduated 
as a member of the class of 1893. He forthwith proved that he had made 
good use of the advantages here afforded him. as he passed the required 
examination before the state board of pharmacy, and that the test must 
have been rigorous is shown in the fact that out of thirty-four persons 
examined at this time only four received diplomas as registered pharma- 
cists, Mr. Peterson being one of this fortunate number. He defrayed 
the expenses of his college course through his own exertions and has ever 
been self-reliant and ambitious, so that his advancement, gained through 
well-directed endeavor, gives him definite right to the proud American 
title — a self-made man. 

After gaining his diploma as pharmacist, Mr. Peterson continued 
to be employed in his brother's drug store at Seven Corners in the city 
of Minneapolis, and he was thus associated with his brother for a total 
of thirteen years. In 1901, upon the completion of the fine, modern 
Andrus building, Mr. Peterson became one of its first tenants, having at 
that time opened a well-equipped drug store on the eighth floor. He had 
the prescience to realize that here was afforded an especially eligible loca- 
tion for a store of the sort, as, almost simultaneously, more than seventy- 
five of the representative physicians of Minneapolis secured quarters in 
the new building, in which they utilized the seventh, eighth and ninth 
floors. That his confidence was well justified is shown in the fact that at 
the present time Mr. Peterson has the largest prescription business of all 
drug establishments in the city and he and one other are the only drug- 
gists in the city who do not handle patent medicines — a statement that 
bears its own significance. The enterprise has been conducted with 
marked discrimination and utmost care by Mr. Peterson and has grown 
steadily in scope and importance as the years have passed, thus giving 
him precedence as one of the successful business men and representative 
druggists of the Minnesota metropolis. He is a valued member of the 
Minnesota State Pharmacists' Association, as well as those of his home 
county and city, besides which he is identified with the Odin Club and 
other representative fraternal and civic organizations. As a specially 
skilled and practical chemist, he has compounded a line of toilet prepara- 
tions under the name of "Sapphine." These products are of unquestion- 
able superiority and purity and have found a wide sale in all sections c. 
the Union, being utilized both in a private way and in a large proportion 
of the first-class barber shops. Both Mr. Peterson and his wife are 
zealous members of the Lutheran church. 

On the 23rd of October, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Peterson to Miss Julia Peterson, daughter of Erik and Mary Peterson, 
of Stockholm, Wisconsin, of which thriving town Erik Peterson was the 
founder. He died a number of years ago, and his widow now maintains 



r 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 833 



her home in Alinneapolis. 'Sir. and Airs. Frank W. Peterson have two 
children — Donald Earl, who was born on the 29th of August, 1902, and 
Florence, who was born on the loth of December, 1908. 

xA.NDREw Olson. — Among, the hopeful and ambitious young men 
who immigrated to America from Sweden, hoping in this land of pleasant 
promise to obtain a firm foothold in the realms of industry, and ere 
many years should pass to here establish a good home for themselves 
and their families, is Andrew Olson, a well-known and successful mer- 
chant tailor and clothier of Minneapolis, Hennepin county. A skilled 
workman, thoroughly versed in the art of tailoring, strictly honest and 
upright in all of his dealings, he has built up a large patronage in this 
city and is eminently deserving of the prosperity now crowning his 
labors, A son of Olof and Amalia Christina (Nesberg) Olson, he was 
born, June 11, 1857, in Brunflo parish, near Ostersund, Sweden. 

The educational advantages offered Mr. Olson as a boy were indeed 
limited, being confined principally to two years at a public school. When 
a lad of but eleven years, he was apprenticed to learn the tailor's trade, 
and under the instruction of his employer became master of the details 
of his occupation. Subsequently, while the state railway was being put 
through Jemtland, his native county, or district, Mr. Olson opened a 
tailoring establishment on his own account, in its management meeting 
with encouraging success. In April, 1882, he followed the tide of emi- 
gration to this country, locating in Anoka, Anoka county, Minnesota, 
where he remained two years. He afterwards went on a circuit, working 
in various places at his trade, including among other cities St. Paul, 
[Minnesota, and Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Returning to Anoka, Mr. Olson, 
in company with his former employer, there carried on a substantial 
business until after the fire, when he sold his interest in the shop and 
stock to his partner, and came to Minneapolis in search of a favorable 
location. In 1885 he opened a merchant tailoring shop at 1007 Wash- 
ington avenue. North, and later moved to 235 Nicollet avenue, com- 
mencing on a rather modest scale, and has now one of the best patronized 
establishments in this part of the city. In 1902 Mr. Olson admitted to 
partnership with himself Mr. A. A. M. Carlson, an expert clothing sales- 
man, moved to 227 Nicollet avenue, added a clothing, and furnishing 
goods department, arid has since carried on an extensive and lucrative 
business both as a merchant tailor and as a dealer in clothing and furnish- 
ing goods, his store being well known and largely patronized. 

On June 3, 1888, Mr. Olson married Lydia Anderson Lindell, who 
was born at Odensala, Sweden, near Ostersund, and they are the parents 
of three children, namely: Bertha Amalia, born February 28, 1889; 
Carl Andrew, born August 3, 1890; and Ellen Christina, born April 23, 
1897. Mr. Olson and his family are Swedish Lutherans in religion, 
belonging to the Bethlehem church, of which he is a trustee. He is 

53 



834 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

likewise a member of the Swedish Hospital Association, of the Odd 
Fellows, and of the Odin Club. Mr. Olson was formerly an officer in 
the State Militia, serving as second lieutenant of Battery B until the 
militia was called, in 1893, to attend the opening of the World's Fair 
in Chicago, when he was forced to resign from the battery on account 
of the pressure of business, which did not admit of his being away. In 
1907 Mr. and Mrs. Olson made a trip to Europe, and in addition to 
visiting, their old home and friends in Sweden travelled through England, 
Scotland, Denmark, Germany, France and Belgium, bringing back_ to 
their home, at No. 2635 Lyndale avenue, memories which will bring 
pleasure to them for years to come. 

Oscar H. Carlson, a successful florist of Minneapolis, was born in 
Sandsjo. Smaland, Sweden, February 16, 1878, and is the son of Carl 
and Hilda (Berggren) Israelson, both now living at Hakonaryd, Smaland. 
They were the parents of seven children, of whom four survive, two sons 
in America, a daughter at jMarcus, Washington, and a daughter in 
Sweden. 

Oscar Carlson received his education in the public schools of his 
native land, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. He embarked 
for the United States in 1892, going to St. Paul, where he spent six years 
in the employ of L. L. May, a prominent florist at that place. He then 
removed to Minneapolis, and for six years was foreman for L. S. 
Donaldson & Company, having charge of the rose section. Mr. Carlson 
made a thorough study of the details of the business with which he was 
connected, and has now started in business on his own account, in part- 
nership with Andrew S. Sandberg, at 1903 Twenty-second avenue. 
Northeast. He has modern methods of cultivating his plants and carry- 
ing on his business, and his enterprise is meeting with well-deserved 
success. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Modern Woodmen of America, St. Anthony Commercial Club and Bos- 
ton Social Club. 

Mr. Carlson married, in 1902. Caroline Tornberg, who was born in 
the neighborhood of Halmstad, Sweden, October i, 1881, and came to 
the United States with her parents. She returned to Sweden with her 
mother, who longed for her native country, but came back to the United 
States and married Mr. Carlson. They have two daughters, namely: 
Margaret Constance, born in 1903, and Dorothy Ruth, born in 1905. 
They reside at 1925 Twenty-second avenue. Northeast. 

Alfred Gustafson, who for fifteen years has conducted a meat 
market at 1003 East Twenty-fourth street, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was 
born January 10, 1862, in Sillerund, Vermland, Sweden. His parents, 
Gustaf and Anna (nee Olson) Anderson, emigrated to this country in 
1884. and passed the rest of their lives and died here. The father was 
a millwright bv trade. In their family were seven children, one of whom 
is deceased. Those living are : Andrew Martin, Nicolaus, Ulrika. Alfred, 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 835 



Anna Lisa, and Mina — all farmers in Clay county, Minnesota, except 
Alfred and Anna Lisa, the wife of Louis Wickmann, a North Dakota 
farmer. Ulrika is the wife of Adolph Gustafson and Mina is the wife of 
Andrew Sundberg. 

Alfred Gustafson was educated in the public schools of Glava, to 
which place his parents moved soon after his birth, and in due time he 
was confirmed in the Lutheran church. After his confirmation he worked 
with his father, at the trade of millwright, until 1882, when he emi- 
grated to America and came to Clay county, Minnesota, where his 
brothers had settled the preceding year, and where, two years later, they 
were joined by the parents and other members of the family. In Clay 
county Alfred spent four years in farm work. Then, in 1886, he came 
to Minneapolis and as coachman went to work for G. S. Barnes, with 
whom he remained eight years. In 1894 he started a meat market busi- 
ness, on his own account, which he has since successfully conducted at 
1003 East Twenty-fourth street. 

July 6, 1896, Mr. Gustafson married Miss Louise Anderson, who 
was born in Stafnas parish, Vermland, September 11, 1864, and they 
have one son, Carl Stuart, born January 31, 1898. Her parents are still 
living in Sweden. Mr. Gustafson resides with his family at 241 1 Elliott 
avenue. The family belong to the Mission Friends Covenant Tabernacle, 
and Mr. Gustafson is a member of the A. O. U. W. and the Royal 
League. 

Rev. John G. Hultkrans. — For many years the Rev, John G. 
Hultkrans has been one of the many efficient laborers in the cause of 
Christianity in Minneapolis, and since 1892 he has been the pastor of the 
Bethlehem Swedish Lutheran church. He is earnest and eloquent in 
his presentation of the truth, and his efforts have been abundantly 
blessed. Rev. Hultkrans was born in Vissnum, Vermland, January 21, 
1857, ^"d his parents were Johannes and Sara (Olson) Goranson, farm- 
ing people. Of their nine children five are now living; the Rev. C. A, 
Hultkrans, superintendent of Bethesda Hospital, of St. Paul ; Mrs. 
Johansson, the wife of the Rev. August Johansson, of Youngstown, Ohio ; 
Elis Goranson, a farmer in Wisconsin ; and Anna Maria, the wife of 
John Mort, a farmer in Wisconsin. The family came from Sweden to 
Lake City, Minnesota, in 1870, and at the end of that year moved to 
Pierce county, Wisconsin, where the husband and father died in 1887, 
the nth of December, and the mother in 1903, on the 30th of September. 

John G. Hultkrans received his early educational training in the 
schools of Sweden and later in those of Wisconsin. In 1879 he entered 
Gustavus Adolphus Academy and graduated therefrom in 1881, and in 
the fall of the same year he matriculated in Augustana College and later 
in the seminary, graduating in 1886. On the 22d of June of the same 
year he was ordained for the ministry at Minneapolis, and during the 
following three years served the church at Titusville, Pennsylvania, and 



836 SWEDISH-AAIERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



then accepting a call from Brainerd, Minnesota, in 1889. He was then 
called to become assistant to the pastor of St. Paul's First Swedish 
Lutheran church as city missionary, and during his stay there organized 
the Emanuel Lutheran church and became its first pastor, and continued 
in that position until in 1892, when he accepted a call from Bethlehem 
Lutheran church of Minneapolis, and has remained its revered pastor 
throughout all the intervening years. 

Rev. Hultkrans was for nine years a member of the board of direc- 
tors of Bethesda Hospital, St. Paul, and acted as secretary of the board 
during all those years. For three years he was chairman of the St. Paul 
district of the Minnesota Conference and for two years chairman of the 
Twin City Pastoral Association. By Governor John Lind he was 
appointed a member of the Reformatory Board of St. Cloud, serving 
until the State Board of Control was instituted and the Reformatory 
Board discontinued. Almost since the days when he left college the 
Rev. Hultkrans has contributed a weekly article to the Minnesota Stats 
Tidning and has published a church paper, Stadsmissionaren, for more 
than seventeen years. He was one of the founders of the Swedish 
Lutheran jMission Society of the Twin Cities, serving as its secretary 
from its organization in 1901 to the year of 1909. This society sent out 
its first missionaries, A. W. Edwins and his wife and Sister Ingeborg 
Nystul, to China in 1905. By an almost unanimous vote the society's 
mission was taken over by the Augustana Synod as its own foreign mis- 
sion in 1908. In 1906 Rev. Hultkrans traveled extensively over Europe, 
visiting England, Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Denmark and every prov- 
ince of Sweden, and during his travels was an interesting correspondent 
to the Minnesota Stats Tidning, and following his return delivered illus- 
trated lectures. He has also traveled extensively in the United States, 
Canada and Mexico. 

Rev. Hultkrans married, in 1886, Miss Hannah Nelson, of Scandian 
Grove, Minnesota, and of the eight children which blessed their marriage 
union the following seven are living: Hilding E., born October 28, 
1889; Edna Florinda, April 20, 1892; Carl Elmer, August 10, 1894; 
Mabel Linnea, December 24, 1896; Esther Adelia, June 22, 1899; Evan- 
gelina ]\Iarie, March 25, 1903; and George Harold, August 28, 1904. 

Otto E. Alving, M. D. — Though Dr. Alving has but recently taken 
up his abode in America, he merits consideration in this volume as one of 
the representative physicians and surgeons of the city of Minneapolis. 
He is a man of exceptionally fine professional attainments and it has 
been a matter of gratification to his fellow countrymen in ^linneapolis 
as well as to his professional confreres that he has here established his 
home and engaged in active general practice. No physician of the city 
is more admiralaly fortified in the science of medicine and surgery and 
his success is certain to be of the most definite order and accumulative 
tendencv. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 837 



Dr. Alving' is a scion of sturdy old Viking stock and in his person- 
ality shows the fine characteristics of the race from which he has sprung. 
He was born in Hogdal parish, Bohus Ian, on the 3rd of October, 1870, 
and is a son of Olof and Anna Maria (Larson) Jonasson, who still main- 
tain their home in that parish, where the father has long been actively 
and successfully identified with the great basic industry of agriculture. 
Of the eight children four are living and Dr. Alving is the youngest of 
the number. 

Dr. Alving received his early educational discipline in the collegiate 
school of Strdmstad and later entered the fourth standard of the State 
College in Gothenborg in 1884. There he continued his studies with 
marked appreciation until he had passed the lower seventh standard, and 
he then went to the State College of Orebro, in which he was graduated 
as member of the class of 1884 and from which he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. This entitled him to matriculation in the University 
of Upsala without examination, and he entered that celebrated institu- 
tion in 1890. Here he passed the preliminary medico-philosophic exami- 
nation in 1 89 1. This made him eligible for entrance to the great Caro- 
lingian Medical Institution at Stockholm. The technical course in this 
institution is both protracted and difficult, covering virtually the entire 
field of medicine and surgery, so that after the final examination and 
graduation no post-graduate course is necessary. Dr. Alving here passed 
the examination as Candidatus Medicina in 1894, and after another four 
years of continuous study he received the degree of Licentitatus Medicina, 
entitling him to a diploma as a full-fledged Doctor of Medicine and 
Surgery. During his last two years of study at the Carolingina Insti- 
tution he served as assistant physician and surgeon at the hospital of the 
Royal Guards in the city of Stockholm, where he gained especially val- 
uable clinical experience. 

In 1898 Dr. Alving located at Grangesberg, Dalecarlia, where he 
engaged in the general practice of his pwofession, in which he there con- 
tinued for one year, at the expiration of which he was appointed district 
physician and also received appointment to the office of physician 
and surgeon to the local hospital. He remained at Grangesberg un- 
til 1905, when he was appointed second surgeon at the government 
hospital at Falun, where he continued in effective service until 1907. He 
had in the meanwhile decided to gain further knowledge in regard to 
several branches of his profession and with this end in view he then went 
to the city of Berlin. Germany, where he prosecuted the study of gyne- 
cology under the celebrated Prof. Olshausen. From Berlin he went to 
Ziirich, Switzerland, where he gave his attention to the study of general 
surgical and clinical work, under the direction of Prof. Kroenlein, and 
where he also studied advanced ophthalmiatrics under Prof. Haab. Still 
later he went to Davos sanitarium, where he gave careful study and 
investigation to tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases. Fram these 
brief statements it will readily be seen that few physicians are more thor- 



838 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



oughly equipped for the work of the profession, according to the highest 
modern standards, and in addition to his professional attainments the 
doctor is a man of fine academic scholarship and is a gentleman of 
gracious and pleasing personality. 

At the end of the year 1909 Dr. Alving decided to seek a wider field 
for his professional endeavors and in October of that year he came to 
America and established his residence in Minneapolis, January, 1910, 
where, it is scarcely necessary to say, he successfully passed the examina- 
tion before the state board of medical examiners, after which he opened 
an office at 1426 Washington avenue, South, and here he has since been 
engaged in the general practice of medicine and surgery. He has already 
gained a large and profitable clientage and his practice is constantly 
extending in scope and importance, so that he is recognized as a valuable 
acquisition to the medical fraternity in Minneapolis. He is a member 
of the Medical Society of Dalecarlia, in his native land, but since coming 
to America he has found the exactions of his profession such as to afford 
him no time to identify himself with local medical organizations, though 
it is his intention to unite with representative associations of this kind 
within a short period. 

On the 22nd of August, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Alving to Miss Esther Olson, a daughter of Bengt and Rosa (Torslund) 
Olson, of Sodertelje. Dr. and Mrs. Alving have two children — Sven 
Alf, who was born on the 8th of March, 1902, and Ingrid, who was born 
on the 2nd of May, 1904. Dr. and Mrs. Alving are members of the 
Lutheran church. 

Henry W. Quist, M. D. — Among those who have attained dis- 
tinctive prestige in the practice of medicine in Minneapolis is Dr. Henry 
W. Quist, a man of scholarly attainments and who has made deep and 
careful research in the science to which he is devoting his life's work. 
After leaving the public schools of his home town he entered the Gustavus 
Adolphus College at St. Peter, and from there went to Hamline Uni- 
versity and from there to the University of Minnesota, and graduated 
from the medical department in 1907. From June of that year until 
June of 1908 he served as a house physician in the Swedish Hospital at 
Minneapolis, and then opening an office at 3047 Nicollet avenue in this 
city, he entered actively into the work and has won enviable prestige 
as one of the able and successful physicians of iMinneapolis. He is a 
member of the Minneapolis Medical Club, Hennepin County Medical 
Society and American Medical Association, of the Home Protective 
Circle, the North Star Benefit Association, the Vasa Orden of Americans, 
a distinctively Swedish institution, and the I. O. O. F. In politics he is 
a Republican. 

Dr. Quist was born at Chisago City, Minnesota, May 17, 1879, ^ son 
of Peter and Louise (Lyon) Quist, both of whom were born at Wexio, 
Sweden, and coming to the United States about the year 1872 they 




^^^cO^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 841 



located at Chisago City in Minnesota. The father, a wagon maker, died 
in the year of 1888, but he is still survived by his widow. In their 
family were eight children, but two died in infancy, and those living 
are : ' Carl J., Lydia, Alfred, Anna C, who married John A. Shogren, 
Otto and Dr. Henry W. The doctor is unmarried and is a member of 
the Swedish Lutheran church. 

GusTAF Ferdinand Sunvvall, 327 East Franklin avenue, Minne- 
apolis, is one of the best-known members of the Board of Trade in this 
city. He was born April 11, 1852, in Sund parish, Ostergotland, Sweden, 
a son of Swedish parents. His father was born December 15, 1814, and 
at this writing is living at Reby, Osby parish; his mother's name before 
marriage was Sarah Maria Forsman. She was a daughter of John Fors- 
man, a farmer in Oppaby, Ostergotland, and a representative of one of 
the oldest families in that part of the state. Gustaf F. is one of a family 
of five children. He has two brothers, Oscar and Carl Peter, born in 
1847 ^"cl 1854, respectively, and both residents of Ostergotland, Sweden. 
One sister, Hedda. born in 1845, died, unmarried; the other sister, Ma- 
thilda, born in 1845, in 1866 became the wife of John Sundin, of Carver, 
Minnesota. She died some years later, leaving two daughters. 

After finishing his studies in the public school, young Sunwall en- 
tered college at Eksjo, and passed through six grades there. Then, in 
1869, he came to America, landing at New York on the 25th of August, 
and directing his way to Carver, Minnesota, where he accepted a position 
as clerk in the store of John Dunn, in whose employ he remained until 
1872. In the fall of that year he went to Walnut Grove, where he en- 
gaged in business for himself, and located the town site. An opportunity 
offering whereby he could better his condition, he sold out his business 
and moved to St. Paul, where he accepted a position as grain buyer for 
R. Bardon, and afterward opened an office for his firm in Blakely, Minne- 
sota. He remained with Mr. Bardon until 1877, when he began buying 
grain for himself. In 1879 he moved his business to Carver, and was 
actively interested in buying grain at that point until the fall of 1886. 
Since that time he has been a resident of Minneapolis, and has retained 
his identity with the grain business. In 1883 he organized the Minne- 
apolis & St. Louis Elevator Company, which in 1887 changed its name 
to Central Elevator Company, of which latter company Mr. Sunwall was 
one of the principal stockholders and manager. Selling his interest in 
this concern in 1896, he started the firm of G. F. Sunwall & Co., grain 
and commission merchants, with offices in the Corn Exchange, and did 
a prosperous business until 1903, when he sold out and accepted a posi- 
tion with the Minnesota Grain Company, with which, however, he re- 
mained only one year, resigning in order to take up his present work, 
that of "floor" manager and all-around man with the John Miller Com- 
pany, one of the best-known firms in the Northwest, with offices in several 
cities. 



842 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF AIINXESOTA 

June 25, 1887, Mr. Sun wall married Annie Elizabeth Kelly, daughter 
of James Kelly, a merchant of Blakely, Minnesota. To them have been 
given eight children, of whom seven lived to maturity, namely: Mary 
Alathilda, now deceased, was the wife of W. J. Byrnes, a veteran of the 
Spanish- American war; Charles Emmet, Amelie Agnes, Gustaf Enoch, 
James Oscar, Victor and Katharine. 

Mr. Sunwall is one of the oldest members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, having membership certificate No. 45, acquired in 1882. He and 
his family reside at 327 East Franklin avenue, he having built the home 
here in 1887 ; and they are all identified with St. Stephen's Roman Cath- 
olic church. Also he is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 

John Edward Thurnell, of Minneapolis, is the city representative 
of the Oregon Orchard Company, one of the leading fruit raising com- 
panies of the Northwest. He is a man of energy and sound business 
judgment, as well as one of the prominent musicians among the Swedish- 
Americans of his adopted city. Several years ago he was a resident of 
Chicago and his people, both in that city and Minneapolis, are enthusiastic 
admirers of his abilities as a tenor. As a resident of the latter city he has 
been an active and valued member of the Orpheus and Gustav Adolph 
singing societies, and also a leader in the secret societies, Svithiod and 
Vasa. 

Mr. Thurnell was born in Kisa parish, Ostergotland, September 13, 
1869, son of Carl Gustav Nilson and Carolina Samuelson. The father 
was also, born in that place April 15, 1840, and has practiced his trade as 
a shoemaker there for many years ; the mother is a native of Hessleby 
parish, Smaland, Sweden, born May 28, 1840. The children of this 
imion were : Carl Gustaf Anthon Nilson, born in Kisa, November 30, 
1867, a shoemaker of that place, married and the father of three children; 
John E. Thurnell, of this sketch ; Ernst August Leonard Nilson, born 
May 3, 1871, a shoemaker of Linkoping, married and has one child; 
Agnes Carolina Cecilia, who was born May 11, 1873, and married Verner 
Johanson, a furniture manufacturer of Tranas, Smaland ; and Axel Gun- 
nar Nilson. born September 30, 1875, a carpenter and unmarried. 

John E. Thurnell remained with his parents until he was fourteen 
years of age, dividing his time between the public school and the shoe- 
maker's bench. He served a regular apprenticeship of four years and a 
half in Linkoping, and then returned to his home in Kisa, where he 
worked in his father's shop for a year. But, not yet satisfied with his 
skill, he entered the employ of a shoemaking firm in Jonkoping, with 
whom he remained for six years and then abandoned his trade because 
of sickness caused by his confining work. At the advice of his physician 
he sought more active work which would also take him out of doors, and 
finally became a traveling salesman for the Singer Sewing Machine Com- 
pany, holding that position for three and a half years. He then accepted 
positions from other houses which carried heavier responsibilities and 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 843 



better salaries, and after spending another four years in Sweden as a 
commercial traveler emigrated to the United States. For some time Mr. 
Thurnell resided in Chicago, but wishing to become connected with a 
community which was more distinctively Swedish- American, in 1907 he 
settled among his enterprising fellow countrymen of Minneapolis, where 
he has met with a warm welcome and gratifying advancement. He mar- 
ried Eda Josfina Graubom, born in Grenna, Sweden, in 1879, and daugh- 
ter of Gustaf Graubom, a farmer of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Thurnell 
have one child, Berthild Oscar Edward, born in Minneapolis, December 
2, 1907. 

Albin Ahlouist is one of the best-known representatives of the 
machinists' profession in Minneapolis, which has been his home since 
1906. He was born in Gothenburg, Sweden, May 6, 1883, and coming 
to America in 1903, he lived first in Duluth, Minnesota, and from there 
came to Minneapolis in 1906. His father, O. L. Ahlquist, born July 2, 
1846, is yet living, in the employ of the State Railways Company in 
Gothenburg, but the mother, nee Inga Kristina Berggren, died in 1892, 
in that city. Their children are : Ernest, with the Falen Engkilda Bank, 
Falen, Sweden, is married and has a son ; Filip is a revenue ofThcer in 
Gothenburg ; and John is an electrotyper in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Albin Ahlquist, the youngest in the above family, attended the public 
schools of his native city until the age of fourteen, and he then began 
learning the machinist's trade with the State Railways. After coming 
to this country he worked for the Twin City Rapid Transit Company for 
a year and a half, and then entered upon his association with Gus Lager- 
quist, one of the best-known elevator builders in the Northwest. Mr. 
Ahlquist married on December 9, 1904, Mary Lansky, from Duluth, and 
their two children are Lucile and Eleonore, born, respectively, on the 22d 
of July, 1905, and on the 26th of July, 1907. Mr. Alquist is a member of 
the Lutheran church, of the Orpheus Singing Society and of the Lyric 
Society, and he is considered one of the best first tenor singers in the 
city of Minneapolis. The Ahlquist residence is at 1224 Main street, 
Northeast. 

Frank Emil Moody, D. M. D. — It shows double strength of char- 
acter to be popular both among those to whom one applies his special 
professional talents and with his associates in the same field, who, even 
viewed in the most kindly light, are more or less competitors. To attain 
such an enviable standing presupposes unusual ability and a conscientious 
desire to be charitable of mind and treatment, or to fight in open and 
manly fashion when conflict is unavoidable. The fact, therefore, that 
Dr. Frank E. Moody, of Minneapolis, who is in partnership with his 
brother in dentistry, has one of the largest professional followings both 
among patrons and fellow workers in the city, is proof positive that he is 
able in his chosen field and strong as a man. In 1900 he was appointed 



844 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

by Governor Lind a member of the State Board of Dental Examiners 
for a term of three years, and by the action of Governor Van Sant in 
1903 was continued in office for another Hke term, holding the presi- 
dency for three years. During this period, in 1904, Dr. Moody was 
elected vice-president of the National Board of Dental Examiners. After 
being successively chosen to all the offices attached to the Dental Alumni 
Association of the Minnesota University he is still in the presidential 
chair and is also a director of the General Alumni Association. The 
doctor is treasurer and has been president of the Gustavus Adolphus 
Club; is one of the charter members of the Odin Club, in which he has 
held all the offices except treasurer (president in 1908) ; has been secre- 
tary of the Monitor Republican League, and is a director in the Union 
State Bank and in several other corporations. Further, Dr. Moody is 
an active Mason, who has reached high rank in the order, being a member 
of the various bodies from the Blue Lodge to the Commandery, and has 
served as Venerable Council (president) of Cedar Camp, Modern Wood- 
men of America. In his religious faith he is a Lutheran, identified with 
St. John's church and chairman of the board of trustees. 

Dr. Moody, who has not reached his present station in his profession 
or the general afifairs of the community without hard and continuous 
struggles and not a few drawbacks, is a native of Finnagarden, Soraby 
parish, Smaland, Sweden, where he was born on the 5th of March, 1870. 
His father, who was also a native of that part of the fatherland, John 
Modig by name, was a manufacturer of furniture and threshing machines 
there, and his mother (nee Louisa Anderson) was born in Lenhofda 
parish. They became the parents of eleven children, the following seven 
being alive : ' Mathilda Carolina, now Mrs. J. A. Lundquist, whose hus- 
band is laboratory man in Dr. Moody's office; John Alfred Moody, a 
farmer located at St. James, Minnesota ; Frank E.. of this sketch ; Andrew 
G., who is a traveling salesman covering South Dakota; Carl Oscar, 
also a farmer at St. James; Adolph Fredrik Moody, who is in partner- 
ship with Frank E. ;' and Magnus Ossian Moody, a third agriculturist 
of the family, located at St. James. After obtaining a partial education 
in the public schools of his native parish, Frank E. came to the United 
States With relatives in 1882, or at the age of twelve, and located at St. 
James. The following year his parents, with their other children, joined 
him there, and during the succeeding three years he continued his school- 
ing, assisted in the breaking and cultivation of a virgin farm, and varied 
such occupation by clerking in a local store. But his ambition craved a 
larger place with its greater opportunities for advancement, and in 1885 
he moved to Minneapolis. There he clerked in several large drygoods 
stores, saving sufficient money to enable him to put himself well along 
the course of three years which he pursued at Gustavus Adolphus College 
at St. Peter, Minnesota. 

Up to this time Dr. Moody's labors had all been in conscious or 
unconscious preparation for his professional career, and he now fomially 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 847 



entered his chosen field by becoming a student in the dental department 
of the University of Minnesota, from which he graduated with honors 
in 1896. He at once commenced practice at Minneapolis, where he had 
already made numerous friends by his evident ability and integrity, as 
well as by his attractive traits of sociability and whole-heartedness. His 
business has increased so rapidly that it now requires seven rooms in the 
Syndicate block, where he employs five experienced assistants, besides 
having the professional services of his brother and partner. These par- 
lors of Drs. Moody and Moody are handsomely furnished and are also 
supplied with the latest mechanisms required in the delicate operations 
of dentistry — a profession so akin to medicine and the maintenance of 
good health that it is difficult to draw a distinct line between the two, or 
to exaggerate the importance of dentistry. Master dentists, such as Dr. 
Moody, are both physicians and surgeons in a special and a very important 
field. ' 

The doctor's social and domestic relations mark him as a high type 
of the American citizen ; and his married life, like every other phase of 
human existence, has been flecked by mingled shadows and sunshine. 
While pursuing his studies at the university he became engaged to a 
fellow student. Miss Rose Peterson, of Newark, South Dakota. His 
wife-to-be graduated in 1895 ^"^ he himself obtained his D. M. D. in the 
following year, the marriage occurring June 26, 1897. On April 13th 
of the following year a son was born to them, Richard Villard Moody. 
With happy and hopeful hearts the young couple were just about to 
occupy their beautiful new home on Park avenue, in 1899, when the 
wife and mother was stricken with a fatal attack of pneumonia. That 
was the darkest cloud of Dr. Moody's life. Neither man nor woman 
can live alone in the past, however, and on March 29, 1904, his household 
was again given a gentle and cultured mistress in Miss Clara Amalia 
Dahle, daughter of ex-Congressman H. B. Dahle, of Mount Horeb, 
Wisconsin. His wife was born August 22, 1879, and has become the 
mother of Harold Jerome, born February 4, 1905, and Marie Louise 
Moody, born October i, 1908. 

Samuel Edwin Johnson, artist photographer, was born in Stock- 
holm, Wisconsin, March 14, 1878. The father, Samuel Johnson, came 
to America immediately after the Civil war and located in Chicago. 
After a few years he emigrated to Wisconsin and bought a farm in Pepin 
county, where he married Ulrika Farrell and where their first son, 
Samuel Edwin, was born. As a boy of six or seven years of age, 
Samuel E. commenced to show tendencies toward the artistic and a 
desire for drawing, and at the age of ten he had fully determined upon 
his art career. The parents were poor, however, and could not give the 
youth any education, but they were deeply religious and kept him to the 
strict path of duty, laying the foundation of his character in integrity 
and honor. So after completing his primary courses in the common 



848 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



school, both in the English and Scandinavian languages, he had to seek 
his own self-support and education. Between hard work and study he 
managed to lay the foundation of a fine-grained intellect, keeping close 
to the study of free-hand art during all his spare moments. The con- 
ception of the beautiful effects of light and shade rapidly developed in 
the young man, but his practical talents, with his intense push and 
energy, made him realize that his gifts must materialize into a profession 
for money making. His hoarded dollars, earned through farm and horti- 
cultural work, were then utilized to take a course in portrait making 
and photography. In the fall of 1898 he entered a photographic studio 
in Lake City, Minnesota, studying under an artist who was well known 
in the Northwest for fine work at that time, and continuing for a year 
and a half at that place, where he also completed a course in a business 
college. Under the necessity of keeping up his finances and also rapidly 
progressing in his studies his metal was fully tested. By the kind help 
received from Senator Allen J. Greer, of Lake City, who took a fancy 
to him and advanced money for his schooling in exchange for work 
around his place, Mr. Johnson was enabled to continue his schooling. 
His days were fully occupied from five o'clock in the morning until late 
at night ; but the w^ork was never held as drudgery, as he always main- 
tained a jolly disposition and a kindly nature, thereby smoothing the 
path, both for himself and others. Mingling also in social circles as the 
life of the young folks, he maintained his youthful appearance. 

In the summer of 1900 Mr. Johnson removed to Minneapolis and 
secured work and practice in photographic art, making progress which 
was welcomed by his employers, as he was always ready to assist in the 
upbuilding of the business and aimed at the highest workmanship in the 
profession. After a brief vacation in the fall of 1901, he moved to 
Hudson, Wisconsin, there renting a photographic studio. With only a. 
few dollars in his pocket he received the financial assistance of his 
younger brother, Franz H. Johnson, in return for learning the business, 
and the result was the formation of the firm of S. E. Johnson & Company. 
Their reputation for doing fine work at once spread throughout the 
town, and their business enterprise blossomed out to such an extent that 
the seeking of larger fields for activity and study became necessary. 
With the money saved and realized from the sale of the business at 
Hudson, Mr. Johnson returned to Minneapolis and worked in a studio 
through the winter of 1902-03, his brother proceeding with a college 
education. In the spring of 1903 S. E. Johnson again bought a recently 
established studio in Minneapolis, on the corner of Washington avenue. 
South, and First avenue, and founded the firm of Johnson & Anderson. 
.The business met with many drawbacks at first, but its founder could 
"not be discouraged. In the fall, when his brother returned and bought 
the Anderson interest, the name again became S. E. Johnson & Company. 
S. E. Johnson, with his large ambition, was always individualizing 
and building for the higher in art, both in his business and among his 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 849 



co-workers. He was an active worker in photographic societies, and in 
the summer of 1903 was elected secretary of the Northwestern Pho- 
tographers' Association, comprising five states, which office he held one 
year. In 1904 he studied at the National Photographers' Association of 
America, held at St. Louis during the World's Fair. The visit resulted 
in a great addition to his former knowledge of art, and from that time 
on he progressed rapidly in artistic accomplishments and stimulated his 
business to such an extent that his quarters again began to be crowded. 
In 1906 their exhibition of Grand Art Portraits in the Northwestern 
Association collection were awarded a gold medal, and since then their 
work has maintained the highest standard of merit in the Twin Cities. 
In 1907 the well known Opsahl studio on Sixth street was purchased — 
one of the most completely equipped photographic institutions in the 
Northwest. In July, 1909, Mr. Johnson attended the largest convention 
ever held by the Photographers' Association of America, which was held 
in Rochester, New York. This was one of the greatest schools and 
exhibitions of photography ever held in America. 

S. E. Johnson, through his fine social qualities and refinement, has 
gained the confidence of the wealthiest and finest people in social and 
business circles, who are patrons of his art. His congenial spirit is 
ever the same, whether he comes in touch with rich or poor, and his 
large and increasing circle of friends remain permanently attached to 
him. In its truest sense Mr. Johnson is a self-made man, who has by 
efforts of thinking and reason individualized his own contour of great- 
ness and mastery of self. His keen knowledge of life from the beginning 
to the end, comprehends the realms of existence and the true reading, of 
human nature as an absolute factor and positive knowledge. No idle 
time is left for him, since whatever spare moments come to him are 
either devoted to pleasure or thinking and study. In his present location 
his education is reinforced by wide travels, in which he delves always 
for the foremost in art, ideality and the poetry of the world. His out- 
look for the future is for the improvement of art in the sense of a 
glorious achievement in beauty and progress. 

Rev. Jonas Gotthold Lagerstrom, who for the past twenty years 
has been connected with the lumber business of C. A. Smith & Company, 
Minneapolis, is a retired pioneer clergyman and missionary of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, identified, in a noteworthy degree, with the establish- 
ment and development of the Gustavus Adolphus College. He was born 
at Hohult, Elghult parish, Smaland, on the 20th of July, 1837, his parents 
being Jonas Gummeson and Anna Louisa (Johnson) Gummeson, both 
of Swedish agricultural stock. The mother died in Sweden and the 
father in the United States, parents of nine children : Lena Stina, Kajsa 
Louisa, and Karl, all of whom died in Red Wing, Minnesota; Johan, 
who passed away in Sweden, as a well known organist and school teacher ; 
54 



850 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Johannes, a farmer of Spring Garden, Goodhue county, Minnesota ; Rev, 
Jonas Gotthold, of this biography ; Peter, who died in Sweden ; and Anna,, 
who died at Afton, Minnesota, as the wife of Rev. Mr. Forsberg, a 
Methodist minister. 

Mr. Lagerstrom was educated in the public school of his native 
parish, confirmed in the Lutheran church and worked on the paternal 
farm until 1857, when, at the age of twenty, he emigrated to the United 
States. His two older brothers had preceded them, in company with the 
renowned pastor, Erland Carlson, to Chicago. Gotthold secured work in 
the harvesting machine factory at Geneva, Illinois, which carried him 
over the first winter, and in the following spring he went to Red Wing, 
Minnesota. There he was employed as a carpenter by old Hakan Olson, 
and also worked for a time as a stone mason. In 1862 the Gustavus 
Adolphus College was founded at Red Wing as St. Ansgar's Academy 
by Dr. Erik Norelius, the first three students of the institution being 
Jonas Magni, J. S. Nilson and J. T. Lagerstr5m. In the following year 
the school was moved to Carver, where the last named continued his 
course until 1864, when he entered Augustana College and Seminary at 
Paxton. Illinois. While still a student there, shortly before Christmas of 
1867, he was called to New York to take charge of the Gustavus Adolphus 
church, whose condition was then very feeble and uncertain. His hard 
labors, for which he was paid at twenty-five dollars per month (including- 
expenses), included the building-up of a poor and disorganized parish 
and mission work at Brooklyn, Hoboken, and at whatever points a few 
Swedes were gathered. Much of his time was devoted to work among 
Swedish immigrants. The result was creditable alike to his ability and 
faithfulness. In 1869 Mr. Lagerstrom completed his course at Augustana 
College and Seminary and w"as called to the pastorate of the Swedish 
Lutheran church at Moores Prairie (now Stockholm), Minnesota. The 
place was already well settled by his countrymen and his work so_ ex- 
panded that he eventually founded parishes at Cokato, North Crow River, 
Dassel, and Swan Lake.^ Besides having charge of this centraHzed work,, 
he was a traveling missionary through a large extent of country and 
neglected no member of the church, or possible convert, within his 
knowledge. In 1874 he accepted a call to the pastorate of St. Peter, 
Mankato, and Belgrade and remained over that charge until 1886, when 
the serious condit'ion of his health forced him to resign. During this 
period the Gustavus Adolphus College was moved to St. Peter and, as 
one of the incorporators, director and treasurer of that institution, Mr. 
Lagerstrom was prominent in its management and advancement. 

When Mr. Lagerstrom withdrew from the ministry in 1886, he 
located at Red Wing, where, for three years, he remained with his 
brother-in-law, G. A. Carlson, a lime manufacturer, acting as his book- 
keeper. In 1889 he was called to Minneapolis by another brother-in-law,. 
C. A. Smith, and has ably filled a similar position in his large lumber 
business ever since. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 851 



In 1870 Rev. Jonas G. Lagerstrom married Miss Magdalena Ander- 
son, who is a sister of Mrs. C. A. Smith, both being daughters of the 
Swedish riksdagsman, Hon. Olof Anderson. Their father had come to 
the United States with his family in 1858, locating at Gotaholm, Carver 
county. Rev. and Mrs. Lagerstrom became the parents of six children, 
of whom three are living. Lydia Theodora, the eldest, was born Sep- 
tember 30, 187 1, and is a University graduate and teacher in the East 
High School of Minneapolis. Ansgarius Thelander, the elder son, was 
born March 8, 1882, is also the graduate of a university and for one year 
was instructor at Gustavus Adolphus College. On account of failing 
health he was obliged to resign and go to California, serving for some 
time as bookkeeper for the Edison Electric Company at Los Angeles. 
In 1909 he associated himself with C. A. Smith in the lumber business at 
Bay Point, California, where he now resides. Cornelius Anselmus, the 
younger son of Rev. Jonas G. Lagerstrom and his wife, was born August 
7, 1884, completed a four years' course in the high school and three years 
of engineering in the University of Minnesota. He then went to Bilti- 
more, North Carolina, and, after one year, received his diploma as a 
forester from the forestry school at that place, being now connected with 
the lumber business of C. A. Smith Timber Company. The members of 
the Lagerstrom family who reside in Minneapolis are all active in t\\e 
work of the Salem English Evangelical Lutheran church, of which the 
father has long served as deacon. Their home is at 2310 Emerson 
avenue, South. 

Ernest Spongberg was born March 5, 1881, at Stockholm, Sweden, 
and received a thorough education, both on the so-called real and the 
Grecian-Latin lines, at the high school, from which he graduated at the 
age of seventeen. His parents wanted him to prepare for a lawyer's 
vocation, but Ernest was not ready to decide immediately, wishing to see 
a bit of the world first and learn "how the other half lives." So he 
started out, fresh from the school bench, with a steamer ; paid a visit 
at Tenerifife, Canary Islands, called at Buenos Ayres, Argentine, rounded 
"the Horn," visited French China and India and returned, strong in 
body and sound mentally, home via the Suez canal. 

During this voyage his receptive mind became charged with varied 
impressions and with the knowledge of the manners and habits of foreign 
people acquired in his travels, and he began his career as a productive 
and entertaining writer. Barely eighteen years old he was already a full- 
fledged' editor of a thrice-a-week paper in a progressive city in the 
northern part of Sweden. However, he found the field too small for 
him in a city of the third magnitude only, and the following year we 
find him as a useful reporter and interviewer for a big daily paper in 
Stockholm. Since then he has been connected with many other dailies 
in the same city. Right along he contributed sketches to literarv maga- 
zines and gradually gained quite a reputation as a clever writer. 



852 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Until then the United States had been for him "terra incognita," so 
he set sail for the shores of this glorious republic and went through all 
the states along the Atlantic coast. Returning home he was still burning 
with a desire to travel and set out again the following year on a round- 
trip to the principal countries of Europe, being all the time correspondent 
to Swedish papers. In the year 1901 we find him for the second time 
in America, proceeding as far west as Niagara Falls. His second visit 
comprised six months only and he hurried back to Stockholm to fulfill 
his duties as a conscript in the army. 

In 1902 he opened in his native town a news bureau, the first of its 
kind over there, forwarding by means of the phone the latest messages 
from the capital to rural papers, and everything was well. Then, 1903, 
the old restlessness came over him, and once more he completed the 
traveling circuit in Europe and "crossed the big drink" for the third 
time. He made a specialty of studying the conditions of "the sub- 
merged tenth" in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago, and 
finally landed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was engaged as 
associate editor of Svenska Folkets Tidning. For one year he succeeded 
in dispelling all thoughts of further roaming about the world, but at the 
lapse of twelve months he turned his face westward and located in 
Seattle, Washington, and attempted there something novel, viz. : the pub- 
lishing of Scandia Bulletin, a wide-awake English weekly for the Scandi- 
navians on the Pacific coast. Under his stay in Seattle he had almost 
been picked by the directors for the Portland Fair, 1905, as the most 
suitable person to advance its cause in and stimulate participating from 
the Scandinavian countries, but at the last minute the directors decided 
not to send any special commissioner over. 

He was just about to settle down for good in the prosperous city 
by Puget sound when the traveling microbes began to gnaw his intes- 
tines anew, so he sold the paper with great profit, moved to San Fran- 
cisco and planned his second trip around the globe. In the fall of 1905 
the preliminary arrangements were completed and he boarded a ship 
destined for Japan. This is the route he followed : Hawaii Islands, 
Samoa Islands, Tahiti, Japan, China, New Zealand. Australia, Africa, 
Gibraltar — and arrived at Stockholm the very same day San Francisco 
was destroyed by earthquake and fire, thus giving him, an excellent 
opportunity to picture for the public the aspect of the beautiful city 
before the terrible disaster occurred. 

Five weeks' stay in his native town was sufficient for him ; then the 
old longing to get back to America got hold of him and for the third 
time he made a lightning trip to the capitals of the Old World : London, 
Paris, Vienna, St. Petersburg, Berlin, Amsterdam, Brussels, etc., and 
afterwards made a dash for — Minneapolis, Minnesota, with whose 
respected and enterprising Swedish paper, Svenska Folkets Tidning, he 
was connected as associate editor until the spring of 1910, when he 
accepted a position with Svenska Amerikanska Fasten. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 853 



Mr. Spongberg is a true cosmopolitan; he feels just as much at 
home in London, Paris or Berlin, as he does in Stockholm or in Minne- 
apolis, and can derive the same pleasure from the company of an Irish- 
man, German or a Frenchman as he can from associating with his own 
countrymen. Although a young man, he has had a vast experience in 
the journalistic field, from a literary point of view and with regard to 
the technical side of the publishing business, and he is quite a linguist, 
possessing a reading knowledge of eight languages and being able to 
converse in a few of them. He is satisfied with travel for the time 
being, but in the future very likely will circumnavigate our terrestrial 
habitation once more. 



CHAPTER XXIII. 
THE SWEDES OF ST. PAUL. 

In her book, "The Homes of the New World," Fredrika Bremer, 
who visited St. Paul in 1850, writes: "We sped rapidly past an Indian 
village, Kaposia, coming up the Mississippi river. The water was here 
as clear and deep as our own river Gota Elf, and the next moment taking 
an abrupt turn to the left, St. Paul was before us, standing upon a high bluff 
on the eastern bank of the IMississippi ; behind it the blue arch of heaven, 
and far below it the great river, and before it, extending right and left, 
beautiful valleys with their verdant hill-sides scattered with wood — a. 
really grand and commanding sitviation — affording the most beautiful 
views. We lay-to at the lower part of the town, whence the upper is 
reached by successive flights of steps, exactly as with us on the South 
Hill by Moschacke in Stockholm. Indians were sitting or walking along 
the street which runs by the shore. Wrapped in their long blankets they 
marched wnth a proud step, and were, some of them, stately figures. 
Just opposite the steamer, and at the foot of the steps, sat some young 
Indians, splendidly adorned with feathers and ribbons, and smoking from 
a long pipe which they handed from one to the other, so that they merely 
smoked a few whiffs each. 

"Scarcely had we touched the shore when the governor of Minnesota, 
Mr. Alexander Ramsey, and his pretty young wife, came on board and 
invited me to take up my quarters at their house. And there I am now ; 
happy with these kind people, and with them I make excursions in the 
neighborhood. The town is one of the youngest infants of the great 
West, scarcely 18 months old, and yet it has, in this short time, increased 
to a population of two thousand persons, and in very few years it will 
certainly be possessed of twenty-two thousand, for its situation is as re- 
markable for beauty and healthiness as it is advantageous to trade. Here 
the Indians come with their furs from that immense countr^^ lying be- 
tween the Mississippi and the Missouri, the western boundary of Minne- 
sota, and the forests still undespoiled of their primeval wealth and the 

854 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 855 

rivers and lakes abounding, in fish, offer their inexhaustible resources, 
whilst the great Mississippi affords the means of their conveyance to the 
commercial markets of the world, flowing, as it does, through the whole of 
Central North America down to New Orleans. Hence it is that several 
traders here have already acquired considerable wealth, while others are 
coming hither more and more, and they are building houses as fast as 
they can. 

"As yet, however, the town is but in its infancy, and people manage 
with such dwellings as they can get. The drawing-room at Governor 
Ramsay's house is also his office, and Indians and workpeople, and ladies 
and gentlemen, are all alike admitted. In the meantime, Mr. Ramsay 
is building himself a handsome, spacious house, upon a hill, a little out 
of the city, with beautiful trees around it, and commanding a grand 
view over the river. If I were to live on the Mississippi 1 would live 
here. It is a hilly region, and on all hands extend beautiful and varying 
landscapes ; and all abounds with such youthful and fresh life. 

"The city is thronged with Indians. The men for the most part go 
about grandly ornamented, and with naked hatchets, the shafts of which 
serve them as pipes. They paint themselves so utterly without any taste 
that it is incredible. Sometimes one half of the countenance will be 
painted of a cinnamon-red, striped and in blotches, and the other half with 
yellow ditto, as well as all other sorts of fancies, in green, and blue, and 
black, without the slightest regard to beauty that I can discover. Here 
comes an Indian who has painted a great red spot in the middle of his 
nose; here another who has painted the whole of his forehead in small 
lines of yellow and black; there a third with coal-black rings around his 
eyes. All have eagles' or cocks' feathers in their hair, for the most 
part colored, or with scarlet tassels of worsted at the ends. The hair is 
cut short on the forehead, and for the rest hangs in elf-locks or in plaits 
on the shoulders, both of men and women. The women are less painted, 
and with better taste than the men, generally with merely one deep red 
little spot in the middle of the cheeks, and the parting of the hair on the 
forehead is dyed in purple. They have a kind smile and often a very 
kind expression*; as well as something in the glance which is more 
human ; but they are evidently merely their husbands' beasts of burden." 

In our sketch of Jacob Fahlstrom it was mentioned that the first 
Swede Fahlstrom met, after the separation from his uncle, was a tailor 
from Skane by the name of John Peterson, whom he ran across at St. 
Paul. Peterson's intention was to remain in St. Paul, but, on the invita- 



856 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

tion of Fahlstrom, he accompanied him to his home in Afton, where he 
Hked the land so well that he decided to settle there. He moved to Afton 
in 1852 and was the second Swede in that settlement. N. P. Ofelt, who 
later moved to Vasa, Goodhue county, and has furnished Dr. E. Norelius 
with information concerning the first Swedish settlers in St. Paul, did 
not mention John Peterson's name, so it seems probable that Peterson 
had moved away from St. Paul before Mr. Ofelt's coming there. Ofelt 
was born in Farlof, Kristianstad's Lan, and emigrated to America in May, 
1852, landing, at Boston July 27, of the same year. In his company from 
Sweden were Johan Johanson, with three children, from Ostergotland ; 
a shoemaker from Lund, by the name of Swen Rosenquist, with family ; 
another shoemaker. Nils Nyberg, from Farlof, and Carl Bjarstedt from 
the same place, both bachelors. In Boston they were joined by Henry 
Russel (Rosell) and family. Russell lived twelve years in Boston, where 
he landed as a sailor. He was a high-class tailor and became wealthy. 
His wife is still living. A man by the name of Tidlund with family, from 
Vestergotland, also followed. He had come over the preceding year. 
Russell and Tidlund were tailors by trade. In Chicago the company was 
increased by a tailor from Vestergotland by the name of Ringdahl and 
another man from the same province, P. M. Anderson, who had come 
to America the year before. All those now set out together for St. Paul 
and remained there during the first winter. To Ofelt's knowledge there 
were only two Swedes ahead of them in St. Paul, namely. Nils Nilson 
from Ostergotland, or "the doctor's Nils," as he was called, because of 
his being the hired man of Doctor Sweeney, of Red Wing, and A. J. 
Ekman, who had been a business man in Gothenburg. Ekman died in 
1856. In the same year (1852) Ofelt also met Jacob Fahlstrom, who 
said he had then been here twenty-seven years and been married twice, 
both times to Indian women. 

In 1853 quite a number of Swedes arrived, most of them from Oster- 
gotland. Among those new-comers Mr. Ofelt remembered Johan Johan- 
son, a tailor from Umea ; a carpenter, John Johnson, who later removed 
to Galesburg, Illinois, and a minister, C. P. Agrelius. Through his influ- 
ence Tidlund and Johnson became zealous Methodists. 

It is quite possible that Rev. J. Unonius at the time of his visit at 
Chisago Lake, in 1852, also met the Swedes in St. Paul for religious pur- 
poses ; but it is a well-known fact that the IMethodist preachers Agrelius 
and Tidlund had been working there before any Swedish Lutheran min- 
ister had visited the place. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 857 

The first child born of Swedish parents in St. Paul, now Mrs. 
Selma Christensen, of Rush City, is the daughter of Col. Hans Mattson's 
sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Willard. 

Rev. P. Carlson visited St. Paul in 1862 and it took him nearly 
three hours to find the aforesaid Swedish tailor, Johan Johanson. He 
preached the fourth Sunday of the Advent in a dance-hall belonging to 
"Railroad" Erikson. This hall was new and was going to be opened 
during the following week in connection with a saloon. Rev. Carlson, 
who was an ardent Christian, is very strong, in his condemnation of 
such an unchristian undertaking by one of his own countrymen. His 
sermon and prayers there seem to have been rewarded and heard, as 
when he a few months later visited St. Paul he did not even find the 
building, which had been swept away by fire or torn down. 

The first Swedes in St. Paul lived in the vicinity where the first 
Swedish Lutheran church is now located. Later comers settled in 
"Svenska Dalen" (the Swedish Dale), on Phalen creek. This dale 
extends from Seventh street to Hamm's brewery. Very few Swedes 
are now living in the dale, having moved up to the Arlington hills, 
where Payne avenue is an almost exclusively Swedish street. The 
Swedes commenced to settle on the hills about twenty-five years ago. 
Of course they are now scattered all over St. Paul, where a number 
are to be found on the fashionable St. Anthony Hill. 

In 1877 Rev. A. P. Monten came from Philadelphia to St. Paul, 
having in his company a young Swedish nobleman, Herman Stocken- 
strom, who became well known both in the journalistic and political fields 
of the Twin Cities. 

Stockenstrom was born at Stjernsund, Dalarne, March 13, 1853. 
He was educated in the college at Falun, the gymnasium at Stockholm 
and at the Schartau Mercantile Institute at Stockholm. In 1877 he went 
out as a sailor, landing at Philadelphia, where he met Rev. Monten, 
who persuaded the young man to accompany him out west. He studied 
some time for the ministry at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, 
and became editor of the Swedish newspaper Skandia in Moline. In 
the fall of 1877 he came to St. Paul and studied at the University of 
Minnesota a couple of years. From 1879 to 1881 he was editor of 
Skaffarcn in St. Paul and until 1884 editor and manager for the con- 
solidated Skaffaren och Minnesota Stats Tidning. In 1884 he became 
manager and editor for the northwestern edition of Henilandet, with 
which paper he was connected eleven years. He was deeply interested 



858 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

in politics and was elected delegate to two state conventions and a 
number of county conventions. In 1886 he was a strong candidate for 
the office of secretary of state, but at the last moment stepped aside in 
favor of Col. Hans Mattson, who upon taking charge of the office 
appointed Stockenstrom assistant secretary of state and statistician. In 
1889 he was reappointed by Col. Mattson and in 1891 appointed by 
Secretary of State F. P. Brown, who reappointed him in 1893. He 
served in all eight years as assistant secretary of state. During this 
period during the protracted absence of the secretary he was acting 
secretary of state. In the spring of 1896 he became the successor of 
Ninian Werner as editor of Svenska Amerikanska Posten. He was 
married to Miss Anna Maria Nelson, a daughter of Martin and Chris- 
tine Nelson, St. Paul. Stockenstrom died in 1905. 

In St. Paul, as in other cities, there are a large number of branches 
or lodges of societies which have originated in other states. It is not 
our purpose to take up our space with them. There is, however, one 
Swedish society which originated in St. Paul, namely, Svenska Broder 
(Swedish Brothers). This is not in the least related to a society with 
identical name and object in Minneapolis, but is perfectly independent. 
Svenska Broder was organized March 4, 1895, with fifteen members. 
Its first officers were : John Blomquist, president ; C. Tunberg, vice- 
president ; A. Lindahl, secretary ; N. H. Lineer, treasurer. The first 
directors were : T. A. Lundberg, C. A. Peterson, C. J. R. JBergstrom 
and August Degerberg. The present membership (1910) is 474. The 
object is to assist sick members and in case of death to defray burial 
expenses. The society has paid over $30,006 benefits and has a cash 
balance on hand of $4,000. Consisting mostly of members residing on 
Arlington Hill, it meets the first Monday every month in Woodman Hall 
on Payne avenue. As to entertainments the society has held a few picnics 
and has yearly banquets. The present officers are: John Blomquist, 
president; Alfred Fredlund, vice-president; A. Lindahl, secretary; V. C. 
Sundberg, treasurer. The directors are : Charles A. Olson, James Blom- 
quist, John Hanson and Patrik Johnson. 

In politics the Swedes of St. Paul have taken active interest during 
the last fifteen years. Mr. A. P. Croonquist, an old settler, has been 
a member of the board of education ; J. G. Elmquist has been both in 
the state legislature and city assembly (as the board of aldermen is 
called). O. Arosin has been county treasurer and served in the assembly. 
J. Aug. Nilsson has been in the legislature and custodian of the court- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 859 

house; Bernt Anderson, now editor of Minnesota Stats Tidning, was state 
dairy commissioner under Gov. Knut Nelson ; Andrew Holm has served 
in the legislature and A. Dahlquist in the city assembly. The list is 
probably much longer. On the police force there are a large number of 
Swedes, as well as in the fire department. In the state capitol the 
Swedes are very prominent, from the governor and superintendent of 
public instruction all the way down to the janitor. In the city and 
county offices there are also several Swedes appointed. 

Frank Johnson. — The wealth and standing which have come to 
Frank Johnson, of St. Paul, and which have made him a leader in the 
great mining industries of the Lake Superior region, are the results of 
years of hardy investigations backed by a splendid confidence in the 
country and his own ability to uncover a noticeable portion of its vast 
mineral wealth. Born in Axtorp, Varola parish, Skaraborgslan, Smalancl, 
in the year 1861, Mr. Johnson is a son of Jonas Jonson and wife. His 
mother died when he was only five years of age and in 1869, when he was 
eight, his father emigrated to the United States with the other children 
and located on a farm near Willmar, Minnesota, where he died in 1906. 
Frank, who was the fifth of the seven children, remained on the homestead 
until he was fifteen, helping, his father and attending the settlement 
school. This was the sole source of his book learning, but he left the 
school room to plunge at once into the adventurous and invigorating life 
of an explorer in the far northwest of the United States and Canada. 

At the period mentioned, when in his sixteenth year, Frank Johnson 
joined an exploring party, and for the succeeding fifteen years traveled 
through the northwestern states, British Columbia and far into the Arctic 
regions, north of Greenland, being, for eighteen months in the employ of the 
Hudson Bay Company. His chief investigations were devoted to the 
mineral indications of the country north of Lake Superior, and bore real 
fruit in 1887, when he made the first discoveries of iron ore in that region. 
From time to time he bought land within the area of his thorough and 
practical investigations until he had acquired six thousand four hundred 
acres. This tract formed the basis of The Johnson Nickel Mining Com- 
pany, which he organized in 1894, with a capital of $1,000,000 and himself 
as president and principal stockholder. As a slight "pointer" to probable 
property value, the fact is advanced that sixty-four acres were tested 
with diamond drills sunk to a depth of ten hundred and seventy feet, with 
the result that about forty million tons of ore were in sight. Mr. John- 
son is also president of the Parry Sound Copper Mining Company, lim- 
ited, of Ontario, organized in 1900 with a capital of five miUion dollars 
and land holdings of two thousand acres. The rock taken from this 
property assays from two and a half to sixty-five per cent pure copper, 
the deposits are being actively developed and the company expects soon 
to erect its own smelter by which the profits of the output will be greatly 



850 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



increased. IVIr. Johnson has also large individual holdings in northern 
Minnesota and the west. With the pronounced success of the Nickel 
Mining Company he evidently decided that he was quite ready to resign 
his old-time position as a restless explorer and settle down to a more 
fixed and domestic life, and on October 21, 1896, married Miss Marie 
Anderson, who is a native of Falkoping, Sweden, born in 1875. This har- 
monious union has resulted in four children: Elva, born June 24, 1897, 
who is attending school and has shown promising talents as a vocalist 
and musician in general ; Frank, born May 5, 1903 ; Mary, born February 
5, 1904, and Andrew, born September 14, 1906. The adult members of 
the family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church. The magnifi- 
cent homestead, which comprises a beautiful modern residence, a flour- 
ishing orchard and handsome grounds, covering six acres, is situated 
at Forest Lake, a few miles from St. Paul, where Mr. Johnson is thor- 
oughly enjoying the results of his labors and foresight not only in per- 
sonal comforts and luxuries, but in the bestowal of his means and afifec- 
tion upon his family and friends. He owns a large amount of other 
property in the vicinity and, on all hands and in all ways, is considered 
among the leading representatives of the Swedish-Americans of the Twin 
Cities. 

Mr. Johnson has six brothers and sisters in the west, all prosperous 
and honored in their various communities. The oldest Alfred Wahl- 
strand, is a retired farmer living south of Willmar, ]\Iinnesota. A. W. 
Grant is a retired captain and steamboat owner, who long plied the Mis- 
sissippi and now resides at Port Barron, Illinois, and August Johnson, 
the third in birth, was for twenty years a member of Roundlund and 
Johnson, am.ong the largest of the mercantile firms of Willmar, where he 
"is living in retirement. Herman Johnson, long an active and successful 
farmer of Falun township. Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, has also retired, 
while Frank Johnson, of this sketch (fifth in order of birth), might retire 
a dozen times over, but has no desire to do so. As to his two younger 
sisters — Hilda married Alfred Linderholm, a banker, merchant and 
prosperous business man of Belgrade, Minnesota, and Josie (half sister) 
became the wife of Peter Nelson, a commission stockbroker of St. Paul. 

Charles E. Nyberg, alderman of the First ward, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, is of Swedish birth but has been identified with this country for a 
period of twenty-five years, nearly the whole of this time having been 
spent in St. Paul. He" was born March 31, 1865, at Nerke, Sweden, son 
of Charles Nyberg, who was for about twenty-five years a soldier in 
the regular army of Sweden and who is now on the retired list. In 1884, 
equipped with a public-school education obtained in his native land, 
Charles E., at the age of nineteen, emigrated to America, and upon his 
arrival here settled "first at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he found 
work in the coal mines and where he remained about two years. From 
there he came to St. Paul, Minnesota. Here he was for a time variously 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 86i 



employed and finally became associated with Deebach Bros., who gave spe- 
cial baths and massage treatments, and was with this firm twelve years, 
becoming expert in this line of work. In 1902, he engaged in the plas- 
tering business, as a contractor, and has by his excellent work built up 
a reputation that extends not only throughout St. Paul and vicinity, but 
also into other states, he having had contracts in numerous cities. 

Mr. Nyberg has for several years been interested in local politics. 
In 1904, he was the candidate of the Democratic party for alderman in 
the First ward, and while this ward is strongly Republican and no Demo- 
crat had ever before been elected in it, Mr. Nyberg received a good 
majority of the votes cast and twice has been re-elected, at present serving 
his third term. He is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the Modern 
Woodmen, the Swedish Brothers, the Red Men, and the Druids. Re- 
ligiously, he is a Lutheran. 

In 1890, Mr. Nyberg married Annie L. Lawson, and they have seven 
children : Arthur, Robert, Earnest, Elmer, William, Taylor and Ester. 

Professor Emil Anderson, a prominent musician and violin teacher 
of St. Paul, was born near Malmo, Sweden, November 15, 1870, and is 
a son of Jeppa and Hanna Anderson. Of their nine children, seven are 
living, and four are residents of the United States. Emil Anderson begun 
his education in the noted, Paulson private school, and later attended 
the collegiate high school at Malmo. He has played on the violin since 
reaching the age of eight, and spent many years in study of this instru- 
ment. Mr. Anderson came to the United States at the age of sixteen, 
proceeding to St. Paul, where he spent some time with his father's friend, 
A. E. Johnson, land and ticket agent, until able to find employment. He 
secured a position in a real estate office, and after that worked in various 
positions, at the same time continuing to study and practice music, and 
took lessons of the great orchestra leader, Prof. Frank Danz, Jr. 

Professor Anderson returned to Sweden in 1893, ^.nd studied music 
five years at the Royal Conservatory at Stockholm, being, under the 
instruction of eminent teachers, such as Prof. Johan Lindberg, violin spe- 
cialist. Professor Bergen in theory of music, and the piano specialist. 
Professor Carl Anderson. After his graduation he spent some time 
with various orchestras, and in 1899 returned to St. Paul. He became 
connected with the noted Johnson School of Music, at Minneapolis, and 
gave lessons on the violin both there and in St. Paul ; he has made his 
home in the latter city since his return to the United States, and his 
studio is now in the Philipsborn Building, at the corner of Seventh and 
Cedar streets. Professor Anderson several years ago travelled all over 
the northwest as bass and violin soloist with the famous Arpi Quartette, 
and he and Oscar Anderson, the St. Paul tenor singer, are considered 
the best singers of Wennerberg's Gluntarne in the northwest. He is now 
at the head of the violin department of the College of St. Catherine and 
St. Agatha's Conservatory of Music and Art, where he supervises teach- 



862 SWEDISH-AIMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



ers and classes. His unusual talent has made his presence an honor to 
any gathering, and he has many friends and admirers. He belongs to the 
Norden Club. 

Professor Anderson married, in 1903, Carine Lucinda Paradis, born 
in St. Paul, of French parents, who died about a year and a half later, 
giving birth to a daughter, Carine Eugenia, born June 19, 1905, who is 
being reared in a private family. 

Dr. Robert O. Earl, president and surgeon of the Mounds Park San- 
itarium and surgeon of the Bethesda Hospital, as well as a general prac- 
titioner of medicine and surgery in St. Paul, was born in Allamakee 
county, Iowa, on the 27th day of August, 1872, his parents being Peter 
Olson and Johanna Anderson Earl, the former a merchant of Minne- 
apolis. In their family were eight children, of whom five are now living. 
The family removed from Iowa to Minneapolis when Dr. Earl was ten 
years old, and he continued his studies in the public schools of that city, 
while later he entered the University of Minnesota to prepare for the 
practice of medicine. He took the complete course and was graduated 
from the medical department in 1896, since which time he has contin- 
uously followed the profession, and his ability has found recognition in 
the liberal patronage accorded him. He practices along modern scien- 
tific lines and keeps in touch with the progress of the profession by his 
membership in the Ramsey County Medical Society, the Minnesota 
Medical Association and the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Earl's offices, which are located in the Endicott Arcade Build- 
ing on Robert street, are equipped wnth all modern facilities for careful 
diagnostic work. Though a young man, he occupies a prominent position 
in the ranks of the medical fraternity, being, a recognized leader in the 
Northwest. In 1905 he was appointed by the legislature as one of the 
three commissioners of the State Hospital for crippled and deformed 
children. He also is a member of the board of directors of the anti- 
tuberculosis committee. He is vice-president of the St. Paul Park Board, 
on which he has served for nine years. As a director of the East St. 
Paul State Bank and president of the Scandinavian Savings Bank he 
has become a factor in financial circles. 

On the first of June, 1900, Dr. Earl was married to Miss Clara 
Swanstrom, daughter of a pioneer of Minnesota, and they now have 
two children, a daughter. May Lillian, and a son, John Robert. They 
have a handsome residence on the East Side, and hold membership in 
the Baptist church. 

Dr. Earl is a member of the Alontgomery Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and is the president of the East Side Commercial Club. His interest 
in community affairs is deep and sincere and he gives active and hearty 
cooperation to movements for the general good inasmuch as the labors 
of his profession will permit. The enterprise and activity which have 
been dominant factors in the business life and substantial upbuilding of 



^^UBL, 



' Yq. 






^•---^S-^- 



^s. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 865 



the middle west are manifest in his professional career, leading him 
onward to successful accomplishment in a calling where "success and 
merit go linked together." 

Andrew John Carlson, a successful contractor and builder of St. 
Paul, was born in Rydaholm, Smaland, Sweden, March 25, 1865, and is 
a son of Hakan and Kajsa Carlson, both deceased. They were parents of 
five children, four of whom are living. All received their education in the 
public schools and were confirmed in the Lutheran church. 

Andrew J. Carlson worked on his father's farm until he reached 
his majority. In 1888 he emigrated to America, locatmg at St. Paul, 
where he worked two years at the trade of carpenter ; he then removed 
to West Superior, which place was then growing rapidly, and worked 
there three years, and then, the boom of the city having subsided, 
returned to St. Paul. A year later he started in business on his own 
account, as contractor and builder, having an office on Sibley street. 
Later he moved to Jackson street, and finally to his present location, 
417 Sibley street. Besides his business in the line of house building, Mr. 
Carlson has a factory for the manufacture of store and office fixtures, and 
has also met with unusual success in this line, having built up a prosper- 
ous business. Besides his residence at 603 Magnolia street, Mr. Carlson 
owns two residences in Merriam Park. He is a member of the Norden 
Club. 

Andrew Holm was born in Klackamala, Eringsboda parish, near 
Ronneby, Sweden, November 26, 1853, and is a son of John and Ingelof 
Holm, who lived on a farm, both now deceased. Their eight children 
were : George, a farmer at Stark, Minnesota ; Andrew ; Frederick, Frank 
and Alfred, deceased ; Annie, lives in St. Paul ; Elina and Otto Julius, 
both deceased. 

Andrew Holm was educated in the public schools of his native parish 
and confirmed in the Lutheran church, and at the early age of twelve 
years was apprenticed to learn the trade of tanning, spending two years 
at Ronneby and three at Carlsham. In 1872 he emigrated to America, and 
came by way of St. Paul to his family, who had settled at Stark, Minne- 
sota, in 1868. He did not work at his trade after coming to the United 
States, but spent his time at first in the lumber camps in winter and at the 
saw-mills at Stillwater in the summer, until 1877, when he embarked in 
railroad contracting business on a small scale, which he continued until 
1883 ; in that year he came to St. Paul and there engaged in the hotel 
business. Mr. Holm has always taken an active interest in politics, and 
in 1898 was elected a member of the Minnesota Legislature, being re- 
elected two years later. He spends his summers with his parents, at 
Chisago Lake. He has a large circle of friends, and is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Ancient Order of Druids,. 
55 



866 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Vega Literary Society, Fraternal Society of Moose, and of the Norden 
Club. 

Mr. Holm married, in 1885, Amanda Olson, who died in 1886, giving 
birth to a daughter, Amanda Albertina, who died at the age of seven 
months. He married (second) in 1889, Tillie Dahlberg, who was born 
in Ronneby, Sweden, and came to Center City, Minnesota, with her 
parents. Their union has been blessed with one daughter, Mabel, born 
March 11, 1893; she has been educated in the public schools of St. Paul, 
and has taken a course in the agricultural department of the University 
of Minnesota. The family resides at 543 Canada street, and attends the 
St. Sigfrid's Episcopal church, of which they are members. 

Johnson Brothers, manufacturers of bank and office fixtures, etc., 
have met with success in their enterprise from the time of its beginning 
in 1878. They have been close companions from childhood, proceeding 
together to many different cities, and have always been mutually affec- 
tionate. They were born in Krogsered, Halland, Sweden, and are sons 
of Johannes and Johanna Petronella Nelson, who both died in America. 
Charles Johnson was born October 24, 1843, ^-^id his brother Henry 
October 24, 1846. They had one brother and two sisters, of whom all 
survive save one sister. 

Charles and Henry Johnson had few educational advantages, and at 
the age of ten years had to commence work. Charles removed to Den- 
mark when eighteen years old, to learn the trade of cabinet-making, and 
a year later was joined by his brother Henry. In Copenhagen they 
learned the trade, becoming thoroughly masters of it, and at the same 
time supplemented their education by study in industrial schools. After 
spending about eight years in Copenhagen, they came to Amerfca, locating 
at Philadelphia, where for eight years they worked at their trade, and in 
1878 removed to St. Paul. They at once embarked in business on their 
own account, under the name of Johnson Brothers, and after four years 
took in as partner a Mr. Loomis, changing the name to Johnson Brothers 
& Loomis. Twelve years later the firm dissolved partnership, the two 
brothers then organizing under the name of Capital City Furniture Com- 
pany, under which they are now doing business. They are very enter- 
prising in their manner of doing business, and are well known for integ- 
rity and promptness in filling orders. They have had large contracts for 
bank fixtures and high grade interior finish and furniture, having fur- 
nished same in every state from Indiana to the Pacific Coast, and their 
work has been highly commended by all who have had occasion to in- 
spect it. 

Charles Johnson resides at 83 Como avenue. He married, in 1881, 
Augusta Carlson, born in Smaland, Sweden, and they have five children, 
as follows : Sophie, a school teacher ; Nellie, also a school teacher ; Anna, 
who died in 1895; Clarence; and Carl. 

Henry Johnson has been twice married, first, in 1873, to Hanna 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 867 



Bjorkman, of Christianstad ; she died in 1883. leaving two daughters, 
Clara, born in Philadelphia, married Bruce D. Youells, a banker of Cas- 
selton, North Dakota, and Julia S., a book-keeper and stenographer in her 
father's office. Air. Johnson married, second, in 1885, Ida Sophia John- 
son, born in Smaland, Sweden, and they have one daughter, Florence A., 
who is a school teacher in St. Paul. Mr. Johnson is a member of the 
Norden Club. They reside at 332 Central avenue. West. 

Axel T. Sundberg. — A prominent and successful business man of 
St. Paul, Axel T. Sundberg is well known throughout the city for his 
many interests, being, in partnership with his brother, Victor C. Sund- 
berg, proprietor of three well-kept and finely-managed drug stores. A 
son of Peter Sundberg, he was born. May 10, 1874, at Lake City, Minne- 
sota, coming from excellent Swedish ancestry. 

A native of Sweden, Peter Sundberg emigrated with his family to 
the United States in 1869. Locating at Lake City, Minnesota, he has 
since been actively and prosperously engaged in the shoe trade, being 
numbered among the successful business men and respected citizens of 
that place. To him and his wife, whose maiden name was Johanna Peter- 
son, four children were born, as follows : Victor C. ; Axel T. ; Hilma, 
deceased ; and Edith A. 

Attending the graded and high schools of Lake City, Axel T. Sund- 
berg obtained a practical knowledge of the common branches of study, 
fitting him for a business career. Soon after his graduation from the 
high school, he became assistant postmaster at Lake City, and filled 
that position of trust and responsiblity for four years, rendering good 
service. Subsequently learning the drug business, Mr. Sundberg. opened 
a drug store in Lake City, where he continued for four years, meeting 
with much success in his venture. Coming then to St. Paul, he estab- 
lished himself as a druggist at No. 329 East Seventh street, in the employ 
of John Bodin & Co., in 1897, and there built up a substantial trade. He 
next opened a drug store at Dale street and Selby avenue, continuing there 
four years. He then became a stockholder in the Bodin-Sundberg Drug Co., 
and in 1908 opened a drug store at No. 879 Rice street. The business is 
now incorporated under the firm name of The Bodin-Sundberg Drug 
Company, and is one of the largest and most prosperous of the kind in 
this part of Ramsey county. Wide-awake and progressive, these gentle- 
men spare neither time nor expense in their efforts to please and meet 
the demands of their many patrons, in each of their stores keeping a 
select stock of goods, and at all times paying close attention to the proper 
compounding of prescriptions brought to them to be filled. 

Mr. Sundberg married, June 22, 1904, Hattie E. Sandell, a daughter 
of John Sandell, a highly respected business man of St. Paul, of whom a 
brief biographical sketch may be found elsewhere in this work. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sundberg, namely : Evadne E., 



868 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



whose birth occurred June i8, 1905 ; and Theodore Leroy, born July 4, 
1908. 

Arvid William Lindberg was born May 17, 1875, in Stillwater, 
Minnesota, and is the son of John D. and Johanna (Anderson) Lindberg, 
both born and educated in Sweden. John D. Lindberg became a farmer 
in his native country, and in 1872 emigrated to the United States, locating 
at Stillwater, later moving to Dakota and still later to Superior, Wis- 
consin. He is a Republican in his political views and has held several 
minor appointive and elective offices ; he has served six terms of one 
year each as superintendent of the poor farm of Douglas county, Wis- 
consin, which fact speaks well of his faithful performance of the duties 
imposed upon him in filling the office. 

Arvid W. Lindberg acquired his education in the country school 
and high school of Milbank, South Dakota, and since he reached the age 
of sixteen years has made his own way in the world. He worked in 
various places and at different occupations until 1898, when he became 
employed as assistant manager in a wholesale grocery house at Superior, 
Wisconsin, where he spent three years. He then removed to St. Paul 
and became identified with the firm of Foley Brothers & Kelly, one of 
the largest grocery firms in the Northwest, beginning as shipping clerk ; 
a year later he was made city salesman, and is a leader among the sales- 
men of the establishment. He has become an expert in his line, and has 
acquired a reputation for his success ; in the course of his travels he 
acquired a large circle of friends and acquaintances among the people 
with whom he does business. He is actively interested in several social 
and fraternal societies. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, having passed through the chairs of the subordinate lodge 
of which he was a member before taking a transfer to St. Paul Lodge 
No. 2, being, probably the youngest man in the state of Wisconsin to 
officiate in the lodge as noble grand, as he was but twenty-three at that 
time ; he is a member of the Encampment and has served as lieutenant 
of the Canton. In 1893 he became a member of the local council of 
United Commercial Travellers of America, and in March, 1909, was 
elected to the office of senior counselor of the local council. He has 
served as vice-president of the City Salesmen Association of St. Paul, 
is a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and also belongs to the 
East Side Commercial Club. He has always taken an active interest 
in politics and is a supporter of the Republican party. Mr. Lindberg is 
a devout member of the Swedish IrlJtheran church at Merriam Park, 
St. Paul, where he owns a handsom.e residence. 

Mr. Lindberg married, January 7, 1904, Alma S., daughter of 
Anders Anderson ; she was born in Sweden, and received her education 
in the public schools of her native country and of Superior, Wisconsin. 
She is a member of Degree of Rebekah and of the Swedish Lutheran 
church. 




^L. ^r c:^^2x.^^c/.-C^^CA^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 871 



Carl G. Schulz. — The Superintendent of Public Instruction of the 
State of Minnesota, whose name heads this article, was born in the town 
of New Sweden, Nicollet county, Minnesota, March 13, 1867, and is the 
son of John and Anna Schulz, both natives of Sweden, who came from 
Dalsland to Minnesota, in 1865, and settled on a farm, in Nicollet county. 
Carl Schulz received his primary education in the public schools of his 
native county, and later attended Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. 
Peter, for a period of four years, and then entered Augustana College, of 
Rock Island, Illinois, from which he graduated in 1888. 

His first occupation in life was teaching, and he began in the dis- 
trict schools of Minnesota, and after several years spent in this way was 
appointed principal of the schools at Winthrop, Minnesota, where he 
served one year in this position. In January, 1890, Mr. Schulz was ap- 
pointed superintendent of schools of Nicollet county, succeeding Judge 
Gresham, and while occupying the position his ability and success were 
appreciated to the extent that at the next election he was elected to the 
position, and filled it for some years, being re-elected several times, until 
his appointment, in January, 1901, to the office of Assistant Superinten- 
dent of Public Instruction in the state, which he filled eight years. He 
received his present appointment in January, 1909. At the convention of 
the Department of Superintendence, National Educational Association, 
in March, 1910, Mr. Schulz was elected secretary. Mr. Schulz has made 
a careful study of all the subjects and affairs under his supervision, and 
his administration of them has been distinguished by careful and consci- 
entious service to the public interests. He has served for twelve years 
as a member of the Board of Directors for the Gustavus Adolphus College, 
at St. Peter, having been secretary and treasurer, and is now acting as 
president. In political affairs he has followed the dictates of the Repub- 
lican party, and takes an ardent and active interest in all public affairs. 
He is a member of the English Lutheran church. 

July I, 1893, Mr. Schulz married Emma J. Carlson, of St. Peter, 
daughter of Nels J. and Mary (Olson) Carlson, born in Vestergotland, 
Smaland, Sweden, and they have one daughter, Marion, born October 
28, 1896. 

Bergstedt Brothers. — The members of this firm are two brothers, 
Victor and Edward Bergstedt, both born in Nysund parish, Vermland, 
Sweden, Victor February 19, 1872, and Edward November 7, 1873. Their 
parents, August and Mariana Bergstedt, still live on the old homestead, 
in the parish mentioned above, one-half of which is in the province of 
Nerike and the other half in the province of Vermland. There were four 
sons and one daughter in the family, of whom Victor, Edward and John 
Alfred reside in America, and Carl Emil and Augusta in Sweden. All 
received their education in the public schools and were confirmed in the 
Lutheran church. 



872 SWEDISH-AiAIERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Victor Bergstedt came to St. Paul in 1891, and became a clerk in a 
wholesale house ; his brother Edward followed a year later, and learned 
the trade of carpenter. They started business on their own account in 
February, 1897, as manufacturers and jobbers of cider and cigars, and 
afterwards became jobbers in soda fountain supplies and later took up 
the manufacture of soda fountains. They are both energetic and enter- 
prising, and conduct their business in a creditable manner. 

Mctor Bergstedt is unmarried ; he is most of the time occupied in 
selling the firm's output on the road, and belongs to the Illinois Com- 
merci^al Men's Association, United Commercial Travellers' Association, 
Minnesota Commercial Men's Health Association and the Norden Club. 

Edward Bergstedt married, October 10, 1900, Julia Wilhelmina, 
daughter of Peter J. and Emma Wilhelmina Holmberg, who had lived for 
some years in St. Paul, and they have five children, namely: Marian 
Wilhelmina, born August 22, 1901 ; Harriet Elizabeth, born March 23, 
1903; Walter Edward, born March 30, 1905, and died May 14, 1909; 
Milton Victor, born November 18, 1906; and Laura Julia, born April 
15, 1909. The family are members of St. James' English Lutheran 
church, of which Mr. Bergstedt was elected trustee and deacon in Jan- 
uary, 1908. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, Swe- 
dish Brothers, United Commercial Travellers, and the Norden Club. 

BoRGE CoLLANDER, a succcssful coal and grain dealer of St. Paul, 
was born June ii, 1854, in Sweden, and is the son of Carl and Anna 
Collander. He received his education in the public schools of Sweden, and 
at the age of fourteen was thrown on his own resources. He was em- 
ployed several years as servant, and in 1884 emigrated to -the United 
States; after spending a few months in Pittsburg and Alleghany City, 
Pennsylvania, he removed to St. Paul, where he first found employment 
in the work on the Clarington Hotel, then being, erected. He served a 
year as porter in this hotel, then spent two years as coachman, and after- 
wards spent three years in the employ of Gorden & Ferguson, merchants 
in St. Paul. 

Mr. Collander's first independent enterprise was in the teaming busi- 
ness, at first using but one team, and later he formed a partnership with 
Otto Peterson, dealing in coal, wood, grain and hay, the location being 
Payne avenue. They continued in business eight years, and then dissolved 
partnership, at which time Mr. Collander carried on the business alone, 
and is now one of the best known dealers in the First ward in this line. 
He has a reputation for honesty and integrity, and by his industry and 
thrift has established a lucrative trade. 

Mr. Collander married, June 4, 1883, Carlena Johnson, and they have 
three children, namely: Hilma E., Bertha E. and Ernest. They had 
also a son Alvin, who died at the age of five years. For many years Mr. 
Collander has been an active member of the Lutheran church of the East 
Side, serving over eight years as treasurer and twelve years as trustee. 





<:^CiAylyU4^ ^^ /Jr 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 875 



Dr. Ernest G. Sterner, a rising young physician of St. Paul, was 
born in Smalancl, Sweden, October 31, 1882. His father was a carpenter 
and builder, and emigrated to the United States in 1 891, locating at St. 
Paul, where he made a permanent residence. Ernest G. Sterner began 
his education in Sweden, later attended the public schools of St. Paul, 
and then entered the Northwestern University of St. Paul. He studied 
medicine for some time in the office of Dr. Lundholm, of St. Paul, one 
of the most prominent and able physicians in the state. In 1901 he 
entered Hamline University, of St. Paul, from which he graduated in 
1906, and the same year passed the examination of the State Board and 
was admitted to practice. He spent three years as assistant to Dr. Lund- 
holm, which further fitted him for the independent practice of his pro- 
fession, and in March, 1909, opened an independent office at Rice street 
and University avenue, where he has established a growing practice. 
Pie is enterprising and progressive, and his prospects are promising for 
making a name for himself in medical circles. He is unmarried. 

Dr. Sterner is a member of the American Medical Association, 
Minnesota State Medical Association, Ramsey County Medical Society, 
Twin City Physicians' Club, and is a member of the surgical staff of 
Bethesda Hospital, of St. Paul. He also belongs to the Brotherhood of 
Yeomen. 

Gust Peterson, a wholesale dealer in cider and cigars, of St. Paul, 
was born August 19, 1862, in Sweden, and is the son of Peter Peterson. 
He attended the public school in his native country and later the agricul- 
tural school, after which he became book-keeper in a mill and rose to 
position of manager. In 1888 he emigrated to the United States, locating 
first at Chicago, Illinois, where he learned the trade of painter. Later in 
the same year he removed to St. Paul, where he engaged in business on 
his own account, and took contracts for painting. He was an expert at 
the trade, and soon built up an extensive patronage. However, he was 
ambitious, and began to do business in a small way in another line, the 
firm being, called Twin City Cider & Cigar Company, and when he had 
built it up to warrant his action, he abandoned painting and turned all his 
energies in the direction of his new enterprise. He manufactures the 
cider by what is known as the "process" method, and sells only at whole- 
sale, employing several travelling salesmen. He is enterprising and pro- 
gressive, and does a constantly increasing business. 

Mr. Peterson is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, the Moose order. Swedish United Sons 
of America, East Side Commercial Club, Modern Protective Association 
and Royal League. He lives in the First ward, where he is quite popular 
in social circles, and has a large circle of friends. 

Carl Otto Erickson, the well-known photographer at 171-3 East 
Seventh street, St. Paul, was born in Grasmark, Vermland, Sweden, 



876 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

August 9, 1875, and is a son of Anders and Martha Erickson. His 
father, who was a miller by occupation, died several years since, and 
his mother still resides in Sweden. They had eight children, of whom 
the following seven survive: Hanna, the oldest, married Mr. Paulson, 
of Brecke, Jemtland ; Christine, a widow, resides in Brecke ; Maria Eliza- 
beth, unmarried, lives in America ; Johan August, an engineer, lives in 
Bergen, Norway; Erick Wilhelm, also an engineer, lives in Clarkia, 
Idaho ; Anders Gustaf , a mechanical engineer, is located in Sundswall, 
Sweden; and Carl O., the youngest. 

After acquiring his education in the public schools and being con- 
firmed in the Lutheran church, Mr. Erickson left his native country for 
America, when he had reached the age of seventeen years. He settled 
first at Duluth, but removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he learned 
the art of photography and remained three years. He then removed to 
St. Paul, and worked two years for Algot Anderson, after which he 
opened an independent studio at 93 East Seventh street, and a year later 
removed to his present location. He is a thorough master of his art, and 
his business acumen, combined with his natural taste in the line of his 
vocation, have served to give him a growing patronage. He belongs to 
the Norden Club, East Side Commercial Club, and with the other mem- 
bers of his family, to the Gustavus Adolphus Lutheran church. They 
reside at 493 Maryland street. 

In 1900 Mr. Erickson married Josephine Blomquist, of Froskog 
parish, Dalsland, Sweden, who came to America in 1893. They have 
one daughter, Esther Josephine, born July 21, 1904. 

Charles W. Swanson, proprietor of the Summit Club Livery, at 
240 Selby avenue, St. Paul, was born March 19, 1867, in Sweden, and is 
the son of Carl J. Swenson, a farmer. Carl J. Swenson came to the 
United States some thirty-five years ago, remaining about five years, after 
which he returned to Sweden, which has since been his place of resi- 
dence. 

The son was educated in the public schools of his native country, 
after which he spent some years working on the farm. In 1888 he em- 
barked for the United States, locating, at St. Paul, where he found 
employment in the livery stable of W. Burden, where he remained 
about two years, and then spent some time as coachman for General H. 
H. Sibley, of St. Paul. Subsequently he removed to Shipaway county, 
Minnesota, where he spent five years cultivating a farm, after which he 
removed to Maynard, Minnesota, where he carried on a hotel and livery 
business for six years with pleasing success. Upon selling out his inter- 
ests at Maynard he settled in St. Paul and started business at his present 
location, having now one of the best equipped stables in the city. He has 
all modern conveniences and vehicles, and is prepared on short notice to 
furnish whatever is required for all occasions, such as funeral, wedding 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 879 



and opera calls. Besides the livery business he is engaged quite ex- 
tensively in teaming. 

Mr. Sw^anson married, April 16, 1891, Annie Larson, of St. Paul, 
who vv^as born and educated in Sweden, and they have one child, Edith 
Agnes, now a student in the high school. 

Frank L. Gustafson, a successful florist of St. Paul, was born 
March 7, 1870, in Sweden, and is the son of Gustaf Johnson, who was 
a farmer. Frank L. Gustafson acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native country, and worked for some time as farm hand 
and clerk in a grocery store ; subsequently he spent four years learning 
the trade of gardener and florist. In 1892 Mr. Gustafson emigrated 
to the United States and located in St. Paul, where he found employ- 
ment as florist in the employ of A. Swanson, with whom he remained 
about a year and a half. He then took the position of foreman for L. 
L. May, in the same line of business, and remained with him for 
several years. 

In 1905 Mr. Gustafson embarked in business on his own account, 
and at the present time has one of the best establishments of the kind 
in the city ; he not only has a large and lucrative patronage in St. Paul, 
but also does a large mail order business, and ships goods some dis- 
tance. He is located at 904 Dale street, one of the old garden spots of 
St. Paul, and here Christ Hanson conducted a florist business for a 
number of years. The greenhouses contain forty thousand square feet 
of glass. Mr. Gustafson is enterprising and progressive, and has many 
fine and rare plants, and in all his dealings has shown such honesty and 
integrity as to bring him a reputation for giving his customers the value 
of their expenditures. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, 
Royal Arcanum, Swedish Brothers of America, and the Lutheran 
church. 

Mr. Gustafson married, October 30, 1897, Alma Nelson, born and 
educated in Sweden, and they have two children, namely : Elvera Doro- 
thy, born April 17, 1900, and Evald Leonard, born July 2, 1903. 

Andrew Dahlquist, a restaurant and hotel-keeper of St. Paul, 
was born in Varna parish, in the Province of Ostergotland, Sweden, No- 
vember 30, 1853, and is a son of Lars and Gustafva (Ekman) Nelson. 
After acquiring his education in the public schools and being confirmed 
in the Lutheran church, Mr. Dahlquist went to work on the government 
railroads, and in the course of four years learned the trade of stone- 
cutter. He then became a conductor on the railroad, and remained in 
that capacity two years. Later he worked at his trade in the machine 
works of Bolinder & Co., of Stockholm, Sweden, at the time the firm 
was building, an addition to the works. Subsequently he removed to 
Enkoping. where he entered the employ of Lindeberg & Carlson, con- 
tractors, who built a hotel in that city. 



88o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Mr. Dahlquist emigrated to the United States in 1878, landing in 
New York, and from there he went to St. Joseph, Missouri, where 
for two years he worked as stone cutter for a railroad, and in 1881 re- 
moved to St. Paul. Here he found employment as stone cutter for the 
State of ]Minnesota, which erected the old capitol building. In the fall 
of the same year he was sent by the Northern Pacific Railroad to Port- 
land, Oregon, as foreman for the stone work on their machine works, 
and he remain in that position until June 16, 1884, at which time he 
returned to St. Paul and engaged in the hotel and restaurant business, 
which he has since continued. He maintains a good establishment, and 
has met with pleasing success. 

Air. Dahlquist takes an active interest in public affairs and politics, 
and in 1890 was elected alderman from the Third ward of St. Paul, the 
richest ward of the city, and served two terms, during which time he 
introduced a bill for building a public market. This bill was passed, 
and by the expenditure of $440,000 St. Paul has now the largest market 
in the northwest. Mr. Dahlquist has also taken an active part in im- 
proving railroad facilities and wholesale houses, has had a number of 
streets paved and the lighting, improved in his ward. He has always 
lent his support to work for the worthy poor, and when the forest fires 
at Hinckley destroyed property in that region Mr. Dahlquist donated a 
considerable sum for the alleviation of suffering, and for a long time 
cared for the orphans and widows of nine families. He is a member of 
the Order of Druids. Order of Eagles, Loyal Order of Moose, Vega 
Literary Society and the Druid Ladies' Circle. 

Mr. Dahlquist married, in 1887. Emma Christina Anderson, who 
was born near Jonkoping, in 1862, and came to America in 1877. To 
them have been born four children, of whom three are living, namely: 
Ellen Christina, born August 7, 1888, is a stenographer and book-keeper; 
Signe Gerda Maria, born June 15, 1891, is learning millinery, and Andy 
Leonard, born July 15, 1896, is a student. One son is deceased. The 
family resides at 542 Sibley street, and they are members of St. Sigfrid's 
Swedish Episcopal church. 

Axel Nystrom. — A man of prominence and influence in business 
and social circles, Axel Nystrom holds an assured position among the 
leading citizens of St. Paul, and has for many years been a dominant 
power in the development and promotion of its industrial prosperity. A 
son of Lewis G. Nystrom, he was born on the parental farm in Sweden, 
November 19, 1856, and in his native country was bred and educated. 

After leaving the public schools, Axel Nystrom completed the regu- 
lar course of study in the School of Building Instruction, after which he 
served an apprenticeship at the builder's trade, at which he subsequently 
worked as a journeyman for a few years. Emigrating to the United 
States in 1880. INIr. Nystrom located at Braddock, Pennsylvania, where 
he found employment at his trade with the Andrew Carnegie Company. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 88i 



Coming from there to St. Paul in 1882, he worked at his trade for various 
firms for a period of three years. Starting in business on his own 
account in 1885, he has since won a commanding position among the 
leading contractors of this vicinity, confining himself not exclusively to 
city work, but frequently taking large contracts in neighboring cities. 
Mr. Nystrom is known far and wide as one of the most popular and pro- 
gressive contractors in his line of work, which is now almost entirely 
confined to stone and brick work, in this part of the state, and his services 
are in constant demand. 

On November 1 1, 1879, ^^- Nystrom was united in marriage with 
Anna Helen Olson, who was born and educated in Sweden. She died, 
March 7, 1881. Mr. Nystrom was married to Hannah Maria Nyman 
on June 3, 1882, and into their home three children were born, namely: 
Harry A., born August 26, 1884; Edward W., born June 18, 1886; and 
Clifford M., born December 21, 1888. Harry A. died January 3, 1898. 
Edward W. and Clifford M. were educated in St. Paul, being graduated 
from the grammar school and in one of St. Paul's business colleges. 
Clifford M. is now a stenographer for a large manufacturing concern, 
and Edward W. is in business in St. Paul as a jeweler and watch-maker. 
Mr. Nystrom is very active and prominent in Masonic circles, being a 
Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic Shrine ; he is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to the lodge in 
which he is a past grand, and is also a member of the Encampment, and 
the Patriarchs Militant. He is a member of the Swedish United Sons 
of America ; and of the Modern Samaritans. Both Edward W. and 
Clifford M. belong to the Masonic order. 

Professor Olof Valline, of St. Paul, is generally one of the most 
popular Swedish-Americans of Minnesota. He is a native of Vanne- 
berga, Trolle-Ljungby parish, Sweden, born on the 3rd of November, 
1847, to Ola and Elna (Hanson) Swenson. The father was a carpenter 
by trade, and the son received his education in the public schools and 
under private instructors in Lund. As it was evident from an early 
period that his tastes were decidedly musical, Olof was sent to Ahus, 
at the age of twelve years, to take lessons on the piano and organ, this 
being preparatory to entering the Royal Conservatory of Music at 
Stockholm. Two years at the latter institution, however, exhausted the 
funds of the young man, now well advanced as a student, so that in the 
fall of 1868 he was obliged to leave the more expensive capital city and 
move to the university town of Lund, near his home town. There he 
continued his musical studies under the renowned choirmaster and or- 
ganist of the cathedral, Gnospelius. One year of this fine training enabled 
him to pass the reg.vilar examination for that position himself, and from 
1869 to 1872 he spent as an organist and leader of singing societies. 

In 1872 Professor Valline married Miss Flilma Josephina Liljeblad. 

56 



882 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

a school teacher and daughter of the well known organist and choirmas- 
ter of Fulltofta, Skane, and the young couple at once emigrated to the 
United States, settling at Moline, Illinois, in May of that year. Their 
wedded happiness was of short duration, for the wife died after eleven 
months in childbirth, the infant daughter only surviving six months. 
During his six years at Moline, Professor Valline taught music and lead 
the choirs of the Swedish Lutheran churches in that city and at Rock 
Island, and upon moving to Red Wing continued a like career there. A 
few years of busy and creditable professional work in the latter city 
was followed by a change of residence to St. Paul, where he was em- 
ploved in the branch book store of the Engberg-Holmberg Publishing 
Company of Chicago, as well as by its successor. K. A. Wallen. _ The 
two years thus spent terminated his connection with the book business, 
and since then he has been continuously identified with the profession for 
which he has been so thoroughly fitted and to which he is so naturally 

adapted. 

Since 1891 the professor has served as the leader of the Swedish 
singing society Vega, and to his enthusiasm and inspiration are almost 
enttrely due its rapid advancement and splendid present standing. His 
talents have not only been recognized by its members, in personal ac- 
knowledgment, but upon several noteworthy public occasions. On No- 
vember 3, 1907, upon the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, he was 
honored with a surprise party at Vasa Hall, St. Paul, where his friends 
and admirers crowned him with a laurel wreath in recognition of his 
mastery of Swedish music and song. When the great Swedish opera 
singer, Carl Frederick Lundquist, visited the Twin Cities, Professor 
Vafline was selected as leader of the great chorus, comprising the singing 
societies, Vega, of St. Paul, and Orpheus, of Minneapolis. 

Alexander Lindahl.— Many of the most thrifty and successful 
business men of Ramsev county were born and reared on the other side 
of the Atlantic; and to Sweden especially is Minnesota indebted for 
some of her most enterprising and prosperous citizens. Prominent among 
this number is Alexander Lindahl, a well-known watchmaker and jeweler 
of St. Paul, located at No. 910 Payne avenue. He was born, in i860, 
in Lund, Sweden, a son of Sven Johan Lindahl, who was a blacksmith 
by trade. His father married Christina Richter, and of the six children 
born to them two died in infancy, and four are now living, as follows: 
Johan. of Malmo, Sweden, is a machine inspector on the State Railroad ; 
Christian, a blacksmith, resides at Eslof, Sweden; Alexander, the spe- 
cial subject of this brief biographical sketch; and Christopher, of St. 
Paul. Minnesota, is a clerk in the office of the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction at the Capitol. 

At the age of fifteen years, having completed the course of study 
in the public schools of his native city, Alexander Lindahl entered the 
employ of Sven Lundin, a prominent watchmaker of Lund, and after 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 885 

serving an apprenticeship of four years received, at the age of nineteen 
years, his diploma as a competent watchmaker journeyman. The follow- 
ing year he worked at his trade in Lund, and then, in 1881, emigrated 
to this country, locating first in Chicago, Illinois, where he spent eighteen 
months, working for dififerent firms. Removing from, there to Crystal 
Falls, Michigan, in 1883, he resided there two years, keeping busily 
employed. In 1885 Mr. Lindahl established himself as a jeweler and 
watchmaker in St. Paul, and in the time that has since elapsed has here 
built up a large and constantly increasing patronage, his skill and ability, 
and his honest, upright dealings, attracting customers from the city and 
its suburbs, and winning him the position of watch inspector for the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

Mr. Lindahl married, in 1887, Hanna Aplin, of Vestergotland, Swe- 
den, and into their home eight children have been born, two of whom, 
Ebba and Russell, died in infancy, and six are now living, namely: 
Edith, a teacher in the public schools ; Fritz, learning the watchmaker's 
trade with his father; Olga and Einar, students in the St. Paul High 
School ; and Mildred and Elmer, attending the graded schools. 

Taking a deep interest in the public welfare, Mr. Lindahl served 
the city as alderman from 1894 until 1898, and since 1903 has been a 
member of the Board of Education. He belongs to numerous fraterni- 
ties, being a member of the blue lodge of Masons ; of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; of the Modern Woodmen of America; of the 
Modern Samaritans; of the Swedish United Sons of America; of the 
Swedish Brothers, of which he is secretary ; and is also a member of the 
East Side Commercial Club. The family residence is at No yq? Case 
street. ' ^^^ 

Olof Seaquist, a well-known merchant tailor of St. Paul, was born 
in Grasmark parish, Vermland, Sweden, September 5, 1857, and is the 
son of Nels and Christina Person; the former died in 1908 and his 
widow still resides in Vermland. They had a family of ten children, all 
still living, and four of them are residents of the United States. 

Mr. Seaquist received his education in the public school of his 
native parish, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church, thereafter 
being apprenticed to learn the tailoring trade at Thorsby. 'Two years 
later he removed to Stockholm, where he further perfected himself in 
his art, and remained in that city five years. In 1880 Mr. Seaquist 
emigrated to the United States, landing in New York, and spent two 
years working at his trade in Brooklyn, at first working at sewing, and 
later as assistant cutter. He removed to St. Paul in 1882, and there 
spent sixteen years in the employ of John Sandell, a prominent and 
successful merchant tailor, where he worked in the capacity of cutter. 
He first entered into the business on his own account in 1898, locating 
in the Merchants' Hotel, in St. Paul, and since that time has enjoyed 
excellent success and has built up a lucrative custom. He is thorou^-h 



886 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



master of the trade, and his honesty and integrity are shown in all his 
deaUngs. Mr. Seaquist is unmarried, and is a member of the Norden 
Ckib. 

GusTAF R. Anderson, a popular tonsorial artist of St. Paul, was 
born November 30, 1864, in Orebro, Sweden, and is the son of Johan 
Gustaf Reinhold and Maria Anderson. His father was a skilled organ 
builder, and' was connected with the renowned firm of Zetterquist & Son, 
of Orebro. After receiving his education in the public schools of his 
native parish and being confirmed in the Lutheran church, he started 
at the early age of fourteen years to learn the trade of barber. After 
attaining his majority he served two years in the Swedish army, and then 
worked a few years at his trade. He then removed to the United States, 
spending some time in Brattleboro, Vermont, from where he went to 
Worcester, Massachusetts, and in 1888 removed to Minneapolis, where he 
worked at his trade for some time ; he then opened a shop on his own ac- 
count, being located three years in the New York Life Building, and for 
another three years in South Minneapolis. In 1895 he removed to St. 
Paul and began business at his present location August i of that year. 
He is a skilled barber, and an enterprising business man, so that he has 
met with success in his undertakings. Socially he is a member of the 
Swedish brothers, of the Modern Woodmen of America, and of the Nor- 
den Club. He was one of the first members of the Orpheus Singing 
Society of Minneapolis, and of the Vega Singing Society of St. Paul. 
In 1908 he removed, with his family, to his new residence at 1142 Marshall 
avenue. 

Mr. Anderson was married, in 1901, to Miss Moline, of Nora, West- 
manland, Sweden, born in 1877, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren. Anders Rudolph, born July 5, 1902, and Elsa Maria, born Febru- 
ary 8, 1907. 

Nels Sandell, a well-known merchant of St. Paul, was born in 
Fryksande parish, Vermland, Sweden, January 14, 1845, and is a son of 
Nils and Maria (Johanson) Nilson, both now deceased. They were 
farmers and kept an inn, these inns furnishing board and lodging, also 
means of transportation to the next inn, where there are no railroads, 
and they are under the regulation of the government as to service and 
prices. Of the five children of Nils Nilson four are living, Nels and John 
in St. Paul, and Marit and Maria on the old homestead in Sweden. 

Nels Sandell received his education in the public school, and after- 
wards helped with the work on his father's farm and the work of the inn, 
and being a young man of considerable enterprise, at the same time kept 
a general merchandise store on his own account. He served the required 
two years with the Swedish army, and in 1868 emigrated to the United 
States ; he settled in Minnesota, where he worked two years for a river 
contractor, and then opened a general store in Jordan, Scott county. In 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 887 



the spring of 1882 he sold out his interests and removed to St. Paul, 
where inl:he fall of that year he again embarked in business. He is zn 
energetic and keen business man, and conducts his affairs with integrity 
and honest dealing. He is a member of the Ancient Free & Accepted 
Masons, blue lodge, is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Druids, Working Men's Association, and belongs to the Norden 
Club. 

^Ir. Sandell married, in 1867, in Sweden, Carolina Johnson, who 
was born in the same parish as himself, and their six children are: 
George, born March 29, 1871 ; Oscar, born April 13, 1873 ; Anna Matilda, 
bornMay i, 1875; Albert, born January 4, 1878; Hilda Rovina, born 
February 26, 1885, and Walter William, born February 28, 1890. George, 
Oscar and Albert are in business ; Anna Matilda and Hilda Rovina, the 
latter a music teacher, reside with their parents, and Walter W. is study- 
ing at the University of Minnesota. George was married, March 4, 1903, 
to Margaretta Aurillia Baier, of Jordan, Minnesota, and they have two 
children, Urana Alice, born December 21, 1905, and George Albert, born 
May 5, 1908. George Sandell is a member of the Norden Club. Oscar 
was married, June 16, 1903, to Anna S. Grote, of St. Paul, and they have 
two children, Ethel, born April 14, 1904, and Paul, born October 30, 
1905. Oscar Sandell is a Blue Lodge Mason, member of the Order of 
Druids, United Commercial Travelers, Norden Club and East Side Com- 
mercial Club, of St. Paul. Albert Sandell is also a member of the Norden 
Club. The family of Nels Sandell reside at 1209 Ashland avenue, and 
are members of St. Sigfrid's Swedish Episcopal church. 

Hans G. Johnson. — Having begun on a low rung, of the ladder of 
attainments, Hans G. Johnson has, by close application, untiring energy, 
and diligent use of his faculties and opportunities, proved himself a useful 
and worthy citizen, and is now carrying on a substantial grocery business 
at No. 915 Arcade street, being the leading grocer in that part of St. 
Paul. A son of John Swanson. a farmer, he was born, June 15, 1852, in 
Sweden, which was his home for nearly three decades. 

After leaving school Hans G. Johnson worked on the parental home- 
stead until 1 88 1, when he determined to make a decided change in life. 
Coming to the United States, he crossed the country to Minnesota, and 
in St. Paul found work in a saw mill operated by the Omaha Railroad 
Company. At the end of the summer he visited his brother. Rev. N. J. 
Brink, pastor of a Lutheran church, with whom he spent the following 
winter. Returning then to this city, he was employed a few months in 
street grading, after which he purchased an outfit and followed teaming 
for about a year. Selling his team, Mr. Johnson went back to his 
brother's home, where he devoted much of his time to the study of the 
English language. When he had become sufficiently familiar with the 
new tongue, he again came to St. Paul, and for three months was clerk 
in a wholesale grocery. Not liking the confinement indoors, he resigned, 



888 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



and accepted a position as delivery clerk in the retail grocery of John 
Blom, with whom he remained from 1884 until 1890. The following nine 
years Mr. Johnson, in company with August Lundquist, was engaged in 
the grocery business at No. 915 Arcade street. The partnership was 
dissolved on October i, 1899, and Mr. Johnson has since continued the 
business alone, at the same old stand. He is enterprising and progress- 
ive, taking wise advantage of every opportunity to attract and increase 
his patronage, keeping his shelves well stocked with a superior assort- 
ment and quality of goods found in first-class groceries of a large city, 
and has here built up a thriving and remunerative business. 

Mr. Johnson married, June 28, 1884, Bettie Johnson, of St. Paul, 
who was born and educated in Sweden, and they are the parents of two 
children, namely: Joseph H., born April 26, 1885, married Delia San- 
dell, of St. Paul, and they have one child, Harry Theodore; and Ruth 
Amelia, born June 20, 1892. Since 1881 Mr. Johnson has been a devoted 
member of the First Swedish Lutheran church, and has always taken an 
active part in its work. He was for twelve years a deacon in the church ; 
was vice-superintendent of its Sunday School for three years, and one of 
its teachers for twenty years ; has served as treasurer of the Mission, 
and was three times a delegate to the Conference. 

Otto Pe.\rson. — Numbered among, the enterprising and prosperous 
business men of St. Paul is Otto Pearson, of No. 937 Payne avenue, East, 
who has here built up a thriving trade as a dealer in meats and pro- 
visions, his market being, one of the best and most attractive in the 
vicinity. A son of Nels and Anna Pearson, he was born, September 15, 
1870, in Sweden, where he spent his days of boyhood and early man- 
hood. His father, who is now retired from active pursuits, his name 
being on the pension list, was for many years a public official, being what 
is called in Sweden an agriculture inspector. 

Leaving his native land in 1888, Otto Pearson crossed the Atlantic 
in search of remunerative employment, coming to St. Paul, which was 
even then the home of many of his countrymen. The ensuing six years 
he labored industriously at any honorable work, and being naturally pru- 
dent in his expenditures and wise in his savings, accumulated considerable 
money, comparatively speaking. Starting in business for himself in 1896, 
Mr. Pearson opened his present market, on Payne avenue, and in its 
management has been ver}^ successful, having established a large and 
lucrative trade, and in the meantime having won the confidence and 
esteem of the community by his manly, upright dealings. 

On September 20, 1901, Mr. Pearson married Anna Toren. who was 
born and educated in Sweden, being, a daughter of Nels Toren, now of 
St. Paul. Mr. Pearson is interested in various fraternal organizations, 
belonging to Montgomery Lodge, No. 258, F. & A. M. ; to Jewel Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; to the Modern Woodmen of America, and to the Swedish 



THENSWYORJi: 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDENFOUNOATiONa. 




C. A. HALLENBERG 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 891 



Brothers. He is also a member of several insurance societies. Relig- 
iously he attends the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Carl A. Hallenberg. — The dominant factors in the accumulation 
of wealth in this competitive age are of necessity men possessing a rare 
combination of business qualifications, although they may not be strictly 
classed with the world's financiers. Prominent among the number is 
Carl A. Hallenberg, of Minneapolis, whose industry, thrift, sound judg- 
ment, and keen foresight have won him success in his career. A son of 
Anders and Hanna (Suneson) Hard, he was born, October 12, 1837, on 
the estate Faglasang, in Hallaryd parish, Smaland, Sweden, coming from 
distinguished ancestry. 

Mr. Hallenberg is a nephew of the renowned Professor Jonas Hallen- 
berg, who was born in the same place, in 1748, and died in 1834. Profes- 
sor Hallenberg was a man of culture, especially interested in historical 
research, and for his contributions to Swedish literature received, during 
the later years of his life, the title of Royal Privy Councillor, and was 
elevated to the rank of nobility. His most notable work was "The His- 
tory of the Kingdom of Sweden During, the Reign of Gustavus Adolphus 
the Great," a work which is considered one of the greatest treasures of 
the historic literature of Sweden, although he did not live long enough 
to fully complete the history. 

After his confirmation, Carl A. Hallenberg began life for himself 
as a clerk in a general mercantile establishment, remaining thus employed 
until attaining his majority. Having in the meantime acquired a practical 
knowledge of the business, he then opened a general store in Fagarhult, 
Kalmar province, where he remained three years. Moving then to the 
village of Nybro, he was there engaged in mercantile pursuits for four 
years. In 1867, wishing to broaden his scope of action, Mr. Hallenberg 
came to this country, and after traveling in different parts of the United 
States for a year, looking for a favorable location, he settled in St. Paul, 
where he resided during the ensuing ten years. During that time he 
filled a contract for laying a part of the first water mains in the city, 
the water being brought from Lake Phalen. On the completion of the 
water works, in 1870, Mr. Hallenberg started a drayage and express 
business, at the same time opening a hotel. These lines of industry 
proved almost as lucrative as contracting had been, enabling him, in 1877, 
to take with him to Fargo, North Dakota, a comfortable sum for invest- 
ment. There, purchasing a large house, he opened a hotel and restaurant, 
which he managed most successfully. As his business grew, and money 
accumulated, he invested in lands, buying or selling farms as the case 
might be, and in addition bought city property, farm lands in Minnesota, 
and bank stock, having at one time been a director in the Moorhead 
(Minn.) National Bank, but later selling his stock in that institution. 

During the disastrous conflagration of 1893, in Fargo, Mr. Hallen- 
berg lost a large part of his properties, among them being his hotel. 



892 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

With characteristic enterprise, however, he had rebuilt two of his busi- 
ness properties within sixty days. The fire materially changed his plans, 
as he and his wife, intending on that very evening to leave Fargo for a 
trip to Sweden, were forced to unpack their baggage and forego their 
expected European visit. Instead of rebuilding his hotel, Mr. Hallen- 
berg opened a real estate, land and farm loan business, which he con- 
ducted with profit for many years, accumulating property of great value. 
He also owns, and occupies,' the large apartment building "Elsinore," at 
the corner of Chicago avenue and Eighteenth street, Minneapolis; his 
real home, however, being in Woodland Park, Moorhead, Minnesota. 

Mr. Hallenberg has been twice married. He married first, in 1866, 
Johanna Charlotte Johanson, who was born at Sandvik, near Vimmerby, 
Sweden. She died in 1899, and her body is interred in the Riverside 
Cemeterv, in Fargo, North Dakota, a beautiful resting place for the dead. 
Eight children blessed their union, six of whom are living, namely: 
Selma Johanna Matilda, wife of Dr. Albert W. Skelsey, a well-known 
physician and surgeon of Fargo ; Edla Hanna Christina, wife of Thomas 
D. Stack, a noted lawyer and city judge of Walhalla, North Dakota; 
Oscar, one of the leading druggists of Fargo ; Albert, a successful dentist 
in Fargo; Herbert, practicing law in Fargo; and Victor, at present a 
student in the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Hallenberg married, 
second, in 1905, Edla Hanson, who was born at Norra Tang, S5derakra, 
province of Kalmar, Sweden. Although he takes no active part in polit- 
ical affairs, Mr. Hallenberg, during his earlier residence in St. Paul, 
served as United States marshal, and was appointed immigrant agent 
by Governor Pillsbury. 

John Bodin. — That success is by no means accidental is manifest in 
a review of the lives of those who have attained to positions of inde- 
pendence in professional and commercial callings. It becomes apparent 
upon such study that certain essential qualifications were present and 
constantlv utilized in the direction of a fixed purpose. Willingness to 
w^ork. persistence, the faithful performance of every duty, honesty and 
ambition to rise— these among other qualities will be found predominating 
in those who are meeting with prosperity and controlling business inter- 
ests. The elements of success are inborn, and St. Paul numbers among 
its business coterie many who, on the merits of their innate powers, have 
gradually worked their way from comparative obscurity to places of 
prominence in its commercial circles. Among such deserving mention 
is John Bodin, who for thirty years had been one of St. Paul's leading 
druggists. He entered into rest October 30, 1906, leaving behind him an 
enviable record. 

Mr. Bodin was born in Sweden, January 14, 1842. The public 
schools of his native land afforded him his educational advantages and. 
having completed his studies, he remained amid his Alpine surroundings 
until lie had reached his twenty-fifth year, or until 1867, when he sailed 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 893 



for the United States. Impressed with the reports of exceptional oppor- 
tunities offered in the new world to those wishing to enter any of the 
various callings, he became imbued with the idea of casting his lot on 
American soil and his ambition was gratified when he landed in the 
United States. Upon his arrival he located in St. Paul, where he secured 
employment with a wholesale drug firm, Noyes Bros. & Cutler, The 
value of his services in his first position is apparent from the fact that he 
remained with the employer by whom he was engaged for eleven years. 
Quick of perception, bright and particularly observant, this lapse of time 
was well utilized, so that he became thoroughly familiar with every detail 
of the business. In 1878, feeling confident that his knowledge of phar- 
macy was adequate to justify him in conducting business on his own 
account, he opened a drug store at No. 329 East Seventh street, which 
was his stand for a period of thirty years. Successful from the outset, 
through his unwearied industry and solicitation to please his customers, 
he became one of the most popular and prosperous pharmacists in the 
city. For seventeen years he conducted the business alone, but, owing 
to its increasing business he took V. C. Sundberg as a partner in 1895, 
the firm being known as John Bodin & Company. Following the part- 
nership he opened another establishment, and at the time of his death 
operated a drug store on Payne avenue and at the same time continued 
business at the old stand. No. 329 East Seventh street. After his death 
his wife became a member of the firm. The members of the company 
incorporated in January, 1909, and the firm is now known as the Bodin- 
Sundberg Drug Company, and opened up another store on Rice street 
at that time. The business is constantly increasing and it is one of the 
most reliable and largest drug firms in St. Paul. 

On the 9th of February. 1877, Mr. Bodin was united in marriage to 
Miss Helen Sammelson. daughter of Frank and Johanna Sammelson, of 
Vasa, Goodhue county, Minnesota. Her parents were born and educated 
in Sweden, coming to the United States when quite young. Mrs. Bodin 
was born at Geneva, Illinois, but was later taken by her parents to Vasa, 
where she was reared and educated. To Mr. and Mrs. Bodin were born 
nine children: Emil, whose birth occurred in 1879, "^i^d May 8, 1883; 
Hannah, married Edward Bjorklund in 1906; Frank, married Martha 
Hawkinson in 1908 ; Amelia ; Ruth ; Edith ; Mamie ; Carl ; and Erwin. 

Politically Mr. Bodin was a Republican. While he took active inter- 
est in party affairs, exerting his influence in behalf of the election of 
Republican candidates, he never desired nor sought public office as a 
reward for his services. He was prominently identified with the Swedish 
Lutheran church, having for over thirty years officiated as a member of 
the church board and served for the same period as a deacon. His con- 
duct ever in the keeping with the tenets of his religious faith, he sustains 
an unassailable reputation, while as an honorable business man he com- 
manded the respect of all who knew him and was one of St. Paul's sub- 
stantial commercial factors and worthy citizens. 



894 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

John Peterson. — The subject of this sketch occupies a prominent 
place among the leading Swedish-Americans of Minnesota. Successful 
in business, prominent and popular in political, educational and religious- 
affairs, John Peterson, of St. Paul, is entitled to special notice on the 
pages of this work. 

Mr. Peterson is a native of Kil, Vermland, Sweden, and was born 
July 6, 1841, son of Peter and Carrie (Karin) Johnson, farmers. In the 
Peterson family were five children, namely: Anna (deceased), Stina 
Kajsa, Per, John and Erik Magnus, who were educated in the public 
schools and confirmed in the Lutheran church. 

After his confirmation John was apprenticed to the trade of car- 
penter, and for a number of years followed this trade. He was employed 
in the work of building station houses and bridges on the line of the gov- 
ernment railroad. Afterward he worked at Lesjofors, north of Filip- 
stad, and, in 1863, at Sundsvall, in northern Sweden, he helped to erect 
the fine public school building, which subsequently was destroyed by fire. 
After this he went back to railroad work and covered much important 
work at various places, including, the building of the railroad station at 
Charlottenberg, on the boundary between Sweden and Norway. He was 
later made superintendent of construction of railroad bridges for the 
Swedish government. 

In 1869, America, with its many advantages for a young man's 
advancement, appealed to Mr. Peterson, and that year he left his native 
land and took up his abode in Minnesota. Like most of his countrymen 
who landed here, he was glad to accept the first employment that offered. 
In his case it was grading on the line of the railroad being built from 
St. Paul to Sioux City, which is now a part of the Northwestern system. 
The following summer he worked in the harvest fields near Rochester, 
and in the fall he returned to railroad work, this time as a sub-contractor 
on the Winona & St. Peter Railroad. In 1871 he became a member of 
the firm of C. J. Larson & Company, with which he was associated until 
1888, when it was dissolved, and during that period of eighteen years he 
was actively identified with the building of many hundred miles of railroad 
in the Northwest. In the meantime he became interested in stone quarry- 
ing and building, in partnership with Mr. Fred Widell, of Mankato, with 
whom he was associated several years. Also, from time to time, he has 
been identified with various other enterprises, which he has pushed to 
success. He has conducted extensive farming operations in northwestern 
Nebraska, and in northern Minnesota has had large investments in live 
stock. Since its organization he has served as director of the Nicollet 
National Bank of St. Peter, where he settled on coming to the state, and 
he has been president of the Northwestern Publishing Company of St. 
Paul, and vice-president of the Svcnska Folkcts Tidiiing of ■Minneapolis. 

Politically Mr. Peterson is a Republican. For years has given his 
influence and much personal service to advance the best interests of his 
party, many times serving as delegate to congressional and state conven- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 895 



tions. Several years he was a member of the Central Committee and of 
the Second Congressional district. In 1894 he was elected to the Min- 
nesota State Senate, in which he served with credit to himself and his 
constituents. Three times he was appointed a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the State Hospitals for Insane, twice by Governor Merriam 
and once by Governor Nelson, For fifteen years, from 1881 to 1896, 
he was a member of the City Council of St. Peter, and for two years was 
its president. He was appointed to his present position, that of collector 
of customs for the district of Minnesota, in December, 1897 ; took charge 
of the office on February i, 1898, and has filled the same acceptably ever 
since. 

Educational and religious matters also have claimed much of Mr. 
Peterson's time and attention. For more than twenty years he served as 
a director of Gustavus Adolphus College of St. Peter, and for many years 
was its treasurer. In his church, the Swedish Lutheran church, he has 
served for many years as a member of the Council. 

In 1873 Mr. Peterson married Miss Fredrika Elizabeth Lundburg, 
who died in 1908, leaving him, with a family of seven children : Agnes L., 
Adolph C, Bernard R., Hjalmar N., Mabel F. C, Vernon J. C, and 
Russell F. G. 

John Calander, a manufacturer of St. Paul, was born in Herrestad, 
Karda parish, Smaland, Sweden, January 29, 1857, and is a son of Johan 
and Kajsa Peterson. His father was a farmer and builder and died at 
the age of eighty-one years and his mother at the age of ninety-one years. 
Mr. Calander was one of four sons, of whom August died in his native 
country ; Anders Peter is a farmer in Sweden ; the third is John, and the 
youngest, Fred, is a farmer of Pope county, Minnesota. His two brothers 
who survive call themselves Johnson, after the Swedish custom of using 
the father's Christian name for a surname, adding the suffix son; Mr. 
Calander, however, on account of the large number of persons using the 
name of Johnson, took the name of Calander, which suited him much 
better, and which he has used since coming to America. 

Like most Swedish children, John attended the public schools until 
the time of his confirmation in the Lutheran church, and later learned the 
trade of carpenter, after spending some time on his father's farm. On 
attaining his majority he served the necessary two years in the army, and 
in 1880 emigrated to America. He located in St. Paul, which has since 
been his place of residence. He worked nine years at his trade, being 
in the employ of one firm the last six years, and in 1889, under the nam,e 
of John Calander, started business on his own account, doing general 
contracting, and jobbing, and manufacturing store and office fixtures. In 
1895 he added the manufacture of rolling stepladders for use in stores, 
and now also manufactures the Glenwood lace cabinet. His factory is 
located at 629-31-3 Jackson street, on a site which he owns, and he also 
owns his residence at 580 Laurel avenue, as well as other property. He 



896 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



is a man of much business acumen and energy, and has a large and pros- 
perous enterprise. 

February 18, 1886, Mr. Calander married Ida Johnson, who was born 
in Ryssby, Smaland, August 12, 1865, and the union has been blessed with 
five children, namely: Agnes Elvira, born November 19, 1886, book- 
keeper and stenographer in her father's office ; Lilly Otilia, born August 2, 
1888; Arthur Reuben, born December 3, 1894; and George Edwin, born 
November 19, 1898; one daughter, Ruth Emilia Josephina, born February 
13, 1893, clicd May 25, 1895. They attend the First Swedish Lutheran 
church. 

GusTAF Hedberg. — Among the prosperous business men of St. Paul, 
Ramsey county, Gustaf Hedberg holds an assured position, being, junior 
member of the firm of Sjoberg & Hedberg, fire insurance agents, and 
dealers in real estate, loans and farm lands, with office at No. 313 Jackson 
street. A native of Sweden, he was born, January 15, 1865, in Grafva 
parish, \'ermland, a son of Peter and ]\Iaria Brita (Nelson) Johanson, 
who are now living in Karlstad, Sweden, the father being, a builder of 
window glass factories. Of the ten children born to his parents eight are 
now living, as follows-: Nils, a glass manufacturer in Sweden ; John, a 
railroad contractor in this country ; Andrew, a contractor and builder, 
resides in Denver, Colorado ; Gustaf, the subject of this sketch ; Maria, 
Sophia and Christina, are married and live in Sweden ; and Clara, who is 
also married, lives in Massachusetts. 

Having acquired an excellent knowledge of books in the public 
schools, Gustaf Hedberg was confirmed in the Lutheran church, after 
which he worked in sawmills until attaining his majority, when he served 
for one year in the Swedish army. The ensuing year, in 1887, he emi- 
grated to Alinnesota, coming direct to St. Paul, and working for a few 
months for a stone mason. He subsequently worked as a carpenter on 
the Great Northern Building, then in process of construction, until the 
spring of 1888, when he resumed stone masonry work. From the spring 
of 1889 until the spring of 1890 Mr. Hedberg was employed in the ship- 
ping department of Noyes Brothers, wholesale druggists, after which he 
was for a few months surveyor for the Twin City Railroad Company. 
He then accepted a position as manager of the Alacalester Block, on 
Fourth street, now known as the Kendall Hotel, and remained there until 
1892. In the spring of that year, ]\Ir. Hedberg formed a copartnership 
with Mr. Edwin Sjoberg, opened their present office, and have here built 
up a thriving business. 

j\Ir. Hedberg married, in 1889, Annie Wistrom, who was born August 
19, 1864, in Grammalkil parish, Ostergotland, Sweden. After the death 
of her father she came to America, arriving in 1884, and has since lived 
in Minnesota. Her mother died in Sweden in 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Hed- 
berg have been sadly bereaved in the death of three of their children, all 
of whom died in early life. They have two children living, namely : Lillie, 




/yi^C^yi^^^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 899 



a dressmaker and milliner; and Violet, born January 13, 1893, is studying 
to become a trained nurse. The family reside at No. 105 1 Jenks street 
and attend the Church of the Covenant, or Mission Friends. Fraternally 
Mr. Hedberg is a member of the Woodmen of the World ; of the Modern 
Samaritans ; and belongs to the Dayton's Bluff Commercial Club. 

Frank G. Lilygreen. — A man of far more than average skill and 
ability as a master mechanic, Frank G. Lilygreen is well known in the 
city of St. Paul through his connection with the American Hoist and 
Derrick Company, of whose plant he has had the general superintend- 
ence for the past nine years. A son of Carl Oscar and Ingrid Maria 
(Anderson) Lilygreen, he was born, December 13, 1866, in Slatthult, 
Ljuder parish, Smaland, Sweden, and there spent the first ten years 
of his life. 

Carl Oscar Lilygreen, inheriting, the talent of his father, who was 
an Inventor and a practical mechanic, was a blacksmith, an all-round 
mechanic, and a miller, operating a flour mill for many years. In 
1877 he came with his family to Minnesota, locating at Marine Mills, 
where he reared his family, which consisted of three children, namely : 
Frank G., the subject of this sketch; Annie, wife of William Ahl, a trav- 
elling salesman, living in Stillwater, Minnesota ; and Victor E., a ma- 
chinist, residing in the state of Washington. 

Frank G. Lilygreen received his elementary education in his native 
land, subsequently attending the public schools of Marine Mills. Fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his immediate ancestors, he chose a mechanical 
occupation, and in Stillwater, Minnesota, under D. M. Swain, served 
an apprenticeship of four years at the machinist's trade. Locating in 
St. Paul in 1887, he spent two years in the shops of the Great Northern 
Railroad Company, in the meantime, at the evening schools, taking a 
thorough course in mechanical drawing and the higher mathematics. 
Entering then the employ of the Watrous Engine Works, he was made 
general foreman, and remained with that company about three years. 
From there Mr. Lilygreen came to Minneapolis, accepting a position 
with the Twin City Railway Company, having charge of the pattern 
department until 1895. In that year he was offered a position with the 
American Hoist and Derrick Company, being asked to assume control 
of their pattern department. In 1897 this company took a large con- 
tract for the United States Government to construct disappearing motor 
carnages, which are used in fortifications for coast defence to carry the 
heavy guns. Mr. Lilygreen was transferred from the pattern depart- 
ment, and given entire charge of the Government work. The follow- 
ing year, in 1898, he was made general foreman of the company, and 
in 1900 was promoted to his present position as general superintendent 
of the plant, which employs six hundred men, and covers six whole 
blocks of ground, it being one of the largest plants in the entire city. 



900 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



This company is carrying on a large and especially remunerative busi- 
ness, manufacturing locomotive cranes, derricks, and similar heavy 
machinery. 

Mr. Lilygreen has been twice married. He married first, in 1889, 
Annie Lawson, of Stillwater, Minnesota. She died in MinneapoUs, in 
1894, leaving one son, Carl Sherman, born July 24, 1890, in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Mr, Lilygreen married second, in December, 1895, Mrs. 
Emma Myers, of St. Paul, a widow, who brought with her to their 
home at No. 756 Ashland avenue, St. Paul, an adopted daughter, Lillie 
Louetta, born October 24, 1890. Fraternally Mr. Lilygreen belongs to 
the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; to the Swedish Brothers, which 
he served as president for a year; and to the Norden Club, of which 
he was elected president in January, 1909. 

Louis Peterson. — Prominent among the worthy representatives of 
the Swedish population of St. Paul is Louis Peterson, who rendered com- 
mendable service as head jailer for many years, and has since been suc- 
cessfully engaged in the restaurant business. A son of Ola Peterson, he 
was born on a farm in Helsingborg, Sweden, and there reared to man- 
hood, receiving his knowledge of books in the public schools. 

Brought up on the homestead, Louis Peterson assisted his father in 
its management until 1872, when he sailed for America, the land of his 
heart's desire. The following year he worked as a railroad employe in 
Minneapolis, after which he came to St. Paul, where he worked at any 
honorable employment for twelve months. He was subsequently em- 
ployed for thirteen years in private families as a coachman, .his last 
service being with J. J. Hill, the gre^t railroad magnate, president of the 
Great Northern Railway. Forming then a partnership with Andrew 
Holm, Mr. Peterson was for two years manager of a hotel. Not being 
quite satisfied with the business, he then sold his interest in the house 
and accepted an appointment as head jailer, a position which he filled 
acceptably to all concerned for three full terms of four years each, serv- 
ing under Sheriffs Richter, Captain Edward Bean, and Charles E. Chap- 
pie. He w^as without doubt one of the most efficient and trustworthy 
jailers St. Paul has ever known, and on his retirement from the office was 
given by those in power above him testimonials of which he may well be 
proud. For a number of years afterwards he was successfully engaged 
in the restaurant business in this city, carrying on a profitable business. 

On January 15, 1883, Mr. Peterson married Hattie E. Sjosten, who 
was born and educated in Sweden, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren, namely: Alfred F., born November 6, 1883; and Reuben Alex- 
ander, born September 4, 1885, is now employed in the St. Paul post- 
office. Mr. Peterson has accumulated considerable property through his 
own efforts, and owns valuable real estate just outside the city limits. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 901 



He is a stanch Republican in politics, and true to the religious faith in 
which he was reared is a Lutheran. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and of the United Ancient Order of 
Druids. 

Fred C. Norlander. — A man of push and energy, possessing a reso- 
lute will and an honorable ambition to succeed in his undertakings, Fred 
C. Norlander has earned a fine reputation as a contractor and builder, 
being one of the leading men in his line of occupation in the city of St. 
Paul, Minnesota. A son of Carl Kant and his wife, Inger Olsotter, he 
was born, June 11, i860, in Lyby parish, Skane, Sweden. Neither of his 
parents are living, his father having passed to the life beyond in 1872, 
and his mother in 1875. Of their seven children but four are living, 
namely: Fred C, the special subject of this brief sketch; Peter Carlson, 
living in Sweden ; John Kirk, a railway contractor in America ; and 
Sophia, wife of Janne Lind, a stone cutter in Sweden. 

Finishing, the course of study in the public schools and being con- 
firmed in the Lutheran church, Fred C. Norlander went to Malmo in 1877, 
and during the first year that he staid in that city spent his evenings in a 
technical school, studying construction drawing. In 1879 he there began 
an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, and four years later, on March 
I, 1883, he became a fullfledged master mechanic, receiving his diploma 
as such. He subsequently worked for various contractors, spending the 
whole of the year 1884 at the Kookum Machine Works. 

In 1887 Mr. Norlander emigrated to America, and two months later, 
after he had become well established in St. Paul, he was here joined by 
his wife and children. Mr. Norlander's first employment in this city was 
with an old-time carpenter and contractor, Tim Reardon, and he was 
afterwards employed by other contractors. In 1891, having become 
familiar with the language and customs of the country, he started in 
business as a contractor on his own account, and has continued since 
without interruption. Mr. Norlander has been very successful in busi- 
ness and has handled many large contracts, among others of note having 
erected a number of large school buildings, church edifices, and court- 
houses in Minnesota, Dakota, Iowa, and "VVisconsin. 

In Sweden, on August 11, 1883. Mr. Norlander was united in mar- 
riage with which Johanna Helena, only child of N. C. and Ingrid (Peter- 
son) Hallengren. She was born, August 10, 1863, and was bred and edu- 
cated in her native land. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Norlander, one of whom, Edward, died at the age of nine years, and six 
are living, namely: Nels Carl Oscar, born September 8, 1884, is a book- 
keeper in St. Paul ; Inez Josephina Fredrika, born December 2, 1885, 
now a teacher, was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
the University in Minnesota in 1908 and is a member of the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society, which requires an extraordinary degree of excellence in 



902 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

scholarship to obtain membership ; Edith Amanda Sophia, born November 
6, 1890, is a stenographer and typewriter; Einas Emil, born ]\Iarch 16, 
1893, is a graduate of the pubUc schools; Ebba Myrtle Elizabeth, born 
June 20, 1895, is a public school pupil ; and Fredrik Johan Edward, born 
April 30, 1897, is yet a schoolboy. The family live at No. 1025 Bradley 
street, and all attend the Swedish Mission tabernacle. Fraternally Mr. 
Norlander is a Mason and a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and of the United Ancient Order of Druids, and a member of the 
Swedish Brothers. He likewise belongs to the St. Paul Commercial Club. 

Andrew G. Johnson, superintendent of the Gribben Lumber Com- 
panv, St. Paul. Minnesota, was born in Gunrabol, near Amal, Sweden, 
August 21, 1864, son of John Peter and ^lartha Lisa Anderson. His 
parents were farmers and lived and died in Sweden. Their family com- 
prised eleven children, of whom seven are now living, all in America, 
namely: Anna, widow of Gustaf Anderson; Anton, with the Gribben 
Lumber Company, St. Paul, Minnesota; Augusta, wife of C. E. Holm- 
strom, a blacksm'ith of St. Paul; Amalia, wife of Andrew Anderson, a 
farmer of Chisago county, Minnesota ; Andrew G., whose name introduces 
this sketch ; Ehzabeth, "wife of August Dahlquist, a carpenter in the 
employ of the Gribben Lumber Company; and Sophia, wife of Herman 
Hedm'an, a machinist with the American Hoist & Derrick Company. 

Andrew G. Johnson was educated in the public school and confirmed 
in the Lutheran church, after which he worked on a farm. With a 
desire to see something of the world, he went to Gothenborg, and from 
there worked his way to America, coming via Hull and Liverpool to 
New York, where he landed in the spring of 1882. From New York he 
came directly to St. Paul. 

Here he immediately obtained employment with the C. N. Nelson 
Lumber Company, with which he remained one year, since which time he 
has been identified with the Gribben Lumber Company. For three years 
he worked as a common laborer, was then promoted to the position of 
clerk in the office, and in 1900 was made superintendent, a position he 
has since filled. In the meantime he invested in stock of the company 
and is now one of its stockholders and directors. Also he is a director 
and treasurer in the Union Cemetery Association of St. Paul. He has a 
fine summer home on his beautiful Cloverdale farm on Doctor's Lake, 
Chisago county, Minnesota, and his St. Paul residence is at 793 Magnolia 
street. 

In 1889 Mr. Johnson married Miss Mathilda Anderson, a native of 
Amal, Sweden, born February 7, 1868, and who came, in 1882, to 
America with her parents, Gustaf Anderson and wife Sara. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson have had seven children, of whom five are living: Grace 
Harriet, born September 12, 1894; Andrew Raymond, June 4, 1897; 



SWEDISH-AAIERICANS OF MINNESOTA 903 



Clara Mathilda, December 22, 1900 ; Helen Elizabeth, April 22, 1903 ; and 
Martha Elvira, September 21, 1908. Fraternally Mr. Johnson is identi- 
fied with the Masonic Order, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Swedish Brothers. Also he is a member of the East Side Commercial 
Club. 

Rev. O. p. Berggren was born near Christianstad. Sweden, October 
31, 1840, and died in St. Paul, Minnesota, September 16, 1889. June 24, 
1867, at Copenhagen, Denmark, he married Anna Christina Neilsen, a 
native of that city, born November 19, 1842, and who is still living, now 
a resident of St. Paul. In the same year of their marriage they came to 
America and settled in St. Paul, and from that time until his death he was 
a traveling minister. He was one of the originators of the "Lutheran 
Mission Friends." Rev. Mr. Berggren and wife were the parents of five 
children, namely : Emma Louise, wife of Frank Johnson, a railroad con- 
tractor; Emil T., who resides with his mother in St. Paul, and is at this 
writing the owner of the Capitol Electric Company of this city ; Dagmar 
C, who married August Lund, resides in San Francisco, California ; Miss 
May A. Berggren, the youngest of the family, resides with her mother; 
and Godfrey N. 

Godfrey N., the youngest son, was born November 28, 1873. After 
completing his studies in the public schools he entered the employ of an 
electrical concern, the McBride Electric Company, in which five years 
later he purchased an interest. This business gradually developed from a 
repair shop to a contracting establishment, taking contracts both in their 
•home city and surrounding towns and cities. They installed the elec- 
trical work in at least one-half dozen armory posts and in some twenty 
postoffices and numerous large buildings of various kinds, and they have 
installed electric lighting plants from coast to coast. After being in part- 
nership with Mr. C. F. McBride, of the McBride Electric Company, for 
about three years, Godfrey N. Berggren purchased the interests of the 
other members of the firm and is now running the Unity Electric Com- 
pany of St. Paul. This company in its busy season employs as many as 
two hundred men. 

December 21, 1890, Godfrey N. Berggren married Miss Alice Down- 
ing, who was born in Waukegan, Illinois, May 24, 1874. To them have 
been given four children: Roy, born August 8, 1892, is in his father's 
employ; William, born March 29, 1894, is at this writing a student in 
business college ; Myrtle, born September 10, 1895, and Luella Dolly, born 
May 31, 1899, are attending public school. The family reside at 661 
DeSota street. 

Mr. Berggren is a member of the following fraternal organizations : 
]\Iodern Woodmen of America, Court of Honor, Ancient Order of United 
Druids, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the National Protective 
Learion. He is also a member of the Commercial Club of St. Paul. 



904 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



John Thoorsell. — While it may justly be said that the great state 
of Minnesota is especially fortunate in the eminence and character of 
its citizens, it may likewise be added that to no class of people is it more 
indebted for its industrial progress and prosperity than to those of 
Swedish birth and breeding; and worthy of especial mention among the 
number is John Thoorsell, a well known undertaker in St. Paul. He 
was born, July 28, 1848, in Thorbjorntorp, near Falkoping, Sweden, 
and was there reared and educated. His parents, Anders and Anna 
Maria (Carlson) Johnson, farmers by occupation, reared seven children, 
namely : Maria Elizabeth, wife of Johannes Olson, a railroad man ; 
Jonas, engaged in agricultural pursuits in Sweden ; Anna, wife of Jonas 
Johanson, of Sweden; John, the subject of this sketch; Anders Gustaf, 
formerly a manufacturer, but now manager of large landed estate ; 
Augusta, unmarried, is keeping house for her father ; and Sven Victor, 
managing his father's farm. 

John Thoorsell was educated in the common schools of his native 
land, and after his confirmation in the Lutheran church learned the 
trade of a cabinet maker, working, first in Skara, and later in Gothen- 
borg. Anxious to better his financial condition, he emigrated, in 1869, 
to the United States, and for five years lived in Rockford, Illinois. 
Moving from there to Cannon Falls, Minnesota, in 1874, Mr. Thoorsell 
opened a cabinet-making and undertaking and retail furniture estab- 
lishment, which he conducted successfully until 1887, when he was 
burned out. Coming then to St. Paul, he embarked in the furniture 
and undertaking business, being in partnership with Mr. Charles Wall- 
blom until the memorable financial crisis of 1893, when the firm was 
dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. Thoorsell was subsequently .engaged 
in the undertaking business alone for two years, but from 1895 until 
1906 was in partnership with J. G. Thaung. Since that time, however, 
Mr. Thoorsell has been alone, his undertaking establishment being lo- 
cated at No. 457 Broadway, and he has carried on a substantial busi- 
ness, being, well liked and extensively patronized. 

Mr. Thoorsell married, in 1877, Ida Turner, of Vasa, Goodhue 
county, Minnesota, and of their union eight children have been born, 
namely : Victor Emanuel ; Ebba Victoria ; Phoebe Adelia ; Inez Eliza- 
beth ; Lydia Theodora; Ada Adelia, deceased; Walter Winfield ; and 
Marie Alphine. In his political affiliations Mr. Thoorsell is a stanch 
Republican, and although never an aspirant for public office did serve 
one year as recorder while living in Cannon Falls. Religiously Mr. 
Thoorsell and his family were active members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which he was a trustee for twelve years, three years of that 
time serving likewise as treasurer, but he has now joined the new 
Gloria Dei English Lutheran church, being, with his wife and family, 
among the charter members of that organization. Mr. Thoorsell was 
instrumental in establishing the Union Cemetery Association, which has 
the management of the Union Cemetery, a burial ground designed more 





""^^ j^^^^^<— ^-^--^_^ 



11 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 907 



especially as a final resting place for those of Swedish birth or descent. 
It was incorporated under the state laws, and of this corporation Mr. 
Thoorsell has been secretary for ten years, and is now a trustee. 

Emil Peterson, building contractor, 408 Selby avenue, St. Paul, 
Minnesota, was born January 5, 1867, in Verum parish, Kristianstads Ian, 
Sweden. His father, Per Johansson, born February 2J, 1827, is a son of 
Jonas Persson, who died in 1875. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Elna Jonson, was born in 1832, daughter of Jons Johansson, an architect 
and building contractor in Verum, who died in 1878. Mr. Peterson's 
father and paternal grandfather were farmers. His parents are both 
living, as also are his three brothers. He had one sister. Louis Peterson, 
born February 27, 1857, came to America and settled in St. Paul in 1882. 
He is a carpenter by trade and has been twice married, first, in 1891, to 
Christina Johnson, who died in 1893. In 1900 he married Miss Minnie 
Schultz, of St. Paul. Nels Peterson, born August 7, 1861, came to St. 
Paul in 1883, and at this writing is foreman for Andrew Rankin, con- 
tractor and builder. In 1893 he married Tillie Anderson, who came to 
this country from Vesseltofta parish, Skane, and they have one son, 
Edward Luther, born in 1894. Olof Peterson, born December 29, 1863, 
is a farmer at the old homestead in Sweden, this place having been trans- 
ferred from father to son for several generations. Olof is unmarried. 
The sister's name was Bengta. She was born August 7, 1859, and died 
in 1887. She was the wife of Olof Olsson, a farmer in Vesseltafta parish, 
who, with two sons, survive her. 

Emil Peterson was reared on his father's farm and attended the 
public school until he reached the age of fourteen years. The next six 
vears he spent at the homestead, assisting his father in the farm work, 
and in 1887 he emigrated to America and came direct to St. Paul, where, 
the second day after his arrival he went to work as a carpenter. For 
ten vears he was a wageworker at this trade. Meanwhile, being am- 
bitious to obtain a better education, for several winters he attended the 
evening classes of the Franklin school, and there acquired a fair knowl- 
edge of the English language. Also he studied drawing and architecture 
in his leisure hours, and the houses erected by him are nearly all built 
after his own plans and specifications. Since 1897 he has been contract- 
ing and building, and since 1899 he has occupied his present quarters at 
406 Selby avenue, where, by honest and earnest effort, he has built up 
a large and increasing business, both in building new houses and repair- 
ing, old ones. Mr. Peterson averages a dozen or more houses a year and 
regularly furnishes employment to about twenty men. His own com- 
fortable and attractive home is situated at 1237 Dayton avenue. 

May 17, 1899, he married Jennie Matson, the marriage ceremony 
being performed by Rev. Frank Jensen, of St. James English Lutheran 
church. Mrs. Peterson was born in Gualof, Skane, Sweden, where her 
father, Matts Jonsson, was a farmer, Mr. Jonsson emigrated to America 



9o8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

and died in Cheyenne, North Dakota, in 1906. At the time of her mar- 
riage ^Irs. Peterson was a resident of St. Paul. The fruits of this union 
are'^four children, a son and three daughters, namely: Harold Curtis 
Emanuel, born March 31, 1901 ; Anna Evelyn Jencete, August 7, 1903; 
Dorothy Eleanor Florence, September 15, 1905, and Myrtle Alice Libian, 
September 23, 1908. j, y u 

Mr. Peterson and his family are active members of St. James Fnglish 
Lutheran church, and he is identified with the following fraternal organi- 
zations: The Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Scandinavian Relief Association of Red Wing, Minnesota. 

Abel Swanson, dealer in musical instruments, picture frames, paints 
and paper, 853 Payne avenue, St. Paul, Alinnesota, has been a resident of 
this city for over twenty years and has worked his way from a common 
laborer up to the head of a prosperous business. 

Mr. Swanson was born in Sweden, August i, 1857, the son of Swan 
Nelson, a farmer by occupation. He attended the public schools and as- 
sisted his father on the farm, and when a young man learned the painter's 
trade. Then he clerked in a general merchandise store, and for two years 
and a half successfully conducted a store of his own, which he sold before 
coming to this country. In 1887, he came to the United States and settled 
at St. Paul, where he has since made his home. After a short time spent 
as a wage worker, he engaged in business as a contract painter, in which 
he has continued successfully up to the present time. He gave his energies 
to this work exclusively until May, 1895, when he opened a pamt and 
wall paper store, and in 1901 he added musical instruments and a repair 
department. He now occupies two store rooms (their combined floor 
space being 50 bv 65 feet, and is at the head of a prosperous and -growing 
business. He is' an active member of the East Side Commercial Club. 

October 10, 1894, Mr. Swanson married Miss Hillna Anderson, who 
was a native of' Sweden, and has been a resident of St. Paul since 1882. 
There are nine children : Lawrence R., Olivena, Robert, Denvey, Ruben, 
Herbert, Myrtle, Elsie and Abel. Mrs. Swanson died February 24, 1909. 

John Magnus Carlson.— Conspicious on the long roll of names that 
have conferred honor upon the Swedish population of Minnesota is that 
of John Magnus Carlson, a prominent contractor and builder of St. Paul, 
who, by his honest dealings, reliable work, and close application to_ details, 
has won the confidence of the people of all nationalities, and built up a 
large and remunerative patronage. A man of pronounced ability, and 
forceful individualitv, he has accumulated a fortune in the pursuit of his 
chosen occupation, but has not permitted that fact to change his char- 
acter in any way, being the same modest, unassuming man that he was 
when he came to this city forty years ago, poor in pocket, but rich in cour- 
age and ambition. He was born, November 29, 1841, in Gardsbytofta, near 
Yexio Sweden, a son of Carl and Christina (Johnson) Jonason, the 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 911 



former of whom was born at Fylleryd, Sweden, and the latter at Allatorp, 
Sweden. 

Completing his early education in the public schools of his native 
land, and being confirmed in the Lutheran cTiurch, John M. Carlson sub- 
sequently learned the trades of a cabinet maker and carpenter, which he 
followed a few years. Emigrating to America in 1866, he worked at 
his trades in Chicago, Illinois, for two years. In 1868, he came to St. 
Paul, and the ensuing thirteen years was in the employ of R. C. Wyley, 
who at the end of that time admitted him to partnership. Mr. Carlson 
continued in business with Mr. Wyley for nine years, when, in 1890, he 
bought his partner's interest in the business, and has since continued alone 
as a contractor and builder, becoming one of the leading men in his line 
of industry, his office being located at No. 227-229 East Fifth street. He 
has built many buildings of prominence, among others being the old Capi- 
tol, numerous business blocks, and many fine residences. 

On June g, 1868, Mr. Carlson married Christine Monson, who was 
born in Dadesjo, Smaland, Sweden, and they have three children, namely: 
Harry ]., a prominent architect in Boston, Massachusetts ; Carl Edward, a 
dentist, with offices in the New York Life Building, at St. Paul; and 
George W., in business with his father. Mr. Carlson and his family reside 
at No. 475 Dayton avenue, having a pleasant and attractive home. Mr. 
Carlson takes an active interest in municipal affairs and for four years 
has been a member of the Board of Water Commissioners. He is a prom- 
inent member of the Swedish Lutheran church, of which he has been a 
trustee for more than twenty years, and belongs to the Union Cemetery 
Association, in which he has held several offices of trust and responsi- 
bility. 

Olof Sohlberg, M. D.— The professional career of Dr. Olof Sohl- 
berg, of St. Paul, is a special evidence of the generally admitted fact that 
the patience, the intelligence, the even temperament and the typical 
balance of the Swedish character especially adapt those who are honored 
with that racial blood to successfully follow the practice of medicine. 
The true physician, while a man of profound penetration and sympathy, 
has, at the same time, his feelings under such control that he can direct 
them to the most permanent good of his patient — which are traits very 
noticeable in the personality of Dr. Sohlberg. He is a native of Oster- 
sund, Sweden, born on the 6th of July, 1859, his family being distin- 
guished both for its patriotism and intellectual tendencies. Olof Sohl- 
berg, his father, was a painter, who spent most of his life in that 
place, while his grandfather, Olof Sohlberg, whose earlier life covered 
a most momentous period in the political his'tory of his fatherland, served 
faithfully and with not a little distinction in the Swedish-Russian wars 
of 1808-9 and the Swedish-Norwegian campaign of 18 14. The result of 
the former campaigns was the cession of Finland to Russia, and of the 
latter, the union of Norway with Sweden. 



912 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Having received a collegiate education in his native city, in 1879 
the doctor, with his parents and a younger brother, emigrated to the 
United States, spending the winter of 1 880-1 at Gustavus Adolphus Col- 
lege, St. Peter, Minnesota, and there so perfected himself in the mastery 
of English that he had no difficulty, thereafter, in a free and progressive 
intercourse with his adopted countrymen. After completing his course 
in English at that institution he was matriculated, as a medical student, 
at the Minnesota College Hospital, which afterward became the medical 
department of the state university. Dr. Sohlberg not only obtained his 
professional degree, at his graduation February 29, 1884, but was hon- 
ored with several of the prizes for excellence in scholarship. He at 
once located for practice at St. Paul, and is still occupying the same 
office which he opened a quarter of a centurv' ago. Further, he has 
been in continuous practice during all that period, with the exception 
of portions of 1890-1, which he spent at the European centers of medical 
education, devoting himself to post-graduate work. Dr. Sohlberg has 
established a substantial practice and a high professional reputation at 
St. Paul, and is the owner of a comfortable winter home in a good resi- 
dence district of that city, as well as a summer home at Forest Lake, 
Minnesota, where he generally spends the warmer months of the year 
with his family. 

On June 30, 1886, Dr. Sohlberg married Miss Helvina A. Wold, 
their son Olof, and their foster son, Karl Wold, being both medical 
students at the Minnesota State University. Their daughter. Evie, has 
just completed her common-school course. It should be added to Dr. 
Sohlberg's specific professional record that he is a member of the Ram- 
sey County Medical Society, Twin City Swedish Medical Society, Min- 
nesota State Medical Association and the American Medical Associa- 
tion. He is also a member of the medical stafif of the Bethesda Hospital, 
St. Paul, as well as a director in the Bethesda Hospital and Bethesda 
Deaconess Home of St. Paul. Bethesda Old People's Home of Chisago 
City, Minnesota, and the ^Minnesota College. Minneapolis. Dr. Sohl- 
berg is identified with several other institutions and societies, and has 
been honored with the secretaryship of the board of trustees of the 
First Swedish Lutheran church of St. Paul for nearly twenty years. 

Victor C. Sundberg. — A man of much executive ability, possessing 
good business tact and judgment, Victor C. Sundberg is actively associ- 
ated with the mercantile interests of St. Paul, and as general manager 
of the three stores established and maintained by the Bodin-Sundberg 
Drug Company, of which he is senior member, is numbered among the 
foremost merchants of the city. A son of Peter Sundberg, he was born 
August 29, 1 87 1, in Lake City, Wabasha county, Minnesota, of substan- 
tial Swedish stock. 

Peter Sundberg was born and reared in Sweden, as a young man be- 
ing engaged in business as a shoe dealer in Sunne, Wermland, and married 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 913 



Johanna Peterson after emigrating to America. Coming to Minnesota 
in 1868, he settled at Lake City, where he is now in the shoe business, 
having, as the head of the firm of P. Sundberg & Co., built up a large and 
lucrative trade. To him and his wife four children have been born, 
namely: Victor C, the special subject of this brief sketch; Axel T., 
manager of the Bodin-Sundberg Company's store at No. 879 Rice street ; 
Hilma, who died in childhood; and Edith A., living with her parents in 
Lake City, Minnesota. 

After his graduation from the Lake City high school. Victor C. Sund- 
berg took up the study of pharmacy in Minneapolis, attending a private 
school that was subsequently incorporated in the University of Minne- 
sota. He was graduated from that school in 1893, and the following two 
years remained in Lake City, being connected with the ]\I. L. Collins drug 
store. Coming from there to St. Paul in 1895, Mr. Sundberg entered into 
a copartnership with the well-known druggist John Bodin, under the firm 
name of the Bodin-Sundberg Company. Mr. Bodin died October 28, 
1906, and his interest in the company is retained by his widow. The 
Bodin-Sundberg Drug Company has built up a remunerative trade, con- 
ducting business in three establishments, one store being located at No. 
329 East Seventh street, with Carl Rudeen manager; one at No. 881 
Payne street, with H. M. Johnson manager ; and one at No. 879 Rice 
street. Axel T. Sundberg manager. In the management of these stores 
Mr. Sundberg has met with unquestioned success, each season enlarging 
his operations and increasing his scope of business. 

Mr. Sundberg married, in 1896, Mary Anderson, who was born 
March 29, 1872, a daughter of Oscar Anderson, an. ex-mayor of Lake 
City, who was there for many years engaged in the real estate business, 
but is now living retired from active pursuits, with his good wife, Caro- 
lina Anderson, enjoying the fruits of his earlier years of toil. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sundberg are the parents of five children, namely : Carl T., born 
August 5, 1897 ; Harold V., born February 4, 1899 ; Rudolph H., bom 
February 22, 1901 ; Ranald, born March 2,"], 1903 ; and Helen Marie, born 
May 16, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Sundberg, have a pleasant home at No. 993 
Burr street, where they enjoy entertaining their many friends. They are 
members of the First Swedish Lutheran church, and among its most 
active workers. Mr. Sundberg is a member of the Swedish Brothers, 
of which he has been treasurer since its organization, in 1906 ; and belongs 
to three Retail Pharmacists' Associations, the National, State and City. 

Victor Nathaniel Peterson, M. D. — A rising young physician and 
surgeon of St. Paul, Minnesota, Victor N. Peterson, M. D., has already 
built up an extensive and lucrative patronage, and is fast winning for 
himself an honored name in the medical profession of Ramsey ^county. A 
native of Minnesota, he was born. September 5, 1879, ""i Cokato, Wright 
county, where his father, A. P. Peterson, is engaged in the drug business. 
A. P. Peterson was born in Sweden, and came with his parents to this 

58 



914 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



state in 1861. To him and his wife, whose maiden name was Anna Ander- 
son, three children were born, namely: Victor N., the special subject of 
this brief sketch ; Adler E., a pharmacist, managing his father's business 
in Cokato ; and Leonard Clarence, still in school. 

After leaving the public schools Victor N. Peterson entered the 
Academic Department of the Gustavus Adolphus College, in St. Peter, 
Minnesota, from which he was graduated with the degree of B. A. in 
1902. In the fall of that year he matriculated at the Medical and Sur- 
gical Department of the University of Minnesota, where, after a four 
years' course he was graduated in 1906. The ensuing year Dr. Peterson 
spent as an interne at the Bethesda Hospital in St. Paul, in that capacity 
gaining wisdom and valuable experience. He has since been engaged 
in general practice as a physician and surgeon in St. Paul, being located 
at No. 879 Rice street. In his professional career, the doctor has made 
rapid strides, and deserves much credit for the position he has won, not 
only as a physician, but as a popular and highly esteemed citizen. 

Dr. Peterson is a member of the State Medical Society ; of the 
Ramsey County Medical Society ; and of the Medical Stafif of the Beth- 
esda Hospital. He also belongs to the Phi Rho Sigma Fraternity, and 
is Medical Examiner for the Scandia Life Insurance Company of 
Chicago. 

Anton W. Johnson. — Many of the more energetic and prosperous 
business men of Minnesota have been born and bred on European soil, to 
Sweden, mayhap, is this state more deeply indebted for citizens of worth 
than to any other foreign country. Prominent among the younger gen- 
eration of native-born Swedes that are contributing toward the mercan- 
tile advancement of St. Paul is Anton W. Johnson, junior mem'ber of the 
firm of Johnson Brothers, who are carrying, on a thriving business at 
No. 926 Arcade street, where they have a commodius and well-stocked 
grocery store. He was born in Sweden, March 8, 1882, a brother of 
Oscar E. Johnson, in whose sketch, which appears elsewhere in this 
volume, may be found a very brief notice of their father, John P. 
Johnson. 

Educated in the public schools of his native land, Anton W. Johnson 
emigrated to the United States in 1901, coming directly to St. Paul, where 
his brother was already located. Entering the employ of O. T. Rasen, 
a furrier, he worked in the dressing department of his fur shop for about 
a year, after which he was for eight months with David Birdman, of this 
city, a dealer in hides, furs, and tallow. Becoming then a clerk in the 
grocery store of Herman Johnson, on Payne avenue, he continued with 
him five years, gaining wisdom and experience in the business. He was 
subsequently similarly employed in the store of A. L. Ohlman, remaining 
there until Septemeber, 1907, when he bought a half interest in the store 
with which he is now connected, becoming associated with his brother 
Oscar under the firm name of Johnson Brothers. This firm is conducting 



:i 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 917 



business on systematic methods, keeping an up-to-date stock, and is meet- 
ing with great success, being one of the best known and most popular 
groceries in the neighborhood. 

On April 8, 1908, Mr. Johnson married Nellie Dalilen, a bright young 
Swede girl who came to this country from Sweden when quite young, and 
here completed her school life. She is a woman of ambition and spirit, 
possessing a keen eye for business, having, previous to her marriage, 
taken up a claim of one hundred and sixty acres of land in South Dakota, 
proved up on it, and subsequently paid for the tract, which is now quite 
valuable. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have one daughter, Ellen, born August 7, 
1909. They are members of the Swedish Baptist church, and are highly 
esteemed in social circles. 

Charles J. Bergouist, merchant tailor, 850 Payne avenue, St. Paul, 
Minnesota, may be said to have grown up in a tailor shop, and has prac- 
tically spent his whole life engaged in this business, having worked at 
his trade in various cities before settling at St. Paul. 

Mr. Bergquist was born, August 23, 1868, in Vestergotland, Sweden, 
son of Swan Johnson, a merchant tailor. At the age of eight years the 
boy was put to work with the needle. Then for several years his time was 
divided between working in his father's shop and attending public school. 
He continued to work for his father until he was seventeen, when he 
left the old home in Sweden and came to America, landing here in May, 
1886, and directing his course westward to Rockford, Illinois, where he 
went to work on a farm. After six months of farming he was ready to 
return to his trade. He worked one year in Minneapolis and six years 
in Duluth, for different tailors, after which he opened a tailoring estab- 
lishment of his own at Tower, Minnesota, which he conducted two years. 
Next we find him on the Pacific coast. He was employed as expert cutter 
in San Francisco and other western cities and towns, and spent three years 
there, then going to Denver, Colorado, where he engaged in business 
for himself and where he remained until 1907. That year he returned to 
Minnesota and opened up his present business in St. Paul. 

April 18, 1895, Mr. Bergquist married Miss Carrie J. Olund, daughter 
of John Olund, and they have two children : Frederick William, born 
March 9, 1896, and John Walter, August 28, 1898. Fraternally, Mr. 
Bergquist is identified with the Masonic Order, the Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias, and the Druids. 

Alfred M. Bergstrom. — The record of the Bergstrom family has 
proven its worth both in the establishment of the pioneer institutions 
of the state and the development of modern and up-to-date business 
enterprises ; and, for proof of this statement it is not necessary to revert 
to other members than Alfred M., president of the Banner Clothing 
Company of St. Paul, and his father, Peter M. Bergstrom, the widely 
known pioneer of Meeker county. The former was born near Litch- 



9i8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



field, that county, on the nth of October, 1870, and his parents (his 
mother was Anna C. Erickson) emigrated from their native Sweden 
to that locality in the early sixties. At that time, when the elder Mr. 
Bergstrom took up land in Meeker county, the country was sparsely set- 
tled by all except Indians, which were both numerous and troublesome. 
He became one of the most prominent farmers in that section of the 
state ; not only that, but he took a deep and active interest in the estab- 
lishment of morality and religion in his community, being one of the 
charter members of the Swedish Lutheran church and, for several 
years, one of the society officials. He was the father of eleven children, 
four of whom died young and the following are alive : Alfred M., 
Robert O., Charles J., William O., Albert T. ; Josephine, who mar- 
ried Edward J. Boreen ; and Dorothea. 

Alfred M. Bergstrom, of this biography, first attended the schools 
of ]\Ieeker county, and after completing the grammar courses pursued 
a two years' course at Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. Peter, Minne- 
sota. As he had early evinced business inclinations and talents, he 
next became identified with the Palace Clothing Company of Minneap- 
olis and, after being thus employed for some five years, assumed a 
position as salesman in the Enterprise Department Store of St. Paul. 
His experience of seven years and a half with that flourishing house 
gave him a broad and intimate acquaintance with a vast variety of both 
popular and high-grade goods, and furnished the very training necessary 
for success in the business which he established himself under the title 
of the Banner Clothing Company. It was incorporated, in January, 
1906, and consists of A. M. Bergstrom, president; C. Bergstrom, vice 
president; and O. M. Jorgenson and A. Jorgenson, directors. Their 
large, well arranged and thoroughly stocked store is located at the 
corner of Third and Sibley streets. ' Ready-made clothing, fur goods, 
coats and cloaks, gents' furnishings, hats, shoes and leather goods, are 
all carried in complete and selected lines. As the firm is progressive 
in the wav of fully meeting the public wants and has established a fine 
reputation for unfailing courtesy and honorable dealing, a continuous 
and rapid growth of business has been the inevitable result. 

A. M. Bergstrom is also financially interested in several other busi- 
ness enterprises, among which we mention Boreen Flour and Feed Co., 
of St. Paul, of which he is vice president, and he is also one of the firm 
of Bergstrom Bros.' Plumbing and Heating Co. of St. Paul. Frater- 
nally, he is one of the best known men in St. Paul, in Masonry being 
identified with Montgomery Lodge No. 358, A. F. & A. M. ; Minnesota 
Chapter No. i, R. A. M. ; St. Paul Council No. i, Damascus Command- 
erv No. i and Minnesota Consistory No. i. He is a past master oi 
the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter, member of the Scottish 
Rite and Shrine, and past deputy grand master. Further, Mr. Berg- 
strom belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Elks and 
Modern Woodmen of America, and enjoys membership in the Norden 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 919 



and Commercial Clubs. His religious connections are with the St. 
James (English) Lutheran church of St. Paul. On February 2, 1899, 
Mr. Bergstrom married Miss Carrie Thoen, daughter of Swan Thoen, 
•of Minneapolis, and the three children born to this union are as follows : 
Marlow B., born in November, 1899; Wallace, born in October, 1901, 
and Alfred M., Jr., born November 6, 1905. 

Louis Harold Olson. — A prosperous business man of St. Paul, 
Louis Harold Olson is actively associated with the mercantile interests of 
this city, being proprietor of one of its leading shoe stores. A native of 
Southern Sweden, he was born January 21, 1867, a son of' Otto Olson, 
who was for many years clerk of the court. 

Having received a practical education in the public schools, he learned 
the trade of a cabinet-maker, at which he worked for a short time in 
his native land. In the spring of 1886, with a laudable desire to take 
advantage of every opportunity for improving his financial condition, he 
came to the United States, locating in St. Paul. For about two years 
having been unable to find work at his trade, he was employed on the 
railroad. Entering then a shoe factory in St. Paul, he remained four 
years, acquiring an excellent knowledge of shoe making, after which he 
followed his trade for a brief time in Duluth, Minnesota. Returning to 
St. Paul, Mr. Olson was for seven years employed in the shoe factory of 
Foot, Shultz & Co. Opening then a shoe repairing shop on Payne avenue, 
St. Paul, Mr. Olson established a substantial business, which he subse- 
quently enlarged, putting in a good stock of shoes. Meeting with such 
eminent success, he has gradually increased his operations, and has now 
a finely-equipped and well-stocked shoe store at No. 882 Payne avenue, 
where he has an extensive trade in shoes of all kinds, and does a good 
amount of repairing, that department of his shop bringing him in a fine 
income. 

Mr. Olson married, November 3, 1887, Jennie Monson. of St. Paul, 
and their only child, Louis Martin, was born May i, 1888. Another 
child, born August 16, 1899, died in infancy. Formerly Mr. Olson be- 
longed to the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
to the Modern Woodmen of America, and is now a member of the Swe- 
dish Brothers. Religiously he belongs to the Swedish Episcopal church. 

John Sandell, merchant tailor, 197 East Seventh street, St. Paul, 
Minnesota, is a native of Sweden, born August 4, 1851. In 1868, a youth 
of seventeen, he landed in this country, and came west to Jordan, Minne- 
sota, where he made his home for ten years. In 1878, he became a resi- 
dent of St. Paul, established himself in business here as a merchant tailor, 
and here for over thirty years he has lived and prospered, being regarded 
as one of the most reliable merchant tailors in the citv of St. Paul. 

Mr Sandell has taken a commendable interest in public afifairs in his 
city. He was a member of the first elective assembly of St. Paul, in 



920 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

1892. In 1899, he was appointed a member of the Board of Public 
Works, and made all the assessments for improvements where benefit and 
damages were to be considered when the land for Phalen Park was taken 
by the city. Eighteen thousand parcels of land were assessed. His home, 
at the corner of Jessamine and Jesse streets, is one of the handsomest 
residences of the First ward. 

Fraternally Mr. Sandell is identified with the Druids, the Modern 
Samaritans, the I. O. O. F., the Nords Club, and the Swedish Old Set- 
tlers' Union. He belongs to the Swedish Episcopal church, 

October 16, 1874, Mr. Sandell married Miss Hulda D. A. Bonander, 
a native of Sweden but a resident of the United States since her early 
childhood, she having been reared and educated at Jordan, Minnesota. 
They have six children: Hattie Elvira, wife of Axel T. Sund- 
berg; Adell Elenora, wife of Joseph Johnson; Hilmer Aneida, Alven 
-Walter, Leroy Arthur and Ethel Evadne. 

Hans Martin Johnson. — Numbered among the leading pharmacists 
of St. Paul is Hans Martin Johnson, a member of the Bodin-Sundberg 
Drug Company, who is eminently fitted through a full course of study 
for the business in which he is so successfully employed, having charge 
now of the store located at No. 881 Payne avenue. A native-born citizen 
of St. Paul, his birth occurred April 2j, 1883. His parents, Frank and 
Martha Johnson, emigrated to this country from Sweden in 1880, set- 
tling in St. Paul, where they reared and educated their three children, 
Albin, Emil, and Hans M. 

Having completed the full course of study in the public schools of 
this city, Hans M. Johnson went to Minneapolis, where he prepared him- 
self to enter the drug business by taking two courses of study at the 
Institute of Pharmacy. In 1898 he accepted the position of a clerk in 
the drug store of J. A. Batto, of St. Paul, remaining with him six years. 
In 1903 Mr. Johnson entered the employ of the Bodin-Sundberg Drug 
Company as a clerk, and during the ensuing six years proved himself of 
such value and assistance that in January, 1909, he was made a member 
of the firm, which is one of the largest and most prosperous of the 
kind in the city. 

On November 12, 1906, Mr. Johnson married Marie Peterson, who 
was born and educated in St. Paul, being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jacob Peterson, who came to this country from Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson have one child, Howard Martin, born August 20, 1907. Mr. 
Johnson is actively and prominently identified with various fraternal or- 
ganizations, being a member, and a trustee, of Montgomery Lodge, No. 
258, A. F. & A. M. ; a member of Jewel Chapter, No. 76,' R. A. M. ; a 
member, and manager, of Maple Camp, No. 5453, M. W. A., and a mem- 
ber of the Modern Brotherhood of America ; also Apollo Council, No. 69, 
Modern Samaritans. He is also a member of the East Side Commercial 
Club, which he assisted in organizing, and of which he is secretary for 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 923 



the third term, and was director for one year, and is now secretary of 
the Bodin-Sundberg Drug Company. 

J. G. Thaung. — Prominent among the leading citizens of St. Paul 
is J. G. Thaung, a well known undertaker, located at No. 327 East Sev- 
enth street. A man of unquestioned integrity and ability, he holds high 
rank among the influential business men of the city, and is actively identi- 
fied with various financial and fraternal organizations. A native of 
Sweden, he was born, January 24, 1865, at Gardsby, near Vexio, Sma- 
land, where his earlier years were spent. His father, J. G. Tong, of 
Gardsby, was for many years prosperously engaged in the saddler's busi- 
ness at that place, at his retirement from active pursuits being succeeded 
by a son. His wife, whose maiden name was Sofia Johnson, died in 1905. 
Of the nine children born to them, six are now living, namely : Johannes 
Gustaf, the subject of this brief sketch; Johanna Louisa, wife of Albert 
Johnson, a farmer at Cromwell, Minnesota; Charles M., of St. Paul; 
Ida Augusta, wife of M. M. Archdale, engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in Knowlton, Montana; Otto Wilhelm, of Gardsby, Sweden, who suc- 
ceeded to his father's business ; and Jennie Amalia, wife of Axel Johnson, 
a farmer in Gardsby. 

Having acquired a practical education in the public schools of 
Gardsby, J. G. Thaung learned the saddler's trade, working with his 
father. On attaining his majority he started for America, thinking in 
this land of promise and plenty to lay a substantial foundation for his 
future prosperity. Coming directly to Minnesota, he located, in 1886, in 
St. Paul, and the following four years was employed in a wholesale gro- 
cery. In 1890 Mr. Thaung embarked in the undertaking business on his 
own account, and in the management of his affairs has met with excel- 
lent success, having built up a fine patronage, not only among the Scandi- 
navian population, but throughout the community, being well liked by 
all. Mr. Thaung's office is located at No. 327 East Seventh street, but 
the residence occupied by himself and family is at the corner of York 
and Burr streets. 

On May 25, 1898, Mr. Thaung married Ida Wedin, of St. Paul, and 
into their pleasant home five children have made their advent, namely: 
Charlotte Walfrida, born September 3, 1899; Edith Erica, born February 
IT. 1902; Julius Gunnar, born November i, 1903; Helen Victoria, born 
July 26, 1905 ; and Ruth Lillian Evelyn, born May 25, 1907. Mr. Thaung 
has held many positions of trust and responsibility, in each and every 
office serving ably and satisfactorily to all concerned. He is one of the 
trustees of the Scandinavian Savings Bank, and is a director in the 
East St. Paul State Bank ; is ex-president and ex-treasurer of the East 
Side Commercial Club ; and has been a director of the Norden Club. 
He has served as president of the Swedish Brothers ; member of the 
Bethesda Benefit Association ; and of numerous other societies. Frater- 
nally Mr. Thaung belongs to Braden Lodge, No. 168, A. F. & A. M.; to 



924 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Minnesota Chapter, No. i, R. A. M. ; to Damascus Commandery, No. i, 
K. T. ; and to Osman Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

Oscar E. Johnson. — A young man with a remarkable degree of 
push and enterprise, Oscar E. Johnson, senior member of the firm of 
Johnson Brothers, grocers, in St. Paul, has already won for himself a 
place of note in the business world, and gained the confidence and good 
will of his associates in both financial and social circles. He was born, 
May 29, 1880, in Sweden, a son of John P. Johnson, a farmer and car- 
penter, who reared five children, namely : Oscar E., Carl F., Anton W., 
Alma, and John A. 

In 1897, while yet in his teens, Oscar E. Johnson, having completed 
his early education in the public schools, bade adieu to his native land, 
and came to this country in search of fortune. Taking up his residence 
in St. Paul, Minnesota, he farmed and did odd jobs of work the first 
year or two, after which he became clerk in the grocery of Peter Haldeen, 
of Payne avenue, with whom he remained until ]\Ir. Haldeen sold out 
to Herman Johnson, when he entered the employ of the new owner of the 
store, and continued with him three years. Accepting a position as clerk 
with A. L. Ohman, who was located on Jackson street, St. Paul, Mr. 
Johnson was in that establishment two and one-half years, after which he 
was similarly employed for a year in the store of Adolph Skooglun, 
on Payne avenue. Embarking then in business on his own account, Mr. 
Johnson bought, in the spring of 1907, a half interest in his present 
grocery, at No. 926 Arcade avenue. In September, 1907, his brother, 
Anton W. Johnson, purchased the remaining half interest in the concern, 
and the business has since been ably and profitably conducted under the 
firm name of Johnson Brothers. Mr. Johnson's previous experience as 
clerk in various groceries was a valuable asset to him, and has helped 
him to win success in his ventures. This firm carries a fine line of the best 
groceries to be found in the market, the shelves of the store being stocked 
with a high grade of goods, which meet with a ready sale among 
the people of this vicinity. 

On June 10. 1903, Mr. Johnson married Hilda Oleen, who came to 
Minnesota from Salt Lake City, Utah, where she went from Sweden with 
her parents, when a 3'Oung maiden, and they have one child, Alice F., 
born March 26, 1907. Religiously Air. Johnson is a member of the Swe- 
dish Baptist church, and fraternally he belongs to the United Order of 
Foresters. 

Olaf J. Olson, junior member of the widely known firm of florists, 
Holm & Olson, is one of the most prominent representatives of his busi- 
ness in the United States. The headquarters of the firm at Nos. 22-24 
West Fifth street are really conservatories of high art and, with their 
convenient, commodious and handsome arrangements, are not surpassed 
by anything of the kind in the country. Mr. Olson is still a young man, 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 925 



having been born January 9, 1874, in the province of Blekinge, Sweden. 
When he was six years of age he was brought by his parents to the 
United States, the family locating at Hancock, Minnesota. There the 
father purchased a farm, upon which he resided until the time of 
his death in 1882. 

Olaf J. was educated in the public schools of St. Paul and began his 
business career as an errand boy for Charles Bennett, the St. Paul 
florist. He remained in that position for two years, when he was iden- 
tified with the confectionery establishment of J. George Smith for about 
a year and a half. Floriculture, however, appealed to both his artistic 
taste and his business judgment, and he therefore re-entered the employ 
of Mr. Bennett, and in the four years of his faithful service with him 
acquired a thorough knowledge of the scientific field and the northwest- 
ern market. In 1903 Mr. Olson became associated with E. F. Lemke, 
St. Paul's pioneer florist, and continued in that connection until October 
I, 1906, when he formed a partnership with E. P. Holm, under the present 
firm name. As both partners are comparatively young men, with a 
thorough training and a great natural ability, their business has rapidly 
extended over many of the northwestern and middle states. Although 
the headquarters of their trade are at St. Paul and its bulk is in Minne- 
sota and adjoining territory, they have six hundred live agents located in 
various sections of the country and have already established an outside busi- 
ness amounting to fifty thousand dollars per year. In 1908 the enterprise' 
was incorporated with a capital stock of seventy-five thousand dollars, its 
founders admitting S. D. Dysinger into partnership. 

Personally, Mr. Olson has been honored with the vice presidency of 
the Society of American Florists and is a life member of the St. Paul 
Institute of Arts and Sciences. He also belongs to the Norden, Commer- 
cial and Roosevelt Clubs of St. Paul and has fraternal connections with 
Masonry (Knight Templar and Shriner) and with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Modern Samaritans, National Union and Independent 
Order of Foresters. On October 18, 1899, Mr. Olson married Miss Augusta 
Oslunn, of St. Paul, and they are the parents of four children : George 
H., born August 6, 1900; Warren W., born October i, 1902; Helen, born 
February 11, 1904, and Eugene, born September 25, 1906. 

Peter Mattson. — Endowed to a marked degree with those traits of 
industry, honesty and thrift characteristic of his countrymen, Peter Matt- 
son is one of the successful business men of St. Paul, as a member of 
the firm of Eklund & Mattson, merchant tailors, has a large and remuner- 
ative patronage, his establishment being located in the Medical Block, 
at the corner of Seventh and Robert streets. A native of Sweden, his 
birth occurred October 11, 1861. His father, Matthias Mattson. came 
with his family to Minnesota in 1879, settling in St. Paul, where he fol- 
lowed his trade of a carpenter until a short time prior to his death, in 
1903. 



926 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Attending the public schools of Sweden when a boy, Peter Matt- 
son completed his early education in the public schools of St. Paul. 
Soon after coming here he began learning the tailor's trade, and having 
served his apprenticeship worked as a journeyman for various tailoring 
firms, continuing thus employed until 1908. Having in the meantime 
acquired a thorough knowledge of his trade, and experience of value, 
Mr. Mattson, in partnership with Charles D. Eklund, then opened his 
present tailoring establishment, and is rapidly building up a substantial 
business. Both members of the firm are expert cutters and fitters, and 
turn out thoroughly finished work, competing with any of the artists 
in their line of work. 

When but twenty-two years of age, Mr. Mattson enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the State Militia, which subsequently was merged into the State 
Gviards. He served first for a term of five years, and afterwards re- 
enlisted five times for terms of three years each, serving in all nineteen 
years. He served first in the cavalry, later in the infantry, and after- 
wards in the artillery, and was promoted in regular order from private 
to the rank of lieutenant, in which he was serving when retired from the 
Guards. His regiment was held in reserve during the Spanish-American 
war, but was not called to action. Probably but few men of the state 
have served longer or more faithfully as a soldier than Mr. Mattson, 
and his military record is one in which he may well take great pride. 

Mr. Mattson married, June 10, 1897, Anna Lundblad, who was 
born and educated in Sweden, and their only child, Sophia C, born 
August 18, 1898, is a student in the St. Paul public schools. Airs. Matt- 
son is a member of the Lutheran church, which Mr. Mattson attends, 
and of which his parents were life-long members. 

F. Victor Ekholm. — The men that have been active and useful 
in establishing and maintaining the business prosperity of St. Paul 
are of necessity energetic, clear-headed and far-sighted, never afraid to 
make bold ventures, and always ready to put their shoulders to the 
wheel of progress. Noteworthy among this number of St. Paul's citizens 
is F. Victor Ekholm, one of the leading furriers of this part of Ramsey 
county. Coming from Swedish ancestry, he was born, February 7, 1877, 
at Brunswick, Minnesota, a son of Andrew Ekholm. 

Andrew Ekholm, a native of Sweden, came to the United States 
about 1870, hoping in this land of promise to secure an independence 
as regarded his financial condition. He was a carpenter by trade, but 
after coming to Minnesota took up land in Brunswick, and there fol- 
lowed farming for seven years. Moving then with his family to St. 
Paul, he was a resident of this city till 1896, when he returned to his 
farm and still resides there. To him and his wife, whose maiden name 
was Charlotte Sandell, eight children were born, namelv: Carl R., F. 
Victor, Paul C, Hilda C.,"john A., Anna M.. Mabel E., and Gertrude E. 

As a bov and young man F. Victor Ekholm obtained a practical 



I -1 >- i-'^iL. ^iIjuAH Y 



i Tl., 



'-!:NfOX AND 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 929 

education, attending both the day and evening schools of St. Paul, after- 
wards taking a thorough course of instruction at one of the business 
colleges. His first employment was that of an errand boy in one of the 
leading fur stores of this city, and in that capacity he proved himself 
so eminently trustworthy that he was promoted to cutter and subse- 
quently made foreman. Showing marked ability as a business man, Mr. 
Ekholm was admitted to the firm in 1905, and continued one of the 
partners until 1908. Embarking then in business by himself, Mr. Ekholm 
Opened his present establishment at No. 14 East Sixth street, where he 
carries a superb line of furs of all kinds, and makes a specialty of manu- 
facturing garments from the raw material, selecting for his use only 
the finest pelts or hides. He repairs and remodels garments in the 
latest styles, employing in his shop artistic designers and clever cutters, 
guaranteeing his patrons perfect satisfaction in regard to workmanship. 
His line of "furs include a choice selection of those most in vogue. His 
collection of black lynx, mink, and other valuable skins being one of the 
best in the state. 

Mr. Ekholm married, September 25, 1907, Ebba Virginia Thoor- 
sell, of St. Paul, and they have one child, Steven Turner, born August 
3, 1908. Fraternally Mr.Ekholm is a member of the North Star Benefit 
Association. Religiously he belongs to the Memorial Evangelical Lu- 
theran church, which he has served for a number of years as deacon and 
financial secretary, while in its Sunday School he has been active as a 
teacher. 

Otto Hall, dealer in ready-made clothing and gents' furnishing 
goods. 957 Pavne avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota, is a native of Sweden. 
Mr. Hall was iDorn October 6, 1871, son of S. P. Hall, and in 1880, then 
a lad of nine vears, came with his parents and other members of the 
family to the United States. His father settled at River Falls. Wisconsin, 
where he bought a farm and became a prosperous farmer, and where he 
is now living retired from active life. In this family were eight children : 
Johana, who married Ola Herstrom ; Sarah, who became the wife of 
John Swenson ; Peter J. ; August ; Christena, who married C. O. Ander- 
son ; Emma, who married Victor Moline ; Charles, and Otto. 

Otto Hall attended public school at River Falls, Wisconsin, and 
while yet a boy came to St. Paul and began his business career as clerk 
and messenger boy in a dry-goods store, in which capacity he served two 
years. He then clerked in a grocery eighteen months, after which he 
turned his attention to the clothing business. He clerked sixteen years 
in clothing stores in St. Paul, the last seven years in the Palace Clothing 
Store, and during that time laid the foundation for a successful business 
career. On leaving the Palace, he opened a store at 957 Payne avenue, 
where he has a room 35 by 60 feet in dimensions, well stocked with ready- 
made clothing and gents'' furnishing goods, and where he is regarded as 
one of the progressive business men of the East Side, 

59 



930 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



In October, 1896, Mr. Hall married Miss Hilma Peterson, a native 
of Sweden but for a number of years a resident of St. Paul ; daughter 
of Carl Peterson. They have three children : Hilma, Ambert, and an 
infant. 

David Skooglun, dealer in clothing and gents' furnishing .goods, 
at 896 Payne avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota, is a native of Rush Point, this 
state, borii May 20, 1875, a son of Swedish parents, Olof A. and Anna 
(Nelson) Skooglun. His father, a carpenter by trade, came to the 
United States when he was about thirty years of age, and settled at 
Rush Point, Minnesota, where he has since resided. David attended 
public school in St. Paul, and received his first business training as 
clerk in the wholesale house of Gordon & Ferguson, of this city, remain- 
ing with the firm two years. Afterward he clerked three years for a 
St. Paul grocery firm. Then he formed a partnership with his brother, 
Adolph, and engaged in the grocery business, which they conducted four 
years. Preferring the clothing business to the one in which he was 
engaged, he sold out, and entered a clothing house, in \vhich he clerked 
two years, after which he opened his present store at 896 Payne avenue, 
where he has a well-selected stock of up-to-date clothing and gents' 
furnishing goods and is doing a prosperous business, having had as 
partner, since August, 1907, Mr. J. M. Aurelius. 

Mr. Skooglun is a member of the Foresters, the Modern Samaritans, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Swedish Benevolent Society, the 
Continental Mutual Life, the Provident Life and Trust, and the Swedish 
Svithiod. Also he is a member of the Swedish Baptist church. Sep- 
tember 13, 1900, he married Miss Sophia Oslund, of St. Paul, and they 
have two' children : Ralph D., born July 21, 1902, and Candace M., Feb- 
ruary 15, 1907. 

Elmquist Brothers. — Although a comparatively young organiza- 
tion, the enterprising firm of Elmquist Brothers, located at No. 151 East 
Ninth street, St. Paul, is carrying, on a substantial business as manufac- 
turers of store and office fixtures, sideboards, and china cabinets, wood 
turning and band sawing. This firm consists of three keen-sighted, 
progressive men, G. S. Elmquist, C. L. Elmquist, and their brother-in- 
law, C. A. Enquist, all of whom are skilled mechanics, thoroughly con- 
versant with the details of the different branches of their business. Be- 
ginning in a modest way, these gentlemen have from time to time found 
it imperative to add to their facilities for conducting their operations, 
and within the past two years have moved two or three times. They 
are now well located, having a commodious and conveniently arranged 
building, equipped with the most modern machinery, and are prepared 
to turn out first-class goods in their line of manufacturing, their prod- 
ucts finding a ready sale in St. Paul. 

Charles L. Elmquist was born, January i, 1868, in Sweden, a son 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 931 



of Frans Carlson. His father, a skilled mechanic, was one of the best 
known cabinet manufacturers in Southern Sweden, where he carried on 
an extensive business for many years. He married Unla Ogrem, by whom 
he had seven children, as follows : Carl L. ; Uhan ; August ; Gustfred S. ; 
Emma C. ; Oscar W. ; and Almeda, wife of Charles Enquist, of the firm of 
Elmquist Brothers. After leaving the public schools, Charles L. Elm- 
quist learned the trade of a cabinet maker in his father's factory, work- 
ing there until 1888. Coming then to St. Paul, he continued at his trade 
until April i, 1907, when, in company with his brother, Gustfred S. Elm- 
quist, he established his present business, which is now one of the largest 
of the kind in the city. He married, February 25, 1895, Anna Knudson, 
of St. Paul, and they have two children, Carl W., born in September, 
1896, and Clara E., born in March, 1899. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church. 

Gustfred S. Elmquist, also a son of Frans Carlson, was born in 
Sweden, January 19, 1873. Educated in the public schools of his native 
land, he subsequently learned the trade of a cabinet-maker under his 
father's tuition. At the age of twenty years, desirous of trying the hazard 
of new fortunes, he emigrated to the United States, locating in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, where he was employed at jobbing and repairing until he and 
his brother Charles established their present business, on April i, 1907. 
He married, February 25, 1899, Julia M. Nelson, of St. Paul, who was 
born and educated in Sweden, and of their union three children have been 
born, namely: Ray E., whose birth occurred November 19, 1902; Egner, 
born May 13, 1903 ; and Arthur, born January 18, 1906. He is a member 
of the Swedish Lutheran church, to which his wife likewise belongs, and 
for the past nine years has been one of its trustees. 

Charles A. Enquist. the remaining member of the firm of Elmquist 
Brothers, was born in St. Paul. September 12, 1880, a son of John and 
Caroline Elenquist, who settled at Corner, Minnesota, on coming from 
Sweden to this country, in 1870, but are now residents of St. Paul. 
Charles A. Enquist was educated in the graded and high schools of this 
city, and was afterwards chief clerk in the office of the General Manager 
of the Chicago Great Western Railway Company for eleven years. On 
September i, 1908, he was admitted to the firm of Elmquist Brothers, 
and has since been actively identified with the advancement of the manu- 
facturing interests of St. Paul. Mr. Enquist married, August 14, 1907, 
Almeda M. Elmquist, who was born in Sweden, as were her brothers, 
C. L. and G. S. Elmquist, and was educated at the Central Institute, in 
Stockholm. Both Mr. and Mrs. Enquist are consistent members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church. 

Peter Westlund, brother of John Westlund, both of St. Paul, Min- 
nesota, was born February 26. 1873, at Perserud, near Arvika, Sweden, 
son of Anders and Magdelena (nee Person) Anderson. Personal men- 



932 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



tion of other members of the family will be found in the biographical 
sketch of John Westlund, on another page of this work. 

Like his brothers and sisters, Peter attended public school and the 
Lutheran church, in which at the proper age he was confirmed, and 
afterward he served an apprenticeship of a year and a half to the carpen- 
ter's trade at Gunnarskog. In 1892, he came to America and took up 
his abode in St. Paul, where he at once found work at his trade. After 
one year's work at the carpenter's trade, he entered the employ of the 
Walter A. Woods harvester works, with which he was connected four 
and a half years. His brother John had preceded him to this country and 
was engaged in the meat market business. Peter purchased an interest 
in the establishment. They opened a branch store at 927 Rice street, 
in 1904, which the junior member of tTie firm managed until February 
I, 1906, when the brothers made a friendly separation, each one taking 
the market of which he had charge, Peter on Rice street and John on 
Burr street, and each has continued to do a prosperous business. 

The family residence of Peter Westlund is at No. 95 Litchfield 
avenue, St. Paul. June 6, 1896, he married Miss Borrett Marie Peder- 
sen, who was born May 16, 1872, at Overaas, Vestnas, Molde, Norway. 
They have four children, namely: Sigard Hjalmar, born April 15, 1897; 
Walter Lemond, July 25, 1899; Alpha, December 30, 1901, and Berenice 
Elizabeth, September 8, 1907. The family attend worship at the First 
Swedish Baptist church in St. Paul. Mr. Westlund has membership 
in the Modern Americans and the Modern Samaritans. 

I 

John Westlund, a successful meat-market man in St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, dates his birth July 29, 1868, at Perserud. near Arvika, Sweden. 
He is a son of Anders and Magdalena (Person) Anderson, the father 
born in 1828, the mother in 1832, and both are still living in Sweden. 
Of their ten children, seven are living, as follows: Kajsa, wife of Emil 
Person, a farmer in Sweden, and their son, Herman Person, born June 4, 
1 88 1, came to America in 1904, and at this writing is in the employ of 
his uncle, John Westlund, the subject of this sketch; Anders is a resident 
of Sweden ; Ida is the wife of Peter Elof son, a farmer in Sweden ; Caro- 
line is the widow of Johannes Olson, a farmer, who died in 1908; Ma- 
thilda lives in Sweden, taking care of her aged parents ; Peter is a resi- 
dent of St. Paul, interested in business with his brother John, and Maria, 
wife of Anders Swenson of Arvika. One daughter, Hanna, died at the 
age of eighteen years. 

After having passed through the public school and been confirmed 
in the Lutheran church, John Westlund worked on the old homestead 
until his nineteenth year, when he came to America. Upon his arrival 
here, he went first to W^hitehall, Michigan, where he had a cousin, with 
whom he remained two weeks. Then he came to St. Paul, Minnesota, 
which has since been his home, where he has a nice residence and a well 
established business. After working at odd jobs one year, Mr. West- 



THENEWYOPK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



*STOS, LENOX AND 
-N f (DUND*7 




/^^L^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 935 



kind learned the painter's trade, and gave his attention to it until 1896. 
That year he worked in a meat market, then he opened up a meat market 
on his own account, at 964 Burr street, and for two years conducted it 
alone, at the end of which time he took in as partner his brother, Peter 
Westlund. Their trade increased substantially, and so they opened an- 
other store, on Rice street, of which Peter took charge and is still con- 
ducting, John continuing at the old stand. 

In 1908 Mr. Westlund moved his family into their new residence at 
521 York street. He married, June 4, 1892, Miss Maria Anderson, who 
was born in Brunskog, Vermland, January 18, 1867, daughter of Anders 
and Maria (Wilson) Olson, farmers. Mr. and Mrs. Westlund have had 
five children, of whom four are living: Elmer Carl Eugene, born in 
1896; Arnold Lucene, in 1899; John Rudolph, in 1902; and Edith Marion, 
in 1907. Mr. Westlund is a member of the Modern Samaritans, and 
both he and his family belong to the First Swedish Baptist church. 

GusTAF Alfred Johnson. — Occupying, a position of prominence 
among the native-born Swedes of Minnesota is Gustaf Alfred Johnson, 
who has served as deputy clerk of the District Court of Ramsey county 
during the past twenty years. A native of Sweden, he was born, May 
31, 1854, in Vallby parish, Uppland, a son of John and Anna Maria 
Ersson, farmers, who were the parents of five children, namely : Gustaf 
Alfred ; Sophie, wife of John Carlson, a farmer ; Johan Peter ; Mathilda, 
wife to Andreas P. Johanson ; and Anders Reinhold, a farmer. 

Laying a substantial foundation for his future education in the pub- 
lic schools of Uppland, Gustaf A. Johnson was sent to the Collegiate High 
School. At the death of his parents, he found himself possessed of an 
inheritance which enabled him to take a course of study at Agricultural 
College of Alnarp, from which he was graduated with honors in 1879. 
Returning to his old home, he began the study of the English language 
preparatory to taking an agricultural course at Knapton Range, a large 
estate in England, managed by James Weldon, where he studied from the 
fall of 1879 until the spring of 1881. Going then to Scotland, Mr. John- 
son continued his studies at Dearlton, North Berk, for a number of 
months. While there he met several Swedish youths bound for America, 
and they, having excited Mr. Johnson's enthusiasm, easily persuaded him 
to come with them to this country: Arriving in October, 1881, he spent 
a very brief time in St. Paul, Minnesota, and then went to the Grandine 
Farm in North Dakota, where he remained throughout the harvesting sea- 
son. The lack of sociability, of cleanliness, and of good roads, so dis- 
gusted him with the condition of things in that section of the country, 
that he soon returned to St. Paul. Here Mr. Johnson secured a position 
with Glidden, Griggs & Company, wdiolesale grocers, with whom he re- 
mained two years, when, on account of not receiving a promised advance- 
ment in position and wages, he resigned his place. From that time until 



936 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



1887, he was salesman for a cigar firm, and then established himself in the 
real estate business in this city. 

Interested in politics from the time he became a resident of St. Paul, 
Mr. Johnson was employed for about two months, in 1888, as a clerk 
in the county treasurer's office, and on March i, 1889, ^^ was advanced 
to deputy clerk of the District Court, and has since held the position, serv- 
ing during the first six years under a Democratic administration, and the 
remaining portion under Republican rule. 

Mr. Johnson married, in 1888, Annie M. Andrews, who was born, 
in 1 861, in Vestergotland, Sweden, and to them two children have been 
born, namely: George Albin Lester, born January 20, 1890; and Mabel 
Lillian, born February 13, 1892. The son is a student at the University 
of Minnesota, and the daughter is a pupil in the St. Paul High School, 
Both children attend the Central Presbyterian church. Politically Mr. 
Johnson is a straightforward Republican, and has served as chairman 
of the Republican organization of the First ward. He is prominent in 
social circles, belonging to many of the leading fraternal organizations, 
including the following-named : the United Ancient Order of Druids ; 
the Knights of Pythias ; the Knights of the Maccabees ; the Modern 
Woodmen of America ; and the Yeomen of America. He is likewise affi- 
liated with numerous Swedish societies, including the Vega, the Swedish 
Citizens' Association, the East Side Commercial Club, and the Norden 
Club. He has been presiding officer of many of these organizations, and 
since 1895 has acted as grand secretary for the Druids in the state of 
Minnesota, in which capacity he has traveled extensively throughout the 
state, looking after the interests of the members of the order, particu- 
larly those of his countrymen. 

Carl Emil Dahl, superintendent of the fur manufacturing depart- 
ment of Gordon, Ferguson & Co., St, Paul, Minnesota, is a native of 
Sweden, dating his birth at Falun, December 23, 1870. He is a son of 
Hans Johan and Emma (nee Hellstrom) Dahl, both of whom died in 
Sweden. The father was for many years proprietor of a restaurant in 
Falun. He was twice married. By his first wife he had eight children, 
namely: Hjalmar, deceased; Erik, deceased; Emmy, wife of Wilhelm 
Okerblom, of Los Angeles, California ; Carl Emil, whose name heads 
this sketch ; Ernst, a bookbinder of Brooklyn, New York ; John, assistant 
foreman in the establishment of Gordon, Ferguson & Co., above referred 
to ; George, deceased ; and Anna, deceased. By his second wife, Maria 
Dahl (nee Baikstrom), who is still living, he had three children: Esther, 
wife of Frithiof Strandberg, a banker of Noorland, Sweden ; Anna, cash- 
ier for the Falun Brewing Company ; and George, assistant auditor of 
Noorlands Enskilda Bank, of Falun. 

Carl Emil was educated in the training school for teachers at Falun, 
which he left at the early age of thirteen and a half years and went to 
Ostersund to learn the trade of furrier, which trade he mastered in its 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 937 



every detail. On becoming of age in 1891, he entered the Swedish army, 
in which he served one year, after which he came to America. June 23, 
1892, he landed in St. Paul, Minnesota. Here he accepted a position with 
E. Sundkrist, with whom he remained until the fall of 1893, when he 
went to Chicago to enter the employ of Marshall Field & Company. He 
was connected with the fur department of that large establishment until 
Christmas, 1894, when he returned to St. Paul, where he has since re- 
mained, with Gordon, Ferguson & Company. In 1899, he was made 
assistant foreman, and in 1903 was promoted to the position of superin- 
tendent of the manufacturing business, which at that time was divided 
into two departments. In September, 1907, he was placed in charge of the 
whole manufacturing department, a position he has since filled. 

June 22, 1904, he married Miss Anna Moberg, a native of St. Paul, 
born November 4, 1881 ; and they reside at 11 13 Lincoln avenue. They 
attend the English Memorial Lutheran church. He is a member of the 
Swedish Brothers, and the Norden Club. Being gifted with a fine bass 
voice, he naturally has been sought as a member of various singing soci- 
eties, and has been identified with the Vega, Orpheus, Apollo, and the 
Arpi Singing Club. 

Louis J. Larson. — Success in the business and industrial world, 
while it may be furthered by educational privileges, is by no means 
dependent thereon, as is abundantly proven in case of many who, although 
such advantages have for the most part been denied them, have attained 
positions of prosperity and usefulness in the commercial world. Louis 
J. Larson, an expert contracting plasterer of St. Paul, who came when 
a boy, had no opportunities offered him out of which to lay the founda- 
tion for a successful career, except those which were within him in the 
nature of resident force — firm resolution, perseverence and willingness 
to work. He looked within himself for bringing his inborn abilities to 
bear upon conditions as he found them, he gradually succeeded to stations 
of advantage until he finally established for himself the reputation of 
being one of the most reliable and efficient contract-plasterers in the 
city. 

Vermland, Sweden, is the native state of Mr. Larson. There he was 
born October 22, 1859, a son of Lars Augustus Larson, who followed 
agricultural pursuits for a livelihood. The public schools afforded him his 
educational advantages, while during the months the school was not in 
session he assisted his father in the duties of the farm, thus becoming 
inured to physical labor and having his energies directed into channels of 
thrift and economy which formed the foundation for his future develop- 
ment and prosperity. Upon the home farm he spent his life until he 
was in his twentieth year, or until May 7, 1880, when impressed with 
the news of the larger opportunities offered by the New World, he em- 
barked for the United States. He first located in Stillwater, Minnesota, 
where he became an apprentice to his uncle, John O. Larson, who was a 



938 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

contracting plasterer. With him he completed his trade, remaining in his 
employ until 1884, when he repaired to St. Paul and worked as journey- 
man for James CuUen, who is recognized for his proficiency at the trade. 
Meanwhile Mr. Larson had bent every energy to master the details of 
the business, and his success is evident from the fact that during the 
last three years he worked for Mr. Cullen he acted as foreman and had 
the supervision of a number of important contracts. Mr. Larson severed 
his relations with Mr. Cullen in 1893, and, in partnership with his brother, 
Charles Larson, began to execute contracts independently. After six 
years, however, the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Larson conducted 
the business alone, his brother laboring with him as a journeyman plas- 
terer until 1908. His expert and careful workmanship, rigid adherence 
to specifications, solicitation to thoroughly execute his contracts and 
strictly honorable business methods, have won him steady and permament 
advancement until now he is considered among the best and most trust- 
worthy men in his line of trade in the Twin Cities. Many evidences of 
his superior artisanship are to be seen in the local city, and at present 
he has the contract for the plain and ornamental plastering on the new 
Masonic Temple, of St. Paul. 

Mr. Larson began his domestic life with his marriage to Miss Carrie 
F. Westlund, March 4, 1885. They have four children: Amanda, born 
December 29, 1885, who received her education in the common school 
and graduated from St. Paul high school ; George W., born October 6, 
1887 ; Ethel, born February 8, 1889 ; and Agnes, who was born September 
24, 1892, and died November 13, 1902. Mr. Larson holds fraternal rela- 
tions with the Modern Woodmen of America, while his religious convic- 
tions become apparent upon mention that he is a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. Progressive regarding his own business cpncerns,_ in- 
terested in the welfare of the city and evidencing those qualities requisite 
to good citizenship, Mr. Larson 'is entitled to worthy mention as a repre- 
sentative type of St. Paul's industrious and enterprising factors. 

John August Swenson, of St. Paul, who has been identified with 
the executive work of the state government for the past fifteen years, and 
is a musician of rare technical knowledge and talents, is a son of one 
of the early Swedish-American pioneers of Minnesota. Nels Swenson, 
his father, was born in Skifvarp parish, Skane, Sweden, on the 2d of 
February, 1830, coming to the United States in 1856 and locating at 
Moline, 'Illinois, where he worked at the John Deere Plow Works. On 
July 25, 1857, he married Miss Kersti Hakansdotter, who had been born 
at Ofverlof, in his native province, July 10, 1826, and had just arrived 
from Sweden. In 1861 the parents moved to Centre City, with their 
infant son, John A., and resided in that place for ten years. During the 
Civil war the father had enlisted in Company D, Second Regiment of Min- 
nesota Veteran Volunteer Infantrv, receiving his honorable discharge from 
the service July 11, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky. In 1871 the family moved 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 939 



to Vasa, Goodhue county, where the father died September 26, 1894. He 
is buried in the Swedish Lutheran cemetery of that place, having been 
a faithful member of that denomination since boyhood. Nels Swenson 
and his wife were the parents of three children, John August, Sven David 
and Hannah Swenson. 

John A. Swenson, the oldest of the children, was born at Moline, 
Illinois, May 12, i860, and obtained his elementary education in the 
common schools of Centre City and Vasa. He worked on his father's 
farm at the latter place until he was eighteen years of age, when he went 
to St. Peter and spent three years there as a student in the Gustavus 
Adolphus College. After leaving that institution he taught in the public 
schools of Vasa for two years, and in 1884 located at Duluth, IMinnesota, 
where he secured a position in the county auditor's office, which he held 
for four years. He served as deputy register of deeds of St. Louis 
county in 1889-90; was connected with the office of clerk of the court at 
Superior, Wisconsin, in 1891-2; was variously employed at his old home 
in Vasa during 1893-4, and in the latter year was appointed to a position 
in the office of the secretary of state under Albert Berg, being identified 
with that department for a period of twelve years. In January, 1907, he 
accepted a position with Samuel G. Iverson, state auditor, which he still 
holds. 

In the above is drawn the practical, business phase of Mr. Swenson's 
life. He has another striking side, refined and mellowed by years of 
musical culture, and which has found expression in his career as organist, 
choir leader, band director, composer and publisher. He founded the 
original Arpi Club, a Swedish male chorus composed of the following 
members : Professor O. A. Olson, now of Litchfield, Minnesota ; Messrs. 
N. P. Wold, Oscar Anderson and J. A. Swenson of St. Paul; Hon. 
Albert Berg, now of Spooner, Minnesota; Hon. J. F. Dahl, of Minneap- 
olis, and Prof. Gustav Holmquist, now of Chicago, Illinois. In honor 
of this club, so noted in the musical circles of Minnesota Swedish-Ameri- 
cans, he compiled and published the "Arpiklubbens Album for Male 
Voices," afterward commencing the publication of "Sangen," a Swedish 
musical journal which was shortly suspended, however, as its proper 
management and development were attended with more labor and expense 
than its projector could afiford to expend. Mr. Swenson has published 
several volumes of music, including his own compositions, and is consid- 
ered in every way a most worthy patron of Swedish-American music in 
the northwest. On October 3, 1885, he was married to Miss Tillie 
Englund, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Englund, of Vasa, Minnesota. 
Mrs. Swenson was born in Vermland, Sweden, September 8, 1863, and 
has become the mother of six children: Winford Aurelius, born at 
Duluth, Minnesota, September 21, 1886; Edgar Constans, bom in that 
:city August 18, 1888 ; Ethel Dorothea, born in^Superior, Wisconsin, April 
27, 1891 ; Hazel Naomi, born at Vasa, Minnesota, May 19, 1893; Frances 



940 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Marion, born in St. Paul, August 28, 1896, and Albert William Clarence^ 
also born in the capital city June 27, 1898. 

Rev. Sven David (Swenson) Hawkins, second son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Nels Swenson, is pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at Troy, Idaho. 
He is a native of Centre City, Minnesota, born November 30, 1863, and 
is a graduate of Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, and Augustana 
College, Rock Island. Illinois. After leaving college he taught school and 
served as organist at various places, later becoming book-keeper of the 
Lutheran Augustana Book Concern at Rock Island and holding the posi- 
tion for a number of years. Ordained to the Lutheran ministry of the 
Augustana Synod in June, 1906, his present charge, as stated, is over the 
church at Troy, Idaho. Rev. Mr. Hawkins was married at Rock Island, 
March 29, 1894, to Miss Louisa Fredrickson, daughter of Magnus and 
Maria (Johanson) Fredrickson, who was born at Hangsdala, Sweden, 
Januarv 30, 1867, and located at Oregon, Illinois, in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hawkins have three children: Eskil Theodore, born February 17, 1895; 
Ivar Daniel, born January 2, 1898; and Alma Elizabeth, born April 13, 
1900, all natives of Rock Island. 

Hannah Swenson, now Mrs. Nels G. Anderson, of Vasa, Mmnesota, 
is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Swenson, and was born at 
Centre City, Minnesota, May 17, 1867. First educated in the public 
schools of Vasa, that state, she then attended Gustavus Adolphus College 
for two years, subsequently teaching school until her marriage. This 
occurred December 25, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson reside with their 
family at Vasa. There they became the parents of the following : Nels 
Wilhelm. born October 15, 1895; Anton Erhard, born March 17, 1897; 
Arthur ^lelvin, born September 24, 1898; Oscar Fridolph, born February 
15, 1900; Delmer Richard, born October 31, 1904; and Ruth Hildegard, 
born May 20, 1907. 

Erik Sundkvist, well known as the St. Paul furrier, was born at 
Ostersund, Jemtland, April 8, 1853, son of Erik and Christine Olson, and 
one of the three sons out of five that are now living. The eldest brother, 
Olof Sundkvist, is a farmer of Isanti county, Minnesota, and the youngest 
is a contractor in Sweden. The parents being engaged in agricultural 
pursuits the children were reared on a farm and were educated in the- 
public schools. 

At the age of fifteen, Erik was apprenticed to the trade of hatter and, 
later, to that of furrier, and in due time became master of both trades 
Then for two years he carried on a fur business at Ostersund, which he 
sold, in 1880, in order to come to America. In the meantime he had 
married, and some of his wife's relatives had emigrated to this country 
and settled in Isanti countv, Minnesota. ; and upon the arrival of Mr. 
Sundkvist and his wife in New York, they directed their way to Isanti 
county, where they remained during the summer. In the fall they came 
to St.' Paul, where he entered the employ of E. Albrecht, for whom he 



HhNZW YOr 

"uBLICLIBRAi 



A8Te?»,LEN»X ANT 

TILD&NF«UNn»T:. ■ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 943 



-worked two years. Afterward he was with Gordon & Ferguson, the 
largest fur house in the world. Leaving them in 1889, he engaged in 
business for himself, on Payne avenue, St. Paul, from whence, in 1894, 
he moved to Seventh and Waucota streets, at the latter location having a 
partner, whose interest, however, he bought in 1908. He still continues 
at this location and now has associated with him his son, Carl Oscar 
Sundkvist, the firm style being E. Sundkvist & Co. 

Mr. Sundkvist resides with his family at 852 Holly avenue, St. Paul. 
He has been twice married. In 1878, he married Miss Elizabeth Sohlberg, 
who died, a few years later, in St. Paul, leaving him with two children : 
Carl Oscar, born November 27, 1881, and Elizabeth, born February 15, 
1883. In August, 1886, Mr. Sundkvist married a widow, j\Irs. Anna 
Johnson (jiee Backlund), and the fruits of this union are three daughters 
and one son, as follows: Lillie, born April 30, 1890; Judith and Emma, 
twins, born September 15, 1892; and Gerald, born November 14, 1897. 
The family belong to the First Swedish Lutheran church, of which Mr. 
Sundkvist has been a trustee for a number of years. He is also a member 
of Bethesda Sick Benefit Society. 

Otto Peterson, who deals in wood and coal and conducts a general 
transfer business, with headquarters at loio Payne avenue, St. Paul, Min- 
nesota, has been identified with the city since he landed here twenty-five 
years ago. Mr. Peterson was born in Blekinge, the southern part of Swe- 
den, February 13, 1864, son of Peter Johnson, a well-to-do farmer, and 
was left an orphan at the age of eight years. From his eighth to his fif- 
teenth year he made his home with his sister, working on the farm in 
summer and in winter attending public school. When he was fifteen he 
went to Germany. There he was employed in farm work for three years, 
at the end of that time returning to Sweden, and in 1883 coming to the 
United States and becoming a resident of St. Paul. Here he was variously 
employed until 1890. when, having saved a portion of his earnings, he en- 
tered into a partnership with John A. Peterson and engaged in the flour, 
feed and fuel business. This partnership continued for eight years, when 
the subject of our sketch sold out and formed a new partnership for the 
same business. At the end of another eight years the store was burned. 
That was April i, 1908. One year prior to the fire Mr. Peterson pur- 
chased his partner's interest, and has since conducted the business under 
his own name, dealing in coal and wood and also doing a general transfer 
and moving business. 

October 2, 1892, Mr. Peterson married Miss Beda Charlotte Moberg, 
who bore him two children : Elmer W., who died at the age of nine 
months, and Florence K. The mother of these children died April 2, 
1901, and in November, 1903, he married her sister, Sofia. 

For more than sixteen years Mr. Peterson has been a member of the 
Swedish Brotherhood ; also he is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 



944 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

church and is one of its trustees. He owns his residence at 767 York 
street. 

Aron Erickson. — Prominent among the leading merchants of St. 
Paul is Aron Erickson, who has a large, well-kept, and elegantly equipped 
shoe store at No. 970 Payne avenue. A native of Sweden, he was born, 
July 2.'/, 1863, in Vestergotland, near Boras, a son of Erick Parson. His 
father died in October, 1863, leaving his widow with six small children, 
Aron, the youngest, being but ten weeks old. Although left without 
means, she'labored with persistent energy, and by patient self-sacrifice 
and wise economy reared and educated her family. 

When through school Aron Erickson assisted his mother in her labors 
by working at odd jobs, remaining at home until fourteen years working 
there for farmers until twenty-two years old. Emigrating to this country 
in 1886, he came directly to St. Paul, and for awhile worked as a railroad 
hand, or at any employment that he could find. He was subsequently 
made agent for the Lutheran Augustana Book Concern of Rock Island, 
Illinois, acting in that capacity for five years. While in that position Mr. 
Erickson not only made good money, but gained valuable experience, and 
a knowledge of human nature and character that he could obtain in 
no other manner. In 1900 Mr. Erickson embarked in business on his own 
accotmt, opening his present shoe establishment in St. Paul. In this 
venture he has been exceedingly prosperous, keeping a fine stock of shoes, 
both as regards quality and quantity, being ever ready to meet the de- 
mands of his numerous customers. Since locating in this city, Mr. 
Erickson has twice visited his mother, who is now, in the summer of 
1909, a venerable woman of eighty-seven years, still living in her daugh- 
ter's home near Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Mr. Erickson is an active and influential member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, which he has served for many years as a deacon and a 
trustee, likewise being a member of the Board of Foreign Missions con- 
nected with the church. He is interested in its Sunday School, in which 
he was a teacher for a long while. 

S. J. Nelson. — A man of push and energy, S. J. Nelson has achieved 
success'in his active career, and is a fine representative of the self-made 
men of Minnesota. By industry, perseverance and economy he has 
gradually climbed the ladder of progress, from a day laborer having 
worked his way upward until now he has a well-established mercantile 
business at No. 1003 Payne avenue, St. Paul, where he deals in flour 
and feed. A son of Nels' Olson, he was born. May 21, 1871, in Sweden, 
and was there reared and educated, attending the public schools, and 
afterwards assisting in the labors incidental to life on a farm. 

Immigrating to the LTnited States in 1893, Mr. Nelson came directly 
across the country to St. Paul, where for a time he accepted any remuner- 
ative employment. Ambitious and progressive, he wisely saved his money, 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 945 



and when he had accumulated a sufficient sum started in business on 
his own account, buying, in March, 1908, his present feed and flour 
store. Genial, accommodating, and strictly honest in all of his dealings, 
he has here built up a good and constantly increasing trade, being favor- 
ably known throughout the community. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1900, Annie K. Madson, of Minneapolis, who 
was born in Sweden, and they have one child, Otto Harry, born March 
20. 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson are valued members of the Lutheran 
church, with which he has been connected since his boyhood days. 

Charles J. Carlson. — For a full quarter of a century a resident of 
St. Paul, Charles J. Carlson, one of the best known and "most popular 
of its Swedish-born citizens, may well be called one of its old settlers. 
Throughout his residence here, he has ever evinced a warm interest in 
local progress and improvements, and has been especially active in the 
management of the political affairs of the First and Second wards of the 
city. For twenty or more years Mr. Carlson has served the county in a 
clerical position, being now an employe in the ofiice of the county treas- 
urer, where he devotes his time and energies to the faithful performance 
of the duties devolving upon him in this capacity, ever mindful of the 
interests of the people. He was born, January 2, 1859, in Boras, Vester- 
gotland, Sweden, where his parents, Emanuel and Charlotte Carlson, were 
life-long residents. His father, a prosperous business man, and the owner 
of a tannery, was born in 1821, and died in 1878. 

The only child of his parents, Charles J. Carlson received his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools, after which he attended the 
Boras College for six years. He subsequently became chief clerk in the 
freight department of the State Railways, and retained the position until 
1883. Deciding then to cast his lot with those of his countrymen who 
had found America a field rich with promises, Mr. Carlson emigrated 
to this country, in 1884 locating in St. Paul, which has since been his 
home, his present place of residence being at No. 1098 East Seventh 
street. For four years after coming here he was employed at different 
kinds of labor, in the meantime becoming familiar with the customs and 
language of the people. In 1888 M. J. Bell, then registrar of deeds for 
Ramsey county, appointed Mi". Carlson to a position in his office, where 
he continued for five years. In 1893 Mr. Carlson accepted a more re- 
munerative position in the county treasurer's office, and has since retained 
this position, with the exception of the period in which the State Legis- 
lature of 1899 was in session, when he served as clerk of its reapportion- 
ment committee. Having served in his present capacity under four 
different county treasurers, it is generally conceded that Mr. Carlson 
has a more thorough knowledge of the work of that office than any other 
employe, and his opinions and judgment in financial matters are much 
respected. 

Mr. Carlson married, in 1891, Elizabeth Theodora Proetz, daughter 

60 



946 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of August Proetz, and they have two children, namely: Carl Albert, 
born in 1892 ; and Edna Katharina, born in 1895. Fraternally Mr. Carl- 
son has for many years been an active member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

John E. Holt. — Representative among the plumbing and heating 
contractors of St. Paul is John E. Holt, who conducts a business of large 
proportions and profitable nature and stands in the front rank of the city's 
expert mechanics and men of affairs. His career is an excellent recom- 
mendation of his executive ability and his sagacity in the manipulation of 
circumstances in the furtherance of honorable ends. Without family influ- 
ence or pecuniary means, Mr. Holt came to the United States from Swe- 
den, when he was sixteen years old, and from that period of his life has 
attained commendable prominence through independent effort, sustained 
by laudable ambition, innate ability and manly confidence. 

Born in Calunar Lan, Madesjo parish, Sweden, on the 17th of January, 
1867, Mr. Holt is a son of Nels and Helena (Johnson) Holt. His father 
was a farmer and under his training the boy imbibed those sound ideas 
of economy and practical conservatism which enabled him under American 
conditions to succeed in his business ventures. He obtained a complete 
public school education before he emigrated to the United States, and in 
1883 left home, first locating in Chisago county, where he was employed 
on his uncle's farm until the spring of 1885. In the meantime, by attend- 
ance at the public schools during the winters of 1883 and 1884, he had 
obtained a "working knowledge" of the English language, and in the fall 
of 1885 became a plumber's apprentice in the establishment of W. J. 
Franey of St. Paul. Completing his preparation in the shop of J. P. 
Adamson, he continued with the latter as an employee for four years, 
during which he not only thoroughly mastered every detail of the trade 
but of the general business connected with plumbing and heating appli- 
ances. Upon severing, his relations with Mr. Adamson, he located at 
Duluth and other towns as a journeyman plumber, further enlarging his 
experience and fitting himself for an independent venture. This was made 
in 1893, when he formed a partnership with C. P. Dahlby, under the style 
of Holt & Dahlby, plumbers and heating contractors. They transacted a 
successful business for twelve years, their high-class services and honor- 
able methods continually adding to their popularity and the volume of their 
trade. In 1906 Mr. Holt purchased his partner's interest and has since 
conducted the business alone, its greatest growth occurring during that 
period. 

The wide popularity and firm confidence which Mr. Holt has earned 
in business has also been reflected upon his public relations. For years he 
has taken a lively interest in the Republican party, and in 1900 his friends 
and supporters "in the First ward elected him to the city council. The 
record of his first term insured his re-election in 1902, and the faithful and 
able performance of his aldermanic duties for the four years brought him 



.RY 



';3 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 949 

a nomination to the assembly of the state in 1904. But that was the year 
of the Democratic landshde in Minnesota, and Mr. Holt was swept away 
with his fellow Republicans, only one of his associates being elected. In 
his fraternal and social relations, he is affiliated with the Masonic order, 
as a Shriner and a Knight Templar ; with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America, and the United Swedish Sons of 
America. His firm religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
English Memorial Lutheran church, of which he has been an active mem- 
ber and served as chairman of the building committee. 

On the 23rd of August, 1890, Mr. Holt was united in marriage, at 
St. Paul, to Miss Kate Dannielson, a lady who was born and educated in 
Sweden. They have one child, Edith Gertrude, whose birth occurred 
March 4, 1898.' In his character of husband and father, Mr, Holt rounds 
out those individual traits which mark him as the highest type of the in- 
dustrious, able, honest and domestic American citizen of Swedish nativity. 

Nels Pearson. — An active, practical and successful business man 
of St. Paul, Nels Pearson is widely known as senior member of the wide- 
awake firm called "The Arlington Livery," which is located at the corner 
of Wells street and Payne avenue. He was born, August 17, 1867, in 
Trup, Sweden, being one of the eleven children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Pear Nelson, five of whom have passed to the life beyond, while six 
are living, namely : Caroline, wife of Bank Nelson ; Jacob ; Hannah, who 
married Axel Carlson; Nels, the subject of this sketch; Swan Bengta; 
and Erick. 

Bred and educated in Sweden, Nels Pearson grew to manhood on 
the parental farm, assisting in its management until 1886, when he fol- 
lowed the tide of emigration across the Atlantic to Ottumwa, Iowa, where 
he remained about a year. Coming to St. Paul in 1887 he worked for 
a year and a half in a local creamery, after which he was employed in a 
liverv and feed stable until May i, 1905. Becoming familiar with the 
business, he then, in company with C. W. Swanson, opened a livery stable 
of his own. Six months later the partnership with Mr. Swanson was 
dissolved, and Mr. Pearson combined forces with Frank O. Anderson, and 
under the firm name of Pearson & Anderson opened their present livery 
stable, which is the only one in the First ward of the city. The firm's 
livery equipment is complete in every respect, and these enterprising 
gentlemen are ever ready to respond to calls of every kind, furnishing 
elegant and appropriate outfits for funerals, weddings or light calls, 
answering cheerfully and promptly all demands made upon them by 
their long line of patrons. 

On January 15, 1901, Mr. Pearson married Selma Marie Blomster, 
of St. Paul, a native of Sweden, and into their household five children 
have made their advent, namely: Otto Leonard, Oscar A.. Aditis M., 
Raymond Herbert, and Adolph M. Mr. Pearson is prominent in various 
fraternal organizations, belonging to the United Ancient Order of 



950 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Druids ; to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; to the Modern Wood- 
men of America; and to the Woodmen of the World. He is likewise 
a member of the Swedish United Sons of America ; of the Norden Club ; 
and of the East Side Commercial Club. Religiously he is a member of 
the Episcopal church. 

John Carlson, of the firm of Nelson & Carlson, contracting painters, 
668 Jessamine street, St. Paul., Minnesota, was born May 28, 1869, in 
the province of Venoman, Sweden, son of John and Christina Carlson. 
In his youth he had the advantage of the usual public-school education 
of his native land, and assisted his father on the farm. In 1886, while yet 
a boy in his teens, he came to the United States, and at Deer Lake, Mich- 
igan, found employment in the lumber camps, remaining there one year. 
Then he came to St. Paul and for some time was variously employed, 
working at whatever he could get to do. Next we find him engaged 
in coal mining in Iowa. From a common laborer, he was promoted until 
he was in charge of a mining machine and soon became expert in his 
work. While attending to his duties as machine manager, he met with 
an accident in which he sustained serious injuries, four ribs and his left 
arm being broken, his back injured and his skull fractured. To the fact 
that he had lived a correct life, avoiding, all forms of dissipation, and that 
he had a strong constitution, was due his recovery from these numerous 
injuries. After being an invalid and a great sufiferer for four years and 
having a hard time to get along, he was able to go to work again, and he 
turned his attention to painting, a trade which he had learned some years 
before he went to the mines. In 1903, he formed a partnership with 
Theodore Nelson, under the firm name of Nelson & Carlson, contracting 
painters. From its beginning, the business of this firm prospered, and has 
continued to grow, until now the firm has contracts for work not only 
in St. Paul and vicinity but also government and railroad contracts in 
other western states, including. Montana and Idaho. 

For a number of years Mr. Carlson has been prominent and active 
in church and Sabbath School work. He is one of the trustees of the 
Swedish Baptist church ; for years was a faithful teacher in the Sunday 
School, and is now Sunday School superintendent; and as treasurer of 
the Sick, Help and Burial Fund Association, a church society, he has 
been identified with a work that has done an immense amount of good 
in relieving the distressed. He is one of the directors and a member of 
the executive board of the Mound Park Sanatorium. 

May 5, 1897, Mr. Carlson married Miss Caroline Sarvenson, of St. 
Paul, daughter of Sovey and Ellen Sarvenson, and they have had three 
children: Bernice M., born October 30, 1899, died July 5, 1902; Alice 
L., born January 27, 1901 ; Lorma C. born February 2, 1908. Like her 
husband, Mrs. Carlson is a member of the Swedish Baptist church, and 
is prominent and active in its various societies. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 951 



Edwin Sjoberg, dealer in real estate and fire insurance, at 313 
Jackson street, St. Paul, was born September i, 1858, in Silbodall parish, 
Vermland, Sweden. He is a son of Per and Marie (Danielson) S jo- 
berg; the former, born in 1910, died in 1876, and the latter, born in 
1819, died in 1864. Per Sjoberg was a farmer, lumber dealer and 
"namdeman." He and his wife had nine children, of which seven are 
dead, the survivors being Daniel, a widower, born in 1847, and Edwin, 
both living in St. Paul. 

Edwin Sjoberg received his education in the public schools, and 
afterwards was in the employ of his father, later becoming engaged in 
business on his own account, dealing in lumber and timber, until he 
emigrated to America in 1880, coming to St. Paul and securing a position 
with the wholesale drug house of Noyes Brothers & Cutler, for which 
firm he worked until 1890, when he engaged in real estate and fire insur- 
ance business on his own account. Mr. Sjoberg has been successful 
in a business way, having one of the most profitable and largest insur- 
ance agencies of the Swedes of Minnesota and is considered a representa- 
tive, patriotic and well-to-do citizen of St. Paul, having a fine residence 
at 1029 Jenks street, at which the family, consisting of Mr. Sjoberg 
and daughter, Elsie E. Sjoberg, born October 31, 1891, reside during 
the winters and spending the summers at Mr. Sjoberg's large and well 
appointed farm at Inver Grove, being one-half hour's trip from the city 
by electric railway. 

Charles E. Larson, of St. Paul, was born January 22, 1866, in 
Sweden, and is the son of Charles E. and Johanna Larson, the former 
of whom died in 1872. The father was born, educated and married in 
Sweden, and in 1868 emigrated to the United States, locating in Chicago, 
Illinois. He became employed in Lincoln Park, caring for the grounds, 
and remained in this position until his death. Charles E. and Johanna 
Larson had three children, namely: Emma, became the wife of C. A. 
Rose, of St. Paul ; Charles E. ; and Matilda, who married Theodore 
Peterson, of St. Paul. 

Charles E. Larson received his education in the public schools and 
then worked several years on a farm. When nineteen years of age he 
removed to St. Paul, where he worked at various kinds of employment 
until 1890, then becoming a clerk in the employ of Olaf Olson, grand 
recorder for the state of Minnesota of the Ancient Order of United 
W^orkmen. In February, 1902, Mr. Olson died, and Mr. Larson suc- 
ceeded him in the office of grand recorder, which he still holds. The 
order was organized in Minnesota in 1877, and since that time has dis- 
bursed over seven million dollars, the amount of annual disbursements 
now being about half a million, and the office of grand recorder thus 
requires considerable ability and demands considerable time and atten- 
tion. It is a fraternal benefit association and has a growing member- 
ship. Mr. Larson has had several years' experience in the office, and 



952 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

has filled it creditably. He is a devout member of the Lutheran church 
and belongs also to the Knights of Pythias and the Norden Club of 
St. Paul. 

Mr. Larson married, in May, 1886, Rose Nelson, and they have three 
children, namely: Robert, born March 10, 1897; Edward, born in June, 
1901 ; and Arthur, in 1904. 

Charles J. Nelson. — Conspicuous among the leading citizens of 
St. Paul is Charles J. Nelson, a quick-witted, brainy man, active in 
financial, political and social circles, who is actively identified with the 
industrial and business interests of the city as secretary, treasurer, and 
inside manager of the Minnesota Laundry Company. A native of 
Sweden, he was born, July 11, 1864, in Hersebrata, a son of Oluf and 
Anna Nelson, w4io came with their family to the United States in 1870, 
locating in St. Paul. 

A lad of six years when he was brought to St. Paul, Cha.rles_ J. 
Nelson received his early education in the public schools of this city.' 
When but thirteen years old he began hustling for himself and has since 
been practically self-supporting. He first worked as a farm laborer, 
afterwards being employed for a few months on the railroad, and subse- 
quently working in a dry goods establishment. In 1883 Mr. Nelson 
entered the employment of the Minnesota Laundry Company as a driver 
of the delivery wagon. Beginning in this humble capacity, he made 
himself so useful that he was promoted from step to step, and is now 
not only manager of the inside work of the laundry, but is secretary and 
treasurer of the company, which is one of the largest and best known in 
the Twin Cities. Mr. Nelson has now been associated with this com- 
pany for twenty-six years, and has been an important factor in the 
upbuilding of its present extensive and lucrative business. 

Mr. Nelson is one of the leading members of the Republican party, 
and in 1898, urged by his large circle of friends, he became a candidate 
for the Assembly, was elected, and in 1900 was reelected to the same 
public office. In 1908 he was again elected by the largest vote of the 
year and leading all other candidates on the ticket. During his service 
as assemblyman he was a member of several committees_ of importance, 
perhaps the most notable having been the committee which made nego- 
tiations with the Great Northern Railway Company to locate its shops 
in St. Paul, a matter of special interest to this city. Mr. Nelson also 
had the distinction of being chosen, with Dr. Whitcomb, to represent St. 
Paul at the funeral of President McKinley, in Canton, Ohio. 

On September 22, 1891, Mr. Nelson married Alma C. Ringstrom, 
a native of Sweden, and they have one child, Cecil, born August 28, 
1892, a student in the St. Paul high school. Fraternally Mr. Nelson 
is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, and of the Swedish 
Bethesda Benevolent Society. 



-'-I 



J 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 955 



Christian Ek, a skilled mechanic of St. Paul, was born October 12, 
1872, in Sweden, and is the son of Lars Ek. He received his education 
in the public schools of his native country, and when a young man 
served as apprentice to a blacksmith. In 1890 he emigrated to the 
United States, locating at St. Paul. Here he found employment at his 
trade with Schurmeier Wagon Company, and his services were so 
satisfactory that he remained with them fourteen years. He then visited 
his native country, being gone about eight months, and on his return 
became employed in St. Paul by Scott & Company, carriage builders, 
with whom he remained two years. At the end of this time he began 
working for Torkelson Carriage Manufacturing Company, on Selby 
avenue, and is still in the employ of this concern. Mr. Ek is thorough 
master of his trade, and his skill and good habits are given due appre- 
ciation by his employers. He is a man of high character and good 
standing and a public spirited citizen. He is a member of the A/todern 
Woodmen of America and the United Swedish Sons of America. 

Mr. Ek married, May 25, 1903, Marie Berglund, who was born and 
educated in Sweden, and the union has been blessed with one child, 
Aimer C, born June 30, 1904. 

Charles Bergstrom of the firm of Bergstrom Brothers, plumbers, 
820 Payne avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota, was born in Meeker county, 
this state, August 24, 1877, and is of Swedish descent, his parents being 
Peter M. and"xA.nna C. (Olson) Bergstrom. Peter M. Bergstrom landed 
in the United States in 1863 and that same year located in Meeker 
county, Minnesota, where he took claim to a tract of land and became a 
prosperous farmer. He is the father of the following named children : 
Alfred ; Martin F. ; William, deceased ; Annie C, wife of Charles C. 
Broberg ; Robert ; Charles ; E. Amanda and Clara V., both deceased ; 
William ; Theodore ; Josie, who married Edward Boren, and Dora. 

Charles Bergstrom was educated in the public schools of his native 
countv. Up to the time he was twenty-one he assisted his father in 
the work of the farm, and on reaching his majority he became an appren- 
tice to the plumber's trade. After learning his trade he worked at it 
seven years before going into business for himself. In 1905 he formed 
a partnership with his brother William, under the firm name of Berg- 
strom Bros., plumbing and heating, and they established themselves at 
their present location, 820 Payne avenue, St. Paul, where they are doing 
a prosperous business. 

Mr. Bergstrom has identified himself with numerous fraternal 
organizations, including the Master Plumbers' Association, the East End 
Commercial Club, the Swedish United Sons of America, the Scandi- 
navian American Liberty Club, the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Masonic Order. Also he is a member of 
the Swedish Episcopal church. 

May 20, 1907, he married Miss Gertrude Tunberg. She is of 



956 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF AIINNESOTA 



Swedish descent, but was born and reared in St. Paul, daughter of 
Charles Tunberg. 

Oscar William Johnson. — The American-born Swedes of St. 
Paul have no more worthy representative than Oscar W. Johnson, who 
holds an official position in the department of state, being deputy weigher 
in the state weighmaster's office. A man of integrity and honesty, emi- 
nently trustworthy, his services are appreciated by his employers, and he 
is frequently sent, in the interests of the grain department, on official 
business to different parts of Minnesota. A son of the late Eric Johnson, 
he was born, November 7, 1878, in St. Paul, which has always been his 
home, residing at the present time at No. 705 Reaney street. 

Born in Dahlsland, Sweden, in 1837, Eric Johnson emigrated to St. 
Paul in 1870. and soon after coming here established a shoe store, which 
he conducted successfully until his death, in 1891. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Sophia Olson, was born, in 1835, in Vermland, 
Sweden, and died, July 4, 1907, in St. Paul. Three children were born 
of their marriage, namely: Nettie E., born in 1872, died in 1906; Emma 
C, born in 1875, married Lewis P. Burlingham, a wholesale and retail 
stationery merchant of Stillwater, Minnesota, and they have one child, 
Harvey Preston, born in 1903 ; and Oscar W., the special subject of this 
sketch. 

At the age of fifteen years, having completed his early studies in the 
city schools, Oscar W. Johnson worked for three years as an apprentice 
in a printing establishment. The work and the confinement not agree- 
ing with his health, he then accepted a position in the "Golden Rule," 
the largest department store in St. Paul, and for six years was manager 
of its Bicycles and Fishing Supply department. His health jiot improv- 
ing, Mr. Johnson, upon the advice of his physician, resigned that posi- 
tion, and in order to be more out of doors became solicitor for Charles 
Ek. groceries, with whom he remained until 1905. Accepting then his 
present position in the State Weigh Master's office, he has since served 
most satisfactorily to all concerned as deputy weigher in the grain de- 
partment, performing the duties of his office with ability and fidelity. 

For a long time Air. Johnson has been an active member and an 
earnest worker in the Lincoln Club of the Second ward, and for the past 
ten years he has belonged to Minnehaha Camp No. 674, Modern Wood- 
men of America. 

Elof p. Holm, of the firm of Holm & Olson, florists, St. Paul, Alin- 
nesota, was born at Abyholm, Blekinge Lan, Sweden, October 23, 1871, 
son of Peter and Gustafva (Svenson) Peterson. In their family were six 
children, four sons and two daughters, namely: Carl Victor, Elof. Mari- 
anna, Olof, Anna Mathilda and Israel, all of whom were educated in the 
public schools and confirmed in the Lutheran church. 

In 1887, Peter Peterson came to American. The following year he 




ELOF P. HOLM 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 959 



sent for Carl Victor and Elof. They sent for Olof and Marianna, and later 
for Anna, and last of all came Mrs. Peterson with her youngest son, Israel. 
She was reluctant to leave the old home and come to a new, strange 
country, but finally her husband went back to Sweden and brought her 
over, and she has gradually become accustomed to her new surroundings. 
Mr. Peterson is now employed in his son's greenhouse. 

On his arrival in this country, Elof worked on a farm, and in the 
winter and evenings studied under the instruction of a school teacher who 
boarded at the farm. Later, he worked on another farm near Northfield, 
Minnesota, the owner of which, Mr. A. B. Lewis, subsequently obtained a 
job for the young, Swede in a greenhouse at St. Paul, where he learned 
the florist's business. After working in the greenhouse for a short time, 
the proprietor placed him in charge of his store in the city. The store was 
afterward sold, and young Holm remained with the new owner until 
May 23, 1895, when, in partnership with Charles Anderson, he bought the 
business of Charles Bennett, and together they launched out under the 
firm name of E. P. Holm & Co. In 1897, Mr. Olof J. Olson purchased 
Mr. Anderson's interest, and since that date the business has been con- 
ducted under the firm name of Holm & Olson. 

Mr. Holm resides with his family at 431 Dayton avenue, St. Paul. 
February 22, 1896, he married Miss Anna Elizabeth Holm, who was born, 
in 1877, at Bralanda, Dalsland ; and their family comprises four children : 
Florence Elizabeth, born August 3, 1897 ; Herbert Leroy, born October 6, 
1899; Marion Evangeline, June 2, 1906, and Helen Marguerite, July 14, 
1908. The family are members of the English Lutheran Gloria Dei 
church, of which Mr. Holm is the treasurer. 

Fraternally, Mr. Holm is identified with St. Paul Lodge of Elks, 
Modern Woodmen of America, Maccabees, and Sons of Hermann. Also 
he is a member of the East Side Commercial Club and the Norden Club. 

Nils Magnus Borgstrom. — One of the oldest Swedish settlers in 
the city of St. Paul is Nils Magnus Borgstrom, who was born in Fulltofta 
parish, Skane, Sweden, September 24, 1837, son of Peter and Anna Borg- 
strom. Peter Borgstrom was established in business as a contractor, and 
erected mills, churches, residences, etc. He and his wife were parents of 
four sons and two daughters, and those surviving are : Peter, who lives 
in Meeker county ; Martin, of Kandiyohi county ; and Johannes and 
Bengta, who live in Horby, Skane. 

The earliest education of Nils M. Borgstrom was acquired by private 
instruction from an old lady, and later he attended the public schools. 
When old enough he was apprenticed to the trade of cabinet-maker in 
the city of Lund, where he became a skilled mechanic. After completing 
his apprenticeship he worked at his trade in Malmo and Gothenburg, sail- 
ing from the latter city in the Swedish vessel "Albers" to Quebec, Canada, 
where he arrived June 18, 1864. Mr. Borgstrom remained in the city of 



96o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Quebec about nine weeks, working in a furniture factory, and later re- 
moved to ^Montreal, where he was employed in a similar position some six 
weeks. At this time he removed to the United States, crossing Niagara 
Falls bv rail, and going thence by way of the Great Lakes to Chicago. 
He worked in a furniture factory in Chicago about ten months, and then 
left that city for LaCrosse, Wisconsin, by rail, proceeding thence by 
steamer up the river to St. Paul, arriving at his destination July lo, 1865. 

Upon his arrival in St. Paul Mr. Borgstrom soon found employment 
at his trade, and worked at the manufacture of all kinds of cabinet work, 
such as store, office and bank fixtures, sash and door work, etc. At one 
time he secured a contract for refitting the old capitol at St. Paul, which 
job occupied three years. Except for this particular contract, however, 
]\Ir. Borgstrom has worked for others, and won a reputation for careful 
and conscientious execution of the smallest detail of the work entrusted 
to him. He possesses good business judgment, and by carefully saving 
and investing his earnings provided for his last days so that he could 
enjoy his well earned leisure. In 1892 he visited his native land and re- 
tired' from active life. He has also spent two winters in California. He 
has shown great foresight in his investments in real estate, and has profited 
well by his deals. He now owns six houses and resides at 234 West 
Sixth St. 

In 1866 Mr. Borgstrom married Eva Sophia Ljungberg, of Vackel- 
sang parish, Smaland ; they had no children. Mrs. Borgstrom^ died No- 
vember 14, 1907. Mr. Borgstrom has always taken a deep interest in 
religious matters, and gives his support to many good causes. He is 
actively interested in public affairs, and politically is a Republican. He is 
well known and highly respected. 

Carl J. Nordgren, merchant tailor located at 153 East Fifth street, 
St. Paul, was born April 25, 1855, in Sweden, and is the son of C. W. and 
Christina Nordgren. He received his education in the public schools_ of 
Sweden, and then became an apprentice in the tailoring trade, following 
his trade in his native country until 1893, at which time he came to the 
United States. His first permanent location was Chicago, where for four- 
teen vears he was employed by some of the largest tailoring establish- 
ments, in the capacity of' cutter and fitter ; some of the men connected 
with these places had' the reputation of being among the finest tailors in 
the world, so it was a great advantage to be connected with them. Among 
his emplovers were Edward Ely, John Almquist and F. A. Rose, the last- 
named being known throughout the west as an expert in his line. Later 
Mr. Nordgren was selected for the position of instructor in the Chicago 
Cutting School, an institution devoted to the cutting and fitting of both 
men's and ladies' garments, and this position could be filled only by one a 
thorough master of the trade. 

Mr. Nordgren was first employed in St. Paul in the capacity of cutter 
for Taylor Lee, a merchant tailor, located in the Grand Opera Annex; 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 961 



he remained here three years and then took a similar position with Fried- 
man Brothers, with whom he remained eight months, and in 1908 formed 
a partnership with his two sons in the line of merchant tailoring, at his 
present location, since which time they have met a very fair degree of 
success. His reputation as an expert in his line assured him a good 
patronage from the first, and the firm are conducting a lucrative business, 
with an outlook for future growth ; he stands unquestionably at the head 
of his profession in the city, and has a well-deserved reputation for in- 
tegrity and probity. 

From his youth Mr. Nordgren has been a strong advocate of tem- 
perance, and for many years has been an active member of the Good 
Templars ; he served as Chief Templar of his lodge in Chicago, as Secre- 
tary of the Fourteenth District of Illinois, and filled many important of- 
fices, including Deputy Grand Chief Templar. He has taken all the de- 
grees belonging to the order save one. He is a devout member of the 
Swedish Baptist church, and has served some time on the official board 
of the church. 

Mr. Nordgren married, November 26, 1877, Clara S. Carlson, who 
was born and educated in Sweden, and they became the parents of ten 
children, namely: Carl, who died in Chicago, at the age of eighteen 
years ; three who died in infancy, in Sweden ; Debora, died in Chicago, 
at the age of four; Eva E. ; Esther; Daniel J.; Joe F. ; and Florence. 
The last-named is now a student in the public school. 

Daniel J. Nordgren was born in Sweden, where he began his educa- 
tion, which was completed in the public schools of Chicago. He became 
an errand boy for the firm of Williams & Skinner of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, and was promoted from time to time until he became travelling 
salesman for the firm, and remained with them eight years. He was next 
employed as salesman for Taylor Lee, of St. Paul, with whom he re- 
mained two years, and later spent five months in the employ of Fried- 
man Brothers, of St. Paul. In 1908 he entered into partnership with his 
father, and being an expert salesman, spends most of his time in that 
capacity in the interests of the firm. 

Joe F. Nordgren was born in Sweden, and like his brother acquired 
his education in the public schools of Sweden and Chicago ; he subse- 
quently became employed as shipping clerk with the firm of Williams & 
Skinner Company, of Holyoke, Massachusetts. He is now a member of 
the firm with his father and brother, at St. Paul. He married, in Oc- 
tober, 1906, Ruth Marlin, of St. Paul, and they have one child, Cortland. 

Carl J. Nordgren is an earnest member of the Swedish Tabernacle 
Church, and has always been active in church work ; he served three 
years as secretary of the organization, and served some time as trustee of 
the church. He was one of the organizers of the Sick Benefit Society 
connected with the church, which has been the means of doing a great 
deal of good. 

61 ! 



962 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

August Wallentin. — Especially worthy of note in a work of this 
magnitude is August Wallentin, a well-known contractor and builder, 
now living in retirement at St. Paul, his home being at No. 940 Ashland 
avenue. A man of excellent principles and character, and possessing 
great business ability, he won well deserved success in his undertakings 
by his thorough mastery of his calling, fidelity to his trusts, and by his 
honest dealings at all times, the respect so generously accorded him by his 
fellow-men giving evidence of his upright and manly life. He was born, 
February 13, 1859, in Gammalkil, Ostergotland, Sweden, where he spent 
his early life. He is a son of Nils P. and the late Elizabeth (Anderson) 
Bjork, who reared two children, namely: August, the subject of this 
sketch; and Albert, with whom his aged father lives, is engaged in the 
drayage business in Linkoping, Sweden. 

August Wallentin was educated in the public schools of his native 
town, and confirmed in the Lutheran church. At the age of seventeen 
years' he began working at the carpenter's trade under a Mr. Bergstrom, 
in Nykil, remaining with him a year. Going then to Norsholm, he helped 
build a hotel, after which he continued at his trade in Linkoping for a 
time. Subsequently locating in Duseborg, Mr. Wallentin was there em- 
ployed in a flour mill from December, 1877, until March, 1878, and from 
that time until the summer of 1880 remained at home with his father. 
Then, after a year's service in the Swedish Army, went to Mjolby, where 
he was foreman in a flour mill until called to serve his second year in the 
army. Leaving the army, Mr. Wallentin located in Stockholm, where he 
was employed in carpentering until the fall of 1882, when he accepted a 
position as millwright in W' ellinge. Returning to Stockholm in the spring 
of 1883, he followed his trade there six months, when, in October, 
1883, in companv with Frederick Anderson, he opened a wholesale com- 
mission business^ continuing it until the fall of 1884, when the partner- 
ship was dissolved. Mr. Wallentin, however, continued the commission 
business in connection with the management of a grocery on Mastersa- 
muels gatan until the spring of 1885, when he sold out, and ventured in 
the contracting and building business. Becoming associated with A. E. 
Magnusson, he bought lots on Roslagstulls gatan, and erected apartment 
buildings thereon. Just as he was well started, came the startling crash 
and faUure of Handtuerksbanken, whose president, Mr. Astrom, ab- 
sconded, causing a suspension, almost of business, and a discontinuance 
of building operations. Mr. Magnusson was one of the foremost builders 
in Stockholm, among his contracts of prominence in that city having 
been the building of Riksdagshuset and Riksbanken, the Royal Opera 
House, and the Academy for Free Arts. While living in Stockholm, 
Mr. Wallentin further advanced his early education by attending a busi- 
ness college, and taking an evening course at the Technical College. 

After the failure of the bank, alluded to above, Mr. Wallentin emi- 
grated to America, arriving in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1886. Learning 
the bricklayer's trade, he followed it in that city and St. Paul until the 




pih^t^n^yi^ 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 965 



autumn of 1887, when he began contracting on his own account as a 
brick layer and stone mason. Taking up his residence in St. Paul in 
1888, he did general contract work for many years, putting up apart- 
ment buildings, and filling large contracts throughout the northwest, build- 
ing up a large and remunerative business. Having achieved success in his 
labors, he began to build apartment and business buildings, of which he 
sold some and others he retained for renting, and today he has a num- 
ber of first class buildings. He is now living retired from active pur- 
suits. 

Mr. Wallentin married, in 1888, Ingrid Swenson, who was born in 
Nassjo, Smaland, Sweden, and into their household three children have 
made their advent, namely: George, born in 1889; Hilda, born in 1893; 
and Dorothea, born in 1895. Religiously Mr. Wallentin belongs to no 
particular church as a member, but attends for the most part the Mission 
Friends' church, and socially is a member of the St. Paul Commercial 
Club. 

John Gustaf Olson. — Active and industrious, and eminently trust-, 
worthy and reliable, John Gustaf Olson is carrying on a substantial 
business in St. Paul as a carpenter and contractor, evidence of his skilful 
handiwork being seen not only in the residential and business parts of 
the city, but in the public parks. A son of Olof and Charlotte (Larson) 
Johnson, he was born, March 23, 1859, in Grums, Vermland, Sweden, 
where he completed his early education in the common schools, and was 
confirmed in the Lutheran church. 

After attaining his majority, Mr. Olson served the obligatory two 
years in the Swedish Army, and soon after returning to his home sailed 
for the United States, arriving here in 1882. Making his way directly 
to St. Paul, Ramsey county, he has since been a resident of this city. 
Learning the carpenter's trade after coming here, he has since followed 
it with success, and as a contractor and builder has now a well-estab- 
lished and remunerative business, being one of the leading men in his 
line of industry. 

Mr. Olson married, in 1883, Anna Olson, also a native of Grums, 
Sweden, and resides with his family at No. 887 Marshall avenue. Mr. 
and Mrs. Olson have four children, namely : Mabel Josephine, Lawrence 
G., Roy Conrad INIilton, and Dell Dorothy. The family are valued mem- 
bers of the Gustavus Adolphus Lutheran church. 

Olof Swenson, contractor and builder, 945 Clark street, St. Paul, 
Minnesota, has been identified with this city since he landed in the 
United States over twenty-five years ago, and has worked his way to the 
front ranks of the men in his line of business. 

Mr. Swenson was born March 30, 1854, at Farlof Per Christianstad, 
Sweden, son of Swen and Anna (Jonsson) Bengtson, and one of a family 
of ten children, three of whom died in infancy, those who reached adult 



966 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



age being : Bante, who married Swan Nelson ; Per ; Prenda, deceased ; 
Eric ; Olof ; Hannah, deceased, and Swen. 

Olof Swenson attended the pubHc school in his youth, and assisted 
his father in the farm work, his father being both a farmer and a dealer 
in flour ; and, later, learned the carpenter's trade and took a course of 
study in drawing at a night school. Subsequently, he became foreman 
for a contractor and builder in the city of Malmo, Sweden, in which capa- 
city he served three years, until 1883. when he came to this country, and' 
settled at St. Paul. Here he worked at his trade for thirteen years. Then 
he engaged in business as a contractor and builder, which he has since 
continued, at times employing a large force of men, and having estab- 
lished a reputation for thoroughness and reliability. He is an investor 
in a sugar plantation in Mexico, and is a member of the St. Paul Build- 
ing Exchange. Also he is a director of the Mound Park Sanatorium. 

In 1883, Mr. Swenson married Miss Ellen Nelson, a native of Swe- 
den, who came to the United States the year previous to their marriage. 
They had four children: Freda E., born in 1884, is a graduate of the 
Cleveland High School of St. Paul and also of the University of Minne- 
sota; Eva E., born in 1885, is a graduate of Cleveland High School of 
St. Paul and of the College of Agriculture of this city, and at this writing 
is studying vocal music and the languages; Lillie E., born in 1891, is a 
graduate of the Cleveland High School, and William R., twin to Lillie 
E., died in 1896. Mr. Swenson has for years been a member of the 
Swedish Baptist church of St. Paul, and is one of its board of trustees. 

Oscar William Holcomb, M. D., one of the progressive young phy- 
sicians of St. Paul, Minnesota, is a descendant of one of the earliest 
Swedish settlers of the State. Magnus Holcomb, the doctor's grand- 
father, emigrated to this country and settled in Minnesota in 1854. He 
came from Vackelsang, Kronoberg's Lan, Sweden, and his Swedish 
name was Magnus Halanson, which was changed to Holcomb soon after 
his arrival in America. He was the father of six children, one of whom 
was John Holcomb, the doctor's father. John Holcomb married Maja 
Stina Persdotter, and to them were given ten children, six of whom are 
living, namely: Frank A., a druggist of St. Paul; Solomon J., who lives 
on tiie old homestead in this state; Johanna Carolina (Carin), wife of 
Prof. A. Stomberg of the University of Minnesota; Josephina Cornelia, 
wife of Rev. Carl Kraft of Sveadahl, Minnesota ; Oscar W., whose name 
introduces this sketch; and Joel Theodore, who received the degree of 
M. D. from the University of Minnesota in 1909. The family belonged 
to the Swedish Elini church of Scandia, Washington county, Minnesota. 

Oscar W. Holcomb was born at Prairie Hollow, Minnesota, January 
24, 1877, and attended public school at Marvin Mills, this state, and in 
due time was confirmed in the church. His first work was in a drug store 
at Lindstrom. Later he went to IMinneapolis, where he pursued a course 
in pharmacy, and passed examination before the State Board of Exam- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 967 



mers, and received his diploma as a registered pharmacist. Then, return- 
ing to Lindstrom, he remained there until 1901, conducting a drug store 
in which he owned a half interest. During that time he was elected vil- 
lage recorder, and served in that capacity until he began the study of 
medicine. He was one of a little company that built an English Lutheran 
church in that town, in which organization he was honored with the office 
of deacon, and served acceptably. 

In the fall of 1901, young Holcomb matriculated at the Medical Col- 
lege of the Northwestern University, Chicago, where he graduated as a 
physician and surgeon in 1905. By competitive examination, he gained 
entrance at the Mercy Hospital, as interne under Dr. J. B. Murphy, and 
remained at that institution a year and a half. In this position. Dr. Hol- 
comb's practical experience as druggist was of value to him, and, young 
as he was, it was a part of his duty as interne to give lectures on materia 
medica to the nurses. 

In 1907, Dr. Holcomb came to St. Paul, where he at once estab- 
lished himself in the practice of his profession, and where he is meeting 
with signal success. He is pathologist at the Swedish Bethesda Hospital. 
In the field of medical literature he is active and is gaining prominence, 
especially for his work in making abstracts from the Swedish medical 
literature for the St. Paul Medical Journal. He has also written a num- 
ber of treatises on various diseases. 

Fraternally, the doctor is identified with the Alpha Omega Alpha 
Honorary Medical Fraternity, a society to which members are elected 
only on account of high scholarship ; and the Swedish United Sons of 
America. Of the latter, he was in June, 1908, elected head physician. 

It is worthy of note in this brief personal mention of Dr. Holcomb, 
that at an early age he was thrown entirely upon his own resources, and 
that his education has been acquired by dint of his own energy and perse- 



Frans August Holcomb, the popular druggist at 960 Payne ave- 
nue, St. Paul, Minnesota, is doing a prosperous business among his 
countrymen who reside on Arlington Hill, the Swedish stronghold of the 
city. 

Mr. Holcomb was born April 29, 1865, '^^ Chisago county, Minnesota, 
and belongs to one of the first Swedish families to settle in this state, 
some mention of whom will be found in the biographical sketch of Dr. 
O. W. Holcomb above. After attending the public schools in his native 
county, Mr. Holcomb entered Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, 
Minnesota, where he finished the academic course in 1887. On leaving 
college, he went to work in a drug store at River Falls, Wisconsin, where 
he remained a year and a half, afterward working three years in a drug 
store at Barron. Wisconsin. Feeling the need, however, of further prepa- 
ration for his work, he entered the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy, and 
in due time completed the regular course in that institution, and in the 



968 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

month of April, 1890, passed examination before the State Board of 
Examiners in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota. After this he 
worked three years for Frederic Scott, a prominent druggist of Still- 
water. Minneso'ta; a year and a half for P. Q. Boiden, a druggist of Hud- 
son, Wisconsin, and a year and a half for John Bodine of St. Paul, Minne- 
sota. His next move was to Lindstrom, Minnesota, where, during the 
Cleveland administration, he found business so dull that for a time he 
was unoccupied. Later, returning to Stillwater, he entered the employ 
of Alexander Richard, with whom he remained three years, until business 
prospects were brighter. September i, 1889, he returned to St. Paul. At 
that time a drug store on Payne avenue — the oldest drug store in the city 
— was for sale, and in partnership with Edward C. ]\Iagnusson, he pur- 
chased it. Two years later he bought his partner's interest and he has 
since successfully' conducted the establishment under his own name. 

October 31, 1894, he married Miss Jennie C. Magnusson, a native 
of Stillwater, and a sister of his former partner. Mr. Holcomb is a mem- 
ber of the Norden Club, the East Side Commercial Club, the Modern 
Woodmen, the Masonic Order (including the thirty-second degree), the 
Knights of Pythias and the Maccabees. Both he and his wife belong to 
the First Swedish Lutheran church of St. Paul. 

C. E. I. Hough, an enterprising and successful dealer in real estate, 
of 376 Robert street, St. Paul, Minnesota, was born [March 12, 1858. 
He has been in business in St. Paul for twenty-five years, and is well 
known by the business men of the city. During this time he has executed 
a large amount of business, is well acquainted with all parts of the city, 
and is probably better able to appraise the value of real property in St. 
Paul and vicinity than anv other dealer. Besides buying and selling prop- 
ertv Mr. Hough also deals in mortgage loans. He is highly respected by 
all,' and is accounted one of the public-spirited, representative citizens of 
St. Paul. 

John M. Perlow, a well-known merchant of St. Paul, was born in 
Sweden, July 13, 1871, and is a son of ^lons P. Perlow. Mons Perlow 
was a carpenter, and died in Sweden in 1886; he was the father of eight 
children, of whom four came to the United States. John M. Perlow ac- 
quired his education in the public schools of his native town, and in 1890 
came to the United States, locating at St. Paul. He became employed 
in various capacities the first year, and then began work in a large shoe 
factory, where he worked eight years, and thoroughly learned the trade 
of making shoes, becoming an expert workman. He then spent two years 
in the baggage department of the Union Depot, of St. Paul. January i, 
1903, he established an independent business, on Payne avenue, dealing in 
hay. grain, feed, coal, wood, etc., and does a thriving business. He is 
thriftv and enterprising, and is a man of recognized integrity in his deal- 
ings. ' He is a member of the Swedish Brothers, of St. Paul. 



THE NEW YO 

PUBLIC LIBR/ 



*6TOB,LENOX> 

TILDES f«UNn,*"' 



SWEDISH^AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 971 



Mr. Perlow married, June 7, 1899, Ellen Rose, of St. Paul, who was 
born in Sweden ; she came to the United States with her parents in in- 
fancy, and received her education in the public schools of St. Paul. 

Charles Skooglun, contractor and builder, 1105 Jessie street, St. 
Paul. Minnesota, dates his birth in Vermland, Sweden, October 2, i860. 
Mr. Skooglun's father, Olef A. Skooglun, was a carpenter by trade but 
was for many years engaged in farming. In 1868, the Skooglun family 
emigrated to the United States and took up their residence in St. Paul, 
where Charles received his education in the public schools. As soon as 
he was old enough he went to work on his father's farm in the vicinity 
of Rush Point, Minnesota, and was thus employed there for about eight 
years. He then learned the carpenter's trade. In 1889, he began con- 
tracting and building, which he has continued up to the present, having 
established a reputation for reliability and first-class work, and ranking 
to-dav with the leading contractors and builders of Minnesota. He is 
now erecting the new Masonic Temple at St. Paul, which is 120 by 150 
feet, three stories, and when completed will be one of the finest buildings 
in St. Paul. Mr. Skooglun furnishes employment to from forty to fifty 
men, and his field of work is not confined to St. Paul and vicinity, but 
extends into other states. He built the court house at Elsworth, Wiscon- 
sin ; Jackson, Minnesota, and Hillsboro, North Dakota, and had some 
large railroad contracts in the West and Northwest. 

Mr. Skooglun is a member of the F. & A. M., and the First Swedish 
Baptist church. In 1886, he married Miss Inga B. Oslund, of Rush 
Point, ^Minnesota, to which place she came from her native land, Sweden, 
and they have four children : Mabel, Edna, Mildred and Roy. 

Gust Berg, a carpenter and builder of St. Paul, was born May 2, 
1862, in Sweden, and received his education in his native country. He 
then learned the trade of carpenter and cabinet-maker in Norway. He 
emigrated to the United States in 1884, and first found employment at 
South Stillwater, where he entered the employ of St. Cloud Lumber Com- 
pany, where he spent three years. He then removed to St. Paul, where 
he remained for some nine years in the employ of McClary & Company, 
located at Sixth and Cedar streets, after which he spent two years as fore- 
man for the Twin City Separator Company. For the past seven years 
Mr. Berg has been employed by Mr. Anderberg, a contractor and builder 
of St. Paul. He is an expert mechanic and not only skilled as a carpenter, 
but understands the finer work of making cabinets and fine furniture. 
He takes an interest in the work he performs, and is a faithful and con- 
scientious worker, who takes pleasure in turning out fine work. He is a 
public-spirited citizen, and actively interested in public affairs and im- 
provements. 

Mr. Berg married, October 19, 1890, Annie Swanson, who was born 



972 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



and educated in Sweden ; they are both devout members of the English 
Presbyterian church. 

Prof. Justus Magnus Lundberg, one of the most prominent music 
teachers of the state on the piano, was born in Kahnar, Sweden, Novem- 
ber 12, 1866, and is a son of J. F. Pontus Lundberg, a chemist and dealer 
in toilet articles, and his wife, Sophie (Wahlstrom) Lundberg, both of 
whom still reside in their native country. The father of J. F. Pontus 
Lundberg was a linguist and teacher of languages in GothenlDerg. Justus 
M. Lundberg, was one of six children, four of whom are living, namely : 
Justus M., the oldest ; Agnes, living with her parents ; Berger, born July 
7, 1872, manager and part owner of the Chicago offices of the Skandi- 
navien-Amerikaline ; and Anna, born in 1874, resides with her parents. 

Professor Lundberg received his early education with private tutors, 
and later matriculated in the State Collegiate High School, where he 
reached the sixth standard. At the early age of seven he had shown his 
gift and predilection in the line of music, and during the time of his edu- 
cation took lessons in music from private tutors. December 12, 1887, he 
graduated as organist from the Royal Conservatory of Music in Stock- 
holm, with the highest attainable testimonial for excellence on the piano; 
this admitted him to the class of artists of the conservatory, and he 
availed himself of the privilege, making an exclusive study of piano music 
for one year. Having fitted himself for a career as teacher, he then set 
sail for America, and in August, 1888, he arrived in St. Paul, which has 
since been his residence. He has remarkable talent in the line of organ 
music, and makes a specialty of teaching piano music, in which he has 
gained a wide reputation, his technique being of an unusually high 
standard. 

Professor Lundberg married, February 5, 1898, Mathilda Goranson, 
who was born in Frinnaryd, Smaland, Sweden, January 19, 1865, and re- 
moved to Stockholm when only a year old, with her parents, Goran and 
Anna Christina (Svenson) Johanson. Mr. Johanson was a merchant in 
Stockholm, and died in December, 1908, at the age of eighty-five years ; 
his wife died in 1888, at the age of seventy-four. They are both buried in 
Stockholm. Airs. Lundberg is as remarkable an artist in her line as her 
husband in his profession, and has gained the reputation of being one of 
the finest modistes in the Twin Cities, having patrons among the wealth- 
iest and most distinguished families, not only of St. Anthony Hill, St. 
Paul, where she resides, but from all over the city, from Minneapolis, 
and other cities in the state. She came to the United States in 1891 and 
came to St. Paul, where a sister resided. Professor Lundberg and his 
wife reside at 163 Farrington avenue. 

William Oscar Williams, a well-known hotel and restaurant 
keeper of St. Paul, was born in Indiana, and is the son of John A. and 
Clara Sophia Williams, both immigrants from Sweden. They were farm- 



- NiS^ 



'<}/ tO-R^J 



."cUSK^ 



pTC 






.fj..''-"'' 



T»ON>' 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 975 



ers, and the father now Hves on a farm in Travers county, Minnesota. 
The mother died when WiUiam was seventeen years of age, at which 
time he left his home and removed to Red Wing, Minnesota, where he 
resided for a time. He had received his education in the pubhc schools 
of his native state, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. From Red 
Wing Mr. Williams went to St. Paul, where he found employment in a 
restaurant, working in various capacities, as dish-washer, cook and waiter, 
and thus learned the details of the business in which he later became en- 
gaged. In 1893 he opened the Rockaway Restaurant on Seventh street, 
now located on Jackson street between Sixth and Seventh. 

In 1904 Mr. Williams purchased what was known as the Delicatessen 
Restaurant on Robert street, and five years later rebuilt it, transforming 
it into a European hotel, having sixty rooms; the dining-room has been 
handsomely decorated with mural paintings, by the hand of a Swedish 
artist, and in connection with the hotel Mr. Williams conducts what is 
known as the Lenox Restaurant. He caters to high-class custom, and 
has a handsome, modern establishment. He is a member of the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Mystic Shrine Degree, and also 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, Knighted Order of Tented 
Maccabees, Samaritans, Knights of Pythias and Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He resides at 751 Ashland avenue, and his 
family attends the English Episcopal church. 

Mr. Williams married, in 1895, Julia Courtney, of Rochester, Min- 
nesota, who died in 1906, leaving four children, as follows : Arthur 
William, born August 12, 1896; Ethel Gladys, April 28, 1898; Florence 
Georgie, April 3, 1900; and Clara Mabel, August 12, 1901. 

Erik Mauritz Lundholm, M. D., is a leading physician and sur- 
geon of St. Paul who was born in Venjan Delarne, Sweden, June 20, 
1858, and completed his collegiate education at Falun in 1881. In the 
same year he commenced his medical studies at the University of Upsala. 
Under the Swedish law, the medical student was obliged to pursue a 
course at either the universities of Upsala or Lund, attend the Medical 
Institute at Stockholm and take about two years of clinical work at one 
of the university hospitals at Upsala or Lvmd, and at the hospitals in 
Stockholm. In accord with these provisions, Dr. Lundholm completed 
his professional studies at Upsala University in 1886 ; spent the years 
from 1886 to 1890 in his medical studies and clinical work at Stockholm, 
and in the latter year passed his final examinations at the Carolinean 
Medical Institute. In 1890 he also obtained his license to practice in 
Sweden. For three summers during his studies he served as assistant 
physician at the Springs of Satra, Vestmanland, and in Djursatra, Vester- 
gotland. 

In 1888, however. Dr. Lundholm had already visited the United 
States and passed his examination in St. Paul before the Minnesota State 
Medical Board, but returned, a few months later, to complete his studies 



976 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

in Sweden. Since 1891 he has practiced in St. Paul, having been ofifi- 
cially connected with the Bethesda Hospital as one of its surgeons. The 
doctor's professional society connections are with the Svenska Lakare 
Salskopet of Sweden, American Medical Association, Minnesota State 
Medical Association, Ramsey County Medical Society and Minnesota 
Academy of Medicine. In 1890 he married Miss Anna Olson, of Gestrik- 
land, Sweden, and the five children born to them have been Arthur, 
Astrid, Edward, Ruth and Dagmar— Astrid having died several years 
ago. 

Nels C. Nelson. — St. Paul is particularly fortunate in having been 
populated bv an eminently worthy and enterprising class of citizens, who, 
by their industry, thrift and progressive spirit have materially advanced 
it's highest interests. Noteworthy among this number is Nels C. Nelson, 
a well-known groceryman, located at No. 881 Rice street, where, as head 
of the firm ofNelson & Company, he is carrying on a substantial busi- 
ness. The son of Nels Nelson, a' blacksmith, he was born, September 4, 
i860, in Sweden, and was there bred and educated, attending the public 
schools as a boy and a youth. 

In 1882, soon after becoming of age, Nels C. Nelson bade adieu to 
his native land and came to theljnited States in search of satisfactory 
employment. For about five years he worked at such occupations as 
promised him sufficient remuneration, residing in the meantime in St 
Paul. The following eight years he clerked in a grocei-y store in this 
city, while thus employed becoming familiar with the business in its 
every detail. When sufficiently confident of his ability to manage an 
establishment of his own, Mr. Nelson, in 1895, in partnership with 
Andrew Borgstrom, opened his present place of business, and as senior 
member of the firm of Nelson & Company has since built up an extended 
and profitable trade, the firm being one of the most successful and promi- 
nent grocery firms on Rice street. The storeroom is large and com- 
modious, being twenty-five feet by seventy feet, and is well stocked with 
a choice line of staple and fancy groceries, the aim of this enterprising 
firm being to supply the wants of its numerous patrons with up-to-date 
goods of the finest quality. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1897, Tillie Midtsund, who was born and 
educated in Norway, coming from honored Norwegian ancestry. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, three of whom died in 
infancv, and one, Harold P., bom November 7, 1897, is now attending 
the city schools. Mrs. Nelson died in November. 1908, while yet a young 
woman, her death causing a sad vacancy in the home circle. Mr. Nelson 
belongs to the Swedish Lutheran church and is a member of the 
Northern Commercial Club, which is a Scandinavian organization. 

Theodore Nelson. — Natives of Sweden have supplied many admir- 
able citizens and efficient business men to the New World and among 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 977 



those worthy of mention is Theodore Nelson, of the firm of Nelson & 
Carlson, who are engaged in the general painting and decorating busi- 
ness at St. Paul. He is an artisan of acknowledged merit, doing expen- 
sive contracting in his particular field of labor, and the amount of work 
he accomplishes gives him a prominent place in the industrial circles 
of the city. But a youth when he left his native land for the broader 
opportunities of the United States and without means or influence, he 
applied himself diligently, gradually winning prestige from the time 
he became a journeyman at the painter's craft until the present, wlilen 
he is second to none in his chosen vocation. The excellent record he has 
made in establishing a lucrative and popular enterprise speaks in strong 
terms of his innate business ability and of the high class workmanship 
which has made it possible for him to attain his present standing in the 
business life of St. Paul. 

Mr. Nielson was born in Vermland, Sweden, January 14. 1863, a 
son of Nels Anderson. His father followed agricultural pursuits in 
the old country and reared a family of seven children, three of whom 
died in infancy. The surviving ones are : Theodore ; Anna, the wife 
of Andrew Nelson ; Anton and Nelson. 

Theodore Nelson was reared on his father's farm and while there 
performing the daily routine of the husbandman was given advantage 
of an education in the public schools. Under the parental roof he 
remained until he was twenty years of age, when he embarked for the 
United States, taking up his abode in Minneapolis. There he sojourned 
for five years, meanwhile serving an apprenticeship at the painter's trade. 
At the expiration of that period he came to St. Paul, where he plied 
his craft as a journeyman. For eight years he was thus employed, all 
the while making it a point to attain the highest proficiency, thereby 
making his service of utmost value as an expert workmen. Ambitious 
to become independent in the business world and confident that his 
comprehensive knowledge of the trade and skill as an artisan justified 
him in making the venture, in 1897 he formed a partnership with 
Gust Lundblom, and under the firm style of Nelson & Lundblom under- 
took contract work. Thus associated he continued in the conduct of a 
successful business for two years, when the partnership was dissolved. 
During the succeeding year he executed contracts alone and then formed 
his present partnership with John Carlson, the firm being known as 
Nelson & Carlson. They do all description of painting, thoroughness 
and good taste having developed their business to large proportions. 
Their contracts, far from being limited to St. Paul, extend throughout 
many of the western and northwestern states. Mr. Nelson is an expert 
in his line, particularly as a decorator, and evidences of his dexterous 
hand may be seen on many of the fine buildings of the city. The ceiling 
of his own elegant residence on Jessamine street presents a striking 
exemplification of his artistic skill. He executed the contract for the 
painting and decorating on the court house at Jackson, Minnesota, and 

62 



978 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



•^Iso on that at Ellsworth, Wisconsin. At present he has the contract 
for painting and decorating the new Masonic Temple now under con- 
struction in St. Paul. 

On the 8th of August, 1888, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage 
to Miss Emelia Anderson, daughter of P. A. Anderson, of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. She was born in Vermland, Sweden, and, when a child, 
came to the United States with her parents, acquiring her education in 
the public schools of Minneapolis. To Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have been 
born three children: Maud Florence Nelson, born May 10, 1889, 
attended the public and high schools and is a student at Nichols Busi- 
ness College, of this cit)^ "Edith S., born February, 1891, completed a 
course of study in the public school, graduated from the high school, 
and is a student at McColesters Business College, of St. Paul; LeRoy 
F., born January 31, 1898, is a pupil at the St. Paul high school. 

Mr. Nelson's fraternal affiliations are with the Masons, Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Samaritans. He belongs to the Swedish 
Lutheran church and is a member of the board of trustees of that 
organization. Public spirited and deeply interested in the welfare of 
the city, Mr. Nelson is always ready to endorse measures designed to 
promote the general good of the community. His aggressiveness and 
business enterprise, based upon sound and' honorable methods, have 
raised him to a position of prominence in the financial life of the city, 
and he is numbered among those who have contributed to the city's 
reputation as a business center, fraught with opportunities for all who 
are willing to apply their energies. 

John Lixd, a well known and able contractor of St. Paul, and a 
substantial and respected citizen, is a native of Sweden, born in the 
citv of Falkoping, Skaraborgs Ian, on the i6th of April, 1863, and is a 
son of Nils and Greta Lind. His father was a well known farmer in 
the neighborhood of the city named, who died May 20, 1895, \vhen 
sixty-two years of age, the mother having passed away in 1883 in her 
fortv-fourth year. Both parents died in Minneapolis, where they had 
made their home with their son for several years. They also had two 
daughters. Hilda Josefina, born in Sweden in 1870, resides in St. Paul; 
is married to Robert Stein, who is in the employ of the People's Ice 
Company and is the mother of two daughters and two sons. Augusta 
Mathilda, the second daughter, born in Sweden in 1872, is the wife of 
Frank Hallstrom, w^ho is also an employee of the People's Ice Company. 

Mr. Lind remained at home until 1883, securing his education in 
the public schools and assisting on the farm. That year also he decided 
to try his fortune in the United States and emigrated to the state which 
his people have so favored. He first stopped at Stillwater. Minnesota, 
but in the latter portion of 1883, with the exhaustion of his finances, 
he moved to St. Paul, secured employment and, after some two years, 
established himself in that city as a contractor. From the first he has 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 981 



made a specialty of sewerage construction and excavation work, and now 
employs as high as one hundred men, being the leading contractor in 
these lines in St. Paul. 

Mr. Lind has fairly earned his high position as a business man 
and a fair employer of labor, and has the respect and good will of all 
classes. He is an active member of the Modern Woodmen of America 
and a leader in the work of the First Swedish Lutheran church. In 
1885 he married Miss Ida Maria Johnson, a native of Sweden, born in 
1859, and daughter of Johannes Johansson and wife, both of whom died 
while living with Mrs. Lind a few years ago. The Lind residence and 
grounds constitute a fine piece of property at 2']'] Rondo street, St. Paul. 

Joseph Alfred Arner Burnquist. — A rising young attorney of 
St. Paul, Joseph A. A. Burnquist is fast winning for himself a prominent 
and honorable name in the legal profession of Ramsey county, and can be 
relied upon to make his mark in the world, a man of his mental caliber 
and scholarly attainments being especially fitted for a leader in profes- 
sional, business or social circles. A son of John A. Burnquist, he was 
born, July 22, 1879. in Dayton, Iowa, of excellent Swedish ancestry. 

Born and bred in Skaraborgs laen, Sweden. John A. Burnquist emi- 
grated to this county in 1864, and after spending two years in x\ndover, 
Illinois, went, in 1866, to Dayton, Iowa, where he estabhshed a success- 
ful business as a hardware merchant. On September 25, 1876, he mar- 
ried Anna Louisa Johnson, who was born in Adelof, Jonkoping laen, 
Sweden, and came to this country in 1873. Three children were born 
to them, namely: Selma, Joseph Alfred Arner and Mabel M. 

After his graduation from the Dayton High School, in Iowa, Joseph 
A. A. Burnquist entered Carleton Academy, from which he received 
his diploma in 1898. Continuing his studies in Carleton College, he 
was graduated from there in 1902, and two years later, in 1904, was grad- 
uated from Columbia University with the degree of A. M. The follow- 
ing year he spent in the Law Department of the University of Minne- 
sota, from which he was graduated in 1905 with the degree of LL. B. 
Gifted as a speaker, Mr. Burnquist won the first place in the Minnesota 
State Oratorical contest held in St. Paul in 1901, and in 1903 had the 
distinction of winning the honors for Columbia University in a debate 
held in New York City by that university with Cornell University. He 
has likewise participated in other debates, especially in college contests, 
winning an enviable reputation as an orator. 

On January i, 1906, Mr. Burnquist married Mary Louise Cross, of 
Anoka, Minnesota, and they have one child, John McLean Burnquist. 
Although bending his energies to making a success of his profession, Mr. 
Burnquist takes great interest in public affairs, and in 1908 represented 
his district in the State Legislature. Socially he is a member of the 
Ramsey County Bar Association, and of the East Side Commercial Club. 
Religiouslv he and his family attend the Congregational Church. 



982 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



John D. Anderson, of the firm of Anderson Bros., proprietors of 
a meat market, 985 and 987 Payne avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota, is one 
of the progressive young business men of this city. He was born in 
Sweden, August 6, 1871, son of Gustavus and Eva Anderson, his father 
a farmer and contractor. 

Coming to this cotmtry from his native land in 1889, John D. joined 
his brother at St. Paul and went to work in his meat market. Here he 
learned every detail of the business and laid the foundation for a pros- 
perous career. Subsequently, with his brother, Frank O. Anderson, he 
engaged in business under the firm style of Anderson Bros., at their 
present location, 987 Payne avenue, and by fair and square dealing 
they have built up and maintained a prosperous business, both as butchers 
and meat dealers. Their establishment is the largest of its kind in St. 
Paul, owned and conducted by Scandinavians. John D. is also interested 
extensively in real estate, buying and selling, and at this writing owns 
a fine farm, on which he has valuable stock, including two fine race 
horses. He takes great pleasure in outdoor sports, especially driving, 
and is a member of the St. Paul Driving Club. Also he is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America, the East Side Commercial Club, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Swedish United Sons of 
America, the Modern Samaritans, and the Butchers' Association, 

Olof Holm, general contractor, St. Paul, was born in Leksand, 
Dalarne, Sweden, February i, 1864, son of Per Olof and wife, Karin 
Person. Per Olof was for many years a contractor and builder in 
Sweden, and remained there until after the death of his wife in 1904, 
when he came to this country and has since made his home with his son 
in St. Paul, now being seventy-seven years of age. In his fainily were 
five children, of whom three are living, namely : Anders Person, a 
farmer in Herjedalen, Sweden; Brita, wife of Johan Gustaf Lundquist, 
formerly superintendent for a lumber company, now a farmer in Jemt- 
land ; and Olof, whose name heads this sketch. 

Olof Holm received his early training in the public school, in due 
time was confirmed in the Lutheran church, and for several years 
remained on the homestead, after which he went to Christianstad to 
learn the cabinet-maker's trade, and became a cabinet journeyman. He 
then returned north and had a cabinet-maker's shop in Hudiksvall for 
two years. All this was before he reached his majority. At the age of 
twenty-one, according to the custom, he entered the Swedish army and 
served the stipulated two years. After his return from the army he 
worked as a carpenter contractor for a few years, until 1888, when he 
came to America, landing in New York and coming directly west to St. 
Paul, which has since been his home. Here he at once found work as 
a carpenter and was a wage earner until 1896, when he became a general 
contractor, in which line he has, with the exception of a couple of short 
intervals, been engaged ever since. During the Klondyke gold excite- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 985 



ment in 1898, Mr. Holm went to the scene of action and prospected for 
the yellow metal, spending a year in Alaska, and during that time he 
grew rich in experience if he did not gather in a great amount of gold. 
On his return to St. Paul, to use his own expression, he "hoofed" some 
seven hundred and fifty miles, under climatic and other conditions that 
were not the most favorable. In the spring of 1907 he went up to Win- 
nipeg, where he was in the contracting business for about one year, 
returning to his family in St. Paul in the fall of 1908 and resuming 
business in this city, with office at the corner of Smith and Chestnut 
streets. He resides at 1043 Goodrich avenue, and in addition to his 
St. Paul real estate he has property in Little Falls, Morrison county, 
Minnesota. 

In 1887. the year before he came to America, Mr. Holm married 
Miss Anna Josephine Westerbery, who was born in Vestergotland. May 
24, 1862, and who grew up and was educated in Stockholm. Her father 
was a musician of high attainment and was the musical director and 
band master with the Royal Life Horse Guards. He was killed by 
being thrown from his horse while on duty, when Mrs. Holm was three 
years old. Her mother remarried and is still living in Stockholm. Mr. 
and Mrs. Holm have two daughters: Ruth Ecelia, born September 11, 
1893. and Mabel Charlotte, in July, 1896. They attend the Presbyterian 
church. Fraternally Mr. Holm is identified with the Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen 
of America, the Swedish Brothers and the Norden Club. 

August S. Swanson was born in Vanas, near Christianstad, Swe- 
den, August 3, 1858, and is a son of Pete and Helena Swanson; the 
father died in Sweden, and his widow, now eighty years of age, resides 
in Minneapolis. They had six children, namely: August S., the oldest; 
Herman N., a fruit farmer at Lake Minnetonka ; Carl Oscar, a florist in 
Minneapolis ; Svante Leonard, lives in Omaha, Nebraska ; Augusta, lives 
with her mother in Minneapolis ; and Shunne Raimey, a florist, lives in 
Minneapolis. 

After receiving his education in the public school of his native parish 
and being confirmed in the Lutheran church, Mr. Swanson spent con- 
siderable time in Gothenberg, the last five years of his residence in Swe- 
den being with the Gothenberg. Garden Society. This society is a semi- 
public one, admitting twelve pupils each year for a course of two years. 
During the last two years of his stay he had charge of the greenhouses, 
and his evenings were mostly spent in the Chalmer School of Technology, 
where he studied drawing and other branches. He gained a thorough 
knowledge of the business conducted by the institution by which he was 
employed, being fully acquainted with all the details. In 1881 he re- 
moved to the United States, and spent one year in Chicago, in the em- 
ploy of August Dressel, after which he spent a year in Des Moines. Iowa, 
in the employ of a resident of the city. A year later he removed to Min- 



986 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



neapolis, where he entered the employ of Mr. Kilvington, the leading flor- 
ist, remaining a year. He took up his residence in St. Paul in 1884, 
being put in charge of the greenhouse department of the State Train- 
ing School. Mr. Swanson began business on his own account in 1888, 
purchasing the store of E. V. Beal, in St. Paul, and soon afterward 
built a greenhouse, in 1890 establishing the first one in Alerriam Park. 
He has since made several additions, to meet the demands of his grow- 
ing business, and now has about twenty greenhouses, covering some sev- 
enty-five thousand square feet, all devoted to cut flowers. By careful culture 
he has produced a new rose, of rare beauty and perfection, and has 
named it the "Minnehaha." He conducts a salesroom at the Endicott 
Arcade, where his sales are enormous, his annual business being con- 
stantly increasing. Mr. Swanson received only a limited education in 
boyhood, but his constant observation, reading and study, as well as 
personal experience, in later years, have made him a man of consider- 
able information and culture. He conducts his business in an able man- 
ner, and has a large circle of friends. He is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. Mr. Swanson is a life member of the American Florists' 
Association, of which he has served as vice president, and he was the 
organizer of the Minnesota branch of the society. He is also a life 
member of the Society of Minnesota Horticulturists. 

October 20, 1888, Mr. Swanson married Selma G. Peterson, of 
Hector, Minnesota, a native of Skane, Sweden, and they have one son, 
Carl August, born March 13, 1896, who is attending school. 

Rev. J. V. Alfvegren. — One of the efficient workers in the cause of 
Christianity in Minnesota and the Northwest is the Rev. J. F. Alfvegren, 
for many years a ministerial laborer in Minnesota and now the general 
missionary for the Swedish work in the Northwest. Johan Victor Alf- 
vegren was born at Nasungs, Dalhem, Gotland, Sweden, June 16, 1867, a 
son of Nils and Brita Maria Lauretta (Christenson) Alfvegren. The 
father died at Nasungs, Sweden, on the 30th of April, 1908, when he had 
attained the age of seventy-two years, seven months and fourteen days, 
and his widow, a lady of seventy years, still survives him and is living 
with her son Victor. The son supplemented his public school training 
at Dalhem by college work at Wisby, but in June of 1885 he left that 
educational institution to enter college at Lund (Cathedral-School), where 
he graduated in December, 1885. And then after spending one term at 
the University of Lund he entered the University of Upsala in the fall of 
1886 to pursue medical studies. 

In the spring of 1889 the young student left his native land for 
America, and arriving on the 21st of May he spent two years in New 
York and a similar period in Illinois and then came to Minnesota in the 
fall of 1893. It had been his intention to complete his medical training, 
but after coming to Minnesota he entered the Seabury Divinity School at 
Faribault and sfraduated from the institution with the degree of B. D. in 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 987 



May of 1896. In 1895 ^""^ ^^^^ ^^^" ordained a deacon, and in June of 
1896, by Bishop H. B. Whipple, he was ordained to the priesthood and 
spent the following six months in missionary work in North Dakota. At 
the close of that period and at the call of Bishop Gilbert the Rev. Alf- 
vegren came in November of 1896 to St. Paul to take charge of the 
Swedish work here, and he also organized St. Sigfrid's church in St. 
Paul and continued as its rector until in 1903, when he was appointed by 
the General Board of Missions of New York as the general missionary 
for the Swedish work in the Northwest. He has been the incumbent of 
this position to the present time and has proved an efficient and effective 
worker in the missionary field. During this time he has organized and 
built five new churches. He is thoroughly sincere in all his thoughts, 
words and deeds, earnest in the presentation of the truth, and his efforts 
have been abundantly blessed. 

On the 19th of October, 1906. the Rev. Alfvegren was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Signe Augusta Almgren, the ceremony being solemnized 
in St. Bartholomew's Swedish chapel. New York City, by the Rev. G. 
Hammarskold. Mrs. Alfvegren was born at Hydinge Sya, Ostergotland, 
March 26, 1886, and she is a daughter of Otto Bernhard and Augusta 
Wilhelmina (Ekholm) Almgren. 

J. August Nilsson, for nearly thirty years identified with the busi- 
ness and official life of St. Paul and the state, possesses a career and 
character that presents many remarkable features. Not the least admir- 
able of these characteristics is his patriotism. He is a Swede of the 
Swedes when he can do anything to help his countrymen or promote 
things that he considers an honor to his mother country. On the other 
hand, his Americanism is such as to justify, in his case, the quoting of 
that old and rather worn aphorism about the Swedes that "they love 
Sweden as their mother, but America as their bride." 

His personal character is also noteworthy because of its emphatic 
affections and judgments. Friendship with him is inviolable, and neither 
in gossip or action will he betray the trust once bestowed. These aggre- 
gate qualities of personality and character are mentioned first, as they 
are doubtless the most valuable of the sum of life's treasures. His mate- 
rial record is, however, none the less interesting and important. 

Johan August (he is thus known among his friends, seldom by his 
last name) Nilsson is by birth a genuine Smalander, having been born 
at Wexio, Sweden, January 2y, 1858. His parents were Johannes and 
Charlotta (Petterson) Nilsson. The father was a contractor and builder 
of more than local note, the churches which he built being many and situ- 
ated in various towns and country sides. He also built many public and 
private houses. He lived and died in Sweden, but his wife spent her last 
years in this country. 

Of the eight children in the family, three sons and one daughter are 
living, the latter keeping house for her brother, Johan. His brother. 



988 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Gustaf. is a cigar manufacturer in Minneapolis and married Emma Eck- 
man, whose family is mentioned in this work. They reside in Merriam 
Park and have several children. The other brother, Frans Oscar, is in 
the portrait business at Minneapolis. 

After receiving a primary education in the schools of his native city, 
and after confirmation, Johan August Nilsson became assistant book- 
keeper in the match factory of the city, and in 1878 engaged in the furni- 
ture business in Stockholm, the capital city. In 1881 he yielded to the 
"American fever," and landed at New York City on May 27, and on 
June 2 arrived in St. Paul, where he met his brother, Gustaf, who had 
preceded him to this country. During the first year he was in the ern- 
ploy of the J. F. Pennel men's furnishing house, but then joined his 
brother, Gustaf, in the manufacture of cigars, their firm style being 
Nilsson Brothers. Their special brands ''Vega" and "Christina Nilsson" 
were popular among smokers during the three years this partnership 
lasted. Disposing of his interest to his brother in 1885, August was 
until 1890 engaged in the real estate and land business. 

He had been a resident of America and St. Paul only nine years, 
but in this time had won the confidence of his fellow citizens so that he 
was elected as representative of the Third ward of St. Paul in the state 
legislature. The Third is the heaviest tax-paying ward in the city. He 
was the youngest representative of foreign birth ever elected up to that 
date, and was re-elected for a second term. In the legislature he was in- 
strumental in securing the new capitol for St. Paul, efforts being made 
at the time to get the capital located in Kandiyohi county, which was 
considered the center of the state as to population and geography. He 
also gave his support to the eight-hour law, but that was a later act of 
legislation. In 1894 he was elected custodian of the court house in St. 
Paul, for a term of two years. In 1896 he was the unsuccessful candi- 
date for the office of county treasurer. In June, 1897, he engaged in the 
cigar manufacturing business for himself at Wacouta and Seventh streets, 
and in 1900 removed to his present location at 209 East Seventh. 

On the death of his sister, Anna, Mr. Nilsson took to his home the 
youngest son, Gustaf Adolf Berling, and is giving him an education and 
fitting him for a useful career. . . 

Mr. Nilsson was once an active member of the Swedish Smgmg 
Society Vega. He is now an honorary member. In earlier years he 
possessed a fine voice, and did much to improve the musical status of his 
city. He is a member of the Swedish Brothers and of the Norden Club. 
His hobby is the raising of Angora goats. For this purpose he has a 
large farm in Northern Minnesota, and that is at present the principal 
industry of the farmstead. 

Carl J. Rudeen. — Patience, perseverance and well directed energy, 
put into execution in any of the multifarious callings of life, will invari- 
ablv win the race for him who is strong-hearted enough to persist m 



F 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 989 



their application, Mr. Rudeen possesses these qualities and his diligent 
pursuance of a definite purpose has enabled him to ascend in the business 
circles of St. Paul until he is at present a partner in a large drug enter- 
prise, the company of which he is a constituent operating three drug 
stores, located in various portions of the city. As an errand boy in an 
establishment of the nature of the business in which he is now engaged 
in an executive capacity, he made his initial step in the commercial arena. 
He started business life as an errand boy in a drug store, and by learning 
to cheerfully obey and to faithfully carry out the orders and wishes of 
his employers fitted himself to conduct large interests of his own. Born 
in Jernsoken Dalsland, Sweden, April 13, 1878, Carl J. Rudeen is a son 
of Frederick and Eva Rudeen. His father followed farming, in the old 
country, but gave up that occupation in 1887 and sailed for the United 
States. The son, however, then a lad of eight years of age, remained 
in his native land until 1891, meanwhile acquiring an education in the 
public schools. In that year he located at St. Paul. Being without means 
or influence it was imperative that he obtain employment in order to 
gain support, but he was not long in the city until he secured a situation 
in the drug store of John Bodin as an errand boy. Although a lad of but 
twelve years and placed amid unaccustomed surroundings, he was not to 
be thwarted in his efforts to succeed. At once he set himself to perform 
his daily tasks faithfully and carefully, and had not long been connected 
with the business before he became imbued with the ambition to thor- 
oughly master it in detail and adopt it as his life work. To accomplish 
his purpose he worked diligently utilizing his powers to learn what he 
could of the business while about the store, while, at the same time he 
lived economically and saved his earnings with a view to pursuing a 
course of instruction in pharmacy. Presently he entered the Minnesota 
College of Pharmacy, at Minneapolis, and so progressed in his studies 
that before he was nineteen years old he had passed what is known as the 
assistants' examination. In his twenty-second year he was graduated 
as a pharmacist, and returned to the store of his former employer, John 
Bodin, at No. 329 East Seventh street, where he acted in the dual capa- 
city of clerk and manager. With his enlarged experience, his services 
and efficiency as a pharmacist became recognized and in January, 1909, 
he was admitted to a partnership. The firm is incorporated, consisting of 
Victor C. Sunberg, Axel Sunberg, Mrs. Helen Bodin, H. Martin John- 
son and Carl J. Rudeen. The company operates three establishments — 
one at No. 881 Payne avenue, another at No. 879 Rice street and a third 
at No. 329 East Seventh street. The last named is one of the oldest 
pharmacies at St. Paul, the business at that stand having been established 
over thirty years ago. 

Mr. Rudeen is a progressive business man, active and alert and al- 
ways on the outlook for opportunities whereby to further his interests 
and make the most of his time and talents. His comprehensive knowledge 



992 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of pharmacy assures him of accuracy in the preparation of compounds 
and his widely recognized reliabihty has won him the reputation of being- 
one of the firiest druggists in the city. Sociable and of a genial disposi- 
tion, he has a large circle of friends who respect him for his manly quali- 
ties, his professional efficiency and for the high standard of ethics he 
observes in all his transactions. Interested in the moral status of the 
community, ]\Ir. Rudeen is an active member of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association and belongs to the Gustave-Adolphus Lutheran church. 
He is also secretary of the Swedish Union Cemetery Company. 

HjALMAR Alexis Andree. — Sydney Smith once said, ''Whatever 
you are from nature, keep to it; never desert your own line of talent. 
Be what nature intended you for, and you will succeed; be anything 
else and you will be ten thousand times worse than nothing." The gen- 
tleman whose name stands at the head of this sketch has shown by his- 
career that he understands and fully appreciates the thought of this 
noted author; for he has measured his own ability, and hewn his way 
straight to the line thus marked out. He is prominently known in the 
business circles of the East and the Middle West, having been buyer 
and manager for the M. Phillipsborn & Company's Specialty Store, one 
of the foremost mercantile establishments of St. Paul, and he has an 
extended reputation as a man of superior judgment and rare business 
ability. 

Mr. Andree was born, November 20, 1863, in Uddevalla, Sweden,, 
a son of Robert and Debora (Rahnberg) Andree. His father, a skilful 
and successful photographer, died in Stromstad, Sweden, in 1908, but 
his widow is still living in that city. Of the seven children born of their 
union one daughter, Anna, died in infancy, and six are living, as follows : 
Hjalmar. the special subject of this brief biographical sketch; Albert, a 
watchmaker and jeweler in Frederikstad, Norway; Agnes, managing 
her father's former studio in Stromstad; Alma, a dressmaker in the 
same citv ; Gerda, in partnership with her sister Agnes as a pho- 
tographer ; and Sten, a clerk in a mercantile establishment in Stromstad,. 
Sweden. 

Receiving better educational advantages than the greater number 
of the Swedes that immigrate to this country, Mr. Andree attended the 
Collegiate High School at Uddevalla for six years, from the Sixth 
Standard of which he was graduated in 1879. The ensuing three years 
he was employed in a store of general merchandise in Uddevalla, after 
which he accepted a position as clerk in the largest drygoods concern, 
of that city, and continued with that firm five years. Wide-awake, intel- 
ligent and observing, Mr. Andree made himself familiar with the busi- 
ness, from time to "time being promoted until he was made chief clerk, 
a capacity in which he served the last three years. 

In 1888, in company with his boyhood friend and chum, Oscar 
Mattson, the well-known sporting goods man of ^Minneapolis, who had 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 993 



also been a clerk for five years in the same store in Uddevalla, Mr. 
Andree emigrated to America, coming directly to Minneapolis, the 
objective point of so many of his countrymen. The very day following 
his arrival in this city Mr. Andree had the good fortune to secure a 
position in the large department store of the S. E. Olson Company, 
with which he was connected thirteen consecutive years. Beginning 
in the humble capacity of stock boy, with a salary of three dollars a 
week, he gradually worked his way upward until he became buyer and 
manager of the ladies' cloak and suit department, in which he first 
started. Receiving then a flattering offer of a position in the Golden 
Rule Department Store in St. Paul, Mr. Andree accepted it, and 
remained with that firm seven years, being buyer and manager of the 
ladies' cloak and suit department. On January 26, 1909, he accepted a 
still better position in the Specialty Store of M. Phillipsborn & Co., of 
which he was until recently the buyer and manager. In this capacity 
Mr. Andree traveled extensively, for the past eighteen years having 
visited New York City six times each year, and during that period has 
purchased millions of dollars worth of goods. He is widely known in 
commercial afifairs as a man of extraordinary ability, eminently trust- 
worthy, and has a splendid reputation among his Swedish and American 
friends. He is in every way qualified for extensive operations and might 
long ago have opened a business of his own had he not preferred to 
let others assume the cares, responsibilities and troubles of those dealing 
extensively in merchandise of value. Lately, however, he changed his 
mind upon this proposition and opened a fine store of his own on 
Sixth street, St. Paul, which has been a success from the start and 
where the popularity of Mr. Andree is drawing an ever increasing 
number of customers. 

In September, 1893, Mr. Andree married Sophia Johanson, who was 
born, in 1866, in Fjellbacka, the davtghter of a sea captain. She was 
the first and only love of Mr. Andree, and came to America at his 
solicitation in 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Andree have two children, namely: 
Johan Albert, born July 13, 1894, was graduated from the public school 
in June, 1909, and in the fall of that year entered the St. Paul high 
school ; and Robert Hjalmar, born April 26, 1896, is a pupil in the public 
school. Both boys attend the Sunday School connected with St. John's 
Episcopal church. He has an attractive home at No. 822 Marshall 
avenue, and there extends a generous hospitality to his large circle of 
friends and well-wishers. 

Fraternally Mr. Andree is a thirty-second degree Mason and a 
member of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also belongs to the Norden Club, and is an enthusiastic 
member of the St. Paul Rod and Gun Club. His favorite recreation is 
fishing and hunting, and he is justly proud of being the owner of two 
of the finest thoroughbred hunting dogs in Minnesota. 

63 



994 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Adolph Theodore Rosen, one of the substantial and representative 
business men of St. Paul, came to America with nothing to aid him in 
gaining his present enviable position among his fellows save his health 
and knowledge, with no friends to give him, substantial aid or advice. 
He had the requisite ambition, energy and good sense to enable him to 
take advantage of the opportunities offered him in his adopted country, 
and make the most of his chances. Mr. Rosen was born in Stockholm, 
Sweden, November lo, 1856, being, next to the youngest of seven chil- 
dren. Like many he obtained his education in the public schools of his 
native land, but lacked the facilities for obtaining a university education. 
At the age of fourteen years he left home to try his fortune, and enlisted 
as a sailor boy in the first ship that afforded him the chance ; in this way 
he visited the ports of Finland, Russia, Spain, Italy, Turkey, Holland, 
and other lands, besides those of his native country. After spending four 
years in this manner Mr. Rosen decided to take a course in navigation, 
thus hoping to be able to advance more rapidly in his chosen career. He 
took a course in one of the naval academies of Sweden, which fitted him 
to hold an official position on any boat in any land. 

However, it was not Mr. Rosen's lot to continue a sailor, and soon 
after his naval education he entered the employ of Joseph Gulda, of 
his native city, where he learned the principles and methods of fur dress- 
ing, which knowledge proved of such value to him in after years. Many 
of his countrymen were yearly emigrating to the United States, and Mr. 
Rosen, becoming imbued with the same desire, yielded to it in 1880, and 
in that year settled in St. Paul. On the morning after his arrival in that 
city he' obtained work as a laborer, using a shovel and wheelbarrow. 
However, he was not satisfied to remain in this sort of work, -and from 
time to time took such small contracts as he was able in dressing furs; 
soon after he met one of the foremost men in this line in the Northwest, 
and this proved of considerable benefit to him. 

Mr. Rosen founded his business in 1885, the first shop being a two 
story building, twenty-four by forty-eight feet, containing an eight-horse- 
power engine ; he now has sixty thousand square feet of floor space, with a 
steam power plant of one hundred horse power. He has two artesian wells, 
the factorv is lighted with its own electric lighting plant, contains three 
elevators, and is equipped with all modern machinery for carrying on the 
dressing and dyeing of furs. In the first year of business seventy-five 
thousand skins were dressed and dyed in the factory ; now skins from all 
parts of the world are brought to this factor}^ and during the year 1908 
1,700,000 skins were cared for in the plant. 

Mr. Rosen understands all branches and details of the business m 
which he has made his fortune, and also has great ability in inventing 
new machinery and appliances to insure quicker and better work, and 
thus is able to compete successfully with others in the same line of busi- 
ness. He has also discovered several new dyes, and is looked upon as 
an authoritv and an expert in his line. In his business dealings he has 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 999 



always shown the utmost honesty and straightforward deahng, and 
among those who deal with him his word given by speech does not have 
to be confirmed in writing above his signature. His place among the 
leadmg men of financial circles in St. Paul has been attained by earnest 
endeavor and single purpose. 

Among the masonic fraternity of the state Mr. Rosen is a well- 
known worker; in 1889 he joined Blue Lodge No. 3, of St. Paul; he is 
a member of Minnesota Chapter No. i, St. Paul Council No. i, and Da- 
mascus Commandery No. i ; is also a Scottish Rite Mason and a member 
of the Osman Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 59, and is a member of St. 
Sigfried Episcopal Church of St. Paul, being one of the charter mem- 
bers of that organization. He has made large contributions toward the 
support of the church, and has held the post of senior warden since 1896. 
He is a director of the Scandinavian American Bank, was the second 
president of the Norden Club, and has served as president of the Union 
Cemetery. His property holdings include some of the choicest portions 
of the city. Mr. Rosen is afifiliated with the Republican party and served 
six years'as alderman of South St. Paul, and during 1902-3 as a member 
of the assembly of the city council. 

Mr. Rosen has been twice married, first in 1876, to Charlotte Jo- 
sephine Rosen. The only surviving child of this union is Gustaf Theo- 
dore Frithjof, born October 31, 1877, who is engaged with his father 
in the fur business. Mr. Rosen married (second), December 24, 1882, 
Anna Sophia Johnson, of St. Paul, and of this marriage Jeannette Val- 
frida is the only one living. She was married September 5, 1906, to C. 
H. Biorn, an attorney of St. Paul. Mr. Rosen resides at 334 Cherokee 
avenue, and owns the most beautiful home in West St. Paul ; the house 
stands on high ground, and affords a fine view of the river and the busi- 
ness part of the city. 

JoHAN Oscar Cederberg. — To say that Johan Oscar Cederberg is 
assistant public examiner for the state of Minnesota by no means conveys 
a fitting idea of his standing as an influencial citizen and Democrat. One 
of the leading and most versatile Swedish-Americans of the common- 
wealth, he has overcome the hardest kind of obstacles by the bravery and 
wise methods of his attacks and his cheerful, whole-souled and optimistic 
temperament. 

When the financial storm of the early eighties swept over the greater 
part of Europe, striking Scandinavia with especial fury, Mr. Cederberg's 
prosperous business and his private fortune were swept away; to that 
time he had been remarkably successful as a real estate dealer and pro- 
moter. For some years he attempted to repair his shattered affairs in 
Sweden, but finding it almost a hopeless case, even for one of his abilities 
and temperament, he decided to resume the task in the northwest of the 
new world. With this explanatory paragraph, a characteristic resume 



looo SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



of his American career is given in his own words: "I was born in 
Lenhofda parish, Smaland, January 15. 1851, and came to this land of 
promise Decoration Day, 1890. Hard times commenced to set in almost 
immediately. Tried for seven long years to make a living as a newspaper 
man, and got so thin that I had to take up life insurance in order to get 
f^esh on my bones. Succeeded in killing two Swedish weekly newspapers 
and took in the funeral of the American Assessment Association. My 
'dog days' well served and pretty nearly broken in soul and body, I 
tried to take up politics for a living ; but I soon found out that to engage 
in politics is something similar to engaging in matrimony — takes_ two to 
make a bargain, and if only one is willing there is 'nothing doing.' I 
courted dame politics with more or less success for another seven lean 
years, working as clerk in the county treasurer's office and the public 
examiners office; as assistant actuary in the insurance commissioner's 
office; for three years (1902-3) as head bookkeeper for the St. Paul city 
treasurer, until finally in the spring of 1905 I landed as assistant public 
examiner in the new Minnesota capitol. I am still holding on to that 
job." 

Mr. Cederberg passes over the details of his work and also neglects 
to state, with characteristic modesty, that, although he has not accumu- 
lated another fortune in the United States, he has accomplished that for 
which he has earned far greater honor — has done most able work in sev- 
eral fields and that which has vastly benefitted his countrymen. His long 
and useful journalistic career originated in Sweden, in 1880, when, in 
company with Mauritz Linder, he established Oskarshamnstidningcn, 
which today is one of the most successful newspapers published in 
Smaland. While a citizen of the Northwest he has ably edited"papers in 
Superior, Wisconsin, and Duluth, Minnesota, besides having been editor 
and publisher of two weeklies in St. Paul. He is a very clear and logical 
writer ; as a practical man he always has his point definitely in view and 
never misses it with his literary weapons. Coming to America in the 
maturity of his fortieth year, without even a knowledge of the language 
of his adopted country, Mr. Cederberg has overcome far greater obstacles 
than the majority of his countrymen, as his aims were higher and 
broader; but his brilliant mind, his energy, his perseverance, his ability 
to look on the bright side of a situation, while recognizing the clouds of 
a normal world, has enabled him to raise himself to a high position of 
honor among the Swedish-Americans of Alinnesota. 

No feature of Mr. Cederberg's career has been greater to his ability 
and honor and brought more lasting benefit to his people than the part 
he has taken in placing Scandinavian life insurance companies on a safe 
basis. In 1900 he published a pamphlet entitled "Hus pa Sanden" 
("Houses Built on the Sand"), in which he attacked the system of assess- 
ment then prevailing in some of the mutual insurance associations. The 
pamphlet caused a storm of protest, but it eventually resulted in changes 
being- made in several of the leading associations along the lines which 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA looi 



he suggested. In the reformation of its system the Galesburg (IlHnois) 
Mutual Aid Association, one of the strongest organizations of the kind 
among the Scandinavians of the Northwest, called upon Mr. Cederberg 
as an expert to propose a better plan than that under which the associa- 
tion was then working. Then going before its board of directors, he 
proved that it was only a matter of time before, under the prevailing 
system, the association would either be forced into bankruptcy or to adopt 
a schedule of assessments which would force out the majority of its 
members — a policy which also meant bankruptcy. Mr. Cederberg was 
then asked to formulate a new and saving scheme, which should both 
keep the association alive and protect its policy-holders. When the latter 
bodv met at Galesburg, in the winter of 1901-2, the proposition which he 
submitted was accepted with but a few dissenting votes. The Galesburg 
Mutual Aid Association was then reorganized as the Scandia Life Insur- 
ance Company, which is doing a stable and a fine business. It is esti- 
mated that Mr. Cederberg saved its policy-holders fully two million dol- 
lars by his work, and it is known that he succeeded in reorganizing a 
somewhat uncertain institution into one in which northwestern Scandi- 
navians have the greatest and the justest confidence. 

Mr. Cederberg has been twice married, his first wife (Ida Fatima 
Peterson) having died in 1882, leaving four children. Gustav, the oldest 
child by this marriage, was born in 1877, and is now second assistant 
corporation examiner for Minnesota, with headquarters at St. Paul. 
Esther, who was born in 1879, was married in Sweden ; Ingrid, born in 
1881, is a resident of Stockholm; and Thornsten, born in 1882, is a phy- 
sician attached to the Royal Swedish navy and living in Stockholm. Both 
Esther and Ingrid spent their childhood in this country, but returned to 
the fatherland a few years ago. Mr. Cederberg married as his second 
wife Miss Emma Louisa Ruuth, who has borne him three children, as 
follows : John Oscar, who graduated from the University of Illinois in 
1908, is an architect and resides with his parents in St. Paul; Ruth, born 
in 1887, who is a student in art ; and Emmy Signe, born in 1890, who is 
studying music. The modest but comfortalDle family residence is at 689 
Bedford street, St. Paul. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 
CITY OF DULUTH. 

In 18/1, when Hon. J. Proctor Knott, the orator and famous wit 
of Kentucky delivered his noted speech in the national house of represent- 
atives, which was designed to kill time, as well as the proposed land 
grant of the Bayfield & St. Croix Railroad, he did the city of Duluth 
an incalculable service. Thinking that Duluth was to be the real term- 
inus of the line, he covered the place with bombastic and really witty 
verbiage, and advertised it throughout the United States beyond its 
fondest hopes. His own efforts, so ludicrously described, to locate Du- 
luth on the national map, were not so far-fetched at the time, especially 
from a gentleman who hailed from the south ; but from that time on, 
the city was a fixture on the map of the United States, and few had to 
be told, even in a special way, where it was. The Hon. Proctor Knott 
managed to kill the St. Croix land grant, for the time being, to the great 
joy of Duluth. He was therefore the indirect means of securing for that 
city the Lake Superior & Mississippi grant and the direct cause of 
bringing her into national prominence. And it is hardly too much to 
say that his wildest statements in regard to her prominence as a wheat, 
a lumber and an ore center, have been exceeded by the actual development 
since he made his historic speech. 

The "Zenith City of the Unsalted Seas," as it has become popularly 
known, has a freshness, a vigor and a push that are well described in that 
phrase. Altogether, it is the greatest shipping port in the world, its 
annual tonnage of 37,0(X),(XX) (or more) placing it ahead of London, 
Liverpool and New York. It is the headquarters of the greatest iron 
ore mining in the world, its immense docks and some four hundred 
freighters being visible evidences of the power of the United States 
Steel Corporation. The city is the commercial center of a district which 
produces some 100,000,000 million bushels of wheat annually and 887,- 
000,000 feet of lumber, and it has developed a water power which is one 

I002 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1003 

of the most enormous in the world. On a hill, about eight hundred feet 
above lake level, is a reservoir of forty acres, from which a canal three 
miles long lead's to an enormous power house. Through this system, 
it is estimated that sixty thousand horse power has been made available 
for the industrial and commercial establishments of Duluth. In the 
manipulation of the vast stocks of raw materials which enter her limits, 
large black furnaces, iron works, machine shops, saw mills, match fac- 
tories and flour mills are working night and day. 

Duluth is not only the terminus of thirteen steamship lines, but of 
three great railroad systems — the Chicago & Northwestern, Great North- 
ern and Northern Pacific. Its transportation facilities are further in- 
creased by close connections with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, 
and it is the headquarters of the Duluth, Missabe & Northern, Duluth, 
Rainy Lake & Winnipeg, Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, Duluth & 
Iron Range, and the Duluth & Northern Minnesota. At the head of 
navigation of the Great Lakes, Duluth is the natural outlet for the vast 
wheat harvests of the northwest, and the primary distributing point not 
only for this crop, but for the iron ores of the entire Lake Superior 
region; but, although she possessed all these advantages of location, 
when Proctor Knott delivered his famous philippic she had just assumed 
the dignity of a municipality — and a small one at that. 

Duluth was not incorporated until 1870, and ten years later the 
population had only reached 3,483. In 1890 the city had grown to be 
a place of 33,115 souls, and in 1900 it had a population of 52,969, of 
which 21,000 were of foreign birth. In 1909, the city proper was esti- 
mated at 85,000, and, with suburbs, at 94,000. Duluth was permanently 
settled in 1853, but took its name from the famous French traveler Dan- 
iel Gresolon, or Sieur du Lhut, who first visited the locality in 1679-80. 
It is easy to see how, for euphony's sake, du-Lhut became Duluth. 

Under the municipal charter of 1900, Duluth elects its mayor, treas- 
urer, comptroller and judge of the municipal court, while the clerk, 
attorney, assessor, clerk of the municipal court, city engineer, chief of 
police, superintendent of streets, commissioner of health, chief of the 
fire department and others, are appointed. The annual municipal income 
is about $1,700,000 and the expenditure $1,650,000. Of the latter, more 
than $1,000,000 goes toward the maintenance and operation of the pub- 



I004 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

lie schools, of which there are thirty-eight. There are also a number 
of select business colleges and nineteen parochial schools. One of the 
state normal schools is also located at Duluth. It was established in 
1895, the city donating six acres as a site, and the buildings as they 
now stand were completed in 1901 at a cost of $103,000. In speaking of 
Duluth as a municipality, it should also be said that she owns and 
operates both her gas plant and water works. 

In all of this splendid development of the city, commercially, in- 
dustrially and educationally, the Swedish-Americans have been promi- 
nent. They have also participated in the progress of local journalism. 
The Duluth Posten and the Duluth Skandinav, both established in 1887, 
(when Duluth was still young), have done a good work in its general 
promotion, as well as in championing the special interests of their coun- 
trymen. 

Another feature of Duluth which owes much to the instincts, tastes 
and talents of the Swedish-Americans, is the beautifying of its public 
park area. The city now has four hundred acres of land devoted to parks 
and about twenty miles of boulevards. The Swedish-Americans are 
great frequenters of all out-of-door resorts. Some of the finest views 
in Duluth may be obtained from Lester, Lincoln and Chester parks,and 
Lakeview Terrace, the last named a beautiful drive winding along the 
shores of the lake some five hundred feet above its level. 

Distinctly domestic and lovers of home, the Scandinavians of Duluth 
also faithfully care for the last resting places of their dead. Among their 
burial grounds best known are Scandia Cemetery, on the south side of 
London road, east of Thirty-second avenue east; Park Hill (Norwegian), 
on the south side of Vermillion road, four miles northeast of the court 
house; and the Scandinavian Union Cemetery, at Hermantown. 

In the furtherance of the religious and charitable life of the city, 
it goes without saying (among those who have even a superficial ac- 
quaintance with Swedish- Americans) that our countrymen have done 
very much to make Duluth the church-going community which it is. 
The Evangelical Lutherans are the most numerous of denominational 
members among both the Swedes and the Norwegians. The latter have 
six churches, with a total membership of about 1,600, while the Swedes 
support the following: Elim Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
Fifty-sixth avenue west, corner of Elinor, which was organized in 1890, 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1005 

and now has a membership of 480 ; First Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, Third street, southwest corner of Sixth avenue east, which was 
organized in 1871 and numbers 475; Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
Bethany Church, southwest corner of Third street and Twenty-third 
avenue west, organized in 1886 and membership 626; and Swedish-Finnish 
Evangelical Lutheran, southwest corner of Fifty-third and Wadena, or- 
ganized in 1898, and membership 125. 

There are fifteen Methodist churches in Duluth, of which the Swed- 
ish-Americans have two : First Swedish M. E. Church, northeast corner 
of Third street and Twentieth avenue west, organized 1888, membership 
100; Second Swedish M. E. Church, northeast corner of Sixtieth avenue 
west and Bristol, membership 18. 

Of the three Baptist churches in the city, Swedish-Americans main- 
tain three, as follows : First, northeast corner of First street and Nine- 
teenth avenue west, organized in 1884 and present membership 240; 
Bethel, northwest corner of Third street and Ninth avenue east; and 
Third Swedish Baptist Church, southeast corner of Fifty-ninth street 
and Ramsey, organized 1892, present membership 118. 

Swedish Mission (Covenant) Church, northwest corner of Second 
street and Twenty-first avenue west, was organized in 1886 and now has 
a membership of 375; while the Swedish Christian Mission (Covenant), 
southwest corner of Fifty-ninth avenue and Greene stireet, has 25 
members. 

One of the seven Episcopalian churches of Duluth (St. Peter's), 
on First street west, was organized in 1899. The diocese of this denomi- 
nation was established in the city in 1895, the Catholic diocese having 
been founded in Duluth since 1889. 

The Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church, the Swedish Mission, 
as well as other religious bodies supported by Swedish-Americans, main- 
tain parochial schools in the city. They also have a number of well- 
conducted charitable organizations, such as the Swedish Christian Sick 
Benefit Society. 

In fact, it is evident that Duluth but repeats the general story which 
is told by all other Minnesota towns and cities — that its Swedish-Ameri- 
cans are a decided credit to themselves as a distinct racial element and 
to the best institutions of their adopted country. 



ioo6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF I^IINNESOTA 



John E. Ericsson, a member of the well-known firm of contractors 
and builders, Lanquist, Illsley & Company, with headquarters at 393 
North Clark street, Chicago, Illinois, is a native of Sweden and dates his 
birth May 2t„ 1868. He came with his parents, Carl and Martha (John- 
son) Ericsson, to this country in 1883, when a new home was established 
on a farm in Martin county, Minnesota. Here the father followed farm- 
ing the rest of his life, and died in 1905. The mother died in 1907. They 
were the parents of thirteen children, six of whom died in Sweden. Those 
who came to the United States with their parents were Henry, Charles, 
John E., Lena (who married John A. Hall), William, Hannah (who 
married George Keeler), and Naomi, who died in 1903. 

John E. Ericsson attended public school in Sweden and also was a 
student at the Elementary College, Stockholm. He was fifteen years of 
age when he landed in this country. Here he served an apprenticeship 
to the trade of brick mason. At nineteen he was made a foreman and a 
few years later, in 1890, was advanced to the position of superintendent 
for the firm of A. Lanquist & Company, contractors and builders, a 
position he filled twelve years. In 1902 he formed a partnership with 
his brother Henry, under the name of Henry & John Ericsson, general 
contractors, with headquarters in Chicago. This business association 
lasted four years, when it was dissolved, and the subject of our sketch 
became a partner of the firm of Lanquist, Illsley & Company, 393 North 
Clark street. This company does an extensive business, that employs a 
large force of men, and extends over several states. At this writing the 
firm has under construction the new court house at Duluth, which will 
cost about one million dollars, and which is under the supervision of 
Mr. Ericsson ; also the immense steel plant at Gar}- , Indiana, which, when 
completed, will be the largest plant of the kind in the world. . 

In 1894, Mr. Ericsson married Miss Celia Peterson, daughter of 
Swan Peterson, a dry goods merchant of Chicago, and they are the 
parents of three children: Earl, born in 1895; Lillian, in 1897; Vivian, 
in 1898 — all students in the Chicago public schools. Mrs. Ericsson was 
born and educated in Chicago. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ericsson is identified with the A. F. & A. M., 
including the Mystic Shrine and the Consistory ; the Royal Arcanum, in 
which he has passed all the chairs ; the North Star, and the Swedish 
United Sons of America, and the Swedish Glee Club of Chicago. Both 
he and his wife belong to the Swedish Lutheran church, Mrs. Ericsson 
being active in church work, and filling the office of secretary of the 
Lutheran Woman's League. 

Helmer Grape, of Duluth, Minnesota, was born September 7, 
1862, in the parish of Carl Gustaf, Norrbotten, Sweden, "the Land of the 
Midnight Sun," a few miles from the Polar Circle, where his father 
was a well known minister. His early education was obtained in a 
primary school in Haparanda, the most northern city in the world. 



ASTOR.LE.NQX AND 
TILOiN f OUND*TiON8. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1009 

barring Hammerfest in Norway ; he attended high school in Umea, West- 
erbotten, where he graduated in 1880, after which he enrolled at the 
University of Upsala, and spent several years there as a student. Having 
developed a taste for literary work, he went to Stockholm, where he 
engaged in newspaper work and did some other writing. 

Deciding to try his luck in the United States, he embarked for this 
country, in the spring of 1893, and landed here at a time of business 
depression. During the next fifteen years he was variously employed, 
chiefly in newspaper work, as editor of papers in Duluth, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis, and Superior. Also he served as editor of the Suometar, 
Calumet, Michigan, a paper published in the Finnish language, which 
has since been discontinued. 

About 1900 Mr. Grape filed a homestead claim in Michigan, apd 
dates the beginning of his prosperity at that time. Soon he became in- 
terested in getting up settlements of Swedes and Finns, such as Herman, 
and Covington in Michigan, and is still identified with work of this 
character, associated with a Duluth firm. 

Mr. Grape is a member of the Swedish United Sons of America. He 
is unmarried. He is doing a prosperous business in real estate, principally ^ 
around Duluth and other Minnesota and Wisconsin towns. 

Prof. K. A. Ostergren, of Duluth, Minnesota, was born in the 
province of Orebro, Sweden, September 15, 1848, and received his earliest 
education in the common school of his native parish of Ringkarleby. 
He entered Karolinska Laroverket, Orebro, in 1861, and graduated in 
1867. While yet a student, he identified himself with the free religious 
movement in Sweden, and joined the Baptist church at Orebro in 1868. 
That same year he made an engagement with A. Viberg, a Baptist pastor 
of Stockholm, to write for a religious periodical. He spent the years 
1869-1871 at Upsala, as pastor of the Baptist church, and at the same 
time studied philosophy at the university. In 1871 he engaged to ac- 
company a large party of emigrants from the southern part of Sweden 
to "New Sweden," Maine. Upon their arrival in this country, they 
found the Maine colony overcrowded and a large number of emigrants 
wanting employment. He went ahead to Boston, Massachusetts, and 
to Providence, Rhode Island, to procure work for them, and near the 
latter place, at the Rumford Chemical Works, he found employment 
for a great number. For a year he remained with them to help thern 
along in their new environments, and to such an extent did they appreci- 
ate his service that they furnished him with means that enabled him to 
pursue a course of study in Newton Theological Institution near Boston, 
where he graduated in 1875. 

Immediately following his graduation, Mr. Ostergren came to Min- 
nesota and became pastor of the First Sw^edish Baptist Church of St. 
Paul; also he published the denominational paper, Sions Vakt and 
Facklan. 

64 



loio SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Through acquaintance with Boston people, he was induced to lead 
immigration of Swedes into Northern Wisconsin, and he founded a col- 
ony in Price and Taylor counties, in a heavily timbered district, which fur- 
nished abundant opportunities for employment for the settlers. In 1889 
Mr. Ostergren was appointed State Commissioner of Immigration, by 
Governor William E. Smith, and continued in office four years, spending 
a part of this time in Chicago. For eleven years he was identified with 
the Swedish settlement at Ogema, engaged in receiving newcomers, and 
had the satisfaction of seeing a prosperous community developing in the 
southern part of Price county and in parts of Taylor and Lincoln coun- 
ties. In addition to other duties connected with the building up of the 
settlement, he was secretary of the school board and took an active 
interest in educational work. 

In 1891, Mr. Ostergren moved to Duluth, where he has been engaged 
in educational work, besides being for several years editor of the Duluth 
Posten, with which he is still connected. During the panic of 1893-96 
he spent three winters at Grand Marais, as principal of the county 
school of Cook county, Minnesota. He was appointed deputy clerk 
of the District Court of Duluth, in 1904, a position he has since filled. 

In 1875, in Boston, he married Miss Mary Henrietta Johanson, 
daughter of a wholesale merchant of Stockholm, Sweden, formerly of 
Hull, England, where she was born. Since they have been residents 
of Duluth, Mrs. Ostergren has taught music, and is well known there. 
The family consists of seven children, four sons and three daughters: 
E. A., assistant superintendent of the Allouez ore dock at Superior; 
K. A., salesman with the firm of French & Bassett, Duluth ; C. D., well 
known as a musical director in both Duluth and Superior; the youngest 
son, a senior in the Duluth high school; Agnes Mary, wife of Dr. 
Arvid Gordh, president of Bethel Academy at St. Paul ; Henrietta, wife 
of Harvey R. Gardner of St. Paul; and May, in training as nurse, at 
Mounds Park Sanitarium, St. Paul. 

Charles Mork, who is engaged in the clothing business at 1930 
West Superior street, Duluth, Minnesota, came to this country from 
Sweden when a young man and, unaided, has worked his way to success. 

Mr. Mork was born in Wermland, Sweden, November 12, 1866, 
son of Carl and Christena (Streed) Mork, he being the second in a 
family of eleven children, namely: Amanda, who married A. G. Malm- 
quist; Charles; Emil ; Edward; Oscar; William; Anna, who married 
Fred Larson; Lois; Peter; Gustaf, and Adolph. All of them came to 
this countrv, and are now living in Duluth, with the exception of Lois 
and Peter, who returned to Sweden. The father died October i, 1907; 
the mother, October i, 1906. 

When a boy, Charles attended the public schools of his native land, 
and assisted his' father in a meat market, the father being a butcher by 
trade; and in 1885, at the age of eighteen, came to America, Minneapolis 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA loii 



being his objective point. He did various kinds of work, chiefly rail- 
roading, at different places, until 1888, from that year until 1894 he 
worked on the coal docks, and in the last named year he was appointed 
to a position on the Duluth Police force. After serving four years as 
patrolman, he was promoted to the office of city detective, in which 
capacity he acted four years. Resigning his position on the police force, 
he engaged in the clothing business at his present location, 1930 West 
Superior street, where he handles ready-made clothing and gents' furnish- 
ing goods, keeping a well-selected stock and doing a successful business. 

Politically, Mr. Mork is a Democrat. In addition to his public 
service on the police force, he has filled the office of alderman, having 
been elected in 1896, and served two years. He is member of the 
Modern Woodmen and the Swedish orders of I. S. W. A. and S. H. & 
E. F., and he belongs to the Swedish Mission church. 

December 10, 1888, Mr. Mork married Miss Sophia Johnson, 
daughter of Peter Johnson, and they have three children : Frank William, 
a clerk in his father's store, was born October 27, 1889; Ida, March 18, 
1 89 1, and Esther, September 7, 1893, both attending the Duluth Central 
High School, which Frank William also attended before taking a course 
in the Duluth Business University. 

David E. Seashore, M. D. of Duluth, Minnesota, was born February 
4, 1875, ^t Dayton, Iowa, son of Rev. Carl G. and Emily (Borg) Sea- 
shore. Rev. Carl G. Seashore and his wife were natives of Smaland, 
Sweden. They came to America in 1869, and settled at Dayton, Iowa, 
where they made their home and reared their family of five children : 
Carl E., August F., Emma, now the wife of B. F. Anderson ; Selma, who 
died in 1903, at the age of twenty-five years, and David E. The father 
was a Lutheran minister, a pioneer worker, and an influence for great 
good in the community. Boxholm had no Swedish Lutheran church 
at the time of his settlement there. He at once began preaching, and 
gathered together the few Swedish Lutherans in the town and sur- 
rounding country. After holding meetings in the school-house for a 
few years, he solicited funds with which to purchase lumber and other 
material for the erection of a house of worship, and, being a carpenter, 
he built the church with his own hands. He continued to serve as 
pastor of his church up to the time of his death in 1898. 

After receiving a public school education in his native town, David 
E. Seashore pursued a course of study in Gustavus Adolphus College 
at St. Peter, Minnesota, and subsequently entered the University of Min- 
nesota, where he completed the medical course and graduated in 1902. 
He began the practice of his profession in Otter Tail county, Minnesota, 
and remained there two years, coming thence, in 1904, to Duluth, where 
he has established himself in a successfvil practice. Dr. Seashore has 
identified himself with numerous fraternal organizations, including the 
American Medical Association ; the State Medical Society of Minnesota, 



IOI2 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



and the St. Louis County Medical Society; also the A. F. & A. M., 
being a Scottish Rite Mason; the I. O. O. F., the A. O. U. W., the 
K. O. T. M., the M. B. A, the Swedish Brothers, and the North Star 
Benevolent Society. 

June 10, 1904. Dr. Seashore married Miss Winfred Jones, daughter 
of Dr. M. S. Jones, of Battle Lake, Minnesota, and they have two chil- 
dren : Helen Emily, born June 10, 1905 ; and Malcolm D., born January 
22, 1909. The doctor and his wife are members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church. 

Eric A. Lindgren, general emigrant agent for the Duluth South 
Shore and Atlantic Railroad, Duluth, Minnesota, was born at Ofver 
Tornea Pello, Sweden, in 1868, son of Nels and Maria (Jurva) Lind- 
gren, the former a native of Sweden and the latter of Finland. Nels 
Lindgren was engaged in merchandising in Sweden for many years, 
and died there in October, 1908. 

In the public and elementary schools of his native land, Eric A. 
received his early training. The greater part of his education, however, 
has been obtained from the broad school of experience. He spent two 
years as clerk in a railroad office in Sweden before coming to America 
in 1889. On landing in New York, he directed his course westward to 
the Black Hills, and at once found employment in the mines ; but mining 
was not to his liking, eight days' work being sufficient to convince him 
of that fact. From the Black Hills he went to Calumet, Michigan, 
where he spent six months as clerk in a general merchandise store. Next 
we find him in Montana, where he was financially interested as a stock- 
holder in a lead and silver mining company. This venture proved unfor- 
tunate, and the company, after having invested and lost $160,000, 
abandoned the enterprise. 

Young Lindgren, without means but undaunted, returned to Calu- 
met, Michigan, and accepted a position as bookkeeper in a drug store, 
where he remained six months. In 1895 he came to Duluth. He 
clerked in a law office a short time, two years was bookkeeper in the 
courthouse and two years was employed in the same capacity by the 
Duluth Board of Trade. In 1905 he was appointed emigrant agent for 
the Duluth South Shore and Atlantic Railroad, a position for which he 
was specially adapted by reason of his familiarity with several languages, 
and he soon became an important factor in the office and was promoted 
to the responsible position of general emigrant agent for the company, 
which office he is now filling. Mr. Lindgren is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum and the Sons of Sweden. 

William A. Anderson, deputy register of titles of St. Louis county, 
Minnesota, was born February 4, 1882, at Iron Mountain, Michigan, son 
of Andrew W. and Amelia (Larson) Anderson, natives of Sweden. Mr. 
Anderson's parents came to the United States in 1880 and settled at Iron 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1013 



Mountain, Michigan, where they made their home until the father's 
death, in 1894. He had studied engineering in Sweden, and was em- 
ployed as engineer at Iron Mountain and in that vicinity. In their 
family were ten children, namely : Minnie, who married a Mr. Fredin ; 
William A. ; Alma T., who married Victor Manson ; the next two died 
in infancy ; Eugene V., Phillip, Rudolph E., Milton D., and Gorden L. 
The family moved to Duluth in 1889. 

Mr. Anderson was educated in the public schools of Tower, Minne- 
sota, and the Duluth high school, and began his business career as shipper 
and order clerk in the wholesale store of Schulze Bros., where he 
remained three years. Then he accepted a clerkship in the office of the 
registrar of deeds. Three years later he was appointed deputy register 
of titles of St. Louis county, has twice been reappointed for a term of 
two years, and is now serving his third term. 

He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and belongs to several 
benevolent insurance orders. In his church, the Third Swedish Baptist 
church, he has charge of the music, and has long been a faithful worker. 
For fourteen years he has been organist, and for eight years leader of 
the choir. Also he is an active member of the Y. M. C. A., in which for 
two years he was leader of the orchestra. 

November 11, 1908, Mr. Anderson married Miss Olga V. Olson, 
daughter of O. G. Olson, one of Duluth's prominent and highly respected 
business men. 

Peter J. Borgstrom, bookkeeper in the office of county auditor, 
Duluth, Minnesota, was born January 19, 1864, in Jemtland province, 
Sweden, son of John and Catherine Borgstrom, natives of Sweden. The 
Borgstrom family emigrated to the United States in 1881 and settled at 
Willmar, Minnesota, where they made their home for about nine years, 
at the end of that time removing to Duluth, where they have since 
resided. John and Catherine Borgstrom are the parents of three chil- 
dren : Martha, wife of John J. Eckander, of Willmar, Minnesota, and 
Peter J., and Andrew J. 

Peter J. was educated in the public schools of his native land, and 
was a youth of seventeen at the time he accompanied his parents to 
America. At Willmar he secured a position as clerk in the postoffice, 
where he was employed two years. Then he entered a general mer- 
chandise store, in which he clerked until the removal of the family to 
Duluth. Here he accepted a clerkship in the real estate office of Edward 
Elston, of West Duluth. A year later, in 1892, he was elected clerk of 
the municipal courl of West Duluth ; was reelected the following year, 
and served until tht; court was discontinued, which was caused by the 
consolidation of West Duluth with Duluth. In 1894 he was elected 
register of deeds of St. Louis county, Minnesota, and filled this office 
two terms, having been reelected. He has since been employed as book- 
keeper in the auditor's office. 



IOI4 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Mr. Borgstrom married, April ii, 1885, Miss Martha E. Nelson, 
daughter of Erick Nelson, of Willmar, and they have four children: 
Cora Mabel, born May 6, 1890; Earl L., March 26. 1896; Myrtle, Jan- 
uary 9, 1898; and Joel Reuben, September 14, 1906. Fraternally, Mr. 
Borgstrom is identified with the Independent Order of Good Templars, 
and both he and his wife have membership in the Swedish Baptist 
church. 

Peter Johnson, painter and sign manufacturer, 211 West Superior 
street, Duluth, Minnesota, was born in Skona, Sweden, July 21, 1861, 
son of John and Gertrude (Hausson) Person. John Person came to the 
United States in 1876, and settled at Willmar, Minnesota. About a 
year and a half later he went to Langdon, Minnesota, but subsequently 
he returned to Willmar, where he has since resided. His wife joined 
him here in 1886, and other members of the family came at different 
times, the family consisting of five children, namely : Cecilia, Ella, John, 
Peter and Hannah. 

Peter Johnson received a public-school education in his native land 
and there served an apprenticeship to the trade of painter. In 1881, at 
the age of twenty, he left the old home in Sweden and joined his father 
at Willmar, where he remained about eighteen months. Afterward he 
went to Minneapolis and from there to St. Paul, spending four years in 
the latter city, all the while working at his trade. In 1887 he took up 
his residence in Duluth. Here he formed a partnership with M. _H. 
Ekstrom, under the firm name of Ekstrom & Johnson, painters and sign 
manufacturers ; three years later he purchased his partner's interest, and 
has since continued the business in his own name. He manufactures 
all kinds of signs, including the most modern and artistic electric signs, 
and has built up a substantial and growing business, with headquarters 
at 211 West Superior street. 

In 1897 Mr. Johnson married Miss Edith Erickson, daughter of 
John Erickson, a farmer of Cannon Falls, Alinnesota, and a veteran of 
the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have one child, Gertrude, bom 
November 26, 1908. Fraternally, Mr. Johnson is identified with the 
Modern Woodmen and the Modern Samaritans. 

Peter M. Carlson, who is identified with the manufacturing inter- 
ests of Duluth, Minnesota, was born in Sweden, November 7, 1887. In 
his native land he received a public-school education and was raised on a 
farm, but later learned the trade of cabinetmaker, at which he worked 
there' for several vears. Coming to this country, in 1897, he found 
emplovment on a 'farm near St. Paul, where he remained for about 
eighteen months. Afterward he worked in the railroad shops at St. 
Paul a few months, and then, wishing to see something more of this 
country he made a trip west to Dakota and Montana, stopping at various 
places "and spending some time at work at different occupations. Re- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1015 



turning to Minnesota he took up his abode in Duluth and went to work 
at the carpenter's trade. After working five years as a journeyman 
carpenter he formed a partnership with E. F. Blowers, and for two years 
they were engaged in contracting and building. In May, 1901, Mr. 
Carlson turned his attention to the manufacture of show-cases and ofifice 
fixtures, beginning in a small way, at 1608-10 West Michigan street, 
but having his factory equipped with up-to-date machinery, and from 
the start turning out first class work. The business grew and soon 
demanded larger quarters. Mr. Carlson organized and incorporated a 
company, with a capital stock of $50,000, the largest part of which he 
retained, and under his general management the business has continued 
to prosper. The factoi-y was moved to 302-6 Lake avenue. South, where 
they now occupy a building 100 by 100 feet, two stories high, and employ 
a number of men. 

Mr. Carlson is a member of the I. O. O. F., and was formerly a 
member of the Royal Temple of Templars, a temperance organization, 
with headquarters at Bufl^alo, New York, of which he was for several 
years financial secretary. He is unmarried. 

Dr. Joel Alfred Osterberg, dentist, 2004 West Superior street, 
Duluth, Minnesota, was born September 23, 1875, at Stockholm, Wright 
county, Minnesota, son of Lewis P. and Christena (Johnson) Osterberg, 
natives of Sweden. 

Lewis P. Osterberg and wife came to the United States in 1868, 
and the following year settled in Wright county, Minnesota, where they 
still live, on a farm. He was one of the organizers of the Stockholm 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and was elected its president. Their 
family consists of nine children, namely : John A., Charles E., Frank O., 
J. Alfred, Herman N., Tillie J., Arthur G., Albert M. and Clara M. 

Joel Alfred Osterberg received his early education in the public 
schools of his native town, and continued his studies in the high school, 
after which he entered the Dental Department of the University of Min- 
nesota, and graduated in 1901. Immediately after his graduation he 
opened an office at 2004 West Superior street, Duluth, where he has 
established himself in a substantial and growing practice. 

April 29, 1908, Dr. Osterberg married Miss Victoria Clausen, 
daughter of John Clausen, a farmer, and an old resident of Duluth. Mrs. 
Osterberg is a native of Minnesota. Both the doctor and his wife are 
members of the Modern Samaritans. 

HjALMAR Ahl, assistant secretary for the firm of Bridgeman-Rus- 
sell Co., wholesale dairy products, Duluth, Minnesota, was born Feb- 
ruary 7, 1877, at Algutsboda, Sweden, son of Swen and Mariana Ahl. 
Swen Ahl was for many years a merchant in Sweden, and is still living 
there. His wife died in 1897. In their family were ten children, four of 
whom are residents of this country, namely : Charles, who lives in Du- 



ioi6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

kith ; Anna, in Seattle, Washington ; Martin, in San Francisco, California, 
and Hjalmar. 

Hjalmar Ahl came to the United States in 1893, a youth of sixteen, 
and for a few years had to struggle hard for an existence. He worked 
as a common laborer, coachman, deliveryman for a grocery store, clerk 
in a general store, and bookkeeper. Mr. Ahl had received a common- 
school education in his native lanad, and as soon as circumstances per- 
mitted it, he attended Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, and later 
took a course in a business university. In April, 1907, he accepted the 
position he now holds, that of assistant secretary of the Bridgeman- 
Russell Company, wholesale dairy products. 

During the Spanish- American war Mr. Ahl was a soldier, a mem- 
ber of Company A, Fourteenth Regiment of Minnesota Volunteers, and 
also served in the expedition that suppressed the Leach Lake Indian 
uprising at Bemidji, Minnesota, in 1898, and for four years was a mem- 
ber of the Minnesota State Militia. 

June 23, 1906, Mr. Ahl married Miss Ida Peterson, daughter of 
Isaac Peterson, of Fish Lake, Minnesata, and they have one child, a 
daughter, Dagmar, born September 6, 1908. 

For years Mr. Ahl has been prominent and active in church work. 
He is a member of the First Swedish Lutheran church of Duluth, and 
of its Young People's Society. Of the former he has been a trustee, 
and in the latter for thirteen years he served in an official capacity, 
having filled the offices of president, secretary and librarian. 

Axel E. Zimmerman, deputy city clerk of Duluth, Minnesota, was 
born May 16, 1869, at Cannon Falls, this state, son of Swedish parents, 
Victor and Emma Zimmerman. Victor Zimmerman emigrated from his 
home in northern Sweden to this country in 1863, and settled in Minne- 
sota, first at Red Wing and afterward at Cannon Falls. He had learned 
the trade of miller in the old country, and worked at it after coming 
here, as also did his brothers, some of them being experts in the flour 
milling business. One of his brothers, Ole, who came to the United 
States" about the same time, married, had one son named John, and 
became a prominent farmer of Minnesota. Victor Zimmerman died 
in 1882. His widow subsequently became the wife of John Ntelson, 
and is now a resident of Cannon Falls. By her first husband she had 
six children : Two died in infancy of scarlet fever, Victor and Axel ; 
Conrad died of diphtheria, at the age of seven years; Sallie. who is now 
dead, was the wife of Paul Rothe, who is engaged in the milling business 
at Cannon Falls; David, who died in 1900; and Axel E., of this sketch. 
By her second marriage she has two daughters, Edna and Amy, and one 
son, John, who has been engaged in the milling business at Superior, 
Wisconsin, for more than twenty years and is one of the best known 
millers in that citv. 

Axel E. Zimmerman received his early education m the public 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1017 

schools of Cannon Falls, Minnesota. His first work was as clerk in the 
store of John Eslargreen & Son. While he was there, in May, 1887,, 
Cannon Falls had a great fire, which destroyed half the business section 
of the town. After this young Zimmerman went to St. Paul, where he 
became a clerk in the wholesale grocery store of Yanz, Griggs & Howes, 
now Griggs, Cooper & Company, where he remained three years. At 
this time, feeling the need of a better training for business, he entered 
Parson's Business College, at Duluth, and took a commercial course, 
including stenography, typewriting, bookkeeping, etc., and graduated in 
the spring of 1890.'^ Then he went to Cook county, JNIinnesota, and took 
up land, which he subsequently commuted. Returning to Duluth, he 
accepted a position as bookkeeper for the Duluth Provision & Dry Goods 
Company, which he resigned in 1899 to take up the work of deputy in 
the office of the city clerk. To this position he has been reappointed 
each year for eleven successive years, and is still filling the office, his 
long service being ample evidence of his efficiency. Meanwhile Mr. 
Zimmerman has traveled extensively over the United States, and has 
made two trips to the West Indies. From time to time he has made 
investments of various kinds. He is a stockholder in several mining 
and development companies, is a stockholder and director in the 
Duluth Gas Engine Company, and is the owner of a valuable fruit farm' 
near Jacksonville, Florida. This farm he purchased from Stanly Smith, 
a retired Englishman, who had lived on the place eighteen years and 
brought it to a high state of cultivation, its chief products being pears, 
pecans, figs and persimmons. 

Fraternally, Mr. Zimmerman is identified with the A. F. & A. M., 
Knights of Maccabees, Modern Samaritans, and B. P. O. E., and both 
he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. May 22, 1895, 
he married Miss Mary Nelson, a native of Duluth, born June 16, 1873, 
daughter of Carl Nelson. They have an adopted son, Barny R. Zimmer- 
man, who was born in 1898, and whom they have had since he was two 
years old. 

T. I. Eklund, M. D., recognized throughout northern Minnesota as 
a skilled surgeon, and well known as one of Duluth's most public-spirited 
and influential citizens, was born in Sweden in 1861, and in early child- 
hood came with his parents to this country. His father, N. J. Eklund, 
on landing in America, in 1866, came to Minnesota and settled at Tay- 
lor's Falls, where he lived with his family until 1870, when he moved to 
a farm near Rush Point in Chisago county. He was interested in tem- 
perance and church work, giving efficient eflfort and substantial support 
to both causes, for years serving as a deacon in the Swedish Lutheran 
church. 

T. J. Eklund was five years old at the time of their coming to 
America. After attending the public school in the country he spent 
two years preparing for college in the home of his brother-in-law, Rev. 



ioi8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



A. Engdahl, at Cambridge, Minnesota. Then he was for three years 
a student at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, this state, following 
which he entered the Minnesota College Hospital, where he graduated 
as a physician and surgeon in 1885. Two years later this institution 
became the Medical Department of the University of Minnesota. 

Immediately after his graduation Dr. Eklund engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession at Duluth, where he has since continued, growing 
with the city and establishing a large practice. In the meantime, in 
order to keep up with the advancement made in the science of medicine 
and surgery, he spent two terms of study at the New York Polyclinic, 
New York City, and of late years by his skillful work in surgery he has 
gained a reputation among his profession as one of the leading surgeons 
in northern ^Minnesota. 

From the beginning of his residence in Duluth Dr. Eklund has taken 
an active interest in the building up of the city. He was a member of the 
first City Charter Commission and chairman of the committee which 
drew up that part of the charter regarding the Board of Health ; was 
for three years a member of the City Water and Light Board, and is 
identified with various private interests that have contributed to the 
city's growth and prosperity. He is a director of the Northern National 
Bank, is a heav}' owner of Duluth real estate, and at this writing is 
building a handsome home in the most choice resident district of the city. 

Politically, the doctor is a Republican, active and influential in party 
afifairs. For ten years he served as coroner of St. Louis county. He 
was district delegate to the Republican National Convention that nomi- 
nated President McKinley, and was again honored by being made an 
elector-at-large from this state in the recent election of Mr. Taft, and 
also was chosen messenger to carry the vote to Washington. - 

In 1888 Dr. Eklund married Miss Nannie Asp, of St. Peter, Min- 
nesota. She died in 1905, leaving one son, William J., born in 1890. 

Andrew Nelson, for a number of years identified with the educa- 
tional interests of Minnesota, and now engaged in the practice of law at 
Duluth, was born at Marine, Washington county, Minnesota, April i, 
1872. Mr. Nelson's parents were natives of Sweden, his father, Jonas 
Nelson, born in the province of Blekinge, in 1830; his mother, Catherine 
(Swanson) Nelson, in Smaland, Sweden, in 1843. He came to the 
United States in 1856; she in 1870. On his arrival in this country Jonas 
Nelson settled on a farm in Washington county, where he passed the rest 
of his life, and where he died in 1893. He was an active member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church ; in politics was a Republican ; was a public- 
spirited man, and took a keen interest in the walfare of the community, 
especially in educational aiTairs, serving as a member of the school board. 
He was the father of three sons: Andrew, the subject of this sketch ; and 
John and Peter, twins. 

Andrew Nelson's education was begun in the public schools of his 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1019 



native county. He was a student at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. 
Peter, Minnesota, and afterward entered the University of . Minnesota, 
where he graduated in 1892, receiving the degree of B. A. and the fel- 
lowship for mathematics. Then he took a post-graduate course and in 
1893 received his degree of M. A. In 1893 he was elected principal of 
the graded school at Marine, Minnesota, which position he held one year. 
From 1894 to 1896 he was principal of the high school at Elgin, Minne- 
sota; from 1896 to 1899 was superintendent of public schools at Benson, 
Minnesota, and in 1899 was appointed by Governor Lind to the position 
of assistant superintendent of public instruction at St. Paul, where he 
served until 1901. During the next five years he was superintendent of 
public schools at Austin, Minnesota, and there rounded out a period of 
thirteen years in educational work. Having previously studied law in the 
office of State Senator Albert Schaller, of St. Paul, and at the law depart- 
ment of Michigan University, he was admitted to the bar in 1906, and in 
the fall of that year entered upon the practice of law in Duluth, with 
office in the First National Bank Building. 

Mr. Nelson is a Democrat. He is an eloquent, forceful speaker, is 
chairman of the Democratic committee of St. Louis county, and has per- 
formed much efficient campaign work for his party. While he has never 
sought public office for himself, he has been urged by his friends to do so, 
and could have had the nomination for Congress from his district in the 
fall of 1908, but declined to become a candidate. 

He is a member of the various Masonic bodies from the Blue Lodge 
to the Commandery, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of 
Pythias, ^Modern Woodmen, Royal League, Modern Samaritans, United 
Sons of Sweden, and the Congregational church. June 30, 1898, Mr. 
Nelson married Miss Eleanor Harris, daughter of John Harris, of Minne- 
apolis, and they have had two children : Arthur Raymond, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1901, died February 22, 1901 ; and Harris, born February 19, 
1908. 

Olef a. Oredson, M. D., prominent in the medical profession at 
Duluth, Minnesota, was born at St. James, this state, March 3, 1872, the 
son of Swedish parents, Andrew and Anna (Nelson) Oredson. He was 
educated at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, and at the 
Iowa State University, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Hamline 
University, and has the degrees of M. D. and C. M. Previously to his 
taking up the study of medicine he spent two years, 1894 to 1896, as a 
school teacher, and following that experience was for two years a com- 
mercial traveler. After graduation, in June, 1903, he served as house 
surgeon of Bethesda Hospital, St. Paul for one year. After completion 
of the hospital course, in June, 1904, he settled in Duluth and engaged in 
the practice of his profession, and from the start has met with that success 
which his thorough preparation for the work warranted. 

Dr. Oredson is identified with numerous fraternal organizations, 



1020 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

including the North Star Benefit Association, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the ^lodern Samaritans, Independent Working Association, 
Scandinavian Help and Aid Society, the Scandinavian Life Insurance 
Company and Security Mutual. Of all these organizations he is medical 
examiner. Also he is a member of the St. Louis County Medical Asso- 
ciation, Minnesota State Medical and American Medical Associations, and 
he has membership in the West End Svea Glee Club, Commercial Club, 
Recreation, Boating and Driving Club and Sons of Sweden, and is a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

In 1905 Dr. Oredson was the choice of his party for a place on the 
local school board, and in 1908 he was a candidate for the legislature of 
Minnesota. Both times, however, he was defeated, as his party was in 
the minority, but in the last campaign he was much stronger than the 
Democratic ticket, running several hundred votes ahead of it. February 
2, 1906, he married Miss Emley Rosan, daughter of Samuel Rosan, of 
LeRoy, Minnesota. 

Oscar Lonegren. — Among the leading business men in Duluth, 
Minnesota, is Oscar Lonegren, who is officially associated with the L. W. 
Leithhead Drug Company (wholesalers), as secretary and credit man. 
He descends from a family that has been connected with the Swedish 
state church for centuries. 

Mr. Lonegren was born in Wederslof, Sweden, on October 27, 1858, 
where his father was rector of the state church. He was educated in his 
native land and began his business career with a grain firm in Gothenberg, 
after having graduated from the most prominent business college in that 
city. 

In 1882 Mr. Lonegren left Sweden for the United States and for a 
few months worked as a mechanic at the Red Wing Wagon Factory, 
afterwards engaging in newspaper work in St. Paul, continuing thus 
employed until receiving the appointment in 1891 as bank examiner for 
Minnesota, which office he held nine years. 

In 1 90 1 Mr. Lonegren accepted a position as assistant credit man 
with the L. W. Leithhead Drug Company, and in 1905 was elected a 
director and secretary and credit man of the company, which position he 
still occupies. 

Mr. Lonegren for years was known as one of the most pleasing public 
speakers and was often called upon to address the public at both business, 
political and social meetings or functions. Personally he is suave or 
stern, as the passing fancy suits him, but a keen, just and liberal financier, 
and has contributed much to the upbuilding of the business interests of 
the Northwest. 

Mr. Lonegren, who recently celebrated his fifty-first anniversary, and 
also his silver\vedding, has one daughter and two sons, one of whom 
was recently elected cashier of the "Duluth State Bank," and the other 
one assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Ely, Minnesota. Mr. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1021 



Lonegren is an enthusiastic member of the Masonic bodies, being a 
thirty-second degree Mason, a Knights Templar, and Shriner. 

Emil August Swenson, who has been engaged in the furniture 
business the past seven years at Duluth, Minnesota, was born September 
II, 1868, in Lefvar NordmaUng, of Westerbottens Ian (or province). In 
1886, at the age of eighteen, he emigrated to America, where he has since 
Hved in various cities, being variously employed. He spent a number of 
years in New York, working in different stores, hotels, hospitals, etc., and 
had an experience that gave him a knowledge of the doings of "the 400" 
as well as the manner of living of the people who landed at Castle 
Garden. 

In 1899 Mr. Swenson married Miss Ida A. Okerlind, of New York, 
and to them have been born four children, namely : Rudolph Emil, aged 
nine years ; Uno Edward, who died at the age of four months, in Brooklyn, 
New York ; Oscar Edward and Mathilda Lovisa, both born in Erie, 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Swenson is a member of the Lutheran church, the Swedish 
United Sons of America, and the Royal League. 

Charles W. Ericson, one of the leading merchants of Duluth, Min- 
nesota, dates his birth at Montala, Sweden, September 27, i860. His 
parents, William and Augusta (Engman) Ericson, emigrated from 
Sweden, their native land, to America, when Charles W. was a boy, and 
settled at Duluth, where the father still lives. He was a hardware mer- 
chant in Sweden. His wife died in 1905, at the age of seventy-four 
vears. They had a family of seven children, namely : Charles W. ; 
Alfred, deceased ; Isador, deceased ; Augusta, deceased ; Josephine, who 
is the wife of J. H. Wordby ; Enock, deceased ; and Victoria Kinder- 
gartner. William Ericson has long been a worthy member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, as also was his wife. 

Charles W. was educated in the public schools of Sweden and Duluth, 
and began to make his own way in the world at the age of fifteen. From 
fifteen to seventeen he was variously employed, doing whatever kind of 
work he could find. At seventeen he became a clerk in the clothing store 
of M. G. Wills, of Duluth, and was employed in this capacity for a period 
of eight years, during which time he acquired a thorough knowledge of 
every detail of the business, and laid the foundation for a prosperous 
career. In 1886 he bought the store in which he had clerked. No. 219 
West Superior street, and of which he has since been proprietor. How well 
he has succeeded may be shown by the statement that Mr. Ericson is 
ranked today as one of the prominent business men of Duluth. The 
store, 140 by 25 feet, is two-story, with basement, and is well stocked with 
men's and boys' ready-made clothing, hats, caps and shoes, and a full 
line of gents' furnishing goods. Also Mr. Ericson is interested in 
mining, being a director and treasurer of the Calumet Mining Company. 



I022 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



October 26, 1886, he married Miss Amelia H. Acker, daughter of 
Lambert Acker, of Duluth, where she was reared and educated. She is 
a native of Grand Island, New York. The children born to this union are : 
Ethel L., August 3, 1887; Edna M., April 18, 1889; Vivia, July 31, 1890; 
Ruth A., December 23, 1891 ; and Dorthey, February 7, 1899. At this 
writing Ethel and Edna are students at the Holyoke College, South 
Hadley, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Ericson is identified with the Y. M. C. A., the City Civil Service, 
the Modern Samaritans and the English Congregational church, in all of 
which he is prominent and active. For more than twenty years he has 
been a director of the Y. M. C. A. He is a member of the "board of the 
City Civil Service and in his church he occupies a place on the board of 
trustees. 

Carl Wilhelm Lofroth. — Noteworthy for his good citizenship and 
many excellent traits of character, Carl Wilhelm Lofroth is a highly 
esteemed and valued resident of the city of Duluth, which has been his 
home the greater part of the time since coming to this country from a 
foreign shore. He was born, March 9, 1874, in Ofwervetie parish, Wasa 
Ian, Finland. His father, Frederick Wilhelm Lofroth, was born, in 
August, 1819, in the same place, while the birthplace of his mother, who 
died in 1891, was in Kammers, Finland, occurring there in 1832. 

Obtaining the rudiments of his education in the public schools and 
in a collegiate college, Carl W. Lofroth completed a course in pharmacy 
at Gamlakarlaby in 1890. He subsequently followed his profession in his 
native land for five years, and then, emigrating to the United States, 
followed it in this country for ten years. On November 2, 1905, INIr. 
Lofroth accepted his present position as assistant emigration agent of the 
Duluth Steamship and Atlantic Railway Company, and has since served 
in this capacity with fidelity and efficiency. 

On May 7, 1898, Mr. Ldfroth was united in marriage with Alma 
Johnson, and to them five children have been born. 

August Hagberg, merchant tailor at 218 West Superior street, 
Duluth, Minnesota, and state factory inspector, is a native of Wermland, 
Sweden, born May 12, 1869, son of Nels and Christein Hagberg. He 
spent his boyhood days on the farm, his father being a farmer, and later 
served an apprenticeship to the tailor's trade. His parents died in the 
year 1875. In 1886, at the age of sixteen, he emigrated to America and 
came to Duluth, where he found employment in the tailoring establish- 
ment of John Drew, with whom he remained one year. Afterward he 
went to school in winter and worked at his trade in summer for four 
years, until he acquired sufficient education to enable him to teach, and 
for three winters he taught district school. Then he accepted a position 
as clerk in the clothing store of Charles Ericson, of Duluth, where he 
was employed two years. In 1899 and 1900 he served as deputy registrar 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1025 

of deeds of St. Louis county, In 1902 he was a candidate for this office 
on the Democratic ticket, but as the county is strongly Republican he was 
defeated. However, he had gained recognition for faithful service, and 
this, together with his other qualifications, gained for him, in 1904, 
appointment bv Governor Johnson to the office of state factory inspector, 
which office he still fills. In 1902, in partnership with his brother, Carl J., 
under the firm name of Hagberg Bros., he engaged in the merchant 
tailoring business at his present location on Superior street. After two 
years he purchased his brother's interest in the establishment and since 
1904 the business has been conducted under his own name. The high- 
' grade and satisfactory work done at this place has drawn to it 3. select 
class of patrons from' among the best people of the city, and gained for 
it a reputation for excellent tailoring second to none in Duluth. 

Like manv prosperous men in this locality, ]\Ir. Hagberg has mining 
investments. He is president of the Lake Superior & Nevada Develop- 
ment Company, which has mining properties located in the States of 
Nevada, California and Arizona, which are being developed. This com- 
pany has over twenty-five hundred stockholders, most of whom are 
Swedes. 

:Mr. Hagberg is a member of the Sons of Sweden and the Red Wmg 
Scandinavian Relief Association, being a director of the last named 
organization, and he has membership in the Baptist church. 

January 23, 1892, he married Miss Lottie Stark, daughter of John 
Stark, a farmer of St. Louis county, and to them have been given six 
children: Hepzibah C, Brenard L., Archie. C. (who died at the age of 
three years), Julian V., Rhoebie M. and Clara A. The two oldest are 
students in the Duluth high school. 

Nels p. Turnbladh. — One of the well-known Swedish-American 
citizens of Duluth is Nels P. Turnbladh, who has here gained prestige 
as a reliable and enterprising business man and who has made advance- 
ment through his own abilities and efforts until he is now to be consist- 
ently designated as one of the representative business men of the state 
that has been his home since his boyhood days. 

Nels P. Turnbladh, proprietor of the Gopher Shoe Works, in the 
city of Duluth, was born at Hammarlunda, Skane, Sweden, on the 26th 
of January, 1869, and is a son of Peter T. and Mary Turnbladh. He 
gained his rudimentary education in the schools of his native land, and 
was seventeen years of age at the time of his immigration to America. 
Together with four younger brothers and sisters they made their way 
to Minnesota in the year 1886 to join their father, who had settled there 
three vears previous. The mother died in 1880, when the subject of this 
sketch was a lad of eleven years, and the father passed the closing years 
of his life in the city of St.' Paul, where he died in 1900. _ Nels P. early 
gained experience in connection with the practical responsibilities of life. 
In the meanwhile he gained a good English education by attending night 



\ 



1026 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



school, thus fitting himself in a preliminary way for the winning of 
independence and definite success through his own efforts. At the age of 
nineteen years he secured employment in a shoe factory in St. Paul, and 
during the several years of his connection with this establishment he 
familiarized himself with all practical details of the business, in connec- 
tion with which he became an expert shoeman. Upon leaving the factory 
Mr. Turnbladh accepted a position as clerk in a local shoe store, and 
later he was made manager of the shoe department of the large retail es- 
tablishment of J. W. Kerr, of Minneapolis, an incumbency which he re- 
tained for five years. When the Palace Clothing Company opened their 
St. Pavil store Mr. Turnbladh became manager of the shoe department 
of the establishment, and for a period of four years he was the efficient 
and valued manager of the shoe departments of the three stores con- 
ducted by the company — two in Minneapolis and one in St. Paul. 

His long and varied experience in manufacturing and retail business 
gave Mr. Turnbladh confidence to engage in business on his own re- 
sponsibility, and he gave careful consideration to ways and means and 
to the selecting of an eligible location before he thus instituted his inde- 
pendent career. In 1903 he took up his residence in the city of Duluth, 
where he established the Gopher Shoe Works, equipping the same with 
the well-known Goodyear machinery for the manufacturing and repair- 
ing of shoes and thus providing facilities of the best modern type. His 
business has been emphatically prosperous, owing alike to his able admin- 
istration and to the excellent service accorded. He now has three places 
of business — two in Duluth and one in Superior, Wisconsin — and his fair 
and honorable methods have gained to him and his establishments un- 
qualified popular confidence. He gives ' employment to a corps of able 
workmen and assistants and makes a specialty of repair work. " 

In politics Mr. Turnbladh gives his allegiance to the Republican 
party, and he and his wife hold membership in the Lutheran church. He 
is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica and other fraternal and social organizations. 

Mr. Turnbladh chose as his wife and helpmeet Miss Emma Dahl, 
of Minneapolis, and they have two children — \"iviene Kathlyn, who was 
born in January, 1902, and Edwin Theodore, who was born in August, 
1905. 

August A. Larson. — Bringing to the country o.f his adoption the 
habits of honesty, sobriety and thrift characteristic of his Swedish ances- 
tors, August A. Larson has met with marked success as a business man 
and is now identified with the commercial interests of Duluth, Minne- 
sota, as traveling salesman. He was born March 4, 1866, in Ostersund, 
Jemtland, Sweden, a son of Peter Larson, a mail carrier, whose death 
occurred in 1871. His mother was born, in 1832, in Angcomanland, 
Sweden. 

65 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1027 



Brought up and educated in his native country, August A. Larson, 
ever on the lookout for favorable opportunities of advancing his inter- 
ests, came to the United States in 1888, locating first in Cambridge, Min- 
nesota, where for a year and a half he was employed in a bakery. 
Having fully mastered the trade of a baker while thus employed, Mr. 
Larson, in 1891, opened a baker's shop in Duluth, and after managing 
it awhile sold out at an advantage. He subsequently worked for the 
Consolidated Milling Company, of Duluth, for the Marshall-Wells Hard- 
ware Company, and as inspector for the Duluth Gas and Water Depart- 
ment, retaining the latter position until 1908, when he accepted his 
present position as traveling salesman for Carlson Brothers, wholesale 
dealers, of Duluth. In this capacity Mr. Larson is exceedingly pros- 
perous, his business tact and fair dealings winning him an excellent 
trade. 

Mr. Larson married, in 1889, Kristina Larson, who was born, in 
1864, in Medelpad, Sweden, and they have a most pleasant and attractive 
home at Spirit Lake, on the street car line from Duluth. Fraternally 
Mr. Larson belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and is a 
member of the Svea Singing Society, of which he was one of the 
organizers. 



CHAPTER XXV. 
LEADING CITIZENS OF MINNESOTA. 

Representative Swedish-Americans of Mankato, St. Cloud, Brainerd, 
St. Peter, Cambridge, Blue Earth, Crow Wing, Nicollet, Stearns, 
Meeker, Sibley, Nobles, Becker, Kandiyohi, Wabasha, Clay, Mille Lacs, 
Chippewa, Renville, Douglas and Carlton counties, all contribute to the 
fine array. 

Smaller centers of population than those already described in fore- 
going pages have made noteworthy contributions to the strong Swedish- 
American element of Minnesota, and played an important part in making 
its influence what it is. This fine and lasting contribution to the progress 
of the commonwealth and the Northwest has come from good and stal- 
wart men in all walks of life — business and professional men, financiers, 
musicians, manufacturers and officials of all grades. That this is no 
mis-statement or over-statement of the facts, is evident from the personal 
sketches published in the following pages. 

Oscar Anderson, a prominent real estate dealer of Lake City, was 
born in Atvidaberg, Nygard, Sweden, March 24, 1847. He is a son of 
A. P. and Mary Anderson, natives of Ostergotland, Sweden, where the 
former was a painter. They had children as follows : Mina, married 
A. Berling, a farmer of Pepin county, Wisconsin ; Matilda, Mrs. Wal- 
berg, of Minneapolis, where her husband is employed in a lumber mill ; 
Emma, died in Sweden ; Anna, now in Sweden, her husband, Gustaf 
Peterson, having died in Sweden ; Louise, married C. W. Lundquist, a 
contractor of Minneapolis ; Albin, a farmer in Pepin county, Wisconsin ; 
A. G., a carpenter of Minneapolis ; Oscar, of this sketch ; and two who are 
now deceased. 

Oscar Anderson was educated in the public schools of his native 
country, and learned the trade of painter from his father ; he came to 
the United States in 1868, locating first in Red Wing, June 3, and later 
in the same month removed to Lake City, where he has since resided. 
He worked three years in various lines, and for another three years 
conducted a grain elevator, buying and selling. For twenty-four years 

1028 




(J&^i^^^^ 




C€^7^Zy 



YORK I 



ox ANO 

,niTioN8. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1031 



he was engaged in the retail Hquor trade, and then embarked in the Hne 
of real estate and loans, in which he has met with very good success. 
He interests himself in public affairs, and has contributed his share to- 
ward the improvement of the city. He is alderman and former mayor of 
the city. In political views he is a Republican, and the family belongs to 
the Swedish Lutheran church. Besides his real estate interests Mr. An- 
derson deals in steamship tickets and other things of the same nature. 

Mr. Anderson married, in 1871, Pauline Matea Olson, and their chil- 
dren are: Mary Sophia, married Victor Sundberg, a druggist of St. 
Paul ; Charles, died at the age of seventeen, and Pauline W., now at 
home. 

John Henry Peterson. — The substantial and well-to-do-citizens of 
St; Peter have no more worthy representative than John Harvey Peterson, 
who, as a dealer in music and musical instruments, is actively identified 
with the mercantile interests of the city. A son of Swan Peter Peterson, 
he was born, April 13, 1874, in Brule, Union county. South Dakota, and 
was among the first, if not the very first, white child born in that county. 

Swan Peter Peterson, and his wife, whose maiden name was Au- 
gusta Carlson, were both born in Ostergotland, Sweden, his birth occur- 
ring July 19, 1839, and hers August 16, 1845. Socially both were of a 
higher rank than the peasantry, his father having been superintendent 
of a large landed estate, while' her father, Mr. Carl Carlson, was book- 
keeper for the owner of that same estate. Having, obtained an excellent 
education when young, Swan P. Peterson went to Stockholm, where he 
remained until i'869, when he migrated to this country. Locating first 
in Chicago, he entered the employ of a contractor, and helped build the 
Court House, and assisted in laying out Lincoln Park. Losing his 
position, and all of his worldly goods, in the memorable conflagration of 
October, 1871, he went to Kansas City, and soon after his arrival secured 
emplovment in running a mule team between that city and Topeka. Hav- 
ing saved a sufficient sum of money, Mr. Peterson bought a pair of 
horses and a wagon, drove to Union county, South Dakota, which had 
just been opened up, and there pre-empted a tract of land, being one of 
the first settlers in that county. Immediately beginning the improvement 
of his claim, he engaged in general farming, and still resides on the 
homestead which he improved from its original wildness, although since 
1898 he has lived retired from active labor. Nine children were born to 
him and his wife, namely: John Henry, the special subject of this 
brief sketch; Carl William, engaged in agricultural pursuits in Union 
countv. South Dakota; Hannah Mathilda, deceased; Aleda Augusta; 
Gusta'vus Adolphus, managing the homestead property, in Union county ; 
Tekla Cecelia, wife of Albert Umdahl, a farmer, in Union county; 
Martin, who died, in 1908, aged eighteen years ; Hannah Marie, at home ; 
and Esther Mathilda, at home. Po'litically Mr. Swan Peterson is a stanch 
Republican, and religiously he is a valued member of the Swedish 



I032 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Lutheran church, of which he has been a deacon for twenty-two years. 
Although never an office seeker, he has been prominent in pubHc affairs, 
and held various township offices. 

Brought up on the home farm, John Henry Peterson was educated 
in the public schools of South Dakota, and at Gustavus Adolphus College, 
in St. Peter, Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1899. He 
subsequently took a one year's post-graduate course at the University of 
Minnesota, after w^iich he taught school until 1908, being employed as 
a teacher at Lafavette and at Parker Prairie, Minnesota. Resigning from 
his profession in 1908, Mr. Peterson opened his present store in St. 
Peter, and as a dealer in music and musical instruments is meeting with 
encouraging success, having in this comparatively short time already 
•established an excellent business. 

On June 8, 1902, Mr. Peterson married Esther Carlson, daughter 
of Peter Carlson, a farmer in Carver county, Minnesota, and into their 
pleasant home two children have been born, namely: Esther Vivian 
Hildegarde, and Ralph Henry Martin. In politics Mr. Peterson is inde- 
pendent in his views, and has filled minor town offices. Religiously he is 
a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

John A. Hedberg. — As senior member of the firm of Hedberg & 
Eckman, furniture dealers and undertakers, John A. Hedberg is actively 
identified with the advancement of the mercantile interests of Dassel, and 
is contributing his part in maintaining the reputation of his Swedish 
countrymen as able and progressive business men. A native of Minne- 
sota, he was born, November 25, 1875, in Wright county, a son of John 
Hedberg. 

Born and brought up in Vermland, Sweden, John Herberg, ambitious 
to take advantage of every opportunity for improving his material condi- 
tion, emigrated to the United States in 1868, following the example of so 
many of his neighbors and friends who had previously crossed the ocean 
in their efforts to find a favorable location for themselves and their fami- 
lies. Buying a tract of land in Wright county, this state, he cleared and 
improved a homestead, and was there successfully employed in tilling 
the soil until 1905, when he retired from the activities of labor, and has 
since lived in Dassel, an esteemed and respected citizen. He married 
Mary Pehrson, who was born in Vermland, Sweden, in 1833, three years 
earlier than he was, his birth having occurred April 3, 1836. She died on 
the home farm, in Wright county, in September, 1895. Seven children 
were born to them, as follows: Christina, widow of the late Herman 
Kohlman ; Emma ; Alfred, a furniture dealer in Cokato, Minnesota ; John 
A., the subject of this brief sketch; Albert L., engaged in the clothing 
business in Minneapolis; Peter; and Caroline, deceased, who married 
Emil H. Eck. 

Brought up on the homestead, John A. Hedburg received the advan- 
tages of a good public school education in his native county. Going 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1033 



then to Minneapolis, he was there employed as a clerk for a number of 
years, after which he spent seven years in Montana, living in different 
places, and being variously employed. Locating in Dassel in 1905, Mr. 
Hedberg, forming a partnership with Emil Eckman, opened his present 
furniture and undertaking establishment, and under the firm name of 
Hedberg & Eckman has since carried on a substantial business. 

Mr. Hedberg married, November 28, 1901, Nina Briggs, daughter 
of Oscar Briggs, a retired miller, and they are the parents of four chil- 
dren, namely : Albert, Clarence, Catherine, and Alvin Milton. Politically 
Mr. Hedberg is identified with the Republican party, invariably support- 
ing its principles by voice and vote. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

I 

Joseph Olson. — A young man of energy, push and enterprise, 
Joseph Olson is carrying on a substantial mercantile business in Dassel, 
Meeker county, being in partnership with his father, Andrew Olson. 
Born of Swedish parents, his birth occurred, August 16, 1877, on the 
parental homestead, about seven miles from the village of Dassel. 

Andrew Olson was born, November 28, 1837, in Vermland, Sweden, 
and was there reared and educated. During his earlier life he was em- 
ployed in tilling the soil in his native land, living there for some time after 
his marriage. Emigrating to America in 1869, he located in Meeker 
county, Minnesota, and from the tract of wild land that he took up in 
Kingston township cleared and improved a valuable homestead, on which 
he resided until the spring of 19 10, when he moved to Dassel. He mar- 
ried Maria Kajsa Anderson, and to them eight children have been born, 
namely : Rev. Andrew Gustaf, a minister at Elbow Lake, Minnesota ; 
Marie, wife of A. G. Freeman, a farmer ; Ida, living, in North Dakota ; 
Alfred, engaged in agricultural pursuits ; Charles, a traveling salesman ; 
Joseph, the subject of this sketch; Mary, wife of A. G. Krans, a traveling 
salesman ; and Esther, living at home. 

After leaving the public schools, Joseph Olson took up two years 
of high school work at the Litchfield High School, and in 1898 entered 
the commercial department of the Gustavus Adolphus College, in St. 
Peter, from which he was graduated in 1900. Coming then to Dassel, 
he has since been here engaged in business as a general merchant, in part- 
nership with his father, and has here built up an extensive and profitable 
trade, his stock including articles most in demand in general trade. 

Mr. Olson married, June 10, 1903, Ida Sangren, daughter of John 
Sangren, of Lake Park, Minnesota, and they have four children, namely : 
Viola Marion, Edith Irene, Carl Vernon, and Alfred Sanford, the two 
latter named being twins. Politically Mr. Olson is an independent Re- 
publican, voting for the best men and measures ; religiously he is a mem- 
ber of the Swedish Lutheran church. 



I034 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Eric Hagelin. — Conspicuous among-, the prosperous business men 
of Dassel is Eric Hagelin, who has operated a. flour mill in this place for 
the last quarter of a century, and through his sound judgment and wise 
investments has accumulated considerable property. He is an excellent 
representative of the Swedish pioneers of Minnesota, and true type of 
the energetic, hardy and enterprising men who have so largely assisted in 
developing the industrial resources of the state. A son of Nils Fredrik 
and ]\Iary Hagelin, he was born, January 24, 1849, i" Dahlsland, Froskog 
socken, Sweden, where he spent his earlier years. 

Nils F. Hagelin, a native of Froskog socken, Sweden, was a black- 
smith by trade, and spent his entire life in his native land, dying in 1874, 
leaving a widow with five children, as follows: Carl Wilhelm, a black- 
smith in Minneapolis ; Eric, the special subject of this sketch ; Christopher, 
who is following the trade of a blacksmith in Michigan; Tilma, widow of 
Axel Johnson ; Seiman, engaged in mining in Mexico. Emigrating with 
her family to America, Mrs. Hagelin lived first in Marquette county^ 
Michigan,' from there moving in 1890 to Minneapolis, where she spent 
her remaining years, passing away in 1893. 

Bred and educated in his native land, Eric Hagelin was not at all 
content to there follow in the footsteps of his ancestors, but with the 
broader views engendered by contact with those who had visited America, 
he earlv determined to try his luck in this land of promise, and in 1869 
emigrated to the United States. Settling first in Paxton, Illinois, he 
there resided for three months, following farming, and learning the black- 
smith's trade. Going from there to Muskegon, Michigan, he worked in 
a sawmill six months, after which he was for five years engaged in mining 
in Marquette, Michigan. Locating then in Alinneapolis, Minnesota, he 
worked as a millwright in that city two years. In 1884 :Mr. Hagelin, in 
partnership with A. F. Johnson, opened a foundry and machine shop in 
Dassel, Meeker county, where he has since resided. The following year 
Mr. Hagelin built a flour mill, which he has operated continuously ever 
since, in its management having met with eminent success. He has also 
interests of financial importance and value, being a stockholder in the 
Citizens' Bank, and the owner of a tract of good farming land in Canada. 

Mr. Hagelin married, in 1895, Mrs. Mary (Larson) Linquist, widow 
of Andrew Linquist, late of Dassel, and mother of Oscar E. Linquist, 
whose sketch may be found on another page of this work, and they have 
one child, Lawrence Waldemar Hagelin. In his political affiliations Mr. 
Hagelin is a stanch Republican, and has taken an active part in public 
afifairs. having served as president of the village in 1892, and as village 
trustee several terms. 

Alfred C. Peterson, M. D. — Numbered among the prosperous phys- 
icians of Meeker county. Dr. Alfred C. Peterson is meeting with note- 
worthy success in the practice of his profession in the village of Dassel, 
where he has been located for more than four years. Coming on both 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1035 



sides of the house from thrifty Swedish ancestry, he was born in Wright 
county, Minnesota. February 4, 1875, a son of Carl G. Peterson. 

A native of Sweden, Carl G. Peterson was born in Smaland, Kalmar 
Lan, in 1825, and was there brought up and educated. He was subse- 
quently employed as a coachman in Ostergotland, for many years, resid- 
ing there until 1869, when he emigrated to this country. SettUng first in 
Woodhull, Illinois, he there worked for two years in a factory. Coming 
to Minnesota in 1871, he invested his money in land, buying a farm in 
Wright county, and was there prosperously engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his death, in 1903. He was a firm supporter of the principles 
of the Republican party, and an active member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, serving as deacon and trustee a large part of his life. He married 
Josephine M. Dahlstrom, who was born in Kalmar lan, Sweden, in 1838, 
and is still living. To them six children were born, namely: Gust. O., a 
druggist in Dassel, Minnesota; Josephine; Alfred C, the subject of this 
brief sketch ; John F., of Dassel, a machinist ; George, a practicing phy- 
sician in Dassel, Minnesota; and Edward E., engaged in farming in 
Wright county, ^Minnesota. 

Receiving his elementary education in the public schools of Wright 
countv, Alfred C. Peterson was subsequently employed for some time 
in a drug store, while there obtaining some knowledge of the properties 
and values of medicinal herbs. In 1894 he entered the Minneapolis 
School of Pharmacy, and in 1899 was made a registered pharmacist. 
Turning then his attention to the study of medicine, he entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in Minneapolis, but on account of ill health 
did not receive his diploma until 1904, when he was graduated with the 
degree of M. D. Locating in Shevlin, Minnesota, Dr. Peterson began the 
practice of his profession, at the same time running a drug store. He 
subsequently spent a few months in Murdock, Minnesota, from there 
coming, in February, 1905, to Dassel, where he has since remained. Here, 
in the exercise of his profession, the doctor is meeting with flattering 
results, having gained an excellent reputation for skill, and won an exten- 
sive and remunerative patronage. 

Dr. Peterson married, July 9, 1905, Cary M. Gordhamer, daughter 
of J. H. Gordhamer, one of the leading merchants of Kerkhoven, Minne- 
sota, and they have one child, Blanche Sylvia. Politically the doctor is an 
independent Republican ; religiously he is a member, and a trustee, of the 
Swedish Lutheran church ; and socially he is a member of the County 
and of the State Medical Associations. He is also examiner for numer- 
ous insurance companies. 

Ole Nystrom. — Many of the most enterprising and progressive busi- 
ness men of Meeker county were born in countries beyond the sea, and 
have brought to the new world the habits of industry, prudence and econ- 
omy that command success, and noteworthy among this number is Ole 
Nvstrom, a well-known shoe dealer in Dassel. A son of Nels Nvman, he 



1036 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



was born, December lo, 1861, in Vermland, Sweden, where he grew to 
man's estate. 

Nels Nyman lived in Vermland, Sweden, his native place, until past 
middle age, following the trade of a shoemaker. In 1895 he emigrated to 
Minnesota, whither some of his children had preceded him, and for three 
years resided in Annandale, Wright county. Since 1898 he has made his 
home in Dassel, living here happy and contented in being near his chil- 
dren. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Johnson, was born 
and bred in Wermland, Sweden. To them six children were born, as 
follows : Cary, wife of Ole Nyberg, a farmer in Fairhaven, Minnesota ; 
Marv, wife of John Norberg, of Princeton, Minnesota, a dealer in hard- 
ware ; Christina, wife of Olof Anderson, a banker in Dassel ; Hannah, 
living in jNIinneapolis ; Gerda, wife of N. E. Heglund, of IMinneapolis, a 
conductor on the street railway; and Ole, the special subject of this brief 
biographical sketch. 

Having completed the course of study in the public schools of his 
native Ian, Ole Nystrom learned the trade of a shoemaker, which he 
followed in Sweden until he had accumulated enough money to pay his 
way to America. Coming to Minnesota, in 1890, he followed farming in 
Dassel for twelve years, after which he was employed from 1902 until 
1906 in the general store of Palmerston & Olson. Becoming familiar 
with the details of mercantile management, Mr. Nystrom then opened 
a retail shoe establishment in Dassel, and has since built up a substantial 
business, his success being entirely due to his own persevering efforts. He 
is an earnest supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and is 
a consistent member of the Mission Friends' church. November 25, 1906, 
he was married to Miss Ida Johnson, daughter of Swan Johnson, of 
Dassel. Mrs. Nvstrom was born in Meeker countv, Minnesota, October 
18, 1875. 

GusTAF A. Ahlstrom. — Since his return from Sweden, in 1909, 
Gustaf A. Ahlstrom has resided with his family on the old parental home- 
stead at Dassel, Meeker county, and is now chiefly engaged in formula- 
ting his plans for the exploitation and manufacture of a number of valuable 
patents which he purchased in his native country. He has organized a 
company known as the Delta Manufacturing Company (Incorporated), 
capital Sioo.ooo, headquarters Minneapolis, with the following officers: 
Fred S. Pew, president; G. A. Ahlstrom, secretary and treasurer. As he 
is a man of substantial education and broad business experience (obtained 
principally in St. Paul) he is thoroughly prepared to conduct all his 
interests to success. 

Mr. Ahlstrom is a native of Korsberga parish, Smaland, born Jan- 
uary 21, 1869, and is a son of Jacob and Johanna (Jonsson) Ahlstrom. 
His father was born in 1840 and was a farmer in that parish until 1881, 
when he emigrated to the United States and settled on a farm near Sf. 
Peter. Eight years afterward he sold that property and settled on his farm 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1037 



at Dassel, where he died in the latter part of 1908. The widow, born in 
1838, is Hving with her son, Gustaf A., upon the homestead at that point. 
She is also the mother of a daughter, Mathilda, who is the wife of Albert 
Johnson, a farmer of Gwinner, North Dakota. 

At the age of ten years, Gustaf A. Ahlstrom came to America alone, 
for four years living with his uncle, S. J. Turner, a farmer of Goodhue 
county, Minnesota. Then (in 1883) he commenced to work for neigh- 
boring farmers as an independent hand, being thus engaged for some 
five years. By persistent work and economy he had saved enough, in 
1888^ to keep him in the business department of Gustavus Adolphus Col- 
lege for a year and to enable him to graduate therefrom in 1889. After 
his graduation he obtained a position with the county treasurer, at St. 
Paul, under whom (A. N. Nelson was then in office) he worked for two 
years. He then became bookkeeper at the Scandinavian-American Bank 
of St. Paul, combining with the duties of that position those of assistant 
teller. Nine and a half years thus passed, when, in the spring of 1900, 
he formed a partnership with August Blomberg in the insurance and 
real estate business, the former covering fire, life and accident risks. In 
the spring of 1903 Mr. Ahlstrom sold his interest to his partner, went to 
Duluth and for four years was engaged in newspaper work. In the 
spring of 1908 he went with his family to Sweden and returned to the 
United States in the fall of 1909. 

In 1904 Mr. Ahlstrom married Miss Naomi Sandell, who was born 
in 1874 and is a daughter of Rev. Michael Sandell, of Stromsund, Sweden. 
The two children of Mr. and Mrs. Ahlstrom are : Holger Michael, born 
November 18, 1904, and Yngve Valdemar, born September i, 1906. 

K. Arvid Sodergren, who resides near Dassel, Meeker county, is 
doing a good work among the Finnish population in this country, espe- 
cially in Minnesota and Michigan, by teaching them the English language 
and other branches necessary to the attainment of intelligent citizenship. 
This he is accomplishing through the operation of a correspondence school 
which he established several years ago and which has reached the position 
of a substantial and flourishing institution. Its founder and conductor 
was born in Joensuu, Finland, on the ist of November, 1873, and after 
attending the public schools of his native parish, where he was taught both 
Swedish and Finnish, he pursued a course in natural sciences in the Uni- 
versity at Helsinfors, the capital of Finland. After graduating in 1897, 
Mr. Sodergren emigrated to the United States, first locating at Calumet, 
Michigan, "and entered the employ of his brother, a manufacturing and 
wholesale druggist, who soon afterwards established his business in Min- 
neapolis, where the former followed him, but after a few years moved to 
Duluth, Minnesota, where he was employed in several of the county 
offices. In 1905 he resigned in order that he might push his enterprise 
of a correspondence school among his countrymen. Many Finnish immi- 
grants have realized their deficiencies in the English language and the 



1038 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



branches characteristic of American education, but are unable to attend 
any of the schools of their adopted country. It was to this ambitious 
and intelligent element that Mr. Sodergren brought the desired knowledge 
and training, and the growth of his enterprise indicates that his efforts 
and his talents as a teacher have been appreciated. Mr. Sodergren is 
married, but has no children. At present he resides on his farm near 
Dassel, from which he conducts the operations of his correspondence 
school. 

Oscar E. Linguist. — The subje6t of this sketch was born on a farm 
near Dassel, Meeker county, Minnesota, on the 6th day of April, 1874, and 
has always resided in that village. His parents, Andrew and Mary Lin- 
quist, were among the early settlers of the county. 

He received his education in the public schools and on March 3, 
1897, was appointed postmaster of Dassel. Minnesota, taking charge of the 
office April i, 1897. which was then of the fourth class; it is now an 
office of the third class and has five rural routes. Mr. Linquist gives his 
personal attention to the duties of the position and his services have been 
so satisfactory to the department and the public that he has served con- 
tinuously since the year of his appointment. 

Married November 8, 1899, to Miss Alice E. Ellstrom, of Duluth, 
Minnesota, and they have one child, Lenore Lucile, born June 4, 1903. 
He has two brothers residing in Minneapolis, Minnesota : William A., 
who is northwestern manager for the M. Schulz Piano Company, and 
Charles S., a traveling salesman for Wyman, Partridge & Company; a 
sister, Minnie B., employed in the Dassel postoffice, and a half-brother, 
Lawrence W. Hagelin, a promising youth, now attending the public 
schools. 

Mr. Linquist takes great interest in local progress and heartily 
endorses the enterprises that benefit the general public. Since 1898 he 
has been secretary of the Dassel Fair Association, which holds an annual 
fair on the third Friday and Saturday in October of each year, and it is 
known throughout the Northwest as a remarkably successful fair. Frater- 
nallv he is a member of Griswold Lodge, No. 218, A. F. & A. M., and 
Willmar Lodge, No. 952, B. P. O. Elks. 

Peter A. Erickson, who is the proprietor of the only greenhouse in 
Brainerd, and an enterprising, and wide-awake business man, was born 
in Opsala Ian, Sweden, August 28, 1859. He is a son of Eric and Anna 
Person, who lived and died on their home farm in Sweden. A list of 
their children is given in connection with the biographical sketch of Carl 
A. Erickson, of Brainerd, found elsewhere in this work. After receiving 
his education in the public schools of his native land, Peter A. Erickson 
then learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed until he came to 
the United States, in 1881. He spent four months in Menekaunee,/ Wis- 
consin, and then went to Forest Lake, where he worked one winter in 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1039 



the woods. He spent the following year in Rock Island, Illinois, and 
came to Brainerd in 1883. His first occupation in this city was working 
in a sawmill, where he spent two years, and for twelve years worked in 
the shops of the Northern Pacific Railway. He then joined his brother, 
Carl A. Erickson, in contracting and building, and in 1908 went into busi- 
ness on his own account as florist. He has met with success and has a 
growing trade. 

In 1886 Mr. Erickson married Anna Matilda Larson, and they have 
two children : Robert, a carpenter, living at home ; and Anna Alfreda, 
who died at the age of eight years. Mr. Erickson is a member of the 
Swedish Lutheran church. In politics he is a Republican. 

Professor Per Victor Malm, proprietor of the Brainerd Business 
College, was born in Smaland, Sweden, October 7, 1867, and is the son of 
Peter F. and Susanna Malm. His father was a native of Ostergotland 
and his mother was born in Kalmer Ian. They came to the United States 
in 1869, and located on a homestead near St. James, Minnesota ; they car- 
ried on the farm until 1903 and then removed to Zimmerman, Minnesota. 
The mother died in 1905. Their children were : Carl F., a prominent 
merchant at Bowman, North Dakota. Harman S., a farmer living near 
Brown's Valley, Minnesota ; Per Victor, of this sketch ; Otto A., of 
Fargo, North Dakota, working for the Northwest Thresher Company ; 
Edward C, of Minot, North Dakota, working for the Avery Thresher 
Company ; Helma O., married Ole Young, of Minneapolis ; Ada J., mar- 
ried C. J. Johnson, a farmer of Sherburne county, Minnesota ; Selma H., 
married D. P. Cheney, a merchant of Los Angeles ; Clara S., deceased, 
the wife of M. J. Golden, assistant general freight agent of the Chicago, 
& North- Western Railway Company; Anna M., married Wm. Keitel, a 
merchant in New York City ; Ellen L., married William T. O'Brien, an 
engineer on the Great Northern Railway, living at Minot, North Dakota. 

Per Victor Malm received his early education in the public schools 
and later entered Dixon College, Dixon, Illinois, where he pursued a 
scientific course, and a business course at the Dixon Business College ; he 
also studied law at the University of Minnesota. He entered the pro- 
fession of teaching with marked success. Having taught a number of 
years in two of the leading business colleges in Minneapolis, he removed 
to Crookston, Minnesota, where he organized a school and conducted the 
same for five years. After disposing of his interest in the Crookston 
College he returned to Minneapolis, where he accepted a position with 
the Minnesota College, being the first instructor at the institution, at 
which he remained for three years. He left the Minnesota College to 
accept the principalship of the high school at Arlington, Minnesota, and 
from Arlington he was called as supervisor of the commercial work in 
the public schools at Stillwater, Minnesota, and then located at Brainerd, 
Minnesota, where he purchased the Brainerd Business College. Professor 



I040 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Malm has one of the best equipped institutions of its kind in Minnesota, 
and otTers advantages afforded by no other commercial school. During 
the brief time Professor Malm has been in Brainerd he has made his 
influence felt in the whole community, and has established a school that 
has raised the standard of commercial education in the Northwest. 

Rev. Oscar Severin Jacobson, pastor of the Swedish Baptist church 
at Brainerd, Minnesota, was born September 2, 1875, and is a son of Karl 
and Karolina Jacobson, who now keep a grocery store in Skane, Sweden. 
They were the parents of twelve children, of whom the following six sur- 
vive : Sigfrid \'ictorinus, a baggageman on a passenger train, in Sweden ; 
Bayert Winfrid, a merchant of Malmo, Sweden ; Jacob Jeremiah, who 
has a hotel in Sweden ; Dahn Wilhelm, living at home ; Ossian Dagerbart, 
a merchant, living in Sweden ; and Oscar Severin. 

Rev. Mr. Jacobson was educated in the public schools of his native 
country, and learned the trade of painter. In 1893 he came to the United 
States and for about seven years followed his trade in Brooklyn. During 
this time he took a short course in the Cliristian Alliance Training School 
of New York City. In October, 1899, he removed to Morgan Park, 
Chicago, and entered the Swedish Baptist Seminary. For two years he 
was located at Bailey, Michigan, from there going to DeKalb, Illinois, 
and since 1907 he has been located at Brainerd. He is a man of influence 
and good standing in the community and enjoys the esteem and respect 
of the community. In his political views he is a Prohibitionist, and he 
espouses the cause of every movement for the upbuilding and growth of 
the city. 

December 18, 1903, Reverend Jacobson married Alfreda Palm, of 
Skane, Sweden, and they have three children, Bayert Palmer, Esther 
Caroline, and Evelyn Teresia. 

Otto F. Johnson, M. D. — Devoted to the practice of his profession, 
of which he has an excellent knowledge. Dr. Otto F. Johnson well de- 
serves the reputation he enjoys of being one of the most skillful and 
faithful physicians of Winthrop, Sibley county. A native of Sweden, he 
was born, April 5, 1875, in Smaland, which was likewise the birthplace of 
his father, A. M. Johnson. 

Emigrating, with his family to the United States in 1881, A. M. 
Johnson lived for a year at Granite Falls, Minnesota, from there remov- 
ing to St. Paul, where he still resides. A good mechanic, he followed 
the carpenter's trade throughout his active career, but since 1902 has 
lived retired, enjoying to the utmost the fruits of his many years of toil. 
He married Christine Solomonson, who was born in Smaland, Sweden, 
and they have reared three children, namely: John, engaged in butcher- 
ing in St. Paul ; Amanda, wife of Frank Peterson, commissioner of the 
First, Second, and Third wards, St. Paul ; and Otto F., the special sub- 
ject of this sketch. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1043 

But six vears old when he came with his parents to Minnesota, Otto 
F. Johnson received his elementary education in the public schools of St. 
Paul, supplementing it by an attendance at private and evening schools. 
Subsequently entering Hamline University, he was graduated from the 
Medical Department with the class of 1902, after which he spent a year 
as an interne at Bethesda Hospital, where he gained both knowledge 
and experience. Locating immediately afterwards in Winthrop, Dr. John- 
son has here built up a fine practice, his professional skill and abilty 
being recognized and well appreciated. Religiously the Doctor is a mem- 
ber of the Swedish Lutheran church, and politically he is independent, 
voting with the courage of his convictions for the best men and meas- 
ures. He belongs to two of the leading medical societies, the Camp 
Release, and the Minnesota State Medical Society. 

Dr. Johnson married, June 9, 1909. Miss Selma Elizabeth Thorson, 
daughter of T. Thorson, former and for the past ten years a commis- 
sioner of Sibley county, Minnesota. 

t 

William E. Erickson, of the firm of Bredenberg & Erickson, an 
enterprising firm of grocers of Brainerd, was born in Soudermanland, 
Sweden, October 16, 1865. His father, Nels Erickson, was born in 
Wvingokr socken, Soudermanland Ian, Sweden, August 27, 1832, attended 
the piiblic school until ten years of age, and then at the age of eleven 
went to sea as a cabin boy on a boat bound for China. He followed this 
occupation until 1853, sailing in vessels from Sweden, Prussia, Hamburg 
and England. In ^853 he "landed in Boston from Valparaiso, and for 
some years sailed out of Boston, Baltimore and San Francisco. In 1859 
he followed the lead of many others and went to the gold mining district 
in Mariposa county, California, where he remained until the spring of 
1864. He returned to Sweden, intending to come back to the United 
States the same year, but was married and changed his plans. He lived 
in Sweden until 1869, during this time sailing on the lakes, and in that 
year again came to the United States ; he located first in Lockport, Illinois, 
engaged at various employment, principally as hardware clerk. He 
removed to Oxford, Mississippi, where he operated a cotton plantation 
on shares for one Colonel LeMar. However, as the climate of that state 
was not agreeing with him, he removed to Rush City, Minnesota, and 
engaged in street and road building. He took a homestead and followed 
farming until 1904, when he retired and moved to Brainerd, where he 
now resides. He was married, in 1864, to Clara Matilda Larson, a 
native of Hof socken, Ostergotland, Sweden, and their children were: 
Emma, married Edward Peterson, deceased; Albert, of Brainerd; Kate, 
married Karl S. Bredenberg, who is mentioned elsewhere in this book; 
Cecilia, married Robert McKay, of Rush City ; Oscar, a clerk, residing in 
Brainerd ; William E. ; and Gusto f, died at the age of eleven years. 

William E. Erickson was educated in the public schools of Rush 
City, and then followed the occupation of clerk, which he continued for a 



I044 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



number of years, until February, 1897, at which time he took an interest 
in the grocery business on his own account, in partnership with Karl S. 
Bredenberg. They have a flourishing business and one that is constantly 
increasing. 

Mr. Erickson carries stock to the amount of thirty-five hundred dol- 
lars in groceries. He is a member of the Congregational church and a 
Republican, and is a member of the Brainerd board of education. Mr. 
Erickson married Mary J. Herring, of Rush City, in 1894, and they 
became parents of three children, namely: Evelyn, Stella and Roy, all 
residing at home. 

Rev. Carl Victor Sigfrid Engstrom, recently pastor of the Swedish 
Mission church at Brainerd, was born at Jorn, Westerbotten, Sweden, 
August 7, 1879. He is a son of C. V. F. and Anialia Augusta ( Rosen- 
dor f) Engstrom, the former a native of Gotland and the latter of Stock- 
holm. The father was at various times a merchant and cabinetmaker, 
and is now in the employ of the Swedish government. His children 
are : Signhild, married Reverend Lans, of Upland, Sweden ; Sigrid, 
of Chicago ; and Carl V. S. 

Carl V. S. Engstrom attended the public school of his native town, 
and at the age of seventeen began working in a grocery, remaining in 
this business six and one-half years. During the time he was working 
he was still continuing his studies, having an ambition to advance him- 
self as much as possible. He came to the United States in 1903, and 
for the first three months worked in a cemetery in Chicago. In 1906 
he graduated from the seminary of the North Park College ; during this 
time he had two Chicago congregations, and during the second summer 
had one in Seattle. After graduating he had charge one sumtfier of the 
Tabernacle of Chicago. He spent one year in Lamson, Minnesota, and 
since 1907 for two years was pastor of the Mission church in Brainerd, 
where he did good work and was universally liked. He received a call 
from the Swedish Mission church of West Duluth and began his pas- 
torate there October i, 1909. Reverend Engstrom married, November 
28, 1907, Mary Nyquist, of Lamson. In political views he is a 
Republican. 

Karl Samuel Bredenberg, of the grocery firm of Bredenberg & 
Erickson, was born in W^rmland. Sweden, October 27, 1869. He is a 
son of P. E. and Sophia Bredenberg, the former born in Dalarne and 
the latter in Wermland, Sweden. P. E. Bredenberg followed the trade 
of ironworking. Of his eleven children six survive, namely : Louisa, 
married Otto Gafvert, of Sweden ; Anna, married Nils Hagberg, of 
Sweden ; Gustof, a rolling mill employe ; Karl S. ; Esther, married Mr. 
Sjoquist, of Sweden ; and Emma, married C. F. Lundblad, of Seattle. 

Karl S. Bredenberg attended the public schools of his native coun- 
try, and later was employed in a rolling mill. In 1888 he emigrated 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1045 



to the United States, proceeding to Minnesota, where for about a year 
he worked on a farm. He removed to Minneapolis and there for five 
years worked in a paper mill. He then went with the paper mill com- 
pany to Little Falls, Minnesota, where he remained for three years and 
then came to Brainerd and here engaged in the grocery business with 
J. A. Hogberg and Johanna Kronberg as partners, under the firm name 
of Bredenberg, Hogberg & Company. A year later they were suc- 
ceeded by Bredenberg & Hogberg, and a year from that time, in 1897, 
the name became Bredenberg & Erickson, William E. Erickson becom- 
ing his partner, and this firm still does business. They have a good 
business and take care to retain their customers by giving them the 
worth of their money in first-class goods. 

Mr. Bredenberg is a member and secretary of the Swedish Mission 
church, is past chief ranger of the Independent Order of Foresters and 
assistant astronomer of the North Star order. In political matters he 
is not confined to the mandates of any party, but is independent. Mr. 
Bredenberg married. December 22, 1892, Kate Erickson, and their four 
children are : Bessie, Melville, Myrtle and Lester. 

Ole Benson, of Peterson & Benson, doing a flourishing business 
in Brainerd, was born in Smaland, Sweden, October 6, 1873, and is a 
son of Bengt and Penella Benson. They were natives of Smaland, 
where they lived and died ; the father was a blacksmith. Their children, 
besides Ole Benson, were: Nils, a farmer in Crow Wing county, Min- 
nesota ; Per, a farmer of Sweden ; Bengta, married John Rosencrantz, 
a blacksmith of Sweden ; Christina, married Nils Nelson, of Sweden ; 
Swan, a blacksmith, living in Sweden ; Ingrid, residing in Sweden ; and 
three children deceased, making ten altogether. 

Ole Benson received his education in the public schools of his native 
country, and in 1893 came to the United States; he located in Brainerd, 
and worked on a farm one year. He was then employed in various 
capacities in the woods, sawmills and shops, thus occupying himself until 
1902, and in that year engaged in business in company with Charles 
Peterson, further mention of whom is made in another portion of this 
work. They have a first-class livery stable, and are both industrious and 
enterprising. Mr. Benson is independent in politics, a member of the 
Swedish Sons of America. Independent Order of Good Templars, and 
also belongs to the Swedish-American Singing Society. He married 
Hannah Nelson, of Smaland, Sweden, July 6, 1906, and they have one 
child, Elvia Marguerite. 

Reverend Hugo Thorene, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Brainerd, Minnesota, was born August 28, 1876, in Smaland, Sweden, 
and is a son of Nels Peter and Christina (Anderson) Thorene. His 
father was a model and wagon maker, having a shop near Vexio for 



I046 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



some years ; he also operated a dairy sixteen years. He emigrated to the 
United States and located at Stillwater, Minnesota, where he worked at 
carpentering nntil his death, February 3, 1908, at the age of sixty-eight 
years. The mother, who was born March 6, 1839, resides with her son 
Hugo. Of their ten children, seven are living, namely: Joe, a painter 
and decorator and farmer, of Stillwater, ]\Iinnesota ; Nellie, married 
Theodore Van Tassel, a blacksmith and farmer of Stillwater; Tore, a 
farmer and poultry raiser of Stillwater; Hugo; Mary, married F. N. 
Nood, a millwright, of Ashland ; John, a painter and decorator, of Brain- 
erd, and Wendell, a machinist, of Brainerd. 

Hugo Thorene came to the United States in 1885, and received his 
primary education in the public schools of Stillwater, Minnesota. In 
1893 he went to Chicago and attended Martin Luther College one year; 
he worked until 1896 and went to St. Peter, Minnesota, where he entered 
Gustavus Adolphus College, where he graduated in 1903. The same 
year he entered the theological seminary of Augustana College at Rock 
Island, Illinois, and graduated in 1906, being ordained in ministry June 
17, of that year, at Denver, Colorado. His first charge was at North 
Easton, Massachusetts, where he remained one year and eight months. 
His health failed, and for a short time he had charge of the parish com- 
prising Mount Vernon, New Rochelle and Port Chester, New York. He 
settled in Brainerd, Minnesota, August i, 1908, and has won the regard 
and esteem of all within his pastorate. In political views he is an Inde- 
pendent Republican. He is unmarried. 

Carl A. Erickson, an enterprising and successful contractor of 
Brainerd, was born in Upsala Lan, Sweden, March 10, 1869,. and is a 
son of Eric and Maria Peterson, who lived and died on a farm in Sweden. 
Their children were: August, deceased; Peter A., of whom further 
mention is made elsewhere in this work ; John Gustaf, a farmer, residing 
in Sweden; Maria Gustafva, married John G. Anderson, a farmer of 
Sweden ; and Carl A. 

Carl A. Erickson was educated in the public schools of his native 
country, and learned the trade of carpenter. He emigrated to the United 
States in 1890 in search of wider opportunities in the line of his trade, 
and located in Brainerd, which has since been his home. By his careful 
attention to details, and the conscientious manner in which he has carried 
out the contracts entrusted to him, he has built up a flourishing business, 
and has contributed a good share towards the improvement of the city. 
He is a Republican in his political views, and takes an active interest in 
public affairs and welfare. He belongs to the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Mr. Erickson married Hulda Matilda Erickson, of Vermland, Swe- 
den, in 1900; she died in 1901, and in 1905 he married Emma Lovisa 
Hollstrand, of Upsala Lan, Sweden. Their children are Edith Maria and 
Carl Hildina:. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1047 



Swan Johnson, of the firrn of Johnson Brothers, bakers, was born 
at Hallary socken, Kronebergs Lan, Sweden, October 9, 1870. He is a 
son of John and Anna Anderson, who Uved and died on a farm in Sweden. 
Of their seven children four survive, namely : Bessie, who married 
Ole Sandberg, a farmer of Pierce county, Wisconsin ; John ; Nels and 
Swan. 

When nineteen years old Swan Johnson came to the United States. 
He had received his education in his native country and, locating in 
Pierce county, Wisconsin, he followed farming there for seven or eight 
years. He worked for a time on railroads and then started a bakery at 
River Falls, Wisconsin, with his brother Nels as partner. Three years 
later they removed to Tracy and conducted a bakery and restaurant there 
for a year and one-half, and took into partnership their brother John, 
retaining the name of Johnson Brothers. They removed to Brainerd 
in 1905. They are experts in their line and have a large trade. Swan 
Johnson is unmarried ; he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Mystic 
Shrine, North Star and Swedish United Sons of America. Nels married 
Rosella Anderson, of Brainerd ; he is a member of the Knighted Order 
Tented Maccabees, North Star and Swedish United Sons of America. John 
married Ida Eckdahl, of Christianstad ; he is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. All three brothers are independent in politics, and members 
of the Swedish Lutheran church. They are public-spirted, useful citzens, 
and highly respected. 

Charles Peterson, of the firm of Peterson & Benson, proprietors of 
a livery stable at Brainerd, was born at Skane, Sweden, November 23, 
1873. He is a son of Per and Lucia Persson, both natives of Skane, 
where the father followed his trade of tailor until his death in 1891. 
After his decease the mother came to the United States. Their children 
are : Peter, in California ; Kate, who married Nils Benson, a gardener 
of Brainerd, Minnesota ; John, a farmer in Cass county, Minnesota ; Swan, 
a gardener, of Brainerd ; Ole, a butcher, in Cass county ; Charles ; Tillie, 
who married A. E. Carlson, a carpenter, of Pocatello, Idaho, and Bror 
Berndt, who died when a year and a half old, in Sweden. 

Charles Peterson attended the public schools of his native town, and 
worked as a gardener for five years in Sweden. He came to the United 
States in 1893, locating in Brainerd, where he worked as a butcher two 
years, in the employ of his brother. For five years he was employed in 
the sawmill of the Brainerd Lumber Mill Company, and then conducted 
a butcher shop on his own account, two years, in East Brainerd. Mr. 
Peterson then formed a partnership with his brother Ole, in the livery 
business, and six months later the latter's interest was purchased by Ole 
Benson. The name was then changed to Peterson & Benson. Both 
members of the firm are enterprising and ambitious, and try to meet the 
requirements of their patrons, in the best possible manner. Mr. Peterson 
is single. In political views he favors the principles of the Prohibition 



1048 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

party. He is a member of the I. O. G. T., Nordstjernan, the Swedish 
United Sons of America, and the Woodmen of the World. 

August Hallouist, a well-to-do grocer of Brainerd, was born in 
Halland, Sweden, November 29, 1859, and is a son of Johannes and Annie 
(Person) Larson, both natives also of Halland, where they still reside. 
The father was a carpenter. Their children are: Louis, of Duluth ; 
Louise, John, August, Emil and Aaron. August Hallquist received his 
education in Sweden, and then went to work on a farm. He came to the 
United States in 1880, and at first worked in the mines in Clayfield county, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained about six months. Then removing to 
Minnesota, he worked a few months on the railroad in Car\'er county, 
after which he went to INIinneapolis and to Lake Park, where he worked 
on a farm and conducted a lumber yard until the fall of 1882. He then 
came to Brainerd. and for six months worked in the Northern Pacific 
Railway Company shops. Following this he was for eight years engaged 
in retail liquor business, and for a year and one-half worked as clerk in a 
grocery store. For a short time he did bridge work for the Northern 
Pacific, for two years worked as clerk in the Valard Hotel, and for 
two years conducted a restaurant. He sold the restaurant and opened 
an ice cream and confectionery business, which he continued eight 
months, and for four years thereafter he worked as clerk in a grocery 
store. Februarv 2, 1902. Air. Hallquist embarked in the grocery business 
on his own account, and has met with very fair success. He carries a 
stock worth some two thousand dollars. His industry and honesty have 
enabled him to build up a large trade, which he holds through the merits 
of his goods and his honorable treatment of customers. 

Mr. Hallquist married Josephine Dahl, of Norway, August 12, 1884, 
and thev became the parents of four children, namely: Ralph, born 
February 13, 1886, a graduate veterinary surgeon; Gertrude, born m 
1889; Alice, in 1893; and Harry, who died in infancy. Mr. Hallquist 
is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, Degree of Honor, and M. B. A. 

GoTHFRED S. SwANSON, a prominent and rising young attorney, of 
Brainerd, Minnesota, was born August 19, 1883, in Smaland, Sweden, and 
is a son of Andrew and Nellie (Nelson) Swanson, the former a native 
of Smaland and tlie latter of Skane. The father followed farming in 
Sweden and came to America in 1886, where he worked four years as 
lumberman at Cross Lake and Gull River. He then removed to Brainerd, 
and has since been emploved in the shops of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
wav. His familv followed to the United States in 1888. His children 
we're eight in number, namely: Jennie, deceased; Gothfred ; Hilding 
Alfred, a student at University" of Alinnesota, INIinneapolis ; John Albert, 
a machinist apprentice at Brainerd ; Edwin Oscar, Hannah Augusta and 
Ellen Mabel, attending high school ; and William. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1049 



Gothfred S. Swanson attended the common schools of Brainerd, 
from which he was graduated in 1902. He worked two years as clerk 
in the store department of the Northern Pacific Railway at Brainerd 
and Duluth. In 1904 he entered the law department of the University, 
of Minnesota, graduating in 1907, since which time he has been engaged 
in the practice of his profession at Brainerd. He is a member of the 
Swedish Lutheran Church and vice president of the Young People's 
Society. He is president of the Nordstjeman Society, the largest Scan- 
dinavian Society in the city, is recording secretary of the Swedish United 
Sons of America, a member of the Royal League, and also of the Inde- 
pendent Order Scandinavian Workmen of America and Modern Wood- 
men of America, and belongs to the Young Men's Qiristian Association, 
being on its board of directors and one of its quartette. He takes an 
active and pleasurable interest in musical matters. 

In political views Mr. Swanson is a Republican, and he ably fills 
the office of municipal judge of Brainerd. He takes an active interest 
in all public improvements and movements for the good of the com- 
munity. 

Peter Gustof Fogelstrom, a successful carpenter and contractor 
of Brainerd, was born at Blekinge, Sweden, April 24, 1846. He attended 
the public schools of his native country until he reached the age of twelve 
years, and then spent two years at sea in company with his father, on a 
merchant vessel, on the Baltic and North seas. He then entered service 
as an apprentice on a full-rigged ship, called the Princess Louise, of 
Stockholm, sailing to England, Hongkong, and Manila; twice he rounded 
Cape Horn, the entire trip consuming twenty-two months. He spent 
the following four years making voyages to Denmark, and then sailed to 
Chile, in a Danish vessel. His father died about this time, and he 
returned to Sweden, for one summer sailing out of that country. 

Mr. Fogelstrom emigrated to the United States in 1866, locating first 
in Chicago, where for fifteen years he sailed on the Great Lakes, acting 
as second and first mate about eleven years of that time. He spent his 
winters in Iowa, in doing carpenter work. In 1882 Mr. Fogelstrom re- 
moved to Brainerd and there took up the trade of carpenter, building the 
first Scandinavian church ever erected in that city. He has since con-- 
tinned in this occupation, and has successfully fulfilled many contracts. 
At present his chief business is the erection of bridges. He has won 
the confidence and respect of all with whom he has done business, and 
is considered one of the influential citizens of the city. 

In his political views Mr. Fogelstrom endorses the policy of the 
Republican party. He has served three terms as street commissioner, in 
1886 one term as county commisioner, in 1884 served one year on the 
police force, and for twelve years was a member of the city council. 

Mr. Fogelstrom married, in 1882, Bertha C. Hanson, of Red Wing, 
Minnesota, and they have had five children, namely : Arthur Garfield, de- 



1050 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

ceased ; Clarence Richard, married Agnes Boyd ; Lydia O., at home ; and 
George Washington and John Webster, both deceased. Mrs. Fogel- 
strom died in 1891, and in 1895 he married Hulda C. Johnson, of Swe- 
den; they had eight children, as follows: Esther N.; Claude Russell; 
Henry George, deceased; Violet; Gust Wilford; Gladys Bedelia; Alpha 
Forest, and Walter Ransford. 

Swan A. Swanson. — INIany of Minnesota's most honored and re- 
spected citizens were born and reared on the other side of the Atlantic, 
and to Sweden, especially, is the state indebted for some of her mpst 
enterprising and progressive business men. Occupying a leading position 
among this number is Swan A. Swanson, a prosperous merchant oi Man- 
kato. Blue Earth county. He was born September 15, 1861, in Ohr 
socken, Sunnanakra gord, Vexio Stift, Kronabergs Lan, Smaland, a son 
of Swen and Helena (Andersdoter) Isacson, also natives of Smaland, 
who spent their lives in Southern Sweden, being engaged in tilling the 
soil. 

Educated in the public schools of his native land. Swan A. Swanson 
early resolved to seek an opportunity to better his financial interest in a 
new country, and in 1881, ere attaining his majority, emigrated to the 
United States. Settling in Mankato, Minnesota, he followed the trade 
of a stone cutter for about twelve years, in the meantime, in 1885, return- 
ing to his old home for a visit with his parents and friends. In 1895, 
he moved to St. James, Watonwan county, and was there for ten years 
engaged in various lines of business including banking and real estate. 
The ensuing two years Mr. Swanson lived practically retired from active 
pursuits, during which time he paid a second visit to his kinsrnen in Swe- 
den, this time being accompanied by his wife and his son Carl, They 
traveled extensively in Europe, becoming familiar with the more important 
cities. Returning to Blue Earth county, Mr. Swanson embarked in the 
mercantile business in Mankato in March, 1908, and as a dealer in pianos, 
organs and other musical instruments, built up a profitable trade, which he 
has recently disposed of, and is now carrying on a substantial business 
as a dealer in real estate. 

On March 17, 1887, Mr. Swanson married Alma Sophia Engwalson, 
who was born in Alsborg lan, Ericksbyn gord, Skalerud socken, Dalsland. 
Into their home eight children have been born, namely: Carl, studying 
law in the Minnesota State University; Anna Louisa; Phoebe Helena, 
died when four years of age ; Effie ; Oscar ; Minnie ; Arthur Wendel, died 
in infancy; and Ebba. In his political affiliations Mr. Swanson is a Re- 
publican, and in his religious faith he is a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. 

Swan August Anderson. — Prominent among the well-known and 
successful business men of Blue Earth county is Swan A. Anderson, who 
is actively identified with the industrial interests of this section of the 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1051 



state as a quarryman and contractor in Mankato. A son of Anders and 
Anastina Magnusson, he was born, January 12, 1852, in Lonshult Pjett- 
eryd socken, Kronebergs Ian, Sweden, and there lived until after attain- 
ing his majority. 

Anders Magnusson was born, lived and died in Sweden, his birth 
occurring in 1817, and his death in 1885. He was an excellent mechanic, 
and during his active years was engaged in carpentering and contracting. 
His wife, who was born in Sweden in 1827, survived him, and now makes 
her home in Mankato, Minnesota. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, as follows : Eva, died at the age of eleven years ; John August, 
lived but two years ; Swan August, the special subject of this brief 
biography; Tilda May, wife of C. A. Gustafson, of Mankato, a stone 
cutter ; Magnus Edward, a farmer and stone cutter, died in 1905 ; Carl 
Gustaf, a stone cutter, living in Mankato, married Johanna Johnson ; and 
Otto, of Mankato. 

Attending the public schools during the days of his boyhood and 
youth, Swan A. Anderson obtained an excellent education, and subse- 
quently served for a few years as coachman in a minister's family. He 
was afterwards employed for ten years by the Swedish Government as a 
stone cutter on the railroad. Having made up his mind, however, that 
greater success awaited him in this country than in his native land, he 
sailed for America on April 2, 1880. Making his way at once to Blue 
Earth county, Mr. Anderson secured employment as a stone cutter at 
Mankato, and at the end of three years had proved himself so capable 
and faithful that he was made foreman of the yard, a position which he 
filled satisfactorily until 1898. Leasing in that year a quarry on his own 
account, Mr. Anderson has since been extensively engaged in quarrying 
and contracting, and in addition operates a sawmill and a stone crusher. 
Prosperity has seemingly smiled on his every effort, his material success 
in the business world being entirely due to his industry, thrift and prac- 
tical judgment in the management of affairs. 

Mr. Anderson married, October 14, 1880, after coming to this coun- 
try, Johanna Anderson, and of their union these children have been born, 
namely : Johan August, who died in infancy ; Olga Dorethea, head book- 
keeper for the Citizens' Telephone Company in Mankato ; Arthur Fredolf, 
formerly head book-keeper in the National Citizens' Bank in Mankato, 
at present holding a responsible position in Denver, Colorado ; Walter 
Leonard, lived but two years ; Clarence Otto, born in 1893 ; and Oscar and 
Leonard, died in infancy. One of the leading members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, Mr. Anderson has served as its deacon and trustee 
since 1882. A man of strong convictions, he is independent in politics, 
and served as street commissioner, being elected without solicitation on 
his part, but resigned the position at the end of the first year to go into 
business. Fraternally Mr. Anderson is a member of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen. 



I052 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



John S. Rolf, who was numbered among the esteemed and valued 
citizens of North Mankato, was a Swede by birth, breeding and edu- 
cation, who had profitably followed the tailor's trade, which he learned 
in his native country, his industry and skill being recognized and appre- 
ciated by his many patrons. He was born, September i8, 1848, in Ystad, 
province of Skane, Sweden, where his parents, Christian and Kastin 
(Olson) Swenson, spent their period of earthly life. The father was a 
gardener by occupation. To him and his wife six children were born, 
as follows: John S., with whom this brief sketch is chiefly concerned; 
Carl, who died, in 1902, in North Mankato ; Olof, a tailor in Sweden ; 
Tilda, deceased; Mary, residing in Sweden; and Tilda, the second, 
deceased. 

Having completed his course of study in the common schools of his 
native land, John S. Rolf served an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, 
and followed it for a number of years in Skane. In September, 1887, 
following in the footsteps of so many of his countrymen that had met 
with success on this side of the Atlantic, he emigrated to the United 
States, locating first at Forest City, Iowa. After spending six years in 
that locality, Mr. Rolf came to Blue Earth county, where he followed 
his trade of tailor in North Mankato until his death, July 30, 1909. 

On August 18, 1871, Mr. Rolf married Elsa Anderson, and into 
the household thus established eight children have been born, namely: 
Alfred, a tailor, lives in North Dakota ; Hilda, wife of Anders Anderson, 
of Mankato; William, married and engaged in tailoring at Sioux City, 
Iowa ; Elaine, clerk in a dry goods house in Fargo, North Dakota ; God- 
frey, a tailor in North Dakota; Emil, a soldier in the United States 
Army, is now, 1909, located in California ; Elsie, living at home ; .and God- 
frey, deceased. Religously Mr. Rolf was a follower of Emanuel Sweden- 
borg, the Mystic. Politically he was a stanch Democrat, and served on 
the local school board. Fraternally he belonged to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

John P. Anderson, superintendent of the shops of the Northern 
Pacific Railway Company, was born near Hernosand, Bjorstad socken, 
Norrland, Aldermans Lan, Sweden, December 25, 1869. He attended 
the public school of his native town until ten years of age, and in 1880 
came to the United States, locating first in Minneapolis. Here he con- 
tinued his education, and later went to Brainerd, where for five years 
he was an apprentice in the Northern Pacific Railway shops, as machinist. 
He spent several years traveling in the employ of various railroad com- 
panies, and in 1899 returned to Brainerd and again entered the employ 
of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, as journeyman. He was soon 
promoted to the position of erecting foreman, later to that of general 
foreman, and after eleven months was made superintendent of the shops, 
which position he has since held. He is an able machinist, and has under 
his supervision eleven hundred men, engaged in repairing locomotives. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1055 

etc., for the entire Northern Pacific system, east of BilHngs, Montana, also 
manufacturing repair parts for outside points, etc. 

Mr. Anderson is a pubHc-spirited citizen, and takes an active interest 
in pubHc affairs and improvements. He is a Republican in his political 
views. He served some time as chairman of the water and light commis- 
sion of Brainerd. He is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Anderson was married, Alay 25, 1897, to Christine Erickson, 
daughter of John Erickson, comptroller of the city of Superior, Wiscon- 
sin, and they have three children, namely: Eleanor Gurine, born March 
II, 1898; Leah, died at the age of two years; John Henry, born May 3, 
1908. Mr. Anderson attends the Swedish Lutheran church. 

J. C. Ranseen. — A man of excellent business ability and judgment, 
J. C. Ranseen occupies an assured position among the prosperous mer- 
chants of Watonwan county, as junior member of the firm of Swendsen & 
Ranseen, having a well-established and lucrative trade in St. James, where 
he has been located for nearly a score of years. A native of Sweden, 
he was born, September 19, 1854, in Blekinge, Jenshogs socken. His 
parents, C. M. and Kari (Johnson) Ranseen, natives of Skane, Sweden, 
spent their entire lives in the land that gave them birth, and there reared 
their six children, namely: Kari, wife of O. Hanson, a tailor in Elgin, 
Illinois ; Sissa, widow of the late Nels Johnson, for many years engaged 
in farming in Sweden; M. C, pastor of a Swedish Lutheran church in 
Chicago, Illinois; Ingre, deceased, married John Carlson, a tailor in 
Chicago, Illinois; Bettie, of Ottumwa, Iowa; and J. C, the special subject 
of this brief sketch. Both parents were devout members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, and the death of the mother in 1868, and of the father 
in 1872, were both deeply lamented by their many friends and neighbors. 

In common with his brothers and sisters, J. C. Ranseen received his 
education in the public schools of Sweden, where he subsequently served 
an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade. In 1874, following the tide of 
emigration across the broad Atlantic, he came to the United States, and 
the following seven years worked as a tailor in Ottumwa, Iowa, after 
which he was similarly employed in Chicago, Illinois, for four years. 
Returning to Ottumwa in 1886. he was there a resident until 1891, when 
he located in St. James. Forming then a partnership with C. J. Swend- 
sen, Mr. Ranseen embarked in business as a general merchant under 
the firm name of Swendsen & Ranseen, and has here built up a large and 
remunerative trade, the firm being widely and favorably known through- 
out this section of the country. 

Mr. Ranseen has been twice married. He married first, in Chicago, 
October 23, 1883, Miss Maria Fredrica Osterlind, by whom he had one 
child, Ethel Selna, now married to A. P. Tried, at Iowa City, Iowa. Mr. 
Ranseen's first wife died June i, 1888, while yet in the prime of woman- 



1056 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

hood. Mr. Ranseen was married, second, January 21, 1890, to Miss Nellie 
Anderson, daughter of John Anderson, of Ottumwa, Iowa, and of this 
union three children have been born, namely : Clarence Eugene, a student 
in Gustavus Adolphus College ; Moritz Harold ; and Rudolph Constantine. 
Religiously Mr. Ranseen is a prominent member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, in which he is serving as deacon. Politically he is an earnest 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and is a member and 
president of the St. James board of education. 

Magnus Wilhelm Sandquist. — Among the able and influential 
citzens of St. James, Magnus Wilhelm Sandquist holds an honored posi- 
tion, being founder of the Watonwan Collection Agency, a dealer in real 
estate, a fire insurance agent, and city justice, having filled the latter 
office for a full decade. A sons of Nels Sandquist, he was born, Novem- 
ber 19, 1861, in Copenhagen, Denmark, of Swede and German ancestn\ 

Nels Sandquist was born and reared in Skane, Sweden, but after 
attaining his majority spent some time in Copenhagen, where he followed 
the tailor's trade. Coming to this country in 1869, he located as a tailor 
in St. Peter, Minnesota, from there removing to Minneapolis, where he 
spent his remaining years, dying in 1884. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Dorothea Muller, was born in Kiel, Germany. 

Emigrating to the United States in 1869, Magnus W. Sandquist at 
first made his home in St. James, Minn., with his uncle, Alartin Person. 
Continuing his education in the city schools, he subsequently completed 
his studies at Gustavus Adolphus College, where he took a three years' 
course, being graduated in 1884. Then, in 1888, after teaching school 
for four years, Mr. Sandquist established himself in the mercantile busi- 
ness in St. James, on the north side, opening the first general stdre in that 
part of the city, selling furniture, also, and continued its management until 
1 89 1, when he sold out. In that year he established the Watonwan County 
Collection Agency, which is still flourishing. He is still interested in this 
agency, is agent for a fire insurance company, and a successful dealer 
in real estate. In 1899 Mr. Sandquist was elected city justice, and has 
served in this capacity ever since. 

On November 5, 1884, Mr. Sandquist married Christina Erlanson, 
of Watonwan county. She died in early womanhood, leaving one child, 
Eben, a harness and furniture dealer in Dunnell, Minnesota. Mr. Sand- 
quist married second, August 16, 1887, Tilda Anderson, of Watonwan 
county, who died May 10, 1898, leaving three children — Esther. Olga, 
and Carl. On September 20, 1900, Mr. Sandquist married for his third 
wife Miss Emma Person, of Watonwan county, and of this union three 
children have been born, namely : Inez, Muriel, and Wilhelm. A promi- 
nent and active member of the Swedish Lutheran church, Mr. Sandquist 
was leader of the church choir for a quarter of a century, from 1883 until 
1908, and for a number of years has been a member of the Board of 
Auditors. Politically he is a steadfast Republican, and fraternally he 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1057 



belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; to the Modern Wood- 
men of America ; to the Woodmen of the World ; to the Modern Samari- 
tans ; to the Degree of Honor; and to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. 

John Wessberg. — Noteworthy among the highly respected citizens 
of St. James is John Wessberg, who by his industry, thrift and straight- 
forward course in life, has fully established himself in the esteem and 
confidence of his neighbors and associates. A representative of the 
American born Swedes, he is a native of Watonwan county, his birth 
having occurred in Nelson township, October 13, 1872. He is a son of 
A. P. Wessberg, a well known farmer of St. James. 

A. P. Wessberg was born and brought up in Sweden and married 
Johanna Anderson. In 1869 they emigrated to America, and after living 
for a short time in Mankato, Blue Earth county, Minnesota, took up a 
homestead claim in St. James, cleared and improved, and have since 
resided on their well-kept and well-managed farm. Both parents are 
members of the Swedish Lutheran church, while in politics the father is a 
decided Republican. They are the parents of seven children, as follows : 
Ellen, wife of A. W. Warner, a carpenter in St. James; John; Hulda; 
Emma, who died in childhood; Aaron, of St. James, junior member of 
the jewelry firm of Hansen & Wessberg; Matilda; and William. _ 

Obtaining a practical education in the common schools of his native 
district, John Wessberg was well trained in the various branches of 
agriculture by his father, remaining on the home farm until nineteen 
years of age. Turning then his attention to mercantile pursuits, he has 
since been employed as a clerk in the establishment of J. K. Sonneseyn 
& Co., of St. James. 

On November 6, 1901, Mr. Wessberg married Anna Horton, daugh- 
ter of O. O. Horton, of Long Lake township, and into their household 
two children have been born, namely: Arnold, born November 6, 1902, 
and Victor, who died in infancy. Religiously Mr. Wessberg is an 
active member and a trustee of the Swedish Lutheran church, and 
politically he is identified with the Republican party. 

Severin Anderson. — A man of versatile talents, energetic and 
enterprising, Severin Anderson, of St. James, is carrying on a substan- 
tial business as manager of the John Anderson Company, with which 
he has been associated since 1899. A son of the late Andrew Jonson, 
he was born in Norunga socken, Elsborgs Lan, Westergothland, Sweden, 
September 20, 1868, and there spent his early years. 

Andrew Jonson, a life-long resident of Sweden, was a farmer by 
occupation, and reared a large family of children. He was twice mar- 
ried. By his first wife, whose maiden name was Johanna Swenson, he 
had four children, as follows: August, died in Sweden; Carl, a farmer 
in Sweden ; Kasper, who came to Watonwan county, Minnesota, in 1868, 

67 



1058 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

and died at Mankato; and Kissa, who married Lars Johnson, Hves in 
Sweden. After the death of his^ first wife Andrew Jonson married 
Annakisa Andersdater. and they became the parents of five children, 
namely: Gustaf Hendrik, a merchant in Sweden; Amanda Carolina, 
wife of C. G. Bouvin, foreman of a manufacturing establishment in 
Halmstad, Sweden; Severin, the subject of this sketch; Henning A. of 
St. James, Minnesota, clerk in the store of Swendsen & Ranseen ; and 
Alvida Mathia, wife of Herman Peterson, of Sweden Henning A. 
Anderson, the fourth child of the second marriage, served in the Spanish- 
American war as a member of Company H, Second Minnesota Volun- 
teer Infantry. He married, October 15, 1902, Anna Sophia Anderson, 
daughter of Charles Anderson, of Long Lake, Minnesota, and they have 
three children, Lucille Deborah Henrietta, Sylvia Theresia, and Saline 
Reinhold. 

Severin Anderson was educated in the public schools of Sweden, 
and was there a resident until 1887. In that year, desirous of trying the 
hazard of new fortunes, he emigrated to the United States, coming 
directly to St. James, Minnesota, where for a dozen years he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. Forming then a partnership with the 
late John Anderson, under the name of the John Anderson Company, 
he assisted in establishing the business which he is now so successfully 
managing, manufacturing cement blocks and sidewalks, and retailing 
mason's materials. Since the death of Mr. John Anderson, his widow 
retains his interest in the business, which is still conducted under its 
original name, and under the skilful management of Severin Anderson is 
steadily increasing. 

Mr. Anderson has been twice married. He married first, June 27, 
1893, Maria Anderson, who was born in Christianstads Ian, Skane, 
Sweden, August 14, 1867. She died May 20, 1904, leaving two children, 
namely: Anna Ethel Victoria, born August 7, 1894, and Mauritz Sever- 
ance, i3orn May 13, 1904. Mr. Anderson married, second, Anna Louisa 
Benson, and they have one child, Reuben Clifford, born August 3, 1907. 
Politically Mr. Anderson is an Independent Republican ; religiously he 
belongs to the Swedish Lutheran church ; and fraternally he is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. 

Olof Anderson. — Many of the most thriving and enterprising citi- 
zens of Minnesota have come from the land across the sea, and of this 
number Olof Anderson, of St. James, is a worthy representative. He 
was born, August 17, 1866, in Christianstad Ian, northern Skane, Sweden, 
a son of Anders and Christina (Jensen) Anderson, the former of whom 
died in America, soon after his arrival here, in 1869. Of the children 
born to him and his wife but two are now living: Theodore, of Sweden, 
and Olof, the subject of this personal biography. 

Brought up and educated in his native country, Olof Anderson sub- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1059 



sequently determined to seek his fortune on American soil, and in 1890 
came to Minnesota, where he had friends hving. Locating in St. James, 
he has since successfully followed his trade of a carpenter and contractor, 
having for many years been in partnership with Albert Anderson, under 
the firm name of Anderson & Anderson. The interest of his copartner 
having been purchased, in 1907, by John P. Krone, the firm name has 
since been Anderson & Krone. As contractors, builders and manufac- 
turers of sashes, doors and blinds, this firm has a very large and lucra- 
tive business, its reputation for substantial, artistic and durable work 
being widely and favorably known. 

Mr. Anderson married, October 3, 1906, ]\Iiss Annie Person, daugh- 
ter of Per Nelson, of Sweden, and they are the parents of two children, 
Arvid Ossian and Eric Philip. True to the faith of his forefathers, Mr. 
Anderson is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. In his political 
views he is a sound Republican, and fraternally he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and to the Yeomen of America. 

Alfred Danielson. — Enterprising and energetic, possessing excel- 
lent business ability and judgment, Alfred Danielson, of St. Peter, holds 
a firm position among the prosperous merchants of southern Minnesota, 
having three established music stores, one in the city in which he resides, 
one in Mankato, and one in New Ulm. A son of Daniel Anderson, he 
was born February 12, 1861, in Tisselskog socken, Dahlsland, Sweden, 
where he spent the days of his boyhood and youth. 

Daniel Anderson, a farmer by occupation, was also interested to 
some extent in seafaring pursuits, having been part owner of a merchant 
ship, and while on a voyage, in 1864, losing his life at sea. He married 
Christina Larsdoter, who survived him, passing away in 1879. Five 
children were born of their marriage, as follows : Nannie, who died in 
childhood; Alfred, the subject of this brief biographical sketch; Martin, 
deceased ; Anna Amelia, deceased ; Lars Wilhelm, now operating a saw- 
mill in Sweden. 

Going to Norway soon after leaving school, Alfred Danielson was 
there employed in railroad work for two years, but w^as not at all satis- 
fied with his work. Hoping to find more congenial employment in a 
newer country, he bade goodbye to home and friends in 1879, came to 
Minnesota, and for twelve years thereafter was busily employed at Man- 
kato as a stone mason and in railroad work. The following year Mr, 
Danielson spent in Virginia, filling contracts for the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad Company. Returning then to Minnesota, Mr. Danielson 
worked for the Singer Sewing Machine Company for four years. De- 
ciding then to start in business on his own account, he opened a music 
store in St. Peter in 1897, and met with such success in its management 
that he subsequently established one in Mankato, and another at New 
LUm, both of which he still operates, having an extensive and lucrative 
trade. 



io6o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



In July, 1881, Mr. Danielson married Martha Matteson, daughter 
of Lars Matteson, of Windom, Minnesota, and to them eight children 
have been born, two of whom are dead and six Hving. Those hving 
are : Samuel Albert, assistant foreman in a laundry connected with the 
state hospital in St. Peter, married Inga Wettergren, of New Sweden, 
Minnesota; Anna, wife of C. W. Watts, a farmer at Mankato; Henry 
W., superintendent of Employers' Detective Agency of Chicago, married 
Clara Grunewald, of Dawson, Minnesota; Maggie, wife of F. E. Eng- 
lish, of New Ulm; and Minnie and Oscar, at home. Religiously Mr. 
Danielson is a conscientious member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 
Politically he is a Republican and takes an intelligent interest in local 
affairs, for three years rendering good service as a member of the City 
Council. He is a member of various secret societies, belonging to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Modern 
Samaritans, the Eagles, the Beavers, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, Modern Woodmen of America, the Degree of Honor, the 
Equitable Fraternal Union, and to the Workmen's Benefit Association. 
Mr. Danielson owns a fine residence at 324 North Seventh street, St. 
Peter, Minnesota, where he is living with his family at the present time. 



Rev. Erik J. Nystrom. — As pastor of the First Swedish Lutheran 
church of St. Peter, Rev. Erik J. Nystrom leads a busy and useful life, 
and in his ministerial labors is meeting with marked success, his extreme 
earnestness of purpose and his sincere devotion to his parochial duties 
bringing to him well-merited reward. A son of the late Carl Wilhelm 
Nystrom, he was born. May 8, i860, in Fornasa, Ostergotland, where 
he spent his boyhood days. 

Carl Wilhelm Nystrom was bom, lived and died on the homestead 
founded in Sweden by his ancestors, his birth occurring June 9, 1827, 
and his death on April 14, 1907. An agriculturist, he carried on general 
farming throughout his active career. He married Sophia Lof, who 
was born in Lonsas, Ostergotland, July 12, 1827, and there died December 
5, 1905. They were the parents of four children, namely: Carl August, 
born September 4, 1855, succeeded to the ownership of the ancestral 
homestead, which he is successfully managing, having remained in 
Sweden; Emma Christina, born January 9, 1858, is the wife of G. E. 
Dahlquist, a farmer, living in Tony, Wisconsin; Erik Johan, the special 
subject of this sketch ; and Aron Wilhelm, born September 20, 1865, is 
engaged in general farming at St. Joe, Idaho. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Swedish Lutheran church, and reared their family in the same 
faith. 

Having obtained his rudimentary education in the public schools of 
his native land, Erik J. Nystrom migrated, in 1879, to the United States, 
and for a short time lived in Chicago, Illinois. Going from there to 
Iowa, he first located at New Sweden, but afterwards went to Swedes- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1061 

burg, Henry county, where, during the summer of 1880, he taught the 
parochial school. Subsequently Mr. Nystrom attended the Augustana 
College, at Rock Island, Illinois, where, in the fall of 1887, having com- 
pleted the classical course, he entered the Theological Seminary. While 
in school he was frequently sent out as a teacher, and had charge of 
congregations in different places, including New London and Clinton, 
Iowa, Longmont, Boulder and Ryssby, Colorado; the mission field: 
Hudson-Ashland, Wisconsin; Geneseo, Illinois; Jamestown^ New York; 
and Worthington, Slayton and Blooming Prairie, Minnesota. 

On June 16, 1889, at Rock Island, Mr. Nystrom was ordained as a 
minister, and immediately went to Ottumwa, Iowa, where he had charge 
of a large church, with a mission at Muchakinock, from June, 1889, until 
November, 1896. Then, in response to a call from an eastern state, he 
accepted the pastorate of the Swedish Lutheran church at Worcester, 
Massachusetts, where he remained until February, 1905, being very suc- 
cessful in his labors. Since that date Mr. Nystrom has had charge of 
the First Swedish Lutheran church at St. Peter, Minnesota, where he is 
widely known as a man of earnest convictions, strong character, and an 
able and faithful worker in the Christian ministry. Mr. Nystrom has 
served in various official capacities in his denominational labors, having 
been treasurer, chairman and secretary in the Burlington district of the 
Iowa Conference ; and while in Worcester, Massachusetts, was first sec- 
retary and later chairman of the Boston district, and was also one of the 
members of the executive committee of the Mission Board of that con- 
ference. At the present time he is statistician of the St. Peter district. 

On June 7, 1890, Mr. Nystrom married Hilma Julida Ohlin, daughter 
of Samuel and Karin (Swenson) Ohlin, of Titusville, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Nystrom died October 10, 1903, in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
leaving two children, little girls, not yet in their "teens," namely : Helga 
Erika Theodora, born in Ottumwa, Iowa, June 13, 1891 ; and Margareta 
Irene, born in Ottumwa, Iowa, May 6, 1893. Both daughters are now 
attending Gustavus Adolphus College. Politically Mr. Nystrom is Inde- 
pendent in his views, especially as regards local affairs. Liberal and 
charitable, he is an active member of the Swea Sick Benefit Society of 
St. Peter. 

Peter A. Mattson, Ph. D. — From the position of an humble student 
in a strange college, in a strange land, to the high office of presidency 
of that same educational institution is a long stride, but one which has 
been taken bv Peter A. Mattson. Ph. D., now standing at the head of the 
Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, Minnesota, being its third 
president. A graduate of this college, he is a fine representative of all 
that is best in the institution, while his attainments in scholarship, and 
his great administrative capacities, are fully recognized by those most 
nearlv concerned. A Swede by birth and breeding, he was born, Sep- 



io62 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



tember 29, 1865, in Hvitsand, Wermland, where he obtained his elemen- 
tary education, Hving there until seventeen years of age. 

Coming with his brother Edward to America in the summer of 1882, 
Mr. Mattson resided for a year in the village of Sacred Heart, Renville 
county, Minnesota, from there going to Warren, where he remained until 
the spring of 1885, in the meantime continuing his studies. When, on 
January 3, 1885, Mr. Mattson entered the Gustavus Adolphus College 
at St. Peter, he had almost unlimited faith in himself and his future life, 
but not then, nor even later, when he was graduated with honors, or 
even when he was ordained to the ministry, did he once imagine that he 
was destined to be chosen president of the college, and the recognized 
leader of the Swedish-Lutheran movement in the Northwest. Studious 
and ambitious, he was graduated from the Classical Department of the 
college, June 12, 1892, with the degree of B. A. Entering the Augustana 
College at Rock Island, Illinois, in the fall of that year, Mr. Mattson took 
up the study of theology, and after two years of close application to his 
studies again carried off the honors of his class, graduating with the 
degree of B. D. on June 10, 1894. 

Returning to Minnesota, Mr. Mattson was regularly ordained as a 
minister of the gospel during the synodical convention held at St. Peter 
that year, and at once accepted a call to the pastorate of the First 
Lutheran church of Tacoma, Washington, the largest church on the 
Pacific coast. Devoting his energies to the duties devolving upon him 
in that capacity he, with the exception of a year spent in California for 
the benefit of his health, remained in that city for five years, meeting 
with great success in his ministerial labors, and greatly endearing himself 
to the members of his congregation. During the time he was for two 
years secretary of the Columbia Conference and one term its vice-presi- 
dent. Failing health forced him to resign the charge he had so success- 
fully conducted and return to Minnesota. 

Recuperating his physical forces after a period of rest, ]\Ir. ]\Iattson 
was installed as pastor of Ebenezer church, ]\Iinneapolis, in 1899, and 
filled the pulpit most acceptably for five years. Then, in 1904, he was 
elected by the Minnesota Conference to succeed Dr. Wahlstrom, who had 
completed twenty-three years as president of the Gustavus Adolphus 
College, a position for which he is eminently fitted, not only by scholar- 
ship and training, but in instinct, ideals and spirit. He is well and 
widely known, and in 1906 received the degree of Ph. D. at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, while the honorary degree of D. D. was conferred 
upon him by the Muhlenberg College at AUentown, Pennsylvania. 

On June 18, 1895, Dr. Mattson married Emma Anna Olson, daughter 
of Andrew A. and Christina (Johnson) Olson, of Hopkins, Minnesota. 
Three children have blessed their union, namely : Myrtle Annette Hattie, 
born in 1896; Hamlin August Nathanael born in 1899; and Violet Emma 
Christine, born in 1907. Politically the doctor is independent, with 
Republican tendencies. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1063 



August Olson. — Prominent among the public officials of Nicollet 
county is August Olson, of St. Peter, who is now filling his second term 
as sheriff. He is a man of influence, possessing in an eminent degree 
the discretion, trustworthiness, and force of character requisite for the 
duties devolving upon him in his present capacity. A native of Minne- 
sota, he was born, December 22, 1861, in West Union, Carver county, 
a son of Andrew Olson. 

Born in Gottenburg, Wester Gothland, in March, 1818, Andrew 
Olson was there reared to agricultural pursuits, and continued a resi- 
dent of Sweden for upwards of forty years. In the spring of 1861, 
hoping in a newer country to improve his financial condition, he came 
with his family to America. Locating in Minnesota, he purchased a 
tract of land in Carver county, and immediately resumed the occupation 
to which he had so long been accustomed. Moving to New Sweden, 
Nicollet county, in 1868, he bought land, and was there prosperously 
employed as a tiller of the soil until his death, in 1895. Intelligent and 
enterprising, he took great interest in local affairs, becoming a stanch 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party. True to the religious 
faith in which he was brought up, he was a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. 

Andrew Olson was twice married. By his first wife he had three 
children, as follows: Mary, living in St. Peter, Minnesota, is the 
widow of the late N. J. Carlson, for many years a successful farmer in 
Nicollet county; Annie, wife of C. E. Lindberg, of Minneapolis; and 
John, a retired farmer, living at Walnut Grove. INIr. Olson married 
second, in Sweden, Mariastena Johnson, who was born in Gottenburg, 
Sweden, in 1826, and by this union he became the father of nine chil- 
dren, namely: Jennie, wife of Louis Becklund, a real estate dealer in 
Winthrop, Minnesota; Tilda, wife of J. N. Gayner, special public exam- 
iner of Litchfield ; Louis, a real estate dealer in New Sweden ; August, 
the special subject of this sketch ; Albert, engaged in farming in New 
Sweden ; Emma, residing in Tacoma, Washington ; Alfred, of New 
Sweden ; Kate, also of New Sweden ; and Charles, chef on the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, his run being between St. Paul and Seattle. 

August Olson obtained a good common school education in Nicollet 
county, and after learning the carpenter's trade was employed as a con- 
tractor and builder in Nicollet and Sibley counties for a number of sea- 
sons, becoming widely known throughout this section of the state. On 
January i, 1901, Mr. Olson was appointed deputy sheriff by Sherifif 
John McMillen, under whom he served the ensuing six years. Having 
in the meantime proved himself in every way worthy and capable, he 
was elected, in 1906, as sheriff, and in 1908 had the honor of being 
reelected to the same office without opposition, this incident showing 
]\Ir. Olson's popularity with all classes of people, regardless of party 
prejudices. 

Mr. Olson married, June 2^, 1907, Miss Natie Frazer, daughter of 



io64 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Frazer, of St. Peter, and they have two children — 
Franklin Andrew and Mary Elizabeth. Mrs. Olson is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically Mr. Olson is identi- 
fied with the Republican party, and fraternally he is a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons ; of the Knights of 
Pythias ; of the Modern Woodmen of America ; and of the Improved 
Order of Red Men. 

Charles Frederick Bergouist. — A man of strong character, capable 
and far-seeing, Charles F. Bergquist, of Winthrop, holds a prominent posi- 
tion among the progressive citizens of Sibley county, his business ability 
and personal integrity being respected throughout the community in 
which he resides. Scholarly and cultured, he is likewise a gifted musi- 
cian, his talent in this direction having met with a ready recognition, and 
to his children he has imparted a love of his favorite art, one of his sons 
being an exceptionally fine organist and composer. A son of Carl J. Berg- 
quist, he was born, December ii, 1849, ^^ the little mining town of 
Versbo, Varna socken, Ostergothland, Sweden. 

A life-long resident of Sweden, both Carl Johan Bergquist and his 
wife, Johanna, were born, lived and died, in Ostergothland, his birth oc- 
curring in 1828, and hers in 1820, while her death occurred in 1886, and 
his in 1903. He was an industrious, hard working man, following the 
blacksmith's trade throughout his active life. Their children, six in 
number, were as follows: Mathilda, widow of the late Andrew Knut- 
strom, a farmer; Charles Frederick, the special subject of this sketch; 
Anna Sophia passed away at the age of nineteen years ; Katherine, still 
living in Sweden, married Oscar Eckstrom, a shoemaker; Emerentsia, 
wife of Charles Anderson, a farmer in Iowa ; and Johan, a blacksmith, 
died, in 1892, in America. 

Acquiring his early knowledge of books in the common schools of his 
native land, Charles F. Bergquist came to this country in search of fame 
and fortune in 1868, and spent that summer as a miner in Michigan. 
Coming then to Minnesota, he secured work on a railroad as a day 
laborer, subsequently becoming, a foreman and contractor, and continu- 
ing thus employed until 1873. "^^ ^^74 Mr. Bergquist embarked in a 
mercantile career, and for five years was clerk in a farm implement store 
in St. Peter. Desirous then of fitting himself for a position of more im- 
portance, he attended Gustavus Adolphus College for three years, being 
graduated in 1882. While there he paid special attention to the study 
of the Swedish language, preparing himself for a teacher, and also took 
private lessons in music, perfecting himself as an organist. The ensuing 
two years, from January, 1884, until January, 1886, Mr. Bergquist taught 
school, and was church organist, in Fremont, Iowa. Going, then to Min- 
neapolis, he there continued teaching, at the same time becoming organ- 
ist of Augustana church. Giving up then his professional labors, he was 
for two and one-half years clerk in the lumber yard of C. A. Smith. 




^. ^x?^^..^ 



iyUny:> ^ 



^^^^/»-»^i\^ 



3yju 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1069 

Locating in Winthrop in 189 1, Mr. Bergquist was for a year bookkeeper 
for his brother-in-law, C. J. Larson, a lumber dealer, after which he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Larson, and contmued m the lumber 
business until the death of Mr. Larson, in 1902, in the meantime opening 
a branch lumber yard at Lafayette, Minnesota. The business being subse- 
quently divided, Mr. Bergquist retained the Lafayette branch, which he 
placed' in charge of his son, Theodore Ferdinand, and has since lived 
retired from active pursuits, enjoying the competence which he has 

acquired. ,1-11 

Mr. Bergquist married, March 5, 1874, Emma Applequist, daughter 
of Johannes and Maria Applequist, natives of Westergothland, Sweden. 
Their union has been blessed by the birth of five children, namely : Carl 
Emil, M. D., a physician in Galesville, Wisconsin, married Borghild Tor- 
kelson, by whom he has two children, Ethel Clarabelle and Blanche Evan- 
geline; J. Victor, organist and music teacher in Minneapolis, married 
Amelia Johnson, and they have one child, Carl Elvir; Theodore Ferdi- 
nand a hardware and lumber merchant in Lafayette, married Cary Erics- 
son, 'and they have one child, Stewart Theodore; Ernest Bernhard 
superintendent of the schools at Zumbrota, Minnesota; and Oscar Sig- 
fried, a druggist in Galesville, Wisconsin. Politically Mr. Bergquist is a 
stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and for three 
years served as assessor, while for nine years he was a member of the 
local school board, two years of the time being its president. A valued 
member of the Swedish Lutheran church, he was for many years a dea- 
con, and the organist. 

J. Victor Bergquist, the second son, is a musician of note, having 
inherited great musical talent from his father. Going to Europe m 
1900, he took lessons on the organ under the noted organist of Berlin 
Grun'icke, and under Guilmant in Paris, and piano lessons under Schar- 
wenka, while under Berger he studied composition. Subsequently wit- 
nessing a performance of the Passion Play at Oberammergau, he was in- 
spired with a great desire to compose appropriate music, and his oratorio, 
"Golgotha," was the result of his inspiration. This oratorio was success- 
fully^prod'uced in Minneapolis and St. Paul, with a trained chorus of 
three hundred voices. In 1905, 1906 and 1907, he was director of music 
in Gustavus Adolphus College. He is at present teaching in Minneapolis, 
and holding the position of organist at the Lutheran Augustana church. 
His compositions include two organ sonatas, the first now being played 
by several of the prominent organists of the country, solos for piano, 
voice, male chorus and mixed chorus numbers. 

Rev. Louis G. Almen.— Throughout the length and breadth of 
Nicollet county no finer representative of the energetic, progressive and 
public-spirited^ Swedish citizens can be found than Rev. Louis G. Almen, 
of St. Peter. A regularly ordained minister of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, he is a powerful and magnetic speaker, one of the ablest par- 



I070 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



liamentarians in the Conference, and is both prominent and influential in 
the denomination to which he belongs. He has always taken an intelli- 
gent interest in the temperance cause, and is known far and wide as one 
of its strongest advocates in this part of the state. A Swede by birth 
and breeding, he was born, March 30, 1846, in Tasso, Dalsland, Sweden, 
where his parents, Per Peterson and Mary (Anderson) Almen, spent 
their entire lives, being engaged in farming. 

Brought up and educated in Sweden, Louis G. Almen remained in 
his native land until twenty-four years of age. Coming to the United 
States in 1870, he w^as for about two years and a half employed as a 
common laborer and contractor in railroad construction and logging in 
Minnesota and Wisconsin. In 1873, wishing to prepare himself for a 
professional career, Mr. Almen entered Augustana College, at Rock 
Island, Illinois, and after three years and a half of close application to 
his studies was graduated, in 1876, from the Theological Department. 
The following three years he had charge of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Beaver, Iroquois county, Illinois, and the next year traveled as a mis- 
sionary through Renville, Chippewa, Yellow Aledicine and Lac qui Parle 
counties, Minnesota, doing a noteworthy work for his denomination. 
Accepting then a call to New London, Minnesota, Mr. Almen continued 
there as pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church until 1893, when he 
accepted a call to Balaton, Lyon county, where for twelve consecutive 
years he filled the pulpit most successfully. Locating in St. Peter on 
December 20, 1905, Mr. Almen has since been a resident of this city, 
and for the past four years has been successfully engaged in soliciting 
funds for building and endowment for Gustavus Adolphus College, the 
leading institution of the kind in the Northwest. For twelve years Mr. 
Almen was editor of the church and temperance departments of Skaf- 
farcn, the semi-ofificial organ of the Swedish Lutheran Minnesota Con- 
ference, in that capacity greatly advancing the work in which he was 
engaged. 

On December i, 1876, Rev. j\Ir. Almen married Alice C. Johnson, 
daughter of August C. and Louise Johnson, of Graceville, ^Minnesota, 
where both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson died in 1906. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson has been blessed by the birth of ten children, namely : 
Hannah Theodora, born November 24, 1877, who is a school teacher in 
Watertown, Carver county, and also organist of the church ; Louisa 
Victoria, born June 2, 1879, married Prof. G. H. Towley, principal of 
the Commercial Department of Gustavus Adolphus College ; Gustaf 
Theodore, born July 30, 1881, now principal in a commercial school at 
Thief River Falls. Minnesota, married, in September, 1908, Martha Mar- 
garet Curtis; Bertha Alethea, born May 17, 1883; Christine Constantia, 
deceased, was born May 5, 1885 ; Ansgar Laurentius, born March 8, 
1887; Minnie Elizabeth, born May 24, 1889; Carl John Wilhelm, born 
September 17, 1891 ; Edith Maria Sophia, born July 12. 1893 ; and 
Alphonsus Peter Constantine, born December 23, 1895. These children 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1071 



have all been g-iven excellent educational advantages, completing their 
studies at Gustavus Adolphus College. Politically Mr. Almen is an 
independent Republican. 

Theodore Ferdinand Bergquist, an enterprising merchant of 
Lafayette, Minnesota, was born at St. Peter, Nicollet county, Minnesota, 
March 10, 1879, and is a son of Charles Frederick and Emma (Apel- 
quist) Bergquist, of Winthrop, Minnesota, given further mention else- 
where in this work. Theodore Bergquist received his education in the 
public schools of Winthrop and Minneapolis, and took a year's course 
at the commercial department of the Gustavus Adolphus College, of St. 
Peter. He removed to Lafayette in 1896, on the day the town was first 
started, and has since resided there, engaged in the lumber, hardware and 
machinery business. He is a man of keen business instincts, honest 
and industrious, and has met a well-earned success. He takes an active 
interest in public affairs and has served as a member of the village 
council. He is a member and treasurer of the Swedish Lutheran church, 
and is a Republican. 

Mr. Bergquist was united in marriage, June 28, 1906, with Carrie 
S. Erickson, daughter of John H. Erickson, of Bernadotte, Minnesota, 
and they have been blessed with one son, whom they have named 
Stuart Theodore, and one daughter, Carol Cassie. 

Rev. Carl Bernhard Leonard Boman, Bernadotte, pastor of the 
Swedish Lutheran church, was born at Garpenberg socken, Dalarne, Swe- 
den, November 15, 1849, and is a son of Anton and Margreta Elisabeth 
Boman, the former a tailor, who lived and died in Sweden. Of their 
eight children, but two survive, namely: Bror Knut, a lieutenant in the 
Swedish army, and Carl B. L. 

Reverend Boman studied until 1873 in his native country, and then 
came to the United States and attended Augustana College at Paxton, 
Illinois, until 1875, and at Rock Island until 1877. He was ordained a 
minister of the Swedish Lutheran church in Jamestown, New York, in 
1876. While pursuing his studies he served congregations at Chnton, 
Iowa, and Sterling, Illinois. His first charge after ordination was Salem 
church, in Chicago, where he remained nine years, rebuilding the church. 
He then spent three years at Carver and East Union, Minnesota, and 
spent two years at St. Peter. He spent over fourteen years at Stockholm, 
Wright county, Minnesota, and since August, 1905, has been pastor of 
the church at Bernadotte, Nicollet county, Minnesota. 

While living in Chicago Reverend Boman was a member of the exec- 
utive committee of the Swedish Illinois Conference. He was one of the 
incorporators of the Augustana Hospital. He has been a member of the 
board of directors of Gustavus Adolphus College for eight years, and is 
at present a member of the board of trustees and of the executive com- 



1072 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

mittee of the building committee of the Gustavus Adolphus College, and 
of the board of foreign missions in China. He has been a member of 
the board of trustees of the Bethesda Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota. _ In 
political views he is an independent Republican. Reverend Boman is a 
man of great influence and prominence, not only in the state, but through- 
out the church in which he is a worker. He is one of those who is 
''never weary of well-doing," and universally esteemed and respected. 

He married, June 6, 1877, Ida Sophia Romvall, of Carver county, 
Minnesota, and their children are: Hannah, married A. E. Johnson, 
manager of three factories in Rockford, Illinois, who has three children, 
Ralph, Philip (deceased) and Lloyd; Ida Leontine, married Dr. Stolpe- 
stad, of Lafayette, and has two children, Herbert and Armour Harold ; 
Carl Emanuel, a graduate of the University of Minnesota, and electrical 
engineer for the Bell Telephone Company, at New York City ; Bernhard 
S., travels for Rockford Furniture Company; Lily B., and Alma S., school 
teachers ; Paul, at home, and Lily, who died at the age of two years. Rev. 
Mr. Boman has put in pulpits and altars of his own design in fifty-one 
churches. 

Rev. Sven August Lindholm, the pastor of the Swedish Lutheran 
church at LaFayette, was born in Alorlunda parish, Smaland, Sweden, 
August 17, 1852. He received his education in the public schools of his 
native country, and came to the United States in 1869, remaining in De- 
Kalb, Illinois, until the autumn of 1870. For three years thereafter 
he attended St. Ansgarius Academy at Carver, Minnesota, in 1873 en- 
tered Augustana College and Theological Seminary, then located at 
Paxton, Illinois, and in 1875 at Rock Island. After having finished his 
theological course, he was ordained at Princeton, Illinois, in 1878, as a 
minister of the gospel of the Lutheran Church by the Augustana Synod. 
His first charge was at Dahlsborg, South Dakota, where for one year he 
also had charge of two other congregations ; failing health led him then 
to accept a call to Lake City, Minnesota, in 1879, remaining there until 
1884. He then removed to Mead, Nebraska, as he thought a milder 
climate would benefit his health, where he remained four years, and 
during that period built an eight thousand dollar church. He spent two 
years at Lake Park, Minnesota, and from 1890 until 1895 was stationed 
at Moorhead, Minnesota, meanwhile organizing a congregation and build- 
ing a church at Fargo, North Dakota. At Comstock and Krogness, Min- 
nesota, he also worked during this time, so that congregations soon were 
established in both places. In 1895 he located at Tripolis, Kandiyohi 
county, was instrumental in the rebuilding and renovation of the church 
and school, and remained there until 1907, since which time he has been at 
LaFayette. Reverend Lindholm is a man of unusual talent and elo- 
quence, and has written many fine articles for publication. For some 
time he edited a department devoted to the interest of the church few 
the Minnesota Stats-Tidning, and has since been a constant correspond- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1073 



ent for that publication. He was elected three times secretary of the 
Minnesota Conference of the Augustana Synod of North America, one 
of the Synods constituting the general council of the Lutheran church, 
the first time February i, 1880, and was appointed the first secretary 
of the Nebraska Conference, when it was organized over twenty years 
ago. He was again elected secretary of the Minnesota Conference in 
1906, and has since been re-elected every year. In political views he is 
an independent Republican. He has taken an active part in the educa- 
tional work within the church. He served for a number of years as mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of Luther Academy, Wahoo, Nebraska. He 
has also served on the Board of Directors of Gustavus Adolphus College, 
St. Peter, Minnesota, and was selected secretary of that body for a num- 
ber of years. He has been for a long time and is now member of the 
Board of Trustees for the Ministerial Aid Fund of the Augustana Synod. 
As secretary for this body he has through the press and otherwise accom- 
plished not a little for the advancement of the cause of this important 
institution. 

The Reverend Lindholm married, June 25, 1878, in Chicago, Miss 
Alfreda Cedar, a native of Nordkoping, Sweden, and they have children 
as follows: Fridolph, a member of Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra; 
Alfreda, a music teacher ; Olga A., married Frank A. Martin, a real estate 
dealer at Albuquerque, New Mexico; Edith O., a graduate of St. Cloud 
Normal School, teaching at Hutchinson, and later at Dayton, Washing- 
ton ; Hedvig E., a graduate of the Normal School at St. Cloud, and now 
teaching in the high school at Stewart, Minnesota; Gotthard, a student 
at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota. 

H. J. GouLDBERG, of the firm of Gouldberg & Anderson, of Cam- 
bridge, was born at Boda socken, Dalarne, Sweden, July 8, 1850, and 
is the son of Hans and Anna Gouldberg, both natives of Sweden. Hans 
Gouldberg was born in 1821 and died in 1894, and his wife was born 
in 1828 and died in 1906; they lived on a farm. In 1866 they came to 
the United States, locating near Cambridge, where they purchased a 
farm and lived on it until they retired from active life, when they moved 
to Cambridge. Their only child was Hans J. 

Hans J. Gouldberg received his education in the public schools of 
Sweden, and came to the United States with his parents at the age 
of sixteen years, remaining eight years on his father's farm. In 1874 
Mr. Gouldberg began learning the trade of carpenter and cabinet maker, 
after which he started in business in partnership with Jonas Olson, 
in a general store at Cambridge, under the firm name of Gouldberg & 
Olson. September 16, 1876, Mr. Olson's interest was purchased by D. 
O. Anderson, and the name changed to Gouldberg & Anderson, since 
that time doing a flourishing business. Both members of the firm are 
shrewd and active business men, and they have met with pleasing success. 
Mr. Gouldberg is independent in his political views, and served five years 
68 



I074 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

as postmaster of Cambridge. He is a member of the village council, and 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Gouldberg married, June 8, 1874, Anna Anderson, and they 
have children as follows: Edwin, a plumber and tinsmith, residing at 
Cambridge ; Geneva, married G. G. Goodwin, mentioned in another place 
in this work; Theresa, a stenographer in the employ of her father; and 
Lillette, attending the public school. 

Godfrey G. Goodwin, a prominent attorney of Cambridge, was bom 
at Scandian Grove, Minnesota, January 11, 1873, and is the son oi Gustof 
and Cecelia Goodwin, both natives of Sweden, where they carried on a 
farm. His mother came to the United States in 1872, locating at Vasa, 
Minnesota, and Mr. Goodwin received his early education in the public 
and high schools of St. Paul, Minnesota. He graduated from the aca- 
demic department of the University of Minnesota, in 1895, and one year 
later graduated from the department of law. 

He has since been in successful practice of his profession at Cam- 
bridge, where he has built up a reputation. He served from 1899 until 
1907 as attorney of Isanti county, and served two terms as president of 
the village council. He has also served as president of the school board. 
]\Ir. Goodwin is public-spirited and progressive, and in political views is 
a Republican. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. He 
married, June 5, 1905, Geneva, daughter of H. J. Gouldberg, of Cam- 
bridge, and they are the parents of one son, Nathaniel. 

Andrew E. Lofstrom, of Cambridge, was born at Jemtland, Oster- 
sund, Sweden, March 23, 1864. and is the son of Eric and Anna Morten- 
son, both natives of Sweden, who lived on a farm, and died in their native 
country. They had children as follows: Morton, resides in Sweden; 
Katherina, deceased ; Britta, resides in Sweden ; Sigrid, Anna and Edward, 
deceased ; and Andrew E. 

Andrew E. Lofstrom was educated in Sweden and came to the United 
States in 1882, locating at Cambridge. He worked one summer on the 
railroad, and then spent four years as stationary engineer, after which 
for three years he was miller in a flour mill. He next worked in lumber 
vards and later in a brick yard. In 1904 Mr. Lofstrom built a brick 
blacksmith, machine and repair shop at Cambridge, and has the leading 
business of this nature in Isanti county. By his diligence and close atten- 
tion to his work he has built up a good custom, and being a first-class me- 
chanic in his line, he has been very successful in this enterprise. In polit- 
ical views Mr. Lofstrom is an adherent of the Republican party, and he is 
a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Mr. Lofstrom married, October 24, 1892, Anna Moline, of Dalarne, 
Sweden, and they have children as follows: Martin, Joseph, Arthur, 
Lawrence and Andreas. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1075 



John Engberg, Register of Deeds of Isanti county was born Septem- 
ber 6, 1858, at Sundsvall, Wester-Norlands Ian, Sweden, and is the son of 
Olof and Sarah Katrina (Forsberg) Engberg, both natives of Sweden. 
Olof Engberg was in comfortable circumstances, being engaged in busi- 
ness in the several lines of glass manufacture, lumber dealer and saw mill 
owner and operator, besides being a minister of the gospel. He came to 
the United States in 1887 and located in Isanti county, where he now 
resides, retired from active life. Of his thirteen children, the following 
five survive : Axel, employed in a mill at Minneapolis ; John ; Elise, mar- 
ried Louis Rask, a farmer; Lily, married Gustaf R. Wallgren, a cutter, 
residing at Goshen, Indiana ; and Hulda, married Reverend O. Lind, min- 
ister of the Swedish Baptist church, at Dalbo, Minnesota. 

John Engberg, of Cambridge, received his education in the public 
schools of his native country, and then spent two years in the machinery 
department of a boat building firm. He came to the United States in 1879, 
and until the fall of 1880 was employed as clerk in a grocery store, in 
Chicago. He then spent one year in a hotel in Brooklyn, New York, after 
which he removed to Minneapolis, where for some years he worked as 
grocery clerk. In 1890 he engaged in business on his own account, in the 
grocery line, and two years later sold his interests and removed to Cam- 
bridge, where for a period of ten years he remained in the employ of a 
general store in that town. He is much interested in public afifairs, and in 
political views is an adherent of the Republican party. He is enterprising 
and progressive in his ideas, and since 1902 has held the office of County 
Register of Deeds, ably filled by him. 

" Mr. Engberg married, August 7, 1886, Hilda Johnson, a native of 
Sweden, who came to America in 1880, and they became the parents of 
children as follows: Edward J., attending the University of Minnesota; 
Vernie O., a clerk in the employ of the United States Postal Service; 
Ellen E., residing at home, and Leroy, attending school at Cambridge. 
The family are attendants of the Swedish Baptist church. 

Rev. John Henry Nelson, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
of Cambridge, was born near Christianstad, Skane, Sweden, September 9, 
1862, and is the son of Peter and Christina Nelson, both natives of Swe- 
den. His parents were people of considerable wealth, owning an estate, 
and were interested in various enterprises in their native country. They 
came to the United States in 1868, locating at Council Bluifs, Iowa, 
where Peter Nelson was engaged for about five years in railroad con- 
struction. In 1873 they removed to Kansas and engaged in farming, 
remaining until 1880, at which time they removed to Dalesburg, South 
Dakota, "where they engaged in farming. In 1886 they removed to 
Worthington, Minnesota, where Mrs. Nelson died in 1895, and Mr. 
Nelson, February i, 1903. They had five children, namely: Hanna, 
married John Ledene, of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, now retired; Cary, 
married N. E. Carlson, a farmer at Dalesburg, South Dakota, Anna, mar- 



1076 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



ried H. A. Hemming, a farmer at Dalesburg; John Henry; and Sigrid, 
died at the age of twenty-four, 

John Henr}^ Nelson came to America in 1870 and received his early 
education at Council Blufifs, Iowa, and Hiawatha, Kansas ; he entered 
Gustavus Adolphus College in 1884, graduating in 1892. Later he was 
graduated from the Theological Seminary of Augustana College, Rock 
Island, Illinois, and in June, 1894, at St. Peter, was ordained a minister 
of the Swedish Lutheran church and stationed at Sacred Heart, Minne- 
sota. For eight years Reverend Nelson was in charge of the church at 
Sacred Heart, from 1902 until 1905 he officiated at the church at Berna- 
dotte, and since that time has Jaeen located at Cambridge. Reverened 
Nelson has devoted his best gifts and energies to his chosen field of 
labor, and has won the respect and affection of all who know him. He 
takes a keen interest in the progress and development of the state, as 
w^ell as town and county, and is a member of the State Board of Direct- 
ors of the Anti-Saloon League ; he is always an active worker in the cause 
of temperance, and gives his influence in its interests whenever possible. 
He has for many years been a member of the Board of Directors of 
Gustavus Adolphus College. In 1897 he and his wife made an extensive 
tour of Europe. 

Reverend Nelson married, November 28, 1894, Carolina, daughter 
of Andrew Dahlgren, of Minneapolis, and they are parents of children 
as follows: Ruth Eleanor, born November 23, 1898; Lawrence John, 
born September 2^, 1901, and Mildred Caroline, born November 4, 1906. 

A. Hans Southerland, a prominent attorney of Cambridge, and 
judge of probate of Isanti county, was born at Boda socken. Dalarne. 
Sweden, September 14, 1862, and is the son of Andreas Hans and 
Christine (Andersdoter) Hanson, both natives of Dalarne, and who lived 
on a farm. He was their only child ; his mother, who was born in 1839, 
died in 1869, and his father married (second) Elizabeth Ericsdoter, by 
whom he had children as follows : Andrew, a brick mason of Minneap- 
olis ; Eric, a mason, living in Denver ; Olof, a graduate of Upsala and 
Stockholm, teacher of music and other branches in Sweden ; Jonas, car- 
rying on the farm of his father ; and Bessie, at home ; Christine and 
Annie, married and living in Dalarne. 

A. Hans Southerland received his education in the public schools 
of Sweden, and May 18, 1882, arrived in Cambridge, where he had come 
direct from Sweden. He obtained employment the first summer on the 
railroad between Hinckley and St. Cloud, and the following winter 
w^orked at lumbering. The second winter he attended school at Cam- 
bridge, and for the next three years was employed as clerk in the store 
of Gouklberg & Anderson, at Cambridge. He then attended the Curtis 
Business College at Minneapolis, after which he returned to Cambridge, 
in 1887, and was employed as book-keeper by Gouldberg & Anderson, 
remaining with them until 1891. Being of an ambitious nature, and 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1077 

imbued with the desire for further education, Mr. Southerland entered 
the University of Minnesota, graduating from the law department, in 
1895 ; he then returned to Cambridge, where he entered partnership with 
H. F.' Barker, under the firm name of Barker & Southerland, which lasted 
until December, 1903. During that time Mr. Southerland served one 
term as county attorney. He spent one year in successful practice by 
himself, and in January, 1905, took the post of judge of probate, which 
he has since held continuously. In political views he is a Republican, 
and he attends the Swedish Baptist church. Mr. Southerland served 
four years as president of the village council of Cambridge. He also 
served one term as a member of the Republican State Central Commit- 
tee. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, also the 
Knights of Pythias. Mr. Southerland has one daughter, Mae, attending 
school at Morris, Minnesota. 

» 

NoRELius Brothers. — The firm of Norelius Brothers, Isanti, Minne- 
sota, is composed of Edward and Albert Norelius, sons of Peter and 
Anna Norelius. natives of Helsingland, Sweden. In 1853, Peter Norelius 
emigrated to this country and at first settled in Chicago, where lie spent 
one year. Then he moved to a farm in Chisago county, Minnesota, 
thence to Vasa, Goodhue county, and in 1859 to Isanti county, where he 
purchased a farm, on which he spent the rest of his life and died. He 
and his wife were the parents of ten children, five of whom are now liv- 
ing, namely: Andrew, a Canadian farmer; Hans, a farmer in Isanti 
county, Minnesota ; Edward and Albert, above referred to, and Horace, 
on the old homestead in Isanti county. 

Edward Norelius was born on his father's farm in Isanti county, 
Minnesota. May 30, i860; was educated in the common schools of the 
county, and until 1900 was occupied in farming. That year he engaged 
in general merchandising in Isanti, and conducted business alone until 
1903, when his brother Albert became his partner. In 1882, Edward 
married Miss Anna Lundquist, of Isanti county, by whom he had one child, 
Marion, now deceased. This wife died in 1885, and in 1888 he married 
Miss Elizabeth Eastlund, also of Isanti county. The children of their 
union are Mabel, Florence, Rudolph, Carl and Evelyn. The last named 
died in 1904. 

Albert Norelius, like his brother, was born and reared on his father's 
farm in Isanti county, the date of his birth being October 11, 1865. and 
in his youth he had the advantage of the common schools. Until 1896, 
he carried on farming. That year he was elected Register of Deeds_ of 
Isanti county, which "ofiice he filled for a term of six years, and during 
that time he made a wide acquaintance over the country. At the expira- 
tion of his official term, he entered into partnership with his brother 
Edward, in a general store at Isanti, where he has since been engaged 
in a prosperous business. October 5, 1904, he married Kate Eastlund, 
of his own countv. 



1078 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Fraternally both he and his brother Edward are identified with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and, politically, they affiliate with the 
Republican party, Edward also having served officially in various town 
and village offices. 

GusTAF C. Olson. — Gustaf C. Olson, lumber dealer, Isanti, Minne- 
sota, was born March 22, 1877, in Dalsland, Sweden, son of Carl and 
Anna Olson. Carl Olson, a farmer by occupation, emigrated to this 
country in 1882, and settled on a homestead in Bradford township, Isanti 
county, in Minnesota, where he still lives. His wife, Anna, died in 1890, 
at the age of thirty-eight years. She left three children ; Gustaf C, the 
subject of this sketch; William, now deceased; Amelia, at home with her 
father. 

After receiving a common school education in this country, Gustaf 
C. Olson turned his attention to general merchandising at Bradford, 
Minnesota, and was engaged in business there four years, after which, in 
1902, he came to his present location at Isanti. Here, in partnership with 
O. L. Lnndberg, he entered the lumber business, under the firm name of 
the Isanti Lumber Company, and has since continued to maintain a pros- 
perous business. 

May II, 1904, Mr. Olson married Miss Viola Hagen, of Watertown, 
Wisconsin, and they have one son, Arthur. Mr. Olson is a Republican, 
and at this writing is the village recorder. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Modern Woodmen of America. 

SwEN AsPLUND, of Lake City, Minnesota, was born in Vermland, 
Sweden, March 28, 1849, and is a son of Anders and Maria (P?rsdoter) 
Erickson, farmers of Vermland, where they lived and died. Their 
eight children are : Eric, Per, Anders, Swen, Johan, Carolina, Anna 
Maria and Brita Christina. Swen Asplund was educated in the public 
schools of his native country, and followed the occupation of farming 
until he came to the United States, in 1869. He located in Lake City and 
worked as brick and stone mason and plasterer, for five years. He 
afterwards spent many years in farming. In 1895 Mr. Asplund engaged 
in the mercantile business in Lake City, in partnership with his son, 
A. W. Asplund, given further mention elsewhere in this work, and they 
continued eleven years, under the firm name of S. Asplund & Son. He 
retired from active business in 1906, selling his interest to his sons Emil 
and David ; the firm now does business under the name of Asplund 
Brothers. 

Mr. Asplund is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church and was 
for many years a deacon. He is a Republican in politics. He takes no 
active part in the work of his farm, which consists of five hundred acres 
of well improved land. .He married, July i, 1869, IMaria Erickson, of 
Vermland, Sweden, and they became parents of twelve children, namely : 
A. W., of Pine City, Minnesota ; V. O. Albert, a farmer living in North 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1079 



Dakota; Maria, a stenographer, living in North Dakota; Anna E., mar- 
ried Professor C. E. Sjostrand, of Warren, Minnesota ; Emil E. and 
David E., in business in Lake City ; Esther Ceciha, a music teacher ; Dina 
Alfreda, a student at Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. Peter ; Ellen 
Eugenia, died September 11, 1907; Lydia Lavinia, a student; and Eric 
and Swan, deceased. 

Emil E. Asplund was born in Wabasha county, Minnesota, January 
19, 1880, and received his education in the public schools and commer- 
cial college of Lake City. He worked on a farm for a time and then 
entered the employ of his father in the general store at Lake City, having 
previously had charge of the farm for two years. He worked in the 
store a year and a half, and in 1901, when A. W. Asplund retired, the 
firm continued until 1903 under the name of S. Asplund. In 1903 Emil 
and David became members of the firm, and the firm became S. Asplund 
& Sons, which continued until February i, 1906, when the father retired. 
Since that time the business has been carried on by Emil and David, 
under the firm name of Apslund Brothers. They keep a line of general 
merchandise and carry a large stock of high-class goods. The members 
of this firm are wide-awake, enterprising and industrious, and business- 
like in their methods. Emil Asplund married, June 24, 1908, Esther M. 
Swenson, daughter of John Swenson, of St. Peter. Minnesota. He is 
a member of the Swedish Lutheran church and a Republican ; also be- 
longs to the Lake City Commercial Club and the Swedish Sick Aid 
Society. 

David Asplund, the youngest son of Swen Asplund, was born in 
Wabasha county, Minnesota, March 18, 1882, and received his education 
in the public schools, and at the age of fourteen entered the store at 
Lake City, where he remained two years. He took a course in a business 
college and returned to work in the store. Since 1902 he has done all 
the buying for the firm, of which he is a member. He is a member of 
the Swedish Lutheran church, and in politics a Republican. He also 
belongs to the Equitable Fraternal Union, Commercial Club of Lake 
City, Lake Pepin Yachting Club and the Swedish Sick Aid Society. 

Peter Sundberg, a successful shoe dealer of Lake City, was born in 
Sunne socken, Vermland, Sweden, August 12, 1839, and is a son of 
Peter and Karin Peterson, farmers of Vermland. They had five chil- 
dren, namely : Lars, died at the age of twenty-eight ; Nils, died in Lake 
City, in 1906 ; Peter ; Katerina, deceased ; and Christina, who married Jan 
Janssen, a farmer in Sweden. 

Peter Sundberg received his education in the public schools of his 
native land, and learned the trade of shoemaker. He came to the United 
States in 1869 and located at Lake City, where he has since followed his 
trade. In 1887 he took as partner Nils Hallin, and they have the firm 
name of P. Sundberg & Company. They carry a stock worth about six 
thousand dollars, and have a fine line of high-grade shoes. Mr. Sund- 



io8o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



berg is an industrious and enterprising merchant and pays careful atten- 
tion to the wants of his customers. He is a member and deacon in the 
Swedish Lutheran church, and has been for forty years ; he is an adherent 
of the Repubhcan party and a member of the Swedish Sick Aid Society. 
He is interested in pubHc afifairs and all movements for the progress and 
improvement of the town. 

Mr. Sundberg married, November i6, 1871, Hannah Peterson, of 
Westmanland, Sweden, and their four children are as follows : Claus 
Victor and Axel Theodore, both druggists of St. Paul; Hilma A., de- 
ceased, and Edith, at home. 

Rev. Oscar Julius Nelson, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Lake Cit}^, Minnesota, was born at Pecatonica, Illinois, October 26, 
1876, son of J. M. and ]\Iatilda (Johnson) Nelson, natives of Smaland, 
Sweden. J. M. Nelson came to the L^nited States in 1868, at the age of 
thirty years, and settled first at Rockford, Illinois. He had the advan- 
tage of a good education in Sweden, for six years being a student at 
Vexio, and after he came to this country was engaged in teaching school 
at Rockford, Illinois. Subsequently he took up the study of theology, 
and pursued a course at Augustana College, Paxton, Illinois, and in 1873 
was ordained a minister of the Swedish Lutheran Augustana Synod and 
took up his work as pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at Pecatonica, 
Illinois, in the summer of 1873. He died at Pecatonica in 1877. He and 
his wife were the parents of three children : C. J. Carl, a Swedish Luth- 
eran minister of Marinette, Wisconsin ; Gustaf, who died in childhood, 
and Oscar Julius. 

In the public schools of Rockford, IlHnois, Oscar J. received his 
early training. Then he entered the preparatory department a't Augus- 
tana College, Rock Island, and spent eleven years at that institution, tak- 
ing the regular college and theological courses and devoting one year to 
music. In 1902, he was ordained, and immediately afterward he entered 
upon the work of the ministry as pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Sacred Heart, where he remained until the summer of 1909, when he 
took charge of the Swedish Lutheran church at Lake City. Rev. Mr. 
Nelson's mother resides with him. His political views harmonize with 
those of the Independent Republicans. 

August Elof Johnson, M. D., of Isanti, Minnesota, was born at 
Refteled socken, Jonkopings Lan, Smaland, Sweden. June 5. 1869, son of 
Johannes Anderson and Caroline Erickson, his wife, farming, people of 
Smaland. He is the eldest of his father's three children, the others 
being Ida Christina, in Sweden, and Louise, who died at the age of nine- 
teen years. The father died in 1875. and the mother subsequently became 
the wife of Carl Anderson of Smaland, by whom she had six children, 
namely: John Ander, Carl Anton, Alma, Selma, Anna, and Linnea, all 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1081 



residents of Sweden, with the exception of Selma, who lives in Minne- 
apolis. 

August E. attended the common schools of his native land, and for 
one year was employed there as a common laborer. In 1888, at the age 
of nineteen, he came to America, and in Minneapolis began working for 
the street railway company, with which he remained a year and a half, 
after which he was for three years employed in a clothing house, and a 
year and a half in a sash and door factory. During this time he felt the 
need of better educational equipment, and in 1899 he entered the Minne- 
apolis Academy, where he was a student two years. Then he entered the 
Hamline School of Physicians and Surgeons, where he graduated in 
1906. The year following his graduation, he spent as interne at the 
Swedish Hospital in Minneapolis. In 1907, he settled at Isanti, and has 
since been engaged in the practice of his profession here. He is health 
officer of the town. 

October 2J, 1908, Doctor Johnson married Miss Ida Louise Johnson, 
daughter of Jonas Swenson of Minneapolis. Fraternally, the doctor is 
identified with the I. O. O. F., the M. W. of A., and the A. F. & A. M., 
and, politically, he is an independent. 

Andrew Peterson. — As proprietor of one of the leading tailoring 
establishments of Anoka county, Andrew Peterson, of Anoka, has ac- 
quired an enviable reputation for the excellence, durability and style 
of his work, and by industry, good management, and close attention to 
the demands of his numerous customers has built up a noteworthy trade. 
A son of Peter Petterson, he was born, December 13, 1862, in Hjemt- 
land, Sweden. His father, a farmer through life, was twice married. By 
his first wife, whose Christian name was Carrie, he had four children, 
Lars, now deceased ; John ; Peter ; and Ole ; anl these three still reside 

in their native country. By his second wife, Annie , he had six 

children, namely: Cary, wife of Carl Wickstad, of Sweden; Jonas, en- 
gaged in farming in the old country; Andrew, the subject of this sketch; 
Peter, living in Michigan ; Stephen, a resident of Sweden ; and Mary, 
wife of a Mr. Johnson, of Smaland, Sweden. 

Educated in his native land, Andrew Peterson there learned the 
tailor's trade, which he followed in Sweden for four years. Making up 
his mind then to seek another location, he came to America in 1892, 
located immediately upon his arrival in Anoka, where, since 1905, he has 
been engaged in the tailoring business on his own account, in the manage- 
ment of his shop meeting with satisfactory success. 

Mr. Peterson married, in August, iQoS, Hulda Caroline Anderson, 
of Cambridge, Minnesota, and he and his estimable wife have won for 
themselves an assured position in the community, being held in high 
regard by all. Religiously Mr. Peterson is a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, and politically he is an independent Republican, voting 
with the courage of his convictions for the best men and measures. 



io84 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



August Anderson. — A well-known and highly respected resident of 
Anoka, Anoka county, August Anderson is numbered among the active 
business men who are contributing largely toward the development of 
its leading interests, being prosperously engaged in the retail shoe trade. 
A son of Anders and Stina Person, he was born, September 17, 1869, 
in Vermland, Sweden, being one of a family of four children, namely: 
Christina, wife of Mr. Qvarnstrom, of Sweden; Gustaf, living in Swe- 
den; Clara, a resident of California, and August. Anders Person, a 
shoemaker by trade, served for thirty years in the Swedish army, his 
name as a soldier having been Ryman. 

After completing his early studies in the public schools, August 
Anderson learned the shoemaker's trade, becoming an expert at it. As 
soon as he was of age, he emigrated to America, arriving in this country 
in 1890. He spent the ensuing year in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and then 
located in Minneapolis, ]\Iinnesota, where he followed his trade success- 
fully for seven years. Coming then to Anoka county, Mr. Anderson 
opened a shoe store in Anoka, and has here built up a substantial retail 
business in that line, being one of the leading shoe merchants in this 
part of the state. 

On December 8, 1895, Mr. Anderson married Maria Peterson, and 
they are the parents of three children, namely: Agnes, born in 1896; 
Ruby, born in 1900; and Waldo, born in 1904. A strong advocate of the 
temperance cause, Mr. Anderson is a stanch adherent of the Prohibition 
party. Religiously he belongs to the Swedish Mission church, of which 
he is the organist and song leader. In the Sunday School he has served 
as superintendent for ten years, and is a firm believer in teaching the 
children in the Holy Bible. 

Emil W. Olson. — A man of sterling integrity and worth, possess- 
ing undoubted financial and executive ability, Emil W. Olson, of Win- 
throp, occupies a prominent position among the American-born Swedes of 
Southern Minnesota, where he is widely known in connection with vari- 
ous banking institutions, more especially as cashier of the First National 
Bank of Winthrop. A native of Sibley county, he was born, January 9, 
1875, "ear Winthrop, a son of John W. Olson. 

Born in Dalarne, Sweden, John W. Olson emigrated to America in 
1868, coming directly to Sibley county, Minnesota",^ where he has since 
been prosperously employed in agricultural pursuits, being now the 
owner of a fine farm near Winthrop. He is an influentiarmember of 
the Swedish Lutheran church, of which he has been deacon for manv 
years, and in politics is affiliated with the Republican party. He married 
Lottie Kulander, who was born in Vestergotland, Sweden, and to them 
five children have been born, as follows: Emil W., the subject of this 
sketch; August W.. engaged in farming in Siblev county; Carl Oscar, 
also a farmer in this county; Arthur Ludwig, born May 5, 1884, was 
graduated from the Commercial Department of Gustavus Adolphus Col- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1085 



lege, and since 1903 has been associated with the First National Bank of 
Winthrop, at the present time being assistant cashier; and Esther, living 
at home. All of these children belong to the Swedish Lutheran church, 
Arthur L. being its treasurer. 

After finishing the course of study in the common schools, Emil 
W. Olson spent two years, from 1892 until 1894, in Gustavus Adolphus 
College, after which he took a two years' commercial course in Minneap- 
olis, thus preparing himself for a business career. From 1896 until 
1900 Mr. Olson was engaged in the furniture business at Winthrop, being 
junior partner of the firm of Kulander & Olson. The ensuing three years 
he was engaged in the grain business, operating an elevator. In 1903, 
when the First National Bank was organized, he made his first venture 
in banking, and two years later, in 1905, he, with other stockholders, took 
over the stock of this bank, and it was reorganized with the following- 
named officers : J. August Swanson, president ; William Klossner, vice 
president; Emil W. Olson, cashier; and Arthur L. Olson, assistant cash- 
ier. Under the efficient management of these able business men, the 
institution is in a flourishing condition, Mr. Olson as cashier performing 
well his share in maintaining its substantial standing in financial circles. 
Mr. Olson also organized the Farmers' State Bank at Atwater, Minne- 
sota, and the Farmers' State Bank at Almont, North Dakota, both of 
which are exceedingly prosperous institutions. 

Mr. Olson married, October 28, 1896, Miss Hilda Asp, daughter of 
Gustaf Asp, farmer, living in Lafayette, Minnesota. Four children have 
blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Olson, namely : Edith, Laura, Mildred 
and Leonard. A member of the Swedish Lutheran church, Mr. Olson 
has been its organist for the past ten years. Politically he is identified 
with the Republican party, and has served as an alderman, and as a 
member of the local school board. 

Carl J. Bergouist. — Especially worthy of mention in a work of this 
character is Carl J. Bergquist, well known in Winthrop and vicinity as a 
skillful and capable tailor, whose success in life is due entirely to his 
own unaided efiforts. Like so many of the most valued and respected 
citizens of Sibley county, he is of foreign birth, having been born, No- 
vember 15, 1855, in Son socken, Ostergotland, Sweden. His parents 
John Peterson and Johanna Uhransdoter, were life-long residents of the 
same place, the father being a tailor by occupation. 

Spending his earlier years in his native country, Mr. Bergquist 
obtained a good common school education, and under his father's instruc- 
tions became familiar with the details of tailoring. Not content, how- 
ever, with the pecuniary results of his work, he sought for a more advan- 
tageous opportunity to advance his finances in America, coming to Min- 
nesota in 1874, when nineteen years of age. Locating in St. Paul, he 
followed his trade in that city until 1887, when he removed to Winthrop, 



io86 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



where he has since worked up a fine line of patronage. He devotes his 
entire time and attention to his business, endeavoring in all respects to 
please his numerous customers, and is meeting with deserved success. 

Mr. Bergquist married Matilda Kulander, of St. Paul, and they have 
one child, Laura Florence, an accomplished and talented musician, now 
engaged as a music teacher. Politically Mr. Bergquist is identified with 
the Republican party, and religiously he is a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. 

John P. Quist. — A lad still in his teens when he came from Sweden 
to this country, poor in pocket, but rich in ambition and resolution, John 
P. Quist has steadily climber the ladder of success, with the brave per- 
sistency and determination characteristic of his people surmounting all 
obstacles, and is now numbered among the substantial and respected citi- 
zens of Winthrop, Sibley county, where he is carrying on a successful 
mercantile business. A son of Per and Kama Quist, he was born, Sep- 
tember 13, 1847, in Skane, Sweden, being a brother of Peter P. Quist, 
of Minneapolis, of whom a sketch may be found on another page of this 
volume. 

Receiving his early education in the common schools of his native 
land, John P. Quist subsequently there learned the tailor's trade, at 
which he worked as a journeyman for about five years. Emigrating to 
America in 1864, he worked as a farm hand near St. Peter, this state, 
vuitil 1 87 1, in the meantime gaining a practical knowledge of the various 
branches of agriculture. He was afterwards employed in farming on his 
own account for eleven years, meeting with excellent results. Moving 
then to Winthrop, he formed a partnership with his brother, Peter P. 
Quist, with whom from that time until 1893 he was engaged in' business 
as a dealer in hardware and farm implements. Embarking then in the 
grain business, Mr. Quist bought and sold grain of all kinds, and oper- 
ated an elevator, for eleven years. In 1904 he established his present 
business, and has since dealt extensively in furniture, having gained a 
large and remunerative trade in this part of the county. 

Mr. Quist married, November 2, 1871, Helen Louisa Paulson, of 
Nicollet county. She died November 2, 1898, the anniversary of her 
w^edding day, leaving nine children, namely : Anna Maria, wife of Alfred 
A. Anderson, of Winthrop, a drayman; Hilda Carnelia, wife of F. W. 
Lindquist, a harness maker in Winthrop; Amelia, living at home; Aaron 
Emanuel, engaged in farming in Chisago country, married Anna Cedar- 
holm ; Amanda Eleanor, a trained nurse, resides in Biwabik ; William, of 
Stillwater, married Mattie Knable ; and Nellie Carolina, Alice Victoria 
and Esther Louisa, at home. Mr. Quist is an active and consistent mem- 
ber of the Swedish Lutheran church, and has charge of the cemetery 
belonging to that denomination. He is a sound Republican in politics, 
and for a number of terms served as countv commissioner. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1087 

John Grunlund. — An enterprising and progressive business man, 
and a worthy representative of the prosperous and respected Swedish 
citizens of Sibley county, John Grunkind is actively identified with the 
mercantile interests of Winthrop, where he has a well-kept and well- 
managed general store. He was born, January 10, 1868, in Berga, Krbs 
Ian, Sweden, where he grew to man's estate. His parents, C. A. and 
Mary Grunlund, were born and reared in tke same locality, and there the 
father still follows the occupation of a tanner, and there his eight chil- 
dren were born and brought up, their names being as follows: _ Carl 
Emil, employed as a painter in Stockholm, Sweden ; Elizabeth, wife of 
Alphonse Reintjens, a baker, living in Minneapolis ; Carl Knut, of Seat- 
tle, Washington, is a painter by trade ; Mathilda Christina Wahlstrom, of 
San Francisco, California; Bettie Elvira, living in Minneapolis; Carl 
Edward, a publisher, residing in Minneapolis; John, the special subject 
of this brief sketch; and Hilma, wife of Glaus Tornberg, a railway em- 
ploye in Ljungby, Sweden. 

Receiving good educational advantages when young, John Grunlund 
completed his school life in Stockholm, and was subsequently for seven 
years employed as a clerk in a mercantile establishment in Sweden, deal- 
ing in wall papers only. A young man of push and energy, alert to take 
advantage of offered opportunities for advancing his material welfare, 
he early determined to try life in the United States, where so many of his 
countrymen were exceedingly prosperous. He came, accordingly, in 
1887, to Minnesota, and for fourteen years thereafter was engaged in 
the printing business in Minneapolis, from 1893 until 1896 being the 
publisher of a Swedish weekly paper called Budkaflcn. Disposing of his 
interests there in 1901, Mr. Grunlund removed to Lamberton, Redwood 
county, where he carried on a successful business in general merchan- 
dise for five years. Locating in Winthrop in 1906, he opened a general 
store, which he has since managed with satisfactory pecuniary results, 
having won the confidence and esteem of his patrons by his prompt at- 
tention, courtesy, and upright methods of dealing. 

Mr. Grunlund married, September 30, 1893, Selma Swanbeck, daugh- 
ter of Peter J. Swanbeck, of Sweden, and of their union two children 
have been born, namely: Hjalmar C. J., and Russell H. E. In his 
political views Mr. Grunlund is independent, voting with the courage 
of his honest convictions, regardless of party prejudice. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; and of two of the 
leading local organizations of Minneapolis, the Swedish Brothers, and 
Gustavus Adolphus. 

August L. Anderson. — A man of sterling integrity and worth, 
possessing unbounded energy, ability and push, August L. Anderson oc- 
cupies a noteworthy position among the men of prominence and influence 
in Winthrop, Sibley county, at the present time serving as mayor of this 



io88 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



recently incorporated city, having the distinction of being the first to fill 
the chair. A native of Vestergotland, Sweden, he was born, April 23, 
1863, in Lekasa socken. His parents, Anders and Johanna (Carlson) 
Anderson, were born, and lived and died in the same place, residing on 
a farm. They reared five children, as follows : Lotta, wife of Johannes 
Johnson, a farmer in Sweden; Majastina, wife of Carl Anderson, who is 
engaged in farming in Sweden ; Christina, w^ho married Carl Pehrson, a 
farmer in Sweden ; Christina, wife of John Alumbaugh, M. D., of Cali- 
fornia; and August L., the subject of this biographical sketch. 

Emigrating to this country in 1882, before attaining his majority, 
August L. Anderson took up his residence in Sibley county, near Win- 
throp, where he was employed as a farm laborer for five years. In 1888 
he purchased land, and for eleven years was actively and successfully 
engaged in general farming. Moving to the village of Winthrop in 1899, 
Mr. Anderson has since carried on a thriving business in buying and 
selling grain. He has been active in the management of local affairs, 
was village trustee in 1904, president of the village in 1905 and 1906, and 
in 1908 was elected mayor of the city at the time of its incorporation, and 
is serving most satisfactorily to all concerned in this capacity. In 1907 
and 1909 he was manager of the Winthrop Canning Company, and in 
1908 was instrumental in securing for Winthrop its present creamery, 
of which he is the manager. 

On July II, 1888, ]\Ir. Anderson married Mary E., daughter of 
Gust Larson, by whom he has had seven children, namely; Johanna 
Maria Elizabeth, who died February 20, 1909; Cordelia Amanda Olivia; 
Nestor Elias; Paul Augustinus ; Moritz ; Carl Ralph; and Elvira. Re- 
ligiously Mr. Anderson, following in footsteps of his ancestors, is an 
active and valued member of the Swedish Lutheran church, .of which 
for nine years, while he was a resident of Bemadotte, he was a trustee, 
and was also, in 1896 and 1897, a member of the building committee 
w^hich erected the church. Politically he is a stanch Republican, and an 
energetic supporter of all enterprises conducive to the public welfare, 
and was largely influential in securing the city charter. For fifteen years 
he was a member of the school board, for six years serving as its 
treasurer. 

John Chilstrom. — Conspicuous among the leading merchants of 
Sibley county is John Chilstrom, proprietor of a large and well-stocked 
general store in Winthrop. He is a man of mark and of recognized worth 
as a citizen, his business ability being unquestioned, and his character 
above reproach. Like so many of Minnesota's most valued citizens, he 
is foreign born, his birth having occurred, December 24, 1850, in Holm- 
stad socken, Smaland, Sweden, the birthplace of his father, Johannes 
Chilstrom. 

Brought up in his native land, Johannes Chilstrom learned the car- 
penter's trade when young, and in addition to being a tiller of the soil 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1089 



followed contracting and building for many years. In 1870 he emi- 
grated with his family to this country, locating in Rockford, Illinois, 
where he lived retired from active pursuits until his death, in 1896, at 
the venerable age of eighty-seven years. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Brita Chilstrom, was born in Sweden, and died there in 1876, aged 
but sixty-two years. 

Leaving Sweden, where he had acquired a good commun school 
education, in 1869, John Chilstrom spent a year in Rockford, Illinois, 
working in a brick yard. Going then to Louisiana, he was there em- 
ployed in cotton raising for six months. Not liking the climate, how- 
ever, he came up the Mississippi river as far as St. Paul, looking for a 
favorable place in which to locate, finally settling in Minneapolis, where 
he was employed in lumber yards for about nine years. At the time of the 
founding of Winthrop, in 1882, Mr. Chilstrom" was one of the first to 
embark in business in this part of the county, becoming a pioneer mer- 
chant of the place. Meeting with success from the start, he has grad- 
ually enlarged his operations, and has now one of the most extensive and 
best paying general stores in the city, his stock, valued at $25,000, being 
large and choice. 

On October 8, 1884, Mr. Chilstrom was united in marriage with Miss 
Christina Larson, of Stockholm, Minnesota, and they have five Children, 
namely: John Arthur, employed in his father's store; Alida, born in 
1891 ; Oscar, born in 1893 ' Helen, born in 1895 ; and Conrad, born in 
1901. Religiously Mr. Chilstrom is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which he was treasurer when the church was first organized, 
and for many years thereafter. In politics he is a stanch Prohibitionist. 
He has always taken a great interest in promoting the growth and pros- 
perity of the place in which he lives, and during the years of 1886 and 
1887 was mayor of Winthrop, filling the office ably and acceptably. 

C. A. Lund. — A resident of Sibley county for more than a quarter 
of a century, C. A. Lund, engaged in general mercantile business in Gib- 
bon, has been identified with dififerent industries in this vicinity, and as a 
man of integrity and honor is highly respected in the community where 
he now lives, and to promote whose advancement and prosperity he is 
ever ready to lend a helping hand. A son of C. J. Carlson, he was born. 
May 29, i860, in Mallila socken, Kalmarland, Sweden, where he spent 
the early years of his life. 

Emigrating with his family to the United States in 1885, C. J. Carl- 
son located at Bernadotte, Nicollet county, ]Minnesota. where he contin- 
ued the independent occupation to which he was reared, being there en- 
gaged in tilling the soil until his death, in 1893. His wife, Mary Carlson, 
survived him many years, passing away in 1908. They were the parents 
of five children, as follows: Mary, came to this country m 1881, and 
settled in Bernadotte, where she died in 1893, was the wife of C. J. Lar- 
son ; John, a farmer, lives in Bernadotte; C. A., the special subject of this 

69 



I090 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

brief biographical sketch; Oscar, employed in agricultural pursuits in 
Morrison county, ^Minnesota ; and Victor, of Lafayette, is a merchant, and 
the postmaster. 

Brought up and educated in his native place, C. A. Lund there ob- 
tained a practical knowledge of the various branches of agriculture, and 
after coming to the United States, in 1881, followed farming in Iowa for 
two years. Subsequently settling in Sibley county, Mr. Lund was simi- 
larly engaged in the vicinity of Gibbon until 1901, as a general farmer, 
reaping a rich reward for his strenuous labors. The following two years 
he dealt in grain in Gibbon, and in 1903, in partnership with Fred Hoppen- 
stadt, opened a mercantile establishment in Gibbon, "The New Store," 
and has since carried on an extensive and lucrative business. 

Mr. Lund married, Alay 18, 1888, Miss Hilda Swanson, of Berna- 
dotte, Minnesota, and they have one child, I. Alma, a successful school 
teacher. Mr. Lund is a prominent member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which he has been a trustee for six years. In politics he is 
a Democrat, and has been active in local affairs, serving formerly as a 
member of the city council, and at the present time belonging to the 
school board. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

Reverend Carl Oscar Palmberg, pastor of the Swedish Mission 
church at Buffalo, was born at Okna parish, Smaland, Sweden, December 
I, 1866. He is a son of S. A. and Christina Louisa (Peterson) Ander- 
son, natives of Smaland, where the mother still resides, the father being 
deceased. They had six children, namely: Ida, married Oscar Larson, 
of Sweden; Carl O. ; August Emil, residing in Iowa; Jonas Gustof, of 
Iowa; Anders Johan, also of Iowa, and Otto Algot, an organist and 
school teacher in Hallsberg, Sweden. 

Carl O. Palmberg received some education in Sweden, and there 
worked on his father's farm. He came to the United States in 1888, and 
went to Laramie, Wyoming, where he worked some time in a rolling 
mill. He removed to Minneapolis in 1893, and there attended the Swe- 
dish Mission Covenant Seminary. He spent three years there and at 
Chicago, and then spent five years in charge of a church at Johnsonburg, 
Pennsylvania, and seven years in Webster county, Iowa. Since Novem- 
ber, 1907, Reverend Palmberg has been pastor of the Mission church 
at Buffalo, where he has extended a good influence and has done much 
good work. He is a Prohibitionist and a member of the Anti-Saloon 
League, and takes an active interest in any movement for the good of the 
town and state. 

Reverend Palmberg married. May 13, 1897, Amanda Sutherland, of 
Laramie, Wyoming, and they have seven children, namely: Carl, aged 
eleven; Oscar, nine; Ida, eight; Edwin, six; Elmer, four; Einar, two 
years, and Ruth, one month. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1091 



John L. Burkland, a prominent merchant of Buffalo, Minnesota, 
was born near Gottenberg, Sweden, May 13, 1870, and is a son of John 
and Anna Burkland. They were farmers in Sweden, and emigrated to 
America in 1891, locating in Iowa, where the father worked in shops. 
In 1904 he removed to Wright county, Minnesota, and purchased a farm, 
upon which he still lives. Their children are : Jennie, married Reverend 
Tignell, a Swedish Mission minister, of Springfield, Massachusetts ; Han- 
nah, a school teacher ; and John L. 

John L. Burkland received his education in Sweden, and came to the 
United States in 1887, locating in Iowa. He took a course in business 
college and worked as clerk in a grocery store in Ottumwa, Iowa, several 
years. In 1901 he removed to Buffalo, and engaged in business in the 
line of a general retail store, and has met with pleasing success in this 
line. He is enterprising and up-to-date in his ideas and methods, and 
keeps a high class stock, amounting to about fourteen thousand dollars. 
Politically he is a Republican, and in 1907 was a trustee of the village. 
He is a member and the secretary of the Swedish Mission church of 
Buffalo. 

Mr. Burkland married, June 12, 1900, Freda Risberg, of Galesburg, 
Illinois, and they have five children, namely: Ruth, Paul, Evelyn and 
Evangeline (twins), and Carl. 

Magnus Holmstrom. — Among the Swedish-born citizens of Wright 
county noteworthy for their ability and integrity is Magnus Holmstrom, 
who has been identified for more than a quarter of a century with the 
mercantile prosperity of the village of Cokato, where he is now living re- 
tired from active pursuits, having turned over to his son the management 
of his large general store, which he conducted so successfully for many 
years. He was born, September 17, 1838, in Vermland, Sweden, where 
his parents, Olof and Britta Holmstrom, spent their entire lives, the father 
being employed in a nail factory. In the parental household there were 
seven children, namely: Marie, wife of Gustaf Wallberg, a miller in 
Sweden ; John, engaged in farming in Mille Lacs county, Minnesota ; 
Annie, deceased, married J. G. Rudberg ; Olof, farming near Little Falls, 
Minnesota; Magnus, the special subject of this sketch; Stina, wife of 
Andrew Fisk, of Sweden; and Kajsa, deceased, married Andrew Ander- 
son. 

During the days of his boyhood and youth, Magnus Holmstrom at- 
tended a private school established especially for the children of factory 
workers in Vermland. He subsequently learned the trade of a black- 
smith in his native land, and in 1869 emigrated to America, locating at 
once in Minnesota. He worked for a time in Winona, and was after- 
wards foreman on a railroad in Hastings for nearly three years. Going 
to Minneapolis in 1872, Mr. Holmstrom resumed his trade of a black- 
smith, for about six years being employed in a plow manufactory. Com- 
ing to Cokato, Wright county, in 1878, he continued at blacksmithing 



1092 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

until 1883, when he purchased the property he has since occupied, and 
opened a general store, which he managed most judiciously, building up 
a large and remunerative trade, winning patronage by his square and 
honest dealings. 

On December 25, 1861. Mr. Holmstrom was united in marriage with 
Sophia Christina Warg, and to them ten children have been born, namely : 
Carl August, died at the age of twenty-eight years; Annakajsa, who mar- 
ried Edward Carlin, a merchant in Knapp, Minnesota, has four children, 
Rudolph, Raymond, Milton and Clififord; Kajsa died in infancy; Louisa, 
wife of Ole Hedman, a merchant in St. Paul, has three children, Ethel, 
Ruth, and Constance; John, died at the age of six years; Edward lived 
but seven years ; Gena married Fred Swanberg, a farmer in Cokato, and 
they have one child, Reinhold ; Ella, wife of Carl Titrud, a merchant in 
Cokato, has one child, Carlton; Lawrence died when five years old,_ and 
Walter, who now has the management of his father's store. In political 
matters Mr. Holmstrom has always taken an active and intelligent in- 
terest, and has filled many offices of importance, having been three times 
elected to the State Legislature, in 1883, 1885, and 1889; has served as 
president of the Village Council ; and treasurer of the School Board, 
being always elected on the Republican ticket. A valued member of the 
Swedish Lutheran church, he has been prominent in both the church and 
Sunday School, serving six years as deacon in the Augustana church, 
Minneapolis, and six years in the same capacity in Cokato. He is now 
a director of the Minnesota Scandinavian Relief Association, of which 
he was one of the earliest members, holding certificate No. 213. 

Rev. Johannes Alfred Nyvall was born in Carlskoga parish, 
Vermland, March 12, 1861, a son of Carl Johan and Anna (Moberg) 
Nyvall, both of whom died in Sweden. The father was an iron master 
or bergsman, and later became an ardent and famous layman preacher, 
one of the originators of the Mission Friends covenant church. He was 
also very active in educational work in his native province, and was 
the founder among other institutions of Carlskoga Practical School. 
His wife was likewise highly interested in educational work, originating 
a children's home. Carlskoga at that time was the real hearth for the 
independent religious movements in Sweden. 

Johannes Alfred Nyvall received his early educational training at 
home bv private tutors, and later attended the collegiate high schools 
of Vesteras and Stockholm. He then took a complete course in the 
teachers' seminary at Carlstad, graduating therein in 1878. He next 
made a trip for educational purposes to Germany and Denmark, and in 
the latter country became acquainted with the teachings of the_ great 
Grundtvig, who made an impression upon the young man that will last 
through his lifetime. Upon his return to Sweden, in 1879, he accepted a 
position as teacher in the public schools of Jonkoping, where he later 
became superintendent, and continued for some five years. He then 




J. A. NYVALL 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1095 

became dean of the Practical School of Christinehamn, and during that 
period also entered the literary field as editor of a political weekly en- 
titled Praktikcn, and later founded and edited a literary weekly, Illiis- 
treradt Familyeblad. In 1892 he left for America, where, after some time, 
he entered Augustana Seminary, under the guidance of Professor Olof 
Olson, and was ordained to the ministry of the gospel at Chicago in 1895, 
and received a call to the pastorate at Little Falls, Minnesota. In 1896 
he was called to St. Cloud, remaining there about one year, and then, 



-• f tyKMi iij ; A .-3a: '£g : 




NOBTHWESTEEN HOSPITAL, MOOEHEAD, MINN. 

Erected 1908, at a cost of $55,000, with beds for 75 patients, is an up-to-date institu- 
tion in every way, with all the latest appliances known to medical science. 
The hospital belongs to the Swedish Lutheran Church. 

in 1897, was called to Moorhead, where the congregation held their 
meetings in an old brick high school house, the parsonage being in the 
basement. This was a great field for a young and energetic minister, and 
Rev. Nyvall proved the man for the place. At first he set about to obtain 
suitable' living quarters, and succeeded in having the new and com- 
modious parsonage built at a total cost of three thousand dollars, and 



1096 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

continued preaching in the old school house until, in 1900, he received a 
call from the Swedish Lutheran church in Rock Island, Illinois, and while 
there was also editor-in-chief of the Swedish Lutheran paper, Fosterlandet, 
which was published at Chicago. In 1904 he was recalled to Moorhead, 
where he set about the building of the new and splendid church edifice 
which, as to architecture, is now the most beautiful Swedish church west 
of Minneapolis. The building, erected at a cost of nearly twenty thou- 
sand dollars, was completed and dedicated with fitting ceremonies under 
the leadership of the president of the Minnesota Conference, Dr. J. A. 
Krantz, and the president of the Augustana Synod, Dr. Erik Norelius, 
in 1906. 

Dr. Nyvall served that congregation until February i, 1909. The 
year after the completion of the church, having seen the necessity of a 
Swedish hospital in the Northwest, he started the raising of subscriptions 
for a new hospital to be built at Moorhead. Although working under 
many adversities and ig;iorant opposition, which often had its source 
in personal antagonism, the hospital, under the almost superhuman efforts 
of Rev. Nyvall, was built after the plans of the architect Bebee, who had 
also designed and planned the new Bethesda church referred to above. 
The hospital, which is a very beautiful and up-to-date structure, is situ- 
ated opposite the Clay county court house. Its sponsor is the Swedish 
Bethesda Hospital Society, and the cost of construction was fifty thousand 
dollars. Naturally, it is yet encumbered with a heavy debt, but it is to 
be hoped the wealthy Swedish citizens of the Northwest will see not 
only the necessity and propriety but also their plain duty in interesting 
themselves in this praiseworthy undertaking, as alleviating pain and suf- 
fering. Institutions of this kind starting without material endowments 
generally have a hard time at the beginning, but in most cases the help 
has come when most needed. While working out the plan of the hospital 
in his mind Rev. Nyvall prepared himself for new duties by studying 
mechanical therapeutics at the American College of Mechanical Thera- 
peutics of Chicago, from where he received his diploma as a Doctor of 
Mechanical Therapeutics in 1908. 

Dr. Nyvall has been twice married, wedding first in Sweden, in 
Jonkoping, in 1885, Miss Augusta Radberg, of Carlstad. She died in 
1901, leaving two sons: Ragnar, born in 1886 and engaged in steel con- 
struction work in Canada, and Yuyva, born in 1887, a graduate of 
Bethany College and now studying medicine at the University of Minne- 
sota. In 1895 Rev. Nyvall married Miss Amanda Kjellstrom, of Red 
Wing, Minnesota. In 1908 he received the nomination for the office of 
mayor of Moorhead, but was defeated at the polls, and he has for several 
years been a member of the Carnegie library board of that city. 

Nels O. Nelson, county treasurer of Kandiyohi county, was born 
October 17, 1854, in Sweden, and is the son of Ole Nelson ; the latter 
was born in Sweden, November 26, 1822, and his wife April 27, 1821. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1097 



In 1 87 1 Ole Nelson came with his family to the United States, landing 
in New York, May 24, and in June settled on a farm at Whitefield. 

Nels O. Nelson received his education in the public schools of Swe- 
den, and in 1871 came with his parents to the United States, where for 
some time he helped his father on the farm, and later bought land in 
the same section. For some years he continued on a farm, and now owns 
two hundred and eighty acres of rich land within eight miles of Willmar, 
along a free delivery route. He has moved with his family to Willmar, 
where he owns a comfortable residence, and for several years has been 
engaged in business in that city. He has long been manager of the 
Farmers' Elevator Company, of Willmar, at first in partnership with 
Swan Nelson, but subsequently alone. He is an energetic and enterpris- 
ing business man, of proven integrity and good judgment, and has been 
successful in his dealings. Mr. Nelson has been a supporter of the 
Republican party since becoming a citizen of the United States, and has 
taken a keen interest in local affairs. He served as alderman of the 
Fourth ward, is now a member of the Municipal Water and Light Com- 
mission, has served as town clerk, and chairman and treasurer cf the 
board of supervisors. He has served several years as treasurer of Dis- 
trict 55, in 1898 was elected as representative to the State Legislature, and 
in November, 1908, was elected to the office of county treasurer of Kandi- 
yohi county, Minnesota. 

On July 14, 1880, at Svea, Minnesota, Mr. Nelson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Olga Hanson. She was born in Fjelkinge parish, Kristian- 
stads Ian, Sweden, September 5, i860. Her parents were Hans Larson 
and Nilla Rasmusson. Three children were born in this marriage : Hat- 
tie C, born May 30, 1881, now Mrs. S. L. Benton; Nannie A., born 
September 14, 1883 ; and Marie A., born September 17, 1887. Mrs. 
Nelson died April 12, 1888. On June 7, 1889, Mr. Nelson was married 
to Miss Lina Regina Westerberg. She was born in Elmstad parish, 
Sraaland, Sweden, July 27, 1864. Her parents were Lars Magnus Wes- 
terberg, born August 7, 1831, and Anna Fredrickson, born December 
II, 1835, both natives of the same parish. Two children have been born 
in the second marriage: Amy Olga, born April 23, 1891 ; and Carl 
Herbert, born April 26, 1896, died in infancy. 

David Elmquist, a successful jeweler of Willmar, was born April 
29, 1848, in Sweden, and is the son of John M. Elmquist ; John M. 
Elmquist was a farmer, and also interested in the manufacture of salt- 
petre until his death, about 1882. David Elmquist received his education 
in the public schools of his native country, and there learned the trade 
of watchmaker and jeweler, under the supervision of his brother, Peter 
J. Elmquist. In 1869 he removed to the United States, and for about 
four years worked at his trade in the employ of his brother, Peter J. 
He then came to Minnesota, locating first at Minneapolis, where he and 
his brother engaged in partnership under the name of Elmquist Brothers. 



1098 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



About five years later they dissolved partnership, and David Elmquist 
established an independent business in Litchfield, Minnesota, where he 
carried on a jewelry store for twenty-five years. In 1902 he removed 
to Willmar, where he engaged in business on Benson avenue, and by his 
strict attention to same has built up a lucrative patronage. He is thor- 
ough master of the details of his trade, and has established a reputation 
for ability and integrity; he carries a first-class stock of goods. He is 
affiliated with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is a member 
of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Elmquist married, in 1870, Ida Matilda Hultgren, born and edu- 
cated in Sweden, and they have seven children, namely: Emily C. E., 
married C. E. Redlund ; Charles E. ; Elemina C. E. ; Arthur E. ; Oscar E. ; 
Hazel C. E. ; and one son, who died when an infant. 

Dr. Ludwig Wolmer Anderson was born in Sweden, July 11, 1881, 
and is the son of Nels and Augusta Anderson, both natives of that 
country. Nels Anderson brought his wife and children to the United 
States in 1886, locating in Minneapolis, where he found employment at 
his trade of cabinet-maker. He had three children, namely: L. W., 
Hilda, and Elfrida. 

Dr. Anderson graduated from the East Side high school of Minne- 
apolis, and entered the medical department of the University of Minne- 
sota, graduating with the class of 1904. He spent a year as interne in 
Bethesda Hospital, St. Paul, and then began practicing at Bayfield, Wis- 
consin, where he spent three successful years. In April, 1908, he removed 
to Atwater, which has since been his home. He is a member of the 
county medical society, and is enterprising and progressive. He belongs 
to the Modern Woodmen of America, to the Elks, and the" Swedish 
Lutheran church. Dr. Anderson married, December 2, 1905, Anna C. 
Tour, of St. Paul, who was born in Sweden and educated at St. Paul. 

Edward L. Bjorkquist, the postmaster of Moorhead, was born at 
Norra Bjorko parish, Elfsborg's Ian, May 26, 1857, a son of Lars 
Johnson and Alaria Erickson, the father born December 19, 1809, and 
the mother June 24, 1817. Lars Johnson owned a small farm, and was 
also engaged to some extent in contracting and building. His father 
was Jonas Nojd, a soldier in the Swedish army, and he served in the wars 
against Napoleon and Russia. His father, Lars Johnson, was a farmer at 
Norra Bjorko. Lars Johnson and Maria Erickson had nine children, 
namely: Sophia, who married Gustof Anderson, a carpenter in Minne- 
apolis ; Maria Christina, who married N. M. Nyquist, of Moorhead ; Anna 
Beata, who died in 1872 ; John L., who was a general contractor and died 
in 1904, having been twice married, and he left a widow and three chil- 
dren ; Anders Magnus, a carpenter at Moorhead ; Inga Helena, who mar- 
ried Halvor Tilseth and died in 1907, leaving two children; Carl, a con- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1099 

tractor at Moorhead ; Edward L., mentioned below; and Augusta, who 
married C. O. Carlander, a contractor at Moorhead. 

Edward L. Bjorkquist was educated in the pubhc schools of Sweden 
and confirmed. He then learned the trade of a mason, and followed that 
occupation at different places, especially in Gothenborg,, until in 1880, 
accompanied by his youngest sister, he came to America, they havmg 
been preceded here by his oldest sister in 1869 and by his oldest brother 
in 187 1. Coming directly to Moorhead, he has ever since made his home 
in this city with the exception of the year and a half he spent in Big 
Stone county. He worked as the foreman for his brother until the latter's 
death in 1894, and then was in the contracting business with his brother 
Carl. At this time, upon the recommendation of his townsmen, he was 
appointed the postmaster by President McKinley, and the Moorhead 
office was then raised to the second class. He has since been twice re- 
appointed by President Roosevelt. 

In 1885 Mr. Bjorkquist married Miss Mary Cavallm, a daughter of 
the Rev. J. O. Cavallin, and of their three children a son died in infancy. 
Stella Mathilda, the daughter, born October 6, 1887, is a graduate of 
the normal school at Moorhead and is a successful teacher, teachmg now 
in the school at Oak Port, not far from Moorhead; Elmer Livingston, 
born October 23, 1891, is a student at the normal school. The mother 
of these children died in 1894, and in 1902 Mr. Bjorkquist married Mrs. 
Christene Melin, born at Fryksande, Vermland, November 15, 1874, a 
daughter of John Johnson. She came to America with her father, two 
brothers and two sisters, her mother having died in 1876. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bjorkquist have four children : Livia Alexandra, born January 27, 1903 ; 
Elba Marietta, March 5, 1905; Gretchen Linnea, April 29, 1907; and 
Morton Vincent, January 11, 1909. The family are members of Bethesda 
Swedish Lutheran church, of which Mr. Bjorkquist is now the secretary, 
and he has held every office connected with the church, and was among 
those instrumental in the building of the new church edifice. 

Carl Joseph Bloom, M. D., is a young, scholarly, balanced and 
rising physician, who has somewhat recently settled at Lake Park, Becker 
countv. He was born in Grangarde parish, Dalarne, Sweden, on the 15th 
of October, 1882, and is a son of Rev. K. J. and Maria Helena (Wall) 
Bloom. His parents are also both natives of Sweden, the father born m 
Wintrosa, Orebro Ian, in 1852, and the mother in Skaraborgs Ian in 1850. 
In 1886 the family emigrated to the United States and settled at Cadillac, 
Michigan, where the father held his first charge as a pastor of the Mission 
Friends' Covenant church. The home is now at Whitehall, Michigan. 
Two sons and two daughters were born into this household, but Joseph 
was the onlv child to survive infancy. 

The future physician was first educated in the public schools of 
Davton. Iowa, and Wesley. Iowa, and subsequently pursued his studies 
at Carleton Academy, Northfield. Minnesota, graduating from the latter 



iioo SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in 1900. He then entered Carleton College and in 1904 completed a 
brilliant four years' course with the degree of B. A. He was president 
of Philomathian Society of the college in 1903, and during part of his 
course was manager of The Carletonia, the semi-weekly publication of 
that institution. In the fall of 1904 Dr. Bloom was matriculated in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons (medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota), graduating in 1908 as an M. D. During the last 
year of his course he served as president of the medical fraternity, Nu 
Sigma Nu. 

After graduating in medicine he served for one year as an interne 
at the Swedish Hospital in Minneapolis, receiving his diploma in June, 
1909. On July 23rd of that year he located at Lake Park, buying the 
office fixtures of Dr. Winberg and succeeding to his practice. Thus estab- 
lishing himself under most favorable auspices, his quiet and reassuring 
manners, with his known record of thorough preparation and education, 
have marked him, both among fellow practitioners and patients, as a 
highly valued accession to the profession. While always a deep scholar, 
he has invariably refused to be a drag on the community, and while 
passing through the university supported himself in part by working 
evenings in the medical bookstore. It is this combination of the practical 
and the manly with the purely thoughtful and scholarly, which has made 
the doctor so popular throughout. In his fraternal relations with the 
profession he is a member of the Clay-Becker County and the State 
Medical associations, and his religious affiliations are with the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Adolph S. Larson, general merchant. Sandstone, Minnesota, dates 
his birth in Halland, Sweden, December 3, 1879, and is a son of Emil 
Larson and his wife, Emma Arvedsdoter, farming people of Sweden, 
the former a native of Smaland and the latter of Halland. In 1892, Emil 
Larson emigrated with his family to the United States and settled on a 
homestead at Partridge, Minnesota, w"here he has since lived. He has 
six children, all now residents of Sandstone, namely : Mary, wife of 
Gus Gjertson ; Oscar, a contractor; Adolph S., a merchant; Albert, a 
carpenter ; Annie, wife of Fred Dahlberg ; and Albin, a carpenter. 

Adolph S. received a public school education in his native land, and 
accompanied his parents to this country. Soon after their arrival at 
Partridge, he secured a position as clerk in the store of Walter Scott, 
where he remained for seven years. Then he entered the employ of 
H. P. Webb & Co., and at this writing is manager of this firm's general 
store at Sandstone. 

July 13, 1902, he married Miss Lena Halverson, a daughter of Ed 
Halverson of Sandstone, and they are the parents of three children: 
Arnold, Edward, and Helen. Politically, Mr. Larson affiliates with the 
Prohibitionists. He is clerk of the town of Sandstone, and treasurer of 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA noi 

the Scandinavian Grand Lodge, I. O. G. T of Minnesota. Also, he is 
a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. F. & A. M. 

Oscar Asklund, tailor, Sandstone, Minnesota, has been a respected 
citizen of this place since 1903, and of this country a decade longer. Mr. 
Asklund was born at Lindkoping, Sweden, September 4, i^7h son ot 
Andrew and Matilda Asklund, natives of that pace where the father 
was a shoemaker. The father died in Sweden in 1897, at the age of 
sixty-two years; the mother is still living there. Their family consisted 
of two children, Oscar and Anna Matilda. This daughter is now the 
wife of Andrew Anderson, an employe of Swift s packmg plant at bt. 

Paul, Minnesota. , , . ■ 1 • <.- ^ 

Oscar Asklund received a common school education in his native 
land and there learned the trade of tailor. A young man, just past his 
majiritv, he came, in 1893, to America and, like most of his countrymen 
who em'igrate to this country, directed his course to Minnesota. He first 
stopped at White Bear. He remained there, however, only a short time, 
croinc. thence to Lake City, where he settled down to work at his trade 
and where he made his home for eight years. He came, m 1904, to 
Sandstone, and has since worked at his trade here. 

January 2, 1897, Mr. Asklund married Miss Bessie Nelson daughter 
of Nils Nelson of Sweden, and they have six children: Esther, Edna, 
Bertha, Gladys, Virgil and Emery. Mr. Asklund is ^ ."^^-;b;i, ^ *e 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
the Eagles and the Modern Brotherhood, and, politically, he is what is 
termed an Independent Republican. 

Hugo Wickstrom, of Sandstone, Minnesota, dates his birth at Lulea, 
Sweden. December i. 1878, and is a son of Isaac and Mane Wickstrom 
Isaac Wickstrom has been a resident of Pine City, Minnesota, since he 
came from Sweden to this country in 1906. He is a harness-maker and 

^""^Hucro Wickstrom spent his first fifteen years in his native land. In 
1893, ambitious to see something of the world and settle ma new coun ry 
where opportunities for advancement were better than in the older coun- 
tries of Europe, he came to the United States, and went to Zumbro a 
Minnesota, whe^e he had an uncle. For three Y^ars he worked on this 
uncle's farm during the summer, and in winter attended school, his ^chool- 
ino- here including a course in a business college at Lake City. Atter tms 
he%ntered the employ of the Tri-State Telephone Company as switch- 
board man and, later, as division superintendent. June i, 1908, he came 
to Sandstone a^d opened a butcher shop, which ^e^as since conducted^ 
Mr Wickstrom married. February 15, 1906. Miss Ella Glenville, and 
they have one child. Fern. While in Pine City, m the telephone service 
he served two year as alderman, to which office he was elected on the 



II02 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Republican ticket. He is a member of the I. O. O. P., Eades D of H 
and A. O. U. W. 

Henry Fredrikson, engaged in the blacksmith business, under the 
firm name of McLean-Fredrikson Co., at Sandstone, Minnesota, has been 
a resident of this town since 1907, and is classed among its respected 
citizens. 

Mr. Fredrikson was born in Pope county, Minnesota, January 5, 
1872, the son of Swedish parents, Fredrik and Carolina Fredrikson, na- 
tives of Westmanland. The father was a miner in Sweden previous to 
his emigration to America, which was in 1868, and after his settlement 
here, he worked in the mines at Ishpeming, Michigan, for three years. 
At the end of that time he moved to Pope county, ^Minnesota, took up a 
homestead claim, and there passed the rest of his life in agricultural pur- 
suits. _ He died June 14, 1893, at the age of fifty-five years. The mother, 
born in 1846, is still living on the homestead. Of their eleven children, 
five are living, namely : Charles, an engineer in a sash factory at Troy, 
Idaho; Henry, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a farmer in Colorado; 
John, on the home place with his mother, and Helmer, a farmer and meat- 
market man in Colorado. 

Henry Fredrikson, in his boyhood, attended public school in his 
native county, and when a young man learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed for nine years. Then he took up the work of black- 
smith and wagonmaker, thoroughly mastered the trade, and has worked 
at it ever since. He came to Sandstone in 1907, formed a partnership 
with Daniel McLean, and is now doing business under the firm name of 
McLean-Fredrikson Co., blacksmiths and wagonmakers. 

December 11, 1900, Mr. Fredrikson married Miss Anna Erickson, 
daughter of John Erickson, of Westmanland. They have two children: 
Frances Senora and Milton Fredrik Lauren. The family are attendants 
of' the Swedish Lutheran church. Politically, Mr. Fredrikson is a Re- 
publican. 

Andrew William Asplund, an enterprising and successful grocer 
of Pine City, Minnesota, has been engaged in that business about one 
year, and has built up a good custom as a reward for his industry and 
careful attention to the wants of his customers. He was born at Lake 
City, Minnesota, May 27, 1870, and is a son of Swen and Mary Asplund, 
further mention of whom is given elsewhere in this work. 

Andrew Asplund was educated in the common schools, supplemented 
by a course of six months in the Minneapolis Business College. For a 
few months he worked as clerk in a store, and for five years was em- 
ployed in the Lake City Bank. He purchased the business owned by 
Peter Anderson, at Lake City, and for seven years operated a general 
store. He spent the next three years on a farm, and in 1906 removed 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1105 



to Pine City, where he opened up a racket store. In 1908 he engaged 
in the grocery business, which he still continues. 

Mr. Asplund is a Republican in his political affiliations, and belongs 
to the Ancient Order United Workmen, Degree of Honor, and Equitable 
Fraternal Union. He married, in 1903, Hulda Wickstrom, of Zumbrota, 
Minnesota, and they became parents of three children, namely: Vivian, 
Harold and Ellen. Mr. Asplund is a public-spirited and patriotic citizen, 
and very well liked in the city where he resides. 

Peter Thompson. — A man of undoubted executive and business 
ability, no one. mayhap, has been more intimately associated with the 
growth and advancement of the leading interests of Worthington than 
Peter Thompson, who was here when the town was surveyed, and subse- 
quently purchased the first three building lots sold within its limits. He 
has resided in the place for nearly forty years, during which time he has 
founded various enterprises of importance, contributing his full share 
towards the improvement and upbuilding of the present prosperous city. 
He was bom, January 2^, 1839, in Jerfsjo, Helsingland, Sweden, and 
there lived until eleven years of age. His parents, Peter and Karin 
(Goranson) Thompson, emigrated from Sweden to this country in 1850, 
locating first at Pine Lake, Wisconsin, from there going to Waupaca, 
Wisconsin, where they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying 
at the age of eighty-seven years, in 1896, and the mother in 1903, at the 
advanced age of ninety-four years. 

Coming with his parents to the United States when a lad of eleven 
years, Peter Thompson lived for a year at Pine Lake, Wisconsin, and 
then went with the family to Waupaca, where he assisted on the farm 
and for two years attended school, after which he was for five years 
employed as a clerk in a drug store. Going to Carver, Minnesota, in 
1858, he was clerk in a general store for five years, subsequently spending 
one year as clerk on a steamboat plying the Mississippi and Minnesota 
rivers. Having thus obtained a practical insight into the management 
of mercantile affairs, Mr. Thompson embarked in business on his own 
account, opening in Carver, Minnesota, a general store, which he oper- 
ated for the next seven years. Going to Jackson, Minnesota, in Sep- 
tember, 187 1, he filed on the west half of the southeast quarter of section 
34, township 103, range 40, his filing being the first made in Elk town- 
ship. In October, 1871, Mr. Thompson came to the site of the proposed 
town of Worthington, arriving here the very day before it was surveyed, 
and purchased, as above mentioned, the first three lots sold in the town. 
On April 16, 1872, he came here on the first train to enter the town and 
immediately erected a building for a general store, which he managed 
for a number of years, being also engaged in various other lines of busi- 
ness, his energy and keen foresight bringing him marked success. He 
subsequently built a warehouse and engaged in the grain business for 
some time, also dealing in farm machinery. In 1879 Mr. Thompson sold 

70 



iio6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



his general store to B. W. Lyon, at the same time discontinuing his grain 
business. In 1878 he opened an agricultural warehouse and grain ele- 
vator at Adrian, Minnesota, placing it in charge of A. M. Crosby, and 
continued its ownership until 1886, when he sold out to A. G. Lindgren. 

Since 1879, when he prepared a set of abstract books, Mr. Thompson 
has been engaged in the real estate and abstracting business, in 1904 
having been appointed abstractor of Nobles county. On January i, 
1880, in partnership with George J. Day he founded the Nobles County 
Bank, and until 1894 was actively engaged in banking. At the present 
time he is owner and publisher of the JVorthington Globe, one of the 
influential journals of the county. 

Politically Mr. Thompson is a prominent member of the Prohibition 
party. He has been influential in municipal affairs and had the honor 
to be elected, in 1873, as the first treasurer of the city, an office to which 
he was reelected in 1874. He was president of the Village Council in 
1876 and 1877, and in 1879 ^^^ 1880 was county treasurer. In 1892 
he was made chairman of the board of county commissioners, but 
resigned in 1873. One of the leading members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, he was very active in its reorganization in 1876; has served as 
treasurer and trustee; and for thirty-six years has been a deacon in the 
church. For eight years he was a director of Gustavus Adolphus 
College. 

Mr. Thompson married, March 18, i860, Christine Danielson, and 
they are the parents of two children, namely: Hannah, wife of Fred 
Parker, of Duluth, Minnesota; and Nellie, wife of James W. Parker, 
of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

Olof E. Oslund, merchant and postmaster of Groningen. Minnesota, 
was born in Carver county, this state, July 3, 1868, son of Eric Oslund 
and Karin Mansdoter, natives of Nejssocken, Wermland, Sweden. Eric 
Oslund was engaged in farming in the old country previous to his emi- 
gration to America, which was in 1868, and not long after his arrival 
in Minnesota he took a homestead claim on section 30, French Lake town- 
ship, Wright county, where he is still engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Before coming to Wright county, however, he and his wife spent six 
months in Carver county, where their eldest child, Olof E., was born. 
Their other children, in order of birth, are as follows: Emil, a farmer 
in McHenry county, North Dakota ; Gust, deceased ; William, deceased, 
and Mary, William and Hulda, at home. 

Olof E. grew up on his father's farm, assisting with the work in 
summer and in winter attending the common schools. Later he ran a 
thrashing machine and sawmill. In 1894, he moved to Swift county, 
Minnesota, where for three years, in addition to running a thrashing 
machine, he sold farm machinery. The next two years he farmed at 
Mission Creek. Then he located at Groningen and opened a general 
store, which he has since conducted. Also, he opened and is conducting a 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1107 



branch store at Banning. In each of these stores he carries a stock of 
from $10,000 to $15,000, and is doing a prosperous business. 

December 25, 1895, Mr. Oshuid married Miss Anna Sundberg, of 
Wright county, Minnesota, and they have five children, namely : Hulda 
Charlotte, Esther Olivia Antonette, Leo Earl Clarence, Irene (deceased), 
and Amy Viola Octavia. 

Politically, Mr. Oslund is a Republican, and at the' hands of his 
party he has received favors in the way of appointment to the office of 
postmaster and election to the position of town clerk. Fraternally, he is 
identified with the F. & A. M., the I. O. O. F., and the M. W. A. 
Religiously, he holds to the faith in which he was reared. He is a 
member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Peter O. Erickson, a prominent merchant, and present mayor of 
Aitken, was born in Gafvunda Dalarne, Sweden, December 14, i860, and 
is a son of O. E. and Irene (Nelson) Erickson, both natives of Dalarne. 
O. E. Erickson had a large real estate business and practiced law in 
his native place, and in 1884 removed to the United States; he located 
in Meeker county, Minnesota, where he lived in retirement until his 
death, in 1908. His wife died in 1899. Of their ten children, five sur- 
vive, namely : Andrew, a farmer of Meeker county ; Ole E., a farmer 
of Cook county; Cary, married John P. Erickson; Margaret, married 
Axel Kjelgren, salesman and collector for a lumber company in Minne- 
apolis ; and Peter O. 

Peter O. Erickson received his education in the public schools of 
his native country, and came to the United States in 1880, at the age 
of nineteen years. He located in Minneapolis, and there took a course 
in a business college. Thereafter he worked as clerk in a general store 
until 1897, and then removed to Aitken, where he engaged in general 
merchandise business, with Swan Anderson as partner. Since 1903 Mr. 
Erickson has conducted the business on his own account, and carries 
a stock of about twelve thousand dollars. Besides his mercantile interests, 
he also has some mining lands, and has extensive holdings of land in 
Aitken, Minneapolis and British Columbia. He has been a member of 
the city council, and at the last election was honored by receiving the 
office of mayor; he was for ten years treasurer of the school board of 
Aitken. In politics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Erickson married, in 1884, Annie Anderson, of Venjan, Dalarne, 
Sweden, and their children are: Frank Richard, Victor E., Edwin L., 
and George H., all living at home. Air. Erickson has gained the respect 
and esteem of his fellows, and is one of the most prominent and in- 
fluential citizens of Aitken. 

John N. Nelson, a thrifty and industrious jeweler of Aitken, is a 
fine example of the better class of emigrants from Sweden, and has at- 
tained his present success through his own untiring and unaided efforts. 



iio8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



He was born in Wester Dalarne, Sweden, July 21, 1865, and is a son of 
Nels Nelson and Christina Johnson, both natives of Dalarne. Their 
children are Christina, who married Ole P. Johnson, a banker and farmer, 
of South Dakota ; Annie, married Aug.ust Schallin, a merchant of Will- 
mar, Alinnesota ; Nels, of Minneapolis ; John N., of this sketch ; and 
Andrew, a police officer of Minneapolis. Nels Nelson was at one time 
well-to-do, but through misfortune lost all the property he possessed. 
Discouraged, he decided to try his fortune in a new land and in different 
surroundings, so he came to America, leaving his family practically 
penniless. The good mother procured work and so helped out the fam- 
ily, doing the best she could for all her children. While undergoing 
the disheartening privations and hardships of this time, her son, John N. 
Nelson, managed to acquire a high school education in Sweden, finishing 
at the age of twelve years. 

In 1878, Mr. Nelson's father sent for him to come to the United 
States, and upon arriving he went to work. For a time he gave his 
earnings to his father, but later went out in the world to work for him- 
self. He worked and saved, in the meanwhile attending, school. From 
the start thus gained he entered business in a general store, in partner- 
ship with his brother-in-law, August Schallin. He soon dissolved this 
partnership and removed to Minneapolis, where he spent several years in 
various forms of employment. He then went to Winona, and after 
undergoing many privations, on account of small funds, was graduated 
October 6. 1 891,' from W. F. A. Woodcock's Horological School. Lo- 
cating at Buffalo, Minnesota, as a watchmaker and jeweler, he spent eight 
years here, in the meantime graduating from the Chicago Opthalmic Col- 
lege, June I, 1897. From Buffalo he returned to Minneapolis, and from 
there removed to Aitken, where he has since been located. "He is in 
business on his own account, as jeweler, watchmaker and optician, carry- 
ing a large stock of high-grade goods. Mr. Nelson has won a reputation 
for honesty and integrity, and is preeminently a self-made man. 

In politics Mr. Nelson votes independent of party. He is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen of 
America. He married Mary Thor, of Buffalo, Minnesota. They have 
no children. 

Rev. Ernest H. Sanden, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at 
Aitken, Minnesota, was born at Chariton, Iowa, February 11, 1873, 
and is a son of P. J. and Emelia Sanden, the father a native of Smaland 
and the mother of Ostergotland, Sweden. P. J. Sanden studied theology 
in his native country, and in 1865 came to the United States, locating at 
Rock Island, Illinois, where he studied at Augustana College, also 
traveled as a student. He was ordained in the Swedish Lutheran church, 
at Princeton, Illinois, June 23, 1878, and his first charge was the Salem 
church at Vliets, Kansas, where he remained nine years. He spent four 
years at Porter, Indiana, and nine years in Swede Valley, Iowa, near 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1109 

Ogden. After spending a few years in Texas, he retired, and now lives 
in Iowa. He had children as follows: Hilma, who married John Kjell- 
berg, a cabinet-maker, of Rock Island, Illinois ; Ernest H. ; Esther, mar- 
ried to Gust Anderson, a cabinet-maker, of Rock Island, Illinois ; Martin, 
who has a livery at Ogden, Iowa ; Hugo, in hardware business at Ogden ; 
Arvid, of Ogden ; and Hjalmar, an art student of unusual promise. 

E. H. Sanden was educated at Bethany College, in Kansas, and in 
1898 graduated from Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois. He 
taught school some years. Returning to Augustana in 1902, he was 
graduated from the theological seminary in 1905 and was ordained a 
minister of the Swedish Lutheran church, at Stanton, Iowa, the same 
year. His first charge was at Aitken, Minnesota, where he has since 
remained. In political views he is independent. 

Rev. Sanden married Thekla Estergren, of Ottumwa, Iowa, May 27, 
1908, and they have one daughter, Ernestine Linnea. 

Harold Siren, who is engaged in the undertaking business at Milaca, 
Minnesota, was born at Carlstad, Wermland, Sweden, May 12, 1873. He 
received his education and learned the trade of cabinetmaker in his native 
land, and then, in 1892, at the age of nineteen, came to America. For ten 
years he worked at his trade in Minneapolis, after which he came to 
Milaca and opened a furniture store, to which he subsequently added 
undertaking. He conducted both the furniture and the undertaking busi- 
ness until 1906, when he sold the furniture department. He is a licensed 
embalmer. For the past three years his undertaking business has de- 
manded the whole of his time and attention. 

August 15, 1894, Mr. Siren married Miss Frida Sjostrom, of Sma- 
land, Sweden, and they have three children : Joseph, Blanche and Walter. 

Mr. Siren affiliates with the Republican party and is what may be 
termed an Independent Republican. He takes more than a passing interest 
in local afifairs, at this writing being a member of the Milaca school board 
and of the Milaca Water & Light Commission. Fraternally he is a Free 
Mason, a M. W. A., and a Yeoman. 

Carl John Dahlstrom, shoe dealer, Milaca, Minnesota, was born in 
Wermland', Sweden. July 22. 1857. son of John Erickson and Kajsa Olofs- 
doter, farming people of Wermland. In 1891, the father, then ^yell ad- 
vanced in vears, came to America and engaged in the lumber business at 
Milaca. Minnesota, and died here in 1899. His first wife died in 1875, 
leaving him with five children : Stina Maria, Lotta, Carl John, Eric John, 
and 0\oi Frederick, all residents of Sweden except Carl J. and Olof F., 
the latter being a carpenter of Milaca. By his second wife, Charlotte 
Carlson. John Erickson had two children : Emma, wife of Charles John- 
son, of Milaca. and Emil. also of Milaca. 

Carl J. was reared and educated in his native land, and in the city 
of Stockholm learned the trade of shoemaker. In 1891, he came t 



mo SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



America and settled at Milaca, where he has since worked at his trade, 
and where, since 1892, he has conducted a retail shoe business. 

Mr. Dahlstrom has been twice married. By his first wife, Charlotte 
Larson, whom he wedded in Sweden, he had two children : Carl Harold, 
now assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Milaca, and Gust, 
deceased. This wife and mother died in 1891. By his present wife, who 
was Miss Augusta Johnson, he has six children : Esther Sophia, Hugo, 
Walter, Katherine, Reuben and Siegred. Mr. Dahlstrom and his family 
are members of the Swedish Baptist church, of which he is a deacon, and, 
politically, he may be termed an independent Prohibitionist. 

Nels M. Nelson, blacksmith and wagonmaker at Princeton, Minne- 
sota, is one of the representative and highly respected citizens of the town 
in which he lives. Mr. Nelson claims Skane, Sweden, as the place of his 
nativity, the date of his birth being July 30, 1863. His parents, Nels 
Nelson and Margerita Bengtsdoter, natives of Skane, passed their lives 
as farmers in that place, and died there, the former in 1865, the latter in 
1895. Nels M. was the only child of this union. His mother, by a 
subsequent marriage, to Martin Jepson of Skane, had a daughter, Jo- 
hanna, now the wife of Hans Jonson of that place. 

Up to the time he was twenty-one, Nels M. was occupied in attend- 
ing school and working on the farm. Then he learned the trade of black- 
smith and wagonmaker, which, for five years, he followed in Sweden, at 
the end of that time coming to this country and taking up his abode in 
St. Paul, Minnesota. That was in 1888. He worked at his trade two 
years in St. Paul and four years in Lake City ; after that, in the winter 
of 1893-94 he visited his old home in Sweden. Returning from_ there 
he came to Princeton, where he has since been in business for himself 
Here he started a wagon shop, in partnership with Frank Peterson 
association continued until 1907, when Mr. Peterson was succ 
son, Oscar W. Peterson, the firm style being Peterson & ''^ 
company has the reputation of making the best sleds m- "^ 
Mille Lacs county. 

June 22, 1895, Mr. Nelson married Miss Hilda _C. Jo^ 
land, and he and his wife are the parents of three childrc 
Mvrtle Elvina and Theron Wilbur. Mr. Nelson is 
fraternal order K. O. T. M., and, politically, is an In 

Rev. August Lundquist, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Princeton, Minnesota, was born in Wermland, Sweden, April 15, 1849, 
son of P. Peterson and Martha, his wife, farming people of Wermland. 
In their old age, in 1891, his parents came to this country and settled 
at Two Harbors, Minnesota, where the father died in 1895, and where the 
mother is still living. In their family were three sons: John, now a 
locomotive engineer of Two Harbors ; Andrew, deceased, and August, the 
f^bject of this sketch. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA iiii 

In his native land August Lundquist passed his youth and early man- 
hood and, in 1872, ambitious to see something of the world and better his 
condition 'he said goodby to the old home and came to America, St. Paul, 
Minnesot'a, his objective point. There, for twelve years, he worked as 
a mechanic. Then he engaged in the grocery business, and had, at dif- 
ferent times, as partners, Nicholas Noren, H. J. Johnson and August 
Johnson From 1899 to 1908, he conducted business alone. Previous to 
his coming to this countrv and during his business career here, he spent 
much time in the study of theology, finally taking a course at Augustana 
College, and on June 14, 1908, at Chicago, he was ordained as a minister 
of the Swedish Lutheran church. In the meantime. May 15, 1908, he sold 
his store, and after his ordaination he came to Princeton as pastor of the 
church at this place. 

Mr. Lundquist has a wife and four children. May 26, 1875, he mar- 
ried Miss Mariana Johnson, like himself a native of Wermland, Sweden 
Their eldest daughter, Hulda, is the wife of Grant Huntberg, a lawyer of 
Rock Island, Illinois. Wilhelmina, the next in order of birth, is the 
wife of David Lincoln, an undertaker of Jamestown, New York. They 
have one son, Daniel Freeman. The other children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lundquist, Ruth, M. and Adina Nahamie, are at home. Politically, Mr. 
Lundquist is a Republican. 

J C D VLBERG. dealer in paints and oils, Montevideo, Minnesota, was 
born at f^cksfors, Wermland, Sweden, March 18, 1852, son of A. T. and 
C (Carlson) Dalberg. A. T. Dalberg was a carpenter and millwright. 
He passed his life and died in Sweden. Of his children, six are living, 
namely • Thea, wife of Andrew Anderson Kull ; Inga, wife of John Ram- 
berg- Louise, wife of Emil Bjorknes; Mary, wife of H. J. Helgerson; 
C. J ' a merchant in Sweden ; and J. C, the subject of this brief sketch. 

J. C. Dalberg received the usual public school education m his native 
land and there learned the painter's trade, which he has since followed. 
He remained in Sweden until the spring of 1882, when he came to the 
United States, landing on American soil on April 14, 1882; and came 
direct to ^lontevideo, Minnesota, where he has since made his home. Here 
he established a paint business, which has grown until he now carries a 
fine stock of paints and oils and employs a force of seven men to do his 

contract work. . , ,,. -kt /^i r -r- 1 

Februarv 6, 1876, Mr. Dalberg married Miss Nora Olson of Tocks- 
fors Sweden. They have one child, Albert Oscar, who married Lillian 
Burman, of Amery, Wisconsin, in which town he has recently entered the 
hardware business, buying a store there. , 

In local politics, Mr. Dalberg has shown a commendable interest, 
affiliating with the Republican party, and serving as judge of election 
manv times. He is a member of the fraternal orders. Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and Ancient Order of United Workmen, and, religiously, 
is identified with the Swedish Lutheran church. 



1 1 12 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



John O. Anderson, well known in the business and social circles 
of Montevideo, Minnesota, was born in Carver county, this state, Alarch 
29, 1859, son of John and Christine Anderson, natives of Ostergotland, 
Sweden. Mr. Anderson's parents emigrated to America in 1854 and 
settled at Burlington, Iowa, from whence they subsequently moved to 
Scandia, Alinnesota, where the father was the pastor of the Swedish 
Baptist church. He preached at Vasa from 1861 to 1879, ^^^ from 1879 
to 1880 was pastor of the First Swedish Baptist church at Minneapolis. 
In 1885 he moved to Leenthrop, where he was pastor of the Baptist 
church until the time of his death. He died in 1887, at the age of 
fifty-seven years; his wife died in 1887, ^t the age of sixty-one. Their 
family comprised six children, as follows : Henry S., deceased ; John 
O. ; Julia, wife of B. I. Melin, a farmer of Goodhue county ; Ruth, 
widow of Fred W. Johnson, deceased ; Frances, wife of S. E. Herrick, 
manager of a ranch in Alberta, Canada ; and Grace, wife of S. K. Booth, 
employed in the Census Department at Washington, D. C. 

John O. received his education in the common schools, and at 
Archibold's Academy, Minneapolis. He spent some time in farm work, 
until January i, 1890, when he accepted a position as bookkeeper in 
the Chippewa County Bank at Montevideo, Minnesota, where he remained 
until 1901. That year he was elected Register of Deeds, and held the 
office for a term of six years. On his retirement from his position, he 
became cashier of the First National Bank of Montevideo, which place 
he has since filled. 

May 29, 1889, Mr. Anderson married Miss Jennie W. Fredine of 
Maynard, Minnesota, who has borne him three children : Clinton, Lelah 
and Wenona. The last named is deceased. Mr. Anderson is a member 
of the American Baptist church, and is prominent and active in Svmday 
school work, at this writing being Sunday-school superintendent. He is, 
politicallv, a Republican, and, fraternallv, he is identified with the I. 
O. O. F.; the A. O. U. W., the M. W. A.,' and the K. O. T. M. 

Nels p. and George E. Peterson, prominent business men of Olivia, 
Minnesota, are sons of Samuel and Catharine (Nelson) Peterson, natives 
of Smaland, Sweden. Samuel Peterson was a farmer in the old country, 
and after his emigration to America, which was in 1858, he bought a 
farm in Chisago county, Minnesota, where he lived a few years, remov- 
ing thence to East Union, Carver county, Minnesota, where he spent the 
rest of his life and died. His wife also died at East Union. They were 
the parents of eight children, namely : Matilda, wife of O. A. Norman, a 
retired farmer of Renville county, Minnesota ; Frank William, a piano 
dealer of Fargo, North Dakota ; Carl Albert, deceased ; John Edward, a 
farmer of Carver county ; Nels P. ; George E. ; Mary C, of Olivia. Minne- 
sota ; and Amanda H., wife of Alfred Lundin, of St. Peter, Minnesota. 

Nels P. Peterson was born in Chisago county, Minnesota, April 9, 
1864, and was educated in the common schools of Carver county, to which 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1113 



place, as already stated, his parents moved a few years after his birth; 
and he was for' one term a student at Augsburg College, Minneapolis. 
Then, until 1895, he was engaged in farming. That year he took charge 
of the Grand Central hotel at Olivia, the leading hotel of the town, and 
has since operated it successfully. February 22, 1896, he married Miss 
Regina Broberg, of Atwater, Minnesota, and they have five children; 
Viola, Frances, Verna, Gertrude and Grace. 

George E. Peterson was born in Anoka county, Minnesota, June 2, 
1866. and received his education in the public schools of Carver county, 
at East Union. In 1881, he settled on a farm of 480 acres in Renville 
county, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1897. He 
then came to Olivia, where he has since that date devoted his energies to 
the real estate business. He married, May 2, 1894, Miss Martha S. Bro- 
berg, of Atwater, and they are the parents of five children: Myrtle, 
George Lester, Effie, Clifford and Delores, 

Fraternally, both Nels P. and George E. are Masons, and, politically, 
they are Republicans, the latter having served as justice of the peace, 
and several years as town clerk. The former is serving on the board of 
education of the Olivia high school. In addition to their property in Olivia, 
both have real estate holdings elsewhere, Nels P. owning a farm of 640 
acres in Dakota, and George E., a farm of 320 acres in Canada, besides 
extensive holdings along the Gulf coast in Texas, and in Renville county, 
Minnesota. Refigiously, both families are Lutheran, but are also iden- 
tified with the Methodist Episcopal church of Olivia. 

John L. Johnson, county auditor of Renville county, Minnesota, 
is a native of Stockholm, Sweden. He was born December 25, 1866, and 
is a son of P. L. and Wendla (Hjalmn) Johnson, the former a native of 
Karlskrone, and the latter of Stockholm. In 1869, when John L. was 
three years old, the family emigrated to America, and settled at St. Paul, 
where', until 1873, the father worked at his trade, that of cabinetmaker. 
He then moved to Willmar, where he has since lived, having been retired 
for a number of vears. He and his wife are the parents of six sons: 
John L., Charles H., George W., Edward A., Henry L., and Arthur, and 
all, except John L., are in the ice cream business. Charles H. and 
Henry L. are in Fargo, North Dakota. George W. and Edward A. are 
at Willmar and Glenwood, Minnesota, respectivel}-, and Arthur is a 
resident of Crookston, Minnesota. 

In the Willmar common schools John L. received his early edu- 
cation, which has been supplemented by practical experience in office 
life. After spening a few years in a railroad office, in 1884 he entered the 
emplov of the Bank of Willmar, and subsequently he was employed in 
various places and in different capacities, from bookkeeper to cashier, 
being thus occupied for a number of years, up to 1908. In the mean- 
time he filled some of the village offices, and in 1908 he was elected, on 
the Republican ticket, to the office of county auditor. 



1 1 14 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

June 24, 1890, Mr. Johnson married Miss Caroline R. Carlson, of Ren- 
ville, and to them have been given nine children: Marian, Alfred, John, 
Inez, Stella, Victor, Joel, Carl and Adrian. 

Carl Bolander, a successful real estate dealer, of Little Falls, Min- 
nesota, was born July 10, 1867, at Vrigstad, Smaland, Sweden, and is a 
son of M. A. and Charlotte Bolander, natives of that place. His father is 
President in the Vrigstad Savings Bank, was for thirty-two years a 
member of the Swedish Legislature, and has filled every elective and 
appointive office of honor in his district. He also has lumber interests. 
He has three children, namely, Carl; Wilhelmina, married Carl Nelson, 
a landowner and lumberman, of Sweden ; and Gustaf, lumberman and 
superintendent of a pulp paper-mill at Braos, Sweden. 

Carl Bolander was educated in his native town, and until twenty- 
four years of age assisted his father in the lumber business and in manag- 
ing his farm. In July, 1892, he emigrated to the United States, his 
object being to visit the World's Fair at Chicago. He remained in that 
city until July, 1893, and was employed as a carpenter. He then moved 
to Little Falls, where he bought some property and entered the employ 
of Congressman C. A. Lindbergh; he has continued since that time in 
charge of Mr. Lindbergh's real estate interests. He operates a farm 
of two hundred forty acres, employing several men the year around, 
also a farm of one hundred sixty acres, well improved, with good 
buildings. 

Politically Mr. Bolander is a Republican, and takes an active interest 
in public affairs. He has been a member of the board of public works, 
and has been alderman of Little Falls. He is past noble grand of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, 
past counsel of the Modern Woodmen of America, secretary of the 
Swedish United Sons of America, and a prominent man socially. He 
is interested in every movement for the growth and development of 
the city. 

Mr. Bolander married, June 21, 1905, Helena Newman, of Little 
Falls, born of German parents in Detroit, Michigan. In 1899 he visited 
Sweden, and again in 1908, accompanied by his wife, and during this 
trip they traveled extensively through Sweden, Norway, England and 
the continent. They have one son, Carl Magnus, born June 17, 1909. 

Ole Swanson. — Occupying a noteworthy position among the active 
business men of Worthington is Ole Swanson, who is identified with the 
industrial interests of this part of Nobles as agent for the John W. Tut- 
hill Lumber Company. A native of Sweden, Ole Thompson was born, 
April 22, 1866, in Christianstads Lan, which was likewise the birth- 
place of his father. Swan Anderson, while his mother, whose maiden 
name was Johnson, was a native of Smaland, Sweden. Both parents 
are still residents of their native land, where the father is carrying on 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1117 



general farming. They have but two children, namely, Ole, the special 
subject of this sketch; and Berthilde, wife of Anders Person, who is en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits in Sweden. 

After leaving school, Ole Swanson assisted his father in tilling the 
soil until of age, and afterwards there engaged in farming. In 1890, 
realizing to some extent the superior advantages offered the laboring 
man in the United States, he emigrated to this country, going directly 
to Sioux Center, Iowa, where for a year and a half he was employed 
on a railroad. Locating then in Worthington, Mr. Swanson carried on 
farming, until 1900, when he became agent for the John W. Tuthill 
Lumber Company, a position which he has ably and satisfactorily filled 
ever since. 

Mr. Swanson married, in April, 1899, Elsie Larson, daughter of 
L. J. Larson, of Worthington, and of their union four children have 
been born, namely: Gustof Henning, Iver Julius, Emil Lavine, and Ole 
Raymond. In his political affiliations, Mr. Swanson is a straightfor- 
ward Republican. He is a member, and secretary, of the Swedish Lu- 
theran church, and belongs to the Scandinavian Relief Association. 

Hans Engberg, president of the First National Bank of Cambridge, 
was born at Hassela socken, Backarang City, Halsingland, Sweden, July 
10, 1853, and is the son of Per Johnson and Margerita Hansdoter, both 
natives of Halsingland. Per Johnson in early life was a merchant, and 
later engaged in farming ; he died in Sweden, in 1865, at the age of fifty- 
three years. His widow came to America in 1873, and died in Isanti 
county, Minnesota, in 1895, ^t the age of eighty. They were parents of 
five children, namely : Karin, married Jons Grift ; Anna, married Daniel 
Danielson ; Jonas, a farmer of Isanti county ; Maggie, married John 
Sederberg; and Hans. 

Hans Engberg received his education in the public schools of 
Sweden, and in 1869 came to the United States, locating in Isanti county. 
He attended school three winters in Polk county, Wisconsin, and spent 
two years in the employ of sash and door factories. He went into the 
general merchandise and lumber business, in 1875, in company with 
his brother and brother-in-law, vmder the name of Engberg Brothers & 
Company, and this partnership lasted until 1879, the enterprise meeting 
with moderate success. In 1878 he was elected auditor of Isanti county, 
and held this office ten years. In 1892 Mr. Engberg, with other business 
men. engaged in banking, under the name of Isanti County Bank, at 
Cambridge ; in 1904 this concern was organized as a national bank, and 
the name changed to the First National Bank of Cambridge. For four- 
teen years Mr. Engberg held the position of cashier, and since 1906 he 
has served as president of the institution. He is a keen, progressive 
business man. and administers the affairs of the bank in an able manner. 

Mr. Engberg married, first. February 9, 1884, Nancy A. Peterson, 
of Isanti county, and they had children as follows : Aurelia E., assistant 



iii8 SWED.:SH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



cashier of the First National Bank ; Edith M., a school teacher ; Ada W. 
and Rhodie V., attending the public school ; and Nannie. Mrs. Engberg- 
died January 25, 1897, and Mr. Engberg married, for his second wife, 
November 24, 1899. Emma J. Hogdahl, of Sundswall, Sweden, and they 
have one son, Clarence Henry. Mr. Engberg is an independent in his 
political views, and he and his family attend the Swedish Baptist church 
of Cambridge. 

Julius Palm. — Well worthy of representation in a work of this kind 
is Julius Palm, a carpenter and contractor of Worthington, Nobles county, 
who has won deserved success by his thorough mastery of his calling, 
fidelity to his trusts, and honest dealings with all men. A son of Carl 
Palm, he was born, October 28, 1866, in Smaland, Sweden, where he 
resided until attaining his majority. Carl Palm, a contractor and builder, 
spent his entire life in Sweden, dying there in 1907. His wife, Anna 
Palm, survives him, and still resides on the old homestead in Sweden. 
Six children were born of their union, namely : Anna, deceased ; Emma, 
wife of August Strom, a salesman in Worthington ; Olof , a carpenter 
in Erskine, Minnesota, married Helga Lindquist ; Julius, the special 
subject of this brief biography; August, of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, a 
contractor, married Nellie Olson; and Carl, engaged in business as a 
contractor in California. 

After completing his studies in the common schools of his native 
land, Julius Palm learned the carpenter's trade under his father's in- 
structions. In 1887, being firmly convinced that there were greater 
opportunities for the working man in the United States than in any 
other part of the world, he came to this country, locatmg at ,once in 
Worthington, where he has since followed his trade most successfully. 

Mr. Palm married, December 16, 1904, Miss Anna Johnson, 
daughter of Andrew Johnson, and of their union six children have been 
born, namely: Evelyn, May, Violet, Helen, Agnes, and Carl. Politically 
Mr. Palm affiliates with the Republican party; religiously he has never 
departed from the faith of his ancestors, being a consistent member of 
the Swedish Lutheran church ; and fraternally he belongs to the Alodern 
Woodmen of America. 

Rev. Anders Mattson, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Alexandria, Minnesota, was born August 29, 1853, at Jemtland, Swe- 
den, and is a son of M. and Margerita (Anderson) Davidson, farmers 
of Jemtland. They emigrated to the United States in 1893 and resided 
with their son Anders, their only child. The mother died in 1894. 

Anders Mattson was educated in the common schools of his native 
country, and in 1889 he came to the United States. He entered the 
theological seminary of Augustana College, at Rock Island, Illinois, 
and in 1891 was ordained a minister of the Swedish Lutheran church. 
His first charge was at Centerville, Iowa, and from 1893 until 1897 he 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1119 



was located at Mediapolis, Iowa. In the latter year he removed to 
Warren, Minnesota, where he remained until 1903 and then spent three 
years in Brainerd, Minnesota. In 1906 he was called to the church at 
Alexandria, and has resided there since. He is a man of eloquence 
and ability in his chosen field of labor, and universally esteemed and 
respected. In political views he espouses the cause of the Republican 
party. 

Rev. Mattson married, in 1891, Anna Martenson, of Jemtland, Swe- 
den, and they have children as follows : Margaret, married Albert 
Dahlquist, merchant and postmaster at Middle River, Minnesota ; Albin, 
of Warren, ^Minnesota ; Edward, at Middle River, Minnesota, and Ernest 
and Verner, residing at home. 

Frithiof Lawrence Kling, city physician of Alexandria, Minne- 
sota, was born at Dixon, Illinois, February 24, 1873, ^^'^ is a son of 
August and Caroline (Johnson) Kling. The father, a native of Skare, 
Westergotland, Sweden, followed the trade of watch-maker, and in 
1865 emigrated to the United States. He enlisted in the Union army, 
one month before the close of hostilities. He located at Dixon, Illinois, 
and there opened a jewelry store, which he conducted until 1875, ^^^ i" 
that year removed to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he opened a similar 
establishment, and continued there four years. In 1879 he settled at Des 
Moines, and in 1885 removed to Miller, South Dakota, where he fol- 
low^ed the occupation of farmer until 1890. In that year he removed to 
Minneapolis, where he has since been established in the jewlery business. 
He had children as follows : Minnie, who married Matt Collet, a car- 
penter of Minneapolis ; Frithiof L. ; Hulda, married Louis Rahm, a mill- 
wright of Minneapolis ; Laura, married Seymour Mowers, a wholesale 
crockery dealer, of Des Moines ; and Ella, of Des Moines. 

Dr. Kling attended the public schools of Des Moines and Miller, 
South Dakota, and graduated from the Central High School of Minne- 
apolis in 1898. He graduated from the medical department of Hamline 
University in 1903. After spending one year as interne at Bethesda Hos- 
pital at: St. Paul, he took charge of the hospital at Starbrook for two 
months, and then began practice at Pelican Rapids, where he remained 
two years. At this time he located at Alexandria, and has since con- 
tinued there in the successful practice of his profession. Dr. Kling is 
health officer of Alexandria, county health officer, and city physician. 
He is a Republican in his political views, and belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias, ^lodern Woodmen of America, Ancient Order United Work- 
men and the County and State Medical associations. He married, October 
6, 1904, Anna Lois, daughter of Reverend Hudgins, of Belleville, On- 
tario, she is a graduate nurse from St. Barnaby's Hospital, and a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. They have one son, William 
Lawrence. 



II20 SWEDISH-AAIERICAXS OF MINNESOTA 



Dr. Jacob Eric Nyquist, a physician and druggist residing at Clo- 
quet, Minnesota, comes from one of the oldest Finnish families. He was 
born in Sundsvall, Sweden, November ii, 1873, and is a son of Jacob 
and Anna JVIaria (Segervael) Nyquist, farmers, and natives of Finland. 
His grandfather, Eric Nyquist, came from Finland, and settled in Mille 
Lacs county, Minnesota, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Dr. Nyquist removed with his parents to Finland when about four 
years old, and there attended school until 1886, when the family emigrated 
to the United States, locating in Bessemer, Michigan, where he attended 
the public schools. His mother died in 1887, and his father was killed 
in the mines in 1891. He had one brother, Alfred, now a student at 
Gustavus Adolphus College. Jacob Nyquist removed to Alinnesota in 
the year following his father's death, and entered Gustavus Adolphus 
College at St. Peter, graduating in 1899, earning his way through college 
by teaching school in Minnesota and North Dakota. He taught school 
one year more, and in 1901 entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, from which institution he graduated in 1905. For 
one year he was an interne at Bethesda Hospital, and then he spent a 
few months in Hibbing. He then removed to Cloquet, where he is now 
located, and has built up a good practice. He is an able physician, and 
also conducts a good drug store. He has been appointed physician to 
the Chippewa and Fond du Lac Indians, residing on the reservation. Dr. 
Nyquist is a member of the St. Louis County Medical Society, also of 
the State Medical Society. He is a Republican, He is now county 
coroner, which office he has already held two terms. He is a member 
and deacon in the Swedish Lutheran church. He married, June 4, 1908, 
Olina Olson, of Cloquet, a native of Smaland, Sweden. 

Frank Oscar Anderson, of the firm of Kolseth & Anderson, of 
Cloquet, was born at Ostergotland, Sweden, September 29, 1863, and is 
a son of Andrew and Gustafa Larson. They were natives of Smaland, 
and farmers, who lived and died in Sweden. They had four children, 
namely: Hannah, married Swante Larson, a farmer of Sweden; Carl 
Johan, a farmer living in Sweden; August Andrew, also a farmer in 
his native country ; and Frank Oscar. 

Air. Anderson acquired his education in Sweden and came to the 
United States in April, 1881, locating at Red Wing, Minnesota, where 
he worked a short time in a stone quarry. He spent two years on a 
farm, worked some time in a clock factory at Red Wing, and then as 
delivery man. He was next employed in a livery stable, and then on 
a farm. In the winter of 1884 Mr. Anderson worked in the woods. He 
owned a team, and was employed as teamster, in 1885-6, and in 1887 
removed to St. Paul, where he drove his own team and worked for the 
Northern Pacific Railway Company. He spent the next winter in the 
woods, and then located at Barnum, Minnesota, where he worked in 
a mill. Returning to Minneapolis, he worked as delivery man in a feed 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1121 



store two and one-half years, returned to Barnum, and after spending 
the winter in the woods, entered the employ of the Johnson Company, 
spending eight years there and at Cloquet. In 1901 Mr. Anderson 
engaged in the grocery business in company with John Blomberg, in 
Cloquet ; in February, 1902, Mr. Blomberg's interest was purchased 
by Ole Kolseth, and the firm has since continued as Kolseth & Ander- 
son. They conduct a general store, carrying a high grade stock to the 
amount of about twenty thousand dollars. Mr. Anderson is a prominent 
and public-spirited citizen, and served two years as alderman of Hoquet. 
He is independent in politics. 

Mr. Anderson married, August 21, 1886, Betsy Chelberg, of Red 
Wing, and they have been blessed with children as follows : Carl Arthur, 
aged nineteen, employed in the store ; Earl Ernest, aged sixteen, driving 
a delivery wagon for the store ; Ethel Mildred, aged twelve ; and Luella 
Alay, aged tw^o years. 

Carl Oscar Farm. — Prominent among the younger representatives 
of the business interest of St. Cloud is numbered its retail shoe 
merchant, Carl Oscar Farm, a native born son of the state and of Swedish 
ancestry. His parents, C. L. and Louisa Farm, were born in that country, 
and coming to the United States their first home here was in St. Peter, 
and the father was employed at railroad work for about two years. He 
then purchased a tract of land in Nicollet county, and has since been 
numbered among the substantial agriculturists there. They have six 
living children, namely: Gustof Emil, who is farming with his father 
in Nicollet county ; Hannah, the wife of A. G. Roust, also a farmer 
there ; John H., engaged in the shoe business in Dakota ; Carl O., of this 
review ; Harry and Walter, wdio are also farming at home. 

Carl O. Farm was born in Nicolett county November 18, 1880, 
and after a good educational training in the public schools in the 
Mankato Business College he entered upon his business career as a clerk 
in a dry goods store in Alankato. But after two years in that capacity 
he in company with his brother, John H., engaged in the shoe business 
in Mankato, but three years later Carl O. sold his interest to his brother, 
and coming to St. Cloud served a four years' clerkship in a shoe store 
here. He was later engaged in the same capacity for one year in St. 
Paul, and then returning to St. Cloud he in the spring of 1908 entered 
the retail shoe business for himself, and is thus prominently identifying 
himself with the life and interests of his city. He is a member of the 
Swedish Lutheran church, and is one of its trustees and a teacher in 
its Sunday-school. In politics he is a Republican voter. 



EnERT Johnson is identified with the business life of St. Cloud as 
a hardware merchant. Coming to the LTnited States in 1883 from his 
native land of Sweden, he entered at once upon his business career as 

71 



1 122 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



a hardware merchant in St. Cloud, his first work being in the capacit}' 
of a clerk, and in 1905, in association with L. E. Wakeman and Peter 
Vandershus, he embarked in the business on his own account. This 
association was continued until February i, 1909, when Mr. Johnson 
purchased his partners' interests and has since conducted the business 
by himself, but retains the original name of the Powell Hardware Com- 
pany. He carries a full and complete line of general hardware valued 
at about twenty thousand dollars, and he has enrolled his name among 
the foremost business men of his adopted city of St. Cloud. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Vermland, Sweden, emigrated to America 
when eleven years old, and received his education at the State Normal 
School, St. Cloud, Minnesota. He is the son of Nels and Lena Johnson, 
the father, a saw mill operator, still living in Norrland, Sweden, but the 
mother is deceased, dying in 1888. Of their three children Ebert is the 
first born. His younger brother Elmer is a stationary engineer in St. 
Paul, and his sister Mary is the wife of Andrew Larson, a saw mill 
operator in Sweden. Mr. Johnson married on the 12th of June, 1895, 
Emma Lundblad, of Stanchfield, Minnesota, and their children are 
Clarence, Walter, Roy, Eleanor, Mildred, George, Clififord and Helen. 
He is a member of the Baptist church in St. Cloud, and is one of its 
board of deacons and its secretary. He is a Republican in his political 
affiliations, and has served his party as chairman of its county committees. 
The city numbers him among her most prominent business men and 
substantial and progressive citizens. 

Rev. Peter Gatthard Nelson, pastor of the Swedish Baptist church 
at Cambridge, was born at Christianstads Lan, Skane, Sweden, _May 5, 
1873, ^^^^ is the son of Nels and Hannah (Pehrson) Larson, natives of 
Skane, where they lived on a farm. They came to the United States in 
1892, and purchased a farm at Vasa, Minnesota, where they have since 
been living. They had two children, namely : Peter Gatthard, and Axel, 
a farmer, at Walnut Grove, Minnesota. 

Peter G. Nelson received his education in his native land, and came 
to the U^nited States in 189 1, one year before his parents, and for four 
years was engaged in farming at Vasa. He then took a course at the 
Theological Department of the University of Chicago, graduating in 1901, 
and received his first pastorate at Rush Point, Isanti county, where he 
remained two and one-half years. After spending two and one-half 
years at Lake Elizabeth, he spent a similar length of time at Brainerd, 
after which he entered the work of state evangelist of Minnesota, holding 
revivals at many dififerent places. After several years spent in this 
way he settled at Cambridge, which has since remained his post of duty, 
and where he is now pastor of the Swedish Baptist church. He is a 
man of pleasing address, an eloquent speaker, and has won many to the 
wavs of truth. In every church under his charge he has held successful 




^..^.^&^\9a-^Cjt^i-€U-^ 



■"':;£\1^^ 






SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1125 

revival meetings and his field has been wide. In political views Reverend 
Nelson is a Republican, and he is a member of the North Star Association. 
Reverend Nelson married, October 31, 1896, Mary Johnson, daughter 
of John Manson, of Skane, Sweden, and they have two children, namely : 
Efifie Victoria and Reuben Emanuel. 

August Swanson has been a resident of St. Cloud, Minnesota, 
for more than twenty-five years, having come here direct from Sweden 
in 1882. Mr. Swanson was born in Smaland, Sweden, June 24, 1855, 
son of Sven Gustof Jonasson and Christina Larson, farming people of 
Smaland. In 1894, at the age of seventy, the father came to this country, 
and spent the closing years of his life in St. Cloud. He died here in 
1898, at the age of seventy-four. He and his wife were the parents 
of eight children, namely : Carl Johan, a stone mason ; August, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Christine, w"ife of August Sundberg, a plasterer by 
trade and a resident of Butte, Montana; Swan, of St. Cloud; Thilda, 
wife of August Halberg, of St. Cloud; Albertina, wife of Otto Nelson, 
of Ironwood, Michigan ; and John Peter and Otto, both engaged in the 
laundry business, the former in Spokane, Washington, and the latter in 
Minneapolis. 

August Swanson was educated in Sweden and there also learned 
the carpenter's trade, at which he worked until 1882, when he emigrated 
to this country and took up his residence in St. Cloud, Minnesota. His 
first year here was spent at work in a wagon shop, after which he turned 
his attention to the laundry business, and for sixteen and a half years 
operated a laundry. In the meantime he bought a farm, and after he 
sold his laundry he spent three years on the farm. In 1903, he opened 
a grocery, in connection with which he handles flour, feed, etc., carrying 
a $3,000 stock, and doing a prosperous business. 

In May. 1884, Mr. Swanson married Miss Caroline Brockman, of 
Wermland, Sweden, and they have four children: Alice Victoria, a 
stenographer of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Albin Leonard, employed in 
his fa'ther's store; Godfrey Edwin, also employed in the store ; and Mabel 
Isabel, at home. Mr. Swanson is a member of the Swedish Baptist 
church, and a voter with the Republican ranks. 

Charles P. Ahlgren, of the Granite City Granite Company, of 
St. Cloud, Minnesota, was born in Smaland, Sweden, December 27, 1863. 
His parents were Gustof and Christine Carlson, farming people, where 
the father is still living. They had eight children, of whom six are now 
living, namely : Johanna, of Sweden ; Charles P. ; Louisa, wife of A. 
Rosa'nder, a tailor of Chicago, Illinois ; Matilda, of Washington, D. C. ; 
Helena, wife of B. Peterson, of Chicago. Illinois ; and Johan. 

Having received the usual public school education in his native land, 
Charles P. Ahlgren after leaving school was for four years engaged 
in farm work previous to his coming to America, which was in 1881. 



1 126 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF ^IIXXESOTA 



Arrived here, he went to work in the quarries at Kasota, Minnesota, 
where he spent two years. He then learned the stone cutter's trade, 
which he has since followed. From 1898 to 1905, he was a member of 
the St. Cloud Granite Works and in the last named year he sold his 
interest in this company, and, with Axel E. Hagquist and Frank Ekstrom 
as partners, he organized the Granite City Granite Company, and has 
since conducted a prosperous business, dealing principally in monuments. 
In 1888, Mr. Ahlgren married Miss Eva Anderson, of Alankato, 
and to them have been born one son and three daughters : Arthur, Helen, 
Agnes and J\Iabel. The family are members of the Swedish Mission 
church. Politically, Mr. Ahlgren affiliates with the Republican party, 
and is a member of the St. Cloud City Council. 

Frederick Rudberg holds a position of note among the valued citi- 
zens of Litchfield, IMeeker county, where, as a painter and decorator, he 
is carrying on a substantial business. A son of the late Johan Gustaf 
Rudberg, he was born July 13, 1869, in Grasmark. \"ermland, Sweden. 

John Gustaf Rudberg, a man of talent and education, was for many 
years the organist, and a teacher, in the public schools of Grasmark, serv- 
ing in that capacity for nearly thirty years. He was accidentally killed 
by falling from a plank gang over a river, just as he was on his way to 
close up the school for the season. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Anna Holmstrom, survived him, and is now living in Minneapolis. She 
bore her husband nine children, as follows : Christina, widow of John 
Peterson, who died in 1899; Johanna died in infancy; Jacob, a rancher 
in Montana ; Julius, a merchant tailor in Alinneapolis ; Melcher and Olof 
Frithiof, painters in ]Minneapolis ; Frederick, with whom this sketch is 
chiefly concerned ; Otto Edwin died in Tacoma, Washington ; and Anna 
Sophia, wife of Thor Olson, a contracting plasterer in Minneapolis. 

Frederick Rudberg obtained his elementary education in his father's 
school, and at the age of twelve years went to Stockholm, Sweden's capi- 
tal, where he remained some time, working first in his cousin's book and 
music store, and later as an apprentice at the trade of a painter and 
decorator. At the age of sixteen years, he shipped as a cabin boy on a 
steamer sailing to Denmark, France, England, and other countries. The 
following year, in 1886, he came to Minneapolis, where two of his brothers 
and a sister were living, and at first worked day times in a grocery store, 
and attended evening schools in order to learn the English language. 

Mr. Rudberg is an accomplished musician, playing the trombone, 
the euphonium, and the piano with skill, and for some time played in 
Oscar Ringwall's band and orchestra, for two years of the time being 
manager of both organizations. Subsequently enlisting in the United 
States Army, he was sent with his regiment to the Philippine Islands, 
and was soon promoted to corporal, and the following week was made 
sergeant of his company, remaining in that capacity until 1901, when he 
was made principal musician, a position that he held the remainder of his 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1127 

army service. He participated while in the Philippines in a number of 
engaRements, being with General Wheaton on his expedition to Cavite 
and Batangas, from January 4 to January 14, 1900, and from February 
IS until February 22, 1900, being with General Bates s expedition to the 
province of Camarines. On June 3, iQOi, Mr. Rudberg was honorably 
discharged from the army with the following testimony: Honest and 
Faithful, and Character excellent. ,. ^^ -n ju 

Returning from the Philippines to Minneapolis, Mr. Rudberg spent 
the following year as a musician, and the next year located m Litchheld, 
where he has since been successfully employed as a painter and decorator, 
am.ong other works of importance in which he has been engaged having 
been Sie painting of several church edifices. 

Mr Rudberg married, in 1891, Carolina Larson, who was born, m 
i86g in Vestergotland, Sweden, and of the four children that have been 
born of their union three are living, namely: Hazel Danelia born June 
12 1802; Arvid Mauritz, born May 25, 1896; and Evelyn Sylvia, born 
Ailo-ust 8 1008. Fraternally Mr. Rudberg is a Blue Lodge Mason; a 
Matter Workman in the Ancient Order of United Workmenof America; 
and is district deputy of the United Ancient Order of Druids. He has 
also the distinction of being president of the oldest Scandinavian Music 
Band in Minnesota, the Band of Litchfield, which has existed for twenty- 
two years, ^and during the entire time has been under the leadership of 
Prof O A Olson. Mr. Rudberg was formerly captain of the local l^ire 
Department, and is now captain of the Hook and Ladder truck. He re- 
sides in his own house, which is pleasantly located at No. 424 Miller 
avenue. 

ToHN A Carlson.— Endowed by nature with those habits of indus- 
try perseverance and thrift characteristic of the Swedish race, John A. 
Carlson has met with success in the business world, and as one ot tlie 
leading carpenters and contractors of North Mankato is kept busily 
employed in this part of Blue Earth county. He was born March 8, 
1864, 'in Boras, Tarpasocken, Ryssby, Elfsborgs_ Lan Wes ergotland, 
Sweden, where his parents, Carl August and Maria Olofson) Johnson, 
were born, reared, married, and are still living, the father being a farmer, 
builder, and contractor. He is the oldest child m a family of eight five 
boys and three girls, their names being as follows : Carl, a contractor in 
Sweden; Lars, an ice dealer in Sweden; Claus, engaged m carpentering 
in his native land; Clara, a dressmaker, in Sweden ;_ Louise, a dressmaker 
still a resident of her native country ; Anna, alsohvmgm Sweden; Gustat 
died in infancy;and John A., the subject of this brief sketch. ^ 

After leaving school John A. Carlson learned the carpenter s trade 
which he followed at first in his native country. Desirous, however,_ of 
broadening his scope of action, he left Sweden on June 27, 1889, coming 
to Lakefield, Jackson county, Minnesota, where he remained about hree 
months. Locating then in Blue Earth county, Mr. Carlson estabhshed 



1 128 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



himself as a carpenter and contractor at North Alankota, and here from 
the very first met with such encouraging success that he has remained 
until the present time, devoting his time and attention to the needs of his 
patrons. 

Mr. Carlson married, in June, 1888, in Sweden, Wilhelmina Christina 
Jacobson, daughter of Jacob Nelson, of Sweden, and they are the parents 
of three children, namely : Elvida Otille, Clara Cecilia, and Carl Elmer, 
all of whom are attending school. True to the religious faith in which he 
was brought up, Mr. Carlson is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, in which he is a deacon. Politically he is a steadfast Republican, 
and fraternally he belongs to, and is treasurer of, the Workmen's Benefit 
Association. 

John N. Stenborg, of Sacred Heart, Alinnesota, is a prominent fac- 
tor in his town, where he has been engaged in a general mercantile busi- 
ness for over twenty years. Mr. Stenborg was born in Wermland, 
Sweden, January 20, 1861, son of Nils and Karin Stenborg, farming peo- 
ple of Wermland, where they passed their lives, and died, the former in 
1907, at the age of eighty-six years; the latter in 1901, at the age of 
seventy-four years. In their family were ten children, of whom six are 
living "at this writing, namely : Marie, wife of August Randstrom ; Karin, 
wifeof J. Johnson, a farmer; Marit, wife of Eric Johnson, a farmer; 
Gertrude, wife of O. Olson, a farmer ; and Carl, also a farmer — all of 
Sweden — John N., the youngest, the subject of this sketch, being the 
only one of the family in America. 

John N, Stenborg in his youth attended the public school in his native 
land, and after he came to this country, in 1879, he went to school for a 
short time. The chief part of his education, however, has been gained in 
the broad school of experience, and in the true sense of the work he may 
be termed self-made. The first two years of his life in America were spent 
on a farm near Sacred Heart. The next five years he clerked in a general 
store, during this time gaining a knowledge of the details of business that 
later enabled him to make a success of his undertakings. The year 1886 
he spent in travel. He visited California, Oregon, Washington and other 
western states, and upon his return to Minnesota accepted a position as 
clerk in a clothing store in jMinneapolis, where he remained two and a 
half years. Then he came back to Sacred Heart and engaged in business 
for himself. That was in 1889. He opened up a stock of general mer- 
chandise, and from the start has met with well-earned success, carrying a 
stock of well assorted goods to the value of over $10,000. 

May 12, 1892, Mr. Stenborg married Miss Sarah Maria Olson, of 
Alexandria, Minnesota, and they have four children : Albert, Oscar, \\{\\- 
iam and Elmer, all at school. Politically, Mr. Stenborg is a Republican, 
and has always taken a commendable interest in public affairs, especially 
those of his own locality, and as a member of the city council and school 
board he has rendered valued service to his town. He was reared a 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1129 



Lutheran, to which faith he still clings, being prominent and active in 
church work, having served as a trustee of the church for twelve years. 

Olof Peter Erickson, a successful real estate dealer of Brainerd, 
Minnesota, and the owner of mining and lumber land in various parts 
of Minnesota, was born February 4, 1857, at Wermland, Sweden, and is a 
son of Eric and Maria Erickson, both natives of the same place, where 
their entire lives were spent. 

Mr. Erickson received his education in the common schools of 
Sweden, and when a young man emigrated to the United States, landing 
at New York June 11, 1877. He located at Minneapolis, where for a 
year he worked as a laborer, and then until 1881 worked at lumbering 
and various other occupations as opportunity offered. He then entered 
the employ of the Northern Pacific Railway, as foreman and inspector, 
making his home at Brainerd, and worked there until 1891. Until 1896 
he engaged himself in lumbering, and in that year was elected sheriff of 
Crow Wing county, being re-elected continuously and holding office until 
January i, 1909. 

He now turns his activities in the line of real estate, and his other 
business interests. He takes an active interest in public affairs, and has 
done much toward the growth and upbuilding of the community ; he lives 
up to his beliefs and principles, standing for right and justice in all things. 
He was a member of the school board, being president in 1892 and treas- 
urer in 1893. He was also at that time president of the Cooperative Store 
and vice-president of the Building & Loan Association, both of which are 
not in business now. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, Modern Woodmen of America, and the Yeomen. In political 
views he is an independent. Mr. Erickson married, June 2^, 1883, Betsy 
C. Johnson, daughter of Olof Johnson, of Wright county, Minnesota, and 
their children are : Mamie, living at home ; Clara, a teacher in Belling- 
ham, ^linnesota; and Lester, in school. 

John Stenberg, a prominent shoe dealer of Brainerd, was born in 
Movik, Dalsland. Elfsborgs Ian, Sweden, February 14, 1865. He is a 
son of John and Maria (Anderson) Stenberg, natives of the same place; 
his father was a shoemaker, and both he and his wife are now deceased. 
They had two children : John, and Caroline, who married Anton 
Anderson. 

John Stenberg began his education in his native town and continued it 
in Norway, where he also learned the trade of shoemaker, following it in 
Norway and Sweden until 1892, when he emigrated to the United States. 
Upon coming to this country he worked some years in the lumber yards at 
Shell Lake, Washburn and West Superior, Wisconsin, and for two years 
conducted a shoe repairing shop. He settled in Brainerd in 1901, and there 
engaged in business in the retail shoe business, which he has since con- 



1 130 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



tinned, with gratifying success and profit. He carries an average stock 
of three thousand dollars' worth of goods. 

Mr. Stenberg is an independent in politics. He married, October 29, 
1903, Hilda ]\Iaria Johnson, of Poplar, Wisconsin, and they are members 
of the Swedish Mission church of Brainerd. He has been able to work 
up a good trade and endeavors to please his customers by fair treatment 
and the highest grade of goods, thus laying a sure foundation for future 
success. 

Dr. Otto W. Sterner, of Cambridge, was born at Smaland, Sweden, 
October i, 1878, and is a son of John and Johanna Magnusson, both 
natives of Sweden. The father was born in 183 1 and his wife in 1837. 
They came to the United States in 1891, and after living a few years at 
St. Paul settled on a farm in Chisago county, where they still reside. 
Their children are : August Tour, a soldier, residing in Sweden ; 
Martha, who married Charles Ringus, a farmer of Washington county, 
Minnesota ; Tilda, married to Peter Cedarstrom, a farmer of Washington 
county ; Charles M., a Swedish mission minister, of Worthington ; Peter 
Johnson, a painter, of St. Paul ; Anna, who married E. G. Stone, a fruit 
farmer in California ; Ida, wife of Charles Moline, foreman in the Golden 
Rule Stables, of St. Paul ; Dr. Otto W., of this sketch ; and Ernest G., a 
physician residing, in St. Paul and mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

Otto W. Sterner began his education in his native country and came 
to the United States with his parents in 1891, for one year attending the 
public school. He then worked as. cash boy in a department store, and 
afterward as an office boy for a physician. In 1895 he reentered school 
and was graduated from a St. Paul high school in 1899. He was grad- 
uated from the medical department of the University of Minnesota in 
1903, since which time he has been in successful practice of his pro- 
fession at Cambridge. He is a skilled physician and has been honored 
by election to the office of coroner of the county, and has also served as 
mayor of his town. He belongs to County, State and National Medical 
Associations, and is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Doctor Sterner married, October i, 1903, Hildegarde, daughter of 
Charles G. Johnson, of St. Paul, and they have one son, E. Russell, born 
June 29, 1906. 

Doctor G. Alfred Magnusson, a prominent physician of Aitkin, 
was born in Chisago county, Minnesota, April 25, 1880, and is a son of 
Sven and Christine Maria (Stendahl) Magnusson, the father being a 
native of Smaland, where he lived on a farm. He came to the United 
States about 1868, locating in Chisago county, and purchased a tract of 
land, which he cultivates. His children are : Peter Magnus, professor 
of history and civics at St. Cloud Normal School ; Victor, died in infancy ; 
Matilda Louise, at home ; Ida Christina, married Arthur Elftman, a mining 
engineer, of Tonopah, Nevada ; Carl Edward, head of the electrical depart- 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1133 



ment of the University of Washington at Seattle ; Jennie Marie, a teacher 
in the Minneapohs pubhc schools ; Herman Victor, a physician, of Aitkin, 
Minnesota ; Hulda Sophia, a teacher in Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. 
Peter; Gustav Alfred, of this sketch; and Axel Theodore, a student. 

Dr. Magnusson was educated in the East Side high school of Minne- 
apolis, Normal School of St. Cloud, and received the degree A. B. in the 
University of New Mexico. He graduated from the medical department 
of the University of Minnesota in 1908, and was for a year assistant at 
the Northwestern Hospital at Brainerd. He is now associated in partner- 
ship with his brother at Aitkin, Minnesota, where they have a large prac- 
tice. He is a man of high ideals and ambitions, and during the time of 
acquiring his education taught school three years. He is a member of 
the Swedish Lutheran church and in politics is a Democrat. 

Rev. Alfred J. Elmer^ pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at 
Milaca, Minnesota, was born at Pjettry, Kroneberg's province, Sweden, 
May 6, 1859, son of Anders Johnson and Martha Peterson, and his aged 
mother is still living in Sweden. His father died in 1882. Their family 
comprised nine children, as follows: Swen Johan, Maria Christina, and 
Anna Katerina, all living on farms in Sweden ; Adolph, deceased ; Carl 
August, farming in Sweden ; Alfred J., of this sketch ; Elof and Otto, 
engaged in farming in Sweden ; and Emma Sophia, deceased. 

Alfred J., the fourth son mentioned, was reared to farm life and 
educated in the common schools of his native land. For two years after 
coming to the United States in 1887. he continued to be engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Henry county, Illinois, and in 1890 became a student 
in Augustana College. He worked his way through that institution, as 
well as in the theological seminary, and in 1898 was ordained to the 
ministry at Galesburg, Illinois. Afterward he took charge of a church 
near Cokato, Minnesota, where his pastorate covered a period of three 
years. His next charge was seven and a half miles from the first, and he 
served it faithfully and ably three and a half years, his pastorate of the 
Milaca church dating from 1904. 

Of Mr. Elmer's family we record that on the 6th of July, 1898, he 
married Miss Anna Louisa Juleen, of Whitehall, Michigan, and to them 
have been born five children. Johannes Augustus, the eldest, died at the 
age of five years, and the others, in order of birth, are as follows : Joseph 
Constantine, Oscar Clemence, Alfred Theodoros and Martha Dorothea. 
Politically Rev. Elmer is a Republican, but all his strength and abilities 
are given to his chosen calling in the cause of Christianity and 
Lutheranism. 

John Algren. — Many of the energetic and enterprising men that 
have so largely assisted in developing the agricultural resources of Minne- 
sota are of foreign birth and breeding, and have brought to this country 
the habits of thrift and industrv that have gained them success in their 



1 134 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



various pursuits. Noteworthy among this number is John Algren, an 
active and well-to-do farmer of Hasty, Wright county. He was born, 
June I, 1867, in Wermland, Sweden, where he received a practical common 
school education. 

At the age of seventeen years, ambitious to improve his financial 
opportunities, Mr. Algren emigrated to the United States, locating in 
1884 in Kansas, where for a time he was employed in railroad work. 
Subsequently coming to Minnesota, he was for several years engaged in 
business in Minneapolis, where he made money. Wisely investing his 
accumulations in land, Mr. Algren bought a farm in Hasty a few years 
ago, and has since been actively and successfully engaged in its improve- 
ment. Here he is carrying on general farming in a profitable manner, in 
the meantime taking special pleasure in the raising of fruit, enjoying the 
beautiful blossoms of the trees in the springtime and their luscious fruit 
during and after harvesting. Mr. Algren has a beautiful modern home, 
with conveniences equal to those of many city homes, he having spared 
neither time nor expense in adding such improvements as may be of use 
and comfort to the family. 

Mr. Algren is married but has no children. Although Mr. Algren 
confines his attention principally to the care of his farm, he still has 
business interests of importance in Minneapolis. 

Henry Strom. — Noteworthy among the enterprising and active busi- 
ness men of Gibbon, Sibley county, is Henry Strom, who, as junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Olson & Strom, is identified with the mercantile pros- 
perity of the city. A son of Bengt Strom, he was born in Kroneberg's 
Ian, Sweden, August 15, 1865, and there lived until four years of age. 

Born and brought up in Kronebergs Ian, Sweden, Bengt Strom 
became a farmer from choice, and was employed in tilling the soil in his 
native land for a number of years after his marriage. Hoping in America 
to give his children better advantages in every respect, he emigrated to 
this country in 1869, arriving in the month of May. Coming directly to 
Sibley county, he took up land in Cornish township, and on the homestead 
which he improved still resides, a happy and contented farmer. To him 
and his good wife, whose maiden name was Inga Nelson, six children 
have been born, as follows : John, died at the age of fifteen years ; Carl, 
died in childhood; Henry, the subject of this sketch; Otto William, living 
on the home farm; Alma, wife of Gustaf Blaad, a farmer, residing at 
Palmyra, Renville county; and Jennie, living with her parents. Mr. 
Bengt Strom is a valued member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he has held all of the offices. 

A mere child when he accompanied his parents to Minnesota, Henry 
Strom received his elementary education in the common schools of his 
district, after which he took a commercial course at Gustavus Adolphus 
College. Turning then his attention to agricultural pursuits he assisted in 
the management of the home farm for fifteen years. Locating in Gibbon 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1135 



in 1906, Mr. Strom formed a copartnership with Hans Olson, and has 
since, under the firm name of Olson & Strom, carried on a successful 
business as a general merchant, having an excellent trade. 

Mr. Strom married, July 3, 1895, Anna Olin, daughter of Aaron 
Melander, a well-known farmer, and into their household four children 
have been born, namely: Helen, Carl, Myrtle, and Annie. Religiously 
Mr. Strom belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics is 
an Independent Republican. Interested in educational matters, he was a 
member of the school board several terms, and for four years was clerk. 

Alvin Ernest Olson, chief engineer at the water works at Somer- 
set, was born June 22, 1878, in Hallesjo, Sweden, a son of Nils and Anna 
(Engstrom) Olson. Nils Olson, born in 1834, was a tailor in Hallesjo, 
but coming to the United States he was a farmer near Mora, in Kanabec 
county, Minnesota, from 1882 until his death in 1889. His widow has 
since married Nils Berglin, also a farmer near Mora. The children born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Olson are : Emma, who married William Oscar Johnson, 
a real estate dealer in Portland, Oregon; Christine, the wife of Nils 
Agran, a printer in that city; Anna, who married Nels Thompson, who 
died in 1903 in Colorado, and they had two children; Carl Theodore, a 
farmer near Mora, is married and has four children ; Lydia, the wife of 
John Larson, a pattern maker owning his own business in Spokane, Wash- 
ington, and he is married and has four children; Alvin E., mentioned 
below ; Jennie Theresia, the wife of J. McNulty, a carpenter in Spokane ; 
Sven Olof Leonard, a railroad contractor in Spokane, is married and has 
one child ; Hilding, is living with her mother on the homestead near Mora. 

Alvin E. Olson came to America with the family in 1882 and thev 
located their farm near Mora. He remained on the farm there and 
attended public school until the homestead was sold in 1899, and he then 
went to Stillwater and learned the machinist trade. After four years 
there he returned to Minneapolis, where he resided until 1908, and then 
accepting a good position with the water company at Somerset, Wis- 
consin, he has since remained in that city. He married Anna Ganhild 
Dahl, who was born on April 8, 1879, in Alsterbo, Smaland, Sweden, a 
daughter of N. A. Dahl, from the same place. The two children of this 
union are Florence and Ethel, born in April, 1904, and in October, 1906, 
respectively. Mrs. Olson is a member of the Lutheran church, while 
Mr. Olson is a member of the Mission church. He has a splendid first 
tenor voice, and is one of the leading members of the Gustavus Adolphus 
Singing Society. 

Frank A. Nelson, an enterprising photographer of Little Falls, Min- 
nesota, was born December 28. 1872, in Elmhult, Smaland, Sweden, and 
is a son of Nels and Ellen (Fling) Person, who lived on a farm. The 
mother died and in 1904 the father came to the United States, locating at 



1 136 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Center City, Minnesota, where he now Hves, retired. He was born in 
1831 and his wife in 1829. They had children as follows: Johanna, mar- 
ried Jacob Jacobson, of Sweden ; Christiana, married William Sundberg, 
of Sweden ; Blenda, unmarried ; Tilda, married Fred Palmdahl, of Minne- 
apolis ; John, manufacturer of monuments, at Center City ; Peter, a 
photographer, living at Anoka, Minnesota ; and Frank A. 

Frank A. Nelson received his education in Sweden and worked on a 
farm until he came to the United States, in 1892. He first located in 
Minneapolis, and worked one year for Gillette-Herscher Manufacturing 
Company, tending a machine. He learned photography with his brother 
Peter, at Anoka, and has since followed this avocation. He has operated 
a studio at Little Falls since 1897, and has branches at Royalton and 
Pierce ; formerly he had branches at Aitkin and Staples. He is master 
of this art and has been very successful. 

In political views Mr. Nelson is independent. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He married, October 17, 
1900, Tillie Eklund, of Minnesota, and they have two children, Victor and 
Floyd. 

J. H. Peterson. — Holding an assured position among the industrious 
and highly respected citizens of Worthington, Nobles county, is J. H. 
Peterson, who is carrying on a substantial business as a carpenter and 
contractor, his mechanical skill and honest work winning him a good 
patronage. Like many of the most thrifty and prosperous citizens of this 
part of the LTnion, he is of foreign birth, having been born, Alay 8. 1871, 
in Dahlsland, Sweden. His parents. Per and Amelia (Johnson) Olson, 
are still living in their native land, owning and occupying a farm in 
Sweden. They had five children, namely : Axel Theodore, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in Sweden ; Hedwig, wife of Axel Johnson, a 
farmer in Sweden; Emma, wife of a Mr. Carlson, also employed in 
Sweden as a tiller of the soil ; Alma, married Charles Berg, a carpenter of 
Sioux City, Iowa; and J. H., the special subject of this brief biographical 
sketch. 

Having completed his school life, J. H. Peterson was employed in a 
public capacity for a few months, working for the official corresponding 
in the United States to that of sheriff. In 1887, enthused by the glowing 
accounts of the prosperity to be gained in America, Mr. Peterson crossed 
the ocean, emigrating to Nova Scotia, where for eight months, in Halifax, 
he worked as a teamster. Continuing his journey westward, Mr. Peter- 
son located in Chicago, Illinois, where for four months he was employed 
by the Pullman Company. Going from there to Omaha, he worked at 
street paving for a similar length of time, after which he resided for 
four years in Sioux City, Iowa, where he was engaged a part of the time 
in railroad work, principally being employed, however, as a carpenter. 
He subsequently spent a year working as a bridge carpenter at Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. Coming then to Nobles county, Minnesota, Mr. 




LOUIS NELSON 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 113/ 



Peterson settled in Worthington as a carpenter, and since 1900 has made 
a specialty of contracting and building, in this employment meeting with 
well-merited success. 

Mr. Peterson married, September 17, 1896, and has one child, Elsie 
Hedwig, now attending school. Politically Mr. Peterson is an earnest 
advocate of the principles of the Republican party, and religiously is a 
conscientious member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Louis Nelson, D. D. S., was born at Lake Park, in Becker county, 
Minnesota, July 18, 1872, to the marriage union of Nils and Christina 
Nilson. Nils Nilson, now seventy-three years of age, and his wife, sixty- 
nine years, are among the earliest Swedish settlers in this part of Minne- 
sota, and of the ten children which blessed their union the six now living 
are : Kerstin, married to Magnus Lindstrom, a farmer at Lake Park ; 
Louis and August, twins, and the latter is also a farmer at Lake Park ; 
and John and Emma, twins, the former a druggist at Lake Park ; and 
Hilda, wife of O. A. Erickson, a hardware merchant of Lake Park. 

Louis Nelson received his early education in a district school and was 
confirmed in the Lutheran church. Later, in company with his brothers, 
John and August, he pursued a course at Hope Academy and still later 
entered Augustana College at Rock Island, Illinois, and pursued a three 
years' course there, and at its close matriculated in the University of Min- 
nesota and graduated from its dental department in 1900 as a Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. During the two years following his graduation Dr. 
Nelson practiced in Minneapolis in association with Dr. Burg in the 
Andrns Building, and since 1902 he has been a member of the dental 
profession at Moorhead. 

In 1905 he married Miss Annie M. Bjorge, a daughter of Banker 
Bjorge, of Lake Park, and a son, Oscar Louis Norman, was born to them 
on March i, 1909. Dr. and Mrs. Nelson are members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church at Lake Park. He is also a member of the State Dental 
Society, the Red River Valley Dental Society and of the Knights of 
Pythias and Elks fraternities. Being gifted with a fine basso baritone 
voice, while at Augustana College he traveled through the eastern and 
western states with the Re-Echo Quartet, and has belonged to the Twin 
City Quartet and the Arpi Sextet. He is very popular in this city, and 
enjoys an extensive dental practice. 

Nils Nilson. — The time is quite near when the host of friends 
listed by the venerable Nils Nilson, of Lake Park township, Becker 
county, as the most valued asset of his good fortune may celebrate the 
fortieth anniversary of the coming to America of one of the most highly 
successful Swedes who ever honored that section of Minnesota with his 
stalwart character and his works of practical usefulness and Christian 
zeal. Now in his seventy-third year he is a prince among the land 
owners and operators of the Swedish-American element, and in company 



485988 



1 140 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



with his material prosperity stands the splendid fact that he has never 
shirked his duty toward his church, his community with its varied chari- 
ties, or his family with its human demands upon his patience, his gen- 
erosity and his love. Not far from his fine homestead is a handsome 
religious edifice called the Eksjo church, which is a symbol of his faith, 
that of the old Lutheran school, and in which he has labored as an active 
member and an official for many years. Neither does he forget his 
duties as a most devout and humble worshiper. His local influence with 
his brethren has carried him abroad as a delegate both to the assemblies 
of the Lutheran Augustana Synod and to the Minnesota Conference of 
the church. Vigorous in body and mind, sound in heart, thoroughly 
versed in the doctrines of his faith, he has always been one of the popular, 
marked and influential members of these public conferences between repre- 
sentatives of his faith; and his private life has been in conformity with 
his open professions. 

Mr. Nilson is a native of Appelbo, Dalarne, Sweden, bom April 5, 
1837, to Nils Ersson and his wife, Anna Jonson. They were both of 
ancient yeoman stock. The father, born in i797,_ died in 1871, and the 
mother, whose natal year was iSbi, passed away in 1898, at the unusual 
age of ninety-seven years. They became the parents of four sons and 
one daughter, of whom only Nils and his brother, Olof (the latter in 
Sweden), are living. Nils Nilson worked on the old homestead until he 
emigrated to the United States in 1870, settling at Spring Brook, near 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin. There he remained a year, and then leaving his 
wife and three children at the place named he went to Minnesota to locate 
a homestead. Finding suitable land for the purpose at Lake Park, he 
returned to Wisconsin for his family. First he bought a team of horses 
and a sleigh and, accompanied by his family and three countrniien, he 
set out for St. Paul. When he arrived at that city the snow had melted, 
so he bought a wagon and shipped his sleigh by rail to St. Cloud, driving 
his team and wagon and the entire party walking except the children. 
In St. Qoud they struck snow again; packed the wagon on the sleigh 
and thus continued to Alexandria, where he left his wife and children 
and returned to Sauk Center to regather his household goods which he 
had left there. From Alexandria the party continued the journey to 
Lake Park without serious mishap, but under continuous suffering and 
privations, arriving at Lake Park in April 1871. At that time and in 
^hat country a man who was the possessor of a team of horses was con- 
sidered rich, and as Nelson had soon added a yoke of oxen to his original 
animals he promptly became a leader among his fellow farmers. As his 
land was rolling prairie it was easily broken and it was not long before 
he had many acres of his first quarter section under the plow. Following 
the ready cultivation of his fertile land came rich harvests, gathered by 
skilful hands and placed on the market with good judgment, and the 
fine profits were periodically invested in other lands until now rolls 
before him a splendid landed' domain of three hundred and sevent}-three 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1141 



acres, two hundred of which are under cultivation, fifty acres in timber 
and the balance in rich pasture. Many years ago Mr. Nilson passed that 
point of life where it was necessary for him to be closely bound to his 
lands in order that his afifairs should not suffer; so that in 1892 he was 
able to perform a duty, prompted by filial love and affection for his native 
land, by visiting his aged mother in Sweden, after an absence of twenty- 
two years. 

Nine years before his departure to America Nils Nilson had married 
Miss Christina Larson, daughter of Lars and Christina (Christianson) 
Larson. Mr. and Mrs. Nilson have had ten children, of whom four are 
deceased; two died in infancy, one son (Nils) at the age of twenty-one 
years, and one daughter (Anna), who was married to Erik Erikson, and 
died at the age of thirty-five years, leaving four children. The living 
children are as follows: Kerstin, born in 1861, who married Magnus 
Lindstrom, a Lake Park farmer; August and Lars (Louis), born July 
18, 1872 (twins), of whom August is the manager of his father's farm, 
and Louis is a popular and skilful dentist, with headquarters in Moorhead, 
but well known in the Twin Cities^ John and Emma, also twins, born 
January 31, 1875 — John being a druggist at Lake Park and Emma 
residing with her parents; and Hilda, born October 4, 1884, who became 
the wife of O. A. Erickson, a hardware merchant at Lake Park. 

Victor Emanuel Lawson was born at Paxton, Illinois, March 24, 
1871, a son of Carl M. and Maria (Lindstrom) Lawson, both born in 
Sweden. Carl Magnus Lawson (Larson) was born at Ekeberg, Mjolby 
parish, Linkopingslan, April 4, 1834, and Maria, his wife was born No- 
vember 9, 1837, the first born child of Jonas Lindstrom, who resided near 
Ronneby, Sweden. James J. Lindstrom, a brother of Mrs. Lawson, born 
August 25, 1840, enlisted at the age of twenty-one in Company H of the 
Forty-fifth Illinois Infantry at Rock Island. He served in General 
Grant's first campaign on the Tennessee river, and was wounded at the 
battle of Pittsburg Landing, necessitating the amputation of a foot. He 
taught school in the early days at Chisago Lake, Minnesota, and he died 
at Crystal Lake, Illinois, January 19, 1887. His widow, Mrs. Elsie E. 
Lindstrom, resides at New London, Minnesota. Andrew J. Lindstrom, 
another brother of Mrs. Lawson, born May 14. 1843, attracted as a youth 
the notice of the early founders of the Swedish Lutheran church. He 
was induced to continue his studies and was sent back to Sweden, where 
he graduated from the University of Upsala in 1869 with the degree 
of Ph. D. He was ordained to the ministry and became a professor at 
Augustana College, but his promising career was cut short by death. He 
died at Lake Jessup, Florida, whither he had gone for his health, Jan- 
uary 24, 1872. 

The Lawsons were among the early Swedish emigrants to arrive in 
America in the fifties, and the father of both Mr. and Mrs. Lawson fell 
victims to the epidemic of the Asiatic cholera. The families located at 



1142 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Rock Island, Illinois, and vicinity. Air. Carl M. Lawson secured work 
in a sash and door factory and became a carpenter and contractor. 
During his stay in Rock Island he changed the spelling of his name 
slightly to distinguish it from other Larsons residing there. In 1863 
the family moved to Paxton, Illinois, where Dr. Hasselquist had founded 
a Swedish colony in connection with Augustana College, and a modest 
little home was built within a block of the school, where the family con- 
tinued to live for seventeen years. But in the interest of the health of 
Mrs. Lawson the family moved to Minnesota in the fall of 1880, locating 
at New London. They settled on a farm at that time covered with brush 
and timber, in section 16, a mile and a half from the village, but a few 
years later the farm was rented and a residence was built in the village, 
where the family now lives. Mr. Lawson labored at his trade continu- 
ously for more than fifty years. Both he and his wife are active members 
of the Lebanon Lutheran church. They became the parents of fifteen 
children, but of these nine died in infancy, and those surviving are: 
Carrie, now Mrs. F. O. Swanson, of Green Lake; Thomas J., who re- 
sides with his wife and five children at New Lebanon; Victor E., men- 
tioned below; Eben E., who has obtained a reputation as an artist, and 
who resides with his wife at Pasadena, California; and Elsie Theodora 
and Esther V., who are with their parents. 

Mctor E. Lawson attended a private Swedish primary school and 
later the graded public school, and after the family came to this county 
his time was divided between attending the New London school, par- 
ticipating in the struggle to clear the land and doing the usual farm 
work. His early ambition was to learn the printer's trade, and all his 
small sayings were invested in printing material, while the most of his 
leisure time was spent at this work and in reading all the books and 
literature within his reach. In the spring of 1889 he secured a teacher's 
certificate and taught a term of school in district No. 8, and in the sum- 
mer following he was offered the position of manager of the New Lon- 
don Times, which he accepted. Less than two years later he purchased 
the Tunes in the name of his brother, T. J. Lawson, as he was not of 
age at the time. In 1892 he was appointed deputy postmaster and erected 
a brick-veneered building to accommodate the postoffice and his printing 
business, and he was acting postmaster until the office went into Demo- 
cratic hands, while besides being editor and postmaster he served as 
township justice, village recorder and chief of the fire department. 

Mr. Lawson was in those days an ardent Republican, and his con- 
victions led him into many a battle with the numerous Populists of the 
neighborhood, and these controversies also led him to study economics 
until finally he reluctantly saw one after another of his cherished political 
notions dissipated by logic and reason, the result being that the fire of 
enthusiastic youth was damped in the Times. When in the spring of 
1895 the editor was ofifered the management of the new Populist news- 
paper at Willmar by Dr. C. Johnson, a former political associate, the 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1143 



chance for an enlarged field of action was gladly accepted. He moved to 
Willmar in the spring of 1895, and thenceforth gave all his efforts to 
establishing the new paper on a permanent basis. It was a hard struggle 
during the first years, but the paper finally emerged from the status of a 
campaign sheet to a live local paper with decided opinions and zealous 
for the welfare and upbuilding of its home county and city. 

In the summer of 1897 Mr. Lawson and F. F. Nelson erected a busi- 
ness block that became known as the Tribune Building. On January 12, 
1898, J. Emil Nelson acquired a one-half interest in the business, Dr. 
Johnson at the same time retiring from the firm. Mr. Nelson became the 
business manager, and with his exceptional ability as a solicitor, the new 
firm did many big stunts in the way of special editions that were quite 
unusual for a country newspaper. The final enterprise of the firm of 
Lawson & Nelson was the publication of the Kandiyohi County History, 
on which work was begun in 1901, and which was brought to a successful 
conclusion in 1905. One eminent authority who examined this work 
stated as his belief "that never before was so small a political division 
enriched and dignified by a history of itself as Kandiyohi county is by this 
publication." The financing and soliciting for the work was done by 
Mr. Nelson and Mr. Lawson superintended the compilation of the subject 
matter, Martin E. Tew being the author of the chapters relating to the 
early and political history of the county and a number of other persons 
assisting in the work. 

In January, 1907, Mr. Nelson having become extensively interested 
in other business ventures, the firm was dissolved, and Mr. Lawson be- 
came the exclusive owner of the Willmar Tribune printing plant. He has 
purchased the lot adjoining the government building in this city and 
expects in a short time to erect a modern printing house and equip it 
with an up-to-date printing plant, and he will then have the necessary 
facilities for establishing a journal of special interest to Swedish-Amer- 
icans throughout the country and which will fulfill a long cherished plan. 

Since the collapse of the People's party movement the Tribune has 
remained independent in politics. It espoused the anti-license cause in 
1898, and the Tribune was one of the very first local papers in Minnesota 
that came out openly for prohibition. County option for Minnesota has 
been its slogan for more than twelve years. The opinion is freely ex- 
pressed that the fact that Willmar is a clean town without saloons and 
that it has been so for ten and a half years out of the last twelve, as well 
as the fact that nearly all the villages for many miles around are also 
withoiit saloons, is due largely to the fact of the fearless stand taken by 
the Tribune years ago and its participation annually in the campaigns. 

Mr. Lawson has been a member of the Minnesota Editorial Associa- 
tion for twenty years, and was elected a life member of the Minnesota 
Historical Society after the Kandiyohi County History appeared. He 
is an active member of the Willmar Commercial Club and the chairman 
of its publicity committee, and is secretary of the Willmar Park Assem- 



1 144 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



bly. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran Bethel church at WiUmai 
aiid is a member of its board of trustees. He has also been twice honored 
by election as lay delegate to the national assembly or synod, and was a 
member of the board of education which established the Minnesota Col- 
lege at Minneapolis in 1904. 

On September 20, 1894, Mr. Lawson married Miss Minnie Nelson, 
a daughter of S. M. and Karolina Nelson, of New London, and she died 
on the 14th of December. 1901, without issue. On the 13th of May, 1909, 
he wedded ]\Iiss Julia Kallstrom, a native of Ishpeming, Michigan. 

Edwin Nordstrom, druggist at Sacred Heart, Minnesota, was born 
at Beckeforsammlung, Stenby pastorate, Dalsland, Elfsborgs Lan, 
Sweden, August 14, 1862. He came to the United States in 1875, a boy 
of thirteen, and worked on a farm in Renville county, five miles west of 
Sacred Heart. Later he served an apprenticeship in a drug store. Pre- 
vious to his coming to this country he attended public school in Sweden, 
and after coming to Minnesota he continued his studies while working 
on the farm and in the store. Feeling the need, however, of better edu- 
cational equipment, in 1882, he entered Gustavus Adolphus College at 
St. Peter, where he took the regular course, and graduated in 1885. He 
worked his way through college by teaching, and for three years after 
his graduation he taught school in Renville county, following which he 
spent three years as clerk in a drug store, and took a course in the Minne- 
sota Institute of Pharmacy at Minneapolis. In 1891, having been made 
a registered pharmacist, he came to Sacred Heart and engaged in the 
drug business on his own account, and here he has since continued suc- 
cessfully. 

August 25, 1898, Mr. Nordstrom married Miss Helma C. Hilden, of 
Montevideo, and their union has been blessed in the birth of two children, 
Evelyn Augusta and Verdi Jerome. Mr. Nordstrom casts his vote with 
the Republican party. 

Emanuel Rylander, manager of the interests of the Minneapolis 
Brewing Company at Litchfield, is a native of Sweden, born March 22, 
1872, and is a son of Carl and Augusta Rylander. He obtained a high 
school education and also pursued a course at the Agricultural College 
of Sweden, from which he graduated in 1889. Not long after leaving 
college he became an inspector in Kalmar, a maritime province of south- 
eastern Sweden, and remained in that position for about three years, 
when he resigned to engage with his father in the cattle business. 

Mr. Rylander emigrated to the United States in 1898, and for two 
years was a resident of Chicago, employed as a clerk with the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific Railroad. He then came to Minneapolis and estab- 
lished an insurance and labor employment agency, which eventually trans- 
acted quite an extensive business. In January. 1908, he located at Litch- 
field, and as manager of the Minneapolis Brewing Company at that place 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1145 



has become widely and favorably known to the business community. He 
is also a leader in fraternal work, being a member of the Order of Red 
Men and one of the organizers of the Order of Vasa in Minnesota, having 
served both as state secretary and president of the latter. On September 
25, 1902, Mr. Rylander married Miss Annie L. Johnson — a lady both 
born and educated in Sweden — and their child, Margaret, was bom 
August I, 1908. Both Mr. and Mrs. Rylander are popular and respected 
members of Swedish-American society at Litchfield, and are highly hon- 
ored members of the general community. 

Peter Ackerson. — Conspicuous among the Swedish-Americans es- 
pecially worthy of mention in a work of this character is Peter Ackerson, 
a successful journalist, now living at 2007 Tower avenue, Superior, Wis- 
consin. A native of Sweden, he was born October 28, 1862, in Farlof 
parish. Kristianstad Ian, where his early life was passed. 

His father, the late Ake Soneson, was a farmer by occupation, own- 
ing a large country estate. He married Elma Person, daughter of the 
late Peter Nilson, a farmer at Farlof, Sweden, and they reared five chil- 
dren, as follows : Sven Ackerson, engaged in agricultural and business 
pursuits at Vasa, Minnesota ; Anders Ackerson, living near Hallock, Kitt- 
son county, Minnesota; Elna, wife of C. A. Pramp, of Areslof, Skane, 
Sweden ; Brugta, wife of Sven Svenson, a farmer at Trolle, Ljungby, 
Beckaskog, Sweden ; and Peter, with whom this sketch is chiefly con- 
cerned. 

Having finished the course of study in the common schools of his 
native parish and in the Kristianstad Collegiate Institute, Peter Ackerson 
attended the Onnestad High School, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1879. He subsequently remained at home with his parents 
until 1885, when he bade good-bye to friends and relatives, and embarked 
for America, the land teeming with bright promises. Locating in Good- 
hue county, Minnesota, he spent the first winter in school, acquiring a 
knowledge of the English language with the pupils. Accepting then a 
position with Mr. Ryan, proprietor of the Ryan Hotel, he remained with 
him seven years. Mr. Ackerson was afterwards engaged in business in 
Detroit. Minnesota, and in Minneapolis, in both cities being successful. 
In i8q8 he moved to Superior, Wisconsin, becoming an employee of the 
Duluth & Superior Traction Company. In 1903 he purchased an inter- 
est in the Interstate Printing and Publishing Company, and since then 
has managed the affairs of its office at Superior, Wisconsin, with recog- 
nized ability, being eminently successful as a newspaper man. He is 
quite prominent in city affairs, and his home on Tower avenue is spacious 
and elegant. 

Albert Berg. — One of the conspicuous figures in the public life of 
Minnesota is Albert Berg, who has proved a valuable factor in its legis- 
lative and political councils and who is also well known in banking circles. 



1 146 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



He was born at Center City in Chisago county, Minnesota, June 25, 1861, 
a son of Jonas Berg and of Anna Maria Berg, his wife. The early years 
of his Hfe until the age of fifteen were spent in attending public and 
parochial schools and under the private tutelage of James J. Lindstrom. 
He was then confirmed in the Lutheran church in Center City in June, 
1876, and from 1877 until 1878 was a student at Carleton and during 
1879 and a part of 1880 at Gustavus Adolphus College. During the 
years of 1880, 1881 and 1883 Mr. Berg was a member of the staff of the 
Fargo Argus at Fargo, which was then in the territory of Dakota ; during 
the years of 1883 and 1884 taught school in Chisago county, Minnesota, 
from 1887 to 1895 was register of deeds of Chisago county; from 1895 
to 1901 was secretary of the state of Minnesota, and in 1901 and 1902 
represented his district in the state legislature, the latter being a special 
session. In 1892 Mr. Berg was a delegate to the National Republican 
Convention and was reading clerk of the convention in 1908. Few raen 
attain higher honors in public life than has been accorded to Albert Berg, 
who has also gained distinction in his community as a business man. He 
was the cashier and director of the State Bank of Warroad, Minnesota, 
from 1903 to 1906; was the founder and from 1906 to the present time 
the president of the Security State Bank of Spooner, Minnesota, and since 
the organization of the village of Spooner he has served as its mayor. He 
is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the grand lodge of the 
order of Minnesota and its grand marshal in 1910, and is a past grand 
prelate and a past grand vice chancellor of the Knights of Pythias for 
the domain of Minnesota. Since 1890 he has had fraternal relations with 
the order of Elks, St. Paul Lodge No. 59. 

In one of our historical chapters Mr. Berg is referred to as one of 
the most ardent promoters and leading members of the Arpi Club, .which 
blossomed and bloomed while at Center City, Mr. Berg being gifted with 
a fine second bass voice. In the same article he is called "the amiable and 
musical giant." Mr. Berg married in 1899 Lillian R. Peltier, of St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

C. A. Jacobson. — The name of C. A. Jacobson is alike well known 
in commercial and musical circles. He is the master of his art as a bass 
singer, and as the head of the Brooklyn Ladies' Directory and as the 
proprietor and publisher of the Svenska Post en he has won an equal 
degree of prominence. The Brooklyn Ladies' Directory is the best 
known servants' employment agency in the city and it was established 
in 1870 by Mr. Jacobson and has been located at its present location 
since 1872. It has in the meantime furnished help to the first class 
families of Brooklyn, New York and elsewhere and has received the 
most flattering encomiums for the superiority of the class of female help 
furnished by him. He has agents in Sweden and Germany, and the 
agency not only supplies female help, but coachmen, grooms, waiters. 



SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 1147 



gardeners, farm hands, etc., producing at the same time most satis- 
factory references as to the reUability and excellence of the servants. 

As stated, Mr. Jacobson is also at the head of a second successful 
enterprise, the publication of a large newspaper in the Swedish language, 
the Svenska Posten or the Szvedish Post, which is published every 
Thursday and circulates over the entire eastern, southern and middle 
states. It is an tmsurpassed medium for reaching the numerous Swedes, 
Norwegians and Danes east of Chicago, and each issue contains a large 
quantity of the most interesting and valuable reading matter, beautifully 
printed and ably edited by Messrs. P. O. Nilson and Gustaf Ekdahl, 
both talented young journalists. Mr. Jacobson is also the agent for the 
sale of steamship tickets, as well as for those of the Erie Railroad, which 
proves a great convenience to many of his acquaintances and country 
people. He has been an active and enterprising resident of Brooklyn 
during the past twelve years and his name stands out prominently in its 
musical circles as a bass singer. He has sung in the choirs of St. Paul's 
church, New York ; St. James' Episcopal church, Brooklyn ; in Christ's 
church and St. Stephen's, New York, and in the concerts of the Choral 
Union he has acquitted himself in a manner that has elicited the highest 
praise from critics and the press. During several years he has been a 
guest of the Bums Association and the Empire Club, of which James 
Eadie, the Eastern District broker, is the president. He has also been 
a mem.ber of an Italian opera troupe, and having studied under the 
great Errani, he is in every respect a master of his art and one of the 
finest bass singers in the country. Mr. Jacobson is a gentleman alike 
respected and esteemed by the entire community. 



r\^'